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1

Depositional environments of upper Morrow sandstone in southeast Tracy and southeast Eva fields, Texas County, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Southeast Tracy field, Texas County, Oklahoma, produces gas from an upper Morrow sandstone. The field has produced over 33 bcf of gas and a negligible amount of oil from 12 wells, since its discovery in November 1958. Development drilling on the southern end of the Southeast Tracy field has extended its boundary to within 1.4 mi of the Southeast Eva

Harvey O. Vick

1987-01-01

2

The depositional environment and reservoir characteristics of the Upper Morrow "A" sandstone, Postle field, Texas County, Oklahoma  

E-print Network

THE DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT AND RESERVOIR CHARACTERISTICS OF THE UPPER MORROW 'A' SANDSTONE, POSTLE FIELD, TEXAS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA A Thesis by LYNN SUZANNE TRAVIS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1987 Major subject: Geology THE DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT AND RESERVOIR CHARACTERISTICS OF THE UPPER MORROW 'A' SANDSTONE POSTLE FIELD, TEXAS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA A Thesis by LYNN...

Travis, Lynn Suzanne

2012-06-07

3

Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Development through High-Resolution 3C3D Seismic and Horizontal Drilling: Eva South Marrow Sand Unit, Texas County, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The Eva South Morrow Sand Unit is located in western Texas County, Oklahoma. The field produces from an upper Morrow sandstone, termed the Eva sandstone, deposited in a transgressive valley-fill sequence. The field is defined as a combination structural stratigraphic trap; the reservoir lies in a convex up -dip bend in the valley and is truncated on the west side by the Teepee Creek fault. Although the field has been a successful waterflood since 1993, reservoir heterogeneity and compartmentalization has impeded overall sweep efficiency. A 4.25 square mile high-resolution, three component three-dimensional (3C3D) seismic survey was acquired in order to improve reservoir characterization and pinpoint the optimal location of a new horizontal producing well, the ESU 13-H.

Wheeler,David M.; Miller, William A.; Wilson, Travis C.

2002-03-11

4

PayneOklahoma SOIL SURVEY OF PAYNE COUNTY, OKLAHOMA  

E-print Network

Map Units Cities Detailed Counties Detailed States Interstate Highways Roads Rails Water Hydrography SURVEY OF PAYNE COUNTY, OKLAHOMA OSURR Headquarters Source of Map: Natural Resources Conservation Service Miscellaneous Water Rock Outcrop Saline Spot Sandy Spot Slide or Slip Sinkhole Sodic Spot Spoil Area Stony Spot

Ghajar, Afshin J.

5

Digital geologic map of Beaver County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This data set consists of digital data and accompanying documentation for the surficial geology of Beaver County, Oklahoma. The original data are from the Hydrogeologic Map, sheet 1 of 3, included in the U.S. Geological Survey publication, Reconnaissance of the Water Resources of Beaver County, Oklahoma, Hydrologic Investigations Atlas HA-450, Morton and Goemaat, 1973. The geology was compiled by S.L. Schoff, 1953.

Cederstrand, J.R.

1997-01-01

6

78 FR 16036 - Service Level Environmental Impact Statement for the Texas Oklahoma Passenger Rail Study Corridor...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Statement for the Texas Oklahoma Passenger Rail Study Corridor, South Texas to Oklahoma...improved high- speed intercity passenger rail service along an 850-mile corridor...Level EIS, the Texas Oklahoma Passenger Rail Study (Study) also includes...

2013-03-13

7

The Texas- Oklahoma Cattle Feeding Industry: Structure and Operational Characteristics.  

E-print Network

December 1968 I The Texas-Oklahoma 1 Cattle Feeding Industry Structure I and Operational 1 Characteristics TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY Texas Agricultural Experiment Station H. 0. Kunkel, Acting Director, College Station, Texas In Cooperation... and Shifts in Cattle Feeding 6 Organizational Characteristics of the ........... Texas-0 klahoma Cattle Feeding Industry ,., 7 ................................ Longevity of Present Feedlots 7 .................................... Legal Form of Ownership 8...

Dietrich, Raymond A.

1968-01-01

8

Purchasing in Texas Counties.  

E-print Network

contracts are made for the purchase of record books, letterheads, miscellaneous stationery items, drugs, laundry work, electric light bulbs, and milk. Quarterly contracts are made for the purchase of bread for the county farm and jail, and monthly... of lumber would be $70 in the case of treated lumber and $220 in the case of untreated lumber. These figures apply to a period of time measured by the life of a treated lumber struc- ture. 8 BULLETIN NO. 653, TEXAS. AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION...

Hervey, E. J.; Bradshaw, H. C.

1944-01-01

9

Digital Atlas of Texas Counties  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created by the Center for Geosptial Technology at Texas Tech University, this digital atlas is a fantastic find. It brings together information about all of Texas's counties, including satellite relief maps and data sets about the roads, rivers, lakes, and other features in each area. Visitors can use the interactive map to click on a county of interest, or use the drop down menu to select a region. Once users select a county, they can download information about it for future use. The site also contains a number of Featured Links to resources from the U.S. Census Bureau, the Texas Association of Counties, and several tourism agencies.

10

MISR Scans the Texas-Oklahoma Border  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

These MISR images of Oklahoma and north Texas were acquired on March 12, 2000 during Terra orbit 1243. The three images on the left, from top to bottom, are from the 70-degree forward viewing camera, the vertical-viewing (nadir) camera, and the 70-degree aftward viewing camera. The higher brightness, bluer tinge, and reduced contrast of the oblique views result primarily from scattering of sunlight in the Earth's atmosphere, though some color and brightness variations are also due to differences in surface reflection at the different angles. The longer slant path through the atmosphere at the oblique angles also accentuates the appearance of thin, high-altitude cirrus clouds.

On the right, two areas from the nadir camera image are shown in more detail, along with notations highlighting major geographic features. The south bank of the Red River marks the boundary between Texas and Oklahoma. Traversing brush-covered and grassy plains, rolling hills, and prairies, the Red River and the Canadian River are important resources for farming, ranching, public drinking water, hydroelectric power, and recreation. Both originate in New Mexico and flow eastward, their waters eventually discharging into the Mississippi River.

A smoke plume to the north of the Ouachita Mountains and east of Lake Eufaula is visible in the detailed nadir imagery. The plume is also very obvious at the 70-degree forward view angle, to the right of center and about one-fourth of the way down from the top of the image.

MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

2000-01-01

11

Lower Pennsylvanian (Morrowan) crinoids from Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Texas  

E-print Network

the mid- dle Wapanucka of southern Oklahoma. N. Gary Lane (1964) in a study New Pennsylvanian crinoids from Clark County, Nevada described two spe- cies from Morrowan strata of the Callville Formation as Polusocrinus pachyplax Lane and Polusocrinus calycu... the mid- dle Wapanucka of southern Oklahoma. N. Gary Lane (1964) in a study New Pennsylvanian crinoids from Clark County, Nevada described two spe- cies from Morrowan strata of the Callville Formation as Polusocrinus pachyplax Lane and Polusocrinus calycu...

Moore, R. C.; Strimple, H. L.

1973-06-22

12

Detection of Trichinella murrelli in coyotes ( Canis latrans) from Oklahoma and North Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

We determined the prevalence and mean intensity of Trichinella sp. infection in coyotes from six counties in Oklahoma and one in northern Texas. Tongues from 77 coyotes were examined using histology and artificial tissue digestion. Histological examination showed a prevalence of 3.9% (3 of 77) whereas the prevalence was 6.5% (5 of 77) based on artificial digestion of 5.0g of

Mason V. Reichard; Kathryn E. Tiernan; Kelsey L. Paras; Maria Interisano; Michael H. Reiskind; Roger J. Panciera; Edoardo Pozio

2011-01-01

13

Shoreline assessment of Jefferson County, Texas  

E-print Network

Shoreline erosion is an issue of economic and environmental concern on the Texas coast. Texas State Highway 87, located in Jefferson County, Texas, has been repeatedly destroyed by storms and rebuilt in the past 50 years. Reconstruction of State...

Lee, Hoo Il

2004-09-30

14

SOIL SURVEY OF PAYNE COUNTY, OKLAHOMA OSURR Section 5  

E-print Network

Units Cities Detailed Counties Detailed States Interstate Highways Roads Rails Water Hydrography Oceans OF PAYNE COUNTY, OKLAHOMA OSURR Section 5 Source of Map: Natural Resources Conservation Service Web Soil, closed Eroded Spot Gravel Pit Gravelly Spot Gulley Lava Flow Landfill Marsh or Swamp Miscellaneous Water

Ghajar, Afshin J.

15

National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Wichita Falls Quadrangle, Texas and Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The uranium favorability of the Wichita Falls Quadrangle, Texas and Oklahoma, was determined by using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria; by subsurface studies of structure, facies distribution, and gamma-ray anomalies in well logs to a depth of 1500 m; and by surface studies involving extensive field sampling and radiometric surveying. These were supplemented by both aerial radiometric and hydrogeochemical and

M. B. Edwards; R. L. Andersen

1982-01-01

16

Hydrogeologic data for the Blaine aquifer and associated units in southwestern Oklahoma and northwestern Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report is a compilation of hydrogeologic data collected for an areal ground-water investigation of the Blaine aquifer and associated units in southwestern Oklahoma and northwestern Texas. The study area includes parts of Greer, Harmon, and Jackson counties in Oklahoma and parts of Childress, Collingsworth, Hall, Hardeman, and Wilbarger counties in Texas. The Blaine aquifer consists of cavernous gypsum and dolomite beds. Water from the Blaine aquifer supports a local agriculture based mainly on irrigated cotton and wheat. The purpose of the study was to determine the availability, quantity, and quality of ground water from the Blaine aquifer and associated units. This report provides a reference for some of the data that was used as input into a computer ground-water flow model that simulates ground-water flow in the Blaine aquifer. The data in this report consists of: (1) Monthly or periodic water-level measurements in 134 wells; (2) daily mean water-level measurements for 11 wells equipped with water-level recorders; (3) daily total precipitation measurements from five precipitation gages; (4) low-flow stream-discharge measurements for 89 stream sites; (5) miscellaneous stream-discharge measurements at seven stream sites; (6) chemical analyses of surface water from 78 stream sites during low-flow periods; (7) chemical analyses of ground water from 41 wells; and (8) chemical analyses of runoff water collected at five sites.

Runkle, D.L.; Bergman, D.L.; Fabian, R.S.

1997-01-01

17

Source of shallow Simpson Group Oil in Murray County, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oils produced from the Simpson Group (Middle Ordovician) in three shallow fields located north of the Arbuckle Mountains in Murray County, Oklahoma, have widely differing compositions: SW Sandy Creek, 28.9° API, 0.57% sulfur; Davis NE, 25.9° API, 0.72% sulfur; Sulfur NW, 16.4° API, 1.44% sulfur. From gas chromatography and biomarker analysis, they determined that the oils were derived from the

I. Zemmels; D. M. Tappmeyer; C. C. Walters

1987-01-01

18

Hydrogeology of Webb County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Introduction: Webb County, in semiarid South Texas on the U.S.-Mexico border, is a region confronted by increasing stresses on natural resources. Laredo (fig. 1), the largest city in Webb County (population 193,000 in 2000), was one of the 10 fastest-growing metropolitan areas in the country during 1990-2000 (Perry and Mackun, 2001). Commercial and industrial activities have expanded throughout the region to support the maquiladora industry (manufacturing plants in Mexico) along the border and other growth as a result of the passage of the North American Free Trade Agreement. The Rio Grande currently (2002) is the primary source of public water supply for Laredo and other cities along the border in Webb County (fig. 1). Other cities, such as Bruni and Mirando City in the southeastern part of the county, rely on ground-water supplies to meet municipal demands. Increased water demand associated with development and population growth in the region has increased the need for the City of Laredo and Webb County to evaluate alternative water sources to meet future demand. Possible options include (1) supplementing the surface-water supply with ground water, and (2) applying artificial storage and recovery (ASR) technology to recharge local aquifers. These options raise issues regarding the hydraulic capability of the aquifers to store economically substantial quantities of water, current or potential uses of the resource, and possible effects on the quality of water resulting from mixing ground water with alternative source waters. To address some of these issues, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the City of Laredo, began a study in 1996 to assess the ground-water resources of Webb County. A hydrogeologic study was conducted to review and analyze available information on the hydrogeologic units (aquifers and confining units) in Webb County, to locate available wells in the region with water-level and water-quality information from the aquifers, and to analyze the hydraulic properties of the aquifers. The purpose of this report is to document the findings of the study. The information is organized by hydrogeologic unit and presented on this and six other sheets.

Lambert, Rebecca B.

2004-01-01

19

Chromosomal homology among subspecies of Peromyscus maniculatus in Texas and Oklahoma  

E-print Network

CHROMOSOMAL HOMOLOGY AMONG SUBSPECIES OF PEROMYSCUS MANICULATUS IN TEXAS AND OKLAHOMA A Thesis by TERRY BRYCE VAN FLEET Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1985 Major Subject: Zoology CHROMOSOMAL HOMOLOGY AMONG SUBSPECIES OF PEROMYSCUS MANICULATUS IN TEXAS AND OKLAHOMA A Thesis by TERRY BRYCE VAN FLEET Approved as to style and content by: Ir . reenbaum (Ch i of Committee...

Van Fleet, Terry Bryce

2012-06-07

20

Statistical characteristics of storm interevent time, depth, and duration for eastern New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The design of small runoff-control structures, from simple floodwater-detention basins to sophisticated best-management practices, requires the statistical characterization of rainfall as a basis for cost-effective, risk-mitigated, hydrologic engineering design. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas Department of Transportation, has developed a framework to estimate storm statistics including storm interevent times, distributions of storm depths, and distributions of storm durations for eastern New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. The analysis is based on hourly rainfall recorded by the National Weather Service. The database contains more than 155 million hourly values from 774 stations in the study area. Seven sets of maps depicting ranges of mean storm interevent time, mean storm depth, and mean storm duration, by county, as well as tables listing each of those statistics, by county, were developed. The mean storm interevent time is used in probabilistic models to assess the frequency distribution of storms. The Poisson distribution is suggested to model the distribution of storm occurrence, and the exponential distribution is suggested to model the distribution of storm interevent times. The four-parameter kappa distribution is judged as an appropriate distribution for modeling the distribution of both storm depth and storm duration. Preference for the kappa distribution is based on interpretation of L-moment diagrams. Parameter estimates for the kappa distributions are provided. Separate dimensionless frequency curves for storm depth and duration are defined for eastern New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. Dimension is restored by multiplying curve ordinates by the mean storm depth or mean storm duration to produce quantile functions of storm depth and duration. Minimum interevent time and location have slight influence on the scale and shape of the dimensionless frequency curves. Ten example problems and solutions to possible applications are provided.

Asquith, William H.; Roussel, Meghan C.; Cleveland, Theodore G.; Fang, Xing; Thompson, David B.

2006-01-01

21

FEDERAL ORDER Domestic Quarantine of Counties in Oklahoma and Tennessee for  

E-print Network

.81-3 (c) allows the APHIS Administrator to include uninfested acreage within a quarantined area due to its counties: Oklahoma The following entire counties: Atoka, Coal, Cotton, Garvin, Jackson, Jefferson, Le

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

22

An Interindustry Model of El Paso and Hudspeth Counties, Texas  

E-print Network

TR- 69 1976 An Interindustry Model of El Paso and Hudspeth Counties, Texas W.S. Coffman B.R. Beattie L.L. Jones J.W. Adams Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University ...TR- 69 1976 An Interindustry Model of El Paso and Hudspeth Counties, Texas W.S. Coffman B.R. Beattie L.L. Jones J.W. Adams Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University ...

Coffman, W. S.; Beattie, B. R.; Jones, L. L.; Adams, J. W.

23

40 CFR 81.337 - Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Lincoln County Logan County McClain County Oklahoma County Pottawatomie County AQCR 185 North Central Oklahoma...County Logan County McClain County Pottawatomie County AQCR 185North Central Oklahoma Intrastate...

2010-07-01

24

Summary of proceedings: Oklahoma and Texas wind energy forum, April 2-3, 1981  

SciTech Connect

The Wind Energy Forum for Oklahoma and Texas was held at the Amarillo Quality Inn in Amarillo, Texas on April 2-3, 1981. Its purpose was to bring together the diverse groups involved in wind energy development in the Oklahoma and Texas region to explore the future commercial potential and current barriers to achieving this potential. Major topics of discussion included utility interconnection of wind machines and the buy-back rate for excess power, wind system reliability and maintenance concerns, machine performance standards, and state governmental incentives. A short summary of each presentation is included.

Nelson, S.C.; Ball, D.E.

1981-06-01

25

Tri-county pilot study. [Texas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author has identified the following significant results. An area inventory was performed for three southeast Texas counties (Montgomery, Walker, and San Jacinto) totaling 0.65 million hectares. The inventory was performed using a two level hierarchy. Level 1 was divided into forestland, rangeland, and other land. Forestland was separated into Level 2 categories: pine, hardwood, and mixed; rangeland was not separated further. Results consisted of area statistics for each county and for the entire study site for pine, hardwood, mixed, rangeland, and other land. Color coded county classification maps were produced for the May data set, and procedures were developed and tested.

Reeves, C. A. (principal investigator); Austin, T. W.; Kerber, A. G.

1976-01-01

26

Environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas  

SciTech Connect

In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and the eight other potentially sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Deaf Smith County site as one of the five sites suitable for characterization. 591 refs., 147 figs., 173 tabs.

Not Available

1986-05-01

27

Environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas  

SciTech Connect

In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines.

Not Available

1986-05-01

28

Funding of Oklahoma Common Schools with a Texas Tax Plan: A Cautionary Note.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report examines the theoretical result of a change in the way Oklahoma could fund its common schools if it used a Texas tax system that relied heavily on an ad valorum tax structure or another taxation system. Using data from the 1999 school year, calculations of state aid for the more than 540 school districts were made for four scenarios:

Hancock, Kenneth

29

The Significance of Stratigraphy and Lithology in Landform Development in Washington County, Oklahoma  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This winning entry in the museum's Young Naturalist Awards 1999 by Katie, a 15 year old student from Oklahoma, takes a look at the development of Washington County, Oklahoma. Katie's essay has a field-journal focus and explains stratigraphy and lithology, two of the main factors controlling the shape of the land in her county. She provides an overview of the six different formations in the Skiatook Group and the five different formations that outcrop in the Bartlesville area. There are descriptions of the many rock samples she took for this study.

30

Wrench faulting and cavity concentration ; Dollarhide Field, Andrews County, Texas  

E-print Network

WRENCH FAULTZNG AND CAVZTY CONCENTRATZON; DOLLARHZDE FIELD / ANDREWS COUNTY g TEXAS A Thesis by TODD CHARLES DYGERT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE DECEMBER 1992 Ma)or Subject: Geophysics WRENCE FAULTING AND CAVZTY COMCENTRATZON; DOLLAREZDE TZELD i ANDREWS COUNTY I TEXAS A Thesis by TODD CHARLES DYGERT Approved as to style and content by: oel S. Watkins (C air of Committee...

Dygert, Todd Charles

2012-06-07

31

The Impact of Declining Groundwater Supply in the Northern High Plains of Texas and Oklahoma on Expenditures for Community Services  

E-print Network

TR- 71 1976 The Impact of the Declining Groundwater Supply in the Northern High Plains of Texas and Oklahoma on Expenditures for Community Services G.H. Williford B.R. Beattie R.D. Lacewell...TR- 71 1976 The Impact of the Declining Groundwater Supply in the Northern High Plains of Texas and Oklahoma on Expenditures for Community Services G.H. Williford B.R. Beattie R.D. Lacewell...

Williford, G. H.; Beattie, B. R.; Lacewell, R. D.

32

NOTES ON FOODS OF GREAT HORNED OWLS (BUBO VIRGINIANUS) IN JACKSON COUNTY, OKLAHOMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prey species were identified from 169 pellets cast by a pair of great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) and their young in Jackson County, southwestern Oklahoma. Pellets were collected monthly between February and August, 1977. In decreasing order of importance, prey species were: cottontails (Sylvilagus spp.), cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus), and mice (Perognathus hispidus, Peromyscus spp., and Reithrodontomys spp.).

Jack D. Tyler; Jill F. Jensen

1981-01-01

33

The Vascular Flora of the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve, Osage County, Oklahoma  

E-print Network

The Vascular Flora of the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve, Osage County, Oklahoma Michael W. Palmer collected between 1992 and 2007 were examined to obtain a vouchered flora of the preserve. The known flora of the vascular flora of the TGPP, both to assist research and to serve as a baseline inventory in case management

Palmer, Michael W.

34

76 FR 77578 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00057  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...disaster for the State of Oklahoma dated 12/07/2011...the disaster: Primary Counties: Lincoln. Contiguous Counties: Oklahoma: Creek, Logan, Okfuskee, Oklahoma, Payne, Pottawatomie. The Interest Rates...

2011-12-13

35

Records of wells and water quality for the Garber-Wellington Aquifer, northern Oklahoma and southern Logan Counties, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey has collected data on Oklahoma's ground-water resources since 1934. Most of these data were collected as part of specific ground-water studies conducted in cooperation with various Federal, State, and local agencies. In 1972, at the request of the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, the Geological Survey undertook a study of the Garber-Wellington aquifer in northern Oklahoma and southern Logan Counties. As a part of this project, records of about 120 wells were collected and 12 samples of ground water from the aquifer were analyzed in the laboratories of the Geological Survey; these records are included in this report. In addition, records of about 302 wells and analyses of 60 water samples were taken from a report by Wood and Burton (1966) and from the files of the Geological Survey. Also included in this report are selected references for those desiring more information on the area's ground-water resources. The stratigraphic nomenclature and age determinations used in this report are those accepted by the Oklahoma Geological Survey and do not necessarily agree with those of the U.S. Geological Survey. Acknowledgment is extended to the many hundred of individuals who have provided the data compiled in this report.

Carr, Jerry E.; Havens, John S.

1976-01-01

36

Measurement of soil moisture trends with airborne scatterometers. [Guymon, Oklahoma and Dalhart, Texas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In an effort to investigate aircraft multisensor responses to soil moisture and vegetation in agricultural fields, an intensive ground sampling program was conducted in Guymon, Oklahoma and Dalhart, Texas in conjunction with aircraft data collected for visible/infrared and passive and active microwave systems. Field selections, sampling techniques, data processing, and the aircraft schedule are discussed for both sites. Field notes are included along with final (normalized and corrected) data sets.

Jones, C. L.; Mcfarland, M. J.; Rosethal, W. D.; Theis, S. W. (principal investigators)

1982-01-01

37

Predictability of littoral-zone fish communities through ontogeny in Lake Texoma, Oklahoma-Texas, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

SynopsisWe sampled larval, juvenile and adult fishes from littoral-zone areas of a large reservoir (Lake Texoma, Oklahoma-Texas) (1) to characterize environmental factors that influenced fish community structure, (2) to examine how consistent fishenvironment relationships were through ontogeny (i.e., larval vs. juvenile and adult), and (3) to measure the concordance of larval communities sampled during spring to juvenile and adult communities

Michael A. Eggleton; Raul Ramirez; Chad W. Hargrave; Keith B. Gido; Jason R. Masoner; Gary D. Schnell; William J. Matthews

2005-01-01

38

Linear features determined from Landsat imagery in the Texas and Oklahoma panhandles  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A map (scale 1:500,000) shows the linear features determined from Landsat imagery in the Texas and Oklahoma panhandles. The linear features, sometimes called linear trends or lineaments, are not identified as to type or origin. Most probably represent fractures or fracture zones, which may affect the movement of water or other fluids through rocks. The linear features are classified as to length--less than 30 mi/mg and more than 30 mi/mg. (USGS)

Cooley, M.E.

1984-01-01

39

Farmer Adjustments to Drouth In a Texas County.  

E-print Network

of the cooperative ;u.c;tc of Texas and other states of the Southwest research project were set up. (1) Determine the farm i!li~ing tlle 1950's attracted nation-wide attention. population changes in a selected area of Texas during ugh certain areas of Texas...~~lation by Clarence W. Ketch, a ~Ikcertatiort in Sociology, Louisiana State University, January I!dl: A So 11lniz's Land Hecon~es a County by Flora Gatlin Roslc~. \\lill~ County Historical Society, The Steck Company, Iectin, 'I rus; ant1 Types of Farming in Texas...

Skrabanek, R. L.; Banks, Vera J.; Bowles, Gladys Kleinwort

1964-01-01

40

The State of Texas Children 1994: A County by County Fact Book.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As part of a nationwide effort to highlight the well-being of children in every state, Texas Kids Count is building a comprehensive database of indicators of child well-being to be used to produce annual data books and other analyses on the status of children in Texas. This report presents, county by county, data on several child well-being

Texas Kids Count Project, Austin.

41

Desegregation in Brazos County, Texas, 1946-1971  

E-print Network

This study examines the process of desegregation in Brazos County, Texas. The landmark decision in Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas (1954) ruled that segregated schools were inherently unequal and therefore, unconstitutional. Brazos...

Hill, Scott Ogden

2012-06-07

42

Budgeting in Texas Counties, 1931-1940.  

E-print Network

the ~arions associations of county officers, particularly the county judges and commissioners, the county auditors, and the county dmlcs. CONTENTS Introduction 5 Purpose of Study 6 Procedure 6 Legal Provisions 9 The Budget Form 11 Number of Budgets... the ~arions associations of county officers, particularly the county judges and commissioners, the county auditors, and the county dmlcs. CONTENTS Introduction 5 Purpose of Study 6 Procedure 6 Legal Provisions 9 The Budget Form 11 Number of Budgets...

Bradshaw, H. C.

1941-01-01

43

Geology of the upper James River area Mason County, Texas  

E-print Network

The Upper James River area is looated in southuestern Nason County, Texas, on the southuest flanh of the Llano uplift. In this area, rooks of Paleosoiox Nesosoio, and, Cenosoie age are found. The litholegio units that are exposed over most of the thesis... snail part, add to the hnovledge of the geology of the Central Mineral Region of Texas. QKkXRS The Upper Jones River area is looated on the southwest flanh of the Llano uplift in soutbvestern Mason County, Texas. The southern bounds ry of the area...

White, Dixon Nesbit

2012-06-07

44

Measuring availability of healthful foods in two rural Texas counties  

E-print Network

A comprehensive in-store survey may capture the availability of healthful food alternatives in different store types in two rural counties. The purpose of this study was to: (1) compare the availability of healthful foods in two rural Texas counties...

Bustillos, Brenda Diane

2009-05-15

45

Ken Regan (Delaware) Field, Reeves County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Ken Regan field located in northern Reeves County, Texas, was discovered in July 1954. Discovery was from Delaware (Olds) sands at an approximate depth of 3,300 ft (1,005 m). For the past 29 years, the field has experienced periods of active development followed by long periods of no activity. To date, the ultimate field limits have not been established and development continues. The reservoir is a deep marine channel similar to, but slightly older than, the Ramsey sand of the upper Bell Canyon. Deposition of the Olds channel was from the northeast along the bottom of the basin. Subsequent eastward tilting has positioned the trap along the western boundary of the channel. Because of the irregularity of bottom-floor topography, prediction of the channel direction remains a challenge. Ken Regan field will be 30 years old in July 1984. It should continue to expand in size until the ultimate channel terminus is found or until economics preclude further drilling. Use of modern concepts of deep marine sedimentation has influenced much of the drilling which has occurred in recent years.

Hamilton, D.C.

1984-01-01

46

Handbook: County Program Building for Texas Agricultural Extension Workers.  

E-print Network

lkrc~ound bbmafbn Puklkiso b.Ammi)te88 and Tndlirfdods E~atluate and Project the County Program BASIC STEPS A TEXAS. AGRtCULTURAL EXTEPISION SERVICE [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] To A I1 &tension Workers: This handbook supplements... this handbook, we assume that each county has a program building committee of some kind. Because of the wide differences among vounties, no one organizational plan will fit all counties in detail. The handbook provides an organizational structure which can...

1955-01-01

47

How Walk Across Texas (WAT) Worked in a School: An Example from Grayson County, Texas  

E-print Network

have a popcorn party. 7. Publicity was coordinated with the local newspapers and television stations Vandergriff, Grayson County 4-H Program Assistant. Updated September 2012. Educational programs of the Texas A

48

SOIL SURVEY OF PAYNE COUNTY, OKLAHOMA OSURR Section 4  

E-print Network

Source of Map: Natural Resources Conservation Service Web Soil Survey URL: http: 2/20/1995; 2/21/1995 MAP LEGEND Soil Map Units Cities Detailed Counties Detailed States Interstate Highways Roads Rails Water Hydrography Oceans Escarpment, bedrock Escarpment, non-bedrock Gulley Levee

Ghajar, Afshin J.

49

LittleRockCreek SOIL SURVEY OF ATOKA COUNTY, OKLAHOMA  

E-print Network

Source of Map: Natural Resources Conservation Service Web Soil Survey URL: http: 3/8/1995; 3/10/1995 MAP LEGEND Soil Map Units Cities Detailed Counties Detailed States Interstate Highways Roads Rails Water Hydrography Oceans Escarpment, bedrock Escarpment, non-bedrock Gulley Levee

Ghajar, Afshin J.

50

SOIL SURVEY OF PAYNE COUNTY, OKLAHOMA OSURR Section 17  

E-print Network

Map Units Cities Detailed Counties Detailed States Interstate Highways Roads Rails Water Hydrography Conservation Service Web Soil Survey URL: http://websoilsurvey.nrcs.usda.gov Coordinate System: UTM Zone 14 Miscellaneous Water Rock Outcrop Saline Spot Sandy Spot Slide or Slip Sinkhole Sodic Spot Spoil Area Stony Spot

Ghajar, Afshin J.

51

Emergence of Autochthonous Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Northeastern Texas and Southeastern Oklahoma  

PubMed Central

Autochthonous human cases of leishmaniasis in the United States are uncommon. We report three new cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis and details of a previously reported case, all outside the known endemic range in Texas. Surveys for enzootic rodent reservoirs and sand fly vectors were conducted around the residences of three of the case-patients during the summer of 2006; female Lutzomyia anthophora sand flies were collected at a north Texas and southeast Oklahoma residence of a case-patient, indicating proximity of a suitable vector. Urban sprawl, climatologic variability, or natural expansion of Leishmania mexicana are possible explanations for the apparent spread to the north and east. Enhanced awareness among healthcare providers in the south central region of the United States is important to ensure clinical suspicion of leishmaniasis, diagnosis, and appropriate patient management. PMID:23185078

Clarke, Carmen F.; Bradley, Kristy K.; Wright, James H.; Glowicz, Janet

2013-01-01

52

Evaluating the perceptions, knowledge, and attitudes of Texas county extension agents about sustainable agriculture  

E-print Network

The purpose of this study was to determine the level of knowledge, perceptions of, and attitudes toward sustainable agriculture held by Texas county extension agents. Conducted from August 1998 to August 1999, the study targeted 570 Texas county...

Edwards, Karen Jennifer

2012-06-07

53

The geoarchaeology of Buttermilk Creek, Bell County, Texas  

E-print Network

December 1997 Major Subject; Anthropology THE GEOARCHAEOLOGY OF BUTTERMILK CREEK& BELL COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by BRANDY DEANNE GIBSON Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS... Approved as to style and content by: Michael Waters (Chair of Committee) arry Sh er (Mem er) Vatche Tchak rian (Member) Vaughn Bry (Head of Department) December 1997 Major Subject: Anthropology ABSTRACT The Geoarchaeology of Buttermilk Creek...

Gibson, Brandy Deanne

2012-06-07

54

Geology of the Normangee Lake area, Leon County, Texas  

E-print Network

deposits, which partly obscure the older formations, In remapping the Normangee Lake area a major structural break was found to occur along the Running Creek-Black Marsh valley. This break is interpreted to be a normal fault, downthrown to the south... within Leon and Madison counties, Texas. Principal structural features of eastern Texas 27 Cross-section A''-A''', without structural inter- pretation, of Running Creek-Black Marsh area 40 Development of deltaic facies. 92 Delta front...

Anspach, David Harold

2012-06-07

55

Daily Fish and Zooplankton Abundances in the Littoral Zone of Lake Texoma, Oklahoma-Texas, in Relation to Abiotic Variables  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many studies have shown the effects of yearly or monthly environmental conditions on the structure of fish and zooplankton communities. Environmental conditions can also vary greatly on much shorter time scales. We tested the effects of abiotic conditions on the daily abundance of fish and zooplankton in the littoral zone of Lake Texoma, Oklahoma-Texas. After date was removed statistically from

Philip W. Lienesch; William J. Matthews

2000-01-01

56

Depth Distribution of Striped Bass and Other Fish in Lake Texoma (Oklahoma-Texas) during Summer Stratification  

Microsoft Academic Search

In May and June 1982, before stratification, echolocator charts indicated that fish in the main basin of Lake Texoma (Oklahoma-Texas) were distributed from the surface to the bottom. With the onset of stratification and oxygen depletion in the hypolimnion in July, fish moved upward in the water column, avoiding anoxic conditions near the bottom. Stratification (defined more conspicuously by dissolved

William J. Matthews; Loren G. Hill; Scott M. Schellhaass

1985-01-01

57

HIV on Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU): A Study of Five Campuses in Texas, Oklahoma, Louisiana  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students (N = 1,146) from five Historically Black Colleges and Universities in Texas, Louisiana, and Oklahoma participated in this study. Although students report a moderate level of HIV knowledge, they are deficient on three items related to the role of Nonoxynol-9 on HIV transmission, role of prior STD history on HIV transmission, and meaning of

Chng, Chwee-Lye; Carlon, Alfonso; Toynes, Brian

2006-01-01

58

The vascular flora of Robertson County, Texas  

E-print Network

by Barney L. Lipscomb (Southern Methodist Univ. , Dallas, Tx. ); Crataegus and Euphorbfa by Wm. F. Nahler (Southern Methodist Univ. , Dallas, Tx. ); and Soli dago by Constance S. Taylor (Southeastern Oklahoma S ate Univ. , Durant, Okl. ). Listed taza... Corydalis micrantha v texensis Crataegus engelmannii Crataegus molli s Crataegus spathulata Crataegus vi ri di s Cropti ion di vari catum v di vari catum Phacella strictif lore v stri cti flora Phalari s caroli ni ana Phlox cuspi data v cusptdata...

Starbuck, Thomas Junn

2012-06-07

59

Ground-water resources of Cass and Marion Counties, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Cass and Marion Counties, an area of 1,325 square miles in northeast Texas, are underlain by the Cypress aquifer which is composed of the Wilcox Group, Carrizo Sand, Reklaw Formation, and Queen City Sand, all of Eocene age. These geologic units are for the most part hydraulically interconnected and generally function as a single aquifer.

Broom, Mathew E.

1971-01-01

60

Serving Tarrant County and all of North Texas  

E-print Network

Serving Tarrant County and all of North Texas Jobs · Find a Job · Post a Job Cars · Auto Reviews Research Institute that developed the patent-pending medical device. When a baby stops breathing, sensors in the bars of the crib recognize it and send an alert via a radio refrequency identification tag and receiver

Chiao, Jung-Chih

61

Comparison of Irrigation Water Use Estimates Calculated from Remotely Sensed Irrigated Acres and State Reported Irrigated Acres in the Lake Altus Drainage Basin, Oklahoma and Texas, 2000 Growing Season  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Increased demand for water in the Lake Altus drainage basin requires more accurate estimates of water use for irrigation. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, is investigating new techniques to improve water-use estimates for irrigation purposes in the Lake Altus drainage basin. Empirical estimates of reference evapotranspiration, crop evapotranspiration, and crop irrigation water requirements for nine major crops were calculated from September 1999 to October 2000 using a solar radiation-based evapotranspiration model. Estimates of irrigation water use were calculated using remotely sensed irrigated crop acres derived from Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus imagery and were compared with irrigation water-use estimates calculated from irrigated crop acres reported by the Oklahoma Water Resources Board and the Texas Water Development Board for the 2000 growing season. The techniques presented will help manage water resources in the Lake Altus drainage basin and may be transferable to other areas with similar water management needs. Irrigation water use calculated from the remotely sensed irrigated acres was estimated at 154,920 acre-feet; whereas, irrigation water use calculated from state reported irrigated crop acres was 196,026 acre-feet, a 23 percent difference. The greatest difference in irrigation water use was in Carson County, Texas. Irrigation water use for Carson County, Texas, calculated from the remotely sensed irrigated acres was 58,555 acrefeet; whereas, irrigation water use calculated from state reported irrigated acres was 138,180 acre-feet, an 81 percent difference. The second greatest difference in irrigation water use occurred in Beckham County, Oklahoma. Differences between the two irrigation water use estimates are due to the differences of irrigated crop acres derived from the mapping process and those reported by the Oklahoma Water Resources Board and Texas Water Development Board.

Masoner, J. R.; Mladinich, C. S.; Konduris, A. M.; Smith, S. Jerrod

2003-01-01

62

The Sparta aquifer, northern Brazos County, Texas  

E-print Network

for municipal aad iadastrial ?ses ia aorthera Brazos Ceaaty, which is located ia the upper Gulf Goastal Plain of East Central Texas as showa ea Figure 1. The purpose of this thesis is te preseat the geology ef the Sparta aquifer ia cea- aoctioa with its... for municipal aad iadastrial ?ses ia aorthera Brazos Ceaaty, which is located ia the upper Gulf Goastal Plain of East Central Texas as showa ea Figure 1. The purpose of this thesis is te preseat the geology ef the Sparta aquifer ia cea- aoctioa with its...

Wauters, John F

2012-06-07

63

Environmental assessment, Deaf Smith County site, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (42 USC sections 10101-10226) requires the environmental assessment of a proposed site to include a statement of the basis for nominating a site as suitable for characterization. Volume 2 provides a detailed statement evaluating the site suitability of the Deaf Smith County Site under DOE siting guidelines, as well as a comparison of the Deaf Smith County Site to the other sites under consideration. The evaluation of the Deaf Smith County Site is based on the impacts associated with the reference repository design, but the evaluation will not change if based on the Mission Plan repository concept. The second part of this document compares the Deaf Smith County Site to Davis Canyon, Hanford, Richton Dome and Yucca Mountain. This comparison is required under DOE guidelines and is not intended to directly support subsequent recommendation of three sites for characterization as candidate sites. 259 refs., 29 figs., 66 refs. (MHB)

Not Available

1986-05-01

64

Edwards Aquifer Evaluation: Kinney County, Texas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Edwards Aquifer is one of the most studied and most prolific aquifers in the United States. The aquifer is a heavily fractured and faulted carbonate aquifer with transmissivities in excess of 100 ft2/s. The City of San Antonio relies upon the Edwards Aquifer as its sole source for water. Much work has been done on quantifying recharge to the aquifer and discharge from wells and acquiring aquifer characteristics from pumping tests, specific capacity tests, and geophysical logs. Although the aquifer has been well studied in Bexar County, much less is known about the Edwards Aquifer in Kinney County. This is partly due to the lower population within the county (approximately 3,500 people) relative to the eastern counties (Uvalde, Medina, Bexar, Comal, and Hays) and the great distance of Kinney County from high profile discharge areas such as the City of San Antonio and Comal and San Marcos Springs. Three key products resulted from this study: (1) exploratory well drilling and the largest aquifer test in the county that were conducted to evaluate the well yields within a 10,000 acre study area in which a drawdown of 2.5 ft approximately 1.2 miles away was observed while pumping at approximately 4,600 gpm; (2) a recharge estimate for the Edwards Aquifer within Kinney County of approximately 71,382 ac-ft/yr; and (3) locating the Brackettville Groundwater Divide from an evaluation of ground water flow direction and hydrograph analysis. These results help evaluate the complex hydraulics occurring within Kinney County and aid in development of ground water modeling that will be used in managing the Edwards Aquifer.

Khorzad, Kaveh

2003-10-01

65

75 FR 30871 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00038  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...affected by the disaster: Primary Counties (Physical Damage and Economic...Cleveland, McIntosh, Okfuskee, Oklahoma, Pottawatomie, Seminole. Contiguous Counties (Economic Injury Loans Only): Oklahoma: Canadian, Creek,...

2010-06-02

66

Causes of property tax delinquency in Grayson County, Texas  

E-print Network

, Cho county amxst suffer financially from leak of revenue which could pormit lower ins of Cnxeo ox' increasing so@vices fbx" its oitisens, K ~ P Gabbor4& Taa Delinquency on Perm Real Rotate kn Texas& Texas Agricultural gsporimcnt Station 13ulletin... dolinquont in Choir Cax payments~ Othox' praporty owners, in such times of stross, will allow taxes ta go unpaid rathez' Chan Ca saox'ifioo ox' "cut oornzc's in oxdex Chat Csx payment can be made~ Xf' something must wait ax go unpaid& it seams...

Cunningham, James Morgan

2012-06-07

67

Genetic variation in the 16s mitochondrial rDNA gene from Texas and Oklahoma populations of Amblyomma maculatum  

E-print Network

), switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), and Canada wild-rye (Elymus canadensis). Shay Ranch is located in Refugio County and is situated in the Gulf Prairies ecological area of Texas. The vegetation of the Gulf Prairies is generally tall grasses such as big...), switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), and Canada wild-rye (Elymus canadensis). Shay Ranch is located in Refugio County and is situated in the Gulf Prairies ecological area of Texas. The vegetation of the Gulf Prairies is generally tall grasses such as big...

Lostak, Tracy Karon

2009-05-15

68

SEROLOGICAL PREVALENCE AND ISOLATION OF BABESIA ODOCOILE! AMONG WHITE-TAILED DEER (ODOCOILEUS VIRGINIANUS) IN TEXAS AND OKLAHOMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Serum samples collected from 581 white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) from Texas and from 124 white-tailed deer from Oklahoma were tested by the indirect fluorescent antibody technique against Babesia odocoilei. Prevalence of seropositive reactors varied from site to site in both states. Prevalence rates were statistically ranked as high, intermediate or low. Deer <12-mo-old had a significantly lower prevalence than all

K. A. Waldrup; A. A. Kocan; T. Qureshi; D. S. Davis; D. Baggett; G. G. Wagner

69

Air pollution and lung cancer mortality in Harris County, Texas, 1979-1981  

Microsoft Academic Search

Elevated lung cancer mortality rates in Harris County, Texas compared with other US counties and previously published reports that suggested a causal relation between air pollution and lung cancer in Houston prompted this ecologic analysis. A weighted regression analysis was used to examine the air pollution-lung cancer mortality relation for white males in Harris County, Texas, 1979-1981. The regression model

P. A. Buffler; S. P. Cooper; S. Stinnett; C. Contant; S. Shirts; R. J. Hardy; V. Agu; B. Gehan; K. Burau

1988-01-01

70

Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This Technical Quarterly Report is for the reporting period July 1, 2000 to September 30, 2000. The report provides details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma''. The project is divided into nine separate tasks. Since this is the first Quarterly report, much of the work done is of a preliminary nature. Several of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, while other tasks are dependent on earlier tasks being completed. The selection of the pilot test area has been completed. The drilling of the test well is waiting on rig availability. Phillips has begun sonic core testing of offset cores, waiting on the core from the well to be drilled. Design work is progressing for the tool, which will be built to fit the test well. Installation of monitoring equipment and the downhole vibration tool will occur after the well is drilled. Technical transfer efforts have begun with the submission of an abstract for a technical paper for the Oklahoma City Society of Petroleum Engineers meeting in March 2001.

J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

2000-09-30

71

Evaluation of coastal wave attenuation due to viscous fluid sediment at Jefferson County, Texas  

E-print Network

This thesis is a two-part discussion concerning a Gulf of Mexico beach in Jefferson County, Texas. The first part involves collecting and analyzing shoreline evolution data for an ongoing Texas A&M University Ocean Engineering Program investigation...

Tuttle, Meghan I

2012-06-07

72

Ground-water resources of Wheeler and eastern Gray Counties, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Wheeler and eastern Gray Counties are in the eastcentral part of the Texas Panhandle. The two counties are characterized by rolling to fairly rugged topography with many sand-dune areas and a well developed drainage system.

Maderak, M. L.

1973-01-01

73

Houston area multicrop inspection trips. [Wharton County, Texas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The phenology of crops such as corn, cotton, soybeans, sorghum, sunflowers, and rice and their observed signatures on LANDSAT imagery was studied. This was accomplished by photographing the various crops in segments 275 and 276 located in Wharton County, Texas and comparing those photographs with LANDSAT imagery of the same dates. These comparisons gave insight as to why a particular crop growth stage appeared as a definite signature on LANDSAT and how the percentage of ground cover of various crops affected the signatures on LANDSAT imagery. Numerous crop growth stages could not be directly compared due to cloud cover during several LANDSAT overpasses.

Dunham, E. W. (principal investigator)

1980-01-01

74

Gaseous Oxidized Mercury Dry Deposition Measurements in the Southwestern USA: A Comparison between Texas, Eastern Oklahoma, and the Four Corners Area  

PubMed Central

Gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) dry deposition measurements using aerodynamic surrogate surface passive samplers were collected in central and eastern Texas and eastern Oklahoma, from September 2011 to September 2012. The purpose of this study was to provide an initial characterization of the magnitude and spatial extent of ambient GOM dry deposition in central and eastern Texas for a 12-month period which contained statistically average annual results for precipitation totals, temperature, and wind speed. The research objective was to investigate GOM dry deposition in areas of Texas impacted by emissions from coal-fired utility boilers and compare it with GOM dry deposition measurements previously observed in eastern Oklahoma and the Four Corners area. Annual GOM dry deposition rate estimates were relatively low in Texas, ranging from 0.1 to 0.3?ng/m2h at the four Texas monitoring sites, similar to the 0.2?ng/m2h annual GOM dry deposition rate estimate recorded at the eastern Oklahoma monitoring site. The Texas and eastern Oklahoma annual GOM dry deposition rate estimates were at least four times lower than the highest annual GOM dry deposition rate estimate previously measured in the more arid bordering western states of New Mexico and Colorado in the Four Corners area. PMID:24955412

Sather, Mark E.; Allen, Kara L.; Smith, Luther; Mathew, Johnson; Jackson, Clarence; Callison, Ryan; Scrapper, Larry; Hathcoat, April; Adam, Jacque; Keese, Danielle; Brunette, Robert; Karlstrom, Jason; Van der Jagt, Gerard

2014-01-01

75

Environments of deposition of the Yegua Formation (Eocene), Brazos County, Texas  

E-print Network

ENVIRONMENTS OF DEPOSITION OF THE YEGUA FORMATION (EOCENE), BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by RUFUS JOSEPH LEBLANC, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of ' Texas A@M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1970 Major Subject: Geology ENVIRONMENTS OF DEPOSITION OF THE YEGUA FORMATION (EOCENE), BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by RUFUS JOSEPH LEBLANC, JR. Approved as to style and content by: (Charrman o ominittee) (Head...

LeBlanc, Rufus Joseph

2012-06-07

76

The influence of deer hunting leases on land values in Brazos County, Texas  

E-print Network

THE INFLUENCE OF DEER HUNTING LEASES ON LAND VALUES IN BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS 1959-1963 A Thesis FRANCIS BOYD ANDREWS Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas AAM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1965 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics THE INFLUENCE OF DEER HUNTING LEASES ON LAND VALUES IN HRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS 1959-196& A Thesis FRANCIS BOYD ANDREWS Approved as to style and content by: - ~ C airman of Committee...

Andrews, Francis Boyd

2012-06-07

77

Relationships among land ownership, land use, and landowner behavior changes in Gillespie and Washington Counties, Texas  

E-print Network

and Washington Counties, Texas. (May 2001) Mark Shane Steinbach, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Fred Smeins The recent trend of land parcelization and habitat fragmentation has prompted concern among scientists. This concern has... APPENDIX B . . 74 78 79 APPENDIX C . . 85 VITA. 90 LIST OF TABLES Page Table 1. Selected sociodemographic characteristics of Gillespie and Washington Counties and the State of Texas . . . . 25 Table 2, Selected economic and land tenure...

Steinbach, Mark Shane

2012-06-07

78

Soils-geomorphology of the Brazos River terraces Brazos County, Texas  

E-print Network

SOILS-GEOMORPHOLOGY OF THE BRAZOS RIVER TERRACES BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by LEE CHARLES NORDT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AAM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... Oecember 1983 Major Subject: Geography SOILS-GEOMORPHOLOGY OF THE BRAZOS RIVER TERRACES BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by LEE CHARLES NORDT Approved as to style and content by: Kenneth L. White (Chairman of ommittee) Clarissa T. Kimber (Member...

Nordt, Lee C

2012-06-07

79

Geology and hydrogeology of the Edwards Aquifer Transition Zone, Bexar County, Texas  

E-print Network

GEOLOGY AND HYDROGEOLOGY OF THE EDWARDS AQUIFER TRANSITION ZONE, BEXAR COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by JEFFREY STEPHEN HEATHERY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AQh University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1989 Major Subject: Geology GEOLOGY AND HYDROGEOLOGY OF THE EDWARDS AQUIFER TRANSITION ZONE, BEXAR COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by JEFFREY STEPHEN HEATHERY Approved as to style and content by: Chris pher C. Mathewson...

Neathery, Jeffrey Stephen

2012-06-07

80

Depositional and diagenetic history of some Jurassic carbonates, Indian Rock-Gilmer Field, Upshur County, Texas  

E-print Network

~ ~ ~ 0 '''j DEPOSITIONAL AND DIAGENETIC HISTORY OF SOME JURASSIC CARBONATES, INDIAN ROCK-GILMER FIELD, UPSHUR COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by STEVEN ANTHONY FALL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1974 Major Subject: Geology DEPOSITIONAL AND DIAGENETIC HISTORY OF SOME JURASSIC CARBONATES, INDIAN ROCK-GILMER FIELD, UPSHUR COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by STEVEN ANTHONY FALL Approved as to style...

Fall, Steven Anthony

2012-06-07

81

Pesticide safety training among farmworker adolescents from Starr County, Texas.  

PubMed

This study of adolescent farmworkers describes employer compliance with pesticide safety training, a requirement of the EPA-mandated Worker Protection Standard (WPS), and identifies variables associated with having received training within the prior five years. Data are from "A Study of Work Injuries in Farmworker Children, " a three-year cohort study of high school students living along the Texas-Mexico border in Starr County. Data were collected using a web-based, self-administered, confidential survey. Of 324 students who participated in field work between January 1 and September 30, 2003, 68 (21.0%) reported ever receiving pesticide safety training. Overall, the 61 (18.8%) students who reported training within the prior five years also reported that their most recent instruction covered at least three key WPS areas (i.e., entry into a recently treated field, pesticide-related injuries/illnesses, and emergency care for pesticide exposure). Based on a multiple logistic regression, students who were male (OR = 1.97), worked only outside of Texas (OR = 2.73), worked only for commercial growers/owners (OR = 4.35), worked only for contractors (OR = 3.18), worked corn crops (OR = 2.93), and worked potato crops (OR = 3.11) were more likely to report receipt of training within the prior five years. Results suggest that increased enforcement may be needed, especially in Texas, and special educational efforts may be needed to reach female farmworker youth. PMID:17892073

Shipp, E M; Cooper, S P; del Junco, D J; Bolin, J N; Whitworth, R E; Cooper, C J

2007-07-01

82

Ground-water geology of Bexar County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The investigation in Bexar County was part of a comprehensive study of a large area in south-central Texas underlain by the Edwards and associated limestones (Comanche Peak and Georgetown) of Cretaceous age. The limestones form an aquifer which supplies water to the city of San Antonio, several military installations, many industrial plants, and many irrigated farms. The geologic formations that yield water to wells in Bexar County are sedimentary rocks of Mesozoic and Cenozoic age. The rocks strike northeastward and dip southeastward toward the Gulf of Mexico. In the northern part of the county, in an erosional remnant of the Edwards Plateau, the rocks are clearly flat and free from faulting. In the central and southern parts of the county, however, the rocks dip gulfward at gentle to moderately steep angles and are extensively faulted in the Balcones and Mexia fault zones. Individual faults or shatter zones were traced as much as 25 miles; the maximum displacement is at least 600 feet. In general, the formations are either monoclinal or slightly folded; in the western part of the county the broad Culebra anticline plunges southwestward. Most of the large-capacity wells in Bexar County draw water from the Edwards and associated limestones, but a few draw from the Glen Rose limestone, the Austin chalk, and surficial sand and gravel. The Hosston formation, Glen Rose limestone, Buda limestone, and Austin chalk, all of Cretaceous age, generally yield small to large supplies of water; the Wilcox group and Carrizo sand of Tertiary age yield moderate supplies and alluvium of Pleistocene and Recent age generally yield small supplies. The Edwards and associated limestones are recharged primarily by groundwater underflow into Bexar County from the west, and secondarily by seepage from streams that cross the outcrop of the aquifer in Bexar County. During the period 1934-47 the recharge to the aquifer in Bexar County is estimated to have averaged between 400,000 and 430,000 acre-feet per year. Discharge from the aquifer takes place by means of wells and springs and by underflow into Comal and Guadalupe Counties on the northeast. During the period 1934-47 the estimated average discharge from wells and springs was about 174,000 acre-feet per year. The discharge by underflow out of the county during the same period is estimated to have averaged between 220,000 and 260.000 acre-feet per year. Probably only a small amount of water moves downdip southeast of San Antonio. The presence of highly mineralized water in that area suggests that the circulation of water is poor because of the low permeability of the aquifer. During the period 1934-56 the discharge from the Edwards and associated limestones greatly exceeded the recharge; consequently, water levels in wells declined. The decline was greatest in the northwestern part of the county, where the water levels in wells dropped as much as 100 feet. The decline was progressively less toward the east, averaging 40 feet along the Bexar-Comal County line. The area of the greatest concentration of discharge, which includes San Antonio and extends to the southwest and northeast, coincides with the area of maximum faulting and maximum recorded yields from wells and is not the area of greatest decline. The ability of the Edwards and associated limestones to transmit and store water in the San Antonio area apparently is so great that the discharge from wells results in much smaller declines of water level than do similar or even smaller discharges in other areas. The water from the Edwards is almost uniformly a calcium bicarbonate water of good quality, although hard. In the southern part of the San Antonio area the water is charged with hydrogen sulfide; farther downdip it becomes highly mineralized.

Arnow, Ted

1963-01-01

83

78 FR 36556 - Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...disaster: Cleveland, Lincoln, McClain, Oklahoma, and Pottawatomie Counties for Individual Assistance. Cleveland, Lincoln, McClain, Oklahoma, and Pottawatomie Counties for debris removal and emergency...

2013-06-18

84

Locating turfgrass production sites for removal of phosphorus in Erath County, Texas  

E-print Network

by JEREMY EDWARD HANZLIK Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: Clyde Munster (Chair of Committee) Richard White... County, Texas. (May 2003) Jeremy Edward Hanzlik, B.S., Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Clyde Munster The North Bosque River watershed of central Texas hosts a large portion of dairy production in the state. In recent years...

Hanzlik, Jeremy Edward

2004-09-30

85

Role of sea surface temperature and soil-moisture feedback in the 1998 Oklahoma-Texas drought.  

PubMed

The drought that affected the US states of Oklahoma and Texas in the summer of 1998 was strong and persistent, with soil moisture reaching levels comparable to those of the 1930s 'dust bowl'. Although other effects of the record-strength 1997-98 El Nio were successfully predicted over much of the United States, the Oklahoma-Texas drought was not. Whereas the response of the tropical atmosphere to strong anomalies in sea surface temperature is quite predictable, the response of the extratropical atmosphere is more variable. Here we present results from mechanistic experiments to clarify the origin and maintenance of this extratropical climate extreme. In addition to global atmospheric models, we use a regional model to isolate regional climate feedbacks. We conclude that during April and May 1998, sea surface temperature anomalies combined with a favourable atmospheric circulation to establish the drought. In June-August, the regional positive feedback associated with lower evaporation and precipitation contributed substantially to the maintenance of the drought. The drought ended in the autumn, when stronger large-scale weather systems were able to penetrate the region and overwhelm the soil-moisture feedback. Our results show the potential for numerical models including appropriate physical processes to make skillful predictions of regional climate. PMID:11130719

Hong, S Y; Kalnay, E

2000-12-14

86

Digital map of base of aquifer for High Plains Aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report contains digital data and accompanying documentation for base of aquifer contours of the High Plains aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. The original data are from the 1:1,000,000-scale mylar source map for Gutentag and others (1984).

Cederstrand, Joel R.; Becker, Mark F.

1998-01-01

87

A study of secondary recovery possibilities of the Hogshooter field, Washington County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Hogshooter field, located in east central Washington County, Oklahoma, was first developed during the period 1906 to 1913. The field was extended later during the period 1918 to 1922. The principal producing horizon is the Bartlesville sand, found at an average depth of 1,150 feet. To January 1, 1944, the Bartlesville sand has produced 7,566,000 barrels of oil from 5,610 productive acres and 871 oil wells. Peak production, averaging 2,025 barrels per day for the year, was attained in the year 1910. The accumulation of oil in the Bartlesville sand is not related to structure. The total recovery from the Bartlesville sand in the Hogshooter field to January 1, 1944, is estimated to represent 10.3 per cent of the original oil in place, and the total residual oil is estimated to average 11,776 barrels per acre. Widespread application of vacuum, started in 1915, has had little beneficial effect on production. Some gas-repressuring in recent years has increased recovery to a small extent. Conservatively estimated water-flood recovery possibilities are: 3,500 barrels per acre for an area consisting of 1,393 acres (4,875,000 barrels total) with a reasonable profit at the present price of crude oil, and 2,500 barrels per acre for an area of 2,248 acres (5,620,000 barrels total), with no profit indicated under existing conditions. The latter area would show a profit equal to the first-mentioned area only with an increase in price of crude oil of forty-five cents per barrel. Subsurface waters at depths of 1,400 to 1,700 feet are indicated as a satisfactory source for use in water-flooding operations.

Fox, I. William; Thigpen, Claude H.; Ginter, Roy L.; Alden, George P.

1945-01-01

88

Subsurface characterization using time-domain electromagnetics at the Texas A&M University Brazos River Hydrologic Field Site, Burleson County, Texas  

E-print Network

A transient controlled-source electromagnetic (TDEM) survey has been performed at the Texas A&M University Hydrogeological Test Site adjacent to the Brazos River in Burleson County, Texas. A I-D regularized inversion of the data shows...

Sananikone, Khamla

2012-06-07

89

3 CFR - Expediting Review of Pipeline Projects From Cushing, Oklahoma, to Port Arthur, Texas, and Other...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Arthur, Texas, and Other Domestic Pipeline Infrastructure...Arthur, Texas, and Other Domestic Pipeline Infrastructure...development of our natural gas resources. But...creating jobs and supporting domestic industry. In order...ensuring the health, safety, and security of...

2013-01-01

90

Gravity and seismic reflection studies over the Ferguson Crossing Salt Dome, Grimes and Brazos Counties, Texas  

E-print Network

on the following pages follow the . tyle of Gen~hsics. Location The Ferguson Crossing Salt Dome is located in eastern Brazos County and western Grimes County, Texas (Figure 1). The major town near this area is College Station which is located approxi- mately... on the following pages follow the . tyle of Gen~hsics. Location The Ferguson Crossing Salt Dome is located in eastern Brazos County and western Grimes County, Texas (Figure 1). The major town near this area is College Station which is located approxi- mately...

Cordero Ardila, Vladimir Francisco

2012-06-07

91

78 FR 42147 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00073  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...13647 and 13648] Oklahoma Disaster OK-00073...for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA- 4117-DR...disaster: Primary Counties: Atoka, Canadian...Nowata, Okfuskee, Oklahoma, Okmulgee, Pittsburg, Pottawatomie, Pushmataha,...

2013-07-15

92

Water table recovery in a reclaimed surface lignite mine, Grimes County, Texas  

E-print Network

Water table recovery in four reclaimed mine blocks containing replaced overburden has been monitored at Gibbons Creek Lignite Mine in Grimes County, Texas since 1986. Recovery analysis was conducted based on data recorded at 27 wells installed...

Peace, Kelley H.

2012-06-07

93

RepoRt on a MaMMal SuRvey at CaMp Maxey, laMaR County, texaS (texaS aRMy national GuaRd faCility)  

Microsoft Academic Search

A mammal survey was conducted of Camp Maxey (Texas Army National Guard training site), Lamar County, Texas, from October 2002 through June 2004. This military installation is located in eastern Texas and is situated at the gradational boundary between the Pineywoods (east) and Blackland Prairies (west). Sherman traps, snap traps, pitfall traps, mist nets, DK-1 and Macabee gopher traps, and

Cody W. EdWards

94

77 FR 61466 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00063  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...for the State of Oklahoma, dated 08/22...disaster: Primary Counties: (Physical Damage...Cleveland. Contiguous Counties: (Economic Injury Loans Only): Oklahoma: Canadian, Mcclain, Oklahoma, Pottawatomie. All other...

2012-10-09

95

75 FR 32491 - Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...following areas of the State of Oklahoma have been designated as adversely...Cleveland, McIntosh, Okfuskee, Oklahoma, Pottawatomie, and Seminole Counties for Individual Assistance...counties within the State of Oklahoma are eligible to apply...

2010-06-08

96

NAME: Half Moon Reef Restoration Project LOCATION: Palacios/Matagorda County, Texas  

E-print Network

NAME: Half Moon Reef Restoration Project LOCATION: Palacios/Matagorda County, Texas ACRES Texas Parks and Wildlife PROJECT DESCRIPTION: Half Moon Reef is located on Palacios Point within of the suitability of Half Moon as a restoration project. Expected Benefits: The project will result in the direct

US Army Corps of Engineers

97

Development of visible/infrared/microwave agriculture classification and biomass estimation algorithms. [Guyton, Oklahoma and Dalhart, Texas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Agricultural crop classification models using two or more spectral regions (visible through microwave) are considered in an effort to estimate biomass at Guymon, Oklahoma Dalhart, Texas. Both grounds truth and aerial data were used. Results indicate that inclusion of C, L, and P band active microwave data, from look angles greater than 35 deg from nadir, with visible and infrared data improve crop discrimination and biomass estimates compared to results using only visible and infrared data. The microwave frequencies were sensitive to different biomass levels. The K and C band were sensitive to differences at low biomass levels, while P band was sensitive to differences at high biomass levels. Two indices, one using only active microwave data and the other using data from the middle and near infrared bands, were well correlated to total biomass. It is implied that inclusion of active microwave sensors with visible and infrared sensors on future satellites could aid in crop discrimination and biomass estimation.

Rosenthal, W. D.; Mcfarland, M. J.; Theis, S. W.; Jones, C. L. (principal investigtors)

1982-01-01

98

ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY WITH DOWNHOLE VIBRATION STIMULATION IN OSAGE COUNTY OKLAHOMA  

SciTech Connect

This Final Report covers the entire project from July 13, 2000 to June 30, 2003. The report summarizes the details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma'' under DOE Contract Number DE-FG26-00BC15191. The project was divided into nine separate tasks. This report is written in an effort to document the lessons learned during the completion of each task. Therefore each task will be discussed as the work evolved for that task throughout the duration of the project. Most of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, but certain tasks were dependent on earlier tasks being completed. During the three years of project activities, twelve quarterly technical reports were submitted for the project. Many individual topic and task specific reports were included as appendices in the quarterly reports. Ten of these reports have been included as appendices to this final report. Two technical papers, which were written and accepted by the Society of Petroleum Engineers, have also been included as appendices. The three primary goals of the project were to build a downhole vibration tool (DHVT) to be installed in seven inch casing, conduct a field test of vibration stimulation in a mature waterflooded field and evaluate the effects of the vibration on both the produced fluid characteristics and injection well performance. The field test results are as follows: In Phase I of the field test the DHVT performed exceeding well, generating strong clean signals on command and as designed. During this phase Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory had installed downhole geophones and hydrophones to monitor the signal generated by the downhole vibrator. The signals recorded were strong and clear. Phase II was planned to be ninety-day reservoir stimulation field test. This portion of the field tests was abruptly ended after one week of operations, when the DHVT became stuck in the well during a routine removal activity. The tool cannot operate in this condition and remains in the well. There was no response measured during or afterwards to either the produced fluids from the five production wells or in the injection characteristics of the two injection wells in the pilot test area. Monitoring the pilot area injection and production wells ceased when the field test was terminated March 14, 2003. Thus, a key goal of this project, which was to determine the effects of vibration stimulation on improving oil recovery from a mature waterflood, was not obtained. While there was no improved oil recovery effect measured, there was insufficient vibration stimulation time to expect a change to occur. No conclusion can be drawn about the effectiveness of vibration stimulation in this test.

Robert Westermark; J. Ford Brett

2003-11-01

99

Development of ground-water resources in Orange County, Texas, and adjacent areas in Texas and Louisiana, 1971-80  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The major water-bearing unit in the study area is the Chicot aquifer. The Chicot aquifer overlies the Evangeline aquifer. The Evangeline aquifer is undeveloped in Orange County, but is developed at Evadale in Jasper County, Texas, and at Silsbee in Hardin County, Texas. Both aquifers consist of unconsolidated and discontinuous layers of sand and clay that dip toward the Gulf of Mexico. Pumpage in Orange County from the lower unit of the Chicot aquifer averaged 21.2 million gallons per day and pumpage from the upper unit of the Chicot averaged about 2 million gallons per day from 1971-79. Pumpage increased in municipal areas and decreased in industrial areas with little net change in total pumpage during the report period. Most water levels continued to decline in Orange County, generally at a slower rate than before 1971. Water levels tended to stabilize in areas where ground-water withdrawals decreased. In some of the areas water levels rose. Bench-mark elevations determined during 1973 show regional land-surface subsidence from 1918-73, generally attributed to ground-water development, to be less than 0.5 foot. Locally, subsidence due to production of oil, gas , saltwater, or sulphur was about 15 feet at Spindletop Dome, Jefferson County, Texas, and as much as 3 feet (.9 meter) near Port Acres gas field, Jefferson County, Texas. Although saltwater encroachment is evident in parts of southern Orange County, the encroachment is not expected to increase because artesian pressure is unlikely to be decreased further due to stable ground-water pumping and a projected increase in the use of surface water to meet future demands. (USGS)

Bonnet, C. W.; Gabrysch, R. K.

1982-01-01

100

Geology of the Voca-North area, McCulloch County, Texas  

E-print Network

GEOLOGY OF THE VOCA-NORTH AREA~ IIcCULLOCH COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis BRIAN EDKJND SEALY Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of IIASTER... OF SCIENCE January 1963 IIagor Subject: Geology GEOLOGY OY THE UOCA?NORTH AREA NoCULLOCH COUNTY? TEXAS A Thesis By BRIAN ZDNJND SEALY Approved as to sty)e and content by: i ea o sent January, 1963 TABL:- O;: ' ONE'"NTS A B ' R A C T ~ 0 0 ~ 0 e 0...

Sealy, Brian Edmund

2012-06-07

101

An Exploratory Study of Female Juvenile Offenders: Harris County, Texas, 1993-2004  

Microsoft Academic Search

Female offenders are the fastest growing population in the criminal justice system. The purpose of this study is to determine the month or months that most female juvenile offenses occur in Harris County (the largest county in the State of Texas), identify the average age of the offender, investigate the possibility of a relationship between ethnicity and referrals for offense

Valerie D. JACKSON; Jennifer N. FOSTER; Moni TARANATH-SANGHAVI; Bonnie J. WALKER

2009-01-01

102

78 FR 60826 - Foreign-Trade Zone 155-Calhoun/Victoria Counties, Texas; Authorization of Production Activity...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Foreign-Trade Zone 155--Calhoun/Victoria Counties, Texas; Authorization of Production Activity; Caterpillar, Inc. (Excavator and Frame Assembly Production); Victoria, Texas On May 29, 2013, The Calhoun-Victoria Foreign Trade Zone,...

2013-10-02

103

Stratigraphy of the Calvert Bluff Formation of the Wilcox Group, Brazos County, Texas  

E-print Network

, Calvert Bluff (including the Sabinetown shale), and Carizzo formations of the Wilcox Group. 3 Study area map showing major structural features: basins, fault zones, salt domes. . 7 4 Regional map of the Texas Gulf Coast showing the Wilcox outcrop... of the older structure. Three salt domes lie within or near this study area and include the Clay Creek dome to the south in Washington County, Millican dome in southern Brazos County, and Ferguson dome on the border between Brazos and Grimes counties...

May, Audrey Gail

2012-06-07

104

76 FR 34799 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00050  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-1989-DR...disaster: Primary Counties (Physical Damage...Mcclain, Contiguous Counties (Economic Injury Loans Only): Oklahoma: Adair, Blaine...Payne, Pontotoc, Pottawatomie, Stephens....

2011-06-14

105

78 FR 31998 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00071  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...affected by the disaster: Primary Counties (Physical Damage and Economic Injury...Cleveland, Lincoln, McClain, Oklahoma, Pottawatomie. Contiguous Counties (Economic Injury Loans Only): Oklahoma: Canadian, Creek, Garvin,...

2013-05-28

106

Discrimination against and Adaptation of Italians in the Coal Counties of Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the late 1800s and early 1900s coal reigned supreme in what is now southeastern Oklahoma. As was the case in the northeastern United States, Italians and other immigrants from southern and eastern Europe were brought in as a form of inexpensive labor to work the mines. Italians had different customs, a different language, a unique appearance,

LoConto, David G.

2004-01-01

107

Digital map of water levels in 1980 for the High Plains Aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report contains digital data and accompanying documentation for contours for 1980 water-level elevations for the High Plains aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. This digital data set was created by digitizing the 1980 water-level elevation contours from a 1:1,000,000-scale base map created by the U.S. Geological Survey High Plains Regional Aquifer Systems-Analysis (RASA) project (Gutentag, E.D., Heimes, F.J., Krothe, N.C., Luckey, R.R., and Weeks, J.B., 1984, Geohydrology of the High Plains aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1400-B, 63 p.) The data are not intended for use at scales larger than 1:1,000,000.

Cederstrand, Joel R.; Becker, Mark F.

1999-01-01

108

Digital map of predevelopment water levels for the High Plains Aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report contains digital data and accompanying documentation for aquifer boundaries of contours for predevelopment water-level elevations for the High Plains aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. This digital data set was created by digitizing the contours for predevelopment water-level elevations from a 1:1,000,000-scale base map created by the U.S. Geological Survey High Plains Regional Aquifer-System Analysis (RASA) project (Gutentag, E.D., Heimes, F.J., Krothe, N.C., Luckey, R.R., and Weeks, J.B., 1984, Geohydrology of the High Plains aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1400-B, 63 p.) The data should not be used at scales larger than 1:1,000,000.

Cederstrand, Joel R.; Becker, Mark F.

1999-01-01

109

Digital map of geologic faults for the High Plains Aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report contains digital data and accompanying documentation for faults of the High Plains aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. This digital data set was created by digitizing the faults from a 1:1,000,000-scale base map created by the U.S. Geological Survey High Plains Regional Aquifer-System Analysis (RASA) project (Gutentag, E.D., Heimes, F.J., Krothe, N.C., Luckey, R.R., and Weeks, J.B., 1984, Geohydrology of the High Plains aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1400-B, 63 p.) The data are not intended for use at scales larger than 1:1,000,000.

Cederstrand, Joel R.; Becker, Mark F.

1999-01-01

110

Digital map of hydraulic conductivity for the High Plains Aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This digital data set consists of hydraulic conductivity contours and polygons for the High Plains aquifer in the central United States. The High Plains aquifer extends from south of 32 degrees to almost 45 degrees north latitude and from 96 degrees 30 minutes to almost 104 degrees west longitude. The area covers 174,000 square miles and is present in Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Kansas, Colorado, Nebraska, Wyoming, and South Dakota.

Cederstrand, J. R.; Becker, M. F.

1998-01-01

111

Temporal and Spatial Variability in Otolith Trace-Element Signatures of Juvenile Striped Bass from Spawning Locations in Lake Texoma, Oklahoma-Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

We assessed the potential of trace-element analysis for identifying spawning locations of striped bass Morone saxatilis in the two tributaries of Lake Texoma, Oklahoma-Texas, during 2002-2004. We also assessed the temporal stability of elemental signatures over 3 years. Elemental composition of juvenile striped bass otoliths varied considerably between the two tributary arms of Lake Texoma both within and among years.

Jason J. Schaffler; Dana L. Winkelman

2008-01-01

112

Horizontal stresses from well-bore breakouts and lithologies associated with their formation, Oklahoma and Texas Panhandle  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Orientations of crustal stresses are inferred from stress-induced well-bore breakouts in three areas in the south-central United States: the eastern part of the Anadarko basin in central Oklahoma, the Marietta basin in south-central Oklahoma, and the Bravo dome area of the central Texas Panhandle. Inferred directions of maximum horizontal principal stress (SHmax) are ENE for the eastern Anadarko basin, and NE for the Marietta basin and the Bravo dome area. For the Bravo dome area, the magnitudes of the three principal stresses (S1, S2, S3) are known from existing hydraulic-fracturing (hydrofrac) measurements, and a normal-faulting stress regime (SV > SHmax > SHmin) is implied. For the eastern Anadarko basin and the Marietta basin, the magnitudes of the principal stresses are not known. Because Quaternary left-lateral oblique slip on the Meers fault in south-central Oklahoma suggests strike-slip (SHmax > Sv > SHmin) and reverse faulting (SHmax > SHmin > SV), the study region is inferred to be a possible transition zone between areas of extensional and compressional stresses. Breakout data from the eastern Anadarko basin yield a single consistent SHmax orientation. Data from the Marietta basin and the Bravo dome area have bimodal-orthogonal distributions consisting of breakouts and orthogonal sets of well-bore enlargement orientations. Orthogonal trends in the data are probably related to drilling-induced hydraulic fracturing of the well bore, or to preexisting natural fractures or joint sets intersecting the well bore. On the dipmeter log, breakouts and fracture enlargements have elliptical cross sections of similar size and shape. Orthogonally oriented well-bore enlargements are differentiated by comparing their long-axis orientations with directions of known or inferred horizontal stress. Dispersion, or data scatter, among enlargement orientations (bimodal data sets) increases the standard deviations for many well data sets from the Marietta basin and the Bravo dome area. In these two areas, some dispersion may reflect variation in stress conditions across fault-bounded blocks and the orientations of fractures or joints within these blocks. Although breakouts and fracture enlargements formed in all parts of the thick sequences of sedimentary rocks logged, they occurred primarily in limestone, shale, and dolomitic rocks, reflecting the abundance of these rock types in the study areas.

Dart, Richard L.

1989-01-01

113

The stratigraphy and structure of the Rosita gas fields, Duval County, Texas  

E-print Network

Stratigraphic Column for the Subsurface Early Tertiary Page in the South Texas Gulf Coast. 2 Production Statistics for Northwest Rosita field, Duval County, Texas. Average Composition end Texture of Sandstones for the Shell: Stegell 1A, Travis McGee 1..., 12252 ft. 15 Grain size, composition, snd. bedsets of the upper "V" sandstone, Shell Stegall 1A. Grain size, composition, and bedsets of the middle "V" sandstone, Shell Stegall 1A. . . . . . . . , . . . . . . 42 Grain size composition, and bedsets...

Straccia, Joseph Robert

2012-06-07

114

76 FR 68188 - Valero Refining-Texas, L.P. v. Port of Corpus Christi Authority of Nueces County, TX; Notice of...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Authority of Nueces County, Texas (PCCA) hereinafter...laws of the State of Texas, and operates a petroleum refinery at two locations...sub-division of the State of Texas.'' Complainant alleges...presiding officer to the use of alternative...

2011-11-03

115

The University of Texas at Arlington College of Nursing Equivalency Chart for: University of Oklahoma  

E-print Network

(1865- present) HIST 1493 United States, 1865 to Present POLS 2311 Government of the United States P SC 1113 American Federal Government POLS 2312 State and Local Government (Texas) None None ENGL 1301_Flyer_Campus.pdf For more information on the online AP BSN program requirements please go to: http

Huang, Haiying

116

The organization, powers, and duties of the county commissioners' court in Texas  

E-print Network

or an Administrative Body, " Texas Law Review, XI (June, 1933), 518. All following citations of Texas Law Review will be so: (volume) TLR (page) . 5. Gaines v. Newborough, 34 S. W. 1048 (1896) . 6. Tex. Const. art. 5, sec. 18. 33 construed by the courts.... Von Rosenberg v. Lovett, 173 S. W. 508 (1915); Parr v. Duval County, 304 S. W. 2d 959 (1957) . 9. Dallas County Bois D'Arc Island Levee District v. Glenn, 288 S. W. 165 (1926); Scott v. Graham, 292 S. W. 2d 324 (1956); 41 TLR 539. 10. Tex...

Daughety, Gerald Lee

2012-06-07

117

Ground-water data in Orange County and adjacent counties, Texas, 1985-90  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The lower unit of the Chicot aquifer is a major source of freshwater for Orange County, Texas. In 1989, the average rate of ground-water withdrawal from the lower unit of the Chicot aquifer in Orange County for municipal and industrial use was 13.8 million gallons per day, a substantial decrease from the historical high of 23.1 million gallons per day in 1972. The average withdrawal for industrial use decreased substantially from 14.4 million gallons per day during 1963?84 to 6.9 million gallons per day during 1985?89. The average withdrawal for municipal use during 1985?89 was 6.8 million gallons per day, similar to the average withdrawal of 5.8 million gallons per day during 1963?84. Water levels in wells in most of the study area rose during 1985?90. The largest rise in water levels was more than 10 feet in parts of Orange and Pinehurst, north of site B (one of three areas of ground-water withdrawal for industrial use), while the largest decline in water levels was a localized decline of more than 60 feet at site C in south-central Orange County (also an area of withdrawal for industrial use). Chemical analyses of ground-water samples from the lower Chicot aquifer during 1985?90 indicate that the aquifer contained mostly freshwater (dissolved solids concentrations less than 1,000 milligrams per liter). Dissolved chloride concentrations remained relatively constant in most wells during 1985?90 but could vary greatly between wells within short distances. Saline-water encroachment continued to occur during 1985?89 but at a slower rate than in the 1970s and early 1980s. On the basis of chemical data collected during 1985?89, a relation was determined between specific conductance and dissolved chloride concentration that can be used to estimate dissolved chloride by multiplying the specific conductance by different factors for low or high conductances.

Kasmarek, Mark C.

1999-01-01

118

Effects of hydrogeology on lignite recovery in the Manning Formation, Grimes County, Texas  

E-print Network

EFFECTS OF HyDROGEOLOGY ON LIGNITE RECOVER IN THE IVJBiING FOiVcATION, GR MES COU!!a I, TEXAS A Thesis IZSIIE NARX LEUITAN Su'omitteu to ' he Graduate ColleSe of Texas A@I1 University in parti ! t'ulfill!n nt cf the requiremert for the degree... of !IASTER OF SCIENCE Decesher 1976 Najor Suhject: Geolody EFFECTS OF HYDROGEOLOGY ON LIGNITE RECOVERY IN THE MAIDNING FORMATION, GRIMES COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis LESLIE MARK IZVITAN Approved as to style and content by: (Ctwirman of Committee Head...

Levitan, Leslie Mark

2012-06-07

119

Depositional environment and reservoir morphology of Guadalupian Bell Canyon sandstones, Scott field, Ward and Reeves counties, Texas  

E-print Network

DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT AND RESERVOIR MORPHOLOGY OF GUADALUPIAN BELL CANYON SANDSTONES, SCOTT FIELD. WARD AND REEVES COUNTIES, TEXAS A Thesis by GERARD PAUL KASHATUS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial... fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1986 Major Subject: Geology DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT AND RESERVOIR MORPHOLOGY OF GUADALUPIAN BELL CANYON SANDSTONES, SCOTT FIELD, WARD AND REEVES COUNTIES, TEXAS A Thesis by GERARD...

Kashatus, Gerard Paul

2012-06-07

120

SUBSURFACE WELL-LOG CORRELATION OF ARSENIC-BEARING LITHOFACIES IN THE PERMIAN GARBER SANDSTONE AND WELLINGTON FORMATION, CENTRAL OKLAHOMA AQUIFER (COA), CLEVELAND COUNTY, OKLAHOMA  

EPA Science Inventory

The fluvial Garber Sandstone and the underlying Wellington Formation are important sources of drinking water in central Oklahoma. These formations, which make up much of the COA, consist of amalgamated sandstones with some interbedded mudstones, siltstones, and local mudstone- a...

121

An evaluation of the suitability of ERTS data for the purposes of petroleum exploration. [Anadarko Basin in Oklahoma and Texas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This investigation was undertaken to determine the types and amounts of information valuable to petroleum exploration that are extractable from ERTS data and to determine the cost of obtaining the information from ERTS relative to costs using traditional or conventional means. In particular, it was desirable to evaluate this new petroleum exploration tool in a geologically well-known area in order to assess its potential usefulness in an unknown area. In light of the current energy situation, it is felt that such an evaluation is important in order to best utilize technical efforts with customary exploration tools, by rapidly focusing attention on the most promising areas in order to reduce the time required to go through the exploration cycle and to maximize cost savings. The Anadarko Basin lies in western Oklahoma and the panhandle of Texas (Figure 1). It was chosen as a test site because there is a great deal of published information available on the surface and subsurface geology of the area, there are many known structures that act as traps for hydrocarbons, and it is similar to several other large epicontinental sedimentary basins.

Everett, J. R.; Petzel, G.

1974-01-01

122

Planning, implementing and evaluating a pilot master gardener program for Brazos County, Texas  

E-print Network

by the local partner of the Cooperative Extension Service. Topics differ from county to county and as public needs change. In Texas, a handbook was developed and included chapters on basic botany, soils and fertilizers, basic entomology, basic plant... at that location. Instructors for training in the various areas covered by the handbook (basic botany, soils and fertilizers, basics of entomology, basic plant pathology, understanding pesticides, plant propagation, pruning, vegetable gardening, tree fruits...

Hoelscher, Janet Marie

2012-06-07

123

Did fertility go up after the oklahoma city bombing? An analysis of births in metropolitan counties in Oklahoma, 19901999  

Microsoft Academic Search

Political and sociocultural events (e.g., Brown v. Board of Education in 1954 and the German reunification in 1989) and natural disasters (e.g., Hurricane Hugo in 1989) can affect fertility.\\u000a In our research, we addressed the question of whether the Oklahoma City bombing in April 1995, a man-made disaster, influenced\\u000a fertility patterns in Oklahoma. We defined three theoretical orientationsreplacement theory, community

Joseph Lee Rodgers; Craig A. St. John; Ronnie Coleman

2005-01-01

124

Reseeding trials with seedhay material of little bluestem in western Williamson County, Texas  

E-print Network

) that approximately 14~000~000 acres of depleted grasing land in Texas and Oklahoma alone are in need of reseeding. This reseeding must be done if these range lands are to produce monetary returns in future years and for t. m oonservation of soil and water.... Considerable progress has been made in recent years toward the establLshmsnt of grass covers on depleted range landsi The greatest portion of this success has been made on ranges vh&ere seed sources stQ. 1 ~ and proper management has been the responsible...

Yarlett, Lewis L

2012-06-07

125

Forest Carbon Dynamics Associated with Growth and Disturbances in Oklahoma and Texas,  

E-print Network

rates are greater, many counties in the eastern portions of both states were carbon sources due in the United States. Increasing availability of remote sens- ing (RS) data and the rapid development of RS carbon change in the conterminous United States between 1992 and 2001 based on a land cover change map

126

Geology of the Cedar Mountain area, Llano County, Texas  

E-print Network

was compiled by Roemer (1846), In this report he described "the Enchanted Rock" north of Fredericksburg from accounts and rock samples delivered by his friends, and mistakenly concluded that the plutonic rocks of central Texas were part of the Rocky Mountain... was compiled by Roemer (1846), In this report he described "the Enchanted Rock" north of Fredericksburg from accounts and rock samples delivered by his friends, and mistakenly concluded that the plutonic rocks of central Texas were part of the Rocky Mountain...

Dewitt, Gary Ray

2012-06-07

127

Geology of the Grossville School area, Mason County, Texas  

E-print Network

explained their chenioal and textural characteristics. garnes, Dawson, and Farhinson (1942) presented a report on the building stones cf central Texas vhich contained excellent descriptions of these rocks at oertain loccJ. itios, g granite sass vhich... explained their chenioal and textural characteristics. garnes, Dawson, and Farhinson (1942) presented a report on the building stones cf central Texas vhich contained excellent descriptions of these rocks at oertain loccJ. itios, g granite sass vhich...

Fuller, Robert Louis

2012-06-07

128

A unique Austin Chalk reservoir, Van field, Van Zandt County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Significant shallow oil production from the Austin Chalk was established in the Van field, Van Zandt County, in East Texas in the late 1980s. The Van field structure is a complexly faulted domal anticline created by salt intrusion. The Woodbine sands, which underlie the Austin Chalk, have been and continue to be the predominant reservoir rocks in the field. Evidence

Lowe

1990-01-01

129

In-between Southerners: European immigrants and racial violence in Brazos County, Texas  

E-print Network

Five black men died in Brazos County, Texas, in a series of violent racial incidents in 1896, 1897, and 1900-01. At first glance, nothing seemed exceptional about their deaths. The causes were unremarkable: each of the three episodes was sparked...

Nevels, Cynthia Margaret Skove

2012-06-07

130

Structural characterization of the Emperor and Halley fields, Winkler County, West Texas  

E-print Network

The Halley and Emperor fields, Winkler County, West Texas, are located along the western margin of the Central Basin Platform (CBP), a late Paleozoic fault-bounded structural high in the Permian Basin. Well data, regional 2D seismic lines, and a 3D...

Leone, John Vincent

2012-06-07

131

Trends in Texas youth livestock exhibition and County Extension agent perceptions and adoption of quality counts  

E-print Network

the comparison, market livestock projects have increased by 7.06% since 2000. Beef cattle and goats have increased, while sheep and swine have slightly decreased. Roughly a third of Texas counties will be utilizing the Quality Counts curriculum during the year...

Coufal, Dustin Wayne

2009-05-15

132

Characterization of the structure of faults in the Eocene Carrizo Formation near Gause, Milam County, Texas  

E-print Network

This study characterizes the structure and evolution of a series of excellently exposed, normal faults in a small quarry in the Eocene Carrizo Formation near the town of Gause, Milam County, Texas. The faults strike NE-SW and comprise a small...

Yilmaz, Ramazan

2012-06-07

133

American Fern Society New County Records of Botrychium lunarioides in Texas  

E-print Network

American Fern Society New County Records of Botrychium lunarioides in Texas Author(s): L. H. Do, R. D. Gooch, J. R. Stevens, W. C. Holmes Source: American Fern Journal, Vol. 86, No. 1 (Jan. - Mar., 1996), pp. 28-31 Published by: American Fern Society Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1547608

Stevens, Jeffrey

134

Horizontal drilling in the Lower Glen Rose Formation, Maverick County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents preliminary results of a project to assess the economic viability of horizontal drilling in the Lower Glen Rose Formation of Maverick County, Texas. This project is part of an ongoing Department of Energy investigation of directional drilling in the development of gas resources within the United States. The paper includes: project description; results covering geologic setting, reservoir

C. E. Drimal; G. Muncey

1992-01-01

135

COMMENTS ON THE OCCURRENCE OF SMILISCA BAUDINI (DUMERIL AND BIBRON) (AMPHIBIA: HYLIDAE) IN BEXAR COUNTY, TEXAS-he  

E-print Network

and Cameron counties and possibly as far north as Bexar County:' but in his Field Guide to Reptiles) and Duellman (1968) restricted the Texas range to Cameron County, and Raun and Gehlbach (1972) pronounced.) of Smil$ca baudini (Dumeril and Bibron). The specimen was identified by Alan E. Leviton in 1962 and has

Murphy, Bob

136

Geology of the Hilda-Northwest Area, Mason County, Texas  

E-print Network

first r&. ported by V, H. Barnes (1939). David Keppel (1940) described in detail the structu'&e, texture, and coo&position of the &. antral Texas granite massifs. V. E. i&urn& s (1944) && sde the f ' rot ment, ion oi' t "&&. Welge san&i- stone member... first r&. ported by V, H. Barnes (1939). David Keppel (1940) described in detail the structu'&e, texture, and coo&position of the &. antral Texas granite massifs. V. E. i&urn& s (1944) && sde the f ' rot ment, ion oi' t "&&. Welge san&i- stone member...

Fisher, Neil E

2012-06-07

137

Geology of the Little Bluff Creek Area, Mason County, Texas  

E-print Network

and the Wilberns forccatlon to the Cap Mountain foraatlon. He designated Cap Ncncntain ln XLanc County as the type Locality. Cloud, Barnaa, and Bridge (A/46) relocated the boundaries of taiga~a Cap Mountain forccatlon to include the calcareous sandstone... and the Wilberns forccatlon to the Cap Mountain foraatlon. He designated Cap Ncncntain ln XLanc County as the type Locality. Cloud, Barnaa, and Bridge (A/46) relocated the boundaries of taiga~a Cap Mountain forccatlon to include the calcareous sandstone...

Mangum, Charles Roland

2012-06-07

138

Late Pleistocene fauna from Zesch Cave, Mason County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Zesch Cave local fauna is one of the most diverse fossil vertebrate localities from central Texas, and one of the only three sites on the Edwards Plateau juxtaposed to the Llano Uplift. At least 70 vertebrate taxa are identified in this local fauna including fish, four lissamphibians, six sauropsids, eight birds, and fifty-one mammal species. A largely granitic structural

James Christopher Sagebiel

2010-01-01

139

Davis-Gardner Oil Pool, Coleman County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Davis-Gardner Oil Pool is of special interest because it is typical of many middle Pennsylvanian strawn sandstone fields in central Texas. The close pattern of drilling and extensive electric-log coverage simplify interpretation of its sedimentary features and geologic occurrence. The reservoir is a stratigraphic trap in lenticular sandstones deposited as offshore bars in a shallow, probably transgressive sea. The

Rothrock

1980-01-01

140

Digital map of aquifer boundary for the High Plains Aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report contains digital data and accompanying documentation for aquifer boundaries for the High Plains aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. This digital data set was compiled from a digital coverage that was created for publication of paper maps in McGrath and Dugan (1993, Water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer -- predevelopment to 1991: U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 93-4088, 53 p.) The data are not intended for use at scales larger than 1:1,000,000.

Cederstrand, Joel R.; Becker, Mark F.

1999-01-01

141

Records of ground-water levels and effects of pumping in the Ardmore well-field area, Carter County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The purpose of this report is to outline the results of work done by the U.S. Geological Survey in the Ardmore well-field area, near Newport, Carter County. The work, completed in two periods between April 1964 and June 1965, was done as part of the ground-water program carried out by the Geological Survey in cooperation with the Oklahoma Water Resources Board. The study in the report area included: (1) a physical inventory of wells in the vicinity of the Ardmore well field (fig. 1); (2) information on depths, perforated intervals, ground-water levels, and water use (table 1); (3) records of water-level fluctuations in deep and shallow wells (table 2) to determine if there is a hydraulic connection between the deep zones tapped by Ardmore's wells and the shallow and intermediate zones tapped by domestic and stock wells in the surrounding area; and (4) general information on the geologic and hydrologic features that may be of use in evaluating the ground-water potential of the Wichita Formation, the principal aquifer in the area. (available as photostat copy only)

Wood, P.R.

1965-01-01

142

Soil salinity detection. [Starr and Cameron Counties, Texas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author has identified the following significant results. Growth forms and herbage biomass production varied considerably among saline and nonsaline soil range sites in Starr County. Grasses on saline soil sites were shallow-rooted and short whereas on nonsaline sites there was an intermixture of short and midgrass species. Differentiation between primarily undisturbed saline and nonsaline rangelands, in Starr County, is partially possible using film optical density readings from Skylab imagery. Differentiation among eight saline and nonsaline soil sites in Cameron County, using black and white and color film was not possible according to statistical results from both DMRT and correlation analysis. Linear analysis showed that Bendix 24-band MSS data (aircraft) collected at 1700 m and 4800 m, as well as Skylab and LANDSAT-1 MSS data, were significantly correlated to electrical conductivity readings. In Starr County, the best spectral band for detection of saline soil levels, using black and white SO-022 film, was in the 0.6 to 0.7 micron spectral region. In Cameron County, the best spectral bands for detection of saline soil levels were the 2.3 to 2.43 micron, 0.72 to 0.76 micron, 0.69 to 1.75 micron, and 0.7 to 1.1 micron spectral regions.

Wiegand, C. L.; Richardson, A. J.; Gausman, H. W.; Leamer, R. W.; Gerbermann, A. H.; Everitt, J. H.; Cuellar, J. A. (principal investigators)

1975-01-01

143

Water supplies of East Central and Southeastern Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

To plan effectively for future growth in East Central and Southeastern Oklahoma, sound information on public water systems is imperative. This report evaluates the 229 public water systems in 24 counties in East Central and Southeastern Oklahoma. Areas included are: the Central Oklahoma Economic Development District, the Kiamichi Economic Development District of Oklahoma, and the Southern Oklahoma Development Authority. Quantity,

J. W. Ferrell; J. B. Perry; W. F. Harris

1984-01-01

144

Health assessment for Motco, Incorporated, Texas City, Galveston County, Texas, Region 6. CERCLIS No. TXD980629851. Addendum. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The MOTCO National Priorities List (NPL) site is located in the City of LaMarque, Galveston County, Texas. The contaminants of concern consist of several volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and semi-volatile organic compounds (semi-VOCs). Evidence of heavy metal contamination was also noted. Areas of highest contaminant concentration are in the subsurface soil, on-site pits, and shallow ground water. Population exposure to the site is limited due to location; those most likely to be exposed are unprotected remedial workers and trespassers. Although these groups might be exposed by skin contact with, ingestion of, or inhalation of contaminated soil and pit waste, there is no evidence that exposures to site contaminants are occurring. Therefore, the site is currently classified as no public health hazard. The ATSDR Health Activities Recommendation Panel (HARP) and the Texas Department of Health (TDH) have evaluated the MOTCO site for appropriate follow-up with respect to health activities.

Not Available

1992-05-07

145

Biostratigraphy of the upper cretaceous Austin Group, Travis County, Texas  

E-print Network

of the deposition of the Upper Austin Group, affected the paleobathymetry on the ramp. 'Ihis tectonic activity included the formation of a volcano located in southeast Travis County near the community of Pilot i&noh. The movement of the sea floor incr eased... and the Pilot Knob section) 14 18 21 Comparison of the thickness and sequence of the Austin Group in North Travis County with that near the Pilot Knob volcano. 24 12. 13 ' 14. 15. Relative water depths during the deposition of the Austin Group...

Harris, William Maurice

2012-06-07

146

76 FR 30224 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00047  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Declaration 12592 and 12593] Oklahoma Disaster OK-00047 AGENCY...Assistance Only for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-- 1985--DR...by the disaster: Primary Counties: Craig, Creek, Jefferson...Osage, Ottawa, Pawnee, Pottawatomie, Rogers, Stephens,...

2011-05-24

147

75 FR 11949 - Oklahoma Disaster # OK-00035  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Declaration 12070 and 12071] Oklahoma Disaster OK-00035 AGENCY...Assistance Only for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA- 1883-DR), dated...by the disaster: Primary Counties: Alfalfa, Caddo, Cleveland...Muskogee, Okmulgee, Pontotoc, Pottawatomie, Roger Mills,...

2010-03-12

148

75 FR 35103 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00040  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Declaration 12206 and 12207] Oklahoma Disaster OK-00040 AGENCY...Assistance Only for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA- 1917-DR), dated...by the disaster: Primary Counties: Alfalfa, Cleveland, Grant...Noble, Okfuskee, Osage, Pottawatomie, Seminole. The...

2010-06-21

149

75 FR 10330 - Oklahoma Disaster # OK-00034  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Declaration 12051 and 12052] Oklahoma Disaster OK-00034 AGENCY...Assistance Only for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA- 1876-DR), dated...by the disaster: Primary Counties: Canadian, Cleveland, Comanche...Ottawa, Payne, Pontotoc, Pottawatomie, Rogers, Sequoyah,...

2010-03-05

150

Geology of the Big Brushy canyon area, Brewster County, Texas  

E-print Network

from Early Cretaceous to Quaternary, The Oretaoeous strata comprise approximately 8, 100 feet of sedimontary rook, dominantly limestone, and no oldex' roosts are exposed. West of' tbe cretaceous strata belong to tbe comanohe Series and include, from...~ Pecos area of Texas. This investigation included only tbe general stratigraphic and structural featuxos of the region, The stratigraphic column of the southern Trans Pecos region was established by Udden (190'p). Bat-. er and Bowman (1919) visited...

Howle, Arlen Guy

2012-06-07

151

New Lower Permian fusulinids from Culberson County, Texas  

E-print Network

, in addition to the type-species, the West Texas species Para fusulina diabloensis DUN- BAR & SKINNER, P. bakeri DUNBAR & SKINNER, and P. fountaini DuNBAR & SKINNER, as well as a number of species from other areas. Although a study of topotype specimens... indicates that P. di- abloensis is closely related to P. schucherti, and therefore should be included in this subgenus, P. bakeri and P. fountaini appear to be typical representatives of Parafusulina (Parafusulina). A consideration of Parafusulina schucherti...

Skinner, J. W.

1971-06-30

152

Ground-Water Resources of Bastrop County, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The principal formations in Bastrop County that yield or are capable of yielding moderate or large quantities of water to wells are, in order of decreasing yields, the Wilcox Group, Carrizo Sand, Queen City Sand, and Sparta Sand. The Reklaw, Cook Mountain...

C. R. Follett

1970-01-01

153

Ground-Water Resources of Lee County, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

About 6,000 feet of alternating beds of friable sandstone, highly indurated sandstone, silt, siltstone, clay, shale, and some thin local limestone lenses form the entire geologic section which contains the aquifer in the county. In 1963 about 1.5 mgd (mil...

G. L. Thompson

1966-01-01

154

Porosity Characterization Utilizing Petrographic Image Analysis: Implications for Identifying and Ranking Reservoir Flow Units, Happy Spraberry Field, Garza County, Texas.  

E-print Network

The Spraberry Formation is traditionally thought of as deep-water turbidites in the central Midland Basin. At Happy Spraberry field, Garza County, Texas, however, production is from a carbonate interval about 100 feet thick that has been correlated...

Layman, John Morgan, II

2004-09-30

155

Ground-water resources of Atascosa County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Atascosa County, Tex., is underlain by water-bearing sands of Tertiary age that furnish water for domestic and stock supplies throughout the county, for the public supply of all except one of the towns and cities in the county, for irrigation in several localities, for drilling oil wells in the central and southern parts of the county, for washing glass sand in the northern part of the county, and for maintaining several lakes that are used for hunting and fishing. By far the most productive formation is the Carrizo sand, but supplies of considerable magnitude are also obtained from sands in the Mount Selman and Cook Mountain. formations. The rate of withdrawal from the Carrizo sand amounted to about 15,500 acre-feet a year in 1944-45 or an average of about 13.8 million gallons a day. This was about 6,000 acre-feet a year greater in 1944-45 than it was in 1929-30. Of the total amount of water withdrawn in 1944-45 about 6,500 acre-feet a year is largely wasted from uncontrolled flowing wells. If the waste of water from wells in the Carrizo sand were stopped, the consumption of water for useful purposes could be increased about 70 percent without increasing the draft on the underground reservoir. The increase in total withdrawals from the Carrizo sand has been accompanied by a general decline in the artesian head between 1929-30 and 1944 ranging from 3 to 25 feet. On the whole, the evidence shows that the artesian reservoir is not being overdrawn and that it will sustain a somewhat greater draft.

Sundstrom, Raymond W.; Follett, C. R.

1950-01-01

156

The geology, ground water, and surface subsidence of the Baytown-La Porte area, Harris County, Texas  

E-print Network

, Goose Creek field? Harris County& Texas ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ e ~ ~ ~ 14 Generalized crosc-section of Goose Creek field, Harx'is County' ~ Texas ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ s ~ ~ ~ ~ 1 5 6. Barly subsidence of Goose Creek oil field ~ ~, . . . ?, 26... Contours on subsidence of the Goose Creek field i'rom 19'l7 to 1925 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ y ~ ~ ~ o ~ ~ ~ ~ + ~ ~ ~ 30 Profiles across surfs, ce xaults in the Baytown-La Porte ax'ea o ~ ~ i ~ ~ ~ a y ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ s ~ ~ ~ a ~ ~ 34 Local areas of ground...

Gray, Eddie Vaughn

2012-06-07

157

Digital map of specific yield for the High Plains Aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This digital data set consists of specific yield percentage contours and polygons for the High Plains aquifer in the central United States. The High Plains aquifer extends from south of 32 degrees to almost 44 degrees north latitude and from 96 degrees 30 minutes to almost 106 degrees west longitude. The outcrop area covers 174,000 square miles and is present in Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, South Dakota, and Wyoming. This digital data set was created by digitizing the specific yield percentage contours from a 1:1,000,000 base map created by the U.S. Geological Survey High Plains Regional Aquifer-System Analysis (RASA) project (Gutentag, E.D., Heimes, F.J., Krothe, N.C., Luckey, R.R., and Weeks, J.B., 1984, Geohydrology of the High Plains aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1400-B, 63 p.) The data should not be used at scales larger than 1:1,000,000.

Cederstrand, J. R.; Becker, M. F.

1998-01-01

158

Emergency department usage by uninsured patients in Galveston County, Texas  

PubMed Central

The number of uninsured Texas residents who rely on the medical emergency department as their primary health care provider continues to increase. Unfortunately, little information about the characteristics of this group of emergency department users is available. Using an administrative billing database, we conducted a descriptive study to examine the demographic and clinical features of 17,110 consecutive patients without medical insurance who presented to the emergency department of the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston over a 12-month period. We also analyzed the risk of multiple emergency department visits or hospitalization according to demographic characteristics. Twenty percent of the study population made two or more emergency department visits during the study period; 19% of the population was admitted to the hospital via the emergency department. The risk of multiple emergency department visits was significantly elevated among African Americans and increased in a stepwise fashion according to age. The risk of being hospitalized was significantly reduced among females, African Americans, and Hispanics. There was an age-related monotonic increase in the risk of hospitalization. Abdominal pain, cellulitis, and spinal disorders were the most common primary diagnoses in patients who made multiple emergency department visits. Hospitalization occurred most frequently in patients with a primary diagnosis of chest pain, nonischemic heart disease, or an affective disorder. Additional studies of emergency department usage by uninsured patients from other regions of Texas are warranted. Such data may prove helpful in developing effective community-based alternatives to the emergency department for this growing segment of our population. Local policymakers who are responsible for the development of safety net programs throughout the state should find this information particularly useful. PMID:18628970

Paar, David; Giordano, Thomas P.; Zachariah, Brian; Rudkin, Laura L.; Wu, Z. Helen; Raimer, Ben G.

2008-01-01

159

Helicopter Electromagnetic and Magnetic Surveys of the Upper and Middle Zones of the Trinity Aquifer, Uvalde and Bexar Counties, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Detailed helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic surveys (HEM) were conducted in northern Uvalde and Bexar Counties, Texas, as part of a geologic mapping and hydrologic study being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The aquifers of the Lower Cretaceous Trinity Group (collectively termed the Trinity aquifer) are an important regional water source in the Hill Country of south-central Texas. Rock

D. V. Smith; C. D. Blome; B. D. Smith; A. C. Clark

2009-01-01

160

Geology of the Brysch uranium mine, Karnes County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Approximately 13,700 tons (12,400 tonnes) of oxidized uranium ore, averaging about 0.1 percent UO, was mined during 1966 and 1967 from the lower unit of the Deweesville Sandstone Member of the upper Eocene Whitsett Formation, from depths of 75 to 90 feet (23-27 m). The mine is in the Karnes County uranium area, 3 miles (5 km) east of Falls

K. A. Dickinson; M. W. Sullivan

1976-01-01

161

Effect of fractures on reserve calculations as determined by petrology: Birthright field, Hopkins County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Birthright field in Hopkins County, Texas, produces oil and gas from Jurassic carbonate grainstone deposits of the upper Smackover Formation. The field was discovered in 1965 by the drilling of the Schneider and Corey 1 E.M. Strode well. This well initially tested 491 BOPD from a 34-ft interval at 9,519 ft. The field has an oil-water contact at subsea 9,090

Hugh J. Mitchell-Tapping

1989-01-01

162

Diagenetic history and evolution of porosity of the Cotton Valley Limestone, Southeastern Smith County, Texas  

E-print Network

wells studied are from the upper 200 ft (61 m) of the Cotton Valley Limestone in southeastern Smith County, Texas (Figure 8). The lithologies of these rocks range from grainy, non-skeletal lime- stones to less grainy, non-skeletal and skeletal... limestones to muddy limestones with shaly intervals. These lithic types can be divided further on the basis of composition, texture, and sedimentary struc- tures (Figures 9-17). Composition Cotton Valley constituent grains consist mainly of non-skeletal...

Covington, Thomas Edward

2012-06-07

163

Deep Wilcox structure and stratigraphy in Fandango field area, Zapata County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Fandango field in Zapata County, Texas, is a new deep Wilcox trend extension. The deep Wilcox sands are commonly found at depths of 15,000 to 20,000 ft (4,500 to 6,100 m). Enough well log and seismic control now exists to make an accurate integrated interpretation of regional deep Wilcox structure and stratigraphy. Deep Wilcox structure and stratigraphy are controlled

1983-01-01

164

Deep Wilcox structure and stratigraphy in Fandango field area, Zapata County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Fandango field in Zapata County, Texas, is a new deep Wilcox trend extension. The deep Wilcox sands are commonly found at depths of 15,000-20,000 ft (4500-6100 m). Enough well log and seismic control exists to make an accurate integrated interpretation of regional deep Wilcox structure and stratigraphy. Deep Wilcox structure and stratigraphy are controlled by regionally extensive shale anticlines.

1984-01-01

165

Helminth parasites of the western sandpiper, Calidris mauri (Aves), from El Paso and Hudspeth counties, Texas.  

PubMed

Fifty western sandpipers, Calidris mauri, from El Paso and Hudspeth counties, Texas, were collected and examined for helminth parasites. Fifty-three helminths (means abundance = 1.06, SD = 2.31) consisting of 4 cestode and 1 nematode species were collected. The helminth community showed low species richness (5), low diversity and evenness (0.05, 0.14), low concentration for dominance (0.19), and all species were contagiously distributed. There were no clearly identifiable core species. PMID:1919931

Canaris, A G; Munir, N T

1991-10-01

166

Horizontal drilling in the Lower Glen Rose Formation, Maverick County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents preliminary results of a project to assess the economic viability of horizontal drilling in the Lower Glen Rose Formation of Maverick County, Texas. This project is part of an ongoing Department of Energy investigation of directional drilling in the development of gas resources within the United States. The paper includes: project description; results covering geologic setting, reservoir engineering, and seismic surveys; and future work on drilling location selection, drilling, and well completion. (AT)

Drimal, C.E.; Muncey, G.

1992-01-01

167

Horizontal drilling in the Lower Glen Rose Formation, Maverick County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents preliminary results of a project to assess the economic viability of horizontal drilling in the Lower Glen Rose Formation of Maverick County, Texas. This project is part of an ongoing Department of Energy investigation of directional drilling in the development of gas resources within the United States. The paper includes: project description; results covering geologic setting, reservoir engineering, and seismic surveys; and future work on drilling location selection, drilling, and well completion. (AT)

Drimal, C.E.; Muncey, G.

1992-10-01

168

Geology and engineering geology of a Wilcox lignite deposit in northeastern Rusk County, Texas  

E-print Network

the log correlations to determine the trend of the lignite and various units. In addition, dip sections were correlated to a Wilcox lignite deposit in south- western Harrison County, Texas (Watson, 1979; and Charles, 1979) which is located ad]scent to... MILES N Figure 3. Surface geology of study site. formations. Quaternary sands are cleaner and more loosely packed than Carrizo sands (Charles, 1979). Stratigraphy G~1G* Much of the regional stratigraphy of the Wilcox Group has been established...

Cole, William F.

2012-06-07

169

Depositional environment of Canyon (Cisco) sandstones, North Jameson field Mitchell County, Texas  

E-print Network

helpful and I deeply appreciate his efforts. I also would. like to thank both Dr. Berg and my parents for all the financial support that each provided. I would like to thank Sun production Company and in particular, several of its employees... Canyon (Cisco) sandstones of Jameson (North) Strawn field, block 1-A, HATC Survey, Mitchell County, Texas. Contour interval 20 ft, (3 m). . Sedimentary structures in Canyon (Cisco) sandstones, Sun Stubhlefield A-1, Jameson (North) Strawn field...

Dally, David Jesse

2012-06-07

170

An evaluation of ?Ra and ?Ra in drinking water in several counties in Texas, USA.  

PubMed

Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) or Technology Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (TENORM) can be a potential health risk. It is now well known that the underlying geology in many parts of Texas has given rise to levels of (226)Ra and (228)Ra that often exceed the limits set by the US Environmental Protection Agency. A detailed literature search was undertaken to assess the levels of (226)Ra and (228)Ra in all of the Texas counties. Several statistical evaluations of the data were performed. The Hickory aquifer in the Llano Uplift region of Texas has consistently had the highest number of (226)Ra and (228)Ra concentrations above the legal limit. As well many of the affected rural communities may not have the financial resources to rectify the problem. PMID:23490545

Landsberger, S G; George, G

2013-11-01

171

Water Flow in the High Plains Aquifer in Northwestern Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The High Plains is a major agricultural area, supported primarily by water from the High Plains aquifer, which is used to irrigate wheat and corn and to raise cattle and swine. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB) began a study of the High Plains aquifer in 1996. One purpose of the study was to develop a ground-water flow model that the OWRB could use to allocate the amount of water withdrawn from the a aquifer. The study area in Oklahoma covers all or parts of Beaver, Cimarron, Dewey, Ellis, Harper, Texas, and Woodward Counties. To provide appropriate hydrologic boundaries for the ground-water flow model, the study area was expanded to include parts of Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, and Texas.

Luckey, Richard R.; Osborn, Noel I.; Becker, Mark F.; Andrews, William J.

2000-01-01

172

Reflectance of vegetation, soil, and water. [in Hidalgo County, Texas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author has identified the following significant results. A study was conducted in a 340-acre (139 hectares) field of grain sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) to determine if multispectral data from ERTS-1 could be used to detect differences in chlorophyll concentration between iron-deficient (chlorotic) and apparently normal (green) grain sorghum. Chlorotic sorghum areas 2.8 acres (1.1 hectares) or larger in size were identified on a computer printout of band 5 data which contains the chlorophyll absorption band at the 0.65 micron wavelength. ERTS resolution is sufficient for practical applications in detecting iron-deficient sorghum in otherwise uniform fields. The first classification map of the study county has been produced. Vegetation (crops), rangeland, bare soil, water, and an undefined (all other) category occupied 15.2, 45.0, 19.1, 0.02, and 20.6% of the land area, respectively.

Wiegand, C. L. (principal investigator)

1973-01-01

173

Environmental Impacts of Petroleum Production: Initial Results from the Osage-Skiatook Petroleum Environmental Research Sites, Osage County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Exploration for and production of petroleum have caused major detrimental impacts to soils, surface and ground waters, and the local ecosystems in the United States. These impacts arise primarily from the improper disposal of large volumes of saline water produced with oil and gas, from accidental hydrocarbon and produced water releases, and from abandoned oil wells that were not correctly sealed. It is important to understand the long-term and short-term effects of produced water and hydrocarbon releases from these sites in order to develop risk-based remediation plans. Remediation is particularly needed in aging and depleted fields where land use is changing from petroleum production to residential, agricultural or recreational uses. About 20 scientists from the USGS and other governmental agencies and academia are involved in a multidisciplinary investigation to study the transport, fate, and natural attenuation of inorganic salts, trace metals, organic compounds and radionuclides present in produced water, and their impacts at the Osage-Skiatook Petroleum Environmental Research (OSPER) 'A' and 'B' sites, located on the Osage Reservation in Osage County, Oklahoma. Stakeholders in the project include the Osage Nation, which holds the mineral rights, the Bureau of Indian Affairs with trust responsibility, and the Army Corps of Engineers, which owns the surface rights at these sites and manages adjacent Skiatook Lake. The 4250-hectare Skiatook Lake provides drinking water to local Tulsa suburban communities and a rural water district, and offers recreational fishing and boating opportunities to tens of thousands of visitors each year. Approximately 1.5 and 1.0 hectare of land at the OSPER 'A' (depleted Lester lease) and 'B' (active Branstetter lease) sites, respectively, are affected by salt scarring, tree kills, soil salinization and brine and petroleum contamination due to the leakage of produced water and associated hydrocarbons from brine pits and accidental releases from active and inactive pipes and tank batteries. The leases are typical of many depleted and aging petroleum fields in Osage County, which ranks among the top oil and gas producing counties in Oklahoma with about 39,000 wells. Oil and gas production has occurred in Osage county for over one hundred years, but current production is mainly from stripper wells (averaging ~2.8 bbl/d oil and >30 bbl/d brine) that are shallow, mostly 300-700 m in depth, and produce from several sandstones of Pennsylvanian age. Results to date show that the produced water source is a Na-Ca-Cl brine (~150,000 mg/L total dissolved solids), with relatively high concentrations of Mg, Sr, and NH4, but low SO4 and H2S. With the exception of Fe and Mn, the concentrations of trace metals are low. Results also show that some and, eventually, the bulk, of inorganic salts and some dissolved organic species in the released brine from both sites will reach Skiatook Lake. Results at the 'A' site show that the salts have essentially been removed from the sandy soil which formed in a surficial layer of eolian sand, but degraded and weathered oil persists on the surface of old oil and brine pits, close to sites of old tanks, on old channels that carried oil from tanks to the oil pits and other impacted areas. Results also show a plume of high salinity water (5,000-30,600 mg/L TDS) is present at intermediate depths that extend from below the old oil and brine pits to Skiatook Lake. No liquid petroleum was found in the contaminated groundwater, but soluble petroleum byproducts, including organic acid anions and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are present. Results to date clearly show that significant amounts of salts from produced-water releases and petroleum hydrocarbons still remain in the soils and rocks of the impacted area after more than 60 years of natural attenuation. At the 'B' site significant amounts of produced water from the two active brine pits percolate into th

Kharaka, Yousif K.; Otton, James K.

2003-01-01

174

Saline contamination of soil and water on Pawnee tribal trust land, eastern Payne County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Bureau of Land Management reported evidence of saline contamination of soils and water in Payne County on Pawnee tribal trust land. Representatives of the Bureau of Land Management and U.S. Geological Survey inspected the site, in September 1997, and observed dead grass, small shrubs, and large trees near some abandoned oil production wells, a tank yard, an pit, and pipelines. Soil and bedrock slumps and large dead trees were observed near a repaired pipeline on the side of the steep slope dipping toward an unnamed tributary of Eagle Creek. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Bureau of Land Management, initiated an investigation in March 1998 to examine soil conductance and water quality on 160 acres of Pawnee tribal trust land where there was evidence of saline contamination and concern about saline contamination of the Ada Group, the shallowest freshwater aquifer in the area. The proximity of high specific conductance in streams to areas containing pipeline spill, abandoned oil wells, the tank yard, and the pit indicates that surface-water quality is affected by production brines. Specific conductances measured in Eagle Creek and Eagle Creek tributary ranged from 1,187 to 10,230 microsiemens per centimeter, with the greatest specific conductance measured downgradient of a pipeline spill. Specific conductance in an unnamed tributary of Salt Creek ranged from 961 to 11,500 microsiemens per centimeter. Specific conductance in three ponds ranged from 295 to 967 microsiemens per centimeter, with the greatest specific conductance measured in a pond located downhill from the tank yard and the abandoned oil well. Specific conductance in water from two brine storage pits ranged from 9,840 to 100,000 microsiemens per centimeter, with water from the pit near a tank yard having the greater specific conductance. Bartlesville brine samples from the oil well and injection well have the greatest specific conductance, chloride concentration, and dissolved solids concentrations, and plot the furthest from meteoric water on a graph of 8 deuterium and d 18oxygen. Waterflooding of the Bartlesville sand in the study area started in 1957 and continued until 1998. Waterflooding is the process of injecting brine water under pressure to drive the remaining oil to the production wells. The high dissolved solids concentration samples from observation wells 1, 3B, 5,7, and 8 could result from mixing of the Bartlesville brine from the waterfiood with meteoric water.

Runkle, Donna L.; Abbott, Marvin M.; Lucius, Jeffrey E.

2001-01-01

175

Spatial Analysis of County-Level Breast Cancer Mortality in Texas  

PubMed Central

Objective. The objectives of the study were to detect high-risk areas and to examine how racial and ethnic status affect the geographic distribution of female breast cancer mortality in Texas. Analyses were based on county-level data for the years from 2000 to 2008. Materials and Methods. Breast cancer mortality data were obtained from the Texas Cancer Registry, and the Spatial Scan Statistics method was used to run Purely Spatial Analyses using the Discrete Poisson, Bernoulli, and Multinomial models. Results and Conclusions. Highest rates of female breast cancer mortality in Texas have shifted over time from southeastern areas towards northern and eastern areas, and breast cancer mortality at the county level is distributed heterogeneously based on racial/ethnic status. Non-Hispanic blacks were at highest risk in the northeastern region and lowest risk in the southern region, while Hispanics were at highest risk in the southern region along the border with Mexico and lowest risk in the northeastern region. PMID:22518193

Bambhroliya, Arvind B.; Burau, Keith D.; Sexton, Ken

2012-01-01

176

Ground-water data of selected test holes and wells along the Arkansas River in LeFlore and Haskell Counties, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The data in this report were collected during the period 1958-64 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Army, Corps of Engineers, as part of a comprehensive study of the ground-water resources of the alluvium along the Arkansas and Verdigris Rivers between Moffett and Catoosa, Oklahoma (fig. 1). The purpose of this report is to make the hydrologic data obtained during the study of ground water in the alluvium along the Arkansas River in Le Flore and Haskell Counties readily available to the public. The data in this report should be useful in predicting geologic and hydrologic conditions when drilling new wells. Table 1 gives information on the sizes, depths, yields, and other characteristics of wells in the area. The table also provides a key to the additional information for each well site given in tables 2 through 6. Table 2 gives logs for the materials penetrated at test holes and wells in the report area; table 3 gives depths to water measured in wells; table 4 includes chemical analyses of water from wells; table 5 gives laboratory determinations of particle-size distribution of earth samples collected from test holes and wells; and table 6 gives coefficients of permeability and other hydrologic properties of earth samples from the selected test holes. Similar data for Sequoyah County, Muskogee County, and Wagoner-Rogers Counties are available in other open-file reports. An interpretive report, 'Hydrology of the alluvium of the Arkansas River, Muskogee, Oklahoma, to Fort Smith, Arkansas,' by Harry H. Tanaka and Jerrald R. Hollowell will be published as U.S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 1809-T.

Tanaka, H. H.; Hart, D. L., Jr.; Knott, R. K.

1965-01-01

177

Plan of study for the High Plains regional aquifer-system analysis in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Ogallala Formation and associated Tertiary and Quarternary deposits from the principal aquifers supporting irrigation in the High Plains of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. The volume of water in storage within the aquifers is declining in most of the High Plains because water is being withdrawn in excess of the rate of replenishment. The U.S. Geological Survey has initiated a 5-year study of the High Plains aquifer system to develop the geohydrologic data base and computer models of the ground-water flow system needed to evaluate the response of the aquifer system to ground-water management alternatives. This report describes the objectives, plan, and organization of the study and outlines the work to be accomplished in each State in the study area. (Woodard-USGS)

Weeks, John B.

1978-01-01

178

Digital Map of Saturated Thickness in the High Plains Aquifer in Parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming, 1996 to 1997  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This digital data set consists of saturated thickness contours for the High Plains aquifer in Central United States, 1996-97. The High Plains aquifer extends from south of 32 degrees to almost 44 degrees north latitude and from 96 degrees 30 minutes to 104 degrees west longitude. The aquifer underlies about 174,000 square miles in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. This data set was based on 10,085 water-level measurements, 49 stream elevations, (March 1997) and 10,036 water-level elevations from wells (1,370 from 1996 and 8,666 from 1997) and the base of aquifer value for each measurement location. The saturated thickness at each measurement location was determined by subtracting the water-level elevation from the base of aquifer at that location.

Fischer, Brian C.; Kollasch, Keith M.; McGuire, Virginia L.

2000-01-01

179

Water table in the High Plains aquifer in 1978 in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The High Plains aquifer includes an area of about 177,000 square miles, with 74 percent of the area in Kansas, Nebraska, and Texas, and 26 percent of the area in Colorado, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, and Wyoming. The High Plains aquifer consists of one or more hydraulically connected geologic units of late Tertiary or Quaternary age. The late Tertiary rocks consist of the Brule Formation, Arikaree Group, and Ogallala Formation. The Quaternary rocks consist of alluvial, dune-sand, and valley-fill deposits. The configuration of the water table indicates that the High Plains aquifer is continuous throughout its extent, ground water generally flows west to east, and areas overlain by dune sand are recharge areas. Discharge from the aquifer is primarily to wells and streams. (USGS).

Gutentag, Edwin D.; Weeks, John B.

1980-01-01

180

Conodont biostratigraphy of the Hueco Mountains, El Paso County, west Texas  

E-print Network

of Helms West Well U. S. G, S. 7. 5 Minute Topographic Map 55 LIST OF PLATES Plate Stratigraphic Sections and Range Chart of the Hueco Mountains, El Paso County, Texas Page . (in pocket) 2. A. Oolitic and Skeletal Lithologies 2. B. Skeletal...). King and others (1945) divided the Magdalena Group into three informal divisions in the Hueco Mountains. The lower division is composed of 450 feet of dark-gray, thick- bedded skeletal wackestone. The middle division is composed of 300 feet of marl...

McLerran, Richard Dennis

2012-06-07

181

A game management plan for Rancho de los Jefes, Brooks County, Texas  

E-print Network

; Dr. James G, Teer KAMEB Services, Inc. of Houston maintains a 4, 564, 9 hectare hunting lease in Brooks County, Texas for white-tailed deer (Ddocoileus vir inianus), wild turkeys )~Ml ~11 ' t d' ), j 1 )~P ~t (Zenaida macroura) . The objectives...-tailed deer (Qd '1 ~), '1d * k y (~M1 ' ~lj t d' ), j 1' (~P~4' ), h h h't M '1 (Colinus vir inianus), and mourning dove (Zenaida macroura) At present no organized plan exists for wildlife management on the leased land, Rancho de los Jefes, and very...

Frazier, Kenneth Durward

2012-06-07

182

Sedimentology and stratigraphy of the Queen Formation, Millard Field, Pecos County, Texas  

E-print Network

of this project, through him I have learned to research a problem and strive for excellence. Dr. Berg was especially helpful in the early stages of the study and by his example of research techniques. Or. S. J. Mazzullo provided valuable criticism, suggestions..., to establish a model of deposit1on, subsequent cementation, and diagenesis. The Millard Field in Pecos County, Texas produces from the queen Format1on and provides such an area to study the format1on. GEOLOGIC SETTING Structure The Permian Basin reg1on...

Williams, Matt Brian

2012-06-07

183

Educational attainment and aspirations of rural and urban Spanish-Americans in two South Texas counties  

E-print Network

". :ent for the degree of NASTER OI' SCI1:NCE 1anua, v ". 969 Nado& Subj ct. : . ocic logy EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT AND ASPIRATIONS OF RURAL Al(D URBAN SPANISH-A'IERICANS IN TNO SOU H TEXAS COUNTIES A Thesis HELEN B. SCOTT Approved as to style... lover educational attainment levels than white adults in the state as a whole. former m mhers of the study households completed more than twice as many years of school as their parent and about the same number c f years oi school as the white...

Scott, Helen Browne

2012-06-07

184

An investigation of the contact between the Oakville and Catahoula Formations in Grimes County, Texas  

E-print Network

of investigation, has been studied in detail by Rolf (1958) and Brewster (1965) respectively. The citations on the following pages follow the style of the United States Geologies, l Survey Bulletins. -':! L~OS -. e- CG(a LA A. '~Gee\\4 II 48 IGGZ 4 GIB! Id... and its absence in the Catahoula Forma- tion. Russell (1957) agreed with Renick, but believed there might be a possibility of an angular unconformity between the Qakville and Catahoula Formations near Anderson, in Grimes County, Texas. Rolf (1958...

Sveter, Owen Douglas

2012-06-07

185

Environment of deposition of Woodbine and Eagleford sandstones, Leon, Houston, and Madison counties, Texas  

E-print Network

, Brazos and Grimes counties, Texas showing the location of cored wells and major oil fields in the area. Cored wells are listed in Table 2 (Page 17). Cross section A to A' is shown in Figure 2 (Page 9 ) 16 Electric log of the Tenneco Clyde Robeson 1... Sedimentary structures and trace fossils in Woodbine and Eagleford sandstones in Tenneco Clyde Robeson 1 (TCR-1), Rotary and Hall Parker 1 (RHP-1), and Houston Oil and Ninerals McFarland 2 (HMN-2) cores. Bold- face letters in lower left refer...

Theiss, Richard Michael

2012-06-07

186

West Central Texas. Homework pays off for Originala in Haskell County  

SciTech Connect

Originala Petroleum Corp., Fort Worth, is finding Bend Conglomerate and Caddo oil in NW Haskell County, Texas. The most encouraging find to date is the company's No. 1 June L. White, which potentialed in Sept. 1981 for 493 bopd from perforations in the Caddo at 5638-60 ft. This discovery, along with promising Bend Conglomerate drill stem test and log shows in other wells in the region, support continued exploration efforts in this geologically complex province. The key to overcoming the exploration challenges in NW. Haskell County is to depend primarily upon seismic data to give structural control. Accurate seismic interpretation is only a part of the preparation, and is integrated with other geologic data-collecting methods such as gravity and structural mapping based solely on subsurface control.

Mickey, V.

1983-03-01

187

Factors Associated with Recruitment and Retention Rates of Minority Youth 4-H Members as Perceived by Adult Club Leaders and County Extension Agents in Texas  

E-print Network

minority youth recruitment and retention in Texas 4-H clubs. An electronic survey was distributed to 168 adult leaders and 58 county Extension agents who have participated in 4-H for at least two years from clubs in 54 counties across Texas...

Gonzales, Nicole 1989-

2012-12-05

188

Depositional environment and reservoir characteristics of the lower Vicksburg sandstones, east McAllen Ranch Field, Hidalgo County, Texas  

E-print Network

. The Vicksburg-Frio contact is generally determined by the first occurrence of the index foraminifera Textularia warreni. The Vicksburg Formation changes from a dominant shale section along the Upper Texas Gulf Coast area to a more prominent sandstone section... Anomolia bilateralis Eocene Vicksburg Vicksburg Jackson Textularia warreni Loxostoma delicata Clavulina byramensis Cibicides pippeni Cibicides mississippiensis Uvigerina mexicana Mar inulina cocoaensis Brooks, Hidalgo, and Kenedy Counties, Texas...

Shoemaker, Philip W

2012-06-07

189

78 FR 41074 - Oklahoma; Amendment No. 6 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FEMA-2013-0001] Oklahoma; Amendment No. 6 to...declaration for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-4117-DR...declaration for the State of Oklahoma is hereby amended to...Okfuskee, Okmulgee, and LeFlore Counties for Individual...

2013-07-09

190

40 CFR 81.53 - Southern Louisiana-Southeast Texas Interstate Air Quality Control Region.  

...the State of Texas: Angelina County, Hardin County, Houston County, Jasper County, Jefferson County, Nacogdoches County, Newton County, Orange County, Polk County, Sabine County, San Augustine County, San Jacinto County, Shelby County, Trinity...

2014-07-01

191

Excess leukemia and multiple myeloma in a mining county in northeast Texas.  

PubMed

From 1950 to 1979, cancer mortality rates in Titus County, Texas, increased with a significant excess of deaths from leukemia, lymphoma, brain and liver cancers, and melanoma. County residents requested this study to verify the apparent excess of cancer. Newly diagnosed cases of cancer among white residents from 1977 to 1984 were ascertained from the Texas Cancer Registry, hospital records, and death certificates. Direct and indirect methods were used to calculate incidence rates and standardized incidence ratios (SIR). We identified 663 cancers for 148,470 person-years of observation. No overall excess of cancer was found. However, we found a significant excess of leukemia (SIR = 2.53, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.86, 3.30) and multiple myeloma (SIR = 1.87, 95% CI = 1.02, 3.14). The reasons for the increased SIRs are unknown. However, the excess of cancers in this mining community may be relevant to the ongoing debate on the health effects of the disposal of combustion wastes from mining and fossil fuel and on the need for stricter regulations. Other potential risk factors include the presence of petrochemical and poultry industries. regulations. Other potential risk factors include the presence of petrochemical and poultry industries. PMID:8165588

Strom, S S; Spitz, M R; Cech, I M; Annegers, J F; Downs, T D

1994-02-01

192

The relationship between vertical teaming in science and student achievement as reported in the academic excellence indicator system (AEIS) at selected public schools in Bexar County, Texas  

E-print Network

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN VERTICAL TEAMING IN SCIENCE AND STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT AS REPORTED IN THE ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE INDICATOR SYSTEM (AEIS) AT SELECTED PUBLIC SCHOOLS IN BEXAR COUNTY, TEXAS A Dissertation by VERONICA HERNANDEZ ARTEAGA Submitted... ACHIEVEMENT AS REPORTED IN THE ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE INDICATOR SYSTEM (AEIS) AT SELECTED PUBLIC SCHOOLS IN BEXAR COUNTY, TEXAS A Dissertation by VERONICA HERNANDEZ ARTEAGA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

Arteaga, Veronica Hernandez

2008-10-10

193

The influence of various pruning levels on the production and quality of six Vitis vinifera (L.) grape varieties in Pecos County, Texas  

E-print Network

THE INFLUENCE OF VARIOUS PRUNING LEVELS ON THE PRODUCTION AND QUALITY OF SIX VITIS VINIFKRA (L. ) GRAPE VARIETIES IN PECOS COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by CHARLES DAVID WILLIAMS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1985 Major Subject: Horticulture THE INFLUENCE OF VARIOUS PRUNING LEVELS ON THE PRODUCTION AND QUALITY OF SIX VITIS VINIFERA (L. ) GRAPE VARIETIES IN PECOS COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis...

Williams, Charles David

2012-06-07

194

Freshwater resources and saline water near the Sac and Fox Nation tribal lands, eastern Lincoln County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The purpose of this project was to evaluate the freshwater resources and possible sources of high-chloride and high-sulfate concentrations in parts of the aquifer near the Sac and Fox Nation tribal land in eastern Lincoln County, Oklahoma. Water-quality sampling and borehole geophysical data indicate the potential for fresh ground water on tribal land generally is greatest in the Vanoss Formation, in the SE1/4 sec. 21, T. 14 N., R. 06 E. and in the NE1/4 sec. 22, T. 14 N., R. 06 E. These locations avoid the flood-prone areas and borehole geophysical resistivity logs indicate the altitude of the base of fresh ground water is below 650 ft. The altitude of the base of fresh ground water is indicated to be generally near the surface under the W1/2 sec. 22, T. 14 N., R. 06 E., the SE1/4 sec. 22, SE1/4 SE1/4 NE1/4 sec. 21, and NE1/4 NW1/4 NW1/4 sec. 27. Conditions are more favorable for placement of fresh ground-water wells in sec. 34, T. 14 N., R. 06 E., where the tribe has leased water rights, than on tribal land in secs. 15, 16, 21, and 22, T. 14 N., R. 06 E. Sandstones overlain by or enclosed in thick clay and shale sequences are likely to be somewhat isolated from the flow system and retain some of the residual brine. Borehole geophysical logs suggest that sandstones near CH1, CM1, and WT1 have more clay and shale content than the sandstones near L2. Greater amounts of clay in the sandstones will retard the flushing of residual brines from the sandstones and could result in a shallow base of fresh water near CH1, CM1, and WT1. For these reasons and because circulation of fresh ground water is limited by discharge to the Deep Fork, general water quality under tribal land would probably be poorer than in the area where the tribe has leased water rights. Samples have chloride or sulfate concentrations greater than 250 milligrams per liter in the W1/2 sec. 22, T. 14 N., R. 06 E. Six cluster well samples from tribal land have chloride or sulfate concentrations above the suggested maximum contaminant levels set by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Water-quality data indicate there may be more than one source for the salinity in the very saline and briny samples near the tribal land. Two possible sources for chloride and sulfate in water-quality samples are shallow brines and deep oil brines. Probable sources of shallow brines in the study area are: 1) solution of minerals by fresh water moving through the aquifer and 2) residual brines deposited with the sediment. There are no salt or gypsum beds in the Vanoss, Ada, or Vamoosa Formations, but there may be nodules and finely disseminated minerals present in the formations. Residual brines could remain in sand stones and shales that have low hydraulic conductivity and have not been diluted by freshwater recharge. Data suggest both sources have mixed with the fresh ground water from the Vanoss Formation. This is indicated by the relations of the bromide/chloride concentration ratio to chloride concentration, delta deuterium to delta 18oxygen, and by delta 18oxygen to chloride molality relation.

Abbott, Marvin M.

1998-01-01

195

Digital map of changes in water levels from predevelopment to 1980 for the High Plains Aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report contains digital data and accompanying documentation for contours of predevelopment to 1980 water-level elevation changes for the High Plains aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. This digital data set was created by digitizing the contours for predevelopment to 1980 water-level elevation change from a 1:1,000,000-scale base map created by the U.S. Geological Survey High Plains Regional Aquifer-System Analysis (RASA) project (Gutentag, E.D., Heimes, F.J., Krothe, N.C., Luckey, R.R., and Weeks, J.B., 1984, Geohydrology of the High Plains aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1400-B, 63 p.) The data are not intended for use at scales larger than 1:1,000,000.

Cederstrand, Joel R.; Becker, Mark F.

1999-01-01

196

Estimated Land-Surface Subsidence in Harris County, Texas, 1915-17 to 2001  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Land-surface subsidence, or land subsidence, in Harris County, Texas, which encompasses much of the Houston area, has been occurring for decades. Land subsidence has increased the frequency and extent of flooding, damaged buildings and transportation infrastructure, and caused adverse environmental effects. The primary cause of land subsidence in the Houston area is withdrawal of groundwater, although extraction of oil and gas also has contributed. Throughout most of the 20th century, groundwater was the primary source of municipal, agricultural, and industrial water supply for Harris County. Currently (2009) a transition to surface water as the primary source of supply, guided by a groundwater regulatory plan developed by the Harris-Galveston Subsidence District (2001), is in effect. The aquifers in Harris County contain an abundant amount of potable groundwater, but they also contain layers of clay. Groundwater withdrawals caused compaction of the clay layers, which in turn resulted in the widespread, substantial land-surface subsidence that has occurred in the Houston area.

Kasmarek, Mark C.; Gabrysch, Robert K.; Johnson, Michaela R.

2009-01-01

197

Impact of Hispanic Ethnic Concentration and Socioeconomic Status on Obesity Prevalence in Texas Countie  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this study is to determine whether Hispanic ethnic concentration is associated with a higher prevalence of obesity and, if this relationship exists, whether it is affected by the socioeconomic environment. The study uses the Texas Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) linked to 2000 census data to access the relationship between prevalence of obesity, Hispanic ethnic concentration, poverty and level of education at a county-level. The findings suggest that the association of Hispanic ethnic concentration and obesity varies by socioeconomic environment. Although little influence was observed for % poverty, the relationship between Hispanic ethnic concentration and obesity differed by county-level educational attainment. High proportion of residents with a bachelors degree is associated with a low prevalence of obesity; counties with both high % Hispanic and high % with Bachelors degrees had the lowest prevalence of obesity. Our results suggest that promoting and improving education, perhaps including training on healthful living, may serve as an effective means of curbing current obesity trends and associated health problems in Hispanic and possibly other ethnic communities. PMID:22690191

Salinas, Jennifer J.; Rocha, Elizabeth; Abdelbary, Bassent E.; Gay, Jennifer; Sexton, Ken

2012-01-01

198

Validating the Estimated Cost of Saving Water Through Infrastructure Rehabilitation in the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley (Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2)  

E-print Network

Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan) Ronald D. Lacewell M. Edward Rister Allen W. Sturdivant Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University Department of Agricultural Economics, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX... the Estimated Cost of Saving Water Through Infrastructure Rehabilitation in the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley A Case Study Using Actual Construction Costs for the Lateral A Lining Project, Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan) by: Ronald D...

Lacewell, R. D.; Rister, M.; Sturdivant, A. W.

199

North and west central Texas. Mitchell EOR (enhanced oil recovery) projects yield tertiary oil in Wise and Jack counties  

Microsoft Academic Search

An enhanced oil recovery project utilizing a miscible LPG process provides Mitchell Energy and Development Corp. engineers with a springboard for other miscible flood projects while yielding incremental tertiary oil that otherwise would remain in the ground. The LPG flood project is in the Alvord (3,000-ft Strawn) Unit in Wise County, Texas. The field had been waterflooded for 14 yr,

Mickey

1982-01-01

200

Computer-aided geological characterization of a sandstone reservoir, North Ward Estes field, Ward and Winkler Counties, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The North Ward Estes field is located along the western edge of the Central Basin platform in Ward and Winkler Counties, Texas. The field is part of an upper Guadalupian productive trend that extends uninterrupted for 90 mi on the edge of the platform. The North Ward Estes field has produced over 350 million bbl of oil (one third of

A. S. Jr. Wylie; E. K. Davidsen; J. D. Gillespie; R. S. Butler

1988-01-01

201

Geologic description of San Andres reservoir, Mallet lease, Slaughter field, Hockley County, Texas: Implications for reservoir engineering projects  

Microsoft Academic Search

The lower San Andres dolomite reservoir in the Mallet lease area of Slaughter field, a giant stratigraphic trap in Hockley County, Texas, has been the subject of integrated geologic and engineering reservoir analyses. The geologic study provided a good physical model from which engineering studies could account successfully for past production history and predict the response to future operations. The

W. J. Jr

1987-01-01

202

Applications of artificial neural networks in the identification of flow units, Happy Spraberry Field, Garza County, Texas  

E-print Network

The use of neural networks in the field of development geology is in its infancy. In this study, a neural network will be used to identify flow units in Happy Spraberry Field, Garza County, Texas. A flow unit is the mappable portion of the total...

Gentry, Matthew David

2005-02-17

203

Adapting Knowledge Management to a Heterogeneous Information Environment: A Case Study of County Judges and Clerks in Rural Texas Courts.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents challenges to knowledge management revealed in a 1998 study of county judges and clerks in rural Texas courts. Proposes a model for integration of knowledge management work practices in local courts into large-scale state information systems. This model emphasizes the need for a holistic, well-integrated view of local practitioners' work

Erdelez, Sandra; Doty, Philip

1999-01-01

204

76 FR 36559 - Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of the State of Oklahoma, have been designated...Ottawa, Pawnee, Pottawatomie, Rogers, Stephens...and Washington Counties for Public Assistance...Ottawa, Pawnee, Pottawatomie, Stephens, Wagoner...within the State of Oklahoma are eligible...

2011-06-22

205

Uranium series disequilibrium in the Bargmann property area of Karnes County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Historical evidence is presented for natural uranium series radioactive disequilibrium in uranium bearing soils in the Bargmann property area of karnes County on the Gulf Coastal Plain of south Texas. The early history of uranium exploration in the area is recounted and records of disequilibrium before milling and mining operations began are given. The property contains an open pit uranium mine associated with a larger ore body. In 1995, the US Department of Energy (DOE) directed Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to evaluate the Bargmann tract for the presence of uranium mill tailings (ORNL 1996). There was a possibility that mill tailings had washed onto or blown onto the property from the former tailings piles in quantities that would warrant remediation under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remediation Action Project. Activity ratios illustrating disequilibrium between {sup 226}Ra and {sup 238}U in background soils during 1986 are listed and discussed. Derivations of uranium mass-to-activity conversion factors are covered in detail.

Davidson, J.R.

1998-02-01

206

Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook '96.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This data book presents findings of the Kids Count Project on current conditions faced by Oklahoma children age birth through 18. This second annual factbook organizes state and county data over a period of time to enable conditions for children in each county to be compared and ranked. The benchmark indicators studied include low birthweight

Ingraham, Sandy

207

Digital map of aquifer boundary for the High Plains aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This digital data set represents the extent of the High Plains aquifer in the central United States. The extent of the High Plains aquifer covers 174,000 square miles in eight states: Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. This data set represents a compilation of information from digital and paper sources and personal communication. This boundary is an update to the boundary published in U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1400-B, and this report supersedes Open-File Report 99-267. The purpose of this data set is to refine and update the extent of the High Plains aquifer based on currently available information. This data set represents a compilation of arcs from a variety of sources and scales that represent the 174,000 square-mile extent of the High Plains aquifer within the eight states. Where updated information was not available, the original boundary extent defined by OFR 99-267 was retained. The citations for the sources in each State are listed in the 00README.txt file. The boundary also contains internal polygons, or 'islands', that represent the areas within the aquifer boundary where the aquifer is not present due to erosion or non-deposition. The datasets that pertain to this report can be found on the U.S. Geological Survey's NSDI (National Spatial Data Infrastructure) Node, the links are provided on the sidebar.

Qi, Sharon

2010-01-01

208

Hydrogeologic aspects of the Knippa Gap area in eastern Uvalde and western Medina counties, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Edwards aquifer is the primary source of potable water for the San Antonio area in south-central Texas. The Knippa Gap area is a structural low (trough) postulated to channel or restrict flow in the Edwards aquifer in eastern Uvalde and western Medina Counties, Tex. To better understand the function of the Knippa Gap, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, developed the first detailed surficial geologic map of the Knippa Gap area with data and information obtained from previous investigations and field observations. A simplified version of the detailed geologic map depicting the hydrologic units, faulting, and structural dips of the Knippa Gap area is provided in this fact sheet. The map shows that groundwater flow in the Edwards aquifer is influenced by the Balcones Fault Zone, a structurally complex area of the aquifer that contains relay ramps that have formed in extensional fault systems and allowed for deformational changes along fault blocks. Faulting in southeast Uvalde and southwest Medina Counties has produced relay-ramp structures that dip downgradient to the structural low (trough) of the Knippa Gap.

Lambert, Rebecca B.; Clark, Allan K.; Pedraza, Diana E.; Morris, Robert R.

2014-01-01

209

Relation between ambient air quality and selected birth defects, seven county study, Texas, 1997-2000.  

PubMed

A population-based case-control study investigated the association between maternal exposure to air pollutants, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, sulfur dioxide, and particulate matter <10 microm in aerodynamic diameter during weeks 3-8 of pregnancy and the risk of selected cardiac birth defects and oral clefts in livebirths and fetal deaths between 1997 and 2000 in seven Texas counties. Controls were frequency matched to cases on year of birth, vital status, and maternal county of residence at delivery. Stationary monitoring data were used to estimate air pollution exposure. Logistic regression models adjusted for covariates available in the vital record. When the highest quartile of exposure was compared with the lowest, the authors observed positive associations between carbon monoxide and tetralogy of Fallot (odds ratio = 2.04, 95% confidence interval: 1.26, 3.29), particulate matter <10 microm in aerodynamic diameter and isolated atrial septal defects (odds ratio = 2.27, 95% confidence interval: 1.43, 3.60), and sulfur dioxide and isolated ventricular septal defects (odds ratio = 2.16, 95% confidence interval: 1.51, 3.09). There were inverse associations between carbon monoxide and isolated atrial septal defects and between ozone and isolated ventricular septal defects. Evidence that air pollution exposure influences the risk of oral clefts was limited. Suggestive results support a previously reported finding of an association between ozone exposure and pulmonary artery and valve defects. PMID:15987727

Gilboa, S M; Mendola, P; Olshan, A F; Langlois, P H; Savitz, D A; Loomis, D; Herring, A H; Fixler, D E

2005-08-01

210

77 FR 15357 - Reorganization/Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 106 under Alternative Site Framework, Oklahoma...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Whereas, the Port Authority of Greater Oklahoma City, grantee of Foreign-Trade...Lincoln, Logan, McClain, Noble, Oklahoma, Payne, Pontotoc, Pottawatomie, Seminole and Stephens Counties, Oklahoma, within and adjacent to the...

2012-03-15

211

76 FR 15290 - Foreign-Trade Zone 106-Oklahoma City, OK Application for Reorganization/Expansion Under...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...northeast of Will Rogers World Airport, Oklahoma City; Site 12 (26 acres, sunset...Lincoln, Logan, McClain, Noble, Oklahoma, Payne, Pontotoc, Pottawatomie, Seminole and Stephens Counties, Oklahoma. If approved, the grantee...

2011-03-21

212

77 FR 50762 - Arkansas-Oklahoma Railroad, Inc.-Lease and Operation Exemption-Line of Union Pacific Railroad...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FD 35655] Arkansas-Oklahoma Railroad, Inc...Railroad Company Arkansas-Oklahoma Railroad, Inc. (AOK...at Brangus Road, in Pottawatomie County, Okla. AOK states...Counsel, Arkansas-Oklahoma Railroad, Inc.,...

2012-08-22

213

Update of Estimated Agricultural Benefits Attributable to Drainage and Flood Control in Willacy County, Texas  

E-print Network

Galveston, Texas by Ronald D. Lacewell Roger Freeman David Petit Ed Rister Allan Sturdivant Luis Ribera Michele Zinn Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University i Acknowledgements This evaluation is an update... Galveston, Texas by Ronald D. Lacewell Roger Freeman David Petit Ed Rister Allan Sturdivant Luis Ribera Michele Zinn Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University i Acknowledgements This evaluation is an update...

Lacewell, Ronald D.; Freeman, Roger; Petit, David; Rister, Ed; Sturdivant, Allan; Ribera, Luis; Zinn, Michele

2006-01-01

214

Depositional environments in the Oligocene Frio Formation, McAllen-Pharr Field Area, Hidalgo-County, Texas  

E-print Network

, Hidalgo County, Texas. (December 1990) Micheal Don McGhee, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Robert R. Berg The Frio Formation has produced more than 1. 1 TCF (3. 1 x 10 m ) of gas and 3 1. 4 MMB (2. 1 x 10 m ) of condensate... characterized as dominantly aggradational barrier and strandplain facies (Galloway, 1982) or deltaic facies (Bosch, 1975, Collins, 1968). Hydrocarbon production from the field area has surpassed 1. 1 Tcf (3. 1 x 10 m ) of gas 10 3 and 1. 3 MMBO (2. 1 x 10 m...

McGhee, Micheal Don

2012-06-07

215

Middle Pennsylvanian (Atokan) crinoids from Oklahoma and Missouri  

E-print Network

as from the Bostwick Conglomerate in Carter County, Oklahoma. Some of the material consists of spinose first primi- brachs of the arms, which have distinctive con- figuration and surface ornamentation. Generic assignment of the axillary primibrachs was at... is in some question because the pos- terior side of the cup is unknown. The monotype of the species is from the Bostwick Conglomerate (Atokan) of Love County, Oklahoma. A large specimen from the Atoka Formation of Coal County, Oklahoma, which is also lacking...

Strimple, H. L.

1975-05-28

216

Paleoenvironment and reservoir distribution of upper Glen Rose formation at Alabama Ferry and Fort Trinidad Fields, Houston and Leon Counties, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Alabama Ferry and Fort Trinidad fields (Houston and Leon Counties, Texas) are located updip of a break or reentrant in the Lower Cretaceous shelf-margin reefs. The reentrant probably allowed an unusual amount of tidal energy to pass from the Gulf of Mexico into the relatively shallow East Texas basin and affected formation of shoal complexes throughout much of the Early

Allen K. Cregg

1988-01-01

217

Validating the Estimated Cost of Saving Water Through Infrastructure Rehabilitation in the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley (Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 1)  

E-print Network

County Irrigation District No. 1 (Edinburg) Ronald D. Lacewell M. Edward Rister Allen W. Sturdivant Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University Department of Agricultural Economics, Texas A&M University... (Edinburg) by: Ronald D. Lacewell; Professor, Assistant Vice Chancellor, and Associate Director a,b,c M. Edward Rister; Professor and Associate Head a,b Allen W. Sturdivant; Extension Associate a,d Background The original ?final? economic analysis reporting...

Lacewell, R. D.; Rister, M.; Sturdivant, A. W.

218

Investigations of late archaic coprolites: pollen and macrofossil remains from Hinds Cave (41VV456), Val Verde County, Texas  

E-print Network

fulfillment of the requirements for. the degree of MASTER OF ARTS May 1990 Major Subject: Anthropology INVESTIGATIONS OF LATE ARCHAIC COPROLITES: POLLEN AND MACROFOSSIL REMAINS FROM HINDS CAVE (41VV456), VAL VERDE COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by SHERRIAN... region with an increase in grasslands and scrublands (Bryant and Holloway 1985). Although the environment could continue to support bison, the retreat of the Wisconsin glacier saw the migration of the bison out of the Lower Pecos area. The Post...

Edwards, Sherrian Kay

2012-06-07

219

Foraminiferal and textural analyses of the Weches formation at five localities in Lee, Burleson, Robertson, and Leon counties, Texas  

E-print Network

FORAMINIFEHAL AND TEXTURAL ANALYSES OF THE MECHES FORMATION AT FIVE LOCALITIES IN LEE, BURLESON, ROBERTSON, AND LEON COUNTIES, TEIAS Carlos Michael Maggio Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas... Maggio Angust, 1961 Approved as to style and content by& Chairman of itte Head of Depa ent Page Acknowledgnentso a o o Abetr'act a a o Introduction a ~ ~ a o ~ ~ o a a a a ~ o a 1 Purposes. ~ o ~ 1 Location of Area. . . . . ~ Previous Geologic...

Maggio, Carlos Michael

2012-06-07

220

Integrated Analysis of Production Potential and Profitability of a Horizontal Well in the Lower Glen Rose Formation, Maverick County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The U.S. Department of Energy\\/Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE\\/METC) awarded a contract in 1991 to Prime Energy Corporation (PEC) to demonstrate the benefit of using horizontal wells to recover gas from low permeability formations. The project area was located in the Chittim field of Maverick County, Texas. The Lower Glen Rose Formation in the Chittim field was a promising horizontal

J. R. Ammer; T. H. Mroz; A. M. Zammerilli; Yost A. B; J. G. Muncey; P. S. Hegeman

1995-01-01

221

Depositional patterns of the Lewisville sandstones, northern Hawkins field, Wood County, Texas  

E-print Network

in southwestern Arkansas and southern Oklahoma (Oliver, 1971) . These sources include sedimentary rocks, weakly metamorphosed sedimentary rocks and volcanic and plutonic igneous rocks. A sedimentary source is confirmed by the presence of rounded... in southwestern Arkansas and southern Oklahoma (Oliver, 1971) . These sources include sedimentary rocks, weakly metamorphosed sedimentary rocks and volcanic and plutonic igneous rocks. A sedimentary source is confirmed by the presence of rounded...

Work, David Laurence

2012-06-07

222

Technical procedures for the implementation of cultural resource site studies, Deaf Smith County, Texas: Preliminary draft  

SciTech Connect

Cultural resources at the Deaf Smith County site will be identified, evaluated and managed through the implementation of studies detailed in the Site Study Plan for Cultural Resources. This technical procedure outlines the conduct of pedestrian survey and the documentation of identified cultural resources. The purpose of the field surveys is to identify and document cultural resources in the areas that will be affected by site characterization activities and to record the environmental setting of identified cultural resources. Three pedestrian surveys will cover 100 percent of the on-site and off-site project areas. Survey 1 will provide coverage of the Repository Surface Facility (RSF) area, which includes the Exploratory Shaft Facility (ESF) and two linear engineering design borehole (EDBH) seismic survey corridors. Survey 2 will provide coverage of a 39 km/sup 2/ (15 mi/sup 2/) area that includes the 23 km/sup 2/ (9 mi/sup 2/) Deaf Smith County site plus a 0.4 to 0.8 kM (1/4 to 1/2 mi) border area but excludes the area covered by Survey 1. Survey 3 will cover offsite geotechnical test areas, such as the locations of playa boreholes, deep playa wells, hydrologic tests, site foundation borings, and their access routes. The purpose of site documentation or recording is to address the project information needs for land use permits and approvals, engineering design support, and cultural resource evaluation for National Register of Historic Places eligibility. Site documentation will consist of gathering sufficient data on identified resources to complete Texas Natural Resource Information System (TNRIS). 7 refs., 3 figs.

Not Available

1987-09-30

223

75 FR 11904 - Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...exists in the State of Oklahoma. In order to provide...areas of the State of Oklahoma have been designated...Payne, Pontotoc, Pottawatomie, Rogers, Sequoyah...Tillman, and Tulsa Counties for Public Assistance...within the State of Oklahoma are eligible to...

2010-03-12

224

75 FR 15450 - Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...exists in the State of Oklahoma. In order to provide...areas of the State of Oklahoma have been designated...Okmulgee, Pontotoc, Pottawatomie, Roger Mills, Seminole...Stephens, and Washita Counties for Public Assistance...within the State of Oklahoma are eligible to...

2010-03-29

225

Oklahoma Today  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Published since the 1950s, Oklahoma Today is a production of several state agencies, and it is designed to showcase various cultural, historical, and social aspects of Oklahoma. Over the past several years, Oklahoma State University has digitized back issues of the magazine, and visitors can now read all the way back to the first issue from 1956. Visitors can browse back issues by decade, and they can also perform key-word searches. First-time visitors should start by reading through the spring 1960 issue, which contains pieces on rattlesnakes, Oklahoma wildflowers, and the Washington Irving Trail. While the name Washington Irving may not be commonly associated with Oklahoma, the author spent part of 1832 wandering through the state with a Native American guide. More recent issues feature profiles of singer Vince Gill and Route 66.

226

Digital map of areas of little or no saturated thickness for the High Plains Aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report contains digital data and accompanying documentation for boundaries of areas of little or no saturated thickness within the High Plains aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. This digital data set was compiled from a digital coverage that was created for publication of paper maps in McGrath and Dugan (1993, Water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer -- predevelopment to 1991: U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 93-4088, 53 p.) The data are not intended for use at scales larger than 1:1,000,000.

Cederstrand, Joel R.; Becker, Mark F.

1999-01-01

227

OUTCROP-BASED HIGH RESOLUTION GAMMA-RAY CHARACTERIZATION OF ARSENIC-BEARING LITHOFACIES IN THE PERMIAN GARBER SANDSTONE AND WELLINGTON FORMATION, CENTRAL OKLAHOMA AQUIFER (COA). CLEVELAND COUNTY, OKLAHOMA  

EPA Science Inventory

The COA supplies drinking water to a number of municipalities in central Oklahoma. Two major stratigraphic units in the COA, the Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formation, contain naturally occurring arsenic that exceeds government mandated drinking-water standards (EPA, 2001). ...

228

Aquifer Tests and Characterization of Transmissivity, Ada-Vamoosa Aquifer on the Osage Reservation, Osage County, Oklahoma, 2006  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Ada-Vamoosa aquifer of northeastern Oklahoma is a sedimentary bedrock aquifer of Pennsylvanian age that crops out over 800 square miles of the Osage Reservation. The Osage Nation needed additional information regarding the production potential of the aquifer to aid them in future development planning. To address this need, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Osage Nation, conducted a study of aquifer properties in the Ada-Vamoosa aquifer. This report presents the results of the aquifer tests from 20 wells in the Ada-Vamoosa aquifer and one well in a minor aquifer east of the Ada-Vamoosa outcrop on the Osage Reservation. Well information for 17 of the 21 wells in this report was obtained from the Indian Health Service. Data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey during this investigation are pumping well data from four domestic wells collected during the summer of 2006. Transmissivity values were calculated from well pumping data or were estimated from specific capacity values depending on the reliability of the data. The estimated transmissivity values are 1.1 to 4.3 times greater than the calculated transmissivity values. The calculated and estimated transmissivity values range from 5 to 1,000 feet squared per day.

Abbott, Marvin M.; DeHay, Kelli

2008-01-01

229

Unsaturated flow modeling for performance assessment of a radioactive waste disposal facility in Andrews County, Texas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Quantitifying infiltration rates is a key component of the performance assessment for radioactive waste disposal facilities. In arid regions with scarce infiltration data, this is a challenging problem because of the computational limitations of available numerical implementations to solve water flow and transport equations. This work summarizes methodology and analysis performed to overcome some of these challenges and to generate infiltration scenarios for a low level waste disposal site in Andrews County, Texas. The work presented here includes preparation of a two dimensional finite element model in HYDRUS that includes the cover system and adjacent geologic units, calibration of hydraulic properties and root water uptake parameters based on soft information, preparation of atmospheric forcings based on current and hypothesized future climatic conditions, evaluation of impacts related to temporal and spatial discretization of forcings and model domain, and definition of scenarios for cover degradation and wetter climate conditions. Results of this work include a sensitivity analysis of infiltration rates to changes in boundary conditions under quasi-steady state, evaluation of the impact of temporal discretization of the atmospheric forcings in terms of water balance error and computational efficiency, and the estimation of infiltration rates under different scenarios. Infiltration rates from this work are being incorporated into a transport model to estimate potential radiological doses based on performance assessment modeling analyses. Findings from this work seek to contribute towards robust approaches to estimate infiltration in arid regions.

Martinez Baquero, G. F.; Singh, A.; Holt, R. M.; grisak, G. E.

2011-12-01

230

Cultural resources survey and assessment of the proposed Department of Energy Freeport to Texas City pipeline, Brazoria and Galveston Counties, Texas. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An intensive survey and testing program of selected segments of a proposed Department of Energy pipeline were conducted by Coastal Environments, Inc., Baton Rouge, Louisiana, during December 1985 and January 1986. The proposed pipeline runs from Texas City, Galveston County to Bryan Mound, Brazoria County. The pedestrian survey was preceded by historical records survey to locate possible historic sites within the DOE righ-of-way. Four prehistoric sites within the ROW (41BO159, 160, 161, 162) and one outside the ROW (41BO163) were located. All are Rangia cuneata middens. The survey results are discussed with particular reference to the environmental settings of the sites and the effectiveness of the survey procedure. Two of the sites located within the ROW were subjected to additional testing. The results of the backhoe testing program are included in the site descriptions, and the scientific value of the sites are presented. 52 refs., 20 figs., 10 tabs.

Castille, G.J.; Whelan, J.P. Jr.

1986-01-01

231

Rural Education in Transition : A Study of Recent Trends in Education in Five Texas Rural Counties.  

E-print Network

service personnel, some of the county administrators have worked out cooperative arrangements whereby all small schools in a county have these benefits by shar- ing the costs. In Burleson county, for example, a school nurse works in all of the Negro... service personnel, some of the county administrators have worked out cooperative arrangements whereby all small schools in a county have these benefits by shar- ing the costs. In Burleson county, for example, a school nurse works in all of the Negro...

Skrabanek, R. L.

1954-01-01

232

Main Canal, Maverick County Water Control and Improvement District above Central Power and Light hydro-electric plant, at Maverick and Kinney Counties, Texas  

E-print Network

BAIN CANAL NA~ICK COUNTY WATW CONTROL AND INPROllZXBZ DISTRICT ABOVE C~ POWER AND LION HYDRO ELECTRIC PLANT& AT, SIAVERICK AND KINNEY COUNT'S, T~~S By John J. Ledbetter, Jr. Approved as to style and content by: (Che man Committee Heed of pa... ment or Student Advisor May l952 MAIN CANAL RIA~ICK C01E1TY EATER CONTROL AND INPROVZGiWZ DISTRICT ABOVE G~ F01' AND LIGHT HYDRO-ELECTRIC PLANT, AT MAVERICK AND KINNEY GGKJZIES ~ TEXAS By John J. Ledbetter, Jr, A Thesis Submitted...

Ledbetter, John J

2012-06-07

233

Environmental impacts of oil production on soil, bedrock, and vegetation at the U.S. Geological Survey Osage-Skiatook Petroleum Environmental Research site A, Osage County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey is investigating the impacts of oil and gas production on soils, groundwater, surface water, and ecosystems in the United States. Two sites in northeastern Oklahoma (sites A and B) are presently being investigated under the Osage-Skiatook Petroleum Environmental Research project. Oil wells on the lease surrounding site A in Osage County, Oklahoma, produced about 100,000 bbl of oil between 1913 ard 1981. Prominent production features on the 1.5-ha (3.7-ac) site A include a tank battery, an oil-filled trench, pipelines, storage pits for both produced water and oil, and an old power unit. Site activities and historic releases have left open areas in the local oak forest adjacent to these features and a deeply eroded salt scar downslope from the pits that extends to nearby Skiatook Lake. The site is underlain by surficial sediments comprised of very fine-grained eolian sand and colluvium as much as 1.4 m (4.6 ft) thick, which, in turn, overlie flat-lying, fractured bedrock comprised of sandstone, clayey sandstone, mudstone, and shale. A geophysical survey of ground conductance and concentration measurements of aqueous extracts (1:1 by weight) of core samples taken in the salt scar and adjacent areas indicate that unusual concentrations of NaCl-rich salt are present at depths to at least 8 m (26 ft) in the bedrock; however, little salt occurs in the eolian sand. Historic aerial photographs, anecdotal reports from oil-lease operators, and tree-ring records indicate that the surrounding oak forest was largely established after 1935 and thus postdates the majority of surface damage at the site. Blackjack oaks adjacent to the salt scar have anomalously elevated chloride (>400 ppm) in their leaves and record the presence of NaCl-rich salt or salty water in the shallow subsurface. The geophysical measurements also indicate moderately elevated conductance beneath the oak forest adjoining the salt scar. Copyright ?? 2005. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists/Division of Environmental Geosciences. All rights reserved.

Otton, J.K.; Zielinski, R.A.; Smith, B.D.; Abbott, M.M.; Keeland, B.D.

2005-01-01

234

Uranium roll front study in the upper Jackson group, Atascosa County, Texas  

E-print Network

Texas and iMexico produced volcanic debris which was carried by south- easterly-flowing streams and westerly winds and deposited throughout south Texas (Fig. 9). Alteration of these tuffaceous beds have since produced zeolites, montmorillonite... Texas and iMexico produced volcanic debris which was carried by south- easterly-flowing streams and westerly winds and deposited throughout south Texas (Fig. 9). Alteration of these tuffaceous beds have since produced zeolites, montmorillonite...

Miller, Michael Eugene

2012-06-07

235

Suburban recreation subdivisions in Montgomery County, Texas - a case study analysis  

E-print Network

influenced Montgomery's rapid growth and development. Ni any problems attend rapid . rowth and these are current. ly being studied intensively. The Texas Research League and the Texas Municipal League have expressed the 12 dilemmas of suburban and urban... influenced Montgomery's rapid growth and development. Ni any problems attend rapid . rowth and these are current. ly being studied intensively. The Texas Research League and the Texas Municipal League have expressed the 12 dilemmas of suburban and urban...

Watt, Carson Earl

2012-06-07

236

Petrography and log analysis of the Zan Zan Middle 'Canyon' sandstone, eastern Irion County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Zan Zan field in eastern Irion County, Texas, produces from a 20 to 50-ft-thick basinal sandstone that occurs between Wolfcampian and Strawn limestones. Water saturation calculations, based on cross-plotted density-neutron porosities and dual induction resistivities, are rarely less than 50%. Water production from typical wells in this field is 5-6% of the oil production. Wells had cumulative production of 644,549 bbl of oil and 1.4 bcf gas as of November 1991. Thin sections from this sandstone have a complex lithology. Argillaceous rock fragments are approximately 15% of the detrital constitutents. Patches of kaolinite with intercrystalline micropores are common although not abundant. Secondary pores occur as both oversized mesopores and intraparticle micropores. Grain rimming siderite is very well developed in most thin sections observed. The composition and fabric of this sand makes it difficult to predict the producing character of wells from well logs. Neutron porosities are anomalously high as a result of clays in rock fragments and shale laminations. Where the volume of siderite is significant, density logs may give erroneously low porosities, but typically the total porosity calculated by the density log will include the ineffective microporosity, which is common. The occurrence of siderite-coating sand grains also may be affecting the electric properties of this rock. The path of greatest conductivity measured by the dual induction log may be along this continuous iron carbonate coating along the pore walls. The lack of significant water production at Zan Zan is a result of a high proportion of water in microporosity association with clay minerals and secondary porosity, and/or incorrect S{sub W} calculations due to siderite grain coatings.

Whitsitt, P. (Tucker Drilling Co., Inc., Midland, TX (United States))

1992-04-01

237

CENSUS AND STATISTICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF SOIL AND WATER QUALITY AT ABANDONED AND OTHER CENTRALIZED AND COMMERCIAL DRILLING-FLUID DISPOSAL SITES IN LOUISIANA, NEW MEXICO, OKLAHOMA, AND TEXAS  

SciTech Connect

Commercial and centralized drilling-fluid disposal (CCDD) sites receive a portion of spent drilling fluids for disposal from oil and gas exploration and production (E&P) operations. Many older and some abandoned sites may have operated under less stringent regulations than are currently enforced. This study provides a census, compilation, and summary of information on active, inactive, and abandoned CCDD sites in Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas, intended as a basis for supporting State-funded assessment and remediation of abandoned sites. Closure of abandoned CCDD sites is within the jurisdiction of State regulatory agencies. Sources of data used in this study on abandoned CCDD sites mainly are permit files at State regulatory agencies. Active and inactive sites were included because data on abandoned sites are sparse. Onsite reserve pits at individual wells for disposal of spent drilling fluid are not part of this study. Of 287 CCDD sites in the four States for which we compiled data, 34 had been abandoned whereas 54 were active and 199 were inactive as of January 2002. Most were disposal-pit facilities; five percent were land treatment facilities. A typical disposal-pit facility has fewer than 3 disposal pits or cells, which have a median size of approximately 2 acres each. Data from well-documented sites may be used to predict some conditions at abandoned sites; older abandoned sites might have outlier concentrations for some metal and organic constituents. Groundwater at a significant number of sites had an average chloride concentration that exceeded nonactionable secondary drinking water standard of 250 mg/L, or a total dissolved solids content of >10,000 mg/L, the limiting definition for underground sources of drinking water source, or both. Background data were lacking, however, so we did not determine whether these concentrations in groundwater reflected site operations. Site remediation has not been found necessary to date for most abandoned CCDD sites; site assessments and remedial feasibility studies are ongoing in each State. Remediation alternatives addressed physical hazards and potential for groundwater transport of dissolved salt and petroleum hydrocarbons that might be leached from wastes. Remediation options included excavation of wastes and contaminated adjacent soils followed by removal to permitted disposal facilities or land farming if sufficient on-site area were available.

Alan R. Dutton; H. Seay Nance

2003-06-01

238

Impacts of petroleum production on ground and surface waters: Results from the Osage-Skiatook Petroleum Environmental Research A site, Osage County Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

As part of a multidisciplinary group of about 20 scientists, we are investigating the transport, fate, natural attenuation, and ecosystem impacts of inorganic salts and organic compounds present in releases of produced water and associated hydrocarbons at the Osage-Skiatook Petroleum Environmental Research (OSPER) sites, located in Osage County, Oklahoma. Geochemical data collected from nearby oil wells show that the produced water source is a Na-Ca-Cl brine (???150,000 mg/L total dissolved solids [TDS]), with relatively high concentrations of Mg, Sr, and NH4, but low SO4 and H2S. Results from the depleted OSPER A site show that the salts continue to be removed from the soil and surficial rocks, but degraded oil persists on the contaminated surface. Eventually, the bulk of inorganic salts and dissolved organics in the brine will reach the adjacent Skiatook Lake, a 4250-ha (10,501-ac) potable water reservoir. Repeated sampling of 44 wells show a plume of high-salinity water (2000-30,000 mg/L TDS) at intermediate depths that intersects Skiatook Lake and extends beyond the visibly impacted areas. No liquid petroleum was observed in this plume, but organic acid anions, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX), and other volatile organic carbon (VOC) are present. The chemical composition of released brine is modified by sorption, mineral precipitation and dissolution, evapotranspiration, volatilization, and bacterially mediated oxidation-reduction reactions, in addition to mixing with percolating precipitation water, lake water, and pristine groundwater. Results show that only minor amounts of salt are removed by runoff, supporting the conclusion that significant amounts of salts from produced water and petroleum releases still remain in the soils and rocks of the impacted area after more than 65 yr of natural attenuation. Copyright ?? 2005. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists/Division of Environmental Geosciences. All rights reserved.

Kharaka, Y.K.; Thordsen, J.J.; Kakouros, E.; Herkelrath, W.N.

2005-01-01

239

Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook, 1995.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count report details county and statewide trends in the well-being of Oklahoma's children. The statistical report is based on eight indicators of child well being: (1) percent low birthweight infants; (2) infant mortality rate; (3) births to unmarried teens; (4) child abuse and neglect rates; (5) child death rate; (6) children living in

Oklahoma Inst. for Child Advocacy, Inc., Oklahoma City. Oklahoma Kids Count.

240

Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook '98.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count report details county and statewide trends in the well-being of Oklahoma's children. The statistical portrait is based on eight indicators of child well-being: (1) low birthweight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) births to teens; (4) child abuse and neglect; (5) child death; (6) child poverty; (7) high school dropouts; and (8)

Oklahoma Inst. for Child Advocacy, Inc., Oklahoma City. Oklahoma Kids Count.

241

Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook, 2002.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count Factbook details county and statewide trends in the well-being of children in Oklahoma. The statistical portrait is based on seven indicators or benchmarks of child well-being: (1) low birthweight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) births to young teens; (4) child abuse and neglect; (5) child and teen death; (6) high school

Ingraham, Sandy

242

Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook, 2001.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count Factbook details county and statewide trends in the well-being of Oklahoma's children. The statistical portrait is based on seven indicators or benchmarks of child well-being: (1) low birth weight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) births to young teens; (4) child abuse and neglect; (5) child and teen death; (6) high school

Ingraham, Sandy

243

Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook '97.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count report details county and statewide trends in the well-being of Oklahoma's children. The statistical report is based on eight indicators of child well being: (1) economic distress; (2) percent low birthweight infants; (3) infant mortality rate; (4) births to teens; (5) child abuse and neglect rates; (6) child and teen death rate;

Oklahoma Inst. for Child Advocacy, Inc., Oklahoma City. Oklahoma Kids Count.

244

Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook, 1999.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count Factbook details county and statewide trends in the well-being of Oklahoma's children. The statistical portrait is based on eight indicators of child well-being: (1) low birth weight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) births to young teens; (4) child abuse and neglect; (5) child and teen death; (6) child poverty; (7) high school

Ingraham, Sandy

245

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

-green or purple with a The Ring-necked Pheasant in Oklahoma bright white collar. It is this collar that gives northwest counties. The ring-neck has a high resistance to disease and parasites, is adaptable, a strong Rangeland Specialist Oklahoma State University Jason Sykes Farm Bill Wildlife Biologist Pheasants Forever

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

246

A comparative analysis of pupil attitudes toward selected oral language activities used with fifth graders in the public schools of Brazos County, Texas  

E-print Network

A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF PUPIL ATTITUDES TOWARD SELECTED ORAL LANGUAGE ACTIVITIES USED WITH FIFTH GRADERS IN THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis By FRANCES WILLIAMS BRUSSE Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ASM... University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1967 Major Subject Education A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF PUPIL ATTITUDES TOWARD SELECTED ORAL LANGUAGE ACTIVITIES USED WITH FIFTH GRADERS IN THE PUBLIC...

Brusse, Frances Williams

2012-06-07

247

Environment of deposition and reservoir facies of the Taylor "B" Sandstone, Cotton Valley group (Upper Jurassic), Kildare Field, Cass County, Texas  

E-print Network

ENVIRONMENT OF DEPOSITION AND RESERVOIR FACIES OF THE TAYLOR "8" SANDSTONE, COTTON VALLEY GROUP (UPPER JURASSIC), KILDARE FIELD, CASS COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by CYNTHIA ENGLAND SLACK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AIIM University... in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1983 Major Subject: Geology ENVIROf'iI'1ENT OF DEPOSITION AND RESFRVOIR FACIES OF THE TAYLOR "8" SANDSTONE, COTTON VALLEY GROUP (UPPER JURASSIC), KILDARE FIFLD, CASS...

Black, Cynthia England

2012-06-07

248

Hydrologic impacts of mechanical shearing of Ashe juniper in Coryell County, Texas  

E-print Network

vegetation is composed of sideoats grama (Bouteloua curtipendula), silver bluestem (Bothriochloa laguroides), vine-mesquite (Panicum obtusum), Texas wintergrass (Stipa leucotricha) and Canada and Virginia wildrye (Elymus canadensis and E. virginicus... vegetation is composed of sideoats grama (Bouteloua curtipendula), silver bluestem (Bothriochloa laguroides), vine-mesquite (Panicum obtusum), Texas wintergrass (Stipa leucotricha) and Canada and Virginia wildrye (Elymus canadensis and E. virginicus...

Greer, Courtney Hale

2006-10-30

249

78 FR 41073 - Oklahoma; Amendment No. 7 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Pushmataha, and Seminole Counties for Public Assistance, including...Canadian, Okfuskee, and Okmulgee Counties for Public Assistance, including...Cleveland, Lincoln, McClain, Oklahoma, and Pottawatomie Counties for Public Assistance...

2013-07-09

250

ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN TWO MOSQUITO POPULATIONS AND WEST NILE VIRUS IN HARRIS COUNTY, TEXAS, 2003-061  

PubMed Central

Associations between Culex quinquefasciatus, Aedes albopictus and West Nile virus (WNV) activity, temperature, and rainfall in Harris County, Texas 200306 are discussed. Human cases were highly correlated to Cx. quinquefasciatus (r = 0.87) and Ae. albopictus (r = 0.78) pools, blue jays (r = 0.83), and Ae. albopictus collected (r = 0.71), but not Cx. quinquefasciatus collected (r = 0.45). Human cases were associated with temperature (r = 0.71), not rainfall (r = 0.29), whereas temperature correlated with Ae. albopictus and Cx. quinquefasciatus collections (r = 0.88 and 0.70, respectively) and Cx. quinquefasciatus pools (r = 0.75), but not Ae. albopictus pools (r = 0.55). Both species (collections and pools) and blue jays were weakly correlated (r ? 0.41) with rainfall, but blue jays were better correlated with Cx. quinquefasciatus pools (r = 0.87), compared with Ae. albopictus pools (r = 0.67), Ae. albopictus collections (r = 0.69), and Cx. quinquefasciatus collections (r = 0.46). Peak minimum infection rate for Cx. quinquefasciatus (4.55), and Ae. albopictus (4.41) was in August with highest human cases (17.87), blue jays (55.58), and temperature (29.01C). Between both species, blood meal analysis indicated 68.18% of Cx. quinquefasciatus mammalian hosts were dog, while 22.72% were human, whereas Ae. albopictus had higher human (44.44%) but fewer dog hosts (22.22%). Ten bird species were identified as hosts for Cx. quinquefasciatus, with northern cardinal and blue jay representing 26.66% and 20.00%, respectively. No bird feeding activity was observed in Ae. albopictus. The earliest and latest human blood meal occurred in May (Ae. albopictus) and November (Cx. quinquefasciatus); 66.66% of human host identifications between both species occurred in OctoberNovember, after the seasonal human case peak. Based upon our data, WNV activity in both mosquito species warrants further investigation of their individual roles in WNV ecology within this region. PMID:17939505

DENNETT, JAMES A.; BALA, ADILELKHIDIR; WUITHIRANYAGOOL, TAWEESAK; RANDLE, YVONNE; SARGENT, CHRISTOPHER B.; GUZMAN, HILDA; SIIRIN, MARINA; HASSAN, HASSAN K.; REYNA-NAVA, MARTIN; UNNASCH, THOMAS R.; TESH, ROBERT B.; PARSONS, RAY E.; BUENO, RUDY

2008-01-01

251

Data collection and compilation for a geodatabase of groundwater, surface-water, water-quality, geophysical, and geologic data, Pecos County Region, Texas, 1930-2011  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Middle Pecos Groundwater Conservation District, Pecos County, City of Fort Stockton, Brewster County, and Pecos County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1, compiled groundwater, surface-water, water-quality, geophysical, and geologic data for site locations in the Pecos County region, Texas, and developed a geodatabase to facilitate use of this information. Data were compiled for an approximately 4,700 square mile area of the Pecos County region, Texas. The geodatabase contains data from 8,242 sampling locations; it was designed to organize and store field-collected geochemical and geophysical data, as well as digital database resources from the U.S. Geological Survey, Middle Pecos Groundwater Conservation District, Texas Water Development Board, Texas Commission on Environmental Quality,and numerous other State and local databases. The geodatabase combines these disparate database resources into a simple data model. Site locations are geospatially enabled and stored in a geodatabase feature class for cartographic visualization and spatial analysis within a Geographic Information System. The sampling locations are related to hydrogeologic information through the use of geodatabase relationship classes. The geodatabase relationship classes provide the ability to perform complex spatial and data-driven queries to explore data stored in the geodatabase.

Pearson, Daniel K.; Bumgarner, Johnathan R.; Houston, Natalie A.; Stanton, Gregory P.; Teeple, Andrew P.; Thomas, Jonathan V.

2012-01-01

252

Consultation draft: Site characterization plan overview, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 113)  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing a site characterization plan for the candidate site in Deaf Smith County, Texas. The DOE has provided, for information and review, a consultation draft of the plan to the State of Texas and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The site characterization plan is a lengthy document that describes in considerable detail the program that will be conducted to characterize the geologic, hydrologic, and other conditions relevant to the suitability of the site for a repository. The overview presented here consists of brief summaries of important topics covered in the consultation draft of the site characterization plan; it is not a substitute for the site characterization plan. The arrangement of the overview is similar to that of the plan itself, with brief descriptions of the repository system - the site, the repository, and the waste package - preceding the discussion of the characterization program to be carried out at the Deaf Smith County site. It is intended primarily for the management staff of organizations involved in the DOE's repository program or other persons who might wish to understand the general scope of the site-characterization program, the activities to be conducted, and the facilities to be constructed rather than the technical details of site characterization. 15 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1988-01-01

253

A NEW SPECIES OF CARYOSPORA (APICOMPLEXA: EIMERIIDAE) FROM THE FLATHEAD SNAKE, TANTILLA GRACILIS (OPHIDIA: COLUBRIDAE), IN SOUTHEASTERN OKLAHOMA  

PubMed Central

A single flathead snake, Tantilla gracilis, collected in early October 2010 from Choctaw County, Oklahoma, was found to harbor an undescribed species of Caryospora. Oocysts of Caryospora choctawensis n. sp. were spherical to subspherical, 15.8 15.0 (1418 1416) ?m with a thick bilayered wall and a shape index (length/width) of 1.1. A micropyle and an oocyst residuum are absent but prominent Stieda and bubble-like sub-Stieda bodies were present as well as a bilobed polar granule near the oocyst wall. Sporocysts were ovoidal, 10.8 9.0 (1012 89) ?m with a shape index of 1.3. The sporocyst residuum was spherical and composed of a cluster of granules often membrane-bound. This is the second time a caryosporan species has been reported from T. gracilis, but the first coccidian ever described from a reptilian host in Oklahoma. Additional T. gracilis from Arkansas (n = 6), Oklahoma (n = 1), and Texas (n = 7) were examined and a single specimen from Newton County, Arkansas, harbored Caryospora gracilis Upton, McAllister, Trauth, and Bibb, 1992, previously reported from T. gracilis collected in Arkansas and Texas. PMID:22191621

McAllister, Chris T.; Roehrs, Zachary P.; Seville, R. Scott

2012-01-01

254

Can seismic velocities predict sweet spots in the Woodford Shale? A case study from McNeff 2-28 Well, Grady County, Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In shale, predicting sweet spots (brittle, organic-rich, and hydrocarbon-filled porous zones) ahead of the drill bit using non-intrusive methods such as seismic has been a long-standing challenge. In principle, rock properties can be inferred from P- and S-wave velocities with an appropriate rock physics model, which is a way of expressing the elastic moduli as a function of attributes such as porosity (?), mineralogy and pore-fluid type and saturation. Using high-fidelity logs from McNeff 2-28 well, Grady County, Oklahoma, we demonstrate that ? and composition of the Woodford Shale can be inferred from dipole sonic log using the stiff-sand model. The stiff-sand model takes ? and composition as input and, in conjunction with Gassman's substitution, outputs elastic velocities. We find that the up-scaled McNeff 2-28 log velocities can be closely predicted by two compositional end-member input scenarios differing in location of organic matter (OM). The first scenario comprises 0-2.5% OM, 65-84% Quartz and 0% Calcite in matrix and 30-34% gas in pore-fluid. The second scenario comprises 76-20% Quartz and 1.5-3.9% Calcite in matrix and 16-35% gas and 10-40% OM in pore-fluid. In both compositional scenarios, the remainder in matrix is Illite and in pore-fluid is brine. While the input ? in both scenarios is close to the density-porosity (??) log, the input density (?) is closer to the ? log in the second scenario. The second scenario also gives rise to the concept of effective ? (total ? - ??) which pertains to the proportion occupied by mobile components such as gas and brine, and is up to 40% lower than the total ?. We conclude that from a modeling perspective in the Woodford a) OM should be a part of pore fluid rather than the rock matrix, and b) realistic ? and composition can be inferred from the stiff-sand model. Determining a rock physics model for the Woodford enables an examination of various what-if scenarios by consistently changing the inputs and computing elastic velocities which may eventually help in creating a field guide to quantitative interpretation of the field seismic data.

Jaiswal, P.; Varacchi, B.; Ebrahimi, P.; Dvorkin, J.; Puckette, J.

2014-05-01

255

Problems of wartime and postwar farm mortgage credit in Ellis County, Texas  

E-print Network

rates nore found to bo eahorbitant, femora $n %ilia County aero payixxg interest rates osaparablo nith these paid in the United States as s ahois 4ux ing this porio4. Omereial banks sere lending nonop in Nile County even obaayor than ecsssereial... rates nore found to bo eahorbitant, femora $n %ilia County aero payixxg interest rates osaparablo nith these paid in the United States as s ahois 4ux ing this porio4. Omereial banks sere lending nonop in Nile County even obaayor than ecsssereial...

Puckitt, Carley Welton

2012-06-07

256

Digital Map of Water-Level Changes in the High Plains Aquifer in Parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming, 1980 to 1997  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This data set consists of digital water-level-change contours for the High Plains aquifer in the central United States, 1980 to 1997. The High Plains aquifer extends from south of 32 degrees to almost 44 degrees north latitude and from 96 degrees 30 minutes to 104 degrees west longitude. The aquifer underlies about 174,000 square miles in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. This digital data set was created from 5,233 wells measured in both 1980 and 1997. The water-level-change contours were drawn manually on mylar at a scale of 1:1,000,000. The contours then were converted to a digital map.

Fischer, Brian C.; Kollasch, Keith M.; McGuire, Virginia L.

2000-01-01

257

Digital map of water-level changes in the High Plains Aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming, 1980 to 1995  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This data set consists of digital water-level-change contours for the High Plains aquifer in the central United States, 1980 to 1995. The High Plains aquifer extends from south of 32 degrees to almost 44 degrees north latitude and from 96 degrees 30 minutes to 104 degrees west longitude. The aquifer underlies about 174,000 square miles in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. This digital data set was created from 5,892 wells measured in both 1980 and 1995. The water-level-change contours were drawn manually on mylar. The contours were converted to a digital map at a scale of 1:1,250,000. The data should not be used at scales larger than 1:1,250,000.

Fischer, Brian C.; McGuire, Virginia L.

1999-01-01

258

Digital map of water-level changes in the High Plains Aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming, 1980 to 1996  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This data set consists of digital water-level-change contours for the High Plains aquifer in the Central United States, 1980 to 1996. The High Plains aquifer extends from south of 32 degrees to almost 44 degrees north latitude and from 96 degrees 30 minutes to 104 degrees west longitude. The aquifer underlies about 174,000 square miles in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. This digital data set was created from 5,429 wells measured in both 1980 and 1996. The water-level-change contours were drawn manually on mylar. The contours were converted into a digital map at a scale of 1:1,000,000. The data should not be used at scales larger than 1:1,000,000.

Fischer, Brian C.; McGuire, Virginia L.

1999-01-01

259

Digital map of water-level changes in the High Plains Aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming, 1980 to 1994  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This data set consists of digital water-level-change contour for the High Plains aquifer in the Central United States, 1980 to 1994. The High Plains aquifer extends from south of 32 degrees to almost 44 degrees north latitude and from 96 degrees 30 minutes to 104 degrees west longitude. The aquifer underlies about 174,000 square miles in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. This digital data set was created from 6,143 wells measured in both 1980 and 1994. The water-level-change contours were drawn manually on mylar. The contours were converted into a digital map at a scale of 1:1,250,000. The data should not be used at scales larger than 1:1,250,000.

Fischer, Brian C.; McGuire, Virginia L.

1999-01-01

260

The taxonomy and distribution of the planktonic copepoda from Brazos County, Texas  

E-print Network

in southern Texas. ~clo s vernalis was the most hbundant copepod found. Erickson (1952) found that the largest num- bers of diaptomid and cyclopoid adults occurred during the fall and early. summer. Diaptomids were present only during the summer while... in southern Texas. ~clo s vernalis was the most hbundant copepod found. Erickson (1952) found that the largest num- bers of diaptomid and cyclopoid adults occurred during the fall and early. summer. Diaptomids were present only during the summer while...

Rennie, Thomas Howard

2012-06-07

261

Water-level changes in the high plains aquifer underlying parts of South Dakota, Wyoming, Nebraska, Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas; predevelopment through nonirrigation season 1987-88  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The changes in water levels in the High Plains aquifer from the nonirrigation season 1986-87 through the nonirrigation season 1987-88 and from the nonirrigation season 1979-80 through the nonirrigation season 1987-88 are presented in maps for the entire High Plains aquifer area. Water level changes are caused by interacting changes in precipitation, land use, and annual pumpage. Water levels declined from conditions prior to development until 1980 through parts of the High Plains of Nebraska, Colorado, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. From 1980 through 1987 water level changes were mixed, with declines of more than 10 ft in the highly developed areas of Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas and relatively stable to rising water tables throughout the remaining aquifer area. The net change was a rise of 0.8 ft. The 1981-87 period was generally wetter than normal and pumping for irrigated agriculture was therefore reduced. Water level changes were mixed during 1987. Declines continued in some highly developed areas, but water levels generally rose throughout most of the aquifer. The average area-weighted change was a rise of 0.28 ft. This rise was due to the generally greater than normal precipitation, decreased acreage under irrigation, and decreased pumpage for those areas irrigated. At the end of the growing season, the drought in the Midwest in 1988 affected only limited areas of the High Plains. The effects of the drought on water levels can not be assessed until the water-level measurements for the nonirrigation season of 1988-89 are compiled. (USGS)

Kastner, W. M.; Schild, D. E.; Spahr, D. S.

1989-01-01

262

75 FR 45557 - Prevailing Rate Systems; Definition of Tulsa County, OK, and Angelina County, TX, to...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...County, OK, and Angelina County, TX, to Nonappropriated...SUMMARY: The U.S. Office of Personnel...that would define Tulsa County, Oklahoma, as an area...SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The U.S. Office of Personnel...that would define Tulsa County, Oklahoma, as an...

2010-08-03

263

Geologic framework, structure, and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Knippa Gap area in eastern Uvalde and western Medina Counties, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Edwards aquifer is the primary source of potable water for the San Antonio area in south-central Texas. The Knippa Gap was postulated to channel or restrict flow in the Edwards aquifer in eastern Uvalde County, and its existence was based on a series of numerical simulations of groundwater flow in the aquifer. To better understand the function of the area known as the Knippa Gap as it pertains to its geology and structure, the geologic framework, structure, and hydrogeologic characteristics of the area were evaluated by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-Fort Worth District. The principal structural feature in the San Antonio area is the Balcones Fault Zone, which is the result of Miocene age faulting. In Medina County, the faulting of the Balcones Fault Zone has produced a relay-ramp structure that dips to the southwest from the Edwards aquifer recharge zone and extends westward and below land surface from Seco Creek. Groundwater flow paths in the Edwards aquifer are influenced by faulting and geologic structure. Some faults act as barriers to groundwater flow paths where the aquifer is offset by 50 percent or more and result in flow moving parallel to the fault. The effectiveness of a fault as a barrier to flow changes as the amount of fault displacement changes. The structurally complex area of the Balcones Fault Zone contains relay ramps, which form in extensional fault systems to allow for deformation changes along the fault block. In Medina County, the faulting of the Balcones Fault Zone has produced a relay-ramp structure that dips to the southwest from the Edwards aquifer recharge zone. Groundwater moving down the relay ramp in northern Medina County flows downgradient (downdip) to the structural low (trough) from the northeast to the southwest. In Uvalde County, the beds dip from a structural high known as the Uvalde Salient. This results in groundwater moving from the structural high and downgradient (dip) towards a structural low (trough) to the northeast. These two opposing structural dips result in a subsurface structural low (trough) locally referred to as the Knippa Gap. This trough is located in eastern Uvalde County beneath the towns of Knippa and Sabinal. By using data that were compiled and collected for this study and previous studies, a revised map was constructed depicting the geologic framework, structure, and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Knippa Gap area in eastern Uvalde and western Medina Counties, Tex. The map also shows the interpreted structural dip directions and interpreted location of a structural low (trough) in the area known as the Knippa Gap.

Clark, Allan K.; Pedraza, Diana E.; Morris, Robert R.

2013-01-01

264

Occupational Change Among Spanish-Americans in Atascosa County and San Antonio, Texas.  

E-print Network

in San Antonio, many Nativity Status of which consist of women living alone, and from the higher incidence of large families (6 or more persons) among the rural Spanish-Americans (Table 3). Spanish-American l~ouseholcls were consiclerably larger than... native-born Americans. Only t~vo-ten tl16 of the rural and three-tenths of the urban Ilo~~sclioltl heads were born in Mexico. Almost all of the re- mainder were born in Texas. Of the hot~selioltl he;~tl+ born in Texas, about 65 percent were hol-11 ill...

Skrabanek, R. L.; Rapton, Avra

1966-01-01

265

The Relationship between Land Use and Temperature Change in Dallas County, Texas  

E-print Network

This study examines the relationship between land use and temperature change in Dallas County, TX. The purpose of this research is to analyze the relationship between temperature and land use and to identify the primary factors contributing...

Kim, Hee Ju

2010-10-12

266

Environmental assessment for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Big Hill facility storage of commercial crude oil project, Jefferson County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Big Hill SPR facility located in Jefferson County, Texas has been a permitted operating crude oil storage site since 1986 with benign environmental impacts. However, Congress has not authorized crude oil purchases for the SPR since 1990, and six storage caverns at Big Hill are underutilized with 70 million barrels of available storage capacity. On February 17, 1999, the Secretary of Energy offered the 70 million barrels of available storage at Big Hill for commercial use. Interested commercial users would enter into storage contracts with DOE, and DOE would receive crude oil in lieu of dollars as rental fees. The site could potentially began to receive commercial oil in May 1999. This Environmental Assessment identified environmental changes that potentially would affect water usage, power usage, and air emissions. However, as the assessment indicates, changes would not occur to a major degree affecting the environment and no long-term short-term, cumulative or irreversible impacts have been identified.

NONE

1999-03-01

267

Integrated analysis of production potential and profitability of a horizontal well in the Lower Glen Rose Formation, Maverick County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy/Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE/METC) awarded a contract in 1991 to Prime Energy Corporation (PEC) to demonstrate the benefit of using horizontal wells to recover gas from low permeability formations. The project area was located in the Chittim field of Maverick County, Texas. The Lower Glen Rose Formation in the Chittim field was a promising horizontal well candidate based on the heterogenous nature of the reservoir (suggested by large well-to-well variances in reserves) and the low percentage of economical vertical wells. Since there was substantial evidence of reservoir heterogeneity, it was unknown whether the selected, wellsite would penetrate a reservoir with the desired properties for a horizontal well. Thus, an integrated team was formed to combine geologic analysis, seismic interpretation, reservoir engineering, reservoir simulation, and economic assessment to analyze the production potential and profitability of completing a horizontal well in the Lower Glen Rose formation.

Ammer, J.R.; Mroz, T.H.; Zammerilli, A.M.; Yost, A.B. II [Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States); Muncey, J.G.; Hegeman, P.S.

1995-03-01

268

Geologic controls on movement of produced-water releases at US geological survey research Site A, Skiatook lake, Osage county, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Highly saline produced water was released from multiple sources during oil field operations from 1913 to 1973 at the USGS research Site A on Skiatook Lake in northeastern Oklahoma. Two pits, designed to hold produced water and oil, were major sources for release of these fluids at the site. Produced water spills from these and other features moved downslope following

James K. Otton; Robert A. Zielinski; Bruce D. Smith; Marvin M. Abbott

2007-01-01

269

Hydrology and subsurface transport of oil-field brine at the U.S. Geological Survey OSPER site A, Osage County, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Spillage and improper disposal of saline produced water from oil wells has caused environmental damage at thousands of sites in the United States. In order to improve understanding of the fate and transport of contaminants at these sites, the U.S. Geological Survey carried out multidisciplinary investigations at two oil production sites near Skiatook Lake, Oklahoma. As a part of this

W. N. Herkelrath; Y. K. Kharaka; J. J. Thordsen; M. M. Abbott

2007-01-01

270

Effects of brine on the chemical quality of water in parts of Creek, Lincoln, Okfuskee, Payne, Pottawatomie, and Seminole Counties, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A study of water-quality degradation due to brine contamination was made in an area of ~1,700 mi2 in east-central Oklahoma. The study area coincides in part with the outcrop of the Vamoosa-Ada aquifer of Pennsylvanian age.

Morton, Robert B.

1986-01-01

271

Public health assessment for Rockwool Industries, Belton, Bell County, Texas, Region 6, CERCLIS number TXD066379645. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Rockwool Industries, Inc. (RWI) National Priorities List site is a 100 acre site one-mile east of downtown Belton in Bell County, Texas. The Facility manufactured two types of mineral wool insulation: Blow wool and batt wool. Three main contaminant source areas have been identified at the site. Source 1, in the middle portion of the site, includes contaminated soil associated with the South Shot Pile. Source 2, in the northern portion of the site, includes contaminated soils associated with the Cemetery Shot Pile. Source 3, in the northwest portion of the site includes contaminated soils associated with the Cemetery Shot Pile. The primary waste types at the site include spent iron shot and baghouse dust. Secondary waste types include boiler blowdown water, stormwater runoff, recovered groundwater, and bricks. The Texas Department of Health (TDH) and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) evaluated the environmental information available for the site and identified several exposure situations for evaluation. These exposure situations include possible contact with site contaminants in the soil, surface water, sediment, and groundwater. The potential for exposure to site contaminants through the food chain was also examined. A brief review of the evaluation, organized by hazard category, is presented.

NONE

1999-08-03

272

A GIS study for determining hurricane risk areas and estimating population, Texas Coastal Counties  

E-print Network

The objectives of this study are to create and implement a new Geographic Information System (GIS) for the definition of areas along the Texas coast at risk from hurricane impacts and to estimate populations for those areas. The threat to lives...

Blakely, Christopher Todd

2012-06-07

273

A theoretical model of subsidence caused by petroleum production: Big Hill Field, Jefferson County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the Texas Gulf Coastal Plain, there is a history of oil and gas production extending over 2 to 5 decades. Concurrent with this production history, there has been unprecedented population growth accompanied by vastly increased groundwater demands. Land subsidence on both local and regional bases in this geologic province has been measured and predicted in several studies. The vast

D. W. Hill; J. M. Jr. Sharp

1993-01-01

274

A Comprehensive Evaluation of the Community Action Program in Austin and Travis County, Texas. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Produced in four parts, this report covers a study of poor people in Austin, Texas, begun in 1967. Initial research efforts defined the problem and identified the population to be studied. An interim report was then made on the first year's findings. This involved evaluating some of the community action programs (CAP) and identifying and analyzing

Tracor, Inc., Austin, TX.

275

Estimation of volume and mass and of changes in volume and mass of selected chat piles in the Picher mining district, Ottawa County, Oklahoma, 2005-10  

USGS Publications Warehouse

From the 1890s through the 1970s the Picher mining district in northeastern Ottawa County, Oklahoma, was the site of mining and processing of lead and zinc ore. When mining ceased in about 1979, as much as 165300 million tons of mine tailings, locally referred to as chat, remained in the Picher mining district. Since 1979, some chat piles have been mined for aggregate materials and have decreased in volume and mass. Currently (2013), the land surface in the Picher mining district is covered by thousands of acres of chat, much of which remains on Indian trust land owned by allottees. The Bureau of Indian Affairs manages these allotted lands and oversees the sale and removal of chat from these properties. To help the Bureau of Indian Affairs better manage the sale and removal of chat, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Bureau of Indian Affairs, estimated the 2005 and 2010 volumes and masses of selected chat piles remaining on allotted lands in the Picher mining district. The U.S. Geological Survey also estimated the changes in volume and mass of these chat piles for the period 2005 through 2010. The 2005 and 2010 chat-pile volume and mass estimates were computed for 34 selected chat piles on 16 properties in the study area. All computations of volume and mass were performed on individual chat piles and on groups of chat piles in the same property. The Sooner property had the greatest estimated volume (4.644 million cubic yards) and mass (5.253 0.473 million tons) of chat in 2010. Five of the selected properties (Sooner, Western, Lawyers, Skelton, and St. Joe) contained estimated chat volumes exceeding 1 million cubic yards and estimated chat masses exceeding 1 million tons in 2010. Four of the selected properties (Lucky Bill Humbah, Ta Mee Heh, Bird Dog, and St. Louis No. 6) contained estimated chat volumes of less than 0.1 million cubic yards and estimated chat masses of less than 0.1 million tons in 2010. The total volume of all selected chat piles was estimated to be 18.073 million cubic yards in 2005 and 16.171 million cubic yards in 2010. The total mass of all selected chat piles was estimated to be 20.445 1.840 million tons in 2005 and 18.294 1.646 million tons in 2010. All of the selected chat piles decreased in volume and mass for the period 2005 through 2010. Chat piles CP022 (Ottawa property) and CP013 (Sooner property) had some within-property chat-pile redistribution, with both chat piles having net decreases in volume and mass for the period 2005 through 2010. The Sooner property and the St. Joe property had the greatest volume (and mass) changes, with 1.266 million cubic yards and 0.217 million cubic yards (1.432 0.129 million tons and 0.246 0.022 million tons) of chat being removed, respectively. The chat removed from the Sooner and St. Joe properties accounts for about 78 percent of the chat removed from all selected chat piles and properties. The total volume and mass removed from all selected chat piles for the period 2005 through 2010 were estimated to be 1.902 million cubic yards and 2.151 0.194 million tons, respectively.

Smith, S. Jerrod

2013-01-01

276

Base Flow (1966-2005) and Streamflow Gain and Loss (2006) of the Brazos River, McLennan County to Fort Bend County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During 2006?07, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Texas Water Development Board, did a study to quantify historical (water years 1966?2005) base flow and streamflow gains and losses from two streamflow-measuring surveys (March and August 2006) in the Brazos River from McLennan County to Fort Bend County, Texas. The Brazos River is hydraulically connected to the Brazos River alluvium aquifer, which in turn is hydraulically connected to several underlying aquifers, the outcrops of which occur in laterally adjacent layers generally parallel to the coast (major aquifers, Carrizo-Wilcox and Gulf Coast, and minor aquifers, Queen City, Sparta, and Yegua-Jackson). Hydrograph separation was done using the USGS computer program Hydrograph Separation and Analysis with historical streamflow from 10 USGS gaging stations, three on the Brazos River and seven on selected tributaries to the Brazos River. Streamflow data for computation of gains and losses were collected in March 2006 from 36 sites on the Brazos River and 19 sites on 19 tributaries to the Brazos River; and in August 2006 from 28 sites on the Brazos River and 16 sites on tributaries. Hydrograph separation and associated analyses indicate an appreciable increase in base flow as a percentage of streamflow in the reach of the Brazos River that crosses the outcrops of the Carrizo-Wilcox, Queen City, Sparta, and Yegua-Jackson aquifers compared to that in the adjacent upstream reach (on average from about 43 percent to about 60 percent). No increase in base flow as a percentage of streamflow in the reach of the Brazos River crossing the Gulf Coast aquifer compared to that in the adjacent upstream reach was indicated. Streamflow gains and losses computed for March 2006 for 35 reaches defined by pairs of sites on the Brazos River indicated that five reaches were verifiably gaining streamflow (computed gain exceeded potential flow measurement error) and none were verifiably losing streamflow. Four of the five gaining reaches are in the outcrop areas of the Carrizo-Wilcox and Yegua-Jackson aquifers. The results of the synoptic gain and loss surveys are consistent with the results of the base-flow analysis of historical streamflow. Appreciable increases in streamflow, apparently the result of increases in base flow, occur in the reach of the Brazos River that crosses the outcrops of the Carrizo-Wilcox, Queen City, Sparta, and Yegua-Jackson aquifers.

Turco, Michael J.; East, Jeffery W.; Milburn, Matthew S.

2007-01-01

277

Maternal exposure to fine particulate pollution during narrow gestational periods and newborn health in Harris County, Texas.  

PubMed

It remains unclear when the fetus is most susceptible to the effects of particulate air pollution. We conducted a population-based study in a large urban area to evaluate associations between preterm birth (PTB) and fetal growth and exposures to fine particles (PM(2.5)) during narrow periods of gestation. We identified 177,816 births during 2005-2007 among mothers who resided in Harris County, Texas at the time of delivery. We created three mutually exclusive categories of mildly (33-36 completed weeks of gestation), moderately (29-32 weeks of gestation), and severely (20-28 weeks of gestation) PTB, and among full term infants, we identified those who were born small for their gestational age. Using routine air monitoring data, we generated county-level daily time series of estimated ambient air levels of PM2.5 and then computed exposure metrics during every 4 weeks of a mother's pregnancy. We evaluated associations in each 4-week period using multiple logistic regression. A 10 ?g/m(3) increase in PM(2.5) exposure in the first 4 weeks of pregnancy significantly increased the odds of mildly, moderately and severely PTB by 16, 71 and 73 %, respectively. Associations were stronger when infants with birth defects were excluded. Our findings indicate an association between PM(2.5) and PTB, with stronger associations for moderately and severely PTB infants. Efforts should continue to implement stricter air quality standards and improve ambient air quality. PMID:24585411

Symanski, Elaine; Davila, Marivel; McHugh, Michelle Karpman; Waller, Dorothy Kim; Zhang, Xuan; Lai, Dejian

2014-10-01

278

76 FR 38195 - Oklahoma; Amendment No. 2 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FEMA-2011-0001] Oklahoma; Amendment No. 2 to...declaration for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-1989-DR...declaration for the State of Oklahoma is hereby amended to...Logan, and McClain Counties for Public Assistance...Caddo, Jefferson, LeFlore, Major, and...

2011-06-29

279

75 FR 34753 - Oklahoma; Amendment No. 2 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FEMA-2010-0002] Oklahoma; Amendment No. 2 to...declaration for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-1917-DR...declaration for the State of Oklahoma is hereby amended to...Noble, and Osage Counties for Public Assistance...McIntosh, Okfuskee, Pottawatomie, and Seminole...

2010-06-18

280

Development of ground-water resources in the Orange County area, Texas and Louisiana, 1980-Spring of 1985  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report updates groundwater information pertaining to the lower unit of the Chicot aquifer in the Orange County area, Texas and Louisiana. The period of data collection was from 1980 to the spring of 1985. Some data collected prior to 1980 are presented to establish long-term trends and relations. The lower unit of the Chicot aquifer is the main source of freshwater for several cities, communities, industries, housing subdivisions, and individual homeowners in Orange County. The total pumpage from the lower unit of the Chicot aquifer in Orange County decreased from a historical maximum of 23.1 million gallons per day during 1984. The use of surface water decreased from a peak withdrawal of 58.1 million gallons per day during 1981 to 41.4 million gallons per day during 1984. Water levels rose throughout most of the area. The greatest rise in water levels (as much as 14 feet) occurred in and near the city of Orange, although the greatest decline (3 feet) occurred northwest of Vidor. Most of the water in the lower unit of the Chicot aquifer is fresh, but the water quality can vary greatly within short distances. Chloride concentrations during 1980-84 ranged from 10 to 1,700 milligrams per liter. In general, chloride concentrations remained constant during 1980-84. A relation exists between chloride concentrations and specific conductance. It was determined that, estimated chloride concentrations (milligrams per liter) generally can be approximately determined by multiplying 0.29 times specific-conductance values (microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius by 0.29) when the specific conductance is between 500 and 5,600 microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius. (USGS)

Bonnet, C. W.; Williams, J. F., III

1987-01-01

281

Steamflood hikes Oklahoma heavy oil flow  

SciTech Connect

Conoco Inc.'s fracture assisted steamflood technology (fast) has boosted recovery of heavy oil from shallow zones in Loco Field in Stephens County, Oklahoma to 25 to 50% from approxmately 3%. The company plans to use the fast process to increase recovery from Loco's deeper zones to 40% from 7%. In addition, Conoco expects to license the process for use in heavy oil deposits in Texas, Utah, and Wyoming and the Athabasca tar sands in Alberta. Since the Loco Pilot Project went on stream in 1974, Conoco has run 20 fast injection well patterns which boosted recovery by 25 to 50% from pay at 50 to 350 ft. The first fast test at Loco yielded 43,000 bbl of oil in 6 months, or 60% of the trial zones oil in place. Conoco pegs Loco Fields's shallow oil in place at approximately 70 million bbl with a gravity of approximately 23 to 24. Plans call for the fast process to be used to recover an additional 40%, or approximately 30 million bbl of 26 g oil, from Loco's deeper zones at 1000 to 1200 ft. Tests showed fast recovery feasible at 1500 ft and shallower depths.

Not Available

1981-02-16

282

A rural multi-county judicial district in Texas: a socio-legal analysis  

E-print Network

Blumberg's (1967) observations that a court is truly a closed community and only court "regulars" are really accepted, it would appear that to effectively report on the court system, one must be an "insider. " The researcher began practicing law... counties was only 1, 151 barrels a day. Today, there are several wells in Lee County alone that exceed that figure. 23 It is really too early to gauge the true effect of the zecent upsurge of drilling activity other than to say that it is changing...

Sebesta, Charles Joseph

2012-06-07

283

Geology of the Fredonia area, McCulloch, Mason, and San Saba counties, Texas  

E-print Network

III EHT AM II LT COUNTY LINE EH FARM HIGHWAY NUMBERS PROBABLE FAULT / i' = /&'Hf' OO '. j ' NET LEARN ItNE ROC OIIITR M O P SAN SABA GREY SUBI. ITHOGRAPHIC TO GRANULIIR L POINT PEAK X REEF STRUCTURES v I gg POINT PEAK O GREEN SHALE 8... III EHT AM II LT COUNTY LINE EH FARM HIGHWAY NUMBERS PROBABLE FAULT / i' = /&'Hf' OO '. j ' NET LEARN ItNE ROC OIIITR M O P SAN SABA GREY SUBI. ITHOGRAPHIC TO GRANULIIR L POINT PEAK X REEF STRUCTURES v I gg POINT PEAK O GREEN SHALE 8...

McGrath, Bernard Dennin

2012-06-07

284

The place-names of Brazos County, Texas, 1821 to 1880  

E-print Network

of initial settlement. Place-names, which are an important part of any cultural landscape, provide a valuable means of studying the nature of' the county's settlers and of the land they settled. Specific and generic place-names have been collected... and placed in a dictionary to provide individual and collective glimpses of the county's past. The dictionary also provides the source for an analysis of naming trends and processes, which is in- cluded in this study, as well as for future studies which...

Diem, John William

2012-06-07

285

Geologic land-use mapping of a part of Brazos County, Texas  

E-print Network

clay loam, 1-3 percent slopes Yahola fine sandy loam, 0-1 percent slopes 23 number of individual mappable units. Geol ic Ma (Ma 4) The existing geologic map of Brazos County (Mathews, 1950) proved unsatisfactory for the thesis work. Pleistocene... clay loam, 1-3 percent slopes Yahola fine sandy loam, 0-1 percent slopes 23 number of individual mappable units. Geol ic Ma (Ma 4) The existing geologic map of Brazos County (Mathews, 1950) proved unsatisfactory for the thesis work. Pleistocene...

Ruckman, David W

2012-06-07

286

Mineralogical analysis and uranium distribution of the sediments from the upper Jackson formation, Karnes County, Texas  

E-print Network

and illite. Moreover, smectite in the samples is relatively highly expandable; thus, the adsorption of uranium by smectite into interlayer positions could have played a significant role in uranium mineralization. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I would like to thank..., mineralogy and stratigraphy of uranium ore bodies. Finally, an analysis of the separate areas to determine if there is any correlation between them is needed. Some uranium ores in South Texas show disequilibrium between gamma radioactivity of the non...

Fishman, Paul Harold

2012-06-07

287

Small mammal populations on reclaimed strip-mined areas in Freestone County, Texas  

E-print Network

period was conducted on three reclaimed and one control area. Seven species (Reithrodontomys fulvescens, R. humulis, R. montanus, Peromyscus 1 t, S y* t yl, S~dh~d d M * 1 l were caught. Peromyscus maniculstus was the earliest invader on the recently... at Texas A&M University. 19 RESULTS Species Composition and Abundance Four small mammal species were trapped at the recently reclaimed area during the 12 month sampling period: Peromyscus maniculatus (deer mouse), Reithrodontomys montanus (plains...

Gust, Deborah Anne

2012-06-07

288

Oklahoma Agriculture Agriculture  

E-print Network

Oklahoma Agriculture Agriculture #12;Oklahoma Agriculture 2011Oklahoma Agriculture 2011 Oklahoma agriculture affects each of us every day, young and old, whether we live in largely rural regions or the state's Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources promotes sustainable land use and embraces the land

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

289

Organizational and individual factors related to retention of county extension agents employed by Texas Cooperative Extension  

E-print Network

Business Retention?????????????.....................22 Extension Retention?????????????...................35 III METHOD OF INVESTIGATION............................................................38 Overview of the Study... Extension Agents by How Many Counties Served ...............................................82 1 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Introduction Retention of valued employees is one of the most important management concerns in businesses, organizations...

Chandler, Galen Douglas

2005-02-17

290

Comparisons of cat and dog rabies vaccination rates between epizootic to non-epizootic counties and urban to rural counties in the state of Texas  

E-print Network

come into contact with wildlife. This study was undertaken compare the vaccination rates of cats and dogs the epizootic counties the non-epizootic counties to see if the rabies increase vaccination of cats and dogs the epizootic counties. Comparisons...

Martin-Harborth, Michelle Lynn

2012-06-07

291

Hydrogeology of a proposed surface lignite mine, southwestern Harrison County, Texas  

E-print Network

VITA 126 L I 8 T OF TABLES Table Page Descriptions of geologrc units. 12 Hydraulic conductivity test results for 6 inch infiltration samples. 45 Classification and hydraulic conductivity of soils. 46 Estimated contribution to deep percolation... in the East Texas Embayment area show that coefficients of transmissibility averaged about 18, 000 gpd/ft for a -2 sand thickness of about 90 ft and hydraulic conductivity of 1 x 10 cm/sec. Pumping tests of individual Wilcox sands indicate that for 90 ft...

Charles, Robert John

2012-06-07

292

Depositional environment and reservoir morphology of Spraberry sandstones, Parks field, Midland County, Texas  

E-print Network

, structureless sand- stones, very thinly laminated and bioturbated siltstones, and thin black shales. Sandstones are either thick or thin bedded, and vary in thickness from 0. 05 ft (0. 02 m) to 14. 5 ft (4. 4 m). Sandstones average 2. 7 ft (0. 8 m...' ggv ~+ +~+ )O MARFA I SASIN LEGEND SPRABERRY TREND ggg PARKS FIELD SHEFFIELD CHANNEI v/PALp SOUTHERN SHELF g EIIDE 84 S~I I ON@ I I 0 7fr0 C e+ 4 0 MILES 00 0 KILOMETERS 120 Figure 1. Tectonic map of the West Texas Permian Basin...

Yale, Mark William

2012-06-07

293

Geology of the Shiloh School-Liberty Church area, West Burleson County, Texas  

E-print Network

of the Qulf ~ sreo sua nude at ClaLborn, ~, hF Issue I a (1833). Br~ Ferdinand Russo' oawnly xebnved to ss utho Father of Toxse Qealagyuu wus tho first sall traLnod geologist to visit Texas traveling Csoughunt the state frua Bsuuudwr X@f to April 1847... clears near the tawn aL' ~ City~ Case Crsrstyi Teens. In 19&9~ scrallendt en4 xnebe1 descrfbed the fbeeAfcn in detail snd asdga1 it aoross Ssst Teens es Iert af' the Mouut SaUaen famatfm, es dei'fned by Decsscn (19Ib). Tbe Qneen City vns desfgnated a...

Foster, Raymond Leon

2012-06-07

294

Depositional environment of the Yates Formation in Kermit Field, Winkler County, Texas  

E-print Network

Basin (Figure 1) . The origin of geologic features in this area can be traced to periods of crustal instability during Precambrian time. The area of southern New Mexico and west Texas was a depressional feature on the southwest portion of the North...). He provides no explanation for the rise and fall of sea level, except the possibility of a link with glaciation. Numerous studies have been conducted on the dolomites of the upper Yates in the Guadalupe Mountains (e. g. , Neese and Schwartz, 1977...

Gormican, Sheila Catherine

2012-06-07

295

Origin of gaseous hydrocarbons in Sparta aquifer in Brazos and Burleson Counties, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Gaseous hydrocarbons occur in high concentrations in the Sparta aquifer in east Texas. To test whether these gases migrated from deep petroleum or gas reservoirs, comprehensive chemical and isotopic analyses were performed on the gaseous hydrocarbons and associated waters from 24 wells in the Sparta aquifer and one well in the overlying Yegua aquifer. Similar analyses were also performed on gaseous hydrocarbons from petroleum and gas production wells in the area. The shallow Sparta aquifer is an ideal system to investigate because the limited screen settings in wells sampled from large depth ranges (40-2010 ft) provide excellent stratigraphic control for determining the origin and distribution of the dissolved gas.

Grossman, E.L.; Hahn, R.W.; Fritz, S.J.

1986-09-01

296

Determination of consumers' knowledge of and preference for organic and natural foods in Collin County, Texas  

E-print Network

to better health. This study's specific conclusions, as related . to the basic objectives specified above are: 1. Collin County consumers associated o/n foods with those that are lacking pzeservatives, additives and chemical insecticides and pesticides... Literature Related to the Characteristics and Benefits of Organic and Natural Foods . . 10 Fe rtilize r s Pesticides and Insecticides 12 Preservatives and Additives 13 Nutritive Value 15 Chole ste rol 16 Table of Contents, continued Page Taste 17...

Carlton, Eunice Jean Hargrave

2012-06-07

297

Stratigraphic relationships in Woodbine-Eagleford and Sub-Clarksville sandstones, IDS field, Brazos County, Texas  

E-print Network

southeastward into Grimes County. The profile demonstrates the doming of the Woodbine-Eagleford interval. From Leethem (1984). . LIST OF FIGURES (Continued) Figure Page Depositional model interpreted for Woodbine- Eagleford sandstones at Kurten field... ft (3 m). . 49 20 Base Austin Chalk structure map illustrating monoclinal dip to the southeast interrupted by nosing above Hill dome in the east. Contour interval is 200 ft (60. 6 m). 53 21 Base Austin Chalk residual structure map indicating...

Brogdon, Ron Lee

2012-06-07

298

Hydrogeology of the Piedmont Springs National Historic Site Grimes County, Texas  

E-print Network

unpublished Master of Science Thesis studied the geology of specific areas in Grimes County (Pedrotti, 1958; Rolf, 1958; Walton, 1959) . These studies, however, did not include the Piedmont Springs area. No changes were proposed to the stratigraphic... the southeast into the Gulf of Mexico. However, a slight deviation of the flow occurs in the Catahoula Sand due to pumping at the Navasota Well Field (Baker et al. , 1974) . Eleven privately owned water wells tapping the Jackson Group sands were located...

Waclawczyk, Randy R.

2012-06-07

299

Geologic framework and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Edwards Aquifer outcrop, Hays County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

All of the hydrogeologic subdivisions within the Edwards aquifer outcrop in Hays County have some porosity and permeability. The most porous and permeable appear to be hydrogeologic subdivision VI, the Kirschberg evaporite member of the Kainer Formation; hydrogeologic subdivision III, the leached and collapsed members, undivided; and hydrogeologic subdivision II, the cyclic and marine members, undivided, of the Person Formation. The two types of porosity in the Edwards aquifer outcrop are fabric selective, which is related to depositional or diagenetic elements and typically exists in specific stratigraphic horizons; and not fabric selective, which can exist in any lithostratigraphic horizon. Permeability, the capacity of porous rock to transmit water, depends on the physical properties of the rock such as size, shape, and distribution of pores, and fissuring and dissolution. Two faults, San Marcos Springs and Mustang Branch, completely, or almost completely, offset the Edwards aquifer by juxtaposing Edwards aquifer limestone against nearly impermeable upper confining units along parts of their traces across Hays County. These faults are thought to be barriers, or partial barriers, to ground-water flow where the beds are juxtaposed. In Hays County, the Edwards aquifer probably is most vulnerable to surface contamination in the rapidly urbanizing areas on the Edwards aquifer outcrop. Contamination can result from spills or leakage of hazardous materials; or runoff on the intensely faulted and fractured, karstic limestone outcrops characteristic of the recharge zone.

Hanson, John A.; Small, Ted A.

1995-01-01

300

Geologic framework and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Edwards Aquifer outcrop, Medina County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The hydrogeologic subdivisions of the Edwards aquifer outcrop in Medina County generally are porous and permeable. The most porous and permeable appear to be hydrogeologic subdivision VI, the Kirschberg evaporite member of the Kainer Formation; and hydrogeologic subdivision III, the leached and collapsed members, undivided, of the Person Formation. The most porous and permeable rocks of the Devils River Formation in Medina County appear to be in the top layer. The upper member of the Glen Rose Limestone, the lower confining unit, has much less porosity and permeability than that observed in the Edwards aquifer. The Edwards aquifer has relatively large porosity and permeability resulting, in part, from the development or redistribution of secondary porosity. Lithology, stratigraphy, diagenesis, and karstification account for the effective porosity and permeability in the Edwards aquifer outcrop. Karst features that can greatly enhance effective porosity and permeability in the Edwards aquifer outcrop include sinkholes, dolines, and caves. The Edwards aquifer rocks in Medina County change from the eight-member Edwards Group to the essentially indivisible Devils River Formation. The facies change occurs along a line extending northwestward from just south of Medina Lake.

Small, Ted A.; Clark, Allan K.

2000-01-01

301

Water-Quality, Stream-Habitat, and Biological Data for Highland and Marchand Bayous, Galveston County, Texas, 2006-07  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Houston-Galveston Area Council and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, collected water-quality, stream-habitat, and biological data from five sites on Highland and Marchand Bayous in Galveston County, Texas, during 2006-07. Water-quality data-collection surveys consisted of synoptic 24-hour continuous measurements of water temperature, pH, specific conductance, and dissolved oxygen and periodically collected samples analyzed for several properties and constituents of interest. Bacteria samples were collected monthly at 10 sites on Highland and Marchand Bayous during the study. Stream-habitat data were collected at five sites three times during the study, July-August 2006, March 2007, and July-August 2007. At each site, a representative stream reach was selected. Within this reach, five evenly spaced stream transects were determined. At each transect, stream (wetted channel width, water depth, bottom material, instream cover) and riparian (bank slope and erosion potential, width of natural vegetation, type of vegetation, percentage tree canopy) attributes were measured. Benthic macroinvertebrate and fish data were collected from the same five sites identified for habitat evaluation. Three assessments were done to account for seasonal differences in biotic distribution. Stream-habitat and aquatic biota (benthic macroinvertebrates and fish) were assessed at each site three times during the study to evaluate aquatic life use. A total of 5,126 macroinvertebrate individuals were identified at all sites. During the study, 34 species of fish representing 28 families were collected from all the sites.

Brown, Dexter W.; Mabe, Jeffrey A.; Turco, Michael J.

2008-01-01

302

Hydrologic interpretation of geophysical data from the southeastern Hueco Bolson, El Paso, and Hudspeth Counties, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Airborne-electromagnetic and earth-resistivity surveys were used to explore for fresh ground water in the Hueco Bolson southeast of El Paso, Texas. Aerial surveys were made along about 500 miles of flight line, and 67 resistivity soundings were made along 110 miles of profile. The surveys did not indicate the presence of any large bodies of fresh ground water, but several areas may be underlain by small to moderate amounts of fresh to slightly saline water. The material underlying the flood plain of the Rio Grande is predominantly clay or sand of low resistivity. Along a band on the mesa next to and parallel to the flood plain, more resistive material composed partly of deposits of an ancient river channel extends to depths of about 400 to 1,700 feet. Locally, the lower part of this more resistive material is saturated with fresh to slightly saline water. The largest body of fresh to slightly saline ground water detected is between Fabens and Tornillo, Texas, mostly in the sandhill area between the flood plain and the mesa. Under assumed conditions, the total amount of water in storage may be as much as 400,000 to 800,000 acre-feet. The resistivity data indicate that the deep artesian zone southwest of Fabens extends from a depth of about 1,200 feet to about 2,800 feet. (Woodard-USGS)

Gates, Joseph Spencer; Stanley, W. D.

1976-01-01

303

An unusual Middle Permian flora from the Blaine Formation (Pease River Group: Leonardian-Guadalupian Series) of King County, West Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A new Middle Permian plant assemblage from South Ash Pasture in King County, Texas, may be the youngest and is certainly the most unusual flora known from the Permian of either West Texas or adjoining north-central Texas. Found serendipitously in the evaporite-rich upper Blaine Formation (Pease River Group, Guadalupian Series), the flora is of very low diversity despite intensive collecting efforts, and the affinities of nearly all taxa are enigmatic. The most common elements are parallel-veined leaves that resemble cordaites but that could be isolated pinnules of a pinnate leaf. Gigantopterid foliage is present but not assignable to any known taxon. A single foliar conifer specimen is too incomplete for assignment. Numerous reproductive organs, however, and an abundance of axes may represent conifers. Conchostracans, palaeoniscoid fish scales, and small heteropolar coprolites also occur in the deposit, which originated as a small, claystone-dominated channel fill in a coastal plain setting.

DiMichele, W.A.; Hook, R.W.; Nelson, W.J.; Chaney, D.S.

2004-01-01

304

Geologic framework and hydrogeologic features of the Glen Rose Limestone, Camp Bullis Training Site, Bexar County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Glen Rose Limestone crops out over most of the Camp Bullis Training Site in northern Bexar County, Texas, where it consists of upper and lower members and composes the upper zone and the upper part of the middle zone of the Trinity aquifer. Uncharacteristically permeable in northern Bexar County, the Glen Rose Limestone can provide avenues for recharge to and potential contamination of the downgradient Edwards aquifer, which occupies the southeastern corner of Camp Bullis. The upper member of the Glen Rose Limestone characteristically is thin-bedded and composed mostly of soft limestone and marl, and the lower Glen Rose typically is composed mostly of relatively massive, fossiliferous limestone. The upper member, about 410 to 450 feet thick at Camp Bullis, was divided in this study into five hydrogeologic subdivisions, A through E (youngest to oldest). The approximately 120-foot-thick Interval A has an abundance of caves, which is indicative of its generally well developed fracture, channel, and cavern porosity that in places provides appreciable permeability. The 120- to 150-foot-thick Interval B is similar to Interval A but with less cave development and considerably less permeability. The 10- to 20-foot-thick Interval C, a layer of partly to mostly dissolved soluble carbonate minerals, is characterized by breccia porosity, boxwork permeability, and collapse structures that typically divert ground water laterally to discharge at land surface. The 135- to 180-foot-thick Interval D generally has low porosity and little permeability with some local exceptions, most notably the caprinid biostrome just below the top of the interval, which appears to be permeable by virtue of excellent moldic, vug, fracture, and cavern porosity. The 10- to 20-foot-thick Interval E, a layer of partly to mostly dissolved evaporites similar to Interval C, has similar hydrogeologic properties and a tendency to divert ground water laterally.

Clark, Allan K.

2003-01-01

305

Late diagenetic indicators of buried oil and gas. 2: Direct detection experiment at Cement and Garza fields, Oklahoma and Texas, using enhanced LANDSAT 1 and 2 images  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author has identified the following significant results. The Cement oil field, Oklahoma, was a test site for an experiment designed to evaluate LANDSAT's capability to detect an alteration zone in surface rocks caused by hydrocarbon microseepage. Loss of iron and impregnation of sandstone by carbonate cements and replacement of gypsum by calcite were the major alteration phenomena at Cement. The bedrock alterations were partially masked by unaltered overlying beds, thick soils, and dense natural and cultivated vegetation. Interpreters, biased by detailed ground truth, were able to map the alteration zone subjectively using a magnified, filtered, and sinusoidally stretched LANDSAT composite image; other interpreters, unbiased by ground truth data, could not duplicate that interpretation.

Donovan, T. J.; Termain, P. A.; Henry, M. E. (principal investigators)

1979-01-01

306

Petrological comparison of some tertiary and quaternary sands from Brazos and adjourning counties, Texas  

E-print Network

, Sparta sands, and Quaternary high level terrace deposits from northeastern and western Burleson County (Blankenship, 1955, p. 48; Foster, 1956, p. 52; and Napp, 1956' pp. 4549) suggested coarser sands for the terrace deposits as compared to Queen City... of muscovite in the Queen City and Sparta sands. Napp discovered no dii'ference in the degree of rounding of the various sends studied. Kelly made similar textural analyses of the Queen City and Sparta formations (1953, p. 110). He reported that the sands...

Elsik, William Clinton

2012-06-07

307

Funding for Local Government and Schools in Rural Oklahoma. ERS Staff Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Oil, gas, and agriculture are the bases of rural Oklahoma's economy, and income from these sectors varied widely during the 1980s. This study investigated revenue sources and the effects of changing revenues for county and town governments and school systems in 36 rural Oklahoma counties. Major sources of local revenue were sales taxes, property

Sloggett, Gordon; Doeksen, Gerald

308

Campanian ammonites from the Upper Cretaceous Gober Chalk of Lamar County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Roxton Limestone Member at the top of the Gober Chalk in northeast Texas yields a rich fauna, dominated by Baculites haresi Reeside, 1927, and Inoceramus balticus Boehm, 1909, with sparse occurrences of pachydiscus cf. P. paulsoni (Young, 1963), Anapachydiscus sp.juv., Placenticeras placenta (DeKay, 1828), Hoplitoplacenticeras aff. H. plasticum (Paulcke, 1907), Menabites (Delawarella) delawarensis (Morton, 1830), M.(D.) danei (Young, 1963), M.(D.) aff. M.(D.) vanuxemi (Morton, 1830), Submortoniceras vandalinaense Young, 1963, Submortoniceras sp., Eubostrychoceras sp., and Scaphites hippocrepis (DeKay, 1828) III. The presence of S. hippocrepis III suggests a late early Campanian age assignment for the fauna. The assemblage includes species known from the Western Interior, Gulf Coast, Atlantic seaboard, and western Europe. -Authors

Cobban, W.A.; Kennedy, W.J.

1992-01-01

309

An environmental study of the subsurface Miocene of Matagorda County, Texas  

E-print Network

. L-l, is located ln the Gulf of Mexico 5000 feet from the east line and 900 Figure 1. Location of tests, N 883 CCC't FICCA Oe 0 G~ cP~ O~ C3 + 0 ~yC 0 0 Gg'v I HAMMOND CLEVELAND Np 2. TEXAS GULF, WAOSWORTH NO. I 3. DEEP ROCK, PETRUCHA... NO. I 4. GULF, STATE LEASE 32018 NO. I 5. SHELL, KAIN NO. I 6. ATLANTIC, STATE LEASE 527-S NO. I 7. ATLANTI C, STATE LEASE 446 NO. L-I P PROBASLE DEEP SEATED DOME SCALE I INCH c 32, 000 FEET 0 2 3 4 7 feet from the south line of State Tract...

Trenchard, Walter Howard

2012-06-07

310

Geologic and Engineering Characterization of East Ford Field, Reeves County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this Class III project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost-effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through geologically based field development. The project focused on reservoir characterization of the East Ford unit, a representative Delaware Mountain Group field that produces from the upper Bell Canyon Formation (Ramsey Sandstone). The field, discovered in 1960, is operated by Oral Petco, Inc., as the East Ford unit: it contained an estimated 18.4 million barrels (MMbbl) of original oil in place.

Dutton, Shirley P.; Flanders, William A.; Guzman, Jose I.; Zirczy, Helena

1999-08-16

311

Texas Greenup  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

June 2007 was one of the wettest Junes on record for the state of Texas. Starting in late May, a string of low-pressure systems settled in over the U.S. Southern Plains and unleashed weeks of heavy to torrential rain. During the final week of June, much of Texas, Oklahoma, and Kansas received more than 330 percent of their average rainfall, said the National Climatic Data Center. The widespread heavy rain brought deadly floods to the entire region. On July 6, the Associated Press reported that every major river basin in Texas was at flood stage, an event that had not occurred since 1957. In addition to causing floods, the rains stimulated plant growth. The grassy, often arid, plains and plateaus of northern Mexico (bottom left), Texas (center), and New Mexico (top, left of center) burst to life with dense vegetation as this vegetation anomaly image shows. Regions where plants were growing more quickly or fuller than average are green, while areas where growth is below average are brown. Most of Texas is green, with a concentrated deep green, almost black, spot where vegetation growth was greatest. This area of western Texas is where the Pecos River flows out of New Mexico and heads southeast to the Rio Grande. In the darkest areas, vegetation was more than 100 percent above average. The brown spots in northeastern Texas and Oklahoma (top, right of center) may be areas where persistent clouds or water on the ground are hiding the plants from the satellite's view. Plants may also be growing less than average if swamped by too much rain. The image was made with data collected by the SPOT satellite between June 11 and June 20, 2007. NASA imagery created by Jesse Allen, Earth Observatory, using SPOT data provided courtesy of the USDA Foreign Agricultural Service and processed by Jennifer Small and Assaf Anyamba of the GIMMS Group at NASA GSFC.

2007-01-01

312

N3280RDCOTTONWOODRD PayneOklahoma 11  

E-print Network

51 2 54 11 51 49 4 11 2 11 10 72 51 96 26 47 51 2651 26 76 76 26 4 32 11 26 3 11 26 10 72 51 31 26 51 11 2626 72 11 49 10 11 26 11 26 96 76 26 41 11 76 51 1011 74 31 51 11 SOIL SURVEY OF PAYNE COUNTY Soil Survey Area: Payne County, Oklahoma Spatial Version of Data: 2 Soil Map Compilation Scale: 1

Ghajar, Afshin J.

313

Geology of the Canyon Reservoir site on the Guadalupe River, Comal County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In response to a request by Colonel Harry O. Fisher, District Engineer of the Fort Worth District of the Corps of Engineers, United States Army (letter of Dec. 13, 1954), a reconnaissance investigation was made of the geology of the Canyon (F-1) reservoir site on the Guadalupe River in Comal County, Tex. The purpose of the investigation was to study the geology in relation to possible leakage - particularly leakage of water that might then be lost from the drainage area of the Guadalupe River - and to add to the general knowledge of the ground-water hydrology of the San Antonio area. The dam (F-1) was originally designed for flood control and conservation only, with provision for the addition of a power unit if feasible. Since the completion of the investigation by the Corps of Engineers, the city of San Antonio has expressed an interest in the reservoir as a possible source of public water supply. The Corps of Engineers has made a thorough engineering and geologic study of the dam site (Corps of Engineers, 1950), which has Congressional approval. The geology and water resources of Comal County have been studied by George (1952). The rocks studied are those within the reservoir area and generally below the 1,000-foot contour as shown on the Smithson Valley quadrangle of the U.S. Geological Survey.

George, William O.; Welder, Frank A.

1955-01-01

314

Hydrologic and water-quality data at Government Canyon State Natural Area, Bexar County, Texas, 2002-10  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service, the Edwards Aquifer Authority, and the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, collected rainfall, streamflow, evapotranspiration, and stormflow water-quality data at the Laurel Canyon Creek watershed, within the Government Canyon State Natural Area, Bexar County, Tex. The purpose of the data collection was to support evaluations of the effects of brush management conservation practices on components of the hydrologic budget and water quality. One component of brush management was to take endangered wildlife into consideration, specifically the golden-cheeked warbler (Dendroica chrysoparia). Much of the area that may have been considered for brush management was left intact to protect habitat for the golden-cheeked warbler. The area identified for brush management was approximately 10 percent of the study watershed. The hydrologic data presented here (200210) represent pre- and post-treatment periods, with brush management treatment occurring from winter 200607 to spring 2008.

Banta, J. Ryan; Slattery, Richard N.

2012-01-01

315

Health assessment for Texarkana Wood Preserving Company, Texarkana, Bowie County, Texas, Region 6. CERCLIS No. TXD008056152. Addendum. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Texarkana Wood Preserving Company (TWPC) is a National Priorities List site located in northeastern Texas, at the southern extremity of the City of Texarkana in Bowie County. The TWPC site has been used for various lumber-related activities since the early 1900s and for creosoting operations since the early 1950s. Contaminated soils, groundwater, surface water, and surface water sediments have been detected on and off of the TWPC site. The primary contaminants of concern are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, pentachlorophenol, chlorinated dibenzodioxins and chlorinated dibenzofurans. The population at greatest risk of exposure to these contaminants are on-site workers engaged in remedial activities. There are currently no residences or businesses located immediately adjacent to the site and no documentation that contaminated groundwater is being used for potable purposes. The Texarkana Wood Preserving Company site has been evaluated by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) Health Activities Recommendation Panel (HARP) for appropriate follow-up with respect to health activities.

Not Available

1992-05-11

316

Environmental assessment of the brine pipeline replacement for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Bryan Mound Facility in Brazoria County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0804, for the proposed replacement of a deteriorated brine disposal pipeline from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Bryan Mound storage facility in Brazoria County, Texas, into the Gulf of Mexico. In addition, the ocean discharge outfall would be moved shoreward by locating the brine diffuser at the end of the pipeline 3.5 miles offshore at a minimum depth of 30 feet. The action would occur in a floodplain and wetlands; therefore, a floodplain/wetlands assessment has been prepared in conjunction with this EA. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (42 USC. 4321, et seg.). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). This FONSI also includes a Floodplain Statement of Findings in accordance with 10 CFR Part 1022.

Not Available

1993-09-01

317

Computer-aided geological characterization of a sandstone reservoir, North Ward Estes field, Ward and Winkler Counties, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The North Ward Estes field is located along the western edge of the Central Basin platform in Ward and Winkler Counties, Texas. The field is part of an upper Guadalupian productive trend that extends uninterrupted for 90 mi on the edge of the platform. The North Ward Estes field has produced over 350 million bbl of oil (one third of the trend's cumulative production) from more than 3000 wells since its discovery in 1929. Production in the field is from back-reef lagoonal siliciclastics (sandstones) of the Yates, Seven Rivers, and Queen Formations. A correlation scheme was developed for the field based on laterally continuous key dolomites that bracket the productive sands and segment the reservoir into discrete mappable units. Applying this scheme, more than 60,000 correlation markers were selected and loaded into a computer database. Computer-generated net isopach maps of the sands display a north-south strike. The sands pinch out into an evaporite facies updip and a carbonate facies downdip. Dip-oriented cross sections illustrate a systematic migration of the sand thicks through time. The depositional model for the field indicates that the siliciclastics were deposited during an overall progradational, shallowing-upward Late Permian event that experienced minor transgressive and regressive cycles.

Wylie, A.S. Jr.; Davidsen, E.K.; Gillespie, J.D.; Butler, R.S.

1988-02-01

318

Computer-aided geological characterization of a sandstone reservoir, North Ward Estes field, Ward and Winkler Counties, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The North Ward Estes field is located along the western edge of the Central Basin platform in Ward and Winkler Counties, Texas. The field is part of an upper Guadalupian productive trend that extends uninterrupted for 90 mi on the edge of the platform. The North Ward Estes field has produced over 350 million bbl of oil (one-third of the trend's cumulative production) from more than 3,000 wells since its discovery in 1929. Production in the field is from back-reef lagoonal siliciclastics (sandstones) of the Yates, Seven Rivers, and Queen Formations. A correlation scheme was developed for the field based on laterally continuous key dolomites that bracket the productive sands and segment the reservoir into discrete mappable units. Applying this scheme, more than 60,000 correlation markers were selected and loaded into a computer database. Concurrently, 15 million curve feet of log data and 30,000 ft of core analysis data were digitized. Core analyses were depth corrected. Logs were normalized using a 60-ft interval of laterally continuous anhydritic dolomite. Core porosity data were cross plotted vs. bulk-density log values to develop equations (transforms) for derivation of porosity. Corrections for hole rugosity, overburden pressure, and lithologic complications were applied to refine the porosity transform. Structure and porosity-feet maps were then merged with fluid contact and water saturation data to calculate volumetrics.

Wylie, A.S. Jr.; Davidsen, E.K.; Gillespie, J.D.; Butler, R.S.

1988-01-01

319

Induction conductivity and natural gamma logs collected in 15 wells at Camp Stanley Storage Activity, Bexar County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Camp Stanley Storage Activity conducted electromagnetic induction conductivity and natural gamma logging of 15 selected wells on the Camp Stanley Storage Activity, located in northern Bexar County, Texas, during March 28-30, 2005. In late 2004, a helicopter electromagnetic survey was flown of the Camp Stanley Storage Activity as part of a U.S. Geological Survey project to better define subsurface geologic units, the structure, and the catchment area of the Trinity aquifer. The electromagnetic induction conductivity and natural gamma log data in this report were collected to constrain the calculation of resistivity depth sections and to provide subsurface controls for interpretation of the helicopter electromagnetic data collected for the Camp Stanley Storage Activity. Logs were recorded digitally while moving the probe in an upward direction to maintain proper depth control. Logging speed was no greater than 30 feet per minute. During logging, a repeat section of at least 100 feet was recorded to check repeatability of log responses. Several of the wells logged were completed with polyvinyl chloride casing that can be penetrated by electromagnetic induction fields and allows conductivity measurement. However, some wells were constructed with steel centralizers and stainless steel screen that caused spikes on both conductivity and resulting resistivity log curves. These responses are easily recognizable and appear at regular intervals on several logs.

Stanton, Gregory P.

2005-01-01

320

Geology and hydrostratigraphy of Guadalupe River State Park and Honey Creek State Natural Area, Kendall and Comal Counties, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Hydrogeologic mapping and descriptions of the lithostratigraphy and hydrostratigraphy of Guadalupe River State Park and Honey Creek State Natural Area, Kendall and Comal Counties, Texas, are presented in this first detailed 1:24,000 geologic map, along with proposed names and descriptions of the hydrostratigraphic units in the study area. Variations in the amount and type of porosity of the lithostratigraphic unit, which vary depending on the depositional environment, lithology, structural history and diagenesis support the resulting hydrostratigraphy proposed herein. Rocks exposed in the study area consist of Early Cretaceous sedimentary rocks that are assigned to the Trinity Group. The lithostratigraphy includes the Hammett Shale, Cow Creek Limestone, Hensell Sand Members of the Pearsall Formation, and the lower member of the Glen Rose Limestone. These lithologic units contain shale, grainstone, sandstone, and fossiliferous limestone, alternating and interfingering with mudstone, wackestone, packstone, and grainstone. The Trinity aquifer hydrostratigraphic units shown on the map and described herein are characterized by their porosity types. Porosity types were first determined from an analysis of two boreholes conducted in comparison with 143 geophysical logs from northern Bexar County, Texas. The cores and geophysical log comparison resulted in division of the lower member of the Glen Rose Limestone into six hydrostratigraphic units, designated A through F. Of those six units, only three remain in the study area because of erosion. The proposed naming of these three hydrostratigraphic units is based on topographic or historical features that occur in the outcrop area of those units. Hydrostratigraphic units that correlate with the boundaries of the formation have been given formational names excluding the lithologic modifier. The Doeppenschmidt hydrostratigraphic unit is stratigraphically the highest interval in the study area, characterized by interparticle, moldic, burrowed, bedding plane, fracture, and cave porosity. The underlying Rust hydrostratigraphic unit appears to be a confining unit with springs/seeps issuing near the contact with the overlying Doeppenschmidt unit. The Rust unit has interparticle, fracture, and cave porosity with cave porosity primarily associated with faulting. The Honey Creek hydrostratigraphic unit is an aquifer in the subsurface and exhibits extremely, well developed porosity and permeability including interparticle, moldic, burrowed, bedding plane, fracture, channel, and cave porosity. This unit is named for Honey Creek Cave, which discharges water into Honey Creek. The Hensell hydrostratigraphic unit contains primarily interparticle porosity, but also exhibits some moldic and cave porosity in its upper parts. The Cow Creek hydrostratigraphic unit contains interparticle, moldic, vug, burrowed, fracture, bedding plane, channel, and cave porosity. The Cow Creek hydrostratigraphic unit is an aquifer in the subsurface and is the primary target for water-well drillers in the area. The Hammett hydrostratigraphic unit is not exposed in the study area but is thought to underlie parts of the Guadalupe River, based on mapping of the overlying units and comparisons with subsurface thicknesses obtained from the geophysical log. The Hammett unit restricts the downward migration of groundwater, resulting in springs that discharge at the base of the Cow Creek unit. These springs also create some base flow to the Guadalupe River during periods of extreme drought. The faulting and fracturing in the study area are part of the Miocene Balcones Fault Zone, which is an extensional system of faults that generally trend southwest to northeast in south-central Texas. An igneous dike, containing aphanitic texture, cuts through the center of the study area near the confluence of Honey Creek and the Guadalupe River. The dike penetrates the Cow Creek Limestone and the lower part of the Hensell Sand, which outcrops at three locations.

Clark, Allan K.; Blome, Charles D.; Morris, Robert R.

2014-01-01

321

The geologic structure of part of the southern Franklin Mountains, El Paso County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Franklin Mountains are a west tilted fault block mountain range which extends northwards from the city of El Paso, Texas. Geologic mapping in the southern portion of the Franklin Mountains has revealed many previously unrecognized structural complexities. Three large high-angle faults define the boundaries of map. Twenty lithologic units are present in the field area, including the southernmost Precambrian meta-sedimentary rocks in the Franklin Mountains (Lanoria Quartzite and Thunderbird group conglomerates). The area is dominated by Precambrian igneous rocks and lower Paleozoic carbonates, but Cenozoic ( ) intrusions are also recognized. Thin sections and rock slabs were used to describe and identify many of the lithologic units. The Franklin Mountains are often referred to as a simple fault block mountain range related to the Rio Grande Rift. Three critical regions within the study area show that these mountains contain structural complexities. In critical area one, Precambrian granites and rhyolites are structurally juxtaposed, and several faults bisecting the area affect the Precambrian/Paleozoic fault contact. Critical area two contains multiple NNW-trending faults, three sills and a possible landslide. This area also shows depositional features related to an island of Precambrian rock exposed during deposition of the lower Paleozoic rocks. Critical area three contains numerous small faults which generally trend NNE. They appear to be splays off of one of the major faults bounding the area. Cenozoic kaolinite sills and mafic intrusion have filled many of the fault zones.

Smith, W.R.; Julian, F.E. (Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States). Dept. of Geosciences)

1993-02-01

322

Geologic and engineering characterization of Geraldine Ford field, Reeves and Culberson Counties, Texas. Topical report -- 1997  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this Class III project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of clastic reservoirs in basinal sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost-effective way to recover more of the original oil in place by strategic infill-well placement and geologically based field development. The study focused on Geraldine Ford field, which produces from the upper Bell Canyon formation (Ramsey sandstone). Petrophysical characterization of the Ford Geraldine unit was accomplished by integrating core and log data and quantifying petrophysical properties from wireline logs. The petrophysical data were used to map porosity, permeability, net pay, water saturation, mobile oil saturation, and other reservoir properties. Once the reservoir-characterization study was completed, a demonstration area of approximately 1 mi{sup 2} in the northern part of the unit was chosen for reservoir modeling/simulation. A quarter of a five-spot injection pattern in the demonstration area was selected for flow simulations, and two cases of permeability distribution were considered, one using stochastic permeability distribution generated by conditional simulation and the other using layered permeabilities. Flow simulations were performed using UTCOMP, an isothermal, three-dimensional, compositional simulator for miscible gas flooding. Results indicate that 10--30% (1 to 3 MMbbl) of remaining oil in place in the demonstration area can be produced by CO{sub 2} injection.

Dutton, S.P.; Malik, M.A.; Asquith, G.B.; Barton, M.D.; Cole, A.G.; Gogas, J.; Clift, S.J.; Guzman, J.I.

1998-04-01

323

Iodine in Texas Soils.  

E-print Network

LT BKAKY. A Ik M COLLEGE, TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS BULLETIN NO. 579 OCTOBER 1939 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY IODINE IN TEXAS SOILS AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE... OF TEXAS T. 0. WALTON, President [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] soil Cen 2.2, 1.7 lb U to I tota an *. Iodine was determined in over 400 samples of soil from various xrts of Texas. When the geographical divisions of the state are -ranged...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Fudge, J. F. (Joseph Franklin)

1939-01-01

324

Analysis of borehole geophysical information across a uranium deposit in the Jackson Group, Karnes County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Borehole geophysical studies across a uranium deposit in the Jackson Group, South Texas, show the three geochemical environments often associated with uranium roll-type deposits: an altered (oxidized) zone, an ore zone, and an unaltered (reduced) zone. Mineralogic analysis of the total sulfides contained in the drill core shows only slight changes in the total sulfide content among the three geochemical regimes. However, induced polarization measurements on the core samples indicate that samples obtained from the reduced side of the ore zone are more electrically polarizable than those from the oxidized side of the ore zone, and therefore probably contain more pyrite. Analysis of the clay-size fraction in core samples indicates that montmorillonite is the dominant clay mineral. High resistivity values within the ore zone indicate the presence of calcite cement concentrations that are higher than those seen outside of the ore zone. Between-hole resistivity and induced polarization measurements show the presence of an extensive zone of calcite cement within the ore zone, and electrical polarizable material (such as pyrite) within and on the reduced side of the ore zone. A quantitative analysis of the between-hole resistivity data, using a layered-earth model, and a qualitative analysis of the between-hole induced polarization measurements showed that mineralogic variations among the three geochemical environments were more pronounced than were indicated by the geophysical and geologic well logs. Uranium exploration in the South Texas Coastal Plain area has focused chiefly in three geologic units: the Oakville Sandstone, the Catahoula Tuff, and the Jackson Group. The Oakville Sandstone and the Catahoula Tuff are of Miocene age, and the Jackson Group is of Eocene age (Eargle and others, 1971). Most of the uranium mineralization in these formations is low grade (often less than 0.02 percent U3O8) and occurs in shallow deposits that are found by concentrated exploratory drilling programs. The sporadic occurrence of these deposits makes it desirable to develop borehole geophysical techniques that will help to define the depositional environments of the uranium ore, which is characterized by geochemical changes near the uranium deposits. Geochemical changes are accompanied by changes in the physical characteristics of the rocks that can be detected with borehole geophysical tools. This study is concerned with a uranium deposit within the Jackson Group that is located just east of Karnes City, Tex. Five holes were drilled on this property to obtain borehole geophysical data and cores. The cores were analyzed for mineralogic and electrical properties. The borehole geophysical information at this property included induced polarization, resistivity, gamma-gamma density, neutron-neutron, gamma-ray, caliper, and single-point-resistance logs. Between-hole resistivity and induced polarization measurements were made between hole pairs across the ore deposit and off the ore deposit.

Daniels, Jeffrey J.; Scott, James Henry; Smith, Bruce D.

1979-01-01

325

Morphology and sedimentology of a central Brazos River point bar, Boxley Bend, Brazos County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

A reconnaissance of Brazos River point bars reveals great variety in their morphology and sedimentology, owing to the complex interaction of climate, local hydrography, and local sediment sources. This paper presents the first in a series of studies of point bars of the Brazos River and concentrates on the Boxley Bend point bar near Snook, Texas. The summer morphology of the point bar is complex, consisting of an upper and lower tier separated by a scarp but connected by a central ramp. The surfaces of the lower tier and ramp display numerous large gravel bars and shallow scour pools as well as low-amplitude sand waves, ripples, and current lineations. In cross section, the lower tier and ramp are characterized by (1) trough cross-bedded, medium to fine sand produced by megaripple migration during floods; (2) massive gravel beds, the product of formation and migration of gravel bars during floods; and (3) fine rippled sand and clay drapes formed during falling flood. The surface of the upper tier displays ripple-laminated eolian sand and deflation deposits of mud clasts. In cross section, the upper tier is characterized by thick beds of horizontally stratified fine sand. During the winter, the entire surface of the point bar is covered by large (2 m high) transverse bars separated by deep scour troughs. Transverse bars migrate into the troughs to produce a sequence of fine sand with backflow ripple cross-stratification overlain by thick beds of tabular cross-bedded medium sand. The transverse bars appear to be transitory features with little net effect on sedimentation, because they are removed from the surface of the point bar by summertime.

Connolly, W.M.; Mazzullo, J.

1986-09-01

326

Radiostratigraphy and heavy mineral content of the Weches Formation (Eocene), Nacogdoches County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Weches Formation of eastern Texas is a mudstone containing green sand-size clay aggregates. A vertical sequence of 43 samples was analyzed along an excavated cliff to determine radionuclide content. Samples average 5 ppm uranium and range from 2 to about 7 ppm. Thorium averages 20 ppm and ranges from 13 to almost 36 ppm. the gamma-ray spectrometer employed exhibits a certainty of about [plus minus]10% (one standard deviation) at the levels measured. Heavy mineral studies of mudstones are few, so one sample of the Weches mudstone was selected for heavy mineral separation and point counting of grain mounts. A total of 2606 grains were counted giving mineral percentages of zircon (28.8%), garnet (17.9%), tourmaline (10.5%), titanite (8.7%), apatite (7.6%), staurolite (6.4%), green hornblende (5.2%), epidote (5.1%), sillimanite (2.8%), monatite (2.2%), kyanite (1.9%), basaltic hornblende (1.5%), and biotite (1.3%). In addition, actinolite, spinel, rutile, and collophane were observed but not counted. Previous studies found a similar heavy mineral suite in the underlying Queen City Formation, but in different proportions. Differences in heavy mineral percentages probably reflect different water-flow regimes at the time of deposition. Heavy minerals in the Weches and Queen City formations are from the same general source area Measured radionuclide ratios are similar to granitic ratios and suggest that detrital heavy minerals, particularly zircon and monazite, are the main site of uranium and thorium and their decay products in the Weches Formation.

Jobe, K.; Ledger, E.B.; Sharp, P.; Crocker, M.C. (Stephen F. Austin State Univ., Nacogdoches, TX (United States))

1993-09-01

327

Aventura ranch field: A classic stratigraphic trap - James Lime, Van Zandt County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Aventura Ranch field, found September 10, 1990, is the most recent significant James Lime discovery in the East Texas basin. Current estimates indicate recoverable reserves of 20 bcf of gas and 1.5 million bbl of condensate. The field represents a classic stratigraphic trap, formed by a facies change from downdip porous and permeable grainstones, terminating updip into carbonate mudstones, wackestones, and unrelated grainstones. The James Lime formation consists of poorly sorted, low-porosity lime wackestone/mudstones, and well-sorted reservoir lime grainstones. The reservoir consists of two facies: (1) skeletal grainstones, and (2) oolitic grainstones. The skeletal grainstones are interpreted as deposits adjacent to the James Lime reef core. The oolitic grainstones were deposited as high-energy shoals or bars in shallow, agitated water, possible paralleling the skeletal grainstones adjacent of the reef. Both interparticle and intraparticle porosity are present in the grainstone facies. Microporosity also is evident and is responsible for suppressing most of the induction log resistivity throughout the field. Resistivity as low as 1.5 ohms is found to be hydrocarbon productive. Subsequent to the development of the Fairway field, a large James Lime stratigraphic trap had been sought for many years, resulting in only the minor discovery of North Athens field. Several dry holes had been drilled amazingly close to the currently productive area. Perseverance and persistence finally paid off with the discovery of Aventura Ranch field. Currently, the field is producing 6 million ft[sup 3] of gas and 425 bbl of condensate a day.

Jones, A.; Palmer, J.T. (Palmer Petroleum, Inc., Shreveport, LA (United States))

1993-09-01

328

Paleoenvironment and reservoir distribution of upper Glen Rose formation at Alabama Ferry and Fort Trinidad Fields, Houston and Leon Counties, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Alabama Ferry and Fort Trinidad fields (Houston and Leon Counties, Texas) are located updip of a break or reentrant in the Lower Cretaceous shelf-margin reefs. The reentrant probably allowed an unusual amount of tidal energy to pass from the Gulf of Mexico into the relatively shallow East Texas basin and affected formation of shoal complexes throughout much of the Early Cretaceous. Alabama Ferry and Fort Trinidad fields produce oil and gas from stratigraphic traps in ooid-skeletal bars contained within shoal complexes of the upper Glen Rose zones A through G. These zones represent cyclic transgressive-regressive limestone-shale sequences deposited across much of the East Texas basin. At Alabama Ferry field, each cycle is generally 50-200 ft thick. The cycles are composed of various high-energy shoal-complex grainstones and packstones bounded above and below by lower energy shelf interior to lagoonal mudstone and/or wackestone or shales. Reservoirs are generally restricted to the 10 to 50-ft skeletal-ooid grainstone bars of the shoal complex. There are also 1 to 8-ft occurrences of more porous coarse-grained skeletal clastic grainstones, interpreted as tidal-channel lag deposits associated with grainstone bars. The cyclic sedimentation present in the East Texas upper Glen Rose may have been achieved by interaction of an oscillatory variation in sea level with a linear rate of subsidence.

Cregg, A.K.

1988-01-01

329

Oklahoma Forestry Services  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The mission of the Oklahoma Forestry Services (OFS) is "to conserve, enhance and protect the forest resources of Oklahoma for present and future generations." As part of this mission the OFS website contains information about fire reports, tree and forest health, and water quality. First-time visitors should start their journey through the site by clicking on the "Oklahoma's Forests" section. Here they will find information about Oklahoma's major forest types, the ecoregions of Oklahoma, and several Trees of Oklahoma fact sheets. Back on the homepage, visitors can learn about upcoming workshops and events, read a list of forestry bulletins, and find out about the Forest Heritage Center Museum. Residents of Oklahoma may also wish to look through the "Home and Community Trees" area to learn more about planning their own trees and Arbor Day related activities.

330

FANTASYLAND/AGGIELAND: A Bibliographic History of Science Fiction and Fantasy at Texas A&M University and in Brazos County, Texas, 1913-1985.  

E-print Network

of vitascopes" appeared in the Grand Opera House. (See the Bryan Daily Eagle, January 28, 1897, p. 4, cols. 2, 6). Page 3 of 134 Additional Sources: Additional material on the fantastic at Texas A&M University after 1985 can be found in several... sources. The Cushing Library maintains the following files: Subject Collection. A clipping file of articles about Texas A&M University. Among the topics of interest: Cepheid Variable - includes AggieCon material (Listing through 2006...

Page, Bill

2010-08-24

331

Fantasyland/Aggieland: A Bibliographic History of Science Fiction and Fantasy at Texas A&M University and in Brazos County, Texas 1913-1985.  

E-print Network

of vitascopes" appeared in the Grand Opera House. (See the Bryan Daily Eagle, January 28, 1897, p. 4, cols. 2, 6). Page 3 of 134 Additional Sources: Additional material on the fantastic at Texas A&M University after 1985 can be found in several... sources. The Cushing Library maintains the following files: Subject Collection. A clipping file of articles about Texas A&M University. Among the topics of interest: Cepheid Variable - includes AggieCon material (Listing through 2006...

Page, Bill

2010-08-17

332

Quantitative geophysical investigations at the Diamond M field, Scurry County, Texas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Diamond M field over the Horseshoe Atoll reservoir of west Texas has produced oil since 1942. Even with some 210 well penetrations, complex reservoir compartmentalization has justified an ongoing drilling program with three wells drilled within the last three years. Accurate reservoir characterization requires accurate description of the geometry, geological facies, and petrophysical property distribution ranging from core, through log to the seismic scale. The operator has conducted a careful logging and coring process including dipole sonic logs in addition to acquiring a modern 3D vertical phone - vertical vibrator "P-wave" seismic data volume and an equivalent size 2-component by 2-componet "S-wave" seismic data volume. I analyze these data at different scales, integrating them into a whole. I begin with core analysis of the petrophysical properties of the Horseshoe Atoll reservoir. Measuring porosity, permeability, NMR T2 relaxation and velocities (Vp and Vs) as a function of pressure and find that porosity measurements are consistent when measured with different techniques. When upscaled, these measurements are in excellent agreement with properties measured at the log scale. Together, these measurements provide a lithology-porosity template against which I correlate my seismic P- and S-impedance measurements. Careful examination of P- and S-impedances as well as density from prestack inversion of the P-wave survey of the original time migrated gathers showed lower vertical resolution for S-impedance and density. These latter two parameters are controlled by the far-offset data, which suffers from migration stretch. I address this shortcoming by applying a recently developed non-stretch NMO technique which not only improved the bandwidth of the data but also resulted in inversions that better match the S-impedance and density well log data. The operator hypothesized that 2C by 2C S-wave data would better delineate lithology than conventional P-wave seismic data. Although introduced in the mid-1980s, 2C by 2C data are rarely acquired, with most surveys showing less vertical resolution than conventional (and prior to slip-sweep technology more economically acquired) P-wave data. Initial processing by the service company showed a comparable, but lower frequency, image for the "transverse" component, and poor images for the "radial" component. Although the dipole sonic logs did not indicate the presence of significant anisotropy, shear wave splitting is readily observed on the surface seismic stacks. I therefore developed a prestack Alford rotation algorithm that minimizes the cross-talk between components, resulting vertical resolution comparable to the P-wave data, and independent measure of lithology, and also a direct measure of the direction of the principal axes of anisotropy. The direction of azimuthal anisotropy is aligned N45E consistent with the regional maximum horizontal stress axis obtained from the world stress map database. On average, the Cisco Formation appears 10% thicker on the slow shear (S2) volume than on the fast shear (S1 ) volume and between 70% and 100% thicker on the P-wave volume. Cross-plotting cumulative production against the various seismic attributes, I find a strong negative correlation to S-impedance and P-impedance. Zones of low S-impedance and low P-impedance correlate to better producing wells. More quantitative correlation will require the analysis of the role fractures versus porosity contribute to production.

Davogustto Cataldo, Oswaldo Ernesto

333

Public health assessment for Alcoa (Point Comfort)/Lavaca Bay, Point Comfort, Calhoun County, Texas, Region 6. Cerclis No. TXD008123168. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The ALCOA (Point Comfort)/Lavaco Bay National Priorities List (NPL) site is in Calhoun County, Texas, approximately 1.5 miles south of Point Comfort and four miles northeast of Port Lavaca. Fish sampling data indicate that levels of mercury in fish are elevated. Mercury has been detected throughout the site in surface soil, shallow groundwater, air, bay sediments, fish and crabs. Other contaminants, including volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and lead, have been detected in shallow groundwater. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been detected in a limited number of sediment, fish, and oyster samples.

NONE

1995-08-24

334

Development of a geodatabase for springs within and surrounding outcrops of the Trinity aquifer in northern Bexar County, Texas, 2010-11  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Trinity aquifer is an important source of groundwater in central Texas, including Bexar County, where population growth has resulted in an increased demand for water. Numerous springs issue from rock outcrops within and surrounding the Trinity aquifer in northern Bexar County. The effects of increased groundwater withdrawals from the Trinity aquifer on springflow in the area are not well documented, but because the total amount of water entering, leaving, and being stored in a groundwater system must be conserved, increased groundwater withdrawals will result in decreases in springflow. Documenting the location, discharge, and basic water-quality information of the springs in northern Bexar County can provide a baseline assessment for comparison to future conditions. Accordingly, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Trinity Glen Rose Groundwater Conservation District, the Edwards Aquifer Authority, and the San Antonio River Authority, developed a geodatabase populated with data associated with springs within and surrounding outcrops of the Trinity aquifer in northern Bexar County during 201011. A geodatabase provides a framework for organizing spatial and tabular data (such as the geographic location and water-quality characteristics, respectively) in a relational database environment, making it easier and more intuitive to evaluate changes over time. Data for 141 springs within and surrounding the Trinity aquifer outcrops in northern Bexar County were compiled from existing reports and databases. A field reconnaissance of springs was done between October 2010 and September 2011 to verify the existing location data and collect additional data (discharge measurements, water-quality data, and property owner and photographic documentation) pertaining to the springs. A total of 46 of the 141 springs were visited during the field reconnaissance. Discharge at springs with flow ranged from 0.003 to 1.46 cubic feet per second. Specific conductance was measured in 21 springs and ranged from 167 to 1,130 microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius. Increasing water demands are likely to continue to affect springflows throughout Texas. By completing reconnaissance-level field investigations and compiling existing data, similar geodatabases could be developed for other aquifer systems in Texas.

Clark, Allan K.; Pedraza, Diane E.

2013-01-01

335

40 CFR 81.337 - Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...County Greer County Harmon County Jackson County Jefferson County Kiowa County...County Greer County Harmon County Jackson County Jefferson County Kiowa County...County Greer County Harmon County Jackson County Jefferson County Kiowa...

2011-07-01

336

Determining the suitability of functional landscapes and wildlife corridors utilizing conservation GIS methods in Denton County, Texas.  

E-print Network

??Denton County's unique cultural and natural landscape has undergone dramatic transformations during the past two centuries due to agricultural, urban and suburban processes which accelerated (more)

Sales, Joshua

2007-01-01

337

Competencies, benefits and limitations for Master Gardener Coordinators: a delphi technique involving county extension agents in Texas  

E-print Network

Agent Master Gardener Coordinators throughout the State of Texas as the expert Delphi panel. Three research questions were asked of the expert panel members. Those questions included: 1. What competencies do you need to be an efficient and effective...

Lockett, Landry

2007-09-17

338

The facies, depositional environment, and cyclicity of the Queen Formation (Guadalupian, Permian), North Ward-Estes Field, Ward County, Texas  

E-print Network

for the study area provided by Chevron USA in Midland, Texas. Geophysical logs are typically modern dual trace, gamma ray and compensated neutron density, terminating near the base of the Queen. Log data were first correlated to the observed cored intervals... for the study area provided by Chevron USA in Midland, Texas. Geophysical logs are typically modern dual trace, gamma ray and compensated neutron density, terminating near the base of the Queen. Log data were first correlated to the observed cored intervals...

Eide, Michael Gary

2012-06-07

339

North Central Texas Regional Public Transportation Coordination Plan  

E-print Network

North Central Texas Council of Governments North Central Texas Regional Public Transportation Coordination Plan Final Report December 21, 2006 North Central Texas Council of Governments North Central Texas Regional Public Transportation... Commissioner, Denton County Mayor, City of Melissa Vice President Director Director General Council Chad Adams Tom Vandergriff Bobby Waddle Jerry Gilmore County Judge, Ellis County County Judge, Tarrant County Mayor Pro Tem, City of DeSoto Executiv...

North Central Texas Council of Governments

2006-12-21

340

MIXED HERONRIES OF OKLAHOMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objectives of this 3-year study were to locate mixed heronries in Oklahoma, census breeding pairs of each species, and indentify site characteristics that may be important to heron ecology. During the study, 17 mixed heronries, containing a total of six ardeid species, were found in Oklahoma. The majority of heronries (82%) were located within the oak-woodland fauna region. Other

G. William Sallee

1982-01-01

341

Pride in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet is intended to be used as background material by social studies and history classroom teachers as they develop and implement educational programs on Oklahoma's heritage. It includes background information on the land and people of Oklahoma (geology, climate, topography, vegetation, animals, prehistoric peoples, French explorers,

Moore, Gordon; Blackburn, Bob L.

342

Oklahoma Tribes: A History  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Oklahoma is a microcosm of American Indian country. Water rights, tribal government impotence, jurisdiction, tribal membership, treaty rights, taxation, sovereignty, racism, and poor housing, education, and health are all vital issues facing the Indian tribes of Oklahoma. In order to understand the complexity of these issues, a review of the

Gover, Kevin

1977-01-01

343

Houston KIDS COUNT: A Snapshot of Children Living in Houston and Harris County. 2005 Texas KIDS COUNT Special Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Houston KIDS COUNT data book examines the status of children in Houston and Harris County and identifies trends in their general welfare. These data provide a portrait of Harris County's children that can be used for developing sound and effective local policy. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) Children in Families; (2)

Center for Public Policy Priorities, 2005

2005-01-01

344

Oklahoma Historical Society  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The mission of the Oklahoma Historical Society is "to preserve and perpetuate the history of Oklahoma and its people by collecting, interpreting and disseminating knowledge of Oklahoma and the Southwest." The Society maintains over 20 museums and historic sites, and they are also responsible for maintaining this website. On the homepage, visitors can learn about the sites they maintain, including the Pawnee Bill Ranch and the Pioneer Woman Museum. In the "Publications" area, visitors can read back issues of "The Chronicles of Oklahoma" dating from 1921 to 1962, and they can also find the "Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture". The Society's "Found in Collections" blog is a great way to learn about their current archival work, and visitors can read about textile preservation techniques and the Civil War. Also, the site includes podcasts created to profile various aspects of the state's history. Finally, visitors can sign up to receive email updates on new additions, programs, and exhibits.

345

Distribution, Abundance, and Habitat Affinities of Oklahoma Muskrats (Ondatra zibethicus): New Insight from Trapper Reports  

Microsoft Academic Search

Distributional records of the muskrat (Ondatra zibethicus) are missing for much of Okla- homa. In the spring of 2005, I further investigated the status of Oklahoma muskrats by collecting surveys from Oklahoma fur trappers and United States Department of Agri- culture wildlife technicians (government trappers). Surveyed individuals were asked to give county locations of muskrat sightings\\/collections, as well as habitats

Brandon McDonald

2006-01-01

346

Hydrogeology and simulation of groundwater flow in the Central Oklahoma (Garber-Wellington) Aquifer, Oklahoma, 1987 to 2009, and simulation of available water in storage, 2010-2059  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Central Oklahoma (Garber-Wellington) aquifer underlies about 3,000 square miles of central Oklahoma. The study area for this investigation was the extent of the Central Oklahoma aquifer. Water from the Central Oklahoma aquifer is used for public, industrial, commercial, agricultural, and domestic supply. With the exception of Oklahoma City, all of the major communities in central Oklahoma rely either solely or partly on groundwater from this aquifer. The Oklahoma City metropolitan area, incorporating parts of Canadian, Cleveland, Grady, Lincoln, Logan, McClain, and Oklahoma Counties, has a population of approximately 1.2 million people. As areas are developed for groundwater supply, increased groundwater withdrawals may result in decreases in long-term aquifer storage. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Oklahoma Water Resources Board, investigated the hydrogeology and simulated groundwater flow in the aquifer using a numerical groundwater-flow model. The purpose of this report is to describe an investigation of the Central Oklahoma aquifer that included analyses of the hydrogeology, hydrogeologic framework of the aquifer, and construction of a numerical groundwater-flow model. The groundwater-flow model was used to simulate groundwater levels and for water-budget analysis. A calibrated transient model was used to evaluate changes in groundwater storage associated with increased future water demands.

Mashburn, Shana L.; Ryter, Derek; Neel, Christopher R.; Smith, S. Jerrod; Magers, Jessica S.

2014-01-01

347

Oklahoma and American Indian Imagery  

E-print Network

: The Grapes of Wrath and the Oklahoma Dust Bowl 120 Chapter 6: American Indian Imagery Since Statehood 168 Chapter 7: Summary 191 Bibliography 199 vii List of Figures 2.1 Map of the Unassigned Lands... 19 2.2 Ejecting an Oklahoma Boomer 20 2.3 The Fertile Fields of Oklahoma 37 2.4 Oklahoma City as it was in 1889 and Oklahoma City as it is To - Day 39 3.1. Map of Indian Territory, 1889 - 1907 45...

Anderson, William Brett

2011-12-31

348

An epidemic of congenital syphilis in Jefferson County, Texas, 1994-1995: inadequate prenatal syphilis testing after an outbreak in adults.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES: After a syphilis epidemic in Jefferson County, Texas, in 1993 and 1994, congenital syphilis prevalence and risk factors were determined and local prenatal syphilis screening practices were assessed. METHODS: Medical records were reviewed, pregnant women with syphilis were interviewed, and prenatal care providers were surveyed. RESULTS: Of 91 women, 59 (65%) had infants with congenital syphilis. Among African Americans, the prevalence per 1000 live births was 24.1 in 1994 and 17.9 in 1995. Of the 50 women with at least 2 prenatal care visits who had infants with congenital syphilis, 15 (30%) had received inadequate testing. Only 16% of 31 providers obtained an early third-trimester syphilis test on all patients. CONCLUSIONS: Inadequate prenatal testing contributed to this outbreak of congenital syphilis. PMID:10191801

Southwick, K L; Guidry, H M; Weldon, M M; Mert, K J; Berman, S M; Levine, W C

1999-01-01

349

Contrasting processes of deposition for the Eagleford "B" sandstone, Bryan, IDS, and Kurten fields, Brazos County, Texas  

E-print Network

interpreted as an offshore bar (Guerra 1986, Keathley 1983) or as a submarine channel fill (Davies 1983, Givens 1984, Berg 1985) . Phillips (1987) presents three basic categories of shelf-sand deposits that can be recognized in the Woodbine... well was located on the northern fringe of the Harris Delta, hoping that the Harris Delta would extend southwestward into Brazos county from its known limits in Madison and Grimes county. It was postulated that this western area was separated from...

Golding, Robert Martin

2012-06-07

350

East Taft field, San Patricio County, Texas, subtle stratigraphic trap: implications for exploration in a supermature province  

Microsoft Academic Search

The shallow upper Frio producing trend along the downthrown side of the Vicksburg flexure in the lower Texas Gulf Coast is one of the world's supermature provinces for oil and gas exploration. Current emphasis in exploration must be for the subtle trap, the discovery of which has been precluded during the many years of intensive exploration. East Taft field is

R. R. Railsback

1987-01-01

351

Shallow stratigraphy, structure, and salt-related features, Yates oil field area, Pecos and Crockett counties, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Yates oil field is situated at the southern tip of the Central Basin platform, a Late Pennsylvanian to Late Permian structural and paleotopographic high separating the Midland and Delaware basins in west Texas and southeastern New Mexico. During Leonardian and early Guadalupian times, carbonate sedimentation occurred in a bank environment on the platform edge. Latest Guadalupian sedimentation consisted largely

1988-01-01

352

East Taft Field, San Patricio County, Texas - a subtle stratigraphic trap: implications for exploration in a supermature province  

Microsoft Academic Search

The shallow upper Frio producing trend along the downthrown side of the Vicksburg flexure in the lower Texas Gulf Coast is certainly one of the world's supermature provinces for oil and gas exploration. Current emphasis in exploration must be for the subtle trap, the discovery of which has been selected against during the many years of intensive exploration. East Taft

Richard R. Railsback

1986-01-01

353

An integrated study of the Grayburg\\/San Andres reservoir, Foster and South Cowden fields, Ector County, Texas, Class II  

Microsoft Academic Search

A project to recover economic amounts of oil from a very mature oil field is being conducted by Laguna Petroleum Corporation of Midland, Texas, with partial funding from a U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) grant to study shallow carbonate rock reservoirs. The objectives of the project are to use modern engineering methods to optimize oil field management and to

Trentham; Robert C; M. S. Robinson; William C; Kevin Wider; Weinbrandt

2000-01-01

354

An Integrated Study of the Grayburg\\/San Andres Reservoir, Foster and South Cowden Fields, Ector County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

A project to recover economic amounts of oil from a very mature oil field is being conducted by Laguna Petroleum Corporation of Midland, Texas, with partial funding from a U. S. Department of Energy grant to study shallow carbonate rock reservoirs. The objectives of the project are to use modern engineering methods to optimize oil field management and to use

William C. Robinson; Robert C. Trentham; Kevin Widner; Richard Wienbrandt

1999-01-01

355

High-resolution stratigraphic and structural characterization of the fault-partitioned Hickory Sandstone aquifer system, Mason County, central Texas  

E-print Network

The Hickory Sandstone is an important aquifer in central Texas and is partitioned by faults that impede cross-fault fluid flow. This study provides a detailed stratigraphic and structural model in the vicinity of a normal, oblique-slip fault...

Wilson, Jason Steven

2012-06-07

356

Dinosaur Tracksites of the Paluxy River Valley (Glen Rose Formation, Lower Cretaceous), Dinosaur Valley State Park, Somervell County, Texas  

E-print Network

41 Dinosaur Tracksites of the Paluxy River Valley (Glen Rose Formation, Lower Cretaceous), Dinosaur Formation; Lower Cretaceous) of the Paluxy River, in what is now Dinosaur Valley State Park (Glen Rose: dinosaurs, ichnology, Glen Rose Formation, Texas, Cretaceous #12;42 Dinosaur tracksites of the Paluxy River

Falkingham, Peter

357

Vision North Texas  

E-print Network

?business as usual? ?Vision North Texas and the North Texas 2050 document ?Implications for energy conservation ESL-KT-11-11-18 CATEE 2011, Dallas, Texas, Nov. 7 ? 9, 2011 The North Texas Region ESL-KT-11-11-18 CATEE 2011, Dallas, Texas, Nov. 7 ? 9..., 2011 ? ? FW D 16 County Region for Vision North Texas 5.3M people in 2000; 6.5M in 2010; 9.5M in 2030; 11.7M in 2050 ESL-KT-11-11-18 CATEE 2011, Dallas, Texas, Nov. 7 ? 9, 2011 ESL-KT-11-11-18 CATEE 2011, Dallas, Texas, Nov. 7 ? 9, 2011 ESL-KT-11...

Walz, K.

2011-01-01

358

Impact of shoreline change on proposed Texas Highway 87 reconstruction  

E-print Network

Over seventeen miles of Texas State Highway 87, located in Jefferson County on the Upper Texas Coast, have repeatedly been destroyed by shoreline recession throughout its history. Jefferson County is currently seeking a long term solution...

Howard, Steven Christopher

2012-06-07

359

Aquifer tests in the flood-plain alluvium and Santa Fe group at the Rio Grande near Canutillo, El Paso County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An aquifer system consisting of the Rio Grande flood-plain alluvium and Santa Fe Group underlying the southern Mesilla Valley in Dona Ana County, New Mexico and El Paso County, Texas has become an important source of water for both municipal and agricultural uses. Determination of aquifer properties is essential in order to evaluate groundwater potential for increasing water demand and potential streamflow depletion of the Rio Grande due to groundwater development. The aquifer system at the Canutillo well field hydrologic section was divided into a shallow, intermediate, and deep zone based on geohydrologic characteristics. Aquifer properties of specific zones at the test site were determined from a series of multiple-well aquifer tests conducted from December 3, 1985 through January 20, 1986. The Rio Grande is hydraulically connected to the shallow flood-plain alluvium. Water generally occurs within the shallow zone under unconfined conditions, within the intermediate zone under semiconfined conditions, and within the deep zone under confined conditions. (USGS)

Nickerson, Edward L.

1989-01-01

360

Geologic framework and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Edwards aquifer outcrop (Barton Springs segment), northeastern Hays and southwestern Travis Counties, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The hydrogeologic subdivisions within the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards aquifer outcrop in northeastern Hays and southwestern Travis Counties generally are porous and permeable. The most porous and permeable appear to be hydrogeologic subdivision VI, the Kirschberg evaporite member of the Kainer Formation; and hydrogeologic subdivision III, the leached and collapsed members, undivided, of the Person Formation. Hydrogeologic subdivision II, the cyclic and marine members, undivided, of the Person Formation, also is quite porous and permeable in Hays County. The porosity of the rocks in the Edwards aquifer outcrop is related to depositional or diagenetic elements along specific stratigraphic horizons (fabric selective) and to dissolution and structural elements that can occur in any lithostratigraphic horizon (not fabric selective). Permeability depends on the physical properties of the rock such as pore size, shape, distribution, fissuring, dissolution, and interconnection of pores and vugs. The Edwards aquifer rocks that crop out in the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards aquifer generally have the same lithologic characteristics as the Edwards aquifer rocks that crop out in Comal and southwestern Hays Counties. However, in the northeastern part of the segment in Travis County, the rock unit that is apparently equivalent to the basal nodular member of the Kainer Formation is called the Walnut Formation. Because the units appear to be stratigraphically and lithologically equivalent, the basal nodular member is used instead of the Walnut Formation for this report. Essentially all of hydrogeologic subdivision II, which is about 70 feet thick in Hays County, is missing in Travis County. In the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards aquifer, the aquifer probably is most vulnerable to surface contamination in the rapidly urbanizing areas on the Edwards aquifer outcrop. Contamination can result from spills or leakage of hazardous materials; or runoff on the intensely faulted and fractured, karstic limestone outcrops characteristic of the recharge zone.

Small, Ted A.; Hanson, John A.; Hauwert, Nico M.

1996-01-01

361

Geology and ground-water features of salt springs, seeps, and plains in the Arkansas and Red River basins of western Oklahoma and adjacent parts of Kansas and Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The salt springs, seeps, and plains described in this report are in the Arkansas and Red River basins in western Oklahoma and adjacent areas in Kansas and Texas. The springs and seeps contribute significantly to the generally poor water quality of the rivers by bringing salt (HaCI) to the surface at an estimated daily rate of more than 8,000 tons. The region investigated is characterized by low hills and rolling plains. Many of the rivers are eroded 100 feet or more below the .surrounding upland surface and in places the valleys are bordered by steep bluffs. The alluvial plains of the major rivers are wide and the river channels are shallow and unstable. The flow of many surface streams is intermittent, especially in the western part of the area. All the natural salt-contributing areas studied are within the outcrop area of rocks of Permian age. The Permian rocks, commonly termed red beds, are composed principally of red and gray gypsiferous shale, siltstone, sandstone, gypsum, anhydrite, and dolomite. Many of the formations contain halite in the subsurface. The halite occurs mostly as discontinuous lenses in shale, although some of the thicker, more massive beds are extensive. It underlies the entire region studied at depths ranging from about 30 feet to more than 2,000 feet. The salt and associated strata show evidence of extensive removal of salt through solution by ground water. Although the salt generally occurs in relatively impervious shale small joints and fractures ,allow the passage of small quantities of water which dissolves the salt. Salt water occurs in the report area at depths ranging from less than 100 feet to more than 1,000 feet. Salt water occurs both as meteoric and connate, but the water emerging as salt springs is meteoric. Tritium analyses show that the age of the water from several springs is less than 20 years. The salt springs, seeps, and plains are confined to 13 local areas. The flow of the springs and seeps is small, but the chloride concentration in the water ranges from a few hundred parts per million to about 190,000 ppm. The wide range of concentration is believed to be due, in part, to differential dilution by fresh water. Alluvium in the vicinity of the salt springs remains saturated with salt water and evaporation from the alluvial surface causes the formation of a salt crust during dry weather. Those areas appear as salt plains that range in size from less than an acre to as much as 60 square miles. The rocks exposed at the surface in the vicinity of the salt springs are permeable enough to allow the infiltration of some precipitation. Under certain geologic and hydrologic conditions ground water percolates down and through salt-bearing rocks where it dissolves the .salt. Hydrostatic pressure of ground water at higher elevations forces the salt water to emerge as salt springs at lower elevations.

Ward, P. E.

1963-01-01

362

A conceptual hydrogeologic model for the hydrogeologic framework, geochemistry, and groundwater-flow system of the Edwards-Trinity and related aquifers in the Pecos County region, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Edwards-Trinity aquifer is a vital groundwater resource for agricultural, industrial, and municipal uses in the Trans-Pecos region of west Texas. A conceptual model of the hydrogeologic framework, geochemistry, and groundwater-flow system in the 4,700 square-mile study area was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Middle Pecos Groundwater Conservation District, Pecos County, City of Fort Stockton, Brewster County, and Pecos County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1. The model was developed to gain a better understanding of the groundwater system and to establish a scientific foundation for resource-management decisions. Data and information were collected or obtained from various sources to develop the model. Lithologic information obtained from well reports and geophysical data were used to describe the hydrostratigraphy and structural features of the groundwater system, and aquifer-test data were used to estimate aquifer hydraulic properties. Groundwater-quality data were used to evaluate groundwater-flow paths, water and rock interaction, aquifer interaction, and the mixing of water from different sources. Groundwater-level data also were used to evaluate aquifer interaction as well as to develop a potentiometric-surface map, delineate regional groundwater divides, and describe regional groundwater-flow paths. Several previous studies have been done to compile or collect physical and chemical data, describe the hydrogeologic processes, and develop conceptual and numerical groundwater-flow models of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer in the Trans-Pecos region. Documented methods were used to compile and collect groundwater, surface-water, geochemical, geophysical, and geologic information that subsequently were used to develop this conceptual model.

Thomas, Jonathan V.; Stanton, Gregory P.; Bumgarner, Johnathan R.; Pearson, Daniel K.; Teeple, Andrew P.; Houston, Natalie A.; Payne, Jason D.; Musgrove, MaryLynn

2013-01-01

363

Spanish and English language usage by rural and urban Spanish-American families in two South Texas counties  

E-print Network

spoken by Spanish-American children of study households in Atascosa County snd San Antonio Language usage by Spanish-American children of study households in Atascosa County and San Antonio while reading, viewing television and movies and listening... they read are printed, and languages of radio programs to which they listen and television programs and movies they watch. 1'h d ~b' t' --t p d'f'I ' f Sp i h and English by rural and urban Spanish-American children ? was 18 accomplished...

Mahoney, Mary Katherine

2012-06-07

364

Distribution and characterization of Heterobilharzia americana in dogs in Texas.  

PubMed

Heterobilharzia americana is a trematode parasite (family Schistosomatidae) that infects a wide range of wild mammalian hosts. Canine cases have been reported in the Gulf coast and south Atlantic states, Kansas, and Oklahoma. A total of 238 canine H. americana cases in Texas were retrospectively collected for a period of approximately 22 years from case records at the Texas Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory and the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital pathology service, diagnostic parasitology service, and Gastrointestinal Laboratory at Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine. Of these cases, 26 patients had 1-2 repeat positive tests for a total of 268 positive tests (26 biopsies, 39 necropsies, 160 fecal examinations, and 43 PCR). Multiple dogs were infected in 12 households. Cases were distributed primarily in the eastern region of Texas in 42 of 254 counties. Cases were seen as far west as Kerr county and in counties bordering Oklahoma, Louisiana, Mexico, and the Gulf of Mexico. The median dog age was 5.6 years (2.7 months to 17.2 years) and the median weight was 20.5 kg (1-61.6 kg). All American Kennel Club (AKC) breed groups were represented (n=186): crossbred (20%), herding (17.8%), sporting (16.1%), toy (10.8%), hounds (10.8%), working (10.1%), terrier (8.5%), non-sporting (4.9%), and miscellaneous (1%). No seasonal pattern of diagnosis was apparent. Clinical signs reported (n=90) were diarrhea (67%), weight loss (38%), anorexia/hyporexia (27%), vomiting (22%), hematochezia (20%), lethargy (17%), polyuria/polydipsia (6%), and collapse (3%). In 39 necropsy cases, trematode eggs were identified by histopathology in the small intestine (84%), liver (84%), large intestine (39%), pancreas (35%), lung (9%), lymph node (8%), spleen (4%), and stomach (3%). Adult parasites were identified histologically in four cases. Granulomatous inflammation associated with the eggs was the most commonly reported histopathologic change. Other changes reported were fibrosis, pigment in macrophages, and organ mineralization. Glomerulonephritis was identified in four cases. Of 20 necropsy cases where death was attributable to H. americana infection, only one case was diagnosed ante mortem. Eleven of these dogs were examined by a veterinarian but H. americana was included as a differential diagnosis in only two cases. Reported differential diagnoses included ethylene glycol toxicity, cholecalciferol toxicity, lymphoma, and pancreatitis. These data indicate that this parasite is more widely distributed and more common than is generally recognized. Increased awareness may aid in more diagnoses and timely therapy. PMID:24746236

Rodriguez, J Y; Lewis, B C; Snowden, K F

2014-06-16

365

Proportions of coarse and fine clay across the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary in Milam, Falls, and Travis Counties, Texas  

E-print Network

PROPOBTIO ~S OF CO. IBSE . ~~ID FINE CLsY . , CROSS THE CHETHCEOUS-TEHTI. BY SOUND iHY IN idlLiLVn FRILLS?, U3D TBiaVIS COUNTII'S, TL'XiiS A Thesis John Charle - Smith Sub. 'nitted to the Graduate College of' Texas AKYi University in partial f... Charles Smith ~ppr ved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Com! ' ee) (He d of', ' artment, ( !I!ber) / c Ql, January, 1966 TaBLE Oi' COi1T~~~'JTB iicEnowledgments -bstract introduction Page vii Objective of the investigation Beasons...

Smith, John Charles

2012-06-07

366

Some effects of fertilization and stage of plant succession on five native range grasses planted in Brazos County, Texas  

E-print Network

46 48 48 NONE EFFECTS OF FERTILIZATION AND STAOE OF PLANT SDOCESSION ON FIVE NATIVE RANGE GRASSES FLANTED IN SRAZOS COUNTYp TNZAS INTRODUCTION Range scientists and ?orkers in soQ and water conservation recommend that perennial grasses... produce low quantitios of gxaea vegetation and poox quality forage. Rany years are required fox' abandoned lande in Brasoe County to become ro- vegetatod with perennial grasses by natural plant succession (Trow, lglp). This proosse Le too slow for ths...

Eaman, Thomas Knox

2012-06-07

367

Using Prescribed Fire in Oklahoma  

E-print Network

Prescribed Fire in Oklahoma Terrence G. Bidwell Professor and Extension Specialist Rangeland Ecology Tall Timbers Research Station Tallahassee, Florida Samuel D. Fuhlendorf Associate Professor RangelandE-927 Using Prescribed Fire in Oklahoma Using Prescribed Fire in Oklahoma Using Prescribed Fire

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

368

Quality of surface-water runoff in selected streams in the San Antonio segment of the Edwards aquifer recharge zone, Bexar County, Texas, 1997-2012  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During 19972012, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the San Antonio Water System, collected and analyzed water-quality constituents in surface-water runoff from five ephemeral stream sites near San Antonio in northern Bexar County, Texas. The data were collected to assess the quality of surface water that recharges the Edwards aquifer. Samples were collected from four stream basins that had small amounts of developed land at the onset of the study but were predicted to undergo substantial development over a period of several decades. Water-quality samples also were collected from a fifth stream basin located on land protected from development to provide reference data by representing undeveloped land cover. Water-quality data included pH, specific conductance, chemical oxygen demand, dissolved solids (filtered residue on evaporation in milligrams per liter, dried at 180 degrees Celsius), suspended solids, major ions, nutrients, trace metals, and pesticides. Trace metal concentration data were compared to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality established surface water quality standards for human health protection (water and fish). Among all constituents in all samples for which criteria were available for comparison, only one sample had one constituent which exceeded the surface water criteria on one occasion. A single lead concentration (2.76 micrograms per liter) measured in a filtered water sample exceeded the surface water criteria of 1.15 micrograms per liter. The average number of pesticide detections per sample in stream basins undergoing development ranged from 1.8 to 6.0. In contrast, the average number of pesticide detections per sample in the reference stream basin was 0.6. Among all constituents examined in this study, pesticides, dissolved orthophosphate phosphorus, and dissolved total phosphorus demonstrated the largest differences between the four stream basins undergoing development and the reference stream basin with undeveloped land cover.

Opsahl, Stephen P.

2012-01-01

369

Molecular detection of Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) from Tom Green County in central Texas.  

PubMed

Serologic and molecular evidence suggest that white-tailed deer in South Texas and North Mexico carry the agents of bovine babesiosis, Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina. To determine if white-tailed deer in central Texas, which is outside the known occurrence of the vector tick at this time, harbor these parasites, blood samples from free-ranging and captive white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in Tom Green County were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for B. bovis and B. bigemina 18S rDNA. Of the 25 samples tested, three (12%) were positive by nested PCR for B. bovis. This identity was confirmed by sequence analysis of the cloned 18S rDNA PCR product. Further confirmation was made by sequence analysis of the rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) 1, 5.8S rRNA gene, and ITS 2 genomic region in two (representing samples from two different ranches) of the B. bovis positive samples. Three samples were positive by B. bigemina nested PCR, but sequencing of the cloned products confirmed only one animal positive for B. bigemina; Theileria spp. DNA was amplified from the other two animal samples. In addition to Theileria spp., two genotypically unique Babesia species sequences were identified among the cloned sequences produced by the B. bigemina primers in one sample. Phylogenetic analysis showed no separation of the deer B. bovis or B. bigemina 18S rDNA, or deer B. bovis ITS region sequences from those of bovine origin. Clarification of the possible role of white-tailed deer as reservoir hosts in maintaining these important pathogens of cattle is critical to understanding whether or not deer contribute to the epidemiology of bovine babesiosis. PMID:21194841

Holman, Patricia J; Carroll, Juliette E; Pugh, Roberta; Davis, Donald S

2011-05-11

370

Recognition criteria for young multiple surface ruptures along the Meers fault in southwestern Oklahoma  

E-print Network

RECOGNITION CRITERIA FOR YOUNG MULTIPLE SURFACE RUPTURES ALONG THE PEERS FAULT IN SOUTHWESTERN OKLAHOMA A Thesis by DIANE PAULA NESTEN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1985 Major Subject. : Geology RECOGNITION CRITERIA FOR YOUNG MULTIPLE SURFACE RUPTURES ALONG THE MEERS FAULT IN SOUTHWESTERN OKLAHOMA A Thesis by DIANE PAULA WESTEN Approved as to style and content by: Norman R...

Westen, Diane Paula

2012-06-07

371

An analysis of the lithic remains from several ring middens in Crockett County, Texas: A study in site function  

E-print Network

Flake; j, Secondary Cortex Flake; k, Interior Flake) Artifacts from Sites 41 CX 241 and 41 CX 218 72 75 78 Figure Figure Artifacts from S i te 41 CX 133 12. Four Common Desert Succulents of Crockett County 88 125 INTRODUCTION In June...) awaiting analysis. It is also common for many of the 1tems listed and bagged as flint flakes, to actually be limestone fragments or some other miscellaneous kind of rock. In addition, a number of specimens fall 1n the category of "no provenience" due...

Moore, Bill

2012-06-07

372

An integrated study of the Grayburg/San Andres reservoir, Foster and South Cowden fields, Ector County, Texas, Class II  

SciTech Connect

A project to recover economic amounts of oil from a very mature oil field is being conducted by Laguna Petroleum Corporation of Midland, Texas, with partial funding from a U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) grant to study shallow carbonate rock reservoirs. The objectives of the project are to use modern engineering methods to optimize oil field management and to use geological and geophysical data to recover untapped potential within the petroleum reservoirs. The integration of data and techniques from these disciplines has yielded results greater than those achievable without their cooperation. The cost of successfully accomplishing these goals is to be low enough for even small independent operators to afford. This article is a report describing accomplishments for the fiscal year 1998-1999.

Trentham, DGS, Robert C.; Robinson, M.S., William C.; Wider, Kevin; Weinbrandt, Ph.D.,PE, Richard

2000-04-14

373

An Integrated Study of the Grayburg/San Andres Reservoir, Foster and South Cowden Fields, Ector County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

A project to recover economic amounts of oil from a very mature oil field is being conducted by Laguna Petroleum Corporation of Midland, Texas, with partial funding from a U. S. Department of Energy grant to study shallow carbonate rock reservoirs. The objectives of the project are to use modern engineering methods to optimize oil field management and to use geological and geophysical data to recover untapped potential within the petroleum reservoirs. The integration of data and techniques from these disciplines has yielded results greater than those achievable without their cooperation. The cost of successfully accomplishing these goals is to be low enough for even small independent operators to afford. This article is a report describing accomplishments for the fiscal year 1997-1998.

Robinson, William C.; Trentham, Robert C.; Widner, Kevin; Wienbrandt, Richard

1999-06-22

374

Developments in the Oklahoma portion of the Arkoma basin, 1960 to 1965  

Microsoft Academic Search

The first natural-gas production in the Arkoma basin in eastern Oklahoma was near Poteau in Le Flore County in 1910. In the next few years several fields were discovered and developed as far west as Quinton in Pittsburg County. Production was from Hartshorne and upper Atoka sandstones at depths of less than 3000 ft. The first deep natural-gas production was

1966-01-01

375

Comparative analysis of wind energy production in Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Scope and method of study. In the last decades humanity has realized the necessity of developing alternative energy sources for its efficient economic development and simple survival in the future. During the last 30 years major improvements were made in renewable energy technologies and they started to become competitive with traditional energy sources (fossil fuels), especially with consideration of external costs. Among the renewable energy sources, wind energy is one of the cheapest and fastest growing nowadays. Oklahoma is a very promising site for wind energy development considering its excellent wind resources. Developing wind energy can allow not only electricity production for in-state consumption, but also exporting to other states. The development of wind energy could encourage economic growth with very few adverse impacts on the environment. However, traditional energy sources are still the cheapest and, thus, the introduction of the wind energy in Oklahoma should be critically analyzed from economic, ecological and social points of view. The goal of this study is to conduct analysis of wind energy electricity production in Oklahoma on the four main stages: (1) Investment Analysis from Private Perspective: Calculate present value net benefits for wind energy and traditional energy (natural gas), make sure that both of them are positive. (2) Investment Analysis from Social Perspective: Evaluate present value net private benefits (PVNPB) and present value net social benefit from both projects (PVNSB). (3) Government Subsidy Analysis: recognize the necessity of the subsidies and evaluate the amount of subsidies if any. (4) Investment Analysis from a Geographic Perspective: determine economic feasibility of wind power generation for 77 Oklahoma counties. Findings and conclusions. The final output of the study is the recommendations concerning wind energy development in Oklahoma with consideration of economic efficiency, ecological and social impacts. Study not only analyze possibilities for wind energy development in the state, but make recommendations on the county by county basis with consideration of wind power density, land cost, property tax and infrastructure development in each county.

Ermilova, Ekaterina Alexeevna

376

Environmental analysis of geopressured-geothermal prospect areas, De Witt and Colorado counties, Texas. Final report, March 1 - August 31, 1979  

SciTech Connect

Information collected and analyzed for a preliminary environmental analysis of geopressured geothermal prospect areas in Colorado and DeWitt Counties, Texas is presented. Specific environmental concerns for each geopressured geothermal prospect area are identified and discussed. Approximately 218 km/sup 2/(85 mi/sup 2/) were studied in the vicinity of each prospect area to: (1) conduct an environmental analysis to identify more and less suited areas for geopressured test wells; and (2) provide an environmental data base for future development of geopressured geothermal energy resources. A series of maps and tables are included to illustrate environmental characteristics including: geology, water resources, soils, current land use, vegetation, wildlife, and meteorological characteristics, and additional relevant information on cultural resources, power- and pipelines, and regulatory agencies. A series of transparent overlays at the scale of the original mapping has also been produced for the purposes of identifying and ranking areas of potential conflict between geopressured geothermal development and environmental characteristics. The methodology for ranking suitability of areas within the two prospect areas is discussed in the appendix. (MHR)

Gustavson, T.C.; Reeder, F.S.; Badger, E.A.

1980-02-01

377

APPLICATION OF WATER-JET HORIZONTAL DRILLING TECHNOLOGY TO DRILL AND ACIDIZE HORIZONTAL DRAIN HOLES, TEDBIT (SAN ANDRES) FIELD, GAINES COUNTY, TEXAS  

SciTech Connect

The San Andres Formation is one of the major hydrocarbon-producing units in the Permian Basin, with multiple reservoirs contained within the dolomitized subtidal portions of upward shoaling carbonate shelf cycles. The test well is located in Tedbit (San Andres) Field in northeastern Gaines County, Texas, in an area of scattered San Andres production associated with local structural highs. Selected on the basis of geological and historical data, the Oil and Gas Properties Wood No. 1 well is considered to be typical of a large number of San Andres stripper wells in the Permian Basin. Thus, successful completion of horizontal drain holes in this well would demonstrate a widely applicable enhanced recovery technology. Water-jet horizontal drilling is an emerging technology with the potential to provide significant economic benefits in marginal wells. Forecast benefits include lower recompletion costs and improved hydrocarbon recoveries. The technology utilizes water under high pressure, conveyed through small-diameter coiled tubing, to jet horizontal drain holes into producing formations. Testing of this technology was conducted with inconclusive results. Paraffin sludge and mechanical problems were encountered in the wellbore, initially preventing the water-jet tool from reaching the kick-off point. After correcting these problems and attempting to cut a casing window with the water-jet milling assembly, lateral jetting was attempted without success.

Michael W. Rose

2005-09-22

378

Effects of brush management on the hydrologic budget and water quality in and adjacent to Honey Creek State Natural Area, Comal County, Texas, 2001--10  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Woody vegetation, including ashe juniper (Juniperus ashei), has encroached on some areas in central Texas that were historically oak grassland savannah. Encroachment of woody vegetation is generally attributed to overgrazing and fire suppression. Removing the ashe juniper and allowing native grasses to reestablish in the area as a brush management conservation practice (hereinafter referred to as "brush management") might change the hydrology in the watershed. These hydrologic changes might include changes to surface-water runoff, evapotranspiration, or groundwater recharge. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Federal, State, and local partners, examined the hydrologic effects of brush management in two adjacent watersheds in Comal County, Tex. Hydrologic data were collected in the watersheds for 3-4 years (pre-treatment) depending on the type of data, after which brush management occurred on one watershed (treatment watershed) and the other was left in its original condition (reference watershed). Hydrologic data were collected in the study area for another 6 years (post-treatment). These hydrologic data included rainfall, streamflow, evapotranspiration, and water quality. Groundwater recharge was not directly measured, but potential groundwater recharge was calculated by using a simplified mass balance approach. This fact sheet summarizes highlights of the study from the USGS Scientific Investigations Report on which it is based.

Banta, J. Ryan; Slattery, Richard N.

2012-01-01

379

Educational Reform in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Oklahoma's answer to the cry for reform and involvement in education emerged as House Bill 1017, a comprehensive $223 million school reform and tax act. This article reviews the HR 1017 story, focusing on its legislative enactment history and offering a content analysis of mandated changes in finance, personnel, governance, student assessment,

Butorac, Marylin M.; First, Patricia F.

1994-01-01

380

Oklahoma and SREB  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) is a nonprofit organization that works collaboratively with Oklahoma and 15 other member states to improve education at every level--from pre-K to postdoctoral study--through many effective programs and initiatives. SREB's "Challenge to Lead" Goals for Education, which call for the region to lead the

Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2009

2009-01-01

381

Estimated rates of groundwater recharge to the Chicot, Evangeline and Jasper aquifers by using environmental tracers in Montgomery and adjacent counties, Texas, 2008 and 2011  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Montgomery County is in the northern part of the Houston, Texas, metropolitan area, the fourth most populous metropolitan area in the United States. As populations have increased since the 1980s, groundwater has become an important resource for public-water supply and industry in the rapidly growing area of Montgomery County. Groundwater availability from the Gulf Coast aquifer system is a primary concern for water managers and community planners in Montgomery County and requires a better understanding of the rate of recharge to the system. The Gulf Coast aquifer system in Montgomery County consists of the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers, the Burkeville confining unit, and underlying Catahoula confining system. The individual sand and clay sequences of the aquifers composing the Gulf Coast aquifer system are not laterally or vertically continuous on a regional scale; however, on a local scale, individual sand and clay lenses can extend over several miles. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Lone Star Groundwater Conservation District, collected groundwater-quality samples from selected wells within or near Montgomery County in 2008 and analyzed these samples for concentrations of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), tritium (3H), helium-3/tritium (3He/3H), helium-4 (4He), and dissolved gases (DG) that include argon, carbon dioxide, methane, nitrogen and oxygen. Groundwater ages, or apparent age, representing residence times since time of recharge, were determined by using the assumption of a piston-flow transport model. Most of the environmental tracer data indicated the groundwater was recharged prior to the 1950s, limiting the usefulness of CFCs, SF6, and 3H concentrations as tracers. In many cases, no tracer was usable at a well for the purpose of estimating an apparent age. Wells not usable for estimating an apparent age were resampled in 2011 and analyzed for concentrations of major ions and carbon-14 (14C). At six of these wells, additional 4He and DG samples were collected and analyzed. Recharge rates estimated from environmental tracer data are dependent upon several hydrogeologic variables and have inherent uncertainties. By using the recharge estimates derived from samples collected from 14 wells completed in the Chicot aquifer for which apparent groundwater ages could be determined, recharge to the Chicot aquifer ranged from 0.2 to 7.2 inches (in.) per year (yr). Based on data from one well, estimated recharge to the unconfined zone of the Evangeline aquifer (outcrop) was 0.1 in./yr. Based on data collected from eight wells, estimated rates of recharge to the confined zone of the Evangeline aquifer ranged from less than 0.1 to 2.8 in./yr. Based on data from one well, estimated recharge to the unconfined zone of the Jasper aquifer (outcrop) was 0.5 in./yr. Based on data collected from nine wells, estimated rates of recharge to the confined zone of the Jasper aquifer ranged from less than 0.1 to 0.1 in./yr. The complexity of the hydrogeology in the area, uncertainty in the conceptual model, and numerical assumptions required in the determination of the recharge rates all pose limitations and need to be considered when evaluating these data on a countywide or regional scale. The estimated recharge rates calculated for this study are specific to each well location and should not be extrapolated or inferred as a countywide average. Local variations in the hydrogeology and surficial conditions can affect the recharge rate at a local scale.

Oden, Timothy D.; Truini, Margot

2013-01-01

382

Variation in Biotic Assemblages and Stream-Habitat Data with Sampling Strategy and Method in Tidal Segments of Highland and Marchand Bayous, Galveston County, Texas, 2007  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Houston-Galveston Area Council and the Galveston Bay Estuary Program under the authority of the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, did a study in 2007 to assess the variation in biotic assemblages (benthic macroinvertebrate and fish communities) and stream-habitat data with sampling strategy and method in tidal segments of Highland Bayou and Marchand Bayou in Galveston County. Data were collected once in spring and once in summer 2007 from four stream sites (reaches) (short names Hitchcock, Fairwood, Bayou Dr, and Texas City) of Highland Bayou and from one reach (short name Marchand) in Marchand Bayou. Only stream-habitat data from summer 2007 samples were used for this report. Additional samples were collected at the Hitchcock, Fairwood, and Bayou Dr reaches (multisample reaches) during summer 2007 to evaluate variation resulting from sampling intensity and location. Graphical analysis of benthic macroinvertebrate community data using a multidimensional scaling technique indicates there are taxonomic differences between the spring and summer samples. Seasonal differences in communities primarily were related to decreases in the abundance of chironomids and polychaetes in summer samples. Multivariate Analysis of Similarities tests of additional summer 2007 benthic macroinvertebrate samples from Hitchcock, Fairwood, and Bayou Dr indicated significant taxonomic differences between the sampling locations at all three reaches. In general, the deepwater samples had the smallest numbers for benthic macroinvertebrate taxa richness and abundance. Graphical analysis of species-level fish data indicates no consistent seasonal difference in fish taxa across reaches. Increased seining intensity at the multisample reaches did not result in a statistically significant difference in fish communities. Increased seining resulted in some changes in taxa richness and community diversity metrics. Diversity increases associated with increased electrofishing intensity were relatively consistent across the two multisample electrofishing reaches (Hitchcock and Fairwood). Differences in the physical characteristics of the Highland and Marchand Bayou reaches are largely the result of the differences in channel gradient and position in the drainage network or watershed of each reach. No trees were observed on the bank adjacent to the five transects at either the Bayou Dr or Texas City reaches. Riparian vegetation at the more downstream Fairwood, Bayou Dr, and Texas City reaches was dominated by less-woody and more-herbaceous shrubs, and grasses and forbs, than at the more upstream Hitchcock and Marchand reaches. The width of the vegetation buffer was variable among all reaches and appeared to be more related to the extent of anthropogenic development in the riparian zone rather than to natural changes in the riparian buffer. Four additional transects per reach were sampled for habitat variables at Hitchcock, Fairwood, and Bayou Dr. Medians of most stream-habitat variables changed with increased sampling intensity (addition of two and four transects to the standard five transects), although none of the differences in medians were statistically significant. All habitat quality index values for the five reaches scored in the intermediate category. Increasing sampling intensity did not change the habitat quality index score for any of the reaches.

Mabe, Jeffrey A.; Moring, J. Bruce

2008-01-01

383

Oklahoma NASA EPSCoR  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The mission of Oklahoma EPSCoR is to make Oklahoma researchers more successful in competing for research funding. Specific goals, objectives, and strategies were developed for each federal EPSCoR program, based on federal and state needs. A theme of stimulating collaboration among campuses and building on common research strengths is a strong component of the Oklahoma EPSCoR strategic plan. It extends also to our relationships with the federal agencies, and wherever possible, Oklahoma EPSCoR projects are developed collaboratively with federal research laboratories and program offices. Overall, Oklahoma EPSCoR seeks to capitalize on unique research capabilities and opportunities. The NASA EPSCoR Program in Oklahoma was developed through this grant as a joint effort between Oklahoma EPSCoR and the NASA Oklahoma Space Grant Consortium (OSGC). The major goal of the Oklahoma NASA EPSCoR Plan established in 1996 is to develop an academic research enterprise directed towards a long-term, self-sustaining, nationally competitive capability in areas of mutual self-interest to NASA and Oklahoma. Our final technical summary pie chart demonstrates the strong successes we have achieved during this period as a result of the award.

Snowden, Victoria Duca

2002-01-01

384

Place-of-residence errors on death certificates for two contiguous U. S. counties  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Based on death certificate data, the Texas Department of Health Bureau of Vital Statistics calculates age adjusted all-cause mortality rates for each Texas county yearly. In 1998 the calculated rates for two adjacent Texas counties was disparate. These counties contain one city (Amarillo) and are identical in size. This study examined the accuracy of recorded county of residence for

J Rush Pierce; Anne V Denison

2006-01-01

385

Remote Sensing Analysis of the Sierra Blanca (Faskin Ranch) Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Site, Hudspeth County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Remote sensing images provide useful physical information, revealing such features as geological structure, vegetation, drainage patterns, and variations in consolidated and unconsolidated lithologies. That technology has been applied to the failed Sierra Blanca (Faskin Ranch) shallow burial low-level radioactive waste disposal site selected by the Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority. It has been re-examined using data from LANDSAT satellite series. The comparison of the earlier LANDSAT V (5/20/86) (30-m resolution) with the later new, higher resolution ETM imagery (10/23/99) LANDSAT VII data (15-m resolution) clearly shows the superiority of the LANDSAT VII data. The search for surficial indications of evidence of fatal flaws at the Sierra Blanca site utilizing was not successful, as it had been in the case of the earlier remote sensing analysis of the failed Fort Hancock site utilizing LANDSAT V data. The authors conclude that the tectonic activity at the Sierra Blanca site is much less recent and active than in the previously studied Fort Hancock site. The Sierra Blanca site failed primarily on the further needed documentation concerning a subsurface fault underneath the site and environmental justice issues. The presence of this fault was not revealed using the newer LANDSAT VII data. Despite this fact, it must be remembered that remote sensing provides baseline documentation for determining future physical and financial remediation responsibilities. On the basis of the two sites examined by LANDSAT remote sensing imaging, it is concluded that it is an essential, cost-effective tool that should be utilized not only in site examination but also in all nuclear-related facilities.

LeMone, D. V.; Dodge, R.; Xie, H.; Langford, R. P.; Keller, G. R.

2002-02-26

386

Reservoir heterogeneity in the middle Frio Formation: Case studies in Stratton and Agua Dulce fields, Nueces County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Selected middle Frio (Oligocene) reservoirs of Stratton field and the contiguous Agua Dulce field are being studied as part of a Gas Research Institute/Department of Energy/State of Texas cosponsored program designed to improve reserve growth in mature gas fields. Over the past four decades, Stratton has produced 2.0 tcf of gas from 113 middle Frio reservoirs, and Agua Dulce has produced 1.6 tcf from 116 reservoirs. Recent drilling and workover activities, however, suggest the presence of additional untapped or bypassed middle Frio reservoirs. Four reservoirs, the E18/6,020-ft, E21/6,050-ft, E31/6,100-ft, and E41/Bertram, were evaluated over a 13,000-acre tract that includes areas adjacent to both fields. The middle Frio is composed of sand-rich channel-fill and splay deposits interstratified with floodplain mudstones, all forming part of the Gueydan fluvial system. Channel-fill deposits are 30 ({plus minus}15) ft thick and 2,500 ({plus minus}500) ft wide. Splay deposits are up to 30 ft thick proximal to channels and extend as much as 2 mi from channels. Channel-fill and associated splay sandstones are reservoir facies (porosity 20%; permeability = 10s to 100s md); floodplain mudstones and levee sandy mudstones are barriers to flow facies separating individual reservoirs vertically and laterally. The E41/Bertram reservoir is an example of a laterally stacked channel system deposited during relatively slow aggradation. This reservoir includes sand-on-sand contacts and is composed of mostly leaky compartments. The E 18/6,020-ft, E21/6,050-ft, and E31/6,100ft reservoirs are examples of vertically stacked channel systems reflecting higher rates of aggradation. Vertically stacked architectures are more favorable for isolated compartments and therefore are better candidates for infield reserve growth.

Kerr, D.R. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (USA))

1990-09-01

387

Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History & Culture  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The 46th state, Oklahoma, presents its unusual history with the online version of The Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. The Encyclopedia was prepared by over 500 "university-based scholars and independent historians and scholars," and was a joint effort by The Oklahoma Historical Society and Oklahoma State University Library Electronic Publishing Center. Visitors can click on the "Table of Contents" link near the bottom of the homepage to "Browse Entries Alphabetically", "Browse Entries Chronologically", or "Browse Entries by Subject". Browsing via chronology introduces visitors to Oklahoma starting with the "Precontact Era", through the "Westward Expansion" and on to "Twentieth Century to Present". Subject categories include "African Americans", "Farming", "Military", and "Petroleum". When searching, visitors will be taken to the Electronic Publishing Center Search Page, so they will need to choose the specific collection, Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture, from the drop down box, to confine the search to the Encyclopedia.

388

Geophysical Delineation of the Freshwater/Saline-Water Transition Zone in the Barton Springs Segment of the Edwards Aquifer, Travis and Hays Counties, Texas, September 2006  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During September 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Barton Springs/Edwards Aquifer Conservation District, conducted a geophysical pilot study to determine whether time-domain electromagnetic (TDEM) sounding could be used to delineate the freshwater/saline-water transition zone in the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards aquifer in Travis and Hays Counties, Texas. There was uncertainty regarding the application of TDEM sounding for this purpose because of the depth of the aquifer (200-500 feet to the top of the aquifer) and the relatively low-resistivity clayey units in the upper confining unit. Twenty-five TDEM soundings were made along four 2-3-mile-long profiles in a study area overlying the transition zone near the Travis-Hays County boundary. The soundings yield measurements of subsurface electrical resistivity, the variations in which were correlated with hydrogeologic and stratigraphic units, and then with dissolved solids concentrations in the aquifer. Geonics Protem 47 and 57 systems with 492-foot and 328-foot transmitter-loop sizes were used to collect the TDEM soundings. A smooth model (vertical delineation of calculated apparent resistivity that represents an estimate [non-unique] of the true resistivity) for each sounding site was created using an iterative software program for inverse modeling. The effectiveness of using TDEM soundings to delineate the transition zone was indicated by comparing the distribution of resistivity in the aquifer with the distribution of dissolved solids concentrations in the aquifer along the profiles. TDEM sounding data show that, in general, the Edwards aquifer in the study area is characterized by a sharp change in resistivity from west to east. The western part of the Edwards aquifer in the study area shows higher resistivity than the eastern part. The higher resistivity regions correspond to lower dissolved solids concentrations (freshwater), and the lower resistivity regions correspond to higher dissolved solids concentrations (saline water). On the basis of reasonably close matches between the inferred locations of the freshwater/saline-water transition zone in the Edwards aquifer in the study area from resistivities and from dissolved solids concentrations in three of the four profiles, TDEM sounding appears to be a suitable tool for delineating the transition zone.

Payne, J.D.; Kress, W.H.; Shah, S.D.; Stefanov, J.E.; Smith, B.A.; Hunt, B.B.

2007-01-01

389

Energy resources of Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The past, present, and near future production of energy sources in Oklahoma is briefly surveyed. In 1977, the production was noted to be 186 million barrels while the reserve of liquid hydrocarbons was estimated to be about 1.4 billion barrels. This gives a reserves-to-production ratio of slightly less than 7:1 (down from 1976). About the same figures are noted for

Mankin

1978-01-01

390

Comparison of irrigation pumpage and change in water storage of the High Plains Aquifer in Castro and Parmer counties, Texas, 1975-83  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An understanding of the relationship between irrigation pumpage and change in groundwater storage was needed to quantify the amount of water returning to the High Plains aquifer as a result of intensive irrigation in Castro and Parmer Counties, Texas. Irrigation pumpage for the 9-yr period, 1975-83, was estimated by using the Blaney-Criddle consumptive-use formula adjusted by a factor to account for irrigation demand and field-measured crop applications. Total estimated pumpage for the 9-yr period was 11,269,000 acre-ft and 8,914,000 acre-ft. The estimated pumpage was based on reported crop acreage data and LANDSAT acreage data, respectively. Aquifer storage for the same period was estimated as the product of specific yield, net water level change, and area. Change in storage was 5,168,00 acre-ft. Many of the areas of the largest change in storage also were the areas of the largest saturated thickness. The only locations that did not experience substantial water level declines were the northwest and northeast parts of the study area. A comparison was made of water returning to the aquifer by calculating the difference between irrigation pumpage and the change in aquifer storage. Two estimates of this comparison, expressed as a percentage of irrigation pumpage, were obtained on the basis of two different sources of acreage data. This comparison was 54% of pumpage based on reported crop acreage data and 42% of pumpage based on LANDSAT interpreted acreage data. (Author 's abstract)

Mackey, G. W.

1987-01-01

391

Hydrologic conditions and water quality of rainfall and storm runoff for two agricultural areas of the Oso Creek watershed, Nueces County, Texas, 2005-08  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board, Coastal Bend Bays and Estuaries Program, and Texas AgriLife Research and Extension Center at Corpus Christi, studied hydrologic conditions and water quality of rainfall and storm runoff of two primarily agricultural subwatersheds of the Oso Creek watershed in Nueces County, Texas. One area, the upper West Oso Creek subwatershed, is about 5,145 acres. The other area, a subwatershed drained by an unnamed tributary to Oso Creek (hereinafter, Oso Creek tributary), is about 5,287 acres. Rainfall and runoff (streamflow) were continuously monitored at the outlets of the two subwatersheds during the study period October 2005-September 2008. Seventeen rainfall samples were collected and analyzed for nutrients and major inorganic ions. Twenty-four composite runoff water-quality samples (12 at West Oso Creek, 12 at Oso Creek tributary) were collected and analyzed for nutrients, major inorganic ions, and pesticides. Twenty-six discrete suspended-sediment samples (12 West Oso Creek, 14 Oso Creek tributary) and 17 bacteria samples (10 West Oso Creek, 7 Oso Creek tributary) were collected and analyzed. These data were used to estimate, for selected constituents, rainfall deposition to and runoff loads and yields from the two subwatersheds. Quantities of fertilizers and pesticides applied in the two subwatersheds were compared with quantities of nutrients and pesticides in rainfall and runoff. For the study period, total rainfall was greater than average. Most of the runoff from the two subwatersheds occurred in response to a few specific storm periods. The West Oso Creek subwatershed produced more runoff during the study period than the Oso Creek tributary subwatershed, 13.95 inches compared with 9.45 inches. Runoff response was quicker and peak flows were higher in the West Oso Creek subwatershed than in the Oso Creek tributary subwatershed. Total nitrogen runoff yield for the 3-year study period averaged 2.62 pounds per acre per year from the West Oso Creek subwatershed and 0.839 pound per acre per year from the Oso Creek tributary subwatershed. Total phosphorus yields from the West Oso Creek and Oso Creek tributary subwatersheds for the 3-year period were 0.644 and 0.419 pound per acre per year, respectively. Runoff yields of nitrogen and phosphorus were relatively small compared to inputs of nitrogen in fertilizer and rainfall deposition. Average annual runoff yield of total nitrogen (subwatersheds combined) represents about 2.5 percent of nitrogen applied as fertilizer to cropland in the watershed and nitrogen entering the subwatersheds through rainfall deposition. Average annual runoff yield of total phosphorus (subwatersheds combined) represents about 4.0 percent of the phosphorus in applied fertilizer and rainfall deposition. Suspended-sediment yields from the West Oso Creek subwatershed were more than twice those from the Oso Creek tributary subwatershed. The average suspended-sediment yield from the West Oso Creek subwatershed was 522 pounds per acre per year and from the Oso Creek tributary subwatershed was 139 pounds per acre per year. Twenty-four herbicides and eight insecticides were detected in runoff samples collected at the two subwatershed outlets. At the West Oso Creek site, 19 herbicides and 4 insecticides were detected; at the Oso Creek tributary site, 18 herbicides and 6 insecticides were detected. Fourteen pesticides were detected in only one sample at low concentrations (near the laboratory reporting level). Atrazine and atrazine degradation byproduct 2-chloro-4-isopropylamino-6-amino-s-triazine (CIAT) were detected in all samples. Glyphosate and glyphosate byproduct aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) were detected in all samples collected and analyzed during water years 2006-07 but were not included in analysis for samples collected in water year 2008. Of all pesticides detected in runoff, the highest runoff yields w

Ockerman, Darwin J.; Fernandez, Carlos J.

2010-01-01

392

Hydrologic Conditions and Quality of Rainfall and Storm Runoff for Two Agricultural Areas of the Oso Creek Watershed, Nueces County, Texas, 2005-07  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board, Coastal Bend Bays and Estuaries Program, and Texas AgriLife Research and Extension Center at Corpus Christi, studied hydrologic conditions and quality of rainfall and storm runoff of two (primarily) agricultural areas (subwatersheds) of the Oso Creek watershed in Nueces County, Texas. One area, the upper West Oso Creek subwatershed, is 5,145 acres. The other area, a subwatershed drained by an unnamed Oso Creek tributary (hereinafter, Oso Creek tributary), is 5,287 acres. Rainfall and runoff (streamflow) were continuously monitored at the outlets of the two subwatersheds during October 2005-September 2007. Fourteen rainfall samples were collected and analyzed for nutrients and major inorganic ions. Nineteen composite runoff samples (10 West Oso Creek, nine Oso Creek tributary) were collected and analyzed for nutrients, major inorganic ions, and pesticides. Twenty-two discrete suspended-sediment samples (10 West Oso Creek, 12 Oso Creek tributary) and 13 bacteria samples (eight West Oso Creek, five Oso Creek tributary) were collected and analyzed. These data were used to estimate, for selected constituents, rainfall deposition to and runoff loads and yields from the study subwatersheds. Quantities of fertilizers and pesticides applied in the subwatersheds were compared with quantities of nutrients and pesticides in rainfall and runoff. For the study period, total rainfall was greater than average. Most of the runoff at both subwatershed outlet sites occurred in response to a few specific storm periods. The West Oso Creek subwatershed produced more runoff during the study period than the Oso Creek tributary subwatershed, 10.83 inches compared with 7.28 inches. Runoff response was quicker and peak flows were higher in the West Oso Creek subwatershed than in the Oso Creek tributary subwatershed. Total nitrogen runoff yield for the 2-year study period averaged 2.61 pounds per acre per year from the West Oso Creek subwatershed and 0.966 pound per acre per year from the Oso Creek tributary subwatershed. Total phosphorus yields from the West Oso Creek and the Oso Creek tributary subwatersheds for the 2-year period were 0.776 and 0.498 pound per acre per year. Runoff yields of nitrogen and phosphorus were relatively small compared to inputs of nitrogen in fertilizer and rainfall deposition. Average annual runoff yield of total nitrogen (subwatersheds combined) represents about 2.4 percent of nitrogen applied as fertilizer and nitrogen entering the subwatersheds through rainfall deposition. Average annual runoff yield of total phosphorus (subwatersheds combined) represents about 4.4 percent of the phosphorus in applied fertilizer and rainfall deposition. Suspended-sediment yields from the West Oso Creek subwatershed were more than twice those from the Oso Creek tributary subwatershed. The average suspended-sediment yield from the West Oso Creek subwatershed was 582 pounds per acre per year. The average suspended-sediment yield from the Oso Creek tributary subwatershed was 257 pounds per acre per year. Twenty-two herbicides and eight insecticides were detected in runoff samples collected from the two subwatershed outlet sites. At the West Oso Creek site, 18 herbicides and four insecticides were detected, and at the Oso Creek tributary site, 17 herbicides and six insecticides. Seventeen pesticides were detected in only one sample at low concentrations (near the laboratory reporting level). Atrazine, atrazine degradation byproducts 2-chloro-4-isopropylamino-6-amino-s-triazine (CIAT) and 2-hydroxy-4-isopropylamino-6-ethylamino-s-triazine (OIET), glyphosate, and glyphosate byproduct aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) were detected in all samples. Of all pesticides detected in runoff, the highest runoff yields were for glyphosate, 0.013 pound per acre per year for the West Oso Creek subwatershed and 0.001 pound per acre per year for the Oso Creek t

Ockerman, Darwin J.

2008-01-01

393

National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Oklahoma City Quadrangle, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reconnaissance and detailed geologic and radiometric investigations were conducted throughout the Oklahoma City Quadrangle, Oklahoma, to evaluate the uranium favorability using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria. Surface and subsurface studies were augmented by data from aerial radiometric surveys, hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance studies, basement-rock computer modeling studies, and Track Etch surveys. The results indicate that there are no environments favorable

J. R. Derby; L. P. Upshaw; E. O. Carter; L. F. Roach; D. G. Roach

1982-01-01

394

Spatial patterns of ice storm disturbance in the forested landscape of Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas and Oklahoma  

E-print Network

SPATIAL PATTERNS OF ICE STORM DISTURBANCE IN THE FORESTED LANDSCAPE OF OUACHITA MOUNTAINS, ARKANSAS AND OKLAHOMA A Thesis by RACHEL E. ISAACS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... by RACHEL E. ISAACS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, Charles W. Lafon Committee Members, Andrew...

Isaacs, Rachel E.

2009-05-15

395

A DIGITAL GEOLOGIC MAP DATABASE FOR THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report consists of a compilation of twelve digital geologic maps provided in ARC\\/INFO interchange (e00) format for the state of Oklahoma. The source maps consisted of nine USGS 1:250,000-scale quadrangle maps and three 1:125,000 scale county maps. This publication presents a digital composite of these data intact and without modification across quadrangle boundaries to resolve geologic unit discontinuities. An

William D. Heran; Gregory N. Green; Douglas B. Stoeser

396

Texas 4-H Report Form  

E-print Network

: ____________________________________ Review the specific regulations for award programs as found in the Texas 4-H Clover Opportunities Handbook before checking 4-H recordbooks. ITEM REQUIRED AT STATE COUNTY DISTRICT STATE 1.Personal Information Page Appropriate Signatures (Books not signed... Handbook and Texas 4-H Member Record Keeping System Guidelines and Instructions for any additional information required with the 4-H Recordbook. Attach this page in the front of each recordbook before being judged at the county level. The same check sheet...

Lepley, Toby

2000-08-01

397

Analysis of site structure and post-depositional disturbance at two Early Holocene components, Richard Beene site (41BX831), Bexar County, Texas  

E-print Network

the Richard Beene site and the data utilized during the analysis. 7 CHAPTER II ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING Interaction between physiography, climate, and biotic resources during both modern and prehistoric times is important in understanding the setting... SOUTH TEXAS PLAINS EDWARDS PLATEAU EDWARDS PLATEAU Richard Beene Site Figure 2. Physiographic regions of Texas based on Gould et al. (1960). 10 The South Texas Plains region is characterized by its transitional nature between the tropical climate...

Mason, James Bryan

2004-09-30

398

University of Oklahoma Police Department  

E-print Network

University of Oklahoma Police Department Case Log Media Apr 09, 2014 Jun 09, 2014From to Date incidents occurred off-campus and have been reported to the local police. Disposition: Date Reported)Disposition: 1Page No.11:00:0806/10/2014Print Date and Time at #12;University of Oklahoma Police Department Case

Oklahoma, University of

399

Indicators of morale of county agricultural extension agents in Texas and an examination of their functional relationship to the Extension Service as a social system  

E-print Network

cities listed among the 100 largest cities in the United States. 5 Many counties contiguous to cities have recently become urban. Since the Extension Sezvice is partially supported by county funds, and many local people have developed a vested... cities listed among the 100 largest cities in the United States. 5 Many counties contiguous to cities have recently become urban. Since the Extension Sezvice is partially supported by county funds, and many local people have developed a vested...

Bullard, Delbert Lance

2012-06-07

400

Herps of Texas  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Funded by the University of Texas and the Texas Memorial Museum, this Website offers useful life history information on the Herps (lizards, turtles, snakes, crocodilians, salamanders, frogs, and toads) of Texas. Each broad group is further classified into Families, and each species is identified by scientific (Latin) and common name. To access descriptive and graphical information, click on the species of choice. Each species entry includes one or more color photograph(s), diagnostic features, natural history information, and a color range map (presence:absence, by county). The concise information in this useful resource should be helpful to seasoned researchers and beginners, alike.

401

Oklahoma Indians and the Cultural Deprivation of an Oklahoma Cherokee Family.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper summarizes the history of Oklahoma Indians, highlights the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, and relates the story of the family of one Oklahoma Cherokee woman, Lou Jane Morgan Jernigan. Oklahoma is the state with the largest population of Indians, largely due to federal policy in the 19th century, which forced Indians into Oklahoma (or

Shaver, Lynda Dixon

402

78 FR 32007 - Environmental Impact Statement for Tulsa-Oklahoma City Passenger Rail Corridor, Oklahoma, Lincoln...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Statement for Tulsa--Oklahoma City Passenger Rail Corridor, Oklahoma, Lincoln, Creek...Oklahoma Department of Transportation (ODOT) Rail Division intend to prepare an EIS pursuant...for the State of Oklahoma High-Speed Rail Initiative: Tulsa--Oklahoma City...

2013-05-28

403

Chemical analyses of surface waters in Oklahoma, September - December, 1944  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Red River at Denison Dam, Texas Sport samples were collected at the remainder of the stations. The analyses of the spot samples were made largely in a laboratory provided by the Oklahoma A. & M. College, under the supervision of Dr. O.M. Smith, Head, Department of Chemistry; Dr. S.R. Wood, Associate Professor of Chemistry; and W.W. Hastings, U.S. Geological Survey. The daily samples were analyzed in the water resources laboratory of the Geological Survey at Austin, Texas. These data have been summarized in a report to the Oklahoma Planning and Resources Board prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey, March 1, 1945. The streams of Oklahoma are classified into two major drainage basins: the Arkansas River and the Red River and their tributaries. The attached analyses are arranged in geographical order for their respective drainage basins, with records listed in downstream order for stations on the main stem first, followed by the analyses for the tributaries. When available, the mean daily discharge is given for the analyses.

U.S. Geological Survey

1945-01-01

404

Wheat Production in Texas.  

E-print Network

of bakery flour. Comanche (Oro x Tenmarq) was developer1 by the Kansas station but distributed simultane- ously by the Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas sta- tions in 1942. The variety is widely adapted and because of its excellent milling and baking char... 57.0 5-1 6-1 4 56.3 5-3 5-29 Figure 14. Bread dough as mixed in a modern bakery plant. This mass of dough will produce hundreds of loaves of bread. are mild, so intermediate winter-type and true spring-type wheat varieties may be grown from...

Atkins, I. M.; Porter, K. B.; Lahr, Keith; Merkle, Owen G.; Futrell, M. C.

1960-01-01

405

4-H Clothing and Textiles Advisory Board The Texas 4-H Clothing and Textiles Advisory Board offers 4-H members, volunteer leaders, and county  

E-print Network

4-H Clothing and Textiles Advisory Board The Texas 4-H Clothing and Textiles Advisory Board offers. The Texas 4-H Clothing and Textiles Advisory Board provides the leadership and coordination of the State Fashion Show. Purpose of the 4-H Clothing and Textiles Advisory Board Provide vision for the future

406

Effects of brush management on the hydrologic budget and water quality in and adjacent to Honey Creek State Natural Area, Comal County, Texas, 2001-10  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service, the Edwards Region Grazing Lands Conservation Initiative, the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board, the San Antonio River Authority, the Edwards Aquifer Authority, Texas Parks and Wildlife, the Guadalupe Blanco River Authority, and the San Antonio Water System, evaluated the hydrologic effects of ashe juniper (Juniperus ashei) removal as a brush management conservation practice in and adjacent to the Honey Creek State Natural Area in Comal County, Tex. By removing the ashe juniper and allowing native grasses to reestablish in the area as a brush management conservation practice, the hydrology in the watershed might change. Using a simplified mass balance approach of the hydrologic cycle, the incoming rainfall was distributed to surface water runoff, evapotranspiration, or groundwater recharge. After hydrologic data were collected in adjacent watersheds for 3 years, brush management occurred on the treatment watershed while the reference watershed was left in its original condition. Hydrologic data were collected for another 6 years. Hydrologic data include rainfall, streamflow, evapotranspiration, and water quality. Groundwater recharge was not directly measured but potential groundwater recharge was calculated using a simplified mass balance approach. The resulting hydrologic datasets were examined for differences between the watersheds and between pre- and post-treatment periods to assess the effects of brush management. The streamflow to rainfall relation (expressed as event unit runoff to event rainfall relation) did not change between the watersheds during pre- and post-treatment periods. The daily evapotranspiration rates at the reference watershed and treatment watershed sites exhibited a seasonal cycle during the pre- and post-treatment periods, with intra- and interannual variability. Statistical analyses indicate the mean difference in daily evapotranspiration rates between the two watershed sites is greater during the post-treatment than the pre-treatment period. Average annual rainfall, streamflow, evapotranspiration, and potential groundwater-recharge conditions were incorporated into a single hydrologic budget (expressed as a percentage of the average annual rainfall) applied to each watershed before and after treatment to evaluate the effects of brush management. During the post-treatment period, the percent average annual unit runoff in the reference watershed was similar to that in the treatment watershed, however, the difference in percentages of average annual evapotranspiration and potential groundwater recharge were more appreciable between the reference and treatment watersheds than during the pre-treatment period. Using graphical comparisons, no notable differences in major ion or nutrient concentrations were found between samples collected at the reference watershed (site 1C) and treatment watershed (site 2C) during pre- and post-treatment periods. Suspended-sediment loads were calculated from samples collected at sites 1C and 2T. The relation between suspended-sediment loads and streamflow calculated from samples collected from sites 1C and 2T did not exhibit a statistically significant difference during the pre-treatment period, whereas during the post-treatment period, relation between suspended-sediment loads and streamflow did exhibit a statistically significant difference. The suspended-sediment load to streamflow relations indicate that for the same streamflow, the suspended-sediment loads calculated from site 2T were generally less than suspended-sediment loads calculated from site 1C during the post-treatment period.

Banta, J. Ryan; Slattery, Richard N.

2011-01-01

407

77 FR 66601 - Northern Natural Gas Company; Notice of Availability of the Environmental Assessment for the...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...A-Line. These facilities are located in Ochiltree, Hansford, Hutchinson, and Carson Counties, Texas; Beaver County, Oklahoma...Texas, milepost (MP) 7.75; A-Line Block Valve 5, Hutchinson County, Texas, MP 29.75; Spearman Compressor...

2012-11-06

408

9th Annual Oklahoma Native American Youth Language Fair Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History  

E-print Network

categories of performance each divided by age. · Spoken Language (Pre9th Annual Oklahoma Native American Youth Language Fair Sam Noble Oklahoma from the Oklahoma Native American Youth Language Fair! We are pleased

Oklahoma, University of

409

Extension programs serve people of all ages regardless of socioeconomic level, race, color, sex, religion, disability, or national origin. The Texas A&M University System, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the County Commissioners Courts of Texas Cooper  

E-print Network

, religion, disability, or national origin. The Texas A&M University System, U.S. Department of Agriculture Research and Inspiration 1 Capturing Ideas 5 Design Definitions Definitions 7 Principles 9 Proportion

410

Rate of Water Evaporation in Texas.  

E-print Network

6000-L180 EX AS AtiRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. R. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION. BRAZOS COU-NTY, TEXAS BULLETIN NO. 484 NOVEMBER, 1933 Rate of Water Evaporation in Texas A( rURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS T. 0. WALTON... with Texas Extension Service. bandman lsbandman 7: nt rist Losses of water through evaporation from reservoirs is an important consideration in the planning for an adequate supply for domestic, municipal, or irrigation purposes and the rate...

Karper, R. E. (Robert Earl)

1933-01-01

411

Regional Interstate Planning Project Program... Bilingual/Multicultural Education Seminar Report (San Antonio, Texas, November 17, 18, 19, 1976).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Sponsored by 10 State departments of education (Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, Utah, and Wyoming), the Project participants met in San Antonio, Texas, on November 17-19, 1976 to discuss bilingual/multicultural education. Since Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas have had significant experience in this field and

Huber, Jake, Ed.; And Others

412

Tardigrada from Brazos County, Texas  

E-print Network

(E. ) tamus n. sp. H~h' (H. ) *he h' ' D y e 13 13 16 Key to the Macrobiotus of the United States . 17 Macrobiotus furcatus Ehrenburg Macrobiotus occidentalis Murray Macrobiotus richtersi Murray H'I e ' ~ea d' d Dy SURVEY RESULTS Summary... + II H. (H. ) oberhausezi--dorsal view 42 43 Buccal apparatus Claws fzom the fouzth pair of legs 43 43 M. furcatus--dorsal view of whole-mount 44 10 Buccal apparatus 44 Claws 44 12 M. occidentalis--side view 45 13 14 15 16 Monster...

Mehlen, Ronal Hugunin

2012-06-07

413

Folk narratives, archaeology, and descendant communities: a case study of the Albert J. Phillips Memorial Cemetery (41gv125), Galveston County, Texas  

E-print Network

is the performance of traditional narratives. The relocation of graves at the Albert J. Phillips Memorial Cemetery (41GV125), an AfricanAmerican burial locale in southeast Texas, provided numerous opportunities for interaction between archaeologists and members...

Powell, Leah Carson

2012-06-07

414

Industrial extension, the Oklahoma way  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Oklahoma has established a customer-driven industrial extension system. A publicly-chartered, private non-profit corporation, the Oklahoma Alliance for Manufacturing Excellence, Inc. (`the Alliance') coordinates the system. The system incorporates principles that Oklahoma manufacturers value: (1) decentralization and local accessibility; (2) coordinated existing resources; (3) comprehensive help; (4) interfirm cooperation; (5) pro-active outreach; (6) self- help and commitment from firms; (7) customer governance; and (8) performance accountability. The Oklahoma system consists of: (1) a network of locally-based broker/agents who work directly with manufacturers to diagnose problems and find appropriate assistance; (2) a group of industry sector specialists who collect and disseminate sector specific technological and market intelligence to the broker/agents and their clients; (3) all the specialized public and private sector resources coordinated by the system; and (4) a customer- driven coordination and evaluation mechanism, the Alliance.

Farrell, Edmund J.

1994-03-01

415

Promoting School Readiness in Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The results of the research, conducted on Oklahoma's universal Pre-kindergarten (Pre-k) program, on children of Tulsa Public Schools (TPS), the largest school district in the state to increase the school readiness are presented.

Gormley, William T., Jr.; Gayer, Ted

2005-01-01

416

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA GRADUATE COLLEGE  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA GRADUATE COLLEGE THE IMPACT OF SINGLE- AND MULTI-MOMENT MICROPHYSICS an immense debt of gratitude. Dr. Kelvin Droegemeier was one of the first professors I met when I first came

Xue, Ming

417

Oklahoma Industrial Energy Management Program  

E-print Network

, closed circuit television short courses on selected energy management topics, energy auditing, industrial energy audits (through the Oklahoma Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Center) , energy and water management research, and two courses currently being...

Turner, W. C.; Estes, C. B.

1982-01-01

418

Heat flow in Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Oklahoma is one area in which terrestrial heat flow data are sparse. The thermal state of the southern mid-continent, however, is a key to understanding several important geologic problems. These include thermal anomalies associated with Paleozoic fluid migrations and the formation of Mississippi Valley-type lead-zinc deposits, the thermal evolution of the Arkoma and Anadarko sedimentary basins, and the history of hydrocarbon generation and overpressuring in the Anadarko Basin. In the late 1920s, the American Petroleum Institute made a set of equilibrium temperature logs in idle oil wells. These temperature data are generally regarded as being high quality, accurate estimates of rock temperature and they cover the entire central part of Oklahoma. Average thermal gradients in the API survey range from 14 to 43 [sup 0]C/km (average 31.2 [sup 0]C/km) over depth intervals that extend from the surface to a an average depth of 961 m. Geothermal gradients decrease from NNE to SSW. The observed change in thermal gradients could be due to a number of factors. The change in thermal gradients could simply reflect changes in lithology and thermal conductivity. Alternatively, the variation in thermal gradients could be indicative of a change in heat flow related perhaps to variations in the concentration of radioactive heat-producing elements in the crust or heat transport by one or more regional groundwater flow systems. We are proceeding to reduce ambiguity in interpretation by estimating heat flow from thermal conductivity measurements on drill cuttings and heat production from available gamma-ray logs which penetrate basement rocks.

Cranganu, C.; Deming, D. (Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States))

1996-01-01

419

Heat flow in Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Oklahoma is one area in which terrestrial heat flow data are sparse. The thermal state of the southern mid-continent, however, is a key to understanding several important geologic problems. These include thermal anomalies associated with Paleozoic fluid migrations and the formation of Mississippi Valley-type lead-zinc deposits, the thermal evolution of the Arkoma and Anadarko sedimentary basins, and the history of hydrocarbon generation and overpressuring in the Anadarko Basin. In the late 1920s, the American Petroleum Institute made a set of equilibrium temperature logs in idle oil wells. These temperature data are generally regarded as being high quality, accurate estimates of rock temperature and they cover the entire central part of Oklahoma. Average thermal gradients in the API survey range from 14 to 43 {sup 0}C/km (average 31.2 {sup 0}C/km) over depth intervals that extend from the surface to a an average depth of 961 m. Geothermal gradients decrease from NNE to SSW. The observed change in thermal gradients could be due to a number of factors. The change in thermal gradients could simply reflect changes in lithology and thermal conductivity. Alternatively, the variation in thermal gradients could be indicative of a change in heat flow related perhaps to variations in the concentration of radioactive heat-producing elements in the crust or heat transport by one or more regional groundwater flow systems. We are proceeding to reduce ambiguity in interpretation by estimating heat flow from thermal conductivity measurements on drill cuttings and heat production from available gamma-ray logs which penetrate basement rocks.

Cranganu, C.; Deming, D. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

1996-12-31

420

40 CFR 81.65 - Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Air Quality Control Region, designated on December 8, 1970, and consisting of the counties of Barton, Jasper, McDonald, and Newton in the State of Missouri and Craig, Delaware, and Ottawa in the State of Oklahoma, is revoked effective upon...

2011-07-01

421

40 CFR 81.65 - Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Air Quality Control Region, designated on December 8, 1970, and consisting of the counties of Barton, Jasper, McDonald, and Newton in the State of Missouri and Craig, Delaware, and Ottawa in the State of Oklahoma, is revoked effective upon...

2013-07-01

422

40 CFR 81.65 - Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region.  

...Air Quality Control Region, designated on December 8, 1970, and consisting of the counties of Barton, Jasper, McDonald, and Newton in the State of Missouri and Craig, Delaware, and Ottawa in the State of Oklahoma, is revoked effective upon...

2014-07-01

423

Fort Cobb Reservoir Watershed, Oklahoma and Thika River Watershed, Kenya Twinning Pilot Project  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Fort Cobb Reservoir Watershed (FCRW) (830 km2) is a watershed within the HELP Washita Basin, located in Caddo and Washita Counties, OK. It is also a benchmark watershed under USDA's Conservation Effects Assessment Project, a national project to quantify environmental effects of USDA and other conservation programs. Population in south-western Oklahoma, in which FCRW is located, is sparse and

D. Moriasi; J. Steiner; J. Arnold; P. Allen; J. Dunbar; C. Shisanya; J. Gathenya; J. Nyaoro; J. Sang

2007-01-01

424

A conceptual model of the hydrogeologic framework, geochemistry, and groundwater-flow system of the Edwards-Trinity and related aquifers in the Pecos County region, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A conceptual model of the hydrogeologic framework, geochemistry, and groundwater-flow system of the Edwards-Trinity and related aquifers, which include the Pecos Valley, Igneous, Dockum, Rustler, and Capitan Reef aquifers, was developed as the second phase of a groundwater availability study in the Pecos County region in west Texas. The first phase of the study was to collect and compile groundwater, surface-water, water-quality, geophysical, and geologic data in the area. The third phase of the study involves a numerical groundwater-flow model of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer in order to simulate groundwater conditions based on various groundwater-withdrawal scenarios. Resource managers plan to use the results of the study to establish management strategies for the groundwater system. The hydrogeologic framework is composed of the hydrostratigraphy, structural features, and hydraulic properties of the groundwater system. Well and geophysical logs were interpreted to define the top and base surfaces of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer units. Elevations of the top and base of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer generally decrease from the southwestern part of the study area to the northeast. The thicknesses of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer units were calculated using the interpolated top and base surfaces of the hydrostratigraphic units. Some of the thinnest sections of the aquifer were in the eastern part of the study area and some of the thickest sections were in the Pecos, Monument Draw, and Belding-Coyanosa trough areas. Normal-fault zones, which formed as growth and collapse features as sediments were deposited along the margins of more resistant rocks and as overlying sediments collapsed into the voids created by the dissolution of Permian-age evaporite deposits, were delineated based on the interpretation of hydrostratigraphic cross sections. The lowest aquifer transmissivity values were measured in the eastern part of the study area; the highest transmissivity values were measured in a faulted area of the Monument Draw trough. Hydraulic conductivity values generally exhibited the same trends as the transmissivity values. Groundwater-quality data and groundwater-level data were used in context with the hydrogeologic framework to assess the chemical characteristics of water from different sources, regional groundwater-flow paths, recharge sources, the mixing of water from different sources, and discharge in the study area. Groundwater-level altitudes generally decrease from southwest to northeast and regional groundwater flow is from areas of recharge south and west to the north and northeast. Four principal sources of recharge to the Edwards-Trinity aquifer were identified: (1) regional flow that originated as recharge northwest of the study area, (2) runoff from the Barilla, Davis, and Glass Mountains, (3) return flow from irrigation, and (4) upwelling from deeper aquifers. Results indicated Edwards-Trinity aquifer water in the study area was dominated by mineralized, regional groundwater flow that most likely recharged during the cooler, wetter climates of the Pleistocene with variable contributions of recent, local recharge. Groundwater generally flows into the down-dip extent of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer where it discharges into overlying or underlying aquifer units, discharges from springs, discharges to the Pecos River, follows a regional flow path east out of the study area, or is withdrawn by groundwater wells. Structural features such as mountains, troughs, and faults play a substantial role in the distribution of recharge, local and regional groundwater flow, spring discharge, and aquifer interaction.

Bumgarner, Johnathan R.; Stanton, Gregory P.; Teeple, Andrew P.; Thomas, Jonathan V.; Houston, Natalie A.; Payne, Jason D.; Musgrove, MaryLynn

2012-01-01

425

Geophysical Analysis of the Salmon Peak Formation Near Amistad Reservoir Dam, Val Verde County, Texas, and Coahuila, Mexico, March 2006, to Aid in Piezometer Placement  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Since 1992, numerous sinkholes have developed northwest of the Amistad Reservoir dam on the Rio Grande. Increases in the discharge of springs south of the dam, on the western side of the Rio Grande, in Coahuila, Mexico, have been documented. In 1995 the Mexico Section of the International Boundary and Water Commission (IBWC) completed a study of the western embankment (Coahuila, Mexico) of the dam that included surface geophysics, borehole geophysics, and installation of piezometers to learn more about subsurface conditions. As part of a 5-year safety inspection in 2005, technical advisors recommended that one line of similarly constructed piezometers be installed on the eastern embankment (Val Verde County, Texas) of the dam for comparison of water levels (potentiometric head) on both the western and eastern embankments of Amistad Reservoir dam. To provide technical assistance for the horizontal and vertical placement of piezometers on the eastern embankment of Amistad Reservoir dam, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Section of the IBWC, conducted a study along both the western and eastern embankments of Amistad Reservoir dam. The study involved an integrated approach using surface and borehole geophysical methods. In the western embankment investigation, geological and geophysical characteristics that indicate relatively large water-yielding properties of the Salmon Peak Formation were identified. The direct-current (DC) resistivity method was selected as the surface geophysical reconnaissance technique to correlate relatively large water-yielding properties of the Salmon Peak Formation, identified from analysis of borehole geophysical logs, with variations in subsurface resistivity. The dipole-dipole array and the reciprocal Schlumberger array were selected as the most applicable DC resistivity arrays. Two resistivity units were identified in both the dipole-dipole array data and the reciprocal Schlumberger array data along DC resistivity profiles on both embankments. Resistivity unit 1 generally is of relatively low resistivity, ranging from 45 to 150 ohm-meters compared with resistivity unit 2, which ranges from 120 to 345 ohm-meters (depending on the DC array type). The presence of mapped sinkholes in the reservoir north of the western embankment study area and the zone of increased water content (as indicated by zones of low neutron log count rates in nearby piezometers) leads to the conclusion that resistivity unit 1 is a preferential flow path where surface water from Amistad Reservoir is forced into the ground-water system (because of increased head from the reservoir). In the eastern embankment investigation, trends in the spatial distribution of sinkholes and the occurrence of weathered zones were identified from geologic descriptions of cores. The correlation of surface geophysical DC resistivity, historical lithologic data, and general trend of documented sinkholes along the eastern end of the eastern embankment profile were used to justify further exploration (drilling of piezometers) in the eastern expression of resistivity unit 1. The spatial location of the piezometers and the screened intervals were selected to best match the locations of the screened intervals of the western embankment piezometers. Six piezometers were installed on the eastern embankment and logged using borehole geophysical techniques. Surface DC resistivity sections superimposed on the resistivity logs for two piezometers indicate three discernible resistivity units that correlate with resistivity units 2, 1, and 2, respectively, identified in the western embankment study area. Resistivity units 1 and 2 in the DC resistivity profiles generally correspond with low and high resistivity zones, respectively, on the normal and lateral resistivity logs collected in the nearby piezometers at the time of installation.

Stanton, Gregory P.; Kress, Wade H.; Teeple, Andrew P.; Greenslate, Michael L.; Clark, Allan K.

2007-01-01

426

Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Hunton formation in Oklahoma has been the subject of attention for the last ten years. The new interest started with the drilling of the West Carney field in 1995 in Lincoln County. Subsequently, many other operators have expanded the search for oil and gas in Hunton formation in other parts of Oklahoma. These fields exhibit many unique production characteristics, including: (1) decreasing water-oil or water-gas ratio over time; (2) decreasing gas-oil ratio followed by an increase; (3) poor prediction capability of the reserves based on the log data; and (4) low geological connectivity but high hydrodynamic connectivity. The purpose of this investigation is to understand the principal mechanisms affecting the production, and propose methods by which we can optimize the production from fields with similar characteristics.

Mohan Kelkar

2007-06-30

427

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

://osufacts.okstate.edu Lease Hunting Opportunities for Oklahoma Landowners Michael D. Porter Regional Manager/Wildlife, and manage wildlife resources. Lease hunting has occurred in Oklahoma as far back as the 1940s. Many Oklahoma of wildlife hunted on Oklahoma hunting leases is native wildlife. Private land managers control wildlife

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

428

Geoscience\\/engineering characterization of the interwell environment in carbonate reservoirs based on outcrop analogs, Permian Basin, West Texas and New Mexico--waterflood performance analysis for the South Cowden Grayburg Reservoir, Ector County, Texas. Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

A reservoir engineering study was conducted of waterflood performance in the South Cowden field, an Upper Permian Grayburg reservoir on the Central Basin Platform in West Texas. The study was undertaken to understand the historically poor waterflood performance, evaluate three techniques for incorporating petrophysical measurements and geological interpretation into heterogeneous reservoir models, and identify issues in heterogeneity modeling and fluid-flow

J. W. Jr

1997-01-01

429

Extension Programs serve people of all ages regardless of race, color, religion, disability or national origin. The Texas A&M University System, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the County Courts of Texas cooperating  

E-print Network

Extension Programs serve people of all ages regardless of race, color, religion, disability, color, religion, disability or national origin. The Texas A&M University System, U.S. Department of any electrical or fire safety hazards such as exposed wiring, extension cords, nonworking emergency

430

Irrigated Sugarbeets: Yield Response and Profit Implications, Texas High Plains.  

E-print Network

* Sugarbeets (Beta vulgaris L.) in Texas are grown solely in the High Plains. In 1985, four counties (Castro, Deaf Smith, Parmer, and Randall) contributed 98 percent of the 37,000 acres of sugarbeets harvested in Texas (Texas Agricultural Statistics Service.... Sugarbeets are typically grown on ~ Respectively, research associate, agricultural economist; professor, agronomist; professor, agricultural economist, Texas Agricultural Ex riment Station, Amarillo, Texas Keywords: Beta vulgaris L., production function...

Lansford, Vernon D.; Winter S.R.; Harman, W.L.

1990-01-01

431

The composition and diagenesis of the Upper Queen Formation (Guadalupian, Permian) at Concho Bluff North and Concho Bluff Queen Fields, Upton and Crane Counties, Texas  

E-print Network

Structure The Permian Basin of west Texas and southeastern New Mexico is a complex region of shelves, platforms, shelf margins, and basins that comprises an area of about 63, 000 miz (164, 000 kmz). The Permian Basin is bounded by four positive... Structure The Permian Basin of west Texas and southeastern New Mexico is a complex region of shelves, platforms, shelf margins, and basins that comprises an area of about 63, 000 miz (164, 000 kmz). The Permian Basin is bounded by four positive...

McKone, Charles Joseph

2012-06-07

432

Texas Agricultural Extension Service The Texas A&M University System  

E-print Network

-trostle@tamu.edu March 22, 2001 Contract guar acreage in the Texas South Plains and surrounding areas for 2000 was about 30,000 acres. Most acreage in 2000 was concentrated in Terry county (close to a contractor) and west Dawson County and far east Gaines County (after hailed-out cotton in early July). Past Production

Mukhtar, Saqib

433

Chickasaw Plum for Wildlife in Oklahoma  

E-print Network

Chickasaw Plum for Wildlife in Oklahoma E-1026 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University #12;Chickasaw Plum for Wildlife is eaten by a variety of animals, including humans (Figure 2). Native American tribes, including the Pawnee

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

434

An investigation of key blow fly (Diptera:Calliphoridae) species of forensic importance occurring in Brazos and Burleson Counties of Central Texas  

E-print Network

committed in Texas, a database of pertinent information must be prepared. The two orders of insects that are most commonly used to help establish such things as time of death (Post Mortem Interval), location, and manner of death are Diptera and Coleoptera...

Tenorio, Felix Mariana

2012-06-07

435

Geologic framework of the Edwards Aquifer and upper confining unit, and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Edwards Aquifer, south-central Uvalde County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The stratigraphic units of the Edwards aquifer in south-central Uvalde County generally are porous and permeable. The stratigraphic units that compose the Edwards aquifer in south-central Uvalde County are the Devils River Formation in the Devils River trend; and the West Nueces, McKnight, and Salmon Peak Formations in the Maverick Basin. The Balcones fault zone is the principal structural feature in Uvalde County; however, the displacement along the fault zone is less in Uvalde County than in adjacent Medina and Bexar Counties to the east. The Uvalde Salient is a structural high in south-central Uvalde County, and consists of several closely connected crustal uplifts that bring Edwards aquifer strata to the surface generally forming prominent hills. The crustal uplifts forming this structural high are the remnants of intrusive and extrusive magnatic activity. Six primary faults?Cooks, Black Mountain, Blue Mountain, Uvalde, Agape, and Connor?cross the length of the study area from the southwest to the northeast juxtaposing the Lower Cretaceous Salmon Peak Formation at the surface in the northwestern part of the study area against Upper Cretaceous formations in the central part of the study area. In the study area, the porosity of the rocks in the Edwards aquifer is related to depositional or diagenetic elements along specific stratigraphic horizons (fabric selective) and to dissolution and structural elements that can occur in any lithostratigraphic horizon (not fabric selective). Permeability depends on the physical properties of the rock such as size, shape, distribution of pores, and fissuring and dissolution. The middle 185 feet of the lower part of the Devils River Formation, the upper part of the Devils River Formation, and the upper unit of the Salmon Peak Formation probably are the most porous and permeable stratigraphic zones of the Edwards aquifer in south-central Uvalde County.

Clark, Allan K.; Small, Ted A.

1997-01-01

436

Environmental Assessment for Central Power and Light Company`s proposed Military Highway-CFE tie 138/69-kV transmission line project Brownsville, Cameron County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Central Power and Light Company (CPL) intends to upgrade its existing transmission line ties with the Commision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) system in Mexico. CPL currently has a single 69-kilovolt (kV) transmission line in the Brownsville area which connects CPL`s system with the system of CFE. This existing line runs between the Brownsville Switching Station, located on Laredo Road in Brownsville, Cameron County, Texas, and an existing CFE 69-kV line at the Rusteberg Bend of the Rio Grande in Cameron County. Under current conditions of need, the existing 69-kV line does not possess sufficient capability to engage in appropriate power exchanges. Therefore, CPL is proposing to build a new line to link up with CFE. This proposed line would be a double-circuit line, which would (1) continue (on a slightly relocated route) the existing 69-kV tie from CPL`s Brownsville Switching Station to CFE`s facilities, and (2) add a 138-kV tie from the Military Highway Substation, located on Military Highway (US Highway 281), to CFE`s facilities. The proposed 138/69-kV line, which will be constructed and operated by CPL, will be built primarily on steel single-pole structures within an average 60-foot (ft) wide right-of-way (ROW). It will be approximately 6900--9200 ft (1.3--1.7 miles) in length, depending on the alternative route constructed.

Not Available

1992-04-01

437

Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the work done so far on Hunton Formation in West Carney Field in Lincoln County, Oklahoma. West Carney Field produces oil and gas from the Hunton Formation. The field was developed starting in 1995. Some of the unique characteristics of the field include decreasing water oil and ratio over time, decreasing gas-oil ratio at the beginning of production, inability to calculate oil reserves in the field based on long data, and sustained oil rates over long periods of time.

Kelkar, Mohan

2001-05-08

438

Determination of reserves of methane from coal beds for use in rural communities in eastern Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Coal-bed methane has been classified as an unconventional source of gas by the U.S. Congress, and it has no Federal price limit. Thus, it is attracting considerable interest concerning its reserves, potential recovery, and use. Previous work in Oklahoma showed that approx. 1.3 tcf of identified coal-bed-methane resources is present in Haskell and Le Flore counties. Thus, the present study was undertaken to determine the feasibility of using methane from coal beds in rural areas in East Oklahoma, and to recommend general locations in which to drill from 500 to 1,800 ft deep to selected coal beds for methane production. Coal-bed-methane reserves have been identified in the Hartshorne coals (Desmoinesian) in the vicinities of Spiro and Poteau in Le Flore County and of Keota in Haskell County, all in the Arkoma Basin. These areas are recommended for exploratory drilling and production of coal-bed methane. 21 references.

Friedman, S.A.

1981-01-01

439

Estimate of self-supplied domestic water use in Oklahoma during 1980  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Reported or measured water-use data for the domestic self-supplied user were not available for Oklahoma; therefore estimates of water use within this classification were derived. The total self-supplied population in Oklahoma during 1980 was estimated to be 343,615, which was 11.4 percent of the total 1980 State population. The rate of water use by this group was estimated to be 56 gallons per capita per day. The estimated annual domestic self-supplied water use by county ranged from 10 to 1,180 acre-feet, with a total statewide use of 21,610 acre-feet.

Stoner, J. D.

1984-01-01

440

Analysis of Vertical Flow During Ambient and Pumped Conditions in Four Monitoring Wells at the Pantex Plant, Carson County, Texas, July-September 2008  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Pantex Plant is a U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (USDOE/NNSA)-owned, contractor-operated facility managed by Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Pantex, LLC (B&W Pantex) in Carson County, Texas, approximately 17 miles northeast of Amarillo. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with B&W Pantex through the USDOE/NNSA, made a series of flowmeter measurements and collected other borehole geophysical logs during July-September 2008 to analyze vertical flow in screened intervals of four selected monitoring wells (PTX01-1012, PTX06-1044, PTX06-1056, and PTX06-1068) at the Pantex Plant. Hydraulic properties (transmissivity values) of the section of High Plains (Ogallala) aquifer penetrated by the wells also were computed. Geophysical data were collected under ambient and pumped flow conditions in the four monitoring wells. Unusually large drawdowns occurred at two monitoring wells (PTX06-1044 and PTX06-1056) while the wells were pumped at relatively low rates. A decision was made to redevelop those wells, and logs were run again after redevelopment in the two monitoring wells. Logs collected in monitoring well PTX01-1012 during ambient conditions indicate a dynamic environment that probably was affected by pumping of nearby irrigation or public-supply wells. During pumping, downward vertical flow of 0.2 to 2.1 gallons per minute that occurred during ambient conditions was either reversed or reduced. During pumping, a gradual trend of more positive flowmeter values (upward flow) with distance up the well was observed. Estimated total transmissivity for four production zones identified from Flow-B numerical model results taken together was calculated to be about 3,100 feet squared per day. Logs collected in monitoring well PTX06-1044 during ambient conditions before redevelopment indicate a static environment with no flow. During pumping there was upward vertical flow at rates ranging from 0.1 to about 1.5 gallons per minute. During pumping, a gradual trend of more positive flowmeter values (upward flow) with distance up the well was observed. Estimated total transmissivity before redevelopment for five production zones identified from Flow-B numerical model results, and transmissivity values for each zone, are considered to be in error because of the lack of communication between the well and the aquifer before redevelopment. After redevelopment, logs for well PTX06-1044 during ambient conditions indicate a near-static environment with minimal downward flow. During pumping there was upward vertical flow at rates ranging from 0.5 to about 4.8 gallons per minute. During pumping, a gradual trend of more positive flowmeter values with distance up the well was observed. Estimated total transmissivity after redevelopment for the same five identified production zones taken together was calculated to be about 520 feet squared per day. Logs collected in monitoring well PTX06-1056 during ambient conditions before redevelopment indicate a static environment with no flow. During pumping there was upward vertical flow at rates ranging from 0.3 to about 1.5 gallons per minute. During pumping, a gradual trend of more positive flowmeter values (upward flow) with distance up the well was observed. Estimated total transmissivity before redevelopment for four production zones identified from Flow-B numerical model results taken together was calculated to be about 450 feet squared per day. After redevelopment, logs collected in monitoring well PTX06-1056 during ambient conditions indicate a near-static environment with no flow except for a very small amount of downward flow near the bottom of the well. During pumping there was upward vertical flow at rates ranging from 0.7 to about 2.9 gallons per minute. Estimated total transmissivity after redevelopment for five production zones identified from Flow-B numerical model results taken together was calculated to be about 330 feet squared per day.

Stanton, Gregory P.; Thomas, Jonathan V.; Stoval, Jeffery

2009-01-01

441

Hydrogeologic Framework of the Salt Basin, New Mexico and Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Salt Basin is a closed drainage basin located in southeastern New Mexico (Otero, Chaves, and Eddy Counties), and northwestern Texas (Hudspeth, Culberson, Jeff Davis, and Presidio Counties), which can be divided into a northern and a southern system. Since the 1950s, extensive groundwater withdrawals have been associated with agricultural irrigation in the Dell City, Texas region, just south of

A. B. Ritchie; F. M. Phillips

2010-01-01

442

The Causes of Lung Cancer In Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

A population-based case-comparison interview study of lung cancer was conduetedI from 1979 to 1982 in six Texas coastal counties-Orange, Jefferson, Chambers, Harris, Gal- veston, and Brazoria-to evaluate the association of lung cancer with occupational and other environmental exposures . Lung cancer mortality rates in these counties consistently haveex- eeeded lung cancer mortality rates observed for Texas and the United States

THOMAS JJ MASOM

443

Environment of deposition of Lower Wilcox "Mula" sandstones, East Washburn and Big Mule fields, La Salle and McMullen Counties, Texas  

E-print Network

by continental shelf topography. The sandstones are classified as sublitharenites or lithic graywackes. They contain an average of 55% quartz, 4%%d feldspar, 14% rock fragments, 4% accessory minerals, and 23K matrix. Cement is largely silica in the form.... The Wilcox Group of South Texas was derived predominately from quartz-rich sources. The sed1ments were deposited largely in a nearshore environment along the former western marg1ns of the Gulf of Mexico. Problems have been encountered while determining...

Fowler, Rhonda Marie

2012-06-07

444

Digital Atlas of the Upper Washita River Basin, Southwestern Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Numerous types of environmental data have been collected in the upper Washita River basin in southwestern Oklahoma. However, to date these data have not been compiled into a format that can be comprehensively queried for the purpose of evaluating the effects of various conservation practices implemented to reduce agricultural runoff and erosion in parts of the upper Washita River basin. This U.S. Geological Survey publication, 'Digital atlas of the upper Washita River basin, southwestern Oklahoma' was created to assist with environmental analysis. This atlas contains 30 spatial data sets that can be used in environmental assessment and decision making for the upper Washita River basin. This digital atlas includes U.S. Geological Survey sampling sites and associated water-quality, biological, water-level, and streamflow data collected from 1903 to 2005. The data were retrieved from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System database on September 29, 2005. Data sets are from the Geology, Geography, and Water disciplines of the U.S. Geological Survey and cover parts of Beckham, Caddo, Canadian, Comanche, Custer, Dewey, Grady, Kiowa, and Washita Counties in southwestern Oklahoma. A bibliography of past reports from the U.S. Geological Survey and other State and Federal agencies from 1949 to 2004 is included in the atlas. Additionally, reports by Becker (2001), Martin (2002), Fairchild and others (2004), and Miller and Stanley (2005) are provided in electronic format.

Becker, Carol J.; Masoner, Jason R.; Scott, Jonathon C.

2008-01-01

445

The status and distribution of woodcock in Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The seasonal and spatial distributions of the American woodcock (Philohela minor) in Oklahoma were determined through field surveys and the collection of all known reports of woodcock sightings. Woodcock were reported in Oklahoma in all seasons and were most Jrequently sighted from 11 October to 10 January. The peak in fall migration occurred between 11 November and 10 December. Woodcock were found in 5 major areas across the eastern two-thirds of the state but 57 percent of the birds reported during the study were in the eastern one-third. A total of 148 displaying males were encountered on 25 sites in 15 of 29 counties included roadside singing ground surveys in 1975 and 1976. The peak number of displaying birds (58) was observed during the second IO-day period in February; displays occurred from January through late March. Personal observations plus data reported via volunteer survey cards, indicated that the typical site used for diurnal cover by woodcock in Oklahoma is a brushy bottomland with moist loamy soils, vegetated by oaks (Quercus spp.), elms (Ulmus spp,), bluestem grasses (Andropogon spp.), dogwoods (Cornus spp.) and green briars (Smilax spp.).

Barclay, J.S.; Smith, R.W.

1977-01-01

446

Fighting for Scholarships in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Fearing a federal court in Oklahoma might end a state-financed merit-scholarship program targeted by a discrimination lawsuit, black legislators passed a bill making the program race and gender neutral. State regents are criticized for failing to develop effective policy to remedy past discrimination. (MSE)

Roach, Ronald

1999-01-01

447

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA GRADUATE COLLEGE  

E-print Network

during the times when I felt like I was not getting anywhere. Additionally, I think that being able of the requirements for the Degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY By ALEXANDER DANIEL SCHENKMAN Norman, Oklahoma 2012 #12 would like to thank my advisor, Dr. Ming Xue, for his help, advice, and encouragement over the last four

Xue, Ming

448

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA RETIREMENT POLICY  

E-print Network

or degenerative nature. #12;F. "Disability Benefits" means benefits provided under the Health Plan of all benefits under the University of Oklahoma Retirement Policy. Any conflict between the terms of the Institution are entitled to certain benefits following the completion of a designated number of years

Oklahoma, University of

449

7 CFR 27.93 - Bona fide spot markets.  

...Montague, Wise, Parker, Erath, Comanche, Mills, San Saba, Mason, Sutton, Edwards, Kinney, Maverick, Webb, Zapata, Star and Hidalgo counties. West Texas All Texas counties not included in the East Texas, Oklahoma and Desert Southwest...

2014-01-01

450

75 FR 31463 - Comal County Regional Habitat Conservation Plan, Comal County, TX  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...SUMMARY: Comal County, Texas (Applicant), has applied to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife...Policy Act (NEPA; 42 U.S.C. 4371 et seq...of an ITP to Comal County; and that the Applicant...going to the Comal County Web site at http...Field Supervisor, by U.S. mail at...

2010-06-03

451

Dental Decay Among Texas School Children.  

E-print Network

'WXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIOP *4. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION. BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS ULLET 'IN NO. DIVISION OF RURAL HOME RESEARCH url rNTAL DECAY AMONG ,,XAS SCHOOL CHILDREN ICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS T. 0.... S. Department of Agriculture. $In cooperation with Texaa Extension Service. lmong 6701 school children of Texas, dental decay was fot in approximately 70 per cent of the white group, 65 per cent o the Mexican, and 45 per cent of the negro...

Whitacre, Jessie (Jessie Opal)

1934-01-01

452

The effects of bus transportation on grades, attendance records, and participation in extra-curricular activities of high school students in Tyler County, Texas, 1953  

E-print Network

Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and !Cschanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of ths rsquirsmenta for the degree of WJLSTER OF SCI':NCE August 1953 Ma/or Sub]sett Rural Sociology AC KROWLEIX'r EVERT Acknowledgement... Homemaking Civics Music ths subJects you Plans Geometry Shorthand Typing Vocational Agz'i? culture If you were taking some subJect that is not listed above, please list the subJect and grads received, 2 ~ 3 ~ 10 ~ From the following list of sports...

McEntire, Gerald

2012-06-07

453

Statewide summary for Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Texas coast (Figure 1) consists of complex and diverse ecosystems with a varying precipitation gradient. The northernmost portion of the coast, extending from Sabine Lake to Galveston Bay, is composed of salt, brackish, intermediate, and fresh marshes, with humid flatwoods inland (Moulton and others, 1997). Coastal prairies are found across the entire coast. From Galveston Bay to Corpus Christi Bay, rivers feed into large bays and estuarine ecosystems. Barrier islands and peninsulas exist along the coast from Galveston Bay to the Mexican border. The southernmost portion of the coast is composed of wind-tidal flats and the hypersaline Laguna Madre. The Laguna Madre lacks rivers and has little rainfall and restricted inlet access to the Gulf. Semiarid rangeland and irrigated agricultural land can be found inland. Approximately 6 million people live in Texas coastal counties (U.S. Census Bureau, 2010; Texas GLO, 2013). Seventy percent of the states industry and commerce occurs within 160.9 km (100 miles) of the coast (Moulton and others, 1997). Texas ports support 1.4 million jobs and generate $6.5 billion in tax revenues (Texas GLO, 2013). Chemical and petroleum production and marine commerce thrive on the Texas coast. Agriculture, grazing, commercial and recreational fishing, and recreation and tourism are strong industries along the coast and in adjacent areas; oil and gas production, agriculture, and tourism are the states three largest industries. Seafood landed at Texas ports valued $240 million in 2011, and recreational saltwater fishing alone provided nearly 17,000 jobs (Texas GLO, 2013). Fishes directly dependent upon wetland habitats include multiple shrimp species, blue crab, eastern oyster, black drum, flounder, sheepshead, and snapper. Texas has the highest number of hunters, anglers, and hunting expenditures in the nation (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 2012). Hunting yields $2.3 billion for the state, and recreational fishing yields $3.2 billion. Texas is the top birding destination in the Nation. Tourism in Texas generates $7.5 billion for the state, and wildlife viewing generates $2.9 billion.

Handley, Lawrence R.; Spear, Kathryn A.; Gibeaut, Jim; Thatcher, Cindy

2014-01-01

454

Provide Assistance to Improve Water Quality in Hood County  

E-print Network

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND LIFE SCIENCES TR-391 2010 Provide Assistance to Improve Water Quality in Hood County By Bruce Lesikar, Justin Mechell, Brent Clayton & Ryan Gerlich Department... Technical Report No. 391 Texas A&M University System College Station, Texas 77843-2118 September 2010 Table of Contents for Provide Assistance to Improve Water Quality in Hood County Introduction...

Lesikar, Bruce; Mechell, Justin; Clayton, Brent; Gerlich, Ryan

455

Oklahoma Building Stones  

E-print Network

carbonate w i t h but a small t r a c e of water. I t s s p e c i f i c g r a v i t y i s 2.656 and i t absorbs 3.07% of water. I t s hardness i s about 21, i t i s compact i n s t r u c t u r e w ith but s l i g h t evidence to the naked eye of the s h... composition and s t r u c t u r e . A form th a t d i f f e r s from i t in t e x t u r e and hardness i s a rock from Uncas i n the same county. I t s hardness i s about 3 and i t s s t r u c t u r e i s almost o o l i t i c , - t h e s h e l l of which i...

Mayberry, James Willard

1906-05-04

456

Investigations Pertaining to Texas Beekeeping.  

E-print Network

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Comparative Honey Production of Italians and Carniolans. . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 The Life History and Control of the Bee-Moth or Wax-Worm: Introduction... of Texas Beekeeping: Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Number and Value of Colonies, by Counties . ... . ....... . ... . ... . ... . . 31 Honey Production by Colonies...

Newell, Wilmon; Paddock, F. B.; Dean, William Harper

1913-01-01

457

Hessian Fly in Texas Wheat  

E-print Network

The Hessian fly came from Russia and may have been introduced into the United States during the Revolutionary War. It has since spread to many parts of the country. By 2005, more than 67 counties in Texas reported Hessian fly infestations...

Morgan, Gaylon; Sansone, Chris; Knutson, Allen E.

2005-07-01

458

Texas Apples.  

E-print Network

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 8 Fe rt iii za t ion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 0 Water Management. .... . .... 10 Weed ControL .............. 11 TEXAS APPLES Bobby D. Reeder and George Ray McEachern* Interest in commercial apple culture has spread across Texas.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 8 Fe rt iii za t ion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 0 Water Management. .... . .... 10 Weed ControL .............. 11 TEXAS APPLES Bobby D. Reeder and George Ray McEachern* Interest in commercial apple culture has spread across Texas...

Reeder, Bobby D.; McEachern, George Ray

1980-01-01

459

Public health assessment for Geneva Industries/Fuhrmann Energy, Houston, Harris County, Texas, Region 6. CERCLIS No. TXD980748453. Addendum. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Geneva Industries Site is an abandoned refinery in Houston, Texas, that manufactured polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Although there is evidence of past exposure to site contaminants, the site currently poses no apparent public health hazard. The contaminants to which persons may have been exposed in the past include polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). The lack of historical ambient air data from the time when the site was active prevents us from evaluating the potential for adverse health effects from inhalation exposure. Although fish and crawfish taken from the local drainageways were contaminated with PCBs, it is unlikely that humans would have been exposed to these species through the food chain. The groundwater under the site is contaminated. Although the contaminated water is not currently being used for human consumption, there is a potential for exposure to contaminated groundwater in the future. Planned groundwater remedial actions should eliminate this threat.

Not Available

1993-04-27

460

Implementing an agricultural water conservation innovation among the urban public: an analysis of the pilot study phase of the San Antonio Evapotranspiration Project--a cooperative effort between the Texas Agricultural Extension Service--Bexar County Offices, Bexar County Master Gardeners, San Antonio Water Systems and Texas A&M University  

E-print Network

stewardship" in its educational programs (Highlights, 1996). In Bexar County, one important aspect of sound environmental stewardship is to promote water conservation. One way this agency is currently carrying out this particular part of its mission is through...

Reilly, Laura Lynne

2012-06-07