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Sample records for tetrachloroethylene

  1. Tetrachloroethylene

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 08 / 011F February 2012 TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF Tetrachloroethylene ( Perchloroethylene ) ( CAS No . 127 - 18 - 4 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) February 2012 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC ii DISCLAIMER T

  2. HEALTH ASSESSMENT DOCUMENT FOR TETRACHLOROETHYLENE (PERCHLOROETHYLENE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tetrachloroethylene (PERC) is believed to exert its adverse effects upon humans via metabolism by the liver. Concern that PERC is likely to be a human carcinogen is based upon the evidence of the National Cancer Institute bioassay, in which PERC induced a statistically significan...

  3. 40 CFR 721.3560 - Derivative of tetra-chloro-ethy-lene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Derivative of tetra-chloro-ethy-lene. ...Chemical Substances § 721.3560 Derivative of tetra-chloro-ethy-lene. ...paragraph (a)(2) of this section: Derivative of tetrachloroethylene,...

  4. 40 CFR 721.3560 - Derivative of tetra-chloro-ethy-lene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Derivative of tetra-chloro-ethy-lene. ...Chemical Substances § 721.3560 Derivative of tetra-chloro-ethy-lene. ...paragraph (a)(2) of this section: Derivative of tetrachloroethylene,...

  5. ACUTE TOXICITY OF TETRACHLOROETHYLENE AND TETRACHLOROETHYLENE WITH DIMETHYLFORMAMIDE TO RAINBOW TROUT (SALMO GAIRDNERI)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, two acute toxicity tests were conducted with tetrachloroethylene (TCE) using rainbow trout. DMF was used as an additive in one of the tests and was proportionally diluted with the toxicant. The 96 hr LC50 was 4.99 mg/l in the test without DMF and 5.84 mg/l for DMF ...

  6. IRIS Toxicological Review of Tetrachloroethylene (Perchloroethylene) (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA conducted a peer review of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of tetrachloroethylene that will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database. Peer review is meant to ensure that science is used credibly and ...

  7. SURFACTANT ENHANCED REMEDIATION OF SOIL COLUMNS CONTAMINATED BY RESIDUAL TETRACHLOROETHYLENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of aqueous surfactant solutions to recover tetrachloroethylene (PCE) entrapped in Ottawa sand was evaluated in four column experiments. Residual PCE was emplaced by injecting 14C-labeled PCE into water-saturated soil columns and displacing the free product ...

  8. IRIS TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF TETRACHLOROETHYLENE (PERCHLOROETHYLENE) (INTERAGENCY SCIENCE DISCUSSION DRAFT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is releasing the draft report, Toxicological Review of Tetrachloroethylene (Perchloroethylene), that was distributed to Federal agencies and White House Offices for comment during the Science Discussion step of the IRIS Assessment...

  9. Health Assessment Document for Tetrachloroethylene (Perchloroethylene) (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) is a volatile solvent with important commercial applications. It has been detected in the ambient air of a variety of urban and nonurban areas of the United States. It has less frequently been detected in water but has been monitored generally at levels ...

  10. Human Health Effects of Tetrachloroethylene: Key Findings and Scientific Issues

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Karen A.; Scott, Cheryl Siegel; Cooper, Glinda S.; Bale, Ambuja S.; Kopylev, Leonid; Barone, Stanley; Makris, Susan L.; Glenn, Barbara; Subramaniam, Ravi P.; Gwinn, Maureen R.; Dzubow, Rebecca C.; Chiu, Weihsueh A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) completed a toxicological review of tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, PCE) in February 2012 in support of the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS). Objectives: We reviewed key findings and scientific issues regarding the human health effects of PCE described in the U.S. EPA’s Toxicological Review of Tetrachloroethylene (Perchloroethylene). Methods: The updated assessment of PCE synthesized and characterized a substantial database of epidemiological, experimental animal, and mechanistic studies. Key scientific issues were addressed through modeling of PCE toxicokinetics, synthesis of evidence from neurological studies, and analyses of toxicokinetic, mechanistic, and other factors (tumor latency, severity, and background rate) in interpreting experimental animal cancer findings. Considerations in evaluating epidemiological studies included the quality (e.g., specificity) of the exposure assessment methods and other essential design features, and the potential for alternative explanations for observed associations (e.g., bias or confounding). Discussion: Toxicokinetic modeling aided in characterizing the complex metabolism and multiple metabolites that contribute to PCE toxicity. The exposure assessment approach—a key evaluation factor for epidemiological studies of bladder cancer, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and multiple myeloma—provided suggestive evidence of carcinogenicity. Bioassay data provided conclusive evidence of carcinogenicity in experimental animals. Neurotoxicity was identified as a sensitive noncancer health effect, occurring at low exposures: a conclusion supported by multiple studies. Evidence was integrated from human, experimental animal, and mechanistic data sets in assessing adverse health effects of PCE. Conclusions: PCE is likely to be carcinogenic to humans. Neurotoxicity is a sensitive adverse health effect of PCE. Citation: Guyton KZ, Hogan KA, Scott CS, Cooper GS, Bale AS, Kopylev L, Barone S Jr, Makris SL, Glenn B, Subramaniam RP, Gwinn MR, Dzubow RC, Chiu WA. 2014. Human health effects of tetrachloroethylene: key findings and scientific issues. Environ Health Perspect 122:325–334;?http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307359 PMID:24531164

  11. Death due to acute tetrachloroethylene intoxication in a chronic abuser.

    PubMed

    Amadasi, Alberto; Mastroluca, Lavinia; Marasciuolo, Laura; Caligara, Marina; Sironi, Luca; Gentile, Guendalina; Zoja, Riccardo

    2015-05-01

    Volatile substances are used widespread, especially among young people, as a cheap and easily accessible drug. Tetrachloroethylene is one of the solvents exerting effects on the central nervous system with experiences of disinhibition and euphoria. The case presented is that of a 27-year-old female, found dead by her father at home with cotton swabs dipped in the nostrils. She was already known for this type of abuse and previously admitted twice to the hospital for nonfatal acute poisonings. The swabs were still soaked in tetrachloroethylene. Toxicological and histological investigations demonstrated the presence of an overlap between chronic intake of the substance (with high concentrations in sites of accumulation, e.g., the adipose tissue, and contemporary tissue damage, as histologically highlighted) and acute intoxication as final cause of death, with a concentration of 158 mg/L in cardiac blood and 4915 mg/kg in the adipose tissue. No other drugs or medicines were detected in body fluids or tissues, and to our knowledge, this is the highest concentration ever detected in forensic cases. This peculiar case confirms the toxicity of this substance and focuses on the importance of complete histological and toxicological investigations in the distinction between chronic abuse and acute intoxication. PMID:25605280

  12. Reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) catalyzed by cyanocobalamin

    SciTech Connect

    Habeck, B.D.; Sublette, K.L.

    1995-12-31

    A biomimetic system has been developed for the reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethylene (PCE). PCE was dechlorinated to trichloroethylene (TCE) and 1,2-dichloroethylene (DCE) in the presence of dithiothreitol or Ti (III) citrate and catalytic amounts of cyanocobalamin in both homogeneous reaction mixtures and packed bed reactor systems. In packed bed reactors with Ti (III) citrate as the reductant, PCE (0.18 mM) conversion averaged 55% at residence times of 1.75 and 3.5 h. The product distribution was 94% TCE and 6% DCE at the lower residence time. DCE formation increased to 45% at the higher residence time. No reduction of PCE was observed in the absence of cyanocobalamin. This system may be useful as a means of pretreatment of halogenated aliphatic hydrocarbons in advance of biological treatment.

  13. Dose-excretion relationship in tetrachloroethylene-exposed workers and the effect of tetrachloroethylene co-exposure on trichloroethylene metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Seiji, K.; Inoue, O.; Jin, C.; Liu, Y.T.; Cai, S.X.; Ohashi, M.; Watanabe, T.; Nakatsuka, H.; Kawai, T.; Ikeda, M. )

    1989-01-01

    Personal monitoring of 8-hour time-weighted average intensity of exposure with diffuse samplers and analysis of shift-end urine for total trichloro-compounds (TTC) and other metabolites were conducted in two groups of workers in China, one (121 subjects) exposed to tetrachloroethylene (TETRA) alone, and the other (38 subjects) exposed to a mixture of TETRA and trichloroethylene (TRI). Urinalysis was also performed on samples from 103 non-exposed controls. A linear exposure-excretion relationship could be observed in both groups of workers. Comparison of these results with those of Japanese TETRA-workers suggested the presence of ethnic difference in TETRA metabolism. Urinary metabolite levels were markedly lower in the mixed (TETRA + TRI) exposure group as compared to previous findings in a group exposed to TRI alone. The observation indicates that metabolism of TRI is suppressed by the co-exposure to TETRA in humans.

  14. RESPONSE TO ISSUES AND DATA SUBMISSIONS ON THE CARCINOGENICITY OF TETRACHLOROETHYLENE (PERCHLOROETHYLENE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The scientific debate over the potential carcinogenicity of tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, perc, PCE) spans several years. his document reviews the issues considered by the EPA's Science Advisory Board (SAB) during its review of the Draft Addendum to the Health Assessmen...

  15. SURFACTANT-ENHANCED SOLUBILIZATION OF TETRACHLOROETHYLENE AND DEGRADATION PRODUCTS IN PUMP AND TREAT REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the enhanced solubilization of tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), and 1,2-dichloroethylene (DCE) in nonionic surfactant solutions of Triton X-100, Brij-30, Igepal CA-720, and Tergitol NP-10 (alkylpolyoxyethylenes). urfact...

  16. Prenatal and Early Childhood Exposure to Tetrachloroethylene and Adult Vision

    PubMed Central

    Getz, Kelly D.; Janulewicz, Patricia A.; Rowe, Susannah; Weinberg, Janice M.; Winter, Michael R.; Martin, Brett R.; Vieira, Veronica M.; White, Roberta F.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Tetrachloroethylene (PCE; or perchloroethylene) has been implicated in visual impairments among adults with occupational and environmental exposures as well as children born to women with occupational exposure during pregnancy. Objectives: Using a population-based retrospective cohort study, we examined the association between prenatal and early childhood exposure to PCE-contaminated drinking water on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, and deficits in adult color vision and contrast sensitivity. Methods: We estimated the amount of PCE that was delivered to the family residence from participants’ gestation through 5 years of age. We administered to this now adult study population vision tests to assess acuity, contrast sensitivity, and color discrimination. Results: Participants exposed to higher PCE levels exhibited lower contrast sensitivity at intermediate and high spatial frequencies compared with unexposed participants, although the differences were generally not statistically significant. Exposed participants also exhibited poorer color discrimination than unexposed participants. The difference in mean color confusion indices (CCI) was statistically significant for the Farnsworth test but not Lanthony’s D-15d test [Farnsworth CCI mean difference = 0.05, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.003, 0.10; Lanthony CCI mean difference = 0.07, 95% CI: –0.02, 0.15]. Conclusions: Prenatal and early childhood exposure to PCE-contaminated drinking water may be associated with long-term subclinical visual dysfunction in adulthood, particularly with respect to color discrimination. Further investigation of this association in similarly exposed populations is necessary. PMID:22784657

  17. Linking indoor air and pharmacokinetic models to assess tetrachloroethylene risk

    SciTech Connect

    Bogen, K.T.; McKone, T.E.

    1988-12-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models describing the uptake, metabolism, and excretion of xenobiotic compounds are now proposed for use in regulatory health-risk assessments. In this study the authors investigate the extent of PCE metabolism arising from domestic respiratory exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE) from ground water, as predicted using a PBPK model. Indoor exposure patterns they use as input to the PBPK model are realistic ones generated from a three-compartment model describing volatilization of PCE from domestic water into household air. Values they use for the metabolic parameters of the PBPK model are estimated from data on urinary metabolites in workers exposed to PCE. It is shown that for respiratory PCE exposure due to typical levels of PCE in ground water, use of time-weighted average air concentrations with a steady-state PBPK model yields estimates of total metabolized PCE similar to those obtained using completely dynamic modeling, despite considerable uncertainty in key exposure- and metabolic-model parameters. These findings suggest that, for PCE, risk estimation taking pharmacokinetics into account may be accomplished using a simple analytic approach.

  18. Tetrachloroethylene Exposure and Bladder Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis of Dry-Cleaning-Worker Studies

    PubMed Central

    Vlaanderen, Jelle; Straif, Kurt; Ruder, Avima; Blair, Aaron; Hansen, Johnni; Lynge, Elsebeth; Charbotel, Barbara; Loomis, Dana; Kauppinen, Timo; Kyyronen, Pentti; Pukkala, Eero; Weiderpass, Elisabete

    2014-01-01

    Background: In 2012, the International Agency for Research on Cancer classified tetrachloroethylene, used in the production of chemicals and the primary solvent used in dry cleaning, as “probably carcinogenic to humans” based on limited evidence of an increased risk of bladder cancer in dry cleaners. Objectives: We assessed the epidemiological evidence for the association between tetrachloroethylene exposure and bladder cancer from published studies estimating occupational exposure to tetrachloroethylene or in workers in the dry-cleaning industry. Methods: Random-effects meta-analyses were carried out separately for occupational exposure to tetrachloroethylene and employment as a dry cleaner. We qualitatively summarized exposure–response data because of the limited number of studies available. Results: The meta-relative risk (mRR) among tetrachloroethylene-exposed workers was 1.08 (95% CI: 0.82, 1.42; three studies; 463 exposed cases). For employment as a dry cleaner, the overall mRR was 1.47 (95% CI: 1.16, 1.85; seven studies; 139 exposed cases), and for smoking-adjusted studies, the mRR was 1.50 (95% CI: 0.80, 2.84; 4 case–control studies). Conclusions: Our meta-analysis demonstrates an increased risk of bladder cancer in dry cleaners, reported in both cohort and case–control studies, and some evidence for an exposure–response relationship. Although dry cleaners incur mixed exposures, tetrachloroethylene could be responsible for the excess risk of bladder cancer because it is the primary solvent used and it is the only chemical commonly used by dry cleaners that is currently identified as a potential bladder carcinogen. Relatively crude approaches in exposure assessment in the studies of “tetrachloroethylene-exposed workers” may have attenuated the relative risks. Citation: Vlaanderen J, Straif K, Ruder A, Blair A, Hansen J, Lynge E, Charbotel B, Loomis D, Kauppinen T, Kyyronen P, Pukkala E, Weiderpass E, Guha N. 2014. Tetrachloroethylene exposure and bladder cancer risk: a meta-analysis of dry-cleaning-worker studies. Environ Health Perspect 122:661–666;?http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307055 PMID:24659585

  19. SUBCHRONIC TOXICITY OF TETRACHLOROETHYLENE (PERCHLOROETHYLENE) ADMINISTERED IN THE DRINKING WATER OF RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study provides data on the effects of tetrachloroethylene in drinking solutions. The acute oral LD(50) was determined in male and female Charles River rats and found to be 3835 mg/kg for males and 3005 mg/kg for females. Male and female rats received theoretical daily doses o...

  20. EVALUATION OF GEOPHYSICAL METHODS FOR THE DETECTION OF SUBSURFACE TETRACHLOROETHYLENE (PCE) IN CONTROLLED SPILL EXPERIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tetrachloroethylene (PCE), typically used as a dry cleaning solvent, is a predominant contaminant in the subsurface at Superfund Sites. PCE is a dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) that migrates downward into the earth, leaving behind areas of residual saturation and free prod...

  1. Continuous Determination of High-Vapor Phase Concentrations of Tetrachloroethylene Using On-Line Mass Spectrometry

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method was developed to determine the vapor concentration of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) at and below its equilibrium vapor phase concentration, 168,000 ?g/L (25°C). Vapor samples were drawn by vacuum into a six-port sampling valve and injected through a jet separator into an io...

  2. Subchronic toxicity of tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene) administered in the drinking water of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, J.R.; Condie, L.W. Jr.; Borzelleca, J.F.

    1986-07-01

    This study provides data on the effects of tetrachloroethylene in drinking solutions. The acute oral LD50 in male and female Charles River rats was found to be 3835 mg/kg for males and 3005 mg/kg for females. Male and female rats received theoretical daily doses of 14,400, and 1400 mg tetrachloroethylene/kg body wt/day for 90 consecutive days. There were no compound-related deaths. Body weights were significantly lower in male and female rats at the higher doses. There were no consistent dose-related effects on any of the hematological, clinical chemistry, or urinalysis parameters. 5'-Nucleotidase activity was increased in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting possible hepatotoxicity; however, other serum indicators of hepatic function were unaffected by the treatment. There were no gross pathological effects observed. Liver and kidney body weight ratios, but not brain weight ratios, were elevated at the higher doses. There was no other evidence of compound-related toxicity. These data suggest that exposure of humans to reported levels of tetrachloroethylene in drinking water (approximately 1 microgram/liter) does not constitute a serious health hazard.

  3. Use of Mini-Sprinklers to Strip Trichloroethylene and Tetrachloroethylene from Contaminated Ground Water.

    SciTech Connect

    Brerisford, Yvette, C.; Bush, Parshall, B.; Blake, John, I.; Bayer, Cassandra L.

    2003-01-01

    Berisford, Y.C., P.B. Bush, J.I. Blake, and C.L. Bayer. 2003. Use of mini-sprinklers to strip trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene from contaminated ground water. J. Env. Qual. 32:801-815. Three low-volume mini-sprinklers were tested for their efficacy to strip trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) from water. Deionized water spiked with TCE and PCE was pumped through a mini-sprinkler supported on top of a 1.8-m-tall. Water was collected in collection vessels at 0.61 and 1.22 m above the ground on support columns that were spaced at 0.61-m intervals from the riser base, and samples were composited per height and distance from the riser. Overall, air-stripping reduced dissolved concentrations of TCE and PCE by 99.1 to 100 and 96.9 to 100%, respectively. Mini-sprinklers offer the advantages of (i) easy setup in series that can be used on practically any terrain; (ii) operation over a long period of time that does not threaten aquifer depletion; (iii) use in small or confined aquifers in which the capacity is too low to support large irrigation or pumping systems; and (iv) use in forests in which the small, low-impact droplets of the mini-sprinklers do not damage bark and in which trees can help manage (via evapotransporation) excess waste water.

  4. SURFACTANT ENHANCED RECOVERY OF TETRACHLOROETHYLENE FROM A POROUS MEDIUM CONTAINING LOW PERMEABILITY LENSES. 1. EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES. (R825409)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    A matrix of batch, column and two-dimensional (2-D) box experiments was conducted to investigate the coupled effects of rate-limited solubilization and layering on the entrapment and subsequent recovery of a representative dense NAPL, tetrachloroethylene (PCE)...

  5. Reductive degradation of tetrachloroethylene by biogenic and chemogenic carbonate green rust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, N.; Bae, S.; Lee, W.

    2013-12-01

    Degradation of contaminants with microorganisms and natural soil minerals has been extensively studied for understanding of complex interaction mechanism in bio-geochemical reactions. In this study, we conducted a batch experiment to demonstrate the different degradation mechanism of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in biogenic and chemogenic carbonate green rust suspensions. Both green rusts were characterized by measurement of Fe(II) content, BET, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron spectroscopy before and after the reaction. The effects of mineral loading, initial concentration of PCE, and solution pH on the degradation kinetic of PCE were investigated. The concentration profiles of transformation products were also monitored to investigate the different degradation mechanism of PCE by biogenic and chemogenic green rust.

  6. Exposure to Tetrachloroethylene-Contaminated Drinking Water and the Risk of Pregnancy Loss

    PubMed Central

    Aschengrau, Ann; Weinberg, Janice M.; Gallagher, Lisa G.; Winter, Michael R.; Vieira, Veronica M.; Webster, Thomas F.; Ozonoff, David M.

    2010-01-01

    There is little information on the impact of solvent-contaminated drinking water on pregnancy outcomes. This retrospective cohort study examined whether maternal exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE) - contaminated drinking water in the Cape Cod region of Massachusetts influenced the risk of clinically recognized pregnancy loss. The study identified exposed (n=959) and unexposed (1,087) women who completed a questionnaire on their residential and pregnancy histories, and confounding variables. Exposure was estimated using water distribution system modeling software. No meaningful associations were seen between PCE exposure level and the risk of clinically recognized pregnancy loss at the exposure levels experienced by the study population. Because PCE remains a common water contaminant, it is important to continue monitoring its impact on women and their pregnancies. PMID:20613966

  7. Adult neuropsychological performance following prenatal and early postnatal exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated drinking water.

    PubMed

    Janulewicz, Patricia A; White, Roberta F; Martin, Brett M; Winter, Michael R; Weinberg, Janice M; Vieira, Veronica; Aschengrau, Ann

    2012-01-01

    This population-based retrospective cohort study examined adult performance on a battery of neuropsychological tests in relation to prenatal and early postnatal exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated drinking water on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Subjects were identified through birth records from 1969 through 1983. Exposure was modeled using pipe network information from town water departments, a PCE leaching and transport algorithm, EPANet water flow modeling software, and a Geographic Information System (GIS). Results of crude and multivariate analyses among 35 exposed and 28 unexposed subjects showed no association between prenatal and early postnatal exposure and decrements on tests that assess abilities in the domains of omnibus intelligence, academic achievement or language. The results were suggestive of an association between prenatal and early postnatal PCE exposure and diminished performance on tests that assessed abilities in the domains of visuospatial functioning, learning and memory, motor, attention and mood. Because the sample size was small, most findings were not statistically significant. Future studies with larger sample sizes should be conducted to further define the neuropsychological consequences of early developmental PCE exposure. PMID:22522125

  8. Adult Neuropsychological Performance Following Prenatal and Early Postnatal Exposure to Tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Janulewicz, Patricia A; White, Roberta F; Martin, Brett M; Winter, Michael R; Weinberg, Janice M; Vieira, Veronica; Aschengrau, Ann

    2012-01-01

    This population-based retrospective cohort study examined adult performance on a battery of neuropsychological tests in relation to prenatal and early postnatal exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated drinking water on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Subjects were identified through birth records from 1969 through 1983. Exposure was modeled using pipe network information from town water departments, a PCE leaching and transport algorithm, EPANet water flow modeling software, and a Geographic Information System (GIS). Results of crude and multivariate analyses among 35 exposed and 28 unexposed subjects showed no association between prenatal and early postnatal exposure and decrements on tests that assess abilities in the domains of omnibus intelligence, academic achievement or language. The results were suggestive of an association between prenatal and early postnatal PCE exposure and diminished performance on tests that assessed abilities in the domains of visuospatial functioning, learning and memory, motor, attention and mood. Because the sample size was small, most findings were not statistically significant. Future studies with larger sample sizes should be conducted to further define the neuropsychological consequences of early developmental PCE exposure. PMID:22522125

  9. Reductive dechlorination of tri- and tetrachloroethylenes depends on transition from aerobic to anaerobic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kastner, M. )

    1991-07-01

    Aerobic enrichment cultures from contaminated groundwaters dechlorinated trichloroethylene (TCE) (14.6 mg/liter; 111 {mu}mol/liter) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) (16.2 mg/liter; 98 {mu}mol/liter) reductively within 4 days after the transition from aerobic to anaerobic conditions. The transformation products were equimolar amounts of cis-1,2-dichloroethylene and traces of 1,1-dichloroethylene. No other chlorinated product and no methane were detected. The change was accompanied by the release of sulfide, which caused a decrease in the redox potential from 0 - {minus}150 mV. In sterile control experiments, sulfide led to the abiotic formation of traces of 1,1-dichloroethylene without cis-1,2-dichloroethylene production. The reductive dechlorination of PCE via TCE depended on these specific transition conditions after consumption of the electron acceptor oxygen or nitrate. Repeated feeding of TCE or PCE to cultures after the change to anaerobic conditions yielded no further dechlorination. Only aerobic subcultures with an air/liquid ratio of 1:4 maintained dechlorination activities; anaerobic subcultures showed no transformation. Bacteria from noncontaminated sites showed no reduction under the same conditions.

  10. A small amount of tetrachloroethylene ingestion from drinking water accelerates antigen-stimulated allergic responses.

    PubMed

    Seo, Makoto; Yamagiwa, Takeo; Kobayashi, Ryo; Ikeda, Koji; Satoh, Masahiko; Inagaki, Naoki; Nagai, Hiroichi; Nagase, Hisamitsu

    2008-01-01

    Previously, we observed that tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, PCE) increased histamine release and inflammatory mediator production from antigen-stimulated mast cells. In this study, we examined the enhancing effect of low concentrations of PCE in drinking water on antigen-stimulated allergic responses. After exposure of Wistar rats to PCE in drinking water for 2 or 4 weeks, we performed a passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) reaction. PCE exposure for 4 weeks enhanced PCA reaction in a dose-dependent manner. In pathological studies, PCE exposure for 2 weeks exacerbated inflammation characterized by infiltration of lymphocytes and accumulation of mast cells around the vessel. Non-purified mast cells (NPMCs) from rats treated with 1mg/L PCE in drinking water for 2 weeks increased antigen-stimulated histamine release. Furthermore, the leukocytes of rats treated with PCE in drinking water for 4 weeks showed increased interleukin (IL)-4 expression. The mechanism of enhancing the PCA reaction is assumed to be that PCE increases IL-4 production and PCE causes T helper (Th) 1/Th2-type helper T-cell imbalance and increases histamine release from excessively accumulated mast cells. The results suggest that the intake of PCE in drinking water, even at a low concentration, leads to the initiation and acceleration of allergic diseases. PMID:18950594

  11. Enhanced dechlorination of tetrachloroethylene by zerovalent silicon in the presence of polyethylene glycol under anoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chun-Chi; Doong, Ruey-An

    2011-03-15

    The combination of zerovalent silicon (Si(0)) with polyethylene glycol (PEG) is a novel technique to enhance the dechlorination efficiency and rate of chlorinated hydrocarbons. In this study, the dechlorination of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) by Si(0) in the presence of various concentrations of PEG was investigated under anoxic conditions. Several surfactants including cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and Tween 80 were also selected for comparison. Addition of SDS and Tween 80 had little effect on the enhancement of PCE dechlorination, while CTAB and PEG significantly enhanced the dechlorination efficiency and rate of PCE by Si(0) under anoxic conditions. The Langmuir-Hinshelwood model was used to describe the dechlorination kinetics of PCE and could be simplified to pseudo-first-order kinetics at low PCE concentration. The rate constants (k(obs)) for PCE dechlorination were 0.21 and 0.36 h(-1) in the presence of CTAB and PEG, respectively. However, the reaction mechanisms for CTAB and PEG are different. CTAB could enhance the apparent water solubility of PCE in solution containing Si(0), leading to the enhancement of dechlorination efficiency and rate of PCE, while PEG prevented the formation of silicon dioxide, and significantly enhanced the dechlorination efficiency and rate of PCE at pH 8.3 ± 0.2. In addition, the dechlorination rate increased upon increasing PEG concentration and then leveled off to a plateau when the PEG concentration was higher than 0.2 ?M. The k(obs) for PCE dechlorination by Si(0) in the presence of PEG was 106 times higher than that by Si(0) alone. Results obtained in this study would be helpful in facilitating the development of processes that could be useful for the enhanced degradation of cocontaminants by zerovalent silicon. PMID:21341692

  12. CONCENTRATION OF TETRACHLOROETHYLENE IN INDOOR AIR AT A FORMER DRY CLEANER FACILITY AS A FUNCTION OF SUBSURFACE CONTAMINATION: A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field study was performed to evaluate indoor air concentrations and vapor intrusion (VI) of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and other chlorinated solvents at a commercial retail site in Dallas, TX. The building is approximately 40 years old and once housed a dry cleaning operation. R...

  13. Interfacial Properties of a Hydrophobic Dye in the Tetrachloroethylene-Water-Glass Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tuck, D.M.

    1999-02-23

    Interfacial effects play an important role in governing multiphase fluid behavior in porous media. Strongly hydrophobic organic dyes, used in many experimental studies to facilitate visual observation of the phase distributions, have generally been implicitly assumed to have no influence on the interfacial properties of the various phases in porous media. Sudan IV is the most commonly used dye for non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in laboratory experiments. It has also been used in at least one field experiment. The effects of this dye on the tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-water-glass system were investigated to test the assumption that the dye does not effect the interfacial properties and therefore PCE mobility. The results indicate that the dye does indeed change the interfacial relationships.The effect of the dye on the interfacial relationships is a complex function of the dye concentration, the solid phase composition, and the dynamic rate of new interface formation. The dye caused a slight (<10 percent) increase in interfacial tension at low concentrations (<0.1 g/L) and high rates of new interface formation. The dye reduced interfacial tension between PCE and water at low rates of new interface formation for all dye concentrations tested (0.00508 to 5.08 g/L). At the highest dye concentration, the PCE-water interfacial tension was significantly reduced regardless of the rate of new interface formation. The apparent interfacial tension increase at low dye concentrations is suspected to be an artifact of a low measured IFT value for the undyed PCE caused by leaching of rubber o-rings by the PCE prior to testing in the final drop-volume configuration.In addition to reducing interfacial tension, the dye was found to significantly alter the wetting relationship between PCE and water on a glass surface at and above the range of reported dye concentrations cited in the literature (1.1 to 1.7 g/L). The wetting relationship was rendered neutral from a water-wet initial condition at the highest dye concentration. The contact angle, measured through the aqueous phase, changed from 58 degrees for undyed PCE to 93 degrees at a dye concentration of 5.08 g/L. Complete reversal of the wettability is likely given the short equilibration time used in this study (approximately five minutes) together with literature indications that hundreds to thousands of hours may be required to reach equilibrium during contact angle measurements. Observations suggesting changing wetting relationships were also noted between PCE, water, and the platinum-iridium surface used in the standard du No/374y ring method for measuring interfacial tension.Observations of the dyed-PCE-water interface behavior during du No/374y ring interfacial tension measurements were similar to observations noted previously during measurements of the interfacial tension between the Savannah River Site (SRS) M-Area Settling Basin DNAPL (M-Area DNAPL) and water. This observation suggests that the M-Area DNAPL may contain surface active components. If this proves to be the case, it would have significant implications for how the M-Area DNAPL is distributed and moves in the SRS subsurface.

  14. The effect of low concentrations of tetrachloroethylene on H2 adsorption and activation on Pt in a fuel cell catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jack Z.; Colón-Mercado, Héctor R.; Goodwin, James G.

    2011-10-01

    The poisoning effect of tetrachloroethylene (TTCE) on the activity of a Pt fuel cell catalyst for the adsorption and activation of H2 was investigated at 60 °C and 2 atm using hydrogen surface concentration measurements. The impurity was chosen as a model compound for chlorinated cleaning and degreasing agents that may be introduced into a fuel cell as a contaminant at a fueling station and/or during vehicle maintenance. In the presence of only H2, introduction of up to 540 ppm TTCE in H2 to Pt/C resulted in a reduction of available Pt surface atoms (measured by H2 uptake) by ca. 30%, which was not enough to shift the H2-D2 exchange reaction away from being equilibrium limited. Exposure of TTCE to Pt/C in a mixed redox environment (hydrogen + oxygen), similar to that at the cathode of a fuel cell, resulted in a much more significant loss of Pt surface atom availability, suggesting a role in TTCE decomposition and/or Cl poisoning. Regeneration of catalyst activity of poisoned Pt/C showed the highest level of recovery when regenerated in only H2, with much less recovery in H2 + O2 or O2. The results from this study are in good agreement with those found in a fuel cell study by Martínez-Rodríguez et al. [2] and confirm that the majority of the poisoning from TTCE on fuel cell performance is most likely at the cathode, rather than the anode.

  15. Reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene catalyzed by vitamin B{sub 12} in homogeneous and heterogeneous systems

    SciTech Connect

    Burris, D.R.; Smith, M.H.; Delcomyn, C.A.; Roberts, A.L.

    1996-10-01

    The reduction of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) catalyzed by vitamin B{sub 12} was examined in homogeneous and heterogeneous (B{sub 12} bound to agarose) batch systems using titanium(III) citrate as the bulk reductant. The solution and surface-mediated reaction rates at similar B{sub 12} loadings were comparable, indicating that binding vitamin B{sub 12} to a surface did not lower catalytic activity. No loss in PCE reducing activity was observed with repeated usage of surface-bound vitamin B{sub 12}. Carbon mass recoveries were 81-84% for PCE reduction and 89% for TCE reduction, relative to controls. In addition to sequential hydrogenolysis, a second competing reaction mechanism for the reduction of PCE and TCE by B{sub 12}, reductive {beta}-elimination, is proposed to account for the observation of acetylene as a significant reaction intermediate. Reductive {beta}-elimination should be considered as a potential pathway in other reactive systems involving the reduction of vicinal polyhaloethenes. Surface-bound catalysts such as vitamin B{sub 12} may have utility in the engineered degradation of aqueous phase chlorinated ethenes. 19 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Risk of Learning and Behavioral Disorders Following Prenatal and Early Postnatal Exposure to Tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Janulewicz, Patricia A; White, Roberta F; Winter, Michael R; Weinberg, Janice M; Gallagher, Lisa E; Vieira, Veronica; Webster, Thomas F; Aschengrau, Ann

    2008-01-01

    This population-based retrospective cohort study examined the association between developmental disorders of learning, attention and behavior and prenatal and early postnatal drinking water exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE) on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Subjects were identified through birth records from 1969 through 1983. Exposure was modeled using information from town water departments, a PCE leaching and transport algorithm, EPANet water flow modeling software, and a Geographic Information System (GIS). Mothers completed a questionnaire on disorders of attention, learning and behavior in their children and on potential confounding variables. The final cohort consisted of 2,086 children. Results of crude and multivariate analyses showed no association between prenatal exposure and receiving tutoring for reading or math, being placed on an Individual Education Plan, or repeating a school grade (adjusted Odds Ratios (OR)=1.0–1.2). There was also no consistent pattern of increased risk for receiving a diagnosis of Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) or Hyperactive Disorder (HD), special class placement for academic or behavioral problems, or lower educational attainment. Modest associations were observed for the latter outcomes only in the low exposure group (e.g., adjusted ORs for ADD were 1.4 and 1.0 for low and high exposure, respectively). (All ORs are based on an unexposed referent group.) Results for postnatal exposure through age five years were similar to those for prenatal exposure. We conclude that prenatal and early postnatal PCE exposure is not associated with disorders of attention, learning and behavior identified on the basis of questionnaire responses and at the exposure levels experienced by this population. PMID:18353612

  17. Risk of learning and behavioral disorders following prenatal and early postnatal exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated drinking water.

    PubMed

    Janulewicz, Patricia A; White, Roberta F; Winter, Michael R; Weinberg, Janice M; Gallagher, Lisa E; Vieira, Veronica; Webster, Thomas F; Aschengrau, Ann

    2008-01-01

    This population-based retrospective cohort study examined the association between developmental disorders of learning, attention and behavior and prenatal and early postnatal drinking water exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE) on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Subjects were identified through birth records from 1969 through 1983. Exposure was modeled using information from town water departments, a PCE leaching and transport algorithm, EPANet water flow modeling software, and a Geographic Information System (GIS). Mothers completed a questionnaire on disorders of attention, learning and behavior in their children and on potential confounding variables. The final cohort consisted of 2086 children. Results of crude and multivariate analyses showed no association between prenatal exposure and receiving tutoring for reading or math, being placed on an Individual Education Plan, or repeating a school grade (adjusted Odds Ratios (OR)=1.0-1.2). There was also no consistent pattern of increased risk for receiving a diagnosis of Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) or Hyperactive Disorder (HD), special class placement for academic or behavioral problems, or lower educational attainment. Modest associations were observed for the latter outcomes only in the low exposure group (e.g., adjusted ORs for ADD were 1.4 and 1.0 for low and high exposure, respectively). (All ORs are based on an unexposed referent group.) Results for postnatal exposure through age five years were similar to those for prenatal exposure. We conclude that prenatal and early postnatal PCE exposure is not associated with disorders of attention, learning and behavior identified on the basis of questionnaire responses and at the exposure levels experienced by this population. PMID:18353612

  18. Prenatal exposure to tetrachloroethylene-contaminated drinking water and the risk of congenital anomalies: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Prior animal and human studies of prenatal exposure to solvents including tetrachloroethylene (PCE) have shown increases in the risk of certain congenital anomalies among exposed offspring. Objectives This retrospective cohort study examined whether PCE contamination of public drinking water supplies in Massachusetts influenced the occurrence of congenital anomalies among children whose mothers were exposed around the time of conception. Methods The study included 1,658 children whose mothers were exposed to PCE-contaminated drinking water and a comparable group of 2,999 children of unexposed mothers. Mothers completed a self-administered questionnaire to gather information on all of their prior births, including the presence of anomalies, residential histories and confounding variables. PCE exposure was estimated using EPANET water distribution system modeling software that incorporated a fate and transport model. Results Children whose mothers had high exposure levels around the time of conception had an increased risk of congenital anomalies. The adjusted odds ratio of all anomalies combined among children with prenatal exposure in the uppermost quartile was 1.5 (95% CI: 0.9, 2.5). No meaningful increases in the risk were seen for lower exposure levels. Increases were also observed in the risk of neural tube defects (OR: 3.5, 95% CI: 0.8, 14.0) and oral clefts (OR 3.2, 95% CI: 0.7, 15.0) among offspring with any prenatal exposure. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that the risk of certain congenital anomalies is increased among the offspring of women who were exposed to PCE-contaminated drinking water around the time of conception. Because these results are limited by the small number of children with congenital anomalies that were based on maternal reports, a follow-up investigation should be conducted with a larger number of affected children who are identified by independent records. PMID:19778411

  19. Adverse Birth Outcomes and Maternal Exposure to Trichloroethylene and Tetrachloroethylene through Soil Vapor Intrusion in New York State

    PubMed Central

    Lewis-Michl, Elizabeth L.; Gomez, Marta I.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Industrial spills of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Endicott, New York (USA), have led to contamination of groundwater, soil, and soil gas. Previous studies have reported an increase in adverse birth outcomes among women exposed to VOCs in drinking water. Objective: We investigated the prevalence of adverse birth outcomes among mothers exposed to trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene [or perchloroethylene (PCE)] in indoor air contaminated through soil vapor intrusion. Methods: We examined low birth weight (LBW), preterm birth, fetal growth restriction, and birth defects among births to women in Endicott who were exposed to VOCs, compared with births statewide. We used Poisson regression to analyze births and malformations to estimate the association between maternal exposure to VOCs adjusting for sex, mother’s age, race, education, parity, and prenatal care. Two exposure areas were identified based on environmental sampling data: one area was primarily contaminated with TCE, and the other with PCE. Results: In the TCE-contaminated area, adjusted rate ratios (RRs) were significantly elevated for LBW [RR = 1.36; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07, 1.73; n = 76], small for gestational age (RR = 1.23; 95% CI: 1.03, 1.48; n = 117), term LBW (RR = 1.68; 95% CI: 1.20, 2.34; n = 37), cardiac defects (RR = 2.15; 95% CI: 1.27, 3.62; n = 15), and conotruncal defects (RR = 4.91; 95% CI: 1.58, 15.24; n = 3). In the PCE-contaminated area, RRs for cardiac defects (five births) were elevated but not significantly. Residual socioeconomic confounding may have contributed to elevations of LBW outcomes. Conclusions: Maternal residence in both areas was associated with cardiac defects. Residence in the TCE area, but not the PCE area, was associated with LBW and fetal growth restriction. PMID:22142966

  20. Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging in an adult cohort following prenatal and early postnatal exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated drinking water.

    PubMed

    Janulewicz, Patricia A; Killiany, Ronald J; White, Roberta F; Martin, Brett M; Winter, Michael R; Weinberg, Janice M; Aschengrau, Ann

    2013-01-01

    This population-based retrospective cohort study examined Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the brain in relation to prenatal and early postnatal exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated drinking water on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Subjects were identified through birth records from 1969 through 1983. Exposure was modeled using pipe network information from town water departments, a PCE leaching and transport algorithm, EPANet water flow modeling software, and Geographic Information System (GIS) methodology. Brain imaging was performed on 26 exposed and 16 unexposed subjects. Scans were acquired on a Philips 3T whole body scanner using the ADNI T1-weighted MP-RAGE scan. The scans were processed by FreeSurfer version 4.3.1 software to obtain measurements of specific brain regions. There were no statistically significant differences between exposed and unexposed subjects on the measures of white matter hypointensities (?: 127.5mm(3), 95% CI: -259.1, 1514.0), white matter volumes (e.g. total cerebral white matter: ?: 21230.0mm(3), 95% CI: -4512.6, 46971.7) or gray matter volumes (e.g. total cerebral gray matter: ?: 11976.0mm(3), 95% CI: -13657.2, 37609.3). The results of this study suggest that exposure to PCE during gestation and early childhood, at the levels observed in this population, is not associated with alterations in the brain structures studied. PMID:23571160

  1. Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging in an Adult Cohort Following Prenatal and Early Postnatal Exposure to Tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Janulewicz, Patricia A; Killiany, Ronald J; White, Roberta F; Martin, Brett M; Winter, Michael R; Weinberg, Janice M; Aschengrau, Ann

    2013-01-01

    This population-based retrospective cohort study examined Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the brain in relation to prenatal and early postnatal exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated drinking water on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Subjects were identified through birth records from 1969 through 1983. Exposure was modeled using pipe network information from town water departments, a PCE leaching and transport algorithm, EPANet water flow modeling software, and Geographic Information System (GIS) methodology. Brain imaging was performed on 26 exposed and 16 unexposed subjects. Scans were acquired on a Philips 3T whole body scanner using the ADNI T1-weighted MP-RAGE scan. The scans were processed by FreeSurfer version 4.3.1 software to obtain measurements of specific brain regions. There were no statistically significant differences between exposed and unexposed subjects on measures of white matter hypointensities (?: 127.5 mm3, 95% CI: ?259.1, 1514.0), white matter volumes (e.g. total cerebral white matter: ?: 21230.0 mm3, 95% CI: ?4512.6, 46971.7) or gray matter volumes (e.g. total cerebral gray matter: ?: 11976.0 mm3, 95% CI: ?13657.2, 37609.3). The results of this study suggest that exposure to PCE during gestation and early childhood, at the levels observed in this population, is not associated with alterations in the brain structures studied. PMID:23571160

  2. Occurrence of mental illness following prenatal and early childhood exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated drinking water: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background While many studies of adults with solvent exposure have shown increased risks of anxiety and depressive disorders, there is little information on the impact of prenatal and early childhood exposure on the subsequent risk of mental illness. This retrospective cohort study examined whether early life exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated drinking water influenced the occurrence of depression, bipolar disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and schizophrenia among adults from Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Methods A total of 1,512 subjects born between 1969 and 1983 were studied, including 831 subjects with both prenatal and early childhood PCE exposure and 547 unexposed subjects. Participants completed questionnaires to gather information on mental illnesses, demographic and medical characteristics, other sources of solvent exposure, and residences from birth through 1990. PCE exposure originating from the vinyl-liner of water distribution pipes was assessed using water distribution system modeling software that incorporated a leaching and transport algorithm. Results No meaningful increases in risk ratios (RR) for depression were observed among subjects with prenatal and early childhood exposure (RR: 1.1, 95% CI: 0.9-1.4). However, subjects with prenatal and early childhood exposure had a 1.8-fold increased risk of bipolar disorder (N = 36 exposed cases, 95% CI: 0.9-1.4), a 1.5-fold increased risk post-traumatic stress disorder (N = 47 exposed cases, 95% CI: 0.9-2.5), and a 2.1-fold increased risk of schizophrenia (N = 3 exposed cases, 95% CI: 0.2-20.0). Further increases in the risk ratio were observed for bipolar disorder (N = 18 exposed cases, RR; 2.7, 95% CI: 1.3-5.6) and post-traumatic stress disorder (N = 18 exposed cases, RR: 1.7, 95% CI: 0.9-3.2) among subjects with the highest exposure levels. Conclusions The results of this study provide evidence against an impact of early life exposure to PCE on the risk of depression. In contrast, the results provide support for an impact of early life exposure on the risk of bipolar disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder. The number of schizophrenia cases was too small to draw reliable conclusions. These findings should be confirmed in investigations of other similarly exposed populations. PMID:22264316

  3. Affinity for risky behaviors following prenatal and early childhood exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated drinking water: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Many studies of adults with acute and chronic solvent exposure have shown adverse effects on cognition, behavior and mood. No prior study has investigated the long-term impact of prenatal and early childhood exposure to the solvent tetrachloroethylene (PCE) on the affinity for risky behaviors, defined as smoking, drinking or drug use as a teen or adult. Objectives This retrospective cohort study examined whether early life exposure to PCE-contaminated drinking water influenced the occurrence of cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, and drug use among adults from Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Methods Eight hundred and thirty-one subjects with prenatal and early childhood PCE exposure and 547 unexposed subjects were studied. Participants completed questionnaires to gather information on risky behaviors as a teenager and young adult, demographic characteristics, other sources of solvent exposure, and residences from birth through 1990. PCE exposure was estimated using the U.S. EPA's water distribution system modeling software (EPANET) that was modified to incorporate a leaching and transport model to estimate PCE exposures from pipe linings. Results Individuals who were highly exposed to PCE-contaminated drinking water during gestation and early childhood experienced 50-60% increases in the risk of using two or more major illicit drugs as a teenager or as an adult (Relative Risk (RR) for teen use = 1.6, 95% CI: 1.2-2.2; and RR for adult use = 1.5, 95% CI: 1.2-1.9). Specific drugs for which increased risks were observed included crack/cocaine, psychedelics/hallucinogens, club/designer drugs, Ritalin without a prescription, and heroin (RRs:1.4-2.1). Thirty to 60% increases in the risk of certain smoking and drinking behaviors were also seen among highly exposed subjects. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that risky behaviors, particularly drug use, are more frequent among adults with high PCE exposure levels during gestation and early childhood. These findings should be confirmed in follow-up investigations of other exposed populations. PMID:22136431

  4. REDUCTION OF HEXACHLOROETHANE TO TETRACHLOROETHYLENE IN GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    At the Canadian Forces Base, Borden, hexachloroethane (HCE) that was introduced into an unconfined sand aquifer disappeared rapidly, with a half-life of about 40 days. Laboratory-scale studies, initiated to help assess the fate of HCE, indicated that it is reductively biotransfor...

  5. NEUROTOXICITY OF TETRACHLOROETHYLENE (PERCHLOROETHYLENE): DISCUSSION PAPER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper is a background document for a meeting of neurotoxicity experts to discuss the central nervous system effects of exposure to perchloroethylene (perc). The document reviews the literature on neurological testing of people exposed to perc occupationally in dry cleanin...

  6. Tetrachloroethylene Degradation by Dithionite with Ultraviolet Activation 

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Jingyuan

    2013-07-30

    . This project has conducted research on degrading PCE with an ARP that combines dithionite and ultraviolet activation. The purpose of the project is to provide knowledge for the development of potential wastewater treatment technologies. Several control...

  7. Charge to the Tetrachloroethylene (Perchloroethylene) Neurotoxicity Expert Panel

    EPA Science Inventory

    Today NCEA is posting the charge which will be discussed at the expert panel meeting on neurotoxicity issues associated with exposure to tetrachlroroethylene. This charge is to be the main agenda topic for the meeting. The time and place of the meeting will be announced in a fu...

  8. IRIS TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW AND SUMMARY DOCUMENTS FOR TETRACHLOROETHYLENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The known toxic effects of perchloroethylene will be summarized, with citations from current scientific literature. The critical effects will be identified, and from this the RfD and RfC and cancer unit risk factors will be derived. The RfD and RfC are reference doses and air c...

  9. EVALUATION OF GEOPHYSICAL METHODS FOR THE DETECTION OF SUBSURFACE TETRACHLOROETHYLENE IN CONTROLLED SPILL EXPERIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the work was to determine the capability of various geophysical methods to detect PCE in the subsurface. Measurements were made with ten different geophysical techniques before, during, and after the PCE injection. This approach provided a clear identification of a...

  10. KINETIC AND MODELING STUDIES OF THE REACTION OF HYDROXYL RADICALS WITH TETRACHLOROETHYLENE. (R826169)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  11. KINETIC STUDIES OF THE REACTION OF HYDROXYL RADICALS WITH TRICHLOROETHYLENE AND TETRACHLOROETHYLENE. (R826169)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rate coefficients are reported for the gas-phase reaction of the hydroxyl radical (OH) with C2HCl3 (k1) and C2Cl4 (k2) over an extended temperature range at 740±10 Torr in a He bath gas. These...

  12. INFLUENCE OF VISCOUS AND BUOYANCY FORCES ON THE MOBILIZATION OF RESIDUAL TETRACHLOROETHYLENE DURING SURFACTANT FLUSHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential for nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) mobilization is one of the most important considerations in the development and implementation of surfactant-based remediation technologies. Column experiments were performed to investigate the onset and extent of tetrachloroethyle...

  13. KINETICS OF THE TRANSFORMATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE AND TETRACHLOROETHYLENE BY IRON SULFIDE. (R825958)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The transformation of nine halogenated aliphatic compounds
    by 10 g/L (0.5 m2/L) FeS at pH 8.3 was studied in batch
    experiments. These compounds were as follows:
    pentachloroethane (PCA), 1,1,2,2- and 1,1,1,2-tetrachloroethanes (1122-TeCA and 1112-TeCA), 1,1,...

  14. Identification of active agents for tetrachloroethylene degradation in Portland cement slurry containing ferrous iron 

    E-print Network

    Ko, Sae Bom

    2006-08-16

    -EDS) were used to identify minerals in chemical mixtures that have high activities. Results indicate that active agents for PCE degradation in Portland cement slurries and in cement extracts might be one of several AFm phases. However, systems without cement...

  15. EVALUATION OF GEOPHYSICAL METHODS FOR THE DETECTION OF SUBSURFACE TETRACHLOROETHYLENE IN CONTROLLED SPILL EXPERIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents some of the results of five of the techniques: cross borehole complex resistivity (CR) also referred to as spectral induced polarization (SIP), cross borehole high resolution seismic (HRS), borehole self potential (SP), surface ground penetration radar (GPR), ...

  16. SOLUBILIZATION OF DODECANE, TETRACHLOROETHYLENE, AND 1,2-DICHLOROBENZENE IN MICELLAR SOLUTIONS OF ETHOXYLATED NONIONIC SURFACTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although surfactants have received considerable attention as a potential means for enhancing the recovery of organic compounds from the subsurface, only limited information is available regarding the micellar solubilization of common groundwater contaminants by nonionic surfactan...

  17. Abstract Pseudomonas stutzeri OX1 naphthalene-oxi-dation activity is induced 3.0-fold by tetrachloroethylene

    E-print Network

    Wood, Thomas K.

    billion under the Safe Drinking Water Act. These compounds are the most common groundwater pollutants and cis-DCE are U.S. EPA priority pollutants (Bradley and Chapelle 1998). Both PCE (Ryoo et al. 2000

  18. SURFACTANT ENHANCED RECOVERY OF TETRACHLOROETHYLENE FROM A POROUS MEDIUM CONTAINING LOW PERMEABILITY LENSES. 2. NUMERICAL SIMULATION. (R825409)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    A numerical model of surfactant enhanced solubilization was developed and applied to the simulation of nonaqueous phase liquid recovery in two-dimensional heterogeneous laboratory sand tank systems. Model parameters were derived from independent, small-scale, ...

  19. Evaluation of modeling for groundwater flow and tetrachloroethylene transport in the Milford-Souhegan glacial-drift aquifer at the Savage Municipal Well Superfund site, Milford, New Hampshire, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harte, Philip T.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services entered into a cooperative agreement to assist in the evaluation of remedy simulations of the MSGD aquifer that are being performed by various parties to track the remedial progress of the PCE plume. This report summarizes findings from this evaluation. Topics covered include description of groundwater flow and transport models used in the study of the Savage Superfund site (section 2), evaluation of models and their results (section 3), testing of several new simulations (section 4), an assessment of the representation of models to simulate field conditions (section 5), and an assessment of models as a tool in remedial operational decision making (section 6).

  20. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart F of... - Organic Hazardous Air Pollutants Subject to Cooling Tower Monitoring Requirements in § 63.104

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Phosgene 75445 Propionaldehyde 123386 Propylene dichloride (1,2-Dichloropropane) 78875 Propylene oxide 75569 Quinone 106514 Styrene 100425 Tetrachloroethane (1,1,2,2-) 79345 Tetrachloroethylene (Perchloroethylene)...

  1. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart F of... - Organic Hazardous Air Pollutants Subject to Cooling Tower Monitoring Requirements in § 63.104

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Phosgene 75445 Propionaldehyde 123386 Propylene dichloride (1,2-Dichloropropane) 78875 Propylene oxide 75569 Quinone 106514 Styrene 100425 Tetrachloroethane (1,1,2,2-) 79345 Tetrachloroethylene (Perchloroethylene)...

  2. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart F of... - Organic Hazardous Air Pollutants Subject to Cooling Tower Monitoring Requirements in § 63.104

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Phosgene 75445 Propionaldehyde 123386 Propylene dichloride (1,2-Dichloropropane) 78875 Propylene oxide 75569 Quinone 106514 Styrene 100425 Tetrachloroethane (1,1,2,2-) 79345 Tetrachloroethylene (Perchloroethylene)...

  3. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart F of... - Organic Hazardous Air Pollutants Subject to Cooling Tower Monitoring Requirements in § 63.104

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Phosgene 75445 Propionaldehyde 123386 Propylene dichloride (1,2-Dichloropropane) 78875 Propylene oxide 75569 Quinone 106514 Styrene 100425 Tetrachloroethane (1,1,2,2-) 79345 Tetrachloroethylene (Perchloroethylene)...

  4. Public health assessment for Vancouver water station No. 1 contamination, Vancouver, Clark County, Washington, Region 10. Cerclis No. WAD988519708. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-19

    Vancouver Water Station No. 1 site (WS1) is a municipal well field located in Vancouver, Clark County, Washington. Low concentrations of tetrachloroethylene were consistently found in water from WS1 production wells and reservoir. The site poses no apparent health hazard to users of the WS1 municipal water supply (residents, workers, and students) as a result of past exposure to low concentrations of tetrachloroethylene in drinking water. Past exposure to tetrachloroethylene may have occurred; however, because of volatilization, concentrations are anticipated to have been minimal and unlikely to cause adverse health effects.

  5. 40 CFR 401.15 - Toxic pollutants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...57. Silver and compounds 58. 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) 59. Tetrachloroethylene 60. Thallium and compounds 61. Toluene 62. Toxaphene 1 63. Trichloroethylene 64. Vinyl chloride 65. Zinc and compounds...

  6. 40 CFR 401.15 - Toxic pollutants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...57. Silver and compounds 58. 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) 59. Tetrachloroethylene 60. Thallium and compounds 61. Toluene 62. Toxaphene 1 63. Trichloroethylene 64. Vinyl chloride 65. Zinc and compounds...

  7. 40 CFR 401.15 - Toxic pollutants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...57. Silver and compounds 58. 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) 59. Tetrachloroethylene 60. Thallium and compounds 61. Toluene 62. Toxaphene 1 63. Trichloroethylene 64. Vinyl chloride 65. Zinc and compounds...

  8. 40 CFR 401.15 - Toxic pollutants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...57. Silver and compounds 58. 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) 59. Tetrachloroethylene 60. Thallium and compounds 61. Toluene 62. Toxaphene 1 63. Trichloroethylene 64. Vinyl chloride 65. Zinc and compounds...

  9. Applications of Monitored Natural Attenuation in the USA (Presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) is widely applied in the USA to control the risk associated with ground water contamination from chlorinated solvents such a tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE). MNA relies on the natural processes of degradation, sorption an...

  10. Applications of Monitored Natural Attenuation in the USA (Abstract)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) is widely applied in the USA to control the risk associated with ground water contamination from chlorinated solvents such a tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE). MNA relies on the natural processes of degradation, sorption an...

  11. 40 CFR 469.12 - Specialized definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...methylene chloride naphthalene 2 Nitrophenol phenol bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate tetrachloroethylene...4 Nitrophenol pentachlorophenol di-n-butyl phthalate anthracene 1,2 Diphenylhydrazine isophorone butyl benzyl pthalate 1,1...

  12. 40 CFR 469.22 - Specialized definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...methylene chloride naphthalene 2 Nitrophenol phenol bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate tetrachloroethylene...4 Nitrophenol pentachlorophenol di-n-butyl phthalate anthracene 1,2 Diphenylhydrazine isophorone butyl benzyl pthalate 1,1...

  13. 40 CFR 464.11 - Specialized definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... is comprised of a discrete list of toxic organic pollutants for each process segment where it is... 81. phenanthrene 84. pyrene 85. tetrachloroethylene 86. toluene (3) Dust Collection Scrubber (§...

  14. BIOVENTING OF CHLORINATED SOLVENTS FOR GROUND-WATER CLEANUP THROUGH BIOREMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorinated solvents such as tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, 1,2-dichloroethane, and dichloromethane (methylene chloride) can exist in contaminated subsurface material as (1) the neat oil, (2) a component of a mixed oily waste, (3) a solu...

  15. THE TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF THE EMISSION OF PERCHLORO- ETHYLENE FROM DRY CLEANED FABRICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was conducted to evaluate the emission of perchloroethylene (tetrachloroethylene) from freshly dry cleaned fabrics using small environmental test chambers. The temperature dependence of the release of perchloroethylene was evaluated over a temperature range of 20 to 45°C....

  16. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: AQUADETOX®/ SVE SYSTEM and AWD Technologies, Inc.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The AWD technology simultaneously treats groundwater and soil-gas contaminated with volatile or ganic compounds (VOC), such as trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE). This technology integrates two processes: (1) AquaDetox®, a moderate vacuum (pressure about 50 ...

  17. IMPACT OF COSOLVENT FLUSHING ON SUBSURFACE MICROBIAL ECOLOGY AT THE FORMER SAGE'S DRY CLEANER SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Solvent Extraction Residual Biotreatment (SERB) technology was evaluated at the former Sage's Dry Cleaner site in Jacksonville, FL where an area of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) contamination was identified. The SERB technology is a treatment train approach to complete site rest...

  18. FIELD EVALUATION OF THE SOLVENT EXTRACTION RESIDUAL BIOTREATMENT (SERB) TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Solvent Extraction Residual Biotreatment (SERB) technology was demonstrated at the former Sage's Dry Cleaner site in Jacksonville, FL where an area of PCE (tetrachloroethylene) contamination was identified. The SERB technology is a treatment train approach to complete site...

  19. MULTIDISCIPLINARY APPROACH TO TOXICOLOGICAL SCREENING: I. SYSTEMIC TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxicity of 10 chemicals (carbaryl, carbon tetrachloride, chlordane, ethylhexylphthalate, dichloromethane, heptachlor, phenol, tetrachloroethylene, triadimefon, and trichloroethylene were examined in the liver, kidney, spleen, thymus, and adrenal of female F-344 rats. cute le...

  20. Does increasing the temperature induce DNAPL migration?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, and chlorobenzene have been identified as contaminants in groundwater and are sometimes called Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids (DNAPL). Thermal methods for remediation of contaminated soils and groundwater rely on raising the temperature o...

  1. TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF THE EMISSION OF PERCHLOROETHYLENE FROM DRY CLEANED FABRICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article discusses an evaluation of the emission of perchloroethylene (tetrachloroethylene) from freshly dry cleaned fabrics using small environment test chambers. he temperature dependence of the release of perchloroethylene was evaluated over a temperature range of 20 to 45 ...

  2. MICROEMULSION OF MIXED CHLORINATED SOLVENTS USING FOOD GRADE (EDIBLE) SURFACTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ground water contamination frequently consists of mixed chlorinated solvents [e.g., tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), and trans-1,2- dichloroethylene (DCE)]. In this research, mixtures of the food grade (edible) surfactants bis(2-ethylhexyl) sodium sulfosuccinat...

  3. IN-PLACE REGENERATION OF SVE LOADED GAC USING FENTON'S REAGENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ten out of the 25 most frequently detected groundwater contaminants at hazardous waste sites are chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) 1 . Trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) are among the top three 1 . Granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption is w...

  4. IN-PLACE REGENERATION OF SVE LOADED GAC USING FENTON'S REAGENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ten out of the 25 most frequently detected groundwater contaminants at hazardous waste sites are chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) 1. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) are among the top three 1. Granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption is widel...

  5. EMISSIONS OF PERCHLOROETHYLENE FROM DRY CLEANED FABRICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was conducted to evaluate the emissions of perchloroethylene (tetrachloroethylene) from dry cleaned fabrics to determine: (a) how the introduction of fresh dry cleaning into a home affects the indoor concentration of perchloroethylene, and (b) the effectiveness of ‘airing...

  6. Some hepatotoxic actions of hexachloroethane and its metabolites in sheep

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, J. S. L.

    1969-01-01

    1. Pentachloroethane and tetrachloroethylene were major metabolites of hexachloroethane in sheep. 2. Concentrations of hexachloroethane, pentachloroethane and tetrachloroethylene were determined by gas-liquid chromatography in blood, bile, faeces, urine and tissues after oral administration of hexachloroethane emulsions to sheep. 3. Increased blood concentrations of sorbitol dehydrogenase, glutamate dehydrogenase, and ornithine carbamoyl transferase were found to follow oral administration of hexachloroethane or pentachloroethane. 4. The rate of bromsulphthalein transfer from liver cells to bile was found to decrease after oral administration of hexachloroethane. PMID:5809742

  7. COMMUNICATION TO THE EDITOR Aerobic Degradation of Mixtures of

    E-print Network

    Wood, Thomas K.

    (TCE) INTRODUCTION Both tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) are suspected carcinogens carcinogen (McCarty, 1997). Both VC and cis-DCE are U.S. Environmental Protection Agency priority pollut carcinogen (Mc- Clay et al., 1996). Because of this ecological risk posed by soil and water contaminated

  8. CATALYTIC HYDRODEHALOGENATION OF CHLORINATED ETHYLENES USING PALLADIUM AND HYDROGEN FOR THE TREATMENT OF CONTAMINATED WATER. (R825689C054,R825689C060)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    A kinetic model is presented for the catalytic hydrodehalogenation of chlorinated ethylenes using Pd and H2 under water treatment conditions. All five chlorinated ethylenes, including tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and vinyl chloride, were completely rem...

  9. SYNERGISTIC AND ANTAGONISTIC EFFECTS ON GENOTOXICITY OF CHEMICALS COMMONLY FOUND IN HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Synergistic and antagonistic effects on genotoxicity of mixtures of four chemicals; i.e., lead tetraacetate (LTA), arsenic trioxide (ATO), dieldrin (DED), and tetrachloroethylene (TCE), were evaluated by the Tradescantia-Micronucleus (Trad-MCN) assay. he concentration of stock so...

  10. Making A Case: The Benefits of

    E-print Network

    Columbia University

    Toluene40 - 55Carbon Dioxide 45 - 60Methane ppmvNMOC% Dry Volume Chemical #12;Global Warming Potential from Landfills Carbon Dioxide and Methane are the 2 major GHGs causing global warming Carbon Dioxide.0NMOC 4Vinyl Chloride0 - 0.2Hydrogen 5Tetrachloroethylene0 - 0.2Carbon Monoxide 6Vinyl Acetate0.1 - 1

  11. MEASUREMENT OF PERCHLOROETHYLENE IN AMBIENT AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchloroethylene (i.e., tetrachloroethylene) is an organic solvent widely used in dry cleaning and industrial metal degreasing operations. Short-term field studies were conducted in each of three major metropolitan areas which were selected on the basis of the number, density an...

  12. PULSED AIR SPARGING IN AQUIFERS CONTAMINATED WITH DENSE NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air sparging was evaluated for remediation of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) present as dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) in aquifers. A two-dimensional laboratory tank with a transparent front wall allowed for visual observation of DNAPL mobilization. A DNAPL zone 50 cm high was ...

  13. Hydrodechlorination of Trichloroethylene to Hydrocarbons Using Bimetallic Nickel-Iron

    E-print Network

    tetrachloride), PCE (tetrachloroethylene), and TCE (trichloroethylene), in groundwater and surface waters. A concentration of only a few parts per million (ppm) of these possible carcino- gens in water supplies requires the overall design of metal-based treatment systems.4,7-10,17 Since the dechlorination reaction of halogenated

  14. FIELD MEASUREMENT OF VAPOR INTRUSION RATES AT A PCE SITE (ABSTRACT ONLY)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field study was performed to evaluate vapor intrusion (VI) of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and other chlorinated solvents at a commercial retail site in Dallas, TX. The building is approximately 40 years old and once housed a dry cleaning operation. Results from an initial site ch...

  15. Infrared transmission at the 3.39 micron helium-neon laser wavelength in liquid-core quartz fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, A. K.; Hinkley, E. D.; Menzies, R. T.

    1979-01-01

    Infrared transmission at the 3.39 micron helium-neon laser wavelength has been measured in a tetrachloroethylene-filled fused-quartz fiber. The loss measurements were taken for three different settings of laser light intensity using a series of neutral density filters. The average value of transmission loss at this wavelength was found to be 56 dB/km.

  16. 40 CFR 132.6 - Application of part 132 requirements in Great Lakes States and Tribes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... State of Wisconsin. (g) Effective February 5, 2001, the chronic aquatic life criterion for selenium in... Mercury (II) a,b 0.9081 0.85 Parathion d 0.013 n/a Selenium a,b 5 0.922 a CCC=CCCtr. b CCCd=(CCCtr) CF... Iron Pyrene Selenium Silver 1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane Tetrachloroethylene Thallium...

  17. 40 CFR 132.6 - Application of part 132 requirements in Great Lakes States and Tribes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... State of Wisconsin. (g) Effective February 5, 2001, the chronic aquatic life criterion for selenium in... Mercury (II) a,b 0.9081 0.85 Parathion d 0.013 n/a Selenium a,b 5 0.922 a CCC=CCCtr. b CCCd=(CCCtr) CF... Iron Pyrene Selenium Silver 1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane Tetrachloroethylene Thallium...

  18. OXIDATION OF WATER SUPPLY REFRACTORY SPECIES BY OZONE WITH ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of ozone with ultraviolet radiation was studied as an advanced treatment process for the removal of micropollutants and trihalomethane precursors from drinking water. The model compounds chloroform, bromo-dichloromethane, tetrachloroethylene and 2,2',4,4',6,6'-hexachlorob...

  19. Critical contaminant/critical pathway analysis - surface water transport for nonradioactive contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Kuo-Fu

    1996-11-01

    The health risks for an individual exposed to contaminants released from SRS outfalls from 1989 to 1995 were estimated. The exposure pathways studied are ingestion of drinking water, ingestion of contaminated fish and dermal contact with contaminants in water while swimming. The estimated incremental risks for an individual developing cancer vary from 3.E-06 to 1.0E-05. The estimated total exposure chronic noncancer hazard indices vary from 6.E-02 to 1.E-01. The critical contaminants were ranked based on their cancer risks and chronic noncarcinogenic hazard quotients. For cancer risks, the critical contaminants released from SRS outfalls are arsenic, tetrachloroethylene, and benzene. For chronic noncarcinogenic risks, the critical contaminants released from srs outfalls are cadmium, arsenic, silver, chromium, mercury, selenium, nitrate, manganese, zinc, nickel, uranium, barium, copper, tetrachloroethylene, cyanide, and phenol. The critical pathways in decreasing risk order are ingestion of contaminated fish, ingestion of drinking water and dermal contact with contaminants in water while swimming.

  20. Health assessment for Nutmeg Valley, Wolcott, Connecticut, Region 1. CERCLIS No. CTSI88045. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-02

    The Nutmeg Valley Industrial Park is listed on the National Priorities List. The site is an industrial park containing 40 companies (light industry metal working and finishing) and 20 private residences. The contaminants present in groundwater at the site are trichloroethylene, benzene, ethyl benzene, toluene, xylene, methylene chloride, trans 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, tetrachloroethylene, pentane, carbon tetrachloride, and chloroform. Investigation into the extent of contamination in other pathways is ongoing.

  1. Aerobic microorganism for the degradation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Fliermans, Carl B. (Augusta, GA)

    1989-01-01

    A chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon-degrading microorganism, having American Type Culture Collection accession numbers ATCC 53570 and 53571, in a biologically pure culture aseptically collected from a deep subsurface habitat and enhanced, mineralizes trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene to HCl, H.sub.2 O and Co.sub.2 under aerobic conditions stimulated by methane, acetate, methanol, tryptone-yeast extract, propane and propane-methane.

  2. Enzymatic formation of an olefin in the metabolism of 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane: an in vitro study. [Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Koizumi, A.; Kumai, M.; Ikeda, M.

    1982-11-01

    Enzyme protein from rat livers was incubated with 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane and the enzymatic conversion to trichloroethylene (TRI) and tetrachloroethylene (TETRA) measured by gas chromatography with flame ionization detector. Results indicate that TRI is formed both enzymatically and non-enzymatically. For TETRA, however, in vitro formation was not detected. It was also shown that activity of the metabolic pathway concerned is low under physiological conditions but high after phenobarbital pretreatment. (JMT)

  3. Distribution of selected volatile organic compounds determined with water-to-vapor diffusion samplers at the interface between ground water and surface water, Centredale Manor site, North Providence, Rhode Island, September 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, Peter E.; Lyford, Forest P.; Clifford, Scott

    2000-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds are present in soils and ground water at the Centredale Manor Superfund Site in North Providence, Rhode Island. In September 1999, water-to-vapor diffusion samplers were placed in the bottom sediments of waterways adjacent to the site to identify possible contaminated ground-water discharge areas. The approximate12-acre site is a narrow stretch of land between the eastern bank of the Woonasquatucket River, downstream from the U.S. Route 44 bridge and a former mill raceway. The samplers were placed along a 2,250-foot reach of the Woonasquatucket River, in the former mill raceway several hundred feet to the east and parallel to the river, and in a cross channel between the river and former mill raceway. Volatile organic compounds were detected in 84 of the 104 water-to-vapor diffusion samplers retrieved. Trichloroethylene and tetrachloro-ethylene were the principal volatile organic compounds detected. The highest vapor concentrations measured for these two chemicals were from diffusion samplers located along an approximate 100-foot reach of the Woonasquatucket River about 500 feet downstream of the bridge; here trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene vapor concentrations ranged from about 2,000 to 180,000 and 1,600 to 1,400,000 parts per billion by volume, respectively. Upstream and downstream from this reach and along the former mill raceway, trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene vapor concentrations from the diffusion samples were generally less than 100 parts per billion by volume. Along the lower reaches of the river and mill raceway, however, and in the cross channel, vapor concentrations of trichloroethylene exceeded 100 parts per billion by volume and tetrachloroethylene exceeded 1,000 parts per billion by volume in several diffusion samples. Although diffusion sample vapor concentrations are higher than water concentrations in surface waters and in ground water, and they should only be interpreted qualitatively as relative values, these values provide important information as to potential discharge areas of contaminants.

  4. 40 CFR 132.6 - Application of part 132 requirements in Great Lakes States and Tribes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... life use. (g) Effective February 5, 2001, the chronic aquatic life criterion for selenium in Table 2 of... d 0.056 n/a Endrin d 0.036 n/a Mercury (II) a,b 0.9081 0.85 Parathion d 0.013 n/a Selenium a,b 5 0... Iron Pyrene Selenium Silver 1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane Tetrachloroethylene Thallium...

  5. 40 CFR 132.6 - Application of part 132 requirements in Great Lakes States and Tribes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... life use. (g) Effective February 5, 2001, the chronic aquatic life criterion for selenium in Table 2 of... d 0.056 n/a Endrin d 0.036 n/a Mercury (II) a,b 0.9081 0.85 Parathion d 0.013 n/a Selenium a,b 5 0... Iron Pyrene Selenium Silver 1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane Tetrachloroethylene Thallium...

  6. 40 CFR 132.6 - Application of part 132 requirements in Great Lakes States and Tribes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... life use. (g) Effective February 5, 2001, the chronic aquatic life criterion for selenium in Table 2 of... d 0.056 n/a Endrin d 0.036 n/a Mercury (II) a,b 0.9081 0.85 Parathion d 0.013 n/a Selenium a,b 5 0... Iron Pyrene Selenium Silver 1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane Tetrachloroethylene Thallium...

  7. Influence of ripening and creaming on the aggregation rate of dodecane-in-water nanoemulsions. Is the creaming rate an appropriate measure of emulsion stability?

    E-print Network

    Yorlis Mendoza; Kareem Rahn-Chique; Antonio M. Puertas; Manuel S. Romero-Cano; German Urbina-Villalba

    2013-05-31

    The behavior of four oil-in-water (O/W) ioinic nanoemulsions composed of dodecane, and mixtures of dodecane with squalene and tetra-chloro-ethylene is studied. These nanoemulsions were stabilized with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The behavior of the turbidity and the average radius of the emulsions were followed as a function of time. The results illustrate the shortcomings of characterizing the stability of emulsions by their creaming rate.

  8. Children’s Exposure to Volatile Organic Compounds as Determined by Longitudinal Measurements in Blood

    PubMed Central

    Sexton, Ken; Adgate, John L.; Church, Timothy R.; Ashley, David L.; Needham, Larry L.; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy; Fredrickson, Ann L.; Ryan, Andrew D.

    2005-01-01

    Blood concentrations of 11 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured up to four times over 2 years in a probability sample of more than 150 children from two poor, minority neighborhoods in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Blood levels of benzene, carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethene, and m-/p-xylene were comparable with those measured in selected adults from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III), whereas concentrations of ethylbenzene, tetrachloroethylene, toluene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and o-xylene were two or more times lower in the children. Blood levels of styrene were more than twice as high, and for about 10% of the children 1,4-dichlorobenzene levels were ?10 times higher compared with NHANES III subjects. We observed strong statistical associations between numerous pairwise combinations of individual VOCs in blood (e.g., benzene and m-/p-xylene, m-/p-xylene and o-xylene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane and m-/p-xylene, and 1,1,1-trichloroethane and trichloroethene). Between-child variability was higher than within-child variability for 1,4-dichlorobenzene and tetrachloroethylene. Between- and within-child variability were approximately the same for ethylbenzene and 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and between-child was lower than within-child variability for the other seven compounds. Two-day, integrated personal air measurements explained almost 79% of the variance in blood levels for 1,4-dichlorobenzene and approximately 20% for tetrachloroethylene, toluene, m-/p-xylene, and o-xylene. Personal air measurements explained much less of the variance (between 0.5 and 8%) for trichloroethene, styrene, benzene, and ethylbenzene. We observed no significant statistical associations between total urinary cotinine (a biomarker for exposure to environmental tobacco smoke) and blood VOC concentrations. For siblings living in the same household, we found strong statistical associations between measured blood VOC concentrations. PMID:15743726

  9. Contamination of shallow ground water in the area of building 95, Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey, 1985-90

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sargent, B.P.; Storck, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    A zone of contaminated ground water at Picatinny Arsenal has resulted from the operation of a metal- plating facility in building 95 during 1960-81, and the wastewater-treatment system that is in and adjacent to the building. Thirty-two monitoring wells were installed in 1989 to supplement 12 previously installed wells. All wells were sampled in 1989 and 1990 for analysis of ground water for inorganic constituents, trace elements, volatile organic compounds, and nutrients. Four wells also were sampled for analysis for base/neutral- and acid-extractable compounds and pesticides, and soil gas from the unsaturated zone at eight sites was analyzed for volatile organic compounds. Concentrations of dissolved solids and sulfate in the study area were consistently above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's secondary drinking-water regulations. The areal distribution of sulfate differed from that of the volatile organic compounds. Concentrations of trace elements were not elevated downgradient from the source. The estimated average velocity of contaminant movement is 0.1 to 1.1 feet per day. The major organic contaminants identified in the study area are trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, and 1,1,1-trichloroethane. Trichloroethylene was detected in wells upgradient from the wastewater- treatment site. Tetrachloroethylene and 1,1,1-trichloroethane might originate at tanks in the basement of building 95 rather than at the adjacent wastewater-treatment system. The pre- dominant gas-phase contaminant, 1,1,1- trichloroethane, was detected at a maximum con- centration of 15.7 micrograms per liter. Both trichoroethylene and tetrachloroethylene were detected in concentrations greater than 0.10 micrograms per liter in five of the eight soil- gas samples, indicating that volatilization and diffusion through the unsaturated zone could be a significant mechanism of contaminant loss from the aquifer.

  10. Desorption Behavior of Trichloroethene and Tetrachloroethene in U.S. Department of Energy Savannah River Site Unconfined Aquifer Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Robert G.; Szecsody, Jim E.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2006-06-21

    The DOE Savannah River Site (SRS) is evaluating the potential applicability of the monitored natural attenuation (MNA) process as a contributor to the understanding of the restoration of its unconfined groundwater aquifer known to be contaminated with the chlorinated hydrocarbon compounds trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE). This report discusses the results from aqueous desorption experiments on SRS aquifer sediments from two different locations at the SRS (A/M Area; P-Area) with the objective of providing technically defensible TCE/PCE distribution coefficient (Kd) data and data on TCE/PCE reversible and irreversible sorption behavior needed for further MNA evaluation.

  11. Test plan for in situ bioremediation demonstration of the Savannah River Integrated Demonstration Project DOE/OTD TTP No.: SR 0566-01. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, T.C.

    1991-09-18

    This project is designed to demonstrate in situ bioremediation of groundwater and sediment contaminated with chlorinated solvents. Indigenous microorganisms will be simulated to degrade trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and their daughter products in situ by addition of nutrients to the contaminated zone. in situ biodegradation is a highly attractive technology for remediation because contaminants are destroyed, not simply moved to another location or immobilized, thus decreasing costs, risks, and time, while increasing efficiency and public and regulatory acceptability. Bioremediation has been found to be among the least costly technologies in applications where it will work.

  12. Supplemental Technical Data Summary M-Area Groundwater Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Marine, I.W., Bledsoe, H.W.

    1995-10-01

    This supplement to the Preliminary Technical Data Summary (TDS) (Gordon, 1982) presents the state of knowledge on the hydrogeology and contaminant plume characteristics in the vicinity of M Area as of October 1984. As discussed in the previous TDS, the contaminants consist of organic solvents used for metal degreasing, namely trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, and 1,1,1-trichloroethane. Since the issuance of the previous TDS, the groundwater consulting firm of Geraghty & Miller, Inc. has been retained to assist with program strategy, planning, and investigative techniques

  13. Radiation induced dechlorination of some chlorinated hydrocarbons in aqueous suspensions of various solid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mú?ka, V.; Bu?ata, M.; ?uba, V.; Silber, R.; Juha, L.

    2015-07-01

    Radiation induced dechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in aqueous solutions containing the active carbon (AC) or cupric oxide (CuO) as the modifiers was studied. The obtained results were compared to the previously studied dechlorination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Both modifiers were found to decrease the efficiency of dechlorination. The AC modifier acts mainly via adsorption of the aliphatic (unlike the aromatic) hydrocarbons and the CuO oxide mainly inhibits the mineralization of the perchloroethylene. The results presented in this paper will be also helpful for the studies of the impact of chlorinated hydrocarbons on the membrane permeability of living cells.

  14. Intermedia transfer factors for fifteen toxic pollutants released to air basins in California

    SciTech Connect

    McKone, T.E.; Daniels, J.I.; Chiao, F.F.; Hsieh, D.P.H.

    1993-10-01

    This report provides a summary definition of the intermedia-transfer factors (ITFs). Methods are discussed for estimating these parameters in the absence of measured values, and the estimation errors inherent in these estimation methods are considered. A detailed summary is provided of measured and estimated ITF values for fifteen air contaminants. They include: 1,3 butadiene; cadmium; cellosolve; cellosolve acetate; chloroform; di-2-ethylhexylphthalate; 1,4-dioxame; hexachlorobenzene; inorganic arsenic; inorganic lead; nickel; tetrachloroethylene; toluene; toluene-2,4-diisocyanate; and 1,3-xylene. Recommendations are made regarding the expected value and variance in these values for use in exposure models.

  15. Inhalation risk assessment of exposure to the selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from the facilities of a steel plant.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Hung L; Lin, Wen H; Lai, Jim S; Wang, Wei C

    2010-09-01

    Concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were investigated in the workplace air of four processes: sintering, cokemaking, hot forming, and cold forming in an integrated iron and steel plant. In addition, the cancer risk was measured for workers in these 4 processes. Seven VOCs (chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, benzene, and ethylbenzene) were selected for cancer risk measurement. Trichloroethylene concentrations are high in the 4 processes, and carbon tetrachloride and tetrachloroethylene concentrations are high in both the cold and hot forming processes. The sequence of the total cancer risk of the 7 species was as follows: cokemaking > sintering > cold forming congruent with hot forming. About 66-93% of the cancer risk of the four processes was caused by trichloroethylene. The cancer risks (3.7 x 10(-3)-30 x 10(-3)) of the average VOC concentrations suggest that improvement of workplace air quality and protection of workers are necessary to reduce cancer risks. PMID:20665324

  16. Health risk assessment of exposure to selected volatile organic compounds emitted from an integrated iron and steel plant.

    PubMed

    Chang, E-E; Wei-Chi, Wang; Li-Xuan, Zeng; Hung-Lung, Chiang

    2010-12-01

    Workplace air samples from sintering, cokemaking, and hot and cold forming processes in the integrated iron and steel industry were analyzed to determine their volatile organic compound (VOC) concentration. Sixteen VOC species including three paraffins (cyclohexane, n-hexane, methylcyclohexane), five chlorinated VOC species (trichloroethylene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, tetrachloroethylene, chlorobenzene, 1,4-dichlorobenzene), and eight aromatics (benzene, ethylbenzene, styrene, toluene, m,p-xylene, o-xylene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene) were selected to measure their noncancer risk for workers. Concentrations of toluene, xylene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, dichlorobenzene, and trichloroethylene were high in all four processes. Carbon tetrachloride and tetrachloroethylene concentrations were high in the hot and cold forming processes. The noncancer risk followed the increasing order: cokemaking > sintering > hot forming > cold forming. 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene contributed 44% to 65% and 13% to 20% of noncancer risk, respectively, for the four processes. Benzene accounted for a high portion of the noncancer risk in cokemaking. The hazard index (HI: 17-108) of the average VOC concentrations suggests that health risks can be reduced by improving workplace air quality and protecting workers. PMID:20828338

  17. Henry's law constants and micellar partitioning of volatile organic compounds in surfactant solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Vane, L.M.; Giroux, E.L.

    2000-02-01

    Partitioning of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into surfactant micelles affects the apparent vapor-liquid equilibrium of VOCs in surfactant solutions. This partitioning will complicate removal of VOCs from surfactant solutions by standard separation processes. Headspace experiments were performed to quantify the effect of four anionic surfactants and one nonionic surfactant on the Henry's law constants of 1,1,1-trichloroethane, tirchloroethylene, toluene, and tetrachloroethylene at temperatures ranging from 30 to 60 C. Although the Henry's law constant increased markedly with temperature for all solutions, the amount of VOC in micelles relative to that in the extramicellar region was comparatively insensitive to temperature. The effect of adding sodium chloride and isopropyl alcohol as consolutes also was evaluated. Significant partitioning of VOCs into miscelles was observed, with the micellar partitioning coefficient (tendency to partition from water into mecelle) increasing according to the following series: trichloroethane < trichloroethylene < toluene < tetrachloroethylene. The addition of surfactant was capable of reversing the normal sequence observed in Henry's law constants for these four VOCs.

  18. Excess molar volumes of linear and cyclic ethers + chloroethenes at 298.15 K

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, A.; Singh, W.

    1996-05-01

    Excess molar volumes V{sub m}{sup E} of binary liquid mixtures of trichloroethylene, C{sub 2}Cl{sub 3}H, and tetrachloroethylene, C{sub 2}Cl{sub 4}, with ethylene glycol monomethyl ether, CH{sub 3}OC{sub 2}H{sub 4}OH, diethylene glycol dimethyl ether, CH{sub 3}(OC{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}OCH{sub 3}, and 1,4-dioxane, [(OC{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}], have been measured as a function of composition at 298.15 K. The measurements were carried out with a continuous-dilution dilatometer. The excess molar volumes V{sub m}{sup E} are positive over the entire range of composition for the systems trichloroethylene + ethylene glycol monomethyl ether and tetrachloroethylene + ethylene glycol monomethyl ether, + diethylene glycol dimethyl ether, and +1,4-dioxane and change sign from positive to negative for the remaining systems, trichloroethylene + diethylene glycol dimethyl ether and +1,4-dioxane. The measured excess volumes have been compared to previous published data with an effort to assess the effects of replacing the hydroxyl hydrogen by methyl groups, of inserting oxyethylene groups, and of switching linear to cyclic ethers. These results are fitted to the Redlich-Kister equation to estimate the binary coefficients.

  19. Appraisal of ground-water quality in the Bunker Hill Basin of San Bernardino Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duell, L.F., Jr.; Schroeder, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Water samples were collected from 47 wells and analyzed for concentration of major inorganic ions, nitrogen species, and volatile (purgeable) organic priority pollutants to assess groundwater quality in the Bunker Hill basin, California. Data were supplemented with additional analysis of nitrate, tetrachloroethylene, and trichloroethylene made by other agencies. The organic quality of groundwater in the basin generally is suitable for most uses, although fluoride concentration exceeded the California public drinking water standard of 1.4 mg/L in water from 5 of 47 wells. Nitrate (as nitrogen) concentration equaled or exceeded the public drinking water standard of 10 mg/L in water from 13 of 47 wells sampled for this study and in an additional 19 of 120 samples analyzed by other agencies. Concentration generally decreased with increasing depth below land surface. Twenty-four of the 33 volatile organic priority pollutants were detected in water from wells sampled during this study. When supplemental data from other agencies are included, tetrachloroethylene concentration exceeded the standard of 5 micrograms/L in water from 49 of 128 wells. No basinwide relation between contamination by these two chemicals and well depth or land use was discerned. A network of 11 observation wells that could be sampled twice a year would enhance the monitoring of changes groundwater quality in the Bunker Hill basin. (USGS)

  20. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) groundwater monitoring report. Fourth quarter 1992 and 1992 summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1992, nine constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in one or more groundwater samples from monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) and adjacent facilities. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread constituents. Fifty-seven (48%) of the 120 monitoring wells, contained elevated tritium activities, and 23 (19%) contained elevated trichloroethylene concentrations. Total alpha-emitting radium, tetrachloroethylene, chloroethene, cadmium, 1,1-dichloroethylene, lead, or nonvolatile beta levels exceeded standards in one or more wells. During 1992, elevated levels of 13 constituents were found in one or more of 80 of the 120 groundwater monitoring wells (67%) at the MWMF and adjacent facilities. Tritium and trichloroethylene exceeded their final PDWS more frequently and more consistently than did other constituents. Tritium activity exceeded its final PDWS m 67 wells and trichloroethylene was. elevated in 28 wells. Lead, tetrachloroethylene, total alpha-emitting radium, gross alpha, cadmium, chloroethene, 1,1-dichloroethylene 1,2-dichloroethane, mercury, or nitrate exceeded standards in one or more wells during the year. Nonvolatile beta exceeded its drinking water screening level in 3 wells during the year.

  1. Neurobehavioural effects of developmental toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Grandjean, Philippe; Landrigan, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    Neurodevelopmental disabilities, including autism, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, dyslexia, and other cognitive impairments, affect millions of children worldwide, and some diagnoses seem to be increasing in frequency. Industrial chemicals that injure the developing brain are among the known causes for this rise in prevalence. In 2006, we did a systematic review and identified five industrial chemicals as developmental neurotoxicants: lead, methylmercury, polychlorinated biphenyls, arsenic, and toluene. Since 2006, epidemiological studies have documented six additional developmental neurotoxicants—manganese, fluoride, chlorpyrifos, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, tetrachloroethylene, and the polybrominated diphenyl ethers. We postulate that even more neurotoxicants remain undiscovered. To control the pandemic of developmental neurotoxicity, we propose a global prevention strategy. Untested chemicals should not be presumed to be safe to brain development, and chemicals in existing use and all new chemicals must therefore be tested for developmental neurotoxicity. To coordinate these efforts and to accelerate translation of science into prevention, we propose the urgent formation of a new international clearinghouse. PMID:24556010

  2. Analysis of organic compounds (VOC) in the forest air of the Southern Black Forest

    SciTech Connect

    Juettner, F.

    1986-01-01

    The volatile organic compounds of forest air (Kaelbelescheuer, Southern Black Forest) and, for comparison, suburban air (Tuebingen) were qualitatively analyzed by gas chromatographic and mass spectrometric methods. 94 Individual compounds were identified, 6 of them belonged to biogenic monoterpenes (..cap alpha..-pinene, ..delta..3-carene, myrcene, limonene, eucalyptol, camphene). While the monoterpenes were enriched in forest air, a similar collection of the pollution products was observed in both locations. Predominant substances were aromatic compounds (toluene, ethylbenzene, benzene, xylenes, ethyltoluenes, pseudocumene and naphthalene) which can be regarded as constituents of vehicle exhaust fumes and incineration processes. Other important substances in forest air were various solvents, of which butyl acetate, isobutyl acetate, tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene, butanol-1, and several ketones were prominent species.

  3. Geohydrology and the occurrence of volatile organic compounds in ground water, Culpeper basin of Prince William County, Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Nelms, D.L.; Richardson, D.L. )

    1990-01-01

    The Culpeper basin of Prince William County comprises an interbedded sequence of Upper Triassic and Lower Jurassic sedimentary and volcanic rocks. This sequence is intersected by diabase intrusives and thermally metamorphosed rocks. The rocks of the Culpeper basin are highly fractured and overlain by a thin cover of overburden. Groundwater in the Culpeper basin flows generally from the uplands along lineaments to the lowlands or valleys. Pumping from municipal-supply wells has caused two cones of depression in the Manassas-Manassas Park area. Volatile organic compounds have been detected in groundwater in 5 areas of the Culpeper basin in the county. The dominant volatile organic compounds detected are tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, and 1,1,1-trichloroethane. Concentrations of the volatile organic compounds range from 0.1 to 5,300 microg/L. 62 refs., 20 figs., 15 tabs.

  4. Enhanced formation of dioxins and furans from combustion devices by addition of trace quantities of bromine

    SciTech Connect

    Lemieux, P.M.; Ryan, J.V.

    1998-12-31

    Past pilot-scale experimental studies have shown a dramatic increase in the formation of certain chlorinated products of incomplete combustion (PICs) caused by the addition of trace amounts of bromine (Br). Emissions of trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene, generated as PICs from the fuel-lean combustion of methylene chloride, were enhanced by up to 3 orders of magnitude by introducing Br in the form of methylene bromide at a constant halogen molar input rate with a 1:10 Br/chlorine (Cl) molar ratio. The two chlorinated PICs in question are both potential ring growth precursors, which could lead to enhanced formation of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDDs/PCDFs). The experiments described in this paper expand on this earlier work by examining the effect of trace amounts of Br on the formation of PCDDs/PCDFs, in addition to other chlorinated, brominated, and mixed bromo-chloro organic PICs.

  5. Competitive Sorption and Desorption of Chlorinated Organic Solvents (DNAPLs) in Engineered Natural Organic Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Jixin; Weber, Walter J., Jr.

    2004-03-31

    The effects of artificially accelerated geochemical condensation and maturation of natural organic matter on the sorption and desorption of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) were studied. The sorption and desorption of TCE in the presence and absence of the competing PCE and 1,2-dichlorobenzene (DCB) were also examined. A sphagnum peat comprising geologically young organic matter was artificially ''aged'' using superheated water, thus increasing the aromaticity and the degree of condensation of its associated organic matter. The sorption of all solutes tested were increased remarkably and their respective desorptions reduced, by the aged peat. The sorption capacities and isotherm nonlinearities of the peat for both TCE and PCE were found to increase as treatment temperature increased. In the competitive sorption studies, both PCE and DCB were found to depress TCE sorption, with PCE having greater effects than DCB, presumably because the molecular structure o f the former is more similar to that of TCE.

  6. Survey of subsurface treatment technologies for environmental restoration sites at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect

    McGrath, Lucas K.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Wright, Jerome L.

    2003-08-01

    This report provides a survey of remediation and treatment technologies for contaminants of concern at environmental restoration (ER) sites at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico. The sites that were evaluated include the Tijeras Arroyo Groundwater, Technical Area V, and Canyons sites. The primary contaminants of concern at these sites include trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), and nitrate in groundwater. Due to the low contaminant concentrations (close to regulatory limits) and significant depths to groundwater ({approx}500 feet) at these sites, few in-situ remediation technologies are applicable. The most applicable treatment technologies include monitored natural attenuation and enhanced bioremediation/denitrification to reduce the concentrations of TCE, PCE, and nitrate in the groundwater. Stripping technologies to remove chlorinated solvents and other volatile organic compounds from the vadose zone can also be implemented, if needed.

  7. Health assessment for National Presto Industries, Eau Claire, Wisconsin, Region 5. CERCLIS No. WID006196174. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-11-09

    The National Presto Industries, Inc. facility at Eau Claire, Wisconsin included facilities for powder storage and mixing, chemical storage and mixing, and primer manufacture and storage. Major contaminants on-site include VOCs, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and heavy metals. The highest concentrations of heavy metals are in lagoon water, spent forging compound, and waste drums from the East Disposal Area. Four chemicals, all of which are carcinogenic in laboratory animals, were measured in concentrations exceeding Wisconsin ground water enforcement standards: 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,1-dichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, and trichloroethylene. The presence of VOCs in residential wells in the area adjacent to the site is a public health concern. Previous studies indicate that VOCs in residential well water of forty residences near the site exceed Wisconsin ground water enforcement standards.

  8. Metabolism of halogenated ethylenes.

    PubMed Central

    Leibman, K C; Ortiz, E

    1977-01-01

    The metabolism of the chlorinated ethylenes may be explained by the formation of chloroethylene epoxides as the first intermediate products. The evidence indicates that these epoxides rearrange with migration of chlorine to form chloroacetaldehydes and chloroacetyl chlorides. Thus, monochloroacetic acid, chloral hydrate, and trichloroacetic acid have been found in reaction mixtures of 1,1-dichloroethylene, trichloroethylene, and tetrachloroethylene, respectively, with rat liver microsomal systems. Rearrangements of the chloroethylene, and glycols formed from the epoxides by hydration may also take place, but would appear, at least in the case of 1,1-dichloroethylene, to be quantitatively less important. The literature on the metabolism of chlorinated ethylenes and its relationship to their toxicity is reviewed. PMID:612463

  9. Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater

    DOEpatents

    Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B.

    1994-01-01

    Disclosed is an apparatus and method for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid (NF) is selected to simulated the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms capable of degrading the contaminants; an oxygenated fluid (OF) is selected to create an aerobic environment with anaerobic pockets. NF is injected periodically while OF is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. NF stimulates microbial colony growth; withholding it periodically forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is acceptable. NF can be methane and OF be air, for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially TCE and tetrachloroethylene.

  10. Surfactant enhanced remediation of subsurface petroleum contamination: Results of a field test

    SciTech Connect

    Sabatini, D.A.; Knox, R.C.; Shiau, B.J.

    1996-10-01

    Pump-and-treat remediation of petroleum contaminated ground water is frequently limited by the presence of residual saturation; surfactant enhanced subsurface remediation is one approach for overcoming this limitation. A field test of surfactant enhanced solubilization was conducted at a U.S. Coast Guard in Traverse City, Michigan. The contaminants of interest were jet fuel and tetrachloroethylene (PCE); micellar solubilization was evaluated at this site using 60 mM Dowfax 8390. Excellent surfactant recovery was realized in the field test using a vertical circulation well system - the regulatory permit was based on 95% surfactant recovery with the actual results exceeding this level. During the test the contaminant mass removal increased by a factor of seven relative to water alone. This is an abstract of a proposed presentation and does not necessarily reflect EPA policy.

  11. Sanitary Landfill groundwater monitoring report. Fourth quarterly report and summary 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    Fifty-seven wells of the LFW series monitor groundwater quality in Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These wells are sampled quarterly to comply with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Domestic Waste Permit DWP-087A and as part of the SRS Groundwater Monitoring Program. Dichloromethane a common laboratory contaminant, and trichloroethylene were the most widespread constituents exceeding standards during 1993. Benzene, chlorobenzene, chloroethene 1,2 dichloroethane, 1,1-dichloroethylene, 1,2-dichloropropane, gross alpha, lindane, mercury, tetrachloroethylene, and tritium also exceeded standards in one or more wells. No groundwater contaminants were observed in wells screened in the lower section of Steed Pond Aquifer.

  12. Public health assessment for Grand Traverse Overall Supply Company, Greilickville, Leelanau County, Michigan, Region 5. Cerclis No. MID017418559. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-21

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) placed the Grand Traverse Overall Supply site on the National Priorities List (NPL) on September 8, 1983. From 1953 through 1977, GTOS disposed of waste water from the process in a dry well and four lagoons on their property. Since 1977, they have used the township sewer system. In 1978, tetrachloroethylene (also known as perchloroethylene or PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) were found in the water in wells serving a school adjacent to GTOS and several nearby residences. The soil around the dry well was excavated and taken off-site for disposal. The lagoons were filled in, and covered with gravel or grass. The site currently poses no apparent public health hazard. Trace amounts of PCE in well water have been detected in the most recent testing, however, the amounts are below the level of public health concern.

  13. Public health assessment for American Anodco Incorporated, Ionia, Ionia County, Michigan. Region 5. Cerclis No. MID006029102. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-07

    The American Anodco, Inc. site, a former anodizing facility, is located in the industrial zone area in the eastern part of the City of Ionia, Michigan. The waste water in seepage lagoons at this site was allowed to seep into the ground and the lagoons were filled with clean soils in 1987. There is some evidence that groundwater at the site is contaminated with arsenic, boron, nitrate and nitrite, 1,1,1-trichloroethane and traces of tetrachloroethylene. There may be some potential health risk to the public if groundwater at this site is used for drinking and other household purposes in the future. Monitoring well OW-6 should be sampled again to confirm the concentration of 1,1,1-trichloroethane, if any, present in water from the well.

  14. Health assessment for Greenacres (Liberty Lake) Landfill, Spokane, Spokane County, Washington, Region 10. CERCLIS No. WAD980514608. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-08-09

    The Greenacres Landfill site is on the National Priorities List. The site is a 90-acre, rural-burning landfill that was closed in 1968. On-site contamination, determined by on-site ground water monitoring wells, consists of trans-1,2-dichloroethylene (41 ppb), chloroform (0.2 ppb), trichloroethylene (2 ppb), benzene (0.6 ppb), tetrachloroethylene (9 ppb), toluene (0.7 ppb), 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (3 ppb), 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (0.6 ppb), chromium (37 ppb), manganese (210 ppb), zinc (2,380 ppb), lead (67 ppb), barium 175 ppb, magnesium (18 ppb), and mercury (4 ppb). The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via the movement of contaminated ground water into an aquifer used as a public water source.

  15. Comparison of temporal trends in VOCs as measured with PDB samplers and low-flow sampling methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harte, P.T.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of temporal trends in tetrachloroethylene (PCE) concentration determined by two sample techniques showed that passive diffusion bag (pdb) samplers adequately sample the large variation in PCE concentrations at the site. The slopes of the temporal trends in concentrations were comparable between the two techniques, and the pdb sample concentration generally reflected the instantaneous concentration sampled by the low-flow technique. Thus, the pdb samplers provided an appropriate sampling technique for PCE at these wells. One or two wells did not make the case for widespread application of pdb samples at all sites. However, application of pdb samples in some circumstances was appropriate for evaluating temporal and spatial variations in VOC concentrations, thus, should be considered as a useful tool in hydrogeology.

  16. Volatile organic compounds in 600 US homes: major sources of personal exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, L.; Clayton, C.A.

    1987-05-01

    The USEPA carried out the Total Exposure Assessment Methodology (TEAM) Study (1980-85) on 600 subjects in five cities representing a total population of more than 700,000 persons. Personal exposures to all prevalent target compounds exceeded outdoor concentrations. Major sources were smoking (benzene, styrene, xylenes, and octane); using hot water (chloroform); wearing dry-cleaned clothes (tetrachloroethylene); and using moth crystals or room air deodorants (para-dichlorobenzene). Eleven of 14 occupations also showed elevated exposures to one or more chemicals (particularly aromatics). Auto related activities (lengthy commuting, filling gas tanks) were associated with increased exposures to several aromatics. Breath concentrations were significantly associated with personal air exposures but not with outdoor concentrations. Residence in major chemical-manufacturing and petroleum-refining areas did not significantly affect personal exposures.

  17. [The protection of drinking water in a public health department].

    PubMed

    Monari, R; Petrolo, A; Mascelli, M; Vannucchi, G

    2008-01-01

    The protection of drinking water is a key issue in a Public Health Department's activity. A substantial amount of planning and monitoring work is involved in the development and implementation of a water safety plan, aimed not only at the enforcement of public health regulations, but also at the improvement of the quality water. We provide an overview of the quality monitoring program of the municipality of Prato, a highly populated and industrialized area, where ground water is contaminated by anthropogenic pollutants such as trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene and nitrate. We show how, in spite of the intrinsically poor quality of the basic water resource, the careful application of an appropriate prevention plan, with the cooperation of the local water authority, allows the delivery of drinking water of increasing safety and quality. PMID:19238879

  18. NIOSH current intelligence bulletins: summaries

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    Summaries were offered of the current intelligence bulletins issued from January 20, 1975 to August of 1988. They include information on the following topics: chloroprene, trichloroethylene, ethylene dibromide, chrome pigment, asbestos, hexamethylphosphoric triamide, polychlorinated biphenyls, 4,4'-diaminodiphenylmethane, chloroform, radon daughters, dimethylcarbamoyl chloride, diethylcarbamoyl-chloride, explosive azide hazard, inorganic arsenic, nitrosamines in cutting fluids, metabolic precursors of beta-naphthylamine, 2-nitropropane, acrylonitrile, 2,4-diaminoanisole, tetrachloroethylene, trimellitic anhydride, ethylene thiourea, disulfiram, direct-blue-6, direct-black-38, direct-brown-95, benzidine derived dyes, ethylene dichloride, NIAX catalyst ESN, chloroethanes, vinyl halides, glycidyl ethers, epichlorohydrin, smoking, arsine poisoning, radiofrequency sealers and heaters, formaldehyde, ethylene oxide, silica flour, vibration syndrome, glycol ethers, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, 1,3-butadiene, cadmium, monohalomethanes, dinitrotoluenes, methylene chloride, 4,4'-methylenedianiline, organic solvent neurotoxicity, mechanical power press injuries, and the carcinogenic effects of diesel exhaust.

  19. Current Intelligence Bulletins: summaries, September 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-01

    Brief summaries of 49 NIOSH Current Intelligence Bulletins were provided in a cumulative listing. Permissible Exposure Limits were included where applicable, and notes were provided with some summaries indicating further action or data since original publication. Topics covered include chloroprene, trichloroethylene, ethylene-dibromide, chrome pigment, asbestos, hexamethylphosphoric-triamide, polychlorinated-biphenyls, 4,4'-diaminodiphenylmethane, chloroform, radon daughters, dimethylcarbamoyl-chloride, diethylcarbamoyl-chloride, explosive azide hazard, arsenic, nitrosamines, metabolic precursors of beta-naphthylamine, 2-nitropropane, acrylonitrile, 2,4-diaminoanisole, tetrachloroethylene, trimellitic-anhydride, ethylene-thiourea, ethylene-dibromide, disulfiram, dyes, ethylene-dichloride, chloroethanes, vinyl halides, glycidyl ethers, epichlorohydrin, smoking, arsine, radiofrequency sealers, formaldehyde, ethylene-oxide, silica flour, vibration syndrome, glycol ethers, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, 1,3-butadiene, cadmium, monohalomethanes, dinitrotoluenes, methylene-chloride, 4,4'-methylenedianiline, organic solvents, and injuries and amputations from working with power presses.

  20. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) groundwater monitoring report. Fourth quarter 1993 and 1993 summary

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, C.T.

    1994-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1993, 10 constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility, the Old Burial Ground, the E-Area Vaults, and the proposed Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Vaults. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread elevated constituents. Carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, chloroethane (vinyl chloride), 1,1-dichloroethylene, dichloromethane (methylene chloride), lead, mercury, or tetrachloroethylene also exceeded standards in one or more wells. Elevated constituents were found in numerous Aquifer Zone 2B{sub 2} (Water Table) and Aquifer Zone 2B{sub 1}, (Barnwell/McBean) wells and in two Aquifer Unit 2A (Congaree) wells. The groundwater flow direction and rates in the three hydrostratigraphic units were similar to those of previous quarters.

  1. Sanitary Landfill Groundwater Monitoring Report. Fourth Quarter 1997 and 1997 Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.

    1998-02-01

    A maximum of forty-eight wells of the LFW series monitor groundwater quality in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These wells are sampled quarterly to comply with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Domestic Water Permit DWP-087A and as part of the SRS Groundwater Monitoring Program. Chloroethene (vinyl chloride) and trichloroethylene were the most widespread constituents exceeding standards during 1997. Lead (total recoverable), 1,4-dichlorobenzene, mercury, benzene, dichloromethane (methylene chloride), a common laboratory contaminant, tetrachloroethylene, 1,2-dichloroethane, gross alpha, tritium, and 1.2-dichloropropane also exceeded standards in one or more wells. The groundwater flow direction in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill was to the southeast (universal transverse Mercator coordinates). The flow rate in this unit was approximately 139 ft/year during first quarter 1997 and 132 ft/year during fourth quarter.

  2. Health assessment for Pinnette's Salvage Yard Site, Washburn, Aroostook County, Maine, Region 1. CERCLIS No. MED980732291. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-20

    The Pinette's Salvage Yard Site (PSY) is on the National Priorities List. In 1979, three transformers were dismantled leaking polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's) and chlorobenzene on-site. Preliminary on-site sampling results have demonstrated 1,3 dichlorobenzene and 1,4 dichlorobenzene in groundwater, and PCB's, 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene, 1,2 dichlorobenzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, chlorobenzene, xylene, and tetrachloroethylene in soil. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of human exposure to hazardous substances. Unauthorized persons having access to the site and/or those having direct contact with on-site soil and sediment are at risk of exposure.

  3. Analysis and evaluation of VOC removal technologies demonstrated at Savannah River

    SciTech Connect

    Chesnut, D.A.; Wagoner, J.; Nitao, J.J.; Boyd, S.; Shaffer, R.J.; Kansa, E.J.; Buscheck, T.A.; Pruess, K.; Falta, R.W.

    1993-09-01

    Volatile Organic Compounds, or VOCs, are ubiquitous subsurface contaminants at industrial as well as DOE sites. At the Savannah River Plant, the principles VOCs contaminating the subsurface below A-Area and M-Area are Trichloroethylene (C{sub 2}HCl{sub 3}, or TCE) and Tetrachloroethylene (C{sub 2}Cl{sub 4}, or PCE). These compounds were used extensively as degreasing solvents from 1952 until 1979, and the waste solvent which did not evaporate (on the order of 2{times}10{sup 6} pounds) was discharged to a process sewer line leading to the M-Area Seepage Basin (Figure I.2). These compounds infiltrated into the soil and underlying sediments from leaks in the sewer line and elsewhere thereby contaminating the vadose zone between the surface and the water table as well as the aquifer.

  4. Synthesis and photocatalytic activity of silane-coated and UV-modified nanoscale zinc oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohe, B.; Veeman, W. S.; Tausch, M.

    2006-01-01

    A new nanoporous material consisting of nano-ZnO particles bridged by -O-Si-O-Si-O- units has been synthesized and characterized. The two-step synthesis involves a precipitation of zinc oxide from a 1 mol l-1 methanolic zinc acetate solution with methanolic KOH in the presence of alkoxyalkylsilanes as coating agents and a UV irradiation of the obtained material in aqueous suspension with air supply. This procedure leads to a nanoscale ZnO network with a high surface area (130 m2 g-1), a better chemical stability than other types of ZnO and a remarkable photocatalytic activity. The photocatalytic mineralization of tetrachloroethylene occurs in the presence of this material at pH = 8 even faster than with the well known and most appreciated nano-TiO2 (anatase).

  5. Neurobehavioural effects of developmental toxicity.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, Philippe; Landrigan, Philip J

    2014-03-01

    Neurodevelopmental disabilities, including autism, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, dyslexia, and other cognitive impairments, affect millions of children worldwide, and some diagnoses seem to be increasing in frequency. Industrial chemicals that injure the developing brain are among the known causes for this rise in prevalence. In 2006, we did a systematic review and identified five industrial chemicals as developmental neurotoxicants: lead, methylmercury, polychlorinated biphenyls, arsenic, and toluene. Since 2006, epidemiological studies have documented six additional developmental neurotoxicants-manganese, fluoride, chlorpyrifos, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, tetrachloroethylene, and the polybrominated diphenyl ethers. We postulate that even more neurotoxicants remain undiscovered. To control the pandemic of developmental neurotoxicity, we propose a global prevention strategy. Untested chemicals should not be presumed to be safe to brain development, and chemicals in existing use and all new chemicals must therefore be tested for developmental neurotoxicity. To coordinate these efforts and to accelerate translation of science into prevention, we propose the urgent formation of a new international clearinghouse. PMID:24556010

  6. Health assessment for American Lake Gardens, Tacoma, Pierce County, Washington, Region 10. CERCLIS No. WAD980833065. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-19

    The American Lake Gardens site is on the National Priorities List. Two areas within the site are the areas of primary contamination; the northeast section's contamination is believed to have come from the closed landfill (now a golf course) on McChord AFB, and the southwest section's contamination from Fort Lewis. Both Fort Lewis and McChord AFB are NPL sites. The environmental contamination on-site consists of trans-1,2-dichloroethylene (530 ppb), trichloroethylene (260 ppb), methylene chloride (38 ppb), tetrachloroethylene (52 ppb), benzene (6 ppb), and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (18 ppb) in ground water. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via ground water (from private wells still in use) and surface water.

  7. TNX-Area groundwater monitoring report. 1993 Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    During 1993, samples from well cluster P 26 and the TBG, TNX, XSB, and YSB well series at the TNX Area were analyzed for selected heavy metals, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Seven parameters exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS). Dichloromethane (methylene chloride), a common laboratory contaminant, nitrate, and trichloroethylene exceeded PDWS most frequently. Four wells in this area currently are part of the Purge Water Contaminant Program due to high trichloroethylene concentrations. Carbon tetrachloride, gross alpha, lead, and tetrachloroethylene were elevated sporadically in one or more wells during the year. Groundwater flow directions and rates in the Unconfined Aquifer were similar from quarter to quarter during the year.

  8. Method for detecting toxic gases

    DOEpatents

    Stetter, Joseph R. (Naperville, IL); Zaromb, Solomon (Hinsdale, IL); Findlay, Jr., Melvin W. (Bolingbrook, IL)

    1991-01-01

    A method capable of detecting low concentrations of a pollutant or other component in air or other gas, utilizing a combination of a heating filament having a catalytic surface of a noble metal for exposure to the gas and producing a derivative chemical product from the component, and an electrochemical sensor responsive to the derivative chemical product for providing a signal indicative of the product. At concentrations in the order of about 1-100 ppm of tetrachloroethylene, neither the heating filament nor the electrochemical sensor is individually capable of sensing the pollutant. In the combination, the heating filament converts the benzyl chloride to one or more derivative chemical products which may be detected by the electrochemical sensor.

  9. Operations Support of Phase 2 Integrated Demonstration In Situ Bioremediation. Volume 1, Final report: Final report text data in tabular form, Disk 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, T.C.

    1993-09-01

    This project was designed to demonstrate in situ bioremediation of ground water and sediment contaminated with chlorinated solvents. Indigenous microorganisms were stimulated to degrade trichlorethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and their daughter products in situ by addition of nutrients to the contaminated aquifer and adjacent vadose zone. The principle carbon/energy source nutrient used in this demonstration was methane (natural gas). In situ biodegradation is a highly attractive technology for remediation because contaminants are destroyed, not simply moved to another location or immobilized, thus decreasing costs, risks, and time, while increasing efficiency, safety, and public and regulatory acceptability. This report describes the preliminary results of the demonstration and provides conclusions only for those measures that the Bioremediation Technical Support Group felt were so overwhelmingly convincing that they do not require further analyses. Though this report is necessarily superficial it does intend to provide a basis for further evaluating the technology and for practitioners to immediately apply some parts of the technology.

  10. Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    During first quarter 1993, samples from 18 groundwater monitoring wells of the AMB series at the Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility were analyzed for certain heavy metals, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Nine parameters exceeded standards during the quarter. As in fourth quarter 1992, tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards in 4 and 7 wells, respectively. Dichloromethane (methylene chloride), not previously compared to a standard in the Savannah River Site Groundwater Monitoring Program, was elevated in one well. Aluminum, iron, manganese, pH, specific conductance, and total organic halogens exceeded the Savannah River Site Flag 2 criteria; all of these parameters, with the exception of aluminum, were reported as elevated in AMB wells during previous quarters. Groundwater flow directions and rates in the water-table unit and the upper section of the Congaree were similar to previous quarters.

  11. Photodegradation of the indoor organic pollutants by UV irradiation using TiO2 catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glajar, Ioana C.; Moldovan, Z.

    2009-08-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are a major environmental concern, because of their carcinogenic and toxic effects on human health. The most frequent types of VOCs found in indoor air are, according to literature, Choloroform, p-dichlorbenzene, tetrachloroethylene, formaldehyde, NOx. Another VOCs found very often mentioned in the literature are ethanol and acetone or BTEX compounds. The investigated compounds used in this work for studding the photodegradation effect are toluene and cholorobenzene. In the present work were calculated the photodegradation rates of the compounds mentioned above using UV radiation and TiO2, as catalyst. The obtained results are discussed based on comparative values of removal quantities for few time intervals for different types of catalysts based on TiO2 aerogel.

  12. Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater

    DOEpatents

    Hazen, Terry C. (Augusta, GA); Fliermans, Carl B. (Augusta, GA)

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus and method for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid is selected to stimulate the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms that are capable of degrading the contaminants; an oxygenated fluid is selected to create a generally aerobic environment for these microorganisms to degrade the contaminants, leaving only pockets that are anaerobic. The nutrient fluid is injected periodically while the oxygenated fluid is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. The nutrient fluid stimulates microbial colony growth; withholding it periodicially forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is reduced to an acceptable, preselected level. The nutrient fluid can be methane and the oxygenated fluid air for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene.

  13. Vapor vacuum extraction treatability study at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Herd, M.D.; Matthern, G.; Michael, D.L.; Spang, N.; Downs, W.; Weidner, J.; Cleary, P.

    1993-05-01

    During the 1960s and early 1970s, barreled mixed waste containing volatile organic compounds (VOCS) and radioactive waste was buried at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). Over time, some of the barrels have deteriorated allowing, VOC vapors to be released into the vadose zone. The primary VOC contaminates of concern are CCl{sub 4} and trichloroethylene; however, chloroform, tetrachloroethylene, and 1,1,1-trichloroethane have also been detected. Vapor Vacuum Extraction (VVE) is one alternative being considered for remediation of the RWMC SDA vadose zone. A proposed pilot-scale treatability study (TS) will provide operation and maintenance costs for the design of the potential scale-up of the system.

  14. Soil gas survey and analysis of the Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology campus using a portable gas chromatograph. Final report, August 1995-May 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, H.B.

    1996-05-01

    This project focuses on a method used to discover hidden contamination--soil gas surveying. The Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology campus in Terre Haute, Indiana is on the site of an old farm. The campus has an old gasoline station on its border, a chemical storage building on the grounds, and areas where fuel, oil, and solvents are used and stored by the physical plant operation. Possible contaminants of these types of operations include Benzene, Toluene, Ethylbenzene, m-, p-, and o-Xylenes, and chlorinated solvents such as Trichloroethylene and Tetrachloroethylene. No significant areas of contamination were found for the contaminants tested. A detailed description of the method and results of testing are presented. Recommendations for improved management of potential contamination areas are also presented.

  15. Organics in soils and groundwater at non-arid sites (A-1) integrated demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, J.L.; Kaback, D.S.; Looney, B.B.

    1994-06-01

    One of the most common environmental problems in the United States is soils and groundwater contaminated with volatile chemical solvents classified as Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), which were used as degreasers and cleaning agents. Leakage of solvents (trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene) from an underground process sewer line has contaminated soils and underlying groundwaters at SRS. This site was chosen for DOE-OTD`s integrated demonstration program to demonstrate innovative technologies for cleanup of soils and groundwater contaminated with VOCs. The Savannah River Site was especially well suited as the test bed for this integrated demonstration project due to the presence of a pre-existing line source of soil and groundwater-based contamination, on-going environmental remediation efforts at the site, and full cooperation from the concerned environmental regulatory agencies. The Integrated Demonstration (ID) at the Savannah River Site has demonstrated systems of technologies and evaluated them with respect to performance, safety and cost effectiveness.

  16. Method for detecting toxic gases

    DOEpatents

    Stetter, J.R.; Zaromb, S.; Findlay, M.W. Jr.

    1991-10-08

    A method is disclosed which is capable of detecting low concentrations of a pollutant or other component in air or other gas. This method utilizes a combination of a heating filament having a catalytic surface of a noble metal for exposure to the gas and producing a derivative chemical product from the component. An electrochemical sensor responds to the derivative chemical product for providing a signal indicative of the product. At concentrations in the order of about 1-100 ppm of tetrachloroethylene, neither the heating filament nor the electrochemical sensor is individually capable of sensing the pollutant. In the combination, the heating filament converts the benzyl chloride to one or more derivative chemical products which may be detected by the electrochemical sensor. 6 figures.

  17. Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater

    DOEpatents

    Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B.

    1995-01-24

    An apparatus and method are described for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid is selected to stimulate the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms that are capable of degrading the contaminants. An oxygenated fluid is selected to create a generally aerobic environment for these microorganisms to degrade the contaminants, leaving only pockets that are anaerobic. The nutrient fluid is injected periodically while the oxygenated fluid is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. The nutrient fluid stimulates microbial colony growth. Withholding it periodically forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is reduced to an acceptable, preselected level. The nutrient fluid can be methane and the oxygenated fluid air for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene. 3 figures.

  18. Alloyed steel wastes utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Sokol, I.V.

    1995-12-31

    Alloyed steel chips and swarf formed during metal processing are looked upon as additional raw materials in metallurgical production. This paper presents some new methods for steel waste chips and swarf cleaning. One of them is swarf and steel chips cleaning in tetrachloroethylene with ultrasonic assistance and solvent regeneration. Thermal cleaning of waste chips and swarf provides off gas products utilization. The catalyst influence of the metal surface on the thermal decomposition of liquid hydrocarbons during the cleaning process has been studied. It has been determined that the efficiency of this metal waste cleaning technique depends on the storage time of the swarf. The waste chips and swarf cleaning procedures have been proven to be economically advantageous and environmentally appropriate.

  19. Simultaneous indoor and outdoor on-line hourly monitoring of atmospheric volatile organic compounds in an urban building. The role of inside and outside sources.

    PubMed

    de Blas, Maite; Navazo, Marino; Alonso, Lucio; Durana, Nieves; Gomez, Maria Carmen; Iza, Jon

    2012-06-01

    Indoor air quality (IAQ) has become a very important issue in recent years. As in developed countries people spend more than 90% of their time indoors, besides outdoor pollution assessment, the indoor one is also required. IAQ is not only affected by indoor sources linked to indoor activities, outdoor sources such as road or street traffic and industrial and commercial activities have their role too. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) frequently show higher indoor mixing ratios with respect to the outdoor ones, and monitoring is required to report their indoor mixing ratios. Many studies have reported average indoor VOCs' mixing ratios in different environments, but their temporal variability has not been well documented. The main objective of this work was to simultaneously measure VOCs' indoor and outdoor mixing ratios with high time-resolution in order to assess the effect of sources inside and outside the building upon indoor mixing ratios of individual VOCs. Simultaneous hourly, continuous, and on-line measurements of C(2)-C(11) VOCs were performed inside and outside the School of Engineering of Bilbao (ETSI) building, located in the city center of Bilbao, an urban area in Northern Spain. The analysis of simultaneous data allowed the classification of VOCs based on their main sources. Some VOCs were mainly emitted by indoor sources (1-pentene, 2-methylpentane, n-hexane, methylcyclopentane, benzene, 1-heptene+2,2,4-trimethylbenzene, and tetrachloroethylene) or by outdoor sources (n-heptane, C(8) alkanes except trimethylpentanes and C(9) aromatics). Other VOCs, such as toluene, were emitted by both indoor and outdoor sources. The isoprene indoor pattern indicated that its main indoor source could be the air exhaled by people occupying the building. Some halocarbons, such as trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, and carbon tetrachloride may be generated from the use inside the building of chlorine bleach containing products. PMID:22542255

  20. Volatile organic compounds detected in vapor-diffusion samplers placed in sediments along and near the shoreline at Allen Harbor Landfill and Calf Pasture Point, Davisville, Rhode Island, March-April 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyford, F.P.; Kliever, J.D.; Scott, Clifford

    1999-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds are present in ground water at the Allen Harbor Landfill and the Calf Pasture Point sites on the former Naval Construction Battalion Center in Davisville, R.I. Vapor-diffusion samplers were used at the two sites during March-April 1998 to identify possible discharge points for contaminants along the shore of Allen Harbor and in two wetland areas near the shore. Results from vapor-diffusion samplers will be used in conjunction with other site information to evaluate proposed ground-water monitoring programs. Volatile organic compounds were detected in 41 of 115 samplers placed along the shoreline at the Allen Harbor Landfill. Trichloroethylene was the principal volatile organic compound detected of eight target compounds. The highest vapor concentration measured exceeded 300,000 parts per billion by volume in an area where TCE was detected in groundwater from nearby monitoring wells. Other chemicals detected in vapor-diffusion samplers included tetrachloroethylene, toluene, and benzene. Concentrations of individual volatile organic compounds were less than 100 parts per billion by volume in most samplers. Volatile organic compounds, principally trichloroethylene, were detected in 7 of 30 samplers placed along the shoreline at Calf Pasture Point; the highest trichloroethylene concentration was 1,900 parts per billion by volume. A trace concentration of tetrachloroethylene was detected in one of the samplers. One of 24 samplers placed in two wetland areas near the shore (suspected discharge areas for ground-water containing volatile organic compounds) detected trichloroethylene at a vapor concentration of 14 parts per billion by volume.

  1. Evaluation of the atmosphere as a source of volatile organic compounds in shallow groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baehr, A.L.; Stackelberg, P.E.

    1999-01-01

    The atmosphere as a source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in shallow groundwater was evaluated over an area in southern New Jersey. Chloroform, methyl tertbutyl ether (MTBE), 1,1,1-trichloroethane, tetrachloroethylene (PCE), and carbon disulfide (not a VOC) were detected frequently at low-level concentrations in a network of 78 shallow wells in the surficial Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer system. The atmosphere was sampled for these compounds and only MTBE concentrations were high enough to potentially explain frequent detection in shallow groundwater. A mathematical model of reactive transport through the unsaturated zone is presented to explain how variations in unsaturated properties across the study area could explain differences in MTBE concentrations in shallow groundwater given the atmosphere as the source. Even when concentrations of VOCs in groundwater are low compared to regulatory concentration limits, it is critical to know the source. If the VOCs originate from a point source(s), concentrations in groundwater could potentially increase over time to levels of concern as groundwater plumes evolve, whereas if the atmosphere is the source, then groundwater concentrations would be expected to remain at low-level concentrations not exceeding those in equilibrium with atmospheric concentrations. This is the first analysis of VOC occurrence in shallow groundwater involving colocated atmosphere data.The atmosphere as a source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in shallow groundwater was evaluated over an area in southern New Jersey. Chloroform, methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), 1,1,1-trichloroethane, tetrachloroethylene (PCE), and carbon disulfide (not a VOC) were detected frequently at low-level concentrations in a network of 78 shallow wells in the surficial Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer system. The atmosphere was sampled for these compounds and only MTBE concentrations were high enough to potentially explain frequent detection in shallow groundwater. A mathematical model of reactive transport through the unsaturated zone is presented to explain how variations in unsaturated properties across the study area could explain differences in MTBE concentrations in shallow groundwater given the atmosphere as the source. Even when concentrations of VOCs in groundwater are low compared to regulatory concentration limits, it is critical to know the source. If the VOCs originate from a point source(s), concentrations in groundwater could potentially increase over time to levels of concern as groundwater plumes evolve, whereas if the atmosphere is the source, then groundwater concentrations would be expected to remain at low-level concentrations not exceeding those in equilibrium with atmospheric concentrations. This is the first analysis of VOC occurrence in shallow groundwater involving collocated atmosphere data.

  2. Replacement Technologies for Precision Cleaning of Aerospace Hardware for Propellant Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beeson, Harold; Kirsch, Mike; Hornung, Steven; Biesinger, Paul

    1997-01-01

    The NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) is developing cleaning and verification processes to replace currently used chlorofluorocarbon-l13- (CFC-113-) based processes. The processes being evaluated include both aqueous- and solvent-based techniques. Replacement technologies are being investigated for aerospace hardware and for gauges and instrumentation. This paper includes the findings of investigations of aqueous cleaning and verification of aerospace hardware using known contaminants, such as hydraulic fluid and commonly used oils. The results correlate nonvolatile residue with CFC 113. The studies also include enhancements to aqueous sampling for organic and particulate contamination. Although aqueous alternatives have been identified for several processes, a need still exists for nonaqueous solvent cleaning, such as the cleaning and cleanliness verification of gauges used for oxygen service. The cleaning effectiveness of tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), ethanol, hydrochlorofluorocarbon 225 (HCFC 225), HCFC 141b, HFE 7100(R), and Vertrel MCA(R) was evaluated using aerospace gauges and precision instruments and then compared to the cleaning effectiveness of CFC 113. Solvents considered for use in oxygen systems were also tested for oxygen compatibility using high-pressure oxygen autogenous ignition and liquid oxygen mechanical impact testing.

  3. Development of CFC-Free Cleaning Processes at the NASA White Sands Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beeson, Harold; Kirsch, Mike; Hornung, Steven; Biesinger, Paul

    1995-01-01

    The NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) is developing cleaning and verification processes to replace currently used chlorofluorocarbon-113- (CFC-113-) based processes. The processes being evaluated include both aqueous- and solvent-based techniques. The presentation will include the findings of investigations of aqueous cleaning and verification processes that are based on a draft of a proposed NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) cleaning procedure. Verification testing with known contaminants, such as hydraulic fluid and commonly used oils, established correlations between nonvolatile residue and CFC-113. Recoveries ranged from 35 to 60 percent of theoretical. WSTF is also investigating enhancements to aqueous sampling for organics and particulates. Although aqueous alternatives have been identified for several processes, a need still exists for nonaqueous solvent cleaning, such as the cleaning and cleanliness verification of gauges used for oxygen service. The cleaning effectiveness of tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), ethanol, hydrochlorofluorocarbon-225 (HCFC-225), tert-butylmethylether, and n-Hexane was evaluated using aerospace gauges and precision instruments and then compared to the cleaning effectiveness of CFC-113. Solvents considered for use in oxygen systems were also tested for oxygen compatibility using high-pressure oxygen autoignition and liquid oxygen mechanical impact testing.

  4. DESORPTION BEHAVIOR OF TRICHLOROETHENE AND TETRACHLOROETHENE IN U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SAVANNAH RIVER SITE UNCONFINED AQUIFER SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Vangelas, K; Robert G. Riley, R; James E. Szecsody, J; A. V. Mitroshkov, A; C. F. Brown, C; Brian02 Looney, B

    2007-01-10

    Sorption is governed by the physico-chemical processes that partition solutes between the aqueous and solid phases in aquifers. For environmental systems, a linear equilibrium relationship between the amount of contaminant in the alternative phases is often assumed. In this traditional approach, the distribution coefficient, or K{sub d}, is a ratio of contaminant associated with the solid phase to the contaminant in the water phase. Recent scientific literature has documented time-dependant behaviors in which more contaminant mass is held in the solid phase than predicted by the standard model. Depending on the specific conceptualization, this has been referred to as nonlinear sorption, time-variable sorption, or ''irreversible sorption''. The potential impact of time-variable sorption may be beneficial or detrimental depending on the specific conditions and remediation goals. Researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have been studying this process to evaluate how various soil types will affect this process for sites contaminated with chlorinated solvents. The results described in this report evaluate sorption-desorption of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in Savannah River Site (SRS) soils. The results of this study will be combined with ongoing PNNL research to provide a more comprehensive look at this process and its impact on contaminant plume stability and sustainability. Importantly, while the results of the study documented differences in sorption properties between two tested SRS soils, the data indicated that ''irreversible sorption'' is not influencing the sorption-desorption behaviors of TCE and PCE for these soils.

  5. Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report. Fourth quarter 1992 and 1992 summary

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1993-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1992, samples from 18 groundwater monitoring wells of the AMB series at the Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility were analyzed for certain heavy metals, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Six parameters exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) and the Savannah River Site Flag 2 criteria during the quarter. The results for fourth quarter 1992 are fairly consistent with the rest of the year`s data. Tetrachloroethylene exceeded the final PDWS in well AMB 4D only two of the four quarters; in the other three wells in which it was elevated, it was present at similar levels throughout the year. Trichloroethylene consistently exceeded its PDWS in wells AMB 4A, 4B, 4D, 5, and 7A during the year. Trichloroethylene was elevated in well AMB 6 only during third and fourth quarters and in well AMB 7 only during fourth quarter. Total alpha-emitting radium was above the final PDWS for total radium in well AMB 5 at similar levels throughout the year and exceeded the PDWS during one of the three quarters it was analyzed for (third quarter 1992) in well AMB 10B.

  6. Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1993-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1992, samples from 18 groundwater monitoring wells of the AMB series at the Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility were analyzed for certain heavy metals, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Six parameters exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) and the Savannah River Site Flag 2 criteria during the quarter. The results for fourth quarter 1992 are fairly consistent with the rest of the year's data. Tetrachloroethylene exceeded the final PDWS in well AMB 4D only two of the four quarters; in the other three wells in which it was elevated, it was present at similar levels throughout the year. Trichloroethylene consistently exceeded its PDWS in wells AMB 4A, 4B, 4D, 5, and 7A during the year. Trichloroethylene was elevated in well AMB 6 only during third and fourth quarters and in well AMB 7 only during fourth quarter. Total alpha-emitting radium was above the final PDWS for total radium in well AMB 5 at similar levels throughout the year and exceeded the PDWS during one of the three quarters it was analyzed for (third quarter 1992) in well AMB 10B.

  7. Savannah River Site A/M Area Southern Sector Characterization Cone Penetrometer Report

    SciTech Connect

    Raabe, B.A.

    1993-05-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is located in the Atlantic Coastal Plaingeologic province. This area is characterized by low relief, predominantly unconsolidated sediments of Cretaceous though Tertiary age. A multiple aquifer system underlies the A/M Area and affects the definition and distribution of a contaminant plume. The water table and uppermost confined aquifer (Steed Pond Aquifer) are contaminated with elevated concentrations of trichloroethylene(TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and their associated compounds. The deeper aquifers in this area have less widely spread chlorinated hydrocarbon contamination.Cone penetrometer testing was selected as the method of investigation because it is minimally invasive, offers advanced technological capabilities in gathering lithologic data, and offers groundwater sampling capabilities. CPT testing utilizes a hydraulic push tool system. The probe collects real-time data that is processed by computer into soil/lithology classifications. The system can also be used to collect sediment and soil vapor samples although these features were not utilized during this project. Advantages of the CPT system include a small borehole diameter which minimizes cross-contamination of lithologic units, virtual elimination of drill cuttings and fluids that require disposal, collection of various types of undisturbed sediment and water samples and plotting of hydrostratigraphic and lithologic data while in the field.

  8. Surface acoustic wave sensors/gas chromatography; and Low quality natural gas sulfur removal and recovery CNG Claus sulfur recovery process

    SciTech Connect

    Klint, B.W.; Dale, P.R.; Stephenson, C.

    1997-12-01

    This topical report consists of the two titled projects. Surface Acoustic Wave/Gas Chromatography (SAW/GC) provides a cost-effective system for collecting real-time field screening data for characterization of vapor streams contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The Model 4100 can be used in a field screening mode to produce chromatograms in 10 seconds. This capability will allow a project manager to make immediate decisions and to avoid the long delays and high costs associated with analysis by off-site analytical laboratories. The Model 4100 is currently under evaluation by the California Environmental Protection Agency Technology Certification Program. Initial certification focuses upon the following organics: cis-dichloroethylene, chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, trichlorethylene, tetrachloroethylene, tetrachloroethane, benzene, ethylbenzene, toluene, and o-xylene. In the second study the CNG Claus process is being evaluated for conversion and recovery of elemental sulfur from hydrogen sulfide, especially found in low quality natural gas. This report describes the design, construction and operation of a pilot scale plant built to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the integrated CNG Claus process.

  9. Gas-solid alkali destruction of volatile chlorocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Foropoulos, J. Jr.

    1995-12-01

    Many chlorocarbons are environmental dangers and health hazards. The simplest perchlorinated hydrocarbon, carbon tetrachloride, is near the top of the list of hazardous compounds. Carbon tetrachloride was used as a cleaning fluid, solvent, and fire-extinguishing agent. The nuclear and defense complexes also employed great quantities of carbon tetrachloride and other chlorocarbons as cleaning and degreasing agents. Many sites nationwide have underground chlorocarbon contamination plumes. Bulk chlorocarbon inventories at many locations await treatment and disposal. Often the problem is compounded by the chlorocarbon being radioactively contaminated. Waste inventory and groundwater contamination problems exist for many other chlorocarbons, especially methylene chloride, chloroform, and tri- and tetrachloroethylene. In this work solid soda lime (a fused mixture of approximately 95% CaO and 5% NaOH in a coarse, granulated form) at 350 C to 400 C acts as the hydrolyzing degradation, and off-gas scrubbing medium. Within soda lime CO{sub 2} and HCl from hydrolysis and degradation convert immediately to calcium and sodium chlorides and carbonates, with water vapor as a volatile byproduct.

  10. Uptake and fate of organohalogens from contaminated groundwater in woody plants

    SciTech Connect

    Sytsma, L.; Mulder, J.; Schneider, J.

    1997-12-31

    The emerging technology of phytoremediation uses green plants for low-cost, low-tech remediation processes in which selected plants and natural or engineered microorganisms work together to metabolize, convert, absorb, accumulate, sequester, or otherwise render harmless multiple environmental contaminants. For many organic contaminants, such as tricholoroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE), there is evidence that plants can degrade a portion of the organohalogen that is taken up to form less volatile compounds, such as trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), which are sequestered in the plant tissue while the remainder is passed out of the leaf tissue with the transpiration stream. Analysis of leaves from trees in uncontaminated areas gives TCAA concentrations that are typically under 100 ng/g TCAA, while in contaminated areas concentrations run as high as 1,000 ng/g. Hybrid poplar plants fed by TCE- and PCE-spiked nutrient solutions in a greenhouse showed elevated TCAA levels in the leaves within a week, as well as evidence for evapotranspiration of the TCE and PCE.

  11. Test plan for Geo-Cleanse{reg_sign} demonstration (in situ destruction of dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL))

    SciTech Connect

    Jerome, K.M.; Looney, B.B.; Accorsi, F.; Dingens, M.; Wilson, J.T.

    1996-09-01

    Soils and groundwater beneath an abandoned process sewer line in the A/M Area of the Savannah River Site (SRS) contain elevated levels of volatile organic compounds, specifically trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE), two common chlorinated solvents. These compounds have low aqueous solubilities, thus when released to the subsurface in sufficient quantity, tend to exist as immiscible fluids or nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). Because chlorinated solvents are also denser than water, they are referred to by the acronym DNAPLs, or dense non-aqueous phase liquids. Technologies targeted at the efficient characterization or removal of DNAPL are not currently proven. For example, most DNAPL studies rely on traditional soil and water sampling and the fortuitous observation of immiscible solvent. Once DNAPL is identified, soil excavation (which is only applicable to small contained spill sites) is the only proven cleanup method. New cleanup approaches based on destruction of DNAPL either in situ or ex situ have been proposed and tested at the pilot scale. The proposed demonstration, as described in this report will evaluate the applicability to DNAPL plumes of a technology proven for in situ destruction of light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs) such as oils.

  12. Retrospective Cohort Study of a Microelectronics and Business Machine Facility

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Sharon R.; Pinkerton, Lynne E.; Fleming, Donald A.; Jones, James H.; Allee, Steven; Luo, Lian; Bertke, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We examined health outcomes among 34,494 workers employed at a microelectronics and business machine facility 1969–2001. Methods Standardized mortality ratio (SMR) and standardized incidence ratios were used to evaluate health outcomes in the cohort and Cox regression modeling to evaluate relations between scores for occupational exposures and outcomes of a priori interest. Results Just over 17% of the cohort (5,966 people) had died through 2009. All cause, all cancer, and many cause-specific SMRs showed statistically significant deficits. In hourly males, SMRs were significantly elevated for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and rectal cancer. Salaried males had excess testicular cancer incidence. Pleural cancer and mesothelioma excesses were observed in workers hired before 1969, but no available records substantiate use of asbestos in manufacturing processes. A positive, statistically significant relation was observed between exposure scores for tetrachloroethylene and nervous system diseases. Conclusions Few significant exposure–outcome relations were observed, but risks from occupational exposures cannot be ruled out due to data limitations and the relative youth of the cohort. PMID:24375784

  13. Phase behavior of chlorinated solvent + water + alcohol mixtures with application to alcohol flushing

    SciTech Connect

    Hayden, N.J.; Diebold, J.; Noyes, G.

    1999-09-01

    Alcohol flushing is a new in-situ remediation technique for the removal of water-immiscible solvents from contaminated soil and groundwater. Understanding the changes in the physical and chemical properties of chlorinated solvents and the aqueous-phase solution during flushing is prerequisite for the successful application of this technology. The overall objectives of these experiments were to characterize the ternary-phase behavior, interfacial tension, viscosity, and density for mixtures containing a chlorinated solvent, water and alcohol. Two chlorinated solvents were used: tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene. The alcohols studied included methanol, ethanol, and propan-2-ol. Results showed that the single-phase region of the ternary relationships increased as the molecular weight of the alcohol increased. The interfacial tension between the chlorinated solvents and aqueous solutions decreased with increasing alcohol concentration and increasing molecular weight of the alcohol. Changes in the viscosity of water + alcohol mixtures due to the addition of the solvents were only evident at high alcohol concentrations. Small changes in density were noted for the chlorinated solvents in equilibrium with water + alcohol solutions except in the case of trichloroethylene and propan-2-ol solutions, which exhibited considerable swelling.

  14. FIELD SCREENING FOR HALOGENATED VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    SciTech Connect

    John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani Jr.; Theresa M. Bomstad

    2002-06-01

    Western Research Institute (WRI) initiated exploratory work towards the development of new field screening methodology and a test kit to measure halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Heated diode and corona discharge sensors are commonly used to detect leaks of refrigerants from air conditioners, freezers, and refrigerators. They are both selective to the presence of carbon-halogen bonds. Commercially available heated diode and corona discharge leak detectors were procured and evaluated for halogenated VOC response. The units were modified to provide a digital readout of signal related to VOC concentration. Sensor response was evaluated with carbon tetrachloride and tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, PCE), which represent halogenated VOCs with and without double bonds. The response characteristics were determined for the VOCs directly in headspace in Tedlar bag containers. Quantitation limits in air were estimated. Potential interferences from volatile hydrocarbons, such as toluene and heptane, were evaluated. The effect of humidity was studied also. The performance of the new devices was evaluated in the laboratory by spiking soil samples and monitoring headspace for halogenated VOCs. A draft concept of the steps for a new analytical method was outlined. The results of the first year effort show that both devices show potential utility for future analytical method development work towards the goal of developing a portable test kit for screening halogenated VOCs in the field.

  15. A procedure to design a Permeable Adsorptive Barrier (PAB) for contaminated groundwater remediation.

    PubMed

    Erto, A; Lancia, A; Bortone, I; Di Nardo, A; Di Natale, M; Musmarra, D

    2011-01-01

    A procedure to optimize the design of a Permeable Adsorptive Barrier (PAB) for the remediation of a contaminated aquifer is presented in this paper. A computer code, including different routines that describe the groundwater contaminant transport and the pollutant capture by adsorption in unsteady conditions over the barrier solid surface, has been developed. The complete characterization of the chemical-physical interactions between adsorbing solids and the contaminated water, required by the computer code, has been obtained by experimental measurements. A case study in which the procedure developed has been applied to a tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated aquifer near a solid waste landfill, in the district of Napoli (Italy), is also presented and the main dimensions of the barrier (length and width) have been evaluated. Model results show that PAB is effective for the remediation of a PCE-contaminated aquifer, since the concentration of PCE flowing out of the barrier is everywhere always lower than the concentration limit provided for in the Italian regulations on groundwater quality. PMID:20846781

  16. Permeable Adsorptive Barrier (PAB) for the remediation of groundwater simultaneously contaminated by some chlorinated organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Erto, A; Bortone, I; Di Nardo, A; Di Natale, M; Musmarra, D

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, a Permeable Reactive Barrier (PRB) made with activated carbon, namely a Permeable Adsorptive Barrier (PAB), is put forward as an effective technique for the remediation of aquifers simultaneously contaminated by some chlorinated organic compounds. A design procedure, based on a computer code and including different routines, is presented as a tool to accurately describe mass transport within the aquifer and adsorption/desorption phenomena occurring inside the barrier. The remediation of a contaminated aquifer near a solid waste landfill in the district of Napoli (Italy), where Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and Trichloroethylene (TCE) are simultaneously present, is considered as a case study. A complete hydrological and geotechnical site characterization, as well as a number of dedicated adsorption laboratory tests for the determination of activated carbon PCE/TCE adsorption capacity in binary systems, are carried out to support the barrier design. By means of a series of numerical simulations it is possible to determine the optimal barrier location, orientation and dimensions. PABs appear to be an effective remediation tool for the in-situ treatment of an aquifer contaminated by PCE and TCE simultaneously, as the concentration of both compounds flowing out of the barrier is everywhere lower than the regulatory limits on groundwater quality. PMID:24747934

  17. Field test of single well DNAPL characterization using alcohol injection/extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Jerome, K.M.; Looney, B.B.; Rhoden, M.L.; Riha, B.; Burdick, S.

    1996-10-29

    Soils and groundwater beneath an abandoned process sewer line in the A/M Area of the Savannah River Site (SRS) contain elevated levels of volatile organic compounds, specifically trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE), two common chlorinated solvents. These compounds have low aqueous solubilities, thus when released to the subsurface in sufficient quantity, tend to exist as immiscible fluids or nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). Because chlorinated solvents are also denser than water, they are referred to by the acronym DNAPLs, or dense non-aqueous phase liquids. Technologies targeted at efficient characterization or removal of DNAPL are not currently proven. The authors performed injection/extraction characterization tests in six existing wells in A/M Area. Water concentrations for TCE and/or PCE in these wells ranged from 0% to 100% of solubility. For each test, small amounts of solubilizing solution were used to try to confirm or deny the presence or absence of DNAPL in the immediate vicinity of the well screen.

  18. Malignant Tumors of the Female Reproductive System

    PubMed Central

    Labrèche, France

    2012-01-01

    This review summarizes the epidemiology of cancer of the female reproductive system and associated lifestyle factors. It also assesses the available evidence for occupational factors associated with these cancers. Cervical, endometrial, and ovarian cancers are relatively common, and cause significant cancer morbidity and mortality worldwide, whereas vulvar, vaginal, fallopian tube cancers, and choriocarcinomas are very rare. As several lifestyle factors are known to play a major role in the etiology of these cancers, very few published studies have investigated possible relationships with occupational factors. Some occupational exposures have been associated with increased risks of these cancers, but apart from the available evidence on the relationships between asbestos fibers and ovarian cancer, and tetrachloroethylene and cervical cancer, the data is rather scarce. Given the multifactorial nature of cancers of the female reproductive system, it is of the utmost importance to conduct occupational studies that will gather detailed data on potential individual confounding factors, in particular reproductive history and other factors that influence the body's hormonal environment, together with information on socio-economic status and lifestyle factors, including physical activity from multiple sources. Studies on the mechanisms of carcinogenesis in the female reproductive organs are also needed in order to elucidate the possible role of chemical exposures in the development of these cancers. PMID:23019529

  19. Vibrational analysis and structural implications of H-bonding in isolated and aggregated 2-amino-1-propanol: a study by MI-IR and Raman spectroscopy and molecular orbital calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fausto, R.; Cacela, C.; Duarte, M. L.

    2000-09-01

    Isolated 2-amino-1-propanol ( 2AP) was studied by matrix-isolation infrared spectroscopy (MI-IR) in Ar and Kr and ab initio 6-31G ? calculations undertaken at the HF-SCF and MP2 levels of theory. For the first time, five different conformational states of 2AP could be experimentally observed, which could be correlated with the most stable forms predicted by the calculations. The first and second lowest energy forms correspond to conformers which exhibit a considerably strong intramolecular OH⋯N hydrogen bond (g'Gg' and gG'g), while the less abundant forms observed in the matrices (gGg', gGt and g'G'g) are characterized by having a weak intramolecular NH⋯O or OH⋯N bond. These results were reinforced by infrared solution studies of the compound in tetrachloromethane and tetrachloroethylene. The experimental data obtained for the pure liquid, where OH⋯N intermolecular hydrogen bonding dominates, indicate that the preferred conformation of the monomeric unit within the aggregates is similar to conformer gGt.

  20. Groundwater quality assessment/corrective action feasibility plan

    SciTech Connect

    Stejskal, G.F.

    1989-11-15

    The Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) Seepage Basins are located in the northeastern section of the 700 Area at the Savannah River Site. Currently the four basins are out of service and are awaiting closure in accordance with the Consent Decree settled under Civil Act No. 1:85-2583. Groundwater monitoring data from the detection monitoring network around the SRL Basins was recently analyzed using South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations R.61-79.264.92 methods to determine if groundwater in the immediate vicinity of the SRL Basins had been impacted. Results from the data analysis indicate that the groundwater has been impacted by both volatile organic constituents (VOCs) and inorganic constituents. The VOCs, specifically trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene, are currently being addressed under the auspices of the SRS Hazardous Waste Permit Application (Volume III, Section J.6.3). The impacts resulting from elevated levels of inorganic constituent, such as barium, calcium, and zinc in the water table, do not pose a threat to human health and the environment. In order to determine if vertical migration of the inorganic constituents has occurred three detection monitoring wells are proposed for installation in the upper portion of the Congaree Aquifer.

  1. Groundwater quality assessment/corrective action feasibility plan. Savannah River Laboratory Seepage Basins

    SciTech Connect

    Stejskal, G.F.

    1989-11-15

    The Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) Seepage Basins are located in the northeastern section of the 700 Area at the Savannah River Site. Currently the four basins are out of service and are awaiting closure in accordance with the Consent Decree settled under Civil Act No. 1:85-2583. Groundwater monitoring data from the detection monitoring network around the SRL Basins was recently analyzed using South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations R.61-79.264.92 methods to determine if groundwater in the immediate vicinity of the SRL Basins had been impacted. Results from the data analysis indicate that the groundwater has been impacted by both volatile organic constituents (VOCs) and inorganic constituents. The VOCs, specifically trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene, are currently being addressed under the auspices of the SRS Hazardous Waste Permit Application (Volume III, Section J.6.3). The impacts resulting from elevated levels of inorganic constituent, such as barium, calcium, and zinc in the water table, do not pose a threat to human health and the environment. In order to determine if vertical migration of the inorganic constituents has occurred three detection monitoring wells are proposed for installation in the upper portion of the Congaree Aquifer.

  2. Occurrence of organic wastewater contaminants, pharmaceuticals, and personal care products in selected water supplies, Cape Cod, Massachusetts, June 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zimmerman, Marc J.

    2005-01-01

    In June 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Barnstable County Department of Health and Environment, sampled water from 14 wastewater sources and drinking-water supplies on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, for the presence of organic wastewater contaminants, pharmaceuticals, and personal care products. The geographic distribution of sampling locations does not represent the distribution of drinking-water supplies on Cape Cod. The environmental presence of the analyte compounds is mostly unregulated; many of the compounds are suspected of having adverse ecological and human health effects. Of the 85 different organic analyte compounds, 43 were detected, with 13 detected in low concentrations (less than 1 microgram per liter) from drinking-water supplies thought to be affected by wastewater because of previously detected high nitrate concentrations. (Phenol and d-limonene, detected in equipment blanks at unacceptably high concentrations, are not included in counts of detections in this report.) Compounds detected in the drinking-water supplies included the solvent, tetrachloroethylene; the analgesic, acetaminophen; the antibiotic, sulfamethoxazole; and the antidepressant, carbamazapine. Nitrate nitrogen, an indicator of wastewater, was detected in water supplies in concentrations ranging from 0.2 to 8.8 milligrams per liter.

  3. Characterization and simulation of fate and transport of selected volatile organic compounds in the vicinities of the Hadnot Point Industrial Area and landfill: Chapter A Supplement 6 in Analyses and historical reconstruction of groundwater flow, contaminant fate and transport, and distribution of drinking water within the service areas of the Hadnot Point and Holcomb Boulevard Water Treatment Plants and vicinities, U.S. Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, L. Elliott; Suárez-Soto, René J.; Anderson, Barbara A.; Maslia, Morris L.

    2013-01-01

    This supplement of Chapter A (Supplement 6) describes the reconstruction (i.e. simulation) of historical concentrations of tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), and benzene3 in production wells supplying water to the Hadnot Base (USMCB) Camp Lejeune, North Carolina (Figure S6.1). A fate and transport model (i.e., MT3DMS [Zheng and Wang 1999]) was used to simulate contaminant migration from source locations through the groundwater system and to estimate mean contaminant concentrations in water withdrawn from water-supply wells in the vicinity of the Hadnot Point Industrial Area (HPIA) and the Hadnot Point landfill (HPLF) area.4 The reconstructed contaminant concentrations were subsequently input into a flow-weighted, materials mass balance (mixing) model (Masters 1998) to estimate monthly mean concentrations of the contaminant in finished water 5 at the HPWTP (Maslia et al. 2013). The calibrated fate and transport models described herein were based on and used groundwater velocities derived from groundwater-flow models that are described in Suárez-Soto et al. (2013). Information data pertinent to historical operations of water-supply wells are described in Sautner et al. (2013) and Telci et al. (2013).

  4. Plume and lithologic profiling with surface resistivity and seismic tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, David B; Doll, William E.; Gamey, Jeff; Sheehan, Jacob R; Jardine, Philip M

    2005-03-01

    Improved surface-based geophysical technologies that are commercially available provide a new level of detail that can be used to guide ground water remediation. Surface-based multielectrode resistivity methods and tomographic seismic refraction techniques were used to image to a depth of approximately 30 m below the surface at the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research Field Research Center. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) established the research center on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to conduct in situ field-scale studies on bioremediation of metals and radionuclides. Bioremediation studies are being conducted on the saprolite, shale bedrock, and ground water at the site that have been contaminated with nitrate, uranium, technetium, tetrachloroethylene, and other contaminants (U.S. DOE 1997). Geophysical methods were effective in imaging the high-ionic strength plume and in defining the transition zone between saprolite and bedrock zones that appears to have a significant influence on contaminant transport. The geophysical data were used to help select the location and depth of investigation for field research plots. Drilling, borehole geophysics, and ground water sampling were used to verify the surface geophysical studies.

  5. Endotoxin removal from water using microporous polyethylene chopped fibres as a new adsorbent.

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Y.; Fujii, R.; Igami, I.; Kawai, A.; Kamiki, T.; Niwa, M.

    1986-01-01

    A new adsorbent, microporous polyethylene chopped fibre, was produced from a high density polyethylene. This can adsorb lipopolysaccharides (LPS) linearly up to 2 h, and showed the highest capacity to adsorb LPS when compared with two other polyethylene-based adsorbents and a polystyrene-based adsorbent. More than twice as much orange II and 4-nitroquinoline N oxide were adsorbed in the new adsorbent as was LPS. The adsorption isotherm of the new adsorbent for LPS was of Ln type, the correlation between adsorption and concentration of solute was proportional; whereas orange II and 4-nitroquinoline N oxide were of L type (greater adsorption than Ln type); tetrachloroethylene adsorption was of S type, less than Ln type. Adsorption of LPS to the new adsorbent increased when temperature rose, whereas adsorption of orange II and 4-nitroquinoline N oxide decreased. These data suggest that the binding of LPS to the new adsorbent is a hydrophobic interaction, whereas the binding of both orange II and 4-nitroquinoline N oxide is not. The new adsorbent has a greater potential for the removal of endotoxin from tap water than other commercially available adsorbents such as charcoal and Amberlite XAD-2. Images Fig. 1 PMID:3734438

  6. Stress survival of a genetically engineered Pseudomonas in soil slurries: Cytochrome P-450cam-catalyzed dehalogenation of chlorinated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Rattan, K.; Shanker, R.; Khanna, P.; Atkins, W.M.

    1999-10-01

    Biological treatment of hazardous chemical wastes has potential as an effective, practical, and economically viable process in above the ground treatment systems that consist of both genetically engineered microorganisms (GEMs) and bioreactors with process control instruments to create ideal conditions for biodegradation. A strain of Pseudomonas putida coexpressing cytochrome P-450cam and luciferase (lux) that provides both the reductive detoxification potential of the hemoprotein and a mechanism for its reduction to survive and remain metabolically competent under nutrient stress in soil slurry microcosms. More than 74% of the cells of engineered Pseudomonas were culturable after 7 days of multiple nutrient (C,N,P) starvation. The diagnostic luminescence and carbon monoxide-difference spectra for the two engineered traits could be detected in a significant fraction of the surviving population. The GEM could be revived after repeated desiccation and starvation using Luria broth, benzoate, or citrate as nutrients. Soil slurries inoculated with the GEM transformed hexachloroethane (HCE) to tetrachloroethylene (tetraCE) 8--10 fold faster than uninoculated slurries. The GEM also transformed the insecticide, {gamma}-HCH ({gamma}-3,4,5,6-hexachlorocyclhexene), to {gamma}-3,4,5,6-tetrachlorocyclohexene ({gamma}tetraCH) in soil slurries under subatmospheric conditions. These results indicate that GEMs can be constructed with broad substrate range detoxification catalysts such as cytochrome P-450 for remediation.

  7. Partitioning Tracer Test for Detection, Estimation, and Remediation Performance Assessment of Subsurface Nonaqueous Phase Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Minquan; Delshad, Mojdeh; Dwarakanath, Varadarajan; McKinney, Daene C.; Pope, Gary A.; Sepehrnoori, Kamy; Tilburg, Charles E.; Jackson, Richard E.

    1995-05-01

    In this paper we present a partitioning interwell tracer test (PITT) technique for the detection, estimation, and remediation performance assessment of the subsurface contaminated by nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). We demonstrate the effectiveness of this technique by examples of experimental and simulation results. The experimental results are from partitioning tracer experiments in columns packed with Ottawa sand. Both the method of moments and inverse modeling techniques for estimating NAPL saturation in the sand packs are demonstrated. In the simulation examples we use UTCHEM, a comprehensive three-dimensional, chemical flood compositional simulator developed at the University of Texas, to simulate a hypothetical two-dimensional aquifer with properties similar to the Borden site contaminated by tetrachloroethylene (PCE), and we show how partitioning interwell tracer tests can be used to estimate the amount of PCE contaminant before remedial action and as the remediation process proceeds. Tracer tests results from different stages of remediation are compared to determine the quantity of PCE removed and the amount remaining. Both the experimental (small-scale) and simulation (large-scale) results demonstrate that PITT can be used as an innovative and effective technique to detect and estimate the amount of residual NAPL and for remediation performance assessment in subsurface formations.

  8. Partitioning tracer test for detection, estimation, and remediation performance assessment of subsurface nonaqueous phase liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, M.; Delshad, M.; Dwarakanath, V.; McKinney, D.C.; Pope, G.A.; Sepehrnoori, K.; Tilburg, C.E.; Jackson, R.E.

    1995-05-01

    In this paper we present a partitioning interwell tracer test (PITT) technique for the detection, estimation, and remediation performance assessment of the subsurface contaminated by nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). We demonstrate the effectiveness of this technique by examples of experimental and simulation results. The experimental results are from partitioning tracer experiments in columns packed with Ottawa sand. Both the method of moments and inverse modeling techniques for estimating NAPL saturation in the sand packs are demonstrated. In the simulation examples we use UTCHEM, a comprehensive three-dimensional, chemical flood compositional simulator developed at the University of Texas, to simulate a hypothetical two-dimensional aquifer with properties similar to the Borden site contaminated by tetrachloroethylene (PCE), and we show how partitioning interwell tracer tests can be used to estimate the amount of PCE contaminant before remedial action and as the remediation process proceeds. Tracer test results from different stages of remediation are compared to determine the quantity of PCE removed and the amount remaining. Both the experimental (small-scale) and simulation (large-scale) results demonstrate that PITT can be used as an innovative and effective technique to detect and estimate the amount of residual NAPL and for remediation performance assessment in subsurface formations. 43 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  9. H-Area Seepage Basins: Groundwater quality assessment report, Savannah River Site. Second quarter, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    During the second quarter of 1990 the wells which make up the H-Area Seepage Basins (H-HWMF) monitoring network were sampled. Laboratory analyses were performed to measure levels of hazardous constituents, indicator parameters, tritium, nonvolatile beta, and gross alpha. A Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) scan was performed on all wells sampled to determine any hazardous organic constituents present in the groundwater. The primary contaminants observed at wells monitoring the H-Area Seepage Basins are tritium, nitrate, mercury, gross alpha, nonvolatile beta, trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene, lead, cadmium, arsenic, and total radium. Concentrations of at least one of the following constituents: tritium, nitrate, total radium, gross alpha, nonvolatile beta, mercury, lead, cadmium, trichloroethylene chromium, and arsenic in excess of the primary drinking water standard (PDWS) were observed in at least one well monitoring the H-Area Seepage Basins. Elevated levels of tritium above the PDWS were exhibited in seventy-seven of the 105 (73%) groundwater monitoring wells. Elevated levels of nitrate in excess of the PDWS were exhibited in forty-four of the 105 (42%) monitoring wells.

  10. H-Area Seepage Basins: Groundwater quality assessment report, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    During the second quarter of 1990 the wells which make up the H-Area Seepage Basins (H-HWMF) monitoring network were sampled. Laboratory analyses were performed to measure levels of hazardous constituents, indicator parameters, tritium, nonvolatile beta, and gross alpha. A Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) scan was performed on all wells sampled to determine any hazardous organic constituents present in the groundwater. The primary contaminants observed at wells monitoring the H-Area Seepage Basins are tritium, nitrate, mercury, gross alpha, nonvolatile beta, trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene, lead, cadmium, arsenic, and total radium. Concentrations of at least one of the following constituents: tritium, nitrate, total radium, gross alpha, nonvolatile beta, mercury, lead, cadmium, trichloroethylene chromium, and arsenic in excess of the primary drinking water standard (PDWS) were observed in at least one well monitoring the H-Area Seepage Basins. Elevated levels of tritium above the PDWS were exhibited in seventy-seven of the 105 (73%) groundwater monitoring wells. Elevated levels of nitrate in excess of the PDWS were exhibited in forty-four of the 105 (42%) monitoring wells.

  11. Final disposal of VOCs from industrial wastewaters

    SciTech Connect

    Ying, W.; Bonk, R.R.; Hannam, S.C. ); Qi-dong Li )

    1994-08-01

    Vapor phase carbon adsorption followed by spent carbon regeneration and catalytic oxidation were evaluated as methods for disposal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released from industrial wastewaters during treatment operations such as aeration, air-stripping and aerobic biodegradation. Adsorptive capacities and breakthrough characteristics for eight VOCs found in many hazardous landfill leachates and contaminated groundwater were compared for selection of the best adsorbent and optimum treatment conditions. Coconut shell-based activated carbons exhibited higher VOC loading capacities than coal-based carbons, fiber carbon, molecular sieve and zeolite. Steam and hot nitrogen were both effective for regeneration of the spent carbon. A small quantity of adsorbates left in the regenerated carbon did not result in immediate VOC breakthrough in the next cycle adsorption treatment. Catalytic oxidation was found to be an attractive alternative for VOC disposal. Using a new commercial catalyst developed for destruction of halogenated organic compounds, even stable VOCs such as trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene were completely destroyed at <350[degrees]C when oxidation was conducted at a space velocity of 17000/hr. 25 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs.

  12. Preparation and response behavior of blue electronic ink microcapsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. P.; Zhao, X. P.; Guo, H. L.; Zheng, Q.

    2008-04-01

    The blue electronic ink microcapsules containing phthalocyanine blue BGS (PB15:3) particles homodispersed in tetrachloroethylene (TCE) were prepared by in situ polymerization. The effects of the various factors, such as the type of modifier, the reaction conditions, and the concentration of surfactant in TCE, on the dispersibility of PB15:3 particles in TCE and capsule morphology and the adsorption of PB15:3 particles on internal surface of capsule wall were experimentally investigated. It was shown that using octadecylamine (ODA) to modify PB15:3 particles resulted in a significant increase of the dispersing extent (D.E) (about 4 times more than that of unmodified). The response time of particles to 0.1 V/?m dc electric field improved from 2.6 s to 0.6 s. The concentration of Span80 in TCE was no less than 0.062 mM, the adsorption of PB15:3 particles on internal surface of wall were restrained. Finally, the microcapsules in which PB15:3 particles possess reversible response to dc electric field were obtained.

  13. Time series geophysical monitoring of permanganate injections and in situ chemical oxidation of PCE, OU1 area, Savage Superfund Site, Milford, NH, USA.

    PubMed

    Harte, Philip T; Smith, Thor E; Williams, John H; Degnan, James R

    2012-05-01

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) treatment with sodium permanganate, an electrically conductive oxidant, provides a strong electrical signal for tracking of injectate transport using time series geophysical surveys including direct current (DC) resistivity and electromagnetic (EM) methods. Effective remediation is dependent upon placing the oxidant in close contact with the contaminated aquifer. Therefore, monitoring tools that provide enhanced tracking capability of the injectate offer considerable benefit to guide subsequent ISCO injections. Time-series geophysical surveys were performed at a superfund site in New Hampshire, USA over a one-year period to identify temporal changes in the bulk electrical conductivity of a tetrachloroethylene (PCE; also called tetrachloroethene) contaminated, glacially deposited aquifer due to the injection of sodium permanganate. The ISCO treatment involved a series of pulse injections of sodium permanganate from multiple injection wells within a contained area of the aquifer. After the initial injection, the permanganate was allowed to disperse under ambient groundwater velocities. Time series geophysical surveys identified the downward sinking and pooling of the sodium permanganate atop of the underlying till or bedrock surface caused by density-driven flow, and the limited horizontal spread of the sodium permanganate in the shallow parts of the aquifer during this injection period. When coupled with conventional monitoring, the surveys allowed for an assessment of ISCO treatment effectiveness in targeting the PCE plume and helped target areas for subsequent treatment. PMID:22459605

  14. Mixed Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report: Third quarter 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    Currently, 125 wells monitor groundwater quality in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) at the Savannah River Site. Samples from the wells are analyzed for selected heavy metals, herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread elevated constituents during third quarter 1994. Sixty-four (51%) of the 125 monitoring wells contained elevated tritium activities. Trichloroethylene concentrations exceeded the final PDWS in 22 (18%) wells. Chloroethene, 1,1-dichloroethylene, and tetrachloroethylene, elevated in one or more wells during third quarter 1994, also occurred in elevated levels during second quarter 1994. These constituents generally were elevated in the same wells during both quarters. Gross alpha, which was elevated in only one well during second quarter 1994, was elevated again during third quarter. Mercury, which was elevated during first quarter 1994, was elevated again in one well. Dichloromethane was elevated in two wells for the first time in several quarters.

  15. Seed germination and root elongation as indicators of exposure of wetland seedlings to metals

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, H.D.; Stokes, S.L.; Hook, D.D.; Klaine, S.J.

    1995-12-31

    Wetland ecosystems have often been impacted by the addition of hazardous waste materials. Methods are needed to evaluate the effect of these substances on wetland ecosystems and the organisms within them. This study evaluates the response of various wetland plant species to representative contaminants (cadmium, nickel, atrazine, anthracene, and tetrachloroethylene). Species tested include Caphalanthus occidentalis (buttonbush), Saururus cernuus (lizard`s tail), Liquidambar styraciflua (sweetgum), Sparganium americanum (bur-reed), and Fraxinus pennsylvanica (green ash). To the authors` knowledge these species have rarely if ever been used in toxicological assays. The endpoints used are germination and root elongation. Preliminary studies using a petri dish system have shown decreased germination at the highest metal concentration (50mg/L) and decreased root elongation in the higher metal concentrations (10, 25, and 50mg/L). Interference from the carrier was observed in the organic tests. Root elongation studies using the metals are being continued using tubes with various sand and vermiculite mixes into which freshly germinated seeds are placed. Species with the best responses will be tested in the field at the Savannah River Site, SC, and also with fuel oil. Lettuce (Lactuca saliva) and radish (Raphanus sativus) are being tested alongside the wetland species as reference organisms for which tests are well established.

  16. Time scales of DNAPL migration in sandy aquifers examined via numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhard, J.I.; Pang, T.; Kueper, B.H.

    2007-03-15

    The time required for dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) to cease migrating following release to the subsurface is a valuable component of a site conceptual model. This study uses numerical simulation to investigate the migration of six different DNAPLs in sandy aquifers. The most influential parameters governing migration cessation time are the density and viscosity of the DNAPL and the mean hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer. Releases of between 1 and 40 drums of chlorinated solvent DNAPLs, characterized by relatively high density and low viscosity, require on the order of months to a few years to cease migrating in a heterogeneous medium sand aquifer having an average hydraulic conductivity of 7.4 x 10{sup -3} cm/s. In contrast to this, the release of 20 drums of coal tar {rho}{sub D} = 1061 kg/m{sup 3}, {mu}{sub D} = 0.161 Pa(.)s) requires more than 100 years to cease migrating in the same aquifer. Altering the mean hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer results in a proportional change in cessation times. Parameters that exhibit relatively little influence on migration time scales are the DNAPL-water interfacial tension, release volume, source capillary pressure, mean aquifer porosity, and ambient ground water hydraulic gradient. This study also demonstrates that low-density DNAPLs (e.g., coal tar) give rise to greater amounts of lateral spreading and greater amounts of pooling on capillary barriers than high-density DNAPLs such as trichloroethylene or tetrachloroethylene.

  17. 1992 toxic hazards research unit annual report. Annual report, 1 October 1991-30 September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, H.G.; Dodd, D.E.; Vinegar, A.; Schneider, M.G.

    1993-04-01

    This report presents a review of the activities of the Toxic Hazards Research Unit (THRU) for the period 1 October 1991 through 30 September 1992. The THRU conducts descriptive, mechanistic, and predictive toxicology research and toxicological risk assessments to provide data to predict health hazards and to assess health risks associated with human exposure to chemicals and materials associated with military systems and operational environments. The report includes summaries of ongoing or completed research activities for the individual toxicology research requirements of the U.S. Air Force, Army, and Navy; highlights of the research support elements and conference activities of the THRU; and appendices that describe the THRU organization and its publications and presentations. 1,3,3-Trinitroazetidine (TNAZ), 1,3,5-Trinitrobenzene (TNB), Carboxylic acid metabolite, Chlorofluorocarbon, Chloroform, Delayed neurotoxicity, Halon replacement, Hydraulic fluid, Hydrazine, Inhalation, Jet engine oil, Lactational transfer, Methylene chloride, MIL-H-19457C, Neurotoxic Esterase (NTE), OTTO Fuel II, Perchloroethylene (PCE), Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling, Polychlorotrifluoroethylene (pCTFE), Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSAR), Reproductive, Risk assessment, Smoke, Tetrachloroethylene (PCE), Toxic dust, Vinyl Chloride (VC) and Trichloroethylene (TCE) mixture.

  18. D-area oil seepage basin bioventing optimization test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, C.J.; Radway, J.C.; Alman, D.; Hazen, T.C.

    1998-12-31

    The D Area Oil Seepage Basin (DOSB) was used from 1952 to 1975 for disposal of petroleum-based products (waste oils), general office and cafeteria waste, and apparently some solvents [trichloroethylene (TCE)/tetrachloroethylene (PCE)]. Numerous analytical results have indicated the presence of TCE and its degradation product vinyl chloride in groundwater in and around the unit, and of petroleum hydrocarbons in soils within the unit. The DOSB is slated for additional assessment and perhaps for environmental remediation. In situ bioremediation represents a technology of demonstrated effectiveness in the reclamation of sites contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents, and has been retained as an alternative for the cleanup of the DOSB. The Savannah River Site is therefore proposing to conduct a field treatability study designed to demonstrate and optimize the effectiveness of in situ microbiological biodegradative processes at the DOSB. The introduction of air and gaseous nutrients via two horizontal injection wells (bioventing) is expected to enhance biodegradation rates of petroleum components and stimulate microbial degradation of chlorinated solvents. The data gathered in this test will allow a determination of the biodegradation rates of contaminants of concern in the soil and groundwater, allow an evaluation of the feasibility of in situ bioremediation of soil and groundwater at the DOSB, and provide data necessary for the functional design criteria for the final remediation system.

  19. Steam reforming of DOE complex waste simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.E.; Kuehne, P.B.

    1995-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has worked with Synthetica Technologies and Manufacturing and Technology Conversion International (MTCl) to demonstrate the applicability of their commercial steam reforming technologies for treating DOE low-level mixed wastes. Previously, Synthetica successfully demonstrated destruction of a Sandia formulated lab trash simulant. During November 1994 Synthetica did not adequately process the aqueous halogenated organic liquid mixed waste simulant (MWTP-2110) formulated by the DOE Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP). Testing at MTCl is ongoing and initial results appear to be favorable. Approximately 200 lbs each of the MWIP aqueous halogenated organic liquids (MWTP-2110), and absorbed aqueous and organic liquids (MWTP-3113/3114) simulants have been processed. At 1650{degree}F, destruction efficiencies of greater than 99% were obtained for tetrachloroethylene, toluene, and 1,2 dichlorobenzene. Product cases consisted primarily of H{sub 2}, C0{sub 2}, CO, and CH{sub 4} and had higher heating values of up to 355 BTU/SCF. Conclusions concerning the suitability of the MTCI process for treating DOE mixed wastes will be drawn upon the completion of testing.

  20. Sorption of vapors of some organic liquids on soil humic acid and its relation to partitioning of organic compounds in soil organic matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chlou, G.T.; Kile, D.E.; Malcolm, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    Vapor sorption of water, ethanol, benzene, hexane, carbon tetrachloride, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, and 1,2-dibromoethane on (Sanhedron) soil humic acid has been determined at room temperature. Isotherms for all organic liquids are highly linear over a wide range of relative pressure (P/P??), characteristic of the partitioning (dissolution) of the organic compounds in soil humic acid. Polar liquids exhibit markedly greater sorption capacities on soil humic acid than relatively nonpolar liquids, in keeping with the polar nature of the soil humic acid as a partition medium. The limiting sorption (partition) capacities of relatively non-polar liquids are remarkably similar when expressed in terms of volumes per unit weight of soil humic acid. The soil humic acid is found to be about half as effective as soil organic matter in sorption of relatively nonpolar organic compounds. The nearly constant limiting sorption capacity for nonpolar organic liquids with soil humic acid on a volume-to-weight basis and its efficiency in sorption relative to soil organic matter provide a basis for predicting the approximate sorption (partition) coefficients of similar compounds in uptake by soil in aqueous systems.

  1. Immobilization of proteins on glow discharge treated polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiaei, D.; Safranj, A.; Chen, J. P.; Johnston, A. B.; Zavala, F.; Deelder, A.; Castelino, J. B.; Markovic, V.; Hoffman, A. S.

    Certain glow discharge-treated surfaces have been shown to enhance retention of adsorbed proteins. On the basis of this phenomenon, we have investigated the possibility of immobilizing (a) albumin for developing thromboresistant and non-fouling surfaces, (b) antibodies for immuno-diagnostic assays and (c) enzymes for various biosensors and industrial bioprocesses. Albumin retention was highest on surfaces treated with tetrafluoroethylene (TFE) compared to untreated surfaces or other glow discharge treatments studied. Preadsorption of albumin on TFE-treated surfaces resulted in low fibrinogen adsorption and platelet adhesion. IgG retention was also highest on TFE-treated surfaces. The lower detection limits of both malaria antigen and circulating anodic antigen of the schistosomiasis worm were enhanced following glow discharge treatment of the assay plates with TFE. Both TFE and tetrachloroethylene (TCE) glow discharge treated surfaces showed high retention of adsorbed horseradish peroxidase (HRP). However, the retained specific activity of HRP after adsorption on TCE-treated surfaces was remarkably higher than on TFE-treated surfaces.

  2. Modeling human exposure to hazardous-waste sites: A question of completeness

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, J.I.; McKone, T.E.

    1991-06-01

    In risk analysis, we use human-exposure assessments to translate contaminant sources into quantitative estimates of the amount of contaminant that comes in contact with human-environment boundaries, that is, the lungs, the gastrointestinal tract, and the skin surface of individuals within a specified population. An assessment of intake requires that we determine how much crosses these boundaries. Exposure assessments often rely implicitly on the assumption that exposure can be linked by simple parameters to ambient concentrations in air, water, and soil. However, more realistic exposure models require that we abandon such simple assumptions. To link contaminant concentrations in water, air, or soil with potential human intakes, we construct pathway-exposure factors (PEFs). For each PEF we combine information on environmental partitioning as well as human anatomy, physiology, and behavior patterns into an algebraic term that converts concentrations of contaminants into a daily intake per unit body weight in mg/kg-d for a specific route of exposure such as inhalation, ingestion, or dermal uptake. Using examples involving human exposure to either a radionuclide (tritium, {sup 3}H) or a toxic organic chemical (tetrachloroethylene, PCE) in soil, water, and air, we illustrate the use of PEFs and consider the implications for risk assessment. 12 refs., 4 tabs.

  3. Evaluation of geophysical methods for the detection of subsurfacetetracgloroethyene in controlled spill experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzella, Aldo; Majer, Ernest L.

    2006-04-10

    A controlled Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) spill experiment was conducted in a multi-layer formation consisting of sand and clayey-sandlayers. The purpose of the work was to determine the detection limits and capability of various geophysical methods. Measurements were made with ten different geophysical techniques before, during, and after the PCE injection. This experiment provided a clear identification of any geophysical anomalies associated with the presence of the PCE. During the injection period all the techniques indicated anomalies associated with the PCE. In order to quantify the results and provide an indication of the PCE detection limits of the various geophysical methods, the tank was subsequently excavated and samples of the various layers were analyzed for residual PCE concentration with gas chromatography (GC). This paper presents some of the results of five of the techniques: cross borehole complex resistivity (CR) also referred to as spectral induced polarization (SIP), cross borehole high resolution seismic (HRS), borehole self potential (SP), surface ground penetration radar (GPR), and borehole video (BV).

  4. Testing of stack-unit/aquifer sensitivity analysis using contaminant plume distribution in the subsurface of Savannah River Site, South Carolina, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rine, J.M.; Shafer, J.M.; Covington, E.; Berg, R.C.

    2006-01-01

    Published information on the correlation and field-testing of the technique of stack-unit/aquifer sensitivity mapping with documented subsurface contaminant plumes is rare. The inherent characteristic of stack-unit mapping, which makes it a superior technique to other analyses that amalgamate data, is the ability to deconstruct the sensitivity analysis on a unit-by-unit basis. An aquifer sensitivity map, delineating the relative sensitivity of the Crouch Branch aquifer of the Administrative/Manufacturing Area (A/M) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina, USA, incorporates six hydrostratigraphic units, surface soil units, and relevant hydrologic data. When this sensitivity map is compared with the distribution of the contaminant tetrachloroethylene (PCE), PCE is present within the Crouch Branch aquifer within an area classified as highly sensitive, even though the PCE was primarily released on the ground surface within areas classified with low aquifer sensitivity. This phenomenon is explained through analysis of the aquifer sensitivity map, the groundwater potentiometric surface maps, and the plume distributions within the area on a unit-by- unit basis. The results of this correlation show how the paths of the PCE plume are influenced by both the geology and the groundwater flow. ?? Springer-Verlag 2006.

  5. Use of Sonification for In-Well Softening of Semivolatile Organic Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Robert W.; Manning, John L.; Ayyiliz, Onder; Wilkey, Michael L.

    2003-03-26

    This study examined an integrated sonication/vapor stripping system's ability to remove/destroy chlorinated organics from groundwater. Chlorinated solvents studied included carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethylene, trichloroethane and tetrachloroethylene. Contaminant concentrations ranged from {approx}1 to {approx}100 mg/L. The sonicator had an ultrasonic frequency of 20 kHz; applied power intensities were 12.3-, 25.3- and 35.8-W/cm2. Batch reactions were operated for up to 10 minutes treatment time, with samples drawn for GC analysis every 2 minutes. Batch experimental results were obtained using sonication, vapor stripping and combined sonication/vapor stripping. For the chlorinated solvents, the first order rate constants were in the range of 0.02 to 0.06 min-1, 0.23 to 0.53 min-1 and 0.34 to 0.90 min-1 for sonication, vapor stripping and combined sonication/vapor stripping. For the chlorinated organics (treatment time {approx}10 min.), the fraction remaining after sonication and vapor stripping ranged from 62% to 82%, while less than 3% remained from the combined sonication/vapor stripping system.

  6. Health assessment for Welsh Road/Barkman Landfill, Honey Brook, Chester County, Pennsylvania, Region 3. CERCLIS No. PAD980829527. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-02

    The Welsh Road/Barkman Landfill site in Honey Brook, Pennsylvania was an unpermitted residential and commercial refuse disposal facility that operated from 1963 to sometime in the 1980s. After 1977, the landfill continued to operate in defiance of legal action to support a closure plan. Various investigations conducted in the 1980s revealed that industrial and hazardous waste had been accepted by the site. The environmental contamination on-site consists of copper, lead, 1,2-dichloropropane, toluene, chloroform and methylene chloride in drummed wastes; and mercury, toluene, dichlorofluoromethane, methylene chloride, trichlorofluoromethane, 5-methyl-2-hexanone, trichloroethylene, 1,2-dichloroethane, and 1,3,5-cycloheptatriene in groundwater. One time sampling indicated the presence of volatile compounds in air (hydrogen chloride and chloroform). The environmental contamination off-site consists of cadmium in sediment; and chloromethane, chloroform, xylenes, dichlorofluoromethane, 1,1-dichloroethane, tetrachloroethylene, p-cresol, toluene, methyl isobutyl ketone, di-n-butyl phthalate, lead, mercury, and zinc in residential well water. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via contaminated groundwater, surface water, soil, sediment, and airborne gases, vapors, and particulate.

  7. Electron donor preference of a reductive dechlorinating consortium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorah, M.M.; Majcher, E.; Jones, E.; Driedger, G.; Dworatzek, S.; Graves, D.

    2005-01-01

    A wetland sediment-derived microbial consortium was developed by the USGS and propagated in vitro to large quantities by SiREM Laboratory for use in bioaugmentation applications. The consortium had the capacity to completely dechlorinate 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethene, tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, cis- and trans-1,2-dichoroethylene, 1.1-dichloroethylene, 1,2-dichloroethane, vinyl chloride, carbon tetrachloride and chloroform. A suite of electron donors with characteristics useful for bioaugmentation applications was tested. The electron donors included lactate (the donor used during WBC-2 development), ethanol, chitin (Chitorem???), hydrogen releasing compound (HRC???), emulsified vegetable oil (Newman Zone???), and hydrogen gas. Ethanol, lactate, and chitin were particularly effective with respect to stimulating, supporting, and sustaining reductive dechlorination of the broad suite of chemicals that WBC-2 biodegraded. Chitorem??? was the most effective "slow release" electron donor tested. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the Proceedings of the 8th International In Situ and On-Site Bioremediation Symposium (Baltimore, MD 6/6-9/2005).

  8. Sanitary Landfill Groundwater Monitoring Report, Fourth Quarter 1999 and 1999 Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.

    2000-03-13

    A maximum of thirty eight-wells of the LFW series monitor groundwater quality in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill Area at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These wells are sampled quarterly to comply with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Domestic Water Permit DWP-087A and as part of the SRS Groundwater Monitoring Program. Iron (Total Recoverable), Chloroethene (Vinyl Chloride) and 1,1-Dichloroethane were the most widespread constituents exceeding the Final Primary Drinking Water Standards during 1999. Trichloroethylene, 1,1-Dichloroethylene, 1,2-Dichloroethane, 1,4-Dichlorobenzene, Aluminum (Total Recoverable), Benzene, cis-1,2-Dichloroethylene, Dichlorodifluoromethane, Dichloromethane (Methylene Chloride), Gross Alpha, Mercury (Total Recoverable), Nonvolatile Beta, Tetrachloroethylene, Total Organic Halogens, Trichlorofluoromethane, Tritium also exceeded standards in one or more wells. The groundwater flow direction in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill is to the southeast (universal transverse Mercator coordinates). The flow rate in this unit was approximately 144.175 ft/year during first quarter 1999 and 145.27 ft/year during fourth quarter 1999.

  9. Test plan for single well injection/extraction characterization of DNAPL

    SciTech Connect

    Looney, B.B.; Jerome, K.M.; Burdick, S.; Rossabi, J.; Jarosch, T.R.; Eddy-Dilek, C.A.

    1995-12-01

    Soils and groundwater beneath an abandoned Process sewer line in the A/M Area of the Savannah River Site (SRS) contain elevated levels of volatile organic compounds, specifically trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE), two common chlorinated solvents. These compounds have low aqueous solubilities, thus when released to the subsurface in sufficient quantity, tend to exist as immiscible fluids or nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). Because chlorinated solvents are also denser than water, they are referred to by the acronym DNAPLS, or dense non aqueous Phase liquids. Technologies targeted at the efficient characterization or removal of DNAPL are not currently proven. For example, most DNAPL studies rely on traditional soil and water sampling and the fortuitous observation of immiscible solvent. Once DNAPL is identified, soil excavation (which is only applicable to small contained spill sites) is the only ``proven`` cleanup method. New cleanup approaches based on enhanced removal by surfactants and/or alcohols have been proposed and tested at the pilot scale. As described below, carefully designed experiments similar to the enhanced removal methods may provide important characterization information on DNAPLs.

  10. Sanitary landfill groundwater monitoring report. Fourth quarter 1996 and 1996 summary

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    A maximum of eighty-nine wells of the LFW series monitor groundwater quality in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These wells are sampled quarterly to comply with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Domestic Waste Permit DWP-087A and as part of the SRS Groundwater Monitoring Program. Dichloromethane, a common laboratory contaminant, and chloroethene (vinyl chloride) were the most widespread constituents exceeding standards during 1996. Benzene, trichloroethylene, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, 1,1-dichloroethylene, lead (total recoverable), gross alpha, mercury (total recoverable), tetrachloroethylene, fluoride, thallium, radium-226, radium-228, and tritium also exceeded standards in one or more wells. The groundwater flow direction in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill was to the southeast (universal transverse Mercator coordinates). The flow rate in this unit was approximately 141 ft/year during first quarter 1996 and 132 ft/year during fourth quarter 1996

  11. Research to Support the Determination of Spacecraft Maximum Acceptable Concentrations of Potential Atmospheric Contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, John L.

    1997-01-01

    In many ways, the typical approach to the handling of bibliographic material for generating review articles and similar manuscripts has changed little since the use of xerographic reproduction has become widespread. The basic approach is to collect reprints of the relevant material and place it in folders or stacks based on its dominant content. As the amount of information available increases with the passage of time, the viability of this mechanical approach to bibliographic management decreases. The personal computer revolution has changed the way we deal with many familiar tasks. For example, word processing on personal computers has supplanted the typewriter for many applications. Similarly, spreadsheets have not only replaced many routine uses of calculators but have also made possible new applications because the cost of calculation is extremely low. Objective The objective of this research was to use personal computer bibliographic software technology to support the determination of spacecraft maximum acceptable concentration (SMAC) values. Specific Aims The specific aims were to produce draft SMAC documents for hydrogen sulfide and tetrachloroethylene taking maximum advantage of the bibliographic software.

  12. Visualization and Time-Series Analysis of Ground-Water Data for C-Area, Savannah River Site, South Carolina, 1984-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conrads, Paul A.; Roehl, Edwin A., Jr.; Daamen, Ruby C.; Chapelle, Francis H.; Lowery, Mark A.; Mundry, Uwe H.

    2007-01-01

    In 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, initiated a study of historical ground-water data of C-Area on the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. The soils and ground water at C-Area are contaminated with high concentrations of trichloroethylene and lesser amounts of tetrachloroethylene. The objectives of the investigation were (1) to analyze the historical data to determine if data-mining techniques could be applied to the historical database to ascertain whether natural attenuation of recalcitrant contaminants, such as volatile organic compounds, is occurring and (2) to determine whether inferential (surrogate) analytes could be used for more cost-effective monitoring. Twenty-one years of data (1984-2004) were collected from 396 wells in the study area and converted from record data to time-series data for analysis. A Ground-Water Data Viewer was developed to allow users to spatially and temporally visualize the analyte data. Overall, because the data were temporally and spatially sparse, data analysis was limited to only qualitative descriptions.

  13. Biotransformation of chlorinated aliphatic solvents in the presence of aromatic compounds under methanogenic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, L.N.; Grbic-Galic, D. . Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1993-08-01

    Transformation of carbon tetrachloride (CT) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) was studied under methanogenic conditions, in the presence or absence of toluene, ethylbenzene, phenol, and benzoate. Microbial inoculate for the experiments were derived from three groundwater aquifers contaminated by jet fuel or creosote. CT and PCE were reductively dechlorinated in all the examined castes (CT to chloroform [CF]; PCE to trichloroethylene [TCE], trans-1,2-dichloroethylene [DCE], and vinyl chloride [VC]). In the aquifer microcosms, the electron donors used for the reductive transformations were most likely the unidentified organic compounds present on aquifer solids, or storage materials in microorganisms. Alternatively, molecular hydrogen from the anaerobic incubator atmosphere could have been used. The addition of benzoate caused a decrease in rates of dechlorination if benzoate was transformed. Phenol and ethylbenzene were not degraded and did not influence the transformation of CT or PCE. Toluene, in most of the studied cases, had no influence on reductive dechlorination of either CT or PCE. Only in microcosms derived from a JP-4 jet fuel-contaminated aquifer did the anaerobic degradation of toluene occur simultaneously with reductive dechlorination of PCE, suggesting that toluene might possibly have been used as an electron donor for reductive transformation of chlorinated solvents.

  14. Complete degradation of polychlorinated hydrocarbons by a two-stage biofilm reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Fathepure, B.Z. ); Vogel, T.M. )

    1991-12-01

    A two-stage anaerobic-aerobic biofilm reactor successfully degraded a mixture of chlorinated organic compounds to water-soluble metabolic intermediates and carbon dioxide. Reductive dechlorination of hexachlorobenzene (HCB), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), and chloroform (CF) occurred on all tested primary carbon sources such as glucose, methanol, and acetate. However, the extent of dechlorination was maximum when the anaerobic biofilm column was fed acetate as a primary carbon source. HCB, PCE, and CF were dechlorinated to the levels of tri- and dichlorinated products (99, 80, and 32%, respectively) with acetate in the feed. This is important, since these less-chlorinated compounds can be metabolized by the aerobic biofilm. The effluent from the anaerobic biofilm column was fed directly into the aerobic column. After both columns, the total amount transformed into nonvolatile intermediates and carbon dioxide was 94, 96, and 83% for ({sup 14}C)HCB, ({sup 14}C)trichloroethylene, and ({sup 14}C)CF, respectively. This research shows the potential application of this novel two-stage bioreactor system for treating groundwaters and industrial effluents composed of highly chlorinated aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons.

  15. Chemical Degradation of Dichloroethylenes by Pyrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Junko; Inoue, Chihiro; Chida, Tadashi; Komai, Takeshi

    2006-05-01

    Chlorinated ethylenes have been recognized for their environmental persistence and risk. Main initial environmental contaminants are tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene but dichloroethylenes persist as a by-product of them, because the dechlorination rate of dichloroethylenes is inferior to initial chemicals in general chemical degradation or bioremediation. They protract the absolute remediation of soil and groundwater. This paper describes the dechlorination ability of pyrite, which can degradate the dichloroethylenes at the grater than or equal to the rate of tetra- or tri- chlorothylenes. In our previous research, the chemical reductive ability of natural sulfide for trichloroethylene was clarified and the reaction process differs completely from that with transitional metals. As same as the reaction of trichloroethylene with sulfide, the dichloroethylenes are entirely dechlorinated and change into to non-contaminated hydrocarbone or sulfur compounds. These reaction products adsorb on hydrophobic pyrite surface in this system. The chemical dechlorination is caused by electron sourced from the dissolution of pyrite at normal temperature and pressure condition. The remediation is easy to proceed in the natural environment.

  16. Current Intelligence Bulletins: summaries

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-07-24

    Summaries are provided for the 47 Current Intelligence Bulletins issued to date by NIOSH; any revisions in NIOSH policy made after a bulletin was issued are included. Subjects of the bulletins include the following: chloroprene; trichloroethylene; ethylene-dibromide; chrome pigment; asbestos exposure; hexamethylphosphoric-triamide; polychlorinated biphenyls; 4,4'-diaminodipheylmethane; chloroform; radon daughters; dimethylcarbamoyl-chloride; diethylcarbamoyl-chloride; explosive azide hazard; inorganic arsenic; nitrosamines; metabolic precursors of beta-naphtylamine; 2-nitropropane; acryonitrile; 2,4-diaminoanisole; tetrachloroethylene; trimellitic-anhydride; ethylene-thiourea; ethylene-dibromide and disulfiram, toxic interaction; direct blue 6, direct black 38, direct brown 95, benzidine derived dyes; ethylene-dichloride; NIAX catalyst ESN; chloroethanes, review of toxicity; vinyl halides, carcinogenicity; glycidyl ethers; epichlorohydrin; smoking and the occupational environment; arsine poisoning in the workplace; radiofrequency sealers and heaters; formaldehyde; ethylene-oxide; silica flour; ethylene-dibromide; vibration syndrome; glycol ethers; 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin; 1,3-butadiene; cadmium; monohalomethanes; dinitrotoluenes; polychlorinated biphenyls in electrical equipment fires or failures; methylene-chloride; and 4,4' methylenedianiline.

  17. A paired comparison between human skin and hairless guinea pig skin in vitro permeability and lag time measurements for 6 industrial chemicals.

    PubMed

    Frasch, H Frederick; Barbero, Ana M

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to measure and compare permeability coefficients (k(p)) and lag times (tau) in human skin and hairless guinea pig (HGP) skin. Paired experiments employed heat-separated epidermal membranes from human and HGP sources mounted on static in vitro diffusion cells. Infinite-dose, saturated aqueous solutions of 6 industrial chemicals were used as donors: aniline, benzene, 1,2- dichloroethane, diethyl phthalate, naphthalene, and tetrachloroethylene. No significant differences were found between human and HGP skin for either k(p) or tau for any of these chemicals (p >or= .24). HGP vs. human k(p) measurements, and HGP vs. human tau measurements, were highly correlated. For k(p), the slope of the linear correlation was close to unity (1.080 +/- 0.182) and the intercept close to 0 (0.015 +/- 0. 029 cm/h), with a correlation coefficient (r(2)) = 0.898. For tau, the slope was also close to unity (0.818 +/- 0.030) and the intercept close to 0 (-0.014 +/- 0.023 h), with r(2) = 0.994. These results suggest that HGP skin may serve as an excellent surrogate for human skin in in vitro dermal penetration studies. PMID:19552540

  18. Separation of volatile organic compounds from dry and humidified nitrogen using polyurethane membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Ponangi, R.P.; Pintauro, P.N.

    1996-08-01

    Homogeneous polyurethane membranes, containing ether or ester soft segments, were examined for the vapor-phase separation of tetrachloroethylene, carbon tetrachloride, benzene, toluene, p-xylene, hexane, and benzene/toluene/xylene mixtures from nitrogen. Both equilibrium sorption/desorption and organic/N{sub 2} separation experiments were carried out. The membranes performed best with aromatic and chlorine-containing organic compounds, with organic/dry N{sub 2} selectivities ranging from 30 to 210 and pressure-normalized permeabilities as high as 1.25 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} cm{sup 3} (STP)/(cm{sup 2} s cmHg) for saturated organic feeds at 23 C and a downstream pressure of 0.005--0.01 atm. Organic/N{sub 2} selectivities and organic permeabilities were generally higher than those reported in the literature for poly(dimethylsiloxane) and aromatic polyimide membranes. Organic permeabilities in the ether soft segment polyurethane membranes were greater than those measured in the polyester films, due to higher organic solubility coefficients (more polymer swelling). The greater swelling of the polyether membranes increased the nitrogen permeabilities and lowered the organic/N{sub 2} selectivities relative to those for polyester membranes. Water permeabilities in both types of polyurethane membranes were low and independent of the organic feed component. The presence of water vapor in the feed (up to 1.2 vol %) had no effect on transmembrane organic fluxes.

  19. Predicting Optimal Resolving Power for Ambient Pressure Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS)

    PubMed Central

    Kanu, Abu B.; Gribb, Molly M.; Hill, Herbert H

    2010-01-01

    Although diffusion theory predicts that IMS resolving power increases with the square root of the voltage applied across the drift tube, in practice there exists an optimum voltage above which resolving power decreases. This optimum voltage was determined to be both compound and initial ion pulse width-dependent. A “conditional” resolving power equation is introduced that can be used to quickly approximate realistic resolving powers for specific instrumental operating parameters and compounds. Using four common environmental contaminants [trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and methyl iso-butyl ketone (MIBK)], diffusion-limited (theoretical), Rd, conditional, Rc, and actual (or measured), Rm, IMS resolving powers were determined and compared for a small IMS instrument designed for subsurface measurements. Detection limits determined at the optimal resolving power for the environmental contaminants ranged from 18 parts per trillion volume-to-volume (pptv) to 80 parts per billion volume-to-volume (ppbv). The maximal measured resolving power for our small, ambient-pressure stand-alone IMS ranged from 42 to 54, yielding an IMS resolving power efficiency, defined as Rm/Rc × 100%, of 56 to 74% of the maximal conditional resolving power possible. PMID:18683951

  20. Interpretation of Borehole Geophysical Logs at Area C, Former Naval Air Warfare Center, Warminster Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sloto, Ronald A.

    2008-01-01

    This study was done by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Navy at Area C of the former Naval Air Warfare Center in Warminster Township, Bucks County, Pa., in support of hydrogeological investigations conducted by the Navy to address ground-water contamination in the Stockton Formation. Borehole geophysical logs were collected, heatpulse-flowmeter measurements were made, and borehole television surveys were run in seven boreholes ranging from 31 to 75 feet deep. Caliper logs and borehole television surveys were used to identify fractures and the location of possible water-bearing zones. Heatpulse-flowmeter measurements were used to identify fractures that were water-bearing zones. Natural-gamma and single-point-resistance logs were used to correlate lithology across the area. Elevated concentrations of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) were measured in water samples from wells with water-bearing zones in the interval of the aquifer where monitor well HN-23A is screened. Water samples from wells with water-bearing zones above or below this interval had substantially lower concentrations of PCE. Wells screened in this interval yielded less than 0.5 gallon per minute, indicating that the interval has low permeability; this may account for the small areal extent and slow migration of PCE.

  1. Synergistic and antagonistic effects on genotoxicity of chemicals commonly found in hazardous waste sites

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, T.H.; Sandhu, S.S.; Peng, Y.; Chen, T.D.; Kim, T.W.

    1992-01-01

    Synergistic and antagonistic effects on genotoxicity of mixtures of four chemicals; i.e., lead tetraacetate (LTA), arsenic trioxide (ATO), dieldrin (DED), and tetrachloroethylene (TCE), were evaluated by the Tradescantia-micronucleus (Trad-MCN) assay. The chemicals were mixed in ratios of 1:1, 1:2 and 2:1 for mixtures of two chemicals and 1:1:1 each for three chemicals. The concentration of stock solution of these chemicals was around the minimum effective dose (MED) or below the MED for these chemicals as reported by Sandhu et al. (1989). Treatments were applied to plant cuttings by hydroponic uptake of the mixed solutions through the stems of the plant for 30 h followed by fixation of the flower buds in aceto-alcohol (1:3 ratio) without a recovery period. Microslides were prepared for scoring MCN frequencies. Results of two series of repeated experiments indicated that all mixtures of LTA/ATO exhibited antagonistic effects. On the other hand, all mixtures of TCE and DED exhibited synergistic effect. These data indicate that for evaluating biological hazards at chemical waste sites, it is prudent to evaluate the genotoxicity of complex chemical mixtures as these exist in nature because the biological effects based on evaluating individual chemicals may not be true predictors of the interactive effects of the pollutants.

  2. A pilot study for delineation of areas contributing water to wellfields at Jackson, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Broshears, R.E.; Connell, J.F.; Short, N.C.

    1991-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment, Division of Groundwater Protection, and the Jackson Utility Division, conducted a pilot study to determine data needs and the applicability of four methods for the delineation of wellhead protection areas. Jackson Utility Division in Jackson, Madison County, Tennessee, pumps about 9 million gallons of ground water daily from two municipal wellfields that tap an unconfined sand aquifer. Under natural hydraulic gradients, ground waterflows southward toward the South Wellfield at approximately 2 to 3 feet per day; natural flow toward the North Wellfield from the east at 1 to 2 feet per day. Water quality generally is suitable for most uses. Concentrations of dissolved solids are low, and excessive iron is the only significant naturally occurring water-quality problem. However, trace concentrations of volatile organic compounds have been detected in water pumps from the South Wellfield; the highest concentration of a single compound has been 23 micrograms per liter of tetrachloroethylene. Potential sources of ground-water contamination in the Jackson area include a hazardous-waste site, municipal and industrial landfill, and underground-storage tanks. Some of the four method for delineating wellhead protection areas did not adequately describe zones contributing flow to the wellfields. Calculations based on a uniform flow equation provided a preliminary delineation of zones of contribution for the wellfields and ground-water time-of-travel contours. Limitations of the applied methods motivated the design of a more rigorous hydrogeologic investigation.

  3. Sustainable in-well vapor stripping: A design, analytical model, and pilot study for groundwater remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, Patrick T.; Ginn, Timothy R.

    2014-12-01

    A sustainable in-well vapor stripping system is designed as a cost-effective alternative for remediation of shallow chlorinated solvent groundwater plumes. A solar-powered air compressor is used to inject air bubbles into a monitoring well to strip volatile organic compounds from a liquid to vapor phase while simultaneously inducing groundwater circulation around the well screen. An analytical model of the remediation process is developed to estimate contaminant mass flow and removal rates. The model was calibrated based on a one-day pilot study conducted in an existing monitoring well at a former dry cleaning site. According to the model, induced groundwater circulation at the study site increased the contaminant mass flow rate into the well by approximately two orders of magnitude relative to ambient conditions. Modeled estimates for 5 h of pulsed air injection per day at the pilot study site indicated that the average effluent concentrations of dissolved tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene can be reduced by over 90% relative to the ambient concentrations. The results indicate that the system could be used cost-effectively as either a single- or multi-well point technology to substantially reduce the mass of dissolved chlorinated solvents in groundwater.

  4. Photochemical pollution at two southern California smog receptor sites

    SciTech Connect

    Grosjean, D.; Williams, E.L. II. )

    1992-06-01

    A one-year survey of air quality has been carried out at two southern California inland locations, Perris and Palm Springs to evaluate transport of photochemical smog from the Los Angeles area and to assess population exposure to toxic air pollutants in the Coachella Valley and eastern Riverside County. Air pollutants measured included formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, nitric acid, and peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN). Acetic acid was also measured as part of the time-integrated method employed to measure PAN. In addition, intensive studies were carried out at both locations and included measurements of aldehydes, nitric acid, PAN, peroxypropionyl nitrate (PPN), methylchloroform and tetrachloroethylene. Maximum concentrations of HCHO, CH{sub 3}CHO, HNO{sub 3}, PAN, PPN, CH{sub 3}COOH and C{sub 2}Cl{sub 4} were 26, 21, 4.5, 7.6, 0.42, 6.6 and 0.29 ppb in Palm Springs and 15, 30, 6.3, 9.1, 0.73, 7.8 and 0.43 ppb in Perris. Pollutant concentrations measured in Palm Springs and Perris are compared to those measured in the Los Angeles area, and are discussed in terms of formation and removal during transport.

  5. Anionic surfactant remediation of soil columns contaminated by nonaqueous phase liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwarakanath, V.; Kostarelos, K.; Pope, Gary A.; Shotts, Doug; Wade, William H.

    1999-06-01

    A variety of column experiments have been completed for the purpose of selecting and evaluating suitable surfactants for remediation of nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). The various NAPLs tested in the laboratory experiments were tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), jet fuel (JP4) and a dense nonaqueous phase liquid from a site at Hill Air Force Base, UT. Both Ottawa sand and Hill field soil were used in these experiments. Surfactant candidates were first screened using phase behavior experiments and only the best ones were selected for the subsequent column experiments. Surfactants which showed high contaminant solubilization, fast coalescence times, and the absence of liquid crystal phases and gels during the phase behavior experiments were tested in soil column experiments. The primary objective of the soil column experiments was to identify surfactants that recovered at least 99% of the contaminant. The secondary objective was to identify surfactants that show low adsorption and little or no loss of hydraulic conductivity during the column experiments. Results demonstrated that up to 99.9% of the contaminants were removed as a result of surfactant flooding of the soil columns. The addition of xanthan gum polymer to the surfactant solution was shown to increase remediation efficiency as a lower volume of surfactant was required for recovering a given volume of NAPL. Based on these experimental results, guidelines for designing highly efficient and robust surfactant floods have been developed and applied to a field demonstration.

  6. Spatiotemporal changes of CVOC concentrations in karst aquifers: analysis of three decades of data from Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xue; Ghasemizadeh, Reza; Padilla, Ingrid; Irizarry, Celys; Kaeli, David; Alshawabkeh, Akram

    2015-04-01

    We studied the spatial and temporal distribution patterns of Chlorinated Volatile Organic Compounds (CVOCs) in the karst aquifers in northern Puerto Rico (1982-2013). Seventeen CVOCs were widely detected across the study area, with the most detected and persistent contaminated CVOCs including trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), carbon tetrachloride (CT), chloroform (TCM), and methylene chloride (DCM). Historically, 471 (76%) and 319 (52%) of the 615 sampling sites have CVOC concentrations above the detection limit and maximum contamination level (MCL), respectively. The spatiotemporal patterns of the CVOC concentrations showed two clusters of contaminated areas, one near the Superfund site "Upjohn" and another near "Vega Alta Public Supply Wells." Despite a decreasing trend in concentrations, there is a general northward movement and spreading of contaminants even beyond the extent of known sources of the Superfund and landfill sites. Our analyses suggest that, besides the source conditions, karst characteristics (high heterogeneity, complex hydraulic and biochemical environment) are linked to the long-term spatiotemporal patterns of CVOCs in groundwater. PMID:25522355

  7. Development of a method for assessing the toxicity of volatile organic contaminants (VOCs) to soil biota

    SciTech Connect

    Cureton, P.M.; Lintott, D.; Balch, G.; Goudey, S.

    1994-12-31

    A method was developed to assess the toxicity of VOCs to plants and earthworms (survival of Eisenia foetida). The procedures followed were based on Greene et al. Gas samples for head space analyses were removed, at test initiation a termination, through a bulkhead fitting in the lid equipped with septa. Treatment levels were prepared, at low temperature to minimize volatilization, by spiking a soil sample with the compound of interest and then serially diluting it with clean soil. Root elongation tests were conducted on filter paper supported by 70 mesh silica sand spiked with the volatile of interest. Soils were then inundated with water, shaken with heating, and the headspace reanalyzed for the total contaminant concentration in the test system (total equals headspace plus adsorbed). Enclosing the seeds and worms in containers did not appear to have detrimental effects. VOCs tested included benzene, xylene, toluene, ethylbenzene, tetrachloroethylene, and 1,1,2-trichloroethylene. Each test was repeated three times with different batches of soil, seed lots and worms from different colonies. Endpoints derived based on nominal and measured concentrations included: NOEC, LOEC, LC{sub 50} and LC{sub 25} for earthworm mortality and EC{sub 50} and EC{sub 25} for emergence and root elongation.

  8. Development of a headspace-solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography method to determine organohalogen contamination in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Mariani, Maurizio Boccacci; Giannetti, Vanessa; Testani, Elena; D'Aiuto, Virginia

    2012-01-01

    The formation of organohalogen compounds in waters treated by chlorination has drawn increasing scientific attention due to the potentially hazardous health effects of this class of substances. Today, chlorination is the most widely used technology for civil water disinfection. In this study, headspace-solid phase microextraction coupled with GC-electron capture detector was used to determine organohalogen compounds in drinking water sampled from aqueducts and artesian wells in Italy. Experimental parameters, such as sample volume, stirring, salting out, extraction temperature, and extraction time, were evaluated and optimized. The LODs ranged from 1 to 10 ng/L and LOQs from 5 to 50 ng/L. A linear response was confirmed by correlation coefficients ranging from 0.9443 to 0.9999. Quantifiable organohalogen residues were found in 11 water samples, with concentration up to 11.3 +/- 0.5 microg/L for the sum of all trihalomethanes and 0.66 +/- 0.03 microg/L for the sum of trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene. These concentrations are lower than the current regulatory limits in Italy. PMID:22468363

  9. Sustainable in-well vapor stripping: A design, analytical model, and pilot study for groundwater remediation.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Patrick T; Ginn, Timothy R

    2014-12-15

    A sustainable in-well vapor stripping system is designed as a cost-effective alternative for remediation of shallow chlorinated solvent groundwater plumes. A solar-powered air compressor is used to inject air bubbles into a monitoring well to strip volatile organic compounds from a liquid to vapor phase while simultaneously inducing groundwater circulation around the well screen. An analytical model of the remediation process is developed to estimate contaminant mass flow and removal rates. The model was calibrated based on a one-day pilot study conducted in an existing monitoring well at a former dry cleaning site. According to the model, induced groundwater circulation at the study site increased the contaminant mass flow rate into the well by approximately two orders of magnitude relative to ambient conditions. Modeled estimates for 5h of pulsed air injection per day at the pilot study site indicated that the average effluent concentrations of dissolved tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene can be reduced by over 90% relative to the ambient concentrations. The results indicate that the system could be used cost-effectively as either a single- or multi-well point technology to substantially reduce the mass of dissolved chlorinated solvents in groundwater. PMID:25461885

  10. Chlorinated organic compounds in ground water at Roosevelt Field, Nassau County, Long Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eckhardt, D.A.; Pearsall, K.A.

    1989-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE), 1,2-dichloroethylene (DCE), and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) have been detected in water from five public-supply wells and six cooling-water wells that tap the Magothy aquifer at Roosevelt Field, a 200-acre area that is now a large shopping mall and office-building complex. The cooling water is discharged after use to the water table (upper glacial) aquifer through a nearby recharge basin and a subsurface drain field. Three plumes of TCE in groundwater have been delineated--the source plume, which has penetrated both aquifers , and two more recent plumes emanating from the two discharge sites in the water-table aquifer. Concentrations of inorganic constituents in the three plumes are the same as those in ambient water in the area. The two secondary plumes discharged cooling water extended at least 1,000 ft south-southeastward in the direction of regional groundwater flow. Pumping at wells screened in the middle and basal sections of the Magothy aquifers, where clay layers are absent and sandy zones provide good vertical hydraulic connection within the aquifer system, has increased the rate of downward contaminant advection. The transient increases in downward movement are cumulative over time and have brought TCE to the bottom of the Magothy aquifer, 500 ft below land surface. (USGS)

  11. Occupational exposure to rubber vulcanization products during repair of rubber conveyor belts in a brown coal mine.

    PubMed

    Gromiec, Jan P; Weso?owski, Wiktor; Brze?nicki, S?awomir; Wróblewska-Jakubowska, Krystyna; Kucharska, Ma?gorzata

    2002-12-01

    Several hundred chemical compounds were found in workroom environments in the rubber industry, but most of the published exposure data relate to the production of tyres; information from the "non-tyre" sections are very limited, if any. This study was carried out to identify chemical substances and measure their air concentrations in the repair shop of a brown coal mine in which damaged rubber conveyor belts were repaired. GC-MS and HPLC analysis of stationary air samples resulted in identification of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons to C12, PAHs, alcohols, phenols, ketones, heterocyclic nitrogen and sulfur compounds. Quantitative evaluation of occupational exposure included determination of organic compound vapours collected on charcoal (GC-MSD), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (HPLC), N-nitrosoamines and other amines (GC-NPD) and DNPH derivatives of aldehydes (HPLC) in the breathing zone of workers representing all job titles. The concentrations of investigated compounds were very low. Carcinogenic substances: N-nitrosoamines, benzene, PAHs were not present in workroom air in concentrations exceeding limits of detection of the analytical methods being applied; concentrations of methylisobutylketone, tetrachloroethylene, naphtha, aromatic hydrocarbons, phthalates and aldehydes were much lower than the respective occupational exposure limit values. The results indicate much lower exposure than that reported in the production of tyres and other fabricated rubber products. PMID:12509065

  12. Sewer Gas: An Indoor Air Source of PCE to Consider During Vapor Intrusion Investigations

    PubMed Central

    Pennell, Kelly G.; Scammell, Madeleine Kangsen; McClean, Michael D.; Ames, Jennifer; Weldon, Brittany; Friguglietti, Leigh; Suuberg, Eric M.; Shen, Rui; Indeglia, Paul A.; Heiger-Bernays, Wendy J.

    2013-01-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) is finalizing its vapor intrusion guidelines. One of the important issues related to vapor intrusion is background concentrations of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) in indoor air, typically attributed to consumer products and building materials. Background concentrations can exist even in the absence of vapor intrusion and are an important consideration when conducting site assessments. In addition, the development of accurate conceptual models that depict pathways for vapor entry into buildings is important during vapor intrusion site assessments. Sewer gas, either as a contributor to background concentrations or as part of the site conceptual model, is not routinely evaluated during vapor intrusion site assessments. The research described herein identifies an instance where vapors emanating directly from a sanitary sewer pipe within a residence were determined to be a source of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) detected in indoor air. Concentrations of PCE in the bathroom range from 2.1 to 190 ug/m3 and exceed typical indoor air concentrations by orders of magnitude resulting in human health risk classified as an “Imminent Hazard” condition. The results suggest that infiltration of sewer gas resulted in PCE concentrations in indoor air that were nearly two-orders of magnitude higher as compared to when infiltration of sewer gas was not known to be occurring. This previously understudied pathway whereby sewers serve as sources of PCE (and potentially other VOC) vapors is highlighted. Implications for vapor intrusion investigations are also discussed. PMID:23950637

  13. The risk screening for indoor air pollution chemicals in Japan.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Kenichi; Uchiyama, Iwao; Ikeda, Koichi

    2007-12-01

    In recent years, public health problems caused by indoor air pollution have been drawing strong public concern in Japan. After conducting extensive exposure assessment, governmental agencies have taken effective measures to solve the problem; for instance, "Guidelines for indoor air quality (IAQ)" of 13 chemicals, for example, formaldehyde, toluene, and xylene, has been established. Thousands of chemicals have been identified in the indoor environment. Priority rating of those chemicals, however, was not based on the health risk level. We developed a risk-screening scheme for indoor air pollution chemicals and analyzed the current status of the risk levels of those chemicals in Japan. We researched scientific knowledge of health hazards and exposure surveys of indoor air pollution chemicals in Japan, and classified those chemicals based on the health risk level estimated from the scheme. The risk levels of 93 chemicals were characterized and six chemicals (formaldehyde, acrolein, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, benzene, tetrachloroethylene, and benzo(a)pyrene) were classified in the highest risk category. PMID:18093057

  14. Preliminary Engineering Report contaminated groundwater seeps 317/319/ENE area

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    When the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation (RFI) in the 317/319/ENE Area of Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) was being completed, groundwater was discovered moving to the surface through a series of seeps. The seeps are located approximately 600 ft south of the ANL fence line in Waterfall Glen Forest Preserve. Samples of this water were collected and analyzed for selected parameters. Two of five seeps sampled were found to contain detectable levels of organic contaminants. Three chemical species were identified: chloroform (14-25 {mu}g/L), carbon tetrachloride (56-340 {mu}g/L), and tetrachloroethylene (3-6 {mu}g/L). The other seeps did not contain detectable levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The water issuing from these two contaminated seeps flows into a narrow ravine, where it is visible as a trickle of water flowing through sand and gravel deposits on the floor of the ravine. Approximately 100-ft downstream of the seep area, the contaminated water is no longer visible, having drained back into the soil in the bed of the ravine. Figure 1 shows the location of the 317/319/ENE Area in relation to the ANL-E site and the Waterfall Glen Forest Preserve.

  15. Analysis of nitrate and volatile organic compound data for ground water in the Great Salt Lake Basins, Utah, Idaho, and Wyoming, 1980-98, National Water-Quality Assessment Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thiros, Susan A.

    2000-01-01

    In 1995, ground water was the source of drinking water to about 52 percent of the population served by public drinking water systems in the Great Salt Lake Basins study unit, which includes parts of Utah, Idaho, and Wyoming. Existing nitrate and volatile organic compound data for ground water collected in the study unit were compiled and summarized as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program?s objective to describe water-quality conditions in the Nation?s aquifers. Prerequisites for the inclusion of nitrate and volatile organic compound data into this retrospective analysis are that the data set is available in electronic form, the data were collected during 1980-98, the data set is somewhat regional in coverage, and the locations of the sampled sites are known. Ground-water data stored in the U.S. Geological Survey?s National Water Information Systemand the Idaho and Utah Public DrinkingWater Systems databases were reviewed. Only the most recent analysis was included in the data sets if more than one analysis was available for a site. The National Water Information System data set contained nitrate analyses for water from 480 wells. The median concentration of nitratewas 1.30 milligrams per liter for the 388 values above minimum reporting limits. The maximum contaminant level for nitrate as established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency was exceeded in water from 10 of the 200 wells less than or equal to 150 feet deep and in water from3 of 280 wells greater than 150 feet deep. The Public Drinking Water Systems data set contained nitrate analyses for water from 587 wells. The median concentration of nitrate was 1.12 milligrams per liter for the 548 values above minimum reporting limits. The maximum contaminant level for nitrate was exceeded at 1 site and 22 sites had concentrations equal to or greater than 5 milligrams per liter. The types of land use surrounding a well and the well depth were related to measured nitrate concentrations in the sampled ground water. Overall, water sampled from wells in rangeland areas had a lowermedianmeasured nitrate concentration (0.76 milligrams per liter) than water from areas with an agricultural or urban/residential land use (1.41 and 1.20 milligrams per liter, respectively). In the NationalWater Information System data set, the median measured nitrate concentration in water from urban/residential areas varied from 1.00 milligrams per liter for wells greater than 150 feet deep to 1.84 milligrams per liter for wells less than or equal to 150 feet deep. The Public DrinkingWater Systems and the National Water Information System data sets contained analyses for most of the State and Federally regulated volatile organic compounds in water from about 368 and 74 wells, respectively. Fifteen different volatile organic compounds were detected at least once in ground water sampled from the Great Salt Lake Basins study unit. Water from 21 wells contained at least 1 volatile organiccompound at detectable concentrations. About 68 percent of the volatile organic compounds detected were in water sampled from wells in Salt Lake County, Utah. Tetrachloroethylene was the most commonly detected volatile organic compound in ground water sampled from the study unit, present in 8 out of 442 samples. Maximum contaminant levels for tetrachloroethylene and 1,1-dichloroethylene as established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency were exceeded in water from one well each.

  16. Piezo-resistivity electric cone penetration technology investigation of the M-basin at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina. Progress report, May 1, 1992--October 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, B.; Rossabi, J.; Shinn, J.D. II; Bratton, W.L.

    1997-05-01

    This report documents the results of a combined field and laboratory investigation program to: (1) delineate the geologic layering and (2) determine the location of a dense non-aqueous liquid-phase (DNAPL) contaminated plume beneath the M Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility at the Savannah River Plant. During April of 1991, DNAPLs were detected in monitoring well (MSB-3D), located adjacent to the capped M-Area Settling Basin. Solvents in the well consisted mainly of tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene, which are also the main solvents found in groundwater in the M Area. In permeable soils, DNAPLs move downward rapidly due to their high density and low viscosity as compared to water. Within the vadose zone, DNAPLs tend to be held by the less permeable clay and silts by capillary force. In the saturated zone, the downward movement is slowed by clays and silts and the DNAPL tends to pool on this layer, then spread laterally. The lateral movement continues until a permeable layer is encountered, which can be a sand lens, fracture or other high conductivity seam. The DNAPL then moves downward, until another low permeability layer is encountered. Applied Research Associates was contracted to conduct a program to: (1) field demonstrate the utility of Cone Penetration Technology to investigate DOE contaminant sites and, (2) conduct a laboratory and field program to evaluate the use of electric resistivity surveys to locate DNAPL contaminated soils. The field program was conducted in the M-Basin and laboratory tests were conducted on samples from the major stratigraphy units as identified in Eddy et. al. Cone Penetration Technology was selected to investigate the M-Basin as it: (1) is minimally invasive, (2) generates minimal waste, (3) is faster and less costly than drilling, (4) provides continuous, detailed in situ characterization data, (5) permits real-time data processing, and (6) can obtain soil, soil gas, and water samples without the need for a boring.

  17. Limited representation of drinking-water contaminants in pregnancy-birth cohorts.

    PubMed

    Makris, Konstantinos C; Andra, Syam S

    2014-01-15

    Water contamination and noise have been consistently the least assessed environmental/lifestyle exposures in pregnancy-birth cohorts (PBC). Water quality surveillance data collected during the past decade within urban drinking-water distribution systems call for re-evaluation of water and health issues in the developed world. The objectives of this scientific commentary were to (i) highlight the extent of appraisal of water contamination in exposure assessment studies of PBC, worldwide, and (ii) propose recommendations to increase awareness of emerging water-related risks through their improved representation into PBC study designs in urban centers. Three scientific literature databases (Scopus, PubMed, and Web of Science) were used for a systematic search on worldwide PBC and their publications that considered water contamination and health outcomes. Publicly-available e-databases (ENRIECO, BIRTHCOHORTS, and CHICOS) were also employed for detailed exploration of existing European Union (EU)-based PBC. Out of the 76 PBC identified in the EU territory, only 12 of them incorporated water contamination into their study designs. Among which only 6 PBC published scientific articles that either included data on water contamination and/or water intake estimates. Trihalomethanes but not other disinfection by-products were mostly studied in the PBC around the globe, while fluoride, atrazine, perfluorinated compounds, tetrachloroethylene, and lead were studied to a lesser extent as water contaminants. It appears that chemical-based water contamination and corresponding human exposures represent a largely underappreciated niche of exposure science pertaining to pregnant mother and children's health in PBC. Future PBC studies should grasp this opportunity to substantially reform elements of water contamination in their exposure assessment protocols and effectively combine them with their epidemiological study designs. PMID:24013514

  18. Chemometric-based determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aqueous samples using ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction combined to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ahmadvand, Mohammad; Sereshti, Hassan; Parastar, Hadi

    2015-09-25

    In the present research, ultrasonic-assisted emulsification-microextraction (USAEME) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has been proposed for analysis of thirteen environmental protection agency (EPA) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in aqueous samples. Tetrachloroethylene was selected as extraction solvent. The main parameters of USAEME affecting the efficiency of the method were modeled and optimized using a central composite design (CCD). Under the optimum conditions (9?L for extraction solvent, 1.15% (w/v) NaCl (salt concentration) and 10min for ultrasonication time), preconcentration factor (PF) of the PAHs was in the range of 500-950. In order to have a comprehensive analysis, multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) as a second-order calibration algorithm was used for resolution, identification and quantification of the target PAHs in the presence of uncalibrated interferences. The regression coefficients and relative errors (REs, %) of calibration curves of the PAHs were in the satisfactory range of 0.9971-0.9999 and 1.17-6.59%, respectively. Furthermore, analytical figures of merit (AFOM) for univariate and second-order calibrations were obtained and compared. As an instance, the limit of detections (LODs) of target PAHs were in the range of 1.87-18.9 and 0.89-6.49ngmL(-1) for univariate and second-order calibration, respectively. Finally, the proposed strategy was used for determination of target PAHs in real water samples (tap and hookah waters). The relative recoveries (RR) and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were 68.4-109.80% and 2.15-6.93%, respectively. It was concluded that combination of multivariate chemometric methods with USAEME-GC-MS can be considered as a new insight for the analysis of target analytes in complex sample matrices. PMID:26319375

  19. Effect of Clay on DNAPL Mobilization During Alcohol Flushing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossman, A. J.; Hayden, N. J.; Matmon, D.

    2001-05-01

    An improved understanding of dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) behavior in clay-containing porous media is critical for improving restoration attempts using in-situ remediation techniques such as alcohol flushing. Clay type and clay fraction at the pore scale affect initial DNAPL distribution and potential mobilization during alcohol flushing. Mobilization experiments were performed on columns containing well-sorted Ottawa white sand and columns containing sand with a 10 percent clay fraction. The clays used were Kaolinite and Ca-montmorillonite. The columns were characterized for pore-size distribution using pressure-saturation experiments and brought to a residual tetrachloroethylene (PCE) saturation before flushing. Successive increments of isopropyl alcohol (IPA) were flushed through the columns to determine the alcohol concentration at the onset of mobilization. In columns containing pure sand and 10 percent Kaolinite (K10), PCE mobilized at approximately the same IPA concentration. PCE mobilized with a much lower IPA concentration in columns containing 10 percent Ca-montmorillonite (M10) indicating that Ca-montmorillonite is affecting DNAPL mobilization. The mobilization at lower IPA concentrations may be due to differing pore sizes and pore-size distributions resulting from the clay type, clay colloid detachment during flushing, interfacial interactions between clay, DNAPL and the pore fluid or some combination of these factors. Pressure-saturation relationships show smaller pores and a greater pore size distribution in the M10 columns. Colloids were observed in the effluent in many experiments and a statistically significant decrease in PCE/water interfacial tension was measured in solutions containing Ca-montmorillonite colloids.

  20. Hydrogeologic Setting of A/M Area: Framework for Groundwater Transport. Book 1

    SciTech Connect

    Van Pelt, R.; Lewis, S.E.; Aadland, R.K.

    1994-03-11

    This document includes a brief summary of the regional geology within a 200--mile radius of the A/M Area, a summary of stratigraphy and hydrostratigraphic nomenclature as it applies to the A/M Area, and a summary of stratigraphy and hydrostratigraphy specific to the A/M Area. Five different stratigraphic cross sections show site-specific geology of the Tertiary section of the Upper Atlantic Coastal Plain geologic province within the A/M Area. The Cretaceous section lacks detail because the deepest wells penetrate only the uppermost part of the Upper Cretaceous sediments. Most of the wells are confined to the Tertiary section. The A/M Area is located in the northwestern corner of the Savannah River Site (SRS). The area serves as a main administrative hub for the site. Between 1958 and 1985, approximately 2,000,000 pounds of volatile organic solvents (metal degreasers, primarily trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene) were routed to the M Area Settling Basin. Between 1954 and 1958, effluent also was discharged to Tim`s Branch via the A014 Outfall. In the main M Area Solvent Handling/Storage Area, a significant amount of leakage occurred from drums stored during this time period. Extensive quantities of solvents were transported, via the Process Sewer Line, to the M Area Settling Basin, and leaks occurred along this line as well. A smaller source area has been identified and is centered around the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) (now called the Savannah River Technology Center [SRTC]) Complex. All of these source areas are represented by solvent contamination in the groundwater system. (Abstract Truncated)

  1. Organic and inorganic composition and microbiology of produced waters from Pennsylvania shale gas wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Akob, Denise M.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Dunlap, Darren S.; Rowan, Elisabeth L.; Lorah, Michelle M.

    2015-01-01

    Hydraulically fractured shales are becoming an increasingly important source of natural gas production in the United States. This process has been known to create up to 420 gallons of produced water (PW) per day, but the volume varies depending on the formation, and the characteristics of individual hydraulic fracture. PW from hydraulic fracturing of shales are comprised of injected fracturing fluids and natural formation waters in proportions that change over time. Across the state of Pennsylvania, shale gas production is booming; therefore, it is important to assess the variability in PW chemistry and microbiology across this geographical span. We quantified the inorganic and organic chemical composition and microbial communities in PW samples from 13 shale gas wells in north central Pennsylvania. Microbial abundance was generally low (66–9400 cells/mL). Non-volatile dissolved organic carbon (NVDOC) was high (7–31 mg/L) relative to typical shallow groundwater, and the presence of organic acid anions (e.g., acetate, formate, and pyruvate) indicated microbial activity. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were detected in four samples (?1 to 11.7 ?g/L): benzene and toluene in the Burket sample, toluene in two Marcellus samples, and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in one Marcellus sample. VOCs can be either naturally occurring or from industrial activity, making the source of VOCs unclear. Despite the addition of biocides during hydraulic fracturing, H2S-producing, fermenting, and methanogenic bacteria were cultured from PW samples. The presence of culturable bacteria was not associated with salinity or location; although organic compound concentrations and time in production were correlated with microbial activity. Interestingly, we found that unlike the inorganic chemistry, PW organic chemistry and microbial viability were highly variable across the 13 wells sampled, which can have important implications for the reuse and handling of these fluids

  2. Effects of Daily Precipitation and Evapotranspiration Patterns on Flow and VOC Transport to Groundwater along a Watershed Flow Path

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, R.L.; Thoms, R.B.; Zogorski, J.S.

    2003-01-01

    MTBE and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are widely observed in shallow groundwater in the United States, especially in urban areas. Previous studies suggest that the atmosphere and/or nonpoint surficial sources could be responsible for some of those VOCs, especially in areas where there is net recharge to groundwater. However, in semiarid locations where annual potential evapotranspiration can exceed annual precipitation, VOC detections in groundwater can be frequent. VOC transport to groundwater under net discharge conditions has not previously been examined. A numerical model is used here to demonstrate that daily precipitation and evapotranspiration (ET) patterns can have a significant effect on recharge to groundwater, water table elevations, and VOC transport. Ten-year precipitation/ET scenarios from six sites in the United States are examined using both actual daily observed values and "average" pulsed precipitation. MTBE and tetrachloroethylene transport, including gas-phase diffusion, are considered. The effects of the precipitation/ET scenarios on net recharge and groundwater flow are significant and complicated, especially under low-precipitation conditions when pulsed precipitation can significantly underestimate transport to groundwater. In addition to precipitation and evapotranspiration effects, location of VOC entry into the subsurface within the watershed is important for transport in groundwater. This is caused by groundwater hydraulics at the watershed scale as well as variations in ET within the watershed. The model results indicate that it is important to consider both daily precipitation/ET patterns and location within the watershed in order to interpret VOC occurrence in groundwater, especially in low-precipitation settings.

  3. Reaching soil cleanup levels by vapor extraction: Laboratory approach

    SciTech Connect

    Hoag, G.E.; Nadim, F.; Dahmani, A.M.

    1996-11-01

    Nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) such as gasoline and chlorinated solvents have a very low water solubility. When these compounds enter the unsaturated soil, buoyancy and capillary forces may hold a portion of them in the soil pores as residual saturation. Hoag and Marley have reported 12--20% residual saturation for gasoline in a partially water saturated sand. Soil Vapor Extraction (SVE) is a technique that removes volatile and some semi-volatile organic compounds from the unsaturated soil by induced flow of air. Through contacts with each state`s EPA office, it was concluded that 21 states have their own regulations for soil cleanup levels and the others follow the guidelines set forth by the Federal RCRA and CERCLA regulations. The State of Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) requires contaminated soils to be remediated to a level such that the amount of contaminant partitioning into the liquid phase remains below the drinking water standard, under equilibrium condition. These standards are 0.001 mg/L for benzene, 1 mg/L for toluene, 0.7 mg/L for ethyl benzene, and 0.005 mg/L for trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene. In order to determine the amount of volatile organics that partition into the liquid phase a test called Toxic Characteristics Leaching Procedure with Zero Headspace Extraction (TCLP-ZHE) is applied to contaminated soils. This test determines the amount of VOC that would partition into the liquid phase in the TCLP-ZHE procedure. This study presents two different laboratory experiments to determine where SVE technology alone, can be an adequate remedy selection for sites that are contaminated with VOCs.

  4. Pre-oxidation efficiency of BAC treatment for VOC removal

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, M.J.; Ahn, S.K.; Kim, Y.R.; Lee, S.H.

    1996-12-31

    Studies have been conducted to evaluate pretreatment for the removal of trichloroethylene(TCE), tetrachloroethylene(PCE) and 1,1,1-trichloroethane(1,1,1-TCA) using the combination of chemical oxidation and biological system with a selected microbial consortium (SMC). SMC were acclimated with the mixture of three chemicals as the sole carbon and energy source. The microbial species isolated from the soil contaminated by VOCs were gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria, identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinobacter calcoaceticus. The purposes of this research were to investigate pre-treatment efficiency for the removal of VOCs in groundwater and to develop design and operational parameters by using a pilot plant system. Simulated groundwater contaminated by VOCs was used to examine the efficiency of chemical oxidation using O{sub 3} alone, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/O{sub 3}, following BAC column. The results showed the efficiency of pretreatment to remove VOCs through six processes composed of ozone generator, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/O{sub 3} reactor and BAC column. Ozone and hydrogen peroxide pretreatment system was more effective to remove VOCs than non-pretreated system and subsequent biodegradation was influenced by pretreatment processes. The mixture of VOCs were removed in the order of TCE, PCE and TCA with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/O{sub 3} and ozone alone. Results obtained show that chemically oxidized VOC can considerably decrease the adsorption capacity. Biological removal efficiency was in the order of TCE, TCA and PCE.

  5. Dechlorination of chlorinated hydrocarbons by bimetallic Ni/Fe immobilized on polyethylene glycol-grafted microfiltration membranes under anoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Parshetti, Ganesh K; Doong, Ruey-an

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the dechlorination of chlorinated hydrocarbons including trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and carbon tetrachloride (CT) by bimetallic Ni/Fe nanoparticles immobilized on four different membranes was investigated under anoxic conditions. Effects of several parameters including the nature of membrane, initial concentration, pH value, and reaction temperature on the dechlorination efficiency were examined. The scanning electron microscopic images showed that the Ni/Fe nanoparticles were successfully immobilized inside the four membranes using polyethylene glycol as the cross-linker. The agglomeration of Ni/Fe were observed in poly(vinylidene fluoride), Millex GS and mixed cellulose ester membranes, while a relatively uniform distribution of Ni/Fe was found in nylon-66 membrane because of its hydrophilic nature. The immobilized Ni/Fe nanoparticles exhibited good reactivity towards the dechlorination of chlorinated hydrocarbons, and the pseudo-first-order rate constant for TCE dechlorination by Ni/Fe in nylon-66 were 3.7-11.7 times higher than those in other membranes. In addition, the dechlorination efficiency of chlorinated hydrocarbons followed the order TCE>PCE>CT. Ethane was the only end product for TCE and PCE dechlorination, while dichloromethane and methane were found to be the major products for CT dechlorination, clearly indicating the involvement of reactive hydrogen species in dechlorination. In addition, the initial rate constant for TCE dechlorination increased upon increasing initial TCE concentrations and the activation energy for TCE dechlorination by immobilized Ni/Fe was 34.9 kJ mol(-1), showing that the dechlorination of TCE by membrane-supported Ni/Fe nanoparticles is a surface-mediated reaction. PMID:22115467

  6. Field demonstration of surfactant-enhanced solubilization of DNAPL at Dover Air Force Base, Delaware.

    PubMed

    Childs, Jeffrey; Acosta, Edgar; Annable, Michael D; Brooks, Michael C; Enfield, Carl G; Harwell, Jeffrey H; Hasegawa, Mark; Knox, Robert C; Rao, P Suresh C; Sabatini, David A; Shiau, Ben; Szekeres, Erika; Wood, A Lynn

    2006-01-01

    This study reports on a surfactant-based flood for tetrachloroethylene (PCE) removal from a control test cell at the Dover National Test Site. The surfactant formulation (sodium dihexyl sulfosuccinate (Aerosol-MA or AMA), isopropanol and calcium chloride) was able to achieve a high concentration of PCE in swollen micelles (supersolubilization) without vertical PCE migration. The hydraulic system included eight screened wells that were operated in both vertical circulation and line drive configurations. After 10 pore volumes of flushing, the overall PCE removal was 68% (65% of which corresponded to the surfactant flooding alone). In addition, the residual PCE saturation was reduced from 0.7% to 0.2%, and the concentration of PCE in the groundwater was reduced from 37-190 mg/L before the flushing to 7.3 mg/L after flooding. Recycling the surfactant solution reduced the required surfactant mass (and thus cost, and waste) by 90%. Close to 80% of the total PCE removal was obtained during the first five pore volumes which were operated in an upward vertical circulation flow scheme. No free oil phase was observed during the test. Further analysis of multilevel sampler data suggests that most of the trapped oil remaining in the cell was likely localized in secluded regions of the aquifer, which helps explain the lower PCE groundwater concentration after remedial activities. In summary, this field study demonstrated the feasibility of surfactant-enhanced remediation to reduce the mass in the source zone and significantly reduce the PCE aqueous concentration and therefore the risk associated with the contaminant plume. PMID:16233935

  7. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction followed by microwave-assisted silylation and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis for simultaneous trace quantification of bisphenol A and 13 ultraviolet filters in wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Cunha, S C; Pena, A; Fernandes, J O

    2015-10-01

    A novel multi-residue gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was validated for the simultaneous determination of trace levels (ng/L) of 13 UV-filters and bisphenol A (BPA) in wastewater samples. It was based on dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLMME) followed by rapid microwave-assisted silylation of the analytes. Several parameters of both extraction and derivatization steps such as type of extractive and dispersive solvents, solvent volumes, pH, salt addition, time and power of microwave were evaluated to achieve the highest yield and to attain the lowest detection limits. Optimized DLLME consisted in the formation of a cloudy solution promoted by the fast addition to the sample (10mL) of a mixture of tetrachloroethylene (50?L, extraction solvent) in acetone (1mL, dispersive solvent). The sedimented phase obtained was evaporated and further silylated under the irradiation of 600W microwave for 5min, being the derivatization yields similar to those obtained after a conventional heating process for 30min at 75°C. Limits of detection and quantification of the method using real samples were 2ng/L and 10ng/L, respectively. Mean extraction efficiency of 82% for three concentrations were achieved, supporting the accuracy of the method. Intra-day and inter-day repeatability of measurements (expressed as relative standard deviation) were lower than 22%. The method was successfully applied to the determination of UV-filters and BPA in samples collected from 15 wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Portugal. Eight analytes were detected, among which 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone, 2-ethylhexyl-4-(dimethylamino)benzoate, octocrylene, and BPA were consistently found in the three seasons of collection. PMID:26341596

  8. Effect of sonication on the photo-catalytic mineralization of some chlorinated organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Katsuhiko; Nitta, Hidenori; Sawada, Katsuya

    2005-03-01

    Effects of the irradiation of ultrasound (US) on the photo-catalytic mineralization of some chlorinated organic compounds such as dichloroethane, tri- and tetrachloroethylenes, chloroacetic acids and chloromethanes were examined in oxygen saturated aqueous solutions suspended titanium dioxide (P25) particles. The yields of the sonochemical mineralization for these compounds were found to be extremely low compared to the photo-catalysis. However, the pre-sonication, US irradiation on the sample solution before the photo-irradiation, enhanced significantly the following photo-catalytic degradation to the complete oxidation. The effect was investigated in detail and it was found that the effect was mainly owing to the increase in the capability of the catalysis of which particles were sparsely dispersed by the sonication. The other contribution of the pre-sonication effect was found to be "pre-sonolysis", the initial formation of some intermediated products sonochemically, which are oxidizable more rapidly further to carbon dioxide than the original compound by the following photo-catalytic reactions. The pre-sonolysis effect was observed remarkably for trichloroacetic acid and tetrachloromethane, both of which are known to be hardly reactive to the photo-catalytic degradation. The photo-catalytic degradation with simultaneous sonication were also carried out for these compounds. The synergetic effect in the mineralization was observed both for carbontetrachloride and for trichloroacetic acid, the higher carbon dioxide yield being obtained in the simultaneous reaction than the sum of the yields in the photo-catalysis and the sonolysis each alone, while no significant synergetic effect was observed in the mineralization of other compounds. PMID:15501709

  9. Widespread PCE Contamination: Characterization and Source Investigation to Protect Municipal Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kropf, C. A.; Benedict, J.; Berg, J. H.

    2003-12-01

    Fifteen years of groundwater quality monitoring of municipal wells in Reno, Nevada have shown increasing levels of PCE (tetrachloroethylene) beyond the U.S. EPA MCL of 5 ug/L. Eleven of the 28 municipal wells have detectable levels of PCE, with five of those wells requiring wellhead treatment. The Central Truckee Meadows Remediation District (CTMRD) was created to provide wellhead treatment of PCE, and evaluate, characterize, and remediate (if possible) the PCE-contaminated groundwater. The CTMRD's first tasks of wellhead treatment, plume characterization, remediation plan development, and source zone identification has been completed. The CTMRD recently completed investigations into the presence of PCE in sanitary sewer systems and their potential as pathways for contaminant migration throughout the Reno/Sparks metropolitan area. The first phase of the sewer investigation considered the possibility that PCE resides in the sanitary sewer system and that it may be actively discharged to the sewer system as well. Results of this investigation revealed that nine sub-regions contained maximum PCE concentrations of that exceeded 100 ug/L, 20 times the U.S. EPA MCL of 5 ug/L. Eight of these nine subregions were located downgradient from active dry-cleaning facilities. One of the sampling locations had a maximum PCE concentration greater than 36,000 ug/L over a 24-hour period. The second phase of the sewer investigation explored for the sanitary sewer system to allow PCE to act as a conduit for contaminant migration. A phased approach was employed to investigate the sewer line leakage and resultant soil and groundwater impact. The investigation found that groundwater beneath most of the targeted sewer line reaches was contaminated. In particular, PCE was detected in 88% of all passive soil gas samples, 71% of all active soil gas samples, 23% of all soil samples, and 73% of all groundwater samples.

  10. Occupation and cancer in Britain

    PubMed Central

    Rushton, L; Bagga, S; Bevan, R; Brown, T P; Cherrie, J W; Holmes, P; Fortunato, L; Slack, R; Van Tongeren, M; Young, C; Hutchings, S J

    2010-01-01

    Background: Prioritising control measures for occupationally related cancers should be evidence based. We estimated the current burden of cancer in Britain attributable to past occupational exposures for International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) group 1 (established) and 2A (probable) carcinogens. Methods: We calculated attributable fractions and numbers for cancer mortality and incidence using risk estimates from the literature and national data sources to estimate proportions exposed. Results: 5.3% (8019) cancer deaths were attributable to occupation in 2005 (men, 8.2% (6362); women, 2.3% (1657)). Attributable incidence estimates are 13?679 (4.0%) cancer registrations (men, 10?063 (5.7%); women, 3616 (2.2%)). Occupational attributable fractions are over 2% for mesothelioma, sinonasal, lung, nasopharynx, breast, non-melanoma skin cancer, bladder, oesophagus, soft tissue sarcoma, larynx and stomach cancers. Asbestos, shift work, mineral oils, solar radiation, silica, diesel engine exhaust, coal tars and pitches, occupation as a painter or welder, dioxins, environmental tobacco smoke, radon, tetrachloroethylene, arsenic and strong inorganic mists each contribute 100 or more registrations. Industries and occupations with high cancer registrations include construction, metal working, personal and household services, mining, land transport, printing/publishing, retail/hotels/restaurants, public administration/defence, farming and several manufacturing sectors. 56% of cancer registrations in men are attributable to work in the construction industry (mainly mesotheliomas, lung, stomach, bladder and non-melanoma skin cancers) and 54% of cancer registrations in women are attributable to shift work (breast cancer). Conclusion: This project is the first to quantify in detail the burden of cancer and mortality due to occupation specifically for Britain. It highlights the impact of occupational exposures, together with the occupational circumstances and industrial areas where exposures to carcinogenic agents occurred in the past, on population cancer morbidity and mortality; this can be compared with the impact of other causes of cancer. Risk reduction strategies should focus on those workplaces where such exposures are still occurring. PMID:20424618

  11. Fates of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in aerobic biological treatment processes: the effects of aeration and sludge addition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Hsiang; Yang, Wen-Ben; Yuan, Chung-Shin; Yang, Jun-Chen; Zhao, Qing-Liang

    2014-05-01

    The emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is becoming an environmental issue of increasing concern. As biological treatment has been considered as one important approach for VOC removal, lab-scale batch experiments were conducted in this study to investigate the fates of four chlorinated hydrocarbons, including chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethylene (TCE), and tetrachloroethylene (PERC), in the biological treatment processes with respect to the effects of aeration and sludge addition. The VOC concentrations in the phases of air, water, and sludge under four simulated treatment stages (the first sedimentation, the forepart and rear part of aerobic biological treatment, and the second sedimentation) were analyzed. The results were used to understand the three-phase partitioning of these compounds and to estimate their potentials for volatilization and biological sorption and degradation in these technologies with the concept of fugacity. It was observed that the VOCs were mainly present in the water phase through the experiments. The effects of aeration or sludge addition on the fates of these VOCs occurred but appeared to be relatively limited. The concentration distributions of the VOCs were well below the reported partitioning coefficients. It was suggested that these compounds were unsaturated in the air and sludge phases, enhancing their potentials for volatilization and biological sorption/degradation through the processes. However, the properties of these chlorinated VOCs such as the volatility, polarity, or even biodegradability caused by their structural characteristics (e.g., the number of chlorine, saturated or unsaturated) may represent more significant factors for their fates in the aerobic biological treatment processes. These findings prove the complication behind the current knowledge of VOC pollutions in WWTPs and are of help to manage the adverse impacts on the environment and public health by the VOCs from these particular sources. PMID:24321332

  12. A national reconnaissance for pharmaceuticals and other organic wastewater contaminants in the United States - II) Untreated drinking water sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Focazio, M.J.; Kolpin, D.W.; Barnes, K.K.; Furlong, E.T.; Meyer, M.T.; Zaugg, S.D.; Barber, L.B.; Thurman, M.E.

    2008-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that a variety of manufactured and natural organic compounds such as pharmaceuticals, steroids, surfactants, flame retardants, fragrances, plasticizers and other chemicals often associated with wastewaters have been detected in the vicinity of municipal wastewater discharges and livestock agricultural facilities. To provide new data and insights about the environmental presence of some of these chemicals in untreated sources of drinking water in the United States targeted sites were sampled and analyzed for 100 analytes with sub-parts per billion detection capabilities. The sites included 25 ground- and 49 surface-water sources of drinking water serving populations ranging from one family to over 8??million people. Sixty-three of the 100 targeted chemicals were detected in at least one water sample. Interestingly, in spite of the low detection levels 60% of the 36 pharmaceuticals (including prescription drugs and antibiotics) analyzed were not detected in any water sample. The five most frequently detected chemicals targeted in surface water were: cholesterol (59%, natural sterol), metolachlor (53%, herbicide), cotinine (51%, nicotine metabolite), ??-sitosterol (37%, natural plant sterol), and 1,7-dimethylxanthine (27%, caffeine metabolite); and in ground water: tetrachloroethylene (24%, solvent), carbamazepine (20%, pharmaceutical), bisphenol-A (20%, plasticizer), 1,7-dimethylxanthine (16%, caffeine metabolite), and tri (2-chloroethyl) phosphate (12%, fire retardant). A median of 4 compounds were detected per site indicating that the targeted chemicals generally occur in mixtures (commonly near detection levels) in the environment and likely originate from a variety of animal and human uses and waste sources. These data will help prioritize and determine the need, if any, for future occurrence, fate and transport, and health-effects research for subsets of these chemicals and their degradates most likely to be found in water resources used for drinking water in the United States.

  13. Exposure to carcinogens for defined job categories in Norway's offshore petroleum industry, 1970 to 2005

    PubMed Central

    Steinsvåg, Kjersti; Bråtveit, Magne; Moen, Bente E

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To identify and describe the exposure to selected known and suspected carcinogenic agents, mixtures and exposure circumstances for defined job categories in Norway's offshore petroleum industry from 1970 to 2005, in order to provide exposure information for a planned cohort study on cancer. Methods Background information on possible exposure was obtained through company visits, including interviewing key personnel (n?=?83) and collecting monitoring reports (n?=?118) and other relevant documents (n?=?329). On the basis of a previous questionnaire administered to present and former offshore employees in 1998, 27 job categories were defined. Results This study indicated possible exposure to 18 known and suspected carcinogenic agents, mixtures or exposure circumstances. Monitoring reports were obtained on seven agents (benzene, mineral oil mist and vapour, respirable and total dust, asbestos fibres, refractory ceramic fibres, formaldehyde and tetrachloroethylene). The mean exposure level of 367 personal samples of benzene was 0.037?ppm (range: less than the limit of detection to 2.6?ppm). Asbestos fibres were detected (0.03?fibres/cm3) when asbestos?containing brake bands were used in drilling draw work in 1988. Personal samples of formaldehyde in the process area ranged from 0.06 to 0.29?mg/m3. Descriptions of products containing known and suspected carcinogens, exposure sources and processes were extracted from the collected documentation and the interviews of key personnel. Conclusions This study described exposure to 18 known and suspected carcinogenic agents, mixtures and exposure circumstances for 27 job categories in Norway's offshore petroleum industry. For a planned cohort study on cancer, quantitative estimates of exposure to benzene, and mineral oil mist and vapour might be developed. For the other agents, information in the present study can be used for further assessment of exposure, for instance, by expert judgement. More systematic exposure surveillance is needed in this industry. For future studies, new monitoring programmes need to be implemented. PMID:17043075

  14. Distribution of volatile organic compounds in a New Jersey coastal plain aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fusillo, T.V.; Hochreiter, J.J., Jr.; Lord, D.G.

    1985-01-01

    Samples for analysis of volatile organic compounds were collected from 315 wells in the Potomac-Raritan-Magothy aquifer system in southwestern New Jersey and a small adjacent area in Pennsylvania during 1980-82. Volatile organic compounds were detected in all three aquifer units of the Potomac-Raritan-Magoth aquifer system in the study area. Most of the contamination appears to be confined to the outcrop area at present. Low levels of contamination, however, were found downdip of the outcrop area in the upper and middle aquifers. Trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, and benzene were the most frequently detected compounds. Differences in the areal distributions of light chlorinated hydrocarbons, such as trichloroethylene, and aromatic hydrocarbons, such as benzene, were noted and are probably due to differences in the uses of the compounds and the distribution patterns of potential contamination sources. The distribution patterns of volatile organic compounds differed greatly among the three aquifer units. The upper aquifer, which crops out mostly in less-developed areas, had the lowest percentage of wells with volatile organic compounds detected (10 percent of wells sampled). The concentrations in most wells in the upper aquifer which had detectable levels were less than 10 ??g/l. In the middle aquifer, which crops out beneath much of the urban and industrial area adjacent to the Delaware River, detectable levels of volatile organic compounds were found in 22 percent of wells sampled, and several wells contained concentrations above 100 ??g/l. The lower aquifer, which is confined beneath much of the outcrop area of the aquifer system, had the highest percentage of wells (28 percent) with detectable levels. This is probably due to (1) vertical leakage of contamination from the middle aquifer, and (2) the high percentage of wells tapping the lower aquifer in the most heavily developed areas of the outcrop.

  15. Field evaluation of ground water sampling devices for volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Muska, C F; Colven, W P; Jones, V D; Scogin, J T; Looney, B B; Price, V Jr

    1986-01-01

    Previous studies conducted under laboratory conditions demonstrated that the type of device used to sample ground water contaminated with volatile organic compounds can significantly influence and analytical results. The purpose of this study was to evaluate, under field conditions, both commercial and developmental ground water sampling devices as part of an ongoing ground water contamination investigation and remediation program at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). Ground water samples were collected using six types of sampling devices in monitoring wells of different depths and concentrations of volatile organic contaminants (primarily trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene). The study matrix was designed to statistically compare the reuslts of each sampling device under the test conditions. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation criteria were used to determine the relative performance of each device. Two categories of sampling devices were evaluated in this field study, positive displacement pumps and grab samplers. The positive displacement pumps consisted of a centrifugal (mechanical) pump and a bladder pump. The grab samples tested were a syringe sampler, a dual-check valve bailer, a surface bomb sampler, and a pressurized bailer. Preliminary studies were conducted to establish the analytical and sampling variability associated with each device. All six devices were then used to collect ground water samples in water table (unconfined), semi-confined aquifer, and confined aquifer monitoring wells. Results were evaluated against a set of criteria that included intrasampling device variability (precision), volatile organic concentration (accuracy), sampling and analytical logistics, and cost. The study showed that, by using careful and reproducible procedures, overall sampling variability is low regardless of sampling device.

  16. Valiant 'Zero-Valent' Effort Restores Contaminated Grounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) are chemical compounds that can contaminate soil and groundwater to the point of irreparability. These substances are only slightly soluble in water, and are much denser than water. Because of their solubility, DNAPLs form separate liquid phases in groundwater, and because of their density, DNAPLs sink in aquifers instead of floating at the water table, making it extremely difficult to detect their presence. If left untreated in the ground, they can taint fresh water sources. Common DNAPLs include chlorinated hydrocarbon compounds such as carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, tetrachloroethylene, and trichloroethylene. Trichloroethylene was used during the early days of the Space Program, as a solvent for flushing rocket engines, and for metal cleaning and degreasing of equipment, electronics, and heavy machinery. As a result, areas of Cape Canaveral s Launch Complex 34, the site of several historic Saturn rocket launches occurring from 1959 to 1968, were polluted with chlorinated DNAPLs. Through the direction and guidance of Dr. Jacqueline Quinn, an environmental engineer in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at NASA s Kennedy Space Center, a biodegradable environmental cleanup technology was developed to reductively dechlorinate DNAPL sources in polluted water at Launch Complex 34. It was important for Kennedy to nip this problem in the bud, in light of the fact that the Space Center is also a National Wildlife Refuge, home to thousands of shorebirds, endangered sea turtles and eagles, manatees, alligators, and diverse habitats that include brackish marshes and salt water estuaries. The success in remediating this historic launch site has led to numerous commercial applications that are restoring the health of our environmental surroundings.

  17. Determinants of personal, indoor and outdoor VOC concentrations: An analysis of the RIOPA data

    PubMed Central

    Su, Feng-Chiao; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Batterman, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Community and environmental exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) has been associated with a number of emission sources and activities, e.g., environmental tobacco smoke and pumping gasoline. Such factors have been identified from mostly small studies with relatively limited information regarding influences on VOC levels. This study uses data from the Relationship of Indoor Outdoor and Personal Air (RIOPA) study to investigate environmental, individual and social determinants of VOC concentrations. RIOPA included outdoor, indoor and personal measurements of 18 VOCs from 310 non-smoking households and adults in three cities and two seasons, and collected a wide range of information pertaining to participants, family members, households, and neighborhoods. Exposure determinants were identified using stepwise regressions and linear mixed-effect models. Most VOC exposure (66 to 78% of the total exposure, depending on VOC) occurred indoors, and outdoor VOC sources accounted for 5 (d-limonene) to 81% (carbon tetrachloride) of the total exposure. Personal exposure and indoor measurements had similar determinants, which depended on the VOC. Gasoline-related VOCs (e.g., benzene, methyl tertiary butyl ether) were associated with city, residences with attached garages, self-pumping of gas, wind speed, and house air exchange rate (AER). Odorant and cleaning-related VOCs (e.g., 1,4-dichlorobenzene and chloroform) also were associated with city and AER, and with house size and family members showering. Dry-cleaning and industry-related VOCs (e.g., tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene) were associated with city, residence water supply type, and dry-cleaner visits. These and other relationships were significant, explained from 10 to 40% of the variation, and are consistent with known emission sources and the literature. Outdoor concentrations had only two common determinants: city and wind speed. Overall, personal exposure was dominated by the home setting, although a large fraction of VOC concentrations were due to outdoor sources. City, personal activities, household characteristics and meteorology were significant determinants. PMID:24034784

  18. A Modified Light Transmission Visualization Method for DNAPL Saturation Measurements in 2-D Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bob, M. M.; Brooks, M. C.; Mravik, S. C.; Wood, L.

    2007-12-01

    In this research, a light transmission visualization (LTV) method was used to quantify dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL) saturation in two-dimensional (2-D), two fluid phase systems. The method is an expansion of earlier LTV methods and takes into account both absorption and refraction light theories. Based on this method, DNAPL and water saturations can rapidly be obtained point wise across sand-packed 2-D flow chambers without the need to develop a calibration curve. The method was applied to measure, for the first time, undyed DNAPL saturation in small 2-D chambers. Known amounts of DNAPL, modeled by tetrachloroethylene (PCE), were added to the chamber and these amounts were compared to results obtained by this LTV method. Strong correlation existed between results obtained based on this method and the known PCE amounts with an R2 value of 0.993. Similar experiments conducted using dyed PCE showed a stronger correlation between results obtained by this LTV method and the known amounts of dyed PCE added to the chamber with an R2 value of 0.999. The method was also used to measure dyed PCE saturation in a large 2-D model following sparging experiments. Results obtained from image analyses following each sparging event were compared to results obtained by two independent techniques, namely gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analyses and carbon column extraction. There was a good agreement between the results obtained by this LTV method and those obtained by the two independent techniques when experiments were carried out under stable light source conditions, and errors in mass balance were minor. The method presented here can be expanded to measure fluid contents in three fluid phase systems and provide a non-destructive, non-intrusive tool to investigate changes in DNAPL architecture and flow characteristics in laboratory experiments. Disclaimer This is an abstract of a proposed presentation and does not necessarily reflect EPA policy.

  19. Distributions and sea-to-air fluxes of volatile halocarbons in the East China Sea in early winter.

    PubMed

    He, Zhen; Yang, Gui-Peng; Lu, Xiao-Lan

    2013-01-01

    The concentrations of six volatile halogenated organic compounds (VHOC)-chloroform (CHCl(3)), trichloroethylene (C(2)HCl(3)), tetrachloroethylene (C(2)Cl(4)), carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)), methylchloroform (CH(3)CCl(3)), and bromoform (CHBr(3)) in the East China Sea (ECS) in November and December 2010 were measured by a purge and trap system coupled to a gas chromatograph with an electron capture detection (ECD). Mean (range) concentrations of CHCl(3), C(2)HCl(3), C(2)Cl(4), CH(3)CCl(3), CCl(4) and CHBr(3) in the surface water were 16.90 (0.40-62.92), 16.27 (2.78-83.33), 2.40 (0.39-9.33), 32.29 (19.72-57.68), 1.70 (0.39-8.73) and 17.11 (4.33-34.46) pM, respectively. With the exception of C(2)HCl(3), the concentrations of other five kinds of VHOC generally exhibited a decreasing trend with distance from the coast, with the low values found in the open sea. The anthropogenic sources contributed to the elevated levels of CCl(4) and CH(3)CCl(3), whereas a combination of the anthropogenic and biogenic sources might be responsible for the elevated levels of CHCl(3), C(2)HCl(3), C(2)Cl(4) and CHBr(3). In the depth profiles, vertical distributions of the six VHOC in the water column were complicated, with the maxima occurring at 0-100 m depths. The mean sea-to-air fluxes of CHCl(3), C(2)HCl(3), C(2)Cl(4) and CHBr(3) were estimated to be 21.08, 29.94, 2.05 and 35.50 nmol m(-2) d(-1), respectively, indicating that the ECS was a source for the four VHOC in the atmosphere. PMID:23102696

  20. Relation of organic contaminant equilibrium sorption and kinetic uptake in plants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Li, H.; Sheng, G.; Chiou, C.T.; Xu, O.

    2005-01-01

    Plant uptake is one of the environmental processes that influence contaminant fate. Understanding the magnitude and rate of plant uptake is critical to assessing potential crop contamination and the development of phytoremediation technologies. We determined (1) the partition-dominated equilibrium sorption of lindane (LDN) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) by roots and shoots of wheat seedlings, (2) the kinetic uptake of LDN and HCB by roots and shoots of wheat seedlings, (3) the kinetic uptake of HCB, tetrachloroethylene (PCE), and trichloroethylene (TCE) by roots and shoots of ryegrass seedlings, and (4) the lipid, carbohydrate, and water contents of the plants. Although the determined sorption and the plant composition together suggest the predominant role of plant lipids for the sorption of LDN and HCB, the predicted partition with lipids of LDN and HCB using the octanol-water partition coefficients is notably lower than the measured sorption, due presumably to underestimation of the plant lipid contents and to the fact that octanol is less effective as a partition medium than plant lipids. The equilibrium sorption or the estimated partition can be viewed as the kinetic uptake limits. The uptakes of LDN, PCE, and TCE from water at fixed concentrations increased with exposure time in approach to steady states. The uptake of HCB did not reach a plateau within the tested time because of its exceptionally high partition coefficient. In all of the cases, the observed uptakes were lower than their respective limits, due presumably to contaminant dissipation in and limited water transpiration by the plants. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  1. Application of a new vertical profiling tool (ESASS) for sampling groundwater quality during hollow-stem auger drilling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harte, Philip T.; Flanagan, Sarah M.

    2011-01-01

    A new tool called ESASS (Enhanced Screen Auger Sampling System) was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. The use of ESASS, because of its unique U.S. patent design (U.S. patent no. 7,631,705 B1), allows for the collection of representative, depth-specific groundwater samples (vertical profiling) in a quick and efficient manner using a 0.305-m long screen auger during hollow-stem auger drilling. With ESASS, the water column in the flights above the screen auger is separated from the water in the screen auger by a specially designed removable plug and collar. The tool fits inside an auger of standard inner diameter (82.55 mm). The novel design of the system constituted by the plug, collar, and A-rod allows the plug to be retrieved using conventional drilling A-rods. After retrieval, standard-diameter (50.8 mm) observation wells can be installed within the hollow-stem augers. Testing of ESASS was conducted at one waste-disposal site with tetrachloroethylene (PCE) contamination and at two reference sites with no known waste-disposal history. All three sites have similar geology and are underlain by glacial, stratified-drift deposits. For the applications tested, ESASS proved to be a useful tool in vertical profiling of groundwater quality. At the waste site, PCE concentrations measured with ESASS profiling at several depths were comparable (relative percent difference <25%) to PCE concentrations sampled from wells. Vertical profiling with ESASS at the reference sites illustrated the vertical resolution achievable in the profile system; shallow groundwater quality varied by a factor of five in concentration of some constituents (nitrate and nitrite) over short (0.61 m) distances.

  2. Application of a new vertical profiling tool (ESASS) for sampling groundwater quality during hollow-stem auger drilling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harte, P.T.; Flanagan, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    A new tool called ESASS (Enhanced Screen Auger Sampling System) was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. The use of ESASS, because of its unique U.S. patent design (U.S. patent no. 7,631,705 B1), allows for the collection of representative, depth-specific groundwater samples (vertical profiling) in a quick and efficient manner using a 0.305-m long screen auger during hollow-stem auger drilling. With ESASS, the water column in the flights above the screen auger is separated from the water in the screen auger by a specially designed removable plug and collar. The tool fits inside an auger of standard inner diameter (82.55 mm). The novel design of the system constituted by the plug, collar, and A-rod allows the plug to be retrieved using conventional drilling A-rods. After retrieval, standard-diameter (50.8 mm) observation wells can be installed within the hollow-stem augers. Testing of ESASS was conducted at one waste-disposal site with tetrachloroethylene (PCE) contamination and at two reference sites with no known waste-disposal history. All three sites have similar geology and are underlain by glacial, stratified-drift deposits. For the applications tested, ESASS proved to be a useful tool in vertical profiling of groundwater quality. At the waste site, PCE concentrations measured with ESASS profiling at several depths were comparable (relative percent difference <25%) to PCE concentrations sampled from wells. Vertical profiling with ESASS at the reference sites illustrated the vertical resolution achievable in the profile system; shallow groundwater quality varied by a factor of five in concentration of some constituents (nitrate and nitrite) over short (0.61 m) distances. Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation ?? 2011, National Ground Water Association. No claim to original US government works.

  3. Reconnaissance of volatile organic compounds in the subsurface at Rutgers University, Busch Campus, Piscataway Township, New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    dePaul, V.T.

    1996-01-01

    During 1991-92, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a hydrogeologic reconnaissance at a site near the Rutgers University, Busch Campus, Chemical Engineering building, C-Wing. Results of analyses of the soil-gas samples, which were collected at 43 locations, indicated the presence of volatile organic compounds, primarily carbon tetrachloride, near the C-Wing building and about 550 feet downgradient from and southwest of the C-Wing building. Concentrations of the compound in soil-gas samples were highest (2.1 ug/L (micrograms per liter)) along the southwestern wall of the C-Wing building. Ground-water samples were collected at depths as great as 55 feet from five wells and piezometers near the C-Wing building. Samples collected along the southwestern wall of the building also contained the highest concentrations of volatile organic compounds. Concentrations of carbon tetrachloride in the ground-water samples ranged from < 0.35 ug/L to 3,400 ug/L, and concentrations of tetrachloro- ethylene ranged from < 0.28 ug/L to 85 ug/L. Ground-water samples collected at depths of 55 feet or more from two wells located on the Rutgers University Golf Course about 2,400 feet down- gradient from the C-Wing building contained concentrations of tetrachloroethylene as great as 17.7 ug/L. Water levels measured in six wells and six piezometers indicated that the general flow direction in the shallow part of the aquifer is to the southwest of the C-Wing building. An electrical-resistivity survey was conducted by azimuthal resistivity techniques. The results of the survey were consistent with field measurements, and the dominant vertical fractures near the Busch Campus trend northeast. An electromagnetic survey was ineffective as a result of cultural interferences and could not be used to determine the hydrogeologic characteristics of the site.

  4. Treatment of chlorinated ethenes in groundwater with ozone and hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Clancy, P.B.; Armstrong, J.; Couture, M.

    1996-12-31

    A study was conducted to enhance the performance of an advanced oxidation process in treating chlorinated ethenes in groundwater at IBM`s groundwater treatment system at its Essex Junction, Vermont facility. A model describing the reaction kinetics and mass transfer of a co-current ozone injection process is presented. This model, in conjunction with experiments, demonstrates that the treatment performance of the ozone treatment process at a given ozone/air concentration and ozone mass flowrate cannot be improved by varying process operating parameters such as number of ozone injectors utilized, use of a static mixer, or variation of groundwater flowrate through each injector. This is because dissolved ozone reaches equilibrium with the injected ozone/air mixture within two seconds of initial contact. Also, the Venturi-type ozone injection system presently in use destroys nearly half of the injected ozone. Injection of hydrogen peroxide in conjunction with ozone increases the overall tetrachloroethylene (PCE) treatment efficiency by a factor of four (in comparison to ozone alone) at a H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/O{sub 3} mass ratio of between 1 and 2. Treatment of trichloroethylene (TCE) is enhanced by a factor of two. This enhancement of the oxidative treatment process results in a reduction in solvent mass load to a granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption system located downstream, thus potentially reducing the usage GAC and regeneration of spent GAC. However, residual hydrogen peroxide and/or hydroxyl free radicals from the oxidation process effluent may interact adversely with certain grades of GAC; the causes of this interaction and methods to attenuate it (i.e., the use of more resistant grades of GAC) are discussed. Overall O{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/GAC system operating costs can potentially be reduced significantly (up to $20K annually). An economic analysis and system operation/cost optimization study are presented. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Alternative Methods for Assessing Contaminant Transport from the Vadose Zone to Indoor Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baylor, K. J.; Lee, A.; Reddy, P.; Plate, M.

    2010-12-01

    Vapor intrusion, which is the transport of contaminant vapors from groundwater and the vadose zone to indoor air, has emerged as a significant human health risk near hazardous waste sites. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) can volatilize from groundwater and from residual sources in the vadose zone and enter homes and commercial buildings through cracks in the slab, plumbing conduits, or other preferential pathways. Assessment of the vapor intrusion pathway typically requires collection of groundwater, soil gas, and indoor air samples, a process which can be expensive and time-consuming. We evaluated three alternative vapor intrusion assessment methods, including 1) use of radon as a surrogate for vapor intrusion, 2) use of pressure differential measurements between indoor/outdoor and indoor/subslab to assess the potential for vapor intrusion, and 3) use of passive, longer-duration sorbent methods to measure indoor air VOC concentrations. The primary test site, located approximately 30 miles south of San Francisco, was selected due to the presence of TCE (10 - 300 ug/L) in shallow groundwater (5 to 10 feet bgs). At this test site, we found that radon was not a suitable surrogate to asses vapor intrusion and that pressure differential measurements are challenging to implement and equipment-intensive. More significantly, we found that the passive, longer-duration sorbent methods are easy to deploy and compared well quantitatively with standard indoor air sampling methods. The sorbent technique is less than half the cost of typical indoor air methods, and also provides a longer duration sample, typically 3 to 14 days rather than 8 to 24 hours for standard methods. The passive sorbent methods can be a reliable, cost-effective, and easy way to sample for TCE, PCE and other VOCs as part of a vapor intrusion investigation.

  6. Effect of Humic Acid on Migration, Distribution and Remediation of Dense Non-aqueous Phase Liquids: A laboratory investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Z.; Wu, J.; Xu, H.; Gao, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Over the last decades, dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) contamination in the subsurface increases with the rapid development of oil industry and becomes the focus of many studies. The migration, distribution and remediation efficiency of DNAPLs in the subsurface environment are greatly affected by the solution chemistry besides the physical heterogeneities of aquifers. Humic acid (HA), which is ubiquitous in natural environments, is a surface active substance exhibiting solubility enhancement behavior for hydrophobic organic compounds such as DNAPLs. Here we reported a laboratory investigation to study the effects of HA on the infiltration, immobilization and subsequent recovery of DNAPL in porous media. Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) was selected as the representative DNAPL in this study. Two-dimensional (2-D) sandbox experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of different HA concentrations on the transport, distribution of PCE and the remediation of PCE using surfactant (Tween 80) flushing in a saturated porous media system. The surfactant flushing of PCE was performed after the PCE transport and distribution had reached equilibrium. A light transmission visualization method with charge-coupled device (CCD) camera was adopted to visualize PCE distribution and quantify its saturation. In addition, the experiments were also designed to gather data for the validation of multiphase flow models. Effluent samples were collected to determine dissolved PCE concentrations. PCE solubilization and PCE-water interfacial tension were experimentally determined in aqueous solutions of varying HA concentrations. The experimental results showed that the presence of HA can have a dramatic impact on PCE flow and entrapment, and significantly improved the recovery of PCE during surfactant enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR). The findings are of use for better understanding of the migration and entrapment of DNAPLs and developing of SEAR technology.

  7. VOCs in Non-Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Non-Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration (ID) was initiated in 1989. Objectives for the ID were to test the integrated demonstration concept, demonstrate and evaluate innovative technologies/systems for the remediation of VOC contamination in soils and groundwater, and to transfer technologies and systems to internal and external customers for use in fullscale remediation programs. The demonstration brought together technologies from DOE laboratories, other government agencies, and industry for demonstration at a single test bed. The Savannah River Site was chosen as the location for this ID as the result of having soil and groundwater contaminated with VOCS. The primary contaminants, trichlorethylene and tetrachloroethylene, originated from an underground process sewer line servicing a metal fabrication facility at the M-Area. Some of the major technical accomplishments for the ID include the successful demonstration of the following: In situ air stripping coupled with horizontal wells to remediate sites through air injection and vacuum extraction; Crosshole geophysical tomography for mapping moisture content and lithologic properties of the contaminated media; In situ radio frequency and ohmic heating to increase mobility, of the contaminants, thereby speeding recovery and the remedial process; High-energy corona destruction of VOCs in the off-gas of vapor recovery wells; Application of a Brayton cycle heat pump to regenerate carbon adsorption media used to trap VOCs from the offgas of recovery wells; In situ permeable flow sensors and the colloidal borescope to determine groundwater flow; Chemical sensors to rapidly quantify chlorinated solvent contamination in the subsurface; In situ bioremediation through methane/nutrient injection to enhance degradation of contaminants by methanotrophic bateria.

  8. Survey of bottled drinking water sold in Canada. Part 2. Selected volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Page, B.D.; Conacher, H.B.S.; Salminen, J.

    1993-01-01

    Selected volatile organic compound (VOC) contaminants were determined in 182 samples of retail bottled waters purchased in Canada. Samples included spring water (86) packaged in containers of polyethylene or in smaller containers of transparent plastic or glass, mineral water (61) packaged only in transparent plastic or glass, and miscellaneous bottled waters (35). Analyses were performed by 3 laboratories, each using headspace sampling and capillary gas chromatography with either mass spectrometric (1 laboratory) or flame ionization detection with mass spectrometric confirmation, if required (2 laboratories). Benzene, the contaminant of primary interest, was detected in only 1 of the 182 samples at 2 {mu}g/kg. Other VOC contaminants detected (number of positive samples, average, and range of positives in {mu}g/kg) included toluene (20, 6.92, 0.5-63), cyclohexane (23, 39.2, 3-108), chloroform (12, 25.8, 3.7-70), and dichloromethane (4, 59, 22-97). Cyclohexane was found in the plastic and as a migrant from the plastic in 20 samples of spring water, but it was found in only 1 of 61 mineral water samples analyzed at only 3 {mu}g/kg/. Chloroform was found almost exclusively in samples that could have been obtained from public water supplies. It was not found in mineral water samples, but it was found in 1 spring water sample at 3.7 {mu}g/kg. The source of the toluene contamination was not known. Other VOCs detected include ethanol and limonene, associated with added flavoring; pentane, as a migrant from a foamed polystyrene cap liner; and 1,1,2,2-tetra-chloroethylene in a sample of demineralized water. 10 refs., 6 tabs.

  9. Concentrations, loads and yields of selected water-quality constituents during low flow and storm runoff from three watersheds at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, May 1994 through September 1996

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rasmussen, P.P.

    1998-01-01

    A study of the effects of storm runoff from urban areas on water quality at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, was conducted from May 1994 through September 1996. The purpose of this report is to present information to assess the current (1994-96) conditions and possible methods for anticipating future water-quality effects from storm runoff and changes in land use. Three sampling sites were established to monitor streamflow and water quality from three watersheds draining the study area. Streamflow was monitored continuously, and water-quality samples were collected during low-flow (12 samples) and storm-runoff (21 samples) conditions to determine mean annual constituent loads. Constituent concentrations for the most part were smallest during low flow with the exception of major ions, dissolved solids, and some nutrients. Concentrations of suspended solids and total recoverable metals at all three sites were much larger in storm-runoff samples than in low-flow samples--typically an order of magnitude larger than low-flow concentrations. Mean low-flow nutrient concentrations were either larger than or smaller than storm-runoff concentrations depending on the watershed. Total chloroform and total tetrachloroethylene were the only two volatile organic compounds detected, and acid-base/neutral organic compounds were not detected in any of the samples collected. Eight pesticides were detected in low-flow samples, and 15 pesticides were detected in storm-runoff samples. The only mean concentrations of the selected constituents in this study that exceeded either the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Maximum Contaminant Level or the Secondary Maximum Contaminant Level were dissolved solids and total recoverable iron and manganese.

  10. Water-Quality Data for Pharmaceuticals and Other Organic Wastewater Contaminants in Ground Water and in Untreated Drinking Water Sources in the United States, 2000-01

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, Kimberlee K.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Focazio, Michael J.; Furlong, Edward T.; Meyer, Michael T.; Zaugg, Steven D.; Haack, Sheridan K.; Barber, Larry B.; Thurman, E. Michael

    2008-01-01

    This report presents water-quality data from two nationwide studies on the occurrence and distribution of organic wastewater contaminants. These data are part of the continuing effort of the U.S. Geological Survey Toxic Substances Hydrology Program to collect baseline information on the environmental occurrence of pharmaceuticals and other organic wastewater contaminants. In 2000, samples were collected from 47 ambient ground-water sites (not drinking-water wells) in 18 states and analyzed for 65 organic wastewater contaminants. In the summer of 2001, samples were collected from 74 sources of raw, untreated, drinking water in 25 states and Puerto Rico and analyzed for 100 organic wastewater contaminants. These sources comprise 25 ground-water and 49 surface-water sources of drinking water serving populations ranging from one family to more than 8 million people. Site selection for both studies focused on areas known or suspected to contain sources of animal and/or human wastewater. The five most frequently detected compounds in samples collected from ambient ground-water sites are N,N-diethyltoluamide (35 percent, insect repellant), bisphenol A (30 percent, plasticizer), tri(2-chloroethy) phosphate (30 percent, fire retardant), sulfamethoxazole (23 percent, veterinary and human antibiotic), and 4-octylphenol monoethoxylate (19 percent, detergent metabolite). The five most frequently detected organic wastewater contaminants in samples of untreated drinking water from surface-water sources are cholesterol (59 percent, natural sterol), metolachlor (53 percent, herbicide), cotinine (51 percent, nicotine metabolite), B -sitosterol (37 percent, natural plant sterol), and 1,7-dimethylxanthine (27 percent, caffeine metabolite). The five most frequently detected organic wastewater contaminants in samples of untreated drinking water from ground-water sources are tetrachloroethylene (24 percent, solvent), carbamazepine (20 percent, pharmaceutical), bisphenol A (20 percent, plasticizer), 1,7-dimethylxanthine (16 percent, caffeine metabolite), and tri(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (12 percent, fire retardant).

  11. Respiratory exposure to components of water-miscible metalworking fluids.

    PubMed

    Suuronen, Katri; Henriks-Eckerman, Maj-Len; Riala, Riitta; Tuomi, Timo

    2008-10-01

    Water-miscible metalworking fluids (MWFs) are capable of causing respiratory symptoms and diseases. Recently, much emphasis has been put on developing new methods for assessing respiratory exposure to MWF emulsions. The air concentrations of ingredients and contaminants of MWF and inhalable dust were measured in 10 metal workshops in southern Finland. Oil mist was determined by infra red spectroscopy analysis after tetrachloroethylene extraction from the filter. Aldehydes were collected on Sep-Pak chemosorbents and analysed by liquid chromatography. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were collected on Tenax adsorbents and analysed by gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection after thermal desorption. Endotoxins were collected on glass fibre filter and analysed by enzyme-based spectrophotometry, and viable microbes were collected on polycarbonate filter and cultured. Inhalable dust was collected on cellulose acetate filter and quantified gravimetrically. Associations between the different exposures were calculated with Spearman's correlations. The mean concentration of oil mist was 0.14 (range <0.010-0.60) mg m(-3). The mean total concentration of aldehydes was 0.095 (0.026-0.38) mg m(-3), with formaldehyde as the main aldehyde. The average total concentration of VOC was 1.9 (0.34-4.5) mg m(-3) consisting mainly of high-boiling aliphatic hydrocarbons. Several potential sensitizing chemicals such as terpenes were found in small quantities. The concentration of microbial contaminants was low. All the measured air concentrations were below the Finnish occupational exposure limits. The exposure in machine shops was quantitatively dominated by volatile compounds. Additional measurements of MWF components such as aldehydes, alkanolamines and VOCs are needed to get more information on the chemical composition of workshops' air. New air cleaning methods should be introduced, as oil mist separators are insufficient to clean the air of small molecular impurities. PMID:18678881

  12. Volatile organic compounds in roadside microenvironments of metropolitan Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, C. Y.; Chan, L. Y.; Wang, X. M.; Liu, Y. M.; Lee, S. C.; Zou, S. C.; Sheng, G. Y.; Fu, J. M.

    The characteristics and concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the roadside microenvironments of metropolitan Hong Kong were investigated. The VOC concentrations, especially toluene, benzene and chlorinated VOCs in Hong Kong were high when compared with those in most developed cities. The average and maximum concentration of toluene was 74.9 and 320.0 ?g m -3, respectively. The respective values for benzene were 25.9 and 128.6 ?g m -3. The chlorinated VOCs were dominated by trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene. The maximum concentrations of these two species reached 248.2 and 144.0 ?g m -3, respectively. There were strong variations in the spatial fluctuation and characteristic of VOC concentrations. The highest VOC concentrations were found in the industrial district, which were followed by those in the commercial district, the central business district and finally the residential district. The highest concentrations of most VOC species, especially chlorinated VOC were found in the industrial and commercial districts. The average benzene/toluene ratio in Hong Kong was 0.5 suggesting that vehicular emission was the dominant VOC source in most areas of Hong Kong. There were strong deviations in benzene/toluene, benzene/ethylbenzene and benzene/( m+ p-xylene) ratios in the commercial district, and highly chlorinated VOC in the industrial and commercial districts. These suggest that there were other benzene and VOC sources overlying on the high background VOC concentrations in these districts. The common usage of organic solvents in the building and construction industries, and in the small industries in the industrial and commercial districts were believed to be important sources of VOC in Hong Kong.

  13. Biodesulfurization techniques: Application of selected microorganisms for organic sulfur removal from coals. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Elmore, B.B.

    1993-08-01

    As an alternative to post-combustion desulfurization of coal and pre-combustion desulfurization using physicochemical techniques, the microbial desulfurization of coal may be accomplished through the use of microbial cultures that, in an application of various microbial species, may remove both the pyritic and organic fractions of sulfur found in coal. Organisms have been isolated that readily depyritize coal but often at prohibitively low rates of desulfurization. Microbes have also been isolated that may potentially remove the organic-sulfur fraction present in coal (showing promise when acting on organic sulfur model compounds such as dibenzothiophene). The isolation and study of microorganisms demonstrating a potential for removing organic sulfur from coal has been undertaken in this project. Additionally, the organisms and mechanisms by which coal is microbially depyritized has been investigated. Three cultures were isolated that grew on dibenzothiophene (DBT), a model organic-sulfur compound, as the sole sulfur source. These cultures (UMX3, UMX9, and IGTS8) also grew on coal samples as the sole sulfur source. Numerous techniques for pretreating and ``cotreating`` coal for depyritization were also evaluated for the ability to improve the rate or extent of microbial depyritization. These include prewashing the coal with various solvents and adding surfactants to the culture broth. Using a bituminous coal containing 0.61% (w/w) pyrite washed with organic solvents at low slurry concentrations (2% w/v), the extent of depyritization was increased approximately 25% in two weeks as compared to controls. At slurry concentrations of 20% w/v, a tetrachloroethylene treatment of the coal followed by depyritization with Thiobacillus ferrooxidans increased both the rate and extent of depyritization by approximately 10%.

  14. Characterization of anaerobic chloroethene-dehalogenating activity in several subsurface sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Skeen, R.S.; Gao, J.; Hooker, B.S.; Quesenberry, R.D.

    1996-11-01

    Anaerobic microcosms of subsurface soils from four locations were used to investigate the separate effects of several electron donors on tetrachloroethylene (PCE) dechlorination activity. The substrates tested were methanol, formate, lactate, acetate, and sucrose. Various levels of sulfate-reducing, acetogenic, fermentative, and methanogenic activity were observed in all sediments. PCE dechlorination was detected in all microcosms, but the amount of dehalogenation varied by several orders of magnitude. Trichloroethylene was the primary dehalogenation product; however, small amounts of cis-1,2-dichloroethylene, 1,1-dichloroethylene, and vinyl chloride were also detected in several microcosms. Lactate-amended microcosms showed large amounts of dehalogenation. in three of the four sediments. One of the two sediments which showed positive activity with lactate also had large amounts of delialogenation with methanol. Sucrose, formate, and acetate also stimulated large amounts of delialogenation in one sediment that showed activity with lactate. These results suggest that lactate may be an appropriate substrate for screening sediments for PCE or TCE delialogenation activity, but that the microbial response is not sufficient for complete in situ bioremediation. A detailed study of the Victoria activity revealed that delialogenation rates were more similar to the Cornell culture than to rates measured for methanogens, or a methanol-enriched sediment culture. This may suggest that these sediments contain a highly efficient delialogenation activity similar to the Cornell culture. This assertion is supported further by the fact that an average of 3% of added reducing equivalents could be diverted to dehalogenation in tests which were conducted using PCE-saturated hexadecane as a constant source of PCE during incubation. Further evidence is needed to confirm this premise. The application of these results to in situ bioremediation of highly contaminated areas are discussed.

  15. Threats to water resources from hexachlorobenzene waste at Kalush City (Ukraine)--a review of the risks and the remediation options.

    PubMed

    Lysychenko, Georgii; Weber, Roland; Kovach, Valeria; Gertsiuk, Modest; Watson, Alan; Krasnova, Iryna

    2015-10-01

    The production of chlorinated solvents such as tetrachloroethylene and tetrachloromethane has resulted in large stockpiles of unintentionally produced persistent organic pollutants (POPs) including high content of hexachlorobenzene (HCB waste). HCB waste of 15,000 t arising from the production of chlorinated solvents at the Kalush factory in Ukraine was landfilled. In 2008, it was discovered that HCB and other pollutants were escaping from the landfill into local environment including the Sapogi-Limnytsia Rivers, tributaries of the Dniester River. This showed that the HCB waste was not appropriately contained and represented a threat to the Dniester River basin. A Presidential Decree of Ukraine was therefore issued requiring remediation of the site and excavation of the waste. Between 2010 and 2013, approximately 29,445 t of HCB waste and associated contaminated soil was excavated and exported to various EU countries for incineration. This excavation revealed that these wastes can corrode through their drums within a few decades with release of pollutants. Other sites at which chlorinated solvents were produced should therefore be assessed for possible similar pollution. Despite the remediation efforts and the excavation of the landfill, the Kalush area remains a POP-contaminated site requiring further assessment. A part of the waste was exported to Poland and is stored close to the Baltic Sea and is treated in an incinerator with small capacity over a time frame of years. This case and recent similar cases reveal that the control of POP waste for destruction even in EU countries needs to be improved. PMID:26286800

  16. A random walk solution for modeling solute transport with network reactions and multi-rate mass transfer in heterogeneous systems: Impact of biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henri, Christopher V.; Fernàndez-Garcia, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    The interplay between the spatial variability of the aquifer hydraulic properties, mass transfer due to sub-grid heterogeneity and chemical reactions often complicates reactive transport simulations. It is well documented that hydro-biochemical properties are ubiquitously heterogeneous and that diffusion and slow advection at the sub-grid scale typically leads to the conceptualization of an aquifer as a multi-porosity system. Within this context, chemical reactions taking place in mobile/immobile water regions can be substantially different between each other. This paper presents a particle-based method that can efficiently simulate heterogeneity, network reactions and multi-rate mass transfer. The approach is based on the development of transition probabilities that describe the likelihood that particles belonging to a given species and mobile/immobile domain at a given time will be transformed into another species and mobile/immobile domain afterwards. The joint effect of mass transfer and sequential degradation is shown to be non-trivial. A characteristic rebound of degradation products can be observed. This late rebound of concentrations is not driven by any change in the flow regime (e.g., pumping ceases in the pump-and-treat remediation strategy) but due to the natural interplay between mass transfer and chemical reactions. To illustrate that the method can simultaneously represent mass transfer, spatially varying properties and network reactions without numerical problems, we have simulated the degradation of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in a three-dimensional fully heterogeneous aquifer subjected to rate-limited mass transfer. Two types of degradation modes were considered to compare the effect of an active biofilm with that of clay pods present in the aquifer. Results of the two scenarios display significantly differences. Biofilms that promote the degradation of compounds in an immobile region are shown to significantly enhance degradation, rapidly producing daughter products and less tailing.

  17. Key comparison of liquid density standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchner, Christian; Zelenka, Zoltan; Kajastie, Heikki; Madec, Tanguy; Wolf, Henning; Vámossy, Csilla; Lorefice, Salvatore; Garberg, Torgunn; Lenard, El?bieta; Spohr, Isabel; Mares, Gabriela; Spurný, Robert; Lumbreras, Angel; Medina, Nieves; Y Akçada?, Ümit; Perkin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Hydrostatic density determination for liquids is mainly performed by laboratories to provide means for calibrating liquid density measuring instruments such as oscillation-type density meters. From 2002 to 2005 the CIPM key comparison CCM.D-K2 'comparison of liquid density standards' was carried out piloted by the PTB. The aim was to compare the results of the density determination by the participating laboratories to support entries to the CMC tables in this sub-field. To provide further laboratories the possibility to support their entries to the CMC tables at the meeting of the EUROMET Working Group on Density in 2007 this comparison was agreed on. BEV (Austria) organized the comparison supported by the PTB (Germany). For the comparison samples of pentadecane, water, tetrachloroethylene and of an oil of high viscosity were measured in the temperature range from 5 °C to 60 °C at atmospheric pressure by hydrostatic weighing. The measurements were completed in 2008. The reference values of the first reports based on the draft of the CCM.D-K2. After the official publication of the CCM.D-K2 the reference values were recalculated and the report was finalised in 2015. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  18. Assessment of soil-gas contamination at three former fuel-dispensing sites, Fort Gordon, Georgia, 2010—2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caldwell, Andral W.; Falls, W. Fred; Guimaraes, Wladmir B.; Ratliff, W. Hagan; Wellborn, John B.; Landmeyer, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Soil gas was assessed for contaminants at three former fuel-dispensing sites at Fort Gordon, Georgia, from October 2010 to September 2011. The assessment included delineation of organic contaminants using soil-gas samplers collected from the former fuel-dispensing sites at 8th Street, Chamberlain Avenue, and 12th Street. This assessment was conducted to provide environmental contamination data to Fort Gordon personnel pursuant to requirements for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B Hazardous Waste Permit process. Soil-gas samplers installed and retrieved during June and August 2011 at the 8th Street site had detections above the method detection level (MDL) for the mass of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), benzene, toluene, ortho-xylene, undecane, tridecane, pentadecane, and chloroform. Total petroleum hydrocarbons soil-gas mass exceeded the MDL of 0.02 microgram in 54 of the 55 soil-gas samplers. The highest detection of TPH soil-gas mass was 146.10 micrograms, located in the central part of the site. Benzene mass exceeded the MDL of 0.01 microgram in 23 soil-gas samplers, whereas toluene was detected in only 10 soil-gas samplers. Ortho-xylene was detected above the MDL in only one soil-gas sampler. The highest soil-gas mass detected for undecane, tridecane, and pentadecane was located in the northeastern corner of the 8th Street site. Chloroform mass greater than the MDL of 0.01 microgram was detected in less than one-third of the soil-gas samplers. Soil-gas masses above the MDL were identified for TPH, gasoline-related compounds, diesel-range alkanes, trimethylbenzenes, naphthalene, 2-methyl-napthalene, octane, and tetrachloroethylene for the July 2011 soil-gas survey at the Chamberlain Avenue site. All 30 of the soil-gas samplers contained TPH mass above the MDL. The highest detection of TPH mass, 426.36 micrograms, was for a soil-gas sampler located near the northern boundary of the site. Gasoline-related compounds and diesel-range alkanes were detected in multiple soil-gas samplers, and the highest detections of these compounds were located near the central part of the site near existing, nonoperational, fuel-dispensing pumps. Trimethylbenzenes were detected in less than half of the soil-gas samplers. Naphthalene soil-gas mass was detected above the MDL in 10 soil-gas samplers, whereas 2-methyl-napthalene was detected above the MDL in half of the soil-gas samplers. Octane mass was detected above the MDL in one soil-gas sampler located near the central part of the site. Tetrachloroethylene soil-gas mass was detected above the MDL in more than half of the soil-gas samplers, and the highest tetrachloroethylene soil-gas mass of 0.90 microgram was located in the northeastern part of the site. Soil-gas samplers collected at the 12th Street site during July 2011 contained soil-gas mass above the MDL for TPH, toluene, undecane, tridecane, and pentadecane (diesel-range alkanes), trichloroethylene, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, chloroform, and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene. The highest detected TPH mass was 24.37 micrograms in a soil-gas sampler located in the northern part of the site. The highest detection of toluene soil-gas mass was from a soil-gas sampler located near the southern boundary of the site. The diesel-range alkanes were detected above the MDL in five soil-gas samplers; the highest detection of soil-gas diesel mass, 0.65 microgram, was located in the southern part of the site. Trichloroethylene and 1,4-dichlorobenzene were detected above the MDL in the northern part of the site in one soil-gas sampler that also had one of the highest detections of TPH. Chloroform was detected above the MDL in three soil-gas samplers, whereas 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene soil-gas mass was detected above the MDL in two soil-gas samplers.

  19. Comparative study of the adsorption performance of a multi-sorbent bed (Carbotrap, Carbopack X, Carboxen 569) and a Tenax TA adsorbent tube for the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs).

    PubMed

    Gallego, E; Roca, F J; Perales, J F; Guardino, X

    2010-05-15

    A comparison between two types of adsorbent tubes, the commonly used Tenax TA and a multi-sorbent bed (Carbotrap, Carbopack X, Carboxen 569) tube developed in our laboratory, has been done to evaluate their usefulness in the analysis of VOCs in ambient air. Duplicate indoor and outdoor samples of Tenax TA and multi-sorbent tubes of 10, 20, 40, 60 and 90l were taken in Barcelona city (Spain) on July and October of 2009. Breakthrough values (defined as %VOCs found in the back tube) were determined for all sampling volumes connecting two sampling tubes in series. The analysis was performed by automatic thermal desorption (ATD) coupled with capillary gas chromatography (GC)/mass spectrometry detector (MSD). Significant differences between the concentrations obtained-from multi-sorbent bed and Tenax TA tubes are observed for the very volatile compounds (56 degrees Ctetrachloroethylene), being the concentrations found higher in multi-sorbent bed than in Tenax TA tubes. On the other hand, mainly all compounds with boiling points higher than 100 degrees C (except alpha-pinene, chlorinated and polar compounds) do not show significant differences between the obtained multi-sorbent bed and Tenax TA tube concentrations. For the concentrations obtained (5ppt to 100ppb), Tenax TA present high breakthrough values (from 0 to 77%) for mainly all compounds and sampling volumes studied. On the other hand, multi-sorbent bed tubes do not exhibit important breakthrough values for these compounds, except the VVOCs ethanol (for all sampled volumes), and acetone, dichloromethane and isopropanol (for sampling volumes over 40l). The concentration differences observed between Tenax TA and multi-sorbent bed tubes are directly related to the high breakthrough values determined for Tenax TA adsorbent. PMID:20298873

  20. Bedrock geology and outcrop fracture trends in the vicinity of the Savage Municipal Well Superfund site, Milford, New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burton, William C.; Harte, Philip T.

    2013-01-01

    The Savage Municipal Well Superfund site consists of an eastward-directed plume of volatile organic compounds, principally tetrachloroethylene (PCE), in alluvium and glacial sand and gravel in the Souhegan River valley, just south of the river and about 4 kilometers west of the town of Milford, New Hampshire. Sampling of monitoring wells at the site has helped delineate the extent of the plume and has determined that some contaminant has migrated into the underlying crystalline bedrock, including bedrock north of the river within 200 meters of a nearby residential development that was constructed in 1999. Borehole geophysical logging has identified a northeast preferential trend for bedrock fractures, which may provide a pathway for the migration of contaminant under and north of the Souhegan River. The current study investigates the bedrock geologic setting for the site, including its position relative to known regional geologic structures, and compiles new strike and dip measurements of joints in exposed bedrock to determine if there are dominant trends in orientation similar to what was found in the boreholes. The site is located on the northwestern limb of a northeast-trending regional anticlinorium that is southeast of the Campbell Hill fault zone. The Campbell Hill fault zone defines the contact between granite and gneiss of the anticlinorium and granite and schist to the northwest and is locally marked by lenses of massive vein quartz, minor faults, and fracture zones that could potentially affect plume migration. The fault zone was apparently not intercepted by any of the boreholes that were drilled to delineate the contaminant plume and therefore passes to the north of the northernmost borehole in the vicinity of the new residential area. Joints measured in surface exposures indicate a strong preferred direction of strike to the north-northeast corroborating the borehole data and previous outcrop and geophysical studies. The north-northeast preferred direction matches the direction of elongation of the cone of depression formed during a pump test of the bedrock wells and could explain a potential pathway for the migration of contaminant north of the river.

  1. In-Situ Anaerobic Biosurfactant Production Process For Remediation Of DNAPL Contamination In Subsurface Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albino, J. D.; Nambi, I. M.

    2009-12-01

    Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery (MEOR) and remediation of aquifers contaminated with hydrophobic contaminants require insitu production of biosurfactants for mobilization of entrapped hydrophobic liquids. Most of the biosurfactant producing microorganisms produce them under aerobic condition and hence surfactant production is limited in subsurface condition due to lack of oxygen. Currently bioremediation involves expensive air sparging or excavation followed by exsitu biodegradation. Use of microorganisms which can produce biosurfactants under anaerobic conditions can cost effectively expedite the process of insitu bioremediation or mobilization. In this work, the feasibility of anaerobic biosurfactant production in three mixed anaerobic cultures prepared from groundwater and soil contaminated with chlorinated compounds and municipal sewage sludge was investigated. The cultures were previously enriched under complete anaerobic conditions in the presence of Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) for more than a year before they were studied for biosurfactant production. Biosurfactant production under anaerobic conditions was simulated using two methods: i) induction of starvation in the microbial cultures and ii) addition of complex fermentable substrates. Positive result for biosurfactant production was not observed when the cultures were induced with starvation by adding PCE as blobs which served as the only terminal electron acceptor. However, slight reduction in interfacial tension was noticed which was caused by the adherence of microbes to water-PCE interface. Biosurfactant production was observed in all the three cultures when they were fed with complex fermentable substrates and surface tension of the liquid medium was lowered below 35 mN/m. Among the fermentable substrates tested, vegetable oil yielded highest amount of biosurfactant in all the cultures. Complete biodegradation of PCE to ethylene at a faster rate was also observed when vegetable oil was amended to the microbial cultures. The microorganisms responsible for biosurfactant production was isolated and identified as Pseudomonas Sp (designated as Pseudomonas Sp ANBIOSURF-1, Gene bank no: FJ930079), Pseudomonas stutzeri (MTCC 10033), Pseudomonas Sp (MTCC 10032) from groundwater, soil and municipal sewage sludge enrichments respectively. This study confirms that biosurfactants can be produced under anaerobic conditions and also in sufficient quantities. The cultures were also able to cometabolically degrade PCE to Ethylene. The isolated microorganisms can be used for remediation of DNAPL contaminated sites by in-situ biosurfactant production.

  2. Inorganic and organic ground-water chemistry in the Canal Creek area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorah, M.M.; Vroblesky, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    Groundwater chemical data were collected from November 1986 through April 1987 in the first phase of a 5-year study to assess the possibility of groundwater contamination in the Canal Creek area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Water samples were collected from 87 observation wells screened in Coastal Plain sediments; 59 samples were collected from the Canal Creek aquifer, 18 from the overlying surficial aquifer, and 10 from the lower confined aquifer. Dissolved solids, chloride, iron, manganese, fluoride, mercury, and chromium are present in concentrations that exceed the Federal maximum contaminant levels for drinking water. Elevated chloride and dissolved-solids concentrations appear to be related from contaminant plumes but also could result from brackish-water intrusion. Excessive concentrations of iron and manganese were the most extensive water quality problems found among the inorganic constituents and are derived from natural dissolution of minerals and oxide coatings in the aquifer sediments. Volatile organic compounds are present in the Canal Creek and surficial aquifers, but samples from the lower confined aquifer do not show any evidence of contamination by inorganic or organic chemicals. The volatile organic contaminants detected in the groundwater and their maximum concentrations (in micrograms/L) include 1,1,2,2- tetrachloroethane (9,000); carbon tetrachloride (480); chloroform (460); 1,1,2-trichloroethane (80); 1,2-dichloroethane (990); 1,1-dichloroethane (3.1); tetrachloroethylene (100); trichloroethylene (1,800); 1,2-trans- dichloroethylene (1,200); 1,1-dichloroethylene (4.4); vinyl chloride (140); benzene (70); and chlorobenzene (39). On the basis of information on past activities in the study area, some sources of the volatile organic compounds include: (1) decontaminants and degreasers; (2) clothing-impregnating operations; (3) the manufacture of impregnite material; (4) the manufacture of tear gas; and (5) fuels used in garages and at the air-field. The high density of most of the detected organic compounds in free-product form would have aided their movement into the aquifers by vertical sinking. The outcrop area of the upper confining unit and an area cut by a paleochannel are most susceptible to contamination because a near-surface impermeable layer is not present. (USGS)

  3. Final report on CCM key comparison CCM.D-K2: Comparison of liquid density standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettin, Horst; Jacques, Claude; Zelenka, Zoltán; Fujii, Ken-ichi; Kuramoto, Naoki; Chang, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Yong Jae; Becerra, Luis Omar; Domostroeva, Natalia

    2013-01-01

    The results are presented of the key comparison CCM.D-K2 that covered the density measurements of four liquids: the density of water at 20 °C, of pentadecane at 15 °C, 20 °C, 40 °C and 60°C, of tetrachloroethlyene at 5 °C and 20 °C and of a viscous oil at 20 °C. Seven national metrology institutes measured the densities at atmospheric pressure by hydrostatic weighing of solid density standards in the time interval from 27 April 2004 to 28 June 2004. Since the participants were asked not to include components for a possible drift or inhomogeneity of the liquid in their uncertainty budget, these uncertainty contributions are investigated for the final evaluation of the data. For this purpose, results of stability and homogeneity measurements of the pilot laboratory are used. The participants decided not to include a possible drift of the liquid's density since no significant drift could be detected, and the influence of the drift and its uncertainty are negligible. Similarly, the inhomogeneity of the water and pentadecane samples is not significant and has no influence on the evaluation. Thus, it was neglected. Only the inhomogeneities of tetrachloroethylene and of the viscous oil were significant. Consequently, they were included in the evaluation. With one or two exceptions, the results show good agreement among the participants. Only in the case of water are the results clearly discrepant. The key comparison reference values were calculated by the weighted mean (taking into account a small correlation between two participants) in the case of consistent results. Otherwise the Procedure B of Cox was used. The expanded uncertainties of all reference densities are below 1 × 10-5 in relative terms. This satisfies the needs of all customers who wish to calibrate or check liquid density measuring instruments such as oscillation-type density meters. The comparison fully supports the calibration measurement capabilities table in the BIPM key comparison database. The results can be used to link regional comparisons to this CCM key comparison. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  4. Monitoring of Emerging and Legacy Contaminants in Groundwater and Tap Water of the Karst Region in Northern Puerto Rico for Assessment of Sources and Fate and Transport Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, I. Y.; Cotto, I.; Torres, P. M.

    2014-12-01

    The karst aquifer region of northern Puerto Rico is the area with the highest groundwater extraction in the island. Urban and industrial development has led to extensive contamination of the groundwater in the region. Of particular concern, is the presence of emerging and legacy organic contaminants, such as phthalates and chlorinated organic compounds (CVOCs), because there high risk for exposure and adverse health impact. Variable sources and the heterogeneous and dynamic conditions of karst groundwater systems, limits the ability to properly assess and manage the water quality of these precious water resources. This work develops a monitoring and water analysis scheme to assess spatial-temporal exposure of hazardous contaminants trough karst water in northern Puerto Rico. Groundwater and tap water are sampled in the region and analyzed for phthalates, CVOCs, and common ions. Detections and concentrations of phthalates and CVOCs are determined by using modified EPA methods, which rely on liquid-liquid extractions and gas chromatography techniques. The modified methods have reduced the volume of samples and solvent waste, decreased the time of analysis, increased analysis outcomes, and lower potential for hazardous exposure. Results show intermittent presence of di-ethyl, di-butyl and di (2-ethyl hexyl) phthalates in 36% of the groundwater and 53% of tap water samples, with detected concentrations ranging between 0.1-88.7 ?g/L. These results indicate that karst groundwater can serve as a route of exposure for phthalates, but there are additional disperse sources in the water system. CVOCs are detected in groundwater at much higher frequencies (50%) than phthalates, and include trichloromethane (TCM), carbon tetrachloride (CT), trichloroethylene (TCE), and tetrachloroethylene (TCE). CVOCs, except for TCM, are found at lower frequencies on tap water (5.8%) than groundwater (27%). TCM is detected more frequently and at higher concentrations in tap water (56.8%) than tap water (30%). Results indicated that most CVOCs on tap water come from groundwater sources. Spatial-temporal analysis of CVOC data shows that transport through karst system is highly heterogeneous variable, and reflect high capacity of the system to store and slowly release contaminants through rate-limited mass transport process.

  5. Simultaneous determination of bisphenol A and bisphenol B in beverages and powdered infant formula by dispersive liquid-liquid micro-extraction and heart-cutting multidimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cunha, S C; Almeida, C; Mendes, E; Fernandes, J O

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a reliable, cost-effective, fast and simple method to quantify simultaneously both bisphenol A (BPA) and bisphenol B (BPB) in liquid food matrixes such as canned beverages (soft drinks and beers) and powdered infant formula using dispersive liquid-liquid micro-extraction (DLLME) with in-situ derivatisation coupled with heart-cutting gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). For the optimisation of the DLLME procedure different amounts of various extractive and dispersive solvents as well as different amounts of the derivative reagent were compared for their effects on extraction efficiency and yields. The optimised procedure consisted of the injection of a mixture containing tetrachloroethylene (extractant), acetonitrile (dispersant) and acetic anhydride (derivatising reagent) directly into an aliquot of beverage samples or into an aqueous extract of powdered milk samples obtained after a pretreatment of the samples. Given the compatibility of the solvents used, and the low volumes involved, the procedure was easily associated with GC-MS end-point determination, which was accomplished by means of an accurate GC dual column (heart-cutting) technique. Careful optimisation of heart-cutting GC-MS conditions, namely pressure of front and auxiliary inlets, have resulted in a good analytical performance. The linearity of the matrix-matched calibration curves was acceptable, with coefficients of determination (r2) always higher than 0.99. Average recoveries of the BPA and BPB spiked at two concentration levels into beverages and powdered infant formula ranged from 68% to 114% and the relative standard deviation (RSD) was <15%. The limits of detection (LOD) in canned beverages were 5.0 and 2.0 ng l(-1) for BPA and BPB, respectively, whereas LOD in powdered infant formula were 60.0 and 30.0 ng l(-1), respectively. The limits of quantification (LOQ) in canned beverages were 10.0 and 7.0 ng l-1 for BPA and BPB, respectively, whereas LOQ in powdered infant formula were 200.0 and 100.0 ng l(-1), respectively. BPA was detected in 21 of 30 canned beverages (ranging from 0.03 to 4.70 µg l(-1)) and in two of seven powdered infant formula samples (0.23 and 0.40 µg l(-1)) collected in Portugal. BPB was only detected in canned beverages being positive in 15 of 30 samples analysed (ranging from 0.06 to 0.17 µg l(-1)). This is the first report about the presence of BPA and BPB in canned beverages and powdered infant formula in the Portuguese market. PMID:21240700

  6. Assessing the vulnerability of public-supply wells to contamination—High Plains Aquifer near York, Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jagucki, Martha L.; Landon, Matthew K.; Clark, Brian R.; Eberts, Sandra M.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program found, in studies from 1991 to 2001, low levels of mixtures of contaminants in ground water near the water table in urban areas across the Nation. Although contaminants were detected less frequently in deeper ground water typically developed for public supply the proximity of contaminant mixtures to underlying public-water-supply sources prompted the NAWQA Program to begin, in 2001, an intensive study to assess the vulnerability of public-supply wells to contamination. As part of this study, the pathways and processes by which contaminants reach public-supply wells in nine aquifer systems across the country are being investigated. In addition to studying the processes that occur below land surface—whereby contaminants are mobilized or attenuated—scientists are also investigating how human activities can affect the vulnerability of public-supply wells to contamination. This fact sheet highlights findings from two reports on the vulnerability study of a single, representative public-supply well in York, Nebraska. The selected high-capacity well typically produces more than 720,000 gallons per day from the upper confined aquifer of the High Plains aquifer. A possible source of contamination to the well is intensive, irrigated agriculture, which can sometimes result in elevated concentrations of nitrate and pesticides in ground water. In addition, a sampling of the selected public-supply well by the USGS in 2002 found low concentrations of the solvents trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), and their degradation products, which may be linked to historical chemical use in urban and residential areas of York. Uranium and arsenic (which occur naturally in the sediments that make up the aquifers in the area) also were detected in 2002 at concentrations less than drinking-water standards but still of concern. Overall, the current NAWQA study found that three primary factors affect the movement and fate of contaminants and the vulnerability of the public-supply well in York: (1) timing of water entry (recharge) to the aquifer, (2) short-circuiting of natural flow paths through inactive wells, and (3) natural geochemical conditions of the aquifer. Study findings are intended to help water managers, drinking-water suppliers, policymakers, and scientists to better understand how and why contamination of public-supply wells occurs and whether water quality may improve or degrade. Additionally, study findings may be used to evaluate various pumping, resource-development, and land-management scenarios.

  7. Assessing the Use of Dry Wells as a Tool for Stormwater Management and Groundwater Recharge in Urban Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, E.; Harter, T.; Fogg, G. E.; Washburn, B.; Bryson, R.; Meirovitz, C.; Fawcett, J.; Kretsinger Grabert, V. J.; Bowles, C.; Carr, M.; Nelson, C.

    2014-12-01

    Dry wells are gravity-fed, excavated pits with perforated casings used to facilitate stormwater infiltration and groundwater recharge in areas comprised primarily of impermeable surfaces or low permeability soils. Stormwater runoff that would otherwise be routed to streams or drains in urban areas is used as a source of aquifer recharge. However, the potential for groundwater contamination caused by urban runoff bypassing surface soil filtration has prevented more widespread use of dry wells as a recharge mechanism. We present the results of a literature survey to assess the potential of dry wells for safe stormwater recharge. Dry wells have been inculpated in groundwater contamination events, although accusations were typically not backed by scientific data. In 1989 groundwater in Modesto, CA, was contaminated with tetrachloroethylene from a dry cleaning facility. The city had been using dry wells to manage stormwater for more than 50 years without detrimental impacts before the contamination. A USGS monitoring study proved that the contamination was from sewer system leakage, and did not involve the dry wells. Some areas of the country have used dry wells with positive results. The Underground Injection Control system (UICs) study in Portland, OR, has been active for ten years, and currently operates over 9,000 UICs. Initially, a ten foot separation distance was enforced between the seasonal high water table and the bottom perforation of the UIC; however, due to monitoring and modeling results that indicate the protectiveness of groundwater, this distance has been reduced to zero feet. Future work will include a comparative pilot study involving a residential and an industrial site in Elk Grove, CA. The study will use modeling tools to assess the recharge potential and groundwater protectiveness of dry wells. Both sites are outfitted with four monitoring wells each: an upgradient monitoring well, two downgradient monitoring wells, and a vadose zone monitoring well. The results of water quality sampling will determine the contaminants of interest, and a model of the fate and transport of these contaminants in the vadose zone will be coupled with hydraulic models to estimate the response of the hydrogeologic system to dry well recharge, with the goal of creating a tool that can be used to evaluate future dry well locations.

  8. Induced Polarization with Electromagnetic Coupling: 3D Spectral Imaging Theory, EMSP Project No. 73836

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, F. Dale; Sogade, John

    2004-12-14

    This project was designed as a broad foundational study of spectral induced polarization (SIP) for characterization of contaminated sites. It encompassed laboratory studies of the effects of chemistry on induced polarization, development of 3D forward modeling and inversion codes, and investigations of inductive and capacitive coupling problems. In the laboratory part of the project a physico-chemical model developed in this project was used to invert laboratory IP spectra for the grain size and the effective grain size distribution of the sedimentary rocks as well as the formation factor, porosity, specific surface area, and the apparent fractal dimension. Furthermore, it was established that the IP response changed with the solution chemistry, the concentration of a given solution chemistry, valence of the constituent ions, and ionic radius. In the field part of the project, a 3D complex forward and inverse model was developed. It was used to process data acquired at two frequencies (1/16 Hz and 1/ 4Hz) in a cross-borehole configuration at the A-14 outfall area of the Savannah River Site (SRS) during March 2003 and June 2004. The chosen SRS site was contaminated with Tetrachloroethylene (TCE) and Trichloroethylene (PCE) that were disposed in this area for several decades till the 1980s. The imaginary conductivity produced from the inverted 2003 data correlated very well with the log10 (PCE) concentration derived from point sampling at 1 ft spacing in five ground-truth boreholes drilled after the data acquisition. The equivalent result for the 2004 data revealed that there were significant contaminant movements during the period March 2003 and June 2004, probably related to ground-truth activities and nearby remediation activities. Therefore SIP was successfully used to develop conceptual models of volume distributions of PCE/TCE contamination. In addition, the project developed non-polarizing electrodes that can be deployed in boreholes for years. A total of 28 of these electrodes were deployed at the SRS site in September of 2002. The project found that (1) currently available field instrumentation need to be faster by an order of magnitude for full SIP to be engaged for broadband characterization in the field, (2) some aspects of the capacitive coupling problem in borehole geometries can be solved by use of a high impedance receiver, (3) a careful investigation of ways to adequately compare inversion results to ground-truth data is warranted, (4) more laboratory studies should be directed to understand the influence of micro-organisms and long residence time of contaminants (aging) on spectral IP properties.

  9. Interpretation of Borehole Geophysical Logs, Aquifer-Isolation Tests, and Water-Quality Data for Sites 1, 3, and 5 at the Willow Grove Naval Air Station/Joint Reserve Base, Horsham Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania: 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sloto, Ronald A.

    2007-01-01

    Borehole geophysical logging, heatpulse-flowmeter measurements, borehole television surveys, and aquifer-isolation tests were conducted in 2005 at the Willow Grove Naval Air Station/Joint Reserve Base (NAS/JRB) in Horsham Township, Montgomery County, Pa. This study was done by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the U.S. Navy in support of hydrogeological investigations to address ground-water contamination. Data collected for this study are valuable for understanding ground-water flow in the Stockton Formation at the local and regional scale. The Willow Grove NAS/JRB is underlain by the Stockton Formation, which consists of sedimentary rocks of Triassic age. The rocks of the Stockton Formation form a complex, heterogeneous aquifer with partially connected zones of high permeability. Borehole geophysical logs, heatpulse-flowmeter measurements, and borehole television surveys made in seven boreholes ranging from 70 to 350 ft deep were used to identify potential water-producing fractures and fracture zones and to select intervals for aquifer-isolation tests. An upward vertical hydraulic gradient was measured in one borehole, a downward vertical hydraulic gradient was measured in four boreholes, both an upward and a downward vertical hydraulic gradient were measured in one borehole, and no flow was measurable in one borehole. The aquifer-isolation tests isolated 30 discrete fractures in the seven boreholes for collection of depth-discrete hydraulic and water-quality data. Of the 30 fractures identified as potentially water producing, 26 fractures (87 percent) produced more than 1 gallon per minute of water. The specific capacity of the isolated intervals producing more than 1 gallon per minute ranged from 0.02 to 5.2 gallons per minute per foot. There was no relation between specific capacity and depth of the fracture. Samples for analysis for volatile organic compounds were collected from each isolated zone. Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) was the most prevalent compound at Site 1; concentrations were as great as 62 ?g/L (micrograms per liter). 1,1-dichloroethane was the most prevalent compound at Site 3; concentrations were as great as 9.3 ?g/L. Toluene was the most prevalent compound at Site 5; concentrations were as great as 77 ?g/L. For five out of the six wells (83 percent) sampled for field determinations of water-quality constituents, the interval with the lowest dissolved oxygen concentration had the highest total VOC concentration.

  10. A modified light transmission visualization method for DNAPL saturation measurements in 2-D models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bob, Mustafa M.; Brooks, Michael C.; Mravik, Susan C.; Wood, A. Lynn

    2008-05-01

    In this research, a light transmission visualization (LTV) method was used to quantify dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL) saturation in two-dimensional (2-D), two fluid phase systems. The method is an expansion of earlier LTV methods and takes into account both absorption and refraction light theories. Based on this method, DNAPL and water saturations can rapidly be obtained point wise across sand-packed 2-D flow chambers without the need to develop a calibration curve. A single point calibration step is, however, needed when dyed DNAPL is used to account for the change in the transmission factor at the dyed DNAPL-water interface. The method was applied to measure, for the first time, undyed DNAPL saturation in small 2-D chambers. Known amounts of DNAPL, modeled by tetrachloroethylene (PCE), were added to the chamber and these amounts were compared to results obtained by this LTV method. Strong correlation existed between results obtained based on this method and the known PCE amounts with an R2 value of 0.993. Similar experiments conducted using dyed PCE showed a stronger correlation between results obtained by this LTV method and the known amounts of dyed PCE added to the chamber with an R2 value of 0.999. The method was also used to measure dyed PCE saturation in a large 2-D model following sparging experiments. Results obtained from image analyses following each sparging event were compared to results obtained by two independent techniques, namely gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analyses and carbon column extraction. There was a good agreement between the results obtained by this LTV method and those obtained by the two independent techniques when experiments were carried out under stable light source conditions and errors in mass balance were minor. The method presented here can be expanded to measure fluid contents in three fluid phase systems and provide a non-destructive, non-intrusive tool to investigate changes in DNAPL architecture and flow characteristics in laboratory experiments.

  11. DUS II SOIL GAS SAMPLING AND AIR INJECTION TEST RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Noonkester, J.; Jackson, D.; Jones, W.; Hyde, W.; Kohn, J.; Walker, R.

    2012-09-20

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) and air injection well testing was performed at the Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) site located near the M-Area Settling Basin (referred to as DUS II in this report). The objective of this testing was to determine the effectiveness of continued operation of these systems. Steam injection ended on September 19, 2009 and since this time the extraction operations have utilized residual heat that is present in the subsurface. The well testing campaign began on June 5, 2012 and was completed on June 25, 2012. Thirty-two (32) SVE wells were purged for 24 hours or longer using the active soil vapor extraction (ASVE) system at the DUS II site. During each test five or more soil gas samples were collected from each well and analyzed for target volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The DUS II site is divided into four parcels (see Figure 1) and soil gas sample results show the majority of residual VOC contamination remains in Parcel 1 with lesser amounts in the other three parcels. Several VOCs, including tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), were detected. PCE was the major VOC with lesser amounts of TCE. Most soil gas concentrations of PCE ranged from 0 to 60 ppmv with one well (VEW-22A) as high as 200 ppmv. Air sparging (AS) generally involves the injection of air into the aquifer through either vertical or horizontal wells. AS is coupled with SVE systems when contaminant recovery is necessary. While traditional air sparging (AS) is not a primary component of the DUS process, following the cessation of steam injection, eight (8) of the sixty-three (63) steam injection wells were used to inject air. These wells were previously used for hydrous pyrolysis oxidation (HPO) as part of the DUS process. Air sparging is different from the HPO operations in that the air was injected at a higher rate (20 to 50 scfm) versus HPO (1 to 2 scfm). . At the DUS II site the air injection wells were tested to determine if air sparging affected VOC soil gas concentrations during ASVE. Five (5) SVE wells that were located closest to the air injection wells were used as monitoring points during the air sparging tests. The air sparging tests lasted 48 hours. Soil gas sample results indicate that sparging did not affect VOC concentrations in four of the five sparging wells, while results from one test did show an increase in soil gas concentrations.

  12. GE/NOMADICS IN-WELL MONITORING SYSTEM FOR VERTICAL PROFILING OF DNAPL CONTAMINANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald E. Shaffer; Radislav Potyralio; Joseph Salvo; Timothy Sivavec; Lloyd Salsman

    2003-04-01

    This report describes the Phase I effort to develop an Automated In Well Monitoring System (AIMS) for in situ detection of chlorinated volatile organic compounds such as trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in groundwater. AIMS is composed of 3 primary components: (a) sensor probe, (b) instrument delivery system, and (c) communication/recharging station. The sensor probe utilizes an array of thickness shear mode (TSM) sensors coated with chemically-sensitive polymer films provides a low-cost, highly sensitive microsensor platform for detection and quantification. The instrument delivery system is used to position the sensor probe in 2 inch or larger groundwater monitoring wells. A communication/recharging station provides wireless battery recharging and communication to enable a fully automated system. A calibration curve for TCE in water was built using data collected in the laboratory. The detection limit of the sensor probe was 6.7 ppb ({micro}g/L) for TCE in water. A preliminary field test was conducted at a GE remediation location and a pilot field test was performed at the DOE Savannah River Site (SRS). The AIMS system was demonstrated in an uncontaminated (i.e., ''clean'') 2-inch well and in a 4-inch well containing 163.5 ppb of TCE. Repeat measurements at the two wells indicated excellent day-to-day reproducibility. Significant differences in the sensor responses were noted between the two types of wells but they did not closely match the laboratory calibration data. The robustness of the system presented numerous challenges for field work and limited the scope of the SRS pilot field test. However, the unique combination of trace detection (detection limits near the MCL, minimum concentration level) and size (operations in 2-inch or larger groundwater wells) is demonstration of the promise of this technology for long-term monitoring (LTM) applications or rapid site characterization. Using the lessons learned from the pilot field test, a number of design changes are proposed to increase the robustness of the system for extended field studies and commercialization.

  13. Effect of urbanization on the water resources of Warminster Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sloto, R.A.; Davis, D.K.

    1982-01-01

    Rapid suburban development occurred in Warminster Township and the surrounding area after World War II, resulting in a large population dependent on ground water. In 1980, approximately 2.7 billion gallons of ground water was pumped by public water suppliers and government facilities. Pumping wells can cause drawdown as far as 2,500 feet undip, downdip, or along strike even if the wells do not penetrate the same strata. Pumping wells have lowered base flow; a stream-gain-and-loss study showed that water lost from Little Neshaminy Creek was about 60 percent of the water pumped from wells near the stream. Net ground-water infiltration to sewers was about 830 million gallons in 1979, a wet year, and about 250 million gallons in 1980, a dry year. Estimated water budgets for 1979 and 1980 indicate evapotranspiration can range from 20 to 26 inches per year (1.0 to 1.2 million gallons per day per square mile) and recharge can range from 8 to 18 inches per year (0.4 to 0.9 million gallons per day per square mile). In a year with average precipitation (45 inches or 2.1 million gallons per day per square mile), evapotranspiration is about 24 inches (1.1 million gallons per day per square mile). Ground-water development in the area influenced by pumping is at its practical limit for years of average recharge, but as much as 1.1 million gallons per day of additional water may be obtained by drilling and pumping wells in areas of Warminster Township not affected by pumping. The concentration of most dissolved constituents increased in water from seven wells, sampled at the onset of urbanization in 1953 and 1956 and again in 1979. Ground-water contamination by volatile organic compounds, especially trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene, has made water from some wells unsuitable for public supply. The concentration of lead in 26 samples of ground water ranged from 0 to 55 micrograms per liter, with a median of 17 micrograms per liter; this is above the reported national median and the median in nearby Chester County. High concentrations of sulfate and dissolved solids in ground water are probably caused by restricted gournd-water circulation and may be reduced by long-term pumping, which flushes the aquifer. Effluent from sewage treatment plants has degraded the quality of low streamflow.

  14. Coupled geophysical-hydrological modeling of controlled NAPL spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalsky, M. B.; Majer, E.; Peterson, J. E.; Finsterle, S.; Mazzella, A.

    2006-12-01

    Past studies have shown reasonable sensitivity of geophysical data for detecting or monitoring the movement of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in the subsurface. However, heterogeneity in subsurface properties and in NAPL distribution commonly results in non-unique data interpretation. Combining multiple geophysical data types and incorporating constraints from hydrological models will potentially decrease the non-uniqueness in data interpretation and aid in site characterization. Large-scale laboratory experiments have been conducted over several years to evaluate the use of various geophysical methods, including ground-penetrating radar (GPR), seismic, and electrical methods, for monitoring controlled spills of tetrachloroethylene (PCE), a hazardous industrial solvent that is pervasive in the subsurface. In the current study, we consider an experiment in which PCE was introduced into a large tank containing a heterogeneous distribution of sand and clay mixtures, and allowed to migrate while time-lapse geophysical data were collected. We consider two approaches for interpreting the surface GPR and crosswell seismic data. The first approach involves (a) waveform inversion of the surface GPR data using a non-gradient based optimization algorithm to estimate the dielectric constant distributions and (b) conversion of crosswell seismic travel times to acoustic velocity distributions; the dielectric constant and acoustic velocity distributions are then related to NAPL saturation using appropriate petrophysical models. The second approach takes advantage of a recently developed framework for coupled hydrological-geophysical modeling, providing a hydrological constraint on interpretation of the geophysical data and additionally resulting in quantitative estimates of the most relevant hydrological parameters that determine NAPL behavior in the system. Specifically, we simulate NAPL migration using the multiphase multicomponent flow simulator TOUGH2 with a 2-D radial model that takes advantage of radial symmetry in the experimental setup. The flow model is coupled to forward models for simulating the GPR and seismic measurements, and joint inversion of the multiple data types results in images of time-varying NAPL saturation distributions. Comparison of the two approaches with results of the post-experiment excavation indicate that combining geophysical data types and incorporating hydrological constraints improves estimates of NAPL saturation relative to the conventional interpretation of the geophysical data sets. Notice: Although this work was reviewed by EPA and approved for publication, it may not necessarily reflect the official Agency policy. Mention of trade names or commercial products does not constitute endorsement or recommendation by EPA for use. This work was supported, in part, by the U.S. Dept. of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02- 05CH11231.

  15. Cracking of Clay Due to Contact with Waste Chlorinated Solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero, M.; Ayral, D.; Shipan, J.; Goltz, M. N.; Huang, J.; Demond, A. H.

    2012-12-01

    Clays are known to crack upon desiccation. Desiccation cracks of up to 3 cm wide have been reported in natural soils. This raises the question if a similar behavior is seen when a dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL) waste is in contact with clay. The contact with organic liquids causes the clay structure to shrink, leading to the formation of cracks. Moreover, DNAPL waste not only contains the organic liquid solvent but also includes surface-active solutes or surfactants. Such solutes can enhance the interaction of the organic solvents with the clay. This research will assess whether or not contact with chlorinated organic waste causes cracking. In order to evaluate the possibility of cracking in the clay, microcosms have been constructed that mimic aquifer systems, consisting of a saturated layer of sand, a saturated layer of bentonite clay and a 2.5 cm layer of either pure chlorinated solvents or DNAPL waste. The onset of cracking for the microcosm with tetrachloroethylene (PCE) waste as the DNAPL layer occurred after ten days of contact. Similarly, at eight days, cracks were observed in a microcosm containing trichloroethylene (TCE) waste . Forty-four days later, the length and number of cracks have grown considerably; with a total crack length of 50 cm on a surface of 80 cm2 in the microcosm containing PCE waste. On the other hand it took approximately 161 days for the clay layer in the microcosm containing pure PCE to crack. To quantity the degree of cracking, crack maps were developed using the image software, Image J. Characteristics like crack length, crack aperture, and the percentage of total length for a range of apertures were calculated using this software. For example, for the PCE waste microcosm, it was calculated that 3.7% of the crack length had an aperture of 100-300 microns, 15.1% of the crack length had an aperture of 300-500 microns, 29.7% of the crack length had an aperture of 500-700 microns, 40.1% of the crack length had an aperture of 700-900 microns, 6.3% had an aperture of 900-1,100 microns and 5.1% had an aperture of over 1,100 microns. These data suggest that aquitards in the field might crack when in contact with the DNAPL waste. Moreover, it is apparent that the waste contains solutes that accelerate the cracking of the clay layer. Thus, models examining the impact of storage in low permeability layers need to consider the possible impact of cracking.

  16. Uncertainties in pharmacokinetic modeling for perchloroethylene. I. Comparison of model structure, parameters, and predictions for low-dose metabolism rates for models derived by different authors.

    PubMed

    Hattis, D; White, P; Marmorstein, L; Koch, P

    1990-09-01

    In recent years physiologically based pharmacokinetic models have come to play an increasingly important role in risk assessment for carcinogens. The hope is that they can help open the black box between external exposure and carcinogenic effects to experimental observations, and improve both high-dose to low-dose and interspecies projections of risk. However, to date, there have been only relatively preliminary efforts to assess the uncertainties in current modeling results. In this paper we compare the physiologically based pharmacokinetic models (and model predictions of risk-related overall metabolism) that have been produced by seven different sets of authors for perchloroethylene (tetrachloroethylene). The most striking conclusion from the data is that most of the differences in risk-related model predictions are attributable to the choice of the data sets used for calibrating the metabolic parameters. Second, it is clear that the bottom-line differences among the model predictions are appreciable. Overall, the ratios of low-dose human to bioassay rodent metabolism spanned a 30-fold range for the six available human/rat comparisons, and the seven predicted ratios of low-dose human to bioassay mouse metabolism spanned a 13-fold range. (The greater range for the rat/human comparison is attributable to a structural assumption by one author group of competing linear and saturable pathways, and their conclusion that the dangerous saturable pathway constitutes a minor fraction of metabolism in rats.) It is clear that there are a number of opportunities for modelers to make different choices of model structure, interpretive assumptions, and calibrating data in the process of constructing pharmacokinetic models for use in estimating "delivered" or "biologically effective" dose for carcinogenesis risk assessments. We believe that in presenting the results of such modeling studies, it is important for researchers to explore the results of alternative, reasonably likely approaches for interpreting the available data--and either show that any conclusions they make are relatively insensitive to particular interpretive choices, or to acknowledge the differences in conclusions that would result from plausible alternative views of the world. PMID:2236748

  17. Design and Operation of a Borehole Straddle Packer for Ground-Water Sampling and Hydraulic Testing of Discrete Intervals at U.S. Air Force Plant 6, Marietta, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holloway, Owen G.; Waddell, Jonathan P.

    2008-01-01

    A borehole straddle packer was developed and tested by the U.S. Geological Survey to characterize the vertical distribution of contaminants, head, and hydraulic properties in open-borehole wells as part of an ongoing investigation of ground-water contamination at U.S. Air Force Plant 6 (AFP6) in Marietta, Georgia. To better understand contaminant fate and transport in a crystalline bedrock setting and to support remedial activities at AFP6, numerous wells have been constructed that include long open-hole intervals in the crystalline bedrock. These wells can include several discontinuities that produce water, which may contain contaminants. Because of the complexity of ground-water flow and contaminant movement in the crystalline bedrock, it is important to characterize the hydraulic and water-quality characteristics of discrete intervals in these wells. The straddle packer facilitates ground-water sampling and hydraulic testing of discrete intervals, and delivery of fluids including tracer suites and remedial agents into these discontinuities. The straddle packer consists of two inflatable packers, a dual-pump system, a pressure-sensing system, and an aqueous injection system. Tests were conducted to assess the accuracy of the pressure-sensing systems, and water samples were collected for analysis of volatile organic compound (VOCs) concentrations. Pressure-transducer readings matched computed water-column height, with a coefficient of determination of greater than 0.99. The straddle packer incorporates both an air-driven piston pump and a variable-frequency, electronic, submersible pump. Only slight differences were observed between VOC concentrations in samples collected using the two different types of sampling pumps during two sampling events in July and August 2005. A test conducted to assess the effect of stagnation on VOC concentrations in water trapped in the system's pump-tubing reel showed that concentrations were not affected. A comparison was conducted to assess differences between three water-sampling methods - collecting samples from the well by pumping a packer-isolated zone using a submersible pump, by using a grab sampler, and by using a passive diffusion sampler. Concentrations of tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene and 1,2-dichloropropane were greatest for samples collected using the submersible pump in the packed-isolated interval, suggesting that the straddle packer yielded the least dilute sample.

  18. Geochemical, isotopic, and dissolved gas characteristics of groundwater in a fractured crystalline-rock aquifer, Savage Municipal Well Superfund site, Milford, New Hampshire, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harte, Philip T.

    2013-01-01

    Tetrachloroethylene (PCE), a volatile organic compound, was detected in groundwater from deep (more than (>) 300 feet (ft) below land surface) fractures in monitoring wells tapping a crystalline-rock aquifer beneath operable unit 1 (OU1) of the Savage Municipal Well Superfund site (Weston, Inc., 2010). Operable units define remedial areas of contaminant concern. PCE contamination within the fractured-rock aquifer has been designated as a separate operable unit, operable unit 3 (OU3; Weston, Inc., 2010). PCE contamination was previously detected in the overlying glacial sand and gravel deposits and basal till, hereafter termed the Milford-Souhegan glacial-drift (MSGD) aquifer (Harte, 2004, 2006). Operable units 1 and 2 encompass areas within the MSGD aquifer, whereas the extent of the underlying OU3 has yet to be defined. The primary original source of contamination has been identified as a former manufacturing facility—the OK Tool manufacturing facility; hence OU1 sometimes has been referred to as the OK Tool Source Area (New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services, undated). A residential neighborhood of 30 to 40 houses is located in close proximity (one-quarter of a mile) from the PCE-contaminated monitoring wells. Each house has its own water-supply well installed in similar rocks as those of the monitoring wells, as indicated by the New Hampshire State geologic map (Lyons and others, 1997). An investigation was initiated in 2010 by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) region 1, and the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (NHDES) to assess the potential for PCE transport from known contaminant locations (monitoring wells) to the residential wells. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the NHDES entered into a cooperative agreement in 2011 to assist in the evaluation of PCE transport in the fractured-rock aquifer. Periodic sampling over the last decade by the USEPA and NHDES has yet to detect PCE in groundwater from the residential-supply wells (as of 2012). However, part of assessing the potential for PCE transport involves understanding the origin of the groundwater in the monitoring and residential wells. One of the tools in delineating the movement of groundwater to wells, particularly in complex, highly heterogeneous fractured-rock aquifers, is the understanding of the geochemical and isotopic composition of groundwater (Lipfert and Reeve, 2004; Harte and others, 2012). This report summarizes findings from analyses of geochemical, isotopic, and dissolved gas characteristics of groundwater. Samples of groundwater were collected in 2011 from monitoring wells and nearby residential-supply wells in proximity to OU1.

  19. Injection of Emulsified Vegetable Oil for Long-Term Bioreduction of Uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, S. C.; Watson, D. B.; Schadt, C. W.; Jardine, P. M.; Gihring, T. M.; Zhang, G.; Mehlhorn, T.; Lowe, K.; Phillips, J.; Earles, J.; Wu, W.; Criddle, C. S.; Kemner, K. M.; Boyanov, M.

    2011-12-01

    In situ bioremediation of a uranium and nitrate-contaminated aquifer with the slow-release electron donor, emulsified vegetable oil (EVO), was tested at the US DOE Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Program (SBR) Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site, in Oak Ridge, TN. The EVO injection took place in Area 2 of the IFRC located about 300 m downgradient of the former S-3 disposal ponds. Liquid wastes, disposed in the ponds from 1951 to 1983, were primarily composed of nitric acid, plating wastes containing various metals (Cr, Ni) radionuclides (U, Tc), inorganics (nitrate, sulfate) and organic contaminants (tetrachloroethylene, acetone). Prior pond closure in 1987, large volumes of waste fluids migrated into the subsurface, down Bear Creek Valley and into Bear Creek. Contaminants detected at Area 2 were transported through a high permeability gravelly fill that is considered a preferred transport pathway for U to Bear Creek. Groundwater in the gravelly fill is contaminated with U (1-3 mg/L), sulfate (95-130 mg/L), and nitrate (20-40 mg/L) and 500 mg/kg or higher U has been detected on the solid phase of the fill material. The objective of this study is to investigate the feasibility and long-term sustainability of U(VI) reduction and immobilization, and nitrate degradation in the high permeability, high flow gravel fill using EVO as the electron donor. A one-time EVO injection was conducted over a 2 hour period in the highly permeable gravel (hydraulic conductivity 0.08 cm/sec) in the well instrumented IFRC Area 2 field plot. Extensive monitoring of geochemical parameters, dissolved gases and microbial populations were conducted during the test. A bromide tracer test was conducted prior to the injection of the EVO to assess transport pathways and rates. Geochemical analysis of site groundwater demonstrated the sequential bioreduction of oxygen, nitrate, Mn(IV), Fe(III) and sulfate. Transient accumulation of acetate was observed as an intermediate in the oil degradation. Reduction and removal of U and nitrate from groundwater was observed in all wells in hydraulic connection to the injection wells after 2-4 weeks. U concentrations in groundwater were reduced to below 30 ppb (US EPA drinking water standard) at some well locations and nitrate was reduced to below detectable levels. Rebound of U in groundwater was observed together with the rebound of sulfate concentrations as the EVO was consumed. The flux of U and nitrate contamination from groundwater to the surface water receptor (Bear Creek) was significantly reduced by the EVO injection over a one year period. Uranium (VI) reduction to U(IV) in the field tests was confirmed by X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) analysis. The reduced U(IV) was determined by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) to be in an Fe-U complex, not uraninite. The activities of major Fe(III)- and sulfate-reducing bacteria with U(VI)-reducing capability as well as methanogens was stimulated after injection of the oil.

  20. Polymer coated gold nanoparticles for tracing the mobility of engineered nanoparticles in the subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uthuppu, Basil; Sidelmann Fjordbøge, Annika; Caspersen, Eva; Broholm, Mette Martina; Havsteen Jakobsen, Mogens

    2014-05-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are manufactured for their specific properties providing possibilities for new and improved products and applications. The use of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) has therefore brought significant innovation and advances to society, including benefits for human health and the environment. At the same time, little is known about the potential risk associated with the inevitable release of these new materials to the environment, and their new properties are poorly understood . Suspensions of ENPs are not very stable, as they tend to aggregate thereby losing their properties as single particles. Coatings, including a large variety of natural and synthetic polymers, are used to enhance the colloid stability in high concentrations . However, increasing the stability of these materials may lead to unintended effects, such as enhancing their mobility in surface water and groundwater leading to inadvertent impacts on aquatic ecosystems and human health. Detection of ENPs in natural water systems, however, has proved very challenging. Hence, there is a need for tracing of ENP behaviour in the environment. We suggest a possibility of introducing inert gold NPs with the same mobility as the reactive NPs, as tracer particles. Colloidal gold has been of great interest for centuries due to its vibrant colors produced by the interaction with visible light. The unusual optical-electronic properties, high chemical stability and relatively low toxicity have made them the model system of choice in this context. Also, the natural occurrence of these particles in the proposed environment is very rare. Laboratory based experiments conducted in sand columns show that stable aqueous suspensions of gold NPs coated with amphiphilic block co polymers (PVP-VA and PVA-COOH) are extremely mobile (retardation factors of 1.0-1.2) with high recovery values (50-95 %). The specific retardation and recovery depends on the coating type, concentration and grafting method. The NPs also show significant partitioning to organic phases such as tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), which are considered as potential ground water pollutants accumulated in the subsurface as DNAPLs (dense non-aqueous phase liquids). Being a noble metal, nanogold is to be detected by nondestructive optical methods at a concentration of at least 1000 fold lower than ENPs. Using conventional spectrophotometric technique equipped with liquid waveguide capillary cell (LWCC), nanogold is detected at very low concentration range (1 ppm - 62.5 ppb). Compared to uncoated particles, surface modified nanogold with polymers retains the plasmonic peaks at 520 nm when diluted with artificial ground water. Acknowledgement: The low level detection of nanogold using LWCC was done at the department of nuclear and quantum engineering, KAIST (Korea Advance Institute of Science and Technology), 291 Daehak-ro, (373-1, Guseong-dong), Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701, Republic of KOREA. We acknowledge Prof. Woojin Lee, Prof. Jong-Il Yun, Kim A Young and Tae Hyeong Kim for the same.

  1. Hydrogeology, Chemical Characteristics, and Transport Processes in the Zone of Contribution of a Public-Supply Well in York, Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landon, Matthew K.; Clark, Brian R.; McMahon, Peter B.; McGuire, Virginia L.; Turco, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    In 2001, the U.S. Geological Survey, as part of the National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program, initiated a topical study of Transport of Anthropogenic and Natural Contaminants (TANC) to PSW (public-supply wells). Local-scale and regional-scale TANC study areas were delineated within selected NAWQA study units for intensive study of processes effecting transport of contaminants to PSWs. This report describes results from a local-scale TANC study area at York, Nebraska, within the High Plains aquifer, including the hydrogeology and geochemistry of a 108-square-kilometer study area that contains the zone of contribution to a PSW selected for study (study PSW), and describes factors controlling the transport of selected anthropogenic and natural contaminants to PSWs. Within the local-scale TANC study area, the High Plains aquifer is approximately 75 m (meter) thick, and includes an unconfined aquifer, an upper confining unit, an upper confined aquifer, and a lower confining unit with lower confined sand lenses (units below the upper confining unit are referred to as confined aquifers) in unconsolidated alluvial and glacial deposits overlain by loess and underlain by Cretaceous shale. From northwest to southeast, land use in the local-scale TANC study area changes from predominantly irrigated agricultural land to residential and commercial land in the small community of York (population approximately 8,100). For the purposes of comparing water chemistry, wells were classified by degree of aquifer confinement (unconfined and confined), depth in the unconfined aquifer (shallow and deep), land use (urban and agricultural), and extent of mixing in wells in the confined aquifer with water from the unconfined aquifer (mixed and unmixed). Oxygen (delta 18O) and hydrogen (delta D) stable isotopic values indicated a clear isotopic contrast between shallow wells in the unconfined aquifer (hereinafter, unconfined shallow wells) and most monitoring wells in the confined aquifers (hereinafter, confined unmixed wells). Delta 18O and delta D values for a minority of wells in the confined aquifers were intermediate between those for the unconfined shallow wells and those for the confined unmixed wells. These intermediate values were consistent with mixing of water from unconfined and confined aquifers (hereinafter, confined mixed wells). Oxidation-reduction conditions were primarily oxic in the unconfined aquifer and variably reducing in the confined aquifers. Trace amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOC), particularly tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), were widely detected in unconfined shallow urban wells and indicated the presence of young urban recharge waters in most confined mixed wells. The presence of degradation products of agricultural pesticides (acetochlor and alachlor) in some confined mixed wells suggests that some fraction of the water in these wells also was the result of recharge in agricultural areas. In the unconfined aquifer, age-tracer data (chlorofluorocarbon and sulfur hexafluoride data, and tritium to helium-3 ratios) fit a piston-flow model, with apparent recharge ages ranging from 7 to 48 years and generally increasing with depth. Age-tracer data for the confined aquifers were consistent with mixing of 'old' water, not containing modern tracers recharged in the last 60 years, and exponentially-mixed 'young' water with modern tracers. Confined unmixed wells contained less than (=) 97% of old water. Confined mixed wells contained >30% young water and mean ages ranged from 12 to 14 years. Median concentrations of nitrate (as nitrogen, hereinafter, nitrate-N) were 17.3 and 16.0 mg/L (milligram per liter) in unconfined shallow urban and agricultural wells, respectively, indicating a range of likely nitrate sources. Septic systems are most numerous near the edge of the urban area and appear to be

  2. Probabilistic performance-assessment modeling of the mixed waste landfill at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    Peace, Gerald L.; Goering, Timothy James; Miller, Mark Laverne; Ho, Clifford Kuofei

    2005-11-01

    A probabilistic performance assessment has been conducted to evaluate the fate and transport of radionuclides (americium-241, cesium-137, cobalt-60, plutonium-238, plutonium-239, radium-226, radon-222, strontium-90, thorium-232, tritium, uranium-238), heavy metals (lead and cadmium), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at the Mixed Waste Landfill (MWL). Probabilistic analyses were performed to quantify uncertainties inherent in the system and models for a 1,000-year period, and sensitivity analyses were performed to identify parameters and processes that were most important to the simulated performance metrics. Comparisons between simulated results and measured values at the MWL were made to gain confidence in the models and perform calibrations when data were available. In addition, long-term monitoring requirements and triggers were recommended based on the results of the quantified uncertainty and sensitivity analyses. At least one-hundred realizations were simulated for each scenario defined in the performance assessment. Conservative values and assumptions were used to define values and distributions of uncertain input parameters when site data were not available. Results showed that exposure to tritium via the air pathway exceeded the regulatory metric of 10 mrem/year in about 2% of the simulated realizations when the receptor was located at the MWL (continuously exposed to the air directly above the MWL). Simulations showed that peak radon gas fluxes exceeded the design standard of 20 pCi/m{sup 2}/s in about 3% of the realizations if up to 1% of the containers of sealed radium-226 sources were assumed to completely degrade in the future. If up to 100% of the containers of radium-226 sources were assumed to completely degrade, 30% of the realizations yielded radon surface fluxes that exceeded the design standard. For the groundwater pathway, simulations showed that none of the radionuclides or heavy metals (lead and cadmium) reached the groundwater during the 1,000-year evaluation period. Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) was used as a proxy for other VOCs because of its mobility and potential to exceed maximum contaminant levels in the groundwater relative to other VOCs. Simulations showed that PCE reached the groundwater, but only 1% of the realizations yielded aquifer concentrations that exceeded the regulatory metric of 5 {micro}g/L. Based on these results, monitoring triggers have been proposed for the air, surface soil, vadose zone, and groundwater at the MWL. Specific triggers include numerical thresholds for radon concentrations in the air, tritium concentrations in surface soil, infiltration through the vadose zone, and uranium and select VOC concentrations in groundwater. The proposed triggers are based on U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Department of Energy regulatory standards. If a trigger is exceeded, then a trigger evaluation process will be initiated which will allow sufficient data to be collected to assess trends and recommend corrective actions, if necessary.

  3. Effects of a remedial system and its operation on volatile organic compound-contaminated ground water, Operable Unit 1, Savage Municipal Well Superfund Site, Milford, New Hampshire, 1998-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harte, Philip T.

    2006-01-01

    The Savage Municipal Well Superfund site in the Town of Milford, N.H., is underlain by a 0.5-square mile plume of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), mostly tetrachloroethylene (PCE). The plume occurs mostly within a highly transmissive sand and gravel layer, but also extends into underlying till and bedrock. The plume has been divided into two areas called Operable Unit 1 (OU1), which contains the primary source area, and Operable Unit 2 (OU2), which is defined as the extended plume area. PCE concentrations in excess of 100,000 parts per billion (ppb) had been detected in the OU1 area in 1995, indicating a likely Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid (DNAPL) source. In the fall of 1998, the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (NHDES) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) installed a remedial system in OU1 to contain and capture the dissolved VOC plume. The OU1 remedial system includes a low-permeability barrier wall that encircles the highest detected concentrations of PCE, and a series of injection and extraction wells to contain and remove contaminants. The barrier wall likely penetrates the full thickness of the sand and gravel; in most places, it also penetrates the full thickness of the underlying basal till and sits atop bedrock. Remedial injection and extraction wells have been operating since the spring of 1999 and include a series of interior (inside the barrier wall) injection and extractions wells and exterior (outside the barrier wall) injection and extraction wells. A recharge gallery outside the barrier wall receives the bulk of the treated water and reinjects it into the shallow aquifer. From 1998 to 2004, PCE concentrations decreased by an average of 80 percent at most wells outside the barrier wall. This decrease indicates (1) the barrier wall and interior extraction effectively contained high PCE concentrations inside the wall, (2) other sources of PCE did not appear to be outside of the wall, and (3) ambient ground-water flow in conjunction with the exterior remedial wells effectively remediated most of the dissolved PCE plume outside the wall. The overburden at middle depths (40 to 70 ft below land surface) downgradient from exterior extraction wells showed relatively slow decreases in PCE concentrations compared to other areas outside the barrier wall. Numerical simulation shows extraction caused the formation of a small downgradient slow-velocity zone. Because the ambient ground-water velocities are high (approximately 1 foot per day), temporary termination of extraction at the exterior wells may increase dilution downgradient from the exterior extraction wells. Extraction can also be optimized on the basis of seasonal hydrologic conditions to facilitate exterior well capture from upgradient areas outside of the barrier wall where PCE concentrations are highest. Reductions in concentrations of PCE inside the barrier wall from 1998 to 2003 were minimal near suspected source areas, indicating that the operation of interior remedial wells had not been effective in remediating dissolved PCE or the DNAPL source. Capture of the dissolved PCE plume within the barrier wall by interior extraction wells could be enhanced if operation (injection rates) increased at underutilized interior injection wells, thereby increasing hydraulic gradients.

  4. Geohydrology and distribution of volatile organic compounds in ground water in the Casey Village area, Bucks County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sloto, Ronald A.; Conger, Randall W.; Grazul, Kevin E.

    1998-01-01

    Casey Village and the adjoining part of the U.S. Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) are underlain by the Late Triassic-age Stockton Formation, which consists of a dipping series of siltstones and sandstones. The direction of vertical ground-water gradients in the Stockton Formation varies among well locations and sometimes with time. Vertical gradients can be substantial; the difference in water levels at one well pair (two wells screened at different depths) was 7.1 ft (feet) over a 32-ft vertical section of the aquifer. Potentiometric-surface maps show a groundwater divide that bisects the Casey Village area. For wells screened between 18 and 64 ft below land surface (bls), the general ground-water gradient is to the east and northeast on the east side of the divide and to the south and southwest on the west side of the divide. For wells screened between 48 and 106 ft bls, the general ground-water gradient is to the northeast on the east side of the divide and to the southwest and northwest on the west side of the divide. An aquifer test at one well in Casey Village caused drawdown in wells on the opposite side of the ground-water divide on the NAWC and shifted the ground-water divide in the deeper potentiometric surface to the west. Drawdowns formed an elliptical pattern, which indicates anisotropy; however, anisotropy is not aligned with strike or dip. Hydraulic stress caused by pumping crosses stratigraphic boundaries. Between 1993 and 1996, the trichloroethylene (TCE) concentration in water samples collected from wells in Casey Village decreased. The highest concentration of TCE measured in water from one well decreased from 1,200 mg/L (micrograms per liter) in 1993 when domestic wells were pumped in Casey Village to 140 mg/L in 1996, 3 years after the installation of public water and the cessation of domestic pumping. This suggests that pumping of domestic wells may have contributed to TCE migration. Between 1993 and 1996, the tetrachloroethylene (PCE) concentration in water samples collected from wells in Casey Village decreased only slightly. The highest concentration of PCE measured in water from one well decreased from 720 mg/L in 1993 to 630 mg/L in 1996. The distribution of TCE and PCE in ground water indicates the presence of separate PCE and TCE plumes, each with a different source area. The TCE plume appears to be moving in two directions away from the ground-water divide area. The pumping of a domestic well may have caused TCE migration into the ground-water divide area. From the divide area, the TCE plume appears to be moving both to the east and the west under the natural hydraulic gradient. Aquifer-isolation tests conducted in the well with the highest TCE concentrations showed that concentrations of TCE in water samples from the isolated intervals were similar but slightly lower in the deeper isolated zones than in the shallower isolated zones. Upward flow was measured in this well during geophysical logging. If the source of TCE to the well was from shallow fractures, upward flow of less contaminated water could be flushing TCE from the immediate vicinity of this well. This may help explain why the concentration of TCE in water from this well decreased an order of magnitude between 1993 and 1996.

  5. Interpretation of borehole geophysical logs, aquifer-isolation tests, and water quality, supply wells 1 and 2, Willow Grove Naval Air Station/Joint Reserve Base, Horsham Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sloto, Ronald A.; Goode, Daniel J.; Frasch, Steven M.

    2002-01-01

    Ground water pumped from supply wells 1 and 2 on the Willow Grove Naval Air Station/Joint Reserve Base (NAS/JRB) provides water for use at the base, including potable water for drinking. The supply wells have been contaminated by volatile organic compounds (VOC?s), particularly trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE), and the water is treated to remove the VOC?s. The Willow Grove NAS/JRB and surrounding area are underlain by sedimentary rocks of the Triassic-age Stockton Formation, which form a complex, heterogeneous aquifer. The ground-water-flow system for the supply wells was characterized by use of borehole geophysical logs and heatpulse-flowmeter measurements. The heatpulse-flowmeter measurements showed upward and downward borehole flow under nonpumping conditions in both wells. The hydraulic and chemical properties of discrete water-bearing fractures in the supply wells were characterized by isolating each water-bearing fracture with straddle packers. Eight fractures in supply well 1 and five fractures in supply well 2 were selected for testing on the basis of the borehole geophysical logs and borehole television surveys. Water samples were collected from each isolated fracture and analyzed for VOC?s and inorganic constituents. Fractures at 50?59, 79?80, 196, 124?152, 182, 241, 256, and 350?354 ft btoc (feet below top of casing) were isolated in supply well 1. Specific capacities ranged from 0.26 to 5.7 (gal/min)/ft (gallons per minute per foot) of drawdown. The highest specific capacity was for the fracture isolated at 179.8?188 ft btoc. Specific capacity and depth of fracture were not related in either supply well. The highest concentrations of PCE were in water samples collected from fractures isolated at 236.8?245 and 249.8?258 ft btoc, which are hydraulically connected. The concentration of PCE generally increased with depth to a maximum of 39 mg/L (micrograms per liter) at a depth of 249.8? 258 ft btoc and then decreased to 21 mg/L at a depth of 345.3?389 ft btoc. Fractures at 68?74, 115, 162, 182, 205, and 314 ft btoc were isolated in supply well 2. Specific capacities ranged from 0.08 to less than 2.9 (gal/ min)/ft. The highest specific capacity was for the fracture isolated at 157?165.2 ft btoc. Concentrations of detected VOC?s in water samples were 3.6 mg/L or less. Lithologic units penetrated by both supply wells were determined by correlating naturalgamma and single-point-resistance borehole geophysical logs. All lithologic units are not continuous water-bearing units because water-bearing fractures are not necessarily present in the same lithologic units in each well. Although the wells penetrate the same lithologic units, the lithologic location of only three water-bearing fractures are common to both wells. The same lithologic unit may have different hydraulic properties in each well. A regional ground-water divide is southeast of the supply wells. From this divide, ground water flows northwest toward Park Creek, a tributary to Little Neshaminy Creek. Potentiometric-surface maps were prepared from water levels measured in shallow and deep wells. For both depth intervals, the direction of ground-water flow is toward the northwest. For most well clusters, the vertical head gradient is downward from the shallow to the deeper part of the aquifer. Pumping of the supply wells at times can cause the vertical flow direction to reverse.

  6. Assessing the susceptibility to contamination of two aquifer systems used for public water supply in the Modesto and Fresno metropolitan areas, California, 2001 and 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Michael T.; Belitz, Kenneth; Johnson, Tyler D.

    2004-01-01

    Ground-water samples were collected from 90 active public supply wells in the Fresno and Modesto metropolitan areas as part of the California Aquifer Susceptibility (CAS) program. The CAS program was formed to examine the susceptibility to contamination of aquifers that are tapped by public supply wells to serve the citizens of California. The objectives of the program are twofold: (1) to evaluate the quality of ground water used for public supply using volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in ground-water samples and (2) to determine if the occurrence and distribution of low level VOCs in ground water and characteristics, such as land use, can be used to predict aquifer susceptibility to contamination from anthropogenic activities occurring at, or near, land surface. An evaluation was made of the relation between VOC occurrence and the explanatory variables: depth to the top of the uppermost well perforation, land use, relative ground-water age, high nitrate concentrations, density of leaking underground fuel tanks (LUFT), and source of recharge water. VOCs were detected in 92 percent of the wells sampled in Modesto and in 72 percent of the wells sampled in Fresno. Trihalomethanes (THM) and solvents were frequently detected in both study areas. Conversely, the gasoline components?benzene, toluene ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX)?were rarely, if at all, detected, even though LUFTs were scattered throughout both study areas. The rare occurrence of BTEX compounds may be the result of their low solubility and labile nature in the subsurface environment. Samples were analyzed for 85 VOCs; 25 were detected in at least one sample. The concentrations of nearly all VOCs detected were at least an order of magnitude below action levels set by drinking water standards. Concentrations of four VOCs exceeded federal and state maximum contaminant levels (MCL): the solvent trichloroethylene (TCE) and the fumigant 1, 2-dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP) in Fresno, and the solvents TCE and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in Modesto. Chloroform, which is a by product of water disinfection and a constituent used in industrial processes since the 1920s, was the most frequently detected compound, whereas the gasoline oxygenate methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), which has been in widespread production and use only since the 1990s, was detected in only 2 percent of the samples. Downward migration of contaminants appears to be a viable pathway of contamination in the unconfined and semi-confined aquifers underlying the Fresno and Modesto study areas. Within the individual study areas, VOCs were detected more frequently and in greater numbers in shallower wells than in deeper wells. Additionally, VOCs were detected more frequently and in greater numbers in Modesto than in Fresno. Wells sampled in Modesto were significantly shallower than the wells sampled in Fresno; the other explanatory variables examined in this report were not significantly different between the two study areas. VOCs occurred more frequently in younger ground water (water recharged after 1952) than in older ground water (water recharged prior to 1952). Additionally, wells withdrawing younger ground water had a higher number of VOCs detected per well than did wells withdrawing older ground water. Younger ground water was at or near the land surface during a period when VOCs came into widespread production and use. Therefore, wells from which younger ground water is withdrawn may be more susceptible to contamination. Of the explanatory variables examined in this study, land use was the best predictor of aquifer susceptibility in the Fresno and Modesto study areas. VOCs were detected more frequently in wells located in heavily urbanized areas. The number of VOCs detected in ground water was positively correlated to the degree of urbanization. VOCs are produced and used primarily in urban land use settings; therefore, aquifers underlying urban areas may be more susceptible to

  7. Ground-water system, estimation of aquifer hydraulic properties, and effects of pumping on ground-water flow in Triassic sedimentary rocks in and near Lansdale, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senior, Lisa A.; Goode, Daniel J.

    1999-01-01

    Ground water in Triassic-age sedimentary fractured-rock aquifers in the area of Lansdale, Pa., is used as drinking water and for industrial supply. In 1979, ground water in the Lansdale area was found to be contaminated with trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, and other man-made organic compounds, and in 1989, the area was placed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) National Priority List as the North Penn Area 6 site. To assist the USEPA in the hydrogeological assessment of the site, the U.S. Geological Survey began a study in 1995 to describe the ground-water system and to determine the effects of changes in the well pumping patterns on the direction of ground-water flow in the Lansdale area. This determination is based on hydrologic and geophysical data collected from 1995-98 and on results of the simulation of the regional ground-water-flow system by use of a numerical model.Correlation of natural-gamma logs indicate that the sedimentary rock beds strike generally northeast and dip at angles less than 30 degrees to the northwest. The ground-water system is confined or semi-confined, even at shallow depths; depth to bedrock commonly is less than 20 feet (6 meters); and depth to water commonly is about 15 to 60 feet (5 to 18 meters) below land surface. Single-well, aquifer-interval-isolation (packer) tests indicate that vertical permeability of the sedimentary rocks is low. Multiple-well aquifer tests indicate that the system is heterogeneous and that flow appears primarily in discrete zones parallel to bedding. Preferred horizontal flow along strike was not observed in the aquifer tests for wells open to the pumped interval. Water levels in wells that are open to the pumped interval, as projected along the dipping stratigraphy, are drawn down more than water levels in wells that do not intersect the pumped interval. A regional potentiometric map based on measured water levels indicates that ground water flows from Lansdale towards discharge areas in three drainages, the Wissahickon, Towamencin, and Neshaminy Creeks.Ground-water flow was simulated for different pumping patterns representing past and current conditions. The three-dimensional numerical flow model (MODFLOW) was automatically calibrated by use of a parameter estimation program (MODFLOWP). Steady-state conditions were assumed for the calibration period of 1996. Model calibration indicates that estimated recharge is 8.2 inches (208 millimeters) and the regional anisotropy ratio for the sedimentary-rock aquifer is about 11 to 1, with permeability greatest along strike. The regional anisotropy is caused by up- and down-dip termination of high-permeability bed-oriented features, which were not explicitly simulated in the regional-scale model. The calibrated flow model was used to compare flow directions and capture zones in Lansdale for conditions corresponding to relatively high pumping rates in 1994 and to lower pumping rates in 1997. Comparison of the 1994 and 1997 simulations indicates that wells pumped at the lower 1997 rates captured less ground water from known sites of contamination than wells pumped at the 1994 rates. Ground-water flow rates away from Lansdale increased as pumpage decreased in 1997.A preliminary evaluation of the relation between ground-water chemistry and conditions favorable for the degradation of chlorinated solvents was based on measurements of dissolved-oxygen concentration and other chemical constituents in water samples from 92 wells. About 18 percent of the samples contained less than or equal to 5 milligrams per liter dissolved oxygen, a concentration that indicates reducing conditions favorable for degradation of chlorinated solvents.

  8. Nonaqueous Phase Liquid Dissolution in Porous Media: Multi-Scale Effects of Multi-Component Dissolution Kinetics on Cleanup Time

    SciTech Connect

    McNab, W; Ezzedine, S; Detwiler, R

    2007-02-26

    Industrial organic solvents such as trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) constitute a principal class of groundwater contaminants. Cleanup of groundwater plume source areas associated with these compounds is problematic, in part, because the compounds often exist in the subsurface as dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). Ganglia (or 'blobs') of DNAPL serve as persistent sources of contaminants that are difficult to locate and remediate (e.g. Fenwick and Blunt, 1998). Current understanding of the physical and chemical processes associated with dissolution of DNAPLs in the subsurface is incomplete and yet is critical for evaluating long-term behavior of contaminant migration, groundwater cleanup, and the efficacy of source area cleanup technologies. As such, a goal of this project has been to contribute to this critical understanding by investigating the multi-phase, multi-component physics of DNAPL dissolution using state-of-the-art experimental and computational techniques. Through this research, we have explored efficient and accurate conceptual and numerical models for source area contaminant transport that can be used to better inform the modeling of source area contaminants, including those at the LLNL Superfund sites, to re-evaluate existing remediation technologies, and to inspire or develop new remediation strategies. The problem of DNAPL dissolution in natural porous media must be viewed in the context of several scales (Khachikian and Harmon, 2000), including the microscopic level at which capillary forces, viscous forces, and gravity/buoyancy forces are manifested at the scale of individual pores (Wilson and Conrad, 1984; Chatzis et al., 1988), the mesoscale where dissolution rates are strongly influenced by the local hydrodynamics, and the field-scale. Historically, the physico-chemical processes associated with DNAPL dissolution have been addressed through the use of lumped mass transfer coefficients which attempt to quantify the dissolution rate in response to local dissolved-phase concentrations distributed across the source area using a volume-averaging approach (Figure 1). The fundamental problem with the lumped mass transfer parameter is that its value is typically derived empirically through column-scale experiments that combine the effects of pore-scale flow, diffusion, and pore-scale geometry in a manner that does not provide a robust theoretical basis for upscaling. In our view, upscaling processes from the pore-scale to the field-scale requires new computational approaches (Held and Celia, 2001) that are directly linked to experimental studies of dissolution at the pore scale. As such, our investigation has been multi-pronged, combining theory, experiments, numerical modeling, new data analysis approaches, and a synthesis of previous studies (e.g. Glass et al, 2001; Keller et al., 2002) aimed at quantifying how the mechanisms controlling dissolution at the pore-scale control the long-term dissolution of source areas at larger scales.

  9. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, M.J.

    1999-03-24

    This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose-zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year (FY) 1998 on the Word Site, Washington. Soil-vapor extraction in the 200-West Area removed 777 kg of carbon tetrachloride in FY 1998, for a total of 75,490 kg removed since remediation began in 1992. Spectral gamma logging and evaluation of historical gross gamma logs near tank farms and liquid-disposal sites in the 200 Areas provided information on movement of contaminants in the vadose zone. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater-flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1997 and June 1998. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes in groundwater were tritium and iodine-129. Concentrations of technetium-99, uranium, strontium-90, and carbon-14 also exceeded drinking water standards in smaller plumes. Plutonium and cesium-137 exceeded standards only near the 216-B-5 injection well. Derived concentration guide levels specified in U.S. Department of Energy Order 5400.5 were exceeded for tritium, uranium, strontium-90, and plutonium in small plumes or single wells. One well completed in the basalt-confined aquifer beneath the 200-East Area exceeded the drinking water standard for technetium-99. Nitrate is the most extensive chemical contaminant. Carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, chromium, cis-l, Z-dichloroethylene, fluoride, and trichloroethylene also were present in smaller areas at levels above their maximum contaminant levels. Cyanide concentrations were elevated in one area but were below the maximum contaminant level. Tetrachloroethylene exceeded its maximum contaminant level in several wells in the 300 Area for the first time since the 1980s. Metals such as aluminum, cadmium, iron, manganese, and nickel exceeded their maximum contaminant levels in filtered samples from numerous wells; they are believed to represent natural components of groundwater. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 groundwater monitoring continued at 25 waste management areas during FY 1998: 17 under detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater, 6 under interim-status groundwater-quality-assessment programs to assess possible contamination, and 2 under final-status corrective-action programs. Groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued to reduce the amount of strontium-90 (100-N) and chromium (100-K, D, and H) reaching the Columbia River. Two systems in the 200-West Area operated to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetide uranium plumes. Groundwater monitoring continued at these sites and at other sites where there is no active remediation. A three-dimensional, numerical groundwater model was applied to simulate radionuclide movement from sources in the 200 Areas following site closure in 2050. Contaminants will continue to move toward the southeast and north (through Gable Gap), but the areas with levels exceeding drinking water standards will diminish.

  10. Hydrogeologic Investigation, Water Chemistry Analysis, and Model Delineation of contributing Areas for City of Tallahassee Public-Supply Wells, Tallahassee, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, J. Hal; Katz, Brian G.

    2007-01-01

    Ground water from the Upper Floridan aquifer is the sole source of water supply for Tallahassee, Florida, and the surrounding area. The City of Tallahassee (the City) currently operates 28 water-supply wells; 26 wells are distributed throughout the City and 2 are located in Woodville, Florida. Most of these wells yield an ample supply of potable water; however, water from several wells has low levels of tetrachloroethylene (PCE). The City removes the PCE from the water by passing it through granular-activated carbon units before distribution. To ensure that water-supply wells presently free of contamination remain clean, it is necessary to understand the ground-water flow system in sufficient detail to protect the contributing areas. Ground-water samples collected from four public-supply wells were analyzed for tritium (3H), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6). Using data for the CFC compounds, apparent ground-water ages ranged from 7 to 31 years. For SF6, the apparent ages tended to be about 5 to 10 years younger than those from CFCs. Apparent ages based on the tritium/tritiogenic helium-3 (3H/3Hetrit) method ranged from 26 to 33 years. The three dating methods indicate that the apparent age of ground water generally decreases from northern to southern Leon County. This southward trend of decreasing ages is consistent with increasing amounts of recharge that occur as ground water moves from north to south. The ground-water age data derived by geochemical and tracer analyses were used in combination with the flow model and particle tracking to determine an effective porosity for the Hawthorn clays and Upper Floridan aquifer. The effective porosities for the Upper Floridan aquifer that resulted in best model matches were averaged to produce an effective porosity of 7 percent, and the effective porosities for the Hawthorn clays that resulted in a match were averaged to produce an effective porosity of 22 percent. Probabilistic contributing areas were determined for 26 City wells using MODFLOW and MODPATH. For each probabilistic contributing area delineated, the model was run 100 times and the results were analyzed statistically. For each of the 100 runs, a different hydraulic conductivity for each of the zones was assigned to the Upper Floridan aquifer. The hydraulic conductivities were generated randomly assuming a lognormal probability distribution; the mean of the distribution was equal to the hydraulic conductivity from the calibrated model. The 5-year time-dependent capture zones (TDCZs), assuming effective porosities of 0.1, 1, and 7 percent for four representative wells, were delineated. The higher probabilities of capture (greater than 40, 60, and 80 percent) were similar for all effective porosities, and the TDCZ delineated using a 7-percent porosity was slightly smaller; the lower probabilities of capture (greater than 10 and 20 percent) showed a large range of variability.

  11. Hydrogeologic investigation and simulation of ground-water flow in the Upper Floridan Aquifer of north-central Florida and southwestern Georgia and delineation of contributing areas for selected city of Tallahassee, Florida, water-supply wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Hal

    1996-01-01

    A 4-year investigation of the Upper Floridan aquifer and ground-water flow system in Leon County, Florida, and surrounding counties of north-central Florida and southwestern Georgia began in 1990. The purpose of the investigation was to describe the ground-water flow system and to delineate the contributing areas to selected City of Tallahassee, Florida, water-supply wells. The investigation was prompted by the detection of low levels of tetrachloroethylene in ground-water samples collected from several of the city's water-supply wells. Hydrologic data and previous studies indicate that; ground-water flow within the Upper Floridan aquifer can be considered steady-state; the Upper Floridan aquifer is a single water-bearing unit; recharge is from precipitation; and that discharge occurs as spring flow, leakage to rivers, leakage to the Gulf of Mexico, and pumpage. Measured transmissivities of the aquifer ranged from 1,300 ft2/d (feet squared per day) to 1,300,000 ft2/d. Steady-state ground-water flow in the Upper Floridan aquifer was simulated using a three-dimensional ground- water flow model. Transmissivities ranging from less than 5,000 ft2/d to greater than 11,000,000 ft2/d were required to calibrate to observed conditions. Recharge rates used in the model ranged from 18.0 inches per year in areas where the aquifer was unconfined to less than 2 inches per year in broad areas where the aquifer was confined. Contributing areas to five Tallahassee water-supply wells were simulated by particle- tracking techniques. Particles were seeded in model cells containing pumping wells then tracked backwards in time toward recharge areas. The contributing area for each well was simulated twice, once assuming a porosity of 25 percent and once assuming a porosity of 5 percent. A porosity of 25 percent is considered a reasonable average value for the Upper Floridan aquifer; the 5 percent porosity simulated the movement of ground-water through only solution-enhanced bedding plains and fractures. The contributing areas were generally elliptical in shape, reflecting the influence of the sloping potentiometric surface. The contributing areas delineated for a 5 percent porosity were always much larger than those determined using a 25 percent porosity. The lowest average ground-water velocity computed within a contributing area, using a 25 percent porosity, was 1.0 ft/d (foot per day) and the highest velocity was 1.6 ft/d. The lowest average ground-water velocity, determined using a 5 percent porosity, was 2.4 ft/d and the highest was 7.4 ft/d. The contributing areas for each of the five wells was also determined analytically and compared to the model-derived areas. The upgradient width of the simulated contributing areas were larger than the upgradient width of the analytically determined contributing areas for four of the five wells. The model could more accurately delineate contributing areas because of the ability to simulate wells as partially penetrating and by incorporating complex, three-dimensional aquifer characteristics, which the analytical method could not.

  12. Evaluation of volatile organic compounds in two Mojave Desert basins-Mojave River and Antelope Valley-in San Bernardino, Los Angeles, and Kern Counties, California, June-October 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Densmore, Jill N.; Belitz, Kenneth; Wright, Michael T.; Dawson, Barbara J.; Johnson, Tyler D.

    2005-01-01

    The California Aquifer Susceptibility Assessment of the Ground-Water Ambient Monitoring and Assessment Program was developed to assess water quality and susceptibility of ground-water resources to contamination from surficial sources. This study focuses on the Mojave River and the Antelope Valley ground-water basins in southern California. Volatile organic compound (VOC) data were evaluated in conjunction with tritium data to determine a potential correlation with aquifer type, depth to top of perforations, and land use to VOC distribution and occurrence in the Mojave River and the Antelope Valley Basins. Detection frequencies for VOCs were compiled and compared to assess the distribution in each area. Explanatory variables were evaluated by comparing detection frequencies for VOCs and tritium and the number of compounds detected. Thirty-three wells were sampled in the Mojave River Basin (9 in the floodplain aquifer, 15 in the regional aquifer, and 9 in the sewered subset of the regional aquifer). Thirty-two wells were sampled in the Antelope Valley Basin. Quality-control samples also were collected to identify, quantify, and document bias and variability in the data. Results show that VOCs generally were detected slightly more often in the Antelope Valley Basin samples than in the Mojave River Basin samples. VOCs were detected more frequently in the floodplain aquifer than in the regional aquifer and the sewered subset. Tritium was detected more frequently in the Mojave River Basin samples than in the Antelope Valley Basin samples, and it was detected more frequently in the floodplain aquifer than in the regional aquifer and the sewered subset. Most of the samples collected in both basins for this study contained old water (water recharged prior to 1952). In general, in these desert basins, tritium need not be present for VOCs to be present. When VOCs were detected, young water (water recharge after 1952) was slightly more likely to be contaminated than old water. Trihalomethanes (THMs) were detected less frequently in the Mojave River Basin samples than in the Antelope Valley Basin samples. The THMs that were detected in the Mojave River Basin were detected more frequently in the floodplain aquifer than in the regional aquifer and sewered subset. Solvents were detected more frequently in the Mojave River samples than in the Antelope Valley samples. In the Mojave River Basin samples, solvents were detected less frequently in the floodplain aquifer than in the regional aquifer and the sewered subset. Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) were not detected in either study area. Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) was detected in one sample from both the Mojave River and Antelope Valley Basins. The most frequently detected compound (detected in more than 10 percent of the wells) in the Mojave River Basin was chloroform. The two most frequently detected compounds in the Antelope Valley Basin were chloroform and tetrachloroethylene (PCE). In the Mojave River Basin, aquifer type and land use within 1,640 ft (500 m) of the well head were not statistically correlated with the number of VOCs detected, although VOCs were detected more frequently in the floodplain aquifer than in the regional aquifer and the sewered subset. Depth to the top of the perforations was an explanatory factor for the number of VOCs detected in the Mojave River Basin; the detection frequency was greater for shallow wells than for deep wells. In the Antelope Valley Basin, neither aquifer type, depth to the top of the perforations, nor land use within 1,640 ft of the well head were explanatory factors for the number of VOCs detected. Although aquifer type and depth to top of the perforations did explain the presence of tritium in the Mojave River Basin, land use within 1,640 ft of the well head was not a statistically significant explanatory factor for the presence of tritium in this basin. Aquifer type, depth to the top of the perfora

  13. Development and evaluation of a harmonized physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for perchloroethylene toxicokinetics in mice, rats, and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Weihsueh A.; Ginsberg, Gary L.

    2011-06-15

    This article reports on the development of a 'harmonized' PBPK model for the toxicokinetics of perchloroethylene (tetrachloroethylene or perc) in mice, rats, and humans that includes both oxidation and glutathione (GSH) conjugation of perc, the internal kinetics of the oxidative metabolite trichloroacetic acid (TCA), and the urinary excretion kinetics of the GSH conjugation metabolites N-Acetylated trichlorovinyl cysteine and dichloroacetic acid. The model utilizes a wider range of in vitro and in vivo data than any previous analysis alone, with in vitro data used for initial, or 'baseline,' parameter estimates, and in vivo datasets separated into those used for 'calibration' and those used for 'evaluation.' Parameter calibration utilizes a limited Bayesian analysis involving flat priors and making inferences only using posterior modes obtained via Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC). As expected, the major route of elimination of absorbed perc is predicted to be exhalation as parent compound, with metabolism accounting for less than 20% of intake except in the case of mice exposed orally, in which metabolism is predicted to be slightly over 50% at lower exposures. In all three species, the concentration of perc in blood, the extent of perc oxidation, and the amount of TCA production is well-estimated, with residual uncertainties of {approx} 2-fold. However, the resulting range of estimates for the amount of GSH conjugation is quite wide in humans ({approx} 3000-fold) and mice ({approx} 60-fold). While even high-end estimates of GSH conjugation in mice are lower than estimates of oxidation, in humans the estimated rates range from much lower to much higher than rates for perc oxidation. It is unclear to what extent this range reflects uncertainty, variability, or a combination. Importantly, by separating total perc metabolism into separate oxidative and conjugative pathways, an approach also recommended in a recent National Research Council review, this analysis reconciles the disparity between those previously published PBPK models that concluded low perc metabolism in humans and those that predicted high perc metabolism in humans. In essence, both conclusions are consistent with the data if augmented with some additional qualifications: in humans, oxidative metabolism is low, while GSH conjugation metabolism may be high or low, with uncertainty and/or interindividual variability spanning three orders of magnitude. More direct data on the internal kinetics of perc GSH conjugation, such as trichlorovinyl glutathione or tricholorvinyl cysteine in blood and/or tissues, would be needed to better characterize the uncertainty and variability in GSH conjugation in humans. - Research Highlights: >We analyze perchloroethylene (perc) toxicokinetics with a physiological model. >Results from previous analyses lumping metabolic pathways are inconsistent. >Separately tracking oxidation and conjugation pathways reconciles these results. >Available data are adequate for predicting perc blood levels and oxidation by P450. >High uncertainty remains for human conjugation of perc with glutathione.

  14. Final Technical Report: Effects of Impurities on Fuel Cell Performance and Durability

    SciTech Connect

    James G. Goodwin, Jr.; Hector Colon-Mercado; Kitiya Hongsirikarn; and Jack Z. Zhang

    2011-11-11

    The main objectives of this project were to investigate the effect of a series of potential impurities on fuel cell operation and on the particular components of the fuel cell MEA, to propose (where possible) mechanism(s) by which these impurities affected fuel cell performance, and to suggest strategies for minimizing these impurity effects. The negative effect on Pt/C was to decrease hydrogen surface coverage and hydrogen activation at fuel cell conditions. The negative effect on Nafion components was to decrease proton conductivity, primarily by replacing/reacting with the protons on the Bronsted acid sites of the Nafion. Even though already well known as fuel cell poisons, the effects of CO and NH3 were studied in great detail early on in the project in order to develop methodology for evaluating poisoning effects in general, to help establish reproducibility of results among a number of laboratories in the U.S. investigating impurity effects, and to help establish lower limit standards for impurities during hydrogen production for fuel cell utilization. New methodologies developed included (1) a means to measure hydrogen surface concentration on the Pt catalyst (HDSAP) before and after exposure to impurities, (2) a way to predict conductivity of a Nafion membranes exposed to impurities using a characteristic acid catalyzed reaction (methanol esterification of acetic acid), and, more importantly, (3) application of the latter technique to predict conductivity on Nafion in the catalyst layer of the MEA. H2-D2 exchange was found to be suitable for predicting hydrogen activation of Pt catalysts. The Nafion (ca. 30 wt%) on the Pt/C catalyst resides primarily on the external surface of the C support where it blocks significant numbers of micropores, but only partially blocks the pore openings of the meso- and macro-pores wherein lie the small Pt particles (crystallites). For this reason, even with 30 wt% Nafion on the Pt/C, few Pt sites are blocked and, hence, are accessible for hydrogen activation. Of the impurities studied, CO, NH3, perchloroethylene (also known as tetrachloroethylene), tetrahydrofuran, diborane, and metal cations had significant negative effects on the components in a fuel cell. While CO has no effect on the Nafion, it significantly poisons the Pt catalyst by adsorbing and blocking hydrogen activation. The effect can be reversed with time once the flow of CO is stopped. NH3 has no effect on the Pt catalyst at fuel cell conditions; it poisons the proton sites on Nafion (by forming NH4+ cations), decreasing drastically the proton conductivity of Nafion. This poisoning can slowly be reversed once the flow of NH3 is stopped. Perchloroethylene has a major effect on fuel cell performance. Since it has little/no effect on Nafion conductivity, its poisoning effect is on the Pt catalyst. However, this effect takes place primarily for the Pt catalyst at the cathode, since the presence of oxygen is very important for this poisoning effect. Tetrahydrofuran was shown not to impact Nafion conductivity; however, it does affect fuel cell performance. Therefore, its primary effect is on the Pt catalyst. The effect of THF on fuel cell performance is reversible. Diborane also can significant affect fuel cell performance. This effect is reversible once diborane is removed from the inlet streams. H2O2 is not an impurity usually present in the hydrogen or oxygen streams to a fuel cell. However, it is generated during fuel cell operation. The presence of Fe cations in the Nafion due to system corrosion and/or arising from MEA production act to catalyze the severe degradation of the Nafion by H2O2. Finally, the presence of metal cation impurities (Na+, Ca 2+, Fe3+) in Nafion from MEA preparation or from corrosion significantly impacts its proton conductivity due to replacement of proton sites. This effect is not reversible. Hydrocarbons, such as ethylene, might be expected to affect Pt or Nafion but do not at a typical fuel cell temperature of 80oC. In the presence of large quantities of hydrogen on the anode side, ethylene i

  15. Application of health-based screening levels to ground-water quality data in a state-scale pilot effort

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Toccalino, Patricia L.; Norman, Julia E.; Phillips, Robyn H.; Kauffman, Leon J.; Stackelberg, Paul E.; Nowell, Lisa H.; Krietzman, Sandra J.; Post, Gloria B.

    2004-01-01

    A state-scale pilot effort was conducted to evaluate a Health-Based Screening Level (HBSL) approach developed for communicating findings from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment Program in a human-health context. Many aquifers sampled by USGS are used as drinking-water sources, and water-quality conditions historically have been assessed by comparing measured contaminant concentrations to established drinking-water standards and guidelines. Because drinking-water standards and guidelines do not exist for many analyzed contaminants, HBSL values were developed collaboratively by the USGS, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, and Oregon Health & Science University, using USEPA toxicity values and USEPA Office of Water methodologies. The main objective of this report is to demonstrate the use of HBSL approach as a tool for communicating water-quality data in a human-health context by conducting a retrospective analysis of ground-water quality data from New Jersey. Another important objective is to provide guidance on the use and interpretation of HBSL values and other human-health benchmarks in the analyses of water-quality data in a human-health context. Ground-water samples collected during 1996-98 from 30 public-supply, 82 domestic, and 108 monitoring wells were analyzed for 97 pesticides and 85 volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The occurrence of individual pesticides and VOCs was evaluated in a human-health context by calculating Benchmark Quotients (BQs), defined as ratios of measured concentrations of regulated compounds (that is, compounds with Federal or state drinking-water standards) to Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) values and ratios of measured concentrations of unregulated compounds to HBSL values. Contaminants were identified as being of potential human-health concern if maximum detected concentrations were within a factor of 10 of the associated MCL or HBSL (that is, maximum BQ value (BQmax) greater than or equal to 0.1) in any well type (public supply, domestic, monitoring). Most (57 of 77) pesticides and VOCs with human-health benchmarks were detected at concentrations well below these levels (BQmax less than 0.1) for all three well types; however, BQmax values ranged from 0.1 to 3,000 for 6 pesticides and 14 VOCs. Of these 20 contaminants, one pesticide (dieldrin) and three VOCs (1,2-dibromoethane, tetrachloroethylene, and trichloroethylene) both (1) were measured at concentrations that met or exceeded MCL or HBSL values, and (2) were detected in more than 10 percent of samples collected from raw ground water used as sources of drinking water (public-supply and (or) domestic wells) and, therefore, are particularly relevant to human health. The occurrence of multiple pesticides and VOCs in individual wells also was evaluated in a human-health context because at least 53 different contaminants were detected in each of the three well types. To assess the relative human-health importance of the occurrence of multiple contaminants in different wells, the BQ values for all contaminants in a given well were summed. The median ratio of the maximum BQ to the sum of all BQ values for each well ranged from 0.83 to 0.93 for all well types, indicating that the maximum BQ makes up the majority of the sum for most wells. Maximum and summed BQ values were statistically greater for individual public-supply wells than for individual domestic and monitoring wells. The HBSL approach is an effective tool for placing water-quality data in a human-health context. For 79 of the 182 compounds analyzed in this study, no USEPA drinking-water standards or guidelines exist, but new HBSL values were calculated for 39 of these 79 compounds. The new HBSL values increased the number of detected pesticides and VOCs with human-health benchmarks from 65 to 77 (of 97 detected compounds), thereby expanding the basis for interpreting contaminant-occu

  16. Groundwater contamination and risk assessment of industrial complex in Busan Metropolitan City, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamm, S.-Y.; Ryu, S. M.; Cheong, J.-Y.; Woo, Y.-J.

    2003-04-01

    In Korea, the potential of groundwater contamination in urban areas is increasing by industrial and domestic waste waters, leakage from oil storage tanks and sewage drains, leachate from municipal landfill sites and so on. Nowadays, chlorinated organic compounds such as trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE), which are driving residential area as well as industrial area, are recognized as major hazardous contaminants. As well known, TCE is wisely used industrial activities such as degreasing, metal stripping, chemical manufacturing, pesticide production, coal gasification plants, creosote operation, and also used in automobile service centers, photo shops and laundries as cleaning solvent. Thus, groundwater protection in urban areas is important issue in Korea This study is to understand groundwater quality and contamination characteristics and to estimate risk assessment in Sasang industrial complex, Busan Metropolitan City. Busan Metropolitan City is located on southeastern coast of the Korean peninsula and is the second largest city in South Korea with a population of 3.8 millions. The geology of the study area is composed of andesite, andesitic tuff, biotite granite and alluvium (Kim et al., 1998). However, geology cannot be identified on the surface due to pavement and buildings. According to drill logs in the study area, the geologic section consists in landfill, fine sand, clay, gravelly clay, and biotite granite from the surface. Biotite granite appears 5.5- 6 m depth. Groundwater samples were collected at twenty sites in Sasang industrial complex. The groundwater samples are plotted on Piper's trilinear diagram, which indicates Ca-Cl2 type. The groundwater may be influenced by salt water because Sasang industrial complex is located near the mouse of Nakdong river that flows to the South Sea. The Ca-Cl2 water type may be partly influenced by anthropogenic contamination in the study area, since water type in granite area generally belongs Ca-HCO3 or Na-HCO3 types. TDS (107-14,500 /L), EC (225-25,500 ?S/cm), salinity (100-15,500 /kg), Na+ (13.39-2,866 /L) and Cl- (15.3-7,066 /L) concentrations are also higher than those of general groundwater. This fact indicates that groundwater in study area was polluted by saline water and/or anthropogenic sources. TCE, PCE, 1.1.1-trichloroethane (TCA) were analyzed by Busan Metropolitan City Institute of Health &Environment. PCE and TCA are not detected most of sites, while TCE is detected most of the sites and exceeds drinking water standard of Korea 0.03 /L. It is considered that TCE was derived from variety contamination sources such as car-washing centers, transportation companies, iron molding factories and waste treating companies. Risk assessment to human health and environmental resources by groundwater contamination was conducted. The RBCA Tool Kit for Chemical Releases can be used for the risk assessment at Tier 1 and Tier 2. The risk assessment determines risk-based concentration of constituents of concerns (COCs) that moves through groundwater, soil and air. It also evaluates carcinogenic risk and toxic effect when receptor exposures to the COCs. Tier 1 analysis determines risk-based screening levels (RBSLs) for one-site exposure. Tier 2 analysis evaluates RBSL and/or site-specific target levels (SSTLs) for both on-site and off-site receptor. RBSLs were calculated as 2.2E-2 /L for TCE and as 4.7E-3 /L for PCE at Tier 1 risk assessment. Average concentrations of TCE and PCE from measuring the groundwater samples were 0.15 mg/L and 0.016 mg/L, respectively. The actual measured values are higher than the RBSLs. Carcinogenic risk of TCE to animals was identified as B2 (inadequate or no human evidence but sufficient animal evidence). From this result, we will conduct the further detail risk assessment at Tier 2 level before conducting groundwater remediation. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT The authors wish to acknowledge the financial support of the Korea Science &Engineering Foundation (KOSEF) under the Basic Research Program (grant no: R02-2001-00249).

  17. Changes in Groundwater Flow and Volatile Organic Compound Concentrations at the Fischer and Porter Superfund Site, Warminster Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, 1993-2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sloto, Ronald A.

    2010-01-01

    The 38-acre Fischer and Porter Company Superfund Site is in Warminster Township, Bucks County, Pa. Historically, as part of the manufacturing process, trichloroethylene (TCE) degreasers were used for parts cleaning. In 1979, the Bucks County Health Department detected TCE and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in water from the Fischer and Porter on-site supply wells and nearby public-supply wells. The Fischer and Porter Site was designated as a Superfund Site and placed on the National Priorities List in September 1983. A 1984 Record of Decision for the site required the Fischer and Porter Company to pump and treat groundwater contaminated by VOCs from three on-site wells at a combined rate of 75 gallons per minute to contain groundwater contamination on the property. Additionally, the Record of Decision recognized the need for treatment of the water from two nearby privately owned supply wells operated by the Warminster Heights Home Ownership Association. In 2004, the Warminster Heights Home Ownership Association sold its water distribution system, and both wells were taken out of service. The report describes changes in groundwater levels and contaminant concentrations and migration caused by the shutdown of the Warminster Heights supply wells and presents a delineation of the off-site groundwater-contamination plume. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted this study (2006-09) in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). The Fischer and Porter Site and surrounding area are underlain by sedimentary rocks of the Stockton Formation of Late Triassic age. The rocks are chiefly interbedded arkosic sandstone and siltstone. The Stockton aquifer system is comprised of a series of gently dipping lithologic units with different hydraulic properties. A three-dimensional lithostratigraphic model was developed for the site on the basis of rock cores and borehole geophysical logs. The model was simplified by combining individual lithologic units into generalized units representing upward fining sedimentary cycles capped by a siltstone bed. These cycles were labeled units 1 through 8 and are called stratigraphic units in this report. Groundwater in the unweathered zone mainly moves through a network of interconnecting secondary openings--bedding-plane fractures and joints. Groundwater generally is unconfined in the shallower part of the aquifer and confined or semiconfined in the deeper part of the aquifer. The migration of VOCs from the Fischer and Porter Site source area is influenced by geologic and hydrologic controls. The hydrologic controls have changed with time. Stratigraphic units 2 and 3 crop out beneath the former Fischer and Porter plant. VOCs originating at the plant source area entered these stratigraphic units and moved downdip to the northwest. When the wells at and in the vicinity of the site were initially sampled in 1979-80, three public-supply wells (BK-366, BK-367, MG-946) and three industrial-supply wells (BK-368, BK-370, and BK-371) were pumping. Groundwater contaminated with VOCs flowed downdip and then northeast along strike toward well BK-366, downdip toward well BK-368, and downdip and then west along strike toward well MG-946. The long axis of the TCE plume is oriented about N. 18? W. in the direction of dip. In 1979-80, the leading edge of the plume was about 3,500 feet wide. With the cessation of pumping of the supply wells in 2004, the size of the plume has decreased. In 2007-09, the plume was approximately 2,000 feet long and 2,000 feet wide at the leading edge. On the western side of the site, TCE and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) appear to be moving downdip though stratigraphic unit 3. The downdip extent of TCE and PCE migration extended approximately 550 feet off-site to the northwest and 750 feet off-site to the north. TCE concentrations in water samples from wells at the western site boundary increased from 1996 to 2007. On the northern side of the site, TCE and P