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Sample records for tetrachloroethylene

  1. Tetrachloroethylene

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Tetrachloroethylene ( Perchloroethylene ) ; CASRN 127 - 18 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessm

  2. Mechanism of pentachloroethane dehydrochlorination to tetrachloroethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, A.L.; Gschwend, P.M. )

    1991-01-01

    The dehydrochlorination of pentachloroethane to tetrachloroethylene was investigated to gain insight into mechanisms of hexachloroethane reduction as well as structure-reactivity relationships for polyhalogenated alkanes. Although the absence of deuterium exchange excludes the possibility of an (E{sub 1CB}){sub R} mechanism, several factors suggest the transition state possesses considerable carbanion character: the reaction is insensitive to buffer catalysis, exhibits a moderately large solvent kinetic isotope effect, and only displays a neutral mechanism at low pH. Though our results cannot rule out a stepwise (E{sub 1CB}){sub I} or (E{sub 1CB}){sub ip} sequence, we believe CHCl{sub 2}CCl{sub 3} reacts via a concerted mechanism based on a comparison of its dehydrohalogenation kinetics with proton-exchange rates for CHCl{sub 3} and CHCl{sub 2}CF{sub 3}. Pentachloroethane reported in the reduction of hexachloroethane to tetrachloroethylene is unlikely to result from carbanion protonation. Rather, it may be diagnostic of free-radical reduction mechanisms. Because pentachloroethane reacts relatively rapidly, future studies of hexachloroethane reduction should consider whether pentachloroethane represents a reaction intermediate instead of dismissing it as a minor side product.

  3. SURFACTANT ENHANCED REMEDIATION OF SOIL COLUMNS CONTAMINATED BY RESIDUAL TETRACHLOROETHYLENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of aqueous surfactant solutions to recover tetrachloroethylene (PCE) entrapped in Ottawa sand was evaluated in four column experiments. Residual PCE was emplaced by injecting 14C-labeled PCE into water-saturated soil columns and displacing the free product ...

  4. IRIS TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF TETRACHLOROETHYLENE (PERCHLOROETHYLENE) (INTERAGENCY SCIENCE DISCUSSION DRAFT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is releasing the draft report, Toxicological Review of Tetrachloroethylene (Perchloroethylene), that was distributed to Federal agencies and White House Offices for comment during the Science Discussion step of the IRIS Assessment...

  5. IRIS Toxicological Review of Tetrachloroethylene (Perchloroethylene) (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA conducted a peer review of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of tetrachloroethylene that will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database. Peer review is meant to ensure that science is used credibly and ...

  6. Human Health Effects of Tetrachloroethylene: Key Findings and Scientific Issues

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Karen A.; Scott, Cheryl Siegel; Cooper, Glinda S.; Bale, Ambuja S.; Kopylev, Leonid; Barone, Stanley; Makris, Susan L.; Glenn, Barbara; Subramaniam, Ravi P.; Gwinn, Maureen R.; Dzubow, Rebecca C.; Chiu, Weihsueh A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) completed a toxicological review of tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, PCE) in February 2012 in support of the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS). Objectives: We reviewed key findings and scientific issues regarding the human health effects of PCE described in the U.S. EPA’s Toxicological Review of Tetrachloroethylene (Perchloroethylene). Methods: The updated assessment of PCE synthesized and characterized a substantial database of epidemiological, experimental animal, and mechanistic studies. Key scientific issues were addressed through modeling of PCE toxicokinetics, synthesis of evidence from neurological studies, and analyses of toxicokinetic, mechanistic, and other factors (tumor latency, severity, and background rate) in interpreting experimental animal cancer findings. Considerations in evaluating epidemiological studies included the quality (e.g., specificity) of the exposure assessment methods and other essential design features, and the potential for alternative explanations for observed associations (e.g., bias or confounding). Discussion: Toxicokinetic modeling aided in characterizing the complex metabolism and multiple metabolites that contribute to PCE toxicity. The exposure assessment approach—a key evaluation factor for epidemiological studies of bladder cancer, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and multiple myeloma—provided suggestive evidence of carcinogenicity. Bioassay data provided conclusive evidence of carcinogenicity in experimental animals. Neurotoxicity was identified as a sensitive noncancer health effect, occurring at low exposures: a conclusion supported by multiple studies. Evidence was integrated from human, experimental animal, and mechanistic data sets in assessing adverse health effects of PCE. Conclusions: PCE is likely to be carcinogenic to humans. Neurotoxicity is a sensitive adverse health effect of PCE. Citation: Guyton KZ, Hogan KA, Scott CS, Cooper GS, Bale AS

  7. Death due to acute tetrachloroethylene intoxication in a chronic abuser.

    PubMed

    Amadasi, Alberto; Mastroluca, Lavinia; Marasciuolo, Laura; Caligara, Marina; Sironi, Luca; Gentile, Guendalina; Zoja, Riccardo

    2015-05-01

    Volatile substances are used widespread, especially among young people, as a cheap and easily accessible drug. Tetrachloroethylene is one of the solvents exerting effects on the central nervous system with experiences of disinhibition and euphoria. The case presented is that of a 27-year-old female, found dead by her father at home with cotton swabs dipped in the nostrils. She was already known for this type of abuse and previously admitted twice to the hospital for nonfatal acute poisonings. The swabs were still soaked in tetrachloroethylene. Toxicological and histological investigations demonstrated the presence of an overlap between chronic intake of the substance (with high concentrations in sites of accumulation, e.g., the adipose tissue, and contemporary tissue damage, as histologically highlighted) and acute intoxication as final cause of death, with a concentration of 158 mg/L in cardiac blood and 4915 mg/kg in the adipose tissue. No other drugs or medicines were detected in body fluids or tissues, and to our knowledge, this is the highest concentration ever detected in forensic cases. This peculiar case confirms the toxicity of this substance and focuses on the importance of complete histological and toxicological investigations in the distinction between chronic abuse and acute intoxication. PMID:25605280

  8. Transformation of tetrachloroethylene to trichloroethylene by homoacetogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Terzenbach, D P; Blaut, M

    1994-10-15

    Eight homoacetogenic strains of the genera Acetobacterium, Clostridium and Sporomusa were tested for their ability to dechlorinate tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethene, PCE). Of the organisms tested only Sporomusa ovata was able to reductively dechlorinate PCE with methanol as an electron donor. Resting cells of S. ovata reductively dechlorinated PCE at a rate of 9.8 nmol h-1 (mg protein)-1 to trichloroethylene (TCE) as the sole product. The dechlorination activity depended on concomitant acetogenesis from methanol and CO2. Cell-free extracts of S. ovata, Clostridium formicoaceticum, Acetobacterium woodii, and the methanogenic bacterium Methanolobus tindarius transformed PCE to TCE with Ti(III) or carbon monoxide as electron donors. Corrinoids were shown in S. ovata to be involved in the dechlorination reaction of PCE to TCE as evident from the reversible inhibition with propyl iodide. Rates of dechlorination followed a pseudo-first-order kinetic. PMID:7988892

  9. Prenatal and Early Childhood Exposure to Tetrachloroethylene and Adult Vision

    PubMed Central

    Getz, Kelly D.; Janulewicz, Patricia A.; Rowe, Susannah; Weinberg, Janice M.; Winter, Michael R.; Martin, Brett R.; Vieira, Veronica M.; White, Roberta F.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Tetrachloroethylene (PCE; or perchloroethylene) has been implicated in visual impairments among adults with occupational and environmental exposures as well as children born to women with occupational exposure during pregnancy. Objectives: Using a population-based retrospective cohort study, we examined the association between prenatal and early childhood exposure to PCE-contaminated drinking water on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, and deficits in adult color vision and contrast sensitivity. Methods: We estimated the amount of PCE that was delivered to the family residence from participants’ gestation through 5 years of age. We administered to this now adult study population vision tests to assess acuity, contrast sensitivity, and color discrimination. Results: Participants exposed to higher PCE levels exhibited lower contrast sensitivity at intermediate and high spatial frequencies compared with unexposed participants, although the differences were generally not statistically significant. Exposed participants also exhibited poorer color discrimination than unexposed participants. The difference in mean color confusion indices (CCI) was statistically significant for the Farnsworth test but not Lanthony’s D-15d test [Farnsworth CCI mean difference = 0.05, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.003, 0.10; Lanthony CCI mean difference = 0.07, 95% CI: –0.02, 0.15]. Conclusions: Prenatal and early childhood exposure to PCE-contaminated drinking water may be associated with long-term subclinical visual dysfunction in adulthood, particularly with respect to color discrimination. Further investigation of this association in similarly exposed populations is necessary. PMID:22784657

  10. EVALUATION OF GEOPHYSICAL METHODS FOR THE DETECTION OF SUBSURFACE TETRACHLOROETHYLENE (PCE) IN CONTROLLED SPILL EXPERIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tetrachloroethylene (PCE), typically used as a dry cleaning solvent, is a predominant contaminant in the subsurface at Superfund Sites. PCE is a dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) that migrates downward into the earth, leaving behind areas of residual saturation and free prod...

  11. 40 CFR 721.3560 - Derivative of tetra-chloro-ethy-lene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Health Administration regulations and set forth at 29 CFR 1910.134, and 30 CFR part 11, respectively, and... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Derivative of tetra-chloro-ethy-lene. 721.3560 Section 721.3560 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED)...

  12. 40 CFR 721.3560 - Derivative of tetra-chloro-ethy-lene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Derivative of tetra-chloro-ethy-lene. 721.3560 Section 721.3560 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3560 Derivative...

  13. 40 CFR 721.3560 - Derivative of tetra-chloro-ethy-lene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Health Administration regulations and set forth at 29 CFR 1910.134, and 30 CFR part 11, respectively, and... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Derivative of tetra-chloro-ethy-lene. 721.3560 Section 721.3560 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED)...

  14. 40 CFR 721.3560 - Derivative of tetra-chloro-ethy-lene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Health Administration regulations and set forth at 29 CFR 1910.134, and 30 CFR part 11, respectively, and... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Derivative of tetra-chloro-ethy-lene. 721.3560 Section 721.3560 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED)...

  15. 40 CFR 721.3560 - Derivative of tetra-chloro-ethy-lene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Derivative of tetra-chloro-ethy-lene. 721.3560 Section 721.3560 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3560 Derivative...

  16. Continuous Determination of High-Vapor Phase Concentrations of Tetrachloroethylene Using On-Line Mass Spectrometry

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method was developed to determine the vapor concentration of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) at and below its equilibrium vapor phase concentration, 168,000 μg/L (25°C). Vapor samples were drawn by vacuum into a six-port sampling valve and injected through a jet separator into an io...

  17. Use of Mini-Sprinklers to Strip Trichloroethylene and Tetrachloroethylene from Contaminated Ground Water.

    SciTech Connect

    Brerisford, Yvette, C.; Bush, Parshall, B.; Blake, John, I.; Bayer, Cassandra L.

    2003-01-01

    Berisford, Y.C., P.B. Bush, J.I. Blake, and C.L. Bayer. 2003. Use of mini-sprinklers to strip trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene from contaminated ground water. J. Env. Qual. 32:801-815. Three low-volume mini-sprinklers were tested for their efficacy to strip trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) from water. Deionized water spiked with TCE and PCE was pumped through a mini-sprinkler supported on top of a 1.8-m-tall. Water was collected in collection vessels at 0.61 and 1.22 m above the ground on support columns that were spaced at 0.61-m intervals from the riser base, and samples were composited per height and distance from the riser. Overall, air-stripping reduced dissolved concentrations of TCE and PCE by 99.1 to 100 and 96.9 to 100%, respectively. Mini-sprinklers offer the advantages of (i) easy setup in series that can be used on practically any terrain; (ii) operation over a long period of time that does not threaten aquifer depletion; (iii) use in small or confined aquifers in which the capacity is too low to support large irrigation or pumping systems; and (iv) use in forests in which the small, low-impact droplets of the mini-sprinklers do not damage bark and in which trees can help manage (via evapotransporation) excess waste water.

  18. SURFACTANT ENHANCED RECOVERY OF TETRACHLOROETHYLENE FROM A POROUS MEDIUM CONTAINING LOW PERMEABILITY LENSES. 1. EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES. (R825409)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    A matrix of batch, column and two-dimensional (2-D) box experiments was conducted to investigate the coupled effects of rate-limited solubilization and layering on the entrapment and subsequent recovery of a representative dense NAPL, tetrachloroethylene (PCE)...

  19. TETRACHLOROETHYLENE EXPOSURE AND RISK OF SCHIZOPHRENIA: OFFSPRING OF DRY CLEANERS IN A POPULATION BIRTH COHORT, PRELIMINARY FINDINGS

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, Mary C.; Opler, Mark G.; Harlap, Susan; Harkavy-Friedman, Jill; Kleinhaus, Karine; Nahon, Daniella; Fennig, Shmuel; Susser, Ezra S.; Malaspina, Dolores

    2009-01-01

    Tetrachloroethylene is a solvent used in dry cleaning with reported neurotoxic effects. Using proportional hazard methods, we examined the relationship between parental occupation as a dry cleaner and risk for schizophrenia in a prospective population-based cohort of 88, 829 offspring born in Jerusalem from 1964 through 1976, followed from birth to age 21–33 years. Of 144 offspring whose parents were dry cleaners, 4 developed schizophrenia. We observed an increased incidence of schizophrenia in offspring of parents who were dry cleaners (RR = 3.4, 95% CI, 1.3–9.2, p=0.01). Tetrachloroethylene exposure warrants further investigation as a risk factor for schizophrenia. PMID:17113267

  20. Integrating address geocoding, land use regression, and spatiotemporal geostatistical estimation for groundwater tetrachloroethylene.

    PubMed

    Messier, Kyle P; Akita, Yasuyuki; Serre, Marc L

    2012-03-01

    Geographic information systems (GIS) based techniques are cost-effective and efficient methods used by state agencies and epidemiology researchers for estimating concentration and exposure. However, budget limitations have made statewide assessments of contamination difficult, especially in groundwater media. Many studies have implemented address geocoding, land use regression, and geostatistics independently, but this is the first to examine the benefits of integrating these GIS techniques to address the need of statewide exposure assessments. A novel framework for concentration exposure is introduced that integrates address geocoding, land use regression (LUR), below detect data modeling, and Bayesian Maximum Entropy (BME). A LUR model was developed for tetrachloroethylene that accounts for point sources and flow direction. We then integrate the LUR model into the BME method as a mean trend while also modeling below detects data as a truncated Gaussian probability distribution function. We increase available PCE data 4.7 times from previously available databases through multistage geocoding. The LUR model shows significant influence of dry cleaners at short ranges. The integration of the LUR model as mean trend in BME results in a 7.5% decrease in cross validation mean square error compared to BME with a constant mean trend. PMID:22264162

  1. Reductive dechlorination of Tri- and tetrachloroethylenes depends on transition from aerobic to anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Kästner, M

    1991-07-01

    Aerobic enrichment cultures from contaminated groundwaters dechlorinated trichloroethylene (TCE) (14.6 mg/liter; 111 mumol/liter) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) (16.2 mg/liter; 98 mumol/liter) reductively within 4 days after the transition from aerobic to anaerobic conditions. The transformation products were equimolar amounts of cis-1,2-dichloroethylene and traces of 1,1-dichloroethylene. No other chlorinated product and no methane were detected. The change was accompanied by the release of sulfide, which caused a decrease in the redox potential from 0 to -150 mV. In sterile control experiments, sulfide led to the abiotic formation of traces of 1,1-dichloroethylene without cis-1,2-dichloroethylene production. The reductive dechlorination of PCE via TCE depended on these specific transition conditions after consumption of the electron acceptor oxygen or nitrate. Repeated feeding of TCE or PCE to cultures after the change to anaerobic conditions yielded no further dechlorination. Only aerobic subcultures with an air/liquid ratio of 1:4 maintained dechlorination activities; anaerobic subcultures showed no transformation. Bacteria from noncontaminated sites showed no reduction under the same conditions. PMID:1892393

  2. Kinetics of tetrachloroethylene-reductive dechlorination catalyzed by vitamin B{sub 12}

    SciTech Connect

    Burris, D.R.; Deng, B.; Buck, L.E.; Hatfield, K.

    1998-09-01

    Reductive dechlorination kinetics of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) to ethylene catalyzed by vitamin B{sub 12} using Ti[III] citrate as the bulk reductant was examined in a vapor-water batch system. A kinetic model incorporating substrate-B{sub 12} electron-transfer complex formation and subsequent product release was developed. The model also accounted for the primary reductive dechlorination pathways (hydrogenolysis and reductive {beta} elimination) and vapor/water-phase partitioning. Reaction rate constants were sequentially determined by fitting the model to experimental kinetic data while moving upward through consecutive reaction pathways. The release of product from the complex was found to be second order with respect to substrate concentration for both PCE and acetylene; all other substrates appeared to release by first order. Reductive {beta} elimination was found to be a significant reaction pathway for trichloroethylene (TCE), and chloroacetylene was observed as a reactive intermediate. Acetylene production appears to be primarily due to the reduction of chloroacetylene derived from TCE. The reduction of cis-dichloroethylene (cis-DCE), the primary DCE isomer formed, was extremely slow, leading to a significant buildup of cis-DCE. The kinetics of acetylene and vinyl chloride reduction appeared to be limited by the formation of relatively stable substrate-B{sub 12} complexes. The relatively simple model examined appears to adequately represent the main features of the experimental data.

  3. Integrating Address Geocoding, Land Use Regression, and Spatiotemporal Geostatistical Estimation for Groundwater Tetrachloroethylene

    PubMed Central

    Messier, Kyle P.; Akita, Yasuyuki; Serre, Marc L.

    2012-01-01

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) based techniques are cost-effective and efficient methods used by state agencies and epidemiology researchers for estimating concentration and exposure. However, budget limitations have made statewide assessments of contamination difficult, especially in groundwater media. Many studies have implemented address geocoding, land use regression, and geostatistics independently, but this is the first to examine the benefits of integrating these GIS techniques to address the need of statewide exposure assessments. A novel framework for concentration exposure is introduced that integrates address geocoding, land use regression (LUR), below detect data modeling, and Bayesian Maximum Entropy (BME). A LUR model was developed for Tetrachloroethylene that accounts for point sources and flow direction. We then integrate the LUR model into the BME method as a mean trend while also modeling below detects data as a truncated Gaussian probability distribution function. We increase available PCE data 4.7 times from previously available databases through multistage geocoding. The LUR model shows significant influence of dry cleaners at short ranges. The integration of the LUR model as mean trend in BME results in a 7.5% decrease in cross validation mean square error compared to BME with a constant mean trend. PMID:22264162

  4. Reductive dechlorination of Tri- and tetrachloroethylenes depends on transition from aerobic to anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Kästner, M

    1991-01-01

    Aerobic enrichment cultures from contaminated groundwaters dechlorinated trichloroethylene (TCE) (14.6 mg/liter; 111 mumol/liter) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) (16.2 mg/liter; 98 mumol/liter) reductively within 4 days after the transition from aerobic to anaerobic conditions. The transformation products were equimolar amounts of cis-1,2-dichloroethylene and traces of 1,1-dichloroethylene. No other chlorinated product and no methane were detected. The change was accompanied by the release of sulfide, which caused a decrease in the redox potential from 0 to -150 mV. In sterile control experiments, sulfide led to the abiotic formation of traces of 1,1-dichloroethylene without cis-1,2-dichloroethylene production. The reductive dechlorination of PCE via TCE depended on these specific transition conditions after consumption of the electron acceptor oxygen or nitrate. Repeated feeding of TCE or PCE to cultures after the change to anaerobic conditions yielded no further dechlorination. Only aerobic subcultures with an air/liquid ratio of 1:4 maintained dechlorination activities; anaerobic subcultures showed no transformation. Bacteria from noncontaminated sites showed no reduction under the same conditions. PMID:1892393

  5. Adult Neuropsychological Performance Following Prenatal and Early Postnatal Exposure to Tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Janulewicz, Patricia A; White, Roberta F; Martin, Brett M; Winter, Michael R; Weinberg, Janice M; Vieira, Veronica; Aschengrau, Ann

    2012-01-01

    This population-based retrospective cohort study examined adult performance on a battery of neuropsychological tests in relation to prenatal and early postnatal exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated drinking water on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Subjects were identified through birth records from 1969 through 1983. Exposure was modeled using pipe network information from town water departments, a PCE leaching and transport algorithm, EPANet water flow modeling software, and a Geographic Information System (GIS). Results of crude and multivariate analyses among 35 exposed and 28 unexposed subjects showed no association between prenatal and early postnatal exposure and decrements on tests that assess abilities in the domains of omnibus intelligence, academic achievement or language. The results were suggestive of an association between prenatal and early postnatal PCE exposure and diminished performance on tests that assessed abilities in the domains of visuospatial functioning, learning and memory, motor, attention and mood. Because the sample size was small, most findings were not statistically significant. Future studies with larger sample sizes should be conducted to further define the neuropsychological consequences of early developmental PCE exposure. PMID:22522125

  6. Kinetics of the transformation of trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene by iron sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, E.C.; Hayes, K.F. . Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering)

    1999-06-15

    The transformation of trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), and 1,1-dichloroethylene FeS in aqueous solution at pH 8.3 was studied in batch experiments. TCE and PCE were transformed by FeS with pseudo-first-order rate constants, corrected for partitioning to the sample headspace, of (1.49 [+-] 0.14) [times] 10[sup [minus]3] h[sup [minus]1] (TCE) and (5.7 [+-] 1.0) [times] 10[sup [minus]4] h[sup [minus]1] (PCE). A 17% decrease in the concentration of 1,3-DCE was observed over 120 days; however, no reaction products were detected. TCE and PCE transformation data were fit to a rate law assuming transformation of TCE via parallel reaction pathways to acetylene and cis-1,2-dichloroethylene (cis-DCE) and transformation of PCE via parallel reaction pathways to acetylene and TCE. Acetylene was the major reaction product for both TCE and PCE. Determination of rate constants for each reaction pathway indicated that TCE was transformed to acetylene 11.8 [+-] 1.1 times faster than to cis-DCE and that PCE was transformed to acetylene 8.2 [+-] 1.8 times faster than to TCE. Additional minor reaction products were vinyl chloride (VC) for TCE and cis-DCE for PCE. Detection of acetylene as the major product of both TCE and PCE transformation by FeS contrasts with the sequential hydrogenolysis products typically observed in the microbial transformation of these compounds, making acetylene a potential indicator of abiotic transformation of TCE and PCE by FeS in natural systems.

  7. Mutagenicity of the Cysteine S-Conjugate Sulfoxides of Trichloroethylene and Tetrachloroethylene in the Ames Test

    PubMed Central

    Irving, Roy M.; Elfarra, Adnan A.

    2013-01-01

    The nephrotoxicity and nephrocarcinogenicity of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) are believed to be mediated primarily through the cysteine S-conjugate β-lyase-dependent bioactivation of the corresponding cysteine S-conjugate metabolites S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (DCVC) and S-(1,2,2-trichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (TCVC), respectively. DCVC and TCVC have previously been demonstrated to be mutagenic by the Ames Salmonella mutagenicity assay, and reduction in mutagenicity was observed upon treatment with the β-lyase inhibitor aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA). Because DCVC and TCVC can also be bioactivated through sulfoxidation to yield the potent nephrotoxicants S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine sulfoxide (DCVCS) and S-(1,2,2-trichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine sulfoxide (TCVCS), respectively, the mutagenic potential of these two sulfoxides was investigated using the Ames S. typhimuriumTA100 mutagenicity assay. The results show both DCVCS and TCVCS were mutagenic, and TCVCS exhibited 3-fold higher mutagenicity than DCVCS. However, DCVCS and TCVCS mutagenic activity was approximately 700-fold and 30-fold lower than DCVC and TCVC, respectively. DCVC and DCVCS appeared to induce toxicity in TA100, as evidenced by increased microcolony formation and decreased mutant frequency above threshold concentrations. TCVC and TCVCS were not toxic in TA100. The toxic effects of DCVC limited the sensitivity of TA100 to DCVC mutagenic effects and rendered it difficult to investigate the effects of AOAA on DCVC mutagenic activity. Collectively, these results suggest that DCVCS and TCVCS exerted a definite but weak mutagenicity in the TA100 strain. Therefore, despite their potent nephrotoxicity, DCVCS and TCVCS are not likely to play a major role in DCVC or TCVC mutagenicity in this strain. PMID:23416178

  8. Prenatal Exposure to Tetrachloroethylene-Contaminated Drinking Water and the Risk of Adverse Birth Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Aschengrau, Ann; Weinberg, Janice; Rogers, Sarah; Gallagher, Lisa; Winter, Michael; Vieira, Veronica; Webster, Thomas; Ozonoff, David

    2008-01-01

    Background Prior studies of prenatal exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE) have shown mixed results regarding its effect on birth weight and gestational age. Objectives In this retrospective cohort study we examined whether PCE contamination of public drinking-water supplies in Massachusetts influenced the birth weight and gestational duration of children whose mothers were exposed before the child’s delivery. Methods The study included 1,353 children whose mothers were exposed to PCE-contaminated drinking water and a comparable group of 772 children of unexposed mothers. Birth records were used to identify subjects and provide information on the outcomes. Mothers completed a questionnaire to gather information on residential histories and confounding variables. PCE exposure was estimated using EPANET water distribution system modeling software that incorporated a fate and transport model. Results We found no meaningful associations between PCE exposure and birth weight or gestational duration. Compared with children whose mothers were unexposed during the year of the last menstrual period (LMP), adjusted mean differences in birth weight were 20.9, 6.2, 30.1, and 15.2 g for children whose mothers’ average monthly exposure during the LMP year ranged from the lowest to highest quartile. Similarly, compared with unexposed children, adjusted mean differences in gestational age were −0.2, 0.1, −0.1, and −0.2 weeks for children whose mothers’ average monthly exposure ranged from the lowest to highest quartile. Similar results were observed for two other measures of prenatal exposure. Conclusions These results suggest that prenatal PCE exposure does not have an adverse effect on these birth outcomes at the exposure levels experienced by this population. PMID:18560539

  9. Lactate Injection by Electric Currents for Bioremediation of Tetrachloroethylene in Clay

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xingzhi; Gent, David B.; Davis, Jeffrey L.; Alshawabkeh, Akram N.

    2012-01-01

    Biological transformation of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in silty clay samples by ionic injection of lactate under electric fields is evaluated. To prepare contaminated samples, a silty clay slurry was mixed with PCE, inoculated with KB-1® dechlorinators and was consolidated in a 40 cm long cell. A current density between 5.3 and 13.3 A m−2 was applied across treated soil samples while circulating electrolytes containing 10 mg L−1 lactate concentration between the anode and cathode compartments to maintain neutral pH and chemically reducing boundary conditions. The total adsorbed and aqueous PCE was degraded in the soil to trichloroethylene (TCE), cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE), vinyl chloride (VC) and ethene in 120 d, which is about double the time expected for transformation. Lactate was delivered into the soil by a reactive transport rate of 3.7 cm2 d−1 V−1. PCE degradation in the clay samples followed zero order transformation rates ranging from 1.5 to 5 mg L−1 d−1 without any significant formation of TCE. cis-DCE transformation followed first order transformation rates of 0.06 to 0.10 per day. A control experiment conducted with KB-1 and lactate, but without electricity did not show any significant lactate buildup or cis-DCE transformation because the soil was practically impermeable (hydraulic conductivity of 2×10−7 cm s−1). It is concluded that ionic migration will deliver organic additives and induce biological activity and complete PCE transformation in clay, even though the transformation occurs under slower rates compared to ideal conditions. PMID:23264697

  10. Effect of trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene on methane oxidation and community structure of methanotrophic consortium.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sun-Ah; Lee, Eun-Hee; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2013-01-01

    The methane oxidation rate and community structure of a methanotrophic consortium were analyzed to determine the effects of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) on methane oxidation. The maximum methane oxidation rate (Vmax ) of the consortium was 326.8 μmol·g-dry biomass(-1)·h(-1), and it had a half-saturation constant (Km ) of 143.8 μM. The addition of TCE or PCE resulted in decreased methane oxidation rates, which were decreased from 101.73 to 5.47-24.64 μmol·g-dry biomass(-1)·h(-1) with an increase in the TCE-to-methane ratio, and to 61.95-67.43 μmol·g-dry biomass(-1)·h(-1) with an increase in the PCE-to-methane ratio. TCE and PCE were non-competitive inhibitors for methane oxidation, and their inhibition constants (Ki ) were 33.4 and 132.0 μM, respectively. When the methanotrophic community was analyzed based on pmoA using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), the pmoA gene copy numbers were shown to decrease from 7.3 ± 0.7 × 10(8) to 2.1-5.0 × 10(7) pmoA gene copy number · g-dry biomass(-1) with an increase in the TCE-to-methane ratio and to 2.5-7.0 × 10(7) pmoA gene copy number · g-dry biomass(-1) with an increase in the PCE-to-methane ratio. Community analysis by microarray demonstrated that Methylocystis (type II methanotrophs) were the most abundant in the methanotrophic community composition in the presence of TCE. These results suggest that toxic effects caused by TCE and PCE change not only methane oxidation rates but also the community structure of the methanotrophic consortium. PMID:23947712

  11. Interfacial Properties of a Hydrophobic Dye in the Tetrachloroethylene-Water-Glass Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tuck, D.M.

    1999-02-23

    Interfacial effects play an important role in governing multiphase fluid behavior in porous media. Strongly hydrophobic organic dyes, used in many experimental studies to facilitate visual observation of the phase distributions, have generally been implicitly assumed to have no influence on the interfacial properties of the various phases in porous media. Sudan IV is the most commonly used dye for non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in laboratory experiments. It has also been used in at least one field experiment. The effects of this dye on the tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-water-glass system were investigated to test the assumption that the dye does not effect the interfacial properties and therefore PCE mobility. The results indicate that the dye does indeed change the interfacial relationships.The effect of the dye on the interfacial relationships is a complex function of the dye concentration, the solid phase composition, and the dynamic rate of new interface formation. The dye caused a slight (<10 percent) increase in interfacial tension at low concentrations (<0.1 g/L) and high rates of new interface formation. The dye reduced interfacial tension between PCE and water at low rates of new interface formation for all dye concentrations tested (0.00508 to 5.08 g/L). At the highest dye concentration, the PCE-water interfacial tension was significantly reduced regardless of the rate of new interface formation. The apparent interfacial tension increase at low dye concentrations is suspected to be an artifact of a low measured IFT value for the undyed PCE caused by leaching of rubber o-rings by the PCE prior to testing in the final drop-volume configuration.In addition to reducing interfacial tension, the dye was found to significantly alter the wetting relationship between PCE and water on a glass surface at and above the range of reported dye concentrations cited in the literature (1.1 to 1.7 g/L). The wetting relationship was rendered neutral from a water-wet initial

  12. Apartment residents' and day care workers' exposures to tetrachloroethylene and deficits in visual contrast sensitivity.

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Judith S; Hudnell, H Kenneth; Geller, Andrew M; House, Dennis E; Aldous, Kenneth M; Force, Michael S; Langguth, Karyn; Prohonic, Elizabeth J; Parker, Jean C

    2002-01-01

    Tetrachloroethylene (also called perchloroethylene, or perc), a volatile organic compound, has been the predominant solvent used by the dry-cleaning industry for many years. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) classified perc as a hazardous air pollutant because of its potential adverse impact on human health. Several occupational studies have indicated that chronic, airborne perc exposure adversely affects neurobehavioral functions in workers, particularly visual color discrimination and tasks dependent on rapid visual-information processing. A 1995 study by Altmann and colleagues extended these findings, indicating that environmental perc exposure at a mean level of 4,980 microg/m(3) (median=1,360 microg/m(3)) alters neurobehavioral functions in residents living near dry-cleaning facilities. Although the U.S. EPA has not yet set a reference concentration guideline level for environmental exposure to airborne perc, the New York State Department of Health set an air quality guideline of 100 microg/m(3). In the current residential study, we investigated the potential for perc exposure and neurologic effects, using a battery of visual-system function tests, among healthy members of six families living in two apartment buildings in New York City that contained dry-cleaning facilities on the ground floors. In addition, a day care investigation assessed the potential for perc exposure and effects among workers at a day care center located in the same one-story building as a dry-cleaning facility. Results from the residential study showed a mean exposure level of 778 microg/m(3) perc in indoor air for a mean of 5.8 years, and that perc levels in breath, blood, and urine were 1-2 orders of magnitude in excess of background values. Group-mean visual contrast sensitivity (VCS), a measure of the ability to detect visual patterns, was significantly reduced in the 17 exposed study participants relative to unexposed matched-control participants. The groups did not

  13. CONCENTRATION OF TETRACHLOROETHYLENE IN INDOOR AIR AT A FORMER DRY CLEANER FACILITY AS A FUNCTION OF SUBSURFACE CONTAMINATION: A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field study was performed to evaluate indoor air concentrations and vapor intrusion (VI) of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and other chlorinated solvents at a commercial retail site in Dallas, TX. The building is approximately 40 years old and once housed a dry cleaning operation. R...

  14. Remediation of an aquifer polluted with dissolved tetrachloroethylene by an array of wells filled with activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Bortone, I; Di Nardo, A; Di Natale, M; Erto, A; Musmarra, D; Santonastaso, G F

    2013-09-15

    In this work, an array of deep passive wells filled with activated carbon, namely a Discontinuous Permeable Adsorptive Barrier (PAB-D), has been proposed for the remediation of an aquifer contaminated by tetrachloroethylene (PCE). The dynamics of the aquifer in the particular PAB-D configuration chosen, including the contaminant transport in the aquifer and the adsorption onto the barrier material, has been accurately performed by means of a computer code which allows describing all the phenomena occurring in the aquifer, simultaneously. A PAB-D design procedure is presented and the main dimensions of the barrier (number and position of passive wells) have been evaluated. Numerical simulations have been carried out over a long time span to follow the contaminant plume and to assess the effectiveness of the remediation method proposed. The model results show that this PAB-D design allows for a complete remediation of the aquifer under a natural hydraulic gradient, the PCE concentrations flowing out of the barrier being always lower than the corresponding Italian regulation limit. Finally, the results have been compared with those obtained for the design of a more traditional continuous barrier (PAB-C) for the same remediation process. PMID:23876256

  15. Tetrachloroethylene in drinking water and birth outcomes at the US Marine Corps Base at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Sonnenfeld, N; Hertz-Picciotto, I; Kaye, W E

    2001-11-15

    A study of mean birth weight, small-for-gestational-age infants, and preterm birth was conducted at the US Marine Corps Base at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, where drinking water was contaminated with volatile organic compounds. Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) was the predominant contaminant. The authors used multiple linear and logistic regression to analyze 1968-1985 data from 11,798 birth certificates. Overall, at most weak associations were observed between PCE exposure and study outcomes. However, associations were found between PCE exposure and birth-weight outcomes for infants of older mothers and mothers with histories of fetal loss. Adjusted mean birth-weight differences between PCE-exposed and unexposed infants were -130 g (90% confidence interval (CI): -236, -23) for mothers aged 35 years or older and -104 g (90% CI: -174, -34) for mothers with two or more previous fetal losses. Adjusted odds ratios for PCE exposure and small-for-gestational-age infants were 2.1 (90% CI: 0.9, 4.9) for older mothers and 2.5 (90% CI: 1.5, 4.3) for mothers with two or more prior fetal losses. These results suggest that some fetuses may be more vulnerable than others to chemical insult. PMID:11700244

  16. Synergistic effect of nano-sized mackinawite with cyano-cobalamin in cement slurries for reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethylene.

    PubMed

    Kyung, Daeseung; Sihn, Youngho; Kim, Sangwoo; Bae, Sungjun; Amin, Muhammad Tahir; Alazba, Abdulrahman Ali; Lee, Woojin

    2016-07-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) by nano-Mackinawite (nFeS) with cyano-cobalamin (Cbl(III)) in cement slurries. Almost complete degradation of PCE by nFeS-Cbl(III) was observed in cement slurries in 5h and its degradation kinetics (kobs-PCE=0.57h(-1)) was 6-times faster than that of nFeS-Cbl(III) without the cement slurries. PCE was finally transformed to non-chlorinated organic compounds such as ethylene, acetylene, and C3-C4 hydrocarbons by nFeS-Cbl(III) in cement slurries. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and PCE degradation by cement components (SiO2, Al2O3, and CaO) revealed that both the reduced Co species in Cbl(III) and the presence of Ca in cement played an important role for the enhanced reductive dechlorination of PCE. The increase in the concentration of Cbl(III) (0.005-0.1mM), cement ratio (0.05-0.2), and suspension pH (11.5-13.5) accelerated the PCE degradation kinetics by providing more favorable environments for the production of reactive Ca species and reduction of Co species. We also observed that the degradation efficiency of PCE by nFeS-Cbl(III)-cement lasted even at high concentration of PCE. The experimental results obtained from this study could provide fundamental knowledge of redox interactions among nFeS, Cbl(III), and cement, which could significantly enhance reductive dechlorination of chlorinated organics in contaminated natural and engineered environments. PMID:26950611

  17. Adverse Birth Outcomes and Maternal Exposure to Trichloroethylene and Tetrachloroethylene through Soil Vapor Intrusion in New York State

    PubMed Central

    Lewis-Michl, Elizabeth L.; Gomez, Marta I.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Industrial spills of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Endicott, New York (USA), have led to contamination of groundwater, soil, and soil gas. Previous studies have reported an increase in adverse birth outcomes among women exposed to VOCs in drinking water. Objective: We investigated the prevalence of adverse birth outcomes among mothers exposed to trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene [or perchloroethylene (PCE)] in indoor air contaminated through soil vapor intrusion. Methods: We examined low birth weight (LBW), preterm birth, fetal growth restriction, and birth defects among births to women in Endicott who were exposed to VOCs, compared with births statewide. We used Poisson regression to analyze births and malformations to estimate the association between maternal exposure to VOCs adjusting for sex, mother’s age, race, education, parity, and prenatal care. Two exposure areas were identified based on environmental sampling data: one area was primarily contaminated with TCE, and the other with PCE. Results: In the TCE-contaminated area, adjusted rate ratios (RRs) were significantly elevated for LBW [RR = 1.36; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07, 1.73; n = 76], small for gestational age (RR = 1.23; 95% CI: 1.03, 1.48; n = 117), term LBW (RR = 1.68; 95% CI: 1.20, 2.34; n = 37), cardiac defects (RR = 2.15; 95% CI: 1.27, 3.62; n = 15), and conotruncal defects (RR = 4.91; 95% CI: 1.58, 15.24; n = 3). In the PCE-contaminated area, RRs for cardiac defects (five births) were elevated but not significantly. Residual socioeconomic confounding may have contributed to elevations of LBW outcomes. Conclusions: Maternal residence in both areas was associated with cardiac defects. Residence in the TCE area, but not the PCE area, was associated with LBW and fetal growth restriction. PMID:22142966

  18. Prenatal exposure to tetrachloroethylene-contaminated drinking water and the risk of congenital anomalies: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Prior animal and human studies of prenatal exposure to solvents including tetrachloroethylene (PCE) have shown increases in the risk of certain congenital anomalies among exposed offspring. Objectives This retrospective cohort study examined whether PCE contamination of public drinking water supplies in Massachusetts influenced the occurrence of congenital anomalies among children whose mothers were exposed around the time of conception. Methods The study included 1,658 children whose mothers were exposed to PCE-contaminated drinking water and a comparable group of 2,999 children of unexposed mothers. Mothers completed a self-administered questionnaire to gather information on all of their prior births, including the presence of anomalies, residential histories and confounding variables. PCE exposure was estimated using EPANET water distribution system modeling software that incorporated a fate and transport model. Results Children whose mothers had high exposure levels around the time of conception had an increased risk of congenital anomalies. The adjusted odds ratio of all anomalies combined among children with prenatal exposure in the uppermost quartile was 1.5 (95% CI: 0.9, 2.5). No meaningful increases in the risk were seen for lower exposure levels. Increases were also observed in the risk of neural tube defects (OR: 3.5, 95% CI: 0.8, 14.0) and oral clefts (OR 3.2, 95% CI: 0.7, 15.0) among offspring with any prenatal exposure. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that the risk of certain congenital anomalies is increased among the offspring of women who were exposed to PCE-contaminated drinking water around the time of conception. Because these results are limited by the small number of children with congenital anomalies that were based on maternal reports, a follow-up investigation should be conducted with a larger number of affected children who are identified by independent records. PMID:19778411

  19. Tetrachloroethylene-contaminated drinking water in Massachusetts and the risk of colon-rectum, lung, and other cancers.

    PubMed Central

    Paulu, C; Aschengrau, A; Ozonoff, D

    1999-01-01

    We conducted a population-based case-control study to evaluate the relationship between cancer of the colon-rectum (n = 326), lung (n = 252), brain (n = 37), and pancreas (n = 37), and exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE) from public drinking water. Subjects were exposed to PCE when it leached from the vinyl lining of drinking-water distribution pipes. Relative delivered dose of PCE was estimated using a model that took into account residential location, years of residence, water flow, and pipe characteristics. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for lung cancer were moderately elevated among subjects whose exposure level was above the 90th percentile whether or not a latent period was assumed [ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), 3.7 (1.0-11.7), 3.3 (0.6-13.4), 6.2 (1.1-31.6), and 19.3 (2.5-141.7) for 0, 5, 7, and 9 years of latency, respectively]. The adjusted ORs for colon-rectum cancer were modestly elevated among ever-exposed subjects as more years of latency were assumed [OR and CI, 1.7 (0.8-3.8) and 2.0 (0.6-5.8) for 11 and 13 years of latency, respectively]. These elevated ORs stemmed mainly from associations with rectal cancer. Adjusted ORs for rectal cancer among ever-exposed subjects were more elevated [OR and CI, 2.6 (0. 8-6.7) and 3.1 (0.7-10.9) for 11 and 13 years of latency, respectively] than were corresponding estimates for colon cancer [OR and CI, 1.3 (0.5-3.5) and 1.5 (0.3-5.8) for 11 and 13 years of latency, respectively]. These results provide evidence for an association between PCE-contaminated public drinking water and cancer of the lung and, possibly, cancer of the colon-rectum. PMID:10090704

  20. Evaluation of the Webler-Brown model for estimating tetrachloroethylene exposure from vinyl-lined asbestos-cement pipes

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Lisa A; Aschengrau, Ann; Gallagher, Lisa E; Webster, Thomas F; Heeren, Timothy C; Ozonoff, David M

    2008-01-01

    Background From May 1968 through March 1980, vinyl-lined asbestos-cement (VL/AC) water distribution pipes were installed in New England to avoid taste and odor problems associated with asbestos-cement pipes. The vinyl resin was applied to the inner pipe surface in a solution of tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, PCE). Substantial amounts of PCE remained in the liner and subsequently leached into public drinking water supplies. Methods Once aware of the leaching problem and prior to remediation (April-November 1980), Massachusetts regulators collected drinking water samples from VL/AC pipes to determine the extent and severity of the PCE contamination. This study compares newly obtained historical records of PCE concentrations in water samples (n = 88) with concentrations estimated using an exposure model employed in epidemiologic studies on the cancer risk associated with PCE-contaminated drinking water. The exposure model was developed by Webler and Brown to estimate the mass of PCE delivered to subjects' residences. Results The mean and median measured PCE concentrations in the water samples were 66 and 0.5 μg/L, respectively, and the range extended from non-detectable to 2432 μg/L. The model-generated concentration estimates and water sample concentrations were moderately correlated (Spearman rank correlation coefficient = 0.48, p < 0.0001). Correlations were higher in samples taken at taps and spigots vs. hydrants (ρ = 0.84 vs. 0.34), in areas with simple vs. complex geometry (ρ = 0.51 vs. 0.38), and near pipes installed in 1973–1976 vs. other years (ρ = 0.56 vs. 0.42 for 1968–1972 and 0.37 for 1977–1980). Overall, 24% of the variance in measured PCE concentrations was explained by the model-generated concentration estimates (p < 0.0001). Almost half of the water samples had undetectable concentrations of PCE. Undetectable levels were more common in areas with the earliest installed VL/AC pipes, at the beginning and middle of VL/AC pipes, at

  1. Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging in an adult cohort following prenatal and early postnatal exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated drinking water.

    PubMed

    Janulewicz, Patricia A; Killiany, Ronald J; White, Roberta F; Martin, Brett M; Winter, Michael R; Weinberg, Janice M; Aschengrau, Ann

    2013-01-01

    This population-based retrospective cohort study examined Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the brain in relation to prenatal and early postnatal exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated drinking water on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Subjects were identified through birth records from 1969 through 1983. Exposure was modeled using pipe network information from town water departments, a PCE leaching and transport algorithm, EPANet water flow modeling software, and Geographic Information System (GIS) methodology. Brain imaging was performed on 26 exposed and 16 unexposed subjects. Scans were acquired on a Philips 3T whole body scanner using the ADNI T1-weighted MP-RAGE scan. The scans were processed by FreeSurfer version 4.3.1 software to obtain measurements of specific brain regions. There were no statistically significant differences between exposed and unexposed subjects on the measures of white matter hypointensities (β: 127.5mm(3), 95% CI: -259.1, 1514.0), white matter volumes (e.g. total cerebral white matter: β: 21230.0mm(3), 95% CI: -4512.6, 46971.7) or gray matter volumes (e.g. total cerebral gray matter: β: 11976.0mm(3), 95% CI: -13657.2, 37609.3). The results of this study suggest that exposure to PCE during gestation and early childhood, at the levels observed in this population, is not associated with alterations in the brain structures studied. PMID:23571160

  2. Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging in an Adult Cohort Following Prenatal and Early Postnatal Exposure to Tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Janulewicz, Patricia A; Killiany, Ronald J; White, Roberta F; Martin, Brett M; Winter, Michael R; Weinberg, Janice M; Aschengrau, Ann

    2013-01-01

    This population-based retrospective cohort study examined Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the brain in relation to prenatal and early postnatal exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated drinking water on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Subjects were identified through birth records from 1969 through 1983. Exposure was modeled using pipe network information from town water departments, a PCE leaching and transport algorithm, EPANet water flow modeling software, and Geographic Information System (GIS) methodology. Brain imaging was performed on 26 exposed and 16 unexposed subjects. Scans were acquired on a Philips 3T whole body scanner using the ADNI T1-weighted MP-RAGE scan. The scans were processed by FreeSurfer version 4.3.1 software to obtain measurements of specific brain regions. There were no statistically significant differences between exposed and unexposed subjects on measures of white matter hypointensities (β: 127.5 mm3, 95% CI: −259.1, 1514.0), white matter volumes (e.g. total cerebral white matter: β: 21230.0 mm3, 95% CI: −4512.6, 46971.7) or gray matter volumes (e.g. total cerebral gray matter: β: 11976.0 mm3, 95% CI: −13657.2, 37609.3). The results of this study suggest that exposure to PCE during gestation and early childhood, at the levels observed in this population, is not associated with alterations in the brain structures studied. PMID:23571160

  3. Transfer of methyl chloroform, trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene to milk, tissues and expired air following intraruminal or oral administration in lactating goats and milk-fed kids.

    PubMed

    Hamada, T; Tanaka, H

    1995-01-01

    The distribution of methyl chloroform was determined (MCF), trichloroethylene (TRI) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in milk, tissues and expired air by intraruminally administering 0.625 ml kg(-0.75) of an equal-volume mixture of the three compounds to lactating goats. The milk secreted during 24 h after the intraruminal administration contained 1.42 mg of MCF, 1.87 mg of TRI, 6.43 mg of PCE and 0.33 mg of trichloroethanol (TCE). MCF, TRI and PCE appeared in the blood less than 30 min after administration. Oral administration of these chemicals to milk-fed kids showed that at 3.5 h post-administration, the liver contained these chemicals in greatest abundance. The adaptation of milk-fed kids to 3 weeks administration of small amounts of propylene glycol stimulated the metabolic conversion of TRI to TCE. There were linear relationships between the blood concentrations of these chemicals and the expiration rates after oral administration of 0.4 ml kg(-1) of each chemical to milk-fed kids. The expiration rates of MCF, TRI and PCE were 605, 122 and 46 microg min(-1) kg(-1) at 2 microg ml(-1) blood concentrations of MCF, TRI and PCE, respectively. These results suggested that MCF is little metabolized, being most readily exhaled in expired air, while PCE demonstrates the greatest tissue-partitioning, being largely secreted into the milk or retained in the liver. TRI can be extensively metabolized to other compounds such as TCE in milk-fed kids. PMID:15091581

  4. Affinity for risky behaviors following prenatal and early childhood exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated drinking water: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Many studies of adults with acute and chronic solvent exposure have shown adverse effects on cognition, behavior and mood. No prior study has investigated the long-term impact of prenatal and early childhood exposure to the solvent tetrachloroethylene (PCE) on the affinity for risky behaviors, defined as smoking, drinking or drug use as a teen or adult. Objectives This retrospective cohort study examined whether early life exposure to PCE-contaminated drinking water influenced the occurrence of cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, and drug use among adults from Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Methods Eight hundred and thirty-one subjects with prenatal and early childhood PCE exposure and 547 unexposed subjects were studied. Participants completed questionnaires to gather information on risky behaviors as a teenager and young adult, demographic characteristics, other sources of solvent exposure, and residences from birth through 1990. PCE exposure was estimated using the U.S. EPA's water distribution system modeling software (EPANET) that was modified to incorporate a leaching and transport model to estimate PCE exposures from pipe linings. Results Individuals who were highly exposed to PCE-contaminated drinking water during gestation and early childhood experienced 50-60% increases in the risk of using two or more major illicit drugs as a teenager or as an adult (Relative Risk (RR) for teen use = 1.6, 95% CI: 1.2-2.2; and RR for adult use = 1.5, 95% CI: 1.2-1.9). Specific drugs for which increased risks were observed included crack/cocaine, psychedelics/hallucinogens, club/designer drugs, Ritalin without a prescription, and heroin (RRs:1.4-2.1). Thirty to 60% increases in the risk of certain smoking and drinking behaviors were also seen among highly exposed subjects. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that risky behaviors, particularly drug use, are more frequent among adults with high PCE exposure levels during gestation and early childhood

  5. Risk of breast cancer following exposure to tetrachloroethylene-contaminated drinking water in Cape Cod, Massachusetts: reanalysis of a case-control study using a modified exposure assessment

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) is an important occupational chemical used in metal degreasing and drycleaning and a prevalent drinking water contaminant. Exposure often occurs with other chemicals but it occurred alone in a pattern that reduced the likelihood of confounding in a unique scenario on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. We previously found a small to moderate increased risk of breast cancer among women with the highest exposures using a simple exposure model. We have taken advantage of technical improvements in publically available software to incorporate a more sophisticated determination of water flow and direction to see if previous results were robust to more accurate exposure assessment. Methods The current analysis used PCE exposure estimates generated with the addition of water distribution modeling software (EPANET 2.0) to test model assumptions, compare exposure distributions to prior methods, and re-examine the risk of breast cancer. In addition, we applied data smoothing to examine nonlinear relationships between breast cancer and exposure. We also compared a set of measured PCE concentrations in water samples collected in 1980 to modeled estimates. Results Thirty-nine percent of individuals considered unexposed in prior epidemiological analyses were considered exposed using the current method, but mostly at low exposure levels. As a result, the exposure distribution was shifted downward resulting in a lower value for the 90th percentile, the definition of "high exposure" in prior analyses. The current analyses confirmed a modest increase in the risk of breast cancer for women with high PCE exposure levels defined by either the 90th percentile (adjusted ORs 1.0-1.5 for 0-19 year latency assumptions) or smoothing analysis cut point (adjusted ORs 1.3-2.0 for 0-15 year latency assumptions). Current exposure estimates had a higher correlation with PCE concentrations in water samples (Spearman correlation coefficient = 0.65, p < 0.0001) than estimates

  6. Occurrence of mental illness following prenatal and early childhood exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated drinking water: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background While many studies of adults with solvent exposure have shown increased risks of anxiety and depressive disorders, there is little information on the impact of prenatal and early childhood exposure on the subsequent risk of mental illness. This retrospective cohort study examined whether early life exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated drinking water influenced the occurrence of depression, bipolar disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and schizophrenia among adults from Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Methods A total of 1,512 subjects born between 1969 and 1983 were studied, including 831 subjects with both prenatal and early childhood PCE exposure and 547 unexposed subjects. Participants completed questionnaires to gather information on mental illnesses, demographic and medical characteristics, other sources of solvent exposure, and residences from birth through 1990. PCE exposure originating from the vinyl-liner of water distribution pipes was assessed using water distribution system modeling software that incorporated a leaching and transport algorithm. Results No meaningful increases in risk ratios (RR) for depression were observed among subjects with prenatal and early childhood exposure (RR: 1.1, 95% CI: 0.9-1.4). However, subjects with prenatal and early childhood exposure had a 1.8-fold increased risk of bipolar disorder (N = 36 exposed cases, 95% CI: 0.9-1.4), a 1.5-fold increased risk post-traumatic stress disorder (N = 47 exposed cases, 95% CI: 0.9-2.5), and a 2.1-fold increased risk of schizophrenia (N = 3 exposed cases, 95% CI: 0.2-20.0). Further increases in the risk ratio were observed for bipolar disorder (N = 18 exposed cases, RR; 2.7, 95% CI: 1.3-5.6) and post-traumatic stress disorder (N = 18 exposed cases, RR: 1.7, 95% CI: 0.9-3.2) among subjects with the highest exposure levels. Conclusions The results of this study provide evidence against an impact of early life exposure to PCE on the risk of depression. In contrast, the

  7. Simulation of solute transport of tetrachloroethylene in ground water of the glacial-drift aquifer at the Savage Municipal Well Superfund Site, Milford, New Hampshire, 1960-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harte, Philip T.

    2004-01-01

    The Savage Municipal Well Superfund site, named after the former municipal water-supply well for the town of Milford, is underlain by a 0.5-square mile plume of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), primarily tetrachloroethylene (PCE). The plume occurs mostly within a highly transmissive sand-and-gravel unit, but also extends to an underlying till and bedrock unit. The plume logistically is divided into two areas termed Operable Unit No. 1 (OU1), which contains the primary source area, and Operable Unit No. 2 (OU2), which is the extended plume area. PCE concentrations in excess of 100,000 parts per billion (ppb) had been detected in the OU1 area in 1995, indicating a likely Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid (DNAPL) source. In the fall of 1998, the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (NHDES) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) installed a remedial system in OU1. The OU1 remedial system includes a low-permeability barrier that encircles the highest detected concentrations of PCE, and a series of injection and extraction wells. The barrier primarily sits atop bedrock and penetrates the full thickness of the sand and gravel; and in some places, the full thickness of the underlying basal till. The sand and gravel unit and the till comprise the aquifer termed the Milford-Souhegan glacial-drift aquifer (MSGD). Two-dimensional and three-dimensional finite-difference solute-transport models of the unconsolidated sediments (MSGD aquifer) were constructed to help evaluate solute-transport processes, assess the effectiveness of remedial activities in OU1, and to help design remedial strategies in OU2. The solute-transport models simulate PCE concentrations, and model results were compared to observed concentrations of PCE. Simulations were grouped into the following three time periods: an historical calibration of the distribution of PCE from the initial input (circa 1960) of PCE into the subsurface to the 1990s, a pre-remedial calibration from 1995

  8. NEUROTOXICITY OF TETRACHLOROETHYLENE (PERCHLOROETHYLENE): DISCUSSION PAPER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper is a background document for a meeting of neurotoxicity experts to discuss the central nervous system effects of exposure to perchloroethylene (perc). The document reviews the literature on neurological testing of people exposed to perc occupationally in dry cleanin...

  9. IRIS TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW AND SUMMARY DOCUMENTS FOR TETRACHLOROETHYLENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The known toxic effects of perchloroethylene will be summarized, with citations from current scientific literature. The critical effects will be identified, and from this the RfD and RfC and cancer unit risk factors will be derived. The RfD and RfC are reference doses and air c...

  10. Charge to the Tetrachloroethylene (Perchloroethylene) Neurotoxicity Expert Panel

    EPA Science Inventory

    Today NCEA is posting the charge which will be discussed at the expert panel meeting on neurotoxicity issues associated with exposure to tetrachlroroethylene. This charge is to be the main agenda topic for the meeting. The time and place of the meeting will be announced in a fu...

  11. [Tetrachloroethylene: effect of low concentrations of 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene) on the mouse. II. Study of tetrachloroethylene in various organs and demonstration of histological changes in the examined organs].

    PubMed

    Marth, E; Stünzner, D; Binder, H; Möse, J R

    1985-12-01

    Perchlorethylene in subacute amounts in form of contaminated drinking-water was given to a group of NMRI-mice (group A = 0,05 mg PER/kg BW/d and group B = 0,1 mg PER/kg BW/d) over a period of seven weeks. The histologic changes of various organs and the perchlorethylene-residues in the examined organs have been determined. We only could establish the light-microscopic perceivable histologic changes in the spleen. Thus the pulpa cords were rich in erythrocytes and the area of the red pulpa contained plenty of blood-formation-centers with megakaryocytes. In the spleens of group B a siderin-storage in the red pulpa in macrophages could be established. These results are indicative for an increased hemolysis. In all of the examined organs, the heaviest accumulation of perchlorethylene we could be established in the spleen, whereby the concentration in the spleen amounted to several times as much as the residue-examinations of the other organs. In the liver for instance an insignificant amount of PER was stored. The erythrocytes and the fragments of them, that have been changed by the storage of PER are being decomposed in the spleen, and perchlorethylene reaches the spleen via the erythrocytes. PMID:4096156

  12. INFLUENCE OF VISCOUS AND BUOYANCY FORCES ON THE MOBILIZATION OF RESIDUAL TETRACHLOROETHYLENE DURING SURFACTANT FLUSHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential for nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) mobilization is one of the most important considerations in the development and implementation of surfactant-based remediation technologies. Column experiments were performed to investigate the onset and extent of tetrachloroethyle...

  13. [The tetrachloroethylene burden of residents adjacent to chemical dry cleaning establishments].

    PubMed

    Schaefer, I; Hohmann, H

    1989-06-01

    The paper describes the concentration of tetrachlorethen (TCE) in the air of flats in Bremen adjacent to drycleaners and the resulting TCE concentration in the food and blood of the residents. The results indicate that--regardless of the cleaning system--a high TCE pollution must be expected with nearly everybody living next to a TCE dry cleaning shop. The currently propagated guiding value of 0.1 mg TCE per m3 of air or 0.1 mg TCE per kg of food can hardly be complied with--even after reorganisation in the drycleaning shop. The problem of guiding and limit values of TCE and possible alternatives to dry cleaning with TCE are discussed. The paper shows that Public Health Offices--in cooperation with other institutions--can make relevant contributions to investigations in the field of environmental health. PMID:2526938

  14. SOLUBILIZATION OF DODECANE, TETRACHLOROETHYLENE, AND 1,2-DICHLOROBENZENE IN MICELLAR SOLUTIONS OF ETHOXYLATED NONIONIC SURFACTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although surfactants have received considerable attention as a potential means for enhancing the recovery of organic compounds from the subsurface, only limited information is available regarding the micellar solubilization of common groundwater contaminants by nonionic surfactan...

  15. EVALUATION OF GEOPHYSICAL METHODS FOR THE DETECTION OF SUBSURFACE TETRACHLOROETHYLENE IN CONTROLLED SPILL EXPERIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the work was to determine the capability of various geophysical methods to detect PCE in the subsurface. Measurements were made with ten different geophysical techniques before, during, and after the PCE injection. This approach provided a clear identification of a...

  16. EVALUATION OF GEOPHYSICAL METHODS FOR THE DETECTION OF SUBSURFACE TETRACHLOROETHYLENE IN CONTROLLED SPILL EXPERIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents some of the results of five of the techniques: cross borehole complex resistivity (CR) also referred to as spectral induced polarization (SIP), cross borehole high resolution seismic (HRS), borehole self potential (SP), surface ground penetration radar (GPR), ...

  17. SURFACTANT ENHANCED RECOVERY OF TETRACHLOROETHYLENE FROM A POROUS MEDIUM CONTAINING LOW PERMEABILITY LENSES. 2. NUMERICAL SIMULATION. (R825409)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    A numerical model of surfactant enhanced solubilization was developed and applied to the simulation of nonaqueous phase liquid recovery in two-dimensional heterogeneous laboratory sand tank systems. Model parameters were derived from independent, small-scale, ...

  18. Evaluation of modeling for groundwater flow and tetrachloroethylene transport in the Milford-Souhegan glacial-drift aquifer at the Savage Municipal Well Superfund site, Milford, New Hampshire, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harte, Philip T.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services entered into a cooperative agreement to assist in the evaluation of remedy simulations of the MSGD aquifer that are being performed by various parties to track the remedial progress of the PCE plume. This report summarizes findings from this evaluation. Topics covered include description of groundwater flow and transport models used in the study of the Savage Superfund site (section 2), evaluation of models and their results (section 3), testing of several new simulations (section 4), an assessment of the representation of models to simulate field conditions (section 5), and an assessment of models as a tool in remedial operational decision making (section 6).

  19. Effectiveness of three solvents and two associations of solvents on gutta-percha and resilon.

    PubMed

    Faria-Júnior, Norberto Batista de; Loiola, Livia Etchebehere de; Guerreiro-Tanomaru, Juliane Maria; Berbert, Fábio Luis Camargo Villela; Tanomaru-Filho, Mário

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of 3 solvents (Citrol orange oil, Eucalyptol and Tetrachloroethylene) and 2 associations of solvents (Citrol orange oil+Tetrachloroethylene and Eucalyptol+Tetrachloroethylene) on 3 types of gutta-percha (conventional, thermoplastic and EndoREZ) and Resilon. Ten discs (10 mm diameter x 1 mm thick) from each material were prepared using standard metallic molds. Each specimen was weighed to determinate its initial mass. The specimens were immersed in the solvents for 10 min, followed by immersion in distilled water for 20 min, and were then reweighed to obtain the final mass. The mean weight loss determined the solvent capacity. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test at 5% significance level. Tetrachloroethylene was the most effective on conventional gutta-percha (p<0.05). Tetrachloroethylene was also the most effective on thermoplastic gutta-percha, but it was not significantly different (p>0.05) from Eucalyptol+Tetrachloroethylene, Citrol+Tetrachloroethylene, and Citrol. All solvents and associations presented little effectiveness on Resilon. The association Eucalyptol+Tetrachloroethylene was the most effective on EndoREZ, but it did not differ significantly (p>0.05) from Citrol+Tetrachloroethylene and Tetrachloroethylene. All evaluated substances presented solvent action. Tetrachloroethylene improved the effectiveness of both Citrol and Eucalyptol. PMID:21519647

  20. 40 CFR Table 16 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Selected Hazardous Air Pollutants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-Dimethyl hydrazine 57578 beta-Propiolactone 58899 Lindane (all isomers) 59892 N-Nitrosomorpholine 60117...) 127184 Tetrachloroethylene (Perchloroethylene) 140885 Ethyl acrylate 302012 Hydrazine 542756...

  1. EVALUATION OF HAZARDOUS WASTE INCINERATION IN AN AGGREGATE KILN: FLORIDA SOLITE CORPORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aggregate kiln incineration of chlorinated liquid organic waste was investigated in a one-week program at Florida Solite Company. POHCs (toluene, tetrachloroethylene, methyl ethyl ketone, and methyl isobutyl ketone) were monitored in waste and stack emissions. In addition, stack ...

  2. TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF THE EMISSION OF PERCHLOROETHYLENE FROM DRY CLEANED FABRICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article discusses an evaluation of the emission of perchloroethylene (tetrachloroethylene) from freshly dry cleaned fabrics using small environment test chambers. he temperature dependence of the release of perchloroethylene was evaluated over a temperature range of 20 to 45 ...

  3. BIOVENTING OF CHLORINATED SOLVENTS FOR GROUND-WATER CLEANUP THROUGH BIOREMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorinated solvents such as tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, 1,2-dichloroethane, and dichloromethane (methylene chloride) can exist in contaminated subsurface material as (1) the neat oil, (2) a component of a mixed oily waste, (3) a solu...

  4. Does increasing the temperature induce DNAPL migration?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, and chlorobenzene have been identified as contaminants in groundwater and are sometimes called Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids (DNAPL). Thermal methods for remediation of contaminated soils and groundwater rely on raising the temperature o...

  5. 40 CFR Appendix J to Part 122 - NPDES Permit Testing Requirements for Publicly Owned Treatment Works (§ 122.21(j))

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... chloride Methylene chloride 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane Tetrachloroethylene Toluene 1,1,1-trichloroethane 1,1,2-trichloroethane Trichloroethylene Vinyl chloride Acid-extractable compounds P-chloro-m-creso...

  6. 40 CFR Appendix J to Part 122 - NPDES Permit Testing Requirements for Publicly Owned Treatment Works (§ 122.21(j))

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... chloride Methylene chloride 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane Tetrachloroethylene Toluene 1,1,1-trichloroethane 1,1,2-trichloroethane Trichloroethylene Vinyl chloride Acid-extractable compounds P-chloro-m-creso...

  7. IN-PLACE REGENERATION OF SVE LOADED GAC USING FENTON'S REAGENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ten out of the 25 most frequently detected groundwater contaminants at hazardous waste sites are chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) 1. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) are among the top three 1. Granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption is widel...

  8. IN-PLACE REGENERATION OF SVE LOADED GAC USING FENTON'S REAGENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ten out of the 25 most frequently detected groundwater contaminants at hazardous waste sites are chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) 1 . Trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) are among the top three 1 . Granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption is w...

  9. MICROEMULSION OF MIXED CHLORINATED SOLVENTS USING FOOD GRADE (EDIBLE) SURFACTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ground water contamination frequently consists of mixed chlorinated solvents [e.g., tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), and trans-1,2- dichloroethylene (DCE)]. In this research, mixtures of the food grade (edible) surfactants bis(2-ethylhexyl) sodium sulfosuccinat...

  10. FIELD APPLICATIONS OF CHEMICAL TIME-SERIES SAMPLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two municipal supply wells in Lakewood, Washington, were found to be contaminated with trichloroethylene, transdichloroethylene, and tetrachloroethylene. Sequential samples were taken for chemical analyses, in conjunction with drawdown measurement during aquifer (pump) tests desi...

  11. FIELD EVALUATION OF THE SOLVENT EXTRACTION RESIDUAL BIOTREATMENT (SERB) TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Solvent Extraction Residual Biotreatment (SERB) technology was demonstrated at the former Sage's Dry Cleaner site in Jacksonville, FL where an area of PCE (tetrachloroethylene) contamination was identified. The SERB technology is a treatment train approach to complete site...

  12. Applications of Monitored Natural Attenuation in the USA (Abstract)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) is widely applied in the USA to control the risk associated with ground water contamination from chlorinated solvents such a tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE). MNA relies on the natural processes of degradation, sorption an...

  13. Applications of Monitored Natural Attenuation in the USA (Presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) is widely applied in the USA to control the risk associated with ground water contamination from chlorinated solvents such a tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE). MNA relies on the natural processes of degradation, sorption an...

  14. IMPACT OF COSOLVENT FLUSHING ON SUBSURFACE MICROBIAL ECOLOGY AT THE FORMER SAGE'S DRY CLEANER SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Solvent Extraction Residual Biotreatment (SERB) technology was evaluated at the former Sage's Dry Cleaner site in Jacksonville, FL where an area of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) contamination was identified. The SERB technology is a treatment train approach to complete site rest...

  15. 40 CFR Table 8 to Subpart G of... - Organic HAP's Subject to the Wastewater Provisions for Process Units at New Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 75343 (1,1-Dichloroethane). Hexachlorobutadiene 87683 Hexachloroethane 67721 Hexane 100543 Methyl bromide (Bromomethane) 74839 Methyl chloride (Chloromethane) 74873 Phosgene 75445 Tetrachloroethylene (Perchloroethylene) 127184 Toluene 108883 Trichloroethane (1,1,1-) (Methyl chloroform) 71556 Trichloroethylene...

  16. 40 CFR Table 8 to Subpart G of... - Organic HAP's Subject to the Wastewater Provisions for Process Units at New Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 75343 (1,1-Dichloroethane). Hexachlorobutadiene 87683 Hexachloroethane 67721 Hexane 100543 Methyl bromide (Bromomethane) 74839 Methyl chloride (Chloromethane) 74873 Phosgene 75445 Tetrachloroethylene (Perchloroethylene) 127184 Toluene 108883 Trichloroethane (1,1,1-) (Methyl chloroform) 71556 Trichloroethylene...

  17. 40 CFR Table 8 to Subpart G of... - Organic HAP's Subject to the Wastewater Provisions for Process Units at New Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 75343 (1,1-Dichloroethane). Hexachlorobutadiene 87683 Hexachloroethane 67721 Hexane 100543 Methyl bromide (Bromomethane) 74839 Methyl chloride (Chloromethane) 74873 Phosgene 75445 Tetrachloroethylene (Perchloroethylene) 127184 Toluene 108883 Trichloroethane (1,1,1-) (Methyl chloroform) 71556 Trichloroethylene...

  18. 40 CFR Table 8 to Subpart G of... - Organic HAP's Subject to the Wastewater Provisions for Process Units at New Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-Dichloroethane). Hexachlorobutadiene 87683 Hexachloroethane 67721 Hexane 100543 Methyl bromide (Bromomethane) 74839 Methyl chloride (Chloromethane) 74873 Phosgene 75445 Tetrachloroethylene (Perchloroethylene) 127184 Toluene 108883 Trichloroethane (1,1,1-) (Methyl chloroform) 71556 Trichloroethylene...

  19. 40 CFR Table 8 to Subpart G of... - Organic HAP's Subject to the Wastewater Provisions for Process Units at New Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-Dichloroethane). Hexachlorobutadiene 87683 Hexachloroethane 67721 Hexane 100543 Methyl bromide (Bromomethane) 74839 Methyl chloride (Chloromethane) 74873 Phosgene 75445 Tetrachloroethylene (Perchloroethylene) 127184 Toluene 108883 Trichloroethane (1,1,1-) (Methyl chloroform) 71556 Trichloroethylene...

  20. 21 CFR 178.3010 - Adjuvant substances used in the manufacture of foamed plastics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... agent in polystyrene. Isopentane For use as a blowing agent in polystyrene. n-Pentane Do. 1,1,2,2-Tetra-chloroethylene For use only as a blowing agent adjuvant in polystyrene at a level not to exceed 0.3 percent by weight of finished foamed polystyrene intended for use in contact with food only of the types...

  1. 21 CFR 178.3010 - Adjuvant substances used in the manufacture of foamed plastics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... agent in polystyrene. Isopentane For use as a blowing agent in polystyrene. n-Pentane Do. 1,1,2,2-Tetra-chloroethylene For use only as a blowing agent adjuvant in polystyrene at a level not to exceed 0.3 percent by weight of finished foamed polystyrene intended for use in contact with food only of the types...

  2. 21 CFR 178.3010 - Adjuvant substances used in the manufacture of foamed plastics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... agent in polystyrene. Isopentane For use as a blowing agent in polystyrene. n-Pentane Do. 1,1,2,2-Tetra-chloroethylene For use only as a blowing agent adjuvant in polystyrene at a level not to exceed 0.3 percent by weight of finished foamed polystyrene intended for use in contact with food only of the types...

  3. 21 CFR 178.3010 - Adjuvant substances used in the manufacture of foamed plastics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...-Difluoroethane (CAS Reg. No. 75-37-6) For use as a blowing agent in polystyrene. Isopentane For use as a blowing agent in polystyrene. n-Pentane Do. 1,1,2,2-Tetra-chloroethylene For use only as a blowing agent adjuvant in polystyrene at a level not to exceed 0.3 percent by weight of finished foamed...

  4. 21 CFR 178.3010 - Adjuvant substances used in the manufacture of foamed plastics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... agent in polystyrene. Isopentane For use as a blowing agent in polystyrene. n-Pentane Do. 1,1,2,2-Tetra-chloroethylene For use only as a blowing agent adjuvant in polystyrene at a level not to exceed 0.3 percent by weight of finished foamed polystyrene intended for use in contact with food only of the types...

  5. Cocaine detection by a mid-infrared waveguide integrated with a microfluidic chip.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Chi; Wägli, Philip; Paeder, Vincent; Homsy, Alexandra; Hvozdara, Lubos; van der Wal, Peter; Di Francesco, Joab; de Rooij, Nico F; Peter Herzig, Hans

    2012-09-01

    A germanium (Ge) strip waveguide on a silicon (Si) substrate is integrated with a microfluidic chip to detect cocaine in tetrachloroethylene (PCE) solutions. In the evanescent field of the waveguide, cocaine absorbs the light near 5.8 μm, which is emitted from a quantum cascade laser. This device is ideal for (bio-)chemical sensing applications. PMID:22806146

  6. THE TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF THE EMISSION OF PERCHLORO- ETHYLENE FROM DRY CLEANED FABRICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was conducted to evaluate the emission of perchloroethylene (tetrachloroethylene) from freshly dry cleaned fabrics using small environmental test chambers. The temperature dependence of the release of perchloroethylene was evaluated over a temperature range of 20 to 45°C....

  7. EMISSIONS OF PERCHLOROETHYLENE FROM DRY CLEANED FABRICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was conducted to evaluate the emissions of perchloroethylene (tetrachloroethylene) from dry cleaned fabrics to determine: (a) how the introduction of fresh dry cleaning into a home affects the indoor concentration of perchloroethylene, and (b) the effectiveness of ‘airing...

  8. COMPLETE NATURAL ATTENUATION OF PCE AND TCE WITHOUT VINYL CHLORIDE AND ETHENE ACCUMULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A shallow aquifer at the Twin Cities Army Ammunition Plant (TCAAP) was contaminated with tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE). Cisdichloroethylene (cis-DCE) is found in ground water at the site, indicating that reductive dehalogenation of PCE and TCE is occurrin...

  9. FIELD MEASUREMENT OF VAPOR INTRUSION RATES AT A PCE SITE (ABSTRACT ONLY)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field study was performed to evaluate vapor intrusion (VI) of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and other chlorinated solvents at a commercial retail site in Dallas, TX. The building is approximately 40 years old and once housed a dry cleaning operation. Results from an initial site ch...

  10. Infrared transmission at the 3.39 micron helium-neon laser wavelength in liquid-core quartz fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, A. K.; Hinkley, E. D.; Menzies, R. T.

    1979-01-01

    Infrared transmission at the 3.39 micron helium-neon laser wavelength has been measured in a tetrachloroethylene-filled fused-quartz fiber. The loss measurements were taken for three different settings of laser light intensity using a series of neutral density filters. The average value of transmission loss at this wavelength was found to be 56 dB/km.

  11. PULSED AIR SPARGING IN AQUIFERS CONTAMINATED WITH DENSE NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air sparging was evaluated for remediation of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) present as dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) in aquifers. A two-dimensional laboratory tank with a transparent front wall allowed for visual observation of DNAPL mobilization. A DNAPL zone 50 cm high was ...

  12. BINARY DESORPTION ISOTHERMS OF TCE AND PCE FROM SILICA GEL AND NATURAL SOLIDS. (R822626)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Binary solute desorption isotherms of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) at 100% relative humidity from silica gel and two well-characterized natural solids were investigated. Results indicated that the ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) was able to descr...

  13. SYNERGISTIC AND ANTAGONISTIC EFFECTS ON GENOTOXICITY OF CHEMICALS COMMONLY FOUND IN HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Synergistic and antagonistic effects on genotoxicity of mixtures of four chemicals; i.e., lead tetraacetate (LTA), arsenic trioxide (ATO), dieldrin (DED), and tetrachloroethylene (TCE), were evaluated by the Tradescantia-Micronucleus (Trad-MCN) assay. he concentration of stock so...

  14. MEASUREMENT OF PERCHLOROETHYLENE IN AMBIENT AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchloroethylene (i.e., tetrachloroethylene) is an organic solvent widely used in dry cleaning and industrial metal degreasing operations. Short-term field studies were conducted in each of three major metropolitan areas which were selected on the basis of the number, density an...

  15. CATALYTIC HYDRODEHALOGENATION OF CHLORINATED ETHYLENES USING PALLADIUM AND HYDROGEN FOR THE TREATMENT OF CONTAMINATED WATER. (R825689C054,R825689C060)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    A kinetic model is presented for the catalytic hydrodehalogenation of chlorinated ethylenes using Pd and H2 under water treatment conditions. All five chlorinated ethylenes, including tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and vinyl chloride, were completely rem...

  16. In vivo exposure of female rats to toxicants may affect oocyte quality.

    PubMed

    Berger, Trish; Horner, Catherine M

    2003-01-01

    A potential endpoint for female reproductive toxicants is fertilizability of the oocytes. This endpoint has not been adequately examined for mammalian females. The objective of these studies was to evaluate fertilizability of rat oocytes following in vivo exposure to known male reproductive toxicants that exert effects via pathways that do not include endocrine disruption and to 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide, known to interfere with early follicular development. Oocytes were obtained from females following exposure and quality assessed by in vitro fertilization rate. One study evaluated fertilizability following 2 weeks exposure of females to inhaled tetrachloroethylene (2h/day, 5 days/week). The remaining studies evaluated fertilizability immediately following 2 weeks exposure via drinking water to tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, the fuel oxidants methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), ethyl tertiary butyl ether (ETBE), tertiary amyl methyl ether (TAME), and a metabolite of the first two ethers 2-methyl-1,2-propanediol (2M2P), and to 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide. The percentage of oocytes fertilized was reduced following inhalation exposure to tetrachloroethylene, or consumption of trichloroethylene or TAME. Fertilizability was not altered by exposures to the other reproductive toxicants or to the other fuel oxidants. Consistent with the reduced oocyte fertilizability following exposure to trichloroethylene, oocytes from exposed females had a reduced ability to bind sperm plasma membrane proteins. Female reproductive capability assessed by the endpoint, oocyte fertilizability, was reduced by exposure to trichloroethylene and inhaled tetrachloroethylene. PMID:12759095

  17. Critical contaminant/critical pathway analysis - surface water transport for nonradioactive contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Kuo-Fu

    1996-11-01

    The health risks for an individual exposed to contaminants released from SRS outfalls from 1989 to 1995 were estimated. The exposure pathways studied are ingestion of drinking water, ingestion of contaminated fish and dermal contact with contaminants in water while swimming. The estimated incremental risks for an individual developing cancer vary from 3.E-06 to 1.0E-05. The estimated total exposure chronic noncancer hazard indices vary from 6.E-02 to 1.E-01. The critical contaminants were ranked based on their cancer risks and chronic noncarcinogenic hazard quotients. For cancer risks, the critical contaminants released from SRS outfalls are arsenic, tetrachloroethylene, and benzene. For chronic noncarcinogenic risks, the critical contaminants released from srs outfalls are cadmium, arsenic, silver, chromium, mercury, selenium, nitrate, manganese, zinc, nickel, uranium, barium, copper, tetrachloroethylene, cyanide, and phenol. The critical pathways in decreasing risk order are ingestion of contaminated fish, ingestion of drinking water and dermal contact with contaminants in water while swimming.

  18. Health assessment for Nutmeg Valley, Wolcott, Connecticut, Region 1. CERCLIS No. CTSI88045. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-02

    The Nutmeg Valley Industrial Park is listed on the National Priorities List. The site is an industrial park containing 40 companies (light industry metal working and finishing) and 20 private residences. The contaminants present in groundwater at the site are trichloroethylene, benzene, ethyl benzene, toluene, xylene, methylene chloride, trans 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, tetrachloroethylene, pentane, carbon tetrachloride, and chloroform. Investigation into the extent of contamination in other pathways is ongoing.

  19. Toxicity potential of compounds found in parenteral solutions with rubber stoppers

    SciTech Connect

    Danielson, J.W. )

    1992-03-01

    Leached stopper components found in parenteral solutions produced by several manufacturers were identified and quantitated. Their toxicity potential was determined by comparing the types and quantities of the leached components with known toxicity levels and/or harmful effects. Toxicity potentials for benzaldehyde, 2-butoxyethanol, cyclohexanone, ethylbenzene, 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, and tetrachloroethylene are listed. Breakdown products of dextrose (furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural), which may also have harmful effects, were quantitated.

  20. H-Area Seepage Basins groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1992-06-01

    During first quarter 1992, tritium, nitrate, nonvolatile beta, total alpha-emitting radium (radium-224 and radium-226), gross alpha, antimony, mercury, lead, tetrachloroethylene, arsenic, and cadmium exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from monitoring wells at the H-Area Seepage Basins (HASB) at the Savannah River Site. This report presents and discusses the groundwater monitoring results in the H-Area for first quarter 1992.

  1. H-Area Seepage Basins groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    During second quarter 1992, tritium, nitrate, nonvolatile beta, total alpha-emitting radium (radium-224 and radium-226), gross alpha, mercury, lead, tetrachloroethylene, arsenic, and cadmium exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from monitoring wells at the H-Area Seepage Basins (HASB) at the Savannah River Plant. This report gives the results of the analyses of groundwater from the H-Area Seepage Basin.

  2. In situ air stripping using horizontal wells. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    In-situ air stripping employs horizontal wells to inject or sparge air into the ground water and vacuum extract VOC`S from vadose zone soils. The horizontal wells provide better access to the subsurface contamination, and the air sparging eliminates the need for surface ground water treatment systems and treats the subsurface in-situ. A full-scale demonstration was conducted at the Savannah River Plant in an area polluted with trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene. Results are described.

  3. Distribution of selected volatile organic compounds determined with water-to-vapor diffusion samplers at the interface between ground water and surface water, Centredale Manor site, North Providence, Rhode Island, September 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, Peter E.; Lyford, Forest P.; Clifford, Scott

    2000-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds are present in soils and ground water at the Centredale Manor Superfund Site in North Providence, Rhode Island. In September 1999, water-to-vapor diffusion samplers were placed in the bottom sediments of waterways adjacent to the site to identify possible contaminated ground-water discharge areas. The approximate12-acre site is a narrow stretch of land between the eastern bank of the Woonasquatucket River, downstream from the U.S. Route 44 bridge and a former mill raceway. The samplers were placed along a 2,250-foot reach of the Woonasquatucket River, in the former mill raceway several hundred feet to the east and parallel to the river, and in a cross channel between the river and former mill raceway. Volatile organic compounds were detected in 84 of the 104 water-to-vapor diffusion samplers retrieved. Trichloroethylene and tetrachloro-ethylene were the principal volatile organic compounds detected. The highest vapor concentrations measured for these two chemicals were from diffusion samplers located along an approximate 100-foot reach of the Woonasquatucket River about 500 feet downstream of the bridge; here trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene vapor concentrations ranged from about 2,000 to 180,000 and 1,600 to 1,400,000 parts per billion by volume, respectively. Upstream and downstream from this reach and along the former mill raceway, trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene vapor concentrations from the diffusion samples were generally less than 100 parts per billion by volume. Along the lower reaches of the river and mill raceway, however, and in the cross channel, vapor concentrations of trichloroethylene exceeded 100 parts per billion by volume and tetrachloroethylene exceeded 1,000 parts per billion by volume in several diffusion samples. Although diffusion sample vapor concentrations are higher than water concentrations in surface waters and in ground water, and they should only be interpreted qualitatively as relative

  4. Aerobic microorganism for the degradation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Fliermans, Carl B.

    1989-01-01

    A chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon-degrading microorganism, having American Type Culture Collection accession numbers ATCC 53570 and 53571, in a biologically pure culture aseptically collected from a deep subsurface habitat and enhanced, mineralizes trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene to HCl, H.sub.2 O and Co.sub.2 under aerobic conditions stimulated by methane, acetate, methanol, tryptone-yeast extract, propane and propane-methane.

  5. Contamination of shallow ground water in the area of building 95, Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey, 1985-90

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sargent, B.P.; Storck, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    A zone of contaminated ground water at Picatinny Arsenal has resulted from the operation of a metal- plating facility in building 95 during 1960-81, and the wastewater-treatment system that is in and adjacent to the building. Thirty-two monitoring wells were installed in 1989 to supplement 12 previously installed wells. All wells were sampled in 1989 and 1990 for analysis of ground water for inorganic constituents, trace elements, volatile organic compounds, and nutrients. Four wells also were sampled for analysis for base/neutral- and acid-extractable compounds and pesticides, and soil gas from the unsaturated zone at eight sites was analyzed for volatile organic compounds. Concentrations of dissolved solids and sulfate in the study area were consistently above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's secondary drinking-water regulations. The areal distribution of sulfate differed from that of the volatile organic compounds. Concentrations of trace elements were not elevated downgradient from the source. The estimated average velocity of contaminant movement is 0.1 to 1.1 feet per day. The major organic contaminants identified in the study area are trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, and 1,1,1-trichloroethane. Trichloroethylene was detected in wells upgradient from the wastewater- treatment site. Tetrachloroethylene and 1,1,1-trichloroethane might originate at tanks in the basement of building 95 rather than at the adjacent wastewater-treatment system. The pre- dominant gas-phase contaminant, 1,1,1- trichloroethane, was detected at a maximum con- centration of 15.7 micrograms per liter. Both trichoroethylene and tetrachloroethylene were detected in concentrations greater than 0.10 micrograms per liter in five of the eight soil- gas samples, indicating that volatilization and diffusion through the unsaturated zone could be a significant mechanism of contaminant loss from the aquifer.

  6. Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1993-09-01

    During second quarter 1993, samples from AMB groundwater monitoring wells at the metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) were analyzed for certain heavy metals, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Six parameters exceeded standards during the quarter. As in previous quarters, tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), and pH and total organic halogens exceeded the Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the wells. Dichloromethane (methylene chloride), a common laboratory contaminant which was first compared to its final PDWS during first quarter 1993, was elevated in three wells.

  7. TNX area groundwater monitoring report. 1996 Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    During 1996, samples from selected wells of well cluster P 26 and the TBG, TIR, TNX, TRW, XSB, and YSB well series at the TNX Area of the Savannah River Plant were analyzed for selected heavy metals, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Sixteen parameters exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS). Trichloroethylene exceeded the final PDWS most frequently. Antimony, arsenic beryllium, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, chromium, copper, dichloromethane, gross alpha, lead, mercury, nitrate, nitrate-nitrite, tetrachloroethylene, or trichloroethylene were evaluated in one or more wells during the year. Groundwater flow directions and rates in the Unconfined Aquifer were similar from quarter to quarter during the year.

  8. H-Area Seepage Basins

    SciTech Connect

    Stejskal, G.

    1990-12-01

    During the third quarter of 1990 the wells which make up the H-Area Seepage Basins (H-HWMF) monitoring network were sampled. Laboratory analyses were performed to measure levels of hazardous constituents, indicator parameters, tritium, nonvolatile beta, and gross alpha. A Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) scan was performed on all wells sampled to determine any hazardous organic constituents present in the groundwater. The primary contaminants observed at wells monitoring the H-Area Seepage Basins are tritium, nitrate, mercury, gross alpha, nonvolatile beta, trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene, lead, cadmium, arsenic, and total radium.

  9. H-Area Seepage Basins. Third quarter 1990 groundwater quality assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    Stejskal, G.

    1990-12-01

    During the third quarter of 1990 the wells which make up the H-Area Seepage Basins (H-HWMF) monitoring network were sampled. Laboratory analyses were performed to measure levels of hazardous constituents, indicator parameters, tritium, nonvolatile beta, and gross alpha. A Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) scan was performed on all wells sampled to determine any hazardous organic constituents present in the groundwater. The primary contaminants observed at wells monitoring the H-Area Seepage Basins are tritium, nitrate, mercury, gross alpha, nonvolatile beta, trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene, lead, cadmium, arsenic, and total radium.

  10. Evaluation of hazardous-waste incineration in an aggregate kiln: Florida Solite Corporation. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Day, D.R.; Cox, L.A.; Peters, J.A.

    1985-04-01

    Aggregate kiln incineration of chlorinated liquid organic waste was investigated in a one-week program at Florida Solite Company. POHCs (toluene, tetrachloroethylene, methyl ethyl ketone, and methyl isobutyl ketone) were monitored in waste and stack emissions. In addition, stack emissions were monitored for particulate matter, particulate trace metals, HCl, SO/sub 2/, and NOx. Process samples were collected and analyzed for trace metals and chloride. The destruction and removal efficiency of POHCs and the fate of trace metals and chloride ion in the kiln process were determined.

  11. Chemical Sensing with a Magnetically-Excitied Flexural Plate Wave Resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, D.R.; Butler, M.A.; Kottenstette, R.; Martin, S.J.; Mitchell, M.A.; Schubert, W.K.; Wessendorf, K.O.

    1999-05-26

    Chemical sensing with a magnetically excited flexural plate wave (mag- FPW) resonator has been demonstrated for the first time. One surface of the resonator was coated with ethyl cellulose to impart sensitivity to volatile solvents such as chloroform, tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, and toluene. The absorbed mass of the analyte causes a shift in the membrane resonance frequency of the two-port mag-FPW resonator. An oscillator circuit is used to track the resonance frequency, providing a convenient means of monitoring analyte concentration levels. Analyte concentrations of 10 ppm were easily detected.

  12. Intermedia transfer factors for fifteen toxic pollutants released to air basins in California

    SciTech Connect

    McKone, T.E.; Daniels, J.I.; Chiao, F.F.; Hsieh, D.P.H.

    1993-10-01

    This report provides a summary definition of the intermedia-transfer factors (ITFs). Methods are discussed for estimating these parameters in the absence of measured values, and the estimation errors inherent in these estimation methods are considered. A detailed summary is provided of measured and estimated ITF values for fifteen air contaminants. They include: 1,3 butadiene; cadmium; cellosolve; cellosolve acetate; chloroform; di-2-ethylhexylphthalate; 1,4-dioxame; hexachlorobenzene; inorganic arsenic; inorganic lead; nickel; tetrachloroethylene; toluene; toluene-2,4-diisocyanate; and 1,3-xylene. Recommendations are made regarding the expected value and variance in these values for use in exposure models.

  13. Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report: Third quarter 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    During third quarter 1993, samples from AMB groundwater monitoring wells at the Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility were analyzed for certain heavy metals, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Eight parameters exceeded standards during the quarter. As in previous quarters, tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards; and aluminum, iron, lead, manganese, pH, and total organic halogens exceeded the Savannah River Site Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the wells. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water-table unit were similar to previous quarters.

  14. Azo Dyes and Their Interfacial Activity: Implications for Multiphase Flow Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tuck, D.M.

    1999-04-21

    Interfacial effects play an important role in governing multiphase fluid behavior in porous media (Neustadter 1984; Tuck et al. 1988). For instance, several dimensionless numbers have been developed to express important force ratios applicable to multiphase flow in porous media (Morrow and Songkran 1981; Chatzis and Morrow 1984; Wardlaw 1988; Pennell et al. 1996; Dawson and Roberts 1997). These force ratios emphasize the importance of interfacial properties. Our objectives are to provide chemical information regarding the dyes commonly used in multiphase flow visualization studies and to show the surface chemistry effects of the most commonly used dye, Sudan IV, in the tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-water-glass system

  15. Search for Neutrinos from the Sun

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Davis, Raymond Jr.

    1968-09-01

    A solar neutrino detection system has been built to observe the neutrino radiation from the sun. The detector uses 3,900,000 liters of tetrachloroethylene as the neutrino capturing medium. Argon is removed from the liquid by sweeping with helium gas, and counted in a small low level proportional counter. The recovery efficiency of the system was tested with Ar{sup 36} by the isotope dilution method, and also with Ar{sup 37} produced in the liquid by fast neutrons. These tests demonstrate that Ar{sup 37} produced in the liquid by neutrino capture can be removed with a 95 percent efficiency by the procedure used.

  16. Desorption Behavior of Trichloroethene and Tetrachloroethene in U.S. Department of Energy Savannah River Site Unconfined Aquifer Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Robert G.; Szecsody, Jim E.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2006-06-21

    The DOE Savannah River Site (SRS) is evaluating the potential applicability of the monitored natural attenuation (MNA) process as a contributor to the understanding of the restoration of its unconfined groundwater aquifer known to be contaminated with the chlorinated hydrocarbon compounds trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE). This report discusses the results from aqueous desorption experiments on SRS aquifer sediments from two different locations at the SRS (A/M Area; P-Area) with the objective of providing technically defensible TCE/PCE distribution coefficient (Kd) data and data on TCE/PCE reversible and irreversible sorption behavior needed for further MNA evaluation.

  17. Test plan for in situ bioremediation demonstration of the Savannah River Integrated Demonstration Project DOE/OTD TTP No.: SR 0566-01. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, T.C.

    1991-09-18

    This project is designed to demonstrate in situ bioremediation of groundwater and sediment contaminated with chlorinated solvents. Indigenous microorganisms will be simulated to degrade trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and their daughter products in situ by addition of nutrients to the contaminated zone. in situ biodegradation is a highly attractive technology for remediation because contaminants are destroyed, not simply moved to another location or immobilized, thus decreasing costs, risks, and time, while increasing efficiency and public and regulatory acceptability. Bioremediation has been found to be among the least costly technologies in applications where it will work.

  18. Radiation induced dechlorination of some chlorinated hydrocarbons in aqueous suspensions of various solid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Múčka, V.; Buňata, M.; Čuba, V.; Silber, R.; Juha, L.

    2015-07-01

    Radiation induced dechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in aqueous solutions containing the active carbon (AC) or cupric oxide (CuO) as the modifiers was studied. The obtained results were compared to the previously studied dechlorination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Both modifiers were found to decrease the efficiency of dechlorination. The AC modifier acts mainly via adsorption of the aliphatic (unlike the aromatic) hydrocarbons and the CuO oxide mainly inhibits the mineralization of the perchloroethylene. The results presented in this paper will be also helpful for the studies of the impact of chlorinated hydrocarbons on the membrane permeability of living cells.

  19. Intelligent Unmanned Monitoring of Remediated Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Emile Fiesler, Ph.D.

    2001-06-01

    During this Phase I project, IOS demonstrated the feasibility of combining digital signal processing and neural network analysis to analyze spectral signals from pure samples of several typical contaminants. We fabricated and tested a prototype system by automatically analyzing Raman spectral data taken in the Vadose zone at the 321 M site in the M area of DOE's Savannah River Site in South Carolina. This test demonstration proved the ability of IOS's technology to detect the target contaminants, tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), in isolation, and to detect the spectra of these contaminants in real-world noisy samples taken from a mixture of materials obtained from this typical remediation target site.

  20. High charged red pigment nanoparticles for electrophoretic displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Xin-Yan; Bian, Shu-Guang; Chen, Jian-Feng; Le, Yuan

    2012-12-01

    Organic pigment permanent red F2R nanoparticles were prepared via surface modification to improve the surface charge and dispersion ability in organic medium. Their large surface chargeability is confirmed by ζ-potential value of -49.8 mV. The prepared particles exhibited average size of 105 nm and showed very narrow distribution with polydispersity index of 0.068. The sedimentation ratio of the prepared particles in tetrachloroethylene was less than 5% within 12 days. The electrophoretic inks consisting of the prepared red particles with white particles as contrast showed good electrophoretic display, its refresh time was 200 ms.

  1. Supplemental Technical Data Summary M-Area Groundwater Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Marine, I.W., Bledsoe, H.W.

    1995-10-01

    This supplement to the Preliminary Technical Data Summary (TDS) (Gordon, 1982) presents the state of knowledge on the hydrogeology and contaminant plume characteristics in the vicinity of M Area as of October 1984. As discussed in the previous TDS, the contaminants consist of organic solvents used for metal degreasing, namely trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, and 1,1,1-trichloroethane. Since the issuance of the previous TDS, the groundwater consulting firm of Geraghty & Miller, Inc. has been retained to assist with program strategy, planning, and investigative techniques

  2. Health assessment for Watkins-Johnson Facility, Scotts Valley, California, Region 9. CERCLIS No. CAD980893234. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-30

    The Watkins-Johnson facility is on the National Priorities List. The facility manufactures electronic components. The environmental sampling conducted to date indicates that the contaminants of concern at the site are predominantly VOCs present in ground water, surface water, and soil. The VOCs present in one or more environmental media include trichloroethylene (TCE); 1,2-dichloroethylene (DCE); tetrachloroethylene perchloroethylene (PCE); vinyl chloride; methylene chloride; 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA); and Freon 113. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via ingestion of contaminated ground water.

  3. Health assessment for Metal Working Shop Site, Lake Ann, Michigan, Region 5. CERCLIS No. MID980992952. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-30

    The Metal Working Shop Site is listed on the National Priorities List. The site consists of an operating metal-working facility in a sparsely populated rural area in Benzie, Michigan. Identified contaminants of potential concern on the site include chromium, tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethane, and toluene in water and trichloroethylene (TCE), trichloroethane, xylenes, ethylbenzene, and toluene in soil. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via contaminated well water and soil. Confirmation of sampling results that show contamination in well water and soil is needed.

  4. Soil Vapor Extraction of PCE/TCE Contaminated Soil

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, J.M.; Morgenstern, M.R.

    1998-08-01

    The A/M Area of the Savannah River Site soil and groundwater is contaminated with tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE). Contamination is the result of previous waste disposal practices, once considered state-of-the-art. Soil Vapor Extraction (SVE) units have been installed to remediate the A/M Area vadose zone. SVE is a proven in-situ method for removing volatile organics from a soil matrix with minimal site disturbance. SVE alleviates the infiltration of contaminants into the groundwater and reduces the total time required for groundwater remediation. Lessons learned and optimization of the SVE units are also discussed.

  5. Evidence for existence in human tissues of monomers for plastics and rubber manufacture.

    PubMed

    Wolff, M S

    1976-10-01

    Although exposure to many industrially important monomers is controlled by law, few of these reactive chemicals have been determined in human tissues. Analogy with other fat-soluble organic substances strongly implies that these monomers may be retained in tissue, subject to the usual physiological constraints of metabolism, solubility and volatility. The storage of DDT and PCBs is discussed, as well as tetrachloro-ethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), which are chemically similar to many industrially used monomers. Styrene in blood and breath and its metabolites in urine have been studied in humans. Styrene and vinyl chloride have been measured in fat tissue of polymerization workers. PMID:829070

  6. Test plan for in situ bioremediation demonstration of the Savannah River Integrated Demonstration Project DOE/OTD TTP No. : SR 0566-01

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, T.C.

    1991-09-18

    This project is designed to demonstrate in situ bioremediation of groundwater and sediment contaminated with chlorinated solvents. Indigenous microorganisms will be simulated to degrade trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and their daughter products in situ by addition of nutrients to the contaminated zone. in situ biodegradation is a highly attractive technology for remediation because contaminants are destroyed, not simply moved to another location or immobilized, thus decreasing costs, risks, and time, while increasing efficiency and public and regulatory acceptability. Bioremediation has been found to be among the least costly technologies in applications where it will work.

  7. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA region 2): Brewster Well Field, Brewster, Putnam County, New York, September 1986. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-09-30

    The Brewster Well Field, located on the northern bank of the East Branch Croton River, is three-quarters of a mile east of the Village of Brewster, Town of Southeast, Putnam County, NY. Since 1954 when Well Field No. 1 was developed, the Village of Brewster has used the aquifers beneath the Village-owned land as a water supply source. In 1967 Well Field No. 2 was brought on line. In 1978 evidence of volatile halogenated organic compound contamination from an unidentified source first appeared. VHOs have been the primary contaminants detected in the ground water. The principal contaminants were found to be tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, and 1,2-dichloroethylene.

  8. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    Groundwater monitoring continued at the Savannah River Plant. During second quarter 1993, nine constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility, the Old Burial Ground, the E-Area Vaults, and the proposed Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Vaults. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread constituents. Chloroethene (vinyl chloride), dichloromethane (methylene chloride), 1,1-dichloroethylene, gross alpha, lead, nonvolatile beta, or tetrachloroethylene also exceeded standards in one or more wells. The groundwater flow directions and rates in the three hydrostratigraphic units were similar to those of previous quarters.

  9. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) Groundwater Monitoring Report: Fourth quarter 1991 and 1991 summary

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1992-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1991, tritium, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, chloroethene (vinyl chloride), total radium, mercury, and lead exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency primary drinking water standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) and adjacent facilities. Tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread contaminants; 55 (49%) wells exhibited elevated tritium activities, and 24 (21%) wells exhibited elevated trichloroethylene concentrations. Tritium and trichloroethylene levels exceeding the PDWS also occurred in several wells in Aquifer Unit IIA (Congaree). Levels of manganese, total organic halogens, nickel, iron, 1,1-dichloroethane, aluminum, nonvolatile beta, and trichlorofluoromethane that exceeded Flag 2 criteria were found in one or more wells beneath the MWMF. Downgradient wells in the three hydrostratigraphic units at the MWMF contained elevated levels of tritium, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, total radium, chloroethene (vinyl chloride), lead, mercury, manganese, total organic halogens, nickel, iron, 1,1-dichloroethane, aluminum, nonvolatile beta, or trichlorofluoromethane. Groundwater samples from 81 (72%) of the monitoring wells at the MWMF and adjacent facilities contained elevated levels of several contaminants.

  10. Adsorption of low molecular weight halocarbons by montmorillonite

    SciTech Connect

    Estes, T.J.; Shah, R.V.; Vilker, V.L. )

    1988-04-01

    Montmorillonite clay from Clay Spur, WY, was found to adsorb several low molecular weight, hydrophobic halocarbons from aqueous solution at sub-parts-per-million levels. The halocarbons studied were trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, hexachloroethane, and dibromochloropropane. When the montmorillonite was treated with sodium citrate-bicarbonate-dithionite (CBD), it adsorbed higher levels of halocarbons than the untreated clay. In addition, the CBD-treated clay exhibited a maximum in halocarbon adsorption around pH 4, while untreated clay showed little variation in adsorption over the pH range 2-10. Adsorption of trichloroethylene was inhibited by low concentrations of sodium chloride (0.01 M or greater) in solution. Aging the CBD-treated clay in water decreased its capacity to adsorb trichloroethylene. Desorption studies showed that the sorption of tetrachloroethylene to CBD-treated clay is an irreversible process when compared to sorption by fumed silica. The ability of montmorillonite to adsorb halocarbons and the instability of the clay in water are postulated to involve changes in the oxide surface coating on the clay.

  11. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) groundwater monitoring report. Fourth quarter 1992 and 1992 summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1992, nine constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in one or more groundwater samples from monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) and adjacent facilities. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread constituents. Fifty-seven (48%) of the 120 monitoring wells, contained elevated tritium activities, and 23 (19%) contained elevated trichloroethylene concentrations. Total alpha-emitting radium, tetrachloroethylene, chloroethene, cadmium, 1,1-dichloroethylene, lead, or nonvolatile beta levels exceeded standards in one or more wells. During 1992, elevated levels of 13 constituents were found in one or more of 80 of the 120 groundwater monitoring wells (67%) at the MWMF and adjacent facilities. Tritium and trichloroethylene exceeded their final PDWS more frequently and more consistently than did other constituents. Tritium activity exceeded its final PDWS m 67 wells and trichloroethylene was. elevated in 28 wells. Lead, tetrachloroethylene, total alpha-emitting radium, gross alpha, cadmium, chloroethene, 1,1-dichloroethylene 1,2-dichloroethane, mercury, or nitrate exceeded standards in one or more wells during the year. Nonvolatile beta exceeded its drinking water screening level in 3 wells during the year.

  12. In situ measurement of volatile organic compounds in groundwater by methods coupled to the cone penetrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Doskey, P.V.; Aldstadt, J.H.; Kuo, J.M.; Costanza, M.S.; Erickson, M.D.

    1995-03-01

    The objective of this investigation is to interface an in situ, on-line sparging system with a cone penetrometer to provide direct analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCS) in groundwater by on-site analysis. Transfer line materials (15 m {times} 0.160--0.216 cm ID) composed of stainless steel, nickel, aluminum and Teflon{reg_sign}PFA, PTFE, and FEP were evaluated for their ability to quantitatively transfer chloroform, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, carbon tetrachloride, tetrachloroethylene, n-hexane, benzene, toluene, and o-xylene in the gas phase. The water content of the gas stream had an insignificant effect on the quantitative transfer of VOCs through Teflon{reg_sign} tubing but was critical to quantitative transfer of the compounds through metal tubing, particularly for nickel. Transfer efficiencies for all 7 analytes in moist gas streams through stainless steel tubing were greater than 95%. Toluene, tetrachloroethylene, and o-xylene were transferred with 93, 81 and 80% efficiency, respectively when drawn through Teflon{reg_sign}PFA tubing at 25 C. The sorption of these VOCs by Teflon{reg_sign} tubing was reversible and their transfer efficiencies improved to 94% when the tubing was flushed with 16 equivalent volumes of air. In general, the retention of the VOCs by Teflon{reg_sign} increased with decreasing aqueous solubility of the analyte. The efficiency at which VOCs were sparged from aqueous standards in Teflon{reg_sign}PFA, Type 304 stainless steel, and glass vessels were similar.

  13. The influence of personal activities on exposure to volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Wallace, L A; Pellizzari, E D; Hartwell, T D; Davis, V; Michael, L C; Whitmore, R W

    1989-10-01

    Seven persons volunteered to perform 25 common activities thought to increase personal exposure to volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) during a 3-day monitoring period. Personal, indoor, and outdoor air samples were collected on Tenax cartridges three times per day (evening, overnight, and daytime) and analyzed by GC-MS for 17 target VOCs. Samples of exhaled breath were also collected before and after each monitoring period. About 20 activities resulted in increasing exposure to one or more of the target VOCs, often by factors of 10, sometimes by factors of 100, compared to exposures during the sleep period. These concentrations were far above the highest observed outdoor concentrations during the length of the study. Breath levels were often significantly correlated with previous personal exposures. Major exposures were associated with use of deodorizers (p-dichlorobenzene); washing clothes and dishes (chloroform); visiting a dry cleaners (1,1,1-trichloroethane, tetrachloroethylene); smoking (benzene, styrene); cleaning a car engine (xylenes, ethylbenzene, tetrachloroethylene); painting and using paint remover (n-decane, n-undecane); and working in a scientific laboratory (many VOCs). Continuously elevated indoor air levels of p-dichlorobenzene, trichloroethylene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, carbon tetrachloride, decane, and undecane were noted in several homes and attributed to unknown indoor sources. Measurements of exhaled breath suggested biological residence times in tissue of 12-18 hr and 20-30 hr for 1,1,1-trichloroethane and p-dichlorobenzene, respectively. PMID:2792060

  14. Appraisal of ground-water quality in the Bunker Hill Basin of San Bernardino Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duell, L.F., Jr.; Schroeder, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Water samples were collected from 47 wells and analyzed for concentration of major inorganic ions, nitrogen species, and volatile (purgeable) organic priority pollutants to assess groundwater quality in the Bunker Hill basin, California. Data were supplemented with additional analysis of nitrate, tetrachloroethylene, and trichloroethylene made by other agencies. The organic quality of groundwater in the basin generally is suitable for most uses, although fluoride concentration exceeded the California public drinking water standard of 1.4 mg/L in water from 5 of 47 wells. Nitrate (as nitrogen) concentration equaled or exceeded the public drinking water standard of 10 mg/L in water from 13 of 47 wells sampled for this study and in an additional 19 of 120 samples analyzed by other agencies. Concentration generally decreased with increasing depth below land surface. Twenty-four of the 33 volatile organic priority pollutants were detected in water from wells sampled during this study. When supplemental data from other agencies are included, tetrachloroethylene concentration exceeded the standard of 5 micrograms/L in water from 49 of 128 wells. No basinwide relation between contamination by these two chemicals and well depth or land use was discerned. A network of 11 observation wells that could be sampled twice a year would enhance the monitoring of changes groundwater quality in the Bunker Hill basin. (USGS)

  15. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) groundwater monitoring report, second quarter 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    During second quarter 1992, tritium, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, chloroethene, antimony, 1,1-dichloroethylene, lead, nonvolatile beta, radium-228, thorium-228, or total alpha-emitting radium (radium-226 and radium-228) exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) and adjacent facilities. Tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread constituents; 55 (48%) of the 115 monitored wells contained elevated tritium activities, and 23 (20%) wells exhibited elevated trichloroethylene concentrations. Sixty-three downgradient wells screened in Aquifer Zone IIB2 (Water Table), Aquifer Zone IIB[sub 2] (Barnwell/McBean), and Aquifer Unit IIA (Congaree) contained concentrations of tritium, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, chloroethene, antimony, 1,1-dichloroethylene, lead, nonvolatile beta, radium-228, thorium-228, or total alpha-emitting radium that exceeded the PDWS during second quarter 1992. Upgradient wells BGO 1D and 2D and HSB 85A, 85B, and 85C did not contain any constituents that exceeded the PDWS.

  16. Mixed Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.A.

    1994-09-01

    Currently, 125 wells monitor groundwater quality in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) at the Savannah River Site. Samples from the wells are analyzed for selected heavy metals, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. During second quarter 1994, chloroethene (vinyl chloride), 1,1-dichloroethylene, gross alpha, lead, tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, or tritium exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in approximately half of the downgradient wells at the MWMF. Consistent with historical trends, elevated constituent levels were found primarily in Aquifer Zone. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread elevated constituents during second quarter 1994. Sixty-two of the 125 monitoring wells contained elevated tritium activities. Trichloroethylene concentrations exceeded the final PDWS in 23 wells. Chloroethene, 1,1-dichloroethylene, lead, and tetrachloroethylene, elevated in one or more wells during second quarter 1994, also occurred in elevated levels during first quarter 1994. These constituents generally were elevated in the same wells during both quarters. Gross alpha, which was not elevated in any well during first quarter 1994, was elevated in one well during second quarter. Copper, mercury, and nonvolatile beta were elevated during first quarter 1994 but not during second quarter.

  17. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) groundwater monitoring report, second quarter 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    During second quarter 1992, tritium, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, chloroethene, antimony, 1,1-dichloroethylene, lead, nonvolatile beta, radium-228, thorium-228, or total alpha-emitting radium (radium-226 and radium-228) exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) and adjacent facilities. Tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread constituents; 55 (48%) of the 115 monitored wells contained elevated tritium activities, and 23 (20%) wells exhibited elevated trichloroethylene concentrations. Sixty-three downgradient wells screened in Aquifer Zone IIB2 (Water Table), Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 2} (Barnwell/McBean), and Aquifer Unit IIA (Congaree) contained concentrations of tritium, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, chloroethene, antimony, 1,1-dichloroethylene, lead, nonvolatile beta, radium-228, thorium-228, or total alpha-emitting radium that exceeded the PDWS during second quarter 1992. Upgradient wells BGO 1D and 2D and HSB 85A, 85B, and 85C did not contain any constituents that exceeded the PDWS.

  18. Ground-water levels and water-quality data for wells in the Spring Creek area near Arnold Air Force Base, Tennessee, April and May 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Shannon D.; Aycock, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Arnold Air Force Base (AAFB) occupies about 40,000 acres in Coffee and Franklin Counties, Tennessee. Numerous site-specific ground-water contamination investigations have been conducted at designated solid waste management units (SWMU?s) at AAFB. Several synthetic volatile organic compounds (VOC?s), primarily chlorinated solvents, have been identified in groundwater samples collected from monitoring wells near SWMU 8 in the Spring Creek area. During April and May 2000, a study of the groundwater resources in the Spring Creek area was conducted to determine if VOC?s from AAFB have affected local private water supplies and to advance understanding of the ground-water-flow system in this area. The study focused on sampling private wells located within the Spring Creek area that are used as a source of drinking water. Ground-water-flow directions were determined by measuring water levels in wells and constructing a potentiometric-surface map of the Manchester aquifer in the study area. Data were collected from a total of 35 private wells and 22 monitoring wells during the period of study. Depths to ground water were determined for 22 of the private wells and all 22 of the monitoring wells. The wells ranged in depth from 21 to 105 feet. Water-level altitudes ranged from 930 to 1,062 feet above sea level. Depths to water ranged from 8 to 83 feet below land surface. Water-quality samples were collected from 29 private wells which draw water from either gravel zones in the upper part of the Manchester aquifer, fractured bedrock in the lower part of the Manchester aquifer, or a combination of these two zones. Concentrations of 50 of the 55 VOC?s analyzed for were less than method detection limits. Chloroform, acetone, chloromethane, 2-butanone, and tetrachloroethylene were detected in concentrations exceeding the method detection limits. Only chloroform and acetone were detected in concentrations equal to or exceeding reporting limits. Chloroform was detected in a sample

  19. Sanitary landfill groundwater monitoring report. Fourth quarter 1994 and 1994 summary

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    Eighty-nine wells of the LFW series monitor groundwater quality in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These wells are sampled quarterly to comply with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Domestic Waste Permit DWP-087A and as part of the SRS Groundwater Monitoring Program. Dichloromethane, a common laboratory contaminant, and trichloroethylene were the most widespread constituents exceeding standards during 1994. Benzene, chloroethene (vinyl chloride), 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,1-dichloroethylene, 1,2-dichloropropane, gross alpha, mercury, nonvolatile beta, tetrachloroethylene, and tritium also exceeded standards in one or more wells. The groundwater flow direction in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill was to the southeast (universal transverse Mercator coordinates). The flow rate in this unit was approximately 140 ft/year during first and fourth quarters 1994.

  20. Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    During first quarter 1993, samples from 18 groundwater monitoring wells of the AMB series at the Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility were analyzed for certain heavy metals, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Nine parameters exceeded standards during the quarter. As in fourth quarter 1992, tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards in 4 and 7 wells, respectively. Dichloromethane (methylene chloride), not previously compared to a standard in the Savannah River Site Groundwater Monitoring Program, was elevated in one well. Aluminum, iron, manganese, pH, specific conductance, and total organic halogens exceeded the Savannah River Site Flag 2 criteria; all of these parameters, with the exception of aluminum, were reported as elevated in AMB wells during previous quarters. Groundwater flow directions and rates in the water-table unit and the upper section of the Congaree were similar to previous quarters.

  1. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    During first quarter 1993, eight constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste anagement Facility, the Old Burial Ground, the E-Area Vaults, and the proposed Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Vaults (HWMWDV). As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread constituents. Tetrachloroethylene, chloroethene, 1,1-dichloroethylene, gross alpha, lead, or nonvolatile beta levels also exceeded standards in one or more wells. The elevated constituents were found primarily in Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 2} (Water Table) and Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 1}, (Barnwell/McBean) wells. However, several Aquifer Unit IIA (Congaree) wells also contained elevated constituent levels. The groundwater flow directions and rates in the three hydrostratigraphic units were similar to previous quarters.

  2. Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    During second quarter 1994, samples from AMB groundwater monitoring wells at the Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility were analyzed for selected heavy metals, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Three parameters exceeded standards during the quarter. As in previous quarters, tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards. Total organic halogens exceeded the Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria in two of the wells. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the M-Area Aquifer Zone were similar to previous quarters. Conditions affecting determination of groundwater flow directions and rates in the Upper Lost Lake Aquifer Zone, Lower Lost Lake Aquifer Zone, and the Middle Sand Aquifer Zone of the Crouch Branch Confining Unit were also similar to previous quarters. During second quarter 1994, SRS received SCDHEC approval for five point-of-compliance wells and two plume definition wells near the Met Lab HWMF. Field work has begun on this project.

  3. TNX Area 1994 Annual Groundwater Monitoring Report

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.A.

    1995-05-01

    During 1994, samples from selected wells of well cluster P 26 and the TBG, TNX, XSB, and YSB well series at the TNX Area were analyzed for selected heavy metals, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Six parameters exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS). Nitrate and trichloroethylene exceeded the final PDWS most frequently. Five wells in this area currently are part of the Purge Water Containment Program due to high trichloroethylene concentrations. Carbon tetrachloride, gross alpha, nonvolatile beta, and tetrachloroethylene were elevated sporadically in one or more wells during the year. Groundwater flow directions and rates in the Unconfined Aquifer were similar from quarter to quarter during the year.

  4. Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    During first quarter 1995, samples from AMB groundwater monitoring wells at the Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility (Met Lab HWMF) were analyzed for selected heavy metals, field measurements, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Six parameters exceeded standards during the quarter. As in previous quarters, tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS). Total organic halogens exceeded its Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criterion during first quarter 1995 as in fourth quarter 1994. Aluminum, iron, and manganese, which were not analyzed for during fourth quarter 1994, exceeded the Flag 2 criteria in at least two wells each during first quarter 1995. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the M-Area Aquifer Zone were similar to previous quarters. Conditions affecting the determination of groundwater flow directions and rates in the Upper Lost Lake Aquifer Zone, Lower Lost Lake Aquifer Zone, and the Middle Sand Aquifer Zone of the Crouch Branch Confining Unit were also similar to previous quarters.

  5. Quarterly sampling of the wetlands along the old F-Area effluent ditch: August 1994. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Cummins, C.L.; Dixon, K.L.

    1994-08-01

    In August 1994, well point water and near-surface water samples were collected to further characterize tritium and volatile organic compounds in the Wetlands along the old F-Area effluent ditch south of 643-E at the Savannah River Plant. Well point samples were collected from seven locations and near-surface water samples were collected at four locations. Results of the August 1994 sampling event further support findings that tritium and volatile organic compounds are outcropping in the Wetlands near the old F-area effluent ditch. Four analytes (1,2-dichloroethylene, trichloroethylene, tritium, and vinyl chloride) were detected at least once at concentrations above the primary Drinking Water Standards or the Maximum Contaminant Levels. Five analytes (the above chemicals plus tetrachloroethylene) were detected at least once in the near-surface water samples at concentrations greater than the method detection limit.

  6. Analysis of organic compounds (VOC) in the forest air of the Southern Black Forest

    SciTech Connect

    Juettner, F.

    1986-01-01

    The volatile organic compounds of forest air (Kaelbelescheuer, Southern Black Forest) and, for comparison, suburban air (Tuebingen) were qualitatively analyzed by gas chromatographic and mass spectrometric methods. 94 Individual compounds were identified, 6 of them belonged to biogenic monoterpenes (..cap alpha..-pinene, ..delta..3-carene, myrcene, limonene, eucalyptol, camphene). While the monoterpenes were enriched in forest air, a similar collection of the pollution products was observed in both locations. Predominant substances were aromatic compounds (toluene, ethylbenzene, benzene, xylenes, ethyltoluenes, pseudocumene and naphthalene) which can be regarded as constituents of vehicle exhaust fumes and incineration processes. Other important substances in forest air were various solvents, of which butyl acetate, isobutyl acetate, tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene, butanol-1, and several ketones were prominent species.

  7. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) groundwater monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1992-12-01

    During third quarter 1992, 12 constituents exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in one or more groundwater samples from monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility and adjacent facilities. Tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread constituents: 57 (48%) and 23 (19%) of the 119 monitoring wells contained elevated tritium and trichloroethylene levels, respectively. Elevated constituents were found primarily in Aquifer Zone IIB[sub 2] (Water Table) and Aquifer Zone IIB[sub 1] (Barnwell/McBean). Elevated constituents also occurred in five Aquifer Unit IIA (Congaree) wells. Upgradient wells BGO 1D and 2D and HSB 85A, 85B, and 85C did not contain any constituents that exceeded the PDWS. Downgradient wells in the three hydrostratigraphic units contained elevated levels of tritium, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, chloroethene, antimony, 1,1-dichloroethylene, gross alpha, lead, nonvolatile beta, thallium, total alpha-emitting radium (radium-224 and radium-226), or cadmium.

  8. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) groundwater monitoring report. Third quarter 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1992-12-01

    During third quarter 1992, 12 constituents exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in one or more groundwater samples from monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility and adjacent facilities. Tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread constituents: 57 (48%) and 23 (19%) of the 119 monitoring wells contained elevated tritium and trichloroethylene levels, respectively. Elevated constituents were found primarily in Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 2} (Water Table) and Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 1} (Barnwell/McBean). Elevated constituents also occurred in five Aquifer Unit IIA (Congaree) wells. Upgradient wells BGO 1D and 2D and HSB 85A, 85B, and 85C did not contain any constituents that exceeded the PDWS. Downgradient wells in the three hydrostratigraphic units contained elevated levels of tritium, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, chloroethene, antimony, 1,1-dichloroethylene, gross alpha, lead, nonvolatile beta, thallium, total alpha-emitting radium (radium-224 and radium-226), or cadmium.

  9. Remotion of organic compounds of actual industrial effluents by electron beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampa, M. H. O.; Duarte, C. L.; Rela, P. R.; Somessari, E. S. R.; Silveira, C. G.; Azevedo, A. L.

    1998-06-01

    Organic compounds has been a great problem of environmental pollution, the traditional methods are not effecient on removing these compounds and most of them are deposited to ambient and stay there for long time causing problems to the environment. Ionizing radiation has been used with success to destroy organic molecules. Actual industrial effluents were irradiated using IPEN's electron beam wastewater pilot plant to study organic compounds degradation. The samples were irradiated with and without air mixture by different doses. Irradiation treatment efficiency was evaluated by the Cromatography Gas Analyses of the samples before and after irradiation. The studied organic compounds were: phenol, chloroform, tetrachloroethylene (PCE), carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethylene (TCE), 1,1-dichloroethane, dichloromethane, benzene, toluene and xilene. A degradation superior to 80% was achieved for the majority of the compounds with air addition and 2kGy delivered dose condition. For the samples that were irradiated without air addition the degradation was higher.

  10. Reaction mechanisms involved in reduction of halogenated hydrocarbons using sulfated iron

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, S.M.; Cipollone, M.G.; Wolfe, N.L.

    1995-12-01

    Experiments were carried out to investigate the mechanisms and pathways involved in the reduction of halogenated hydrocarbons represented by trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) with sulfated iron aqueous media. Results suggested that iron sulfide acted as the dehalogenation center. Zero-valent iron acted as a generator for molecular hydrogen through its reaction with water. Results of experiments in which iron sulfide was replaced by other transition metal sulfides and experiments in which zero-valent iron was replaced by other sources of molecular hydrogen will be reported. The main reduction product of chloroethylene derivatives was ethyne which under the catalytic reaction of zero-valent iron was reduced further to ethene and finally to ethane. Intermediate products were identified using GC-MS. Mechanisms and pathways will be presented.

  11. Variability in biological monitoring of solvent exposure. I. Development of a population physiological model.

    PubMed Central

    Droz, P O; Wu, M M; Cumberland, W G; Berode, M

    1989-01-01

    Biological indicators of exposure to solvents are often characterised by a high variability that may be due either to fluctuations in exposure or individual differences in the workers. To describe and understand this variability better a physiological model for differing workers under variable industrial environments has been developed. Standard statistical distributions are used to simulate variability in exposure concentration, physical workload, body build, liver function, and renal clearance. For groups of workers exposed daily, the model calculates air monitoring indicators and biological monitoring results (expired air, blood, and urine). The results obtained are discussed and compared with measured data, both physiological (body build, cardiac output, alveolar ventilation) and toxicokinetic for six solvents: 1,1,1-trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, benzene, toluene, styrene, and their main metabolites. Possible applications of this population physiological model are presented. PMID:2765418

  12. Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater

    DOEpatents

    Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B.

    1994-01-01

    Disclosed is an apparatus and method for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid (NF) is selected to simulated the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms capable of degrading the contaminants; an oxygenated fluid (OF) is selected to create an aerobic environment with anaerobic pockets. NF is injected periodically while OF is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. NF stimulates microbial colony growth; withholding it periodically forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is acceptable. NF can be methane and OF be air, for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially TCE and tetrachloroethylene.

  13. Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater

    DOEpatents

    Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B.

    1995-01-24

    An apparatus and method are described for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid is selected to stimulate the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms that are capable of degrading the contaminants. An oxygenated fluid is selected to create a generally aerobic environment for these microorganisms to degrade the contaminants, leaving only pockets that are anaerobic. The nutrient fluid is injected periodically while the oxygenated fluid is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. The nutrient fluid stimulates microbial colony growth. Withholding it periodically forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is reduced to an acceptable, preselected level. The nutrient fluid can be methane and the oxygenated fluid air for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene. 3 figures.

  14. Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater

    DOEpatents

    Hazen, Terry C.; Fliermans, Carl B.

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus and method for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid is selected to stimulate the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms that are capable of degrading the contaminants; an oxygenated fluid is selected to create a generally aerobic environment for these microorganisms to degrade the contaminants, leaving only pockets that are anaerobic. The nutrient fluid is injected periodically while the oxygenated fluid is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. The nutrient fluid stimulates microbial colony growth; withholding it periodicially forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is reduced to an acceptable, preselected level. The nutrient fluid can be methane and the oxygenated fluid air for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene.

  15. Mixed waste management facility groundwater monitoring report. Fourth quarter 1995 and 1995 summary

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1995, seven constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility. No constituents exceeded final PDWS in samples from the upgradient monitoring wells. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread elevated constituents. Chloroethene, gross alpha, lead, mercury, and tetrachloroethylene also exceeded final PDWS in one or more wells. Elevated constituents were found in numerous Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 2} (Water Table) and Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 1} (Barnwell/McBean) wells and in three Aquifer Unit IIA (Congaree) wells. The groundwater flow directions and rates in the three hydrostratigraphic units were similar to those of previous quarters.

  16. Geohydrology and the occurrence of volatile organic compounds in ground water, Culpeper basin of Prince William County, Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Nelms, D.L.; Richardson, D.L. )

    1990-01-01

    The Culpeper basin of Prince William County comprises an interbedded sequence of Upper Triassic and Lower Jurassic sedimentary and volcanic rocks. This sequence is intersected by diabase intrusives and thermally metamorphosed rocks. The rocks of the Culpeper basin are highly fractured and overlain by a thin cover of overburden. Groundwater in the Culpeper basin flows generally from the uplands along lineaments to the lowlands or valleys. Pumping from municipal-supply wells has caused two cones of depression in the Manassas-Manassas Park area. Volatile organic compounds have been detected in groundwater in 5 areas of the Culpeper basin in the county. The dominant volatile organic compounds detected are tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, and 1,1,1-trichloroethane. Concentrations of the volatile organic compounds range from 0.1 to 5,300 microg/L. 62 refs., 20 figs., 15 tabs.

  17. Competitive Sorption and Desorption of Chlorinated Organic Solvents (DNAPLs) in Engineered Natural Organic Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Jixin; Weber, Walter J., Jr.

    2004-03-31

    The effects of artificially accelerated geochemical condensation and maturation of natural organic matter on the sorption and desorption of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) were studied. The sorption and desorption of TCE in the presence and absence of the competing PCE and 1,2-dichlorobenzene (DCB) were also examined. A sphagnum peat comprising geologically young organic matter was artificially ''aged'' using superheated water, thus increasing the aromaticity and the degree of condensation of its associated organic matter. The sorption of all solutes tested were increased remarkably and their respective desorptions reduced, by the aged peat. The sorption capacities and isotherm nonlinearities of the peat for both TCE and PCE were found to increase as treatment temperature increased. In the competitive sorption studies, both PCE and DCB were found to depress TCE sorption, with PCE having greater effects than DCB, presumably because the molecular structure o f the former is more similar to that of TCE.

  18. Investigation of the behavior of VOCs in ground water across fine- and coarse-grained geological contacts using a medium-scale physical model

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, F.; Chiarappa, M.L.

    1998-03-01

    One of the serious impediments to the remediation of ground water contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is that the VOCs are retarded with respect to the movement of the ground water. Although the processes that result in VOC retardation are poorly understood, we have developed a conceptual model that includes several retarding mechanisms. These include adsorption to inorganic surfaces, absorption to organic carbon, and diffusion into areas of immobile waters. This project was designed to evaluate the relative contributions of these mechanisms; by improving our understanding, we hope to inspire new remediation technologies or approaches. Our project consisted of a series of column experiments designed to measure the retardation, in different geological media, of four common ground water VOCs (chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethylene, and tetrachloroethylene) which have differing physical and chemical characteristics. It also included a series of diffusion parameters that constrain the model, we compared the data from these experiments to the output of a computational model.

  19. Neurobehavioural effects of developmental toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Grandjean, Philippe; Landrigan, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    Neurodevelopmental disabilities, including autism, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, dyslexia, and other cognitive impairments, affect millions of children worldwide, and some diagnoses seem to be increasing in frequency. Industrial chemicals that injure the developing brain are among the known causes for this rise in prevalence. In 2006, we did a systematic review and identified five industrial chemicals as developmental neurotoxicants: lead, methylmercury, polychlorinated biphenyls, arsenic, and toluene. Since 2006, epidemiological studies have documented six additional developmental neurotoxicants—manganese, fluoride, chlorpyrifos, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, tetrachloroethylene, and the polybrominated diphenyl ethers. We postulate that even more neurotoxicants remain undiscovered. To control the pandemic of developmental neurotoxicity, we propose a global prevention strategy. Untested chemicals should not be presumed to be safe to brain development, and chemicals in existing use and all new chemicals must therefore be tested for developmental neurotoxicity. To coordinate these efforts and to accelerate translation of science into prevention, we propose the urgent formation of a new international clearinghouse. PMID:24556010

  20. Public health assessment for American Anodco Incorporated, Ionia, Ionia County, Michigan. Region 5. Cerclis No. MID006029102. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-07

    The American Anodco, Inc. site, a former anodizing facility, is located in the industrial zone area in the eastern part of the City of Ionia, Michigan. The waste water in seepage lagoons at this site was allowed to seep into the ground and the lagoons were filled with clean soils in 1987. There is some evidence that groundwater at the site is contaminated with arsenic, boron, nitrate and nitrite, 1,1,1-trichloroethane and traces of tetrachloroethylene. There may be some potential health risk to the public if groundwater at this site is used for drinking and other household purposes in the future. Monitoring well OW-6 should be sampled again to confirm the concentration of 1,1,1-trichloroethane, if any, present in water from the well.

  1. Public health assessment for Grand Traverse Overall Supply Company, Greilickville, Leelanau County, Michigan, Region 5. Cerclis No. MID017418559. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-21

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) placed the Grand Traverse Overall Supply site on the National Priorities List (NPL) on September 8, 1983. From 1953 through 1977, GTOS disposed of waste water from the process in a dry well and four lagoons on their property. Since 1977, they have used the township sewer system. In 1978, tetrachloroethylene (also known as perchloroethylene or PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) were found in the water in wells serving a school adjacent to GTOS and several nearby residences. The soil around the dry well was excavated and taken off-site for disposal. The lagoons were filled in, and covered with gravel or grass. The site currently poses no apparent public health hazard. Trace amounts of PCE in well water have been detected in the most recent testing, however, the amounts are below the level of public health concern.

  2. Water-Quality Data for Pharmaceuticals and Other Organic Wastewater Contaminants in Ground Water and in Untreated Drinking Water Sources in the United States, 2000-01

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, Kimberlee K.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Focazio, Michael J.; Furlong, Edward T.; Meyer, Michael T.; Zaugg, Steven D.; Haack, Sheridan K.; Barber, Larry B.; Thurman, E. Michael

    2008-01-01

    The five most frequently detected compounds in samples collected from ambient ground-water sites are N,N-diethyltoluamide (35 percent, insect repellant), bisphenol A (30 percent, plasticizer), tri(2-chloroethy) phosphate (30 percent, fire retardant), sulfamethoxazole (23 percent, veterinary and human antibiotic), and 4-octylphenol monoethoxylate (19 percent, detergent metabolite). The five most frequently detected organic wastewater contaminants in samples of untreated drinking water from surface-water sources are cholesterol (59 percent, natural sterol), metolachlor (53 percent, herbicide), cotinine (51 percent, nicotine metabolite), β-sitosterol (37 percent, natural plant sterol), and 1,7-dimethylxanthine (27 percent, caffeine metabolite). The five most frequently detected organic wastewater contaminants in samples of untreated drinking water from ground-water sources are tetrachloroethylene (24 percent, solvent), carbamazepine (20 percent, pharmaceutical), bisphenol A (20 percent, plasticizer), 1,7-dimethylxanthine (16 percent, caffeine metabolite), and tri(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (12 percent, fire retardant).

  3. Current Intelligence Bulletins: summaries, September 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-01

    Brief summaries of 49 NIOSH Current Intelligence Bulletins were provided in a cumulative listing. Permissible Exposure Limits were included where applicable, and notes were provided with some summaries indicating further action or data since original publication. Topics covered include chloroprene, trichloroethylene, ethylene-dibromide, chrome pigment, asbestos, hexamethylphosphoric-triamide, polychlorinated-biphenyls, 4,4'-diaminodiphenylmethane, chloroform, radon daughters, dimethylcarbamoyl-chloride, diethylcarbamoyl-chloride, explosive azide hazard, arsenic, nitrosamines, metabolic precursors of beta-naphthylamine, 2-nitropropane, acrylonitrile, 2,4-diaminoanisole, tetrachloroethylene, trimellitic-anhydride, ethylene-thiourea, ethylene-dibromide, disulfiram, dyes, ethylene-dichloride, chloroethanes, vinyl halides, glycidyl ethers, epichlorohydrin, smoking, arsine, radiofrequency sealers, formaldehyde, ethylene-oxide, silica flour, vibration syndrome, glycol ethers, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, 1,3-butadiene, cadmium, monohalomethanes, dinitrotoluenes, methylene-chloride, 4,4'-methylenedianiline, organic solvents, and injuries and amputations from working with power presses.

  4. NIOSH current intelligence bulletins: summaries

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    Summaries were offered of the current intelligence bulletins issued from January 20, 1975 to August of 1988. They include information on the following topics: chloroprene, trichloroethylene, ethylene dibromide, chrome pigment, asbestos, hexamethylphosphoric triamide, polychlorinated biphenyls, 4,4'-diaminodiphenylmethane, chloroform, radon daughters, dimethylcarbamoyl chloride, diethylcarbamoyl-chloride, explosive azide hazard, inorganic arsenic, nitrosamines in cutting fluids, metabolic precursors of beta-naphthylamine, 2-nitropropane, acrylonitrile, 2,4-diaminoanisole, tetrachloroethylene, trimellitic anhydride, ethylene thiourea, disulfiram, direct-blue-6, direct-black-38, direct-brown-95, benzidine derived dyes, ethylene dichloride, NIAX catalyst ESN, chloroethanes, vinyl halides, glycidyl ethers, epichlorohydrin, smoking, arsine poisoning, radiofrequency sealers and heaters, formaldehyde, ethylene oxide, silica flour, vibration syndrome, glycol ethers, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, 1,3-butadiene, cadmium, monohalomethanes, dinitrotoluenes, methylene chloride, 4,4'-methylenedianiline, organic solvent neurotoxicity, mechanical power press injuries, and the carcinogenic effects of diesel exhaust.

  5. Volatile organic compounds in 600 US homes: major sources of personal exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, L.; Clayton, C.A.

    1987-05-01

    The USEPA carried out the Total Exposure Assessment Methodology (TEAM) Study (1980-85) on 600 subjects in five cities representing a total population of more than 700,000 persons. Personal exposures to all prevalent target compounds exceeded outdoor concentrations. Major sources were smoking (benzene, styrene, xylenes, and octane); using hot water (chloroform); wearing dry-cleaned clothes (tetrachloroethylene); and using moth crystals or room air deodorants (para-dichlorobenzene). Eleven of 14 occupations also showed elevated exposures to one or more chemicals (particularly aromatics). Auto related activities (lengthy commuting, filling gas tanks) were associated with increased exposures to several aromatics. Breath concentrations were significantly associated with personal air exposures but not with outdoor concentrations. Residence in major chemical-manufacturing and petroleum-refining areas did not significantly affect personal exposures.

  6. Analysis and evaluation of VOC removal technologies demonstrated at Savannah River

    SciTech Connect

    Chesnut, D.A.; Wagoner, J.; Nitao, J.J.; Boyd, S.; Shaffer, R.J.; Kansa, E.J.; Buscheck, T.A.; Pruess, K.; Falta, R.W.

    1993-09-01

    Volatile Organic Compounds, or VOCs, are ubiquitous subsurface contaminants at industrial as well as DOE sites. At the Savannah River Plant, the principles VOCs contaminating the subsurface below A-Area and M-Area are Trichloroethylene (C{sub 2}HCl{sub 3}, or TCE) and Tetrachloroethylene (C{sub 2}Cl{sub 4}, or PCE). These compounds were used extensively as degreasing solvents from 1952 until 1979, and the waste solvent which did not evaporate (on the order of 2{times}10{sup 6} pounds) was discharged to a process sewer line leading to the M-Area Seepage Basin (Figure I.2). These compounds infiltrated into the soil and underlying sediments from leaks in the sewer line and elsewhere thereby contaminating the vadose zone between the surface and the water table as well as the aquifer.

  7. Comparison of temporal trends in VOCs as measured with PDB samplers and low-flow sampling methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harte, P.T.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of temporal trends in tetrachloroethylene (PCE) concentration determined by two sample techniques showed that passive diffusion bag (pdb) samplers adequately sample the large variation in PCE concentrations at the site. The slopes of the temporal trends in concentrations were comparable between the two techniques, and the pdb sample concentration generally reflected the instantaneous concentration sampled by the low-flow technique. Thus, the pdb samplers provided an appropriate sampling technique for PCE at these wells. One or two wells did not make the case for widespread application of pdb samples at all sites. However, application of pdb samples in some circumstances was appropriate for evaluating temporal and spatial variations in VOC concentrations, thus, should be considered as a useful tool in hydrogeology.

  8. Transformations of 1- and 2-carbon halogenated aliphatic organic compounds under methanogenic conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Bouwer, E J; McCarty, P L

    1983-01-01

    Several 1- and 2-carbon halogenated aliphatic organic compounds present at low concentrations (less than 100 micrograms/liter) were degraded under methanogenic conditions in batch bacterial cultures and in a continuous-flow methanogenic fixed-film laboratory-scale column. Greater than 90% degradation was observed within a 2-day detention time under continuous-flow methanogenic conditions with acetate as a primary substrate. Carbon-14 measurements indicated that chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, and 1,2-dichloroethane were almost completely oxidized to carbon dioxide, confirming removal by biooxidation. The initial step in the transformations of tetrachloroethylene and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane to nonchlorinated end products appeared to be reductive dechlorination to trichloroethylene and 1,1,2-trichloroethane, respectively. Transformations of the brominated aliphatic compounds appear to be the result of both biological and chemical processes. The data suggest that transformations of halogenated aliphatic compounds can occur under methanogenic conditions in the environment. PMID:6859849

  9. Public health assessment for crossley farm/Hereford groundwater, Hereford township, Berks County, Pennsylvania, Region 3. CERCLIS No. PAD981740061. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    The report describes an illegal waste disposal site in east central Pennsylvania and its effect on groundwater in the area surrounding the site. The Crossley Farm (Hereford Groundwater) site is in the Huffs Church community of Hereford Township, Berks County. Illegal waste disposal activities reportedly occurred at the site from the mid-1960's to mid-1970's. About 250 residents live hydrogeological downgradient of the site (within two miles) and another 200 live within one-half mile upgradient of the site. The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources has collected groundwater samples in 1983 and the EPA has collected samples in 1986. The estimated exposures are to substances (trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene in particular) in groundwater at concentrations that with long-term exposure can cause adverse health effects to the population.

  10. Method for detecting toxic gases

    DOEpatents

    Stetter, Joseph R.; Zaromb, Solomon; Findlay, Jr., Melvin W.

    1991-01-01

    A method capable of detecting low concentrations of a pollutant or other component in air or other gas, utilizing a combination of a heating filament having a catalytic surface of a noble metal for exposure to the gas and producing a derivative chemical product from the component, and an electrochemical sensor responsive to the derivative chemical product for providing a signal indicative of the product. At concentrations in the order of about 1-100 ppm of tetrachloroethylene, neither the heating filament nor the electrochemical sensor is individually capable of sensing the pollutant. In the combination, the heating filament converts the benzyl chloride to one or more derivative chemical products which may be detected by the electrochemical sensor.

  11. Organics in soils and groundwater at non-arid sites (A-1) integrated demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, J.L.; Kaback, D.S.; Looney, B.B.

    1994-06-01

    One of the most common environmental problems in the United States is soils and groundwater contaminated with volatile chemical solvents classified as Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), which were used as degreasers and cleaning agents. Leakage of solvents (trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene) from an underground process sewer line has contaminated soils and underlying groundwaters at SRS. This site was chosen for DOE-OTD`s integrated demonstration program to demonstrate innovative technologies for cleanup of soils and groundwater contaminated with VOCs. The Savannah River Site was especially well suited as the test bed for this integrated demonstration project due to the presence of a pre-existing line source of soil and groundwater-based contamination, on-going environmental remediation efforts at the site, and full cooperation from the concerned environmental regulatory agencies. The Integrated Demonstration (ID) at the Savannah River Site has demonstrated systems of technologies and evaluated them with respect to performance, safety and cost effectiveness.

  12. Distribution of natural halocarbons in marine boundary air over the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokouchi, Yoko; Inoue, Jun; Toom-Sauntry, Desiree

    2013-08-01

    Ongoing environmental changes in the Arctic will affect the exchange of natural volatile organic compounds between the atmosphere and the Arctic Ocean. Among these compounds, natural halocarbons play an important role in atmospheric ozone chemistry. We measured the distribution of five major natural halocarbons (methyl iodide, bromoform, dibromomethane, methyl chloride, and methyl bromide) together with dimethyl sulfide and tetrachloroethylene in the atmosphere over the Arctic Ocean (from the Bering Strait to 79°N) and along the cruise path to and from Japan. Methyl iodide, bromoform, and dibromomethane were most abundant near perennial sea ice in air masses derived from coastal regions and least abundant in the northernmost Arctic, where the air masses had passed over the ice pack, whereas methyl chloride and methyl bromide showed the opposite distribution pattern. Factors controlling those distributions and future prospects for natural halocarbons in the Arctic are discussed.

  13. Bias in biologic monitoring caused by concomitant medication

    SciTech Connect

    Borm, P.J.; de Barbanson, B.

    1988-03-01

    Medication of the worker with pharmacotherapeutic agents and its meaning for individual pharmacokinetics of the agent(s) to which the worker is exposed is a largely unexplored zone, on the border of both occupational and clinical medicine. Medication and exposure to occupational agents can result in pharmacodynamic and/or pharmacokinetic interactions; the latter type of interactions will be discussed in this paper. Using styrene, toluene, tetrachloroethylene, and 1,1,1-trichloroethane as examples of solvents with various kinetic properties, it is demonstrated in what way concomitant therapy can influence the elimination of the solvent. Major emphasis is laid on the effects on conclusions drawn from biomonitoring studies in exhaled air and venous blood. To achieve this purpose, a physiologic simulation model, run on a 640-kilobyte microcomputer, is used. The simulated variation of several parameters is illustrated with examples from pharmacologic practice. 45 references.

  14. [The protection of drinking water in a public health department].

    PubMed

    Monari, R; Petrolo, A; Mascelli, M; Vannucchi, G

    2008-01-01

    The protection of drinking water is a key issue in a Public Health Department's activity. A substantial amount of planning and monitoring work is involved in the development and implementation of a water safety plan, aimed not only at the enforcement of public health regulations, but also at the improvement of the quality water. We provide an overview of the quality monitoring program of the municipality of Prato, a highly populated and industrialized area, where ground water is contaminated by anthropogenic pollutants such as trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene and nitrate. We show how, in spite of the intrinsically poor quality of the basic water resource, the careful application of an appropriate prevention plan, with the cooperation of the local water authority, allows the delivery of drinking water of increasing safety and quality. PMID:19238879

  15. TNX-Area groundwater monitoring report. 1993 Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    During 1993, samples from well cluster P 26 and the TBG, TNX, XSB, and YSB well series at the TNX Area were analyzed for selected heavy metals, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Seven parameters exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS). Dichloromethane (methylene chloride), a common laboratory contaminant, nitrate, and trichloroethylene exceeded PDWS most frequently. Four wells in this area currently are part of the Purge Water Contaminant Program due to high trichloroethylene concentrations. Carbon tetrachloride, gross alpha, lead, and tetrachloroethylene were elevated sporadically in one or more wells during the year. Groundwater flow directions and rates in the Unconfined Aquifer were similar from quarter to quarter during the year.

  16. Alloyed steel wastes utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Sokol, I.V.

    1995-12-31

    Alloyed steel chips and swarf formed during metal processing are looked upon as additional raw materials in metallurgical production. This paper presents some new methods for steel waste chips and swarf cleaning. One of them is swarf and steel chips cleaning in tetrachloroethylene with ultrasonic assistance and solvent regeneration. Thermal cleaning of waste chips and swarf provides off gas products utilization. The catalyst influence of the metal surface on the thermal decomposition of liquid hydrocarbons during the cleaning process has been studied. It has been determined that the efficiency of this metal waste cleaning technique depends on the storage time of the swarf. The waste chips and swarf cleaning procedures have been proven to be economically advantageous and environmentally appropriate.

  17. Operations Support of Phase 2 Integrated Demonstration In Situ Bioremediation. Volume 1, Final report: Final report text data in tabular form, Disk 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, T.C.

    1993-09-01

    This project was designed to demonstrate in situ bioremediation of ground water and sediment contaminated with chlorinated solvents. Indigenous microorganisms were stimulated to degrade trichlorethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and their daughter products in situ by addition of nutrients to the contaminated aquifer and adjacent vadose zone. The principle carbon/energy source nutrient used in this demonstration was methane (natural gas). In situ biodegradation is a highly attractive technology for remediation because contaminants are destroyed, not simply moved to another location or immobilized, thus decreasing costs, risks, and time, while increasing efficiency, safety, and public and regulatory acceptability. This report describes the preliminary results of the demonstration and provides conclusions only for those measures that the Bioremediation Technical Support Group felt were so overwhelmingly convincing that they do not require further analyses. Though this report is necessarily superficial it does intend to provide a basis for further evaluating the technology and for practitioners to immediately apply some parts of the technology.

  18. Public-health assessment for 10th Street site (a/k/a Columbus Public Water Supply), Columbus, Platte County, Nebraska, Region 7. CERCLIS No. NED981713837. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-12

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has developed plans to conduct a Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (RI/FS) for the Tenth Street Superfund Site in Columbus, Nebraska. The first task for this RI/FS was to prepare a project scoping report to define the limits of the investigation. The subject site is located in the business district of the City of Columbus and may be the source of contamination of several of the City's municipal supply wells. The major site contaminants are trihalomethanes (THM), trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE). Contributors to the site contamination are speculated to be four dry cleaning establishments, a radiator repair/machine shop, and an unpaved parking lot that previously was a scrap metal yard. Until such time that the RI/FS is completed by EPA, water monitoring should be continued to prevent consumption of contaminated water. The site has been reviewed by the ATSDR Health Activities Recommendation Panel.

  19. Health assessment for Mystery Bridge Road/US Highway 20 Site, Brookhurst Subdivision, Evansville, Natrona County, Wyoming, Region 8. CERCLIS No. WYD981546005. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-04-04

    The Mystery Bridge Road, U.S. Highway 20 site, also known as the Brookhurst Subdivision (BSD), is located adjacent to industrial sites in Wyoming. The sites include a natural gas processing facility, an oil and gas well servicing company, and a railroad siding. Organic chemicals from the industrial sites have contaminated the underlying aquifer and resulted in contamination of downgradient drinking water wells in the BSD. The list of organic contaminants detected on-site include toluene, xylene, benzene, tetrachloroethylene (PCE), 1,1-dichloroethane, trichloroethylene (TCE), and 1,1,1-trichloroethane. An estimated 414 persons in the subdivision rely on groundwater wells for potable water. An alternative supply of potable water has been provided for these residents.

  20. Health assessment for Monolithic Memories, Sunnyvale, California, Region 9. CERCLIS No. CAD049236201. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-19

    The Monolithic Memories Site (MMS) is on the National Priorities List. The site is located in Sunnyvale (Santa Clara County), California. MMS consists of 4 buildings that are used for production, assembly, storage, and for offices and laboratories. Preliminary on-site ground water sampling results have identified 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane (1.7 ppb). Other preliminary on-site ground water sampling results identified tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), xylene, chlorobenzene, dichlorobenzene, ethyl benzene, and acetone. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of human exposure to hazardous substances. Direct contact with and ingestion of contaminated ground water and soil are the exposure pathways of concern. In addition, inhalation of volatilized contaminants represents another possible source of exposure.

  1. Health assessment for Islip Sanitary Landfill, Suffolk County, New York, Region 2. CERCLIS No. NYD980506901. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-29

    The Islip Sanitary landfill 40-acre site has been in operation since 1927, accepting municipal and industrial wastes. The site continues to operate. The site is unlined, and only partially capped. Environmental sampling conducted to date indicates that the contaminants of immediate concern are predominately volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) in ground water and perhaps air. The VOCs present in one or more environmental media include trichloroethylene (TCE); tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene (PCE)); trichloroethane (TCA); vinyl chloride; and methylene chloride. Contaminated or potentially contaminated environmental pathways associated with the site which are of greatest public health importance are on-site and off-site ground water, and possibly air. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances. While it does not appear that a human population is currently exposed to site contaminants, the potential for such exposure remains and should be carefully monitored.

  2. Groundwater contamination by PCE and TCE: ATSDR's approach to evaluating public health hazard

    SciTech Connect

    Weis, B.K.; Susten, A.S.

    1999-07-01

    The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) conducts public health assessments and consultations that evaluate the potential health impacts from human exposure to hazardous substances and recommend appropriate actions needed to mitigate or prevent exposures. ATSDR has conducted health evaluations for more than 80 federal facilities. Eighteen sites involve human exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE) or trichloroethylene (TCE) in groundwater. ATSDR uses a two-tiered approach to evaluate health hazard or risk from exposure. The first tier of analysis is described as a rote algorithmic determination of risk (RAD) and is used to screen exposure conditions that do not pose a health hazard under conservative assumptions of exposure. The second tier is a weight-of-evidence analysis that incorporates the traditional elements of risk assessment within the broader context of professional and biomedical health hazard for exposure pathways involving groundwater contamination at federal facilities.

  3. Health assessment for Rockaway Borough Well Field National Priorities List (NPL) site, Borough of Rockaway, Morris County, New Jersey, Region 2. CERCLIS No. NJD980654115. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-17

    The Rockaway Borough Well Field is a National Priorities List site located in the Borough of Rockaway, Morris County, New Jersey. Because of yet unidentified source(s) of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in ground water, municipal wells of the Borough of Rockaway have been contaminated sometime prior to 1980, when well water was found to contain high concentrations of these volatile organic compounds. The site is of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health resulting from possible exposure to hazardous substances at concentrations that may result in adverse health effects. Human exposure to elevated concentrations of TCE and/or PCE may occur, be occurring, or have occurred via oral, dermal, or inhalation exposure to contaminated municipal drinking water (only in the unlikely event that breakthrough occurs) or private well water.

  4. Health assessment for Middletown Air Field, Middletown, Pennsylvania, Region 3. CERCLIS No. PAD980538763. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-04-01

    The Middletown Air Field is located southeast of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Past waste disposal activities at the Middletown Air Field have resulted in contamination of the groundwater aquifer with trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), and other volatile organic chemicals (VOCs). Since 1983, the selective pumping of wells and periodic monitoring of water from the wells and distribution system have maintained VOC concentrations in finished water below acceptable health-based values. It is not possible to assess potential health effects that may have resulted from exposure to VOCs in potable water prior to 1983 because of the lack of data. Additional studies are needed to determine whether there is any human exposure to contamination sources from private potable wells or through other routes of exposure.

  5. Health assessment for Malvern Trichloroethylene, Malvern, Pennsylvania, Region 3. CERCLIS No. PAD014353445. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-19

    The Malvern Trichloroethylene (TCE) Site (MTS) is in Malvern(Chester County) Pennsylvania. From 1952 to 1976 drums containing various wastes including volatile organic compounds and PCBs were dumped on-site. Preliminary on-site groundwater sampling results have identified TCE (ND to 1,330 ppm), perchloroethylene (PCE) (7 to 1,170 ppm), 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA) (12 to 2,230 ppm), and tetrachloroethylene (ND to 22,000 ppb). In addition, PCBs were identified in soil (1,350 ppm) and in drums. The site is considered to be of public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of human exposure to hazardous substances.

  6. Survey of subsurface treatment technologies for environmental restoration sites at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect

    McGrath, Lucas K.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Wright, Jerome L.

    2003-08-01

    This report provides a survey of remediation and treatment technologies for contaminants of concern at environmental restoration (ER) sites at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico. The sites that were evaluated include the Tijeras Arroyo Groundwater, Technical Area V, and Canyons sites. The primary contaminants of concern at these sites include trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), and nitrate in groundwater. Due to the low contaminant concentrations (close to regulatory limits) and significant depths to groundwater ({approx}500 feet) at these sites, few in-situ remediation technologies are applicable. The most applicable treatment technologies include monitored natural attenuation and enhanced bioremediation/denitrification to reduce the concentrations of TCE, PCE, and nitrate in the groundwater. Stripping technologies to remove chlorinated solvents and other volatile organic compounds from the vadose zone can also be implemented, if needed.

  7. Method for detecting toxic gases

    DOEpatents

    Stetter, J.R.; Zaromb, S.; Findlay, M.W. Jr.

    1991-10-08

    A method is disclosed which is capable of detecting low concentrations of a pollutant or other component in air or other gas. This method utilizes a combination of a heating filament having a catalytic surface of a noble metal for exposure to the gas and producing a derivative chemical product from the component. An electrochemical sensor responds to the derivative chemical product for providing a signal indicative of the product. At concentrations in the order of about 1-100 ppm of tetrachloroethylene, neither the heating filament nor the electrochemical sensor is individually capable of sensing the pollutant. In the combination, the heating filament converts the benzyl chloride to one or more derivative chemical products which may be detected by the electrochemical sensor. 6 figures.

  8. Health assessment for American Lake Gardens, Tacoma, Pierce County, Washington, Region 10. CERCLIS No. WAD980833065. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-19

    The American Lake Gardens site is on the National Priorities List. Two areas within the site are the areas of primary contamination; the northeast section's contamination is believed to have come from the closed landfill (now a golf course) on McChord AFB, and the southwest section's contamination from Fort Lewis. Both Fort Lewis and McChord AFB are NPL sites. The environmental contamination on-site consists of trans-1,2-dichloroethylene (530 ppb), trichloroethylene (260 ppb), methylene chloride (38 ppb), tetrachloroethylene (52 ppb), benzene (6 ppb), and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (18 ppb) in ground water. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via ground water (from private wells still in use) and surface water.

  9. Mechanisms and controlling characteristics of the catalytic oxidation of methane

    SciTech Connect

    Klier, Kamil; Simmons, Gary W.; Herman, Richard G.; Park, Kenneth T.; Hess, James S.; Hunsicker, Robert A.

    1999-07-01

    Methane dissociation and oxygen activation have been found to be structure sensitive on different single crystal palladium surfaces. Geometrically restricted surfaces on Pd single crystal and polycrystalline surfaces using tetrachloroethylene and pentamethylcyclopentasiloxane have been formed and compared with surface structures formed using dichloromethane and chlorine. The adsorption and activation of O{sub 2}, CO, and H{sub 2}O on clean Pd surfaces and those containing the surface ensembles have also been investigated. To interpret high-resolution angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectra (HR AR-XPS), a new self-modeling method of resolving HR-XPS spectra was developed and applied to the experimental spectra. The effects of electron-accepting Cl, O{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O adsobated on Cs/MoS{sub 2} were determined.

  10. Gas phase photocatalytic degradation on TiO{sub 2} pellets of volatile chlorinated organic compounds from a soil vapor extraction well

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki-Nishida, S.; Read, H.W.; Nagano, J.K.; Anderson, M.A.; Cervera-March, S.; Jarosch, T.R.; Eddy-Dilek, C.A.

    1993-05-20

    The mineralization of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in gas stream from a soil vapor extraction (SVE) well was demonstrated with an annular photocatalytic reactor packed with porous TiO{sub 2} pellets in field trials at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, SC. The TiO{sub 2} pellets were prepared using a sol-gel method. The experiments were performed at 55 to 60{degree}C using space times of 10{sup 8} to 10{sup 10} g s/mol for TCE and PCE. Chloroform (CHCl{sub 3}) and carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) were detected as minor products from side reactions. On a molar basis, CCl{sub 4} and CHCl{sub 3} produced were about 2% and 0.2 % of the reactants.

  11. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) groundwater monitoring report. Fourth quarter 1993 and 1993 summary

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, C.T.

    1994-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1993, 10 constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility, the Old Burial Ground, the E-Area Vaults, and the proposed Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Vaults. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread elevated constituents. Carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, chloroethane (vinyl chloride), 1,1-dichloroethylene, dichloromethane (methylene chloride), lead, mercury, or tetrachloroethylene also exceeded standards in one or more wells. Elevated constituents were found in numerous Aquifer Zone 2B{sub 2} (Water Table) and Aquifer Zone 2B{sub 1}, (Barnwell/McBean) wells and in two Aquifer Unit 2A (Congaree) wells. The groundwater flow direction and rates in the three hydrostratigraphic units were similar to those of previous quarters.

  12. Breathing with chlorinated solvents

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, P.L.

    1997-06-06

    Chlorinated solvents are effective cleaners and in the past dirted solvents were dumped into landfills, stored in tanks that often leaked, or spilled. As a result the most common contaminants of organic groundwater at hazardous waste sites are the two major chlorinated solvents - tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE). Both are suspected carcinogens and both are highly resistant to biodegradation. Now however, there is a report of a bacterium that can remove all of the chlorine atoms from both by halorespiration to form ethene, an innocuous end product. This article goes on to discuss the background of biodegradation of chlorinated compounds, why it is so difficult, and what the future is in this area. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) groundwater monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1992-06-01

    During first quarter 1992, tritium, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, lead, antimony, I,I-dichloroethylene, 1,2-dichloroethane, gross alpha, mercury, nickel, nitrate, nonvolatile beta, and total alpha-emitting radium (radium-224 and radium-226) exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) and adjacent facilities. Tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread constituents; 57 (49%) of the 116 monitored wells contained elevated tritium activities, and 21 (18%) wells exhibited elevated trichloroethylene concentrations Sixty-one downgradient wells screened in Aquifer Zone IIB2 (Water Table), Aquifer Zone IIB[sub 2] (Barnwell/McBean), and Aquifer Unit IIA (Congaree) contained constituents that exceeded the PDWS during first quarter 1992. Upgradient wells BGO 1D and HSB 85A, BC, and 85C did not contain any constituents that exceeded the PDWS. Upgradient well BGO 2D contained elevated tritium.

  14. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1992-06-01

    During first quarter 1992, tritium, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, lead, antimony, I,I-dichloroethylene, 1,2-dichloroethane, gross alpha, mercury, nickel, nitrate, nonvolatile beta, and total alpha-emitting radium (radium-224 and radium-226) exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) and adjacent facilities. Tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread constituents; 57 (49%) of the 116 monitored wells contained elevated tritium activities, and 21 (18%) wells exhibited elevated trichloroethylene concentrations Sixty-one downgradient wells screened in Aquifer Zone IIB2 (Water Table), Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 2} (Barnwell/McBean), and Aquifer Unit IIA (Congaree) contained constituents that exceeded the PDWS during first quarter 1992. Upgradient wells BGO 1D and HSB 85A, BC, and 85C did not contain any constituents that exceeded the PDWS. Upgradient well BGO 2D contained elevated tritium.

  15. Sanitary Landfill groundwater monitoring report. Fourth quarterly report and summary 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    Fifty-seven wells of the LFW series monitor groundwater quality in Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These wells are sampled quarterly to comply with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Domestic Waste Permit DWP-087A and as part of the SRS Groundwater Monitoring Program. Dichloromethane a common laboratory contaminant, and trichloroethylene were the most widespread constituents exceeding standards during 1993. Benzene, chlorobenzene, chloroethene 1,2 dichloroethane, 1,1-dichloroethylene, 1,2-dichloropropane, gross alpha, lindane, mercury, tetrachloroethylene, and tritium also exceeded standards in one or more wells. No groundwater contaminants were observed in wells screened in the lower section of Steed Pond Aquifer.

  16. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) groundwater monitoring report: Third quarter 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    During third quarter 1993, eight constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility, the Old Burial Ground, the E-Area Vaults, and the proposed Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Vaults. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread constituents Chloroethene (vinyl chloride), 1,1-dichloroethylene, dichloromethane (methylene chloride), lead, mercury, or tetrachloroethylene also exceeded standards in one or more wells. The elevated constituents were found in Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 2} (Water Table) and Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 1} (Barnwell/McBean) wells. No elevated constituents were exhibited in Aquifer Unit IIA (Congaree) wells. The groundwater flow directions and rates in the three hydrostratigraphic units were similar to those of previous quarters.

  17. Mutagenicity testing of condensates of smoke from titanium dioxide/hexachloroethane and zinc/hexachloroethane pyrotechnic mixtures.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, N; Fängmark, I; Häggqvist, I; Karlsson, B; Rittfeldt, L; Marchner, H

    1991-05-01

    Condensates of smoke from titanium dioxide/hexachloroethane and zinc/hexachloroethane pyrotechnic mixtures were investigated for their potential to produce genetic damage in the tester strains TA98, TA100, TA1535 and TA1537 of Salmonella typhimurium and in the mouse bone marrow micronucleus assay. Both smoke condensates contained several chlorinated hydrocarbons among which tetrachloroethylene, hexachloroethane, hexachlorobutadiene and hexachlorobenzene were identified by GC/MS. Condensate of smoke from titanium dioxide/hexachloroethane showed a dose-related positive response in the Salmonella assay with strains TA98 and TA100 in the absence of metabolic activation from rat liver S9 fraction. Both smoke condensates were negative in the micronucleus assay but produced a small but significant depression of erythropoietic activity. The results indicate that smoke condensate from titanium dioxide/hexachloroethane mixtures contains unidentified compound(s) that may be considered mutagenic in the Salmonella assay. PMID:2027339

  18. Sanitary Landfill Groundwater Monitoring Report. Fourth Quarter 1997 and 1997 Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.

    1998-02-01

    A maximum of forty-eight wells of the LFW series monitor groundwater quality in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These wells are sampled quarterly to comply with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Domestic Water Permit DWP-087A and as part of the SRS Groundwater Monitoring Program. Chloroethene (vinyl chloride) and trichloroethylene were the most widespread constituents exceeding standards during 1997. Lead (total recoverable), 1,4-dichlorobenzene, mercury, benzene, dichloromethane (methylene chloride), a common laboratory contaminant, tetrachloroethylene, 1,2-dichloroethane, gross alpha, tritium, and 1.2-dichloropropane also exceeded standards in one or more wells. The groundwater flow direction in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill was to the southeast (universal transverse Mercator coordinates). The flow rate in this unit was approximately 139 ft/year during first quarter 1997 and 132 ft/year during fourth quarter.

  19. Quarterly sampling of the wetlands along the old F-Area effluent ditch: March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, K.L.; Cummins, C.L.; Rogers, V.A.

    1994-05-01

    In March 1994, well point water and near surface water (bucket) samples were collected to further characterize tritium and volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the wetlands along the old F-Area effluent ditch south of 643-E (old burial ground). Groundwater flow paths suggest that compounds detected in water table wells around 643-E would migrate towards the old F-Area effluent ditch and Fourmile Branch. Recent analytical results from near surface water sampling in the wetlands that comprise the old F-Area effluent ditch have shown that tritium and small quantities of VOCs are outcropping in the area. Results of the March 1994 sampling event further support findings that tritium and volatile organic compounds originating from 643-E are outcropping in the wetlands near the old F-Area effluent ditch. Six different analytes were detected in the well points at least once at concentrations greater than the method detection limit: d 1,2-dichloroethylene, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, and tritium. 1,2-dichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, and tritium were detected at levels above Primary Drinking Water Standards or Maximum Contaminant Levels list. Four analytes, 1,2-dichloroethylene, trichloroethylene, tritium, and vinyl chloride, were detected at least once at concentrations greater than the method detection limit and least once at concentrations above the PDWS or the MCL. Based on differences in tritium concentrations at each location, it was determined that the sampling devices intercepted different groundwater flow paths. This negated direct comparison of analytical results between devices. However, when VOC concentrations measured at each well point and bucket location were normalized, resulting well point and bucket VOC concentrations were comparable in most cases. These results suggest that volatilization losses of VOCs from the buckets were negligible.

  20. P-Area Reactor 1993 annual groundwater monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-01

    Groundwater was sampled and analyzed during 1993 from wells monitoring the water table at the following locations in P Area: well P 24A in the eastern section of P Area, the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin, the P-Area Coal Pile Runoff Containment Basin, the P-Area Disassembly Basin, the P-Area Burning/Rubble Pit, and the P-Area Seepage Basins. During 1993, pH was above its alkaline standard in well P 24A. Specific conductance was above its standard in one well each from the PAC and PCB series. Lead exceeded its 50 {mu}g/L standard in one well of the PDB series during one quarter. Tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene were detected above their final primary drinking water standards in one well of the PRP well series. Tritium was consistently above its DWS in the PDB and PSB series. Also during 1993, radium-228 exceeded the DWS for total radium in three wells of the PAC series and one well of the PCB series; total alpha-emitting radium exceeded the same standard in a different PCB well. These results are fairly consistent with those from previous years. Unlike results from past years, however, no halogenated volatiles other than trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene exceeded DWS in the PRP well series although gas chromatographic volatile organic analyses were performed throughout the year. Some of the regulated units in P Area appear to need additional monitoring by new wells because there are insufficient downgradient wells, sometimes because the original well network, installed prior to regulation, included sidegradient rather than downgradient wells. No monitoring wells had been installed through 1993 at one of the RCRA/CERCLA units named in the Federal Facilities Agreement, the Bingham Pump Outage Pits.

  1. In situ measurement of volatile organic compounds in groundwater by methods coupled to the cone penetrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Doskey, P.V.; Aldstadt, J.H.; Kuo, J.M.; Costanza, M.S.; Erickson, M.D.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this investigation was to interface an in situ, on-line sparging system with a cone penetrometer to provide direct analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCS) in groundwater by on-site analysis. Transfer lines (15 m x 0.160- to 0.216-cm ID) composed of stainless steel, nickel, aluminum and Teflon{reg_sign} PFA, PTFE, and FEP were evaluated for their ability to quantitatively transfer chloroform, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, carbon tetrachloride, tetrachloroethylene, n-hexane, benzene, toluene, and o-xylene in the gas phase at 25 C. The water content of the gas stream had an insignificant effect on the quantitative transfer of VOCs through Teflon{reg_sign} tubing but was critical to efficiently transfer the compounds through metal tubing, particularly nickel. Transfer efficiencies for all eight analytes in moist gas streams through stainless steel tubing were greater than 95%. Toluene, tetrachloroethylene, and o-xylene were transferred with 93, 81, and 80% efficiency, respectively, when they were drawn through Teflon{reg_sign} PFA tubing at 25 C. The sorption of these VOCs by Teflon{reg_sign} tubing was reversible, and their transfer efficiencies improved to 94% when the tubing was flushed with 16 equivalent volumes of air. In general, the retention of the VOCs by Teflon{reg_sign} increased with decreasing aqueous solubility of the analyte. The efficiencies at which VOCs were sparged from aqueous standards in Teflon{reg_sign} PFA, Type 304 stainless steel, and glass vessels were similar.

  2. Evaluation of exposure to contaminated drinking water and specific birth defects and childhood cancers at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, North Carolina: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Drinking water supplies at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune were contaminated with trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, benzene, vinyl chloride and trans-1,2-dichloroethylene during 1968 through 1985. Methods We conducted a case control study to determine if children born during 1968–1985 to mothers with residential exposure to contaminated drinking water at Camp Lejeune during pregnancy were more likely to have childhood hematopoietic cancers, neural tube defects (NTDs), or oral clefts. For cancers, exposures during the first year of life were also evaluated. Cases and controls were identified through a survey of parents residing on base during pregnancy and confirmed by medical records. Controls were randomly sampled from surveyed participants who had a live birth without a major birth defect or childhood cancer. Groundwater contaminant fate and transport and distribution system models provided estimates of monthly levels of drinking water contaminants at mothers’ residences. Magnitude of odds ratios (ORs) was used to assess associations. Confidence intervals (CIs) were used to indicate precision of ORs. We evaluated parental characteristics and pregnancy history to assess potential confounding. Results Confounding was negligible so unadjusted results were presented. For NTDs and average 1st trimester exposures, ORs for any benzene exposure and for trichloroethylene above 5 parts per billion were 4.1 (95% CI: 1.4-12.0) and 2.4 (95% CI: 0.6-9.6), respectively. For trichloroethylene, a monotonic exposure response relationship was observed. For childhood cancers and average 1st trimester exposures, ORs for any tetrachloroethylene exposure and any vinyl chloride exposure were 1.6 (95% CI: 0.5-4.8), and 1.6 (95% CI: 0.5-4.7), respectively. The study found no evidence suggesting any other associations between outcomes and exposures. Conclusion Although CIs were wide, ORs suggested associations between drinking water contaminants and NTDs. ORs suggested

  3. Volatile organic compounds detected in vapor-diffusion samplers placed in sediments along and near the shoreline at Allen Harbor Landfill and Calf Pasture Point, Davisville, Rhode Island, March-April 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyford, F.P.; Kliever, J.D.; Scott, Clifford

    1999-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds are present in ground water at the Allen Harbor Landfill and the Calf Pasture Point sites on the former Naval Construction Battalion Center in Davisville, R.I. Vapor-diffusion samplers were used at the two sites during March-April 1998 to identify possible discharge points for contaminants along the shore of Allen Harbor and in two wetland areas near the shore. Results from vapor-diffusion samplers will be used in conjunction with other site information to evaluate proposed ground-water monitoring programs. Volatile organic compounds were detected in 41 of 115 samplers placed along the shoreline at the Allen Harbor Landfill. Trichloroethylene was the principal volatile organic compound detected of eight target compounds. The highest vapor concentration measured exceeded 300,000 parts per billion by volume in an area where TCE was detected in groundwater from nearby monitoring wells. Other chemicals detected in vapor-diffusion samplers included tetrachloroethylene, toluene, and benzene. Concentrations of individual volatile organic compounds were less than 100 parts per billion by volume in most samplers. Volatile organic compounds, principally trichloroethylene, were detected in 7 of 30 samplers placed along the shoreline at Calf Pasture Point; the highest trichloroethylene concentration was 1,900 parts per billion by volume. A trace concentration of tetrachloroethylene was detected in one of the samplers. One of 24 samplers placed in two wetland areas near the shore (suspected discharge areas for ground-water containing volatile organic compounds) detected trichloroethylene at a vapor concentration of 14 parts per billion by volume.

  4. A survey of household products for volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sack, Thomas M.; Steele, David H.; Hammerstrom, Karen; Remmers, Janet

    A total of 1159 common household products were analysed for 31 volatile organic compounds as potential sources of indoor air pollution. The products were distributed among 65 product categories within 8 category classes: automotive products (14.4% of the products); household cleaners/polishes (9.6%); paint-related products (39.9%); fabric and leather treatments (7.9%); cleaners for electronic equipment (6.0%); oils, greases and lubricants (9.6%); adhesive-related products (6.6%); and miscellaneous products (6.1%). The study was conducted in two parts. In the first part, or the original study, the products were reanalysed for methylene chloride and five other chlorocarbons using purge-and-trap gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), and a data base containing the analytical results was developed. Because full mass spectra were taken, the original set of GC/MS data also contained information regarding other volatile chemicals in the products. However, this additional data was not reported at that time. In the second part of the study, the GC/MS data were reanalysed to determine the presence and concentrations of an additional 25 volatile chemicals. The 31 chemicals included in both parts of this study were: carbon tetrachloride; methylene chloride; tetrachloroethylene; 1,1,1-trichloroethane; trichlorethylene; 1,1,2-tricholorotrifluoroethane; acetone; benzene; 2-butanone; chlorobenzene; chloroform; cyclohexane; 1,2-dichloroethane; 1,4-dioxane; ethylbenzene; n-hexane; d-limonene; methylcyclohexane; methylcyclopentane; methyl isobutyl ketone; n-nonane; n-octane; α-pinene; propylene oxide; styrene; 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane; tetrahydrofuran; toluene; m-mxylene; o-xylene; and p-xylene. Of the 31 chemicals, toluene, the xylenes and methylene chloride were found to occur most frequently—in over 40% of the products tested. Chemicals that were typically found in relatively high concentrations in the samples (i.e. greater than 20% w/w) included acetone, 2-butanone

  5. Dodecyl sulfate-hydrotalcite nanocomposites for trapping chlorinated organic pollutants in water.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongting; Nagy, Kathryn L

    2004-06-15

    A series of hybrid organic-inorganic nanocomposite materials was synthesized by three different procedures using sodium dodecyl sulfate (DDS) and magnesium-aluminum layered double hydroxide (Mg/Al LDH with a Mg/Al molar ratio of 2 to 5). Both the pH of the exchange medium (6.5 to 10) and the Mg/Al molar ratio of the LDH affected the basal spacing, the content of DDS retained and the orientation of the DDS chains within the interlamellar space. For LDH with higher charge density (Mg/Al=2 and 3), DDS molecules likely formed a perpendicular monolayer within the LDH interlayer and the solution pH had little effect on the basal spacing, with a mean and standard deviation of 25.5+/-0.4 A. However, for LDH with lower charge density (Mg/Al=4 and 5), DDS molecules more likely formed an interpenetrating bilayer, and the basal spacing significantly increased with increasing pH, with a mean and standard deviation of 32.7+/-5.2 A. Sorption of trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene by DDS-LDH varied with synthesis conditions, LDH type and DDS configuration in the interlayer. DDS-Mg(3)Al-LDH had the highest affinity for both trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene in water, either comparable to or as much as four times higher than other clay-derived sorbents, followed by DDS-Mg(4)Al-LDH and DDS-Mg(5)Al-LDH. DDS-Mg(2)Al-LDH had the lowest sorption affinity although the highest amount of DDS. The pH of the exchange solution also affected the amount of DDS retained by the LDH as well as the sorption efficiency. Mg(3)Al-LDH has a charge equivalent area of 32.2 A(2)/charge, which allows the formation of optimal DDS configuration within its interlayer, thus resulting in the highest affinity for the chlorinated compounds. The DDS-Mg/Al-LDHs can be easily synthesized either ex situ or in situ at low temperature, indicating the feasibility of practical applications. The results obtained by controlling the synthesis procedure suggest that different arrangements of DDS molecules in the

  6. Evaluation of the atmosphere as a source of volatile organic compounds in shallow groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baehr, A.L.; Stackelberg, P.E.

    1999-01-01

    The atmosphere as a source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in shallow groundwater was evaluated over an area in southern New Jersey. Chloroform, methyl tertbutyl ether (MTBE), 1,1,1-trichloroethane, tetrachloroethylene (PCE), and carbon disulfide (not a VOC) were detected frequently at low-level concentrations in a network of 78 shallow wells in the surficial Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer system. The atmosphere was sampled for these compounds and only MTBE concentrations were high enough to potentially explain frequent detection in shallow groundwater. A mathematical model of reactive transport through the unsaturated zone is presented to explain how variations in unsaturated properties across the study area could explain differences in MTBE concentrations in shallow groundwater given the atmosphere as the source. Even when concentrations of VOCs in groundwater are low compared to regulatory concentration limits, it is critical to know the source. If the VOCs originate from a point source(s), concentrations in groundwater could potentially increase over time to levels of concern as groundwater plumes evolve, whereas if the atmosphere is the source, then groundwater concentrations would be expected to remain at low-level concentrations not exceeding those in equilibrium with atmospheric concentrations. This is the first analysis of VOC occurrence in shallow groundwater involving colocated atmosphere data.The atmosphere as a source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in shallow groundwater was evaluated over an area in southern New Jersey. Chloroform, methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), 1,1,1-trichloroethane, tetrachloroethylene (PCE), and carbon disulfide (not a VOC) were detected frequently at low-level concentrations in a network of 78 shallow wells in the surficial Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer system. The atmosphere was sampled for these compounds and only MTBE concentrations were high enough to potentially explain frequent detection in shallow groundwater. A

  7. F-Area seepage basins, groundwater quality assessment report, first quarter 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    During the first quarter of 1990, wells which make up the F-Area Seepage Basins (F-HWMF) monitoring network were sampled. Laboratory analyses were performed to measure levels of hazardous constituents, indicator parameters, tritium, gross alpha, and nonvolatile beta. The primary contaminants observed at wells monitoring the F-Area Seepage Basins are tritium, nitrate, cadmium, lead, total radium, gross alpha, and nonvolatile beta. Concentrations of at least one of the following constituents: tritium, nitrate, total radium, gross alpha, cadmium, lead, tetrachloroethylene, nonvolatile beta, endrin, lindane, barium, fluoride, mercury, and trichlorethylene in excess of the primary drinking water standard (PDWS) were observed in at least one well monitoring the F-Area Seepage Basins. Tritium concentrations above the PDWS occur in forty-four of the fifty-nine (75%) groundwater monitoring wells. Nitrate concentrations above the PDWS occur in thirty-four of the fifty-nine (59%) groundwater wells. The radionuclides, total radium, gross alpha, and nonvolatile beta, exceed the PDWS is over twenty-five percent of the groundwater wells. Heavy metals, cadmium and lead in particular, exceed the PDWS in over twelve percent of the wells. Since 1987, tritium and nitrate concentrations have been steadily declining in a majority of the wells. However, tritium concentrations, from fourth quarter 1989 to first quarter 1990, have increased.

  8. Synergistic and antagonistic effects on genotoxicity of chemicals commonly found in hazardous waste sites

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, T.H.; Sandhu, S.S.; Peng, Y.; Chen, T.D.; Kim, T.W.

    1992-01-01

    Synergistic and antagonistic effects on genotoxicity of mixtures of four chemicals; i.e., lead tetraacetate (LTA), arsenic trioxide (ATO), dieldrin (DED), and tetrachloroethylene (TCE), were evaluated by the Tradescantia-micronucleus (Trad-MCN) assay. The chemicals were mixed in ratios of 1:1, 1:2 and 2:1 for mixtures of two chemicals and 1:1:1 each for three chemicals. The concentration of stock solution of these chemicals was around the minimum effective dose (MED) or below the MED for these chemicals as reported by Sandhu et al. (1989). Treatments were applied to plant cuttings by hydroponic uptake of the mixed solutions through the stems of the plant for 30 h followed by fixation of the flower buds in aceto-alcohol (1:3 ratio) without a recovery period. Microslides were prepared for scoring MCN frequencies. Results of two series of repeated experiments indicated that all mixtures of LTA/ATO exhibited antagonistic effects. On the other hand, all mixtures of TCE and DED exhibited synergistic effect. These data indicate that for evaluating biological hazards at chemical waste sites, it is prudent to evaluate the genotoxicity of complex chemical mixtures as these exist in nature because the biological effects based on evaluating individual chemicals may not be true predictors of the interactive effects of the pollutants.

  9. Influence of sulfur oxyanions on reductive dehalogenation activities in Desulfomonile tiedjei.

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, G T; Suflita, J M

    1997-01-01

    The inhibition of aryl reductive dehalogenation reactions by sulfur oxyanions has been demonstrated in environmental samples, dehalogenating enrichments, and the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfomonile tiedjei; however, this phenomenon is not well understood. We examined the effects of sulfate, sulfite, and thiosulfate on reductive dehalogenation in the model microorganism D. tiedjei and found separate mechanisms of inhibition due to these oxyanions under growth versus nongrowth conditions. Dehalogenation activity was greatly reduced in extracts of cells grown in the presence of both 3-chlorobenzoate, the substrate or inducer for the aryl dehalogenation activity, and either sulfate, sulfite, or thiosulfate, indicating that sulfur oxyanions repress the requisite enzymes. In extracts of fully induced cells, thiosulfate and sulfite, but not sulfate, were potent inhibitors of aryl dehalogenation activity even in membrane fractions lacking the cytoplasmically located sulfur oxyanion reductase. These results suggest that under growth conditions, sulfur oxyanions serve as preferred electron acceptors and negatively influence dehalogenation activity in D. tiedjei by regulating the amount of active aryl dehalogenase in cells. Additionally, in vitro inhibition by sulfur oxyanions is due to the interaction of the reactive species with enzymes involved in dehalogenation and need not involve competition between two respiratory processes for reducing equivalents. Sulfur oxyanions also inhibited tetrachloroethylene dehalogenation by the same mechanisms, further indicating that chloroethylenes are fortuitously dehalogenated by the aryl dehalogenase. The commonly observed inhibition of reductive dehalogenation reactions under sulfate-reducing conditions may be due to similar regulation mechanisms in other dehalogenating microorganisms that contain multiple respiratory activities. PMID:9293011

  10. Review of analytical results from the proposed agent disposal facility site, Aberdeen Proving Ground

    SciTech Connect

    Brubaker, K.L.; Reed, L.L.; Myers, S.W.; Shepard, L.T.; Sydelko, T.G.

    1997-09-01

    Argonne National Laboratory reviewed the analytical results from 57 composite soil samples collected in the Bush River area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. A suite of 16 analytical tests involving 11 different SW-846 methods was used to detect a wide range of organic and inorganic contaminants. One method (BTEX) was considered redundant, and two {open_quotes}single-number{close_quotes} methods (TPH and TOX) were found to lack the required specificity to yield unambiguous results, especially in a preliminary investigation. Volatile analytes detected at the site include 1, 1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, trichloroethylene, and tetrachloroethylene, all of which probably represent residual site contamination from past activities. Other volatile analytes detected include toluene, tridecane, methylene chloride, and trichlorofluoromethane. These compounds are probably not associated with site contamination but likely represent cross-contamination or, in the case of tridecane, a naturally occurring material. Semivolatile analytes detected include three different phthalates and low part-per-billion amounts of the pesticide DDT and its degradation product DDE. The pesticide could represent residual site contamination from past activities, and the phthalates are likely due, in part, to cross-contamination during sample handling. A number of high-molecular-weight hydrocarbons and hydrocarbon derivatives were detected and were probably naturally occurring compounds. 4 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs.

  11. Groundwater quality assessment/corrective action feasibility plan. Savannah River Laboratory Seepage Basins

    SciTech Connect

    Stejskal, G.F.

    1989-11-15

    The Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) Seepage Basins are located in the northeastern section of the 700 Area at the Savannah River Site. Currently the four basins are out of service and are awaiting closure in accordance with the Consent Decree settled under Civil Act No. 1:85-2583. Groundwater monitoring data from the detection monitoring network around the SRL Basins was recently analyzed using South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations R.61-79.264.92 methods to determine if groundwater in the immediate vicinity of the SRL Basins had been impacted. Results from the data analysis indicate that the groundwater has been impacted by both volatile organic constituents (VOCs) and inorganic constituents. The VOCs, specifically trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene, are currently being addressed under the auspices of the SRS Hazardous Waste Permit Application (Volume III, Section J.6.3). The impacts resulting from elevated levels of inorganic constituent, such as barium, calcium, and zinc in the water table, do not pose a threat to human health and the environment. In order to determine if vertical migration of the inorganic constituents has occurred three detection monitoring wells are proposed for installation in the upper portion of the Congaree Aquifer.

  12. Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report. Fourth quarter 1993 and 1993 summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The AMB wells at the Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility (Met Lab HWMF) are monitored for selected constituents to comply with the Natural Resources Defense council et al. Consent Decree of May 1988 that identifies the Met Lab HWMF as subject to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. In addition, the wells are monitored, as requested, for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During the fourth quarter 1993, samples from AMB groundwater monitoring wells at the Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility were analyzed for selected heavy metals, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Six parameters exceeded standards during the quarter. As in previous quarters, dichloromethane (methylene chloride), tetrachloroethylene, and trichloroethylene exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards; pH, specific conductance, and total organic halogens exceeded the Savannah River Site Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the wells. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water-table unit were similar to previous quarters.

  13. Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report: First quarter 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1992-06-01

    During first quarter 1992, 18 groundwater monitoring wells of the AMB series at the Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility (Metlab HWMF) at Savannah River Plant were visited for sampling. Groundwater samples were analyzed for certain heavy metals, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. This report describes the results that exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) and the Savannah River Site flagging criteria during the quarter. Tetrachloroethylene exceeded the PDWS in wells AMB 4A, 5, and 7A; trichloroethylene exceeded the PDWS in wells AMB 4A, 4B, 4D, 5, and 7A; and total alpha-emitting radium (radium-224 and radium-226) exceeded the PDWS in well AMB 5. Total organic halogens exceeded the Flag 2 criterion in wells AMB 4A, 5, 6, 7A, 7B, and IODD; manganese was elevated in wells AMB 4D and TODD; iron was elevated in well AMB TODD; and pH was elevated in well AMB 10A.

  14. Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report. Third quarter, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    During third quarter 1994, samples from AMB groundwater monitoring wells at the Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility (Met Lab HWMF) were analyzed for selected heavy metals, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Eight parameters exceeded standards during the quarter. As in previous quarters, tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS). Bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate exceeded final PDWS in one well. Aluminum, iron, manganese, tin, and total organic halogens exceeded the Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the M-Area Aquifer Zone were similar to previous quarters. Conditions affecting determination of groundwater flow directions and rates in the Upper Lost Lake Aquifer Zone, Lower Lost Lake Aquifer Zone, and the Middle Sand Aquifer Zone of the Crouch Branch Confining Unit were also similar to previous quarters. During second quarter 1994, SRS received South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control approval for constructing five point-of-compliance wells and two plume definition wells near the Met Lab HWMF. This project began in July 1994 and is complete; however, analytical data from these wells is not available yet.

  15. Complete degradation of polychlorinated hydrocarbons by a two-stage biofilm reactor.

    PubMed Central

    Fathepure, B Z; Vogel, T M

    1991-01-01

    A two-stage anaerobic-aerobic biofilm reactor successfully degraded a mixture of chlorinated organic compounds to water-soluble metabolic intermediates and carbon dioxide. Reductive dechlorination of hexachlorobenzene (HCB), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), and chloroform (CF) occurred on all tested primary carbon sources such as glucose, methanol, and acetate. However, the extent of dechlorination was maximum when the anaerobic biofilm column was fed acetate as a primary carbon source. HCB, PCE, and CF were dechlorinated to the levels of tri- and dichlorinated products (99, 80, and 32%, respectively) with acetate in the feed. This is important, since these less-chlorinated compounds can be metabolized by the aerobic biofilm. The effluent from the anaerobic biofilm column was fed directly into the aerobic column. After both columns, the total amount transformed into nonvolatile intermediates and carbon dioxide was 94, 96, and 83% for [14C]HCB, [14C]trichloroethylene, and [14C]CF, respectively. This research shows the potential application of this novel two-stage bioreactor system for treating groundwaters and industrial effluents composed of highly chlorinated aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. PMID:1785918

  16. FIELD SCREENING FOR HALOGENATED VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    SciTech Connect

    John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani Jr.; Theresa M. Bomstad

    2002-06-01

    Western Research Institute (WRI) initiated exploratory work towards the development of new field screening methodology and a test kit to measure halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Heated diode and corona discharge sensors are commonly used to detect leaks of refrigerants from air conditioners, freezers, and refrigerators. They are both selective to the presence of carbon-halogen bonds. Commercially available heated diode and corona discharge leak detectors were procured and evaluated for halogenated VOC response. The units were modified to provide a digital readout of signal related to VOC concentration. Sensor response was evaluated with carbon tetrachloride and tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, PCE), which represent halogenated VOCs with and without double bonds. The response characteristics were determined for the VOCs directly in headspace in Tedlar bag containers. Quantitation limits in air were estimated. Potential interferences from volatile hydrocarbons, such as toluene and heptane, were evaluated. The effect of humidity was studied also. The performance of the new devices was evaluated in the laboratory by spiking soil samples and monitoring headspace for halogenated VOCs. A draft concept of the steps for a new analytical method was outlined. The results of the first year effort show that both devices show potential utility for future analytical method development work towards the goal of developing a portable test kit for screening halogenated VOCs in the field.

  17. Ranking the potential carcinogenic hazards to workers from exposures to chemicals that are tumorigenic in rodents

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, L.S.; Backman, G.M.; Hooper, N.K.; Peto, R.

    1987-12-01

    For 41 chemicals there exist both reasonable data on carcinogenic potency in experimental animals and also a defined Permissible Exposure Level (PEL), which is the upper limit of legally permissible chronic occupational exposure for US workers. These 41 agents are ranked by an index that compares the permitted chronic human exposure to the chronic dose rate that induces tumors in 50% of laboratory animals. This index, the Permitted Exposure/Rodent Potency index, or PERP, does not estimate absolute risks directly, but rather suggests the relative hazards that such substances may pose. The PERP values for these 41 substances differ by more than 100,000-fold from each other. The PERP does not take into account the actual level of exposure or the number of exposed workers. Nevertheless, it might be reasonable to give priority attention to the reduction of allowable worker exposures to substances that appear most hazardous by this index and that some workers may be exposed to full-time near the PEL. Ranked by PERP, these chemicals are: ethylene dibromide, ethylene dichloride, 1,3-butadiene, tetrachloroethylene, propylene oxide, chloroform, formaldehyde, methylene chloride, dioxane, and benzene.

  18. Surface acoustic wave sensors/gas chromatography; and Low quality natural gas sulfur removal and recovery CNG Claus sulfur recovery process

    SciTech Connect

    Klint, B.W.; Dale, P.R.; Stephenson, C.

    1997-12-01

    This topical report consists of the two titled projects. Surface Acoustic Wave/Gas Chromatography (SAW/GC) provides a cost-effective system for collecting real-time field screening data for characterization of vapor streams contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The Model 4100 can be used in a field screening mode to produce chromatograms in 10 seconds. This capability will allow a project manager to make immediate decisions and to avoid the long delays and high costs associated with analysis by off-site analytical laboratories. The Model 4100 is currently under evaluation by the California Environmental Protection Agency Technology Certification Program. Initial certification focuses upon the following organics: cis-dichloroethylene, chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, trichlorethylene, tetrachloroethylene, tetrachloroethane, benzene, ethylbenzene, toluene, and o-xylene. In the second study the CNG Claus process is being evaluated for conversion and recovery of elemental sulfur from hydrogen sulfide, especially found in low quality natural gas. This report describes the design, construction and operation of a pilot scale plant built to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the integrated CNG Claus process.

  19. Accounting for Transport Parameter Uncertainty in Geostatistical Groundwater Contaminant Release History Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrowski, J.; Shlomi, S.; Michalak, A.

    2007-12-01

    The process of estimating the release history of a contaminant in groundwater relies on coupling a limited number of concentration measurements with a groundwater flow and transport model in an inverse modeling framework. The information provided by available measurements is generally not sufficient to fully characterize the unknown release history; therefore, an accurate assessment of the estimation uncertainty is required. The modeler's level of confidence in the transport parameters, expressed as pdfs, can be incorporated into the inverse model to improve the accuracy of the release estimates. In this work, geostatistical inverse modeling is used in conjunction with Monte Carlo sampling of transport parameters to estimate groundwater contaminant release histories. Concentration non-negativity is enforced using a Gibbs sampling algorithm based on a truncated normal distribution. The method is applied to two one-dimensional test cases: a hypothetical dataset commonly used in validating contaminant source identification methods, and data collected from a tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene plume at the Dover Air Force Base in Delaware. The estimated release histories and associated uncertainties are compared to results from a geostatistical inverse model where uncertainty in transport parameters is ignored. Results show that the a posteriori uncertainty associated with the model that accounts for parameter uncertainty is higher, but that this model provides a more realistic representation of the release history based on available data. This modified inverse modeling technique has many applications, including assignment of liability in groundwater contamination cases, characterization of groundwater contamination, and model calibration.

  20. Visualization and Time-Series Analysis of Ground-Water Data for C-Area, Savannah River Site, South Carolina, 1984-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conrads, Paul A.; Roehl, Edwin A., Jr.; Daamen, Ruby C.; Chapelle, Francis H.; Lowery, Mark A.; Mundry, Uwe H.

    2007-01-01

    In 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, initiated a study of historical ground-water data of C-Area on the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. The soils and ground water at C-Area are contaminated with high concentrations of trichloroethylene and lesser amounts of tetrachloroethylene. The objectives of the investigation were (1) to analyze the historical data to determine if data-mining techniques could be applied to the historical database to ascertain whether natural attenuation of recalcitrant contaminants, such as volatile organic compounds, is occurring and (2) to determine whether inferential (surrogate) analytes could be used for more cost-effective monitoring. Twenty-one years of data (1984-2004) were collected from 396 wells in the study area and converted from record data to time-series data for analysis. A Ground-Water Data Viewer was developed to allow users to spatially and temporally visualize the analyte data. Overall, because the data were temporally and spatially sparse, data analysis was limited to only qualitative descriptions.

  1. Elimination kinetics of volatile organics in humans using breath measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Pellizzari, E.D.; Wallace, L.A.; Gordon, S.M. )

    1992-07-01

    During the past decade significant strides have been made toward understanding the sources and factors which lead to volatile organic chemical (VOC) exposure in the general population. Less is known, however, about the impact of low-level environmental exposure on human health. Investigations are underway in a number of laboratories in an effort to determine the uptake, distribution, metabolism, and elimination kinetics for VOCs in humans. We examined the elimination kinetics for the third phase for ten VOCs--1,1,-trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, benzene, toluene, m,p-xylenes, o-xylene, ethylbenzene, p-dichlorobenzene, and limonene--in human subjects. Subjects were exposed to a variety of common consumer products and breath samples were collected post-exposure while the subjects spent up to 10 hr in a clean air environment. VOCs from breath samples were collected into canisters or onto Tenax GC cartridges and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Exponential modeling of the decay data was performed to obtain kinetic parameters. The half-lives for trichloroethylene and 1,1,1-trichloroethane were approximately 5 to 8 hr for the four subjects. In general, the magnitude and range of variability was larger for toluene, limonene, and p-dichlorobenzene than for the other VOCs; the elimination rate spanning a few hours to a day or two. Thus, VOCs exhibit relatively short residence times in the body relative to other halo-carbons, such as polychlorinated biphenyls and dioxins.

  2. Steam reforming of DOE complex waste simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.E.; Kuehne, P.B.

    1995-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has worked with Synthetica Technologies and Manufacturing and Technology Conversion International (MTCl) to demonstrate the applicability of their commercial steam reforming technologies for treating DOE low-level mixed wastes. Previously, Synthetica successfully demonstrated destruction of a Sandia formulated lab trash simulant. During November 1994 Synthetica did not adequately process the aqueous halogenated organic liquid mixed waste simulant (MWTP-2110) formulated by the DOE Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP). Testing at MTCl is ongoing and initial results appear to be favorable. Approximately 200 lbs each of the MWIP aqueous halogenated organic liquids (MWTP-2110), and absorbed aqueous and organic liquids (MWTP-3113/3114) simulants have been processed. At 1650{degree}F, destruction efficiencies of greater than 99% were obtained for tetrachloroethylene, toluene, and 1,2 dichlorobenzene. Product cases consisted primarily of H{sub 2}, C0{sub 2}, CO, and CH{sub 4} and had higher heating values of up to 355 BTU/SCF. Conclusions concerning the suitability of the MTCI process for treating DOE mixed wastes will be drawn upon the completion of testing.

  3. VOCs in fixed film processes. I: Pilot studies

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, W.J.; Monteith, H.D.; Melcer, H.

    1996-07-01

    Stripping of volatile organic contaminants (VOCs) during wastewater treatment is of concern due to the potential of these compounds to contribute to stratospheric ozone depletion, ground-level smog formation, chronic toxicity to exposed workers, and odors. A study of the fate of volatile organic contaminants (VOCs) in trickling filters (TF) and rotating biological contactors (RBC) was performed. Of the target compounds investigated, tetrachloroethylene was volatilized to the greatest extent, while 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane was the least volatilized in the TF and bromoform was least volatilized in the RBC. Toulene, o-xylene and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene were biodegraded to the greatest extent and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane was least biodegraded. Increasing the hydraulic loading tended to increase the proportion of influent VOCs found in the TF effluent. Imposing effluent recycle on the TF increased the fraction of influent VOCs found in the effluent, but also decreased the fraction stripped and increased the fraction that was biodegraded. Increasing hydraulic loading to the RBC tended to increase the proportion of influent VOCs found in the effluent and off-gas. Increasing the RBC disc rotational speed increased the fraction that was biodegraded and decreased the fraction of VOCs found in the effluent and off-gas streams. The TF tended to have greater losses to volatilization than the RBC while the RBC maintained a greater fraction of the candidate VOCs in the process effluent than the TF. Differences between the processes with respect to biodegradation could not be inferred.

  4. Controlling the reactivity of chlorinated ethylenes with flavin mononucleotide hydroquinone.

    PubMed

    Ciptadjaya, Christopher G E; Guo, Wen; Angeli, Jayni M; Obare, Sherine O

    2009-03-01

    Reduction rate constants of the chlorinated ethylenes cis-1,2-dichloroethylene (cis-DCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) reacted with flavin mononucleotide hydroquinone (FMNH2) under anoxic conditions were investigated. FMNH2 was produced in methanol solvent by the photoreduction of FMN. In aqueous solution, FMN was not fully reduced to FMNH2 but instead yielded the semiquinone radical FMNH*. However, when FMN was anchored to nanocrystalline TiO2, band gap irradiation resulted in electron transfer from the TiO2 conduction band to FMN, thus yielding FMNH2. The FMNH2 generated in aqueous solution on the TiO2 surface was a stronger reductant toward chlorinated ethylenes, relative to FMNH2 in solution. Furthermore, by combining the reactivity of the TiO2 conduction band electrons [TiO2(e-(CB)] with FMNH2, reduction rate constants for the chlorinated ethylenes increased by 2 orders of magnitude relative to FMNH2 alone. The results show how biological molecules such as FMNH2 could have significant effects toward the remediation of organic pollutants. PMID:19350940

  5. Molecular recognition with metal containing supramolecular compounds: Soluble tetradentate dithioglyoximes for the detection of organic solvents in the gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Oeztuerk, Z.Z.

    1996-12-31

    Supramolecular structures have been widely investigated for their specific recognition of ions. Recently, they have been also used to detect neutral molecules and especially organic solvents in the gas phase. In this context, the authors developed a new type of supramolecular structures for the recognition of the organic solvent molecules by their selective incorporation to the bulk of thin films. The authors synthesized a series of the soluble tetradentate dithiogloximes which included mono-, tri-, and pentanuclear metal complexes as well as the heteronuclear polymers. Thin layers of these compounds were prepared from their solutions by evaporating their volatile organic solvents. The subsequent exposure of these films to the same organic solvent molecules in air shows drastic transducer signals, i.e., changes in masses and capacitances due to selective interactions of coordinatively and electronically unsaturated metal complexes with gas molecules. The organic solvents investigated in this work are dichloromethane, trichloromethane, tetrachloromethane, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, acetone, benzene, toluene, n-hexane, n-octane, methanol, ethanol and n-propanol. Sensor responses were monitored with interdigital capacitor (IDC) and quartz crystal oscillators (QCM).

  6. Note: A top-view optical approach for observing the coalescence of liquid drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Luhai; Zhang, Guifu; Wu, Haiyi; Yang, Jiming; Zhu, Yujian

    2016-02-01

    We developed a new device that is capable of top-view optical examination of the coalescence of liquid drops. The device exhibits great potential for visualization, particularly for the early stage of liquid bridge expansion, owing to the use of a high-speed shadowgraph technique. The fluid densities of the two approaching drops and that of the ambient fluid are carefully selected to be negligibly different, which allows the size of the generated drops to be unlimitedly large in principle. The unique system design allows the point of coalescence between two drops to serve as an undisturbed optical pathway through which to image the coalescence process. The proposed technique extended the dimensionless initial finite radius of the liquid bridge to 0.001, in contrast to 0.01 obtained for conventional optical measurements. An examination of the growth of the bridge radius for a water and oil-tetrachloroethylene system provided results similar to Paulsen's power laws of the inertially limited viscous and inertial regimes. Furthermore, a miniscule shift in the center of the liquid bridge was detected at the point of crossover between the two regimes, which can be scarcely distinguished with conventional side-view techniques.

  7. Testing of stack-unit/aquifer sensitivity analysis using contaminant plume distribution in the subsurface of Savannah River Site, South Carolina, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rine, J.M.; Shafer, J.M.; Covington, E.; Berg, R.C.

    2006-01-01

    Published information on the correlation and field-testing of the technique of stack-unit/aquifer sensitivity mapping with documented subsurface contaminant plumes is rare. The inherent characteristic of stack-unit mapping, which makes it a superior technique to other analyses that amalgamate data, is the ability to deconstruct the sensitivity analysis on a unit-by-unit basis. An aquifer sensitivity map, delineating the relative sensitivity of the Crouch Branch aquifer of the Administrative/Manufacturing Area (A/M) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina, USA, incorporates six hydrostratigraphic units, surface soil units, and relevant hydrologic data. When this sensitivity map is compared with the distribution of the contaminant tetrachloroethylene (PCE), PCE is present within the Crouch Branch aquifer within an area classified as highly sensitive, even though the PCE was primarily released on the ground surface within areas classified with low aquifer sensitivity. This phenomenon is explained through analysis of the aquifer sensitivity map, the groundwater potentiometric surface maps, and the plume distributions within the area on a unit-by- unit basis. The results of this correlation show how the paths of the PCE plume are influenced by both the geology and the groundwater flow. ?? Springer-Verlag 2006.

  8. Immobilization of proteins on glow discharge treated polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiaei, D.; Safranj, A.; Chen, J. P.; Johnston, A. B.; Zavala, F.; Deelder, A.; Castelino, J. B.; Markovic, V.; Hoffman, A. S.

    Certain glow discharge-treated surfaces have been shown to enhance retention of adsorbed proteins. On the basis of this phenomenon, we have investigated the possibility of immobilizing (a) albumin for developing thromboresistant and non-fouling surfaces, (b) antibodies for immuno-diagnostic assays and (c) enzymes for various biosensors and industrial bioprocesses. Albumin retention was highest on surfaces treated with tetrafluoroethylene (TFE) compared to untreated surfaces or other glow discharge treatments studied. Preadsorption of albumin on TFE-treated surfaces resulted in low fibrinogen adsorption and platelet adhesion. IgG retention was also highest on TFE-treated surfaces. The lower detection limits of both malaria antigen and circulating anodic antigen of the schistosomiasis worm were enhanced following glow discharge treatment of the assay plates with TFE. Both TFE and tetrachloroethylene (TCE) glow discharge treated surfaces showed high retention of adsorbed horseradish peroxidase (HRP). However, the retained specific activity of HRP after adsorption on TCE-treated surfaces was remarkably higher than on TFE-treated surfaces.

  9. Removal of contaminants in leachate from landfill by waste steel scrap and converter slag.

    PubMed

    Oh, Byung-Taek; Lee, Jai-Young; Yoon, Jeyong

    2007-08-01

    This study may be the first investigation to be performed into the potential benefits of recycling industrial waste in controlling contaminants in leachate. Batch reactors were used to evaluate the efficacy of waste steel scrap and converter slag to treat mixed contaminants using mimic leachate solution. The waste steel scrap was prepared through pre-treatment by an acid-washed step, which retained both zero-valent iron site and iron oxide site. Extensive trichloroethene (TCE) removal (95%) occurred by acid-washed steel scrap within 48 h. In addition, dehalogenation (Cl(-) production) was observed to be above 7.5% of the added TCE on a molar basis for 48 h. The waste steel scrap also removed tetrachloroethylene (PCE) through the dehalogenation process although to a lesser extent than TCE. Heavy metals (Cr, Mn, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, and Pb) were extensively removed by both acid-washed steel scrap and converter slag through the adsorption process. Among salt ions (NH (4)(+) , NO (3)(-) , and PO (4)(3-) ), PO (4)(3-) was removed by both waste steel scrap (100% within 8 h) and converter slag (100% within 20 min), whereas NO (3)(-) and NH (4)(+ ) were removed by waste steel scrap (100% within 7 days) and converter slag (up to 50% within 4 days) respectively. This work suggests that permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) with waste steel scrap and converter slag might be an effective approach to intercepting mixed contaminants in leachate from landfill. PMID:17492478

  10. Modelling of sequential groundwater treatment with zero valent iron and granular activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Peter; Finkel, Michael

    2005-06-01

    Multiple contaminant mixtures in groundwater may not efficiently be treated by a single technology if contaminants possess rather different properties with respect to sorptivity, solubility, and degradation potential. An obvious choice is to use sequenced units of the generally accepted treatment materials zero valent iron (ZVI) and granular activated carbon (GAC). However, as the results of this modelling study suggest, the required dimensions of both reactor units may strongly differ from those expected on the grounds of a contaminant-specific design. This is revealed by performing an analysis for a broad spectrum of design alternatives through numerical experiments for selected patterns of contaminant mixtures consisting of monochlorobenzene, tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene (TCE), cis-1,2-dichloroethylene (cis-DCE), and vinyl chloride (VC). It is shown that efficient treatment can be achieved only if competitive sorption effects in the GAC unit as well as the formation of intermediate products in the ZVI unit are carefully taken into account. Cost-optimal designs turned out to vary extremely depending on the prevailing conditions concerning contaminant concentrations, branching ratios, and unit costs of both reactor materials. Where VC is the critical contaminant, due to high initial concentration or extensive production as an intermediate, two options are cost-effective: an oversized ZVI unit with an oversized GAC unit or a pure GAC reactor. PMID:15949610

  11. Well venting and application of passive soil vapor extraction at Hanford and Savannah River

    SciTech Connect

    Rohay, V.J.; Rossabi, J.; Looney, B.; Cameron, R.; Peters, B.

    1993-09-01

    At the Hanford and Savannah River Sites, wells with open intervals in the unsaturated zone have been observed to {open_quotes}breathe{close_quotes}, i.e., to inhale ambient air from the surface and to exhale soil gas to the atmosphere. This breathing results primarily from the difference in pressure that develops between the soil pressure near the open interval of a well and the barometric pressure. Volatile organic compounds (VOC) have been identified at both Hanford (carbon tetrachloride) and Savannah River (trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene). Passive vapor extraction (PVE) refers to the enhancement and application of this natural breathing phenomenon as a remediation method for increased VOC removal rates from the unsaturated zone. Passive vapor extraction is proposed as a complementary technology to be used with active vapor extraction (AVE). The AVE system would be used to extract soil gas from the high VOC concentration, highly permeable zones. The enhanced PVE would be used to address those zones of lower VOC concentration and those zones where extraction is limited by mass transfer and diffusion. The primary advantages of PVE application are low capital costs and minimal operating costs. This combination allows for many small PVE systems to be placed on individual wells and for the systems to operate for the extended periods of time associated with remediation of sites in which soil-gas transport is diffusion limited.

  12. Groundwater quality assessment/corrective action feasibility plan

    SciTech Connect

    Stejskal, G.F.

    1989-11-15

    The Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) Seepage Basins are located in the northeastern section of the 700 Area at the Savannah River Site. Currently the four basins are out of service and are awaiting closure in accordance with the Consent Decree settled under Civil Act No. 1:85-2583. Groundwater monitoring data from the detection monitoring network around the SRL Basins was recently analyzed using South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations R.61-79.264.92 methods to determine if groundwater in the immediate vicinity of the SRL Basins had been impacted. Results from the data analysis indicate that the groundwater has been impacted by both volatile organic constituents (VOCs) and inorganic constituents. The VOCs, specifically trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene, are currently being addressed under the auspices of the SRS Hazardous Waste Permit Application (Volume III, Section J.6.3). The impacts resulting from elevated levels of inorganic constituent, such as barium, calcium, and zinc in the water table, do not pose a threat to human health and the environment. In order to determine if vertical migration of the inorganic constituents has occurred three detection monitoring wells are proposed for installation in the upper portion of the Congaree Aquifer.

  13. Health assessment for Whitmoyer Laboratories, Jackson Township, Lebanon County, Pennsylvania, Region 3. CERCLIS No. PAD003005014. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-11-17

    The Whitmoyer Laboratories 17.5-acre site is formerly an animal arsenical pharmaceutical manufacturing facility that operated from 1934 to 1984. In the early 1960s, approximately four million pounds of soluble arsenic wastes were placed into unlined lagoons. The environmental contamination on-site consists of arsenic and aniline in solid material in the concrete vault; arsenic, anile, 1,1-trichloroethane, and trans-1,2-dichloroethene in groundwater; arsenic in soil; and arsenic in surface water. Contamination off-site consists of arsenic, aniline, 1,1,1-trichloroethane in groundwater from an industrial well; arsenic in surface water; and arsenic in sediment. In addition, extensive sampling of domestic and industrial wells off-site has found arsenic, aniline, 1,2-dichloroethane, trans-1,2-dichloroethylene, trichloroethylene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and tetrachloroethylene. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via contaminated groundwater, surface water, sediment, soil, and possibly air.

  14. A paired comparison between human skin and hairless guinea pig skin in vitro permeability and lag time measurements for 6 industrial chemicals.

    PubMed

    Frasch, H Frederick; Barbero, Ana M

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to measure and compare permeability coefficients (k(p)) and lag times (tau) in human skin and hairless guinea pig (HGP) skin. Paired experiments employed heat-separated epidermal membranes from human and HGP sources mounted on static in vitro diffusion cells. Infinite-dose, saturated aqueous solutions of 6 industrial chemicals were used as donors: aniline, benzene, 1,2- dichloroethane, diethyl phthalate, naphthalene, and tetrachloroethylene. No significant differences were found between human and HGP skin for either k(p) or tau for any of these chemicals (p >or= .24). HGP vs. human k(p) measurements, and HGP vs. human tau measurements, were highly correlated. For k(p), the slope of the linear correlation was close to unity (1.080 +/- 0.182) and the intercept close to 0 (0.015 +/- 0. 029 cm/h), with a correlation coefficient (r(2)) = 0.898. For tau, the slope was also close to unity (0.818 +/- 0.030) and the intercept close to 0 (-0.014 +/- 0.023 h), with r(2) = 0.994. These results suggest that HGP skin may serve as an excellent surrogate for human skin in in vitro dermal penetration studies. PMID:19552540

  15. Gas-solid alkali destruction of volatile chlorocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Foropoulos, J. Jr.

    1995-12-01

    Many chlorocarbons are environmental dangers and health hazards. The simplest perchlorinated hydrocarbon, carbon tetrachloride, is near the top of the list of hazardous compounds. Carbon tetrachloride was used as a cleaning fluid, solvent, and fire-extinguishing agent. The nuclear and defense complexes also employed great quantities of carbon tetrachloride and other chlorocarbons as cleaning and degreasing agents. Many sites nationwide have underground chlorocarbon contamination plumes. Bulk chlorocarbon inventories at many locations await treatment and disposal. Often the problem is compounded by the chlorocarbon being radioactively contaminated. Waste inventory and groundwater contamination problems exist for many other chlorocarbons, especially methylene chloride, chloroform, and tri- and tetrachloroethylene. In this work solid soda lime (a fused mixture of approximately 95% CaO and 5% NaOH in a coarse, granulated form) at 350 C to 400 C acts as the hydrolyzing degradation, and off-gas scrubbing medium. Within soda lime CO{sub 2} and HCl from hydrolysis and degradation convert immediately to calcium and sodium chlorides and carbonates, with water vapor as a volatile byproduct.

  16. Modeling human exposure to hazardous-waste sites: A question of completeness

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, J.I.; McKone, T.E.

    1991-06-01

    In risk analysis, we use human-exposure assessments to translate contaminant sources into quantitative estimates of the amount of contaminant that comes in contact with human-environment boundaries, that is, the lungs, the gastrointestinal tract, and the skin surface of individuals within a specified population. An assessment of intake requires that we determine how much crosses these boundaries. Exposure assessments often rely implicitly on the assumption that exposure can be linked by simple parameters to ambient concentrations in air, water, and soil. However, more realistic exposure models require that we abandon such simple assumptions. To link contaminant concentrations in water, air, or soil with potential human intakes, we construct pathway-exposure factors (PEFs). For each PEF we combine information on environmental partitioning as well as human anatomy, physiology, and behavior patterns into an algebraic term that converts concentrations of contaminants into a daily intake per unit body weight in mg/kg-d for a specific route of exposure such as inhalation, ingestion, or dermal uptake. Using examples involving human exposure to either a radionuclide (tritium, {sup 3}H) or a toxic organic chemical (tetrachloroethylene, PCE) in soil, water, and air, we illustrate the use of PEFs and consider the implications for risk assessment. 12 refs., 4 tabs.

  17. Evaluation of geophysical methods for the detection of subsurfacetetracgloroethyene in controlled spill experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzella, Aldo; Majer, Ernest L.

    2006-04-10

    A controlled Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) spill experiment was conducted in a multi-layer formation consisting of sand and clayey-sandlayers. The purpose of the work was to determine the detection limits and capability of various geophysical methods. Measurements were made with ten different geophysical techniques before, during, and after the PCE injection. This experiment provided a clear identification of any geophysical anomalies associated with the presence of the PCE. During the injection period all the techniques indicated anomalies associated with the PCE. In order to quantify the results and provide an indication of the PCE detection limits of the various geophysical methods, the tank was subsequently excavated and samples of the various layers were analyzed for residual PCE concentration with gas chromatography (GC). This paper presents some of the results of five of the techniques: cross borehole complex resistivity (CR) also referred to as spectral induced polarization (SIP), cross borehole high resolution seismic (HRS), borehole self potential (SP), surface ground penetration radar (GPR), and borehole video (BV).

  18. Time scales of DNAPL migration in sandy aquifers examined via numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhard, J.I.; Pang, T.; Kueper, B.H.

    2007-03-15

    The time required for dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) to cease migrating following release to the subsurface is a valuable component of a site conceptual model. This study uses numerical simulation to investigate the migration of six different DNAPLs in sandy aquifers. The most influential parameters governing migration cessation time are the density and viscosity of the DNAPL and the mean hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer. Releases of between 1 and 40 drums of chlorinated solvent DNAPLs, characterized by relatively high density and low viscosity, require on the order of months to a few years to cease migrating in a heterogeneous medium sand aquifer having an average hydraulic conductivity of 7.4 x 10{sup -3} cm/s. In contrast to this, the release of 20 drums of coal tar {rho}{sub D} = 1061 kg/m{sup 3}, {mu}{sub D} = 0.161 Pa(.)s) requires more than 100 years to cease migrating in the same aquifer. Altering the mean hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer results in a proportional change in cessation times. Parameters that exhibit relatively little influence on migration time scales are the DNAPL-water interfacial tension, release volume, source capillary pressure, mean aquifer porosity, and ambient ground water hydraulic gradient. This study also demonstrates that low-density DNAPLs (e.g., coal tar) give rise to greater amounts of lateral spreading and greater amounts of pooling on capillary barriers than high-density DNAPLs such as trichloroethylene or tetrachloroethylene.

  19. Ultralow temperature synthesis and improved adsorption performance of graphene oxide nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Xiaojun; Wang, Xiaodong; Li, Zhiwei; Zhou, Shaomin

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we first report an ultralow temperature (-60 °C) synthesis of graphene oxide nanosheets (GONs), which is achieved via the reduction reaction of tetrachloroethylene (C2Cl4) and potassium in liquid ammonia solution at atmospheric pressure. The as-obtained multilayer GONs with a high quality exhibit a low C/O atomic ratio of approximately 2:1, indicating that GONs are rich in the oxygen-containing functional groups. In order to improve their adsorption property, GONs are reduced at 500 °C for 2 h in flowing N2, which results in the successful preparation of graphene nanosheets (GNs) with a high C/O atomic ratio of approximately 32:1. GNs show high specific surface area (508 m2/g), high adsorption capacity (Qe = 148.36 mg/g, Co = 180 mg/L), and rapid adsorption rate (>96%, 10 min) of organic dye rhodamine B (RhB) from water, suggesting that GNs have potential environmental applications as alternatives to commercial materials in wastewater treatment for the removal of organic dye. Compared with the reported methods to prepare GONs, our techniques have attractive advantages, such as low reaction temperature and being friendly to environment.

  20. Health assessment for Welsh Road/Barkman Landfill, Honey Brook, Chester County, Pennsylvania, Region 3. CERCLIS No. PAD980829527. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-02

    The Welsh Road/Barkman Landfill site in Honey Brook, Pennsylvania was an unpermitted residential and commercial refuse disposal facility that operated from 1963 to sometime in the 1980s. After 1977, the landfill continued to operate in defiance of legal action to support a closure plan. Various investigations conducted in the 1980s revealed that industrial and hazardous waste had been accepted by the site. The environmental contamination on-site consists of copper, lead, 1,2-dichloropropane, toluene, chloroform and methylene chloride in drummed wastes; and mercury, toluene, dichlorofluoromethane, methylene chloride, trichlorofluoromethane, 5-methyl-2-hexanone, trichloroethylene, 1,2-dichloroethane, and 1,3,5-cycloheptatriene in groundwater. One time sampling indicated the presence of volatile compounds in air (hydrogen chloride and chloroform). The environmental contamination off-site consists of cadmium in sediment; and chloromethane, chloroform, xylenes, dichlorofluoromethane, 1,1-dichloroethane, tetrachloroethylene, p-cresol, toluene, methyl isobutyl ketone, di-n-butyl phthalate, lead, mercury, and zinc in residential well water. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via contaminated groundwater, surface water, soil, sediment, and airborne gases, vapors, and particulate.

  1. Membrane-Extraction Ion Mobility Spectrometry for In-Situ Detection of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons in Water

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yongzhai; Zhang, Wei; Whitten, William B; Li, Haiyang; Watson, David B; Xu, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Membrane-extraction ion mobility spectrometry (ME-IMS) has been developed for in-situ sampling and analysis of trace chlorinated hydrocarbons in water in a single procedure. The sampling is configured so that aqueous contaminants permeate through a spiral hollow polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane and are carried away by a vapor flow through the membrane tube. The extracted analyte flows into an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) chamber and is analyzed in a home-made IMS analyzer. PDMS membrane is found to effectively extract chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents from liquid phase to vapor. The specialized IMS analyzer has been found to have resolutions of R=33 and 41, respectively, for negative- and positive-modes and is capable of detecting aqueous tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) as low as 80 g/L and 74 g/L in negative ion mode, respectively. The time-dependent characteristics of sampling and detection of TCE are both experimentally and theoretically studied for various concentrations, membrane lengths, and flow rates. These characteristics demonstrate that membrane-extraction IMS is feasible for the continuous monitoring of chlorinated hydrocarbons in water.

  2. Stress survival of a genetically engineered Pseudomonas in soil slurries: Cytochrome P-450cam-catalyzed dehalogenation of chlorinated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Rattan, K.; Shanker, R.; Khanna, P.; Atkins, W.M.

    1999-10-01

    Biological treatment of hazardous chemical wastes has potential as an effective, practical, and economically viable process in above the ground treatment systems that consist of both genetically engineered microorganisms (GEMs) and bioreactors with process control instruments to create ideal conditions for biodegradation. A strain of Pseudomonas putida coexpressing cytochrome P-450cam and luciferase (lux) that provides both the reductive detoxification potential of the hemoprotein and a mechanism for its reduction to survive and remain metabolically competent under nutrient stress in soil slurry microcosms. More than 74% of the cells of engineered Pseudomonas were culturable after 7 days of multiple nutrient (C,N,P) starvation. The diagnostic luminescence and carbon monoxide-difference spectra for the two engineered traits could be detected in a significant fraction of the surviving population. The GEM could be revived after repeated desiccation and starvation using Luria broth, benzoate, or citrate as nutrients. Soil slurries inoculated with the GEM transformed hexachloroethane (HCE) to tetrachloroethylene (tetraCE) 8--10 fold faster than uninoculated slurries. The GEM also transformed the insecticide, {gamma}-HCH ({gamma}-3,4,5,6-hexachlorocyclhexene), to {gamma}-3,4,5,6-tetrachlorocyclohexene ({gamma}tetraCH) in soil slurries under subatmospheric conditions. These results indicate that GEMs can be constructed with broad substrate range detoxification catalysts such as cytochrome P-450 for remediation.

  3. Degradation of trichloroethylene by toluene dioxygenase in whole-cell studies with Pseudomonas putida F1.

    PubMed Central

    Wackett, L P; Gibson, D T

    1988-01-01

    Toluene-induced cells of Pseudomonas putida F1 removed trichloroethylene from growth media at a significantly greater initial rate than the methanotroph Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. With toluene-induced P. putida F1, the initial degradation rate varied linearly with trichloroethylene concentration over the range of 8 to 80 microM (1.05 to 10.5 ppm). At 80 microM (10.5 ppm) trichloroethylene and 30 degrees C, the initial rate was 1.8 nmol/min per mg of total cell protein, but the rate decreased rapidly with time. A series of mutant strains derived from P. putida F1 that are defective in the todC gene, which encodes the oxygenase component of toluene dioxygenase, failed to degrade trichloroethylene and to oxidize indole to indigo. A spontaneous revertant selected from a todC culture regained simultaneously the abilities to oxidize toluene, to form indigo, and to degrade trichloroethylene. The three isomeric dichloroethylenes were degraded by P. putida F1, but tetrachloroethylene, vinyl chloride, and ethylene were not removed from incubation mixtures. PMID:3415234

  4. Characteristics and reactivity of volatile organic compounds from non-coal emission sources in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qiusheng; Yan, Yulong; Li, Hongyan; Zhang, Yiqiang; Chen, Laiguo; Wang, Yuhang

    2015-08-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were sampled from non-coal emission sources including fuel refueling, solvent use, industrial and commercial activities in China, and 62 target species were determined by gas chromatography-mass selective detector (GC-MSD). Based on the results, source profiles were developed and discussed from the aspects of composition characteristics, potential tracers, BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene) diagnostic ratios and chemical reactivity. Compared with vehicle exhausts and liquid fuels, the major components in refueling emissions of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), gasoline and diesel were alkenes and alkanes. Oppositely, aromatics were the most abundant group in emissions from auto-painting, book binding and plastic producing. Three groups contributed nearly equally in printing and commercial cooking emissions. Acetone in medical producing, chloroform and tetrachloroethylene in wet- and dry-cleaning, as well as TEX in plastic producing etc. were good tracers for the respective sources. BTEX ratios showed that some but not all VOCs sources could be distinguished by B/T, B/E and B/X ratios, while T/E, T/X and E/X ratios were not suitable as diagnostic indicators of different sources. The following reactivity analysis indicated that emissions from gasoline refueling, commercial cooking, auto painting and plastic producing had high atmospheric reactivity, and should be controlled emphatically to prevent ozone pollution, especially when there were large amounts of emissions for them.

  5. Final disposal of VOCs from industrial wastewaters

    SciTech Connect

    Ying, W.; Bonk, R.R.; Hannam, S.C. ); Qi-dong Li )

    1994-08-01

    Vapor phase carbon adsorption followed by spent carbon regeneration and catalytic oxidation were evaluated as methods for disposal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released from industrial wastewaters during treatment operations such as aeration, air-stripping and aerobic biodegradation. Adsorptive capacities and breakthrough characteristics for eight VOCs found in many hazardous landfill leachates and contaminated groundwater were compared for selection of the best adsorbent and optimum treatment conditions. Coconut shell-based activated carbons exhibited higher VOC loading capacities than coal-based carbons, fiber carbon, molecular sieve and zeolite. Steam and hot nitrogen were both effective for regeneration of the spent carbon. A small quantity of adsorbates left in the regenerated carbon did not result in immediate VOC breakthrough in the next cycle adsorption treatment. Catalytic oxidation was found to be an attractive alternative for VOC disposal. Using a new commercial catalyst developed for destruction of halogenated organic compounds, even stable VOCs such as trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene were completely destroyed at <350[degrees]C when oxidation was conducted at a space velocity of 17000/hr. 25 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs.

  6. Permeable Adsorptive Barrier (PAB) for the remediation of groundwater simultaneously contaminated by some chlorinated organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Erto, A; Bortone, I; Di Nardo, A; Di Natale, M; Musmarra, D

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, a Permeable Reactive Barrier (PRB) made with activated carbon, namely a Permeable Adsorptive Barrier (PAB), is put forward as an effective technique for the remediation of aquifers simultaneously contaminated by some chlorinated organic compounds. A design procedure, based on a computer code and including different routines, is presented as a tool to accurately describe mass transport within the aquifer and adsorption/desorption phenomena occurring inside the barrier. The remediation of a contaminated aquifer near a solid waste landfill in the district of Napoli (Italy), where Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and Trichloroethylene (TCE) are simultaneously present, is considered as a case study. A complete hydrological and geotechnical site characterization, as well as a number of dedicated adsorption laboratory tests for the determination of activated carbon PCE/TCE adsorption capacity in binary systems, are carried out to support the barrier design. By means of a series of numerical simulations it is possible to determine the optimal barrier location, orientation and dimensions. PABs appear to be an effective remediation tool for the in-situ treatment of an aquifer contaminated by PCE and TCE simultaneously, as the concentration of both compounds flowing out of the barrier is everywhere lower than the regulatory limits on groundwater quality. PMID:24747934

  7. Influence of residual surfactants on DNAPL characterization using partitioning tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jaehyun; Annable, Michael D.; Rao, P. Suresh C.

    2004-08-01

    The partitioning tracer technique is among the DNAPL source-zone characterization methods being evaluated, while surfactant in-situ flushing is receiving attention as an innovative technology for enhanced source-zone cleanup. Here, we examine in batch and column experiments the magnitude of artifacts introduced in estimating DNAPL content when residual surfactants are present. The batch equilibrium tests, using residual surfactants ranging from 0.05 to 0.5 wt.%, showed that as the surfactant concentrations increased, the tracer partition coefficients decreased linearly for sodium hexadecyl diphenyl oxide disulfonate (DowFax 8390), increased linearly for polyoxyethylene (10) oleyl ether (Brij 97), and decreased slightly or exhibited no observable trend for sodium dihexyl sulfosuccinate (AMA 80). Results from column tests using clean sand with residual DowFax 8390 and Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) were consistent with those of batch tests. In the presence of DowFax 8390 (less than 0.5 wt.%), the PCE saturations were underestimated by up to 20%. Adsorbed surfactants on a loamy sand with positively charged oxides showed false indications of PCE saturation based on partitioning tracers in the absence of PCE. Using no surfactant (background soil) gave a false PCE saturation of 0.0004, while soil contacted by AMA 80, Brij 97, and DowFax 8390 gave false PCE saturations of 0.0024, 0.043, and 0.23, respectively.

  8. Source assessment of hexachlorobenzene from the organic chemical manufacturing industry.

    PubMed

    Jacoff, F S; Scarberry, R; Rosa, D

    1986-01-01

    The Office of Solid Waste of the US Environmental Protection Agency determines the hazards of wastes produced by the organic chemical manufacturing industry. Based on these determinations, regulations have been laid down for many wastes under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Additional wastes from this industry will be considered for regulation following further study and evaluation. Among the wastes under study are hexachlorobenzene (HCB)-containing wastes. Although HCB is no longer manufactured in the USA, the US Environmental Protection Agency has estimated that approximately 4130 t are generated annually as a by-product in the production of chlorinated organics and pesticides. Of this total, about 77% (3178 t) is generated from the production of three chlorinated solvents: tetrachloroethylene, carbon tetrachloride and trichloroethylene. All wastewater containing HCB is treated biologically in surface impoundments, resulting in HCB accumulation in the biological sludge. Disposal methods for HCB-containing sludges and distillation bottoms are incineration and landfilling, with 81% (3345 t) being incinerated and 19% (785 t) going to landfills. PMID:3596719

  9. Ground-water-quality data for Picatinny arsenal, New Jersey, 1958-85

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sargent, B.P.; Green, J.W.; Harte, P.T.; Vowinkel, E.F.

    1986-01-01

    The water resources of Picatinny Arsenal in northern New Jersey are described using the results of 1,129 analyses of groundwater , including 522 determinations of inorganic constituents and 607 determinations of organic constituents. Water samples were collected from 56 wells on the site from 1958 through 1985. Of these wells, 50 are screened in stratified drift aquifers and 6 are in bedrock. Samples were collected and analyzed by a total of four agencies: one State, one Federal, and two private. Of the 1,129 samples, 51 were collected and analyzed by the U.S. Geological Survey. The data on inorganic constituents exhibit much variability. Specific conductance ranges from 40 to 2,150 microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees C, pH ranges from 2.9 units to 10 units, and dissolved solids ranges from 51 to 1,210 milligrams per liter. Trace elements that display wide variations in concentration ranges are iron (<2 to 540,000 micrograms/L), manganese (<1 to 55,000 micrograms/L), and zinc (<3 to 1,900 micrograms/L). The organic compounds with the widest variations in concentration are: 1 ,2-transdichloroethylene (<1 to 542 micrograms/L), tetrachloroethylene (<1 to 386 micrograms/L), 1,1 ,1-trichloroethane (<1 to 1,780 micrograms/L), and trichloroethylene (<1 to 25,000 micrograms/L). (USGS)

  10. Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report. Fourth quarter 1992 and 1992 summary

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1993-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1992, samples from 18 groundwater monitoring wells of the AMB series at the Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility were analyzed for certain heavy metals, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Six parameters exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) and the Savannah River Site Flag 2 criteria during the quarter. The results for fourth quarter 1992 are fairly consistent with the rest of the year`s data. Tetrachloroethylene exceeded the final PDWS in well AMB 4D only two of the four quarters; in the other three wells in which it was elevated, it was present at similar levels throughout the year. Trichloroethylene consistently exceeded its PDWS in wells AMB 4A, 4B, 4D, 5, and 7A during the year. Trichloroethylene was elevated in well AMB 6 only during third and fourth quarters and in well AMB 7 only during fourth quarter. Total alpha-emitting radium was above the final PDWS for total radium in well AMB 5 at similar levels throughout the year and exceeded the PDWS during one of the three quarters it was analyzed for (third quarter 1992) in well AMB 10B.