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1

Morphological divergence rate tests for natural selection: uncertainty of parameter estimation and robustness of results  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract In this study, we used a combination of geometric morphometric and evolutionary genetics methods for the inference of possible mechanisms,of evolutionary divergence. A sensitivity analysis for the constant-heritability rate test results regarding variation in genetic and demographic parameters was performed, in order to assess the relative influence of uncertainty of parameter estimation on the robustness of test results. As

Leandro R. Monteiro; José L. Gomes-Jr

2005-01-01

2

Clinical trials: robust tests are wonderful for imperfect data.  

PubMed

Robust tests are tests that can handle the inclusion into a data file of some outliers without largely changing the overall test results. Despite the risk of non-Gaussian data in clinical trials, robust tests are virtually never performed. The objective of this study was to review important robust tests and to assess whether they provide better sensitivity of testing than standard tests do. In a 33 patient study of frailty scores, no significant t value was obtained (P = 0.067). The following 4 robust tests were performed: (1) z test for medians and median absolute deviations, (2) z test for Winsorized variances, (3) Mood test, and (4) z test for M-estimators with bootstrap standard errors. They produced P values of, respectively, <0.0001, 0.043, <0.0001, and 0.005. Robust tests are wonderful for imperfect clinical data because they often produce statistically significant results, whereas standard tests do not. PMID:23896742

Cleophas, Ton J

2015-01-01

3

Robust Tests for the Equality of Variances  

Microsoft Academic Search

Alternative formulations of Levene's test statistic for equality of variances are found to be robust under nonnormality. These statistics use more robust estimators of central location in place of the mean. They are compared with the unmodified Levene's statistic, a jackknife procedure, and a ? test suggested by Layard which are all found to be less robust under nonnormality.

Morton B. Brown; Alan B. Forsythe

1974-01-01

4

Testing the robustness of Windows NT software  

Microsoft Academic Search

To date, most studies on the robustness of operating system software have focused on Unix based systems. The paper develops a methodology and architecture for performing intelligent black box analysis of software that runs on the Windows NT platform. The goals of the research are three fold: first, to develop intelligent robustness testing techniques for commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) software; second,

Anup K. Ghosh; Matt Schmid; Viren Shah

1998-01-01

5

Cholesterol testing and results  

MedlinePLUS

... test results; Coronary risk profile results; Hyperlipidemia-results; Lipid disorder test results ... in your blood. You may also have a lipid (or coronary risk) profile, which includes: Total cholesterol ...

6

Testing for Linkage underRobust Genetic Models  

Microsoft Academic Search

Robust genetic models are used to assess linkage between a quantitative trait and genetic variation at a specific locus using allele-sharing data. Little is known about the relative performance of different possible significance tests under these models. Under the robust variance components model approach there are several alternatives: standard Wald and likelihood ratio tests, a quasilikelihood Wald test, and a

R. Guerra; Y. Wan; A. Jia; C. I. Amos; J. C. Cohen

1999-01-01

7

Lithium cell test results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Three lithium SO2 cells, two lithium CF cells, and a vinyl chloride cell, all with crimped seals, and all strictly experimental, were independently discharged on resistors. Three temperatures were used and several different storage temperatures. Discharge rate generally on the nominal discharges were 0.1 amp, 0.5 amp, and 1 amp. Tests results show that the crimp seals are inadequate, especially for the SO2 cells. Normal discharges present no hazards. All cells discharge to zero. The problem of lithium cell explosions, such as occurred during off-limits testing, is discussed.

Bragg, B. J.

1977-01-01

8

Results of patch tests  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this work were to construct, install, and operate a patch testing unit on a hot gas stream at a coal-fired fluidized-bed boiler. A 2,000-hour patch test was conducted on ceramic disks of materials used in the fabrication of ceramic candles and ceramic cross-flow filters. The primary issues addressed in these tests were the long-term physical, thermal, and chemical stability of the ceramic materials; long-term pressure drop and filtration characteristics of the ceramic filters; potential for irreversible blinding of filter elements; and long-term performance and reliability of auxiliary hardware, such as the tube sheet and pulse-cleaning systems. Results on three samples, or patches, 10 cm in diameter are given.

Pontius, D.H.

1994-10-01

9

Climax granite test results  

SciTech Connect

The Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL), as part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) program, is carrying out in situ rock mechanics testing in the Climax granitic stock at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This summary addresses only those field data taken to date that address thermomechanical modeling for a hard-rock repository. The results to be discussed include thermal measurements in a heater test that was conducted from October 1977 through July 1978, and stress and displacement measurements made during and after excavation of the canister storage drift for the Spent Fuel Test (SFT) in the Climax granite. Associated laboratory and field measurements are summarized. The rock temperature for a given applied heat load at a point in time and space can be adequately modeled with simple analytic calculations involving superposition and integration of numerous point source solutions. The input, for locations beyond about a meter from the source, can be a constant thermal conductivity and diffusivity. The value of thermal conductivity required to match the field data is as much as 25% different from laboratory-measured values. Therefore, unless we come to understand the mechanisms for this difference, a simple in situ test will be required to obtain a value for final repository design. Some sensitivity calculations have shown that the temperature field is about ten times more sensitive to conductivity than to diffusivity under the test conditions. The orthogonal array was designed to detect anisotropy. After considering all error sources, anisotropic efforts in the thermal field were less than 5 to 10%.

Ramspott, L.D.

1980-01-15

10

Testing of java web services for robustness  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a new compile-time analysis that enables a testing methodology for white-box coverage testing of error recovery code (i.e., exception handlers) in Java web services using compiler-directed fault injection. The analysis allows compiler-generated instrumentation to guide the fault injection and to record the recovery code exercised. (An injected fault is experienced as a Java exception.) The analysis (i)

Chen Fu; Barbara G. Ryder; Ana Milanova; David Wonnacott

2004-01-01

11

COLD TEST LOOP INTEGRATED TEST LOOP RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

A testing facility (Cold Test Loop) was constructed and operated to demonstrate the efficacy of the Accelerated Waste Retrieval (AWR) Project's planned sluicing approach to the remediation of Silos 1 and 2 at the Fernald Environmental Management Project near Cincinnati, Ohio. The two silos contain almost 10,000 tons of radium-bearing low-level waste, which consists primarily of solids of raffinates from processing performed on ores from the Democratic Republic of Congo (commonly referred to as ''Belgium Congo ores'') for the recovery of uranium. These silos are 80 ft in diameter, 36 ft high to the center of the dome, and 26.75 ft to the top of the vertical side walls. The test facility contained two test systems, each designed for a specific purpose. The first system, the Integrated Test Loop (ITL), a near-full-scale plant including the actual equipment to be installed at the Fernald Site, was designed to demonstrate the sluicing operation and confirm the selection of a slurry pump, the optimal sluicing nozzle operation, and the preliminary design material balance. The second system, the Component Test Loop (CTL), was designed to evaluate many of the key individual components of the waste retrieval system over an extended run. The major results of the initial testing performed during July and August 2002 confirmed that the AWR approach to sluicing was feasible. The ITL testing confirmed the following: (1) The selected slurry pump (Hazleton 3-20 type SHW) performed well and is suitable for AWR application. However, the pump's motor should be upgraded to a 200-hp model and be driven by a 150-hp variable-frequency drive (VFD). A 200-hp VFD is not much more expensive and would allow the pump to operate at full speed. (2) The best nozzle performance was achieved by using 15/16-in. nozzles operated alternately. This configuration appeared to most effectively mine the surrogate. (3) The Solartron densitometer, which was tested as an alternative mass flow measurement device, did not operate effectively. Consequently, it is not suitable for application to the AWR process. (4) Initially, the spray ring (operated at approximately 2300 psi) and the nozzles provided by the pump vendor did not perform acceptably. The nozzles were replaced with a more robust model, and the performance was then acceptable. (5) The average solids concentration achieved in the slurry before Bentogrout addition was approximately 16% by weight. The solids concentration of the slurry after Bentogrout addition ranged from 26% to approximately 40%. The slurry pump and ITL system performed well at every concentration. No line plugging or other problems were noted. The results of the CTL runs and later ITL testing are summarized in an appendix to this report.

Abraham, TJ

2003-10-22

12

Your Kidney Test Results  

MedlinePLUS

... the acid level in your blood. Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN) Normal: Less than 20 Your Result: BUN ... PTH) Normal: Less than 65 Your Result: PTH controls the calcium and phosphorus levels in your blood. ...

13

Organic Separation Test Results  

SciTech Connect

Separable organics have been defined as “those organic compounds of very limited solubility in the bulk waste and that can form a separate liquid phase or layer” (Smalley and Nguyen 2013), and result from three main solvent extraction processes: U Plant Uranium Recovery Process, B Plant Waste Fractionation Process, and Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Process. The primary organic solvents associated with tank solids are TBP, D2EHPA, and NPH. There is concern that, while this organic material is bound to the sludge particles as it is stored in the tanks, waste feed delivery activities, specifically transfer pump and mixer pump operations, could cause the organics to form a separated layer in the tank farms feed tank. Therefore, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is experimentally evaluating the potential of organic solvents separating from the tank solids (sludge) during waste feed delivery activities, specifically the waste mixing and transfer processes. Given the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste acceptance criteria per the Waste Feed Acceptance Criteria document (24590-WTP-RPT-MGT-11-014) that there is to be “no visible layer” of separable organics in the waste feed, this would result in the batch being unacceptable to transfer to WTP. This study is of particular importance to WRPS because of these WTP requirements.

Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

2014-09-22

14

Recap Weak Normal EC Strong Normal EC Robustness Combined with WCT Equivalence Class Testing  

E-print Network

Recap Weak Normal EC Strong Normal EC Robustness Combined with WCT Equivalence Class Testing: Equivalence Class Testing #12;Recap Weak Normal EC Strong Normal EC Robustness Combined with WCT Outline Recap Weak Normal EC Strong Normal EC Robustness Combined with WCT Mousavi: Equivalence Class Testing #12

Mousavi, Mohammad

15

Bootstrap tests for robust means of asymmetric distributions with unequal shapes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bootstrap procedures for testing equality of robust means in the one-, two-, and multi-sample problems for asymmetrically distributed data with unequal shapes are described. The emphasis is on parametric procedures, but some results are provided for nonparametric procedures as well. In the parametric framework, it is assumed that a model with two parameters, shape and scale, can be used to

A. Marazzi

2002-01-01

16

Variability of aflatoxin test results  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using 12 lb samples, 280 g subsamples, the Waltking method of analysis, and densitometric procedures, the sampling, subsampling,\\u000a and analytical variances associated with aflatoxin test procedures were estimated. Regression analysis indicated that each\\u000a of the above variance components is a function of the concentration of aflatoxin in the population being tested. Results,\\u000a for the test procedures given above, showed that

T. B. Whitaker; J. W. Dickens; R. J. Monroe

1974-01-01

17

Test the reliability of doubly robust estimation with missing response data  

PubMed Central

Summary In statistical inference one has to make sure that the underlying regression model is correctly specified otherwise the resulting estimation may be biased. Model checking is an important method to detect any departure of the regression model from the true one. Missing data is a ubiquitous problem in social and medical studies. If the underlying regression model is correctly specified, recent researches show great popularity of the doubly robust estimates method for handling missing data because of its robustness to the misspecification of either the missing data model or the conditional mean model, i.e. the model for the conditional expectation of true regression model conditioning on the observed quantities. However, little work has been devoted to the goodness of fit test for doubly robust estimates method. In this paper, we propose a testing method to assess the reliability of the estimator derived from the doubly robust estimating equation with possibly missing response and always observed auxiliary variables. Numerical studies demonstrate that the proposed test can control type I errors well. Furthermore the proposed method can detect departures from model assumptions in the marginal mean model of interest powerfully. A real dementia data set is used to illustrate the method for the diagnosis of model misspecification in the problem of missing response with an always observed auxiliary variable for cross-sectional data. PMID:24571677

Chen, Baojiang; Qin, Jing

2014-01-01

18

NCV Flow Diagnostic Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

There were two objectives for this test. First, was to assess the reasons why there is approximately 1.5 drag counts (cts) discrepancy between measured and computed drag improvement of the Non-linear Cruise Validation (NCV) over the Technology Concept Airplane (TCA) wing body (WB) configurations. The Navier-Stokes (N-S) pre-test predictions from Boeing Commercial Airplane Group (BCAG) show 4.5 drag cts of improvement for NCV over TCA at a lift coefficient (CL) of 0. I at Mach 2.4. The pre-test predictions from Boeing Phantom Works - Long Beach, BPW-LB, show 3.75 drag cts of improvement. BCAG used OVERFLOW and BPW-LB used CFL3D. The first test entry to validate the improvement was held at the NASA Langley Research Center (LARC) UPV;T, test number 1687. The experimental results showed that the drag improvement was only 2.6 cts, not accounting for laminar run and trip drag. This is approximately 1.5 cts less than predicted computationally. In addition to the low Reynolds Number (RN) test, there was a high RN test in the Boeing Supersonic Wind Tunnel (BSWT) of NCV and TCA. BSV@T test 647 showed that the drag improvement of NCV over TCA was also 2.6 cts, but this did account for laminar run and trip drag. Every effort needed to be done to assess if the improvement measured in LaRC UPWT and BSWT was correct. The second objective, once the first objective was met, was to assess the performance increment of NCV over TCA accounting for the associated laminar run and trip drag corrections in LaRC UPWT. We know that the configurations tested have laminar flow on portions of the wing and have trip drag due to the mechanisms used to force the flow to go from laminar to turbulent aft of the transition location.

Cappuccio, Mina

1999-01-01

19

Mobile evaporator corrosion test results  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory corrosion tests were conducted on eight candidates to select a durable and cost-effective alloy for use in mobile evaporators to process radioactive waste solutions. Based on an extensive literature survey of corrosion data, three stainless steel alloys (304L, 316L, AL-6XN), four nickel-based alloys (825, 625, 690, G-30), and titanium were selected for testing. The corrosion tests included vapor phase, liquid junction (interface), liquid immersion, and crevice corrosion tests on plain and welded samples of candidate materials. Tests were conducted at 80{degrees}C for 45 days in two different test solutions: a nitric acid solution. to simulate evaporator conditions during the processing of the cesium ion-exchange eluant and a highly alkaline sodium hydroxide solution to simulate the composition of Tank 241-AW-101 during evaporation. All of the alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance in the alkaline test solution. Corrosion rates were very low and localized corrosion was not observed. Results from the nitric acid tests showed that only 316L stainless steel did not meet our performance criteria. The 316L welded interface and crevice specimens had rates of 22.2 mpy and 21.8 mpy, respectively, which exceeds the maximum corrosion rate of 20 mpy. The other welded samples had about the same corrosion resistance as the plain samples. None of the welded samples showed preferential weld or heat-affected zone (HAZ) attack. Vapor corrosion was negligible for all alloys. All of the alloys except 316L exhibited either {open_quotes}satisfactory{close_quotes} (2-20 mpy) or {open_quotes}excellent{close_quotes} (<2 mpy) corrosion resistance as defined by National Association of Corrosion Engineers. However, many of the alloys experienced intergranular corrosion in the nitric acid test solution, which could indicate a susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in this environment.

Rozeveld, A.; Chamberlain, D.B.

1997-05-01

20

The cellphone antenna test results  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results of experimental testing near reactive zone of the different kinds the cellphone antennas are presented. Dielectric coating parameters influence on cellphone antenna near reactive zone pattern is studied. The specific absorption rate (SAR) is also measured, presented and discussed in this paper. The properties of electrically small antennas as a function their total length, geometry and effective volume

A. I. Karpov; V. A. Katrych; E. A. Antonenko; S. A. Yarmolchuc

2009-01-01

21

Central Composite Design with\\/without Artificial Neural Networks in Microemulsion Liquid Chromatography Separation Robustness Testing  

Microsoft Academic Search

In past few years, for overcoming some analytical problems in liquid chromatography, the microemulsion as eluent was employed. Due to the strict regulatory requirements, robustness testing became important especially when proposing completely new method such as microemulsion liquid chromatography (MELC). In this paper robustness testing of MELC method, proposed for carbamazepine and its impurities (iminostilben and iminodibenzyl) separation, was done

Biljana Jan; Andjelija Malenovi; Darko Ivanovi; Mirjana Medenica

22

Cryogenic Brush Seal Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Brush seals are compliant, contact seals that have long-life, low-leakage characteristics desirable for use in rocket engine turbopumps. 50.8-mm (2.0 inch) diameter brush seals with a nominal initial radial interference of 0.127-mm (0.005 inch) were tested in liquid nitrogen at shaft speeds up to 35,000 rpm and differential pressure loads up to 1.21 MPa (175 psi) per brush. The measured leakage rate of a single brush was 2-3 times less than that measured for a 12-tooth, 0.127-mm (0.005 inch) radial clearance labyrinth seal used as a baseline. Stage effects were studied and it was found that two brush seals with a large separation distance leaked less than two brushes tightly packed together. The maximum measured groove depth on the Inconel 718 rotor was 25.4 (mu)m (0.001 inch) after 4.31 hours of shaft rotation. The Haynes-25 bristles wore approximately 25.4-76.2 (mu)m (0.001-0.003 inch) under the same conditions. Three seal runner coatings, chromium carbide, Teflon impregnated chromium, and zirconium oxide, were tested in liquid hydrogen at 35,000 and 65,000 rpm with separate 50.8 mm diameter brush seals made of Haynes-25 bristles and having a nominal initial radial interference of 129 rpm. Two bare Inconel-718 rotors were also tested as a baseline. The test results revealed significant differences between the wear characteristics of the uncoated and coated seal runners. At both speeds the brush seal with the bare Inconel-718 seal runner exhibited significant bristle wear with excessive material transferring to the runner surface. In contrast, the coated seal runners inhibited the transfer and deposit of bristle material. The chromium carbide coating showed only small quantities of bristle material transferring to its surface. The Teflon impregnated chromium coating also inhibited material transfer and provided some lubrication. This coating, however, is self-sacrificing. The Teflon remained present on the low speed runner, but it was completely removed from the high speed brush seal, which was tested considerably longer. The tests of the Teflon coating revealed the importance of using a lubricating and low friction coating for brush seals to reduce bristle and seal runner wear. The zirconium oxide coating exhibited the greatest amount of coating wear, while the brushes incurred only slight wear. Further testing of ceramics is recommended before making a final judgement on the viability of ceramic coatings for brush seals because of the contrast between the results reported by Carlile and the results presented herein. Strictly based on the results presented hereinabove, the chromium carbide and Teflon impregnated chromium coatings were considered preferable to the uncoated Inconel-718 and zirconium oxide coatings because of their good wear resistance and characteristics to inhibit bristle material wear and transfer to the seal runner.

Proctor, Margaret P.; Walker, James F.

1996-01-01

23

RSG Deployment Case Testing Results  

SciTech Connect

The RSG deployment case design is centered on taking the RSG system and producing a transport case that houses the RSG in a safe and controlled manner for transport. The transport case was driven by two conflicting constraints, first that the case be as light as possible, and second that it meet a stringent list of Military Specified requirements. The design team worked to extract every bit of weight from the design while striving to meet the rigorous Mil-Spec constraints. In the end compromises were made primarily on the specification side to control the overall weight of the transport case. This report outlines the case testing results.

Owsley, Stanley L.; Dodson, Michael G.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Seim, Thomas A.; Alexander, David L.; Hawthorne, Woodrow T.

2005-09-01

24

SERIES-X test results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The SERIES-X project which demonstrates the feasibility of a method involving measurements of the distance from the TOPEX earth satellite and various points on the ground to Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites is described. The features of SERIES-X are compared with three better-known geodetic-quality GPS systems (Geostar, Macrometer, and SERIES). It is shown that the system is capable of measuring the positions of isolated stations, but its accuracy is improved when it measures baselines. Test results of some measurements of baselines ranging in length from 15 to 171,000 m are presented and discussed.

Crow, R. B.; Bletzacker, F. R.; Najarian, R. J.; Purcell, G. H., Jr.; Statman, J. I.; Thomas, J. B.

25

Diagnostic Tests and Examination Results.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study of the usefulness of several diagnostic tests for selecting students to enter a civil engineering program found that the tests were not appropriate and that tests should be developed specifically for civil engineering. (MSE)

Barker, Dennis

1988-01-01

26

Results of PRIM gyroscope testing  

SciTech Connect

The tests were designed so that motions of the gyroscope and the Partially Restrained Internal Member (PRIM) could be measured at different conditions of spin and PRIM clearance gaps. Two types of PRIM drive were tested. A round shaft configuration was used to test theory. An octagon drive was used to simulate the XM785 design.

Cornell, R.

1985-03-01

27

Robust algorithm for automated microindentation measurement in Vickers hardness testing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Current algorithms for automated processing of Vickers hardness testing images are unsuitable for a broad range of images that are taken in industrial environments because such images show great variations in the Vickers indentation as well as in the specimen surface. The authors present a three-stage multiresolution template matching algorithm that shows excellent results, even for such challenging images. The capabilities of this algorithm are compared to known algorithms from the literature and results are presented. The comparison is conducted on two significant indentation image databases with 150 and 216 highly varying images. The applicability of the proposed algorithm is further illustrated by its competitive runtime performance.

Gadermayr, Michael; Maier, Andreas; Uhl, Andreas

2012-04-01

28

Robust Means Modeling: An Alternative for Hypothesis Testing of Independent Means under Variance Heterogeneity and Nonnormality  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study proposes robust means modeling (RMM) approaches for hypothesis testing of mean differences for between-subjects designs in order to control the biasing effects of nonnormality and variance inequality. Drawing from structural equation modeling (SEM), the RMM approaches make no assumption of variance homogeneity and employ robust

Fan, Weihua; Hancock, Gregory R.

2012-01-01

29

Testing Multicultural Robustness of the Child Behavior Checklist in a National Epidemiological Sample in Uruguay  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Comparisons of Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) scores from 31 societies (Rescorla et al. "Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders" 15:13-142 2007) supported the instrument's multicultural robustness, but none of these societies was in South America. The present study tested the multicultural robustness of the 2001 CBCL using data from a…

Viola, Laura; Garrido, Gabriela; Rescorla, Leslie

2011-01-01

30

A Rapid Association Test Procedure Robust under Different Genetic Models Accounting for Population Stratification  

PubMed Central

Objective For genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in case-control data with stratification, a commonly used association test is the generalized Armitage (GA) trend test implemented in the software EIGENSTRAT. The GA trend test uses principal component analysis to correct for population stratification. It usually assumes an additive disease model and can have high power when the underlying disease model is additive or multiplicative, but may have relatively low power when the underlying disease model is recessive or dominant. The purpose of this paper is to provide a test procedure for GWAS with increased power over the GA trend test under the recessive and dominant models while maintaining the power of the GA trend test under the additive and multiplicative models. Methods We extend a Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium (HWD) trend test for a homogeneous population to account for population stratification, and then propose a robust association test procedure for GWAS that incorporates information from the extended HWD trend test into the GA trend test. Results and Conclusions Our simulation studies and application of our method to a GWAS data set indicate that our proposed method can achieve the purpose described above. PMID:23571404

Chen, Wenan; Chen, Xiangning; Archer, Kellie J.; Liu, Nianjun; Li, Qizhai; Zhao, Zhongming; Sun, Shumei; Gao, Guimin

2013-01-01

31

Results of Deposition Scoping Tests  

SciTech Connect

The processes of crystallization and solid deposit formation that led to the shutdown of the 2H evaporator operation at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and that could possibly cause similar problems in the future or in other evaporators need to be better understood. Through experimentation, thermodynamic modeling, and correlation of scaling to historical tank farm operations, progress has been made in developing guidelines as to the concentrations of silicon and aluminum that can be processed by evaporators while avoiding unacceptable levels of scale formation. However, because of limitations of the thermodynamic model and an insufficient amount of operational data at slightly supersaturated concentration levels, uncertainty still exists regarding acceptable feed concentrations. The objective of this effort is to provide information that can be used in defining acceptable levels of silicon and aluminum in evaporator feed solutions. Data collected previously showed that particle formation reactions can be rapid at evaporator temperatures for elevated silicon and aluminum concentrations. However, insufficient data exists to estimate the silicon and aluminum concentrations above which solids will form in the time frame of evaporator processing. The work described in this report was designed to determine the induction period for solutions of decreasing aluminum and silicon concentration such that the supersaturation level corresponding to a 4-h induction time for particle nucleation/growth in bulk solution can be estimated. In addition, experiments were conducted to explore the supersaturation levels that can result in deposition of solids on metal surfaces at varying aluminum-to-silicon concentration ratios. Laboratory studies of particle growth in solution were conducted at relatively low supersaturation levels. Dynamic-light-scattering (DLS) studies and deposition tests, similar to those performed in FY 2001, were conducted with solutions at relatively low supersaturation levels and at elevated temperatures to explore the formation of solids under conditions similar to those encountered in evaporator processing. The deposition of solids on stainless steel samples placed in the solutions during the experiments was simultaneously investigated. In addition, the deposition of solids on stainless steel surfaces was investigated in laboratory-scale batch evaporation experiments. Completion of this effort will aid the development of operating strategies to mitigate or avoid solid scale formation on surfaces in evaporator systems. The results are expected to benefit plant operations by helping to determine acceptable silicon and aluminum feed concentrations.

Hu, M.Z.

2003-03-04

32

TEST OF EQUATION ROBUSTNESS TO PREDICT FORAGE QUALITY FROM REMOTELY SENSED DATA  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

In an earlier study, calibration equations were developed to predict forage quality from hyperspectral reflectance data collected from monocultures of Midland, Midland 99, Worldfeeder and Ozarka bermudagrasses (Cynodon dactylon L. (Pears.). To test equation robustness, we applied the previously dev...

33

Testing robustness of relative complexity measure method constructing robust phylogenetic trees for Galanthus L. Using the relative complexity measure  

PubMed Central

Background Most phylogeny analysis methods based on molecular sequences use multiple alignment where the quality of the alignment, which is dependent on the alignment parameters, determines the accuracy of the resulting trees. Different parameter combinations chosen for the multiple alignment may result in different phylogenies. A new non-alignment based approach, Relative Complexity Measure (RCM), has been introduced to tackle this problem and proven to work in fungi and mitochondrial DNA. Result In this work, we present an application of the RCM method to reconstruct robust phylogenetic trees using sequence data for genus Galanthus obtained from different regions in Turkey. Phylogenies have been analyzed using nuclear and chloroplast DNA sequences. Results showed that, the tree obtained from nuclear ribosomal RNA gene sequences was more robust, while the tree obtained from the chloroplast DNA showed a higher degree of variation. Conclusions Phylogenies generated by Relative Complexity Measure were found to be robust and results of RCM were more reliable than the compared techniques. Particularly, to overcome MSA-based problems, RCM seems to be a reasonable way and a good alternative to MSA-based phylogenetic analysis. We believe our method will become a mainstream phylogeny construction method especially for the highly variable sequence families where the accuracy of the MSA heavily depends on the alignment parameters. PMID:23323678

2013-01-01

34

Inconclusive TSC Genetic Test Results  

MedlinePLUS

... Plan Results Reporting Staff Directory Board of Directors Endowment Fund Corporate Advisory Board Corporate Relations Policy Frequently ... a Donation Research Directed Donations Tributes Planned Giving/Endowments Partner Offers Workplace Giving/Matching Program Personal Online ...

35

Developing Uncertainty Models for Robust Flutter Analysis Using Ground Vibration Test Data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A ground vibration test can be used to obtain information about structural dynamics that is important for flutter analysis. Traditionally, this information#such as natural frequencies of modes#is used to update analytical models used to predict flutter speeds. The ground vibration test can also be used to obtain uncertainty models, such as natural frequencies and their associated variations, that can update analytical models for the purpose of predicting robust flutter speeds. Analyzing test data using the -norm, rather than the traditional 2-norm, is shown to lead to a minimum-size uncertainty description and, consequently, a least-conservative robust flutter speed. This approach is demonstrated using ground vibration test data for the Aerostructures Test Wing. Different norms are used to formulate uncertainty models and their associated robust flutter speeds to evaluate which norm is least conservative.

Potter, Starr; Lind, Rick; Kehoe, Michael W. (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

36

Robust Design of Reliability Test Plans Using Degradation Measures.  

SciTech Connect

With short production development times, there is an increased need to demonstrate product reliability relatively quickly with minimal testing. In such cases there may be few if any observed failures. Thus, it may be difficult to assess reliability using the traditional reliability test plans that measure only time (or cycles) to failure. For many components, degradation measures will contain important information about performance and reliability. These measures can be used to design a minimal test plan, in terms of number of units placed on test and duration of the test, necessary to demonstrate a reliability goal. Generally, the assumption is made that the error associated with a degradation measure follows a known distribution, usually normal, although in practice cases may arise where that assumption is not valid. In this paper, we examine such degradation measures, both simulated and real, and present non-parametric methods to demonstrate reliability and to develop reliability test plans for the future production of components with this form of degradation.

Lane, Jonathan Wesley; Lane, Jonathan Wesley; Crowder, Stephen V.; Crowder, Stephen V.

2014-10-01

37

Robustness Testing of Java Server Applications Chen Fu, Ana Milanova, Member, IEEE Computer Society,  

E-print Network

Robustness Testing of Java Server Applications Chen Fu, Ana Milanova, Member, IEEE Computer Society for white-box coverage testing of error recovery code (i.e., exception handlers) of server applications-generated instrumentation to guide the fault injection and to record the recovery code exercised. (An injected fault

Milanova, Ana

38

Test 6, Test 7, and Gas Standard Analysis Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This viewgraph presentation shows results of analyses on odor, toxic off gassing and gas standards. The topics include: 1) Statistical Analysis Definitions; 2) Odor Analysis Results NASA Standard 6001 Test 6; 3) Toxic Off gassing Analysis Results NASA Standard 6001 Test 7; and 4) Gas Standard Results NASA Standard 6001 Test 7;

Perez, Horacio, III

2007-01-01

39

Robust electrochemical analysis of As(III) integrating with interference tests: a case study in groundwater.  

PubMed

In Togtoh region of Inner Mongolia, northern China, groundwater encountered high concentrations As contamination (greater than 50 ?g L(-1)) causes an increasing concern. This work demonstrates an electrochemical protocol for robust (efficient and accurate) determination of As(III) in Togtoh water samples using Au microwire electrode without the need of pretreatment or clean-up steps. Considering the complicated conditions of Togtoh water, the efficiency of Au microwire electrode was systematically evaluated by a series of interference tests, stability and reproducibility measurements. No obvious interference on the determination of As(III) was observed. Especially, the influence of humic acid (HA) was intensively investigated. Electrode stability was also observed with long-term measurements (70 days) in Togtoh water solution and under different temperatures (0-35 °C). Excellent reproducibility (RSD:1.28%) was observed from different batches of Au microwire electrodes. The results obtained at Au microwire electrode were comparable to that obtained by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), indicating a good accuracy. These evaluations (efficiency, robustness, and accuracy) demonstrated that the Au microwire electrode was able to determine As(III) in application to real environmental samples. PMID:24953937

Liu, Zhong-Gang; Chen, Xing; Liu, Jin-Huai; Huang, Xing-Jiu

2014-08-15

40

A robust numerical scheme for highly compressible magnetohydrodynamics: Nonlinear stability, implementation and tests  

E-print Network

The ideal MHD equations are a central model in astrophysics, and their solution relies upon stable numerical schemes. We present an implementation of a new method, which possesses excellent stability properties. Numerical tests demonstrate that the theoretical stability properties are valid in practice with negligible compromises to accuracy. The result is a highly robust scheme with state-of-the-art efficiency. The scheme's robustness is due to entropy stability, positivity and properly discretised Powell terms. The implementation takes the form of a modification of the MHD module in the FLASH code, an adaptive mesh refinement code. We compare the new scheme with the standard FLASH implementation for MHD. Results show comparable accuracy to standard FLASH with the Roe solver, but highly improved efficiency and stability, particularly for high Mach number flows and low plasma beta. The tests include 1D shock tubes, 2D instabilities and highly supersonic, 3D turbulence. We consider turbulent flows with RMS sonic Mach numbers up to 10, typical of gas flows in the interstellar medium. We investigate both strong initial magnetic fields and magnetic field amplification by the turbulent dynamo from extremely high plasma beta. The energy spectra show a reasonable decrease in dissipation with grid refinement, and at a resolution of 512^3 grid cells we identify a narrow inertial range with the expected power-law scaling. The turbulent dynamo exhibits exponential growth of magnetic pressure, with the growth rate twice as high from solenoidal forcing than from compressive forcing. Two versions of the new scheme are presented, using relaxation-based 3-wave and 5-wave approximate Riemann solvers, respectively. The 5-wave solver is more accurate in some cases, and its computational cost is close to the 3-wave solver.

Knut Waagan; Christoph Federrath; Christian Klingenberg

2011-01-15

41

Labyrinth Seal Flutter Analysis and Test Validation in Support of Robust Rocket Engine Design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

High energy-density turbomachines, like the SSME turbopumps, utilize labyrinth seals, also referred to as knife-edge seals, to control leakage flow. The pressure drop for such seals is order of magnitude higher than comparable jet engine seals. This is aggravated by the requirement of tight clearances resulting in possible unfavorable fluid-structure interaction of the seal system (seal flutter). To demonstrate these characteristics, a benchmark case of a High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump (HPOTP) outlet Labyrinth seal was studied in detail. First, an analytical assessment of the seal stability was conducted using a Pratt & Whitney legacy seal flutter code. Sensitivity parameters including pressure drop, rotor-to-stator running clearances and cavity volumes were examined and modeling strategies established. Second, a concurrent experimental investigation was undertaken to validate the stability of the seal at the equivalent operating conditions of the pump. Actual pump hardware was used to construct the test rig, also referred to as the (Flutter Rig). The flutter rig did not include rotational effects or temperature. However, the use of Hydrogen gas at high inlet pressure provided good representation of the critical parameters affecting flutter especially the speed of sound. The flutter code predictions showed consistent trends in good agreement with the experimental data. The rig test program produced a stability threshold empirical parameter that separated operation with and without flutter. This empirical parameter was used to establish the seal build clearances to avoid flutter while providing the required cooling flow metering. The calibrated flutter code along with the empirical flutter parameter was used to redesign the baseline seal resulting in a flutter-free robust configuration. Provisions for incorporation of mechanical damping devices were introduced in the redesigned seal to ensure added robustness

El-Aini, Yehia; Park, John; Frady, Greg; Nesman, Tom

2010-01-01

42

Replacing Linear Hamming Codes by Robust Nonlinear Codes Results in a Reliability Improvement of Memories  

E-print Network

Replacing Linear Hamming Codes by Robust Nonlinear Codes Results in a Reliability Improvement used for protection of memories cannot detect and also miscorrect many errors with large Hamming against soft errors to increase the reliability of the system. These codes have Hamming distance 4

Karpovsky, Mark

43

Are Nested Networks More Robust to Disturbance? A Test Using Epiphyte-Tree, Comensalistic Networks  

PubMed Central

Recent research on ecological networks suggests that mutualistic networks are more nested than antagonistic ones and, as a result, they are more robust against chains of extinctions caused by disturbances. We evaluate whether mutualistic networks are more nested than comensalistic and antagonistic networks, and whether highly nested, host-epiphyte comensalistic networks fit the prediction of high robustness against disturbance. A review of 59 networks including mutualistic, antagonistic and comensalistic relationships showed that comensalistic networks are significantly more nested than antagonistic and mutualistic networks, which did not differ between themselves. Epiphyte-host networks from old-growth forests differed from those from disturbed forest in several topological parameters based on both qualitative and quantitative matrices. Network robustness increased with network size, but the slope of this relationship varied with nestedness and connectance. Our results indicate that interaction networks show complex responses to disturbances, which influence their topology and indirectly affect their robustness against species extinctions. PMID:21589931

Piazzon, Martín; Larrinaga, Asier R.; Santamaría, Luis

2011-01-01

44

ROBUST SPEECH RECOGNITION BY INTEGRATING SPEECH SEPARATION AND HYPOTHESIS TESTING  

E-print Network

-frequency domain. Such methods require a binary mask which labels time-frequency regions of a noisy speech signal for estimating the mask are based mainly on bottom-up speech separation cues such as har- monicity and produce- tem in order to improve mask estimation and produce better recog- nition results. First, an n

Wang, DeLiang "Leon"

45

Flexible and Robust Methods for Rare-Variant Testing of Quantitative Traits in Trios and Nuclear Families  

PubMed Central

Most rare-variant association tests for complex traits are applicable only to population-based or case-control resequencing studies. There are fewer rare-variant association tests for family-based resequencing studies, which is unfortunate since pedigrees possess many attractive characteristics for such analyses. Family-based studies can be more powerful than their population-based counterparts due to increased genetic load and further enable the implementation of rare-variant association tests that, by design, are robust to confounding due to population stratification. With this in mind, we propose a rare-variant association test for quantitative traits in families; this test integrates the QTDT approach of Abecasis et al. [Abecasis, et al. 2000a] into the kernel-based SNP association test KMFAM of Schifano et al. [Schifano, et al. 2012]. The resulting within-family test enjoys the many benefits of the kernel framework for rare-variant association testing, including rapid evaluation of p-values and preservation of power when a region harbors rare causal variation that acts in different directions on phenotype. Additionally, by design, this within-family test is robust to confounding due to population stratification. While within-family association tests are generally less powerful than their counterparts that use all genetic information, we show that we can recover much of this power (while still ensuring robustness to population stratification) using a straightforward screening procedure. Our method accommodates covariates and allows for missing parental genotype data, and we have written software implementing the approach in R for public use. PMID:25044337

Jiang, Yunxuan; Conneely, Karen N.; Epstein, Michael P.

2014-01-01

46

Flexible and robust methods for rare-variant testing of quantitative traits in trios and nuclear families.  

PubMed

Most rare-variant association tests for complex traits are applicable only to population-based or case-control resequencing studies. There are fewer rare-variant association tests for family-based resequencing studies, which is unfortunate because pedigrees possess many attractive characteristics for such analyses. Family-based studies can be more powerful than their population-based counterparts due to increased genetic load and further enable the implementation of rare-variant association tests that, by design, are robust to confounding due to population stratification. With this in mind, we propose a rare-variant association test for quantitative traits in families; this test integrates the QTDT approach of Abecasis et al. [Abecasis et al., ] into the kernel-based SNP association test KMFAM of Schifano et al. [Schifano et al., ]. The resulting within-family test enjoys the many benefits of the kernel framework for rare-variant association testing, including rapid evaluation of P-values and preservation of power when a region harbors rare causal variation that acts in different directions on phenotype. Additionally, by design, this within-family test is robust to confounding due to population stratification. Although within-family association tests are generally less powerful than their counterparts that use all genetic information, we show that we can recover much of this power (although still ensuring robustness to population stratification) using a straightforward screening procedure. Our method accommodates covariates and allows for missing parental genotype data, and we have written software implementing the approach in R for public use. PMID:25044337

Jiang, Yunxuan; Conneely, Karen N; Epstein, Michael P

2014-09-01

47

The APL Test: Extension to General Nuclear Families and Haplotypes and Examination of Its Robustness  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The Association in the Presence of Linkage test (APL) is a powerful statistical method that allows for missing parental genotypes in nuclear families. However, in its original form, the statistic does not easily extend to mixed nuclear family structures nor to multiple-marker haplotypes. Furthermore, the robustness of APL in practice has not been examined. Here we present a generalization

Ren-Hua Chung; Elizabeth R. Hauser; Eden R. Martin

2006-01-01

48

Testing the Robustness of Online Word Segmentation: Effects of Linguistic Diversity and Phonetic Variation  

E-print Network

Testing the Robustness of Online Word Segmentation: Effects of Linguistic Diversity and Phonetic transcribed corpora. Accordingly, they implicitly assume that children know how to undo phonetic variation models given in- puts where phonetic variation has not been re- duced. To do so, we measure segmentation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

49

Robust multivariable predictive control: an application to an industrial test stand  

Microsoft Academic Search

The air conditioning system of an aircraft is used to regulate the cockpit temperature and pressure during flight and usually generates its airflow from the compressor turbine of the jet engine. Testing an air conditioning system requires simulation of the running conditions at ground level. The article concerns the application to such a simulation of ?-MPC, a robust extension of

Joël Bordeneuve-Guibé; Cyril Vaucoret

2001-01-01

50

Intent to Fail: Significance Testing of Forced Choice Test Results.  

PubMed

A score that is significantly below the level of chance on a forced choice (FC) performance validity test results from the deliberate production of wrong answers. In order to increase the power of significance testing of a below chance result on standardized FC tests with empirically derived cutoff scores, we recommend using one-tailed tests of significance and selecting probability levels greater than .05 (.20 for most standardized FC tests with empirically derived cutoff scores). Under certain circumstances, we also recommend combining scores from different sections of the same FC test and combining scores across different FC tests. These recommendations require modifications when applied to non-standardized FC tests that lack empirically derived cutoff scores or to FC tests with a non-random topographical distribution of correct and incorrect answers. PMID:25386898

Binder, Laurence M; Larrabee, Glenn J; Millis, Scott R

2014-11-11

51

Salmonella mutagenicity test results for 250 chemicals  

Microsoft Academic Search

This publication is a presentation of Salmonella testing results on 250 coded chemicals, encompassing 370 tests. The majority of these results were previously summarized in issues of the National Toxicology Program Technical Bulletin. However, some interpretations were changed since publication in the NTP Bulletin, based upon a reevaluation of the data. The presentation here is designed both to summarize the

Steve Haworth; Timothy Lawlor; Kristien Mortelmans; William Speck; Errol Zeiger

1983-01-01

52

Assessment And Testing of Industrial Devices Robustness Against Cyber Security Attacks  

E-print Network

CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research),like any organization, needs to achieve the conflicting objectives of connecting its operational network to Internet while at the same time keeping its industrial control systems secure from external and internal cyber attacks. With this in mind, the ISA-99[0F1] international cyber security standard has been adopted at CERN as a reference model to define a set of guidelines and security robustness criteria applicable to any network device. Devices robustness represents a key link in the defense-in-depth concept as some attacks will inevitably penetrate security boundaries and thus require further protection measures. When assessing the cyber security robustness of devices we have singled out control system-relevant attack patterns derived from the well-known CAPEC[1F2] classification. Once a vulnerability is identified, it needs to be documented, prioritized and reproduced at will in a dedicated test environment for debugging purposes. CERN - in collaboration ...

Tilaro, F

2011-01-01

53

Review of Fenton Hill HDR test results  

SciTech Connect

Results of recent flow testing at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, have been examined in light of their applicability to the development of commercial-scale hot dry rock (HDR) reservoirs at other sites. These test results, obtained during the cumulative 11 months of reservoir flow testing between 1992 and 1995, show that there was no significant production temperature drawdown during this time and that the reservoir flow became more dispersed as flow testing proceeded. Based on these test results together with previous HDR research at Fenton Hill and elsewhere, it is concluded that a three-well geometry, with one centrally located injection well and two production wells-one at each end of the pressure-stimulated reservoir region-would provide a much more productive system for future HDR development than the two-well system tested at Fenton Hill.

Brown, D.

1997-01-01

54

Inter-instrumental method transfer of chiral capillary electrophoretic methods using robustness test information.  

PubMed

Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is an electrodriven separation technique that is often used for the separation of chiral molecules. Advantages of CE are its flexibility, low cost and efficiency. On the other hand, the precision and transfer of CE methods are well-known problems of the technique. Reasons for the more complicated method transfer are the more diverse instrumental differences, such as total capillary lengths and capillary cooling systems; and the higher response variability of CE methods compared to other techniques, such as liquid chromatography (HPLC). Therefore, a larger systematic change in peak resolutions, migration times and peak areas, with a loss of separation and efficiency may be seen when a CE method is transferred to another laboratory or another type of instrument. A swift and successful method transfer is required because development and routine use of analytical methods are usually not performed in the same laboratory and/or on the same type of equipment. The aim of our study was to develop transfer rules to facilitate CE method transfers between different laboratories and instruments. In our case study, three ?-blockers were chirally separated and inter-instrumental transfers were performed. The first step of our study was to optimise the precision of the chiral CE method. Next, a robustness test was performed to identify the instrumental and experimental parameters that were most influencing the considered responses. The precision- and the robustness study results were used to adapt instrumental and/or method settings to improve the transfer between different instruments. Finally, the comparison of adapted and non-adapted transfers allowed deriving some rules to facilitate CE method transfers. PMID:24931445

De Cock, Bart; Borsuk, Agnieszka; Dejaegher, Bieke; Stiens, Johan; Mangelings, Debby; Vander Heyden, Yvan

2014-08-01

55

Test Results Untrustworthy. Point of View Essay  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

America's public schools are making harmful, irreversible decisions based on test results that--in an increasing number of cases--can't be trusted, Arizona State University's Education Policy Research Laboratory has found. The pressure of high-stakes tests is forcing school districts and state Departments of Education to take inappropriate and at…

Berliner, David C.; Nichols, Sharon L.

2005-01-01

56

DARPA February 1992 ATIS benchmark test results  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper documents the third in a series of Benchmark Tests for the DARPA Air Travel Information System (ATIS) common task domain. The first results in this series were reported at the June 1990 Speech and Natural Language Workshop [1], and the second at the February 1991 Speech and Natural Language Workshop [2]. The February 1992 Benchmark Tests include: (1)

David S. Pallett; Nancy L. Dahlgren; Jonathan G. Fiscus; William M. Fisher; John S. Garofolo; Brett C. Tjaden

1992-01-01

57

Cone Penetrometer N Factor Determination Testing Results  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the results of testing activities to determine the empirical 'N Factor' for the cone penetrometer in kaolin clay simulant. The N Factor is used to releate resistance measurements taken with the cone penetrometer to shear strength.

Follett, Jordan R.

2014-03-05

58

Experimental results for absolute cylindrical wavefront testing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Applications for Cylindrical and near-cylindrical surfaces are ever-increasing. However, fabrication of high quality cylindrical surfaces is limited by the difficulty of accurate and affordable metrology. Absolute testing of such surfaces represents a challenge to the optical testing community as cylindrical reference wavefronts are difficult to produce. In this paper, preliminary results for a new method of absolute testing of cylindrical wavefronts are presented. The method is based on the merging of the random ball test method with the fiber optic reference test. The random ball test assumes a large number of interferograms of a good quality sphere with errors that are statistically distributed such that the average of the errors goes to zero. The fiber optic reference test utilizes a specially processed optical fiber to provide a clean high quality reference wave from an incident line focus from the cylindrical wave under test. By taking measurements at different rotation and translations of the fiber, an analogous procedure can be employed to determine the quality of the converging cylindrical wavefront with high accuracy. This paper presents and discusses the results of recent tests of this method using a null optic formed by a COTS cylindrical lens and a free-form polished corrector element.

Reardon, Patrick J.; Alatawi, Ayshah

2014-09-01

59

Robust Multivariable Predictive Control How Can It Be Applied to Industrial Test Stands?  

Microsoft Academic Search

load. The controller we propose in this article, denoted?-MPC, is a robust extension of the initial multivariable predictive control law that improves the disturbance-rejection proper- ties of the closed-loop system, reducing the H ?-norm of the multivariable sensitivity function with an extra parameter. This augmented algorithm has been chosen to carry out the new tests on the industrial process. Experimental

Cyril Vaucoret

60

Adaptive structures - Test hardware and experimental results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The facilities and procedures used at JPL to test adaptive structures such as the large deployable reflector (LDR) are described and preliminary results are reported. The applications of adaptive structures in future NASA missions are outlined, and the techniques which are employed to modify damping, stiffness, and isolation characteristics, as well as geometric changes, are listed. The development of adaptive structures is shown to be effective as a result of new actuators and sensors, and examples are listed for categories such as fiber optics, shape-memory materials, piezoelectrics, and electrorheological fluids. Some ground test results are described for laboratory truss structures and truss test beds, which are shown to be efficient and easy to assemble in space. Adaptive structures are shown to be important for precision space structures such as the LDR, and can alleviate ground test requirements.

Wada, Ben K.; Fanson, James L.; Chen, Gun-Shing; Kuo, Chin-Po

1990-01-01

61

Uprated OMS engine status: Altitude testing results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The current Space Shuttle Orbital Maneuvering Engine (OME) is pressure fed, utilizing storable propellants. Performance uprating of this engine, through the use of a gas generator driven turbopump to increased operating pressure, is being pursued by the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). Component level design, fabrication, and test activities on this engine system began at Aerojet in 1984. More recently, a complete engine, designated the Integrated Component Test Bed (ICTB), was tested at simulated altitude conditions at the NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF). A description of the test hardware, and results of the altitude test program are presented. These results, which include the test condition operating envelope, confirm the capability of the selected Uprated OME (UOME) configuration to meet or exceed performance and operational requirements. Engine flexibility, demonstrated through testing at two different operational mixture ratios, along with a summary of projected Space Shuttle performance enhancements using the UOME, are discussed. Planned future activities and recommendations for further engine development are also discussed.

Schoenberg, Richard J.

1992-02-01

62

NEXT Single String Integration Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As a critical part of NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) test validation process, a single string integration test was performed on the NEXT ion propulsion system. The objectives of this test were to verify that an integrated system of major NEXT ion propulsion system elements meets project requirements, to demonstrate that the integrated system is functional across the entire power processor and xenon propellant management system input ranges, and to demonstrate to potential users that the NEXT propulsion system is ready for transition to flight. Propulsion system elements included in this system integration test were an engineering model ion thruster, an engineering model propellant management system, an engineering model power processor unit, and a digital control interface unit simulator that acted as a test console. Project requirements that were verified during this system integration test included individual element requirements ; integrated system requirements, and fault handling. This paper will present the results of these tests, which include: integrated ion propulsion system demonstrations of performance, functionality and fault handling; a thruster re-performance acceptance test to establish baseline performance: a risk-reduction PMS-thruster integration test: and propellant management system calibration checks.

Soulas, George C.; Patterson, Michael J.; Pinero, Luis; Herman, Daniel A.; Snyder, Steven John

2010-01-01

63

Cryogenic Test Results of Hextek Mirror  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A 250 mm diameter lightweight borosilicate mirror has been interferometrically tested from room-temperature down to 30 K at the X-Ray Calibration Facility (XRCF) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The minor blank was manufactured by Hextek Corporation using a high-temperature gas fusion process and was then polished at MSFC. It is a sandwich-type mirror consisting of a thin face-sheet (approx.1.5 mm thick), a core structure (20 mm thick, approx.43 mm diameter cells, & 0.5-1.2 mm thick walls), and a thin back-sheet (3 mm thick). The mirror has a 2500 mm spherical radius-of- curvature @/lo). The areal density is 14 kg/sq m. The mirror was tested in the 1 m x 2 m chamber using an Instantaneous Phase Interferometer (PI) from ADE Phase Shift Technologies. The mirror was tested twice. The first test measured the change in surface figure from ambient to 30 K and the repeatability of the change. An attempt was then made by QED Technologies to cryo-figure the mirror using magnetorheological finishing. The second test measured the effectiveness of the cryo- figuring. This paper will describe the test goals, the test instrumentation, and the test results for these cryogenic tests.

Hadaway, James; Stahl, H. Philip; Eng, Ron; Hogue, William

2004-01-01

64

Sequential Circuit Test Generator (STG) benchmark results  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors report on the results of running a version of the Sequential Circuit Test Generator (STG3) on the ISCAS-89 sequential circuit benchmarks. First, they present a brief history of STG and briefly describe the algorithms used. They then describe the conditions under which the experiments were run and give the benchmark results. No particular problems were encountered when running

W.-T. Cheng; S. Davidson

1989-01-01

65

Results from the DESY TESLA Test Facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The TESLA Test Facility (TTF), under construction at DESY by an international collaboration, is an R&D test bed for the superconducting option for linear e+/e- colliders. It consists of an infrastructure to process and test the cavities and of a 390 MeV linac. The linac is composed of three cryomodules, each containing eight nine-cell cavities operated at 1.3 GHz. The designed accelerating gradient is 15 MV/m, with a Q of 3.10^9. The injector delivers a 10-15 MeV beam, it is composed of a 250 kV gun followed by a superconducting cavity. It has been installed and commissioned. More than 20 cavities have been tested in vertical and horizontal cryostats. A 140 MeV beam is expected in June 97 with the first cryomodule. An overview of the facility and results of the tests are given in this paper.

Aune, B.

1997-05-01

66

Rockwell-Rocketdyne flywheel test results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Results are presented of the spin test evaluation of the Rockwell-Rocketdyne RPE-10 design flywheel at the Oak Ridge Flywheel Evaluation Laboratory. Details of the static evaluation, including measures of weight, inertia, natural frequencies, and radiography, are also presented. The flywheel was subjected to seven spin cycles with a maximum of 383 rps, 105% of design speed. At that speed, the energy stored was 1.94 kWhr at 36.1 Whr/kg. The maximum speed was limited by the inability of the test facility to accommodate the increasing eccentric shift of both hub disks with increasing speed. No material degradation was observed during the testing.

Steele, R. S., Jr.; Babelay, E. F., Jr.; Sutton, B. J.

1981-01-01

67

First results from MIRI verification model testing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) is one of the three scientific instruments to fly on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), which is due for launch in 2013. MIRI contains two sub-instruments, an imager, which has low resolution spectroscopy and coronagraphic capabilities in addition to imaging, and a medium resolution IFU spectrometer. A verification model of MIRI was assembled in 2007 and a cold test campaign was conducted between November 2007 and February 2008. This model was the first scientifically representative model, allowing a first assessment to be made of the performance. This paper describes the test facility and testing done. It also reports on the first results from this test campaign.

Lim, Tanya; Alvarez, Jose L.; Bauwens, Eva; Garcia Bedregal, Alejandro; Blommaert, Joris; Dannerbauer, Helmut; Eccleston, Paul; Ferlet, Marc; Fischer, Sebastian; Garcia-Marin, Macarena; Glasse, Alistair; Glauser, Adrian Michael; Gordon, Karl; Greene, Tom; Grundy, Tim; Hennemann, Martin; Klaas, Ulrich; Labiano, Alvaro; Lahuis, Fred; Martínez-Galarza, Juan Rafael; Martin, Bruno Merin; Morrison, Jane; Nakos, Theodoros; O'Sullivan, Brian; Pindor, Bart; Ressler, Michael; Shaughnessy, Bryan; Vandenbussche, Bart; Wells, Martyn; Wright, Gillian; Zuther, Jens

2008-07-01

68

J series thruster thermal test results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Test experience with J series ion thrusters have indicated that the present thruster design may result in excessive temperatures in areas which utilize organic materials such as wire insulation, with the resultant outgassing and potential contamination of insulating materials. Further, it appears that thermal data obtained with earlier thruster designs, such as the 700 series thruster, may not be directly applicable to the J series design. Two J series thrusters were fitted with thermocouples and critical temperatures measured for a variety of configurations and operating parameters. Completely enclosing the thruster to reduce facility contamination significantly increased temperatures prompting the selection of a compromise geometry for life testing. The operating parameter having the largest effect on temperatures was discharge power, while beam power affected little else than extraction system temperatures. Several off-normal operating modes were also investigated. Data believed to be sufficient to effectively modify existing thermal models were obtained from the tests.

Bechtel, R. T.; Dulgeroff, C. R.

1982-01-01

69

Adaptive and robust algorithms and tests for visual-based navigation of a space robotic manipulator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Optical navigation for guidance and control of robotic systems is a well-established technique from both theoretic and practical points of view. According to the positioning of the camera, the problem can be approached in two ways: the first one, "hand-in-eye", deals with a fixed camera, external to the robot, which allows to determine the position of the target object to be reached. The second one, "eye-in-hand", consists in a camera accommodated on the end-effector of the manipulator. Here, the target object position is not determined in an absolute reference frame, but with respect to the image plane of the mobile camera. In this paper, the algorithms and the test campaign applied to the case of the planar multibody manipulator developed in the Guidance and Navigation Lab at the University of Rome La Sapienza are reported with respect to the eye-in-hand case. In fact, being the space environment the target application for this research activity, it is quite difficult to imagine a fixed, non-floating camera in the case of an orbital grasping maneuver. The classic approach of Image Base Visual Servoing considers the evaluation of the control actions directly on the basis of the error between the current image of a feature and the image of the same feature in a final desired configuration. Both simulation and experimental tests show that such a classic approach can fail when navigation errors and actuation delays are included. Moreover, changing light conditions or the presence of unexpected obstacles can lead to a camera failure in target acquisition. In order to overcome these two problems, a Modified Image Based Visual Servoing algorithm and an Extended Kalman Filtering for feature position estimation are developed and applied. In particular, the filtering shows a quite good performance if target's depth information is supplied. A simple procedure for estimating initial target depth is therefore developed and tested. As a result of the application of all the novel approaches proposed, the experimental test campaign shows a remarkable increase in the robustness of the guidance, navigation and control systems.

Sabatini, Marco; Monti, Riccardo; Gasbarri, Paolo; Palmerini, Giovanni B.

2013-02-01

70

Polyurethane Barrier Surface Tracking Test Results  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper documents the testing results of the ZR prototype 600-kV mini-Marx trigger generator (MTG) and polyurethane barrier samples from four suppliers. Our goal was to qualify alternative suppliers as future sources of the dielectric interface barriers. The approach was to raise the electric fields on the polyurethane\\/water interface until surface tracks, or flashovers, occurred and compare the hold-off performance

D. L. Smith; J. M. Garde; R. L. Starbird; G. R. Ziska

2005-01-01

71

Test Results From a High Power Linear Alternator Test Rig  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Stirling cycle power conversion is an enabling technology that provides high thermodynamic efficiency but also presents unique challenges with regard to electrical power generation, management, and distribution. The High Power Linear Alternator Test Rig (HPLATR) located at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio is a demonstration test bed that simulates electrical power generation from a Stirling engine driven alternator. It implements the high power electronics necessary to provide a well regulated DC user load bus. These power electronics use a novel design solution that includes active rectification and power factor control, active ripple suppression, along with a unique building block approach that permits the use of high voltage or high current alternator designs. This report describes the HPLATR, the test program, and the operational results.

Birchenough, Arthur G.; Hervol, David S.; Gardner, Brent G.

2010-01-01

72

Test Results from a High Power Linear Alternator Test Rig  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Stirling cycle power conversion is an enabling technology that provides high thermodynamic efficiency but also presents unique challenges with regard to electrical power generation, management, and distribution. The High Power Linear Alternator Test Rig (HPLATR) located at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, OH is a demonstration test bed that simulates electrical power generation from a Stirling engine driven alternator. It implements the high power electronics necessary to provide a well regulated DC user load bus. These power electronics use a novel design solution that includes active rectification and power factor control, active ripple suppression, along with a unique building block approach that permits the use of high voltage or high current alternator designs. This presentation describes the HPLATR, the test program, and the operational results.

Birchenough, Arthur G.; Hervol, David S.; Gardner, Brent G.

2010-01-01

73

49 CFR 234.273 - Results of inspections and tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Results of inspections and tests. 234.273 Section...Testing Inspections and Tests § 234.273 Results of inspections and tests. (a) Results of inspections and tests made in...

2010-10-01

74

Advanced Thermal Simulator Testing: Thermal Analysis and Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Work at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center seeks to develop high fidelity, electrically heated thermal simulators that represent fuel elements in a nuclear reactor design to support non-nuclear testing applicable to the development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. Comparison between the fuel pins and thermal simulators is made at the outer fuel clad surface, which corresponds to the outer sheath surface in the thermal simulator. The thermal simulators that are currently being tested correspond to a SNAP derivative reactor design that could be applied for Lunar surface power. These simulators are designed to meet the geometric and power requirements of a proposed surface power reactor design, accommodate testing of various axial power profiles, and incorporate imbedded instrumentation. This paper reports the results of thermal simulator analysis and testing in a bare element configuration, which does not incorporate active heat removal, and testing in a water-cooled calorimeter designed to mimic the heat removal that would be experienced in a reactor core.

Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Dickens, Ricky; Dixon, David; Reid, Robert; Adams, Mike; Davis, Joe

2008-01-01

75

Advanced Thermal Simulator Testing: Thermal Analysis and Test Results  

SciTech Connect

Work at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center seeks to develop high fidelity, electrically heated thermal simulators that represent fuel elements in a nuclear reactor design to support non-nuclear testing applicable to the potential development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. Comparison between the fuel pins and thermal simulators is made at the outer fuel clad surface, which corresponds to the outer sheath surface in the thermal simulator. The thermal simulators that are currently being tested correspond to a liquid metal cooled reactor design that could be applied for Lunar surface power. These simulators are designed to meet the geometric and power requirements of a proposed surface power reactor design, accommodate testing of various axial power profiles, and incorporate imbedded instrumentation. This paper reports the results of thermal simulator analysis and testing in a bare element configuration, which does not incorporate active heat removal, and testing in a water-cooled calorimeter designed to mimic the heat removal that would be experienced in a reactor core.

Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Dickens, Ricky; Dixon, David; Reid, Robert; Adams, Mike; Davis, Joe [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Nuclear Systems Branch/ER24, MSFC, AL 35812 (United States)

2008-01-21

76

Robust test of Bell's inequality with amplified N00N states  

E-print Network

For more than 40 years physicists have been struggling to perform an indisputable test of Bell's inequality. Although our understanding of Bell's theorem and experimental techniques to test it have improved over the years, thus far all Bell tests have suffered at least from the detection or the locality loophole. Most optical Bell tests rely on inefficient discrete-outcome measurements, often provided by photon counting detection. One possible way to close the detection loophole in optical Bell tests is to involve efficient continuous-variable measurements instead, such as homodyne detection. Here, we propose a test of the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) inequality that applies photon counting and homodyne detection on amplified two-photon N00N states. The scheme suggested is remarkably robust against experimental imperfections and suits the limits of current technology. Our work explores the opportunities and limits of macroscopic quantum states. It may constitute an alternative platform for a loophole-free Bell test, which is also important for quantum-technological applications.

Falk Töppel; Magdalena Stobi?ska; Gerd Leuchs

2014-04-14

77

PHASE I SINGLE CELL ELECTROLYZER TEST RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

This document reports the results of Phase I Single Cell testing of an SO{sub 2}-Depolarized Water Electrolyzer. Testing was performed primarily during the first quarter of FY 2008 at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) using an electrolyzer cell designed and built at SRNL. Other facility hardware were also designed and built at SRNL. This test further advances this technology for which work began at SRNL in 2005. This research is valuable in achieving the ultimate goal of an economical hydrogen production process based on the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Cycle. The focus of this work was to conduct single cell electrolyzer tests to further develop the technology of SO{sub 2}-depolarized electrolysis as part of the HyS Cycle. The HyS Cycle is a hybrid thermochemical cycle that may be used in conjunction with advanced nuclear reactors or centralized solar receivers to produce hydrogen by water-splitting. Like all other sulfur-based cycles, HyS utilizes the high temperature thermal decomposition of sulfuric acid to produce oxygen and regenerate sulfur dioxide. The unique aspect of HyS is the generation of hydrogen in a water electrolyzer that is operated under conditions where dissolved sulfur dioxide depolarizes the anodic reaction, resulting in substantial voltage reduction. Low cell voltage is essential for both thermodynamic efficiency and hydrogen cost. Sulfur dioxide is oxidized at the anode, producing sulfuric acid that is sent to the high temperature acid decomposition portion of the cycle. The electrolyzer cell uses the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) concept. The anode and cathode are formed by spraying platinum containing catalyst on both sides of a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM). In most testing the material of the PEM was NafionR. The electrolyzer cell active area can be as large as 54.8 cm{sup 2}. Feed to the anode of the electrolyzer is a sulfuric acid solution containing sulfur dioxide. The partial pressure of sulfur dioxide could be varied in the range of 1 to 6 atm (15 to 90 psia). Temperatures could be controlled in the range from ambient to 80 C. Hydrogen generated at the cathode of the cell was collected for the purpose of flow measurement and composition analysis. The test facility proved to be easy to operate, versatile, and reliable.

Steimke, J; Timothy Steeper, T

2008-08-05

78

JWST near infrared detectors: latest test results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The James Webb Space Telescope, an infrared-optimized space telescope being developed by NASA for launch in 2014, will utilize cutting-edge detector technology in its investigation of fundamental questions in astrophysics. JWST's near infrared spectrograph, NIRSpec utilizes two 2048 × 2048 HdCdTe arrays with Sidecar ASIC readout electronics developed by Teledyne to provide spectral coverage from 0.6 microns to 5 microns. We present recent test and calibration results for the "pathfinder NIRSpec detector subsystem" as well as data processing routines for noise reduction and cosmic ray rejection.

Smith, Erin C.; Rauscher, Bernard J.; Alexander, David; Clemons, Brian L.; Engler, Chuck; Garrison, Matthew B.; Hill, Robert J.; Johnson, Thomas; Lindler, Don J.; Manthripragada, Sridhar s.; Marshall, Cheryl; Mott, Brent; Parr, Thomas M.; Roher, Wayne D.; Shakoorzadeh, Kamdin B.; Schnurr, Richard; Waczynski, Augustyn; Wen, Yiting; Wilson, Donna; Loose, Markus; Bagnasco, Giorgio; Böker, Torsten; De Marchi, Guido; Ferruit, Pierre; Jakobsen, Peter; Strada, Paolo

2009-08-01

79

The NASA B-757 HIRF Test Series: Flight Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In 1995, the NASA Langley Research Center conducted a series of aircraft tests aimed at characterizing the electromagnetic environment (EME) in and around a Boeing 757 airliner. Measurements were made of the electromagnetic energy coupled into the aircraft and the signals induced on select structures as the aircraft was flown past known RF transmitters. These measurements were conducted to provide data for the validation of computational techniques for the assessment of electromagnetic effects in commercial transport aircraft. This paper reports on the results of flight tests using RF radiators in the HF, VHF, and UHF ranges and on efforts to use computational and analytical techniques to predict RF field levels inside the airliner at these frequencies.

Moeller, Karl J.; Dudley, Kenneth L.

1997-01-01

80

A prototype tap test imaging system: Initial field test results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes a simple, field-worthy tap test imaging system that gives quantitative information about the size, shape, and severity of defects and damages. The system consists of an accelerometer, electronic circuits for conditioning the signal and measuring the impact duration, a laptop PC and data acquisition and processing software. The images are generated manually by tapping on a grid printed on a plastic sheet laid over the part's surface. A mechanized scanner is currently under development. The prototype has produced images for a variety of aircraft composite and metal honeycomb structures containing flaws, damages, and repairs. Images of the local contact stiffness, deduced from the impact duration using a spring model, revealed quantitatively the stiffness reduction due to flaws and damages, as well as the stiffness enhancement due to substructures. The system has been field tested on commercial and military aircraft as well as rotor blades and engine decks on helicopters. Field test results will be shown and the operation of the system will be demonstrated.—This material is based upon work supported by the Federal Aviation Administration under Contract #DTFA03-98-D-00008, Delivery Order No. IA016 and performed at Iowa State University's Center for NDE as part of the Center for Aviation Systems Reliability program.

Peters, J. J.; Barnard, D. J.; Hudelson, N. A.; Simpson, T. S.; Hsu, D. K.

2000-05-01

81

A robust and reliable non-invasive test for stress responsivity in mice  

PubMed Central

Stress and an altered stress response have been associated with many multifactorial diseases, such as psychiatric disorders or neurodegenerative diseases. As currently mouse mutants for each single gene are generated and phenotyped in a large-scale manner, it seems advisable also to test these mutants for alterations in their stress responses. Here we present the determinants of a robust and reliable non-invasive test for stress-responsivity in mice. Stress is applied through restraining the mice in tubes and recording behavior in the Open Field 20 min after cessation of the stress. Two hours, but not 15 or 50 min of restraint lead to a robust and reproducible increase in distance traveled and number of rearings during the first 5 min in the Open Field in C57BL/6 mice. This behavioral response is blocked by the corticosterone synthesis inhibitor metyrapone, but not by RU486 treatment, indicating that it depends on corticosteroid secretion, but is not mediated via the glucocorticoid receptor type II. We assumed that with a stress duration of 15 min one could detect hyper-responsivity, and with a stress duration of 2 h hypo-responsivity in mutant mouse lines. This was validated with two mutant lines known to show opposing effects on corticosterone secretion after stress exposure, corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) over-expressing mice and CRH receptor 1 knockout (KO) mice. Both lines showed the expected phenotype, i.e., increased stress responsivity in the CRH over-expressing mouse line (after 15 min restraint stress) and decreased stress responsivity in the CRHR1-KO mouse line (after 2 h of restraint stress). It is possible to repeat the acute stress test several times without the stressed animal adapting to it, and the behavioral response can be robustly evoked at different ages, in both sexes and in different mouse strains. Thus, locomotor and rearing behavior in the Open Field after an acute stress challenge can be used as reliable, non-invasive indicators of stress responsivity and corticosterone secretion in mice. PMID:24782732

Zimprich, Annemarie; Garrett, Lillian; Deussing, Jan M.; Wotjak, Carsten T.; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; de Angelis, Martin Hrab?; Wurst, Wolfgang; Hölter, Sabine M.

2014-01-01

82

Boeing's High Voltage Solar Tile Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Real concerns of spacecraft charging and experience with solar array augmented electrostatic discharge arcs on spacecraft have minimized the use of high voltages on large solar arrays despite numerous vehicle system mass and efficiency advantages. Boeing's solar tile (patent pending) allows high voltage to be generated at the array without the mass and efficiency losses of electronic conversion. Direct drive electric propulsion and higher power payloads (lower spacecraft weight) will benefit from this design. As future power demand grows, spacecraft designers must use higher voltage to minimize transmission loss and power cable mass for very large area arrays. This paper will describe the design and discuss the successful test of Boeing's 500-Volt Solar Tile in NASA Glenn's Tenney chamber in the Space Plasma Interaction Facility. The work was sponsored by NASA's Space Solar Power Exploratory Research and Technology (SERT) Program and will result in updated high voltage solar array design guidelines being published.

Reed, Brian J.; Harden, David E.; Ferguson, Dale C.; Snyder, David B.

2002-01-01

83

Boeing's High Voltage Solar Tile Test Results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Real concerns of spacecraft charging and experience with solar array augmented electrostatic discharge arcs on spacecraft have minimized the use of high voltages on large solar arrays despite numerous vehicle system mass and efficiency advantages. Boeing's solar tile (patent pending) allows high voltage to be generated at the array without the mass and efficiency losses of electronic conversion. Direct drive electric propulsion and higher power payloads (lower spacecraft weight) will benefit from this design. As future power demand grows, spacecraft designers must use higher voltage to minimize transmission loss and power cable mass for very large area arrays. This paper will describe the design and discuss the successful test of Boeing's 500-Volt Solar Tile in NASA Glenn's Tenney chamber in the Space Plasma Interaction Facility. The work was sponsored by NASA's Space Solar Power Exploratory Research and Technology (SERT) Program and will result in updated high voltage solar array design guidelines being published.

Reed, Brian J.; Harden, David E.; Ferguson, Dale C.; Snyder, David B.

2002-10-01

84

Testing the robustness of management decisions to uncertainty: Everglades restoration scenarios.  

PubMed

To effectively manage large natural reserves, resource managers must prepare for future contingencies while balancing the often conflicting priorities of different stakeholders. To deal with these issues, managers routinely employ models to project the response of ecosystems to different scenarios that represent alternative management plans or environmental forecasts. Scenario analysis is often used to rank such alternatives to aid the decision making process. However, model projections are subject to uncertainty in assumptions about model structure, parameter values, environmental inputs, and subcomponent interactions. We introduce an approach for testing the robustness of model-based management decisions to the uncertainty inherent in complex ecological models and their inputs. We use relative assessment to quantify the relative impacts of uncertainty on scenario ranking. To illustrate our approach we consider uncertainty in parameter values and uncertainty in input data, with specific examples drawn from the Florida Everglades restoration project. Our examples focus on two alternative 30-year hydrologic management plans that were ranked according to their overall impacts on wildlife habitat potential. We tested the assumption that varying the parameter settings and inputs of habitat index models does not change the rank order of the hydrologic plans. We compared the average projected index of habitat potential for four endemic species and two wading-bird guilds to rank the plans, accounting for variations in parameter settings and water level inputs associated with hypothetical future climates. Indices of habitat potential were based on projections from spatially explicit models that are closely tied to hydrology. For the American alligator, the rank order of the hydrologic plans was unaffected by substantial variation in model parameters. By contrast, simulated major shifts in water levels led to reversals in the ranks of the hydrologic plans in 24.1-30.6% of the projections for the wading bird guilds and several individual species. By exposing the differential effects of uncertainty, relative assessment can help resource managers assess the robustness of scenario choice in model-based policy decisions. PMID:18488629

Fuller, Michael M; Gross, Louis J; Duke-Sylvester, Scott M; Palmer, Mark

2008-04-01

85

Honeycomb spacer crush stength test results  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses aluminum honeycomb spacers, which are used as an energy absorbent material in shipping packages for off site shipment of radioactive materials and which were ordered in two crush strengths, 1,000 psi and 2,000 psi for use in drop tests requested by the Packaging and Transportation group as part of the shipping container rectification process. Both the group as part of the shipping container rectification process. Both the vendor and the SRTC Materials Laboratory performed crush strength measurements on test samples made from the material used to fabricate the actual spacers. The measurements of crush strength made in the SRTC Materials Laboratory are within 100 psi of the measurements made by the manufacturer for all samples tested and all test measurements are within 10% of the specified crush strength, which is acceptable to the P&T group for the planned tests.

Leader, D.R.

1993-09-15

86

42 CFR 493.1281 - Standard: Comparison of test results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... false Standard: Comparison of test results. 493.1281 Section 493.1281 ...1281 Standard: Comparison of test results. (a) If a laboratory performs...and defines the relationship between test results using the different methodologies,...

2010-10-01

87

42 CFR 493.1281 - Standard: Comparison of test results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false Standard: Comparison of test results. 493.1281 Section 493.1281 ...1281 Standard: Comparison of test results. (a) If a laboratory performs...and defines the relationship between test results using the different methodologies,...

2011-10-01

88

Further results on robustness of (possibly discontinuous) sample and hold feedback  

Microsoft Academic Search

We demonstrate that sample and hold state feedback control (possibly discontinuous with respect to the state) is robust when the closed loop system possesses an appropriate Lyapunov function. We first show that if a Lyapunov decrease over sampling periods exists for the nominal system, this decrease can be maintained with some degradation relative to a sufficiently small additive perturbation. We

Christopher M. Kellett; Hyungbo Shim; Andrew R. Teel

2004-01-01

89

The Graphical Display of Simulation Results, with Applications to the Comparison of Robust IRT Estimators of Ability.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Simulation studies of the performance of (potentially) robust statistical estimation produce large quantities of numbers in the form of performance indices of the various estimators under various conditions. This report presents a multivariate graphical display used to aid in the digestion of the plentiful results in a current study of Item…

Thissen, David; Wainer, Howard

90

Flash Lidar Performance Testing: Configuration and Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lidar-based hazard detection and avoidance will enable safe landing in scientifically interesting terrain with higher hazard abundance. ASC GoldenEye flash lidar was tested at JPL as part of EDL technology development for Mars 2018

Poberezhskiy, Ilya; Johnson, Andrew; Chang, Daniel; Ek, Eric; Natzic, David; Spiers, Gary; Penniman, Steve; Short, Brad

2012-01-01

91

X-48B Preliminary Flight Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation reviews the preliminary Flight tests of the X-48B development program. The X-48B is a blended wing body aircraft that is being used to test various features of the BWB concept. The research concerns the following: (1) Turbofan Development, (2) Intelligent Flight Control and Optimization, (3) Airdata Calibration (4) Parameter Identification (i.e., Determination of the parameters of a mathematical model of a system based on observation of the system inputs and response.)

Taylor, Brian R.

2009-01-01

92

CLIC test beam facilities status and results  

E-print Network

CERN is studying the feasibility of building a 1 TeV c.m. e+e- linear collider (CLIC) based on 30 GHz accelerating structures and RF power production from a low energy, high intensity drive linac. Two major challenges of the CLIC two-beam scheme are the generation of the high intensity drive beam and the extraction of 30 GHz RF power using transfer structures. Two test facilities are currently being used to study these specific problems. The CLIC Test Facility (CTF) is a purpose-built CERN facility to study the generation of the drive beam by photo-injectors, the generation of 30 GHz RF power, and the testing of components. This facility has produced single bunch charges of 35 nC with a bunch length of 14 ps (FWHH) and up to 76 MW of 30 GHz RF power. It is at present being updated to a 10 m long two-beam test accelerator producing 480 MW of 30 GHz RF peak power and accelerating electron bunches with gradients of 80 MV/m. The FEL Test Facility at CESTA (Bordeaux) is being used to study the generation of the CL...

Wilson, Ian H

1996-01-01

93

Results from Grimethorpe PFBC turbine cascade tests  

SciTech Connect

The test program at the Grimethorpe Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustion (PFBC) facility included an assessment of the potential for deposition, corrosion, and erosion of gas turbine blade materials when exposed to PFBC off gases. Flue gas from the combustor was fed through three stages of cyclones before entering the cascade. The impulse foils were approximately the size and shape of the first stage blades in the GE MS-1002 gas turbine. The cascade operated through three test series, accumulating a total of 649 hours. The conditions experienced are summarized. The paper lists the alloys tested, and discusses the efficiency of the cyclones, the particle size distribution of the dusts not removed by the cyclones, and corrosion of the turbine blades. 4 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

Not Available

1986-12-01

94

Avco Lycoming emission and flight test results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Avco Lycoming flight test program for reduced emissions was conducted to determine and document the lean fuel schedule limits for current production aircraft based on flight safety. Based on analysis of the emissions profile, Avco Lycoming proposed to evaluate the effect of leaner schedules in the idle/taxi, climb, and approach modes. These modes were selected as areas where it was felt that possible improvements could be made with the greatest improvement in cyclic emissions reduction. The fuel systems to produce these leaner stepped fuel schedules were tailored specifically for the flight test.

Duke, L. C.

1976-01-01

95

Validation of the Chinese Version of the Life Orientation Test with a Robust Weighted Least Squares Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Of the several measures of optimism presently available in the literature, the Life Orientation Test (LOT; Scheier & Carver, 1985) has been the most widely used in empirical research. This article explores, confirms, and cross-validates the factor structure of the Chinese version of the LOT with ordinal data by using robust weighted least squares…

Li, Cheng-Hsien

2012-01-01

96

A transmission disequilibrium test for general pedigrees that is robust to the presence of random genotyping errors and any number of untyped parents  

PubMed Central

Two issues regarding the robustness of the original transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) developed by Spielman et al are: (i) missing parental genotype data and (ii) the presence of undetected genotype errors. While extensions of the TDT that are robust to items (i) and (ii) have been developed, there is to date no single TDT statistic that is robust to both for general pedigrees. We present here a likelihood method, the TDTae, which is robust to these issues in general pedigrees. The TDTae assumes a more general disease model than the traditional TDT, which assumes a multiplicative inheritance model for genotypic relative risk. Our model is based on Weinberg’s work. To assess robustness, we perform simulations. Also, we apply our method to two data sets from actual diseases: psoriasis and sitosterolemia. Maximization under alternative and null hypotheses is performed using Powell’s method. Results of our simulations indicate that our method maintains correct type I error rates at the 1, 5, and 10% levels of significance. Furthermore, a Kolmorogov–Smirnoff Goodness of Fit test suggests that the data are drawn from a central ?2 with 2 df, the correct asymptotic null distribution. The psoriasis results suggest two loci as being significantly linked to the disease, even in the presence of genotyping errors and missing data, and the sitosterolemia results show a P-value of 1.5 × 10?9 for the marker locus nearest to the sitosterolemia disease genes. We have developed software to perform TDTae calculations, which may be accessed from our ftp site. PMID:15162128

Gordon, Derek; Haynes, Chad; Johnnidis, Christopher; Patel, Shailendra B; Bowcock, Anne M; Ott, Jürg

2005-01-01

97

Gifted Adolescents: A Handbook of Test Results.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Governor's School of North Carolina is a residential summer program for talented and gifted juniors and seniors from all over the state. It is designed to provide a distinctive educational experience and to serve as an experimental laboratory for innovative instruction. This handbook reports on an extensive testing program carried out at the…

Welsh, George S.

98

Karhula hot gas cleanup test results  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this work is to develop a practical hot gas filter design that meets the performance and operational requirements of pressurized fluidized bed combustion--bubbling bed, circulating bed and second generation--applications. The Westinghouse hot gas candle filter system is currently installed in the Ahlstrom Pyropower 10 MW (thermal) pressurized circulating fluidized bed combustor (PCFB) test facility located in Karhula,

T. E. Lippert; G. J. Bruck; J. Isaksson

1994-01-01

99

Liquid Motion Experiment Flight Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Liquid Motion Experiment (LME), designed to study the effects of liquid motion in rotating tanks, was flown on STS 84. LME was essentially a spin table that created a realistic nutation motion of scale-model tanks containing liquid. TWo spherical and two cylindrical transparent tanks were tested simultaneously, and three sets of such tanks were employed to vary liquid viscosity, fill level, and propellant management device (PMD) design. All the tanks were approximately 4.5 inches diameter. The primary test measurements were the radial and tangential torques exerted on the tanks by the liquid. Resonant frequencies and damping of the liquid oscillations were determined by sine sweep tests. For a given tank shape, the resonant frequency depended on fill level. For the cylindrical tanks, the resonances had somewhat different frequencies for the tangential axis (0.55 to 0.75 times spin rate) and the radial axis (0.73 to 0.78 times spin rate), and the tangential axis resonance agreed more closely with available analytical models. For the spherical tanks, the resonant frequencies were between 0.74 to 0.77 times the spin rate and were the same for the tangential and radial axes. The damping coefficients varied from about I% to 3% of critical, depending on tank shape, fill level, and liquid viscosity. 'Me viscous energy dissipation rates of the liquid oscillations were determined from sine dwell tests. The LME energy dissipation rates varied from 0.3 to 0.5 times the estimates obtained from scaling previous ground tests and spacecraft flight data. The PNDs sometimes enhanced the resonances and energy dissipation rates and sometimes decreased them, which points out the need to understand better the effects of PMD on liquid motion as a function of PMD and tank design.

Chato David J.; Dalton, Penni J.; Dodge, Franklin T.; Green, Steve

1998-01-01

100

Statistical voice activity detection based on integrated bispectrum likelihood ratio tests for robust speech recognition.  

PubMed

Currently, there are technology barriers inhibiting speech processing systems that work in extremely noisy conditions from meeting the demands of modern applications. These systems often require a noise reduction system working in combination with a precise voice activity detector (VAD). This paper shows statistical likelihood ratio tests formulated in terms of the integrated bispectrum of the noisy signal. The integrated bispectrum is defined as a cross spectrum between the signal and its square, and therefore a function of a single frequency variable. It inherits the ability of higher order statistics to detect signals in noise with many other additional advantages: (i) Its computation as a cross spectrum leads to significant computational savings, and (ii) the variance of the estimator is of the same order as that of the power spectrum estimator. The proposed approach incorporates contextual information to the decision rule, a strategy that has reported significant benefits for robust speech recognition applications. The proposed VAD is compared to the G.729, adaptive multirate, and advanced front-end standards as well as recently reported algorithms showing a sustained advantage in speech/nonspeech detection accuracy and speech recognition performance. PMID:17550192

Ramírez, J; Górriz, J M; Segura, J C

2007-05-01

101

A robust association test for detecting genetic variants with heterogeneous effects.  

PubMed

One common strategy for detecting disease-associated genetic markers is to compare the genotype distributions between cases and controls, where cases have been diagnosed as having the disease condition. In a study of a complex disease with a heterogeneous etiology, the sampled case group most likely consists of people having different disease subtypes. If we conduct an association test by treating all cases as a single group, we maximize our chance of finding genetic risk factors with a homogeneous effect, regardless of the underlying disease etiology. However, this strategy might diminish the power for detecting risk factors whose effect size varies by disease subtype. We propose a robust statistical procedure to identify genetic risk factors that have either a uniform effect for all disease subtypes or heterogeneous effects across different subtypes, in situations where the subtypes are not predefined but can be characterized roughly by a set of clinical and/or pathologic markers. We demonstrate the advantage of the new procedure through numeric simulation studies and an application to a breast cancer study. PMID:25057183

Yu, Kai; Zhang, Han; Wheeler, William; Horne, Hisani N; Chen, Jinbo; Figueroa, Jonine D

2015-01-01

102

The 757 NLF glove flight test results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A major concern in the application of a laminar flow wing design to commercial transports is whether laminar flow can be sustained in the presence of the noise environment due to wing mounted turbofan engines. To investigate this issue, a flight test program was conducted using the Boeing 757 flight research airplane with a portion of the wing modified to obtain natural laminar flow. The flight test had two primary objectives. The first was to measure the noise levels on the upper and lower surface of the wing for a range of flight conditions. The second was to investigate the effect of engine noise on laminar boundary layer transition. The noise field on the wing and transition location on the glove were then measured as a function of the engine power setting at a given flight condition. The transition and noise measurement on the glove show that there is no apparent effect of engine noise on the upper surface transition location. On the lower surface, the transition location moved forward 2 to 3 percent chord. A boundary layer stability analysis to the flight data showed that cross flow disturbances were the dominant cause of transition at most flight conditions.

Runyan, L. Jim; Bielak, G. W.; Behbehani, R. A.; Chen, A. W.; Rozendaal, Roger A.

1987-01-01

103

LOFT lead rod test results evaluation. [PWR  

SciTech Connect

The purpose for evaluating the LOFT Lead Rod Test (simulations of large break, loss-of-coolant accidents) data was to determine; (a) if the centerline thermocouple and fuel rod elongation sensor data show indications of the collapsed fuel rod cladding, (b) the capability of the FRAP-T5 computer code to accurately predict cladding collapse, and (c) if cladding surface thermocouples enhance fuel rod cooling. With consideration to unresolved questions on data integrity, it was concluded that: the fuel rod centerline thermocouple and elongation sensor data do show indications of the fuel rod cladding collapse; the FRAP-T5 code conservatively predicts cladding collapse; and there is an indication that cladding surface thermocouples are enhancing fuel rod cooling.

Driskell, W.B.; Tolman, E.L.

1980-07-30

104

49 CFR 236.110 - Results of tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Results of tests. 236.110 Section 236.110 Transportation...Inspections and Tests; All Systems § 236.110 Results of tests. (a) Results of tests made in compliance with §§...

2011-10-01

105

49 CFR 236.110 - Results of tests.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Results of tests. 236.110 Section 236.110 Transportation...Inspections and Tests; All Systems § 236.110 Results of tests. (a) Results of tests made in compliance with §§...

2010-10-01

106

REVIEW OF FENTON HILL HDR TEST RESULTS Donald BROWN  

E-print Network

REVIEW OF FENTON HILL HDR TEST RESULTS Donald BROWN Los Alamos National Laboratory ABSTRACT Results of recent flow testing at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, have been examined in light of their applicability as flow testing proceeded. Based on these test results together with previous HDR research at Fenton Hill

107

Recent results of the GAINS test flight  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A demonstration flight of the Global Atmosphere-ocean IN-situ System (GAINS) Prototype III balloon is scheduled to occur in early summer 2002. The 18-m diameter PIII superpressure balloon, built by GSSL, Inc., will float a 135-kg payload at 16 km. Performance of the SpectraTM envelope will be assessed over two day-night cycles. The payload consists of line-of-sight communications for transmitting GPS position, and monitored parameters on balloon and payload state and the internal and external thermal environments. Primary termination is by radio command with several independent backup termination systems. Safe operation of the balloon is ensured by an onboard transponder that keeps the balloon under active air traffic control. The balloon is tracked by an aircraft that will record communications from the balloon and instigate termination of the flight. Mobile ground stations positioned at the launch and recovery locations will also be capable of recording and terminating the flight. A suite of trajectory forecast tools has been developed based on radiosondes and winds from numerical weather models. A GPS surface reflection experiment for determining ocean surface winds will be tested on this platform. Physical and electronic integration of the radio and mechanical systems was completed over the last two years. Data and videos from the June flight will be presented.

Girz, C.

108

Fractional representation theory - Robustness results with applications to finite dimensional control of a class of linear distributed systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper reviews and extends the fractional representation theory. In particular, new and powerful robustness results are presented. This new theory is utilized to develop a preliminary design methodology for finite dimensional control of a class of linear evolution equations on a Banach space. The design is for stability in an input-output sense, but particular attention is paid to internal stability as well.

Nett, C. N.; Jacobson, C. A.; Balas, M. J.

1983-01-01

109

Test results of a prototype dielectric microcalorimeter  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The initial development work on a dielectric microcalorimeter is presented. It focuses on the dielectric properties of the ferroelectric material KTa(1-x)Nb(x)O3 (KTN). Measurements of the temperature dependent dielectric constant are given together with the first alpha particle detection results from a prototype composite microcalorimeter operating at 1.3 K. A nonthermal mechanism for detecting 6 MeV alpha particles in a monolithic KTN sample is also reported.

Pfafman, T. E.; Silver, E.; Labov, S.; Beeman, J.; Goulding, F.; Hansen, W.; Landis, D.; Madden, N.

1990-01-01

110

Test results of a prototype dielectric microcalorimeter  

SciTech Connect

The initial development work on a dielectric microcalorimeter is presented. It focuses on the dielectric properties of the ferroelectric material KTa{sub 1-x}Nb{sub x}O{sub 3} (KTN). Measurements of the temperature dependent dielectric constant are given together with the first alpha particle detection results from a prototype composite microcalorimeter operating at 1.3 K. a non-thermal mechanism for detecting 6 MeV alpha particles in a monolithic KTN sample is also reported. 7 refs, 16 figs., 1 tab.

Pfafman, T.E.; Silver, E.; Labov, S. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Beeman, J.; Goulding, F.; Hansen, W.; Landis, D.; Madden, N. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

1990-08-13

111

Initial test results using the GEOS-3 engineering model altimeter  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Data from a series of experimental tests run on the engineering model of the GEOS 3 radar altimeter using the Test and Measurement System (TAMS) designed for preflight testing of the radar altimeter are presented. These tests were conducted as a means of preparing and checking out a detailed test procedure to be used in running similar tests on the GEOS 3 protoflight model altimeter systems. The test procedures and results are also included.

Hayne, G. S.; Clary, J. B.

1977-01-01

112

Stirling convertor performance mapping test results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has selected Free-Piston Stirling Convertors as a technology for future advanced radioisotope space power systems. In August 2000, DOE awarded competitive Phase I, Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG) power system integration contracts to three major aerospace contractors, resulting in SRG conceptual designs in February 2001. All three contractors based their designs on the Technology Demonstration Convertor (TDC) developed by Stirling Technology Company (STC) for DOE. The contract award to a single system integration contractor for Phases II and III of the SRG program is anticipated in late 2001. The first potential SRG mission is targeted for a Mars rover. Recent TDC performance data are provided in this paper, together with predictions from Stirling simulation models. .

Qiu, Songgang; Peterson, Allen A.; White, Maurice A.; Faultersack, Franklyn; Redinger, Darin L.; Petersen, Stephen L.

2002-01-01

113

40 CFR 204.57-5 - Reporting of test results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...STANDARDS FOR CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT Portable Air Compressors § 204.57-5 Reporting of test results...ii) Year, make, assembly date, and model of compressor. (iii) Compressor serial number. (iv) Test results by...

2010-07-01

114

40 CFR 204.57-5 - Reporting of test results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Reporting of test results. 204.57-5 Section 204.57-5...Compressors § 204.57-5 Reporting of test results. (a)(1) The manufacturer shall...Compressor serial number. (iv) Test results by serial numbers (3) The...

2011-07-01

115

Mathematics Placement Test: Typical Results with Unexpected Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Based on the results of a prior case-study analysis of mathematics placement at one university, the mathematics department developed and piloted a mathematics placement test. This article describes the implementation process for a mathematics placement test and further analyzes the test results for the pilot group. As an unexpected result, the…

Ingalls, Victoria

2011-01-01

116

Compact And Robust Laser Impulse Measurement Device, With Ultrashort Pulse Laser Ablation Results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An impulse measurement device and analysis package was conceived, designed, constructed, tested, and demonstrated to be capable of: measuring nanoNewton-seconds to milliNewton-seconds of impulse due to laser-ablation; being transported as carry-on baggage; set-up and tear-down times of less than an hour; target exchange times of less than two minutes (targets can be ablated at multiple positions for thousands of shots); measurements in air and in vacuum; error of just a few percent; repeatability over a wide range of potential systematic error sources; and time between measurements, including ring-down and analysis, of less than 30 seconds. The instrument consists of a cantilever (i.e. leaf spring), whose time-dependent displacement/oscillation is measured and analyzed to determine the impulse imparted by a laser pulse to a target. These shapes are readily/commercially available, and any target material can be used, provided it can be fashioned in the form of a cantilever, or as a coating/film/tape, suitable for mounting on a cantilever of known geometry. The instrument was calibrated both statically and dynamically, and measurements were performed on brass, steel, and Aluminum, using laser pulses of ˜7 ns, ˜500 ps, and ˜500 fs. The results agree well with those published in the literature, with surface effects, atmosphere, and pre-/post-pulses demonstrating interesting effects and indicating areas for further study. These parameters should be carefully controlled and held constant during a series of measurements. The impulse imparted by ablation due to laser filaments in air was also explored.

Kremeyer, Kevin; Lapeyre, John; Hamann, Steven

2008-04-01

117

The Adequacy of Different Robust Statistical Tests in Comparing Two Independent Groups  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the current study, we evaluated various robust statistical methods for comparing two independent groups. Two scenarios for simulation were generated: one of equality and another of population mean differences. In each of the scenarios, 33 experimental conditions were used as a function of sample size, standard deviation and asymmetry. For each…

Pero-Cebollero, Maribel; Guardia-Olmos, Joan

2013-01-01

118

Robust Fault Diagnosis using Parallelotope-based Set-membership Consistency Tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper proposes robust fault detection methods that take advantage of a recently proposed set-membership identification procedure based on parallelotopes for systems linear in the parameters. It is shown that consistency checks indicating faults can be performed in a natural manner with a parallelotope description of the feasible parameter set. Fault detection algorithms are presented for systems with invariant parameters,

Ari Ingimundarson; J. M. Bravo; V. Puig; T. Alamo

2005-01-01

119

CMU/ICES Technical Report #01-27-98 Automatic Robustness Testing of  

E-print Network

-The-Shelf (COTS) software to reduce costs and shorten development time even though COTS software components may sacrificing the cost and time advantages of using COTS software. This report describes a scalable, portable, or by consumers to compare the robustness of competing COTS component libraries. Acknowledgments This research

Koopman, Philip

120

Inverter Performance Certification: Results from the Sandia Test Protocol  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses results of the work to develop a test protocol for evaluating PV inverter performance, results obtained by testing to the protocol as required by the California Energy Commission (CEC), and the use of those results to develop and evaluate inverter performance models. This paper presents preliminary results of the modeling effort, comparing the models derived from CEC

Chuck Whitaker; Jeff Newmiller; Ward Bower

2006-01-01

121

Test results of the DOE/Sandia 17 meter VAWT  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A review is given of the test program of a 17 meter Vertical Axis Wind Turbine VAWT. Performance test results are discussed including difficulties encountered during the VAWT operation along with ways of solving these problems.

Nellums, R. O.; Worstell, M. H.

1979-01-01

122

49 CFR 199.229 - Reporting of alcohol testing results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Reporting of alcohol testing results. 199.229 Section 199.229...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING Alcohol Misuse Prevention Program § 199.229...

2012-10-01

123

49 CFR 199.229 - Reporting of alcohol testing results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Reporting of alcohol testing results. 199.229 Section 199.229...TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING Alcohol Misuse Prevention Program § 199.229...

2013-10-01

124

Effects of testing conditions on conceptual survey results  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Pre-testing and post-testing is a commonly used method in Physics Education Research to assess student learning gains. It is well recognized in the community that timings and incentives in delivering conceptual tests can impact test results. However, it is difficult to control these variables across different studies. As a common practice, a pre-test is often administered either at or near the beginning of a course, while a post-test can be given either at or near the end of a course. Also, in conducting such tests there often is no norm as to whether incentives should be offered to students. Because these variations can significantly affect test results, it is important to study and document their impact. We analyzed five years of data that were collected at The Ohio State University from over 2100 students, who took both the pre-test and post-test of the Conceptual Survey of Electricity and Magnetism under various timings and incentives. We observed that the actual time frame for giving a test has a marked effect on the test results and that incentive granting also has a significant influence on test outcomes. These results suggest that one should carefully monitor and document the conditions under which tests are administered.

Ding, Lin; Reay, Neville W.; Lee, Albert; Bao, Lei

2008-09-22

125

Experimental test of a robust formation controller for marine unmanned surface vessels  

Microsoft Academic Search

Experiments with two formation controllers for marine unmanned surface vessels are reported. The formation controllers are\\u000a designed using the nonlinear robust model-based sliding mode approach. The marine vehicles can operate in arbitrary formation\\u000a configurations by using two leader-follower control schemes. For the design of these controller schemes 3 degrees of freedom\\u000a (DOFs) of surge, sway, and yaw are assumed in

Daniel Schoerling; Chris Van Kleeck; Farbod Fahimi; Charles Robert Koch; Alfons Ams; Peter Löber

2010-01-01

126

7 CFR 91.24 - Reports of test results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Reports of test results. 91.24 Section 91.24 Agriculture Regulations...INFORMATION Reporting § 91.24 Reports of test results. (a) Results of analyses are provided, in writing, by...

2011-01-01

127

7 CFR 91.24 - Reports of test results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reports of test results. 91.24 Section 91.24 Agriculture Regulations...INFORMATION Reporting § 91.24 Reports of test results. (a) Results of analyses are provided, in writing, by...

2010-01-01

128

Robust non-parametric tests for complex-repeated measures problems in ophthalmology.  

PubMed

The NonParametric Combination methodology (NPC) of dependent permutation tests allows the experimenter to face many complex multivariate testing problems and represents a convincing and powerful alternative to standard parametric methods. The main advantage of this approach lies in its flexibility in handling any type of variable (categorical and quantitative, with or without missing values) while at the same time taking dependencies among those variables into account without the need of modelling them. NPC methodology enables to deal with repeated measures, paired data, restricted alternative hypotheses, missing data (completely at random or not), high-dimensional and small sample size data. Hence, NPC methodology can offer a significant contribution to successful research in biomedical studies with several endpoints, since it provides reasonably efficient solutions and clear interpretations of inferential results. Pesarin F. Multivariate permutation tests: with application in biostatistics. Chichester-New York: John Wiley &Sons, 2001; Pesarin F, Salmaso L. Permutation tests for complex data: theory, applications and software. Chichester, UK: John Wiley &Sons, 2010. We focus on non-parametric permutation solutions to two real-case studies in ophthalmology, concerning complex-repeated measures problems. For each data set, different analyses are presented, thus highlighting characteristic aspects of the data structure itself. Our goal is to present different solutions to multivariate complex case studies, guiding researchers/readers to choose, from various possible interpretations of a problem, the one that has the highest flexibility and statistical power under a set of less stringent assumptions. MATLAB code has been implemented to carry out the analyses. PMID:21705436

Brombin, Chiara; Midena, Edoardo; Salmaso, Luigi

2013-12-01

129

A reliability test system for educational purposes-basic results  

Microsoft Academic Search

A set of basic reliability indices at the generation and composite generation and transmission levels for a small reliability test system are presented. The test system and the results presented have evolved from reliability research and teaching programs. The indices presented are for fundamental reliability applications which should be covered in a power system reliability teaching program. The RBTS test

R. Billinton; S. Kumar; N. Chowdhury; K. Chu; L. Goel; E. Khan; P. Kos; G. Nourbakhsh; J. Oteng-Adjei

1990-01-01

130

Test results of the highly instrumented Space Shuttle Main Engine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Test results of a highly instrumented Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) are presented. The instrumented engine, when combined with instrumented high pressure turbopumps, contains over 750 special measurements, including flowrates, pressures, temperatures, and strains. To date, two different test series, accounting for a total of sixteen tests and 1,667 seconds, have been conducted with this engine. The first series, which

H. V. McConnaughey; J. L. Leopard; R. M. Lightfoot

1992-01-01

131

Space Power Demonstration Engine linear alternator dynamometer test results  

Microsoft Academic Search

To verify the alternator bench test and finite element code results, it was decided to test the Space Power Demonstration Engine (SPDE) alternator on a linear dynamometer. The dynamometer tests confirmed that the primary source of losses in the SPDE alternator assembly was the adjacent magnetic structure and not the alternator proper. Alternator efficiency above 90% was demonstrated by substitution

M. Dhar; J. Rauch; S. Huang; R. Bolton

1989-01-01

132

Flight Test Results for a Turbulence Detection Radar  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of flight tests conducted on an aircraft turbulence detection radar system. Topics covered include: flight operations summary, radar data collection, baseline algorithm methodology, radar hazard tables and proposed alert criteria. Flight tests results are presented and summarized. Data analysis from these flight tests are also included.

Schaffner, Phil

2003-01-01

133

TEST RESULTS FOR FUEL-CELL OPERATION ON LANDFILL GAS  

EPA Science Inventory

Test results from a demonstration of fuel-cell (FC) energy recovery and control of landfill gas emissions are presented. The project addressed two major issues: (i) the design, construction, and testing of a landfill-gas cleanup system; and (ii) a field test of a commercial phos...

134

EDD-7 Electric Charge Point Meter test results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The results of tests evaluating the electric switching portion of the EDD-7 Electric Charge Point Meter (ECPM) are presented. The ECPM is a modified parking meter that allows the purchase of 120 or 240 volt electric power. The ECPM is designed to make electricity available at any vehicle parking location. The test results indicate that the ECPM operated without failure through a series of over current and ground fault tests at three different test temperatures. The magnitude of current required to trip the over current protection circuitry varied with temperature while the performance of the ground fault interruption circuitry did not change significantly with the test temperature.

Mersman, C. R.

1993-09-01

135

EDD-7 Electric Charge Point Meter test results  

SciTech Connect

The results of tests evaluating the electric switching portion of the EDD-7 Electric Charge Point Meter (ECPM) are presented. The ECPM is a modified parking meter that allows the purchase of 120 or 240 volt electric power. The ECPM is designed to make electricity available at any vehicle parking location. The test results indicate that the ECPM operated without failure thru a series of over current and ground fault tests at three different test temperatures. The magnitude of current required to trip the over current protection circuitry varied with temperature while the performance of the ground fault interruption circuitry did not change significantly with the test temperature.

Mersman, C.R.

1993-09-01

136

Robustness of Ability Estimation to Multidimensionality in CAST with Implications to Test Assembly  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Computer Adaptive Sequential Testing (CAST) is a test delivery model that combines features of the traditional conventional paper-and-pencil testing and item-based computerized adaptive testing (CAT). The basic structure of CAST is a panel composed of multiple testlets adaptively administered to examinees at different stages. Current applications…

Zhang, Yanwei; Nandakumar, Ratna

2006-01-01

137

2006 Toyota Highlander-5681 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing hybrid electric vehicles batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and battery testing results for the 2007 Toyota Highlander hybrid electric vehicle (Vin Number JTEDW21A860005681). Testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation conduct Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

2010-01-01

138

2006 Toyota Highlander-6395 Hyrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing hybrid electric vehicles batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and battery testing results for the 2007 Toyota Highlander hybrid electric vehicle (Vin Number JTEDW21A160006395). Testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation conduct Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

2010-01-01

139

2007 Toyota Camry-7129 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing hybrid electric vehicles batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and battery testing results for the 2007 Toyota Camry hybrid electric vehicle (Vin Number JTNBB46K773007129). Testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation conduct Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

2010-01-01

140

The Dornier 328 Acoustic Test Cell (ATC) for interior noise tests and selected test results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

To perform acoustic studies for achieving low noise levels for the Dornier 328, an acoustic test cell (ATC) of the Dornier 328 has been built. The ATC consists of a fuselage section, a realistic fuselage suspension system, and three exterior noise simulation rings. A complex digital 60 channel computer/amplifier noise generation system as well as multichannel digital data acquisition and evaluation system have been used. The noise control tests started with vibration measurements for supporting acoustic data interpretation. In addition, experiments have been carried out on dynamic vibration absorbers, the most important passive noise reduction measure for low frequency propeller noise. The design and arrangement of the current ATC are presented. Furthermore, exterior noise simulation as well as data acquisition are explained. The most promising results show noise reduction due to synchrophasing and dynamic vibration absorbers.

Hackstein, H. Josef; Borchers, Ingo U.; Renger, Klaus; Vogt, Konrad

1992-01-01

141

Correlating Flammability of Materials with FTIR Analysis Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose of this experiment was to correlate flammability data with FTIR test results. Kydex 100 is a blend of chlorinated polyvinyl chloride and polymethylmethacrylate, with some filler materials. Samples supplied were 0.125 in. thick. 10 samples were taken from a sheet of Kydex and analyzed for flammability and by FTIR spectroscopy. This material was utilized as a round robin sample for flammability testing. The flammability test results were found to vary across the same sheet.

Moore, Robin; Whitfield, Steve

2003-01-01

142

AIS wavefront sensor: a robust optical test of exposure tools using localized wavefront curvature  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present an update of the AIS wavefront sensor, a diagnostic sensor set for insertion in the upgraded 0.5 NA SEMATECH Albany and Berkeley METs. AIS works by using offset monopole illumination to probe localized regions of the test optic pupil. Variations in curvature manifest as focus shifts, which are measured using a photodiode- based grating-on- grating contrast monitor, and the wavefront aberrations are reconstructed using a least-squares approach. We present results from an optical prototype of AIS demonstrating an accuracy of better than ?/30 rms for Zernike polynomials Z4 through Z10. We also discuss integration strategies and requirements as well as specifications on system alignment.

Miyakawa, Ryan; Zhou, Xibin; Goldstein, Michael; Ashworth, Dominic; Cummings, Kevin; Fan, Yu-Jen; Shroff, Yashesh; Denbeaux, Greg; Kandel, Yudhi; Naulleau, Patrick

2014-04-01

143

China Energy Efficiency Round Robin Testing Results for Room  

E-print Network

LBNL-3502E China Energy Efficiency Round Robin Testing Results for Room Air Conditioners Nan Zhou Round Robin Testing Results and Analysis by China National Institute of Standardization..................................................................................................................... 1 I.1.1 China's Energy Constraint Problem and the Need to Improve the Energy Efficiency of Energy

144

Closed-loop hover test results with a neurocontroller on piezoactuated smart rotor blades  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

On-blade smart structure actuators are capable of actively altering the aerodynamic loads on rotor blades. With a suitable feedback control law, such actuators could potentially be used to counter the vibrations induced by periodic aerodynamic loading on the blades with lower weight penalties than the previous actuation methods and without the bandwidth constraints. This paper covers the development and testing of a new, robust individual blade control (IBC) methodology for rotor vibration suppression using piezo actuated trailing edge flaps and active twist tip rotors. The controller uses a neural network to learn to actuate the trailing edge flap thus adaptively suppressing the blade or hub vibrations. In this application, no off-line training is performed. Instead, a neural network is used in real time to adaptively command the actuator deflections thus reducing vibrations. Closed loop experimental tests with piezo actuated scale rotor systems were conducted on the University of Maryland hover test stand. The results include two different Mach scale smart rotor systems (trailing edge flaps and active tip twist) that were controlled by the same adaptive neurocontrol algorithm. These tests demonstrate the controller's robust ability to successfully learn to control the rotor vibrations with no a priori information about the blade/actuator structure or the aerodynamic loading.

Spencer, Michael G.; Sanner, Robert M.; Chopra, Inderjit

2000-06-01

145

Early results of gate valve flow interruption blowdown tests  

SciTech Connect

The preliminary results of the USNRC/INEL high-energy BWR line break flow interruption testing are presented. Two representative nuclear valve assemblies were cycled under design basis Reactor Water Cleanup pipe break conditions to provide input for the technical basis for resolving the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Generic Issue 87. The effects of the blowdown hydraulic loadings on valve operability, especially valve closure stem forces, were studied. The blowdown tests showed that, given enough thrust, typical gate valves will close against the high flow resulting from a line break. The tests also showed that proper operator sizing depends on the correct identification of values for the sizing equation. Evidence exists that values used in the past may not be conservative for all valve applications. The tests showed that improper operator lock ring installation following test or maintenance can invalidate in-situ test results and prevent the valve from performing its design function. 2 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

DeWall, K.G.

1988-01-01

146

A unifying framework for robust association testing, estimation, and genetic model selection using the generalized linear model.  

PubMed

The analysis of genome-wide genetic association studies generally starts with univariate statistical tests of each single-nucleotide polymorphism. The standard approach is the Cochran-Armitage trend test or its logistic regression equivalent although this approach can lose considerable power if the underlying genetic model is not additive. An alternative is the MAX test, which is robust against the three basic modes of inheritance. Here, the asymptotic distribution of the MAX test is derived using the generalized linear model together with the Delta method and multiple contrasts. The approach is applicable to binary, quantitative, and survival traits. It may be used for unrelated individuals, family-based studies, and matched pairs. The approach provides point and interval effect estimates and allows selecting the most plausible genetic model using the minimum P-value. R code is provided. A Monte-Carlo simulation study shows that the asymptotic MAX test framework meets type I error levels well, has good power, and good model selection properties for minor allele frequencies ?0.3. Pearson's ?(2)-test is superior for lower minor allele frequencies with low frequencies for the rare homozygous genotype. In these cases, the model selection procedure should be used with caution. The use of the MAX test is illustrated by reanalyzing findings from seven genome-wide association studies including case-control, matched pairs, and quantitative trait data. PMID:23572026

Loley, Christina; König, Inke R; Hothorn, Ludwig; Ziegler, Andreas

2013-12-01

147

Trend Tests for Case-Control Studies of Genetic Markers: Power, Sample Size and Robustness  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Cochran-Armitage trend test is commonly used as a genotype-based test for candidate gene association. Corresponding to each underlying genetic model there is a particular set of scores assigned to the genotypes that maximizes its power. When the variance of the test statistic is known, the formulas for approximate power and associated sample size are readily obtained. In practice, however,

Boris Freidlin; Gang Zheng; Zhaohai Li; Joseph L. Gastwirth

2002-01-01

148

High-performance robust motion control of machine tools: an adaptive robust control approach and comparative experiments  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper studies the high-performance robust motion control of machine tools. The newly proposed adaptive robust control (ARC) is applied to make the resulting closed-loop system robust to model uncertainties, instead of the disturbance observer (DOB) design previously tested by many researchers. Compared to DOB, the proposed ARC has a better tracking performance and transient in the presence of discontinuous

Bin Yao; Mohammed Al-Majed; Masayoshi Tomizuka

1997-01-01

149

Preliminary Results from the QuietSpike Flight Test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This viewgraph presentation reviews the QuietSpike flight test results. It shows the previous tests from Nearfield probes. The presentation then reviews the approach to test the QuietSpike, and shows graphics of the positions of the test vehicles. It also shows the components of the Sonic Boom Probing Noseboom. A graph of the Pressure Over- Under-shoot (Shaped Sonic Boom Demonstration (SSBD)Data) is presented. It reviews the Shock Probing Orientations, explaining that the probing plane is always behind the tail of the QuietSpike jet. Graphs of the Shock Position Geometry (SSBD Data) and the QuietSpike signature as of the test on 12/13/06, Near-Field Probing Directly Under the QuietSpike jet, and Near-Field Probing to Side, Near-Field Probing Above and to Side. Several slides review the Computational Fluid Dynamic models, and results compared to the probe tests.

Haering, Edward A., Jr.; Cliatt, Larry J., II; Howe, Don; Waithe, Kenrick

2007-01-01

150

2007 Toyota Camry-6330 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing hybrid electric vehicles batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and battery testing results for the 2007 Toyota Camry hybrid electric vehicle (Vin Number JTNBB46K673006330). Testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation. The AVTA is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation conduct AVTA for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

2010-01-01

151

FERET (Face Recognition Technology) Recognition Algorithm Development and Test Results  

Microsoft Academic Search

As part of the Face Recognition Technology (FERET) program, the U.S. ArmyResearch Laboratory (ARL) conducted supervised government tests and evaluationsof automatic face recognition algorithms. The goal of the tests was toprovide an independent method of evaluating algorithms and assessing thestate of the art in automatic face recognition. This report describes the designand presents the results of the August1994andMarch1995FERET tests. Resultsfor

P. Jonathon Phillips; Patrick J. Rauss; Sandor Z. Der

1996-01-01

152

Cold vacuum drying proof of performance (first article testing) test results  

SciTech Connect

This report presents and details the test results of the first of a kind process referred to as Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD). The test results are compiled from several months of testing of the first process equipment skid and ancillary components to de-water and dry Multi-Canister Overpacks (MCO) filled with Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF). The tests results provide design verifications, equipment validations, model validation data, and establish process parameters.

MCCRACKEN, K.J.

1999-06-23

153

RTG performance on Galileo and Ulysses and Cassini test results  

SciTech Connect

Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Similar comparisons are made for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995. Also presented are test results from small scale thermoelectric modules and full scale converters performed for the Cassini program. The Cassini mission to Saturn is scheduled for an October 1997 launch. Small scale module test results on thermoelectric couples from the qualification and flight production runs are shown. These tests have exceeded 19,000 hours are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. Test results are presented for full scale units both ETGs (E-6, E-7) and RTGs (F-2, F-5) along with mission power predictions. F-5, fueled in 1985, served as a spare for the Galileo and Ulysses missions and plays the same role in the Cassini program. It has successfully completed all acceptance testing. The ten years storage between thermal vacuum tests is the longest ever experienced by an RTG. The data from this test are unique in providing the effects of long term low temperature storage on power output. All ETG and RTG test results to date indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of at least five percent are predicted. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Kelly, C.E.; Klee, P.M. [Lockheed Martin Corporation P.O. Box 8555, 29B41-KB, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania19101 (United States)

1997-01-01

154

RTG performance on Galileo and Ulysses and Cassini test results  

SciTech Connect

Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Similar comparisons are made for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995. Also presented are test results from small scale thermoelectric modules and full scale converters performed for the Cassini program. The Cassini mission to Saturn is scheduled for an October 1997 launch. Small scale module test results on thermoelectric couples from the qualification and flight production runs are shown. These tests have exceeded 19,000 hours are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. Test results are presented for full scale units both ETGs (E-6, E-7) and RTGs (F-2, F-5) along with mission power predictions. F-5, fueled in 1985, served as a spare for the Galileo and Ulysses missions and plays the same role in the Cassini program. It has successfully completed all acceptance testing. The ten years storage between thermal vacuum tests is the longest ever experienced by an RTG. The data from this test are unique in providing the effects of long term low temperature storage on power output. All ETG and RTG test results to date indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of at least five percent are predicted.

Kelly, C. Edward; Klee, Paul M. [Lockheed Martin Corporation P.O. Box 8555, 29B41-KB, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19101 (United States)

1997-01-10

155

EVALUATION OF THE EFFICIENCY OF INDUSTRIAL FLARES: TEST RESULTS  

EPA Science Inventory

The report gives results of Phases 3 and 4 of a four-phase research program to quantify emissions from, and efficiencies of, industrial flares. Phase 1 consisted of the experimental design; Phase 2, the design of the test facilities; Phase 3, development of the test facilities; a...

156

PROJECT PLUTO CONTROL SYSTEM DEVELOPMENTS AND TEST RESULTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tory Il-A, the first experimental reactor in the Pluto nuclear ramjet ; missile program, was successfully tested. The methods of control which are ; employed on Tory II-A are summarized and unclassified test results pertaining to ; the major control systems are presented. Recent control system developments for ; Tory II-C, a flight-type ramjet reactor, are also described. The Tory

R. E. Finnigan; G. G. Nelson

1961-01-01

157

Space Shuttle Main Engine instrumented High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump technology test bed testing results summary  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the test results from the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) instrumented High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (HPOTP). The turbopump was tested on Engine 3001, a highly instrumented engine, in an effort to characterize the turbopump and the engine system. Seven tests, for a total duration of 766 seconds, were performed over a five month time period. The testing

Mary E. Koelbl

1993-01-01

158

A Comparison Between The NORCAT Rover Test Results and the ISRU Excavation System Model Predictions Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An Excavation System Model has been written to simulate the collection and transportation of regolith on the moon. The calculations in this model include an estimation of the forces on the digging tool as a result of excavation into the regolith. Verification testing has been performed and the forces recorded from this testing were compared to the calculated theoretical data. The Northern Centre for Advanced Technology Inc. rovers were tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center Simulated Lunar Operations facility. This testing was in support of the In-Situ Resource Utilization program Innovative Partnership Program. Testing occurred in soils developed at the Glenn Research Center which are a mixture of different types of sands and whose soil properties have been well characterized. This testing is part of an ongoing correlation of actual field test data to the blade forces calculated by the Excavation System Model. The results from this series of tests compared reasonably with the predicted values from the code.

Gallo, Christopher A.; Agui, Juan H.; Creager, Colin M.; Oravec, Heather A.

2012-01-01

159

Multilevel Factor Analysis by Model Segregation: New Applications for Robust Test Statistics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Measures of classroom environments have become central to policy efforts that assess school and teacher quality. This has sparked a wide interest in using multilevel factor analysis to test measurement hypotheses about classroom-level variables. One approach partitions the total covariance matrix and tests models separately on the…

Schweig, Jonathan

2014-01-01

160

An Empirical Study of the Robustness of Windows NT Applications Using Random Testing  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report on the third in a series of studies on the reliability of application programs in the face of random input. In 1990 and 1995, we studied the reliability of UNIX application programs, both command line and X-Window based (GUI). In this study, we apply our testing techniques to applications running on the Windows NT operating system. Our testing

Justin E. Forrester; Barton P. Miller

2000-01-01

161

Myeloma Patient's Guide to Understanding Your Test Results  

MedlinePLUS

... test results. (continues on other side) n Serum Protein Electrophoresis (SPEP) Assesses the amount of abnormal (monoclonal) protein. n Urine Protein Electrophoresis (UPEP) Shows the amount of monoclonal protein ...

162

Test results on reuse of reclaimed shower water - A summary  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results are presented from tests to evaluate a microgravity whole body shower and waste water recovery system design for possible use on the Space Station. Several water recovery methods were tested, including phase change distillation, a thermoelectric hollow fiber membrane evaporation subsystem, and a reverse osmosis dynamic membrane system. Consideration is given to the test hardware, the types of soaps evaluated, the human response to showering with reclaimed water, chemical treatment for microbial control, the procedures for providing hygienic water, and the quality of water produced by the systems. All three of the waste water recovery systems tested successfully produced reclaimed water for reuse.

Verostko, Charles E.; Garcia, Rafael; Sauer, Richard; Reysa, Richard P.; Linton, Arthur T.

1989-01-01

163

Apollo experience report: Electronic systems test program accomplishments and results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A chronological record is presented of the Electronic Systems Test Program from its conception in May 1963 to December 1969. The original concept of the program, which was primarily a spacecraft/Manned Space Flight Network communications system compatibility and performance evaluation, is described. The evolution of these concepts to include various levels of test detail, as well as systems level design verification testing, is discussed. Actual implementation of these concepts is presented, and the facility to support the program is described. Test results are given, and significant contributions to the lunar landing mission are underlined. Plans for modifying the facility and the concepts, based on Apollo experience, are proposed.

Ohnesorge, T. E.

1972-01-01

164

Statistical analysis of Salmonella test data and comparison to results of animal cancer tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary A quantitative framework for the analysis of results of the Salmonella (Ames) test is presented, and the relationship between mutagenesis and carcinogenesis is examined. Color graphics are used for the Salmonella data to describe variability, and trends across multiple chemicals and test conditions. Positivity in the Salmonella test, using statistical criteria to classify results, is compared to positivity in

Joyce McCann; L SWIRSKYGOLD; Laura Horn; R. McGill; T. E. Graedel; John Kaldor

1988-01-01

165

Structural fatigue test results for large wind turbine blade sections  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In order to provide quantitative information on the operating life capabilities of wind turbine rotor blade concepts for root-end load transfer, a series of cantilever beam fatigue tests was conducted. Fatigue tests were conducted on a laminated wood blade with bonded steel studs, a low cost steel spar (utility pole) with a welded flange, a utility pole with additional root-end thickness provided by a swaged collar, fiberglass spars with both bonded and nonbonded fittings, and, finally, an aluminum blade with a bolted steel fitting (Lockheed Mod-0 blade). Photographs, data, and conclusions for each of these tests are presented. In addition, the aluminum blade test results are compared to field failure information; these results provide evidence that the cantilever beam type of fatigue test is a satisfactory method for obtaining qualitative data on blade life expectancy and for identifying structurally underdesigned areas (hot spots).

Faddoul, J. R.; Sullivan, T. L.

1982-01-01

166

Social context of disclosing HIV test results in Tanzania.  

PubMed

This study sought to understand how individuals reveal their HIV test results to others and the ways in which social relations affect the disclosure process. The data were collected through open-ended interviews administered in Swahili to informants who had just been tested for HIV and to those who were living with HIV in Dar es Salaam and Iringa regions. Analysis shows that social relations influence the decisions individuals make about disclosure. Most people preferred to reveal their HIV status to close family members. Most also mentioned the fear of being rejected and discriminated against as major reasons for not disclosing their test results to others. PMID:21936654

Lugalla, Joe; Yoder, Stanley; Sigalla, Huruma; Madihi, Charles

2012-01-01

167

Microgravity two-phase flow experiment and test results  

SciTech Connect

A two-phase flow system was tested in the NASA KC-135 reduced gravity test facility. Its innovative flow configuration results in an unusual ease of control and significantly reduced power and heat rejection requirements, while permitting flow regimes, pressure drops, and boiling and condensing heat transfer to be examined. Numerous design features were incorporated that minimize the impact of the KC-135 environment on system condition. Among other results, flight testing indicates no significant effect of gravity on pressure drop for the conditions examined, and that many conditions can be examined definitively only in the long-term reduced gravity afforded by a space experiment. 12 refs.

Hill, W.S.; Best, F.R. (Foster-Miller, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States) Texas A and M University, College Station (United States))

1991-07-01

168

Low Emissions RQL Flametube Combustor Component Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report describes and summarizes elements of the High Speed Research (HSR) Low Emissions Rich burn/Quick mix/Lean burn (RQL) flame tube combustor test program. This test program was performed at NASA Glenn Research Center circa 1992. The overall objective of this test program was to demonstrate and evaluate the capability of the RQL combustor concept for High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) applications with the goal of achieving NOx emission index levels of 5 g/kg-fuel at representative HSCT supersonic cruise conditions. The specific objectives of the tests reported herein were to investigate component performance of the RQL combustor concept for use in the evolution of ultra-low NOx combustor design tools. Test results indicated that the RQL combustor emissions and performance at simulated supersonic cruise conditions were predominantly sensitive to the quick mixer subcomponent performance and not sensitive to fuel injector performance. Test results also indicated the mixing section configuration employing a single row of circular holes was the lowest NOx mixer tested probably due to the initial fast mixing characteristics of this mixing section. However, other quick mix orifice configurations such as the slanted slot mixer produced substantially lower levels of carbon monoxide emissions most likely due to the enhanced circumferential dispersion of the air addition. Test results also suggested that an optimum momentum-flux ratio exists for a given quick mix configuration. This would cause undesirable jet under- or over-penetration for test conditions with momentum-flux ratios below or above the optimum value. Tests conducted to assess the effect of quick mix flow area indicated that reduction in the quick mix flow area produced lower NOx emissions at reduced residence time, but this had no effect on NOx emissions measured at similar residence time for the configurations tested.

Holdeman, James D.; Chang, Clarence T.

2001-01-01

169

Oscillating flow loss test results in Stirling engine heat exchangers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The results are presented for a test program designed to generate a database of oscillating flow loss information that is applicable to Stirling engine heat exchangers. The tests were performed on heater/cooler tubes of various lengths and entrance/exit configurations, on stacked and sintered screen regenerators of various wire diameters and on Brunswick and Metex random fiber regenerators. The test results were performed over a range of oscillating flow parameters consistent with Stirling engine heat exchanger experience. The tests were performed on the Sunpower oscillating flow loss rig which is based on a variable stroke and variable frequency linear drive motor. In general, the results are presented by comparing the measured oscillating flow losses to the calculated flow losses. The calculated losses are based on the cycle integration of steady flow friction factors and entrance/exit loss coefficients.

Koester, G.; Howell, S.; Wood, G.; Miller, E.; Gedeon, D.

1990-01-01

170

Update on results of SPRE testing at NASA Lewis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Space Power Research Engine (SPRE), a free-piston Stirling engine with a linear alternator, is being tested at NASA Lewis Research Center as part of the Civilian Space Technology Initiative (CSTI) as a candidate for high capacity space power. Results are presented from recent SPRE tests designed to investigate the effects of variation in the displacer seal clearance and piston centering port area on engine performance and dynamics. The effects of these variations on PV power and efficiency are presented. Comparisons of the displacer seal clearance test results with HFAST code predictions show good agreement for PV power but poor agreement for PV efficiency. Correlations are presented relating the piston mid-stroke position to the dynamic Delta P across the piston and the centering port area. Test results indicate that a modest improvement in PV power and efficiency may be realized with a reduction in piston centering port area.

Cairelli, James E.; Swec, Diane M.; Wong, Wayne A.; Doeberling, Thomas J.; Madi, Frank J.

171

Uprated OMS Engine Status-Sea Level Testing Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The current Space Shuttle Orbital Maneuvering Engine (OME) is pressure fed, utilizing storable propellants. Performance uprating of this engine, through the use of a gas generator driven turbopump to increase operating pressure, is being pursued by the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). Component level design, fabrication, and test activities for this engine system have been on-going since 1984. More recently, a complete engine designated the Integrated Component Test Bed (ICTB), was tested at sea level conditions by Aerojet. A description of the test hardware and results of the sea level test program are presented. These results, which include the test condition operating envelope and projected performance at altitude conditions, confirm the capability of the selected Uprated OME (UOME) configuration to meet or exceed performance and operational requirements. Engine flexibility, demonstrated through testing at two different operational mixture ratios, along with a summary of projected Space Shuttle performance enhancements using the UOME, are discussed. Planned future activities, including ICTB tests at simulated altitude conditions, and recommendations for further engine development, are also discussed.

Bertolino, J. D.; Boyd, W. C.

1990-01-01

172

Flight Test Results of a Thermoelectric Energy Harvester for Aircraft  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The idea of thermoelectric energy harvesting for low-power wireless sensor systems in aircraft and its practical implementation was recently published. The concept of using a thermoelectric generator (TEG) attached to the aircraft inner hull and a thermal storage device to create an artificial temperature gradient at the TEG during take-off and landing from the temperature changes of the fuselage has passed initial tests and is now subject to flight testing. This work presents preflight test results, e.g., vibration and temperature testing of the harvesters, the practical installation of two harvesting devices inside a test plane, and the first test flight results. Several flight cycles with different flight profiles, flight lengths, and outside temperatures have been performed. Although the influence of different flight profiles on the energy output of the harvester can be clearly observed, the results are in good agreement with expectations from numerical simulations with boundary conditions evaluated from initial climate chamber experiments. In addition, the flight test demonstrates that reliable operation of thermoelectric energy harvesting in harsh aircraft environments seems to be feasible, therefore paving the way for realization of energy-autonomous, wireless sensor networks.

Samson, D.; Kluge, M.; Fuss, T.; Schmid, U.; Becker, Th.

2012-06-01

173

A Robust Method of Measuring Other-Race and Other-Ethnicity Effects: The Cambridge Face Memory Test Format  

PubMed Central

Other-race and other-ethnicity effects on face memory have remained a topic of consistent research interest over several decades, across fields including face perception, social psychology, and forensic psychology (eyewitness testimony). Here we demonstrate that the Cambridge Face Memory Test format provides a robust method for measuring these effects. Testing the Cambridge Face Memory Test original version (CFMT-original; European-ancestry faces from Boston USA) and a new Cambridge Face Memory Test Chinese (CFMT-Chinese), with European and Asian observers, we report a race-of-face by race-of-observer interaction that was highly significant despite modest sample size and despite observers who had quite high exposure to the other race. We attribute this to high statistical power arising from the very high internal reliability of the tasks. This power also allows us to demonstrate a much smaller within-race other ethnicity effect, based on differences in European physiognomy between Boston faces/observers and Australian faces/observers (using the CFMT-Australian). PMID:23118912

McKone, Elinor; Stokes, Sacha; Liu, Jia; Cohan, Sarah; Fiorentini, Chiara; Pidcock, Madeleine; Yovel, Galit; Broughton, Mary; Pelleg, Michel

2012-01-01

174

Can in vitro mammalian cell genotoxicity test results be used to complement positive results in the Ames test and help predict carcinogenic or in vivo genotoxic activity? I. Reports of individual databases presented at an EURL ECVAM Workshop.  

PubMed

Positive results in the Ames test correlate well with carcinogenic potential in rodents. This correlation is not perfect because mutations are only one of many stages in tumour development. Also, situations can be envisaged where the mutagenic response may be specific to the bacteria or the test protocol, e.g., bacterial-specific metabolism, exceeding a detoxification threshold, or the induction of oxidative damage to which bacteria may be more sensitive than mammalian cells in vitro or tissues in vivo. Since most chemicals are also tested for genotoxicity in mammalian cells, the pattern of mammalian cell results may help identify whether Ames-positive results predict carcinogenic or in vivo mutagenic activity. A workshop was therefore organised and sponsored by the EU Reference Laboratory for Alternatives to Animal Testing (EURL ECVAM) to investigate this further. Participants presented results from other genotoxicity tests with Ames-positive compounds. Data came from published, regulatory agency, and industry sources. The question was posed whether negative results in mammalian cell tests were associated with absence of carcinogenic or in vivo genotoxic activity despite a positive Ames test. In the limited time available, the presented data were combined and an initial analysis suggested that the association of negative in vitro mammalian cell test results with lack of in vivo genotoxic or carcinogenic activity could have some significance. Possible reasons why a positive Ames test may not be associated with in vivo activity and what additional investigations/tests might contribute to a more robust evaluation were discussed. Because a considerable overlap was identified among the different databases presented, it was recommended that a consolidated database be built, with overlapping chemicals removed, so that a more robust analysis of the predictive capacity for potential carcinogenic and in vivo genotoxic activity could be derived from the patterns of mammalian cell test results obtained for Ames-positive compounds. PMID:25435356

Kirkland, David; Zeiger, Errol; Madia, Federica; Gooderham, Nigel; Kasper, Peter; Lynch, Anthony; Morita, Takeshi; Ouedraogo, Gladys; Parra Morte, Juan Manuel; Pfuhler, Stefan; Rogiers, Vera; Schulz, Markus; Thybaud, Veronique; van Benthem, Jan; Vanparys, Philippe; Worth, Andrew; Corvi, Raffaella

2014-12-01

175

Proposed Interventions to Decrease the Frequency of Missed Test Results  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Numerous studies have identified that delays in diagnosis related to the mishandling of abnormal test results are an import contributor to diagnostic errors. Factors contributing to missed results included organizational factors, provider factors and patient-related factors. At the diagnosis error conference continuing medical education conference…

Wahls, Terry L.; Cram, Peter

2009-01-01

176

Designs and test results for three new rotational sensors  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We discuss the designs and testing of three rotational seismometer prototypes developed at the Institute of Geophysics, Academy of Sciences (Prague, Czech Republic). Two of these designs consist of a liquid-filled toroidal tube with the liquid as the proof mass and providing damping; we tested the piezoelectric and pressure transduction versions of this torus. The third design is a wheel-shaped solid metal inertial sensor with capacitive sensing and magnetic damping. Our results from testing in Prague and at the Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory of the US Geological Survey of transfer function and cross-axis sensitivities are good enough to justify the refinement and subsequent testing of advanced prototypes. These refinements and new testing are well along.

Jedlicka, P.; Kozak, J.T.; Evans, J.R.; Hutt, C.R.

2012-01-01

177

Test results of the highly instrumented Space Shuttle Main Engine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Test results of a highly instrumented Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) are presented. The instrumented engine, when combined with instrumented high pressure turbopumps, contains over 750 special measurements, including flowrates, pressures, temperatures, and strains. To date, two different test series, accounting for a total of sixteen tests and 1,667 seconds, have been conducted with this engine. The first series, which utilized instrumented turbopumps, characterized the internal operating environment of the SSME for a variety of operating conditions. The second series provided system-level validation of a high pressure liquid oxygen turbopump that had been retrofitted with a fluid-film bearing in place of the usual pump-end ball bearings. Major findings from these two test series are highlighted in this paper. In addition, comparisons are made between model predictions and measured test data.

McConnaughey, H. V.; Leopard, J. L.; Lightfoot, R. M.

1992-07-01

178

NEXT Ion Engine 2000 Hour Wear Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The results of the NEXT 2000 h wear test are presented. This test was conducted with a 40 cm engineering model ion engine, designated EM1, at a 3.52 A beam current and 1800 V beam power supply voltage. Performance tests, which were conducted over a throttling range of 1.1 to 6.9 kW throughout the wear test, demonstrated that EM1 satisfied all thruster performance requirements. The ion engine accumulated 2038 h of operation at a thruster input power of 6.9 kW, processing 43 kg of xenon. Overall ion engine performance, which includes thrust, thruster input power, specific impulse, and thrust efficiency, was steady with no indications of performance degradation. The ion engine was also inspected following the test. This paper presents these findings.

Soulas, George C.; Kamhawi, Hani; Patterson, Michael J.; Britton, Melissa A.; Frandina, Michael M.

2004-01-01

179

COMPARISON OF RESPONSE OF 9977 TEST PACKAGES TO ANALYTICAL RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

Each of the hypothetical accident test cases for the 9977 prototypes was included in the battery of finite element structural analyses performed for the package. Comparison of the experimental and analytical results provides a means of confirming that the analytical model correctly represents the physical behavior of the package. The ability of the analytical model to correctly predict the performance of the foam overpack material for the crush test is of particular interest. The dissipation of energy in the crushing process determines the deceleration of the package upon impact and the duration of the impact. In addition, if the analytical model correctly models the foam behavior, the predicted deformation of the package will match that measured on the test articles. This study compares the deformations of the test packages with the analytical predictions. In addition, the impact acceleration and impact duration for the test articles are compared with those predicted by the analyses.

Smith, A; Tsu-Te Wu, T

2007-12-05

180

Preliminary results of the partial array LCT coil tests  

SciTech Connect

The Large Coil Task (LCT) is a collaboration between the US, Euratom, Japan, and Switzerland for the production and testing of 2.5 x 3.5-m bore, superconducting 8-T magnets. The definitive tests in the design configuration, the six coils arrayed in a compact torus, will begin in 1985. Partial-array tests are being done in 1984. In January the initial cooldown of two coils was aborted because of helium-to-vacuum leaks that developed in certain seal welds when the coil temperatures were 170 to 180 K. In July three adjacent coils (designated JA, GD, CH) were cooled and in August two were energized to the limits of the test facility. An overview of the results are presented, including facility, cooldown (warmup has not yet begun), energization, dump, recovery from intentional normal zones, strain, and displacement, for operation up to 100% of design current but below full field and stress. These initial results are highly encouraging.

Luton, J.N.; Cogswell, F.D.; Dresner, L.; Friesinger, G.M.; Gray, W.H.; Iwasa, Y.; Koizumi, K.; Lubell, M.S.; Lue, J.W.; Nishi, M.F.

1984-09-10

181

Data-Division-Specific Robustness and Power of Randomization Tests for ABAB Designs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study deals with the statistical properties of a randomization test applied to an ABAB design in cases where the desirable random assignment of the points of change in phase is not possible. To obtain information about each possible data division, the authors carried out a conditional Monte Carlo simulation with 100,000 samples for each…

Manolov, Rumen; Solanas, Antonio; Bulte, Isis; Onghena, Patrick

2010-01-01

182

A Robust Strategy for Total Ionizing Dose Testing of Field Programmable Gate Arrays  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We present a novel method of FPGA TID testing that measures propagation delay between flip-flops operating at maximum speed. Measurement is performed on-chip at-speed and provides a key design metric when building system-critical synchronous designs.

Wilcox, Edward; Berg, Melanie; Friendlich, Mark; Lakeman, Joseph; KIm, Hak; Pellish, Jonathan; LaBel, Kenneth

2012-01-01

183

Power and Robustness of Linkage Tests for Quantitative Traits in General Pedigrees  

E-print Network

tests satisfy all of the other qualities of an ideal quantitative trait linkage analysis method. Genet). Others are gen- erally viewed as dichotomous (e.g., diabetes) but are closely associated). A statistically signifi- cant negative slope in the regression indicates linkage to a quantitative trait locus

Broman, Karl W.

184

Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Pogo testing and results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

To effectively assess the Pogo stability of the space shuttle vehicle, it was necessary to characterize the structural, propellant, and propulsion dynamics subsystems. Extensive analyses and comprehensive testing programs were established early in the project as an implementation of management philosophy of Pogo prevention for space shuttle. The role of the space shuttle main engine (SSMF) in the Pogo prevention plans, the results obtained from engine ground testing with analysis, and measured data from STS-1 flight are discussed.

Fenwick, J. R.; Jones, J. H.; Jewell, R. E.

1982-01-01

185

Global Astrophysical Telescope System -- test results from telescope nr 2  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present first results of observational examination of our new 0.7m spectroscopic telescope before and after its transportation to Winer Observatory in Arizona, USA. Spectrograph stability tests show that we should be able to achieve a precision of 20 m/s. Photometric tests using our diffraction technique, dedicated for very bright stars, prove that a precision of at least 0.005 mag is achievable.

Kami?ski, Krzysztof; Dimitrow, Wojciech; Fagas, Monika; Poli?ska, Magdalena

2014-12-01

186

Reducing variability in inclined-plane tracking test results  

Microsoft Academic Search

Factors which cause variability in the results of inclined-plane tracking tests have been investigated. The effects of introducing shunt or stray capacitance across the test specimen, or of varying the contaminant flow rate, are measured. The discharge energy to the time of observation of initial damage shows less variability than the time-to-track criterion, and may be a more appropriate criterion

A. S. G. Alghamdi; D. W. Auckland; A. J. Risino; B. R. Varlow

1996-01-01

187

SP100 Fuel Pin Performance: Results from Irradiation Testing  

Microsoft Academic Search

A total of 86 experimental fuel pins with various fuel, liner, and cladding candidate materials have been irradiated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) and the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) reactor as part of the SP-100 fuel pin irradiation testing program. Postirradiation examination results from these fuel pins are key in establishing performance correlations and demonstrating the lifetime and

Bruce J. Makenas; Dean M. Paxton; Swaminathan Vaidyanathan; Martin Marietta; Carl W. Hoth

1994-01-01

188

Test results of Ya-21u thermionic space power system  

SciTech Connect

The Soviet-made TOPAZ-II space nuclear power system unit designated Ya-21u underwent a total of 15 tests both in the Union of Soviet Socialist Republic (USSR) (1989--1990) and in the US (August 1993 to March 1995) for a cumulative test/operation time of 7681 h at conditions far exceeding design limits. These tests included steady-state operation at different power levels, fast start-ups and power optimizations, and shock and vibration tests. Test results are presented and analyzed. Results indicate a gradual change in the performance parameters such as the optimum cesium pressure and optimum load voltage. The electric power and conversion efficiency of the unit at an input thermal power of 105 kW decreased from 3.7 kW (electric) and 4% in the test in the USSR to 2.13 kW (electric) and 2.3% in the last test in the US. A discussion and qualitative assessment of potential causes of the performance changes of the Ya-21u unit are given.

Paramonov, D.V.; El-Genk, M.S. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-01-01

189

DSN advanced receiver: Breadboard description and test results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A breadboard Advanced Receiver for use in the Deep Space Network was designed, built, and tested in the laboratory. Field testing was also performed during Voyager Uranus encounter at DSS-13. The development of the breadboard is intended to lead towards implementation of the new receiver throughout the network. The receiver is described on a functional level and then in terms of more specific hardware and software architecture. The results of performance tests in the laboratory and in the field are given. Finally, there is a discussion of suggested improvements for the next phase of development.

Brown, D. H.; Hurd, W. J.

1987-01-01

190

Wellbore inertial navigation system (WINS) software development and test results  

SciTech Connect

The structure and operation of the real-time software developed for the Wellbore Inertial Navigation System (WINS) application are described. The procedure and results of a field test held in a 7000-ft well in the Nevada Test Site are discussed. Calibration and instrumentation error compensation are outlined, as are design improvement areas requiring further test and development. Notes on Kalman filtering and complete program listings of the real-time software are included in the Appendices. Reference is made to a companion document which describes the downhole instrumentation package.

Wardlaw, R. Jr.

1982-09-01

191

Argon Spill Duct Bellows Leak Test Procedures and Results  

SciTech Connect

This engineering note describes the testing of the argoll spill duct bellows. It includes a detailed explanation of the procedures, along with a summary of the results of the testing done on 2/18/91 and 2/19/91 by Gary Trotter. The original bellows were purchased from Expansion Joint Systems (see Appendix 2). The general conclusion from the testing was that the leaks that were found were small enough so that they would not show up at the design pressure of 0.1 psig. Therefore, the leaks were acceptable, and the conclusion was that the bellows were fit for use.

Trotter, G.R.; Wu, J.; /Fermilab

1991-03-11

192

Advanced Stirling Convertor Durability Testing: Plans and Interim Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Lockheed Martin Corporation (LM), and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) have been developing the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) for use as a power system for space science missions. In support of this program, NASA?s Glenn Research Center (GRC) has been involved in testing Stirling convertors, including the Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC), for use in the ASRG. This testing includes electromagnetic interference/compatibility (EMI/EMC), structural dynamics, advanced materials, organics, and unattended extended operation. The purpose of the durability tests is to experimentally demonstrate the margins in the ASC design. Due to the high value of the hardware, previous ASC tests focused on establishing baseline performance of the convertors within the nominal operating conditions. The durability tests present the first planned extension of the operating conditions into regions beyond those intended to meet the product spec, where the possibility exists of lateral contact, overstroke, or over-temperature events. These tests are not intended to cause damage that would shorten the life of the convertors, so they can transition into extended operation at the conclusion of the tests. This paper describes the four tests included in the durability test sequence: 1) start/stop cycling, 2) exposure to constant acceleration in the lateral and axial directions, 3) random vibration at increased piston amplitude to induce contact events, and 4) overstroke testing to simulate potential failures during processing or during the mission life where contact events could occur. The paper also summarizes the analysis and simulation used to predict the results of each of these tests.

Meer, Dave; Oriti, Sal

2012-01-01

193

ART-XC/SRG: results of thermo-vacuum tests  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

ART-XC - a medium-x-ray-energy survey instrument for SRG project is being developed in Russia. Space Research institute (IKI) and Federal Nuclear Center (VNIIEF) has developed and tested the STM (Structural and Thermal Model) of ART-XC/SRG Instrument. The STM was tested in a 40 m3 vacuum chamber, equipped with black cryogenic screens, cooled by liquid nitrogen. During the tests various thermal telescope modes were simulated. In particular we have simulated emergency mode, when mirrors heaters were switched-off. During the tests temperature of instrument's structure was controlled by 64 independent sensors. Stability of optical axis of mirror systems was also measured. STM test has shown that temperature of mirror system was lower than required, temperature of detectors met the requirements. The test also confirmed geometrical stability of the carbon fiber housing despite of significant temperature gradients. Additional experiments with two mirror systems, each containing a full set of simple nickel shells, were performed. In these experiments we have measured longitudinal and transverse temperature gradients of mirror systems. Next thermovacuum tests of the qualification model of the ART-XC instrument are being prepared. Results of STM tests are presented in this paper.

Semena, N.; Pavlinsky, M.; Buntov, M.; Serbinov, D.; Gurova, E.; Tambov, V.; Roiz, I.; Garin, M.; Lazarchuk, V.; Zaytcev, A.; Martunov, V.; Shabarchin, A.; Sokolov, A.

2014-07-01

194

Thermal Analysis of Low Layer Density Multilayer Insulation Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Investigation of the thermal performance of low layer density multilayer insulations is important for designing long-duration space exploration missions involving the storage of cryogenic propellants. Theoretical calculations show an analytical optimal layer density, as widely reported in the literature. However, the appropriate test data by which to evaluate these calculations have been only recently obtained. As part of a recent research project, NASA procured several multilayer insulation test coupons for calorimeter testing. These coupons were configured to allow for the layer density to be varied from 0.5 to 2.6 layer/mm. The coupon testing was completed using the cylindrical Cryostat-l00 apparatus by the Cryogenics Test Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center. The results show the properties of the insulation as a function of layer density for multiple points. Overlaying these new results with data from the literature reveals a minimum layer density; however, the value is higher than predicted. Additionally, the data show that the transition region between high vacuum and no vacuum is dependent on the spacing of the reflective layers. Historically this spacing has not been taken into account as thermal performance was calculated as a function of pressure and temperature only; however the recent testing shows that the data is dependent on the Knudsen number which takes into account pressure, temperature, and layer spacing. These results aid in the understanding of the performance parameters of MLI and help to complete the body of literature on the topic.

Johnson, Wesley L.

2011-01-01

195

Salmonella mutagenicity tests. IV. Results from the testing of 300 chemicals  

SciTech Connect

Three hundred chemicals were tested for mutagenicity, under code, in Salmonella typhimurium, using a preincubation protocol. All tests were performed in the absence of exogenous metabolic activation, and in the presence of liver S-9 from Aroclor-induced male Sprague-Dawley rats and Syrian hamsters. The results and data from these tests are presented.

Zeiger, E.; Anderson, B.; Haworth, S.; Lawlor, T.; Mortelmans, K.

1988-01-01

196

Midtemperature Solar Systems Test Facility (MSSTF) project test results: Phase 4A MSSTF system operation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results of testing the Department of Energy's Midtemperature Solar Systems Test Facility (MSSTF) at Sandia Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico are summarized. The system is a dispersed power system that collects solar energy and supplies both the electrical and thermal energy demands of a representative load. Testing was done between July 1976 and March 1978. The Phase IVA MSSTF studied

T. D. Harrison; W. H. McCulloch

1978-01-01

197

NASA Fastrac Engine Gas Generator Component Test Program and Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Low cost access to space has been a long-time goal of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The Fastrac engine program was begun at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to develop a 60,000-pound (60K) thrust, liquid oxygen/hydrocarbon (LOX/RP), gas generator-cycle booster engine for a fraction of the cost of similar engines in existence. To achieve this goal, off-the-shelf components and readily available materials and processes would have to be used. This paper will present the Fastrac gas generator (GG) design and the component level hot-fire test program and results. The Fastrac GG is a simple, 4-piece design that uses well-defined materials and processes for fabrication. Thirty-seven component level hot-fire tests were conducted at MSFC's component test stand #116 (TS116) during 1997 and 1998. The GG was operated at all expected operating ranges of the Fastrac engine. Some minor design changes were required to successfully complete the test program as development issues arose during the testing. The test program data results and conclusions determined that the Fastrac GG design was well on the way to meeting the requirements of NASA's X-34 Pathfinder Program that chose the Fastrac engine as its main propulsion system.

Dennis, Henry J., Jr.; Sanders, T.

2000-01-01

198

Virtex-II Pro SEE Test Methods and Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objective of this coarse Single Event Effect (SEE) test is to determine the suitability of the commercial Virtex-II Pro family for use in spaceflight applications. To this end, this test is primarily intended to determine any Singe Event Latchup (SEL) susceptibilities for these devices. Secondly, this test is intended to measure the level of Single Event Upset (SEU) susceptibilities and in a general sense where they occur. The coarse SEE test was performed on a commercial XC2VP7 device, a relatively small single processor version of the Virtex-II Pro. As the XC2VP7 shares the same functional block design and fabrication process with the larger Virtex-II Pro devices, the results of this test should also be applicable to the larger devices. The XC2VP7 device was tested on a commercial Virtex-II Pro development board. The testing was performed at the Cyclotron laboratories at Texas A&M and Michigan State Universities using ions of varying energy levels and fluences.

Petrick, David; Powell, Wesley; Howard, James W., Jr.; LaBel, Kenneth A.

2004-01-01

199

Large coil task and results of testing US coils  

SciTech Connect

The United States, EURATOM, Japan, and Switzerland have collaborated since 1978 in development of superconducting toroidal field coils for fusion reactor applications. The United States provided a test facility nd three coils; the other participants, one coil each. All coils have the same interface dimensions and performance requirements (stable at 8 T), but internal design was decided by each team. Two US coil teams chose bath-cooled NbTi, 10-kA conductors. One developed a Nb/sub 3/Sn conductor, cooled by internal flow, rated at 18 kA. All US coils have diagnostic instrumentation and imbedded heaters that enable stability tests and simulated nuclear heating experiments. In single-coil tests, each coil operated at full current in self-field (6.4 T). In six-coil tests that began in July 1986, one US coil and the Japanese coil hve been successfully operated at full current at 8 T. The other coils have operated as background coils while awaiting their turn as test coil. Coil tests have been informative and results gratifying. The facility has capably supported coil testing and its operation has provided information that will be useful in designing future fusion systems. Coil capabilities beyond nominal design points will be determined.

Haubenreich, P.N.

1986-01-01

200

The advanced receiver 2: Telemetry test results in CTA 21  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Telemetry tests with the Advanced Receiver II (ARX II) in Compatibility Test Area 21 are described. The ARX II was operated in parallel with a Block-III Receiver/baseband processor assembly combination (BLK-III/BPA) and a Block III Receiver/subcarrier demodulation assembly/symbol synchronization assembly combination (BLK-III/SDA/SSA). The telemetry simulator assembly provided the test signal for all three configurations, and the symbol signal to noise ratio as well as the symbol error rates were measured and compared. Furthermore, bit error rates were also measured by the system performance test computer for all three systems. Results indicate that the ARX-II telemetry performance is comparable and sometimes superior to the BLK-III/BPA and BLK-III/SDA/SSA combinations.

Hinedi, S.; Bevan, R.; Marina, M.

1991-01-01

201

CSI computer system/remote interface unit acceptance test results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The validation tests conducted on the Control/Structures Interaction (CSI) Computer System (CCS)/Remote Interface Unit (RIU) is discussed. The CCS/RIU consists of a commercially available, Langley Research Center (LaRC) programmed, space flight qualified computer and a flight data acquisition and filtering computer, developed at LaRC. The tests were performed in the Space Structures Research Laboratory (SSRL) and included open loop excitation, closed loop control, safing, RIU digital filtering, and RIU stand alone testing with the CSI Evolutionary Model (CEM) Phase-0 testbed. The test results indicated that the CCS/RIU system is comparable to ground based systems in performing real-time control-structure experiments.

Sparks, Dean W., Jr.

1992-01-01

202

SMS messages increase adherence to rapid diagnostic test results among malaria patients: results from a pilot study in Nigeria  

PubMed Central

Background The World Health Organization now recommends parasitological confirmation for malaria case management. Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for malaria are an accurate and simple diagnostic to confirm parasite presence in blood. However, where they have been deployed, adherence to RDT results has been poor, especially when the test result is negative. Few studies have examined adherence to RDTs distributed or purchased through the private sector. Methods The Rapid Examination of Malaria and Evaluation of Diagnostic Information (REMEDI) study assessed the acceptability of and adherence to RDT results for patients seeking care from private sector drug retailers in two cities in Oyo State in south-west Nigeria. In total, 465 adult participants were enrolled upon exit from a participating drug shop having purchased anti-malaria drugs for themselves. Participants were given a free RDT and the appropriate treatment advice based on their RDT result. Short Message Service (SMS) text messages reiterating the treatment advice were sent to a randomly selected half of the participants one day after being tested. Participants were contacted via phone four days after the RDT was conducted to assess adherence to the RDT information and treatment advice. Results Adherence to RDT results was 14.3 percentage points (P-val <0.001) higher in the treatment group who were sent the SMS. The higher adherence in the treatment group was robust to several specification tests and the estimated difference in adherence ranged from 9.7 to 16.1 percentage points. Further, the higher adherence to the treatment advice was specific to the treatment advice for anti-malarial drugs and not other drugs purchased to treat malaria symptoms in the RDT-negative participants who bought both anti-malarial and symptom drugs. There was no difference in adherence for the RDT-positive participants who were sent the SMS. Conclusions SMS text messages substantially increased adherence to RDT results for patients seeking care for malaria from privately owned drug retailers in Nigeria and may be a simple and cost-effective means for boosting adherence to RDT results if and when RDTs are introduced as a commercial retail product. PMID:24564925

2014-01-01

203

Suit Port Aft Bulkhead Mockup 2008 Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Lunar Electric Rover (LER), formerly called the Small Pressurized Rover (SPR), is currently being carried as an integral part of the current Lunar Surface Architectures under consideration in the Constellation program. One element of the LER is the suit port, the means by which the crew performs Extravehicular Activities (EVAs). Two suit port deliverables were produced in fiscal year 2008: an aft bulkhead mockup for functional integrated testing with the 1-G LER mockup and a functional and pressurizable Engineering Unit (EU). This paper focuses on the aft bulkhead mockup test results from Desert Research and Technology Studies (D-RATS) October 2008 testing at Black Point Lava Flow (BPLF), Arizona. Refer to 39th International Conference on Environmental Systems (ICES) for test results of the EU. The suit port aft bulkhead mockup was integrated with the mockup of the LER cabin and chassis. It is located on the aft bulkhead of the LER cabin structure and includes hatches, a locking mechanism, seals, interior and exterior suit don/doff aids, and exterior platforms to accommodate different crewmember heights. A lightweight mockup of the Mark III suit was tested with the suit port aft bulkhead mockup. There are several limitations to the suit port and mockup suits, and results of the suit port evaluation are presented and interpreted within the context of the limitations.

Romig, Barbara A.; Allton, Charles S.; Litaker, Harry L.

2009-01-01

204

Robust tracking control of a magnetically suspended rigid body  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This study is an application of H-infinity and micro-synthesis for designing robust tracking controllers for the Large Angle Magnetic Suspension Test Facility. The modeling, design, analysis, simulation, and testing of a control law that guarantees tracking performance under external disturbances and model uncertainties is investigated. The type of uncertainties considered and the tracking performance metric used is discussed. This study demonstrates the tradeoff between tracking performance at low frequencies and robustness at high frequencies. Two sets of controllers were designed and tested. The first set emphasized performance over robustness, while the second set traded off performance for robustness. Comparisons of simulation and test results are also included. Current simulation and experimental results indicate that reasonably good robust tracking performance can be attained for this system using multivariable robust control approach.

Lim, Kyong B.; Cox, David E.

1994-01-01

205

Robust Diagnostic Genetic Testing Using Solution Capture Enrichment and a Novel Variant-Filtering Interface  

PubMed Central

Targeted hybridization enrichment prior to next-generation sequencing is a widespread method for characterizing sequence variation in a research setting, and is being adopted by diagnostic laboratories. However, the number of variants identified can overwhelm clinical laboratories with strict time constraints, the final interpretation of likely pathogenicity being a particular bottleneck. To address this, we have developed an approach in which, after automatic variant calling on a standard unix pipeline, subsequent variant filtering is performed interactively, using AgileExomeFilter and AgilePindelFilter (http://dna.leeds.ac.uk/agile), tools designed for clinical scientists with standard desktop computers. To demonstrate the method's diagnostic efficacy, we tested 128 patients using (1) a targeted capture of 36 cancer-predisposing genes or (2) whole-exome capture for diagnosis of the genetically heterogeneous disorder primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). In the cancer cohort, complete concordance with previous diagnostic data was achieved across 793 variant genotypes. A high yield (42%) was also achieved for exome-based PCD diagnosis, underscoring the scalability of our method. Simple adjustments to the variant filtering parameters further allowed the identification of a homozygous truncating mutation in a presumptive new PCD gene, DNAH8. These tools should allow diagnostic laboratories to expand their testing portfolios flexibly, using a standard set of reagents and techniques. PMID:24307375

Watson, Christopher M; Crinnion, Laura A; Morgan, Joanne E; Harrison, Sally M; Diggle, Christine P; Adlard, Julian; Lindsay, Helen A; Camm, Nick; Charlton, Ruth; Sheridan, Eamonn; Bonthron, David T; Taylor, Graham R; Carr, Ian M

2014-01-01

206

Robust diagnostic genetic testing using solution capture enrichment and a novel variant-filtering interface.  

PubMed

Targeted hybridization enrichment prior to next-generation sequencing is a widespread method for characterizing sequence variation in a research setting, and is being adopted by diagnostic laboratories. However, the number of variants identified can overwhelm clinical laboratories with strict time constraints, the final interpretation of likely pathogenicity being a particular bottleneck. To address this, we have developed an approach in which, after automatic variant calling on a standard unix pipeline, subsequent variant filtering is performed interactively, using AgileExomeFilter and AgilePindelFilter (http://dna.leeds.ac.uk/agile), tools designed for clinical scientists with standard desktop computers. To demonstrate the method's diagnostic efficacy, we tested 128 patients using (1) a targeted capture of 36 cancer-predisposing genes or (2) whole-exome capture for diagnosis of the genetically heterogeneous disorder primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). In the cancer cohort, complete concordance with previous diagnostic data was achieved across 793 variant genotypes. A high yield (42%) was also achieved for exome-based PCD diagnosis, underscoring the scalability of our method. Simple adjustments to the variant filtering parameters further allowed the identification of a homozygous truncating mutation in a presumptive new PCD gene, DNAH8. These tools should allow diagnostic laboratories to expand their testing portfolios flexibly, using a standard set of reagents and techniques. PMID:24307375

Watson, Christopher M; Crinnion, Laura A; Morgan, Joanne E; Harrison, Sally M; Diggle, Christine P; Adlard, Julian; Lindsay, Helen A; Camm, Nick; Charlton, Ruth; Sheridan, Eamonn; Bonthron, David T; Taylor, Graham R; Carr, Ian M

2014-04-01

207

Model NbTi Helical Solenoid Fabrication and Test Results  

SciTech Connect

A program to develop model magnets for a helical cooling channel is under way at Fermilab. In the first steps of a planned sequence of magnets, two four-coil helical solenoid models with 300 mm aperture have been fabricated and tested. These two models, HSM01 and HSM02, used insulated NbTi Rutherford cable wound onto stainless steel rings with spliceless transitions between coils. Strip heaters were included for quench protection of each coil, and the coils were epoxy-impregnated after winding inside the support structures. Based on the results of the first model the second model was made using a cable with optimized cross-section, improved winding and epoxy-impregnation procedures, enhanced ground insulation, and included heat exchange tubing for a test of conduction cooling. We report on the results and lessons learned from fabrication and tests of these two models.

Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Chlachidze, G.; Evbota, D.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lamm, M.J.; Makarov, A.; Novitski, I.; Orris, D.F.; Tartaglia, M.A.; /Fermilab

2011-09-01

208

GICHD mine dog testing project : soil sample results #5.  

SciTech Connect

A mine dog evaluation project initiated by the Geneva International Center for Humanitarian Demining is evaluating the capability and reliability of mine detection dogs. The performance of field-operational mine detection dogs will be measured in test minefields in Afghanistan containing actual, but unfused landmines. Repeated performance testing over two years through various seasonal weather conditions will provide data simulating near real world conditions. Soil samples will be obtained adjacent to the buried targets repeatedly over the course of the test. Chemical analysis results from these soil samples will be used to evaluate correlations between mine dog detection performance and seasonal weather conditions. This report documents the analytical chemical methods and results from the fifth batch of soils received. This batch contained samples from Kharga, Afghanistan collected in June 2003.

Barnett, James L.; Phelan, James M.; Archuleta, Luisa M.; Donovan, Kelly L.; Bender, Susan Fae Ann

2004-01-01

209

GICHD mine dog testing project - soil sample results #4.  

SciTech Connect

A mine dog evaluation project initiated by the Geneva International Center for Humanitarian Demining is evaluating the capability and reliability of mine detection dogs. The performance of field-operational mine detection dogs will be measured in test minefields in Afghanistan and Bosnia containing actual, but unfused landmines. Repeated performance testing over two years through various seasonal weather conditions will provide data simulating near real world conditions. Soil samples will be obtained adjacent to the buried targets repeatedly over the course of the test. Chemical analysis results from these soil samples will be used to evaluate correlations between mine dog detection performance and seasonal weather conditions. This report documents the analytical chemical methods and results from the fourth batch of soils received. This batch contained samples from Kharga, Afghanistan collected in April 2003 and Sarajevo, Bosnia collected in May 2003.

Barnett, James L.; Phelan, James M.; Archuleta, Luisa M.; Wood, Tyson B.; Donovan, Kelly L.; Bender, Susan Fae Ann

2003-08-01

210

GICHD Mine Dog Testing Project - Soil Sample Results No.3  

SciTech Connect

A mine dog evaluation project initiated by the Geneva International Center for Humanitarian Demining is evaluating the capability and reliability of mine detection dogs. The performance of field-operational mine detection dogs will be measured in test minefields in Afghanistan and Bosnia containing actual, but unfused landmines. Repeated performance testing over two years through various seasonal weather conditions will provide data simulating near real world conditions. Soil samples will be obtained adjacent to the buried targets repeatedly over the course of the test. Chemical analysis results from these soil samples will be used to evaluate correlations between mine dog detection performance and seasonal weather conditions. This report documents the analytical chemical methods and results from the third batch of soils received. This batch contained samples from Kharga, Afghanistan collected in October 2002.

PHELAN, JAMES M.; BARNETT, JAMES L.; BENDER, SUSAN FAE ANN; ARCHULETA, LUISA M.

2003-03-01

211

An effect of base hole size on dynamic test results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents the dynamic test results of a flat-base sharp cone model hole diameters. The test Mach number is M = 5.047; cone semiangle is 10 deg; and the free-flow Reynolds number based on the model length is (2.2-13.3) x 10 to the 6th. The results show that the effect of the base hole diameter on test data really exists. In general, when the boundary-layer transition occurs on the aft surface of the model, the effect is obvious; with increasing hole diameter the static stability decreases and the dynamic stability increases. When the transition moves forward, the effect becomes unimportant. The mechanism of the effect is discussed briefly.

Lou, H.

1986-06-01

212

Understanding Your Soil Test Results Education Center and Info Line  

E-print Network

. Glossary ofTerms on the Report Form pH - Indicates whether the soil is acid or alkaline. 7.0 is a neutral level; less than 7.0 is acidic and greater than 7.0 is alkaline. Although NH soils are naturally veryUnderstanding Your Soil Test Results Education Center and Info Line practical solutions to everyday

New Hampshire, University of

213

SSPS results of test and operation, 1981-1984  

SciTech Connect

The results of three years of testing and operation of the two dissimilar solar thermal power plants of the SSPS project are summarized. The project includes: (1) a Distributed Collector System, and (2) a Central Receiver System. Environmental conditions are presented and an economical assessment of the project is provided. (BCS)

none,

1985-05-01

214

Early results of gate valve flow interruption blowdown tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

The preliminary results of the USNRC\\/INEL high-energy BWR line break flow interruption testing are presented. Two representative nuclear valve assemblies were cycled under design basis Reactor Water Cleanup pipe break conditions to provide input for the technical basis for resolving the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Generic Issue 87. The effects of the blowdown hydraulic loadings on valve operability, especially valve closure

DeWall

1988-01-01

215

First Test Results of the New LANSCE Wire Scanner  

SciTech Connect

The Beam Diagnostics and Instrumentation Team (BDIT) at Los Alamos National Laboratory's LANSCE facility is presently developing a new and improved wire scanner diagnostics system controlled by National Instrument's cRIO platform. This paper describes the current state of development of the control system along with the results gathered from the latest actuator motion performance and accelerator-beam data acquisition tests.

Sedillo, James Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01

216

ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker test-beam results  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several prototypes of the Transition Radiation Tracker for the ATLAS experiment at the LHC have been built and tested at the CERN SPS accelerator. Results from detailed studies of the straw-tube hit registration efficiency and drift-time measurements and of the pion and electron spectra without and with radiators are presented.

T. Akesson; E. Arik; K. Baker; S. Baron; D. Benjamin; H. Bertelsen; V. Bondarenko; V. Bytchkov; J. Callahan; M. Capeans; L. Cardiel-Sas; A. Catinaccio; S. A. Cetin; P. Cwetanski; M. Dam; H. Danielsson; F. Dittus; B. Dolgoshein; N. Dressnandt; C. Driouichi; W. L. Ebenstein; P. Eerola; P. Farthouat; O. Fedin; D. Froidevaux; P. Gagnon; Y. Grichkevitch; N. Grigalashvili; Z. Hajduk; P. Hansen; F. Kayumov; P. T. Keener; G. Kekelidze; A. Khristatchev; S. Konovalov; L. Koudine; S. Kovalenko; T. Kowalski; V. A. Kramarenko; K. Kruger; A. Laritchev; P. Lichard; F. Luehring; B. Lundberg; V. Maleev; I. Markina; K. McFarlane; V. Mialkovski; V. A. Mitsou; B. Mindur; S. Morozov; A. Munar; S. Muraviev; A. Nadtochy; F. M. Newcomer; H. Ogren; S. H. Oh; S. Oleshko; J. Olszowska; S. Passmore; S. Patritchev; V. Peshekhonov; R. Petti; M. Price; C. Rembser; O. Rohne; A. Romaniouk; D. R. Rust; Yu. Ryabov; V. Schegelsky; D. Seliverstov; T. Shin; A. Shmeleva; S. Smirnov; V. Sosnovtsev; V. Soutchkov; E. Spiridenkov; V. Tikhomirov; R. Van Berg; V. Vassilakopoulos; L. Vassilieva; C. Wang; H. H. Williams; A. Zalite

2004-01-01

217

RESEARCH RESULTS OF LARGE-SCALE EMBANKMENT OVERTOPPING BREACH TESTS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Dam and embankment breaching from overtopping is important to both engineers and planners. The processes observed during overtopping and breach tests conducted on large-scale models as well as preliminary analysis of the results are described in this paper. Three large-scale embankments, two at 2....

218

Comparison of road load simulator test results with track tests on electric vehicle propulsion system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A special-purpose dynamometer, the road load simulator (RLS), is being used at NASA's Lewis Research Center to test and evaluate electric vehicle propulsion systems developed under DOE's Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program. To improve correlation between system tests on the RLS and track tests, similar tests were conducted on the same propulsion system on the RLS and on a test track. These tests are compared in this report. Battery current to maintain a constant vehicle speed with a fixed throttle was used for the comparison. Scatter in the data was greater in the track test results. This is attributable to variations in tire rolling resistance and wind effects in the track data. It also appeared that the RLS road load, determined by coastdown tests on the track, was lower than that of the vehicle on the track. These differences may be due to differences in tire temperature.

Dustin, M. O.

1983-01-01

219

Large-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results  

SciTech Connect

One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty due to extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high-pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are scarce. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine aerosol release fractions and generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and rectangular slots. The round holes ranged in size from 0.2 to 4.46 mm. The slots ranged from (width × length) 0.3 × 5 to 2.74 × 76.2 mm. Most slots were oriented longitudinally along the pipe, but some were oriented circumferentially. In addition, a limited number of multi-hole test pieces were tested in an attempt to assess the impact of a more complex breach. Much of the testing was conducted at pressures of 200 and 380 psi, but some tests were conducted at 100 psi. Testing the largest postulated breaches was deemed impractical because of the large size of some of the WTP equipment. The purpose of this report is to present the experimental results and analyses for the aerosol measurements obtained in the large-scale test stand. The report includes a description of the simulants used and their properties, equipment and operations, data analysis methodology, and test results. The results of tests investigating the role of slurry particles in plugging of small breaches are reported in Mahoney et al. 2012a. The results of the aerosol measurements in the small-scale test stand are reported in Mahoney et al. (2012b).

Schonewill, Philip P.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Daniel, Richard C.; Kurath, Dean E.; Adkins, Harold E.; Billing, Justin M.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Davis, James M.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Fischer, Christopher M.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Lukins, Craig D.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Shutthanandan, Janani I.; Smith, Dennese M.

2012-12-01

220

Graphite electrode arc melter demonstration Phase 2 test results  

SciTech Connect

Several U.S. Department of Energy organizations and the U.S. Bureau of Mines have been collaboratively conducting mixed waste treatment process demonstration testing on the near full-scale graphite electrode submerged arc melter system at the Bureau`s Albany (Oregon) Research Center. An initial test series successfully demonstrated arc melter capability for treating surrogate incinerator ash of buried mixed wastes with soil. The conceptual treatment process for that test series assumed that buried waste would be retrieved and incinerated, and that the incinerator ash would be vitrified in an arc melter. This report presents results from a recently completed second series of tests, undertaken to determine the ability of the arc melter system to stably process a wide range of {open_quotes}as-received{close_quotes} heterogeneous solid mixed wastes containing high levels of organics, representative of the wastes buried and stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The Phase 2 demonstration test results indicate that an arc melter system is capable of directly processing these wastes and could enable elimination of an up-front incineration step in the conceptual treatment process.

Soelberg, N.R.; Chambers, A.G.; Anderson, G.L.; O`Connor, W.K.; Oden, L.L.; Turner, P.C.

1996-06-01

221

In-orbit test results of the first SILEX terminal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Semi conductor Inter satellite Link EXperiment, SILEX, consists of two terminals, one terminal embarked on the French LEO observation satellite SPOT4 and one terminal embarked on the ESA GEO telecommunication satellite ARTEMIS. The objective of SILEX is first to perform optical communication experiments in orbit and then on an operational basis transmit SPOT4 earth observation data to ARTEMIS, which will relay the data to ground via its Ka band feeder link. SPOT4 with the SILEX terminal was successfully launched on 22nd March 1998. While waiting for the counter terminal on ARTEMIS, a test program has been undertaken to characterize the performances without a counter terminal. The test program involves CCD calibrations, laser diode calibrations, emit/transmit co- alignment calibrations, measurement of point ahead mechanism accuracy, star acquisitions and tracking, sensitivity to sunlight, and characterization of platform/terminal dynamic interaction. The paper reports on test results of the in orbit testing, with comparison to similar ground testing and predictions. The conclusion of the test program is that the first optical communication terminal in orbit is in very good health and that the demonstrated performances are stable and considerably better than the expected.

Tolker-Nielsen, Toni; Demelenne, Benoit; Desplats, Eric

1999-04-01

222

In silico robustness testing of a compendial HPLC purity method by using of a multidimensional design space build by chromatography modeling-Case study pramipexole.  

PubMed

Purity testing of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) pramipexole is performed using an official (compendial) and harmonized method published in the European Pharmacopeia (E.P.) and United States Pharmacopeia (USP). According to this monograph the successful chromatographic separation of the API from impurities is achieved on a C18 column with gradient elution of an ion pairing buffer of pH 3.0 (mobile phase A) and acetonitrile (mobile phase B). Although not recommended in general, compendial methods are often adapted for purity testing of generic formulations. In this paper a novel approach to evaluate method robustness of an adapted method - prior of full method validation - is described. Based on Quality-by-Design (QbD) principles, a small number of experiments are performed, which after entering them into a chromatography modeling software allow to visualize a multidimensional "Design Space", a region, in which changes in method parameters will not significantly affect the results as defined in the ICH guideline Q8(R2) leading to a more flexible method handling in routine analysis. For two different recommended C18 columns a multidimensional Design Space (Method Operating Design Region, MODR) was constructed to study the robustness of the adapted method with a newly developed Robustness Module. In a full factorial design the following six parameters were varied at three levels (low, nominal, high): gradient time, temperature, pH of the aqueous eluent (A), flow rate, start- and end concentration of the organic mobile phase component (eluent B). The resulting 3(6)=729 experiments were performed in silico from the previously constructed models for Design Space in less than 1min and showed that the required resolution of 2.0 could not be reached in all experiments for the two columns which were recommended by the E.P. (failure rate 25% and 16%, respectively). However, by adjusting the gradient time, we were able to fulfill the requirements with a failure rate of zero. For the aqueous eluent a separate "Eluent Design Space" study was performed, which allows the construction of ionic strength vs. ion pairing concentration models to identify the optimum combination of the concentrations for the buffer and the ion-pairing reagent. PMID:24440825

Schmidt, Alexander H; Stanic, Mijo; Molnár, Imre

2014-03-01

223

Long Term Corrosion/Degradation Test Six Year Results  

SciTech Connect

The Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) contains neutron-activated metals from non-fuel, nuclear reactor core components. The Long-Term Corrosion/Degradation (LTCD) Test is designed to obtain site-specific corrosion rates to support efforts to more accurately estimate the transfer of activated elements to the environment. The test is using two proven, industry-standard methods—direct corrosion testing using metal coupons, and monitored corrosion testing using electrical/resistance probes—to determine corrosion rates for various metal alloys generally representing the metals of interest buried at the SDA, including Type 304L stainless steel, Type 316L stainless steel, Inconel 718, Beryllium S200F, Aluminum 6061, Zircaloy-4, low-carbon steel, and Ferralium 255. In the direct testing, metal coupons are retrieved for corrosion evaluation after having been buried in SDA backfill soil and exposed to natural SDA environmental conditions for times ranging from one year to as many as 32 years, depending on research needs and funding availability. In the monitored testing, electrical/resistance probes buried in SDA backfill soil will provide corrosion data for the duration of the test or until the probes fail. This report provides an update describing the current status of the test and documents results to date. Data from the one-year and three-year results are also included, for comparison and evaluation of trends. In the six-year results, most metals being tested showed extremely low measurable rates of general corrosion. For Type 304L stainless steel, Type 316L stainless steel, Inconel 718, and Ferralium 255, corrosion rates fell in the range of “no reportable” to 0.0002 mils per year (MPY). Corrosion rates for Zircaloy-4 ranged from no measurable corrosion to 0.0001 MPY. These rates are two orders of magnitude lower than those specified in the performance assessment for the SDA. The corrosion on the carbon steel, beryllium, and aluminum were more evident with a clear difference in corrosion performance between the 4-ft and 10-ft levels. Notable surface corrosion products were evident as well as numerous pit initiation sites. Since the corrosion of the beryllium and aluminum is characterized by pitting, the geometrical character of the corrosion becomes more significant than the general corrosion rate. Both pitting factor and weight loss data should be used together. For six-year exposure, the maximum carbon steel corrosion rate was 0.3643 MPY while the maximum beryllium corrosion rate was 0.3282 MPY and the maximum aluminum corrosion rate was 0.0030 MPY.

M. K. Adler Flitton; C. W. Bishop; M. E. Delwiche; T. S. Yoder

2004-09-01

224

Free-piston stirling component test power converter test results of the initial test phase  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)—Lewis Research Center (LeRC) has the responsibility to develop power technologies that have the potential of satisfying anticipated future space mission power requirements. The Free-Piston Stirling Power Converter (FPSC) is one of the many power technologies being evaluated and developed by NASA. FPSPCs have the potential to provide high reliability, long life, efficient operation; and they can be coupled with all potential heat sources, nuclear, radioisotope and solar, various heat input, heat rejection systems, and various power management and distribution systems. FPSPCs can complete favorably with alternative power conversion systems over a range of hundreds of watts to hundreds of kilowatts and to megawatts. Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) is developed FPSPC technology under contract to NASA-LeRC and will demonstrate this technology in two full-scale power converters. The first of these, the Component Test Power Converter (CTPC), initiated testing in Spring 1991 to evaluate mechanical operation at space operating temperatures. This paper reviews the testing of the CTPC at MTI and the companion testing of the earlier technology engine, the Space Power Research Engine (SPRE) at NASA-LeRC.

Dochat, George R.; Dudenhoefer, James E.

1992-01-01

225

Evaluation of the geomorphometric results and residual values of a robust plane fitting method applied to different DTMs of various scales and accuracy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Due to the need for quantitative analysis of various geomorphological landforms, the importance of fast and effective automatic processing of the different kind of digital terrain models (DTMs) is increasing. The robust plane fitting (segmentation) method, developed at the Institute of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing at Vienna University of Technology, allows the processing of large 3D point clouds (containing millions of points), performs automatic detection of the planar elements of the surface via parameter estimation, and provides a considerable data reduction for the modeled area. Its geoscientific application allows the modeling of different landforms with the fitted planes as planar facets. In our study we aim to analyze the accuracy of the resulting set of fitted planes in terms of accuracy, model reliability and dependence on the input parameters. To this end we used DTMs of different scales and accuracy: (1) artificially generated 3D point cloud model with different magnitudes of error; (2) LiDAR data with 0.1 m error; (3) SRTM (Shuttle Radar Topography Mission) DTM database with 5 m accuracy; (4) DTM data from HRSC (High Resolution Stereo Camera) of the planet Mars with 10 m error. The analysis of the simulated 3D point cloud with normally distributed errors comprised different kinds of statistical tests (for example Chi-square and Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests) applied on the residual values and evaluation of dependence of the residual values on the input parameters. These tests have been repeated on the real data supplemented with the categorization of the segmentation result depending on the input parameters, model reliability and the geomorphological meaning of the fitted planes. The simulation results show that for the artificially generated data with normally distributed errors the null hypothesis can be accepted based on the residual value distribution being also normal, but in case of the test on the real data the residual value distribution is often mixed or unknown. The residual values are found to be dependent on two input parameters (standard deviation and maximum point-plane distance both defining distance thresholds for assigning points to a segment) mainly and the curvature of the surface affected mostly the distributions. The results of the analysis helped to decide which parameter set is the best for further modelling and provides the highest accuracy. With these results in mind the success of quasi-automatic modelling of the planar (for example plateau-like) features became more successful and often provided more accuracy. These studies were carried out partly in the framework of TMIS.ascrea project (Nr. 2001978) financed by the Austrian Research Promotion Agency (FFG); the contribution of ZsK was partly funded by Campus Hungary Internship TÁMOP-424B1.

Koma, Zsófia; Székely, Balázs; Dorninger, Peter; Kovács, Gábor

2013-04-01

226

Neutral buoyancy test results of a deployable space beam  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Large erectable and deployable space structures have been studied extensively in the past few years with a view toward usage in the near future for space platforms. The paper covers in particular the operational testing of a double-cell, double-folding cubic aluminum module at the Marshall Space Flight Center Neutral Buoyancy Simulator. Joining methods, deployment kinematics, configurations and operation time lines were analyzed using the Shuttle Remote Manipulator System (RMS) and EVA crewmen. Results of the test were considered successful, with crew tasks accomplished and the structural design adequate for flight design.

Stokes, J. W.; Engler, E. E.; Agan, W. E.

1981-01-01

227

The Results of Tests of the MICE Spectrometer Solenoids  

SciTech Connect

The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) spectrometer solenoid magnets will be the first magnets to be installed within the MICE cooling channel. The spectrometer magnets are the largest magnets in both mass and surface area within the MICE ooling channel. Like all of the other magnets in MICE, the spectrometer solenoids are kept cold using 1.5 W (at 4.2 K) pulse tube coolers. The MICE spectrometer solenoid is quite possibly the largest magnet that has been cooled using small coolers. Two pectrometer magnets have been built and tested. This report discusses the results of current and cooler tests of both magnets.

Green, Michael A.; Virostek, Steve P.

2009-10-19

228

Performance results of a digital test signal generator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Performance results of a digital test signal-generator hardware-demonstration unit are reported. Capabilities available include baseband and intermediate frequency (IF) spectrum generation, for which test results are provided. Repeatability in the setting of a given signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) when a baseband or an IF spectrum is being generated ranges from 0.01 dB at high SNR's or high data rates to 0.3 dB at low data rates or low SNR's. Baseband symbol SNR and carrier SNR (Pc/No) accuracies of 0.1 dB were verified with the built-in statistics circuitry. At low SNR's that accuracy remains to be fully verified. These results were confirmed with measurements from a demodulator synchronizer assembly for the baseband spectrum generation, and with a digital receiver (Pioneer 10 receiver) for the IF spectrum generation.

Gutierrez-Luaces, B. O.; Marina, M.; Parham, B.

1993-01-01

229

Experimental test results of a generalized parameter fuel control  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Considerable interest has been generated recently in low cost jet propulsion systems. One of the more complicated components of jet engines is the fuel control. Results of an effort to develop a simpler hydromechanical fuel control are presented. This prototype fuel control was installed on a J85-GE-13 jet engine. Results show that the fuel control provided satisfactory engine performance at sea level static conditions over its normal nonafterburning operating range, including startup. Results of both bench and engine tests are presented; the difficulties encountered are described.

Batterton, P. G.; Gold, H.

1973-01-01

230

High-Speed, High-Temperature Finger Seal Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Finger seals have significantly lower leakage rates than conventional labyrinth seals used in gas turbine engines and are expected to decrease specific fuel consumption by over 1 percent and to decrease direct operating cost by over 0.5 percent. Their compliant design accommodates shaft growth and motion due to thermal and dynamic loads with minimal wear. The cost to fabricate these finger seals is estimated to be about half the cost to fabricate brush seals. A finger seal has been tested in NASA's High Temperature, High Speed Turbine Seal Test Rig at operating conditions up to 1200 F, 1200 ft/s, and 75 psid. Static, performance and endurance test results are presented. While seal leakage and wear performance are acceptable, further design improvements are needed to reduce the seal power loss.

Proctor, Margaret P.; Kumar, Arun; Delgado, Irebert R.

2002-01-01

231

SP-100 fuel pin performance: Results from irradiation testing  

SciTech Connect

A total of 86 experimental fuel pins with various fuel, liner, and cladding candidate materials have been irradiated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) and the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) reactor as part of the SP-100 fuel pin irradiation testing program. Postirradiation examination results from these fuel pin are key in establishing performance correlations and demonstrating the lifetime and safety of the reactor fuel system. This paper provides a brief description of the in-reactor fuel pin tests and presents the most recent irradiation data on the performance of wrought rhenium (Re) liner material and high density UN fuel at goal burnup of 6 atom percent (at. %). It also provides an overview of the significant variety of other fuel/liner/cladding combinations which were irradiated as part of this program and which may be of interest to more advanced efforts.

Makenas, B.J.; Paxton, D.M. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Vaidyanathan, S. [Martin Marietta, San Jose, CA (United States); Hoth, C.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1993-09-01

232

DUS II SOIL GAS SAMPLING AND AIR INJECTION TEST RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

Soil vapor extraction (SVE) and air injection well testing was performed at the Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) site located near the M-Area Settling Basin (referred to as DUS II in this report). The objective of this testing was to determine the effectiveness of continued operation of these systems. Steam injection ended on September 19, 2009 and since this time the extraction operations have utilized residual heat that is present in the subsurface. The well testing campaign began on June 5, 2012 and was completed on June 25, 2012. Thirty-two (32) SVE wells were purged for 24 hours or longer using the active soil vapor extraction (ASVE) system at the DUS II site. During each test five or more soil gas samples were collected from each well and analyzed for target volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The DUS II site is divided into four parcels (see Figure 1) and soil gas sample results show the majority of residual VOC contamination remains in Parcel 1 with lesser amounts in the other three parcels. Several VOCs, including tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), were detected. PCE was the major VOC with lesser amounts of TCE. Most soil gas concentrations of PCE ranged from 0 to 60 ppmv with one well (VEW-22A) as high as 200 ppmv. Air sparging (AS) generally involves the injection of air into the aquifer through either vertical or horizontal wells. AS is coupled with SVE systems when contaminant recovery is necessary. While traditional air sparging (AS) is not a primary component of the DUS process, following the cessation of steam injection, eight (8) of the sixty-three (63) steam injection wells were used to inject air. These wells were previously used for hydrous pyrolysis oxidation (HPO) as part of the DUS process. Air sparging is different from the HPO operations in that the air was injected at a higher rate (20 to 50 scfm) versus HPO (1 to 2 scfm). . At the DUS II site the air injection wells were tested to determine if air sparging affected VOC soil gas concentrations during ASVE. Five (5) SVE wells that were located closest to the air injection wells were used as monitoring points during the air sparging tests. The air sparging tests lasted 48 hours. Soil gas sample results indicate that sparging did not affect VOC concentrations in four of the five sparging wells, while results from one test did show an increase in soil gas concentrations.

Noonkester, J.; Jackson, D.; Jones, W.; Hyde, W.; Kohn, J.; Walker, R.

2012-09-20

233

Accelerated aging test results for aerospace wire insulation constructions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Several wire insulation constructions were evaluated with and without continuous glow discharges at low pressure and high temperature to determine the aging characteristics of acceptable wire insulation constructions. It was known at the beginning of the test program that insulation aging takes several years when operated at normal ambient temperature and pressure of 20 C and 760 torr. Likewise, it was known that the accelerated aging process decreases insulation life by approximately 50% for each 10 C temperature rise. Therefore, the first phases of the program, not reported in these test results, were to select wire insulation constructions that could operate at high temperature and low pressure for over 10,000 hours with negligible shrinkage and little materials' deterioration.The final phase of the program was to determine accelerated aging characteristics. When an insulation construction is subjected to partial discharges the insulation is locally heated by the bombardment of the discharges, the insulation is also subjected to ozone and other deteriorating gas particles that may significantly increase the aging process. Several insulation systems using either a single material or combinations of teflon, kapton, and glass insulation constructions were tested. All constructions were rated to be partial discharge and/or corona-free at 240 volts, 400 Hz and 260 C (500 F) for 50, 000 hours at altitudes equivalent to the Paschen law. Minimum partial discharge aging tests were preceded by screening tests lasting 20 hours at 260 C. The aging process was accelerated by subjecting the test articles to temperatures up to 370 C (700 F) with and without partial discharges. After one month operation with continuous glow discharges surrounding the test articles, most insulation systems were either destroyed or became brittle, cracked, and unsafe for use. Time with space radiation as with partial discharges is accumulative.

Dunbar, William G.

1995-01-01

234

Accelerated aging test results for aerospace wire insulation constructions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several wire insulation constructions were evaluated with and without continuous glow discharges at low pressure and high temperature to determine the aging characteristics of acceptable wire insulation constructions. It was known at the beginning of the test program that insulation aging takes several years when operated at normal ambient temperature and pressure of 20 C and 760 torr. Likewise, it was known that the accelerated aging process decreases insulation life by approximately 50% for each 10 C temperature rise. Therefore, the first phases of the program, not reported in these test results, were to select wire insulation constructions that could operate at high temperature and low pressure for over 10,000 hours with negligible shrinkage and little materials' deterioration.The final phase of the program was to determine accelerated aging characteristics. When an insulation construction is subjected to partial discharges the insulation is locally heated by the bombardment of the discharges, the insulation is also subjected to ozone and other deteriorating gas particles that may significantly increase the aging process. Several insulation systems using either a single material or combinations of teflon, kapton, and glass insulation constructions were tested. All constructions were rated to be partial discharge and/or corona-free at 240 volts, 400 Hz and 260 C (500 F) for 50, 000 hours at altitudes equivalent to the Paschen law. Minimum partial discharge aging tests were preceded by screening tests lasting 20 hours at 260 C. The aging process was accelerated by subjecting the test articles to temperatures up to 370 C (700 F) with and without partial discharges. After one month operation with continuous glow discharges surrounding the test articles, most insulation systems were either destroyed or became brittle, cracked, and unsafe for use. Time with space radiation as with partial discharges is accumulative.

Dunbar, William G.

1995-11-01

235

Spent fuel drying system test results (second dry-run)  

SciTech Connect

The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks have been detected in the basins and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuel elements in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site (WHC 1995). Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 7.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of the second dry-run test, which was conducted without a fuel element. With the concurrence of project management, the test protocol for this run, and subsequent drying test runs, was modified. These modifications were made to allow for improved data correlation with drying procedures proposed under the IPS. Details of these modifications are discussed in Section 3.0.

Klinger, G.S.; Oliver, B.M.; Abrefah, J.; Marschman, S.C.; MacFarlan, P.J.; Ritter, G.A.

1998-07-01

236

VLT deformable secondary mirror: integration and electromechanical tests results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The VLT Deformable secondary is planned to be installed on the VLT UT#4 as part of the telescope conversion into the Adaptive Optics test Facility (AOF). The adaptive unit is based on the well proven contactless, voice coil motor technology that has been already successfully implemented in the MMT, LBT and Magellan adaptive secondaries, and is considered a promising technical choice for the forthcoming ELT-generation adaptive correctors, like the E-ELT M4 and the GMT ASM. The VLT adaptive unit has been recently assembled after the completion of the manufacturing and modular test phases. In this paper, we present the most relevant aspects of the system integration and report the preliminary results of the electromechanical tests performed on the unit. This test campaign is a typical major step foreseen in all similar systems built so far: thanks to the metrology embedded in the system, that allows generating time-dependent stimuli and recording in real time the position of the controlled mirror on all actuators, typical dynamic response quality parameters like modal settling time, overshoot and following error can be acquired without employing optical measurements. In this way the system dynamic and some aspect of its thermal and long term stability can be fully characterized before starting the optical tests and calibrations.

Biasi, R.; Andrighettoni, M.; Angerer, G.; Mair, C.; Pescoller, D.; Lazzarini, P.; Anaclerio, E.; Mantegazza, M.; Gallieni, D.; Vernet, E.; Arsenault, R.; Madec, P.-Y.; Duhoux, P.; Riccardi, A.; Xompero, M.; Briguglio, R.; Manetti, M.; Morandini, M.

2012-07-01

237

Results of a sub-scale model rotor icing test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A heavily instrumented sub-scale model of a helicopter main rotor was tested in the NASA Lewis Research Center Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) in September and November 1989. The four-bladed main rotor had a diameter of 1.83 m (6.00 ft) and the 0.124 m (4.9 in) chord rotor blades were specially fabricated for this experiment. The instrumented rotor was mounted on a Sikorsky Aircraft Powered Force Model, which enclosed a rotor balance and other measurement systems. The model rotor was exposed to a range of icing conditions that included variations in temperature, liquid water content, and median droplet diameter, and was operated over ranges of advance ratio, shaft angle, tip Mach number (rotor speed) and weight coefficient to determine the effect of these parameters on ice accretion. In addition to strain gage and balance data, the test was documented with still, video, and high speed photography, ice profile tracings, and ice molds. The sensitivity of the model rotor to the test parameters, is given, and the result to theoretical predictions are compared. Test data quality was excellent, and ice accretion prediction methods and rotor performance prediction methods (using published icing lift and drag relationships) reproduced the performance trends observed in the test. Adjustments to the correlation coefficients to improve the level of correlation are suggested.

Flemming, Robert J.; Bond, Thomas H.; Britton, Randall K.

1991-01-01

238

Results of a sub-scale model rotor icing test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A heavily instrumented sub-scale model of a helicopter main rotor was tested in the NASA Lewis Research Center Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) in September and November 1989. The four-bladed main rotor had a diameter of 1.83 m (6.00 ft) and the 0.124 m (4.9 in) chord rotor blades were specially fabricated for this experiment. The instrumented rotor was mounted on a Sikorsky Aircraft Powered Force Model, which enclosed a rotor balance and other measurement systems. The model rotor was exposed to a range of icing conditions that included variations in temperature, liquid water content, and median droplet diameter, and was operated over ranges of advance ratio, shaft angle, tip Mach number (rotor speed) and weight coefficient to determine the effect of these parameters on ice accretion. In addition to strain gage and balance data, the test was documented with still, video, and high speed photography, ice profile tracings, and ice molds. The sensitivity of the model rotor to the test parameters is given, and the result to theoretical predictions are compared. Test data quality was excellent, and ice accretion prediction methods and rotor performance prediction methods (using published icing lift and drag relationships) reproduced the performance trends observed in the test. Adjustments to the correlation coefficients to improve the level of correlation are suggested.

Flemming, Robert J.; Bond, Thomas H.; Britton, Randall K.

1991-01-01

239

Test Results for a High Power Thermal Management System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In response to the identified needs of emerging high power spacecraft applications, a multiple evaporator hybrid loop heat pipe (H-LHP) was developed and tested as part of a Dual Use Science and Technology (DUS&T) program co-sponsored by ATK and AFRL/PRP. During the course of the DUS&T program, a two-kilowatt system with three evaporators was developed and tested to identify viable system architectures and characterize system performance capabilities as a function of heat load profiles and spatial distribution of the evaporators. Following the successful development of the two-kilowatt system, a 10-kilowatt system with six evaporators was fabricated and tested. Tests were performed with the system operating in a totally passive mode, where applying a small amount of power to a sweepage evaporator provides the auxiliary flow through the primary evaporators, and as a self-regulating, capillary-controlled mechanically pumped system. This paper will provide a description of the 10-kilowatt multi-evaporator system and present the results of the passive and mechanically pump test programs.

Wrenn, Kimberly R.; Wolf, David A.

2008-01-01

240

Interpreting “statistical hypothesis testingresults in clinical research  

PubMed Central

Difference between “Clinical Significance and Statistical Significance” should be kept in mind while interpreting “statistical hypothesis testingresults in clinical research. This fact is already known to many but again pointed out here as philosophy of “statistical hypothesis testing” is sometimes unnecessarily criticized mainly due to failure in considering such distinction. Randomized controlled trials are also wrongly criticized similarly. Some scientific method may not be applicable in some peculiar/particular situation does not mean that the method is useless. Also remember that “statistical hypothesis testing” is not for decision making and the field of “decision analysis” is very much an integral part of science of statistics. It is not correct to say that “confidence intervals have nothing to do with confidence” unless one understands meaning of the word “confidence” as used in context of confidence interval. Interpretation of the results of every study should always consider all possible alternative explanations like chance, bias, and confounding. Statistical tests in inferential statistics are, in general, designed to answer the question “How likely is the difference found in random sample(s) is due to chance” and therefore limitation of relying only on statistical significance in making clinical decisions should be avoided. PMID:22707861

Sarmukaddam, Sanjeev B.

2012-01-01

241

Initial test results for the mini-mast  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objectives of the 20-meter Mini-Mast were: (1) to learn how to efficiently test this type of large truss structure, (2) to relate component testing to the overall behavior of the structure, and (3) to update the associated analytical model based upon the experimental data. The Mini-Mast represents structural characteristics similar to the COFS beam which is planned to be flown on Shuttle to perform on-orbit structures and controls experiments. The information is of interest to LDR because it represents analysis and test information on a truss-type structure which may be similar to the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) backup structure. The structure has a total of 111 titanium joints; the joint in the center of the truss element is a near-center latch joint. The results of this research indicate that linear deployable-type structures can be built, but difficulties do exist in extracting modes with identical frequencies; gravitational loading does affect the ground test results; and prediction of truss-type-structure dynamic characteristics is not trivial.

Horta, L.; Horner, G.

1988-01-01

242

Fan Noise Source Diagnostic Test: Tone Modal Structure Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This investigation is part of a test series that was extremely comprehensive and included aerodynamic and acoustic testing of a fan stage using two different fan rotors and three different stator designs. The test series is known as the Source Diagnostic Test (SDT) and was conducted by NASA Glenn as part of the Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) Noise Reduction Program. Tone mode measurements of one of the rotors with three different stators were made. The stator designs involve changes in vane count and sweep at constant solidity. The results of both inlet and exhaust tone mode measurements are presented in terms of mode power for both circumferential and radial mode orders. The results show benefits of vane sweep to be large, up to 13 dB in total tone power. At many conditions, the increase in power due to cutting on the rotor/stator interaction is more than offset by vane sweep. The rotor locked mode is shown as an important contributor to tone power when the blade tip speed is near and above Mach one. This is most evident in the inlet when the direct rotor field starts to cut on.

Heidelberg, Laurence J.

2002-01-01

243

Salmonella mutagenicity tests. II. Results from the testing of 270 chemicals  

Microsoft Academic Search

This publication includes data of Salmonella mutagenicity results on 270 coded chemicals, encompassing 329 tests performed by three laboratories under contract to the National Toxicology Program (NTP). The preincubation modification of the Salmonella\\/mammalian microsome assay was used to test chemicals in up to five Salmonella strains in the presence and absence of rat and hamster liver S-9. With a few

Kristien Mortelmans; Steve Haworth; Timothy Lawlor; William Speck; Beth Tainer; Errol Zeiger

1986-01-01

244

A Robust Parity Test for Extracting Parallel Vectors in 3D Tao Ju, Minxin Cheng, Xu Wang, and Ye Duan, Member, IEEE  

E-print Network

A Robust Parity Test for Extracting Parallel Vectors in 3D Tao Ju, Minxin Cheng, Xu Wang, and Ye, are commonly used to represent curvilinear features in 3D for data visualization. Methods for extracting PV usually operate on a 3D grid and start with detecting seed points on a cell face. We propose, to the best

Ju, Tao

245

First tritium results of the KATRIN test experiment TRAP  

SciTech Connect

The TRAP experiment (Tritium Argon frost Pump) has been built at the Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe (TLK) as a test rig for the Cryogenic Pumping Section (CPS) of the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino Experiment (KATRIN). TRAP employs a heterogeneous layer of pre-condensed argon to adsorb hydrogen isotopes at {approx} 4.2 K This paper presents results obtained in the first three tritium experiments with TRAP. (authors)

Eichelhardt, F. [Universitaet Karlsruhe TH, P. O. Box 3640, D- 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Bornschein, B. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Bornschein, L. [Universitaet Karlsruhe TH, P. O. Box 3640, D- 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Kazachenko, O.; Kernert, N. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Sturm, M. [Universitaet Karlsruhe TH, P. O. Box 3640, D- 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

2008-07-15

246

Initial results from the EUV engineering test stand  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Engineering Test Stand (ETS) is an EUV lithography tool designed to demonstrate full-field EUV imaging and provide data required to accelerate production-tool development. Early lithographic results and progress on continuing functional upgrades are presented and discussed. In the ETS a source of 13.4 nm radiation is provided by a laser plasma source in which a Nd:YAG laser beam is

Daniel A. Tichenor; Avijit K. Ray-Chaudhuri; Sang Hun Lee; Henry N. Chapman; William C. Replogle; Kurt W. Berger; Richard H. Stulen; Glenn D. Kubiak; Leonard E. Klebanoff; John B. Wronosky; Donna J. O'Connell; Alvin H. Leung; Karen J. Jefferson; William P. Ballard; Layton C. Hale; Kenneth L. Blaedel; John S. Taylor; James A. Folta; Eberhard A. Spiller; Regina Soufli; Gary E. Sommargren; Donald W. Sweeney; Patrick P. Naulleau; Kenneth A. Goldberg; Eric M. Gullikson; Jeffrey Bokor; David T. Attwood; Uwe Mickan; Ralph M. Hanzen; Eric M. Panning; Pei-yang Yan; John E. Bjorkholm; Charles W. Gwynf

2001-01-01

247

NASA wind shear flight test in situ results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The main objectives in developing the NASA in situ windshear detection algorithm were to provide a measurement standard for validation of forward-look sensors under development, and to demonstrate the algorithm's ability to operate with a suitably low nuisance alert rate. It was necessary to know exactly how the algorithm was implemented and what parameters and filtering were used, in order to be able to fully test its effectiveness and correlate in situ results with forward-look sensor data.

Oseguera, Rosa M.

1992-01-01

248

Robust stability test of a class of linear time-invariant interval fractional-order system using Lyapunov inequality  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract This paper provides a new analytical robust stability checking method of fractional- order linear time invariant interval uncertain system. This paper continues the au- thors’ previous work [4] where matrix perturbation theory was used. For the new robust stability checking, Lyapunov inequality is utilized for nding the maximum eigenvalue of a Hermitian matrix. Through numerical examples, the usefulness and

Hyo-sung Ahn; Yangquan Chen; Igor Podlubny

2007-01-01

249

Small-Scale Spray Releases: Additional Aerosol Test Results  

SciTech Connect

One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. To expand the data set upon which the WTP accident and safety analyses were based, an aerosol spray leak testing program was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL’s test program addressed two key technical areas to improve the WTP methodology (Larson and Allen 2010). The first technical area was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where slurry particles may plug the hole and prevent high-pressure sprays. The results from an effort to address this first technical area can be found in Mahoney et al. (2012a). The second technical area was to determine aerosol droplet size distribution and total droplet volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, including sprays from larger breaches and sprays of slurries for which literature data are largely absent. To address the second technical area, the testing program collected aerosol generation data at two scales, commonly referred to as small-scale and large-scale. The small-scale testing and resultant data are described in Mahoney et al. (2012b) and the large-scale testing and resultant data are presented in Schonewill et al. (2012). In tests at both scales, simulants were used to mimic the relevant physical properties projected for actual WTP process streams.

Schonewill, Philip P.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, G. N.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Kurath, Dean E.

2013-08-01

250

Spacesuit Portable Life Support System Breadboard (PLSS 1.0) Development and Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A multi-year effort has been carried out at the Johnson Space Center to develop an advanced EVA PLSS design intended to further the current state of the art by increasing operational flexibility, reducing consumables, and increasing robustness. This multi-year effort has culminated in the construction and operation of PLSS 1.0, a test rig that simulates full functionality of the advanced PLSS design. PLSS 1.0 integrates commercial off-the-shelf hardware with prototype technology development components, including the primary and secondary oxygen regulators, ventilation loop fan, Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) swingbed, and Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME). PLSS 1.0 was tested from June 17th through September 30th, 2011. Testing accumulated 233 hours over 45 days, while executing 119 test points. An additional 164 hours of operational time were accrued during the test series, bringing the total operational time for PLSS 1.0 testing to 397 hours. Specific PLSS 1.0 test objectives assessed during this testing include: (1) Confirming prototype components perform in a system level test as they have performed during component level testing, (2) Identifying unexpected system-level interactions (3) Operating PLSS 1.0 in nominal steady-state EVA modes to baseline subsystem performance with respect to metabolic rate, ventilation loop pressure and flow rate, and environmental conditions (4) Simulating nominal transient EVA operational scenarios (5) Simulating contingency EVA operational scenarios (6) Further evaluating prototype technology development components Successful testing of the PLSS 1.0 provided a large database of test results that characterize system level and component performance. With the exception of several minor anomalies, the PLSS 1.0 test rig performed as expected. Documented anomalies and observations include: (1) Ventilation loop fan controller issues at high fan speeds (near 70,000 rpm, whereas the fan speed during nominal operations would be closer to 35,000 rpm) (2) RCA performance at boundary conditions, including carbon dioxide and water vapor saturation events, as well as reduced vacuum quality (3) SWME valve anomalies (4 documented cases where the SWME failed to respond to a control signal or physically jammed, preventing SWME control) (4) Reduction of SWME hollow fiber hydrophobicity and significant reduction of the SWME degassing capability after significant accumulated test time.

Watts, Carly A.; Vogel, Matt

2012-01-01

251

Fan Noise Source Diagnostic Test: Rotor Alone Aerodynamic Performance Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The aerodynamic performance of an isolated fan or rotor alone model was measured in the NASA Glenn Research Center 9- by 15- Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel as part of the Fan Broadband Source Diagnostic Test conducted at NASA Glenn. The Source Diagnostic Test was conducted to identify the noise sources within a wind tunnel scale model of a turbofan engine and quantify their contribution to the overall system noise level. The fan was part of a 1/5th scale model representation of the bypass stage of a current technology turbofan engine. For the rotor alone testing, the fan and nacelle, including the inlet, external cowl, and fixed area fan exit nozzle, were modeled in the test hardware; the internal outlet guide vanes located behind the fan were removed. Without the outlet guide vanes, the velocity at the nozzle exit changes significantly, thereby affecting the fan performance. As part of the investigation, variations in the fan nozzle area were tested in order to match as closely as possible the rotor alone performance with the fan performance obtained with the outlet guide vanes installed. The fan operating performance was determined using fixed pressure/temperature combination rakes and the corrected weight flow. The performance results indicate that a suitable nozzle exit was achieved to be able to closely match the rotor alone and fan/outlet guide vane configuration performance on the sea level operating line. A small shift in the slope of the sea level operating line was measured, which resulted in a slightly higher rotor alone fan pressure ratio at take-off conditions, matched fan performance at cutback conditions, and a slightly lower rotor alone fan pressure ratio at approach conditions. However, the small differences in fan performance at all fan conditions were considered too small to affect the fan acoustic performance.

Hughes, Christopher E.; Jeracki, Robert J.; Woodward, Richard P.; Miller, Christopher J.

2005-01-01

252

Qualification test results for blue-red reflecting solar covers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent market forces and design innovations have spurred the development of solar cell covers that significantly reduce the solar absorptance for a cell array. GaAs cells, using Ge as the substrate host material, can have a significantly higher output if the solar absorptance of the cell array is reduced. New optical coating design techniques have allowed the construction of covers that reflect the ultraviolet energy (below 350 nm) and the near infrared energy (above 900 nm) resulting in the beneficial reduction in absorptance. Recent modeling suggests three or more present output increase due to the lowered temperature with such a device. Within the last several months we have completed the testing of production samples of these new covers in a qualification series that included the usual environmental effects associated with the routine testing of solar cell covers and the combined effects of protons, electrons and solar UV as would be encountered in space. For the combined effects testing the samples were exposed to 300 sun days equivalent UV, 5 x 10(exp 14)/sq cm of 0.5 MeV protons and 10(exp 15)/sq cm of 1.0 MeV electrons. Measurements of the reflectance, transmission, emittance and other appropriate parameters were made before and after the testing. As measured by the averaged transmission over the cell operating band, the change in transmission for the samples was less than or about equal to 1 percent. The details of the testing and the results in terms of transmission, reflectance and emittance are discussed in the paper.

Beauchamp, W. T.

1994-09-01

253

Qualification test results for blue-red reflecting solar covers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recent market forces and design innovations have spurred the development of solar cell covers that significantly reduce the solar absorptance for a cell array. GaAs cells, using Ge as the substrate host material, can have a significantly higher output if the solar absorptance of the cell array is reduced. New optical coating design techniques have allowed the construction of covers that reflect the ultraviolet energy (below 350 nm) and the near infrared energy (above 900 nm) resulting in the beneficial reduction in absorptance. Recent modeling suggests three or more present output increase due to the lowered temperature with such a device. Within the last several months we have completed the testing of production samples of these new covers in a qualification series that included the usual environmental effects associated with the routine testing of solar cell covers and the combined effects of protons, electrons and solar UV as would be encountered in space. For the combined effects testing the samples were exposed to 300 sun days equivalent UV, 5 x 10(exp 14)/sq cm of 0.5 MeV protons and 10(exp 15)/sq cm of 1.0 MeV electrons. Measurements of the reflectance, transmission, emittance and other appropriate parameters were made before and after the testing. As measured by the averaged transmission over the cell operating band, the change in transmission for the samples was less than or about equal to 1 percent. The details of the testing and the results in terms of transmission, reflectance and emittance are discussed in the paper.

Beauchamp, W. T.

1994-01-01

254

Swirl Coaxial Injector Development. Part I: Test Results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sierra Engineering, in conjunction with the Air Force Research Laboratory Propulsion Directorate, has undertaken a program to develop a gas-centered, swirl coaxial injector. This injector design will be used in the multi-element Advanced Fuels Tester (AFT) engine to test a variety of hydrocarbon propellants. As part of this program, a design methodology is being developed which will be applicable to future injector design efforts. The methodology combines cold flow data, acquired in the AFRL High Pressure Injector Flow facility, uni-element hot fire data, collected in AFRL Test Cell EC-1, and a computational effort conducted at University of Alabama-Birmingham, to identify key design features and sensitivities. Results from the computational effort will be presented in the Part II companion paper (9). Three different gas-centered swirl coaxial element concepts were studied: a converging design, a diverging design, and a pre-filming design. The cold flow experiments demonstrated that all three classes of elements produced an extremely dense, solid cone spray, with the highest mass density in the center. The atomization of all of these injectors was excellent, producing mean drop sizes 1/3 to 1/4 of that typically measured for shear coaxial elements operating under similar conditions. Uni-element hot fire testing of these elements has begun, but the elements have not yet been tested at the design operating conditions. Preliminary low chamber pressure test results show the converging design performs better than the pre-filming and diverging design. Uni-element C* efficiencies in excess of 90% have been measured over a wide-range of mixture ratios.

Muss, J. A.; Johnson, C. W.; Cohn, R. K.; Strakey, P. A.; Bates, R. W.

2002-03-01

255

Results of toxicological testing of Jefferson Parish pilot plant samples.  

PubMed Central

Five toxicological tests were performed using concentrated drinking water samples collected at a pilot-scale drinking water treatment plant that had streams treated with different disinfectants (no disinfectant, ozone, chlorine dioxide, monochloramine, or chlorine) before treatment with granular activated carbon (GAC). The toxicological tests used in this study were the Ames Salmonella assay, a subchronic in vivo toxicity assay in mice, the SENCAR mouse skin initiation-promotion assay, a rat liver foci assay, and the lung adenoma assay in strain A mice. These tests were conducted to determine the general toxicity and the mutagenic/carcinogenic potential associated with the use of disinfection and/or GAC in the treatment of drinking water. The stability of the mutagenic activity of the samples tested was determined by repeated analysis using the Ames Salmonella assay. Results indicated that the samples remained mutagenic for the duration of the tests. All the drinking water concentrates (4000 X) prepared by the XAD resin adsorption procedure failed to provide statistically significant indication of carcinogenic activity in the SENCAR mouse, rat liver foci, and the lung adenoma assays. However, concentrates of the chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine treated waters gave consistent mutagenic responses in the Ames Salmonella assay. GAC was effective for 6 months in removing both the mutagenicity of chlorine-treated water and the potential of water to become mutagenic when treated with chlorine. In the in vivo, subchronic 30-day toxicity test in mice, some statistically significant differences in organ weights and body weights of animals exposed to different concentrates of some of the samples were observed. However, a consistent pattern of these differences indicating overt toxicity was not detected. PMID:3816718

Miller, R G; Kopfler, F C; Condie, L W; Pereira, M A; Meier, J R; Ringhand, H P; Robinson, M; Casto, B C

1986-01-01

256

SCD1 thermal design and test result analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The SCD 01 (Satelite de Coleta de Dados 01) is a spin stabilized low Earth orbit satellite dedicated to the collection and distribution of environmental data. It was completely developed at the Brazilian Institute for Space Research (INPE) and is scheduled to be launched in 1992. The SCD 01 passive thermal control design configuration is presented and the thermal analysis results are compared with the temperatures obtained from a Thermal Balance Test. The correlation between the analytical and experimental results is considered very good. Numerical flight simulations show that the thermal control design can keep all the subsystem temperatures within their specified temperature range.

Cardoso, Humberto Pontes; Muraoka, Issamu; Mantelli, Marcia Barbosa Henriques; Leite, Rosangela M. G.

1990-01-01

257

Flight test results of the strapdown hexad inertial reference unit (SIRU). Volume 2: Test report  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results of flight tests of the Strapdown Inertial Reference Unit (SIRU) navigation system are presented. The fault tolerant SIRU navigation system features a redundant inertial sensor unit and dual computers. System software provides for detection and isolation of inertial sensor failures and continued operation in the event of failures. Flight test results include assessments of the system's navigational performance and fault tolerance. Performance shortcomings are analyzed.

Hruby, R. J.; Bjorkman, W. S.

1977-01-01

258

Shake Test Results and Dynamic Calibration Efforts for the Large Rotor Test Apparatus  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Prior to the full-scale wind tunnel test of the UH-60A Airloads rotor, a shake test was completed on the Large Rotor Test Apparatus. The goal of the shake test was to characterize the oscillatory response of the test rig and provide a dynamic calibration of the balance to accurately measure vibratory hub loads. This paper provides a summary of the shake test results, including balance, shaft bending gauge, and accelerometer measurements. Sensitivity to hub mass and angle of attack were investigated during the shake test. Hub mass was found to have an important impact on the vibratory forces and moments measured at the balance, especially near the UH-60A 4/rev frequency. Comparisons were made between the accelerometer data and an existing finite-element model, showing agreement on mode shapes, but not on natural frequencies. Finally, the results of a simple dynamic calibration are presented, showing the effects of changes in hub mass. The results show that the shake test data can be used to correct in-plane loads measurements up to 10 Hz and normal loads up to 30 Hz.

Russell, Carl R.

2014-01-01

259

Single event test methodology and test results of commercial gigabit per second fiber channel hardware  

SciTech Connect

This article presents a detailed description of the single event test methods used to evaluate two different component sets conforming to the Fiber Channel (FC) commercial high-speed serial bus standard. The devices tested perform the hierarchically low-level functions such as transmission coding and actual electrical or optical linking. Pertinent portions of the FC specification, and details of the test setup and methods are presented prior to description of the observed error types, correlation of error types to source circuitry, and radiation test results. The authors conclude that one of these COTS device sets may be suitable for space use with the use of additional circuit hardening, and that the other (also a COTS device set) is not suitable for space use. The test methods and descriptions of error types should prove useful in preparation for future FC component SEE testing.

Carts, M.A.; Marshall, P.W. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)] [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States); [SFA, Inc., Largo, MD (United States); Marshall, C.J. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)] [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States); Label, K.A.; Flanegan, M.; Bretthauer, J. [NASA GSFC, Greenbelt, MD (United States)] [NASA GSFC, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

1997-12-01

260

Chronic cannabis users: Further analysis of objective test results.  

PubMed

Twelve objective tests, generating 16 psychological test variables were administered to 850 chronic cannabis takers and 839 non-takers, all Egyptian males, ranging in age between 15 and 50 years, and representing various positions on continua of literacy-illiteracy and urbanism-ruralism. The tests were intended to assess different modalities of 5 broad psychological functions: speed of psychomotor performance, estimation of moderate distances, estimation of a few minutes time interval, immediate memory for digits and designs and visual-motor co-ordination. Analysis of variance based on 3 x 3 x 2 factorial design was carried out and revealed statistically significant differences between the two groups of subjects on most of the test variables. Detailed analyses showed that controls displayed better performance than drug users on the majority of the variables. Significant second order interaction effects emerged in a big number of cases denoting that, under certain conditions relating to literacy-illiteracy and urbanism-ruralism, the superiority of controls over cannabis users became much more impressive. Our findings were discussed in the light of investigations which were conducted on the psychological correlates and/or effects of long term and short term cannabis consumption. The clinical psychological literature was cited where slowness of psychomotor performance, defective visual-motor co-ordination and impaired memory for designs were reported to be associated with psychiatric disorder. It is suggested that our results point to meaningful associations between chronic cannabis consumption and manifestations of psychopathology. PMID:1044285

Soueif, M I

1975-01-01

261

Results of toxicological testing of Jefferson Paris pilot plant samples  

SciTech Connect

Five toxicological tests were performed using concentrated drinking water samples collected at a pilot-scale drinking water treatment plant that had streams treated with different disinfectants (no disinfectant, ozone, chlorine dioxide, monochloramine, or chlorine) before treatment with granular activated carbon (GAC). The toxicological tests used in this study were the Ames Salmonella assay, a subchronic in vivo toxicity assay in mice, the SENCAR mouse skin initiation-promotion assay, a rat liver foci assay, and the lung adenoma assay in strain A mice. These tests were conducted to determine the general toxicity and the mutagenic/carcinogenic potential association with the use of disinfection and/or GAC in the treatment of drinking water. Results indicated that the samples remained mutagenic for the duration of the tests. All the drinking water concentrates (4000 x) prepared by the XAD resin adsorption procedure failed to provide statistically significant indication of carcinogenic activity in the SENCAR mouse, rat liver foci, and the lung adenoma assays. However, concentrates of the chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine treated waters gave consistent mutagenic responses in the Ames Salmonella assay. GAC was effective for 6 months in removing both the mutagenicity of chlorine-treated water and the potential of water to become mutagenic when treated with chlorine. A consistent pattern of these differences indicating overt toxicity was not detected.

Miller, R.G.; Kopfler, F.C.; Condie, L.W.; Pereira, M.A.; Meier, J.R.; Ringhand, H.P.; Robinson, M.; Casto, B.C.

1986-11-01

262

Test results of the advanced translator processing system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Advanced Translator Processing System was developed to provide a low cost alternative to tracking translated GPS signals. It is backwards compatible with the Translator Processing System (TPS) currently used to track Ballistic Missile Translators (BMT) by the US Ranges. NAVSYS has also developed a BMT compatible Translator. A key element of the ATPS is the Preamplifier/Downconvertor (P/DC) module which was developed by NAVSYS to condition the received Translator signal so it can be tracked with a conventional C/A code receiver. This significantly reduces the cost of the hardware by allowing the ATPS to be constructed mostly from off-the-shelf components. The ATPS and Translator were tested against the RAJPO Ballistic Missile and Translator Processing System Specifications. This paper presents the results of tests demonstrating the performance of the ATPS and Translator under different operating conditions. NAVSYS has also developed a Post Test Processing System (PTPS), incorporating the same components, which records the Translator data during the tests. When this data is played back, high-accuracy Time and Space Position

Brown, Alison K.; Sward, William; Brown, Peter

1992-11-01

263

Test results for the Gemini Planet Imager data reduction pipeline  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) is a new facility instrument for the Gemini Observatory designed to detect and characterize planets and debris disks orbiting nearby stars; its science camera is a near infrared integral field spectrograph. We have developed a data pipeline for this instrument, which will be made publicly available to the community. The GPI data reduction pipeline (DRP) incorporates all necessary image reduction and calibration steps for high contrast imaging in both the spectral and polarimetric modes, including datacube generation, wavelength solution, astrometric and photometric calibrations, and speckle suppression via ADI and SSDI algorithms. It is implemented in IDL as a flexible modular system, and includes both command line and graphical interface tools including a customized viewer for GPI datacubes. This GPI data reduction pipeline is currently working very well, and is in use daily processing data during the instrument’s ongoing integration and test period at UC Santa Cruz. Here we summarize the results from recent pipeline tests, and present reductions of instrument test data taken with GPI. We will continue to refine and improve these tools throughout the rest of GPI’s testing and commissioning, and they will be released to the community, including both IDL source code and compiled versions that can be used without an IDL license.

Maire, Jérôme; Perrin, Marshall D.; Doyon, René; Chilcote, Jeffrey; Larkin, James E.; Weiss, Jason L.; Marois, Christian; Konopacky, Quinn M.; Millar-Blanchaer, Maxwell; Graham, James R.; Dunn, Jennifer; Galicher, Raphael; Marchis, Franck; Wiktorowicz, Sloane J.; Labrie, Kathleen; Thomas, Sandrine J.; Goodsell, Stephen J.; Rantakyro, Fredrik T.; Palmer, David W.; Macintosh, Bruce A.

2012-09-01

264

Experimental design for the optimization and robustness testing of a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method for the trace analysis of the potentially genotoxic 1,3-diisopropylurea.  

PubMed

This paper discusses a design of experiments (DoE) assisted optimization and robustness testing of a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method development for the trace analysis of the potentially genotoxic 1,3-diisopropylurea (IPU) impurity in mometasone furoate glucocorticosteroid. Compared to the conventional trial-and-error method development, DoE is a cost-effective and systematic approach to system optimization by which the effects of multiple parameters and parameter interactions on a given response are considered. The LC and MS factors were studied simultaneously: flow (F), gradient (G), injection volume (Vinj), cone voltage (E(con)), and collision energy (E(col)). The optimization was carried out with respect to four responses: separation of peaks (Sep), peak area (A(p)), length of the analysis (T), and the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N). An optimization central composite face (CCF) DoE was conducted leading to the early discovery of carry-over effect which was further investigated in order to establish the maximum injectable sample load. A second DoE was conducted in order to obtain the optimal LC-MS/MS method. As part of the validation of the obtained method, its robustness was determined by conducting a fractional factorial of resolution III DoE, wherein column temperature and quadrupole resolution were considered as additional factors. The method utilizes a common Phenomenex Gemini NX C-18 HPLC analytical column with electrospray ionization and a triple quadrupole mass detector in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode, resulting in short analyses with a 10-min runtime. The high sensitivity and low limit of quantification (LOQ) was achieved by (1) MRM mode (instead of single ion monitoring) and (2) avoiding the drawbacks of derivatization (incomplete reaction and time-consuming sample preparation). Quantitatively, the DoE method development strategy resulted in the robust trace analysis of IPU at 1.25 ng/mL absolute concentration corresponding to 0.25 ppm LOQ in 5 g/l mometasone furoate glucocorticosteroid. Validation was carried out in a linear range of 0.25-10 ppm and presented a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 1.08% for system precision. Regarding IPU recovery in mometasone furoate, spiked samples produced recoveries between 96 and 109 % in the range of 0.25 to 2 ppm. PMID:24243602

Székely, György; Henriques, Bruno; Gil, Marco; Alvarez, Carlos

2014-09-01

265

Metal patch test results from 1990-2009.  

PubMed

Although metals are common contact allergens, clinical findings of metal contact dermatitis have varied. Such patients have subsequently become rare in Japan as gold dermatitis caused by ear piercing or baboon syndrome by broken thermometers. To evaluate such clinical findings and to determine the frequency of metal allergy, we analyzed the results of patch testing with 18 metals from 1990-2009. Nine hundred and thirty-one patients (189 men and 742 women, mean age 39.0years [standard deviation±17.8]) were tested. Metals were applied on the back for 2days, and the results read with the International Contact Dermatitis Research Group (ICDRG) scoring system 3days after application. Reactions of + to +++ were regarded as positive. Differences of positive rates between men and women, and patients from 1990-1999 and those from 2000-2009 were analyzed with the ?(2) -test. Differences were considered significant at P<0.05. The metal to which the most patients reacted was 5% nickel sulfate (27.2%), irrespective of sex and phase. Significantly more women reacted to nickel sulfate (P<0.01), mercuric chloride (P<0.05) and gold chloride (P<0.01) than men. Significantly more patients in the 1990s reacted to palladium chloride, mercuric chloride and gold chloride (all P<0.01) than from 2000-2009. Nickel has been the most common metal allergen and mercury-sensitivity has decreased over 19years in Japan. PMID:21342229

Nonaka, Hiromitsu; Nakada, Tokio; Iijima, Masafumi; Maibach, Howard I

2011-03-01

266

Suit Port Aft Bulkhead Mockup Test Results and Lessons Learned  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Small Pressurized Rover (SPR) is currently being carried as an integral part of the current Lunar Surface Architectures under consideration in the Constellation program. One element of the SPR is the suit port, the means by which the crew performs Extravehicular Activities (EVAs). Two suit port deliverables were produced in fiscal year 2008: an aft bulkhead mockup for functional integrated testing with the 1-G SPR mockup and a functional and pressurizable engineering unit. This paper focuses on the test results and lessons learned on the aft bulkhead mockup. The suit port aft bulkhead mockup was integrated with the mockup of the SPR cabin and chassis. It is located on the aft bulkhead of the SPR cabin structure and includes hatches, a locking mechanism, seals, interior and exterior suit don/doff aids, and exterior platforms to accommodate different crewmember heights. A lightweight mockup of the Mark III suit was tested with the suit port aft bulkhead mockup. There are several limitations to the suit port and mockup suits, and results of the suit port evaluation are presented and interpreted within the context of the limitations.

Romig, Barbara A.; Allton, Charles

2009-01-01

267

Flight test results of the SHARE II monogroove heat pipe  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The SHARE II (Space Station Heat Pipe Advanced Radiator Elements) flight experiment was flow in August 1991 on STS-43 in support of the Space Station Freedom (SSF) program. The flight experiment was designed to demonstrate startup and sustained microgravity operation of two 22 ft. long high capacity prototype SSF heat pipe radiator designs. The monogroove heat pipe radiator, one of the two heat pipe radiator designs flown on this experiment, is the subject of this paper. During the flight, the monogroove heat pipe, which contained 40 to 50 ppm of noncondensible gas to simulate end-of-life conditions, was shown to start up, vent bubbles as necessary, reprime under load, and operate successfully under all test conditions. The monogroove heat pipe operated under load for a total of 75 hours and achieved sustained heat transport of 50,000 watt-inches. This paper briefly describes the results of the previous SHARE flight experiment and the improvements made to the monogroove heat pipe as a result of that experiment. The test results of the SHARE II flight are discussed in detail. Based on the results of the SHARE II experiment, the monogroove heat pipe is ready for use in its intended application on SSF.

Brown, Richard F.; Ungar, Eugene; Cornwell, John

1992-01-01

268

Vented Tank Resupply Experiment--Flight Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper reports the results of the Vented Tank Resupply Experiment (VTRE) which was flown as a payload on STS 77. VTRE looks at the ability of vane Propellant Management Devices (PMD) to separate liquid and gas in low gravity. VTRE used two clear 0.8 cubic foot tanks one spherical and one with a short barrel section and transferred Refrigerant 113 between them as well as venting it to space. Tests included retention of liquid during transfer, liquid free venting, and recovery of liquid into the PMD after thruster firing. Liquid was retained successfully at the highest flow rate tested (2.73 gpm). Liquid free vents were achieved for both tanks, although at a higher flow rate (0.1591 cfm) for the spherical tank than the other (0.0400 cfm). Recovery from a thruster firing which moved the liquid to the opposite end of the tank from the PMD was achieved in 30 seconds.

Chato, David J.; Martin, Timothy A.

1997-01-01

269

False-positive results with amylase testing of citrus fruits.  

PubMed

In a case of robbery in which the criminals passed through the garden adorned with calamondin trees (Citrus madurensis), the investigators found in the grass six calamondin fruits, some undamaged, while others apparently bitten. The fruits were collected and sent to the laboratory for DNA analysis to verify the presence of saliva and robbers' DNA profile. A specific immunochromatographic strip test for saliva confirmed the presence of human salivary ?-amylase, but similar positive results were also observed for intact calamondin and other citrus fruits. Further analysis with a specific automated amylase test confirmed the absence of amylase activity. DNA quantification and typing using a specific forensic kit revealed no human DNA presence in any fruits. This case report demonstrates for the first time the occurrence of false positives when human saliva is sought on citrus fruits. PMID:24502328

Ricci, Ugo; Carboni, Ilaria; Torricelli, Francesca

2014-09-01

270

High school staff characteristics and mathematics test results  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This study investigates the relationship between measures of mathematics teacher skill and student achievement in California high schools. Test scores are analyzed in relation to teacher experience and education and student demographics. The results are consistent with the hypotheses that there is a shortage of qualified mathematics teachers in California and that this shortage is associated with low student scores in mathematics. After controlling for poverty, teacher experience and preparation significantly predict test scores. Short-term strategies to increase the supply of qualified mathematics teachers could include staff development, and recruitment incentives. A long-term strategy addressing root causes of the shortage requires more emphasis on mathematics in high school and undergraduate programs.

Fetler, Mark

2010-06-22

271

LEDA RF distribution system design and component test results  

SciTech Connect

The 350 MHz and 700 MHz RF distribution systems for the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) have been designed and are currently being installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Since 350 MHz is a familiar frequency used at other accelerator facilities, most of the major high-power components were available. The 700 MHz, 1.0 MW, CW RF delivery system designed for LEDA is a new development. Therefore, high-power circulators, waterloads, phase shifters, switches, and harmonic filters had to be designed and built for this applications. The final Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) RF distribution systems design will be based on much of the same technology as the LEDA systems and will have many of the RF components tested for LEDA incorporated into the design. Low power and high-power tests performed on various components of these LEDA systems and their results are presented here.

Roybal, W.T.; Rees, D.E.; Borchert, H.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); McCarthy, M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Toole, L. [Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC (United States)

1998-12-31

272

LWR surveillance dosimetry improvement program: PSF metallurgical blind test results  

SciTech Connect

The metallurgical irradiation experiment at the Oak Ridge Research Reactor Poolside Facility (ORR-PSF) was designed as a benchmark to test the accuracy of radiation embrittlement predictions in the pressure vessel wall of light water reactors on the basis of results from surveillance capsules. The PSF metallurgical Blind Test is concerned with the simulated surveillance capsule (SSC) and the simulated pressure vessel capsule (SPVC). The data from the ORR-PSF benchmark experiment are the basis for comparison with the predictions made by participants of the metallurgical ''Blind Test''. The Blind Test required the participants to predict the embrittlement of the irradiated specimen based only on dosimetry and metallurgical data from the SSC1 capsule. This exercise included both the prediction of damage fluence and the prediction of embrittlement based on the predicted fluence. A variety of prediction methodologies was used by the participants. No glaring biases or other deficiencies were found, but neither were any of the methods clearly superior to the others. Closer analysis shows a rather complex and poorly understood relation between fluence and material damage. Many prediction formulas can give an adequate approximation, but further improvement of the prediction methodology is unlikely at this time given the many unknown factors. Instead, attention should be focused on determining realistic uncertainties for the predicted material changes. The Blind Test comparisons provide some clues for the size of these uncertainties. In particular, higher uncertainties must be assigned to materials whose chemical composition lies outside the data set for which the prediction formula was obtained. 16 references, 14 figures, 5 tables.

Kam, F.B.K.; Maerker, R.E.; Stallmann, F.W.

1984-01-01

273

Dynamic test results for the CASES ground experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Controls, Astrophysics, and Structures Experiment in Space (CASES) Ground Test Facility (GTF) has been developed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to provide a facility for the investigation of Controls/Structures Interaction (CSI) phenomena, to support ground testing of a potential shuttle-based CASES flight experiment, and to perform limited boom deployment and retraction dynamics studies. The primary objectives of the ground experiment are to investigate CSI on a test article representative of a Large Space Structure (LSS); provide a platform for Guest Investigators (GI's) to conduct CSI studies; to test and evaluate LSS control methodologies, system identification (ID) techniques, failure mode analysis; and to compare ground test predictions and flight results. The proposed CASES flight experiment consists of a 32 meter deployable/retractable boom at the end of which is an occulting plate. The control objective of the experiment is to maintain alignment of the tip plate (occulter) with a detector located at the base of the boom in the orbiter bay. The tip plate is pointed towards a star, the sun, or the galactic center to collect high-energy X-rays emitted by these sources. The tip plate, boom, and detector comprise a Fourier telescope. The occulting holes in the tip plate are approximately one millimeter in diameter making the alignment requirements quite stringent. Control authority is provided by bidirectional linear thrusters located at the boom tip and Angular Momentum Exchange Devices (AMED's) located at mid-boom and at the tip. The experiment embodies a number of CSI control problems including vibration suppression, pointing a long flexible structure, and disturbance rejection. The CASES GTF is representative of the proposed flight experiment with identical control objectives.

Bukley, Angelia P.; Patterson, Alan F.; Jones, Victoria L.

1993-01-01

274

Dark Ages Radio Explorer Instrument Verification Program: Antenna Test Results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Observations of the HI 21 cm transition line promises to be an important probe into the cosmic Dark Ages and Epoch of Reionization. The Dark Ages Radio Explorer (DARE) is designed to measure the sky-averaged 21-cm signal from this cosmic age using a single radiometer operating between 40-120 MHz (redshifts z=11-35). DARE will orbit the Moon for a mission lifetime of ? 3 years and take data above the lunar far side, where it is shielded from the Earth's intense interference. The science objectives of DARE include formation of first stars, first accreting black holes, beginning of reionization and end of the Dark Ages. The science instrument is composed of a three-element radiometer, including electrically-short, tapered, bi-conical dipole antennas, a receiver, and a digital spectrometer. Although the TRL (Technology Readiness Level) of the individual components of DARE instrument is high, the overall instrument TRL is low. One of the main aim of the entire DARE team is to advance the instrument TRL. In this work we mainly focus on the development work for DARE Antenna. We will present the initial test results of a prototype DARE antenna, fabricated in NRAO. Some CST simulations using the actual DARE experiment set up have also been performed. In future, we plan to perform extensive tests to characterize the beam pattern and spectral response of the prototype DARE instrument design. In order to utilize the anechoic chamber available at NRAO, we will use a half-scale version of the DARE antenna (120-200 MHz). The full-scale version of the DARE antenna (40-120 MHz) along with the final version of the DARE receiver will be used for outdoor tests in the low-RFI environment of Western Australia. We will also present the initial software development for analyzing the test results from the prototype DARE antenna and receiver.

Datta, Abhirup; Bradley, R.; Burns, J. O.; Lazio, J.; Bauman, J.

2012-01-01

275

ROC curve estimation under test-result-dependent sampling  

PubMed Central

The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve is often used to evaluate the performance of a biomarker measured on continuous scale to predict the disease status or a clinical condition. Motivated by the need for novel study designs with better estimation efficiency and reduced study cost, we consider a biased sampling scheme that consists of a SRC and a supplemental TDC. Using this approach, investigators can oversample or undersample subjects falling into certain regions of the biomarker measure, yielding improved precision for the estimation of the ROC curve with a fixed sample size. Test-result-dependent sampling will introduce bias in estimating the predictive accuracy of the biomarker if standard ROC estimation methods are used. In this article, we discuss three approaches for analyzing data of a test-result-dependent structure with a special focus on the empirical likelihood method. We establish asymptotic properties of the empirical likelihood estimators for covariate-specific ROC curves and covariate-independent ROC curves and give their corresponding variance estimators. Simulation studies show that the empirical likelihood method yields good properties and is more efficient than alternative methods. Recommendations on number of regions, cutoff points, and subject allocation is made based on the simulation results. The proposed methods are illustrated with a data example based on an ongoing lung cancer clinical trial. PMID:22723502

Wang, Xiaofei; Ma, Junling; George, Stephen L.

2013-01-01

276

Operational Test Results of the Final Approach Spacing Tool  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A prototype decision support tool for terminal area air traffic controllers, referred to as the Final Approach Spacing Tool (FAST), was recently evaluated in operation with live air traffic at the Dallas/Fort Worth Terminal Radar Approach Control (TRACON) facility in the United States. Controllers utilized the FAST system's runway assignment and sequence advisories to manage and control arrival traffic during more than twenty five peak rush traffic periods. The system performed well resulting in capacity increases at the airport of 10-20% depending on weather and airport conditions. As a result of these tests, the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is proceeding with plans to further develop the prototype FAST system for national deployment at five to ten TRACONs within the United States during the next five years. This paper will present the results of these tests including data on the FAST system impact on airport capacity, aircraft flight times in the terminal area, delay reduction, tower operations including ground movement, and human factors data including workload assessments.

Davis, Thomas J.; Isaacson, Douglas R.; Robinson, John E., III; Lee, Katharine K.; Tobias, Leonard (Technical Monitor)

1996-01-01

277

Current test results for the Athena radar responsive tag  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sandia National Laboratories has teamed with General Atomics and Sierra Monolithics to develop the Athena tag for the Army's Radar Tag Engagement (RaTE) program. The radar-responsive Athena tag can be used for Blue Force tracking and Combat Identification (CID) as well as data collection, identification, and geolocation applications. The Athena tag is small (~4.5" x 2.4" x 4.2"), battery-powered, and has an integral antenna. Once remotely activated by a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) or Moving Target Indicator (MTI) radar, the tag transponds modulated pulses to the radar at a low transmit power. The Athena tag can operate Ku-band and X-band airborne SAR and MTI radars. This paper presents results from current tag development testing activities. Topics covered include recent field tests results from the AN/APY-8 Lynx, F16/APG-66, and F15E/APG-63 V(1) radars and other Fire Control radars. Results show that the Athena tag successfully works with multiple radar platforms, in multiple radar modes, and for multiple applications. Radar-responsive tags such as Athena have numerous applications in military and government arenas. Military applications include battlefield situational awareness, combat identification, targeting, personnel recovery, and unattended ground sensors. Government applications exist in nonproliferation, counter-drug, search-and-rescue, and land-mapping activities.

Ormesher, Richard C.; Martinez, Ana; Plummer, Kenneth W.; Erlandson, David; Delaware, Sheri; Clark, David R.

2006-05-01

278

Deimos Methane-Oxygen Rocket Engine Test Results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents the results of the first DEIMOS Liquid Methane/Oxygen rocket engine test campaign. DEIMOS is an acronym for `Delft Experimental Methane Oxygen propulsion System'. It is a project performed by students under the auspices of DARE (Delft Aerospace Rocket Engineering). The engine provides a theoretical design thrust of 1800 N and specific impulse of 287 s at a chamber pressure of 40 bar with a total mass flow of 637 g/s. It has links to sustainable development, as the propellants used are one of the most promising so-called `green propellants'-combinations, currently under scrutiny by the industry, and the engine is designed to be reusable. This paper reports results from the provisional tests, which had the aim of verifying the engine's ability to fire, and confirming some of the design assumptions to give confidence for further engine designs. Measurements before and after the tests are used to determine first estimates on feed pressures, propellant mass flows and achieved thrust. These results were rather disappointing from a performance point of view, with an average thrust of a mere 3.8% of the design thrust, but nonetheless were very helpful. The reliability of ignition and stability of combustion are discussed as well. An initial assessment as to the reusability, the flexibility and the adaptability of the engine was made. The data provides insight into (methane/oxygen) engine designs, leading to new ideas for a subsequent design. The ultimate goal of this project is to have an operational rocket and to attempt to set an amateur altitude record.

Engelen, S.; Souverein, L. J.; Twigt, D. J.

279

Preliminary operational results of the industrial process heat field tests  

SciTech Connect

There are currently six DOE-funded solar industrial process heat (IPH) field tests which have been operational for one year or longer. These are all low temperature first generation projects which supply heat at temperatures below 100/sup 0/C - three hot water and three hot air. During the 1979 calendar year, personnel from the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) visited all of these sites; the performance and cost results obtained for each project and the operational problems encountered at each site are discussed.

Kutscher, C.; Davenport, R.

1980-04-01

280

Test Results of the Luminosity Monitors for the LHC  

SciTech Connect

The Luminosity Monitor for the LHC has been built at LBNL and will be operational in the LHC during the upcoming run. The device, a gas ionization chamber, is installed in the high luminosity regions (those dedicated to the ATLAS and CMS experiments) and capable to resolve bunch-by-bunch luminosity as well as survive extreme levels of radiation. During the experimental R&D phase of its design, a prototype of this detector has been tested extensively at the ALS, in RHIC as well as in the SPS. Results of these experiments are presented here.

Beche, J.F.; Byrd, J. M.; Doolittle, L.; Manfredi, P. F.; Matis, H. S.; Monroy, M.; Ratti, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stiller, J.; Turner, W.; Yaver, H.; Drees, A.; Bravin, E.

2009-05-04

281

Assessing Equivalent Viscous Damping Using Piping System test Results  

SciTech Connect

The specification of damping for nuclear piping systems subject to seismic-induced motions has been the subject of many studies and much controversy. Damping estimation based on test data can be influenced by numerous factors, consequently leading to considerable scatter in damping estimates in the literature. At present, nuclear industry recommendations and nuclear regulatory guidance are not consistent on the treatment of damping for analysis of nuclear piping systems. Therefore, there is still a need to develop a more complete and consistent technical basis for specification of appropriate damping values for use in design and analysis. This paper summarizes the results of recent damping studies conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

Nie, J.; Morante, R.

2010-07-18

282

JWST Near-Infrared Detectors: Latest Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The James Webb Space Telescope, an infrared-optimized space telescope being developed by NASA for launch in 2013, will utilize cutting-edge detector technology in its investigation of fundamental questions in astrophysics. JWST's near infrared spectrograph, NIRSpec utilizes two 2048 x 2048 HdCdTe arrays with Sidecar ASIC readout electronics developed by Teledyne to provide spectral coverage from 0.6 microns to 5 microns. We present recent test and calibration results for the NIRSpec flight arrays as well as data processing routines for noise reduction and cosmic ray rejection.

Smith, Erin C.; Rauscher, Bernard J.; Alexander, David; Brambora, Clifford K.; Chiao, Meng; Clemons, Brian L.; Derro, Rebecca; Engler, Chuck; Fox, Ori; Garrison, Matthew B.; Greenhouse, Matthew A.; Henegar, Greg; Hill, Robert J.; Johnson, Thomas; Lavaque, Dodolfo J.; Lindler, Don J.; Manthripragada, Sridhar S.; Marshall, Cheryl; Mott, Brent; Parr, Thomas M.; Roher, Wayne D.; Shakoorzadeh, Kamdin B.; Schnurr, Richard; Smith, Miles; Waczynski, Augustyn

2009-01-01

283

The X-31A quasi-tailless flight test results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A quasi-tailless flight investigation was launched using the X-31A enhanced fighter maneuverability airplane. In-flight simulations were used to assess the effect of partial to total vertical tail removal. The rudder control surface was used to cancel the stabilizing effects of the vertical tail, and yaw thrust vector commands were used to restabilize and control the airplane. The quasi-tailless mode was flown supersonically with gentle maneuvering and subsonically in precision approaches and ground attack profiles. Pilot ratings and a full set of flight test measurements were recorded. This report describes the results obtained and emphasizes the lessons learned from the X-31A flight test experiment. Sensor-related issues and their importance to a quasi-tailless simulation and to ultimately controlling a directionally unstable vehicle are assessed. The X-31A quasi-tailless flight test experiment showed that tailless and reduced tail fighter aircraft are definitely feasible. When the capability is designed into the airplane from the beginning, the benefits have the potential to outweigh the added complexity required.

Bosworth, John T.; Stoliker, P. C.

1996-01-01

284

Bridge Testing With Ground-Based Interferometric Radar: Experimental Results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The research of innovative non-contact techniques aimed at the vibration measurement of civil engineering structures (also for damage detection and structural health monitoring) is continuously directed to the optimization of measures and methods. Ground-Based Radar Interferometry (GBRI) represents the more recent technique available for static and dynamic control of structures and ground movements. Dynamic testing of bridges and buildings in operational conditions are currently performed: (a) to assess the conformity of the structure to the project design at the end of construction; (b) to identify the modal parameters (i.e. natural frequencies, mode shapes and damping ratios) and to check the variation of any modal parameters over the years; (c) to evaluate the amplitude of the structural response to special load conditions (i.e. strong winds, earthquakes, heavy railway or roadway loads). If such tests are carried out by using a non-contact technique (like GBRI), the classical issues of contact sensors (like accelerometers) are easily overtaken. This paper presents and discusses the results of various tests carried out on full-scale bridges by using a Stepped Frequency-Continuous Wave radar system.

Chiara, P.; Morelli, A.

2010-05-01

285

Bridge Testing With Ground-Based Interferometric Radar: Experimental Results  

SciTech Connect

The research of innovative non-contact techniques aimed at the vibration measurement of civil engineering structures (also for damage detection and structural health monitoring) is continuously directed to the optimization of measures and methods. Ground-Based Radar Interferometry (GBRI) represents the more recent technique available for static and dynamic control of structures and ground movements.Dynamic testing of bridges and buildings in operational conditions are currently performed: (a) to assess the conformity of the structure to the project design at the end of construction; (b) to identify the modal parameters (i.e. natural frequencies, mode shapes and damping ratios) and to check the variation of any modal parameters over the years; (c) to evaluate the amplitude of the structural response to special load conditions (i.e. strong winds, earthquakes, heavy railway or roadway loads). If such tests are carried out by using a non-contact technique (like GBRI), the classical issues of contact sensors (like accelerometers) are easily overtaken.This paper presents and discusses the results of various tests carried out on full-scale bridges by using a Stepped Frequency-Continuous Wave radar system.

Chiara, P.; Morelli, A. [SO.IN.G Strutture e Ambiente S.r.l., Via delle Corallaie 24/4, Livorno (Italy)

2010-05-28

286

Test results from large wing and fuselage panels  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents the first results in an assessment of the strength, stiffness, and damage tolerance of stiffened wing and fuselage subcomponents. Under this NASA funded program, 10 large wing and fuselage panels, variously fabricated by automated tow placement and dry-stitched preform/resin transfer molding, are to be tested. The first test of an automated tow placement six-longeron fuselage panel under shear load was completed successfully. Using NASTRAN finite-element analysis the stiffness of the panel in the linear range prior to buckling was predicted within 3.5 percent. A nonlinear analysis predicted the buckling load within 10 percent and final failure load within 6 percent. The first test of a resin transfer molding six-stringer wing panel under compression was also completed. The panel failed unexpectedly in buckling because of inadequate supporting structure. The average strain was 0.43 percent with a line load of 20.3 kips per inch of width. This strain still exceeds the design allowable strains. Also, the stringers did not debond before failure, which is in contrast to the general behavior of unstitched panels.

Madan, Ram C.; Voldman, Mike

1993-01-01

287

Relating results from earthworm toxicity tests to agricultural soil  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The artificial soil tests of the European Economic Community and of the Organization for Economic Cooperation produce data relating earthworm mortality to pesticide concentrations in soil under laboratory conditions. To apply these results to agricultural soils it is necessary to relate these concentrations to amounts of pesticide applied per area. This paper reviews the relevant published literature and suggests a simple relation for regulatory use. Hazards to earthworms from pesticides are suggested to be greatest soon after application, when the pesticides may be concentrated in a soil layer a few millimeters thick. For estimating exposure of earthworms, however, a thicker soil layer should be considered, to account for their movement through soil. During favorable weather conditions, earthworms belonging to species appropriate to the artificial soil test have been reported to confine their activity to a layer about 5 cm. If a 5-cm layer is accepted as relevant for regulatory purposes, then an application of 1 kg/ha would be equivalent to 1-67 ppm (dry) in the artificial soil test.

Beyer, W.N.

1992-01-01

288

Hydrologic testing methodology and results from deep basalt boreholes  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the hydrologic field-testing program is to provide data for characterization of the groundwater systems wihin the Pasco Basin that are significant to understanding waste isolation. The effort is directed toward characterizing the areal and vertical distributions of hydraulic head, hydraulic properties, and hydrochemistry. Data obtained from these studies provide input for numerical modeling of groundwater flow and solute transport. These models are then used for evaluating potential waste migration as a function of space and time. The groundwater system beneath the Hanford Site and surrounding area consists of a thick, accordantly layered sequence of basalt flows and associated sedimentary interbed that primarily occur in the upper part of the Columbia River basalt. Permeable horizons of the sequence are associated with the interbeds and the interflow zones within the basalt. The columnar interiors of a flow act as low-permeability aquitards, separating the more-permeable interflows or interbeds. This paper discusses the hydrologic field-gathering activities, specifically, field-testing methodology and test results from deep basalt boreholes.

Strait, S R; Spane, F A; Jackson, R L; Pidcoe, W W

1982-05-01

289

Testing and results of an infrared polarized scene generator concept demonstrator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Polarization signature information is becoming more useful as an added discriminant in a variety of signature analysis applications. However, there are few infrared scene projection systems that provide the capability to inject target simulation images with polarization content into a seeker, or other imaging sensor. In this paper, we discuss a polarization scene generator (PSG) concept that is applicable to testing sensor systems operating in cryogenic-vacuum environments. This polarization scene generator concept demonstrator system was constructed from off-the-shelf technology using commercially available mid-wave infrared (MWIR) scene projectors based on micromirror device display technology, standard infrared polarizers, and standard IR cameras. The demonstrator system used two digital micromirror device (DMD)-based displays, each projecting orthogonal polarization states, which were then combined to generate images with pixels having independent S I or S II polarization content. This concept is robust because it is relatively unconstrained by the IR scene generators used or by the seekers tested. This paper discusses the test results of the concept demonstrator system with regard to sensitivity to misalignment, radiance mismatch, and display uniformity.

Erbach, Peter S.; Pezzaniti, J. L.; Chenault, David B.; Saylor, Danny; Lowry, Heard S.

2008-04-01

290

Salmonella mutagenicity tests. II. Results from the testing of 270 chemicals  

SciTech Connect

This publication includes data of Salmonella mutagenicity results on 270 coded chemicals, encompassing 329 tests performed by three laboratories under contract to the National Toxicology Program (NTP). The preincubation modification of the Salmonella/mammalian microsome assay was used to test chemicals in up to five Salmonella strains in the presence and absence of rat and hamster liver S-9. With a few exceptions, inter- and intralaboratory reproducibility was good.

Mortelmans, K.; Haworth, S.; Lawlor, T.; Speck, W.; Tainer, B.; Zeiger, E.

1986-01-01

291

Summary of preliminary hydrologic testing results, Grande Ronde interflow, test interval No. 6 in DC-12  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the preliminary results of hydrologic tests conducted in an interflow zone within the Grande Ronde Basalt to evaluate the effects of drilling fluid on hydraulic property and hydrochemical characterization. Preliminary analysis of data obtained indicates that no discernible impact was evident through the use of drilling mud on the characterization of hydraulic properties and/or hydrochemistry for this test horizon. 1 ref., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1980-11-14

292

Airframe Noise Results from the QTD II Flight Test Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

With continued growth in air travel, sensitivity to community noise intensifies and materializes in the form of increased monitoring, regulations, and restrictions. Accordingly, realization of quieter aircraft is imperative, albeit only achievable with reduction of both engine and airframe components of total aircraft noise. Model-scale airframe noise testing has aided in this pursuit; however, the results are somewhat limited due to lack of fidelity of model hardware, particularly in simulating full-scale landing gear. Moreover, simulation of true in-flight conditions is non-trivial if not infeasible. This paper reports on an investigation of full-scale landing gear noise measured as part of the 2005 Quiet Technology Demonstrator 2 (QTD2) flight test program. Conventional Boeing 777-300ER main landing gear were tested, along with two noise reduction concepts, namely a toboggan fairing and gear alignment with the local flow, both of which were down-selected from various other noise reduction devices evaluated in model-scale testing at Virginia Tech. The full-scale toboggan fairings were designed by Goodrich Aerostructures as add-on devices allowing for complete retraction of the main gear. The baseline-conventional gear, faired gear, and aligned gear were all evaluated with the high-lift system in the retracted position and deployed at various flap settings, all at engine idle power setting. Measurements were taken with flyover community noise microphones and a large aperture acoustic phased array, yielding far-field spectra, and localized sources (beamform maps). The results were utilized to evaluate qualitatively and quantitatively the merit of each noise reduction concept. Complete similarity between model-scale and full-scale noise reduction levels was not found and requires further investigation. Far-field spectra exhibited no noise reduction for both concepts across all angles and frequencies. Phased array beamform maps show inconclusive evidence of noise reduction at selective frequencies (1500 to 3000 Hz) but are otherwise in general agreement with the far-field spectra results (within measurement uncertainty).

Elkoby, Ronen; Brusniak, Leon; Stoker, Robert W.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Abeysinghe, Amal; Moe, Jefferey W.

2007-01-01

293

Impact of Proficiency Testing on Results of the Microscopic Agglutination Test for Diagnosis of Leptospirosis  

PubMed Central

A proficiency testing scheme for the leptospirosis microscopic agglutination test was provided to 37 laboratories in 23 countries in 2002 (round 1) and to 60 laboratories in 34 countries in 2003 (round 2). Thirty-four laboratories participated in both rounds. Each panel consisted of five rabbit serum samples, four of which were antisera raised against pathogenic serovars of Leptospira. One of these samples was a mixture of two different antisera. The rates of false-negative results, calculated on the basis of the assumption that serovars within a serogroup will cross-react, were 11% for round 1 and 14% for round 2. There were regional differences in the rates of false-negative results. The titers reported by laboratories testing for the same sample with the same serovar varied widely. Laboratories that had previously participated in round 1 reported fewer false-negative results in round 2 than new participants (10 and 21%, respectively [P = 0.002]) and reported 0.56 false-negative results per participant, whereas new participants reported 1.23 false-negative results per participant (P = 0.041). Laboratories that had previously participated also reported fewer false-negative results in round 2 than in round 1 when samples common to both rounds were tested (5 and 15%, respectively [P = 0.028]). The titers reported by the new participants were, on average, lower than those reported by the laboratories that had participated previously (P = 0.019) and were significantly more variable (P = 0.001). Analysis of these results suggests a positive impact of proficiency testing on the testing performance of the participating laboratories. PMID:15583270

Chappel, R. J.; Goris, M.; Palmer, M. F.; Hartskeerl, R. A.

2004-01-01

294

Test results of high-precision large cryogenic lens holders  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For the Euclid mission a Pre-Development phase is implemented to prove feasibility of individual components of the system [1]. The Near Infrared Spectrometer and Photometer (NISP) of EUCLID requires high precision large lens holders (?170 mm) at cryogenic temperatures (150K). The four lenses of the optical system are made of different materials: fused silica, CaF2, and LF5G15 that are mounted in a separate lens barrel design. Each lens has its separate mechanical interface to the lens barrel, the so called adaption ring. The performance of the lens holder design is verified by adapted test equipment and test facility including an optical metrology system. The characterization of the lens deformation and displacement (decenter, tilt) due to mechanical loads of the holder itself as well as thermally induced loads are driven by the required submicron precision range and the operational thermal condition. The surface deformation of the lens and its holder is verified by interferometric measurements, while tilt and position accuracy are measured by in-situ fibre based distance sensors. The selected distance measurement sensors have the capability to measure in a few mm range with submicron resolution in ultra high vacuum, in vibration environments and at liquid nitrogen temperatures and below. The calibration of the measurement system is of crucial importance: impacts such as temperature fluctuation, surface roughness, surface reflectivity, straylight effects, etc. on the measured distance are carefully calibrated. Inbuilt thermal expansion effects of the fibre sensors are characterized and proven with lens dummy with quasi zero CTE. The paper presents the test results and measured performance of the high precision large cryogenic lens holders attained by the metrology system. These results are presented on behalf of the EUCLID consortium.

Gal, C.; Reutlinger, A.; Boesz, A.; Leberle, T.; Mottaghibonab, A.; Eckert, P.; Dubowy, M.; Gebler, H.; Grupp, F.; Geis, N.; Bode, A.; Katterloher, R.; Bender, R.

2012-09-01

295

Fan Noise Source Diagnostic Test: LDV Measured Flow Field Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results are presented of an experiment conducted to investigate potential sources of noise in the flow developed by two 22-in. diameter turbofan models. The R4 and M5 rotors that were tested were designed to operate at nominal take-off speeds of 12,657 and 14,064 RPMC, respectively. Both fans were tested with a common set of swept stators installed downstream of the rotors. Detailed measurements of the flows generated by the two were made using a laser Doppler velocimeter system. The wake flows generated by the two rotors are illustrated through a series of contour plots. These show that the two wake flows are quite different, especially in the tip region. These data are used to explain some of the differences in the rotor/stator interaction noise generated by the two fan stages. In addition to these wake data, measurements were also made in the R4 rotor blade passages. These results illustrate the tip flow development within the blade passages, its migration downstream, and (at high rotor speeds) its merging with the blade wake of the adjacent (following) blade. Data also depict the variation of this tip flow with tip clearance. Data obtained within the rotor blade passages at high rotational speeds illustrate the variation of the mean shock position across the different blade passages.

Podboy, Gary C.; Krupar, Martin J.; Hughes, Christopher E.; Woodward, Richard P.

2003-01-01

296

Portable narcotics detector and the results obtained in field tests  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A compact integrated narcotics detection instrument (CINDI) has been developed at NOVA R&D, Inc. with funding provided by the U.S. Coast Guard. CINDI is designed as a portable sensitive neutron backscatter detector which has excellent penetration for thick and high Z compartment barriers. It also has a highly sensitive detection system for backscattered neutrons and, therefore, uses a very weak californium-252 neutron source. Neutrons backscatter profusely from materials that have a large hydrogen content, such as narcotics. The rate of backscattered neutrons detected is analyzed by a microprocessor and displayed on the control panel. The operator guides the detector along a suspected area and displays in real time the backscattered neutron rate. CINDI is capable of detecting narcotics effectively behind panels made of steel, wood, fiberglass, or even lead-lined materials. This makes it useful for inspecting marine vessels, ship bulkheads, automobiles, structure walls or small sealed containers. The strong response of CINDI to hydrogen-rich materials such as narcotics makes it an effective tool for detecting concealed drugs. Its response has been field tested by NOVA, the U.S. Coast Guard and Brewt Power Systems. The results of the tests show excellent response and specificity to narcotic drugs. Several large shipments of concealed drugs have been discovered during these trials and the results are presented and discussed.

Tumer, Tumay O.; Su, Chih-Wu; Kaplan, Christopher R.; Rigdon, Stephen W.

1997-02-01

297

Aerodynamic and Acoustic Flight Test Results and Results for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As part of the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy program, a 747SP airplane was modified to carry a 2.5-m telescope in the aft section of the fuselage. The resulting airborne observatory allows for observations above 99 percent of the water vapor in the atmosphere. The open cavity created by the modifications had the potential to significantly affect the airplane in the areas of aerodynamics and acoustics. Several series of flight tests were conducted to clear the operating envelope of the airplane for astronomical observations, planned to be performed between the altitudes of 35,000 ft and 45,000 ft. The flight tests were successfully completed. Cavity acoustics were below design limits, and the overall acoustic characteristics of the cavity were better than expected. The modification did have some effects on the stability and control of the airplane, but these effects were not significant. Airplane air data systems were not affected by the modifications. This paper describes the methods used to examine the aerodynamics and acoustic data from the flight tests and provides a discussion of the flight-test results in the areas of cavity acoustics, stability and control, and air data.

Cumming, Stephen B.; Smith, Mark S.; Cliatt, Larry J.; Frederick, Michael A.

2014-01-01

298

Field testing results for the strategic petroleum reserve pipeline corrosion control program  

SciTech Connect

Results of two studies conducted as part of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Pipeline Corrosion Control Program are reported. These studies focused on evaluation of rotary-applied concrete materials for internal pipeline protection against the erosive and corrosive effects of flowing brine. The study also included evaluation of liners applied by hand on pipe pieces that cannot be lined by rotary methods. Such pipe pieces include tees, elbows and flanged pipe sections. Results are reported from a corrosion survey of 17 different liner formulations tested at the-Big-Rill SPR Site. Testing consisted of electrochemical corrosion rate measurements made on lined pipe sections exposed, in a test manifold, to flowing SPR generated fluids. Testing also involved cumulative immersion exposure where samples were exposed to static site-generated brine for increasing periods of time. Samples were returned to the laboratory for various diagnostic analyses. Results of this study showed that standard calcium silicate concrete (API RP10E) and a rotary calcium aluminate concrete formulation were excellent performers. Hand-lined pipe pieces did not provide as much corrosion protection. The focus of the second part of the study was on further evaluation of the calcium silicate, calcium aluminate and hand-applied liners in actual SPR equipment and service. It was a further objective to assess the practicality of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) for field corrosion monitoring of concrete lined pipe compared to the more well-known linear polarization technique. This study showed that concrete linings reduced the corrosion rate for bare steel from 10 to 15 mils per year to 1 mil per year or less. Again, the hand-applied liners did not provide as much corrosion protection as the rotary-applied liners. The EIS technique was found to be robust for field corrosion measurements. Mechanistic and kinetic corrosion rate data were reliably obtained.

Buchheit, R.G.; Maestas, L.M.; Hinkebein, T.E.

1998-02-01

299

Results of the STRV-2 lasercom terminal evaluation tests  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The STRV-2 lasercom terminal (LCT) was designed and developed by AstroTerra Corporation of San Diego, California, under funding from the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO). Scheduled for launch in late 1998 it will be used to demonstrate, for the first time, high data rate bi-directional satellite-to-ground optical communications. Concurrently with the development of the STRV-2 lasercom NASA/JPL was assembling the lasercom test and evaluation station (LTES), a high quality test platform for pre-flight characterization of optical communications terminals. The respective development schedules allowed evaluation of the STRV-2 LCT using LTES, for a month, prior to integration of the LCT with the spacecraft palette. Final co-alignment of the transmitter lasers to within plus or minus 20 (mu) rads with respect to the receive axis was achieved. This in turn allowed the specified 76 (mu) rad transmit beam divergence to be realized. However, subjecting the LCT to expected on-orbit temperatures revealed that the co-alignment deteriorated causing beam spreading, a finding which prompted the recommendation to operate the lasers warmed up during ground encounters. The 'bent-pipe' operation bit-error rates (BER) at 155, 194 and 325 Mbps were less than or equal to 1E - 10 over an approximately 20 dB range of irradiance measured at the receive telescope aperture. At 500 Mbps BER's of 1E-6 were achieved over an approximately 6 dB irradiance range, suggesting greater vulnerability to atmosphere induced fades. A pointing offset between the acquisition receivers and transmitter lasers of 1 mrad was measured. The impact of this offset will be to limit acquisition camera framing rates to 87 and 251 Hz, thus limiting the tracking loop bandwidth. Tracking performance test of the lasercom terminal, though planned could not be carried out because the software was not ready at the time of testing with LTES. The test results obtained for STRV-2 lasercom terminal will be used for designing the ground receiver.

Biswas, Abhijit; Williams, G.; Wilson, Keith E.; Hakakha, Harel; Stieger, Ron; Korevaar, Eric J.

1998-05-01

300

Mutagenicity in drug development: interpretation and significance of test results.  

PubMed

The use of mutagenicity data has been proposed and widely accepted as a relatively fast and inexpensive means of predicting long-term risk to man (i.e., cancer in somatic cells, heritable mutations in germ cells). This view is based on the universal nature of the genetic material, the somatic mutation model of carcinogenesis, and a number of studies showing correlations between mutagenicity and carcinogenicity. An uncritical acceptance of this approach by some regulatory and industrial concerns is over-conservative, naive, and scientifically unjustifiable on a number of grounds: Human cancers are largely life-style related (e.g., cigarettes, diet, tanning). Mutagens (both natural and man-made) are far more prevalent in the environment than was originally assumed (e.g., the natural bases and nucleosides, protein pyrolysates, fluorescent lights, typewriter ribbon, red wine, diesel fuel exhausts, viruses, our own leukocytes). "False-positive" (relative to carcinogenicity) and "false-negative" mutagenicity results occur, often with rational explanations (e.g., high threshold, inappropriate metabolism, inadequate genetic endpoint), and thereby confound any straightforward interpretation of mutagenicity test results. Test battery composition affects both the proper identification of mutagens and, in many instances, the ability to make preliminary risk assessments. In vitro mutagenicity assays ignore whole animal protective mechanisms, may provide unphysiological metabolism, and may be either too sensitive (e.g., testing at orders-of-magnitude higher doses than can be ingested) or not sensitive enough (e.g., short-term treatments inadequately model chronic exposure in bioassay). Bacterial systems, particularly the Ames assay, cannot in principle detect chromosomal events which are involved in both carcinogenesis and germ line mutations in man. Some compounds induce only chromosomal events and little or no detectable single-gene events (e.g., acyclovir, caffeine, methapyrilene). In vivo mutagenicity assays are more physiological but appear to be relatively insensitive due to the inability to achieve sufficiently high acute plasma levels to mimic cumulative long-term effects. Examination of the mutagenicity of naturally occurring analogs may indicate the irrelevance of a test compound's mutagenicity (e.g., deoxyguanosine and the structurally related antiviral drug, acyclovir, have identical mutagenicity patterns). Life-threatening or severe debilitating diseases (e.g., cancer, severe psychoses, severe crippling arthritis, sight-threatening diseases) may justify treatment with mutagenic or even carcinogenic therapeutic agents (benefit/risk considerations).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:3991935

Clive, D

1985-03-01

301

40 CFR 1033.320 - Calculation and reporting of test results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false Calculation and reporting of test results. 1033.320 Section 1033.320 Protection...1033.320 Calculation and reporting of test results. (a) Calculate initial test results using the applicable test procedure...

2011-07-01

302

Influence of Blood Lipids on Global Coagulation Test Results  

PubMed Central

Background High levels of blood lipids have been associated with high levels of coagulation factors. We investigated whether blood lipids influence the results of global coagulation tests, including prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), and thrombin generation assay (TGA). Methods PT, aPTT, and TGA, along with procoagulant and anticoagulant factors, were measured in 488 normal individuals. Vitamin K status was assessed with prothrombin-induced by vitamin K absence-II (PIVKA-II). Results The procoagulant factors II, VII, IX, X, and XI and anticoagulant factors protein C and protein S showed significant correlations with triglyceride, and the procoagulant factors II, V, VII, IX, X, XI, and XII and anticoagulant factors antithrombin and protein C correlated with total cholesterol. There were no correlations of blood lipid levels with PIVKA-II levels. Subjects with high triglyceride levels (?200 mg/dL) showed shorter PT values than those with lower triglyceride levels. However, aPTT value was not changed in terms of blood lipid levels. In both 1 and 5 pM tissue factor-induced TGAs, subjects in the high-triglyceride or high-cholesterol groups (?240 mg/dL) had high levels of lag time, time-to-peak, and endogenous thrombin potential. Total cholesterol was a significant determinant of PT and TGA values. Conclusion High blood lipids were related with increased coagulation activity in a normal population. Our findings are expected to help interpret the global coagulation test results in individuals with high lipid levels. PMID:25553275

Kim, Jung-Ah; Kim, Ji-Eun; Song, Sang Hoon

2015-01-01

303

Space Shuttle Main Engine instrumented High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump technology test bed testing results summary  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents the test results from the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) instrumented High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (HPOTP). The turbopump was tested on Engine 3001, a highly instrumented engine, in an effort to characterize the turbopump and the engine system. Seven tests, for a total duration of 766 seconds, were performed over a five month time period. The testing was performed at a wide variety of engine conditions. Changes in engine mixture ratio, power level, engine inlet oxidizer pressure, engine inlet fuel pressure, and engine start sequence were made. A discussion of all the HPOTP pressure and temperature data obtained are presented with comparisons to supporting analyses made where applicable. The effect of the various engine conditions on the measured data is addressed. This paper also discusses the challenges that were overcome to obtain the data. The significant instrumentation related problems encountered during the design, fabrication, and testing of this turbopump are summarized. Only those issues that affected the data obtained or the instrumentation itself are discussed. The relevance of the data to other noninstrumented turbomachinery is outlined. Conclusions and recommendations resulting from the test series will be presented.

Koelbl, Mary E.

1993-06-01

304

Space Shuttle Main Engine instrumented High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump technology test bed testing results summary  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents the test results from the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) instrumented High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (HPOTP). The turbopump was tested on Engine 3001, a highly instrumented engine, in an effort to characterize the turbopump and the engine system. Seven tests, for a total duration of 766 seconds, were performed over a five month time period. The testing was performed at a wide variety of engine conditions. Changes in engine mixture ratio, power level, engine inlet oxidizer pressure, engine inlet fuel pressure, and engine start sequence were made. A discussion of all the HPOTP pressure and temperature data obtained are presented with comparisons to supporting analyses made where applicable. The effect of the various engine conditions on the measured data is addressed. This paper also discusses the challenges that were overcome to obtain the data. The significant instrumentation related problems encountered during the design, fabrication, and testing of this turbopump are summarized. Only those issues that affected the data obtained or the instrumentation itself are discussed. The relevance of the data to other noninstrumented turbomachinery is outlined. Conclusions and recommendations resulting from the test series will be presented.

Koelbl, Mary E.

1993-01-01

305

SSME seal test program: Test results for smooth, hole-pattern and helically-grooved stators  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

All of the listed seals were tested in a liquid Halon test facility at high Reynolds numbers. In addition, a helically-grooved-stator seal was tested in an air seal facility. An analysis of the test results with comparisons to theoretical predictions supports the following conclusions: (1) For small seals, the Hirs' friction-factor model is more restricted than had been thought; (2) For smooth seals, predictions of stiffness and damping improve markedly as the radical clearance is reduced; (3) Friction-factor data for hole-pattern-seal stators frequently deviates from the Hirs model; (4) Predictions of stiffness and damping coefficients for hole-pattern-stator seals is generally reasonable; (5) Tests for the hole-pattern stators at reduced clearances show no clear optimum for hole-pattern seals with respect to either hole-area ratio or hole depth to minimum clearance ratios; (6) Tests of these hole-pattern stators show no significant advantage in net damping over smooth seals; (7) Tests of helically-grooved seal stators in Halon show reasonable agreement between theory and prediction for leakage and direct stiffness but poor agreement for the net damping coefficient.

Childs, Dara W.

1987-01-01

306

Robust reinforcement learning.  

PubMed

This letter proposes a new reinforcement learning (RL) paradigm that explicitly takes into account input disturbance as well as modeling errors. The use of environmental models in RL is quite popular for both offline learning using simulations and for online action planning. However, the difference between the model and the real environment can lead to unpredictable, and often unwanted, results. Based on the theory of H(infinity) control, we consider a differential game in which a "disturbing" agent tries to make the worst possible disturbance while a "control" agent tries to make the best control input. The problem is formulated as finding a min-max solution of a value function that takes into account the amount of the reward and the norm of the disturbance. We derive online learning algorithms for estimating the value function and for calculating the worst disturbance and the best control in reference to the value function. We tested the paradigm, which we call robust reinforcement learning (RRL), on the control task of an inverted pendulum. In the linear domain, the policy and the value function learned by online algorithms coincided with those derived analytically by the linear H(infinity) control theory. For a fully nonlinear swing-up task, RRL achieved robust performance with changes in the pendulum weight and friction, while a standard reinforcement learning algorithm could not deal with these changes. We also applied RRL to the cart-pole swing-up task, and a robust swing-up policy was acquired. PMID:15720771

Morimoto, Jun; Doya, Kenji

2005-02-01

307

Results and Analysis from Space Suit Joint Torque Testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A space suit's mobility is critical to an astronaut's ability to perform work efficiently. As mobility increases, the astronaut can perform tasks for longer durations with less fatigue. Mobility can be broken down into two parts: range of motion (ROM) and torque. These two measurements describe how the suit moves and how much force it takes to move. Two methods were chosen to define mobility requirements for the Constellation Space Suit Element (CSSE). One method focuses on range of motion and the second method centers on joint torque. A joint torque test was conducted to determine a baseline for current advanced space suit joint torques. This test utilized the following space suits: Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES), I-Suit, D-Suit, Enhanced Mobility (EM)- ACES, and Mark III (MK-III). Data was collected data from 16 different joint movements of each suit. The results were then reviewed and CSSE joint torque requirement values were selected. The focus of this paper is to discuss trends observed during data analysis.

Matty, Jennifer

2010-01-01

308

Test-beam Results for the CMS Forward Pixel Detector  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Silicon pixel detectors and readout chips for the CMS pixel were tested in a beam at CERN. A silicon telescope consisting of 8 planes of silicon strips gave the position of the 250 GeV/c pion beam with a ? = 7 ? m at the position of the pixel detector. The pixel sensors under test are located between the telescope planes. The information is read out with a custom made VME system. Data was taken with the beam at different angles of incidence relative to the pixel sensors that have a square shape and 150 ? m size. Using an analog readout of the signal and a magnetic field of up to 3T, a position resolutions between 10 and 20 ? m were observed with detectors before irradiation. These results satisfy the requirements set for the CMS detector but still need to be confirmed after irradiating the sensors. Participating institutions: U. of California Davis, FNAL, Johns Hopkins U., IHEP Vienna, U. of Mississippi, Northwestern U., Purdue U., PSI Zürich, Rutgers U., U. of Zürich.

Rott, Carsten

2001-04-01

309

Metrology and Tests beamline at SOLEIL Design and first results  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project is install at the 2.75 GeV SOLEIL synchrotron radiation source a calibration and metrology test facility for the R and D of optical components and detectors. We have build, on a bending magnet, two branches to cover an energy range from few eV to 28 keV and give access to white beam. This installation will first address the needs of the SOLEIL experimental groups(Optics and Detectors)and will be used by a large community. This beamline will also be valuable as a general-purpose beamline to prepare, test and set up a wide range of experiments in the field of Astrophysics, laser plasma etc...A complementary important aspect of this installation is the realization of primary standard: the metrology beamline of SOLEIL could become the national primary standard source in collaboration with the Laboratoire National d'Essais(LNE)and help in the design and characterization of several diagnostics for the Megajoule Laser in Bordeaux in collaboration with the CEA DIF. The beamline has been designed to provide great flexibility. In this paper, we describe the beamline design, the end station instrumentation and give also some preliminary results.

Idir, Mourad; Mercere, Pascal; Moreno, Thierry; Delmotte, Aurelien; Dasilva, Paulo; Modi, Mohammed H. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L'Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin-BP 48 91192 GIF-sur-YVETTE CEDEX (France)

2010-06-23

310

In-flight and laboratory vacuum-friction test results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Coefficient of friction measurements were made for six unlubricated metal couples exposed to the space environment aboard the OV-1-13 spacecraft and exposed to laboratory vacuum. Materials studied included mutually soluble, partially soluble, and insoluble metal combinations. Two samples of each material couple were tested in space and in the laboratory using the disk and rider technique. Linear velocity was 0.10 cm/s (2.5 in/min) and rider normal load was 4.45 N (1 lb) for the gold versus silver couples and 8.90 N (2lb) for the other combinations. Results showed that friction data obtained in a clean ion-pumped laboratory vacuum of 10 to the minus 10 power materials with low mutual solubility can be correlated to operation in the vicinity of a typical scientific spacecraft that is exposed to an ambient pressure as low as 10 to the minus 12 power torr. The expected increase in coefficient of friction with solubility was shown. Material couples with high mutual solubility present the hazard of unpredictable drastic friction increase in orbit which may not be evident in laboratory testing at levels down to 10 to the minus 10 power torr. It was also shown that gross cold welding of unlubricated metals exposed to a satellite environment does not occur.

Devine, E. J.; Evans, H. E.; Leasure, W. A.

1973-01-01

311

Synthetic vision system flight test results and lessons learned  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Honeywell Systems and Research Center developed and demonstrated an active 35 GHz Radar Imaging system as part of the FAA/USAF/Industry sponsored Synthetic Vision System Technology Demonstration (SVSTD) Program. The objectives of this presentation are to provide a general overview of flight test results, a system level perspective that encompasses the efforts of the SVSTD and Augmented VIsual Display (AVID) programs, and more importantly, provide the AVID workshop participants with Honeywell's perspective on the lessons that were learned from the SVS flight tests. One objective of the SVSTD program was to explore several known system issues concerning radar imaging technology. The program ultimately resolved some of these issues, left others open, and in fact created several new concerns. In some instances, the interested community has drawn improper conclusions from the program by globally attributing implementation specific issues to radar imaging technology in general. The motivation for this presentation is therefore to provide AVID researchers with a better understanding of the issues that truly remain open, and to identify the perceived issues that are either resolved or were specific to Honeywell's implementation.

Radke, Jeffrey

1993-01-01

312

First Measurements and Results With a Stretched Wire Test Setup  

SciTech Connect

The LINAC Coherent Light Source [LCLS] is a free electron laser, designed to produce high brilliant X-ray beams using Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission [SASE]. Due to the physics of SASE, the electron beam has to be held very precisely on the same trajectory as the X-ray light beam generated by the undulator magnets. To optimize the SASE output, trajectory deviations between both beams have to be minimized to a few micrometers along the entire undulator section and held stable over the time period between beam-based-alignment processes. Consequently, extremely high position stability of all magnets in the undulator section is required to operate the LCLS successfully. The knowledge of any magnet movement exceeding few micrometers during periods of several weeks is essential for efficient X-ray generation. A well known principle of monitoring transverse component positions along beam lines is the application of stretched wires, associated with suitable wire position sensors and electronics. The particular challenge at LCLS is the required wire system performance in conjunction with the length of the undulator section and the large number of monitors. Verification of system stability and resolution under real conditions is the primary goal of this test setup. A stretched wire test setup has been implemented to gain experience for the final design of a wire system, which will meet the position monitoring requirements in the LCLS undulator section. The report briefly introduces the system's architecture and describes first measurements and results.

Peters, Franz

2010-12-13

313

PROTEC TM TEAR-OFFS: RESULTS OF LONG TERM TESTING  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has completed a series of tests (Phases 1 and 2) to assess the potential use of a Mylar{reg_sign} tear-off system as a primary or secondary protective barrier to minimize acid etching ('frosting'), accidental scratching, and/or radiation damage for shielded cells, glovebox, and/or chemical hood windows. Conceptually, thin, multi-layered sheets of Mylar (referred to throughout this report as the ProTec{trademark} tear-off system) can be directly applied to the shielded cell, glovebox, or hood sash window to serve as a secondary (or primary) barrier. Upon degradation of visual clarity due to accidental scratching, spills/splatters, and/or radiation damage, the outer layer (or sheet) of Mylar could be removed refreshing or restoring the view. Due to the multilayer aspect, the remaining Mylar layers would provide continued protection for the window from potential reoccurrences. Although the concept of using a tear-off system as a protective barrier is conceptually enticing, potential technical issues were identified and addressed as part of this phased study to support implementation of this type of system in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Specific test conditions of interest to the DWPF included the performance of the tear-off system exposed to or under the following conditions: (1) acid(s) (concentrated (28.9 M) HF, concentrated (15.9M) HNO{sub 3}, 6M HCl, and 0.6M H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}); (2) base (based on handling of radioactive sludges with pH of {approx}12-13); (3) gamma radiation (due to radioactive sources or materials being used in the analytical cells); (4) scratch resistance (simulating accidental scratching with the manipulators); and (5) in-situ testing (sample coupons exposed to actual field conditions in DWPF). The results of the Phase 1 study indicated that the ProTec tear-off concept (as a primary or secondary protective barrier) is a potential technical solution to prevent or retard excessive damage that would result from acid etching, base damage (as a result of a sludge spill or splatter), gamma radiation damage, and/or accidental scratching (due to manipulator/tool contact). Although identified as a potential solution, the Phase 1 testing was relatively short-term with exposure times up to 1-2 months for the acid and gamma radiation tests. Phase 2 testing included longer exposure times for the acid resistance (up to 456 days) and gamma radiation exposure (700 days with a cumulative gamma dose of {approx}3.1 x 10{sup 5} rad) assessments. The tear-off system continued to perform well in these longer-term acid resistance testing and gamma exposure conditions. Complete removal of the tear-offs after these long-term exposure times indicate that not only could visual clarity be restored but the mechanical integrity could be retained. The results also provided insight into the ability of the ProTec tear-off system to withstand the chemical and physical abuses expected in off-normal shielded cells operations. The conceptual erasing of scratches or marks by excessive manipulator abuse was demonstrated in the SRNL Shielded Cells mock-up facility through the removal of the outer layer tear-off with manipulators. In addition, the Phase 2 testing included an in-situ assessment of a prototype tear-off system in the DWPF Sampling Cells where the system was exposed to actual field conditions including radioactive sources, acidic and basic environments, dusting, and chemical cleaning solutions over a 5-6 month period. DWPF personnel were extremely satisfied with the performance (including the successful removal of 3 layers with manipulators) of the ProTec tear-off system under actual field conditions. The successful removal of the outer layer tear-offs with the manipulator, using tabs not specifically designed for remote operations, demonstrates that the system is 'manipulator-friendly' and could be implemented in a remote environment. The ability to remove the outer layer tear-off not only regains visual clarity but also reduces waste disposal volumes (i.e., dispo

Peeler, D

2008-07-24

314

Behaviour of ceria nanoparticles in standardized test media - influence on the results of ecotoxicological tests  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The main objectives of this work were to establish the behaviour of a ceria nanopowder in different ecotoxicological media commonly used in standardized aquatic ecotoxicity tests and consequently to assess the acute and chronic ecotoxicity in two micro-invertebrates: Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia and in a freshwater green algae: Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. Different approaches to disperse the ceria nanoparticles (i.e. stirring, use of probe sonication, addition of humic acids) were tested and the influence on the biological endpoints was investigated. Despite the agglomeration phenomena observed in all the tested media, the results obtained indicated higher stability in the lower ionic strength media with addition of humic acid (2 mg.L-1 TOC). No acute toxicity were observed with D. magna, whatever the dispersal method performed and the nCeO2 concentration tested (up to 1000 mg.L-1), as no acute toxicity was recorded with C. dubia following exposure to the stirring suspensions. On contrary, acute toxicity was recorded in C. dubia with EC50 values comprise between 11.9 and 25.3 mg.L-1 using the probe sonicated suspension with or without humic acids addition. Significant chronic effect on the reproduction capability was also recorded in C. dubia. The estimated EC10 values were comprised between 2.1 and 2.9 mg.L-1. Focusing on P. subcapitata, despite the different agglomerate size recorded in the tested media at the end of the exposure periods, results obtained were similar. Adverse effect on algal growth around 5 mg.L-1 were reported (mean EC10 = 4 ± 1.8 mg.L-1). Those results suggested the needed for standardized testing protocol concerning the aqueous media used or the sample preparation for laboratory testing.

Manier, Nicolas; Garaud, Maël; Delalain, Patrice; Aguerre-Chariol, Olivier; Pandard, Pascal

2011-07-01

315

Np Behavior in Synthesized Uranyl Phases: Results of Initial Tests  

SciTech Connect

Initial tests were completed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for developing a potential mechanism to retard the mobility of neptunium at the Yucca Mountain repository. Neptunium is of concern because of its mobility in the environment and long half life, contributing a large percentage of the potential dose over extended times at the perimeter of the site. The mobility of neptunium could be retarded by associating with uranium mineral phases. The following four uranium mineral phases were examined and are potential secondary phases expected to form as a result of interactions of spent nuclear fuel with the local environment: meta-schoepite, studtite, uranophane, and sodium boltwoodite. The fate of the neptunium was examined in these synthetic experiments.

Friese, Judah I.; Douglas, Matthew; McNamara, Bruce K.; Clark, Sue B.; Hanson, Brady D.

2004-09-28

316

Computational Modeling of NEXT 2000-Hour Wear Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Ion optics computational models are invaluable tools for the design of ion optics systems. In this study, a new computational model developed by an outside vendor for NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is presented. This model is a gun code which has been modified to model the plasma sheaths both upstream and downstream of the ion optics. The model handles multiple species (e.g. singly and doubly-charged ions) and includes a charge-exchange model for erosion estimates. The model uses commercially available solid design and meshing software, allowing high flexibility in ion optics geometric configurations. This computational model is compared to experimental results from the NASA Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) 2000-hour wear test, including over-focusing along the edge apertures, pit-and-groove erosion due to charge exchange, and beamlet distortion at the edge of the hole pattern.

Malone, Shane P.

2004-01-01

317

Performance and test results of a regulated magnetron pulser  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the test results and performance of a 5.0-kV, 750-mA, regulated current pulser used to drive an Hitachi model 2M130 2,425-MHz magnetron. The magnetron is used to modulate the plasma in a particle accelerator injector. In this application, precise and stable rf power is crucial to extract a stable and accurate particle beam. A 10-kV high-voltage triode vacuum tube with active feedback is used to control the magnetron current and output rf power. The pulse width may be varied from as little as ten microseconds to continuous duty by varying the width of a supplied gate pulse. The output current level can be programmed between 10 and 750 mA. Current regulation and accuracy are better than 1%. The paper discusses the overall performance of the pulser and magnetron including anode current and rf power waveforms, linearity compliance, and vacuum tube performance.

Rose, C.R.; Warren, D.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1998-12-31

318

Preliminary Test Results for the MICE Spectrometer Superconducting Solenoids  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the MICE spectrometer solenoids as built. Each magnet consists of five superconducting coils. Two coils are used to tune the beam going from or to the MICE spectrometer from the rest of the MICE cooling channel. Three spectrometer coils (two end coils and a long center coil) are used to create a uniform 4 T field (to {+-}0.3 percent) over a length of 1.0 m within a diameter of 0.3 m. The three-coil spectrometer set is connected in series. The two end coils use small power supplies to tune the uniform field region where the scintillating fiber tracker is located. This paper will present the results of the preliminary testing of the first spectrometer solenoid.

Virostek, Steve P.; Green, Michael A; Li, Derun; Zisman, Michael S.; Wang, S.T.; Wahrer, R.; Taylor, Clyde; Lu, X.; Chen, J. Y.; Wang, Mimi; Juang, Tiki

2008-08-02

319

Daily reproducibility of electrophysiologic test results in malignant ventricular arrhythmia.  

PubMed

The reproducibility of electrophysiologic testing on successive days was assessed in the absence of antiarrhythmic drug treatment. Forty-two patients, 17 with compromising ventricular tachycardia and 25 with ventricular fibrillation unrelated to myocardial infarction, underwent 2 baseline studies. During the first electrophysiologic study, arrhythmia was induced in 32 of 42 patients (76%); however, during the second study a similar endpoint was reached in only 22 patients (52%) (chi 2 = 5.12, p less than 0.05). Only 18 of the 32 patients (56%) with induced arrhythmia during the first study had a reproducible result. Reproducibility was not related to presence of coronary artery disease, nature of presenting arrhythmia, or endpoint achieved (sustained or nonsustained ventricular tachycardia) during electrophysiologic study. Hence, reproducibility of endpoint during electrophysiologic investigation should be ascertained in each patient before initiating serial drug studies. PMID:3942083

Lombardi, F; Stein, J; Podrid, P J; Graboys, T B; Lown, B

1986-01-01

320

Scale model test results of several STOVL ventral nozzle concepts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Short take-off and vertical landing (STOVL) ventral nozzle concepts are investigated by means of a static cold flow scale model at a NASA facility. The internal aerodynamic performance characteristics of the cruise, transition, and vertical lift modes are considered for four ventral nozzle types. The nozzle configurations examined include those with: butterfly-type inner doors and vectoring exit vanes; circumferential inner doors and thrust vectoring vanes; a three-port segmented version with circumferential inner doors; and a two-port segmented version with cylindrical nozzle exit shells. During the testing, internal and external pressure is measured, and the thrust and flow coefficients and resultant vector angles are obtained. The inner door used for ventral nozzle flow control is found to affect performance negatively during the initial phase of transition. The best thrust performance is demonstrated by the two-port segmented ventral nozzle due to the elimination of the inner door.

Meyer, B. E.; Re, R. J.; Yetter, J. A.

1991-01-01

321

Results from Silicon Photo-Multiplier neutron irradiation test  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Silicon photo-multipliers, often called "SiPM", are semiconductor photon detectors built from a square matrix of avalanche photo-diodes on common silicon substrate. SiPM have been proposed for several different applications in High Energy Physics, in particular where a large detection granularity and a high photon detection efficiency is needed. In this paper the results of a radiation hardness test performed at the Frascati Neutron Generator are presented. Several SiPMs of different manufacturers have been irradiated integrating up to 7 × 1010 1-MeV-equivalent neutrons per cm2. For the first time, their performance have been recorded during the neutron irradiation and a gradual deterioration of their properties was found to happen already after an integrated dose of the order of 108 1-MeV-equivalent neutrons per cm2.

Faccini, R.; Pinci, D.; Baldini, W.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Ramusino, A. Cotta; Malaguti, R.; Pozzati, M.; Angelone, M.; Pillon, M.

2010-04-01

322

Results of MPBX studies at the single heater test  

SciTech Connect

We have developed an extensometer for measurement of distance and displacements in a geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste. This is an optical extensometer that measures distance using a modulated laser beam. In this design, reflecting targets are placed at desired measurement locations, and distance between each target and an optical head are measured repeatedly using the modulated laser beam. Moreover, all electronic and moving parts are located outside of the hostile or difficult environment as the optical head is connected to the laser, switching and signal analysis hardware using optical fibers. A reference beam is utilized to provide direct correction of system behavior. `Be system also - utilizes movable reflective anchors that can be repositioned if desired. We have installed the system in the Single Heater Test being conducted in Alcove 5 of the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain, and report preliminary results.

Blair, S. C.,LLNL

1997-10-01

323

Enhanced vision systems: results of simulation and operational tests  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Today's aircrews have to handle more and more complex situations. Most critical tasks in the field of civil aviation are landing approaches and taxiing. Especially under bad weather conditions the crew has to handle a tremendous workload. Therefore DLR's Institute of Flight Guidance has developed a concept for an enhanced vision system (EVS), which increases performance and safety of the aircrew and provides comprehensive situational awareness. In previous contributions some elements of this concept have been presented, i.e. the 'Simulation of Imaging Radar for Obstacle Detection and Enhanced Vision' by Doehler and Bollmeyer 1996. Now the presented paper gives an overview about the DLR's enhanced vision concept and research approach, which consists of two main components: simulation and experimental evaluation. In a first step the simulational environment for enhanced vision research with a pilot-in-the-loop is introduced. An existing fixed base flight simulator is supplemented by real-time simulations of imaging sensors, i.e. imaging radar and infrared. By applying methods of data fusion an enhanced vision display is generated combining different levels of information, such as terrain model data, processed images acquired by sensors, aircraft state vectors and data transmitted via datalink. The second part of this contribution presents some experimental results. In cooperation with Daimler Benz Aerospace Sensorsystems Ulm, a test van and a test aircraft were equipped with a prototype of an imaging millimeter wave radar. This sophisticated HiVision Radar is up to now one of the most promising sensors for all weather operations. Images acquired by this sensor are shown as well as results of data fusion processes based on digital terrain models. The contribution is concluded by a short video presentation.

Hecker, Peter; Doehler, Hans-Ullrich

1998-07-01

324

2011 Hyundai Sonata 3539 - Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing hybrid electric vehicle batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2011 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid (VIN KMHEC4A47BA003539). Battery testing was performed by Intertek Testing Services NA. The Idaho National Laboratory and Intertek collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy.

Matthew Shirk; Tyler Gray; Jeffrey Wishart

2014-09-01

325

Preimplantation genetic haplotyping: 127 diagnostic cycles demonstrating a robust, efficient alternative to direct mutation testing on single cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Preimplantation genetic diagnosis using whole genome amplification and a haplotyping approach (PGH) was first described in 2006 and suggested as an efficient alternative to single-cell PCR for monogenic disorders. DNA from single cells was amplified using multiple displacement amplification; the resulting products were then tested using disease-specific PCR multiplexes applied under standard laboratory conditions to determine the haplotypes in the

Pamela Renwick; Jane Trussler; Alison Lashwood; Peter Braude; Caroline Mackie Ogilvie

2010-01-01

326

Seasons can influence the results of the methacholine challenge test  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: This study tried to evaluate whether a methacholine test may be influenced by the seasons. METHODS: We considered 4826 consecutive subjects with normal spirometry (50.53% males; age: 35.1±16.2; forced expiratory volume in one second: 99.5±13.0%) who underwent a methacholine test for suspected asthma symptoms between 2000 and 2010. They were subdivided into four groups, like the seasons, according to the test dates. RESULTS: A total of 1981 (41%) resulted normal (no PD20 was obtained with 2400 ?g of methacholine); the others showed a mean LogPD20 of 2.52±0.5 ?g. The number of subjects with bronchial hyper-responsiveness (BHR) found in autumn (789, 62.3%) was higher than in summer (583, 56.7%; P=0.03). A higher number of females and overweight/obese subjects showed a BHR in autumn compared with the other seasons. The spring mean LogPD20 value (2.48±0.48 ?g) was lower if compared with the one measured in summer (2.59±0.49 ?g; P=0.05). LogPD20 value was lower in females and non-smokers in spring compared with summer (P<0.05). Overweight/obese non-smokers showed a lower LogPD20 in spring and autumn compared with that in summer (P<0.05). Autumn was a risk factor (OR: 1.378; P=0.001) for BHR (using a PD20 <2 400 ?g as BHR limit), while spring (OR: 1.330; P=0.021) and autumn (OR: 1.331; P=0.020) were risk factors for a more severe BHR (using a PD20 <400 ?g as BHR limit). CONCLUSION: There was a higher probability of finding BHR in outpatients with suspected asthma in autumn and spring compared with summer. Spring is the season where BHR may be more severe. Females and overweight/obese subjects were those mainly involved in this seasonal variability of BHR. PMID:22558009

Sposato, Bruno; Scalese, Marco; Pammolli, Andrea; Scala, Raffaele; Naldi, Mario

2012-01-01

327

Evaluation of the robustness of the preprocessing technique improving reversible compressibility of CT images: Tested on various CT examinations  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To modify the preprocessing technique, which was previously proposed, improving compressibility of computed tomography (CT) images to cover the diversity of three dimensional configurations of different body parts and to evaluate the robustness of the technique in terms of segmentation correctness and increase in reversible compression ratio (CR) for various CT examinations.Methods: This study had institutional review board approval with waiver of informed patient consent. A preprocessing technique was previously proposed to improve the compressibility of CT images by replacing pixel values outside the body region with a constant value resulting in maximizing data redundancy. Since the technique was developed aiming at only chest CT images, the authors modified the segmentation method to cover the diversity of three dimensional configurations of different body parts. The modified version was evaluated as follows. In randomly selected 368 CT examinations (352 787 images), each image was preprocessed by using the modified preprocessing technique. Radiologists visually confirmed whether the segmented region covers the body region or not. The images with and without the preprocessing were reversibly compressed using Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG), JPEG2000 two-dimensional (2D), and JPEG2000 three-dimensional (3D) compressions. The percentage increase in CR per examination (CR{sub I}) was measured.Results: The rate of correct segmentation was 100.0% (95% CI: 99.9%, 100.0%) for all the examinations. The median of CR{sub I} were 26.1% (95% CI: 24.9%, 27.1%), 40.2% (38.5%, 41.1%), and 34.5% (32.7%, 36.2%) in JPEG, JPEG2000 2D, and JPEG2000 3D, respectively.Conclusions: In various CT examinations, the modified preprocessing technique can increase in the CR by 25% or more without concerning about degradation of diagnostic information.

Jeon, Chang Ho; Kim, Bohyoung; Gu, Bon Seung; Lee, Jong Min [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kil Joong [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707, South Korea and Department of Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 103 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707, South Korea and Department of Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 103 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Ho [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707, South Korea and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, and Clinical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707, South Korea and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, and Clinical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Ki [Medical Information Center, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of)] [Medical Information Center, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-10-15

328

Development of Test-Analysis Models (TAM) for correlation of dynamic test and analysis results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The primary objective of structural analysis of aerospace applications is to obtain a verified finite element model (FEM). The verified FEM can be used for loads analysis, evaluate structural modifications, or design control systems. Verification of the FEM is generally obtained as the result of correlating test and FEM models. A test analysis model (TAM) is very useful in the correlation process. A TAM is essentially a FEM reduced to the size of the test model, which attempts to preserve the dynamic characteristics of the original FEM in the analysis range of interest. Numerous methods for generating TAMs have been developed in the literature. The major emphasis of this paper is a description of the procedures necessary for creation of the TAM and the correlation of the reduced models with the FEM or the test results. Herein, three methods are discussed, namely Guyan, Improved Reduced System (IRS), and Hybrid. Also included are the procedures for performing these analyses using MSC/NASTRAN. Finally, application of the TAM process is demonstrated with an experimental test configuration of a ten bay cantilevered truss structure.

Angelucci, Filippo; Javeed, Mehzad; Mcgowan, Paul

1992-01-01

329

Results of graphite-polyimide isogrid panel testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A procedure was developed for fabricating short-fiber HTS graphite and NR150B2 polyimide resin into an isogrid configuration. After fabrication, the panels were subjected to structural analysis and testing. The testing program is described.

Hyer, M. W.; Douglas, D. O.

1977-01-01

330

A robustness study of parametric and non-parametric tests in model-based multifactor dimensionality reduction for epistasis detection  

PubMed Central

Background Applying a statistical method implies identifying underlying (model) assumptions and checking their validity in the particular context. One of these contexts is association modeling for epistasis detection. Here, depending on the technique used, violation of model assumptions may result in increased type I error, power loss, or biased parameter estimates. Remedial measures for violated underlying conditions or assumptions include data transformation or selecting a more relaxed modeling or testing strategy. Model-Based Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction (MB-MDR) for epistasis detection relies on association testing between a trait and a factor consisting of multilocus genotype information. For quantitative traits, the framework is essentially Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) that decomposes the variability in the trait amongst the different factors. In this study, we assess through simulations, the cumulative effect of deviations from normality and homoscedasticity on the overall performance of quantitative Model-Based Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction (MB-MDR) to detect 2-locus epistasis signals in the absence of main effects. Methodology Our simulation study focuses on pure epistasis models with varying degrees of genetic influence on a quantitative trait. Conditional on a multilocus genotype, we consider quantitative trait distributions that are normal, chi-square or Student’s t with constant or non-constant phenotypic variances. All data are analyzed with MB-MDR using the built-in Student’s t-test for association, as well as a novel MB-MDR implementation based on Welch’s t-test. Traits are either left untransformed or are transformed into new traits via logarithmic, standardization or rank-based transformations, prior to MB-MDR modeling. Results Our simulation results show that MB-MDR controls type I error and false positive rates irrespective of the association test considered. Empirically-based MB-MDR power estimates for MB-MDR with Welch’s t-tests are generally lower than those for MB-MDR with Student’s t-tests. Trait transformations involving ranks tend to lead to increased power compared to the other considered data transformations. Conclusions When performing MB-MDR screening for gene-gene interactions with quantitative traits, we recommend to first rank-transform traits to normality and then to apply MB-MDR modeling with Student’s t-tests as internal tests for association. PMID:23618370

2013-01-01

331

Pressure Balanced, Low Hysteresis Finger Seal Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate: low cost photoetching fabrication technique; pressure balanced finger seal design; and finger seal operation. The tests and analyses includes: finger seal air leakage analysis; rotor-run out and endurance tests; and extensive analytical work and rig testing.

Arora, Gul K.; Proctor, Margaret; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Delgado, Irebert R.

2000-01-01

332

12 CFR 252.148 - Disclosure of stress test results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...risks included in the stress test; (2) A general description...methodologies used in the stress test, including those employed...percentage of average portfolio balance) in the aggregate and by...5) With respect to a stress test conducted pursuant to...

2014-01-01

333

12 CFR 252.148 - Disclosure of stress test results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...risks included in the stress test; (2) A general description...methodologies used in the stress test, including those employed...percentage of average portfolio balance) in the aggregate and by...5) With respect to a stress test conducted pursuant to...

2013-01-01

334

Results of IEC 62804 Draft Round Robin Testing (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Three crystalline silicon module designs were distributed in five replicas each to five laboratories for testing according to the IEC 62804 (Committee Draft) system voltage durability qualification test for crystalline silicon photovoltaic (PV) modules. The stress tests were performed in environmental chambers at 60 degrees C, 85% relative humidity, 96 h, and with module nameplate system voltage applied.

Hacke, P.; Terwilliger, K.; Koch, S.; Weber, T.; Berghold, J.; Hoffmann, S.; Koehl, M.; Dietrich, S.; Mathiak, G.; Ebert, M.

2013-09-01

335

PHOSPHATE MANAGEMENT: FY2010 RESULTS OF PHOSPHATE PRECIPITATION TESTS  

SciTech Connect

The Phosphate Management program seeks to develop treatment options for caustic phosphate solutions resulting from the caustic leaching of the bismuth phosphate sludge. The SRNL subtask investigated the precipitation of phosphate salts from caustic solutions through addition of fluoride and by crystallization. The scoping tests examined the: precipitation of phosphate by the addition of sodium fluoride to form the sodium fluorophosphate double salt, Na{sub 7}F(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} {center_dot} 19H{sub 2}O, crystallization of phosphate by reducing the temperature of saturated phosphate solutions, and combinations of precipitation and crystallization. A simplified leachate simulant was used in the study produced by dissolving sodium phosphate in 1 M to 3.5 M sodium hydroxide solutions. The results show that all three processes; precipitation with sodium fluoride, crystallization, and combined precipitation/crystallization can be effective for removing large amounts of phosphate from solution. The combined process of precipitation/crystallization showed >90% removal of phosphate at all hydroxide concentrations when cooling a non-saturated phosphate solution from 65 C to 25 C. Based on the measured solubility of sodium phosphate, pH adjustment/caustic addition will also remove large amounts of phosphate from solution (>80%). For all three processes, the phosphate concentration in the caustic solution must be managed to keep the phosphate from becoming too concentrated and thereby potentially forming a solid mass of sodium phosphate after an effective phosphate removal process.

Hay, M.; King, W.

2011-04-04

336

NASA VCE test bed engine aerodynamic performance characteristics and test results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Core Driven Fan Stage (CDFS) Variable Cycle Engine (VCE) has been identified as a leading candidate for advanced supersonic cruise aircraft. A scale demonstrator version of this engine has been designed and tested. This testbed engine features a split fan with double bypass capability, variable forward and aft mixers, and a variable area low pressure turbine nozzle to permit exploration and optimization of the cycle in both single and double bypass modes. This paper presents the aerodynamic performance characteristics and experimental results obtained from both the core engine and full engine tests.

French, M. W.; Allen, C. L.

1981-01-01

337

DEM integrity monitor experiment (DIME) flight test results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper discusses flight test results of a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) integrity monitor. The DEM Integrity Monitor Experiment (DIME) was part of the NASA Synthetic Vision System (SVS) flight trials at Eagle-Vail, Colorado (EGE) in August/September, 2001. SVS provides pilots with either a Heads-down Display (HDD) or a Heads-up Display (HUD) containing aircraft state, guidance and navigation information, and a virtual depiction of the terrain as viewed 'from the cockpit'. SVS has the potential to improve flight safety by increasing the situational awareness (SA) in low to near zero-visibility conditions to a level of awareness similar to daytime clear-weather flying. This SA improvement not only enables low-visibility operations, but may also reduce the likelihood of Controlled Flight Into Terrain (CFIT). Because of the compelling nature of SVS displays high integrity requirements may be imposed on the various databases used to generate the imagery on the displays even when the target SVS application does not require an essential or flight-critical integrity level. DIME utilized external sensors (WAAS and radar altimeter) to independently generate a 'synthesized' terrain profile. A statistical assessment of the consistency between the synthesized profile and the profile as stored in the DEM provided a fault-detection capability. The paper will discuss the basic DIME principles and will show the DIME performance for a variety of approaches to Runways 7 and 25 at EGE. The monitored DEMs are DTED Level 0, USGS with a 3-arcsec spatial resolution, and a DEM provided by NASA Langley. The test aircraft was a Boeing 757-200.

Uijt de Haag, Maarten; Young, Steve D.; Sayre, Jonathon; Campbell, Jacob; Vadlamani, Ananth

2002-07-01

338

Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: Program Descriptionand Results  

SciTech Connect

California utilities have been exploring the use of critical peak prices (CPP) to help reduce needle peaks in customer end-use loads. CPP is a form of price-responsive demand response (DR). Recent experience has shown that customers have limited knowledge of how to operate their facilities in order to reduce their electricity costs under CPP (Quantum 2004). While the lack of knowledge about how to develop and implement DR control strategies is a barrier to participation in DR programs like CPP, another barrier is the lack of automation of DR systems. During 2003 and 2004, the PIER Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) conducted a series of tests of fully automated electric demand response (Auto-DR) at 18 facilities. Overall, the average of the site-specific average coincident demand reductions was 8% from a variety of building types and facilities. Many electricity customers have suggested that automation will help them institutionalize their electric demand savings and improve their overall response and DR repeatability. This report focuses on and discusses the specific results of the Automated Critical Peak Pricing (Auto-CPP, a specific type of Auto-DR) tests that took place during 2005, which build on the automated demand response (Auto-DR) research conducted through PIER and the DRRC in 2003 and 2004. The long-term goal of this project is to understand the technical opportunities of automating demand response and to remove technical and market impediments to large-scale implementation of automated demand response (Auto-DR) in buildings and industry. A second goal of this research is to understand and identify best practices for DR strategies and opportunities. The specific objectives of the Automated Critical Peak Pricing test were as follows: (1) Demonstrate how an automated notification system for critical peak pricing can be used in large commercial facilities for demand response (DR). (2) Evaluate effectiveness of such a system. (3) Determine how customers will respond to this form of automation for CPP. (4) Evaluate what type of DR shifting and shedding strategies can be automated. (5) Explore how automation of control strategies can increase participation rates and DR saving levels with CPP. (6) Identify optimal demand response control strategies. (7) Determine occupant and tenant response.

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Xu, Peng

2006-04-06

339

Experimental test results from an environmental protection agency test method for determination of vapor suppressant effectiveness  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The results obtained from laboratory experiments conducted using Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) subpart WWWW of 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) part 63 (1)-test method are discussed in this article. The original test method was developed to measure the effectiveness of wax suppressants used to reduce hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions from unsaturated polyester (UP)/vinyl ester resins. Wax additions of ˜1.5% by weight to commercial UP resins suppress HAP emissions through the formation of surface barrier films. However, the tests performed in this study included the use of limestone and an adjunct, organic fiber reinforcement, rather than the wax. The addition of either commercial product to the UP formulations tested in this study was also shown to reduce HAP emissions. Suppression was a combination of absorption and an increased diffusion path barrier for the volatile organic carbon (VOC) components. Based on the limited data obtained, it was shown that the oil absorption characteristics of the two adjunct products could be used to estimate the expected level of vapor suppression for a specific resin formulation. Values reported in the literature for the oil adsorption characteristics of the adjunct limestone and the commercial biomass fiber were used in the laboratory tests. Although the oil adsorption characteristic of any ingredient added to a base resin formulation is indicative of its potential for emissions reduction, the EPA test protocol is still required to be performed for validation. Such screening tests will always be needed due to the variability associated with commercial UP resins and the evolution of customized UP/fiberglass composite formulations developed by custom molding shops.

Tock, Richard W.; Ahern, Daniel W.

2005-04-01

340

Aluminum Stabilized NbTi Conductor Test Coil Design, Fabrication, and Test Results  

SciTech Connect

A new generation of precision muon conversion experiments is planned at both Fermilab and KEK. These experiments will depend upon a complex set of solenoid magnets for the production, momentum selection and transport of a muon beam to a stopping target, and for tracking detector momentum analysis of candidate conversion electrons from the target. Baseline designs for the production and detector solenoids use NbTi cable that is heavily stabilized by an extruded high RRR aluminum jacket. A U.S.-Japan research collaboration has begun whose goal is to advance the development of optimized Al-NbTi conductors, gain experience with the technology of winding coils from this material, and test the conductor performance as modest length samples become available. For this purpose, a 'conductor test' solenoid with three coils was designed and built at Fermilab. A sample of the RIKEN Al-NbTi conductor from KEK was wound into a 'test' coil; this was sandwiched between two 'field' coils wound from doubled SSC cable, to increase the peak field on the RIKEN test coil. All three solenoid coils were epoxy impregnated, and utilized aluminum outer bandage rings to apply preload to the coils when cold. The design and fabrication details, and results of the magnet quench performance tests are presented and discussed.

Andreev, N.; Chlachidze, G.; Evbota, D.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Lamm, M.; Makarov, A.; Tartaglia, M.; /Fermilab; Nakamoto, T.; Ogitsu, T.; Tanaka, K.; Yamamoto, A.; /KEK, Tsukuba

2011-09-01

341

Four Models of HIV Counseling and Testing: Utilization and Test Results in South Africa  

PubMed Central

Background HIV Counseling and Testing (HCT) is the point-of-entry for pathways of HIV care and prevention. However, HCT is not reaching many who are HIV infected and this may be related to the HCT provision model. We describe HCT utilization and HIV diagnosis using four models of HCT delivery: clinic-based, urban mobile, rural mobile, and stand-alone. Methods Using cross-sectional data from routine HCT provided in South Africa, we described client characteristics and HIV test results from information collected during service delivery between January 2009 and June 2012. Results 118,358 clients received services at clinic-based units, 18,597; stand-alone, 28,937; urban mobile, 38,840; and rural mobile, 31,984. By unit, clients were similar in terms of median age (range 28–31), but differed in sex distribution, employment status, prior testing, and perceived HIV risk. Urban mobile units had the highest proportion of male clients (52%). Rural mobile units reached the highest proportion of clients with no prior HCT (61%) and reporting no perceived HIV risk (64%). Overall, 10,862 clients (9.3%) tested HIV-positive. Conclusions Client characteristics varied by HCT model. Importantly, rural and urban mobile units reached more men, first-time testers, and clients who considered themselves to be at low risk for HIV. PMID:25013938

Mabuto, Tonderai; Latka, Mary H.; Kuwane, Bulelani; Churchyard, Gavin J.; Charalambous, Salome; Hoffmann, Christopher J.

2014-01-01

342

DETERMINING A ROBUST D-OPTIMAL DESIGN FOR TESTING FOR DEPARTURE FROM ADDITIVITY IN A MIXTURE OF FOUR PFAAS  

EPA Science Inventory

Our objective was to determine an optimal experimental design for a mixture of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) that is robust to the assumption of additivity. Of particular focus to this research project is whether an environmentally relevant mixture of four PFAAs with long half-liv...

343

Dynamic analysis and test results of the Viking Orbiter  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Viking Orbiter (VO) was launched in August 1975 on a new Titan/Centaur launch vehicle. Weight limitations of the VO and the use of a new launch vehicle made it necessary to conduct a load analysis which was verified by a test. The load analysis required a good mathematical dynamic model. Attention is given to aspects of mathematical formulation, subsystem characteristics, the body displacement functions, the propulsion subsystem, details regarding the dynamic model, the static test, and the sine vibration test.

Wada, B. K.; Garba, J. A.

1975-01-01

344

The Submillimeter Array: Current Status and Testing Results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Submillimeter Array (SMA) is a new radio interferometer currently being deployed at the summit of Mauna Kea, consisting of 8 telescopes of 6 meters diameter each, operating in the frequency range of 180 to 900 GHz. This project is a joint collaboration between the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and the Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics in Taiwan, which has built two of the antennas. In this paper, we present the current status of the SMA and summarize various testing results. As of mid-October 2001, five of the antennas are fully operational, with the correlation capabilities of up to 6 baselines. The antennas are currently equipped with 230 and 345 GHz receivers and the correlator provides a bandwidth of 328 MHz, with a resolution of about 1 MHz per channel. The surface accuracy of the antennas is about 13 to 20 microns (see poster by Sridharan et al.) and the blind pointing rms error is about 5". Efforts at improving the pointing performance are underway, with implementation of real-time corrections using electronic inclinometers. While the control software for the array is still in its preliminary stages, the array is operable remotely over internet. The interferometric data is archived in FITS-IDI format (for AIPS++) and in the Caltech MIR format (for IDL).

Saito, M.; SMA Team

2001-12-01

345

Test Results of the Phenix Drift Chamber Prototype.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The central arms of the PHENIX detector are composed of several elements whose design is driven by features of heavy ion collisions at RHIC: charged particle multiplicity up to 1500 per rapidity unit and a transverse momentum spectrum of soft particles peaking at 200-300 MeV/c. Low mass, multiple focusing drift chambers (DC) which satisfy these requirements were designed and fabricated by PNPI (St.Petersburg, Russia). Each drift chamber of two PHENIX central arms is an arch-shaped titanium frame with inner radius 2 m and outer radius 2.5 m . The length of the DC along the direction of colliding beams is about 4 m and covers 90^circ in azimuthal angle. The design has the following features: modular structure for wiring X- , U- and V- planes; (2) each anode wire is cut in the middle thus decreasing the pulse rate ; (3) electrostatic configuration of drift cell minimizes left-right ambiguity and provides a short avalanche time-length; and (4) the design of the front end electronics allows 1.5 mm track separation for each registration channel. Test results of the DC full scale prototype (11.25^circ in azimuthal angle) are presented and shown to satisfy most calculations and expectations for the final DC design.

Pantuev, Vladislav

1997-04-01

346

Results and Analysis from Space Suit Joint Torque Testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A space suit s mobility is critical to an astronaut s ability to perform work efficiently. As mobility increases, the astronaut can perform tasks for longer durations with less fatigue. The term mobility, with respect to space suits, is defined in terms of two key components: joint range of motion and joint torque. Individually these measures describe the path which in which a joint travels and the force required to move it through that path. Previous space suits mobility requirements were defined as the collective result of these two measures and verified by the completion of discrete functional tasks. While a valid way to impose mobility requirements, such a method does necessitate a solid understanding of the operational scenarios in which the final suit will be performing. Because the Constellation space suit system requirements are being finalized with a relatively immature concept of operations, the Space Suit Element team elected to define mobility in terms of its constituent parts to increase the likelihood that the future pressure garment will be mobile enough to enable a broad scope of undefined exploration activities. The range of motion requirements were defined by measuring the ranges of motion test subjects achieved while performing a series of joint maximizing tasks in a variety of flight and prototype space suits. The definition of joint torque requirements has proved more elusive. NASA evaluated several different approaches to the problem before deciding to generate requirements based on unmanned joint torque evaluations of six different space suit configurations being articulated through 16 separate joint movements. This paper discusses the experiment design, data analysis and results, and the process used to determine the final values for the Constellation pressure garment joint torque requirements.

Matty, Jennifer E.; Aitchison, Lindsay

2009-01-01

347

Closed loop IBC results from CH53G flight tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

ZF Luftfahrttechnik GmbH (ZFL) has conducted open and closed loop IBC (Individual Blade Control) flight tests with the CH-53G IBC testbed of the German Federal Armed Forces Engineering Center for Aircraft. Over 25 flight hours had been spent in an “open loop” campaign to investigate the positive IBC effects. Early during the flight tests, it became clear that the response

Uwe T. P. Arnold; Daniel Fürst

2005-01-01

348

Cone Penetrometer Load Cell Temperature and Radiation Testing Results  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes testing activities performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to verify the cone penetrometer load cell can withstand the tank conditions present in 241-AN-101 and 241-AN-106. The tests demonstrated the load cell device will operate under the elevated temperature and radiation levels expected to be encountered during tank farm deployment of the device.

Follett, Jordan R.

2013-08-28

349

POLLUTANTS FROM SYNTHETIC FUELS PRODUCTION: COAL GASIFICATION SCREENING TEST RESULTS  

EPA Science Inventory

Coal gasification test runs have been conducted in a semibatch, fixed-bed laboratory gasifier in order to evaluate various coals and operating conditions for pollutant generation. Thirty-eight tests have been completed using char, coal, lignite, and peat. Extensive analyses were ...

350

Reliability Test Results for an Implementation Profile Instrument.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This test-retest reliability study was conducted to test the reliability of an instrument designed to measure the relative importance of eight implementation conditions. Data for the Ensminger-Surry Implementation Profile Instrument (ESIP) were gathered starting January 2003. Participants were from a variety of occupations. Ages ranged from the…

Porter, Barry E.; Surry, Daniel W.; Ensminger, David C.

351

Direct structural parameter identification by modal test results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A direct identification procedure is proposed to obtain the mass and stiffness matrices based on the test measured eigenvalues and eigenvectors. The method is based on the theory of matrix perturbation in which the correct mass and stiffness matrices are expanded in terms of analytical values plus a modification matrix. The simplicity of the procedure enables real time operation during the structural testing.

Chen, J.-C.; Kuo, C.-P.; Garba, J. A.

1983-01-01

352

Building a Robust 21st Century Chemical Testing Program at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency: Recommendations for Strengthening Scientific Engagement  

PubMed Central

Background: Biological pathway-based chemical testing approaches are central to the National Research Council’s vision for 21st century toxicity testing. Approaches such as high-throughput in vitro screening offer the potential to evaluate thousands of chemicals faster and cheaper than ever before and to reduce testing on laboratory animals. Collaborative scientific engagement is important in addressing scientific issues arising in new federal chemical testing programs and for achieving stakeholder support of their use. Objectives: We present two recommendations specifically focused on increasing scientific engagement in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ToxCast™ initiative. Through these recommendations we seek to bolster the scientific foundation of federal chemical testing efforts such as ToxCast™ and the public health decisions that rely upon them. Discussion: Environmental Defense Fund works across disciplines and with diverse groups to improve the science underlying environmental health decisions. We propose that the U.S. EPA can strengthen the scientific foundation of its new chemical testing efforts and increase support for them in the scientific research community by a) expanding and diversifying scientific input into the development and application of new chemical testing methods through collaborative workshops, and b) seeking out mutually beneficial research partnerships. Conclusions: Our recommendations provide concrete actions for the U.S. EPA to increase and diversify engagement with the scientific research community in its ToxCast™ initiative. We believe that such engagement will help ensure that new chemical testing data are scientifically robust and that the U.S. EPA gains the support and acceptance needed to sustain new testing efforts to protect public health. Citation: McPartland J, Dantzker HC, Portier CJ. 2015. Building a robust 21st century chemical testing program at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency: recommendations for strengthening scientific engagement. Environ Health Perspect 123:1–5;?http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408601 PMID:25343778

Dantzker, Heather C.; Portier, Christopher J.

2014-01-01

353

Weather Information Communication (WINCOMM) VDL-3 and 1090ES Final Test Requirements, Test Plans, and Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA s Aviation Safety Program was created for the purpose of making a significant reduction in the incidents of weather related aviation accidents by improving situational awareness. The objectives of that program are being met in part through advances in weather sensor technology, and in part through advances in the communications technology that are developed for use in the National Airspace System. It is this latter element, i.e., the improvements in aviation communication technologies, that is the focus of the Weather Information Communications project. This report describes the final flight test results completed under the WINCOMM project at the NASA Glenn Research Center of the 1090 Extended Squitter (1090ES) and VDL Mode 3 (VDL-3) data links as a medium for weather data exchange. It presents the use of 1090ES to meet the program objectives of sending broadcast turbulence information and the use of VDL-3 to send graphical weather images. This report provides the test requirements and test plans, which led to flight tests, as well as final results from flight testing. The reports define the changes made to both avionics and ground-based receivers as well as the ground infrastructure to support implementation of the recommended architecture, with a focus on the issues associated with these changes.

Griner, James H.; Jirberg, Russ; Frantz, Brian; Kachmar, Brian A.

2006-01-01

354

49 CFR 40.23 - What actions do employers take after receiving verified test results?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...employers take after receiving verified test results? 40.23 Section 40.23 Transportation...employers take after receiving verified test results? (a) As an employer who receives a verified positive drug test result, you must immediately remove...

2010-10-01

355

49 CFR 40.255 - What happens next after the alcohol confirmation test result?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...happens next after the alcohol confirmation test result? 40.255 Section 40.255 Transportation...happens next after the alcohol confirmation test result? (a) After the EBT has printed the result of an alcohol confirmation test, you...

2011-10-01

356

49 CFR 40.23 - What actions do employers take after receiving verified test results?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...employers take after receiving verified test results? 40.23 Section 40.23 Transportation...employers take after receiving verified test results? (a) As an employer who receives a verified positive drug test result, you must immediately remove...

2011-10-01

357

10 CFR 26.103 - Determining a confirmed positive test result for alcohol.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...false Determining a confirmed positive test result for alcohol. 26.103 Section 26.103...103 Determining a confirmed positive test result for alcohol. (a) A confirmed positive test result for alcohol must be declared under any...

2011-01-01

358

Preliminary test results and upgrades for an automated assembly system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An automated structures assembly testbed developed by Langley Research Center to study the practical problems associated with the automated assembly of large space structures using robotic manipulators is described. Emphasis is placed on the requirements and features of system upgrades and their impact on system performance, flexibility, and reliability. The current research program is aimed at evolving the baseline assembly system into a flexible, robust, sensor-based system capable of assembling more complex truss-supported satellite systems. To achieve this objective, five system upgrades have been developed including a machine vision capability to eliminate taught robot arm positions; an on-board end-effector microprocessor to reduce communications; a second-generation end-effector to construct contoured trusses for antennas and install payloads; the installation of reflector-type panels on the truss to produce a complete and functional system, and an expert system to significantly reduce the amount of software code required for system operation and provide greater flexibility in implementing new features.

Will, Ralph W.; Rhodes, Marvin D.; Quach, Cuong

1992-01-01

359

Results from a pilot cell test of cermet anodes  

SciTech Connect

Goal was to develop long-lasting, energy-efficient anodes for Hall-Heroult cells used to produce Al metal. The anodes were made from a ceramic/metal composite consisting of NiO and NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and a Cu/Ni metal phase. Thirteen cermet anodes were tested at Reynolds Metals Co., Muscle Shoals, AL. All anodes corroded severely during the pilot test. Electrolyte components were found deep within the anodes. However, there were many deficiencies in the pilot cell test, mainly the failure to maintain optimal operating conditions. It is concluded that there is a variety of fabrication and operational considerations that need to be addressed carefully in any future testing. 118 figs, 16 tabs, 17 refs.(DLC)

Windisch, Jr, C F; Strachan, D M; Henager, Jr, C H; Greenwell, E N [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Alcorn, T R [Reynolds Metals Co., Muscle Shoals, AL (United States). Mfg. Technology Lab.

1992-08-01

360

Photovoltaic-powered vaccine refrigerator: Freezer systems field test results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A project to develop and field test photovoltaic-powered refrigerator/freezers suitable for vaccine storage was undertaken. Three refrigerator/freezers were qualified; one by Solar Power Corp. and two by Solvolt. Follow-on contracts were awarded for 19 field test systems and for 10 field test systems. A total of 29 systems were installed in 24 countries between October 1981 and October 1984. The project, systems descriptions, installation experiences, performance data for the 22 systems for which field test data was reported, an operational reliability summary, and recommendations relative to system designs and future use of such systems are explained. Performance data indicate that the systems are highly reliable and are capable of maintaining proper vaccine storage temperatures in a wide range of climatological and user environments.

Ratajczak, A. F.

1985-01-01

361

U.S. field testing programs and results  

SciTech Connect

The United States has been active in four major international in-situ or field testing programs over the past two decades, involving the burial of simulated high-level waste forms and package components. These programs are designed to supplement laboratory testing studies in order to obtain the most complete and realistic picture possible of waste glass behavior under realistic repository-relevant conditions.

Wicks, G.G.

2000-06-09

362

SLAC FASTBUS Snoop Module: test results and support software  

SciTech Connect

The development of a diagnostic module for FASTBUS has been completed. The Snoop Module is designed to reside on a Crate Segment and provide high-speed diagnostic monitoring and testing capabilities. Final hardware details and testing of production prototype modules are reported. Features of software under development for a stand-alone single Snoop diagnostic system and Multi-Snoop networks will be discussed. 3 refs., 2 figs.

Gustavson, D.B.; Walz, H.V.

1985-09-01

363

SIMS prototype system 1 test results: Engineering analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The space and domestic water solar heating system designated SIMS Prototype Systems 1 was evaluated. The test system used 720 ft (gross) of Solar Energy Products Air Collectors, a Solar Control Corporation SAM 20 Air Handler with Model 75-175 control unit, a Jackson Solar Storage tank with Rho Sigma Mod 106 controller, and 20 tons of rack storage. The test data analysis performed evaluates the system performance and documents the suitability of SIMS Prototype System 1 hardware for field installation.

1978-01-01

364

Results of Repeat Tracer Tests at Ohaaki, NZ  

SciTech Connect

During 20 years of tracer testing at Ohaaki a number of wells have been used more than once as tracer injection sites. In studying the various responses obtained it has been necessary to consider variations in the experimental test conditions before making comparisons which relate to field conditions. Some very significant changes have occurred in the field hydrology in recent years and water flow speeds as high as those encountered at Wairakei have been demonstrated.

McCabe, W.J.; Clotworthy, A.W.; Morris, C.

1995-01-01

365

RE1000 free-piston Stirling engine sensitivity test results  

Microsoft Academic Search

The NASA Lewis Research Center has been testing a 1 kW (1.33 hp) free-piston Stirling engine. The tests performed over the past several years have been on a single cylinder machine known as the RE-1000. The data recorded were to aid in the investigation of the dynamics and thermo-dynamics of the free-piston Stirling engine. The data are intended to be

Jeffrey G. Schreiber; Steven M. Geng; Gary V. Lorenz

1986-01-01

366

Robust Brain-computer interface for virtual Keyboard (RoBIK): project results Louis Mayaud (1-4), Sabine Filipe (5), Lucie Ptgnief (6), Olivier Rochecouste (7) and Marco Congedo  

E-print Network

Robust Brain-computer interface for virtual Keyboard (RoBIK): project results Louis Mayaud (1.01.013 #12;Abstract Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) is a technology that translates the brain electrical (Electroencephalography, EEG) and interface (signal processing and applications). The RoBIK project (Robust Brain-computer

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

367

Description of the NACA Universal Test Engine and Some Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report describes the 5-inch bore by 7-inch stroke single cylinder test engine used at the Langley Field Laboratory of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics in laboratory research on internal-combustion engine problems and presents some results of tests made therewith. The engine is arranged for variation over wide ranges, of the compression ratio and lift and timing of both inlet and exhaust valves while the engine is in operation. Provision is also made for the connection of a number of auxiliaries. These features tend to make the engine universal in character, and especially suited for the study of certain problems involving change in compression ratio, valve timing, and lift.

Ware, Marsden

1927-01-01

368

Power Burst Facility (PBF) severe fuel damage test 1-4 test results report  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive evaluation of the Severe Fuel Damage (SFD) Test 1-4 performed in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is presented. Test SFD 1-4 was the fourth and final test in an internationally sponsored light water reactor severe accident research program, initiated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The overall technical objective of the test was to contribute to the understanding of fuel and control rod behavior, aerosol and hydrogen generation, and fission product release and transport during a high-temperature, severe fuel damage transient. A test bundle, comprised of 26 previously irradiated (36,000 MWd/MtU) pressurized water-reactor-type fuel rods, 2 fresh instrumented fuel rods, and 4 silver-indium-cadmium control rods, was surrounded by an insulating shroud and contained in a pressurized in-pile tube. The experiment consisted of a 1.3-h transient at a coolant pressure of 6.95 MPa in which the inlet coolant flow to the bundle was reduced to 0.6 g/s while the bundle fission power was gradually increased until dryout, heatup, cladding rupture, and oxidation occurred. With sustained fission power and heat from oxidation, temperatures continued to rise rapidly, resulting in zircaloy and control rod absorber alloy melting, fuel liquefaction, material relocation, and the release of hydrogen, aerosols, and fission products. The transient was terminated over a 2100-s time span by slowly reducing the reactor power and cooling the damaged bundle with argon gas. A description and evaluation of the major phenomena, based upon the response of on-line instrumentation, analysis of fission product and aerosol data, postirradiation examination of the fuel bundle, and calculations using the SCDAP/RELAP5 computer code, are presented. 40 refs., 160 figs., 31 tabs.

Petti, D.A.; Martinson, Z.R.; Hobbins, R.R.; Allison, C.M.; Carlson, E.R.; Hagrman, D.L.; Cheng, T.C.; Hartwell, J.K.; Vinjamuri, K.; Seifken, L.J.

1989-04-01

369

Hypervelocity Impact Test Results for a Metallic Thermal Protection System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Hypervelocity impact tests have been performed on specimens representing metallic thermal protection systems (TPS) developed at NASA Langley Research Center for use on next-generation reusable launch vehicles (RLV). The majority of the specimens tested consists of a foil gauge exterior honeycomb panel, composed of either Inconel 617 or Ti-6Al-4V, backed with 2.0 in. of fibrous insulation and a final Ti-6Al-4V foil layer. Other tested specimens include titanium multi-wall sandwich coupons as well as TPS using a second honeycomb sandwich in place of the foil backing. Hypervelocity impact tests were performed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Orbital Debris Simulation Facility. An improved test fixture was designed and fabricated to hold specimens firmly in place during impact. Projectile diameter, honeycomb sandwich material, honeycomb sandwich facesheet thickness, and honeycomb core cell size were examined to determine the influence of TPS configuration on the level of protection provided to the substructure (crew, cabin, fuel tank, etc.) against micrometeoroid or orbit debris impacts. Pictures and descriptions of the damage to each specimen are included.

Karr, Katherine L.; Poteet, Carl C.; Blosser, Max L.

2003-01-01

370

Resolve! Version 2.5: Flammable Gas Accident Analysis Tool Acceptance Test Plan and Test Results  

SciTech Connect

RESOLVE! Version 2 .5 is designed to quantify the risk and uncertainty of combustion accidents in double-shell tanks (DSTs) and single-shell tanks (SSTs). The purpose of the acceptance testing is to ensure that all of the options and features of the computer code run; to verify that the calculated results are consistent with each other; and to evaluate the effects of the changes to the parameter values on the frequency and consequence trends associated with flammable gas deflagrations or detonations.

LAVENDER, J.C.

2000-10-17

371

49 CFR 199.119 - Reporting of anti-drug testing results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-10-01 false Reporting of anti-drug testing results. 199.119 Section 199.119 Transportation...CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING Drug Testing § 199.119 Reporting of anti-drug testing...

2010-10-01

372

Quench Module Insert Capabilities and Development Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Quench Module Insert is a directional solidification furnace that will operate in the Materials Science Research Rack (MSRR) on the International Space Station. It will provide high thermal gradient and quench capabilities for processing metals and alloys in microgravity. Numerical analyses and breadboard testing conducted to date show that the QMI can produce an axial temperature gradient approaching 150 C per centimeter in a 1 centimeter diameter aluminum sample with a maximum molten sample temperature of 1100 C. Breadboard testing and analysis have also shown that the quench capabilities of the furnace are sufficient to rapidly solidify at least a 5mm axial portion of a 1 centimeter diameter molten aluminum sample in significantly less than the required 2 seconds and prevent significant backmelt. This paper presents the furnace requirements and capabilities and a status of the associated development testing and analyses.

Carswell, William E.; Crouch, M. R.; Farmer, J.; Breeding, S.; Rose, F.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

373

Overview of the PBF test results. [PWR; BWR  

SciTech Connect

The Thermal Fuels Behavior Program (TFBP) of EG and G Idaho conducts fuel behavior research in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) at INEL and at the Halden Reactor in Norway. The fuels behavior research in the PBF is directed toward providing a detailed understanding of the response of light water reactor (LWR) nuclear fuel assemblies to off-normal and hypothesized accident conditions. Single fuel rods and clusters of highly instrumented fuel rods are installed within a central test space of the PBF core for testing. The core can be operated in various modes to provide test conditions typical of accidents and off-normal conditions that may be experienced in a pressurized water reactor or a boiling water reactor.

Zeile, H.J.

1980-01-01

374

Parabolic dish Stirling module development and test results  

SciTech Connect

Private industry and the U.S. Department of Energy are presently cost sharing the design, manufacture and test of a 25 Kwe parabolic dish Stirling module, known as Vanguard. The Vanguard module achieved a world's record sunlight to electric conversion efficiency of 31.6% in February 1984 at the Rancho Mirage, California test site. The module is presently operating daily in sunrise to sunset tests to determine the long term performance and O and M requirements of this distributed receiver system. Each module can be easily integrated into a larger field of modules to provide power generation opportunities from a single 25 Kwe unit for isolated loads to 30 Mwe systems for integrated utility power generation.

Washom, B.

1984-08-01

375

First Results of the Phebus FPT3 Test  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to provide a preliminary overview of the phenomena observed during the experimental phase of the PHEBUS Fission Product Test FPT3. This experiment was the last in the series of 5 in-pile integral experiments performed by IRSN in the PHEBUS facility operated by the CEA on the site of Cadarache. Unlike the previous tests, FPT3 used boron carbide as absorber material instead of silver-indium-cadmium, so varying an important parameter impacting physico-chemical phenomena. FPT3 test course was in agreement with the pre-defined test protocol, including a 8,5-day irradiation phase, a fuel bundle degradation phase which lasted less than 5 hours and a 4-day long-term phase that consisted of an aerosol stage dedicated to the analysis of aerosol deposition mechanisms inside the containment vessel and a chemistry stage devoted to the analysis of the iodine chemistry. During the experiment, both the on-line instrumentation and the periodic samplings worked quite well. The fuel degradation progress could be analysed through both temperatures inside the bundle and gaseous concentration measurements performed in the circuit and inside the containment vessel. Some major events, like fuel clad and absorber rod failures or material relocations, were clearly correlated to both bundle and circuit instrumentation signals. The post test non destructive examinations of the fuel bundle (X-radiography, X- and {gamma}-tomographies and {gamma}-scanning) allowed to compare FPT2 and FPT3 bundle final degradation states. On-line {gamma}-detector measurements coupled with numerous post test gamma-counted sequential samplings help for the characterization of the iodine behaviour inside the containment vessel during the degradation and the long term phases. The whole set of measurements appears self-consistent and provides new data for the iodine solubility inside the sump, the iodine gaseous fraction and the organic versus molecular iodine distribution inside the containment atmosphere. (authors)

March, Philippe; Biard, Bruno; Manenc, Christelle; Payot, Frederic; Gaillard, Claude; Guillot, Jerome; Janot, Michel; Morassano, Bruno; Pepino, Michel; Simondi-Teisseire, Beatrice [IRSN, 31, avenue de la Division Leclerc, BP 17 - 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses Cedex (France); Garnier, Yves; Gregoire, Gilles; Masson, Veronique; Pantera, Laurent [CEA-Cadarache, 13108 St Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France)

2006-07-01

376

HIDEC F-15 adaptive engine control system flight test results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA-Ames' Highly Integrated Digital Electronic Control (HIDEC) flight test program aims to develop fully integrated airframe, propulsion, and flight control systems. The HIDEC F-15 adaptive engine control system flight test program has demonstrated that significant performance improvements are obtainable through the retention of stall-free engine operation throughout the aircraft flight and maneuver envelopes. The greatest thrust increase was projected for the medium-to-high altitude flight regime at subsonic speed which is of such importance to air combat. Adaptive engine control systems such as the HIDEC F-15's can be used to upgrade the performance of existing aircraft without resort to expensive reengining programs.

Smolka, James W.

1987-01-01

377

Biomedical results of the Space Shuttle orbital flight test program  

SciTech Connect

On July 4, 1982, the Space Shuttle Columbia landed at Edwards Air Force Base, CA, thus successfully completing the fourth and last in a series of Orbital Flight Tests (OFT) of the Space Transportation System (STS). The primary goal of medical operations support for the OFT was to assure the health and well-being of flight personnel during all phases of the mission. To this end, crew health status was evaluated preflight, inflight, and postflight. Biomedical flight test requirements were completed in the following areas: physiological adaptation to microgravity, cabin acoustical noise, cabin atmospheric evaluation, radiation dosimetry, crew exercise equipment evaluation, and a cardiovascular deconditioning countermeasure assessment. 9 references.

Pool, S.L.; Nicogossian, A.

1983-12-01

378

Graphite/Larc-160 technology demonstration segment test results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A structural test program was conducted on a Celion/LARC-160 graphite/polyimide technology demonstration segment (TDS) to verify the technology. The 137 x 152 cm (54 x 60 in.) TDS simulates a full-scale section of the orbiter composite body flap design incorporating three ribs and extending from the forward cove back to the rear spar. The TDS was successfully subjected to mechanical loads and thermal environments (-170 to 316 C) simulating 100 shuttle orbiter missions. Successful completion of the test program verified the design, analysis, and fabrication methodology for bonded Gr/PI honeycomb sandwich structure and demonstration that Gr/PI composite technology readiness is established.

Morita, W. H.; Graves, S. R.

1983-01-01

379

10 CFR 26.139 - Reporting initial validity and drug test results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Reporting initial validity and drug test results. 26.139 Section 26.139 Energy...Reporting initial validity and drug test results. (a) The licensee testing facility...under § 26.75(h), positive test results from initial drug tests at the...

2011-01-01

380

Results of Statewide TerraNova Testing, Fall 1998.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This summary provides key findings about state, district, and school level performance on the TerraNova examinations (CTB/McGraw Hill) in Nevada in 1998-1999. The TerraNova tests are used to assess students in grades 4, 8, and 10 as stipulated by Nevada law. Within this summary, a description of performance as measured by national percentile…

La Marca, Paul M.

381

Operational and technical results from the Spent Fuel Test - Climax  

SciTech Connect

The technical feasibility of short-term storage and retrieval of spent nuclear fuel assemblies has recently been demonstrated in a test of deep geologic storage at the US Department of Energy Nevada Test Site (NTS). Handling systems and procedures developed and deployed on this test functioned safely and reliably to emplace eleven intact spent-fuel assemblies and retrieve them three years later. Three exchanges of spent fuel were conducted at regular intervals during the storage period to maintain the proficiency of personnel and the readiness of the handling system. Technical data was collected using nearly 1000 instruments. These data show that the mechanical and thermal properties of granites are compatible with nuclear waste isolation objectives. Measured and calculated temperatures are in excellent agreement, confirming the adequacy of available heat transfer codes. Radiation transport calculations were of high quality, exceeding the accuracy of available long-term dosimetry techniques which were used on the test. We also found good agreement between measured and calculated displacements within the rock mass. 28 references, 4 figures.

Patrick, W.C.

1985-01-01

382

Quench Module Insert Capabilities and Development Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Quench Module Insert is a directional solidification furnace, which will fly in the Materials Science Research Facility. The QMI provides high thermal gradient and quench capabilities for processing metals and alloys in microgravity. This paper will describe the capabilities and present of on-going analysis and development testing.

Carswell, B.; Crouch, M.; Farmer, J.; Breeding, S.; Rose, F.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

383

Still Just 1 "g": Consistent Results from Five Test Batteries  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a recent paper, Johnson, Bouchard, Krueger, McGue, and Gottesman (2004) addressed a long-standing debate in psychology by demonstrating that the g factors derived from three test batteries administered to a single group of individuals were completely correlated. This finding provided evidence for the existence of a unitary higher-level general…

Johnson, Wendy; te Nijenhuis, Jan; Bouchard, Thomas J., Jr.

2008-01-01

384

Corrosion prevention with an organic metal (polyaniline): corrosion test results  

Microsoft Academic Search

The organic metal polyaniline (PAni) was found by us some years ago to be a powerful corrosion protection agent. The properties of the new PAni containing primer CORRPASSIVTM sealed with different top coats are characterized and compared with top coated probes using no or a conventional zinc primer. The combination of measurements of salt spray test, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)

Bernhard Wessling; Joerg Posdorfer

1999-01-01

385

Test results from LAGEOS-2 optical characterization using pulsed lasers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Laser Geodynamic Satellite-2 (LAGEOS-2) has undergone extensive optical testing at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center during 1989. The techniques included measuring the far field diffraction pattern using cw and pulsed lasers. In the pulsed measurement technique, response of the satellite was studied by measuring the far-field diffraction pattern (FFDP) as a function of pulsewidth, wavelength, polarization, position in the

Thomas K. Varghese; Michael Selden; Thomas Oldham; Christopher Clarke; Thomas Zagwodzki

1993-01-01

386

Physical Education and Its Effect on Elementary Testing Results  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study was designed to determine the impact of increased quality Physical Education time on Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) standardized scores. The MCAS test was given to 311 fourth-grade students in two Southeastern communities in Massachusetts, within a two-month period in April and May of 2001. The participants were…

Tremarche, Pamela V.; Robinson, Ellyn M.; Graham, Louise B.

2007-01-01

387

Analysis and Test Results of Tunneling IP over NFCIP-1  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we present a concept for a test system, that can establish an IP connection over NFC. Any further IP data traffic is then tunneled through a wireless NFC link. Besides a short introduction about the NFC technology, this concept is described in the first part of the paper. This system has been realized with two NFC boards,

S. Grunberger; Josef Langer

2009-01-01

388

MISSISSIPPI COTTON YIELD MONITOR: THREE YEARS OF FIELD TEST RESULTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Mississippi cotton yield monitor, which is based on an optical cotton-flow sensor comprised of emitters and detectors in one unit that can be affixed to only one side of a pneumatic duct, has been under development at Mississippi State University since 1999. One prototype of the yield monitor was field tested that year in Mississippi. In 2000, three prototypes

J. A. Thomasson; R. Sui

389

Performance testing and results of the first Etec CORE-2564  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In order to be able to write 64 megabit DRAM reticles, to prepare to write 256 megabit DRAM reticles and in general to meet the current and next generation mask and reticle quality requirements, Hoya Micro Mask (HMM) installed in 1991 the first CORE-2564 Laser Reticle Writer from Etec Systems, Inc. The system was delivered as a CORE-2500XP and was subsequently upgraded to a 2564. The CORE (Custom Optical Reticle Engraver) system produces photomasks with an exposure strategy similar to that employed by an electron beam system, but it uses a laser beam to deliver the photoresist exposure energy. Since then the 2564 has been tested by Etec's standard Acceptance Test Procedure and by several supplementary HMM techniques to insure performance to all the Etec advertised specifications and certain additional HMM requirements that were more demanding and/or more thorough than the advertised specifications. The primary purpose of the HMM tests was to more closely duplicate mask usage. The performance aspects covered by the tests include registration accuracy and repeatability; linewidth accuracy, uniformity and linearity; stripe butting; stripe and scan linearity; edge quality; system cleanliness; minimum geometry resolution; minimum address size and plate loading accuracy and repeatability.

Franks, C. Edward; Shikata, Asao; Baker, Catherine A.

1993-03-01

390

Concentrated whey in fattening pig feeding on farm testing results  

E-print Network

castrated) were tested in order to compare a commercial diet with a diet containing 600 g dry matter in the form of concentrated whey (300 g DM/1). The pigs were fed according to a feed restriction plan subjected to feed restriction (maize-soybean meal diet) reared in individual or mixed pens J. CASTAING M

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

391

Accelerated aging test results for aerospace wire insulation constructions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several wire insulation constructions were evaluated with and without continuous glow discharges at low pressure and high temperature to determine the aging characteristics of acceptable wire insulation constructions. It was known at the beginning of the test program that insulation aging takes several years when operated at normal ambient temperature and pressure of 20 C and 760 torr. Likewise, it

William G. Dunbar

1995-01-01

392

Semiscale steam-generator tube-rupture test results. [PWR  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Semiscale Program and Test facility are located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and operated by EG and G Idaho, Inc., for the US Department of Energy. The system is a small-scale model of the primary coolant system of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear generating plant. An experimental program designed to provide data from steam generator tube rupture

Dimenna

1983-01-01

393

Test Beam Results Using an RPC Semi-Digital HCAL  

E-print Network

We report on the development of an GRPCs (Glass Resistive Plate chambers) Semi- Digital hadron calorimeter for the future International Linear Collider (ILC).Two types of GRPCs (small and 1m2) were tested in PS beam at CERN. Detector performances are presented here in terms of efficiency, pad multiplicity, homogeneity and stability in time.

Khaled Belkadhi

2010-08-21

394

Enhancing Building Operations through Automated Diagnostics: Field Test Results  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Whole Building Diagnostician (WBD) is a modular diagnostic software system that provides detection and diagnosis of problems with the operation of HVAC systems and major energy end-uses. It has been extensively field tested and demonstrated in buildings over the past several years. WBD found problems with many air-handling units at all sites. The problems ranged from a simple set

Srinivas Katipamula; Michael R. Brambley; Nathan N. Bauman; Robert G. Pratt

2003-01-01

395

TEST RESULTS FOR FUEL CELL OPERATION ON ANAEROBIC DIGESTER GAS  

EPA Science Inventory

EPA, in conjunction with ONSI Corp., embarked on a project to define, design, test, and assess a fuel cell energy recovery system for application at anaerobic digester waste water (sewage) treatment plants. Anaerobic digester gas (ADG) is produced at these plants during the proce...

396

40 CFR 86.609-98 - Calculation and reporting of test results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...applicable emission standard expressed to one additional significant figure. (b) Final test results for each test...applicable standard expressed to one additional significant figure. (c) Final deteriorated test results....

2014-07-01

397

Design and preliminary test results of Daya Bay RPC modules  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) modules will be used as one part of the cosmic muon veto system in the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment. A total of 189 RPC modules will cover the three water pools in the experiment. To achieve track reconstruction and high efficiency, each module consists of 4 layers, each of which contains two sizes of bare chambers. The placement of bare chambers is reversed in different layers to reduce the overlapping dead areas. The module efficiency and patch efficiency were studied both in simulation and test of the data analysis. 143 modules have been constructed and tested. The preliminary study shows that the module and patch 3 out of 4 layers efficiency reaches about 98%.

Xu, Ji-Lei; Guan, Meng-Yun; Yang, Chang-Gen; Wang, Yi-Fang; Zhang, Jia-Wen; Lu, Chang-Guo; Kirk, McDonald; Robert, Hackenburg; Kwong, Lau; Logan, Lebanowski; Cullen, Newsom; Lin, Shih-Kai; Jonathan, Link; Ma, Lie-Hua; Viktor, P??; Vit, Vorobel; Chen, Jin; Liu, Jin-Chang; Zhou, Yong-Zhao; Liang, Hao

2011-09-01

398

Geolab Results from Three Years of Analog Mission Tests  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

GeoLab is a prototype glovebox for geological sample examination that was, until November 2012, fully integrated into NASA's Deep Space Habitat Analog Testbed [1,2]. GeoLab allowed us to test science operations related to contained sample examination during simulated exploration missions. The facility, shown in Figure 1 and described elsewhere [1-4], was designed for fostering the development of both instrument technology and operational concepts for sample handling and examination during future missions [3-5]. Even though we recently deintegrated the glovebox from the Deep Space Habitat (Fig. 2), it continues to provide a high-fidelity workspace for testing instruments that could be used for sample characterization. As a testbed, GeoLab supports the development of future science operations that will enhance the early scientific returns from exploration missions, and will help ensure selection of the best samples for Earth return.

Evans, Cindy A.; Bell, M. S.; Calaway, M. J.

2013-01-01

399

PROTEC TM TEAR-OFFS: RESULTS OF LONG TERM TESTING  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has completed a series of tests (Phases 1 and 2) to assess the potential use of a Mylar{reg_sign} tear-off system as a primary or secondary protective barrier to minimize acid etching ('frosting'), accidental scratching, and\\/or radiation damage for shielded cells, glovebox, and\\/or chemical hood windows. Conceptually, thin, multi-layered sheets of Mylar (referred to throughout

Peeler

2008-01-01

400

Debris Particles resulting from the Chinese Nuclear Bomb Test  

Microsoft Academic Search

ON October 16, 1964, at 1500 h the Chinese exploded a nuclear weapon bomb (Hsinhua News Agency, October 17, 1964) at a test site near Lop Nor in Takla Makan in Sing Kiang. On October 27 the first debris appeared in Swedish ground-air samples. Scarcely any detectable fission product activity appeared in high-altitude air samples1. The background, emanating principally from

Jan Sisefsky

1965-01-01

401

Beta test results for the CAA mini-SAM system  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Chemical Analysis Automation (CAA) Program is to automate methods for chemical analysis of environmental samples. To accomplish this mission, the CAA team has developed automated laboratory systems based on a plug-and-work strategy for integrating components. Realizing that standardization is the key to implementing this strategy, CAA has developed, demonstrated, and encouraged commercialization of standards for laboratory automation. While the CAA mission is driven by the analyses in support of the extensive remediation programs of the Departments of Energy and Defense, it also impacts any industry that depends upon high volumes of repetitive chemical analysis. A Standard Analysis Method (SAM) is any collection of hardware and software used to automate part or all of a method. The method automated for the Mini-SAM testing is EPA Method 3550, which outlines semivolatiles extraction by sonication. The list of semivolatiles includes the polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) analytes of interest. The basic building block of a SAM is the Standard Laboratory Module (SLM). For the Mini-SAM test an automated sonication SLM and an automated concentration SLM were configured to perform the extraction and concentration processes. The Mini-SAM differs from the Full-SAM in that a fully automated delivery of materials, samples, and extracts is not required. The intent of the Beta Test of the Mini-SAM was threefold. Firstly, the Mini-SAM Beta Test met a milestone mandated by the Department of Energy in the course of the program effort. Secondly, the CAA Program secured an independent assessment of the equipment and its capabilities from Assagai Analytical Laboratory. Lastly, the Program captured real-world sample data. The independent assessment, coupled with CAA observation of equipment performance, was used to determine strengths and weaknesses of the Mini-SAM and to compile possible modifications for CAA engineers to address.

Johnson, R.C.; Monagle, M.

1997-04-01

402

Life cycle test results of a bipolar nickel hydrogen battery  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A history of low Earth orbit laboratory test data on a 6.5 Ah bipolar nickel hydrogen battery designed and built at the NASA Lewis Research Center is presented. During the past several years the Storage and Thermal Branch has been deeply involved in the design, development, and optimization of nickel hydrogen devices. The bipolar concept is a means of achieving the goal of producing an acceptable battery of higher energy density, able to withstand the demands of low Earth orbit regimes.

Cataldo, R. L.

1985-01-01

403

Suntech Solar Linear Array Thermal System (SLATS) test results  

Microsoft Academic Search

A fixed-receiver, movable-reflector solar collector system was tested. The collector included 260 sq m of reflector area. Thermal energy was transferred from the linear receiver to a heat exchanger by water and from the heat exchanger to the thermal storage tanks by Therminol 66. The collector system start-up and operation over a period of 16 months is described. Several data

H. J. Gerwin

1979-01-01

404

Deflection test results on D0 Run IIB stave  

SciTech Connect

The D0 RunIIb final design stave has been tested to verify its actual mechanical performance. The effectiveness of four G-11 (fiberglass/epoxy) braces to bridge the two channels has been investigated as well. All staves have met the goal stiffness for the silicon area. The stave mockups with braces have shown excellent stiffness in complete agreement with what theoretically calculated.

Lanfranco, Giobatta; /Fermilab

2003-09-01

405

Correlation Results for a Mass Loaded Vehicle Panel Test Article Finite Element Models and Modal Survey Tests  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

High-fidelity Finite Element Models (FEMs) were developed to support a recent test program at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The FEMs correspond to test articles used for a series of acoustic tests. Modal survey tests were used to validate the FEMs for five acoustic tests (a bare panel and four different mass-loaded panel configurations). An additional modal survey test was performed on the empty test fixture (orthogrid panel mounting fixture, between the reverb and anechoic chambers). Modal survey tests were used to test-validate the dynamic characteristics of FEMs used for acoustic test excitation. Modal survey testing and subsequent model correlation has validated the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the FEMs. The modal survey test results provide a basis for the analysis models used for acoustic loading response test and analysis comparisons

Maasha, Rumaasha; Towner, Robert L.

2012-01-01

406

Development of optimal liquid based cytology sample processing methods for HPV testing: minimising the 'inadequate' test result.  

PubMed

Incorporation of HPV testing into cervical screening is anticipated and robust methods for DNA extraction from liquid based cytology (LBC) samples are required. This study compared QIAamp extraction with Proteinase K digestion and developed methods to address DNA extraction failure (?-globin PCR negative) from clinical specimens. Proteinase K and QIAamp extraction methods in paired LBC samples were comparable with adequate DNA retrieved from 93.3% of clinical specimens. An HPV prevalence cohort (n=10,000) found 7% (n=676) LBC samples tested negative for ?-globin, and were classified as inadequate. This 'failure' rate is unsuitable for population screening, particularly as the sampling method is intrusive. 379/676 samples were assessed to determine the cause of test failure. Re-testing confirmed adequate DNA in 21.6% of the original extracts; re-extraction from stored material identified 56.2% samples contained adequate material; dilution to overcome sample inhibition (1:10) resolved 51.7% cases in original extracts and 28% in new extracts. A standardised approach to HPV testing with an optimal DNA concentration input rather than standard volume input is recommended. Samples failing initial DNA extraction should be repeat extracted and assessed for sample inhibition to reduce the 7% of HPV tests being reported as inadequate and reduce the need for retesting of those women to <1%. PMID:21295606

Peevor, R; Jones, J; Fiander, A N; Hibbitts, S

2011-05-01

407

Power Burst Facility (PBF) severe fuel damage test 1-4 test results report  

Microsoft Academic Search

A comprehensive evaluation of the Severe Fuel Damage (SFD) Test 1-4 performed in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is presented. Test SFD 1-4 was the fourth and final test in an internationally sponsored light water reactor severe accident research program, initiated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The overall technical objective of the test

D. A. Petti; Z. R. Martinson; R. R. Hobbins; C. M. Allison; E. R. Carlson; D. L. Hagrman; T. C. Cheng; J. K. Hartwell; K. Vinjamuri; L. J. Seifken

1989-01-01

408

PBF (Power Burst Facility) severe fuel damage test 1--3 test results report  

Microsoft Academic Search

A comprehensive evaluation of the Severe Fuel Damage (SFD) Test 1--3 performed in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is presented. Test SFD 1--3 was the third test in an internationally sponsored light water reactor severe accident research program, initiated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The overall technical objective of the test was to

Z. R. Martinson; M. Gasparini; R. R. Hobbins; D. A. Petti; C. M. Allison; J. K. Hohorst; D. L. Hagrman; K. Vinjamuri

1989-01-01

409

Life test results for an ensemble of CO2 lasers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The effects of cathode material, cathode operating temperature, anode configuration, window materials, and hydrogen additives on laser lifetime are determined. Internally oxidized copper and silber-copper alloy cathodes were tested. The cathode operating temperature was raised in some tubes through the use of thermal insulation. Lasers incorporating thermally insulated silver copper oxide cathodes clearly yielded the longest lifetimes-typically in excess of 22,000 hours. The use of platinum sheet versus platinum pin anodes had no observable effect on laser lifetime. Similarly, the choice of germanium, cadmium telluride, or zinc selenide as the optical window material appears to have no impact on lifetime.

Peruso, C. J.; Degnan, J. J.; Hochuli, U. E.

1978-01-01

410

Test Results of a 200 W Class Hall Thruster  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The performance of a 200 W class Hall thruster was evaluated. Performance measurements were taken at power levels between 90 W and 250 W. At the nominal 200 W design point, the measured thrust was 11.3 mN. and the specific impulse was 1170 s excluding cathode flow in the calculation. A laboratory model 3 mm diameter hollow cathode was used for all testing. The engine was operated on laboratory power supplies in addition to a breadboard power processing unit fabricated from commercially available DC to DC converters.

Jacobson, David; Jankovsky, Robert S.

1999-01-01

411

Test results from a breadboard cryogenic propellant condition assembly  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Cryogenic auxiliary propulsion systems consist of five major subsystems: propellant tanks, propellant conditioning assemblies, accumulators, propellant distribution systems, and thrustors. The propellant conditioning assembly (PCA) converts low pressure liquid to high pressure gas for use by the thrustors, and is one of the most complex subsystems of the cryogenic propulsion system. The ability to achieve rapid starts and at the same time maintain system control are two critical areas of PCA operation. To investigate these critical areas of operation, a PCA of the general type required was designed, fabricated, and tested using existing hardware. Realistic start times were achieved and system control was maintained at all operating conditions.

Stinson, H. P., Jr.

1974-01-01

412

AiResearch QCGAT engine: Acoustic test results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The noise levels of the quiet, general aviation turbofan (QCGAT) engine were measured in ground static noise tests. The static noise levels were found to be markedly lower than the demonstrably quiet AiResearch model TFE731 engine. The measured QCGAT noise levels were correlated with analytical noise source predictions to derive free-field component noise predictions. These component noise sources were used to predict the QCGAT flyover noise levels at FAR Part 36 conditions. The predicted flyover noise levels are about 10 decibels lower than the current quietest business jets.

Kisner, L. S.

1980-01-01

413

The Results of Recent MICE Superconducting Spectrometer Solenoid Test  

SciTech Connect

The MICE spectrometer solenoid magnets will be the first magnets to be installed within the MICE cooling channel. The MICE spectrometer solenoids may be the largest magnets that have been cooled using small two stage coolers. During the previous test of this magnet, the cooler first stage temperatures were too high. The causes of some of the extra first stage heat load has been identified and corrected. The rebuilt magnet had a single stage GM cooler in addition to the three pulse tube coolers. The added cooler reduces the temperature of the top of the HTS leads, the shield and of the first stage of the pulse tube coolers.

Green, Michael A; Virostek, Steve P.; Zisman, Michael S.

2010-10-15

414

Development, implementation, and test results on integrated optics switching matrix  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A small integrated optics switching matrix, which was developed, implemented, and tested, indicates high performance. The matrix serves as a model for the design of larger switching matrices. The larger integrated optics switching matrix should form the integral part of a switching center with high data rate throughput of up to 300 megabits per second. The switching matrix technique can accomplish the design goals of low crosstalk and low distortion. About 50 illustrations help explain and depict the many phases of the integrated optics switching matrix. Many equations used to explain and calculate the experimental data are also included.

Rutz, E.

1982-01-01

415

Preliminary results from the advanced photovoltaic experiment flight test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Advanced Photovoltaic Experiment is a space flight test designed to provide reference cell standards for photovoltaic measurement as well as to investigate the solar spectrum and the effect of the space environment on solar cells. After a flight of 69 months in low earth orbit as part of the Long Duration Exposure Facility set of experiments, it was retrieved in January, 1990. The electronic data acquisition system functioned as designed, measuring and recording cell performance data over the first 358 days of flight; limited by battery lifetime. Significant physical changes are also readily apparent, including erosion of front surface paint, micrometeoroid and debris catering and contamination.

Brinker, David J.; Hart, Russell E., Jr.; Hickey, John R.

1990-01-01

416

Test results from LAGEOS-2 optical characterization using pulsed lasers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Laser Geodynamic Satellite-2 (LAGEOS-2) has undergone extensive optical testing at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center during 1989. The techniques included measuring the far field diffraction pattern using cw and pulsed lasers. In the pulsed measurement technique, response of the satellite was studied by measuring the far-field diffraction pattern (FFDP) as a function of pulsewidth, wavelength, polarization, position in the FFDP, detector/processing techniques, and satellite orientation. The purpose of the pulsed laser testing was two-fold: (1) to characterize the satellite optical response with the detector and signal processing electronics currently used in most SLR stations using the portable laser ranging standard, and (2) to characterize the satellite response for various conditions using the highest bandwidth optical detector (streak camera) available for the next generation of satellite laser ranging (SLR) technology. The portable ranging standard employed multiple measurement devices and an optical calibration scheme to eliminate range-dependent and amplitude-dependent systematics. These precautions were taken to eliminate/minimize instrumental errors and provide maximum accuracy. For LAGEOS orbit (6000 Km), ground stations are located 34 to 38 Mu radians off the axis of the return signal from the satellite; therefore, an optical mask was used to restrict the field of view (FOV) of detection to this annular region of the FFDP. The two measurement techniques were implemented using an aperture sharing scheme and complemented each other by providing mutual verification.

Varghese, Thomas K.; Selden, Michael; Oldham, Thomas; Clarke, Christopher; Zagwodzki, Thomas

1993-01-01

417

GridPix detectors: Production and beam test results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The innovative GridPix detector is a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) that is read out with a Timepix-1 pixel chip. By using wafer post-processing techniques an aluminium grid is placed on top of the chip. When operated, the electric field between the grid and the chip is sufficient to create electron induced avalanches which are detected by the pixels. The time-to-digital converter (TDC) records the drift time enabling the reconstruction of high precision 3D track segments. Recently GridPixes were produced on full wafer scale, to meet the demand for more reliable and cheaper devices in large quantities. In a recent beam test the contribution of both diffusion and time walk to the spatial and angular resolutions of a GridPix detector with a 1.2 mm drift gap are studied in detail. In addition long term tests show that in a significant fraction of the chips the protection layer successfully quenches discharges, preventing harm to the chip.

Koppert, W. J. C.; van Bakel, N.; Bilevych, Y.; Colas, P.; Desch, K.; Fransen, M.; van der Graaf, H.; Hartjes, F.; Hessey, N. P.; Kaminski, J.; Schmitz, J.; Schön, R.; Zappon, F.

2013-12-01

418

Results of Laboratory Testing of Advanced Power Strips: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of a laboratory investigation to evaluate the technical performance of advanced power strip (APS) devices when subjected to a range of home entertainment center and home office usage scenarios.

Earle, L.; Sparn, B.

2012-08-01

419

Results of the SPAS-01 RCS plume impingement test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Orbiter RCS flowfield is modeled in the free molecular region and an impingement analysis is performed to characterize on-orbit plume interactions with nearby bodies, such as the SPAS-01 satellite. The flow in the far field is treated with a source flow model at any point 40 ft from the nozzle. Impingement is calculated according to Newtonian impact theory. The flow density in the far field is expressed in terms of a conservation of energy equation, with account taken of the expansion of the gas, cooling, and the angular distribution. The SPAS-01 platform gathered data at eight different positions around the Orbiter to test the model predictions. Excellent agreement was obtained in predictions of the torque and rotation rate induced on the SPAS by firing the thrusters.

Lazaron, M. P.; Alred, J. W.

1985-01-01

420

D. phi. vertex drift chamber construction and test results  

SciTech Connect

A jet-cell based vertex chamber has been built for the D{O} experiment at Fermilab and operated in a test beam there. Low drift velocity and diffusion properties were achieved using CO{sub 2}(95%)-ethane(5%) at atmospheric pressure. The drift velocity is found to be consistent with (9.74+8.68( E -1.25)) {mu}m/nsec where E is the electric field strength in (kV/cm < E z 1.6 kV/cm.) An intrinsic spatial resolution of 60 {mu}m or better for drift distances greater than 2 mm is measured. The track pair efficiency is estimated to be better than 90% for separations greater than 630 {mu}m. 8 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Clark, A.R.; Goozen, F.; Grudberg, P.; Klopfenstein, C.; Kerth, L.T.; Loken, S.C.; Oltman, E.; Strovink, M.; Trippe, T.G.

1991-05-01

421

Test results, Industrial Solar Technology parabolic trough solar collector  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories and Industrial Solar Technology are cost-sharing development of advanced parabolic trough technology. As part of this effort, several configurations of an IST solar collector were tested to determine the collector efficiency and thermal losses with black chrome and black nickel receiver selective coatings, combined with aluminized film and silver film reflectors, using standard Pyrex{reg_sign} and anti-reflective coated Pyrex{reg_sign} glass receiver envelopes. The development effort has been successful, producing an advanced collector with 77% optical efficiency, using silver-film reflectors, a black nickel receiver coating, and a solgel anti-reflective glass receiver envelope. For each receiver configuration, performance equations were empirically derived relating collector efficiency and thermal losses to the operating temperature. Finally, equations were derived showing collector performance as a function of input insolation value, incident angle, and operating temperature.

Dudley, V.E. [EG and G MSI, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Evans, L.R.; Matthews, C.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-11-01

422

Flight test results for several light, canard-configured airplanes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Brief flight evaluations of two different, light, composite constructed, canard and winglet configured airplanes were performed to assess their handling qualities; one airplane was a single engine, pusher design and the other a twin engine, push-pull configuration. An emphasis was placed on the slow speed/high angle of attack region for both airplanes and on the engine-out regime for the twin. Mission suitability assessment included cockpit and control layout, ground and airborne handling qualities, and turbulence response. Very limited performance data was taken. Stall/spin tests and the effects of laminar flow loss on performance and handling qualities were assessed on an extended range, single engine pusher design.

Brown, Philip W.

1987-01-01

423

Results of dynamic testing of GP-B spherical gyroscopes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Laboratory tests of the spherical electrostatically levitated cryogenically cooled coated gyroscope being developed for the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) spacecraft (Bardas et al., 1986) are reported. Spin speed and the dc components of the trapped magnetic field are measured with three orthogonal pickup loops attached to SQUID detectors as the levitated gyro is brought up to speed by an He gas jet. Data on the spin-vector time history, mass unbalance, higher rotor-shape harmonics, and spin-vector position are presented in extensive graphs and characterized in detail, and a mathematical model of the electrostatic suspension torques is derived. Prototype gyro 86-4 is found to have mass unbalance within the range required for the GP-B mission (to detect the geodetic and motional effects predicted by general relativity theory).

Keiser, G. M.; Breakwell, J. V.; Xiao, Y.; Feteih, S.

1989-01-01

424

Test results of JPL LiSOCl sub 2 cells  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the development of high rate Li-SO-Cl2 cells for various applications, the goal is to achieve 300 watt-hours per kilogram at the C/2 (5 amp) rate in a D cell configuration. The JPL role is to develop the understanding of the performance, life, and safety limiting characteristics in the cell and to transfer the technology to a manufacturer to produce a safe, high quality product in a reproducible manner. The approach taken to achieve the goals is divided into four subject areas: cathode processes and characteristics; chemical reactions and safety; cell design and assembly; and performance and abuse testing. The progress made in each of these areas is discussed.

Halpert, G.; Subbarao, S.; Dawson, S.; Ang, V.; Deligiannis, E.

1986-01-01

425

Testing of aircraft passenger seat cushion materials. Full scale, test description and results, volume 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Eight different seat cushion configurations were subjected to full-scale burn tests. Each cushion configuration was tested twice for a total of sixteen tests. Two different fire sources were used. They consisted of one liter of Jet A fuel for eight tests and a radiant energy source with propane flame for eight tests. Both fire sources were ignited by a propane flame. During each test, data were recorded for smoke density, cushion temperatures, radiant heat flux, animal response to combustion products, rate of weight loss of test specimens, cabin temperature, and for the type and content of gas within the cabin atmosphere. When compared to existing passenger aircraft seat cushions, the test specimens incorporating a fire barrier and those fabricated from advanced materials, using improved construction methods, exhibited significantly greater fire resistance.

Schutter, K. J.; Gaume, J. G.; Duskin, F. E.

1981-01-01

426

40 CFR 205.171-7 - Reporting of the test results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Reporting of the test results. 205.171-7 Section 205.171-7...205.171-7 Reporting of the test results. (a)(1) The manufacturer must...of test motorcycle; and (iv) Test results by serial numbers. (b) In...

2011-07-01

427

40 CFR 205.171-7 - Reporting of the test results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Reporting of the test results. 205.171-7 Section 205.171-7...205.171-7 Reporting of the test results. (a)(1) The manufacturer must...of test motorcycle; and (iv) Test results by serial numbers. (b) In...

2010-07-01

428

Preliminary results of a computer-assisted vocal load test with 10-min test duration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nowadays, many occupations require a high vocal loading capacity. Therefore, it becomes increasingly important to have suitable\\u000a test procedures for the vocal load, which can be executed with a low personnel and temporal expenditure. Patients with decreased\\u000a vocal loading capacity were distinguished from test persons free of voice complaints with a 15-min test. It should be examined\\u000a whether the test

Holger Hanschmann; Christoph Gaipl; Roswitha Berger

2011-01-01

429

40 CFR 94.508 - Calculation and reporting of test results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...results to the number of decimal places contained in the applicable emission standard expressed to one additional significant figure. (b) To calculate test results, sum the initial test results derived in paragraph (a) of this...

2010-07-01

430

40 CFR 94.508 - Calculation and reporting of test results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...results to the number of decimal places contained in the applicable emission standard expressed to one additional significant figure. (b) To calculate test results, sum the initial test results derived in paragraph (a) of this...

2012-07-01

431

40 CFR 94.508 - Calculation and reporting of test results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...results to the number of decimal places contained in the applicable emission standard expressed to one additional significant figure. (b) To calculate test results, sum the initial test results derived in paragraph (a) of this...

2011-07-01

432

40 CFR 94.508 - Calculation and reporting of test results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...results to the number of decimal places contained in the applicable emission standard expressed to one additional significant figure. (b) To calculate test results, sum the initial test results derived in paragraph (a) of this...

2013-07-01

433

40 CFR 94.508 - Calculation and reporting of test results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...results to the number of decimal places contained in the applicable emission standard expressed to one additional significant figure. (b) To calculate test results, sum the initial test results derived in paragraph (a) of this...

2014-07-01

434

Automated cognitive testing of monkeys in social groups yields results comparable to individual laboratory based testing  

PubMed Central

Cognitive abilities likely evolved in response to specific environmental and social challenges and are therefore expected to be specialized for the life history of each species. Specialized cognitive abilities may be most readily engaged under conditions that approximate the natural environment of the species being studied. While naturalistic environments might therefore have advantages over laboratory settings for cognitive research, it is difficult to conduct certain types of cognitive tests in these settings. We implemented methods for automated cognitive testing of monkeys (Macaca mulatta) in large social groups (Field station) and compared the performance to that of laboratory housed monkeys (Laboratory). The Field station animals shared access to four touch screen computers in a large naturalistic social group. Each Field station subject had an RFID chip implanted in each arm for computerized identification and individualized assignment of cognitive tests. The Laboratory group was housed and tested in a typical laboratory setting, with individual access to testing computers in their home cages. Monkeys in both groups voluntarily participated at their own pace for food rewards. We evaluated performance in two visual psychophysics tests, a perceptual classification test, a transitive inference test, and a delayed matching to sample memory test. Despite differences in housing, social environment, age, and sex, monkeys in the two groups performed similarly in all tests. Semi-free ranging monkeys living in complex social environments are therefore viable subjects for cognitive testing designed to take advantage of the unique affordances of naturalistic testing environments. PMID:23263675

Gazes, Regina Paxton; Brown, Emily Kathryn; Basile, Benjamin M.; Hampton, Robert R.

2013-01-01

435

GMI Spin Mechanism Assembly Design, Development, and Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The GMI Spin Mechanism Assembly (SMA) is a precision bearing and power transfer drive assembly mechanism that supports and spins the Global Microwave Imager (GMI) instrument at a constant rate of 32 rpm continuously for the 3 year plus mission life. The GMI instrument will fly on the core Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) spacecraft and will be used to make calibrated radiometric measurements at multiple microwave frequencies and polarizations. The GPM mission is an international effort managed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to improve climate, weather, and hydro-meteorological predictions through more accurate and frequent precipitation measurements [1]. Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation (BATC) was selected by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to design, build, and test the GMI instrument. The SMA design has to meet a challenging set of requirements and is based on BATC space mechanisms heritage and lessons learned design changes made to the WindSat BAPTA mechanism that is currently operating on orbit and has recently surpassed 8 years of Flight operation.

Woolaway, Scott; Kubitschek, Michael; Berdanier, Barry; Newell, David; Dayton, Chris; Pellicciotti, Joseph W.

2012-01-01

436

Interlaboratory results for blood lead proficiency testing program in Thailand.  

PubMed

Between December 1994 to 1995, Faculty of Medical Technology, Mahidol University have a thirteen laboratory to participate in Blood Lead Proficiency Testing Program (BLPT). Every-month the Toxicology Unit in Faculty of Medical Technology Mahidol University which served for Reference Laboratory Center for BLPT send the three lots of whole blood sample which made from bovine blood to the participants by EMS. After evaluation in term of accuracy: using 75 per cent correctly when compared with the target value. There are nine laboratory which have successful in blood lead below 20 micrograms/dL and three laboratory which passing the analysed when the concentration of blood lead at 21-50 micrograms/dL and 51-80 micrograms/dL. In term of precision evaluation the planning process will show that laboratory using Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (GFAAS) reported reliability than using Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (FAAS). From joining with this program the participants will get three advantages, First the target value from the reference laboratory in Thailand and Singapore are similar with the Center for Disease Control (CDC) from the United State of America which known world wide for Reference Laboratory. In the second participants will develop the analysis and solve the problem by himself, The third advantage: will showing the superior, methodology and instruments which guarantee for quality assurance and guideline to standardized blood lead analysis in the International level. PMID:10659569

Pidetcha, P; Suwanthon, L; Preechavuth, A; Pusiri, A; Tatt, S C

1999-12-01

437

Airborne Optical Communications Demonstrator Design And Preflight Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A second generation optical communications demonstrator (OCD-2) intended for airborne applications like air-to-ground and air-to-air optical links is under development at JPL. This development provides the capability for unidirectional high data rate (2.5-Gbps) transmission at 1550-nm, with the ability to receive an 810-nm beacon to aid acquisition pointing and tracking. The transmitted beam width is nominally 200-(micro)rad. A 3x3 degree coarse field-of-view (FOV) acquisition sensor with a much smaller 3-mrad FOV tracking sensor is incorporated. The OCD-2 optical head will be integrated to a high performance gimbal turret assembly capable of providing pointing stability of 5- microradians from an airborne platform. Other parts of OCD-2 include a cable harness, connecting the optical head in the gimbal turret assembly to a rugged electronics box. The electronics box will house: command and control processors, laser transmitter, data-generation-electronics, power conversion/distribution hardware and state-of-health monitors. The entire assembly will be integrated and laboratory tested prior to a planned flight demonstrations.

Biswas, Abhijit; Page, N.; Neal, J.; Zhu, D.; Wright, M.; Ovtiz, G.; Farr, W. H.; Hernnzati, H.

2005-01-01

438

Advanced Test Reactor probabilistic risk assessment methodology and results summary  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) Level 1 report documents a comprehensive and state-of-the-art study to establish and reduce the risk associated with operation of the ATR, expressed as a mean frequency of fuel damage. The ATR Level 1 PRA effort is unique and outstanding because of its consistent and state-of-the-art treatment of all facets of the risk study, its comprehensive and cost-effective risk reduction effort while the risk baseline was being established, and its thorough and comprehensive documentation. The PRA includes many improvements to the state-of-the-art, including the following: establishment of a comprehensive generic data base for component failures, treatment of initiating event frequencies given significant plant improvements in recent years, performance of efficient identification and screening of fire and flood events using code-assisted vital area analysis, identification and treatment of significant seismic-fire-flood-wind interactions, and modeling of large loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs) and experiment loop ruptures leading to direct damage of the ATR core. 18 refs.

Eide, S.A.; Atkinson, S.A.; Thatcher, T.A.

1992-01-01

439

Advanced Rooftop Control (ARC) Retrofit: Field-Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The multi-year research study was initiated to find solutions to improve packaged equipment operating efficiency in the field. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building Technologies Office (BTO) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) conducted this research, development and demonstration (RD&D) study. Packaged equipment with constant speed supply fans is designed to provide ventilation at the design rate at all times when the fan is operating as required by building code. Although there are a number of hours during the day when a building may not be fully occupied or the need for ventilation is lower than designed, the ventilation rate cannot be adjusted easily with a constant speed fan. Therefore, modulating the supply fan in conjunction with demand controlled ventilation (DCV) will not only reduce the coil energy but also reduce the fan energy. The objective of this multi-year research, development and demonstration project was to determine the magnitude of energy savings achievable by retrofitting existing packaged rooftop air conditioners with advanced control strategies not ordinarily used for packaged units. First, through detailed simulation analysis, it was shown that significant energy (between 24% and 35%) and cost savings (38%) from fan, cooling and heating energy consumption could be realized when packaged air conditioning units with gas furnaces are retrofitted with advanced control packages (combining multi-speed fan control, integrated economizer controls and DCV). The simulation analysis also showed significant savings for heat pumps (between 20% and 60%). The simulation analysis was followed by an extensive field test of a retrofittable advanced rooftop unit (RTU) controller.

Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas; Ngo, Hung; Underhill, Ronald M.; Taasevigen, Danny J.; Lutes, Robert G.

2013-07-31

440

Recent results at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly  

SciTech Connect

The Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) project at Los Alamos is charged with developing and demonstrating the tritium technology required for the magnetic fusion energy program. Since June 1987 the project has been operated by Los Alamos National Laboratory under the joint funding of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). At TSTA the technology under development includes reactor exhaust gas processing technology and safety systems. This project is not currently investigating the processing of tritium extracted from a breeding blanket. The processing of tritium extracted from a breeding blanket is a possible upgrade to TSTA. This possible upgrade is the subject of an ongoing study among Los Alamos, JAERI and the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). This installing such on upgraded process systems at TSTA in the 1990--1992 time frame. The exhaust gas processing system at TSTA is designed to demonstrate full-scale exhaust gas processing for a fusion machine of a size currently being designed for ITER. Of course, deuterium is also a major component of the exhaust gas. Current gas processing uses a total gas stream comprised of /approximately/65% deuterium, 35% tritium, 1-2% reactive impurities (currently nitrogen and methane) with the remaining gas hydrogen and helium. The tritium inventory required to process through this loop at this rate is about 110 g. The main process loop at TSTA has been operating at this flow rate since July 1987. In addition to the operation of the main process loop, a number of nonloop experiments are underway at TSTA. This paper will update the status of both loop and nonloop studies at Los Alamos.

Anderson, J.L.; Bartlit, J.R.

1988-01-01

441

On-Line Mu Method for Robust Flutter Prediction in Expanding a Safe Flight Envelope for an Aircraft Model Under Flight Test  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A structured singular value (mu) analysis method of computing flutter margins has robust stability of a linear aeroelastic model with uncertainty operators (Delta). Flight data is used to update the uncertainty operators to accurately account for errors in the computed model and the observed range of aircraft dynamics of the aircraft under test caused by time-varying aircraft parameters, nonlinearities, and flight anomalies, such as test nonrepeatability. This mu-based approach computes predict flutter margins that are worst case with respect to the modeling uncertainty for use in determining when the aircraft is approaching a flutter condition and defining an expanded safe flight envelope for the aircraft that is accepted with more confidence than traditional methods that do not update the analysis algorithm with flight data by introducing mu as a flutter margin parameter that pres