Sample records for tests robustness results

  1. Research of Stochastic Robustness: Results and conclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrison, Chris

    1995-01-01

    With stochastic robustness we are creating tools to design robust compensators for practical systems. During this year, the stochastic robustness research achieved the following results: refined the search tools needed for synthesis; successfully designed robust compensators for the American Controls Conference benchmark problem; and successfully designed robust compensators for a nonlinear hypersonic aircraft model with uncertainties in 28 parameters.

  2. Robustness Testing of the Microsoft Win32 API

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles P. Shelton; Philip Koopman; Kobey Devale

    2000-01-01

    Although Microsoft Windows is being deployed in mission-critical applications, little quantitative data has been published about its robustness. We present the results of executing over two million Ballista-generated exception handling tests across 237 functions and system calls involving six Windows variants, as well as similar tests conducted on the Linux operating system. Windows 95, Windows 98, and Windows CE were

  3. Robustness Testing of A Distributed Simulation Backplane Masters Thesis

    E-print Network

    Koopman, Philip

    /40 Robustness Testing of A Distributed Simulation Backplane Abstract Creating robust software requires testing has been demonstrated to be a useful adjunct to high- quality software development processes Robustness in software is becoming essential as critical computer systems increasingly pervade our daily

  4. Guidance for robustness\\/ruggedness tests in method validation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. Vander Heyden; A. Nijhuis; J. Smeyers-Verbeke; B. G. M. Vandeginste; D. L. Massart

    2001-01-01

    This paper is intended to give guidance in setting-up and interpreting a robustness test. The different steps in a robustness test are discussed and illustrated with examples. The recommendations given for the different steps are based on approaches found in the literature, several case studies performed by the authors and discussions of the authors within a commission of the French

  5. A step towards accreditation: A robustness test of etching process.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, F; Veschetti, M; Tonnarini, S; Cardellini, F; Trevisi, R

    2015-08-01

    In the present study the robustness of the etching process used by our laboratory was assessed. The strategy followed was based on the procedure suggested by Youden. Critical factors for the process were estimated using both Lenth's method and Dong's algorithm. The robustness test evidences that particular attention needs to be paid to the control of the etching solution's temperature. PMID:26002275

  6. A Robust Particle Filter for State Estimation with Convergence Results

    E-print Network

    Schön, Thomas

    A Robust Particle Filter for State Estimation ­ with Convergence Results Xiao-Li Hu, Thomas B. Sch function we refer to Section V. The contribution of this paper is to provide a robust particle filter¨on and Lennart Ljung Abstract-- Particle filters are becoming increasingly impor- tant and useful for state

  7. Undulator Transportation Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zachary; Horton, Nick; Kharakh, David; Levashov, Yurii; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Poling, Ben; Reese, Ed; /SLAC; ,

    2010-11-17

    A test was performed to determine whether transporting and handling the undulators makes any changes to their properties. This note documents the test. No significant changes to the test undulator were observed. After the LCLS undulators are tuned and fiducialized in the Magnetic Measurement Facility (MMF), they must be transported to storage buildings and transported to the tunnel. It has been established that the undulators are sensitive to temperature. We wish to know whether the undulators are also sensitive to the vibrations and shocks of transportation. To study this issue, we performed a test in which an undulator was measured in the MMF, transported to the tunnel, brought back to the MMF, and re-measured. This note documents the test and the results.

  8. Robust parametric bootstrap test with MOM estimator: An alternative to independent sample t-test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harun, Nurul Hanis; Yusof, Zahayu Md

    2014-12-01

    Normality and homogeneity are two major assumptions that need to be fulfilled when using independent sample t-test. However, not all data encompassed with these assumptions. Consequently, the result produced by independent sample t-test becomes invalid. Therefore, the alternative is to use robust statistical procedure in handling the problems of nonnormality and variances heterogeneity. This study proposed to use Parametric Bootstrap test with popular robust estimators, MADn and Tn which empirically determines the amount of trimming. The Type I error rates produced by each procedure were examined and compared with classical parametric test and nonparametric test namely independent sample t-test and Mann Whitney test, respectively. 5000 simulated data sets are used in this study in order to generate the Type I error for each procedure. The findings of this study indicate that the Parametric Bootstrap test with MADn and Tn produces the best Type I error control compared to the independent sample t-test and the Mann Whitney test under nonnormal distribution, heterogeneous variances and unbalanced design. Then, the performance of each procedure was demonstrated using real data.

  9. Climax granite test results

    SciTech Connect

    Ramspott, L.D.

    1980-01-15

    The Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL), as part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) program, is carrying out in situ rock mechanics testing in the Climax granitic stock at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This summary addresses only those field data taken to date that address thermomechanical modeling for a hard-rock repository. The results to be discussed include thermal measurements in a heater test that was conducted from October 1977 through July 1978, and stress and displacement measurements made during and after excavation of the canister storage drift for the Spent Fuel Test (SFT) in the Climax granite. Associated laboratory and field measurements are summarized. The rock temperature for a given applied heat load at a point in time and space can be adequately modeled with simple analytic calculations involving superposition and integration of numerous point source solutions. The input, for locations beyond about a meter from the source, can be a constant thermal conductivity and diffusivity. The value of thermal conductivity required to match the field data is as much as 25% different from laboratory-measured values. Therefore, unless we come to understand the mechanisms for this difference, a simple in situ test will be required to obtain a value for final repository design. Some sensitivity calculations have shown that the temperature field is about ten times more sensitive to conductivity than to diffusivity under the test conditions. The orthogonal array was designed to detect anisotropy. After considering all error sources, anisotropic efforts in the thermal field were less than 5 to 10%.

  10. Dissociated methanol test results

    SciTech Connect

    Finegold, J.G.; McKinnon, J.T.

    1982-04-01

    The design and testing of an automotive fuel system that provides hydrogen-rich gases to an internal combustion engine by catalytically cracking, or dissociating, methanol on board the vehicle is described. The vaporization and dissociation of methanol absorb heat from the engine exhaust and increase the lower heating value of the fuel by approximately 22%. In addition, raising the compression ratio and burning with excess air increase the engine thermal efficiency. Engine dynamometer test results with dissociated methanol demonstrated improvement in brake thermal efficiency compared to gasoline from 30% to 100% depending on engine speed and torque. Lower speeds and torques produce the largest improvements. Maps of exhaust temperature and exhaust heat content are presented. The exhaust temperature is almost always high enough for dissociation to occur, but at lower power outputs, there is only enough exhaust energy for partial dissociation of the methanol.

  11. Comparing Several Robust Tests of Stochastic Equality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vargha, Andras; Delaney, Harold D.

    In this paper, six statistical tests of stochastic equality are compared with respect to Type I error and power through a Monte Carlo simulation. In the simulation, the skewness and kurtosis levels and the extent of variance heterogeneity of the two parent distributions were varied across a wide range. The sample sizes applied were either small or…

  12. COLD TEST LOOP INTEGRATED TEST LOOP RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, TJ

    2003-10-22

    A testing facility (Cold Test Loop) was constructed and operated to demonstrate the efficacy of the Accelerated Waste Retrieval (AWR) Project's planned sluicing approach to the remediation of Silos 1 and 2 at the Fernald Environmental Management Project near Cincinnati, Ohio. The two silos contain almost 10,000 tons of radium-bearing low-level waste, which consists primarily of solids of raffinates from processing performed on ores from the Democratic Republic of Congo (commonly referred to as ''Belgium Congo ores'') for the recovery of uranium. These silos are 80 ft in diameter, 36 ft high to the center of the dome, and 26.75 ft to the top of the vertical side walls. The test facility contained two test systems, each designed for a specific purpose. The first system, the Integrated Test Loop (ITL), a near-full-scale plant including the actual equipment to be installed at the Fernald Site, was designed to demonstrate the sluicing operation and confirm the selection of a slurry pump, the optimal sluicing nozzle operation, and the preliminary design material balance. The second system, the Component Test Loop (CTL), was designed to evaluate many of the key individual components of the waste retrieval system over an extended run. The major results of the initial testing performed during July and August 2002 confirmed that the AWR approach to sluicing was feasible. The ITL testing confirmed the following: (1) The selected slurry pump (Hazleton 3-20 type SHW) performed well and is suitable for AWR application. However, the pump's motor should be upgraded to a 200-hp model and be driven by a 150-hp variable-frequency drive (VFD). A 200-hp VFD is not much more expensive and would allow the pump to operate at full speed. (2) The best nozzle performance was achieved by using 15/16-in. nozzles operated alternately. This configuration appeared to most effectively mine the surrogate. (3) The Solartron densitometer, which was tested as an alternative mass flow measurement device, did not operate effectively. Consequently, it is not suitable for application to the AWR process. (4) Initially, the spray ring (operated at approximately 2300 psi) and the nozzles provided by the pump vendor did not perform acceptably. The nozzles were replaced with a more robust model, and the performance was then acceptable. (5) The average solids concentration achieved in the slurry before Bentogrout addition was approximately 16% by weight. The solids concentration of the slurry after Bentogrout addition ranged from 26% to approximately 40%. The slurry pump and ITL system performed well at every concentration. No line plugging or other problems were noted. The results of the CTL runs and later ITL testing are summarized in an appendix to this report.

  13. Xception fault injection and robustness testing framework: a case-study of testing RTEMS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Mai; L. Henriques; R. Barbosa; H. Madeira

    Xception is an automated and comprehensive fault injection and robustness testing environment that enables accurate and flexible V&V (verification & validation) and evaluation of mission and business critical computer systems and computer components, with particular emphasis to software components. In this paper we focus on the new robustness testing features of Xception and illustrate them with a concrete example of

  14. Robust speech recognition by integrating speech separation and hypothesis testing

    E-print Network

    Wang, DeLiang "Leon"

    Robust speech recognition by integrating speech separation and hypothesis testing Soundararajan estimation and recognition accuracy. First, an n-best lattice consistent with a speech separation mask significant improvement in recognition performance compared to that using speech separation alone. Ó 2009

  15. A Robust Test of General Relativity in Space

    E-print Network

    James Graber

    2008-02-22

    LISA may make it possible to test the black-hole uniqueness theorems of general relativity, also called the no-hair theorems, by Ryan's method of detecting the quadrupole moment of a black hole using high-mass-ratio inspirals. This test can be performed more robustly by observing inspirals in earlier stages, where the simplifications used in making inspiral predictions by the perturbative and post-Newtonian methods are more nearly correct. Current concepts for future missions such as DECIGO and BBO would allow even more stringent tests by this same method. Recently discovered evidence supports the existence of intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs). Inspirals of binary systems with one IMBH and one stellar-mass black hole would fall into the frequency band of proposed maximum sensitivity for DECIGO and BBO. This would enable us to perform the Ryan test more precisely and more robustly. We explain why tests based on observations earlier in the inspiral are more robust and provide preliminary estimates of possible optimal future observations.

  16. Dissociated methanol test results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. G. Finegold; J. T. McKinnon

    1982-01-01

    The design and testing of an automotive fuel system that provides hydrogen-rich gases to an internal combustion engine by catalytically cracking, or dissociating, methanol on board the vehicle is described. The vaporization and dissociation of methanol absorb heat from the engine exhaust and increase the lower heating value of the fuel by approximately 22%. In addition, raising the compression ratio

  17. Your Kidney Test Results

    MedlinePLUS

    ... lower the amount of calcium in your bones. Phosphorus Normal: 2.7 to 4.6* Your Result: Phosphorus is important for strong bones and healthy blood ... 65 Your Result: PTH controls the calcium and phosphorus levels in your blood. It is needed to ...

  18. Preliminary neuropsychological test results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. M. J. Sonneville; E. Schmidt; Ute Michel; U. Batzler

    1990-01-01

    A series of information processing tasks was administered to 22 PKU children aged 8.5 years who had been under dietary treatment since birth as well as to 20 controls of the same age. This contribution presents the results of two tasks from this series: a continuous performance task and a calculation task. The continuous performance task revealed a sustained attention

  19. On robustness of the test for detection of multivariate outliers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Madhusudan Bhandary

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, Wilks' [Wilks, S.S., 1963, Multivariate statistical outliers. Sankhya, Ser. A, 25, 407–426.] multivariate normal results for detection of outliers are extended to the multivariate elliptically symmetric case, with mean slippage and dispersion slippage outlier model. The main result can be viewed as a robustness property of Wilks' [Wilks, S.S., 1963, Multivariate statistical outliers. Sankhya, Ser. A., 25,

  20. Organic Separation Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2014-09-22

    Separable organics have been defined as “those organic compounds of very limited solubility in the bulk waste and that can form a separate liquid phase or layer” (Smalley and Nguyen 2013), and result from three main solvent extraction processes: U Plant Uranium Recovery Process, B Plant Waste Fractionation Process, and Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Process. The primary organic solvents associated with tank solids are TBP, D2EHPA, and NPH. There is concern that, while this organic material is bound to the sludge particles as it is stored in the tanks, waste feed delivery activities, specifically transfer pump and mixer pump operations, could cause the organics to form a separated layer in the tank farms feed tank. Therefore, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is experimentally evaluating the potential of organic solvents separating from the tank solids (sludge) during waste feed delivery activities, specifically the waste mixing and transfer processes. Given the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste acceptance criteria per the Waste Feed Acceptance Criteria document (24590-WTP-RPT-MGT-11-014) that there is to be “no visible layer” of separable organics in the waste feed, this would result in the batch being unacceptable to transfer to WTP. This study is of particular importance to WRPS because of these WTP requirements.

  1. Robustness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, R.

    1993-01-01

    Robustness is a buzz word common to all newly proposed space systems design as well as many new commercial products. The image that one conjures up when the word appears is a 'Paul Bunyon' (lumberjack design), strong and hearty; healthy with margins in all aspects of the design. In actuality, robustness is much broader in scope than margins, including such factors as simplicity, redundancy, desensitization to parameter variations, control of parameter variations (environments flucation), and operational approaches. These must be traded with concepts, materials, and fabrication approaches against the criteria of performance, cost, and reliability. This includes manufacturing, assembly, processing, checkout, and operations. The design engineer or project chief is faced with finding ways and means to inculcate robustness into an operational design. First, however, be sure he understands the definition and goals of robustness. This paper will deal with these issues as well as the need for the requirement for robustness.

  2. Robust and Powerful Affected Sibpair Test for Rare Variant Association.

    PubMed

    Lin, Keng-Han; Zöllner, Sebastian

    2015-07-01

    Advances in DNA sequencing technology facilitate investigating the impact of rare variants on complex diseases. However, using a conventional case-control design, large samples are needed to capture enough rare variants to achieve sufficient power for testing the association between suspected loci and complex diseases. In such large samples, population stratification may easily cause spurious signals. One approach to overcome stratification is to use a family-based design. For rare variants, this strategy is especially appropriate, as power can be increased considerably by analyzing cases with affected relatives. We propose a novel framework for association testing in affected sibpairs by comparing the allele count of rare variants on chromosome regions shared identical by descent to the allele count of rare variants on nonshared chromosome regions, referred to as test for rare variant association with family-based internal control (TRAFIC). This design is generally robust to population stratification as cases and controls are matched within each sibpair. We evaluate the power analytically using general model for effect size of rare variants. For the same number of genotyped people, TRAFIC shows superior power over the conventional case-control study for variants with summed risk allele frequency f<0.05; this power advantage is even more substantial when considering allelic heterogeneity. For complex models of gene-gene interaction, this power advantage depends on the direction of interaction and overall heritability. In sum, we introduce a new method for analyzing rare variants in affected sibpairs that is robust to population stratification, and provide freely available software. PMID:25966809

  3. Protocols for Robust Herbicide Resistance Testing in Different Weed Species.

    PubMed

    Panozzo, Silvia; Scarabel, Laura; Collavo, Alberto; Sattin, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Robust protocols to test putative herbicide resistant weed populations at whole plant level are essential to confirm the resistance status. The presented protocols, based on whole-plant bioassays performed in a greenhouse, can be readily adapted to a wide range of weed species and herbicides through appropriate variants. Seed samples from plants that survived a field herbicide treatment are collected and stored dry at low temperature until used. Germination methods differ according to weed species and seed dormancy type. Seedlings at similar growth stage are transplanted and maintained in the greenhouse under appropriate conditions until plants have reached the right growth stage for herbicide treatment. Accuracy is required to prepare the herbicide solution to avoid unverifiable mistakes. Other critical steps such as the application volume and spray speed are also evaluated. The advantages of this protocol, compared to others based on whole plant bioassays using one herbicide dose, are related to the higher reliability and the possibility of inferring the resistance level. Quicker and less expensive in vivo or in vitro diagnostic screening tests have been proposed (Petri dish bioassays, spectrophotometric tests), but they provide only qualitative information and their widespread use is hindered by the laborious set-up that some species may require. For routine resistance testing, the proposed whole plant bioassay can be applied at only one herbicide dose, so reducing the costs. PMID:26167668

  4. Misleading biochemical laboratory test results

    PubMed Central

    Nanji, Amin A.

    1984-01-01

    This article reviews the general and specific factors that interfere with the performance of common biochemical laboratory tests and the interpretation of their results. The clinical status of the patient, drug interactions, and in-vivo and in-vitro biochemical interactions and changes may alter the results obtained from biochemical analysis of blood constituents. Failure to recognize invalid laboratory test results may lead to injudicious and dangerous management of patients. PMID:6375845

  5. State Test Results Are Predictable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tienken, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    Out-of-school, community demographic and family-level variables have an important influence on student achievement as measured by large-scale standardized tests. Studies described here demonstrated that about half of the test score is accounted for by variables outside the control of teachers and school administrators. The results from these…

  6. Bell Canyon test and results

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, C.L.; Hunter, T.O.

    1980-01-01

    The purposes of the Borehold Plugging Program are: to identify issues associated with sealing boreholes and shafts; to establish a data base from which to assess the importance of these issues; and to develop sealing criteria, materials, and demonstrative test for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The Bell Canyon Test described in this report is one part of that program. Its purpose was to evaluate, in situ, the state of the art in borehole plugs and to identify and resolve problems encountered in evaluating a typical plug installation in anhydrite. The test results are summarized from the work of Peterson and Christensen and divided into two portions: system integrity and wellbore characterization tests prior to plug installation, and a series of tests to evaluate isolation characteristics of the 1.8-m-long plug. Conclusions of the Bell Canyon Test are: brine and fresh-water grouts, with acceptable physical properties in the fluid and hardened states, have been developed; the field data, taken together with laboratory data, suggest that the predominant flow into the test region occurs through the cement plug/borehold interface region, with lesser contributions occurring through the wellbore damage zone, the plug core, and the surrounding undisturbed anhydrite bed; and the 1.8-m-long by 20-cm-diameter grout plug, installed in anhydrite at a depth of 1370 m in the AEC-7 borehole, limits flow from the high pressure Bell Canyon aquifer to 0.6 liters/day.

  7. Robustness-Guided Temporal Logic Testing and Verification for Stochastic Cyber-Physical Systems

    E-print Network

    Fainekos, Georgios E.

    Robustness-Guided Temporal Logic Testing and Verification for Stochastic Cyber-Physical Systems.ueda@tema.toyota.com Abstract--We present a framework for automatic specification- guided testing for Stochastic Cyber-Physical Systems (SCPS). The framework utilizes the theory of robustness of Metric Temporal Logic (MTL

  8. Equivalence of robust delay-fault and single stuck-fault test generation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexander Saldanha; Robert K. Brayton; Alberto L. Sangiovanni-Vincentelli

    1992-01-01

    A link between the problems of robust delay-fault and single stuck-fault test generation is established. In particular, it is proved that all the robust test vector pairs for any path delay-fault in a network are directly obtained by all the test vectors for a corresponding single stuck-fault in a modified network. Since single stuck-fault test generation is a well solved

  9. Preliminary QCGAT program test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, R. W.; Sievers, G. K.

    1979-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center is conducting a program to demonstrate that large commercial engine technology can be applied to general aviation engines to reduce noise, emissions and fuel consumption and to develop new technology where required. The overall engine program, design, and technology incorporated into the QCGAT engines are described. In addition, preliminary engine test results are presented and compared to the technical requirements the engines were designed to meet.

  10. Adaptive robust genetic association tests using case-parents triad families.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiun-Yi; Tai, John Jen

    2015-05-01

    Using the conditional likelihood, a model-specific score test can be derived under a given genetic model to test genetic association for case-parents triad family data. When the underlying genetic model is correctly specified, the score test is most powerful. However, it can lose substantial power when the model is misspecified. Several robust tests have been proposed to deal with the problem, such as the maximum test statistic, the maximin efficiency robust test, and the constrained likelihood ratio test. These tests have been shown to be robust against model misspecification compared with those model-specific score tests, but they are either time-consuming in computation or not sufficiently high in power robustness under some situations. In this study, a data-driven procedure is proposed to construct two adaptive robust genetic association tests WMERT and WMAX . The WMERT is simple in calculation and has fairly high power robustness. The empirical power of WMAX is quite stable and close to those of the model-specific score tests. The two proposed tests should be beneficial to practical genetic association studies. A real dataset consisting of neural tube defect triad families is used for illustration of the methods. R-scripts are also provided for numerical calculation of the proposed methods in practical studies. PMID:25764170

  11. SuperORRUBA Test Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhart, A. J.; Ahn, S.; Bardayan, D. W.; Kozub, R. L.; Pain, S. D.

    2012-10-01

    Transfer reactions in inverse kinematics with radioactive ion beams are needed to provide nuclear structure information far from stability to aid in the development of nuclear models and in the understanding of astrophysical processes. Highly granular, low threshold detector arrays are needed to perform such experiments. The SuperORRUBA (Oak Ridge Rutgers University Barrel Array) was created to measure lower threshold reactions with better energy resolution than the original ORRUBA detectors. The new array consists of 18 silicon detectors, each with a 64 non-resistive strip front side and a 4 non-resistive strip back side. To collect the data from these 1224 channels, the ASICs (Application-Specific Integrated Circuits) are used for timing, triggering, shaping, and digitizing the signals, with each chip handling 32 channels. Utilizing the ASICs system and a triple-alpha source, SuperORRUBA detectors were tested to ensure proper function. In addition, all preamps and ASICs elements were tested. The depletion voltage of each detector was found, and the detectors were tested for any shift in gain over time. Finally, issues with crosstalk causing poor resolution on particular channels were investigated. A detailed description of the system and the test results will be presented.

  12. Cryogenic Brush Seal Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.; Walker, James F.

    1996-01-01

    Brush seals are compliant, contact seals that have long-life, low-leakage characteristics desirable for use in rocket engine turbopumps. 50.8-mm (2.0 inch) diameter brush seals with a nominal initial radial interference of 0.127-mm (0.005 inch) were tested in liquid nitrogen at shaft speeds up to 35,000 rpm and differential pressure loads up to 1.21 MPa (175 psi) per brush. The measured leakage rate of a single brush was 2-3 times less than that measured for a 12-tooth, 0.127-mm (0.005 inch) radial clearance labyrinth seal used as a baseline. Stage effects were studied and it was found that two brush seals with a large separation distance leaked less than two brushes tightly packed together. The maximum measured groove depth on the Inconel 718 rotor was 25.4 (mu)m (0.001 inch) after 4.31 hours of shaft rotation. The Haynes-25 bristles wore approximately 25.4-76.2 (mu)m (0.001-0.003 inch) under the same conditions. Three seal runner coatings, chromium carbide, Teflon impregnated chromium, and zirconium oxide, were tested in liquid hydrogen at 35,000 and 65,000 rpm with separate 50.8 mm diameter brush seals made of Haynes-25 bristles and having a nominal initial radial interference of 129 rpm. Two bare Inconel-718 rotors were also tested as a baseline. The test results revealed significant differences between the wear characteristics of the uncoated and coated seal runners. At both speeds the brush seal with the bare Inconel-718 seal runner exhibited significant bristle wear with excessive material transferring to the runner surface. In contrast, the coated seal runners inhibited the transfer and deposit of bristle material. The chromium carbide coating showed only small quantities of bristle material transferring to its surface. The Teflon impregnated chromium coating also inhibited material transfer and provided some lubrication. This coating, however, is self-sacrificing. The Teflon remained present on the low speed runner, but it was completely removed from the high speed brush seal, which was tested considerably longer. The tests of the Teflon coating revealed the importance of using a lubricating and low friction coating for brush seals to reduce bristle and seal runner wear. The zirconium oxide coating exhibited the greatest amount of coating wear, while the brushes incurred only slight wear. Further testing of ceramics is recommended before making a final judgement on the viability of ceramic coatings for brush seals because of the contrast between the results reported by Carlile and the results presented herein. Strictly based on the results presented hereinabove, the chromium carbide and Teflon impregnated chromium coatings were considered preferable to the uncoated Inconel-718 and zirconium oxide coatings because of their good wear resistance and characteristics to inhibit bristle material wear and transfer to the seal runner.

  13. RSG Deployment Case Testing Results

    SciTech Connect

    Owsley, Stanley L.; Dodson, Michael G.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Seim, Thomas A.; Alexander, David L.; Hawthorne, Woodrow T.

    2005-09-01

    The RSG deployment case design is centered on taking the RSG system and producing a transport case that houses the RSG in a safe and controlled manner for transport. The transport case was driven by two conflicting constraints, first that the case be as light as possible, and second that it meet a stringent list of Military Specified requirements. The design team worked to extract every bit of weight from the design while striving to meet the rigorous Mil-Spec constraints. In the end compromises were made primarily on the specification side to control the overall weight of the transport case. This report outlines the case testing results.

  14. SERIES-X test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crow, R. B.; Bletzacker, F. R.; Najarian, R. J.; Purcell, G. H., Jr.; Statman, J. I.; Thomas, J. B.

    The SERIES-X project which demonstrates the feasibility of a method involving measurements of the distance from the TOPEX earth satellite and various points on the ground to Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites is described. The features of SERIES-X are compared with three better-known geodetic-quality GPS systems (Geostar, Macrometer, and SERIES). It is shown that the system is capable of measuring the positions of isolated stations, but its accuracy is improved when it measures baselines. Test results of some measurements of baselines ranging in length from 15 to 171,000 m are presented and discussed.

  15. Diagnostic Tests and Examination Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Dennis

    1988-01-01

    A study of the usefulness of several diagnostic tests for selecting students to enter a civil engineering program found that the tests were not appropriate and that tests should be developed specifically for civil engineering. (MSE)

  16. Robust Means Modeling: An Alternative for Hypothesis Testing of Independent Means under Variance Heterogeneity and Nonnormality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fan, Weihua; Hancock, Gregory R.

    2012-01-01

    This study proposes robust means modeling (RMM) approaches for hypothesis testing of mean differences for between-subjects designs in order to control the biasing effects of nonnormality and variance inequality. Drawing from structural equation modeling (SEM), the RMM approaches make no assumption of variance homogeneity and employ robust…

  17. Testing Multicultural Robustness of the Child Behavior Checklist in a National Epidemiological Sample in Uruguay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viola, Laura; Garrido, Gabriela; Rescorla, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    Comparisons of Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) scores from 31 societies (Rescorla et al. "Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders" 15:13-142 2007) supported the instrument's multicultural robustness, but none of these societies was in South America. The present study tested the multicultural robustness of the 2001 CBCL using data from a…

  18. Test results of CHICO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. Y.; Cline, D.; Hayes, A. B.; Kwan, E.; Chyzh, A.; Lee, I. Y.

    2012-10-01

    CHICO is a highly segmented 4? position-sensitive parallel-plate avalanche counter and has been used very successfully for many experiments as an auxiliary detector for Gammapshere. With the advent of the gamma-ray energy tracking array such as GRETINA, the development of a new generation of auxiliary detectors with a mating position resolution is absolutely needed. The upgrade of CHICO to CHICO2 with the matching position resolution for GRETINA is one of the coordinated efforts to accomplish this goal and is nearly complete. The test will be performed in the summer of 2012 with the new hardware and software. The new hardware includes the pixelated cathode board coupled with the delay-line readout for the position measurement and the 5-channel fast amplifier for processing both anode and cathode signals. The pulse height in addition to the time for the anode will be recorded for each event. The firmware for the new VME-based data acquisition system has been developed in anticipation of CHICO2 as an auxiliary detector for GRETINA and Gammasphere. The description of both hardware and software together with the test results will be presented. This work is supported by DOE, DE-AC52-07NA27344 (LLNL) and DE-AC02-05CH11231 (LBNL) as well as the NSF for U. of Rochester.

  19. Quantitative testing of robustness on super-omniphobic surfaces by drop impact

    E-print Network

    Thi Phuong Nhung Nguyen; Philippe Brunet; Yannick Coffinier; Rabah Boukherroub

    2010-10-11

    The quality of a liquid-repellent surface is quantified by both the apparent contact angle $\\theta_0$ that a sessile drop adopts on it, and the value of the liquid pressure threshold the surface can withstand without being impaled by the liquid, hence keeping a low-friction condition. We designed surfaces covered with nano-wires obtained by the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth technique, that are able to repel most of the existing non-polar liquids including those of very low surface tension, as well as many polar liquids of moderate to high surface tension. These super-omniphobic surfaces exhibit apparent contact angles ranging from 125 to 160$^{\\circ}$ depending on the liquid. We tested the robustness of the surfaces against impalement by carrying out drop impact experiments. Our results show how this robustness depends on the Young's contact angle $\\theta_0$ related to the surface tension of the liquid, and that the orientational growth of NWs is a favorable factor for robustness.

  20. An Exploration of the Robustness of Four Test Equating Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skaggs, Gary; Lissitz, Robert W.

    This study examined how four commonly used test equating procedures (linear, equipercentile, Rasch Model, and three-parameter) would respond to situations in which the properties or the two tests being equated were different. Data for two tests plus an external anchor test were generated from a three parameter model in which mean test differences…

  1. Results of PRIM gyroscope testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornell, R.

    1985-03-01

    The tests were designed so that motions of the gyroscope and the partially restrained internal member (PRIM) could be measured at different conditions of spin and PRIM clearance gaps. Two types of PRIM drive were tested. A round shaft configuration was used to test theory. An octagon drive was used to simulate the XM785 design.

  2. Results of PRIM gyroscope testing

    SciTech Connect

    Cornell, R.

    1985-03-01

    The tests were designed so that motions of the gyroscope and the Partially Restrained Internal Member (PRIM) could be measured at different conditions of spin and PRIM clearance gaps. Two types of PRIM drive were tested. A round shaft configuration was used to test theory. An octagon drive was used to simulate the XM785 design.

  3. Mobile evaporator corrosion test results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Rozeveld; D. B. Chamberlain

    1997-01-01

    Laboratory corrosion tests were conducted on eight candidates to select a durable and cost-effective alloy for use in mobile evaporators to process radioactive waste solutions. Based on an extensive literature survey of corrosion data, three stainless steel alloys (304L, 316L, AL-6XN), four nickel-based alloys (825, 625, 690, G-30), and titanium were selected for testing. The corrosion tests included vapor phase,

  4. A robust method using propensity score stratification for correcting verification bias for binary tests

    PubMed Central

    He, Hua; McDermott, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    Sensitivity and specificity are common measures of the accuracy of a diagnostic test. The usual estimators of these quantities are unbiased if data on the diagnostic test result and the true disease status are obtained from all subjects in an appropriately selected sample. In some studies, verification of the true disease status is performed only for a subset of subjects, possibly depending on the result of the diagnostic test and other characteristics of the subjects. Estimators of sensitivity and specificity based on this subset of subjects are typically biased; this is known as verification bias. Methods have been proposed to correct verification bias under the assumption that the missing data on disease status are missing at random (MAR), that is, the probability of missingness depends on the true (missing) disease status only through the test result and observed covariate information. When some of the covariates are continuous, or the number of covariates is relatively large, the existing methods require parametric models for the probability of disease or the probability of verification (given the test result and covariates), and hence are subject to model misspecification. We propose a new method for correcting verification bias based on the propensity score, defined as the predicted probability of verification given the test result and observed covariates. This is estimated separately for those with positive and negative test results. The new method classifies the verified sample into several subsamples that have homogeneous propensity scores and allows correction for verification bias. Simulation studies demonstrate that the new estimators are more robust to model misspecification than existing methods, but still perform well when the models for the probability of disease and probability of verification are correctly specified. PMID:21856650

  5. Results of Deposition Scoping Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, M.Z.

    2003-03-04

    The processes of crystallization and solid deposit formation that led to the shutdown of the 2H evaporator operation at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and that could possibly cause similar problems in the future or in other evaporators need to be better understood. Through experimentation, thermodynamic modeling, and correlation of scaling to historical tank farm operations, progress has been made in developing guidelines as to the concentrations of silicon and aluminum that can be processed by evaporators while avoiding unacceptable levels of scale formation. However, because of limitations of the thermodynamic model and an insufficient amount of operational data at slightly supersaturated concentration levels, uncertainty still exists regarding acceptable feed concentrations. The objective of this effort is to provide information that can be used in defining acceptable levels of silicon and aluminum in evaporator feed solutions. Data collected previously showed that particle formation reactions can be rapid at evaporator temperatures for elevated silicon and aluminum concentrations. However, insufficient data exists to estimate the silicon and aluminum concentrations above which solids will form in the time frame of evaporator processing. The work described in this report was designed to determine the induction period for solutions of decreasing aluminum and silicon concentration such that the supersaturation level corresponding to a 4-h induction time for particle nucleation/growth in bulk solution can be estimated. In addition, experiments were conducted to explore the supersaturation levels that can result in deposition of solids on metal surfaces at varying aluminum-to-silicon concentration ratios. Laboratory studies of particle growth in solution were conducted at relatively low supersaturation levels. Dynamic-light-scattering (DLS) studies and deposition tests, similar to those performed in FY 2001, were conducted with solutions at relatively low supersaturation levels and at elevated temperatures to explore the formation of solids under conditions similar to those encountered in evaporator processing. The deposition of solids on stainless steel samples placed in the solutions during the experiments was simultaneously investigated. In addition, the deposition of solids on stainless steel surfaces was investigated in laboratory-scale batch evaporation experiments. Completion of this effort will aid the development of operating strategies to mitigate or avoid solid scale formation on surfaces in evaporator systems. The results are expected to benefit plant operations by helping to determine acceptable silicon and aluminum feed concentrations.

  6. A robust particle filter for state estimation — with convergence results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiao-Li Hu; T. B. Schon; Lennart Ljung

    2007-01-01

    Particle filters are becoming increasingly important and useful for state estimation in nonlinear systems. Many filter versions have been suggested, and several results on convergence of filter properties have been reported. However, apparently a result on the convergence of the state estimate itself has been lacking. This contribution describes a general framework for particle filters for state estimation, as well

  7. Chemical compatibility screening test results

    SciTech Connect

    Nigrey, P.J.; Dickens, T.G.

    1997-12-01

    A program for evaluating packaging components that may be used in transporting mixed-waste forms has been developed and the first phase has been completed. This effort involved the screening of ten plastic materials in four simulant mixed-waste types. These plastics were butadiene-acrylonitrile copolymer rubber, cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE), epichlorohydrin rubber, ethylene-propylene rubber (EPDM), fluorocarbon (Viton or Kel-F), polytetrafluoroethylene, high-density polyethylene (HDPE), isobutylene-isoprene copolymer rubber (butyl), polypropylene, and styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR). The selected simulant mixed wastes were (1) an aqueous alkaline mixture of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite; (2) a chlorinated hydrocarbon mixture; (3) a simulant liquid scintillation fluid; and (4) a mixture of ketones. The testing protocol involved exposing the respective materials to 286,000 rads of gamma radiation followed by 14-day exposures to the waste types at 60{degrees}C. The seal materials were tested using vapor transport rate (VTR) measurements while the liner materials were tested using specific gravity as a metric. For these tests, a screening criterion of 0.9 g/hr/m{sup 2} for VTR and a specific gravity change of 10% was used. Based on this work, it was concluded that while all seal materials passed exposure to the aqueous simulant mixed waste, EPDM and SBR had the lowest VTRs. In the chlorinated hydrocarbon simulant mixed waste, only Viton passed the screening tests. In both the simulant scintillation fluid mixed waste and the ketone mixture simulant mixed waste, none of the seal materials met the screening criteria. For specific gravity testing of liner materials, the data showed that while all materials with the exception of polypropylene passed the screening criteria, Kel-F, HDPE, and XLPE offered the greatest resistance to the combination of radiation and chemicals.

  8. Adaptive antenna processor test results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. R. Hamalainen; J. W. Howland

    1991-01-01

    Summary form only given. A two-element adaptive array processor (AAP) was designed, built and tested. The primary purpose of this development was to demonstrate the operational airborne utility and to quantify the amount of jam resistance improvement offered by the AAP when operating in conjunction with a tactical anti-jam (AJ) radio set employing fast frequency hopping. Performance was measured with

  9. Experimental electrochemical capacitor test results

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, R.B.; Murphy, T.C.; Rogers, S.A.; Sutula, R.A.

    1998-07-01

    Various electrochemical capacitors (ultracapacitors) are being developed for hybrid vehicles as candidate power assist devices for the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) fast-response engine. The envisioned primary functions of the ultracapacitor are to level the dynamic power loads on the primary propulsion device and recover available energy from regenerative breaking during off-peak power periods. This paper will present test data from selected US Department of Energy (DOE) supported ultracapacitor projects designed to meet the fast response engine requirements. This paper will address the temperature dependence of test data obtained from a set of three devices provided from Maxwell Energy Products, Inc. These devices are rated at 2,300 F at 2.3 V. Constant-current, constant-power, and self-discharge testing as a function of temperature have been conducted. From these tests were determined the capacitance, equivalent series resistance, specific energy and power, and the self-discharge energy loss factor as a function of the device operating temperature.

  10. Mars Balloon Flight Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Jeffery L.; Pauken, Michael T.; Kerzhanovich, Viktor V.; Walsh, Gerald J.; Kulczycki, Eric A.; Fairbrother, Debora; Shreves, Chris; Lachenmeier, Tim

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a set of four Earth atmosphere flight test experiments on prototype helium superpressure balloons designed for Mars. Three of the experiments explored the problem of aerial deployment and inflation, using the cold, low density environment of the Earth's stratosphere at an altitude of 30-32 km as a proxy for the Martian atmosphere. Auxiliary carrier balloons were used in three of these test flights to lift the Mars balloon prototype and its supporting system from the ground to the stratosphere where the experiment was conducted. In each case, deployment and helium inflation was initiated after starting a parachute descent of the payload at 5 Pa dynamic pressure, thereby mimicking the conditions expected at Mars after atmospheric entry and high speed parachute deceleration. Upward and downward looking video cameras provided real time images from the flights, with additional data provided by onboard temperature, pressure and GPS sensors. One test of a 660 cc pumpkin balloon was highly successful, achieving deployment, inflation and separation of the balloon from the flight train at the end of inflation; however, some damage was incurred on the balloon during this process. Two flight tests of 12 m diameter spherical Mylar balloons were not successful, although some lessons were learned based on the failure analyses. The final flight experiment consisted of a ground-launched 12 m diameter spherical Mylar balloon that ascended to the designed 30.3 km altitude and successfully floated for 9.5 hours through full noontime daylight and into darkness, after which the telemetry system ran out of electrical power and tracking was lost. The altitude excursions for this last flight were +/-75 m peak to peak, indicating that the balloon was essentially leak free and functioning correctly. This provides substantial confidence that this balloon design will fly for days or weeks at Mars if it can be deployed and inflated without damage.

  11. Weak Instrument Robust Tests in GMM and the New Keynesian Phillips Curve

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frank KLEIBERGEN; Sophocles MAVROEIDIS

    2008-01-01

    We discuss weak instrument robust statistics in GMM for testing hypotheses on the full parameter vec- tor or on subsets of the parameters. We use these test procedures to reexamine the evidence on the new Keynesian Phillips curve model. We find that U.S. postwar data are consistent with the view that infla- tion dynamics are predominantly forward-looking, but we cannot

  12. Robust Design of Reliability Test Plans Using Degradation Measures.

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, Jonathan Wesley; Lane, Jonathan Wesley; Crowder, Stephen V.; Crowder, Stephen V.

    2014-10-01

    With short production development times, there is an increased need to demonstrate product reliability relatively quickly with minimal testing. In such cases there may be few if any observed failures. Thus, it may be difficult to assess reliability using the traditional reliability test plans that measure only time (or cycles) to failure. For many components, degradation measures will contain important information about performance and reliability. These measures can be used to design a minimal test plan, in terms of number of units placed on test and duration of the test, necessary to demonstrate a reliability goal. Generally, the assumption is made that the error associated with a degradation measure follows a known distribution, usually normal, although in practice cases may arise where that assumption is not valid. In this paper, we examine such degradation measures, both simulated and real, and present non-parametric methods to demonstrate reliability and to develop reliability test plans for the future production of components with this form of degradation.

  13. Experimental Results for IDDQ and VLV Testing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonathan T.-Y. Chang; Chao-wen Tseng; Yi-chin Chu; Sanjay Wattal; Mike Purtell; Edward J. Mccluskey

    1998-01-01

    An experimental test chip was designed and manufactured to evaluate different test techniques. Based on the results presented in the wafer probe, 309 out of 5491 dies that passed the Stage 1 tests were packaged for further investigation. This paper describes the experimental setup and the preliminary results for the final package test. We focus on the correlation among various

  14. Robust electrochemical analysis of As(III) integrating with interference tests: a case study in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhong-Gang; Chen, Xing; Liu, Jin-Huai; Huang, Xing-Jiu

    2014-08-15

    In Togtoh region of Inner Mongolia, northern China, groundwater encountered high concentrations As contamination (greater than 50 ?g L(-1)) causes an increasing concern. This work demonstrates an electrochemical protocol for robust (efficient and accurate) determination of As(III) in Togtoh water samples using Au microwire electrode without the need of pretreatment or clean-up steps. Considering the complicated conditions of Togtoh water, the efficiency of Au microwire electrode was systematically evaluated by a series of interference tests, stability and reproducibility measurements. No obvious interference on the determination of As(III) was observed. Especially, the influence of humic acid (HA) was intensively investigated. Electrode stability was also observed with long-term measurements (70 days) in Togtoh water solution and under different temperatures (0-35 °C). Excellent reproducibility (RSD:1.28%) was observed from different batches of Au microwire electrodes. The results obtained at Au microwire electrode were comparable to that obtained by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), indicating a good accuracy. These evaluations (efficiency, robustness, and accuracy) demonstrated that the Au microwire electrode was able to determine As(III) in application to real environmental samples. PMID:24953937

  15. A ROBUST TEST FOR NONLINEAR MIXTURE DETECTION IN HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGES

    E-print Network

    Dobigeon, Nicolas

    nonlinearity detector for hyper- spectral image analysis. The reflectances of linearly mixed pixels are assumed Gaussian noise. Nonlinear mixing, however, is not restricted to any prescribed non- linear mixing model alarm and detection as functions of the test threshold. The proposed detector is compared to another

  16. Recent radiation test results at JPL

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bruce E. Pritchard; Bernard G. Rax; Steven S. McClure

    2003-01-01

    This paper documents recent TID (including ELDRS) and proton damage test results obtained by JPL. Unusual test results, such as abnormally low or high failure levels or unusual failure or response mechanisms, are emphasized.

  17. Labyrinth Seal Flutter Analysis and Test Validation in Support of Robust Rocket Engine Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Aini, Yehia; Park, John; Frady, Greg; Nesman, Tom

    2010-01-01

    High energy-density turbomachines, like the SSME turbopumps, utilize labyrinth seals, also referred to as knife-edge seals, to control leakage flow. The pressure drop for such seals is order of magnitude higher than comparable jet engine seals. This is aggravated by the requirement of tight clearances resulting in possible unfavorable fluid-structure interaction of the seal system (seal flutter). To demonstrate these characteristics, a benchmark case of a High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump (HPOTP) outlet Labyrinth seal was studied in detail. First, an analytical assessment of the seal stability was conducted using a Pratt & Whitney legacy seal flutter code. Sensitivity parameters including pressure drop, rotor-to-stator running clearances and cavity volumes were examined and modeling strategies established. Second, a concurrent experimental investigation was undertaken to validate the stability of the seal at the equivalent operating conditions of the pump. Actual pump hardware was used to construct the test rig, also referred to as the (Flutter Rig). The flutter rig did not include rotational effects or temperature. However, the use of Hydrogen gas at high inlet pressure provided good representation of the critical parameters affecting flutter especially the speed of sound. The flutter code predictions showed consistent trends in good agreement with the experimental data. The rig test program produced a stability threshold empirical parameter that separated operation with and without flutter. This empirical parameter was used to establish the seal build clearances to avoid flutter while providing the required cooling flow metering. The calibrated flutter code along with the empirical flutter parameter was used to redesign the baseline seal resulting in a flutter-free robust configuration. Provisions for incorporation of mechanical damping devices were introduced in the redesigned seal to ensure added robustness

  18. A robust numerical scheme for highly compressible magnetohydrodynamics: Nonlinear stability, implementation and tests

    E-print Network

    Knut Waagan; Christoph Federrath; Christian Klingenberg

    2011-04-27

    The ideal MHD equations are a central model in astrophysics, and their solution relies upon stable numerical schemes. We present an implementation of a new method, which possesses excellent stability properties. Numerical tests demonstrate that the theoretical stability properties are valid in practice with negligible compromises to accuracy. The result is a highly robust scheme with state-of-the-art efficiency. The scheme's robustness is due to entropy stability, positivity and properly discretised Powell terms. The implementation takes the form of a modification of the MHD module in the FLASH code, an adaptive mesh refinement code. We compare the new scheme with the standard FLASH implementation for MHD. Results show comparable accuracy to standard FLASH with the Roe solver, but highly improved efficiency and stability, particularly for high Mach number flows and low plasma beta. The tests include 1D shock tubes, 2D instabilities and highly supersonic, 3D turbulence. We consider turbulent flows with RMS sonic Mach numbers up to 10, typical of gas flows in the interstellar medium. We investigate both strong initial magnetic fields and magnetic field amplification by the turbulent dynamo from extremely high plasma beta. The energy spectra show a reasonable decrease in dissipation with grid refinement, and at a resolution of 512^3 grid cells we identify a narrow inertial range with the expected power-law scaling. The turbulent dynamo exhibits exponential growth of magnetic pressure, with the growth rate twice as high from solenoidal forcing than from compressive forcing. Two versions of the new scheme are presented, using relaxation-based 3-wave and 5-wave approximate Riemann solvers, respectively. The 5-wave solver is more accurate in some cases, and its computational cost is close to the 3-wave solver.

  19. Motivations Problem Formulation Main Results Example Conclusions Robust H Control for Model-Based

    E-print Network

    Chen, Sheng

    Problem Formulation NCS Configuration NCS Dynamics 3 Main Results Robust Stochastic Stability Synthesis Networked Control Systems Our Novelty 2 Problem Formulation NCS Configuration NCS Dynamics 3 Main Results Example Conclusions Some Basics An NCS is a control system in which the control loop is closed via

  20. Are Nested Networks More Robust to Disturbance? A Test Using Epiphyte-Tree, Comensalistic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Piazzon, Martín; Larrinaga, Asier R.; Santamaría, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Recent research on ecological networks suggests that mutualistic networks are more nested than antagonistic ones and, as a result, they are more robust against chains of extinctions caused by disturbances. We evaluate whether mutualistic networks are more nested than comensalistic and antagonistic networks, and whether highly nested, host-epiphyte comensalistic networks fit the prediction of high robustness against disturbance. A review of 59 networks including mutualistic, antagonistic and comensalistic relationships showed that comensalistic networks are significantly more nested than antagonistic and mutualistic networks, which did not differ between themselves. Epiphyte-host networks from old-growth forests differed from those from disturbed forest in several topological parameters based on both qualitative and quantitative matrices. Network robustness increased with network size, but the slope of this relationship varied with nestedness and connectance. Our results indicate that interaction networks show complex responses to disturbances, which influence their topology and indirectly affect their robustness against species extinctions. PMID:21589931

  1. Comment on "Weak instrument robust tests in GMM and the new Keynesian Phillips curve"

    E-print Network

    Mikusheva, Anna

    Comment on "Weak instrument robust tests in GMM and the new Keynesian Phillips curve", Frank Kleibergen, Sophocles Mavroeidis. Journal of Business and Economic Statistics. July 1, 2009, 27(3): 293-311. doi:10.1198/jbes.2009.08280.

  2. Testing the Robustness of Online Word Segmentation: Effects of Linguistic Diversity and Phonetic Variation

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Testing the Robustness of Online Word Segmentation: Effects of Linguistic Diversity and Phonetic transcribed corpora. Accordingly, they implicitly assume that children know how to undo phonetic variation models given in- puts where phonetic variation has not been re- duced. To do so, we measure segmentation

  3. Robustness to Format Effects of IRT Linking Methods for Mixed-Format Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Seonghoon; Kolen, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Four item response theory linking methods (2 moment methods and 2 characteristic curve methods) were compared to concurrent (CO) calibration with the focus on the degree of robustness to format effects (FEs) when applying the methods to multidimensional data that reflected the FEs associated with mixed-format tests. Based on the quantification of…

  4. A Generally Robust Approach for Testing Hypotheses and Setting Confidence Intervals for Effect Sizes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keselman, H. J.; Algina, James; Lix, Lisa M.; Wilcox, Rand R.; Deering, Kathleen N.

    2008-01-01

    Standard least squares analysis of variance methods suffer from poor power under arbitrarily small departures from normality and fail to control the probability of a Type I error when standard assumptions are violated. This article describes a framework for robust estimation and testing that uses trimmed means with an approximate degrees of…

  5. Building a robust self-test on multimode seeker (MMS) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Y. K.; McAdam, Bill; Mills, Kathy; Quets, Emmanuel P.; Kubala, Diane; O'Hara, Mike; Howard, Beth

    2003-12-01

    In a smart weapon system, reliability of the sensor system is the most essential characteristic. Self Test (ST) is a way to diagnose the health of the system in order to keep the system reliable. It is important to measure reliability not only right before system deployment but also during the system development. For a robust self test design, many things need to be addressed. One important consideration is a way to input threshold values without code change to the released self test. Threshold values can be ever changing measuring sticks depending on each sensor"s characteristics or material changes during the development of sensors. Another consideration is a way to do fault isolation to enable component replacement. In this paper, we will present how we have built a robust self test for the MMS. In the conclusion, lessons learned will be shared.

  6. Bayes factors based on robust TDT-type tests for family trio design.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Min; Pan, Xiaoqing; Yang, Yaning

    2015-06-01

    Adaptive transmission disequilibrium test (aTDT) and MAX3 test are two robust-efficient association tests for case-parent family trio data. Both tests incorporate information of common genetic models including recessive, additive and dominant models and are efficient in power and robust to genetic model specifications. The aTDT uses information of departure from Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium to identify the potential genetic model underlying the data and then applies the corresponding TDT-type test, and the MAX3 test is defined as the maximum of the absolute value of three TDT-type tests under the three common genetic models. In this article, we propose three robust Bayes procedures, the aTDT based Bayes factor, MAX3 based Bayes factor and Bayes model averaging (BMA), for association analysis with case-parent trio design. The asymptotic distributions of aTDT under the null and alternative hypothesis are derived in order to calculate its Bayes factor. Extensive simulations show that the Bayes factors and the p-values of the corresponding tests are generally consistent and these Bayes factors are robust to genetic model specifications, especially so when the priors on the genetic models are equal. When equal priors are used for the underlying genetic models, the Bayes factor method based on aTDT is more powerful than those based on MAX3 and Bayes model averaging. When the prior placed a small (large) probability on the true model, the Bayes factor based on aTDT (BMA) is more powerful. Analysis of a simulation data about RA from GAW15 is presented to illustrate applications of the proposed methods. PMID:26030793

  7. Assessment And Testing of Industrial Devices Robustness Against Cyber Security Attacks

    E-print Network

    Tilaro, F

    2011-01-01

    CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research),like any organization, needs to achieve the conflicting objectives of connecting its operational network to Internet while at the same time keeping its industrial control systems secure from external and internal cyber attacks. With this in mind, the ISA-99[0F1] international cyber security standard has been adopted at CERN as a reference model to define a set of guidelines and security robustness criteria applicable to any network device. Devices robustness represents a key link in the defense-in-depth concept as some attacks will inevitably penetrate security boundaries and thus require further protection measures. When assessing the cyber security robustness of devices we have singled out control system-relevant attack patterns derived from the well-known CAPEC[1F2] classification. Once a vulnerability is identified, it needs to be documented, prioritized and reproduced at will in a dedicated test environment for debugging purposes. CERN - in collaboration ...

  8. MIT 12 Tesla Coil test results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. M. Steeves; M. O. Hoenig

    1985-01-01

    Test results from the MIT 12 Tesla Coil experiment are presented. The coil was tested in the High Field Test Facility (HFTF) of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in October 1984 and January 1985. The experiment measured the performance of an Internally Cooled, Cabled Superconductor (ICCS) of practical size, intended for use in magnetic fusion experiments. The MIT coil carried

  9. Alternative filtration testing program: Pre-evaluation of test results

    SciTech Connect

    Georgeton, G.K.; Poirier, M.R.

    1990-09-28

    Based on results of testing eight solids removal technologies and one pretreatment option, it is recommended that a centrifugal ultrafilter and polymeric ultrafilter undergo further testing as possible alternatives to the Norton Ceramic filters. Deep bed filtration should be considered as a third alternative, if a backwashable cartridge filter is shown to be inefficient in separate testing.

  10. Salmonella mutagenicity test results for 250 chemicals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steve Haworth; Timothy Lawlor; Kristien Mortelmans; William Speck; Errol Zeiger

    1983-01-01

    This publication is a presentation of Salmonella testing results on 250 coded chemicals, encompassing 370 tests. The majority of these results were previously summarized in issues of the National Toxicology Program Technical Bulletin. However, some interpretations were changed since publication in the NTP Bulletin, based upon a reevaluation of the data. The presentation here is designed both to summarize the

  11. Results of steel containment vessel model test

    SciTech Connect

    Luk, V.K.; Ludwigsen, J.S.; Hessheimer, M.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Komine, Kuniaki [Nuclear Power Engineering Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Matsumoto, Tomoyuki [Hitachi Ltd., Hitachi, Ibaraki (Japan); Costello, J.F. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1998-05-01

    A series of static overpressurization tests of scale models of nuclear containment structures is being conducted by Sandia National Laboratories for the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation of Japan and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Two tests are being conducted: (1) a test of a model of a steel containment vessel (SCV) and (2) a test of a model of a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV). This paper summarizes the conduct of the high pressure pneumatic test of the SCV model and the results of that test. Results of this test are summarized and are compared with pretest predictions performed by the sponsoring organizations and others who participated in a blind pretest prediction effort. Questions raised by this comparison are identified and plans for posttest analysis are discussed.

  12. Fragile X mice have robust mGluR5-dependent alterations of social behaviour in the Automated Tube Test.

    PubMed

    de Esch, C E F; van den Berg, W E; Buijsen, R A M; Jaafar, I A; Nieuwenhuizen-Bakker, I M; Gasparini, F; Kushner, S A; Willemsen, R

    2015-03-01

    Fragile X syndrome is the most common monogenetic form of intellectual disability and autism. Although the Fmr1 knockout mouse model recapitulates many aspects of the human FXS condition, the establishment of robust social behavioural phenotypes suitable for drug screening has been difficult. Here, we describe a novel social behavioural paradigm, the Automated Tube Test (ATT), for which Fmr1 knockout mice demonstrate a highly reliable and robust phenotype. Fmr1 KO mice show highly dominant behaviour over wild-type littermates in the ATT. Consistent with previous findings, we observed a highly significant, albeit partial, rescue of the altered social behaviour of Fmr1 knockout mice in the ATT, using genetic (mGluR5 deletion) or pharmacological inhibition (mGluR5 antagonist) of mGluR5 signalling independently. Together, our results validate the Automated Tube Test as a robust outcome measure for social behaviour in preclinical research for FXS, and confirm the pathophysiological relevance of mGluR5 signalling. Moreover, our findings highlight the strategy of initiating pharmacological intervention in adulthood as holding significant clinical potential. PMID:25562659

  13. Test Results Untrustworthy. Point of View Essay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berliner, David C.; Nichols, Sharon L.

    2005-01-01

    America's public schools are making harmful, irreversible decisions based on test results that--in an increasing number of cases--can't be trusted, Arizona State University's Education Policy Research Laboratory has found. The pressure of high-stakes tests is forcing school districts and state Departments of Education to take inappropriate and at…

  14. DARPA February 1992 ATIS benchmark test results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David S. Pallett; Nancy L. Dahlgren; Jonathan G. Fiscus; William M. Fisher; John S. Garofolo; Brett C. Tjaden

    1992-01-01

    This paper documents the third in a series of Benchmark Tests for the DARPA Air Travel Information System (ATIS) common task domain. The first results in this series were reported at the June 1990 Speech and Natural Language Workshop [1], and the second at the February 1991 Speech and Natural Language Workshop [2]. The February 1992 Benchmark Tests include: (1)

  15. Cone Penetrometer N Factor Determination Testing Results

    SciTech Connect

    Follett, Jordan R.

    2014-03-05

    This document contains the results of testing activities to determine the empirical 'N Factor' for the cone penetrometer in kaolin clay simulant. The N Factor is used to releate resistance measurements taken with the cone penetrometer to shear strength.

  16. Module Hipot and ground continuity test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffith, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Hipot (high voltage potential) and module frame continuity tests of solar energy conversion modules intended for deployment into large arrays are discussed. The purpose of the tests is to reveal potentially hazardous voltage conditions in installed modules, and leakage currents that may result in loss of power or cause ground fault system problems, i.e., current leakage potential and leakage voltage distribution. The tests show a combined failure rate of 36% (69% when environmental testing is included). These failure rates are believed easily corrected by greater care in fabrication.

  17. Clinical False-Positive Drug Test Results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tai C. Kwong

    A confirmed positive drug test reassures all the parties involved in the drug testing process that the reported positive result\\u000a is an analytical true positive and as such is evidence that the individual has been exposed to the drug. That individual may\\u000a not be a drug abuser and may have a valid alternative explanation for the positive result. In this

  18. Low Emissions RQL Flametube Combustor Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Clarence T.; Holdeman, James D.

    2001-01-01

    The overall objective of this test program was to demonstrate and evaluate the capability of the Rich-burn/Quick-mix/Lean-burn (RQL) combustor concept for HSR applications. This test program was in support of the Pratt & Whitney and GE Aircraft Engines HSR low-NOx Combustor Program. Collaborative programs with Parker Hannifin Corporation and Textron Fuel Systems resulted in the development and testing of the high-flow low-NOx rich-burn zone fuel-to-air ratio research fuel nozzles used in this test program. Based on the results obtained in this test program, several conclusions can be made: (1) The RQL tests gave low NOx and CO emissions results at conditions corresponding to HSR cruise. (2) The Textron fuel nozzle design with optimal multiple partitioning of fuel and air circuits shows potential of providing an acceptable uniform local fuel-rich region in the rich burner. (3) For the parameters studied in this test series, the tests have shown T3 is the dominant factor in the NOx formation for RQL combustors. As T3 increases from 600 to 1100 F, EI(NOx) increases approximately three fold. (4) Factors which appear to have secondary influence on NOx formation are P4, T4, infinity(sub rb), V(sub ref,ov). (5) Low smoke numbers were measured for infinity(sub rb) of 2.0 at P4 of 120 psia.

  19. Uprated OMS engine status: Altitude testing results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenberg, Richard J.

    1992-02-01

    The current Space Shuttle Orbital Maneuvering Engine (OME) is pressure fed, utilizing storable propellants. Performance uprating of this engine, through the use of a gas generator driven turbopump to increased operating pressure, is being pursued by the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). Component level design, fabrication, and test activities on this engine system began at Aerojet in 1984. More recently, a complete engine, designated the Integrated Component Test Bed (ICTB), was tested at simulated altitude conditions at the NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF). A description of the test hardware, and results of the altitude test program are presented. These results, which include the test condition operating envelope, confirm the capability of the selected Uprated OME (UOME) configuration to meet or exceed performance and operational requirements. Engine flexibility, demonstrated through testing at two different operational mixture ratios, along with a summary of projected Space Shuttle performance enhancements using the UOME, are discussed. Planned future activities and recommendations for further engine development are also discussed.

  20. NEXT Single String Integration Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, George C.; Patterson, Michael J.; Pinero, Luis; Herman, Daniel A.; Snyder, Steven John

    2010-01-01

    As a critical part of NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) test validation process, a single string integration test was performed on the NEXT ion propulsion system. The objectives of this test were to verify that an integrated system of major NEXT ion propulsion system elements meets project requirements, to demonstrate that the integrated system is functional across the entire power processor and xenon propellant management system input ranges, and to demonstrate to potential users that the NEXT propulsion system is ready for transition to flight. Propulsion system elements included in this system integration test were an engineering model ion thruster, an engineering model propellant management system, an engineering model power processor unit, and a digital control interface unit simulator that acted as a test console. Project requirements that were verified during this system integration test included individual element requirements ; integrated system requirements, and fault handling. This paper will present the results of these tests, which include: integrated ion propulsion system demonstrations of performance, functionality and fault handling; a thruster re-performance acceptance test to establish baseline performance: a risk-reduction PMS-thruster integration test: and propellant management system calibration checks.

  1. Adaptive and robust algorithms and tests for visual-based navigation of a space robotic manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatini, Marco; Monti, Riccardo; Gasbarri, Paolo; Palmerini, Giovanni B.

    2013-02-01

    Optical navigation for guidance and control of robotic systems is a well-established technique from both theoretic and practical points of view. According to the positioning of the camera, the problem can be approached in two ways: the first one, "hand-in-eye", deals with a fixed camera, external to the robot, which allows to determine the position of the target object to be reached. The second one, "eye-in-hand", consists in a camera accommodated on the end-effector of the manipulator. Here, the target object position is not determined in an absolute reference frame, but with respect to the image plane of the mobile camera. In this paper, the algorithms and the test campaign applied to the case of the planar multibody manipulator developed in the Guidance and Navigation Lab at the University of Rome La Sapienza are reported with respect to the eye-in-hand case. In fact, being the space environment the target application for this research activity, it is quite difficult to imagine a fixed, non-floating camera in the case of an orbital grasping maneuver. The classic approach of Image Base Visual Servoing considers the evaluation of the control actions directly on the basis of the error between the current image of a feature and the image of the same feature in a final desired configuration. Both simulation and experimental tests show that such a classic approach can fail when navigation errors and actuation delays are included. Moreover, changing light conditions or the presence of unexpected obstacles can lead to a camera failure in target acquisition. In order to overcome these two problems, a Modified Image Based Visual Servoing algorithm and an Extended Kalman Filtering for feature position estimation are developed and applied. In particular, the filtering shows a quite good performance if target's depth information is supplied. A simple procedure for estimating initial target depth is therefore developed and tested. As a result of the application of all the novel approaches proposed, the experimental test campaign shows a remarkable increase in the robustness of the guidance, navigation and control systems.

  2. JPL pyro shock test approaches and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Kurng Y.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents the overall approach at JPL in performing spacecraft pyrotechnic shock qualification testing. Initially, the assembly shock requirements are developed early in the program based on previous spacecraft test experience and data. Pyrotechnic device development testing firings and spacecraft Development Test Model (DTM) pyro firings are then conducted to verify the adequacy of the assembly shock requirements and to determine the subsystem test firing and the subsequent system level test firing requirements. The electro-dynamic shaker, through shock synthesis techniques, is utilized to qualify the shock sensitive flight equipment with margins applied. Actual pyrotechnic device firings on spacecraft equipment or science instruments are performed when the influence of the pyros is localized and can be ignored at the system level. Full spacecraft system level shock tests, which include multiple firings of certain critical pyro devices, are conducted to verify the spacecraft design structural integrity and functions as well as to qualify hardware items which have not been previously qualified. These tests also provide a source of data from which assembly level requirements can be evaluated and compared. For example, during the Galileo program, the results demonstrated that good agreement between predicted and measured shock environments and adequate qualification of the flight spacecraft was achieved.

  3. Testing alleged mediumship: methods and results.

    PubMed

    O'keeffe, Ciarán; Wiseman, Richard

    2005-05-01

    Mediums claim to be able to communicate with the deceased. Such claims attract a considerable amount of public interest and, if valid, have important implications for many areas of psychology. For over 100 years, researchers have tested alleged mediums. This work has obtained mixed results and provoked a considerable amount of methodological debate. This paper reviews the key issues in this debate, describes how the authors devised a method of testing that aimed to prevent the many problems that have hindered past research, and how they then used this method to test several professional mediums. The results of this work did not support the existence of genuine mediumistic ability. Competing interpretations of these results are discussed, along with ways in which the methodology presented in the paper could be used to assess conceptually similar, but non-paranormal, claims made in clinical, occupational and forensic contexts. PMID:15969829

  4. BPX insulation irradiation program test results

    SciTech Connect

    McManamy, T.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Kanemoto, G. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Snook, P.G. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1991-01-01

    The toroidal field coil insulation for the Burning Plasma Experiment (BPX) is expected to receive a radiation dose of nearly 10{sup 10} rad and to withstand significant mechanical stresses. An irradiation test program was performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) using the Advanced Technology Reactor (ATR) for irradiations to doses on the order of 3 {times} 10{sup 10} rad. The flexure and shear strength with compression of commercially procured sheet material were reported earlier. A second series of tests has been performed to slightly higher dose levels with vacuum impregnated materials, glass strand material, and Spaulrad-S sheet samples. Vacuum impregnation with a Shell 9405 resin and 9470 hardener was used to produce bonded copper squares and flexure samples of both pure resin and resin with S-glass. A new test fixture was developed to test the bonded samples in shear without applied compression. The Spaulrad-S flexure samples demonstrated a loss of strength with irradiation, similar to previous results. The pure resin lost nearly all flexibility, while the S-glass-reinforced samples retained between 30% and 40% of the initial flexure strength. The S-glass strands showed a 30% loss of strength at the higher dose level when tested in tension. The bonded copper squares had a low room-temperature shear strength of approximately 17 MPa before irradiation, which was unchanged in the irradiated samples. Shear testing of unirradiated bonded copper squares with ten different types of surface treatment revealed that the low shear strength resulted from the polyurethane primer used. In the later series of test, the epoxy-based primers and DZ-80 from Ciba-Geigy did much better, with shear strengths on the order of 40 MPa. These samples also demonstrated a resistance to cryogenic shock. One irradiated bonded sample was tested up 10 210 MPa in compression, the limit of the test fixture, without failure.

  5. Test Results for the Automated Rendezvous and Capture System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruzen, Craig; Dabney, Richard; Lomas, James

    1999-01-01

    The Automated Rendezvous and Capture (AR&C) system was designed and tested at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to demonstrate technologies and mission strategies for automated rendezvous and docking of spacecraft in Earth orbit, The system incorporates some of the latest innovations in Global Positioning, System space navigation, laser sensor technologies and automated mission sequencing algorithms. The system's initial design and integration was completed in 1998 and has undergone testing at MSFC. This paper describes the major components of the AR&C system and presents results from the official system tests performed in MSFC's Flight Robotics Laboratory with digital simulations and hardware in the loop tests. The results show that the AR&C system can safely and reliably perform automated rendezvous and docking missions in the absence of system failures with 100 percent success. When system failures are included, the system uses its automated collision avoidance maneuver logic to recover in a safe manner. The primary objective of the AR&C project is to prove that by designing a safe and robust automated system, mission operations cost can be reduced by decreasing the personnel required for mission design, preflight planning and training required for crewed rendezvous and docking missions.

  6. SLD liquid argon calorimeter prototype test results

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, R.; Eigen, G.; Au, Y.; Sleeman, J.; Breidenbach, M.; Brau, J.; Ludgate, G.A.; Oram, C.J.; Cook, V.; Johnson, J.

    1985-10-01

    The results of the SLD test beam program for the selection of a calorimeter radiator composition within a liquid argon system are described, with emphasis on the study of the use of uranium to obtain equalization of pion and electron responses.

  7. STABILITY TEST RESULTS FOR GPS RUBIDIUM CLOCKS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Danzy; W. Riley

    This paper presents the results of further long-term stability tests on two prototype GPS rubidium frequency standards. These testa, currently underway at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, have resulted in the highest stabilities yet reported for such devices. Both units have smooth, highly modelable drift under 2 x 10-14\\/day and a stability of about 1 x 10-l4 at lo5 to

  8. Planck 2015 results. XI. CMB power spectra, likelihoods, and robustness of parameters

    E-print Network

    Aghanim, N; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bock, J J; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Challinor, A; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Clements, D L; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Désert, F -X; Di Valentino, E; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dolag, K; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Ducout, A; Dunkley, J; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Fergusson, J; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Frejsel, A; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Gauthier, C; Gerbino, M; Giard, M; Gjerløw, E; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Gudmundsson, J E; Hamann, J; Hansen, F K; Harrison, D L; Helou, G; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, A H; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kiiveri, K; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Jeune, M Le; Leonardi, R; Lesgourgues, J; Levrier, F; Lewis, A; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Lilley, M; Linden-Vørnle, M; Lindholm, V; López-Caniego, M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Maggio, G; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Mangilli, A; Maris, M; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Meinhold, P R; Melchiorri, A; Migliaccio, M; Millea, M; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Narimani, A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Oxborrow, C A; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Partridge, B; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Pearson, T J; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Renzi, A; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; d'Orfeuil, B Rouillé; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Salvati, L; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savelainen, M; Savini, G; Scott, D; Serra, P; Spencer, L D; Spinelli, M; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sunyaev, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Trombetti, T; Tucci, M; Tuovinen, J; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Wehus, I K; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the Planck 2015 likelihoods, statistical descriptions of the 2-point correlation functions of CMB temperature and polarization. They use the hybrid approach employed previously: pixel-based at low multipoles, $\\ell$, and a Gaussian approximation to the distribution of cross-power spectra at higher $\\ell$. The main improvements are the use of more and better processed data and of Planck polarization data, and more detailed foreground and instrumental models. More than doubling the data allows further checks and enhanced immunity to systematics. Progress in foreground modelling enables a larger sky fraction, contributing to enhanced precision. Improvements in processing and instrumental models further reduce uncertainties. Extensive tests establish robustness and accuracy, from temperature, from polarization, and from their combination, and show that the {\\Lambda}CDM model continues to offer a very good fit. We further validate the likelihood against specific extensions to this baseline, suc...

  9. GPS interferometric attitude and heading determination: Initial flight test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vangraas, Frank; Braasch, Michael

    1991-01-01

    Attitude and heading determination using GPS interferometry is a well-understood concept. However, efforts have been concentrated mainly in the development of robust algorithms and applications for low dynamic, rigid platforms (e.g., shipboard). This paper presents results of what is believed by the authors to be the first realtime flight test of a GPS attitude and heading determination system. The system is installed in Ohio University's Douglas DC-3 research aircraft. Signals from four antennas are processed by an Ashtech 3DF 24-channel GPS receiver. Data from the receiver are sent to a microcomputer for storage and further computations. Attitude and heading data are sent to a second computer for display on a software generated artificial horizon. Demonstration of this technique proves its candidacy for augmentation of aircraft state estimation for flight control and navigation as well as for numerous other applications.

  10. GPS interferometric attitude and heading determination - Initial flight test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Graas, Frank; Braasch, Michael

    1992-01-01

    Attitude and heading determination using GPS interferometry is a well-understood concept. However, efforts have been concentrated mainly in the development of robust algorithms and applications for low-dynamic, rigid platforms (e.g., shipboard). This paper presents results of what is believed to be the first real-time flight test of a GPS attitude and heading determination system. Signals from four antennas are processed by a 24-channel GPS receiver. Data from the receiver are sent to a microcomputer for storage and further computations. Attitude and heading data are sent to a second computer for display on a software-generated artificial horizon. Demonstration of this technique proves its candidacy for augmentation of aircraft state estimation for flight control and navigation, as well as for numerous other applications.

  11. Investigation of the Robust Rank-Order Test for Non-Normal Populations with Unequal Variances: The Case of Reaction Time

    Microsoft Academic Search

    BRUNO D. ZUMBO; DANIEL COULOMBE

    1997-01-01

    This article examines the performance of the robust rank-order (Fligner-Policello) test of treatment effects for populations with unequal variances. Both symmetric (normal) and skewed (ex-Gaussian) distributions are examined. The ex-Gaussian distribution is particularly relevant because it is representative of skewed distributions found in experimental psychology, most notably reaction time data. The results indicate that when testing the hypothesis of equal

  12. Advanced Thermal Simulator Testing: Thermal Analysis and Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Dickens, Ricky; Dixon, David; Reid, Robert; Adams, Mike; Davis, Joe

    2008-01-01

    Work at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center seeks to develop high fidelity, electrically heated thermal simulators that represent fuel elements in a nuclear reactor design to support non-nuclear testing applicable to the development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. Comparison between the fuel pins and thermal simulators is made at the outer fuel clad surface, which corresponds to the outer sheath surface in the thermal simulator. The thermal simulators that are currently being tested correspond to a SNAP derivative reactor design that could be applied for Lunar surface power. These simulators are designed to meet the geometric and power requirements of a proposed surface power reactor design, accommodate testing of various axial power profiles, and incorporate imbedded instrumentation. This paper reports the results of thermal simulator analysis and testing in a bare element configuration, which does not incorporate active heat removal, and testing in a water-cooled calorimeter designed to mimic the heat removal that would be experienced in a reactor core.

  13. Magnetohydrodynamics with Chombo: Tests and First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryukov, I. A.; Borovikov, S. N.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Zank, G. P.

    2006-12-01

    DOE's SciDAC adaptive mesh refinement code Chombo has been modified for solution of compressible MHD flows with the application of high resolution, shock-capturing numerical schemes. The code is verified against several standard 1D and 2D MHD test flows involving multiple discontinuities, such as an Orszag--Tang vortex problem, rotor problems, blast wave interactions with dense clouds, Kelvin--Helmholtz instability, etc., and we show here. The results of several such tests are presented. We also summarize the first results obtained using a multifluid model of the solar wind -- interstellar medium interaction. It is shown that the heliopause is subject to both Rayleigh--Taylor and Kelvin--Helmholtz instabilities.

  14. Highly Loaded Composite Strut Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, K. C.; Jegley, Dawn C.; Barnard, Ansley; Phelps, James E.; McKeney, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    Highly loaded composite struts from a proposed truss-based Altair lunar lander descent stage concept were selected for development under NASA's Advanced Composites Technology program. Predicted compressive member forces during launch and ascent of over -100,000 lbs were much greater than the tensile loads. Therefore, compressive failure modes, including structural stability, were primary design considerations. NASA's industry partner designed and built highly loaded struts that were delivered to NASA for testing. Their design, fabricated on a washout mandrel, had a uniform-diameter composite tube with composite tapered ends. Each tapered end contained a titanium end fitting with facing conical ramps that are overlaid and overwrapped with composite materials. The highly loaded struts were loaded in both tension and compression, with ultimate failure produced in compression. Results for the two struts tested are presented and discussed, along with measured deflections, strains and observed failure mechanisms.

  15. The NASA B-757 HIRF Test Series: Flight Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moeller, Karl J.; Dudley, Kenneth L.

    1997-01-01

    In 1995, the NASA Langley Research Center conducted a series of aircraft tests aimed at characterizing the electromagnetic environment (EME) in and around a Boeing 757 airliner. Measurements were made of the electromagnetic energy coupled into the aircraft and the signals induced on select structures as the aircraft was flown past known RF transmitters. These measurements were conducted to provide data for the validation of computational techniques for the assessment of electromagnetic effects in commercial transport aircraft. This paper reports on the results of flight tests using RF radiators in the HF, VHF, and UHF ranges and on efforts to use computational and analytical techniques to predict RF field levels inside the airliner at these frequencies.

  16. A robust and reliable non-invasive test for stress responsivity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zimprich, Annemarie; Garrett, Lillian; Deussing, Jan M.; Wotjak, Carsten T.; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; de Angelis, Martin Hrab?; Wurst, Wolfgang; Hölter, Sabine M.

    2014-01-01

    Stress and an altered stress response have been associated with many multifactorial diseases, such as psychiatric disorders or neurodegenerative diseases. As currently mouse mutants for each single gene are generated and phenotyped in a large-scale manner, it seems advisable also to test these mutants for alterations in their stress responses. Here we present the determinants of a robust and reliable non-invasive test for stress-responsivity in mice. Stress is applied through restraining the mice in tubes and recording behavior in the Open Field 20 min after cessation of the stress. Two hours, but not 15 or 50 min of restraint lead to a robust and reproducible increase in distance traveled and number of rearings during the first 5 min in the Open Field in C57BL/6 mice. This behavioral response is blocked by the corticosterone synthesis inhibitor metyrapone, but not by RU486 treatment, indicating that it depends on corticosteroid secretion, but is not mediated via the glucocorticoid receptor type II. We assumed that with a stress duration of 15 min one could detect hyper-responsivity, and with a stress duration of 2 h hypo-responsivity in mutant mouse lines. This was validated with two mutant lines known to show opposing effects on corticosterone secretion after stress exposure, corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) over-expressing mice and CRH receptor 1 knockout (KO) mice. Both lines showed the expected phenotype, i.e., increased stress responsivity in the CRH over-expressing mouse line (after 15 min restraint stress) and decreased stress responsivity in the CRHR1-KO mouse line (after 2 h of restraint stress). It is possible to repeat the acute stress test several times without the stressed animal adapting to it, and the behavioral response can be robustly evoked at different ages, in both sexes and in different mouse strains. Thus, locomotor and rearing behavior in the Open Field after an acute stress challenge can be used as reliable, non-invasive indicators of stress responsivity and corticosterone secretion in mice. PMID:24782732

  17. Partial-array test results in IFSMTF

    SciTech Connect

    Lue, J.W.; Dresner, L.; Koizumi, K.; Lubell, M.S.; Luton, J.N.; Shen, S.S.; Zahn, G.R.; Zichy, J.A.

    1985-07-01

    Preliminary performance tests of two large super conducting magnets have been carried out in the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility (IFSMTF). Each of the Japanese (JA) and General Dynamics/Convair (GD) coils was operated up to its full design current of 10.2 kA with the other serving as an adjacent background coil at 40% of design current. Cryostatic stability was demonstrated for both coils by noting recovery from a full half-turn (5 m) driven normal. A new pick-up coil compensation scheme was successfully used for the quench detection system. Each coil remained superconducting when the other was dumped. Unique instrumentation was used to measure changes in bore dimensions and displacement of the winding from the coil case. Agreement between structural analysis and measurement of bore dimension changes resulting from magnetic loads is good. The Swiss (CH) coil underwent only a cryogenic test. The forced cooling worked well and an inlet temperature of 3.8 K was demonstrated.

  18. Preliminary test results for the SVX4

    SciTech Connect

    Christofek, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Rapidis, P.; Utes, M.; /Fermilab

    2005-06-01

    We present and summarize the preliminary test results for SVX4 chip testing. There are presently two versions of the SVX4. Version 2 has on-chip bypassing and Version 1 does not. The on-chip bypassing is a layer of transistors under the front-end analog pipeline that acts as a bypassing capacitor for the voltage supply. Its size is about a microfarad. We aggressively choose to test Version 2 because of this feature. The feature is advantageous for hybrid design because it eliminates the need for an additional passive component on the hybrid itself by placing it on the actual SVX4 die. Also, the SVX4 was designed to operate in two modes: D. and CDF. One can set which mode the chip will operate by placing a jumper in the proper position on the SVX4 chip carrier. In either mode, the chip can either use the operating parameters from the shift register or the shadow register. Similarly, this is selected by placing a jumper on the SVX4 chip carrier. This chip has this feature because it was unknown whether the new design of the shadow register would be operable. The shadow register is also call the SEU register or Single Event Upset register. An introduction into the functionality of the chip and an explanation on the difference between D. and CDF mode can be found in the SVX4 User's Manual [1].

  19. Field Lysimeter Test Facility: Second year (FY 1989) test results

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, M.D.; Gee, G.W.; Kanyid, M.J.; Rockhold, M.L.

    1990-04-01

    The Record of Decision associated with the Hanford Defense Waste Environmental Impact Statement (53 FR 12449-53) commits to an evaluation of the use of protective barriers placed over near-surface wastes. The barrier must protect against wind and water erosion and limit plant and animal intrusion and infiltration of water. Successful conclusion of this program will yield the necessary protective barrier design for near-surface waste isolation. This report presents results from the second year of tests at the FLTF. The primary objective of testing protective barriers at the FLTF was to measure the water budgets within the various barriers and assess the effectiveness of their designs in limiting water intrusion into the zone beneath each barrier. Information obtained from these measurements is intended for use in refining barrier designs. Four elements of water budget were measured during the year: precipitation, evaporation, storage, and drainage. Run-off, which is a fifth element of a complete water budget, was made negligible by a lip on the lysimeters that protrudes 5 cm above the soil surface to prevent run-off. A secondary objective of testing protective barriers at the FLTF was to refine procedures and equipment to support data collection for verification of the computer model needed for long-term projections of barrier performance. 6 refs.

  20. Testing the robustness of management decisions to uncertainty: Everglades restoration scenarios.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Michael M; Gross, Louis J; Duke-Sylvester, Scott M; Palmer, Mark

    2008-04-01

    To effectively manage large natural reserves, resource managers must prepare for future contingencies while balancing the often conflicting priorities of different stakeholders. To deal with these issues, managers routinely employ models to project the response of ecosystems to different scenarios that represent alternative management plans or environmental forecasts. Scenario analysis is often used to rank such alternatives to aid the decision making process. However, model projections are subject to uncertainty in assumptions about model structure, parameter values, environmental inputs, and subcomponent interactions. We introduce an approach for testing the robustness of model-based management decisions to the uncertainty inherent in complex ecological models and their inputs. We use relative assessment to quantify the relative impacts of uncertainty on scenario ranking. To illustrate our approach we consider uncertainty in parameter values and uncertainty in input data, with specific examples drawn from the Florida Everglades restoration project. Our examples focus on two alternative 30-year hydrologic management plans that were ranked according to their overall impacts on wildlife habitat potential. We tested the assumption that varying the parameter settings and inputs of habitat index models does not change the rank order of the hydrologic plans. We compared the average projected index of habitat potential for four endemic species and two wading-bird guilds to rank the plans, accounting for variations in parameter settings and water level inputs associated with hypothetical future climates. Indices of habitat potential were based on projections from spatially explicit models that are closely tied to hydrology. For the American alligator, the rank order of the hydrologic plans was unaffected by substantial variation in model parameters. By contrast, simulated major shifts in water levels led to reversals in the ranks of the hydrologic plans in 24.1-30.6% of the projections for the wading bird guilds and several individual species. By exposing the differential effects of uncertainty, relative assessment can help resource managers assess the robustness of scenario choice in model-based policy decisions. PMID:18488629

  1. Robust engineering approaches to maximize results in business, cost, engineering, human, quality and system technologies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. C. V. Boas

    1999-01-01

    Robust engineering is a new branch of engineering techniques developed by Geinichi Taguchi, in the early fifties in Japan. It is now in wide use throughout the western world, after the tremendous success of several industrial applications. The article shows that the so called robust designs are orthogonal arrays formally identified with fractional factorial designs, constituting a design matrix for

  2. Results from the Cooler and Lead Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A

    2010-06-10

    The report presents the results of testing MICE spectrometer magnet current leads on a test apparatus that combines both the copper leads and the high temperature superconducting (HTS) leads with a single Cryomech PT415 cooler and liquid helium tank. The current is carried through the copper leads from 300 K to the top of the HTS leads. The current is then carried through the HTS leads to a feed-through from the vacuum space to the inside of a liquid helium tank. The experiment allows one to measure the performance of both cooler stages along with the performance of the leads. While the leads were powered we measured the voltage drops through the copper leads, through the HTS leads, through spliced to the feed-through, through the feed-through and through the low-temperature superconducting loop that connects one lead to the other. Measurements were made using the leads that were used in spectrometer magnet 1A and spectrometer magnet 2A. These are the same leads that were used for Superbend and Venus magnets at LBNL. The IL/A for these leads was 5.2 x 10{sup 6} m{sup -1}. The leads turned out to be too long. The same measurements were made using the leads that were installed in magnet 2B. The magnet 2B leads had an IL/A of 3.3 x 10{sup 6} A m{sup -1}. This report discusses the cooler performance and the measured electrical performance of the lead circuit that contains the copper leads and the superconducting leads. All of the HTS leads that were installed in magnet 2B were current tested using this apparatus.

  3. Flash lidar performance testing: configuration and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poberezhskiy, Ilya; Johnson, Andrew; Chang, Daniel; Ek, Eric; Natzic, David; Spiers, Gary; Penniman, Steve; Short, Brad

    2012-06-01

    Future planetary and lunar landers can benefit from a hazard detection (HD) system that employs a lidar to create a highresolution 3D terrain map in the vicinity of the landing site and an onboard computer to process the lidar data and identify the safest landing site within the surveyed area. A divert maneuver would then be executed to land in this safe site. An HD system enables landing in regions with a relatively high hazard abundance that would otherwise be considered unacceptably risky, but are of high interest to the scientific community. A key component of a HD system is a lidar with the ability to generate a 3D terrain image with the required range precision in the prescribed time and fits within the project resource constraints. In this paper, we present the results obtained during performance testing of a prototype "GoldenEye" 3D flash lidar developed by ASC, Inc. The testing was performed at JPL with the lidar and the targets separated by 200 m. The analysis of the lidar performance obtained for different target types and albedos, pulse energies, and fields of view is presented and compared to key HD lidar requirements identified for the Mars 2018 lander.

  4. Advanced wing design survivability testing and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruno, J.; Tobias, M.

    1992-01-01

    Composite wings on current operational aircraft are conservatively designed to account for stress/strain concentrations, and to assure specified damage tolerance. The technology that can lead to improved composite wing structures and associated structural efficiency is to increase design ultimate strain levels beyond their current limit of 3500 to 4000 micro-in/in to 6000 micro-in/in without sacrificing structural integrity, durability, damage tolerance, or survivability. Grumman, under the sponsorship of the Naval Air Development Center (NADC), has developed a high-strain composite wing design for a subsonic aircraft wing using novel and innovative design concepts and manufacturing methods, while maintaining a state-of-the-art fiber/resin system. The current advanced wing design effort addressed a tactical subsonic aircraft wing using previously developed, high-strain wing design concepts in conjunction with newer/emerging fiber and polymer matrix composite (PMC) materials to achieve the same goals, while reducing complexity. Two categories of advanced PMC materials were evaluated: toughened thermosets; and engineered thermoplastics. Advanced PMC materials offer the technological opportunity to take maximum advantage of improved material properties, physical characteristics, and tailorability to increase performance and survivability over current composite structure. Damage tolerance and survivability to various threats, in addition to structural integrity and durability, were key technical issues addressed during this study, and evaluated through test. This paper focuses on the live-fire testing, and the results performed to experimentally evaluate the survivability of the advanced wing design.

  5. Boeing's High Voltage Solar Tile Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian J.; Harden, David E.; Ferguson, Dale C.; Snyder, David B.

    2002-01-01

    Real concerns of spacecraft charging and experience with solar array augmented electrostatic discharge arcs on spacecraft have minimized the use of high voltages on large solar arrays despite numerous vehicle system mass and efficiency advantages. Boeing's solar tile (patent pending) allows high voltage to be generated at the array without the mass and efficiency losses of electronic conversion. Direct drive electric propulsion and higher power payloads (lower spacecraft weight) will benefit from this design. As future power demand grows, spacecraft designers must use higher voltage to minimize transmission loss and power cable mass for very large area arrays. This paper will describe the design and discuss the successful test of Boeing's 500-Volt Solar Tile in NASA Glenn's Tenney chamber in the Space Plasma Interaction Facility. The work was sponsored by NASA's Space Solar Power Exploratory Research and Technology (SERT) Program and will result in updated high voltage solar array design guidelines being published.

  6. Robust Force Control of an SRM-Based Electromechanical Brake and Experimental Results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Prashanth Krishnamurthy; Wenzhe Lu; Farshad Khorrami; Ali Keyhani

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose robust nonlinear force controllers for a switched-reluctance-motor (SRM) electromechanical brake system which is a promising replacement for hydraulic brakes in the automotive industry. A torque-level control law is first designed using robust backstepping. The backstepping proceeds via the force and the velocity states. The voltage-level control laws are obtained from the virtual control law for

  7. Summary of CPAS EDU Testing Analysis Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romero, Leah M.; Bledsoe, Kristin J.; Davidson, John.; Engert, Meagan E.; Fraire, Usbaldo, Jr.; Galaviz, Fernando S.; Galvin, Patrick J.; Ray, Eric S.; Varela, Jose

    2015-01-01

    The Orion program's Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) project is currently conducting its third generation of testing, the Engineering Development Unit (EDU) series. This series utilizes two test articles, a dart-shaped Parachute Compartment Drop Test Vehicle (PCDTV) and capsule-shaped Parachute Test Vehicle (PTV), both of which include a full size, flight-like parachute system and require a pallet delivery system for aircraft extraction. To date, 15 tests have been completed, including six with PCDTVs and nine with PTVs. Two of the PTV tests included the Forward Bay Cover (FBC) provided by Lockheed Martin. Advancements in modeling techniques applicable to parachute fly-out, vehicle rate of descent, torque, and load train, also occurred during the EDU testing series. An upgrade from a composite to an independent parachute simulation allowed parachute modeling at a higher level of fidelity than during previous generations. The complexity of separating the test vehicles from their pallet delivery systems necessitated the use the Automatic Dynamic Analysis of Mechanical Systems (ADAMS) simulator for modeling mated vehicle aircraft extraction and separation. This paper gives an overview of each EDU test and summarizes the development of CPAS analysis tools and techniques during EDU testing.

  8. Power Actuation and Switching Module Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, Greg; Deligiannis, Frank; Franco, Lauro; Jones, Loren; Lam, Barbara; Nelson, Ron; Pantaleon, Jose; Ruiz, Ian; Treichler, John; Wester, Gene

    2006-01-01

    The X2000 Power System Electronics (PSE) is a Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) task to develop a new generation of power system building blocks for use on future deep-space missions. The effort includes the development of electronic components and modules that can be used as building blocks in the design of generic spacecraft power systems. All X2000 avionics components and modules are designed for use in centralized or distributed spacecraft architectures. The Power Actuation and Switching Module (PASM) has been developed under the X2000 program. This component enables a modular and scalable design approach for power switching applications, which can result in a wide variety of power switching architectures using this simple building block. The PASM is designed to provide most of the necessary power switching functions of spacecraft for various Deep Space missions including future missions to Mars, comets, Jupiter and its moons. It is fabricated using an ASIC process that is tolerant of high radiation. The development included two application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) and support circuitry all packaged using High Density Interconnect (HDI) technology. It can be operated in series or parallel with other PASMs. It can be used as a high-side or low-side switch and it can drive thruster valves, pyrotechnic devices such as NASA standard initiators, bus shunt resistors, and regular spacecraft component loads. Each PASM contains two independent switches with internal current limiting and over-current trip-off functions to protect the power subsystem from load faults. During turnon and turnoff each switch can limit the rate of current change (di/dt) to a value determined by the user. Three-way majority-voted On/Off commandability and full switch status telemetry (both analog and digital) are built into the module. This paper is a follow up to the one presented at he IECEC 2004 conference that will include the lessons learned and test results from the development.

  9. Validation of the Chinese Version of the Life Orientation Test with a Robust Weighted Least Squares Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Cheng-Hsien

    2012-01-01

    Of the several measures of optimism presently available in the literature, the Life Orientation Test (LOT; Scheier & Carver, 1985) has been the most widely used in empirical research. This article explores, confirms, and cross-validates the factor structure of the Chinese version of the LOT with ordinal data by using robust weighted least squares…

  10. 49 CFR 199.109 - Review of drug testing results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Review of drug testing results. 199.109 Section 199.109...OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING Drug Testing § 199.109 Review of drug testing...

  11. 49 CFR 199.109 - Review of drug testing results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Review of drug testing results. 199.109 Section 199.109...OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING Drug Testing § 199.109 Review of drug testing...

  12. 49 CFR 199.109 - Review of drug testing results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Review of drug testing results. 199.109 Section 199.109...OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING Drug Testing § 199.109 Review of drug testing...

  13. Honeycomb spacer crush stength test results

    SciTech Connect

    Leader, D.R.

    1993-09-15

    This report discusses aluminum honeycomb spacers, which are used as an energy absorbent material in shipping packages for off site shipment of radioactive materials and which were ordered in two crush strengths, 1,000 psi and 2,000 psi for use in drop tests requested by the Packaging and Transportation group as part of the shipping container rectification process. Both the group as part of the shipping container rectification process. Both the vendor and the SRTC Materials Laboratory performed crush strength measurements on test samples made from the material used to fabricate the actual spacers. The measurements of crush strength made in the SRTC Materials Laboratory are within 100 psi of the measurements made by the manufacturer for all samples tested and all test measurements are within 10% of the specified crush strength, which is acceptable to the P&T group for the planned tests.

  14. 12 CFR 252.147 - Reports of stress test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 2013-01-01 false Reports of stress test results. 252.147 Section...STANDARDS (REGULATION YY) Company-Run Stress Test Requirements for Covered Companies § 252.147 Reports of stress test results. (a) Reports to...

  15. 12 CFR 325.207 - Publication of stress test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Publication of stress test results. 325.207 Section 325.207...GENERAL POLICY CAPITAL MAINTENANCE Annual Stress Test § 325.207 Publication of stress test results. (a) Publication...

  16. 12 CFR 325.207 - Publication of stress test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Publication of stress test results. 325.207 Section 325.207...GENERAL POLICY CAPITAL MAINTENANCE Annual Stress Test § 325.207 Publication of stress test results. (a) Publication...

  17. 12 CFR 252.157 - Disclosure of stress test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 false Disclosure of stress test results. 252.157 Section 252...STANDARDS (REGULATION YY) Company-Run Stress Test Requirements for Banking Organizations...Companies § 252.157 Disclosure of stress test results. (a) Public...

  18. 12 CFR 252.147 - Reports of stress test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2014-01-01 false Reports of stress test results. 252.147 Section...STANDARDS (REGULATION YY) Company-Run Stress Test Requirements for Covered Companies § 252.147 Reports of stress test results. (a) Reports to...

  19. 12 CFR 252.157 - Disclosure of stress test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Disclosure of stress test results. 252.157 Section 252...STANDARDS (REGULATION YY) Company-Run Stress Test Requirements for Banking Organizations...Companies § 252.157 Disclosure of stress test results. (a) Public...

  20. 12 CFR 252.148 - Disclosure of stress test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Disclosure of stress test results. 252.148 Section...STANDARDS (REGULATION YY) Company-Run Stress Test Requirements for Covered Companies § 252.148 Disclosure of stress test results. (a) Public...

  1. 12 CFR 252.148 - Disclosure of stress test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 false Disclosure of stress test results. 252.148 Section...STANDARDS (REGULATION YY) Company-Run Stress Test Requirements for Covered Companies § 252.148 Disclosure of stress test results. (a) Public...

  2. 49 CFR 234.273 - Results of inspections and tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Results of inspections and tests. 234.273 Section 234.273...SIGNAL SYSTEM SAFETY AND STATE ACTION PLANS Maintenance, Inspection, and Testing Inspections and Tests § 234.273 Results of...

  3. Flash Lidar Performance Testing: Configuration and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poberezhskiy, Ilya; Johnson, Andrew; Chang, Daniel; Ek, Eric; Natzic, David; Spiers, Gary; Penniman, Steve; Short, Brad

    2012-01-01

    Lidar-based hazard detection and avoidance will enable safe landing in scientifically interesting terrain with higher hazard abundance. ASC GoldenEye flash lidar was tested at JPL as part of EDL technology development for Mars 2018

  4. Heated Promoted Combustion-Initial Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, Carl D.; Herald, Stephen; Davis, S. Eddie

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the STD 6001 test 17 is to determine the flammability of materials in GOX at ambient temperature and at use pressure. The purpose of the new Heated Promoted combustion test is to determine the flammability of material in GOX at use temperature and pressure. The objective is to present the new heated promoted combustion method and show initial data and trends for three representative metals.

  5. X-48B Preliminary Flight Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Brian R.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the preliminary Flight tests of the X-48B development program. The X-48B is a blended wing body aircraft that is being used to test various features of the BWB concept. The research concerns the following: (1) Turbofan Development, (2) Intelligent Flight Control and Optimization, (3) Airdata Calibration (4) Parameter Identification (i.e., Determination of the parameters of a mathematical model of a system based on observation of the system inputs and response.)

  6. The compensated pulsed alternator - Preliminary test results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. L. Bird; W. F. Weldon; H. G. Rylander; H. H. Woodson; B. M. Carder; B. T. Merritt; W. F. Gagnon

    1979-01-01

    An engineering prototype compensated pulsed alternator (Compulsator) has been designed and fabricated. The prototype compulsator is designed to drive a load consisting of sixteen parallel xenon flashlamps, 1.5 cm in diameter by 112 cm in length. The engineering prototype compulsator test facility is described, and the sequence of operation of the pulsed power circuit is discussed. Initial measurements of alternator

  7. Liquid Motion Experiment Flight Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato David J.; Dalton, Penni J.; Dodge, Franklin T.; Green, Steve

    1998-01-01

    The Liquid Motion Experiment (LME), designed to study the effects of liquid motion in rotating tanks, was flown on STS 84. LME was essentially a spin table that created a realistic nutation motion of scale-model tanks containing liquid. TWo spherical and two cylindrical transparent tanks were tested simultaneously, and three sets of such tanks were employed to vary liquid viscosity, fill level, and propellant management device (PMD) design. All the tanks were approximately 4.5 inches diameter. The primary test measurements were the radial and tangential torques exerted on the tanks by the liquid. Resonant frequencies and damping of the liquid oscillations were determined by sine sweep tests. For a given tank shape, the resonant frequency depended on fill level. For the cylindrical tanks, the resonances had somewhat different frequencies for the tangential axis (0.55 to 0.75 times spin rate) and the radial axis (0.73 to 0.78 times spin rate), and the tangential axis resonance agreed more closely with available analytical models. For the spherical tanks, the resonant frequencies were between 0.74 to 0.77 times the spin rate and were the same for the tangential and radial axes. The damping coefficients varied from about I% to 3% of critical, depending on tank shape, fill level, and liquid viscosity. 'Me viscous energy dissipation rates of the liquid oscillations were determined from sine dwell tests. The LME energy dissipation rates varied from 0.3 to 0.5 times the estimates obtained from scaling previous ground tests and spacecraft flight data. The PNDs sometimes enhanced the resonances and energy dissipation rates and sometimes decreased them, which points out the need to understand better the effects of PMD on liquid motion as a function of PMD and tank design.

  8. HTS SMES magnet design and test results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. S. Kalsi; D. Aized; B. Conner; G. Snitchier; J. Campbell; R. E. Schwall; J. Kellers; T. Stephanblome; A. Tromm; P. Winn

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes design, construction, and testing of a 5 kJ superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) magnet. This magnet was built by American Superconductor Corporation (ASC) for Gesellschaft fur Innovative Energieumwandlung und Speicherung (EUS) of Germany. The magnet consists of a solenoidal coil constructed from a silver-sheathed BiPb2Sr2Ca2Cu2O (Bi-2223) conductor which was reacted before winding. The coil is epoxy impregnated

  9. STRATEGY/RESULT FOR SRF TEST INFRASTRUCTURES

    E-print Network

    Weingarten, W

    2011-01-01

    The report summarizes the requirements needed to further develop the technology of RF superconductivity for accelerator application beyond the present state of the art. In relation to emerging European accelerator projects present collaboration schemes are identified. The required test capacities are described and compared with the available ones. Based on a short historical review, the actual performance limits of superconducting cavities are evaluated and measures are proposed to overcome them.

  10. Phase noise test results for 'mini' TWTA's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrigus, W. E.

    1980-07-01

    A series of laboratory tests of mini TWT used as power amplifiers for missile and other applications where a premium is placed on space and weight is reported. Typical performance characteristics and other requirements for RF power devices for coherent radars used in tactical applications are discussed. The TWTA performance is better than required by the specification with or without vibration but there is an increase in noise power with vibration.

  11. Achieving geodetic motion for LISA test masses: ground testing result

    E-print Network

    L. Carbone; A. Cavalleri; R. Dolesi; C. D. Hoyle; M. Hueller; S. Vitale; W. J. Weber

    2004-02-04

    The low-frequency resolution of space-based gravitational wave observatories such as LISA (Laser Interferometry Space Antenna) hinges on the orbital purity of a free-falling reference test mass inside a satellite shield. We present here a torsion pendulum study of the forces that will disturb an orbiting test mass inside a LISA capacitive position sensor. The pendulum, with a measured torque noise floor below 10 fNm/sqrt{Hz} from 0.6 to 10 mHz, has allowed placement of an upper limit on sensor force noise contributions, measurement of the sensor electrostatic stiffness at the 5% level, and detection and compensation of stray DC electrostatic biases at the mV level.

  12. Hypothesis testing at the extremes: fast and robust association for high-throughput data.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yi-Hui; Wright, Fred A

    2015-07-01

    A number of biomedical problems require performing many hypothesis tests, with an attendant need to apply stringent thresholds. Often the data take the form of a series of predictor vectors, each of which must be compared with a single response vector, perhaps with nuisance covariates. Parametric tests of association are often used, but can result in inaccurate type I error at the extreme thresholds, even for large sample sizes. Furthermore, standard two-sided testing can reduce power compared with the doubled [Formula: see text]-value, due to asymmetry in the null distribution. Exact (permutation) testing is attractive, but can be computationally intensive and cumbersome. We present an approximation to exact association tests of trend that is accurate and fast enough for standard use in high-throughput settings, and can easily provide standard two-sided or doubled [Formula: see text]-values. The approach is shown to be equivalent under permutation to likelihood ratio tests for the most commonly used generalized linear models (GLMs). For linear regression, covariates are handled by working with covariate-residualized responses and predictors. For GLMs, stratified covariates can be handled in a manner similar to exact conditional testing. Simulations and examples illustrate the wide applicability of the approach. The accompanying mcc package is available on CRAN http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/mcc/index.html. PMID:25792622

  13. Results from some anode wire aging tests

    SciTech Connect

    Juricic, I.; Kadyk, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    Using twin setups to test anode wire aging in small gas avalanche tubes, a variety of different gas mixtures were tried and other parameters were varied to study their effects upon the gain drop, nomalized to charge transfer: - 1/Q dI/I. This was found to be quite sensitive to the purity of the gases, and also sensitive to the nominal gain and the gas flow rate. The wire surface material can also significantly affect the aging, as can additives, such as ethanol or water vapor. Certain gas mixtures have been found to be consistent with zero aging at the sensitivity level of this technique.

  14. The 757 NLF glove flight test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runyan, L. Jim; Bielak, G. W.; Behbehani, R. A.; Chen, A. W.; Rozendaal, Roger A.

    1987-01-01

    A major concern in the application of a laminar flow wing design to commercial transports is whether laminar flow can be sustained in the presence of the noise environment due to wing mounted turbofan engines. To investigate this issue, a flight test program was conducted using the Boeing 757 flight research airplane with a portion of the wing modified to obtain natural laminar flow. The flight test had two primary objectives. The first was to measure the noise levels on the upper and lower surface of the wing for a range of flight conditions. The second was to investigate the effect of engine noise on laminar boundary layer transition. The noise field on the wing and transition location on the glove were then measured as a function of the engine power setting at a given flight condition. The transition and noise measurement on the glove show that there is no apparent effect of engine noise on the upper surface transition location. On the lower surface, the transition location moved forward 2 to 3 percent chord. A boundary layer stability analysis to the flight data showed that cross flow disturbances were the dominant cause of transition at most flight conditions.

  15. Fractional representation theory - Robustness results with applications to finite dimensional control of a class of linear distributed systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nett, C. N.; Jacobson, C. A.; Balas, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    This paper reviews and extends the fractional representation theory. In particular, new and powerful robustness results are presented. This new theory is utilized to develop a preliminary design methodology for finite dimensional control of a class of linear evolution equations on a Banach space. The design is for stability in an input-output sense, but particular attention is paid to internal stability as well.

  16. L1B test results Jos de Kloe,

    E-print Network

    Stoffelen, Ad

    ADM-Aeolus L1B test results Jos de Kloe, L1B PM16 10-Mar-2009 #12;L2B-PM15, J. de Kloe, 11-Mar-2009 2 Test cases: Base Reference RMS (1) Academic Tests [with/without noise] (27) Sanity Tests (2) Realistic Tests [LITE data] (9) Mispointing Tests [CALIPSO data] (9) #12;L2B-PM15, J. de Kloe, 11-Mar-2009 3

  17. L2B test results Jos de Kloe,

    E-print Network

    Stoffelen, Ad

    ADM-Aeolus L2B test results Jos de Kloe, L2B PM15 11-Mar-2009 #12;L2B-PM15, J. de Kloe, 11-Mar-2009 2 Test cases: Base Reference RMS (1) Academic Tests [with/without noise] (27) Sanity Tests (2) Realistic Tests [LITE data] (9) Mispointing Tests [CALIPSO data] (9) #12;L2B-PM15, J. de Kloe, 11-Mar-2009 3

  18. An Experimental Chip to Evaluate Test Techniques: Experiment Results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Siyad C. Ma; Piero Franco; Edward J. Mccluskey

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the testing of a chip especially designed to facilitate the evaluation of various test techniques for combinational circuitry. The different test sets and test conditions are described. Several tables show the results of voltage tests applied, either at rated speed or 2\\/3 speed, to each defective CUT. Data for CrossCheck, Very-Low-Voltage, IDDQ and delay tests are also

  19. GOES Type III Loop Heat Pipe Life Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ottenstein, Laura

    2011-01-01

    The GOES Type III Loop Heat Pipe (LHP) was built as a life test unit for the loop heat pipes on the GOES N-Q series satellites. This propylene LHP was built by Dynatherm Corporation in 2000 and tested continuously for approximately 14 months. It was then put into storage for 3 years. Following the storage period, the LHP was tested at Swales Aerospace to verify that the loop performance hadn t changed. Most test results were consistent with earlier results. At the conclusion of testing at Swales, the LHP was transferred to NASA/GSFC for continued periodic testing. The LHP has been set up for testing in the Thermal Lab at GSFC since 2006. A group of tests consisting of start-ups, power cycles, and a heat transport limit test have been performed every six to nine months since March 2006. Tests results have shown no change in the loop performance over the five years of testing. This presentation will discuss the test hardware, test set-up, and tests performed. Test results to be presented include sample plots from individual tests, along with conductance measurements for all tests performed.

  20. Robust Gain Scheduled Control of a Hydrokinetic Turbine Part 2: Testing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vincent J. Ginter; Jeff K. Pieper

    2009-01-01

    A vertical-axis hydrokinetic-turbine speed control system was developed in ¿Robust Gain Scheduled Control of a Hydrokinetic Turbine Part 1: Design¿ that guarantees stability and performance properties for the entire range of operation including tracking of the maximum power point below rated speeds and power regulation above rated speed. Secondary objectives included explicit incorporation of a tuning method to adjust the

  1. The Adequacy of Different Robust Statistical Tests in Comparing Two Independent Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pero-Cebollero, Maribel; Guardia-Olmos, Joan

    2013-01-01

    In the current study, we evaluated various robust statistical methods for comparing two independent groups. Two scenarios for simulation were generated: one of equality and another of population mean differences. In each of the scenarios, 33 experimental conditions were used as a function of sample size, standard deviation and asymmetry. For each…

  2. TEST RESULT ANALYSIS WITH RESPECT TO FORMAL SPECIFICATIONS

    E-print Network

    von Bochmann, Gregor

    TEST RESULT ANALYSIS WITH RESPECT TO FORMAL SPECIFICATIONS Gregor v. BOCHMANN and Omar B. BELLAL Université de Montréal Montréal, Canada Abstract: There are two aspects to testing: (1) the selection of appropriate test inputs and (2) the analysis of the observed interactions of the implementation under test

  3. 12 CFR 252.156 - Reports of stress test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 2013-01-01 false Reports of stress test results. 252.156 Section 252...STANDARDS (REGULATION YY) Company-Run Stress Test Requirements for Banking Organizations...Covered Companies § 252.156 Reports of stress test results. (a) Reports to...

  4. 12 CFR 252.156 - Reports of stress test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2014-01-01 false Reports of stress test results. 252.156 Section 252...STANDARDS (REGULATION YY) Company-Run Stress Test Requirements for Banking Organizations...Covered Companies § 252.156 Reports of stress test results. (a) Reports to...

  5. 42 CFR 493.1281 - Standard: Comparison of test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    (b) The laboratory must have a system to identify and assess patient test results that appear inconsistent with the following relevant criteria, when available: (1) Patient age. (2) Sex. (3) Diagnosis or pertinent clinical data. (4) Distribution of patient test...

  6. Test results of the DOE/Sandia 17 meter VAWT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nellums, R. O.; Worstell, M. H.

    1979-01-01

    A review is given of the test program of a 17 meter Vertical Axis Wind Turbine VAWT. Performance test results are discussed including difficulties encountered during the VAWT operation along with ways of solving these problems.

  7. Experimental test of a robust formation controller for marine unmanned surface vessels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel Schoerling; Chris Van Kleeck; Farbod Fahimi; Charles Robert Koch; Alfons Ams; Peter Löber

    2010-01-01

    Experiments with two formation controllers for marine unmanned surface vessels are reported. The formation controllers are\\u000a designed using the nonlinear robust model-based sliding mode approach. The marine vehicles can operate in arbitrary formation\\u000a configurations by using two leader-follower control schemes. For the design of these controller schemes 3 degrees of freedom\\u000a (DOFs) of surge, sway, and yaw are assumed in

  8. Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster decelerator subsystem drop test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moog, R. D.; Sheppard, J. D.; Kross, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    An air drop test program was conducted as part of the development of a decelerator subsystem for recovering the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster. This development test program consisted of six drops performed over the period from June 1977 to September 1978 at a parachute test center in California. The testing concerned a 48,000-lb drop test vehicle released from the B-52 mothership. The drop test program is described and pertinent test results are discussed. Data include snatch loads, inflation characteristics, peak inflation and disreef loads, and drag performance. Performance characteristics of the drogue parachute and the main parachute are established.

  9. Info-gap robustness for the correlation of tests and simulations of a non-linear transient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemez, François M.; Ben-Haim, Yakov

    2004-11-01

    An alternative to the theory of probability is applied to the problem of assessing the robustness, to uncertainty in model parameters, of the correlation between measurements and computer simulations. The analysis is based on the theory of information-gap uncertainty, which models the clustering of uncertain events in families of nested sets instead of assuming a probability structure. The system investigated is the propagation of a transient impact through a layer of hyper-elastic material. The two sources of non-linearity are (1) the softening of the constitutive law representing the hyper-elastic material and (2) the contact dynamics at the interface between metallic and crushable materials. The robustness of the correlation between test and simulation, to sources of parameter variability, is first studied to identify the parameters of the model that significantly influence the agreement between measurements and predictions. Model updating under non-probabilistic uncertainty is then illustrated, based on two complementary immunity functions: the robustness to uncertainty and the opportunity from uncertainty. Finally an info-gap model is embedded within a probability density function to represent uncertainty in the knowledge of the model's parameters and their correlation structure. Although computationally expensive, it is demonstrated that info-gap reasoning can greatly enhance our understanding of a moderately complex system when the theory of probability cannot be applied due to insufficient information.

  10. Test Results for Entry Guidance Methods for Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, John M.; Jones, Robert E.

    2003-01-01

    There are a number of approaches to advanced guidance and control (AG&C) that have the potential for achieving the goals of significantly increasing reusable launch vehicle (RLV) safety and reliability, and reducing the cost. This paper examines some approaches to entry guidance. An effort called Integration and Testing of Advanced Guidance and Control Technologies (ITAGCT) has recently completed a rigorous testing phase where these algorithms faced high-fidelity vehicle models and were required to perform a variety of representative tests. The algorithm developers spent substantial effort improving the algorithm performance in the testing. This paper lists the test cases used to demonstrate that the desired results are achieved, shows an automated test scoring method that greatly reduces the evaluation effort required, and displays results of the tests. Results show a significant improvement over previous guidance approaches. The two best-scoring algorithm approaches show roughly equivalent results and are ready to be applied to future reusable vehicle concepts.

  11. Test Results for Entry Guidance Methods for Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, John M.; Jones, Robert E.

    2004-01-01

    There are a number of approaches to advanced guidance and control that have the potential for achieving the goals of significantly increasing reusable launch vehicle (or any space vehicle that enters an atmosphere) safety and reliability, and reducing the cost. This paper examines some approaches to entry guidance. An effort called Integration and Testing of Advanced Guidance and Control Technologies has recently completed a rigorous testing phase where these algorithms faced high-fidelity vehicle models and were required to perform a variety of representative tests. The algorithm developers spent substantial effort improving the algorithm performance in the testing. This paper lists the test cases used to demonstrate that the desired results are achieved, shows an automated test scoring method that greatly reduces the evaluation effort required, and displays results of the tests. Results show a significant improvement over previous guidance approaches. The two best-scoring algorithm approaches show roughly equivalent results and are ready to be applied to future vehicle concepts.

  12. A Multivariate Randomization Test of Association Applied to Cognitive Test Results

    E-print Network

    participants was given a 5 test battery before and after the "ride" were also asked to rate the difficulty & Hochberg, 1995) . For a k = 5 test battery, there are k(k-1)/2 = 10 correlations to test. The simulationA Multivariate Randomization Test of Association Applied to Cognitive Test Results Albert Ahumada

  13. Turbine Air-Flow Test Rig CFD Results for Test Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Josh

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the Turbine Air-Flow Test (TAFT) rig computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results for test matrix. The topics include: 1) TAFT Background; 2) Design Point CFD; 3) TAFT Test Plan and Test Matrix; and 4) CFD of Test Points. This paper is in viewgraph form.

  14. Preflight test results of the ASTER SWIR flight model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yoji Iwata; Michio Otsuka; Hiroshi Akao

    1997-01-01

    A series of observational performances tests and mechanical\\/thermal environmental tests had been performed on the advanced spaceborne thermal emission and reflection radiometer (ASTER) short wave infrared radiometer (SWIR) proto flight model (PFM). Radiometric resolution test results show that S\\/Ns (signal to noise ratio) are about 130 to 300 at high level radiance and about 35 to 70 at low level

  15. Test results of an orifice pulse tube refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kral, Stephen F.; Hill, Dallas; Restivo, Jon; Johnson, Joseph; Curwen, Peter; Waldron, Warren; Jones, Howard

    An orifice pulse tube refrigerator has been designed, fabricated and tested. A hydraulically actuated diaphragm compressor, which allows direct determination of compressor PV work, dynamic pressure amplitudes and phase shifts, is used to drive the refrigerator. Test results are presented and compared to analytic predictions and design specifications. Sources of potential performance improvement are identified and future testing goals are discussed.

  16. TEST RESULTS FOR FUEL-CELL OPERATION ON LANDFILL GAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Test results from a demonstration of fuel-cell (FC) energy recovery and control of landfill gas emissions are presented. The project addressed two major issues: (i) the design, construction, and testing of a landfill-gas cleanup system; and (ii) a field test of a commercial phos...

  17. AIS wavefront sensor: a robust optical test of exposure tools using localized wavefront curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyakawa, Ryan; Zhou, Xibin; Goldstein, Michael; Ashworth, Dominic; Cummings, Kevin; Fan, Yu-Jen; Shroff, Yashesh; Denbeaux, Greg; Kandel, Yudhi; Naulleau, Patrick

    2014-04-01

    We present an update of the AIS wavefront sensor, a diagnostic sensor set for insertion in the upgraded 0.5 NA SEMATECH Albany and Berkeley METs. AIS works by using offset monopole illumination to probe localized regions of the test optic pupil. Variations in curvature manifest as focus shifts, which are measured using a photodiode- based grating-on- grating contrast monitor, and the wavefront aberrations are reconstructed using a least-squares approach. We present results from an optical prototype of AIS demonstrating an accuracy of better than ?/30 rms for Zernike polynomials Z4 through Z10. We also discuss integration strategies and requirements as well as specifications on system alignment.

  18. EDD-7 Electric Charge Point Meter test results

    SciTech Connect

    Mersman, C.R.

    1993-09-01

    The results of tests evaluating the electric switching portion of the EDD-7 Electric Charge Point Meter (ECPM) are presented. The ECPM is a modified parking meter that allows the purchase of 120 or 240 volt electric power. The ECPM is designed to make electricity available at any vehicle parking location. The test results indicate that the ECPM operated without failure thru a series of over current and ground fault tests at three different test temperatures. The magnitude of current required to trip the over current protection circuitry varied with temperature while the performance of the ground fault interruption circuitry did not change significantly with the test temperature.

  19. Test results of the Vulcain engine hydrogen turbopump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosson, R.; Caisso, P.; de La Fouchardiere, C.

    1993-06-01

    The development status of the hydrogen turbopump of the Vulcain engine, tested since 1988, is discussed. In parallel with tests performed to verify the behavior of the turbopump and investigate the life duration under specified conditions, several turbopump tests were performed outside the specified range: slow and fast transient, low and high speed, low and high pump flow coefficient, and cavitation. This paper presents the results of tests performed outside the specified range and with off-design hardware.

  20. Closed-loop hover test results with a neurocontroller on piezoactuated smart rotor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Michael G.; Sanner, Robert M.; Chopra, Inderjit

    2000-06-01

    On-blade smart structure actuators are capable of actively altering the aerodynamic loads on rotor blades. With a suitable feedback control law, such actuators could potentially be used to counter the vibrations induced by periodic aerodynamic loading on the blades with lower weight penalties than the previous actuation methods and without the bandwidth constraints. This paper covers the development and testing of a new, robust individual blade control (IBC) methodology for rotor vibration suppression using piezo actuated trailing edge flaps and active twist tip rotors. The controller uses a neural network to learn to actuate the trailing edge flap thus adaptively suppressing the blade or hub vibrations. In this application, no off-line training is performed. Instead, a neural network is used in real time to adaptively command the actuator deflections thus reducing vibrations. Closed loop experimental tests with piezo actuated scale rotor systems were conducted on the University of Maryland hover test stand. The results include two different Mach scale smart rotor systems (trailing edge flaps and active tip twist) that were controlled by the same adaptive neurocontrol algorithm. These tests demonstrate the controller's robust ability to successfully learn to control the rotor vibrations with no a priori information about the blade/actuator structure or the aerodynamic loading.

  1. Cloud Observation and Modeling Test Bed for Air Force Weather Applications: Overview and First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobis, T. E.

    2012-12-01

    Air Force Weather (AFW) has documented requirements for real-time cloud analysis and short range cloud forecasts to support DoD missions around the world. To meet these needs, AFW utilizes the Cloud Depiction and Forecast System (CDFS) II system to develop a hourly cloud analysis and short range forecast. The system creates cloud masks from 16 different satellite sources and optimally merges them to create the analysis. This analysis then forms the initialization field for a short range 'advective' based cloud forecast. Northrop Grumman Corp. has recently delivered a CDFS II based Cloud Model Test Bed. This system offers the ability to test several aspects of the CDFS II system including: the effect of adding and subtracting sources of cloud imagery, the effect of changing source and skill of required external data sources, and the impact of changing the cloud information merge process among the various sources. In addition, the test bed offers a capability to generate a robust cloud modeling baseline against which to measure progress of a next generation Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) based advanced data assimilation system. Finally, the test bed allows the development and testing of new cloud modeling validation techniques (and sources) to provide greater confidence in results generated from the test bed. This presentation will provide a basic overview of the CDFS II system and of the newly developed Test Bed and will include results from the first series of experiments conducted using the Test Bed.

  2. Correlating Flammability of Materials with FTIR Analysis Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Robin; Whitfield, Steve

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to correlate flammability data with FTIR test results. Kydex 100 is a blend of chlorinated polyvinyl chloride and polymethylmethacrylate, with some filler materials. Samples supplied were 0.125 in. thick. 10 samples were taken from a sheet of Kydex and analyzed for flammability and by FTIR spectroscopy. This material was utilized as a round robin sample for flammability testing. The flammability test results were found to vary across the same sheet.

  3. China Energy Efficiency Round Robin Testing Results for Room

    E-print Network

    LBNL-3502E China Energy Efficiency Round Robin Testing Results for Room Air Conditioners Nan Zhou Round Robin Testing Results and Analysis by China National Institute of Standardization..................................................................................................................... 1 I.1.1 China's Energy Constraint Problem and the Need to Improve the Energy Efficiency of Energy

  4. Uncertainties in the Item Parameter Estimates and Robust Automated Test Assembly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veldkamp, Bernard P.; Matteucci, Mariagiulia; de Jong, Martijn G.

    2013-01-01

    Item response theory parameters have to be estimated, and because of the estimation process, they do have uncertainty in them. In most large-scale testing programs, the parameters are stored in item banks, and automated test assembly algorithms are applied to assemble operational test forms. These algorithms treat item parameters as fixed values,…

  5. Trend Tests for Case-Control Studies of Genetic Markers: Power, Sample Size and Robustness

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Boris Freidlin; Gang Zheng; Zhaohai Li; Joseph L. Gastwirth

    2002-01-01

    The Cochran-Armitage trend test is commonly used as a genotype-based test for candidate gene association. Corresponding to each underlying genetic model there is a particular set of scores assigned to the genotypes that maximizes its power. When the variance of the test statistic is known, the formulas for approximate power and associated sample size are readily obtained. In practice, however,

  6. Research on Speed Robustness for Airborne Hydraulic Pump in the Circular Stress Accelerated Life Test

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yong Sang; Zhanlin Wang

    2009-01-01

    According to the theory of the accelerated life test, a new accelerated life testing stand for airborne hydraulic pump has been developed recently. During the testing under the circular stress, speed character of the airborne hydraulic pump accompanied with vibration and noise of the gear box has become worse because gear backlash that often leads to collision in gear transmission

  7. Ground Based Test Results for Broad Band LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heaps, W. S.; Georgieva, E.; Huang, W.; Baldauf, B.; McComb, T.

    2010-12-01

    Our team of personnel from Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems (NGAS) and Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is developing two new lidar systems for column CO2 measurement based on an innovative new lidar technique using a Fabry-Perot based detector and a broadband laser source which replaces the narrow band laser commonly used. Our lidar is capable of mitigating inaccuracy associated with atmospherically induced variations in CO2 absorption line shape and strength and reduces the number of individual different wavelength lasers required from three or more to only one.It also reduces the requirement for source wavelength stability, instead putting this responsibility on the Fabry-Perot based receiver. There is a great need for measurements of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration with high spatial and temporal resolution for global and regional studies of the carbon cycle. Such measurements will better resolve the linkage between global warming and anthropogenic CO2 emissions. In the Decadal Survey of Earth Science the National Research Council recommended that NASA develop, build, and fly a laser based system for precision measurement of total carbon dioxide column (the ASCENDS mission). The mission demands measurements of CO2 to a precision of 1 ppm out of the total ~400 ppm column in order to locate sources and sinks. Achieving this 400:1 precision is made more difficult due to the strong dependence on changes in atmospheric pressure and temperature of atmospheric carbon dioxide absorption line position, shape, and strength. Most lidar systems currently under development for remote sensing of atmospheric CO2 require multiple lasers operating at different, very narrow bandwidth wavelengths in order to resolve these effects. Our approach requires only a single laser and the wavelength stability requirements are much less stringent than those for the multiple laser approaches. Since 2007 GSFC has been developing a lidar using their broadband detection scheme and a 1.57 ?m superluminescent light emitting diode (SLED) amplified by an optical parametric amplifier (OPA). In 2008 NGAS, leveraging expertise in thulium (Tm) fiber laser systems and recognizing the merit of the broadband approach, suggested a partnership with GSFC to develop a broadband lidar operating at 2.05 ?m. Such a system takes advantage of the broad Tm-fiber gain spectrum and the inherent mechanical robustness, compact size, simple power scalability, efficiency and high beam quality offered by fiber lasers. In early 2010 NGAS completed development of a laboratory level, highly efficient, Tm-fiber laser that produces a specially formatted pulsed broadband output around 2.05 ?m, a spectral region where CO2 has strong atmospheric absorption features. NGAS has loaned this tunable 2.05 ?m laser to GSFC which had concurrently developed a 2.05 ?m lidar sensor/receiver. In May 2010 the two systems were tested together to provide proof of concept of 2.05 µm broadband detection of CO2. This presentation will present results of ground based testing of the 1.57 ?m and the 2.05 ?m systems and discuss their potential application as space borne sensors for the ASCENDS mission.

  8. Three principal results from recent Fenton Hill flow testing

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); DuTeaux, R. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Results of recent flow testing at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, have been examined in light of their applicability to the development of commercial-scale hot dry rock (HDR) reservoirs at other sites. These test results, obtained during the cumulative 11 months of reservoir flow testing between 1992 and 1995, show that there was no significant production temperature drawdown during this time and that the reservoir flow became more dispersed as flow testing proceeded. Based on these test results together with previous HDR research at Fenton Hill and elsewhere, it is concluded that a three-well geometry, with one centrally located injection well and two production wells -- one at each end of the pressure-stimulated reservoir region -- would provide a much more productive system for future HDR development than the two-well system tested at Fenton Hill.

  9. NASA Fastrac Engine Gas Generator Component Test Program and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Henry J., Jr.; Sanders, Tim; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This presentation consists of viewgraph which review the test program and the results of the tests for the Gas Generator (GG) component for the Fastrac Engine. Included are pictures of the Fastrac (MC-1) Engine and the GG, diagrams of the flight configuration, and schematics of the LOX, and the RP-1 systems and the injector assembly. The normal operating parameters are reviewed, as are the test instrumentation. Also shown are graphs of the hot gas temperature, and the test temperature profiles. The results are summarized.

  10. Cold vacuum drying proof of performance (first article testing) test results

    SciTech Connect

    MCCRACKEN, K.J.

    1999-06-23

    This report presents and details the test results of the first of a kind process referred to as Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD). The test results are compiled from several months of testing of the first process equipment skid and ancillary components to de-water and dry Multi-Canister Overpacks (MCO) filled with Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF). The tests results provide design verifications, equipment validations, model validation data, and establish process parameters.

  11. RF Test Results from Cryomodule 1 at the Fermilab SRF Beam Test Facility

    E-print Network

    Harms, E; Chase, B; Cullerton, E; Hocker, A; Jensen, C; Joireman, P; Klebaner, A; Kubicki, T; Kucera, M; Legan, A; Leibfritz, J; Martinez, A; McGee, M; Nagaitsev, S; Nezhevenko, O; Nicklaus, D; Pfeffer, H; Pischalnikov, Y; Prieto, P; Reid, J; Schappert, W; Tupikov, V; Varghese, P; Branlard, J

    2012-01-01

    Powered operation of Cryomodule 1 (CM-1) at the Fermilab SRF Beam Test Facility began in late 2010. Since then a series of tests first on the eight individual cavities and then the full cryomodule have been performed. We report on the results of these tests and lessons learned which will have an impact on future module testing at Fermilab.

  12. LIMESTONE WET-SCRUBBING TEST RESULTS AT THE EPA ALKALI SCRUBBING TEST FACILITY. CAPSULE REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This capsule report discusses the highlights of the first detailed engineering progress report. It describes the test facility and test program and presents results to date of the limestone wet-scrubbing testing. In addition, the realiability and operability of the test facility ...

  13. Multilevel Factor Analysis by Model Segregation: New Applications for Robust Test Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schweig, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Measures of classroom environments have become central to policy efforts that assess school and teacher quality. This has sparked a wide interest in using multilevel factor analysis to test measurement hypotheses about classroom-level variables. One approach partitions the total covariance matrix and tests models separately on the…

  14. Preliminary Results from the QuietSpike Flight Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haering, Edward A., Jr.; Cliatt, Larry J., II; Howe, Don; Waithe, Kenrick

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the QuietSpike flight test results. It shows the previous tests from Nearfield probes. The presentation then reviews the approach to test the QuietSpike, and shows graphics of the positions of the test vehicles. It also shows the components of the Sonic Boom Probing Noseboom. A graph of the Pressure Over- Under-shoot (Shaped Sonic Boom Demonstration (SSBD)Data) is presented. It reviews the Shock Probing Orientations, explaining that the probing plane is always behind the tail of the QuietSpike jet. Graphs of the Shock Position Geometry (SSBD Data) and the QuietSpike signature as of the test on 12/13/06, Near-Field Probing Directly Under the QuietSpike jet, and Near-Field Probing to Side, Near-Field Probing Above and to Side. Several slides review the Computational Fluid Dynamic models, and results compared to the probe tests.

  15. Physical and chemical test results of electrostatic safe flooring materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gompf, R. H.

    1988-01-01

    This test program was initiated because a need existed at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) to have this information readily available to the engineer who must make the choice of which electrostatic safe floor to use in a specific application. The information, however, should be of value throughout both the government and private industry in the selection of a floor covering material. Included are the test results of 18 floor covering materials which by test evaluation at KSC are considered electrostatically safe. Tests were done and/or the data compiled in the following areas: electrostatics, flammability, hypergolic compatibility, outgassing, floor type, material thickness, and available colors. Each section contains the test method used to gather the data and the test results.

  16. The right not to know HIV-test results.

    PubMed

    Temmerman, M; Ndinya-Achola, J; Ambani, J; Piot, P

    1995-04-15

    Large numbers of pregnant women in Africa have been invited to participate in studies on HIV infection. Study protocols adhere to guidelines on voluntary participation after pre-test and post-test counselling and informed consent; nevertheless, women may consent because they have been asked to do so without fully understanding the implications of being tested for HIV. Our studies in Nairobi, Kenya, show that most women tested after giving informed consent did not actively request their results, less than one third informed their partner, and violence against women because of a positive HIV-antibody test was common. It is important to have carefully designed protocols weighing the benefits against the potential harms for women participating in a study. Even after having consented to HIV testing, women should have the right not to be told their result. PMID:7619122

  17. Test Results of a Nb3Sn Wind/React"Stress-Managed" Block Dipole

    SciTech Connect

    McInturff, A.; Blackburn, R.; Diaczenko, N.; Elliott, T.; Henchel, W.; Jaisle, A.; McIntyre, P.; Noyes, P.; Sattarov, A.; Lietzke, A.; Hafalia Jr., R.; Lau, W.; Nyman, M.; Bish, P.

    2007-06-01

    A second phase of a high field dipole technology development has been tested. A Nb{sub 3}Sn block-coil model dipole was fabricated, using magnetic mirror geometry and wind/react coil technology. The primary objective of this phase was to make a first experimental test of the stress-management strategy pioneered at Texas A&M. In this strategy a high-strength support matrix is integrated with the windings to intercept Lorentz stress from the inner winding so that it does not accumulate in the outer winding. The magnet attained a field that was consistent with short sample limit on the first quench; there was no training. The decoupling of Lorentz stress between inner and outer windings was validated. In ramp rate studies the magnet exhibited a remarkable robustness in rapid ramping operation. It reached 85% of short sample(ss) current even while ramping 2-3 T/s. This robustness is attributed to the orientation of the Rutherford cables parallel to the field in the windings, instead of the transverse orientation that characterizes common dipole designs. Test results are presented and the next development phase plans are discussed.

  18. Small Projects Rapid Integration and Test Environment (SPRITE): Application for Increasing Robustness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rakoczy, John; Heater, Daniel; Lee, Ashley

    2013-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Small Projects Rapid Integration and Test Environment (SPRITE) is a Hardware-In-The-Loop (HWIL) facility that provides rapid development, integration, and testing capabilities for small projects (CubeSats, payloads, spacecraft, and launch vehicles). This facility environment focuses on efficient processes and modular design to support rapid prototyping, integration, testing and verification of small projects at an affordable cost, especially compared to larger type HWIL facilities. SPRITE (Figure 1) consists of a "core" capability or "plant" simulation platform utilizing a graphical programming environment capable of being rapidly re-configured for any potential test article's space environments, as well as a standard set of interfaces (i.e. Mil-Std 1553, Serial, Analog, Digital, etc.). SPRITE also allows this level of interface testing of components and subsystems very early in a program, thereby reducing program risk.

  19. 2007 Toyota Camry-6330 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler Gray; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing hybrid electric vehicles batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and battery testing results for the 2007 Toyota Camry hybrid electric vehicle (Vin Number JTNBB46K673006330). Testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation. The AVTA is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation conduct AVTA for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  20. 2007 Nissan Altima-2351 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler Gray; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing the HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on-road accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and the battery testing results for the 2007 Nissan Altima HEV, number 2351 (VIN 1N4CL21E87C172351). The battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation (eTec). The Idaho National Laboratory and eTec conduct the AVTA for DOE’s Vehicle Technologies Program.

  1. Results of the Centralia underground coal gasification field test

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, R.W.; Thorsness, C.B.; Cena, R.J.; Stephens, D.R.

    1984-08-01

    The Centralia Partial Seam CRIP (PSC) test described herein is the second test conducted at this site. The first test was done in the fall and winter of 1981 to 1982 when the Large Block (LBK) tests were successfully completed at the Centralia, Washington site. The LBK tests consisted of five small scale experiments in which approximately 900 to 1800 cubic feet (25 to 50 cubic meters) of coal were affected in each test. The LBK tests indicated that the Centralia site was a reasonable candidate for UCG. The PSC test was then conceived along with a third test, the Full Seam CRIP test, to provide the technical data needed to further evaluate the economic potential of UCG at the Centralia site, as well as enhance our general knowledge concerning the UCG process. The PSC test represents a 20 to 30 fold increase in scale over the LBK tests with the full-seam test representing another five fold increase in size. This series of three tests have become known as the Tono Basin Tests. During the active gasification phase, which lasted 30 days, 1400 cubic meters (2000 tons) of coal were affected. The test utilized primarily steam and oxygen as the injected reactants. Three distinct periods of gasification were observed. The initial period in which the vertical production well was in use which yielded a typical dry gas heating value of 219 kJ/mol (248 Btu/scf). This period was followed by a period of considerably higher gas quality, 261 kJ/mol (296 Btu/scf), which resulted from the switch to the slant production well and the CRIP maneuver. The final period began when a large-scale underground roof fall occurred and the typical dry gas heating value fell to 194 kJ/mol (220 Btu/scf). 7 references, 11 figures, 3 tables.

  2. Statistical analysis of Salmonella test data and comparison to results of animal cancer tests

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joyce McCann; L SWIRSKYGOLD; Laura Horn; R. McGill; T. E. Graedel; John Kaldor

    1988-01-01

    Summary A quantitative framework for the analysis of results of the Salmonella (Ames) test is presented, and the relationship between mutagenesis and carcinogenesis is examined. Color graphics are used for the Salmonella data to describe variability, and trends across multiple chemicals and test conditions. Positivity in the Salmonella test, using statistical criteria to classify results, is compared to positivity in

  3. Advanced Stirling Convertor Dynamic Test Approach and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meer, David W.; Hill, Dennis; Ursic, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Lockheed Martin (LM), and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) have been developing the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) for use as a power system for space science missions. As part of the extended operation testing of this power system, the Advanced Stirling Converters (ASC) at NASA John H. Glenn Research Center undergo a vibration test sequence intended to simulate the vibration history of an ASC used in an ASRG for a space mission. This sequence includes testing at Workmanship and Flight Acceptance levels interspersed with periods of extended operation to simulate pre and post fueling. The final step in the test sequence utilizes additional testing at Flight Acceptance levels to simulate launch. To better replicate the acceleration profile seen by an ASC incorporated into an ASRG, the input spectra used in testing the convertors was modified based on dynamic testing of the ASRG Engineering Unit ( ASRG-EU) at Lockheed Martin. This paper presents the vibration test plan for current and future ASC units, including the modified input spectra, and the results of recent tests using these spectra. The test results include data from several accelerometers mounted on the convertors as well as the piston position and output power variables.

  4. EVALUATION OF THE EFFICIENCY OF INDUSTRIAL FLARES: TEST RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of Phases 3 and 4 of a four-phase research program to quantify emissions from, and efficiencies of, industrial flares. Phase 1 consisted of the experimental design; Phase 2, the design of the test facilities; Phase 3, development of the test facilities; a...

  5. RTG performance on Galileo and Ulysses and Cassini test results

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, C. Edward; Klee, Paul M. [Lockheed Martin Corporation P.O. Box 8555, 29B41-KB, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19101 (United States)

    1997-01-10

    Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Similar comparisons are made for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995. Also presented are test results from small scale thermoelectric modules and full scale converters performed for the Cassini program. The Cassini mission to Saturn is scheduled for an October 1997 launch. Small scale module test results on thermoelectric couples from the qualification and flight production runs are shown. These tests have exceeded 19,000 hours are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. Test results are presented for full scale units both ETGs (E-6, E-7) and RTGs (F-2, F-5) along with mission power predictions. F-5, fueled in 1985, served as a spare for the Galileo and Ulysses missions and plays the same role in the Cassini program. It has successfully completed all acceptance testing. The ten years storage between thermal vacuum tests is the longest ever experienced by an RTG. The data from this test are unique in providing the effects of long term low temperature storage on power output. All ETG and RTG test results to date indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of at least five percent are predicted.

  6. RTG performance on Galileo and Ulysses and Cassini test results

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, C.E.; Klee, P.M. [Lockheed Martin Corporation P.O. Box 8555, 29B41-KB, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania19101 (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Similar comparisons are made for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995. Also presented are test results from small scale thermoelectric modules and full scale converters performed for the Cassini program. The Cassini mission to Saturn is scheduled for an October 1997 launch. Small scale module test results on thermoelectric couples from the qualification and flight production runs are shown. These tests have exceeded 19,000 hours are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. Test results are presented for full scale units both ETGs (E-6, E-7) and RTGs (F-2, F-5) along with mission power predictions. F-5, fueled in 1985, served as a spare for the Galileo and Ulysses missions and plays the same role in the Cassini program. It has successfully completed all acceptance testing. The ten years storage between thermal vacuum tests is the longest ever experienced by an RTG. The data from this test are unique in providing the effects of long term low temperature storage on power output. All ETG and RTG test results to date indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of at least five percent are predicted. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Results of field tests of a transportable calorimeter assay system

    SciTech Connect

    Rakel, D.A.; Lemming, J.F.; Rodenburg, W.W.; Duff, M.F.; Jarvis, J.Y.

    1981-01-01

    A transportable calorimetric assay system, developed for use by US Department of Energy inspectors, is described. The results of field tests at three DOE sites are presented. The samples measured in these tests represent a variety of forms (ash, oxide, metal buttons), isotopic composition, and total plutonium content.

  8. Results of an integrated water recovery system test

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Pickering; G. Pariani; M. Campbell; B. Finger; C. Verostko; K. Wines

    2002-01-01

    The results of an integrated advanced water recovery system test are presented. The test evaluated the ability of the system to recover potable water from human generated wastewater. Primary processing was performed by a biological water processor (BWP), which included microbial organic carbon oxidation and nitrification. The majority of inorganic contaminant removal was accomplished with reverse osmosis (RO). Water from

  9. Documenting and Explaining Major Field Test Results among Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Contreras, Salvador; Badua, Frank; Chen, Jiun Shiu; Adrian, Mitchell

    2011-01-01

    The authors investigated the results of the Educational Testing Service Major Field Test (ETS-MFT) administered to business majors at a U.S. state university. Longitudinal trends and cross-sectional differences are documented, including significant performance differences among students of different majors. Findings suggest that a cohort affect…

  10. Results of residential air conditioner testing in WECC

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. M. Gaikwad; R. J. Bravo; D. Kosterev; S. Yang; A. Maitra; P. Pourbeik; B. Agrawal; R. Yinger; D. Brooks

    2008-01-01

    This paper summarizes the key results of testing work performed by three organizations (EPRI, SCE, and BPA) on a total of twenty seven air conditioning units in order to better understand and thus characterize their behavior for power system simulations. The diversity of the tested air conditioner units included sizes (tonnage), compressor technology (reciprocating and scroll), type of refrigerant (R-22

  11. 49 CFR 229.313 - Product testing results and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...subpart. Results of product testing conducted by a vendor or private equipment owner in support of a SA shall be provided to the railroad as part of the SA. (b) The testing records shall contain all of the following: (1) The name of the...

  12. 49 CFR 229.313 - Product testing results and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...subpart. Results of product testing conducted by a vendor or private equipment owner in support of a SA shall be provided to the railroad as part of the SA. (b) The testing records shall contain all of the following: (1) The name of the...

  13. 49 CFR 229.313 - Product testing results and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...subpart. Results of product testing conducted by a vendor or private equipment owner in support of a SA shall be provided to the railroad as part of the SA. (b) The testing records shall contain all of the following: (1) The name of the...

  14. Test results for SEU and SEL immune memory circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiseman, D.; Canaris, J.; Whitaker, S.; Gambles, J.; Arave, K.; Arave, L.

    1993-01-01

    Test results for three SEU logic/circuit hardened CMOS memory circuits verify upset and latch-up immunity for two configurations to be in excess of 120 MeV cm(exp 2)/mg using a commercial, non-radiation hardened CMOS process. Test chips from three separate fabrication runs in two different process were evaluated.

  15. Test results of the STI GPS time transfer receiver

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. L. Hall; J. Handlan; P. Wheeler

    1983-01-01

    Global time transfer, or synchronization, between a user clock and USNO UTC time can be performed using the Global Positioning System (GPS), and commercially available time transfer receivers. This paper presents the test results of time transfer using the GPS system and a Stanford Telecommunications, Inc. (STI) Time Transfer System (TTS) Model 502. Tests at the GPS Master Control Site

  16. Diagnostic inferences of brain lesions based on psychological test results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ralph M. Reitan

    1966-01-01

    Although formal study of the psychological consequences of cerebral lesions in human beings has a long and rich history, attempts to draw diagnostic inferences concerning disease or damage of the brain from psychological test results represent a relatively recent effort. The recent history of psychology has seen the introduction of a number of tests and procedures explicitly intended for diagnosis

  17. Robust cosmological bounds on neutrinos and their combination with oscillation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Garcia, M. C.; Maltoni, Michele; Salvado, Jordi

    2010-08-01

    We perform a global analysis of cosmological observables in generalized cosmologies which depart from ?CDM models by allowing non-vanishing curvature ? k 6= 0, dark energy with equation of state with ? ? -1, the presence of additional relativistic degrees of freedom ? N rel, and neutrino masses ??= 0. By combining the data from cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments (in particular the latest results from WMAP-7), the present day Hubble constant (H0) measurement, the high-redshift Type-I supernovae (SN) results and the information from large scale structure (LSS) surveys, we determine the parameters in the 10-dimensional parameter space for such models. We present the results from the analysis when the full shape information from the LSS matter power spectrum (LSSPS) is included versus when only the corresponding distance measurement from the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) is accounted for. We compare the bounds on the neutrino mass scale in these generalized scenarios with those obtained for the 6+1 parameter analysis in ?CDM + m ? models and we also study the dependence of those on the set of observables included in the analysis. Finally we combine these results with the information on neutrino mass differences and mixing from the global analysis of neutrino oscillation experiments and derive the presently allowed ranges for the two laboratory probes of the absolute scale of neutrino mass: the effective electron neutrino mass in single beta decay and the effective Majorana neutrino mass in neutrinoless ?? decay.

  18. Compendium of Test Results of Recent Single Event Effect Tests Conducted by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClure, Steven S.; Allen, Gregory R.; Irom, Farokh; Scheick, Leif Z.; Adell, Philippe C.; Miyahira, Tetsuo F.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports heavy ion and proton-induced single event effect (SEE) results from recent tests for a variety of microelectronic devices. The compendium covers devices tested over the last two years by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  19. Evaluation of the robustness of the fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas, larval survival and growth test, U.S. EPA method 1000.0

    SciTech Connect

    Pickering, Q.H.; Lazorchak, J.M. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States). Environmental Monitoring Systems Lab.

    1995-04-01

    An intralaboratory study was conducted to evaluate the robustness of the Fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) Larval Survival and Growth Test, Method 1000.0. Toxicity tests were conducted with the reference toxicants hexavalent chromium (Cr{sup 6+}) and copper (Cu), and the data were statistically analyzed using hypothesis testing. Differences in age, size, feeding regimes, and water quality did not cause more than a twofold difference in 13 subchronic values (SCVs) for Cr{sup 6+}. These tests involved side-by-side tests initiated with 1-, 4-, and 7-d larvae or initiated with 1-d larvae and two size groups of 4-d larvae fed differently. The mean SCV was 3,600 {mu}g Cr{sup 6+}/L, and the values ranged from 2,100 to 4,200 {mu}g Cr{sup 6+}/L. Eleven of these tests with a homogeneous variance gave an average minimum significant difference (MSD) of 14.3%. The no-observed-effect concentration (NOEC) for growth was always lower than the effect on survival. In the side-by-side tests with 1-, 4-, and 7-d larvae exposed in hard water the SCV was 35 {mu}g Cu/L for each age group. Except for one test with Cu in soft water, the effects of Cr{sup 6+} and Cu on growth were more sensitive than the effect on survival. These toxicity tests along with some nontoxicant studies indicated that reasonable differences in methods parameters did not cause any changes greater than a factor or two in analytical results despite the noise of biological variability.

  20. EVALUATION OF THE ROBUSTNESS OF THE FATHEAD MINNOW, PIMEPHALES PROMELAS, LARVAL SURVIVAL AND GROWTH TEST, U.S. EPA METHOD 1000.0

    EPA Science Inventory

    An intralaboratory study was conducted to evaluate the robustness of the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas) Larval Survival and Growth Test, Method 1000.0 Toxicity tests were conducted with the reference toxicants hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) and copper (Cu), and the data were st...

  1. 40 CFR 211.212-5 - Reporting of test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING Hearing Protective Devices § 211.212-5 Reporting of test results...of publication; however, the requirements will remain in effect if the Administrator is taking appropriate steps to...

  2. 49 CFR 199.109 - Review of drug testing results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...The MRO must report all drug test results to the operator...operator, by a substance abuse professional under contract...ensure that a substance abuse professional, who determines...resolving problems with drug abuse, does not refer the...

  3. 49 CFR 199.109 - Review of drug testing results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...The MRO must report all drug test results to the operator...operator, by a substance abuse professional under contract...ensure that a substance abuse professional, who determines...resolving problems with drug abuse, does not refer the...

  4. Fast and robust segmentation of solar EUV images: algorithm and results for solar cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barra, V.; Delouille, V.; Kretzschmar, M.; Hochedez, J.-F.

    2009-10-01

    Context: The study of the variability of the solar corona and the monitoring of coronal holes, quiet sun and active regions are of great importance in astrophysics as well as for space weather and space climate applications. Aims: In a previous work, we presented the spatial possibilistic clustering algorithm (SPoCA). This is a multi-channel unsupervised spatially-constrained fuzzy clustering method that automatically segments solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images into regions of interest. The results we reported on SoHO-EIT images taken from February 1997 to May 2005 were consistent with previous knowledge in terms of both areas and intensity estimations. However, they presented some artifacts due to the method itself. Methods: Herein, we propose a new algorithm, based on SPoCA, that removes these artifacts. We focus on two points: the definition of an optimal clustering with respect to the regions of interest, and the accurate definition of the cluster edges. We moreover propose methodological extensions to this method, and we illustrate these extensions with the automatic tracking of active regions. Results: The much improved algorithm can decompose the whole set of EIT solar images over the 23rd solar cycle into regions that can clearly be identified as quiet sun, coronal hole and active region. The variations of the parameters resulting from the segmentation, i.e. the area, mean intensity, and relative contribution to the solar irradiance, are consistent with previous results and thus validate the decomposition. Furthermore, we find indications for a small variation of the mean intensity of each region in correlation with the solar cycle. Conclusions: The method is generic enough to allow the introduction of other channels or data. New applications are now expected, e.g. related to SDO-AIA data.

  5. Preliminary results of steel containment vessel model test

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, T.; Komine, K.; Arai, S. [Nuclear Power Engineering Corp., Tokyo (Japan)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    A high pressure test of a mixed-scaled model (1:10 in geometry and 1:4 in shell thickness) of a steel containment vessel (SCV), representing an improved boiling water reactor (BWR) Mark II containment, was conducted on December 11-12, 1996 at Sandia National Laboratories. This paper describes the preliminary results of the high pressure test. In addition, the preliminary post-test measurement data and the preliminary comparison of test data with pretest analysis predictions are also presented.

  6. Results of no-flow rotary drill bit comparison testing

    SciTech Connect

    WITWER, K.S.

    1998-11-30

    This document describes the results of testing of a newer rotary sampling bit and sampler insert called the No-Flow System. This No-Flow System was tested side by side against the currently used rotary bit and sampler insert, called the Standard System. The two systems were tested using several ''hard to sample'' granular non-hazardous simulants to determine which could provide greater sample recovery. The No-Flow System measurably outperformed the Standard System in each of the tested simulants.

  7. NNWSI Phase II materials interaction test procedure and preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, J.K.; Gerding, T.J.

    1985-01-01

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) project is investigating the volcanic tuff beds of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a potential location for a high-level radioactive waste repository. This report describes a test method (Phase II) that has been developed to measure the release of radionuclides from the waste package under simulated repository conditions, and provides information on materials interactions that may occur in the repository. The results of 13 weeks of testing using the method are presented, and an analog test is described that investigates the relationship between the test method and expected repository conditions. 9 references, 10 figures, 11 tables.

  8. Structural fatigue test results for large wind turbine blade sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faddoul, J. R.; Sullivan, T. L.

    1982-01-01

    In order to provide quantitative information on the operating life capabilities of wind turbine rotor blade concepts for root-end load transfer, a series of cantilever beam fatigue tests was conducted. Fatigue tests were conducted on a laminated wood blade with bonded steel studs, a low cost steel spar (utility pole) with a welded flange, a utility pole with additional root-end thickness provided by a swaged collar, fiberglass spars with both bonded and nonbonded fittings, and, finally, an aluminum blade with a bolted steel fitting (Lockheed Mod-0 blade). Photographs, data, and conclusions for each of these tests are presented. In addition, the aluminum blade test results are compared to field failure information; these results provide evidence that the cantilever beam type of fatigue test is a satisfactory method for obtaining qualitative data on blade life expectancy and for identifying structurally underdesigned areas (hot spots).

  9. Results from the Astronomy Diagnostic Test National Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deming, G. L.

    2001-12-01

    During 2000 and 2001, the validity and reliability of the Astronomy Diagnostic Test Version 2.0 (ADT 2.0) were formally investigated through the Astronomy Diagnostic Test National Project. The ADT 2.0 was administered as a pre-test to 5346 students and as a post-test to 3842 students. Student test results were collected from 97 classes that ranged in size from 4 to 320 students with 30 states represented. The 68 professors participating in the ADT National Project taught classes at universities (54%), 4-year colleges (27%), and 2-year colleges (19%). The database was analyzed for reliability at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education. A pre-test value for Cronbach's alpha of 0.65 and post-test value of 0.76 demonstrate an acceptable degree of internal consistency. The average score for the 44 participating professors who completed the ADT as experts was 98%. Face and content validity were established by combining results from the experts with feedback from 60 student interviews. Student results from the National Project yielded an average score of 32.4% for the pre-test and 47.3% for the post-test. There is a gender discrepancy in favor of males that persists in both the pre-test (11% points) and the post-test (12% points) scores. The variations across geographic distribution and institution types were not significant. In addition to the 21 content items, the ADT 2.0 has 12 student background questions enabling instructors to have a better understanding of who takes introductory astronomy. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation through grants REC-0089239 (GD) and DGE-9714489 (BH).

  10. Low Emissions RQL Flametube Combustor Component Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, James D.; Chang, Clarence T.

    2001-01-01

    This report describes and summarizes elements of the High Speed Research (HSR) Low Emissions Rich burn/Quick mix/Lean burn (RQL) flame tube combustor test program. This test program was performed at NASA Glenn Research Center circa 1992. The overall objective of this test program was to demonstrate and evaluate the capability of the RQL combustor concept for High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) applications with the goal of achieving NOx emission index levels of 5 g/kg-fuel at representative HSCT supersonic cruise conditions. The specific objectives of the tests reported herein were to investigate component performance of the RQL combustor concept for use in the evolution of ultra-low NOx combustor design tools. Test results indicated that the RQL combustor emissions and performance at simulated supersonic cruise conditions were predominantly sensitive to the quick mixer subcomponent performance and not sensitive to fuel injector performance. Test results also indicated the mixing section configuration employing a single row of circular holes was the lowest NOx mixer tested probably due to the initial fast mixing characteristics of this mixing section. However, other quick mix orifice configurations such as the slanted slot mixer produced substantially lower levels of carbon monoxide emissions most likely due to the enhanced circumferential dispersion of the air addition. Test results also suggested that an optimum momentum-flux ratio exists for a given quick mix configuration. This would cause undesirable jet under- or over-penetration for test conditions with momentum-flux ratios below or above the optimum value. Tests conducted to assess the effect of quick mix flow area indicated that reduction in the quick mix flow area produced lower NOx emissions at reduced residence time, but this had no effect on NOx emissions measured at similar residence time for the configurations tested.

  11. Reliability of simulated robustness testing in fast liquid chromatography, using state-of-the-art column technology, instrumentation and modelling software.

    PubMed

    Kormány, Róbert; Fekete, Jen?; Guillarme, Davy; Fekete, Szabolcs

    2014-02-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of simulated robustness testing using commercial modelling software (DryLab) and state-of-the-art stationary phases. For this purpose, a mixture of amlodipine and its seven related impurities was analyzed on short narrow bore columns (50×2.1mm, packed with sub-2?m particles) providing short analysis times. The performance of commercial modelling software for robustness testing was systematically compared to experimental measurements and DoE based predictions. We have demonstrated that the reliability of predictions was good, since the predicted retention times and resolutions were in good agreement with the experimental ones at the edges of the design space. In average, the retention time relative errors were <1.0%, while the predicted critical resolution errors were comprised between 6.9 and 17.2%. Because the simulated robustness testing requires significantly less experimental work than the DoE based predictions, we think that robustness could now be investigated in the early stage of method development. Moreover, the column interchangeability, which is also an important part of robustness testing, was investigated considering five different C8 and C18 columns packed with sub-2?m particles. Again, thanks to modelling software, we proved that the separation was feasible on all columns within the same analysis time (less than 4min), by proper adjustments of variables. PMID:24252726

  12. Robust tracking control of a magnetically suspended rigid body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Kyong B.; Cox, David E.

    1994-01-01

    This study is an application of H-infinity and micro-synthesis for designing robust tracking controllers for the Large Angle Magnetic Suspension Test Facility. The modeling, design, analysis, simulation, and testing of a control law that guarantees tracking performance under external disturbances and model uncertainties is investigated. The type of uncertainties considered and the tracking performance metric used is discussed. This study demonstrates the tradeoff between tracking performance at low frequencies and robustness at high frequencies. Two sets of controllers were designed and tested. The first set emphasized performance over robustness, while the second set traded off performance for robustness. Comparisons of simulation and test results are also included. Current simulation and experimental results indicate that reasonably good robust tracking performance can be attained for this system using multivariable robust control approach.

  13. Data-Division-Specific Robustness and Power of Randomization Tests for ABAB Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manolov, Rumen; Solanas, Antonio; Bulte, Isis; Onghena, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    This study deals with the statistical properties of a randomization test applied to an ABAB design in cases where the desirable random assignment of the points of change in phase is not possible. To obtain information about each possible data division, the authors carried out a conditional Monte Carlo simulation with 100,000 samples for each…

  14. Noise robust voice activity detection using normal probability testing and time-domain histogram analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Houman Ghaemmaghami; David Dean; Sridha Sridharan; Iain McCowan

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a method of voice activity detection (VAD) suitable for high noise scenarios, based on the fusion of two complementary systems. The first system uses a proposed non-Gaussianity score (NGS) feature based on normal probability testing. The second system employs a histogram distance score (HDS) feature that detects changes in the signal through conducting a template-based similarity measure

  15. Robust Tests of the Lower Partial Moment Asset Pricing Model in Emerging Markets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Javed Iqbal; Robert D. Brooks; Don U. A. Galagedera

    2007-01-01

    This paper tests and compares the CAPM of Black (1972) and the Mean Lower Partial Moment (MLPM) Capital Asset Pricing Model of Bawa and Lindenberg (1977) and Harlow and Rao (1989) in the context of emerging markets. It is well known that returns in emerging markets are non-normal and have greater predictability than in the developed markets. Considering these stylized

  16. A Robust Strategy for Total Ionizing Dose Testing of Field Programmable Gate Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Edward; Berg, Melanie; Friendlich, Mark; Lakeman, Joseph; KIm, Hak; Pellish, Jonathan; LaBel, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel method of FPGA TID testing that measures propagation delay between flip-flops operating at maximum speed. Measurement is performed on-chip at-speed and provides a key design metric when building system-critical synchronous designs.

  17. Uprated OMS Engine Status-Sea Level Testing Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertolino, J. D.; Boyd, W. C.

    1990-01-01

    The current Space Shuttle Orbital Maneuvering Engine (OME) is pressure fed, utilizing storable propellants. Performance uprating of this engine, through the use of a gas generator driven turbopump to increase operating pressure, is being pursued by the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). Component level design, fabrication, and test activities for this engine system have been on-going since 1984. More recently, a complete engine designated the Integrated Component Test Bed (ICTB), was tested at sea level conditions by Aerojet. A description of the test hardware and results of the sea level test program are presented. These results, which include the test condition operating envelope and projected performance at altitude conditions, confirm the capability of the selected Uprated OME (UOME) configuration to meet or exceed performance and operational requirements. Engine flexibility, demonstrated through testing at two different operational mixture ratios, along with a summary of projected Space Shuttle performance enhancements using the UOME, are discussed. Planned future activities, including ICTB tests at simulated altitude conditions, and recommendations for further engine development, are also discussed.

  18. Flight Test Results of a Thermoelectric Energy Harvester for Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samson, D.; Kluge, M.; Fuss, T.; Schmid, U.; Becker, Th.

    2012-06-01

    The idea of thermoelectric energy harvesting for low-power wireless sensor systems in aircraft and its practical implementation was recently published. The concept of using a thermoelectric generator (TEG) attached to the aircraft inner hull and a thermal storage device to create an artificial temperature gradient at the TEG during take-off and landing from the temperature changes of the fuselage has passed initial tests and is now subject to flight testing. This work presents preflight test results, e.g., vibration and temperature testing of the harvesters, the practical installation of two harvesting devices inside a test plane, and the first test flight results. Several flight cycles with different flight profiles, flight lengths, and outside temperatures have been performed. Although the influence of different flight profiles on the energy output of the harvester can be clearly observed, the results are in good agreement with expectations from numerical simulations with boundary conditions evaluated from initial climate chamber experiments. In addition, the flight test demonstrates that reliable operation of thermoelectric energy harvesting in harsh aircraft environments seems to be feasible, therefore paving the way for realization of energy-autonomous, wireless sensor networks.

  19. Robust Multivariable Estimation of the Relevant Information Coming from a Wheel Speed Sensor and an Accelerometer Embedded in a Car under Performance Tests

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Wilmar

    2005-01-01

    In the present paper, in order to estimate the response of both a wheel speed sensor and an accelerometer placed in a car under performance tests, robust and optimal multivariable estimation techniques are used. In this case, the disturbances and noises corrupting the relevant information coming from the sensors' outputs are so dangerous that their negative influence on the electrical systems impoverish the general performance of the car. In short, the solution to this problem is a safety related problem that deserves our full attention. Therefore, in order to diminish the negative effects of the disturbances and noises on the car's electrical and electromechanical systems, an optimum observer is used. The experimental results show a satisfactory improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio of the relevant signals and demonstrate the importance of the fusion of several intelligent sensor design techniques when designing the intelligent sensors that today's cars need.

  20. Results from Testing of Two Rotary Percussive Drilling Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kriechbaum, Kristopher; Brown, Kyle; Cady, Ian; von der Heydt, Max; Klein, Kerry; Kulczycki, Eric; Okon, Avi

    2010-01-01

    The developmental test program for the MSL (Mars Science Laboratory) rotary percussive drill examined the e ect of various drill input parameters on the drill pene- tration rate. Some of the input parameters tested were drill angle with respect to gravity and percussive impact energy. The suite of rocks tested ranged from a high strength basalt to soft Kaolinite clay. We developed a hole start routine to reduce high sideloads from bit walk. The ongoing development test program for the IMSAH (Integrated Mars Sample Acquisition and Handling) rotary percussive corer uses many of the same rocks as the MSL suite. An additional performance parameter is core integrity. The MSL development test drill and the IMSAH test drill use similar hardware to provide rotation and percussion. However, the MSL test drill uses external stabilizers, while the IMSAH test drill does not have external stabilization. In addition the IMSAH drill is a core drill, while the MSL drill uses a solid powdering bit. Results from the testing of these two related drilling systems is examined.

  1. Wind turbine wake interactions; results from blind tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krogstad, Per-Åge; Sætran, Lars

    2015-06-01

    Results from three "Blind test" Workshops on wind turbine wake modeling are presented. While the first "Blind test" (BT1, 2011) consisted of a single model turbine located in a large wind tunnel, the complexity was increased for each new test in order to see how various models performed. Thus the next "Blind test" (BT2, 2012) had two turbines mounted in-line. This is a crucial test for models intended to predict turbine performances in a wind farm. In the last "Blind test" (BT3, 2013) the two turbines were again mounted in-line, but offset sideways so that the rotor of the downstream turbine only intersected half the wake from the upstream turbine. This case produces high dynamic loads and strong asymmetry in the wake. For each "Blind test" the turbine geometry and wind tunnel environment was specified and the participants were asked to predict the turbine performances, as well as the wake development to five diameters downstream of the second turbine. For the first two tests axisymmetry could be assumed if the influence of the towers was neglected. This was not possible in BT3 and therefore only fully 3D methods could be applied. In all tests the prediction scatter was surprisingly high.

  2. Salmonella mutagenicity tests. IV. Results from the testing of 300 chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Zeiger, E.; Anderson, B.; Haworth, S.; Lawlor, T.; Mortelmans, K.

    1988-01-01

    Three hundred chemicals were tested for mutagenicity, under code, in Salmonella typhimurium, using a preincubation protocol. All tests were performed in the absence of exogenous metabolic activation, and in the presence of liver S-9 from Aroclor-induced male Sprague-Dawley rats and Syrian hamsters. The results and data from these tests are presented.

  3. Midtemperature Solar Systems Test Facility (MSSTF) project test results: Phase 4A MSSTF system operation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. D. Harrison; W. H. McCulloch

    1978-01-01

    The results of testing the Department of Energy's Midtemperature Solar Systems Test Facility (MSSTF) at Sandia Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico are summarized. The system is a dispersed power system that collects solar energy and supplies both the electrical and thermal energy demands of a representative load. Testing was done between July 1976 and March 1978. The Phase IVA MSSTF studied

  4. Autonomous Airborne Refueling Demonstration Phase I Flight Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dibley, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides flight test results of the automatic in-flight refueling of an Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle (UAV) using an automated hose-and-drogue refueling method. The program objective was to demonstrate one fully automatic engagement between the receiver and tanker aircraft. Systems involved, concept of operations, results and conclusions are included.

  5. Proposed Interventions to Decrease the Frequency of Missed Test Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahls, Terry L.; Cram, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Numerous studies have identified that delays in diagnosis related to the mishandling of abnormal test results are an import contributor to diagnostic errors. Factors contributing to missed results included organizational factors, provider factors and patient-related factors. At the diagnosis error conference continuing medical education conference…

  6. Test results of the highly instrumented Space Shuttle Main Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcconnaughey, H. V.; Leopard, J. L.; Lightfoot, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    Test results of a highly instrumented Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) are presented. The instrumented engine, when combined with instrumented high pressure turbopumps, contains over 750 special measurements, including flowrates, pressures, temperatures, and strains. To date, two different test series, accounting for a total of sixteen tests and 1,667 seconds, have been conducted with this engine. The first series, which utilized instrumented turbopumps, characterized the internal operating environment of the SSME for a variety of operating conditions. The second series provided system-level validation of a high pressure liquid oxygen turbopump that had been retrofitted with a fluid-film bearing in place of the usual pump-end ball bearings. Major findings from these two test series are highlighted in this paper. In addition, comparisons are made between model predictions and measured test data.

  7. COMPARISON OF RESPONSE OF 9977 TEST PACKAGES TO ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A; Tsu-Te Wu, T

    2007-12-05

    Each of the hypothetical accident test cases for the 9977 prototypes was included in the battery of finite element structural analyses performed for the package. Comparison of the experimental and analytical results provides a means of confirming that the analytical model correctly represents the physical behavior of the package. The ability of the analytical model to correctly predict the performance of the foam overpack material for the crush test is of particular interest. The dissipation of energy in the crushing process determines the deceleration of the package upon impact and the duration of the impact. In addition, if the analytical model correctly models the foam behavior, the predicted deformation of the package will match that measured on the test articles. This study compares the deformations of the test packages with the analytical predictions. In addition, the impact acceleration and impact duration for the test articles are compared with those predicted by the analyses.

  8. Abstract: Evaluation of Test Statistics for Robust Structural Equation Modeling With Nonnormal Missing Data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xin Tong; Zhiyong Zhang; Ke-Hai Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Traditional structural equation modeling (SEM) techniques have trouble dealing with incomplete and\\/or nonnormal data that are often encountered in practice. Yuan and Zhang (2011a) developed a two-stage procedure for SEM to handle nonnormal missing data and proposed four test statistics for overall model evaluation. Although these statistics have been shown to work well with complete data, their performance for incomplete

  9. Some Robust Exact Results on Sample Autocorrelations and Tests of Randomness

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. Dufour; R. Roy

    1984-01-01

    Ce Texte Presente Plusieurs Resultats Exacts Sur les Seconds Moments des Autocorrelations Echantillonnales, Pour des Series Gaussiennes Ou Non-Gaussiennes. Nous Donnons D'abord des Formules Generales Pour la Moyenne, la Variance et les Covariances des Autocorrelations Echantillonnales, Dans le Cas Ou les Variables de la Serie Sont Interchangeables. Nous Deduisons de Celles-Ci des Bornes Pour les Variances et les Covariances des

  10. Results of interlaboratory comparisons of column percolation tests.

    PubMed

    Kalbe, Ute; Berger, Wolfgang; Simon, Franz-Georg; Eckardt, Jürgen; Christoph, Gabriele

    2007-09-30

    Laboratory leaching tests may be used for source term determination as a basis for risk assessment for soil-groundwater pathway (leachate forecast) on contaminated sites in Germany. Interlaboratory comparisons on the evaluation of the reproducibility of column percolation tests were conducted within the framework of an integrated R+D program using three waste reference materials. The interlaboratory comparisons of column percolation tests showed good reproducibility of the results for inorganic and organic parameters as well as for the accompanying parameters. This is due to the stipulations concerning the time of contact between leachant and sample material as well as the sample placement in the columns. Different column dimensions used by the participants of the interlaboratory comparisons did not have any substantial influence on the column test results. PMID:17451876

  11. Steel Containment Vessel Model Test: Results and Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Costello, J.F.; Hashimote, T.; Hessheimer, M.F.; Luk, V.K.

    1999-03-01

    A high pressure test of the steel containment vessel (SCV) model was conducted on December 11-12, 1996 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, USA. The test model is a mixed-scaled model (1:10 in geometry and 1:4 in shell thickness) of an improved Mark II boiling water reactor (BWR) containment. A concentric steel contact structure (CS), installed over the SCV model and separated at a nominally uniform distance from it, provided a simplified representation of a reactor shield building in the actual plant. The SCV model and contact structure were instrumented with strain gages and displacement transducers to record the deformation behavior of the SCV model during the high pressure test. This paper summarizes the conduct and the results of the high pressure test and discusses the posttest metallurgical evaluation results on specimens removed from the SCV model.

  12. Management of Test Results in Family Medicine Offices

    PubMed Central

    Elder, Nancy C.; McEwen, Timothy R.; Flach, John M.; Gallimore, Jennie J.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE We wanted to explore test results management systems in family medicine offices and to delineate the components of quality in results management. METHODS Using a multimethod protocol, we intensively studied 4 purposefully chosen family medicine offices using observations, interviews, and surveys. Data analysis consisted of iterative qualitative analysis, descriptive frequencies, and individual case studies, followed by a comparative case analysis. We assessed the quality of results management at each practice by both the presence of and adherence to systemwide practices for each results management step, as well as outcomes from chart reviews, patient surveys, and interview and observation notes. RESULTS We found variability between offices in how they performed the tasks for each of the specific steps of results management. No office consistently had or adhered to office-wide results management practices, and only 2 offices had written protocols or procedures for any results management steps. Whereas most patients surveyed acknowledged receiving their test results (87% to 100%), a far smaller proportion of patient charts documented patient notification (58% to 85%), clinician response to the result (47% to 84%), and follow-up for abnormal results (28% to 55%). We found 2 themes that emerged as factors of importance in assessing test results management quality: safety awareness—a leadership focus and communication that occurs around quality and safety, teamwork in the office, and the presence of appropriate policies and procedures; and technological adoption—the presence of an electronic health record, digital connections between the office and testing facilities, use of technology to facilitate patient communication, and the presence of forcing functions (built-in safeguards and requirements). CONCLUSION Understanding the components of safety awareness and technological adoption can assist family medicine offices in evaluating their own results management processes and help them design systems that can lead to higher quality care. PMID:19597172

  13. Reducing variability in inclined-plane tracking test results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. S. G. Alghamdi; D. W. Auckland; A. J. Risino; B. R. Varlow

    1996-01-01

    Factors which cause variability in the results of inclined-plane tracking tests have been investigated. The effects of introducing shunt or stray capacitance across the test specimen, or of varying the contaminant flow rate, are measured. The discharge energy to the time of observation of initial damage shows less variability than the time-to-track criterion, and may be a more appropriate criterion

  14. Field test results prove GPS performance and utility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. W. Blank

    1988-01-01

    Statistical and operational results of extensive government field-testing of the Rockwell-Collins Global Positioning System (GPS) units are summarized. The equipment has exhibited better than 16-m spherical-error probable-position accuracy in over 6300 hours of testing conducted during the past two years. One-channel, two-channel, and five-channel receivers were subjected to thorough evaluation. Their respective signal-processing and data-processing architectures are described. Data highlighting

  15. Acoustic results of the Boeing model 360 whirl tower test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Michael E.; Jordan, David

    1990-01-01

    An evaluation is presented for whirl tower test results of the Model 360 helicopter's advanced, high-performance four-bladed composite rotor system intended to facilitate over-200-knot flight. During these performance measurements, acoustic data were acquired by seven microphones. A comparison of whirl-tower tests with theory indicate that theoretical prediction accuracies vary with both microphone position and the inclusion of ground reflection. Prediction errors varied from 0 to 40 percent of the measured signal-to-peak amplitude.

  16. Wellbore inertial navigation system (WINS) software development and test results

    SciTech Connect

    Wardlaw, R. Jr.

    1982-09-01

    The structure and operation of the real-time software developed for the Wellbore Inertial Navigation System (WINS) application are described. The procedure and results of a field test held in a 7000-ft well in the Nevada Test Site are discussed. Calibration and instrumentation error compensation are outlined, as are design improvement areas requiring further test and development. Notes on Kalman filtering and complete program listings of the real-time software are included in the Appendices. Reference is made to a companion document which describes the downhole instrumentation package.

  17. Advanced Stirling Convertor Durability Testing: Plans and Interim Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meer, David W.; Oriti, Salvatore M.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Lockheed Martin Corporation (LM), and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) have been developing the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) for use as a power system for space science missions. In support of this program, GRC has been involved in testing Stirling convertors, including the Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC), for use in the ASRG. This testing includes electromagnetic interference/compatibility (EMI/EMC), structural dynamics, advanced materials, organics, and unattended extended operation. The purpose of the durability tests is to experimentally demonstrate the margins in the ASC design. Due to the high value of the hardware, previous ASC tests focused on establishing baseline performance of the convertors within the nominal operating conditions. The durability tests present the first planned extension of the operating conditions into regions beyond those intended to meet the product spec, where the possibility exists of lateral contact, overstroke, or over-temperature events. These tests are not intended to cause damage that would shorten the life of the convertors, so they can transition into extended operation at the conclusion of the tests. This paper describes the four tests included in the durability test sequence: 1) start/stop cycling, 2) exposure to constant acceleration in the lateral and axial directions, 3) random vibration at increased piston amplitude to induce contact events, and 4) overstroke testing to simulate potential failures during processing or during the mission life where contact events could occur. The paper also summarizes the analysis and simulation used to predict the results of each of these tests.

  18. Advanced Stirling Convertor Durability Testing: Plans and Interim Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meer, Dave; Oriti, Sal

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Lockheed Martin Corporation (LM), and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) have been developing the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) for use as a power system for space science missions. In support of this program, NASA?s Glenn Research Center (GRC) has been involved in testing Stirling convertors, including the Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC), for use in the ASRG. This testing includes electromagnetic interference/compatibility (EMI/EMC), structural dynamics, advanced materials, organics, and unattended extended operation. The purpose of the durability tests is to experimentally demonstrate the margins in the ASC design. Due to the high value of the hardware, previous ASC tests focused on establishing baseline performance of the convertors within the nominal operating conditions. The durability tests present the first planned extension of the operating conditions into regions beyond those intended to meet the product spec, where the possibility exists of lateral contact, overstroke, or over-temperature events. These tests are not intended to cause damage that would shorten the life of the convertors, so they can transition into extended operation at the conclusion of the tests. This paper describes the four tests included in the durability test sequence: 1) start/stop cycling, 2) exposure to constant acceleration in the lateral and axial directions, 3) random vibration at increased piston amplitude to induce contact events, and 4) overstroke testing to simulate potential failures during processing or during the mission life where contact events could occur. The paper also summarizes the analysis and simulation used to predict the results of each of these tests.

  19. Thermal Analysis of Low Layer Density Multilayer Insulation Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wesley L.

    2011-01-01

    Investigation of the thermal performance of low layer density multilayer insulations is important for designing long-duration space exploration missions involving the storage of cryogenic propellants. Theoretical calculations show an analytical optimal layer density, as widely reported in the literature. However, the appropriate test data by which to evaluate these calculations have been only recently obtained. As part of a recent research project, NASA procured several multilayer insulation test coupons for calorimeter testing. These coupons were configured to allow for the layer density to be varied from 0.5 to 2.6 layer/mm. The coupon testing was completed using the cylindrical Cryostat-l00 apparatus by the Cryogenics Test Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center. The results show the properties of the insulation as a function of layer density for multiple points. Overlaying these new results with data from the literature reveals a minimum layer density; however, the value is higher than predicted. Additionally, the data show that the transition region between high vacuum and no vacuum is dependent on the spacing of the reflective layers. Historically this spacing has not been taken into account as thermal performance was calculated as a function of pressure and temperature only; however the recent testing shows that the data is dependent on the Knudsen number which takes into account pressure, temperature, and layer spacing. These results aid in the understanding of the performance parameters of MLI and help to complete the body of literature on the topic.

  20. ART-XC/SRG: results of thermo-vacuum tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semena, N.; Pavlinsky, M.; Buntov, M.; Serbinov, D.; Gurova, E.; Tambov, V.; Roiz, I.; Garin, M.; Lazarchuk, V.; Zaytcev, A.; Martunov, V.; Shabarchin, A.; Sokolov, A.

    2014-07-01

    ART-XC - a medium-x-ray-energy survey instrument for SRG project is being developed in Russia. Space Research institute (IKI) and Federal Nuclear Center (VNIIEF) has developed and tested the STM (Structural and Thermal Model) of ART-XC/SRG Instrument. The STM was tested in a 40 m3 vacuum chamber, equipped with black cryogenic screens, cooled by liquid nitrogen. During the tests various thermal telescope modes were simulated. In particular we have simulated emergency mode, when mirrors heaters were switched-off. During the tests temperature of instrument's structure was controlled by 64 independent sensors. Stability of optical axis of mirror systems was also measured. STM test has shown that temperature of mirror system was lower than required, temperature of detectors met the requirements. The test also confirmed geometrical stability of the carbon fiber housing despite of significant temperature gradients. Additional experiments with two mirror systems, each containing a full set of simple nickel shells, were performed. In these experiments we have measured longitudinal and transverse temperature gradients of mirror systems. Next thermovacuum tests of the qualification model of the ART-XC instrument are being prepared. Results of STM tests are presented in this paper.

  1. Bell Pole CROW pilot test results and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Fahy, L.J.; Johnson, L.A. Jr. [Western Research Inst., Laramie, WY (United States); Sola, D.V.; Horn, S.G.; Christofferson, J.L. [Conestoga-Rovers and Associates Limited, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    1992-11-01

    Beginning in 1990, efforts were initiated to implement an in situ remediation project to address the creosote and pentachlorophenol (PCP) contaminated surficial aquifer at the Bell Lumber and Pole Company (Bell Pole) Site. The remediation project involves the application of the Contained Recovery of Oily Wastes (CROW{trademark}) process which consists of hot-water injection to displace and recover the non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL). Based on the results from the pilot test the following conclusions can be made: (1) The pilot test provided sufficient hydraulic information to design the full-scale CROW remediation system. The pumping test portion of the pilot test indicated uniform aquifer properties. The entire thickness of the aquifer reached the target temperature range and containment of the injected hot water was achieved. (2) Pretest injection and production rate predictions were achieved. (3) The post test soil boring data indicated hot-water injection displaced greater than 80% of the NAPL near the injection well. The data indicates that a NAPL saturation of approximately 19% (pore volume basis) and a 500 fold decrease in PCP concentration can be achieved with 20 pore volumes of flushing. (4) The treatment system used during the pilot test was effective in reducing PCP and PAH compounds to concentrations acceptable for sanitary sewer discharge. (5) The microbial assay of the post test samples found an encouraging increase in microbial population compared to earlier data collected before the pilot test.

  2. Bell Pole CROW pilot test results and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Fahy, L.J.; Johnson, L.A. Jr. (Western Research Inst., Laramie, WY (United States)); Sola, D.V.; Horn, S.G.; Christofferson, J.L. (Conestoga-Rovers and Associates Limited, St. Paul, MN (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Beginning in 1990, efforts were initiated to implement an in situ remediation project to address the creosote and pentachlorophenol (PCP) contaminated surficial aquifer at the Bell Lumber and Pole Company (Bell Pole) Site. The remediation project involves the application of the Contained Recovery of Oily Wastes (CROW[trademark]) process which consists of hot-water injection to displace and recover the non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL). Based on the results from the pilot test the following conclusions can be made: (1) The pilot test provided sufficient hydraulic information to design the full-scale CROW remediation system. The pumping test portion of the pilot test indicated uniform aquifer properties. The entire thickness of the aquifer reached the target temperature range and containment of the injected hot water was achieved. (2) Pretest injection and production rate predictions were achieved. (3) The post test soil boring data indicated hot-water injection displaced greater than 80% of the NAPL near the injection well. The data indicates that a NAPL saturation of approximately 19% (pore volume basis) and a 500 fold decrease in PCP concentration can be achieved with 20 pore volumes of flushing. (4) The treatment system used during the pilot test was effective in reducing PCP and PAH compounds to concentrations acceptable for sanitary sewer discharge. (5) The microbial assay of the post test samples found an encouraging increase in microbial population compared to earlier data collected before the pilot test.

  3. Flight test results of the Strapdown hexad Inertial Reference Unit (SIRU). Volume 1: Flight test summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hruby, R. J.; Bjorkman, W. S.

    1977-01-01

    Flight test results of the strapdown inertial reference unit (SIRU) navigation system are presented. The fault-tolerant SIRU navigation system features a redundant inertial sensor unit and dual computers. System software provides for detection and isolation of inertial sensor failures and continued operation in the event of failures. Flight test results include assessments of the system's navigational performance and fault tolerance.

  4. Robust diagnostic genetic testing using solution capture enrichment and a novel variant-filtering interface.

    PubMed

    Watson, Christopher M; Crinnion, Laura A; Morgan, Joanne E; Harrison, Sally M; Diggle, Christine P; Adlard, Julian; Lindsay, Helen A; Camm, Nick; Charlton, Ruth; Sheridan, Eamonn; Bonthron, David T; Taylor, Graham R; Carr, Ian M

    2014-04-01

    Targeted hybridization enrichment prior to next-generation sequencing is a widespread method for characterizing sequence variation in a research setting, and is being adopted by diagnostic laboratories. However, the number of variants identified can overwhelm clinical laboratories with strict time constraints, the final interpretation of likely pathogenicity being a particular bottleneck. To address this, we have developed an approach in which, after automatic variant calling on a standard unix pipeline, subsequent variant filtering is performed interactively, using AgileExomeFilter and AgilePindelFilter (http://dna.leeds.ac.uk/agile), tools designed for clinical scientists with standard desktop computers. To demonstrate the method's diagnostic efficacy, we tested 128 patients using (1) a targeted capture of 36 cancer-predisposing genes or (2) whole-exome capture for diagnosis of the genetically heterogeneous disorder primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). In the cancer cohort, complete concordance with previous diagnostic data was achieved across 793 variant genotypes. A high yield (42%) was also achieved for exome-based PCD diagnosis, underscoring the scalability of our method. Simple adjustments to the variant filtering parameters further allowed the identification of a homozygous truncating mutation in a presumptive new PCD gene, DNAH8. These tools should allow diagnostic laboratories to expand their testing portfolios flexibly, using a standard set of reagents and techniques. PMID:24307375

  5. Spent fuel drying system test results (first dry-run)

    SciTech Connect

    Klinger, G.S.; Oliver, B.M.; Abrefah, J.; Marschman, S.C.; MacFarlan, P.J.; Ritter, G.A.

    1998-07-01

    The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks in the basin have been detected and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuel elements in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site. Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 7.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of the first dry-run test, which was conducted without a fuel element. The empty test apparatus was subjected to a combination of low- and high-temperature vacuum drying treatments that were intended to mimic, wherever possible, the fuel treatment strategies of the IPS. The data from this dry-run test can serve as a baseline for the first two fuel element tests, 1990 (Run 1) and 3128W (Run 2). The purpose of this dry-run was to establish the background levels of hydrogen in the system, and the hydrogen generation and release characteristics attributable to the test system without a fuel element present. This test also serves to establish the background levels of water in the system and the water release characteristics. The system used for the drying test series was the Whole Element Furnace Testing System, described in Section 2.0, which is located in the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL, 327 Building). The test conditions and methodology are given in section 3.0, and the experimental results provided in Section 4.0. These results are further discussed in Section 5.0.

  6. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, Garrett N.; Kurath, Dean E.; Buchmiller, William C.; Smith, Dennese M.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Song, Chen; Daniel, Richard C.; Wells, Beric E.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2013-05-29

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty due to extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high-pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are scarce. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine aerosol release fractions and net generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of antifoam agents was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and rectangular slots. For the combination of both test stands, the round holes ranged in size from 0.2 to 4.46 mm. The slots ranged from (width × length) 0.3 × 5 to 2.74 × 76.2 mm. Most slots were oriented longitudinally along the pipe, but some were oriented circumferentially. In addition, a limited number of multi-hole test pieces were tested in an attempt to assess the impact of a more complex breach. Much of the testing was conducted at pressures of 200 and 380 psi, but some tests were conducted at 100 psi. Testing the largest postulated breaches was deemed impractical because of the much larger flow rates and equipment that would be required. This report presents the experimental results and analyses for the aerosol measurements obtained in the small-scale test stand. It includes a description of the simulants used and their properties, equipment and operations, data analysis methodologies, and test results. The results of tests investigating the role of slurry particles in plugging small breaches are reported in Mahoney et al. (2012). The results of the aerosol measurements in the large-scale test stand are reported in Schonewill et al. (2012) along with an analysis of the combined results from both test scales.

  7. Robust yaw stability controller design and hardware-in-the-loop testing for a road vehicle

    E-print Network

    Guvenc, Levent

    Unsymmetrical loading on a car like mu-split braking, side wind forces, or unilateral loss of tire pressure results in unexpected yaw disturbances that require yaw stabilization either by the driver or by an automatic ...

  8. Comparison of road load simulator test results with track tests on electric vehicle propulsion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dustin, M. O.

    1983-01-01

    A special-purpose dynamometer, the road load simulator (RLS), is being used at NASA's Lewis Research Center to test and evaluate electric vehicle propulsion systems developed under DOE's Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program. To improve correlation between system tests on the RLS and track tests, similar tests were conducted on the same propulsion system on the RLS and on a test track. These tests are compared in this report. Battery current to maintain a constant vehicle speed with a fixed throttle was used for the comparison. Scatter in the data was greater in the track test results. This is attributable to variations in tire rolling resistance and wind effects in the track data. It also appeared that the RLS road load, determined by coastdown tests on the track, was lower than that of the vehicle on the track. These differences may be due to differences in tire temperature.

  9. Testing the robustness, to changes in process, of a scaling relationship between soil grading and geomorphology using a pedogenesis model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willgoose, G. R.; Welivitiya, W. D. D. P.; Hancock, G. R.

    2014-12-01

    Using the mARM1D pedogenesis model (which simulated armouring and weathering processes on a hillslope) previous work by Cohen found a strong log-log linear relationship between the size distribution of the soil (e.g. d50), the contributing area and the local slope. However, Cohen performed his simulations using only one set of grading data, one climate, one geology and did his simulations over a relatively limited range of area and slope combinations. A model based on mARM, called SSSPAM, that generalises the modelled processes has been developed, and calibrated to mARM. This calibration was used as the starting point for a parametric study of the robustness to changes in environmental conditions and weathering conditions of the area-slope and d50 relationship, different initial soil gradings and weathering conditions, different geology, and a broader range of area and slope combinations. This parametric study assessed the influence of changes in the model parameters on the soil evolution results. These simulations confirmed the robustness of the area-slope and d50 relationship discovered by Cohen using mARM. We also demonstrated that the area-slope-diameter relationship is not only true for d50 but for the entire grading range (e.g. d10, d90). The results strengthen our confidence in the generality of the log-log linear scaling relationship between area, slope and soil grading. The paper will present the results of our parametric study and will highlight the potential uses of the relationship for digital soil mapping and better characterization of soils in environmental models.

  10. SMS messages increase adherence to rapid diagnostic test results among malaria patients: results from a pilot study in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization now recommends parasitological confirmation for malaria case management. Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for malaria are an accurate and simple diagnostic to confirm parasite presence in blood. However, where they have been deployed, adherence to RDT results has been poor, especially when the test result is negative. Few studies have examined adherence to RDTs distributed or purchased through the private sector. Methods The Rapid Examination of Malaria and Evaluation of Diagnostic Information (REMEDI) study assessed the acceptability of and adherence to RDT results for patients seeking care from private sector drug retailers in two cities in Oyo State in south-west Nigeria. In total, 465 adult participants were enrolled upon exit from a participating drug shop having purchased anti-malaria drugs for themselves. Participants were given a free RDT and the appropriate treatment advice based on their RDT result. Short Message Service (SMS) text messages reiterating the treatment advice were sent to a randomly selected half of the participants one day after being tested. Participants were contacted via phone four days after the RDT was conducted to assess adherence to the RDT information and treatment advice. Results Adherence to RDT results was 14.3 percentage points (P-val <0.001) higher in the treatment group who were sent the SMS. The higher adherence in the treatment group was robust to several specification tests and the estimated difference in adherence ranged from 9.7 to 16.1 percentage points. Further, the higher adherence to the treatment advice was specific to the treatment advice for anti-malarial drugs and not other drugs purchased to treat malaria symptoms in the RDT-negative participants who bought both anti-malarial and symptom drugs. There was no difference in adherence for the RDT-positive participants who were sent the SMS. Conclusions SMS text messages substantially increased adherence to RDT results for patients seeking care for malaria from privately owned drug retailers in Nigeria and may be a simple and cost-effective means for boosting adherence to RDT results if and when RDTs are introduced as a commercial retail product. PMID:24564925

  11. CSI computer system/remote interface unit acceptance test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, Dean W., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The validation tests conducted on the Control/Structures Interaction (CSI) Computer System (CCS)/Remote Interface Unit (RIU) is discussed. The CCS/RIU consists of a commercially available, Langley Research Center (LaRC) programmed, space flight qualified computer and a flight data acquisition and filtering computer, developed at LaRC. The tests were performed in the Space Structures Research Laboratory (SSRL) and included open loop excitation, closed loop control, safing, RIU digital filtering, and RIU stand alone testing with the CSI Evolutionary Model (CEM) Phase-0 testbed. The test results indicated that the CCS/RIU system is comparable to ground based systems in performing real-time control-structure experiments.

  12. The advanced receiver 2: Telemetry test results in CTA 21

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinedi, S.; Bevan, R.; Marina, M.

    1991-02-01

    Telemetry tests with the Advanced Receiver II (ARX II) in Compatibility Test Area 21 are described. The ARX II was operated in parallel with a Block-III Receiver/baseband processor assembly combination (BLK-III/BPA) and a Block III Receiver/subcarrier demodulation assembly/symbol synchronization assembly combination (BLK-III/SDA/SSA). The telemetry simulator assembly provided the test signal for all three configurations, and the symbol signal to noise ratio as well as the symbol error rates were measured and compared. Furthermore, bit error rates were also measured by the system performance test computer for all three systems. Results indicate that the ARX-II telemetry performance is comparable and sometimes superior to the BLK-III/BPA and BLK-III/SDA/SSA combinations.

  13. Results of ground vibration tests on a YF-12 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. J.; Cazier, F. W., Jr.; Larson, R. R.

    1973-01-01

    Ground vibration tests were conducted on a YF-12 airplane. To approximate a structural free-free boundary condition during the tests, each of the landing gears was supported on a support system designed to have a low natural frequency. The test equipment and the procedures used for the ground vibration tests are described. The results are presented in the form of frequency response data, measured mode lines, and elastic mode shapes for the wing/body, rudder, and fuselage ventral fin. In the frequency range between 3.4 cps and 28.8 cps, nine symmetrical wing/body modes, six antisymmetrical wing/body modes, two rudder modes, and one ventral fin mode were measured.

  14. High Stability Engine Control (HISTEC) Flight Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Southwick, Robert D.; Gallops, George W.; Kerr, Laura J.; Kielb, Robert P.; Welsh, Mark G.; DeLaat, John C.; Orme, John S.

    1998-01-01

    The High Stability Engine Control (HISTEC) Program, managed and funded by the NASA Lewis Research Center, is a cooperative effort between NASA and Pratt & Whitney (P&W). The program objective is to develop and flight demonstrate an advanced high stability integrated engine control system that uses real-time, measurement-based estimation of inlet pressure distortion to enhance engine stability. Flight testing was performed using the NASA Advanced Controls Technologies for Integrated Vehicles (ACTIVE) F-15 aircraft at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. The flight test configuration, details of the research objectives, and the flight test matrix to achieve those objectives are presented. Flight test results are discussed that show the design approach can accurately estimate distortion and perform real-time control actions for engine accommodation.

  15. The advanced receiver 2: Telemetry test results in CTA 21

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinedi, S.; Bevan, R.; Marina, M.

    1991-01-01

    Telemetry tests with the Advanced Receiver II (ARX II) in Compatibility Test Area 21 are described. The ARX II was operated in parallel with a Block-III Receiver/baseband processor assembly combination (BLK-III/BPA) and a Block III Receiver/subcarrier demodulation assembly/symbol synchronization assembly combination (BLK-III/SDA/SSA). The telemetry simulator assembly provided the test signal for all three configurations, and the symbol signal to noise ratio as well as the symbol error rates were measured and compared. Furthermore, bit error rates were also measured by the system performance test computer for all three systems. Results indicate that the ARX-II telemetry performance is comparable and sometimes superior to the BLK-III/BPA and BLK-III/SDA/SSA combinations.

  16. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, Garrett N.; Kurath, Dean E.; Buchmiller, William C.; Smith, Dennese M.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Song, Chen; Daniel, Richard C.; Wells, Beric E.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2012-11-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty due to extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high-pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are scarce. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine aerosol release fractions and generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and rectangular slots. The round holes ranged in size from 0.2 to 4.46 mm. The slots ranged from (width × length) 0.3 × 5 to 2.74 × 76.2 mm. Most slots were oriented longitudinally along the pipe, but some were oriented circumferentially. In addition, a limited number of multi-hole test pieces were tested in an attempt to assess the impact of a more complex breach. Much of the testing was conducted at pressures of 200 and 380 psi, but some tests were conducted at 100 psi. Testing the largest postulated breaches was deemed impractical because of the large size of some of the WTP equipment. This report presents the experimental results and analyses for the aerosol measurements obtained in the small-scale test stand. It includes a description of the simulants used and their properties, equipment and operations, data analysis methodologies, and test results. The results of tests investigating the role of slurry particles in plugging small breaches are reported in Mahoney et al. (2012). The results of the aerosol measurements in the large-scale test stand are reported in Schonewill et al. (2012) along with an analysis of the combined results from both test scales.

  17. Wind tunnel test IA300 analysis and results, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, P. B.; Beaufait, W. B.; Kitchens, L. L.; Pace, J. P.

    1987-01-01

    The analysis and interpretation of wind tunnel pressure data from the Space Shuttle wind tunnel test IA300 are presented. The primary objective of the test was to determine the effects of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) and the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) plumes on the integrated vehicle forebody pressure distributions, the elevon hinge moments, and wing loads. The results of this test will be combined with flight test results to form a new data base to be employed in the IVBC-3 airloads analysis. A secondary objective was to obtain solid plume data for correlation with the results of gaseous plume tests. Data from the power level portion was used in conjunction with flight base pressures to evaluate nominal power levels to be used during the investigation of changes in model attitude, eleveon deflection, and nozzle gimbal angle. The plume induced aerodynamic loads were developed for the Space Shuttle bases and forebody areas. A computer code was developed to integrate the pressure data. Using simplified geometrical models of the Space Shuttle elements and components, the pressure data were integrated to develop plume induced force and moments coefficients that can be combined with a power-off data base to develop a power-on data base.

  18. Model NbTi Helical Solenoid Fabrication and Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Chlachidze, G.; Evbota, D.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lamm, M.J.; Makarov, A.; Novitski, I.; Orris, D.F.; Tartaglia, M.A.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    A program to develop model magnets for a helical cooling channel is under way at Fermilab. In the first steps of a planned sequence of magnets, two four-coil helical solenoid models with 300 mm aperture have been fabricated and tested. These two models, HSM01 and HSM02, used insulated NbTi Rutherford cable wound onto stainless steel rings with spliceless transitions between coils. Strip heaters were included for quench protection of each coil, and the coils were epoxy-impregnated after winding inside the support structures. Based on the results of the first model the second model was made using a cable with optimized cross-section, improved winding and epoxy-impregnation procedures, enhanced ground insulation, and included heat exchange tubing for a test of conduction cooling. We report on the results and lessons learned from fabrication and tests of these two models.

  19. Test results of a shower water recovery system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verostko, Charles E.; Price, Donald F.; Garcia, Rafael; Pierson, Duane L.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1987-01-01

    A shower test was conducted recently at NASA-JSC in which waste water was reclaimed and reused. Test subjects showered in a prototype whole body shower following a protocol similar to that anticipated for Space Station. The waste water was purified using reverse osmosis followed by filtration through activated carbon and ion exchange resin beds. The reclaimed waste water was maintained free of microorganisms by using both heat and iodine. This paper discusses the test results, including the limited effectiveness of using iodine as a disinfectant and the evaluation of a Space Station candidate soap for showering. In addition, results are presented on chemical and microbial impurity content of water samples obtained from various locations in the water recovery process.

  20. GICHD mine dog testing project - soil sample results #4.

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, James L.; Phelan, James M.; Archuleta, Luisa M.; Wood, Tyson B.; Donovan, Kelly L.; Bender, Susan Fae Ann

    2003-08-01

    A mine dog evaluation project initiated by the Geneva International Center for Humanitarian Demining is evaluating the capability and reliability of mine detection dogs. The performance of field-operational mine detection dogs will be measured in test minefields in Afghanistan and Bosnia containing actual, but unfused landmines. Repeated performance testing over two years through various seasonal weather conditions will provide data simulating near real world conditions. Soil samples will be obtained adjacent to the buried targets repeatedly over the course of the test. Chemical analysis results from these soil samples will be used to evaluate correlations between mine dog detection performance and seasonal weather conditions. This report documents the analytical chemical methods and results from the fourth batch of soils received. This batch contained samples from Kharga, Afghanistan collected in April 2003 and Sarajevo, Bosnia collected in May 2003.

  1. GICHD Mine Dog Testing Project - Soil Sample Results No.3

    SciTech Connect

    PHELAN, JAMES M.; BARNETT, JAMES L.; BENDER, SUSAN FAE ANN; ARCHULETA, LUISA M.

    2003-03-01

    A mine dog evaluation project initiated by the Geneva International Center for Humanitarian Demining is evaluating the capability and reliability of mine detection dogs. The performance of field-operational mine detection dogs will be measured in test minefields in Afghanistan and Bosnia containing actual, but unfused landmines. Repeated performance testing over two years through various seasonal weather conditions will provide data simulating near real world conditions. Soil samples will be obtained adjacent to the buried targets repeatedly over the course of the test. Chemical analysis results from these soil samples will be used to evaluate correlations between mine dog detection performance and seasonal weather conditions. This report documents the analytical chemical methods and results from the third batch of soils received. This batch contained samples from Kharga, Afghanistan collected in October 2002.

  2. GICHD mine dog testing project : soil sample results #5.

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, James L.; Phelan, James M.; Archuleta, Luisa M.; Donovan, Kelly L.; Bender, Susan Fae Ann

    2004-01-01

    A mine dog evaluation project initiated by the Geneva International Center for Humanitarian Demining is evaluating the capability and reliability of mine detection dogs. The performance of field-operational mine detection dogs will be measured in test minefields in Afghanistan containing actual, but unfused landmines. Repeated performance testing over two years through various seasonal weather conditions will provide data simulating near real world conditions. Soil samples will be obtained adjacent to the buried targets repeatedly over the course of the test. Chemical analysis results from these soil samples will be used to evaluate correlations between mine dog detection performance and seasonal weather conditions. This report documents the analytical chemical methods and results from the fifth batch of soils received. This batch contained samples from Kharga, Afghanistan collected in June 2003.

  3. First Test Results of the New LANSCE Wire Scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Sedillo, James Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-01

    The Beam Diagnostics and Instrumentation Team (BDIT) at Los Alamos National Laboratory's LANSCE facility is presently developing a new and improved wire scanner diagnostics system controlled by National Instrument's cRIO platform. This paper describes the current state of development of the control system along with the results gathered from the latest actuator motion performance and accelerator-beam data acquisition tests.

  4. Evaluation of Smart Irrigation Controllers: Initial Bench Testing Results

    E-print Network

    Swanson, Charles; Fipps, Guy

    COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND LIFE SCIENCES TR-354 2009 Evaluation of Smart Irrigation Controllers: Initial Bench Testing Results July 2009 By Charles Swanson, Extension Associate Guy Fipps, Professor and Extension... Agricultural Engineer Rio Grande Basin Initiative Irrigation Technology Center Texas AgriLife Extension Service Texas Water Resources Institute Technical Report July 2009 TR 354 EVALUATION OF SMART IRRIGATION CONTROLLERS...

  5. Understanding Your Soil Test Results Education Center and Info Line

    E-print Network

    New Hampshire, University of

    Understanding Your Soil Test Results Education Center and Info Line practical solutions to everyday the U.S. Postal Service on a computer-generated report form. Each report has a common format. Chart 1 questions. · Sample Name: The name you gave to this soil sample. For example, Front Lawn. · Lab Run Date

  6. ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker test-beam results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Akesson; E. Arik; K. Baker; S. Baron; D. Benjamin; H. Bertelsen; V. Bondarenko; V. Bytchkov; J. Callahan; M. Capeans; L. Cardiel-Sas; A. Catinaccio; S. A. Cetin; P. Cwetanski; M. Dam; H. Danielsson; F. Dittus; B. Dolgoshein; N. Dressnandt; C. Driouichi; W. L. Ebenstein; P. Eerola; P. Farthouat; O. Fedin; D. Froidevaux; P. Gagnon; Y. Grichkevitch; N. Grigalashvili; Z. Hajduk; P. Hansen; F. Kayumov; P. T. Keener; G. Kekelidze; A. Khristatchev; S. Konovalov; L. Koudine; S. Kovalenko; T. Kowalski; V. A. Kramarenko; K. Kruger; A. Laritchev; P. Lichard; F. Luehring; B. Lundberg; V. Maleev; I. Markina; K. McFarlane; V. Mialkovski; V. A. Mitsou; B. Mindur; S. Morozov; A. Munar; S. Muraviev; A. Nadtochy; F. M. Newcomer; H. Ogren; S. H. Oh; S. Oleshko; J. Olszowska; S. Passmore; S. Patritchev; V. Peshekhonov; R. Petti; M. Price; C. Rembser; O. Rohne; A. Romaniouk; D. R. Rust; Yu. Ryabov; V. Schegelsky; D. Seliverstov; T. Shin; A. Shmeleva; S. Smirnov; V. Sosnovtsev; V. Soutchkov; E. Spiridenkov; V. Tikhomirov; R. Van Berg; V. Vassilakopoulos; L. Vassilieva; C. Wang; H. H. Williams; A. Zalite

    2004-01-01

    Several prototypes of the Transition Radiation Tracker for the ATLAS experiment at the LHC have been built and tested at the CERN SPS accelerator. Results from detailed studies of the straw-tube hit registration efficiency and drift-time measurements and of the pion and electron spectra without and with radiators are presented.

  7. Heave Compensation Systems: Analysis and Results of Field Testing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wenceslao Azpiazu; M. Thatcher; E. Schwelm

    1983-01-01

    A program to determine the performance of heave compensator systems under actual at-sea working conditions has been undertaken. As a result of this test program, parameters have been determined for heave compensation systems that will allow design of these systems with preestablished performance goals. A description of the methods used to determine the coefficients that control system performance is presented

  8. Effects of vessel geometric irregularity on dissolution test results.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zongming; Ahadi, Shafiq; Moore, Terry W; Doub, William H; Westenberger, B J; Buhse, Lucinda F

    2011-03-01

    Dissolution testing of pharmaceutical products is an important technique used extensively for both product development and quality control, but there are many variables that can affect dissolution results. In this study, the effect of the inner shape of standard 1-L dissolution vessels on drug dissolution results was investigated. The geometric dimensions and irregularities of commercially available vessels (obtained from four different manufacturers) were examined using a three-dimensional video-based measuring machine (VMM). The same analyst, dissolution test assembly, and experimental conditions were used for dissolution testing involving 10 mg of prednisone tablets (NCDA #2) with dissolution apparatus 2 (paddle). Mechanical calibration of the dissolution apparatus was performed prior to dissolution testing with each set of vessels. Geometric characteristics varied within and among the sets of vessels, but the overall averages and standard deviations of dissolution results (six vessels) showed no statistical significant differences among the vessel sets. However, some dissolution differences were noted when comparing individual vessels. With these types of comparisons, the vessel concentricity, sphericity, and radius of sphere were found to possibly influence the amount of prednisone dissolved, but flatness of vessel flange, cylindricity, and circularity showed no effect on dissolution results. The study shows that VMM is a technique that could be used to qualify dissolution vessels. PMID:20803604

  9. Relationships between driving simulator performance and driving test results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. C. F. de Winter; S. de Groot; M. Mulder; P. A. Wieringa; J. Dankelman; J. A. Mulder

    2009-01-01

    This article is considered relevant because: 1) car driving is an everyday and safety-critical task; 2) simulators are used to an increasing extent for driver training (related topics: training, virtual reality, human – machine interaction); 3) the article addresses relationships between performance in the simulator and driving test results–a relevant topic for those involved in driver training and the virtual

  10. Autoclave Curing — Comparisons of Model and Test Results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter R. Ciriscioli; Qiuling Wang; George S. Springer

    1992-01-01

    Tests were performed measuring the temperature, ionic conductivity, and compaction in 16 to 200 ply thick graphite-epoxy laminates made of either Fiberite T300\\/976 (tape or fabric) or Hercules AS\\/3501-6 (tape). The data were compared to results calculated by the Loos-Springer CURE model. Good agreement was found between the model results and the data indicating that the model can be used

  11. A Robust Test of the Unified Model for Seyfert Galaxies with Implications for the Starburst Phenomenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, Kimberly A.

    1997-01-01

    My research involves detailed analysis of X-ray emission from Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). For over a decade, the paradigm for AGN has rested soundly on the unified model hypothesis, which posits that the only difference between broad-line objects (e.g., Type 1 Seyfert galaxies) and narrow-line objects (e.g., Type 2 Seyferts) is that in the former case our line of sight evades toroidal obscuration surrounding the nucleus, while in the latter, our line of sight is blocked by the optically thick torus. It is well established that some Seyfert 2s contain Seyfert I nuclei (i.e., a hidden broad line region), but whether or not all Seyfert 2s contain obscured Seyfert 1 nuclei or whether some Seyfert 2s are intrinsically Seyfert 2s is not known. Optical, IR, and UV surveys are not appropriate to examine this hypothesis because such emissions are either anisotropic or subject to the effects of obscuration, and thus depend strongly on viewing angle. Hard X-rays, on the other hand, can penetrate gas with column densities as high as 10( exp 24.5) cm(-2) and thus provide reliable, direct probes of the cores of heavily obscured AGN. Combining NASA archival data from the Advanced Satellite of Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), and Rosat, I am accumulating X-ray data between 0.1 and 60 keV to produce a catalog of the broad-band X-ray spectral properties of Seyfert galaxies. These data will be used to perform concrete tests of the unified model, and (compared with similar data on Starbursts) to examine a possible evolutionary connection between Seyfert and Starburst galaxies.

  12. Graphite electrode arc melter demonstration Phase 2 test results

    SciTech Connect

    Soelberg, N.R.; Chambers, A.G.; Anderson, G.L.; O`Connor, W.K.; Oden, L.L.; Turner, P.C.

    1996-06-01

    Several U.S. Department of Energy organizations and the U.S. Bureau of Mines have been collaboratively conducting mixed waste treatment process demonstration testing on the near full-scale graphite electrode submerged arc melter system at the Bureau`s Albany (Oregon) Research Center. An initial test series successfully demonstrated arc melter capability for treating surrogate incinerator ash of buried mixed wastes with soil. The conceptual treatment process for that test series assumed that buried waste would be retrieved and incinerated, and that the incinerator ash would be vitrified in an arc melter. This report presents results from a recently completed second series of tests, undertaken to determine the ability of the arc melter system to stably process a wide range of {open_quotes}as-received{close_quotes} heterogeneous solid mixed wastes containing high levels of organics, representative of the wastes buried and stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The Phase 2 demonstration test results indicate that an arc melter system is capable of directly processing these wastes and could enable elimination of an up-front incineration step in the conceptual treatment process.

  13. Updated test results of a pumped monopropellant propulsion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maybee, Jeffrey C.; Swink, Don G.; Whitehead, John C.

    1993-11-01

    Significant progress was made in 1992 and 1993 towards demonstration at the system level of a high-performance pumped monopropellant propulsion system. Two separate breadboard systems were designed, fabricated and tested with hydrazine at vacuum and sea level conditions. Both designs utilized improved warm-gas-driven reciprocating pumps to transfer fuel from a low-pressure hydrazine tank (70 psig) directly to a pair of 56-lbf thrusters operating at 580 psia chamber pressure. The system most recently tested included direct warm gas pressurization of the hydrazine tank. This novel propulsion system design has been presented and discussed in various configurations in previous papers. This paper will provide an update to test results presented in 1991. This recent testing of these latest system designs included a continuous 60-second burn of a 42-lbf thruster operating at sea level, in addition bootstrap and pulse-mode firings. These results have demonstrated that improvements to the 3-way valve design of the pump were successful, and have verified performance predictions obtained from a mathematical model of the system. Further testing of a more advanced breadboard system is planned for late 1993.

  14. Developing a flammability test system for sunglasses: results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magri, Renan; Ventura, Liliane

    2015-03-01

    Sunglasses popularity has increased tremendously. This fact has further led to the need of certificating sunglasses accordingly to the standard NBR 15111 to protect consumers from damages and secondary hazards caused by sunglasses use. The ongoing need comes at the expense that none certification institution in Brazil performs all tests procedures required by the NBR 15111. This manuscript presents the development of a flammability test system for sunglasses and the assessments results. The equipment for testing flammability developed is made of an electrical furnace with a thermocouple and electronic system that maintains the temperature in 650 ºC. This furnace heats a steel rod used for testing flammability. A steel cable connected to a linear actuator drives the rod. The main control system is based on an ARM Cortex M0 microcontroller and we developed a PC interface in LabView to acquire data and store it. The equipment built also has a control panel with a push button, status LEDs and temperature indicator. We performed flammability tests in 45 sunglasses: 45 lenses and 45 frames using the equipment described. None of the samples ignited or continued to glow when the test has finished, however, all polycarbonate samples were melted in the contact region with the steel rod. All samples complied with the NBR 15111. The proof argues that the polycarbonate is extremely resistant to ignition.

  15. Results of the parabolic flight tests of the rapunzel deployer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabath, D.; Krischke, M.; Kast, W.; Kowalczyk, M.; Kruijff, M.; van der Heide, E.

    The tether assisted re-entry of small payloads is a highly interesting tool for space transportation especially for the return of small payloads from Space Station ISSA. The small tether mission Rapunzel was initiated in 1991 by the Institute of Astronautics, TU München and the Kayser-Threde Company, to design a low cost and feasible tether experiment for the verification of the tether assisted re-entry. Together with the Samara State Aerospace University, Russia, a mission concept on a Russian Resurs or Photon capsule was developed. Based on this mission a deployer has been designed, mainly based on technology of the textile industry, which insures high reliability at low cost. Recently a similar configuration is being discussed for the ESA-TSE mission. The main work during the recent time was the development and test of the breadboard model of the deployer system. After successfully completing initial ground tests with the deployer, further tests during the ESA Parabolic Flight campaign in November 1995 were conducted. After a short introduction of the overall mission scenario, the planned configuration in orbit, this paper will present the results of the microgravity test campaign onboard the KC-135 aircraft and compare them with the ground test. The deployer showed a good performance during all tests, including ejection of the end-mass, deployment, and braking. Problems that occurred during the tests will be discussed, and solutions for the detected flaws and the results of the redesign now in progress will be presented. These verifications have shown the feasibility of the concept and will lay the base for the planned development of the flight model of the deployer.

  16. Results of MACE tests M0 and M1

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, B.W.; Farmer, M.T.; Armstrong, D.R.; Kilsdonk, D.J.; Aeschlimann, R.W. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Fischer, M. (Siemens AG, Berlin (Germany))

    1992-01-01

    This document discusses the Melt Attack and Coolability Experiment (MACE) Program underway at Argonne National Laboratory under ACE/EPRI sponsorship. The program addresses the efficacy of water to terminate an accident situation if melt progression were to result in a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) in the reactor containment. Large-scale experiments are being conducted in parallel with related modeling efforts, involving the addition of water to an MCI already underway. The experiments utilize UO{sub 2}/ZrO{sub 2}/Zr corium mixtures, direct electrical heating for simulation of decay heating, and various types of concrete basemats. Currently the tests involve 430 kg corium mass, 25 cm depth, in a 50 cm square test section. Test MO was a successful scoping test, but the first full size test, Ml, failed to achieve melt-water contact owing to existence of a preexisting bridge crust of corium charge. A heat flux of 3.5 MW/m{sup 2} was measured in MO which removed energy from the corium pool equivalent to its entire heat of solidification prior to abatement by formation of an interfacial crust. The crust subsequently limited heat extraction to 600 kW/m{sup 2} and less. Both tests MO and Ml revealed physical evidence of large pool swelling events which resulted in extrusion (and ejection) of melt into water above the crust, significantly increasing the overall quench and reducing the remaining melt in contact with the concrete. Furthermore, test Ml provided evidence of occasional burst mode'' ablation events and one additional important benefit of overlying water -- aerosol capture.

  17. GPM Avionics Module Heat Pipes Design and Performance Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ottenstein, Laura; DeChristopher, Mike

    2011-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an international network of satellites that provide the next-generation global observations of rain and snow. The GPM core satellite carries an advanced radar / radiometer system to measure precipitation from space and serve as a reference standard to unify precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational satellites. Through improved measurements of precipitation globally, the GPM mission will help to advance our understanding of Earth's water and energy cycle, improve forecasting of extreme events that cause natural hazards and disasters, and extend current capabilities in using accurate and timely information of precipitation to directly benefit society. The avionics module on the core satellite contains a number of electronics boxes which are cooled by a network of aluminum/ammonia heat pipes and a honeycomb radiator which contains thirteen embedded aluminum/ammonia heat pipes. All heat pipes were individually tested by the vendor (Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc.) prior to delivery. Following delivery to NASA, the flight avionics radiator and the flight spare transport heat pipes were mounted to flight-like test structure and a system level thermal vacuum test was performed. This test, which used simulators in place of all electronics boxes, was done to verify the operation of the thermal control system as a whole. This presentation will discuss the design of the avionics module heat pipes, and then discuss performance tests results for the individual heat pipes prior to delivery and for the system level thermal vacuum test. All heat pipes met their performance requirements. However, it was found that the power was too low in some instances to start all of the smaller radiator spreader heat pipes when they were tested in a reflux configuration (which is the nominal test configuration). Although this lowered the efficiency of the radiator somewhat, it did not impact the operating temperatures of the electronics boxes.

  18. Long Term Corrosion/Degradation Test Six Year Results

    SciTech Connect

    M. K. Adler Flitton; C. W. Bishop; M. E. Delwiche; T. S. Yoder

    2004-09-01

    The Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) contains neutron-activated metals from non-fuel, nuclear reactor core components. The Long-Term Corrosion/Degradation (LTCD) Test is designed to obtain site-specific corrosion rates to support efforts to more accurately estimate the transfer of activated elements to the environment. The test is using two proven, industry-standard methods—direct corrosion testing using metal coupons, and monitored corrosion testing using electrical/resistance probes—to determine corrosion rates for various metal alloys generally representing the metals of interest buried at the SDA, including Type 304L stainless steel, Type 316L stainless steel, Inconel 718, Beryllium S200F, Aluminum 6061, Zircaloy-4, low-carbon steel, and Ferralium 255. In the direct testing, metal coupons are retrieved for corrosion evaluation after having been buried in SDA backfill soil and exposed to natural SDA environmental conditions for times ranging from one year to as many as 32 years, depending on research needs and funding availability. In the monitored testing, electrical/resistance probes buried in SDA backfill soil will provide corrosion data for the duration of the test or until the probes fail. This report provides an update describing the current status of the test and documents results to date. Data from the one-year and three-year results are also included, for comparison and evaluation of trends. In the six-year results, most metals being tested showed extremely low measurable rates of general corrosion. For Type 304L stainless steel, Type 316L stainless steel, Inconel 718, and Ferralium 255, corrosion rates fell in the range of “no reportable” to 0.0002 mils per year (MPY). Corrosion rates for Zircaloy-4 ranged from no measurable corrosion to 0.0001 MPY. These rates are two orders of magnitude lower than those specified in the performance assessment for the SDA. The corrosion on the carbon steel, beryllium, and aluminum were more evident with a clear difference in corrosion performance between the 4-ft and 10-ft levels. Notable surface corrosion products were evident as well as numerous pit initiation sites. Since the corrosion of the beryllium and aluminum is characterized by pitting, the geometrical character of the corrosion becomes more significant than the general corrosion rate. Both pitting factor and weight loss data should be used together. For six-year exposure, the maximum carbon steel corrosion rate was 0.3643 MPY while the maximum beryllium corrosion rate was 0.3282 MPY and the maximum aluminum corrosion rate was 0.0030 MPY.

  19. CMS Pixel Tracker Upgrade: Results from Test Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosius, Richard; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish

    2012-03-01

    The CMS Pixel detector is the closest tracking device to the interaction point. With current sensor technology, maintaining reliable performance of the tracker at much higher luminosities expected in the High Luminosity LHC environment would be extremely challenging. A promising research and development plan is being pursued to evaluate novel detectors, with improved radiation hardness of sensors, allowing for less frequent replacement of the inner layers of the pixel detector. A series of tests with beam have been conducted at Fermilab to study various types of sensors: (a) n-in-n magnetic Czochralski (MCZ), (b) 3D silicon, and (c) diamond. Preliminary results from the test beam will be discussed.

  20. The Results of Tests of the MICE Spectrometer Solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.; Virostek, Steve P.

    2009-10-19

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) spectrometer solenoid magnets will be the first magnets to be installed within the MICE cooling channel. The spectrometer magnets are the largest magnets in both mass and surface area within the MICE ooling channel. Like all of the other magnets in MICE, the spectrometer solenoids are kept cold using 1.5 W (at 4.2 K) pulse tube coolers. The MICE spectrometer solenoid is quite possibly the largest magnet that has been cooled using small coolers. Two pectrometer magnets have been built and tested. This report discusses the results of current and cooler tests of both magnets.

  1. Field test results prove GPS performance and utility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blank, R. W.; Rhodes, W. D., Jr.

    A summary of the statistical and operational results of field tests on Phase III GPS user equipment is presented. The GPS user equipment includes a one-channel Manpack/Vehicular configuration for backpack, land vehicle, and small watercraft applications; a two-channel configuration for Army helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft; a five-channel configuration for Air Force and Navy helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft; and a five-channel ship configuration for Navy ocean going vessels. The signal-processing and data-processing architectures of the receivers are described. Specific test data are presented which highlight dynamic position accuracy, static position accuracy, acquisition times, and field reliability.

  2. Thermosyphon Flooding in Reduced Gravity Environments Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Marc A.; Jaworske, Donald A.; Sanzi, Jim; Ljubanovic, Damir

    2013-01-01

    The condenser flooding phenomenon associated with gravity aided two-phase thermosyphons was studied using parabolic flights to obtain the desired reduced gravity environment (RGE). The experiment was designed and built to test a total of twelve titanium water thermosyphons in multiple gravity environments with the goal of developing a model that would accurately explain the correlation between gravitational forces and the maximum axial heat transfer limit associated with condenser flooding. Results from laboratory testing and parabolic flights are included in this report as part I of a two part series. The data analysis and correlations are included in a follow on paper.

  3. Salmonella mutagenicity tests. II. Results from the testing of 270 chemicals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kristien Mortelmans; Steve Haworth; Timothy Lawlor; William Speck; Beth Tainer; Errol Zeiger

    1986-01-01

    This publication includes data of Salmonella mutagenicity results on 270 coded chemicals, encompassing 329 tests performed by three laboratories under contract to the National Toxicology Program (NTP). The preincubation modification of the Salmonella\\/mammalian microsome assay was used to test chemicals in up to five Salmonella strains in the presence and absence of rat and hamster liver S-9. With a few

  4. Behaviour of ceria nanoparticles in standardized test media influence on the results of ecotoxicological tests

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Behaviour of ceria nanoparticles in standardized test media ­ influence on the results.manier@ineris.fr Abstract. The main objectives of this work were to establish the behaviour of a ceria nanopowder the ceria nanoparticles (i.e. stirring, use of probe sonication, addition of humic acids) were tested

  5. Experimental test results of a generalized parameter fuel control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batterton, P. G.; Gold, H.

    1973-01-01

    Considerable interest has been generated recently in low cost jet propulsion systems. One of the more complicated components of jet engines is the fuel control. Results of an effort to develop a simpler hydromechanical fuel control are presented. This prototype fuel control was installed on a J85-GE-13 jet engine. Results show that the fuel control provided satisfactory engine performance at sea level static conditions over its normal nonafterburning operating range, including startup. Results of both bench and engine tests are presented; the difficulties encountered are described.

  6. TEST RESULTS FROM GAMMA IRRADIATION OF ALUMINUM OXYHYDROXIDES

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.; Westbrook, M.; Sindelar, R.

    2012-02-01

    Hydrated metal oxides or oxyhydroxides boehmite and gibbsite that can form on spent aluminum-clad nuclear fuel assemblies during in-core and post-discharge wet storage were exposed as granular powders to gamma irradiation in a {sup 60}Co irradiator in closed laboratory test vessels with air and with argon as separate cover gases. The results show that boehmite readily evolves hydrogen with exposure up to a dose of 1.8 x 10{sup 8} rad, the maximum tested, in both a full-dried and moist condition of the powder, whereas only a very small measurable quantity of hydrogen was generated from the granular powder of gibbsite. Specific information on the test setup, sample characteristics, sample preparation, irradiation, and gas analysis are described.

  7. SP-100 Fuel Pin Performance: Results from Irradiation Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makenas, Bruce J.; Paxton, Dean M.; Vaidyanathan, Swaminathan; Marietta, Martin; Hoth, Carl W.

    1994-07-01

    A total of 86 experimental fuel pins with various fuel, liner, and cladding candidate materials have been irradiated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) and the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) reactor as part of the SP-100 fuel pin irradiation testing program. Postirradiation examination results from these fuel pins are key in establishing performance correlations and demonstrating the lifetime and safety of the reactor fuel system. This paper provides a brief description of the in-reactor fuel pin tests and presents the most recent irradiation data on the performance of wrought rhenium (Re) liner material and high density UN fuel at goal burnup of 6 atom percent (at. %). It also provides an overview of the significant variety of other fuel/liner/cladding combinations which were irradiated as part of this program and which may be of interest to more advanced efforts.

  8. SP-100 fuel pin performance: Results from irradiation testing

    SciTech Connect

    Makenas, B.J.; Paxton, D.M. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Vaidyanathan, S. [Martin Marietta, San Jose, CA (United States); Hoth, C.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1993-09-01

    A total of 86 experimental fuel pins with various fuel, liner, and cladding candidate materials have been irradiated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) and the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) reactor as part of the SP-100 fuel pin irradiation testing program. Postirradiation examination results from these fuel pin are key in establishing performance correlations and demonstrating the lifetime and safety of the reactor fuel system. This paper provides a brief description of the in-reactor fuel pin tests and presents the most recent irradiation data on the performance of wrought rhenium (Re) liner material and high density UN fuel at goal burnup of 6 atom percent (at. %). It also provides an overview of the significant variety of other fuel/liner/cladding combinations which were irradiated as part of this program and which may be of interest to more advanced efforts.

  9. Experimental design for the optimization and robustness testing of a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method for the trace analysis of the potentially genotoxic 1,3-diisopropylurea.

    PubMed

    Székely, György; Henriques, Bruno; Gil, Marco; Alvarez, Carlos

    2014-09-01

    This paper discusses a design of experiments (DoE) assisted optimization and robustness testing of a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method development for the trace analysis of the potentially genotoxic 1,3-diisopropylurea (IPU) impurity in mometasone furoate glucocorticosteroid. Compared to the conventional trial-and-error method development, DoE is a cost-effective and systematic approach to system optimization by which the effects of multiple parameters and parameter interactions on a given response are considered. The LC and MS factors were studied simultaneously: flow (F), gradient (G), injection volume (Vinj), cone voltage (E(con)), and collision energy (E(col)). The optimization was carried out with respect to four responses: separation of peaks (Sep), peak area (A(p)), length of the analysis (T), and the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N). An optimization central composite face (CCF) DoE was conducted leading to the early discovery of carry-over effect which was further investigated in order to establish the maximum injectable sample load. A second DoE was conducted in order to obtain the optimal LC-MS/MS method. As part of the validation of the obtained method, its robustness was determined by conducting a fractional factorial of resolution III DoE, wherein column temperature and quadrupole resolution were considered as additional factors. The method utilizes a common Phenomenex Gemini NX C-18 HPLC analytical column with electrospray ionization and a triple quadrupole mass detector in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode, resulting in short analyses with a 10-min runtime. The high sensitivity and low limit of quantification (LOQ) was achieved by (1) MRM mode (instead of single ion monitoring) and (2) avoiding the drawbacks of derivatization (incomplete reaction and time-consuming sample preparation). Quantitatively, the DoE method development strategy resulted in the robust trace analysis of IPU at 1.25 ng/mL absolute concentration corresponding to 0.25 ppm LOQ in 5 g/l mometasone furoate glucocorticosteroid. Validation was carried out in a linear range of 0.25-10 ppm and presented a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 1.08% for system precision. Regarding IPU recovery in mometasone furoate, spiked samples produced recoveries between 96 and 109 % in the range of 0.25 to 2 ppm. PMID:24243602

  10. Capillary Suction Time (CST) Test: Developments in testing methodology and reliability of results 

    E-print Network

    Sawalha, Ola

    2011-01-01

    The dewatering of wastewater sludge (slurry) is a routine operation at wastewater treatment plants, and the results of dewaterability tests underpin the selection of dewatering processes. The two most commonly applied ...

  11. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Orifice Plugging Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Kimura, Marcia L.; Kurath, Dean E.

    2012-09-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities, is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations published in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials present in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty introduced by extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches in which the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are largely absent. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine the aerosol release fractions and aerosol generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents (AFA) was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and rectangular slots. Much of the testing was conducted at pressures of 200 and 380 psi, but some tests were conducted at 100 psi. Testing the largest postulated breaches was deemed impractical because of the large size of some of the WTP equipment. The purpose of the study described in this report is to provide experimental data for the first key technical area, potential plugging of small breaches, by performing small-scale tests with a range of orifice sizes and orientations representative of the WTP conditions. The simulants used were chosen to represent the range of process stream properties in the WTP. Testing conducted after the plugging tests in the small- and large-scale test stands addresses the second key technical area, aerosol generation. The results of the small-scale aerosol generation tests are included in Mahoney et al. 2012. The area of spray generation from large breaches is covered by large-scale testing in Schonewill et al. 2012.

  12. Non-Nuclear Validation Test Results of a Closed Brayton Cycle Test-Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Steven A.

    2007-01-01

    Both NASA and DOE have programs that are investigating advanced power conversion cycles for planetary surface power on the moon or Mars, or for next generation nuclear power plants on earth. Although open Brayton cycles are in use for many applications (combined cycle power plants, aircraft engines), only a few closed Brayton cycles have been tested. Experience with closed Brayton cycles coupled to nuclear reactors is even more limited and current projections of Brayton cycle performance are based on analytic models. This report describes and compares experimental results with model predictions from a series of non-nuclear tests using a small scale closed loop Brayton cycle available at Sandia National Laboratories. A substantial amount of testing has been performed, and the information is being used to help validate models. In this report we summarize the results from three kinds of tests. These tests include: 1) test results that are useful for validating the characteristic flow curves of the turbomachinery for various gases ranging from ideal gases (Ar or Ar/He) to non-ideal gases such as CO2, 2) test results that represent shut down transients and decay heat removal capability of Brayton loops after reactor shut down, and 3) tests that map a range of operating power versus shaft speed curve and turbine inlet temperature that are useful for predicting stable operating conditions during both normal and off-normal operating behavior. These tests reveal significant interactions between the reactor and balance of plant. Specifically these results predict limited speed up behavior of the turbomachinery caused by loss of load, the conditions for stable operation, and for direct cooled reactors, the tests reveal that the coast down behavior during loss of power events can extend for hours provided the ultimate heat sink remains available.

  13. Flight test results of the strapdown hexad inertial reference unit (SIRU). Volume 2: Test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hruby, R. J.; Bjorkman, W. S.

    1977-01-01

    Results of flight tests of the Strapdown Inertial Reference Unit (SIRU) navigation system are presented. The fault tolerant SIRU navigation system features a redundant inertial sensor unit and dual computers. System software provides for detection and isolation of inertial sensor failures and continued operation in the event of failures. Flight test results include assessments of the system's navigational performance and fault tolerance. Performance shortcomings are analyzed.

  14. Large-Scale Spray Releases: Additional Aerosol Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Richard C.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Kurath, Dean E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Mahoney, Lenna A.

    2013-08-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak event involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids that behave as a Newtonian fluid. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and in processing facilities across the DOE complex. To expand the data set upon which the WTP accident and safety analyses were based, an aerosol spray leak testing program was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL’s test program addressed two key technical areas to improve the WTP methodology (Larson and Allen 2010). The first technical area was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where slurry particles may plug the hole and prevent high-pressure sprays. The results from an effort to address this first technical area can be found in Mahoney et al. (2012a). The second technical area was to determine aerosol droplet size distribution and total droplet volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, including sprays from larger breaches and sprays of slurries for which literature data are mostly absent. To address the second technical area, the testing program collected aerosol generation data at two scales, commonly referred to as small-scale and large-scale testing. The small-scale testing and resultant data are described in Mahoney et al. (2012b), and the large-scale testing and resultant data are presented in Schonewill et al. (2012). In tests at both scales, simulants were used to mimic the relevant physical properties projected for actual WTP process streams.

  15. Experimental Results of Integrated Refrigeration and Storage System Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Notardonato, W. U.; Johnson, W. L.; Jumper, K.

    2009-01-01

    Launch operations engineers at the Kennedy Space Center have identified an Integrated Refrigeration and Storage system as a promising technology to reduce launch costs and enable advanced cryogenic operations. This system uses a close cycle Brayton refrigerator to remove energy from the stored cryogenic propellant. This allows for the potential of a zero loss storage and transfer system, as well and control of the state of the propellant through densification or re-liquefaction. However, the behavior of the fluid in this type of system is different than typical cryogenic behavior, and there will be a learning curve associated with its use. A 400 liter research cryostat has been designed, fabricated and delivered to KSC to test the thermo fluid behavior of liquid oxygen as energy is removed from the cryogen by a simulated DC cycle cryocooler. Results of the initial testing phase focusing on heat exchanger characterization and zero loss storage operations using liquid oxygen are presented in this paper. Future plans for testing of oxygen densification tests and oxygen liquefaction tests will also be discussed. KEYWORDS: Liquid Oxygen, Refrigeration, Storage

  16. Spent fuel drying system test results (second dry-run)

    SciTech Connect

    Klinger, G.S.; Oliver, B.M.; Abrefah, J.; Marschman, S.C.; MacFarlan, P.J.; Ritter, G.A.

    1998-07-01

    The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks have been detected in the basins and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuel elements in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site (WHC 1995). Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 7.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of the second dry-run test, which was conducted without a fuel element. With the concurrence of project management, the test protocol for this run, and subsequent drying test runs, was modified. These modifications were made to allow for improved data correlation with drying procedures proposed under the IPS. Details of these modifications are discussed in Section 3.0.

  17. Test Results for a High Power Thermal Management System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrenn, Kimberly R.; Wolf, David A.

    2008-01-01

    In response to the identified needs of emerging high power spacecraft applications, a multiple evaporator hybrid loop heat pipe (H-LHP) was developed and tested as part of a Dual Use Science and Technology (DUS&T) program co-sponsored by ATK and AFRL/PRP. During the course of the DUS&T program, a two-kilowatt system with three evaporators was developed and tested to identify viable system architectures and characterize system performance capabilities as a function of heat load profiles and spatial distribution of the evaporators. Following the successful development of the two-kilowatt system, a 10-kilowatt system with six evaporators was fabricated and tested. Tests were performed with the system operating in a totally passive mode, where applying a small amount of power to a sweepage evaporator provides the auxiliary flow through the primary evaporators, and as a self-regulating, capillary-controlled mechanically pumped system. This paper will provide a description of the 10-kilowatt multi-evaporator system and present the results of the passive and mechanically pump test programs.

  18. Experimental Results of Integrated Refrigeration and Storage System Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notardonato, W. U.; Johnson, W. L.; Oliveira, J.; Jumper, K.

    2010-04-01

    Launch operations engineers at the Kennedy Space Center have identified an Integrated Refrigeration and Storage system as a promising technology to reduce launch costs and enable advanced cryogenic operations. This system uses a closed cycle Brayton refrigerator to remove energy from the stored cryogenic propellant. This allows for control of the temperature and pressure of the fluid, and enables advanced operations such as zero boil off storage and zero loss transfer. If required, this also can serve as a propellant densification system or liquefier. However, the behavior of the fluid in this type of system is different than typical cryogenic storage systems, and there will be a learning curve associated with its use. A 400 liter research cryostat has been designed, fabricated and delivered to KSC to test the thermofluid behavior of liquid oxygen as energy is removed from the cryogen by a simulated DC cycle cryocooler. Results of the initial testing phase focusing on heat exchanger characterization and zero loss storage operations using liquid oxygen are presented in this paper. Future plans for testing of oxygen densification tests and oxygen liquefaction tests will also be discussed.

  19. Results of a sub-scale model rotor icing test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemming, Robert J.; Bond, Thomas H.; Britton, Randall K.

    1991-01-01

    A heavily instrumented sub-scale model of a helicopter main rotor was tested in the NASA Lewis Research Center Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) in September and November 1989. The four-bladed main rotor had a diameter of 1.83 m (6.00 ft) and the 0.124 m (4.9 in) chord rotor blades were specially fabricated for this experiment. The instrumented rotor was mounted on a Sikorsky Aircraft Powered Force Model, which enclosed a rotor balance and other measurement systems. The model rotor was exposed to a range of icing conditions that included variations in temperature, liquid water content, and median droplet diameter, and was operated over ranges of advance ratio, shaft angle, tip Mach number (rotor speed) and weight coefficient to determine the effect of these parameters on ice accretion. In addition to strain gage and balance data, the test was documented with still, video, and high speed photography, ice profile tracings, and ice molds. The sensitivity of the model rotor to the test parameters, is given, and the result to theoretical predictions are compared. Test data quality was excellent, and ice accretion prediction methods and rotor performance prediction methods (using published icing lift and drag relationships) reproduced the performance trends observed in the test. Adjustments to the correlation coefficients to improve the level of correlation are suggested.

  20. Thermally Induced Groundwater Flow Resulting from an Underground Nuclear Test

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, R.M.; Tompson, A.F.B.; Rambo, J.T.; Carle, S.F.; Pawloski, G.A.

    2000-12-16

    The authors examine the transient residual thermal signal resulting from an underground nuclear test (buried below the water table) and its potential to affect local groundwater flow and radionuclide migration in a saturated, fractured, volcanic aquifer system. Thermal profiles measured in a drillback hole between 154 days and 6.5 years after the test have been used to calibrate a non-isothermal model of fluid flow. In this process, they have estimated the magnitude and relative changes in permeability, porosity and fracture density between different portions of the disturbed and undisturbed geologic medium surrounding the test location. The relative impacts of buoyancy forces (arising from the thermal residual of the test and the background geothermal gradient) and horizontal pressure gradients on the post-test flow system are better understood. A transient particle/streamline model of contaminant transport is used to visualize streamlines and streaklines of the flow field and to examine the migration of non-reactive radionuclides. Sensitivity analyses are performed to understand the effects of local and sub-regional geologic features, and the effects of fractured zones on the movement of groundwater and thermal energy. Conclusions regarding the overall effect of the thermal regime on the residence times and fluxes of radionuclides out of the system are drawn, and implications for more complicated, reactive contaminant transport are discussed.

  1. Flight test results of riblets at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuniga, Fanny A.; Anderson, Bianca T.; Bertelrud, Arild

    1992-01-01

    A flight experiment to test and evaluate the skin friction drag characteristics of a riblet surface in turbulent flow at supersonic speeds was conducted at NASA Dryden. Riblets of groove sizes 0.0030 and 0.0013 in. were mounted on the F-104G flight test fixture. The test surfaces were surveyed with boundary layer rakes and pressure orifices to examine the boundary layer profiles and pressure distributions of the flow. Skin friction reductions caused by the riblet surface were reported based on measured differences of momentum thickness between the smooth and riblet surfaces obtained from the boundary layer data. Flight test results for the 0.0030 in. riblet show skin friction reductions of 4 to 8 % for Mach numbers ranging from 1.2 to 1.6 and Reynolds numbers ranging from 2 to 3.4 million per unit foot. The results from the 0.0013 in. riblets show skin friction reductions of 4 to 15 % for Mach 1.2 to 1.4 and Reynolds numbers ranging from 3.6 to 6 million per unit foot.

  2. Fan Noise Source Diagnostic Test: Tone Modal Structure Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidelberg, Laurence J.

    2002-01-01

    This investigation is part of a test series that was extremely comprehensive and included aerodynamic and acoustic testing of a fan stage using two different fan rotors and three different stator designs. The test series is known as the Source Diagnostic Test (SDT) and was conducted by NASA Glenn as part of the Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) Noise Reduction Program. Tone mode measurements of one of the rotors with three different stators were made. The stator designs involve changes in vane count and sweep at constant solidity. The results of both inlet and exhaust tone mode measurements are presented in terms of mode power for both circumferential and radial mode orders. The results show benefits of vane sweep to be large, up to 13 dB in total tone power. At many conditions, the increase in power due to cutting on the rotor/stator interaction is more than offset by vane sweep. The rotor locked mode is shown as an important contributor to tone power when the blade tip speed is near and above Mach one. This is most evident in the inlet when the direct rotor field starts to cut on.

  3. The XRS Low Temperature Cryogenic System: Ground Performance Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breon, Susan; Sirron, Peter; Boyle, Robert; Canavan, Ed; DiPirro, Michael; Serlemitsos, Aristides; Tuttle, James; Whitehouse, Paul

    1998-01-01

    The X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) instrument is part of the Astro-E mission scheduled to launch early in 2000. Its cryogenic system is required to cool a 32-element square array of x-ray microcalorimeters to 60-65 mK over a mission lifetime of at least 2 years. This is accomplished using an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) contained within a two-stage superfluid helium/solid neon cooler. Goddard Space Flight Center is providing the ADR and helium dewar. The flight system was assembled in Sept. 1997 and subjected to extensive thermal performance tests. This paper presents test results at both the system and component levels. In addition, results of the low temperature topoff performed in Japan with the engineering unit neon and helium dewars are discussed.

  4. Field test results prove GPS performance and utility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. W. Blank; W. D. Rhodes Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A summary of the statistical and operational results of field tests on Phase III GPS user equipment is presented. The GPS user equipment includes a one-channel Manpack\\/Vehicular configuration for backpack, land vehicle, and small watercraft applications; a two-channel configuration for Army helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft; a five-channel configuration for Air Force and Navy helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft; and a five-channel

  5. Heave compensation systems: analysis and results of field testing

    SciTech Connect

    Azpiazu, W.; Schweim, E.R.; Thatcher, M.T.

    1983-05-01

    A program to determine the performance of heave compensator systems under actual at-sea working conditions has been undertaken. As a result of this test program, parameters have been determined for heave compensation systems that will allow design of these systems with preestablished performance goals. A description of the methods used to determine the coefficients that control system performance is presented and equations are given to determine system response to the full spectrum of envisioned working conditions.

  6. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Additional Aerosol Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Schonewill, Philip P.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, G. N.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Kurath, Dean E.

    2013-08-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. To expand the data set upon which the WTP accident and safety analyses were based, an aerosol spray leak testing program was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL’s test program addressed two key technical areas to improve the WTP methodology (Larson and Allen 2010). The first technical area was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where slurry particles may plug the hole and prevent high-pressure sprays. The results from an effort to address this first technical area can be found in Mahoney et al. (2012a). The second technical area was to determine aerosol droplet size distribution and total droplet volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, including sprays from larger breaches and sprays of slurries for which literature data are largely absent. To address the second technical area, the testing program collected aerosol generation data at two scales, commonly referred to as small-scale and large-scale. The small-scale testing and resultant data are described in Mahoney et al. (2012b) and the large-scale testing and resultant data are presented in Schonewill et al. (2012). In tests at both scales, simulants were used to mimic the relevant physical properties projected for actual WTP process streams.

  7. SCD1 thermal design and test result analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardoso, Humberto Pontes; Muraoka, Issamu; Mantelli, Marcia Barbosa Henriques; Leite, Rosangela M. G.

    1990-01-01

    The SCD 01 (Satelite de Coleta de Dados 01) is a spin stabilized low Earth orbit satellite dedicated to the collection and distribution of environmental data. It was completely developed at the Brazilian Institute for Space Research (INPE) and is scheduled to be launched in 1992. The SCD 01 passive thermal control design configuration is presented and the thermal analysis results are compared with the temperatures obtained from a Thermal Balance Test. The correlation between the analytical and experimental results is considered very good. Numerical flight simulations show that the thermal control design can keep all the subsystem temperatures within their specified temperature range.

  8. Qualification test results for blue-red reflecting solar covers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beauchamp, W. T.

    1994-01-01

    Recent market forces and design innovations have spurred the development of solar cell covers that significantly reduce the solar absorptance for a cell array. GaAs cells, using Ge as the substrate host material, can have a significantly higher output if the solar absorptance of the cell array is reduced. New optical coating design techniques have allowed the construction of covers that reflect the ultraviolet energy (below 350 nm) and the near infrared energy (above 900 nm) resulting in the beneficial reduction in absorptance. Recent modeling suggests three or more present output increase due to the lowered temperature with such a device. Within the last several months we have completed the testing of production samples of these new covers in a qualification series that included the usual environmental effects associated with the routine testing of solar cell covers and the combined effects of protons, electrons and solar UV as would be encountered in space. For the combined effects testing the samples were exposed to 300 sun days equivalent UV, 5 x 10(exp 14)/sq cm of 0.5 MeV protons and 10(exp 15)/sq cm of 1.0 MeV electrons. Measurements of the reflectance, transmission, emittance and other appropriate parameters were made before and after the testing. As measured by the averaged transmission over the cell operating band, the change in transmission for the samples was less than or about equal to 1 percent. The details of the testing and the results in terms of transmission, reflectance and emittance are discussed in the paper.

  9. Results of toxicological testing of Jefferson Parish pilot plant samples.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, R G; Kopfler, F C; Condie, L W; Pereira, M A; Meier, J R; Ringhand, H P; Robinson, M; Casto, B C

    1986-01-01

    Five toxicological tests were performed using concentrated drinking water samples collected at a pilot-scale drinking water treatment plant that had streams treated with different disinfectants (no disinfectant, ozone, chlorine dioxide, monochloramine, or chlorine) before treatment with granular activated carbon (GAC). The toxicological tests used in this study were the Ames Salmonella assay, a subchronic in vivo toxicity assay in mice, the SENCAR mouse skin initiation-promotion assay, a rat liver foci assay, and the lung adenoma assay in strain A mice. These tests were conducted to determine the general toxicity and the mutagenic/carcinogenic potential associated with the use of disinfection and/or GAC in the treatment of drinking water. The stability of the mutagenic activity of the samples tested was determined by repeated analysis using the Ames Salmonella assay. Results indicated that the samples remained mutagenic for the duration of the tests. All the drinking water concentrates (4000 X) prepared by the XAD resin adsorption procedure failed to provide statistically significant indication of carcinogenic activity in the SENCAR mouse, rat liver foci, and the lung adenoma assays. However, concentrates of the chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine treated waters gave consistent mutagenic responses in the Ames Salmonella assay. GAC was effective for 6 months in removing both the mutagenicity of chlorine-treated water and the potential of water to become mutagenic when treated with chlorine. In the in vivo, subchronic 30-day toxicity test in mice, some statistically significant differences in organ weights and body weights of animals exposed to different concentrates of some of the samples were observed. However, a consistent pattern of these differences indicating overt toxicity was not detected. PMID:3816718

  10. MUSE image slicer: test results on largest slicer ever manufactured

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Florence; Renault, Edgard; Kosmalski, Johan; Adjali, Louisa; Boudon, Didier; Bacon, Roland; Caillier, Patrick; Remillieux, Alban; Salaun, Yves; Delabre, Bernard

    2008-07-01

    An image slicer breadboard has been designed, manufactured and tested for MUSE (Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer) instrument, a second generation integral field spectrograph developed for the European Southern Observatory (ESO) for the VLT. MUSE is operating in the visible and near IR wavelength range (0.465-0.93 ?m) and is composed of 24 identical Integral Field Units; each one incorporates an advanced image slicer associated with a classical spectrograph. This paper describes the original optical design, the manufacturing, component test results (shape, roughness, reflectivity, microscopic visualization) and overall system performance (image quality, alignment) of the image slicer breadboard. This one is a combination of two mirror arrays of 48 elements each. It is made of Zerodur and uses a new polishing approach where all individual optical components are polished together by classical method. This image slicer constitutes the first one which has the largest number of active slices (48) associated with strict tolerances in term of positioning. The main results of the tests on this image slicer breadboard will then be presented. Most of them are compliant with requirements. This demonstrates that the manufacturing process is mature and gives good confidence for serial production applied to MUSE instrument.

  11. Shake Test Results and Dynamic Calibration Efforts for the Large Rotor Test Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Carl R.

    2014-01-01

    A shake test of the Large Rotor Test Apparatus (LRTA) was performed in an effort to enhance NASAscapability to measure dynamic hub loads for full-scale rotor tests. This paper documents the results of theshake test as well as efforts to calibrate the LRTA balance system to measure dynamic loads.Dynamic rotor loads are the primary source of vibration in helicopters and other rotorcraft, leading topassenger discomfort and damage due to fatigue of aircraft components. There are novel methods beingdeveloped to reduce rotor vibrations, but measuring the actual vibration reductions on full-scale rotorsremains a challenge. In order to measure rotor forces on the LRTA, a balance system in the non-rotatingframe is used. The forces at the balance can then be translated to the hub reference frame to measure therotor loads. Because the LRTA has its own dynamic response, the balance system must be calibrated toinclude the natural frequencies of the test rig.

  12. ROBUST SOLUTION OF SINGULARLY PERTURBED PROBLEMS USING MULTIGRID METHODS; ANALYSIS AND NUMERICAL RESULTS IN ONE AND TWO DIMENSIONS

    E-print Network

    MacLachlan, Scott

    ROBUST SOLUTION OF SINGULARLY PERTURBED PROBLEMS USING MULTIGRID METHODS; ANALYSIS AND NUMERICAL of solving linear systems of equations that arise in the numerical solution of singularly perturbed ordinary to certain linear singularly perturbed boundary value problems in one and two dimensions. These differential

  13. Test results of LHC interaction regions quadrupoles produced by Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Bossert, R.; Carson, J.; Chichili, D.R.; Feher, S.; Kerby, J.; Lamm, M.J.; Nobrega, A.; Nicol, T.; /Fermilab; Ogitsu, T.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Orris, D.; Page, T.; Peterson, T.; Rabehl, R.; Robotham, W.; /Fermilab; Scanlan, R.; /LBL, Berkeley; Schlabach, P.; Sylvester, C.; Strait, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Tompkins, J.C.; Velev, G.; /Fermilab

    2004-10-01

    The US-LHC Accelerator Project is responsible for the production of the Q2 optical elements of the final focus triplets in the LHC interaction regions. As part of this program Fermilab is in the process of manufacturing and testing cryostat assemblies (LQXB) containing two identical quadrupoles (MQXB) with a dipole corrector between them. The 5.5 m long Fermilab designed MQXB have a 70 mm aperture and operate in superfluid helium at 1.9 K with a peak field gradient of 215 T/m. This paper summarizes the test results of several production MQXB quadrupoles with emphasis on quench performance and alignment studies. Quench localization studies using quench antenna signals are also presented.

  14. [Antituberculous measures according to the results of Mantoux test].

    PubMed

    Guse?nov, G K; Mamaev, I A; Abdulaeva, Z K

    2003-01-01

    Analyzing the results of Mantoux tests with 2 TE made 7 times for 5 years in 750-850 schoolchildren of the settlement of Sulak has demonstrated that the infection rates are on the increase on the one hand, and, due to material and transport problems, the proportion of examinees from a risk group decreases to 10-30% of those to be examined, on the other hand. The authors suggest that the remaining unexamined children should undergo chemotherapy with 2-3 antituberculosis drugs for 3 months so as to perform an examination when the first opportunity occurs. They propose to examine the coverage of children, except for children and adolescents with a hyperergic and increasing reactions and those with a highly positive (15-16 mm) Mantoux test. An algorithm for implementation of the above measures is offered. PMID:12652976

  15. Stereovision safety system for identifying workers' presence: results of tests.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Andrzej; Jankowski, Jaros?aw; D?wiarek, Marek; Kosi?ski, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the results of extensive tests of a stereovision safety system performed using real and artificial images. A vision based protective device (VBPD) analyses images from 2 cameras to calculate the position of a worker and moving parts of a machine (e.g., an industrial robot's arm). Experiments show that the stereovision safety system works properly in real time even when subjected to rapid changes in illumination level. Experiments performed with a functional model of an industrial robot indicate that this safety system can be used to detect dangerous situations at workstations equipped with a robot, in human-robot co- operation. Computer-generated artificial images of a workplace simplify and accelerate testing procedures, and make it possible to compare the effectiveness of VBPDs and other protective devices at no additional cost. PMID:24629872

  16. Relationships between driving simulator performance and driving test results.

    PubMed

    de Winter, J C F; de Groot, S; Mulder, M; Wieringa, P A; Dankelman, J; Mulder, J A

    2009-02-01

    This article is considered relevant because: 1) car driving is an everyday and safety-critical task; 2) simulators are used to an increasing extent for driver training (related topics: training, virtual reality, human-machine interaction); 3) the article addresses relationships between performance in the simulator and driving test results--a relevant topic for those involved in driver training and the virtual reality industries; 4) this article provides new insights about individual differences in young drivers' behaviour. Simulators are being used to an increasing extent for driver training, allowing for the possibility of collecting objective data on driver proficiency under standardised conditions. However, relatively little is known about how learner drivers' simulator measures relate to on-road driving. This study proposes a theoretical framework that quantifies driver proficiency in terms of speed of task execution, violations and errors. This study investigated the relationships between these three measures of learner drivers' (n=804) proficiency during initial simulation-based training and the result of the driving test on the road, occurring an average of 6 months later. A higher chance of passing the driving test the first time was associated with making fewer steering errors on the simulator and could be predicted in regression analysis with a correlation of 0.18. Additionally, in accordance with the theoretical framework, a shorter duration of on-road training corresponded with faster task execution, fewer violations and fewer steering errors (predictive correlation 0.45). It is recommended that researchers conduct more large-scale studies into the reliability and validity of simulator measures and on-road driving tests. PMID:18972239

  17. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Pilot-Scale Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2006-03-01

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, ''Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive.'' The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemissions of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate that the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project will conduct pilot and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosage requirements to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. A third utility, to be named later, will provide the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. This topical report presents the results from the Task 2 and Task 4 pilot-scale additive tests. The Task 3 and Task 5 full-scale additive tests will be conducted later in calendar year 2006.

  18. Salmonella mutagenicity tests. II. Results from the testing of 270 chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Mortelmans, K.; Haworth, S.; Lawlor, T.; Speck, W.; Tainer, B.; Zeiger, E.

    1986-01-01

    This publication includes data of Salmonella mutagenicity results on 270 coded chemicals, encompassing 329 tests performed by three laboratories under contract to the National Toxicology Program (NTP). The preincubation modification of the Salmonella/mammalian microsome assay was used to test chemicals in up to five Salmonella strains in the presence and absence of rat and hamster liver S-9. With a few exceptions, inter- and intralaboratory reproducibility was good.

  19. The ACES Mission: System Tests Results and Development Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacciapuoti, Luigi

    Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space (ACES) is a mission of the European Space Agency (ESA) testing fundamental laws of physics with high-performance atomic clocks1 . Operated on-board the International Space Station, the ACES payload will distribute a clock signal with fractional frequency instability and inaccuracy of 1·10-16 . This frequency reference is resulting from the medium-term stability of an active hydrogen maser (SHM) and the long-term stability and accuracy of a primary standard based on samples of laser cooled Cs atoms (PHARAO). The ACES clocks are combined by two servo-loops, the first stabilizing the PHARAO local oscillator on SHM, the second controlling the long-term instabilities of SHM using the error signal generated by the PHARAO Cesium resonator. A link in the microwave domain (MWL) and an optical link (ELT) will make the ACES clock signal available to ground laboratories equipped with atomic clocks, connecting them in a worldwide network. Space-to-ground and ground-to-ground comparisons of atomic frequency standards will be used to test Einstein's theory of general relativity including a precision measurement of the gravitational red-shift, a search for time variations of fundamental constants, and Lorentz Invariance tests. Applications in geodesy, optical time transfer, and ranging will also be supported. The ACES main instruments and subsystems have now reached an advanced status of devel-opment, demonstrated by the completion and the successful test of their engineering models. In particular, a dedicated test campaign has recently verified the performance of the ACES system, where PHARAO and SHM, locked together via the ACES servo loops, are operated as a unique oscillator to generate the ACES frequency reference. The test campaign conducted 1 Luigi Cacciapuoti and Christophe Salomon, Space Clocks and Fundamental Tests: The ACES Experiment, EPJ Special topics 172, 57 (2009). at CNES premises in Toulouse between July and November 2009 concluded the engineering models phase, releasing the manufacturing of the ACES flight models. The first prototype of the ACES MWL ground terminal is being assembled. The ACES ground segment architecture has been defined. Based on an extension of the standard Columbus USOC (User Support and Operations Center) located in CADMOS-Toulouse, the ACES USOC will remotely control the network of MWL ground terminals, and provide the necessary interfaces with the Columbus Control Center and the ACES users' community. The current development status of the ACES mission elements will be presented and discussed. An overview of future planning will be given.

  20. Test Results of a Nb3Sn Wind/React 'Stress-Managed' BlockDipole

    SciTech Connect

    McInturff, A.; Bish, P.; Blackburn, R.; Diaczenko, N.; Elliott,T.; Hafalia Jr., R.; Henchel, W.; Jaisle, A.; Lau, W.; Lietzke, A.; McIntyre, P.; Noyes, P.; Nyman, M.; Sattarov, A.; Sattarov, A.

    2006-08-25

    A second phase of a highfield dipole technology developmenthas been tested. A Nb3Sn block-coil model dipole was fabricated, usingmagnetic mirror geometry and wind/react coil technology. The primaryobjective of this phase was to make a first experimental test of thestress-management strategy pioneered at Texas A&M. In this strategy ahigh-strength support matrix is integrated with the windings to interceptLorentz stress from the inner winding so that it does not accumulate inthe outer winding. The magnet attained a field that was consistent withshort sample limit on the first quench; there was no training. Thedecoupling of Lorentz stress between inner and outer windings wasvalidated. In ramp rate studies the magnet exhibited a remarkablerobustness in rapid ramping operation. It reached 85 percent of shortsample(ss) current even while ramping 2-3 T/s. This robustness isattributed to the orientation of the Rutherford cables parallel to thefield in the windings, instead of the transverse orientation thatcharacterizes common dipole designs. Test results are presented and thenext development phase plans are discussed.

  1. Current test results for the Athena radar responsive tag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormesher, Richard C.; Martinez, Ana; Plummer, Kenneth W.; Erlandson, David; Delaware, Sheri; Clark, David R.

    2006-05-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has teamed with General Atomics and Sierra Monolithics to develop the Athena tag for the Army's Radar Tag Engagement (RaTE) program. The radar-responsive Athena tag can be used for Blue Force tracking and Combat Identification (CID) as well as data collection, identification, and geolocation applications. The Athena tag is small (~4.5" x 2.4" x 4.2"), battery-powered, and has an integral antenna. Once remotely activated by a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) or Moving Target Indicator (MTI) radar, the tag transponds modulated pulses to the radar at a low transmit power. The Athena tag can operate Ku-band and X-band airborne SAR and MTI radars. This paper presents results from current tag development testing activities. Topics covered include recent field tests results from the AN/APY-8 Lynx, F16/APG-66, and F15E/APG-63 V(1) radars and other Fire Control radars. Results show that the Athena tag successfully works with multiple radar platforms, in multiple radar modes, and for multiple applications. Radar-responsive tags such as Athena have numerous applications in military and government arenas. Military applications include battlefield situational awareness, combat identification, targeting, personnel recovery, and unattended ground sensors. Government applications exist in nonproliferation, counter-drug, search-and-rescue, and land-mapping activities.

  2. The Castor 120 (TM) motor: Development and qualification testing results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilden, Jack G.; Poirer, Beverly M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses Thiokol Corporation's static test results for the development and qualification program of the Castor 120(TM) motor. The demonstration program began with a 25,000-pound motor to demonstrate the new technologies and processes that would be used on the larger Castor 120(TM) motor. The Castor 120(TM) motor was designed to be applicable as a first stage, second stage, or strap-on motor. Static test results from the Castor 25 and two Castor 120(TM) motors are discussed in this paper. The results verified the feasibility of tailoring the propellant grain configuration and nozzle throat diameter to meet various customer requirements. The first and second motors were conditioned successfully at ambient temperature and 28 F, respectively, to demonstrate that the design could handle a wide range of environmental launch conditions. Furthermore, the second Castor 120(TM) motor demonstrated a systems tunnel and forward skirt extension to verify flight-ready stage hardware. It is anticipated that the first flight motor will be ready by the fall of 1994.

  3. Field testing results for the strategic petroleum reserve pipeline corrosion control program

    SciTech Connect

    Buchheit, R.G.; Maestas, L.M.; Hinkebein, T.E.

    1998-02-01

    Results of two studies conducted as part of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Pipeline Corrosion Control Program are reported. These studies focused on evaluation of rotary-applied concrete materials for internal pipeline protection against the erosive and corrosive effects of flowing brine. The study also included evaluation of liners applied by hand on pipe pieces that cannot be lined by rotary methods. Such pipe pieces include tees, elbows and flanged pipe sections. Results are reported from a corrosion survey of 17 different liner formulations tested at the-Big-Rill SPR Site. Testing consisted of electrochemical corrosion rate measurements made on lined pipe sections exposed, in a test manifold, to flowing SPR generated fluids. Testing also involved cumulative immersion exposure where samples were exposed to static site-generated brine for increasing periods of time. Samples were returned to the laboratory for various diagnostic analyses. Results of this study showed that standard calcium silicate concrete (API RP10E) and a rotary calcium aluminate concrete formulation were excellent performers. Hand-lined pipe pieces did not provide as much corrosion protection. The focus of the second part of the study was on further evaluation of the calcium silicate, calcium aluminate and hand-applied liners in actual SPR equipment and service. It was a further objective to assess the practicality of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) for field corrosion monitoring of concrete lined pipe compared to the more well-known linear polarization technique. This study showed that concrete linings reduced the corrosion rate for bare steel from 10 to 15 mils per year to 1 mil per year or less. Again, the hand-applied liners did not provide as much corrosion protection as the rotary-applied liners. The EIS technique was found to be robust for field corrosion measurements. Mechanistic and kinetic corrosion rate data were reliably obtained.

  4. Preliminary operational results of the industrial process heat field tests

    SciTech Connect

    Kutscher, C.; Davenport, R.

    1980-04-01

    There are currently six DOE-funded solar industrial process heat (IPH) field tests which have been operational for one year or longer. These are all low temperature first generation projects which supply heat at temperatures below 100/sup 0/C - three hot water and three hot air. During the 1979 calendar year, personnel from the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) visited all of these sites; the performance and cost results obtained for each project and the operational problems encountered at each site are discussed.

  5. Plutonium immobilization program - Cold pour Phase 1 test results

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, L.

    2000-04-28

    The Plutonium Immobilization Project will disposition excess weapons grade plutonium. It uses the can-in-canister approach that involves placing plutonium-ceramic pucks in sealed cans that are then placed into Defense Waste Processing Facility canisters. These canisters are subsequently filled with high-level radioactive waste glass. This process puts the plutonium in a stable form and makes it unattractive for reuse. A cold (non-radioactive) glass pour program was performed to develop and verify the baseline design for the canister and internal hardware. This paper describes the Phase 1 scoping test results.

  6. Plutonium Immobilization Program -- Cold pour Phase 1 test results

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, L.

    2000-01-18

    The Plutonium Immobilization Project will disposition excess weapons grade plutonium. It uses the can-in-canister approach that involves placing plutonium-ceramic pucks in sealed cans that are then placed into Defense Waste Processing Facility canisters. These canisters are subsequently filled with high-level radioactive waste glass. This process puts the plutonium in a stable form and makes it unattractive for reuse. A cold (non-radioactive) glass pour program was performed to develop and verify the baseline design for the canister and internal hardware. This paper describes the Phase 1 scoping test results.

  7. Flight Results of USV-1 Dropped Transonic Flight Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Matteis, P.; Marino, G.; Richiello, C.; Russo, G.; Solazzo, M.

    2011-08-01

    The present paper describes the second mission of the USV program, named DTFT-2, carried out in April 2010 by the Flight Test Bed FTB-1 "Polluce". The main experimental objectives of the flight are described along with the major modifications implemented into the "Polluce" unit, as lesson learned of the first flight mission DTFT_1, carried out in 2007. The on-board experiments and post-flight analysis, relied upon either direct measurements, through a number sensors distributed all along the vehicle, and data obtained from elaboration of inertial measurements. The results available from the post-flight analysis carried out so far, are presented and discussed as lesson learned.

  8. Test Results of the Luminosity Monitors for the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Beche, J.F.; Byrd, J. M.; Doolittle, L.; Manfredi, P. F.; Matis, H. S.; Monroy, M.; Ratti, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stiller, J.; Turner, W.; Yaver, H.; Drees, A.; Bravin, E.

    2009-05-04

    The Luminosity Monitor for the LHC has been built at LBNL and will be operational in the LHC during the upcoming run. The device, a gas ionization chamber, is installed in the high luminosity regions (those dedicated to the ATLAS and CMS experiments) and capable to resolve bunch-by-bunch luminosity as well as survive extreme levels of radiation. During the experimental R&D phase of its design, a prototype of this detector has been tested extensively at the ALS, in RHIC as well as in the SPS. Results of these experiments are presented here.

  9. Hanford coring bit temperature monitor development testing results report

    SciTech Connect

    Rey, D.

    1995-05-01

    Instrumentation which directly monitors the temperature of a coring bit used to retrieve core samples of high level nuclear waste stored in tanks at Hanford was developed at Sandia National Laboratories. Monitoring the temperature of the coring bit is desired to enhance the safety of the coring operations. A unique application of mature technologies was used to accomplish the measurement. This report documents the results of development testing performed at Sandia to assure the instrumentation will withstand the severe environments present in the waste tanks.

  10. Assessing Equivalent Viscous Damping Using Piping System test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, J.; Morante, R.

    2010-07-18

    The specification of damping for nuclear piping systems subject to seismic-induced motions has been the subject of many studies and much controversy. Damping estimation based on test data can be influenced by numerous factors, consequently leading to considerable scatter in damping estimates in the literature. At present, nuclear industry recommendations and nuclear regulatory guidance are not consistent on the treatment of damping for analysis of nuclear piping systems. Therefore, there is still a need to develop a more complete and consistent technical basis for specification of appropriate damping values for use in design and analysis. This paper summarizes the results of recent damping studies conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  11. JWST Near-Infrared Detectors: Latest Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Erin C.; Rauscher, Bernard J.; Alexander, David; Brambora, Clifford K.; Chiao, Meng; Clemons, Brian L.; Derro, Rebecca; Engler, Chuck; Fox, Ori; Garrison, Matthew B.; Greenhouse, Matthew A.; Henegar, Greg; Hill, Robert J.; Johnson, Thomas; Lavaque, Dodolfo J.; Lindler, Don J.; Manthripragada, Sridhar S.; Marshall, Cheryl; Mott, Brent; Parr, Thomas M.; Roher, Wayne D.; Shakoorzadeh, Kamdin B.; Schnurr, Richard; Smith, Miles; Waczynski, Augustyn

    2009-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope, an infrared-optimized space telescope being developed by NASA for launch in 2013, will utilize cutting-edge detector technology in its investigation of fundamental questions in astrophysics. JWST's near infrared spectrograph, NIRSpec utilizes two 2048 x 2048 HdCdTe arrays with Sidecar ASIC readout electronics developed by Teledyne to provide spectral coverage from 0.6 microns to 5 microns. We present recent test and calibration results for the NIRSpec flight arrays as well as data processing routines for noise reduction and cosmic ray rejection.

  12. Bridge Testing With Ground-Based Interferometric Radar: Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect

    Chiara, P.; Morelli, A. [SO.IN.G Strutture e Ambiente S.r.l., Via delle Corallaie 24/4, Livorno (Italy)

    2010-05-28

    The research of innovative non-contact techniques aimed at the vibration measurement of civil engineering structures (also for damage detection and structural health monitoring) is continuously directed to the optimization of measures and methods. Ground-Based Radar Interferometry (GBRI) represents the more recent technique available for static and dynamic control of structures and ground movements.Dynamic testing of bridges and buildings in operational conditions are currently performed: (a) to assess the conformity of the structure to the project design at the end of construction; (b) to identify the modal parameters (i.e. natural frequencies, mode shapes and damping ratios) and to check the variation of any modal parameters over the years; (c) to evaluate the amplitude of the structural response to special load conditions (i.e. strong winds, earthquakes, heavy railway or roadway loads). If such tests are carried out by using a non-contact technique (like GBRI), the classical issues of contact sensors (like accelerometers) are easily overtaken.This paper presents and discusses the results of various tests carried out on full-scale bridges by using a Stepped Frequency-Continuous Wave radar system.

  13. Hydrologic testing methodology and results from deep basalt boreholes

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, S R; Spane, F A; Jackson, R L; Pidcoe, W W

    1982-05-01

    The objective of the hydrologic field-testing program is to provide data for characterization of the groundwater systems wihin the Pasco Basin that are significant to understanding waste isolation. The effort is directed toward characterizing the areal and vertical distributions of hydraulic head, hydraulic properties, and hydrochemistry. Data obtained from these studies provide input for numerical modeling of groundwater flow and solute transport. These models are then used for evaluating potential waste migration as a function of space and time. The groundwater system beneath the Hanford Site and surrounding area consists of a thick, accordantly layered sequence of basalt flows and associated sedimentary interbed that primarily occur in the upper part of the Columbia River basalt. Permeable horizons of the sequence are associated with the interbeds and the interflow zones within the basalt. The columnar interiors of a flow act as low-permeability aquitards, separating the more-permeable interflows or interbeds. This paper discusses the hydrologic field-gathering activities, specifically, field-testing methodology and test results from deep basalt boreholes.

  14. Relating results from earthworm toxicity tests to agricultural soil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beyer, W.N.

    1992-01-01

    The artificial soil tests of the European Economic Community and of the Organization for Economic Cooperation produce data relating earthworm mortality to pesticide concentrations in soil under laboratory conditions. To apply these results to agricultural soils it is necessary to relate these concentrations to amounts of pesticide applied per area. This paper reviews the relevant published literature and suggests a simple relation for regulatory use. Hazards to earthworms from pesticides are suggested to be greatest soon after application, when the pesticides may be concentrated in a soil layer a few millimeters thick. For estimating exposure of earthworms, however, a thicker soil layer should be considered, to account for their movement through soil. During favorable weather conditions, earthworms belonging to species appropriate to the artificial soil test have been reported to confine their activity to a layer about 5 cm. If a 5-cm layer is accepted as relevant for regulatory purposes, then an application of 1 kg/ha would be equivalent to 1-67 ppm (dry) in the artificial soil test.

  15. Tc-99 Adsorption on Selected Activated Carbons - Batch Testing Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Smith, Ronald M.

    2010-12-01

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently developing a 200-West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system as the remedial action selected under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Record of Decision for Operable Unit (OU) 200-ZP-1. This report documents the results of treatability tests Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers conducted to quantify the ability of selected activated carbon products (or carbons) to adsorb technetium-99 (Tc-99) from 200-West Area groundwater. The Tc-99 adsorption performance of seven activated carbons (J177601 Calgon Fitrasorb 400, J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, J177612 Norit GAC830, J177613 Norit GAC830, and J177617 Nucon LW1230) were evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36. Four of the best performing carbons (J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, and J177613 Norit GAC830) were selected for batch isotherm testing. The batch isotherm tests on four of the selected carbons indicated that under lower nitrate concentration conditions (382 mg/L), Kd values ranged from 6,000 to 20,000 mL/g. In comparison. Under higher nitrate (750 mg/L) conditions, there was a measureable decrease in Tc-99 adsorption with Kd values ranging from 3,000 to 7,000 mL/g. The adsorption data fit both the Langmuir and the Freundlich equations. Supplemental tests were conducted using the two carbons that demonstrated the highest adsorption capacity to resolve the issue of the best fit isotherm. These tests indicated that Langmuir isotherms provided the best fit for Tc-99 adsorption under low nitrate concentration conditions. At the design basis concentration of Tc 0.865 µg/L(14,700 pCi/L), the predicted Kd values from using Langmuir isotherm constants were 5,980 mL/g and 6,870 mL/g for for the two carbons. These Kd values did not meet the target Kd value of 9,000 mL/g. Tests conducted to ascertain the effects of changing pH showed that at pH values of 6.5 and 7.5, no significant differences existed in Tc-adsorption performance for three of the carbons, but the fourth carbon performed better at pH 7.5. When the pH was increased to 8.5, a slight decline in performance was observed for all carbons. Tests conducted to ascertain the temperature effect on Tc-99 adsorption indicated that at 21 ºC, 27 ºC, and 32 ºC there were no significant differences in Tc-99 adsorption for three of the carbons. The fourth carbon showed a noticeable decline in Tc-99 adsorption performance with increasing temperature. The presence of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the source water did not significantly affect Tc-99 adsorption on either of two carbons tested. Technetium-99 adsorption differed by less than 15% with or without VOCs present in the test water, indicating that Tc-99 adsorption would not be significantly affected if VOCs were removed from the water prior to contact with carbon.

  16. Comparison of airfoil results from an adaptive wall test section and a porous wall test section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, Raymond E.

    1989-01-01

    Two wind tunnel investigations were conducted to assess two different wall interference alleviation/correction techniques: adaptive test section walls and classical analytical corrections. The same airfoil model has been tested in the adaptive wall test section of the NASA-Langley 0.3 m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT) and in the National Aeronautical Establishment (NAE) High Reynolds Number 2-D facility. The model has a 9 in. chord and a CAST 10-2/DOA 2 airfoil section. The 0.3 m TCT adaptive wall test section has four solid walls with flexible top and bottom walls. The NAE test section has porous top and bottom walls and solid side walls. The aerodynamic results corrected for top and bottom wall interference at Mach numbers from 0.3 to 0.8 at a Reynolds number of 10 by 1,000,000. Movement of the adaptive walls was used to alleviate the top and bottom wall interference in the test results from the NASA tunnel.

  17. Airframe Noise Results from the QTD II Flight Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elkoby, Ronen; Brusniak, Leon; Stoker, Robert W.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Abeysinghe, Amal; Moe, Jefferey W.

    2007-01-01

    With continued growth in air travel, sensitivity to community noise intensifies and materializes in the form of increased monitoring, regulations, and restrictions. Accordingly, realization of quieter aircraft is imperative, albeit only achievable with reduction of both engine and airframe components of total aircraft noise. Model-scale airframe noise testing has aided in this pursuit; however, the results are somewhat limited due to lack of fidelity of model hardware, particularly in simulating full-scale landing gear. Moreover, simulation of true in-flight conditions is non-trivial if not infeasible. This paper reports on an investigation of full-scale landing gear noise measured as part of the 2005 Quiet Technology Demonstrator 2 (QTD2) flight test program. Conventional Boeing 777-300ER main landing gear were tested, along with two noise reduction concepts, namely a toboggan fairing and gear alignment with the local flow, both of which were down-selected from various other noise reduction devices evaluated in model-scale testing at Virginia Tech. The full-scale toboggan fairings were designed by Goodrich Aerostructures as add-on devices allowing for complete retraction of the main gear. The baseline-conventional gear, faired gear, and aligned gear were all evaluated with the high-lift system in the retracted position and deployed at various flap settings, all at engine idle power setting. Measurements were taken with flyover community noise microphones and a large aperture acoustic phased array, yielding far-field spectra, and localized sources (beamform maps). The results were utilized to evaluate qualitatively and quantitatively the merit of each noise reduction concept. Complete similarity between model-scale and full-scale noise reduction levels was not found and requires further investigation. Far-field spectra exhibited no noise reduction for both concepts across all angles and frequencies. Phased array beamform maps show inconclusive evidence of noise reduction at selective frequencies (1500 to 3000 Hz) but are otherwise in general agreement with the far-field spectra results (within measurement uncertainty).

  18. Does pain confound interpretation of neuropsychological test results?

    PubMed

    Nicholson, K; Martelli, M F; Zasler, N D

    2001-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that pain and related problems (e.g., affective distress, sleep disturbance, medication use) can interfere with cognitive performance and confound the interpretation of neuropsychological test results. This may be of particular concern in cases of the persistent post-concussive syndrome where headache is the primary problem. Such effects can be pronounced, obscuring the effects associated with mild or even much more significant brain injury. However, it remains unclear what specific chronic or acute pain experiences, in what individuals, with or without which associated problems, will actually result in particular performance deficits. Whereas pain may disrupt brain function, this is likely to be temporary and not indicative of permanent impairment of neuropsychological function. Further study of this important topic is warranted. PMID:11790908

  19. Results of recent tests of NEC AMS systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundquist, M. L.; Loger, R. L.; Daniel, R. E.; Kitchen, R. L.; Kolonko, J. J.; Klody, G. M.

    1999-06-01

    Results of the performance tests of the latest NEC 5 MV Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) systems at the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute Tono Geoscience Center (JNC) in Gifu, Japan and at the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) in Tsukuba, Japan are reported. Carbon dating precision on the order of 0.1 to 0.2% has been shown for solid and gas samples on both systems, using both the 40 sample MC-SNICS source with the NEC sequential injection system and the 12 sample MGF-SNICS gas source with the NEC simultaneous injection system. These results were obtained with analyzed beam currents up to 25 particle ?A (p?A) 12C.

  20. JWST tunable filter imager: etalon prototype test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touahri, D.; Cameron, P.; Evans, C.; Greenberg, E.; Rowlands, N.; Scott, A.; Doyon, R.; Beaulieu, M.; Djazovski, O.

    2008-07-01

    We present the prototyping results and laboratory characterization of a narrow band Fabry-Perot etalon flight model which is one of the wavelength selecting elements of the Tunable Filter Imager. The latter is a part of the Fine Guidance Sensor which represents the Canadian contribution to NASA's James Webb Space Telescope. The unique design of this etalon provides the JWST observatory with the ability to image at 30 Kelvin, a 2.2'x2.2' portion of its field of view in a narrow spectral bandwidth of R~100 at any wavelength ranging between 1.6 and 4.9 ?m (with a gap in coverage between 2.5 and 3.2 ?m). Extensive testing has resulted in better understanding of the thermal properties of the piezoelectric transducers used as an actuation system for the etalon gap tuning. Good throughput, spectral resolution and contrast have been demonstrated for the full wavelength range.

  1. Re-evaluation of the 1995 Hanford Large Scale Drum Fire Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J M

    2007-05-02

    A large-scale drum performance test was conducted at the Hanford Site in June 1995, in which over one hundred (100) 55-gal drums in each of two storage configurations were subjected to severe fuel pool fires. The two storage configurations in the test were pallet storage and rack storage. The description and results of the large-scale drum test at the Hanford Site were reported in WHC-SD-WM-TRP-246, ''Solid Waste Drum Array Fire Performance,'' Rev. 0, 1995. This was one of the main references used to develop the analytical methodology to predict drum failures in WHC-SD-SQA-ANAL-501, 'Fire Protection Guide for Waste Drum Storage Array,'' September 1996. Three drum failure modes were observed from the test reported in WHC-SD-WM-TRP-246. They consisted of seal failure, lid warping, and catastrophic lid ejection. There was no discernible failure criterion that distinguished one failure mode from another. Hence, all three failure modes were treated equally for the purpose of determining the number of failed drums. General observations from the results of the test are as follows: {lg_bullet} Trash expulsion was negligible. {lg_bullet} Flame impingement was identified as the main cause for failure. {lg_bullet} The range of drum temperatures at failure was 600 C to 800 C. This is above the yield strength temperature for steel, approximately 540 C (1,000 F). {lg_bullet} The critical heat flux required for failure is above 45 kW/m{sup 2}. {lg_bullet} Fire propagation from one drum to the next was not observed. The statistical evaluation of the test results using, for example, the student's t-distribution, will demonstrate that the failure criteria for TRU waste drums currently employed at nuclear facilities are very conservative relative to the large-scale test results. Hence, the safety analysis utilizing the general criteria described in the five bullets above will lead to a technically robust and defensible product that bounds the potential consequences from postulated fires in TRU waste facilities, the means of storage in which are the Type A, 55-gal drums.

  2. SSME seal test program: Test results for smooth, hole-pattern and helically-grooved stators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, Dara W.

    1987-01-01

    All of the listed seals were tested in a liquid Halon test facility at high Reynolds numbers. In addition, a helically-grooved-stator seal was tested in an air seal facility. An analysis of the test results with comparisons to theoretical predictions supports the following conclusions: (1) For small seals, the Hirs' friction-factor model is more restricted than had been thought; (2) For smooth seals, predictions of stiffness and damping improve markedly as the radical clearance is reduced; (3) Friction-factor data for hole-pattern-seal stators frequently deviates from the Hirs model; (4) Predictions of stiffness and damping coefficients for hole-pattern-stator seals is generally reasonable; (5) Tests for the hole-pattern stators at reduced clearances show no clear optimum for hole-pattern seals with respect to either hole-area ratio or hole depth to minimum clearance ratios; (6) Tests of these hole-pattern stators show no significant advantage in net damping over smooth seals; (7) Tests of helically-grooved seal stators in Halon show reasonable agreement between theory and prediction for leakage and direct stiffness but poor agreement for the net damping coefficient.

  3. Test results of high-precision large cryogenic lens holders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, C.; Reutlinger, A.; Boesz, A.; Leberle, T.; Mottaghibonab, A.; Eckert, P.; Dubowy, M.; Gebler, H.; Grupp, F.; Geis, N.; Bode, A.; Katterloher, R.; Bender, R.

    2012-09-01

    For the Euclid mission a Pre-Development phase is implemented to prove feasibility of individual components of the system [1]. The Near Infrared Spectrometer and Photometer (NISP) of EUCLID requires high precision large lens holders (?170 mm) at cryogenic temperatures (150K). The four lenses of the optical system are made of different materials: fused silica, CaF2, and LF5G15 that are mounted in a separate lens barrel design. Each lens has its separate mechanical interface to the lens barrel, the so called adaption ring. The performance of the lens holder design is verified by adapted test equipment and test facility including an optical metrology system. The characterization of the lens deformation and displacement (decenter, tilt) due to mechanical loads of the holder itself as well as thermally induced loads are driven by the required submicron precision range and the operational thermal condition. The surface deformation of the lens and its holder is verified by interferometric measurements, while tilt and position accuracy are measured by in-situ fibre based distance sensors. The selected distance measurement sensors have the capability to measure in a few mm range with submicron resolution in ultra high vacuum, in vibration environments and at liquid nitrogen temperatures and below. The calibration of the measurement system is of crucial importance: impacts such as temperature fluctuation, surface roughness, surface reflectivity, straylight effects, etc. on the measured distance are carefully calibrated. Inbuilt thermal expansion effects of the fibre sensors are characterized and proven with lens dummy with quasi zero CTE. The paper presents the test results and measured performance of the high precision large cryogenic lens holders attained by the metrology system. These results are presented on behalf of the EUCLID consortium.

  4. RF Test Results from Cryomodule 1 at the Fermilab SRF Beam Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Harms, E.; Carlson, K.; Chase, B.; Cullerton, E.; Hocker, A.; Jensen, C.; Joireman, P.; Klebaner, A.; Kubicki, T.; Kucera, M.; Legan, A.; /Fermilab /DESY

    2011-07-26

    Powered operation of Cryomodule 1 (CM-1) at the Fermilab SRF Beam Test Facility began in late 2010. Since then a series of tests first on the eight individual cavities and then the full cryomodule have been performed. We report on the results of these tests and lessons learned which will have an impact on future module testing at Fermilab. Since November 2010 Cryomodule 1 has been operating at 2 Kelvin. After evaluating each of the eight cavities while individually powered, the entire module has recently been powered and peak operation determined as shown in Figure 4. Several more weeks of measurements are planned before the module is warmed up, removed and replaced with Cryomodule 2 now under assembly at Fermilab.

  5. Portable narcotics detector and the results obtained in field tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumer, Tumay O.; Su, Chih-Wu; Kaplan, Christopher R.; Rigdon, Stephen W.

    1997-02-01

    A compact integrated narcotics detection instrument (CINDI) has been developed at NOVA R&D, Inc. with funding provided by the U.S. Coast Guard. CINDI is designed as a portable sensitive neutron backscatter detector which has excellent penetration for thick and high Z compartment barriers. It also has a highly sensitive detection system for backscattered neutrons and, therefore, uses a very weak californium-252 neutron source. Neutrons backscatter profusely from materials that have a large hydrogen content, such as narcotics. The rate of backscattered neutrons detected is analyzed by a microprocessor and displayed on the control panel. The operator guides the detector along a suspected area and displays in real time the backscattered neutron rate. CINDI is capable of detecting narcotics effectively behind panels made of steel, wood, fiberglass, or even lead-lined materials. This makes it useful for inspecting marine vessels, ship bulkheads, automobiles, structure walls or small sealed containers. The strong response of CINDI to hydrogen-rich materials such as narcotics makes it an effective tool for detecting concealed drugs. Its response has been field tested by NOVA, the U.S. Coast Guard and Brewt Power Systems. The results of the tests show excellent response and specificity to narcotic drugs. Several large shipments of concealed drugs have been discovered during these trials and the results are presented and discussed.

  6. Test results for fuel cell operation on anaerobic digester gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiegel, R. J.; Preston, J. L.

    EPA, in conjunction with ONSI, embarked on a project to define, design, test, and assess a fuel cell energy recovery system for application at anaerobic digester waste water (sewage) treatment plants. Anaerobic digester gas (ADG) is produced at these plants during the process of treating sewage anaerobically to reduce solids. ADG is primarily comprised of methane (57-66%), carbon dioxide (33-39%), nitrogen (1-10%), and a small amount of oxygen (<0.5%). Additionally, ADG contains trace amounts of fuel cell catalyst contaminants consisting of sulfur-bearing compounds (principally hydrogen sulfide) and halogen compounds (chlorides). The project has addressed two major issues: development of a cleanup system to remove fuel cell contaminants from the gas and testing/assessing of a modified ONSI PC25 C fuel cell power plant operating on the cleaned, but dilute, ADG. Results to date demonstrate that the ADG fuel cell power plant can, depending on the energy content of the gas, produce electrical output levels close to full power (200 kW) with measured air emissions comparable to those obtained by a natural gas fuel cell. The cleanup system results show that the hydrogen sulfide levels are reduced to below 10 ppbv and halides to approximately 30 ppbv.

  7. Ks-146A Camera Development And Flight Test Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustyn, Thomas

    1984-12-01

    In 1979, CAI began the development of the KS-146A 1676-mm (66-inch) focal length, f/5.6 frame camera system designed exclusively for long range oblique photographic (LOROP) missions. The goal was to produce a stabilized system tailored for use with relatively slow, but high-definition films such as EK 3412 and 3414 while also providing growth potential to an electro-optical (E-0) real-time sensor. A detailed design description of the system was presented during SPIE's 1981 symposium. Since then, six systems have been fabricated, evaluated and flight tested over a wide range of airborne conditions. All systems are now operational and the results obtained have confirmed that all objectives have been achieved. Airborne resolution of 8.5 prod (70 Ip/mm) has consistently been demonstrated at slant ranges exceeding 30 nmi. Modular construction and the flexibility inherent in the KS-I 46A design makes the conversion to an E-0 sensor straightforward, and the effort to expand the capabilities of the system have begun. Details of the camera development and a review of flight test results are presented. The modifications to convert the system to near real time are also discussed.

  8. Fan Noise Source Diagnostic Test: LDV Measured Flow Field Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary C.; Krupar, Martin J.; Hughes, Christopher E.; Woodward, Richard P.

    2003-01-01

    Results are presented of an experiment conducted to investigate potential sources of noise in the flow developed by two 22-in. diameter turbofan models. The R4 and M5 rotors that were tested were designed to operate at nominal take-off speeds of 12,657 and 14,064 RPMC, respectively. Both fans were tested with a common set of swept stators installed downstream of the rotors. Detailed measurements of the flows generated by the two were made using a laser Doppler velocimeter system. The wake flows generated by the two rotors are illustrated through a series of contour plots. These show that the two wake flows are quite different, especially in the tip region. These data are used to explain some of the differences in the rotor/stator interaction noise generated by the two fan stages. In addition to these wake data, measurements were also made in the R4 rotor blade passages. These results illustrate the tip flow development within the blade passages, its migration downstream, and (at high rotor speeds) its merging with the blade wake of the adjacent (following) blade. Data also depict the variation of this tip flow with tip clearance. Data obtained within the rotor blade passages at high rotational speeds illustrate the variation of the mean shock position across the different blade passages.

  9. Evaluation of the robustness of the preprocessing technique improving reversible compressibility of CT images: Tested on various CT examinations

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Chang Ho; Kim, Bohyoung; Gu, Bon Seung; Lee, Jong Min [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kil Joong [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707, South Korea and Department of Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 103 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707, South Korea and Department of Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 103 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Ho [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707, South Korea and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, and Clinical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707, South Korea and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, and Clinical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Ki [Medical Information Center, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of)] [Medical Information Center, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To modify the preprocessing technique, which was previously proposed, improving compressibility of computed tomography (CT) images to cover the diversity of three dimensional configurations of different body parts and to evaluate the robustness of the technique in terms of segmentation correctness and increase in reversible compression ratio (CR) for various CT examinations.Methods: This study had institutional review board approval with waiver of informed patient consent. A preprocessing technique was previously proposed to improve the compressibility of CT images by replacing pixel values outside the body region with a constant value resulting in maximizing data redundancy. Since the technique was developed aiming at only chest CT images, the authors modified the segmentation method to cover the diversity of three dimensional configurations of different body parts. The modified version was evaluated as follows. In randomly selected 368 CT examinations (352 787 images), each image was preprocessed by using the modified preprocessing technique. Radiologists visually confirmed whether the segmented region covers the body region or not. The images with and without the preprocessing were reversibly compressed using Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG), JPEG2000 two-dimensional (2D), and JPEG2000 three-dimensional (3D) compressions. The percentage increase in CR per examination (CR{sub I}) was measured.Results: The rate of correct segmentation was 100.0% (95% CI: 99.9%, 100.0%) for all the examinations. The median of CR{sub I} were 26.1% (95% CI: 24.9%, 27.1%), 40.2% (38.5%, 41.1%), and 34.5% (32.7%, 36.2%) in JPEG, JPEG2000 2D, and JPEG2000 3D, respectively.Conclusions: In various CT examinations, the modified preprocessing technique can increase in the CR by 25% or more without concerning about degradation of diagnostic information.

  10. Aeronautical satellite data link concept, design, and flight test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Samuel S.; Hogle, Lawrence H.; Breitwisch, Ronald; Edwards, C. P.; Hamilton, Robert J.; Lipke, David W.

    The MITRE Corporation has conducted a three-year study of aeronautical satellite communications that culminated in a set of flight tests over the North Atlantic during August of 1985. The flight tests required the cooperation of four organizations in addition to MITRE: The Communications Satellite Corporation (COMSAT), Rockwell International, Ball Aerospace and Avantek. A test aircraft, equipped with a specially designed satellite data link terminal and antenna configuration, was flown from Cedar Rapids, Iowa across the North Atlantic to Iceland, and north of Iceland to 75° latitude. The purpose of the flight tests was to measure the performance of a full duplex aeronautical satellite data link (ASDL) using the International Maritime Satellite Organization's (INMARSAT's) spacecraft and earth station at Southbury, Connecticut, and to demonstrate potential applications. The data link operates at 200 bits-per-second (bps), uses forward error correction (FEC) coding, and employs a terminal monitor that provides interfaces to on-board avionics, data recording equipment, and an industry-standard personal computer (PC). The PC serves as a user terminal as well as a real-time monitor of bit-error-rate (BER) performance. In addition to channel propagation and BER experiments, demonstrations of potential applications of an oceanic ASDL system were conducted. A standard commercial airline data link management unit (MU) was used to communicate data over the ASDL using standard protocols. The interface to the MU allowed access to data from two distinct navigation systems: an inertial navigation system (INS) and a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver. Aircraft position data was transmitted from the aircraft to the earth station on an automatic basis to simulate automatic dependent surveillance (ADS) of oceanic air space. This paper is divided into three sections: 1) A discussion of background issues, such as the motivation for the reported research and development, and important operational ASDL system design topics; 2) a detailed description of the developed ASDL design; and 3) a description of the test program and a preliminary summary of the results.

  11. Aerodynamic and Acoustic Flight Test Results and Results for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cumming, Stephen B.; Smith, Mark S.; Cliatt, Larry J.; Frederick, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    As part of the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy program, a 747SP airplane was modified to carry a 2.5-m telescope in the aft section of the fuselage. The resulting airborne observatory allows for observations above 99 percent of the water vapor in the atmosphere. The open cavity created by the modifications had the potential to significantly affect the airplane in the areas of aerodynamics and acoustics. Several series of flight tests were conducted to clear the operating envelope of the airplane for astronomical observations, planned to be performed between the altitudes of 35,000 ft and 45,000 ft. The flight tests were successfully completed. Cavity acoustics were below design limits, and the overall acoustic characteristics of the cavity were better than expected. The modification did have some effects on the stability and control of the airplane, but these effects were not significant. Airplane air data systems were not affected by the modifications. This paper describes the methods used to examine the aerodynamics and acoustic data from the flight tests and provides a discussion of the flight-test results in the areas of cavity acoustics, stability and control, and air data.

  12. Influence of Blood Lipids on Global Coagulation Test Results

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Ah; Kim, Ji-Eun; Song, Sang Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Background High levels of blood lipids have been associated with high levels of coagulation factors. We investigated whether blood lipids influence the results of global coagulation tests, including prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), and thrombin generation assay (TGA). Methods PT, aPTT, and TGA, along with procoagulant and anticoagulant factors, were measured in 488 normal individuals. Vitamin K status was assessed with prothrombin-induced by vitamin K absence-II (PIVKA-II). Results The procoagulant factors II, VII, IX, X, and XI and anticoagulant factors protein C and protein S showed significant correlations with triglyceride, and the procoagulant factors II, V, VII, IX, X, XI, and XII and anticoagulant factors antithrombin and protein C correlated with total cholesterol. There were no correlations of blood lipid levels with PIVKA-II levels. Subjects with high triglyceride levels (?200 mg/dL) showed shorter PT values than those with lower triglyceride levels. However, aPTT value was not changed in terms of blood lipid levels. In both 1 and 5 pM tissue factor-induced TGAs, subjects in the high-triglyceride or high-cholesterol groups (?240 mg/dL) had high levels of lag time, time-to-peak, and endogenous thrombin potential. Total cholesterol was a significant determinant of PT and TGA values. Conclusion High blood lipids were related with increased coagulation activity in a normal population. Our findings are expected to help interpret the global coagulation test results in individuals with high lipid levels. PMID:25553275

  13. Test Procedure for 170.302.h Incorporate Laboratory Test Results APPROVED Version 1.1 September 24, 2010

    E-print Network

    Test Procedure for §170.302.h Incorporate Laboratory Test Results APPROVED Version 1.1 September 24, 2010 1 Test Procedure for §170.302 (h) Incorporate Laboratory Test Results This document describes the test procedure for evaluating conformance of complete EHRs or EHR modules1

  14. Development of Test-Analysis Models (TAM) for correlation of dynamic test and analysis results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelucci, Filippo; Javeed, Mehzad; Mcgowan, Paul

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of structural analysis of aerospace applications is to obtain a verified finite element model (FEM). The verified FEM can be used for loads analysis, evaluate structural modifications, or design control systems. Verification of the FEM is generally obtained as the result of correlating test and FEM models. A test analysis model (TAM) is very useful in the correlation process. A TAM is essentially a FEM reduced to the size of the test model, which attempts to preserve the dynamic characteristics of the original FEM in the analysis range of interest. Numerous methods for generating TAMs have been developed in the literature. The major emphasis of this paper is a description of the procedures necessary for creation of the TAM and the correlation of the reduced models with the FEM or the test results. Herein, three methods are discussed, namely Guyan, Improved Reduced System (IRS), and Hybrid. Also included are the procedures for performing these analyses using MSC/NASTRAN. Finally, application of the TAM process is demonstrated with an experimental test configuration of a ten bay cantilevered truss structure.

  15. Test results and design analysis for a thermoacoustic underwater projector

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, W.C. (Los Alamos Natl. Lab., MS-J576, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)); Gabrielson, T.B. (Naval Air Development Ctr., Code 5044, Warminster, PA 18974 (United States))

    1994-05-01

    An experimental thermoacoustic projector (a heat-driven sound source without moving parts) produced source levels near 190 dB at 120 Hz during recent tests at the Navy's Seneca Lake facility. These data were taken near 60 m depth; in thermoacoustic projectors, the source level increases linearly with depth. The device is composed of two coupled vertical tubes. The upper driver tube is filled with helium and contains a thermoacoustic stack with hot and cold heat exchangers. The lower tube is an impedance matching device filled with water up to a variable level. The tube opening is necessarily small compared to wavelength. For a radiation impedance with such a small resistive component, the test device demonstrated a resonant mode ambiguity before reaching the optimum tuning point. This effect reduced the maximum source level by 3--5 dB below the design level, and had a similar effect on the overall efficiency. This presentation will give an overview of the experimental results and introduce design modifications to overcome the observed limitations and reduce the size of the projector as well.

  16. Metrology and Tests beamline at SOLEIL Design and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idir, Mourad; Mercere, Pascal; Moreno, Thierry; Delmotte, Aurélien; Dasilva, Paulo; Modi, Mohammed H.

    2010-06-01

    The objectives of this project is install at the 2.75 GeV SOLEIL synchrotron radiation source a calibration and metrology test facility for the R&D of optical components and detectors. We have build, on a bending magnet, two branches to cover an energy range from few eV to 28 keV and give access to white beam. This installation will first address the needs of the SOLEIL experimental groups (Optics and Detectors) and will be used by a large community. This beamline will also be valuable as a general-purpose beamline to prepare, test and set up a wide range of experiments in the field of Astrophysics, laser plasma etc … A complementary important aspect of this installation is the realization of primary standard: the metrology beamline of SOLEIL could become the national primary standard source in collaboration with the Laboratoire National d'Essais (LNE) and help in the design and characterization of several diagnostics for the Megajoule Laser in Bordeaux in collaboration with the CEA DIF. The beamline has been designed to provide great flexibility. In this paper, we describe the beamline design, the end station instrumentation and give also some preliminary results.

  17. PROTEC TM TEAR-OFFS: RESULTS OF LONG TERM TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Peeler, D

    2008-07-24

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has completed a series of tests (Phases 1 and 2) to assess the potential use of a Mylar{reg_sign} tear-off system as a primary or secondary protective barrier to minimize acid etching ('frosting'), accidental scratching, and/or radiation damage for shielded cells, glovebox, and/or chemical hood windows. Conceptually, thin, multi-layered sheets of Mylar (referred to throughout this report as the ProTec{trademark} tear-off system) can be directly applied to the shielded cell, glovebox, or hood sash window to serve as a secondary (or primary) barrier. Upon degradation of visual clarity due to accidental scratching, spills/splatters, and/or radiation damage, the outer layer (or sheet) of Mylar could be removed refreshing or restoring the view. Due to the multilayer aspect, the remaining Mylar layers would provide continued protection for the window from potential reoccurrences. Although the concept of using a tear-off system as a protective barrier is conceptually enticing, potential technical issues were identified and addressed as part of this phased study to support implementation of this type of system in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Specific test conditions of interest to the DWPF included the performance of the tear-off system exposed to or under the following conditions: (1) acid(s) (concentrated (28.9 M) HF, concentrated (15.9M) HNO{sub 3}, 6M HCl, and 0.6M H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}); (2) base (based on handling of radioactive sludges with pH of {approx}12-13); (3) gamma radiation (due to radioactive sources or materials being used in the analytical cells); (4) scratch resistance (simulating accidental scratching with the manipulators); and (5) in-situ testing (sample coupons exposed to actual field conditions in DWPF). The results of the Phase 1 study indicated that the ProTec tear-off concept (as a primary or secondary protective barrier) is a potential technical solution to prevent or retard excessive damage that would result from acid etching, base damage (as a result of a sludge spill or splatter), gamma radiation damage, and/or accidental scratching (due to manipulator/tool contact). Although identified as a potential solution, the Phase 1 testing was relatively short-term with exposure times up to 1-2 months for the acid and gamma radiation tests. Phase 2 testing included longer exposure times for the acid resistance (up to 456 days) and gamma radiation exposure (700 days with a cumulative gamma dose of {approx}3.1 x 10{sup 5} rad) assessments. The tear-off system continued to perform well in these longer-term acid resistance testing and gamma exposure conditions. Complete removal of the tear-offs after these long-term exposure times indicate that not only could visual clarity be restored but the mechanical integrity could be retained. The results also provided insight into the ability of the ProTec tear-off system to withstand the chemical and physical abuses expected in off-normal shielded cells operations. The conceptual erasing of scratches or marks by excessive manipulator abuse was demonstrated in the SRNL Shielded Cells mock-up facility through the removal of the outer layer tear-off with manipulators. In addition, the Phase 2 testing included an in-situ assessment of a prototype tear-off system in the DWPF Sampling Cells where the system was exposed to actual field conditions including radioactive sources, acidic and basic environments, dusting, and chemical cleaning solutions over a 5-6 month period. DWPF personnel were extremely satisfied with the performance (including the successful removal of 3 layers with manipulators) of the ProTec tear-off system under actual field conditions. The successful removal of the outer layer tear-offs with the manipulator, using tabs not specifically designed for remote operations, demonstrates that the system is 'manipulator-friendly' and could be implemented in a remote environment. The ability to remove the outer layer tear-off not only regains visual clarity but also reduces waste disposal volumes (i.e., dispo

  18. Laboratory test results for an airborne ASTER simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezaka, Teruya; Kannari, Yoshiaki; Mills, Franklin P.; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Sano, Masaharu; Chang, Sheng-Huei

    1993-08-01

    An airborne ASTER simulator (AAS) is being developed by the Geophysical Environmental Research Corporation (GER) to study land surface temperature and emittance in the thermal infrared. Laboratory tests in October 1992 at NASA's Stennis Space Center (SSC) measured the AAS's spectral, approximate NEdT, and approximate spatial response characteristics. The spectral FWHM for most channels is smaller than 0.3 micrometers ; the NEdT for most TIR channels is better than 0.4 K; and the nominal IFOV is 5 mrad. Flight data was collected over Cuprite and Goldfield, Nevada and near Valencia, California in November 1992. The silicified and opalized zones at Cuprite could be discriminated using decorrelation-stretch images. AAS decorrelation-stretch images agree, qualitatively, with data from NASA's thermal infrared mapping spectrometer (TIMS). These results indicate the AAS may be a good tool for remote sensing studies of geological materials. Lower noise detector arrays and linear variable (optical) filters for the TIR channels will be tested in flights over Cuprite, Nevada later this year. These and other improvements may reduce the NEdT and improve the signal-to-noise ratio.

  19. Validity of neuropsychological test results in disability evaluations.

    PubMed

    Guilmette, T J; Whelihan, W; Sparadeo, F R; Buongiorno, G

    1994-06-01

    A group of 50 disability claimants referred by the Social Security Administration for neuropsychological screening were administered a 36-item, forced-choice, digit-recognition method of detecting malingering to assess effort and motivation to perform well. This abbreviated form of the 1989 Hiscock and Hiscock Forced-choice Procedure has been shown to be quite easy even for individuals with severe organic brain dysfunction. A perfect performance of 36 correct on this digit-recognition task is obtained by most individuals with moderate to severe brain damage. A performance of less than 90% correct is due more likely to poor effort or even malingering rather than brain damage. In this sample, 18% (n = 9) obtained scores of less than 90% correct, i.e., < 33, which calls into question the reliability and validity of test data obtained. An additional 20% (n = 10) obtained intermediate scores of 33 to 35 correct. These intermediate scores are more difficult to interpret although at least some proportion of those scores reflects poor motivation. The results over-all indicate that nearly one-fifth of potential disability claimants produced invalid and uninterpretable neuropsychological test protocols and an additional one-fifth obtained protocols that should be well scrutinized for evidence of poor effort as well. Neuropsychologists conducting disability evaluations are urged to use measures designed specifically to assess effort and motivation. PMID:7936941

  20. A comparison of results from dynamic-response field tests

    SciTech Connect

    Hock, S.M.; Thresher, R.W.; Wright, A.D.

    1988-11-01

    The dynamic response of Howden's 330-kW horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT) and the Northern Power Systems 100-kW ''North Wind 100'' HAWT has been measured. The Howden machine incorporates a 26-m-diameter, upwind, three-bladed, wood/epoxy rotor that operates at 42 rpm and is a rigid-hub design. The North Wind 100 rotor has a diameter of 17.8 m, is upwind, two-bladed, and constructed of fiberglass, and has a teetered hub. The Northern Power turbine's blades are fully pitchable, while the Howden machine uses pitchable blade tips. This paper will present the results from each of these test programs in an effort to compare the dynamic response of each turbine. The analysis will focus on rotor bending loads in terms of both time domain and frequency response. The FLAP code will be used to explore sensitivity to teeter stiffness and natural frequency placement to provide a better understanding of the differences in behavior caused by configuration alone. The results are presented in the form of normalized azimuth-averaged plots of the deterministic loads, and spectral density plots of the stochastic responses. This presentation of the results will contrast major response differences due to design configurations. 6 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Pregnancy feelings among adolescents awaiting pregnancy test results.

    PubMed Central

    Hellerstedt, W. L.; Fee, R. M.; McNeely, C. A.; Sieving, R. E.; Shew, M. L.; Resnick, M. D.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors surveyed adolescent girls about their feelings regarding pregnancy. METHODS: A survey was administered to 117 13- to 18-year-olds who obtained pregnancy tests at nine clinics in Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota, in 1998. The survey included four measures of pregnancy feelings. The authors used bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses to examine the associations of these measures with engagement with school, future expectations, social and environmental characteristics, and perceived partner desire for pregnancy. RESULTS: The four measures of pregnancy feelings were highly correlated (P = 0.0001). Participants reported a range of positive, negative, and ambivalent feelings on all measures. Perceived partner desire for pregnancy, limited future expectations, and lack of school engagement were significantly associated with positive pregnancy feelings for the four measures. CONCLUSIONS: Successful adolescent pregnancy prevention interventions may include the involvement of partners and key adults as well as strategies to enhance the educational or employment aspirations of girls and adolescents. PMID:11889284

  2. Computational Modeling of NEXT 2000-Hour Wear Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, Shane P.

    2004-01-01

    Ion optics computational models are invaluable tools for the design of ion optics systems. In this study, a new computational model developed by an outside vendor for NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is presented. This model is a gun code which has been modified to model the plasma sheaths both upstream and downstream of the ion optics. The model handles multiple species (e.g. singly and doubly-charged ions) and includes a charge-exchange model for erosion estimates. The model uses commercially available solid design and meshing software, allowing high flexibility in ion optics geometric configurations. This computational model is compared to experimental results from the NASA Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) 2000-hour wear test, including over-focusing along the edge apertures, pit-and-groove erosion due to charge exchange, and beamlet distortion at the edge of the hole pattern.

  3. Scale model test results of several STOVL ventral nozzle concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, B. E.; Re, R. J.; Yetter, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    Short take-off and vertical landing (STOVL) ventral nozzle concepts are investigated by means of a static cold flow scale model at a NASA facility. The internal aerodynamic performance characteristics of the cruise, transition, and vertical lift modes are considered for four ventral nozzle types. The nozzle configurations examined include those with: butterfly-type inner doors and vectoring exit vanes; circumferential inner doors and thrust vectoring vanes; a three-port segmented version with circumferential inner doors; and a two-port segmented version with cylindrical nozzle exit shells. During the testing, internal and external pressure is measured, and the thrust and flow coefficients and resultant vector angles are obtained. The inner door used for ventral nozzle flow control is found to affect performance negatively during the initial phase of transition. The best thrust performance is demonstrated by the two-port segmented ventral nozzle due to the elimination of the inner door.

  4. Eurobot Underwater Model Control System Overview & Tests Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlo, A.; Battistoni, G.; Pensavalle, E.; Didot, F.

    2008-08-01

    The European Space Agency in 2003 proposed to study a robotic Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) assistant, named Eurobot, capable of helping the EVA crew and performing others tasks autonomously with the common purpose of servicing human-compatible space infrastructures (ISS, planetar y orbiters, planet surface bases). Eurobot is of a size similar to a human, with three identical arms mounted around a central body. Each arm has similar force and reach capabilities to a human arm. Each arm has an end-effector and a camera for close-up monitoring & visual sensing. In addition, a stereo head camera on a pan & tilt unit is mounted on Eurobot body and used for overall scene monitoring. This paper gives an overview of the Eurobot Wet Model (EWM) control system, together with the results of the test campaigns performed in the Altec NBF in Torino and in the European Astronaut Center in Köln.

  5. 2011 Hyundai Sonata 3539 - Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Matthew Shirk; Tyler Gray; Jeffrey Wishart

    2014-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing hybrid electric vehicle batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2011 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid (VIN KMHEC4A47BA003539). Battery testing was performed by Intertek Testing Services NA. The Idaho National Laboratory and Intertek collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy.

  6. Flight Test Results for the HST Orbital Systems Test (HOST) Capillary Pump Loop Cooling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchko, M.; Kaylor, M.; Kroliczek, E.; Ottenstein, L.

    1999-01-01

    The Near Infrared Camera and Multi Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) was installed in the Hubble Space Telescope (MST) in February 1997. Shortly thereafter, the instrument experienced a thermal short in its solid nitrogen dewar system which will significantly shorten the instrument's useful life. A reverse Brayton cycle mechanical refrigerator will be installed during the Third Servicing Mission (SM3) to provide cooling for the instrument, and thereby extend its operations. A Capillary Pump Loop (CPL) and radiator system was designed, built and tested to remove up to 500 watts of heat from the mechanical cryocooler and its associated electronics. The HST Orbital Systems Test (HOST) platform was flown on the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-95) as a flight demonstration of the cryocooler system, CPL control electronics, and the CPL/Radiator. This paper will present the flight test results and thermal performance of the CPL system in detail.

  7. Building a Robust 21st Century Chemical Testing Program at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency: Recommendations for Strengthening Scientific Engagement

    PubMed Central

    Dantzker, Heather C.; Portier, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Biological pathway-based chemical testing approaches are central to the National Research Council’s vision for 21st century toxicity testing. Approaches such as high-throughput in vitro screening offer the potential to evaluate thousands of chemicals faster and cheaper than ever before and to reduce testing on laboratory animals. Collaborative scientific engagement is important in addressing scientific issues arising in new federal chemical testing programs and for achieving stakeholder support of their use. Objectives: We present two recommendations specifically focused on increasing scientific engagement in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ToxCast™ initiative. Through these recommendations we seek to bolster the scientific foundation of federal chemical testing efforts such as ToxCast™ and the public health decisions that rely upon them. Discussion: Environmental Defense Fund works across disciplines and with diverse groups to improve the science underlying environmental health decisions. We propose that the U.S. EPA can strengthen the scientific foundation of its new chemical testing efforts and increase support for them in the scientific research community by a) expanding and diversifying scientific input into the development and application of new chemical testing methods through collaborative workshops, and b) seeking out mutually beneficial research partnerships. Conclusions: Our recommendations provide concrete actions for the U.S. EPA to increase and diversify engagement with the scientific research community in its ToxCast™ initiative. We believe that such engagement will help ensure that new chemical testing data are scientifically robust and that the U.S. EPA gains the support and acceptance needed to sustain new testing efforts to protect public health. Citation: McPartland J, Dantzker HC, Portier CJ. 2015. Building a robust 21st century chemical testing program at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency: recommendations for strengthening scientific engagement. Environ Health Perspect 123:1–5;?http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408601 PMID:25343778

  8. DETERMINING A ROBUST D-OPTIMAL DESIGN FOR TESTING FOR DEPARTURE FROM ADDITIVITY IN A MIXTURE OF FOUR PFAAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our objective was to determine an optimal experimental design for a mixture of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) that is robust to the assumption of additivity. Of particular focus to this research project is whether an environmentally relevant mixture of four PFAAs with long half-liv...

  9. Determining a Robust D-Optimal Design for Testing for Departure from Additivity in a Mixture of Four Perfluoroalkyl Acids.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our objective is to determine an optimal experimental design for a mixture of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) that is robust to the assumption of additivity. PFAAs are widely used in consumer products and industrial applications. The presence and persistence of PFAAs, especially in ...

  10. Making Sense of Your Pap and HPV Test Results

    MedlinePLUS

    ... same symptoms or health problems. Cervical Cancer Screening Tests One important way to prevent cervical cancer is ... lead to cervical cancer. The Pap and HPV tests can find early problems that could lead to ...

  11. Myeloma Patient's Guide to Understanding Your Test Results

    MedlinePLUS

    ... n Laboratory tests (blood and urine) n n Pathology studies (biopsies) n n There are also tests ... occurs with the benefit of using bisphosphonate therapy. Pathology Studies n Bone marrow biopsy Performed to assess ...

  12. Phase 3 integrated water recovery testing at MSFC: Single loop test results and lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Donald Layne; Bagdigian, Robert M.

    1993-01-01

    A series of tests has been conducted at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to evaluate the performance of the Space Station Freedom (SSF) water recovery system. Potable and urine reclamation processors were integrated with waste water generation equipment and sucessfully operated for a total of 144 days. This testing marked the first occasion in which the waste feed sources for the previous potable and hygiene loops were combined into a single loop and processed to potable water quality. Reclaimed potable water from the combined waste waters routinely met the SSF water quality specifications.In the last stage of testing, data was obtained that indicated that the water processor (WP) presterilizer may not be required to meet the potable water quality specification. The removal of the presterilizer from the Water Processor design would provide a significant power savings, though an increase in the residence time of the catalytic oxidation reactor may be required to meet the potable microbial and total Organic Carbon specifications. This paper summarizes the test objectives, system design, test activities/protocols, significant results/anomalies and major lessons learned.

  13. KASCADE: Astrophysical results and tests of hadronic interaction models

    E-print Network

    Haungs, A; Apel, W D; Badea, A F; Bekk, K; Bercuci, A; Blümer, H; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Büttner, C; Chilingarian, A A; Daumiller, K; Doll, P; Engel, R; Engler, J; Fessler, F; Gils, H J; Glasstetter, R; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Kampert, K H; Klages, H O; Maier, G; Mathes, H J; Mayer, H J; Milke, J; Müller, M; Obenland, R; Oehlschläger, J; Ostapchenko, S; Petcu, M; Rebel, H; Risse, A; Risse, M; Roth, M; Schatz, G; Schieler, H; Scholz, J; Thouw, T; Ulrich, H; Van Buren, J; Vardanyan, A; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Zabierowski, J

    2004-01-01

    KASCADE is a multi-detector setup to get redundant information on single air shower basis. The information is used to perform multiparameter analyses to solve the threefold problem of the reconstruction of (i)the unknown primary energy, (ii) the primary mass, and (iii) to quantify the characteristics of the hadronic interactions in the air-shower development. In this talk recent results of the KASCADE data analyses are summarized concerning cosmic ray anisotropy studies, determination of flux spectra for different primary mass groups, and approaches to test hadronic interaction models. Neither large scale anisotropies nor point sources were found in the KASCADE data set. The energy spectra of the light element groups result in a knee-like bending and a steepening above the knee. The topology of the individual knee positions shows a dependency on the primary particle. Though no hadronic interaction model is fully able to describe the multi-parameter data of KASCADE consistently, the more recent models or impro...

  14. PHOSPHATE MANAGEMENT: FY2010 RESULTS OF PHOSPHATE PRECIPITATION TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M.; King, W.

    2011-04-04

    The Phosphate Management program seeks to develop treatment options for caustic phosphate solutions resulting from the caustic leaching of the bismuth phosphate sludge. The SRNL subtask investigated the precipitation of phosphate salts from caustic solutions through addition of fluoride and by crystallization. The scoping tests examined the: precipitation of phosphate by the addition of sodium fluoride to form the sodium fluorophosphate double salt, Na{sub 7}F(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} {center_dot} 19H{sub 2}O, crystallization of phosphate by reducing the temperature of saturated phosphate solutions, and combinations of precipitation and crystallization. A simplified leachate simulant was used in the study produced by dissolving sodium phosphate in 1 M to 3.5 M sodium hydroxide solutions. The results show that all three processes; precipitation with sodium fluoride, crystallization, and combined precipitation/crystallization can be effective for removing large amounts of phosphate from solution. The combined process of precipitation/crystallization showed >90% removal of phosphate at all hydroxide concentrations when cooling a non-saturated phosphate solution from 65 C to 25 C. Based on the measured solubility of sodium phosphate, pH adjustment/caustic addition will also remove large amounts of phosphate from solution (>80%). For all three processes, the phosphate concentration in the caustic solution must be managed to keep the phosphate from becoming too concentrated and thereby potentially forming a solid mass of sodium phosphate after an effective phosphate removal process.

  15. Pressure Balanced, Low Hysteresis Finger Seal Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arora, Gul K.; Proctor, Margaret; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Delgado, Irebert R.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate: low cost photoetching fabrication technique; pressure balanced finger seal design; and finger seal operation. The tests and analyses includes: finger seal air leakage analysis; rotor-run out and endurance tests; and extensive analytical work and rig testing.

  16. Obtaining Trustworthy Test Results in Multi-threaded Systems

    E-print Network

    Cirne, Walfredo

    , fubica, walfredo}@lsd.ufcg.edu.br Abstract. Testing multi-threaded systems is quite a challenge. The non- determinism of these systems makes their implementation and their test imple- mentation far more susceptible) are performed at inappropriate times. Unreliable tests make de- velopers waste their time trying to find non

  17. Results of IEC 62804 Draft Round Robin Testing (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Hacke, P.; Terwilliger, K.; Koch, S.; Weber, T.; Berghold, J.; Hoffmann, S.; Koehl, M.; Dietrich, S.; Mathiak, G.; Ebert, M.

    2013-09-01

    Three crystalline silicon module designs were distributed in five replicas each to five laboratories for testing according to the IEC 62804 (Committee Draft) system voltage durability qualification test for crystalline silicon photovoltaic (PV) modules. The stress tests were performed in environmental chambers at 60 degrees C, 85% relative humidity, 96 h, and with module nameplate system voltage applied.

  18. Test results on systems developed for the SST-1 tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bora, D.; SST-1 Team

    2003-12-01

    The steady state superconducting tokamak (SST-1) is a large aspect ratio tokamak, configured to run double null diverted plasmas with significant elongation (kgr) and triangularity (dgr). Superconducting (SC) magnets are deployed for both the toroidal and poloidal field coils in SST-1. A NbTi based cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) has been fabricated by M/S Hitachi Cables Ltd., Japan under specification and supervision of the Institute for Plasma Research (IPR). The suitability of this CICC for the SST-1 magnets has been validated through test carried out on a model coil wound from this CICC. Toroidal and poloidal SC magnets have been fabricated and factory acceptance tests have been performed. SC magnets require liquid helium (LHe) cooled current leads, electrical isolators at LHe temperature, superconducting bus bars and LHe transfer lines. Full scale prototypes of these have been developed and tested successfully. SC magnets will be cooled to 4.5 K by forced flow of supercritical helium through the CICC. A 1 kW grade liquefier/refrigerator has been installed and is in final stages of commissioning at IPR. SST-1 deploys a fully welded ultra high vacuum vessel, made up of 16 vessel sectors (VSs) having ports and 16 rings with {\\sf D} -shaped cross-section. To establish the fabrication methodology for this, a fullscale prototype of the vessel with two VSs and three rings has been fabricated and tested successfully. Based on this the fabrication of the VSs and rings is in final stage of fabrication. Liquid nitrogen cooled radiation shield are deployed between the vacuum vessel and SC magnets as well as SC magnets and cryostat, to minimize the radiation losses at the SC magnets. SST-1 will have three different high power radio frequency systems to additionally heat and non-inductively drive plasma current to sustain the plasma in steady state for a duration of up to 1000 s. Ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) and electron cyclotron resonance frequency (ECRF) systems will primarily be used for heating the plasma while lower hybrid waves will be used for non inductive lower hybrid current drive (LHCD). A neutral beam injection with peak power of 0.8 MW with variable beam energy in range of 10-80 keV will be used as additional auxiliary heating system. A number of prototypes for various critical components have confirmed the fabrication methodology. The fabrication of most of the subsystems is nearing completion and many components have already been accepted on site. Erection and installation of the base of the mechanical structure has already been initiated in the SST hall. This paper reports on the results of the tests on various prototypes and actual components to be used on SST-1 for various subsystems.

  19. Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: Program Descriptionand Results

    SciTech Connect

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Xu, Peng

    2006-04-06

    California utilities have been exploring the use of critical peak prices (CPP) to help reduce needle peaks in customer end-use loads. CPP is a form of price-responsive demand response (DR). Recent experience has shown that customers have limited knowledge of how to operate their facilities in order to reduce their electricity costs under CPP (Quantum 2004). While the lack of knowledge about how to develop and implement DR control strategies is a barrier to participation in DR programs like CPP, another barrier is the lack of automation of DR systems. During 2003 and 2004, the PIER Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) conducted a series of tests of fully automated electric demand response (Auto-DR) at 18 facilities. Overall, the average of the site-specific average coincident demand reductions was 8% from a variety of building types and facilities. Many electricity customers have suggested that automation will help them institutionalize their electric demand savings and improve their overall response and DR repeatability. This report focuses on and discusses the specific results of the Automated Critical Peak Pricing (Auto-CPP, a specific type of Auto-DR) tests that took place during 2005, which build on the automated demand response (Auto-DR) research conducted through PIER and the DRRC in 2003 and 2004. The long-term goal of this project is to understand the technical opportunities of automating demand response and to remove technical and market impediments to large-scale implementation of automated demand response (Auto-DR) in buildings and industry. A second goal of this research is to understand and identify best practices for DR strategies and opportunities. The specific objectives of the Automated Critical Peak Pricing test were as follows: (1) Demonstrate how an automated notification system for critical peak pricing can be used in large commercial facilities for demand response (DR). (2) Evaluate effectiveness of such a system. (3) Determine how customers will respond to this form of automation for CPP. (4) Evaluate what type of DR shifting and shedding strategies can be automated. (5) Explore how automation of control strategies can increase participation rates and DR saving levels with CPP. (6) Identify optimal demand response control strategies. (7) Determine occupant and tenant response.

  20. Weather Information Communication (WINCOMM) VDL-3 and 1090ES Final Test Requirements, Test Plans, and Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griner, James H.; Jirberg, Russ; Frantz, Brian; Kachmar, Brian A.

    2006-01-01

    NASA s Aviation Safety Program was created for the purpose of making a significant reduction in the incidents of weather related aviation accidents by improving situational awareness. The objectives of that program are being met in part through advances in weather sensor technology, and in part through advances in the communications technology that are developed for use in the National Airspace System. It is this latter element, i.e., the improvements in aviation communication technologies, that is the focus of the Weather Information Communications project. This report describes the final flight test results completed under the WINCOMM project at the NASA Glenn Research Center of the 1090 Extended Squitter (1090ES) and VDL Mode 3 (VDL-3) data links as a medium for weather data exchange. It presents the use of 1090ES to meet the program objectives of sending broadcast turbulence information and the use of VDL-3 to send graphical weather images. This report provides the test requirements and test plans, which led to flight tests, as well as final results from flight testing. The reports define the changes made to both avionics and ground-based receivers as well as the ground infrastructure to support implementation of the recommended architecture, with a focus on the issues associated with these changes.

  1. Airborne Turbulence Detection and Warning ACLAIM Flight Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannon, Stephen M.; Bagley, Hal R.; Soreide, Dave C.; Bowdle, David A.; Bogue, Rodney K.; Ehernberger, L. Jack

    1999-01-01

    The Airborne Coherent Lidar for Advanced Inflight Measurements (ACLAIM) is a NASA/Dryden-lead program to develop and demonstrate a 2 micrometers pulsed Doppler lidar for airborne look-ahead turbulence detection and warning. Advanced warning of approaching turbulence can significantly reduce injuries to passengers and crew aboard commercial airliners. The ACLAIM instrument is a key asset to the ongoing Turbulence component of NASA's Aviation Safety Program, aimed at reducing the accident rate aboard commercial airliners by a factor of five over the next ten years and by a factor of ten over the next twenty years. As well, the advanced turbulence warning capability can prevent "unstarts" in the inlet of supersonic aircraft engines by alerting the flight control computer which then adjusts the engine to operate in a less fuel efficient, and more turbulence tolerant, mode. Initial flight tests of the ACLAIM were completed in March and April of 1998. This paper and presentation gives results from these initial flights, with validated demonstration of Doppler lidar wind turbulence detection several kilometers ahead of the aircraft.

  2. Results of interlaboratory comparisons of column percolation tests

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ute Kalbe; Wolfgang Berger; Franz-Georg Simon; Jürgen Eckardt; Gabriele Christoph

    2007-01-01

    Laboratory leaching tests may be used for source term determination as a basis for risk assessment for soil–groundwater pathway (leachate forecast) on contaminated sites in Germany. Interlaboratory comparisons on the evaluation of the reproducibility of column percolation tests were conducted within the framework of an integrated R+D program using three waste reference materials.The interlaboratory comparisons of column percolation tests showed

  3. Time and Temperature Test Results for PFP Thermal Stabilization Furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    COMPTON, J.A.

    2000-08-09

    The national standard for plutonium storage acceptability (standard DOE-STD-3013-99, generally known as ''the 3013 standard'') has been revised to clarify the requirement for processes that will produce acceptable storage materials. The 3013 standard (Reference 1) now states that ''Oxides shall be stabilized by heating the material in an oxidizing atmosphere to a Material Temperature of at least 950 C (1742 F) for not less than 2 hours.'' The process currently in use for producing stable oxides for storage at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) heats a furnace atmosphere to 1000 C and holds it there for 2 hours. The temperature of the material being stabilized is not measured directly during this process. The Plutonium Process Support Laboratories (PPSL) were requested to demonstrate that the process currently in use at PFP is an acceptable method of producing stable plutonium dioxide consistently. A spare furnace identical to the production furnaces was set up and tested under varying conditions with non-radioactive surrogate materials. Reference 2 was issued to guide the testing program. The process currently in use at the PFP for stabilizing plutonium-bearing powders was shown to heat all the material in the furnace to at least 950 C for at least 2 hours. The current process will work for (1) relatively pure plutonium dioxide, (2) dioxide powders mixed with up to 20 weight percent magnesium oxide, and (3) dioxide powders with up to 11 weight percent magnesium oxide and 20 weight percent magnesium nitrate hexahydrate. Time and temperature data were also consistent with a successful demonstration for a mixture containing 10 weight percent each of sodium and potassium chloride; however, the molten chloride salts destroyed the thermocouples in the powder and temperature data were unavailable for part of that run. These results assume that the current operating limits of no more than 2500 grams per furnace charge and a powder height of no more than 1.5 inches remain in effect, although deeper powder beds (up to 2 inches) also yielded temperatures of greater than 950 C for longer than 2 hours.

  4. SSME seal test program: Test results for hole-pattern damper seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, D. W.

    1985-01-01

    The results consisting of direct and transverse force coefficients are presented for thirteen, hole-pattern, damper-seal configurations. The designation damper seal refers to a seal which uses a deliberately roughened stator nd smooth rotor, to increase the net damping force developed by a seal. The designation hole-pattern refers to a stator roughness pattern which is developed by a pattern of round holes while are milled into the stator. All seals tested use the same smooth rotor and have the same constant minimum clearance. The seal tests examined the following major design options: (1) hole-area density, i.e., the proportion of stator surface area consumed by holes; and (2) hole depth, particularly the ratio of hole depth to minimum clearance. In addition, limited data were taken to examine the influence of in-line versus staggered hole patterns and flat-bottomed versus spherical-bottomed holes.

  5. Power Burst Facility (PBF) severe fuel damage test 1-4 test results report

    SciTech Connect

    Petti, D.A.; Martinson, Z.R.; Hobbins, R.R.; Allison, C.M.; Carlson, E.R.; Hagrman, D.L.; Cheng, T.C.; Hartwell, J.K.; Vinjamuri, K.; Seifken, L.J.

    1989-04-01

    A comprehensive evaluation of the Severe Fuel Damage (SFD) Test 1-4 performed in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is presented. Test SFD 1-4 was the fourth and final test in an internationally sponsored light water reactor severe accident research program, initiated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The overall technical objective of the test was to contribute to the understanding of fuel and control rod behavior, aerosol and hydrogen generation, and fission product release and transport during a high-temperature, severe fuel damage transient. A test bundle, comprised of 26 previously irradiated (36,000 MWd/MtU) pressurized water-reactor-type fuel rods, 2 fresh instrumented fuel rods, and 4 silver-indium-cadmium control rods, was surrounded by an insulating shroud and contained in a pressurized in-pile tube. The experiment consisted of a 1.3-h transient at a coolant pressure of 6.95 MPa in which the inlet coolant flow to the bundle was reduced to 0.6 g/s while the bundle fission power was gradually increased until dryout, heatup, cladding rupture, and oxidation occurred. With sustained fission power and heat from oxidation, temperatures continued to rise rapidly, resulting in zircaloy and control rod absorber alloy melting, fuel liquefaction, material relocation, and the release of hydrogen, aerosols, and fission products. The transient was terminated over a 2100-s time span by slowly reducing the reactor power and cooling the damaged bundle with argon gas. A description and evaluation of the major phenomena, based upon the response of on-line instrumentation, analysis of fission product and aerosol data, postirradiation examination of the fuel bundle, and calculations using the SCDAP/RELAP5 computer code, are presented. 40 refs., 160 figs., 31 tabs.

  6. Cone Penetrometer Load Cell Temperature and Radiation Testing Results

    SciTech Connect

    Follett, Jordan R.

    2013-08-28

    This report summarizes testing activities performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to verify the cone penetrometer load cell can withstand the tank conditions present in 241-AN-101 and 241-AN-106. The tests demonstrated the load cell device will operate under the elevated temperature and radiation levels expected to be encountered during tank farm deployment of the device.

  7. Selective Sampling with Co-Testing: Preliminary Results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ion Muslea; Steven Minton; Craig A. Knoblock

    2000-01-01

    We present a novel approach to selective sampling, co- testing, which can be applied to problems with redun- dant views (i.e., problems with multiple disjoint sets of attributes that can be used for learning). The main idea behind co-testing consists of selecting the queries among the unlabeled examples on which the existing views disagree. Selective sampling (Seung, Opper, & Sompolinski

  8. Results from a GPS Shuttle Training Aircraft flight test

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Penny E. Saunders; Moises N. Montez; Michael C. Robel; David N. Feuerstein; Mike E. Aerni; S. Sangchat; Lon M. Rater; Scott P. Cryan; Lydia R. Salazar; Mark P. Leach

    1991-01-01

    A series of Global Positioning System (GPS) flight tests were performed on a National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA). The objective of the tests was to evaluate the performance of GPS-based navigation during simulated Shuttle approach and landings for possible replacement of the current Shuttle landing navigation aid, the Microwave Scanning Beam Landing System (MSBLS). In

  9. Experimental results of the European HELINOISE aeroacoustic rotor test

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. R. Splettstoesser; G. Niesl; F. Cenedese; F. Nitti; D. G. Papanikas

    1995-01-01

    In a cooperative research program between eight European partners, a 40% geometrically and dynamically scaled and highly instrumented model of the ECD (formerly MBB) BO 105 helicopter main rotor was tested in the open-jet anechoic test section of the German-Dutch Wind Tunnel (DNW) in the Netherlands. The primary objectives of this experimental study were to: (1) to improve the physical

  10. POLLUTANTS FROM SYNTHETIC FUELS PRODUCTION: COAL GASIFICATION SCREENING TEST RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coal gasification test runs have been conducted in a semibatch, fixed-bed laboratory gasifier in order to evaluate various coals and operating conditions for pollutant generation. Thirty-eight tests have been completed using char, coal, lignite, and peat. Extensive analyses were ...

  11. Delaware Educational Assessment Program. 1986 Statewide Test Results. Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaware State Dept. of Public Instruction, Dover.

    During April, 1986, approximately 60,000 Delaware public school students in grades 1 through 8 and in grade 11 were administered a battery of achievement tests as part of the state-funded Delaware Educational Assessment Program (DEAP). The Comprehensive Tests of Basic Skills (CTBS) in reading, language arts, and mathematics was administered. In…

  12. Neuropsychological test results associated with psychiatric disorders in adults

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert K. Heaton; Lyle E. Baade; Kathy L. Johnson

    1978-01-01

    Reviews 94 studies that compared test scores of psychiatric patients with scores of brain-damaged patients or with established norms for organicity. Despite methodological inconsistencies and deficiencies across studies, most studies found that psychiatric diagnostic groups other than chronic or process schizophrenics performed better than organics on testing. Organic vs functional discrimination rates reported in these studies are similar to discrimination

  13. Improved PFB operations - 400-hour turbine test results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. J. Rollbuhler; S. M. Benford; G. R. Zellars

    1980-01-01

    The paper deals with a 400-hr small turbine test in the effluent of a pressurized fluidized bed (PFB) at an average temperature of 770 C, an average relative gas velocity of 300 m\\/sec, and average solid loadings of 200 ppm. Consideration is given to combustion parameters and operating procedure as well as to the turbine system and turbine test operating

  14. 49 CFR 199.119 - Reporting of anti-drug testing results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 2010-10-01 false Reporting of anti-drug testing results. 199.119 Section 199.119 Transportation...CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING Drug Testing § 199.119 Reporting of anti-drug testing...

  15. Results from a GPS Shuttle Training Aircraft flight test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, Penny E.; Montez, Moises N.; Robel, Michael C.; Feuerstein, David N.; Aerni, Mike E.; Sangchat, S.; Rater, Lon M.; Cryan, Scott P.; Salazar, Lydia R.; Leach, Mark P.

    1991-01-01

    A series of Global Positioning System (GPS) flight tests were performed on a National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA). The objective of the tests was to evaluate the performance of GPS-based navigation during simulated Shuttle approach and landings for possible replacement of the current Shuttle landing navigation aid, the Microwave Scanning Beam Landing System (MSBLS). In particular, varying levels of sensor data integration would be evaluated to determine the minimum amount of integration required to meet the navigation accuracy requirements for a Shuttle landing. Four flight tests consisting of 8 to 9 simulation runs per flight test were performed at White Sands Space Harbor in April 1991. Three different GPS receivers were tested. The STA inertial navigation, tactical air navigation, and MSBLS sensor data were also recorded during each run. C-band radar aided laser trackers were utilized to provide the STA 'truth' trajectory.

  16. Canister Decontamination Chamber No. 1 operability test results

    SciTech Connect

    Magoulas, V.E.

    1987-10-30

    The DWPF Canister Decontamination Chamber No. 1 (CDC) was installed at the TNX facility in October, 1986 for operability testing. Operability testing was required because this equipment is unique and is a critical part of the defense waste process. The test was successful in demonstrating the canister decontamination operation. Testing verified proper nozzle locations, frit suspension, level probe and CCTV operations. The following recommendations are based on data obtained from frit blasting 24 canisters: reduce the recirculation pump speed, to allow proper level probes operation; add an extension to the chamber rinse nozzle which allows removal of frit from the top of the upper guide rinse nozzle; increase visibility through the CCTV camera; make the CMM grapple jaw pins more compatible with the MSM; and improve canister guide capability to aid in canister loading. CDC Operability Testing was completed October, 1987. 6 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Test Results for RD3c, A Nb3Sn Common-Coil Racetrack Dipole Magnet

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. F. Lietzke; S. Caspi; M. Coccoli; D. R. Dietderich; P. Ferracin; S. A. Gourlay; R. R. Haffalia; L. Chiesa; A. D. McInturff; G. Sabbi; R. M. Scanlan

    2002-01-01

    The Superconducting Magnet Group at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has been developing racetrack technology for economical, high-field accelerator magnets from brittle superconductor. Recent tests have demonstrated (1) robust, reusable, double-layer, flat racetrack, wind and react NbSn coils, (2) a reusable, easily assembled, coil-support structure that can minimize conductor movement, and (3) 15T dipole fields, with no degradation. RD3c is our first

  18. Test results of RD3c, a Nb3Sn common-coil racetrack dipole magnet

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. F. Lietzke; S. Caspi; L. Chiesa; M. Coccoli; D. R. Dietderich; P. Ferracin; S. A. Gourlay; R. R. Hafalia; A. D. McInturff; G. Sabbi; R. M. Scanlan

    2003-01-01

    The superconducting magnet group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been developing racetrack coil technology for economical, high-field accelerator magnets from brittle superconductor. Recent tests have demonstrated 1) robust, reusable, double-layer, flat racetrack, wind and react Nb3Sn coils, 2) a reusable, easily assembled coil-support structure that can minimize conductor movement and 3) nearly 15 T dipole fields, without conductor degradation.

  19. Robust Decentralized Controller Design: Subsystem Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosinová, Danica; Thuan, Nguyen Quang; Veselý, Vojtech; Marko, L'ubomír

    2012-01-01

    The paper addresses the problem of the robust output feedback PI controller design for complex large-scale stable systems with a state decentralized control structure. A decentralized control design procedure is proposed for static output feedback control which is based on solving robust control design problems of subsystems' size. The presented approach is based on the Generalized Gershgorin Theorem and uses the so-called equivalent subsystems approach to consider the interactions in the local robust controller design. The resulting decentralized control scheme has been successfully tested on two examples: a linearized model of three interconnected boiler-turbine subsystems and a linear model of four cooperating DC motors where the problem is to design four local PI controllers for a large scale system which will guarantee robust stability and performance of the closed-loop uncertain system.

  20. Tower test results for an imaging LADAR seeker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andressen, Cliff; Anthony, David; DaMommio, Tony; Hulsey, Don; Lawton, Clint; Neisz, James; Perona, Tay; Steinmehl, Doug; Grobmyer, Joe; Lum, Tommy

    2005-05-01

    Raytheon has developed a new tactical form-factored, imaging LADAR (LAser Detection And Ranging) seeker. In a joint activity with AMRDEC, the seeker was used in a tower test data collection at the Russell Measurement Facility at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. The seeker collected 3D imagery of fixed structures and vehicles embedded in various clutter backgrounds for use in analysis of computer vision and automatic target recognition techniques. This paper presents a high-level overview of the seeker, a description of the test activities, representative LADAR range and intensity imagery collected during the test, and 3D rendered scenes constructed from the imagery.

  1. Resolve! Version 2.5: Flammable Gas Accident Analysis Tool Acceptance Test Plan and Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    LAVENDER, J.C.

    2000-10-17

    RESOLVE! Version 2 .5 is designed to quantify the risk and uncertainty of combustion accidents in double-shell tanks (DSTs) and single-shell tanks (SSTs). The purpose of the acceptance testing is to ensure that all of the options and features of the computer code run; to verify that the calculated results are consistent with each other; and to evaluate the effects of the changes to the parameter values on the frequency and consequence trends associated with flammable gas deflagrations or detonations.

  2. 46 CFR 153.1604 - Determining the stripping quantity from the test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...the stripping quantity from the test results. 153.1604 Section...GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK...COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Test and Calculation Procedures...stripping quantity from the test results. (a) For a...

  3. 46 CFR 153.1604 - Determining the stripping quantity from the test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...the stripping quantity from the test results. 153.1604 Section...GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK...COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Test and Calculation Procedures...stripping quantity from the test results. (a) For a...

  4. 46 CFR 153.1604 - Determining the stripping quantity from the test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...the stripping quantity from the test results. 153.1604 Section...GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK...COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Test and Calculation Procedures...stripping quantity from the test results. (a) For a...

  5. 46 CFR 153.1604 - Determining the stripping quantity from the test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...the stripping quantity from the test results. 153.1604 Section...GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK...COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Test and Calculation Procedures...stripping quantity from the test results. (a) For a...

  6. 46 CFR 153.1604 - Determining the stripping quantity from the test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...the stripping quantity from the test results. 153.1604 Section...GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK...COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Test and Calculation Procedures...stripping quantity from the test results. (a) For a...

  7. 40 CFR 86.609-98 - Calculation and reporting of test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...applicable emission standard expressed to one additional significant figure. (b) Final test results for each test...applicable standard expressed to one additional significant figure. (c) Final deteriorated test results....

  8. System test results from the GNC experiments on the PRISMA in-orbit test bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodin, Per; Noteborn, Ron; Larsson, Robin; Chasset, Camille

    2011-04-01

    The PRISMA in-orbit test bed will demonstrate guidance, navigation, and control strategies for spacecraft formation flying and rendezvous. The project is funded by the Swedish National Space Board and the prime contractor is the Swedish Space Corporation. The project is further supported by the German Aerospace Center, the Technical University of Denmark, and the French Space Agency. PRISMA was launched on June 15, 2010 and after three weeks of operations, all on-board systems and units have passed an initial commissioning phase. Separation of the two PRISMA satellites from each other is expected by mid-August 2010. PRISMA consists of two spacecraft: MAIN and TARGET. The MAIN spacecraft has full orbit control capability while TARGET is attitude controlled only. The Swedish Space Corporation is responsible for three groups of guidance, navigation, and control experiments. These experiments include GPS- and vision-based formation flying during which the spacecraft will fly in passive as well as forced motion. The three experiments are: autonomous formation flying, proximity operations with final approach/recede maneuvers, and autonomous rendezvous. This paper presents system test results from two of these experiments as obtained with the flight-ready system. The system tests consist of a series of simulations performed on the flight model spacecraft with a large amount of hardware in the loop.

  9. Photovoltaic-Powered Vaccine Refrigerator: Freezer Systems Field Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratajczak, A. F.

    1985-01-01

    A project to develop and field test photovoltaic-powered refrigerator/freezers suitable for vaccine storage was undertaken. Three refrigerator/freezers were qualified; one by Solar Power Corp. and two by Solvolt. Follow-on contracts were awarded for 19 field test systems and for 10 field test systems. A total of 29 systems were installed in 24 countries between October 1981 and October 1984. The project, systems descriptions, installation experiences, performance data for the 22 systems for which field test data was reported, an operational reliability summary, and recommendations relative to system designs and future use of such systems are explained. Performance data indicate that the systems are highly reliable and are capable of maintaining proper vaccine storage temperatures in a wide range of climatological and user environments.

  10. SIMS prototype system 1 test results: Engineering analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The space and domestic water solar heating system designated SIMS Prototype Systems 1 was evaluated. The test system used 720 ft (gross) of Solar Energy Products Air Collectors, a Solar Control Corporation SAM 20 Air Handler with Model 75-175 control unit, a Jackson Solar Storage tank with Rho Sigma Mod 106 controller, and 20 tons of rack storage. The test data analysis performed evaluates the system performance and documents the suitability of SIMS Prototype System 1 hardware for field installation.

  11. Selected wind tunnel test results for the Darrieus wind turbine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. F. Blackwell; R. E. Sheldahl

    1977-01-01

    Five blade configurations of a 2-m-diam Darrieus wind turbine have been tested in the Vought Corporation 4.6- x 6.1-m (15- x 20-ft) Low-Speed Wind Tunnel. Rotor solidity, Reynolds number, and freestream velocities tested were in the following ranges: solidity, 13 to 30%; Reynolds number, 1 to 3 x 10⁵; freestream velocity, 7 to 11 m\\/s. The airfoil selection for all

  12. Selected wind tunnel test results for the Darrieus wind turbine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. F. Blackwell; R. E. Sheldahl

    1977-01-01

    Five blade configurations of a 2-m-diam Darrieus wind turbine have been tested in a low-speed wind tunnel. Rotor solidity, Reynolds number, and free-stream velocities tested were in the following ranges: solidity, 13-30%; Reynolds number, 100,000-300,000; free-stream velocity, 7-11 m\\/s. The airfoil selection for all configurations was NACA 0012. The parameters measured were rotor torque, rotor rotational speed, and tunnel conditions.

  13. U.S. field testing programs and results

    SciTech Connect

    Wicks, G.G.

    2000-06-09

    The United States has been active in four major international in-situ or field testing programs over the past two decades, involving the burial of simulated high-level waste forms and package components. These programs are designed to supplement laboratory testing studies in order to obtain the most complete and realistic picture possible of waste glass behavior under realistic repository-relevant conditions.

  14. Correlation Results for a Mass Loaded Vehicle Panel Test Article Finite Element Models and Modal Survey Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maasha, Rumaasha; Towner, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    High-fidelity Finite Element Models (FEMs) were developed to support a recent test program at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The FEMs correspond to test articles used for a series of acoustic tests. Modal survey tests were used to validate the FEMs for five acoustic tests (a bare panel and four different mass-loaded panel configurations). An additional modal survey test was performed on the empty test fixture (orthogrid panel mounting fixture, between the reverb and anechoic chambers). Modal survey tests were used to test-validate the dynamic characteristics of FEMs used for acoustic test excitation. Modal survey testing and subsequent model correlation has validated the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the FEMs. The modal survey test results provide a basis for the analysis models used for acoustic loading response test and analysis comparisons

  15. Operational results of pilot cell test with cermet ``inert`` anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Alcorn, T.R.; Tabereaux, A.T.; Richards, N.E. [Reynolds Metals Co., Muscle Shoals, AL (United States). Mfg. Technology Lab.; Windisch, C.F. Jr.; Strachan, D.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Gregg, J.S.; Frederick, M.S. [ELTECH Research Corp., Fairport Harbor, OH (United States)

    1993-02-01

    The operational performance of a ``six-pack`` of cermet anodes and corrosion rates was evaluated in a six kA pilot reduction cell at Reynolds` Manufacturing Technology Laboratory. Two separate test periodswere conducted with the cermet anodes; the first period was in conjunction with the Pacific Northwest Laboratory and the second with ELTECH Research Corporation. Both tests used identical NiO-NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-Cu anodes manufactured by Ceramic Magnetics, Inc.. The ELTECH testing involved the in situ coating of the anodes with cerium oxide. Primary evaluations for both test periods were conducted at target conditions of alumina saturation and 0.5 amp/cm{sup 2} anode current density. Individual anodes remained in operation for 25 days during the two and one-half month testing period. Operational difficulties developed throughout the test due to breakage of the anode conductor stems, cracking and breaking of the cermet anodes, unequal anode current distribution, and alumina muck build-up in the cell. These operational problems are discussed as well as an estimate of anode corrosion rates based on metal impurity levels in the aluminum metal pad.

  16. Operational results of pilot cell test with cermet inert'' anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Alcorn, T.R.; Tabereaux, A.T.; Richards, N.E. (Reynolds Metals Co., Muscle Shoals, AL (United States). Mfg. Technology Lab.); Windisch, C.F. Jr.; Strachan, D.M. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Gregg, J.S.; Frederick, M.S. (ELTECH Research Corp., Fairport Harbor, OH (United States))

    1993-02-01

    The operational performance of a six-pack'' of cermet anodes and corrosion rates was evaluated in a six kA pilot reduction cell at Reynolds' Manufacturing Technology Laboratory. Two separate test periodswere conducted with the cermet anodes; the first period was in conjunction with the Pacific Northwest Laboratory and the second with ELTECH Research Corporation. Both tests used identical NiO-NiFe[sub 2]O[sub 4]-Cu anodes manufactured by Ceramic Magnetics, Inc.. The ELTECH testing involved the in situ coating of the anodes with cerium oxide. Primary evaluations for both test periods were conducted at target conditions of alumina saturation and 0.5 amp/cm[sup 2] anode current density. Individual anodes remained in operation for 25 days during the two and one-half month testing period. Operational difficulties developed throughout the test due to breakage of the anode conductor stems, cracking and breaking of the cermet anodes, unequal anode current distribution, and alumina muck build-up in the cell. These operational problems are discussed as well as an estimate of anode corrosion rates based on metal impurity levels in the aluminum metal pad.

  17. Design and flight test of a robust autopilot for the IRIS-T air-to-air missile

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Harald Buschek

    2003-01-01

    The Infra-Red Imaging System-Tail\\/thrust-vector controlled (IRIS-T) missile is a next-generation short-range air-to-air missile currently developed by Germany, Greece, Italy, Norway, and Sweden. IRIS-T is characterized by an extreme maneuverability for close-in air-to-air combat. The corresponding highly nonlinear and rapidly time-varying dynamics constitute a significant challenge for the autopilot design. Robust control techniques are employed to design lateral and roll controllers

  18. Urine Pretreatment Configuration and Test Results for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Stanley G.; Hutchens, Cindy F.; Rethke, Donald W.; Swartley, Vernon L.; Marsh, Robert W.

    1998-01-01

    Pretreatment of urine using Oxone and sulfuric acid is baselined in the International Space Station (ISS) waste water reclamation system to control odors, fix urea and control microbial growth. In addition, pretreatment is recommended for long term flight use of urine collection and two phase separation to reduce or eliminate fouling of the associated hardware and plumbing with urine precipitates. This is important for ISS application because the amount of maintenance time for cleaning and repairing hardware must be minimized. This paper describes the development of a chemical pretreatment system based on solid tablet shapes which are positioned in the urine collection hose and are dissolved by the intrained urine at the proper ratio of pretreatment to urine. Building upon the prior success of the developed and tested solid Oxone tablet a trade study was completed to confirm if a similar approach, or alternative, would be appropriate for the sulfuric acid injection method. In addition, a recommended handling and packaging approach of the solid tablets for long term, safe and convenient use on ISS was addressed. Consequently, the solid tablet concept with suitable packaging was identified as the Urine Pretreat / Prefilter Assembly (UPPA). Testing of the UPPA configuration confirmed the disolution rates and ratios required by ISS were achieved. This testing included laboratory controlled methods as well as a 'real world' test evaluation that occurred during the 150 day Stage 10 Water Recovery Test (WRT) conducted at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  19. Test result analysis and validation of test verdicts G. v. Bochmann, D. Desbiens, M. Dubuc, D. Ouimet and F. Saba

    E-print Network

    von Bochmann, Gregor

    Test result analysis and validation of test verdicts G. v. Bochmann, D. Desbiens, M. Dubuc, D's) are useful in the protocol development cycle, particulary in the conformance testing area. In this paper, we present TETRA, a test and trace analysis tool based on the LOTOS FDT which can be used to automatically

  20. Results of an international ring test with the dung fly Musca autumnalis in support of a new OECD test guideline

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jörg Römbke; Katie Barrett; Wolf U. Blanckenhorn; Tom Hargreaves; Nassera Kadiri; Silvio Knäbe; Jörn Lehmhus; Jean-Pierre Lumaret; Boris Rosenkranz; Adam Scheffczyk; Tatsuya Sekine

    2010-01-01

    A standardized bioassay using the face fly, Musca autumnalis L. (Diptera: Muscidae), was developed to test the lethal and sublethal toxicity of parasiticide residues in livestock dung. The repeatability of this test was assessed for the parasiticide ivermectin in seven tests performed in four laboratories in Germany and France. Additional results of limit tests were provided by two laboratories from

  1. Evaluation of the extended use of ferrocene for test cell smoke abatement; engine and environmental test results. Interim report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Klarman

    1977-01-01

    Results of a test program to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing the smoke suppressant fuel additive, ferrocene, during post overhaul performance checks of gas turbine engines at Naval Air Rework Facilities (NARF's) and other lower level maintenance test facilities to reduce test cell exhaust smoke plumes to environmentally acceptable levels are presented. This test program was conducted on the following

  2. Overview of the PBF test results. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Zeile, H.J.

    1980-01-01

    The Thermal Fuels Behavior Program (TFBP) of EG and G Idaho conducts fuel behavior research in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) at INEL and at the Halden Reactor in Norway. The fuels behavior research in the PBF is directed toward providing a detailed understanding of the response of light water reactor (LWR) nuclear fuel assemblies to off-normal and hypothesized accident conditions. Single fuel rods and clusters of highly instrumented fuel rods are installed within a central test space of the PBF core for testing. The core can be operated in various modes to provide test conditions typical of accidents and off-normal conditions that may be experienced in a pressurized water reactor or a boiling water reactor.

  3. CSI Flight Computer System and experimental test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, Dean W., Jr.; Peri, F., Jr.; Schuler, P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the CSI Computer System (CCS) and the experimental tests performed to validate its functionality. This system is comprised of two major components: the space flight qualified Excitation and Damping Subsystem (EDS) which performs controls calculations; and the Remote Interface Unit (RIU) which is used for data acquisition, transmission, and filtering. The flight-like RIU is the interface between the EDS and the sensors and actuators positioned on the particular structure under control. The EDS and RIU communicate over the MIL-STD-1553B, a space flight qualified bus. To test the CCS under realistic conditions, it was connected to the Phase-0 CSI Evolutionary Model (CEM) at NASA Langley Research Center. The following schematic shows how the CCS is connected to the CEM. Various tests were performed which validated the ability of the system to perform control/structures experiments.

  4. Parabolic dish Stirling module development and test results

    SciTech Connect

    Washom, B.

    1984-08-01

    Private industry and the U.S. Department of Energy are presently cost sharing the design, manufacture and test of a 25 Kwe parabolic dish Stirling module, known as Vanguard. The Vanguard module achieved a world's record sunlight to electric conversion efficiency of 31.6% in February 1984 at the Rancho Mirage, California test site. The module is presently operating daily in sunrise to sunset tests to determine the long term performance and O and M requirements of this distributed receiver system. Each module can be easily integrated into a larger field of modules to provide power generation opportunities from a single 25 Kwe unit for isolated loads to 30 Mwe systems for integrated utility power generation.

  5. Quench Module Insert Capabilities and Development Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carswell, William E.; Crouch, M. R.; Farmer, J.; Breeding, S.; Rose, F.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Quench Module Insert is a directional solidification furnace that will operate in the Materials Science Research Rack (MSRR) on the International Space Station. It will provide high thermal gradient and quench capabilities for processing metals and alloys in microgravity. Numerical analyses and breadboard testing conducted to date show that the QMI can produce an axial temperature gradient approaching 150 C per centimeter in a 1 centimeter diameter aluminum sample with a maximum molten sample temperature of 1100 C. Breadboard testing and analysis have also shown that the quench capabilities of the furnace are sufficient to rapidly solidify at least a 5mm axial portion of a 1 centimeter diameter molten aluminum sample in significantly less than the required 2 seconds and prevent significant backmelt. This paper presents the furnace requirements and capabilities and a status of the associated development testing and analyses.

  6. Using GPS to determine vehicle attitude - USS Yorktown test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruczynski, Leonard R.; Li, Pui C.; Evans, Alan G.; Hermann, Bruce R.

    Prototype GPS orientation equipment was tested aboard the USS Yorktown, a U.S. Navy guided missile cruiser, to demonstrate that GPS could be used to determine orientation on a moving vessel. Initialization, integer maintenance, and accuracy in a real-time dynamic environment were addressed. The tests confirmed GPS-based real-time orientation determination, provided real-world data to exercise enhanced orientation algorithms, and identified equipment improvements that will make GPS a viable source of vehicle attitude in addition to GPS's superior positioning capabilities.

  7. Graphite/Larc-160 technology demonstration segment test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morita, W. H.; Graves, S. R.

    1983-01-01

    A structural test program was conducted on a Celion/LARC-160 graphite/polyimide technology demonstration segment (TDS) to verify the technology. The 137 x 152 cm (54 x 60 in.) TDS simulates a full-scale section of the orbiter composite body flap design incorporating three ribs and extending from the forward cove back to the rear spar. The TDS was successfully subjected to mechanical loads and thermal environments (-170 to 316 C) simulating 100 shuttle orbiter missions. Successful completion of the test program verified the design, analysis, and fabrication methodology for bonded Gr/PI honeycomb sandwich structure and demonstration that Gr/PI composite technology readiness is established.

  8. Results of the first provisional technical secretariat interlaboratory comparison test

    SciTech Connect

    Stuff, J.R.; Hoffland, L. [Army Edgewood Research, Army Material Command Treaty Lab., Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States)

    1995-06-01

    The principal task of this laboratory in the first Provisional Technical Secretariat (PTS) Interlaboratory Comparison Test was to verify and test the extraction and preparation procedures outlined in the Recommended Operating Procedures for Sampling and Analysis in the Verification of Chemical Disarmament in addition to our laboratory extraction methods and our laboratory analysis methods. Sample preparation began on 16 May 1994 and analysis was completed on 12 June 1994. The analytical methods used included NMR ({sup 1}H and {sup 31}P) GC/AED, GC/MS (EI and methane CI), GC/IRD, HPLC/IC, HPLC/TSP/MS, MS/MS(Electrospray), and CZE.

  9. Creep test results on D0 RunIIB stave

    SciTech Connect

    Lanfranco, Giobatta; /Fermilab

    2003-12-01

    The D0 RunIIb final design stave has been tested to verify its response to long term loading (creep). Two stave mockups have been investigated. Mechanical stave No.3 has been under continuous loading for 8 weeks. The maximum deflection was 3.6 {micro}m, with 80% of the total sag reached after the first two weeks. Mechanical stave No.2, despite the denomination, has been assembled successively with improved gluing assembly process and tested for six weeks. No creep mechanism has been observed in this surveyed mockup.

  10. [Biomedical results of the Space Shuttle Orbital Flight Test Program].

    PubMed

    Pool, S L; Nicogossian, A

    1984-01-01

    On July 4, 1982 the Space Shuttle Columbia landed at Edwards Air Force Base, California, thus successfully completing the fourth and last in a series of Orbital Flight Tests (OFT) of the Space Transportation System (STS). The primary goal of medical operation support for the OFT was to assure the health and well-being of flight personnel during all phases of the mission. To this end, the crew health status was evaluated preflight, inflight and postflight. Biomedical flight test requirements were completed in the following areas: physiological adaptation to microgravity, cabin acoustical noise, cabin atmospheric evaluation, radiation dosimetry, crew exercise equipment evaluation and a cardiovascular deconditioning countermeasure assessment. PMID:6142142

  11. Hot fire fatigue testing results for the compliant combustion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavli, Albert J.; Kazaroff, John M.; Jankovsky, Robert S.

    1992-01-01

    A hydrogen-oxygen subscale rocket combustion chamber was designed incorporating an advanced design concept to reduce strain and increase life. The design permits unrestrained thermal expansion of a circumferential direction and, thereby, provides structural compliance during the thermal cycling of hot-fire testing. The chamber was built and test fired at a chamber pressure of 4137 kN/sq m (600 psia) and a hydrogen-oxygen mixture ratio of 6.0. Compared with a conventional milled-channel configuration, the new structurally compliant chamber had a 134 or 287 percent increase in fatigue life, depending on the life predicted for the conventional configuration.

  12. 170.302 (h) Incorporate laboratory test results Errata December 3, 2010

    E-print Network

    170.302 (h) Incorporate laboratory test results Errata December 3, 2010 1 Errata for §170.302 (h Section: Test Data, TD170.302.h: Test Data Sets Description: Removed stray LOINC code from test data set sets the test report date to T+ n days at their discretion. #12;170.302 (h) Incorporate laboratory test

  13. Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX): Instructions for Implementing the Test Procedure, Calibration Test Reference Results, and Example Acceptance-Range Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Judkoff, R.; Polly, B.; Bianchi, M.; Neymark, J.; Kennedy, M.

    2011-08-01

    This publication summarizes building energy simulation test for existing homes (BESTEST-EX): instructions for implementing the test procedure, calibration tests reference results, and example acceptance-range criteria.

  14. Accelerated aging test results for aerospace wire insulation constructions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William G. Dunbar

    1995-01-01

    Several wire insulation constructions were evaluated with and without continuous glow discharges at low pressure and high temperature to determine the aging characteristics of acceptable wire insulation constructions. It was known at the beginning of the test program that insulation aging takes several years when operated at normal ambient temperature and pressure of 20 C and 760 torr. Likewise, it

  15. Mechanical planter update: 2007 Bayou Teche test plant cane results

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mechanization of cane planting has been somewhat limited, due to the fact that the entire 4-5 ft stalk must be planted horizontally in the seedbed. Several modifications were made to mechanical planters by a grower cooperator. To test the modifications, a replicated field trial was planted on Augus...

  16. Test results on a free-cylinder Stirling engine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. I. Banks

    1989-01-01

    In the early 1980s Sunpower Incorporated of Athens, Ohio designed and built some prototype free-cylinder Stirling engine powered water pumps for use in rural areas. In 1988, one of the products of this development was donated to the University of Witwatersrand. This engine has been comprehensively instrumented and is in the process of being tested. A net output power of

  17. Still Just 1 "g": Consistent Results from Five Test Batteries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Wendy; te Nijenhuis, Jan; Bouchard, Thomas J., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    In a recent paper, Johnson, Bouchard, Krueger, McGue, and Gottesman (2004) addressed a long-standing debate in psychology by demonstrating that the g factors derived from three test batteries administered to a single group of individuals were completely correlated. This finding provided evidence for the existence of a unitary higher-level general…

  18. Physical Education and Its Effect on Elementary Testing Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tremarche, Pamela V.; Robinson, Ellyn M.; Graham, Louise B.

    2007-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the impact of increased quality Physical Education time on Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) standardized scores. The MCAS test was given to 311 fourth-grade students in two Southeastern communities in Massachusetts, within a two-month period in April and May of 2001. The participants were…

  19. First test results for the ITER central solenoid model coil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Kato; H. Tsuji; T. Ando; Y. Takahashi; H. Nakajima; M. Sugimoto; T. Isono; N. Koizumi; K. Kawano; M. Oshikiri; K. Hamada; Y. Nunoya; K. Matsui; T. Shinba; Y. Tsuchiya; G. Nishijima; H. Kubo; E. Hara; H. Hanawa; K. Imahashi; K. Ootsu; Y. Uno; T. Oouchi; J. Okayama; T. Kawasaki; M. Kawabe; S. Seki; K. Takano; Y. Takaya; F. Tajiri; A. Tsutsumi; T. Nakanura; H. Wakabayashi; K. Nishii; N. Hosogane; M. Matsukawa; Y. Miura; T. Terakado; J. Okano; K. Shimada; M. Yamashita; K. Arai; T. Ishigouoka; A. Ninomiya; K. Okuno; D. Bessete; H. Takigami; N. Martovetsky; P. Michael; M. Takayasu; M. Ricci; R. Zanino; L. Savoldi; G. Zahn; A. Martinez; R. Maix

    2001-01-01

    The largest pulsed superconducting coils ever built, the Central Solenoid (CS) Model Coil and Central Solenoid Insert Coil were successfully developed and tested by international collaboration under the R&D activity of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), demonstrating and validating the engineering design criteria of the ITER Central Solenoid coil. The typical achievement is to charge the coil up to

  20. MISSISSIPPI COTTON YIELD MONITOR: THREE YEARS OF FIELD TEST RESULTS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. Thomasson; R. Sui

    The Mississippi cotton yield monitor, which is based on an optical cotton-flow sensor comprised of emitters and detectors in one unit that can be affixed to only one side of a pneumatic duct, has been under development at Mississippi State University since 1999. One prototype of the yield monitor was field tested that year in Mississippi. In 2000, three prototypes

  1. Results of dynamic testing of GP-B spherical gyroscopes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. M. Keiser; J. V. Breakwell; Y. Xiao; S. Feteih

    1989-01-01

    Laboratory tests of the spherical electrostatically levitated cryogenically cooled coated gyroscope being developed for the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) spacecraft (Bardas et al., 1986) are reported. Spin speed and the dc components of the trapped magnetic field are measured with three orthogonal pickup loops attached to SQUID detectors as the levitated gyro is brought up to speed by an He

  2. Operational and technical results from the Spent Fuel Test - Climax

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick, W.C.

    1985-01-01

    The technical feasibility of short-term storage and retrieval of spent nuclear fuel assemblies has recently been demonstrated in a test of deep geologic storage at the US Department of Energy Nevada Test Site (NTS). Handling systems and procedures developed and deployed on this test functioned safely and reliably to emplace eleven intact spent-fuel assemblies and retrieve them three years later. Three exchanges of spent fuel were conducted at regular intervals during the storage period to maintain the proficiency of personnel and the readiness of the handling system. Technical data was collected using nearly 1000 instruments. These data show that the mechanical and thermal properties of granites are compatible with nuclear waste isolation objectives. Measured and calculated temperatures are in excellent agreement, confirming the adequacy of available heat transfer codes. Radiation transport calculations were of high quality, exceeding the accuracy of available long-term dosimetry techniques which were used on the test. We also found good agreement between measured and calculated displacements within the rock mass. 28 references, 4 figures.

  3. An EBIS-based RHIC Preinjector Test EBIS Results

    E-print Network

    Time of flight mass-spectrometer Faraday cup-2 Faraday cup-3 Scale 1.00 m Test EBIS - showing ion solenoid Electron gun bucking coil Electron collector bucking coil Electron collector Ion extractor Faraday cup-1 Electrostatic deflectors Electrostatic quadrupole lens LEVA ion source Electrostatic 30° bender

  4. Tower test results for an imaging LADAR seeker

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cliff Andressen; David Anthony; Tony DaMommio; Don Hulsey; Clint Lawton; James Neisz; Tay Perona; Doug Steinmehl; Joe Grobmyer; Tommy Lum

    2005-01-01

    Raytheon has developed a new tactical form-factored, imaging LADAR (LAser Detection And Ranging) seeker. In a joint activity with AMRDEC, the seeker was used in a tower test data collection at the Russell Measurement Facility at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. The seeker collected 3D imagery of fixed structures and vehicles embedded in various clutter backgrounds for use in analysis of computer

  5. Test results: textiles selected for direct gain passive buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Guerin, D.A.; Butler, S.L.

    1981-01-01

    Upholstery textiles that are commercially available to residents of passive solar homes were tested to determine the sunlight resistance and thermal conductivity properties. Those textiles with the highest rating for sunlight resistance can then be recommended for use in direct gain passive solar buildings.

  6. Test results for 27.5- to 30-GHz communications satellite receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conroy, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    Five proof of concept receivers are tested. The receivers operate in the 27.5 to 30 GHz uplink band for communications satellites and produce an output at C band. Receiver requirements and test results are given. Test methods are discussed and results are compared with the contractor's test results.

  7. 40 CFR 94.508 - Calculation and reporting of test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...results to the number of decimal places contained in the applicable emission standard expressed to one additional significant figure. (b) To calculate test results, sum the initial test results derived in paragraph (a) of this...

  8. 40 CFR 94.508 - Calculation and reporting of test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...results to the number of decimal places contained in the applicable emission standard expressed to one additional significant figure. (b) To calculate test results, sum the initial test results derived in paragraph (a) of this...

  9. 40 CFR 94.508 - Calculation and reporting of test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...results to the number of decimal places contained in the applicable emission standard expressed to one additional significant figure. (b) To calculate test results, sum the initial test results derived in paragraph (a) of this...

  10. 40 CFR 94.508 - Calculation and reporting of test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...results to the number of decimal places contained in the applicable emission standard expressed to one additional significant figure. (b) To calculate test results, sum the initial test results derived in paragraph (a) of this...

  11. 40 CFR 94.508 - Calculation and reporting of test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...results to the number of decimal places contained in the applicable emission standard expressed to one additional significant figure. (b) To calculate test results, sum the initial test results derived in paragraph (a) of this...

  12. Assessing standardization of molecular testing for non-small-cell lung cancer: results of a worldwide external quality assessment (EQA) scheme for EGFR mutation testing

    PubMed Central

    Patton, S; Normanno, N; Blackhall, F; Murray, S; Kerr, K M; Dietel, M; Filipits, M; Benlloch, S; Popat, S; Stahel, R; Thunnissen, E

    2014-01-01

    Background: The external quality assurance (EQA) process aims at establishing laboratory performance levels. Leading European groups in the fields of EQA, Pathology, and Medical and Thoracic Oncology collaborated in a pilot EQA scheme for somatic epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutational analysis in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: EQA samples generated from cell lines mimicking clinical samples were provided to participating laboratories, each with a mock clinical case. Participating laboratories performed the analysis using their usual method(s). Anonymous results were assessed and made available to all participants. Two subsequent EQA rounds followed the pilot scheme. Results: One hundred and seventeen labs from 30 countries registered and 91 returned results. Sanger sequencing and a commercial kit were the main methodologies used. The standard of genotyping was suboptimal, with a significant number of genotyping errors made. Only 72 out of 91 (72%) participants passed the EQA. False-negative and -positive results were the main sources of error. The quality of reports submitted was acceptable; most were clear, concise and easy to read. However, some participants reported the genotyping result in the absence of any interpretation and many obscured the interpretation required for clinical care. Conclusions: Even in clinical laboratories, the technical performance of genotyping in EGFR mutation testing for NSCLC can be improved, evident from a high level of diagnostic errors. Robust EQA can contribute to global optimisation of EGFR testing for NSCLC patients. PMID:24983368

  13. Recent results from the Spacecraft Fabrication and Test MODIL

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, T.T.

    1993-04-01

    The Spacecraft Fabrication and Test Manufacturing Operations Development and Integration Laboratory (SF&T MODIL) is working with SDIO program offices and contractors to reduce schedule and budget risks for SDIO systems as they go into production. The concurrent engineering thrust has identified potential high payoff areas. A materials and structures demonstration project has been successfully completed in partial automated closing of matched metal molds for a continuous fiber composite. In addition to excellent accuracy, the parts demonstrated excellent predictability and repeatability of physical properties. The cryocooler thrust successfully demonstrated and inserted precision technologies into a generic cryocooler part. The precision technologies thrust outlined two potentially high payoff areas in precision alignment and miniature rocket thrust measurement. The Producible Technology Working Group (PTWG) efforts identified the need for a test and assembly thrust. Due to funding limitations, continuing efforts are limited to the cryocooler thrust.

  14. Life cycle test results of a bipolar nickel hydrogen battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cataldo, R. L.

    1985-04-01

    A history of low Earth orbit laboratory test data on a 6.5 Ah bipolar nickel hydrogen battery designed and built at the NASA Lewis Research Center is presented. During the past several years the Storage and Thermal Branch has been deeply involved in the design, development, and optimization of nickel hydrogen devices. The bipolar concept is a means of achieving the goal of producing an acceptable battery of higher energy density, able to withstand the demands of low Earth orbit regimes.

  15. Life cycle test results of a bipolar nickel hydrogen battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cataldo, R. L.

    1985-12-01

    A history of low earth orbit laboratory test data on a 6.5 Ah bipolar nickel hydrogen battery designed and built at the NASA Lewis Research Center is presented. During the past several years the storage and Thermal Branch has been deeply involved in the design, development, and optimization of nickel hydrogen devices. The bipolar concept is a means of achieving the goal of producing an acceptable battery of higher energy density, able to withstand the demands of low earth orbiter regimes.

  16. Life cycle test results of a bipolar nickel hydrogen battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cataldo, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    A history of low Earth orbit laboratory test data on a 6.5 Ah bipolar nickel hydrogen battery designed and built at the NASA Lewis Research Center is presented. During the past several years the Storage and Thermal Branch has been deeply involved in the design, development, and optimization of nickel hydrogen devices. The bipolar concept is a means of achieving the goal of producing an acceptable battery of higher energy density, able to withstand the demands of low Earth orbit regimes.

  17. Life cycle test results of a bipolar nickel hydrogen battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cataldo, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    A history of low earth orbit laboratory test data on a 6.5 Ah bipolar nickel hydrogen battery designed and built at the NASA Lewis Research Center is presented. During the past several years the storage and Thermal Branch has been deeply involved in the design, development, and optimization of nickel hydrogen devices. The bipolar concept is a means of achieving the goal of producing an acceptable battery of higher energy density, able to withstand the demands of low earth orbiter regimes.

  18. Beta test results for the CAA mini-SAM system

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.C.; Monagle, M.

    1997-04-01

    The mission of the Chemical Analysis Automation (CAA) Program is to automate methods for chemical analysis of environmental samples. To accomplish this mission, the CAA team has developed automated laboratory systems based on a plug-and-work strategy for integrating components. Realizing that standardization is the key to implementing this strategy, CAA has developed, demonstrated, and encouraged commercialization of standards for laboratory automation. While the CAA mission is driven by the analyses in support of the extensive remediation programs of the Departments of Energy and Defense, it also impacts any industry that depends upon high volumes of repetitive chemical analysis. A Standard Analysis Method (SAM) is any collection of hardware and software used to automate part or all of a method. The method automated for the Mini-SAM testing is EPA Method 3550, which outlines semivolatiles extraction by sonication. The list of semivolatiles includes the polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) analytes of interest. The basic building block of a SAM is the Standard Laboratory Module (SLM). For the Mini-SAM test an automated sonication SLM and an automated concentration SLM were configured to perform the extraction and concentration processes. The Mini-SAM differs from the Full-SAM in that a fully automated delivery of materials, samples, and extracts is not required. The intent of the Beta Test of the Mini-SAM was threefold. Firstly, the Mini-SAM Beta Test met a milestone mandated by the Department of Energy in the course of the program effort. Secondly, the CAA Program secured an independent assessment of the equipment and its capabilities from Assagai Analytical Laboratory. Lastly, the Program captured real-world sample data. The independent assessment, coupled with CAA observation of equipment performance, was used to determine strengths and weaknesses of the Mini-SAM and to compile possible modifications for CAA engineers to address.

  19. Debris Particles resulting from the Chinese Nuclear Bomb Test

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jan Sisefsky

    1965-01-01

    ON October 16, 1964, at 1500 h the Chinese exploded a nuclear weapon bomb (Hsinhua News Agency, October 17, 1964) at a test site near Lop Nor in Takla Makan in Sing Kiang. On October 27 the first debris appeared in Swedish ground-air samples. Scarcely any detectable fission product activity appeared in high-altitude air samples1. The background, emanating principally from

  20. Still just 1 g: Consistent results from five test batteries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wendy Johnson; Jan te Nijenhuis; Thomas J. Bouchard

    2008-01-01

    In a recent paper, Johnson, Bouchard, Krueger, McGue, and Gottesman (2004) addressed a long-standing debate in psychology by demonstrating that the g factors derived from three test batteries administered to a single group of individuals were completely correlated. This finding provided evidence for the existence of a unitary higher-level general intelligence construct whose measurement is not dependent on the specific

  1. Test results of a catalytic combustor for a gas turbine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y Ozawa; T Fujii; Y Tochihara; T Kanazawa; K Sagimori

    1998-01-01

    A catalytically assisted low NOx combustor has been developed which has the advantage of catalyst durability. Combustion characteristics of catalysts at high pressure were investigated using a bench scale reactor and an improved catalyst was selected. A combustor for multi-can type gas turbine of 10MW class was designed and tested at high-pressure conditions using liquefied natural gas (LNG) fuel. This

  2. Deflection test results on D0 Run IIB stave

    SciTech Connect

    Lanfranco, Giobatta; /Fermilab

    2003-09-01

    The D0 RunIIb final design stave has been tested to verify its actual mechanical performance. The effectiveness of four G-11 (fiberglass/epoxy) braces to bridge the two channels has been investigated as well. All staves have met the goal stiffness for the silicon area. The stave mockups with braces have shown excellent stiffness in complete agreement with what theoretically calculated.

  3. Early results from solar dynamic space power system testing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard K. Shaltens; Lee S. Mason

    1996-01-01

    Abstract Agovernment\\/industry team designed, built and tested a 2-kWesolar dynamic,space power system in a large thermal\\/ vacuum,facility with a simulated ,Sun at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The Lewis facility provides an accurate simulation of temperatures, high vacuum and solar flux as encountered,in low-Earth orbit. The solar dynamic ,system includes a Brayton power conversion unit integrated with a solar receiver

  4. Results from the ARGO-YBJ test experiment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C Bacci; K. Z Bao; F Barone; B Bartoli; P Bernardini; S Bussino; E Calloni; B. Y Cao; R Cardarelli; S Catalanotti; F Cesaroni; P Creti; Danzengluobu; B. D'Ettorre Piazzoli; M. De Vincenzi; T. Di Girolamo; G. Di Sciascio; Z. Y Feng; X. Y Gao; Q. X Geng; H. W Guo; H. H He; M He; Q Huang; M Iacovacci; N Iucci; H. Y Jai; C. L Jing; F. M Kong; H. H Kuang; Labaciren; B Li; J. Y Li; Z. Q Liu; H Lu; X. H Ma; G Mancarella; S. M Mari; G Marsella; D Martello; X. R Meng; L Milano; J Mu; M Panareo; Z. R Peng; P Pistilli; R Santonico; P. R Shen; C Stanescu; L. R Sun; S. C Sun; A Surdo; Y. H Tan; S Vernetto; C. R Wang; H Wang; H. T Yang; Q. K Yao; G. C Yu; X. D Yue; A. F Yuan; M Zha; H. M Zhang; J. L Zhang; N. J Zhang; X. Y Zhang; Zhaxisangzhu; Zhaxiciren; Q. Q. Zhu

    2002-01-01

    A resistive plate counters (RPCs) carpet of ?50 m2 has been put in operation in the Yangbajing Laboratory (Tibet, P.R. China) at 4300 m a.s.l., in order to study the RPCs performance at high altitude and the detector capability of imaging the EAS disc. This test has been performed in view of an enlarged use of RPCs for the ARGO-YBJ

  5. Test results for a Nb3Sn dipole magnet

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. F. Lietzke; R. Benjegerdes; S. Caspi; D. Dell'Orco; W. Harnden; A. D. McInturff; M. Morrison; R. M. Scanlan; C. E. Taylor; J. M. van Oort

    1997-01-01

    A cosine theta type dipole magnet using Nb3Sn conductor have been designed, built and tested. D19H is a two-layer dipole magnet with a Nb3Sn inner layer and a recycled NbTi outer layer. Coil-pairs are connected with two of the four Nb3Sn splices in a high field region, and compressed by a ring and collet system. The ramp-rate sensitivity and the

  6. Steel-to-concrete bond after concrete splitting: test results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pietro G. Gambarova; Gian Paolo Rosati; Barbara Zasso

    1989-01-01

    The definite trend towards the use of large-diameter rebars and the introduction of high-strength steels (f\\u000a y=500 to 600 MPa) make it necessary to study the effects of longitudinal splitting on the steel-to-concrete bond. The study\\u000a of splitting effects requires firstly basic tests to be performed in order to gather experimental information on bond and\\u000a confinement stresses acting at the

  7. Results of baseline tests of the Lucas Limousine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soltis, R. F.; Dustin, M. O.; Sargent, N. B.

    1977-01-01

    The Lucas Limousine, an electric vehicle, was tested to assess the state-of-the-art of electric vehicles. All tests were made without the regenerative braking system and were conducted at the gross vehicle weight of 7,700 pounds. Over a 30 mph stop and go driving cycle the vehicle went 48.4 miles. The vehicle was able to accelerate to 30 mph in about 15 seconds with a gradeability limit of 16.5 percent. As determined by coast down tests the road power and road energy consumption for the vehicle were 2.92 kilowatts and 0.146 kWh/mi, respectively, at 20 mph. At 40 mph the road power requirement was 11.12 kilowatts and the road energy requirement was 0.278 kWh/mi. The maximum energy economy measured 0.45 kilowatt hours per mile at 30 mph and increased to 0.76 kilowatt hours per mile at 50 mph. Over the 30 mph stop and go driving cycle the energy economy was 0.92 kilowatt hours per mile.

  8. Preliminary results of durability testing with borosilicate glass compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Adel-Hadadi, M.; Adiga, R.; Barkatt, Aa.; Barkatt, Al.; Feng, X.; Finger, S.; Freeborn, W.P.; Macedo, P.B.; Mohr, R.; Montrose, C.; Pegg, I.L.; Saad, E.; Sousanpour, W.

    1987-01-28

    This is a report on the first year of research conducted at the Vitreous State Laboratory of the Catholic University of America in support of the West Valley Demonstration Project. One objective is the vitrification of liquid waste generated by previous nuclear fuel reprocessing. This work has been directed principally at the problem of glass composition optimization. This has necessitated the development of a coordinated program of glass production, durability measurements, and processability assessment. A small-scale continuous melter has been constructed for melting uranium and thorium containing glasses and for studying glass processing characteristics. Glass viscosities have been measured over a range of temperatures. A large number of glasses have also been produced in small crucible melts. Glass durability has been assessed using four types of leach tests: MCC-3, MCC-1, IAEA/ISO, and pulsed-flow tests. Extensive data from these tests are reported. The data have led to the design of very durable glasses (comparable to the Savannah River Laboratory Defense Waste Reference Glass) which have the requisite waste loading and processing characteristics. 14 refs., 4 figs., 77 tabs.

  9. Results of deep-well injection testing at Mulberry, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickey, John J.; Wilson, W.E.

    1982-01-01

    At the Kaiser Aluminum and Chemical Corporation plant, Mulberry, Fla., high-chloride, acidic liquid wastes are injected into a dolomite section at depths below about 4,000 feet below land surface. In 1975, a satellite monitor well was drilled 2,291 feet from the injection well and a series of three injection tests were performed. Duration of the tests ranged from 240 to 10,020 minutes and injection rates ranged from 110 to 230 gallons per minute. Based on an evaluation of factors that affect hydraulic response, water-level data suitable for interpretation of hydraulic characteristics of the injection zone were identified to occur from 200 to 1,000 minutes during the 10,020-minute test. Transmissivity of the injection zone was computed to be within the range from 700 to 1,000 feet squared per day and storage coefficient of the injection zone was computed to be within the range from .00001 to .00005. The confining bed accepting most of the leakage appears to be the underlying bed. Also, it appears that the overlying beds are probably relatively impermeable and significantly retard the vertical movement of neutralized waste effluent. (USGS)

  10. Autonomous Airborne Refueling Demonstration: Phase I Flight-Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dibley, Ryan P.; Allen, Michael J.; Nabaa, Nassib

    2007-01-01

    The first phase of the Autonomous Airborne Refueling Demonstration (AARD) project was completed on August 30, 2006. The goal of this 15-month effort was to develop and flight-test a system to demonstrate an autonomous refueling engagement using the Navy style hose-and-drogue air-to-air refueling method. The prime contractor for this Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) sponsored program was Sierra Nevada Corporation (SNC), Sparks, Nevada. The responsible flight-test organization was the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC), Edwards, California, which also provided the F/A-18 receiver airplane (McDonnell Douglas, now The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois). The B-707-300 tanker airplane (The Boeing Company) was contracted through Omega Aerial Refueling Services, Inc., Alexandria, Virginia, and the optical tracking system was contracted through OCTEC Ltd., Bracknell, Berkshire, United Kingdom. Nine research flights were flown, testing the functionality and performance of the system in a stepwise manner, culminating in the plug attempts on the final flight. Relative position keeping was found to be very stable and accurate. The receiver aircraft was capable of following the tanker aircraft through turns while maintaining its relative position. During the last flight, six capture attempts were made, two of which were successful. The four misses demonstrated excellent characteristics, the receiver retreating from the drogue in a controlled, safe, and predictable manner that precluded contact between the drogue and the receiver aircraft. The position of the receiver aircraft when engaged and in position for refueling was found to be 5.5 to 8.5 ft low of the ideal position. The controller inputs to the F/A-18 were found to be extremely small.

  11. Autonomous Airborne Refueling Demonstration, Phase I Flight-Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dibley, Ryan P.; Allen, Michael J.; Nabaa, Nassib

    2007-01-01

    The first phase of the Autonomous Airborne Refueling Demonstration (AARD) project was completed on August 30, 2006. The goal of this 15-month effort was to develop and flight-test a system to demonstrate an autonomous refueling engagement using the Navy style hose-and-drogue air-to-air refueling method. The prime contractor for this Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) sponsored program was Sierra Nevada Corporation (SNC), Sparks, Nevada. The responsible flight-test organization was the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC), Edwards, California, which also provided the F/A-18 receiver airplane (McDonnell Douglas, now The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois). The B-707-300 tanker airplane (The Boeing Company) was contracted through Omega Aerial Refueling Services, Inc., Alexandria, Virginia, and the optical tracking system was contracted through OCTEC Ltd., Bracknell, Berkshire, United Kingdom. Nine research flights were flown, testing the functionality and performance of the system in a stepwise manner, culminating in the plug attempts on the final flight. Relative position keeping was found to be very stable and accurate. The receiver aircraft was capable of following the tanker aircraft through turns while maintaining its relative position. During the last flight, six capture attempts were made, two of which were successful. The four misses demonstrated excellent characteristics, the receiver retreating from the drogue in a controlled, safe, and predictable manner that precluded contact between the drogue and the receiver aircraft. The position of the receiver aircraft when engaged and in position for refueling was found to be 5.5 to 8.5 ft low of the ideal position. The controller inputs to the F/A-18 were found to be extremely small

  12. Negative HPV test result is better predictor of low cervical cancer risk than negative Pap test

    Cancer.gov

    Based on a study that included more than 1 million women, DCEG investigators and colleagues have determined that a negative test for human papillomavirus (HPV) infection compared to a negative Pap test provides greater safety, or assurance, against future risk of cervical cancer. That is, women who test negative on the HPV test have an extremely low risk of developing cervical cancer. The findings appeared online July 18, 2014, in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

  13. Life cycle test results of a bipolar nickel hydrogen battery

    SciTech Connect

    Cataldo, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    A history of low Earth orbit laboratory test data on a 6.5 Ah bipolar nickel hydrogen battery designed and built at the NASA Lewis Research Center is presented. During the past several years the Storage and Thermal Branch has been deeply involved in the design, development, and optimization of nickel hydrogen devices. The bipolar concept is a means of achieving the goal of producing an acceptable battery of higher energy density, able to withstand the demands of low Earth orbit regimes. 1 reference.

  14. Free-electron laser results from the Advanced Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Orzechowski, T.J.; Miller, J.L.; Weir, J.T.; Chong, Y.P.; Chambers, F.; Deis, G.A.; Paul, A.C.; Prosnitz, D.; Scharlemann, E.T.; Hallbach, K.

    1988-10-01

    PALADIN is a 10.6-..mu..m FEL amplifier experiment operating at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Advanced Test Accelerator, an induction linear accelerator designed to produce a 45-MeV, 10-kA electron beam. With a 15-m long wiggler, PALADIN demonstrated 27 dB of exponential gain from a 14-kW input signal. With a 5-MW input signal, the amplifier saturated after 10 dB of gain. The exponentially growing signal in the unsaturated amplifier was clearly seen to be gain guided by the electron beam. 7 refs., 8 figs.

  15. Test Results of a 200 W Class Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, David; Jankovsky, Robert S.

    1999-01-01

    The performance of a 200 W class Hall thruster was evaluated. Performance measurements were taken at power levels between 90 W and 250 W. At the nominal 200 W design point, the measured thrust was 11.3 mN. and the specific impulse was 1170 s excluding cathode flow in the calculation. A laboratory model 3 mm diameter hollow cathode was used for all testing. The engine was operated on laboratory power supplies in addition to a breadboard power processing unit fabricated from commercially available DC to DC converters.

  16. The Results of Recent MICE Superconducting Spectrometer Solenoid Test

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A; Virostek, Steve P.; Zisman, Michael S.

    2010-10-15

    The MICE spectrometer solenoid magnets will be the first magnets to be installed within the MICE cooling channel. The MICE spectrometer solenoids may be the largest magnets that have been cooled using small two stage coolers. During the previous test of this magnet, the cooler first stage temperatures were too high. The causes of some of the extra first stage heat load has been identified and corrected. The rebuilt magnet had a single stage GM cooler in addition to the three pulse tube coolers. The added cooler reduces the temperature of the top of the HTS leads, the shield and of the first stage of the pulse tube coolers.

  17. Beam test results of high counting rate MRPCs at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xianglei; Wang, Yi; Wang, Jingbo; Li, Yuanjing; Cheng, Jianping

    2010-03-01

    The usage of electrodes made of semi-conductive glass is an inspiring way of improving the counting rate capability of resistive plate chamber. We developed 6 and 10-gap multi-gap resistive plate chambers (MRPCs) with low resistive silicate glass electrodes (bulk resistivity ˜1010 ?cm) for applications in time-of-flight (TOF) at high counting rates. These two prototypes were tested with secondary irradiation from 2.5 GeV proton beam at GSI. Time resolutions below 90 ps and efficiencies above 90% were obtained at counting rates up to 28 kHz/cm2 for the 10-gap MRPC.

  18. Test results of a large size thermomechanical pump

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, A.; Herz, W.; Suesser, E.; Vogeley, B.; Voelkel, T.; Zahn, G. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1994-12-31

    A thermomechanical pump designed for operating the EURATOM-LCT coil with forced flow of helium II has been tested. When operated in self-driven mode, the flow rate proves to saturate for a heat load of 70 W, but even higher loads of up to 150 W can be removed from the loop without problems. Peak flow rates of up to 30 g/s and pressure heads of up to 0.450 bar have been achieved. The performance of the pump is compared with the predictions. This comprises the various heat exchangers, the internal pressure drop and the critical flow rate given by the porous plug.

  19. Moment independent importance measures: new results and analytical test cases.

    PubMed

    Borgonovo, Emanuele; Castaings, William; Tarantola, Stefano

    2011-03-01

    Moment independent methods for the sensitivity analysis of model output are attracting growing attention among both academics and practitioners. However, the lack of benchmarks against which to compare numerical strategies forces one to rely on?ad hoc?experiments in estimating the sensitivity measures. This article introduces a methodology that allows one to obtain moment independent sensitivity measures analytically. We illustrate the procedure by implementing four test cases with different model structures and model input distributions. Numerical experiments are performed at increasing sample size to check convergence of the sensitivity estimates to the analytical values. PMID:21070300

  20. Full length SSC R and D dipole magnet test results

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, J.; Bleadon, M.; Brown, B.C.; Hanft, R.; Kuchnir, M.; Lamm, M.; Mantsch, P.; Mazur, P.O.; Orris, D.; Peoples, J.

    1989-03-01

    Four full scale SSC development dipole magnets have been tested for mechanical and quench behavior. Two are of a design similar to previous magnets but contain a number of improvements, including more uniform coil size, higher pre-stress and a redesigned inner-outer coil splice. One exceeds the SSC operating current on the second quench but the other appears to be limited by damaged superconductor to a lower current. The other two magnets are of alternate designs. One trains erratically and fails to reach a plateau and the other reaches plateau after four quenches. 12 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Life test results for an ensemble of CO2 lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peruso, C. J.; Degnan, J. J.; Hochuli, U. E.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of cathode material, cathode operating temperature, anode configuration, window materials, and hydrogen additives on laser lifetime are determined. Internally oxidized copper and silber-copper alloy cathodes were tested. The cathode operating temperature was raised in some tubes through the use of thermal insulation. Lasers incorporating thermally insulated silver copper oxide cathodes clearly yielded the longest lifetimes-typically in excess of 22,000 hours. The use of platinum sheet versus platinum pin anodes had no observable effect on laser lifetime. Similarly, the choice of germanium, cadmium telluride, or zinc selenide as the optical window material appears to have no impact on lifetime.

  2. GPM Avionics Module Heat Pipes Design and Performance Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ottenstein, Laura; DeChristopher, Mike

    2012-01-01

    GPM is a satellite constellation to study precipitation formed from a partnership between NASA and the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). The GPM Core Observatory, being developed and tested at GSFC, serves as a reference standard to unify precipitation measurements from the GPM satellite constellation. The Core Observatory carries an advanced radar/radiometer system to measure precipitation from space. The scientific data gained from GPM will benefit both NASA and JAXA by advancing our understanding of Earth's water and energy cycle, improving forecasts of extreme weather events, and extending our current capabilities in using accurate and timely precipitation information to benefit society.

  3. Test results and facility description for a 40-kilowatt stirling engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelm, G. G.; Cairelli, J. E.; Walter, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    A 40 kilowatt Stirling engine, its test support facilities, and the experimental procedures used for these tests are described. Operating experience with the engine is discussed, and some initial test results are presented

  4. 40 CFR 205.171-7 - Reporting of the test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycle Exhaust Systems § 205.171-7 Reporting of the test... (iii) Year, make serial number, and model of test motorcycle; and (iv) Test results by serial numbers....

  5. 49 CFR 40.255 - What happens next after the alcohol confirmation test result?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false What happens next after the alcohol confirmation test result? 40.255 Section...Transportation PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Alcohol Confirmation Tests § 40.255 What...

  6. 49 CFR 40.255 - What happens next after the alcohol confirmation test result?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false What happens next after the alcohol confirmation test result? 40.255 Section...Transportation PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Alcohol Confirmation Tests § 40.255 What...

  7. 49 CFR 40.255 - What happens next after the alcohol confirmation test result?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false What happens next after the alcohol confirmation test result? 40.255 Section...Transportation PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Alcohol Confirmation Tests § 40.255 What...

  8. 49 CFR 40.255 - What happens next after the alcohol confirmation test result?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false What happens next after the alcohol confirmation test result? 40.255 Section...PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Alcohol Confirmation Tests § 40.255 What...

  9. 49 CFR 40.255 - What happens next after the alcohol confirmation test result?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false What happens next after the alcohol confirmation test result? 40.255 Section...PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Alcohol Confirmation Tests § 40.255 What...

  10. Single event test methodology and test results of commercial gigabit per second Fiber Channel hardware

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. A. Carts; P. W. Marshall; C. J. Marshall; K. A. Label; M. Flanegan; J. Bretthauer

    1997-01-01

    This article presents a detailed description of the single event test methods used to evaluate two different component sets conforming to the Fiber Channel (FC) commercial high-speed serial bus standard. The devices tested perform the hierarchically low-level functions such as transmission coding and actual electrical or optical linking. Pertinent portions of the FC specification, and details of the test setup

  11. GridPix detectors: Production and beam test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppert, W. J. C.; van Bakel, N.; Bilevych, Y.; Colas, P.; Desch, K.; Fransen, M.; van der Graaf, H.; Hartjes, F.; Hessey, N. P.; Kaminski, J.; Schmitz, J.; Schön, R.; Zappon, F.

    2013-12-01

    The innovative GridPix detector is a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) that is read out with a Timepix-1 pixel chip. By using wafer post-processing techniques an aluminium grid is placed on top of the chip. When operated, the electric field between the grid and the chip is sufficient to create electron induced avalanches which are detected by the pixels. The time-to-digital converter (TDC) records the drift time enabling the reconstruction of high precision 3D track segments. Recently GridPixes were produced on full wafer scale, to meet the demand for more reliable and cheaper devices in large quantities. In a recent beam test the contribution of both diffusion and time walk to the spatial and angular resolutions of a GridPix detector with a 1.2 mm drift gap are studied in detail. In addition long term tests show that in a significant fraction of the chips the protection layer successfully quenches discharges, preventing harm to the chip.

  12. Short-Term Test Results: Multifamily Home Energy Efficiency Retrofit

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.

    2013-01-01

    Multifamily deep energy retrofits (DERs) represent great potential for energy savings, while also providing valuable insights on research-generated efficiency measures, cost-effectiveness metrics, and risk factor strategies for the multifamily housing industry. The Bay Ridge project is comprised of a base scope retrofit with a goal of achieving 30% savings (relative to pre-retrofit), and a DER scope with a goal of 50% savings (relative to pre-retrofit). The base scope has been applied to the entire complex, except for one 12-unit building which underwent the DER scope. Findings from the implementation, commissioning, and short-term testing at Bay Ridge include air infiltration reductions of greater than 60% in the DER building; a hybrid heat pump system with a Savings to Investment Ratio (SIR) > 1 (relative to a high efficiency furnace) which also provides the resident with added incentive for energy savings; and duct leakage reductions of > 60% using an aerosolized duct sealing approach. Despite being a moderate rehab instead of a gut rehab, the Bay Ridge DER is currently projected to achieve energy savings ? 50% compared to pre-retrofit, and the short-term testing supports this estimate.

  13. Results of 2007 test beam of AMS-02 Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falco, Stefano Di

    2010-01-01

    The AMS-02 experiment will be delivered by the Space Shuttle Discovery to the ISS in summer 2010. The main goals of the experiment are search for antimatter and dark matter, high precision measurement of charged cosmic ray spectra and fluxes and study of gamma rays, in the GeV to TeV energy range. In AMS-02 the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) is required to measure e+,e- and gamma energy and to discriminate electromagnetic showers from hadronic cascades. ECAL is based on a lead/scintillating fiber sandwich, providing a 3D imaging reconstruction of the showers. The electronics equipping the detector has low power consumption, low noise, large dynamic range readout and full double redundancy. The calorimeter successfully got through several space qualification tests concerning the mechanical and thermal stability, the electromagnetic compatibility and radiation hardness. The ECAL Flight Model was calibrated during Summer 2007 in a test beam at CERN, using 6-250 GeV electron and proton beams: angular and energy resolutions, obtained from these data, are reported.

  14. Jet-Surface Interaction Test: Far-Field Noise Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clifford A.

    2012-01-01

    Many configurations proposed for the next generation of aircraft rely on the wing or other aircraft surfaces to shield the engine noise from the observers on the ground. However, the ability to predict the shielding effect and any new noise sources that arise from the high-speed jet flow interacting with a hard surface is currently limited. Furthermore, quality experimental data from jets with surfaces nearby suitable for developing and validating noise prediction methods are usually tied to a particular vehicle concept and, therefore, very complicated. The Jet/Surface Interaction Test was intended to supply a high quality set of data covering a wide range of surface geometries and positions and jet flows to researchers developing aircraft noise prediction tools. During phase one, the goal was to measure the noise of a jet near a simple planar surface while varying the surface length and location in order to: (1) validate noise prediction schemes when the surface is acting only as a jet noise shield and when the jet/surface interaction is creating additional noise, and (2) determine regions of interest for more detailed tests in phase two. To meet these phase one objectives, a flat plate was mounted on a two-axis traverse in two distinct configurations: (1) as a shield between the jet and the observer (microphone array) and (2) as a reflecting surface on the opposite side of the jet from the observer.

  15. Recent Performance Testing Results Using the 3-element Production Test Array for the Allen Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarter, J. C.; Blitz, L.; ATA 25 person Team; Paul G. Allen Foundation Collaboration

    2002-12-01

    The Allen Telescope Array will consist of 350 fixed six-meter dishes at the Hat Creek Radio Observatory in northern California (land use permits pending). It is the first massively parallel array ever built. Where possible, components from consumer markets and mass-production manufacturing processes have been used to lower costs. The architecture of the array explicitly anticipates future growth as a result of "Moore's Law" improvements. There will be many novel features of this array including ultra-wideband instantaneous frequency coverage from 0.5 to 11 GHz, a very wide field of view (2.5 degrees across at 21 cm), miniaturized 80K cryogenics, full bandwidth analog data transmission from the antennas to the Myhrvold central processing facility, dynamic null-formation and tracking of satellite interferers, and continuous multi-user support for radio astronomical research and SETI explorations. Starting in July 2000, the technology development for this array has been a collaboration between the Paul G. Allen Foundation and the ATA team located at the SETI Institute and at the Radio Astronomy Laboratory at UC Berkeley. A rapid prototyping array (RPA) consisting of seven COTS antennas and room temperature L-band receivers was erected in Orinda, CA in March 2001. Thanks to strong and continuing support from Sun Microsystems, the RPA has provided an invaluable testbed for software development and evaluation of RFI mitigation schemes. An operational 3-element Production Test Array (PTA) has been implemented at Hat Creek Observatory over the last few months. The antennas, drives, monitor and control software, and frontend components are near-final versions to be manufactured for the full array. This poster provides performance data from the first few months of testing with the PTA. A final decision on commitment for construction is expected by April 1, 2003.

  16. Results of Laboratory Testing of Advanced Power Strips: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Earle, L.; Sparn, B.

    2012-08-01

    This paper describes the results of a laboratory investigation to evaluate the technical performance of advanced power strip (APS) devices when subjected to a range of home entertainment center and home office usage scenarios.

  17. Dynamic SDRAM SEFI Detection and Recovery Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guertin, Steven M.; Patterson, Jeffrey D.; Nguyen, Duc N.

    2004-01-01

    Single event functionality interrupt (SEFI) results are presented for Hynix SDRAMS. The SEFI response threshold is below LET 9.9 Mev-cm(exp 2)/mg and the saturated cross section is 6 x 10(exp -5)cm(exp 2). Dynamic SEFI identification was made, and in-situ recovery restored functionality. Verification results of the identification algorithm are presented. An observed high current radiation response is also presented.

  18. Results of field testing the cement evaluation tool

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, C.A.; Finlayson, C.G.; Van der Kolk, C.

    1984-01-01

    The Cement Evaluation Tool (CET) developed by Schlumberger employs a pulse-echo technique using eight sonic transducers to investigate the casing cement bond. The tool has been widely field tested in a clastic environment in Brunei (N.W. Borneo), across both oil and gas bearing reservoirs. Numerous comparisons of the CET with conventional CBL/VDL logs have been made. Across oil and water bearing intervals the CET is shown to compare favourably with the CBL/VDL and yields significant additional information on channeling, cement distribution, and the success of casing centralization. In addition, the accuracy of the acoustic calipers have proved sufficient to be used in assisting drilling and completion operations. The response of the tool to a microannulus has also been demonstrated by multiple runs under varying wellbore pressures.

  19. Filtration Understanding: FY10 Testing Results and Filtration Model Update

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Richard C.; Billing, Justin M.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Peterson, Reid A.; Russell, Renee L.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Shimskey, Rick W.

    2011-04-04

    This document completes the requirements of Milestone 2-4, Final Report of FY10 Testing, discussed in the scope of work outlined in the EM31 task plan WP-2.3.6-2010-1. The focus of task WP 2.3.6 is to improve the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) understanding of filtration operations for high-level waste (HLW) to improve filtration and cleaning efficiencies, thereby increasing process throughput and reducing the Na demand (through acid neutralization). Developing the cleaning/backpulsing requirements will produce much more efficient operations for both the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and the Savannah River Site (SRS), thereby significantly increasing throughput by limiting cleaning cycles. The scope of this work is to develop the understanding of filter fouling to allow developing this cleaning/backpulsing strategy.

  20. Test results of JPL LiSOCl sub 2 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpert, G.; Subbarao, S.; Dawson, S.; Ang, V.; Deligiannis, E.

    1986-01-01

    In the development of high rate Li-SO-Cl2 cells for various applications, the goal is to achieve 300 watt-hours per kilogram at the C/2 (5 amp) rate in a D cell configuration. The JPL role is to develop the understanding of the performance, life, and safety limiting characteristics in the cell and to transfer the technology to a manufacturer to produce a safe, high quality product in a reproducible manner. The approach taken to achieve the goals is divided into four subject areas: cathode processes and characteristics; chemical reactions and safety; cell design and assembly; and performance and abuse testing. The progress made in each of these areas is discussed.