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Sample records for tetrachloroethylene toluene trichloroethylene

  1. Transformation of tetrachloroethylene to trichloroethylene by homoacetogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Terzenbach, D P; Blaut, M

    1994-10-15

    Eight homoacetogenic strains of the genera Acetobacterium, Clostridium and Sporomusa were tested for their ability to dechlorinate tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethene, PCE). Of the organisms tested only Sporomusa ovata was able to reductively dechlorinate PCE with methanol as an electron donor. Resting cells of S. ovata reductively dechlorinated PCE at a rate of 9.8 nmol h-1 (mg protein)-1 to trichloroethylene (TCE) as the sole product. The dechlorination activity depended on concomitant acetogenesis from methanol and CO2. Cell-free extracts of S. ovata, Clostridium formicoaceticum, Acetobacterium woodii, and the methanogenic bacterium Methanolobus tindarius transformed PCE to TCE with Ti(III) or carbon monoxide as electron donors. Corrinoids were shown in S. ovata to be involved in the dechlorination reaction of PCE to TCE as evident from the reversible inhibition with propyl iodide. Rates of dechlorination followed a pseudo-first-order kinetic. PMID:7988892

  2. Degradation of trichloroethylene by toluene dioxygenase in whole-cell studies with Pseudomonas putida F1.

    PubMed Central

    Wackett, L P; Gibson, D T

    1988-01-01

    Toluene-induced cells of Pseudomonas putida F1 removed trichloroethylene from growth media at a significantly greater initial rate than the methanotroph Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. With toluene-induced P. putida F1, the initial degradation rate varied linearly with trichloroethylene concentration over the range of 8 to 80 microM (1.05 to 10.5 ppm). At 80 microM (10.5 ppm) trichloroethylene and 30 degrees C, the initial rate was 1.8 nmol/min per mg of total cell protein, but the rate decreased rapidly with time. A series of mutant strains derived from P. putida F1 that are defective in the todC gene, which encodes the oxygenase component of toluene dioxygenase, failed to degrade trichloroethylene and to oxidize indole to indigo. A spontaneous revertant selected from a todC culture regained simultaneously the abilities to oxidize toluene, to form indigo, and to degrade trichloroethylene. The three isomeric dichloroethylenes were degraded by P. putida F1, but tetrachloroethylene, vinyl chloride, and ethylene were not removed from incubation mixtures. PMID:3415234

  3. Tetrachloroethylene

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Tetrachloroethylene ( Perchloroethylene ) ; CASRN 127 - 18 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessm

  4. Use of Mini-Sprinklers to Strip Trichloroethylene and Tetrachloroethylene from Contaminated Ground Water.

    SciTech Connect

    Brerisford, Yvette, C.; Bush, Parshall, B.; Blake, John, I.; Bayer, Cassandra L.

    2003-01-01

    Berisford, Y.C., P.B. Bush, J.I. Blake, and C.L. Bayer. 2003. Use of mini-sprinklers to strip trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene from contaminated ground water. J. Env. Qual. 32:801-815. Three low-volume mini-sprinklers were tested for their efficacy to strip trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) from water. Deionized water spiked with TCE and PCE was pumped through a mini-sprinkler supported on top of a 1.8-m-tall. Water was collected in collection vessels at 0.61 and 1.22 m above the ground on support columns that were spaced at 0.61-m intervals from the riser base, and samples were composited per height and distance from the riser. Overall, air-stripping reduced dissolved concentrations of TCE and PCE by 99.1 to 100 and 96.9 to 100%, respectively. Mini-sprinklers offer the advantages of (i) easy setup in series that can be used on practically any terrain; (ii) operation over a long period of time that does not threaten aquifer depletion; (iii) use in small or confined aquifers in which the capacity is too low to support large irrigation or pumping systems; and (iv) use in forests in which the small, low-impact droplets of the mini-sprinklers do not damage bark and in which trees can help manage (via evapotransporation) excess waste water.

  5. Kinetics of the transformation of trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene by iron sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, E.C.; Hayes, K.F. . Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering)

    1999-06-15

    The transformation of trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), and 1,1-dichloroethylene FeS in aqueous solution at pH 8.3 was studied in batch experiments. TCE and PCE were transformed by FeS with pseudo-first-order rate constants, corrected for partitioning to the sample headspace, of (1.49 [+-] 0.14) [times] 10[sup [minus]3] h[sup [minus]1] (TCE) and (5.7 [+-] 1.0) [times] 10[sup [minus]4] h[sup [minus]1] (PCE). A 17% decrease in the concentration of 1,3-DCE was observed over 120 days; however, no reaction products were detected. TCE and PCE transformation data were fit to a rate law assuming transformation of TCE via parallel reaction pathways to acetylene and cis-1,2-dichloroethylene (cis-DCE) and transformation of PCE via parallel reaction pathways to acetylene and TCE. Acetylene was the major reaction product for both TCE and PCE. Determination of rate constants for each reaction pathway indicated that TCE was transformed to acetylene 11.8 [+-] 1.1 times faster than to cis-DCE and that PCE was transformed to acetylene 8.2 [+-] 1.8 times faster than to TCE. Additional minor reaction products were vinyl chloride (VC) for TCE and cis-DCE for PCE. Detection of acetylene as the major product of both TCE and PCE transformation by FeS contrasts with the sequential hydrogenolysis products typically observed in the microbial transformation of these compounds, making acetylene a potential indicator of abiotic transformation of TCE and PCE by FeS in natural systems.

  6. Mutagenicity of the Cysteine S-Conjugate Sulfoxides of Trichloroethylene and Tetrachloroethylene in the Ames Test

    PubMed Central

    Irving, Roy M.; Elfarra, Adnan A.

    2013-01-01

    The nephrotoxicity and nephrocarcinogenicity of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) are believed to be mediated primarily through the cysteine S-conjugate β-lyase-dependent bioactivation of the corresponding cysteine S-conjugate metabolites S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (DCVC) and S-(1,2,2-trichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (TCVC), respectively. DCVC and TCVC have previously been demonstrated to be mutagenic by the Ames Salmonella mutagenicity assay, and reduction in mutagenicity was observed upon treatment with the β-lyase inhibitor aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA). Because DCVC and TCVC can also be bioactivated through sulfoxidation to yield the potent nephrotoxicants S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine sulfoxide (DCVCS) and S-(1,2,2-trichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine sulfoxide (TCVCS), respectively, the mutagenic potential of these two sulfoxides was investigated using the Ames S. typhimuriumTA100 mutagenicity assay. The results show both DCVCS and TCVCS were mutagenic, and TCVCS exhibited 3-fold higher mutagenicity than DCVCS. However, DCVCS and TCVCS mutagenic activity was approximately 700-fold and 30-fold lower than DCVC and TCVC, respectively. DCVC and DCVCS appeared to induce toxicity in TA100, as evidenced by increased microcolony formation and decreased mutant frequency above threshold concentrations. TCVC and TCVCS were not toxic in TA100. The toxic effects of DCVC limited the sensitivity of TA100 to DCVC mutagenic effects and rendered it difficult to investigate the effects of AOAA on DCVC mutagenic activity. Collectively, these results suggest that DCVCS and TCVCS exerted a definite but weak mutagenicity in the TA100 strain. Therefore, despite their potent nephrotoxicity, DCVCS and TCVCS are not likely to play a major role in DCVC or TCVC mutagenicity in this strain. PMID:23416178

  7. Effect of trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene on methane oxidation and community structure of methanotrophic consortium.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sun-Ah; Lee, Eun-Hee; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2013-01-01

    The methane oxidation rate and community structure of a methanotrophic consortium were analyzed to determine the effects of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) on methane oxidation. The maximum methane oxidation rate (Vmax ) of the consortium was 326.8 μmol·g-dry biomass(-1)·h(-1), and it had a half-saturation constant (Km ) of 143.8 μM. The addition of TCE or PCE resulted in decreased methane oxidation rates, which were decreased from 101.73 to 5.47-24.64 μmol·g-dry biomass(-1)·h(-1) with an increase in the TCE-to-methane ratio, and to 61.95-67.43 μmol·g-dry biomass(-1)·h(-1) with an increase in the PCE-to-methane ratio. TCE and PCE were non-competitive inhibitors for methane oxidation, and their inhibition constants (Ki ) were 33.4 and 132.0 μM, respectively. When the methanotrophic community was analyzed based on pmoA using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), the pmoA gene copy numbers were shown to decrease from 7.3 ± 0.7 × 10(8) to 2.1-5.0 × 10(7) pmoA gene copy number · g-dry biomass(-1) with an increase in the TCE-to-methane ratio and to 2.5-7.0 × 10(7) pmoA gene copy number · g-dry biomass(-1) with an increase in the PCE-to-methane ratio. Community analysis by microarray demonstrated that Methylocystis (type II methanotrophs) were the most abundant in the methanotrophic community composition in the presence of TCE. These results suggest that toxic effects caused by TCE and PCE change not only methane oxidation rates but also the community structure of the methanotrophic consortium. PMID:23947712

  8. Kinetic study of trichloroethylene and toluene degradation by a bioluminescent reporter bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, C.J.; Sanseverino, J.; Bienkowski, P.R.; Sayler, G.S.

    1995-12-31

    A constructed bioluminescent reporter bacterium, Pseudomonas putida B2, is very briefly described in this paper. The bacterium degrades toluene and trichloroethylene (TCE), and produces light in the presence of toluene. The light response is an indication of cellular viability and expression of the genes encoding toluene and TCE degrading enzymes.

  9. Trichloroethylene oxidation by purified toluene 2-monooxygenase: products, kinetics, and turnover-dependent inactivation.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, L M; Wackett, L P

    1997-01-01

    Trichloroethylene is oxidized by several types of nonspecific bacterial oxygenases. Toluene 2-monooxygenase from Burkholderia cepacia G4 is implicated in trichloroethylene oxidation and is uniquely suggested to be resistant to turnover-dependent inactivation in vivo. In this work, the oxidation of trichloroethylene was studied with purified toluene 2-monooxygenase. All three purified toluene 2-monooxygenase protein components and NADH were required to reconstitute full trichloroethylene oxidation activity in vitro. The apparent Km and Vmax were 12 microM and 37 nmol per min per mg of hydroxylase component, respectively. Ten percent of the full activity was obtained when the small-molecular-weight enzyme component was omitted. The stable oxidation products, accounting for 84% of the trichloroethylene oxidized, were carbon monoxide, formic acid, glyoxylic acid, and covalently modified oxygenase proteins that constituted 12% of the reacted [14C]trichloroethylene. The stable oxidation products may all derive from the unstable intermediate trichloroethylene epoxide that was trapped by reaction with 4-(p-nitrobenzyl)pyridine. Chloral hydrate and dichloroacetic acid were not detected. This finding differs from that with soluble methane monooxygenase and cytochrome P-450 monooxygenase, which produce chloral hydrate. Trichloroethylene-dependent inactivation of toluene 2-monooxygenase activity was observed. All of the protein components were covalently modified during the oxidation of trichloroethylene. The addition of cysteine to reaction mixtures partially protected the enzyme system against inactivation, most notably protecting the NADH-oxidoreductase component. This suggested the participation of diffusible intermediates in the inactivation of the oxidoreductase. PMID:8981984

  10. Trichloroethylene degradation by Escherichia coli containing the cloned Pseudomonas putida F1 toluene dioxygenase genes

    SciTech Connect

    Zylstra, G.J.; Gibson, D.T. ); Wackett, L.P. )

    1989-12-01

    Toluene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida F1 has been implicated as an enzyme capable of degrading trichloroethylene. This has now been confirmed with Escherichia coli JM109(pDTG601) that contains the structural genes (todC1C2BA) of toluene dioxygenase under the control of the tac promoter. The extent of trichloroethylene degradation by the recombinant organism depended on the cell concentration and the concentration of trichloroethylene. A linear rate of trichloroethylene degradation was observed with the E. coli recombinant strain. In contrast, P. putida F39/D, a mutant strain of P. putida F1 that does not contain cis-toluene dihydrodiol dehydrogenase, showed a much faster initial rate of trichloroethylene degradation which decreased over time.

  11. Novel Pathway of Toluene Catabolism in the Trichloroethylene-Degrading Bacterium G4

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Malcolm S.; Montgomery, Stacy O.; Chapman, Peter J.; Cuskey, Stephen M.; Pritchard, P. H.

    1989-01-01

    o-Cresol and 3-methylcatechol were identified as successive transitory intermediates of toluene catabolism by the trichloroethylene-degrading bacterium G4. The absence of a toluene dihydrodiol intermediate or toluene dioxygenase and toluene dihydrodiol dehydrogenase activities suggested that G4 catabolizes toluene by a unique pathway. Formation of a hybrid species of 18O- and 16O-labeled 3-methylcatechol from toluene in an atmosphere of 18O2 and 16O2 established that G4 catabolizes toluene by successive monooxygenations at the ortho and meta positions. Detection of trace amounts of 4-methylcatechol from toluene catabolism suggested that the initial hydroxylation of toluene was not exclusively at the ortho position. Further catabolism of 3-methylcatechol was found to proceed via catechol-2,3-dioxygenase and hydroxymuconic semialdehyde hydrolase activities. PMID:16347956

  12. Recruitment and expression of toluene/trichloroethylene biodegradation genes in bacteria native to deep-subsurface sediments.

    PubMed Central

    Romine, M F; Brockman, F J

    1996-01-01

    Four plasmids, each encoding a combination of either an Escherichia coli or Pseudomonas putida promoter and either toluene dioxygenase or toluene monooxygenase, were electroporated into five bacterial strains isolated from sediments found at depths of 91 to 295 m. Four of these engineered bacterial strains demonstrated both toluene and trichloroethylene degradation activities. PMID:8779603

  13. Recruitment and expression of toluene/trichloroethylene biodegradation genes in bacteria native to deep-subsurface sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Romine, M.F.; Brockman, F.J.

    1996-07-01

    Four plasmids, each encoding a combination of either an Escherichia coli or Pseudomonas putida promoter and either toluene dioxygenase or toluene monooxygenase, were electroporated into five bacterial strains isolated from sediments found at depths of 91 to 295 m. Four of these engineered bacterial strains demonstrated both toluene and trichloroethylene degradation activities. 26 refs., 2 tabs.

  14. Adverse Birth Outcomes and Maternal Exposure to Trichloroethylene and Tetrachloroethylene through Soil Vapor Intrusion in New York State

    PubMed Central

    Lewis-Michl, Elizabeth L.; Gomez, Marta I.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Industrial spills of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Endicott, New York (USA), have led to contamination of groundwater, soil, and soil gas. Previous studies have reported an increase in adverse birth outcomes among women exposed to VOCs in drinking water. Objective: We investigated the prevalence of adverse birth outcomes among mothers exposed to trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene [or perchloroethylene (PCE)] in indoor air contaminated through soil vapor intrusion. Methods: We examined low birth weight (LBW), preterm birth, fetal growth restriction, and birth defects among births to women in Endicott who were exposed to VOCs, compared with births statewide. We used Poisson regression to analyze births and malformations to estimate the association between maternal exposure to VOCs adjusting for sex, mother’s age, race, education, parity, and prenatal care. Two exposure areas were identified based on environmental sampling data: one area was primarily contaminated with TCE, and the other with PCE. Results: In the TCE-contaminated area, adjusted rate ratios (RRs) were significantly elevated for LBW [RR = 1.36; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07, 1.73; n = 76], small for gestational age (RR = 1.23; 95% CI: 1.03, 1.48; n = 117), term LBW (RR = 1.68; 95% CI: 1.20, 2.34; n = 37), cardiac defects (RR = 2.15; 95% CI: 1.27, 3.62; n = 15), and conotruncal defects (RR = 4.91; 95% CI: 1.58, 15.24; n = 3). In the PCE-contaminated area, RRs for cardiac defects (five births) were elevated but not significantly. Residual socioeconomic confounding may have contributed to elevations of LBW outcomes. Conclusions: Maternal residence in both areas was associated with cardiac defects. Residence in the TCE area, but not the PCE area, was associated with LBW and fetal growth restriction. PMID:22142966

  15. Effect of trichloroethylene (TCE) and toluene concentrations on TCE and toluene biodegradation and the population density of TCE and toluene degraders in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, D.Y.; Scow, K.M.

    1994-07-01

    Toluene is one of several cosubstrates able to support the cometabolism of trichloroethylene (TCE) by soil microbial communities. Indigenous microbial populations in soil degraded TCE in the presence, but not the absence, of toluene after a 60- to 80-h lag period. Initial populations of toluene and TCE degraders ranged from 0.2 x 10{sup 3} to 4 x 10{sup 3} cells per g of soil and increased by more than 4 orders of magnitude after the addition of 20 {mu}g of toluene and 1 {mu}g of TCE per mol of soil solution. The numbers of TCE and toluene degraders and the percent removal of TCE increased with an increase in initial toluene concentration. As the initial TCE concentration was increased from 1 to 20 {mu}g/ml, the numbers of toluene and TCE degraders and the rate of toluene degradation decreased, and no TCE degradation occurred. No toluene or TCE degradation occurred at a TCE concentration of 50 {mu}g/ml. 22 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Kinetics of trichloroethylene cometabolism and toluene biodegradation: Model application to soil batch experiments

    SciTech Connect

    El-Farhan, Y.H.; Scow, K.M.; Fan, S.; Rolston, D.E.

    2000-06-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) biodegradation in soil under aerobic conditions requires the presence of another compound, such as toluene, to support growth of microbial populations and enzyme induction. The biodegradation kinetics of TCE and toluene were examined by conducting three groups of experiments in soil: toluene only, toluene combined with low TCE concentrations, and toluene with TCE concentrations similar to or higher than toluene. The biodegradation of TCE and toluene and their interrelationships were modeled using a combination of several biodegradation functions. In the model, the pollutants were described as existing in the solid, liquid, and gas phases of soil, with biodegradation occurring only in the liquid phase. The distribution of the chemicals between the solid and liquid phase was described by a linear sorption isotherm, whereas liquid-vapor partitioning was described by Henry's law. Results from 12 experiments with toluene only could be described by a single set of kinetic parameters. The same set of parameters could describe toluene degradation in 10 experiments where low TCE concentrations were present. From these 10 experiments a set of parameters describing TCE cometabolism induced by toluene also was obtained. The complete set of parameters was used to describe the biodegradation of both compounds in 15 additional experiments, where significant TCE toxicity and inhibition effects were expected. Toluene parameters were similar to values reported for pure culture systems. Parameters describing the interaction of TCE with toluene and biomass were different from reported values for pure cultures, suggesting that the presence of soil may have affected the cometabolic ability of the indigenous soil microbial populations.

  17. Trichloroethylene removal and oxidation toxicity mediated by toluene dioxygenase of Pseudomonas putida

    SciTech Connect

    Heald, S.; Jenkins, R.O.

    1994-12-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a major ground water contaminant and potential health hazard in drinking water. This paper reports on the cometabolism of TCE by a wild-type strain of Pseudomonas putida containing an inducible toluene dioxygenase enzyme. The results show rapid TCE removal by the strain but severe oxidation toxicity and rapid cell death. This is also the first report of enhanced capacity of bacterial cells to remove TCE in the presence of dithiothreitol. Presented also is evidence for induction of toluene degradation by TCE. 17 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Transfer of methyl chloroform, trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene to milk, tissues and expired air following intraruminal or oral administration in lactating goats and milk-fed kids.

    PubMed

    Hamada, T; Tanaka, H

    1995-01-01

    The distribution of methyl chloroform was determined (MCF), trichloroethylene (TRI) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in milk, tissues and expired air by intraruminally administering 0.625 ml kg(-0.75) of an equal-volume mixture of the three compounds to lactating goats. The milk secreted during 24 h after the intraruminal administration contained 1.42 mg of MCF, 1.87 mg of TRI, 6.43 mg of PCE and 0.33 mg of trichloroethanol (TCE). MCF, TRI and PCE appeared in the blood less than 30 min after administration. Oral administration of these chemicals to milk-fed kids showed that at 3.5 h post-administration, the liver contained these chemicals in greatest abundance. The adaptation of milk-fed kids to 3 weeks administration of small amounts of propylene glycol stimulated the metabolic conversion of TRI to TCE. There were linear relationships between the blood concentrations of these chemicals and the expiration rates after oral administration of 0.4 ml kg(-1) of each chemical to milk-fed kids. The expiration rates of MCF, TRI and PCE were 605, 122 and 46 microg min(-1) kg(-1) at 2 microg ml(-1) blood concentrations of MCF, TRI and PCE, respectively. These results suggested that MCF is little metabolized, being most readily exhaled in expired air, while PCE demonstrates the greatest tissue-partitioning, being largely secreted into the milk or retained in the liver. TRI can be extensively metabolized to other compounds such as TCE in milk-fed kids. PMID:15091581

  19. Oxidation of trichloroethylene, toluene, and ethanol vapors by a partially saturated permeable reactive barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoodlu, Mojtaba G.; Hassanizadeh, S. Majid; Hartog, Niels; Raoof, Amir

    2014-08-01

    The mitigation of volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors in the unsaturated zone largely relies on the active removal of vapor by ventilation. In this study we considered an alternative method involving the use of solid potassium permanganate to create a horizontal permeable reactive barrier for oxidizing VOC vapors. Column experiments were carried out to investigate the oxidation of trichloroethylene (TCE), toluene, and ethanol vapors using a partially saturated mixture of potassium permanganate and sand grains. Results showed a significant removal of VOC vapors due to the oxidation. We found that water saturation has a major effect on the removal capacity of the permeable reactive layer. We observed a high removal efficiency and reactivity of potassium permanganate for all target compounds at the highest water saturation (Sw = 0.6). A change in pH within the reactive layer reduced oxidation rate of VOCs. The use of carbonate minerals increased the reactivity of potassium permanganate during the oxidation of TCE vapor by buffering the pH. Reactive transport of VOC vapors diffusing through the permeable reactive layer was modeled, including the pH effect on the oxidation rates. The model accurately described the observed breakthrough curve of TCE and toluene vapors in the headspace of the column. However, miscibility of ethanol in water in combination with produced water during oxidation made the modeling results less accurate for ethanol. A linear relationship was found between total oxidized mass of VOC vapors per unit volume of permeable reactive layer and initial water saturation. This behavior indicates that pH changes control the overall reactivity and longevity of the permeable reactive layer during oxidation of VOCs. The results suggest that field application of a horizontal permeable reactive barrier can be a viable technology against upward migration of VOC vapors through the unsaturated zone.

  20. Trichloroethylene

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Trichloroethylene ; CASRN 79 - 01 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  1. Oxidation of trichloroethylene, 1,1-dichloroethylene, and chloroform by toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase from Pseudomonas stutzeri OX1

    SciTech Connect

    Chauhan, S.; Wood, T.K.; Barbieri, P.

    1998-08-01

    Toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase (ToMO) from Pseudomonas stutzeri OX1, which oxidizes toluene and o-xylene, was examined for its ability to degrade the environmental pollutants trichloroethylene (TCE), 1,1-dichloroethylene (1,1-DCE), cis-1,2-DCE, trans-1,2-DCE, chloroform, dichloromethane, phenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 2,4,5-trichlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, 2,3,5,6-tetrachlorophenol, and 2,3,4,5,6-pentachlorophenol. Escherichia coli JM109 that expressed ToMO from genes on plasmid pBZ1260 under control of the lac promoter degraded TCE, 1,1-DCE, and chloroform at initial rates of 3.1, 3.6, and 1.6 nmol, respectively. Stoichiometric amounts of chloride release were seen, indicating mineralization. Thus, the substrate range of ToMO is extended to include aliphatic chlorinated compounds.

  2. Cometabolic degradation of trichloroethylene by Pseudomonas cepacia G4 in a chemostat with toluene as the primary substrate.

    PubMed Central

    Landa, A S; Sipkema, E M; Weijma, J; Beenackers, A A; Dolfing, J; Janssen, D B

    1994-01-01

    Pseudomonas cepacia G4 is capable of cometabolic degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) if the organism is grown on certain aromatic compounds. To obtain more insight into the kinetics of TCE degradation and the effect of TCE transformation products, we have investigated the simultaneous conversion of toluene and TCE in steady-state continuous culture. The organism was grown in a chemostat with toluene as the carbon and energy source at a range of volumetric TCE loading rates, up to 330 mumol/liter/h. The specific TCE degradation activity of the cells and the volumetric activity increased, but the efficiency of TCE conversion dropped when the TCE loading was elevated from 7 to 330 mumol/liter/h. At TCE loading rates of up to 145 mumol/liter/h, the specific toluene conversion rate and the molar growth yield of the cells were not affected by the presence of TCE. The response of the system to varying TCE loading rates was accurately described by a mathematical model based on Michaelis-Menten kinetics and competitive inhibition. A high load of 3,400 mumol of TCE per liter per h for 12 h caused inhibition of toluene and TCE conversion, but reduction of the TCE load to the original nontoxic level resulted in complete recovery of the system within 2 days. These results show that P. cepacia can stably and continuously degrade toluene and TCE simultaneously in a single-reactor system without biomass retention and that the organism is more resistant to high concentrations and shock loadings of TCE than Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. PMID:7524444

  3. Modeling trichloroethylene degradation by a recombinant pseudomonad expressing toluene ortho-monooxygenase in a fixed-film bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, A.K.; Hong, J.; Wood, T.K.

    1998-07-05

    Burkholderia cepacia PR1{sub 23}(TOM{sub 23C}), expressing constitutively the TCE-degrading enzyme toluene ortho-monooxygenase (Tom), was immobilized on SIRAN{trademark} glass beads in a biofilter for the degradation and mineralization of gas-phase trichloroethylene (TCE). To interpret the experimental results, a mathematical model has been developed which includes axial dispersion, convection, film mass-transfer, and biodegradation coupled with deactivation of the TCE-degrading enzyme. Parameters used for numerical simulation were determined from either independent experiments or values reported in the literature. The model was compared with the experimental data, and there was good agreement between the predicted and measured TCE breakthrough curves. The simulations indicated that TCE degradation in the biofilter was not limited by mass transfer of TCE or oxygen from the gas phase to the liquid/biofilm phase (biodegradation limits), and predicts that improving the specific TCE degradation rates of bacteria will not significantly enhance long-term biofilter performance. The most important factors for prolonging the performance of biofilter are increasing the amount of active biomass and the transformation capacity enhancing resistance to TCE metabolism.

  4. Rhizoremediation of Trichloroethylene by a Recombinant, Root-Colonizing Pseudomonas fluorescens Strain Expressing Toluene ortho-Monooxygenase Constitutively

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Dennis C.; Maynard, Jennifer A.; Wood, Thomas K.

    1998-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) was removed from soils by using a wheat rhizosphere established by coating seeds with a recombinant, TCE-degrading Pseudomonas fluorescens strain that expresses the tomA+ (toluene o-monooxygenase) genes from Burkholderia cepacia PR123(TOM23C). A transposon integration vector was used to insert tomA+ into the chromosome of P. fluorescens 2-79, producing a stable strain that expressed constitutively the monooxygenase at a level of 1.1 nmol/min · mg of protein (initial TCE concentration, 10 μM, assuming that all of the TCE was in the liquid) for more than 280 cell generations (36 days). We also constructed a salicylate-inducible P. fluorescens strain that degraded TCE at an initial rate of 2.6 nmol/min · mg of protein in the presence of 10 μM TCE [cf. B. cepacia G4 PR123(TOM23C), which degraded TCE at an initial rate of 2.5 nmol/min · mg of protein]. A constitutive strain, P. fluorescens 2-79TOM, grew (maximum specific growth rate, 0.78 h−1) and colonized wheat (3 × 106 CFU/cm of root) as well as wild-type P. fluorescens 2-79 (maximum specific growth rate, 0.77 h−1; level of colonization, 4 × 106 CFU/cm of root). Rhizoremediation of TCE was demonstrated by using microcosms containing the constitutive monooxygenase-expressing microorganism, soil, and wheat. These closed microcosms degraded an average of 63% of the initial TCE in 4 days (20.6 nmol of TCE/day · plant), compared to the 9% of the initial TCE removed by negative controls consisting of microcosms containing wild-type P. fluorescens 2-79-inoculated wheat, uninoculated wheat, or sterile soil. PMID:9435067

  5. Toluene

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Toluene ; CASRN 108 - 88 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects )

  6. TRICHLOROETHYLENE METABOLISM BY MICROORGANISMS THAT DEGRADE AROMATIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) was metabolized by the natural microflora of three different environmental water samples when stimulated by the addition of either toluene or phenol. Two different strains of Pseudomonas putida that degrade toluene by a pathway containing a toluene dioxyge...

  7. TRICHLOROETHYLENE IHIBITS VOLTAGE-SENSITIVE CALCIUM CURRENTS IN DIFFERENTIATED PC 12 CELLS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT BODY: It has been demonstrated recently that volatile organic compounds (VOCs)such as toluene, perchloroethylene and trichloroethylene inhibit function of voltage-sensitive calcium channels (VSSC). Such actions are hypothesized to contribute to the acute neurotoxicity of...

  8. Trichloroethylene. I. Carcinogenicity of trichloroethylene.

    PubMed

    Motohashi, N; Nagashima, H; Molnár, J

    1999-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) as an industrial pollutant may damage human health and can be considered as carcinogen. TCE has been detected in the environment and in various human organs, e.g., liver, kidney and brain etc. There are histological alterations such as depletion of glycogen and hydropic degeneration in the liver, however, other signs of TCE effects can be found in various organs as well. TCE and its metabolites, e.g., trichlorethanol, trichloro-acetic acid and epoxides were recently identified as strong mutagens in Ames mutagenicity test inducing frameshift and base-substitution mutations. TCE induced predominantly hepatocellular carcinoma after long term administration in mice. In these animals, kidneys and liver were supposed to be primary target organs with low epoxy-hydrolase activity. A high level of mitotic gene conversion (or gene rearrangement) was indicated by the metabolism of TCE after repeated administration. Purified TCE by was a weak mutagen in the presence of S9 microsomal fraction of rats and as a consequence, the carcinogenic activity was low in the kidney of rats. However, a dose related increase of Leydig cell tumors was found in male rats. PMID:10459493

  9. CONSTITUTIVE DEGRADATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE BY AN ALTERED BACTERIUM IN A GAS-PHASE BIOREACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pseudomonas cepacia G4 expresses a unique toluene ortho-monooxygenase (Tom) that enables it to degrade toluene and trichloroethylene (TCE). ransposon mutants of G4 have been isolated that constitutively express Tom. wo fixed-film bioreactor designs were investigated for the explo...

  10. Mechanism of pentachloroethane dehydrochlorination to tetrachloroethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, A.L.; Gschwend, P.M. )

    1991-01-01

    The dehydrochlorination of pentachloroethane to tetrachloroethylene was investigated to gain insight into mechanisms of hexachloroethane reduction as well as structure-reactivity relationships for polyhalogenated alkanes. Although the absence of deuterium exchange excludes the possibility of an (E{sub 1CB}){sub R} mechanism, several factors suggest the transition state possesses considerable carbanion character: the reaction is insensitive to buffer catalysis, exhibits a moderately large solvent kinetic isotope effect, and only displays a neutral mechanism at low pH. Though our results cannot rule out a stepwise (E{sub 1CB}){sub I} or (E{sub 1CB}){sub ip} sequence, we believe CHCl{sub 2}CCl{sub 3} reacts via a concerted mechanism based on a comparison of its dehydrohalogenation kinetics with proton-exchange rates for CHCl{sub 3} and CHCl{sub 2}CF{sub 3}. Pentachloroethane reported in the reduction of hexachloroethane to tetrachloroethylene is unlikely to result from carbanion protonation. Rather, it may be diagnostic of free-radical reduction mechanisms. Because pentachloroethane reacts relatively rapidly, future studies of hexachloroethane reduction should consider whether pentachloroethane represents a reaction intermediate instead of dismissing it as a minor side product.

  11. Cometabolic biodegradation of trichloroethylene in a biofilm reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Arcangeli, J.P.; Arvin, E.; Jensen, H.M.

    1995-12-31

    Cometabolic degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in an aerobic biofilm system with toluene as primary substrate was investigated. TCE degradation rate was first-order, giving an average first-order surface removal rate constant, k{sub 1,a}, of 0.26 m/d. TCE was probably degraded by a toluene-induced enzyme. However, if toluene was provided in high concentrations, degradation of TCE was inhibited. Furthermore, it appeared that TCE inhibited toluene degradation. This inhibition increased with the TCE concentration in the reactor, but it decreased with an increasing toluene concentration. The authors conclude that these interactions could be the result of a competitive inhibition between TCE and toluene. Practically, this shows that degradation of TCE can be maximized if an optimum concentration of toluene is provided. An example presented in this paper reveals that the optimum toluene concentration was in the range of 200 to 500 {micro}g/L for a TCE inlet concentration of 135 {micro}g/L. Under these optimal conditions, the TCE degradation rate was 0.045 g m{sup {minus}2} d{sup {minus}1}, leading to a first-order surface removal rate constant of 0.4 m/d and a transformation yield of 0.05 g TCE/g toluene degraded.

  12. ROUTE-DEPENDENT EFFECTS OF TOLUENE ON SIGNAL DETECTION BEHAVIOR IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The acute effects of toluene and other solvents on behavior are thought to depend upon their concentration in the brain. We have shown previously that inhaled toluene and trichloroethylene disrupt sustained attention in rats as assessed with a visual signal detection task (SDT). ...

  13. TRICHLOROETHYLENE (TCE) ISSUE PAPERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    These issue papers are a part of EPA's effort to develop a trichloroethylene (TCE) human health risk assessment. These issue papers were developed by EPA to provide scientific and technical information to the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) for use in developing their advice ...

  14. Induction of the tod operon by trichloroethylene in Pseudomonas putida TVA8

    SciTech Connect

    Shingleton, J.T.; Applegate, B.M.; Nagel, A.C.; Bienkowski, P.R.; Sayler, G.S.

    1998-12-01

    Bioluminescence, mRNA levels, and toluene degradation rates in Pseudomonas putida TVA8 were measured as a function of various concentrations of toluene and trichloroethylene (TCE). TVA8 showed an increasing bioluminescence response to increasing TCE and toluene concentrations. Compared to uninduced TVA8 cultures, todC1 mRNA levels increased 11-fold for TCE-treated cultures and 13-fold for toluene-treated cultures. Compared to uninduced P. putida F1 cultures, todC1 mRNA levels increased 4,4-fold for TCE-induced cultures and 4.9-fold for toluene-induced cultures. Initial toluene degradation rates were linearly correlated with specific bioluminescence in TVA8 cultures.

  15. Reductive dechlorination of Tri- and tetrachloroethylenes depends on transition from aerobic to anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Kästner, M

    1991-07-01

    Aerobic enrichment cultures from contaminated groundwaters dechlorinated trichloroethylene (TCE) (14.6 mg/liter; 111 mumol/liter) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) (16.2 mg/liter; 98 mumol/liter) reductively within 4 days after the transition from aerobic to anaerobic conditions. The transformation products were equimolar amounts of cis-1,2-dichloroethylene and traces of 1,1-dichloroethylene. No other chlorinated product and no methane were detected. The change was accompanied by the release of sulfide, which caused a decrease in the redox potential from 0 to -150 mV. In sterile control experiments, sulfide led to the abiotic formation of traces of 1,1-dichloroethylene without cis-1,2-dichloroethylene production. The reductive dechlorination of PCE via TCE depended on these specific transition conditions after consumption of the electron acceptor oxygen or nitrate. Repeated feeding of TCE or PCE to cultures after the change to anaerobic conditions yielded no further dechlorination. Only aerobic subcultures with an air/liquid ratio of 1:4 maintained dechlorination activities; anaerobic subcultures showed no transformation. Bacteria from noncontaminated sites showed no reduction under the same conditions. PMID:1892393

  16. Kinetics of tetrachloroethylene-reductive dechlorination catalyzed by vitamin B{sub 12}

    SciTech Connect

    Burris, D.R.; Deng, B.; Buck, L.E.; Hatfield, K.

    1998-09-01

    Reductive dechlorination kinetics of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) to ethylene catalyzed by vitamin B{sub 12} using Ti[III] citrate as the bulk reductant was examined in a vapor-water batch system. A kinetic model incorporating substrate-B{sub 12} electron-transfer complex formation and subsequent product release was developed. The model also accounted for the primary reductive dechlorination pathways (hydrogenolysis and reductive {beta} elimination) and vapor/water-phase partitioning. Reaction rate constants were sequentially determined by fitting the model to experimental kinetic data while moving upward through consecutive reaction pathways. The release of product from the complex was found to be second order with respect to substrate concentration for both PCE and acetylene; all other substrates appeared to release by first order. Reductive {beta} elimination was found to be a significant reaction pathway for trichloroethylene (TCE), and chloroacetylene was observed as a reactive intermediate. Acetylene production appears to be primarily due to the reduction of chloroacetylene derived from TCE. The reduction of cis-dichloroethylene (cis-DCE), the primary DCE isomer formed, was extremely slow, leading to a significant buildup of cis-DCE. The kinetics of acetylene and vinyl chloride reduction appeared to be limited by the formation of relatively stable substrate-B{sub 12} complexes. The relatively simple model examined appears to adequately represent the main features of the experimental data.

  17. Reductive dechlorination of Tri- and tetrachloroethylenes depends on transition from aerobic to anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Kästner, M

    1991-01-01

    Aerobic enrichment cultures from contaminated groundwaters dechlorinated trichloroethylene (TCE) (14.6 mg/liter; 111 mumol/liter) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) (16.2 mg/liter; 98 mumol/liter) reductively within 4 days after the transition from aerobic to anaerobic conditions. The transformation products were equimolar amounts of cis-1,2-dichloroethylene and traces of 1,1-dichloroethylene. No other chlorinated product and no methane were detected. The change was accompanied by the release of sulfide, which caused a decrease in the redox potential from 0 to -150 mV. In sterile control experiments, sulfide led to the abiotic formation of traces of 1,1-dichloroethylene without cis-1,2-dichloroethylene production. The reductive dechlorination of PCE via TCE depended on these specific transition conditions after consumption of the electron acceptor oxygen or nitrate. Repeated feeding of TCE or PCE to cultures after the change to anaerobic conditions yielded no further dechlorination. Only aerobic subcultures with an air/liquid ratio of 1:4 maintained dechlorination activities; anaerobic subcultures showed no transformation. Bacteria from noncontaminated sites showed no reduction under the same conditions. PMID:1892393

  18. SURFACTANT ENHANCED REMEDIATION OF SOIL COLUMNS CONTAMINATED BY RESIDUAL TETRACHLOROETHYLENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of aqueous surfactant solutions to recover tetrachloroethylene (PCE) entrapped in Ottawa sand was evaluated in four column experiments. Residual PCE was emplaced by injecting 14C-labeled PCE into water-saturated soil columns and displacing the free product ...

  19. IRIS TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF TETRACHLOROETHYLENE (PERCHLOROETHYLENE) (INTERAGENCY SCIENCE DISCUSSION DRAFT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is releasing the draft report, Toxicological Review of Tetrachloroethylene (Perchloroethylene), that was distributed to Federal agencies and White House Offices for comment during the Science Discussion step of the IRIS Assessment...

  20. IRIS Toxicological Review of Tetrachloroethylene (Perchloroethylene) (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA conducted a peer review of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of tetrachloroethylene that will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database. Peer review is meant to ensure that science is used credibly and ...

  1. Biodegradation of Trichloroethylene by an Endophyte of Hybrid Poplar

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jun Won; Khan, Zareen

    2012-01-01

    We isolated and characterized a novel endophyte from hybrid poplar. This unique endophyte, identified as Enterobacter sp. strain PDN3, showed high tolerance to trichloroethylene (TCE). Without the addition of inducers, such as toluene or phenol, PDN3 rapidly reduced TCE levels in medium from 72.4 μM to 30.1 μM in 24 h with a concurrent release of 127 μM chloride ion, and nearly 80% of TCE (55.3 μM) was dechlorinated by PDN3 in 5 days with 166 μM chloride ion production, suggesting TCE degradation. PMID:22367087

  2. 40 CFR Appendix J to Part 122 - NPDES Permit Testing Requirements for Publicly Owned Treatment Works (§ 122.21(j))

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... chloride Methylene chloride 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane Tetrachloroethylene Toluene 1,1,1-trichloroethane 1,1,2-trichloroethane Trichloroethylene Vinyl chloride Acid-extractable compounds P-chloro-m-creso...

  3. 40 CFR Appendix J to Part 122 - NPDES Permit Testing Requirements for Publicly Owned Treatment Works (§ 122.21(j))

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... chloride Methylene chloride 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane Tetrachloroethylene Toluene 1,1,1-trichloroethane 1,1,2-trichloroethane Trichloroethylene Vinyl chloride Acid-extractable compounds P-chloro-m-creso...

  4. 40 CFR Table 8 to Subpart G of... - Organic HAP's Subject to the Wastewater Provisions for Process Units at New Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 75343 (1,1-Dichloroethane). Hexachlorobutadiene 87683 Hexachloroethane 67721 Hexane 100543 Methyl bromide (Bromomethane) 74839 Methyl chloride (Chloromethane) 74873 Phosgene 75445 Tetrachloroethylene (Perchloroethylene) 127184 Toluene 108883 Trichloroethane (1,1,1-) (Methyl chloroform) 71556 Trichloroethylene...

  5. 40 CFR Table 8 to Subpart G of... - Organic HAP's Subject to the Wastewater Provisions for Process Units at New Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 75343 (1,1-Dichloroethane). Hexachlorobutadiene 87683 Hexachloroethane 67721 Hexane 100543 Methyl bromide (Bromomethane) 74839 Methyl chloride (Chloromethane) 74873 Phosgene 75445 Tetrachloroethylene (Perchloroethylene) 127184 Toluene 108883 Trichloroethane (1,1,1-) (Methyl chloroform) 71556 Trichloroethylene...

  6. 40 CFR Table 8 to Subpart G of... - Organic HAP's Subject to the Wastewater Provisions for Process Units at New Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 75343 (1,1-Dichloroethane). Hexachlorobutadiene 87683 Hexachloroethane 67721 Hexane 100543 Methyl bromide (Bromomethane) 74839 Methyl chloride (Chloromethane) 74873 Phosgene 75445 Tetrachloroethylene (Perchloroethylene) 127184 Toluene 108883 Trichloroethane (1,1,1-) (Methyl chloroform) 71556 Trichloroethylene...

  7. 40 CFR Table 8 to Subpart G of... - Organic HAP's Subject to the Wastewater Provisions for Process Units at New Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-Dichloroethane). Hexachlorobutadiene 87683 Hexachloroethane 67721 Hexane 100543 Methyl bromide (Bromomethane) 74839 Methyl chloride (Chloromethane) 74873 Phosgene 75445 Tetrachloroethylene (Perchloroethylene) 127184 Toluene 108883 Trichloroethane (1,1,1-) (Methyl chloroform) 71556 Trichloroethylene...

  8. 40 CFR Table 8 to Subpart G of... - Organic HAP's Subject to the Wastewater Provisions for Process Units at New Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-Dichloroethane). Hexachlorobutadiene 87683 Hexachloroethane 67721 Hexane 100543 Methyl bromide (Bromomethane) 74839 Methyl chloride (Chloromethane) 74873 Phosgene 75445 Tetrachloroethylene (Perchloroethylene) 127184 Toluene 108883 Trichloroethane (1,1,1-) (Methyl chloroform) 71556 Trichloroethylene...

  9. Lactate Injection by Electric Currents for Bioremediation of Tetrachloroethylene in Clay

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xingzhi; Gent, David B.; Davis, Jeffrey L.; Alshawabkeh, Akram N.

    2012-01-01

    Biological transformation of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in silty clay samples by ionic injection of lactate under electric fields is evaluated. To prepare contaminated samples, a silty clay slurry was mixed with PCE, inoculated with KB-1® dechlorinators and was consolidated in a 40 cm long cell. A current density between 5.3 and 13.3 A m−2 was applied across treated soil samples while circulating electrolytes containing 10 mg L−1 lactate concentration between the anode and cathode compartments to maintain neutral pH and chemically reducing boundary conditions. The total adsorbed and aqueous PCE was degraded in the soil to trichloroethylene (TCE), cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE), vinyl chloride (VC) and ethene in 120 d, which is about double the time expected for transformation. Lactate was delivered into the soil by a reactive transport rate of 3.7 cm2 d−1 V−1. PCE degradation in the clay samples followed zero order transformation rates ranging from 1.5 to 5 mg L−1 d−1 without any significant formation of TCE. cis-DCE transformation followed first order transformation rates of 0.06 to 0.10 per day. A control experiment conducted with KB-1 and lactate, but without electricity did not show any significant lactate buildup or cis-DCE transformation because the soil was practically impermeable (hydraulic conductivity of 2×10−7 cm s−1). It is concluded that ionic migration will deliver organic additives and induce biological activity and complete PCE transformation in clay, even though the transformation occurs under slower rates compared to ideal conditions. PMID:23264697

  10. UNCERTAINTIES IN TRICHLOROETHYLENE PHARMACOKINETIC MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the pharmacokinetics of a chemical¯its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion in humans and laboratory animals ¯ is critical to the assessment of its human health risks. For trichloroethylene (TCE), numerous physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK)...

  11. Constitutive degradation of trichloroethylene by an altered bacterium in a gas-phase bioreactor. Book chapter

    SciTech Connect

    Shields, M.S.; Reagin, M.J.; Gerger, R.R.; Somerville, C.; Schaubhut, R.

    1994-01-01

    Pseudomonas cepacia G4 expresses a unique toluene orth-monooxygenase (Tom) that enables it to degrade toluene and trichloroethylene (TCE). Transposon mutants of G4 have been isolated that constitutively express Tom. Two fixed-film bioreactor designs were investigated for the exploitation of one such constitutive strain (G4 PR1) in the degradation of vapor-phase TCE. DNA probe analysis indicates that the genes responsible for the toluene catabolic pathway are located on a large plasmid of G4 (> or = 150 kb) termed pG4L. The authors propose that pG4L will serve as a archetype for a new class of catabolic plasmid known as Tom, which encodes an ortho-hydroxylation pathway for the degradation of benzene, toluene, o-xylene, cresols, and phenol.

  12. Mutants of Pseudomonas cepacia G4 defective in catabolism of aromatic compounds and trichloroethylene.

    PubMed Central

    Shields, M S; Montgomery, S O; Cuskey, S M; Chapman, P J; Pritchard, P H

    1991-01-01

    Pseudomonas cepacia G4 possesses a novel pathway of toluene catabolism that is shown to be responsible for the degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE). This pathway involves conversion of toluene via o-cresol to 3-methylcatechol. In order to determine the enzyme of toluene degradation that is responsible for TCE degradation, chemically induced mutants, blocked in the toluene ortho-monooxygenase (TOM) pathway of G4, were examined. Mutants of the phenotypic class designated TOM A- were all defective in their ability to oxidize toluene, o-cresol, m-cresol, and phenol, suggesting that a single enzyme is responsible for conversion of these compounds to their hydroxylated products (3-methylcatechol from toluene, o-cresol, and m-cresol and catechol from phenol) in the wild type. Mutants of this class did not degrade TCE. Two other mutant classes which were blocked in toluene catabolism, TOM B-, which lacked catechol-2,3-dioxygenase, and TOM C-, which lacked 2-hydroxy-6-oxoheptadienoic acid hydrolase activity, were fully capable of TCE degradation. Therefore, TCE degradation is directly associated with the monooxygenation capability responsible for toluene, cresol, and phenol hydroxylation. PMID:1892384

  13. Human Health Effects of Tetrachloroethylene: Key Findings and Scientific Issues

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Karen A.; Scott, Cheryl Siegel; Cooper, Glinda S.; Bale, Ambuja S.; Kopylev, Leonid; Barone, Stanley; Makris, Susan L.; Glenn, Barbara; Subramaniam, Ravi P.; Gwinn, Maureen R.; Dzubow, Rebecca C.; Chiu, Weihsueh A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) completed a toxicological review of tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, PCE) in February 2012 in support of the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS). Objectives: We reviewed key findings and scientific issues regarding the human health effects of PCE described in the U.S. EPA’s Toxicological Review of Tetrachloroethylene (Perchloroethylene). Methods: The updated assessment of PCE synthesized and characterized a substantial database of epidemiological, experimental animal, and mechanistic studies. Key scientific issues were addressed through modeling of PCE toxicokinetics, synthesis of evidence from neurological studies, and analyses of toxicokinetic, mechanistic, and other factors (tumor latency, severity, and background rate) in interpreting experimental animal cancer findings. Considerations in evaluating epidemiological studies included the quality (e.g., specificity) of the exposure assessment methods and other essential design features, and the potential for alternative explanations for observed associations (e.g., bias or confounding). Discussion: Toxicokinetic modeling aided in characterizing the complex metabolism and multiple metabolites that contribute to PCE toxicity. The exposure assessment approach—a key evaluation factor for epidemiological studies of bladder cancer, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and multiple myeloma—provided suggestive evidence of carcinogenicity. Bioassay data provided conclusive evidence of carcinogenicity in experimental animals. Neurotoxicity was identified as a sensitive noncancer health effect, occurring at low exposures: a conclusion supported by multiple studies. Evidence was integrated from human, experimental animal, and mechanistic data sets in assessing adverse health effects of PCE. Conclusions: PCE is likely to be carcinogenic to humans. Neurotoxicity is a sensitive adverse health effect of PCE. Citation: Guyton KZ, Hogan KA, Scott CS, Cooper GS, Bale AS

  14. Toluene emissions from plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiden, A. C.; Kobel, K.; Komenda, M.; Koppmann, R.; Shao, M.; Wildt, J.

    The emission of toluene from different plants was observed in continuously stirred tank reactors and in field measurements. For plants growing without stress, emission rates were low and ranged from the detection limit up to 2·10-16 mol·cm-2·s-1. Under conditions of stress, the emission rates exceeded 10-14 mol·cm-2·s-1. Exposure of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. cv. Gigantheus) to 13CO2 resulted in 13C-labeling of the emitted toluene on a time scale of hours. Although no biochemical pathway for the production of toluene is known, these results indicate that toluene is synthesized by the plants. The emission rates of toluene from sunflower are dependent on nutrient supply and wounding. Since α-pinene emission rates are also influenced by these factors, toluene and α-pinene emissions show a high correlation. During pathogen attack on Scots pines (Pinus sylvestris L.) significant toluene emissions were observed. In this case emissions of toluene and α-pinene also show a good correlation. Toluene emissions were also found in field experiments with pines using branch enclosures.

  15. Metabolism of trichloroethylene.

    PubMed Central

    Lash, L H; Fisher, J W; Lipscomb, J C; Parker, J C

    2000-01-01

    A major focus in the study of metabolism and disposition of trichloroethylene (TCE) is to identify metabolites that can be used reliably to assess flux through the various pathways of TCE metabolism and to identify those metabolites that are causally associated with toxic responses. Another important issue involves delineation of sex- and species-dependent differences in biotransformation pathways. Defining these differences can play an important role in the utility of laboratory animal data for understanding the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of TCE in humans. Sex-, species-, and strain-dependent differences in absorption and distribution of TCE may play some role in explaining differences in metabolism and susceptibility to toxicity from TCE exposure. The majority of differences in susceptibility, however, are likely due to sex-, species-, and strain-dependent differences in activities of the various enzymes that can metabolize TCE and its subsequent metabolites. An additional factor that plays a role in human health risk assessment for TCE is the high degree of variability in the activity of certain enzymes. TCE undergoes metabolism by two major pathways, cytochrome P450 (P450)-dependent oxidation and conjugation with glutathione (GSH). Key P450-derived metabolites of TCE that have been associated with specific target organs, such as the liver and lungs, include chloral hydrate, trichloroacetate, and dichloroacetate. Metabolites derived from the GSH conjugate of TCE, in contrast, have been associated with the kidney as a target organ. Specifically, metabolism of the cysteine conjugate of TCE by the cysteine conjugate ss-lyase generates a reactive metabolite that is nephrotoxic and may be nephrocarcinogenic. Although the P450 pathway is a higher activity and higher affinity pathway than the GSH conjugation pathway, one should not automatically conclude that the latter pathway is only important at very high doses. A synthesis of this information is then

  16. Exposure assessment of trichloroethylene.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, C; Schaum, J

    2000-01-01

    This article reviews exposure information available for trichloroethylene (TCE) and assesses the magnitude of human exposure. The primary sources releasing TCE into the environment are metal cleaning and degreasing operations. Releases occur into all media but mostly into the air due to its volatility. It is also moderately soluble in water and can leach from soils into groundwater. TCE has commonly been found in ambient air, surface water, and groundwaters. The 1998 air levels in microg/m(3) across 115 monitors can be summarized as follows: range = 0.01-3.9, mean = 0.88. A California survey of large water utilities in 1984 found a median concentration of 3.0 microg/L. General population exposure to TCE occurs primarily by inhalation and water ingestion. Typical average daily intakes have been estimated as 11-33 microg/day for inhalation and 2-20 microg/day for ingestion. A small portion of the population is expected to have elevated exposures as a result of one or more of these pathways: inhalation exposures to workers involved in degreasing operations, ingestion and inhalation exposures occurring in homes with private wells located near disposal/contamination sites, and inhalation exposures to consumers using TCE products in areas of poor ventilation. More current and more extensive data on TCE levels in indoor air, water, and soil are needed to better characterize the distribution of background exposures in the general population and elevated exposures in special subpopulations. Images Figure 1 PMID:10807565

  17. Pharmacological classification of the abuse-related discriminative stimulus effects of trichloroethylene vapor

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Keith L.; Nicholson, Katherine L.

    2014-01-01

    Inhalants are distinguished as a class primarily based upon a shared route of administration. Grouping inhalants according to their abuse-related in vivo pharmacological effects using the drug discrimination procedure has the potential to provide a more relevant classification scheme to the research and treatment community. Mice were trained to differentiate the introceptive effects of the trichloroethylene vapor from air using an operant procedure. Trichloroethylene is a chlorinated hydrocarbon solvent once used as an anesthetic as well as in glues and other consumer products. It is now primarily employed as a metal degreaser. We found that the stimulus effects of trichloroethylene were similar to those of other chlorinated hydrocarbon vapors, the aromatic hydrocarbon toluene and the vapor anesthetics methoxyflurane and isoflurane. The stimulus effects of trichloroethylene overlapped with those of the barbiturate methohexital, to a lesser extent the benzodiazepine midazolam and to ethanol. NMDA antagonists, the kappa opioid agonist U50,488 and the mixed 5-HT agonist mCPP largely failed to substitute for trichloroethylene. These data suggest that stimulus effects of chlorinated hydrocarbon vapors are mediated at least partially by GABAA receptor positive modulatory effects. PMID:25202471

  18. Death due to acute tetrachloroethylene intoxication in a chronic abuser.

    PubMed

    Amadasi, Alberto; Mastroluca, Lavinia; Marasciuolo, Laura; Caligara, Marina; Sironi, Luca; Gentile, Guendalina; Zoja, Riccardo

    2015-05-01

    Volatile substances are used widespread, especially among young people, as a cheap and easily accessible drug. Tetrachloroethylene is one of the solvents exerting effects on the central nervous system with experiences of disinhibition and euphoria. The case presented is that of a 27-year-old female, found dead by her father at home with cotton swabs dipped in the nostrils. She was already known for this type of abuse and previously admitted twice to the hospital for nonfatal acute poisonings. The swabs were still soaked in tetrachloroethylene. Toxicological and histological investigations demonstrated the presence of an overlap between chronic intake of the substance (with high concentrations in sites of accumulation, e.g., the adipose tissue, and contemporary tissue damage, as histologically highlighted) and acute intoxication as final cause of death, with a concentration of 158 mg/L in cardiac blood and 4915 mg/kg in the adipose tissue. No other drugs or medicines were detected in body fluids or tissues, and to our knowledge, this is the highest concentration ever detected in forensic cases. This peculiar case confirms the toxicity of this substance and focuses on the importance of complete histological and toxicological investigations in the distinction between chronic abuse and acute intoxication. PMID:25605280

  19. Trichloroethylene. I. An overview.

    PubMed

    Waters, E M; Gerstner, H B; Huff, J E

    1977-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) has been an industrial chemical of some importance for the past 50 years. First synthesized by Fischer in 1864, TCE has enjoyed considerable industrial usage as a degreaser and limited medical use as an inhalation anesthetic and analgesic. This TCE overview provides a narrative survey of the reference literature. Highlights include history, nomenclature, physical and chemical properties, manufacture, analysis, uses, metabolism, toxicology, carcinogenic potential, exposure routes, recommended standards, and conclusions. Chemically, TCE is a colorless, highly volatile liquid of molecular formula C2HCl3. Autoxidation of the unstable compound yields acidic products. Stabilizers are added to retard decomposition. TCE's multitude of industrial uses center around its highly effective fat-solvent properties. Metabolically, TCE is transformed in the liver to trichloroacetic acid, trichloroethanol, and trichloroethanol glucuronide; these breakdown products are excreted through the kidneys. Most toxic responses occur as a result of industrial exposures. TCE affects principally the central nervous system (CNS). Short exposures result in subjective symptoms such as headache, nausea, and incoordination. Longer exposures may result in CNS depression, hepatorenal failure, and increased cardiac output. Cases of sudden death following TCE exposure are generally attributed to ventricular fibrillation. Current interest in TCE has focused on recent experimental data that implicate TCE as a cause of hepatocellular carcinoma in mice. No epidemiological data are available that demonstrate a similar action in humans. The overall population may be exposed to TCE through household cleaning fluids, decaffeinated coffee, and some spice extracts. The NIOSH recommended standard for TCE is 100 ppm as a time-weighted average for an 8-hr day, with a maximum allowable peak concentration of 150 ppm for 10 min. PMID:403297

  20. Trichloroethylene and cancer: epidemiologic evidence.

    PubMed Central

    Wartenberg, D; Reyner, D; Scott, C S

    2000-01-01

    Trichloroethylene is an organic chemical that has been used in dry cleaning, for metal degreasing, and as a solvent for oils and resins. It has been shown to cause liver and kidney cancer in experimental animals. This article reviews over 80 published papers and letters on the cancer epidemiology of people exposed to trichloroethylene. Evidence of excess cancer incidence among occupational cohorts with the most rigorous exposure assessment is found for kidney cancer (relative risk [RR] = 1.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-2.7), liver cancer (RR = 1.9, 95% CI(1.0-3.4), and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (RR = 1.5, 95% CI 0.9-2.3) as well as for cervical cancer, Hodgkin's disease, and multiple myeloma. However, since few studies isolate trichloroethylene exposure, results are likely confounded by exposure to other solvents and other risk factors. Although we believe that solvent exposure causes cancer in humans and that trichloroethylene likely is one of the active agents, we recommend further study to better specify the specific agents that confer this risk and to estimate the magnitude of that risk. PMID:10807550

  1. Health assessment for Malvern Trichloroethylene, Malvern, Pennsylvania, Region 3. CERCLIS No. PAD014353445. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-19

    The Malvern Trichloroethylene (TCE) Site (MTS) is in Malvern(Chester County) Pennsylvania. From 1952 to 1976 drums containing various wastes including volatile organic compounds and PCBs were dumped on-site. Preliminary on-site groundwater sampling results have identified TCE (ND to 1,330 ppm), perchloroethylene (PCE) (7 to 1,170 ppm), 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA) (12 to 2,230 ppm), and tetrachloroethylene (ND to 22,000 ppb). In addition, PCBs were identified in soil (1,350 ppm) and in drums. The site is considered to be of public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of human exposure to hazardous substances.

  2. The use of biofilters to improve indoor air quality: the removal of toluene, TCE, and formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Darlington, A; Dixon, M A; Pilger, C

    1998-01-01

    A biofilter composed of a scrubber, a hydroponic planting system, and an aquatic system with green plants as a base maintained air quality within part of a modern office building. The scrubber was composed of five parallel fiberglass modules with external faces of porous lava rock. The face, largely covered with mosses, was wetted by recirculating water. Air was drawn through the scrubber and the immediately adjacent hydroponic region by a dedicated air handling system. The system was challenged for 4 weeks with three common indoor organic pollutants and removed significant amounts of all compounds. A single pass through the scrubber removed 10% of the trichloroethylene and 50% of the toluene. A single pass lowered formaldehyde air concentrations to 13 micrograms m-3 irrespective of influent levels (ranging between 30 and 90 micrograms m-3). The aquatic system accumulated trichloroethylene but neither toluene nor formaldehyde, suggesting the rapid breakdown of these materials. The botanical components removed some pollutants. PMID:11540466

  3. Enhancing trichloroethylene degradation using non-aromatic compounds as growth substrates.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seungjin; Hwang, Jeongmin; Chung, Jinwook; Bae, Wookeun

    2014-06-30

    The effect of non-aromatic compounds on the trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation of toluene-oxidizing bacteria were evaluated using Burkholderia cepacia G4 that expresses toluene 2-monooxygenase and Pseudomonas putida that expresses toluene dioxygenase. TCE degradation rates for B. cepacia G4 and P. putida with toluene alone as growth substrate were 0.144 and 0.123 μg-TCE/mg-protein h, respectively. When glucose, acetate and ethanol were fed as additional growth substrates, those values increased up to 0.196, 0.418 and 0.530 μg-TCE/mg-protein h, respectively for B. cepacia G4 and 0.319, 0.219 and 0.373 μg-TCE/mg-protein h, respectively for P. putida. In particular, the addition of ethanol resulted in a high TCE degradation rate regardless of the initial concentration. The use of a non-aromatic compound as an additional substrate probably enhanced the TCE degradation because of the additional supply of NADH that is consumed in co-metabolic degradation of TCE. Also, it is expected that the addition of a non-aromatic substrate can reduce the necessary dose of toluene and, subsequently, minimize the potential competitive inhibition upon TCE co-metabolism by toluene. PMID:24857894

  4. Prenatal and Early Childhood Exposure to Tetrachloroethylene and Adult Vision

    PubMed Central

    Getz, Kelly D.; Janulewicz, Patricia A.; Rowe, Susannah; Weinberg, Janice M.; Winter, Michael R.; Martin, Brett R.; Vieira, Veronica M.; White, Roberta F.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Tetrachloroethylene (PCE; or perchloroethylene) has been implicated in visual impairments among adults with occupational and environmental exposures as well as children born to women with occupational exposure during pregnancy. Objectives: Using a population-based retrospective cohort study, we examined the association between prenatal and early childhood exposure to PCE-contaminated drinking water on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, and deficits in adult color vision and contrast sensitivity. Methods: We estimated the amount of PCE that was delivered to the family residence from participants’ gestation through 5 years of age. We administered to this now adult study population vision tests to assess acuity, contrast sensitivity, and color discrimination. Results: Participants exposed to higher PCE levels exhibited lower contrast sensitivity at intermediate and high spatial frequencies compared with unexposed participants, although the differences were generally not statistically significant. Exposed participants also exhibited poorer color discrimination than unexposed participants. The difference in mean color confusion indices (CCI) was statistically significant for the Farnsworth test but not Lanthony’s D-15d test [Farnsworth CCI mean difference = 0.05, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.003, 0.10; Lanthony CCI mean difference = 0.07, 95% CI: –0.02, 0.15]. Conclusions: Prenatal and early childhood exposure to PCE-contaminated drinking water may be associated with long-term subclinical visual dysfunction in adulthood, particularly with respect to color discrimination. Further investigation of this association in similarly exposed populations is necessary. PMID:22784657

  5. Potential waste minimization of trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene via aerobic biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Cutright, Teresa J

    2005-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE) are two of the most frequently detected chlorinated organics found in groundwater. Biodegradation with a new aerobic consortium was used to ascertain the viability of bioremediation for waste minimization applications. After 1 week of treatment, the degradation rate constants, k, were between 0.004 and 0.012 d(-1) for initial concentrations of 54-664 microM TCE. When PCE was used as the sole contaminant, the k values were approximately 0.01 d(-1) regardless of the initial concentration. The addition of 0.2 microM toluene or phenol as an inducer dramatically increased TCE degradation. For instance, at 200 microM TCE the k value when toluene was added (0.03 d(-1)) was 2.2 times higher than without inducers (0.009 d(-1)). The addition of 0.2 microM phenol increased the rate constant by 58%. However, PCE degradation rates were not changed significantly. PMID:15991724

  6. Benzene and toluene biodegradation down gradient of a zero-valent iron permeable reactive barrier.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Liu, Fei; Liu, Yulong; Dong, Hongzhong; Colberg, Patricia J S

    2011-04-15

    This study simulated benzene and toluene biodegradation down gradient of a zero-valent iron permeable reactive barrier (ZVI PRB) that reduces trichloroethylene (TCE). The effects of elevated pH (10.5) and the presence of a common TCE dechlorination by product [cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-1,2-DCE)] on benzene and toluene biodegradation were evaluated in batch experiments. The data suggest that alkaline pH (pH 10.5), often observed down gradient of ZVI PRBs, inhibits Fe(III)-mediated biotransformation of both benzene and toluene. Removal was reduced by 43% for benzene and 26% for toluene as compared to the controls. The effect of the addition of cis-1,2-DCE on benzene and toluene biodegradation was positive and resulted in removal that was greater than or equal to the controls. These results suggest that, at least for cis-1,2-DCE, its formation may not be toxic to iron-reducing benzene and toluene degrading bacteria; however, for microbial benzene and toluene removal down gradient of a ZVI PRB, it may be necessary to provide pH control, especially in the case of a biological PRB that is downstream from a ZVI PRB. PMID:21316847

  7. Addition of Aromatic Substrates Restores Trichloroethylene Degradation Activity in Pseudomonas putida F1

    PubMed Central

    Morono, Yuki; Unno, Hajime; Tanji, Yasunori; Hori, Katsutoshi

    2004-01-01

    The rate of trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation by toluene dioxygenase (TDO) in resting cells of Pseudomonas putida F1 gradually decreased and eventually stopped within 1.5 h, as in previous reports. However, the subsequent addition of toluene, which is the principal substrate of TDO, resulted in its immediate degradation without a lag phase. After the consumption of toluene, degradation of TCE restarted at a rate similar to its initial degradation, suggesting that this degradation was mediated by TDO molecules that were present before the cessation of TCE degradation. The addition of benzene and cumene, which are also substrates of TDO, also caused restoration of TCE degradation activity: TCE was degraded simultaneously with cumene, and a larger amount of TCE was degraded after cumene was added than after toluene or benzene was added. But substrates that were expected to supply the cells with NADH or energy did not restore TCE degradation activity. This cycle of pseudoinactivation and restoration of TCE degradation was observed repeatedly without a significant decrease in the number of viable cells, even after six additions of toluene spread over 30 h. The results obtained in this study demonstrate a new type of restoration of TCE degradation that has not been previously reported. PMID:15128539

  8. Simultaneous biodegradation of carbon tetrachloride and trichloroethylene in a coupled anaerobic/aerobic biobarrier.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Kiwook; Shim, Hojae; Bae, Wookeun; Oh, Juhyun; Bae, Jisu

    2016-08-01

    Simultaneous biodegradation of carbon tetrachloride (CT) and trichloroethylene (TCE) in a biobarrier with polyethylene glycol (PEG) carriers was studied. Toluene/methanol and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) were used as electron donors and an electron acceptor source, respectively, in order to develop a biologically active zone. The average removal efficiencies for TCE and toluene were over 99.3%, leaving the respective residual concentrations of ∼12 and ∼57μg/L, which are below or close to the groundwater quality standards. The removal efficiency for CT was ∼98.1%, with its residual concentration (65.8μg/L) slightly over the standards. TCE was aerobically cometabolized with toluene as substrate while CT was anaerobically dechlorinated in the presence of electron donors, with the respective stoichiometric amount of chloride released. The oxygen supply at equivalent to 50% chemical oxygen demand of the injected electron donors supported successful toluene oxidation and also allowed local anaerobic environments for CT reduction. The originally augmented (immobilized in PEG carriers) aerobic microbes were gradually outcompeted in obtaining substrate and oxygen. Instead, newly developed biofilms originated from indigenous microbes in soil adapted to the coupled anaerobic/aerobic environment in the carrier for the simultaneous and almost complete removal of CT, TCE, and toluene. The declined removal rates when temperature fell from 28 to 18°C were recovered by doubling the retention time (7.2 days). PMID:27054665

  9. 21 CFR 173.290 - Trichloroethylene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... trichloroethylene resulting from its use as a solvent in the manufacture of foods as follows: Decaffeinated ground coffee 25 parts per million. Decaffeinated soluble (instant) coffee extract 10 parts per million....

  10. DECHLORINATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE USING ELECTROCHEMICAL METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electrochemical degradation (ECD) is used to decontaminate organic and inorganic contaminants through oxidative or reductive processes. The ECD of Trichloroethylene (TCE) dechlorinates TCE through electric reduction. TCE dechlorination presented in the literature utilized electro...

  11. EVALUATION OF GEOPHYSICAL METHODS FOR THE DETECTION OF SUBSURFACE TETRACHLOROETHYLENE (PCE) IN CONTROLLED SPILL EXPERIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tetrachloroethylene (PCE), typically used as a dry cleaning solvent, is a predominant contaminant in the subsurface at Superfund Sites. PCE is a dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) that migrates downward into the earth, leaving behind areas of residual saturation and free prod...

  12. 40 CFR 721.3560 - Derivative of tetra-chloro-ethy-lene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Health Administration regulations and set forth at 29 CFR 1910.134, and 30 CFR part 11, respectively, and... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Derivative of tetra-chloro-ethy-lene. 721.3560 Section 721.3560 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED)...

  13. 40 CFR 721.3560 - Derivative of tetra-chloro-ethy-lene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Derivative of tetra-chloro-ethy-lene. 721.3560 Section 721.3560 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3560 Derivative...

  14. 40 CFR 721.3560 - Derivative of tetra-chloro-ethy-lene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Health Administration regulations and set forth at 29 CFR 1910.134, and 30 CFR part 11, respectively, and... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Derivative of tetra-chloro-ethy-lene. 721.3560 Section 721.3560 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED)...

  15. 40 CFR 721.3560 - Derivative of tetra-chloro-ethy-lene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Health Administration regulations and set forth at 29 CFR 1910.134, and 30 CFR part 11, respectively, and... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Derivative of tetra-chloro-ethy-lene. 721.3560 Section 721.3560 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED)...

  16. 40 CFR 721.3560 - Derivative of tetra-chloro-ethy-lene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Derivative of tetra-chloro-ethy-lene. 721.3560 Section 721.3560 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3560 Derivative...

  17. Continuous Determination of High-Vapor Phase Concentrations of Tetrachloroethylene Using On-Line Mass Spectrometry

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method was developed to determine the vapor concentration of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) at and below its equilibrium vapor phase concentration, 168,000 μg/L (25°C). Vapor samples were drawn by vacuum into a six-port sampling valve and injected through a jet separator into an io...

  18. Mortality of aerospace workers exposed to trichloroethylene.

    PubMed

    Morgan, R W; Kelsh, M A; Zhao, K; Heringer, S

    1998-07-01

    We measured mortality rates in a cohort of 20,508 aerospace workers who were followed up over the period 1950-1993. A total of 4,733 workers had occupational exposure to trichloroethylene. In addition, trichloroethylene was present in some of the washing and drinking water used at the work site. We developed a job-exposure matrix to classify all jobs by trichloroethylene exposure levels into four categories ranging from "none" to "high" exposure. We calculated standardized mortality ratios for the entire cohort and the trichloroethylene exposed subcohort. In the standardized mortality ratio analyses, we observed a consistent elevation for nonmalignant respiratory disease, which we attribute primarily to the higher background rates of respiratory disease in this region. We also compared trichloroethylene-exposed workers with workers in the "low" and "none" exposure categories. Mortality rate ratios for nonmalignant respiratory disease were near or less than 1.00 for trichloroethylene exposure groups. We observed elevated rare ratios for ovarian cancer among those with peak exposure at medium and high levels] relative risk (RR) = 2.74; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.84-8.99] and among women with high cumulative exposure (RR = 7.09; 95% CI = 2.14-23.54). Among those with peak exposures at medium and high levels, we observed slightly elevated rate ratios for cancers of the kidney (RR = 1.89; 95% CI = 0.85-4.23), bladder (RR = 1.41; 95% CI = 0.52-3.81), and prostate (RR = 1.47; 95% CI = 0.85-2.55). Our findings do not indicate an association between trichloroethylene exposure and respiratory cancer, liver cancer, leukemia or lymphoma, or all cancers combined. PMID:9647907

  19. Trichloroethylene interactions with muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kössler, F

    1991-06-01

    The toxic effect of trichlorethylene (TCE) was investigated on isolated muscles prepared from frog and rats. Twitch and tetanic contractions as well as caffeine-induced contractures, were recorded. Trichloroethylene at a concentration of 0.25-4.0 mM depressed the force development of both twitch and tetanic tension in a dose-dependent manner. This effect was not influenced by the type of muscle. As TCE shortened the time to peak of twitch contractions, it may alter the Ca2+ binding kinetics. Subthreshold caffeine concentrations applied after pre-exposure to TCE (1 or 2mM) induced contractures. The same TCE exposure enhanced regular caffeine contractures through increasing the speed of tension development and the absolute force. Exposure to 5 or 10 mM TCE did not affect the first caffeine-induced contracture but enhanced the potency of the second caffeine dose given 15 min after the first. The results suggest that the interaction of TCE with membrane sites is responsible for Ca2+ release for contractile processes. PMID:1918792

  20. Induction of toluene oxidation activity in pseudomonas mendocina KR1 and pseudomonas sp. strain ENVPC5 by chlorinated solvents and alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    McClay, K.; Streger, S.H.; Steffan, R.J.

    1995-09-01

    Toluene oxidation activity in Pseudomonas mendocina KR1 and Pseudomonas sp. strain ENVPC5 was induced by trichloroethylene (TCE), and induction was followed by the degradation of TCE. Higher levels of toluene oxidation activity were achieved in the presence of a supplemental growth substrate such as glutamate, with levels of activity of up to 86% of that observed with toluene-induced cells. Activity in P. mendocina KR1 was also induced by cis-1,2-dichloroethylene, perchloroethylene, chloroethane, hexane, pentane, and octane, but not by trans-1,2-dichloroethylene. Toluene oxidation was not induced by TCE in Burkholderia (Pseudomonas) cepacia G4, P. putida F1, Pseudomonas sp. strain ENV110, or Pseudomonas sp. strain ENV113. 22 refs., 4 tabs.

  1. 21 CFR 173.290 - Trichloroethylene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Trichloroethylene. 173.290 Section 173.290 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Solvents, Lubricants, Release Agents and...

  2. 21 CFR 173.290 - Trichloroethylene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Trichloroethylene. 173.290 Section 173.290 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Solvents, Lubricants, Release Agents and...

  3. Test Pile Reactivity Loss Due to Trichloroethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Plumlee, K.E.

    2001-03-09

    The presence of trichloroethylene in the test pile caused a continual decrease in pile reactivity. A system which removed, purified, and returned 12,000 cfh helium to the pile has held contamination to a negligible level and has permitted normal pile operation.

  4. Silylene- and disilyleneacetylene polymers from trichloroethylene

    DOEpatents

    Barton, T.J.; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, S.

    1990-07-10

    Organosilane polymers having recurring silyleneacetylene and/or disilyleneacetylene units are prepared in a one-pot synthesis from trichloroethylene. Depending on the organic substituents (R and R[prime]), these polymers have useful film-forming properties, and are converted to the ceramic, silicon carbide upon heating in very uniform high yields. They can also be pulled into fibers.

  5. Silylene- and disilyleneacetylene polymers from trichloroethylene

    DOEpatents

    Barton, Thomas J.; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Sina

    1990-07-10

    Organosilane polymers having recurring silyleneacetylene and/or disilyleneacetylene units are prepared in a one-pot synthesis from trichloroethylene. Depending on the organic substituents (R and R'), these polymers have useful film-forming properties, and are converted to the ceramic, silicon carbide upon heating in very uniform high yields. They can also be pulled into fibers.

  6. KINETICS OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE COMETABOLISM AND TOLUENE BIODEGRADATION: MODEL APPLICATION TO SOIL BATCH EXPERIMENTS. (R825433)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  7. Abatement of trichloroethylene using DBD plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesali-Naseh, M.; Xu, S.; Xu, L.; Khodadadi, A.; Mortazavi, Y.; Ostrikov, K.

    2014-08-01

    Dielectric barrier discharge plasma was used to oxidize trichloroethylene (TCE) in 21% of O2 in carriers of N2 and He. The degradation products of TCE were analyzed using gas chromatography mass spectrometry. TCE was decomposed completely at optimum energy density of 260 and 300 J/l for He and N2, respectively and its conversion followed zero order reaction. The TCE removal efficiency is decreased in humid air due to interception of reactive intermediates by OH radicals.

  8. Leaching of toluene-neoprene adhesive wastes.

    PubMed

    Font, R; Sabater, M C; Martínez, M A

    2001-03-01

    This work consists of the study of the extraction of solvent (toluene) from a polymeric (neoprene) substrate during a leaching process. Total organic carbon (TOC) is the main contaminant parameter in the leaching of these systems due to the solution of the toluene and the dispersion of the polymer. The toxicity of the extracts was measured with a Microtox equipment, using Photobacteria phosphoreum, deducing that the toxicity of the extracts is low due to the low solubility of toluene but that the toxicity of toluene is high. On the basis of the experimental results, the amount of toluene diffused vs time in plane sheet systems was studied. A kinetic model has been developed considering two stages: In the first stage, the toluene diffuses into the system across the neoprene chains at a constant rate, not depending on the initial toluene concentration. This fact is explained by considering that there is a constant difference of the toluene concentration between the interface with the water and the inner part of the sample. In the second stage, the dispersion of the polymer with the corresponding amount of toluene takes place. The diffusion of toluene in the leaching process is compared and analyzed considering the diffusion of toluene in a desorption process in air so that the difference of toluene concentration between the interface and the interior can be estimated. A mathematical model is also proposed for considering the leaching process in other operating conditions. PMID:11351545

  9. Pulmonary reactions caused by welding-induced decomposed trichloroethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Sjoegren, B.P.; Plato, N.; Alexandersson, R.; Eklund, A.; Falkenberg, C. )

    1991-01-01

    This is the report of a welder who performed argon-shielded electric arc welding in an atmosphere containing trichloroethylene. He developed immediate respiratory symptoms, pulmonary edema 12 hours after exposure, and recurring dyspnea ten days after exposure. These pulmonary reactions might be explained by inhalation of decomposition products of trichloroethylene such as dichloroacetyl chloride and phosgene.

  10. Inhibited 1,1,1-trichloroethane replaces trichloroethylene for degreasing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuler, F. T.

    1970-01-01

    In fight against air pollution inhibited TCE /1,1,1-trichloroethane/ is effective substitute for trichloroethylene in degreasing plants. This chemical has only slight photochemical activity and causes little eye irritation. TCE is less toxic than trichloroethylene and can withstand production loads and conditions, or long term storage, without degradation.

  11. Toluene stability Space Station Rankine power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havens, V. N.; Ragaller, D. R.; Sibert, L.; Miller, D.

    1987-01-01

    A dynamic test loop is designed to evaluate the thermal stability of an organic Rankine cycle working fluid, toluene, for potential application to the Space Station power conversion unit. Samples of the noncondensible gases and the liquid toluene were taken periodically during the 3410 hour test at 750 F peak temperature. The results obtained from the toluene stability loop verify that toluene degradation will not lead to a loss of performance over the 30-year Space Station mission life requirement. The identity of the degradation products and the low rates of formation were as expected from toluene capsule test data.

  12. Alkylation of toluene with ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Walendziewski, J.; Trawczynski, J.

    1996-10-01

    A series of Y and ZSM-5 zeolite based catalysts was prepared. Zeolites were cation exchanged and formed with 50% of aluminum hydroxide as a binder, and the obtained catalysts were finally thermally treated. Activity tests in alkylation of toluene with ethanol were carried out in the temperature range of 325--400 C, in nitrogen or hydrogen stream, and a pressure up to 3 MPa. The feed consisted of toluene and ethanol mixed in a mole ratio 1/1 or 2/1. The obtained results showed that among the studied catalysts the highest activity in the alkylation reaction was attained by ZSM-5 zeolite based catalyst with a moderate acidity and medium silica to alumina ratio, i.e., {approximately}50. Activity and selectivity of the most active catalyst as well as conversion of the feed components were similar to those reported in other papers. The content of p-ethyltoluene in alkylation products attained ca. 60%.

  13. Characterization of the methanotrophic bacterial community present in a trichloroethylene-contaminated subsurface groundwater site.

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, J P; Jiménez, L; Rosario, I; Hazen, T C; Sayler, G S

    1993-01-01

    Groundwater, contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE), was collected from 13 monitoring wells at Area M on the U.S. Department of Energy Savannah River Site near Aiken, S.C. Filtered groundwater samples were enriched with methane, leading to the isolation of 25 methanotrophic isolates. The phospholipid fatty acid profiles of all the isolates were dominated by 18:1 omega 8c (60 to 80%), a signature lipid for group II methanotrophs. Subsequent phenotypic testing showed that most of the strains were members of the genus Methylosinus and one isolate was a member of the genus Methylocystis. Most of the methanotroph isolates exhibited soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) activity. This was presumptively indicated by the naphthalene oxidation assay and confirmed by hybridization with a gene probe encoding the mmoB gene and by cell extract assays. TCE was degraded at various rates by most of the sMMO-producing isolates, whereas PCE was not degraded. Savannah River Area M and other groundwaters, pristine and polluted, were found to support sMMO activity when supplemented with nutrients and then inoculated with Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. The maximal sMMO-specific activity obtained in the various groundwaters ranged from 41 to 67% compared with maximal rates obtained in copper-free nitrate mineral salts media. This study partially supports the hypothesis that stimulation of indigenous methanotrophic communities can be efficacious for removal of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons from subsurface sites and that the removal can be mediated by sMMO. PMID:8368829

  14. Acute toxicity of trichloroethylene to saltwater organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, G.S.; Tolmsoff, A.J.; Petrocelli, S.R.

    1986-12-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon primarily utilized for vapor-phase degreasing in the fabricated metals industry. Other applications include cold-metal cleaning and use in the manufacture of organic chemicals. TCE enters the environment as a result of volatilization during its production and through its industrial uses. TCE has been detected in aquatic environments and organisms at part-per-trillion (pptr) concentrations. Although TCE is indicated to be widely distributed, relatively limited data exist on the acute effects of TCE on aquatic organisms, especially saltwater species. Results of static acute tests of TCE with a saltwater alga, invertebrate, and fish are reported here to enhance the data base.

  15. Mineralization of trichloroethylene by heterotrophic enrichment cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, T.J.; Ringelberg, D.; Mikell, A.T.; White, D.C. |; Fliermans, C.B.

    1988-12-31

    Microbial consortia capable of aerobically degrading greater than 99% of 50 mg/l exogenous trichloroethylene (TCE) have been enriched from TCE contaminated subsurface sediments. Concentrations of TCE greater than 300 mg/l were not degraded nor was TCE used as a sole energy source. Successful electron donors for growth included tryptone-yeast extract, methanol, methane or propane. The optimum temperature for growth was 22--37 C and the ph optimum was 7.0--8.1. Utilization of TCE occurred only after apparent microbial growth had ceased. The major end products recovered were hydrochloric acid and carbon dioxide. Minor products included dichloroethylene, vinylidine chloride and possibly chloroform.

  16. SURFACTANT ENHANCED RECOVERY OF TETRACHLOROETHYLENE FROM A POROUS MEDIUM CONTAINING LOW PERMEABILITY LENSES. 1. EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES. (R825409)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    A matrix of batch, column and two-dimensional (2-D) box experiments was conducted to investigate the coupled effects of rate-limited solubilization and layering on the entrapment and subsequent recovery of a representative dense NAPL, tetrachloroethylene (PCE)...

  17. Fogging in Polyvinyl Toluene Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, Richard J.; Fritz, Brad G.; Hurlbut, Charles; Kouzes, Richard T.; Ramey, Ashley; Smola, Richard

    2015-02-01

    It has been observed that large polyvinyl toluene (PVT)-based gamma ray detectors can suffer internal “fogging” when exposed to outdoor environmental conditions over long periods of time. When observed, this change results in reduced light collection by photomultiplier tubes connected to the PVT. Investigation of the physical cause of these changes has been explored, and a root cause identified. Water penetration into the PVT from hot, high-humidity conditions results in reversible internal water condensation at room temperature, and permanent micro-fracturing of the PVT at very low environmental temperatures. Mitigation procedures and methods are being investigated.

  18. IRIS Toxicological Review of Trichloroethylene (Interagency Science Discussion Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is releasing the draft report, Toxicological Review of Trichloroethylene, that was distributed to Federal agencies and White House Offices for comment during the Science Discussion step of the IRIS Assessment Development Process. Comments received from other Federal agencies ...

  19. EVALUATION OF MULTIPLE PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING STRUCTURES FOR TRICHLOROETHYLENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of PBPK models were developed for trichloroethylene (TCE) to evaluate biological processes that may affect the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) of TCE and its metabolites.

  20. IRIS Toxicological Review of Trichloroethylene (TCE) (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is conducting a peer review and public comment of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of Trichloroethylene (TCE) that when finalized will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database.

  1. Evaluation of toxicity of trichloroethylene for plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, S.B.; Davis, L.C.; Dana, J.; Selk, K.; Erickson, L.E.

    1996-12-31

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) exposure of several species of plants was studied. Although earlier studies indicated that the root systems of plants could tolerate an aqueous phase concentration of 1 mM for a day, toxicity to whole plants was observed at somewhat lower levels in the gas phase in this study. The tested species included pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima), tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum), sweet potato (Dioscoria batata), tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), soybean (Glycine max L. Merr), and alfalfa (Medicago sativa). Damage was observable as wilting or failure of the gravitropic response of shoots at levels above about 0.2 mM in the gas phase, which corresponds to 0.5 mM in the aqueous phase. Plants were usually killed quickly at gas phase concentrations above 0.4 mM.

  2. 27 CFR 21.132 - Toluene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Toluene. 21.132 Section 21.132 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.132 Toluene. (a) Distillation range. (For...

  3. HEALTH EFFECTS OF TOLUENE: A REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    This evaluative review covers the neurotoxic effects of toluene. General health effects of toluene are also discussed in more limited detail. A brief description of chemical properties and environmental prevalence is given, followed by a review of pharmacokinetic data. General he...

  4. 27 CFR 21.132 - Toluene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Toluene. 21.132 Section 21.132 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.132 Toluene. (a) Distillation range. (For...

  5. 27 CFR 21.132 - Toluene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Toluene. 21.132 Section 21.132 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.132 Toluene. (a) Distillation range. (For...

  6. 27 CFR 21.132 - Toluene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Toluene. 21.132 Section 21.132 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.132 Toluene. (a) Distillation range. (For...

  7. Ethnic Differences in the Metabolism of Toluene: Comparisons between Korean and Foreign Workers Exposed to Toluene

    PubMed Central

    Won, Young Lim; Ko, Kyung Sun

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the individual characteristics, lifestyle habits, exposure levels, and genetic diversity of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes involved in toluene metabolism in Korean and foreign workers exposed to toluene at a manufacturing plant. This study was conducted to determine the effects of culture or ethnicity on toluene metabolism. The results showed that blood and urinary toluene concentrations were dependent on the level of exposure to toluene. We analyzed the correlation between toluene metabolism and genetic diversity in glutathione S-transferase (GST) (M1), GSTT1, and cytochrome p-450 (CYP) 2E1*5 as well as lifestyle habits (smoking, drinking, and exercise habits). The results revealed significant correlations between toluene metabolism and GSTM1 and GSTT1 genetic diversity, as well as smoking and exercise. PMID:25874030

  8. TETRACHLOROETHYLENE EXPOSURE AND RISK OF SCHIZOPHRENIA: OFFSPRING OF DRY CLEANERS IN A POPULATION BIRTH COHORT, PRELIMINARY FINDINGS

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, Mary C.; Opler, Mark G.; Harlap, Susan; Harkavy-Friedman, Jill; Kleinhaus, Karine; Nahon, Daniella; Fennig, Shmuel; Susser, Ezra S.; Malaspina, Dolores

    2009-01-01

    Tetrachloroethylene is a solvent used in dry cleaning with reported neurotoxic effects. Using proportional hazard methods, we examined the relationship between parental occupation as a dry cleaner and risk for schizophrenia in a prospective population-based cohort of 88, 829 offspring born in Jerusalem from 1964 through 1976, followed from birth to age 21–33 years. Of 144 offspring whose parents were dry cleaners, 4 developed schizophrenia. We observed an increased incidence of schizophrenia in offspring of parents who were dry cleaners (RR = 3.4, 95% CI, 1.3–9.2, p=0.01). Tetrachloroethylene exposure warrants further investigation as a risk factor for schizophrenia. PMID:17113267

  9. Integrating address geocoding, land use regression, and spatiotemporal geostatistical estimation for groundwater tetrachloroethylene.

    PubMed

    Messier, Kyle P; Akita, Yasuyuki; Serre, Marc L

    2012-03-01

    Geographic information systems (GIS) based techniques are cost-effective and efficient methods used by state agencies and epidemiology researchers for estimating concentration and exposure. However, budget limitations have made statewide assessments of contamination difficult, especially in groundwater media. Many studies have implemented address geocoding, land use regression, and geostatistics independently, but this is the first to examine the benefits of integrating these GIS techniques to address the need of statewide exposure assessments. A novel framework for concentration exposure is introduced that integrates address geocoding, land use regression (LUR), below detect data modeling, and Bayesian Maximum Entropy (BME). A LUR model was developed for tetrachloroethylene that accounts for point sources and flow direction. We then integrate the LUR model into the BME method as a mean trend while also modeling below detects data as a truncated Gaussian probability distribution function. We increase available PCE data 4.7 times from previously available databases through multistage geocoding. The LUR model shows significant influence of dry cleaners at short ranges. The integration of the LUR model as mean trend in BME results in a 7.5% decrease in cross validation mean square error compared to BME with a constant mean trend. PMID:22264162

  10. Integrating Address Geocoding, Land Use Regression, and Spatiotemporal Geostatistical Estimation for Groundwater Tetrachloroethylene

    PubMed Central

    Messier, Kyle P.; Akita, Yasuyuki; Serre, Marc L.

    2012-01-01

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) based techniques are cost-effective and efficient methods used by state agencies and epidemiology researchers for estimating concentration and exposure. However, budget limitations have made statewide assessments of contamination difficult, especially in groundwater media. Many studies have implemented address geocoding, land use regression, and geostatistics independently, but this is the first to examine the benefits of integrating these GIS techniques to address the need of statewide exposure assessments. A novel framework for concentration exposure is introduced that integrates address geocoding, land use regression (LUR), below detect data modeling, and Bayesian Maximum Entropy (BME). A LUR model was developed for Tetrachloroethylene that accounts for point sources and flow direction. We then integrate the LUR model into the BME method as a mean trend while also modeling below detects data as a truncated Gaussian probability distribution function. We increase available PCE data 4.7 times from previously available databases through multistage geocoding. The LUR model shows significant influence of dry cleaners at short ranges. The integration of the LUR model as mean trend in BME results in a 7.5% decrease in cross validation mean square error compared to BME with a constant mean trend. PMID:22264162

  11. Adult Neuropsychological Performance Following Prenatal and Early Postnatal Exposure to Tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Janulewicz, Patricia A; White, Roberta F; Martin, Brett M; Winter, Michael R; Weinberg, Janice M; Vieira, Veronica; Aschengrau, Ann

    2012-01-01

    This population-based retrospective cohort study examined adult performance on a battery of neuropsychological tests in relation to prenatal and early postnatal exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated drinking water on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Subjects were identified through birth records from 1969 through 1983. Exposure was modeled using pipe network information from town water departments, a PCE leaching and transport algorithm, EPANet water flow modeling software, and a Geographic Information System (GIS). Results of crude and multivariate analyses among 35 exposed and 28 unexposed subjects showed no association between prenatal and early postnatal exposure and decrements on tests that assess abilities in the domains of omnibus intelligence, academic achievement or language. The results were suggestive of an association between prenatal and early postnatal PCE exposure and diminished performance on tests that assessed abilities in the domains of visuospatial functioning, learning and memory, motor, attention and mood. Because the sample size was small, most findings were not statistically significant. Future studies with larger sample sizes should be conducted to further define the neuropsychological consequences of early developmental PCE exposure. PMID:22522125

  12. Composition of Toluene-Degrading Microbial Communities from Soil at Different Concentrations of Toluene

    PubMed Central

    Hubert, Casey; Shen, Yin; Voordouw, Gerrit

    1999-01-01

    Toluene-degrading bacteria were isolated from hydrocarbon-contaminated soil by incubating liquid enrichment cultures and agar plate cultures in desiccators in which the vapor pressure of toluene was controlled by dilution with vacuum pump oil. Incubation in desiccators equilibrated with either 100, 10, or 1% (wt/wt) toluene in vacuum pump oil and testing for genomic cross-hybridization resulted in four genomically distinct strains (standards) capable of growth on toluene (strains Cstd1, Cstd2, Cstd5, and Cstd7). The optimal toluene concentrations for growth of these standards on plating media differed considerably. Cstd1 grew best in an atmosphere equilibrated with 0.1% (wt/wt) toluene, but Cstd5 failed to grow in this atmosphere. Conversely, Cstd5 grew well in the presence of 10% (wt/wt) toluene, which inhibited growth of Cstd1. 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing and cross-hybridization analysis indicated that both Cstd1 and Cstd5 are members of the genus Pseudomonas. An analysis of the microbial communities in soil samples that were incubated with 10% (wt/wt) toluene with reverse sample genome probing indicated that Pseudomonas strain Cstd5 was the dominant community member. However, incubation of soil samples with 0.1% (wt/wt) toluene resulted in a community that was dominated by Pseudomonas strain Q7, a toluene degrader that has been described previously (Y. Shen, L. G. Stehmeier, and G. Voordouw, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 64:637–645, 1998). Q7 was not able to grow by itself in an atmosphere equilibrated with 0.1% (wt/wt) toluene but grew efficiently in coculture with Cstd1, suggesting that toluene or metabolic derivatives of toluene were transferred from Cstd1 to Q7. PMID:10388704

  13. Composition of toluene-degrading microbial communities from soil at different concentrations of toluene.

    PubMed

    Hubert, C; Shen, Y; Voordouw, G

    1999-07-01

    Toluene-degrading bacteria were isolated from hydrocarbon-contaminated soil by incubating liquid enrichment cultures and agar plate cultures in desiccators in which the vapor pressure of toluene was controlled by dilution with vacuum pump oil. Incubation in desiccators equilibrated with either 100, 10, or 1% (wt/wt) toluene in vacuum pump oil and testing for genomic cross-hybridization resulted in four genomically distinct strains (standards) capable of growth on toluene (strains Cstd1, Cstd2, Cstd5, and Cstd7). The optimal toluene concentrations for growth of these standards on plating media differed considerably. Cstd1 grew best in an atmosphere equilibrated with 0.1% (wt/wt) toluene, but Cstd5 failed to grow in this atmosphere. Conversely, Cstd5 grew well in the presence of 10% (wt/wt) toluene, which inhibited growth of Cstd1. 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing and cross-hybridization analysis indicated that both Cstd1 and Cstd5 are members of the genus Pseudomonas. An analysis of the microbial communities in soil samples that were incubated with 10% (wt/wt) toluene with reverse sample genome probing indicated that Pseudomonas strain Cstd5 was the dominant community member. However, incubation of soil samples with 0.1% (wt/wt) toluene resulted in a community that was dominated by Pseudomonas strain Q7, a toluene degrader that has been described previously (Y. Shen, L. G. Stehmeier, and G. Voordouw, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 64:637-645, 1998). Q7 was not able to grow by itself in an atmosphere equilibrated with 0.1% (wt/wt) toluene but grew efficiently in coculture with Cstd1, suggesting that toluene or metabolic derivatives of toluene were transferred from Cstd1 to Q7. PMID:10388704

  14. Anticonvulsant and antipunishment effects of toluene

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, R.W.; Coleman, J.B.; Schuler, R.; Cox, C.

    1984-01-01

    Toluene can have striking acute behavioral effects and is subject to abuse by inhalation. To determine if its actions resemble those of drugs used in the treatment of anxiety (anxiolytics), two sets of experiments were undertaken. Inasmuch as prevention of pentylenetetrazol-induced convulsions is an identifying property of this class of agents, the authors first demonstrated that pretreatment of mice with injections of toluene delayed the onset of convulsive signs and prevented the tonic extension phase of the convulsant activity in a dose-related manner. Injections of another alkyl benzene, m-xylene, were of comparable potency to toluene. Inhalation of toluene delayed the time of death after pentylenetetrazol injection in a manner related to the duration and concentration of exposure; at lower convulsant doses, inhalation of moderate concentrations (EC/sub 58/, 1300 ppm) prevented death. Treatment with a benzodiazepine receptor antagonist (Ro 15-1788) failed to reduce the anticonvulsant activity of inhaled toluene. Anxiolytics also attenuate the reduction in response rate produced by punishment with electric shock. Toluene increased rates of responding suppressed by punishment when responding was maintained under a multiple fixed-interval fixed-interval punishment schedule of reinforcement. Distinct antipunishment effects were observed in rats after 2 hr of exposure to 1780 and 3000 ppm of toluene; the rate-increasing effects of toluene were related to concentration and to time after the termination of exposure. Thus, toluene and m-xylene resemble in several respects clinically useful drugs such as the benzodiazepines. 51 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  15. Dilated cardiomyopathy associated with toluene abuse.

    PubMed

    Vural, Mutlu; Ogel, Kultegin

    2006-01-01

    The use of paint thinner and glue to achieve an euphoric state has been associated with serious social and health problems in children and young adults. We present the case of a 21-year-old man with dilated cardiomyopathy occurring following abuse of paint thinner and glue containing toluene as main compound. After cessation of toluene abuse, the patient recovered rapidly and completely. Because of the increasing prevalence of toluene abuse, harmful effects of this volatile agent on the heart are also discussed. PMID:16479101

  16. The pyrolysis of toluene and ethyl benzene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolovskaya, V. G.; Samgin, V. F.; Kalinenko, R. A.; Nametkin, N. S.

    1987-01-01

    The pyrolysis of toluene at 850 to 950 C gave mainly H2, CH4, and benzene; PhEt at 650 to 750 C gave mainly H2, CH4, styrene, benzene, and toluene. The rate constants for PhEt pyrolysis were 1000 times higher than those for toluene pyrolysis; the chain initiation rate constants differed by the same factor. The activation energy differences were 46 kJ/mole for the total reaction and 54 kJ/mole for chain initiation. The chain length was evaluated for the PhEt case (10 + or - 2).

  17. 78 FR 34377 - Trichloroethylene TSCA Chemical Risk Assessment; Notice of Public Meetings and Opportunity to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-07

    ... Risk Assessment for Trichloroethylene: Degreaser and Arts/Crafts Uses.'' EPA will hold three peer..., including one entitled, ``TSCA Workplan Chemical Risk Assessment for Trichloroethylene: Degreaser and Arts/Crafts Uses.'' Trichloroethylene (TCE) (CASRN 79-01-6) is one of 83 chemicals identified for review...

  18. Current trends in trichloroethylene biodegradation: a review.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Awadhesh Kumar; Upadhyay, Siddh Nath; Dubey, Suresh Kumar

    2014-06-01

    Over the past few years biodegradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) using different microorganisms has been investigated by several researchers. In this review article, an attempt has been made to present a critical summary of the recent results related to two major processes--reductive dechlorination and aerobic co-metabolism used for TCE biodegradation. It has been shown that mainly Clostridium sp. DC-1, KYT-1, Dehalobacter, Dehalococcoides, Desulfuromonas, Desulfitobacterium, Propionibacterium sp. HK-1, and Sulfurospirillum bacterial communities are responsible for the reductive dechlorination of TCE. Efficacy of bacterial communities like Nitrosomonas, Pseudomonas, Rhodococcus, and Xanthobacter sp. etc. for TCE biodegradation under aerobic conditions has also been examined. Mixed cultures of diazotrophs and methanotrophs have been used for TCE degradation in batch and continuous cultures (biofilter) under aerobic conditions. In addition, some fungi (Trametes versicolor, Phanerochaete chrysosporium ME-446) and Actinomycetes have also been used for aerobic biodegradation of TCE. The available information on kinetics of biofiltration of TCE and its degradation end-products such as CO2 are discussed along with the available results on the diversity of bacterial community obtained using molecular biological approaches. It has emerged that there is a need to use metabolic engineering and molecular biological tools more intensively to improve the robustness of TCE degrading microbial species and assess their diversity. PMID:23057686

  19. Emission factors for trichloroethylene vapor degreasers

    SciTech Connect

    Wadden, R.A.; Scheff, P.A.; Franke, J.E. )

    1989-09-01

    Emission factors were developed for two production trichloroethylene (TCE) vapor degreasers: an open-top (0.76 m x 1.16 m x 1.8 m) and a conveyor-fed enclosed design. Both were fitted with functioning local exhaust hoods. Emissions were determined from field data by using a Fick's law diffusion approach and the observed variation in time of the TCE concentration gradient within 4 m of each device. The average emission factor for the open-top degreaser was 2.6 g TCE/min (2.9 g TCE/(m2.min)) which corresponds to 9.5% of the total degreaser emissions escaping into the workplace. The average emission factor for the enclosed degreaser was 0.67 g TCE/min, a release of 3% of the total emissions into the work area. These values are considered to be representative of the average lower limit of emissions during production from TCE degreasers of like designs with similar local exhaust controls (which were typical but did not meet American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists' (ACGIH) airflow rate criteria).

  20. Human variability and susceptibility to trichloroethylene.

    PubMed Central

    Pastino, G M; Yap, W Y; Carroquino, M

    2000-01-01

    Although humans vary in their response to chemicals, comprehensive measures of susceptibility have generally not been incorporated into human risk assessment. The U.S. EPA dose-response-based risk assessments for cancer and the RfD/RfC (reference dose-reference concentration) approach for noncancer risk assessments are assumed to protect vulnerable human subgroups. However, these approaches generally rely on default assumptions and do not consider the specific biological basis for potential susceptibility to a given toxicant. In an effort to focus more explicitly on this issue, this article addresses biological factors that may affect human variability and susceptibility to trichloroethylene (TCE), a widely used halogenated industrial solvent. In response to Executive Order 13045, which requires federal agencies to make protection of children a high priority in implementing their policies and to take special risks to children into account when developing standards, this article examines factors that may affect risk of exposure to TCE in children. The influence of genetics, sex, altered health state, coexposure to alcohol, and enzyme induction on TCE toxicity are also examined. PMID:10807552

  1. Phytoremediation of trichloroethylene with hybrid poplars.

    PubMed

    Gordon, M; Choe, N; Duffy, J; Ekuan, G; Heilman, P; Muiznieks, I; Ruszaj, M; Shurtleff, B B; Strand, S; Wilmoth, J; Newman, L A

    1998-08-01

    Axenic tumor cultures of poplar cells, clone H11-11, were grown in the presence of [14C]-trichloroethylene (TCE) (uniformly labeled). The cells were capable of metabolizing TCE to produce trichloroethanol, di- and trichloroacetic acid. Some of the carbon from TCE was found in insoluble, nonextractable cell residue, and small amounts were mineralized to [14C]CO2. Poplar cuttings grown in soil and exposed to TCE produced the same metabolites. In field trials, trees were planted in soil in test cells and exposed to TCE via underground water injection during the growing season. During the growing season, at least 95% of the TCE was removed from the influent water stream in cells containing trees. Mass balance studies conducted in the laboratory indicated that 70 to 90% of the TCE was transpired; however, greenhouse and field study results showed that less than 5% of the total TCE taken up by the plants is transpired. These results show that significant TCE uptake and degradation occur in poplars. Poplars appear to be useful for in situ remediation of TCE-contaminated sites under proper conditions. PMID:9703485

  2. Polydispersity of asphaltenes in toluene

    SciTech Connect

    Sheu, E.Y.; Liang, K.S.; Sinha, S.K.; Overfield, R.E. )

    1990-08-01

    Asphaltenes have been reported to exhibit colloidal behavior in solutions. However, the thermodynamics of their self-association and the resulting particle polydispersity was not yet fully investigated. In this paper, the authors measured the structure and polydispersity of the asphaltene particles in toluene using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). To study their self-association they systematically increased the solution temperature to observe the evolution, if any, of the particle structure and size. In order to determine the asphaltene size distribution and the corresponding polydispersity they fitted the SANS data with a polydispersity model in which one more adjustable parameter (than monodisperse analysis) was used to account for the particle size distribution. Because of one more free parameter used in data fitting, an ambiguous result due to multiple convergence may lead to a misinterpretation. In order to minimize this ambiguity and obtain a realistic particle size distribution they developed a method by which one can self-consistently verify the obtained particle size distribution. From SANS data analysis they found that the Schultz distribution function properly described the asphaltene particle sizes and the polydispersity decreases whenever temperature or concentration increases.

  3. Oxidation Mechanisms of Toluene and Benzene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, David A.

    1995-01-01

    An expanded and improved version of a previously published benzene oxidation mechanism is presented and shown to model published experimental data fairly successfully. This benzene submodel is coupled to a modified version of a toluene oxidation submodel from the recent literature. This complete mechanism is shown to successfully model published experimental toluene oxidation data for a highly mixed flow reactor and for higher temperature ignition delay times in a shock tube. A comprehensive sensitivity analysis showing the most important reactions is presented for both the benzene and toluene reacting systems. The NASA Lewis toluene mechanism's modeling capability is found to be equivalent to that of the previously published mechanism which contains a somewhat different benzene submodel.

  4. Primary atmospheric oxidation mechanism for toluene.

    PubMed

    Baltaretu, Cristian O; Lichtman, Eben I; Hadler, Amelia B; Elrod, Matthew J

    2009-01-01

    The products of the primary OH-initiated oxidation of toluene were investigated using the turbulent flow chemical ionization mass spectrometry technique at temperatures ranging from 228 to 298 K. A major dienedial-producing pathway was detected for the first time for toluene oxidation, and glyoxal and methylglyoxal were found to be minor primary oxidation products. The results suggest that secondary oxidation processes involving dienedial and epoxide primary products are likely responsible for previous observations of glyoxal and methylglyoxal products from toluene oxidation. Because the dienedial-producing pathway is a null cycle for tropospheric ozone production and glyoxal and methylglyoxal are important secondary organic aerosol precursors, these new findings have important implications for the modeling of toluene oxidation in the atmosphere. PMID:19118482

  5. Prenatal Exposure to Tetrachloroethylene-Contaminated Drinking Water and the Risk of Adverse Birth Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Aschengrau, Ann; Weinberg, Janice; Rogers, Sarah; Gallagher, Lisa; Winter, Michael; Vieira, Veronica; Webster, Thomas; Ozonoff, David

    2008-01-01

    Background Prior studies of prenatal exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE) have shown mixed results regarding its effect on birth weight and gestational age. Objectives In this retrospective cohort study we examined whether PCE contamination of public drinking-water supplies in Massachusetts influenced the birth weight and gestational duration of children whose mothers were exposed before the child’s delivery. Methods The study included 1,353 children whose mothers were exposed to PCE-contaminated drinking water and a comparable group of 772 children of unexposed mothers. Birth records were used to identify subjects and provide information on the outcomes. Mothers completed a questionnaire to gather information on residential histories and confounding variables. PCE exposure was estimated using EPANET water distribution system modeling software that incorporated a fate and transport model. Results We found no meaningful associations between PCE exposure and birth weight or gestational duration. Compared with children whose mothers were unexposed during the year of the last menstrual period (LMP), adjusted mean differences in birth weight were 20.9, 6.2, 30.1, and 15.2 g for children whose mothers’ average monthly exposure during the LMP year ranged from the lowest to highest quartile. Similarly, compared with unexposed children, adjusted mean differences in gestational age were −0.2, 0.1, −0.1, and −0.2 weeks for children whose mothers’ average monthly exposure ranged from the lowest to highest quartile. Similar results were observed for two other measures of prenatal exposure. Conclusions These results suggest that prenatal PCE exposure does not have an adverse effect on these birth outcomes at the exposure levels experienced by this population. PMID:18560539

  6. Reduction of benzene toxicity by toluene

    SciTech Connect

    Plappert, U.; Barthel, E.; Seidel, H.J.

    1994-12-31

    BDF{sub 1} mice were exposed in inhalation chambers to benzene (900 ppm, 300 ppm) and/or toluene (500 ppm, 250 ppm) 6 hr per day, 5 days per week, for up to 8 weeks. Benzene alone induced a slight anemia after 4 and 8 weeks and a reduction of BFU-E and CFU-E numbers in the marrow. The coexposure to toluene reduced the degree of anemia. These results confirm previous studies where toluene was found to reduce benzene toxicity. This protective effect was most pronounced when DNA damage was studied in peripheral blood cells, bone marrow, and liver using the single cell gel (SCG) assay. With benzene alone, either with 300 or 900 ppm, a significant increase in DNA damage was detected in cells sampled from all three organs. Toluene alone did not induce a significant increase in DNA damage. The coexposure of benzene and toluene reduced the extent of DNA damage to about 50% of benzene alone. This result is considered a clear indication for a protective effect of toluene on the genetic toxicity of benzene. 18 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Toluene-induced ototoxicity by subcutaneous administration

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, G.T.; Howd, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Inhalation exposure of rats to toluene causes irreversible hearing loss (e.g., Pryor et al.). To determine whether noise emanating from the inhalation system was a major contributing factor and whether exposure by a noninhalation route would cause a similar effect, weanling, male Fischer-344 rats were injected SC twice daily in a quiet environment with PEG-300 (control) or with 1.5 or 1.7 g/kg of toluene for 7 days. After being trained to perform a multisensory conditioned avoidance response (CAR) task, tone intensity-response functions were generated at 4, 8, 12, and 20 kHz, and behavioral auditory response thresholds were estimated. Toluene caused a dose-related hearing loss at frequencies of 8 kHz and above, with no effect on performance of the CAR in response to light, nonaversive footshock, or the 4-kHz tone. The similarity of this effect to that observed following inhalation exposure indicates that noise is not a major factor in the toluene-induced hearing loss, although possible interactions between noise and toluene remain to be investigated. These results also demonstrate that direct penetration of the toluene vapors through the external ear structure, as might occur during inhalation exposure, is not a necessary condition for inducing the hearing loss.

  8. Biodegradation of trichloroethylene by Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b.

    PubMed Central

    Tsien, H C; Brusseau, G A; Hanson, R S; Waclett, L P

    1989-01-01

    The methanotroph Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, a type II methanotroph, degraded trichloroethylene at rates exceeding 1.2 mmol/h per g (dry weight) following the appearance of soluble methane monooxygenase in continuous and batch cultures. Cells capable oxidizing trichloroethylene contained components of soluble methane monooxygenase as demonstrated by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis with antibodies prepared against the purified enzyme. Growth of cultures in a medium containing 0.25 microM or less copper sulfate caused derepression of the synthesis of soluble methane monooxygenase. In these cultures, the specific rates of methane and methanol oxidation did not change during growth, while trichloroethylene oxidation increased with the appearance of soluble methane monooxygenase. M. trichosporium OB3b cells that contained soluble methane monooxygenase also degraded vinyl chloride, 1,1-dichloroethylene, cis-1,2-dichloroethylene, and trans-1,2-dichloroethylene. Images PMID:2515801

  9. Human Health Risk Assessment of Trichloroethylene from Industrial Complex A

    PubMed Central

    Sin, Saemi

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the human health risks of trichloroethylene from Industrial Complex A. The excessive carcinogenic risks for central tendency exposure were 1.40 × 10?5 for male and female residents in the vicinity of Industrial Complex A. The excessive cancers risk for reasonable maximum exposure were 2.88 × 10?5 and 1.97 × 10?5 for males and females, respectively. These values indicate that there are potential cancer risks for exposure to these concentrations. The hazard index for central tendency exposure to trichloroethylene was 1.71 for male and female residents. The hazard indexes for reasonable maximum exposure were 3.27 and 2.41 for males and females, respectively. These values were over one, which is equivalent to the threshold value. This result showed that adverse cancer and non-cancer health effects may occur and that some risk management of trichloroethylene from Industrial Complex A was needed. PMID:24278607

  10. Modeling of TCE and Toluene Toxicity to Pseudomonas putida F1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R.; Olson, M. S.

    2009-12-01

    Prediction of viable bacterial distribution with respect to contaminants is important for efficient bioremediation of contaminated ground-water aquifers, particularly those contaminated with residual NAPLs. While bacterial motility and chemotaxis may help situate bacteria close to high concentrations of contaminant thereby enhancing bioremediation, prolonged exposure to high concentrations of contaminates is toxic to contaminant-degrading bacteria. The purpose of this work is to model the toxicity of trichloroethylene and toluene to Pseudomonas putida F1. The Live/Dead® bacterial viability assay was used to determine the toxic effect of chemical contaminants on the viability of P. putida F1 in a sealed zero head-space experimental environment. Samples of bacterial suspensions were exposed to common ground-water pollutants, TCE and toluene, for different durations. Changes in live and dead cell populations were monitored over the course of experiments using fluorescence microscopy. Data obtained from these toxicity experiments were fit to simple linear and exponential bacterial decay models using non-linear regression to describe loss of bacterial viability. TCE toxicity to P. putida F1 was best described with an exponential decay model (Figure 1a), with a decay constant kTCE = 0.025 h-4.95 (r2 = 0.956). Toluene toxicity showed a marginally better fit to the linear decay model (Figure 1b) (r2 = 0.971), with a decay constant ktoluene = 0.204 h-1. Best-fit model parameters obtained for both TCE and toluene were used to predict bacterial viability in toxicity experiments with higher contaminant concentrations and matched well with experimental data. Results from this study can be used to predict bacterial accumulation and viability near NAPL sources, and thus may be helpful in improving bioremediation performance assessment of contaminated sites. Figure 1: Survival ratios (S = N/No) of P. putida F1 in TCE- (a) and toluene- (b) stressed samples (observed (

  11. Electrochemical fluorination of trichloroethylene and N, N-dimethyltrifluoroacetamide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, L.-C.

    1979-01-01

    The paper presents the results of experiments concerning the fluorination of trichloroethylene and N, N-dimethyltrifluoroacetamide carried out on a laboratory scale in an advanced 'Simons' type electrochemical apparatus which could be operated automatically from ambient to 50 psi pressure. It is shown that a variety of fluorine-substituted products are formed, depending upon electrolysis conditions and concentrations of reactant relative to the NaF, KF, HF electrolyte. A new reaction mechanism of electrochemical fluorination of trichloroethylene is proposed. Finally, the solvency-to-fluorine content relationship of fluorinated N, N-dimethyltrifluoroacetamide is described.

  12. Displacement of soil pore water by trichloroethylene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wershaw, R. L.; Aiken, G.R.; Imbrigiotta, T.E.; Goldberg, M.C.

    1994-01-01

    Dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLS) are important pollutants because of their widespread use as chemical and industrial solvents. An example of the pollution caused by the discharge of DNAPLs is found at the Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey, where trichloroethylene (TCE) has been discharged directly into the unsaturated zone. This discharge has resulted in the formation of a plume of TCE-contaminated water in the aquifer downgradient of the discharge. A zone of dark-colored groundwater containing a high dissolved organic C content has been found near the point of discharge of the TCE. The colored-water plume extends from the point of discharge at least 30 m (100 feet) downgradient. Fulvic acids isolated from the colored-waters plume, from water from a background well that has not been affected by the discharge of chlorinated solvents, and from soil pore water collected in a lysimeter installed at an uncontaminated site upgradient of the study area have been compared. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the fulvic acids from the colored waters and from the lysimeter are very similar, but are markedly different from the nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of the fulvic acid from the background well. The three-dimensional fluorescence spectrum and the DOC fractionation profile of the colored groundwater and the soil pore water are very similar to each other, but quite different from those of the background water. It is proposed from these observations that this colored water is soil pore water that has been displaced by a separate DNAPL liquid phase downward to the saturated zone.

  13. Coexposure to Mercury Increases Immunotoxicity of Trichloroethylene

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Kathleen M.; Rowley, Benjamin; Gomez-Acevedo, Horacio; Blossom, Sarah J.

    2011-01-01

    We have shown previously that chronic (32 weeks) exposure to occupationally relevant concentrations of the environmental pollutant trichloroethylene (TCE) induced autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) in autoimmune-prone MRL+/+ mice. In real-life, individuals are never exposed to only one chemical such as TCE. However, very little is known about the effects of chemical mixtures on the immune system. The current study examined whether coexposure to another known immunotoxicant, mercuric chloride (HgCl2), altered TCE-induced AIH. Female MRL+/+ mice were treated for only 8 weeks with TCE (9.9 or 186.9 mg/kg/day in drinking water) and/or HgCl2 (260 μg/kg/day, sc). Unlike mice exposed to either TCE or HgCl2 alone, mice exposed to both toxicants for 8 weeks developed significant liver pathology commensurate with early stages of AIH. Disease development in the coexposed mice was accompanied by a unique pattern of anti-liver and anti-brain antibodies that recognized, among others, a protein of approximately 90 kDa. Subsequent immunoblotting showed that sera from the coexposed mice contained antibodies specific for heat shock proteins, a chaperone protein targeted by antibodies in patients with AIH. Thus, although TCE can promote autoimmune disease following chronic exposure, a shorter exposure to a binary mixture of TCE and HgCl2 accelerated disease development. Coexposure to TCE and HgCl2 also generated a unique liver-specific antibody response not found in mice exposed to a single toxicant. This finding stresses the importance of including mixtures in assessments of chemical immunotoxicity. PMID:21084432

  14. Impact of Iron Sulfide Transformation on Trichloroethylene Degradation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is one of the most common and persistent groundwater contaminants encountered at hazardous waste sites around the world. A growing body of evidence indicates that iron sulfides play an important role in degrading TCE in natural environments and in enginee...

  15. EFFECT OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE ON MALE SEXUAL BEHAVIOR: POSSIBLE OPIOID ROLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a chlorinated hydrocarbon solvent which is widely used as an industrial degreasing agent. Workers exposed to TCE often exhibit symptoms similar to those symptoms produced by narcotics. The present studies evaluated the effects of TCE exposure on measure...

  16. ADSORPTION AND CATALYTIC DESTRUCTION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE IN HYDROPHOBIC ZEOLITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several chromium exchanged ZSM-5 zeolites of varying SiO2/Al2O3 ratio were prepared and investigated for ambient (23 ?C) adsorption and subsequent oxidative destruction (250-400 ?C) of gaseous trichloroethylene (TCE, Cl2C=CHCl) in a humid air stream. With an increase in the SiO2...

  17. EFFECTS OF ORAL EXPOSURE TO TRICHLOROETHYLENE ON FEMALE REPRODUCTIVE FUNCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the present study, the distribution, metabolism and reproductive toxicity of trichloroethylene (TCE) administered by the oral route to female rats were examined. The distribution study with 14C-TCE indicated that relatively high levels of radioactivity accumulated in the ovary...

  18. EFFECTS OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE EXPOSURE ON MALE REPRODUCTIVE FUNCTION IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present study was designed to evaluate the influences of trichloroethylene (TCE) on the reproductive system of male rats. In addition, information was obtained on the distribution and metabolism of TCE. At 100 days of age, male rats were allowed to copulate with ovariectomize...

  19. Chronic dysphagia and trigeminal anesthesia after trichloroethylene exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, W.H.; Partyka, E.K.

    1981-12-01

    A patient is described who inhaled trichloroethylene fumes while working in a closed underground pit. At the time of exposure he developed dysphagia, dysarthria and dyspnea. Assessment of his condition 11 years after the incident indicated major damage of cranial nerves, particularly the trigeminal, chronic involvement of the bulbar cranial nerves, and resultant esophageal and pharnygeal motility impairment. (JMT)

  20. IRIS Toxicological Review of Trichloroethylene (Interagency Science Consultation Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    On November 3, 2009, the Toxicological Review of Trichloroethylene and the charge to external peer reviewers were released for external peer review and public comment. The Toxicological Review and charge were reviewed internally by EPA and by other federal agencies and White Hous...

  1. USE OF GRANULAR GRAPHITE FOR ELECTROLYTIC DECHLORINATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Granular graphite is a potential electrode material for the electrochemical remediation of refractory chlorinated organic compounds such as trichloroethylene (TCE). However, the use of granular graphite can complicate the experimental results. On one hand, up to 99% of TCE was re...

  2. THE EFFECT OF VOLTAGE ON ELECTROCHEMICAL DEGRADATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study investigates electrochemical degradation of Trichloroethylene (TCE) using granular graphite as electrodes in a flow-through reactor system. The experiments were conducted to obtain information on the effect of voltage and flow rates on the degradation rates of TCE. The...

  3. EFFECTS OF THERMAL TREATMENTS ON THE CHEMICAL REACTIVITY OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of experiments was completed to investigate abiotic degradation and reaction product formation of trichloroethylene (TCE) when heated. A quartz-tube apparatus was used to study short residence time and high temperature conditions that are thought to occur during thermal ...

  4. BIODEGRADATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE AND INVOLVEMENT OF AN AROMATIC BIODEGRADATIVE PATHWAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biodegradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) by the bacterial isolate strain G4 resulted in complete dechlorination of the compound as indicated by the production of inorganic chloride. A component of the water from which strain G4 was isolated that was required for TCE degradation ...

  5. Trichloroethylene toxicity in a human hepatoma cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Thevenin, E.; McMillian, J.

    1994-12-31

    The experiments conducted in this study were designed to determine the usefullness of hepatocyte cultures and a human hepatoma cell line as model systems for assessing human susceptibility to hepatocellular carcinoma due to exposure to trichloroethylene. The results from these studies will then be analyzed to determine if human cell lines can be used to conduct future experiments of this nature.

  6. FULL SCALE EVALUATION OF IN SITU COMETABOLIC DEGRADATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE IN GROUNDWATER THROUGH TOLUENE INJECTION. (R825689C067)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  7. Excited state of protonated benzene and toluene

    SciTech Connect

    Esteves-López, Natalia; Dedonder-Lardeux, Claude; Jouvet, Christophe

    2015-08-21

    We present photo-fragmentation electronic spectra of the simplest protonated aromatic molecules, protonated benzene and toluene, recorded under medium resolution conditions and compared with the photo-fragmentation spectrum of protonated pyridine. Despite the resolution and cold temperature achieved in the experiment, the electronic spectra of protonated benzene and toluene are structure-less, thus intrinsically broadened. This is in agreement with the large geometrical changes and the fast dynamic toward internal conversion predicted by ab initio calculations for protonated benzene [Rode et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 113, 5865–5873 (2009)].

  8. Interfacial Properties of a Hydrophobic Dye in the Tetrachloroethylene-Water-Glass Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tuck, D.M.

    1999-02-23

    Interfacial effects play an important role in governing multiphase fluid behavior in porous media. Strongly hydrophobic organic dyes, used in many experimental studies to facilitate visual observation of the phase distributions, have generally been implicitly assumed to have no influence on the interfacial properties of the various phases in porous media. Sudan IV is the most commonly used dye for non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in laboratory experiments. It has also been used in at least one field experiment. The effects of this dye on the tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-water-glass system were investigated to test the assumption that the dye does not effect the interfacial properties and therefore PCE mobility. The results indicate that the dye does indeed change the interfacial relationships.The effect of the dye on the interfacial relationships is a complex function of the dye concentration, the solid phase composition, and the dynamic rate of new interface formation. The dye caused a slight (<10 percent) increase in interfacial tension at low concentrations (<0.1 g/L) and high rates of new interface formation. The dye reduced interfacial tension between PCE and water at low rates of new interface formation for all dye concentrations tested (0.00508 to 5.08 g/L). At the highest dye concentration, the PCE-water interfacial tension was significantly reduced regardless of the rate of new interface formation. The apparent interfacial tension increase at low dye concentrations is suspected to be an artifact of a low measured IFT value for the undyed PCE caused by leaching of rubber o-rings by the PCE prior to testing in the final drop-volume configuration.In addition to reducing interfacial tension, the dye was found to significantly alter the wetting relationship between PCE and water on a glass surface at and above the range of reported dye concentrations cited in the literature (1.1 to 1.7 g/L). The wetting relationship was rendered neutral from a water-wet initial

  9. Apartment residents' and day care workers' exposures to tetrachloroethylene and deficits in visual contrast sensitivity.

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Judith S; Hudnell, H Kenneth; Geller, Andrew M; House, Dennis E; Aldous, Kenneth M; Force, Michael S; Langguth, Karyn; Prohonic, Elizabeth J; Parker, Jean C

    2002-01-01

    Tetrachloroethylene (also called perchloroethylene, or perc), a volatile organic compound, has been the predominant solvent used by the dry-cleaning industry for many years. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) classified perc as a hazardous air pollutant because of its potential adverse impact on human health. Several occupational studies have indicated that chronic, airborne perc exposure adversely affects neurobehavioral functions in workers, particularly visual color discrimination and tasks dependent on rapid visual-information processing. A 1995 study by Altmann and colleagues extended these findings, indicating that environmental perc exposure at a mean level of 4,980 microg/m(3) (median=1,360 microg/m(3)) alters neurobehavioral functions in residents living near dry-cleaning facilities. Although the U.S. EPA has not yet set a reference concentration guideline level for environmental exposure to airborne perc, the New York State Department of Health set an air quality guideline of 100 microg/m(3). In the current residential study, we investigated the potential for perc exposure and neurologic effects, using a battery of visual-system function tests, among healthy members of six families living in two apartment buildings in New York City that contained dry-cleaning facilities on the ground floors. In addition, a day care investigation assessed the potential for perc exposure and effects among workers at a day care center located in the same one-story building as a dry-cleaning facility. Results from the residential study showed a mean exposure level of 778 microg/m(3) perc in indoor air for a mean of 5.8 years, and that perc levels in breath, blood, and urine were 1-2 orders of magnitude in excess of background values. Group-mean visual contrast sensitivity (VCS), a measure of the ability to detect visual patterns, was significantly reduced in the 17 exposed study participants relative to unexposed matched-control participants. The groups did not

  10. Cometabolic biodegradation of trichloroethylene in microcosms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kane, Allen C.; Wilson, Timothy P.; Fischer, Jeffrey M.

    1997-01-01

    Laboratory microcosms were used to determine the concentrations of oxygen (O2) and methane (CH4) that optimize trichloroethylene (TCE) biodegradation in sediment and ground-water samples from a TCE-contaminated aquifer at Picatinny Arsenal, Morris County, New Jersey. The mechanism for degradation is the cometabolic activity of methanotrophic bacteria. The laboratory data will be used to support a field study designed to demonstrate the effectiveness of combining air sparging with cometabolic degradation of TCE for the purpose of aquifer remediation. Microcosms were constructed in autoclaved 250-mL (milliliter) amber glass bottles with valves for repeated headspace sampling. Equal volumes (25 mL) of sediment and ground water, collected from a depth of 40 feet, were added. TCE was added to attain initial aqueous concentrations equal to the field level of 1,400 mu g/L (micrograms per liter). Nine microcosms were constructed with initial headspace O2 concentrations of 5%, 10%, or 14% and CH4 concentrations of 0.5%, 3%, or 5%, with nitrogen making up the balance. Sterile controls, controls without CH4, and controls without sediment were also constructed. A 4-mL gas sample was removed periodically and TCE, O2 , CH4 , and carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations were measured by using gas chromatography. As biodegradation proceeded, the decrease in O2, CH4 , and TCE concentrations and the production of CO2 were monitored. An initial acclimation period of at least 100 days was observed in those microcosms in which significant microbial activity occurred, as determined from decreases in O2 and CH4 concentrations and an increase in CO2 content. Degradation of TCE occurred with O2 concentrations of 2.7 to 8.7% and CH4 concentrations of 0.5 to 3.5%. Microcosms that initially contained 10% O2 and 3% CH4 showed the greatest microbial activity and the greatest amount of TCE degradation. The greatest rates of TCE degradation occurred when O2 and CH4 headspace concentrations reached

  11. Toluene Monooxygenase-Catalyzed Epoxidation of Alkenes

    PubMed Central

    McClay, Kevin; Fox, Brian G.; Steffan, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    Several toluene monooxygenase-producing organisms were tested for their ability to oxidize linear alkenes and chloroalkenes three to eight carbons long. Each of the wild-type organisms degraded all of the alkenes that were tested. Epoxides were produced during the oxidation of butene, butadiene, and pentene but not hexene or octadiene. A strain of Escherichia coli expressing the cloned toluene-4-monooxygenase (T4MO) of Pseudomonas mendocina KR1 was able to oxidize butene, butadiene, pentene, and hexene but not octadiene, producing epoxides from all of the substrates that were oxidized. A T4MO-deficient variant of P. mendocina KR1 oxidized alkenes that were five to eight carbons long, but no epoxides were detected, suggesting the presence of multiple alkene-degrading enzymes in this organism. The alkene oxidation rates varied widely (ranging from 0.01 to 0.33 μmol of substrate/min/mg of cell protein) and were specific for each organism-substrate pair. The enantiomeric purity of the epoxide products also varied widely, ranging from 54 to >90% of a single epoxide enantiomer. In the absence of more preferred substrates, such as toluene or alkenes, the epoxides underwent further toluene monooxygenase-catalyzed transformations, forming products that were not identified. PMID:10788354

  12. Dynamics of toluene degradation in biofilters

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Hsiu-Mu; Hwang, Shyh-Jye; Hwang, Sz-Chwun

    1995-12-31

    Biodegradation processes have been validated as a promising alternative to other conventional air pollution control technologies. The objective of this research was to systematically investigate the transient behavior of shut down and restart-up operation and shock loading of the biofilter. Experiments were conducted in three laboratory-scale biofilters with mixtures of chaff/compost, D.E. (diatomaceous earth)/compost, and GAC (granular activated carbon)/compost, respectively as the filter materials. Toluene was used as the gas pollutant in this study. The response of each biofilter to shock loading was studied by abruptly changing the concentration or flow rate of the inlet gas. For each transient operation, toluene concentration was continuously measured until a new steady state was achieved. The results indicated that the biofilters responded effectively to the shut down and restart-up operation and shock loading of toluene concentration or gas flow rate. Moreover, the highly adsorptive GAC could improve the biofilter performance, especially for the treatment of less water soluble compounds such as toluene. Therefore, the GAC/compost biofilter had the highest maximum elimination capacity of 97 (g hr{sup {minus}1} m{sup {minus}3}). 17 refs., 8 figs.

  13. HEALTH ASSESSMENT DOCUMENT FOR TOLUENE. FINAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The health effect of primary concern with regard to exposures of humans to toluene is dysfunction of the central nervous system (CNS). Occupational exposures in the range of 200 to 1,500 ppm have elicited dose-related CNS alterations. Although myelotoxicity was previously attribu...

  14. Gas chromatographic determination of residual methylene chloride and trichloroethylene in decaffeinated instant and ground coffee with electrolytic conductivity and electron capture detection.

    PubMed

    Page, B D; Charbonneau, C F

    1977-05-01

    A method is described for the quantitative determination of residual methylene chloride (MC) and trichloroethylene (TCE) in decaffeinated instant and ground roasted coffees. The residual solvents were isolated by a closed system vacuum distillation technique with toluene as a carrier solvent, chromatographed on Chromosorb 102, detected by both electron capture and electrolytic conductivity detectors, and quantitated by comparison with an internal standard. Average recoveries of MC from instant and ground coffees spiked at 1, 10, and 25 ppm were 100.0 (88-113), 93.2 (92-95), and 97.7% (94-102%); and for TCE, 97.2 (92-101), 96.2 (95-99), and 96.5% (92-100%), respectively. The results from both detectors are compared. At lower attenuations, levels less than 1 ppm can be readily measured. The procedure developed was applied to domestic and imported coffee samples. PMID:858707

  15. Project Overview: IRIS TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW AND SUMMARY DOCUMENTS FOR TOLUENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toluene is used as an additive to gasoline mixtures (BTEX) to increase octane ratings, in benzene production, and as a solvent in paints, coatings, inks, adhesives, and cleaners. Additionally, toluene is used in the production of nylon, plastics, and polyurethanes. Toluene was o...

  16. CONCENTRATION OF TETRACHLOROETHYLENE IN INDOOR AIR AT A FORMER DRY CLEANER FACILITY AS A FUNCTION OF SUBSURFACE CONTAMINATION: A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field study was performed to evaluate indoor air concentrations and vapor intrusion (VI) of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and other chlorinated solvents at a commercial retail site in Dallas, TX. The building is approximately 40 years old and once housed a dry cleaning operation. R...

  17. Metabolism and Excretion of Trichloroethylene after Inhalation by Human Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Bartoníček, V.

    1962-01-01

    Eight volunteers were exposed to trichloroethylene vapour (1,042 μg./l.) for five hours; 51 to 64% of the inhaled trichloroethylene was retained. The concentration of trichloroethanol and trichloroacetic acid in the urine was studied daily for a three-week period; on the third day both metabolites were determined in faeces, sweat, and saliva. The concentration of trichloroacetic acid in plasma and red blood cells was studied on alternate days. Of the trichloroethylene retained, 38·0 to 49·7% was excreted in the urine as trichloroethanol and 27·4 to 35·7% as trichloroacetic acid. Of both metabolites 8·4% was excreted in the faeces. Sweat collected on the third day of the experiment contained 0·10 to 1·92 mg./100 ml. trichloroethanol and 0·15 to 0·35 mg./100 ml. trichloroacetic acid. In saliva the concentrations were 0·09 to 0·32 mg./100 ml. trichloroethanol and 0·10 to 0·15 mg./100 ml. trichloroacetic acid. The value of the expression trichloroethanol/trichloroacetic acid calculated in the urine within 22 days was within the range 1·15 to 1·81. PMID:13865497

  18. Decomposition characteristics of toluene by a corona radical shower system.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zu-liang; Gao, Xiang; Luo, Zhong-yang; Ni, Ming-jiang; Cen, Ke-fa

    2004-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma technologies offer an innovative approach to decomposing various volatile organic compounds(VOCs). The decomposition of toluene from simulated flue gas was investigated using a pipe electrode with nozzles for the generation of free radicals. Corona characteristics and decomposition of toluene were investigated experimentally. In addition, the decomposition mechanism of toluene was explored in view of reaction rate. The experimental results showed that the humidity of additional gas has an important effect on corona characteristics and modes and stable streamer corona can be generated through optimizing flow rate and humidity of additional gas. Applied voltage, concentration of toluene, humidity of toluene and resident time are some important factors affecting decomposition efficiency. Under optimizing conditions, the decomposition efficiency of toluene can reach 80%. These results can give a conclusion that the corona radical shower technology is feasible and effective on the removal of toluene in the flue gas. PMID:15495952

  19. Health assessment for Nutmeg Valley, Wolcott, Connecticut, Region 1. CERCLIS No. CTSI88045. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-02

    The Nutmeg Valley Industrial Park is listed on the National Priorities List. The site is an industrial park containing 40 companies (light industry metal working and finishing) and 20 private residences. The contaminants present in groundwater at the site are trichloroethylene, benzene, ethyl benzene, toluene, xylene, methylene chloride, trans 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, tetrachloroethylene, pentane, carbon tetrachloride, and chloroform. Investigation into the extent of contamination in other pathways is ongoing.

  20. Health effects of the alkylbenzenes. I. Toluene.

    PubMed

    Low, L K; Meeks, J R; Mackerer, C R

    1988-03-01

    The alkylbenzenes, toluene being the most common example, represent a class of six-membered ring aromatic compounds that have a variety of alkyl groups attached. These chemicals are liquids with relatively low boiling points and are used primarily as solvents or as starting materials in the synthesis of other chemicals and drugs. They are also integral components of gasoline, distillate fuels and other petroleum products. These substituted aromatics are economically important in the chemical, petroleum, pharmaceutical, polymer, paint and dye industries. Alkylbenzenes such as toluene, xylene, ethylbenzene, styrene and cumene are toxicologically important since they are produced, used or disposed of in the largest quantities and therefore might pose significant and potential health risks to man and the environment. In general, the toxicity of alkylbenzenes has been found to be relatively low. Also, for the most part, human and environmental risks are low; however, there may be a few operations where the potential for high exposure could exist. These exposures are minimized by workplace controls or personal protective equipment. Furthermore, health risks for humans are minimized by guidelines for maximum allowable exposure concentrations which have been established for the workplace. This present paper reviews the toxicology and disposition of toluene in animals and humans. PMID:3291202

  1. Catalytic conversion of pyrolysis gasoline and toluene

    SciTech Connect

    Syunyakova, Z.F.; Valitov, R.B.; Shmelev, A.S.; Mazitov, M.F.; Faskhutdinova, R.A.; Sokolova, G.P.

    1984-11-01

    A basic process for production of benzene from petroleum, along with catalytic reforming, is processing of liquid pyrolysis products and toluene. The conversion of pyrolysis gasoline and toluene on an iron-chromium oxide catalyst in a medium of steam and hydrogen at atmospheric pressure was investigated. Catalytic conversion of the pyrolysis gasoline was carried out in a medium of steam in a gradientless spherical reactor made of Kh23N18T steel under the following conditions: temperature 750 to 840/sup 0/C; steam pyrolysis gasoline weight ratio 1:1; pyrolysis gasoline feed rate 1 g per g catalyst per hour; experiment time 1 hour; catalyst volume 8 cm/sup 3/. Hydrodealkylation of toluene was also studied with the goal of producing benzene. In contrast to the conversion of pyrolysis gasoline in a medium of steam, hydrodealkylation was accomplished in a medium of steam and hydrogen. The preliminary tests showed that higher selectivity for formation of benzene is achieved in the presence of hydrogen. 11 references, 4 tables.

  2. USE OF CARBON STABLE ISOTOPE TO INVESTIGATE CHLOROMETHANE FORMATION IN THE ELECTROLYTIC DECHLORINATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbon stable isotope trichloroethylene (13C TCE) was used to investigate the formation of chloromethane (CM) during the electrolytic dechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) at a granular-graphite packed cathode. A method was developed to use a conventional GC/MS to ...

  3. Benzodiazepine-like discriminative stimulus effects of toluene vapor

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Keith L.; Nicholson, Katherine L.

    2013-01-01

    In vitro studies show that the abused inhalant toluene affects a number of ligand-gated ion channels. The two most consistently implicated of these are γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors which are positively modulated by toluene and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors which are negatively modulated by toluene. Behavioral studies also suggest an interaction of toluene with GABAA and/or NMDA receptors but it is unclear if these receptors underlie the abuse-related intoxicating effects of toluene. Seventeen B6SJLF1/J mice were trained using a two-choice operant drug discrimination procedure to discriminate 10 min of exposure to 2000 ppm toluene vapor from 10 min of exposure to air. The discrimination was acquired in a mean of 65 training sessions. The stimulus effects of 2000 ppm toluene vapor were exposure concentration-dependent but rapidly diminished following the cessation of vapor exposure. The stimulus effects of toluene generalized to the chlorinated hydrocarbon vapor perchloroethylene but not 1,1,2-trichloroethane nor the volatile anesthetic isoflurane. The competitive NMDA antagonist CGS-17955, the uncompetitive antagonist dizocilpine and the glycine-site antagonist L701,324 all failed to substitute for toluene. The classical nonselective benzodiazepines midazolam and chlordiazepoxide produced toluene-like stimulus effects but the alpha 1 subunit preferring positive GABAA modulator zaleplon failed to substitute for toluene. The barbiturates pentobarbital and methohexital and the GABAA-positive modulator neurosteroid allopregnanolone did not substitute for toluene. These data suggest that the stimulus effects of toluene may be at least partially mediated by benzodiazepine-like positive allosteric modulation of GABAA receptors containing alpha 2, 3 or 5 subunits. PMID:24436974

  4. [Advances in non-carcinogenic toxicity of trichloroethylene].

    PubMed

    Huang, Peiwu; Li, Xuan; Liu, Wei; Liu, Jianjun

    2015-09-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a widely used organic solvent and an important industrial material. Due to mass production and use, and improper waste disposal, TCE has become a common environmental contaminant, so there is a wide range of occupationally and environmentally exposed population. Occupational and environmental exposure to TCE can produce toxic effects on multiple organs and systems. This paper is a review of the immunotoxicity, reproductive toxicity, neurotoxicity, teratogenic effect and other non-carcinogenic toxic effects of TCE from the aspects of epidemiological study, experimental evidence on animals and toxic mechanisms. PMID:26733146

  5. Electronic and Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Toluene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Adrian M.; Green, Alistair M.; Tame-Reyes, Victor; Wright, Timothy G.

    2012-06-01

    Electronic and photoelectron spectra of toluene are presented and discussed. The utilization of a recently reported scheme for assigning the normal vibrations of substituted benzenes allows these spectra to be compared to those of other molecules with unprecedented clarity. Changes in vibrational activity within a series of substituted benzene molecules will be discussed, specifically the increased rate of intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution observed in molecules where the substituent is a methyl group. A. M. Gardner and T. G. Wright, J. Chem. Phys., 135, 114305 (2011)

  6. Permeation of polymeric materials by toluene

    SciTech Connect

    Vahdat, N.

    1987-02-01

    The permeation of toluene through protective clothing materials composed of butyl, butyl-coated nomex, neoprene, and polyvinyl alcohol was tested at 25/sup 0/C and 45/sup 0/C with the use of ASTM method F-739. Butyl exhibited breakthrough of 18 min at 25/sup 0/C and 11 min at 45/sup 0/ C. Butyl nomex exhibited breakthrough times of 11 min and 25/sup 0/C and 6 min at 45/sup 0/C. PVA showed no breakthrough in 20 hr. The steady-state permeation rates and the diffusion coefficients were determined.

  7. Anaerobic degradation of toluene by a denitrifying bacterium.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, P J; Mang, D T; Kim, K S; Young, L Y

    1991-01-01

    A denitrifying bacterium, designated strain T1, that grew with toluene as the sole source of carbon under anaerobic conditions was isolated. The type of agar used in solid media and the toxicity of toluene were determinative factors in the successful isolation of strain T1. Greater than 50% of the toluene carbon was oxidized to CO2, and 29% was assimilated into biomass. The oxidation of toluene to CO2 was stoichiometrically coupled to nitrate reduction and denitrification. Strain T1 was tolerant of and grew on 3 mM toluene after a lag phase. The rate of toluene degradation was 1.8 mumol min-1 liter-1 (56 nmol min-1 mg of protein-1) in a cell suspension. Strain T1 was distinct from other bacteria that oxidize toluene anaerobically, but it may utilize a similar biochemical pathway of oxidation. In addition, o-xylene was transformed to a metabolite in the presence of toluene but did not serve as the sole source of carbon for growth of strain T1. This transformation was dependent on the degradation of toluene. Images PMID:2059037

  8. Remediation of an aquifer polluted with dissolved tetrachloroethylene by an array of wells filled with activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Bortone, I; Di Nardo, A; Di Natale, M; Erto, A; Musmarra, D; Santonastaso, G F

    2013-09-15

    In this work, an array of deep passive wells filled with activated carbon, namely a Discontinuous Permeable Adsorptive Barrier (PAB-D), has been proposed for the remediation of an aquifer contaminated by tetrachloroethylene (PCE). The dynamics of the aquifer in the particular PAB-D configuration chosen, including the contaminant transport in the aquifer and the adsorption onto the barrier material, has been accurately performed by means of a computer code which allows describing all the phenomena occurring in the aquifer, simultaneously. A PAB-D design procedure is presented and the main dimensions of the barrier (number and position of passive wells) have been evaluated. Numerical simulations have been carried out over a long time span to follow the contaminant plume and to assess the effectiveness of the remediation method proposed. The model results show that this PAB-D design allows for a complete remediation of the aquifer under a natural hydraulic gradient, the PCE concentrations flowing out of the barrier being always lower than the corresponding Italian regulation limit. Finally, the results have been compared with those obtained for the design of a more traditional continuous barrier (PAB-C) for the same remediation process. PMID:23876256

  9. Tetrachloroethylene in drinking water and birth outcomes at the US Marine Corps Base at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Sonnenfeld, N; Hertz-Picciotto, I; Kaye, W E

    2001-11-15

    A study of mean birth weight, small-for-gestational-age infants, and preterm birth was conducted at the US Marine Corps Base at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, where drinking water was contaminated with volatile organic compounds. Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) was the predominant contaminant. The authors used multiple linear and logistic regression to analyze 1968-1985 data from 11,798 birth certificates. Overall, at most weak associations were observed between PCE exposure and study outcomes. However, associations were found between PCE exposure and birth-weight outcomes for infants of older mothers and mothers with histories of fetal loss. Adjusted mean birth-weight differences between PCE-exposed and unexposed infants were -130 g (90% confidence interval (CI): -236, -23) for mothers aged 35 years or older and -104 g (90% CI: -174, -34) for mothers with two or more previous fetal losses. Adjusted odds ratios for PCE exposure and small-for-gestational-age infants were 2.1 (90% CI: 0.9, 4.9) for older mothers and 2.5 (90% CI: 1.5, 4.3) for mothers with two or more prior fetal losses. These results suggest that some fetuses may be more vulnerable than others to chemical insult. PMID:11700244

  10. CARDIOVASCULAR AND THERMOREGULATORY RESPONSE TO ORAL TOLUENE IN THE RAT.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toluene and other volatile organic compounds have often been shown to affect behavior in animals when given by inhalation, and less effective when given orally. Previous work showed that toluene increased heart rate (HR) and motor activity (MA), and reduced core temperature (Tc) ...

  11. BEHAVIOR OF TOLUENE ADDED TO SLUDGE-AMENDED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toluene is a priority pollutant that can be introduced to soils in a variety of wastes, including some municipal sludges. aboratory experiments were conducted to study the behavior of toluene in two soils in the presence and absence of municipal sludge. ludge additions increased ...

  12. BEHAVIOR OF TOLUENE ADDED TO SLUDGE-AMENDED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toluene is a priority pollutant that can be introduced to soils in a variety of wastes, including some municipal sludges. Laboratory experiments were conducted to study the behavior of toluene in two soils in the presence and absence of municipal sludge. Sludge additions increa...

  13. PERFORMANCE OF TRICKLE BED BIOFILTERS UNDER HIGH TOLUENE LOADING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The performance of two pelletized media biofilters, highly loaded with toluene, was evaluated in this study. oth biofilters were operated as the same influent concentration of 250 ppmv toluene. iofilter "A" was operated at 1 minute EBRT and biofilter "B" at 0.67 minute EBRT. he i...

  14. TOLUENE EXPERIMENTAL EXPOSURES IN HUMANS: PHARMACOKINETICS AND BEHAVIOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toluene Experimental Exposures in Humans:
    Pharmacokinetics and Behavioral Effects
    (Ongoing Research)

    Vernon A. Benignus1, Philip J. Bushnell2 and William K. Boyes2

    Human subjects will be exposed to 250 and 500 ppm toluene for one hour in the Human St...

  15. Optical emission study of radio-frequency excited toluene plasma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Szetsen; Liu, Shiao-Jun; Liang, Rui-Ji

    2008-12-25

    UV-visible emission spectra of radio-frequency (rf) excited toluene plasma were studied. Benzyl radicals as well as toluene monomer and excimer were observed in toluene plasma. It was found that the intensities, peak positions, and linewidths of monomer and excimer emission bands exhibit strong dependence on rf power and plasma processing time. This can be ascribed to photochemical reactions in plasma. Gas-chromatographic analysis of the deposition products from toluene plasma indicated that the main component was bibenzyl. Spectroscopic evidence has shown that the bibenzyl molecule was formed by the coupling reaction between two benzyl radicals in plasma. The spectroscopic characteristics of toluene monomer and excimer are correlated with a kinetic model in plasma. PMID:19049320

  16. Toluene inducing acute respiratory failure in a spray paint sniffer

    PubMed Central

    Peralta, Diego P.; Chang, Aymara Y.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Toluene, formerly known as toluol, is an aromatic hydrocarbon that is widely used as an industrial feedstock and as a solvent. Like other solvents, toluene is sometimes also used as an inhalant drug for its intoxicating properties. It has potential to cause multiple effects in the body including death. Case Report: I report a case of a 27-year-old male, chronic spray paint sniffer, who presented with severe generalized muscle weakness and developed acute respiratory failure requiring ventilatory support. Toluene toxicity was confirmed with measurement of hippuric acid of 8.0 g/L (normal <5.0 g/L). Conclusions: Acute respiratory failure is a rare complication of chronic toluene exposure that may be lethal if it is not recognized immediately. To our knowledge, this is the second case of acute respiratory failure due to toluene exposure. PMID:23569498

  17. Synergistic effect of nano-sized mackinawite with cyano-cobalamin in cement slurries for reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethylene.

    PubMed

    Kyung, Daeseung; Sihn, Youngho; Kim, Sangwoo; Bae, Sungjun; Amin, Muhammad Tahir; Alazba, Abdulrahman Ali; Lee, Woojin

    2016-07-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) by nano-Mackinawite (nFeS) with cyano-cobalamin (Cbl(III)) in cement slurries. Almost complete degradation of PCE by nFeS-Cbl(III) was observed in cement slurries in 5h and its degradation kinetics (kobs-PCE=0.57h(-1)) was 6-times faster than that of nFeS-Cbl(III) without the cement slurries. PCE was finally transformed to non-chlorinated organic compounds such as ethylene, acetylene, and C3-C4 hydrocarbons by nFeS-Cbl(III) in cement slurries. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and PCE degradation by cement components (SiO2, Al2O3, and CaO) revealed that both the reduced Co species in Cbl(III) and the presence of Ca in cement played an important role for the enhanced reductive dechlorination of PCE. The increase in the concentration of Cbl(III) (0.005-0.1mM), cement ratio (0.05-0.2), and suspension pH (11.5-13.5) accelerated the PCE degradation kinetics by providing more favorable environments for the production of reactive Ca species and reduction of Co species. We also observed that the degradation efficiency of PCE by nFeS-Cbl(III)-cement lasted even at high concentration of PCE. The experimental results obtained from this study could provide fundamental knowledge of redox interactions among nFeS, Cbl(III), and cement, which could significantly enhance reductive dechlorination of chlorinated organics in contaminated natural and engineered environments. PMID:26950611

  18. Prenatal exposure to tetrachloroethylene-contaminated drinking water and the risk of congenital anomalies: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Prior animal and human studies of prenatal exposure to solvents including tetrachloroethylene (PCE) have shown increases in the risk of certain congenital anomalies among exposed offspring. Objectives This retrospective cohort study examined whether PCE contamination of public drinking water supplies in Massachusetts influenced the occurrence of congenital anomalies among children whose mothers were exposed around the time of conception. Methods The study included 1,658 children whose mothers were exposed to PCE-contaminated drinking water and a comparable group of 2,999 children of unexposed mothers. Mothers completed a self-administered questionnaire to gather information on all of their prior births, including the presence of anomalies, residential histories and confounding variables. PCE exposure was estimated using EPANET water distribution system modeling software that incorporated a fate and transport model. Results Children whose mothers had high exposure levels around the time of conception had an increased risk of congenital anomalies. The adjusted odds ratio of all anomalies combined among children with prenatal exposure in the uppermost quartile was 1.5 (95% CI: 0.9, 2.5). No meaningful increases in the risk were seen for lower exposure levels. Increases were also observed in the risk of neural tube defects (OR: 3.5, 95% CI: 0.8, 14.0) and oral clefts (OR 3.2, 95% CI: 0.7, 15.0) among offspring with any prenatal exposure. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that the risk of certain congenital anomalies is increased among the offspring of women who were exposed to PCE-contaminated drinking water around the time of conception. Because these results are limited by the small number of children with congenital anomalies that were based on maternal reports, a follow-up investigation should be conducted with a larger number of affected children who are identified by independent records. PMID:19778411

  19. Tetrachloroethylene-contaminated drinking water in Massachusetts and the risk of colon-rectum, lung, and other cancers.

    PubMed Central

    Paulu, C; Aschengrau, A; Ozonoff, D

    1999-01-01

    We conducted a population-based case-control study to evaluate the relationship between cancer of the colon-rectum (n = 326), lung (n = 252), brain (n = 37), and pancreas (n = 37), and exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE) from public drinking water. Subjects were exposed to PCE when it leached from the vinyl lining of drinking-water distribution pipes. Relative delivered dose of PCE was estimated using a model that took into account residential location, years of residence, water flow, and pipe characteristics. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for lung cancer were moderately elevated among subjects whose exposure level was above the 90th percentile whether or not a latent period was assumed [ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), 3.7 (1.0-11.7), 3.3 (0.6-13.4), 6.2 (1.1-31.6), and 19.3 (2.5-141.7) for 0, 5, 7, and 9 years of latency, respectively]. The adjusted ORs for colon-rectum cancer were modestly elevated among ever-exposed subjects as more years of latency were assumed [OR and CI, 1.7 (0.8-3.8) and 2.0 (0.6-5.8) for 11 and 13 years of latency, respectively]. These elevated ORs stemmed mainly from associations with rectal cancer. Adjusted ORs for rectal cancer among ever-exposed subjects were more elevated [OR and CI, 2.6 (0. 8-6.7) and 3.1 (0.7-10.9) for 11 and 13 years of latency, respectively] than were corresponding estimates for colon cancer [OR and CI, 1.3 (0.5-3.5) and 1.5 (0.3-5.8) for 11 and 13 years of latency, respectively]. These results provide evidence for an association between PCE-contaminated public drinking water and cancer of the lung and, possibly, cancer of the colon-rectum. PMID:10090704

  20. Saturation mutagenesis of Bradyrhizobium sp. BTAi1 toluene 4-monooxygenase at alpha-subunit residues proline 101, proline 103, and histidine 214 for regiospecific oxidation of aromatics.

    PubMed

    Yanık-Yıldırım, K Cansu; Vardar-Schara, Gönül

    2014-11-01

    A novel toluene monooxygenase (TMO) six-gene cluster from Bradyrhizobium sp. BTAi1 having an overall 35, 36, and 38 % protein similarity with toluene o-xylene monooxygenase (ToMO) of Pseudomonas sp. OX1, toluene 4-monooxygenase (T4MO) of Pseudomonas mendocina KR1, and toluene-para-monooxygenase (TpMO) of Ralstonia pickettii PKO1, respectively, was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli TG1, and its potential activity was investigated for aromatic hydroxylation and trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation. The natural substrate toluene was hydroxylated to p-cresol, indicating that the new toluene monooxygenase (T4MO·BTAi1) acts as a para hydroxylating enzyme, similar to T4MO and TpMO. Some shifts in regiospecific hydroxylations were observed compared to the other wild-type TMOs. For example, wild-type T4MO·BTAi1 formed catechol (88 %) and hydroquinone (12 %) from phenol, whereas all the other wild-type TMOs were reported to form only catechol. Furthermore, it was discovered that TG1 cells expressing wild-type T4MO·BTAi1 mineralized TCE at a rate of 0.67 ± 0.10 nmol Cl(-)/h/mg protein. Saturation and site directed mutagenesis were used to generate eight variants of T4MO·BTAi1 at alpha-subunit positions P101, P103, and H214: P101T/P103A, P101S, P101N/P103T, P101V, P103T, P101V/P103T, H214G, and H214G/D278N; by testing the substrates phenol, nitrobenzene, and naphthalene, positions P101 and P103 were found to influence the regiospecific oxidation of aromatics. For example, compared to wild type, variant P103T produced four fold more m-nitrophenol from nitrobenzene as well as produced mainly resorcinol (60 %) from phenol whereas wild-type T4MO·BTAi1 did not. Similarly, variants P101T/P103A and P101S synthesized more 2-naphthol and 2.3-fold and 1.6-fold less 1-naphthol from naphthalene, respectively. PMID:25016343

  1. PHASE-TRANSFER-CATALYST APPLIED TO THE OXIDATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE BY POTASSIUM PERMANGANATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorinated ethylenes such as trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE) are common contaminants (Plumb 1991; Westrick et al., 1984). They opccur in the subsurface as zones of residual saturation or occasionally as free products. Because of their inherently low solubil...

  2. Development of a replacement for trichloroethylene in the two-stage cleaning process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, W. B.

    1992-12-01

    Isopropyl alcohol, d-limonene, and a synthetic mineral spirits were compared for effectiveness as replacements for trichloroethylene in an ultrasonic cleaning process. All were found to be suitable. Isopropyl alcohol is recommended as the replacement.

  3. Fate and transport of trichloroethane and trichloroethylene contaminated groundwater, building 719, Dover Air Force Base, Delaware

    SciTech Connect

    Melchiorre, K.J.

    1996-08-01

    Trichloroethane and trichloroethylene are common chlorinated aliphatic industrial organic solvents used in degreasing operations. Both are typically found in groundwater environments as a result of leaking underground storage tanks, leachate from landfills, and contaminant migration from hazardous waste dump sites. Transformation by-products are also found in association with trichloroethane and trichloroethylene without any known source other than from reductive dechlorination. Dechlorinated by-products include 1,1-dichloroethane; cis and trans 1,2-dichloroethylene, 1,1-dichloroethylene, chloroethane, and vinyl chloride. Trichloroethane and trichloroethylene and their transformation by-products are suspected human health hazards. Vinyl chloride is a known human carcinogen, while trichloroethylene is considered a probable human carcinogen, and 1,1-dichloroethylene and 1,1-dichloroethane possible human carcinogens.

  4. PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINEITC (PBPK) MODELING OF METABOLIC INHIBITION FOR INTERACTION BETWEEN TRICHLOROETHYLENE AND CHLOROFORM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) and chloroform (CHCl3) are two of the most common environmental contaminants found in water. PBPK models have been increasingly used to predict target dose in internal tissues from available environmental exposure concentrations. A closed inhalation (or g...

  5. EFFECTS OF REACTION PARAMETERS ON ELECTROCHEMICAL DECHLORINATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE RATE AND BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) was electrochemically dechlorinated in aqueous environments using granular graphite cathode in a mixed reactor. Effects of pH, current, electrolyte type, and flow rate on TCE dechlorination rate were evaluated. TCE dechlorination rate constant and gas prod...

  6. EFFECTS OF REACTOR CONDITIONS ON ELECTROCHEMICAL DECHLORINATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE USING GRANULAR-GRAPHITE ELECTRODE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) was electrochemically dechlorinated in aqueous environments using granular graphite cathode in a mixed reactor. Effects of pH, current, electrolyte type, and flow rate on TCE dechlorination rate were evaluated. TCE dechlorination rate constant and gas pr...

  7. ELECTROCHEMICAL DECHLORINATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE USING GRANULAR-GRAPHITE ELECTRODES: IDENTIFICATION AND QUANTIFICATION OF DECHLORINATION PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electrochemical degradation (ECD) utilizes high redox potential at the anode and low redox potential at the cathode to oxidize and/or reduce organic and inorganic contaminants. ECD of Trichloroethylene (TCE), although theoretically possible, has not been experimentally proven. Th...

  8. EFFECTS OF REACTOR CONDITIONS ON ELECTROCHEMICAL DECHLORINATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE USING GRANULAR-GRAPHITE ELECTRODE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) was electrochemically dechlorinated in aqueous environments using granular graphite cathode in a mixed reactor. Effects of pH, current, electrolyte type, and flow rate on TCE dechlorination rate were evaluated. TCE dechlorination rate constant and gas pr...

  9. COVALENT BINDING OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE TO PROTEINS IN HUMAN AND RAT HEPATOCYTES. (R826409)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The environmental contaminant and occupational solvent trichloroethylene is metabolized to a reactive intermediate that covalently binds to specific hepatic proteins in exposed mice and rats. In order to compare covalent binding between humans and rodents, primary hepatocyte c...

  10. MODELING THE ELECTROLYTIC DECHLORINATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE IN A GRANULAR GRAPHITE-PACKED REACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A comprehensive reactor model was developed for the electrolytic dechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) at a granular-graphite cathode. The reactor model describes the dynamic processes of TCE dechlorination and adsorption, and the formation and dechlorination of all the major...

  11. Renal toxicity after chronic inhalation exposure of rats to trichloroethylene.

    PubMed

    Mensing, Thomas; Welge, Peter; Voss, Bruno; Fels, Lüder M; Fricke, Hajo Hennig; Brüning, Thomas; Wilhelm, Michael

    2002-03-10

    Male Long-Evans rats were exposed to 0 (controls) or 500 ppm trichloroethylene (TRI) for 6 months, 6 h daily, and 5 days a week. The TRI metabolites trichloroethanol (TCE) in blood and trichloroacetic acid (TCA) in urine were measured. Specific parameters related to the renal damage were determined in urine [biomarker for glomerular damage: high molecular weight proteins (HMW), albumin (ALB); for proximal tubular damage: N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), low-molecular-weight-proteins (LMW)]. Significantly increased concentrations of NAG and LMW in urine of exposed rats were detected. No DNA-strand breaks in kidney cells could be detected using the comet assay, and histological examinations were performed. Histological alterations were observed in glomeruli and tubuli of exposed rats. The release of biomarkers for nephrotoxicity suggested alterations preferably in the proximal tubules of the exposed rats. PMID:11869834

  12. Biodegradation of vapor phase trichloroethylene (TCE) in compost packed biofilters

    SciTech Connect

    Sukesan, S.; Watwood, M.E.

    1996-10-01

    Batch and column scale biofiltration experiments were performed to measure biodegradation of gaseous trichloroethylene (TCE) in finished compost. Compost was amended with hydrocarbon gas (methane or propane) as primary substrate to support microorganisms capable of cometabolic TCE degradation. In column biofilter experiments hydrocarbon utilization was observed within 10-15 days; gaseous TCE (50 ppmv) was then introduced continuously into the biofilter at approximately 1 L min{sup -1}. Columns supplied with 0.5% v/v methane removed 73% TCE after 8 days of continuous column operation, whereas amendment with 0.25% v/v methane corresponded with TCE removal of 93%, which was observed after 1.5 h of column operation. Similar results were obtained for propane amendment. Biofilters without hydrocarbon amendment exhibited no TCE biodegradation over 35 days. These results, analyzed together with those obtained in batch experiments, indicate that hydrocarbon identity and concentration and other related parameters influence the extent of ICE breakdown.

  13. Air trichloroethylene oxidation in a corona plasma-catalytic reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoomi-Godarzi, S.; Ranji-Burachaloo, H.; Khodadadi, A. A.; Vesali-Naseh, M.; Mortazavi, Y.

    2014-08-01

    The oxidative decomposition of trichloroethylene (TCE; 300 ppm) by non-thermal corona plasma was investigated in dry air at atmospheric pressure and room temperature, both in the absence and presence of catalysts including MnOx, CoOx. The catalysts were synthesized by a co-precipitation method. The morphology and structure of the catalysts were characterized by BET surface area measurement and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) methods. Decomposition of TCE and distribution of products were evaluated by a gas chromatograph (GC) and an FTIR. In the absence of the catalyst, TCE removal is increased with increases in the applied voltage and current intensity. Higher TCE removal and CO2 selectivity is observed in presence of the corona and catalysts, as compared to those with the plasma alone. The results show that MnOx and CoOx catalysts can dissociate the in-plasma produced ozone to oxygen radicals, which enhances the TCE decomposition.

  14. Blink reflex latency after exposure to trichloroethylene in well water

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, R.G.; Chirico-Post, J.; Proctor, S.P.

    1988-03-01

    The electrophysiological measurement of the blink reflex (BR) can quantify the conduction latency in the reflex arc involving the Vth (trigeminal) and VIIth (facial) cranial nerves. We measured the electrophysiological BR in a population (N = 21), which had alleged chronic exposure to trichloroethylene (TCE) through the public drinking water at levels 30-80 times higher than the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Maximum Contamination Level (MCL). A highly significant difference was observed in the conduction latency means of the BR components (p less than .0001), when the study population was compared with laboratory controls (N = 27). This difference suggests a subclinical alteration of the Vth cranial nerve function due to chronic, environmental exposure to TCE.

  15. The role of testosterone in trichloroethylene penetration in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, K.; Abdel-Rahman, M.S. )

    1991-02-01

    Sex differences are known to exist in the metabolism and bioavailability of trichloroethylene (TCE). This study revealed that dermal penetration of ({sup 14}C)TCE in vitro was twofold greater in untreated female than in untreated male Sprague-Dawley rats. Since testosterone has been shown to mediate a wide variety of sex differences, its role in dermal penetration of ({sup 14}C)TCE was investigated. Penetration was measured by using an in vitro evaporation-penetration cell with a 10-hour collection period. Depriving male rats of testosterone (by castration) resulted in increased values for total penetration, area under the curve (AUC), and penetration slopes compared to those found in the female control group. Administration of testosterone to female animals produced values for total penetration, AUC, and penetration slopes significantly lower than those of the female control group.

  16. [Reductive Dechlorination of Trichloroethylene by Benzoate-Enriched Anaerobic Cultures].

    PubMed

    Li, Jiang-wei; Yang, Xiao-yong; Hu, An-yi; Yu, Chang-ping

    2015-10-01

    Gas chromatography was used to monitor the reductive dechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) by anaerobic enrichment cultures with benzoate as the sole carbon source. The 454 pyrosequencing technique was used to investigate the microbial community and the real-time quantitative PCR was used to quantify the gene copies of Dehalococcoides spp. (DHC). The results showed that TCE was dechlorinated to vinyl chloride along with the formation of methane in 94 days. The anaerobic enrichment cultures exhibited a high diversity, which were classified into 16 phyla, 33 classes, 52 orders, 88 families and 129 genera, while 51.2% of them belonged to unclassified group, which inferred that there were a large portion of bacteria with unknown functional in this system. Degradation of TCE was accomplished by reductive dechlorinating and other functional populations, and the DHC which carried tceA gene could be the dominant reductive dechlorinating populations in the system. PMID:26841609

  17. Carbon Nanotube Based Groundwater Remediation: The Case of Trichloroethylene.

    PubMed

    Jha, Kshitij C; Liu, Zhuonan; Vijwani, Hema; Nadagouda, Mallikarjuna; Mukhopadhyay, Sharmila M; Tsige, Mesfin

    2016-01-01

    Adsorption of chlorinated organic contaminants (COCs) on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has been gaining ground as a remedial platform for groundwater treatment. Applications depend on our mechanistic understanding of COC adsorption on CNTs. This paper lays out the nature of competing interactions at play in hybrid, membrane, and pure CNT based systems and presents results with the perspective of existing gaps in design strategies. First, current remediation approaches to trichloroethylene (TCE), the most ubiquitous of the COCs, is presented along with examination of forces contributing to adsorption of analogous contaminants at the molecular level. Second, we present results on TCE adsorption and remediation on pure and hybrid CNT systems with a stress on the specific nature of substrate and molecular architecture that would contribute to competitive adsorption. The delineation of intermolecular interactions that contribute to efficient remediation is needed for custom, scalable field design of purification systems for a wide range of contaminants. PMID:27455218

  18. Dioxinlike properties of a trichloroethylene combustion-generated aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Villalobos, S.A.; Anderson, M.J.; Hinton, D.E.

    1996-07-01

    Conventional chemical analyses of incineration by-products identify compounds of known toxicity but often fail to indicate the presence of other chemicals that may pose health risks. In a previous report, extracts from soot aerosols formed during incomplete combustion of trichloroethylene (TCE) and pyrolysis of plastics exhibited a dioxinlike response when subjected to a keratinocyte assay. To verify this dioxinlike effect, the complete extract, its polar and nonpolar fractions, some containing primarily halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons, were evaluated for toxicity using an embryo assay, for antiestrogenicity using primary liver cell cultures, and for the ability to transform the aryl hydrocarbon receptor into its DNA binding form using liver cytosol in a gel retardation assay. Each of these assays detect dioxinlike effects. Medaka (Oryzias latipes) embryos and primary liver cell cultures of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were exposed to concentrations of extract ranging from 0.05 to 45 {mu}g/l. 67 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Health assessment for Metal Working Shop Site, Lake Ann, Michigan, Region 5. CERCLIS No. MID980992952. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-30

    The Metal Working Shop Site is listed on the National Priorities List. The site consists of an operating metal-working facility in a sparsely populated rural area in Benzie, Michigan. Identified contaminants of potential concern on the site include chromium, tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethane, and toluene in water and trichloroethylene (TCE), trichloroethane, xylenes, ethylbenzene, and toluene in soil. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via contaminated well water and soil. Confirmation of sampling results that show contamination in well water and soil is needed.

  20. Detailed mechanism of toluene oxidation and comparison with benzene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, David A.

    1988-01-01

    A detailed mechanism for the oxidation of toluene in both argon and nitrogen dilutents is presented. The mechanism was used to compute experimentally ignition delay times for shock-heated toluene-oxygen-argon mixtures with resonably good success over a wide range of initial temperatures and pressures. Attempts to compute experimentally measured concentration profiles for toluene oxidation in a turbulent reactor were partially successful. An extensive sensitivity analysis was performed to determine the reactions which control the ignition process and the rates of formation and destruction of various species. The most important step was found to be the reaction of toluene with molecular oxygen, followed by the reactions of hydroperoxyl and atomic oxygen with benzyl radicals. These findings contrast with the benzene oxidation, where the benzene-molecular oxygen reaction is quite unimportant and the reaction of phenyl with molecular oxygen dominates. In the toluene mechanism the corresponding reaction of benzyl radicals with oxygen is unimportant. Two reactions which are important in the oxidation of benzene also influence the oxidation of toluene for several conditions. These are the oxidations of phenyl and cyclopentadienyl radicals by molecular oxygen. The mechanism presented successfully computes the decrease of toluene concentration with time in the nitrogen diluted turbulent reactor. This fact, in addition to the good prediction of ignition delay times, shows that this mechanism can be used for modeling the ignition and combustion process in practical, well-mixed combustion systems.

  1. Remediation of trichloroethylene by bio-precipitated and encapsulated palladium nanoparticles in a fixed bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Hennebel, Tom; Verhagen, Pieter; Simoen, Henri; De Gusseme, Bart; Vlaeminck, Siegfried E; Boon, Nico; Verstraete, Willy

    2009-08-01

    Trichloroethylene is a toxic and recalcitrant groundwater pollutant. Palladium nanoparticles bio-precipitated on Shewanella oneidensis were encapsulated in polyurethane, polyacrylamide, alginate, silica or coated on zeolites. The reactivity of these bio-Pd beads and zeolites was tested in batch experiments and trichloroethylene dechlorination followed first order reaction kinetics. The calculated k-values of the encapsulated catalysts were a factor of six lower compared to non-encapsulated bio-Pd. Bio-Pd, used as a catalyst, was able to dechlorinate 100 mgL(-1) trichloroethylene within a time period of 1h. The main reaction product was ethane; yet small levels of chlorinated intermediates were detected. Subsequently polyurethane cubes empowered with bio-Pd were implemented in a fixed bed reactor for the treatment of water containing trichloroethylene. The influent recycle configuration resulted in a cumulative removal of 98% after 22 h. The same reactor in a flow through configuration achieved removal rates up to 1059 mg trichloroethylene g Pd(-1)d(-1). This work showed that fixed bed reactors with bio-Pd polyurethane cubes can be instrumental for remediation of water contaminated with trichloroethylene. PMID:19560796

  2. Transformation of toluene and benzene by mixed methanogenic cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Grbić-Galić, D; Vogel, T M

    1987-01-01

    The aromatic hydrocarbons toluene and benzene were anaerobically transformed by mixed methanogenic cultures derived from ferulic acid-degrading sewage sludge enrichments. In most experiments, toluene or benzene was the only semicontinuously supplied carbon and energy source in the defined mineral medium. No exogenous electron acceptors other than CO2 were present. The cultures were fed 1.5 to 30 mM unlabeled or 14C-labeled aromatic substrates (ring-labeled toluene and benzene or methyl-labeled toluene). Gas production from unlabeled substrates and 14C activity distribution in products from the labeled substrates were monitored over a period of 60 days. At least 50% of the substrates were converted to CO2 and methane (greater than 60%). A high percentage of 14CO2 was recovered from the methyl group-labeled toluene, suggesting nearly complete conversion of the methyl group to CO2 and not to methane. However, a low percentage of 14CO2 was produced from ring-labeled toluene or from benzene, indicating incomplete conversion of the ring carbon to CO2. Anaerobic transformation pathways for unlabeled toluene and benzene were studied with the help of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The intermediates detected are consistent with both toluene and benzene degradation via initial oxidation by ring hydroxylation or methyl oxidation (toluene), which would result in the production of phenol, cresols, or aromatic alcohol. Additional reactions, such as demethylation and ring reduction, are also possible. Tentative transformation sequences based upon the intermediates detected are discussed. PMID:3105454

  3. Reductive dehalogenation of chlorinated benzenes and toluenes under methanogenic conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Ramanand, K; Balba, M T; Duffy, J

    1993-01-01

    The anaerobic metabolism of chlorinated benzenes and toluenes was evaluated in soil slurry microcosms under methanogenic conditions. A mixture of hexachlorobenzene, pentachlorobenzene, and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene (TCB) in soil slurries was biotransformed through sequential reductive dechlorination to chlorobenzene (CB). The metabolic pathway for hexachlorobenzene and pentachlorobenzene decay proceeded via 1,2,3,4-tetrachlorobenzene (TTCB)-->1,2,3-TCB + 1,2,4-TCB-->1,2-dichlorobenzene (DCB) + 1,4-DCB-->CB. In a mineral salts medium, the CB-adapted soil microorganisms dehalogenated individual 1,2,4,5-TTCB, 1,2,3,4-TTCB, 1,2,3-TCB, and 1,2,4-TCB but not 1,2,3,5-TTCB or 1,3,5-TCB. Similarly, a mixture of 2,3,6-trichlorotoluene (TCT), 2,5-dichlorotoluene (DCT), and 3,4-DCT was reductively dechlorinated in soil slurries to predominantly toluene and small amounts of 2-, 3-, and 4-chlorotoluene (CT). Toluene was further degraded. When tested individually in a mineral salts medium, the CT-adapted soil microorganisms dechlorinated several TCT and DCT isomers. Key metabolic routes for TCTs followed: 2,3,6-TCT-->2,5-DCT-->2-CT-->toluene; 2,4,5-TCT-->2,5-DCT + 3,4-DCT-->3-CT + 4-CT-->toluene. Among DCTs tested, 2,4-DCT and 3,4-DCT were dechlorinated via the removal of o- and m-chlorine, respectively, to 4-CT and subsequently to toluene via p-chlorine removal. Likewise, 2,5-DCT was dechlorinated via 2-CT to toluene. Evidently, microorganisms capable of removing o-, m-, and p-chlorines are present in the soil system, as reflected by the dechlorination of different isomers of CBs and CTs to CB and toluene, respectively. These findings help clarify the metabolic fate of chlorinated benzenes and toluenes in anaerobic environments. PMID:8250553

  4. Determination of toluene hydrogenation kinetics with neutron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Falkowska, Marta; Chansai, Sarayute; Manyar, Haresh G; Gladden, Lynn F; Bowron, Daniel T; Youngs, Tristan G A; Hardacre, Christopher

    2016-06-29

    Total neutron scattering has been used to follow the hydrogenation of toluene-d8 to methylcyclohexane-d14 over 3 wt% platinum supported on highly ordered mesoporous silica (MCM-41) at 298 K and under 150 mbar D2 pressure. The detailed kinetic information so revealed indicates that liquid reorganisation inside pores is the slowest step of the whole process. Additionally, the results were compared with the reaction performed under 250 mbar D2 pressure as well as with toluene-h8 hydrogenation using D2 at 150 mbar. PMID:27052196

  5. Effects of dynamic redox zonation on the potential for natural attenuation of trichloroethylene at a fire-training-impacted aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skubal, K.L.; Haack, S.K.; Forney, L.J.; Adriaens, P.

    1999-01-01

    Hydrogeochemical and microbiological methods were used to characterize temporal changes along a transect of an aquifer contaminated by mixed hydrocarbon and solvent wastes from fire training activities at Wurtsmith Air Force Base (Oscoda, MI). Predominant terminal electron accepting processes (TEAPs) as measured by dissolved hydrogen indicated reoxygenation along the transect between October 1995 and October 1996, possibly because of recharge, fluctuations in water table elevation, or microbial activity. Microbiological analyses using universal and archaeal probes revealed a relationship between groundwater hydrogen concentration, TEAP, and predominant bacterial phylogeny. Specifically, a raised water table level and evidence of methanogenesis corresponded to an order of magnitude increase in archaeal 16S rRNA relative to when this zone was unsaturated. Spatial microbial and geochemical dynamics did not result in measurable differences in trichloroethylene (TCE) mineralization potential in vadose, capillary fringe, and saturated zone soils during a 500-day microcosm experiment using unprocessed contaminated soil and groundwater. Aerobic systems indicated that methane, but not toluene, may serve as cosubstrate for TCE cometabolism. Anaerobic microcosms demonstrated evidence for methanogenesis, CO2 production and hydrogen consumption, yet dechlorination activity was only observed in a microcosm with sulfate-reduction as the dominant TEAP. Mass balance calculations indicated less than 5% mineralization, regardless of redox zone or degree of saturation, at maximum rates of 0.01-0.03 ??mol/g soil??d. The general lack of dechlorination activity under laboratory conditions corroborates the limited evidence for natural dechlorination at this site, despite abundant electron donor material and accumulated organic acids from microbial degradation of alkylbenzenes. Thus, the short-term temporal dynamics in redox conditions is unlikely to have measurable effects on the long

  6. Rheology of asphaltene-toluene/water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Sztukowski, Danuta M; Yarranton, Harvey W

    2005-12-01

    The stability of water-in-crude oil emulsions is frequently attributed to a rigid asphaltene film at the water/oil interface. The rheological properties of these films and their relationship to emulsion stability are ill defined. In this study, the interfacial tension, elastic modulus, and viscous modulus were measured using a drop shape analyzer for model oils consisting of asphaltenes dissolved in toluene for concentrations varying from 0.002 to 20 kg/m(3). The effects of oscillation frequency, asphaltene concentration, and interface aging time were examined. The films exhibited viscoelastic behavior. The total modulus increased as the interface aged at all asphaltene concentrations. An attempt was made to model the rheology for the full range of asphaltene concentration. The instantaneous elasticity was modeled with a surface equation of state (SEOS), and the elastic and viscous moduli, with the Lucassen-van den Tempel (LVDT) model. It was found that only the early-time data could be modeled using the SEOS-LVDT approach; that is, the instantaneous, elastic, and viscous moduli of interfaces aged for at most 10 minutes. At longer interface aging times, the SEOS-LVDT approach was invalid, likely because of irreversible adsorption of asphaltenes on the interface and the formation of a network structure. PMID:16316096

  7. Evaluation of the Webler-Brown model for estimating tetrachloroethylene exposure from vinyl-lined asbestos-cement pipes

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Lisa A; Aschengrau, Ann; Gallagher, Lisa E; Webster, Thomas F; Heeren, Timothy C; Ozonoff, David M

    2008-01-01

    Background From May 1968 through March 1980, vinyl-lined asbestos-cement (VL/AC) water distribution pipes were installed in New England to avoid taste and odor problems associated with asbestos-cement pipes. The vinyl resin was applied to the inner pipe surface in a solution of tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, PCE). Substantial amounts of PCE remained in the liner and subsequently leached into public drinking water supplies. Methods Once aware of the leaching problem and prior to remediation (April-November 1980), Massachusetts regulators collected drinking water samples from VL/AC pipes to determine the extent and severity of the PCE contamination. This study compares newly obtained historical records of PCE concentrations in water samples (n = 88) with concentrations estimated using an exposure model employed in epidemiologic studies on the cancer risk associated with PCE-contaminated drinking water. The exposure model was developed by Webler and Brown to estimate the mass of PCE delivered to subjects' residences. Results The mean and median measured PCE concentrations in the water samples were 66 and 0.5 μg/L, respectively, and the range extended from non-detectable to 2432 μg/L. The model-generated concentration estimates and water sample concentrations were moderately correlated (Spearman rank correlation coefficient = 0.48, p < 0.0001). Correlations were higher in samples taken at taps and spigots vs. hydrants (ρ = 0.84 vs. 0.34), in areas with simple vs. complex geometry (ρ = 0.51 vs. 0.38), and near pipes installed in 1973–1976 vs. other years (ρ = 0.56 vs. 0.42 for 1968–1972 and 0.37 for 1977–1980). Overall, 24% of the variance in measured PCE concentrations was explained by the model-generated concentration estimates (p < 0.0001). Almost half of the water samples had undetectable concentrations of PCE. Undetectable levels were more common in areas with the earliest installed VL/AC pipes, at the beginning and middle of VL/AC pipes, at

  8. 78 FR 37818 - Request for Information on Toluene Diisocyanates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-24

    ... published a Current Intelligence Bulletin on toluene diisocyanate (TDI) and toluenediamine (TDA) [DHHS (NIOSH) Publication No. 90-101] which classified TDI and TDA (used in the manufacturing of TDI)...

  9. Atmospheric analyzer, carbon monoxide monitor and toluene diisocyanate monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, A. V.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of the atmospheric analyzer and the carbon monoxide and toluene diisocyanate monitors is to analyze the atmospheric volatiles and to monitor carbon monoxide and toluene diisocyanate levels in the cabin atmosphere of Skylab. The carbon monoxide monitor was used on Skylab 2, 3, and 4 to detect any carbon monoxide levels above 25 ppm. Air samples were taken once each week. The toluene diisocyanate monitor was used only on Skylab 2. The loss of a micrometeoroid shield following the launch of Skylab 1 resulted in overheating of the interior walls of the Orbital Workshop. A potential hazard existed from outgassing of an isocyanate derivative resulting from heat-decomposition of the rigid polyurethane wall insulation. The toluene diisocyanate monitor was used to detect any polymer decomposition. The atmospheric analyzer was used on Skylab 4 because of a suspected leak in the Skylab cabin. An air sample was taken at the beginning, middle, and the end of the mission.

  10. Elastic scattering of low-energy electrons from toluene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaamini, Ahmad; Hargreaves, L. R.; Khakoo, M. A.; Pastega, D. F.; Bettega, M. H. F.

    2016-04-01

    Theoretical and normalized experimental differential, momentum transfer, and integral cross sections for vibrationally elastic scattering of low-energy electrons from toluene (C6H5C H3 ) are presented. The differential cross sections are measured at incident energies from 1 to 20 eV and scattering angles from 15° to 130°. The calculated cross sections are obtained using the Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials in the static-exchange plus polarization approximation. Comparisons are made between the present theory and measurements with earlier available measurements. In general, the agreement between the theory and the experiment is very good. We also discuss the resonance spectra of toluene, where we find three π* shape resonances whose locations agree well with the experiment. In addition, we compare the cross sections of toluene and benzene, since the former can be considered as a benzene derivative by the substitution of a hydrogen in benzene by a C H3 group in toluene.

  11. Gamma radiolysis of toluene and deuterated toluenes—I. Isotopic exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagert, Norman H.; MacFarlane, Roy; Kremers, Walter

    The γ radiolysis of liquid toluene and toluene-d 8 was studied at 50°C. For toluene, product yields were 0.14 molecules of hydrogen, 0.006 of methane, 0.090 of biphenyl and 0.9 of "polymer" for each 100 eV absorbed. For toluene-d 8, these yields are lower by a factor of two to three. Radiolysis of mixtures of toluene and toluene-d 8 shows a disproportionately high decomposition of the light toluene, suggesting that energy initially absorbed in toluene-d 8 transfers to toluene before decomposition occurs. Deuterium tracer studies indicate that about 14% of the hydrogen arises from unimolecular processes, whereas none of the methane or bibenzyl arises in this way. Studies using an electron scavenger, ethyl bromide, and a proton scavenger, ethanol, showed that the hydrogen yield did not likely have long-lived electrons or ions as precursors. Thus the energy transfer from toluene-d 8 to toluene is probably by direct excitation transfer, and not by charge transfer.

  12. Predicting toluene degradation in organic Rankine-cycle engines

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, R.L.; Demirgian, J.C.; Allen, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the measurement of toluene degradation in dynamic loop tests that simulate operation of an organic Rankine-cycle engine. Major degradation products and degradation mechanisms are identified, and degradation is quantified. Results indicate that toluene is a stable fluid with benign degradation products, provided that oxygen is excluded from the engine. A means of predicting degradation in the engine is developed. 3 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Pseudomonas putida which can grow in the presence of toluene

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Akira; Yamamoto, Mami; Horikoshi, Koki )

    1991-05-01

    A Pseudomonas putida strain able to grow in the presence of more than 50% toluene was isolated from soil. The strain was tolerant of other toxic solvents, including aliphatic hydrocarbons, alicyclic hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, and ethers. The stability of the solvent tolerance of strain IH-2,000 was stimulated by addition of Mg{sup 2+} and Ca{sup 2+} to the medium containing toluene.

  14. Reproductive and developmental toxicity of toluene: a review.

    PubMed

    Donald, J M; Hooper, K; Hopenhayn-Rich, C

    1991-08-01

    Toluene is a widely used industrial solvent, and humans may also have high exposures to toluene from the deliberate inhalation ("sniffing") of paint reducer, paint thinner, or paint for their narcotic effects. A number of case reports describe neonatal effects that have been attributed to toluene abuse during pregnancy. These effects may include intrauterine growth retardation, premature delivery, congenital malformations, and postnatal developmental retardation. The possibility of exposures to other fetotoxic agents, either as impurities or admixtures in toluene-containing products, or by deliberate or accidental exposures to other chemicals or drugs, cannot be excluded in these cases. The fetotoxic effects of toluene have been demonstrated in controlled studies in animals and are comparable to those observed in humans who have abused toluene-containing products before or during pregnancy. Intrauterine developmental retardation is the most clearly established effect in animals, as evidenced by decreased late fetal weight and retarded skeletal development. There is also limited evidence in rodents for skeletal and kidney abnormalities, as well as some evidence for effects on postnatal physical and possibly neurobehavioral development. Estimated daily exposures from experimental studies in animals are compared to estimated human daily intakes at the occupational permissible exposure level and at the level reported to produce euphoria in humans. Acceptable human intakes under California's Proposition 65 and under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency procedures are discussed. PMID:1954933

  15. Toluene diffusion and reaction in unsaturated Pseudomonas putida biofilms

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, P.A.; Hunt, J.R.; Firestone, M.K.

    1997-12-20

    Biofilms are frequently studied in the context of submerged or aquatic systems. However, much less is known about biofilms in unsaturated systems, despite their importance to such processes as food spoilage, terrestrial nutrient cycling, and biodegradation of environmental pollutants in soils. Using modeling and experimentation, the authors have described the biodegradation of toluene in unsaturated media by bacterial biofilms as a function of matric water potential, a dominant variable in unsaturated systems. They experimentally determined diffusion and kinetic parameters for Pseudomonas putida biofilms, then predicted biodegradation rates over a range of matric water potentials. For validation, the authors measured the rate of toluene depletion by intact biofilms and found the results to reasonably follow the model predictions. The diffusion coefficient for toluene through unsaturated P. putida biofilm averaged 1.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} cm{sup 2}/s, which is approximately two orders of magnitude lower than toluene diffusivity in water. Their studies show that, at the scale of the microbial biofilm, the diffusion of toluene to biodegrading bacteria can limit the overall rate of biological toluene depletion in unsaturated systems.

  16. Toluene Diffusion and Reaction in Unsaturated Pseudomonas putida Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Patricia A.; Hunt, James R.; Firestone, Mary K.

    2010-01-01

    Biofilms are frequently studied in the context of submerged or aquatic systems. However, much less is known about biofilms in unsaturated systems, despite their importance to such processes as food spoilage, terrestrial nutrient cycling, and biodegradation of environmental pollutants in soils. Using modeling and experimentation, we have described the biodegradation of toluene in unsaturated media by bacterial biofilms as a function of matric water potential, a dominant variable in unsaturated systems. We experimentally determined diffusion and kinetic parameters for Pseudomonas putida biofilms, then predicted biodegradation rates over a range of matric water potentials. For validation, we measured the rate of toluene depletion by intact biofilms and found the results to reasonably follow the model predictions. The diffusion coefficient for toluene through unsaturated P. putida biofilm averaged 1.3 × 10−7 cm2/s, which is approximately two orders of magnitude lower than toluene diffusivity in water. Our studies show that, at the scale of the microbial biofilm, the diffusion of toluene to biodegrading bacteria can limit the overall rate of biological toluene depletion in unsaturated systems. PMID:18642338

  17. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling of two binary mixtures: metabolic activation of carbon tetrachloride by trichloroethylene and metabolic inhibition of chloroform by trichloroethylene.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interaction between trichloroethylene (TCE) and chloroform (CHCI3) has been described as less than additive, with co-exposure to TCE and CHC13 resulting in less hepatic and renal toxicity than observed with CHCl3 alone. In contrast, the nonadditive interaction between TCE and...

  18. Optimization of electrochemical dechlorination of trichloroethylene in reducing electrolytes

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xuhui; Ciblak, Ali; Baek, Kitae; Amiri, Mohammad; Loch-Caruso, Rita; Alshawabkeh, Akram N.

    2012-01-01

    Electrochemical dechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) in aqueous solution is investigated in a closed, liquid-recirculation system. The anodic reaction of cast iron generates ferrous species, creating a chemically reducing electrolyte (negative ORP value). The reduction of TCE on the cathode surface is enhanced under this reducing electrolyte because of the absence of electron competition. In the presence of the iron anode, the performances of different cathodes are compared in a recirculated electrolysis system. The copper foam shows superior capability for dechlorination of aqueous TCE. Electrolysis by cast iron anode and copper foam cathode is further optimized though a multivariable experimental design and analysis. The conductivity of the electrolyte is identified as an important factor for both final elimination efficiency (FEE) of TCE and specific energy consumption. The copper foam electrode exhibits high TCE elimination efficiency in a wide range of initial TCE concentration. Under coulostatic conditions, the optimal conditions to achieve the highest FEE are 9.525 mm thick copper foam electrode, 40 mA current and 0.042 mol L−1 Na2SO4. This novel electrolysis system is proposed to remediate groundwater contaminated by chlorinated organic solvents, or as an improved iron electrocoagulation process capable of treating the wastewater co-contaminated with chlorinated compounds. PMID:22264798

  19. Key Scientific Issues in the Health Risk Assessment of Trichloroethylene

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Weihsueh A.; Caldwell, Jane C.; Keshava, Nagalakshmi; Scott, Cheryl Siegel

    2006-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a common environmental contaminant at hazardous waste sites and in ambient and indoor air. Assessing the human health risks of TCE is challenging because of its inherently complex metabolism and toxicity and the widely varying perspectives on a number of critical scientific issues. Because of this complexity, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) drew upon scientific input and expertise from a wide range of groups and individuals in developing its 2001 draft health risk assessment of TCE. This scientific outreach, which was aimed at engaging a diversity of perspectives rather than developing consensus, culminated in 2000 with 16 state-of-the-science articles published together as an Environmental Health Perspectives supplement. Since that time, a substantial amount of new scientific research has been published that is relevant to assessing TCE health risks. Moreover, a number of difficult or controversial scientific issues remain unresolved and are the subject of a scientific consultation with the National Academy of Sciences coordinated by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and co-sponsored by a number of federal agencies, including the U.S. EPA. The articles included in this mini-monograph provide a scientific update on the most prominent of these issues: the pharmacokinetics of TCE and its metabolites, mode(s) of action and effects of TCE metabolites, the role of peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor in TCE toxicity, and TCE cancer epidemiology. PMID:16966103

  20. Reductive dehalogenation of trichloroethylene using zero-valent iron

    SciTech Connect

    Gotpagar, J.; Grulke, E.; Bhattacharyya, D.

    1997-12-31

    Reductive dehalogenation of hazardous organics using zero-valent metals is a promising technology. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of feed concentration, initial pH, metal loading and particle size of metal on the degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE), using zero-valent iron. The degradation rate was found to be first order with respect to the organic molecule, thus the conversion was independent of initial TCE concentration. The amount of TCE degraded at any given time was found to be directly proportional to the dissolved iron in solution. The metal surface area plays a crucial role in the process. Twofold increase in the pseudo first order rate constant was obtained when the metal particle size was decreased from 370 {mu}m by factor of 2.5. For iron surface area per unit volume (S/V) of solution < 1000 m{sup -1}, the TCE degradation rate constant increased linearly with S/V ratio. 20 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Cometabolic degradation of trichloroethylene in a bubble column bioscrubber.

    PubMed

    Hecht, V; Brebbermann, D; Bremer, P; Deckwer, W D

    1995-08-20

    A bubble column bioreactor was used as bioscrubber to carry out a feasibility study for the cometabolic degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE). Phenol was used as cosubstrate and inducer. The bioreactor was operated like a conventional chemostat with regard to the cosubstrate and low dilution rates were used to minimize the liquid outflow. TCE degradation measurements were carried out using superficial gas velocities between 0.47and 4.07 cm s(-1) and TCE gas phase loads between 0.07 and 0.40 mg L(-1) Depending on the superficial gas velocity used, degrees of conversion between 30% and 80% were obtained. A simplified reactor model using plug flow for the gas phase, mixed flow for the liquid phase, and pseudo first order reaction kinetics for the conversionof TCE was established. The model is able to give a reasonable approximation of the experimental data. TCE degradation at the used experimental conditions is mainly limited by reaction rate rather than by mass transfer rate. The model can be used to calculate the reactor volume and the biomass concentration for a required conversion. (c) 1995 John Wiley & Sons Inc. PMID:18623422

  2. Complete dissolution of trichloroethylene in saturated porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Imhoff, P.T.; Arthur, M.H.; Miller, C.T.

    1998-08-15

    Porous media containing trichloroethylene (TCE) trapped at residual saturation in otherwise water-saturated porous media were flushed with water to asses the dissolution rate of TCE as TCE volumetric fractions approached zero. Careful attention to column design and experimental methods limited the effect of column materials on effluent concentrations. Effluent concentration measurements during TCE dissolution are presented for a glass bead porous medium, a mixed sand, and a treated soil. Effluent concentrations were measured as they decreased below 5 {micro}g/L, the maximum allowable contaminant level, in the glass bead and mixed sand media. Effluent concentrations from columns packed with treated soil were measured down to 20 {micro}g/L. Solvent extraction of the treated soil after the dissolution experiments revealed that extremely small quantities of TCE were retained in this medium. Results from parallel experiments on columns exposed to only aqueous TCE suggest that TCE remaining in the treated soil columns was sorbed to the porous medium. Existing power-law models were capable of describing TCE dissolution in these media, if the exponent on the TCE volume fraction was modified appropriately.

  3. Biotransformation of trichloroethylene by a phenol-induced mixed culture

    SciTech Connect

    Shurtliff, M.M.; Parkin, G.F.; Gibson, D.T.; Weathers, L.J.

    1996-07-01

    Biodegradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) was studied using a mixed culture of aerobic, phenol-induced organisms. Abiotic experiments showed that sorption of TCE to biomass was negligible in the systems studied. The effects of influent phenol and TCE concentration on the TCE degradation capacity of the culture were studied using chemostats. A relationship exists between the influent phenol/TCE ratio and TCE biodegradation. TCE transformation yields ranged from 0.052 to 0.222 mg TCE removed/mg phenol removed. Monod kinetic coefficients for phenol degradation were determined. Monod kinetic coefficients were also determined for TCE biotransformation by resting cells. The concept of transformation capacity was used to model the decrease in active biomass concentration caused by TCE transformation. In mineralization studies using {sup 14}C-labeled TCE, 22% of the degraded mass of TCE was transformed to carbon dioxide, 8.8% was incorporated into biomass, 42% was transformed to nonvolatile products, with the remaining, unrecovered 27% most likely transformed into volatile or semivolatile products.

  4. Mass recovery methods for trichloroethylene in plant tissue.

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalakrishnan, G.; Negri, M. C.; Werth, C. J.; Energy Systems; Univ. of Illionis

    2009-06-01

    Monitoring expenses form a significant fraction of the costs associated with remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater sites. A novel monitoring method that could result in significant cost savings is the use of plants as monitoring devices; previous work indicates that plant tissue samples, especially trunk (core) and branch samples, can be used to delineate soil and groundwater plumes at phytoremediation sites. An important factor in reducing the uncertainty associated with this sampling method is development of a technique to analyze, both consistently and accurately, the chemicals stored in plant tissue samples. The present research presents a simple, robust, and inexpensive technique to recover most of the contaminant in plant branch tissue, irrespective of the age or species of the plant. Trichloroethylene (TCE) was the chemical analyzed. A number of headspace and solvent extraction techniques in the literature were evaluated, including headspace extraction at different incubation times and temperatures and solvent extraction using hexane or hot methanol. Extraction using hot methanol was relatively fast, simple, and reliable; this method recovered more than 89% of the TCE present in branches of five different tree species.

  5. Trichloroethylene: Mechanistic, Epidemiologic and Other Supporting Evidence of Carcinogenic Hazard

    PubMed Central

    Rusyn, Ivan; Chiu, Weihsueh A.; Lash, Lawrence H.; Kromhout, Hans; Hansen, Johnni; Guyton, Kathryn Z.

    2013-01-01

    The chlorinated solvent trichloroethylene (TCE) is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant. The carcinogenic hazard of TCE was the subject of a 2012 evaluation by a Working Group of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Information on exposures, relevant data from epidemiologic studies, bioassays in experimental animals, and toxicity and mechanism of action studies was used to conclude that TCE is carcinogenic to humans (Group 1). This article summarizes the key evidence forming the scientific bases for the IARC classification. Exposure to TCE from environmental sources (including from hazardous waste sites and contaminated water) is common throughout the world. While workplace use of TCE has been declining, occupational exposures remain of concern, especially in developing countries. Strongest human evidence is from studies of occupational TCE exposure and kidney cancer. Positive, although less consistent, associations were reported for liver cancer and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. TCE is carcinogenic at multiple sites in multiple species and strains of experimental animals. The mechanistic evidence includes extensive data on the toxicokinetics and genotoxicity of TCE and its metabolites. Together, available evidence provided a cohesive database supporting the human cancer hazard of TCE, particularly in the kidney. For other target sites of carcinogenicity, mechanistic and other data were found to be more limited. Important sources of susceptibility to TCE toxicity and carcinogenicity were also reviewed by the Working Group. In all, consideration of the multiple evidence streams presented herein informed the IARC conclusions regarding the carcinogenicity of TCE. PMID:23973663

  6. Modes of action of trichloroethylene for kidney tumorigenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Lash, L H; Parker, J C; Scott, C S

    2000-01-01

    This article focuses on the various models for kidney toxicity due to trichloroethylene (TCE) and its glutathione-dependent metabolites, in particular S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-l-cysteine. Areas of controversy regarding the relative importance of metabolic pathways, species differences in toxic responses, rates of generation of reactive metabolites, and dose-dependent phenomena are highlighted. The first section briefly reviews information on the incidence and risk factors of kidney cancer in the general U.S. population. Epidemiological data on incidence of kidney cancer in male workers exposed occupationally to TCE are also summarized. This is contrasted with cancer bioassay data from laboratory animals, that highlights sex and species differences and, consequently, the difficulties in making risk assessments for humans based on animal data. The major section of the article considers proposed modes of action for TCE or its metabolites in kidney, including peroxisome proliferation, alpha(2u)-globulin nephropathy, genotoxicity, and acute and chronic toxicity mechanisms. The latter comprise oxidative stress, alterations in calcium ion homeostasis, mitochondrial dysfunction, protein alkylation, cellular repair processes, and alterations in gene expression and cell proliferation. Finally, the status of risk assessment for TCE based on the kidneys as a target organ and remaining questions and research needs are discussed. PMID:10807554

  7. A Case of Occupational Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis Associated with Trichloroethylene

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Jae; Hwang, Eu Dong; Leem, Ah Young; Kang, Beo Deul; Chang, Soo Yun; Kim, Ho Keun; Park, In Kyu; Kim, Song Yee; Kim, Eun Young; Jung, Ji Ye; Kang, Young Ae; Park, Moo Suk; Kim, Young Sam; Kim, Se Kyu; Chang, Joon

    2014-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a toxic chemical commonly used as a degreasing agent, and it is usually found in a colorless or blue liquid form. TCE has a sweet, chloroform-like odor, and this volatile chlorinated organic chemical can cause toxic hepatitis, neurophysiological disorders, skin disorders, and hypersensitivity syndromes. However, the hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) attributed to TCE has rarely been reported. We hereby describe a case of HP associated with TCE in a 29-year-old man who was employed as a lead welder at a computer repair center. He was installing the capacitors on computer chip boards and had been wiped down with TCE. He was admitted to our hospital with complaints of dry coughs, night sweats, and weight losses for the past two months. HP due to TCE exposure was being suspected due to his occupational history, and the results of a video-associated thoracoscopic biopsy confirmed the suspicions. Symptoms have resolved after the steroid pulse therapy and his occupational change. TCE should be taken into consideration as a potential trigger of HP. Early recognition and avoidance of the TCE exposure in the future is important for the treatment of TCE induced HP. PMID:24624216

  8. Removal of Trichloroethylene and Heavy Metals by Zerovalent Iron Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boparai, H. K.; O'Carroll, D. M.

    2009-05-01

    Heavy metals combined with chlorinated solvents are one class of mixed waste found at various hazardous waste sites in North America. Nano zerovalent iron (nZVI), an emerging technology, is being successfully used for treating chlorinated solvents and heavy metals independently, however comparatively little research has investigated the remediation of the wastes when they are present in the same mixture. The remediation of trichloroethylene (TCE)/heavy metal waste mixtures via nZVI has been investigated in the present study. Results suggest that some metals are reduced by nZVI to their zerovalent state and thus precipitate on nZVI particles. This improves the contaminant removal performance of nZVI by forming bimetallic iron nanoparticles. Other metals are directly precipitated or adsorbed on the nZVI particles in their original oxidation state and are rendered immobile. In some cases the presence of the heavy metals in the waste mixture enhanced the dechlorination of TCE while in other cases it did not. This study suggests that nano zerovalent iron particles can be effectively used for the remediation of mixed contamination of heavy metals and chlorinated solvents. Results have been supported by a variety of techniques including X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis.

  9. Biodegradation of trichloroethylene and biomanipulation of aquifers. Technical report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, P.R.; Taylor, S.W.; Baek, N.H.; Christopher, P.; Milly, D.

    1988-08-01

    Three distinct aspects of the biodegradation process in a porous media were addressed. The effect of the trichloroethylene(TCE) concentration on bacterial activity was investigated. The results showed that the dissolved-phase concentration directly affects the bacterial activity. For aerobic soils, LD50 for water concentrations ranged between 200-300 mg/l for CO/sub 2/ evolution, and 80 to 150 mg/l for dehydrogenase activity. The degradation of TCE and its intermediates by mixed cultures containing fermenters and methanogens was investigated. Results showed that fermenters play an important role in this process and that the degradation rate correlates with the methanogenic activity. It was shown that TCE can be degraded by these mixed cultures via 1,1-dichloroethylene to vinyl chloride, to chloroethane which is readily degradable. Kinetic rates were obtained for this degradation process and normalized with respect to the methane production. The effect of biomass production in porous media on the permeability and dispersivity was investigated. Experimental results showed that the permeability of a sandy media depends on the biomass if the biomass is less than 0.4 mg of organic carbon/cu cm, and becomes independent of the biomass for higher values. Changes in permeability and dispersivity as a function of the biofilm thickness were modeled successfully using a modified cut-and-random-rejoin-type model.

  10. Degradation of trichloroethylene by Pseudomonas cepacia G4 and the constitutive mutant strain G4 5223 PR1 in aquifer microcosms.

    PubMed

    Krumme, M L; Timmis, K N; Dwyer, D F

    1993-08-01

    Pseudomonas cepacia G4 degrades trichloroethylene (TCE) via a degradation pathway for aromatic compounds which is induced by substrates such as phenol and tryptophan. P. cepacia G4 5223 PR1 (PR1) is a Tn5 insertion mutant which constitutively expresses the toluene ortho-monooxygenase responsible for TCE degradation. In groundwater microcosms, phenol-induced strain G4 and noninduced strain PR1 degraded TCE (20 and 50 microM) to nondetectable levels (< 0.1 microM) within 24 h at densities of 10(8) cells per ml; at lower densities, degradation of TCE was not observed after 48 h. In aquifer sediment microcosms, TCE was reduced from 60 to < 0.1 microM within 24 h at 5 x 10(8) PR1 organisms per g (wet weight) of sediment and from 60 to 26 microM over a period of 10 weeks at 5 x 10(7) PR1 organisms per g. Viable G4 and PR1 cells decreased from approximately 10(7) to 10(4) per g over the 10-week period. PMID:7690223

  11. Copper Enhanced Monooxygenase Activity and FT-IR Spectroscopic Characterisation of Biotransformation Products in Trichloroethylene Degrading Bacterium: Stenotrophomonas maltophilia PM102

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Piyali; Roy, Pranab

    2013-01-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia PM102 (NCBI GenBank Acc. no. JQ797560) is capable of growth on trichloroethylene as the sole carbon source. In this paper, we report the purification and characterisation of oxygenase present in the PM102 isolate. Enzyme activity was found to be induced 10.3-fold in presence of 0.7 mM copper with a further increment to 14.96-fold in presence of 0.05 mM NADH. Optimum temperature for oxygenase activity was recorded at 36°C. The reported enzyme was found to have enhanced activity at pH 5 and pH 8, indicating presence of two isoforms. Maximum activity was seen on incubation with benzene compared to other substrates like TCE, chloroform, toluene, hexane, and petroleum benzene. Km and Vmax for benzene were 3.8 mM and 340 U/mg/min and those for TCE were 2.1 mM and 170 U/mg/min. The crude enzyme was partially purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by dialysis. Zymogram analysis revealed two isoforms in the 70% purified enzyme fraction. The activity stain was more prominent when the native gel was incubated in benzene as substrate in comparison to TCE. Crude enzyme and purified enzyme fractions were assayed for TCE degradation by the Fujiwara test. TCE biotransformation products were analysed by FT-IR spectroscopy. PMID:24083236

  12. Cardiorespiratory effects of outpatient anesthesia for oral surgery: trichloroethylene-halothane.

    PubMed

    Allen, G D; Everett, G B; Haines, M

    1976-12-01

    The cardiorespiratory effects of trichloroethylene supplementation of nitrous oxide-oxygen anesthesia, with simultaneous use of halothane at induction as needed, were studied in outpatient oral surgery patients undergoing dental extractions under general anesthesia. The technique produced no deleterious cardiovascular effects that could be attributed to the combined use of these agents. Elevations of blood pressure, stroke volume, and peripheral resistance indicated light anesthesia. The versatility of halothane combined with the absence of nephrotoxic and hepatotoxic breakdown products of trichloroethylene provides a satisfactory technique for outpatient oral surgery. The agents appear pharmacologically complimentary in that halothane lacks analgesic properties and postoperative shivering occurs, while induction with trichloroethylene is slow and tachypnea is a problem. PMID:1069107

  13. Performance and properties of nanoscale calcium peroxide for toluene removal.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yajie; Zhou, Xuefei; Zhang, Yalei; Zhang, Weixian; Chen, Jiabin

    2013-04-01

    Due to the large diameter and small surface, the contaminant degradation by conventional calcium peroxide (CaO2) is slow with high dosage required. The aggregation of conventional CaO2 also makes it difficult to operate. Nanoscale CaO2 was therefore synthesized and applied to remove toluene in this study. Prepared from nanoscale Ca(OH)2 and H2O2 in the ratio of 1:7, the finely dispersed nanoscale CaO2 particles were confirmed by the scanning electron microscope to be in the range of 100-200nm in size. Compared to their non nanoscale counterparts, the synthesized nanoscale CaO2 demonstrated a superior performance in the degradation of toluene, which could be eliminated in 3d at pH 6. The oxidation products of toluene were analyzed to include benzyl alcohol, benzaldehyde and three cresol isomers. With the addition of 2-propanol, hydroxyl radicals were indicated as the main reactive oxygen species in the oxidation of toluene by nanoscale CaO2. Superoxide radicals were also investigated as the marker of nanoscale CaO2 in the solution. Our study thus provides an important insight into the application of nanoscale CaO2 in the removal of toluene contaminants, which is significant, especially for controlling the petroleum contaminations. PMID:23466092

  14. Water stress effects on toluene biodegradation by Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Holden, P A; Halverson, L J; Firestone, M K

    1997-01-01

    We quantified the effects of matric and solute water potential on toluene biodegradation by Pseudomonas putida mt-2, a bacterial strain originally isolated from soil. Across the matric potential range of 0 to -1.5 MPa, growth rates were maximal for P. putida at -0.25 MPa and further reductions in the matric potential resulted in concomitant reductions in growth rates. Growth rates were constant over the solute potential range 0 to -1.0 MPa and lower at -1.5 MPa. First order toluene depletion rate coefficients were highest at 0.0 MPa as compared to other matric water potentials down to -1.5 MPa. Solute potentials down to -1.5 MPa did not affect first order toluene depletion rate coefficients. Total yield (protein) and carbon utilization efficiency were not affected by water potential, indicating that water potentials common to temperate soils were not sufficiently stressful to change cellular energy requirements. We conclude that for P. putida: (1) slightly negative matric potentials facilitate faster growth rates on toluene but more negative water potentials result in slower growth, (2) toluene utilization rate per cell mass is highest without matric water stress and is unaffected by solute potential, (3) growth efficiency did not differ across the range of matric water potentials 0.0 to -1.5 MPa. PMID:9396169

  15. Enhanced reductive dechlorination of trichloroethylene by sulfidated nanoscale zerovalent iron.

    PubMed

    Rajajayavel, Sai Rajasekar C; Ghoshal, Subhasis

    2015-07-01

    Direct injection of reactive nanoscale zerovalent iron particles (NZVI) is considered to be a promising approach for remediation of aquifers contaminated by chlorinated organic pollutants. In this study we show that the extent of sulfidation of NZVI enhances the rate of dechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) compared to that by unamended NZVI, and the enhancement depends on the Fe/S molar ratio. Experiments where TCE was reacted with NZVI sulfidated to different extents (Fe/S molar ratios 0.62-66) showed that the surface-area normalized first-order TCE degradation rate constant increased up to 40 folds compared to non-sulfidated NZVI. Fe/S ratios in the range of 12-25 provided the highest TCE dechlorination rates, and rates decreased at both higher and lower Fe/S. In contrast, sulfidated NZVI exposed to water in the absence of TCE showed significantly lower hydrogen evolution rate (2.75 μmol L(-1) h(-1)) compared to that by an unamended NZVI (6.92 μmol L(-1) h(-1)), indicating that sulfidation of NZVI suppressed corrosion reactions with water. Sulfide (HS(-)) ions reacted rapidly with NZVI and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses showed formation of a surface layer of FeS and FeS2. We propose that more electrons are preferentially conducted from sulfidated NZVI than from unamended NZVI to TCE, likely because of greater binding of TCE on the reactive sites of the iron sulfide outer layer. Resuspending sulfidated NZVI in sulfide-free or sulfide containing solutions altered the TCE degradation rate constants because of changes in the FeS layer thickness. Sulfidated NZVI maintained its high reactivity in the presence of multiple mono and divalent ions and with polyelectrolyte coatings. Thus, sulfide ions in groundwater can significantly alter NZVI reactivity. PMID:25935369

  16. Natural attenuation of trichloroethylene in fractured shale bedrock.

    PubMed

    Lenczewski, M; Jardine, P; McKay, L; Layton, A

    2003-07-01

    This paper describes one of the first well-documented field examples of natural attenuation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in groundwater in a fractured shale bedrock. The study was carried out adjacent to a former waste burial site in Waste Area Grouping 5 (WAG5) on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, TN. A contaminant plume containing TCE and its daughter products were detected downgradient from the buried waste pits, with most of the contamination occurring in the upper 6 m of the bedrock. The monitoring well array consists of a 35-m-long transect of multilevel sampling wells, situated along a line between the waste pits and a seep which discharges into a small stream. Concentrations of volatile organic carbons (VOCs) were highest in the waste trenches and decreased with distance downgradient towards the seep. Sampling wells indicated the presence of overlapping plumes of TCE, cis-dichloroethylene (cDCE), vinyl chloride (VC), ethylene, ethane, and methane, with the daughter products extending further downgradient than the parent (TCE). This type of distribution suggests anaerobic biodegradation. Measurements of redox potential at the site indicated that iron-reduction, sulfate reduction, and potentially methanogensis were occurring and are conducive to dechlorination of TCE. Bacteria enrichment of groundwater samples revealed the presence of methanotrophs, methanogens, iron-reducing bacteria and sulfate-reducing bacteria, all of which have previously been implicated in anaerobic biodegradation of TCE. 16S rDNA sequence from DNA extracted from two wells were similar to sequences of organisms previously implicated in the anaerobic biodegradation of chlorinated solvents. The combined data strongly suggest that anaerobic biodegradation of the highly chlorinated compounds is occurring. Aerobic biodegradation may also be occurring in oxygenated zones, including near a seep where groundwater exits the site, or in the upper bedrock during seasonal fluctuations in water

  17. Conditions affecting the mutagenicity of trichloroethylene in Salmonella

    SciTech Connect

    McGregor, D.B.; Reynolds, D.M. ); Zeiger, E. )

    1989-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a high production volume chemical frequency stabilized with oxiranes. These oxiranes may be responsible for the mutagenic activity of TCE in Salmonella, which has been occasionally, but not consistently, reported. High purity and oxirane-stabilized TCE samples were tested for their mutagenic potential in Salmonella typhimurium strains TA 1535, TA 98, and TA 100. Stabilized TCE was tested using a preincubation protocol up to a dose level of 10,000 {mu}g per plate, but not mutagenic response was observed in either the presence or absence of a supplementary metabolic activation system (S9 mix) derived from Aroclor 1254-induced male rat liver. TCE without oxirane stabilizers also was nonmutagenic when tested in a vapor delivery system at nominal concentrations of up to 20% and using S9 mix derived from either rat or hamster. TCE containing 0.5-0.6% 1,2-epoxybutane did induce mutagenic responses from strains TA 1535 and TA 100 in the presence and absence of S9 mix. Vapor-phase tests with 1,2-epoxybutane showed that an atmospheric concentration of 0.009% could induce 12-fold and 3-fold increases, respectively, in strains TA 1535 and TA 100. These increases would account for the mutagenic activity of the stabilized TCE sample. The absence of a significant response caused by unstabilized TCE in the presence of S9 mix is probably due to a lack of assay sensitivity, since chloral, a metabolite of TCE, is a mutagen in TA 100.

  18. Impact of iron sulfide transformation on trichloroethylene degradation

    SciTech Connect

    He, Y. Thomas; Wilson, John T.; Wilkin, Richard T.

    2010-05-04

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is one of the most common and persistent groundwater contaminants encountered at hazardous waste sites around the world. A growing body of evidence indicates that iron sulfides play an important role in degrading TCE in natural environments and in engineered systems designed for groundwater cleanup. In this study, we investigate transformation processes of iron sulfides and consequent impacts on TCE degradation using batch experimental techniques, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Our results show that mackinawite is highly reactive toward TCE and no detectable mineralogical changes were detected during the course of reaction. However, freeze-dried FeS transformed to a mixture of mackinawite and greigite during the freeze drying process, with further mineralogical changes during reaction with TCE to lepidocrocite, goethite and pyrite. Newly formed lepidocrocite is a transient phase, with conversion to goethite over time. TCE transformation kinetics show that freeze-dried FeS is 20-50 times less reactive in degrading TCE than non-freeze-dried FeS, and the TCE degradation rate increases with pH (from 5.4 to 8.3), possibly due to an increase of surface deprotonation or electron transfer at higher pH. Results suggest that freeze drying could cause FeS particle aggregation, decreased surface area and availability of reactive sites; it also could change FeS mineralogy and accelerate mineral transformation. These aspects could contribute to the lower reactivity of freeze-dried FeS toward TCE degradation. Modeling results show that FeS transformation in natural environments depends on specific biogeochemical conditions, and natural FeS transformation may affect mineral reactivity in a similar way as compared to the freeze drying process. Rapid transformation of FeS to FeS{sub 2} could significantly slow down TCE degradation in both natural and engineered systems.

  19. Relationship between vapor intrusion and human exposure to trichloroethylene.

    PubMed

    Archer, Natalie P; Bradford, Carrie M; Villanacci, John F; Crain, Neil E; Corsi, Richard L; Chambers, David M; Burk, Tonia; Blount, Benjamin C

    2015-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) in groundwater has the potential to volatilize through soil into indoor air where it can be inhaled. The purpose of this study was to determine whether individuals living above TCE-contaminated groundwater are exposed to TCE through vapor intrusion. We examined associations between TCE concentrations in various environmental media and TCE concentrations in residents. For this assessment, indoor air, outdoor air, soil gas, and tap water samples were collected in and around 36 randomly selected homes; blood samples were collected from 63 residents of these homes. Additionally, a completed exposure survey was collected from each participant. Environmental and blood samples were analyzed for TCE. Mixed model multiple linear regression analyses were performed to determine associations between TCE in residents' blood and TCE in indoor air, outdoor air, and soil gas. Blood TCE concentrations were above the limit of quantitation (LOQ; ≥ 0.012 µg L(-1)) in 17.5% of the blood samples. Of the 36 homes, 54.3%, 47.2%, and >84% had detectable concentrations of TCE in indoor air, outdoor air, and soil gas, respectively. Both indoor air and soil gas concentrations were statistically significantly positively associated with participants' blood concentrations (P = 0.0002 and P = 0.04, respectively). Geometric mean blood concentrations of residents from homes with indoor air concentrations of >1.6 µg m(-3) were approximately 50 times higher than geometric mean blood TCE concentrations in participants from homes with no detectable TCE in indoor air (P < .0001; 95% CI 10.4-236.4). This study confirms the occurrence of vapor intrusion and demonstrates the magnitude of exposure from vapor intrusion of TCE in a residential setting. PMID:26259926

  20. Trichloroethylene Metabolism in the Rat Ovary Reduces Oocyte Fertilizability

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Katherine Lily; Berger, Trish

    2007-01-01

    Exposure to trichloroethylene (TCE, an environmental toxicant) reduced oocyte fertilizability in the rat. In vivo, TCE may be metabolized by cytochrome P450 dependent oxidation or glutathione conjugation in the liver or kidneys, respectively. Cytochrome P450 dependent oxidation is the higher affinity pathway. The primary isoform of cytochrome P450 to metabolize TCE in the liver, cytochrome P450 2E1, is present in the rodent ovary. Ovarian metabolism of TCE by the oxidative pathway and the production of reactive oxygen species may occur given the presence of the metabolizing enzyme. The objectives of this study were to define the sensitive interval of oocyte growth to TCE exposure, and to determine if TCE exposure resulted in the formation of ovarian protein carbonyls, an indicator of oxidative damage. Rats were exposed to TCE in drinking water (0.45% TCE (v/v) in 3% Tween) or 3% Tween (vehicle-control) during three 4–5 day intervals of oocyte development preceding ovulation. Oocytes from TCE-exposed females were less fertilizable compared with vehicle-control oocytes. Immunohistochemical labeling of ovaries and Western blotting of ovarian proteins demonstrated TCE treatment induced a greater incidence of protein carbonyls compared with vehicle controls. Protein carbonyl formation in the ovary is consistent with TCE metabolism by the cytochrome P450 pathway. Oxidative damage following ovarian TCE metabolism or the presence of TCE metabolites may contribute to reduced oocyte fertilizability. In summary, these results indicate maturing oocytes are susceptible to very short in vivo exposures to TCE. PMID:17673192

  1. Autoxidation of trichloroethylene in aqueous solution at groundwater contamination concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenbeis, J.J.

    1989-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE), a commonly used industrial degreaser and solvent, is one of the most frequently detected contaminants of soils and groundwater. One aspect of the subsurface behavior of TCE involves the types and rates of degradation processes the various phases undergo. While biological degradation of TCE has received much recent attention in the research, very little research has been directed at autoxidation of TCE in dilute aqueous solutions at concentrations typical of subsurface contamination. Dilute aqueous solutions of TCE were examined under laboratory conditions to evaluate the kinetics of aqueous phase autoxidation. The concentrations and temperatures used were within the range of those typically found in contaminated groundwater and soils. Autoxidation was carried out in 44 ml glass reaction vials and the degradation rate was monitored by measuring the loss of TCE by gas chromatography. Results indicated that autoxidation occurred despite the addition of an antioxidant to the pure solvent by the manufacturer. Autoxidation of TCE is suspected to occur via a sequence of free radical reactions. The overall reaction order determined for the sequence was approximately 0.8. The overall reaction was found to proceed at two rates, an initial rate from 0 to 24 hours and a long term rate thereafter. The rate coefficients corresponding to these two rate thereafter. The rate coefficients corresponding to these two reaction rates were approximately 2 and 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}mol{sup 0.2}1{sup {minus}0.2}hr{sup {minus}1}, respectively. The rate coefficient and reaction order were used to determine an equation to calculate half life. Solutions of 10 ppb and 1 ppm were calculated to have half lives of approximately 10 days and 25 days, respectively.

  2. Impact of iron sulfide transformation on trichloroethylene degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Y. Thomas; Wilson, John T.; Wilkin, Richard T.

    2010-04-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is one of the most common and persistent groundwater contaminants encountered at hazardous waste sites around the world. A growing body of evidence indicates that iron sulfides play an important role in degrading TCE in natural environments and in engineered systems designed for groundwater cleanup. In this study, we investigate transformation processes of iron sulfides and consequent impacts on TCE degradation using batch experimental techniques, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Our results show that mackinawite is highly reactive toward TCE and no detectable mineralogical changes were detected during the course of reaction. However, freeze-dried FeS transformed to a mixture of mackinawite and greigite during the freeze drying process, with further mineralogical changes during reaction with TCE to lepidocrocite, goethite and pyrite. Newly formed lepidocrocite is a transient phase, with conversion to goethite over time. TCE transformation kinetics show that freeze-dried FeS is 20-50 times less reactive in degrading TCE than non-freeze-dried FeS, and the TCE degradation rate increases with pH (from 5.4 to 8.3), possibly due to an increase of surface deprotonation or electron transfer at higher pH. Results suggest that freeze drying could cause FeS particle aggregation, decreased surface area and availability of reactive sites; it also could change FeS mineralogy and accelerate mineral transformation. These aspects could contribute to the lower reactivity of freeze-dried FeS toward TCE degradation. Modeling results show that FeS transformation in natural environments depends on specific biogeochemical conditions, and natural FeS transformation may affect mineral reactivity in a similar way as compared to the freeze drying process. Rapid transformation of FeS to FeS 2 could significantly slow down TCE degradation in both natural and engineered systems.

  3. Human Health Effects of Trichloroethylene: Key Findings and Scientific Issues

    PubMed Central

    Jinot, Jennifer; Scott, Cheryl Siegel; Makris, Susan L.; Cooper, Glinda S.; Dzubow, Rebecca C.; Bale, Ambuja S.; Evans, Marina V.; Guyton, Kathryn Z.; Keshava, Nagalakshmi; Lipscomb, John C.; Barone, Stanley; Fox, John F.; Gwinn, Maureen R.; Schaum, John; Caldwell, Jane C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In support of the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) completed a toxicological review of trichloroethylene (TCE) in September 2011, which was the result of an effort spanning > 20 years. Objectives: We summarized the key findings and scientific issues regarding the human health effects of TCE in the U.S. EPA’s toxicological review. Methods: In this assessment we synthesized and characterized thousands of epidemiologic, experimental animal, and mechanistic studies, and addressed several key scientific issues through modeling of TCE toxicokinetics, meta-analyses of epidemiologic studies, and analyses of mechanistic data. Discussion: Toxicokinetic modeling aided in characterizing the toxicological role of the complex metabolism and multiple metabolites of TCE. Meta-analyses of the epidemiologic data strongly supported the conclusions that TCE causes kidney cancer in humans and that TCE may also cause liver cancer and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Mechanistic analyses support a key role for mutagenicity in TCE-induced kidney carcinogenicity. Recent evidence from studies in both humans and experimental animals point to the involvement of TCE exposure in autoimmune disease and hypersensitivity. Recent avian and in vitro mechanistic studies provided biological plausibility that TCE plays a role in developmental cardiac toxicity, the subject of substantial debate due to mixed results from epidemiologic and rodent studies. Conclusions: TCE is carcinogenic to humans by all routes of exposure and poses a potential human health hazard for noncancer toxicity to the central nervous system, kidney, liver, immune system, male reproductive system, and the developing embryo/fetus. PMID:23249866

  4. Performance test plan for a space station toluene heater tube

    SciTech Connect

    Parekh, M.B.

    1987-10-01

    Sundstrand Energy Systems was awarded a contract to investigate the performance capabilities of a toluene heater tube integral to a heat pipe as applied to the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) solar dynamic power system for the Space Station. This heat pipe is a subassembly of the heat receiver. The heat receiver, the heat absorption component of the ORC solar dynamic power system, consists of forty liquid metal heat pipes located circumferentially around the heat receiver`s outside diameter. Each heat pipe contains a toluene heater, two thermal energy storage (TES) canisters and potassium. The function of the heater tube is to heat the supercritical toluene to the required turbine inlet temperature. During the orbit of the space station, the heat receiver and thereby the heat pipe and heater tube will be subjected to variable heat input. The design of the heater must be such that it can accommodate the thermal and hydraulic variations that will be imposed upon it.

  5. Linking Toluene Degradation with Specific Microbial Populations in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Jessica R.; Macalady, Jennifer L.; Harris, David; Scow, Kate M.

    1999-01-01

    Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis of a soil microbial community was coupled with 13C isotope tracer analysis to measure the community’s response to addition of 35 μg of [13C]toluene ml of soil solution−1. After 119 h of incubation with toluene, 96% of the incorporated 13C was detected in only 16 of the total 59 PLFAs (27%) extracted from the soil. Of the total 13C-enriched PLFAs, 85% were identical to the PLFAs contained in a toluene-metabolizing bacterium isolated from the same soil. In contrast, the majority of the soil PLFAs (91%) became labeled when the same soil was incubated with [13C]glucose. Our study showed that coupling 13C tracer analysis with PLFA analysis is an effective technique for distinguishing a specific microbial population involved in metabolism of a labeled substrate in complex environments such as soil. PMID:10583996

  6. Incineration of toluene and chlorobenzene in a laboratory incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Z.; Mcintosh, M.J.; Demirgian, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports experimental results on the incineration of toluene and chlorobenzene in a small laboratory incinerator. Temperature of the incinerator, excess air ratio and mean residence time were varied to simulate both complete and incomplete combustion conditions. The flue gas was monitored on line using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy coupling with a heated long path cell (LPC). Methane, toluene, benzene, chlorobenzene, hydrogen chloride and carbon monoxide in the flue gas were simultaneously analyzed. Experimental results indicate that benzene is a major product of incomplete combustion (PIC) besides carbon monoxide in the incineration of toluene and chlorobenzene, and is very sensitive to combustion conditions. This suggests that benzene is a target analyle to be monitored in full-scale incinerators.

  7. Incineration of toluene and chlorobenzene in a laboratory incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Zhuoxiong; McIntosh, M.J.; Demirgian, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports results on incineration of toluene and chlorobenzene in a small laboratory incinerator. The incinerator temperature, excess air ratio and mean residence time were varied to simulate both complete and incomplete combustion conditions. The flue gas was monitored on line using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy coupling with a heated long path cell (LPC). Methane, toluene, benzene, chlorobenzene, hydrogen chloride and carbon monoxide in the flue gas were simultaneously analyzed. Experimental results indicate that benzene is a major product of incomplete combustion (PIC), besides carbon monoxide, in the incineration of toluene and chlorobenzene and is very sensitive to the combustion conditions. This suggests that benzene is a target analyte to be monitored in full-scale incinerators.

  8. Incineration of toluene and chlorobenzene in a laboratory incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Zhuoxiong; McIntosh, M.J.; Demirgian, J.C.

    1992-12-31

    This paper reports results on incineration of toluene and chlorobenzene in a small laboratory incinerator. The incinerator temperature, excess air ratio and mean residence time were varied to simulate both complete and incomplete combustion conditions. The flue gas was monitored on line using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy coupling with a heated long path cell (LPC). Methane, toluene, benzene, chlorobenzene, hydrogen chloride and carbon monoxide in the flue gas were simultaneously analyzed. Experimental results indicate that benzene is a major product of incomplete combustion (PIC), besides carbon monoxide, in the incineration of toluene and chlorobenzene and is very sensitive to the combustion conditions. This suggests that benzene is a target analyte to be monitored in full-scale incinerators.

  9. SYNCHROTRON X-RAY MICROTOMOGRAPHY, ELECTRON PROBE MICROANALYSIS, AND NMR OF TOLUENE WASTE IN CEMENT.

    SciTech Connect

    BUTLER,L.G.

    1999-07-22

    Synchrotron X-ray microtomography shows vesicular structures for toluene/cement mixtures, prepared with 1.22 to 3.58 wt% toluene. Three-dimensional imaging of the cured samples shows spherical vesicles, with diameters ranging from 20 to 250 {micro}m; a search with EPMA for vesicles in the range of 1-20 {micro}m proved negative. However, the total vesicle volume, as computed from the microtomography images, accounts for less than 10% of initial toluene. Since the cements were cured in sealed bottles, the larger portion of toluene must be dispersed within the cement matrix. Evidence for toluene in the cement matrix comes from {sup 29}Si MAS NMR spectroscopy, which shows a reduction in chain silicates with added toluene. Also, {sup 2}H NMR of d{sub 8}-toluene/cement samples shows high mobility for all, toluene and thus no toluene/cement binding. A model that accounts for all observations follows: For loadings below about 3 wt%, most toluene is dispersed in the cement matrix, with a small fraction of the initial toluene phase separating from the cement paste and forming vesicular structures that are preserved in the cured cement. Furthermore, at loadings above 3 wt%, the abundance of vesicles formed during toluene/cement paste mixing leads to macroscopic phase separation (most toluene floats to the surface of the cement paste).

  10. SPERMATID MICRONUCLEUS ANALYSES OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE AND CHLORAL HYDRATE EFFECTS IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mice were exposed by inhalation to trichloroethylene (TCE), or by i.p. injection to the TCE metabolite, chloral hydrate (CH). arly spermatids were analyzed for micronucleus (MN) frequency and kinetochore status (presence or absence) using fluorochrome-labeled anti-kinetochore ant...