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1

OPTIMIZING GEO-CELLULAR RESERVOIR MODELING IN A BRAIDED RIVER INCISED VALLEY FILL: POSTLE FIELD, TEXAS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA  

E-print Network

, TEXAS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA by Tiffany Dawn Jobe #12;#12;ABSTRACT Reservoir characterization, modeling Field is a mature oil and gas field in Texas County, Oklahoma which produces from Pennsylvanian valley

2

The depositional environment and reservoir characteristics of the Upper Morrow "A" sandstone, Postle field, Texas County, Oklahoma  

E-print Network

THE DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT AND RESERVOIR CHARACTERISTICS OF THE UPPER MORROW 'A' SANDSTONE, POSTLE FIELD, TEXAS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA A Thesis by LYNN SUZANNE TRAVIS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1987 Major subject: Geology THE DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT AND RESERVOIR CHARACTERISTICS OF THE UPPER MORROW 'A' SANDSTONE POSTLE FIELD, TEXAS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA A Thesis by LYNN...

Travis, Lynn Suzanne

2012-06-07

3

INTEGRATED PERMEABILITY MODELING OF THE MORROW A SANDSTONE, HOVEY MORROW UNIT POSTLE FIELD, TEXAS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA  

E-print Network

INTEGRATED PERMEABILITY MODELING OF THE MORROW A SANDSTONE, HOVEY MORROW UNIT POSTLE FIELD, TEXAS the Pennsylvanian A sandstone member of the Morrow Formation, averaging 30 ft of net pay thickness at a depth data were used to identify sandstone petrofacies within the reservoir and to further distinguish them

4

Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Development through High-Resolution 3C3D Seismic and Horizontal Drilling: Eva South Marrow Sand Unit, Texas County, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The Eva South Morrow Sand Unit is located in western Texas County, Oklahoma. The field produces from an upper Morrow sandstone, termed the Eva sandstone, deposited in a transgressive valley-fill sequence. The field is defined as a combination structural stratigraphic trap; the reservoir lies in a convex up -dip bend in the valley and is truncated on the west side by the Teepee Creek fault. Although the field has been a successful waterflood since 1993, reservoir heterogeneity and compartmentalization has impeded overall sweep efficiency. A 4.25 square mile high-resolution, three component three-dimensional (3C3D) seismic survey was acquired in order to improve reservoir characterization and pinpoint the optimal location of a new horizontal producing well, the ESU 13-H.

Wheeler,David M.; Miller, William A.; Wilson, Travis C.

2002-03-11

5

Adjustments Due to a Declining Groundwater Supply: High Plains of Northern Texas and Western Oklahoma  

E-print Network

The region north of the Canadian River in Texas and including the three western counties of Oklahoma have been rapidly developing the groundwater resource since the mid 1960's. This region, hereafter referred to as the Northern High Plains...

Lacewell, R D.; Jones, L. L.; Osborn, J. E.

6

PayneOklahoma SOIL SURVEY OF PAYNE COUNTY, OKLAHOMA  

E-print Network

SOIL SURVEY OF PAYNE COUNTY, OKLAHOMA OSURR Headquarters 0 700 1,400 2,100 2,800350 Feet 0 200 400100 Meters Web Soil Survey 1.1 National Cooperative Soil Survey 5/7/2007 Page 1 of 4 #12;MAP INFORMATION SOIL Web Soil Survey URL: http://websoilsurvey.nrcs.usda.gov Coordinate System: UTM Zone 14 Soil Survey

Ghajar, Afshin J.

7

Integrated geophysical investigations of linkages between Precambrian basement and sedimentary structures in the Ucayali basin, Peru; Fort Worth basin, Texas; and Osage County, Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

I conducted integrated geophysical studies within the Fort Worth basin, Texas; Osage County, Oklahoma, and the Ucayali basin, Peru. My studies are directed at understanding the relationships or links between Precambrian basement structures and sedimentary structures using these three areas as case studies. Links between basement structure, hydrocarbon reservoirs, and sedimentary sequences are not a new concept. Such relationships have been documented in the Paradox, Hardeman, Anadarko, Arkoma, Ardmore and Williston basins among others. Structures such as fault zones that can influence the formation of sedimentary basins and mineral deposits are often formed by intraplate tectonism. In order to compare the relationship between the Precambrian basement structures and sedimentary structures, I analyzed series of derivative and filtered maps of aeromagnetic and gravity data, which enhance basement structures, that were integrated with seismic data and seismic attribute data that enhance structures within the sedimentary sections. Other information such as well data and geologic information etc were also integrated. This integrated workflow facilitates the comparison of the links or relationships between the two structures. The results of the Fort Worth basin are presented in Chapter 3. The results of this integrated study show that the sedimentary structures within the study area are mainly related to basement structures because these structures are aligned parallel to anomalies identified on the high-resolution aeromagnetic (HRAM) data. The northeast-southwest and northwest-southeast orientations of sedimentary features are consistently parallel with Precambrian structural fabrics that are associated with structures such as the northeast trending Ouachita orogenic belt and the northwest trending Muenster Arch, which reactivated a late Cambrian/Late Precambrian faults. The knowledge gained in this study will impact oil and gas exploration and development within the study area because, the orientation of the natural and induced fractures can be predicted even if seismic data is limited or unavailable. In Chapter 4, the results of an integrated analysis that includes the use of 3D seismic data, seismic attributes, and derivative maps from potential field data to study the basement, Mississippi Chert and the Arbuckle Group of Osage County, Oklahoma are presented. The workflow employed in this study was effective in studying and identifying polygonal, highly coherent, and high amplitude lineaments that strike northwesterly and northeasterly within these reservoirs. Basement structure lineaments are found to be parallel in orientation with the trend of lineaments seen within the Mississippian Chert and the Arbuckle Group. The northwest-striking lineaments may be related to the late-Paleozoic tectonism that affected both the Precambrian and Paleozoic section of Osage County. Another part of this research investigated the large gravity and magnetic anomalies and their association with the Mid-Continent Rift System (MCRS). Results of this analysis revealed prominent northeast trending anomalies that suggest that the MCRS extends into northern Oklahoma. However, geochronological data for basement rocks suggest that this extension would have to be limited to intrusive bodies that have little or no subcrops. The integrated study conducted in the Ucayali basin of Peru revealed that the northwest-southeast trending lineaments interpreted as Precambrian basement structures are sub-parallel to the late Paleozoic fold and thrust belts that resulted from the shortening associated with the formation of the Andes. These fold and thrust belts are reactivated along the zones of weaknesses that already existed in the Precambrian basement. The east-northeast lineaments are located beneath the Fitzcarrald Arch locate above the buoyant Nazca ridge. I interpret these east-northeast lineaments as part of the Ene Pisco -- Abancay Fitzcarrald tectonic lineaments, which is one of the five tectonic domains in these region. Gravity modeling suggests that t

Elebiju, Olubunmi Olumide

8

78 FR 16036 - Service Level Environmental Impact Statement for the Texas Oklahoma Passenger Rail Study Corridor...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Statement for the Texas Oklahoma Passenger Rail Study Corridor, South Texas to Oklahoma...improved high- speed intercity passenger rail service along an 850-mile corridor...Level EIS, the Texas Oklahoma Passenger Rail Study (Study) also includes...

2013-03-13

9

STATE OF TEXAS COUNTY OF ________________  

E-print Network

AFFIDAVIT STATE OF TEXAS § § COUNTY OF ________________ § Before me, the undersigned Notary Public and correct. 2. I graduated or will graduate from a Texas high school or received my GED certificate in Texas. 3. I resided in Texas for three years leading up to graduation from high school or receiving my GED

Garbey, Marc

10

SOIL SURVEY OF PAYNE COUNTY, OKLAHOMA OSURR Section 17  

E-print Network

66 26 76 26 26 26 SOIL SURVEY OF PAYNE COUNTY, OKLAHOMA OSURR Section 17 0 300 600 900 1,200150 Feet 0 100 20050 Meters Web Soil Survey 1.1 National Cooperative Soil Survey 5/7/2007 Page 1 of 3 #12;MAP INFORMATION SOIL SURVEY OF PAYNE COUNTY, OKLAHOMA OSURR Section 17 Source of Map: Natural Resources

Ghajar, Afshin J.

11

Digital Atlas of Texas Counties  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created by the Center for Geosptial Technology at Texas Tech University, this digital atlas is a fantastic find. It brings together information about all of Texas's counties, including satellite relief maps and data sets about the roads, rivers, lakes, and other features in each area. Visitors can use the interactive map to click on a county of interest, or use the drop down menu to select a region. Once users select a county, they can download information about it for future use. The site also contains a number of Featured Links to resources from the U.S. Census Bureau, the Texas Association of Counties, and several tourism agencies.

12

Detection of Dirofilaria immitis and Ehrlichia species in coyotes (Canis latrans), from rural Oklahoma and Texas.  

PubMed

There is a lack of knowledge regarding the prevalence of Dirofilaria immitis and Ehrlichia spp. in coyotes in Oklahoma and Texas. Documenting the prevalence of these vector-borne disease agents in coyotes from Oklahoma and Texas underscores the importance of wild canids as reservoir hosts that infect companion animals and humans. To learn more about the sylvatic cycle of D. immitis and Ehrlichia spp. in coyotes from Oklahoma and Texas, we tested for infection with and exposure to, respectively, these disease agents. Coyote carcasses were collected opportunistically from animal control experts and hunters in seven counties in Oklahoma and Texas from January to March, 2010. Serum samples from 77 coyotes were tested with a commercial ELISA test. Five (6.5%) coyotes had D. immitis antigens, and four (5.2%) had antibodies to Ehrlichia spp. The overall prevalence of D. immitis was low relative to studies from the eastern United States. Little is known about the prevalence of Ehrlichia spp. throughout the United States, but coyotes from rural Oklahoma in the current study had a higher exposure rate than those reported from California, and a lower rate than data from an earlier study from Oklahoma. PMID:22448722

Paras, Kelsey L; Little, Susan E; Reichard, Mason V; Reiskind, Michael H

2012-07-01

13

MISR Scans the Texas-Oklahoma Border  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

These MISR images of Oklahoma and north Texas were acquired on March 12, 2000 during Terra orbit 1243. The three images on the left, from top to bottom, are from the 70-degree forward viewing camera, the vertical-viewing (nadir) camera, and the 70-degree aftward viewing camera. The higher brightness, bluer tinge, and reduced contrast of the oblique views result primarily from scattering of sunlight in the Earth's atmosphere, though some color and brightness variations are also due to differences in surface reflection at the different angles. The longer slant path through the atmosphere at the oblique angles also accentuates the appearance of thin, high-altitude cirrus clouds.

On the right, two areas from the nadir camera image are shown in more detail, along with notations highlighting major geographic features. The south bank of the Red River marks the boundary between Texas and Oklahoma. Traversing brush-covered and grassy plains, rolling hills, and prairies, the Red River and the Canadian River are important resources for farming, ranching, public drinking water, hydroelectric power, and recreation. Both originate in New Mexico and flow eastward, their waters eventually discharging into the Mississippi River.

A smoke plume to the north of the Ouachita Mountains and east of Lake Eufaula is visible in the detailed nadir imagery. The plume is also very obvious at the 70-degree forward view angle, to the right of center and about one-fourth of the way down from the top of the image.

MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

2000-01-01

14

SOIL SURVEY OF PAYNE COUNTY, OKLAHOMA OSURR Section 4  

E-print Network

25 6 4 11 25 41 72 25 74 49 74 11 51 4926 26 74 26 26 26 SOIL SURVEY OF PAYNE COUNTY, OKLAHOMA OSURR Section 4 0 400 800 1,200 1,600200 Feet 0 100 20050 Meters Web Soil Survey 1.1 National Cooperative Soil Survey 5/7/2007 Page 1 of 3 #12;MAP INFORMATION SOIL SURVEY OF PAYNE COUNTY, OKLAHOMA OSURR Section 4

Ghajar, Afshin J.

15

Detection of Trichinella murrelli in coyotes ( Canis latrans) from Oklahoma and North Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

We determined the prevalence and mean intensity of Trichinella sp. infection in coyotes from six counties in Oklahoma and one in northern Texas. Tongues from 77 coyotes were examined using histology and artificial tissue digestion. Histological examination showed a prevalence of 3.9% (3 of 77) whereas the prevalence was 6.5% (5 of 77) based on artificial digestion of 5.0g of

Mason V. Reichard; Kathryn E. Tiernan; Kelsey L. Paras; Maria Interisano; Michael H. Reiskind; Roger J. Panciera; Edoardo Pozio

2011-01-01

16

The Vascular Flora of the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve, Osage County, Oklahoma  

E-print Network

The Vascular Flora of the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve, Osage County, Oklahoma Michael W. Palmer* Department of Botany, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078-3013 ABSTRACT The 15,410 ha Tallgrass Prairie Preserve (Osage County, Oklahoma), managed by The Nature Conservancy, consists

Palmer, Michael W.

17

LittleRockCreek SOIL SURVEY OF ATOKA COUNTY, OKLAHOMA  

E-print Network

3800600 3800600 3800800 3800800 3801000 3801000 3801200 3801200 3801400 3801400 SOIL SURVEY OF ATOKA 200 400100 Meters Web Soil Survey 1.1 National Cooperative Soil Survey 3/17/2007 Page 1 of 3 #12;MAP INFORMATION SOIL SURVEY OF ATOKA COUNTY, OKLAHOMA Wes Watkins Agricultural Research and Extension Center

Ghajar, Afshin J.

18

Purchasing in Texas Counties.  

E-print Network

delivery in the most economical manner. Perhaps the manner in which delivery is taken deserves addi- tional attention. For example, this study indicates that all counties taking delivery of gasoline in tank wagon lots, can secure approximately the same... recog- nizes that some one person or board should he responsible for a high per- centage of the purchasing. Otherwise each employee must become an ex- pert in order to secure good prices. Further, such a system recognizes that bids must be secured...

Hervey, E. J.; Bradshaw, H. C.

1944-01-01

19

Texas-Oklahoma Representations and Automorphic Forms September 28-30, 2012  

E-print Network

Texas-Oklahoma Representations and Automorphic Forms TORA III September 28-30, 2012 at The University of Oklahoma Mahdi Asgari (OSU) Charles Conley (UNT) Kimball Martin (OU) Ameya Pitale (OU) A is a conference series hosted in rotation by University of North Texas, Oklahoma State University

Schmidt, Ralf

20

The Texas- Oklahoma Cattle Feeding Industry: Structure and Operational Characteristics.  

E-print Network

Oklahoma Worth Central' . I owa Nebraska Illinois Other North Central Western RegionZ Arizona Colorado California Other Western states Other states3 United States ------ Percent 3.6 4.2 4.1 4.8 2.8 3.3 3.2 3.8 -8 .9 .9 1 .O 70.6 64.5 65.... NUMBER OF FEEDLOTS AND AVERAGE NUMBER OF CATTLE ON FEED, BY SlZE OF FEEDLOT, TEXAS AND OKLAHOMA, AND SE- LECTED AREAS, JANUARY 1, 1964-68, AND PERCENTAGE CHANGES 1964-68 - --- Under 1.000 head Over 1,000 head 1 tem - -- Percentage Percentage 1964...

Dietrich, Raymond A.

1968-01-01

21

SOIL SURVEY OF PAYNE COUNTY, OKLAHOMA OSURR Section 5  

E-print Network

21 76 11 25 61 49 2 11 65 25 74 25 25 25 6125 65 25 40 11 W 26 25 32 W 54 3 11 65 11 74 11 74 SOIL Soil Survey 1.1 National Cooperative Soil Survey 5/7/2007 Page 1 of 3 #12;MAP INFORMATION SOIL SURVEY OF PAYNE COUNTY, OKLAHOMA OSURR Section 5 Source of Map: Natural Resources Conservation Service Web Soil

Ghajar, Afshin J.

22

Aerobiology of Juniperus Pollen in Oklahoma, Texas, and New Mexico  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Pollen from members of the Cupressaceae are major aeroallergens in many parts of the world. In the south central and southwest United States, Juniperus pollen is the most important member of this family with J. ashei (JA) responsible for severe winter allergy symptoms in Texas and Oklahoma. In New Mexico, pollen from J. monosperma (JM) and other Juniperus species are important contributors to spring allergies, while J. pinchotii (JP) pollinates in the fall affecting sensitive individuals in west Texas, southwest Oklahoma and eastern New Mexico. Throughout this region, JA, JM, and JP occur in dense woodland populations. Generally monitoring for airborne allergens is conducted in urban areas, although the source for tree pollen may be forested areas distant from the sampling sites. Improved pollen forecasts require a better understanding of pollen production at the source. The current study was undertaken to examine the aerobiology of several Juniperus species at their source areas for the development of new pollen forecasting initiatives.

Levetin, Estelle; Bunderson, Landon; VandeWater, Pete; Luvall, Jeff

2014-01-01

23

Hydrogeology of Webb County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Introduction: Webb County, in semiarid South Texas on the U.S.-Mexico border, is a region confronted by increasing stresses on natural resources. Laredo (fig. 1), the largest city in Webb County (population 193,000 in 2000), was one of the 10 fastest-growing metropolitan areas in the country during 1990-2000 (Perry and Mackun, 2001). Commercial and industrial activities have expanded throughout the region to support the maquiladora industry (manufacturing plants in Mexico) along the border and other growth as a result of the passage of the North American Free Trade Agreement. The Rio Grande currently (2002) is the primary source of public water supply for Laredo and other cities along the border in Webb County (fig. 1). Other cities, such as Bruni and Mirando City in the southeastern part of the county, rely on ground-water supplies to meet municipal demands. Increased water demand associated with development and population growth in the region has increased the need for the City of Laredo and Webb County to evaluate alternative water sources to meet future demand. Possible options include (1) supplementing the surface-water supply with ground water, and (2) applying artificial storage and recovery (ASR) technology to recharge local aquifers. These options raise issues regarding the hydraulic capability of the aquifers to store economically substantial quantities of water, current or potential uses of the resource, and possible effects on the quality of water resulting from mixing ground water with alternative source waters. To address some of these issues, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the City of Laredo, began a study in 1996 to assess the ground-water resources of Webb County. A hydrogeologic study was conducted to review and analyze available information on the hydrogeologic units (aquifers and confining units) in Webb County, to locate available wells in the region with water-level and water-quality information from the aquifers, and to analyze the hydraulic properties of the aquifers. The purpose of this report is to document the findings of the study. The information is organized by hydrogeologic unit and presented on this and six other sheets.

Lambert, Rebecca B.

2004-01-01

24

FEDERAL ORDER Domestic Quarantine of Counties in Oklahoma and Tennessee for  

E-print Network

FEDERAL ORDER Domestic Quarantine of Counties in Oklahoma and Tennessee for Imported Fire Ant (IFA discussion with the State Plant Regulatory Official of Oklahoma and Tennessee. Effective immediately determinations have been made by the APHIS Administrator in reference to Oklahoma and Tennessee. The 7 CFR 301

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

25

Hydrogeologic data for the Blaine aquifer and associated units in southwestern Oklahoma and northwestern Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report is a compilation of hydrogeologic data collected for an areal ground-water investigation of the Blaine aquifer and associated units in southwestern Oklahoma and northwestern Texas. The study area includes parts of Greer, Harmon, and Jackson counties in Oklahoma and parts of Childress, Collingsworth, Hall, Hardeman, and Wilbarger counties in Texas. The Blaine aquifer consists of cavernous gypsum and dolomite beds. Water from the Blaine aquifer supports a local agriculture based mainly on irrigated cotton and wheat. The purpose of the study was to determine the availability, quantity, and quality of ground water from the Blaine aquifer and associated units. This report provides a reference for some of the data that was used as input into a computer ground-water flow model that simulates ground-water flow in the Blaine aquifer. The data in this report consists of: (1) Monthly or periodic water-level measurements in 134 wells; (2) daily mean water-level measurements for 11 wells equipped with water-level recorders; (3) daily total precipitation measurements from five precipitation gages; (4) low-flow stream-discharge measurements for 89 stream sites; (5) miscellaneous stream-discharge measurements at seven stream sites; (6) chemical analyses of surface water from 78 stream sites during low-flow periods; (7) chemical analyses of ground water from 41 wells; and (8) chemical analyses of runoff water collected at five sites.

Runkle, D.L.; Bergman, D.L.; Fabian, R.S.

1997-01-01

26

Costs and Economies of Size in Texas-Oklahoma Cattle Feedlot Operations.  

E-print Network

Costs and Economies of Size in I Texas-Oklahoma Cattle Feedlot Operat ions B-1083 May 1969 TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY Texas Agricultural Experiment Station H. 0. Kunkel, Acting Director, College Station, Texas In Cooperation with the U. S... ...................................................................... Degree of Feedlot Utilization ........ .... ........... j I .................... Investment in Equipment and Facilities 6 Annual Fixed Costs ............................... ... .............. 8 ............................................ Variable...

Dietrich, Raymond A.

1969-01-01

27

Detection of Trichinella murrelli in coyotes (Canis latrans) from Oklahoma and North Texas.  

PubMed

We determined the prevalence and mean intensity of Trichinella sp. infection in coyotes from six counties in Oklahoma and one in northern Texas. Tongues from 77 coyotes were examined using histology and artificial tissue digestion. Histological examination showed a prevalence of 3.9% (3 of 77) whereas the prevalence was 6.5% (5 of 77) based on artificial digestion of 5.0 g of muscle from coyote tongues. One sample was positive for Trichinella sp. on histology but negative by artificial digestion. Combining data from both diagnostic techniques showed that six of 77 (7.8%) coyotes were infected with Trichinella spp. The mean intensity of Trichinella sp. larvae ranged from 0.2 to 66.2 with an average of 16.0 larvae per gram (LPG) of tongue. Genotyping results demonstrated that the coyotes were infected with Trichinella murrelli. This is the first report of T. murrelli infection in coyotes in Oklahoma. T. murrelli had previously been isolated from coyotes in Texas. PMID:21723041

Reichard, Mason V; Tiernan, Kathryn E; Paras, Kelsey L; Interisano, Maria; Reiskind, Michael H; Panciera, Roger J; Pozio, Edoardo

2011-12-15

28

The Agricultural Benefits of Salinity Control on the Red River of Texas and Oklahoma  

E-print Network

Salinity of the waters from the Red River and its major tributaries has virtually eliminated its use for irrigation of agricultural crops in Texas and Oklahoma. A chloride control project has been proposed whereby the source salt waters...

Laughlin, D. H.; Lacewell, R. D.; Moore, D. S.

29

Tri-county pilot study. [Texas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author has identified the following significant results. An area inventory was performed for three southeast Texas counties (Montgomery, Walker, and San Jacinto) totaling 0.65 million hectares. The inventory was performed using a two level hierarchy. Level 1 was divided into forestland, rangeland, and other land. Forestland was separated into Level 2 categories: pine, hardwood, and mixed; rangeland was not separated further. Results consisted of area statistics for each county and for the entire study site for pine, hardwood, mixed, rangeland, and other land. Color coded county classification maps were produced for the May data set, and procedures were developed and tested.

Reeves, C. A. (principal investigator); Austin, T. W.; Kerber, A. G.

1976-01-01

30

Environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas  

SciTech Connect

In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and the eight other potentially sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Deaf Smith County site as one of the five sites suitable for characterization. 591 refs., 147 figs., 173 tabs.

Not Available

1986-05-01

31

National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Lawton Quadrangle, Oklahoma and Texas  

SciTech Connect

Uranium resources of the Lawton Quadrangle, Oklahoma and Texas, were evaluated to a depth of 1500 m using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria. Five areas of uranium favorability were delineated. Diagenetically altered, quartzose and sublithic, eolian and marginal-marine sandstones of the Permian Rush Springs Formation overlying the Cement Anticline are favorable for joint-controlled deposits in sandstone, non-channel-controlled peneconcordant deposits, and Texas roll-front deposits. Three areas contain lithologies favorable for channel-controlled peneconcordant deposits: arkosic sandstones and granule conglomerates of the Permian Post Oak Conglomerate south of the Wichita Mountains; subarkosic and sublithic Lower Permian fluvio-deltaic and coastal-plain sandstones of the eastern Red River Valley; and subsurface arkosic, subarkosic, and sublithic alluvial-fan and fan-delta sandstones of the Upper Pennsylvanian-Lower Permian sequence in the eastern Hollis Basin. The coarse-grained facies of the Cambrian Quanah Granite and genetically related aplite and pegmatite dikes in the Wichita Mountains are favorable for orthomagmatic and autometasomatic deposits, respectively.

Al-Shaieb, Z.; Thomas, R.G.; Stewart, G.F.

1982-04-01

32

Environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas  

SciTech Connect

In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines.

Not Available

1986-05-01

33

Forage nutritive value of Texas bluegrass harvested in the morning and afternoon in northwest Oklahoma.  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Texas bluegrass (Poa arachnifera Torr.) is a highly rhizomatous, dioecious, sexual, perennial, cool-season grass native to southern Kansas, Oklahoma, western Arkansas and most of Texas. This native species is of particular interest for development into an improved cool-season forage plant because o...

34

Summary of proceedings: Oklahoma and Texas wind energy forum, April 2-3, 1981  

SciTech Connect

The Wind Energy Forum for Oklahoma and Texas was held at the Amarillo Quality Inn in Amarillo, Texas on April 2-3, 1981. Its purpose was to bring together the diverse groups involved in wind energy development in the Oklahoma and Texas region to explore the future commercial potential and current barriers to achieving this potential. Major topics of discussion included utility interconnection of wind machines and the buy-back rate for excess power, wind system reliability and maintenance concerns, machine performance standards, and state governmental incentives. A short summary of each presentation is included.

Nelson, S.C.; Ball, D.E.

1981-06-01

35

Marketing Milk Under Federal Orders in Texas.  

E-print Network

ITIN 959 JULY 1960 llarketinff Milk un er Federal Orders in Texas order ZAIm includes Beckman county, Oklahoma. 3Also includes eight counties in Oklahoma. TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION R. D. LEWIS, DIRECTOR. COLLEGE STATION, TEXAS... SUMMARY Some Texas dairy farmers have been market- ing milk under federal orders since October 1951. In December 1959, 5,270, or 68 percent of Texas producers sold milk under the seven federal or- ders. In 1959 these producers marketed more than 1...

Stelly, Randall

1960-01-01

36

National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Wichita Falls Quadrangle, Texas and Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The uranium favorability of the Wichita Falls Quadrangle, Texas and Oklahoma, was determined by using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria; by subsurface studies of structure, facies distribution, and gamma-ray anomalies in well logs to a depth of 1500 m; and by surface studies involving extensive field sampling and radiometric surveying. These were supplemented by both aerial radiometric and hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance studies. Favorable environments were identified in fluviodeltaic to fan-delta sandstones in the upper Strawn, Canyon, and Cisco Groups (Pennsylvania to Lower Permian), which occur exclusively in the subsurface. Evaluation was based on the presence of a good uranium source, abundant feldspar, good hydrogeologic characteristics, association with carbonaceous shales, presence of coal and oil fields, and anomalies in gamma logs. Additional favorable environments include deltaic to alluvial sandstones in the Wichita-Albany Group (Lower Permian), which crops out widely and occurs in the shallow subsurface. Evaluation was based on high uranium values in stream-sediment samples, a small uranium occurrence located during the field survey, anomalous gamma logs, good uranium source, and hydrogeologic characteristics. Unfavorable environments include Cambrian to Permian limestones and shales. Pennsylvanian to Permian fluviodeltaic systems that have poor uranium sources, and Permian, Cretaceous, and Pleistocene formations that lack features characteristic of known uranium occurrences.

Edwards, M.B.; Andersen, R.L.

1982-08-01

37

National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Sherman Quadrangle, Texas and Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Uranium favorability of the Sherman Quadrangle, Texas and Oklahoma, was evaluated using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria. Surface and subsurface geologic studies were supplemented by aerial radiometric surveys and hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance studies. A total of 1537 rock, soil, and stream-sediment samples were analyzed for 30 elements. Environments favorable for sandstone-type uranium deposits are present in the Cretaceous Antlers and Woodbine Formations, Pennsylvanian arkoses, and the Permian Wichita-Albany Group. The Antlers Formation is locally radioactive; and rock, stream-sediment, and ground-water samples show uranium enrichment. Dip-oriented sand belts may contain subsurface uranium deposits. Arkosic wedges in the Pennsylvanian Strawn, Canyon, and Cisco Groups were partially derived from a favorable Wichita Mountain source, were highly permeable, and contained downdip reductants; gamma-ray logs showed some anomalies. The Permian Wichita-Albany Group contained small uranium occurrences. The Woodbine Formation had an excellent uranium source in updip volcaniclastic correlatives, good permeability, and organic precipitants; but there is little direct evidence of uranium occurrences. Environments considered unfavorable for uranium deposits are limestones and shales of Cambrian to Pennsylvanian age, Pennsylvanian sandstones derived from a Ouachita source, Lower Cretaceous shales, limestones, and sandstones, Upper Cretaceous marine strata, and sparse Cenozoic sediments. Unevaluated environments include Precambrian granites and metasediments of the buried Muenster Arch.

Hobday, D.K.; Rose, F.G. Jr.

1982-08-01

38

Texas County Fairs: A Report of Survey Results.  

E-print Network

Texas County Fairs: A Report of Survey Results 8-1457 ~ Texas Agricultural Extension Service ? The Texas A&M University System ? Zerle L. Carpenter, Director. College Station , Texas TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION 1 METHODOLOGY 2 FINDINGS... 3 1. Time, Duration and Attendance 3 2. County Fair Growth 5 3. Revenue Generation 9 4. Distribution of Free Fair Admission (Passes) 11 5. Insurance Coverage 12 6. Volunteers and Staffing Levels 13 7. Marketing and Promotion 13 8. Other Uses...

Watt, Carson E.; Wicks, Bruce E.

1983-01-01

39

The Significance of Stratigraphy and Lithology in Landform Development in Washington County, Oklahoma  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This winning entry in the museum's Young Naturalist Awards 1999 by Katie, a 15 year old student from Oklahoma, takes a look at the development of Washington County, Oklahoma. Katie's essay has a field-journal focus and explains stratigraphy and lithology, two of the main factors controlling the shape of the land in her county. She provides an overview of the six different formations in the Skiatook Group and the five different formations that outcrop in the Bartlesville area. There are descriptions of the many rock samples she took for this study.

40

NOTES ON FOODS OF GREAT HORNED OWLS (BUBO VIRGINIANUS) IN JACKSON COUNTY, OKLAHOMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prey species were identified from 169 pellets cast by a pair of great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) and their young in Jackson County, southwestern Oklahoma. Pellets were collected monthly between February and August, 1977. In decreasing order of importance, prey species were: cottontails (Sylvilagus spp.), cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus), and mice (Perognathus hispidus, Peromyscus spp., and Reithrodontomys spp.).

Jack D. Tyler; Jill F. Jensen

1981-01-01

41

Rural Students at Risk in Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report explores the situation of at-risk students in small and rural schools in Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas, and compares this information to the at-risk student situation nationwide. In order to explore both the complexity and the degree of risk of dropping out in rural school settings, research questions were posed

Tompkins, Richard; Deloney, Patricia

42

The stratigraphy of the Jackson Group, Grimes County, Texas  

E-print Network

THE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE JACKSON GROUP, GRIHES COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis RANDALL NEAL EICHER Submitted to the Graduate College, of Texas ASH University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1985... Hajor Subject: Geology THE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE JACKSON GROUP, GRINES COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by RANDALL NEAL EICHER Approved as to style and content by: hristop r . Mathewson (Chai rman o mm'ttee ) nne aymo (Member ) arl oenig (Me ber) Earl R...

Eicher, Randall Neal

2012-06-07

43

Depositional environment of downdip Yegua (Eocene) sandstones, Jackson County, Texas  

E-print Network

DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT OF DONNDIP YEGUA (EOCENE) SANDSTONES, JACKSON COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by CHRISTOPHER JAMES WHITTEN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1988 Major Subject: Geology DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT QF DOWNDIP YEGUA (EOCENE) SANDSTONES, JACKSON COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by CHRISTOPHER JAMES WHITTEN Approved as to style and content by: Robert R. Berg (Chair of Committee...

Whitten, Christopher James

2012-06-07

44

Gaseous Oxidized Mercury Dry Deposition Measurements in Southwestern USA: Comparison between texas, Eastern Oklahoma, and the Four Corners Area  

EPA Science Inventory

Gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) dry deposition measurements using aerodynamic surrogate surface passive samplers were collected in central and eastern Texas and eastern Oklahoma, from September 2011 to September 2012.The purpose of this study was to provide an initial characteriza...

45

Petroleum geochemistry of Texas and Oklahoma oils from the Marathon/Ouachita fold belt  

SciTech Connect

The Marathon uplift of west Texas and the Ouachita Mountains of Oklahoma and Arkansas comprise the surface expressions of a Paleozoic orogenic belt extending across the south-central United States. A century of petroleum exploration in the Marathon and Ouachita exposures has yielded several oil discoveries. In this study, detailed molecular, elemental, and isotopic data are presented for nine Texas oils, five Oklahoma oils, and four Oklahoma solid bitumens, all associated with thrust belt rocks of the Marathons and Ouachitas. Oil-oil and oil-solid bitumen correlations are proposed, and the character of the organic matter in the source rock(s) is deduced from the chemistry of the oils and solid bitumens. All 18 samples are sourced from the same (or very similar) organic matter. This indicates that they are probably cogenetic, despite geographic separations of hundreds of miles. Chemical differences in these samples derive from secondary effects, including biodegradation (e.g., solid bitumens) and differing levels of thermal maturity. The occurrence of unusual chemical compounds (certain bisnor- and trisnor-hopanes) in all samples probably indicates the presence of anaerobic bacteria in the depositional environment. Source deductions from oil chemistry suggest that an Ordovician unit is responsible for these oils and solid bitumens. This conclusion is consistent with previous literature suggesting an Upper Ordovician source for Oklahoma Ouachita oils and supports tectonic reconstructions of the region during Ordovician time.

Curiale, J.A. (Unocal, Inc., Brea, CA (United States))

1991-03-01

46

Oklahoma Agriculture Agriculture  

E-print Network

Oklahoma Agriculture Agriculture #12;Oklahoma Agriculture 2011Oklahoma Agriculture 2011 Oklahoma well-being of our communities and the counties in which they are located. Oklahoma State University Resources Oklahoma State University #12;Farm Operations · 86,600 farms; 4th in the nation · Average age

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

47

Earthquake activity in Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Oklahoma is one of the most seismically active areas in the southern Mid-Continent. From 1897 to 1988, over 700 earthquakes are known to have occurred in Oklahoma. The earliest documented Oklahoma earthquake took place on December 2, 1897, near Jefferson, in Grant County. The largest known Oklahoma earthquake happened near El Reno on April 9, 1952. This magnitude 5.5 (mb) earthquake was felt from Austin, Texas, to Des Moines, Iowa, and covered a felt area of approximately 362,000 km{sup 2}. Prior to 1962, all earthquakes in Oklahoma (59) were either known from historical accounts or from seismograph stations outside the state. Over half of these events were located in Canadian County. In late 1961, the first seismographs were installed in Oklahoma. From 1962 through 1976, 70 additional earthquakes were added to the earthquake database. In 1977, a statewide network of seven semipermanent and three radio-telemetry seismograph stations were installed. The additional stations have improved earthquake detection and location in the state of Oklahoma. From 1977 to 1988, over 570 additional earthquakes were located in Oklahoma, mostly of magnitudes less than 2.5. Most of these events occurred on the eastern margin of the Anadarko basin along a zone 135 km long by 40 km wide that extends from Canadian County to the southern edge of Garvin County. Another general area of earthquake activity lies along and north of the Ouachita Mountains in the Arkoma basin. A few earthquakes have occurred in the shelves that border the Arkoma and Anadarko basins.

Luza, K.V.; Lawson, J.E. Jr. (Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman (USA))

1989-08-01

48

Predictability of littoral-zone fish communities through ontogeny in Lake Texoma, Oklahoma-Texas, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

SynopsisWe sampled larval, juvenile and adult fishes from littoral-zone areas of a large reservoir (Lake Texoma, Oklahoma-Texas) (1) to characterize environmental factors that influenced fish community structure, (2) to examine how consistent fishenvironment relationships were through ontogeny (i.e., larval vs. juvenile and adult), and (3) to measure the concordance of larval communities sampled during spring to juvenile and adult communities

Michael A. Eggleton; Raul Ramirez; Chad W. Hargrave; Keith B. Gido; Jason R. Masoner; Gary D. Schnell; William J. Matthews

2005-01-01

49

National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) performance in southern Arizona, Texas, and Oklahoma in 20032004  

Microsoft Academic Search

Four field campaigns were conducted in southern Arizona (AZ) and in northern Texas and southern Oklahoma (TX-OK) in 2003 and 2004 to evaluate the performance of the U.S. National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) in detecting cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning after an upgrade in 2002 and 2003. The 2-year average flash detection efficiency (DE) in AZ was 93% (1024\\/1097), and the measured

Christopher J. Biagi; Kenneth L. Cummins; Kenneth E. Kehoe; E. Philip Krider

2007-01-01

50

Measurement of soil moisture trends with airborne scatterometers. [Guymon, Oklahoma and Dalhart, Texas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In an effort to investigate aircraft multisensor responses to soil moisture and vegetation in agricultural fields, an intensive ground sampling program was conducted in Guymon, Oklahoma and Dalhart, Texas in conjunction with aircraft data collected for visible/infrared and passive and active microwave systems. Field selections, sampling techniques, data processing, and the aircraft schedule are discussed for both sites. Field notes are included along with final (normalized and corrected) data sets.

Jones, C. L.; Mcfarland, M. J.; Rosethal, W. D.; Theis, S. W. (principal investigators)

1982-01-01

51

Geology of north-central Burleson County, Texas  

E-print Network

GEOLOGY OF NORTH-CENTRAL BURLESON COUNTY ~ TEXAS A THESXS By Thomas Eugene Kelly January, 1955 Appr as +~ s le and ontent by Chairmen of Cvmzzdttee p-(:Z~- ead of the e artment of Geology GEOLOGY OF NORTH-CENTRAL BURLESON COUNTY& TEXAS... Thomas Eugene Kelly Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE in Geology. January, 1955 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS L 0 U U Z A 8...

Kelly, Thomas Eugene

1955-01-01

52

Stone City foraminifera in eastern Burleson County, Texas  

E-print Network

STONE CITY FORAMINIFERA IN EASTERN BURLESON COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis Jack Noreno Bslderas, Jr. August, 1953 Approved as %p style and cont nt by / rman o mm ee e o t e ep r en o eo ogy STONE CITY FORAMINIFERA IN EA STERN BUR LESON COUNTY... Foraminifera Faunal analysis Check list of Foraminifera 1 1 45 15 17 19 lg 19 27 Q2 43 Se le c t e d bib 1 i ogr aphy 61 LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS Figures Thesis area: Burleson County, Texas ~ Page ~ 2 2 ~ 3o The gently undulating surface...

Balderas, Jack Moreno

1953-01-01

53

Artesian water in Somervell County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Somervell County is part of the Grand Prairie region of north-central Texas. An excellent supply of artesian water is available from the Trinity reservoir at no great depth. The first flowing well in Somervell County was drilled in 1880, and the first flowing well in Glen Rose, the county seat, was drilled in 1881. Since 1880 more than 500 wells have been constructed, probably more than half of them prior to 1900. Many of these early wells have been abandoned, either because the well hole caved in as a result of the absence or deterioration of casing or because the wells ceased to yield water by natural flow. The artesian water has always been used chiefly for domestic supply and for watering stock. Only a comparatively small area of farm land is now irrigated. The quantity used to supply the needs of tourist camps and outdoor swimming pools forms a relatively large percentage of the total amount withdrawn from the artesian reservoir in Somervell County. The artesian water is contained chiefly in the permeable sandstone beds--the basal sands for the Trinity group. Some shallow wells of small capacity are supplied by water in the crevices and solution channels in limestone that apparently is near the base of the Glen Rose formation and probably derives its water by leakage from the underlying Trinity reservoir. The wells encounter from one to three aquifers, the number depending upon their depth and location. At and around Glen Rose, the area in which most of the flowing wells are concentrated, the first aquifer is the creviced portion of the limestone, which is encountered at about 50 feet but does not everywhere yield water. The second and third aquifers, both of which are part of the 'basal sands' of the Trinity group, are much more uniform and persistent; the second is encountered at Glen Rose at depths of 100 to 135 feet, and the third at depths of about 275 to 330 feet. The artesian reservoir is supplied by water that falls as rain or snow upon the outcrop of the 'basal sands' on the higher lands west and north of Somervell County. These permeable beds dip eastward and southeastward beneath the county and are covered by the less permeable beds of the overlying Glen Rose formation. As the water that reaches the zone of saturation percolates down the dip of the beds it is confined under artesian pressure, and wells that penetrate these beds at lower altitudes yield water by natural flow. Originally the artesian pressure was sufficient to raise the water in tightly cased wells in the northwestern part of Somervell County to a maximum altitude of about 750 feet above sea level, but at Glen Rose the original artesian head was probably not more than 710 feet. From the information avail- able it would appear that the original head of the water in the upper aquifers was not nearly as great as that of the lower aquifer. The head has declined generally throughout the county. At Glen Rose in June 1930 the artesian head of the water from the deepest aquifer of the Trinity reservoir was about 639 feet above sea level, and the head of the water from the upper aquifers was about 15 feet less. The decline in head still continues, but at a very much slower rate than formerly. With the decline in head the size of the area of artesian flow has decreased, though in recent years the shrinkage has been comparatively little. The draft from the artesian reservoir in Somervell County during the summer is estimated at about 1,000,000 gallons a day, distributed as follows: Domestic use, 150,000 gallons; stock use, 60,000 gallons; recreation pools, 250,000 gallons; irrigation, 180,000 gallons; and waste, not including underground leakage, 360,000 gallons. In winter the daily draft is probably about 370,000 gallons less than in summer. The 360,000 gallons a day permitted to flow from wells without being used for any beneficial purposes is an unnecessary drain upon the artesian reservoir. The head of many of the flowing wells in Glen R

Fiedler, Albert George

1934-01-01

54

Mineral resources of the Trinity River tributary area in Texas and Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In March 1945 Colonel George R. Goethels, Chief of the Civil Works Division of the Corps of Engineers, requested the Director of the Geological Survey, United States Department of the Interior, to prepare a report on the mineral resource of the area that, according to economic studies made by the Corps of Engineers, would be affected by the canalization of the Trinity River to Fort Worth. As a consequence, the staff of the Geological Survey's Regional Office in Rolla, Mo., was assigned the task of preparing the desired information. A. E. Weissenborn, acting Regional Geologist, called on Major H. R. Norman, Division Engineer of the Corps of Engineers, U. S. Army, and discussed with him the purpose, scope, and form of the proposed report. Following this discussion, Dr. John T. Lonsdale, Director of the Bureau of Economic Geology of the University of Texas, at Mr. Weissenborn's request, agreed that the Bureau of Economic Geology should participate in the preparation of the report. My. Weissenborn also called on Robert H. Dott, Director of the Oklahoma State Geological Survey at Norman, Oklahoma. The Oklahoma Geological Survey was unable to participate in writing the report, but was very helpful in supplying published and unpublished or out-of-print information on the mineral resources of Oklahoma.

Weissenborn, A. E., (Edited By)

1946-01-01

55

77 FR 61652 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00066  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Disaster Declaration 13328 and 13329] Oklahoma Disaster OK-00066 AGENCY: U...declaration of a disaster for the State of OKLAHOMA dated 10/01/2012. Incident: Luther...by the disaster: Primary Counties: Oklahoma. Contiguous Counties: Oklahoma:...

2012-10-10

56

75 FR 47650 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00042  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Disaster Declaration 12260 and 1226] Oklahoma Disaster OK-00042 AGENCY: U...declaration of a disaster for the State of OKLAHOMA dated 08/03/2010. Incident: Tornadoes...by the disaster: Primary Counties: Oklahoma. Contiguous Counties: Oklahoma:...

2010-08-06

57

Report of Progress at the Troupe Sub-Station, Smith County Texas.  

E-print Network

TEXAS AGRICULTUR 146-409-lorn [PERIMENT STATIONS BULLETIN NO. 121 FEBRUARY 1, 1909 REPORT OF PROGRESS AT THE TROUPE SUB-STATION, SMITH COUNTY, TEXAS W. H. HOTCHKISS, SUPERINTENDENT IN CHARGE POSTOFFICE COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY..., TEXAS TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS. 'FICERS. tiu v hnNING BOARD. ............................... H. I<. LEGETT, President. .Abilene. .......................... T. D. ROWELL, Vice-President. .Jefferson...

Hotchkiss, W.S.

1909-01-01

58

Emergence of Autochthonous Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Northeastern Texas and Southeastern Oklahoma  

PubMed Central

Autochthonous human cases of leishmaniasis in the United States are uncommon. We report three new cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis and details of a previously reported case, all outside the known endemic range in Texas. Surveys for enzootic rodent reservoirs and sand fly vectors were conducted around the residences of three of the case-patients during the summer of 2006; female Lutzomyia anthophora sand flies were collected at a north Texas and southeast Oklahoma residence of a case-patient, indicating proximity of a suitable vector. Urban sprawl, climatologic variability, or natural expansion of Leishmania mexicana are possible explanations for the apparent spread to the north and east. Enhanced awareness among healthcare providers in the south central region of the United States is important to ensure clinical suspicion of leishmaniasis, diagnosis, and appropriate patient management. PMID:23185078

Clarke, Carmen F.; Bradley, Kristy K.; Wright, James H.; Glowicz, Janet

2013-01-01

59

Environmental assessment overview, Deaf Smith County site, Texas  

SciTech Connect

In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Deaf Smith County site as one of five sites suitable for characterization. 3 figs.

Not Available

1986-05-01

60

Environmental assessment, Deaf Smith County site, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (42 USC sections 10101-10226) requires the environmental assessment of a proposed site to include a statement of the basis for nominating a site as suitable for characterization. Volume 2 provides a detailed statement evaluating the site suitability of the Deaf Smith County Site under DOE siting guidelines, as well as a comparison of the Deaf Smith County Site to the other sites under consideration. The evaluation of the Deaf Smith County Site is based on the impacts associated with the reference repository design, but the evaluation will not change if based on the Mission Plan repository concept. The second part of this document compares the Deaf Smith County Site to Davis Canyon, Hanford, Richton Dome and Yucca Mountain. This comparison is required under DOE guidelines and is not intended to directly support subsequent recommendation of three sites for characterization as candidate sites. 259 refs., 29 figs., 66 refs. (MHB)

Not Available

1986-05-01

61

Edwards Aquifer Evaluation: Kinney County, Texas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Edwards Aquifer is one of the most studied and most prolific aquifers in the United States. The aquifer is a heavily fractured and faulted carbonate aquifer with transmissivities in excess of 100 ft2/s. The City of San Antonio relies upon the Edwards Aquifer as its sole source for water. Much work has been done on quantifying recharge to the aquifer and discharge from wells and acquiring aquifer characteristics from pumping tests, specific capacity tests, and geophysical logs. Although the aquifer has been well studied in Bexar County, much less is known about the Edwards Aquifer in Kinney County. This is partly due to the lower population within the county (approximately 3,500 people) relative to the eastern counties (Uvalde, Medina, Bexar, Comal, and Hays) and the great distance of Kinney County from high profile discharge areas such as the City of San Antonio and Comal and San Marcos Springs. Three key products resulted from this study: (1) exploratory well drilling and the largest aquifer test in the county that were conducted to evaluate the well yields within a 10,000 acre study area in which a drawdown of 2.5 ft approximately 1.2 miles away was observed while pumping at approximately 4,600 gpm; (2) a recharge estimate for the Edwards Aquifer within Kinney County of approximately 71,382 ac-ft/yr; and (3) locating the Brackettville Groundwater Divide from an evaluation of ground water flow direction and hydrograph analysis. These results help evaluate the complex hydraulics occurring within Kinney County and aid in development of ground water modeling that will be used in managing the Edwards Aquifer.

Khorzad, Kaveh

2003-10-01

62

A new species of Elasmia Mschler from New Mexico and Texas, and a new subspecies of Elasmia mandela (Druce) from Texas and Oklahoma (Lepidoptera, Notodontidae, Nystaleinae)  

PubMed Central

Abstract Hippia packardii (Morrison) and Hippia insularis (Grote) are moved to the genus Elasmia Mschler as comb. n. Elasmia cave Metzler, sp. n. is described from New Mexico and Texas, and Elasmia mandela santaana Metzler & Knudson, ssp. n. is described from Texas and Oklahoma. A key to the species of Elasmia of southwestern U.S. is provided. Adult male and female moths of Elasmia from southwestern U.S. and their genitalia are illustrated. PMID:22207794

Metzler, Eric H.; Knudson, Edward C.

2011-01-01

63

Preliminary Geophysical Characterization Of Two Oil Production Sites, Osage County, Oklahoma - Osage Skiatook Petroleum Environmental Research Project  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ground electromagnetic (EM) and dc resistivity geophysical surveys were used to interpret the subsurface distribution of salinized soil, water, and bedrock at two oil production sites (A and B) on Skiatook Lake in southeastern Osage County, Oklahoma and to characterize the larger scale geologic and hydrologic setting. EM measurements were made on grids of about 1000 m2 using a very

Bruce D. Smith; Robert J. Bisdorf; Robert J. Horton; James K. Otton; Ray S. Hutton

64

Land-use and ground-water data, Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribes, Concho Reserve, Canadian County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes, conducted the present study to determine the vulnerability to contamination of ground water beneath tribal lands within the 3,991-acre Concho Reserve in Canadian County, Oklahoma (map A).

Bergman, DeRoy L.; Savoca, Mark E.

1993-01-01

65

An integrated study of seismic anisotropy and the natural fracture system at the Conoco Borehole Test Facility, Kay County, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

A significant body of published work has developed establishing fracture-related seismic anisotropy as an observable effect. To further the understanding of seismic birefringence techniques in characterizing natural fracture systems at depth, an integrated program of seismic and geologic measurements has been conducted at Conoco's Borehole Test Facility in Kay County, Oklahoma. Birefringence parameters inferred from the seismic data are consistent

John H. Queen; William D. Rizer

1990-01-01

66

Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibrations Stimulation in Osage County, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This Technical Quarterly Report is for the reporting period July 1, 2001 to September 30, 2001. The report provides details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma''. The project is divided into nine separate tasks. Several of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, while other tasks are dependent on earlier tasks being completed. The vibration stimulation well is permitted as Well 111-W-27, section 8 T26N R6E Osage County Oklahoma. It was spud July 28, 2001 with Goober Drilling Rig No. 3. The well was drilled to 3090-feet cored, logged, cased and cemented. The Rig No.3 moved off August 6, 2001. Phillips Petroleum Co. has begun analyzing the cores recovered from the test well. Standard porosity, permeability and saturation measurements will be conducted. They will then begin the sonic stimulation core tests Calumet Oil Company, the operator of the NBU, has begun to collect both production and injection wells information to establish a baseline for the project in the pilot field test area. Green Country Submersible Pump Company, a subsidiary of Calumet Oil Company, will provide both the surface equipment and downhole tools to allow the Downhole Vibration Tool to be operated by a surface rod rotating system. The 7-inch Downhole Vibration Tool (DHVT) has been built and is ready for initial shallow testing. The shallow testing will be done in a temporarily abandoned well operated by Calumet Oil Co. in the Wynona waterflood unit. The data acquisition doghouse and rod rotating equipment have been placed on location in anticipation of the shallow test in Well No.20-12 Wynona Waterflood Unit. A notice of invention disclosure was submitted to the DOE Chicago Operations Office. DOE Case No.S-98,124 has been assigned to follow the documentation following the invention disclosure. A paper covering the material presented to the Oklahoma Geologic Survey (OGS)/DOE Annual Workshop in Oklahoma City May 8,9 2001 has been submitted for publication to the OGS. A technical paper draft has been submitted for the ASME/ETCE conference (Feb 2002) Production Technology Symposium. A one-day SPE sponsored short course which is planned to cover seismic stimulation efforts around the world, will be offered at the SPE/DOE Thirteenth Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery in Tulsa, OK, April 13-17, 2002. Dan Maloney, Phillips and Bob Westermark, OGCI will be the instructors. In addition, a proposed technical paper has been submitted for this meeting.

J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

2001-09-30

67

Comparison of Irrigation Water Use Estimates Calculated from Remotely Sensed Irrigated Acres and State Reported Irrigated Acres in the Lake Altus Drainage Basin, Oklahoma and Texas, 2000 Growing Season  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Increased demand for water in the Lake Altus drainage basin requires more accurate estimates of water use for irrigation. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, is investigating new techniques to improve water-use estimates for irrigation purposes in the Lake Altus drainage basin. Empirical estimates of reference evapotranspiration, crop evapotranspiration, and crop irrigation water requirements for nine major crops were calculated from September 1999 to October 2000 using a solar radiation-based evapotranspiration model. Estimates of irrigation water use were calculated using remotely sensed irrigated crop acres derived from Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus imagery and were compared with irrigation water-use estimates calculated from irrigated crop acres reported by the Oklahoma Water Resources Board and the Texas Water Development Board for the 2000 growing season. The techniques presented will help manage water resources in the Lake Altus drainage basin and may be transferable to other areas with similar water management needs. Irrigation water use calculated from the remotely sensed irrigated acres was estimated at 154,920 acre-feet; whereas, irrigation water use calculated from state reported irrigated crop acres was 196,026 acre-feet, a 23 percent difference. The greatest difference in irrigation water use was in Carson County, Texas. Irrigation water use for Carson County, Texas, calculated from the remotely sensed irrigated acres was 58,555 acrefeet; whereas, irrigation water use calculated from state reported irrigated acres was 138,180 acre-feet, an 81 percent difference. The second greatest difference in irrigation water use occurred in Beckham County, Oklahoma. Differences between the two irrigation water use estimates are due to the differences of irrigated crop acres derived from the mapping process and those reported by the Oklahoma Water Resources Board and Texas Water Development Board.

Masoner, J.R.; Mladinich, C.S.; Konduris, A.M.; Smith, S. Jerrod

2003-01-01

68

Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This Technical Quarterly Report is for the reporting period March 31, 2002 to June 30, 2002. The report provides details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma''. The project is divided into nine separate tasks. Several of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, while other tasks are dependent on earlier tasks being completed. The vibration stimulation Well 111-W-27 is located in section 8 T26N R6E of the North Burbank Unit (NBU), Osage County Oklahoma. It was drilled to 3090-feet cored, logged, cased and cemented. The rig moved off August 6, 2001. Phillips Petroleum Co. has performed several core studies on the cores recovered from the test well. Standard porosity, permeability and saturation measurements have been conducted. In addition Phillips has prepared a Core Petrology Report, detailing the lithology, stratigraphy and sedimentology for Well 111-W27, NBU. Phillips has also conducted the sonic stimulation core tests, the final sonic stimulation report has not yet been released. Calumet Oil Company, the operator of the NBU, began collecting both production and injection wells information to establish a baseline for the project in the pilot field test area since May 2001. The original 7-inch Downhole Vibration Tool (DHVT) has been thoroughly tested and it has been concluded that it needs to be redesigned. An engineering firm from Fayetteville AR has been retained to assist in developing a new design for the DHVT. The project participants requested from the DOE, a no-cost extension for the project through December 31, 2002. The no-cost extension amendment to the contract was signed during this reporting period. A technical paper SPE 75254 ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation, Osage County, Oklahoma'' was presented at the 2002 SPE/DOE Thirteenth Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery, in Tulsa OK, April 17, 2002. A one-day short course was conducted at the SPE/DOE Thirteenth Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery in Tulsa, OK, April 13-14, 2002. Dan Maloney, Phillips and Bob Westermark, OGCI, Brett Davidson and Tim Spanos, Prism Production Technologies, were the instructors. The sixteen attendees also participated in the half-day field trip to the test facility near Tulsa.

J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

2002-06-30

69

Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This Technical Quarterly Report is for the reporting period July 1, 2000 to September 30, 2000. The report provides details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma''. The project is divided into nine separate tasks. Since this is the first Quarterly report, much of the work done is of a preliminary nature. Several of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, while other tasks are dependent on earlier tasks being completed. The selection of the pilot test area has been completed. The drilling of the test well is waiting on rig availability. Phillips has begun sonic core testing of offset cores, waiting on the core from the well to be drilled. Design work is progressing for the tool, which will be built to fit the test well. Installation of monitoring equipment and the downhole vibration tool will occur after the well is drilled. Technical transfer efforts have begun with the submission of an abstract for a technical paper for the Oklahoma City Society of Petroleum Engineers meeting in March 2001.

J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

2000-09-30

70

Evaluation of coastal wave attenuation due to viscous fluid sediment at Jefferson County, Texas  

E-print Network

This thesis is a two-part discussion concerning a Gulf of Mexico beach in Jefferson County, Texas. The first part involves collecting and analyzing shoreline evolution data for an ongoing Texas A&M University Ocean Engineering Program investigation...

Tuttle, Meghan I

2012-06-07

71

77 FR 26598 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00059  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Disaster Declaration 13069 and 13070] Oklahoma Disaster OK-00059 AGENCY: U...declaration of a disaster for the State of Oklahoma. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes...Counties: Woodward. Contiguous Counties: Oklahoma: Dewey, Ellis, Harper, Major,...

2012-05-04

72

77 FR 61651 - Oklahoma Disaster # OK-00067  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Disaster Declaration 13330 and 13331] Oklahoma Disaster OK-00067 AGENCY: U...declaration of a disaster for the State of OKLAHOMA dated 10/01/2012. Incident: Multiple...Counties: Payne. Contiguous Counties: Oklahoma: Creek Lincoln, Logan Noble,...

2012-10-10

73

76 FR 60959 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00055  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Disaster Declaration 12839 and 12840] Oklahoma Disaster OK-00055 AGENCY: U...declaration of a disaster for the State of Oklahoma dated 09/21/2011. Incident: Pawnee...Counties: Pawnee. Contiguous Counties: Oklahoma: Creek, Noble, Osage, Payne,...

2011-09-30

74

78 FR 48373 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Texas; Victoria County; 1997 8...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Texas; Victoria County; 1997 8-Hour Ozone Section 110 (a)(1) Maintenance...Plan (SIP). The revision consists of a maintenance plan for Victoria County developed to ensure continued attainment of the...

2013-08-08

75

Ground-water resources of Wheeler and eastern Gray Counties, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Wheeler and eastern Gray Counties are in the eastcentral part of the Texas Panhandle. The two counties are characterized by rolling to fairly rugged topography with many sand-dune areas and a well developed drainage system.

Maderak, M.L.

1973-01-01

76

THE DISTRIBUTION OF NOTROPIS BAIRDI ALONG THE CIMARRON RIVER IN LOGAN COUNTY, OKLAHOMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Recognition is respectfully given to Mr. William Mathews of the University of Oklahoma,for identifying the N. bairdi in our sample. The help of James Magovern and Gregory Steele of the University of Oklahoma is also acknowledged,for their efforts in data collection of the N. bairdi distribution. Our gratitude is expressed to Drs. Loren Hill, University of Oklahoma, and George

Charles L. Marshall

1978-01-01

77

MODELING THE DISTRIBUTION OF THE DWARF PALMETTO (SABAL MINOR; ARECACEAE) IN MCCURTAIN COUNTY, OKLAHOMA  

E-print Network

, OKLAHOMA CHRISTOPHER J. BUTLER,* JENNIFER L. CURTIS, KIMBERLY MCBRIDE, DAVID ARBOUR, AND BERLIN HECK Department of Biology, University of Central Oklahoma, 100 North University Drive, Edmond, OK 73034 (CJB, JC, KM) Oklahoma Ranger District, Ouachita National Forest, Route 4, Box 2900, Broken Bow, OK 74728 (DA

Butler, Christopher J.

78

Sooner rather than later. Oklahoma County hospitals and health agencies take immediate action on the uninsured problem by collaborating.  

PubMed

In reality TV, contestants are constantly forming an alliance--with mixed results. In Oklahoma County, it seemed like a good idea for physicians, hospitals and other leaders to come together to provide care for the uninsured. And it has been. Evan Collins, left, whose organization is part of that alliance, says: "We hope if this model works well, we can export it to other communities to replicate the same thing. PMID:17477189

Zigmond, Jessica

2007-04-23

79

SEROLOGICAL PREVALENCE AND ISOLATION OF BABESIA ODOCOILE! AMONG WHITE-TAILED DEER (ODOCOILEUS VIRGINIANUS) IN TEXAS AND OKLAHOMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Serum samples collected from 581 white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) from Texas and from 124 white-tailed deer from Oklahoma were tested by the indirect fluorescent antibody technique against Babesia odocoilei. Prevalence of seropositive reactors varied from site to site in both states. Prevalence rates were statistically ranked as high, intermediate or low. Deer <12-mo-old had a significantly lower prevalence than all

K. A. Waldrup; A. A. Kocan; T. Qureshi; D. S. Davis; D. Baggett; G. G. Wagner

80

Reservoir characterization, porosity, and recovery efficiency of deeply-buried paleozoic carbonates: Examples from Oklahoma, Texas and New Mexico  

Microsoft Academic Search

Capillary-pressure data from the Early Ordovician Ellenburger Dolomite (west Texas and New Mexico) and the Late Ordovician-Early\\u000a Devonian Hunton Group carbonates (Oklahoma) are used to calculate or infer petrophysical characteristics, such as median pore-throat\\u000a size, pore-throat size distribution, effective porosity, and recovery efficiency (RE). For both data sets, porosity and RE\\u000a are inversely related. A positive relationship between RE and

Joachim E. Amthor; David C. Kopaska-Merkel; Gerald M. Friedman

1988-01-01

81

Ground-water resources of Coke County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Coke County, located in semiarid west-central Texas, where large ranches, small farms, and oil production are the main bases of the economy, has a small supply of ground and surface water. Of the approximately 1,900 acre-feet of fresh to moderately saline ground water used in 1968, industry used 880 acre-feet, irrigation used 210 acre-feet, and domestic supply and livestock used 820 acre-feet. All of the water for municipal supply and some of the water for industry is obtained from surface-water reservoirs.

Wilson, Clyde A.

1973-01-01

82

75 FR 67406 - Exelon Nuclear Texas Holdings, LLC; Victoria County Station Early Site Permit Application; Notice...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Exelon Nuclear Texas Holdings, LLC; Victoria County Station Early Site Permit Application...for an early site permit (ESP) for Victoria County Station (VCS) site, located...approximately 13.3 miles south of the city of Victoria, Texas. The application for the...

2010-11-02

83

Hydrogeology and water quality of the North Canadian River alluvium, Concho Reserve, Canadian County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A growing user population within the Concho Reserve in Canadian County, Oklahoma, has increased the need for drinking water. The North Canadian River alluvium is a reliable source of ground water for agriculture, industry, and cities in Canadian County and is the only ground-water source capable of meeting large demands. This study was undertaken to collect and analyze data to describe the hydrogeology and ground-water quality of the North Canadian River alluvium within the Concho Reserve. The alluvium forms a band about 2 miles long and 0.5 mile wide along the southern edge of the Concho Reserve. Thickness of the alluvium ranges from 19 to 75 feet thick and averages about 45 feet in the study area. Well cuttings and natural gamma-ray logs indicate the alluvium consists of interfingering lenses of clay, silt, and sand. The increase of coarse-grained sand and the decrease of clay and silt with depth suggests that the water-bearing properties of the aquifer within the study area improve with depth. A clay layer in the upper part of the aquifer may be partially responsible for surface water ponding in low areas after above normal precipitation and may delay the infiltration of potentially contaminated water from land surface. Specific conductance measurements indicate the ground-water quality improves in a northern direction towards the terrace. Water-quality properties, bacteria counts, major ion and nutrient concentrations, trace-element and radionuclide concentrations, and organic compound concentrations were measured in one ground-water sample at the southern edge of the Concho Reserve and comply with the primary drinking-water standards. Measured concentrations of iron, manganese, sulfate, and total dissolved solids exceed the secondary maximum contaminant levels set for drinking water. The ground water is a calcium sulfate bicarbonate type and is considered very hard, with a hardness of 570 milligrams per liter as calcium carbonate.

Becker, C.J.

1998-01-01

84

Depositional environment of woodbine sandstones, Polk, Tyler and San Jacinto Counties, Texas  

E-print Network

DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT OF WOODBINE SANDSTONES, POLK, TYLER AND SAN JACINTO COUNTIES, TEXAS A Thesis by DEANE CAMPBELL FOSS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject: Geology DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT OF WOODBINE SANDSTONES, POLK, TYLER AND SAN JACINTO COUNTIES, TEXAS A Thesis by DEANE CAMPBELL FOSS Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committee Head...

Foss, Deane Campbell

2012-06-07

85

Depositional patterns of the Lewisville sandstones, northern Hawkins field, Wood County, Texas  

E-print Network

DEPOSITIONAL PATTERNS OF THE LEWISVILLE SANDSTONES, NORTHERN HAWKINS FIELDS WOOD COUNTY' TEXAS A Thesis by DAVID LAURENCE WORK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1987 Major Subject: Geology DEPOSITIONAL PATTERNS OF THE LEWISVILLE SANDSTONES, NORTHERN HAWKINS FIELD, WOOD COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by DAVID LAURENCE WORK Approved as to style and content by: (Chair of Committee) Thomas...

Work, David Laurence

2012-06-07

86

Deposition of the Woodbine-Eagleford sandstones, Aggieland field, Brazos County, Texas  

E-print Network

DEPOSITION OF THE WOODBINE-EAGLEFORD SANDSTONES, AGGIELAND FIELD) BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by JOSEPH ROBERT DEDONINIC Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&N University in partial i'ulfillment of the requirements i' or the degree... of NASTER OF SCIENCE August 1988 Najor Subject: Geology DEPOSITIQN QF THE WOODBINE-EAGLEFORD SANDSTONES, AGGIELAND FIELD, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by JOSEPH ROBER'I' DEDOMINIC Approved as to style and content by: Robert R. Berg (Chair of...

DeDominic, Joseph Robert

2012-06-07

87

Facies distribution of upper cretaceous Woodbine Sandstones, southern Kurten Field, Brazos County, Texas  

E-print Network

FACIES DISTRIBUTION OF UPPER CRETACEOUS WOODBINE SANDSTONES, SOUTHERN KURTEN FIELD, BRAZOS COUNTY. TEXAS A Thesis by JOHN THOMAS LEETHEM Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1984 Major Subject: Geology FACIES DISTRIBUTION OF UPPER CRETACEOUS WOODBINE SANDSTONES, SOUTHERN KURTEN FIELD, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by JOHN THOMAS LEETHEM Approved as to style and content by: Dr...

Leethem, John Thomas

2012-06-07

88

Depositional environment and reservoir morphology of Spraberry sandstones, Parks field, Midland County, Texas  

E-print Network

DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT AND RESERVOIR MORPHOLOGY OF SPRABERRY SANDSTONES, PARKS FIELD, MIDLAND COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by NARK WILLIAM YALE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Nay 1986 Major Subject: Geology DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT AND RESERVOIR MORPHOLOGY OF SPRABERRY SANDSTONES& PARKS FIELD, MIDLAND COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by MARK WILLIAM YALE Approved as to style and content by: o ert...

Yale, Mark William

2012-06-07

89

Geology and hydrogeology of the Edwards Aquifer Transition Zone, Bexar County, Texas  

E-print Network

GEOLOGY AND HYDROGEOLOGY OF THE EDWARDS AQUIFER TRANSITION ZONE, BEXAR COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by JEFFREY STEPHEN HEATHERY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AQh University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1989 Major Subject: Geology GEOLOGY AND HYDROGEOLOGY OF THE EDWARDS AQUIFER TRANSITION ZONE, BEXAR COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by JEFFREY STEPHEN HEATHERY Approved as to style and content by: Chris pher C. Mathewson...

Neathery, Jeffrey Stephen

1989-01-01

90

Depositional environment of Canyon (Cisco) sandstones, North Jameson field Mitchell County, Texas  

E-print Network

DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT OF CANYON (CISCO) SANDSTONES, NORTH JAMESON FIELD MITCHELL COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis DAVID JESSE DALLY Submitted to the Graduate College of' Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1983 Master Subject: Geology DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT OF CANYON (CISCO) SANDSTONES, NOHTH JAMESON FIELD MITCHELL COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis DAVID JESSE DALLY Approved as to style and content by: Robert R. Berg (Che. irman...

Dally, David Jesse

1983-01-01

91

Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate the impact of downhole vibration stimulation on oil production rates in a mature waterflood field. Oil & Gas Consultants International, Inc. (OGCI) will manage the project in close cooperation with the Osage Tribe as the tests will be conducted in Osage County, Oklahoma, the mineral estate of the Osage Tribe. The field is owned and operated by Calumet Oil Company. Phillips Petroleum Company will contribute their proprietary vibration core analysis of cores recovered from the pilot test area. To achieve the project objectives, the work has been divided into nine tasks, some are concurrent, while other tasks rely on completion of previous steps. The operator, Calumet Oil Company operates several field in Osage County Oklahoma. The North Burbank Unit will be the site of the test. The team will then determine where within the field to optimally locate the vibration test well. With the location determined, the test well will be drilled, cored, logged and 7-inch production casing run and cemented. In a parallel effort, OGCI will be designing, building, and testing a new version of the downhole vibration tool based on their patented and field proven whirling orbital vibrator. With the field test tool built to run in 7-inch casing. Reliability testing of the downhole tool and surface power source will be conducted in nearby field operated by Calumet Oil Company. After the core is recovered, Phillips Petroleum Company will be conducting laboratory tests utilizing their proprietary sonic core apparatus to determine fluid flow response to a range of vibration frequencies. These results, in turn, will allow final adjustments to the frequency generation mechanisms of the downhole vibration tool. One or more offset wells, near to the vibration test well, will be equipped with downhole geophones and or hydro-phones to determine the strength of signal and if the producing formation has a characteristic resonant frequency response. Surface geophones will also be set out and arranged to pick up the signal generated by the downhole vibration tool. The downhole vibrator will be installed in the test well. Monitoring the production and injection for the pilot test area will continue. As the frequency of the downhole tool is changed, the recording of seismic signals, both on the surface and downhole, will also be conducted. The results of the data collection will be a matrix of varying vibration stimulation conditions corresponding to changes in production fluid rates and seismic responses. The report on the results of the downhole vibration stimulation will be prepared and delivered using several venues. Technical papers will be submitted to the Society of Petroleum Engineers. Workshops are planned to be held for operators in Osage County and surrounding areas. A dedicated technical session on vibration stimulation may be offered at the 2002 SPE/DOE/IOR Conference, bringing together the world's experts in this emerging technology. The final task will be to close out the project.

J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

2001-03-31

92

Gaseous oxidized mercury dry deposition measurements in the southwestern USA: a comparison between Texas, eastern Oklahoma, and the Four Corners area.  

PubMed

Gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) dry deposition measurements using aerodynamic surrogate surface passive samplers were collected in central and eastern Texas and eastern Oklahoma, from September 2011 to September 2012. The purpose of this study was to provide an initial characterization of the magnitude and spatial extent of ambient GOM dry deposition in central and eastern Texas for a 12-month period which contained statistically average annual results for precipitation totals, temperature, and wind speed. The research objective was to investigate GOM dry deposition in areas of Texas impacted by emissions from coal-fired utility boilers and compare it with GOM dry deposition measurements previously observed in eastern Oklahoma and the Four Corners area. Annual GOM dry deposition rate estimates were relatively low in Texas, ranging from 0.1 to 0.3 ng/m(2)h at the four Texas monitoring sites, similar to the 0.2 ng/m(2)h annual GOM dry deposition rate estimate recorded at the eastern Oklahoma monitoring site. The Texas and eastern Oklahoma annual GOM dry deposition rate estimates were at least four times lower than the highest annual GOM dry deposition rate estimate previously measured in the more arid bordering western states of New Mexico and Colorado in the Four Corners area. PMID:24955412

Sather, Mark E; Mukerjee, Shaibal; Allen, Kara L; Smith, Luther; Mathew, Johnson; Jackson, Clarence; Callison, Ryan; Scrapper, Larry; Hathcoat, April; Adam, Jacque; Keese, Danielle; Ketcher, Philip; Brunette, Robert; Karlstrom, Jason; Van der Jagt, Gerard

2014-01-01

93

Gaseous Oxidized Mercury Dry Deposition Measurements in the Southwestern USA: A Comparison between Texas, Eastern Oklahoma, and the Four Corners Area  

PubMed Central

Gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) dry deposition measurements using aerodynamic surrogate surface passive samplers were collected in central and eastern Texas and eastern Oklahoma, from September 2011 to September 2012. The purpose of this study was to provide an initial characterization of the magnitude and spatial extent of ambient GOM dry deposition in central and eastern Texas for a 12-month period which contained statistically average annual results for precipitation totals, temperature, and wind speed. The research objective was to investigate GOM dry deposition in areas of Texas impacted by emissions from coal-fired utility boilers and compare it with GOM dry deposition measurements previously observed in eastern Oklahoma and the Four Corners area. Annual GOM dry deposition rate estimates were relatively low in Texas, ranging from 0.1 to 0.3?ng/m2h at the four Texas monitoring sites, similar to the 0.2?ng/m2h annual GOM dry deposition rate estimate recorded at the eastern Oklahoma monitoring site. The Texas and eastern Oklahoma annual GOM dry deposition rate estimates were at least four times lower than the highest annual GOM dry deposition rate estimate previously measured in the more arid bordering western states of New Mexico and Colorado in the Four Corners area. PMID:24955412

Sather, Mark E.; Allen, Kara L.; Smith, Luther; Mathew, Johnson; Jackson, Clarence; Callison, Ryan; Scrapper, Larry; Hathcoat, April; Adam, Jacque; Keese, Danielle; Brunette, Robert; Karlstrom, Jason; Van der Jagt, Gerard

2014-01-01

94

Predictability of littoral-zone fish communities through ontogeny in Lake Texoma, Oklahoma-Texas, USA  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We sampled larval, juvenile and adult fishes from littoral-zone areas of a large reservoir (Lake Texoma, Oklahoma-Texas) (1) to characterize environmental factors that influenced fish community structure, (2) to examine how consistent fish-environment relationships were through ontogeny (i.e., larval vs. juvenile and adult), and (3) to measure the concordance of larval communities sampled during spring to juvenile and adult communities sampled at the same sites later in the year. Larval, juvenile and adult fish communities were dominated by Atherinidae (mainly inland silverside, Menidia beryllina) and Moronidae (mainly juvenile striped bass, Morone saxatilis) and were consistently structured along a gradient of site exposure to prevailing winds and waves. Larval, juvenile and adult communities along this gradient varied from atherinids and moronids at highly exposed sites to mostly centrarchids (primarily Lepomis and Micropterus spp.) at protected sites. Secondarily, zooplankton densities, water clarity, and land-use characteristics were related to fish community structure. Rank correlation analyses and Mantel tests indicated that the spatial consistency and predictability of fish communities was high as larval fishes sampled during spring were concordant with juvenile and adult fishes sampled at the same sites during summer and fall in terms of abundance, richness, and community structure. We propose that the high predictability and spatial consistency of littoral-zone fishes in Lake Texoma was a function of relatively simple communities (dominated by 1-2 species) that were structured by factors, such as site exposure to winds and waves, that varied little through time. ?? Springer 2005.

Eggleton, M.A.; Ramirez, R.; Hargrave, C.W.; Gido, K.B.; Masoner, J.R.; Schnell, G.D.; Matthews, W.J.

2005-01-01

95

Bromide, Chloride, and Sulfate Concentrations, and Specific Conductance, Lake Texoma, Texas and Oklahoma, 2007-08  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Dallas Water Utilities Division, collected water-quality data from 11 sites on Lake Texoma, a reservoir on the Texas-Oklahoma border, during April 2007-September 2008. At 10 of the sites, physical properties (depth, specific conductance, pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, and alkalinity) were measured and samples were collected for analysis of selected dissolved constituents (bromide, calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, carbonate, bicarbonate, chloride, and sulfate); at one site, only physical properties were measured. The primary constituent of interest was bromide. Bromate can form when ozone is used to disinfect raw water containing bromide, and bromate is a suspected human carcinogen. Chloride and sulfate were of secondary interest. Only the analytical results for bromide, chloride, sulfate, and measured specific conductance are discussed in this report. Median dissolved bromide concentrations ranged from 0.28 to 0.60 milligrams per liter. The largest median dissolved bromide concentration (0.60 milligram per liter at site 11) was from the Red River arm of Lake Texoma. Dissolved bromide concentrations generally were larger in the Red River arm of Lake Texoma than in the Washita arm of the lake. Median dissolved chloride concentrations were largest in the Red River arm of Lake Texoma at site 11 (431 milligrams per liter) and smallest at site 8 (122 milligrams per liter) in the Washita arm. At site 11 in the Red River arm, the mean and median chloride concentrations exceeded the secondary maximum contaminant level of 300 milligrams per liter for chloride established by the 'Texas Surface Water Quality Standards' for surface-water bodies designated for the public water supply use. Median dissolved sulfate concentrations ranged from 182 milligrams per liter at site 4 in the Big Mineral arm to 246 milligrams per liter at site 11 in the Red River arm. None of the mean or median sulfate concentrations exceeded the secondary maximum contaminant level of 300 milligrams per liter. Median specific conductance measurements at sites ranged from 1,120 microsiemens per centimeter at site 8 in the Washita arm to 2,100 microsiemens per centimeter in the Red River arm. The spatial distribution of specific conductance in Lake Texoma was similar to that of bromide and chloride, with larger specific conductance values in the Red River arm compared to those in the Washita arm.

Baldys, Stanley

2009-01-01

96

Hydrology of an abandoned coal-mining area near McCurtain, Haskell County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water quality was investigated from October 1980 to May 1983 in an area of abandoned coal mines in Haskell county, Oklahoma. Bedrock in the area is shale, siltstone, sandstone, and the McAlester (Stigler) and Hartshorne coals of the McAlester Formation and Hartshorne Sandstone of Pennsylvanian age. The two coal beds, upper and lower Hartshorne, associated with the Hartshorne Sandstone converge or are separated by a few feet or less of bony coal or shale in the McCurtain area. Many small faults cut the Hartshorne coal in all the McCurtain-area mines. The main avenues of water entry to and movement through the bedrock are the exposed bedding-plane openings between layers of sandstone, partings between laminae of shale, fractures and joints developed during folding and faulting laminae of shale, fractures and joints developed during folding and faulting of the brittle rocks, and openings caused by surface mining--the overburden being shattered and broken to form spoil. Water-table conditions exist in bedrock and spoil in the area. Mine pond water is in direct hydraulic connections with water in the spoil piles and the underlying Hartshorne Sandstone. Sulfate is the best indicator of the presence of coal-mine drainage in both surface and ground water in the Oklahoma coal field. Median sulfate concentrations for four sites on Mule Creek ranged from 26 to 260 milligrams per liter. Median sulfate concentrations increased with increased drainage from unreclaimed mined areas. The median sulfate concentration in Mule Creek where it drains the reclaimed area is less than one-third of that at the next site downstream where the stream begins to drain abandoned (unreclaimed) mine lands. Water from Mule Creek predominantly is a sodium sulfate type. Maximum and median values for specific conductance and concentrations of calcium, magnesium, sodium, sulfate, chloride, dissolved solids, and alkalinity increase as Mule Creek flows downstream and drains increasing areas of abandoned (unreclaimed) mining lands. Constituent concentrations in Mule Creek, except those for dissolved solids, iron, manganese, and sulfate, generally do not exceed drinking-water limits. Reclamation likely would result in decreased concentrations of dissolved solids, calcium, magnesium, sodium, sulfate, and alkalinity in Mule Creek in the vicinity of the reclaimed area. Ground water in the area is moderately hard to very hard alkaline water with a median pH of 7.2 to 7.6. It predominately is a sodium sulfate type and, except for dissolved solids, iron manganese, and sulfate, constituent concentrations generally do not exceed drinking-water limits. Ground-water quality would likely be unchanged by reclamation. The quality of water in the two mine ponds is quite similar to that of the shallow ground water in the area. Constituents in water from both ponds generally do not exceed drinking-water limits and the water quality is unlikely to be changed by reclamation in the area.

Slack, L.J.

1983-01-01

97

76 FR 59766 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00056  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Disaster Declaration 12841 and 12842] Oklahoma Disaster OK-00056 AGENCY: U.S...declaration of a disaster for the State of Oklahoma dated 09/21/2011. Incident: Oklahoma County Wildfire. Incident Period:...

2011-09-27

98

Depositional history of Lower Permian (Wolfcampian-Leonardian) carbonate buildups, Midland Basin, Upton County, Texas  

E-print Network

A north-south oriented trend of Wolfcampian-Leonardian carbonate buildups is located in the southwestern Midland Basin, Upton County, Texas. The buildup trend is located west of the eastern faulted margin of the Central Basin Platform and north...

Merriam, Catherine O'Hara

2012-06-07

99

ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY WITH DOWNHOLE VIBRATION STIMULATION IN OSAGE COUNTY OKLAHOMA  

SciTech Connect

This Final Report covers the entire project from July 13, 2000 to June 30, 2003. The report summarizes the details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma'' under DOE Contract Number DE-FG26-00BC15191. The project was divided into nine separate tasks. This report is written in an effort to document the lessons learned during the completion of each task. Therefore each task will be discussed as the work evolved for that task throughout the duration of the project. Most of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, but certain tasks were dependent on earlier tasks being completed. During the three years of project activities, twelve quarterly technical reports were submitted for the project. Many individual topic and task specific reports were included as appendices in the quarterly reports. Ten of these reports have been included as appendices to this final report. Two technical papers, which were written and accepted by the Society of Petroleum Engineers, have also been included as appendices. The three primary goals of the project were to build a downhole vibration tool (DHVT) to be installed in seven inch casing, conduct a field test of vibration stimulation in a mature waterflooded field and evaluate the effects of the vibration on both the produced fluid characteristics and injection well performance. The field test results are as follows: In Phase I of the field test the DHVT performed exceeding well, generating strong clean signals on command and as designed. During this phase Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory had installed downhole geophones and hydrophones to monitor the signal generated by the downhole vibrator. The signals recorded were strong and clear. Phase II was planned to be ninety-day reservoir stimulation field test. This portion of the field tests was abruptly ended after one week of operations, when the DHVT became stuck in the well during a routine removal activity. The tool cannot operate in this condition and remains in the well. There was no response measured during or afterwards to either the produced fluids from the five production wells or in the injection characteristics of the two injection wells in the pilot test area. Monitoring the pilot area injection and production wells ceased when the field test was terminated March 14, 2003. Thus, a key goal of this project, which was to determine the effects of vibration stimulation on improving oil recovery from a mature waterflood, was not obtained. While there was no improved oil recovery effect measured, there was insufficient vibration stimulation time to expect a change to occur. No conclusion can be drawn about the effectiveness of vibration stimulation in this test.

Robert Westermark; J. Ford Brett

2003-11-01

100

Role of sea surface temperature and soil-moisture feedback in the 1998 Oklahoma-Texas drought.  

PubMed

The drought that affected the US states of Oklahoma and Texas in the summer of 1998 was strong and persistent, with soil moisture reaching levels comparable to those of the 1930s 'dust bowl'. Although other effects of the record-strength 1997-98 El Nio were successfully predicted over much of the United States, the Oklahoma-Texas drought was not. Whereas the response of the tropical atmosphere to strong anomalies in sea surface temperature is quite predictable, the response of the extratropical atmosphere is more variable. Here we present results from mechanistic experiments to clarify the origin and maintenance of this extratropical climate extreme. In addition to global atmospheric models, we use a regional model to isolate regional climate feedbacks. We conclude that during April and May 1998, sea surface temperature anomalies combined with a favourable atmospheric circulation to establish the drought. In June-August, the regional positive feedback associated with lower evaporation and precipitation contributed substantially to the maintenance of the drought. The drought ended in the autumn, when stronger large-scale weather systems were able to penetrate the region and overwhelm the soil-moisture feedback. Our results show the potential for numerical models including appropriate physical processes to make skillful predictions of regional climate. PMID:11130719

Hong, S Y; Kalnay, E

2000-12-14

101

Contrasting depositional processes of Sub-Clarksville and Woodbine reservoir sandstones, Grimes County, Texas  

E-print Network

C~ a a(~ MARTIN'S PRAIRIE ~ F I M In the East Texas basin the Woodbine and Eagleford Groups consist largely of sandstones and shales deposited during the early part of the Upper Cretaceous Gulfian Series (Table 1). This clastic section...CONTRASTING DEPOSITIONAL PROCESSES OF SUB-CLARKSVILLE AND WOODBINE RESERVOIR SANDSTONES, GRIMES COUNTY g TEXAS A Thesis by ROBERT ANDREW BARTON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AsM University in partial fulfillment...

Barton, Robert Andrew

2012-06-07

102

RepoRt on a MaMMal SuRvey at CaMp Maxey, laMaR County, texaS (texaS aRMy national GuaRd faCility)  

Microsoft Academic Search

A mammal survey was conducted of Camp Maxey (Texas Army National Guard training site), Lamar County, Texas, from October 2002 through June 2004. This military installation is located in eastern Texas and is situated at the gradational boundary between the Pineywoods (east) and Blackland Prairies (west). Sherman traps, snap traps, pitfall traps, mist nets, DK-1 and Macabee gopher traps, and

Cody W. EdWards

103

A field guide to the trees, shrubs, and woody vines of Tamborwood, Newton County, Texas  

E-print Network

A FIELD GUIDE TO THE TREES, SHRUBS, AND WOODY VINES OF TAMBORWOOD, NEWTON COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by STEPHEN FRANIK HOLM Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1972 Maj or Subject: Wildlife Science A FIELD GUIDE TO THE TREES, SHRUBS, AND WOODY VINES OF TAMBORWOOD, NEWTON COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by STEPHEN FRANKE HOLM Approved as to style and content by: Co-Chairman of Committee...

Holm, Stephen Franke

1972-01-01

104

78 FR 60826 - Foreign-Trade Zone 155-Calhoun/Victoria Counties, Texas; Authorization of Production Activity...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Board Foreign-Trade Zone 155--Calhoun/Victoria Counties, Texas; Authorization of Production...Excavator and Frame Assembly Production); Victoria, Texas On May 29, 2013, The Calhoun-Victoria Foreign Trade Zone, Inc., grantee...

2013-10-02

105

The organization, powers, and duties of the county commissioners' court in Texas  

E-print Network

County v. Garrett, 62 Tex. 602 (1884); Baker v. Dunning, 13 S. W, 617 (1890); Robbins v. Limestone County, 268 S. W. (1925); Childress County v. State, 92 S. W. 2d 1011 (1936); Texas National Guard Armory Board v. McGraw, 126 S . W. 2d (1939) . 14..., to October, 1836, Texas govern- 6 ment had five different organizational forms. During this period local government was given little attention 7 and was of little importance. The constitution of 1836 contained only three pro- 8 visions dealing...

Daughety, Gerald Lee

1973-01-01

106

Discrimination against and Adaptation of Italians in the Coal Counties of Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the late 1800s and early 1900s coal reigned supreme in what is now southeastern Oklahoma. As was the case in the northeastern United States, Italians and other immigrants from southern and eastern Europe were brought in as a form of inexpensive labor to work the mines. Italians had different customs, a different language, a unique appearance,

LoConto, David G.

2004-01-01

107

Reproductive Cycle of Notropis boops (Pisces: Cyprinidae) in Brier Creek, Marshall County, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The reproductive cycle of the big eye shiner (Notropis boops) in Brier Creek, S-central Oklahoma, is described for 1976 and 1977. Reproduction occurred from late April into August. The breeding season was longer and began earlier in the year than those of northern populations of the species. Ovarian regression began earlier in the 1977 breeding season than in 1976; this

Steven Lehtinen; Anthony A. Echelle

1979-01-01

108

Depositional environment and reservoir characteristics of the lower Vicksburg sandstones, east McAllen Ranch Field, Hidalgo County, Texas  

E-print Network

Anomolia bilateralis Eocene Vicksburg Vicksburg Jackson Textularia warreni Loxostoma delicata Clavulina byramensis Cibicides pippeni Cibicides mississippiensis Uvigerina mexicana Mar inulina cocoaensis Brooks, Hidalgo, and Kenedy Counties, Texas...

Shoemaker, Philip W

1978-01-01

109

Soil, water, and vegetation conditions in south Texas. [Hildago County, Texas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author has identified the following significant results. To distinguish dead from live vegetation, spectrophotometrically measured infinite reflectance of dead and live corn (Zea mays L.) leaves were compared over the 0.5 to 2.5 micron waveband. Dead leaf reflectance was reached over the entire 0.5 to 2.5 micron waveband by stacking only two to three leaves. Live leaf reflectance was attained by stacking two leaves for the 0.5 to 0.75 micron waveband (chlorophyll absorption region), eight leaves for the 0.75 to 1.35 micron waveband (near infrared region), and three leaves for the 1.35 to 2.5 micron waveband (water absorption region). LANDSAT-1 MSS digital data for 11 December 1973 overpass were used to estimate the sugar cane acreage in Hidalgo County. The computer aided estimate was 22,100 acres compared with the Texas Crop and Livestock Reporting Service estimate of 20,500 acres for the 1973-'74 crop year. Although there were errors of omission from harvested fields that were identified as bare soil and some citrus and native vegetation that were mistakenly identified as sugar cane, the mapped location of sugar cane fields in the county compared favorably with their location on the thematic map generated by the computer.

Wiegand, C. L.; Gausman, H. W.; Leamer, R. W.; Richardson, A. J. (principal investigators)

1975-01-01

110

The Occurrence of Chlorothalonil, its Transformation Products, and Selected Other Pesticides in Texas and Oklahoma Streams, 2003-2004  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this study is to determine if the fungicide chlorothalonil (2,4,5,6-tetrachloro-isophthalonitrile) or three of its transformation products are transported to surface water after use on peanuts or other crops. Chlorothalonil is classified as a probable carcinogen, and the 4-hydroxy of chlorothalonil transformation product is more soluble, stable, and toxic than its parent compound. In 2003, 14 water samples were collected from three sites in Texas and two sites in Oklahoma. In 2004, six samples were collected from the two Oklahoma sites. Chlorothalonil was not detected in any sample. The 4-hydroxy of chlorothalonil transformation product was detected in three of the six samples collected in 2004, with a maximum concentration of 0.018 ?g/L; the other two transformation products were not detected in any sample. In addtion, samples were analyzed for as many as 109 other pesticides and transformation products. Atrazine was detected in 13 of the 19 samples with a maximum concentration of 0.122 ?g/L. Deethyatrazine was detected in 10 of the 19 samples with a maximum concentration of 0.04 ?g/L. Metolachlor was detected in 8 of the 19 samples with a maximum concentration of 0.019 ?g/L. Fifteen other pesticides or pesticide transformation products including 2,4-D, carbaryl, simazine, oryzalin, prometon, tebuthiuron were detected in four or fewer samples. In general, concentrations of pesticides were less than is commonly observed in Midwestern streams.

Battaglin, W. A.; Kuivila, K. M.; Winton, K. T.; Meyer, M. T.

2005-12-01

111

Development of visible/infrared/microwave agriculture classification and biomass estimation algorithms. [Guyton, Oklahoma and Dalhart, Texas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Agricultural crop classification models using two or more spectral regions (visible through microwave) are considered in an effort to estimate biomass at Guymon, Oklahoma Dalhart, Texas. Both grounds truth and aerial data were used. Results indicate that inclusion of C, L, and P band active microwave data, from look angles greater than 35 deg from nadir, with visible and infrared data improve crop discrimination and biomass estimates compared to results using only visible and infrared data. The microwave frequencies were sensitive to different biomass levels. The K and C band were sensitive to differences at low biomass levels, while P band was sensitive to differences at high biomass levels. Two indices, one using only active microwave data and the other using data from the middle and near infrared bands, were well correlated to total biomass. It is implied that inclusion of active microwave sensors with visible and infrared sensors on future satellites could aid in crop discrimination and biomass estimation.

Rosenthal, W. D.; Mcfarland, M. J.; Theis, S. W.; Jones, C. L. (principal investigtors)

1982-01-01

112

Development of visible/infrared/microwave agriculture classification and biomass estimation algorithms, volume 2. [Oklahoma and Texas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Agricultural crop classification models using two or more spectral regions (visible through microwave) were developed and tested and biomass was estimated by including microwave with visible and infrared data. The study was conducted at Guymon, Oklahoma and Dalhart, Texas utilizing aircraft multispectral data and ground truth soil moisture and biomass information. Results indicate that inclusion of C, L, and P band active microwave data from look angles greater than 35 deg from nadir with visible and infrared data improved crop discrimination and biomass estimates compared to results using only visible and infrared data. The active microwave frequencies were sensitive to different biomass levels. In addition, two indices, one using only active microwave data and the other using data from the middle and near infrared bands, were well correlated to total biomass.

Rosenthal, W. D.; Mcfarland, M. J.; Theis, S. W.; Jones, C. L. (principal investigators)

1982-01-01

113

Ground-water records for the area surrounding the Chickasaw National Recreation Area, Murray County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report is a compilation of ground-water records, water levels, and water-quality field determinations, for wells in a 132 square-mile (342 square kilometer) area surrounding the Chickasaw National Recreational Area in south-central Oklahoma. This information was collected in cooperation with the National Park Service. The location of the study area is shown on figure 1; the well locations are shown on figure 2. Data from 101 wells are summarized in this report.

Goemaat, Robert L.; Willard, Cass C.

1983-01-01

114

Desegregation in Brazos County, Texas, 1946-1971  

E-print Network

that favored integrations their influence did not speed the process. Integration in the county was effected by the burning of several schools. Ultimately, the last district in the county fully integrated in 1971, seventeen years after the Brown decision....

Hill, Scott Ogden

2012-06-07

115

Groundwater environmental tracer data collected from the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers in Montgomery County and adjacent counties, Texas, 2008  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Gulf Coast aquifer system is the primary water supply for Montgomery County in southeastern Texas, including part of the Houston metropolitan area and the cities of Magnolia, Conroe, and The Woodlands Township, Texas. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Lone Star Groundwater Conservation District, collected environmental tracer data in the Gulf Coast aquifer system, primarily in Montgomery County. Forty existing groundwater wells screened in the Gulf Coast aquifer system were selected for sampling in Montgomery County (38 wells), Waller County (1 well), and Walker County (1 well). Groundwater-quality samples, physicochemical properties, and water-level data were collected once from each of the 40 wells during March-September 2008. Groundwater-quality samples were analyzed for dissolved gases and the environmental tracers sulfur hexafluoride, chlorofluorocarbons, tritium, helium-4, and helium-3/tritium. Water samples were collected and processed onsite using methods designed to minimize changes to the water-sample chemistry or contamination from the atmosphere. Replicate samples for quality assurance and quality control were collected with each environmental sample. Well-construction information and environmental tracer data for March-September 2008 are presented.

Oden, Timothy D.

2011-01-01

116

Depositional environment and reservoir characteristics of the upper Frio sandstones, Willamar field, Willacy County, Texas  

E-print Network

DEEGSITICNAL ENVIRONMENT AND ~IR CHABACZERISIICS OF THE UPPER FRIO SANDBKNES, WILIAMAR FIEID, WILZACY COUNTY, TEXAS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial ~fillment of the reguirements for the degree of MASZER... grade fram a lower massive division to upper planar and ripple laminated divisions, with bed thic)messes that range from 0. 1 to 9. 8 ft (0. 03 to 2. 9 m) . 'Ihe ~oir sandstones aze incomplete tuzbidite sequences dominated by "A" and "B" divisions...

Caram, Hector Luis

1988-01-01

117

Engineering geologic studies of the Austin Chalk, Taylor Marl, and Quaternary alluvium Ellis County, Texas  

E-print Network

ENGINEERING GEOLOGIC STUDIES OF THE AUSTIN CHALK, TAYLOR MARL, AND QUATERNARY ALLUVIUM, ELLIS COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by JOHN GAYDEN WESTERFIELD Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fullfillment... and content by: Norma (Chair of ford ommittee) Christ pher C. Mathewson (Member) Richard L. Carlson (Member) John H. 'Spa (H ad of Department) May 1989 ABSTRACT Engineering Geologic Studies of the Austin Chalk, Taylor Marl, and Quaternary Alluvium...

Westerfield, John Gayden

2012-06-07

118

Environment of deposition of Woodbine and Eagleford sandstones, Leon, Houston, and Madison counties, Texas  

E-print Network

for the degree cf MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1983 Major Subject: Geology ENVIRONMENT OF DEPOSITION OF WOODBINE AND EAGLEFORD SANDSTONES g LEON ~ HOUSTON f AND MADISON COUNTIES TEXAS A Thesis by RICHARD MICHAEL THEISS Approved as to style and content... responsible for the deposition of these sandstones is becoming increasingly important as exploration for stratigraphic petroleum traps in the area increases. Although numerous workers have studied the Woodbine and Eagleford groups in the East Texas basin...

Theiss, Richard Michael

2012-06-07

119

Depositional environment and reservoir morphology of the Upper Wilcox sandstones, Katy gas field, Waller County, Texas  

E-print Network

of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1979 Major Subject: Geology DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT AND RESERVOIR MORPHOLOGY OF THE UPPER WILCOX SANDSTONES, KATY GAS FIELD WALLER COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by GILBERT JOHN DePAUL Approved... is predominantly shale, a Middle Massive Wilcox, equivalent to the Rockdale delta system, and Upper Wilcox sandstone and shale. The Wilcox fault zone lies about 30 miles downdip from the Sabinian shoreline in East Texas (Fisher and McGowan, 1969). Katy field...

DePaul, Gilbert John

2012-06-07

120

Educational attainment and aspirations of rural and urban Spanish-Americans in two South Texas counties  

E-print Network

". :ent for the degree of NASTER OI' SCI1:NCE 1anua, v ". 969 Nado& Subj ct. : . ocic logy EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT AND ASPIRATIONS OF RURAL Al(D URBAN SPANISH-A'IERICANS IN TNO SOU H TEXAS COUNTIES A Thesis HELEN B. SCOTT Approved as to style... is to investigate the educa- tionat attainment and aspirations of rural and urban Spani h-Ameri- cans ir. tuo South Texas counties. For purposes of this thesis project, tbe term, "Spanish-American, " refers to white Spanish- speaking people with Spanish surnames...

Scott, Helen Browne

2012-06-07

121

SUBSURFACE WELL-LOG CORRELATION OF ARSENIC-BEARING LITHOFACIES IN THE PERMIAN GARBER SANDSTONE AND WELLINGTON FORMATION, CENTRAL OKLAHOMA AQUIFER (COA), CLEVELAND COUNTY, OKLAHOMA  

EPA Science Inventory

The fluvial Garber Sandstone and the underlying Wellington Formation are important sources of drinking water in central Oklahoma. These formations, which make up much of the COA, consist of amalgamated sandstones with some interbedded mudstones, siltstones, and local mudstone- a...

122

Geology of the Middle Beaver Creek area, Mason and Gillespie Counties, Texas  

E-print Network

AREA, NASGR AEG GILhNPIR COGRTIES, TEIAB ABSTRACT The Middle Beaver Creek area is situated on the soutlwsst flank of the Llano ?plift region in Mason and Gillespie Counties, Texas Hooks of Presa?brian, Psleosoie, Mesosois, and Genosois age... ' Figure 1. ? Map of' part of Mason and Gillespie Counties, Texass showing location of' the Middle Beaver Creek Area, on aoetats oosered aerial photographs. In order to aoourateIp locate and plot the oontaots asd faults, the photographs vere studies...

Peterson, Don Hamilton

1959-01-01

123

Habitat use and population fluctuations of white-tailed deer at La Copita Research Area, Jim Wells County, Texas  

E-print Network

HABITAT USE AND POPULATION FLUCTUATIONS OF WHITE-TAILED DEER AT LA COPITA RESEARCH AREA, JIM WELLS COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by PATRICK BRENDAN WALSH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1985 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences HABITAT USE AND POPULATION FLUCTUATIONS OF WHITE-TAILED DEER AT LA COPITA RESEARCH AREA, JIM WELLS COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by PATRICK BRENDAN WALSH...

Walsh, Patrick Brendan

2012-06-07

124

A petrologic and mechanical analysis of the Lion Mountain and Welge sandstones of southern Mason County, Texas  

E-print Network

A PETROLOGIC AND MECHANICAL ANALYSIS OF THE LION MOUNTAIN AND WELGE SANDSTONES OF SOUTHERN MASON COUNTY, TEXAS By Thomas Daniel Daugherty Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agrtcultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE in Geology January, 1960 A PETROLOGIC AND MECHANICAL ANALYSIS OF THE LION MOUNTAIN AND WELGE SANDSTONES OF SOUTHERN MASON COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by Thomas Daniel Daugherty January...

Daugherty, Thomas Daniel

2012-06-07

125

Depositional environment and reservoir morphology of Guadalupian Bell Canyon sandstones, Scott field, Ward and Reeves counties, Texas  

E-print Network

DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT AND RESERVOIR MORPHOLOGY OF GUADALUPIAN BELL CANYON SANDSTONES, SCOTT FIELD. WARD AND REEVES COUNTIES, TEXAS A Thesis by GERARD PAUL KASHATUS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial... fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1986 Major Subject: Geology DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT AND RESERVOIR MORPHOLOGY OF GUADALUPIAN BELL CANYON SANDSTONES, SCOTT FIELD, WARD AND REEVES COUNTIES, TEXAS A Thesis by GERARD...

Kashatus, Gerard Paul

2012-06-07

126

Depositional environment and reservoir properties of the Upper Wilcon Group sandstones, Loma Vieja field, Zapata County, Texas  

E-print Network

DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT AND RESERVOIR PROPERTIES OF THE UPPER WILCOX GROUP SANDSTONES, LOMA VIEJA FIELD, ZAPATA COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by DOUGLAS TUIVKR COLLINS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A8tM University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1993 Major Subject: Geology DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT AND RESERVOIR PROPERTIES OF THE UPPER WILCOX GROUP SANDSTONES, LOMA VIEJA FIELD, ZAPATA COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by DOUGLAS...

Collins, Douglas Turner

2012-06-07

127

Spanish and English language usage by rural and urban Spanish-American families in two South Texas counties  

E-print Network

SPANISH AND ENGLISH LANGUAGE USAGE BY RURAL AND URBAN SPANISH-AMERICAN FAMILIES IN TWO SOUTH TEXAS COUNTIES A Thesis by Mary Eatherine Mahoney Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1967 Major Subject: Sociology SPANISH AND ENGLISH LANGUAGE USAGE BY RURAL AND URBAN SPANISH-AMERICAN FAMILIES IN TWO SOUTH TEXAS COUNTIES H Thesis by Mary Katherine Mahoney Approved as to style...

Mahoney, Mary Katherine

2012-06-07

128

Paleopedologic interpretations of soils buried by tertiary and Pleistocene-age volcanic ashes: Southcentral Kansas, Western Oklahoma, and northwestern Texas, U.S.A  

Microsoft Academic Search

Deposits of volcanic ash from major eruptions during the late Tertiary and early-to-middle Pleistocene in the western U.S. are interbedded with unconsolidated sediments in parts of Oklahoma, Kansas, and Texas. Soils and sediments at the land surface at the time of the eruptions were buried by the relatively pure (>95% glass shards) ash. The former surface soils, or paleosols, contain

Phillip A. Ward

1998-01-01

129

Digital map of hydraulic conductivity for the High Plains Aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This digital data set consists of hydraulic conductivity contours and polygons for the High Plains aquifer in the central United States. The High Plains aquifer extends from south of 32 degrees to almost 45 degrees north latitude and from 96 degrees 30 minutes to almost 104 degrees west longitude. The area covers 174,000 square miles and is present in Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Kansas, Colorado, Nebraska, Wyoming, and South Dakota.

Cederstrand, J.R.; Becker, M.F.

1998-01-01

130

The stratigraphy and structure of the Rosita gas fields, Duval County, Texas  

E-print Network

of the lower "V" sandstone, Shell Stegall 1A. xiv Figure Page 18 Principal depositional systems of' the lower Wilcox group, Texas (Fisher and McGowan, 1967). Rosita field is located six miles to the southeast of the so-called shelf edge gas...THE STRATIGRAPHY AND STRUCTURE OF THE ROSITA GAS FIELDS, DUVAL COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by JOSEPH ROBERT STRACCIA Submitted to the Graduate College of' Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of' the requirement for the degree of HAS...

Straccia, Joseph Robert

2012-06-07

131

Gravity and Magnetic Survey of Southern Oklahoma Alcugen in Texas Panhandle, Near the 2000 earthquake swarm North of Amarillo  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Texas panhandle is not a region normally thought of as being prone to seismic activity. Earthquakes with magnitudes of 3 to 4 do however occur in this region every year or so and are felt by residents in the area. There are historical reports of earthquakes of magnitude 5 during the early twentieth century. The earthquakes in this region are most likely associated with displacement on old faults related to the Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen (SOA, 600 Ma) which was deformed during the Ouachita orogeny to form the Wichita Mts. During the summer of 2000 there were an unusually large number of earthquakes for this region, five, all from the same location a few kilometers north of Amarillo Texas, 35.39 degrees north latitude and 101.81 degrees west longitude according to the NEIC catalogue. The non-seismic exploration class at Texas Tech University collected and interpreted gravity and magnetic data along a dirt road crossing the location of this earthquake "swarm" (yes in Texas 5 is a swarm) to determine if the old faults of the SOA coincide with the location of these earthquakes. The survey was conducted along a service road of the Santa Fe Railroad that crosses US 87 approximately 20 miles north of Amarillo, Texas trending in a south-southwest direction. Gravity data were collected every 100m along a 5 km profile using Warden and Lacoste gravity meters with elevation control provided by leveling survey tied to elevation markers on the map. Gravity data were colleted, using GPS elevation location and elevation, on roads over more than 20 km surrounding the local survey to provide regional control. Magnetic data were collected along the 5 km profile. Models derived from these data indicate a 200 m thick layer of poorly consolidated sediments with densities of 2.0 g/cc that can be interpreted as the Ogallala aquifer overlaying a layer with density of 2.6 g/cc. The interface between these layers is very structured and has at least three sharp ridges that we interpret as faults with as much as 50 meters of offset along this interface that could only be interpreted as offset on faults in the Wichita prior to their erosion and burial. We are planning additional work related to this project to use electrical methods (EM34 and GPR) to determine if there is offset in shallower layers that would indicate more recent seismicity. .

Manns, S.; Gurrola, H.; Robinson, R.; Horton, M.; Herrmann, M.; Seshhadri, S.; Anderson, H.; Bribiesca, E.; Lindsey, C.; Montalvo, R.; Cyrek, C.; Allen, T.; Hoemberg, J.; Hassan, A.

2005-12-01

132

Evaluation of waterflood operations at Iatan East Howard field, Mitchell County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mobil Exploration and Producing U.S. Inc. completed a reservoir description study on Iatan East Howard field in Mitchell County, Texas, in 1984. The application of study results has improved subsequent development drilling and waterflood operations. Lease production has doubled within two years with the drilling of 40 producers and 13 injection wells. The field produces from thin (2 to 40

D. P. Smith; S. M. Mitchell

1988-01-01

133

Geology and hydrocarbon production, Sweetwater field, Fisher and Nolan Counties, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Sweetwater Canyon Sand field lies along the boundary of Fisher and Nolan Counties, north of Sweetwater, Texas. The field was discovered in 1955 when oil was found in Pennsylvanian sandstone in a well testing a structural anomaly in the Lower Ordovician Ellenburger Group. More than 4 million bbl of crude oil and 750 mmcf of gas have been produced

J. L. Mergele; J. A. Breyer

1987-01-01

134

Trends in Texas youth livestock exhibition and County Extension agent perceptions and adoption of quality counts  

E-print Network

the comparison, market livestock projects have increased by 7.06% since 2000. Beef cattle and goats have increased, while sheep and swine have slightly decreased. Roughly a third of Texas counties will be utilizing the Quality Counts curriculum during the year...

Coufal, Dustin Wayne

2009-05-15

135

American Fern Society New County Records of Botrychium lunarioides in Texas  

E-print Network

American Fern Society New County Records of Botrychium lunarioides in Texas Author(s): L. H. Do, R) AA JJ FIG. 1. Gemmae of Botrychium pumicola (arrows). Spherical gemmae (class 6) attached to a plant of Botrychium pumicola (arrows). Spherical gemmae (class 6) attached to a plant (class 3) with roots and a shoot

Stevens, Jeffrey

136

Geology of the Carlos-East area, Grimes County, Texas  

E-print Network

Augustine, ' and angelica counties. . H? mapped the remainder of those strata that are J t' included in the present-day Jackson group as catahoula formation. ' . 18 Figure 3 GENESIS OF JACKSON GROUP NOMENCLATURE Penross 1890 Dumble 1892 Kennedy...

Walton, William Lawrence

2012-06-07

137

Causes of property tax delinquency in Grayson County, Texas  

E-print Network

mors eyscifi? cally adapted to this particular county? Unfavorable economic conditions& co they affect tho inczmes of taxpayers by loser yrices recsivod for fare products arA ~lier volumes of busiznss for induetrlec? sere causes fox' an incroaco...

Cunningham, James Morgan

1947-01-01

138

PEDIATRIC ENDOCRINOLOGY SOCIETY OF TEXAS, OKLAHOMA, LOUISIANA, and ARKANSAS -PESTOLA 2011  

E-print Network

Lunch 1:30 pm Growth Therapy with Glycogen Storage Disorder IX - A Pediatric Endocrine Experience Endocrine Neoplasia & Hormonal Disorders University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center #12; A Retropharyngeal Abscess Presenting with Thyroid Storm Ana Páez, MD, UTHSC San Antonio, TX 10:00 am Endocrine

139

An evaluation of the suitability of ERTS data for the purposes of petroleum exploration. [Anadarko Basin in Oklahoma and Texas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This investigation was undertaken to determine the types and amounts of information valuable to petroleum exploration that are extractable from ERTS data and to determine the cost of obtaining the information from ERTS relative to costs using traditional or conventional means. In particular, it was desirable to evaluate this new petroleum exploration tool in a geologically well-known area in order to assess its potential usefulness in an unknown area. In light of the current energy situation, it is felt that such an evaluation is important in order to best utilize technical efforts with customary exploration tools, by rapidly focusing attention on the most promising areas in order to reduce the time required to go through the exploration cycle and to maximize cost savings. The Anadarko Basin lies in western Oklahoma and the panhandle of Texas (Figure 1). It was chosen as a test site because there is a great deal of published information available on the surface and subsurface geology of the area, there are many known structures that act as traps for hydrocarbons, and it is similar to several other large epicontinental sedimentary basins.

Everett, J. R.; Petzel, G.

1974-01-01

140

An evaluation of the suitability of ERTS data for the purposes of petroleum exploration. [Anadarko Basin of Texas and Oklahoma  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This experiment was designed to determine the types and amounts of information valuable to petroleum exploration extractable from ERTS data and the cost of obtaining the information using traditional or conventional means. It was desired that an evaluation of this new petroleum exploration tool be made in a geologically well known area in order to assess its usefulness in an unknown area. The Anadarko Basin lies in western Oklahoma and the panhandle of Texas. It was chosen as a test site because there is a great deal of published information available on the surface and subsurface geology of the area, and there are many known structures that act as traps for hydrocarbons. This basin is similar to several other large epicontinental sedimentary basins. It was found that ERTS imagery is an excellent tool for reconnaissance exploration of large sedimentary basins or new exploration provinces. For the first time, small and medium size oil companies can rapidly and effectively analyze exploration provinces as a whole.

Collins, R. J.; Mccown, F. P.; Stonis, L. P.; Petzel, G.; Everett, J. R.

1974-01-01

141

Planning report for the Edwards-Trinity Regional Aquifer-System analysis in central Texas, Southeast Oklahoma, and Southwest Arkansas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Edwards-Trinity regional aquifer system supplies more than 0.78 million acre-ft/yr (700 million gal/day) of water for central Texas and small adjacent parts of southeast Oklahoma and southwest Arkansas. Current (1986) and future concerns about the aquifer system involve the ever-increasing demand for water, most of which is associated with rapid population increases. Decreases in, or elimination of, spring discharges and encroachment of water from downdip saline water zones into updip freshwater zones are of primary concern in the area underlain by the Edwards (Balcones Fault Zone) aquifer. Water level declines of several hundred ft in the Trinity aquifer are a serious concern in some metropolitan areas. The Edwards-Trinity regional aquifer-system analysis project, begun in October 1985 and scheduled to be completed by October 1991, is one of a series of similar projects being conducted nationwide. The project is intended to define the geohydrologic framework, and to describe the geochemistry and groundwater flow of the aquifer system in order to provide a better understanding of the system 's long-term water yielding potential. A multidisciplinary approach will be used in which computer-based digital simulation of flow in the system will be the principal method of geohydrologic investigation. (Author 's abstract)

Bush, P.W.

1986-01-01

142

Soil salinity detection. [Starr and Cameron Counties, Texas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author has identified the following significant results. Growth forms and herbage biomass production varied considerably among saline and nonsaline soil range sites in Starr County. Grasses on saline soil sites were shallow-rooted and short whereas on nonsaline sites there was an intermixture of short and midgrass species. Differentiation between primarily undisturbed saline and nonsaline rangelands, in Starr County, is partially possible using film optical density readings from Skylab imagery. Differentiation among eight saline and nonsaline soil sites in Cameron County, using black and white and color film was not possible according to statistical results from both DMRT and correlation analysis. Linear analysis showed that Bendix 24-band MSS data (aircraft) collected at 1700 m and 4800 m, as well as Skylab and LANDSAT-1 MSS data, were significantly correlated to electrical conductivity readings. In Starr County, the best spectral band for detection of saline soil levels, using black and white SO-022 film, was in the 0.6 to 0.7 micron spectral region. In Cameron County, the best spectral bands for detection of saline soil levels were the 2.3 to 2.43 micron, 0.72 to 0.76 micron, 0.69 to 1.75 micron, and 0.7 to 1.1 micron spectral regions.

Wiegand, C. L.; Richardson, A. J.; Gausman, H. W.; Leamer, R. W.; Gerbermann, A. H.; Everitt, J. H.; Cuellar, J. A. (principal investigators)

1975-01-01

143

Checklists for: Oklahoma 4-H Hall of Fame  

E-print Network

Checklists for: Oklahoma 4-H Hall of Fame National 4-H Youth Congress Name County Oklahoma 4-H Hall of Fame National 4-H Youth Congress Oklahoma 4-H Hall of Fame has the following requirements: Oklahoma 4-H on the front page of the Oklahoma 4-H Report Form and on the heading for Section I Member must be 16 years

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

144

Serving Tarrant County and all of North Texas  

E-print Network

death syndrome. Cao, a graduate research assistant at the University of Texas at Arlington, came up. The wireless radio-frequency module alerts a nurse or parent. About 2,500 infants die from SIDS each year on their backs. Since then the death rate has dropped, but in recent years it has remained steady, leading

Chiao, Jung-Chih

145

Earth fissures of the Red Light Bolson, Hudspeth County, Texas  

E-print Network

The Red Light Bolson lies in Trans-Pecos Texas. Two sets of earth fissures of differing age are present in the fine-grained alluvium which fills the bolson. These fissures are characterized by a continuous to discontinuous series of elongate...

Sherrier, Michael Perry

2012-06-07

146

Chromosomal homology among subspecies of Peromyscus maniculatus in Texas and Oklahoma  

E-print Network

. , The University of Texas at El Paso Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Ira F. Greenbaum Chromosomal homologies and the amount and location of heterochromatin as revealed by G- and C-banding analyses were examined f P. . 1 t s, P. . ka 1, d P. . Pall . Moo... variation documented in this study is within the range reported for P. maniculatus by other authors, and does not justify the conclusions of Caire and Zidmnerman (1975) that interrelated heterochromatic translocations and inversions are the source...

Van Fleet, Terry Bryce

1985-01-01

147

Seismic Vp & Vs tomography of Texas & Oklahoma with a focus on the Gulf Coast margin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The northwestern Gulf of Mexico passive margin contains an extensive record of continental collision and rifting, as well as deformation associated with orogenic events and heavy sedimentation. Seismic traveltime tomography that incorporates new data from 328 broadband seismic stations deployed throughout the region reveals features that correlate well with expected mantle structures, as well as features that have no obvious expression at the surface. Among the former are a large fast anomaly that corresponds to the southern extent of the Laurentia craton and a large slow anomaly associated with the Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen. Among the latter are a slow layer that we interpret to be a shear zone at the base of the cratonic and transitional continental lithosphere, a zone that is bounded at its top and bottom by discontinuities and high levels of seismic anisotropy identified in companion receiver function and shear wave splitting studies, respectively. A high velocity body underlying the Gulf Coastal Plain may mark delaminating lower crust. If this is true it could provide indirect evidence for an elevated geotherm during the rifting process that created the Gulf of Mexico.

Evanzia, Dominic; Pulliam, Jay; Ainsworth, Ryan; Gurrola, Harold; Pratt, Kevin

2014-09-01

148

Characteristics and barriers impacting the diffusion of e-extension among Texas Cooperative Extension County Extension agents  

E-print Network

The overall purpose of this study was to understand the influence of selected factors on the adoption of eXtension by Texas Cooperative Extension County Extension agents. Specifically, the study looked at how the relationships between stage...

Harder, Amy Marie

2009-05-15

149

Modeling the per capita ecological footprint for Dallas County, Texas: Examining demographic, environmental value, land-use, and spatial influences  

E-print Network

This study addresses factors driving the variation in the per capita Ecological Footprint (EF) in Dallas County, Texas. A main hypothesis was that scientifically estimated demography, environmental values, spatial attributes, and land-use patterns...

Ryu, Hyung Cheal

2005-08-29

150

Stratigraphic relationships in Woodbine-Eagleford and Sub-Clarksville sandstones, IDS field, Brazos County, Texas  

E-print Network

STRATIGRAPHIC RELATIONSHIPS IN WOODBINE-EAGLEFORD AND SUB-CLARKSVILLE SANDSTONES, IDS FIELD, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by RON LEE BROGDON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1990 Major Subject: Geology STRATIGRAPHIC RELATIONSkIIPS IN WOODBINF. -EAGLEI ORD AND SUB-CLARKSVILI. E SANDSTONES, IDS FIELD, BRAZOS COIJN"I y, 'I'LXAS A Thesis by RON LEE BROGDON Approved...

Brogdon, Ron Lee

2012-06-07

151

Distribution of Igneous Rocks in Medina and Uvalde Counties, Texas, as Inferred from Aeromagnetic Data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A high-resolution aeromagnetic survey was flown in 2001 over Medina and Uvalde Counties, Texas, as part of a multi-disciplinary investigation of the geohydrologic framework of the Edwards aquifer in south-central Texas. The objective of the survey was to assist in mapping structural features that influence aquifer recharge and ground-water flow. The survey revealed hundreds of magnetic anomalies associated with igneous rocks that had previously been unmapped. This report presents an interpretation of the outcrops and subcrops of igneous rocks, based upon procedures of matched-filtering and potential field modeling.

Smith, David V.; McDougal, Robert R.; Smith, Bruce D.; Blome, Charles D.

2008-01-01

152

Sedimentology and stratigraphy of the Queen Formation, Millard Field, Pecos County, Texas  

E-print Network

of the Permian Basin of west Texas and New Mexico. The regional structure and stratigraphy of the Permian Basin are well established; however, because published subsurface studies of the Queen Formation are rar e, specific information on depositional..., to establish a model of deposit1on, subsequent cementation, and diagenesis. The Millard Field in Pecos County, Texas produces from the queen Format1on and provides such an area to study the format1on. GEOLOGIC SETTING Structure The Permian Basin reg1on...

Williams, Matt Brian

1984-01-01

153

An Agricultural Economic Survey of Rockwall County, Texas : A Typical Blackland Cotton Farming Area.  

E-print Network

TfXAS AGRICULTURAL fXPfRIMfNT STATION AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS W. B. BIZZELL, President BULLETIN NO. 327 February, 1925 DIVISION OF FARM AND RANCH ECONOMICS AN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMIC SURVEY OF ROCKWALL COUNTY, TEXAS A.... BLUM, B. S., A ssistant Chem ist SOIL SURVEY J. El. T EAGUE, B. S., Assistant Chemist *"'W. T. CARTER, B. S., Chief of Division VELMA GRAHAM, Assistant Chemist H. W. HAWKE R, S oil Surveyor K. KITSUTA, M. S. Assistant Chem ist E. H. TEMPLIN, B. S...

Gabbard, L. P. (Letcher P.)

1925-01-01

154

Ground-water resources of Atascosa County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Atascosa County, Tex., is underlain by water-bearing sands of Tertiary age that furnish water for domestic and stock supplies throughout the county, for the public supply of all except one of the towns and cities in the county, for irrigation in several localities, for drilling oil wells in the central and southern parts of the county, for washing glass sand in the northern part of the county, and for maintaining several lakes that are used for hunting and fishing. By far the most productive formation is the Carrizo sand, but supplies of considerable magnitude are also obtained from sands in the Mount Selman and Cook Mountain. formations. The rate of withdrawal from the Carrizo sand amounted to about 15,500 acre-feet a year in 1944-45 or an average of about 13.8 million gallons a day. This was about 6,000 acre-feet a year greater in 1944-45 than it was in 1929-30. Of the total amount of water withdrawn in 1944-45 about 6,500 acre-feet a year is largely wasted from uncontrolled flowing wells. If the waste of water from wells in the Carrizo sand were stopped, the consumption of water for useful purposes could be increased about 70 percent without increasing the draft on the underground reservoir. The increase in total withdrawals from the Carrizo sand has been accompanied by a general decline in the artesian head between 1929-30 and 1944 ranging from 3 to 25 feet. On the whole, the evidence shows that the artesian reservoir is not being overdrawn and that it will sustain a somewhat greater draft.

Sundstrom, Raymond W.; Follett, C.R.

1950-01-01

155

Big Well field, Dimmit and Zavala counties, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Big Wells (San Miguel) and Big Wells (Lo East) fields, 75 miles (120 km) southwest of San Antonio, Texas, are productive from stratigraphic traps in sandstones of the San Miguel Formation (Upper Cretaceous). Ranging in producing depths from 5200 to 5800 ft (1585 to 1768 m), Big Wells (San Miguel) field covers approximately 30,500 surface acres (25,400 oil-producing and

Layden

1976-01-01

156

Contamination of wells completed in the Roubidoux aquifer by abandoned zinc and lead mines, Ottawa County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Roubidoux aquifer in Ottawa County Oklahoma is used extensively as a source of water for public supplies, commerce, industry, and rural water districts. Water in the Roubidoux aquifer in eastern Ottawa County has relatively low dissolved-solids concentrations (less than 200 mg/L) with calcium, magnesium, and bicarbonate as the major ions. The Boone Formation is stratigraphically above the Roubidoux aquifer and is the host rock for zinc and lead sulfide ores, with the richest deposits located in the vicinity of the City of Picher. Mining in what became known as the Picher mining district began in the early 1900's and continued until about 1970. The water in the abandoned zinc and lead mines contains high concentrations of calcium, magnesium, bicarbonate, sulfate, fluoride, cadmium, copper, iron, lead, manganese, nickel, and zinc. Water from the abandoned mines is a potential source of contamination to the Roubidoux aquifer and to wells completed in the Roubidoux aquifer. Water samples were collected from wells completed in the Roubidoux aquifer in the Picher mining district and from wells outside the mining district to determine if 10 public supply wells in the mining district are contaminated. The chemical analyses indicate that at least 7 of the 10 public supply wells in the Picher mining district are contaminated by mine water. Application of the Mann-Whitney test indicated that the concentrations of some chemical constituents that are indicators of mine-water contamination are different in water samples from wells in the mining area as compared to wells outside the mining area. Application of the Wilcoxon signed-rank test showed that the concentrations of some chemical constituents that are indicators of mine-water contamination were higher in current (1992-93) data than in historic (1981-83) data, except for pH, which was lower in current than in historic data. pH and sulfate, alkalinity, bicarbonate, magnesium, iron, and tritium concentrations consistently indicate that the Cardin, Commerce 1, Commerce 3, Picher 2, Picher 3, Picher 4, and Quapaw 2 wells are contaminated.

Christenson, Scott C.

1995-01-01

157

Field study and stimulation approach - Conger (PENN) Field, Sterling County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

With existing demands for oil and gas at continued higher prices, there has become a greater interest in previously uneconomical reservoirs. The Cisco Canyon Formations in Sterling County, Texas, fall into this category. In particular, the Conger (PENN) area has enjoyed rapid and continuous development since 1977. Hydraulic fracturing has been required to stimulate for commercial production. Stimulation practices have been reviewed and a more efficient approach developed to provide maximum productivity at an optimum cost.

Johnson, J.; Kamp, B.

1981-01-01

158

Helminth parasites of the western sandpiper, Calidris mauri (Aves), from El Paso and Hudspeth counties, Texas.  

PubMed

Fifty western sandpipers, Calidris mauri, from El Paso and Hudspeth counties, Texas, were collected and examined for helminth parasites. Fifty-three helminths (means abundance = 1.06, SD = 2.31) consisting of 4 cestode and 1 nematode species were collected. The helminth community showed low species richness (5), low diversity and evenness (0.05, 0.14), low concentration for dominance (0.19), and all species were contagiously distributed. There were no clearly identifiable core species. PMID:1919931

Canaris, A G; Munir, N T

1991-10-01

159

Emergency department usage by uninsured patients in Galveston County, Texas  

PubMed Central

The number of uninsured Texas residents who rely on the medical emergency department as their primary health care provider continues to increase. Unfortunately, little information about the characteristics of this group of emergency department users is available. Using an administrative billing database, we conducted a descriptive study to examine the demographic and clinical features of 17,110 consecutive patients without medical insurance who presented to the emergency department of the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston over a 12-month period. We also analyzed the risk of multiple emergency department visits or hospitalization according to demographic characteristics. Twenty percent of the study population made two or more emergency department visits during the study period; 19% of the population was admitted to the hospital via the emergency department. The risk of multiple emergency department visits was significantly elevated among African Americans and increased in a stepwise fashion according to age. The risk of being hospitalized was significantly reduced among females, African Americans, and Hispanics. There was an age-related monotonic increase in the risk of hospitalization. Abdominal pain, cellulitis, and spinal disorders were the most common primary diagnoses in patients who made multiple emergency department visits. Hospitalization occurred most frequently in patients with a primary diagnosis of chest pain, nonischemic heart disease, or an affective disorder. Additional studies of emergency department usage by uninsured patients from other regions of Texas are warranted. Such data may prove helpful in developing effective community-based alternatives to the emergency department for this growing segment of our population. Local policymakers who are responsible for the development of safety net programs throughout the state should find this information particularly useful. PMID:18628970

Paar, David; Giordano, Thomas P.; Zachariah, Brian; Rudkin, Laura L.; Wu, Z. Helen; Raimer, Ben G.

2008-01-01

160

Movements of Neotoma floridana attwateri in Brazos County, Texas  

E-print Network

::!!nimum Area Method bJ (g 6, 000 5, 000 o 4, 000 O 3, 000 r4 Co 2. 000 1, 000 / / / QgW / / / / I/ / /I / / I / r 9 O r 30 60 90 120 150 180 NO. OF TRAPP!NG DAYS 330 360 Pig. 6 ? 'zo of' indi-. idaan hone r~~~~e conpared to tho rae... . havior in breeaing red-vr nged blackbirds. The Condor. , 53' 105-U. 6. Cakes, H. and I. C. IIowery 1961 ' Soil map of upland farms and campus of A~-". I Univers'ty. Soil Conservation Service~ USDA, Texas Agricultural Experiment Station~ College...

Tate, William Henry

2012-06-07

161

An evaluation of ?Ra and ?Ra in drinking water in several counties in Texas, USA.  

PubMed

Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) or Technology Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (TENORM) can be a potential health risk. It is now well known that the underlying geology in many parts of Texas has given rise to levels of (226)Ra and (228)Ra that often exceed the limits set by the US Environmental Protection Agency. A detailed literature search was undertaken to assess the levels of (226)Ra and (228)Ra in all of the Texas counties. Several statistical evaluations of the data were performed. The Hickory aquifer in the Llano Uplift region of Texas has consistently had the highest number of (226)Ra and (228)Ra concentrations above the legal limit. As well many of the affected rural communities may not have the financial resources to rectify the problem. PMID:23490545

Landsberger, S G; George, G

2013-11-01

162

Meteorite search in the deflation basins in Lea County, New Mexico and Winkler County, Texas, USA: Discovery of Lea County 003 (H4)  

SciTech Connect

During the past few decades great numbers of meteorites have been recovered from the ice accumulation zones of Antarctica and from the vast Sahara. Although these two great deserts are the two most productive areas, the Southern High Plains in USA (New Mexico and Texas) and Nullarbor Plain, Western Australia have great potential for meteorite recovery. The number of meteorite finds from Roosevelt County, New Mexico alone exceeds 100 in only approximately 11 km{sup 2} area. Most meteorites from this area have been found on the floors of active deflation basins (blowouts) that have been excavated from a mantle of sand dunes. This area has no apparent fluvial or permafrost activity within the last 50,000 years, suggesting that only prevailing winds and natural aridity aid in the concentration and preservation of meteorites. The authors investigated these deflation surfaces in Lea County (the SE corner of New Mexico) and neighboring Winkler County, Texas following a prior search in this area which found two chondrites. They found a tiny H4 chondrite in this search and here they report its mineralogy and petrology along with preliminary data on its exposure history.

Mikouchi, T; Buchanan, P C; Zolensky, M E; Welten, K C; Hutchison, R; Hutchison, M

2000-01-14

163

Farmer Adjustments to Drouth In a Texas County.  

E-print Network

- tomiation is further supplemented with agricultural ~ulation census clata to ascertain what hap- n Mills County as a whole ancl in the study F after the drouth. *AClj :tppe;irec pattern 2 or 3 ant1 occ~ Isere a tf the next 1 . latter ve uqtments.... During 2 to 3 years of continuous drouth as optimism oeg;ln ro wane, adjustments were intensified and

Skrabanek, R. L.; Banks, Vera J.; Bowles, Gladys Kleinwort

1964-01-01

164

The facies, depositional environment, and cyclicity of the Queen Formation (Guadalupian, Permian), North Ward-Estes Field, Ward County, Texas  

E-print Network

-Estes Field, Ward County, Texas. LEA S Lrntnttten 0 S I I I P ARSON cnlreen G A~ N E S e L 1 k e k ee t ~E ttotetrrne( kS+~ l Hentrh Oeeparrctr u reerlerro Porker ruternoa C7 I r Ncornten T c rem rr rln I Snort Hille ( 1 W A R, I...THE FACIES, DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT, AND CYCLICITY OF THE QUEEN FORMATION (GUADALUPIAN, PERMIAN), NORTH WARD-ESTES FIELD, WARD COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by MICHAEL GARY EIDE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A8rM University...

Eide, Michael Gary

2012-06-07

165

An analysis of levels of living of Spanish-American rural and urban families in two South Texas counties  

E-print Network

AN ANALYSIS OF LEVELS OF LIVING OF SPANISH-AMERICAN RURAL AND URBAN FAMILIES IN TNO SOUTH TEXAS COUNTIES A Thesis By Harold M. Clemente Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May, 1963 Major Subject& Sociology AN ANALYSIS OF LEVELS OF LIVING OF SPANISH-AMERICAN RURAL AND URBAN FAMILIES IN T1&0 SOUTH TEXAS COUNTIES A Thesis Harold M. Clements Approved...

Clements, Harold McCutcheon

2012-06-07

166

Saline contamination of soil and water on Pawnee tribal trust land, eastern Payne County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Bureau of Land Management reported evidence of saline contamination of soils and water in Payne County on Pawnee tribal trust land. Representatives of the Bureau of Land Management and U.S. Geological Survey inspected the site, in September 1997, and observed dead grass, small shrubs, and large trees near some abandoned oil production wells, a tank yard, an pit, and pipelines. Soil and bedrock slumps and large dead trees were observed near a repaired pipeline on the side of the steep slope dipping toward an unnamed tributary of Eagle Creek. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Bureau of Land Management, initiated an investigation in March 1998 to examine soil conductance and water quality on 160 acres of Pawnee tribal trust land where there was evidence of saline contamination and concern about saline contamination of the Ada Group, the shallowest freshwater aquifer in the area. The proximity of high specific conductance in streams to areas containing pipeline spill, abandoned oil wells, the tank yard, and the pit indicates that surface-water quality is affected by production brines. Specific conductances measured in Eagle Creek and Eagle Creek tributary ranged from 1,187 to 10,230 microsiemens per centimeter, with the greatest specific conductance measured downgradient of a pipeline spill. Specific conductance in an unnamed tributary of Salt Creek ranged from 961 to 11,500 microsiemens per centimeter. Specific conductance in three ponds ranged from 295 to 967 microsiemens per centimeter, with the greatest specific conductance measured in a pond located downhill from the tank yard and the abandoned oil well. Specific conductance in water from two brine storage pits ranged from 9,840 to 100,000 microsiemens per centimeter, with water from the pit near a tank yard having the greater specific conductance. Bartlesville brine samples from the oil well and injection well have the greatest specific conductance, chloride concentration, and dissolved solids concentrations, and plot the furthest from meteoric water on a graph of 8 deuterium and d 18oxygen. Waterflooding of the Bartlesville sand in the study area started in 1957 and continued until 1998. Waterflooding is the process of injecting brine water under pressure to drive the remaining oil to the production wells. The high dissolved solids concentration samples from observation wells 1, 3B, 5,7, and 8 could result from mixing of the Bartlesville brine from the waterfiood with meteoric water.

Runkle, Donna L.; Abbott, Marvin M.; Lucius, Jeffrey E.

2001-01-01

167

Folk narratives, archaeology, and descendant communities: a case study of the Albert J. Phillips Memorial Cemetery (41gv125), Galveston County, Texas  

E-print Network

FOLK NARRATIVES, ARCHAEOLOGY, AND DESCENDANT COMMUNITIES: A CASE STUDY OF THE ALBERT J. PHILLIPS MEMORIAL CEMETERY (41GV125), GALVESTON COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by LEAH CARSON POWELL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A...), Galveston County, Texas A Thesis by LEAH CARSON POWELL Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS Approved as to style and content by: Katherine A. Dettwy (Chair of Committee) v W...

Powell, Leah Carson

2012-06-07

168

Reflectance of vegetation, soil, and water. [in Hidalgo County, Texas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author has identified the following significant results. A study was conducted in a 340-acre (139 hectares) field of grain sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) to determine if multispectral data from ERTS-1 could be used to detect differences in chlorophyll concentration between iron-deficient (chlorotic) and apparently normal (green) grain sorghum. Chlorotic sorghum areas 2.8 acres (1.1 hectares) or larger in size were identified on a computer printout of band 5 data which contains the chlorophyll absorption band at the 0.65 micron wavelength. ERTS resolution is sufficient for practical applications in detecting iron-deficient sorghum in otherwise uniform fields. The first classification map of the study county has been produced. Vegetation (crops), rangeland, bare soil, water, and an undefined (all other) category occupied 15.2, 45.0, 19.1, 0.02, and 20.6% of the land area, respectively.

Wiegand, C. L. (principal investigator)

1973-01-01

169

Clarksville field Red River County, Texas: Production and facies interpretation  

SciTech Connect

The Clarksville field was discovered in December in 1985 while targeting a deeper paleozoic horizon. Since production went on line in 1986, this field has produced over 1 million barrels of oil (MMBO) with the appearance of a considerably longer and more lucrative life. The producing horizon is a Jurassic-age lithic conglomerate sitting unconformably on the Paleozoic and Triassic structural front of the buried Ouachita range. Facies correlation out of the basin indicate this unit to be Louark age. Mapping and compositional analysis indicate the depositional environmental of this unit to be an arid climate alluvial fan deposited as a 'Bajada' complex. This fan system was laid down at the updip margin of the actively forming Mesozoic embayment where it meets the Ouachita structural front. The significance of this field is demonstrated by the production yield at a relatively shallow depth (5800 ft). At this time, production similar to Clarksville field has yet to be encountered anywhere along the Mesozoic rim of the East Texas basin but does represent a viable exploration trend, in addition to being a gateway for future paleozoic production in the basin.

Reed, C.H. (Tortuga Exploration, Inc., Tyler, TX (United States))

1991-03-01

170

A rural multi-county judicial district in Texas: a socio-legal analysis  

E-print Network

OF SCIENCE August 1979 Major Subject: Sociology RURAL MULTI-COUNTY JUDICIAL DISTRICT IN TEXAS: A SOCIO-LEGAL ANALYSlS A Thesis by CHARLES JOSEPH SEBESTA, JR. Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committee ead of Departmen t Member..., negotiated over 750 plea bargain agreements with over 200 different defense attorneys and appeared before 15 differ- ent district judges. The results of the study concur in part with similar studies of courts in urban areas. It was found that the rural...

Sebesta, Charles Joseph

1979-01-01

171

West Central Texas. Homework pays off for Originala in Haskell County  

SciTech Connect

Originala Petroleum Corp., Fort Worth, is finding Bend Conglomerate and Caddo oil in NW Haskell County, Texas. The most encouraging find to date is the company's No. 1 June L. White, which potentialed in Sept. 1981 for 493 bopd from perforations in the Caddo at 5638-60 ft. This discovery, along with promising Bend Conglomerate drill stem test and log shows in other wells in the region, support continued exploration efforts in this geologically complex province. The key to overcoming the exploration challenges in NW. Haskell County is to depend primarily upon seismic data to give structural control. Accurate seismic interpretation is only a part of the preparation, and is integrated with other geologic data-collecting methods such as gravity and structural mapping based solely on subsurface control.

Mickey, V.

1983-03-01

172

76 FR 23639 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00046 Declaration of Economic Injury  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12529] Oklahoma Disaster OK-00046 Declaration...EIDL) declaration for the State of Oklahoma, dated 04/19/2011. Incident...Rogers, Tulsa. Contiguous Counties: Oklahoma: Adair, Caddo, Cherokee,...

2011-04-27

173

75 FR 19667 - Oklahoma Disaster # OK-00036 Declaration of Economic Injury  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12115] Oklahoma Disaster OK-00036 Declaration...EIDL) declaration for the State of Oklahoma, dated 04/09/2010. Incident...Jefferson, Stephens. Contiguous Counties: Oklahoma Beckham, Caddo, Carter, Cotton,...

2010-04-15

174

Hydrogeologic characterization of the Hickory Sandstone Aquifer near Camp Air in northern Mason and southern McCulloch counties, Texas  

E-print Network

HYDROGEOLOGIC CHARACTERIZATION OF THE HICKORY SANDSTONE AQUIFER NEAR CAMP AIR IN NORTHERN MASON AND SOUTHERN MCCULLOCH COUNTIES, TEXAS A Thesis by CYNTHIA DAPHINE DELANEY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... Thesis by CYNTHIA DAPHINE DELANEY Approved as to style and content by: Brann Johnson (Chair of C(mmittee) Christo her C. Mathewson (Member) Kenneth L White (Member) John H. Spang (Head of Department) December 1990 ABSTRACT Hydrogeologic...

Delaney, Cynthia Daphine

1990-01-01

175

Oklahoma 4-H Alumni Association Membership Form Name Maiden Name  

E-print Network

Oklahoma 4-H Alumni Association Membership Form Name Maiden Name Home County County Residing Awards/Trips Your membership in the Oklahoma 4-H Alumni Association is an investment in the future of Oklahoma 4-H. Half of your dues will be invested in maintaining the 4-H Alumni Association and the 4-H

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

176

Use of landsat thematic mapper data to identify crop types and estimate irrigated acreage, Uvalde and Medina counties, Texas, 1991  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) data were used to estimate that about 51,000 acres of crops were irrigated with water pumped from the Edwards aquifer in Uvalde and Medina Counties, Texas in 1991. Areas calculated for irrigated crops were 31,000 acres for Uvalde County and 20,000 acres for Medina County. Quantities of water pumped from the Edwards aquifer to irrigate crops in 1991 were estimated as 65,000 acre-feet for Uvalde County and 18,000 acre-feet for Medina County. Differences in estimates of ground water used for irrigation in the two counties were attributed primarily to greater pre- cipitation in Medina County than in Uvalde County. The total number of acres of irrigated crops estimated using Landsat TM data was about 9 percent lower in Uvalde County and about 13 percent lower in Medina County than the number of acres calculated from data reported by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service (ASCS). The total quantity of water pumped from the Edwards aquifer in 1991 for irrigation in the two counties, about 83,000 acre- feet, was about 5 percent greater developed than the quantity calculated from data reported by the ASCS.

Raymond, L.H.; McFarlane, S.I.

1994-01-01

177

Visual assessments for Swisher County and Deaf Smith County locations, Palo Duro Basin, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The area of the Swisher and Deaf Smith County locations is characterized by vast open spaces with limited vertical relief and vegetative cover. The stream valleys and areas around the playa lakes provide the only significant topographical relief in either location, and the areas in range vegetation provide the only major contrast to the dominant land cover of agricultural crops. Tree stands occur almost exclusively in association with orchards, country clubs, farmsteads, and urban areas. Because of climatic conditions in the region, there are few permanent water bodies in either location. Grain elevators, farmsteads, and other cultural modifications (roads, utility lines, fence rows, etc.) are scattered throughout both locations, but they constitute a very small portion of the visible landscape. These features help provide scale in the landscape and also serve as visual landmarks.

Not Available

1984-12-01

178

An Overview of Operational Characteristics of Selected Irrigation Districts in the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley: Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan)  

E-print Network

TR-279 April 2005 An Overview of Operational Characteristics of Selected Irrigation Districts in the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley: Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan) Megan J. Stubbs M. Edward Rister... Grande Valley: Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan) Megan J. Stubbs M. Edward Rister Allen W. Sturdivant Ronald D. Lacewell Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University This research was financially...

Stubbs, Megan J.; Rister, M. Edward; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Lacewell, Ronald D.

179

The relationship between vertical teaming in science and student achievement as reported in the academic excellence indicator system (AEIS) at selected public schools in Bexar County, Texas  

E-print Network

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN VERTICAL TEAMING IN SCIENCE AND STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT AS REPORTED IN THE ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE INDICATOR SYSTEM (AEIS) AT SELECTED PUBLIC SCHOOLS IN BEXAR COUNTY, TEXAS A Dissertation by VERONICA HERNANDEZ ARTEAGA Submitted... ACHIEVEMENT AS REPORTED IN THE ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE INDICATOR SYSTEM (AEIS) AT SELECTED PUBLIC SCHOOLS IN BEXAR COUNTY, TEXAS A Dissertation by VERONICA HERNANDEZ ARTEAGA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

Arteaga, Veronica Hernandez

2008-10-10

180

Environment of deposition of Lower Wilcox "Mula" sandstones, East Washburn and Big Mule fields, La Salle and McMullen Counties, Texas  

E-print Network

ENVIRONMENT OF DEPOSITION OF LOWER WILCOX "MULA" SANDSTONES, EAST WASHBURN AND BIG MULE FIELDS, LA SALLE AND MCMULLEN COUNTIES, TEXAS A Thesis by RHONDA MARIE FOWLER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1984 Major Subject: Geology ENVIRONMENT OF DEPOSITION OF LOWER WILCOX "MULA" SANDSTONES, EAST WASHBURN AND BIG MULE FIELDS, LA SALLE AND MCMULLEN COUNTIES, TEXAS A Thesis...

Fowler, Rhonda Marie

2012-06-07

181

Texas-Oklahoma  

... important resources for farming, ranching, public drinking water, hydroelectric power, and recreation. Both originate in New Mexico and ... plume to the north of the Ouachita Mountains and east of Lake Eufaula is visible in the detailed nadir imagery. The plume is also very ...

2014-05-15

182

Soil Remediation Requirements Related to Abandoned Centralized and Commercial Drilling-Fluid Disposal Sites in Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas  

SciTech Connect

This study was a compilation and summary of information on active and inactive centralized or commercial drilling-fluid disposal sites in Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. The objective of the analysis of these sites wass to gain insight into the probable behavior of contaminants at poorly documented abandoned drilling fluid disposal sites. Available information being reported in this study includes number and acreage of pits, delivered waste volumes, and levels of selected constituents in the solid waste, in the water overlying the solids, and groundwater monitored at on-site wells. For many sites, dated constituent analyses for specific monitor wells are available for time-series mapping and graphing of variable concentrations.

Dutton, Alan R.

2002-03-20

183

Plan of study for the High Plains regional aquifer-system analysis in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Ogallala Formation and associated Tertiary and Quarternary deposits from the principal aquifers supporting irrigation in the High Plains of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. The volume of water in storage within the aquifers is declining in most of the High Plains because water is being withdrawn in excess of the rate of replenishment. The U.S. Geological Survey has initiated a 5-year study of the High Plains aquifer system to develop the geohydrologic data base and computer models of the ground-water flow system needed to evaluate the response of the aquifer system to ground-water management alternatives. This report describes the objectives, plan, and organization of the study and outlines the work to be accomplished in each State in the study area. (Woodard-USGS)

Weeks, John B.

1978-01-01

184

Studies on the population biology and host-specificity of helminth parasites of aquatic turtles from Burleson County, Texas and vicinity  

E-print Network

chelydrae Harwoocl, 11132 Falcustra concinnae K%24, 1113 Falcustra procera tt ~13 Order Spiruridea Family Camallanidae Serpinema microcephalus Cucullanus cirratus i34uller, 1777 Oklahoma Illinois South Carolina Tennessee Texas Arkansas Texas..., 1969 Fisher, 1960 * Johnson, 1969 b * Bourque, 1974 Rosen and Marquardt, 1978 * * indicates C~rrseemys ~seri ta ~ele ans as turtle host procera Harwood, 1932; ~S irox~s contortus Rudolphi, 1819). It should be noted that many of the parasite...

DiNuzzo, Anthony Robert

2012-06-07

185

Water supply and use in Deaf Smith, Swisher, and nearby counties in the Texas Panhandle  

SciTech Connect

Irrigation for agriculture is the primary water use in the area of Deaf Smith and Swisher Counties, Texas, and the Ogallala Formation is the main water source. The availability of water in the 12-county area is projected to decrease markedly over the next 5 decades because of the steady depletion of ground water in recoverable storage. Water requirements in the 12-county area are projected to exceed available supplies from about 1990 through 2030. The shortage for the year 2030 is estimated to be approximately 4 million acre-feet under high-growth-rate conditions. Because of its semiarid climate, the area has little available surface water to augment the supply of the Ogallala Formation, which, despite its depletion, could be the principal source of water for the repository. There are, however, other potential sources of water: (1) Lake Mackenzie, on Tule Creek; (2) the Santa Rosa Formation, which underlies much of the Southern High Plains and locally yields moderate amounts of good-quality water; and (3) the Wolfcamp Series, which yields low amounts of highly saline water. The effluents of municipal wastewater treatment plants and municipal water systems may also be useful as supplements to the repository's primary water supply.

Not Available

1985-02-01

186

Child and adolescent drownings in Harris County, Texas, 1983 through 1990.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES. This study described childhood drowning rates and circumstances in Harris County, a large metropolitan area in Texas, and compared case ascertainment between data sources. METHODS. Drowning rates among Harris County residents newborn through 19 years of age were calculated from death certificate data (1983 through 1989), and local childhood drowning hazards were described on the basis of medical examiner data (1983 through 1990). Cases from both sources were compared to determine sensitivity of sources. RESULTS. The drowning rate among Harris County residents newborn through 19 years of age was 3.8 per 100,000 person-years. The drowning rates among Blacks and Hispanics exceeded that of Whites by 56% and 19%, respectively. The majority of the 196 unintentional drownings occurred in swimming pools. Half of the pool drownings occurred in apartment pools and 33% in private home pools. The medical examiner logbook identified a slightly higher number of drownings than did death certificates. International Classification of Diseases external cause of death codes were of limited use in describing drowning circumstances. CONCLUSIONS. Childhood drowning hazards not previously reported were identified, specifically hazards in apartment pools and those among Hispanic children. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8154562

Warneke, C L; Cooper, S P

1994-01-01

187

Design and implementation of an ecological engineering approach to coastal restoration at Loyola Beach, Kleberg County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ecological, coastal, and civil engineering techniques were integrated to obtain a structurally sound, ecologically beneficial engineering restoration method for preserving the shoreline at Loyola Beach, Kleberg County, Texas. The erosion management strategy was based on a plan to integrate the natural landscape, riprap rock, and local fill material, along with native vegetation for beach preservation. Geotechnical parameters including soil moisture,

Kim Jones; Emile Hanna

2004-01-01

188

Depositional environment and reservoir characteristics of Middle Pennsylvanian Granite Wash, northern Palo Duro basin, Oldham County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Lambert 1, Hryhor, and Sundance fields in Oldham County, Texas, produce oil from the Middle Pennsylvanian Canyon granite wash. Canyon granite wash conglomerates and sandstones have a maximum thickness of approximately 450 ft (140 m) and were derived from granitic rocks of the Bravo dome. The sediment was transported across carbonate platforms by streams and deposited into the Oldham

A. L. Vanderhill; R. R. Berg

1987-01-01

189

The geology of the area bordering the Brazos River in southeastern Milam and northeastern Burleson counties, Texas  

E-print Network

Counties, Texas ~ ? ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 4 Pigure 2? Figure P? Figure 4, Pigure 5? Cuesta Pormed by Basal Beds of Carriso Formation, . 2 Rile Northwest of Gauss... ~ ~ ~ ~ ? ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ? ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 18 Figure 6?Rassive Cross-Bedding in Newby Sand, Creek South of' Underpass? Highway 79 ~ 20 Figure 7, Figure 8? Uppermost Beds of' Newby Rember, Locality 5? Beds Above Hammer Are Narquez inhale ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ? ~ ~ ~ ? ~ ~ 20...

Dunlap, John Bettes

1955-01-01

190

Assessment of manure phosphorus export through turfgrass sod production in Erath County, Texas.  

PubMed

A best management practice (BMP) for exporting manure phosphorus (P) in turfgrass sod from the North Bosque River (NBR) watershed in central Texas was assessed using a geographic information system (GIS). The NBR watershed has a mandate to reduce the total annual P load to the NBR by 50% as a result of total maximum daily load regulation. Since dairy waste applications to fields are identified as the major nonpoint source of P to the river, innovative BMPs, such as export of manure P in turfgrass, will be needed to achieve the 50% reduction. However, methods are needed to evaluate the feasibility of these innovative management practices prior to their implementation. A geospatial database of suitable turfgrass production sites was developed for Erath County using GIS. Erath County largely encompasses the upper portion of the NBR watershed. Information from field experiments, production practices, and ground-truthing was used to search, analyze, and verify a geospatial database developed from national and regional sources. The integration and analyses of large databases supports the search by turf producers for sites suitable for turfgrass sod production in Erath County. In addition, GIS enables researchers and regulators to estimate manure P exports and reduced P loading due to implementation of the manure export BMP on a county scale. Under optimal conditions 198,000 kg manure P yr(-1) could be used and 114,840 kg manure P yr(-1) exported from the NBR watershed through implementation of a system using dairy manure to produce turfgrass sod. This is the equivalent of the manure P applied from 10,032 dairy cows yr(-1) and exported from 5808 dairy cows yr(-1). Application of GIS to large-scale planning and decision-making transcends traditional field-scale applications in precision agriculture. PMID:15380316

Munster, C L; Hanzlik, J E; Vietor, D M; White, R H; McFarland, A

2004-11-01

191

Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook '96.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This data book presents findings of the Kids Count Project on current conditions faced by Oklahoma children age birth through 18. This second annual factbook organizes state and county data over a period of time to enable conditions for children in each county to be compared and ranked. The benchmark indicators studied include low birthweight

Ingraham, Sandy

192

Elements of high constructive deltaic sedimentation, lower Frio Formation, Brazoria County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The lower Frio Formation in eastern Brazoria County, upper Texas Gulf Coast, was deposited in a high constructive deltaic environment in the Houston delta system. Constructive elements of the stacked, elongate to lobate deltas that were intersected in core are storm induced delta front splays, delta front slump deposits, and distributary mouth bar, distributary channel and delta plain assemblages. Reworked and winnowed abandonment facies that are volumetrically insignificant relative to constructive elements are subdivided into a crossbedded shoreface-foreshore subfacies and a fine grained cyclic sequence of storm deposits on the lower shoreface that represent a distal abandonment subfacies. Micropaleontological evidence indicates that deposition of constructive and abandonment facies took place in water depths of less than 120 feet.

Tyler, N.; Han, J.H.

1982-01-01

193

Digital map of changes in water levels from predevelopment to 1980 for the High Plains Aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report contains digital data and accompanying documentation for contours of predevelopment to 1980 water-level elevation changes for the High Plains aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. This digital data set was created by digitizing the contours for predevelopment to 1980 water-level elevation change from a 1:1,000,000-scale base map created by the U.S. Geological Survey High Plains Regional Aquifer-System Analysis (RASA) project (Gutentag, E.D., Heimes, F.J., Krothe, N.C., Luckey, R.R., and Weeks, J.B., 1984, Geohydrology of the High Plains aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1400-B, 63 p.) The data are not intended for use at scales larger than 1:1,000,000.

Cederstrand, Joel R.; Becker, Mark F.

1999-01-01

194

Slice-mapping: Reservoir characterization technique - West Yucca Butte Field, Pecos County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The West Yucca Butte field, located in Pecos County, Texas, is a structural-stratigraphic field that lies within the geologic province known as the Sheffield Channel-Val Verde basin area of west Texas. It is one of several producing fields situated in an en echelon pattern along several major northwest-southeast-trending fault systems. These fields are anticlinal features producing gas, condensate, and high-gravity oils from Lower Ordovician dolomites and sandstones, Devonian cherts and cherty limestones, and Pennsylvanian-Permian limestones. Production in the West Yucca Butte field is from the Lower Ordovician Ellenburger Group and the Pennsylvanian Strawn, Canyon, and Cisco Groups. In general, wells located highest on the structure, with adequate porosity, are the better wells. Production is also obtained from downdip wells where reservoirs stratigraphically pinch out along the flanks of the structure. However, in all reservoirs, internal stratigraphic heterogeneities significantly complicated development strategies. The Pennsylvanian reservoirs are very heterogeneous. The carbonates have undergone considerable diagenesis, resulting in the occlusion of primary porosities. Secondary spicular-moldic and microvuggy brecciated porosities are the principal porosity types. Petrographic studies were useful in describing the physical properties of this massive carbonate section and the depositional and diagenetic implications; however, little was known about the distribution and quality of the reservoirs.

Casavant, R.R.

1988-01-01

195

Site study plan for Transportation, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Preliminary draft  

SciTech Connect

This site study plan describes transportation field studies to be conducted during the characterization of the Deaf Smith County, Texas, site for the US Department of Energy's Salt Repository Project. The studies are needed to identify and assess potential project impacts to transportation infrastructure and systems in the project vicinity and along potential transportation routes to the site across the State of Texas. The studies are also needed to locate and design project transportation facilities, and to evaluate and design impact mitigation. After identifying the transportation information requirements needed to comply with Federal, State, and local regulations and repository program requirements, the site study plan describes the study design and rationale, the field data collection procedures and equipment, the data analysis methods and application of results, the data management strategy, the schedule of field activities, the management of the study, and the study's quality assurance program. The field data collection activities are organized into programs for the characterization of site vicinity rail corridors and highway corridors, characterization of alternative statewide transportation routes, monitoring of site characterization effects on transportation, characterization of aircraft overflight patterns and hazardous material transportation patterns, and assessment of emergency response preparedness along alternative statewide transportation routes. 34 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Not Available

1987-06-01

196

Construction, Startup and Operation of a New LLRW Disposal Facility in Andrews County, Texas - 12151  

SciTech Connect

During this last year, Waste Control Specialists LLC (WCS) completed construction and achieved start of operations of a new low level radioactive waste (LLRW) disposal facility in Andrews County Texas. Disposal operations are underway for commercial LLRW, and start up evolutions are in progress for disposal of Department of Energy (DOE) LLRW. The overall approach to construction and start up are presented as well as some of the more significant challenges and how they were addressed to achieve initial operations of the first new commercial low level radioactive waste disposal facility in more than 30 years. The WCS disposal facility consists of two LLRW disposal cells, one for Texas Compact waste, and a separate disposal cell for DOE waste. Both disposal cells have very robust and unique designs. The cells themselves are constructed entirely in very low permeability red bed clay. The cell liners include a 0.91 meter thick clay liner meeting unprecedented permeability limits, 0.3 meter thick reinforced concrete barriers, as well as the standard geo-synthetic liners. Actions taken to meet performance criteria and install these liners will be discussed. Consistent with this highly protective landfill design, WCS chose to install a zero discharge site water management system. The considerations behind the design and construction of this system will be presented. Other activities essential to successful start of LLRW disposal operations included process and procedure development and refinement, staffing and staff development, and training. Mock ups were built and used for important evolutions and functions. Consistent with the extensive regulation of LLRW operations, engagement with the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) was continuous and highly interactive. This included daily activity conference calls, weekly coordination calls and numerous topical conference calls and meetings. TCEQ staff and consultants frequently observed specific construction evolutions, such as geological feature mapping of designated excavation faces, disposal cell clay liner installation, disposal cell concrete barrier construction, etc. (author)

Van Vliet, James A. [Waste Control Specialists LLC, Andrews County, Texas (United States)

2012-07-01

197

Characteristics of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems of two locations in Deaf Smith and Swisher Counties, Texas  

SciTech Connect

According to the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program and the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (P.L. 97-425), a potential nuclear waste repository site must be chosen with consideration of potential impacts on terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. This report is a preliminary environmental characterization of two locations in the Texas Panhandle, one in Deaf Smith County and the other in Swisher County, that have been recommended for further study. A description of important natural areas is offered as a basis for comparative studies of the two locations and for the identification and screening of potential repository sites. Information on current land uses, potential habitats, and expected plant and wildlife species is provided to assist field investigators in the collection of baseline data in support of further siting activities. The results of limited field surveys are also included. The report is in two parts. Part I contains a characterization of terrestrial ecological resources based upon limited field surveys aimed at verifying the presence of plant communities and wildlife habitats. It also presents inventories of species with special status, species with recreational and economic importance, and species of ecological value to important or special-status species. Part II presents information on aquatic ecosystems and resources derived primarily from a review of the literature, interviews, and limited field surveys. 21 figures, 18 tables.

Not Available

1984-11-01

198

Hydrogeologic aspects of the Knippa Gap area in eastern Uvalde and western Medina counties, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Edwards aquifer is the primary source of potable water for the San Antonio area in south-central Texas. The Knippa Gap area is a structural low (trough) postulated to channel or restrict flow in the Edwards aquifer in eastern Uvalde and western Medina Counties, Tex. To better understand the function of the Knippa Gap, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, developed the first detailed surficial geologic map of the Knippa Gap area with data and information obtained from previous investigations and field observations. A simplified version of the detailed geologic map depicting the hydrologic units, faulting, and structural dips of the Knippa Gap area is provided in this fact sheet. The map shows that groundwater flow in the Edwards aquifer is influenced by the Balcones Fault Zone, a structurally complex area of the aquifer that contains relay ramps that have formed in extensional fault systems and allowed for deformational changes along fault blocks. Faulting in southeast Uvalde and southwest Medina Counties has produced relay-ramp structures that dip downgradient to the structural low (trough) of the Knippa Gap.

Lambert, Rebecca B.; Clark, Allan K.; Pedraza, Diana E.; Morris, Robert R.

2014-01-01

199

Environment of deposition and fluid pressure distribution of downdip Lower Wilcox sandstones, Provident City Field, Lavaca County, Texas  

E-print Network

ENVIRONMENT OF DEPOSITION AND FLUID PRESSURE DISTRIBUTION OF DOWNDIP LOWER WILCOX SANDSTONES, PROVI DENT CITY FI ELD g LAVACA COUNTY g TEXAS A Thesis by STEVEN WAYNE VEST Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A & M University... paleontologic study indicates that the deeper, Lower Wilcox section was deposited in a middle- to upper-bathyal environment. A growth fault, having approximately 1000 ft (3048 m) of throw at a depth of 12, 300 ft (3750 m), bounds the field to the northwest...

Vest, Steven Wayne

1989-01-01

200

Depositional environment of Woodbine and Eagleford sandstones at OSR-Halliday field, Leon and Madison counties, Texas  

E-print Network

D POSITIONAL ENYIRONMENT OF VOODBINE AmD EAGLEFORD SANDSTONES AT OSR-HALLIDAY FIFI. D, LEON AND MADISON COUNTIES TEXAS A Th sis by CHARI ES TvOMAS BUKONSKI~ -R Submitted to the Graduate Col]ege of Terse AVA University in partial fulfi...''ment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1984 Ma or Subfect: Geology DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONNENT O'F WOODBINE AND EAGLEFORD SANDSTON1ES AT OSR-HALLIDAY FIELD, LEON AND MADISON CODNTIES, TEXAS A Thesis by CHARLES THONAS BUKOVSKI JR Approved...

Bukowski, Charles Thomas

2012-06-07

201

Altitude and configuration of the 1980 water table in the High Plains regional aquifer, northwestern Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During 1978, the U.S. Geological Survey began a 5-year study of the High Plains regional aquifer system to provide hydrologic information for evaluation of the effects of long-term development of the aquifer and to develop computer models for prediction of aquifer response to alternative changes in ground-water management (Weeks, 1978). This report is one of a series presenting hydrologic information of the High Plains aquifer in Oklahoma. The altitude and configuration of the water table are shown for the eastern area, consisting of Harper, Ellis, Woodward, Dewey, and Roger Mills Counties (sheet 1), and for the Panhandle area, consisting of Cimarron, Texas, and Beaver Counties (sheet 2). Water levels were measured in January, February, and March 1980 by the Oklahoma Water Resources Board.

Havens, John S.

1982-01-01

202

76 FR 13271 - DeQueen and Eastern Railroad, LLC-Corporate Family Transaction Exemption-Texas, Oklahoma...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Railroad, LLC--Corporate Family Transaction Exemption--Texas...transaction within a corporate family. DQ&E seeks to lease and...Tennessee Southern Railroad Company (TSRR).\\1\\ The transaction...transaction within a corporate family of the type exempted from...

2011-03-10

203

77 FR 18891 - Expediting Review of Pipeline Projects From Cushing, Oklahoma, to Port Arthur, Texas, and Other...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...sources--places like the Eagle Ford Shale in South Texas, where production grew by more than 200 percent last year, or the Bakken formation of North Dakota and Montana, where output has increased tenfold in the last 5 years alone. In States like...

2012-03-28

204

An evaluation of extension specialist newsletters as a means of disseminating information to the county extension agents of Texas  

E-print Network

. NEWSLETTERS AS A SOURCE GF MATERIAL FGR NENSPAPER COLUMNS THE IMPORTANCE OF SPECIALIST NEWSLETTERS IN PREPARATION OF COUNTI EXTENSION AGENTS' RADIO PROGRAMS The author believes that specialist nevslettsrs have a great in- fluence on changes made... in agricultural axd home economic practices in Texas. This belief is based on the number of agents currently con ducting radio programs and the uss made of the specialist newsletters in preparing these programs. The chart belov points out, the wide use...

Brown, Reagan V

2012-06-07

205

AN UNUSUAL MIDDLE PERMIAN FLORA FROM THE BLAINE FORMATION (PEASE RIVER GROUP: LEONARDIAN-GUADALUPIAN SERIES) OF KING COUNTY, WEST TEXAS  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACTA new Middle Permian plant assemblage from South Ash Pasture in King County, Texas, may be the youngest and is certainly the most unusual flora known,from the Permian of either West Texas or adjoining north-central Texas. Found serendipitously in the evaporite-rich upper Blaine Formation (Pease River Group, Guadalupian Series), the flora is of very low diversity despite intensive collecting efforts,

WILLIAM A. DiMICHELE; ROBERT W. HOOK; W. JOHN NELSON; DAN S. CHANEY

2004-01-01

206

Late diagenetic indicators of buried oil and gas: II, Direct detection experiment at Cement and Garza oil fields, Oklahoma and Texas, using enhanced LANDSAT I and II images  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Cement oil field, Oklahoma, was a test site for an experiment designed to evaluate LANDSAT's capability to detect an alteration zone in surface rocks caused by hydrocarbon microseepage. Loss of iron and impregnation of sandstone by carbonate cements and replacement of gypsum by calcite are the major alteration phenomena at Cement. The bedrock alterations are partially masked by unaltered overlying beds, thick soils, and dense natural and cultivated vegetation. Interpreters biased by detailed ground truth were able to map the alteration zone subjectively using a magnified, filtered, and sinusoidally stretched LANDSAT composite image; other interpreters, unbiased by ground truth data, could not duplicate that interpretation. Similar techniques were applied at a secondary test site (Garza oil field, Texas), where similar alterations in surface rocks occur. Enhanced LANDSAT images resolved the alteration zone to a biased interpreter and some individual altered outcrops could be mapped using higher resolution SKYLAB color and conventional black and white aerial photographs suggesting repeat experiments with LANDSAT C and D.

Donovan, Terrence J.; Termain, Patricia A.; Henry, Mitchell E.

1979-01-01

207

Prevalence of antibodies to spotted fever group Rickettsia spp. and Ehrlichia spp. in coyotes (Canis latrans) in Oklahoma and Texas, USA.  

PubMed

Coyotes (Canis latrans) are commonly infested with ticks, including Amblyomma americanum, the predominant vector of Ehrlichia chaffeensis and Ehrlichia ewingii; Dermacentor variabilis, an important vector of Rickettsia rickettsii; and Amblyomma maculatum, a major vector of Rickettsia parkeri, a spotted fever group (SFG) Rickettsia. To determine the degree to which coyotes are infected with or exposed to tick-borne bacterial disease agents, serum samples collected from coyotes in Oklahoma and Texas were tested for antibodies reactive to R. rickettsii, Ehrlichia canis, E. chaffeensis, E. ewingii, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Anaplasma phagocytophilum by indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) testing or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Of the coyotes tested, 60% (46/77) and 64% (47/74) had antibodies reactive to R. rickettsii and E. chaffeensis, respectively, on IFA. Additionally, 5% (4/77) had antibodies reactive to E. canis, but not B. burgdorferi or A. phagocytophilum, on SNAP() 4Dx() ELISA; subsequent serologic analysis by plate ELISA using species-specific peptides revealed antibodies to E. ewingii, E. canis, and E. chaffeensis in 46% (23/50), 18% (9/50), and 4% (2/50) of serum samples, respectively. Taken together, these data indicate that coyotes in this region are commonly exposed to SFG Rickettsia and E. ewingii and that further consideration of coyotes as a component of the maintenance cycle for these pathogens may be warranted. PMID:23778619

Starkey, Lindsay A; West, Misti D; Barrett, Anne W; Saucier, Jill M; O'Connor, Tom P; Paras, Kelsey L; Reiskind, Michael H; Reichard, Mason V; Little, Susan E

2013-07-01

208

Digital map of aquifer boundary for the High Plains aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This digital data set represents the extent of the High Plains aquifer in the central United States. The extent of the High Plains aquifer covers 174,000 square miles in eight states: Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. This data set represents a compilation of information from digital and paper sources and personal communication. This boundary is an update to the boundary published in U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1400-B, and this report supersedes Open-File Report 99-267. The purpose of this data set is to refine and update the extent of the High Plains aquifer based on currently available information. This data set represents a compilation of arcs from a variety of sources and scales that represent the 174,000 square-mile extent of the High Plains aquifer within the eight states. Where updated information was not available, the original boundary extent defined by OFR 99-267 was retained. The citations for the sources in each State are listed in the 00README.txt file. The boundary also contains internal polygons, or 'islands', that represent the areas within the aquifer boundary where the aquifer is not present due to erosion or non-deposition. The datasets that pertain to this report can be found on the U.S. Geological Survey's NSDI (National Spatial Data Infrastructure) Node, the links are provided on the sidebar.

Qi, Sharon

2010-01-01

209

Aquifer Tests and Characterization of Transmissivity, Ada-Vamoosa Aquifer on the Osage Reservation, Osage County, Oklahoma, 2006  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Ada-Vamoosa aquifer of northeastern Oklahoma is a sedimentary bedrock aquifer of Pennsylvanian age that crops out over 800 square miles of the Osage Reservation. The Osage Nation needed additional information regarding the production potential of the aquifer to aid them in future development planning. To address this need, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Osage Nation, conducted a study of aquifer properties in the Ada-Vamoosa aquifer. This report presents the results of the aquifer tests from 20 wells in the Ada-Vamoosa aquifer and one well in a minor aquifer east of the Ada-Vamoosa outcrop on the Osage Reservation. Well information for 17 of the 21 wells in this report was obtained from the Indian Health Service. Data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey during this investigation are pumping well data from four domestic wells collected during the summer of 2006. Transmissivity values were calculated from well pumping data or were estimated from specific capacity values depending on the reliability of the data. The estimated transmissivity values are 1.1 to 4.3 times greater than the calculated transmissivity values. The calculated and estimated transmissivity values range from 5 to 1,000 feet squared per day.

Abbott, Marvin M.; DeHay, Kelli

2008-01-01

210

40 CFR 81.53 - Southern Louisiana-Southeast Texas Interstate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...West Baton Rouge Parish, West Feliciana Parish. In the State of Texas: Angelina County, Hardin County, Houston County, Jasper County, Jefferson County, Nacogdoches County, Newton County, Orange County, Polk County, Sabine County, San...

2012-07-01

211

OUTCROP-BASED HIGH RESOLUTION GAMMA-RAY CHARACTERIZATION OF ARSENIC-BEARING LITHOFACIES IN THE PERMIAN GARBER SANDSTONE AND WELLINGTON FORMATION, CENTRAL OKLAHOMA AQUIFER (COA). CLEVELAND COUNTY, OKLAHOMA  

EPA Science Inventory

The COA supplies drinking water to a number of municipalities in central Oklahoma. Two major stratigraphic units in the COA, the Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formation, contain naturally occurring arsenic that exceeds government mandated drinking-water standards (EPA, 2001). ...

212

The establishment, growth, and forage production of five grass species during their first growing season on an upland postoak site in Brazos County, Texas  

E-print Network

THE ESTABLISHNENT, GROWTH, AND FORAGE PRODUCTION OF FIVE GRASS SPECIES DURING THEIR FIRST GROWING SEASON ON AN UPLAND POSTOAK SITE IN BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis By WILLIE LEROY ADCOCK Approved as to style and content by: a man o o ee ea o... Depar men Nay 1954 LIBRARY A 4 M COLLEGE OF TEXAE THE ESTABLISHMENT, GROWTH, AND FORAGE PRODUCTION OF FIVE GRASS SPECIES DURING THEIR FIRST GROWING SEASON ON AN UPLAND POSTOAK SITE IN BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis By WILLIE LEROY ADCOCK...

Adcock, Willie Leroy

2012-06-07

213

Environment of deposition and reservoir facies of the Taylor "B" Sandstone, Cotton Valley group (Upper Jurassic), Kildare Field, Cass County, Texas  

E-print Network

ENVIRONMENT OF DEPOSITION AND RESERVOIR FACIES OF THE TAYLOR "8" SANDSTONE, COTTON VALLEY GROUP (UPPER JURASSIC), KILDARE FIELD, CASS COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by CYNTHIA ENGLAND SLACK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AIIM University... COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by -CYNTHIA ENGLAND BLACK Approved as to styIe and content by: o ert R. Berg (Chairman of Committ e) omas I. ie (I'iember) urray Hi&nord (tiemb r ) bee . Stan'ton ( ead of Department) Nay 1983 ABSTRACT Environment...

Black, Cynthia England

1983-01-01

214

Draft environmental assessment: Swisher County site, Texas. Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 112). [Contains Glossary  

SciTech Connect

In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Swisher County, Texas, as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The potentially acceptable site was subsequently narrowed to an area of 9 square miles. To determine their suitability, the Swisher site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations are reported in this draft environmental assessment (EA), which is being issued for public review and comment. The DOE findings and determinations that are based on these evaluations are preliminary and subject to public review and comment. A final EA will be prepared after considering the comments received. On the basis of the evaluations contained in this draft EA, the DOE has found that the Swisher site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The site is contained in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. This setting contains one other potentially acceptable site - the Deaf Smith site. Although the Swisher site appears to be suitable for site characterization, the DOE has concluded that the Deaf Smith site is the preferred site in the Permian Basin and is proposing to nominate the Deaf Smith site rather than the Swisher site as one of the five sites suitable for characterization.

Not Available

1984-12-01

215

Combined geological and surface geochemical methods discover King Sand production, Concho County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

From December, 1987 to September, 1990, 16 prospects within the current confines of the Lower King (Upper Pennsylvanian Cisco age) Sand Play in Concho County, Texas, were tested by several operators on locations found by various combinations of subsurface geology, reconnaissance surface radiometrics, and soil gas hydrocarbon leads A 37.5% exploratory success rate has resulted in six new field discoveries or extensions with a total exploration and development cost of less than $0.50 per barrel of proven oil reserves. The average recoverable reserves per new field discovery are estimated to be 2.6 Mbbl of oil, and the average recoverable reserves per well are estimated to be 285,000 bbl at a depth of 2200 ft. Five of the six new field discoveries were based primarily on surface geochemical data. The sixth discovery, a southeast extension to the Lonesome Dove II field, was found on the basis of subsurface geology. The Agaritta field is one of the two largest of the new field discoveries with estimated proven (producing and undeveloped) recoverable reserves of 6 Mbbl of oil as of September, 1990. Its discovery was based on a combination of (1) detailed interstitial soil gas hydrocarbon data, (2) soil magnetic susceptibility measurements, and (3) surface potassium and uranium concentrations measured by gamma-ray spectrometry applied over two leads based on reconnaissance radiometrics. What initially appeared to be two separate prospects spaced over 7000 ft apart has since developed into one large field.

Thompson, C.K; Burson, K.R.; Saunders, D.F. (Recon Exploration, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)); Brown, J.J. (Indigo Oil, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States))

1991-03-01

216

Perriwinkle and Perriwinkle North fields, Martin County, Texas: A Cisco-Canyon lowstand reef complex  

SciTech Connect

During the middle-early through early-middle deposition of sediments in Canyon field, a series of glacio-eustatically controlled sea level lowstands resulted in carbonate buildups seaward of the Horseshoe Atoll in Martin County, Texas. The resulting reef tracts consist of algal-bryozoan boundstones, clean forereef talus conglomerates, and other high-energy shelf carbonates. The reef complex was chemically eroded into a tower karst terrain during subsequent sea level lowstands and associated subaerial exposure. The highly sculptured paleotopography was mechanically eroded during the onset of a sea level highstand, filling lows with locally derived conglomerates. In addition, highstand basinal foreshelf conglomerates from the atoll were deposited. These conglomerates contain at least one reservoir-size upper Strawn high-energy shelf allochthon. A transgressive-regressive shelf margin reef tract was deposited seaward of the now exhumed Canyon paleokarst surface during a lowstand that occurred early in Cisco deposition. The tract consists of an algal-bryozoan boundstone, associated forereef talus conglomerates, immediate backreef grainstones and packstones, and erosional foreshelf detritus. Although subaerially exposed, the Cisco reef tract is not as highly solutioned as the Canyon tract, resulting in a lower relief paleotopographic surface. During subsequent sea level highstands, both the Cisco and Canyon reef tracts were buried under lower Cisco basinal foreshelf conglomeraters, masking the stratigraphic intricacies of the paleobathymetric surface and obscuring the relationship of time correlative reservoirs within the shelf-edge complex.

Mozynski, D.C.; Reid, A.M. (Deminex U.S. Oil Co., Dallas, TX (United States))

1992-04-01

217

Combined geological and surface geochemical methods discovered Agaritta and Brady Creek Fields, Concho County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

From December 1987 to March 1991, 25 prospects in the lower King sand (Upper Pennsylvanian Cisco) play in Concho County, Texas, were tested by several operators. They used combinations of subsurface geology, reconnaissance airborne gas sensing, surface radiometrics, soil magnetic susceptibility, and soil-gas hydrocarbon measurements to define prospects. Six new King sand discoveries or extensions and three deeper Goen discoveries resulted in a 36% exploratory success rate. The total exploration and development cost was approximately $0.67/bbl of proven producing oil reserves. Final locations for the discovery wells on each of the nine successful prospects were selected primarily on the basis of combined subsurface geology and surface geochemical data. As examples, we present information about the discovery of Brady Creek and Agaritta fields. Agaritta field is one of the two largest of the new-field discoveries, with estimated proven producing recoverable reserves of 6 million bbl of oil. Its discovery was based on a combination of (1) regional subsurface geologic projection, (2) airborne hydrocarbon sensing, (3) interstitial soil-gas hydrocarbon data, (4) soil magnetic-susceptibility measurements, and (5) surface potassium and uranium concentrations measured by gamma-ray spectrometry.

Saunders, D.F.; Burson, K.R.; Thompson, C.K. (Recon Explorations Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)); Brown, J.J. (Indigo Oil, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States))

1993-07-01

218

Combined geological and surface geochemical methods discover Agaritta and Brady Creek fields, Concho County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

From December 1987 to March 1991, 25 prospects in the lower King Sandstone (Upper Pennsylvanian Cisco) play in Concho County, Texas, were tested by several operators. They used combinations of subsurface geology, reconnaissance airborne gas sensing, surface radiometrics, soil magnetic susceptibility, and soil gas hydrocarbon measurements to define prospects. Six new King Sandstone field discoveries or extensions and three deeper pay Goen Limestone field discoveries resulted in a 36% exploratory success rate. The total exploration and development cost was approximately $0.67 per bbl of proven producing oil reserves. As examples, the authors present the discovery of Brady Creek and Agaritta fields. Agaritta field is one of the two largest of the new field discoveries with estimated proven producing recoverable reserves of 6,000,000 BO. Its discovery was based on a combination of (1) airborne hydrocarbon sensing, (2) interstitial soil gas hydrocarbon data, (3) soil magnetic susceptibility measurements, and (4) surface potassium and uranium concentrations measured by gamma-ray spectrometry. Interstitial soil gas hydrocarbon anomalies combined with soil magnetic susceptibility anomalies provided the best detailed surface guidance to Agaritta field. These were supported locally by radiometric anomalies. The Brady Creek field is interpreted to be a possible crevasse splay deposit. The Aggaritta field is interpreted to be a point bar deposit. Both fields are stratigraphic traps.

Saunders, D.F.; Burson, K.R.; Thompson, C.K. (Recon Exploration, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)); Brown, J.J. (Indigo Oil, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States))

1992-04-01

219

Depositional environments of Pennsylvanian Upper Strawn Group in McCulloch and San Saba Counties, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Upper Strawn Group (Desmoinesean) represents a transition to fluvial facies from progradational deltaic facies. The lower part of the upper Strawn is composed mostly of horizontally bedded, fine-grained sandstones and shales of a distal delta-front origin. These sandstones and shales exhibit foreset bed dips of up to 15/sup 0/. In addition to the dipping foreset beds, the delta-front facies on occasion contain small listric normal faults, resulting from periodic higher rates of sedimentation. The middle parts of the upper Strawn consist predominantly of massive, fine to medium-grained, mature sandstones which represent distributary-mouth-bar deposits, as well as other proximal delta-front deposits such as distributary channels. The upper part of the upper Strawn consists of fluvial trough cross-bedded sandstones and chert-pebble conglomerates. These overlie the deltaic facies and indicate the final stages of upper Strawn deposition. The upper Strawn is overlain by the Adams Branch limestone and shales which represent marine transgression and subsequent shallow-marine deposition. The upper Strawn Group in McCulloch and San Saba Counties, Texas, represents continued filling of the Fort Worth basin during Desmoinesean time. The upper Strawn overlies the lower Strawn, an older, deeper water facies, in most parts of the study area. The upper Strawn overlies the Atokan age Marble Falls Limestone in an isolated section of the study area due to its position there on the Concho arch.

Jamieson, W.H. Jr.

1983-03-01

220

The role of diagenetic studies in flow-unit modeling: San Andres formation, Yoakum County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Permian San Andres Formation represents one of the most prolific hydrocarbon-producing intervals of the Permian basin. Dolostone lithofacies intercalated with thin evaporites accommodate highly compartmentalized reservoirs resulting from complex depositional and diagenetic histories. This compartmentalization often facilitates the use of these reservoirs in flow-unit studies. Perhaps more important than the relationship of productive intervals to depositional facies is the degree to which diagenetic processes have influenced reservoir properties. Detailed petrographic evaluation of the reservoir in question, though often overlooked, should be an integral part of flow-unit studies. Once a diagenetic sequence is established, the information may be incorporated in to the facies model to better understand how to subdivide the reservoir. Such an investigation has been conducted on the San Andres Formation in Reeves field of southeastern Yoakum County, Texas. Here, multistage diagenetic overprints are superimposed on depositional facies that vary in degree of lateral extent, thereby complicating the geometries of individual productive zones within the reservoir. Analysis of the reservoir reveals that Reeves San Andres sediments were subjected to dominant diagenetic processes, including dolomitization and sulfate implacement, both of which are major factors in porosity preservation, and a variety of minor processes that have had little effect on reservoir quality. The recognition of diagenetic facies, and understanding of the processes that have created them, and identification of the implications of these processes on reservoir properties is a vital part of any flow-unit study.

Henderson, S. (Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States))

1994-03-01

221

Summer sound-level characterization of the Deaf Smith County and Swisher County locations in the Palo Duro Basin, Texas  

SciTech Connect

A description of sound levels and sound sources in the Deaf Smith County and Swisher County locations in the Palo Duro Basin during a period representative of the summer season is presented. Included are data collected during the period August 4 through 8, 1982, for both locations. 3 references, 2 figures, 3 tables.

Not Available

1984-03-01

222

Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Coverage Among Females Aged 11 to 17 in Texas Counties: An Application of Multilevel, Small Area Estimation  

PubMed Central

Background Local data are often used to plan and evaluate public health interventions and policy. With increasingly fewer public resources to collect sufficient data to support direct estimation of local outcomes, methods for deriving small area estimates are vital. The purpose of this study is to describe the county-level geographic distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine coverage among adolescent females in Texas using multilevel small area estimation. Methods Multilevel (individual, county, public health region) random-intercept logit models were fit to HPV vaccination data (?1 dose Gardasil) from the 2008 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Using the parameter estimates from the final model, we simulated 10,000 data sets for each regression coefficient from the normal distribution and applied them to the logit model to estimate HPV vaccine coverage in each county. Results County-level coverage estimates ranged from 7% to 29%, compared with the state average of 18% (95% confidence interval [CI], 13.5921.88). Many Southwestern border and metropolitan counties exhibited high coverage estimates. Low coverage estimates were noted in the Panhandle, Southeastern border region, and Northeast. Significant correlations were observed between HPV vaccination and Hispanic ethnicity, county poverty, and public health region poverty. Conclusion Harnessing the flexibility of multilevel small area models to estimate HPV vaccine coverage at the county level, we have provided data that may inform the development of health education programs/policies, the provision of health services, and the planning of new research studies. Additionally, we have provided a framework for modeling other health outcomes at the county level using national survey data. PMID:23481692

Eberth, Jan M.; Hossain, Md Monir; Tiro, Jasmin A.; Zhang, Xingyou; Holt, James B.; Vernon, Sally W.

2013-01-01

223

Oklahoma Today  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Published since the 1950s, Oklahoma Today is a production of several state agencies, and it is designed to showcase various cultural, historical, and social aspects of Oklahoma. Over the past several years, Oklahoma State University has digitized back issues of the magazine, and visitors can now read all the way back to the first issue from 1956. Visitors can browse back issues by decade, and they can also perform key-word searches. First-time visitors should start by reading through the spring 1960 issue, which contains pieces on rattlesnakes, Oklahoma wildflowers, and the Washington Irving Trail. While the name Washington Irving may not be commonly associated with Oklahoma, the author spent part of 1832 wandering through the state with a Native American guide. More recent issues feature profiles of singer Vince Gill and Route 66.

224

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA GRADUATE COLLEGE  

E-print Network

R N00014-10-1-0133. The experiments were performed on the supercomputers of OSCER, University of Oklahoma, supercomputers at Pittsburg Supercomputing Center, supercomputers at Texas Advanced Computing Center and supercomputers at National Institute of Computational Science, University of Tennessee. #12;VI

Xue, Ming

225

Coal Rank and Stratigraphy of Pennsylvanian Coal and Coaly Shale Samples, Young County, North-Central Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Vitrinite reflectance measurements were made to determine the rank of selected subsurface coal and coaly shale samples from Young County, north-central Texas, for the National Coal Resources Database System State Cooperative Program conducted by the Bureau of Economic Geology at The University of Texas at Austin. This research is the continuation of a pilot study that began in adjacent Archer County, and forms part of a larger investigation of the coalbed methane resource potential of Pennsylvanian coals in north-central Texas. A total of 57 samples of coal and coaly shale fragments were hand-picked from drill cuttings from depths of about 2,000 ft in five wells, and Ro determinations were made on an initial 10-sample subset. Electric-log correlation of the sampled wells indicates that the collected samples represent coal and coaly shale layers in the Strawn (Pennsylvanian), Canyon (Pennsylvanian), and Cisco (Pennsylvanian-Permian) Groups. Coal rank in the initial sample subset ranges from lignite (Ro=0.39), in a sample from the Cisco Group at a depth of 310 to 320 ft, to high volatile bituminous A coal (Ro=0.91) in a sample from the lower part of the Canyon Group at a depth of 2,030 to 2,040 ft.

Guevara, Edgar H.; Breton, Caroline; Hackley, Paul C.

2007-01-01

226

Draft environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas. Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 112). [Contains Glossary  

SciTech Connect

In February 1983, the US Department of Energy identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The potentially acceptable site was subsequently narrowed to an area of 9 square miles. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations are reported in this draft environmental assessment, which is being issued for public review and comment. The DOE findings and determinations that are based on these evaluations are preliminary and subject to public review and comment. A final EA will be prepared after considering the comments received. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this draft EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. This setting contains one other potentially acceptable site - the Swisher site. Although the Swisher site appears to be suitable for site characterization, DOE has concluded that the Deaf Smith site is the preferred site. The DOE finds that the site is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is proposing to nominate the Deaf Smith site as one of five sites suitable for characterization. Having compared the Deaf Smith site with the other four sites proposed for nomination, the DOE has determined that the Deaf Smith site is one of the three preferred sites for recommendation to the President as candidates for characterization.

Not Available

1984-12-01

227

A unique Austin Chalk reservoir, Van field, Van Zandt County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Significant shallow oil production from the Austin Chalk was established in the Van field, Van Zandt County, in East Texas in the late 1980s. The Van field structure is a complexly faulted domal anticline created by salt intrusion. The Woodbine sands, which underlie the Austin Chalk, have been and continue to be the predominant reservoir rocks in the field. Evidence indicates that faults provided vertical conduits for migration of Woodbine oil into the Austin Chalk where it was trapped along the structural crest. The most prolific Austin Chalk production is on the upthrown side of the main field fault, as is the Woodbine. The Austin Chalk is a soft, white to light gray limestone composed mostly of coccoliths with some pelecypods. Unlike the Austin Chalk in the Giddings and Pearsall fields, the chalk at Van was not as deeply buried and therefore did not become brittle and susceptible to tensional or cryptic fracturing. The shallow burial in the Van field was also important in that it allowed the chalk to retain primary microporosity. The production comes entirely from this primary porosity. In addition to the structural position and underlying oil source from the Woodbine, the depositional environment and associated lithofacies are also keys to the reservoir quality in the Van field as demonstrated by cores from the upthrown and downthrown (less productive) sides of the main field fault. It appears that at the time of Austin Chalk deposition, the main field fault was active and caused the upthrown side to be a structural high and a more agreeable environment for benthonic organisms such as pelecypods and worms. The resulting bioturbation enhanced the reservoir's permeability enough to allow migration and entrapment of the oil. Future success in exploration for analogous Austin Chalk reservoirs will require the combination of a favorable environment of deposition, a nearby Woodbine oil source, and a faulted trap that will provide the conduit for migration.

Lowe, J.T. (Unocal Corp., Houston, TX (USA))

1990-09-01

228

Helicopter Electromagnetic and Magnetic Survey Data and Maps, Seco Creek Area, Medina and Uvalade Counties, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic (HEM) survey was completed of a 209 square kilometer (81 square miles) area of the central Edwards aquifer. This open-file report is a release of the airborne geophysical data and a summary of the hydrologic application. The survey area was centered on the Valdina Farms sinkhole along the Seco Creek drainage in western Medina County, Texas. Flight lines were flown north south with three east west tie lines to aid in leveling the magnetic data. Additional lines were flown on each side of the Seco and Little Seco Creek drainages. A five kilometer (4 mile) extension of 15 lines was flown north of the main survey block centered on Seco Creek. This digital data release contains the flight line data, grids, and maps of the HEM survey data. The Edwards aquifer in this area consists of three hydrologic zones: catchment, recharge, and confined. The Glen Rose Formation is exposed in the catchment area. The recharge zone is situated in the Balcones fault zone where the Devils River Group of the Edwards aquifer has been exposed by normal faults. The magnetic data is not discussed in depth here, but does have high amplitude closed anomalies caused by shallow igneous intrusives. The Woodard Cave Fault that separates the recharge and catchment zones is in places associated with a weak linear magnetic low. The HEM data has been processed to produce apparent resistivities for each of the six EM coil pairs and frequencies. Maps of the apparent resistivity for the five horizontal coil pairs show that the catchment, recharge, and confined zones all have numerous linear features that are likely caused by structures, many of which have not been mapped. The distribution of high resistivity areas reflects the lithologic differences within the Trinity and Edwards aquifers.

Smith, Bruce D.; Smith, David V.; Hill, Patricia L.; Labson, Victor F.

2003-01-01

229

Time-lapse density prediction for reservoir characterization using probabilistic neural networks at Postle Field, Texas County, Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At Postle Field the main challenge has been to map the Morrow A sandstone. By using a non-linear approach to predict density values from p-wave seismic. I was able to discriminate the reservoir sandstones and identify areas of high quality reservoir. My work conrms the connectivity of the two northern sandstone bodies, increasing the potential resource volume in the study area. The baseline density prediction showed the dry wells were drilled in areas of poor reservoir quality. With the results of this work future drilling locations can be located with less uncertainty. The application of time-lapse neural network prediction successfully predicted changes in the reservoir. Analysis of reservoir modeling and simulation suggest that the time-lapse density changes shown in the neural network prediction at Postle Field are related to pressure changes in the reservoir. Two areas of high quality reservoir have been identied and proposed for future drilling programs. Further engineering evaluation is recommended.

Vega Diaz, Andrea C.

230

Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook, 2002.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count Factbook details county and statewide trends in the well-being of children in Oklahoma. The statistical portrait is based on seven indicators or benchmarks of child well-being: (1) low birthweight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) births to young teens; (4) child abuse and neglect; (5) child and teen death; (6) high school

Ingraham, Sandy

231

Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook, 1999.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count Factbook details county and statewide trends in the well-being of Oklahoma's children. The statistical portrait is based on eight indicators of child well-being: (1) low birth weight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) births to young teens; (4) child abuse and neglect; (5) child and teen death; (6) child poverty; (7) high school

Ingraham, Sandy

232

Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook, 2001.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count Factbook details county and statewide trends in the well-being of Oklahoma's children. The statistical portrait is based on seven indicators or benchmarks of child well-being: (1) low birth weight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) births to young teens; (4) child abuse and neglect; (5) child and teen death; (6) high school

Ingraham, Sandy

233

Oklahoma Digital Maps  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A team of talented librarians at the Oklahoma State University Library have created this collection of 3,600 maps, a true find for those with an interest in Sooner history, geography, culture, and more. The cartographic resources are divided into four collections, including the WPA Collection and the USGS Collection. This first collection consists of almost 2,400 detailed county maps produced in the 1930s by the Works Progress Administration and the Oklahoma Tax Commission to determine real estate values. Moving on, the USGS Collection is made up of 300 detailed maps generated from 1892 to the 1950s documenting topographical conditions throughout the state. Interested parties can view all of the maps here via a nice digital image tool and are also welcome to search across the entire collection by keyword.

234

Estimating the Number of Men Who Have Sex with Men by Race/Ethnicity at the County Level in Texas.  

PubMed

This analysis presents a method for estimating the population of men who have sex with men (MSM) at the county and metropolitan area level in Texas. Surveillance data consistently demonstrate that MSM experience a high burden of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Numerous studies have shown that MSM are also vulnerable to many other health concerns such as suicide, substance abuse, domestic violence and assault, homelessness, and mental illness. However, compilation of rates of HIV, STIs, and other health issues is dependent on estimation of population denominators. In the absence of systematic, consistent, and direct assessment of sexual orientation and gender identity in national surveys, it is difficult to estimate the size of at-risk populations. Previous estimates at the national and state level have been calculated using varied methodologies. However, to date, statewide estimates at the county level have only been produced for the state of Florida. County-level and metropolitan area estimates of MSM population were produced using three modified models developed by Lieb et al. These models used data on population and same-sex households from the US Census, along with estimates of sexual behavior from the National Survey on Family Growth. These models produce an estimate of 599,683 MSM in Texas (6.4 % of the adult male population). Metropolitan areas with the highest percentage of MSM population include Dallas and Austin (10.3 and 9.8 %, respectively). County-level estimates of MSM population range from 1.0 to 12.9 %. These local estimates are critical to targeting vulnerable populations and effective allocation of resources for prevention and treatment programs. PMID:25347955

Campagna, Jesse; Poe, Jonathon; Robbins, Ann; Rowlinson, Emily

2014-10-28

235

Map Showing Geology and Hydrostratigraphy of the Edwards Aquifer Catchment Area, Northern Bexar County, South-Central Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Rock units forming the Edwards and Trinity aquifers in northern Bexar County, Texas, are exposed within all or parts of seven 7.5-minute quadrangles: Bulverde, Camp Bullis, Castle Hills, Helotes, Jack Mountain, San Geronimo, and Van Raub. The Edwards aquifer is the most prolific ground-water source in Bexar County, whereas the Trinity aquifer supplies water for residential, commercial, and industrial uses for areas north of the San Antonio. The geologic map of northern Bexar County shows the distribution of informal hydrostratigraphic members of the Edwards Group and the underlying upper member of the Glen Rose Limestone. Exposures of the Glen Rose Limestone, which forms the Trinity aquifer alone, cover approximately 467 km2 in the county. This study also describes and names five informal hydrostratigraphic members that constitute the upper member of the Glen Rose Limestone; these include, in descending order, the Caverness, Camp Bullis, Upper evaporite, Fossiliferous, and Lower evaporite members. This study improves our understanding of the hydrogeologic connection between the two aquifers as it describes the geology that controls the infiltration of surface water and subsurface flow of ground water from the catchment area (outcropping Trinity aquifer rocks) to the Edwards water-bearing exposures.

Clark, Amy R.; Blome, Charles D.; Faith, Jason R.

2009-01-01

236

Land use/land cover in Swisher County and Deaf Smith County locations, Palo Duro Basin, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Agriculture is the major land use/land cover in the Swisher and Deaf Smith County locations. Most of the agricultural land is irrigated. Furrow, center pivot, and lateral-wheel irrigation systems are in common use. Rangeland is the second most abundant land use/land cover; it is typically associated with stream valleys and playas. The rangeland supports cattle, which are an important source of income. The main urban areas in or near the locations are Tulia and Happy, in Swisher County, and Hereford and Vega, in Deaf Smith County. Most of the land within the locations is privately owned - corporate and government ownership is extremely limited - and large portions are currently under lease for oil exploration. County and regional agencies have no authority to regulate land-use patterns in the locations, although the Panhandle Regional Planning Commission can provide guidance to local jurisdictions. Land use within the corporate limits and extraterritorial jurisdictions of Tulia and Hereford is controlled by zoning ordinances and subdivision regulations. According to projections for the locations, agriculture will remain the major land use in the foreseeable future. Dryland farming and rangeland will become more prevalent as irrigation costs increase and marginal areas are taken out of production.

Not Available

1984-12-01

237

A comparative analysis of pupil attitudes toward selected oral language activities used with fifth graders in the public schools of Brazos County, Texas  

E-print Network

A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF PUPIL ATTITUDES TOWARD SELECTED ORAL LANGUAGE ACTIVITIES USED WITH FIFTH GRADERS IN THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis By FRANCES WILLIAMS BRUSSE Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ASM... University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1967 Major Subject Education A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF PUPIL ATTITUDES TOWARD SELECTED ORAL LANGUAGE ACTIVITIES USED WITH FIFTH GRADERS IN THE PUBLIC...

Brusse, Frances Williams

1967-01-01

238

The lithology, environment of deposition, and diagenesis of the Queen Formation at McFarland, McFarland North, and Magutex Queen Fields, Andrews County, Texas  

E-print Network

, AND MAGUTEX QUEEN FIELDS, ANDREWS COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by CAROLAYNE ELIZABETH HOLLEY Approved as to style and content by: Jame Mazzullo (Chairman of Committee) Robert R. Berg (Membe r ) S. J. Maz ullo (Member) Richard Rezak (Membe r ) John H... in outcrop in the Guadalupe Mountains and present in the subsurface across the Northwest Shelf, Central Basin Platform, Midland Basin, and Eastern Shelf of the Permian Basin of West Texas and eastern New Mexico. Two sandstone members of this formation...

Holley, Carolayne Elizabeth

2012-06-07

239

An insoluble residue study of the upper Walnut Formation, Comanche Peak Limestone, and Edwards Limestone, Bosque and western McLennan counties, Texas  

E-print Network

AN INSOLUE}LE RESIDUE STUDY OF THE UPPER WALNUT FORMATION~ COMANCHE PEAK LIMESTONE ~ AND EDWARDS LIMESTONE, BOSQUE AND WESTERN McLENNAN COUNTIES, TEXAS A Thesis JIMMIE DARRELL SIMPSON Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ASM... University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, 1967 Major Subject: Geology AN INSOLUBLE RESIDUE STUDY OF THE UPPER WALNUT FORMATION, COMANCHE PEAK LIMESTONE, AND EDWARDS LIMESTONE, BOSQUE AND WESTERN...

Simpson, Jimmie Darrell

1967-01-01

240

Microfacies analysis, paleoecology, and environment of deposition of Morrowan shelf carbonates, Magdalena Limestone (lower division), Hueco Mountains, El Paso County, West Texas  

E-print Network

MICROFACIES ANALYSIS, PALEOECOLOGY, AND ENVIRONMENT OF DEPOSITION OF MORROWAN SHELF CARBONATES, MAGDALENA LIMESTONE (LOWER DIVISION), HUECO MOUNTAINS, EL PASO COUNTY, WEST TEXAS Volume I A Thesis by WILLIAM NARC CONNOLLY Submitted... to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1985 Major Subject: Geology MICROFACIES ANALYSIS, PALEOECOLOGY, AND ENVIRONMENT OF DEPOSITION OF MORROWAN SHELF CARBONATES...

Connolly, William Marc

2012-06-07

241

Data collection and compilation for a geodatabase of groundwater, surface-water, water-quality, geophysical, and geologic data, Pecos County Region, Texas, 1930-2011  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Middle Pecos Groundwater Conservation District, Pecos County, City of Fort Stockton, Brewster County, and Pecos County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1, compiled groundwater, surface-water, water-quality, geophysical, and geologic data for site locations in the Pecos County region, Texas, and developed a geodatabase to facilitate use of this information. Data were compiled for an approximately 4,700 square mile area of the Pecos County region, Texas. The geodatabase contains data from 8,242 sampling locations; it was designed to organize and store field-collected geochemical and geophysical data, as well as digital database resources from the U.S. Geological Survey, Middle Pecos Groundwater Conservation District, Texas Water Development Board, Texas Commission on Environmental Quality,and numerous other State and local databases. The geodatabase combines these disparate database resources into a simple data model. Site locations are geospatially enabled and stored in a geodatabase feature class for cartographic visualization and spatial analysis within a Geographic Information System. The sampling locations are related to hydrogeologic information through the use of geodatabase relationship classes. The geodatabase relationship classes provide the ability to perform complex spatial and data-driven queries to explore data stored in the geodatabase.

Pearson, Daniel K.; Bumgarner, Johnathan R.; Houston, Natalie A.; Stanton, Gregory P.; Teeple, Andrew P.; Thomas, Jonathan V.

2012-01-01

242

ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN TWO MOSQUITO POPULATIONS AND WEST NILE VIRUS IN HARRIS COUNTY, TEXAS, 2003061  

PubMed Central

Associations between Culex quinquefasciatus, Aedes albopictus and West Nile virus (WNV) activity, temperature, and rainfall in Harris County, Texas 200306 are discussed. Human cases were highly correlated to Cx. quinquefasciatus (r = 0.87) and Ae. albopictus (r = 0.78) pools, blue jays (r = 0.83), and Ae. albopictus collected (r = 0.71), but not Cx. quinquefasciatus collected (r = 0.45). Human cases were associated with temperature (r = 0.71), not rainfall (r = 0.29), whereas temperature correlated with Ae. albopictus and Cx. quinquefasciatus collections (r = 0.88 and 0.70, respectively) and Cx. quinquefasciatus pools (r = 0.75), but not Ae. albopictus pools (r = 0.55). Both species (collections and pools) and blue jays were weakly correlated (r ? 0.41) with rainfall, but blue jays were better correlated with Cx. quinquefasciatus pools (r = 0.87), compared with Ae. albopictus pools (r = 0.67), Ae. albopictus collections (r = 0.69), and Cx. quinquefasciatus collections (r = 0.46). Peak minimum infection rate for Cx. quinquefasciatus (4.55), and Ae. albopictus (4.41) was in August with highest human cases (17.87), blue jays (55.58), and temperature (29.01C). Between both species, blood meal analysis indicated 68.18% of Cx. quinquefasciatus mammalian hosts were dog, while 22.72% were human, whereas Ae. albopictus had higher human (44.44%) but fewer dog hosts (22.22%). Ten bird species were identified as hosts for Cx. quinquefasciatus, with northern cardinal and blue jay representing 26.66% and 20.00%, respectively. No bird feeding activity was observed in Ae. albopictus. The earliest and latest human blood meal occurred in May (Ae. albopictus) and November (Cx. quinquefasciatus); 66.66% of human host identifications between both species occurred in OctoberNovember, after the seasonal human case peak. Based upon our data, WNV activity in both mosquito species warrants further investigation of their individual roles in WNV ecology within this region. PMID:17939505

DENNETT, JAMES A.; BALA, ADILELKHIDIR; WUITHIRANYAGOOL, TAWEESAK; RANDLE, YVONNE; SARGENT, CHRISTOPHER B.; GUZMAN, HILDA; SIIRIN, MARINA; HASSAN, HASSAN K.; REYNA-NAVA, MARTIN; UNNASCH, THOMAS R.; TESH, ROBERT B.; PARSONS, RAY E.; BUENO, RUDY

2008-01-01

243

Evaluation of Hydraulically Significant Discontinuities in Dockum Group Mudrocks in Andrews County, Texas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Triassic mudrocks of the Dockum Group (Cooper Canyon Formation) host four, below-grade landfills at the Waste Control Specialists (WSC) site in Andrews County, Texas, including: a hazardous waste landfill and three radioactive waste landfills. At the study site, the Dockum consists of mudrocks with sparse siltstone/sandstone interbeds that developed in a semi-arid environment from an ephemeral meandering fluvial system. Sedimentary studies reveal that the mudrocks are ancient floodplain vertisols (soils with swelling clays) and siltstone/sandstone interbeds are fluvial channel deposits that were frequently subaerially exposed. Rock discontinuities, including fractures and syndepositional slickensided surfaces, were mapped during the excavation of the WCS radioactive waste landfills along vertical faces prepared by the construction contractor. Face locations were selected to insure a sampled area with nearly complete vertical coverage for each landfill. Individual discontinuities were mapped and their strike, dip, length, roughness, curvature, staining, and evidence of displacement were described. In the three radioactive waste disposal landfills, over 1750 discontinuities across 35 excavated faces were mapped and described, where each face was nominally 8 to 10 ft tall and 50 to 100 ft long. Genetic units related to paleosol development were identified. On average, the orientation of the discontinuities was horizontal, and no other significant trends were observed. Mapping within the landfill excavations shows that most discontinuities within Dockum rocks are horizontal, concave upward, slickensided surfaces that developed in the depositional environment, as repeated wetting and drying cycles led to shrinking and swelling of floodplain vertisols. Fractures that showed staining (a possible indicator of past or present hydraulic activity) are rare, vertical to near-vertical, and occur mainly in, and adjacent to, mechanically stiff siltstone and sandstone interbeds. No interconnected fracture networks were observed during mapping. A series of pressurized air tests conducted in three pairs of vertical and three pairs of inclined boreholes were tested at depths, ranging from 40 to 215 feet below ground surface, also showed no evidence of fracture interconnection. Genetic units generally consist of fining upward sequences that show increasing pedogenic alteration upward. Arcuate, slickensided discontinuities are more abundant near the top of genetic units, while stained fractures are more common in the more mechanically competent materials near the base of genetic units. A statistical analysis of fractures and discontinuities revealed limited differences between most genetic units. A series of discrete fracture network models were developed to evaluate the uncertainty in our fracture observations. Slickensided discontinuities showing no evidence of staining or past fluid movement were excluded from the analysis. Monte Carlo simulations show no continuous fracture interconnections across the landfill depth intervals.

Holt, R. M.; Kuszmaul, J. S.; Cao, S.; Powers, D. W.

2013-12-01

244

Consultation draft: Site characterization plan overview, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 113)  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing a site characterization plan for the candidate site in Deaf Smith County, Texas. The DOE has provided, for information and review, a consultation draft of the plan to the State of Texas and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The site characterization plan is a lengthy document that describes in considerable detail the program that will be conducted to characterize the geologic, hydrologic, and other conditions relevant to the suitability of the site for a repository. The overview presented here consists of brief summaries of important topics covered in the consultation draft of the site characterization plan; it is not a substitute for the site characterization plan. The arrangement of the overview is similar to that of the plan itself, with brief descriptions of the repository system - the site, the repository, and the waste package - preceding the discussion of the characterization program to be carried out at the Deaf Smith County site. It is intended primarily for the management staff of organizations involved in the DOE's repository program or other persons who might wish to understand the general scope of the site-characterization program, the activities to be conducted, and the facilities to be constructed rather than the technical details of site characterization. 15 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1988-01-01

245

Meteorological and air quality characterization of the Deaf Smith and Swisher County locations in the Palo Duro Basin, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The meteorological and air quality characteristics of the Permian Basin locations in Deaf Smith County and Swisher County, Texas, are described using data from eight climatological stations in the vicinity. Meteorological conditions are reasonably represented by these data because of the generally flat terrain over the area and the geographical proximity of the climatological stations to the locations. Information regarding atmospheric transport and dispersion conditions is derived from data for the period 1976 to 1980 provided by the National Weather Service station at Amarillo, Texas. On an annual basis, southerly winds predominate and the average wind speed is 6.1 m/s (13.7 mph). The analysis of dispersion climatology indicates that neutral atmospheric stability also predominates over the year. This, in combination with high average wind speeds, is characteristic of relatively good dispersion conditions in the area. Significant topographic features are far enough away from the locations that their effects on local dispersion conditions are negligible. The closest available air quality data were collected around population centers and may not accurately represent conditions at these rural and undeveloped locations. The area has been declared ''attaining'' for particulate and sulfur dioxide standards and ''cannot be classified as better than ambient standard'' for nitrogen oxides, ozone, and carbon monoxide. 49 references, 5 figures, 18 tables.

Not Available

1984-03-01

246

CENSUS AND STATISTICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF SOIL AND WATER QUALITY AT ABANDONED AND OTHER CENTRALIZED AND COMMERCIAL DRILLING-FLUID DISPOSAL SITES IN LOUISIANA, NEW MEXICO, OKLAHOMA, AND TEXAS  

SciTech Connect

Commercial and centralized drilling-fluid disposal (CCDD) sites receive a portion of spent drilling fluids for disposal from oil and gas exploration and production (E&P) operations. Many older and some abandoned sites may have operated under less stringent regulations than are currently enforced. This study provides a census, compilation, and summary of information on active, inactive, and abandoned CCDD sites in Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas, intended as a basis for supporting State-funded assessment and remediation of abandoned sites. Closure of abandoned CCDD sites is within the jurisdiction of State regulatory agencies. Sources of data used in this study on abandoned CCDD sites mainly are permit files at State regulatory agencies. Active and inactive sites were included because data on abandoned sites are sparse. Onsite reserve pits at individual wells for disposal of spent drilling fluid are not part of this study. Of 287 CCDD sites in the four States for which we compiled data, 34 had been abandoned whereas 54 were active and 199 were inactive as of January 2002. Most were disposal-pit facilities; five percent were land treatment facilities. A typical disposal-pit facility has fewer than 3 disposal pits or cells, which have a median size of approximately 2 acres each. Data from well-documented sites may be used to predict some conditions at abandoned sites; older abandoned sites might have outlier concentrations for some metal and organic constituents. Groundwater at a significant number of sites had an average chloride concentration that exceeded nonactionable secondary drinking water standard of 250 mg/L, or a total dissolved solids content of >10,000 mg/L, the limiting definition for underground sources of drinking water source, or both. Background data were lacking, however, so we did not determine whether these concentrations in groundwater reflected site operations. Site remediation has not been found necessary to date for most abandoned CCDD sites; site assessments and remedial feasibility studies are ongoing in each State. Remediation alternatives addressed physical hazards and potential for groundwater transport of dissolved salt and petroleum hydrocarbons that might be leached from wastes. Remediation options included excavation of wastes and contaminated adjacent soils followed by removal to permitted disposal facilities or land farming if sufficient on-site area were available.

Alan R. Dutton; H. Seay Nance

2003-06-01

247

Petroleum potential of two sites in Deaf Smith and Swisher Counties, Texas Panhandle: Volume 1: Technical report  

SciTech Connect

This is the third in a series of regional geologic studies to assess the petroleum resources of two potentially acceptable sites under study for a nuclear waste disposal facility. Site 1 is in northeastern Deaf Smith County, Texas, and Site 2 is in northeastern Swisher County, Texas. Although potential reservoir zones are present under Site 1, the likelihood of hydrocarbon charge and structural or stratigraphic entrapment is low. The probability of a commercial petroleum discovery is estimated at 1:1000, and expected net present value of potential production is about $700,000. Little future industry drilling activity is foreseen around Site 1. Five potential reservoir zones are present under Site 2, and some may contain hydrocarbons. Anticlines are adjacent to Site 2, and some may contain hydrocarbons. Anticlines are adjacent to Site 2 on the northeast, southeast, and northwest, but the middle of the acreage block is synclinal, and its petroleum potential is very low. Discovery probability of the structures adjacent to Site 2 is higher, but the chance of developing commercial production is only about 2:100. Such accumulations might extend into the northeast and southeast corners of the block; expected net present value of such conjectured reserves is about $1,100,000 and $650,000, respectively. Continued industry activity pursuant to these three structures is expected, including seismic surveys and drilling. Considering the potential loss of petroleum resources through withdrawal of acreage from exploration, and the possibility of adjacent drilling, Site 1 in Deaf Smith County is clearly preferable for location of the proposed nuclear waste disposal facility.

Rose, P.R.

1986-09-01

248

Texas A&M Transportation Institute | 2012 Page | 1 Loudoun County Transit (LCT)  

E-print Network

Advisory Board (CBAB). The planning, service oversight, contract management, operations and customer@loudoun.gov http://www.loudoun.gov/bus SUMMARY Loudoun County Transit (LCT) operates multiple rush hour service.C. Loudoun County operates the Tysons Express Bus Service, which includes two routes one originating

249

Geologic framework, structure, and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Knippa Gap area in eastern Uvalde and western Medina Counties, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Edwards aquifer is the primary source of potable water for the San Antonio area in south-central Texas. The Knippa Gap was postulated to channel or restrict flow in the Edwards aquifer in eastern Uvalde County, and its existence was based on a series of numerical simulations of groundwater flow in the aquifer. To better understand the function of the area known as the Knippa Gap as it pertains to its geology and structure, the geologic framework, structure, and hydrogeologic characteristics of the area were evaluated by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-Fort Worth District. The principal structural feature in the San Antonio area is the Balcones Fault Zone, which is the result of Miocene age faulting. In Medina County, the faulting of the Balcones Fault Zone has produced a relay-ramp structure that dips to the southwest from the Edwards aquifer recharge zone and extends westward and below land surface from Seco Creek. Groundwater flow paths in the Edwards aquifer are influenced by faulting and geologic structure. Some faults act as barriers to groundwater flow paths where the aquifer is offset by 50 percent or more and result in flow moving parallel to the fault. The effectiveness of a fault as a barrier to flow changes as the amount of fault displacement changes. The structurally complex area of the Balcones Fault Zone contains relay ramps, which form in extensional fault systems to allow for deformation changes along the fault block. In Medina County, the faulting of the Balcones Fault Zone has produced a relay-ramp structure that dips to the southwest from the Edwards aquifer recharge zone. Groundwater moving down the relay ramp in northern Medina County flows downgradient (downdip) to the structural low (trough) from the northeast to the southwest. In Uvalde County, the beds dip from a structural high known as the Uvalde Salient. This results in groundwater moving from the structural high and downgradient (dip) towards a structural low (trough) to the northeast. These two opposing structural dips result in a subsurface structural low (trough) locally referred to as the Knippa Gap. This trough is located in eastern Uvalde County beneath the towns of Knippa and Sabinal. By using data that were compiled and collected for this study and previous studies, a revised map was constructed depicting the geologic framework, structure, and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Knippa Gap area in eastern Uvalde and western Medina Counties, Tex. The map also shows the interpreted structural dip directions and interpreted location of a structural low (trough) in the area known as the Knippa Gap.

Clark, Allan K.; Pedraza, Diana E.; Morris, Robert R.

2013-01-01

250

Subsurface study of Atoka (lower Pennsylvanian) clastic rocks in parts of Jack, Palo Pinto, Parker, and Wise Counties, north-central Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

A lithofacies analysis of the subsurface Atoka clastic rocks in parts of Jack, Palo Pinto, Parker, and Wise Counties, north-central Texas, was designed to provide a meaningful interpretation of depositional environments that existed during Atokan time, as well as the most favorable areas for production of hydrocarbons. The Atoka clastic rocks are the product of the Ouachita orogene interacting with

Tai Wai Ng

1979-01-01

251

Blood meal host preferences of Culex salinarius Coquillett (Diptera : culicidae) in Chambers County, Texas  

E-print Network

Bloodmeal host preferences were assessed for Culex salinarius populations occurring along the upper Gulf Coast region of East Texas. Over a one-year period beginning in September 1991, blood-engorged female Cx. salinarius specimens were collected...

Grieco, John Paul

2012-06-07

252

Reservoir characterization of Yates Formation (Permian, Guadalupian), South Ward field, Ward County, Texas  

E-print Network

The Yates Formation is a prominent hydrocarbon producing unit in the Permian Basin of west Texas. Production is predominantly from very fine grained sandstones and siltstones that are interbedded with carbonates. The producing clastics have...

Dronamraju, Sharma

2012-06-07

253

The geology of North Fredonia area, McCulloch and San Saba Counties, Texas  

E-print Network

THE GEOL(6Y OF NORTH IIIEDONIA AREA, McCOLLOCH AND SAN . 'AHA COUNTIKS, 'IEXAS STANLKY ALFRED INSTELLER Subslitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural aad Hechaaieal College of Texas ia partial fulfillaeat of the requireeeats...

Mosteller, Stanley Alfred

1957-01-01

254

Validating the Estimated Cost of Saving Water Through Infrastructure Rehabilitation in the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley (Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 1)  

E-print Network

% 130% 150% Annual estimated water savings (ac-ft) for the Curry Main Project 1,182 1,418 1,655 1,891 2,128 2,363.9 2,600 2,837 3,073 3,546 Expected Useful Life (years) 10 $60.63 $49.02 $40.72 $34.51 $29.67 $25.80 $22.63 $19.99 $17.76 $14.19 20 $39... of Reclamation, Oklahoma?Texas Area. Austin, TX. Personal correspondence, September, 2005. Rister, M. Edward, Ronald D. Lacewell, John R. Robinson, John R. Ellis, and Allen W. Sturdivant. ?Economic Methodology for South Texas Irrigation Projects ? RGIDECON...

Lacewell, R. D.; Rister, M.; Sturdivant, A. W.

255

Composition of pore water in lake sediments, research site B, Osage County, Oklahoma: Implications for lake water quality and benthic organisms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Shallow ground water at US Geological Survey research site B in northeastern Oklahoma is contaminated with NaCl-rich brine from past and present oil production operations. Contaminated ground water provides a potential source of salts, metals, and hydrocarbons to sediment and water of adjacent Skiatook Lake. A former brine storage pit 10m in diameter that is now submerged just offshore from

Robert A. Zielinski; William N. Herkelrath; James K. Otton

2007-01-01

256

Effects of brine on the chemical quality of water in parts of Creek, Lincoln, Okfuskee, Payne, Pottawatomie, and Seminole Counties, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A study of water-quality degradation due to brine contamination was made in an area of ~1,700 mi2 in east-central Oklahoma. The study area coincides in part with the outcrop of the Vamoosa-Ada aquifer of Pennsylvanian age.

Morton, Robert B.

1986-01-01

257

The Relationship between Land Use and Temperature Change in Dallas County, Texas  

E-print Network

This study examines the relationship between land use and temperature change in Dallas County, TX. The purpose of this research is to analyze the relationship between temperature and land use and to identify the primary factors contributing...

Kim, Hee Ju

2010-10-12

258

A multiphased approach to groundwater investigations for the Edwards-Trinity and related aquifers in the Pecos County region, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Edwards-Trinity aquifer is a vital groundwater resource for agricultural, industrial, and public supply uses in the Pecos County region of western Texas. Resource managers would like to understand the future availability of water in the Edwards-Trinity aquifer in the Pecos County region and the effects of the possible increase or temporal redistribution of groundwater withdrawals. To provide resource managers with that information, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Middle Pecos Groundwater Conservation District, Pecos County, City of Fort Stockton, Brewster County, and Pecos County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1, completed a three-phase study of the Edwards-Trinity and related aquifers in parts of Brewster, Jeff Davis, Pecos, and Reeves Counties. The first phase was to collect groundwater, surface-water, geochemical, geophysical, and geologic data in the study area and develop a geodatabase of historical and collected data. Data compiled in the first phase of the study were used to develop the conceptual model in the second phase of the study. The third phase of the study involved the development and calibration of a numerical groundwater-flow model of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer to simulate groundwater conditions based on various groundwater-withdrawal scenarios. Analysis of well, geophysical, geochemical, and hydrologic data contributed to the development of the conceptual model in phase 1. Lithologic information obtained from well reports and geophysical data was used to describe the hydrostratigraphy and structural features of the groundwater-flow system, and aquifer-test data were used to estimate aquifer hydraulic properties. Geochemical data were used to evaluate groundwater-flow paths, water-rock interaction, aquifer interaction, and the mixing of water from different sources in phase 2. Groundwater-level data also were used to evaluate aquifer interaction, as well as to develop a potentiometric-surface map, delineate regional groundwater divides, and describe regional groundwater-flow paths. During phase 3, the data collected and compiled along with the conceptual information in the study area were incorporated into a numerical groundwater-flow model to evaluate the sustainability of recent (2008) and projected water-use demands on groundwater resources in the study area.

Thomas, Jonathan V.

2014-01-01

259

75 FR 45695 - Final Federal Agency Actions on Trans-Texas Corridor 35 (TTC-35) in Texas  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Administration Final Federal Agency Actions on Trans-Texas Corridor 35 (TTC-35) in Texas AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA...transportation project, TTC-35, extending from the Texas- Oklahoma line to the City of Laredo,...

2010-08-03

260

Environmental assessment for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Big Hill facility storage of commercial crude oil project, Jefferson County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Big Hill SPR facility located in Jefferson County, Texas has been a permitted operating crude oil storage site since 1986 with benign environmental impacts. However, Congress has not authorized crude oil purchases for the SPR since 1990, and six storage caverns at Big Hill are underutilized with 70 million barrels of available storage capacity. On February 17, 1999, the Secretary of Energy offered the 70 million barrels of available storage at Big Hill for commercial use. Interested commercial users would enter into storage contracts with DOE, and DOE would receive crude oil in lieu of dollars as rental fees. The site could potentially began to receive commercial oil in May 1999. This Environmental Assessment identified environmental changes that potentially would affect water usage, power usage, and air emissions. However, as the assessment indicates, changes would not occur to a major degree affecting the environment and no long-term short-term, cumulative or irreversible impacts have been identified.

NONE

1999-03-01

261

Monocrotophpos and dicrotophos residues in birds as a result of misuse of organophosphates in Matagorda County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

About 1100 birds of 12 species died from organophosphate poisoning in Matagorda County on the Texas Gulf Coast in March and May 1982. Birds died from feeding on rice seed that was illegally treated with dicrotophos or monocrotophos and placed near rice fields as bait to attract and kill birds. Brain acetylcholinesterase inhibition of affected birds averaged 87% (range 82-89%), and contents of gastrointestinal tracts contained residues of dicrotophos (5.6-14 ppm) or monocrotophos (2.1-13 ppm). Rice seed collected at mortality sites contained 210 ppm dicrotophos or 950 ppm monocrotophos. Mortality from dicrotophos poisoning continued for almost 3 weeks. The practice of illegally treating rice seed with either of these 2 organophosphates appears to be infrequent but widespread at present.

Flickinger, E.L.; White, D.H.; Mitchell, C.A.; Lamont, T.G.

1984-01-01

262

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY MEDICAL AUTHORITY  

E-print Network

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY MEDICAL AUTHORITY June 30, 2009 #12;OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY MEDICAL Authority Members Oklahoma State University Medical Authority Tulsa, Oklahoma We have audited the accompanying statements of financial position of the Oklahoma State University Medical Authority (the

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

263

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY MEDICAL AUTHORITY  

E-print Network

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY MEDICAL AUTHORITY June 30, 2010 #12;OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY MEDICAL Authority Members Oklahoma State University Medical Authority Tulsa, Oklahoma We have audited the accompanying statements of financial position of the Oklahoma State University Medical Authority (the

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

264

THE OKLAHOMA MESONET  

EPA Science Inventory

The Oklahoma Mesonet, operated and maintained by the Oklahoma Climatological Survey, is Oklahoma's premier climatological data collection system. For the area covered, which includes the entire state, no other system within the United States or internationally has the degree of ...

265

Groundwater levels and water-quality observations pertaining to the Austin Group, Bexar County, Texas, 2009-11  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the San Antonio Water System, examined groundwater-level altitudes (groundwater levels) and water-quality data pertaining to the Austin Group in Bexar County, Texas, during 200911. Hydrologic data collected included daily mean groundwater levels collected at seven sites in the study area. Water-quality samples were collected at six sites in the study area and analyzed for major ions, nutrients, trace elements, organic carbon, and stable isotopes. The resulting datasets were examined for similarities between sites as well as similarities to data from the Edwards aquifer in Bexar County, Tex. Similarities in the groundwater levels between sites completed in the Austin Group and site J (State well AY-68-37-203; hereafter referred to as the Bexar County index well) which is completed in the Edwards aquifer might be indicative of groundwater interactions between the two hydrologic units as a result of nearby faulting or conduit flow. The groundwater levels measured at the sites in the study area exhibited varying degrees of similarity to the Bexar County index well. Groundwater levels at site A (State well AY-68-36-136) exhibited similar patterns as those at the Bexar County index well, but the hydrographs of groundwater levels were different in shape and magnitude in response to precipitation and groundwater pumping, and at times slightly offset in time. The groundwater level patterns measured at sites C, D, and E (State wells AY-68-29-513, AY-68-29-514, and AY-68-29-512, respectively) were not similar to those measured at the Bexar County index well. Groundwater levels at site F (State well AY-68-29-819) exhibited general similarities as those observed at the Bexar County index well; however, there were several periods of notable groundwater-level drawdowns at site F that were not evident at the Bexar County index well. These drawdowns were likely because of pumping from the well at site F. The groundwater levels at sites H and I (State wells AY-68-37-205 and AY-68-29-932, respectively) exhibited similar patterns as those at the Bexar County index well (coefficient of determination [R2] of 0.99 at both wells), indicating there might be some degree of hydrologic connectivity to the Edwards aquifer. In general, the water-quality data indicated that the samples were representative of a calcium carbonate dominated system. The major ion chemistry and relations between magnesium to calcium molar ratios and 87Sr/86Sr isotopic ratios of samples collected from sites H and I indicated that the groundwater from these sites was most geochemically similar to groundwater collected from site B (State well AY-68-36-134), which is representative of groundwater in the Edwards aquifer. Of the sites sampled in this study, there appears to be varying hydrologic connectivity between groundwater from wells completed in the Austin Group and the Edwards aquifer.

Banta, J.R.; Clark, A.K.

2012-01-01

266

Depositional environment of upper Cretaceous woodbine sandstones, Kurten field, Brazos County, Texas  

E-print Network

Texas syncline, flanked to the east and west by more stable areas. Adjacent to the central trough on the west was a re1a- tively stable area called the Central Texas platform. To the east and southeast, the Sabine uplift bordered the trough, although... ading, shel f bar s. The lower "C" and "D" sandstones show a di stinct rel ation to the Harri s Del ta on the east, and thus are interpreted as prograding deltaic sands, while the lower- most "E" sand is interpreted as shelf turbidites. The regional...

Watkins, John Mark

2012-06-07

267

Comparisons of cat and dog rabies vaccination rates between epizootic to non-epizootic counties and urban to rural counties in the state of Texas  

E-print Network

come into contact with wildlife. This study was undertaken compare the vaccination rates of cats and dogs the epizootic counties the non-epizootic counties to see if the rabies increase vaccination of cats and dogs the epizootic counties. Comparisons...

Martin-Harborth, Michelle Lynn

2012-06-07

268

Geothermal resource assessment in Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The procedures and methods used to develop a geothermal gradient map of Oklahoma are discussed. Two areas, Haskell and Pittsburg Counties, in the Arkoma Basin, are discussed in detail. Three sandstone units, the Spiro, Cromwell, and Hartshorne were selected as potential low-temperature geothermal water sources. The average temperature ranged from 103/sup 0/F at Hartshorne to 158/sup 0/F at Cromwell. (MJF)

Harrison, W.E. (Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman); Luza, K.V.; Prater, M.L.; Cheung, P.K.; Ruscetta, C.A. (ed.)

1982-07-01

269

The Wilson Journal of Ornithology 122(2):385387, 2010 Yellow Rails Wintering in Oklahoma  

E-print Network

The Wilson Journal of Ornithology 122(2):385­387, 2010 Yellow Rails Wintering in Oklahoma discovered to migrate through southeastern Oklahoma in small numbers during fall with a few records through Mar 2009) to Red Slough Wildlife Management Area in McCurtain County (Oklahoma) to catch and band

Butler, Christopher J.

270

MODELING ALTERNATIVES FOR EROSION CONTROL AT MATAGORDA COUNTY, TEXAS, WITH GENCADE  

E-print Network

between the Mouth of the Colorado River (MCR) and 3 Mile Cut. Jetties were constructed at MCR between 1988 along the new MCR east jetty. Sargent Beach is one of the fastest eroding beaches on the Texas coast and MCR, and not impact the shoreline change rates at 3 Mile Cut. In addition to several structural

US Army Corps of Engineers

271

Earthworms (Oligochaeta: Acanthodrilidae and Lumbricidae) associated with Hornsby Bend Biosolids Management Plant, Travis County, Texas, USA  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Earthworm populations were surveyed in soils from a variety of habitats associated with the Hornsby Bend Biosolids Management Plant, Austin, Texas, from November 2009 through March 2010. Seven species of terrestrial Oligochaeta, including one species new to science, are reported from two families, ...

272

Characterization of the structure of faults in the Eocene Carrizo Formation near Gause, Milam County, Texas  

E-print Network

with the Reklaw Formation (Renick and Stenzel, 1931). Roemer (1848) prepared the first geologic map to show Eocene rocks in Texas (Plummer, 1932). In the Brazos valley area, however, the Carrizo was initially mapped and described in detail by Renick and Stenzel...

Yilmaz, Ramazan

2012-06-07

273

An analysis of county program building organization in one of the Texas agricultural extension districts  

E-print Network

statement; oZ duty. I Q ana J yae H e caunty si ' un ( i . . ~ tc iden cify sJgnif scant trends, TABLE 15 ~ RESPONSE Cy THE COUNTY EXTENSION AOENTS QN THE DOTIES Oy THE EEECOTIVE CQNNITIEE. Duties Response of count extension a nts Yes No Total Num...

Islam, A. F. M. Serajul

1964-01-01

274

Correlation of stratigraphy with revegetation conditions at the Gibbons Creek Lignite Mine, Grimes County, Texas  

E-print Network

and hydrometer analyses. The geochemical parameters ? acidity, potential acidity, salinity, and trace metal concentration in the soil ? are compared with the Railroad Commission of Texas regulation values. The final step, correlating the environments... . Stratigraphy, DETERMINATION OF THE ENVIRONMENTS OF DEPOSITION . . 13] 13, ' 15/ 20 Geophysical Logs 20 Caliper Logs . Gamma-Ray Logs Density Logs . Resistivity Logs 20 22' 22, 25' Hydrometer Analyses Core Description Environments of Deposition...

Parisot, Laurence D.

2012-06-07

275

Conodont biostratigraphy of the Hueco Mountains, El Paso County, west Texas  

E-print Network

. For correlation purposes, these systems have been subdivided into series, based on type sections as recog- nized elsewhere, by faunal zones. Two taxa with good potential for sub-dividing the Carboniferous are conodonts and fusulinids. Conodonts... on the associated fusulinids to locate the Morrowan-Atokan boundary in the lower Magdalena Group of West Texas. The conodonts further serve biostratigraphically to sub-divide the sequence into previously defined conodont zones. An accessory purpose of the study...

McLerran, Richard Dennis

1983-01-01

276

Hydrogeology of the Piedmont Springs National Historic Site Grimes County, Texas  

E-print Network

Site relative to the economic lignite deposits Surface mining operation using a walking dragline and truck/shovel operation. . . . . . . . . Geologic Map of the Anderson- Millican area, (Star represents the location of Piedmont Springs National...) . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Major structural features of the northwest Gulf Coast Basin, (Ayers and Kaiser, 1986). . . . . . . 19 Hydrogeologic type in reclaimed surface lignite mines in Texas, (Mathewson et al. , 1982) . . . . . . . . 24 Recharge mechanisms of spoil...

Waclawczyk, Randy R.

1989-01-01

277

Depositional environment of the Yates Formation in Kermit Field, Winkler County, Texas  

E-print Network

Permian shelf facies group. Facies in the group grade from quartzose sandstones and dolomites near the reef, to anhydrite and non-marine silts farther east up on the Central Basin platform. Sandstones and shales were derived from regional uplift.... , 1962) present in west Texas and southeastern New Mexico (Figure 2) . Rocks of the Artesia Group (Tansill, Yates, Seven Rivers, Queen and Grayburg formations) were deposited on a shallow coastal plain east of the Capitan Reef and represent a typical...

Gormican, Sheila Catherine

2012-06-07

278

A study of the North Magnolia City oil field, Jim Wells County, Texas  

E-print Network

the problems encountered in writing this paper, Nr. D G, Barnett of the Union Producing Company, Heeville, Texas, was especial1y. helpful in recommending the problem and criticising the results; Dr, Shirley Mason and Nr. W, R, Campbell furnished.... Israelslqr, M. C. , "Notes on the Frio, " Report, of the Houston Geological Society Study'Group~ Am. Assoc. Petroleum Geologists Bull, Vol 24, No. 2: pp. 376-382, February 1940. 10, Reedy, F ~ R. , Jr. , "Stratigraphy oi' the Frio Forms, tion, Orange...

Goodwyn, James Turner

1951-01-01

279

The influence of land use on gully erosion in Brazos County, Texas: an historical perspective  

E-print Network

photographs available are a collection of photomosaics from photographs taken in 1933 and 1936 (U. S. D. A. , SCS 1936). Photographs are then available for the years 1940, 1951, 1964, 1973, and 1979 (U. S. D. A. Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation... Service [U. S. D. A. , ASCS] 1940; U. S. D. A. , ASCS 1951; U. S. D. A. , ASCS 1964; National Aeronautics and Space Administration [NASA] 1973; Texas State Highway Commission 1979). Mess ul ament 5 Several measurements and observations were recorded f...

Clark, Jeffrey Battle

1985-01-01

280

Environments of deposition of the Yegua Formation (Eocene), Brazos County, Texas  

E-print Network

Work Work in Brazos County 9 11 METHODS PF STUDY General Preparation of Cores Megascopic Examination of Cores and Outcrop Petrographic Examination Subsurface Examination 14 14 16 20 22 ENVIRONMENTS OF DEPOSITION Introduction... advantage of examining a cut section of core for details of bedding. Megascopic Examination of Cores and Outcrop After preparation of the cores was completed, megascopic examination was undertaken. This consisted of systematically re- cording...

LeBlanc, Rufus Joseph

2012-06-07

281

A comparison study of gravid and under house CO2 mosquito traps in Harris County, Texas  

E-print Network

in Medical Entomology and opened a whole new world to me. vii NOMENCLATURE Aeab Aedes albopictus Aeae Aedes aegypti ANOVA Analysis of Variance ArcGIS Arc Geographic Information System CDC Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Cxqf Culex... quinquefasciatus Cxrs Culex restuans DNA Deoxyribonucleic Acid GIS Geographic Information System GLM General Linear Model GPS Global Positioning System GV Gravid Trap HCMCD Harris County Mosquito Control Division IDW Inverse Density Weighted MCD Mosquito...

White, Stephanie Lyn

2008-10-10

282

The Astronomy Laboratory Program At Collin County Community College, Plano, Texas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The laboratory program at Collin County Community College is designed to engage the student in a variety of indoor and outdoor activities. Indoor tasks include up to fifteen investigations, some of which have been contributed by our staff and are performed on the computer. Day and evening classes are involved in outdoor observations. Field trips to observatories and planetariums combined with jointly sponsored special astronomy events enhance the student's experience.

Broyles, M. L.

2006-06-01

283

Update on hantavirus in Oklahoma: are we missing cases?  

PubMed

Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) was first recognized in 1993. Through July 6, 2005, 396 cases have been reported in the US, including 50 from Kansas, Texas, and Oklahoma. We report the second case of HPS in Oklahoma and present data from rodent testing to support the presence of hantaviruses across Oklahoma. We examined Oklahoma death certificates for 1999-2003 for possible unreported HPS cases. The rate of death in young adults 15-49 years due to acute respiratory distress syndrome was 69% higher and the death rate due to unspecified respiratory failure was three times higher in the grassland area of Oklahoma as compared to the non-grassland. It appears the highest risk of HPS is in the Oklahoma grasslands but Sin Nombre virus is present in the non-grassland area as well. We request physician collaboration in detection and reporting of HPS cases and present brief recommendations for prevention. PMID:17557601

Smithee, L; Bos, J; Mallonee, S; Nisbett, R A; Crutcher, J M

2007-05-01

284

A GIS study for determining hurricane risk areas and estimating population, Texas Coastal Counties  

E-print Network

to accurately estimate population for each risk area, census data and maps were obtained. For extreme accuracy, data at the individual census block (CTBNA) level was used. The United States Census Bureau provides the public with digital census maps (TIGER... files) as well as population data on CD-ROM. Thesedataare available atthe Texas AtkMUniversityEvansLibrary. ThemapCD- ROMs were borrowed from the library so that the necessary data could be extracted. The TIGER files available at the Evans Library...

Blakely, Christopher Todd

1997-01-01

285

The depositional history of the Midway-Wilcox section, new Ulm field, Austin County, Texas  

E-print Network

of alternating shales, sandstones, and limestones of the Washita Group (Table 1). A regressive wedge called the Woodbine Group was deposited and followed by a trans- gression. Another regression occurred at the top of the Cretaceous represented by the Navarro...~t of the American Association of Petroleum ~a*1 ' t B 11 t' I I j '-l4 Hvt, WIL(QX ~& AVP I. @fg NE i+~~p. HALL(T-'Fsvll;$ A RpSITA +H)AH))NtP NYILLE 0 50 IOO MI 0 50 IOO Km Fig. l. Index map of the Gulf Coast of Texas showing the Wilcox fault zone...

Pinero, Edwin

2012-06-07

286

An unusual Middle Permian flora from the Blaine Formation (Pease River Group: Leonardian-Guadalupian Series) of King County, West Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A new Middle Permian plant assemblage from South Ash Pasture in King County, Texas, may be the youngest and is certainly the most unusual flora known from the Permian of either West Texas or adjoining north-central Texas. Found serendipitously in the evaporite-rich upper Blaine Formation (Pease River Group, Guadalupian Series), the flora is of very low diversity despite intensive collecting efforts, and the affinities of nearly all taxa are enigmatic. The most common elements are parallel-veined leaves that resemble cordaites but that could be isolated pinnules of a pinnate leaf. Gigantopterid foliage is present but not assignable to any known taxon. A single foliar conifer specimen is too incomplete for assignment. Numerous reproductive organs, however, and an abundance of axes may represent conifers. Conchostracans, palaeoniscoid fish scales, and small heteropolar coprolites also occur in the deposit, which originated as a small, claystone-dominated channel fill in a coastal plain setting.

DiMichele, W.A.; Hook, R.W.; Nelson, W.J.; Chaney, D.S.

2004-01-01

287

Geologic Map of the Edwards Aquifer In Northern Medina and Northeastern Uvalde Counties, South-central Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The southern segment of the Edwards aquifer in south-central Texas is one of the most productive subsurface reservoirs of potable water in the world, providing water of excellent quality to more than a million people in the San Antonio region, where the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has declared it to be a sole-source aquifer (van der Leeden and others, 1990). Depending on the depositional province within which the associated carbonate rocks originated (Maclay and Small, 1984), the Edwards aquifer is composed of several geologic formations (primarily limestone and dolostone) of Early Cretaceous age. Most water pumped from the Edwards aquifer comes form the Person and Kainer Formations, which were deposited over the San Marcos Platform. The principal source of ground water in study area is the Devils River Formation, which was deposited in the Devils River trend. The Devils River Formation provides large quantities of irrigation water to fertile bottomland areas of Medina and Uvalde Counties, where the success of farming and ranching activities has long depended upon water from the Edwards aquifer. The study area includes all of the Edwards aquifer recharge zone between the Sabinal River (on the west) and the Medina River (on the east) plus an updip fringe of the confined zone in east-central Uvalde and central Medina Counties. Over about ninety percent of the study area--within the Devils River trend--the Edwards aquifer is composed of the Georgetown Formation plus the underlying Devils River Formation. Over the remaining area--over the southwestern margin of the San Marcos platform--the Edwards aquifer consists of the Georgetown Formation plus the underlying Edwards Group (Rose, 1972), which comprises the Kainer and Person Formations.

Clark, Allan K.; Faith, Jason R.; Blome, Charles D.; Pedraza, Diana E.

2006-01-01

288

Geologic framework and hydrogeologic features of the Glen Rose Limestone, Camp Bullis Training Site, Bexar County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Glen Rose Limestone crops out over most of the Camp Bullis Training Site in northern Bexar County, Texas, where it consists of upper and lower members and composes the upper zone and the upper part of the middle zone of the Trinity aquifer. Uncharacteristically permeable in northern Bexar County, the Glen Rose Limestone can provide avenues for recharge to and potential contamination of the downgradient Edwards aquifer, which occupies the southeastern corner of Camp Bullis. The upper member of the Glen Rose Limestone characteristically is thin-bedded and composed mostly of soft limestone and marl, and the lower Glen Rose typically is composed mostly of relatively massive, fossiliferous limestone. The upper member, about 410 to 450 feet thick at Camp Bullis, was divided in this study into five hydrogeologic subdivisions, A through E (youngest to oldest). The approximately 120-foot-thick Interval A has an abundance of caves, which is indicative of its generally well developed fracture, channel, and cavern porosity that in places provides appreciable permeability. The 120- to 150-foot-thick Interval B is similar to Interval A but with less cave development and considerably less permeability. The 10- to 20-foot-thick Interval C, a layer of partly to mostly dissolved soluble carbonate minerals, is characterized by breccia porosity, boxwork permeability, and collapse structures that typically divert ground water laterally to discharge at land surface. The 135- to 180-foot-thick Interval D generally has low porosity and little permeability with some local exceptions, most notably the caprinid biostrome just below the top of the interval, which appears to be permeable by virtue of excellent moldic, vug, fracture, and cavern porosity. The 10- to 20-foot-thick Interval E, a layer of partly to mostly dissolved evaporites similar to Interval C, has similar hydrogeologic properties and a tendency to divert ground water laterally.

Clark, Allan K.

2003-01-01

289

Clay mineralogy and depositional history of the Frio Formation in two geopressured wells, Brazoria County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Twenty-three shale samples ranging in depth from 5194 ft to 13,246 ft from Gulf Oil Corporation No. 2 Texas State Lease 53034 well and 33 shale samples ranging in depth from 2185 ft to 15,592 ft from General Crude Oil Company/Department of Energy No. 1 Pleasant Bayou well were examined by x-ray techniques to determine the mineralogy of the geopressured zone in the Brazoria Fairway. Both wells have similar weight-percent trends with depth for a portion of the mineralogy. Calcite decreases, and plagioclase, quartz and total clay increase slightly. Within the clays, illite in mixed-layer illite/smectite (I/S) increases and smectite in mixed-layer I/S decreases. Four minerals have distinctly different trends with depth for each well. In the No. 2 Texas State Lease 53034 well, potassium feldspar and mixed-layer I/S decrease, kaolinite increases, and discrete illite is constant. In the No. 1 Pleasant Bayou well, potassium feldspar and kaolinite are constant, mixed-layer I/S increases, and discrete illite decreases.

Freed, R.L.

1982-01-01

290

An economic study of laying flocks in Brazos and Burleson counties of Texas, 1956-1957  

E-print Network

Grouxs of Light Breed Chicks Started, ilsrket Kgg Flocks, Light Breed Hatching Egg Flicks, sml All Flocks, Brazos and Burleson Counties, 1956 lo57 Consuxption of Hlexxfed Feed &er Bird snd Per Dozen Eggs, Selected Market Kgg Flocks, Light Breed... cents per bird was reported for the 33 farms included in the study. A comparison of market egg flocks and ha'ching egg flocks was made in the study conducted in Fdssissippl P The hatching egg flocks had a return to labor per hour of b1. 92...

Brannen, Jack Binford

1958-01-01

291

Rural Education in Transition : A Study of Recent Trends in Education in Five Texas Rural Counties.  

E-print Network

area., and the State occurred immediately after the Gil. mer-Aikin Act was passed. Between the schofi years 1948-49 and 1949-50, their number was re. duced by 36 percent in the five rural counties anr by 28 percent in the State. Decreases in Nep... student! I B 3 bv sex bol students in Burleson anr ev m 1 19 I Girls I Total ' m1 Percent \\ ed 40.1 59.9 tit 16.6 19 ; to 11.9 th 10.5 ; i~: 100.0 dL reference to their attendance. This system pro. vided no incentive for school...

Skrabanek, R. L.

1954-01-01

292

Geology of the Canyon Reservoir site on the Guadalupe River, Comal County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In response to a request by Colonel Harry O. Fisher, District Engineer of the Fort Worth District of the Corps of Engineers, United States Army (letter of Dec. 13, 1954), a reconnaissance investigation was made of the geology of the Canyon (F-1) reservoir site on the Guadalupe River in Comal County, Tex. The purpose of the investigation was to study the geology in relation to possible leakage - particularly leakage of water that might then be lost from the drainage area of the Guadalupe River - and to add to the general knowledge of the ground-water hydrology of the San Antonio area. The dam (F-1) was originally designed for flood control and conservation only, with provision for the addition of a power unit if feasible. Since the completion of the investigation by the Corps of Engineers, the city of San Antonio has expressed an interest in the reservoir as a possible source of public water supply. The Corps of Engineers has made a thorough engineering and geologic study of the dam site (Corps of Engineers, 1950), which has Congressional approval. The geology and water resources of Comal County have been studied by George (1952). The rocks studied are those within the reservoir area and generally below the 1,000-foot contour as shown on the Smithson Valley quadrangle of the U.S. Geological Survey.

George, William O.; Welder, Frank A.

1955-01-01

293

Depositional environment and reservoir characteristics of Middle Pennsylvanian Granite Wash, northern Palo Duro basin, Oldham County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Lambert 1, Hryhor, and Sundance fields in Oldham County, Texas, produce oil from the Middle Pennsylvanian Canyon granite wash. Canyon granite wash conglomerates and sandstones have a maximum thickness of approximately 450 ft (140 m) and were derived from granitic rocks of the Bravo dome. The sediment was transported across carbonate platforms by streams and deposited into the Oldham trough as fan deltas. The granite wash deposits consist primarily of imbricated gravels and cross-stratified sands. Debris-flow deposits are also present. The sediment is dominantly feldspar, granitic rock fragments, and quartz. Carbonate cement averages 5% of the bulk composition. The overall geometry of the granite wash deposits is lobate. Parts of the reservoir show high lateral variability with no continuity between wells on 40-ac spacing. These reservoir facies are thus limited in areal extent and drainage area. However, some intervals can be correlated between wells, which suggests that part of the reservoir may be simulated as layered with no crossflow. The reservoir conglomerates and sandstones have an average porosity of 18% and an average permeability of 75 md/ft. Reasonable net-pay cutoff values in these granite wash reservoirs are 9.5% for porosity and 1.5 md for permeability, and were established by crossplots and cumulative volume capacity.

Vanderhill, A.L.; Berg, R.R. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station (USA))

1987-02-01

294

Geodatabase and characteristics of springs within and surrounding the Trinity aquifer outcrops in northern Bexar County, Texas, 2010--11  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Trinity Glen Rose Groundwater Conservation District, the Edwards Aquifer Authority, and the San Antonio River Authority, developed a geodatabase of springs within and surrounding the Trinity aquifer outcrops in a 331-square-mile study area in northern Bexar County, Texas. The data used to develop the geodatabase were compiled from existing reports and databases, along with spring data collected between October 2010 and September 2011. Characteristics including the location, discharge, and water-quality properties were collected for known springs and documented in the geodatabase. A total of 141 springs were located within the study area, and 46 springs were field verified. The discharge at springs with flow ranged from 0.003 to 1.46 cubic feet per second. The specific conductance of the water discharging from the springs ranged from 167 to 1,130 microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius with a majority of values in the range of 500 microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius.

Clark, Allan K.; Pedraza, Diana E.; Morris, Robert R.; Garcia, Travis J.

2013-01-01

295

Hydrologic and water-quality data at Government Canyon State Natural Area, Bexar County, Texas, 2002-10  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service, the Edwards Aquifer Authority, and the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, collected rainfall, streamflow, evapotranspiration, and stormflow water-quality data at the Laurel Canyon Creek watershed, within the Government Canyon State Natural Area, Bexar County, Tex. The purpose of the data collection was to support evaluations of the effects of brush management conservation practices on components of the hydrologic budget and water quality. One component of brush management was to take endangered wildlife into consideration, specifically the golden-cheeked warbler (Dendroica chrysoparia). Much of the area that may have been considered for brush management was left intact to protect habitat for the golden-cheeked warbler. The area identified for brush management was approximately 10 percent of the study watershed. The hydrologic data presented here (200210) represent pre- and post-treatment periods, with brush management treatment occurring from winter 200607 to spring 2008.

Banta, J. Ryan; Slattery, Richard N.

2012-01-01

296

Induction conductivity and natural gamma logs collected in 15 wells at Camp Stanley Storage Activity, Bexar County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Camp Stanley Storage Activity conducted electromagnetic induction conductivity and natural gamma logging of 15 selected wells on the Camp Stanley Storage Activity, located in northern Bexar County, Texas, during March 28-30, 2005. In late 2004, a helicopter electromagnetic survey was flown of the Camp Stanley Storage Activity as part of a U.S. Geological Survey project to better define subsurface geologic units, the structure, and the catchment area of the Trinity aquifer. The electromagnetic induction conductivity and natural gamma log data in this report were collected to constrain the calculation of resistivity depth sections and to provide subsurface controls for interpretation of the helicopter electromagnetic data collected for the Camp Stanley Storage Activity. Logs were recorded digitally while moving the probe in an upward direction to maintain proper depth control. Logging speed was no greater than 30 feet per minute. During logging, a repeat section of at least 100 feet was recorded to check repeatability of log responses. Several of the wells logged were completed with polyvinyl chloride casing that can be penetrated by electromagnetic induction fields and allows conductivity measurement. However, some wells were constructed with steel centralizers and stainless steel screen that caused spikes on both conductivity and resulting resistivity log curves. These responses are easily recognizable and appear at regular intervals on several logs.

Stanton, Gregory P.

2005-01-01

297

Reservoir characterization of tight gas sand: Taylor sandstone (upper Cotton Valley group, upper Jurassic), Rusk County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

An integrated petrographic, sedimentologic, and log analysis study of the Taylor sandstone in Rusk County, Texas, was conducted to understand the geologic controls on reservoir performance and to identify pay zones for reserves calculations. The Taylor sandstone interval consists of tightly cemented, fine-grained quartzose sandstones interbedded with mudstones, siltstones, and carbonates that occur in upward-coarsening sequences. Helium permeability rarely exceeds 0.1 md, and porosity is rarely greater than 10%. Relationships between porosity and permeability are diffuse because of a string diagenetic overprint. Six major rock types or petrofacies are distinguished on the basis of pore type and dominant cement mineralogy. Three sandstone petrofacies - primary macroporous quartz cemented, moldic macroporous quartz cemented, and microporous clay cemented - have reservoir potential. Although these petrofacies have similar porosities and permeabilities, fluid saturations differ considerably due to differences in pore geometry as indicated by petrographic and capillary pressure analyses. These three reservoir-quality petrofacies can each be identified directly on wireline logs by applying cutoffs to the porosity and normalized gamma-ray logs.

Vavra, C.L.; Scheihing, M.H.; Klein, J.D.

1989-03-01

298

Monocrotophos and dicrotophos residues in birds as a result of misuse of organophosphates in Matagorda county Texas USA  

USGS Publications Warehouse

About 1100 birds of 12 spp. [Red-winged blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus), great-tailed grackle (Quiscalus mexicanus), brown-headed cowbird (Molothrus ater), mourning dove (Zenaida macrours), Eastern meadowlark (Sturnella magna), vesper sparrow (Pooecetes gramineus), common snipe (Gallinago gallinago), blue-winged teal (Anas discors), mottled duck (Anas fulvigula), common moorhen (Gallinula chloropus), redhead (Aythya americana) and ruddy turnstone (Arenaria interpres)] died from organophosphate poisoning in Matagorda County on the Texas Gulf Coast in March and May 1982. Birds died from feeding on rice seed that was illegally treated with dicrotophos or monocrotophos and placed near rice fields as bait to attract and kill birds. Brain acetylcholinesterase inhibition of affected birds averaged 87% (range 82-89%), and contents of gastrointestinal tracts contained residues of dicrotophos (5.6-14 ppm) or monocrotophos (2.1-13 ppm). Rice seed collected at mortality sites contained 210 ppm dicrotophos or 950 ppm monocrotophos. Mortality from dicrotophos poisoning continued for almost 3 wk. The practice of illegally treating rice seed with either of the 2 organophosphates appears to be infrequent but widespread at present.

Flickinger, E.L.; White, D.H.; Mitchell, C.A.; Lamont, T.G.

1984-01-01

299

Hydrologic and water-quality data, Honey Creek State Natural Area, Comal County, Texas, August 2001-September 2003  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey collected rainfall, streamflow, evapotranspiration, and rainfall and stormflow water-quality data from seven sites in two adjacent watersheds in the Honey Creek State Natural Area, Comal County, Texas, during August 2001-September 2003, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service, and the San Antonio Water System. Data collected during this period represent baseline hydrologic and water-quality conditions before proposed removal of ashe juniper (Juniperus ashei) from one of the two watersheds. Juniper removal is intended as a best-management practice to increase water quantity (aquifer recharge and streamflow) and to protect water quality. Continuous (5-minute interval) rainfall data are collected at four sites; continuous (5-minute interval) streamflow data are collected at three sites. Fifteen-minute averages of meteorological and solar-energy-related data recorded at two sites are used to compute moving 30-minute evapotranspiration values on the basis of the energy-balance Bowen ratio method. Periodic rainfall water-quality data are collected at one site and stormflow water-quality data at three sites. Daily rainfall, streamflow, and evapotranspiration totals are presented in tables; detailed data are listed in an appendix. Results of analyses of the periodic rainfall and stormflow water-quality samples collected during runoff events are summarized in the appendix; not all data types were collected at all sites nor were all data types collected during the entire 26-month period.

Slattery, Richard N.; Furlow, Allen L.; Ockerman, Darwin J.

2006-01-01

300

Environmental assessment of the brine pipeline replacement for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Bryan Mound Facility in Brazoria County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0804, for the proposed replacement of a deteriorated brine disposal pipeline from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Bryan Mound storage facility in Brazoria County, Texas, into the Gulf of Mexico. In addition, the ocean discharge outfall would be moved shoreward by locating the brine diffuser at the end of the pipeline 3.5 miles offshore at a minimum depth of 30 feet. The action would occur in a floodplain and wetlands; therefore, a floodplain/wetlands assessment has been prepared in conjunction with this EA. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (42 USC. 4321, et seg.). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). This FONSI also includes a Floodplain Statement of Findings in accordance with 10 CFR Part 1022.

Not Available

1993-09-01

301

Geologic and Engineering Characterization of East Ford Field, Reeves County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this Class III project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost-effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through geologically based field development. The project focused on reservoir characterization of the East Ford unit, a representative Delaware Mountain Group field that produces from the upper Bell Canyon Formation (Ramsey Sandstone). The field, discovered in 1960, is operated by Oral Petco, Inc., as the East Ford unit: it contained an estimated 18.4 million barrels (MMbbl) of original oil in place.

Dutton, Shirley P.; Flanders, William A.; Guzman, Jose I.; Zirczy, Helena

1999-08-16

302

Update of Estimated Agricultural Benefits Attributable to Drainage and Flood Control in Willacy County, Texas  

E-print Network

by month, Lower Rio Grande Valley, Texas Probability January 8 0.0314 February 6 0.0235 March 1 0.0039 April 17 0.0667 May 42 0.1647 June 33 0.1294 July 8 0.0314 August 27 0.1059 September 68 0.2667 October 39 0.1529 November 5 0... for protection at the 10% event level, ranges from $16.8 and $18 million. iii Distribution for Ten Yr Flood PV Benefits/K12 V a lu e s in 1 0 ^ - 6 Values in Millions 0.000 0.200 0.400 0.600 0.800 1.000 1.200 Mean=1.733668E+07...

Lacewell, Ronald D.; Freeman, Roger; Petit, David; Rister, Ed; Sturdivant, Allan; Ribera, Luis; Zinn, Michele

2006-01-01

303

Campanian ammonites from the Upper Cretaceous Gober Chalk of Lamar County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Roxton Limestone Member at the top of the Gober Chalk in northeast Texas yields a rich fauna, dominated by Baculites haresi Reeside, 1927, and Inoceramus balticus Boehm, 1909, with sparse occurrences of pachydiscus cf. P. paulsoni (Young, 1963), Anapachydiscus sp.juv., Placenticeras placenta (DeKay, 1828), Hoplitoplacenticeras aff. H. plasticum (Paulcke, 1907), Menabites (Delawarella) delawarensis (Morton, 1830), M.(D.) danei (Young, 1963), M.(D.) aff. M.(D.) vanuxemi (Morton, 1830), Submortoniceras vandalinaense Young, 1963, Submortoniceras sp., Eubostrychoceras sp., and Scaphites hippocrepis (DeKay, 1828) III. The presence of S. hippocrepis III suggests a late early Campanian age assignment for the fauna. The assemblage includes species known from the Western Interior, Gulf Coast, Atlantic seaboard, and western Europe. -Authors

Cobban, W.A.; Kennedy, W.J.

1992-01-01

304

Geoseismic issues considered for design of the Samalayuca pipeline, El Paso County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Samalayuca, Pipeline is a proposed 20-inch-diameter natural gas pipeline extending approximately 21 miles from the Hueco Compressor Station on the El Paso Natural Gas main line to the International Boundary with Mexico near Clint, Texas, about 25 miles southeast of El Paso. The purpose of the project is to supply gas for power generation at a plant south of Cuidad Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico. Geoseismic issues considered in the design of the Samalayuca Pipeline consisted of surface fault rupture, earthquake-induced landslides, and liquefaction-induced ground displacement.Faults represent two kinds of hazard to pipeline facilities: surface displacement and strong shaking. Earthquake-induced landslides and liquefaction require strong shaking to occur before these processes represent hazards to buried pipelines.

Keaton, J.R. [AGRA Earth and Environmental, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Beckwith, G.H. [AGRA Earth and Environmental, Inc., Phoenix, AZ (United States); Medina, O. [El Paso Natural Gas Co., TX (United States)

1995-12-31

305

Secondary recovery from the Dune Field, Crane County, Texas, is viable through mine workings  

SciTech Connect

Data in Report of Investigations No. 168, published by the Bureau of Economic Geology, University of Texas, indicate the Dune field is a good candidate for secondary recovery of mobile residual oil through an oil mine as described in US Patent {number sign}4,458,945. If trends identified in RI No. 168 can be extended into adjacent sections, oil recovery in the range of $10.00 per barrel or less should be possible. Mine workings will permit a more detailed mapping field jointing and fracturing, in turn permitting better placement of wells on 1 acre or closer spacing. Shafts to the surface would be a mile or more apart greatly decreasing environmental impact. Wastewater generated could be re-introduced to assist in retaining reservoir pressures. If mine workings are driven in hard limestones, as would be possible in the Dune field, produced mine spoil would be marketable as gravel for the concrete industry.

Ayler, M.F. (Hydrocarbon Mining Co., Golden, CO (United States))

1991-03-01

306

OKLAHOMA STATE June 30, 2011  

E-print Network

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY June 30, 2011 #12;OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY June 30, 2011 AUDITED.................................................................................................59 Discretely Presented Component Units Oklahoma State University Foundation..............................................................................................76 OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY DETAILED SCHEDULE OF EXPENDITURES OF FEDERAL AWARDS General University

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

307

OKLAHOMA STATE June 30, 2009  

E-print Network

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY June 30, 2009 #12;OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY June 30, 2009 AUDITED ..........................................................................................................56 Discretely Presented Component Units Oklahoma State University Foundation..............................................................................................71 OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY DETAILED SCHEDULE OF EXPENDITURES OF FEDERAL AWARDS General University

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

308

Oklahoma State University Purchasing Card  

E-print Network

Oklahoma State University Purchasing Card Guidelines Oklahoma State University Fiscal and Administrative Compliance 306 Whitehurst Stillwater, OK 74078 http://faac.okstate.edu August 2011 Oklahoma State University Purchasing Card Guidelines Fiscal and Administrative Compliance Oklahoma State University #12;Page

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

309

Geology and hydrostratigraphy of Guadalupe River State Park and Honey Creek State Natural Area, Kendall and Comal Counties, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Hydrogeologic mapping and descriptions of the lithostratigraphy and hydrostratigraphy of Guadalupe River State Park and Honey Creek State Natural Area, Kendall and Comal Counties, Texas, are presented in this first detailed 1:24,000 geologic map, along with proposed names and descriptions of the hydrostratigraphic units in the study area. Variations in the amount and type of porosity of the lithostratigraphic unit, which vary depending on the depositional environment, lithology, structural history and diagenesis support the resulting hydrostratigraphy proposed herein. Rocks exposed in the study area consist of Early Cretaceous sedimentary rocks that are assigned to the Trinity Group. The lithostratigraphy includes the Hammett Shale, Cow Creek Limestone, Hensell Sand Members of the Pearsall Formation, and the lower member of the Glen Rose Limestone. These lithologic units contain shale, grainstone, sandstone, and fossiliferous limestone, alternating and interfingering with mudstone, wackestone, packstone, and grainstone. The Trinity aquifer hydrostratigraphic units shown on the map and described herein are characterized by their porosity types. Porosity types were first determined from an analysis of two boreholes conducted in comparison with 143 geophysical logs from northern Bexar County, Texas. The cores and geophysical log comparison resulted in division of the lower member of the Glen Rose Limestone into six hydrostratigraphic units, designated A through F. Of those six units, only three remain in the study area because of erosion. The proposed naming of these three hydrostratigraphic units is based on topographic or historical features that occur in the outcrop area of those units. Hydrostratigraphic units that correlate with the boundaries of the formation have been given formational names excluding the lithologic modifier. The Doeppenschmidt hydrostratigraphic unit is stratigraphically the highest interval in the study area, characterized by interparticle, moldic, burrowed, bedding plane, fracture, and cave porosity. The underlying Rust hydrostratigraphic unit appears to be a confining unit with springs/seeps issuing near the contact with the overlying Doeppenschmidt unit. The Rust unit has interparticle, fracture, and cave porosity with cave porosity primarily associated with faulting. The Honey Creek hydrostratigraphic unit is an aquifer in the subsurface and exhibits extremely, well developed porosity and permeability including interparticle, moldic, burrowed, bedding plane, fracture, channel, and cave porosity. This unit is named for Honey Creek Cave, which discharges water into Honey Creek. The Hensell hydrostratigraphic unit contains primarily interparticle porosity, but also exhibits some moldic and cave porosity in its upper parts. The Cow Creek hydrostratigraphic unit contains interparticle, moldic, vug, burrowed, fracture, bedding plane, channel, and cave porosity. The Cow Creek hydrostratigraphic unit is an aquifer in the subsurface and is the primary target for water-well drillers in the area. The Hammett hydrostratigraphic unit is not exposed in the study area but is thought to underlie parts of the Guadalupe River, based on mapping of the overlying units and comparisons with subsurface thicknesses obtained from the geophysical log. The Hammett unit restricts the downward migration of groundwater, resulting in springs that discharge at the base of the Cow Creek unit. These springs also create some base flow to the Guadalupe River during periods of extreme drought. The faulting and fracturing in the study area are part of the Miocene Balcones Fault Zone, which is an extensional system of faults that generally trend southwest to northeast in south-central Texas. An igneous dike, containing aphanitic texture, cuts through the center of the study area near the confluence of Honey Creek and the Guadalupe River. The dike penetrates the Cow Creek Limestone and the lower part of the Hensell Sand, which outcrops at three locations.

Clark, Allan K.; Blome, Charles D.; Morris, Robert R.

2014-01-01

310

Cultural resources: Deaf Smith and Swisher County locations, Palo Duro Basin, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Cultural resources are prehistoric and historic sites, including archeological and paleontological sites, that are important to a group of people. They are protected by both federal and state legislation. In the area covered by the Deaf Smith and Swisher County locations, four stages of cultural development have been identified: Paleo-Indian, Archaic, Ceramic (Neo-Indian or Neo-American), and Historic. Areas where undiscovered cultural resources are most likely to be found include sources of water, playa lakes, and historic trails. Because extensive surveying has not been done in either location, the number of identified sites is low. However, the potential for finding undiscovered sites is high for significant parts of both locations.

Not Available

1984-12-01

311

Commander field: Case study of a gas productive landsat and geochemical anomaly, Parker County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Landsat data for a mature area of southern Parker County were analyzed for structural anomalies and lineaments in order to determine the relationship of these data to gas production and the possible fracturing of Atoka sand reservoirs. Interstitial soil gas data gathered over a 160 acre tract revealed a strong surface anomaly situated at the intersection of two lineaments. The drilling of this anomaly resulted in gas production from a Bend conglomerate and excellent mudlog shows of gas from shallower sands in the Atoka and Strawn intervals. A subsequent offset well, located within the original surface soil gas anomaly, also proved gas productive in the shallow Strawn interval. Well data from the productive gas zones are discussed in relation to local stratigraphy and structure. The limitations and advantages of Landsat/soil gas data are considered in terms of future applicability to other mature areas.

Crowder, W.T. Jr. [Consulting Geologist, Dallas, TX (United States)

1995-06-01

312

Using Prescribed Fire in Oklahoma  

E-print Network

E-927 Using Prescribed Fire in Oklahoma Using Prescribed Fire in Oklahoma Using Prescribed Fire in Oklahoma Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University in cooperation with USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, the Oklahoma

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

313

Geologic framework and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Edwards aquifer, Uvalde County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Edwards aquifer in Uvalde County is composed of Lower Cretaceous carbonate (mostly dolomitic limestone) strata of the Devils River Formation in the Devils River trend and of the West Nueces, McKnight, and Salmon Peak Formations in the Maverick basin. Rocks in the Devils River trend are divided at the bottom of the Devils River Formation into the (informal) basal nodular unit. Maverick basin rocks are divided (informally) into the basal nodular unit of the West Nueces Formation; into lower, middle, and upper units of the McKnight Formation; and into lower and upper units of the Salmon Peak Formation. The Edwards aquifer overlies the (Lower Cretaceous) Glen Rose Limestone, which composes the lower confining unit of the Edwards aquifer. The Edwards aquifer is overlain by the (Upper Cretaceous) Del Rio Clay, the basal formation of the upper confining unit. Upper Cretaceous and (or) Lower Tertiary igneous rocks intrude all stratigraphic units that compose the Edwards aquifer, particularly in the southern part of the study area. The Balcones fault zone and the Uvalde salient are the principal structural features in the study area. The fault zone comprises mostly en echelon, high-angle, and down-to-the-southeast normal faults that trend mostly from southwest to northeast. The Uvalde salient?resulting apparently from a combination of crustal uplift, diverse faulting, and igneous activity?elevates the Edwards aquifer to the surface across the central part of Uvalde County. Downfaulted blocks associated with six primary faults?Cooks, Black Mountain, Blue Mountain, Uvalde, Agape, and Connor?juxtapose the Salmon Peak Formation (Lower Cretaceous) in central parts of the study area against Upper Cretaceous strata in the southeastern part. The carbonate rocks of the Devils River trend and the Maverick basin are products of assorted tectonic and depositional conditions that affected the depth and circulation of the Cretaceous seas. The Devils River Formation formed in a fringing carbonate bank?the Devils River trend?in mostly open shallow marine environments of relatively high wave and current energy. The West Nueces, McKnight, and Salmon Peak Formations resulted mostly from partly restricted to open marine, tidal-flat, and restricted deep-basinal environments in the Maverick basin. The porosity of the Edwards aquifer results from depositional and diagenetic effects along specific lithostratigraphic horizons (fabric selective) and from structural and solutional features that can occur in any lithostratigraphic horizon (non-fabric selective). In addition to porosity depending upon the effects of fracturing and the dissolution of chemically unstable (soluble) minerals and fossils, the resultant permeability depends on the size, shape, and distribution of the porosity as well as the interconnection among the pores. Upper parts of the Devils River Formation and the upper unit of the Salmon Peak Formation compose some of the most porous and permeable rocks in Uvalde County.

Clark, Allan K.

2003-01-01

314

Geologic and engineering characterization of Geraldine Ford field, Reeves and Culberson Counties, Texas. Topical report -- 1997  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this Class III project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of clastic reservoirs in basinal sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost-effective way to recover more of the original oil in place by strategic infill-well placement and geologically based field development. The study focused on Geraldine Ford field, which produces from the upper Bell Canyon formation (Ramsey sandstone). Petrophysical characterization of the Ford Geraldine unit was accomplished by integrating core and log data and quantifying petrophysical properties from wireline logs. The petrophysical data were used to map porosity, permeability, net pay, water saturation, mobile oil saturation, and other reservoir properties. Once the reservoir-characterization study was completed, a demonstration area of approximately 1 mi{sup 2} in the northern part of the unit was chosen for reservoir modeling/simulation. A quarter of a five-spot injection pattern in the demonstration area was selected for flow simulations, and two cases of permeability distribution were considered, one using stochastic permeability distribution generated by conditional simulation and the other using layered permeabilities. Flow simulations were performed using UTCOMP, an isothermal, three-dimensional, compositional simulator for miscible gas flooding. Results indicate that 10--30% (1 to 3 MMbbl) of remaining oil in place in the demonstration area can be produced by CO{sub 2} injection.

Dutton, S.P.; Malik, M.A.; Asquith, G.B.; Barton, M.D.; Cole, A.G.; Gogas, J.; Clift, S.J.; Guzman, J.I.

1998-04-01

315

The geologic structure of part of the southern Franklin Mountains, El Paso County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Franklin Mountains are a west tilted fault block mountain range which extends northwards from the city of El Paso, Texas. Geologic mapping in the southern portion of the Franklin Mountains has revealed many previously unrecognized structural complexities. Three large high-angle faults define the boundaries of map. Twenty lithologic units are present in the field area, including the southernmost Precambrian meta-sedimentary rocks in the Franklin Mountains (Lanoria Quartzite and Thunderbird group conglomerates). The area is dominated by Precambrian igneous rocks and lower Paleozoic carbonates, but Cenozoic ( ) intrusions are also recognized. Thin sections and rock slabs were used to describe and identify many of the lithologic units. The Franklin Mountains are often referred to as a simple fault block mountain range related to the Rio Grande Rift. Three critical regions within the study area show that these mountains contain structural complexities. In critical area one, Precambrian granites and rhyolites are structurally juxtaposed, and several faults bisecting the area affect the Precambrian/Paleozoic fault contact. Critical area two contains multiple NNW-trending faults, three sills and a possible landslide. This area also shows depositional features related to an island of Precambrian rock exposed during deposition of the lower Paleozoic rocks. Critical area three contains numerous small faults which generally trend NNE. They appear to be splays off of one of the major faults bounding the area. Cenozoic kaolinite sills and mafic intrusion have filled many of the fault zones.

Smith, W.R.; Julian, F.E. (Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States). Dept. of Geosciences)

1993-02-01

316

Technical procedures for implementation of aesthetics site studies, Deaf Smith County site, Texas: Environmental Field Program  

SciTech Connect

This chapter introduces the purpose and scope of the visually affected areas determination, as well as definitions, interfaces, and concurrent data needs. This procedure provides a method for determining the extent of visibility of the project. This area is identified as the visually affected area, and becomes the area within which all visual analysis is conducted. The visually affected area analysis of the Deaf Smith County site will involve identifying and mapping the visibility of all major proposed project features. Baseline analysis will be conducted within the overall visually affected area; impact assessment will be conducted within the visually affected area of each major project feature. This procedure presents the guidelines for determining the visually affected area will be in computer data base construction; viewshed modeling, and site visit and verification of results. Computer data base construction will involve digitizing topographic and project facility data from available data source. The extent of the visible area from each major project feature will then be plotted. Finally, these computer-generated visibility plots will be verified in the field.

Not Available

1987-06-01

317

North Central Texas Council of Governments North Central Texas  

E-print Network

North Central Texas Council of Governments North Central Texas Thinking Ahead Donna Coggeshall North Central Texas Council of Governments #12;North Central Texas Council of Governments Thinking Ahead are for the 12-county MPA #12;North Central Texas Council of Governments Thinking Ahead Development Form #12

Texas at Arlington, University of

318

Late diagenetic indicators of buried oil and gas. 2: Direct detection experiment at Cement and Garza fields, Oklahoma and Texas, using enhanced LANDSAT 1 and 2 images  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author has identified the following significant results. The Cement oil field, Oklahoma, was a test site for an experiment designed to evaluate LANDSAT's capability to detect an alteration zone in surface rocks caused by hydrocarbon microseepage. Loss of iron and impregnation of sandstone by carbonate cements and replacement of gypsum by calcite were the major alteration phenomena at Cement. The bedrock alterations were partially masked by unaltered overlying beds, thick soils, and dense natural and cultivated vegetation. Interpreters, biased by detailed ground truth, were able to map the alteration zone subjectively using a magnified, filtered, and sinusoidally stretched LANDSAT composite image; other interpreters, unbiased by ground truth data, could not duplicate that interpretation.

Donovan, T. J.; Termain, P. A.; Henry, M. E. (principal investigators)

1979-01-01

319

An Analysis of Induction-Year Agricultural Education Teachers' Attitude toward Teaching during the 2011-2012 School Year in Texas, Oklahoma, and New Mexico  

E-print Network

. An original researcher-designed instrument based on Moir was composed of 66 items intended to measure induction-year teachers attitude toward teaching and was administered at six different points in time to induction-year agriculture teachers in Texas...

Lawrence, Shannon 1980-

2012-10-26

320

Analysis of borehole geophysical information across a uranium deposit in the Jackson Group, Karnes County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Borehole geophysical studies across a uranium deposit in the Jackson Group, South Texas, show the three geochemical environments often associated with uranium roll-type deposits: an altered (oxidized) zone, an ore zone, and an unaltered (reduced) zone. Mineralogic analysis of the total sulfides contained in the drill core shows only slight changes in the total sulfide content among the three geochemical regimes. However, induced polarization measurements on the core samples indicate that samples obtained from the reduced side of the ore zone are more electrically polarizable than those from the oxidized side of the ore zone, and therefore probably contain more pyrite. Analysis of the clay-size fraction in core samples indicates that montmorillonite is the dominant clay mineral. High resistivity values within the ore zone indicate the presence of calcite cement concentrations that are higher than those seen outside of the ore zone. Between-hole resistivity and induced polarization measurements show the presence of an extensive zone of calcite cement within the ore zone, and electrical polarizable material (such as pyrite) within and on the reduced side of the ore zone. A quantitative analysis of the between-hole resistivity data, using a layered-earth model, and a qualitative analysis of the between-hole induced polarization measurements showed that mineralogic variations among the three geochemical environments were more pronounced than were indicated by the geophysical and geologic well logs. Uranium exploration in the South Texas Coastal Plain area has focused chiefly in three geologic units: the Oakville Sandstone, the Catahoula Tuff, and the Jackson Group. The Oakville Sandstone and the Catahoula Tuff are of Miocene age, and the Jackson Group is of Eocene age (Eargle and others, 1971). Most of the uranium mineralization in these formations is low grade (often less than 0.02 percent U3O8) and occurs in shallow deposits that are found by concentrated exploratory drilling programs. The sporadic occurrence of these deposits makes it desirable to develop borehole geophysical techniques that will help to define the depositional environments of the uranium ore, which is characterized by geochemical changes near the uranium deposits. Geochemical changes are accompanied by changes in the physical characteristics of the rocks that can be detected with borehole geophysical tools. This study is concerned with a uranium deposit within the Jackson Group that is located just east of Karnes City, Tex. Five holes were drilled on this property to obtain borehole geophysical data and cores. The cores were analyzed for mineralogic and electrical properties. The borehole geophysical information at this property included induced polarization, resistivity, gamma-gamma density, neutron-neutron, gamma-ray, caliper, and single-point-resistance logs. Between-hole resistivity and induced polarization measurements were made between hole pairs across the ore deposit and off the ore deposit.

Daniels, Jeffrey J.; Scott, James Henry; Smith, Bruce D.

1979-01-01

321

Morphology and sedimentology of a central Brazos River point bar, Boxley Bend, Brazos County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

A reconnaissance of Brazos River point bars reveals great variety in their morphology and sedimentology, owing to the complex interaction of climate, local hydrography, and local sediment sources. This paper presents the first in a series of studies of point bars of the Brazos River and concentrates on the Boxley Bend point bar near Snook, Texas. The summer morphology of the point bar is complex, consisting of an upper and lower tier separated by a scarp but connected by a central ramp. The surfaces of the lower tier and ramp display numerous large gravel bars and shallow scour pools as well as low-amplitude sand waves, ripples, and current lineations. In cross section, the lower tier and ramp are characterized by (1) trough cross-bedded, medium to fine sand produced by megaripple migration during floods; (2) massive gravel beds, the product of formation and migration of gravel bars during floods; and (3) fine rippled sand and clay drapes formed during falling flood. The surface of the upper tier displays ripple-laminated eolian sand and deflation deposits of mud clasts. In cross section, the upper tier is characterized by thick beds of horizontally stratified fine sand. During the winter, the entire surface of the point bar is covered by large (2 m high) transverse bars separated by deep scour troughs. Transverse bars migrate into the troughs to produce a sequence of fine sand with backflow ripple cross-stratification overlain by thick beds of tabular cross-bedded medium sand. The transverse bars appear to be transitory features with little net effect on sedimentation, because they are removed from the surface of the point bar by summertime.

Connolly, W.M.; Mazzullo, J.

1986-09-01

322

Oligocene volcanism and multiple caldera formation in the Chinati Mountains, Presidio County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Chinati Mountains caldera, which lies in Trans-Pecos Texas in the southern Basin and Range Province, was formed by eruption of the Mitchell Mesa Rhyolite. Volcanism in the Chinati Mountains area began several million years before formation of the Chinati Mountains caldera. Rocks of the Morita Ranch Formation, Infiernito caldera, and Shely Group ring the caldera on the south, east, and north. After its collapse, the caldera was filled by rhyolitic to trachytic lava flows and an ash-flow tuff of the Chinati Mountains Group. These include, from oldest to youngest, the lower trachyte, middle trachyte, lower rhyolite, upper trachyte, and upper rhyolite (ash-flow tuff). The Chinati Mountains Group was then intruded by the West Chinati Stock, the resurgent dome of the caldera. Three cycles of rhyolitic to trachytic magmatism, all derived from a zoned magma chamber, are represented by (1) Mitchell Mesa Rhyolite to lower and middle trachytes, (2) lower rhyolite to upper trachyte, and (3) upper rhyolite to West Chinati Stock. Dominant caldera collapse followed eruption of the Mitchell Mesa Rhyolite, but collapse is also associated with rhyolitic eruptions in the second and third cycles. The entire sequence erupted between 32 and 33 mya. The Chinati Mountains area is the site of one major, inactive silver mine and numerous prospects for silver, lead, zinc, copper, molybdenum, uranium, and fluorite. The Shafter silver district produced 31 million ounces of silver from Permian dolomitic limestones just south of the southern boundary of the caldera. Major prospects are associated with a quartz-monzonite porphyry intrusion (copper-molybdenum) just west of Shafter and with the West Chinati Stock (silver, lead, zinc, copper, and fluorite). All mineralization is probably genetically related to the caldera. 74 references, 15 figures, 3 tables.

Cepeda, J.C.; Henry, C.D.

1983-01-01

323

Helicopter Electromagnetic and Magnetic Surveys of the Upper and Middle Zones of the Trinity Aquifer, Uvalde and Bexar Counties, Texas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Detailed helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic surveys (HEM) were conducted in northern Uvalde and Bexar Counties, Texas, as part of a geologic mapping and hydrologic study being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The aquifers of the Lower Cretaceous Trinity Group (collectively termed the Trinity aquifer) are an important regional water source in the Hill Country of south-central Texas. Rock units comprising the middle aquifer segment are represented by the lower member of the Glen Rose Formation and the Cow Creek Limestone and Hensel Sandstone members of the Pearsall Formation. The lower Trinity hydrologic segment is composed of the Hosston and Sligo Limestones and is confined by the overlying Hammet Shale. Karst features commonly occur in the Trinity Group because of the dissolution of gypsum- and anhydrite-rich beds. Faults and fractures have not been sufficiently analyzed to evaluate the effects these structures have on inter- and intra-formational groundwater flow. The survey in the north Seco Creek area covers the recharge zone of the Edwards aquifer and part of the catchment zone composed of the upper Trinity segment. These data augment the scant geologic mapping in the area by delineating faults, collapse features, and hydrostratigraphic units. The HEM survey in northern Bexar County covered the Camp Stanley Storage Activity, the Camp Bullis Training Site, parts of the recharge zone of the Edwards aquifer south of the military bases, and part of Cibolo Creek to the north. Basic line spacing was 200 meters using six frequencies. In-fill lines were flown with a spacing of 100 meters in the central part of the study area to better resolve geologic structures and karst features. The data processing took into account high EM interference and cultural noise. Apparent resistivity (?a) maps are used in interpretation of geologic structures, trends, and in the identification of electrical properties of lithologic units. The ?a maps show the northwest trending faults of the Balcones fault zone as well as oblique trending cross faults. Though many of the major faults had been identified in previous geologic mapping, other possibly significant faults were not recognized from traditional techniques. High resistivities within the Glen Rose Limestone are indicative of more competent lithologies which have a greater limestone content. During the evolution of the groundwater system the limestone units are most likely to have developed secondary porosity conducive to establishing flow paths. In contrast, lower resistivities are associated with clay, marl, and mudstone units which have lower porosity and permeability. Resistivity depth sections along flight lines and 3D visualization of resistive zones define reefal structures in the middle Trinity segment. Detailed hydrogeologic mapping and HEM depth modeling illustrate the approach to be taken in future studies of the Trinity.

Smith, D. V.; Blome, C. D.; Smith, B. D.; Clark, A. C.

2009-12-01

324

Paleoenvironment and reservoir distribution of upper Glen Rose formation at Alabama Ferry and Fort Trinidad Fields, Houston and Leon Counties, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Alabama Ferry and Fort Trinidad fields (Houston and Leon Counties, Texas) are located updip of a break or reentrant in the Lower Cretaceous shelf-margin reefs. The reentrant probably allowed an unusual amount of tidal energy to pass from the Gulf of Mexico into the relatively shallow East Texas basin and affected formation of shoal complexes throughout much of the Early Cretaceous. Alabama Ferry and Fort Trinidad fields produce oil and gas from stratigraphic traps in ooid-skeletal bars contained within shoal complexes of the upper Glen Rose zones A through G. These zones represent cyclic transgressive-regressive limestone-shale sequences deposited across much of the East Texas basin. At Alabama Ferry field, each cycle is generally 50-200 ft thick. The cycles are composed of various high-energy shoal-complex grainstones and packstones bounded above and below by lower energy shelf interior to lagoonal mudstone and/or wackestone or shales. Reservoirs are generally restricted to the 10 to 50-ft skeletal-ooid grainstone bars of the shoal complex. There are also 1 to 8-ft occurrences of more porous coarse-grained skeletal clastic grainstones, interpreted as tidal-channel lag deposits associated with grainstone bars. The cyclic sedimentation present in the East Texas upper Glen Rose may have been achieved by interaction of an oscillatory variation in sea level with a linear rate of subsidence.

Cregg, A.K.

1988-01-01

325

Quantitative geophysical investigations at the Diamond M field, Scurry County, Texas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Diamond M field over the Horseshoe Atoll reservoir of west Texas has produced oil since 1942. Even with some 210 well penetrations, complex reservoir compartmentalization has justified an ongoing drilling program with three wells drilled within the last three years. Accurate reservoir characterization requires accurate description of the geometry, geological facies, and petrophysical property distribution ranging from core, through log to the seismic scale. The operator has conducted a careful logging and coring process including dipole sonic logs in addition to acquiring a modern 3D vertical phone - vertical vibrator "P-wave" seismic data volume and an equivalent size 2-component by 2-componet "S-wave" seismic data volume. I analyze these data at different scales, integrating them into a whole. I begin with core analysis of the petrophysical properties of the Horseshoe Atoll reservoir. Measuring porosity, permeability, NMR T2 relaxation and velocities (Vp and Vs) as a function of pressure and find that porosity measurements are consistent when measured with different techniques. When upscaled, these measurements are in excellent agreement with properties measured at the log scale. Together, these measurements provide a lithology-porosity template against which I correlate my seismic P- and S-impedance measurements. Careful examination of P- and S-impedances as well as density from prestack inversion of the P-wave survey of the original time migrated gathers showed lower vertical resolution for S-impedance and density. These latter two parameters are controlled by the far-offset data, which suffers from migration stretch. I address this shortcoming by applying a recently developed non-stretch NMO technique which not only improved the bandwidth of the data but also resulted in inversions that better match the S-impedance and density well log data. The operator hypothesized that 2C by 2C S-wave data would better delineate lithology than conventional P-wave seismic data. Although introduced in the mid-1980s, 2C by 2C data are rarely acquired, with most surveys showing less vertical resolution than conventional (and prior to slip-sweep technology more economically acquired) P-wave data. Initial processing by the service company showed a comparable, but lower frequency, image for the "transverse" component, and poor images for the "radial" component. Although the dipole sonic logs did not indicate the presence of significant anisotropy, shear wave splitting is readily observed on the surface seismic stacks. I therefore developed a prestack Alford rotation algorithm that minimizes the cross-talk between components, resulting vertical resolution comparable to the P-wave data, and independent measure of lithology, and also a direct measure of the direction of the principal axes of anisotropy. The direction of azimuthal anisotropy is aligned N45E consistent with the regional maximum horizontal stress axis obtained from the world stress map database. On average, the Cisco Formation appears 10% thicker on the slow shear (S2) volume than on the fast shear (S1 ) volume and between 70% and 100% thicker on the P-wave volume. Cross-plotting cumulative production against the various seismic attributes, I find a strong negative correlation to S-impedance and P-impedance. Zones of low S-impedance and low P-impedance correlate to better producing wells. More quantitative correlation will require the analysis of the role fractures versus porosity contribute to production.

Davogustto Cataldo, Oswaldo Ernesto

326

Texas Greenup  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

June 2007 was one of the wettest Junes on record for the state of Texas. Starting in late May, a string of low-pressure systems settled in over the U.S. Southern Plains and unleashed weeks of heavy to torrential rain. During the final week of June, much of Texas, Oklahoma, and Kansas received more than 330 percent of their average rainfall, said the National Climatic Data Center. The widespread heavy rain brought deadly floods to the entire region. On July 6, the Associated Press reported that every major river basin in Texas was at flood stage, an event that had not occurred since 1957. In addition to causing floods, the rains stimulated plant growth. The grassy, often arid, plains and plateaus of northern Mexico (bottom left), Texas (center), and New Mexico (top, left of center) burst to life with dense vegetation as this vegetation anomaly image shows. Regions where plants were growing more quickly or fuller than average are green, while areas where growth is below average are brown. Most of Texas is green, with a concentrated deep green, almost black, spot where vegetation growth was greatest. This area of western Texas is where the Pecos River flows out of New Mexico and heads southeast to the Rio Grande. In the darkest areas, vegetation was more than 100 percent above average. The brown spots in northeastern Texas and Oklahoma (top, right of center) may be areas where persistent clouds or water on the ground are hiding the plants from the satellite's view. Plants may also be growing less than average if swamped by too much rain. The image was made with data collected by the SPOT satellite between June 11 and June 20, 2007. NASA imagery created by Jesse Allen, Earth Observatory, using SPOT data provided courtesy of the USDA Foreign Agricultural Service and processed by Jennifer Small and Assaf Anyamba of the GIMMS Group at NASA GSFC.

2007-01-01

327

Historical streamflows of Double Mountain Fork of Brazos River and water-surface elevations of Lake Alan Henry, Garza County, Texas, water years 1962-2010  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the City of Lubbock, Texas, operates two surface-water stations in Garza County, Tex.: USGS streamflow-gaging station 08079600 Double Mountain Fork Brazos River at Justiceburg, Tex., and 08079700 Lake Alan Henry Reservoir, a water-supply reservoir about 60 miles southeast of Lubbock, Tex., and about 10 miles east of Justiceburg, Tex. The streamflow and water-surface elevation data from the two stations are useful to water-resource managers and planners in support of forecasting and water-resource infrastructure operations and are used in regional hydrologic studies.

Asquith, William H.; Vrabel, Joseph

2011-01-01

328

Hydrology and subsurface transport of oil-field brine at the U.S. Geological Survey OSPER site "A", Osage County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Spillage and improper disposal of saline produced water from oil wells has caused environmental damage at thousands of sites in the United States. In order to improve understanding of the fate and transport of contaminants at these sites, the U.S. Geological Survey carried out multidisciplinary investigations at two oil production sites near Skiatook Lake, Oklahoma. As a part of this effort, the hydrology and subsurface transport of brine at OSPER site "A", a tank battery and pit complex that was abandoned in 1973, was investigated. Based on data from 41 new boreholes that were cored and completed with monitoring wells, a large (???200 m ?? 200 m ?? 20 m) plume of saline ground water was mapped. The main dissolved species are Na and Cl, with TDS in the plume ranging as high as 30,000 mg/L. Analysis of the high barometric efficiency of the wells indicated a confined aquifer response. Well-slug tests indicated the hydraulic conductivity is low (0.3-7.0 cm/day). Simplified flow and transport modeling supports the following conceptual model: (1) prior to the produced water releases, recharge was generally low (???1 cm/a); (2) in ???60 a of oil production enough saline produced water in pits leaked into the subsurface to create the plume; (3) following abandonment of the site in 1973 and filling of Skiatook Reservoir in the mid-1980s, recharge and lateral flow of water through the plume returned to low values; (4) as a result, spreading of the brine plume caused by mixing with fresh ground water recharge, as well as natural attenuation, are very slow.

Herkelrath, W.N.; Kharaka, Y.K.; Thordsen, J.J.; Abbott, M.M.

2007-01-01

329

Oklahoma Forestry Services  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The mission of the Oklahoma Forestry Services (OFS) is "to conserve, enhance and protect the forest resources of Oklahoma for present and future generations." As part of this mission the OFS website contains information about fire reports, tree and forest health, and water quality. First-time visitors should start their journey through the site by clicking on the "Oklahoma's Forests" section. Here they will find information about Oklahoma's major forest types, the ecoregions of Oklahoma, and several Trees of Oklahoma fact sheets. Back on the homepage, visitors can learn about upcoming workshops and events, read a list of forestry bulletins, and find out about the Forest Heritage Center Museum. Residents of Oklahoma may also wish to look through the "Home and Community Trees" area to learn more about planning their own trees and Arbor Day related activities.

330

Development of a geodatabase for springs within and surrounding outcrops of the Trinity aquifer in northern Bexar County, Texas, 2010-11  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Trinity aquifer is an important source of groundwater in central Texas, including Bexar County, where population growth has resulted in an increased demand for water. Numerous springs issue from rock outcrops within and surrounding the Trinity aquifer in northern Bexar County. The effects of increased groundwater withdrawals from the Trinity aquifer on springflow in the area are not well documented, but because the total amount of water entering, leaving, and being stored in a groundwater system must be conserved, increased groundwater withdrawals will result in decreases in springflow. Documenting the location, discharge, and basic water-quality information of the springs in northern Bexar County can provide a baseline assessment for comparison to future conditions. Accordingly, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Trinity Glen Rose Groundwater Conservation District, the Edwards Aquifer Authority, and the San Antonio River Authority, developed a geodatabase populated with data associated with springs within and surrounding outcrops of the Trinity aquifer in northern Bexar County during 201011. A geodatabase provides a framework for organizing spatial and tabular data (such as the geographic location and water-quality characteristics, respectively) in a relational database environment, making it easier and more intuitive to evaluate changes over time. Data for 141 springs within and surrounding the Trinity aquifer outcrops in northern Bexar County were compiled from existing reports and databases. A field reconnaissance of springs was done between October 2010 and September 2011 to verify the existing location data and collect additional data (discharge measurements, water-quality data, and property owner and photographic documentation) pertaining to the springs. A total of 46 of the 141 springs were visited during the field reconnaissance. Discharge at springs with flow ranged from 0.003 to 1.46 cubic feet per second. Specific conductance was measured in 21 springs and ranged from 167 to 1,130 microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius. Increasing water demands are likely to continue to affect springflows throughout Texas. By completing reconnaissance-level field investigations and compiling existing data, similar geodatabases could be developed for other aquifer systems in Texas.

Clark, Allan K.; Pedraza, Diane E.

2013-01-01

331

Paver Program Oklahoma Memorial Union  

E-print Network

Paver Program Oklahoma Memorial Union The UniversiTy of oklahoma Alumni Association Pave the Way in the Oklahoma Memorial Union Courtyard. Now you can. The UniversiTy of oklahoma Alumni Association 900 Asp Ave of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. This brochure was printed at no cost to the taxpayers

Oklahoma, University of

332

Composition of pore water in lake sediments, research site "B", Osage County, Oklahoma: Implications for lake water quality and benthic organisms  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Shallow ground water at US Geological Survey research site B in northeastern Oklahoma is contaminated with NaCl-rich brine from past and present oil production operations. Contaminated ground water provides a potential source of salts, metals, and hydrocarbons to sediment and water of adjacent Skiatook Lake. A former brine storage pit 10 m in diameter that is now submerged just offshore from site B provides an additional source of contamination. Cores of the upper 16-40 cm of lake sediment were taken at the submerged brine pit, near an offshore saline seep, and at a location containing relatively uncontaminated lake sediment. Pore waters from each 2-cm interval were separated by centrifugation and analyzed for dissolved anions, cations, and trace elements. High concentrations of dissolved Cl- in pore waters (200-5000 mg/L) provide the most direct evidence of contamination, and contrast sharply with an average value of only about 37 mg/L in Skiatook Lake. Chloride/Br- mass ratios of 220-240 in contaminated pore waters are comparable to values in contaminated well waters collected onshore. Dissolved concentrations of Se, Pb, Cu and Ni in Cl--rich pore waters exceed current US Environmental Protection Agency criteria for probable toxicity to aquatic life. At the submerged brine storage pit, the increase of Cl- concentration with depth is consistent with diffusion-dominant transport from deeper contaminated sediments. Near the offshore saline seep, pore water Cl- concentrations are consistently high and vary irregularly with depth, indicating probable Cl- transport by layer-directed advective flow. Estimated annual contributions of Cl- to the lake from the brine storage pit (???20 kg) and the offshore seep (???9 kg) can be applied to any number of similar sources. Generous estimates of the number of such sources at site B indicate minimal impact on water quality in the local inlet of Skiatook Lake. Similar methodologies can be applied at other sites of NaCl contamination surrounding Skiatook Lake and elsewhere.

Zielinski, R.A.; Herkelrath, W.N.; Otton, J.K.

2007-01-01

333

Stable Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Composition of Soil and Shell from an Archeological Site in Kimble County, Texas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report stable carbon (?13C) and oxygen (?18O) isotopic composition of inorganic carbonates, soil organic matter (SOM), and terrestrial gastropod shells present in a 130cm soil profile (radiocarbon date of 2340-2120 B.P) recovered from archeological site 41KM69, Kimble County, Texas. Prior to soil carbonate and SOM analyses, samples were treated with 5% sodium hypochlorite to remove organic matter and treated with 4% HCl to remove inorganic carbonate, respectively. Isotopic compositions of samples were obtained utilizing a Gasbench II (for carbonate-acid reaction technique) and a CHNS Elemental Analyzer (for SOM) coupled with a DeltaPlus XP Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer in continuous-flow. ?13C of carbonates in the soil profile varies in the range -2.15 to -4.63 . ?18O of carbonates (ranging from -3.22 to -3.92) show little variation within the profile. ?13C of SOM (-25.61 to -22.83) suggests that C3 plants were predominant in the study area. There is ~3 enrichment in 13C of SOM at the bottom of profile relative to the top. Previous studies have shown that ?13C of modern soil carbonates are higher by 14-16 than SOM, whereas our results show about 20 difference. ?13C of land snail shells ( Rabdotus, Polygyra, Helicina) recovered from the soil show strong linear correlation with depth (R2= 0.88): -9.46 at 60cm to -5.4 at 112cm. ?18O of shells show no correlation with depth and range from - 3.34 to 0.62. Excluding one shell analysis, ?13C of shells and SOM exhibit good correlation (R2= 0.80). Previous studies of variation in ?13C in land snail shell document that carbon isotopic composition in shell are primarily a function of snail diet. Balakrishnan et al. (2005) have shown that ?13C of shells in C3 vegetation regimes range from -10.0 to -8.8, which is consistent with our results. Although, the interpretation of ?18O values in land snails is not straightforward, values are probably related to several different climate signals including temperature, rainfall, and relative humidity and may be used for potential markers of local climate conditions.

Salazar, K. K.; Paul, D.; Skrzypek, G.; Tomka, S. A.

2007-12-01

334

Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Central Oklahoma Aquifer in central Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

ARC/INFO export files The data sets in this report include digitized aquifer boundaries and maps of hydraulic conductivity, recharge, and ground-water level elevation contours for the Central Oklahoma aquifer in central Oklahoma. This area encompasses all or part of Cleveland, Lincoln, Logan, Oklahoma, Payne, and Pottawatomie Counties. The Central Oklahoma aquifer includes the alluvial and terrace deposits along major streams, the Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formations, and the Chase, Council Grove, and Admire Groups. The Quaternary-age alluvial and terrace deposits consist of unconsolidated clay, silt, sand, and gravel. The Permian-age Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formations consist of sandstone with interbedded siltstone and mudstone. The Permian-age Chase, Council Grove, and Admire Groups consist of sandstone, shale, and thin limestone. The Central Oklahoma aquifer underlies about 3,000 square miles of central Oklahoma where the aquifer is used extensively for municipal, industrial, commercial, and domestic water supplies. Most of the usable ground water within the aquifer is from the Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formations. Substantial quantities of usable ground water also are present in the Chase, Council Grove, and Admire Groups, and in alluvial and terrace deposits associated with the major streams. The aquifer boundaries, hydraulic conductivity and recharge values, and ground-water level elevation contours are from previously published reports.

Runkle, D.L.; Christenson, S.C.; Rea, Alan

1997-01-01

335

Alternative methods to manage waste salt from repository excavation in the Deaf Smith County and Swisher County locations, Texas: A scoping study: Technical report. [Salt and salt-laden material  

SciTech Connect

This report describes and qualitatively evaluates eight options for managing the large volumes of salt and salt-laden rock that would result from the excavation of a high-level radioactive waste repository in Deaf Smith County or Swisher County, Texas. The options are: distribution for commercial use; ocean disposal; deep-well injection; disposal in multilevel mines on the site; disposal in abandoned salt mines off the site; disposal off the site in abandoned mines developed for minerals other than salt; disposal in excavated landfills; and surface disposal on alkali flats. The main features of each option are described, as well as the associated environmental and economic impacts, and regulatory constraints. The options are evaluated in terms of 11 factors that jointly constitute a test of relative suitability. The results of the evaluation and implications for further study are indicated. This document does not consider or include the actual numbers, findings, or conclusions contained in the final Deaf Smith County Environmental Assessment (DOE, 1986). 43 refs., 8 tabs.

Not Available

1987-01-01

336

Chronicles of Oklahoma  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Developed through a partnership between the Oklahoma Historical Society and the Oklahoma State University Library Electronic Publishing Center, this site makes 20 volumes of the Chronicles of Oklahoma available for researchers and the general public. Originally published by the Oklahoma State Historical Society, the available volumes range in date from 1921 to 1942. Users may search the volumes indices provided online, or search by keyword. The volumes contain a number of compelling articles on Oklahoma history, such as "Oklahoma as a Part of the Spanish Dominion, 1763-1803" and "My Experience with the Cheyenne Indians." The table of contents for each volume is a helpful way to browse through the different volumes. Along with the volumes currently available online, more volumes will be added in the future, time and money permitting.

337

Houston KIDS COUNT: A Snapshot of Children Living in Houston and Harris County. 2005 Texas KIDS COUNT Special Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Houston KIDS COUNT data book examines the status of children in Houston and Harris County and identifies trends in their general welfare. These data provide a portrait of Harris County's children that can be used for developing sound and effective local policy. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) Children in Families; (2)

Center for Public Policy Priorities, 2005

2005-01-01

338

Huminite reflectance measurements of Paleocene and Upper Cretaceous coals from borehole cuttings, Zavala and Dimmit counties, South Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The reflectance of huminite in 19 cuttings samples was determined in support of ongoing investigations into the coal bed methane potential of subsurface Paleocene and Upper Cretaceous coals of South Texas. Coal cuttings were obtained from the Core Research Center of the Bureau of Economic Geology, The University of Texas at Austin. Geophysical logs, mud-gas logs, driller's logs, completion cards, and scout tickets were used to select potentially coal-bearing sample suites and to identify specific sample depths. Reflectance measurements indicate coals of subbituminous rank are present in a wider area in South Texas than previously recognized.

Hackley, Paul C.; Hook, Robert W.; Warwick, Peter D.

2005-01-01

339

The stratigraphy and environment of deposition of productive Wilcox clays in west central Freestone and southeast Limestone Counties, Texas  

E-print Network

study area. East Texas Timber Belt of Hill (1900). Geologically, it lies southwest of the East Texas Basin and the Sabine Uplift, and northeast of the San Marcos Arch. The Luling-Mexia fault zone is situated just west of the study area (Figure 3... Uplift area of east Texas (Figure 4). Elsewhere along the Wilcox outcrop, it either has been eroded or never was deposited. The Carrizo Formation is separated from both the Wilcox and the overlying Claiborne Group by unconformities; in subsurface...

Shelvey, Stephanie Anne

1986-01-01

340

Petrography, geochemistry, and depositional setting of the San Pedro and Santo Tomas coal zones: Anomalous algae-rich coals in the middle part of the Claiborne Group (Eocene) of Webb County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two coal zones, the San Pedro and the overlying Santo Tomas, are present for nearly 35 km in outcrop, surface and underground mines, and shallow drill holes along the strike of the middle part of the Claiborne Group (Eocene) in Webb County, Texas. A sandstone-dominated interval of 25 to 35 m separates the two coal zones, which range up to

Peter D. Warwick; Robert W. Hook

1995-01-01

341

Investigations of late archaic coprolites: pollen and macrofossil remains from Hinds Cave (41VV456), Val Verde County, Texas  

E-print Network

. (prickly pear), Asteraceae (composites), and Yucca sp. The inhabitants were mobile year round, exploiting the resources of southwestern Texas. Hinds Cave appears to have been a summer)fall campsite for the occupation period based on the present coprolite...

Edwards, Sherrian Kay

2012-06-07

342

Texas Agricultural Extension Service The Texas A&M University System  

E-print Network

on which test is used based on the soil=s pH, the OSU test may not be as well suited to high pH soilsTexas Agricultural Extension Service The Texas A&M University System Soil Test Information and Soil Fertility Recommendations for Guar Texas A&M University Soil Testing Laboratory Oklahoma State University

Mukhtar, Saqib

343

Indians of Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Oklahoma's present-day Indian culture and civilization, it is noted, are very much pronounced, with more than 68 tribes still proudly embracing their identities. Oklahoma is shown to be the melting pot of Indian America on a map indicating the original homelands of some of the many tribes that settled in the State. The historical development and

Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

344

MIXED HERONRIES OF OKLAHOMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objectives of this 3-year study were to locate mixed heronries in Oklahoma, census breeding pairs of each species, and indentify site characteristics that may be important to heron ecology. During the study, 17 mixed heronries, containing a total of six ardeid species, were found in Oklahoma. The majority of heronries (82%) were located within the oak-woodland fauna region. Other

G. William Sallee

1982-01-01

345

Pride in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet is intended to be used as background material by social studies and history classroom teachers as they develop and implement educational programs on Oklahoma's heritage. It includes background information on the land and people of Oklahoma (geology, climate, topography, vegetation, animals, prehistoric peoples, French explorers,

Moore, Gordon; Blackburn, Bob L.

346

Oklahoma Historical Society  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The mission of the Oklahoma Historical Society is "to preserve and perpetuate the history of Oklahoma and its people by collecting, interpreting and disseminating knowledge of Oklahoma and the Southwest." The Society maintains over 20 museums and historic sites, and they are also responsible for maintaining this website. On the homepage, visitors can learn about the sites they maintain, including the Pawnee Bill Ranch and the Pioneer Woman Museum. In the "Publications" area, visitors can read back issues of "The Chronicles of Oklahoma" dating from 1921 to 1962, and they can also find the "Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture". The Society's "Found in Collections" blog is a great way to learn about their current archival work, and visitors can read about textile preservation techniques and the Civil War. Also, the site includes podcasts created to profile various aspects of the state's history. Finally, visitors can sign up to receive email updates on new additions, programs, and exhibits.

347

Hydrogeology and simulation of groundwater flow in the Central Oklahoma (Garber-Wellington) Aquifer, Oklahoma, 1987 to 2009, and simulation of available water in storage, 2010-2059  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Central Oklahoma (Garber-Wellington) aquifer underlies about 3,000 square miles of central Oklahoma. The study area for this investigation was the extent of the Central Oklahoma aquifer. Water from the Central Oklahoma aquifer is used for public, industrial, commercial, agricultural, and domestic supply. With the exception of Oklahoma City, all of the major communities in central Oklahoma rely either solely or partly on groundwater from this aquifer. The Oklahoma City metropolitan area, incorporating parts of Canadian, Cleveland, Grady, Lincoln, Logan, McClain, and Oklahoma Counties, has a population of approximately 1.2 million people. As areas are developed for groundwater supply, increased groundwater withdrawals may result in decreases in long-term aquifer storage. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Oklahoma Water Resources Board, investigated the hydrogeology and simulated groundwater flow in the aquifer using a numerical groundwater-flow model. The purpose of this report is to describe an investigation of the Central Oklahoma aquifer that included analyses of the hydrogeology, hydrogeologic framework of the aquifer, and construction of a numerical groundwater-flow model. The groundwater-flow model was used to simulate groundwater levels and for water-budget analysis. A calibrated transient model was used to evaluate changes in groundwater storage associated with increased future water demands.

Mashburn, Shana L.; Ryter, Derek; Neel, Christopher R.; Smith, S. Jerrod; Magers, Jessica S.

2014-01-01

348

University of Oklahoma Norman Campus  

E-print Network

University of Oklahoma Norman Campus Parking and Traffic Regulations 2010/2011 Academic Year Visit of the University of Oklahoma has determined that it is in the best interest of the University of Oklahoma stated herein have been adopted by the Board of Regents of the University of Oklahoma effective beginning

Oklahoma, University of

349

University of Oklahoma Norman Campus  

E-print Network

University of Oklahoma Norman Campus Parking and Traffic Regulations 2011/2012 Academic Year Visit of the University of Oklahoma has determined that it is in the best interest of the University of Oklahoma stated herein have been adopted by the Board of Regents of the University of Oklahoma effective beginning

Oklahoma, University of

350

University of Oklahoma Norman Campus  

E-print Network

University of Oklahoma Norman Campus Parking and Traffic Regulations 2012/2013 Academic Year Visit of the University of Oklahoma has determined that it is in the best interest of the University of Oklahoma stated herein have been adopted by the Board of Regents of the University of Oklahoma effective beginning

Oklahoma, University of

351

Oklahoma GSHP Initiative Jim Bullington  

E-print Network

10/1/2012 1 Oklahoma GSHP Initiative Jim Bullington Trade & Industrial Education Oklahoma the Oklahoma CareerTech GSHP Initiative Model · Provide my contact information for you to share with your and Technical Education · Encourage you to contact them to get an initiative rolling Who is Oklahoma Career

352

Main Canal, Maverick County Water Control and Improvement District above Central Power and Light hydro-electric plant, at Maverick and Kinney Counties, Texas  

E-print Network

, the Fain Canal Extension Station and the Hydro Plant weve taken from Exhibits 8-$, 8-4 and 8-5, and tabulated on Exhibit 8 12 by months' The sum of' the flow through the Hydro Plant snd that passing the Hain Canal Extens1on Gaping Station was deduoted... ment or Student Advisor May l952 MAIN CANAL RIA~ICK C01E1TY EATER CONTROL AND INPROVZGiWZ DISTRICT ABOVE G~ F01' AND LIGHT HYDRO-ELECTRIC PLANT, AT MAVERICK AND KINNEY GGKJZIES ~ TEXAS By John J. Ledbetter, Jr, A Thesis Submitted...

Ledbetter, John J

1952-01-01

353

Public health assessment for Lone Star Army Ammunition Plant, Texarkana, Bowie County, Texas, Region 6, CERCLIS number TX7213821831. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Lone Star Army Ammunition Plant (Lone Star) is a 15,546-acre government-owned contractor-operated industrial facility 12 miles west of Texarkana, Texas in Bowie County. Lone Star is near the communities of Hooks and Leary to the north, and Redwater and Maud to the south. The Old Demolition Area (ODA), a 19-acre section of land on the Lone Star facility used for the disposal of explosives by detonation, was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) on July 22, 1987. The Texas Department of Health (TDH) and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) evaluated the environmental information available for the site and identified several exposure situations for evaluation. These exposure situations include possible contact with site contaminants in sediment, soil, ordnance debris, surface water, and groundwater. Based on available data the authors have concluded that overall there are no public health hazards related to environmental contamination at the ODA. In the future, the conclusion category for the whole site could change if additional information indicates that a public health hazard exists.

NONE

1999-07-09

354

76 FR 6837 - Exelon Nuclear Texas Holdings, LLC; Establishment of Atomic Safety and Licensing Board  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...proceeding: Exelon Nuclear Texas Holdings, LLC (Victoria County Station Site) This proceeding concerns...pursuant to Subpart A of 10 CFR part 52 for the Victoria County Station Site, to be located in Victoria County, Texas. A petition to...

2011-02-08

355

A study of the effectiveness of the veterans' farm training program in Fannin, Hunt, and Lamar counties in Texas  

E-print Network

Education, and Mr. Henry Ross, professor of Agricultural Edu cation. Special cred1t is due the coordinetors and instructors of the Veterans' Training rogram in Fannin, Hunt, and Lsmar Counties. Mr. Glen Flewharty, Fannin County Coordinator... AND CONCLUSIONS VII. RZCOMMZNDATIONS BI BLI0 GkAPhi' APPZNDIX A. ~uestionnaire used by Veterans snd Non-Veterans 10 132 137 139 LIST OZ TABLES Page The Number, Per Cent, and i'er Cent Increase or Decrease in Cotton Practices of' 93 Train ess Before...

Dorries, W. L

2012-06-07

356

A conceptual hydrogeologic model for the hydrogeologic framework, geochemistry, and groundwater-flow system of the Edwards-Trinity and related aquifers in the Pecos County region, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Edwards-Trinity aquifer is a vital groundwater resource for agricultural, industrial, and municipal uses in the Trans-Pecos region of west Texas. A conceptual model of the hydrogeologic framework, geochemistry, and groundwater-flow system in the 4,700 square-mile study area was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Middle Pecos Groundwater Conservation District, Pecos County, City of Fort Stockton, Brewster County, and Pecos County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1. The model was developed to gain a better understanding of the groundwater system and to establish a scientific foundation for resource-management decisions. Data and information were collected or obtained from various sources to develop the model. Lithologic information obtained from well reports and geophysical data were used to describe the hydrostratigraphy and structural features of the groundwater system, and aquifer-test data were used to estimate aquifer hydraulic properties. Groundwater-quality data were used to evaluate groundwater-flow paths, water and rock interaction, aquifer interaction, and the mixing of water from different sources. Groundwater-level data also were used to evaluate aquifer interaction as well as to develop a potentiometric-surface map, delineate regional groundwater divides, and describe regional groundwater-flow paths. Several previous studies have been done to compile or collect physical and chemical data, describe the hydrogeologic processes, and develop conceptual and numerical groundwater-flow models of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer in the Trans-Pecos region. Documented methods were used to compile and collect groundwater, surface-water, geochemical, geophysical, and geologic information that subsequently were used to develop this conceptual model.

Thomas, Jonathan V.; Stanton, Gregory P.; Bumgarner, Johnathan R.; Pearson, Daniel K.; Teeple, Andrew P.; Houston, Natalie A.; Payne, Jason D.; Musgrove, MaryLynn

2013-01-01

357

Oklahoma Geological Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Oklahoma Geological Survey is a state agency dedicated to geological research and public service. This site contains information on earthquakes, geographic names, general Oklahoma geology, and the mountains and water resources of the state. There are educational materials available to order, many of which are free. Geologic maps indicate rock types and ages, as well as the geologic provinces of the state. Links are provided for more resources.

358

Competencies, benefits and limitations for Master Gardener Coordinators: a delphi technique involving county extension agents in Texas  

E-print Network

Faculty of Texas Tech University in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of DOCTOR OF EDUCATION Approved James H. Smith / Chris Boleman Scott Cummings David Lawver Cynthia McKenney John Borrelli Dean..., challenging and helping me to focus on a research project of which I am proud. The committee consisted of Dr.s Chris Boleman (TAMU), Scott Cummings (TAMU), David Lawver (TTU), Cynthia McKenney (TTU), and James H. Smith (TTU). A special thanks goes...

Lockett, Landry

2007-09-17

359

Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences  

E-print Network

E-1010 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Prescribed Burning Handbook Oklahoma Prescribed Burning Research Associate, Natural Resource Ecology and Management Oklahoma Prescribed Burning Handbook Oklahoma

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

360

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA GRADUATE COLLEGE  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA GRADUATE COLLEGE NON­LOCAL THERMODYNAMIC EQUILIBRIUM SPECTRUM SYNTHESIS of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY By PETER E. NUGENT Norman, Oklahoma 1997 #12; NON

Nugent, Peter

361

Nobloedischia rasnitsyni, a new genus and species of Oedischiidae (Orthoptera) from the Lower Permian Wellington Formation of Oklahoma, USA  

E-print Network

Nobloedischia rasnitsyni gen. et sp. n. (Oedischiidae) is described from the Lower Permian Wellington Formation of Noble County, Oklahoma. The genus is similar to both Petrelcana (Oedischiidae: Mezenoedischiinae) and Oedischia (Oedischiidae...

Beckemeyer, Roy J.

2011-09-24

362

Geology and ground-water features of salt springs, seeps, and plains in the Arkansas and Red River basins of western Oklahoma and adjacent parts of Kansas and Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The salt springs, seeps, and plains described in this report are in the Arkansas and Red River basins in western Oklahoma and adjacent areas in Kansas and Texas. The springs and seeps contribute significantly to the generally poor water quality of the rivers by bringing salt (HaCI) to the surface at an estimated daily rate of more than 8,000 tons. The region investigated is characterized by low hills and rolling plains. Many of the rivers are eroded 100 feet or more below the .surrounding upland surface and in places the valleys are bordered by steep bluffs. The alluvial plains of the major rivers are wide and the river channels are shallow and unstable. The flow of many surface streams is intermittent, especially in the western part of the area. All the natural salt-contributing areas studied are within the outcrop area of rocks of Permian age. The Permian rocks, commonly termed red beds, are composed principally of red and gray gypsiferous shale, siltstone, sandstone, gypsum, anhydrite, and dolomite. Many of the formations contain halite in the subsurface. The halite occurs mostly as discontinuous lenses in shale, although some of the thicker, more massive beds are extensive. It underlies the entire region studied at depths ranging from about 30 feet to more than 2,000 feet. The salt and associated strata show evidence of extensive removal of salt through solution by ground water. Although the salt generally occurs in relatively impervious shale small joints and fractures ,allow the passage of small quantities of water which dissolves the salt. Salt water occurs in the report area at depths ranging from less than 100 feet to more than 1,000 feet. Salt water occurs both as meteoric and connate, but the water emerging as salt springs is meteoric. Tritium analyses show that the age of the water from several springs is less than 20 years. The salt springs, seeps, and plains are confined to 13 local areas. The flow of the springs and seeps is small, but the chloride concentration in the water ranges from a few hundred parts per million to about 190,000 ppm. The wide range of concentration is believed to be due, in part, to differential dilution by fresh water. Alluvium in the vicinity of the salt springs remains saturated with salt water and evaporation from the alluvial surface causes the formation of a salt crust during dry weather. Those areas appear as salt plains that range in size from less than an acre to as much as 60 square miles. The rocks exposed at the surface in the vicinity of the salt springs are permeable enough to allow the infiltration of some precipitation. Under certain geologic and hydrologic conditions ground water percolates down and through salt-bearing rocks where it dissolves the .salt. Hydrostatic pressure of ground water at higher elevations forces the salt water to emerge as salt springs at lower elevations.

Ward, P.E.

1963-01-01

363

Texas Almanac, 2002-2003.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The 61st edition of the "Texas Almanac" has a reputation as the definitive source for Texas information since 1857. It contains details of the Census 2000 official population count, including statewide, county and town counts, plus an analysis of the numbers by experts at Texas's State Data Center. It includes information about politics,

Ramos, Mary G., Ed.

364

An analysis of the lithic remains from several ring middens in Crockett County, Texas: A study in site function  

E-print Network

Flake; j, Secondary Cortex Flake; k, Interior Flake) Artifacts from Sites 41 CX 241 and 41 CX 218 72 75 78 Figure Figure Artifacts from S i te 41 CX 133 12. Four Common Desert Succulents of Crockett County 88 125 INTRODUCTION In June...) awaiting analysis. It is also common for many of the 1tems listed and bagged as flint flakes, to actually be limestone fragments or some other miscellaneous kind of rock. In addition, a number of specimens fall 1n the category of "no provenience" due...

Moore, Bill

1980-01-01

365

University of Oklahoma Norman Campus  

E-print Network

University of Oklahoma Norman Campus Parking and Traffic Regulations 2013/2014 Academic Year Visit The Board of Regents of the University of Oklahoma has determined that it is in the best interest of the University of Oklahoma that rules and regulations be promulgated and adopted governing the keeping and use

Oklahoma, University of

366

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY BURSAR'S OFFICE  

E-print Network

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY BURSAR'S OFFICE RESTRICTED TITLE IV FUND PAYMENT Valid through July 31st, return form to: Oklahoma State University Office of the Bursar 113 Student Union Building Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 Your authorization may be rescinded at any time by sending a written cancellation request

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

367

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA RETIREMENT POLICY  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA RETIREMENT POLICY (Amended and Restated Effective: July 1, 2002) (Execution of all benefits under the University of Oklahoma Retirement Policy. Any conflict between the terms, modify or terminate the Policy at any time. #12;UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA RETIREMENT POLICY (Formerly

Oklahoma, University of

368

University of Oklahoma Scholarship Guide  

E-print Network

2015-2016 University of Oklahoma Scholarship Guide Updated on November 14, 2014 #12;2 WELCOME LETTER Dear Students: The University of Oklahoma is committed to making available to current of student scholarships. The University of Oklahoma has pledged to make available as many financial resources

Oklahoma, University of

369

University of Oklahoma Norman Campus  

E-print Network

University of Oklahoma Norman Campus Parking and Traffic Regulations 2014/2015 Academic Year Visit The Board of Regents of the University of Oklahoma has determined that it is in the best interest of the University of Oklahoma that rules and regulations be promulgated and adopted governing the keeping and use

Oklahoma, University of

370

University of Oklahoma Scholarship Guide  

E-print Network

2015-2016 University of Oklahoma Scholarship Guide Updated on September 29, 2014 #12;2 WELCOME LETTER Dear Students: The University of Oklahoma is committed to making available to current of student scholarships. The University of Oklahoma has pledged to make available as many financial resources

Oklahoma, University of

371

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY BURSAR'S OFFICE  

E-print Network

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY BURSAR'S OFFICE RESTRICTED PLUS LOAN PAYMENT Valid through July 31st, return form to: Oklahoma State University Office of the Bursar 113 Student Union Building Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 Your authorization may be rescinded at any time by sending a written cancellation request

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

372

West Texas Rain  

E-print Network

County, Cathy Klein, wants the demonstra- tion to show its viability to residents who currently must haul water or buy bottled water. Mecke said more demonstrations are tentatively planned for the West Texas region including the Alpine Library, Mc...tx H2O | pg. 19 West Texas Rain Story by Danielle Supercinski Rainwater, one of the purest sources of wateravailable, is scarce in West Texas. Residentsin this arid land must use all availablemethods of saving water. Rainwater har- vesting, a...

Supercinski, Danielle

2006-01-01

373

Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the High Plains Aquifer in western Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

ARC/INFO export files This diskette contains digitized aquifer boundaries and maps of hydraulic conductivity, recharge, and ground-water level elevation contours for the High Plains aquifer in western Oklahoma. This area encompasses the panhandle counties of Cimarron, Texas, and Beaver, and the western counties of Harper, Ellis, Woodward, Dewey, and Roger Mills. The High Plains aquifer underlies approximately 7,000 square miles of Oklahoma and is used extensively for irrigation. The High Plains aquifer is a water-table aquifer and consists predominately of the Tertiary-age Ogallala Formation and overlying Quaternary-age alluvial and terrace deposits. In some areas the aquifer is absent and the underlying Triassic, Jurassic, or Cretaceous-age rocks are exposed at the surface. These rocks are hydraulically connected with the aquifer in some areas. The High Plains aquifer is composed of interbedded sand, siltstone, clay, gravel, thin limestones, and caliche. The proportion of various lithological materials changes rapidly from place to place, but poorly sorted sand and gravel predominate. The rocks are poorly to moderately well cemented by calcium carbonate. The aquifer boundaries, hydraulic conductivity, and recharge data sets were created by extracting geologic contact lines from published digital surficial geology maps based on a scale of 1:125,000 for the panhandle counties and 1:250,000 for the western counties. The water-level elevation contours and some boundary lines were digitized from maps in a published water-level elevation map for 1980 based on a scale of 1:250,000. The hydraulic conductivity and recharge values in this report were used as input to the ground-water flow model on the High Plains aquifer. Ground-water flow models are numerical representations that simplify and aggregate natural systems. Models are not unique; different combinations of aquifer characteristics may produce similar results. Therefore, values of hydraulic conductivity and recharge used in the model and presented in this data set are not precise, but are within a reasonable range when compared to independently collected data.

Becker, C.J.; Runkle, D.L.; Rea, Alan

1997-01-01

374

Climate Change Impacts on the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer in South-Central Oklahoma due to Projected Precipitation Variations  

E-print Network

Precipitation Variations on the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer in South-Central Oklahoma due to Projected Climate Change Impacts Cesalea N. Osborne Environmental Science Haskell Indian Nations University This project was sponsored by Kiksapa Consulting... through NASA CAN NNX10AU65A The Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer spans five counties in south-central Oklahoma: Carter, Coal, Johnston, Murray, and Pontotoc Base Data Aquifer study area, roads, rural/non-rural communities, state/county boundaries Methodology...

Osborne, Cesalea

2014-11-19

375

Comparative analysis of wind energy production in Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Scope and method of study. In the last decades humanity has realized the necessity of developing alternative energy sources for its efficient economic development and simple survival in the future. During the last 30 years major improvements were made in renewable energy technologies and they started to become competitive with traditional energy sources (fossil fuels), especially with consideration of external costs. Among the renewable energy sources, wind energy is one of the cheapest and fastest growing nowadays. Oklahoma is a very promising site for wind energy development considering its excellent wind resources. Developing wind energy can allow not only electricity production for in-state consumption, but also exporting to other states. The development of wind energy could encourage economic growth with very few adverse impacts on the environment. However, traditional energy sources are still the cheapest and, thus, the introduction of the wind energy in Oklahoma should be critically analyzed from economic, ecological and social points of view. The goal of this study is to conduct analysis of wind energy electricity production in Oklahoma on the four main stages: (1) Investment Analysis from Private Perspective: Calculate present value net benefits for wind energy and traditional energy (natural gas), make sure that both of them are positive. (2) Investment Analysis from Social Perspective: Evaluate present value net private benefits (PVNPB) and present value net social benefit from both projects (PVNSB). (3) Government Subsidy Analysis: recognize the necessity of the subsidies and evaluate the amount of subsidies if any. (4) Investment Analysis from a Geographic Perspective: determine economic feasibility of wind power generation for 77 Oklahoma counties. Findings and conclusions. The final output of the study is the recommendations concerning wind energy development in Oklahoma with consideration of economic efficiency, ecological and social impacts. Study not only analyze possibilities for wind energy development in the state, but make recommendations on the county by county basis with consideration of wind power density, land cost, property tax and infrastructure development in each county.

Ermilova, Ekaterina Alexeevna

376

Chemical Composition of Soils of Cass, Dickens, Falls, Hardeman, Polk, Scurry, and Wheeler Counties.  

E-print Network

of Dickens County, Texas, by William T. Carter, B. H. Henderson, and W. W. Strike. Soil Survey of Falls County, Texas, by M. W. Beck. Soil Survey of Hardeman County, Texas, by E. H. Templin and T. W. Glassey. Soil Survey of Polk County, Texas, by H. M.... Smith, T. C. Reitch, Har- vey Oakes, L. G. Ragsdale, and A. H. Bean. Soil Survey of Scurry County, Texas, by E. H. Templin and T. C. Reitch. Soil Survey of Wheeler County, Texas, by A. H. Bean, T. C. Reitch, and E. C. Foster. Copies of some...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Fudge, J. F. (Joseph Franklin)

1940-01-01

377

System and Patient Barriers to Care among People Living with HIV/AIDS in Houston/Harris County, Texas: HIV Medical Care Providers' Perspectives.  

PubMed

In the United States, a considerable number of people diagnosed with HIV are not receiving HIV medical care due to some barriers. Using data from the Medical Monitoring Project survey of HIV medical care providers in Houston/Harris County, Texas, we assessed the HIV medical care providers' perspectives of the system and patient barriers to HIV care experienced by people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). The study findings indicate that of the 14 HIV care barriers identified, only 1 system barrier and 7 patient barriers were considered of significant (P ? .05) importance, with the proportion of HIV medical care providers' agreement to these barriers ranging from 73.9% (cost of health care) to 100% (lack of social support systems and drug abuse problems). Providers' perception of important system and patient barriers varied significantly (P ? .05) by profession, race/ethnicity, and years of experience in HIV care. To improve access to and for consistent engagement in HIV care, effective intervention programs are needed to address the barriers identified especially in the context of the new health care delivery system. PMID:24943655

Mgbere, Osaro; Khuwaja, Salma; Bell, Tanvir K; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C; Arafat, Raouf; Essien, Ekere James; Singh, Mamta; Aguilar, Jonathan; Roland, Eric

2014-06-18

378

Effects of brush management on the hydrologic budget and water quality in and adjacent to Honey Creek State Natural Area, Comal County, Texas, 2001--10  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Woody vegetation, including ashe juniper (Juniperus ashei), has encroached on some areas in central Texas that were historically oak grassland savannah. Encroachment of woody vegetation is generally attributed to overgrazing and fire suppression. Removing the ashe juniper and allowing native grasses to reestablish in the area as a brush management conservation practice (hereinafter referred to as "brush management") might change the hydrology in the watershed. These hydrologic changes might include changes to surface-water runoff, evapotranspiration, or groundwater recharge. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Federal, State, and local partners, examined the hydrologic effects of brush management in two adjacent watersheds in Comal County, Tex. Hydrologic data were collected in the watersheds for 3-4 years (pre-treatment) depending on the type of data, after which brush management occurred on one watershed (treatment watershed) and the other was left in its original condition (reference watershed). Hydrologic data were collected in the study area for another 6 years (post-treatment). These hydrologic data included rainfall, streamflow, evapotranspiration, and water quality. Groundwater recharge was not directly measured, but potential groundwater recharge was calculated by using a simplified mass balance approach. This fact sheet summarizes highlights of the study from the USGS Scientific Investigations Report on which it is based.

Banta, J. Ryan; Slattery, Richard N.

2012-01-01

379

APPLICATION OF WATER-JET HORIZONTAL DRILLING TECHNOLOGY TO DRILL AND ACIDIZE HORIZONTAL DRAIN HOLES, TEDBIT (SAN ANDRES) FIELD, GAINES COUNTY, TEXAS  

SciTech Connect

The San Andres Formation is one of the major hydrocarbon-producing units in the Permian Basin, with multiple reservoirs contained within the dolomitized subtidal portions of upward shoaling carbonate shelf cycles. The test well is located in Tedbit (San Andres) Field in northeastern Gaines County, Texas, in an area of scattered San Andres production associated with local structural highs. Selected on the basis of geological and historical data, the Oil and Gas Properties Wood No. 1 well is considered to be typical of a large number of San Andres stripper wells in the Permian Basin. Thus, successful completion of horizontal drain holes in this well would demonstrate a widely applicable enhanced recovery technology. Water-jet horizontal drilling is an emerging technology with the potential to provide significant economic benefits in marginal wells. Forecast benefits include lower recompletion costs and improved hydrocarbon recoveries. The technology utilizes water under high pressure, conveyed through small-diameter coiled tubing, to jet horizontal drain holes into producing formations. Testing of this technology was conducted with inconclusive results. Paraffin sludge and mechanical problems were encountered in the wellbore, initially preventing the water-jet tool from reaching the kick-off point. After correcting these problems and attempting to cut a casing window with the water-jet milling assembly, lateral jetting was attempted without success.

Michael W. Rose

2005-09-22

380

An Integrated Study of the Grayburg/San Andres Reservoir, Foster and South Cowden Fields, Ector County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

A project to recover economic amounts of oil from a very mature oil field is being conducted by Laguna Petroleum Corporation of Midland, Texas, with partial funding from a U. S. Department of Energy grant to study shallow carbonate rock reservoirs. The objectives of the project are to use modern engineering methods to optimize oil field management and to use geological and geophysical data to recover untapped potential within the petroleum reservoirs. The integration of data and techniques from these disciplines has yielded results greater than those achievable without their cooperation. The cost of successfully accomplishing these goals is to be low enough for even small independent operators to afford. This article is a report describing accomplishments for the fiscal year 1997-1998.

Robinson, William C.; Trentham, Robert C.; Widner, Kevin; Wienbrandt, Richard

1999-06-22

381

The geology, ground water, and surface subsidence of the Baytown-La Porte area, Harris County, Texas  

E-print Network

eddie Vg~ Amp Buhgltted to the iracbaete 'ohool ef the AgrlcJ1'L~ B. K~ &. oo4a11icsl C013t'ge of ~ezwe ill @extol AQflllm~at of the req~eieute for @hc elegize of yd&'lpga Gq' ' Cg' ~P' A~t 19&R THE GEOLOGY~ GBNHQ biATi&~ AJR SURFACF..., SVHSXQEK'GE QF THE RAXTQMN Ik PQRTE AREA~ HARRXS QQQHTYp TEXAS A Thesis Approved ae to stFXe and oontent bFt Ghairnan of Connect e / Head of Department August~ 1958 Ab tra t 4 Xn't 1c4'action ~ ~ ~ i"", c. , e;. nd . co. . 4 o? inrc'cti, ";at...

Gray, Eddie Vaughn

1958-01-01

382

Estimated rates of groundwater recharge to the Chicot, Evangeline and Jasper aquifers by using environmental tracers in Montgomery and adjacent counties, Texas, 2008 and 2011  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Montgomery County is in the northern part of the Houston, Texas, metropolitan area, the fourth most populous metropolitan area in the United States. As populations have increased since the 1980s, groundwater has become an important resource for public-water supply and industry in the rapidly growing area of Montgomery County. Groundwater availability from the Gulf Coast aquifer system is a primary concern for water managers and community planners in Montgomery County and requires a better understanding of the rate of recharge to the system. The Gulf Coast aquifer system in Montgomery County consists of the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers, the Burkeville confining unit, and underlying Catahoula confining system. The individual sand and clay sequences of the aquifers composing the Gulf Coast aquifer system are not laterally or vertically continuous on a regional scale; however, on a local scale, individual sand and clay lenses can extend over several miles. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Lone Star Groundwater Conservation District, collected groundwater-quality samples from selected wells within or near Montgomery County in 2008 and analyzed these samples for concentrations of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), tritium (3H), helium-3/tritium (3He/3H), helium-4 (4He), and dissolved gases (DG) that include argon, carbon dioxide, methane, nitrogen and oxygen. Groundwater ages, or apparent age, representing residence times since time of recharge, were determined by using the assumption of a piston-flow transport model. Most of the environmental tracer data indicated the groundwater was recharged prior to the 1950s, limiting the usefulness of CFCs, SF6, and 3H concentrations as tracers. In many cases, no tracer was usable at a well for the purpose of estimating an apparent age. Wells not usable for estimating an apparent age were resampled in 2011 and analyzed for concentrations of major ions and carbon-14 (14C). At six of these wells, additional 4He and DG samples were collected and analyzed. Recharge rates estimated from environmental tracer data are dependent upon several hydrogeologic variables and have inherent uncertainties. By using the recharge estimates derived from samples collected from 14 wells completed in the Chicot aquifer for which apparent groundwater ages could be determined, recharge to the Chicot aquifer ranged from 0.2 to 7.2 inches (in.) per year (yr). Based on data from one well, estimated recharge to the unconfined zone of the Evangeline aquifer (outcrop) was 0.1 in./yr. Based on data collected from eight wells, estimated rates of recharge to the confined zone of the Evangeline aquifer ranged from less than 0.1 to 2.8 in./yr. Based on data from one well, estimated recharge to the unconfined zone of the Jasper aquifer (outcrop) was 0.5 in./yr. Based on data collected from nine wells, estimated rates of recharge to the confined zone of the Jasper aquifer ranged from less than 0.1 to 0.1 in./yr. The complexity of the hydrogeology in the area, uncertainty in the conceptual model, and numerical assumptions required in the determination of the recharge rates all pose limitations and need to be considered when evaluating these data on a countywide or regional scale. The estimated recharge rates calculated for this study are specific to each well location and should not be extrapolated or inferred as a countywide average. Local variations in the hydrogeology and surficial conditions can affect the recharge rate at a local scale.

Oden, Timothy D.; Truini, Margot

2013-01-01

383

Oklahoma Biological Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Associated with the state of Oklahoma and the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Oklahoma, this Web site provides a wealth of information on the flora, fauna, and ecological communities found throughout the state. The site offers a variety of databases and literature collections on a variety of subjects including rare species, woody plants, breeding birds, and much more. The site is easy to navigate, and most searches can be executed simply. Some general information on biodiversity and tips on information sources for the non-specialist make this site valuable to a broader audience.

1969-12-31

384

Oklahoma Climate Data  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Produced by the Oklahoma Climatological Survey, the Oklahoma Climate Data Web site offers information on various weather topics for the state that include normals and extremes, a rainfall update, monthly summaries, climate event summaries, and a weather timeline. The data is presented in tables, charts, illustrations, or Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) files (e.g., the timeline that goes back to 1900). A very interesting collection of facts, this site is a great example of a public agency offering quality information of their work to the public.

385

Senate Bill 1528 STATE OF TEXAS  

E-print Network

AFFIDAVIT Senate Bill 1528 STATE OF TEXAS § § COUNTY OF ________________ § Before me and correct. 2. I graduated or will graduate from a Texas high school or received my GED certificate in Texas. 3. I resided in Texas for thirty-six months leading up to graduation from high school or receiving

Mohanty, Saraju P.

386

Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food, and Forestry -Forestry Service Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service  

E-print Network

E-988 Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food, and Forestry - Forestry Service Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service United States Department of Agriculture - Forestry Service Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation Natural Resources Conservation Service Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

387

9th Annual Oklahoma Native American Youth Language Fair Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History  

E-print Network

9th Annual Oklahoma Native American Youth Language Fair Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History University of Oklahoma Elder Voices, Youth Choices from the Oklahoma Native American Youth Language Fair! We are pleased

Oklahoma, University of

388

75 FR 48384 - Texas Disaster #TX-00361  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Zapata. Contiguous Counties (Economic Injury Loans Only): Texas: Brooks, Crockett, Dimmit Duval, Edwards, Kenedy, Kinney La Salle Mcmullen, Sutton, Terrell, Uvalde, Willacy, Zavala. The Interest Rates...

2010-08-10

389

77 FR 66601 - Northern Natural Gas Company; Notice of Availability of the Environmental Assessment for the...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Station, Ochiltree County, Texas, MP 38.47; Beaver Compressor Station, Beaver County, Oklahoma, MP 0.00; Northern/CNG Interconnect, Beaver County, Oklahoma, MP 10.35; Englewood Branch Line, Clark County, Kansas, MP 37.91;...

2012-11-06

390

Oklahoma and SREB  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) is a nonprofit organization that works collaboratively with Oklahoma and 15 other member states to improve education at every level--from pre-K to postdoctoral study--through many effective programs and initiatives. SREB's "Challenge to Lead" Goals for Education, which call for the region to lead the

Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2009

2009-01-01

391

Oklahoma Sheriffs' Association Ok ahoma Sheriff  

E-print Network

Oklahoma Sheriffs' Association Ok ahoma Sheriff The Official Magazine for Oklahoma Sher iffs was recently developed by the Oklahoma Office of Homeland Security (OKOHS), Oklahoma Council on Law Enforcement the current credentialing system already implemented in the state of Oklahoma. In addition to obtaining

Harms, Kyle E.

392

Chickasaw Plum for Wildlife in Oklahoma  

E-print Network

Chickasaw Plum for Wildlife in Oklahoma E-1026 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University #12;Chickasaw Plum for Wildlife in Oklahoma Authors from the Department of Natural Resource Ecology and Management, Oklahoma State University

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

393

Investigation of Soil Moisture - Vegetation Interactions in Oklahoma  

E-print Network

INVESTIGATION OF SOIL MOISTURE ? VEGETATION INTERACTIONS IN OKLAHOMA A Thesis by TRENTON W. FORD Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, Steven M. Quiring Committee Members, Oliver W. Frauenfeld John Nielsen-Gammon Head of Department, Vatche P. Tchakerian May 2013 Major Subject: Geography Copyright 2013 Trenton W. Ford...

Ford, Trenton W.

2013-03-06

394

Hydrologic Conditions and Quality of Rainfall and Storm Runoff in Agricultural and Rangeland Areas in San Patricio County, Texas, 2000-2001  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During 2000?2001, rainfall and runoff were monitored in one mixed agricultural watershed and two rangeland watersheds in San Patricio County, located in the Coastal Bend area of South Texas. During this period, five rainfall samples were collected and analyzed for selected nutrients. Ten runoff samples from nine runoff events were collected at the three watershed monitoring stations. Runoff samples were analyzed for selected nutrients, major ions, trace elements, pesticides, and bacteria. Study area rainfall during 2000 and 2001 was 33.27 and 28.20 inches, respectively, less than the long-term average annual of 36.31 inches. Total runoff from the study area watersheds during 2000?2001 was 2.46 inches; the regional average is about 2 inches per year. Rainfall and runoff during the study period was typical of historical patterns, with periods of below average rainfall interspersed with extreme events. Three individual storm events accounted for about 29 percent of the total rainfall and 86 percent of the total runoff during 2000?2001. Runoff concentrations of nutrients, major ions, and trace elements generally were larger in the mixed agricultural watershed than runoff concentrations in the rangeland watersheds. Pesticides were detected in two of eight runoff samples. Three pesticides (atrazine, deethylatrazine, and trifluralin) were detected in very small concentrations; only deethylatrazine was detected in a concentration greater than the laboratory minimum reporting level. Bacteria in agricultural and rangeland runoff is a potential water-quality concern as all fecal coliform and E. coli densities in the runoff samples exceeded Texas Surface Water Quality Standards for receiving waters. However, runoff and relatively large bacteria densities represent very brief and infrequent conditions, and the effect on downstream water is not known. Rainfall deposition is a major source of nitrogen delivered to the study area. Rainfall nitrogen (mostly ammonia and nitrate) exceeded the runoff yield. The average annual rainfall deposition of total nitrogen on the study area watersheds was 1.3 pounds per acre. In contrast, an average annual yield of 0.57 and 0.21 pound per acre of total nitrogen in runoff exited the mixed agricultural watershed and the rangeland watersheds, respectively.

Ockerman, Darwin J.

2002-01-01

395

A Unique Yttrofluorite-Hosted Giant Heavy Rare Earth Deposit: Round Top Mountain, Hudspeth County, Texas, USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Round Top Mountain is a surface-exposed peraluminous rhyolite laccolith, enriched in heavy rare earth elements, as well as niobium-tantalum, beryllium, lithium, fluorine, tin, rubidium, thorium, and uranium. The extreme extent of the deposit (diameter one mile) makes it a target for recovery of valuable yttrium and HREEs, and possibly other scarce elements. The Texas Bureau of Economic Geology estimated the laccolith mass as at least 1.6 billion tons. A Preliminary Economic Assessment for Texas Rare Earth Resources listed an inferred mineral resource of 430,598,000 kg REOs (rare earth oxides), with over 70% Y+HREEs (YHREE). Put in global perspective, China is thought to produce ~25,000 tons YHREE per year, and exports but a small fraction of that. Because of the extremely fine grain size of the late-phase fluorine-carried critical fluid mineralization, it has not been clear which minerals host the YHREEs. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy experiments at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource revealed that virtually all of the YHREE content resides in yttrofluorite, rather than in the other reported REE minerals in the deposit, bastnaesite and xenotime. The extended x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectra of the sample suite were all quite similar, and proved a close match to known model compound specimens of yttrofluorite from two locations, in Sweden and New Mexico. Small spectral variation between the two model compounds and among the samples is attributable to the variable elemental composition and altervalent substitutional nature of yttrofluorite (Ca [1-x] Y,REE [x])F[2+x]. We found no other reported deposit in the world in which yttrofluorite is the exclusive, or even more than a minor, YHREE host mineral. Leaching experiments show that the YHREEs are easily liberated by dissolution with dilute sulfuric acid, due to the solubility of yttrofluorite. Flotation separation of the yttrofluorite had been demonstrated, but was rendered inefficient by the micron-scale grain size of the yttrofluorite. Our laboratory leaching experiments with different acid strengths, grain sizes, and exposure times showed up to 90% recovery of the YHREEs. As expected, similar recoveries were obtained from longer exposure times at lower sulfuric acid concentration. Optimal grain size is in the 2-10 mm range. Thus a heap leach of the deposit is likely feasible, aided by the fact that 90-95% of the rock comprises insoluble and unreactive quartz and feldspars. The absence of overburden, proximity (a few km) to an interstate highway and major rail systems, temperate climate, and favorable political location enhance the potential and appeal for development of a heap leach operation. The grade of the deposit is just over 0.05% total rare earth elements plus yttrium. Although some might consider this sub-economic, it is in the range of the South China ionic clay deposits that supply essentially all of the world's YHREEs. Further, the grade is remarkably consistent through 1657 samples from 64 reverse-circulation drill holes with a total sampled interval of 30,353 feet. This consistency of grade permits accurate economic assessment and prediction, an unchanging ore grade and mine feedstock over life of mine, and a single REE separation chemistry to be developed. Thus mine and separation procedures need only be developed and optimized once.

Pingitore, N. E.; Clague, J. W.; Gorski, D.

2013-12-01

396

Oklahoma NASA EPSCoR  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The mission of Oklahoma EPSCoR is to make Oklahoma researchers more successful in competing for research funding. Specific goals, objectives, and strategies were developed for each federal EPSCoR program, based on federal and state needs. A theme of stimulating collaboration among campuses and building on common research strengths is a strong component of the Oklahoma EPSCoR strategic plan. It extends also to our relationships with the federal agencies, and wherever possible, Oklahoma EPSCoR projects are developed collaboratively with federal research laboratories and program offices. Overall, Oklahoma EPSCoR seeks to capitalize on unique research capabilities and opportunities. The NASA EPSCoR Program in Oklahoma was developed through this grant as a joint effort between Oklahoma EPSCoR and the NASA Oklahoma Space Grant Consortium (OSGC). The major goal of the Oklahoma NASA EPSCoR Plan established in 1996 is to develop an academic research enterprise directed towards a long-term, self-sustaining, nationally competitive capability in areas of mutual self-interest to NASA and Oklahoma. Our final technical summary pie chart demonstrates the strong successes we have achieved during this period as a result of the award.

Snowden, Victoria Duca

2002-01-01

397

Geophysical Delineation of the Freshwater/Saline-Water Transition Zone in the Barton Springs Segment of the Edwards Aquifer, Travis and Hays Counties, Texas, September 2006  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During September 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Barton Springs/Edwards Aquifer Conservation District, conducted a geophysical pilot study to determine whether time-domain electromagnetic (TDEM) sounding could be used to delineate the freshwater/saline-water transition zone in the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards aquifer in Travis and Hays Counties, Texas. There was uncertainty regarding the application of TDEM sounding for this purpose because of the depth of the aquifer (200-500 feet to the top of the aquifer) and the relatively low-resistivity clayey units in the upper confining unit. Twenty-five TDEM soundings were made along four 2-3-mile-long profiles in a study area overlying the transition zone near the Travis-Hays County boundary. The soundings yield measurements of subsurface electrical resistivity, the variations in which were correlated with hydrogeologic and stratigraphic units, and then with dissolved solids concentrations in the aquifer. Geonics Protem 47 and 57 systems with 492-foot and 328-foot transmitter-loop sizes were used to collect the TDEM soundings. A smooth model (vertical delineation of calculated apparent resistivity that represents an estimate [non-unique] of the true resistivity) for each sounding site was created using an iterative software program for inverse modeling. The effectiveness of using TDEM soundings to delineate the transition zone was indicated by comparing the distribution of resistivity in the aquifer with the distribution of dissolved solids concentrations in the aquifer along the profiles. TDEM sounding data show that, in general, the Edwards aquifer in the study area is characterized by a sharp change in resistivity from west to east. The western part of the Edwards aquifer in the study area shows higher resistivity than the eastern part. The higher resistivity regions correspond to lower dissolved solids concentrations (freshwater), and the lower resistivity regions correspond to higher dissolved solids concentrations (saline water). On the basis of reasonably close matches between the inferred locations of the freshwater/saline-water transition zone in the Edwards aquifer in the study area from resistivities and from dissolved solids concentrations in three of the four profiles, TDEM sounding appears to be a suitable tool for delineating the transition zone.

Payne, J.D.; Kress, W.H.; Shah, S.D.; Stefanov, J.E.; Smith, B.A.; Hunt, B.B.

2007-01-01

398

North Central Texas Regional Public Transportation Coordination Plan  

E-print Network

North Central Texas Council of Governments North Central Texas Regional Public Transportation Coordination Plan Final Report December 21, 2006 North Central Texas Council of Governments North Central Texas Regional Public Transportation... Ken Shetter County Judge, Kaufman County Councilmember, City of Fort Worth Mayor, City of Burleson REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION COUNCIL 2006 ? 2007 Cynthia White, Chair Bill Hale, P.E. Chuck Silcox Commissioner, Denton County District Engineer...

North Central Texas Council of Governments

2006-12-21

399

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA CAMPUS ACTIVITIES COUNCIL SPEAKER BUREAU  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA CAMPUS ACTIVITIES COUNCIL SPEAKER BUREAU CONTRACT FOR SERVICES This Contract of Oklahoma Board of Regents, Norman, Oklahoma 73019, hereafter referred to as "SPONSOR: _____________________________ LOCATION: UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA, NORMAN, OKLAHOMA 73019

Oklahoma, University of

400

Geologic and hydrologic data for the municipal solid waste landfill facility, U.S. Army Air Defense Artillery Center and Fort Bliss, El Paso County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Geologic and hydrologic data for the Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Facility on the U.S. Army Air Defense Artillery Center and Fort Bliss in El Paso County, Texas, were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Department of the Army. The 106.03-acre landfill has been in operation since January 1974. The landfill contains household refuse, Post solid wastes, bulky items, grass and tree trimmings from family housing, refuse from litter cans, construction debris, classified waste (dry), dead animals, asbestos, and empty oil cans. The depth of the filled areas is about 30 feet and the cover, consisting of locally derived material, is 2 to 3 feet thick. Geologic and hydrologic data were collected at or adjacent to the landfill during (1) drilling of 10 30- to 31-foot boreholes that were completed with gas-monitoring probes, (2) drilling of a 59-foot borehole, (3) drilling of a 355-foot borehole that was completed as a ground-water monitoring well, and (4) in situ measurements made on the landfill cover. After completion, the gas- monitoring probes were monitored on a quarterly basis (1 year total) for gases generated by the landfill. Water samples were collected from the ground-water monitoring well for chemical analysis. Data collection is divided into two elements: geologic data and hydrologic data. Geologic data include lithologic descriptions of cores and cuttings, geophysical logs, soil- gas and ambient-air analyses, and chemical analyses of soil. Hydrologic data include physical properties, total organic carbon, and pH of soil and sediment samples; soil-water chloride and soil-moisture analyses; physical properties of the landfill cover; measurements of depth to ground water; and ground-water chemical analyses. Interpretation of data is not included in this report.

Abeyta, Cynthia G.; Frenzel, P.F.

1999-01-01

401

Comparison of irrigation pumpage and change in water storage of the High Plains Aquifer in Castro and Parmer counties, Texas, 1975-83  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An understanding of the relationship between irrigation pumpage and change in groundwater storage was needed to quantify the amount of water returning to the High Plains aquifer as a result of intensive irrigation in Castro and Parmer Counties, Texas. Irrigation pumpage for the 9-yr period, 1975-83, was estimated by using the Blaney-Criddle consumptive-use formula adjusted by a factor to account for irrigation demand and field-measured crop applications. Total estimated pumpage for the 9-yr period was 11,269,000 acre-ft and 8,914,000 acre-ft. The estimated pumpage was based on reported crop acreage data and LANDSAT acreage data, respectively. Aquifer storage for the same period was estimated as the product of specific yield, net water level change, and area. Change in storage was 5,168,00 acre-ft. Many of the areas of the largest change in storage also were the areas of the largest saturated thickness. The only locations that did not experience substantial water level declines were the northwest and northeast parts of the study area. A comparison was made of water returning to the aquifer by calculating the difference between irrigation pumpage and the change in aquifer storage. Two estimates of this comparison, expressed as a percentage of irrigation pumpage, were obtained on the basis of two different sources of acreage data. This comparison was 54% of pumpage based on reported crop acreage data and 42% of pumpage based on LANDSAT interpreted acreage data. (Author 's abstract)

Mackey, G.W.

1987-01-01

402

An integrated study of the Grayburg/San Andres Reservoir, Foster and South Cowden Fields, Ector County, Texas. Annual report, August 1, 1996--July 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this two-phase study is to demonstrate an integrated methodology for reservoir characterization of shallow shelf carbonate reservoir that is feasible, and cost effective for the independent operator. Furthermore, it will provide one of the first public demonstrations of the enhancement of reservoir characterization using high-resolution three dimensional (3D) seismic data. This particular project is evaluating the Grayburg and San Andres reservoirs in the Foster and South Cowden Fields, Ector County, Texas. This 68 year old field was approaching its economic limit and the leases evaluated would have been abandoned in 10 years. A multidisciplinary approach to waterflood design and implementation, along with the addition of reserves by selective infill drilling and deepening, is being applied to this field. This approach in reservoir development will be applicable to a wide range of shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs throughout the US. The first phase of the project included the design, acquisition, and interpretation of the 3D seismic survey, the collection and evaluation of geologic (core and log) data, and engineering (historical production, well test, injection) data from a variety of sources. From this work, a geologically based production history model was simulated. Based on the recommendations made at the end of Phase One, three new wells were drilled, one existing well was deepened, two wells were worked over, one TA`d well was re-entered, and one well was converted to injection. In addition, the quality of the injection water was greatly improved, a step necessary prior to increasing injection in the project area. The realignment of the waterflood and all additional well work await the completion of the seismic based history match and engineering simulation.

Trentham, R.C.; Weinbrandt, R.; Robinson, W.

1997-12-01

403

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR INNOVATION AND  

E-print Network

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR INNOVATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, INC. June 30, 2009 #12;OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR INNOVATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, INC. June 30, 2009 Audited Standards ...........20 #12;Independent Auditors' Report Board of Regents Oklahoma Agricultural

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

404

77 FR 34890 - Oklahoma Regulatory Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...OK-034-FOR; Docket ID OSM-2012-0008] Oklahoma Regulatory Program AGENCY: Office of Surface...announcing receipt of a proposed amendment to the Oklahoma regulatory program (Oklahoma program) under the Surface Mining Control...

2012-06-12

405

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR INNOVATION AND  

E-print Network

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR INNOVATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, INC. June 30, 2010 #12;OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR INNOVATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, INC. June 30, 2010 Audited Standards ...........20 #12;Independent Auditors' Report Board of Regents Oklahoma Agricultural

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

406

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR INNOVATION AND  

E-print Network

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR INNOVATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, INC. June 30, 2011 #12;OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR INNOVATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, INC. June 30, 2011 Standards ...........18 #12; 1 Independent Auditors' Report Board of Regents Oklahoma Agricultural

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

407

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering  

E-print Network

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Assistant Professor The School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Oklahoma State University is pleased to invite applications for six. Salary and other compensation are competitive with major research institutions. Oklahoma State University

408

78 FR 31998 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00071  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Disaster Declaration 13586 and 13587] Oklahoma Disaster OK-00071 AGENCY: U...of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-4117-DR), dated 05/20...Loans): Cleveland, Lincoln, McClain, Oklahoma, Pottawatomie. Contiguous...

2013-05-28

409

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY June 30, 2008  

E-print Network

#12;OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY June 30, 2008 Audited Financial Statements Management's Discussion Standards ...................48 Oklahoma State University Foundation...................................................................................................Appendix C #12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;Independent Auditors' Report Board of Regents Oklahoma

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

410

Hydrologic conditions and water quality of rainfall and storm runoff for two agricultural areas of the Oso Creek watershed, Nueces County, Texas, 2005-08  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board, Coastal Bend Bays and Estuaries Program, and Texas AgriLife Research and Extension Center at Corpus Christi, studied hydrologic conditions and water quality of rainfall and storm runoff of two primarily agricultural subwatersheds of the Oso Creek watershed in Nueces County, Texas. One area, the upper West Oso Creek subwatershed, is about 5,145 acres. The other area, a subwatershed drained by an unnamed tributary to Oso Creek (hereinafter, Oso Creek tributary), is about 5,287 acres. Rainfall and runoff (streamflow) were continuously monitored at the outlets of the two subwatersheds during the study period October 2005-September 2008. Seventeen rainfall samples were collected and analyzed for nutrients and major inorganic ions. Twenty-four composite runoff water-quality samples (12 at West Oso Creek, 12 at Oso Creek tributary) were collected and analyzed for nutrients, major inorganic ions, and pesticides. Twenty-six discrete suspended-sediment samples (12 West Oso Creek, 14 Oso Creek tributary) and 17 bacteria samples (10 West Oso Creek, 7 Oso Creek tributary) were collected and analyzed. These data were used to estimate, for selected constituents, rainfall deposition to and runoff loads and yields from the two subwatersheds. Quantities of fertilizers and pesticides applied in the two subwatersheds were compared with quantities of nutrients and pesticides in rainfall and runoff. For the study period, total rainfall was greater than average. Most of the runoff from the two subwatersheds occurred in response to a few specific storm periods. The West Oso Creek subwatershed produced more runoff during the study period than the Oso Creek tributary subwatershed, 13.95 inches compared with 9.45 inches. Runoff response was quicker and peak flows were higher in the West Oso Creek subwatershed than in the Oso Creek tributary subwatershed. Total nitrogen runoff yield for the 3-year study period averaged 2.62 pounds per acre per year from the West Oso Creek subwatershed and 0.839 pound per acre per year from the Oso Creek tributary subwatershed. Total phosphorus yields from the West Oso Creek and Oso Creek tributary subwatersheds for the 3-year period were 0.644 and 0.419 pound per acre per year, respectively. Runoff yields of nitrogen and phosphorus were relatively small compared to inputs of nitrogen in fertilizer and rainfall deposition. Average annual runoff yield of total nitrogen (subwatersheds combined) represents about 2.5 percent of nitrogen applied as fertilizer to cropland in the watershed and nitrogen entering the subwatersheds through rainfall deposition. Average annual runoff yield of total phosphorus (subwatersheds combined) represents about 4.0 percent of the phosphorus in applied fertilizer and rainfall deposition. Suspended-sediment yields from the West Oso Creek subwatershed were more than twice those from the Oso Creek tributary subwatershed. The average suspended-sediment yield from the West Oso Creek subwatershed was 522 pounds per acre per year and from the Oso Creek tributary subwatershed was 139 pounds per acre per year. Twenty-four herbicides and eight insecticides were detected in runoff samples collected at the two subwatershed outlets. At the West Oso Creek site, 19 herbicides and 4 insecticides were detected; at the Oso Creek tributary site, 18 herbicides and 6 insecticides were detected. Fourteen pesticides were detected in only one sample at low concentrations (near the laboratory reporting level). Atrazine and atrazine degradation byproduct 2-chloro-4-isopropylamino-6-amino-s-triazine (CIAT) were detected in all samples. Glyphosate and glyphosate byproduct aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) were detected in all samples collected and analyzed during water years 2006-07 but were not included in analysis for samples collected in water year 2008. Of all pesticides detected in runoff, the highest runoff yields w

Ockerman, Darwin J.; Fernandez, Carlos J.

2010-01-01

411

Hydrologic Conditions and Quality of Rainfall and Storm Runoff for Two Agricultural Areas of the Oso Creek Watershed, Nueces County, Texas, 2005-07  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board, Coastal Bend Bays and Estuaries Program, and Texas AgriLife Research and Extension Center at Corpus Christi, studied hydrologic conditions and quality of rainfall and storm runoff of two (primarily) agricultural areas (subwatersheds) of the Oso Creek watershed in Nueces County, Texas. One area, the upper West Oso Creek subwatershed, is 5,145 acres. The other area, a subwatershed drained by an unnamed Oso Creek tributary (hereinafter, Oso Creek tributary), is 5,287 acres. Rainfall and runoff (streamflow) were continuously monitored at the outlets of the two subwatersheds during October 2005-September 2007. Fourteen rainfall samples were collected and analyzed for nutrients and major inorganic ions. Nineteen composite runoff samples (10 West Oso Creek, nine Oso Creek tributary) were collected and analyzed for nutrients, major inorganic ions, and pesticides. Twenty-two discrete suspended-sediment samples (10 West Oso Creek, 12 Oso Creek tributary) and 13 bacteria samples (eight West Oso Creek, five Oso Creek tributary) were collected and analyzed. These data were used to estimate, for selected constituents, rainfall deposition to and runoff loads and yields from the study subwatersheds. Quantities of fertilizers and pesticides applied in the subwatersheds were compared with quantities of nutrients and pesticides in rainfall and runoff. For the study period, total rainfall was greater than average. Most of the runoff at both subwatershed outlet sites occurred in response to a few specific storm periods. The West Oso Creek subwatershed produced more runoff during the study period than the Oso Creek tributary subwatershed, 10.83 inches compared with 7.28 inches. Runoff response was quicker and peak flows were higher in the West Oso Creek subwatershed than in the Oso Creek tributary subwatershed. Total nitrogen runoff yield for the 2-year study period averaged 2.61 pounds per acre per year from the West Oso Creek subwatershed and 0.966 pound per acre per year from the Oso Creek tributary subwatershed. Total phosphorus yields from the West Oso Creek and the Oso Creek tributary subwatersheds for the 2-year period were 0.776 and 0.498 pound per acre per year. Runoff yields of nitrogen and phosphorus were relatively small compared to inputs of nitrogen in fertilizer and rainfall deposition. Average annual runoff yield of total nitrogen (subwatersheds combined) represents about 2.4 percent of nitrogen applied as fertilizer and nitrogen entering the subwatersheds through rainfall deposition. Average annual runoff yield of total phosphorus (subwatersheds combined) represents about 4.4 percent of the phosphorus in applied fertilizer and rainfall deposition. Suspended-sediment yields from the West Oso Creek subwatershed were more than twice those from the Oso Creek tributary subwatershed. The average suspended-sediment yield from the West Oso Creek subwatershed was 582 pounds per acre per year. The average suspended-sediment yield from the Oso Creek tributary subwatershed was 257 pounds per acre per year. Twenty-two herbicides and eight insecticides were detected in runoff samples collected from the two subwatershed outlet sites. At the West Oso Creek site, 18 herbicides and four insecticides were detected, and at the Oso Creek tributary site, 17 herbicides and six insecticides. Seventeen pesticides were detected in only one sample at low concentrations (near the laboratory reporting level). Atrazine, atrazine degradation byproducts 2-chloro-4-isopropylamino-6-amino-s-triazine (CIAT) and 2-hydroxy-4-isopropylamino-6-ethylamino-s-triazine (OIET), glyphosate, and glyphosate byproduct aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) were detected in all samples. Of all pesticides detected in runoff, the highest runoff yields were for glyphosate, 0.013 pound per acre per year for the West Oso Creek subwatershed and 0.001 pound per acre per year for the Oso Creek t

Ockerman, Darwin J.

2008-01-01

412

USGS Water Resources of Oklahoma  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS): Water Resources of Oklahoma contains hydrologic data; information on current state water-resource projects; USGS maps and aerial photo images; USGS publications and presentations; technical resources; and information on the general climate and water quality monitoring programs. There is also a form for making water data requests; a drought watch for Oklahoma; analysis of daily and monthly water conditions for Oklahoma; and a Water Science for Schools site.

413

Ames Hole Oklahoma: Impact-formed petroleum reservoirs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ames Hole is a 16 km wide circular subsurface structure centered at 361[degrees]5[prime]north, 098[degrees]12[prime]west in Major County, northern Oklahoma. An impact origin is confirmed by the presence of shock metamorphosed mineral grains and impact melt rocks recovered from drill cores and by a negative Bouger gravity anomaly over its center. Buried about three km deep, the structure is composed of

Mchone

1996-01-01

414

Regional Transit Plan for the Central Texas State Planning Region  

E-print Network

Council of Governments Hill Country Transit District Hill Country Transit District Central Texas Council of Governments, MPO Heart of Central Texas Independent Living Center Central Texas Workforce Bell County Human Services, Killeen Bell County... Human Services, Temple The ARC of Texas Community Development, Killeen TxDOT - Medical Transportation TxDOT - Waco District Agencies and Organizations Represented Public Transportation Hill Country Transit District Funding Sources Texas...

Central Texas Regional Transportation Advisory Group

415

OklahomaState  

Cancer.gov

DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY, OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY is inviting applications for two full-time, Assistant Professor, tenure track positions in Quantitative Psychology and Clinical Health Psychology or Behavior Medicine beginning August, 2015. Candidates are expected to have a strong background in and dedication to scholarly activity, and to interact well with colleagues and students. They must also demonstrate the capacity to maintain a high quality research program leading to scholarly productivity in the form of professional publications, presentations, and grantsmanship.

416

Poultry Houses and Poultry Equipment for Texas.  

E-print Network

I cnAS AGKICULTURAL EXPE RlMENl' STATION BULLETIN NO. 207 JANUARY, 1917 -- - DIVISION OF POULTRY HUSBANDRY Poultry Houses and Poultry Equipment for Texas B. YOUNGBLOOD, DIRECTOR, COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS. [Blank Page in Original... Bulletin] TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION BULLETIN NO. 207 JANUARY, 1917 DIVISION OF POULTRY HUSBANDRY Poultry Houses and Poultry Equipment for Texas R. N. HARVEY, Poultry Husbandman, Texas Agricultural Experiment Station. J. C. OLSEN...

Harvey, R. N.; Olsen, J.C.; Kazmeier, F.W.; Conway, T.J.

1917-01-01

417

BLACK FORK MOUNTAIN ROADLESS AREA, ARAKANSAS AND OKLAHOMA.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Black Fork Mountain Roadless Area covers about 21 sq mi in the Ouachita National Forest in Polk County, Arkansas and LeFlore County, Oklahoma. On the basis of a mineral survey the area has little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral resources. Stone and sand and gravel suitable for construction purposes occur in the Jackfork Sandstone and the Stanley Shale which also occur outside the roadless area. Although the potential for gas and oil is unknown and no resource potential was identified, some investigators believe that there is a possibility for the occurrence of gas and oil in the roadless area.

Miller, Mary H.

1984-01-01

418

Effects of brush management on the hydrologic budget and water quality in and adjacent to Honey Creek State Natural Area, Comal County, Texas, 2001-10  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service, the Edwards Region Grazing Lands Conservation Initiative, the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board, the San Antonio River Authority, the Edwards Aquifer Authority, Texas Parks and Wildlife, the Guadalupe Blanco River Authority, and the San Antonio Water System, evaluated the hydrologic effects of ashe juniper (Juniperus ashei) removal as a brush management conservation practice in and adjacent to the Honey Creek State Natural Area in Comal County, Tex. By removing the ashe juniper and allowing native grasses to reestablish in the area as a brush management conservation practice, the hydrology in the watershed might change. Using a simplified mass balance approach of the hydrologic cycle, the incoming rainfall was distributed to surface water runoff, evapotranspiration, or groundwater recharge. After hydrologic data were collected in adjacent watersheds for 3 years, brush management occurred on the treatment watershed while the reference watershed was left in its original condition. Hydrologic data were collected for another 6 years. Hydrologic data include rainfall, streamflow, evapotranspiration, and water quality. Groundwater recharge was not directly measured but potential groundwater recharge was calculated using a simplified mass balance approach. The resulting hydrologic datasets were examined for differences between the watersheds and between pre- and post-treatment periods to assess the effects of brush management. The streamflow to rainfall relation (expressed as event unit runoff to event rainfall relation) did not change between the watersheds during pre- and post-treatment periods. The daily evapotranspiration rates at the reference watershed and treatment watershed sites exhibited a seasonal cycle during the pre- and post-treatment periods, with intra- and interannual variability. Statistical analyses indicate the mean difference in daily evapotranspiration rates between the two watershed sites is greater during the post-treatment than the pre-treatment period. Average annual rainfall, streamflow, evapotranspiration, and potential groundwater-recharge conditions were incorporated into a single hydrologic budget (expressed as a percentage of the average annual rainfall) applied to each watershed before and after treatment to evaluate the effects of brush management. During the post-treatment period, the percent average annual unit runoff in the reference watershed was similar to that in the treatment watershed, however, the difference in percentages of average annual evapotranspiration and potential groundwater recharge were more appreciable between the reference and treatment watersheds than during the pre-treatment period. Using graphical comparisons, no notable differences in major ion or nutrient concentrations were found between samples collected at the reference watershed (site 1C) and treatment watershed (site 2C) during pre- and post-treatment periods. Suspended-sediment loads were calculated from samples collected at sites 1C and 2T. The relation between suspended-sediment loads and streamflow calculated from samples collected from sites 1C and 2T did not exhibit a statistically significant difference during the pre-treatment period, whereas during the post-treatment period, relation between suspended-sediment loads and streamflow did exhibit a statistically significant difference. The suspended-sediment load to streamflow relations indicate that for the same streamflow, the suspended-sediment loads calculated from site 2T were generally less than suspended-sediment loads calculated from site 1C during the post-treatment period.

Banta, J. Ryan; Slattery, Richard N.

2011-01-01

419

78 FR 32007 - Environmental Impact Statement for Tulsa-Oklahoma City Passenger Rail Corridor, Oklahoma, Lincoln...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Statement for Tulsa--Oklahoma City Passenger Rail Corridor, Oklahoma, Lincoln, Creek...Oklahoma Department of Transportation (ODOT) Rail Division intend to prepare an EIS pursuant...for the State of Oklahoma High-Speed Rail Initiative: Tulsa--Oklahoma City...

2013-05-28

420

Assessment of potential for natural attenuation of chlorinated ethenes and ethanes in ground water at a petrochemical reclamation site, Harris County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Redox conditions in the Numerous Sand Channels Zone beneath a petrochemical reclamation site in Harris County, Texas, range from sulfate reducing to methanogenic as indicated by the presence of methane in ground water and the range of molecular hydrogen concentrations. Assessment of the potential for reductive dechlorination using BIOCHLOR as a screening tool indicated conditions favoring anaerobic degradation of chlorinated organic compounds in the Numerous Sand Channels Zone. Evidence supporting reductive dechlorination includes apparently biogenic cis-1,2-dichloroethene; an increased ratio of 1,2-dichloroethane to 1,1,2-trichloroethane downgradient from the assumed contaminant source area; ethene and methane concentrations greater than background concentrations within the area of the contaminant plume; and a positive correlation of the ratio of ethene to vinyl chloride as a function of methane concentrations. The body of evidence presented in this report argues for hydrogenolysis of trichloroethene to cis-1,2-dichloroethene; of 1,1,2-trichloroethane to 1,2-dichloroethane; and of vinyl chloride to ethene within the Numerous Sand Channels Zone. Simulations using BIOCHLOR yielded apparent first-order decay constants for reductive dechlorination in the sequence Tetrachloroethene --> trichloroethene --> cis-1,2-dichloroethene --> vinyl chloride --> ethene within the range of literature values reported for each compound and apparent first-order decay constants for reductive dechlorination in the sequence 1,1,2-trichloroethane --> 1,2-dichloroethane slightly greater than literature values reported for each compound along the upgradient segment of a simulated ground-water flowpath. Except for vinyl chloride, apparent rates of reductive dechlorination for all simulated species show a marked decrease along the downgradient segment of the simulated ground-water flowpath. Evidence for reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethenes within the Numerous Sand Channels Zone indicates potential for natural attenuation of chlorinated ethenes. Reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethanes apparently occurs to a lesser extent, indicating relatively less potential for natural attenuation of chlorinated ethanes. Additional data are needed on the concentrations and distribution of chlorinated ethenes and ethanes in individual fine sand intervals of the Numerous Sand Channels Zone. This information, combined with lower minimum reporting levels for future chloroethane analyses, might enable a more complete and quantitative assessment of the potential for natural attenuation at the site.

Huff, Glenn F.; Braun, Christopher L.; Lee, Roger W.

2000-01-01

421

An Integrated Hydrogeologic and Geophysical Investigation to Characterize the Hydrostratigraphy of the Edwards Aquifer in an Area of Northeastern Bexar County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In August 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the San Antonio Water System, did a hydrogeologic and geophysical investigation to characterize the hydrostratigraphy (hydrostratigraphic zones) and also the hydrogeologic features (karst features such as sinkholes and caves) of the Edwards aquifer in a 16-square-kilometer area of northeastern Bexar County, Texas, undergoing urban development. Existing hydrostratigraphic information, enhanced by local-scale geologic mapping in the area, and surface geophysics were used to associate ranges of electrical resistivities obtained from capacitively coupled (CC) resistivity surveys, frequency-domain electromagnetic (FDEM) surveys, time-domain electromagnetic (TDEM) soundings, and two-dimensional direct-current (2D-DC) resistivity surveys with each of seven hydrostratigraphic zones (equivalent to members of the Kainer and Person Formations) of the Edwards aquifer. The principal finding of this investigation is the relation between electrical resistivity and the contacts between the hydrostratigraphic zones of the Edwards aquifer and the underlying Trinity aquifer in the area. In general, the TDEM data indicate a two-layer model in which an electrical conductor underlies an electrical resistor, which is consistent with the Trinity aquifer (conductor) underlying the Edwards aquifer (resistor). TDEM data also show the plane of Bat Cave fault, a well-known fault in the area, to be associated with a local, nearly vertical zone of low resistivity that provides evidence, although not definitive, for Bat Cave fault functioning as a flow barrier, at least locally. In general, the CC resistivity, FDEM survey, and 2D-DC resistivity survey data show a sharp electrical contrast from north to south, changing from high resistivity to low resistivity across Bat Cave fault as well as possible karst features in the study area. Interpreted karst features that show relatively low resistivity within a relatively high-resistivity area likely are attributable to clay or soil filling a sinkhole. In general, faults are inferred where lithologic incongruity indicates possible displacement. Along most inferred faults, displacement was not sufficient to place different members of the Kainer or Person Formations (hydrostratigraphic zones) adjacent across the inferred fault plane. In general, the Kainer Formation (hydrostratigraphic zones V through VIII) has a higher resistivity than the Person Formation (hydrostratigraphic zones II through IV). Although resistivity variations from the CC resistivity, FDEM, and 2D-DC resistivity surveys, with mapping information, were sufficient to allow surface mapping of the lateral extent of hydrostratigraphic zones in places, resistivity variations from TDEM data were not sufficient to allow vertical delineation of hydrostratigraphic zones; however, the Edwards aquifer-Trinity aquifer contact could be identified from the TDEM data.

Shah, Sachin D.; Smith, Bruce D.; Clark, Allan K.; Payne, Jason D.

2008-01-01

422

Interpretation of Pennsylvania Bartlesville sandstone in southeastern Kansas and northeastern Oklahoma from continuous dipmeter and gamma-ray logs  

E-print Network

INTERPRETATION OF PENNSYLVANIAN BARTLESVILLE SANDSTONE IN SOUTHEASTERN KANSAS AND NORTHEASTERN OKLAHOMA FROM CONTINUOUS DIPMETER AND GAMMA-RAY LOGS A Thesis by DWIGHT STANLEY KRANZ Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1981 Major Subject: Geology INTERPRETATION OF PENNSYLVANIAN SARTLESVILLE SANDSTONE IN SOUTHEASTERN KANSAS AND NORTHEASTERN OKLAHOMA FROM CONTINUOUS DIPMETER AND GAMMA...

Kranz, Dwight Stanley

2012-06-07

423

Analysis of site structure and post-depositional disturbance at two Early Holocene components, Richard Beene site (41BX831), Bexar County, Texas  

E-print Network

, white-tailed deer, pronghorn, javelina, opossum, jackrabbit and cottontail rabbit, armadillo, squirrels, gray wolf, coyote, ringtail, jaguar, and cougar (Blair 1952). Stretching from northeastern Texas and extending into the southern portion of Bexar... ..............................22 III PREHISTORIC BACKGROUND ...................................................................24 South-Central Texas Chronology..........................................................27 Behavioral Transition...

Mason, James Bryan

2004-09-30

424

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY JUNE 30, 2001  

E-print Network

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY JUNE 30, 2001 #12;OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY June 30, 2001 Table Appendix B--General University Appendix C--Schedule of Agency Acronyms #12;i OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY Management's Discussion and Analysis Overview of the Financial Statements and Financial Analysis The Oklahoma

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

425

OKLAHOMA STATE Report of Independent Accountants' Application  

E-print Network

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY Report of Independent Accountants' Application of Agreed-Upon Procedures to Assist the University in Complying with NCAA Bylaws 6.2.3.1 Year Ended June 30, 2007 #12;OKLAHOMA STATE.2.3.1 .......................................................................................................................................... 1 Intercollegiate Athletics Program Accounts of Oklahoma State University and the Oklahoma State

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

426

Chemical analyses of surface waters in Oklahoma, September - December, 1944  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Red River at Denison Dam, Texas Sport samples were collected at the remainder of the stations. The analyses of the spot samples were made largely in a laboratory provided by the Oklahoma A. & M. College, under the supervision of Dr. O.M. Smith, Head, Department of Chemistry; Dr. S.R. Wood, Associate Professor of Chemistry; and W.W. Hastings, U.S. Geological Survey. The daily samples were analyzed in the water resources laboratory of the Geological Survey at Austin, Texas. These data have been summarized in a report to the Oklahoma Planning and Resources Board prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey, March 1, 1945. The streams of Oklahoma are classified into two major drainage basins: the Arkansas River and the Red River and their tributaries. The attached analyses are arranged in geographical order for their respective drainage basins, with records listed in downstream order for stations on the main stem first, followed by the analyses for the tributaries. When available, the mean daily discharge is given for the analyses.

U.S. Geological Survey

1945-01-01

427

James Douglas "J.D." Hazlewood was born October 26, 1908, on Oak Creek in Coke County (now Tom Green County), Texas. He was the fourth of five sons of farmer and rancher William Temple Hazlewood  

E-print Network

James Douglas "J.D." Hazlewood was born October 26, 1908, on Oak Creek in Coke County (now Tom and his wife Lula Douglas Hazlewood. J.D. grew up on the family ranch on Oak Creek until 1914 when of office for Randall County Attorney. And on February 7, 1937, he married Mary Frances Gowen in Austin

Rock, Chris

428

77 FR 61645 - Exelon Generation Company, LLC, Victoria County Station Site; Notice of Withdrawal of Application...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...NRC-2012-0165] Exelon Generation Company, LLC, Victoria County Station Site; Notice of Withdrawal...for an Early Site Permit (ESP) for the Victoria County Station (VCS) site located in Victoria County, Texas to the U.S. Nuclear...

2012-10-10

429

The Composition of the Soils of the Texas Panhandle.  

E-print Network

TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION BULLETIN NO. 173 FEBRUARY, 1915 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY The Composition of the Soils of the Texas Panhandle POSTOFFICE: COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS VON BOECKMA.NN-JONY6 CO., PRINTERS, AUSTIN..., TEXAS 1915 BLANK PAGE IN ORIGINAL All5-715-15m TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION BULLETIN NO. 173. FEBRUARY, 1915. DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY The Composition of the Soils of the Texas Panhandle BY G. S. FRAPS, Ph. D., CHEMIST IN CHARGE; STATE...

Fraps, G. S.

1915-01-01

430

Iodine in Texas Soils.  

E-print Network

LT BKAKY. A Ik M COLLEGE, TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS BULLETIN NO. 579 OCTOBER 1939 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY IODINE IN TEXAS SOILS AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE....8, Blackland Prairies 5.8, Basins and Mountains 6.6, Rolling Plains 7.1, Rio Grande Plain 8.0, Grand Prairie 10.2, and Edwards Plateau 11.3 parts per million. Heavy textured soils con- tained more iodine than light textured soils. A high iodine content...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Fudge, J. F. (Joseph Franklin)

1939-01-01

431

Herps of Texas  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Funded by the University of Texas and the Texas Memorial Museum, this Website offers useful life history information on the Herps (lizards, turtles, snakes, crocodilians, salamanders, frogs, and toads) of Texas. Each broad group is further classified into Families, and each species is identified by scientific (Latin) and common name. To access descriptive and graphical information, click on the species of choice. Each species entry includes one or more color photograph(s), diagnostic features, natural history information, and a color range map (presence:absence, by county). The concise information in this useful resource should be helpful to seasoned researchers and beginners, alike.

432

One of the high-priority issues addressed by Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service is helping county  

E-print Network

impact their health and wellness. The challenge faced by our county faculty is diffusing these programs-resource audiences, basic nutrition, food safety, health and wellness, and childhood overweight. NOTE: in 2014, a new is helping county residents improve their health. Research shows at least 50% of health status is due

433

Texas Historic Sites Atlas  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Most everything is a bit bigger down around the Rio Grande, and the Texas Historic Sites Atlas fits neatly into that bit of folk wisdom about things in the Lone Star state. All told, the Atlas contains close to 300,000 historic and archaeological site records documenting Texas history. As all of this information is linked up to mapping software, visitors can find a historic site's location and its current condition. To give users a sense of what they can locate here, the database includes records for Texas Historical Markers, county courthouses, cemeteries, and even the fabled East Texas sawmills. For persons with a penchant for historic preservation, cultural geography, or just the state of Texas, this site is a real treat.

434

Fort Cobb Reservoir Watershed, Oklahoma and Thika River Watershed, Kenya Twinning Pilot Project  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Fort Cobb Reservoir Watershed (FCRW) (830 km2) is a watershed within the HELP Washita Basin, located in Caddo and Washita Counties, OK. It is also a benchmark watershed under USDA's Conservation Effects Assessment Project, a national project to quantify environmental effects of USDA and other conservation programs. Population in south-western Oklahoma, in which FCRW is located, is sparse and

D. Moriasi; J. Steiner; J. Arnold; P. Allen; J. Dunbar; C. Shisanya; J. Gathenya; J. Nyaoro; J. Sang

2007-01-01

435

Progress Report Substation No.7, Spur, Texas, 1909-1914.  

E-print Network

. B. S., Animal Husbandman, rn Charge of Farm SUBSTATION NO. 11: Nacogdoches, Nacog- doghes County G. T. McN~ss. Superintendent SUBSTATION NO. 12: Chillicothe. Harde- man County ****R. W. EDWARDS, B. S., Superintendent V. E. HAFNER, B. S...TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION BULLETIN NO. 2 18 SEPTEMBER, 1917 PROGRESS REPORT, SUBSTATION NO. 7, SPUR, TEXAS . , B. YOUNGBLOOD, DIRECTOR, COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS. AunlLuL I UKAL AIVD-~LIIAITYILAL LULLEECVPTE~A~ W. B...

Dickson, R.E.

1917-01-01

436

Cotton Variety Experiments: Substation No. 3, Angleton, Texas  

E-print Network

.. Superintendent No. 2. Troup, Smith County W. S. I~OTCHKISS. Superintendent No. 9. Pecom, Reeves County . V. L. CORY. B. S.. Superintendent No. 1. Angleton. Braroria County V. E. HAFNER, B. S., Superi~tendeni No. LO. (Feeding and Breeding Substation...TEXAS AfiRlCULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS ' W. B. BIZZELL, President BULLETIN NO. 274 FEBRUARY, 1921 DIVISION OF AGRONOMY COTTON VARIETY EXPERIMENTS SUBSTATION NO. 3, ANGLETON, TEXAS B. YOUNGBLOOD...

Reynolds, E. B. (Elbert Brunner)

1921-01-01

437

Making it: inside perceptions on success, relapse, and recidivism by In Prison Therapeutic Treatment Community (IPTC) program parolees in Harris County Texas  

E-print Network

concurred that offenders convicted for crimes of property and drug possession record the highest recidivism rates (Bryan, 1996, May). This and other significant factors remain constant when describing the "high risk" and "successful" profiles. Age... conviction for a new offense, and 10 % returned for new violations" (Sabol, Adams, Parthasarathy, & Yuan, 2000, September, p.5). Only race and crime by offense variables did not concur with the Texas findings. However, the Texas recidivism rate rose...

Hall, Michael Bruce

2004-11-15

438

The lithology, environment of deposition, and reservoir properties of sandstones in the Upper Queen Formation (Guadalupian, Permian) at Concho Bluff Queen Field, Crane County, Texas  

E-print Network

total body BMD and calcium content information. The Texas AdtM University College of Veterinary Medicine provided bones &+a sheep for this study. Each sheep was slaughtered and dismembered. Four leg bones, one from each leg, were sent to the Texas A... be better measured by xelating bone strength to calcium content, a clearer understanding of bone diseases as related to calcium content will develop. Data from these expeximent showed a correlation between bone mineral density and calcium content in sheep...

Newsom, Douglas Floyd

1989-01-01

439

Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Oklahoma Water for Sustainable Environments (ISE) at Oklahoma State University promotes interdisciplinary environmental research development of the natural environment. The Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute (OWRRI) is located

440

Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 Oklahoma Water for Sustainable Environments (ISE) at Oklahoma State University continues to promote interdisciplinary, and sustainably developing the natural environment. The Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute (OWRRI

441

Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Oklahoma Water for Sustainable Environments (ISE) at Oklahoma State University promotes interdisciplinary environmental research development of the natural environment. The Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute (OWRRI) is located

442

OklahOma State UniverSity JUne 30, 2010  

E-print Network

OklahOma State UniverSity JUne 30, 2010 #12;OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY June 30, 2010 AUDITED.................................................................................................61 Discretely Presented Component Units Oklahoma State University Foundation..............................................................................................78 OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY DETAILED SCHEDULE OF EXPENDITURES OF FEDERAL AWARDS General University

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

443

Oklahoma Industrial Energy Management Program  

E-print Network

, closed circuit television short courses on selected energy management topics, energy auditing, industrial energy audits (through the Oklahoma Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Center) , energy and water management research, and two courses currently being...

Turner, W. C.; Estes, C. B.

1982-01-01

444

Industrial extension, the Oklahoma way  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Oklahoma has established a customer-driven industrial extension system. A publicly-chartered, private non-profit corporation, the Oklahoma Alliance for Manufacturing Excellence, Inc. (`the Alliance') coordinates the system. The system incorporates principles that Oklahoma manufacturers value: (1) decentralization and local accessibility; (2) coordinated existing resources; (3) comprehensive help; (4) interfirm cooperation; (5) pro-active outreach; (6) self- help and commitment from firms; (7) customer governance; and (8) performance accountability. The Oklahoma system consists of: (1) a network of locally-based broker/agents who work directly with manufacturers to diagnose problems and find appropriate assistance; (2) a group of industry sector specialists who collect and disseminate sector specific technological and market intelligence to the broker/agents and their clients; (3) all the specialized public and private sector resources coordinated by the system; and (4) a customer- driven coordination and evaluation mechanism, the Alliance.

Farrell, Edmund J.

1994-03-01

445

Promoting School Readiness in Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The results of the research, conducted on Oklahoma's universal Pre-kindergarten (Pre-k) program, on children of Tulsa Public Schools (TPS), the largest school district in the state to increase the school readiness are presented.

Gormley, William T., Jr.; Gayer, Ted

2005-01-01

446

A conceptual model of the hydrogeologic framework, geochemistry, and groundwater-flow system of the Edwards-Trinity and related aquifers in the Pecos County region, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A conceptual model of the hydrogeologic framework, geochemistry, and groundwater-flow system of the Edwards-Trinity and related aquifers, which include the Pecos Valley, Igneous, Dockum, Rustler, and Capitan Reef aquifers, was developed as the second phase of a groundwater availability study in the Pecos County region in west Texas. The first phase of the study was to collect and compile groundwater, surface-water, water-quality, geophysical, and geologic data in the area. The third phase of the study involves a numerical groundwater-flow model of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer in order to simulate groundwater conditions based on various groundwater-withdrawal scenarios. Resource managers plan to use the results of the study to establish management strategies for the groundwater system. The hydrogeologic framework is composed of the hydrostratigraphy, structural features, and hydraulic properties of the groundwater system. Well and geophysical logs were interpreted to define the top and base surfaces of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer units. Elevations of the top and base of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer generally decrease from the southwestern part of the study area to the northeast. The thicknesses of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer units were calculated using the interpolated top and base surfaces of the hydrostratigraphic units. Some of the thinnest sections of the aquifer were in the eastern part of the study area and some of the thickest sections were in the Pecos, Monument Draw, and Belding-Coyanosa trough areas. Normal-fault zones, which formed as growth and collapse features as sediments were deposited along the margins of more resistant rocks and as overlying sediments collapsed into the voids created by the dissolution of Permian-age evaporite deposits, were delineated based on the interpretation of hydrostratigraphic cross sections. The lowest aquifer transmissivity values were measured in the eastern part of the study area; the highest transmissivity values were measured in a faulted area of the Monument Draw trough. Hydraulic conductivity values generally exhibited the same trends as the transmissivity values. Groundwater-quality data and groundwater-level data were used in context with the hydrogeologic framework to assess the chemical characteristics of water from different sources, regional groundwater-flow paths, recharge sources, the mixing of water from different sources, and discharge in the study area. Groundwater-level altitudes generally decrease from southwest to northeast and regional groundwater flow is from areas of recharge south and west to the north and northeast. Four principal sources of recharge to the Edwards-Trinity aquifer were identified: (1) regional flow that originated as recharge northwest of the study area, (2) runoff from the Barilla, Davis, and Glass Mountains, (3) return flow from irrigation, and (4) upwelling from deeper aquifers. Results indicated Edwards-Trinity aquifer water in the study area was dominated by mineralized, regional groundwater flow that most likely recharged during the cooler, wetter climates of the Pleistocene with variable contributions of recent, local recharge. Groundwater generally flows into the down-dip extent of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer where it discharges into overlying or underlying aquifer units, discharges from springs, discharges to the Pecos River, follows a regional flow path east out of the study area, or is withdrawn by groundwater wells. Structural features such as mountains, troughs, and faults play a substantial role in the distribution of recharge, local and regional groundwater flow, spring discharge, and aquifer interaction.

Bumgarner, Johnathan R.; Stanton, Gregory P.; Teeple, Andrew P.; Thomas, Jonathan V.; Houston, Natalie A.; Payne, Jason D.; Musgrove, MaryLynn

2012-01-01

447

Geophysical Analysis of the Salmon Peak Formation Near Amistad Reservoir Dam, Val Verde County, Texas, and Coahuila, Mexico, March 2006, to Aid in Piezometer Placement  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Since 1992, numerous sinkholes have developed northwest of the Amistad Reservoir dam on the Rio Grande. Increases in the discharge of springs south of the dam, on the western side of the Rio Grande, in Coahuila, Mexico, have been documented. In 1995 the Mexico Section of the International Boundary and Water Commission (IBWC) completed a study of the western embankment (Coahuila, Mexico) of the dam that included surface geophysics, borehole geophysics, and installation of piezometers to learn more about subsurface conditions. As part of a 5-year safety inspection in 2005, technical advisors recommended that one line of similarly constructed piezometers be installed on the eastern embankment (Val Verde County, Texas) of the dam for comparison of water levels (potentiometric head) on both the western and eastern embankments of Amistad Reservoir dam. To provide technical assistance for the horizontal and vertical placement of piezometers on the eastern embankment of Amistad Reservoir dam, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Section of the IBWC, conducted a study along both the western and eastern embankments of Amistad Reservoir dam. The study involved an integrated approach using surface and borehole geophysical methods. In the western embankment investigation, geological and geophysical characteristics that indicate relatively large water-yielding properties of the Salmon Peak Formation were identified. The direct-current (DC) resistivity method was selected as the surface geophysical reconnaissance technique to correlate relatively large water-yielding properties of the Salmon Peak Formation, identified from analysis of borehole geophysical logs, with variations in subsurface resistivity. The dipole-dipole array and the reciprocal Schlumberger array were selected as the most applicable DC resistivity arrays. Two resistivity units were identified in both the dipole-dipole array data and the reciprocal Schlumberger array data along DC resistivity profiles on both embankments. Resistivity unit 1 generally is of relatively low resistivity, ranging from 45 to 150 ohm-meters compared with resistivity unit 2, which ranges from 120 to 345 ohm-meters (depending on the DC array type). The presence of mapped sinkholes in the reservoir north of the western embankment study area and the zone of increased water content (as indicated by zones of low neutron log count rates in nearby piezometers) leads to the conclusion that resistivity unit 1 is a preferential flow path where surface water from Amistad Reservoir is forced into the ground-water system (because of increased head from the reservoir). In the eastern embankment investigation, trends in the spatial distribution of sinkholes and the occurrence of weathered zones were identified from geologic descriptions of cores. The correlation of surface geophysical DC resistivity, historical lithologic data, and general trend of documented sinkholes along the eastern end of the eastern embankment profile were used to justify further exploration (drilling of piezometers) in the eastern expression of resistivity unit 1. The spatial location of the piezometers and the screened intervals were selected to best match the locations of the screened intervals of the western embankment piezometers. Six piezometers were installed on the eastern embankment and logged using borehole geophysical techniques. Surface DC resistivity sections superimposed on the resistivity logs for two piezometers indicate three discernible resistivity units that correlate with resistivity units 2, 1, and 2, respectively, identified in the western embankment study area. Resistivity units 1 and 2 in the DC resistivity profiles generally correspond with low and high resistivity zones, respectively, on the normal and lateral resistivity logs collected in the nearby piezometers at the time of installation.

Stanton, Gregory P.; Kress, Wade H.; Teeple, Andrew P.; Greenslate, Michael L.; Clark, Allan K.

2007-01-01

448

Quality of Groundwater at and near an Aquifer Storage and Recovery Site, Bexar, Atascosa, and Wilson Counties, Texas, June 2004-August 2008  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the San Antonio Water System, did a study during 2004-08 to characterize the quality of native groundwater from the Edwards aquifer and pre- and post-injection water from the Carrizo aquifer at and near an aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) site in Bexar, Atascosa, and Wilson Counties, Texas. Groundwater samples were collected and analyzed for selected physical properties and constituents to characterize the quality of native groundwater from the Edwards aquifer and pre- and post-injection water from the Carrizo aquifer at and near the ASR site. Geochemical and isotope data indicated no substantial changes in major-ion, trace-element, and isotope chemistry occurred as the water from the Edwards aquifer was transferred through a 38-mile pipeline to the aquifer storage and recovery site. The samples collected from the four ASR recovery wells were similar in major-ion and stable isotope chemistry compared to the samples collected from the Edwards aquifer source wells and the ASR injection well. The similarity could indicate that as Edwards aquifer water was injected, it displaced native Carrizo aquifer water, or, alternatively, if mixing of Edwards and Carrizo aquifer waters was occurring, the major-ion and stable isotope signatures for the Carrizo aquifer water might have been obscured by the signatures of the injected Edwards aquifer water. Differences in the dissolved iron and dissolved manganese concentrations indicate that either minor amounts of mixing occurred between the waters from the two aquifers, or as Edwards aquifer water displaced Carrizo aquifer water it dissolved the iron and manganese directly from the Carrizo Sand. Concentrations of radium-226 in the samples collected at the ASR recovery wells were smaller than the concentrations in samples collected from the Edwards aquifer source wells and from the ASR injection well. The smaller radium-226 concentrations in the samples collected from the ASR recovery wells likely indicate some degree of mixing of the two waters occurred rather than continued decay of radium-226 in the injected water. Geochemical and isotope data measured in samples collected in May 2005 from two Carrizo aquifer monitoring wells and in July 2008 from the three ASR production-only wells in the northern section of the ASR site indicate that injected Edwards aquifer water had not migrated to these five sites. Geochemical and isotope data measured in samples collected from Carrizo aquifer wells in 2004, 2005, and 2008 were graphically analyzed to determine if changes in chemistry could be detected. Major-ion, trace element, and isotope chemistry varied spatially in the samples collected from the Carrizo aquifer. With the exception of a few samples, major-ion concentrations measured in samples collected in Carrizo aquifer wells in 2004, 2005, and 2008 were similar. A slightly larger sulfate con-centration and a slightly smaller bicarbonate concentration were measured in samples collected in 2005 and 2008 from well NC1 compared to samples collected at well NC1 in 2004. Larger sodium concentrations and smaller calcium, magnesium, bicarbonate, and sulfate concentrations were measured in samples collected in 2008 from well WC1 than in samples collected at this well in 2004 and 2005. Larger calcium and magnesium concentrations and a smaller sodium concentration were measured in the samples collected in 2008 at well EC2 compared to samples collected at this well in 2004 and 2005. While in some cases the computed percent differences (compared to concentrations from June 2004) in dissolved iron and dissolved manganese concentrations in 11 wells sampled in the Carrizo aquifer in 2005 and 2008 were quite large, no trends that might have been caused by migration of injected Edwards aquifer water were observed. Because of the natural variation in geochemical data in the Carrizo aquifer and the small data set collected for this study, differences in major-ion and

Otero, Cassi L.; Petri, Brian L.

2010-01-01

449

Progress Report Substation No. 5, Temple, Texas, 1910-1914.  

E-print Network

SSUBSTATION NO. 12: Chillicothe, Hardes man County R. W. EDWARDS. B. s:. .ruperintendenf V. E. HAFNER, B. S.. Screntlfic Assrstant SUBSTATION N0:14, Sonora, Sn:ton Connty E. M. PETERS, B. S., Acting Superintendenl CLERICAL ASSISTANTS J. M. SCHAEDEL...TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION BULLETIN NO. 2 15 - MAY, 1917 PROGRESS REPORT, SUBSTATION NO. 5, TEMPLE, TEXAS . B. YOUNGBLOOD, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, RRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS. AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLL ECE OF TEXAS W. B. BIZZELL...

Killough, D.T. (David Thornton)

1917-01-01

450

An Overview of Operational Characteristics of Selected Irrigation Districts in the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley: Harlingen Irrigation District Cameron County No. 1  

E-print Network

to the topography, water-delivery infrastructure system, past financial decisions, and population demographics and clientele base of each irrigation district. Harlingen Irrigation District Cameron County No. 1 (HIDCC1) is one of the 29 irrigation districts...

Wolfe, Clint D.; Stubbs, Megan J.; Rister, M. Edward; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Pennington, Ellen L.; Rogers, Callie S.

451

Sulfate and chloride concentrations in Texas aquifers.  

PubMed

Median sulfate and chloride concentrations in groundwater were calculated for 244 Texas counties from measurements at 8236 water wells. The data were mapped and analyzed with a geographic information system (GIS). Concentration clusters for both solutes were highest in north-central, west, and south Texas. Thirty-four counties had median sulfate levels above the secondary standard of 250 mg/L, and 31 counties registered median chloride concentrations above 250 mg/L. County median concentrations ranged from < 1.5 to 1,953 mg/L for sulfate, and from 6 to 1,275 mg/L for chloride. Various factors contribute to high sulfate and chloride levels in Texas aquifers, including mineral constitutents of aquifers, seepage of saline water from nearby formations, coastal saltwater intrusion, irrigation return flow, and oil/gas production. Ten counties in central and northeast Texas lack data and warrant additional monitoring. PMID:11345739

Hudak, P F

2000-08-01

452

IEEE SYSTEMS JOURNAL, VOL. 6, NO. 1, MARCH 2012 27 Wind and Energy Markets: A Case Study of Texas  

E-print Network

IEEE SYSTEMS JOURNAL, VOL. 6, NO. 1, MARCH 2012 27 Wind and Energy Markets: A Case Study of Texas using the particular example of the Electric Reliability Council of Texas market. An estimate is made generation in the states of Texas, Iowa, California, Oregon, Washington, and Oklahoma. Wind power has also

Baldick, Ross

453

Geologic framework of the Edwards Aquifer and upper confining unit, and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Edwards Aquifer, south-central Uvalde County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The stratigraphic units of the Edwards aquifer in south-central Uvalde County generally are porous and permeable. The stratigraphic units that compose the Edwards aquifer in south-central Uvalde County are the Devils River Formation in the Devils River trend; and the West Nueces, McKnight, and Salmon Peak Formations in the Maverick Basin. The Balcones fault zone is the principal structural feature in Uvalde County; however, the displacement along the fault zone is less in Uvalde County than in adjacent Medina and Bexar Counties to the east. The Uvalde Salient is a structural high in south-central Uvalde County, and consists of several closely connected crustal uplifts that bring Edwards aquifer strata to the surface generally forming prominent hills. The crustal uplifts forming this structural high are the remnants of intrusive and extrusive magnatic activity. Six primary faults?Cooks, Black Mountain, Blue Mountain, Uvalde, Agape, and Connor?cross the length of the study area from the southwest to the northeast juxtaposing the Lower Cretaceous Salmon Peak Formation at the surface in the northwestern part of the study area against Upper Cretaceous formations in the central part of the study area. In the study area, the porosity of the rocks in the Edwards aquifer is related to depositional or diagenetic elements along specific stratigraphic horizons (fabric selective) and to dissolution and structural elements that can occur in any lithostratigraphic horizon (not fabric selective). Permeability depends on the physical properties of the rock such as size, shape, distribution of pores, and fissuring and dissolution. The middle 185 feet of the lower part of the Devils River Formation, the upper part of the Devils River Formation, and the upper unit of the Salmon Peak Formation probably are the most porous and permeable stratigraphic zones of the Edwards aquifer in south-central Uvalde County.

Clark, Allan K.; Small, Ted A.

1997-01-01

454

University of Oklahoma [INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY POLICY] The University of Oklahoma |IP Policy 1  

E-print Network

University of Oklahoma [INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY POLICY] The University of Oklahoma |IP Policy 1 INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY POLICY 3.27.1 PREAMBLE (A) The people of the State of Oklahoma may reasonably expect from their creative works, trademarks, discoveries, and inventions. #12;University of Oklahoma

Oklahoma, University of

455

OSU Human Resources, 106 Whitehurst, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 (405) 744-5449 Oklahoma State University  

E-print Network

OSU Human Resources, 106 Whitehurst, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 ­ (405) 744-5449 Oklahoma State.okstate.edu osu-es@okstate.edu Dental/Vision Information EDS Services, Inc. P O Box 24870 Oklahoma City, OK 73124-0870 (800) 752-9475 Emeriti Association Oklahoma State University Conoco Philips Bldg.201 Suite 102

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

456

40 CFR 81.337 - Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section...otherwise noted. OklahomaOzone (1-Hour Standard)2 Designated...noted. 2 The 1-hour ozone standard is revoked effective... Oklahoma1997 8-Hour Ozone NAAQS (Primary and...

2013-07-01

457

40 CFR 81.337 - Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section...otherwise noted. OklahomaOzone (1-Hour Standard)2 Designated...noted. 2 The 1-hour ozone standard is revoked effective...otherwise noted. OklahomaOzone (8-Hour Standard)...

2012-07-01

458

40 CFR 81.424 - Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oklahoma. 81.424 Section 81.424 Protection of Environment...Areas Where Visibility Is an Important Value 81.424 Oklahoma. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing...

2010-07-01

459

40 CFR 81.424 - Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Oklahoma. 81.424 Section 81.424 Protection of Environment...Areas Where Visibility Is an Important Value 81.424 Oklahoma. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing...

2011-07-01

460

40 CFR 81.424 - Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Oklahoma. 81.424 Section 81.424 Protection of Environment...Areas Where Visibility Is an Important Value 81.424 Oklahoma. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing...

2012-07-01

461

For Employees of The University of Oklahoma  

E-print Network

For Employees of The University of Oklahoma 1215 South Boulder · P. O. Box 3283 · Tulsa, OK 74102 Association Blue Health Plans of Oklahoma BlueChoice PPO Certificate of Benefits #12;- 2 - Table of Contents

Oklahoma, University of

462

40 CFR 81.424 - Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Oklahoma. 81.424 Section 81.424 Protection of Environment...Areas Where Visibility Is an Important Value 81.424 Oklahoma. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing...

2013-07-01

463

40 CFR 81.424 - Oklahoma.  

...Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Oklahoma. 81.424 Section 81.424 Protection of Environment...Areas Where Visibility Is an Important Value 81.424 Oklahoma. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing...

2014-07-01