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1

Texas-Oklahoma  

Atmospheric Science Data Center

article title: Texas-Oklahoma Border View ... SpectroRadiometer (MISR) images of Oklahoma and north Texas were acquired on March 12, 2000 during Terra orbit 1243. The three images ... The south bank of the Red River marks the boundary between Texas and Oklahoma. Traversing brush-covered and grassy plains, rolling hills, ...

2014-05-15

2

40 CFR 81.126 - Northwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Oklahoma: Alfalfa County, Beaver County, Blaine County, Cimarron County, Custer County, Dewey County, Ellis County, Harper County, Major County, Roger Mills County, Texas County, Woods County, Woodward...

2010-07-01

3

Digital-model projection of saturated thickness and recoverable water in the Ogallala Aquifer, Texas County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A digital model was used to provide a quantitative description of the Ogallala aquifer in Texas County, Oklahoma, and to predict saturated thickness and water in storage from the aquifer at specified future times. The Ogallala aquifer, which consists of unconsolidated sand, gravel, and clay, is the principal source of ground water in Texas County. Saturated thickness ranged from 0 feet to over 600 feet. The estimated value used for specific yield in most of the areas was 0.15 but 0.05 was used in some places. Hydraulic conductivity ranged from 0 to more than 200 feet per day, and recharge from 0.2 to 2.2 inches per year. Irrigation pumpage was estimated using crop acreage and estimate of irrigation requirements. For projection simulations with large stress, a reasonable maximum stress using a minimum of 4 wells per square mile and 1972 pumping rate per well, if saturated thickness was more than 38 feet, was used. Four types of boundaries were used in the model. They are (1) a zero-flux (impermeable) boundary on the perimeter of the modeled area,(2) a constant-head boundary for a reach of the Cimarron River, (3) a boundary which is a constant-head boundary initially but converts to an impermeable boundary (depending on the potentiometric gradient at the boundary) for a reach of Beaver River, Palo Duro Creek, and south of Palo Duro Creek, and (4) a boundary which is a partially penetrating stream with leaky-stream bed for parts of Beaver River and Coldwater Creek. The base period for calibration was 1966. The model was calibrated by a simulation from 1966 to 1968 in which pumpage was modified until the 1968 calculated heads matched closely the 1968 observed heads. The model was verified by a simulation from 1966 to 1972, using the 1966 to 1972 pumpage stress, in order to determine the degree of conformity between 1972 calculated heads and 1972 observed heads. The agreement was acceptable.

Morton, Robert B.

1980-01-01

4

Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Development through High-Resolution 3C3D Seismic and Horizontal Drilling: Eva South Marrow Sand Unit, Texas County, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The Eva South Morrow Sand Unit is located in western Texas County, Oklahoma. The field produces from an upper Morrow sandstone, termed the Eva sandstone, deposited in a transgressive valley-fill sequence. The field is defined as a combination structural stratigraphic trap; the reservoir lies in a convex up -dip bend in the valley and is truncated on the west side by the Teepee Creek fault. Although the field has been a successful waterflood since 1993, reservoir heterogeneity and compartmentalization has impeded overall sweep efficiency. A 4.25 square mile high-resolution, three component three-dimensional (3C3D) seismic survey was acquired in order to improve reservoir characterization and pinpoint the optimal location of a new horizontal producing well, the ESU 13-H.

Wheeler,David M.; Miller, William A.; Wilson, Travis C.

2002-03-11

5

Digital geologic map of Beaver County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This data set consists of digital data and accompanying documentation for the surficial geology of Beaver County, Oklahoma. The original data are from the Hydrogeologic Map, sheet 1 of 3, included in the U.S. Geological Survey publication, Reconnaissance of the Water Resources of Beaver County, Oklahoma, Hydrologic Investigations Atlas HA-450, Morton and Goemaat, 1973. The geology was compiled by S.L. Schoff, 1953.

Cederstrand, J.R.

1997-01-01

6

Purchasing in Texas Counties.  

E-print Network

8 r3' L \\, & #5, CnLpL"; 3' --%I k? TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, Director College Station, Texas BULLETIN NO. 653 JULY 1944 PURCHASING IN TEXAS COUNTIES H. C. BRADSEAW and E. J, HERVEY Division of Farm and Ranch... Economics 00.: .*- AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS GIBB GILCHRIST, President D-21-744-4500 The use of good purchasing procedures in a number of Texas counties is reducing the cost price of materials, supplies and equipment by 15 to 20 per...

Hervey, E. J.; Bradshaw, H. C.

1944-01-01

7

78 FR 16036 - Service Level Environmental Impact Statement for the Texas Oklahoma Passenger Rail Study Corridor...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Statement for the Texas Oklahoma Passenger Rail Study Corridor, South Texas to Oklahoma...improved high- speed intercity passenger rail service along an 850-mile corridor...Level EIS, the Texas Oklahoma Passenger Rail Study (Study) also includes...

2013-03-13

8

STATE OF TEXAS COUNTY OF ________________  

E-print Network

AFFIDAVIT STATE OF TEXAS § § COUNTY OF ________________ § Before me, the undersigned Notary Public and correct. 2. I graduated or will graduate from a Texas high school or received my GED certificate in Texas. 3. I resided in Texas for three years leading up to graduation from high school or receiving my GED

Garbey, Marc

9

Detection of Dirofilaria immitis and Ehrlichia species in coyotes (Canis latrans), from rural Oklahoma and Texas.  

PubMed

There is a lack of knowledge regarding the prevalence of Dirofilaria immitis and Ehrlichia spp. in coyotes in Oklahoma and Texas. Documenting the prevalence of these vector-borne disease agents in coyotes from Oklahoma and Texas underscores the importance of wild canids as reservoir hosts that infect companion animals and humans. To learn more about the sylvatic cycle of D. immitis and Ehrlichia spp. in coyotes from Oklahoma and Texas, we tested for infection with and exposure to, respectively, these disease agents. Coyote carcasses were collected opportunistically from animal control experts and hunters in seven counties in Oklahoma and Texas from January to March, 2010. Serum samples from 77 coyotes were tested with a commercial ELISA test. Five (6.5%) coyotes had D. immitis antigens, and four (5.2%) had antibodies to Ehrlichia spp. The overall prevalence of D. immitis was low relative to studies from the eastern United States. Little is known about the prevalence of Ehrlichia spp. throughout the United States, but coyotes from rural Oklahoma in the current study had a higher exposure rate than those reported from California, and a lower rate than data from an earlier study from Oklahoma. PMID:22448722

Paras, Kelsey L; Little, Susan E; Reichard, Mason V; Reiskind, Michael H

2012-07-01

10

Digital Atlas of Texas Counties  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created by the Center for Geosptial Technology at Texas Tech University, this digital atlas is a fantastic find. It brings together information about all of Texas's counties, including satellite relief maps and data sets about the roads, rivers, lakes, and other features in each area. Visitors can use the interactive map to click on a county of interest, or use the drop down menu to select a region. Once users select a county, they can download information about it for future use. The site also contains a number of Featured Links to resources from the U.S. Census Bureau, the Texas Association of Counties, and several tourism agencies.

11

MISR Scans the Texas-Oklahoma Border  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

These MISR images of Oklahoma and north Texas were acquired on March 12, 2000 during Terra orbit 1243. The three images on the left, from top to bottom, are from the 70-degree forward viewing camera, the vertical-viewing (nadir) camera, and the 70-degree aftward viewing camera. The higher brightness, bluer tinge, and reduced contrast of the oblique views result primarily from scattering of sunlight in the Earth's atmosphere, though some color and brightness variations are also due to differences in surface reflection at the different angles. The longer slant path through the atmosphere at the oblique angles also accentuates the appearance of thin, high-altitude cirrus clouds.

On the right, two areas from the nadir camera image are shown in more detail, along with notations highlighting major geographic features. The south bank of the Red River marks the boundary between Texas and Oklahoma. Traversing brush-covered and grassy plains, rolling hills, and prairies, the Red River and the Canadian River are important resources for farming, ranching, public drinking water, hydroelectric power, and recreation. Both originate in New Mexico and flow eastward, their waters eventually discharging into the Mississippi River.

A smoke plume to the north of the Ouachita Mountains and east of Lake Eufaula is visible in the detailed nadir imagery. The plume is also very obvious at the 70-degree forward view angle, to the right of center and about one-fourth of the way down from the top of the image.

MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

2000-01-01

12

Detection of Trichinella murrelli in coyotes ( Canis latrans) from Oklahoma and North Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

We determined the prevalence and mean intensity of Trichinella sp. infection in coyotes from six counties in Oklahoma and one in northern Texas. Tongues from 77 coyotes were examined using histology and artificial tissue digestion. Histological examination showed a prevalence of 3.9% (3 of 77) whereas the prevalence was 6.5% (5 of 77) based on artificial digestion of 5.0g of

Mason V. Reichard; Kathryn E. Tiernan; Kelsey L. Paras; Maria Interisano; Michael H. Reiskind; Roger J. Panciera; Edoardo Pozio

2011-01-01

13

Source of shallow Simpson Group Oil in Murray County, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oils produced from the Simpson Group (Middle Ordovician) in three shallow fields located north of the Arbuckle Mountains in Murray County, Oklahoma, have widely differing compositions: SW Sandy Creek, 28.9° API, 0.57% sulfur; Davis NE, 25.9° API, 0.72% sulfur; Sulfur NW, 16.4° API, 1.44% sulfur. From gas chromatography and biomarker analysis, they determined that the oils were derived from the

I. Zemmels; D. M. Tappmeyer; C. C. Walters

1987-01-01

14

Aerobiology of Juniperus Pollen in Oklahoma, Texas, and New Mexico  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Pollen from members of the Cupressaceae are major aeroallergens in many parts of the world. In the south central and southwest United States, Juniperus pollen is the most important member of this family with J. ashei (JA) responsible for severe winter allergy symptoms in Texas and Oklahoma. In New Mexico, pollen from J. monosperma (JM) and other Juniperus species are important contributors to spring allergies, while J. pinchotii (JP) pollinates in the fall affecting sensitive individuals in west Texas, southwest Oklahoma and eastern New Mexico. Throughout this region, JA, JM, and JP occur in dense woodland populations. Generally monitoring for airborne allergens is conducted in urban areas, although the source for tree pollen may be forested areas distant from the sampling sites. Improved pollen forecasts require a better understanding of pollen production at the source. The current study was undertaken to examine the aerobiology of several Juniperus species at their source areas for the development of new pollen forecasting initiatives.

Levetin, Estelle; Bunderson, Landon; VandeWater, Pete; Luvall, Jeff

2014-01-01

15

FEDERAL ORDER Domestic Quarantine of Counties in Oklahoma and Tennessee for  

E-print Network

FEDERAL ORDER Domestic Quarantine of Counties in Oklahoma and Tennessee for Imported Fire Ant (IFA discussion with the State Plant Regulatory Official of Oklahoma and Tennessee. Effective immediately determinations have been made by the APHIS Administrator in reference to Oklahoma and Tennessee. The 7 CFR 301

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

16

Costs and Economies of Size in Texas-Oklahoma Cattle Feedlot Operations.  

E-print Network

Costs and Economies of Size in I Texas-Oklahoma Cattle Feedlot Operat ions B-1083 May 1969 TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY Texas Agricultural Experiment Station H. 0. Kunkel, Acting Director, College Station, Texas In Cooperation with the U. S... This research was conducted by the Texas Agri- cultural Experiment Station of Texas A&M University under a cooperative agreement with Marketing Ece nomics Division, ERS, USDA and under Texas Agri- cultural Experiment Station Project HM-2489, Live- stock...

Dietrich, Raymond A.

1969-01-01

17

Detection of Trichinella murrelli in coyotes (Canis latrans) from Oklahoma and North Texas.  

PubMed

We determined the prevalence and mean intensity of Trichinella sp. infection in coyotes from six counties in Oklahoma and one in northern Texas. Tongues from 77 coyotes were examined using histology and artificial tissue digestion. Histological examination showed a prevalence of 3.9% (3 of 77) whereas the prevalence was 6.5% (5 of 77) based on artificial digestion of 5.0 g of muscle from coyote tongues. One sample was positive for Trichinella sp. on histology but negative by artificial digestion. Combining data from both diagnostic techniques showed that six of 77 (7.8%) coyotes were infected with Trichinella spp. The mean intensity of Trichinella sp. larvae ranged from 0.2 to 66.2 with an average of 16.0 larvae per gram (LPG) of tongue. Genotyping results demonstrated that the coyotes were infected with Trichinella murrelli. This is the first report of T. murrelli infection in coyotes in Oklahoma. T. murrelli had previously been isolated from coyotes in Texas. PMID:21723041

Reichard, Mason V; Tiernan, Kathryn E; Paras, Kelsey L; Interisano, Maria; Reiskind, Michael H; Panciera, Roger J; Pozio, Edoardo

2011-12-15

18

Southwestern Association of Naturalists Feeding Ecology of Three Omnivorous Fishes in Lake Texoma (Oklahoma-Texas)  

E-print Network

Southwestern Association of Naturalists Feeding Ecology of Three Omnivorous Fishes in Lake Texoma OMNIVOROUS FISHES IN LAKE TEXOMA (OKLAHOMA-TEXAS) KEITHB. GIDO* Universityof Oklahoma,BiologicalStation and Departmentof Zoology,Norman, OK 73019 *Correspondent:kgido@ou.edu ABSTRACT-Feeding ecology of 3 omnivorous

Gido, Keith B.

19

The Agricultural Benefits of Salinity Control on the Red River of Texas and Oklahoma  

E-print Network

Salinity of the waters from the Red River and its major tributaries has virtually eliminated its use for irrigation of agricultural crops in Texas and Oklahoma. A chloride control project has been proposed whereby the source salt waters...

Laughlin, D. H.; Lacewell, R. D.; Moore, D. S.

20

National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Lawton Quadrangle, Oklahoma and Texas  

SciTech Connect

Uranium resources of the Lawton Quadrangle, Oklahoma and Texas, were evaluated to a depth of 1500 m using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria. Five areas of uranium favorability were delineated. Diagenetically altered, quartzose and sublithic, eolian and marginal-marine sandstones of the Permian Rush Springs Formation overlying the Cement Anticline are favorable for joint-controlled deposits in sandstone, non-channel-controlled peneconcordant deposits, and Texas roll-front deposits. Three areas contain lithologies favorable for channel-controlled peneconcordant deposits: arkosic sandstones and granule conglomerates of the Permian Post Oak Conglomerate south of the Wichita Mountains; subarkosic and sublithic Lower Permian fluvio-deltaic and coastal-plain sandstones of the eastern Red River Valley; and subsurface arkosic, subarkosic, and sublithic alluvial-fan and fan-delta sandstones of the Upper Pennsylvanian-Lower Permian sequence in the eastern Hollis Basin. The coarse-grained facies of the Cambrian Quanah Granite and genetically related aplite and pegmatite dikes in the Wichita Mountains are favorable for orthomagmatic and autometasomatic deposits, respectively.

Al-Shaieb, Z.; Thomas, R.G.; Stewart, G.F.

1982-04-01

21

Tri-county pilot study. [Texas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author has identified the following significant results. An area inventory was performed for three southeast Texas counties (Montgomery, Walker, and San Jacinto) totaling 0.65 million hectares. The inventory was performed using a two level hierarchy. Level 1 was divided into forestland, rangeland, and other land. Forestland was separated into Level 2 categories: pine, hardwood, and mixed; rangeland was not separated further. Results consisted of area statistics for each county and for the entire study site for pine, hardwood, mixed, rangeland, and other land. Color coded county classification maps were produced for the May data set, and procedures were developed and tested.

Reeves, C. A. (principal investigator); Austin, T. W.; Kerber, A. G.

1976-01-01

22

Marketing Milk Under Federal Orders in Texas.  

E-print Network

ITIN 959 JULY 1960 llarketinff Milk un er Federal Orders in Texas order ZAIm includes Beckman county, Oklahoma. 3Also includes eight counties in Oklahoma. TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION R. D. LEWIS, DIRECTOR. COLLEGE STATION, TEXAS... SUMMARY Some Texas dairy farmers have been market- ing milk under federal orders since October 1951. In December 1959, 5,270, or 68 percent of Texas producers sold milk under the seven federal or- ders. In 1959 these producers marketed more than 1...

Stelly, Randall

1960-01-01

23

Summary of proceedings: Oklahoma and Texas wind energy forum, April 2-3, 1981  

SciTech Connect

The Wind Energy Forum for Oklahoma and Texas was held at the Amarillo Quality Inn in Amarillo, Texas on April 2-3, 1981. Its purpose was to bring together the diverse groups involved in wind energy development in the Oklahoma and Texas region to explore the future commercial potential and current barriers to achieving this potential. Major topics of discussion included utility interconnection of wind machines and the buy-back rate for excess power, wind system reliability and maintenance concerns, machine performance standards, and state governmental incentives. A short summary of each presentation is included.

Nelson, S.C.; Ball, D.E.

1981-06-01

24

Environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas  

SciTech Connect

In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and the eight other potentially sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Deaf Smith County site as one of the five sites suitable for characterization. 591 refs., 147 figs., 173 tabs.

Not Available

1986-05-01

25

Causes of property tax delinquency in Grayson County, Texas  

E-print Network

CAUSES OP PROPERTY TAX DELINQUENCY IN GRAYSON COUNTY' TEXAS A Thesis By James Morgan Cunningham August 1947 Approval as to style and oontent recommended: ead o the Department o Agricultura Eoonomios CAUSES OF PROPERTY TAX DELINQUENCY... IN GRAYSON COUNTY~ TEXAS A Thesis By James Norgan Cunningham August 1947 CAUSES OP PROPERTY TAX DELINQUENCY IN GRAYSON COUNTY' TEXAS A Thesis Submitted to the Faculty of the Agrioultural and Meohanical College of Texas Partial Fulfilment...

Cunningham, James Morgan

1947-01-01

26

National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Sherman Quadrangle, Texas and Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Uranium favorability of the Sherman Quadrangle, Texas and Oklahoma, was evaluated using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria. Surface and subsurface geologic studies were supplemented by aerial radiometric surveys and hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance studies. A total of 1537 rock, soil, and stream-sediment samples were analyzed for 30 elements. Environments favorable for sandstone-type uranium deposits are present in the Cretaceous Antlers and Woodbine Formations, Pennsylvanian arkoses, and the Permian Wichita-Albany Group. The Antlers Formation is locally radioactive; and rock, stream-sediment, and ground-water samples show uranium enrichment. Dip-oriented sand belts may contain subsurface uranium deposits. Arkosic wedges in the Pennsylvanian Strawn, Canyon, and Cisco Groups were partially derived from a favorable Wichita Mountain source, were highly permeable, and contained downdip reductants; gamma-ray logs showed some anomalies. The Permian Wichita-Albany Group contained small uranium occurrences. The Woodbine Formation had an excellent uranium source in updip volcaniclastic correlatives, good permeability, and organic precipitants; but there is little direct evidence of uranium occurrences. Environments considered unfavorable for uranium deposits are limestones and shales of Cambrian to Pennsylvanian age, Pennsylvanian sandstones derived from a Ouachita source, Lower Cretaceous shales, limestones, and sandstones, Upper Cretaceous marine strata, and sparse Cenozoic sediments. Unevaluated environments include Precambrian granites and metasediments of the buried Muenster Arch.

Hobday, D.K.; Rose, F.G. Jr.

1982-08-01

27

National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Wichita Falls Quadrangle, Texas and Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The uranium favorability of the Wichita Falls Quadrangle, Texas and Oklahoma, was determined by using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria; by subsurface studies of structure, facies distribution, and gamma-ray anomalies in well logs to a depth of 1500 m; and by surface studies involving extensive field sampling and radiometric surveying. These were supplemented by both aerial radiometric and hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance studies. Favorable environments were identified in fluviodeltaic to fan-delta sandstones in the upper Strawn, Canyon, and Cisco Groups (Pennsylvania to Lower Permian), which occur exclusively in the subsurface. Evaluation was based on the presence of a good uranium source, abundant feldspar, good hydrogeologic characteristics, association with carbonaceous shales, presence of coal and oil fields, and anomalies in gamma logs. Additional favorable environments include deltaic to alluvial sandstones in the Wichita-Albany Group (Lower Permian), which crops out widely and occurs in the shallow subsurface. Evaluation was based on high uranium values in stream-sediment samples, a small uranium occurrence located during the field survey, anomalous gamma logs, good uranium source, and hydrogeologic characteristics. Unfavorable environments include Cambrian to Permian limestones and shales. Pennsylvanian to Permian fluviodeltaic systems that have poor uranium sources, and Permian, Cretaceous, and Pleistocene formations that lack features characteristic of known uranium occurrences.

Edwards, M.B.; Andersen, R.L.

1982-08-01

28

Environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas  

SciTech Connect

In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines.

Not Available

1986-05-01

29

The Significance of Stratigraphy and Lithology in Landform Development in Washington County, Oklahoma  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This winning entry in the museum's Young Naturalist Awards 1999 by Katie, a 15 year old student from Oklahoma, takes a look at the development of Washington County, Oklahoma. Katie's essay has a field-journal focus and explains stratigraphy and lithology, two of the main factors controlling the shape of the land in her county. She provides an overview of the six different formations in the Skiatook Group and the five different formations that outcrop in the Bartlesville area. There are descriptions of the many rock samples she took for this study.

30

The Vascular Flora of the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve, Osage County, Oklahoma  

E-print Network

The Vascular Flora of the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve, Osage County, Oklahoma Michael W. Palmer, environmental, and taxonomic research (Palmer et al. 2000). The purpose of this paper is to present a checklist of the preserve are in Hamil- ton (1996) and a brief description of research projects at the preserve is in Palmer

Palmer, Michael W.

31

Estimated transportation routes to a candidate salt repository site in Deaf Smith County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a preliminary analysis of possible highway and rail transportation routes within Texas, Oklahoma, and New Mexico for shipments of spent fuel to the candidate repository site in Deaf Smith County, Texas. Two cases are examined for highway shipments. The initial case analyzes shipments following the Department of Transportation's HM-164 regulations for shipment of spent fuel. The second case analyzes normal commercial routes. Three rail cases are also examined. Each case analyzes potential routes that would be used based for different access spurs into the repository site. Two appendices are included which examine additional scenarios generated by restricting routes from passing through various metropolitan areas. The major finding is that most shipments to the Deaf Smith site will pass through Amarillo, Texas. There are few, if any, feasible alternative routes which would significantly reduce the amount of traffic passing through Amarillo.

Joy, D.S.; Johnson, P.E.

1987-10-01

32

The Impact of Declining Groundwater Supply in the Northern High Plains of Texas and Oklahoma on Expenditures for Community Services  

E-print Network

Reduced availability of groundwater in the Northern High Plains of Texas and Oklahoma is expected to have repercussions throughout the regional economy due to the reduction in agricultural income. The decline in the economic base is expected to lead...

Williford, G. H.; Beattie, B. R.; Lacewell, R. D.

33

78 FR 45266 - Notice of Intent To Prepare a Resource Management Plan for the Oklahoma, Kansas, and Texas...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Prepare a Resource Management Plan for the Oklahoma...Kansas, and Texas Planning Area and an Associated...Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION...where applicable, management decisions brought...from existing planning documents....

2013-07-26

34

Gaseous Oxidized Mercury Dry Deposition Measurements in Southwestern USA: Comparison between texas, Eastern Oklahoma, and the Four Corners Area  

EPA Science Inventory

Gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) dry deposition measurements using aerodynamic surrogate surface passive samplers were collected in central and eastern Texas and eastern Oklahoma, from September 2011 to September 2012.The purpose of this study was to provide an initial characteriza...

35

Stone City foraminifera in eastern Burleson County, Texas  

E-print Network

STONE CITY FORAMINIFERA IN EASTERN BURLESON COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis Jack Noreno Bslderas, Jr. August, 1953 Approved as %p style and cont nt by / rman o mm ee e o t e ep r en o eo ogy STONE CITY FORAMINIFERA IN EA STERN BUR LESON COUNTY... of the Stone City formation . . . . . . . ~ ~ Stone City cuesta along Farm Road 1362 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 16 16 5 e Headward erosion in unconsolidated Stone City beds Stone City Bluff, Burleson County, Texas 18 20 6. Stone City Bluff...

Balderas, Jack Moreno

1953-01-01

36

Earthquake activity in Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Oklahoma is one of the most seismically active areas in the southern Mid-Continent. From 1897 to 1988, over 700 earthquakes are known to have occurred in Oklahoma. The earliest documented Oklahoma earthquake took place on December 2, 1897, near Jefferson, in Grant County. The largest known Oklahoma earthquake happened near El Reno on April 9, 1952. This magnitude 5.5 (mb) earthquake was felt from Austin, Texas, to Des Moines, Iowa, and covered a felt area of approximately 362,000 km{sup 2}. Prior to 1962, all earthquakes in Oklahoma (59) were either known from historical accounts or from seismograph stations outside the state. Over half of these events were located in Canadian County. In late 1961, the first seismographs were installed in Oklahoma. From 1962 through 1976, 70 additional earthquakes were added to the earthquake database. In 1977, a statewide network of seven semipermanent and three radio-telemetry seismograph stations were installed. The additional stations have improved earthquake detection and location in the state of Oklahoma. From 1977 to 1988, over 570 additional earthquakes were located in Oklahoma, mostly of magnitudes less than 2.5. Most of these events occurred on the eastern margin of the Anadarko basin along a zone 135 km long by 40 km wide that extends from Canadian County to the southern edge of Garvin County. Another general area of earthquake activity lies along and north of the Ouachita Mountains in the Arkoma basin. A few earthquakes have occurred in the shelves that border the Arkoma and Anadarko basins.

Luza, K.V.; Lawson, J.E. Jr. (Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman (USA))

1989-08-01

37

Oklahoma  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A report on the research activities at the USDA-ARS, Plant Science Research Laboratory in Stillwater, Oklahoma, were compiled for WERA-066 Meeting that was held in Ft. Collins, Colorado, February 13, 2008. Research presentations included barley breeding research, sorghum breeding research, wheat br...

38

Handbook: County Program Building for Texas Agricultural Extension Workers.  

E-print Network

lkrc~ound bbmafbn Puklkiso b.Ammi)te88 and Tndlirfdods E~atluate and Project the County Program BASIC STEPS A TEXAS. AGRtCULTURAL EXTEPISION SERVICE [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] To A I1 &tension Workers: This handbook supplements... publication B-223, "Building the County Pro- gram." It is designed to provide assistance in answering questions that arise in the county program bulding process, and to help extension per- sonnel in working with county committees. Jri developing...

1955-01-01

39

Linear features determined from Landsat imagery in the Texas and Oklahoma panhandles  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A map (scale 1:500,000) shows the linear features determined from Landsat imagery in the Texas and Oklahoma panhandles. The linear features, sometimes called linear trends or lineaments, are not identified as to type or origin. Most probably represent fractures or fracture zones, which may affect the movement of water or other fluids through rocks. The linear features are classified as to length--less than 30 mi/mg and more than 30 mi/mg. (USGS)

Cooley, M.E.

1984-01-01

40

Measurement of soil moisture trends with airborne scatterometers. [Guymon, Oklahoma and Dalhart, Texas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In an effort to investigate aircraft multisensor responses to soil moisture and vegetation in agricultural fields, an intensive ground sampling program was conducted in Guymon, Oklahoma and Dalhart, Texas in conjunction with aircraft data collected for visible/infrared and passive and active microwave systems. Field selections, sampling techniques, data processing, and the aircraft schedule are discussed for both sites. Field notes are included along with final (normalized and corrected) data sets.

Jones, C. L.; Mcfarland, M. J.; Rosethal, W. D.; Theis, S. W. (principal investigators)

1982-01-01

41

National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) performance in southern Arizona, Texas, and Oklahoma in 20032004  

Microsoft Academic Search

Four field campaigns were conducted in southern Arizona (AZ) and in northern Texas and southern Oklahoma (TX-OK) in 2003 and 2004 to evaluate the performance of the U.S. National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) in detecting cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning after an upgrade in 2002 and 2003. The 2-year average flash detection efficiency (DE) in AZ was 93% (1024\\/1097), and the measured

Christopher J. Biagi; Kenneth L. Cummins; Kenneth E. Kehoe; E. Philip Krider

2007-01-01

42

National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) performance in southern Arizona, Texas, and Oklahoma in 2003-2004  

Microsoft Academic Search

Four field campaigns were conducted in southern Arizona (AZ) and in northern Texas and southern Oklahoma (TX-OK) in 2003 and 2004 to evaluate the performance of the U.S. National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) in detecting cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning after an upgrade in 2002 and 2003. The 2-year average flash detection efficiency (DE) in AZ was 93% (1024\\/1097), and the measured

Christopher J. Biagi; Kenneth L. Cummins; Kenneth E. Kehoe; E. Philip Krider

2007-01-01

43

Predictability of littoral-zone fish communities through ontogeny in Lake Texoma, Oklahoma-Texas, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

SynopsisWe sampled larval, juvenile and adult fishes from littoral-zone areas of a large reservoir (Lake Texoma, Oklahoma-Texas) (1) to characterize environmental factors that influenced fish community structure, (2) to examine how consistent fishenvironment relationships were through ontogeny (i.e., larval vs. juvenile and adult), and (3) to measure the concordance of larval communities sampled during spring to juvenile and adult communities

Michael A. Eggleton; Raul Ramirez; Chad W. Hargrave; Keith B. Gido; Jason R. Masoner; Gary D. Schnell; William J. Matthews

2005-01-01

44

Budgeting in Texas Counties, 1931-1940.  

E-print Network

the ~arions associations of county officers, particularly the county judges and commissioners, the county auditors, and the county dmlcs. CONTENTS Introduction 5 Purpose of Study 6 Procedure 6 Legal Provisions 9 The Budget Form 11 Number of Budgets...

Bradshaw, H. C.

1941-01-01

45

Measuring availability of healthful foods in two rural Texas counties  

E-print Network

A comprehensive in-store survey may capture the availability of healthful food alternatives in different store types in two rural counties. The purpose of this study was to: (1) compare the availability of healthful foods in two rural Texas counties...

Bustillos, Brenda Diane

2009-05-15

46

Miocene trend of Calhoun and Matagorda counties, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Calhoun and Matagorda counties are located in the central portion of the Gulf Coast of Texas. The 2-county area is about 100 miles long trending parallel to the coast and extending 10 to 12 miles inland from the coast line. Such fields as Steamboat Pass, Espiritu, J. Welder, Farwell Island, Powderhorn, E., W., and S. Powderhorn, Saluria, Matagorda Bay, Oyster

1970-01-01

47

Hydrogeology of the Chickasaw National Recreation Area, Murray County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Travertine District (Park) of the Chickasaw National Recreation Area, operated and maintained by the National Park Service, is near the City of Sulphur in south-central Oklahoma. The Park was established in 1902 because of its unique hydrologic setting, which includes Rock Creek, Travertine Creek, numerous mineralized and freshwater springs, and a dense cover of riparian vegetation. Since the turn of the century several flowing artesian wells have been drilled within and adjacent to the Park. Discharge from many of these springs and the numbers of flowing wells have declined substantially during the past 86 years. To determine the cause of these declines, a better understanding of the hydrologic system must be obtained. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service, has appraised hydrologic information obtained for the Park from several studies conducted during 1902-87. The principal geologic units referred to in this report are the Arbuckle Group and the overlying Simpson Group. These rocks are of Upper Cambrian to Middle Ordovician age and are composed of dolomitic limestone, with some sandstones and shales in the Simpson Group. Surface geologic maps give a general understanding of the regional subsurface geology, but information about the subsurface geology within the Park is poor. The Simpson and Arbuckle aquifers are the principal aquifers in the study area. The two aquifers are not differentiated readily in some parts of the study area because of the similarity of the Simpson and Arbuckle rocks; thus, both water-bearing units are referred to frequently as the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer. The aquifers are confined under the Park, but are unconfined east and south of the Park. Precipitation on the outcrop area of the Arbuckle aquifer northeast and east of the Park recharges the freshwater springs (Antelope and Buffalo Springs) near the east boundary of the Park. The source of water from mineralized springs located in the central part of the Park, and flowing wells within and north of the Park, is believed to be a mix of waters from rocks of the Arbuckle and Simpson Groups. The source of water from two highly mineralized springs, Bromide and Medicine, that ceased to flow in the early 1970?s is believed to be from the Simpson Group. Water-quality characteristics reflect the sources of ground water in the study area. The highly mineralized springs near the western end of the Park are a sodium chloride type with dissolved solids greater than 4,500 mg/L. The freshwater springs near the eastern end of the Park are a calcium bicarbonate type with total dissolved solids of less than 400 mg/L. Flow from the artesian wells has declined substantially during the past 86 years and the wells are estimated to currently discharge only about 10 percent of the total flow reported in 1939. The depletion is believed to be caused by a gradual lowering of the hydraulic head within the aquifer. The influence on the hydrologic system of local municipal and industrial pumping from the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer is difficult to discern because the system is much more sensitive to precipitation than to pumpage. Ground-water levels and spring flows in this region respond rapidly to precipitation. The effects of withdrawals from the City of Sulphur and Oklahoma Gas and Electric Company power-plant water-well fields are not discernible at wells and springs. The hydrologic system may be influenced by pumping, particularly during extended dry periods of several years, but the impact of pumping on the system cannot be determined without further investigation.

Hanson, Ronald L.; Cates, Steven W.

1994-01-01

48

Geology of north-central Burleson County, Texas  

E-print Network

GEOLOGY OF NORTH-CENTRAL BURLESON COUNTY ~ TEXAS A THESXS By Thomas Eugene Kelly January, 1955 Appr as +~ s le and ontent by Chairmen of Cvmzzdttee p-(:Z~- ead of the e artment of Geology GEOLOGY OF NORTH-CENTRAL BURLESON COUNTY& TEXAS... Thomas Eugene Kelly Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE in Geology. January, 1955 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS L 0 U U Z A 8...

Kelly, Thomas Eugene

1955-01-01

49

Artesian water in Somervell County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Somervell County is part of the Grand Prairie region of north-central Texas. An excellent supply of artesian water is available from the Trinity reservoir at no great depth. The first flowing well in Somervell County was drilled in 1880, and the first flowing well in Glen Rose, the county seat, was drilled in 1881. Since 1880 more than 500 wells have been constructed, probably more than half of them prior to 1900. Many of these early wells have been abandoned, either because the well hole caved in as a result of the absence or deterioration of casing or because the wells ceased to yield water by natural flow. The artesian water has always been used chiefly for domestic supply and for watering stock. Only a comparatively small area of farm land is now irrigated. The quantity used to supply the needs of tourist camps and outdoor swimming pools forms a relatively large percentage of the total amount withdrawn from the artesian reservoir in Somervell County. The artesian water is contained chiefly in the permeable sandstone beds--the basal sands for the Trinity group. Some shallow wells of small capacity are supplied by water in the crevices and solution channels in limestone that apparently is near the base of the Glen Rose formation and probably derives its water by leakage from the underlying Trinity reservoir. The wells encounter from one to three aquifers, the number depending upon their depth and location. At and around Glen Rose, the area in which most of the flowing wells are concentrated, the first aquifer is the creviced portion of the limestone, which is encountered at about 50 feet but does not everywhere yield water. The second and third aquifers, both of which are part of the 'basal sands' of the Trinity group, are much more uniform and persistent; the second is encountered at Glen Rose at depths of 100 to 135 feet, and the third at depths of about 275 to 330 feet. The artesian reservoir is supplied by water that falls as rain or snow upon the outcrop of the 'basal sands' on the higher lands west and north of Somervell County. These permeable beds dip eastward and southeastward beneath the county and are covered by the less permeable beds of the overlying Glen Rose formation. As the water that reaches the zone of saturation percolates down the dip of the beds it is confined under artesian pressure, and wells that penetrate these beds at lower altitudes yield water by natural flow. Originally the artesian pressure was sufficient to raise the water in tightly cased wells in the northwestern part of Somervell County to a maximum altitude of about 750 feet above sea level, but at Glen Rose the original artesian head was probably not more than 710 feet. From the information avail- able it would appear that the original head of the water in the upper aquifers was not nearly as great as that of the lower aquifer. The head has declined generally throughout the county. At Glen Rose in June 1930 the artesian head of the water from the deepest aquifer of the Trinity reservoir was about 639 feet above sea level, and the head of the water from the upper aquifers was about 15 feet less. The decline in head still continues, but at a very much slower rate than formerly. With the decline in head the size of the area of artesian flow has decreased, though in recent years the shrinkage has been comparatively little. The draft from the artesian reservoir in Somervell County during the summer is estimated at about 1,000,000 gallons a day, distributed as follows: Domestic use, 150,000 gallons; stock use, 60,000 gallons; recreation pools, 250,000 gallons; irrigation, 180,000 gallons; and waste, not including underground leakage, 360,000 gallons. In winter the daily draft is probably about 370,000 gallons less than in summer. The 360,000 gallons a day permitted to flow from wells without being used for any beneficial purposes is an unnecessary drain upon the artesian reservoir. The head of many of the flowing wells in Glen R

Fiedler, Albert George

1934-01-01

50

Depositional and diagenetic characteristics of a phylloid algal mound, upper Palo Pinto Formation, Conley field, Hardeman County, Texas  

E-print Network

& ~ ~~gb S I K K Ooigor& I LSO&'" o 0 go Oo W4 qo o" CP O a 0 4j~ 4g Mississippian, and Pennsylvanian strata. Production from Pennsylvanian rocks occurs primarily in the central and eastern portions of Hardeman County. Before... reversal in subduction polarity occurred during Silurian and Devonian times. The resultant change in stress patterns across the Texas-Oklahoma area led to the closure of the marginal basin which existed between the continental shelf and the offshore...

Lovell, Stephen Edd

1988-01-01

51

Evaluating the perceptions, knowledge, and attitudes of Texas county extension agents about sustainable agriculture  

E-print Network

The purpose of this study was to determine the level of knowledge, perceptions of, and attitudes toward sustainable agriculture held by Texas county extension agents. Conducted from August 1998 to August 1999, the study targeted 570 Texas county...

Edwards, Karen Jennifer

1999-01-01

52

Emergence of Autochthonous Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Northeastern Texas and Southeastern Oklahoma  

PubMed Central

Autochthonous human cases of leishmaniasis in the United States are uncommon. We report three new cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis and details of a previously reported case, all outside the known endemic range in Texas. Surveys for enzootic rodent reservoirs and sand fly vectors were conducted around the residences of three of the case-patients during the summer of 2006; female Lutzomyia anthophora sand flies were collected at a north Texas and southeast Oklahoma residence of a case-patient, indicating proximity of a suitable vector. Urban sprawl, climatologic variability, or natural expansion of Leishmania mexicana are possible explanations for the apparent spread to the north and east. Enhanced awareness among healthcare providers in the south central region of the United States is important to ensure clinical suspicion of leishmaniasis, diagnosis, and appropriate patient management. PMID:23185078

Clarke, Carmen F.; Bradley, Kristy K.; Wright, James H.; Glowicz, Janet

2013-01-01

53

Devils waterhole field, McMullen County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Devils Waterhole field is located in the SE. part of McMullen County, Texas, in the main Wilcox producing trend and is oil productive from the uppermost sand in the Wilcox Formation. Regionally, the field is situated in the same down-to-the-coast fault trend as the rest of the main Wilcox trend fields of S. Texas. Structurally, the field is situated

Hargis

1971-01-01

54

Geology of McCaskill field, Karnes County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

McCaskill field is located in the E. portion of Karnes County, Texas, near the Goliad County line. Hydrocarbons in the McCaskill field are trapped by an anticlinal closure on the down-thrown side of a down-to-the-coast fault. Although the anticline was probably caused by growth of the fault during deposition, thickening of the sedimentary section on the down-thrown side of the

Urbanec

1973-01-01

55

Land-use and ground-water data, Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribes, Concho Reserve, Canadian County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes, conducted the present study to determine the vulnerability to contamination of ground water beneath tribal lands within the 3,991-acre Concho Reserve in Canadian County, Oklahoma (map A).

Bergman, DeRoy L.; Savoca, Mark E.

1993-01-01

56

Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibrations Stimulation in Osage County, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This Technical Quarterly Report is for the reporting period July 1, 2001 to September 30, 2001. The report provides details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma''. The project is divided into nine separate tasks. Several of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, while other tasks are dependent on earlier tasks being completed. The vibration stimulation well is permitted as Well 111-W-27, section 8 T26N R6E Osage County Oklahoma. It was spud July 28, 2001 with Goober Drilling Rig No. 3. The well was drilled to 3090-feet cored, logged, cased and cemented. The Rig No.3 moved off August 6, 2001. Phillips Petroleum Co. has begun analyzing the cores recovered from the test well. Standard porosity, permeability and saturation measurements will be conducted. They will then begin the sonic stimulation core tests Calumet Oil Company, the operator of the NBU, has begun to collect both production and injection wells information to establish a baseline for the project in the pilot field test area. Green Country Submersible Pump Company, a subsidiary of Calumet Oil Company, will provide both the surface equipment and downhole tools to allow the Downhole Vibration Tool to be operated by a surface rod rotating system. The 7-inch Downhole Vibration Tool (DHVT) has been built and is ready for initial shallow testing. The shallow testing will be done in a temporarily abandoned well operated by Calumet Oil Co. in the Wynona waterflood unit. The data acquisition doghouse and rod rotating equipment have been placed on location in anticipation of the shallow test in Well No.20-12 Wynona Waterflood Unit. A notice of invention disclosure was submitted to the DOE Chicago Operations Office. DOE Case No.S-98,124 has been assigned to follow the documentation following the invention disclosure. A paper covering the material presented to the Oklahoma Geologic Survey (OGS)/DOE Annual Workshop in Oklahoma City May 8,9 2001 has been submitted for publication to the OGS. A technical paper draft has been submitted for the ASME/ETCE conference (Feb 2002) Production Technology Symposium. A one-day SPE sponsored short course which is planned to cover seismic stimulation efforts around the world, will be offered at the SPE/DOE Thirteenth Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery in Tulsa, OK, April 13-17, 2002. Dan Maloney, Phillips and Bob Westermark, OGCI will be the instructors. In addition, a proposed technical paper has been submitted for this meeting.

J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

2001-09-30

57

CANADIAN RIVER COMPACT The state of New Mexico, the state of Texas, and the state of Oklahoma, acting through  

E-print Network

CANADIAN RIVER COMPACT The state of New Mexico, the state of Texas, and the state of Oklahoma, acting through their commissioners, John H. Bliss, for the state of New Mexico, E. V. Spence] are to promote interstate comity; to remove causes of present and future controversy; to make secure and protect

Johnson, Eric E.

58

Daily Fish and Zooplankton Abundances in the Littoral Zone of Lake Texoma, Oklahoma-Texas, in Relation to Abiotic Variables  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many studies have shown the effects of yearly or monthly environmental conditions on the structure of fish and zooplankton communities. Environmental conditions can also vary greatly on much shorter time scales. We tested the effects of abiotic conditions on the daily abundance of fish and zooplankton in the littoral zone of Lake Texoma, Oklahoma-Texas. After date was removed statistically from

Philip W. Lienesch; William J. Matthews

2000-01-01

59

Reflectance of vegetation, soil, and water. [Hidalgo County, Texas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author has identified the following significant results. The majority of the rangelands of Hidalgo County, Texas are used in cow-calf operations. Continuous year-long grazing is practiced on about 60% of the acreage and some type of deferred system on the rest. Mechanical brush control is used more than chemical control. Ground surveys gave representative estimates for 15 vegetable crops produced in Hidalgo County. ERTS-1 data were used to estimate the acreage of citrus in the county. Combined Kubleka Munk and regression models, that included a term for shadow areas, gave a higher correlation of composite canopy reflectance with ground truth than either model alone.

Wiegand, C. L. (principal investigator)

1974-01-01

60

Comparison of Irrigation Water Use Estimates Calculated from Remotely Sensed Irrigated Acres and State Reported Irrigated Acres in the Lake Altus Drainage Basin, Oklahoma and Texas, 2000 Growing Season  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Increased demand for water in the Lake Altus drainage basin requires more accurate estimates of water use for irrigation. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, is investigating new techniques to improve water-use estimates for irrigation purposes in the Lake Altus drainage basin. Empirical estimates of reference evapotranspiration, crop evapotranspiration, and crop irrigation water requirements for nine major crops were calculated from September 1999 to October 2000 using a solar radiation-based evapotranspiration model. Estimates of irrigation water use were calculated using remotely sensed irrigated crop acres derived from Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus imagery and were compared with irrigation water-use estimates calculated from irrigated crop acres reported by the Oklahoma Water Resources Board and the Texas Water Development Board for the 2000 growing season. The techniques presented will help manage water resources in the Lake Altus drainage basin and may be transferable to other areas with similar water management needs. Irrigation water use calculated from the remotely sensed irrigated acres was estimated at 154,920 acre-feet; whereas, irrigation water use calculated from state reported irrigated crop acres was 196,026 acre-feet, a 23 percent difference. The greatest difference in irrigation water use was in Carson County, Texas. Irrigation water use for Carson County, Texas, calculated from the remotely sensed irrigated acres was 58,555 acrefeet; whereas, irrigation water use calculated from state reported irrigated acres was 138,180 acre-feet, an 81 percent difference. The second greatest difference in irrigation water use occurred in Beckham County, Oklahoma. Differences between the two irrigation water use estimates are due to the differences of irrigated crop acres derived from the mapping process and those reported by the Oklahoma Water Resources Board and Texas Water Development Board.

Masoner, J.R.; Mladinich, C.S.; Konduris, A.M.; Smith, S. Jerrod

2003-01-01

61

The Sparta aquifer, northern Brazos County, Texas  

E-print Network

rock unit, ss did the United States Go?logical Survey on the geologic msp of Texas. plus?mr (1932) mode s very detailed study of the Spurts iu Texas und to this date his is the only comprehens, lve study of the Spurts in Texas. Stenzel (1935... in the sanm general area. The Sparta formation as picked . in the subsurface corresponds closely to the boundaries observed at the surface. The classification of the Claiborne group shown in Table JI, Tab). e 3, and Figure 2, and as used in this thesis...

Wauters, John F

1956-01-01

62

Gomez, Terry County, Texas - A new meteorite find  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Gomez meteorite, weighing slightly over 47 kg, was found near the town of Gomez, Terry County, Texas (33 deg 10 min 53 sec N, 102 deg 24 min 5 sec W) prior to 1974. It is a highly weathered, equilibrated L-6 chondrite of composition Fa 26, Fs 23. A large number of chromite grains and possibly partially weathered lawrencite grains were noted.

Sipiera, P. P.; Tarter, J.; Moore, C. B.; Dod, B. D.; Johnston, R. A.

1980-01-01

63

Geology of Post West (Strawn) Field, Garza County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Post West (Strawn) Field, in Garza County, Texas, has a structurally and stratigraphically controlled hydrocarbon trap. The field produces oil from a structure with fifty feet of closure in two of four reservoir zones. The geologic study of the Strawn reservoir described in this paper should aid in hydrocarbon reserves calculations.

Myers, S.R.

1982-09-01

64

Geology of north Personville field, Limestone County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

In excess of 50 Mitchell Energy Corporation wells have been drilled in the North Personville field, Limestone County, Texas. In order to understand the variables that affect the ultimate reserves within the carbonate section, two conventional cores from Mitchell Energy Corporation wells were analyzed. The Mitchell Energy Corporation 1 Muse-Duke and 1 Ralph Spence limestone sections were studied to determine

Zamboras

1988-01-01

65

Geology of North Personville field, Limestone County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

In excess of 50 Mitchell Energy Corporation wells have been drilled in the North Personville field, Limestone County, Texas. In order to understand the variables that affect the ultimate reserves within the carbonate section, two conventional cores from Mitchell Energy Corporation wells were analyzed. The Mitchell Energy Corporation I Muse-Duke and 1 Ralph Spence limestone sections were studied to determine

Zamboras

1988-01-01

66

Environmental assessment overview, Deaf Smith County site, Texas  

SciTech Connect

In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Deaf Smith County site as one of five sites suitable for characterization. 3 figs.

Not Available

1986-05-01

67

Earthquake activity in Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oklahoma is one of the most seismically active areas in the southern Mid-Continent. From 1897 to 1988, over 700 earthquakes are known to have occurred in Oklahoma. The earliest documented Oklahoma earthquake took place on December 2, 1897, near Jefferson, in Grant County. The largest known Oklahoma earthquake happened near El Reno on April 9, 1952. This magnitude 5.5 (mb)

K. V. Luza; J. E. Jr. Lawson

1989-01-01

68

Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This Technical Quarterly Report is for the reporting period July 1, 2000 to September 30, 2000. The report provides details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma''. The project is divided into nine separate tasks. Since this is the first Quarterly report, much of the work done is of a preliminary nature. Several of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, while other tasks are dependent on earlier tasks being completed. The selection of the pilot test area has been completed. The drilling of the test well is waiting on rig availability. Phillips has begun sonic core testing of offset cores, waiting on the core from the well to be drilled. Design work is progressing for the tool, which will be built to fit the test well. Installation of monitoring equipment and the downhole vibration tool will occur after the well is drilled. Technical transfer efforts have begun with the submission of an abstract for a technical paper for the Oklahoma City Society of Petroleum Engineers meeting in March 2001.

J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

2000-09-30

69

Detection of members of the Tombusviridae in the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve, Osage County, Oklahoma, USA.  

PubMed

Viruses are most frequently discovered because they cause disease in organisms of importance to humans. To expand knowledge of plant-associated viruses beyond these narrow constraints, non-cultivated plants of the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve, Osage County, Oklahoma, USA were systematically surveyed for evidence of the presence of viruses. This report discusses viruses of the family Tombusviridae putatively identified by the survey. Evidence of two carmoviruses, a tombusvirus, a panicovirus and an unclassifiable tombusvirid was found. The complete genome sequence was obtained for putative TGP carmovirus 1 from the legume Lespedeza procumbens, and the virus was detected in several other plant species including the fern Pellaea atropurpurea. Phylogenetic analysis of the sequence and partial sequence of a related virus supported strongly the placement of these viruses in the genus Carmovirus. Polymorphisms in the sequences suggested existence of two populations of TGP carmovirus 1 in the study area and year-to-year variations in infection by TGP carmovirus 3. PMID:21762736

Scheets, Kay; Blinkova, Olga; Melcher, Ulrich; Palmer, Michael W; Wiley, Graham B; Ding, Tao; Roe, Bruce A

2011-09-01

70

Environmental assessment, Deaf Smith County site, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (42 USC sections 10101-10226) requires the environmental assessment of a proposed site to include a statement of the basis for nominating a site as suitable for characterization. Volume 2 provides a detailed statement evaluating the site suitability of the Deaf Smith County Site under DOE siting guidelines, as well as a comparison of the Deaf Smith County Site to the other sites under consideration. The evaluation of the Deaf Smith County Site is based on the impacts associated with the reference repository design, but the evaluation will not change if based on the Mission Plan repository concept. The second part of this document compares the Deaf Smith County Site to Davis Canyon, Hanford, Richton Dome and Yucca Mountain. This comparison is required under DOE guidelines and is not intended to directly support subsequent recommendation of three sites for characterization as candidate sites. 259 refs., 29 figs., 66 refs. (MHB)

Not Available

1986-05-01

71

Edwards Aquifer Evaluation: Kinney County, Texas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Edwards Aquifer is one of the most studied and most prolific aquifers in the United States. The aquifer is a heavily fractured and faulted carbonate aquifer with transmissivities in excess of 100 ft2/s. The City of San Antonio relies upon the Edwards Aquifer as its sole source for water. Much work has been done on quantifying recharge to the aquifer and discharge from wells and acquiring aquifer characteristics from pumping tests, specific capacity tests, and geophysical logs. Although the aquifer has been well studied in Bexar County, much less is known about the Edwards Aquifer in Kinney County. This is partly due to the lower population within the county (approximately 3,500 people) relative to the eastern counties (Uvalde, Medina, Bexar, Comal, and Hays) and the great distance of Kinney County from high profile discharge areas such as the City of San Antonio and Comal and San Marcos Springs. Three key products resulted from this study: (1) exploratory well drilling and the largest aquifer test in the county that were conducted to evaluate the well yields within a 10,000 acre study area in which a drawdown of 2.5 ft approximately 1.2 miles away was observed while pumping at approximately 4,600 gpm; (2) a recharge estimate for the Edwards Aquifer within Kinney County of approximately 71,382 ac-ft/yr; and (3) locating the Brackettville Groundwater Divide from an evaluation of ground water flow direction and hydrograph analysis. These results help evaluate the complex hydraulics occurring within Kinney County and aid in development of ground water modeling that will be used in managing the Edwards Aquifer.

Khorzad, Kaveh

2003-10-01

72

Geology of the upper James River area Mason County, Texas  

E-print Network

snail part, add to the hnovledge of the geology of the Central Mineral Region of Texas. QKkXRS The Upper Jones River area is looated on the southwest flanh of the Llano uplift in soutbvestern Mason County, Texas. The southern bounds ry of the area... of the Cap Mountain nenber vbioh ean be obsercod in tbe tb?is area oonsists of a vhi'te to grays fin~rainedc fossiliferous, glauoonitio, densec linestone. k few of the beds oontain snail enouuts Df arenao4ous naterSALle Sane rust to yellolM?llored stains...

White, Dixon Nesbit

1961-01-01

73

Description of floodplains and wetlands, Deaf Smith County site, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Floodplains and wetlands are important features of the Texas Panhandle landscape, and are found on the Deaf Smith County site and in its vicinity. Use or disturbance of floodplains and wetlands in relation to the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program is subject to environmental review requirements implementing two Executive Orders. This report provides general information on playa wetlands in the Texas Panhandle, and describes and maps floodplains and wetlands on the Deaf Smith site and in its vicinity. The report is based on the published literature, with information from limited field reconnaissance included.

Not Available

1986-11-01

74

Geology of the South Mason County area, Texas  

E-print Network

sandstone ~. . . . . . . . . . . . . . " fo11ow1ng page 32 X1V, Dense vegetation on middle Hickory . . . . , . . . . following page 32 Ffg. 1: Cap Nountain limestone ~. . . . . . " ~" following Fig. 2 ~ Honeycombed weathered surface of Cap Mountain..., and Lower Ordovician age are present in the South Mason area~ Mason County, Texas, Strata be- longing to the Upper Cambrian series are divided into two formations~ the Riley and the Wilberns. The seven members of these two formations were mapped...

Alexander, William Luther

1952-01-01

75

SEROLOGICAL PREVALENCE AND ISOLATION OF BABESIA ODOCOILE! AMONG WHITE-TAILED DEER (ODOCOILEUS VIRGINIANUS) IN TEXAS AND OKLAHOMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Serum samples collected from 581 white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) from Texas and from 124 white-tailed deer from Oklahoma were tested by the indirect fluorescent antibody technique against Babesia odocoilei. Prevalence of seropositive reactors varied from site to site in both states. Prevalence rates were statistically ranked as high, intermediate or low. Deer <12-mo-old had a significantly lower prevalence than all

K. A. Waldrup; A. A. Kocan; T. Qureshi; D. S. Davis; D. Baggett; G. G. Wagner

76

Organizational and individual factors related to retention of county extension agents employed by Texas Cooperative Extension  

E-print Network

The purpose of this study was to determine the organizational and individual factors related to job retention of Texas county Extension agents and learn why agents choose to stay employed by Texas Cooperative Extension. The population for the study...

Chandler, Galen Douglas

2005-02-17

77

Evaluation of coastal wave attenuation due to viscous fluid sediment at Jefferson County, Texas  

E-print Network

This thesis is a two-part discussion concerning a Gulf of Mexico beach in Jefferson County, Texas. The first part involves collecting and analyzing shoreline evolution data for an ongoing Texas A&M University Ocean Engineering Program investigation...

Tuttle, Meghan I

2000-01-01

78

Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This Technical Quarterly Report is for the reporting period September 30, 2001 to December 31, 2001. The report provides details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma''. The project is divided into nine separate tasks. Several of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, while other tasks are dependent on earlier tasks being completed. The vibration stimulation well was permitted as Well 111-W-27, section 8 T26N R6E Osage County Oklahoma. It was spud July 28, 2001 with Goober Drilling Rig No. 3. The well was drilled to 3090-feet cored, logged, cased and cemented. The Rig No.3 moved off August 6, 2001. Phillips Petroleum Co. has performed standard core analysis on the cores recovered from the test well. Standard porosity, permeability and saturation measurements have been conducted. Phillips has begun the sonic stimulation core tests. Calumet Oil Company, the operator of the NBU, has been to collecting both production and injection wells information to establish a baseline for the project in the pilot field test area since May 2001. The 7-inch Downhole Vibration Tool (DHVT) has been built and has been run in a shallow well for initial power source testing. This testing was done in a temporarily abandoned well, Wynona Waterflood Unit, Well No.20-12 operated by Calumet Oil Co both in October and December 2001. The data acquisition system, and rod rotating equipment performed as designed. However, the DHVT experienced two internal failures during vibration operations. The DHVT has been repaired with modifications to improve its functionality. A proposed technical paper abstract has been accepted by the SPE to be presented at the 2002 SPE/DOE Thirteenth Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery, in Tulsa OK, 13-17 April 2002. A one-day SPE sponsored short course which is planned to cover seismic stimulation efforts around the world, will be offered at the SPE/DOE Thirteenth Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery in Tulsa, OK, April 13-17, 2002. Dan Maloney, Phillips and Bob Westermark, OGCI will be the instructors.

J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

2001-12-31

79

Ground-water resources of Wheeler and eastern Gray Counties, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Wheeler and eastern Gray Counties are in the eastcentral part of the Texas Panhandle. The two counties are characterized by rolling to fairly rugged topography with many sand-dune areas and a well developed drainage system.

Maderak, M.L.

1973-01-01

80

Hydrogeology and water quality of the North Canadian River alluvium, Concho Reserve, Canadian County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A growing user population within the Concho Reserve in Canadian County, Oklahoma, has increased the need for drinking water. The North Canadian River alluvium is a reliable source of ground water for agriculture, industry, and cities in Canadian County and is the only ground-water source capable of meeting large demands. This study was undertaken to collect and analyze data to describe the hydrogeology and ground-water quality of the North Canadian River alluvium within the Concho Reserve. The alluvium forms a band about 2 miles long and 0.5 mile wide along the southern edge of the Concho Reserve. Thickness of the alluvium ranges from 19 to 75 feet thick and averages about 45 feet in the study area. Well cuttings and natural gamma-ray logs indicate the alluvium consists of interfingering lenses of clay, silt, and sand. The increase of coarse-grained sand and the decrease of clay and silt with depth suggests that the water-bearing properties of the aquifer within the study area improve with depth. A clay layer in the upper part of the aquifer may be partially responsible for surface water ponding in low areas after above normal precipitation and may delay the infiltration of potentially contaminated water from land surface. Specific conductance measurements indicate the ground-water quality improves in a northern direction towards the terrace. Water-quality properties, bacteria counts, major ion and nutrient concentrations, trace-element and radionuclide concentrations, and organic compound concentrations were measured in one ground-water sample at the southern edge of the Concho Reserve and comply with the primary drinking-water standards. Measured concentrations of iron, manganese, sulfate, and total dissolved solids exceed the secondary maximum contaminant levels set for drinking water. The ground water is a calcium sulfate bicarbonate type and is considered very hard, with a hardness of 570 milligrams per liter as calcium carbonate.

Becker, C.J.

1998-01-01

81

Occupational Change Among Spanish-Americans in Atascosa County and San Antonio, Texas.  

E-print Network

Occupational Change Among Spanish-Americans 1 : In Atascosa County and San Antonio, Texas TEXAS ABM UNIVERSITY Texas Agricultural Experiment Station R. E. Patterson, Director, College Station, Texas S PANISH-AMERICANS TRADITIONALLY HAVE PI ,I... in Texas, althougl~ they rel)lc.scntctl only one-tenth of the State's total labor force. Sintc Spanish-American farm workers are so heavilv eon( en- tratecl in jobs as farm laborers, with relati~el\\ leu operating their own farms, their importancrc...

Skrabanek, R. L.; Rapton, Avra

1966-01-01

82

Locating turfgrass production sites for removal of phosphorus in Erath County, Texas  

E-print Network

County, Texas. (May 2003) Jeremy Edward Hanzlik, B.S., Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Clyde Munster The North Bosque River watershed of central Texas hosts a large portion of dairy production in the state. In recent years..., the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ), formerly known as the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC), has applied a Total Maximum Daily Load Program for soluble phosphorus to the watershed. Best management practices (BMPs...

Hanzlik, Jeremy Edward

2004-09-30

83

Multifrequency remote sensing of soil moisture. [Guymon, Oklahoma and Dalhart, Texas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Multifrequency sensor data collected at Guymon, Oklahoma and Dalhart, Texas using NASA's C-130 aircraft were used to determine which of the all-weather microwave sensors demonstrated the highest correlation to surface soil moisture over optimal bare soil conditions, and to develop and test techniques which use visible/infrared sensors to compensate for the vegetation effect in this sensor's response to soil moisture. The L-band passive microwave radiometer was found to be the most suitable single sensor system to estimate soil moisture over bare fields. In comparison to other active and passive microwave sensors the L-band radiometer (1) was influenced least by ranges in surface roughness; (2) demonstrated the most sensitivity to soil moisture differences in terms of the range of return from the full range of soil moisture; and (3) was less sensitive to errors in measurement in relation to the range of sensor response. L-band emissivity related more strongly to soil moisture when moisture was expressed as percent of field capacity. The perpendicular vegetation index as determined from the visible/infrared sensors was useful as a measure of the vegetation effect on the L-band radiometer response to soil moisture.

Theis, S. W.; Mcfarland, M. J.; Rosenthal, W. D.; Jones, C. L. (principal investigator)

1982-01-01

84

A contribution to the geology of northeastern Texas and southern Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The region in central and northeastern Texas and southern Oklahoma known as the Black and Grand prairies abounds in features of interest to physiographers, geologists, and paleontologists, and the pioneer investigators of this region must have experienced renewed satisfaction in each day's exploration. The reports of Joseph A. Taff, Robert T. Hill, and others, published chiefly under the auspices of State and Federal surveys, represent with approximate accuracy at most places the general distribution of the outcrops of the formations in this region, and contain detailed descriptions of many sections that constitute a mine of useful information. The reader of the present paper is urged, therefore, to hold as most important the general excellence of the earlier reports of these authors and to relegate the inaccuracies and mistakes to which his attention will be called to the relatively unimportant place in which they belong, remembering at the same time that a future generation of investigators may find our own shortcomings as great as those we now criticize.

Stephenson, Lloyd William

1919-01-01

85

Houston area multicrop inspection trips. [Wharton County, Texas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The phenology of crops such as corn, cotton, soybeans, sorghum, sunflowers, and rice and their observed signatures on LANDSAT imagery was studied. This was accomplished by photographing the various crops in segments 275 and 276 located in Wharton County, Texas and comparing those photographs with LANDSAT imagery of the same dates. These comparisons gave insight as to why a particular crop growth stage appeared as a definite signature on LANDSAT and how the percentage of ground cover of various crops affected the signatures on LANDSAT imagery. Numerous crop growth stages could not be directly compared due to cloud cover during several LANDSAT overpasses.

Dunham, E. W. (principal investigator)

1980-01-01

86

Gaseous oxidized mercury dry deposition measurements in the southwestern USA: a comparison between Texas, eastern Oklahoma, and the Four Corners area.  

PubMed

Gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) dry deposition measurements using aerodynamic surrogate surface passive samplers were collected in central and eastern Texas and eastern Oklahoma, from September 2011 to September 2012. The purpose of this study was to provide an initial characterization of the magnitude and spatial extent of ambient GOM dry deposition in central and eastern Texas for a 12-month period which contained statistically average annual results for precipitation totals, temperature, and wind speed. The research objective was to investigate GOM dry deposition in areas of Texas impacted by emissions from coal-fired utility boilers and compare it with GOM dry deposition measurements previously observed in eastern Oklahoma and the Four Corners area. Annual GOM dry deposition rate estimates were relatively low in Texas, ranging from 0.1 to 0.3 ng/m(2)h at the four Texas monitoring sites, similar to the 0.2 ng/m(2)h annual GOM dry deposition rate estimate recorded at the eastern Oklahoma monitoring site. The Texas and eastern Oklahoma annual GOM dry deposition rate estimates were at least four times lower than the highest annual GOM dry deposition rate estimate previously measured in the more arid bordering western states of New Mexico and Colorado in the Four Corners area. PMID:24955412

Sather, Mark E; Mukerjee, Shaibal; Allen, Kara L; Smith, Luther; Mathew, Johnson; Jackson, Clarence; Callison, Ryan; Scrapper, Larry; Hathcoat, April; Adam, Jacque; Keese, Danielle; Ketcher, Philip; Brunette, Robert; Karlstrom, Jason; Van der Jagt, Gerard

2014-01-01

87

Gaseous Oxidized Mercury Dry Deposition Measurements in the Southwestern USA: A Comparison between Texas, Eastern Oklahoma, and the Four Corners Area  

PubMed Central

Gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) dry deposition measurements using aerodynamic surrogate surface passive samplers were collected in central and eastern Texas and eastern Oklahoma, from September 2011 to September 2012. The purpose of this study was to provide an initial characterization of the magnitude and spatial extent of ambient GOM dry deposition in central and eastern Texas for a 12-month period which contained statistically average annual results for precipitation totals, temperature, and wind speed. The research objective was to investigate GOM dry deposition in areas of Texas impacted by emissions from coal-fired utility boilers and compare it with GOM dry deposition measurements previously observed in eastern Oklahoma and the Four Corners area. Annual GOM dry deposition rate estimates were relatively low in Texas, ranging from 0.1 to 0.3?ng/m2h at the four Texas monitoring sites, similar to the 0.2?ng/m2h annual GOM dry deposition rate estimate recorded at the eastern Oklahoma monitoring site. The Texas and eastern Oklahoma annual GOM dry deposition rate estimates were at least four times lower than the highest annual GOM dry deposition rate estimate previously measured in the more arid bordering western states of New Mexico and Colorado in the Four Corners area. PMID:24955412

Sather, Mark E.; Allen, Kara L.; Smith, Luther; Mathew, Johnson; Jackson, Clarence; Callison, Ryan; Scrapper, Larry; Hathcoat, April; Adam, Jacque; Keese, Danielle; Brunette, Robert; Karlstrom, Jason; Van der Jagt, Gerard

2014-01-01

88

A study of secondary recovery possibilities of the Hogshooter field, Washington County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Hogshooter field, located in east central Washington County, Oklahoma, was first developed during the period 1906 to 1913. The field was extended later during the period 1918 to 1922. The principal producing horizon is the Bartlesville sand, found at an average depth of 1,150 feet. To January 1, 1944, the Bartlesville sand has produced 7,566,000 barrels of oil from 5,610 productive acres and 871 oil wells. Peak production, averaging 2,025 barrels per day for the year, was attained in the year 1910. The accumulation of oil in the Bartlesville sand is not related to structure. The total recovery from the Bartlesville sand in the Hogshooter field to January 1, 1944, is estimated to represent 10.3 per cent of the original oil in place, and the total residual oil is estimated to average 11,776 barrels per acre. Widespread application of vacuum, started in 1915, has had little beneficial effect on production. Some gas-repressuring in recent years has increased recovery to a small extent. Conservatively estimated water-flood recovery possibilities are: 3,500 barrels per acre for an area consisting of 1,393 acres (4,875,000 barrels total) with a reasonable profit at the present price of crude oil, and 2,500 barrels per acre for an area of 2,248 acres (5,620,000 barrels total), with no profit indicated under existing conditions. The latter area would show a profit equal to the first-mentioned area only with an increase in price of crude oil of forty-five cents per barrel. Subsurface waters at depths of 1,400 to 1,700 feet are indicated as a satisfactory source for use in water-flooding operations.

Fox, I. William; Thigpen, Claude H.; Ginter, Roy L.; Alden, George P.

1945-01-01

89

The influence of land use on gully erosion in Brazos County, Texas: an historical perspective  

E-print Network

THE INFLUENCE OF LAND USE ON GULLY EROSION IN BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS: AN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE A Thesis JEFFREY BATTLE CLARK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1985 Major Subject: Geography THE INFLUENCE OF LAND USE ON GULLY EROSION IN BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS: AN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE A Thesis JEFFREY BATTLE CLARK Approved as to style and content by: Charles L. Smith (Chair...

Clark, Jeffrey Battle

1985-01-01

90

Mineralogical analysis and uranium distribution of the sediments from the upper Jackson formation, Karnes County, Texas  

E-print Network

MINERALOGICAL ANALYSIS AND URANIUM DISTRIBUTION OF THE SEDIMENTS FROM THE UPPER JACKSON FORMATION KARNES COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by PAUL HAROLD FISHMAN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the reouirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject: Geology MINERALOGICAL ANALYSIS AND URANIUM DISTRIBUTION OF THE SEDIMENTS FROM THE UPPER JACKSON FORMATION KARNES COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by PAUL HAROLD FISHMAN Approved...

Fishman, Paul Harold

1978-01-01

91

Educational orientations of rural youth in selected low-income counties of Texas  

E-print Network

EDUCATIONAL ORIENTATIONS OF RURAL YOUTH IN SELECTED LOW-1NCOME COUNTIES OF TEXAS A Thesis By GEORGE W OHLENDORF Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1967 Major Subject: Sociology EDUCATIONAL ORIENTATIONS OF RURAL YOUTH IN SELECTED LOW-INCOME COUNTIES OF TEXAS A Thesis By GEORGE W OHLENDORF Approved as to style and content by: (Chapman of Committee)? ad of Department...

Ohlendorf, George W

1967-01-01

92

Soils-geomorphology of the Brazos River terraces Brazos County, Texas  

E-print Network

SOILS-GEOMORPHOLOGY OF THE BRAZOS RIVER TERRACES BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by LEE CHARLES NORDT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AAM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... Oecember 1983 Major Subject: Geography SOILS-GEOMORPHOLOGY OF THE BRAZOS RIVER TERRACES BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by LEE CHARLES NORDT Approved as to style and content by: Kenneth L. White (Chairman of ommittee) Clarissa T. Kimber (Member...

Nordt, Lee C

1983-01-01

93

Chironomids associated with common microhabitats in three ponds in Brazos County, Texas  

E-print Network

CHIRONOMIDS ASSOCIATED WITH COMMON MICROHABITATS IN THREE PONDS IN BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS. A Thesis by ALBA ISBELA HERNANDEZ OVIEDO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 'l990 Major Subject:Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences CHIRONOMIDS ASSOCIATED WITH COMMON MICROHABITATS IN THREE PONDS IN BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS. A Thesis by ALBA ISBELA HERNANDEZ OVIEDO Approved as to style and content...

Hernandez Oviedo, Alba Isbela

1990-01-01

94

Predictability of littoral-zone fish communities through ontogeny in Lake Texoma, Oklahoma-Texas, USA  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We sampled larval, juvenile and adult fishes from littoral-zone areas of a large reservoir (Lake Texoma, Oklahoma-Texas) (1) to characterize environmental factors that influenced fish community structure, (2) to examine how consistent fish-environment relationships were through ontogeny (i.e., larval vs. juvenile and adult), and (3) to measure the concordance of larval communities sampled during spring to juvenile and adult communities sampled at the same sites later in the year. Larval, juvenile and adult fish communities were dominated by Atherinidae (mainly inland silverside, Menidia beryllina) and Moronidae (mainly juvenile striped bass, Morone saxatilis) and were consistently structured along a gradient of site exposure to prevailing winds and waves. Larval, juvenile and adult communities along this gradient varied from atherinids and moronids at highly exposed sites to mostly centrarchids (primarily Lepomis and Micropterus spp.) at protected sites. Secondarily, zooplankton densities, water clarity, and land-use characteristics were related to fish community structure. Rank correlation analyses and Mantel tests indicated that the spatial consistency and predictability of fish communities was high as larval fishes sampled during spring were concordant with juvenile and adult fishes sampled at the same sites during summer and fall in terms of abundance, richness, and community structure. We propose that the high predictability and spatial consistency of littoral-zone fishes in Lake Texoma was a function of relatively simple communities (dominated by 1-2 species) that were structured by factors, such as site exposure to winds and waves, that varied little through time. ?? Springer 2005.

Eggleton, M.A.; Ramirez, R.; Hargrave, C.W.; Gido, K.B.; Masoner, J.R.; Schnell, G.D.; Matthews, W.J.

2005-01-01

95

Bromide, Chloride, and Sulfate Concentrations, and Specific Conductance, Lake Texoma, Texas and Oklahoma, 2007-08  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Dallas Water Utilities Division, collected water-quality data from 11 sites on Lake Texoma, a reservoir on the Texas-Oklahoma border, during April 2007-September 2008. At 10 of the sites, physical properties (depth, specific conductance, pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, and alkalinity) were measured and samples were collected for analysis of selected dissolved constituents (bromide, calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, carbonate, bicarbonate, chloride, and sulfate); at one site, only physical properties were measured. The primary constituent of interest was bromide. Bromate can form when ozone is used to disinfect raw water containing bromide, and bromate is a suspected human carcinogen. Chloride and sulfate were of secondary interest. Only the analytical results for bromide, chloride, sulfate, and measured specific conductance are discussed in this report. Median dissolved bromide concentrations ranged from 0.28 to 0.60 milligrams per liter. The largest median dissolved bromide concentration (0.60 milligram per liter at site 11) was from the Red River arm of Lake Texoma. Dissolved bromide concentrations generally were larger in the Red River arm of Lake Texoma than in the Washita arm of the lake. Median dissolved chloride concentrations were largest in the Red River arm of Lake Texoma at site 11 (431 milligrams per liter) and smallest at site 8 (122 milligrams per liter) in the Washita arm. At site 11 in the Red River arm, the mean and median chloride concentrations exceeded the secondary maximum contaminant level of 300 milligrams per liter for chloride established by the 'Texas Surface Water Quality Standards' for surface-water bodies designated for the public water supply use. Median dissolved sulfate concentrations ranged from 182 milligrams per liter at site 4 in the Big Mineral arm to 246 milligrams per liter at site 11 in the Red River arm. None of the mean or median sulfate concentrations exceeded the secondary maximum contaminant level of 300 milligrams per liter. Median specific conductance measurements at sites ranged from 1,120 microsiemens per centimeter at site 8 in the Washita arm to 2,100 microsiemens per centimeter in the Red River arm. The spatial distribution of specific conductance in Lake Texoma was similar to that of bromide and chloride, with larger specific conductance values in the Red River arm compared to those in the Washita arm.

Baldys, Stanley

2009-01-01

96

Hydrology of an abandoned coal-mining area near McCurtain, Haskell County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water quality was investigated from October 1980 to May 1983 in an area of abandoned coal mines in Haskell county, Oklahoma. Bedrock in the area is shale, siltstone, sandstone, and the McAlester (Stigler) and Hartshorne coals of the McAlester Formation and Hartshorne Sandstone of Pennsylvanian age. The two coal beds, upper and lower Hartshorne, associated with the Hartshorne Sandstone converge or are separated by a few feet or less of bony coal or shale in the McCurtain area. Many small faults cut the Hartshorne coal in all the McCurtain-area mines. The main avenues of water entry to and movement through the bedrock are the exposed bedding-plane openings between layers of sandstone, partings between laminae of shale, fractures and joints developed during folding and faulting laminae of shale, fractures and joints developed during folding and faulting of the brittle rocks, and openings caused by surface mining--the overburden being shattered and broken to form spoil. Water-table conditions exist in bedrock and spoil in the area. Mine pond water is in direct hydraulic connections with water in the spoil piles and the underlying Hartshorne Sandstone. Sulfate is the best indicator of the presence of coal-mine drainage in both surface and ground water in the Oklahoma coal field. Median sulfate concentrations for four sites on Mule Creek ranged from 26 to 260 milligrams per liter. Median sulfate concentrations increased with increased drainage from unreclaimed mined areas. The median sulfate concentration in Mule Creek where it drains the reclaimed area is less than one-third of that at the next site downstream where the stream begins to drain abandoned (unreclaimed) mine lands. Water from Mule Creek predominantly is a sodium sulfate type. Maximum and median values for specific conductance and concentrations of calcium, magnesium, sodium, sulfate, chloride, dissolved solids, and alkalinity increase as Mule Creek flows downstream and drains increasing areas of abandoned (unreclaimed) mining lands. Constituent concentrations in Mule Creek, except those for dissolved solids, iron, manganese, and sulfate, generally do not exceed drinking-water limits. Reclamation likely would result in decreased concentrations of dissolved solids, calcium, magnesium, sodium, sulfate, and alkalinity in Mule Creek in the vicinity of the reclaimed area. Ground water in the area is moderately hard to very hard alkaline water with a median pH of 7.2 to 7.6. It predominately is a sodium sulfate type and, except for dissolved solids, iron manganese, and sulfate, constituent concentrations generally do not exceed drinking-water limits. Ground-water quality would likely be unchanged by reclamation. The quality of water in the two mine ponds is quite similar to that of the shallow ground water in the area. Constituents in water from both ponds generally do not exceed drinking-water limits and the water quality is unlikely to be changed by reclamation in the area.

Slack, L.J.

1983-01-01

97

Ground-water data of selected test holes and wells along the Arkansas river in Muskogee County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The data in this report were collected during the period 1958-64 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Army, Corps of Engineers, as part of a comprehensive study of the ground-water resources of the alluvium along the Arkansas and Verdigris Rivers between Moffett and Catoosa, Oklahoma (fig. 1). The purpose of this report is to make the hydrologic data obtained during the study of ground water in the alluvium along the Arkansas River in Muskogee County readily available to the public. The data in this report should be useful in predicting geologic and hydrologic conditions when drilling new wells. Table 1 gives information on the sizes, depths, yields, and other characteristics of wells in the area. The table also provides a key to the additional information for each well site given in tables 2 through 6. Table 2 gives logs for the materials penetrated at test holes and wells in the report area; table 3 gives depths to water measured in wells; table 4 includes chemical analyses of water from wells; table 5 gives laboratory determinations of particle-size distribution of earth samples collected from test holes and wells; and table 6 gives coefficients of permeability and other hydrologic properties of earth samples from the selected test holes. Similar data for Sequoyah County, LeFlore-Haskell Counties, and Wagoner-Rogers Counties are available in other open-file reports. An interpretive report, 'Hydrology of the alluvium of the Arkansas River, Muskogee, Oklahoma, to Fort Smith, Arkansas,' by Harry H. Tanaka and Jerrald R. Hollowell will be published as U.S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 1809-T.

Tanaka, H.H.; Hart, D.L., Jr.; Knott, R.K.

1965-01-01

98

Genetic variation in the 16s mitochondrial rDNA gene from Texas and Oklahoma populations of Amblyomma maculatum  

E-print Network

), switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), and Canada wild-rye (Elymus canadensis). Shay Ranch is located in Refugio County and is situated in the Gulf Prairies ecological area of Texas. The vegetation of the Gulf Prairies is generally tall grasses such as big...

Lostak, Tracy Karon

2009-05-15

99

ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY WITH DOWNHOLE VIBRATION STIMULATION IN OSAGE COUNTY OKLAHOMA  

SciTech Connect

This Final Report covers the entire project from July 13, 2000 to June 30, 2003. The report summarizes the details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma'' under DOE Contract Number DE-FG26-00BC15191. The project was divided into nine separate tasks. This report is written in an effort to document the lessons learned during the completion of each task. Therefore each task will be discussed as the work evolved for that task throughout the duration of the project. Most of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, but certain tasks were dependent on earlier tasks being completed. During the three years of project activities, twelve quarterly technical reports were submitted for the project. Many individual topic and task specific reports were included as appendices in the quarterly reports. Ten of these reports have been included as appendices to this final report. Two technical papers, which were written and accepted by the Society of Petroleum Engineers, have also been included as appendices. The three primary goals of the project were to build a downhole vibration tool (DHVT) to be installed in seven inch casing, conduct a field test of vibration stimulation in a mature waterflooded field and evaluate the effects of the vibration on both the produced fluid characteristics and injection well performance. The field test results are as follows: In Phase I of the field test the DHVT performed exceeding well, generating strong clean signals on command and as designed. During this phase Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory had installed downhole geophones and hydrophones to monitor the signal generated by the downhole vibrator. The signals recorded were strong and clear. Phase II was planned to be ninety-day reservoir stimulation field test. This portion of the field tests was abruptly ended after one week of operations, when the DHVT became stuck in the well during a routine removal activity. The tool cannot operate in this condition and remains in the well. There was no response measured during or afterwards to either the produced fluids from the five production wells or in the injection characteristics of the two injection wells in the pilot test area. Monitoring the pilot area injection and production wells ceased when the field test was terminated March 14, 2003. Thus, a key goal of this project, which was to determine the effects of vibration stimulation on improving oil recovery from a mature waterflood, was not obtained. While there was no improved oil recovery effect measured, there was insufficient vibration stimulation time to expect a change to occur. No conclusion can be drawn about the effectiveness of vibration stimulation in this test.

Robert Westermark; J. Ford Brett

2003-11-01

100

Effects of municipal ground-water withdrawals on the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer, Pontotoc County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in south-central Oklahoma consists of a thick sequence of folded and faulted carbonate and clastic rocks of Upper Cambrian to Middle Ordovician age. Fractures and karst features locally increase the aquifer's capacity to transmit and store ground water. The aquifer is a principal source of water for municipal and rural users. A hydrologic study was conducted to evaluate the effects of municipal ground-water withdrawal from the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer on local ground-water levels and discharge from nearby springs and streams in south-central Pontotoc County. A municipal well was pumped for 63 hours at an average rate of 1,170 gallons per minute. A maximum observed drawdown of 0.3 feet was recorded half a mile from the pumping well. Drawdown was observed as far as 1.2 miles from the pumping well. No measurable response was observed at any of the surface-water-discharge measurement sites; however, recharge from precipitation may have masked any decreases in discharge caused by the pumping. Simultaneous pumping of two municipal wells for 241 hours at average rates of 1,170 and 2,730 gallons per minute resulted in a maximum observed drawdown of 1.3 feet recorded at an average distance of 0.80 miles from the pumping wells. The most distant drawdown observed was at an average distance 1.1 miles from the pumped wells. Less that 2 days after pumping stopped, increases in springflow were recorded at two springs; it is unknown whether these discharge responses reflect the effects of recharge from precipitation, or the combined effects of precipitation and the cessation of ground-water withdrawal. The effects of the stress tests on the hydrologic system were offset by recharge from concurrent precipitation. The maximum observed drawdown represents about 6 percent of the median natural water-level fluctuation during the study period. The effect of drawdown could become critical during extended periods of low precipitation, if water levels are already near the bottom of domestic wells in the area. However, a comparison of maximum observed drawdown (1.3 ft) with the minimum saturated thickness of fresh ground water (1,500 ft) suggests that municipal pumping had little effect on the amount of ground water stored in the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in the study area. This evaluation is based on the limited pumping rates and times of the stress tests.

Savoca, M.E.; Bergman, D.L.

1994-01-01

101

Role of sea surface temperature and soil-moisture feedback in the 1998 Oklahoma-Texas drought  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The drought that affected the US states of Oklahoma and Texas in the summer of 1998 was strong and persistent, with soil moisture reaching levels comparable to those of the 1930s `dust bowl'. Although other effects of the record-strength 1997-98 El Nio were successfully predicted over much of the United States, the Oklahoma-Texas drought was not. Whereas the response of the tropical atmosphere to strong anomalies in sea surface temperature is quite predictable, the response of the extratropical atmosphere is more variable. Here we present results from mechanistic experiments to clarify the origin and maintenance of this extratropical climate extreme. In addition to global atmospheric models, we use a regional model to isolate regional climate feedbacks. We conclude that during April and May 1998, sea surface temperature anomalies combined with a favourable atmospheric circulation to establish the drought. In June-August, the regional positive feedback associated with lower evaporation and precipitation contributed substantially to the maintenance of the drought. The drought ended in the autumn, when stronger large-scale weather systems were able to penetrate the region and overwhelm the soil-moisture feedback. Our results show the potential for numerical models including appropriate physical processes to make skilful predictions of regional climate.

Hong, Song-You; Kalnay, Eugenia

2000-12-01

102

Role of sea surface temperature and soil-moisture feedback in the 1998 Oklahoma-Texas drought.  

PubMed

The drought that affected the US states of Oklahoma and Texas in the summer of 1998 was strong and persistent, with soil moisture reaching levels comparable to those of the 1930s 'dust bowl'. Although other effects of the record-strength 1997-98 El Nio were successfully predicted over much of the United States, the Oklahoma-Texas drought was not. Whereas the response of the tropical atmosphere to strong anomalies in sea surface temperature is quite predictable, the response of the extratropical atmosphere is more variable. Here we present results from mechanistic experiments to clarify the origin and maintenance of this extratropical climate extreme. In addition to global atmospheric models, we use a regional model to isolate regional climate feedbacks. We conclude that during April and May 1998, sea surface temperature anomalies combined with a favourable atmospheric circulation to establish the drought. In June-August, the regional positive feedback associated with lower evaporation and precipitation contributed substantially to the maintenance of the drought. The drought ended in the autumn, when stronger large-scale weather systems were able to penetrate the region and overwhelm the soil-moisture feedback. Our results show the potential for numerical models including appropriate physical processes to make skillful predictions of regional climate. PMID:11130719

Hong, S Y; Kalnay, E

2000-12-14

103

Bookmobiles and Paperbacks; an Extended Study of the Use of Paperbacks and Elimination of Overdue Fines at the Oklahoma County Libraries System.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An experiment conducted in 1975 tested the effects of two policy changes in five Oklahoma County Library System bookmobiles: (1) conversion to predominantly paperback collections; and (2) relaxation of overdue policies. There were two indicators of success: (1) the bookmobiles experienced a 26% increase in circulation during the year; and (2) the

Little, Paul

104

Impacts of the 1985 Farm Bill and Its Alternatives on Rural Economies: The Case of Terry County, Texas.  

E-print Network

TDOC Z TA24S.7 8873 NO.1602 LIBRARY AUG 0 4 1988 8-1602 May 1988 Impacts of t and its Alternatives on Rural Economies: The Case of Terry County, Texas APPC AGRICUL TURAL & FOOD POLICY CENTER Texas Agricultural Experiment Station...: The Case of Terry County, Texas James M. Bowker Assistant Professor Nova Scotia Agricultural College James W. Richardson Professor Texas Agricultural Experiment Station Department of Agricultural Economics Agricultural and Food Policy Center Texas...

Bowker, James M.; Richardson, James W.; Jones, Lonnie L.

1988-01-01

105

40 CFR 81.126 - Northwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...geographically located within the outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Oklahoma: Alfalfa County, Beaver County, Blaine County, Cimarron County, Custer County, Dewey County, Ellis County, Harper County, Major County,...

2014-07-01

106

40 CFR 81.126 - Northwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...geographically located within the outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Oklahoma: Alfalfa County, Beaver County, Blaine County, Cimarron County, Custer County, Dewey County, Ellis County, Harper County, Major County,...

2012-07-01

107

40 CFR 81.126 - Northwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...geographically located within the outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Oklahoma: Alfalfa County, Beaver County, Blaine County, Cimarron County, Custer County, Dewey County, Ellis County, Harper County, Major County,...

2011-07-01

108

40 CFR 81.126 - Northwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...geographically located within the outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Oklahoma: Alfalfa County, Beaver County, Blaine County, Cimarron County, Custer County, Dewey County, Ellis County, Harper County, Major County,...

2013-07-01

109

Environment of deposition of Clear Fork Formation: Yoakum County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Clear Fork Formation is Permian (Leonardian) in age and constitutes a major oil-bearing unit in the Permian basin of west Texas. In Yoakum County, west Texas, the upper Clear Fork carbonates record a subtidal upward-shoaling sequence of deposition. A small bryozoan-algal patch reef is situated within these carbonates near the southern edge of the North Basin platform. The reef is completely dolomitized, but paramorphic replacement has facilitated a study of the paleoecology, lateral variations, and community succession within this buildup. Build-ups of this type are scarcely known in strata of Permian age. The reef was apparently founded on a coquina horizon at the base of the buildup. The reef apparently had a low-relief, dome-shaped morphology. The trapping and binding of sediment by bryozoa appear to have been the main constructional process. A significant role was also played by encrusting forams and the early precipitation of submarine cements, both of which added rigidity to the structure. The reef also contains a low-diversity community of other invertebrates. Algal constituents predominate at the basinward edge of the buildup. The reef was formed entirely subaqueously on a broad, relatively shallow tropical marine carbonate shelf environment. An understanding of the lithofacies distribution and paragenesis within this sequence will provide information on porosity variations and the nature and distribution of permeability barriers. Such information is useful in reservoir modeling studies and for secondary recovery techniques in shelf-edge carbonate reservoirs of this type.

Moore, B.K.

1987-05-01

110

National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) performance in southern Arizona, Texas, and Oklahoma in 2003-2004  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Four field campaigns were conducted in southern Arizona (AZ) and in northern Texas and southern Oklahoma (TX-OK) in 2003 and 2004 to evaluate the performance of the U.S. National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) in detecting cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning after an upgrade in 2002 and 2003. The 2-year average flash detection efficiency (DE) in AZ was 93% (1024/1097), and the measured (first plus subsequent) stroke DE was 76% (2746/3620). The corresponding values in TX-OK were 92% (338/367) and 86% (755/882), respectively. After correcting for the time resolution of the video camera (16.7 ms), we estimate that the actual NLDN stroke DE and video multiplicities were about 68% and 3.71 in AZ and 77% and 2.80 in TX-OK. The average DE for negative first strokes (92%) was larger than the measured DE for subsequent strokes that produced a new ground contact (81%) and the DE for subsequent strokes that remained in a preexisting channel (67%). The primary cause of the NLDN missing strokes was that the peak of the radiated electromagnetic field was below the NLDN detection threshold. The average estimated peak current (Ip) of negative first strokes and the average multiplicity of negative flashes varied from storm to storm and between the two regions, but this variability did not affect the DE as long as the recording sessions had more than 60 flashes. By analyzing the NLDN locations of subsequent strokes that remained in the same channel as the first stroke we infer that the median random position error of the NLDN was 424 m in AZ and 282 m in TX-OK. An evaluation of the classification of lightning type by the NLDN (i.e., CG stroke versus cloud pulse) showed that 1.4-7% (6/420 to 6/86) of the positive NLDN reports with an Ip ? 10 kA in TX-OK were produced by CG strokes; 4.7-26% (5/106 to 5/19) of the positive reports with 10 kA < Ip ? 20 kA were CGs; and 67-95% (30/45 to 30/32) of the reports with Ip ? +20 kA were CG strokes. Some 50-87% (52/104 to 52/60) of the negative, single-stroke NLDN reports in AZ and TX-OK with ?Ip? ? 10 kA were produced by CG flashes. Both the upper and lower bounds in these classification studies have observational biases.

Biagi, Christopher J.; Cummins, Kenneth L.; Kehoe, Kenneth E.; Krider, E. Philip

2007-03-01

111

Risk assessment of runoff on a range watershed in Brazos County, Texas  

E-print Network

A drip type rainfall simulator and an existing watershed study were used to assess relationships between runoff, infiltration, erosion and associated risk thresholds on a range watershed in Brazos County, Texas. The focus of the research...

Gwaltney, Tracy Marie

2004-09-30

112

Water table recovery in a reclaimed surface lignite mine, Grimes County, Texas  

E-print Network

Water table recovery in four reclaimed mine blocks containing replaced overburden has been monitored at Gibbons Creek Lignite Mine in Grimes County, Texas since 1986. Recovery analysis was conducted based on data recorded at 27 wells installed...

Peace, Kelley H.

1995-01-01

113

Suburban recreation subdivisions in Montgomery County, Texas - a case study analysis  

E-print Network

County, Texas--A Case Study Analysis (May 1969) Carson E. Watt, B. S. , 'lexas Technological College Directed by: Dr. Frank Suggitt The general objectives of this thesis were to determine charac- teristics and existing influencing factors which... affect subdivision development in Montgomery County, Texas, and through a case study, to examine some of the relationships among the factors concerning recreation facilities and population characteristics in a recrea- tion subdivision. Specific...

Watt, Carson Earl

1969-01-01

114

Prevalence and trends of substance abuse in Harris County, Texas, 1989 to 1991  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the late 1980s, Harris County, Texas began experiencing an escalation of drug-related activities. Various indicators used in this analysis tracked drug-related trends from 1989 to 1991 to determine patterns for comparison of local (Houston\\/Harris County, Texas) to national levels.^ An important indicator of the drug scenario was drug-related activities among youths, which increased during the period of this study.

James Goldman

1994-01-01

115

Discrimination against and Adaptation of Italians in the Coal Counties of Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the late 1800s and early 1900s coal reigned supreme in what is now southeastern Oklahoma. As was the case in the northeastern United States, Italians and other immigrants from southern and eastern Europe were brought in as a form of inexpensive labor to work the mines. Italians had different customs, a different language, a unique appearance,

LoConto, David G.

2004-01-01

116

Shallow seismic reflection profile of the Meers fault, Comanche County, Oklahoma  

E-print Network

.J., The Meers fault tectonic activity in south- western Oklahoma, U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, NUREG ICR-4852, 1-25, A1-A25, 1987. McLean, R., and Stearns, D.W., Fault analysis in the Wichita Mountains [Abs. ], AAPG Bull. 67, 511-512, 1983. Miller...

Myers, Paul B.; Miller, Richard D.; Steeples, Don W.

1987-07-01

117

NAME: Half Moon Reef Restoration Project LOCATION: Palacios/Matagorda County, Texas  

E-print Network

NAME: Half Moon Reef Restoration Project LOCATION: Palacios/Matagorda County, Texas ACRES Texas Parks and Wildlife PROJECT DESCRIPTION: Half Moon Reef is located on Palacios Point within of the suitability of Half Moon as a restoration project. Expected Benefits: The project will result in the direct

US Army Corps of Engineers

118

Geochemical Data from Produced Water Contamination Investigations: Osage-Skiatook Petroleum Environmental Research (OSPER) Sites, Osage County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We report chemical and isotopic analyses of 345 water samples collected from the Osage-Skiatook Petroleum Environmental Research (OSPER) project. Water samples were collected as part of an ongoing multi-year USGS investigation to study the transport, fate, natural attenuation, and ecosystem impacts of inorganic salts and organic compounds present in produced water releases at two oil and gas production sites from an aging petroleum field located in Osage County, in northeast Oklahoma. The water samples were collected primarily from monitoring wells and surface waters at the two research sites, OSPER A (legacy site) and OSPER B (active site), during the period March, 2001 to February, 2005. The data include produced water samples taken from seven active oil wells, one coal-bed methane well and two domestic groundwater wells in the vicinity of the OSPER sites.

Thordsen, James J.; Kharaka, Yousif K.; Ambats, Gil; Kakouros, Evangelos; Abbott, Marvin M.

2007-01-01

119

Precambrian geology of a portion of the Purdy Hill quadrangle, Mason County, Texas  

E-print Network

PRECAMBRIAN GEOLOGY OF A PORTION OF THE PURDY HILL QUADRANGLE, MASON COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by EMILIO MUTIS-DUPLAT Submitted. to the Graduate College of Texas ASSAM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1969 Major Subject: Geology PRECAMBRIAN GEOLOGY OF A PORTION OF THE PURDY HILL QUADRANGLE, MASON COUNT Y, TEXAS A Thesis by EMILIO MUTIS-DUPI AT Approved as to style and content by; F~ pg (Chairman of Committee) (Member...

Mutis-Duplat, Emilio

1969-01-01

120

RepoRt on a MaMMal SuRvey at CaMp Maxey, laMaR County, texaS (texaS aRMy national GuaRd faCility)  

Microsoft Academic Search

A mammal survey was conducted of Camp Maxey (Texas Army National Guard training site), Lamar County, Texas, from October 2002 through June 2004. This military installation is located in eastern Texas and is situated at the gradational boundary between the Pineywoods (east) and Blackland Prairies (west). Sherman traps, snap traps, pitfall traps, mist nets, DK-1 and Macabee gopher traps, and

Cody W. EdWards

121

Development of ground-water resources in Orange County, Texas, and adjacent areas in Texas and Louisiana, 1971-80  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The major water-bearing unit in the study area is the Chicot aquifer. The Chicot aquifer overlies the Evangeline aquifer. The Evangeline aquifer is undeveloped in Orange County, but is developed at Evadale in Jasper County, Texas, and at Silsbee in Hardin County, Texas. Both aquifers consist of unconsolidated and discontinuous layers of sand and clay that dip toward the Gulf of Mexico. Pumpage in Orange County from the lower unit of the Chicot aquifer averaged 21.2 million gallons per day and pumpage from the upper unit of the Chicot averaged about 2 million gallons per day from 1971-79. Pumpage increased in municipal areas and decreased in industrial areas with little net change in total pumpage during the report period. Most water levels continued to decline in Orange County, generally at a slower rate than before 1971. Water levels tended to stabilize in areas where ground-water withdrawals decreased. In some of the areas water levels rose. Bench-mark elevations determined during 1973 show regional land-surface subsidence from 1918-73, generally attributed to ground-water development, to be less than 0.5 foot. Locally, subsidence due to production of oil, gas , saltwater, or sulphur was about 15 feet at Spindletop Dome, Jefferson County, Texas, and as much as 3 feet (.9 meter) near Port Acres gas field, Jefferson County, Texas. Although saltwater encroachment is evident in parts of southern Orange County, the encroachment is not expected to increase because artesian pressure is unlikely to be decreased further due to stable ground-water pumping and a projected increase in the use of surface water to meet future demands. (USGS)

Bonnet, C.W.; Gabrysch, R.K.

1982-01-01

122

The Occurrence of Chlorothalonil, its Transformation Products, and Selected Other Pesticides in Texas and Oklahoma Streams, 2003-2004  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this study is to determine if the fungicide chlorothalonil (2,4,5,6-tetrachloro-isophthalonitrile) or three of its transformation products are transported to surface water after use on peanuts or other crops. Chlorothalonil is classified as a probable carcinogen, and the 4-hydroxy of chlorothalonil transformation product is more soluble, stable, and toxic than its parent compound. In 2003, 14 water samples were collected from three sites in Texas and two sites in Oklahoma. In 2004, six samples were collected from the two Oklahoma sites. Chlorothalonil was not detected in any sample. The 4-hydroxy of chlorothalonil transformation product was detected in three of the six samples collected in 2004, with a maximum concentration of 0.018 ?g/L; the other two transformation products were not detected in any sample. In addtion, samples were analyzed for as many as 109 other pesticides and transformation products. Atrazine was detected in 13 of the 19 samples with a maximum concentration of 0.122 ?g/L. Deethyatrazine was detected in 10 of the 19 samples with a maximum concentration of 0.04 ?g/L. Metolachlor was detected in 8 of the 19 samples with a maximum concentration of 0.019 ?g/L. Fifteen other pesticides or pesticide transformation products including 2,4-D, carbaryl, simazine, oryzalin, prometon, tebuthiuron were detected in four or fewer samples. In general, concentrations of pesticides were less than is commonly observed in Midwestern streams.

Battaglin, W. A.; Kuivila, K. M.; Winton, K. T.; Meyer, M. T.

2005-12-01

123

Development of visible/infrared/microwave agriculture classification and biomass estimation algorithms. [Guyton, Oklahoma and Dalhart, Texas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Agricultural crop classification models using two or more spectral regions (visible through microwave) are considered in an effort to estimate biomass at Guymon, Oklahoma Dalhart, Texas. Both grounds truth and aerial data were used. Results indicate that inclusion of C, L, and P band active microwave data, from look angles greater than 35 deg from nadir, with visible and infrared data improve crop discrimination and biomass estimates compared to results using only visible and infrared data. The microwave frequencies were sensitive to different biomass levels. The K and C band were sensitive to differences at low biomass levels, while P band was sensitive to differences at high biomass levels. Two indices, one using only active microwave data and the other using data from the middle and near infrared bands, were well correlated to total biomass. It is implied that inclusion of active microwave sensors with visible and infrared sensors on future satellites could aid in crop discrimination and biomass estimation.

Rosenthal, W. D.; Mcfarland, M. J.; Theis, S. W.; Jones, C. L. (principal investigtors)

1982-01-01

124

Development of visible/infrared/microwave agriculture classification and biomass estimation algorithms, volume 2. [Oklahoma and Texas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Agricultural crop classification models using two or more spectral regions (visible through microwave) were developed and tested and biomass was estimated by including microwave with visible and infrared data. The study was conducted at Guymon, Oklahoma and Dalhart, Texas utilizing aircraft multispectral data and ground truth soil moisture and biomass information. Results indicate that inclusion of C, L, and P band active microwave data from look angles greater than 35 deg from nadir with visible and infrared data improved crop discrimination and biomass estimates compared to results using only visible and infrared data. The active microwave frequencies were sensitive to different biomass levels. In addition, two indices, one using only active microwave data and the other using data from the middle and near infrared bands, were well correlated to total biomass.

Rosenthal, W. D.; Mcfarland, M. J.; Theis, S. W.; Jones, C. L. (principal investigators)

1982-01-01

125

Ground-water records for the area surrounding the Chickasaw National Recreation Area, Murray County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report is a compilation of ground-water records, water levels, and water-quality field determinations, for wells in a 132 square-mile (342 square kilometer) area surrounding the Chickasaw National Recreational Area in south-central Oklahoma. This information was collected in cooperation with the National Park Service. The location of the study area is shown on figure 1; the well locations are shown on figure 2. Data from 101 wells are summarized in this report.

Goemaat, Robert L.; Willard, Cass C.

1983-01-01

126

Geology of north Personville field, Limestone County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

In excess of 50 Mitchell Energy Corporation wells have been drilled in the North Personville field, Limestone County, Texas. In order to understand the variables that affect the ultimate reserves within the carbonate section, two conventional cores from Mitchell Energy Corporation wells were analyzed. The Mitchell Energy Corporation 1 Muse-Duke and 1 Ralph Spence limestone sections were studied to determine the relationship between log-derived reservoir parameters and the limestone lithologies for field wide application. Production at North Personville field is lithology selective. Five distinct oolitic grainstone shoal cycles are identified and correlate field wide. The sequence of events that led to the development of reservoir quality grainstones are (1) the infilling by oolitic grainstone shoals on an irregular Buckner Formation paleosurface. This surface was modified by pre-Cotton Valley limestone salt activity such that carbonate deposition did not take place or was eroded over structurally high areas, (2) Cotton Valley limestone deposition culminating with the deposition of a narrow belt of ooid grainstones, (3) nearly complete occlusion of primary porosity and permeability by the deposition of marine cements followed by chalky microporosity formation, (4) post-depositional salt and basement tectonics that pervasively fracture the more competent ooid grainstone facies producing additional secondary porosity and permeability, (5) hydrocarbon generation from the overlying Bossier marine shales migrates into the porous permeable Cotton Valley Limestone. The uppermost shoal cycle is preferentially charged due to their proximity to the source beds.

Zamboras, R.L.

1988-02-01

127

Geology of North Personville field, Limestone County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

In excess of 50 Mitchell Energy Corporation wells have been drilled in the North Personville field, Limestone County, Texas. In order to understand the variables that affect the ultimate reserves within the carbonate section, two conventional cores from Mitchell Energy Corporation wells were analyzed. The Mitchell Energy Corporation I Muse-Duke and 1 Ralph Spence limestone sections were studied to determine the relationship between log-derived reservoir parameters and the limestone lithologies for field wide application. Production at North Personville field is lithology selective. Five distinct oolitic grainstone shoal cycles are identified and correlate field wide. The sequence of events that led to the development of reservoir quality grainstones are (1) the infilling by oolitic grainstone shoals on an irregular Buckner Formation paleosurface. This surface was modified by pre-Cotton Valley limestone salt activity such that carbonate deposition did not take place or was eroded over structurally high areas, (2) Cotton Valley limestone deposition culminating with the deposition of a narrow belt of ooid grainstones, (3) nearly complete occlusion of primary porosity and permeability by the deposition of marine cements followed by chalky microporosity formation, (4) post-depositional salt and basement tectonics that pervasively fracture the more competent ooid grainstone facies producing additional secondary porosity and permeability, (5) hydrocarbon generation from the overlying Bosier marine shales migrates into the porous permeable Cotton Valley Limestone. The uppermost shoal cycle is preferentially charged due to their proximity to the source beds.

Zamboras, R.L.

1988-01-01

128

Contamination of Lake Wewoka and fresh-water sands by disposal of oil-well brines near Wewoka, Seminole County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This reports deals with ground-water conditions in an area about 5 miles wide from east to west and 8 miles long from north to south, in Tps. 8 and 9 N., Rs. 7 and 8 E., in Seminole County, Oklahoma, including the town of Wewoka and Lake Wewoka. The possible contamination of the lake waters from oil-well brines disposed through a well 3.75 miles north of the lake, and other effects of brine disposal, are considered. The investigation was made at the request of Frank Raab, member of the Oklahoma Planning and Resources Board, and Don McBride, Chief Engineer of the Division of Water Resources who has the responsibility of preventing contamination of water supplies in Oklahoma. Field work was done July 5 and 6, 1941, by Robert H. Dott, Director of the Oklahoma Geological Survey; C.G. Lalicker, Department of Geology, University of Oklahoma; and S.L. Schoff, Assistant Geologist in the Ground Water Division, Water Resources Branch, of the U.S. Geological Survey. Lalicker spent both days studying the rocks exposed in the vicinity and measuring their thickness. A copy of the composite section measured by him is attached. Dott and Schoff spent one day collecting the well information summarized in Table 1, and one day with Lalicker on the stratigraphy. (available as photostat copy only)

Schoff, Stuart L.; Dott, Robert H.; Lalicker, Cecil Gordon

1941-01-01

129

Soil, water, and vegetation conditions in south Texas. [Hildago County, Texas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author has identified the following significant results. To distinguish dead from live vegetation, spectrophotometrically measured infinite reflectance of dead and live corn (Zea mays L.) leaves were compared over the 0.5 to 2.5 micron waveband. Dead leaf reflectance was reached over the entire 0.5 to 2.5 micron waveband by stacking only two to three leaves. Live leaf reflectance was attained by stacking two leaves for the 0.5 to 0.75 micron waveband (chlorophyll absorption region), eight leaves for the 0.75 to 1.35 micron waveband (near infrared region), and three leaves for the 1.35 to 2.5 micron waveband (water absorption region). LANDSAT-1 MSS digital data for 11 December 1973 overpass were used to estimate the sugar cane acreage in Hidalgo County. The computer aided estimate was 22,100 acres compared with the Texas Crop and Livestock Reporting Service estimate of 20,500 acres for the 1973-'74 crop year. Although there were errors of omission from harvested fields that were identified as bare soil and some citrus and native vegetation that were mistakenly identified as sugar cane, the mapped location of sugar cane fields in the county compared favorably with their location on the thematic map generated by the computer.

Wiegand, C. L.; Gausman, H. W.; Leamer, R. W.; Richardson, A. J. (principal investigators)

1975-01-01

130

SUBSURFACE WELL-LOG CORRELATION OF ARSENIC-BEARING LITHOFACIES IN THE PERMIAN GARBER SANDSTONE AND WELLINGTON FORMATION, CENTRAL OKLAHOMA AQUIFER (COA), CLEVELAND COUNTY, OKLAHOMA  

EPA Science Inventory

The fluvial Garber Sandstone and the underlying Wellington Formation are important sources of drinking water in central Oklahoma. These formations, which make up much of the COA, consist of amalgamated sandstones with some interbedded mudstones, siltstones, and local mudstone- a...

131

Did fertility go up after the oklahoma city bombing? An analysis of births in metropolitan counties in Oklahoma, 19901999  

Microsoft Academic Search

Political and sociocultural events (e.g., Brown v. Board of Education in 1954 and the German reunification in 1989) and natural disasters (e.g., Hurricane Hugo in 1989) can affect fertility.\\u000a In our research, we addressed the question of whether the Oklahoma City bombing in April 1995, a man-made disaster, influenced\\u000a fertility patterns in Oklahoma. We defined three theoretical orientationsreplacement theory, community

Joseph Lee Rodgers; Craig A. St. John; Ronnie Coleman

2005-01-01

132

Digital map of hydraulic conductivity for the High Plains Aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This digital data set consists of hydraulic conductivity contours and polygons for the High Plains aquifer in the central United States. The High Plains aquifer extends from south of 32 degrees to almost 45 degrees north latitude and from 96 degrees 30 minutes to almost 104 degrees west longitude. The area covers 174,000 square miles and is present in Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Kansas, Colorado, Nebraska, Wyoming, and South Dakota.

Cederstrand, J.R.; Becker, M.F.

1998-01-01

133

Gravity and Magnetic Survey of Southern Oklahoma Alcugen in Texas Panhandle, Near the 2000 earthquake swarm North of Amarillo  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Texas panhandle is not a region normally thought of as being prone to seismic activity. Earthquakes with magnitudes of 3 to 4 do however occur in this region every year or so and are felt by residents in the area. There are historical reports of earthquakes of magnitude 5 during the early twentieth century. The earthquakes in this region are most likely associated with displacement on old faults related to the Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen (SOA, 600 Ma) which was deformed during the Ouachita orogeny to form the Wichita Mts. During the summer of 2000 there were an unusually large number of earthquakes for this region, five, all from the same location a few kilometers north of Amarillo Texas, 35.39 degrees north latitude and 101.81 degrees west longitude according to the NEIC catalogue. The non-seismic exploration class at Texas Tech University collected and interpreted gravity and magnetic data along a dirt road crossing the location of this earthquake "swarm" (yes in Texas 5 is a swarm) to determine if the old faults of the SOA coincide with the location of these earthquakes. The survey was conducted along a service road of the Santa Fe Railroad that crosses US 87 approximately 20 miles north of Amarillo, Texas trending in a south-southwest direction. Gravity data were collected every 100m along a 5 km profile using Warden and Lacoste gravity meters with elevation control provided by leveling survey tied to elevation markers on the map. Gravity data were colleted, using GPS elevation location and elevation, on roads over more than 20 km surrounding the local survey to provide regional control. Magnetic data were collected along the 5 km profile. Models derived from these data indicate a 200 m thick layer of poorly consolidated sediments with densities of 2.0 g/cc that can be interpreted as the Ogallala aquifer overlaying a layer with density of 2.6 g/cc. The interface between these layers is very structured and has at least three sharp ridges that we interpret as faults with as much as 50 meters of offset along this interface that could only be interpreted as offset on faults in the Wichita prior to their erosion and burial. We are planning additional work related to this project to use electrical methods (EM34 and GPR) to determine if there is offset in shallower layers that would indicate more recent seismicity. .

Manns, S.; Gurrola, H.; Robinson, R.; Horton, M.; Herrmann, M.; Seshhadri, S.; Anderson, H.; Bribiesca, E.; Lindsey, C.; Montalvo, R.; Cyrek, C.; Allen, T.; Hoemberg, J.; Hassan, A.

2005-12-01

134

Ground-water data in Orange County and adjacent counties, Texas, 1985-90  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The lower unit of the Chicot aquifer is a major source of freshwater for Orange County, Texas. In 1989, the average rate of ground-water withdrawal from the lower unit of the Chicot aquifer in Orange County for municipal and industrial use was 13.8 million gallons per day, a substantial decrease from the historical high of 23.1 million gallons per day in 1972. The average withdrawal for industrial use decreased substantially from 14.4 million gallons per day during 1963?84 to 6.9 million gallons per day during 1985?89. The average withdrawal for municipal use during 1985?89 was 6.8 million gallons per day, similar to the average withdrawal of 5.8 million gallons per day during 1963?84. Water levels in wells in most of the study area rose during 1985?90. The largest rise in water levels was more than 10 feet in parts of Orange and Pinehurst, north of site B (one of three areas of ground-water withdrawal for industrial use), while the largest decline in water levels was a localized decline of more than 60 feet at site C in south-central Orange County (also an area of withdrawal for industrial use). Chemical analyses of ground-water samples from the lower Chicot aquifer during 1985?90 indicate that the aquifer contained mostly freshwater (dissolved solids concentrations less than 1,000 milligrams per liter). Dissolved chloride concentrations remained relatively constant in most wells during 1985?90 but could vary greatly between wells within short distances. Saline-water encroachment continued to occur during 1985?89 but at a slower rate than in the 1970s and early 1980s. On the basis of chemical data collected during 1985?89, a relation was determined between specific conductance and dissolved chloride concentration that can be used to estimate dissolved chloride by multiplying the specific conductance by different factors for low or high conductances.

Kasmarek, Mark C.

1999-01-01

135

Groundwater environmental tracer data collected from the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers in Montgomery County and adjacent counties, Texas, 2008  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Gulf Coast aquifer system is the primary water supply for Montgomery County in southeastern Texas, including part of the Houston metropolitan area and the cities of Magnolia, Conroe, and The Woodlands Township, Texas. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Lone Star Groundwater Conservation District, collected environmental tracer data in the Gulf Coast aquifer system, primarily in Montgomery County. Forty existing groundwater wells screened in the Gulf Coast aquifer system were selected for sampling in Montgomery County (38 wells), Waller County (1 well), and Walker County (1 well). Groundwater-quality samples, physicochemical properties, and water-level data were collected once from each of the 40 wells during March-September 2008. Groundwater-quality samples were analyzed for dissolved gases and the environmental tracers sulfur hexafluoride, chlorofluorocarbons, tritium, helium-4, and helium-3/tritium. Water samples were collected and processed onsite using methods designed to minimize changes to the water-sample chemistry or contamination from the atmosphere. Replicate samples for quality assurance and quality control were collected with each environmental sample. Well-construction information and environmental tracer data for March-September 2008 are presented.

Oden, Timothy D.

2011-01-01

136

Influences on farmland values in urban Texas counties and the State  

E-print Network

INFLUENCES ON FARMLAND VALUES IN URBAN TEXAS COUNTIES AND THE STATE A Thesis by BLAKE ROBERT CLAMPFFER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: Joe L. Outlaw (Chair o Commi ) Am . hurow ember) H. DelVar etersen (Member) A. Gene Nelson (Head of Department) December 1997 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics ABSTRACT...

Clampffer, Blake Robert

1997-01-01

137

Gravity and seismic reflection studies over the Ferguson Crossing Salt Dome, Grimes and Brazos Counties, Texas  

E-print Network

, TEXAS A Thesis VLADIMIR FRANCISCO CORDERO ARDILA Approved as to style and con' ent by: (Chairman . Comm(ttee (Head of. De, rtment) (Member) May 1977 441630 ABSTRACT Gravity and Seismic R flection Studies Over the Ferguson Crossing Salt Dome..., Grimes and Brazos Counties, Texas. (Nay 1977) Vladimir Francisco Cordero Ardila, B. S. , Universidad IJacional Autonoma de Nicaragua Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Anthony F. Gangi A gravity and seismic investigation over the Ferguson Crossing...

Cordero Ardila, Vladimir Francisco

1977-01-01

138

A game management plan for Rancho de los Jefes, Brooks County, Texas  

E-print Network

; Dr. James G, Teer KAMEB Services, Inc. of Houston maintains a 4, 564, 9 hectare hunting lease in Brooks County, Texas for white-tailed deer (Ddocoileus vir inianus), wild turkeys )~Ml ~11 ' t d' ), j 1 )~P ~t (Zenaida macroura) . The objectives.... W. Lehmann. Q. H. Pattes also assisted with the vegetation work. Acknowledgement is also made to the Texas Agricultural Extensron Service soil testing laboratory for evaluatzon of sorl samples and recommendations for fertilization rates. Finally...

Frazier, Kenneth Durward

1976-01-01

139

Architecture and production characteristics of strand-plain reservoir facies, Matagorda County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The North Markham-North Bay City field, Matagorda County, Texas, is one of the major multiple-reservoir oil fields of the central Texas Coastal Plain that produce from stacked Frio barrier\\/strand-plain sandstones. The three principal oil reservoirs in the field are interpreted to be transgressed strand-plain (Carlson), progradational strand-plain (Cornelius), and composite progradational strand-plain\\/wave-dominated delta (Cayce) systems. Production characteristics of strand-plain facies

Noel Tyler

1984-01-01

140

The taxonomy and distribution of the planktonic copepoda from Brazos County, Texas  

E-print Network

- ple. All planktonic organisms were then identified to maJor groups: i. e. copepod, ostracod, cladocera, rotifer. Their general abundance within each sample was noted by an arbitrary scale of 0 to 5 as follows: Scale Representative Term Approximate...THE TAXONOMY AND DISTRIBUTION OF THE PLANKTONIC COPEPODA FROM BRAZOS COUNTY& TEXAS A Thesis THOMAS HOWARD RENNIE Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas AQf University in Partial fulfillment of the re&Auirenumts for the degree...

Rennie, Thomas Howard

1967-01-01

141

Update of Estimated Agricultural Benefits Attributable to Drainage and Flood Control in Willacy County, Texas  

E-print Network

benefits for drainage and flood control as related to the Raymondville Drain in Willacy County required that The Corps of Engineers digitize the soils maps for the area. Utilizing the digitized data, the incidence of each soil in the Raymondville Drain...TR- 294 2006 Update of Estimated Agricultural Benefits Attributable to Drainage and Flood Control in Willacy County, Texas Raymondville Drain Static and Stochastic Implications Prepared for the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers...

Lacewell, Ronald D.; Freeman, Roger; Petit, David; Rister, Ed; Sturdivant, Allan; Ribera, Luis; Zinn, Michele

2006-01-01

142

Age-dating implications from the morphologic, petrologic, and isotopic investigations of a calcic soil, Terrell County, Texas  

E-print Network

AGE-DATING IMPLICATIONS FROM THE MORPHOLOGIC, PETROLOGIC, AND ISOTOPIC INVESTIGATIONS OF A CALCIC SOIL, TERRELL COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by DARREN MANNING JOLLEY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1994 Ma~or Subject: Geology AGE-DATING IMPLICATIONS FROM THE MORPHOLOGIC, PETROLOGIC, AND ISOTOPIC INVESTIGATIONS OF A CALCIC SOIL, TERRELL COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by DARREN...

Jolley, Darren Manning

1994-01-01

143

Educational status orientations of Mexican American and Anglo American youth in selected low-income counties of Texas  

E-print Network

EDUCATIONAL STATUS ORIENTATIONS OF MEXICAN AMERICAN AND ANGLO AMERICAN YOUTH IN SELECTED LOW-INCOME COUNTIES OF TEXAS A Thesis by RUMALDO Z, JUAREZ Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas AAM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1968 Maj or Sub) ect: Sociology EDUCATIONAL STATUS ORIENTATIONS OF MEXICAN AMERICAN AND ANGLO AMERICAN YOUTH IN SELECTED LON-INCOME COUNTIES OF TEXAS A Thesis by RUMALDO Z. JUAREZ Approved...

Juarez, Rumaldo Zapata

1968-01-01

144

The stratigraphy and environment of deposition of productive Wilcox clays in west central Freestone and southeast Limestone Counties, Texas  

E-print Network

THE STRATIGRAPHY AND ENVIRONMENT OF DEPOSITION OF PRODUCTIVE WILCOX CLAYS IN WEST CENTRAL FREESTONE AND SOUTHEAST LIMESTONE COUNTIES, TEXAS A Thesis by STEPHANIE ANNE SHELVEY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University... in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1986 Major Subject: Geology THE STRATIGRAPHY AND ENVIRONMENT OF DEPOSITION OF PRODUCTIVE WILCOX CLAYS IN WEST CENTRAL FREESTONE AND SOUTHEAST LIMESTONE COUNTIES, TEXAS A...

Shelvey, Stephanie Anne

1986-01-01

145

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University NREM-9017 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets are also available on our website at: http://osufacts.okstate.edu Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Tommy Puffinbarger Extension Educator, Alfalfa County Oklahoma State

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

146

Owl Pellets Reveal Cryptotis parva, a New Record for Caddo County, Oklahoma  

E-print Network

In the spring of 1991 several great horned owl (Bubo virginianus) pellets found near Apache, Caddo County, OK, were examined (1). These owl pellets contained the remains of several taxa: prairie vole, Microtus ochrogaster; deer mouse, Peromyscus leucopus; hispid pocket mouse, Chaetodipus hispidus

Kent S. Smith

1993-01-01

147

An evaluation of the suitability of ERTS data for the purposes of petroleum exploration. [Anadarko Basin of Texas and Oklahoma  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This experiment was designed to determine the types and amounts of information valuable to petroleum exploration extractable from ERTS data and the cost of obtaining the information using traditional or conventional means. It was desired that an evaluation of this new petroleum exploration tool be made in a geologically well known area in order to assess its usefulness in an unknown area. The Anadarko Basin lies in western Oklahoma and the panhandle of Texas. It was chosen as a test site because there is a great deal of published information available on the surface and subsurface geology of the area, and there are many known structures that act as traps for hydrocarbons. This basin is similar to several other large epicontinental sedimentary basins. It was found that ERTS imagery is an excellent tool for reconnaissance exploration of large sedimentary basins or new exploration provinces. For the first time, small and medium size oil companies can rapidly and effectively analyze exploration provinces as a whole.

Collins, R. J.; Mccown, F. P.; Stonis, L. P.; Petzel, G.; Everett, J. R.

1974-01-01

148

An evaluation of the suitability of ERTS data for the purposes of petroleum exploration. [Anadarko Basin in Oklahoma and Texas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This investigation was undertaken to determine the types and amounts of information valuable to petroleum exploration that are extractable from ERTS data and to determine the cost of obtaining the information from ERTS relative to costs using traditional or conventional means. In particular, it was desirable to evaluate this new petroleum exploration tool in a geologically well-known area in order to assess its potential usefulness in an unknown area. In light of the current energy situation, it is felt that such an evaluation is important in order to best utilize technical efforts with customary exploration tools, by rapidly focusing attention on the most promising areas in order to reduce the time required to go through the exploration cycle and to maximize cost savings. The Anadarko Basin lies in western Oklahoma and the panhandle of Texas (Figure 1). It was chosen as a test site because there is a great deal of published information available on the surface and subsurface geology of the area, there are many known structures that act as traps for hydrocarbons, and it is similar to several other large epicontinental sedimentary basins.

Everett, J. R.; Petzel, G.

1974-01-01

149

Adjustments Due to a Declining Groundwater Supply: High Plains of Northern Texas and Western Oklahoma  

E-print Network

of agricultural production on irrigation in the study area is emphasized by Osborn and Harris. It was estimated that the value of crop output in the Northern and Southern High Plains of Texas was $778.1 million in 1967. Of this total, $637.2 million...

Lacewell, R D.; Jones, L. L.; Osborn, J. E.

150

Weed Control Research in Guar in Texas and Oklahoma: 1961-72.  

E-print Network

. Planting5 in cold soil after apj~litation (>i 11-i- fluralin re5ultetl in injury to the crop in o13c tcit. DCPA (Dacthal) ant1 EPTC (Eptam) were I el-T cller- , tirre against ~j,eecls in Oklahom:~ te~ts but f;lilc:l to gi\\.e consistent result\\ in Texas...

Smith, D. T.; Wiese, A. F.; Santelmann, P. W.

1973-01-01

151

Structural characterization of the Emperor and Halley fields, Winkler County, West Texas  

E-print Network

The Halley and Emperor fields, Winkler County, West Texas, are located along the western margin of the Central Basin Platform (CBP), a late Paleozoic fault-bounded structural high in the Permian Basin. Well data, regional 2D seismic lines, and a 3D...

Leone, John Vincent

2001-01-01

152

American Fern Society New County Records of Botrychium lunarioides in Texas  

E-print Network

American Fern Society New County Records of Botrychium lunarioides in Texas Author(s): L. H. Do, R. D. Gooch, J. R. Stevens, W. C. Holmes Source: American Fern Journal, Vol. 86, No. 1 (Jan. - Mar., 1996), pp. 28-31 Published by: American Fern Society Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1547608

Stevens, Jeffrey

153

Occupational Change among Spanish-Americans in Atascoa County and San Antonio, Texas.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study conducted in a rural and an urban county in Texas sought to determine factors affecting changes in occupational patterns taking place in selected Spanish American populations from each of the 2 areas. An attempt was also made to determine levels of living, income, education, and aspirations of parents for their children's futures. The

Skrabanek, R.L.; Rapton, Avra

154

A multidiscipline look at the Thistle field area, Pecos County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

To allow an evaluation of the perspective provided by certain nonseismic methods in the Val Verde basin, the synergistic interpretation of gravimetric and magnetic data, surface geomorphology, and the Ellenburgger surface are compared to surface geochemical data and drilling immediate to the Thistle field, Pecos County, Texas.

Land, J.P. (J.P. Land and Associates, Inc., Houston, TX (United States))

1992-04-01

155

FANTASYLAND/AGGIELAND: A Bibliographic History of Science Fiction and Fantasy at Texas A&M University and in Brazos County, Texas, 1913-1985.  

E-print Network

Page 1 of 134 FANTASYLAND/AGGIELAND: A Bibliographic History of Science Fiction and Fantasy at Texas A&M University and in Brazos County, Texas, 1913-1985. compiled by Bill Page... date for the history of science fiction and fantasy in Brazos County. For example, Bryan had a book store by 1870. It probably sold an occasional fantasy or science fiction novel, such as The Tempest or Frankenstein. After the end of the Civil...

Page, Bill

2010-08-24

156

Fantasyland/Aggieland: A Bibliographic History of Science Fiction and Fantasy at Texas A&M University and in Brazos County, Texas 1913-1985.  

E-print Network

Page 1 of 134 FANTASYLAND/AGGIELAND: A Bibliographic History of Science Fiction and Fantasy at Texas A&M University and in Brazos County, Texas, 1913-1985. compiled by Bill Page... date for the history of science fiction and fantasy in Brazos County. For example, Bryan had a book store by 1870. It probably sold an occasional fantasy or science fiction novel, such as The Tempest or Frankenstein. After the end of the Civil...

Page, Bill

2010-08-17

157

Fate and groundwater impacts of produced water releases at OSPER "B" site, Osage County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

For the last 5 a, the authors have been investigating the transport, fate, natural attenuation and ecosystem impacts of inorganic and organic compounds in releases of produced water and associated hydrocarbons at the Osage-Skiatook Petroleum Environmental Research (OSPER) "A" and "B" sites, located in NE Oklahoma. Approximately 1.0 ha of land at OSPER "B", located within the active Branstetter lease, is visibly affected by salt scarring, tree kills, soil salinization, and brine and petroleum contamination. Site "B" includes an active production tank battery and adjacent large brine pit, two injection well sites, one with an adjacent small pit, and an abandoned brine pit and tank battery site. Oil production in this lease started in 1938, and currently there are 10 wells that produce 0.2-0.5 m3/d (1-3 bbl/d) oil, and 8-16 m3/d (50-100 bbl/d) brine. Geochemical data from nearby oil wells show that the produced water source is a Na-Ca-Cl brine (???150,000 mg/L TDS), with high Mg, but low SO4 and dissolved organic concentrations. Groundwater impacts are being investigated by detailed chemical analyses of water from repeated sampling of 41 boreholes, 1-71 m deep. The most important results at OSPER "B" are: (1) significant amounts of produced water from the two active brine pits percolate into the surficial rocks and flow towards the adjacent Skiatook reservoir, but only minor amounts of liquid petroleum leave the brine pits; (2) produced-water brine and minor dissolved organics have penetrated the thick (3-7 m) shale and siltstone units resulting in the formation of three interconnected plumes of high-salinity water (5000-30,000 mg/L TDS) that extend towards the Skiatook reservoir from the two active and one abandoned brine pits; and (3) groundwater from the deep section of only one well, BR-01 located 330 m upslope and west of the site, appear not to be impacted by petroleum operations. ?? 2007.

Kharaka, Y.K.; Kakouros, E.; Thordsen, J.J.; Ambats, G.; Abbott, M.M.

2007-01-01

158

Seismic Vp & Vs tomography of Texas & Oklahoma with a focus on the Gulf Coast margin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The northwestern Gulf of Mexico passive margin contains an extensive record of continental collision and rifting, as well as deformation associated with orogenic events and heavy sedimentation. Seismic traveltime tomography that incorporates new data from 328 broadband seismic stations deployed throughout the region reveals features that correlate well with expected mantle structures, as well as features that have no obvious expression at the surface. Among the former are a large fast anomaly that corresponds to the southern extent of the Laurentia craton and a large slow anomaly associated with the Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen. Among the latter are a slow layer that we interpret to be a shear zone at the base of the cratonic and transitional continental lithosphere, a zone that is bounded at its top and bottom by discontinuities and high levels of seismic anisotropy identified in companion receiver function and shear wave splitting studies, respectively. A high velocity body underlying the Gulf Coastal Plain may mark delaminating lower crust. If this is true it could provide indirect evidence for an elevated geotherm during the rifting process that created the Gulf of Mexico.

Evanzia, Dominic; Pulliam, Jay; Ainsworth, Ryan; Gurrola, Harold; Pratt, Kevin

2014-09-01

159

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

county OCES agricultural educator or Joe Armstrong, OSU Extension Weeds Specialist, at (405) 744Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University PSS-2779 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets are also available on our website at: http

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

160

Geology of the Normangee Lake area, Leon County, Texas  

E-print Network

embayment (Fig. 3), in the central part the San Marcos arch, and in the south the Rio Grande embayment. Murray (1961, p. 85) states that the Gulf Coastal Province has been influenced mainly by vertical forces and that the positions of most, if not all... of central Texas (Fig. 1) midway between Dallas and Houston. The area is in the Gulf Coastal Plain of Texas, on the eastern edge of the Brazos River Basin, and lies between 30'57'30"? 31'04'00" north latitude and 96'09'00" ? 96'15'00" west longitude (Pl...

Anspach, David Harold

1972-01-01

161

Soil salinity detection. [Starr and Cameron Counties, Texas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author has identified the following significant results. Growth forms and herbage biomass production varied considerably among saline and nonsaline soil range sites in Starr County. Grasses on saline soil sites were shallow-rooted and short whereas on nonsaline sites there was an intermixture of short and midgrass species. Differentiation between primarily undisturbed saline and nonsaline rangelands, in Starr County, is partially possible using film optical density readings from Skylab imagery. Differentiation among eight saline and nonsaline soil sites in Cameron County, using black and white and color film was not possible according to statistical results from both DMRT and correlation analysis. Linear analysis showed that Bendix 24-band MSS data (aircraft) collected at 1700 m and 4800 m, as well as Skylab and LANDSAT-1 MSS data, were significantly correlated to electrical conductivity readings. In Starr County, the best spectral band for detection of saline soil levels, using black and white SO-022 film, was in the 0.6 to 0.7 micron spectral region. In Cameron County, the best spectral bands for detection of saline soil levels were the 2.3 to 2.43 micron, 0.72 to 0.76 micron, 0.69 to 1.75 micron, and 0.7 to 1.1 micron spectral regions.

Wiegand, C. L.; Richardson, A. J.; Gausman, H. W.; Leamer, R. W.; Gerbermann, A. H.; Everitt, J. H.; Cuellar, J. A. (principal investigators)

1975-01-01

162

Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service Rules 07.03.99.X1 County Extension Agents as Candidates for  

E-print Network

Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service Rules 07.03.99.X1 County Extension Agents as CandidatesLife Extension Service Rules 07.03.99.X1 County Extension Agents as Candidates for Certain County Offices Page 1Life Extension Service (AgriLife Extension) County Extension Agents as candidates for certain county offices

163

Late Pleistocene fauna from Zesch Cave, Mason County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Zesch Cave local fauna is one of the most diverse fossil vertebrate localities from central Texas, and one of the only three sites on the Edwards Plateau juxtaposed to the Llano Uplift. At least 70 vertebrate taxa are identified in this local fauna including fish, four lissamphibians, six sauropsids, eight birds, and fifty-one mammal species. A largely granitic structural

James Christopher Sagebiel

2010-01-01

164

Review of CO/sub 2/ flood, Springer ''A'' sand, northeast Purdy Unit, Garvin County, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the response of a CO/sub 2/ flood in the Northeast Purdy Springer ''A'' Sand Unit in Garvin County, OK. Various aspects of field operations are discussed, including surface handling of the CO/sub 2/ production stream, measurement and treatment of produced fluids, corrosion and pump problems, effects of high CO/sub 2/ production seen downhole, and solutions to alleviate these problems. Several patterns in the project have received the full designed CO/sub 2/ slug size of 30% of initial HCPV. On the basis of individual pattern response, operational and design changes were made to enhance the production performance of the flood area. Results of a time-lapse well-logging program are shown, along with comparisons of injection profiles taken before CO/sub 2/ injection, during CO/sub 2/ injection, and during post-CO/sub 2/ water injection. Production response for several wells is shown and compared. The information and operating philosophy presented is based on operating experience before 1985.

Fox, M.J.; Simlote, V.N.; Stark, K.L.; Brinlee, L.D.

1988-11-01

165

Porosity Characterization Utilizing Petrographic Image Analysis: Implications for Identifying and Ranking Reservoir Flow Units, Happy Spraberry Field, Garza County, Texas.  

E-print Network

The Spraberry Formation is traditionally thought of as deep-water turbidites in the central Midland Basin. At Happy Spraberry field, Garza County, Texas, however, production is from a carbonate interval about 100 feet thick that has been correlated...

Layman, John Morgan, II

2004-09-30

166

Environmental Impacts of Petroleum Production: Initial Results from the Osage-Skiatook Petroleum Environmental Research Sites, Osage County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Exploration for and production of petroleum have caused major detrimental impacts to soils, surface and ground waters, and the local ecosystems in the United States. These impacts arise primarily from the improper disposal of large volumes of saline water produced with oil and gas, from accidental hydrocarbon and produced water releases, and from abandoned oil wells that were not correctly sealed. It is important to understand the long-term and short-term effects of produced water and hydrocarbon releases from these sites in order to develop risk-based remediation plans. Remediation is particularly needed in aging and depleted fields where land use is changing from petroleum production to residential, agricultural or recreational uses. About 20 scientists from the USGS and other governmental agencies and academia are involved in a multidisciplinary investigation to study the transport, fate, and natural attenuation of inorganic salts, trace metals, organic compounds and radionuclides present in produced water, and their impacts at the Osage-Skiatook Petroleum Environmental Research (OSPER) 'A' and 'B' sites, located on the Osage Reservation in Osage County, Oklahoma. Stakeholders in the project include the Osage Nation, which holds the mineral rights, the Bureau of Indian Affairs with trust responsibility, and the Army Corps of Engineers, which owns the surface rights at these sites and manages adjacent Skiatook Lake. The 4250-hectare Skiatook Lake provides drinking water to local Tulsa suburban communities and a rural water district, and offers recreational fishing and boating opportunities to tens of thousands of visitors each year. Approximately 1.5 and 1.0 hectare of land at the OSPER 'A' (depleted Lester lease) and 'B' (active Branstetter lease) sites, respectively, are affected by salt scarring, tree kills, soil salinization and brine and petroleum contamination due to the leakage of produced water and associated hydrocarbons from brine pits and accidental releases from active and inactive pipes and tank batteries. The leases are typical of many depleted and aging petroleum fields in Osage County, which ranks among the top oil and gas producing counties in Oklahoma with about 39,000 wells. Oil and gas production has occurred in Osage county for over one hundred years, but current production is mainly from stripper wells (averaging ~2.8 bbl/d oil and >30 bbl/d brine) that are shallow, mostly 300-700 m in depth, and produce from several sandstones of Pennsylvanian age. Results to date show that the produced water source is a Na-Ca-Cl brine (~150,000 mg/L total dissolved solids), with relatively high concentrations of Mg, Sr, and NH4, but low SO4 and H2S. With the exception of Fe and Mn, the concentrations of trace metals are low. Results also show that some and, eventually, the bulk, of inorganic salts and some dissolved organic species in the released brine from both sites will reach Skiatook Lake. Results at the 'A' site show that the salts have essentially been removed from the sandy soil which formed in a surficial layer of eolian sand, but degraded and weathered oil persists on the surface of old oil and brine pits, close to sites of old tanks, on old channels that carried oil from tanks to the oil pits and other impacted areas. Results also show a plume of high salinity water (5,000-30,600 mg/L TDS) is present at intermediate depths that extend from below the old oil and brine pits to Skiatook Lake. No liquid petroleum was found in the contaminated groundwater, but soluble petroleum byproducts, including organic acid anions and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are present. Results to date clearly show that significant amounts of salts from produced-water releases and petroleum hydrocarbons still remain in the soils and rocks of the impacted area after more than 60 years of natural attenuation. At the 'B' site significant amounts of produced water from the two active brine pits percolate into th

Kharaka, Yousif K.; Otton, James K.

2003-01-01

167

INTEGRATED PERMEABILITY MODELING OF THE MORROW A SANDSTONE, HOVEY MORROW UNIT POSTLE FIELD, TEXAS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA  

E-print Network

Approved: _______________________ Dr. Thomas L. Davis Professor of Geophysics Thesis Advisor Golden, Colorado Date______________________ ________________________ Dr. Terence K. Young Professor and Head

168

Paleoenvironment of an upper Cotton Valley (Knowles limestone) patch reef, Milam County, Texas  

E-print Network

occur mainly in rock types which. , a. lthough were likely deposi . ed in relatively shallow water, have been interpreted as reef talus facies deposited on the reef flanks. Qoids and peloids are the otner important non- skeletal car'bonate grains...PALEDENVIRONMEJsT OF AN UPPER ' OTTOV VALLEY (KNCMLES LIMESTONE) PATCH REEF WULAM COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis ALLEN KENT CREGG Submitted to the Gradua. e College of Texas ARM University iJn oartial fulfillment of the requi. emen. s for the de...

Cregg, Allen Kent

1982-01-01

169

Distribution and a possible mechanism of uranium accumulation in the Catahoula Tuff, Live Oak County, Texas  

E-print Network

in east Texas to the Rio Grande River in south Texas. The maximum thickness of the Catahoula Tuff' is in Duval County (see Figure 1) where values of over )00 meters are reported (McBride and others, 1968; and McKnight, 1970). In general, the average... total thickness of the Catahoula Tuff ranges from 150 to 220 meters. The Catahoula Tuff is believed to be Oligocene in age by Galloway (1977), Miocene in age by Eargle and other s (1975) and McKnight (1970), and Oligocene to Early Miocene by McBride...

Parks, Steven Louis

1979-01-01

170

Distribution of Igneous Rocks in Medina and Uvalde Counties, Texas, as Inferred from Aeromagnetic Data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A high-resolution aeromagnetic survey was flown in 2001 over Medina and Uvalde Counties, Texas, as part of a multi-disciplinary investigation of the geohydrologic framework of the Edwards aquifer in south-central Texas. The objective of the survey was to assist in mapping structural features that influence aquifer recharge and ground-water flow. The survey revealed hundreds of magnetic anomalies associated with igneous rocks that had previously been unmapped. This report presents an interpretation of the outcrops and subcrops of igneous rocks, based upon procedures of matched-filtering and potential field modeling.

Smith, David V.; McDougal, Robert R.; Smith, Bruce D.; Blome, Charles D.

2008-01-01

171

The geology, ground water, and surface subsidence of the Baytown-La Porte area, Harris County, Texas  

E-print Network

, Goose Creek field? Harris County& Texas ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ e ~ ~ ~ 14 Generalized crosc-section of Goose Creek field, Harx'is County' ~ Texas ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ s ~ ~ ~ ~ 1 5 6. Barly subsidence of Goose Creek oil field ~ ~, . . . ?, 26... Contours on subsidence of the Goose Creek field i'rom 19'l7 to 1925 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ y ~ ~ ~ o ~ ~ ~ ~ + ~ ~ ~ 30 Profiles across surfs, ce xaults in the Baytown-La Porte ax'ea o ~ ~ i ~ ~ ~ a y ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ s ~ ~ ~ a ~ ~ 34 Local areas of ground...

Gray, Eddie Vaughn

1958-01-01

172

A study of the epidemiological coincidences of selected causes of death and toxic chemical releases in Texas counties  

E-print Network

counties could lead to better understanding of any potential adverse health effects that could occur from direct or indirect exposures to toxic chemical wastes in the environment. The measurement of human health is often indicated by its counterpart... and the releases of toxic chemicals by manufacturing facilities in Texas counties were explored. Cancer is the second leading cause of death. exceeded only by cardiovascular disease, nationally and in Texas. Despite the research attention given to the socio...

Kodamanchaly, Joseph Surgeon

1997-01-01

173

The sources of mosquito blood meals in the salt marsh of Brazoria County, Texas  

E-print Network

Member Member (Memb ~Au st ~6 ASSTBACT T?'. e Sources of' I'Iosquito Bl odI IiIeals in the Salt Marsh -? Brazoria County, Texas, (August 196)) Directed by". D , Darryl P. Sanders salt marsh area in Bra;, aria County, 'exss that is normally u ed...;! ACKNOW'~JLEDGi~IENTS The author ?ashes to express his appreciation to Dr. Darryl P. Sanders, his raa, jor advisor, for his assistance and encouraSement in the ozpletion of thjs research. Also of great help was Dr. C, D. Stee'" . ~. , Entczolo, ". y...

Metz, Richard Henry

1969-01-01

174

Factors influencing preferences for waterbased recreation in Hardin County, Texas  

E-print Network

and political institution in the United States today. During the period 1960-1965, Americans increased their participation in summertime outdoor recrea- tion activities by 51X. (2) Factors affecting the growth in outdoor recreation participation..., powered by motors Information obtained through correspondence with Texas ~De art- ment of Public Safet 10 horsepower or more in size. This undoubtedly excludes from regis- tration a significant number of small craft and sailboats (the boat- ing...

Stribling, James Clayton

1969-01-01

175

78 FR 60826 - Foreign-Trade Zone 155-Calhoun/Victoria Counties, Texas; Authorization of Production Activity...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 155--Calhoun/Victoria Counties, Texas...Foreign Trade Zone, Inc., grantee of FTZ 155, submitted a notification of proposed production...behalf of Caterpillar, Inc., within FTZ 155-Site 5, in Victoria, Texas. The...

2013-10-02

176

Recent Jurassic discoveries in southeastern Cass County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Southeastern Cass County had lain virtually dormant as a prospective Jurassic oil and gas province since the mid-1960s, when East Linden field was discovered and developed. Then, in 1978, Hilliard Oil and Gas drilled the 1 Johnson and discovered Kildare field (Smackover). Subsequent development thru 1982 proved additional reserves in several Cotton Valley sandstones as well, reconfirming southeastern Cass County as territory for viable Jurassic drilling. Additional drilling occurred when Marshall Exploration redrilled and expanded the old Bloomburg field and Heflin redrilled Queen City field. All of this drilling was successful in the Smackover reservoir, finding sour gas and condensate. Wildcat activity included the two Smackover completions finding South Atlanta field, as well as two completions in formations that are highly debated as to their nomenclature. Cities Service reportedly their well in the Eagle Mills. This well brought national attention to southeastern Cass County, when it was reported on the CBS Saturday evening news. The well initially flowed at rates that were as high as 1800 BOPD, 1396 MCFGD, and 32 BWPD, with pressure of 3250 psi. Just as the excitement was dying down, Primary Fuels, Inc. reentered and deepened the Highland Resources 1 Glass and completed that well in a zone correlative to the Cities Service 1-A Pruitt. The 1 glass potentialed for 200 BOPD, 570 MCFGD, and 32 BWPD, at pressure of 2900 psi. The producing zone was determined to be the Norphlet, which once again was made wildcatters of all previous upper Smackover explorers.

Aubrey, J.

1984-09-01

177

Uraniferous asphaltite in Moore and Potter Counties, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Asphaltite is present in facies of the Red Cave and Panhandle lime Formation. Drill cuttings from 30 Moore County wells and 4 cores distributed across Moore and Potter Counties were examined for asphaltite. Results show that asphaltite is widespread but seems to be most abundant over structural highs, and that there is a facies control of asphaltite occurrences. In drill cuttings sandstones contain most abundant nodules yet the nodules are generally very small. Largest nodules were commonly observed in mudstone core samples. A potential exploration program should take those observations into account. Once exploitable deposits are located and if proper in situ leaching materials were developed for extraction of uranium, only sandstones could be worked. Interchannel mudstones are too impermeable and nonporous. Subsurface mining would be forced to address potential problems derived from high concentrations of hydrocarbons in the target rocks (Red Cave Formation produces oil and gas in Moore County) as well as high levels of radon (averages 100 x 10/sup -12/ curies per liter STP) in gas produced from the Panhandle Field.

Handford, C.R.; Granata, G.E.

1980-06-01

178

Field study and stimulation approach - Conger (PENN) Field, Sterling County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

With existing demands for oil and gas at continued higher prices, there has become a greater interest in previously uneconomical reservoirs. The Cisco Canyon Formations in Sterling County, Texas, fall into this category. In particular, the Conger (PENN) area has enjoyed rapid and continuous development since 1977. Hydraulic fracturing has been required to stimulate for commercial production. Stimulation practices have been reviewed and a more efficient approach developed to provide maximum productivity at an optimum cost.

Johnson, J.; Kamp, B.

1981-01-01

179

Did Divorces Decline after the Oklahoma City Bombing?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Oklahoma City bombing in April 1995 was an act of terrorism that had many potential influences on the city and state, including influences on families. We analyzed divorce data from 1985 to 2000 for all 77 counties in Oklahoma to assess the divorce response to the Oklahoma City bombing. Our prediction was that divorce rates in Oklahoma would

Nakonezny, Paul A.; Reddick, Rebecca; Rodgers, Joseph Lee

2004-01-01

180

Meteorite search in the deflation basins in Lea County, New Mexico and Winkler County, Texas, USA: Discovery of Lea County 003 (H4)  

SciTech Connect

During the past few decades great numbers of meteorites have been recovered from the ice accumulation zones of Antarctica and from the vast Sahara. Although these two great deserts are the two most productive areas, the Southern High Plains in USA (New Mexico and Texas) and Nullarbor Plain, Western Australia have great potential for meteorite recovery. The number of meteorite finds from Roosevelt County, New Mexico alone exceeds 100 in only approximately 11 km{sup 2} area. Most meteorites from this area have been found on the floors of active deflation basins (blowouts) that have been excavated from a mantle of sand dunes. This area has no apparent fluvial or permafrost activity within the last 50,000 years, suggesting that only prevailing winds and natural aridity aid in the concentration and preservation of meteorites. The authors investigated these deflation surfaces in Lea County (the SE corner of New Mexico) and neighboring Winkler County, Texas following a prior search in this area which found two chondrites. They found a tiny H4 chondrite in this search and here they report its mineralogy and petrology along with preliminary data on its exposure history.

Mikouchi, T; Buchanan, P C; Zolensky, M E; Welten, K C; Hutchison, R; Hutchison, M

2000-01-14

181

Geology of the Little Bluff Creek Area, Mason County, Texas  

E-print Network

in central Texas waa conducted by Ferdinand Roeaer {1846); hia findings weze the first published descriytions of the older Paleozoic, Caz'boniferous, and Cretaceous x'ocks end fossils in thc rc ion. In 1861 3, F. Shumard confirxxed necx'ly all of t! c...) visited the area in 133$ tc study t le Ca xbricn oo t. on cnd to colic 'Ti . isa 15 from the TCYAts Potsdam ~cup, !t. . a'so concluded t'. ~t thc Potsdam group in Te"~s wns of Labe ". umbrian cge. Several years 1 ter 3. T. Hill {1397) ' n c re. icw...

Mangum, Charles Roland

1960-01-01

182

Depositional environment of downdip Yegua (Eocene) sandstones, Jackson County, Texas  

E-print Network

ft (2347. 0 to 2865. 1 m). The sandstones are isolated in thick marine shales in an area that was previously believed to lack sandstones of significant thickness. Cores from the field and from one wildcat well were described in order to interpret... shales were discovered several miles basinward of presumed Yegua sand limits. A flurry of exploration and lease activity followed the discovery, with the strike-oriented fairway becoming one of the most active plays in South Texas in 1985 and 1986...

Whitten, Christopher James

1988-01-01

183

An evaluation of ?Ra and ?Ra in drinking water in several counties in Texas, USA.  

PubMed

Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) or Technology Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (TENORM) can be a potential health risk. It is now well known that the underlying geology in many parts of Texas has given rise to levels of (226)Ra and (228)Ra that often exceed the limits set by the US Environmental Protection Agency. A detailed literature search was undertaken to assess the levels of (226)Ra and (228)Ra in all of the Texas counties. Several statistical evaluations of the data were performed. The Hickory aquifer in the Llano Uplift region of Texas has consistently had the highest number of (226)Ra and (228)Ra concentrations above the legal limit. As well many of the affected rural communities may not have the financial resources to rectify the problem. PMID:23490545

Landsberger, S G; George, G

2013-11-01

184

Lack of Population Genetic Structure in the Bat Fly (Trichobius major) in Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas based on DNA Sequence Data for the Cytochrome Oxidase I (COI) and NADH Dehydrogenase 4 (ND4) Genes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The bat fly, Trichobius major, is an ectoparasite which resides for most of its life on the cave myotis, Myotis velifer. We used portions of the cytochrome oxidase I (COI) and NADH dehydrogenase 4 (ND4) genes of the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) to infer population genetic structure and gene flow of T. major in Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas. DNA sequence data

Gregory M. Wilson; Kendra S. Byrd; William Caire; Ronald A. Van Den Bussche

185

Drought and grazing effects on Oklahoma phlox (Polemoniaceae, Phlox oklahomensis)  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Oklahoma phlox (Phlox oklahomensis Wherry) is endemic to Butler, Chautauqua, Comanche, Cowley, and Elk Counties of Kansas and Woods and Woodward Counties of Oklahoma. The species comprises populations of a few scattered individuals to several hundred in mixed-grass prairie sites in Oklahoma where co...

186

The State of Texas Children: 2000. A County-By-County Fact Book.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count data book examines statewide trends in the well-being of Texas' children. The statistical portrait is based on 15 indicators of children's well-being: (1) percent low birthweight babies; (2) percent mothers receiving little or no prenatal care; (3) infant mortality rate; (4) child death rate; (5) teen violent death rate; (6)

Hormuth, Pamela

187

Reflectance of vegetation, soil, and water. [in Hidalgo County, Texas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author has identified the following significant results. A study was conducted in a 340-acre (139 hectares) field of grain sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) to determine if multispectral data from ERTS-1 could be used to detect differences in chlorophyll concentration between iron-deficient (chlorotic) and apparently normal (green) grain sorghum. Chlorotic sorghum areas 2.8 acres (1.1 hectares) or larger in size were identified on a computer printout of band 5 data which contains the chlorophyll absorption band at the 0.65 micron wavelength. ERTS resolution is sufficient for practical applications in detecting iron-deficient sorghum in otherwise uniform fields. The first classification map of the study county has been produced. Vegetation (crops), rangeland, bare soil, water, and an undefined (all other) category occupied 15.2, 45.0, 19.1, 0.02, and 20.6% of the land area, respectively.

Wiegand, C. L. (principal investigator)

1973-01-01

188

Clarksville field, Red River County, Texas; Production and facies interpretation  

SciTech Connect

Clarksville field was discovered in December 1985 by a well targeting a deeper Paleozoic horizon. Since production began in 1986, this field has produced more than 1 million bbl of oil with the appearance of a considerably longer and more lucrative life. The producing horizon is a Jurassic age lithic conglomerate sitting unconformable on the Paleozoic and Triassic structural front of the buried Ouachita range. Facies correlation out of the basin indicates this unit to be Louark age. Mapping and compositional analysis indicate the depositional environment of this unit to be an arid climate alluvial fan deposited as a bajada complex. This fan system was laid down at the updip margin of the actively forming Mesozoic embayment where it meets the Ouachita structural front. The significance of this field is demonstrated by the production yield at a relatively shallow depth of 5,800 ft. At this time, similar production to Clarksville field is yet to be encountered anywhere along the Mesozoic rim of the East Texas basin but does represent a viable exploration trend, in addition to being the gateway for future Paleozoic production in the basin.

Reed, C.H.

1991-06-10

189

Preliminary assessment report for Camp Swift Military Reservation, Installation 48070, Bastrop County, Texas. Installation Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Texas Army National Guard property in Bastrop County, Texas. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Camp Swift property, the requirement of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program (IRP). The review of both historical and current practices at the property indicated that the activities at Camp Swift include no operations considered to have an adverse impact to the environment. The recommendation, therefore, is that no further IRP action is necessary at this property.

Dennis, C.B.

1993-08-01

190

Groundwater recharge to the Gulf Coast aquifer system in Montgomery and Adjacent Counties, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Simply stated, groundwater recharge is the addition of water to the groundwater system. Most of the water that is potentially available for recharging the groundwater system in Montgomery and adjacent counties in southeast Texas moves relatively rapidly from land surface to surface-water bodies and sustains streamflow, lake levels, and wetlands. Recharge in southeast Texas is generally balanced by evapotranspiration, discharge to surface waters, and the downward movement of water into deeper parts of the groundwater system; however, this balance can be altered locally by groundwater withdrawals, impervious surfaces, land use, precipitation variability, or climate, resulting in increased or decreased rates of recharge. Recharge rates were compared to the 19712000 normal annual precipitation measured Cooperative Weather Station 411956, Conroe, Tex.

Oden, Timothy D.; Delin, Geoffrey N.

2013-01-01

191

Site study plan for Playa investigations, Deaf Smith County, Texas: Salt Repository Project  

SciTech Connect

This plan defines the purpose and objectives of the Playa Investigation Study, presents a plan of work to provide the information necessary to resolve issues, and discusses the rationale for test method selection. The required information will be obtained from existing well drilling records, describing and testing of soil and rock samples recovered from project test holes, geophysical well logs, seismic surveys, and shallow test pits excavated at ground surface. There have been numerous, often conflicting, theories presented to explain the origin(s) of the playas of the Texas High Plains. The primary purpose of this study is to establish if existing playas and playa alignments are related to deeper subsurface structure, such as faulting or salt dissolution, the potential for future playa development, and the significance of existing and/or future playas on siting a repository in Deaf Smith County, Texas. 11 refs.

Not Available

1987-04-02

192

Plan of study for the High Plains regional aquifer-system analysis in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Ogallala Formation and associated Tertiary and Quarternary deposits from the principal aquifers supporting irrigation in the High Plains of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. The volume of water in storage within the aquifers is declining in most of the High Plains because water is being withdrawn in excess of the rate of replenishment. The U.S. Geological Survey has initiated a 5-year study of the High Plains aquifer system to develop the geohydrologic data base and computer models of the ground-water flow system needed to evaluate the response of the aquifer system to ground-water management alternatives. This report describes the objectives, plan, and organization of the study and outlines the work to be accomplished in each State in the study area. (Woodard-USGS)

Weeks, John B.

1978-01-01

193

Factors influencing plant succession following fire in Ashe juniper woodland types in Real County, Texas  

E-print Network

FACTORS INFLUENCING PLANT SUCCESSION FOLLOWING FIRE IN ASHE JUHIPER WOODLAND TYPES IN REAL COUNTY& TEXAS By DONAID L. RUSS Approved as to style end content by: ~c-". '~ Z). 4:-. = Chairman of Committee Bead of Depantme Nay l954. LIBgARV A... in 1904 as it is today. Foster (1917) reported Ashe juniper in areas not previously observed. Palmer (l920) reported that the Edwards Pleteau was not a sparsely timbered region but that a "scrub juniper" was common on the foothills In 1939, Jenkins...

Huss, Donald Lee

1954-01-01

194

Geology of the central part of the James River Valley, Mason County, Texas  

E-print Network

?&V I'I. F3''% ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ * ~ ~ ~ ORDOVICIAN SXS~&, H F&LLZ;, "lRLRQRR GRC HF CEFOZOIC SXS; EP?S. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ;)UA'. %HART SXS FH ~ ~. . . ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ F Rt&C". . ?!RAL GEO~X ~ ~ C "'"'l?AL S". . A . . &N???. "T. . . . . . . o ~ ~ ~ o :. . A. I... VALLEY, RA~OR COURTY, TEXAS ABSTRACT The Central Part of the James River Valley is located ln south-central mason County, southwest of the town of' %aeon, Rock units of Uppex O'brien, Lower Ordovician, and Quaternary age sre found in the area, Ihe...

Dannemiller, George David

1957-01-01

195

Geology of the Middle Beaver Creek area, Mason and Gillespie Counties, Texas  

E-print Network

of small bioherm and bottom of thin, irregular siltstones at Beaver Creek where the section was measured indicated on plate I, C~ c Figure 2. ? ihe two th'ck zones of strosatolitic bioherm reefs occurring in the I"oint Peak shale. I'icture is taken... AREA, NASGR AEG GILhNPIR COGRTIES, TEIAB ABSTRACT The Middle Beaver Creek area is situated on the soutlwsst flank of the Llano ?plift region in Mason and Gillespie Counties, Texas Hooks of Presa?brian, Psleosoie, Mesosois, and Genosois age...

Peterson, Don Hamilton

1959-01-01

196

Depositional and diagenetic history of the Upper Jurassic Haynesville Formation, Teague Townsite Field, Freestone County, Texas  

E-print Network

, 1968) Texture, composition and sed1mentary structures and the1r relat1onships to microfacies in the Highland Resources l W. A. Keils core 14 Texture, compos1tion and sedimentary tructures and their relat1onsh1ps to microfacies 1n the Highland... in this thesis follow the format and style of the American Association of Petroleum Geolooists Sulletin. N ~)? r -( x o( ARK l~ I 1 Fig . 1--Index map of the east Texas area showing the 1ocation of Freestone County and Teague Townsite Fie1d. 1...

Faucette, Robert Christian

1981-01-01

197

Feldspar diagenesis in the Frio Formation, Brazoria County, Texas Gulf Coast  

SciTech Connect

Tremendous quantities of detrital feldspar have been dissolved or albitized below about 14000 ft (4267 m) in the Frio Formation (Oligocene), Chocolate Bayou Field, Brazoria County, Texas. Some sandstones no longer contain any unmodified detrital feldspar grains. Material transfer involved in these reactions is immense, affecting at least 15% of the rock volume. Thus, albitization has important implications for several other diagenetic processes that involve feldspars or their components. These processes include formation of secondary porosity, precipitation of quartz and carbonate cements, and the evolution of Na-Ca-Cl formation water.

Land, L.S.; Milliken, K.L.

1981-07-01

198

New data on yttrocrasite from the Clear Creek pegmatite, Burnet County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

X-ray diffraction data for non-metamict yttrocrasite from the Clear Creek pegmatite, Burnet County, Texas, shows it to be orthorhombic, space group Pbcn, a = 12.862(7), b : 4.810(2), c : 4.571(3) A, V = 282.79 As. The mineral is biaxial (-) with a = 2.131(2),4 = 2.137(2), y : 2.A2(2),2V,: 60-70'. The strongest diffraction lines are 2.147(100X600), 6.455(90X200), 4.331(90X110), and

Wrr-soN W. Cnoor

199

Educational attainment and aspirations of rural and urban Spanish-Americans in two South Texas counties  

E-print Network

". :ent for the degree of NASTER OI' SCI1:NCE 1anua, v ". 969 Nado& Subj ct. : . ocic logy EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT AND ASPIRATIONS OF RURAL Al(D URBAN SPANISH-A'IERICANS IN TNO SOU H TEXAS COUNTIES A Thesis HELEN B. SCOTT Approved as to style... or tiiis thesis was to obta!'n definitive re cia ch on t! e educ t. on &f the Spanish-Americans and the r lationships 'or. ci!een t!jii educac! on ar!d various socio-economi chs&'acteristics. A total uf . ;&a4 pail h-Am. 'an !1 usehu!d scads !ocated...

Scott, Helen Browne

1969-01-01

200

An environmental study of the subsurface Miocene of Brazoria and Galveston counties, Texas  

E-print Network

of the Middle Transitional nn. ". r arel (2) l!' an i t, ("-l ~R. , M t. io narine. Unit, (3) "3" narrier. (al relate) n~i. ni. aerie Unit. The distribution of Miocene sediments in Braroria end Galveston counties; Texas suggests that Miocene, seas were in a... facies anti (3) the upper 550 feet are cottpased of outs? berrit r sediments. l Tne ~lnn nice lne n: rto . IJntt Tnie entt jr nresent between -4275 en+ 4580 feet end ie 305 feet. thic'k. Regiments of this unit contain a "werc" marine facies. 3 The "P...

Linder, Henry Darrell

1962-01-01

201

Hydrogeologic testing plan for Deep Hydronest Test Wells, Deaf Smith County site, Texas  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses methods of hydraulic testing which are recommended for use in the Deep Hydronest Test Wells at the proposed high level nuclear waste repository site in Deaf Smith County, Texas. The deep hydronest wells are intended to provide geologic, geophysical and hydrologic information on the interval from the Upper San Andres Formation to the base of the Pennsylvanian system at the site. Following the period of drilling and testing, the wells will be converted into permanent monitoring installations through which fluid pressures and water quality can be monitored at various depths in the section. 19 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

Not Available

1987-12-01

202

Cottontail density and distribution on three study areas in Yoakum County, Texas  

E-print Network

Committee: Dr. Nova Silvy o s t cottootsii (s~t ii os O oo i) pop i ti o siti e e determined for three study areas in Yoakum County on the High plains of Texas from August to December 1976 by pellet counts and even1ng walking censuses. The pellet counts... special thanks goes to Dr. Samuel Beasom for the great interest he displayed in the design of the project, and for shouldering the responsibility of chairmanship of my committee following Dr. Cain's departure. Dr. Nova Silvy also deserves a special...

Tanner, Jimmy Ishmael

1979-01-01

203

Visual assessments for Swisher County and Deaf Smith County locations, Palo Duro Basin, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The area of the Swisher and Deaf Smith County locations is characterized by vast open spaces with limited vertical relief and vegetative cover. The stream valleys and areas around the playa lakes provide the only significant topographical relief in either location, and the areas in range vegetation provide the only major contrast to the dominant land cover of agricultural crops. Tree stands occur almost exclusively in association with orchards, country clubs, farmsteads, and urban areas. Because of climatic conditions in the region, there are few permanent water bodies in either location. Grain elevators, farmsteads, and other cultural modifications (roads, utility lines, fence rows, etc.) are scattered throughout both locations, but they constitute a very small portion of the visible landscape. These features help provide scale in the landscape and also serve as visual landmarks.

Not Available

1984-12-01

204

Influence of result demonstrations on the adoption of improved practices in cotton production in a six-county area in Texas  

E-print Network

INFLUENCE OF RESULT DEMONSTRATIONS ON THE ADOPTION OF IMPROVED PRACTICES IN COTTON PRODUCTION IN A SIX ? COUNTY AREA IN TEXAS A Thesis by A. N. M. SHAMSUZZOHA Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1967 Major Subject: Agricultural Education INFLUENCE OF RESULT DEMONSTRATIONS ON THE ADOPTION OF IMPROVED PRACTICES IN COTTON PRODUCTION IN A SIX-COUNTY AREA IN TEXAS A Thesis...

Shamsuzzoha, A. N. M

1967-01-01

205

The influence of various pruning levels on the production and quality of six Vitis vinifera (L.) grape varieties in Pecos County, Texas  

E-print Network

THE INFLUENCE OF VARIOUS PRUNING LEVELS ON THE PRODUCTION AND QUALITY OF SIX VITIS VINIFKRA (L. ) GRAPE VARIETIES IN PECOS COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by CHARLES DAVID WILLIAMS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1985 Major Subject: Horticulture THE INFLUENCE OF VARIOUS PRUNING LEVELS ON THE PRODUCTION AND QUALITY OF SIX VITIS VINIFERA (L. ) GRAPE VARIETIES IN PECOS COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis...

Williams, Charles David

1985-01-01

206

Disparities of food availability and affordability within convenience stores in Bexar County, Texas.  

PubMed

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends healthful food choices; however, some geographic areas are limited in the types of foods they offer. Little is known about the role of convenience stores as viable channels to provide healthier foods in our "grab and go" society. The purposes of this study were to (1) identify foods offered within convenience stores located in two Bexar County, Texas, ZIP Codes and (2) compare the availability and cost of ADA-recommended foods including beverages, produce, grains, and oils/fats. Data were analyzed from 28 convenience store audits performed in two sociodemographically diverse ZIP Codes in Bexar County, Texas. Chi-squared tests were used to compare food availability, and t-tests were used to compare food cost in convenience stores between ZIP Codes. A significantly larger proportion of convenience stores in more affluent areas offered bananas (? (2) = 4.17, P = 0.003), whole grain bread (? (2) = 8.33, P = 0.004), and baked potato chips (? (2) = 13.68, P < 0.001). On average, the price of diet cola (t = -2.12, P = 0.044) and certain produce items (e.g., bananas, oranges, tomatoes, broccoli, and cucumber) was significantly higher within convenience stores in more affluent areas. Convenience stores can play an important role to positively shape a community's food environment by stocking healthier foods at affordable prices. PMID:23935645

Smith, Matthew Lee; Sunil, T S; Salazar, Camerino I; Rafique, Sadaf; Ory, Marcia G

2013-01-01

207

Disparities of Food Availability and Affordability within Convenience Stores in Bexar County, Texas  

PubMed Central

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends healthful food choices; however, some geographic areas are limited in the types of foods they offer. Little is known about the role of convenience stores as viable channels to provide healthier foods in our grab and go society. The purposes of this study were to (1) identify foods offered within convenience stores located in two Bexar County, Texas, ZIP Codes and (2) compare the availability and cost of ADA-recommended foods including beverages, produce, grains, and oils/fats. Data were analyzed from 28 convenience store audits performed in two sociodemographically diverse ZIP Codes in Bexar County, Texas. Chi-squared tests were used to compare food availability, and t-tests were used to compare food cost in convenience stores between ZIP Codes. A significantly larger proportion of convenience stores in more affluent areas offered bananas (?2 = 4.17, P = 0.003), whole grain bread (?2 = 8.33, P = 0.004), and baked potato chips (?2 = 13.68, P < 0.001). On average, the price of diet cola (t = ?2.12, P = 0.044) and certain produce items (e.g., bananas, oranges, tomatoes, broccoli, and cucumber) was significantly higher within convenience stores in more affluent areas. Convenience stores can play an important role to positively shape a community's food environment by stocking healthier foods at affordable prices. PMID:23935645

Smith, Matthew Lee; Sunil, T. S.; Salazar, Camerino I.; Rafique, Sadaf; Ory, Marcia G.

2013-01-01

208

Environmental regulatory compliance plan, Deaf County site, Texas: Draft revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The DOE is committed to conduct its operation in an environmentally safe and sound manner and comply with the letter and spirit of applicable environmental statues and regulations. These objectives are codified in DOE order N 5400.2, ''Environmental Policy Statement.'' This document, the Deaf Smith County site (Texas) Environmental Regulatory Compliance Plam (ERCP), is one means of implementing that policy. The ERCP describes the environmental regulatory requirements applicable to the Deaf Smith County site (Texas), and presented the framework within which the Salt Repository Project Office (SRPO) will comply with the requirements. The plan also discusses how DOE will address State and local environmental requirements. To achieve this purpose the ERCP will be developed in phases. This version of the ERCP is the first phase in the delopment of the ERCP. It represents the Salt Repository Project Office's understanding of environmental requirements for the site characterization phase of repository development. After consultation with the appropriate federal and state agencies and affected Indian tribes, the ERCP will be updated to reflect the results of consultation with these agencies and affected Indian tribes. 6 refs., 38 figs.

Not Available

1987-12-14

209

Water supply and use in Deaf Smith, Swisher, and nearby counties in the Texas Panhandle  

SciTech Connect

Irrigation for agriculture is the primary water use in the area of Deaf Smith and Swisher Counties, Texas, and the Ogallala Formation is the main water source. The availability of water in the 12-county area is projected to decrease markedly over the next 5 decades because of the steady depletion of ground water in recoverable storage. Water requirements in the 12-county area are projected to exceed available supplies from about 1990 through 2030. The shortage for the year 2030 is estimated to be approximately 4 million acre-feet under high-growth-rate conditions. Because of its semiarid climate, the area has little available surface water to augment the supply of the Ogallala Formation, which, despite its depletion, could be the principal source of water for the repository. There are, however, other potential sources of water: (1) Lake Mackenzie, on Tule Creek; (2) the Santa Rosa Formation, which underlies much of the Southern High Plains and locally yields moderate amounts of good-quality water; and (3) the Wolfcamp Series, which yields low amounts of highly saline water. The effluents of municipal wastewater treatment plants and municipal water systems may also be useful as supplements to the repository's primary water supply.

Not Available

1985-02-01

210

Applications of artificial neural networks in the identification of flow units, Happy Spraberry Field, Garza County, Texas  

E-print Network

The use of neural networks in the field of development geology is in its infancy. In this study, a neural network will be used to identify flow units in Happy Spraberry Field, Garza County, Texas. A flow unit is the mappable portion of the total...

Gentry, Matthew David

2005-02-17

211

Depositional framework and reservoir potential of an upper Cotton Valley (Knowles Limestone) patch reef, Milam County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Knowles Limestone is an upper unit of the Cotton Valley Group, and in Milam County, Texas, it is approximately 350 ft (100 m) thick, consisting of shales, terrigenous dolomitic limestones, grainy limestones, and algal boundstones with stromatoporoids and corals. The boundstones represent an elongate, wave resistant, encrusted skeletal patch reef which probably developed on a subtle salt-generated topographic high.

A. K. Cregg; W. M. Ahr

1983-01-01

212

Reservoir characterization of tight gas sand: Taylor sandstone (upper Cotton Valley group, upper Jurassic), Rusk County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

An integrated petrographic, sedimentologic, and log analysis study of the Taylor sandstone in Rusk County, Texas, was conducted to understand the geologic controls on reservoir performance and to identify pay zones for reserves calculations. The Taylor sandstone interval consists of tightly cemented, fine-grained quartzose sandstones interbedded with mudstones, siltstones, and carbonates that occur in upward-coarsening sequences. Helium permeability rarely exceeds

C. L. Vavra; M. H. Scheihing; J. D. Klein

1989-01-01

213

Altitude and configuration of the 1980 water table in the High Plains regional aquifer, northwestern Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During 1978, the U.S. Geological Survey began a 5-year study of the High Plains regional aquifer system to provide hydrologic information for evaluation of the effects of long-term development of the aquifer and to develop computer models for prediction of aquifer response to alternative changes in ground-water management (Weeks, 1978). This report is one of a series presenting hydrologic information of the High Plains aquifer in Oklahoma. The altitude and configuration of the water table are shown for the eastern area, consisting of Harper, Ellis, Woodward, Dewey, and Roger Mills Counties (sheet 1), and for the Panhandle area, consisting of Cimarron, Texas, and Beaver Counties (sheet 2). Water levels were measured in January, February, and March 1980 by the Oklahoma Water Resources Board.

Havens, John S.

1982-01-01

214

Identification and Mapping of Soils, Vegetation, and Water Resources of Lynn County, Texas, by Computer Analysis of ERTS MSS Data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results of the analysis and interpretation of ERTS multispectral data obtained over Lynn County, Texas, are presented. The test site was chosen because it embodies a variety of problems associated with the development and management of agricultural resources in the Southern Great Plains. Lynn County is one of ten counties in a larger test site centering around Lubbock, Texas. The purpose of this study is to examine the utility of ERTS data in identifying, characterizing, and mapping soils, vegetation, and water resources in this semiarid region. Successful application of multispectral remote sensing and machine-processing techniques to arid and seminarid land-management problems will provide valuable new tools for the more than one-third of the world's lands lying in arid-semiarid regions.

Baumgardner, M. F.; Kristof, S. J.; Henderson, J. A., Jr.

1973-01-01

215

Elements of high constructive deltaic sedimentation, lower Frio Formation, Brazoria County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The lower Frio Formation in eastern Brazoria County, upper Texas Gulf Coast, was deposited in a high constructive deltaic environment in the Houston delta system. Constructive elements of the stacked, elongate to lobate deltas that were intersected in core are storm induced delta front splays, delta front slump deposits, and distributary mouth bar, distributary channel and delta plain assemblages. Reworked and winnowed abandonment facies that are volumetrically insignificant relative to constructive elements are subdivided into a crossbedded shoreface-foreshore subfacies and a fine grained cyclic sequence of storm deposits on the lower shoreface that represent a distal abandonment subfacies. Micropaleontological evidence indicates that deposition of constructive and abandonment facies took place in water depths of less than 120 feet.

Tyler, N.; Han, J.H.

1982-01-01

216

Site Study Plan for laboratory soil mechanics, Deaf Smith County site, Texas: Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This Site Study Plan for laboratory soil mechanics describes the laboratory testing to be conducted on soil samples collected as part of the characterization of the Deaf Smith County site, Texas. This study provides for measurements of index, mechanical, thermal, hydrologic, chemical, and mineral properties of soils from boring throughout the site. Samples will be taken from Playa Borings/Trenching, Transportation/Utilities Foundation Borings, Repository Surface Facilities Design Foundation Borings, and Exploratory Shaft Facilities Design Foundation Borings. Data from the laboratory tests will be used for soil strata characterization, design of foundations for surface structures, design of transportation facilities and utility structures, design of impoundments, design of shaft lining, design of the shaft freeze wall, shaft permitting, performance assessment calculations, and other program requirements. A tentative testing schedule and milestone log are given. A quality assurance program will be utilized to assure that activities affecting quality are performed correctly and that appropriate documentation is maintained. 18 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1987-12-01

217

76 FR 59766 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00056  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Oklahoma dated 09/21/2011. Incident: Oklahoma County Wildfire. Incident Period: 08/30/2011 through 09/01/2011. Effective Date: 09/21/2011. Physical Loan Application...

2011-09-27

218

Paleoecology of Eocene Wheelock Member of Cook Mountain Formation in western Houston County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Sixty-nine foraminifera species and 49 mollusk species were recovered from the Wheelock Member of the Cook Mountain Formation, in the Porter's Springs area of Houston County, Texas, and along the Little Brazos River in Brazos County, Texas. The Wheelock Member is primarily a regressive unit. A thin shell lag deposit at the base of the member, consisting of abraded mollusk fragments and subrounded pebbles of impure fossiliferous limestone, is all that remains of the transgressive part of the sequence. Above the shell lag deposit, the lower part of the member consists dominantly of bioturbated, glauconitic, fossiliferous mudstone. The species composition and diversity of benthic foraminifera and the planktonic/benthic ratio, suggest deposition in a normal marine inner or inner-middle shelf environment. Dominant benthic foraminifera include: Ceratobulimina eximia, Cibicides mauricensis, Eponides mexicanus, Gyroidina octocamerata, Melonis planatum, Siphonina claibornensis, and Spiroplectammina mississippiensis. The mollusk population has a low diversity and is dominated by only a few species. These include: Buccitriton texanum, Mesalia claibornensis, Polinices aratus, Notocorbula texana, Vokesula petropolitana, and Cadulus subcoarevatus. The low diversity and high dominance of the mollusk population suggest deposition in an unstable environment. This instability, however, had little or no effect on the foraminifera. The upper part of the Wheelock Member consists dominantly of regularly layered mudstone and siltstone and contains only a low-diversity assemblage of agglutinated foraminifera. This part of the member was probably deposited in a shallow brackish-water environment with a high sedimentation rate. Dominant agglutinated species include: Haplophragmoides mauricensis, Trochammina claibornensis, and Verneuilina cushmanii.

Gaskell, B.A.

1989-09-01

219

Site study plan for Transportation, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Preliminary draft  

SciTech Connect

This site study plan describes transportation field studies to be conducted during the characterization of the Deaf Smith County, Texas, site for the US Department of Energy's Salt Repository Project. The studies are needed to identify and assess potential project impacts to transportation infrastructure and systems in the project vicinity and along potential transportation routes to the site across the State of Texas. The studies are also needed to locate and design project transportation facilities, and to evaluate and design impact mitigation. After identifying the transportation information requirements needed to comply with Federal, State, and local regulations and repository program requirements, the site study plan describes the study design and rationale, the field data collection procedures and equipment, the data analysis methods and application of results, the data management strategy, the schedule of field activities, the management of the study, and the study's quality assurance program. The field data collection activities are organized into programs for the characterization of site vicinity rail corridors and highway corridors, characterization of alternative statewide transportation routes, monitoring of site characterization effects on transportation, characterization of aircraft overflight patterns and hazardous material transportation patterns, and assessment of emergency response preparedness along alternative statewide transportation routes. 34 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Not Available

1987-06-01

220

A theoretical model of subsidence caused by petroleum production: Big Hill Field, Jefferson County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

In the Texas Gulf Coastal Plain, there is a history of oil and gas production extending over 2 to 5 decades. Concurrent with this production history, there has been unprecedented population growth accompanied by vastly increased groundwater demands. Land subsidence on both local and regional bases in this geologic province has been measured and predicted in several studies. The vast majority of these studies have addressed the problem from the standpoint of groundwater usage while only a few have considered the effects of oil and gas production. Based upon field-based computational techniques (Helm, 1984), a model has been developed to predict land subsidence caused by oil and gas production. This method is applied to the Big Hill Field in Jefferson County, Texas. Inputs include production data from a series of wells in this field and lithologic data from electric logs of these same wells. Outputs include predicted amounts of subsidence, the time frame of subsidence, and sensitivity analyses of compressibility and hydraulic conductivity estimates. Depending upon estimated compressibility, subsidence, to date, is predicted to be as high as 20 cm. Similarly, depending upon estimated vertical hydraulic conductivity, the time frame may be decades for this subsidence. These same methods can be applied to other oil/gas fields with established production histories as well as new fields when production scenarios are assumed. Where subsidence has been carefully measured above petroleum reservoir, the model may be used inversely to calculate sediment compressibilities.

Hill, D.W.; Sharp, J.M. Jr. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

1993-02-01

221

Slice-mapping: Reservoir characterization technique - West Yucca Butte Field, Pecos County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The West Yucca Butte field, located in Pecos County, Texas, is a structural-stratigraphic field that lies within the geologic province known as the Sheffield Channel-Val Verde basin area of west Texas. It is one of several producing fields situated in an en echelon pattern along several major northwest-southeast-trending fault systems. These fields are anticlinal features producing gas, condensate, and high-gravity oils from Lower Ordovician dolomites and sandstones, Devonian cherts and cherty limestones, and Pennsylvanian-Permian limestones. Production in the West Yucca Butte field is from the Lower Ordovician Ellenburger Group and the Pennsylvanian Strawn, Canyon, and Cisco Groups. In general, wells located highest on the structure, with adequate porosity, are the better wells. Production is also obtained from downdip wells where reservoirs stratigraphically pinch out along the flanks of the structure. However, in all reservoirs, internal stratigraphic heterogeneities significantly complicated development strategies. The Pennsylvanian reservoirs are very heterogeneous. The carbonates have undergone considerable diagenesis, resulting in the occlusion of primary porosities. Secondary spicular-moldic and microvuggy brecciated porosities are the principal porosity types. Petrographic studies were useful in describing the physical properties of this massive carbonate section and the depositional and diagenetic implications; however, little was known about the distribution and quality of the reservoirs.

Casavant, R.R.

1988-01-01

222

Proximal and distal determinants of access to health care among Hispanics in El Paso County, Texas.  

PubMed

In the United States, having health insurance is an important determinant of health care access and individual health outcomes. Nationwide, a significant proportion of the population does not have health insurance. Hispanics, in particular, are less likely than non-Hispanics to have insurance. A framework was established to examine the relationships between the determinants of insurance coverage and health care affordability in El Paso County, Texas. Data from the 2005 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System were used to examine the relationships described by this framework. The sample included 653 adults, of those 477 self-identified as Hispanic or Latino. In El Paso County, almost half of adult Hispanics lack any type of health insurance coverage, three times the rate of non-Hispanics. Among Hispanics, the lack of health insurance was strongly associated with reduced affordability of health care. Employment status, income, and age were found to have significant associations with insurance coverage and health care affordability. Sex and education level were relevant, yet distal determinants of these outcomes. Ongoing conversations about health care reform should take into account the patterns of coverage within the Hispanic population. Knowing how economic and social factors affect coverage is necessary to inform policy that can effectively alleviate disparities experienced by Hispanics. PMID:20169471

Law, Jon; VanDerslice, James

2011-04-01

223

Site study plan for borehole search and characterization, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This site study plan describes the Borehole Search and Characterization field activities to be conducted during the early stages of Site Characterization at the Deaf Smith County site, Texas. The field program has been designed to provide data useful in addressing information/data needs resulting from Federal/State/Local regulatory requirements and repository program requirements. Air and ground surveys, an extensive literature search, and landowner interviews will be conducted to locate wells within and adjacent to the proposed nuclear waste repository site in Deaf Smith County. Initially, the study will center around the planned Exploratory Shaft Facilities location and will expand outward from that location. Findings from this study may lead to preparation of a new site study plan to search suspected borehole locations, and excavate or reenter known boreholes for additional characterization or remedial action. The Salt Repository Project (SRP) Networks specify the schedule under which the program will operate. The Technical Field Services Contractor (TFSC) is responsible for conducting the field program. Data will be handled and reported in accordance with established SRP procedures. A quality assurance program will be utilized to assure that activities affecting quality are performed correctly and that appropriate documentation is maintained. 13 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1987-12-22

224

Hydrogeologic aspects of the Knippa Gap area in eastern Uvalde and western Medina counties, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Edwards aquifer is the primary source of potable water for the San Antonio area in south-central Texas. The Knippa Gap area is a structural low (trough) postulated to channel or restrict flow in the Edwards aquifer in eastern Uvalde and western Medina Counties, Tex. To better understand the function of the Knippa Gap, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, developed the first detailed surficial geologic map of the Knippa Gap area with data and information obtained from previous investigations and field observations. A simplified version of the detailed geologic map depicting the hydrologic units, faulting, and structural dips of the Knippa Gap area is provided in this fact sheet. The map shows that groundwater flow in the Edwards aquifer is influenced by the Balcones Fault Zone, a structurally complex area of the aquifer that contains relay ramps that have formed in extensional fault systems and allowed for deformational changes along fault blocks. Faulting in southeast Uvalde and southwest Medina Counties has produced relay-ramp structures that dip downgradient to the structural low (trough) of the Knippa Gap.

Lambert, Rebecca B.; Clark, Allan K.; Pedraza, Diana E.; Morris, Robert R.

2014-01-01

225

Characteristics of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems of two locations in Deaf Smith and Swisher Counties, Texas  

SciTech Connect

According to the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program and the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (P.L. 97-425), a potential nuclear waste repository site must be chosen with consideration of potential impacts on terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. This report is a preliminary environmental characterization of two locations in the Texas Panhandle, one in Deaf Smith County and the other in Swisher County, that have been recommended for further study. A description of important natural areas is offered as a basis for comparative studies of the two locations and for the identification and screening of potential repository sites. Information on current land uses, potential habitats, and expected plant and wildlife species is provided to assist field investigators in the collection of baseline data in support of further siting activities. The results of limited field surveys are also included. The report is in two parts. Part I contains a characterization of terrestrial ecological resources based upon limited field surveys aimed at verifying the presence of plant communities and wildlife habitats. It also presents inventories of species with special status, species with recreational and economic importance, and species of ecological value to important or special-status species. Part II presents information on aquatic ecosystems and resources derived primarily from a review of the literature, interviews, and limited field surveys. 21 figures, 18 tables.

Not Available

1984-11-01

226

Late diagenetic indicators of buried oil and gas: II, Direct detection experiment at Cement and Garza oil fields, Oklahoma and Texas, using enhanced LANDSAT I and II images  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Cement oil field, Oklahoma, was a test site for an experiment designed to evaluate LANDSAT's capability to detect an alteration zone in surface rocks caused by hydrocarbon microseepage. Loss of iron and impregnation of sandstone by carbonate cements and replacement of gypsum by calcite are the major alteration phenomena at Cement. The bedrock alterations are partially masked by unaltered overlying beds, thick soils, and dense natural and cultivated vegetation. Interpreters biased by detailed ground truth were able to map the alteration zone subjectively using a magnified, filtered, and sinusoidally stretched LANDSAT composite image; other interpreters, unbiased by ground truth data, could not duplicate that interpretation. Similar techniques were applied at a secondary test site (Garza oil field, Texas), where similar alterations in surface rocks occur. Enhanced LANDSAT images resolved the alteration zone to a biased interpreter and some individual altered outcrops could be mapped using higher resolution SKYLAB color and conventional black and white aerial photographs suggesting repeat experiments with LANDSAT C and D.

Donovan, Terrence J.; Termain, Patricia A.; Henry, Mitchell E.

1979-01-01

227

Prevalence of antibodies to spotted fever group Rickettsia spp. and Ehrlichia spp. in coyotes (Canis latrans) in Oklahoma and Texas, USA.  

PubMed

Coyotes (Canis latrans) are commonly infested with ticks, including Amblyomma americanum, the predominant vector of Ehrlichia chaffeensis and Ehrlichia ewingii; Dermacentor variabilis, an important vector of Rickettsia rickettsii; and Amblyomma maculatum, a major vector of Rickettsia parkeri, a spotted fever group (SFG) Rickettsia. To determine the degree to which coyotes are infected with or exposed to tick-borne bacterial disease agents, serum samples collected from coyotes in Oklahoma and Texas were tested for antibodies reactive to R. rickettsii, Ehrlichia canis, E. chaffeensis, E. ewingii, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Anaplasma phagocytophilum by indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) testing or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Of the coyotes tested, 60% (46/77) and 64% (47/74) had antibodies reactive to R. rickettsii and E. chaffeensis, respectively, on IFA. Additionally, 5% (4/77) had antibodies reactive to E. canis, but not B. burgdorferi or A. phagocytophilum, on SNAP() 4Dx() ELISA; subsequent serologic analysis by plate ELISA using species-specific peptides revealed antibodies to E. ewingii, E. canis, and E. chaffeensis in 46% (23/50), 18% (9/50), and 4% (2/50) of serum samples, respectively. Taken together, these data indicate that coyotes in this region are commonly exposed to SFG Rickettsia and E. ewingii and that further consideration of coyotes as a component of the maintenance cycle for these pathogens may be warranted. PMID:23778619

Starkey, Lindsay A; West, Misti D; Barrett, Anne W; Saucier, Jill M; O'Connor, Tom P; Paras, Kelsey L; Reiskind, Michael H; Reichard, Mason V; Little, Susan E

2013-07-01

228

Digital map of aquifer boundary for the High Plains aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This digital data set represents the extent of the High Plains aquifer in the central United States. The extent of the High Plains aquifer covers 174,000 square miles in eight states: Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. This data set represents a compilation of information from digital and paper sources and personal communication. This boundary is an update to the boundary published in U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1400-B, and this report supersedes Open-File Report 99-267. The purpose of this data set is to refine and update the extent of the High Plains aquifer based on currently available information. This data set represents a compilation of arcs from a variety of sources and scales that represent the 174,000 square-mile extent of the High Plains aquifer within the eight states. Where updated information was not available, the original boundary extent defined by OFR 99-267 was retained. The citations for the sources in each State are listed in the 00README.txt file. The boundary also contains internal polygons, or 'islands', that represent the areas within the aquifer boundary where the aquifer is not present due to erosion or non-deposition. The datasets that pertain to this report can be found on the U.S. Geological Survey's NSDI (National Spatial Data Infrastructure) Node, the links are provided on the sidebar.

Qi, Sharon

2010-01-01

229

Factors Associated with Recruitment and Retention Rates of Minority Youth 4-H Members as Perceived by Adult Club Leaders and County Extension Agents in Texas  

E-print Network

According to enrollment data from the National 4-H Headquarters, minority participation in Texas 4-H clubs has declined over the past five years. This descriptive study measured the perceptions of 4-H adult leaders and county Extension agents about...

Gonzales, Nicole 1989-

2012-12-05

230

Environmental impacts of oil production on soil, bedrock, and vegetation at the U.S. Geological Survey Osage-Skiatook Petroleum Environmental Research site A, Osage County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey is investigating the impacts of oil and gas production on soils, groundwater, surface water, and ecosystems in the United States. Two sites in northeastern Oklahoma (sites A and B) are presently being investigated under the Osage-Skiatook Petroleum Environmental Research project. Oil wells on the lease surrounding site A in Osage County, Oklahoma, produced about 100,000 bbl of oil between 1913 ard 1981. Prominent production features on the 1.5-ha (3.7-ac) site A include a tank battery, an oil-filled trench, pipelines, storage pits for both produced water and oil, and an old power unit. Site activities and historic releases have left open areas in the local oak forest adjacent to these features and a deeply eroded salt scar downslope from the pits that extends to nearby Skiatook Lake. The site is underlain by surficial sediments comprised of very fine-grained eolian sand and colluvium as much as 1.4 m (4.6 ft) thick, which, in turn, overlie flat-lying, fractured bedrock comprised of sandstone, clayey sandstone, mudstone, and shale. A geophysical survey of ground conductance and concentration measurements of aqueous extracts (1:1 by weight) of core samples taken in the salt scar and adjacent areas indicate that unusual concentrations of NaCl-rich salt are present at depths to at least 8 m (26 ft) in the bedrock; however, little salt occurs in the eolian sand. Historic aerial photographs, anecdotal reports from oil-lease operators, and tree-ring records indicate that the surrounding oak forest was largely established after 1935 and thus postdates the majority of surface damage at the site. Blackjack oaks adjacent to the salt scar have anomalously elevated chloride (>400 ppm) in their leaves and record the presence of NaCl-rich salt or salty water in the shallow subsurface. The geophysical measurements also indicate moderately elevated conductance beneath the oak forest adjoining the salt scar. Copyright ?? 2005. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists/Division of Environmental Geosciences. All rights reserved.

Otton, J.K.; Zielinski, R.A.; Smith, B.D.; Abbott, M.M.; Keeland, B.D.

2005-01-01

231

78 FR 76318 - Notice of Intent To Extend the Public Scoping Period for the Oklahoma, Kansas, and Texas Resource...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is extending...Kansas, and Texas planning area, which was...resources in the planning area. DATES...for the Resource Management Plan (RMP) with...paleontology, rangeland management, recreation...wildlife) in the planning area. The...

2013-12-17

232

The Farmer Looks at His Economic Security: A Study of Provisions Made for Old Age by Farm Families in Wharton County, Texas.  

E-print Network

of Farm Operotor , Families, Wharton County, Texas, 1952, Progress Report 1529 ; Retirement Plans of Farm Ope~a- tors, Wharton County, Texas, 1952, Progress Re- port 1565 ; and Attitudes Toward the Old-Age culri Survivors Insurance Program, Wharton... of old-age protection and economic security against misfortunes. The farm opera- , tor, however, to meet the financial adjustments associated with death, disability, unemployment and old age, must rely primarily upon his indiv- idual efforts...

Motheral, Joe R.; Adkins, William G.

1954-01-01

233

Validating the Estimated Cost of Saving Water Through Infrastructure Rehabilitation in the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley (Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2)  

E-print Network

SR- 2005-02 Validating the Estimated Cost of Saving Water Through Infrastructure Rehabilitation in the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley A Case Study Using Actual Construction Costs for the Lateral A Lining Project, Hidalgo County... the Estimated Cost of Saving Water Through Infrastructure Rehabilitation in the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley A Case Study Using Actual Construction Costs for the Lateral A Lining Project, Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan) by: Ronald D...

Lacewell, R. D.; Rister, M.; Sturdivant, A. W.

234

Oklahoma Today  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Published since the 1950s, Oklahoma Today is a production of several state agencies, and it is designed to showcase various cultural, historical, and social aspects of Oklahoma. Over the past several years, Oklahoma State University has digitized back issues of the magazine, and visitors can now read all the way back to the first issue from 1956. Visitors can browse back issues by decade, and they can also perform key-word searches. First-time visitors should start by reading through the spring 1960 issue, which contains pieces on rattlesnakes, Oklahoma wildflowers, and the Washington Irving Trail. While the name Washington Irving may not be commonly associated with Oklahoma, the author spent part of 1832 wandering through the state with a Native American guide. More recent issues feature profiles of singer Vince Gill and Route 66.

235

A phenological study of selected vascular plants of Brazos and Leon Counties, Texas, 1972  

E-print Network

, Sparkleberry) Suaauceuiu usta Wood. (Yellow Trumpets ) Senecio anymKuceua Hook. (Texas Groundsel) Cua~ja Lndivxaa Engelm. (Texas Paintbrush) Rubus ~vial Michx. (Southern Dewberry, Zarazmora) Lupinua aubcaanoaus Hook . (Texas Bluebonnet) Caution ca~atua Michx...

Clark, Carolyn A

1973-01-01

236

Aquifer characteristics, water availability, and water quality of the Quaternary aquifer, Osage County, northeastern Oklahoma, 2001-2002  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Additional sources of water are needed on the Osage Reservation for future growth and development. The Quaternary aquifer along the Arkansas River in the Osage Reservation may represent a substantial water resource, but limited amounts of hydrogeologic data were available for the aquifer. The study area is about 116 square miles of the Quaternary aquifer in the Arkansas River valley and the nearby upland areas along the Osage Reservation. The study area included the Arkansas River reach downstream from Kaw Lake near Ponca City, Oklahoma to upstream from Keystone Lake near Cleveland, Oklahoma. Electrical conductivity logs were produced for 103 test holes. Water levels were determined for 49 test holes, and 105 water samples were collected for water-quality field analyses at 46 test holes. Water-quality data included field measurements of specific conductance, pH, water temperature, dissolved oxygen, and nitrate (nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen). Sediment cores were extracted from 20 of the 103 test holes. The Quaternary aquifer consists of alluvial and terrace deposits of sand, silt, clay, and gravel. The measured thickness of the alluvium ranged from 13.7 to 49.8 feet. The measured thickness of the terrace sediments ranged from 7 to 93.8 feet. The saturated thickness of all sediments ranged from 0 to 38.2 feet with a median of 24.8 feet. The weighted-mean grain size for cores from the alluvium ranged from 3.69 to 0.64 f, (0.08- 0.64 millimeter), and ranged from 4.02 to 2.01 f (0.06-0.25 millimeter) for the cores from terrace deposits. The mean of the weighted-mean grain sizes for cores from the alluvium was 1.67 f (0.31 millimeter), and the terrace deposits was 2.73 f (0.15 millimeter). The hydraulic conductivity calculated from grain size of the alluvium ranged from 2.9 to 6,000 feet per day and of the terrace deposits ranged from 2.9 to 430 feet per day. The calculated transmissivity of the alluvium ranged from 2,000 to 26,000 feet squared per day with a median of 5,100 feet squared per day. Water in storage in the alluvium was estimated to be approximately 200,000 acre-feet. The amount of water annually recharging the aquifer was estimated to be approximately 4,800 acre-feet. Specific conductance for all water samples ranged from 161 to 6,650 microsiemens per centimeter. Median specific conductance for the alluvium was 683 microsiemens per centimeter and for the terrace deposits was 263 microsiemens per centimeter. Dissolved-solids concentrations, estimated from specific conductance, for water samples from the aquifer ranged from 88 to 3,658 milligrams per liter. Estimated median dissolved- solids concentration for the alluvium was 376 milligrams per liter and for the terrace deposits was 145 milligrams per liter. More than half of the samples from the Quaternary aquifer were estimated to contain less than 500 milligrams per liter dissolved solids. Field-screened nitrate concentrations for the sampling in December 2001-August 2002 ranged from 0 to 15 milligrams per liter. The field-screened nitrate concentrations for the second sampling in September 2002 were less than corresponding laboratory reported values.

Mashburn, Shana L.; Cope, Caleb C.; Abbott, Marvin M.

2003-01-01

237

Tight gas sands research program: Field operations and analysis. Analysis of selected wells surrounding SFE No. 3, Waskom Cotton Valley Field, Harrison County, Texas. Topical report  

Microsoft Academic Search

In preparation for the Gas Research Institute sponsored Staged Field Experiment (SFE) No. 3 in the Waskom Cotton Valley Field of Harrison County, Texas, a comprehensive study was performed on six wells surrounding the site for SFE No. 3. Data from the six wells was provided by Mobil Producing Texas New Mexico. The data were analyzed using a two-dimensional, single-phase,

B. C. Wolters; B. M. Robinson; S. A. Holditch

1989-01-01

238

Technical procedures for the implementation of cultural resource site studies, Deaf Smith County, Texas: Preliminary draft  

SciTech Connect

Cultural resources at the Deaf Smith County site will be identified, evaluated and managed through the implementation of studies detailed in the Site Study Plan for Cultural Resources. This technical procedure outlines the conduct of pedestrian survey and the documentation of identified cultural resources. The purpose of the field surveys is to identify and document cultural resources in the areas that will be affected by site characterization activities and to record the environmental setting of identified cultural resources. Three pedestrian surveys will cover 100 percent of the on-site and off-site project areas. Survey 1 will provide coverage of the Repository Surface Facility (RSF) area, which includes the Exploratory Shaft Facility (ESF) and two linear engineering design borehole (EDBH) seismic survey corridors. Survey 2 will provide coverage of a 39 km/sup 2/ (15 mi/sup 2/) area that includes the 23 km/sup 2/ (9 mi/sup 2/) Deaf Smith County site plus a 0.4 to 0.8 kM (1/4 to 1/2 mi) border area but excludes the area covered by Survey 1. Survey 3 will cover offsite geotechnical test areas, such as the locations of playa boreholes, deep playa wells, hydrologic tests, site foundation borings, and their access routes. The purpose of site documentation or recording is to address the project information needs for land use permits and approvals, engineering design support, and cultural resource evaluation for National Register of Historic Places eligibility. Site documentation will consist of gathering sufficient data on identified resources to complete Texas Natural Resource Information System (TNRIS). 7 refs., 3 figs.

Not Available

1987-09-30

239

Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook, 1999.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count Factbook details county and statewide trends in the well-being of Oklahoma's children. The statistical portrait is based on eight indicators of child well-being: (1) low birth weight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) births to young teens; (4) child abuse and neglect; (5) child and teen death; (6) child poverty; (7) high school

Ingraham, Sandy

240

Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook, 2002.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count Factbook details county and statewide trends in the well-being of children in Oklahoma. The statistical portrait is based on seven indicators or benchmarks of child well-being: (1) low birthweight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) births to young teens; (4) child abuse and neglect; (5) child and teen death; (6) high school

Ingraham, Sandy

241

Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook '98.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count report details county and statewide trends in the well-being of Oklahoma's children. The statistical portrait is based on eight indicators of child well-being: (1) low birthweight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) births to teens; (4) child abuse and neglect; (5) child death; (6) child poverty; (7) high school dropouts; and (8)

Oklahoma Inst. for Child Advocacy, Inc., Oklahoma City. Oklahoma Kids Count.

242

Impacts of petroleum production on ground and surface waters: Results from the Osage-Skiatook Petroleum Environmental Research A site, Osage County Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

As part of a multidisciplinary group of about 20 scientists, we are investigating the transport, fate, natural attenuation, and ecosystem impacts of inorganic salts and organic compounds present in releases of produced water and associated hydrocarbons at the Osage-Skiatook Petroleum Environmental Research (OSPER) sites, located in Osage County, Oklahoma. Geochemical data collected from nearby oil wells show that the produced water source is a Na-Ca-Cl brine (???150,000 mg/L total dissolved solids [TDS]), with relatively high concentrations of Mg, Sr, and NH4, but low SO4 and H2S. Results from the depleted OSPER A site show that the salts continue to be removed from the soil and surficial rocks, but degraded oil persists on the contaminated surface. Eventually, the bulk of inorganic salts and dissolved organics in the brine will reach the adjacent Skiatook Lake, a 4250-ha (10,501-ac) potable water reservoir. Repeated sampling of 44 wells show a plume of high-salinity water (2000-30,000 mg/L TDS) at intermediate depths that intersects Skiatook Lake and extends beyond the visibly impacted areas. No liquid petroleum was observed in this plume, but organic acid anions, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX), and other volatile organic carbon (VOC) are present. The chemical composition of released brine is modified by sorption, mineral precipitation and dissolution, evapotranspiration, volatilization, and bacterially mediated oxidation-reduction reactions, in addition to mixing with percolating precipitation water, lake water, and pristine groundwater. Results show that only minor amounts of salt are removed by runoff, supporting the conclusion that significant amounts of salts from produced water and petroleum releases still remain in the soils and rocks of the impacted area after more than 65 yr of natural attenuation. Copyright ?? 2005. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists/Division of Environmental Geosciences. All rights reserved.

Kharaka, Y.K.; Thordsen, J.J.; Kakouros, E.; Herkelrath, W.N.

2005-01-01

243

The organization, powers, and duties of the county commissioners' court in Texas  

E-print Network

Qualifications for o f fice The election of the county judge and the county commissioners Vacancy in office Removal from office Resignation from office The procedures of the county commissioners' court Compensation of the county judge and the coLTtv c... of commissioners' precincts Appointment powers of the commissioners' court Establishing the terms of the county court School lands The office of assessor-collector of taxes The county poor farm Local option elections Stock law elections The salary...

Daughety, Gerald Lee

1973-01-01

244

Oklahoma Digital Maps  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A team of talented librarians at the Oklahoma State University Library have created this collection of 3,600 maps, a true find for those with an interest in Sooner history, geography, culture, and more. The cartographic resources are divided into four collections, including the WPA Collection and the USGS Collection. This first collection consists of almost 2,400 detailed county maps produced in the 1930s by the Works Progress Administration and the Oklahoma Tax Commission to determine real estate values. Moving on, the USGS Collection is made up of 300 detailed maps generated from 1892 to the 1950s documenting topographical conditions throughout the state. Interested parties can view all of the maps here via a nice digital image tool and are also welcome to search across the entire collection by keyword.

245

Summer sound-level characterization of the Deaf Smith County and Swisher County locations in the Palo Duro Basin, Texas  

SciTech Connect

A description of sound levels and sound sources in the Deaf Smith County and Swisher County locations in the Palo Duro Basin during a period representative of the summer season is presented. Included are data collected during the period August 4 through 8, 1982, for both locations. 3 references, 2 figures, 3 tables.

Not Available

1984-03-01

246

The role of diagenetic studies in flow-unit modeling: San Andres formation, Yoakum County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Permian San Andres Formation represents one of the most prolific hydrocarbon-producing intervals of the Permian basin. Dolostone lithofacies intercalated with thin evaporites accommodate highly compartmentalized reservoirs resulting from complex depositional and diagenetic histories. This compartmentalization often facilitates the use of these reservoirs in flow-unit studies. Perhaps more important than the relationship of productive intervals to depositional facies is the degree to which diagenetic processes have influenced reservoir properties. Detailed petrographic evaluation of the reservoir in question, though often overlooked, should be an integral part of flow-unit studies. Once a diagenetic sequence is established, the information may be incorporated in to the facies model to better understand how to subdivide the reservoir. Such an investigation has been conducted on the San Andres Formation in Reeves field of southeastern Yoakum County, Texas. Here, multistage diagenetic overprints are superimposed on depositional facies that vary in degree of lateral extent, thereby complicating the geometries of individual productive zones within the reservoir. Analysis of the reservoir reveals that Reeves San Andres sediments were subjected to dominant diagenetic processes, including dolomitization and sulfate implacement, both of which are major factors in porosity preservation, and a variety of minor processes that have had little effect on reservoir quality. The recognition of diagenetic facies, and understanding of the processes that have created them, and identification of the implications of these processes on reservoir properties is a vital part of any flow-unit study.

Henderson, S. (Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States))

1994-03-01

247

B. C. Canyon field, Howard County, Texas: An ancient analogy to modern tropical tower karst terrains  

SciTech Connect

Late in the early deposition of sediments in Canyon field, a series of glacio-eustatically controlled sea level lowstands resulted in a carbonate buildup seaward of the Horseshoe Atoll in Howard County, Texas. The resulting satellite reef tract consists of fringing boundstone; high-energy shelf grainstones; lower energy shelf packstones and wackestones; and thin, highstand, black shales and mudstones. The original extent and thickness of deposits were extensively modified during karstification coincident with successive sea level lowstands. The resulting paleotopographic landforms appear to be similar to tower karst features of Puerto Rico. During the beginning of each sea level highstand, the paleoterrain was modified by erosion. The basinal foreshelf conglomerates resulting from initial highstand erosion contain dipping strata that commonly can be detected by the dipmeter tool. The mechanism for the formation of these strata may be depositional or the result of diagenetic alteration of the rock fabric in the burial environment. Using dipmeter data, an uneconomic producer has been offset by one of the better producing wells in the field.

Mozynski, D.C.; Reid, A.M. (Deminex U.S. Oil Company, Dallas, TX (United States))

1992-04-01

248

Clay mineralogy and its controls on production, Pennsylvanian upper Morrow sandstone, Farnsworth field, Ochiltree County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Farnsworth field in Ochiltree County, Texas, is the most prolific upper Morrow oil field in the Anadarko basin, producing more than 36 million bbl of oil and 27 billion ft{sup 3} of gas since its discovery in 1955. The bulk of the production comes from an upper Morrow-aged sandstone locally referred to as the Buckhaults sandstone. The Buckhaults sandstone is a coarse to very coarse-grained, arkose to arkosic wacke. Grain-size distributions, sedimentary structure analysis, and sand-body geometry indicate that the Buckhaults was deposited in a fluvial-deltaic environment as distributary channel and distributary mouth-bar sands. Depositional strike is northwest to southeast. The source area for the Buckhaults sediments was primarily a plutonic igneous terrane, with a minor contribution from volcanic and reworked sedimentary rocks. The proposed source area is the Amarillo-Wichita uplift to the south. In addition, the Cimarron arch and/or Keyes dome to the west-northwest may also have contributed sediment to the study area. The large (average) grain size, the amount of feldspar present, and the overall immaturity of the Buckhaults sediments indicate a relatively short distance of transport. Detailed scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction analysis of cores from the productive interval coupled with comparisons of varying completion practices across the field indicate a significant correlation between individual well performance, clay mineralogy, and completion technique.

Munson, T.W. (Mesa Ltd. Partnership, Amarillo, TX (USA))

1989-12-01

249

Site study plan for intermediate hydrology clusters tests wells Deaf Smith County Site, Texas  

SciTech Connect

To characterize the geologic, geochemical, and hydrologic characteristics of intermediate-depth formations at the proposed Deaf Smith County, Texas, repository site, wells called Intermediate Hydrology clusters will test the Dewey Lake, Alibates, Salado, Yates, Upper and Lower Seven Rivers, and Queen Grayburg Formations. Sixteen wells will be installed at six locations. One location will have four wills, two locations will have three wells, and three locations will have two wells for a total of 16 wells. Testing of the formations is to proceed from the bottom up, with 2-day pumping tests at the less permeable formations. Tracer tests and tests for verticall hydraulic properties will be designed and performed after other hydrologic tests are completed. After testing, selected wells are to be completed as single or possibly dual monitoring wells to observe water-level trends. To develop a hydrogeologic testing plan, the response of each formation to potential testing procedures was evaluated using design values and an assumend range for hydraulic parameters. These evaluations indicate that hydraulic properties of a sandy zone of the Dockum, the lower Sever Rivers, and possibly the Alibates and Queen/Grayburg can be determined by pumping tests. Standard of shut-in slug tests must be conducted in the remaining formations. Tests of very long duration would be required to determine the verticla properties of less permeable formations. Tracer tests would also require weeks or months. 61 figs., 34 refs., 4 tabs.

Not Available

1988-01-01

250

Sedimentology, petrology, and reservoir characteristics of lower Strawn sandstone, Bent Tree field, Hardeman County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Reservoir sandstones of the lower Strawn Formation (early Middle Pennsylvanian) in the Bent Tree field of Hardeman County, Texas, are coarse to fine-grained, texturally submature arkoses. Cores show the sandstones to have been deposited in 1.5-4.5 m thick fining-upward successions of aggraded or prograded bar units. Each bar unit has a sharp erosional base overlain by cross-bedded, coarse-grained, conglomeratic sandstone, which, in turn, is overlain by medium to fine-grained, horizontally bedded or ripple-bedded sandstone. The coarse conglomeratic sandstones are interpreted to represent deposition in main channels of a braided fluvial system that were progressively filled by aggrading and prograding bars. The interbedded, finer grained, more immature sandstones appear to have been deposited in auxiliary channels or swales, or in proximal overbank settings. The detrital framework grain suite of the reservoir sandstones averages 47% quartz, 30% feldspars, 19% igneous rock fragments, and 4% sedimentary rock fragments. The source of these sands was a plutonic/cratonic igneous massif with minor exposures of older sedimentary strata, and was probably the ancestral Wichita Mountains. Diagenesis has significantly affected the petrographic and reservoir properties of the lower Strawn sandstones, primarily through the in-situ alteration of detrital feldspathic grains and by the precipitation of authigenic quartz overgrowths, chlorite clay, and carbonate cements.

Moore, T.R.; Bridges, K.F.

1987-08-01

251

Combined geological and surface geochemical methods discover King Sand production, Concho County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

From December, 1987 to September, 1990, 16 prospects within the current confines of the Lower King (Upper Pennsylvanian Cisco age) Sand Play in Concho County, Texas, were tested by several operators on locations found by various combinations of subsurface geology, reconnaissance surface radiometrics, and soil gas hydrocarbon leads A 37.5% exploratory success rate has resulted in six new field discoveries or extensions with a total exploration and development cost of less than $0.50 per barrel of proven oil reserves. The average recoverable reserves per new field discovery are estimated to be 2.6 Mbbl of oil, and the average recoverable reserves per well are estimated to be 285,000 bbl at a depth of 2200 ft. Five of the six new field discoveries were based primarily on surface geochemical data. The sixth discovery, a southeast extension to the Lonesome Dove II field, was found on the basis of subsurface geology. The Agaritta field is one of the two largest of the new field discoveries with estimated proven (producing and undeveloped) recoverable reserves of 6 Mbbl of oil as of September, 1990. Its discovery was based on a combination of (1) detailed interstitial soil gas hydrocarbon data, (2) soil magnetic susceptibility measurements, and (3) surface potassium and uranium concentrations measured by gamma-ray spectrometry applied over two leads based on reconnaissance radiometrics. What initially appeared to be two separate prospects spaced over 7000 ft apart has since developed into one large field.

Thompson, C.K; Burson, K.R.; Saunders, D.F. (Recon Exploration, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)); Brown, J.J. (Indigo Oil, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States))

1991-03-01

252

Combined geological and surface geochemical methods discovered Agaritta and Brady Creek Fields, Concho County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

From December 1987 to March 1991, 25 prospects in the lower King sand (Upper Pennsylvanian Cisco) play in Concho County, Texas, were tested by several operators. They used combinations of subsurface geology, reconnaissance airborne gas sensing, surface radiometrics, soil magnetic susceptibility, and soil-gas hydrocarbon measurements to define prospects. Six new King sand discoveries or extensions and three deeper Goen discoveries resulted in a 36% exploratory success rate. The total exploration and development cost was approximately $0.67/bbl of proven producing oil reserves. Final locations for the discovery wells on each of the nine successful prospects were selected primarily on the basis of combined subsurface geology and surface geochemical data. As examples, we present information about the discovery of Brady Creek and Agaritta fields. Agaritta field is one of the two largest of the new-field discoveries, with estimated proven producing recoverable reserves of 6 million bbl of oil. Its discovery was based on a combination of (1) regional subsurface geologic projection, (2) airborne hydrocarbon sensing, (3) interstitial soil-gas hydrocarbon data, (4) soil magnetic-susceptibility measurements, and (5) surface potassium and uranium concentrations measured by gamma-ray spectrometry.

Saunders, D.F.; Burson, K.R.; Thompson, C.K. (Recon Explorations Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)); Brown, J.J. (Indigo Oil, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States))

1993-07-01

253

Perriwinkle and Perriwinkle North fields, Martin County, Texas: A Cisco-Canyon lowstand reef complex  

SciTech Connect

During the middle-early through early-middle deposition of sediments in Canyon field, a series of glacio-eustatically controlled sea level lowstands resulted in carbonate buildups seaward of the Horseshoe Atoll in Martin County, Texas. The resulting reef tracts consist of algal-bryozoan boundstones, clean forereef talus conglomerates, and other high-energy shelf carbonates. The reef complex was chemically eroded into a tower karst terrain during subsequent sea level lowstands and associated subaerial exposure. The highly sculptured paleotopography was mechanically eroded during the onset of a sea level highstand, filling lows with locally derived conglomerates. In addition, highstand basinal foreshelf conglomerates from the atoll were deposited. These conglomerates contain at least one reservoir-size upper Strawn high-energy shelf allochthon. A transgressive-regressive shelf margin reef tract was deposited seaward of the now exhumed Canyon paleokarst surface during a lowstand that occurred early in Cisco deposition. The tract consists of an algal-bryozoan boundstone, associated forereef talus conglomerates, immediate backreef grainstones and packstones, and erosional foreshelf detritus. Although subaerially exposed, the Cisco reef tract is not as highly solutioned as the Canyon tract, resulting in a lower relief paleotopographic surface. During subsequent sea level highstands, both the Cisco and Canyon reef tracts were buried under lower Cisco basinal foreshelf conglomeraters, masking the stratigraphic intricacies of the paleobathymetric surface and obscuring the relationship of time correlative reservoirs within the shelf-edge complex.

Mozynski, D.C.; Reid, A.M. (Deminex U.S. Oil Co., Dallas, TX (United States))

1992-04-01

254

Combined geological and surface geochemical methods discover Agaritta and Brady Creek fields, Concho County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

From December 1987 to March 1991, 25 prospects in the lower King Sandstone (Upper Pennsylvanian Cisco) play in Concho County, Texas, were tested by several operators. They used combinations of subsurface geology, reconnaissance airborne gas sensing, surface radiometrics, soil magnetic susceptibility, and soil gas hydrocarbon measurements to define prospects. Six new King Sandstone field discoveries or extensions and three deeper pay Goen Limestone field discoveries resulted in a 36% exploratory success rate. The total exploration and development cost was approximately $0.67 per bbl of proven producing oil reserves. As examples, the authors present the discovery of Brady Creek and Agaritta fields. Agaritta field is one of the two largest of the new field discoveries with estimated proven producing recoverable reserves of 6,000,000 BO. Its discovery was based on a combination of (1) airborne hydrocarbon sensing, (2) interstitial soil gas hydrocarbon data, (3) soil magnetic susceptibility measurements, and (4) surface potassium and uranium concentrations measured by gamma-ray spectrometry. Interstitial soil gas hydrocarbon anomalies combined with soil magnetic susceptibility anomalies provided the best detailed surface guidance to Agaritta field. These were supported locally by radiometric anomalies. The Brady Creek field is interpreted to be a possible crevasse splay deposit. The Aggaritta field is interpreted to be a point bar deposit. Both fields are stratigraphic traps.

Saunders, D.F.; Burson, K.R.; Thompson, C.K. (Recon Exploration, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)); Brown, J.J. (Indigo Oil, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States))

1992-04-01

255

Site study plan for exploratory shaft monitoring wells, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Preliminary Draft  

SciTech Connect

As part of site characterization studies, two exploratory shafts will be constructed at the Deaf Smith County site, Texas. Twelve wells at five locations have been proposed to monitor potential impacts of shaft construction on water-bearing zones in the Ogallala Formation and the Dockum Group. In addition, tests have been proposed to determine the hydraulic properties of the water-bearing zones for use in design and construction of the shafts. Samples of the Blackwater Draw Formation, Ogallala Formation, and Dockum Group will be obtained during construction of these wells. Visual indentification, laboratory testing, and in situ testing will yield data necessary for Exploratory Shaft Facility design and construction. This activity provides the earliest data on the Blackwater Drew Formation, Ogallala Formation, and Dockum Group near the exploratory shaft locations. Drilling and hydrologic testing are scheduled prior to other subsurface activity at the Exploratory Shaft Facility to establish ground-water baseline conditions. The Technical Field Services Contractor is responsible for conducting the field program of drilling and testing. Samples and data will be handled and reported in accordance with established Salt Repository Project procedures. A quality assurance program will be utilized to assure that activities affecting quality are performed correctly and that the appropriate documentation is maintained. 45 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

Not Available

1988-01-01

256

Draft environmental assessment: Swisher County site, Texas. Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 112). [Contains Glossary  

SciTech Connect

In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Swisher County, Texas, as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The potentially acceptable site was subsequently narrowed to an area of 9 square miles. To determine their suitability, the Swisher site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations are reported in this draft environmental assessment (EA), which is being issued for public review and comment. The DOE findings and determinations that are based on these evaluations are preliminary and subject to public review and comment. A final EA will be prepared after considering the comments received. On the basis of the evaluations contained in this draft EA, the DOE has found that the Swisher site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The site is contained in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. This setting contains one other potentially acceptable site - the Deaf Smith site. Although the Swisher site appears to be suitable for site characterization, the DOE has concluded that the Deaf Smith site is the preferred site in the Permian Basin and is proposing to nominate the Deaf Smith site rather than the Swisher site as one of the five sites suitable for characterization.

Not Available

1984-12-01

257

Site study plan for routine laboratory rock mechanics, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This Site Study Plan for Routine Laboratory Rock Mechanics describes routine laboratory testing to be conducted on rock samples collected as part of the characterization of the Deaf Smith County site, Texas. This study plan describes the early laboratory testing. Additional testing may be required and the type and scope of testing will be dependent upon the results of the early testing. This study provides for measurements of index, hydrological, mechanical, and chemical properties with tests which are standardized and used widely in geotechnical investigations. Another Site Study Plan for Nonroutine Laboratory Rock Mechanics describes laboratory testing of samples from the site to determine mechanical, thermomechanical, and thermal properties by less widely used methods, many of which have been developed specifically for characterization of the site. Data from laboratory tests will be used for characterization of rock strata, design of shafts and underground facilities, and modeling of repository behavior in support of resolution of both preclosure and postclosure issues. A tentative testing schedule and milestone log are given. A quality assurance program will be utilized to assure that activities affecting quality are performed correctly and that appropriate documentation is maintained. 18 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1987-12-01

258

Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Coverage Among Females Aged 11 to 17 in Texas Counties: An Application of Multilevel, Small Area Estimation  

PubMed Central

Background Local data are often used to plan and evaluate public health interventions and policy. With increasingly fewer public resources to collect sufficient data to support direct estimation of local outcomes, methods for deriving small area estimates are vital. The purpose of this study is to describe the county-level geographic distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine coverage among adolescent females in Texas using multilevel small area estimation. Methods Multilevel (individual, county, public health region) random-intercept logit models were fit to HPV vaccination data (?1 dose Gardasil) from the 2008 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Using the parameter estimates from the final model, we simulated 10,000 data sets for each regression coefficient from the normal distribution and applied them to the logit model to estimate HPV vaccine coverage in each county. Results County-level coverage estimates ranged from 7% to 29%, compared with the state average of 18% (95% confidence interval [CI], 13.5921.88). Many Southwestern border and metropolitan counties exhibited high coverage estimates. Low coverage estimates were noted in the Panhandle, Southeastern border region, and Northeast. Significant correlations were observed between HPV vaccination and Hispanic ethnicity, county poverty, and public health region poverty. Conclusion Harnessing the flexibility of multilevel small area models to estimate HPV vaccine coverage at the county level, we have provided data that may inform the development of health education programs/policies, the provision of health services, and the planning of new research studies. Additionally, we have provided a framework for modeling other health outcomes at the county level using national survey data. PMID:23481692

Eberth, Jan M.; Hossain, Md Monir; Tiro, Jasmin A.; Zhang, Xingyou; Holt, James B.; Vernon, Sally W.

2013-01-01

259

Cultural resources survey and assessment of the proposed Department of Energy Freeport to Texas City pipeline, Brazoria and Galveston Counties, Texas. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An intensive survey and testing program of selected segments of a proposed Department of Energy pipeline were conducted by Coastal Environments, Inc., Baton Rouge, Louisiana, during December 1985 and January 1986. The proposed pipeline runs from Texas City, Galveston County to Bryan Mound, Brazoria County. The pedestrian survey was preceded by historical records survey to locate possible historic sites within the DOE righ-of-way. Four prehistoric sites within the ROW (41BO159, 160, 161, 162) and one outside the ROW (41BO163) were located. All are Rangia cuneata middens. The survey results are discussed with particular reference to the environmental settings of the sites and the effectiveness of the survey procedure. Two of the sites located within the ROW were subjected to additional testing. The results of the backhoe testing program are included in the site descriptions, and the scientific value of the sites are presented. 52 refs., 20 figs., 10 tabs.

Castille, G.J.; Whelan, J.P. Jr.

1986-01-01

260

OPTIMIZING GEO-CELLULAR RESERVOIR MODELING IN A BRAIDED RIVER INCISED VALLEY FILL: POSTLE FIELD, TEXAS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA  

E-print Network

OPTIMIZING GEO-CELLULAR RESERVOIR MODELING IN A BRAIDED RIVER INCISED VALLEY FILL: POSTLE FIELD, inclusion of stratigraphically significant surfaces, facies modeling and geo-body types, as well as incorporation of additional seismic and geo-statistical data. Geologic and reservoir characterization were

261

Coal Rank and Stratigraphy of Pennsylvanian Coal and Coaly Shale Samples, Young County, North-Central Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Vitrinite reflectance measurements were made to determine the rank of selected subsurface coal and coaly shale samples from Young County, north-central Texas, for the National Coal Resources Database System State Cooperative Program conducted by the Bureau of Economic Geology at The University of Texas at Austin. This research is the continuation of a pilot study that began in adjacent Archer County, and forms part of a larger investigation of the coalbed methane resource potential of Pennsylvanian coals in north-central Texas. A total of 57 samples of coal and coaly shale fragments were hand-picked from drill cuttings from depths of about 2,000 ft in five wells, and Ro determinations were made on an initial 10-sample subset. Electric-log correlation of the sampled wells indicates that the collected samples represent coal and coaly shale layers in the Strawn (Pennsylvanian), Canyon (Pennsylvanian), and Cisco (Pennsylvanian-Permian) Groups. Coal rank in the initial sample subset ranges from lignite (Ro=0.39), in a sample from the Cisco Group at a depth of 310 to 320 ft, to high volatile bituminous A coal (Ro=0.91) in a sample from the lower part of the Canyon Group at a depth of 2,030 to 2,040 ft.

Guevara, Edgar H.; Breton, Caroline; Hackley, Paul C.

2007-01-01

262

Educational programs of the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service are open to all people without regard to race, color, sex, disability, religion, age, or national origin. The Texas A&M University System, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the County Comm  

E-print Network

Educational programs of the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service are open to all people without System, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the County Commissioners Courts of Texas Cooperating Changes

263

Educational programs of the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service are open to all people without regard to race, color, sex, disability, religion, age, or national origin. The Texas A&M University System, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the County Comm  

E-print Network

Educational programs of the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service are open to all people without System, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the County Commissioners Courts of Texas Cooperating Conference Planning Guide #12;Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service ii Conference Planning Guide Texas A

264

"Deeply woven roots": health initiatives and community social services of faith-based organizations of the Hidalgo County, Texas.  

PubMed

Faith-based organizations (FBO) continue to play a significant role in the lives of individuals and communities in the United States. This study focused on the contributions of FBO to the health and well-being of residents of Rio Grande Valley, South Texas. Specifically, this study examined two main areas of involvement of FBO in Hidalgo County, Texas: health initiatives and community social services. Despite their influential and historical involvement, FBO partnership in the delivery of health and social services is not well accounted for. This study explores the characteristics of the clergy, parishioners, and FBO that are associated with community health initiatives and social services. Analyses revealed that FBO deliver a remarkably wide range of services. On a weekly basis, one in six or 17% of Hidalgo County residents were reported as receiving some form of health assistance or social services from county FBO. Variations exist depending on the characteristics of the clergy and the FBO. Policy and practice recommendations include engaging in additional networking, organizing resources, and strengthening FBO health initiatives. PMID:24343238

Ramrez-Johnson, Johnny; Park, John; Wilson, Colwick; Pittman, Sharon; Daz, Hctor Luis

2014-08-01

265

A NEW SPECIES OF CARYOSPORA (APICOMPLEXA: EIMERIIDAE) FROM THE FLATHEAD SNAKE, TANTILLA GRACILIS (OPHIDIA: COLUBRIDAE), IN SOUTHEASTERN OKLAHOMA  

PubMed Central

A single flathead snake, Tantilla gracilis, collected in early October 2010 from Choctaw County, Oklahoma, was found to harbor an undescribed species of Caryospora. Oocysts of Caryospora choctawensis n. sp. were spherical to subspherical, 15.8 15.0 (1418 1416) ?m with a thick bilayered wall and a shape index (length/width) of 1.1. A micropyle and an oocyst residuum are absent but prominent Stieda and bubble-like sub-Stieda bodies were present as well as a bilobed polar granule near the oocyst wall. Sporocysts were ovoidal, 10.8 9.0 (1012 89) ?m with a shape index of 1.3. The sporocyst residuum was spherical and composed of a cluster of granules often membrane-bound. This is the second time a caryosporan species has been reported from T. gracilis, but the first coccidian ever described from a reptilian host in Oklahoma. Additional T. gracilis from Arkansas (n = 6), Oklahoma (n = 1), and Texas (n = 7) were examined and a single specimen from Newton County, Arkansas, harbored Caryospora gracilis Upton, McAllister, Trauth, and Bibb, 1992, previously reported from T. gracilis collected in Arkansas and Texas. PMID:22191621

McAllister, Chris T.; Roehrs, Zachary P.; Seville, R. Scott

2012-01-01

266

Can seismic velocities predict sweet spots in the Woodford Shale? A case study from McNeff 2-28 Well, Grady County, Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In shale, predicting sweet spots (brittle, organic-rich, and hydrocarbon-filled porous zones) ahead of the drill bit using non-intrusive methods such as seismic has been a long-standing challenge. In principle, rock properties can be inferred from P- and S-wave velocities with an appropriate rock physics model, which is a way of expressing the elastic moduli as a function of attributes such as porosity (?), mineralogy and pore-fluid type and saturation. Using high-fidelity logs from McNeff 2-28 well, Grady County, Oklahoma, we demonstrate that ? and composition of the Woodford Shale can be inferred from dipole sonic log using the stiff-sand model. The stiff-sand model takes ? and composition as input and, in conjunction with Gassman's substitution, outputs elastic velocities. We find that the up-scaled McNeff 2-28 log velocities can be closely predicted by two compositional end-member input scenarios differing in location of organic matter (OM). The first scenario comprises 0-2.5% OM, 65-84% Quartz and 0% Calcite in matrix and 30-34% gas in pore-fluid. The second scenario comprises 76-20% Quartz and 1.5-3.9% Calcite in matrix and 16-35% gas and 10-40% OM in pore-fluid. In both compositional scenarios, the remainder in matrix is Illite and in pore-fluid is brine. While the input ? in both scenarios is close to the density-porosity (??) log, the input density (?) is closer to the ? log in the second scenario. The second scenario also gives rise to the concept of effective ? (total ? - ??) which pertains to the proportion occupied by mobile components such as gas and brine, and is up to 40% lower than the total ?. We conclude that from a modeling perspective in the Woodford a) OM should be a part of pore fluid rather than the rock matrix, and b) realistic ? and composition can be inferred from the stiff-sand model. Determining a rock physics model for the Woodford enables an examination of various what-if scenarios by consistently changing the inputs and computing elastic velocities which may eventually help in creating a field guide to quantitative interpretation of the field seismic data.

Jaiswal, P.; Varacchi, B.; Ebrahimi, P.; Dvorkin, J.; Puckette, J.

2014-05-01

267

A unique Austin Chalk reservoir, Van field, Van Zandt County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Significant shallow oil production from the Austin Chalk was established in the Van field, Van Zandt County, in East Texas in the late 1980s. The Van field structure is a complexly faulted domal anticline created by salt intrusion. The Woodbine sands, which underlie the Austin Chalk, have been and continue to be the predominant reservoir rocks in the field. Evidence indicates that faults provided vertical conduits for migration of Woodbine oil into the Austin Chalk where it was trapped along the structural crest. The most prolific Austin Chalk production is on the upthrown side of the main field fault, as is the Woodbine. The Austin Chalk is a soft, white to light gray limestone composed mostly of coccoliths with some pelecypods. Unlike the Austin Chalk in the Giddings and Pearsall fields, the chalk at Van was not as deeply buried and therefore did not become brittle and susceptible to tensional or cryptic fracturing. The shallow burial in the Van field was also important in that it allowed the chalk to retain primary microporosity. The production comes entirely from this primary porosity. In addition to the structural position and underlying oil source from the Woodbine, the depositional environment and associated lithofacies are also keys to the reservoir quality in the Van field as demonstrated by cores from the upthrown and downthrown (less productive) sides of the main field fault. It appears that at the time of Austin Chalk deposition, the main field fault was active and caused the upthrown side to be a structural high and a more agreeable environment for benthonic organisms such as pelecypods and worms. The resulting bioturbation enhanced the reservoir's permeability enough to allow migration and entrapment of the oil. Future success in exploration for analogous Austin Chalk reservoirs will require the combination of a favorable environment of deposition, a nearby Woodbine oil source, and a faulted trap that will provide the conduit for migration.

Lowe, J.T. (Unocal Corp., Houston, TX (USA))

1990-09-01

268

Helicopter Electromagnetic and Magnetic Survey Data and Maps, Seco Creek Area, Medina and Uvalade Counties, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic (HEM) survey was completed of a 209 square kilometer (81 square miles) area of the central Edwards aquifer. This open-file report is a release of the airborne geophysical data and a summary of the hydrologic application. The survey area was centered on the Valdina Farms sinkhole along the Seco Creek drainage in western Medina County, Texas. Flight lines were flown north south with three east west tie lines to aid in leveling the magnetic data. Additional lines were flown on each side of the Seco and Little Seco Creek drainages. A five kilometer (4 mile) extension of 15 lines was flown north of the main survey block centered on Seco Creek. This digital data release contains the flight line data, grids, and maps of the HEM survey data. The Edwards aquifer in this area consists of three hydrologic zones: catchment, recharge, and confined. The Glen Rose Formation is exposed in the catchment area. The recharge zone is situated in the Balcones fault zone where the Devils River Group of the Edwards aquifer has been exposed by normal faults. The magnetic data is not discussed in depth here, but does have high amplitude closed anomalies caused by shallow igneous intrusives. The Woodard Cave Fault that separates the recharge and catchment zones is in places associated with a weak linear magnetic low. The HEM data has been processed to produce apparent resistivities for each of the six EM coil pairs and frequencies. Maps of the apparent resistivity for the five horizontal coil pairs show that the catchment, recharge, and confined zones all have numerous linear features that are likely caused by structures, many of which have not been mapped. The distribution of high resistivity areas reflects the lithologic differences within the Trinity and Edwards aquifers.

Smith, Bruce D.; Smith, David V.; Hill, Patricia L.; Labson, Victor F.

2003-01-01

269

Draft environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas. Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 112). [Contains Glossary  

SciTech Connect

In February 1983, the US Department of Energy identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The potentially acceptable site was subsequently narrowed to an area of 9 square miles. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations are reported in this draft environmental assessment, which is being issued for public review and comment. The DOE findings and determinations that are based on these evaluations are preliminary and subject to public review and comment. A final EA will be prepared after considering the comments received. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this draft EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. This setting contains one other potentially acceptable site - the Swisher site. Although the Swisher site appears to be suitable for site characterization, DOE has concluded that the Deaf Smith site is the preferred site. The DOE finds that the site is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is proposing to nominate the Deaf Smith site as one of five sites suitable for characterization. Having compared the Deaf Smith site with the other four sites proposed for nomination, the DOE has determined that the Deaf Smith site is one of the three preferred sites for recommendation to the President as candidates for characterization.

Not Available

1984-12-01

270

Rail transportation corridor analysis report: Deaf Smith County location in the Palo Duro Basin, Texas  

SciTech Connect

An environmental data base was developed for the purpose of preliminary siting of potential rail access corridors between existing rail lines and the potential repository site in Deaf Smith County, Texas. The categories of the data base were environmental conditions considered significant in rail line construction and operation. These included land cover, population areas, slope, surface hydrology, cultivated prime agricultural lands, cultural features, and utility rights-of-way. The categories were divided into avoidance, constraint, and opportunity features, and the constraint features were then weighted for environmental impact potential. An environmental screening analysis using the computerized Geographical Information System (GIS) was then performed. The analysis involved applying the GIS overlay process to the various constraint data categories to produce a composite constraint map of the study area. The composite constraint map, color coded for various levels of constraint to corridor siting, was subsequently used as a guide for the selection of a series of alternative corridors. By means of a further application of GIS procedures, the corridor alternatives were statistically analyzed for adherence to corridor selection guidelines. In addition, a supplementary analysis was performed to compare the alternatives in terms of four impact categories: road crossings, construction costs, degree of land disruption, and population impact. The statistical and supplementary impact analyses led to a preliminary selection of a preferred corridor. The corridor assessment process indicated the importance of analyzing alternative trade-offs, as well as the need for more detailed investigation of certain conditions and a detailed comparison of alternatives prior to final corridor siting.

Not Available

1986-10-01

271

Queen Formation of Millard field, Precos County, Texas: its lithologic characteristics, environment of deposition, and reservoir petrophysics  

SciTech Connect

The Queen Formation is a sequence of interbedded siliciclastics, carbonate mudstones, and evaporites, that extend across a large area of the suubsurface Permian basin in west Texas and southeastern New Mexico. The authors present a description of the lithologic and diagenetic characteristics of the formation in Millard field, Pecos County, Texas, and propose a model for its depositional environment and reservoir formation. Production from the Queen Formation in the field is consistently from two eolian sandstone units, designated the Queen A and C, which can be correlated across the field area. SEM examination of these sandstones indicates a positive correlation between the amount of grain-lining, authigenic smectite and porosity, and concomitantly an inverse relationship between anhydrite cement content and porosity. The porosity of the sandstone reservoirs in the Queen is of secondary origin.

Mazzullo, J.; Williams, M.; Mazzullo, S.J.

1984-01-01

272

Spanish and English language usage by rural and urban Spanish-American families in two South Texas counties  

E-print Network

of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1967 Major Subject: Sociology SPANISH AND ENGLISH LANGUAGE USAGE BY RURAL AND URBAN SPANISH-AMERICAN FAMILIES IN TWO SOUTH TEXAS COUNTIES H Thesis by Mary Katherine Mahoney Approved as to style... structure 6 of the larger society. William Labov, "The Effect of Social Mobility on Linguistic ~ 9 6 'i, "g~g' I ' I ~I', I l. XXXVI, N . I (Bp ' g, 1966)N p. 186. 6 Fernando Penalosa and Edward C. McDonsghy "A Socio-Economic ', Cl Iyp I gy I N ' -I...

Mahoney, Mary Katherine

1967-01-01

273

Technical procedures for implementation of acoustics site studies, Deaf Smith County site, Texas: Environmental Field Program: Preliminary draft  

SciTech Connect

The purpose and scope of the technical procedure for processing data from the tethered meteorological system are covered. Definitions, interfaces, and concurrent data needs are also addressed. This technical procedure describes how to control, organize, verify, and archive tethered meteorological system data. These data will be received at the processing location from the field measurement location and are part of the characterization of the Deaf Smith County Site, Texas for the salt repository program. These measurements will be made in support of the sound propagation study and are a result of environmental data requirements for acoustics. 6 refs., 15 figs., 5 tabs.

Not Available

1987-09-01

274

CENSUS AND STATISTICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF SOIL AND WATER QUALITY AT ABANDONED AND OTHER CENTRALIZED AND COMMERCIAL DRILLING-FLUID DISPOSAL SITES IN LOUISIANA, NEW MEXICO, OKLAHOMA, AND TEXAS  

SciTech Connect

Commercial and centralized drilling-fluid disposal (CCDD) sites receive a portion of spent drilling fluids for disposal from oil and gas exploration and production (E&P) operations. Many older and some abandoned sites may have operated under less stringent regulations than are currently enforced. This study provides a census, compilation, and summary of information on active, inactive, and abandoned CCDD sites in Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas, intended as a basis for supporting State-funded assessment and remediation of abandoned sites. Closure of abandoned CCDD sites is within the jurisdiction of State regulatory agencies. Sources of data used in this study on abandoned CCDD sites mainly are permit files at State regulatory agencies. Active and inactive sites were included because data on abandoned sites are sparse. Onsite reserve pits at individual wells for disposal of spent drilling fluid are not part of this study. Of 287 CCDD sites in the four States for which we compiled data, 34 had been abandoned whereas 54 were active and 199 were inactive as of January 2002. Most were disposal-pit facilities; five percent were land treatment facilities. A typical disposal-pit facility has fewer than 3 disposal pits or cells, which have a median size of approximately 2 acres each. Data from well-documented sites may be used to predict some conditions at abandoned sites; older abandoned sites might have outlier concentrations for some metal and organic constituents. Groundwater at a significant number of sites had an average chloride concentration that exceeded nonactionable secondary drinking water standard of 250 mg/L, or a total dissolved solids content of >10,000 mg/L, the limiting definition for underground sources of drinking water source, or both. Background data were lacking, however, so we did not determine whether these concentrations in groundwater reflected site operations. Site remediation has not been found necessary to date for most abandoned CCDD sites; site assessments and remedial feasibility studies are ongoing in each State. Remediation alternatives addressed physical hazards and potential for groundwater transport of dissolved salt and petroleum hydrocarbons that might be leached from wastes. Remediation options included excavation of wastes and contaminated adjacent soils followed by removal to permitted disposal facilities or land farming if sufficient on-site area were available.

Alan R. Dutton; H. Seay Nance

2003-06-01

275

Estimating the number of men who have sex with men by race/ethnicity at the county level in Texas.  

PubMed

This analysis presents a method for estimating the population of men who have sex with men (MSM) at the county and metropolitan area level in Texas. Surveillance data consistently demonstrate that MSM experience a high burden of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Numerous studies have shown that MSM are also vulnerable to many other health concerns such as suicide, substance abuse, domestic violence and assault, homelessness, and mental illness. However, compilation of rates of HIV, STIs, and other health issues is dependent on estimation of population denominators. In the absence of systematic, consistent, and direct assessment of sexual orientation and gender identity in national surveys, it is difficult to estimate the size of at-risk populations. Previous estimates at the national and state level have been calculated using varied methodologies. However, to date, statewide estimates at the county level have only been produced for the state of Florida. County-level and metropolitan area estimates of MSM population were produced using three modified models developed by Lieb et al. These models used data on population and same-sex households from the US Census, along with estimates of sexual behavior from the National Survey on Family Growth. These models produce an estimate of 599,683 MSM in Texas (6.4 % of the adult male population). Metropolitan areas with the highest percentage of MSM population include Dallas and Austin (10.3 and 9.8 %, respectively). County-level estimates of MSM population range from 1.0 to 12.9 %. These local estimates are critical to targeting vulnerable populations and effective allocation of resources for prevention and treatment programs. PMID:25347955

Campagna, Jesse; Poe, Jonathon; Robbins, Ann; Rowlinson, Emily

2015-02-01

276

Land use/land cover in Swisher County and Deaf Smith County locations, Palo Duro Basin, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Agriculture is the major land use/land cover in the Swisher and Deaf Smith County locations. Most of the agricultural land is irrigated. Furrow, center pivot, and lateral-wheel irrigation systems are in common use. Rangeland is the second most abundant land use/land cover; it is typically associated with stream valleys and playas. The rangeland supports cattle, which are an important source of income. The main urban areas in or near the locations are Tulia and Happy, in Swisher County, and Hereford and Vega, in Deaf Smith County. Most of the land within the locations is privately owned - corporate and government ownership is extremely limited - and large portions are currently under lease for oil exploration. County and regional agencies have no authority to regulate land-use patterns in the locations, although the Panhandle Regional Planning Commission can provide guidance to local jurisdictions. Land use within the corporate limits and extraterritorial jurisdictions of Tulia and Hereford is controlled by zoning ordinances and subdivision regulations. According to projections for the locations, agriculture will remain the major land use in the foreseeable future. Dryland farming and rangeland will become more prevalent as irrigation costs increase and marginal areas are taken out of production.

Not Available

1984-12-01

277

Validating the Estimated Cost of Saving Water Through Infrastructure Rehabilitation in the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley (Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 1)  

E-print Network

SR- 2005-01 Validating the Estimated Cost of Saving Water Through Infrastructure Rehabilitation in the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley A Case Study Using Actual Construction Costs for the Curry Main Pipeline Project, Hidalgo... 2005 Validating the Estimated Cost of Saving Water Through Infrastructure Rehabilitation in the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley A Case Study Using Actual Construction Costs for the Curry Main Pipeline Project, Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 1...

Lacewell, R. D.; Rister, M.; Sturdivant, A. W.

278

Data collection and compilation for a geodatabase of groundwater, surface-water, water-quality, geophysical, and geologic data, Pecos County Region, Texas, 1930-2011  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Middle Pecos Groundwater Conservation District, Pecos County, City of Fort Stockton, Brewster County, and Pecos County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1, compiled groundwater, surface-water, water-quality, geophysical, and geologic data for site locations in the Pecos County region, Texas, and developed a geodatabase to facilitate use of this information. Data were compiled for an approximately 4,700 square mile area of the Pecos County region, Texas. The geodatabase contains data from 8,242 sampling locations; it was designed to organize and store field-collected geochemical and geophysical data, as well as digital database resources from the U.S. Geological Survey, Middle Pecos Groundwater Conservation District, Texas Water Development Board, Texas Commission on Environmental Quality,and numerous other State and local databases. The geodatabase combines these disparate database resources into a simple data model. Site locations are geospatially enabled and stored in a geodatabase feature class for cartographic visualization and spatial analysis within a Geographic Information System. The sampling locations are related to hydrogeologic information through the use of geodatabase relationship classes. The geodatabase relationship classes provide the ability to perform complex spatial and data-driven queries to explore data stored in the geodatabase.

Pearson, Daniel K.; Bumgarner, Johnathan R.; Houston, Natalie A.; Stanton, Gregory P.; Teeple, Andrew P.; Thomas, Jonathan V.

2012-01-01

279

A methodology to evaluate energy savings and NOx emissions reductions from the adoption of the 2000 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) to new residences in non-attainment and affected counties in Texas  

E-print Network

A METHODOLOGY TO EVALUATE ENERGY SAVINGS AND NOx EMISSIONS REDUCTIONS FROM THE ADOPTION OF THE 2000 INTERNATIONAL ENERGY CONSERVATION CODE (IECC) TO NEW RESIDENCES IN NON-ATTAINMENT AND AFFECTED COUNTIES IN TEXAS A Thesis by PILJAE IM... EMISSIONS REDUCTIONS FROM THE ADOPTION OF THE 2000 INTERNATIONAL ENERGY CONSERVATION CODE (IECC) TO NEW RESIDENCES IN NON-ATTAINMENT AND AFFECTED COUNTIES IN TEXAS A Thesis by PILJAE IM Submitted to Texas...

Im, Piljae

2004-09-30

280

THE OKLAHOMA MESONET  

EPA Science Inventory

The Oklahoma Mesonet, operated and maintained by the Oklahoma Climatological Survey, is Oklahoma's premier climatological data collection system. For the area covered, which includes the entire state, no other system within the United States or internationally has the degree of ...

281

ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN TWO MOSQUITO POPULATIONS AND WEST NILE VIRUS IN HARRIS COUNTY, TEXAS, 2003061  

PubMed Central

Associations between Culex quinquefasciatus, Aedes albopictus and West Nile virus (WNV) activity, temperature, and rainfall in Harris County, Texas 200306 are discussed. Human cases were highly correlated to Cx. quinquefasciatus (r = 0.87) and Ae. albopictus (r = 0.78) pools, blue jays (r = 0.83), and Ae. albopictus collected (r = 0.71), but not Cx. quinquefasciatus collected (r = 0.45). Human cases were associated with temperature (r = 0.71), not rainfall (r = 0.29), whereas temperature correlated with Ae. albopictus and Cx. quinquefasciatus collections (r = 0.88 and 0.70, respectively) and Cx. quinquefasciatus pools (r = 0.75), but not Ae. albopictus pools (r = 0.55). Both species (collections and pools) and blue jays were weakly correlated (r ? 0.41) with rainfall, but blue jays were better correlated with Cx. quinquefasciatus pools (r = 0.87), compared with Ae. albopictus pools (r = 0.67), Ae. albopictus collections (r = 0.69), and Cx. quinquefasciatus collections (r = 0.46). Peak minimum infection rate for Cx. quinquefasciatus (4.55), and Ae. albopictus (4.41) was in August with highest human cases (17.87), blue jays (55.58), and temperature (29.01C). Between both species, blood meal analysis indicated 68.18% of Cx. quinquefasciatus mammalian hosts were dog, while 22.72% were human, whereas Ae. albopictus had higher human (44.44%) but fewer dog hosts (22.22%). Ten bird species were identified as hosts for Cx. quinquefasciatus, with northern cardinal and blue jay representing 26.66% and 20.00%, respectively. No bird feeding activity was observed in Ae. albopictus. The earliest and latest human blood meal occurred in May (Ae. albopictus) and November (Cx. quinquefasciatus); 66.66% of human host identifications between both species occurred in OctoberNovember, after the seasonal human case peak. Based upon our data, WNV activity in both mosquito species warrants further investigation of their individual roles in WNV ecology within this region. PMID:17939505

DENNETT, JAMES A.; BALA, ADILELKHIDIR; WUITHIRANYAGOOL, TAWEESAK; RANDLE, YVONNE; SARGENT, CHRISTOPHER B.; GUZMAN, HILDA; SIIRIN, MARINA; HASSAN, HASSAN K.; REYNA-NAVA, MARTIN; UNNASCH, THOMAS R.; TESH, ROBERT B.; PARSONS, RAY E.; BUENO, RUDY

2008-01-01

282

Evaluation of Hydraulically Significant Discontinuities in Dockum Group Mudrocks in Andrews County, Texas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Triassic mudrocks of the Dockum Group (Cooper Canyon Formation) host four, below-grade landfills at the Waste Control Specialists (WSC) site in Andrews County, Texas, including: a hazardous waste landfill and three radioactive waste landfills. At the study site, the Dockum consists of mudrocks with sparse siltstone/sandstone interbeds that developed in a semi-arid environment from an ephemeral meandering fluvial system. Sedimentary studies reveal that the mudrocks are ancient floodplain vertisols (soils with swelling clays) and siltstone/sandstone interbeds are fluvial channel deposits that were frequently subaerially exposed. Rock discontinuities, including fractures and syndepositional slickensided surfaces, were mapped during the excavation of the WCS radioactive waste landfills along vertical faces prepared by the construction contractor. Face locations were selected to insure a sampled area with nearly complete vertical coverage for each landfill. Individual discontinuities were mapped and their strike, dip, length, roughness, curvature, staining, and evidence of displacement were described. In the three radioactive waste disposal landfills, over 1750 discontinuities across 35 excavated faces were mapped and described, where each face was nominally 8 to 10 ft tall and 50 to 100 ft long. Genetic units related to paleosol development were identified. On average, the orientation of the discontinuities was horizontal, and no other significant trends were observed. Mapping within the landfill excavations shows that most discontinuities within Dockum rocks are horizontal, concave upward, slickensided surfaces that developed in the depositional environment, as repeated wetting and drying cycles led to shrinking and swelling of floodplain vertisols. Fractures that showed staining (a possible indicator of past or present hydraulic activity) are rare, vertical to near-vertical, and occur mainly in, and adjacent to, mechanically stiff siltstone and sandstone interbeds. No interconnected fracture networks were observed during mapping. A series of pressurized air tests conducted in three pairs of vertical and three pairs of inclined boreholes were tested at depths, ranging from 40 to 215 feet below ground surface, also showed no evidence of fracture interconnection. Genetic units generally consist of fining upward sequences that show increasing pedogenic alteration upward. Arcuate, slickensided discontinuities are more abundant near the top of genetic units, while stained fractures are more common in the more mechanically competent materials near the base of genetic units. A statistical analysis of fractures and discontinuities revealed limited differences between most genetic units. A series of discrete fracture network models were developed to evaluate the uncertainty in our fracture observations. Slickensided discontinuities showing no evidence of staining or past fluid movement were excluded from the analysis. Monte Carlo simulations show no continuous fracture interconnections across the landfill depth intervals.

Holt, R. M.; Kuszmaul, J. S.; Cao, S.; Powers, D. W.

2013-12-01

283

Consultation draft: Site characterization plan overview, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 113)  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing a site characterization plan for the candidate site in Deaf Smith County, Texas. The DOE has provided, for information and review, a consultation draft of the plan to the State of Texas and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The site characterization plan is a lengthy document that describes in considerable detail the program that will be conducted to characterize the geologic, hydrologic, and other conditions relevant to the suitability of the site for a repository. The overview presented here consists of brief summaries of important topics covered in the consultation draft of the site characterization plan; it is not a substitute for the site characterization plan. The arrangement of the overview is similar to that of the plan itself, with brief descriptions of the repository system - the site, the repository, and the waste package - preceding the discussion of the characterization program to be carried out at the Deaf Smith County site. It is intended primarily for the management staff of organizations involved in the DOE's repository program or other persons who might wish to understand the general scope of the site-characterization program, the activities to be conducted, and the facilities to be constructed rather than the technical details of site characterization. 15 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1988-01-01

284

Meteorological and air quality characterization of the Deaf Smith and Swisher County locations in the Palo Duro Basin, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The meteorological and air quality characteristics of the Permian Basin locations in Deaf Smith County and Swisher County, Texas, are described using data from eight climatological stations in the vicinity. Meteorological conditions are reasonably represented by these data because of the generally flat terrain over the area and the geographical proximity of the climatological stations to the locations. Information regarding atmospheric transport and dispersion conditions is derived from data for the period 1976 to 1980 provided by the National Weather Service station at Amarillo, Texas. On an annual basis, southerly winds predominate and the average wind speed is 6.1 m/s (13.7 mph). The analysis of dispersion climatology indicates that neutral atmospheric stability also predominates over the year. This, in combination with high average wind speeds, is characteristic of relatively good dispersion conditions in the area. Significant topographic features are far enough away from the locations that their effects on local dispersion conditions are negligible. The closest available air quality data were collected around population centers and may not accurately represent conditions at these rural and undeveloped locations. The area has been declared ''attaining'' for particulate and sulfur dioxide standards and ''cannot be classified as better than ambient standard'' for nitrogen oxides, ozone, and carbon monoxide. 49 references, 5 figures, 18 tables.

Not Available

1984-03-01

285

An insoluble residue analysis of a section of the Glen Rose formation in the vicinity of the type locality, Hood County, Texas  

E-print Network

AN INSOLUBLE RESIDUE ANALTBIS OF A SECTION OF THE GLEN HOSE FOENATIUN IN TH?' VICINITI OF THE TTPE LOCALITT HOOD COUllTT, TEXAS Jasper Neaten Fallis ~ ~ Submitted to the Graduate School oi' the Agricultural and Nechanioal College oi' Texas... OF THE TYPE LOCALITY, ROOD COUNTY, TEXAS ABET RACT An insoluble residue analysis vas performed on a measured section of the Glen Rose 11mestone and parts of the Basal Trinity and Paluxy sands as exposed 1n the vicinity of the bridge over the Paluxy river...

Fallis, Jasper Newton

1958-01-01

286

Certification Standards Adopted by the Oklahoma State Board of Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document presents the standards adopted by the Oklahoma State Board of Education for qualification and certification of persons for instructional, supervisory, and administrative positions and services in Oklahoma public schools. Included are rules and regulations governing the issuance and revocation of certificates for county

Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

287

Evaluation of groundwater and surface-water interactions in the Caddo Nation Tribal Jurisdictional Area, Caddo County, Oklahoma, 2010-13  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Streamflows, springs, and wetlands are important natural and cultural resources to the Caddo Nation. Consequently, the Caddo Nation is concerned about the vulnerability of the Rush Springs aquifer to overdrafting and whether the aquifer will continue to be a viable source of water to tribal members and other local residents in the future. Interest in the long-term viability of local water resources has resulted in ongoing development of a comprehensive water plan by the Caddo Nation. As part of a multiyear project with the Caddo Nation to provide information and tools to better manage and protect water resources, the U.S. Geological Survey studied the hydraulic connection between the Rush Springs aquifer and springs and streams overlying the aquifer. The Caddo Nation Tribal Jurisdictional Area is located in southwestern Oklahoma, primarily in Caddo County. Underlying the Caddo Nation Tribal Jurisdictional Area is the Permian-age Rush Springs aquifer. Water from the Rush Springs aquifer is used for irrigation, public, livestock and aquaculture, and other supply purposes. Groundwater from the Rush Springs aquifer also is withdrawn by domestic (self-supplied) wells, although domestic use was not included in the water-use summary in this report. Perennial streamflow in many streams and creeks overlying the Rush Springs aquifer, such as Cobb Creek, Lake Creek, and Willow Creek, originates from springs and seeps discharging from the aquifer. This report provides information on the evaluation of groundwater and surface-water resources in the Caddo Nation Jurisdictional Area, and in particular, information that describes the hydraulic connection between the Rush Springs aquifer and springs and streams overlying the aquifer. This report also includes data and analyses of base flow, evidence for groundwater and surface-water interactions, locations of springs and wetland areas, groundwater flows interpreted from potentiometric-surface maps, and hydrographs of water levels monitored in the Caddo Nation Tribal Jurisdictional Area from 2010 to 2013. Flow in streams overlying the Rush Springs aquifer, on average, were composed of 50 percent base flow in most years. Monthly mean base flow appeared to maintain streamflows throughout each year, but periods of zero flow were documented in daily hydrographs at each measured site, typically in the summer months. A pneumatic slug-test technique was used at 15 sites to determine the horizontal hydraulic conductivity of streambed sediments in streams overlying the Rush Springs aquifer. Converting horizontal hydraulic conductivities (Kh) from the slug-test analyses to vertical hydraulic conductivities (Kv) by using a ratio of Kv/Kh = 0.1 resulted in estimates of vertical streambed hydraulic conductivity ranging from 0.1 to 8.6 feet per day. Data obtained from a hydraulic potentiomanometer in streambed sediments and streams in August 2012 indicate that water flow was from the streambed sediments to the stream (gaining) at 6 of 15 sites, and that water flow was from the stream to the streambed sediments (losing) at 9 of 15 sites. The groundwater and surface-water interaction data collected at the Cobb Creek near Eakly, Okla., streamflow gaging station (07325800), indicate that the bedrock groundwater, alluvial groundwater, and surface-water resources are closely connected. Because of this hydrologic connection, large perennial streams in the study area may change from gaining to losing streams in the summer. The timing and severity of this change from a gaining to a losing condition probably is affected by the local or regional withdrawal of groundwater for irrigation in the summer growing season. Wells placed closer to streams have a greater and more immediate effect on alluvial groundwater levels and stream stages than wells placed farther from streams. Large-capacity irrigation wells, even those completed hundreds of feet below land surface in the bedrock aquifer, can induce surface-water flow from nearby streams by lowering alluvial groundwater levels below the stream altitude. Twenty-five ne

Mashburn, Shana L.; Smith, S. Jerrod

2014-01-01

288

Estimation of volume and mass and of changes in volume and mass of selected chat piles in the Picher mining district, Ottawa County, Oklahoma, 2005-10  

USGS Publications Warehouse

From the 1890s through the 1970s the Picher mining district in northeastern Ottawa County, Oklahoma, was the site of mining and processing of lead and zinc ore. When mining ceased in about 1979, as much as 165300 million tons of mine tailings, locally referred to as chat, remained in the Picher mining district. Since 1979, some chat piles have been mined for aggregate materials and have decreased in volume and mass. Currently (2013), the land surface in the Picher mining district is covered by thousands of acres of chat, much of which remains on Indian trust land owned by allottees. The Bureau of Indian Affairs manages these allotted lands and oversees the sale and removal of chat from these properties. To help the Bureau of Indian Affairs better manage the sale and removal of chat, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Bureau of Indian Affairs, estimated the 2005 and 2010 volumes and masses of selected chat piles remaining on allotted lands in the Picher mining district. The U.S. Geological Survey also estimated the changes in volume and mass of these chat piles for the period 2005 through 2010. The 2005 and 2010 chat-pile volume and mass estimates were computed for 34 selected chat piles on 16 properties in the study area. All computations of volume and mass were performed on individual chat piles and on groups of chat piles in the same property. The Sooner property had the greatest estimated volume (4.644 million cubic yards) and mass (5.253 0.473 million tons) of chat in 2010. Five of the selected properties (Sooner, Western, Lawyers, Skelton, and St. Joe) contained estimated chat volumes exceeding 1 million cubic yards and estimated chat masses exceeding 1 million tons in 2010. Four of the selected properties (Lucky Bill Humbah, Ta Mee Heh, Bird Dog, and St. Louis No. 6) contained estimated chat volumes of less than 0.1 million cubic yards and estimated chat masses of less than 0.1 million tons in 2010. The total volume of all selected chat piles was estimated to be 18.073 million cubic yards in 2005 and 16.171 million cubic yards in 2010. The total mass of all selected chat piles was estimated to be 20.445 1.840 million tons in 2005 and 18.294 1.646 million tons in 2010. All of the selected chat piles decreased in volume and mass for the period 2005 through 2010. Chat piles CP022 (Ottawa property) and CP013 (Sooner property) had some within-property chat-pile redistribution, with both chat piles having net decreases in volume and mass for the period 2005 through 2010. The Sooner property and the St. Joe property had the greatest volume (and mass) changes, with 1.266 million cubic yards and 0.217 million cubic yards (1.432 0.129 million tons and 0.246 0.022 million tons) of chat being removed, respectively. The chat removed from the Sooner and St. Joe properties accounts for about 78 percent of the chat removed from all selected chat piles and properties. The total volume and mass removed from all selected chat piles for the period 2005 through 2010 were estimated to be 1.902 million cubic yards and 2.151 0.194 million tons, respectively.

Smith, S. Jerrod

2013-01-01

289

Petroleum potential of two sites in Deaf Smith and Swisher Counties, Texas Panhandle: Volume 1: Technical report  

SciTech Connect

This is the third in a series of regional geologic studies to assess the petroleum resources of two potentially acceptable sites under study for a nuclear waste disposal facility. Site 1 is in northeastern Deaf Smith County, Texas, and Site 2 is in northeastern Swisher County, Texas. Although potential reservoir zones are present under Site 1, the likelihood of hydrocarbon charge and structural or stratigraphic entrapment is low. The probability of a commercial petroleum discovery is estimated at 1:1000, and expected net present value of potential production is about $700,000. Little future industry drilling activity is foreseen around Site 1. Five potential reservoir zones are present under Site 2, and some may contain hydrocarbons. Anticlines are adjacent to Site 2, and some may contain hydrocarbons. Anticlines are adjacent to Site 2 on the northeast, southeast, and northwest, but the middle of the acreage block is synclinal, and its petroleum potential is very low. Discovery probability of the structures adjacent to Site 2 is higher, but the chance of developing commercial production is only about 2:100. Such accumulations might extend into the northeast and southeast corners of the block; expected net present value of such conjectured reserves is about $1,100,000 and $650,000, respectively. Continued industry activity pursuant to these three structures is expected, including seismic surveys and drilling. Considering the potential loss of petroleum resources through withdrawal of acreage from exploration, and the possibility of adjacent drilling, Site 1 in Deaf Smith County is clearly preferable for location of the proposed nuclear waste disposal facility.

Rose, P.R.

1986-09-01

290

Educational programs of the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service are open to all people without regard to race, color, sex, disability, religion, age, or national origin. The Texas A&M University System, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the County Comm  

E-print Network

Educational programs of the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service are open to all people without System, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the County Commissioners Courts of Texas Cooperating. What: http://walkacrosstexas.tamu.edu/ or contact your local County Extension Agent. Steps for Teachers

291

Educational programs of the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service are open to all people without regard to race, color, sex, disability, religion, age, or national origin. The Texas A&M University System, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the County Comm  

E-print Network

Educational programs of the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service are open to all people without System, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the County Commissioners Courts of Texas Cooperating What and videos visit: http://walkacrosstexas.tamu.edu/ or contact your local County Extension Agent. Steps

292

75 FR 45695 - Final Federal Agency Actions on Trans-Texas Corridor 35 (TTC-35) in Texas  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Administration Final Federal Agency Actions on Trans-Texas Corridor 35 (TTC-35) in Texas AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA...transportation project, TTC-35, extending from the Texas- Oklahoma line to the City of Laredo,...

2010-08-03

293

Geologic framework, structure, and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Knippa Gap area in eastern Uvalde and western Medina Counties, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Edwards aquifer is the primary source of potable water for the San Antonio area in south-central Texas. The Knippa Gap was postulated to channel or restrict flow in the Edwards aquifer in eastern Uvalde County, and its existence was based on a series of numerical simulations of groundwater flow in the aquifer. To better understand the function of the area known as the Knippa Gap as it pertains to its geology and structure, the geologic framework, structure, and hydrogeologic characteristics of the area were evaluated by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-Fort Worth District. The principal structural feature in the San Antonio area is the Balcones Fault Zone, which is the result of Miocene age faulting. In Medina County, the faulting of the Balcones Fault Zone has produced a relay-ramp structure that dips to the southwest from the Edwards aquifer recharge zone and extends westward and below land surface from Seco Creek. Groundwater flow paths in the Edwards aquifer are influenced by faulting and geologic structure. Some faults act as barriers to groundwater flow paths where the aquifer is offset by 50 percent or more and result in flow moving parallel to the fault. The effectiveness of a fault as a barrier to flow changes as the amount of fault displacement changes. The structurally complex area of the Balcones Fault Zone contains relay ramps, which form in extensional fault systems to allow for deformation changes along the fault block. In Medina County, the faulting of the Balcones Fault Zone has produced a relay-ramp structure that dips to the southwest from the Edwards aquifer recharge zone. Groundwater moving down the relay ramp in northern Medina County flows downgradient (downdip) to the structural low (trough) from the northeast to the southwest. In Uvalde County, the beds dip from a structural high known as the Uvalde Salient. This results in groundwater moving from the structural high and downgradient (dip) towards a structural low (trough) to the northeast. These two opposing structural dips result in a subsurface structural low (trough) locally referred to as the Knippa Gap. This trough is located in eastern Uvalde County beneath the towns of Knippa and Sabinal. By using data that were compiled and collected for this study and previous studies, a revised map was constructed depicting the geologic framework, structure, and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Knippa Gap area in eastern Uvalde and western Medina Counties, Tex. The map also shows the interpreted structural dip directions and interpreted location of a structural low (trough) in the area known as the Knippa Gap.

Clark, Allan K.; Pedraza, Diana E.; Morris, Robert R.

2013-01-01

294

Extension Programs serve people of all ages regardless of race, color, religion, disability or national origin. The Texas A&M University System, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the County Courts of Texas cooperating  

E-print Network

Extension Programs serve people of all ages regardless of race, color, religion, disability or national origin. The Texas A&M University System, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the County Courts? YES NO Correction taken #12;Extension Programs serve people of all ages regardless of race

295

An ecological study examining the correlation of end-stage renal disease and ground water heavy metal content in Texas counties  

E-print Network

An ecological study was conducted to examine the correlation of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and the ground water heavy metal level of lead, arsenic, cadmium, mercury and the cumulative level of all four metals in Texas counties. The heavy meal...

Bishop, Scott Alan

1999-01-01

296

Tight-Gas-Sands Research Program: field operations and analysis. Cooperative-well report, Arkla Exploration, T. P. Scott No. 5, Harrison County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Arkla Exploration T.P. Scott No. 5 in Waskom Field, Harrison County, Texas was drilled in May 1986. The well was cored and logged in the Travis Peak formation, and, using the GRI Mobile Testing and Control Facility, The authors monitored the pre-fracture test and the fracture treatment in the Cotton Valley formation. They combined the analyses from GRI's contractors

S. A. Holditch; B. M. Robinson; W. S. Whitehead

1987-01-01

297

SHIGA-TOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI (STEC) O157:H7 INFECTIONS AMONG LIVESTOCK EXHIBITORS AND VISITORS AT A TEXAS COUNTY FAIR  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

We report an agricultural fair-associated shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (STEC O157) outbreak that was unusual in that it affected both livestock exhibitors and visitors. Twenty-five cases of STEC O157 infection were detected after the Fort Bend County Fair in Rosenberg, Texas, which ran f...

298

An evaluation of a culturally sensitive educational program for low economic level Hispanics, Hidalgo County, Texas  

E-print Network

The purpose of this evaluation research was to assess the effectiveness of a pilot project designed to address the problems facing the Hispanic community. The Una Vida Mejor (UVM) pilot project developed by the Texas Agricultural Extension Service...

Abella, Meghan Ann

1995-01-01

299

Hydrologic impacts of mechanical shearing of Ashe juniper in Coryell County, Texas  

E-print Network

vegetation is composed of sideoats grama (Bouteloua curtipendula), silver bluestem (Bothriochloa laguroides), vine-mesquite (Panicum obtusum), Texas wintergrass (Stipa leucotricha) and Canada and Virginia wildrye (Elymus canadensis and E. virginicus...

Greer, Courtney Hale

2006-10-30

300

Texas County Extension Agents Perceptions of the Effectiveness of Using Facebook to Communicate with Constituents  

E-print Network

, and perceptions using social media, Facebook in particular, to communicate with constituents. The participants in the study were a randomly selected group of Texas extension agents. A web-based questionnaire was used to measure the perceived level of confidence...

Lewis, Lacey

2014-01-08

301

Hydrogeology of the Piedmont Springs National Historic Site Grimes County, Texas  

E-print Network

of the confederate currency (Bond, 1977). Piedmont Springs represents an early Texas business enterprise which thrived prior to and during the Civil War. The Piedmont Springs National Historic Site consists of approximately 11. 5 acres, with three existing...

Waclawczyk, Randy R.

1989-01-01

302

Interpretation of the Lewisville sequence, Van Oil Field, Van Zandt County, Texas  

E-print Network

. The stratigraphy of the basin is similar to that of the entire Gulf Coast province (Figure 2) with the main exception being that the sedimentary sequences which have accumulated in the basin are thicker for almost every depositional epoch (Oliver, 1971). Abun... and other updip producing areas are shown. Modified from Oliver (1971) and Foss (1978) Stratigraphic column for the subsurface of East Texas. Modified from Murray (1961) and Nichols (1964). Paleogeographic map of East Texas for lower Gulf- ian time...

Ueckert, John Fant

1981-01-01

303

Educational programs of the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service are open to all people without regard to race, color, sex, disability, religion, age, or national origin. The Texas A&M University System, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the County Comm  

E-print Network

Educational programs of the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service are open to all people without System, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the County Commissioners Courts of Texas Cooperating$, is an enewsletter from the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service. Issued on the second and fourth Mondays

304

Educational programs of the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service are open to all people without regard to race, color, sex, disability, religion, age, or national origin. The Texas A&M University System, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the County Comm  

E-print Network

Educational programs of the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service are open to all people without System, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the County Commissioners Courts of Texas Cooperating Health & AgriLife Extension Health Specialist Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service Janet M. Pollard, M.P.H. Agri

305

Educational programs of the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service are open to all people without regard to race, color, sex, disability, religion, age, or national origin. The Texas A&M University System, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the County Comm  

E-print Network

Educational programs of the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service are open to all people without System, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the County Commissioners Courts of Texas Cooperating conferences provided by Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service (circle response). Yes No Not Sure 2. Compared

306

Educational programs of the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service are open to all people without regard to race, color, sex, disability, religion, age, or national origin. The Texas A&M University System, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the County Comm  

E-print Network

Educational programs of the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service are open to all people without System, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the County Commissioners Courts of Texas Cooperating February Report Dispute Errors on Credit Reports Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Resources Credit Report Errors

307

Educational programs of the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service are open to all people without regard to race, color, sex, disability, religion, age, or national origin. The Texas A&M University System, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the County Comm  

E-print Network

Educational programs of the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service are open to all people without System, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the County Commissioners Courts of Texas Cooperating from the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service. Issued on the second and fourth Mondays of the month

308

Educational programs of the Texas AgriLife Extension Service are open to all people without regard to race, color, sex, disability, religion, age, or national origin. The Texas A&M University System, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the County Commissi  

E-print Network

Educational programs of the Texas AgriLife Extension Service are open to all people without regard.S. Department of Agriculture, and the County Commissioners Courts of Texas Cooperating Medicare Preventive programs of the Texas AgriLife Extension Service are open to all people without regard to race, color, sex

309

Oklahoma Agriculture Agriculture  

E-print Network

's Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources promotes sustainable land use and embraces the landOklahoma Agriculture Agriculture #12;Oklahoma Agriculture 2011Oklahoma Agriculture 2011 Oklahoma agriculture affects each of us every day, young and old, whether we live in largely rural regions or the state

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

310

A multiphased approach to groundwater investigations for the Edwards-Trinity and related aquifers in the Pecos County region, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Edwards-Trinity aquifer is a vital groundwater resource for agricultural, industrial, and public supply uses in the Pecos County region of western Texas. Resource managers would like to understand the future availability of water in the Edwards-Trinity aquifer in the Pecos County region and the effects of the possible increase or temporal redistribution of groundwater withdrawals. To provide resource managers with that information, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Middle Pecos Groundwater Conservation District, Pecos County, City of Fort Stockton, Brewster County, and Pecos County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1, completed a three-phase study of the Edwards-Trinity and related aquifers in parts of Brewster, Jeff Davis, Pecos, and Reeves Counties. The first phase was to collect groundwater, surface-water, geochemical, geophysical, and geologic data in the study area and develop a geodatabase of historical and collected data. Data compiled in the first phase of the study were used to develop the conceptual model in the second phase of the study. The third phase of the study involved the development and calibration of a numerical groundwater-flow model of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer to simulate groundwater conditions based on various groundwater-withdrawal scenarios. Analysis of well, geophysical, geochemical, and hydrologic data contributed to the development of the conceptual model in phase 1. Lithologic information obtained from well reports and geophysical data was used to describe the hydrostratigraphy and structural features of the groundwater-flow system, and aquifer-test data were used to estimate aquifer hydraulic properties. Geochemical data were used to evaluate groundwater-flow paths, water-rock interaction, aquifer interaction, and the mixing of water from different sources in phase 2. Groundwater-level data also were used to evaluate aquifer interaction, as well as to develop a potentiometric-surface map, delineate regional groundwater divides, and describe regional groundwater-flow paths. During phase 3, the data collected and compiled along with the conceptual information in the study area were incorporated into a numerical groundwater-flow model to evaluate the sustainability of recent (2008) and projected water-use demands on groundwater resources in the study area.

Thomas, Jonathan V.

2014-01-01

311

The Relationship between Land Use and Temperature Change in Dallas County, Texas  

E-print Network

This study examines the relationship between land use and temperature change in Dallas County, TX. The purpose of this research is to analyze the relationship between temperature and land use and to identify the primary factors contributing...

Kim, Hee Ju

2010-10-12

312

Trends in Texas youth livestock exhibition and County Extension agent perceptions and adoption of quality counts  

E-print Network

Each year, County Extension Agents dedicate many hours toward educational programs to serve clientele. One of the largest programs in 4-H is the youth livestock project. Livestock projects take a significant amount of time and there is a variety...

Coufal, Dustin Wayne

2009-05-15

313

Funding for Local Government and Schools in Rural Oklahoma. ERS Staff Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Oil, gas, and agriculture are the bases of rural Oklahoma's economy, and income from these sectors varied widely during the 1980s. This study investigated revenue sources and the effects of changing revenues for county and town governments and school systems in 36 rural Oklahoma counties. Major sources of local revenue were sales taxes, property

Sloggett, Gordon; Doeksen, Gerald

314

Environmental assessment for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Big Hill facility storage of commercial crude oil project, Jefferson County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Big Hill SPR facility located in Jefferson County, Texas has been a permitted operating crude oil storage site since 1986 with benign environmental impacts. However, Congress has not authorized crude oil purchases for the SPR since 1990, and six storage caverns at Big Hill are underutilized with 70 million barrels of available storage capacity. On February 17, 1999, the Secretary of Energy offered the 70 million barrels of available storage at Big Hill for commercial use. Interested commercial users would enter into storage contracts with DOE, and DOE would receive crude oil in lieu of dollars as rental fees. The site could potentially began to receive commercial oil in May 1999. This Environmental Assessment identified environmental changes that potentially would affect water usage, power usage, and air emissions. However, as the assessment indicates, changes would not occur to a major degree affecting the environment and no long-term short-term, cumulative or irreversible impacts have been identified.

NONE

1999-03-01

315

Evaluation of geophysical techniques for identifying fractures in program wells in Deaf Smith County, Texas: Revision 1, Topical report  

SciTech Connect

Quantitative information about the presence and orientation of fractures is essential for the understanding of the geomechanical and geohydrological behavior of rocks. This report evaluates various borehole geophysical techniques for characterizing fractures in three Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (CRWM) Program test wells in the Palo Duro Basin in Deaf Smith County, Texas. Emphasis has been placed on the Schlumberger Fracture Identification Log (FIL) which detects vertical fractures and provides data for calculation of orientation. Depths of FIL anomalies were compared to available core. It was found that the application of FIL results to characterize fracture frequency or orientation is inappropriate at this time. The uncertainties associated with the FIL information render the information unreliable. No geophysical logging tool appears to unequivocally determine the location and orientation of fractures in a borehole. Geologic mapping of the exploratory shafts will ultimately provide the best data on fracture frequency and orientation at the proposed repository site. 22 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Gillespie, R.P.; Siminitz, P.C.

1987-08-01

316

Monocrotophpos and dicrotophos residues in birds as a result of misuse of organophosphates in Matagorda County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

About 1100 birds of 12 species died from organophosphate poisoning in Matagorda County on the Texas Gulf Coast in March and May 1982. Birds died from feeding on rice seed that was illegally treated with dicrotophos or monocrotophos and placed near rice fields as bait to attract and kill birds. Brain acetylcholinesterase inhibition of affected birds averaged 87% (range 82-89%), and contents of gastrointestinal tracts contained residues of dicrotophos (5.6-14 ppm) or monocrotophos (2.1-13 ppm). Rice seed collected at mortality sites contained 210 ppm dicrotophos or 950 ppm monocrotophos. Mortality from dicrotophos poisoning continued for almost 3 weeks. The practice of illegally treating rice seed with either of these 2 organophosphates appears to be infrequent but widespread at present.

Flickinger, Edward L.; White, D.H.; Mitchell, C.A.; Lamont, T.G.

1984-01-01

317

Groundwater levels and water-quality observations pertaining to the Austin Group, Bexar County, Texas, 2009-11  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the San Antonio Water System, examined groundwater-level altitudes (groundwater levels) and water-quality data pertaining to the Austin Group in Bexar County, Texas, during 200911. Hydrologic data collected included daily mean groundwater levels collected at seven sites in the study area. Water-quality samples were collected at six sites in the study area and analyzed for major ions, nutrients, trace elements, organic carbon, and stable isotopes. The resulting datasets were examined for similarities between sites as well as similarities to data from the Edwards aquifer in Bexar County, Tex. Similarities in the groundwater levels between sites completed in the Austin Group and site J (State well AY-68-37-203; hereafter referred to as the Bexar County index well) which is completed in the Edwards aquifer might be indicative of groundwater interactions between the two hydrologic units as a result of nearby faulting or conduit flow. The groundwater levels measured at the sites in the study area exhibited varying degrees of similarity to the Bexar County index well. Groundwater levels at site A (State well AY-68-36-136) exhibited similar patterns as those at the Bexar County index well, but the hydrographs of groundwater levels were different in shape and magnitude in response to precipitation and groundwater pumping, and at times slightly offset in time. The groundwater level patterns measured at sites C, D, and E (State wells AY-68-29-513, AY-68-29-514, and AY-68-29-512, respectively) were not similar to those measured at the Bexar County index well. Groundwater levels at site F (State well AY-68-29-819) exhibited general similarities as those observed at the Bexar County index well; however, there were several periods of notable groundwater-level drawdowns at site F that were not evident at the Bexar County index well. These drawdowns were likely because of pumping from the well at site F. The groundwater levels at sites H and I (State wells AY-68-37-205 and AY-68-29-932, respectively) exhibited similar patterns as those at the Bexar County index well (coefficient of determination [R2] of 0.99 at both wells), indicating there might be some degree of hydrologic connectivity to the Edwards aquifer. In general, the water-quality data indicated that the samples were representative of a calcium carbonate dominated system. The major ion chemistry and relations between magnesium to calcium molar ratios and 87Sr/86Sr isotopic ratios of samples collected from sites H and I indicated that the groundwater from these sites was most geochemically similar to groundwater collected from site B (State well AY-68-36-134), which is representative of groundwater in the Edwards aquifer. Of the sites sampled in this study, there appears to be varying hydrologic connectivity between groundwater from wells completed in the Austin Group and the Edwards aquifer.

Banta, J.R.; Clark, A.K.

2012-01-01

318

Comparisons of cat and dog rabies vaccination rates between epizootic to non-epizootic counties and urban to rural counties in the state of Texas  

E-print Network

come into contact with wildlife. This study was undertaken compare the vaccination rates of cats and dogs the epizootic counties the non-epizootic counties to see if the rabies increase vaccination of cats and dogs the epizootic counties. Comparisons...

Martin-Harborth, Michelle Lynn

1999-01-01

319

Public health assessment for Rockwool Industries, Belton, Bell County, Texas, Region 6, CERCLIS number TXD066379645. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Rockwool Industries, Inc. (RWI) National Priorities List site is a 100 acre site one-mile east of downtown Belton in Bell County, Texas. The Facility manufactured two types of mineral wool insulation: Blow wool and batt wool. Three main contaminant source areas have been identified at the site. Source 1, in the middle portion of the site, includes contaminated soil associated with the South Shot Pile. Source 2, in the northern portion of the site, includes contaminated soils associated with the Cemetery Shot Pile. Source 3, in the northwest portion of the site includes contaminated soils associated with the Cemetery Shot Pile. The primary waste types at the site include spent iron shot and baghouse dust. Secondary waste types include boiler blowdown water, stormwater runoff, recovered groundwater, and bricks. The Texas Department of Health (TDH) and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) evaluated the environmental information available for the site and identified several exposure situations for evaluation. These exposure situations include possible contact with site contaminants in the soil, surface water, sediment, and groundwater. The potential for exposure to site contaminants through the food chain was also examined. A brief review of the evaluation, organized by hazard category, is presented.

NONE

1999-08-03

320

Low-level arsenic exposure, AS3MT gene polymorphism and cardiovascular diseases in rural Texas counties.  

PubMed

Most Americans living in rural areas use groundwater for drinking. Exposure to low-level (around the current U.S. standard 10 ?g/L) arsenic in drinking water is associated with increased mortality of cardiovascular diseases. The current study was to determine if coronary heart disease, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia were associated with low-level arsenic exposure and AS3MT gene single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) A35991G (rs10748835) in rural Texas. Subjects (156 men, 343 women, 40-96 years of age with a mean of 61) were residents from rural counties Cochran, Palmer, and Bailey, Texas. Groundwater arsenic concentration at each subject's home was estimated with ArcGIS inverse distance weighted interpolation based on the residential location's distances to surrounding wells with known water arsenic concentrations. The estimated groundwater arsenic concentration ranged from 2.2 to 15.3 (mean 6.2) ?g/L in this cohort. Logistic regression analysis showed that coronary heart disease was associated with higher arsenic exposure (p<0.05) and with AS3MT genotype GG vs. AA (p<0.05) after adjustments for age, ethnicity, gender, education, smoking status, alcoholism, and anti-hyperlipidemia medication. Hypertension was associated with higher arsenic exposure, while hyperlipidemia was associated with genotype AG vs. AA of the AS3MT gene (p<0.05). Thus, coronary heart disease and its main risk factors were associated with low-level arsenic exposure, AS3MT polymorphism or both. PMID:22341486

Gong, Gordon; O'Bryant, Sid E

2012-02-01

321

N3280RDCOTTONWOODRD PayneOklahoma 11  

E-print Network

51 2 54 11 51 49 4 11 2 11 10 72 51 96 26 47 51 2651 26 76 76 26 4 32 11 26 3 11 26 10 72 51 31 26 51 11 2626 72 11 49 10 11 26 11 26 96 76 26 41 11 76 51 1011 74 31 51 11 SOIL SURVEY OF PAYNE COUNTY Soil Survey Area: Payne County, Oklahoma Spatial Version of Data: 2 Soil Map Compilation Scale: 1

Ghajar, Afshin J.

322

76 FR 60959 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00055  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Oklahoma dated 09/21/2011. Incident: Pawnee County Wildfire. Incident Period: 08/07/2011 through 08/14/2011. Effective Date: 09/21/2011. Physical Loan Application...

2011-09-30

323

Earthworms (Oligochaeta: Acanthodrilidae and Lumbricidae) associated with Hornsby Bend Biosolids Management Plant, Travis County, Texas, USA  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Earthworm populations were surveyed in soils from a variety of habitats associated with the Hornsby Bend Biosolids Management Plant, Austin, Texas, from November 2009 through March 2010. Seven species of terrestrial Oligochaeta, including one species new to science, are reported from two families, ...

324

A GIS study for determining hurricane risk areas and estimating population, Texas Coastal Counties  

E-print Network

The objectives of this study are to create and implement a new Geographic Information System (GIS) for the definition of areas along the Texas coast at risk from hurricane impacts and to estimate populations for those areas. The threat to lives...

Blakely, Christopher Todd

1997-01-01

325

The Inequities of the Texas School Finance System (Especially Considering Harris County).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Texas Foundation School Program, popularly known as the Minimum Foundation Program (MFP), is a very complex approach to school finance. It provides basic assistance in three areas--minimum salaries, operating allowances, and transportation--and additional assistance in two others--vocational education and special education. The state pays

Bothwell, Robert O.

326

A theoretical model of subsidence caused by petroleum production: Big Hill Field, Jefferson County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the Texas Gulf Coastal Plain, there is a history of oil and gas production extending over 2 to 5 decades. Concurrent with this production history, there has been unprecedented population growth accompanied by vastly increased groundwater demands. Land subsidence on both local and regional bases in this geologic province has been measured and predicted in several studies. The vast

D. W. Hill; J. M. Jr. Sharp

1993-01-01

327

Development of ground-water resources in the Orange County area, Texas and Louisiana, 1980-Spring of 1985  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report updates groundwater information pertaining to the lower unit of the Chicot aquifer in the Orange County area, Texas and Louisiana. The period of data collection was from 1980 to the spring of 1985. Some data collected prior to 1980 are presented to establish long-term trends and relations. The lower unit of the Chicot aquifer is the main source of freshwater for several cities, communities, industries, housing subdivisions, and individual homeowners in Orange County. The total pumpage from the lower unit of the Chicot aquifer in Orange County decreased from a historical maximum of 23.1 million gallons per day during 1984. The use of surface water decreased from a peak withdrawal of 58.1 million gallons per day during 1981 to 41.4 million gallons per day during 1984. Water levels rose throughout most of the area. The greatest rise in water levels (as much as 14 feet) occurred in and near the city of Orange, although the greatest decline (3 feet) occurred northwest of Vidor. Most of the water in the lower unit of the Chicot aquifer is fresh, but the water quality can vary greatly within short distances. Chloride concentrations during 1980-84 ranged from 10 to 1,700 milligrams per liter. In general, chloride concentrations remained constant during 1980-84. A relation exists between chloride concentrations and specific conductance. It was determined that, estimated chloride concentrations (milligrams per liter) generally can be approximately determined by multiplying 0.29 times specific-conductance values (microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius by 0.29) when the specific conductance is between 500 and 5,600 microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius. (USGS)

Bonnet, C.W.; Williams, J. F., III

1987-01-01

328

Tight gas sands research program: Field operations and analysis. Analysis of selected wells surrounding SFE No. 3, Waskom Cotton Valley Field, Harrison County, Texas. Topical report  

SciTech Connect

In preparation for the Gas Research Institute sponsored Staged Field Experiment (SFE) No. 3 in the Waskom Cotton Valley Field of Harrison County, Texas, a comprehensive study was performed on six wells surrounding the site for SFE No. 3. Data from the six wells was provided by Mobil Producing Texas New Mexico. The data were analyzed using a two-dimensional, single-phase, finite difference reservoir simulator to determine reservoir and fracture properties, which include formation permeability, fracture half-length, fracture conductivity, and reservoir drainage area. The report details the analyses.

Wolters, B.C.; Robinson, B.M.; Holditch, S.A.

1989-12-27

329

Economic Implications of Farmer Storage of Surface Irrigation Water in Federal Projects: El Paso County, Texas  

E-print Network

was based on results from a linear programming model developed for crop production in E1 Paso County. The model was designed to maximize net farm revenue. Twelve crops were included in the analysis. The effects of soil type and salinity level of irrigation...

Cornforth, G. C.; Lacewell, R. D.

330

Depositional environments of Schuler Formation (Cotton Valley Sands), Upshur County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Exploration for tight gas (FERC Section 107) production from the Schuler Formation (Cotton Valley sands) has provided recent data for the recognition of the lower Schuler (Shongaloo member) shoreface facies and delineation of the upper Schuler (Dorcheat member) delta plain complex in Upshur County. Shoreface facies within the lower Schuler have a typical funnel-shaped log pattern (coarsening-upward clastic). In core,

Joe A. Kast

1983-01-01

331

Time of growth of Opelika Dome, Henderson and Van Zandt counties, Texas  

E-print Network

?icknssses of salt were deix&sitec w'}ich covered ruch of the '. ast Texas rsgicn. Later t. :is salt becar'e 1};e source ?ed . '"or the zany &alt iicmes. &&t le&&st 27 cf t} e zi, ;, ctural domes in ast, exes have been prove&. ti. lie s?'t dc&ice by the find.... RFGEO:JAL GFGLGGY The Opelika fielf 's located in a broad b?sin wkrick: ?as been referred to by various writers ao the Fast Tex?s 3'sin, th Tyler Basin, the ast Texas Geosync'ine, ?n, . 4?e Fast ~ ox?s T'zbaym 'rt. Coon (195o) defined ths basin...

Peterson, Thomas Lowe

1958-01-01

332

Reconstruction of the paleoenvironments of Jameson (Strawn) Reef field, Coke County, Texas  

E-print Network

. Ahr The Jameson Reef field of the Pennsylvanian Middle Strawn (Des- moinesian) Formation is an elongate, strike trending mud buildup that occurs within the Strawn Reef trend of west-central Texas. It con- sists primarily of lime wackestones... diagenesis includes primarily micritization of component grains. Leaching occurred in the meteoric phreatic environment following micritization. The leaching produced intergranular, intzagranular, moldic and vuggy porosity. A later transgression placed...

Hopkins, Kenneth Warren

1983-01-01

333

Small mammal populations on reclaimed strip-mined areas in Freestone County, Texas  

E-print Network

period was conducted on three reclaimed and one control area. Seven species (Reithrodontomys fulvescens, R. humulis, R. montanus, Peromyscus 1 t, S y* t yl, S~dh~d d M * 1 l were caught. Peromyscus maniculstus was the earliest invader on the recently... at Texas A&M University. 19 RESULTS Species Composition and Abundance Four small mammal species were trapped at the recently reclaimed area during the 12 month sampling period: Peromyscus maniculatus (deer mouse), Reithrodontomys montanus (plains...

Gust, Deborah Anne

1983-01-01

334

Geology and engineering geology of a Wilcox lignite deposit in northeastern Rusk County, Texas  

E-print Network

, including grain size analyses and Atterberg limit determina- tions. The seven 2-inch (5. 1 cm) diameter cores were obtained from Robert Cargill Co. of Tyler, Texas, and the exploration logs were provided by Paul Weir Company of Chicago, Illinois...-2895 (Appendix III). This description involved sieving selected samples through the p10, ps0, and p200 sieves, as well as determining Atterberg limits on claystone and siltstone units (Lambe, 1951). Microsco ic Descri tion Samples were taken from various...

Cole, William F.

1980-01-01

335

Geology and hydrogeology of the Edwards Aquifer Transition Zone, Bexar County, Texas  

E-print Network

). These discussions are generally brief and only state broad generalizations. Other studies conducted on the Recharge Zone can be applied to the Transition Zone. Analyses of ground-water recharge from streams and through percolation in the Recharge Zone (Reeves... are discussed. These strategies include structural as well as non-structural controls and current storm 10 water management programs being used in Texas and Florida, Ferguson and Lukens (1983) provide detailed discussions of some developmental constraint...

Neathery, Jeffrey Stephen

1989-01-01

336

An investigation of the contact between the Oakville and Catahoula Formations in Grimes County, Texas  

E-print Network

Investigation . 1 1 3 TECHNIQUES. Field Methods Laboratory Methods Calcium Carbonate Content Determinations. C lay Analy s is . Sand-Silt-Clay Analysis 6 7 9 9 11 MINERALOGY 13 Sand-Silt-Clay Analysis Calcium Carbonate Analysis C lay Ana1 ye... and Washington, Texas quadrangles, were used to record the data. Laboratory Methods Stratigraphic changes were investigated by laboratory methods such as, calcium carbonate content determinations, X-ray analysis of clays, and sand-silt-clay analysis...

Sveter, Owen Douglas

1969-01-01

337

The bioarchaeology of Blue Bayou: a late prehistoric mortuary site from Victoria county, Texas  

E-print Network

. 9 Wear facets on incisors. 10 Impacted third molars. 11 Dental anomalies. 12 Arthritis. 13 Osteomyelitis/Periostitis. 33 81 86 87 93 95 97 99 101 104 14 Adult frontal exhibiting the presence of the mytopic suture. 106 CHAPTER I... induced modification of the skeletal elements. Recent studies in the dental anatomy of prehistoric populations from the Texas coast have revealed some very interesting wear patterns (Comuzzie et al. , 1986; Comuzzie and Steele, 1987). Tt has been...

Comuzzie, Anthony Gean

1987-01-01

338

Compliance status summaries for federal and state statutory directives that apply to the Salt Repository Project at the Deaf Smith County Site, Texas  

SciTech Connect

This document contains statutory summaries, checklists of compliance requirements, status summaries, and lists of information needs for the environmental and health and safety statutory directives at Federal and State levels that apply to the Salt Repository Project at the Deaf Smith County Site, Texas. Statutes that apply in general to any repository project but not specifically to the Deaf Smith are not included. The information herein supplements the Salt Repository Project Statutory Compliance Plan and the Salt Repository Project Permitting Management Plan by providing lengthy details on statutory directives, compliance requirements, information needs, and the overall status of the environmental and health and safety compliance program for the Salt Repository Project at the Deaf Smith County Site, Texas.

Not Available

1986-07-01

339

The place-names of Brazos County, Texas, 1821 to 1880  

E-print Network

geoaraphy. Originally, I considered a study which involved an explanation of the ori gins of names found on current maps of Brazos County (ca. 1980); shortcomings of such a study quickly developed. Many names were found during research which did not show... imposes order upon the physical landscape ( the development of tr ansporta- tion and communication networks, the establishment of commercial and agricultural systems, and the patterns of migration and settlement) but the role of naming in the creation...

Diem, John William

1981-01-01

340

Environments of deposition of the Yegua Formation (Eocene), Brazos County, Texas  

E-print Network

Work Work in Brazos County 9 11 METHODS PF STUDY General Preparation of Cores Megascopic Examination of Cores and Outcrop Petrographic Examination Subsurface Examination 14 14 16 20 22 ENVIRONMENTS OF DEPOSITION Introduction... advantage of examining a cut section of core for details of bedding. Megascopic Examination of Cores and Outcrop After preparation of the cores was completed, megascopic examination was undertaken. This consisted of systematically re- cording...

LeBlanc, Rufus Joseph

1970-01-01

341

Cross-sectional study examining the role of acculturation in self-reported hypertension among Mexican Americans in Harris County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this secondary analysis was to examine the role of acculturation and self-reported hypertension in a Mexican-American cohort from Harris County, Texas. Specifically, we examined the acculturation measures of language-based Bidimensional Acculturation Scale (BAS), nativity, and length of United States (U.S) residency. Of 6,229 participants aged 40 and older, 38.0% self-reported hypertension at baseline. ^ Multiple logistic regression

Lacey McQuinn

2011-01-01

342

Site specific statutory compliance planning for the salt repository project at the Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Requirements, strategy, and status: Revision 4  

SciTech Connect

This document and the requirements and actions it presents are addressed to the Deaf Smith County Site, Texas. The proposed actions upon which the plan is based are those described in Chapters 4 and 5 of the final EA for the site. Similarly, the environmental and health and safety requirements covered in the plan are those identified in the EA as being potentially applicable to the salt repository project at the Deaf Smith site. 12 figs., 8 tabs.

Not Available

1986-06-01

343

Water-Quality, Stream-Habitat, and Biological Data for Highland and Marchand Bayous, Galveston County, Texas, 2006-07  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Houston-Galveston Area Council and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, collected water-quality, stream-habitat, and biological data from five sites on Highland and Marchand Bayous in Galveston County, Texas, during 2006-07. Water-quality data-collection surveys consisted of synoptic 24-hour continuous measurements of water temperature, pH, specific conductance, and dissolved oxygen and periodically collected samples analyzed for several properties and constituents of interest. Bacteria samples were collected monthly at 10 sites on Highland and Marchand Bayous during the study. Stream-habitat data were collected at five sites three times during the study, July-August 2006, March 2007, and July-August 2007. At each site, a representative stream reach was selected. Within this reach, five evenly spaced stream transects were determined. At each transect, stream (wetted channel width, water depth, bottom material, instream cover) and riparian (bank slope and erosion potential, width of natural vegetation, type of vegetation, percentage tree canopy) attributes were measured. Benthic macroinvertebrate and fish data were collected from the same five sites identified for habitat evaluation. Three assessments were done to account for seasonal differences in biotic distribution. Stream-habitat and aquatic biota (benthic macroinvertebrates and fish) were assessed at each site three times during the study to evaluate aquatic life use. A total of 5,126 macroinvertebrate individuals were identified at all sites. During the study, 34 species of fish representing 28 families were collected from all the sites.

Brown, Dexter W.; Mabe, Jeffrey A.; Turco, Michael J.

2008-01-01

344

Vertebrate remains from the Wilson-Leonard site (41WM235), Williamson County, Texas: Holocene animal exploitation in central Texas prehistory  

E-print Network

(Instii. ute of Applied Sciences, The University of North Texas), and Dr. Alston V. Thorns (Archaeological Research Laboratory, TexasA&M University) . Dr. Kristin D. Sobolik (The University of Maine at Orono) provided insight on turtle identification...

Baker, Barry Wayne

1994-01-01

345

The reproductive pattern of the swamp rabbit in Brazos County, Texas  

E-print Network

had become dense. A summary of some of its habits and its distribution east of the Mississippi was given by Hamilton (1943 pp. 393-396) . Taylor and Isy (1944 p . 121 ) indicated that the swamp rabbit's ecological niches in eastern Texas were..., breeding was limited to the late fall, winter and In spring months when green forage was abundant in the western Sierra Nevada foothills. He found a one- third grown rabbit that he saId must have been born dur1ng the dry season and considered...

Hunt, Thomas Phillip

1956-01-01

346

Nesting success, growth rates, and recruitment of barn swallows (Hirundo rustica) in Brazos County, Texas  

E-print Network

Cycle The breeding season in Texas begins in late March when the first Barn Swallows arrive (Oberholser 1974). Pair formation usu? ally occurs within two weeks after arriving at the nesting area (Samuel 1971). Samuel (1971) indicated that nest site..., 10 chicken feathers, 4 pieces of wood, 2 human hairs and a piece of leaf and. cotton, and a tablespoonful of minute pieces of rootlets and grass. " Samuel (1971) found that the average nest building time was 6, 4 days, with a. range from 3 to 10...

Barr, Albert Lee

1979-01-01

347

Uranium roll front study in the upper Jackson group, Atascosa County, Texas  

E-print Network

deposits, but volcanic detr1tus is locally abundant and widespread (McKnight, 1972). The ancestral Gulf Coast was per1odically engulfed in volcanic ash from eruptions that were apparently located in northern Mexico and western Texas (Eargle and Weeks... from reduced samples within a uranium roll front show major uranium concentrations ex1st in carbonaceous mater1al, pyri te, and volcanic rock fragments. Absence of pyr1te and part1al destruction of the carbonaceous material by alkaline ground water...

Miller, Michael Eugene

1979-01-01

348

An unusual Middle Permian flora from the Blaine Formation (Pease River Group: Leonardian-Guadalupian Series) of King County, West Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A new Middle Permian plant assemblage from South Ash Pasture in King County, Texas, may be the youngest and is certainly the most unusual flora known from the Permian of either West Texas or adjoining north-central Texas. Found serendipitously in the evaporite-rich upper Blaine Formation (Pease River Group, Guadalupian Series), the flora is of very low diversity despite intensive collecting efforts, and the affinities of nearly all taxa are enigmatic. The most common elements are parallel-veined leaves that resemble cordaites but that could be isolated pinnules of a pinnate leaf. Gigantopterid foliage is present but not assignable to any known taxon. A single foliar conifer specimen is too incomplete for assignment. Numerous reproductive organs, however, and an abundance of axes may represent conifers. Conchostracans, palaeoniscoid fish scales, and small heteropolar coprolites also occur in the deposit, which originated as a small, claystone-dominated channel fill in a coastal plain setting.

DiMichele, W.A.; Hook, R.W.; Nelson, W.J.; Chaney, D.S.

2004-01-01

349

Availability of more healthful food alternatives in traditional, convenience, and nontraditional types of food stores in two rural Texas counties.  

PubMed

Limited research has focused on the availability of more healthful food alternatives in traditional food stores (supermarkets and grocery stores) in rural areas. Current market trends suggest that food items may be available for purchase in stores other than traditional food stores. An observational survey was developed and used on-site to document the availability and variety of fruit and vegetables (fresh, canned, and frozen), meats (meat, poultry, fish, and eggs), dairy (milk, yogurt, and cheese), and grains (whole grains and refined grains) in all traditional food stores, convenience stores, and nontraditional food stores (dollar stores and mass merchandisers) in two rural Texas counties. Descriptive statistics and t tests identified that although the widest selection of more healthful food items was available in supermarkets, not all supermarkets carried all items. Grocery stores carried less variety of fresh fruits (8+/-0.7 vs 4.7+/-0.3; P<0.01) and vegetables (10.7+/-0.2 vs 6+/-0; P<0.001) than supermarkets. Fresh fruits and vegetables were not readily available in convenience or nontraditional food stores. Among convenience and nontraditional food stores, "dollar" stores offered the best variety of more healthful canned fruits and vegetables, whole-wheat bread, and whole-grain cereal. Mass merchandisers and dollar stores offered a greater variety of more healthful types of canned tuna and poultry, reduced-fat and skim milk, and low-fat tortillas. In these rural counties, traditional food stores offered greater availability of more healthful food choices across food groups. More healthful food choices in canned fruits and vegetables, canned meat and fish, milk, and grains were also available in dollar stores, mass merchandisers, and convenience stores. Results suggest that a complete understanding of the food environment, especially in rural areas, requires knowledge of the availability and variety of healthful food in all types of stores that are accessible to families. PMID:19394475

Bustillos, Brenda; Sharkey, Joseph R; Anding, Jenna; McIntosh, Alex

2009-05-01

350

Geologic framework and hydrogeologic features of the Glen Rose Limestone, Camp Bullis Training Site, Bexar County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Glen Rose Limestone crops out over most of the Camp Bullis Training Site in northern Bexar County, Texas, where it consists of upper and lower members and composes the upper zone and the upper part of the middle zone of the Trinity aquifer. Uncharacteristically permeable in northern Bexar County, the Glen Rose Limestone can provide avenues for recharge to and potential contamination of the downgradient Edwards aquifer, which occupies the southeastern corner of Camp Bullis. The upper member of the Glen Rose Limestone characteristically is thin-bedded and composed mostly of soft limestone and marl, and the lower Glen Rose typically is composed mostly of relatively massive, fossiliferous limestone. The upper member, about 410 to 450 feet thick at Camp Bullis, was divided in this study into five hydrogeologic subdivisions, A through E (youngest to oldest). The approximately 120-foot-thick Interval A has an abundance of caves, which is indicative of its generally well developed fracture, channel, and cavern porosity that in places provides appreciable permeability. The 120- to 150-foot-thick Interval B is similar to Interval A but with less cave development and considerably less permeability. The 10- to 20-foot-thick Interval C, a layer of partly to mostly dissolved soluble carbonate minerals, is characterized by breccia porosity, boxwork permeability, and collapse structures that typically divert ground water laterally to discharge at land surface. The 135- to 180-foot-thick Interval D generally has low porosity and little permeability with some local exceptions, most notably the caprinid biostrome just below the top of the interval, which appears to be permeable by virtue of excellent moldic, vug, fracture, and cavern porosity. The 10- to 20-foot-thick Interval E, a layer of partly to mostly dissolved evaporites similar to Interval C, has similar hydrogeologic properties and a tendency to divert ground water laterally.

Clark, Allan K.

2003-01-01

351

The geology of North Fredonia area, McCulloch and San Saba Counties, Texas  

E-print Network

to the strike with s Bruatoa coapass set et the correct eagle of dip aad sighted oa a rod. Dilute hydrochloric acid was carried 1 ~ the field to aid ia dis- tiaguish1ag betweea the limstoaes aad dolosdtes of the Elleaburger. Faedliarity with tho 11thologies... tue eastern flask of the uplift. Ikey also stated that it thins westward and is oaly about 830 feet thick ia the Bald Ridge area of hlcCulloch County. The thickness could not be deterwiaed accurately frow the exposures is the North Fredoaia area...

Mosteller, Stanley Alfred

1957-01-01

352

An engineering study of rural motor vehicle accidents in Brazos County, Texas  

E-print Network

'fective enforcement of the stock law was a definite causative factor in accidents. 37 RIKOIB I', NDA TIONS Before analysing the compiled data, rough oalculations indicate that six months was spent by the author in studying the accident reports. It was natural... The confidential reports of accidents occurrins in Brazos County during a six year period from 1950 1955 were obtained from Patrol:nan 0. L, Luther of the Department of Public Safety. Observation of the data indicated that the study should be confined...

Schleider, Robert Herman

1957-01-01

353

Stratigraphy of the Calvert Bluff Formation of the Wilcox Group, Brazos County, Texas  

E-print Network

trend and net feet of sand of the Rockdale delta system (adapted from Fisher and McGowen, 1969). , 5 Location map showing strike oriented cross-section C-C' and Martins Prairie field. 20 6 Regional cross-section C-C' showing two incised valleys..., in Robertson and Brazos counties, the lignite zones are at the base of the formation. Cross-section C-C' location is shown in Figure 5. Regional strike oriented cross-section C-C' (Figure 6) shows two incised valleys within the Simsboro Formation (Appendix...

May, Audrey Gail

1994-01-01

354

Commercial Space Port Planning in Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Texas Legislature is providing funding to support research and planning activities aimed at creating a commercial spaceport in the state. These monies have been allocated to regional Spaceport Development Corporations that have been established in three countries containing candidate site locations: Willacy County (in South Texas); Brazoria County (East Texas); and Pecos County (West Texas). This program is being

L. Bell; B. Looke

2002-01-01

355

Geology of the Canyon Reservoir site on the Guadalupe River, Comal County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In response to a request by Colonel Harry O. Fisher, District Engineer of the Fort Worth District of the Corps of Engineers, United States Army (letter of Dec. 13, 1954), a reconnaissance investigation was made of the geology of the Canyon (F-1) reservoir site on the Guadalupe River in Comal County, Tex. The purpose of the investigation was to study the geology in relation to possible leakage - particularly leakage of water that might then be lost from the drainage area of the Guadalupe River - and to add to the general knowledge of the ground-water hydrology of the San Antonio area. The dam (F-1) was originally designed for flood control and conservation only, with provision for the addition of a power unit if feasible. Since the completion of the investigation by the Corps of Engineers, the city of San Antonio has expressed an interest in the reservoir as a possible source of public water supply. The Corps of Engineers has made a thorough engineering and geologic study of the dam site (Corps of Engineers, 1950), which has Congressional approval. The geology and water resources of Comal County have been studied by George (1952). The rocks studied are those within the reservoir area and generally below the 1,000-foot contour as shown on the Smithson Valley quadrangle of the U.S. Geological Survey.

George, William O.; Welder, Frank A.

1955-01-01

356

Depositional environments of Schuler Formation (Cotton Valley Sands), Upshur County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Exploration for tight gas (FERC Section 107) production from the Schuler Formation (Cotton Valley sands) has provided recent data for the recognition of the lower Schuler (Shongaloo member) shoreface facies and delineation of the upper Schuler (Dorcheat member) delta plain complex in Upshur County. Shoreface facies within the lower Schuler have a typical funnel-shaped log pattern (coarsening-upward clastic). In core, the corresponding coarsening-upward sequence grades from offshore to upper shoreface facies. Upper offshore sediments are dominated by a heavily bioturbated and intercalated sandstone/shale sequence with numerous trace fossils, escape traces, and shell debris. Associated facies overlying the upper shoreface are lagoonal. Subaerially exposed mottled red and green siltsone and red mudstone show evidence of root penetration and are interpreted as coastal plain to tidal flat. The marsh deposits (green siltstones and red mudstones) gradationally interbed with a subtidal lagoonal facies containing dark gray, fossiliferous, argillaceous, limestone containing oysters, echinoid fragments, and annelid worm tubes. In an effort to tie the limited core data (4 wells) to a countywide environmental interpretation, sand percent interval slice maps were constructed above and below the ubiquitous subtidal lagoonal marker. These maps and core data in the lower Schuler delineate a strike-oriented, linear clastic shoreline (ENEWSW). Within Upshur County, lower Schuler sediments were deposited as interdeltaic, shoreface facies. The upper member is characterized by a dip-oriented sandstone trend interpreted as an aggradational delta plain complex associated with the Lone Oak delta system.

Kast, J.A.

1983-03-01

357

Site handbook: data acquisition system information, Comal County Mental Health Mental Retardation Center, New Braunfels, Texas  

SciTech Connect

This report gives the status of the data acquisition task of Comal County MHMR Solar Retrofit project and a description of the data acquisition hardware. The data acquisition system will be used to monitor the heating and cooling load and equipment at the Comal County MHMR Center will investigate the performance of the passive solar modifications to the structure and heating/cooling control strategy. The passive solar and conservation options included in the building retrofit program were ceiling insulation, weather proofing, fluorescent lighting, roof evaporative spray cooling system, awnings, and ceiling fans. In addition, night ventilation and night flushing cooling were used to reduce the cooling load. Natural daylighting was utilized to replace artificial lighting where possible. The major conservation options that were utilized include: the creation of a new ceiling 6 inches lower than the original and insulating it to an R-22 level in the process; the installation of an evaporation roof spray system; the installation of ceiling fans for destratification; and the creation of fixed awnings.

Not Available

1985-01-01

358

Induction conductivity and natural gamma logs collected in 15 wells at Camp Stanley Storage Activity, Bexar County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Camp Stanley Storage Activity conducted electromagnetic induction conductivity and natural gamma logging of 15 selected wells on the Camp Stanley Storage Activity, located in northern Bexar County, Texas, during March 28-30, 2005. In late 2004, a helicopter electromagnetic survey was flown of the Camp Stanley Storage Activity as part of a U.S. Geological Survey project to better define subsurface geologic units, the structure, and the catchment area of the Trinity aquifer. The electromagnetic induction conductivity and natural gamma log data in this report were collected to constrain the calculation of resistivity depth sections and to provide subsurface controls for interpretation of the helicopter electromagnetic data collected for the Camp Stanley Storage Activity. Logs were recorded digitally while moving the probe in an upward direction to maintain proper depth control. Logging speed was no greater than 30 feet per minute. During logging, a repeat section of at least 100 feet was recorded to check repeatability of log responses. Several of the wells logged were completed with polyvinyl chloride casing that can be penetrated by electromagnetic induction fields and allows conductivity measurement. However, some wells were constructed with steel centralizers and stainless steel screen that caused spikes on both conductivity and resulting resistivity log curves. These responses are easily recognizable and appear at regular intervals on several logs.

Stanton, Gregory P.

2005-01-01

359

Geodatabase and characteristics of springs within and surrounding the Trinity aquifer outcrops in northern Bexar County, Texas, 2010--11  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Trinity Glen Rose Groundwater Conservation District, the Edwards Aquifer Authority, and the San Antonio River Authority, developed a geodatabase of springs within and surrounding the Trinity aquifer outcrops in a 331-square-mile study area in northern Bexar County, Texas. The data used to develop the geodatabase were compiled from existing reports and databases, along with spring data collected between October 2010 and September 2011. Characteristics including the location, discharge, and water-quality properties were collected for known springs and documented in the geodatabase. A total of 141 springs were located within the study area, and 46 springs were field verified. The discharge at springs with flow ranged from 0.003 to 1.46 cubic feet per second. The specific conductance of the water discharging from the springs ranged from 167 to 1,130 microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius with a majority of values in the range of 500 microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius.

Clark, Allan K.; Pedraza, Diana E.; Morris, Robert R.; Garcia, Travis J.

2013-01-01

360

Saline fluid flow and hydrocarbon migration and maturation as related to geopressure, Frio Formation, Brazoria County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Pleasant Bayou geopressured-geothermal test wells in Brazoria County, Texas, display a prominent thermal-maturity anomaly in the Oligocene Anahuac and Frio Formations. Highly geopressured, more-mature shales are interbedded with hydropressured to moderately geopressured sandstones in the upper Frio and Anahuac. In contrast, shales and sandstones in the lower Frio, including the Andrau geopressured-geothermal production zone, are highly geopressured but exhibit lower thermal maturities. Vitrinite-reflectance data, supported by hydrocarbon-maturation data and anomalous concentrations of C/sub 5/ to C/sub 7/ hydrocarbons at Pleasant Bayou, indicate that the upper Frio was subjected to an extended period of hot, extremely saline, basinal fluid flow which caused the above thermal anomaly. Regional salinity studies (Morton and others, 1983) suggest that regional growth faults were the conduits for vertical basinal brine movement at depth. At shallower levels the upwelling waters migrated laterally through permeable sandstone-rich sections such as the upper Frio. Anomalously mature gasoline-range (C/sub 5/-C/sub 7/) hydrocarbons were introduced into the upper Frio by this process. Fluid influx in the lower Frio was probably limited by high geopressure, consequently maturity in the deep Frio section (greater than 14,000 ft) remained consistent with the regional geothermal gradient.

Tyler, N.; Light, M.P.R.; Ewing, T.E.

1985-01-01

361

Surface-water quality in the upper San Antonio River Basin, Bexar County, Texas, 1992-98  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The potential effects of chemicals in rivers and streams on human health or the ecology have long been a source of concern to water managers. Chemicals in rivers may result from natural or anthropogenic sources (such as industrial or residential practices) which are commonly associated with urbanized watersheds. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the San Antonio Water System, examined water-quality data collected from periodic and stormflow sampling events at five sites in the upper San Antonio River Basin during 199298. These water-quality data were compared among sites as well as between periodic and stormflow events. The samples were collected from five continuous streamflow-gaging stations in Bexar County, Texas. Samples were analyzed for major ions, nutrients, trace elements, and organic compounds, including selected pesticides. The reported concentrations for the measured constituents varied among sites as well as between periodic and stormflow samples. Patterns for some constituents, such as nutrients, were observed; however, consistent patterns were not always observed for all analytes. For example, median concentrations for filtered ammonia, nitrate plus nitrite, organic nitrogen, and phosphorus generally were greater in periodic samples collected from the Medina and SAR Elmendorf sites as compared to samples collected from the other sites. Median concentrations of trace elements measured in periodic samples were generally less than concentrations measured in stormflow samples. In general, most of the concentrations of analyzed organic compounds were less than the laboratory reporting levels.

Banta, J. Ryan; Slattery, Richard N.; Crow, Cassi L.

2012-01-01

362

Depositional framework and reservoir potential of an upper Cotton Valley (Knowles Limestone) patch reef, Milam County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Knowles Limestone is an upper unit of the Cotton Valley Group, and in Milam County, Texas, it is approximately 350 ft (100 m) thick, consisting of shales, terrigenous dolomitic limestones, grainy limestones, and algal boundstones with stromatoporoids and corals. The boundstones represent an elongate, wave resistant, encrusted skeletal patch reef which probably developed on a subtle salt-generated topographic high. The reef appears to be slightly more than 1 mi (2 km) across in its narrowest lateral dimension as determined by facies correlations of three cored wells in the study area. Reef core boundstones and reef talus were consistently present downdip, and lagoonal to tidal-flat facies were common updip throughout Knowles deposition. The reef organisms eventually became overwhelmed with terrigenous sediment transported downdip as the tidal-flat environment prograded over the lagoonal, reef talus and reef core facies at the end of Knowles deposition. Early dolomitization of tidal fault and lagoonal facies has created local porous zones in some of these rocks. However, the reef, per se, is cemented by sparry calcite and is not a potential reservoir facies.

Cregg, A.K.; Ahr, W.M.

1983-09-01

363

Reservoir characterization of tight gas sand: Taylor sandstone (upper Cotton Valley group, upper Jurassic), Rusk County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

An integrated petrographic, sedimentologic, and log analysis study of the Taylor sandstone in Rusk County, Texas, was conducted to understand the geologic controls on reservoir performance and to identify pay zones for reserves calculations. The Taylor sandstone interval consists of tightly cemented, fine-grained quartzose sandstones interbedded with mudstones, siltstones, and carbonates that occur in upward-coarsening sequences. Helium permeability rarely exceeds 0.1 md, and porosity is rarely greater than 10%. Relationships between porosity and permeability are diffuse because of a string diagenetic overprint. Six major rock types or petrofacies are distinguished on the basis of pore type and dominant cement mineralogy. Three sandstone petrofacies - primary macroporous quartz cemented, moldic macroporous quartz cemented, and microporous clay cemented - have reservoir potential. Although these petrofacies have similar porosities and permeabilities, fluid saturations differ considerably due to differences in pore geometry as indicated by petrographic and capillary pressure analyses. These three reservoir-quality petrofacies can each be identified directly on wireline logs by applying cutoffs to the porosity and normalized gamma-ray logs.

Vavra, C.L.; Scheihing, M.H.; Klein, J.D.

1989-03-01

364

Site study plan for utilities and solid waste, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Environmental Field Program: Preliminary draft  

SciTech Connect

This site plan describes utilities and solid waste studies to be conducted during the characterization of the Deaf Smith County, Texas, site for the US Department of Energy's Salt Repository Project. After utilities and solid waste information needs derived from Federal, State, and local statutes and regulations and the project specifications are briefly described, the site study plan describes the study design and rationale, the field data collection procedures and equipment, and data analysis methods and application of results, the data management strategy, the schedule of field activities, the management of the study, and the study's quality assurance program. The field data collection activities are organized into programs to characterize electrical power, natural gas, communication, water, wastewater sludge, nonradiological solid waste, nonradiological hazardous waste, and low-level radiological waste. These programs include details for the collection of project needs, identification of utilities and solid waste disposal contractor capabilities, and verification of the obtained data. Utilities and solid waste field activities will begin approximately at the time of site access. Utilities and solid waste characterization will be completed within the first year of activity. 29 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Not Available

1987-06-01

365

Site study plan for non-routine laboratory rock mechanics, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This Site Study Plan describes the non-routine rock mechanics and thermal properties laboratory testing program planned for the characterization of site-specific geologic materials for the Deaf Smith County site, Texas. The study design provides for measurements of index, mechanical, thermomechanical, thermal and special properties for the host salt, and where appropriate, for nonhost lithologies. The types of tests which will be conducted are constant stress (creep) tests, constant strain (stress relaxation) tests, constant strain-rate tests, constant stress-rate tests, cyclic loading tests, hollow cylinder tests, uniaxial and triaxial compression tests, direct tension tests, indirect (triaxial) shear tests, thermal property determinations (conductivity, specific heat, expansivity, and diffusivity), fracture healing tests, thermal decrepitation tests, moisture content determinations, and petrographic and micromechanics analyses. Tests will be conducted at confining pressures up to 30 MPa and temperatures up to 300/degree/C. These data are used to construct mathematical models for the phenomenology of salt deformation. The models are then used in finite-element codes to predict repository response. A tentative testing schedule and milestone log are given. The duration of the testing program is expected to be approximately 5 years. 44 refs., 13 figs., 13 tabs.

Not Available

1987-12-01

366

Technical procedures for utilities and solid waste: Environmental Field Program, Deaf Smith County site, Texas: Final draft  

SciTech Connect

The evaluation of environmental issues and concerns and the addressing of statutory requirements are fundamental parts in the characterization of the site in Deaf Smith County, Texas for the US Department of Energy's Salt Repository Project (SRP). To ensure that the environmental field program comprehensively addresses the issues and requirements of the project, a site study plan (SSP) has been prepared for Utilities and Solid Waste considerations. This technical procedure (TP) has been developed to implement the field program described in the Utilities and Solid Waste Site Study Plan. The purpose and scope of the Utilities and Solid Waste Technical Procedure is to develop and implement a data collection procedure to fulfill the data base needs of the Utilities and Solid Waste SSP. The procedure describes a method of obtaining, assessing and verifying the capabilities of the regional service utilities and disposal contractors. This data base can be used to identify a preferred service source for the engineering contractor. The technical procedure was produced under the guidelines established in Technical Administrative Procedure No. 1.0, Preparation, Review and Approval of Technical Procedures.

Not Available

1987-08-01

367

Environmental assessment of the brine pipeline replacement for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Bryan Mound Facility in Brazoria County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0804, for the proposed replacement of a deteriorated brine disposal pipeline from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Bryan Mound storage facility in Brazoria County, Texas, into the Gulf of Mexico. In addition, the ocean discharge outfall would be moved shoreward by locating the brine diffuser at the end of the pipeline 3.5 miles offshore at a minimum depth of 30 feet. The action would occur in a floodplain and wetlands; therefore, a floodplain/wetlands assessment has been prepared in conjunction with this EA. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (42 USC. 4321, et seg.). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). This FONSI also includes a Floodplain Statement of Findings in accordance with 10 CFR Part 1022.

Not Available

1993-09-01

368

Hydrologic and water-quality data at Government Canyon State Natural Area, Bexar County, Texas, 2002-10  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service, the Edwards Aquifer Authority, and the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, collected rainfall, streamflow, evapotranspiration, and stormflow water-quality data at the Laurel Canyon Creek watershed, within the Government Canyon State Natural Area, Bexar County, Tex. The purpose of the data collection was to support evaluations of the effects of brush management conservation practices on components of the hydrologic budget and water quality. One component of brush management was to take endangered wildlife into consideration, specifically the golden-cheeked warbler (Dendroica chrysoparia). Much of the area that may have been considered for brush management was left intact to protect habitat for the golden-cheeked warbler. The area identified for brush management was approximately 10 percent of the study watershed. The hydrologic data presented here (200210) represent pre- and post-treatment periods, with brush management treatment occurring from winter 200607 to spring 2008.

Banta, J. Ryan; Slattery, Richard N.

2012-01-01

369

Monocrotophos and dicrotophos residues in birds as a result of misuse of organophosphates in Matagorda county Texas USA  

USGS Publications Warehouse

About 1100 birds of 12 spp. [Red-winged blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus), great-tailed grackle (Quiscalus mexicanus), brown-headed cowbird (Molothrus ater), mourning dove (Zenaida macrours), Eastern meadowlark (Sturnella magna), vesper sparrow (Pooecetes gramineus), common snipe (Gallinago gallinago), blue-winged teal (Anas discors), mottled duck (Anas fulvigula), common moorhen (Gallinula chloropus), redhead (Aythya americana) and ruddy turnstone (Arenaria interpres)] died from organophosphate poisoning in Matagorda County on the Texas Gulf Coast in March and May 1982. Birds died from feeding on rice seed that was illegally treated with dicrotophos or monocrotophos and placed near rice fields as bait to attract and kill birds. Brain acetylcholinesterase inhibition of affected birds averaged 87% (range 82-89%), and contents of gastrointestinal tracts contained residues of dicrotophos (5.6-14 ppm) or monocrotophos (2.1-13 ppm). Rice seed collected at mortality sites contained 210 ppm dicrotophos or 950 ppm monocrotophos. Mortality from dicrotophos poisoning continued for almost 3 wk. The practice of illegally treating rice seed with either of the 2 organophosphates appears to be infrequent but widespread at present.

Flickinger, Edward L.; White, D.H.; Mitchell, C.A.; Lamont, T.G.

1984-01-01

370

Structural geology of the Central Bluff Creek area, Mason County, Texas  

E-print Network

~ kSKky NhSOS. COWPff, %KgkS t . &%asska . Sy 8, . 0 U H I ~o %~4. m &~ AgXe as4 eoa4eefs +a. 1 f' lPi~ q. , y N'lgC%%kJ@ OROL4CT GF IRK CE~ ~' ~ k$RAy, WASCW C@fltT~ TEXAS 4ese, X9$4 ~as WQeeht Oeo1o~' %as sriter is aisoorelg... gratefni, to Qr? Q? R? Qlasdc of ths Qspart- nant of geology ef ths kgrl4IALLCnrai sn4 lklehsn&5al College of +ossa for his ai4 in selecting She prsbl. en ai4 his isoalsabke gnk~ throsgbost the pro)oot ~ Qr? Qiana snperoise4' She fiel4 nappLsg as soll...

Grote, Fred Rankin

1954-01-01

371

Campanian ammonites from the Upper Cretaceous Gober Chalk of Lamar County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Roxton Limestone Member at the top of the Gober Chalk in northeast Texas yields a rich fauna, dominated by Baculites haresi Reeside, 1927, and Inoceramus balticus Boehm, 1909, with sparse occurrences of pachydiscus cf. P. paulsoni (Young, 1963), Anapachydiscus sp.juv., Placenticeras placenta (DeKay, 1828), Hoplitoplacenticeras aff. H. plasticum (Paulcke, 1907), Menabites (Delawarella) delawarensis (Morton, 1830), M.(D.) danei (Young, 1963), M.(D.) aff. M.(D.) vanuxemi (Morton, 1830), Submortoniceras vandalinaense Young, 1963, Submortoniceras sp., Eubostrychoceras sp., and Scaphites hippocrepis (DeKay, 1828) III. The presence of S. hippocrepis III suggests a late early Campanian age assignment for the fauna. The assemblage includes species known from the Western Interior, Gulf Coast, Atlantic seaboard, and western Europe. -Authors

Cobban, W.A.; Kennedy, W.J.

1992-01-01

372

Geologic and Engineering Characterization of East Ford Field, Reeves County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this Class III project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost-effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through geologically based field development. The project focused on reservoir characterization of the East Ford unit, a representative Delaware Mountain Group field that produces from the upper Bell Canyon Formation (Ramsey Sandstone). The field, discovered in 1960, is operated by Oral Petco, Inc., as the East Ford unit: it contained an estimated 18.4 million barrels (MMbbl) of original oil in place.

Dutton, Shirley P.; Flanders, William A.; Guzman, Jose I.; Zirczy, Helena

1999-08-16

373

Evaluation of geopressured brine injectability: Department of Energy, Pleasant Bayou No. 2 well, Brazoria County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

A field evaluation of geopressured brine injectability was completed during September 22 to 25, 1980 at the DOE, Brazoria test site in Texas. Membrane filters, with pore sizes of 0.4-..mu..m and 10.0-..mu..m, were used as the basis for obtaining suspended solids data and for developing performance-life estimates of typical spent brine injection wells. Field measurements were made at 130/sup 0/C and line pressures up to 3800 psig. Scale inhibited (phosphonate-polyacrylate threshold-type, carbonate scale inhibitor), prefiltered-scale-inhibited, and untreated brine were evaluated. Test results indicated that raw brine was highly injectable, while scale-inhibited brine had extremely low quality. The poor injectability of scale-inhibited brine resulted from partial precipitation of the scale inhibitor.

Owen, L.B.; Blair, C.K.; Harrar, J.E.; Netherton, R.

1980-10-28

374

Secondary recovery from the Dune Field, Crane County, Texas, is viable through mine workings  

SciTech Connect

Data in Report of Investigations No. 168, published by the Bureau of Economic Geology, University of Texas, indicate the Dune field is a good candidate for secondary recovery of mobile residual oil through an oil mine as described in US Patent {number sign}4,458,945. If trends identified in RI No. 168 can be extended into adjacent sections, oil recovery in the range of $10.00 per barrel or less should be possible. Mine workings will permit a more detailed mapping field jointing and fracturing, in turn permitting better placement of wells on 1 acre or closer spacing. Shafts to the surface would be a mile or more apart greatly decreasing environmental impact. Wastewater generated could be re-introduced to assist in retaining reservoir pressures. If mine workings are driven in hard limestones, as would be possible in the Dune field, produced mine spoil would be marketable as gravel for the concrete industry.

Ayler, M.F. (Hydrocarbon Mining Co., Golden, CO (United States))

1991-03-01

375

Late diagenetic indicators of buried oil and gas. 2: Direct detection experiment at Cement and Garza fields, Oklahoma and Texas, using enhanced LANDSAT 1 and 2 images  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author has identified the following significant results. The Cement oil field, Oklahoma, was a test site for an experiment designed to evaluate LANDSAT's capability to detect an alteration zone in surface rocks caused by hydrocarbon microseepage. Loss of iron and impregnation of sandstone by carbonate cements and replacement of gypsum by calcite were the major alteration phenomena at Cement. The bedrock alterations were partially masked by unaltered overlying beds, thick soils, and dense natural and cultivated vegetation. Interpreters, biased by detailed ground truth, were able to map the alteration zone subjectively using a magnified, filtered, and sinusoidally stretched LANDSAT composite image; other interpreters, unbiased by ground truth data, could not duplicate that interpretation.

Donovan, T. J.; Termain, P. A.; Henry, M. E. (principal investigators)

1979-01-01

376

Geology and hydrostratigraphy of Guadalupe River State Park and Honey Creek State Natural Area, Kendall and Comal Counties, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Hydrogeologic mapping and descriptions of the lithostratigraphy and hydrostratigraphy of Guadalupe River State Park and Honey Creek State Natural Area, Kendall and Comal Counties, Texas, are presented in this first detailed 1:24,000 geologic map, along with proposed names and descriptions of the hydrostratigraphic units in the study area. Variations in the amount and type of porosity of the lithostratigraphic unit, which vary depending on the depositional environment, lithology, structural history and diagenesis support the resulting hydrostratigraphy proposed herein. Rocks exposed in the study area consist of Early Cretaceous sedimentary rocks that are assigned to the Trinity Group. The lithostratigraphy includes the Hammett Shale, Cow Creek Limestone, Hensell Sand Members of the Pearsall Formation, and the lower member of the Glen Rose Limestone. These lithologic units contain shale, grainstone, sandstone, and fossiliferous limestone, alternating and interfingering with mudstone, wackestone, packstone, and grainstone. The Trinity aquifer hydrostratigraphic units shown on the map and described herein are characterized by their porosity types. Porosity types were first determined from an analysis of two boreholes conducted in comparison with 143 geophysical logs from northern Bexar County, Texas. The cores and geophysical log comparison resulted in division of the lower member of the Glen Rose Limestone into six hydrostratigraphic units, designated A through F. Of those six units, only three remain in the study area because of erosion. The proposed naming of these three hydrostratigraphic units is based on topographic or historical features that occur in the outcrop area of those units. Hydrostratigraphic units that correlate with the boundaries of the formation have been given formational names excluding the lithologic modifier. The Doeppenschmidt hydrostratigraphic unit is stratigraphically the highest interval in the study area, characterized by interparticle, moldic, burrowed, bedding plane, fracture, and cave porosity. The underlying Rust hydrostratigraphic unit appears to be a confining unit with springs/seeps issuing near the contact with the overlying Doeppenschmidt unit. The Rust unit has interparticle, fracture, and cave porosity with cave porosity primarily associated with faulting. The Honey Creek hydrostratigraphic unit is an aquifer in the subsurface and exhibits extremely, well developed porosity and permeability including interparticle, moldic, burrowed, bedding plane, fracture, channel, and cave porosity. This unit is named for Honey Creek Cave, which discharges water into Honey Creek. The Hensell hydrostratigraphic unit contains primarily interparticle porosity, but also exhibits some moldic and cave porosity in its upper parts. The Cow Creek hydrostratigraphic unit contains interparticle, moldic, vug, burrowed, fracture, bedding plane, channel, and cave porosity. The Cow Creek hydrostratigraphic unit is an aquifer in the subsurface and is the primary target for water-well drillers in the area. The Hammett hydrostratigraphic unit is not exposed in the study area but is thought to underlie parts of the Guadalupe River, based on mapping of the overlying units and comparisons with subsurface thicknesses obtained from the geophysical log. The Hammett unit restricts the downward migration of groundwater, resulting in springs that discharge at the base of the Cow Creek unit. These springs also create some base flow to the Guadalupe River during periods of extreme drought. The faulting and fracturing in the study area are part of the Miocene Balcones Fault Zone, which is an extensional system of faults that generally trend southwest to northeast in south-central Texas. An igneous dike, containing aphanitic texture, cuts through the center of the study area near the confluence of Honey Creek and the Guadalupe River. The dike penetrates the Cow Creek Limestone and the lower part of the Hensell Sand, which outcrops at three locations.

Clark, Allan K.; Blome, Charles D.; Morris, Robert R.

2014-01-01

377

Oklahoma Forestry Services  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The mission of the Oklahoma Forestry Services (OFS) is "to conserve, enhance and protect the forest resources of Oklahoma for present and future generations." As part of this mission the OFS website contains information about fire reports, tree and forest health, and water quality. First-time visitors should start their journey through the site by clicking on the "Oklahoma's Forests" section. Here they will find information about Oklahoma's major forest types, the ecoregions of Oklahoma, and several Trees of Oklahoma fact sheets. Back on the homepage, visitors can learn about upcoming workshops and events, read a list of forestry bulletins, and find out about the Forest Heritage Center Museum. Residents of Oklahoma may also wish to look through the "Home and Community Trees" area to learn more about planning their own trees and Arbor Day related activities.

378

Fertilizer Statistics for Texas.  

E-print Network

TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION B. YOUNGBLOOD, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION. BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS BULLETIN NO. 350 APRIL, 1927 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY FERTILIZER STATISTICS FOR TEXAS AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS T. 0. WALTON..., Ph. D.. Professor of Marketing and Finance D. SCOATES A. E Professor of Agricultural Engineering H. P. SMITE;, B. 1927. *On Leave. **Dean, School of Veterinary Medicine. ***In...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1927-01-01

379

A study of the North Magnolia City oil field, Jim Wells County, Texas  

E-print Network

38 7 By M73 ~ . , I';, ', -3aeS ' I MBLK 0 -a~i 30k ', j~& ? ~o HOWE LL Thompson - MSP gQ g( gQ E. . JONE -Pig@ 4-A Q ~ + "Maa 9 5 0 BEN HU E HUMBt E Nina BLE ( KlRKSO E. -; M. AYO) S Est. 8 ANAN SLl LIA "2'r23.... hmil le ttr -?80. ?? . 8. SYGD RD )~&5 J, Berm t Sl, NCL PR onio Jo t State Land Bonk R. R. Mullin S, H. Curnmins 2760 NORTH MA( NOI IA CIT Y FIELD Ji M WELLS COUNTY, TE XAS Scale: I inch = IOQO feet Contour Interval: 2G feet M. V. I...

Goodwyn, James Turner

1951-01-01

380

Commander field: Case study of a gas productive landsat and geochemical anomaly, Parker County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Landsat data for a mature area of southern Parker County were analyzed for structural anomalies and lineaments in order to determine the relationship of these data to gas production and the possible fracturing of Atoka sand reservoirs. Interstitial soil gas data gathered over a 160 acre tract revealed a strong surface anomaly situated at the intersection of two lineaments. The drilling of this anomaly resulted in gas production from a Bend conglomerate and excellent mudlog shows of gas from shallower sands in the Atoka and Strawn intervals. A subsequent offset well, located within the original surface soil gas anomaly, also proved gas productive in the shallow Strawn interval. Well data from the productive gas zones are discussed in relation to local stratigraphy and structure. The limitations and advantages of Landsat/soil gas data are considered in terms of future applicability to other mature areas.

Crowder, W.T. Jr. [Consulting Geologist, Dallas, TX (United States)

1995-06-01

381

Cultural resources: Deaf Smith and Swisher County locations, Palo Duro Basin, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Cultural resources are prehistoric and historic sites, including archeological and paleontological sites, that are important to a group of people. They are protected by both federal and state legislation. In the area covered by the Deaf Smith and Swisher County locations, four stages of cultural development have been identified: Paleo-Indian, Archaic, Ceramic (Neo-Indian or Neo-American), and Historic. Areas where undiscovered cultural resources are most likely to be found include sources of water, playa lakes, and historic trails. Because extensive surveying has not been done in either location, the number of identified sites is low. However, the potential for finding undiscovered sites is high for significant parts of both locations.

Not Available

1984-12-01

382

Educational programs of the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service are open to all people without regard to race, color, sex, disability, religion, age, or national origin. The Texas A&M University System, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the County Comm  

E-print Network

Educational programs of the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service are open to all people without System, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the County Commissioners Courts of Texas Cooperating. Do Well, Be Well with Diabetes Do you have Type 2 diabetes? Do you want to be healthier? If so, Do Well , Be Well

383

Educational programs of the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service are open to all people without regard to race, color, sex, disability, religion, age, or national origin. The Texas A&M University System, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the County Comm  

E-print Network

Educational programs of the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service are open to all people without System, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the County Commissioners Courts of Texas Cooperating #12, Extension Assistant-Clothing September 1995 #12;4-H Fashion and Fabric Design A Clothing and Textiles Leader

384

Educational programs of Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service are open to all people without regard to race, color, sex, disability, religion, age, or national origin. The Texas A&M University System, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the County Commissi  

E-print Network

Educational programs of Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service are open to all people without regard.S. Department of Agriculture, and the County Commissioners Courts of Texas Cooperating Name & Phone NumberLife Extension Service are open to all people without regard to race, color, sex, disability, religion, age

385

Geologic controls on movement of produced-water releases at US geological survey research Site A, Skiatook lake, Osage county, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Highly saline produced water was released from multiple sources during oil field operations from 1913 to 1973 at the USGS research Site A on Skiatook Lake in northeastern Oklahoma. Two pits, designed to hold produced water and oil, were major sources for release of these fluids at the site. Produced water spills from these and other features moved downslope following topography and downdip by percolating through permeable eolian sand and colluvium, underlying permeable sandstone, and, to a lesser extent, through shales and mudstones. Saline water penetrated progressively deeper units as it moved through the gently dipping bedrock to the north and NW. A large eroded salt scar north of the pits coincides with underlying fine-grained rocks that have retained substantial concentrations of salt, causing slow revegetation. Where not eroded, thick eolian sand or permeable sandstone bedrock is near the surface, and vegetation has been little affected or has reestablished itself after the introduced salt was flushed by precipitation. The extent of salt-contaminated bedrock extends well beyond existing surface salt scars. These results indicate that one of the legacies of surface salt spills can be a volume of subsurface salinization larger than the visible surface disturbance. ?? 2007.

Otton, J.K.; Zielinski, R.A.; Smith, B.D.; Abbott, M.M.

2007-01-01

386

40 CFR 81.337 - Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...County Dewey County Ellis County Harper County Major County Roger Mills County...County Dewey County Ellis County Harper County Major County Roger Mills County...County Dewey County Ellis County Harper County Major County Roger Mills...

2010-07-01

387

Progress Report, Texas Substation No. 6, Denton, Texas, 1909-14.  

E-print Network

TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION BULLETIN NO. 199 DECEMBER, 1916 PROGRESS REPORT, TEXAS SUBSTATION NO. 6, DENTON, TEXAS POSTOFFICE : COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS. - AUSTIN, TEXAS : VON BOECKMANN-JONES CO., PRINTERS, 1916.... [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION BULLETIN NO. 199 DECEMBER, 1916 PROGRESS REPORT, TEXAS SUBSTATION NO. 6, DENTON, TEXAS V. L. CORY, B. S. . SUPERINTENDENT , . POSTOFFICE : COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY...

Cory, V. L. (Vivian L.)

1916-01-01

388

Geologic and engineering characterization of Geraldine Ford field, Reeves and Culberson Counties, Texas. Topical report -- 1997  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this Class III project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of clastic reservoirs in basinal sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost-effective way to recover more of the original oil in place by strategic infill-well placement and geologically based field development. The study focused on Geraldine Ford field, which produces from the upper Bell Canyon formation (Ramsey sandstone). Petrophysical characterization of the Ford Geraldine unit was accomplished by integrating core and log data and quantifying petrophysical properties from wireline logs. The petrophysical data were used to map porosity, permeability, net pay, water saturation, mobile oil saturation, and other reservoir properties. Once the reservoir-characterization study was completed, a demonstration area of approximately 1 mi{sup 2} in the northern part of the unit was chosen for reservoir modeling/simulation. A quarter of a five-spot injection pattern in the demonstration area was selected for flow simulations, and two cases of permeability distribution were considered, one using stochastic permeability distribution generated by conditional simulation and the other using layered permeabilities. Flow simulations were performed using UTCOMP, an isothermal, three-dimensional, compositional simulator for miscible gas flooding. Results indicate that 10--30% (1 to 3 MMbbl) of remaining oil in place in the demonstration area can be produced by CO{sub 2} injection.

Dutton, S.P.; Malik, M.A.; Asquith, G.B.; Barton, M.D.; Cole, A.G.; Gogas, J.; Clift, S.J.; Guzman, J.I.

1998-04-01

389

The geologic structure of part of the southern Franklin Mountains, El Paso County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Franklin Mountains are a west tilted fault block mountain range which extends northwards from the city of El Paso, Texas. Geologic mapping in the southern portion of the Franklin Mountains has revealed many previously unrecognized structural complexities. Three large high-angle faults define the boundaries of map. Twenty lithologic units are present in the field area, including the southernmost Precambrian meta-sedimentary rocks in the Franklin Mountains (Lanoria Quartzite and Thunderbird group conglomerates). The area is dominated by Precambrian igneous rocks and lower Paleozoic carbonates, but Cenozoic ( ) intrusions are also recognized. Thin sections and rock slabs were used to describe and identify many of the lithologic units. The Franklin Mountains are often referred to as a simple fault block mountain range related to the Rio Grande Rift. Three critical regions within the study area show that these mountains contain structural complexities. In critical area one, Precambrian granites and rhyolites are structurally juxtaposed, and several faults bisecting the area affect the Precambrian/Paleozoic fault contact. Critical area two contains multiple NNW-trending faults, three sills and a possible landslide. This area also shows depositional features related to an island of Precambrian rock exposed during deposition of the lower Paleozoic rocks. Critical area three contains numerous small faults which generally trend NNE. They appear to be splays off of one of the major faults bounding the area. Cenozoic kaolinite sills and mafic intrusion have filled many of the fault zones.

Smith, W.R.; Julian, F.E. (Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States). Dept. of Geosciences)

1993-02-01

390

North Central Texas Council of Governments North Central Texas  

E-print Network

North Central Texas Council of Governments North Central Texas Thinking Ahead Donna Coggeshall North Central Texas Council of Governments #12;North Central Texas Council of Governments Thinking Ahead are for the 12-county MPA #12;North Central Texas Council of Governments Thinking Ahead Development Form #12

Texas at Arlington, University of

391

Technical procedures for implementation of aesthetics site studies, Deaf Smith County site, Texas: Environmental Field Program  

SciTech Connect

This chapter introduces the purpose and scope of the visually affected areas determination, as well as definitions, interfaces, and concurrent data needs. This procedure provides a method for determining the extent of visibility of the project. This area is identified as the visually affected area, and becomes the area within which all visual analysis is conducted. The visually affected area analysis of the Deaf Smith County site will involve identifying and mapping the visibility of all major proposed project features. Baseline analysis will be conducted within the overall visually affected area; impact assessment will be conducted within the visually affected area of each major project feature. This procedure presents the guidelines for determining the visually affected area will be in computer data base construction; viewshed modeling, and site visit and verification of results. Computer data base construction will involve digitizing topographic and project facility data from available data source. The extent of the visible area from each major project feature will then be plotted. Finally, these computer-generated visibility plots will be verified in the field.

Not Available

1987-06-01

392

Site study plan for Deep Hydronest Test Wells, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Preliminary draft  

SciTech Connect

Wells called Deep Hydronest Wells will be installed at six locations at the Deaf Smith County Site to characterize hydraulic parameters in the geologic column between the top of the San Andres Formation and the base of Pennsylvanian System. Three hydronests will be drilled during early stages of site characterization to provide data for performance assessment modeling. Four wells are proposed for each of these 3 nests. Results of drilling, testing, and preliminary modeling will direct drilling and testing activities at the last 3 nests. Two wells are proposed at each of the last 3 nests for a total of 18 wells. The Salt Repository Project (SRP) Networks specify the schedule under which this program will operate. Drilling and hydrologic testing of the first Deep Hydronest will begin early in the Surface Investigation Program. Drilling and testing of the first three Deep Hydronests will require about 18 months. After 12 months of evaluating and analyzing data from the first three hydronests, the remaining three hydronests will be drilled during a 12-month period. The Technical Field Services Contractor is responsible for conducting the field program. Samples and data will be handled and reported in accordance with established SRP procedures. A quality assurance program will be used to assure that activities affecting quality are performed correctly and that the appropriate documentation is maintained. 36 refs., 20 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1987-05-01

393

Bayesian analysis of groundwater quality in a semi-arid coastal county of south Texas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Bayesian frameworks for comparing water quality information to a pre-specified standard or goal and comparing water quality characteristics among two different entities are presented and illustrated using chloride and total dissolved solids (TDS) measurements obtained in the shallower Chicot and the deeper Evangeline formations of the Gulf coast aquifer underlying Refugio County, TX. The Bayesian approach seeks to present evidence in favor of the competing hypotheses which are weighed equally and unlike classical statistics do not make a decision in favor of one hypothesis. When comparing water quality information to a specified goal, the Bayesian approach addresses the more practical questiongiven all the information, what is the probability of meeting the goal? Similarly, when comparing the water quality between two entities, the approach simply emphasizes the nature and extent of differences and as such is better suited for evaluative studies. Bayesian analysis indicated that average chloride concentrations in the Evangeline formation was 1.65 times the concentrations in the Chicot formation while the corresponding TDS concentration ratio was close to unity. The probability of identifying water with TDS ?1,000 g/m3 was extremely low, especially in the more prolific Evangeline formation. The probability of groundwater supplies with mean chloride concentrations ?500 g/m3 was relatively high in the Chicot formation but very low in the Evangeline formation indicating the possible need for blending groundwater with other sources to meet municipal water quality goals.

Uddameri, V.

2007-01-01

394

Analysis of borehole geophysical information across a uranium deposit in the Jackson Group, Karnes County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Borehole geophysical studies across a uranium deposit in the Jackson Group, South Texas, show the three geochemical environments often associated with uranium roll-type deposits: an altered (oxidized) zone, an ore zone, and an unaltered (reduced) zone. Mineralogic analysis of the total sulfides contained in the drill core shows only slight changes in the total sulfide content among the three geochemical regimes. However, induced polarization measurements on the core samples indicate that samples obtained from the reduced side of the ore zone are more electrically polarizable than those from the oxidized side of the ore zone, and therefore probably contain more pyrite. Analysis of the clay-size fraction in core samples indicates that montmorillonite is the dominant clay mineral. High resistivity values within the ore zone indicate the presence of calcite cement concentrations that are higher than those seen outside of the ore zone. Between-hole resistivity and induced polarization measurements show the presence of an extensive zone of calcite cement within the ore zone, and electrical polarizable material (such as pyrite) within and on the reduced side of the ore zone. A quantitative analysis of the between-hole resistivity data, using a layered-earth model, and a qualitative analysis of the between-hole induced polarization measurements showed that mineralogic variations among the three geochemical environments were more pronounced than were indicated by the geophysical and geologic well logs. Uranium exploration in the South Texas Coastal Plain area has focused chiefly in three geologic units: the Oakville Sandstone, the Catahoula Tuff, and the Jackson Group. The Oakville Sandstone and the Catahoula Tuff are of Miocene age, and the Jackson Group is of Eocene age (Eargle and others, 1971). Most of the uranium mineralization in these formations is low grade (often less than 0.02 percent U3O8) and occurs in shallow deposits that are found by concentrated exploratory drilling programs. The sporadic occurrence of these deposits makes it desirable to develop borehole geophysical techniques that will help to define the depositional environments of the uranium ore, which is characterized by geochemical changes near the uranium deposits. Geochemical changes are accompanied by changes in the physical characteristics of the rocks that can be detected with borehole geophysical tools. This study is concerned with a uranium deposit within the Jackson Group that is located just east of Karnes City, Tex. Five holes were drilled on this property to obtain borehole geophysical data and cores. The cores were analyzed for mineralogic and electrical properties. The borehole geophysical information at this property included induced polarization, resistivity, gamma-gamma density, neutron-neutron, gamma-ray, caliper, and single-point-resistance logs. Between-hole resistivity and induced polarization measurements were made between hole pairs across the ore deposit and off the ore deposit.

Daniels, Jeffrey J.; Scott, James Henry; Smith, Bruce D.

1979-01-01

395

Oligocene volcanism and multiple caldera formation in the Chinati Mountains, Presidio County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Chinati Mountains caldera, which lies in Trans-Pecos Texas in the southern Basin and Range Province, was formed by eruption of the Mitchell Mesa Rhyolite. Volcanism in the Chinati Mountains area began several million years before formation of the Chinati Mountains caldera. Rocks of the Morita Ranch Formation, Infiernito caldera, and Shely Group ring the caldera on the south, east, and north. After its collapse, the caldera was filled by rhyolitic to trachytic lava flows and an ash-flow tuff of the Chinati Mountains Group. These include, from oldest to youngest, the lower trachyte, middle trachyte, lower rhyolite, upper trachyte, and upper rhyolite (ash-flow tuff). The Chinati Mountains Group was then intruded by the West Chinati Stock, the resurgent dome of the caldera. Three cycles of rhyolitic to trachytic magmatism, all derived from a zoned magma chamber, are represented by (1) Mitchell Mesa Rhyolite to lower and middle trachytes, (2) lower rhyolite to upper trachyte, and (3) upper rhyolite to West Chinati Stock. Dominant caldera collapse followed eruption of the Mitchell Mesa Rhyolite, but collapse is also associated with rhyolitic eruptions in the second and third cycles. The entire sequence erupted between 32 and 33 mya. The Chinati Mountains area is the site of one major, inactive silver mine and numerous prospects for silver, lead, zinc, copper, molybdenum, uranium, and fluorite. The Shafter silver district produced 31 million ounces of silver from Permian dolomitic limestones just south of the southern boundary of the caldera. Major prospects are associated with a quartz-monzonite porphyry intrusion (copper-molybdenum) just west of Shafter and with the West Chinati Stock (silver, lead, zinc, copper, and fluorite). All mineralization is probably genetically related to the caldera. 74 references, 15 figures, 3 tables.

Cepeda, J.C.; Henry, C.D.

1983-01-01

396

Distribution, Abundance, and Habitat Affinities of Oklahoma Muskrats (Ondatra zibethicus): New Insight from Trapper Reports  

Microsoft Academic Search

Distributional records of the muskrat (Ondatra zibethicus) are missing for much of Okla- homa. In the spring of 2005, I further investigated the status of Oklahoma muskrats by collecting surveys from Oklahoma fur trappers and United States Department of Agri- culture wildlife technicians (government trappers). Surveyed individuals were asked to give county locations of muskrat sightings\\/collections, as well as habitats

Brandon McDonald

2006-01-01

397

40 CFR 81.65 - Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region, designated on December 8, 1970, and consisting of the counties of Barton, Jasper, McDonald, and Newton in the State of Missouri and Craig, Delaware, and Ottawa in the State of Oklahoma, is revoked...

2012-07-01

398

40 CFR 81.65 - Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region, designated on December 8, 1970, and consisting of the counties of Barton, Jasper, McDonald, and Newton in the State of Missouri and Craig, Delaware, and Ottawa in the State of Oklahoma, is revoked...

2011-07-01

399

40 CFR 81.65 - Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region, designated on December 8, 1970, and consisting of the counties of Barton, Jasper, McDonald, and Newton in the State of Missouri and Craig, Delaware, and Ottawa in the State of Oklahoma, is revoked...

2013-07-01

400

40 CFR 81.65 - Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region, designated on December 8, 1970, and consisting of the counties of Barton, Jasper, McDonald, and Newton in the State of Missouri and Craig, Delaware, and Ottawa in the State of Oklahoma, is revoked...

2010-07-01

401

40 CFR 81.65 - Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region, designated on December 8, 1970, and consisting of the counties of Barton, Jasper, McDonald, and Newton in the State of Missouri and Craig, Delaware, and Ottawa in the State of Oklahoma, is revoked...

2014-07-01

402

Ground-water levels in observation wells in Oklahoma, 1980-82  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In the 1980-82 Climatic Years, the U. S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Oklahoma Water Resources Board, collected ground-water level data in Oklahoma from 1,122 sites in 77 counties. This report presents this data.

Goemaat, Robert L.; Mize, Lionel D.; Spiser, Dannie E.

1983-01-01

403

Perceptions of Texas County Extension Agents on Volunteers Who Assist With Planning and Implementation of Extension Educational Programs  

E-print Network

The objective of the study was to determine and evaluate county extension agents' perceptions on volunteer management competencies related to their county program. General perceptions related to volunteer management were also assessed. The research...

Matthies, Allen Z.

2012-02-14

404

Petrographic report on samples from units 4 and 5 salt, lower San Andres formation, J. Friemel No. 1 well, Deaf Smith County, Palo Duro Basin, Texas  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of mineralogic and petrographic analyses performed on samples of salt-bearing rock from a potential repository site in the Palo Duro Basin, Texas. The samples are from Permian Units 4 and 5 salt, Lower San Andres Formation, J. Friemel No. 1 well, Deaf Smith County, Texas. The mineralogic and petrographic data were obtained from polished thin sections cut parallel to the axis of the core for each sample. The polished thin sections were examined in order to determine the abundances of soluble (halite) and insoluble components (anhydrite, clay, carbonate, quartz, gypsum, etc.). The information reported here includes mineral associations (detrital, authigenic, cement, alteration, etc.), texture, grain size, and sedimentary fabrics. The report also includes representative photomicrographs with superimposed bar scales. Photomicrographs of polished thin sections have the up-core direction designated. X-ray diffraction was also used for identification of soluble and insoluble minerals. 7 refs., 2 tabs.

Fukui, L.M.; Hopping, R.B.

1985-01-01

405

Historical streamflows of Double Mountain Fork of Brazos River and water-surface elevations of Lake Alan Henry, Garza County, Texas, water years 1962-2010  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the City of Lubbock, Texas, operates two surface-water stations in Garza County, Tex.: USGS streamflow-gaging station 08079600 Double Mountain Fork Brazos River at Justiceburg, Tex., and 08079700 Lake Alan Henry Reservoir, a water-supply reservoir about 60 miles southeast of Lubbock, Tex., and about 10 miles east of Justiceburg, Tex. The streamflow and water-surface elevation data from the two stations are useful to water-resource managers and planners in support of forecasting and water-resource infrastructure operations and are used in regional hydrologic studies.

Asquith, William H.; Vrabel, Joseph

2011-01-01

406

Geodatabase design and characteristics of geologic information for a geodatabase of selected wells penetrating the Austin Group in central Bexar County, Texas, 2010  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the San Antonio Water System, developed a geodatabase of geologic and hydrogeologic information for selected wells penetrating the Austin Group in central Bexar County, Texas. The Austin Group functions as an upper confining unit to the Edwards aquifer and is the thickest and most permeable of the Edwards aquifer confining units. The geologic and hydrogeologic information pertains to a 377-square-mile study area that encompasses central Bexar County. Data were compiled primarily from drillers' and borehole geophysical logs from federal, State, and local agencies and published reports. Austin Group characteristics compiled for 523 unique wells are documented (if known), including year drilled, well depth, altitude of top and base of the Austin Group, and thickness of the Austin Group.

Pedraza, Diana E.; Shah, Sachin D.

2010-01-01

407

Quantitative geophysical investigations at the Diamond M field, Scurry County, Texas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Diamond M field over the Horseshoe Atoll reservoir of west Texas has produced oil since 1942. Even with some 210 well penetrations, complex reservoir compartmentalization has justified an ongoing drilling program with three wells drilled within the last three years. Accurate reservoir characterization requires accurate description of the geometry, geological facies, and petrophysical property distribution ranging from core, through log to the seismic scale. The operator has conducted a careful logging and coring process including dipole sonic logs in addition to acquiring a modern 3D vertical phone - vertical vibrator "P-wave" seismic data volume and an equivalent size 2-component by 2-componet "S-wave" seismic data volume. I analyze these data at different scales, integrating them into a whole. I begin with core analysis of the petrophysical properties of the Horseshoe Atoll reservoir. Measuring porosity, permeability, NMR T2 relaxation and velocities (Vp and Vs) as a function of pressure and find that porosity measurements are consistent when measured with different techniques. When upscaled, these measurements are in excellent agreement with properties measured at the log scale. Together, these measurements provide a lithology-porosity template against which I correlate my seismic P- and S-impedance measurements. Careful examination of P- and S-impedances as well as density from prestack inversion of the P-wave survey of the original time migrated gathers showed lower vertical resolution for S-impedance and density. These latter two parameters are controlled by the far-offset data, which suffers from migration stretch. I address this shortcoming by applying a recently developed non-stretch NMO technique which not only improved the bandwidth of the data but also resulted in inversions that better match the S-impedance and density well log data. The operator hypothesized that 2C by 2C S-wave data would better delineate lithology than conventional P-wave seismic data. Although introduced in the mid-1980s, 2C by 2C data are rarely acquired, with most surveys showing less vertical resolution than conventional (and prior to slip-sweep technology more economically acquired) P-wave data. Initial processing by the service company showed a comparable, but lower frequency, image for the "transverse" component, and poor images for the "radial" component. Although the dipole sonic logs did not indicate the presence of significant anisotropy, shear wave splitting is readily observed on the surface seismic stacks. I therefore developed a prestack Alford rotation algorithm that minimizes the cross-talk between components, resulting vertical resolution comparable to the P-wave data, and independent measure of lithology, and also a direct measure of the direction of the principal axes of anisotropy. The direction of azimuthal anisotropy is aligned N45E consistent with the regional maximum horizontal stress axis obtained from the world stress map database. On average, the Cisco Formation appears 10% thicker on the slow shear (S2) volume than on the fast shear (S1 ) volume and between 70% and 100% thicker on the P-wave volume. Cross-plotting cumulative production against the various seismic attributes, I find a strong negative correlation to S-impedance and P-impedance. Zones of low S-impedance and low P-impedance correlate to better producing wells. More quantitative correlation will require the analysis of the role fractures versus porosity contribute to production.

Davogustto Cataldo, Oswaldo Ernesto

408

Development of a geodatabase for springs within and surrounding outcrops of the Trinity aquifer in northern Bexar County, Texas, 2010-11  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Trinity aquifer is an important source of groundwater in central Texas, including Bexar County, where population growth has resulted in an increased demand for water. Numerous springs issue from rock outcrops within and surrounding the Trinity aquifer in northern Bexar County. The effects of increased groundwater withdrawals from the Trinity aquifer on springflow in the area are not well documented, but because the total amount of water entering, leaving, and being stored in a groundwater system must be conserved, increased groundwater withdrawals will result in decreases in springflow. Documenting the location, discharge, and basic water-quality information of the springs in northern Bexar County can provide a baseline assessment for comparison to future conditions. Accordingly, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Trinity Glen Rose Groundwater Conservation District, the Edwards Aquifer Authority, and the San Antonio River Authority, developed a geodatabase populated with data associated with springs within and surrounding outcrops of the Trinity aquifer in northern Bexar County during 201011. A geodatabase provides a framework for organizing spatial and tabular data (such as the geographic location and water-quality characteristics, respectively) in a relational database environment, making it easier and more intuitive to evaluate changes over time. Data for 141 springs within and surrounding the Trinity aquifer outcrops in northern Bexar County were compiled from existing reports and databases. A field reconnaissance of springs was done between October 2010 and September 2011 to verify the existing location data and collect additional data (discharge measurements, water-quality data, and property owner and photographic documentation) pertaining to the springs. A total of 46 of the 141 springs were visited during the field reconnaissance. Discharge at springs with flow ranged from 0.003 to 1.46 cubic feet per second. Specific conductance was measured in 21 springs and ranged from 167 to 1,130 microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius. Increasing water demands are likely to continue to affect springflows throughout Texas. By completing reconnaissance-level field investigations and compiling existing data, similar geodatabases could be developed for other aquifer systems in Texas.

Clark, Allan K.; Pedraza, Diane E.

2013-01-01

409

Iodine in Texas Soils.  

E-print Network

LT BKAKY. A Ik M COLLEGE, TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS BULLETIN NO. 579 OCTOBER 1939 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY IODINE IN TEXAS SOILS AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE... OF TEXAS T. 0. WALTON, President [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] soil Cen 2.2, 1.7 lb U to I tota an *. Iodine was determined in over 400 samples of soil from various xrts of Texas. When the geographical divisions of the state are -ranged...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Fudge, J. F. (Joseph Franklin)

1939-01-01

410

Updated Distribution of Aedes albopictus in Oklahoma, and Implications in Arbovirus Transmission.  

PubMed

A series of statewide surveys were conducted in Oklahoma in the summers between 1991 and 2004 to identify the distribution of Aedes albopictus. Adult mosquitoes were identified in 63 counties, bringing the currently known distribution of Ae. albopictus in the state to 69 of 77 counties. The widespread presence of Ae. albopictus in Oklahoma has important current and future public and veterinary health implications for surveillance and control efforts. PMID:25843181

Noden, Bruce H; Coburn, Lisa; Wright, Russell; Bradley, Kristy

2015-03-01

411

Alfalfa Information for West Texas Updated February, 2005  

E-print Network

Alfalfa Information for West Texas Updated February, 2005 The following documents and websites contain information, including New Mexico (alfalfa is the #1 cash crop) and Oklahoma, helpful to West Texas alfalfa producers. Alfalfa publications in Texas are limited as the Texas A&M System currently has

Mukhtar, Saqib

412

MIXED HERONRIES OF OKLAHOMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objectives of this 3-year study were to locate mixed heronries in Oklahoma, census breeding pairs of each species, and indentify site characteristics that may be important to heron ecology. During the study, 17 mixed heronries, containing a total of six ardeid species, were found in Oklahoma. The majority of heronries (82%) were located within the oak-woodland fauna region. Other

G. William Sallee

1982-01-01

413

Oklahoma Tribes: A History  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Oklahoma is a microcosm of American Indian country. Water rights, tribal government impotence, jurisdiction, tribal membership, treaty rights, taxation, sovereignty, racism, and poor housing, education, and health are all vital issues facing the Indian tribes of Oklahoma. In order to understand the complexity of these issues, a review of the

Gover, Kevin

1977-01-01

414

Pride in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet is intended to be used as background material by social studies and history classroom teachers as they develop and implement educational programs on Oklahoma's heritage. It includes background information on the land and people of Oklahoma (geology, climate, topography, vegetation, animals, prehistoric peoples, French explorers,

Moore, Gordon; Blackburn, Bob L.

415

Progress Report of Substation No. 4, Beaumont, Texas, 1909-1914.  

E-print Network

TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION BULLETIN NO. 200 DECEMBER, 1916 = PROGRESS REPORT, SUBSTATION NO. 4, BEAUMONT, TEXAS B. YOUWOBLOOD, DIRECTOR, ' COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS. TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION BULLETIN NO.... 200 DECEMBER, 191 6 PROGRESS REPORT, SUBSTATION NO. 4, BEAUMONT, TEXAS H. H. LAUDE, B. S., SUPERINTENDENT B. YOUNGBLOOD, DIRECTOR, COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS. - - AUSTIN, TEXAS : VON BOECKMANN- JONES CO., PRINTEBS, 1917...

Laude, H. H. (Hilmer Henry)

1916-01-01

416

Alternative methods to manage waste salt from repository excavation in the Deaf Smith County and Swisher County locations, Texas: A scoping study: Technical report. [Salt and salt-laden material  

SciTech Connect

This report describes and qualitatively evaluates eight options for managing the large volumes of salt and salt-laden rock that would result from the excavation of a high-level radioactive waste repository in Deaf Smith County or Swisher County, Texas. The options are: distribution for commercial use; ocean disposal; deep-well injection; disposal in multilevel mines on the site; disposal in abandoned salt mines off the site; disposal off the site in abandoned mines developed for minerals other than salt; disposal in excavated landfills; and surface disposal on alkali flats. The main features of each option are described, as well as the associated environmental and economic impacts, and regulatory constraints. The options are evaluated in terms of 11 factors that jointly constitute a test of relative suitability. The results of the evaluation and implications for further study are indicated. This document does not consider or include the actual numbers, findings, or conclusions contained in the final Deaf Smith County Environmental Assessment (DOE, 1986). 43 refs., 8 tabs.

Not Available

1987-01-01

417

Poultry Houses and Poultry Equipment for Texas.  

E-print Network

~CTOR. COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS. es- , AUSTIN. TEXAS: VON BOECKMANN-JONES CO., PRINTERS, 1917 AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS W. B. BIZZELL, A. M.. D. C. L., President TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS...I cnAS AGKICULTURAL EXPE RlMENl' STATION BULLETIN NO. 207 JANUARY, 1917 -- - DIVISION OF POULTRY HUSBANDRY Poultry Houses and Poultry Equipment for Texas B. YOUNGBLOOD, DIRECTOR, COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS. [Blank Page in Original...

Harvey, R. N.; Olsen, J.C.; Kazmeier, F.W.; Conway, T.J.

1917-01-01

418

Estimating 1980 ground-water pumpage for irrigation on the High Plains in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Current ground-water use is required for the High Plains Regional Aquifer-System Analysis. In response to this need, a sampling approach was developed to estimate water pumped for irrigation on the High Plains during 1980. Pumpage was computed by combining application estimates with mapped irrigated-acreage information. Irrigation application (inches of water applied) was measured at 480 sites in 15 counties in the High Plains during the 1980 growing season. The relationship between calculated Blaney-Criddle irrigation demand and measured application was used to estimate application for unsampled areas of the High Plains. Application estimates multiplied by irrigated-acreate estimates, compiled from Landsat-satellite imagery, yielded the volume of ground water pumped for irrigation. The estimate of ground water pumped for irrigation in the High Plains during 1980 and 18,902,000 acre-feet for 13 ,715,000 irrigated areas. The sampled application data were evaluated for significant trends. The application was greater for crops requiring more water such as corn and hay and less for crops such as sorghum, grain, and cotton. The data showed greater application for flood-irrigated systems than for sprinkler-irrigation systems. Areas of the High Plains with thin saturated thickness tended to have a smaller average discharge per well, fewer irrigated acres per well, and a predominance of crops requiring less water crops. (USGS).

Heimes, F.J.; Luckey, R.R.

1983-01-01

419

Houston KIDS COUNT: A Snapshot of Children Living in Houston and Harris County. 2005 Texas KIDS COUNT Special Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Houston KIDS COUNT data book examines the status of children in Houston and Harris County and identifies trends in their general welfare. These data provide a portrait of Harris County's children that can be used for developing sound and effective local policy. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) Children in Families; (2)

Center for Public Policy Priorities, 2005

2005-01-01

420

Huminite reflectance measurements of Paleocene and Upper Cretaceous coals from borehole cuttings, Zavala and Dimmit counties, South Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The reflectance of huminite in 19 cuttings samples was determined in support of ongoing investigations into the coal bed methane potential of subsurface Paleocene and Upper Cretaceous coals of South Texas. Coal cuttings were obtained from the Core Research Center of the Bureau of Economic Geology, The University of Texas at Austin. Geophysical logs, mud-gas logs, driller's logs, completion cards, and scout tickets were used to select potentially coal-bearing sample suites and to identify specific sample depths. Reflectance measurements indicate coals of subbituminous rank are present in a wider area in South Texas than previously recognized.

Hackley, Paul C.; Hook, Robert W.; Warwick, Peter D.

2005-01-01

421

State summaries: Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2005, Oklahoma mines produced both industrial minerals and coal. No metals were mined in the state. Based on value, leading industrial minerals include crushed stone followed by cement, construction sand and gravel, industrial sand and gravel, iodine and gypsum. The Oklahoma Department of Mines (ODOM) reported that more than 343 mine operators produced nonfuel minerals from 405 mines in the state. However, 530 mining permitted sites were on file. The Oklahoma Miner Training Institute (OMTI) held 239 classes for 33,768 classroom hours of instruction, in which 84 coal miners and 4,587 metal/nonmetal miners were trained.

Krukowski, S.T.

2006-01-01

422

Competencies, benefits and limitations for Master Gardener Coordinators: a delphi technique involving county extension agents in Texas  

E-print Network

time commitments. The results of this study will provide Texas Master Gardener Coordinators a list of essential competencies for effectively managing a Master Gardener program. This list will help Extension Master Gardener Coordinators most effectively...

Lockett, Landry

2007-09-17

423

An evaluation of extension specialist newsletters as a means of disseminating information to the county extension agents of Texas  

E-print Network

RANB "" ~ ?. . . . ". ~ . ?. . ? 39 AGENTSs ATTITUDES TO THE QUESTIONs HOM CAN NE HETTER SERVE RADIO ~ TV/ FARM NAGAZINES& AiiD HZMSPAPZR MITIl AGRICULTURAL AND HcBE Ec 0NE INFsNsHAT IDN ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 40 ATTITUDE GF AGENTS TOMARD... posed in the obfectives. These questionnaires were mailed to 730 agr1cultural and home demonstration agents in Texas, A personal letter bearing the signature of J. D Prewit~ Associcte Direc- to of the Texas Agricultu 'al Extension Service, accompanied...

Brown, Reagan V

1957-01-01

424

40 CFR 81.94 - Shreveport-Texarkana-Tyler Interstate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Vernon Parish, Webster Parish, Winn Parish. In the State of Oklahoma: McCurtain County. In the State of Texas: Anderson County, Bowie County, Camp County, Cass County, Cherokee County, Delta County, Franklin County, Gregg County,...

2010-07-01

425

Determination of foraminiferal criteria for environmental interpretation using Upper Cretaceous sandstones, Brazos, Frio, Walker, and Zavala counties, Texas  

E-print Network

of the Amalga- mated Bonanza Smith 2 and a basinal depositional en- vironment for the shale of the Morgan Central Coal and Coke, G-4 Wildcat 7) Few tests were recovered from the sediments of the Amalgamated Bonanza Smith 2 and the Norgan Central Coal... Bigfoot Field, Frio County, and one San Miguel sandstone core, Zavala County, represent a range of environments from inner to outer shelf. Two Upper Cretaceous Wood- bine sandstone and shale cores from Kurten field, Brazos County, and from a wildcat...

Nufer, Janet Ann

1979-01-01

426

Interpretation of Pennsylvania Bartlesville sandstone in southeastern Kansas and northeastern Oklahoma from continuous dipmeter and gamma-ray logs  

E-print Network

INTERPRETATION OF PENNSYLVANIAN BARTLESVILLE SANDSTONE IN SOUTHEASTERN KANSAS AND NORTHEASTERN OKLAHOMA FROM CONTINUOUS DIPMETER AND GAMMA-RAY LOGS A Thesis by DWIGHT STANLEY KRANZ Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University... Oklahoma from Continuous Diometer and Gamma-Ray Logs (May 1981) Dwight Stanley Kranz, B. S. , Texas aBI1 L~niversity Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Robert R. Berg The Bartlesville sandstones form stratigraohic traps which have produced...

Kranz, Dwight Stanley

1981-01-01

427

Flow pattern in regional aquifers and flow relations between the lower Colorado River valley and regional aquifers in six counties of southeastern Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The 318-river-mile reach of the Lower Colorado River from Mansfield Dam near Austin, Texas, to the Gulf of Mexico is underlain directly or indirectly by six regional aquifers--the Trinity, Edwards, Carrizo-Wilcox, Queen City, Sparta, and Gulf Coast. The Trinity aquifer is further subdivided into the lower Trinity, middle Trinity, and upper Trinity aquifers. Generalized potentiometric-surface maps of each regional aquifer show the groundwater flow pattern near the river valley. Each regional aquifer discharges water to the lower Colorado River valley, particularly in the outcrop area of each aquifer. Only the Gulf Coast aquifer in central Wharton County appears to be recharged by water in the river valley. A summary map shows those subreaches of the lower Colorado River that gain water from the aquifers and the subreaches that lose water to the aquifers. (USGS)

Woodward, D.G.

1989-01-01

428

Staged Field Experiment No. 3: Application of advanced technologies in tight-gas sandstones. Travis Peak and Cotton Valley Formation, Waskom Field, Harrison County, Texas reservoirs. Topical report  

SciTech Connect

The Gas Research Institute has sponsored research directed towards improving the recovery efficiency and reducing the cost of producing gas from tight reservoirs. To more effectively acquire data and perform research experiments, the concept of Staged Field Experiments (SFEs) was developed. SFE No. 3 is the third well in a series of four SFEs. The well is located in the Waskom Field in Harrison County, Texas. Engineering and geologic data were measured and analyzed on the Travis Peak and Cotton Valley Formations. SFE No. 3 provided a field laboratory site to test technology on in-situ stress profiling, fracture diagnostics, real-time fracture analysis, and pre- and post-fracture well performance analysis. The report documents the detailed information and results from GRI's research efforts in SFE No. 3.

Not Available

1991-02-01

429

Petrographic report on clay-rich samples from Permian Unit 4 salt, G. Friemel No. 1 well, Palo Duro Basin, Deaf Smith County, Texas: unanalyzed data  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of mineralogic and petrographic analyses performed on five samples of clay-rich rock from salt-bearing Permian strata sampled by drill core from G. Friemel No. 1 Well, Deaf Smith County, Texas. Five samples of clay-rich rock from depths of about 2457, 2458, 2521, 2548, and 2568 feet were analyzed to determine the amounts of soluble phase (halite) and the amounts and mineralogy of the insoluble phases. The amounts of halite found were 59, 79, 47, 40, and 4 weight percent, respectively, for the samples. The insoluble minerals are predominately clay (20 to 60 volume percent) and anhydrite (up to 17 volume percent), with minor (about 1.0%) and trace amounts of quartz, dolomite, muscovite, and gypsum. The clays include illite, chlorite, and interstratified chlorite-smectite. The results presented in this petrographic report are descriptive, uninterpreted data. 2 references, 7 tables.

Fukui, L.M.

1983-09-01

430

Water-level changes in the Ogallala aquifer, northwestern Oklahoma.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Ogallala aquifer, that part of the High Plains aquifer in Oklahoma, is part of a regional aquifer system that underlies parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. In 1978 the US Geological Survey began a 5- year study of the High Plains regional aquifer system to provide hydrologic information for evaluation of the effects of long-term development of the aquifer and to develop a capability for predicting aquifer response to various ground-water-management alternatives (Weeks, 1978). -from Author

Havens, J.S.

1985-01-01

431

Oklahoma Industrial Energy Management Program  

E-print Network

OKLAHCJ1A INDUSTRIAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM* Wayne C. Turner Richard E. Webb James M. Phillips Trevor A. Viljoen School of Industrial Engineering and Management Oklahoma Department of Energy Oklahoma State University Stillwater...

Turner, W. C.; Webb, R. E.; Phillips, J. M.; Viljoen, T. A.

1979-01-01

432

Texas fever : Second Report : Experiments Made by the Texas Experiment Station in Immunizing Northern Breeding Cattle Against Texas Fever.  

E-print Network

I TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS. Vetefinary Section. -JANUARY, 1902.- Live Stock. TEXAS FEVER. (SECOND REPORT.) [BY ORDEK OF THE COUNCIL.] POSTOFFICE: COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS. TEXAS FEVER FROM INOCULATION. J. J... free of cost to farmers, Irorticulturists and stocknzen of the State upon application to tlze Director. TEXAS FEVER. ( SECOND REPORT.) Experiments made by the Texas Experiment Station in lmmuniz= I ing Northern Breeding Cattle Against Texas Fever...

Francis, M. (Mark)

1902-01-01

433

Aquifer tests in the flood-plain alluvium and Santa Fe group at the Rio Grande near Canutillo, El Paso County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An aquifer system consisting of the Rio Grande flood-plain alluvium and Santa Fe Group underlying the southern Mesilla Valley in Dona Ana County, New Mexico and El Paso County, Texas has become an important source of water for both municipal and agricultural uses. Determination of aquifer properties is essential in order to evaluate groundwater potential for increasing water demand and potential streamflow depletion of the Rio Grande due to groundwater development. The aquifer system at the Canutillo well field hydrologic section was divided into a shallow, intermediate, and deep zone based on geohydrologic characteristics. Aquifer properties of specific zones at the test site were determined from a series of multiple-well aquifer tests conducted from December 3, 1985 through January 20, 1986. The Rio Grande is hydraulically connected to the shallow flood-plain alluvium. Water generally occurs within the shallow zone under unconfined conditions, within the intermediate zone under semiconfined conditions, and within the deep zone under confined conditions. (USGS)

Nickerson, Edward L.

1989-01-01

434

Host feeding pattern of Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae) and its role in transmission of West Nile virus in Harris County, Texas.  

PubMed

The vertebrate hosts of 672 blood-engorged Culex quinquefasciatus Say, collected in Harris County, Texas, during 2005, were identified by nucleotide sequencing PCR products of the cytochrome b gene. Analysis revealed that 39.1% had acquired blood from birds, 52.5% from mammals, and 8.3% were mixed avian and mammalian blood meals. Most frequent vertebrate hosts were dog (41.0%), mourning dove (18.3%), domestic cat (8.8%), white-winged dove (4.3%), house sparrow (3.2%), house finch (3.0%), gray catbird (3.0%), and American robin (2.5%). Results are interpreted in conjunction with concurrent avian and mosquito West Nile virus (WNV) surveillance activities in Harris County. We conclude that Cx. quinquefasciatus is an opportunistic feeder and principal mosquito vector of WNV in this metropolitan area; however, transmission by other mosquito species or by other modes of infection, such as ingestion, must account for the high WNV infection rates among local blue jays and American crows. PMID:17620633

Molaei, Goudarz; Andreadis, Theodore G; Armstrong, Philip M; Bueno, Rudy; Dennett, James A; Real, Susan V; Sargent, Chris; Bala, Adilelkhidir; Randle, Yvonne; Guzman, Hilda; Travassos da Rosa, Amelia; Wuithiranyagool, Taweesak; Tesh, Robert B

2007-07-01

435

State Documents Collection in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A questionnaire was distributed to a selected group of Oklahoma academic, public, and special libraries to survey their patterns of acquisition, organization, and reference use of Oklahoma state documents collections. Findings revealed serious deficiencies in the provision of current, comprehensive, and well organized collections of Oklahoma

Tomberlin, Irma R.

436

Tumbleweed Delta-Lower Tannehill Point Bars, geochemistry and dipmeter logs of Dickens and King Counties, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The oil-prone Tannehill sandstone trend is an extensive Eastern Shelf clastic depositional system derived from an ancient uplift located several counties away to the east-northeast of Dickens and King counties. The older 100-mi-long lower Tannehill system, preceding the upper Tannehill (Frye) system, trended east-west into King and Dickens counties, where it lies in the domain of the shallow-water-shelf delta distributary, situated between the well-documented prolific point-bar (fluvial) deposits of Baylor, Knox, and eastern King counties, and the massive nonproductive slope-mouth bar (deeper water) deposits of western Kent and western Dickens counties. The individual prolific and shallow sand bodies in the shelf distributary of Dickens and King counties are shelf delta point-bars, with some reworking. Geologists for years have erroneously played the sands and interpreted dipmeter logs in this area as fluvial point-bars. Case histories illustrate the complex stratigraphic traps of varying sizes that are formed, and the problems with dipmeter interpretations. Prospecting techniques involving subsurface geology and soil-gas geochemistry have resulted in wildcat success ratios in excess of 25% and development well success in excess of 85%. Numerous fields with proven total recoverable reserves in excess of 800,000 bbl of oil have been found over the last 10 yr. The premise central to modern-day geochemical soil gas prospecting is that very small amounts (parts per million) of light hydrocarbons move upward continuously (but not always vertically) over time from subsurface hydrocarbon reservoirs toward the ground surface, and such microseepage is detectable by modern instruments sensitive to parts per billion. Case histories illustrate that such unconventional techniques are very successful only in certain geologic provinces, and are to be integrated with subsurface geology and other conventional methods.

Usseglio, J.M. (Tumbleweed Oil Co., Dallas, TX (USA))

1990-02-01

437

A conceptual hydrogeologic model for the hydrogeologic framework, geochemistry, and groundwater-flow system of the Edwards-Trinity and related aquifers in the Pecos County region, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Edwards-Trinity aquifer is a vital groundwater resource for agricultural, industrial, and municipal uses in the Trans-Pecos region of west Texas. A conceptual model of the hydrogeologic framework, geochemistry, and groundwater-flow system in the 4,700 square-mile study area was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Middle Pecos Groundwater Conservation District, Pecos County, City of Fort Stockton, Brewster County, and Pecos County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1. The model was developed to gain a better understanding of the groundwater system and to establish a scientific foundation for resource-management decisions. Data and information were collected or obtained from various sources to develop the model. Lithologic information obtained from well reports and geophysical data were used to describe the hydrostratigraphy and structural features of the groundwater system, and aquifer-test data were used to estimate aquifer hydraulic properties. Groundwater-quality data were used to evaluate groundwater-flow paths, water and rock interaction, aquifer interaction, and the mixing of water from different sources. Groundwater-level data also were used to evaluate aquifer interaction as well as to develop a potentiometric-surface map, delineate regional groundwater divides, and describe regional groundwater-flow paths. Several previous studies have been done to compile or collect physical and chemical data, describe the hydrogeologic processes, and develop conceptual and numerical groundwater-flow models of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer in the Trans-Pecos region. Documented methods were used to compile and collect groundwater, surface-water, geochemical, geophysical, and geologic information that subsequently were used to develop this conceptual model.

Thomas, Jonathan V.; Stanton, Gregory P.; Bumgarner, Johnathan R.; Pearson, Daniel K.; Teeple, Andrew P.; Houston, Natalie A.; Payne, Jason D.; Musgrove, MaryLynn

2013-01-01

438

Climate Change Impacts on the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer in South-Central Oklahoma due to Projected Precipitation Variations  

E-print Network

Precipitation Variations on the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer in South-Central Oklahoma due to Projected Climate Change Impacts Cesalea N. Osborne Environmental Science Haskell Indian Nations University This project was sponsored by Kiksapa Consulting... through NASA CAN NNX10AU65A The Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer spans five counties in south-central Oklahoma: Carter, Coal, Johnston, Murray, and Pontotoc Base Data Aquifer study area, roads, rural/non-rural communities, state/county boundaries Methodology...

Osborne, Cesalea

2014-11-19

439

Cattle producers' attitudes concerning the issues of producing versus buying hay for cattle in Freestone and Leon Counties of Texas  

E-print Network

Percentage of Producers that Would Consider Purchasing Hay Types of Hay Preferred by Producers 23 24 26 27 28 Minimum Desirable Protein Levels Importance of Total Digestible Nutrients 30 31 Nutritional Tests Ran on Hay Fed to Cattle in Freestone... and Leon Co. 29 Table 10. Pricing of Hay Sold in Freestone and Leon Counties Table 11. Prices and Quantities of Purchased Hay Table 12. Premiums Paid for Higher Quality Hay Table 13. Delivery of Purchased Hay in Freestone and Leon Counties Table 14...

Lopez, Troy Allen

1994-01-01

440

Winter sound-level characterization of the Deaf Smith County location in the Palo Duro Basin, Texas  

SciTech Connect

A description of sound levels and sound sources in the Deaf Smith County location in the Palo Duro Basin during a period representative of the winter season is presented. Data were collected during the period February 26 through March 1, 1983. 4 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

Not Available

1984-03-01

441

UT Dallas Comet Connection Program Dallas County Community College District and The University of Texas at Dallas  

E-print Network

UT Dallas Comet Connection Program Dallas County Community College District and The University this Comet Connection form. You can view the deadlines for the tuition rates in the Comet Connection brochure acknowledged by DCCCD for participation in this program. Enrollment in the Comet Connection serves to enroll

O'Toole, Alice J.

442

Geology and ground-water features of salt springs, seeps, and plains in the Arkansas and Red River basins of western Oklahoma and adjacent parts of Kansas and Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The salt springs, seeps, and plains described in this report are in the Arkansas and Red River basins in western Oklahoma and adjacent areas in Kansas and Texas. The springs and seeps contribute significantly to the generally poor water quality of the rivers by bringing salt (HaCI) to the surface at an estimated daily rate of more than 8,000 tons. The region investigated is characterized by low hills and rolling plains. Many of the rivers are eroded 100 feet or more below the .surrounding upland surface and in places the valleys are bordered by steep bluffs. The alluvial plains of the major rivers are wide and the river channels are shallow and unstable. The flow of many surface streams is intermittent, especially in the western part of the area. All the natural salt-contributing areas studied are within the outcrop area of rocks of Permian age. The Permian rocks, commonly termed red beds, are composed principally of red and gray gypsiferous shale, siltstone, sandstone, gypsum, anhydrite, and dolomite. Many of the formations contain halite in the subsurface. The halite occurs mostly as discontinuous lenses in shale, although some of the thicker, more massive beds are extensive. It underlies the entire region studied at depths ranging from about 30 feet to more than 2,000 feet. The salt and associated strata show evidence of extensive removal of salt through solution by ground water. Although the salt generally occurs in relatively impervious shale small joints and fractures ,allow the passage of small quantities of water which dissolves the salt. Salt water occurs in the report area at depths ranging from less than 100 feet to more than 1,000 feet. Salt water occurs both as meteoric and connate, but the water emerging as salt springs is meteoric. Tritium analyses show that the age of the water from several springs is less than 20 years. The salt springs, seeps, and plains are confined to 13 local areas. The flow of the springs and seeps is small, but the chloride concentration in the water ranges from a few hundred parts per million to about 190,000 ppm. The wide range of concentration is believed to be due, in part, to differential dilution by fresh water. Alluvium in the vicinity of the salt springs remains saturated with salt water and evaporation from the alluvial surface causes the formation of a salt crust during dry weather. Those areas appear as salt plains that range in size from less than an acre to as much as 60 square miles. The rocks exposed at the surface in the vicinity of the salt springs are permeable enough to allow the infiltration of some precipitation. Under certain geologic and hydrologic conditions ground water percolates down and through salt-bearing rocks where it dissolves the .salt. Hydrostatic pressure of ground water at higher elevations forces the salt water to emerge as salt springs at lower elevations.

Ward, P.E.

1963-01-01

443

The case of the missing flood: the unrecorded flood of 1935 on the James River, Mason County, Texas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A substantial flood occurred on the James River in 1935, a south bank tributary to the Llano River in central Texas. No record of it exists in the official records although it took place at the same time as record-breaking floods elsewhere in the Colorado River basin and throughout Texas. The flood depth is estimated from oral records of water level on ranches along the James River and from newspaper reports. Flood magnitude is estimated by extrapolation from the larger of two recent floods along the James River and, to set an upper limit, by assuming critical flow across measured cross-sections. The frequency of large floods affects the time interval available for flood plain construction by moderate floods, and if high-magnitude floods ceased entirely, then wide bedrock channels might be converted to alluvial flood plain rivers within a century.

Tinkler, Keith J.

2001-08-01

444

Dinosaur Tracksites of the Paluxy River Valley (Glen Rose Formation, Lower Cretaceous), Dinosaur Valley State Park, Somervell County, Texas  

E-print Network

, Fort Wayne, IN 46805 USA (2): Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, TX , M. O'Brien2 , G. J. Kuban3 , B. F. Dattilo1 , K. T. Bates4 , P. L. Falkingham5 , L. Piuela6 , A. Rose1 , A. Freels7 , C. Kumagai1 , C. Libben1 , J. Smith1 and J. Whitcraft1 Recibido el 9 de diciembre

Falkingham, Peter

445

Ground-water levels in observation wells in Oklahoma, period of record to March 1985  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During the 1984-85 climatic years, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Oklahoma Water Resources, collected ground-water level data in Oklahoma from 1,018 sites in 76 of the State's 77 counties. This report is a compilation of all available data through March 1985 for each well currently in the network. Some of the data were collected as early as 1937.

Goemaat, Robert L.; Mize, Lionel D.; Madaj, Ambrose J.; Spiser, Dannie E.

1986-01-01

446

77 FR 66601 - Northern Natural Gas Company; Notice of Availability of the Environmental Assessment for the...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Station, Ochiltree County, Texas, MP 38.47; Beaver Compressor Station, Beaver County, Oklahoma, MP 0.00; Northern/CNG Interconnect, Beaver County, Oklahoma, MP 10.35; Englewood Branch Line, Clark County, Kansas, MP 37.91;...

2012-11-06

447

Strengthening Oklahoma Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Established by the state legislature in 1980, the Oklahoma Citizens' Commission on Education (OCCE) aimed to evaluate the state's schools and prescribe goals for its future educational system. This report presents OCCE's recommendations and background materials. The first section comprises OCCE's 42 recommendations and statements, with supporting

Oklahoma Citizens' Commission on Education, Oklahoma City.

448

Geologic provinces of Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The geologic provinces of Oklahoma are mainly the product of tectonics and attendant sedimentation of Pennsylvanian age. Most boundaries are structural; thus, the provinces map is a generalized tectonic map. Permian and post-Paleozoic strata tend to mask those structures, but most of those strata have been removed by erosion, except in the Anadarko Basin and the Wichita Uplift provinces. The

R. A. Northcutt; J. A. Campbell

1995-01-01

449

Quality of surface-water runoff in selected streams in the San Antonio segment of the Edwards aquifer recharge zone, Bexar County, Texas, 1997-2012  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During 19972012, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the San Antonio Water System, collected and analyzed water-quality constituents in surface-water runoff from five ephemeral stream sites near San Antonio in northern Bexar County, Texas. The data were collected to assess the quality of surface water that recharges the Edwards aquifer. Samples were collected from four stream basins that had small amounts of developed land at the onset of the study but were predicted to undergo substantial development over a period of several decades. Water-quality samples also were collected from a fifth stream basin located on land protected from development to provide reference data by representing undeveloped land cover. Water-quality data included pH, specific conductance, chemical oxygen demand, dissolved solids (filtered residue on evaporation in milligrams per liter, dried at 180 degrees Celsius), suspended solids, major ions, nutrients, trace metals, and pesticides. Trace metal concentration data were compared to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality established surface water quality standards for human health protection (water and fish). Among all constituents in all samples for which criteria were available for comparison, only one sample had one constituent which exceeded the surface water criteria on one occasion. A single lead concentration (2.76 micrograms per liter) measured in a filtered water sample exceeded the surface water criteria of 1.15 micrograms per liter. The average number of pesticide detections per sample in stream basins undergoing development ranged from 1.8 to 6.0. In contrast, the average number of pesticide detections per sample in the reference stream basin was 0.6. Among all constituents examined in this study, pesticides, dissolved orthophosphate phosphorus, and dissolved total phosphorus demonstrated the largest differences between the four stream basins undergoing development and the reference stream basin with undeveloped land cover.

Opsahl, Stephen P.

2012-01-01

450

Hydrologic, water-quality, and sediment-quality data for the Christmas Bay system, Brazoria County, Texas, February 1999-March 2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Christmas Bay system is a group of three small secondary bays (Christmas, Bastrop, and Drum Bays) at the southwestern end of the Galveston Bay estuarine system in Brazoria County, Texas. During February 1999-March 2000, hydrologic, water-quality, and sediment-quality data were collected from each of the three bays to establish baseline conditions. Gage-height fluctuations closely matched open-water tidal fluctuations. Rainfall during February 1999-February 2000 was about 20 percent below the annual average. Specific conductance, pH, water temperature, and dissolved oxygen monitored at 30-minute intervals in Christmas Bay for 13 months showed seasonal variations typical of monitoring stations on the Texas Gulf Coast. Prevailing winds were from the southeast. Monthly water-quality sampling for 13 months showed that in each of the three bays concentrations of major ions were small, and most nutrient concentrations were at or less than minimum reporting levels; indicator bacteria counts were consistently higher in samples collected from Drum Bay. Several trace elements (sampled twice) were detected in small concentrations. The only organochlorine pesticides (sampled once) that were greater than minimum reporting levels were atrazine, deethylatrazine, metolachlor, and simazine. During February 29-March 29, 2000, three semipermeable membrane devices were deployed at the Christmas Bay monitoring station. Seven of 77 semivolatile organic compounds analyzed in the lipids from the devices were detected in minute amounts. Analyses of surficial bed sediment sampled once in each of the three bays yielded detections of a number of semivolatile organic compounds; all concentrations were less than 10 micrograms per liter and much less than the respective benchmark concentration for those compounds that have had a benchmark concentration established for the protection of aquatic life.

East, Jeffery W.

2002-01-01

451

Oklahoma NASA EPSCoR  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The mission of Oklahoma EPSCoR is to make Oklahoma researchers more successful in competing for research funding. Specific goals, objectives, and strategies were developed for each federal EPSCoR program, based on federal and state needs. A theme of stimulating collaboration among campuses and building on common research strengths is a strong component of the Oklahoma EPSCoR strategic plan. It extends also to our relationships with the federal agencies, and wherever possible, Oklahoma EPSCoR projects are developed collaboratively with federal research laboratories and program offices. Overall, Oklahoma EPSCoR seeks to capitalize on unique research capabilities and opportunities. The NASA EPSCoR Program in Oklahoma was developed through this grant as a joint effort between Oklahoma EPSCoR and the NASA Oklahoma Space Grant Consortium (OSGC). The major goal of the Oklahoma NASA EPSCoR Plan established in 1996 is to develop an academic research enterprise directed towards a long-term, self-sustaining, nationally competitive capability in areas of mutual self-interest to NASA and Oklahoma. Our final technical summary pie chart demonstrates the strong successes we have achieved during this period as a result of the award.

Snowden, Victoria Duca

2002-01-01

452

Vision North Texas  

E-print Network

?business as usual? ?Vision North Texas and the North Texas 2050 document ?Implications for energy conservation ESL-KT-11-11-18 CATEE 2011, Dallas, Texas, Nov. 7 ? 9, 2011 The North Texas Region ESL-KT-11-11-18 CATEE 2011, Dallas, Texas, Nov. 7 ? 9..., 2011 ? ? FW D 16 County Region for Vision North Texas 5.3M people in 2000; 6.5M in 2010; 9.5M in 2030; 11.7M in 2050 ESL-KT-11-11-18 CATEE 2011, Dallas, Texas, Nov. 7 ? 9, 2011 ESL-KT-11-11-18 CATEE 2011, Dallas, Texas, Nov. 7 ? 9, 2011 ESL-KT-11...

Walz, K.

2011-01-01

453

Texas Almanac, 2002-2003.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The 61st edition of the "Texas Almanac" has a reputation as the definitive source for Texas information since 1857. It contains details of the Census 2000 official population count, including statewide, county and town counts, plus an analysis of the numbers by experts at Texas's State Data Center. It includes information about politics,

Ramos, Mary G., Ed.

454

Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History & Culture  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The 46th state, Oklahoma, presents its unusual history with the online version of The Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. The Encyclopedia was prepared by over 500 "university-based scholars and independent historians and scholars," and was a joint effort by The Oklahoma Historical Society and Oklahoma State University Library Electronic Publishing Center. Visitors can click on the "Table of Contents" link near the bottom of the homepage to "Browse Entries Alphabetically", "Browse Entries Chronologically", or "Browse Entries by Subject". Browsing via chronology introduces visitors to Oklahoma starting with the "Precontact Era", through the "Westward Expansion" and on to "Twentieth Century to Present". Subject categories include "African Americans", "Farming", "Military", and "Petroleum". When searching, visitors will be taken to the Electronic Publishing Center Search Page, so they will need to choose the specific collection, Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture, from the drop down box, to confine the search to the Encyclopedia.

455

Effects of brush management on the hydrologic budget and water quality in and adjacent to Honey Creek State Natural Area, Comal County, Texas, 2001--10  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Woody vegetation, including ashe juniper (Juniperus ashei), has encroached on some areas in central Texas that were historically oak grassland savannah. Encroachment of woody vegetation is generally attributed to overgrazing and fire suppression. Removing the ashe juniper and allowing native grasses to reestablish in the area as a brush management conservation practice (hereinafter referred to as "brush management") might change the hydrology in the watershed. These hydrologic changes might include changes to surface-water runoff, evapotranspiration, or groundwater recharge. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Federal, State, and local partners, examined the hydrologic effects of brush management in two adjacent watersheds in Comal County, Tex. Hydrologic data were collected in the watersheds for 3-4 years (pre-treatment) depending on the type of data, after which brush management occurred on one watershed (treatment watershed) and the other was left in its original condition (reference watershed). Hydrologic data were collected in the study area for another 6 years (post-treatment). These hydrologic data included rainfall, streamflow, evapotranspiration, and water quality. Groundwater recharge was not directly measured, but potential groundwater recharge was calculated by using a simplified mass balance approach. This fact sheet summarizes highlights of the study from the USGS Scientific Investigations Report on which it is based.

Banta, J. Ryan; Slattery, Richard N.

2012-01-01

456

APPLICATION OF WATER-JET HORIZONTAL DRILLING TECHNOLOGY TO DRILL AND ACIDIZE HORIZONTAL DRAIN HOLES, TEDBIT (SAN ANDRES) FIELD, GAINES COUNTY, TEXAS  

SciTech Connect

The San Andres Formation is one of the major hydrocarbon-producing units in the Permian Basin, with multiple reservoirs contained within the dolomitized subtidal portions of upward shoaling carbonate shelf cycles. The test well is located in Tedbit (San Andres) Field in northeastern Gaines County, Texas, in an area of scattered San Andres production associated with local structural highs. Selected on the basis of geological and historical data, the Oil and Gas Properties Wood No. 1 well is considered to be typical of a large number of San Andres stripper wells in the Permian Basin. Thus, successful completion of horizontal drain holes in this well would demonstrate a widely applicable enhanced recovery technology. Water-jet horizontal drilling is an emerging technology with the potential to provide significant economic benefits in marginal wells. Forecast benefits include lower recompletion costs and improved hydrocarbon recoveries. The technology utilizes water under high pressure, conveyed through small-diameter coiled tubing, to jet horizontal drain holes into producing formations. Testing of this technology was conducted with inconclusive results. Paraffin sludge and mechanical problems were encountered in the wellbore, initially preventing the water-jet tool from reaching the kick-off point. After correcting these problems and attempting to cut a casing window with the water-jet milling assembly, lateral jetting was attempted without success.

Michael W. Rose

2005-09-22

457

Site study plan for Upper Aquifer Hydrology Clusters, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Surface-based geotechnical field program: Preliminary draft  

SciTech Connect

As part of site characterization studies, at the Deaf Smith County site, Texas, 15 wells at 5 locations will be completed in the Ogallala Formation and Dockum Group. The purposes of the wells, which are called Upper Aquifer (2) establish background hydrologic and water quality conditions, (3) provide analysis, (4) monitor responses of the shallow hydrologic system to site activities and nearby pumpage for irrigation, (5) collect water samples from both saturated and unsaturated materials to help define recharge rates and ground-water flow patterns, (6) monitor variations on water quality, and (7) define ground-water resources near the site. The test wells will be installed during a 14-month period starting about 1-1/2 years after site characterization activities begin. The Technical Field Services Contractor is responsible for conducting the field program of drilling and testing. Samples and data will be handled and reported in accordance with established Salt Repository Project procedures. A quality assurance program will assure that activities affecting quality are performed correctly and that the appropriate documentation is maintained. 44 refs., 19 figs., 5 tabs.

Not Available

1988-01-01

458

Three-Dimensional Geologic Model of Complex Fault Structures in the Upper Seco Creek Area, Medina and Uvalde Counties, South-Central Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This multimedia report shows and describes digital three-dimensional faulted geologic surfaces and volumes of the lithologic units of the Edwards aquifer in the upper Seco Creek area of Medina and Uvalde Counties in south-central Texas. This geologic framework model was produced using (1) geologic maps and interpretations of depositional environments and paleogeography; (2) lithologic descriptions, interpretations, and geophysical logs from 31 drill holes; (3) rock core and detailed lithologic descriptions from one drill hole; (4) helicopter electromagnetic geophysical data; and (5) known major and minor faults in the study area. These faults were used because of their individual and collective effects on the continuity of the aquifer-forming units in the Edwards Group. Data and information were compared and validated with each other and reflect the complex relationships of structures in the Seco Creek area of the Balcones fault zone. This geologic framework model can be used as a tool to visually explore and study geologic structures within the Seco Creek area of the Balcones fault zone and to show the connectivity of hydrologic units of high and low permeability between and across faults. The software can be used to display other data and information, such as drill-hole data, on this geologic framework model in three-dimensional space.

Pantea, Michael P.; Cole, James C.; Smith, Bruce D.; Faith, Jason R.; Blome, Charles D.; Smith, David V.

2008-01-01

459

Environmental analysis of geopressured-geothermal prospect areas, De Witt and Colorado counties, Texas. Final report, March 1 - August 31, 1979  

SciTech Connect

Information collected and analyzed for a preliminary environmental analysis of geopressured geothermal prospect areas in Colorado and DeWitt Counties, Texas is presented. Specific environmental concerns for each geopressured geothermal prospect area are identified and discussed. Approximately 218 km/sup 2/(85 mi/sup 2/) were studied in the vicinity of each prospect area to: (1) conduct an environmental analysis to identify more and less suited areas for geopressured test wells; and (2) provide an environmental data base for future development of geopressured geothermal energy resources. A series of maps and tables are included to illustrate environmental characteristics including: geology, water resources, soils, current land use, vegetation, wildlife, and meteorological characteristics, and additional relevant information on cultural resources, power- and pipelines, and regulatory agencies. A series of transparent overlays at the scale of the original mapping has also been produced for the purposes of identifying and ranking areas of potential conflict between geopressured geothermal development and environmental characteristics. The methodology for ranking suitability of areas within the two prospect areas is discussed in the appendix. (MHR)

Gustavson, T.C.; Reeder, F.S.; Badger, E.A.

1980-02-01

460

Tight-Gas-Sands Research Program: field operations and analysis. Cooperative-well report, Arkla Exploration, T. P. Scott No. 5, Harrison County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Arkla Exploration T.P. Scott No. 5 in Waskom Field, Harrison County, Texas was drilled in May 1986. The well was cored and logged in the Travis Peak formation, and, using the GRI Mobile Testing and Control Facility, The authors monitored the pre-fracture test and the fracture treatment in the Cotton Valley formation. They combined the analyses from GRI's contractors and summarized their work in the Travis Peak as well as using their results in the analysis of the Cotton Valley completion. A low-resistivity sandstone was identified as possibly the best candidate for testing in the Travis Peak. Petrographic analyses indicated that clay cutans surrounding the sand grains were probably causing the low resistivity rather than high water saturation. Despite a short flow period and a short shut-in period, an estimate of permeability-thickness could be obtained from the buildup test in the Cotton Valley completion. However, because only a small portion of the perforations appeared to be open, the exact intervals that were producing and the corresponding net gas pay could not be identified. Fracture length was estimated from fracture-design models and simulation of the post-fracture production of the well. These results are discussed in detail in the report.

Holditch, S.A.; Robinson, B.M.; Whitehead, W.S.

1987-01-01