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1

Texas-Oklahoma  

... Texas and Oklahoma. Traversing brush-covered and grassy plains, rolling hills, and prairies, the Red River and the Canadian River are ... formats available at JPL March 12, 2000 - Plains, rivers, and smoke plumes along the Texas-Oklahoma border. ...

2013-04-19

2

Integrated geophysical investigations of linkages between Precambrian basement and sedimentary structures in the Ucayali basin, Peru; Fort Worth basin, Texas; and Osage County, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

I conducted integrated geophysical studies within the Fort Worth basin, Texas; Osage County, Oklahoma, and the Ucayali basin, Peru. My studies are directed at understanding the relationships or links between Precambrian basement structures and sedimentary structures using these three areas as case studies. Links between basement structure, hydrocarbon reservoirs, and sedimentary sequences are not a new concept. Such relationships have

Olubunmi Olumide Elebiju

2009-01-01

3

DRAFT LANDSAT DATA MOSAIC: MONTGOMERY COUNTY, TEXAS; HARRIS COUNTY, TEXAS; FORT BEND COUNTY, TEXAS; BRAZORIA COUNTY, TEXAS; GALVESTON COUNTY, TEXAS  

EPA Science Inventory

This is a draft Landsat Data Mosaic, which contains remote sensing information for Montgomery County, Texas Harris County, Texas Fort Bend County, Texas Brazoria County, Texas Galveston County, and Texas Imagery dates on the following dates: October 6, 1999 and September 29, 200...

4

Annotated bibliography of the Anadarko basin area; Kansas - Oklahoma - Texas  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains 118 additional records related to the geology of the Anadarko basin area of Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas. Specific topics include, but are not limited to: petroleum, and natural gas deposits; mineralogy; lithology; petrology; tectonics; and geochemistry. The subject index provides listings of records related to each county and the geologic ages covered by this area.

McLaughlin, J.E.

1985-01-01

5

Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Development through High-Resolution 3C3D Seismic and Horizontal Drilling: Eva South Marrow Sand Unit, Texas County, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The Eva South Morrow Sand Unit is located in western Texas County, Oklahoma. The field produces from an upper Morrow sandstone, termed the Eva sandstone, deposited in a transgressive valley-fill sequence. The field is defined as a combination structural stratigraphic trap; the reservoir lies in a convex up -dip bend in the valley and is truncated on the west side by the Teepee Creek fault. Although the field has been a successful waterflood since 1993, reservoir heterogeneity and compartmentalization has impeded overall sweep efficiency. A 4.25 square mile high-resolution, three component three-dimensional (3C3D) seismic survey was acquired in order to improve reservoir characterization and pinpoint the optimal location of a new horizontal producing well, the ESU 13-H.

Wheeler,David M.; Miller, William A.; Wilson, Travis C.

2002-03-11

6

Integrated geophysical investigations of linkages between Precambrian basement and sedimentary structures in the Ucayali basin, Peru; Fort Worth basin, Texas; and Osage County, Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

I conducted integrated geophysical studies within the Fort Worth basin, Texas; Osage County, Oklahoma, and the Ucayali basin, Peru. My studies are directed at understanding the relationships or links between Precambrian basement structures and sedimentary structures using these three areas as case studies. Links between basement structure, hydrocarbon reservoirs, and sedimentary sequences are not a new concept. Such relationships have been documented in the Paradox, Hardeman, Anadarko, Arkoma, Ardmore and Williston basins among others. Structures such as fault zones that can influence the formation of sedimentary basins and mineral deposits are often formed by intraplate tectonism. In order to compare the relationship between the Precambrian basement structures and sedimentary structures, I analyzed series of derivative and filtered maps of aeromagnetic and gravity data, which enhance basement structures, that were integrated with seismic data and seismic attribute data that enhance structures within the sedimentary sections. Other information such as well data and geologic information etc were also integrated. This integrated workflow facilitates the comparison of the links or relationships between the two structures. The results of the Fort Worth basin are presented in Chapter 3. The results of this integrated study show that the sedimentary structures within the study area are mainly related to basement structures because these structures are aligned parallel to anomalies identified on the high-resolution aeromagnetic (HRAM) data. The northeast-southwest and northwest-southeast orientations of sedimentary features are consistently parallel with Precambrian structural fabrics that are associated with structures such as the northeast trending Ouachita orogenic belt and the northwest trending Muenster Arch, which reactivated a late Cambrian/Late Precambrian faults. The knowledge gained in this study will impact oil and gas exploration and development within the study area because, the orientation of the natural and induced fractures can be predicted even if seismic data is limited or unavailable. In Chapter 4, the results of an integrated analysis that includes the use of 3D seismic data, seismic attributes, and derivative maps from potential field data to study the basement, Mississippi Chert and the Arbuckle Group of Osage County, Oklahoma are presented. The workflow employed in this study was effective in studying and identifying polygonal, highly coherent, and high amplitude lineaments that strike northwesterly and northeasterly within these reservoirs. Basement structure lineaments are found to be parallel in orientation with the trend of lineaments seen within the Mississippian Chert and the Arbuckle Group. The northwest-striking lineaments may be related to the late-Paleozoic tectonism that affected both the Precambrian and Paleozoic section of Osage County. Another part of this research investigated the large gravity and magnetic anomalies and their association with the Mid-Continent Rift System (MCRS). Results of this analysis revealed prominent northeast trending anomalies that suggest that the MCRS extends into northern Oklahoma. However, geochronological data for basement rocks suggest that this extension would have to be limited to intrusive bodies that have little or no subcrops. The integrated study conducted in the Ucayali basin of Peru revealed that the northwest-southeast trending lineaments interpreted as Precambrian basement structures are sub-parallel to the late Paleozoic fold and thrust belts that resulted from the shortening associated with the formation of the Andes. These fold and thrust belts are reactivated along the zones of weaknesses that already existed in the Precambrian basement. The east-northeast lineaments are located beneath the Fitzcarrald Arch locate above the buoyant Nazca ridge. I interpret these east-northeast lineaments as part of the Ene Pisco -- Abancay Fitzcarrald tectonic lineaments, which is one of the five tectonic domains in these region. Gravity modeling suggests that t

Elebiju, Olubunmi Olumide

7

78 FR 16036 - Service Level Environmental Impact Statement for the Texas Oklahoma Passenger Rail Study Corridor...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Statement for the Texas Oklahoma Passenger Rail Study Corridor, South Texas to Oklahoma...improved high- speed intercity passenger rail service along an 850-mile corridor...Level EIS, the Texas Oklahoma Passenger Rail Study (Study) also includes...

2013-03-13

8

Natural Decrease in Texas Counties.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In replication of other studies, the natural decrease of Texas population was examined in terms of the effect of migration and fertility. Utilizing Texas and U.S. vital statistics and the 1970 U.S. Census of Population, Texas population trends were analyzed for the 1968-72 period by dividing the 254 Texas counties into: (1) 65 natural decrease…

Koebernick, Thomas E.; Markides, Kyriakos S.

9

Digital Atlas of Texas Counties  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created by the Center for Geosptial Technology at Texas Tech University, this digital atlas is a fantastic find. It brings together information about all of Texas's counties, including satellite relief maps and data sets about the roads, rivers, lakes, and other features in each area. Visitors can use the interactive map to click on a county of interest, or use the drop down menu to select a region. Once users select a county, they can download information about it for future use. The site also contains a number of Featured Links to resources from the U.S. Census Bureau, the Texas Association of Counties, and several tourism agencies.

10

Simpson-Arbuckle contact revisited in Northwest Oklahoma County, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The Joins Formation, the lowermost formation of the Simpson Group, is traditionally the least studied or understood of the Simpson formations. The Joins, not known to produce hydrocarbons in central Oklahoma, is frequently overlooked by those more interested in the productive Simpson formations above and the Arbuckle carbonates below. In a study of the lower Simpson to upper Arbuckle interval in northwestern Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, the Joins Formation was found to be present. The central Oklahoma section consists of interbedded gray, olive gray and green splintery moderately waxy shale, cream to light gray homogeneous microcrystallin dolomite, and microcrystalline to fine crystalline fossiliferous slightly glauconitic well cemented sandstones are also noted. The entire Joins Formation is moderately to very fossiliferous; primarily consisting of crinoids, ostracods, brachiopods, and trilobites. The ostracod fauna closely resembles and correlates with the Arbuckle Mountain section, which has been extensively studied over the years by such authors as Taff, Ulrich and Harris. Beneath the Joins in this area is a normal section of Arbuckle dolomites. Due to the absence of a basal sand in the Joins the separation of the Joins and Arbuckle, utilizing electric logs only, is frequently tenuous. In comparison with the Arbuckle, the Joins tends to have higher gamma ray and S.P. values. Other tools, such as resistivity, bulk density and photoelectric (PE), are frequently inconclusive. For geologists studying the Simpson-Arbuckle contact in central Oklahoma, the presence or absence of the Joins Formation is best determined through conventional lithologic and palenontologic sample identification techniques. Once this has been done, correlation of electric logs with this type log is possible for the local area.

Allison, M.D.; Allen, R.W. [Kabodi Inc., Ardmore, OK (United States)

1995-09-01

11

MISR Scans the Texas-Oklahoma Border  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

These MISR images of Oklahoma and north Texas were acquired on March 12, 2000 during Terra orbit 1243. The three images on the left, from top to bottom, are from the 70-degree forward viewing camera, the vertical-viewing (nadir) camera, and the 70-degree aftward viewing camera. The higher brightness, bluer tinge, and reduced contrast of the oblique views result primarily from scattering of sunlight in the Earth's atmosphere, though some color and brightness variations are also due to differences in surface reflection at the different angles. The longer slant path through the atmosphere at the oblique angles also accentuates the appearance of thin, high-altitude cirrus clouds.

On the right, two areas from the nadir camera image are shown in more detail, along with notations highlighting major geographic features. The south bank of the Red River marks the boundary between Texas and Oklahoma. Traversing brush-covered and grassy plains, rolling hills, and prairies, the Red River and the Canadian River are important resources for farming, ranching, public drinking water, hydroelectric power, and recreation. Both originate in New Mexico and flow eastward, their waters eventually discharging into the Mississippi River.

A smoke plume to the north of the Ouachita Mountains and east of Lake Eufaula is visible in the detailed nadir imagery. The plume is also very obvious at the 70-degree forward view angle, to the right of center and about one-fourth of the way down from the top of the image.

MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

2000-01-01

12

National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Lawton Quadrangle, Oklahoma and Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Uranium resources of the Lawton Quadrangle, Oklahoma and Texas, were evaluated to a depth of 1500 m using National Uranium Resource Evaluation critieria. Five areas of uranium favorability were delineated. Diagenetically altered, quartzose and sublithic, ...

Z. Al-Shaieb R. G. Thomas G. F. Stewart

1982-01-01

13

Kay County, Oklahoma, Water and Sewerage Comprehensive Plan.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Kay County, Oklahoma Water and Sewerage Comprehensive Plan is essentially a statement of existing water, sewer and drainage conditions with recommendations and/or proposals relative to future physical development and utility needs of Kay County. Inclu...

1972-01-01

14

Ground water in the Beggs area, Okmulgee County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This memorandum discusses the geology of the Beggs area in Okmulgee County, Oklahoma, as it is related to the availability of ground water. Geological reports and unpublished data from the files of the Oklahoma Geological Survey, together with local information furnished by R.W. Steinman, Beggs Water Superintendent, are the basis for the statements that follow.

Schoff, Stuart L.

1948-01-01

15

Simpson-Arbuckle contact revisited in Northwest Oklahoma County, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Joins Formation, the lowermost formation of the Simpson Group, is traditionally the least studied or understood of the Simpson formations. The Joins, not known to produce hydrocarbons in central Oklahoma, is frequently overlooked by those more interested in the productive Simpson formations above and the Arbuckle carbonates below. In a study of the lower Simpson to upper Arbuckle interval

M. D. Allison; R. W. Allen

1995-01-01

16

Oil and gas developments in Oklahoma and Panhandle of Texas in 1987  

SciTech Connect

Exploration in 1987 focused on development and extension of existing fields, with development wells out-numbering exploratory wells 13 to 1. Operators completed 4.3% more exploratory wells and 25.7% fewer development wells than in 1986. The success rate for exploratory wells increased 7.7%; the success rate for development wells remained constant. The Cherokee shelf was the most active trend, with 53 exploratory wells completed in 1987. The dominant plays were the Atoka, Morrow, Springer, and Marchand in the Anadarko basin; the Misener in Grant County, Oklahoma, on the Sedgwick shelf; the Viola in the Golden Trend along the Pauls Valley uplift; and the Wapanucka, Cromwell, and Atoka in the Arkoma basin. Nineteen eight-seven was a year of major sales and acquisition of Oklahoma and Panhandle of Texas reserves and leases with more than 20 companies buying or selling out. 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Fryklund, R.E.

1988-10-01

17

Geology of the Cottonwood Creek field, Carter County, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

In late 1987, the Cottonwood Creek field, Carter County, Oklahoma, was heralded by flows of nearly 4,000 BOPD and 3 MMCFGD from the upper Arbuckle Group. The field structure is part of the buried Criner uplift along the southwest flank of the Ardmore basin. The uplift formed during a Late Mississippian\\/Early Pennsylvanian episode of bidirectional thrusting (northeast and southwest) probably

M. T. Roberts; D. L. Read

1990-01-01

18

Source of shallow Simpson Group Oil in Murray County, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oils produced from the Simpson Group (Middle Ordovician) in three shallow fields located north of the Arbuckle Mountains in Murray County, Oklahoma, have widely differing compositions: SW Sandy Creek, 28.9° API, 0.57% sulfur; Davis NE, 25.9° API, 0.72% sulfur; Sulfur NW, 16.4° API, 1.44% sulfur. From gas chromatography and biomarker analysis, they determined that the oils were derived from the

I. Zemmels; D. M. Tappmeyer; C. C. Walters

1987-01-01

19

In situ Stress Analysis of Wellbore Breakouts from Oklahoma and the Texas Panhandle.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Orientations of crustal stresses are inferred from stress-induced breakouts (wellbore enlargements) in the eastern part of the Anadarko basin in central Oklahoma, the Marietta basin in south-central Oklahoma, and the Bravo dome area of the central Texas P...

R. L. Dart

1990-01-01

20

Seismicity of the salt areas of Texas, Louisiana, Oklahoma and Kansas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results of a seismicity study of the salt deposit areas of Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas and Louisiana are presented. The study was conducted using some of the short-period seismic data recorded on film at the Wichita Mountain Observatory (WMSO), located in southern Oklahoma, during the years 1961 through 1968. Only data recorded on Sundays were analyzed to minimize the confusion

D. Racine; P. Klouda

1980-01-01

21

Emerging arboviruses in Harris County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Harris County, which includes Houston, Texas, is an endemic and epidemic area for two viruses transmitted by arthropods (arboviruses). These viruses are maintained in cycles involving mosquitoes and wild birds, and transmission to humans is accidental. The majority of human infections is asymptomatic or may result in a flu-like syndrome. However, some infections can result in meningitis or encephalitis. These

Liliana F Rodriguez

2008-01-01

22

Environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas  

SciTech Connect

In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and the eight other potentially sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Deaf Smith County site as one of the five sites suitable for characterization. 591 refs., 147 figs., 173 tabs.

Not Available

1986-05-01

23

Evaluation of water resources for enhanced oil recovery operations, Cement Field, Caddo and Grady Counties, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report is based on the results of an investigation of the water resources local to the Cement Oil Field in Caddo and Grady Counties, southwestern, Oklahoma. The intent of the report is to present at least a semi-quantitative estimate of the volume, deliverability, and chemistry of the water potentially available for enhanced oil recovery in one or more Oklahoma

D. A. Preston; W. E. Harrison; K. V. Luza; L. Prater; R. J. Reddy

1982-01-01

24

The 1998 Oklahoma-Texas Drought: Mechanistic Experiments with NCEP Global and Regional Models  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study presents results from mechanistic experiments to clarify the origin and maintenance of the Oklahoma-Texas (OK-TX) drought of the 1998 summer, using the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) global and regional models. In association with this unprecedented drought, three major mechanisms that can produce extended atmospheric anomalies have been identified: (i) sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies, (ii) soil

Song-You Hong; Eugenia Kalnay

2002-01-01

25

Seismicity of the Salt Areas of Texas, Louisiana, Oklahoma and Kansas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The results of a seismicity study of the salt deposit areas of Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas and Louisiana are presented. The study was conducted using some of the short-period seismic data recorded on film at the Wichita Mountain Observatory (WMSO), located in...

D. Racine P. Klouda

1980-01-01

26

Evaluation of Heavy-Oil Potential of Northeastern Craig and Northwestern Ottawa Counties, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This project was undertaken to evaluate the heavy-oil (oil less than 25 exp 0 API) potential of northeastern Oklahoma - specifically, northwestern Ottawa and northeastern Craig Counties, the area considered to have the best possibility for shallow, heavy-...

W. E. Harrison J. F. Roberts L. J. Heath

1979-01-01

27

Public health assessment for Oklahoma Refining Company, Cyril, Caddo County, Oklahoma, Region 6. Cerclis No. OKD091598870. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Oklahoma Refining Company site, near the town of Cyril, Caddo County, Oklahoma, is approximately 160 acres. Contaminants associated with the site include volatile organic compounds, semi-volatile compounds, heavy metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and petroleum hydrocarbons. Heavy metals and PAHs are the primary contaminants at levels of health concern. During refinery operations, ambient air was likely to have been and could be a significant exposure pathway for on-site workers and off-site residents. Residents swimming in Gladys Creek downstream of the ORC site during refinery operations were likely to have been exposed to contaminants in surface water and sediment. The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) has concluded that the Oklahoma Refining Company site was a public health hazard during its past operation based on probable exposure during the release of wastes from the oil refinery process.

NONE

1995-02-09

28

Gaseous Oxidized Mercury Dry Deposition Measurements in Southwestern USA: Comparison between texas, Eastern Oklahoma, and the Four Corners Area  

EPA Science Inventory

Gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) dry deposition measurements using aerodynamic surrogate surface passive samplers were collected in central and eastern Texas and eastern Oklahoma, from September 2011 to September 2012.The purpose of this study was to provide an initial characteriza...

29

Source of shallow Simpson Group Oil in Murray County, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Oils produced from the Simpson Group (Middle Ordovician) in three shallow fields located north of the Arbuckle Mountains in Murray County, Oklahoma, have widely differing compositions: SW Sandy Creek, 28.9{degree} API, 0.57% sulfur; Davis NE, 25.9{degree} API, 0.72% sulfur; Sulfur NW, 16.4{degree} API, 1.44% sulfur. From gas chromatography and biomarker analysis, they determined that the oils were derived from the same source and that the differences in composition are due to biodegradation of the oils in the shallow reservoirs. A comparison of the biomarker assemblage of the Simpson Group oils to several other oils produced in the Arbuckle Mountain area showed that the Simpson Group assemblage highly resembled the assemblage of a Woodford Formation oil (Devonian) but had no similarity to a Viola Formation oil (upper Middle Ordovician). The Simpson Group oils also differed markedly from an oil produced from the Arbuckle Group (Lower Ordovician) in the nearby, shallow Southeast Hoover field. Their data suggest that the source of the shallow Simpson Group oils is the Woodford Formation located in the downthrown Mill Creek syncline south and west of these fields. A large vertical migration along faults or within the fault block is implied by this geometry. However, the Arbuckle Group oil from the Southeast Hoover field, south of the syncline, has a different source.

Zemmels, I.; Tappmeyer, D.M.; Walters, C.C. (Sun Exploration and Production Co., Dallas, TX (USA))

1987-02-01

30

Measurement of soil moisture trends with airborne scatterometers. [Guymon, Oklahoma and Dalhart, Texas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In an effort to investigate aircraft multisensor responses to soil moisture and vegetation in agricultural fields, an intensive ground sampling program was conducted in Guymon, Oklahoma and Dalhart, Texas in conjunction with aircraft data collected for visible/infrared and passive and active microwave systems. Field selections, sampling techniques, data processing, and the aircraft schedule are discussed for both sites. Field notes are included along with final (normalized and corrected) data sets.

Jones, C. L.; Mcfarland, M. J.; Rosethal, W. D.; Theis, S. W. (principal investigators)

1982-01-01

31

Mammoth Mine, Tierra Vieja Mountains, Presidio County, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Mammoth mine is located in the Tierra Vieja Mountains, approximately 60 miles south of Van Horn, Presidio County, Texas. The region is composed of highly faulted, moderately folded sedimentary rocks, tuffs, flows, and flow breccias of Upper Cretaceous...

T. S. Nye

1978-01-01

32

Virulence analysis of Hessian fly populations from Texas, Oklahoma, and Kansas.  

PubMed

In recent years, the number of wheat, Triticum aestivum L., fields heavily infested by Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor (Say), has increased in the Great Plains of the United States. Historically, resistance genes in wheat have been the most efficient means of controlling this insect pest. To determine which resistance genes are still effective in this area, virulence of six Hessian fly populations from Texas, Oklahoma, and Kansas was determined, using the resistance genes H3, H4, H5, H6, H7H8, H9, H10, H11, H12, H13, H16, H17, H18, H21, H22, H23, H24, H25, H26, H31, and Hdic. Five of the tested genes, H13, H21, H25, H26, and Hdic, conferred high levels of resistance (> 80% of plants scored resistant) to all tested populations. Resistance levels for other genes varied depending on which Hessian fly population they were tested against. Biotype composition analysis of insects collected directly from wheat fields in Grayson County, TX, revealed that the proportion of individuals within this population virulent to the major resistance genes was highly variable (89% for H6, 58% for H9, 28% for H5, 22% for H26, 15% for H3, 9% for H18, 4% for H21, and 0% for H13). Results also revealed that the percentages of biotypes virulent to specific resistance genes in a given population are highly correlated (r2 = 0.97) with the percentages of susceptible plants in a virulence test. This suggests that virulence assays, which require less time and effort, can be used to approximate biotype composition. PMID:19449660

Chen, Ming-Shun; Echegaray, Erik; Whitworth, R Jeffrey; Wang, Haiyan; Sloderbeck, Phillip E; Knutson, Allen; Giles, Kristopher L; Royer, Tom A

2009-04-01

33

Geology of the Cottonwood Creek field, Carter County, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

In late 1987, the Cottonwood Creek field, Carter County, Oklahoma, was heralded by flows of nearly 4,000 BOPD and 3 MMCFGD from the upper Arbuckle Group. The field structure is part of the buried Criner uplift along the southwest flank of the Ardmore basin. The uplift formed during a Late Mississippian/Early Pennsylvanian episode of bidirectional thrusting (northeast and southwest) probably related to convergent strike-slip faulting. The basic field structure formed as a northeast-directed thrust plate, cored with Arbuckle Group carbonates and cut by a backthrust. The Cottonwood Creek anticline was near the crest of the uplift. It was erosionally denuded of its Simpson through Caney cover and karsted to depths of at least 1,600 ft. Subthrust strata include the Woodford source rocks. In the Middle to Late Pennsylvanian the uplift was buried by clastics (about 8,000 ft thick over cottonwood Creek). Culminating in the late Pennsylvanian, a second episode of wrench faulting sliced through the Criner uplift. About 3 mi of left-lateral slip occurred on this Criner-Healdton fault, which also dropped the anticline about 3,000 ft relative to the block to the south, completing the trap at Cottonwood Creek field. Fourteen wells have found oil in the anticline over an approximately 2.5 by 0.5-mi area. The oil column is at least 900 ft thick. Eight of the wells tested for 1,200-3,700 BOPD plus associated gas from a complex of fractures, Brown Zone dolomite, and karst-enhanced porosity in the West Spring Creek and Kindblade formations.

Roberts, M.T.; Read, D.L. (CNG Producing Co., Denver, CO (USA))

1990-05-01

34

Training Needs of County Program Building Committee Members in Texas.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the training needs of county program-building committee members in Texas. Twenty-five competences were identified by a panel of 12 county Extension agents who served as consultants. The population comprised 200 randomly selected committee members who possessed partial degrees of understanding in all areas of competence listed.…

Alsup, Ross Glenn

35

Ground water in the Blanchard area, McClain County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A letter from Lloyd L. Bowser, City Clerk, dated January 8, 1948, in behalf of the town council and Mayor Walter Casey, indicates that a serious shortage of water is faced by the town of Blanchard, McClain County, Oklahoma. The town is near the eastern boundary of Grady County, where an investigation of the ground-water resources is being made by the Oklahoma Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey as part of a State-wide investigation. Information obtained thus far may aid the town by showing where additional ground water for municipal supply may be sought.

Davis, Leon Virgil; Schoff, Stuart L.

1948-01-01

36

The Significance of Stratigraphy and Lithology in Landform Development in Washington County, Oklahoma  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This winning entry in the museum's Young Naturalist Awards 1999 by Katie, a 15 year old student from Oklahoma, takes a look at the development of Washington County, Oklahoma. Katie's essay has a field-journal focus and explains stratigraphy and lithology, two of the main factors controlling the shape of the land in her county. She provides an overview of the six different formations in the Skiatook Group and the five different formations that outcrop in the Bartlesville area. There are descriptions of the many rock samples she took for this study.

37

Artesian water in Somervell County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Somervell County is part of the Grand Prairie region of north-central Texas. An excellent supply of artesian water is available from the Trinity reservoir at no great depth. The first flowing well in Somervell County was drilled in 1880, and the first flowing well in Glen Rose, the county seat, was drilled in 1881. Since 1880 more than 500 wells have been constructed, probably more than half of them prior to 1900. Many of these early wells have been abandoned, either because the well hole caved in as a result of the absence or deterioration of casing or because the wells ceased to yield water by natural flow. The artesian water has always been used chiefly for domestic supply and for watering stock. Only a comparatively small area of farm land is now irrigated. The quantity used to supply the needs of tourist camps and outdoor swimming pools forms a relatively large percentage of the total amount withdrawn from the artesian reservoir in Somervell County. The artesian water is contained chiefly in the permeable sandstone beds--the basal sands for the Trinity group. Some shallow wells of small capacity are supplied by water in the crevices and solution channels in limestone that apparently is near the base of the Glen Rose formation and probably derives its water by leakage from the underlying Trinity reservoir. The wells encounter from one to three aquifers, the number depending upon their depth and location. At and around Glen Rose, the area in which most of the flowing wells are concentrated, the first aquifer is the creviced portion of the limestone, which is encountered at about 50 feet but does not everywhere yield water. The second and third aquifers, both of which are part of the 'basal sands' of the Trinity group, are much more uniform and persistent; the second is encountered at Glen Rose at depths of 100 to 135 feet, and the third at depths of about 275 to 330 feet. The artesian reservoir is supplied by water that falls as rain or snow upon the outcrop of the 'basal sands' on the higher lands west and north of Somervell County. These permeable beds dip eastward and southeastward beneath the county and are covered by the less permeable beds of the overlying Glen Rose formation. As the water that reaches the zone of saturation percolates down the dip of the beds it is confined under artesian pressure, and wells that penetrate these beds at lower altitudes yield water by natural flow. Originally the artesian pressure was sufficient to raise the water in tightly cased wells in the northwestern part of Somervell County to a maximum altitude of about 750 feet above sea level, but at Glen Rose the original artesian head was probably not more than 710 feet. From the information avail- able it would appear that the original head of the water in the upper aquifers was not nearly as great as that of the lower aquifer. The head has declined generally throughout the county. At Glen Rose in June 1930 the artesian head of the water from the deepest aquifer of the Trinity reservoir was about 639 feet above sea level, and the head of the water from the upper aquifers was about 15 feet less. The decline in head still continues, but at a very much slower rate than formerly. With the decline in head the size of the area of artesian flow has decreased, though in recent years the shrinkage has been comparatively little. The draft from the artesian reservoir in Somervell County during the summer is estimated at about 1,000,000 gallons a day, distributed as follows: Domestic use, 150,000 gallons; stock use, 60,000 gallons; recreation pools, 250,000 gallons; irrigation, 180,000 gallons; and waste, not including underground leakage, 360,000 gallons. In winter the daily draft is probably about 370,000 gallons less than in summer. The 360,000 gallons a day permitted to flow from wells without being used for any beneficial purposes is an unnecessary drain upon the artesian reservoir. The head of many of the flowing wells in Glen R

Fiedler, Albert George

1934-01-01

38

Seismicity of the salt areas of Texas, Louisiana, Oklahoma and Kansas  

SciTech Connect

The results of a seismicity study of the salt deposit areas of Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas and Louisiana are presented. The study was conducted using some of the short-period seismic data recorded on film at the Wichita Mountain Observatory (WMSO), located in southern Oklahoma, during the years 1961 through 1968. Only data recorded on Sundays were analyzed to minimize the confusion of quarry blasts. All major quarries within 400 km of WMSO were located and some of the known blasts were studied for distinguishing characteristics. Inquiries were made to the appropriate state agencies for data to produce a list of historical seismic events which occurred during the 1961 to 1968 period. A salt deposit composite map of the areas was also produced and all historical and previously unreported events, as well as the known quarries, were plotted on this base map.

Racine, D.; Klouda, P.

1980-02-01

39

Evaluation of Water Resources for Enhanced Oil Recovery Operations, Cement Field, Caddo and Grady Counties, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report is based on the results of an investigation of the water resources local to the Cement Oil Field in Caddo and Grady Counties, southwestern, Oklahoma. The intent of the report is to present at least a semi-quantitative estimate of the volume, d...

D. A. Preston W. E. Harrison K. V. Luza L. Prater R. J. Reddy

1982-01-01

40

Ground water in the Anadarko area [Caddo County], Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report offers a preliminary interpretation of the geology and ground-water hydrology of the Anadarko area, Oklahoma. L.V. Davis prepared the accompanying map from aerial photographs and furnished much of the geologic information, and records of the State Mineral Survey (WPA) were used in the preparation of the section on the Rush Springs sandstone. (available as photostat copy only)

Schoff, Stuart L.

1948-01-01

41

Devils waterhole field, McMullen County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Devils Waterhole field is located in the SE. part of McMullen County, Texas, in the main Wilcox producing trend and is oil productive from the uppermost sand in the Wilcox Formation. Regionally, the field is situated in the same down-to-the-coast fault trend as the rest of the main Wilcox trend fields of S. Texas. Structurally, the field is situated

Hargis

1971-01-01

42

Emergence of Autochthonous Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Northeastern Texas and Southeastern Oklahoma  

PubMed Central

Autochthonous human cases of leishmaniasis in the United States are uncommon. We report three new cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis and details of a previously reported case, all outside the known endemic range in Texas. Surveys for enzootic rodent reservoirs and sand fly vectors were conducted around the residences of three of the case-patients during the summer of 2006; female Lutzomyia anthophora sand flies were collected at a north Texas and southeast Oklahoma residence of a case-patient, indicating proximity of a suitable vector. Urban sprawl, climatologic variability, or natural expansion of Leishmania mexicana are possible explanations for the apparent spread to the north and east. Enhanced awareness among healthcare providers in the south central region of the United States is important to ensure clinical suspicion of leishmaniasis, diagnosis, and appropriate patient management.

Clarke, Carmen F.; Bradley, Kristy K.; Wright, James H.; Glowicz, Janet

2013-01-01

43

Oil and gas developments in Oklahoma and panhandle of Texas in 1985  

SciTech Connect

Declining oil prices, curtailed gas sales, and uncertain tax law changes contributed to a 9.1% decrease in drilling, a 25.3% drop in gas production, and a 5% drop in oil production in Oklahoma and the panhandle of Texas (Texas Railroad Commission District 10) in 1985. Exploration focused on development and extension of existing fields, with development wells outnumbering exploratory wells 20 to 1. Operators completed 14.3% fewer exploratory wells and 9.1% fewer development wells. The success rate for exploratory wells declined to 28.9%, and the success rate for development wells dropped to 72.3%. The Cherokee shelf was the most active trend, with 90 exploratory wells completed in 1985. 3 figures, 4 tables.

Fryklund, R.E.

1986-10-01

44

Geology of McCaskill field, Karnes County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

McCaskill field is located in the E. portion of Karnes County, Texas, near the Goliad County line. Hydrocarbons in the McCaskill field are trapped by an anticlinal closure on the down-thrown side of a down-to-the-coast fault. Although the anticline was probably caused by growth of the fault during deposition, thickening of the sedimentary section on the down-thrown side of the

Urbanec

1973-01-01

45

A new species of Elasmia M?schler from New Mexico and Texas, and a new subspecies of Elasmia mandela (Druce) from Texas and Oklahoma (Lepidoptera, Notodontidae, Nystaleinae)  

PubMed Central

Abstract Hippia packardii (Morrison) and Hippia insularis (Grote) are moved to the genus Elasmia Möschler as comb. n. Elasmia cave Metzler, sp. n. is described from New Mexico and Texas, and Elasmia mandela santaana Metzler & Knudson, ssp. n. is described from Texas and Oklahoma. A key to the species of Elasmia of southwestern U.S. is provided. Adult male and female moths of Elasmia from southwestern U.S. and their genitalia are illustrated.

Metzler, Eric H.; Knudson, Edward C.

2011-01-01

46

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 6): Hardage/Criner, McClain County, Oklahoma, November 1986. First Remedial Action.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Hardage/Criner site is located in McClain County, Oklahoma, approximately 15 miles southwest of Norman, Oklahoma. The area is agricultural with land on all sides of the site used for grazing cattle. From September 1972 to November 1980, the site was o...

1986-01-01

47

Gomez, Terry County, Texas - A new meteorite find  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Gomez meteorite, weighing slightly over 47 kg, was found near the town of Gomez, Terry County, Texas (33 deg 10 min 53 sec N, 102 deg 24 min 5 sec W) prior to 1974. It is a highly weathered, equilibrated L-6 chondrite of composition Fa 26, Fs 23. A large number of chromite grains and possibly partially weathered lawrencite grains were noted.

Sipiera, P. P.; Tarter, J.; Moore, C. B.; Dod, B. D.; Johnston, R. A.

1980-01-01

48

Depositional environments of the Mississippian Chappel bioherms, Hardeman County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Numerous crinoid-fenestrate bryozoan banks are developed within the Mississippian Chappel Formation, located in the Hardeman basin, Hardeman and Wilbarger Counties, Texas. The banks are oval in shape and range in size from 2 to 12 mi (3 to 19 km) in diameter. Stratigraphic, hydrocarbon entrapment in the banks has resulted in cumulative production exceeding 6 million bbl of oil plus

G. B. Asquith; M. D. Allison

1983-01-01

49

Reservoir recognition in Mississippian Chappel Formation, Hardeman County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fenestrate bryozoan banks are developed in the Chappel formation of the Mississippian in Hardeman County, Texas. Three recognizable facies exist in the Chappel: bank core, bank flank, and interbank. Recognition of what facies is present during drilling is critical in determining the proximity of the well bore to a potential reservoir. Hydrocarbon reservoirs within the Chappel formation have been found

Allison

1990-01-01

50

Ground-Water Resources of Gregg and Upshur Counties, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Gregg and Upshur Counties, in northeast Texas, are underlain by two aquifers that are capable of sustaining additional development. The aquifers consist of the Wilcox Group and Carrizo Sand (Carrizo-Wilcox aquifer) and the Queen City Sand. The Carrizo-Wil...

M. E. Broom

1969-01-01

51

Seepage investigations of Noyes Canal, Menard County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

At the request of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Soil Conservation Service, and the Menard Irrigation Company, a seepage investigation was made on Noyes Canal (Menard Irrigation Company Canal) in Menard County, Texas, from the headgates of the canal to where the canal empties back into the San Saba River.

Yost, Ivan D.

1953-01-01

52

Public Health Assessment for National Zinc Company, Bartlesville, Washington County, Oklahoma, Region 6. CERCLIS No. OKD000829440.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The proposed National Zinc Company (NZC) National Priorities List (NPL) Site is located in the City of Bartlesville in Washington and Osage Counties, Oklahoma. Based on the available information, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR...

1995-01-01

53

HIV on Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU): A Study of Five Campuses in Texas, Oklahoma, Louisiana  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students (N = 1,146) from five Historically Black Colleges and Universities in Texas, Louisiana, and Oklahoma participated in this study. Although students report a moderate level of HIV knowledge, they are deficient on three items related to the role of Nonoxynol-9 on HIV transmission, role of prior STD history on HIV transmission, and meaning of…

Chng, Chwee-Lye; Carlon, Alfonso; Toynes, Brian

2006-01-01

54

Famous Citizens of Panola County Texas.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Created by Gary (Texas) High School students, this publication presents articles about Tex Ritter and Audie Hestilow. The first article, "Tex Ritter's Early Days," provides information on the early life of Tex Ritter gathered through an interview with Earl Cariker, a biographer of Tex Ritter, and through newspaper articles. Earl Cariker describes…

Singleton, Amy; And Others

1990-01-01

55

Geology, petrology and reservoir characteristics of Marchand sandstone in Grady and Caddo counties, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Marchand Sandstone (Pennsylvanian-Missourian) oil production was discovered in 1967 at NE. Verden, T8N, R8W, Grady County, Oklahoma. The fields are on the E. flank of the E. end of the deep Anadarko Basin. At the end of May 1971, 74 producing wells had been completed on 160-acre spacing in a producing trend extending over 15 miles from just west of

Tom Graff

1971-01-01

56

Karnes County, Texas, area hydrogeochemical and stream uranium orientation study  

SciTech Connect

Samples of ground water, stream water, suspended stream sediment, and stream-bed sediment were collected over and near a blind, undeveloped roll-front deposit of uranium in Karnes County, Texas. Dissolved oxygen, pH, Eh, conductivity, temperature, nitrate, ammonia, phosphate, and sulfate in water were measured in the field. Uranium was determined in all samples in the laboratory by neutron activation analysis. The results of the study indicate that ground water may be the preferred sampling medium for geochemical reconnaissance for South Texas roll-front deposits of uranium.

Steele, K.F.

1982-04-01

57

North Mission Valley Field, Dewitt County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The North Mission Valley Field is in the Upper Wilcox producing trend and is located on the Dewitt-Victoria county line about 11 miles S. of Cuero. Although the Upper Wilcox in this area is predominantly gas productive, the North Mission Valley Field produces oil from the First Massive Wilcox sand. The North Mission Valley structure is an elongate fault closure

1965-01-01

58

Comparison of Irrigation Water Use Estimates Calculated from Remotely Sensed Irrigated Acres and State Reported Irrigated Acres in the Lake Altus Drainage Basin, Oklahoma and Texas, 2000 Growing Season  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Increased demand for water in the Lake Altus drainage basin requires more accurate estimates of water use for irrigation. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, is investigating new techniques to improve water-use estimates for irrigation purposes in the Lake Altus drainage basin. Empirical estimates of reference evapotranspiration, crop evapotranspiration, and crop irrigation water requirements for nine major crops were calculated from September 1999 to October 2000 using a solar radiation-based evapotranspiration model. Estimates of irrigation water use were calculated using remotely sensed irrigated crop acres derived from Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus imagery and were compared with irrigation water-use estimates calculated from irrigated crop acres reported by the Oklahoma Water Resources Board and the Texas Water Development Board for the 2000 growing season. The techniques presented will help manage water resources in the Lake Altus drainage basin and may be transferable to other areas with similar water management needs. Irrigation water use calculated from the remotely sensed irrigated acres was estimated at 154,920 acre-feet; whereas, irrigation water use calculated from state reported irrigated crop acres was 196,026 acre-feet, a 23 percent difference. The greatest difference in irrigation water use was in Carson County, Texas. Irrigation water use for Carson County, Texas, calculated from the remotely sensed irrigated acres was 58,555 acrefeet; whereas, irrigation water use calculated from state reported irrigated acres was 138,180 acre-feet, an 81 percent difference. The second greatest difference in irrigation water use occurred in Beckham County, Oklahoma. Differences between the two irrigation water use estimates are due to the differences of irrigated crop acres derived from the mapping process and those reported by the Oklahoma Water Resources Board and Texas Water Development Board.

Masoner, J. R.; Mladinich, C. S.; Konduris, A. M.; Smith, S. Jerrod

2003-01-01

59

Air pollution and lung cancer mortality in Harris County, Texas, 1979-1981  

Microsoft Academic Search

Elevated lung cancer mortality rates in Harris County, Texas compared with other US counties and previously published reports that suggested a causal relation between air pollution and lung cancer in Houston prompted this ecologic analysis. A weighted regression analysis was used to examine the air pollution-lung cancer mortality relation for white males in Harris County, Texas, 1979-1981. The regression model

P. A. Buffler; S. P. Cooper; S. Stinnett; C. Contant; S. Shirts; R. J. Hardy; V. Agu; B. Gehan; K. Burau

1988-01-01

60

Oil and gas developments in Oklahoma and Panhandle of Texas in 1986  

SciTech Connect

In 1986, a 46% drop in the price of oil and a 10% drop in the price of gas, coupled with a decrease in demand, forced a 40.4% decrease in drilling, a 67% drop in gas production, and an 11% drop in oil production in Oklahoma and the Panhandle of Texas (Texas Railroad Commission District 10). Exploration focused on development and extension of existing fields, with development wells outnumbering exploratory wells 18 to 1. Operators completed 58.6% fewer exploratory wells and 59.2% fewer development wells in 1986 than in 1985. The 1986 success rate for exploratory wells dropped 0.8%, and the success rate for development wells increased 0.9%. The Cherokee shelf was the most active trend, with 53 exploratory wells completed in 1986. The dominant plays were the Marrow-Springer and granite wash in the Anadarko basin, Misener on the Sedgwick shelf, Viola and Hunton in the Gold Trend along the Pauls Valley uplift, and Wapanucka, Cromwell, and Atoka in the Arkoma basin. 3 figures, 4 tables.

Fryklund, R.E.

1987-10-01

61

Archaeological Survey of Laughlin Air Force Base, Val Verde County, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Center for Archaeological Research of the University of Texas at San Antionio conducted a 100-percent pedestrian survey of Laughlin Air Force Recreation Area and Marina in Val Verde County, Texas. In addition to the survey, limited paleontological and...

C. L. Tennis M. Renner R. J. Hard

1996-01-01

62

SEROLOGICAL PREVALENCE AND ISOLATION OF BABESIA ODOCOILE! AMONG WHITE-TAILED DEER (ODOCOILEUS VIRGINIANUS) IN TEXAS AND OKLAHOMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Serum samples collected from 581 white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) from Texas and from 124 white-tailed deer from Oklahoma were tested by the indirect fluorescent antibody technique against Babesia odocoilei. Prevalence of seropositive reactors varied from site to site in both states. Prevalence rates were statistically ranked as high, intermediate or low. Deer <12-mo-old had a significantly lower prevalence than all

K. A. Waldrup; A. A. Kocan; T. Qureshi; D. S. Davis; D. Baggett; G. G. Wagner

63

Potential health impacts of heavy-metal exposure at the Tar Creek Superfund site, Ottawa County, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The potential impact of exposure to heavy metals and health problems was evaluated at the Tar Creek Superfund site, Ottawa\\u000a County, Oklahoma, USA. Observed versus expected mortality was calculated for selected conditions in the County and exposed\\u000a cities. Excess mortality was found for stroke and heart disease when comparing the exposed County to the state but not when\\u000a comparing the

John S. Neuberger; Stephen C. Hu; K. David Drake; Rebecca Jim

2009-01-01

64

78 FR 48373 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Texas; Victoria County; 1997 8...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Texas; Victoria County; 1997 8-Hour Ozone Section 110 (a)(1) Maintenance...Plan (SIP). The revision consists of a maintenance plan for Victoria County developed to ensure continued attainment of the...

2013-08-08

65

Assessment of physicians' information needs in five Texas counties.  

PubMed Central

In 1990, a questionnaire was mailed to all physicians in four counties in the lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas and to a random sample of physicians in Bexar County, Texas (San Antonio). Two hundred and eighty of 573 Valley physicians (48.9%) and 162 of 273 Bexar County physicians (59.3%) responded to the survey, for an overall response rate of 52.2%. The two groups were compared primarily to determine differences between physicians who have access to established medical libraries and physicians who practice in remote areas without local access to medical information. Demographic variables, professional practice characteristics, and patient characteristics were compared. Information resource use, particularly reasons for use and non-use of MEDLINE, was explored. Questions also were asked about the availability of various types of information technology. The results indicated that differences in the health care profile did not affect the information usage of the physicians but that differences did exist between the two groups in the use of MEDLINE and libraries. There was no statistically significant difference in either group's rating of experience with using databases, with more than 40% in each group rating themselves as not at all experienced.

Bowden, V M; Kromer, M E; Tobia, R C

1994-01-01

66

Houston area multicrop inspection trips. [Wharton County, Texas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The phenology of crops such as corn, cotton, soybeans, sorghum, sunflowers, and rice and their observed signatures on LANDSAT imagery was studied. This was accomplished by photographing the various crops in segments 275 and 276 located in Wharton County, Texas and comparing those photographs with LANDSAT imagery of the same dates. These comparisons gave insight as to why a particular crop growth stage appeared as a definite signature on LANDSAT and how the percentage of ground cover of various crops affected the signatures on LANDSAT imagery. Numerous crop growth stages could not be directly compared due to cloud cover during several LANDSAT overpasses.

Dunham, E. W. (principal investigator)

1980-01-01

67

Ground-water resources of Coke County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Coke County, located in semiarid west-central Texas, where large ranches, small farms, and oil production are the main bases of the economy, has a small supply of ground and surface water. Of the approximately 1,900 acre-feet of fresh to moderately saline ground water used in 1968, industry used 880 acre-feet, irrigation used 210 acre-feet, and domestic supply and livestock used 820 acre-feet. All of the water for municipal supply and some of the water for industry is obtained from surface-water reservoirs.

Wilson, Clyde A.

1973-01-01

68

Hydrogeology, water use, and simulation of flow in the High Plains aquifer in northwestern Oklahoma, southeastern Colorado, southwestern Kansas, northeastern New Mexico, and northwestern Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Oklahoma Water Resources Board, began a three-year study of the High Plains aquifer in northwestern Oklahoma in 1996. The primary purpose of this study was to develop a ground-water flow model to provide the Water Board with the information it needs to manage the quantity of water withdrawn from the aquifer. The study area consists of about 7,100 square miles in Oklahoma and about 20,800 square miles in adjacent states to provide appropriate hydrologic boundaries for the flow model. The High Plains aquifer includes all sediments from the base of the Ogallala Formation to the potentiometric surface. The saturated thickness in Oklahoma ranges from more than 400 feet to less than 50 feet. Natural recharge to the aquifer from precipitation occurs throughout the area but is extremely variable. Dryland agricultural practices appear to enhance recharge from precipitation, and part of the water pumped for irrigation also recharges the aquifer. Natural discharge occurs as discharge to streams, evapotranspiration where the depth to water is shallow, and diffuse ground-water flow across the eastern boundary. Artificial discharge occurs as discharge to wells. Irrigation accounted for 96 percent of all use of water from the High Plains aquifer in the Oklahoma portion of the study area in 1992 and 93 percent in 1997. Total estimated water use in 1992 for the Oklahoma portion of the study area was 396,000 acre-feet and was about 3.2 million acre-feet for the entire study area. Since development of the aquifer, water levels have declined more than 100 feet in small areas of Texas County, Oklahoma, and more than 50 feet in areas of Cimarron County. Only a small area of Beaver County had declines of more than 10 feet, and Ellis County had rises of more than 10 feet. A flow model constructed using the MODFLOW computer code had 21,073 active cells in one layer and had a 6,000- foot grid in both the north-south and east-west directions. The model was used to simulate the period before major development of the aquifer and the period of development. The model was calibrated using observed conditions available as of 1998. The predevelopment-period model integrated data or estimates on the base of aquifer, hydraulic conductivity, streambed and drain conductances, and recharge from precipitation to calculate the predevelopment altitude of the water table, discharge to the rivers and streams, and other discharges. Hydraulic conductivity, recharge, and streambed conductance were varied during calibration so that the model produced a reasonable representation of the observed water table altitude and the estimated discharge to streams. Hydraulic conductivity was reduced in the area of salt dissolution in underlying Permianage rocks. Recharge from precipitation was estimated to be 4.0 percent of precipitation in greater recharge zones and 0.37 percent in lesser recharge zones. Within Oklahoma, the mean difference between water levels simulated by the model and measured water levels at 86 observation points is -2.8 feet, the mean absolute difference is 44.1 feet, and the root mean square difference is 52.0 feet. The simulated discharge is much larger than the estimated discharge for the Beaver River, is somewhat larger for Cimarron River and Wolf Creek, and is about the same for Crooked Creek. The development-period model added specific yield, pumpage, and recharge due to irrigation and dryland cultivation to simulate the period 1946 through 1997. During calibration, estimated specific yield was reduced by 15 percent in Oklahoma east of the Cimarron-Texas County line. Simulated recharge due to irrigation ranges from 24 percent for the 1940s and 1950s to 2 percent for the 1990s. Estimated recharge due to dryland cultivation is about 3.9 percent of precipitation. The mean difference between the simulated and observed waterlevel changes from predevelopment to 1998 at 162 observation points in

Luckey, Richard L.; Becker, Mark F.

1999-01-01

69

Virulence and biotype analyses of Hessian fly (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) populations from Texas, Louisiana, and Oklahoma.  

PubMed

Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor (Say, 1817), is a major pest of wheat, and is controlled mainly through deploying fly-resistant wheat cultivars. The challenge for the plant resistance approach is that virulence of Hessian fly populations in the field is dynamic, and wheat cultivars may lose resistance within 6-8 yr. To ensure continuous success of host plant resistance, Hessian fly populations in the field need to be constantly monitored to determine which resistance genes remain effective in different geographic regions. This study investigated five Hessian fly populations collected from Texas, Louisiana, and Oklahoma, where infestation by Hessian fly has been high in recent years. Eight resistance genes, H12, H13, H17, H18, H22, H25, H26, and Hdic, were found to be highly effective against all tested Hessian fly populations in this region, conferring resistance to > or = 80% of plants containing one of these resistance genes. The frequencies ofbiotypes virulent to resistance genes H13 (biotype vH13), H18 (vH18), H21 (vH21), H25 (vH25), H26 (vH26), and Hdic (vHdic) were determined, and were found to vary from population to population, ranging from 0 to 45%. A logistic regression model was established to predict biotype frequencies based on the correlation between the percentages of susceptible plants obtained in a virulence test and the log-odds of virulent biotype frequencies determined by a traditional approach. PMID:24665728

Garcés-Carrera, Sandra; Knutson, Allen; Wang, Haiyan; Giles, Kristopher L; Huang, Fangneng; Whitworth, R Jeffrey; Smith, C Michael; Chen, Ming-Shun

2014-02-01

70

Multifrequency remote sensing of soil moisture. [Guymon, Oklahoma and Dalhart, Texas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Multifrequency sensor data collected at Guymon, Oklahoma and Dalhart, Texas using NASA's C-130 aircraft were used to determine which of the all-weather microwave sensors demonstrated the highest correlation to surface soil moisture over optimal bare soil conditions, and to develop and test techniques which use visible/infrared sensors to compensate for the vegetation effect in this sensor's response to soil moisture. The L-band passive microwave radiometer was found to be the most suitable single sensor system to estimate soil moisture over bare fields. In comparison to other active and passive microwave sensors the L-band radiometer (1) was influenced least by ranges in surface roughness; (2) demonstrated the most sensitivity to soil moisture differences in terms of the range of return from the full range of soil moisture; and (3) was less sensitive to errors in measurement in relation to the range of sensor response. L-band emissivity related more strongly to soil moisture when moisture was expressed as percent of field capacity. The perpendicular vegetation index as determined from the visible/infrared sensors was useful as a measure of the vegetation effect on the L-band radiometer response to soil moisture.

Theis, S. W.; Mcfarland, M. J.; Rosenthal, W. D.; Jones, C. L. (principal investigator)

1982-01-01

71

Seismic expression of Red Fork channels in Major and Kay Counties, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This paper investigates the application of regional seismic to exploration and development Red Fork sands of the Cherokee Group, in Major and Kay Counties, Oklahoma. A computer-aided exploration system (CAEX) was used to justify the subtle seismic expressions with the geological interpretation. Modeling shows that the low-velocity shales are the anomalous rock in the Cherokee package, which is most represented by siltstone and thin sands. Because the Red Fork channel sands were incised into or deposited with laterally time-equivalent siltstones, no strong reflection coefficient is associated with the top of the sands. The objective sands become a seismic anomaly only when they cut into and replace a low-velocity shale. This knowledge allows mapping the channel thickness by interpreting the shale thickness from seismic data. A group shoot line in Major County, Oklahoma, has been tied to the geologic control, and the channel thicknesses have been interpreted assuming a detectable vertical resolution of 10 ft. A personal computer-based geophysical work station is used to construct velocity logs representative of the geology to produce forward-modeled synthetic seismic sections, and to display, in color, the seismic trace attributes. These synthetic sections are used as tools to compare with and interpret the seismic line and to evaluate the interpretative value of lowest cost, lesser quality data versus reprocessing or new data acquisition.

Hanoch, C.A.

1987-08-01

72

Petroleum geology of Woodbine Formation, Freestone County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Upper Cretaceous Woodbine Formation consists of clastics deposited in various southwestward-prograding environments on the margin of the subsiding East Texas basin. Depositional environments range from fluvial (in the north) to deltaic and a shelf strandplain (in the southwest). The Woodbine unconformably overlies the Lower Cretaceous Washita Group except in the basin axis and south of the Angelina-Caldwell flexure where deposition may have been continuous. Transgression by Eagle Ford seas closed the Woodbine deposition. Structural features in Freestone County include the East Texas basin, the Sabine uplift, the Mexia-Talco fault zone, and the East Texas salt province. Isopach thicknesses of the Woodbine range from 375 ft in the west to more than 900 ft in the east (basinward). Thickening on the downthrown side of the Mexia-Talco faults indicates syndepositional faulting, related to allochthonous rocks sliding over the Jurassic Louann Salt. Structural accumulations of petroleum have been discovered against faults and salt domes, but stratigraphic pinch-outs of the Woodbine's discontinuous lenticular sand bodies remain as excellent exploration opportunities.

Carden, M.

1986-05-01

73

Hydrogeologic Characterization of the Brazos River Alluvium Aquifer, Bosque County to Fort Bend County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Introduction The Brazos River alluvium aquifer underlies the Brazos River in Texas from Bosque County to Fort Bend County. The aquifer, one of 21 minor aquifers in the State, supplies water for irrigation, domestic, stock, and commercial use. The Brazos River alluvium aquifer likely will become more important in the future as demand for water increases statewide. A thorough understanding of the hydrogeology of the alluvium aquifer will be the foundation for future studies in the area. During October 2006-April 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas Water Development Board, conducted a study to delineate the altitude of the top, altitude of the base, and thickness of the Brazos River alluvium aquifer, and to compile and summarize available hydraulic property (specific capacity, transmissivity, and hydraulic conductivity) data. A digital elevation model was used as the altitude of the top of the aquifer. The altitude of the base of the aquifer was generated using data from wells. The study area encompasses the Brazos River alluvium aquifer in parts of Bosque, Hill, McLennan, Falls, Robertson, Milam, Brazos, Burleson, Grimes, Washington, Waller, Austin, and Fort Bend Counties and a 1.5-mile-wide lateral buffer adjacent to the aquifer. The results of this study will be used by the Texas Water Development Board for input into a ground-water availability model.

Shah, Sachin D.; Houston, Natalie A.; Braun, Christopher L.

2007-01-01

74

Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibrations Stimulation in Osage County, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This Technical Quarterly Report is for the reporting period July 1, 2001 to September 30, 2001. The report provides details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma''. The project is divided into nine separate tasks. Several of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, while other tasks are dependent on earlier tasks being completed. The vibration stimulation well is permitted as Well 111-W-27, section 8 T26N R6E Osage County Oklahoma. It was spud July 28, 2001 with Goober Drilling Rig No. 3. The well was drilled to 3090-feet cored, logged, cased and cemented. The Rig No.3 moved off August 6, 2001. Phillips Petroleum Co. has begun analyzing the cores recovered from the test well. Standard porosity, permeability and saturation measurements will be conducted. They will then begin the sonic stimulation core tests Calumet Oil Company, the operator of the NBU, has begun to collect both production and injection wells information to establish a baseline for the project in the pilot field test area. Green Country Submersible Pump Company, a subsidiary of Calumet Oil Company, will provide both the surface equipment and downhole tools to allow the Downhole Vibration Tool to be operated by a surface rod rotating system. The 7-inch Downhole Vibration Tool (DHVT) has been built and is ready for initial shallow testing. The shallow testing will be done in a temporarily abandoned well operated by Calumet Oil Co. in the Wynona waterflood unit. The data acquisition doghouse and rod rotating equipment have been placed on location in anticipation of the shallow test in Well No.20-12 Wynona Waterflood Unit. A notice of invention disclosure was submitted to the DOE Chicago Operations Office. DOE Case No.S-98,124 has been assigned to follow the documentation following the invention disclosure. A paper covering the material presented to the Oklahoma Geologic Survey (OGS)/DOE Annual Workshop in Oklahoma City May 8,9 2001 has been submitted for publication to the OGS. A technical paper draft has been submitted for the ASME/ETCE conference (Feb 2002) Production Technology Symposium. A one-day SPE sponsored short course which is planned to cover seismic stimulation efforts around the world, will be offered at the SPE/DOE Thirteenth Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery in Tulsa, OK, April 13-17, 2002. Dan Maloney, Phillips and Bob Westermark, OGCI will be the instructors. In addition, a proposed technical paper has been submitted for this meeting.

J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

2001-09-30

75

An integrated study of seismic anisotropy and the natural fracture system at the Conoco Borehole Test Facility, Kay County, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

A significant body of published work has developed establishing fracture-related seismic anisotropy as an observable effect. To further the understanding of seismic birefringence techniques in characterizing natural fracture systems at depth, an integrated program of seismic and geologic measurements has been conducted at Conoco's Borehole Test Facility in Kay County, Oklahoma. Birefringence parameters inferred from the seismic data are consistent

John H. Queen; William D. Rizer

1990-01-01

76

Gaseous Oxidized Mercury Dry Deposition Measurements in the Southwestern USA: A Comparison between Texas, Eastern Oklahoma, and the Four Corners Area  

PubMed Central

Gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) dry deposition measurements using aerodynamic surrogate surface passive samplers were collected in central and eastern Texas and eastern Oklahoma, from September 2011 to September 2012. The purpose of this study was to provide an initial characterization of the magnitude and spatial extent of ambient GOM dry deposition in central and eastern Texas for a 12-month period which contained statistically average annual results for precipitation totals, temperature, and wind speed. The research objective was to investigate GOM dry deposition in areas of Texas impacted by emissions from coal-fired utility boilers and compare it with GOM dry deposition measurements previously observed in eastern Oklahoma and the Four Corners area. Annual GOM dry deposition rate estimates were relatively low in Texas, ranging from 0.1 to 0.3?ng/m2h at the four Texas monitoring sites, similar to the 0.2?ng/m2h annual GOM dry deposition rate estimate recorded at the eastern Oklahoma monitoring site. The Texas and eastern Oklahoma annual GOM dry deposition rate estimates were at least four times lower than the highest annual GOM dry deposition rate estimate previously measured in the more arid bordering western states of New Mexico and Colorado in the Four Corners area.

Sather, Mark E.; Allen, Kara L.; Smith, Luther; Mathew, Johnson; Jackson, Clarence; Callison, Ryan; Scrapper, Larry; Hathcoat, April; Adam, Jacque; Keese, Danielle; Brunette, Robert; Karlstrom, Jason; Van der Jagt, Gerard

2014-01-01

77

Gaseous Oxidized Mercury Dry Deposition Measurements in the Southwestern USA: A Comparison between Texas, Eastern Oklahoma, and the Four Corners Area.  

PubMed

Gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) dry deposition measurements using aerodynamic surrogate surface passive samplers were collected in central and eastern Texas and eastern Oklahoma, from September 2011 to September 2012. The purpose of this study was to provide an initial characterization of the magnitude and spatial extent of ambient GOM dry deposition in central and eastern Texas for a 12-month period which contained statistically average annual results for precipitation totals, temperature, and wind speed. The research objective was to investigate GOM dry deposition in areas of Texas impacted by emissions from coal-fired utility boilers and compare it with GOM dry deposition measurements previously observed in eastern Oklahoma and the Four Corners area. Annual GOM dry deposition rate estimates were relatively low in Texas, ranging from 0.1 to 0.3?ng/m(2)h at the four Texas monitoring sites, similar to the 0.2?ng/m(2)h annual GOM dry deposition rate estimate recorded at the eastern Oklahoma monitoring site. The Texas and eastern Oklahoma annual GOM dry deposition rate estimates were at least four times lower than the highest annual GOM dry deposition rate estimate previously measured in the more arid bordering western states of New Mexico and Colorado in the Four Corners area. PMID:24955412

Sather, Mark E; Mukerjee, Shaibal; Allen, Kara L; Smith, Luther; Mathew, Johnson; Jackson, Clarence; Callison, Ryan; Scrapper, Larry; Hathcoat, April; Adam, Jacque; Keese, Danielle; Ketcher, Philip; Brunette, Robert; Karlstrom, Jason; Van der Jagt, Gerard

2014-01-01

78

Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This Technical Quarterly Report is for the reporting period March 31, 2002 to June 30, 2002. The report provides details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma''. The project is divided into nine separate tasks. Several of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, while other tasks are dependent on earlier tasks being completed. The vibration stimulation Well 111-W-27 is located in section 8 T26N R6E of the North Burbank Unit (NBU), Osage County Oklahoma. It was drilled to 3090-feet cored, logged, cased and cemented. The rig moved off August 6, 2001. Phillips Petroleum Co. has performed several core studies on the cores recovered from the test well. Standard porosity, permeability and saturation measurements have been conducted. In addition Phillips has prepared a Core Petrology Report, detailing the lithology, stratigraphy and sedimentology for Well 111-W27, NBU. Phillips has also conducted the sonic stimulation core tests, the final sonic stimulation report has not yet been released. Calumet Oil Company, the operator of the NBU, began collecting both production and injection wells information to establish a baseline for the project in the pilot field test area since May 2001. The original 7-inch Downhole Vibration Tool (DHVT) has been thoroughly tested and it has been concluded that it needs to be redesigned. An engineering firm from Fayetteville AR has been retained to assist in developing a new design for the DHVT. The project participants requested from the DOE, a no-cost extension for the project through December 31, 2002. The no-cost extension amendment to the contract was signed during this reporting period. A technical paper SPE 75254 ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation, Osage County, Oklahoma'' was presented at the 2002 SPE/DOE Thirteenth Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery, in Tulsa OK, April 17, 2002. A one-day short course was conducted at the SPE/DOE Thirteenth Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery in Tulsa, OK, April 13-14, 2002. Dan Maloney, Phillips and Bob Westermark, OGCI, Brett Davidson and Tim Spanos, Prism Production Technologies, were the instructors. The sixteen attendees also participated in the half-day field trip to the test facility near Tulsa.

J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

2002-06-30

79

Bromide, Chloride, and Sulfate Concentrations, and Specific Conductance, Lake Texoma, Texas and Oklahoma, 2007-08  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Dallas Water Utilities Division, collected water-quality data from 11 sites on Lake Texoma, a reservoir on the Texas-Oklahoma border, during April 2007-September 2008. At 10 of the sites, physical properties (depth, specific conductance, pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, and alkalinity) were measured and samples were collected for analysis of selected dissolved constituents (bromide, calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, carbonate, bicarbonate, chloride, and sulfate); at one site, only physical properties were measured. The primary constituent of interest was bromide. Bromate can form when ozone is used to disinfect raw water containing bromide, and bromate is a suspected human carcinogen. Chloride and sulfate were of secondary interest. Only the analytical results for bromide, chloride, sulfate, and measured specific conductance are discussed in this report. Median dissolved bromide concentrations ranged from 0.28 to 0.60 milligrams per liter. The largest median dissolved bromide concentration (0.60 milligram per liter at site 11) was from the Red River arm of Lake Texoma. Dissolved bromide concentrations generally were larger in the Red River arm of Lake Texoma than in the Washita arm of the lake. Median dissolved chloride concentrations were largest in the Red River arm of Lake Texoma at site 11 (431 milligrams per liter) and smallest at site 8 (122 milligrams per liter) in the Washita arm. At site 11 in the Red River arm, the mean and median chloride concentrations exceeded the secondary maximum contaminant level of 300 milligrams per liter for chloride established by the 'Texas Surface Water Quality Standards' for surface-water bodies designated for the public water supply use. Median dissolved sulfate concentrations ranged from 182 milligrams per liter at site 4 in the Big Mineral arm to 246 milligrams per liter at site 11 in the Red River arm. None of the mean or median sulfate concentrations exceeded the secondary maximum contaminant level of 300 milligrams per liter. Median specific conductance measurements at sites ranged from 1,120 microsiemens per centimeter at site 8 in the Washita arm to 2,100 microsiemens per centimeter in the Red River arm. The spatial distribution of specific conductance in Lake Texoma was similar to that of bromide and chloride, with larger specific conductance values in the Red River arm compared to those in the Washita arm.

Baldys, Stanley, III

2009-01-01

80

Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This Technical Quarterly Report is for the reporting period July 1, 2000 to September 30, 2000. The report provides details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma''. The project is divided into nine separate tasks. Since this is the first Quarterly report, much of the work done is of a preliminary nature. Several of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, while other tasks are dependent on earlier tasks being completed. The selection of the pilot test area has been completed. The drilling of the test well is waiting on rig availability. Phillips has begun sonic core testing of offset cores, waiting on the core from the well to be drilled. Design work is progressing for the tool, which will be built to fit the test well. Installation of monitoring equipment and the downhole vibration tool will occur after the well is drilled. Technical transfer efforts have begun with the submission of an abstract for a technical paper for the Oklahoma City Society of Petroleum Engineers meeting in March 2001.

J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

2000-09-30

81

Evaluation of water resources for enhanced oil recovery operations, Cement Field, Caddo and Grady Counties, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This report is based on the results of an investigation of the water resources local to the Cement Oil Field in Caddo and Grady Counties, southwestern, Oklahoma. The intent of the report is to present at least a semi-quantitative estimate of the volume, deliverability, and chemistry of the water potentially available for enhanced oil recovery in one or more Oklahoma oil fields. Subsequent to a review of several oil fields, the Cement Field was chosen for study because of its large size (25,000 acres), its extensive subsurface control (over 1850 wells), and its long history of production (since 1952) from several producing formations, some of which are already undergoing extensive waterflood operations. A preliminary review of the available data for this study suggested a threefold categorization of water resources, since the data for each category are distinctly different in nature, and, to some extent, different in source. The three categories are: surface water, ground water, and subsurface water. Flow, volume, and chemical analyses of each source are estimated.

Preston, D.A.; Harrison, W.E.; Luza, K.V.; Prater, L.; Reddy, R.J.

1982-02-01

82

Reservoir recognition in Mississippian Chappel Formation, Hardeman County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Fenestrate bryozoan banks are developed in the Chappel formation of the Mississippian in Hardeman County, Texas. Three recognizable facies exist in the Chappel: bank core, bank flank, and interbank. Recognition of what facies is present during drilling is critical in determining the proximity of the well bore to a potential reservoir. Hydrocarbon reservoirs within the Chappel formation have been found in porous core-facies limestones and dolomites, and, in rare cases, in porous cherts. Porosity is primarily of a vuggy, intercrystalline, and fracture type. Porous intervals bordering on cavernous have been recognized. Exploration for reservoirs in the Chappel has been conducted in the past by both geophysical and geological techniques. By understanding the nature of the reservoir, geological and geophysical exploration techniques can be tailored to better fit the objective.

Allison, M.D. (North Texas Sample Log Service, Gainesville, TX (USA))

1990-02-01

83

Earthquake activity in Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oklahoma is one of the most seismically active areas in the southern Mid-Continent. From 1897 to 1988, over 700 earthquakes are known to have occurred in Oklahoma. The earliest documented Oklahoma earthquake took place on December 2, 1897, near Jefferson, in Grant County. The largest known Oklahoma earthquake happened near El Reno on April 9, 1952. This magnitude 5.5 (mb)

K. V. Luza; J. E. Jr. Lawson

1989-01-01

84

Role of sea surface temperature and soil-moisture feedback in the 1998 Oklahoma-Texas drought.  

PubMed

The drought that affected the US states of Oklahoma and Texas in the summer of 1998 was strong and persistent, with soil moisture reaching levels comparable to those of the 1930s 'dust bowl'. Although other effects of the record-strength 1997-98 El Niño were successfully predicted over much of the United States, the Oklahoma-Texas drought was not. Whereas the response of the tropical atmosphere to strong anomalies in sea surface temperature is quite predictable, the response of the extratropical atmosphere is more variable. Here we present results from mechanistic experiments to clarify the origin and maintenance of this extratropical climate extreme. In addition to global atmospheric models, we use a regional model to isolate regional climate feedbacks. We conclude that during April and May 1998, sea surface temperature anomalies combined with a favourable atmospheric circulation to establish the drought. In June-August, the regional positive feedback associated with lower evaporation and precipitation contributed substantially to the maintenance of the drought. The drought ended in the autumn, when stronger large-scale weather systems were able to penetrate the region and overwhelm the soil-moisture feedback. Our results show the potential for numerical models including appropriate physical processes to make skillful predictions of regional climate. PMID:11130719

Hong, S Y; Kalnay, E

2000-12-14

85

F-180 in Garfield and Major Counties, US 60- From 0.25 Mile West of Lahoma Westerly 20.15 Miles, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The project consists of the widening, resurfacing, offset construction and reconstruction of US 60, in Garfield and Major Counties, Oklahoma. Adverse effects include the displacement of people and businesses and reduction of regional grass and farmlands.

1972-01-01

86

An Analysis of Late-Model Commercial Auto-Truck Theft in Harris County, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The objectives of this study were: (1) to determine if certain automobiles were reported as unrecovered, stolen vehicles more frequently than their existence in the population in Harris County Texas; (2) to determine if a monthly variation in the incidenc...

J. L. Burns

1978-01-01

87

Surveys of Night Birds Along the Rio Grande in Webb County, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This project sought to determine species richness and relative abundances of all nocturnal birds at representative wooded riparian (river and stock pond) habitats of the Galvan Ranch, Webb County, Texas. We conducted elicited and non-elicited call count s...

M. C. Woodinand M. K. Skoruppa G. C. Hickman

2000-01-01

88

Selected bibliography pertaining to uranium occurrence in eastern New Mexico and west Texas and nearby parts of Colorado, Oklahoma, and Kansas. Interim report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nearly 500 selected references to uranium and to stratigraphy, ; structure, and groundwater geology related to uranium-bearing formations in ; eastern New Mexico and West Texas and nearby parts of Colorado, Kansas, and ; Oklahoma are indexed topically and geographically. The list is nearly complete ; through 1972 and contains some references with later dates. (GRA)

W. I. Finch; J. C. Wright; M. W. Sullivan

1975-01-01

89

Distribution of Igneous Rocks in Medina and Uvalde Counties, Texas, as Inferred from Aeromagnetic Data.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A high-resolution aeromagnetic survey was flown in 2001 over Medina and Uvalde Counties, Texas, as part of a multidisciplinary investigation of the geohydrologic framework of the Edwards aquifer in south-central Texas. The objective of the survey, which w...

B. D. Smith C. D. Blome D. V. Smith R. R. McDougal

2008-01-01

90

Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This Technical Quarterly Report is for the reporting period September 30, 2001 to December 31, 2001. The report provides details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma''. The project is divided into nine separate tasks. Several of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, while other tasks are dependent on earlier tasks being completed. The vibration stimulation well was permitted as Well 111-W-27, section 8 T26N R6E Osage County Oklahoma. It was spud July 28, 2001 with Goober Drilling Rig No. 3. The well was drilled to 3090-feet cored, logged, cased and cemented. The Rig No.3 moved off August 6, 2001. Phillips Petroleum Co. has performed standard core analysis on the cores recovered from the test well. Standard porosity, permeability and saturation measurements have been conducted. Phillips has begun the sonic stimulation core tests. Calumet Oil Company, the operator of the NBU, has been to collecting both production and injection wells information to establish a baseline for the project in the pilot field test area since May 2001. The 7-inch Downhole Vibration Tool (DHVT) has been built and has been run in a shallow well for initial power source testing. This testing was done in a temporarily abandoned well, Wynona Waterflood Unit, Well No.20-12 operated by Calumet Oil Co both in October and December 2001. The data acquisition system, and rod rotating equipment performed as designed. However, the DHVT experienced two internal failures during vibration operations. The DHVT has been repaired with modifications to improve its functionality. A proposed technical paper abstract has been accepted by the SPE to be presented at the 2002 SPE/DOE Thirteenth Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery, in Tulsa OK, 13-17 April 2002. A one-day SPE sponsored short course which is planned to cover seismic stimulation efforts around the world, will be offered at the SPE/DOE Thirteenth Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery in Tulsa, OK, April 13-17, 2002. Dan Maloney, Phillips and Bob Westermark, OGCI will be the instructors.

J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

2001-12-31

91

Geology of north Personville field, Limestone County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

In excess of 50 Mitchell Energy Corporation wells have been drilled in the North Personville field, Limestone County, Texas. In order to understand the variables that affect the ultimate reserves within the carbonate section, two conventional cores from Mitchell Energy Corporation wells were analyzed. The Mitchell Energy Corporation 1 Muse-Duke and 1 Ralph Spence limestone sections were studied to determine the relationship between log-derived reservoir parameters and the limestone lithologies for field wide application. Production at North Personville field is lithology selective. Five distinct oolitic grainstone shoal cycles are identified and correlate field wide. The sequence of events that led to the development of reservoir quality grainstones are (1) the infilling by oolitic grainstone shoals on an irregular Buckner Formation paleosurface. This surface was modified by pre-Cotton Valley limestone salt activity such that carbonate deposition did not take place or was eroded over structurally high areas, (2) Cotton Valley limestone deposition culminating with the deposition of a narrow belt of ooid grainstones, (3) nearly complete occlusion of primary porosity and permeability by the deposition of marine cements followed by chalky microporosity formation, (4) post-depositional salt and basement tectonics that pervasively fracture the more competent ooid grainstone facies producing additional secondary porosity and permeability, (5) hydrocarbon generation from the overlying Bossier marine shales migrates into the porous permeable Cotton Valley Limestone. The uppermost shoal cycle is preferentially charged due to their proximity to the source beds.

Zamboras, R.L.

1988-02-01

92

Geology of North Personville field, Limestone County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

In excess of 50 Mitchell Energy Corporation wells have been drilled in the North Personville field, Limestone County, Texas. In order to understand the variables that affect the ultimate reserves within the carbonate section, two conventional cores from Mitchell Energy Corporation wells were analyzed. The Mitchell Energy Corporation I Muse-Duke and 1 Ralph Spence limestone sections were studied to determine the relationship between log-derived reservoir parameters and the limestone lithologies for field wide application. Production at North Personville field is lithology selective. Five distinct oolitic grainstone shoal cycles are identified and correlate field wide. The sequence of events that led to the development of reservoir quality grainstones are (1) the infilling by oolitic grainstone shoals on an irregular Buckner Formation paleosurface. This surface was modified by pre-Cotton Valley limestone salt activity such that carbonate deposition did not take place or was eroded over structurally high areas, (2) Cotton Valley limestone deposition culminating with the deposition of a narrow belt of ooid grainstones, (3) nearly complete occlusion of primary porosity and permeability by the deposition of marine cements followed by chalky microporosity formation, (4) post-depositional salt and basement tectonics that pervasively fracture the more competent ooid grainstone facies producing additional secondary porosity and permeability, (5) hydrocarbon generation from the overlying Bosier marine shales migrates into the porous permeable Cotton Valley Limestone. The uppermost shoal cycle is preferentially charged due to their proximity to the source beds.

Zamboras, R.L.

1988-01-01

93

78 FR 60826 - Foreign-Trade Zone 155-Calhoun/Victoria Counties, Texas; Authorization of Production Activity...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Zone 155--Calhoun/Victoria Counties, Texas; Authorization of Production Activity; Caterpillar, Inc. (Excavator and Frame Assembly Production); Victoria, Texas On May 29, 2013, The Calhoun-Victoria Foreign Trade Zone, Inc., grantee of...

2013-10-02

94

An Exploratory Study of Female Juvenile Offenders: Harris County, Texas, 1993-2004  

Microsoft Academic Search

Female offenders are the fastest growing population in the criminal justice system. The purpose of this study is to determine the month or months that most female juvenile offenses occur in Harris County (the largest county in the State of Texas), identify the average age of the offender, investigate the possibility of a relationship between ethnicity and referrals for offense

Valerie D. JACKSON; Jennifer N. FOSTER; Moni TARANATH-SANGHAVI; Bonnie J. WALKER

2009-01-01

95

Hydrogeology and water quality of the North Canadian River alluvium, Concho Reserve, Canadian County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A growing user population within the Concho Reserve in Canadian County, Oklahoma, has increased the need for drinking water. The North Canadian River alluvium is a reliable source of ground water for agriculture, industry, and cities in Canadian County and is the only ground-water source capable of meeting large demands. This study was undertaken to collect and analyze data to describe the hydrogeology and ground-water quality of the North Canadian River alluvium within the Concho Reserve. The alluvium forms a band about 2 miles long and 0.5 mile wide along the southern edge of the Concho Reserve. Thickness of the alluvium ranges from 19 to 75 feet thick and averages about 45 feet in the study area. Well cuttings and natural gamma-ray logs indicate the alluvium consists of interfingering lenses of clay, silt, and sand. The increase of coarse-grained sand and the decrease of clay and silt with depth suggests that the water-bearing properties of the aquifer within the study area improve with depth. A clay layer in the upper part of the aquifer may be partially responsible for surface water ponding in low areas after above normal precipitation and may delay the infiltration of potentially contaminated water from land surface. Specific conductance measurements indicate the ground-water quality improves in a northern direction towards the terrace. Water-quality properties, bacteria counts, major ion and nutrient concentrations, trace-element and radionuclide concentrations, and organic compound concentrations were measured in one ground-water sample at the southern edge of the Concho Reserve and comply with the primary drinking-water standards. Measured concentrations of iron, manganese, sulfate, and total dissolved solids exceed the secondary maximum contaminant levels set for drinking water. The ground water is a calcium sulfate bicarbonate type and is considered very hard, with a hardness of 570 milligrams per liter as calcium carbonate.

Becker, C. J.

1998-01-01

96

Development of visible/infrared/microwave agriculture classification and biomass estimation algorithms. [Guyton, Oklahoma and Dalhart, Texas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Agricultural crop classification models using two or more spectral regions (visible through microwave) are considered in an effort to estimate biomass at Guymon, Oklahoma Dalhart, Texas. Both grounds truth and aerial data were used. Results indicate that inclusion of C, L, and P band active microwave data, from look angles greater than 35 deg from nadir, with visible and infrared data improve crop discrimination and biomass estimates compared to results using only visible and infrared data. The microwave frequencies were sensitive to different biomass levels. The K and C band were sensitive to differences at low biomass levels, while P band was sensitive to differences at high biomass levels. Two indices, one using only active microwave data and the other using data from the middle and near infrared bands, were well correlated to total biomass. It is implied that inclusion of active microwave sensors with visible and infrared sensors on future satellites could aid in crop discrimination and biomass estimation.

Rosenthal, W. D.; Mcfarland, M. J.; Theis, S. W.; Jones, C. L. (principal investigtors)

1982-01-01

97

Development of visible/infrared/microwave agriculture classification and biomass estimation algorithms, volume 2. [Oklahoma and Texas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Agricultural crop classification models using two or more spectral regions (visible through microwave) were developed and tested and biomass was estimated by including microwave with visible and infrared data. The study was conducted at Guymon, Oklahoma and Dalhart, Texas utilizing aircraft multispectral data and ground truth soil moisture and biomass information. Results indicate that inclusion of C, L, and P band active microwave data from look angles greater than 35 deg from nadir with visible and infrared data improved crop discrimination and biomass estimates compared to results using only visible and infrared data. The active microwave frequencies were sensitive to different biomass levels. In addition, two indices, one using only active microwave data and the other using data from the middle and near infrared bands, were well correlated to total biomass.

Rosenthal, W. D.; Mcfarland, M. J.; Theis, S. W.; Jones, C. L. (principal investigators)

1982-01-01

98

The Occurrence of Chlorothalonil, its Transformation Products, and Selected Other Pesticides in Texas and Oklahoma Streams, 2003-2004  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this study is to determine if the fungicide chlorothalonil (2,4,5,6-tetrachloro-isophthalonitrile) or three of its transformation products are transported to surface water after use on peanuts or other crops. Chlorothalonil is classified as a probable carcinogen, and the 4-hydroxy of chlorothalonil transformation product is more soluble, stable, and toxic than its parent compound. In 2003, 14 water samples were collected from three sites in Texas and two sites in Oklahoma. In 2004, six samples were collected from the two Oklahoma sites. Chlorothalonil was not detected in any sample. The 4-hydroxy of chlorothalonil transformation product was detected in three of the six samples collected in 2004, with a maximum concentration of 0.018 ?g/L; the other two transformation products were not detected in any sample. In addtion, samples were analyzed for as many as 109 other pesticides and transformation products. Atrazine was detected in 13 of the 19 samples with a maximum concentration of 0.122 ?g/L. Deethyatrazine was detected in 10 of the 19 samples with a maximum concentration of 0.04 ?g/L. Metolachlor was detected in 8 of the 19 samples with a maximum concentration of 0.019 ?g/L. Fifteen other pesticides or pesticide transformation products including 2,4-D, carbaryl, simazine, oryzalin, prometon, tebuthiuron were detected in four or fewer samples. In general, concentrations of pesticides were less than is commonly observed in Midwestern streams.

Battaglin, W. A.; Kuivila, K. M.; Winton, K. T.; Meyer, M. T.

2005-12-01

99

Disparities in foodborne illness in Harris County, Texas, 2005--2010  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using a retrospective cross-sectional approach, this study quantitatively analyzed foodborne illness data, restaurant inspection data, and census-derived socioeconomic and demographic data within Harris County, Texas between 2005 and 2010. The main research question investigated involved determining the extent to which contextual and regulatory conditions distinguish outbreak and non-outbreak establishments within Harris County. Two groups of Harris County establishments were analyzed:

Elise Russo

2012-01-01

100

Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate the impact of downhole vibration stimulation on oil production rates in a mature waterflood field. Oil & Gas Consultants International, Inc. (OGCI) will manage the project in close cooperation with the Osage Tribe as the tests will be conducted in Osage County, Oklahoma, the mineral estate of the Osage Tribe. The field is owned and operated by Calumet Oil Company. Phillips Petroleum Company will contribute their proprietary vibration core analysis of cores recovered from the pilot test area. To achieve the project objectives, the work has been divided into nine tasks, some are concurrent, while other tasks rely on completion of previous steps. The operator, Calumet Oil Company operates several field in Osage County Oklahoma. The North Burbank Unit will be the site of the test. The team will then determine where within the field to optimally locate the vibration test well. With the location determined, the test well will be drilled, cored, logged and 7-inch production casing run and cemented. In a parallel effort, OGCI will be designing, building, and testing a new version of the downhole vibration tool based on their patented and field proven whirling orbital vibrator. With the field test tool built to run in 7-inch casing. Reliability testing of the downhole tool and surface power source will be conducted in nearby field operated by Calumet Oil Company. After the core is recovered, Phillips Petroleum Company will be conducting laboratory tests utilizing their proprietary sonic core apparatus to determine fluid flow response to a range of vibration frequencies. These results, in turn, will allow final adjustments to the frequency generation mechanisms of the downhole vibration tool. One or more offset wells, near to the vibration test well, will be equipped with downhole geophones and or hydro-phones to determine the strength of signal and if the producing formation has a characteristic resonant frequency response. Surface geophones will also be set out and arranged to pick up the signal generated by the downhole vibration tool. The downhole vibrator will be installed in the test well. Monitoring the production and injection for the pilot test area will continue. As the frequency of the downhole tool is changed, the recording of seismic signals, both on the surface and downhole, will also be conducted. The results of the data collection will be a matrix of varying vibration stimulation conditions corresponding to changes in production fluid rates and seismic responses. The report on the results of the downhole vibration stimulation will be prepared and delivered using several venues. Technical papers will be submitted to the Society of Petroleum Engineers. Workshops are planned to be held for operators in Osage County and surrounding areas. A dedicated technical session on vibration stimulation may be offered at the 2002 SPE/DOE/IOR Conference, bringing together the world's experts in this emerging technology. The final task will be to close out the project.

J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

2001-03-31

101

Highway U.S. 69, From Cherokee County Line to State Highway 7 (4.0 Miles), Angelina County, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The project section of U.S. highway 69 is located in Angelina County, Texas. Adverse effects that can be controlled are soil erosion and air pollution dust. Adverse effects where damage can be reduced are the conversion of timber and pasture land for high...

1972-01-01

102

3 CFR - Expediting Review of Pipeline Projects From Cushing, Oklahoma, to Port Arthur, Texas, and Other...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...facilitating the safe and responsible development of our natural gas resources. But for the foreseeable future, we will continue...oil from unconventional sourcesâplaces like the Eagle Ford Shale in South Texas, where production grew by more than 200...

2013-01-01

103

A study of secondary recovery possibilities of the Hogshooter field, Washington County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Hogshooter field, located in east central Washington County, Oklahoma, was first developed during the period 1906 to 1913. The field was extended later during the period 1918 to 1922. The principal producing horizon is the Bartlesville sand, found at an average depth of 1,150 feet. To January 1, 1944, the Bartlesville sand has produced 7,566,000 barrels of oil from 5,610 productive acres and 871 oil wells. Peak production, averaging 2,025 barrels per day for the year, was attained in the year 1910. The accumulation of oil in the Bartlesville sand is not related to structure. The total recovery from the Bartlesville sand in the Hogshooter field to January 1, 1944, is estimated to represent 10.3 per cent of the original oil in place, and the total residual oil is estimated to average 11,776 barrels per acre. Widespread application of vacuum, started in 1915, has had little beneficial effect on production. Some gas-repressuring in recent years has increased recovery to a small extent. Conservatively estimated water-flood recovery possibilities are: 3,500 barrels per acre for an area consisting of 1,393 acres (4,875,000 barrels total) with a reasonable profit at the present price of crude oil, and 2,500 barrels per acre for an area of 2,248 acres (5,620,000 barrels total), with no profit indicated under existing conditions. The latter area would show a profit equal to the first-mentioned area only with an increase in price of crude oil of forty-five cents per barrel. Subsurface waters at depths of 1,400 to 1,700 feet are indicated as a satisfactory source for use in water-flooding operations.

Fox, I. William; Thigpen, Claude H.; Ginter, Roy L.; Alden, George P.

1945-01-01

104

Ground-Water Resources of Upton County, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The water needs of the county are supplied entirely from ground water, the Trinity Sand being the principal source. Water used in the county during 1965 was 6,781 acre-feet, of which 2,887 acre-feet, or 42 percent, was supplied by wells in adjacent counti...

D. E. White

1968-01-01

105

Slice-mapping: Reservoir characterization technique - West Yucca Butte Field, Pecos County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The West Yucca Butte field, located in Pecos County, Texas, is a structural-stratigraphic field that lies within the geologic province known as the Sheffield Channel-Val Verde basin area of west Texas. It is one of several producing fields situated in an en echelon pattern along several major northwest-southeast-trending fault systems. These fields are anticlinal features producing gas, condensate, and high-gravity

R. R. Casavant

1988-01-01

106

Digital map of hydraulic conductivity for the High Plains Aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This digital data set consists of hydraulic conductivity contours and polygons for the High Plains aquifer in the central United States. The High Plains aquifer extends from south of 32 degrees to almost 45 degrees north latitude and from 96 degrees 30 minutes to almost 104 degrees west longitude. The area covers 174,000 square miles and is present in Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Kansas, Colorado, Nebraska, Wyoming, and South Dakota.

Cederstrand, J. R.; Becker, M. F.

1998-01-01

107

Horizontal stresses from well-bore breakouts and lithologies associated with their formation, Oklahoma and Texas Panhandle  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Orientations of crustal stresses are inferred from stress-induced well-bore breakouts in three areas in the south-central United States: the eastern part of the Anadarko basin in central Oklahoma, the Marietta basin in south-central Oklahoma, and the Bravo dome area of the central Texas Panhandle. Inferred directions of maximum horizontal principal stress (SHmax) are ENE for the eastern Anadarko basin, and NE for the Marietta basin and the Bravo dome area. For the Bravo dome area, the magnitudes of the three principal stresses (S1, S2, S3) are known from existing hydraulic-fracturing (hydrofrac) measurements, and a normal-faulting stress regime (SV > SHmax > SHmin) is implied. For the eastern Anadarko basin and the Marietta basin, the magnitudes of the principal stresses are not known. Because Quaternary left-lateral oblique slip on the Meers fault in south-central Oklahoma suggests strike-slip (SHmax > Sv > SHmin) and reverse faulting (SHmax > SHmin > SV), the study region is inferred to be a possible transition zone between areas of extensional and compressional stresses. Breakout data from the eastern Anadarko basin yield a single consistent SHmax orientation. Data from the Marietta basin and the Bravo dome area have bimodal-orthogonal distributions consisting of breakouts and orthogonal sets of well-bore enlargement orientations. Orthogonal trends in the data are probably related to drilling-induced hydraulic fracturing of the well bore, or to preexisting natural fractures or joint sets intersecting the well bore. On the dipmeter log, breakouts and fracture enlargements have elliptical cross sections of similar size and shape. Orthogonally oriented well-bore enlargements are differentiated by comparing their long-axis orientations with directions of known or inferred horizontal stress. Dispersion, or data scatter, among enlargement orientations (bimodal data sets) increases the standard deviations for many well data sets from the Marietta basin and the Bravo dome area. In these two areas, some dispersion may reflect variation in stress conditions across fault-bounded blocks and the orientations of fractures or joints within these blocks. Although breakouts and fracture enlargements formed in all parts of the thick sequences of sedimentary rocks logged, they occurred primarily in limestone, shale, and dolomitic rocks, reflecting the abundance of these rock types in the study areas.

Dart, Richard L.

1989-01-01

108

Effects of municipal ground-water withdrawals on the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer, Pontotoc County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in south-central Oklahoma consists of a thick sequence of folded and faulted carbonate and clastic rocks of Upper Cambrian to Middle Ordovician age. Fractures and karst features locally increase the aquifer's capacity to transmit and store ground water. The aquifer is a principal source of water for municipal and rural users. A hydrologic study was conducted to evaluate the effects of municipal ground-water withdrawal from the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer on local ground-water levels and discharge from nearby springs and streams in south-central Pontotoc County. A municipal well was pumped for 63 hours at an average rate of 1,170 gallons per minute. A maximum observed drawdown of 0.3 feet was recorded half a mile from the pumping well. Drawdown was observed as far as 1.2 miles from the pumping well. No measurable response was observed at any of the surface-water-discharge measurement sites; however, recharge from precipitation may have masked any decreases in discharge caused by the pumping. Simultaneous pumping of two municipal wells for 241 hours at average rates of 1,170 and 2,730 gallons per minute resulted in a maximum observed drawdown of 1.3 feet recorded at an average distance of 0.80 miles from the pumping wells. The most distant drawdown observed was at an average distance 1.1 miles from the pumped wells. Less that 2 days after pumping stopped, increases in springflow were recorded at two springs; it is unknown whether these discharge responses reflect the effects of recharge from precipitation, or the combined effects of precipitation and the cessation of ground-water withdrawal. The effects of the stress tests on the hydrologic system were offset by recharge from concurrent precipitation. The maximum observed drawdown represents about 6 percent of the median natural water-level fluctuation during the study period. The effect of drawdown could become critical during extended periods of low precipitation, if water levels are already near the bottom of domestic wells in the area. However, a comparison of maximum observed drawdown (1.3 ft) with the minimum saturated thickness of fresh ground water (1,500 ft) suggests that municipal pumping had little effect on the amount of ground water stored in the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in the study area. This evaluation is based on the limited pumping rates and times of the stress tests.

Savoca, M. E.; Bergman, D. L.

1994-01-01

109

Ground-Water Resources of Johnson County, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The use of ground water for irrigation is limited by the low yield of most of the wells and the high sodium content of most of the ground water. In 1965, the population of Johnson County was about 40,100. The economy of the county is based primarily on ag...

G. L. Thompson

1969-01-01

110

Ground-Water Resources of Polk County, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The principal aquifers of Polk County--the Catahoula Sandstone, Jasper aquifer, and Evangeline aquifer--contain fresh to slightly saline water to a depth of as much as 1,800 feet below sea level. In the southeastern part of the county where the base of fr...

G. R. Tarver

1968-01-01

111

Ground-Water Resources of Hardeman County, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Blaine Formation of Permian age and the alluvial terrace deposits of Quaternary age are the most important sources of large quantities of ground water in Hardeman County. In a broad sense, ground water moves eastward from Childress and Cottle Counties...

M. L. Maderak

1972-01-01

112

Ground-Water Resources of Kendall County, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The economy of Kendall County depends chiefly on farming, raising of livestock, and tourist trade. Nearly all water used in the county is obtained from ground-water sources. The principal water-bearing units, which supply most of the water to wells in the...

R. D. Reeves

1967-01-01

113

On the Remanent Magnetism in Precambrian Llanite and Town Mountain Granite from Llano County, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The natural remanent magnetization (NRM) of 32 samples (87 specimens) from 3 sites in the 920 m.y. Llanite dike system and 3 sites in the 1000-1050 m.y. Town Mountain granite of the Lone Grove pluton, Llano County, Texas is not stable to demagnetization. ...

H. Spall

1971-01-01

114

Wilcox depth prediction at Katy Field, Waller County, Texas: problem and solution  

Microsoft Academic Search

Velocity anomalies large enough to cause severe errors in depth maps may not be recognized from prior drilling experience, from regional velocity control, or from seismic reflection configurations. A chastening example of one such anomaly is an outpost well near the Katy field in Waller County, Texas. This outpost well, the Exxon 1 Sparks, tested Wilcox sands, which were both

Olander

1985-01-01

115

Local Government Support of a Child Voucher System: Austin/Travis County, Texas.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Data collected in Austin, Texas (Travis County) indicate that private day care centers operate at less than full capacity and that the most difficult problems of many day care providers are financial--parents' inability to pay the cost of care. Data further indicate that a large percentage of Austin families have incomes below $15,000 and that…

Rodriguez, Linda

116

A multidiscipline look at the Thistle field area, Pecos County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

To allow an evaluation of the perspective provided by certain nonseismic methods in the Val Verde basin, the synergistic interpretation of gravimetric and magnetic data, surface geomorphology, and the Ellenburgger surface are compared to surface geochemical data and drilling immediate to the Thistle field, Pecos County, Texas.

Land, J.P. (J.P. Land and Associates, Inc., Houston, TX (United States))

1992-04-01

117

Relative Bioavailability of Arsenic in Soils from El Paso County, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A study using juvenile swine as test animals was performed to measure the gastrointestinal absorption of arsenic from two soil samples from El Paso County, Texas (Test Material 1 and Test Material 2). The relative bioavailability of arsenic was assessed b...

A. M. Wahlquist S. W. Casteel T. J. Evans W. J. Brattin

2003-01-01

118

Upper Strawn (Desmoinesian) carbonte and clastic depositional environments, southeastern King County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Pennsylvanian upper Strawn Group of southeastern King County, Texas, provides a unique setting to study interactions between coeval carbonate and clastic deposition during the Desmoinesian. One of the most perplexing problems is the relationship of massive Pennsylvanian platform carbonates to shallow-water terrigenous clastic sediments. Within the study area, carbonate facies were deposited along the northern edge of the Knox-Baylor

Todd H. Boring

1990-01-01

119

Geologic characterization of Caddo Limestone Reservoir, Curry Unit, Stephens County, north-central Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three classic carbonate models (carbonate bank, oolitic shoal, and tidal flat) are applied to interpret the depositional environments and diagenesis of the Caddo limestone (Middle Pennsylvanian). The study area is located in west-central Stephens County, approximately 4 mi southwest of Breckenridge, Texas. Phylloid algal mounds developed on a lower Caddo ramp, along the transition of the Concho platform and Fort

J. L. Weber; C. K. Schwartz

1990-01-01

120

Potential health impacts of heavy-metal exposure at the Tar Creek Superfund site, Ottawa County, Oklahoma.  

PubMed

The potential impact of exposure to heavy metals and health problems was evaluated at the Tar Creek Superfund site, Ottawa County, Oklahoma, USA. Observed versus expected mortality was calculated for selected conditions in the County and exposed cities. Excess mortality was found for stroke and heart disease when comparing the exposed County to the state but not when comparing the exposed cities to the nonexposed rest of the County. However, sample sizes in the exposed area were small, population emigration has been ongoing, and geographic coding of mortality data was incomplete. In an exposed community, 62.5% of children under the age of 6 years had blood lead levels exceeding 10 microg/dl. The relationships between heavy-metal exposure and children's health and chronic disease in adults are suggestive that a more thorough investigation might be warranted. A number of possible environmental and health studies are suggested, including those focusing on possible central nervous system impacts. Unfortunately, the exposed population is dispersing. One lesson learned at this site is that health studies need to be conducted as soon as possible after an environmental problem is identified to both study the impact of the most acute exposures and to maximize study sample size-including those exposed to higher doses-and minimize the loss of individuals to follow-up. PMID:18306045

Neuberger, John S; Hu, Stephen C; Drake, K David; Jim, Rebecca

2009-02-01

121

Ground-Water Resources of Grimes County, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Fresh to slightly saline ground water is available everywhere in Grimes County. The Yegua Formation, Jackson Group, Catahoula Sandstone, Fleming Formation, and flood-plain alluvium are the sources of almost all water presently (1971) being pumped. The Car...

E. T. Baker C. R. Follett G. D. McAdoo C. W. Bonnet

1974-01-01

122

Estimation of Volume and Mass and of Changes in Volume and Mass of Selected Chat Piles in the Picher Mining District, Ottawa County, Oklahoma, 2005-10.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

From the 1890s through the 1970s the Picher mining district in northeastern Ottawa County, Oklahoma, was the site of mining and processing of lead and zinc ore. When mining ceased in about 1979, as much as 165300 million tons of mine tailings, locally ref...

S. J. Smith

2013-01-01

123

Ground-Water Resources of Tyler County, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The ground-water supplies underlying Tyler County are practically untapped. In 1964, withdrawals of ground water amounted to about 2,550 acre-feet or 2.3 mgd (million gallons per day) as compared with 62 mgd that is being transmitted by the Jasper, Evange...

G. R. Tarver

1968-01-01

124

Ground-Water Resources of Bee County, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Ground water in the county moves southeastward from areas of recharge to areas of discharge at about 10 feet per year. Precipitation on the outcrop of the formations is the primary source of recharge; and because the water table averages about 50 feet bel...

B. N. Myers O. C. Dale

1966-01-01

125

Ground-Water Resources of Lee County, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

About 6,000 feet of alternating beds of friable sandstone, highly indurated sandstone, silt, siltstone, clay, shale, and some thin local limestone lenses form the entire geologic section which contains the aquifer in the county. In 1963 about 1.5 mgd (mil...

G. L. Thompson

1966-01-01

126

Infill drilling in the Rotherwood field, Harris County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

More than 600 billion bbl of oil are estimated to be left behind in abandoned and producing fields. The average field produces only one-third of the oil originally in place. This paper describes a method to determine where this oil exists in odd-shaped fields like the Rotherwood field in Harris County, TX. Conformal mapping is used. The field's configuration is

Hurst

1991-01-01

127

Red Deer Creek Watershed, Gray, Roberts, and Hemphill Counties, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The project, located in portions of Gray, Hemphill, and Roberts Counties, proposes land treatment measures within the watershed on about 39,010 acres of grassland and cropland and 20 floodwater retarding structures to be constructed during a ten year inst...

1973-01-01

128

History of development and depositional environment and upper Cherokee Prue Sand, Custer and Roger Mills counties, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

In western Oklahoma the uppermost sand member of the Cherokee Group, the True sand, was first drilled and found productive in two discoveries, completed in 1980, in west-central Custer County and in central Roger Mills County, Oklahoma. For 1 1/2 to 2 years these two discoveries, some 18 mi (29 km) apart, were thought to be stratigraphic equivalents of two separate sand bodies occurring parallel to the classic northwest-southeast-trending systems of the Anadarko basin. At present, some 40 productive wells will ultimately produce more than 100 bcf of gas and 3 million bbl of condensate from an average depth of 11,500 ft (3500 m). Sand porosities range from 3 to 18% with most producing wells having porosities in the 12 to 15% range. Because Prue sand is slightly overpressured (a pressure gradient of .53 psi/foot), the reserves are generally better than normal-pressured wells at this depth. The sand body is over 40 mi (64 km) in length, 1 to 1.5 mi (1.6 to 2.4 km) wide, and 60 ft (18 m) thick. Study of the core shows the interval to grade from a medium to fine-grained sand, highly laminated and cross-bedded with black shale, to a slightly coarser grained nonstructured interval and back into a highly laminated cross-bedded sandy black shale interval. The interval is topped by a 10 ft (3 m) thick black shale layer that is a predominant bed throughout the whole area. These conclusions have implications that may assist in the exploration of other Pennsylvanian sands in this area.

Baumann, D.K.; Peterson, M.L.; Hunter, L.W.

1983-03-01

129

Applied regional monitoring of the vernal advancement and retrogradation (Green wave effect) of natural vegetation in the Great Plains corridor. [Texas and Oklahoma  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author has identified the following significant results. A TV16 isoline map at the 6.25 million hectare extended test site area in north central Texas and southern Oklahoma was produced. The map was compared to a published USDA Statistical Reporting Service map, which shows pasture and range feed conditions, as reported by rancher respondents. Both maps show similar areas of drought stress and good to excellent forage conditions, but preliminary indications are that the LANDSAT-derived map more accurately depicts the areal extent of each condition class.

Rouse, J. W., Jr. (principal investigator)

1976-01-01

130

Geology of the Brysch uranium mine, Karnes County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Approximately 13,700 tons (12,400 tonnes) of oxidized uranium ore, averaging about 0.1 percent UâOâ, was mined during 1966 and 1967 from the lower unit of the Deweesville Sandstone Member of the upper Eocene Whitsett Formation, from depths of 75 to 90 feet (23-27 m). The mine is in the Karnes County uranium area, 3 miles (5 km) east of Falls

K. A. Dickinson; M. W. Sullivan

1976-01-01

131

Helicopter Electromagnetic and Magnetic Surveys of the Upper and Middle Zones of the Trinity Aquifer, Uvalde and Bexar Counties, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Detailed helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic surveys (HEM) were conducted in northern Uvalde and Bexar Counties, Texas, as part of a geologic mapping and hydrologic study being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The aquifers of the Lower Cretaceous Trinity Group (collectively termed the Trinity aquifer) are an important regional water source in the Hill Country of south-central Texas. Rock

D. V. Smith; C. D. Blome; B. D. Smith; A. C. Clark

2009-01-01

132

An evaluation of ²²?Ra and ²²?Ra in drinking water in several counties in Texas, USA.  

PubMed

Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) or Technology Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (TENORM) can be a potential health risk. It is now well known that the underlying geology in many parts of Texas has given rise to levels of (226)Ra and (228)Ra that often exceed the limits set by the US Environmental Protection Agency. A detailed literature search was undertaken to assess the levels of (226)Ra and (228)Ra in all of the Texas counties. Several statistical evaluations of the data were performed. The Hickory aquifer in the Llano Uplift region of Texas has consistently had the highest number of (226)Ra and (228)Ra concentrations above the legal limit. As well many of the affected rural communities may not have the financial resources to rectify the problem. PMID:23490545

Landsberger, S G; George, G

2013-11-01

133

Horizontal drilling in the Lower Glen Rose Formation, Maverick County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents preliminary results of a project to assess the economic viability of horizontal drilling in the Lower Glen Rose Formation of Maverick County, Texas. This project is part of an ongoing Department of Energy investigation of directional drilling in the development of gas resources within the United States. The paper includes: project description; results covering geologic setting, reservoir engineering, and seismic surveys; and future work on drilling location selection, drilling, and well completion. (AT)

Drimal, C.E.; Muncey, G.

1992-10-01

134

Horizontal drilling in the Lower Glen Rose Formation, Maverick County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents preliminary results of a project to assess the economic viability of horizontal drilling in the Lower Glen Rose Formation of Maverick County, Texas. This project is part of an ongoing Department of Energy investigation of directional drilling in the development of gas resources within the United States. The paper includes: project description; results covering geologic setting, reservoir engineering, and seismic surveys; and future work on drilling location selection, drilling, and well completion. (AT)

Drimal, C.E.; Muncey, G.

1992-01-01

135

Reservoir geology of Devonian carbonates and chert: Implications for tertiary recovery, Dollarhide field, Andrews County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Devonian strata of the Thirtyone Formation at Dollarhide field, Andrews County, Texas, originally contained 144 million bbl of oil in place, with 18.6 million bbl produced by primary recovery, 39.3 million bbl projected to be produced by secondary recovery (waterflood), and 27.4 million bbl projected to be produced by tertiary recovery (COâ flood). Devonian strata contain five main lithologies (from

A. H. Saller; J. A. Miller; D. V. Horn; B. T. Guy

1991-01-01

136

Microfacies and seismic interpretation of Caddo lime (Desmoinesian) in Chalky Mountain field, Taylor County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

A detailed microfacies and seismic interpretation was conducted for the Caddo lime, a relatively unstudied Middle Pennsylvanian hydrocarbon reservoir in north-central Texas. Five cores from Chalky Mountain field in Taylor County were studied and found to contain six distinct but gradational facies: (1) shale, (2) dark, clay-rich limestone, (3) algal wackestone-boundstone, (4) algal grainstone, (5) skeletal packstone-grainstone, and (6) oolitic

Elizabeth G. Lewis

1987-01-01

137

SUBSURFACE WELL-LOG CORRELATION OF ARSENIC-BEARING LITHOFACIES IN THE PERMIAN GARBER SANDSTONE AND WELLINGTON FORMATION, CENTRAL OKLAHOMA AQUIFER (COA), CLEVELAND COUNTY, OKLAHOMA  

EPA Science Inventory

The fluvial Garber Sandstone and the underlying Wellington Formation are important sources of drinking water in central Oklahoma. These formations, which make up much of the COA, consist of amalgamated sandstones with some interbedded mudstones, siltstones, and local mudstone- a...

138

Did fertility go up after the oklahoma city bombing? An analysis of births in metropolitan counties in Oklahoma, 1990–1999  

Microsoft Academic Search

Political and sociocultural events (e.g., Brown v. Board of Education in 1954 and the German reunification in 1989) and natural disasters (e.g., Hurricane Hugo in 1989) can affect fertility.\\u000a In our research, we addressed the question of whether the Oklahoma City bombing in April 1995, a man-made disaster, influenced\\u000a fertility patterns in Oklahoma. We defined three theoretical orientations—replacement theory, community

Joseph Lee Rodgers; Craig A. St. John; Ronnie Coleman

2005-01-01

139

Contamination of Lake Wewoka and fresh-water sands by disposal of oil-well brines near Wewoka, Seminole County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This reports deals with ground-water conditions in an area about 5 miles wide from east to west and 8 miles long from north to south, in Tps. 8 and 9 N., Rs. 7 and 8 E., in Seminole County, Oklahoma, including the town of Wewoka and Lake Wewoka. The possible contamination of the lake waters from oil-well brines disposed through a well 3.75 miles north of the lake, and other effects of brine disposal, are considered. The investigation was made at the request of Frank Raab, member of the Oklahoma Planning and Resources Board, and Don McBride, Chief Engineer of the Division of Water Resources who has the responsibility of preventing contamination of water supplies in Oklahoma. Field work was done July 5 and 6, 1941, by Robert H. Dott, Director of the Oklahoma Geological Survey; C.G. Lalicker, Department of Geology, University of Oklahoma; and S.L. Schoff, Assistant Geologist in the Ground Water Division, Water Resources Branch, of the U.S. Geological Survey. Lalicker spent both days studying the rocks exposed in the vicinity and measuring their thickness. A copy of the composite section measured by him is attached. Dott and Schoff spent one day collecting the well information summarized in Table 1, and one day with Lalicker on the stratigraphy. (available as photostat copy only)

Schoff, Stuart L.; Dott, Robert H.; Lalicker, Cecil Gordon

1941-01-01

140

Reflectance of vegetation, soil, and water. [in Hidalgo County, Texas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author has identified the following significant results. A study was conducted in a 340-acre (139 hectares) field of grain sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) to determine if multispectral data from ERTS-1 could be used to detect differences in chlorophyll concentration between iron-deficient (chlorotic) and apparently normal (green) grain sorghum. Chlorotic sorghum areas 2.8 acres (1.1 hectares) or larger in size were identified on a computer printout of band 5 data which contains the chlorophyll absorption band at the 0.65 micron wavelength. ERTS resolution is sufficient for practical applications in detecting iron-deficient sorghum in otherwise uniform fields. The first classification map of the study county has been produced. Vegetation (crops), rangeland, bare soil, water, and an undefined (all other) category occupied 15.2, 45.0, 19.1, 0.02, and 20.6% of the land area, respectively.

Wiegand, C. L. (principal investigator)

1973-01-01

141

Geologic and Hydrogeologic Information for a Geodatabase for the Brazos River Alluvium Aquifer, Bosque County to Fort Bend County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During July-October 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Texas Water Development Board (TWDB), developed geologic and hydrogeologic information for a geodatabase for use in development of a Groundwater Availability Model (GAM) of the Brazos River alluvium aquifer along the Brazos River from Bosque County to Fort Bend County, Texas. The report provides geologic and hydrogeologic information for a study area that encompasses the Brazos River alluvium aquifer, a 1/2-mile-wide lateral buffer surrounding the aquifer, and the rocks immediately underlying the aquifer. The geodatabase involves use of a thematic approach to create layers of feature data using a geographic information system. Feature classes represent the various types of data that are keyed to spatial location and related to one another within the geodatabase. The 1/2-mile-wide buffer surrounding the aquifer was applied to include data from wells constructed primarily in alluvium but outside the boundary of the Brazos River alluvium aquifer. A 1/2- by 1/2-mile grid was generated on the study area to facilitate uniform distribution of data for eventual input into the GAM. Data were compiled primarily from drillers and borehole geophysical logs from government agencies and universities, hydrogeologic sections and maps from published reports, and agency files. The geodatabase contains 450 points with geologic data and 280 points with hydrogeologic data.

Shah, Sachin D.; Houston, Natalie A.

2007-01-01

142

Regional variations in crude oil geochemistry, Anadarko basin, Oklahoma, Texas, and Kansas - evidence for multiple sources, mixing, and migration distances  

SciTech Connect

Geochemical analyses of 96 crude oil and condensate samples from the deep Anardarko basin and adjacent shelf areas show three major oil types, which generally correlate with reservoir age. Analyses include C/sub 3/-C/sub 30/ whole oil gas chromatography, C/sub 10/ + saturated hydrocarbon fraction gas chromatography, carbon stable isotopes (ppt relative to PDB) of saturated (sat) and aromatic (arom) hydrocarbon fractions, and computerized GC/MS of selected samples. Three samples from Ordovician Simpson Group reservoirs are typical Ordovician oils (type 1), having strong odd-carbon predominance in the C/sub 13/ to Cr/sub 19/ n-alkanes, containing little or no acyclic isoprenoids, and delta/sup 13/C of -33.9 ppt (sat) and -33.7 ppt (arom). Oils from Devonian and Mississippian reservoirs (type 2) show little or no odd-carbon predominance in the n-alkanes, an exponential decrease in abundance with increasing carbon number, pristane/phytane ratios (pr/ph) of 1.1 to 1.5, and delta/sup 13/C of -30.6 (sat) and -30.1 ppt (arom). Oils in Pennsylvanian reservoirs (type 3) have the greatest amounts of C/sub 15/ + hydrocarbons of all the oils, are isotopically heavy (-27.5 ppt (sat) and -26.4 ppt (arom)), have methyl-cyclohexane as the most abundant hydrocarbon, and have pr/ph values from 1.8 to 0.9 Type 3 oils with pr/ph < 1 form a subgroup in the Texas and Oklahoma panhandles. Condensates correlate with the three oil types based on carbon isotopic and gasoline-range compositions. Oils of type 2 composition occur in rocks of Ordovician to Pennsylvanian age in complex structural traps near the Arbuckle Mountains and in subcrop plays where Pennsylvanian reservoirs directly overlie Devonian and older rocks. Such traps also contain oils that could be mixtures of types 2 and 3 and types 1 and 2. Oils from the Kansas shelf are similar to the Anadarko oil types except that they have only traces of toluene and no detectable benzene.

Burruss, R.C.; Hatch, J.R.

1987-05-01

143

Ground-water quality, levels, and flow direction near Fort Cobb Reservoir, Caddo County, Oklahoma, 1998-2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Fort Cobb Reservoir in northwest Caddo County Oklahoma is managed by the Bureau of Reclamation for water supply, recreation, flood control, and wildlife. Excessive amounts of nitrogen in the watershed have the potential to cause long-term eutrophication of the reservoir and increase already elevated concentrations of nitrogen in the Rush Springs aquifer. The U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation studied ground water in the area surrounding a swine feeding operation located less than 2 miles upgradient from Fort Cobb Reservoir in Caddo County, Oklahoma. Objectives of the study were to (1) determine if the operation was contributing nitrogen to the ground water and (2) measure changes in ground-water levels and determine the local ground-water flow direction in the area surrounding the swine feeding operation. Nitrate concentrations (28.1 and 31.5 milligrams per liter) were largest in two ground-water samples from a well upgradient of the wastewater lagoon. Nitrate concentrations ranged from 4.30 to 8.20 milligrams per liter in samples from downgradient wells. Traces of ammonia and nitrite were detected in a downgradient well, but not in upgradient wells. d15N values indicate atmospheric nitrogen, synthetic fertilizer, or plants were the predominate sources of nitrate in ground water from the downgradient wells. The d15N values in these samples are depleted in nitrogen-15, indicating that animal waste was not a significant contributor of nitrate. Manganese concentrations (1,150 and 965 micrograms per liter) in samples from a downgradient well were substantially larger than concentrations in samples from other wells, exceeding the secondary drinking-water standard of 50 micrograms per liter. Larger concentrations of bicarbonate, magnesium, fluoride, and iron and a higher pH were also measured in water from a downgradient well. Ground-water levels in an observation well were higher from April to mid-July and lower during the late summer and in the fall due to a seasonal decrease in precipitation, increase in water withdrawals, and increase in evapotranspiration. Ground water near the wastewater spray field moved south-southeast toward Willow Creek along a gradient of about 50 feet per mile. Analysis of ground-water samples suggest that commercial fertilizer is contributing nitrate upgradient of the swine feeding operation and that wastewater from the lagoon is contributing reduced forms of nitrogen, ammonia and nitrite. Additional downgradient wells would be needed to (1) determine if the swine feeding operation is adding excessive amounts of nitrogen to ground water, (2) determine the vertical dimension of wastewater flow, and (3) the extent of wastewater downgradient of the lagoon.

Becker, Carol J.

2001-01-01

144

Meteorite search in the deflation basins in Lea County, New Mexico and Winkler County, Texas, USA: Discovery of Lea County 003 (H4)  

SciTech Connect

During the past few decades great numbers of meteorites have been recovered from the ice accumulation zones of Antarctica and from the vast Sahara. Although these two great deserts are the two most productive areas, the Southern High Plains in USA (New Mexico and Texas) and Nullarbor Plain, Western Australia have great potential for meteorite recovery. The number of meteorite finds from Roosevelt County, New Mexico alone exceeds 100 in only approximately 11 km{sup 2} area. Most meteorites from this area have been found on the floors of active deflation basins (blowouts) that have been excavated from a mantle of sand dunes. This area has no apparent fluvial or permafrost activity within the last 50,000 years, suggesting that only prevailing winds and natural aridity aid in the concentration and preservation of meteorites. The authors investigated these deflation surfaces in Lea County (the SE corner of New Mexico) and neighboring Winkler County, Texas following a prior search in this area which found two chondrites. They found a tiny H4 chondrite in this search and here they report its mineralogy and petrology along with preliminary data on its exposure history.

Mikouchi, T; Buchanan, P C; Zolensky, M E; Welten, K C; Hutchison, R; Hutchison, M

2000-01-14

145

West Lawn Site and Planting Plans Oklahoma City Civic ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

West Lawn Site and Planting Plans - Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by N. Shartel Avenue to the West, N. Hudson Avenue to the East, Couch Drive to the North, and Colcord Drive to the South, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK

146

Site Plans (1936 and 2001) Oklahoma City Civic Center, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Site Plans (1936 and 2001) - Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by N. Shartel Avenue to the West, N. Hudson Avenue to the East, Couch Drive to the North, and Colcord Drive to the South, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK

147

Municipal Building Planting Plan Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Municipal Building Planting Plan - Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by N. Shartel Avenue to the West, N. Hudson Avenue to the East, Couch Drive to the North, and Colcord Drive to the South, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK

148

Typical Raised Planter Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Typical Raised Planter - Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by N. Shartel Avenue to the West, N. Hudson Avenue to the East, Couch Drive to the North, and Colcord Drive to the South, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK

149

Granite Monument Plaza Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Granite Monument Plaza - Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by N. Shartel Avenue to the West, N. Hudson Avenue to the East, Couch Drive to the North, and Colcord Drive to the South, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK

150

Site Plans (2008 As Built) Oklahoma City Civic Center, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Site Plans (2008 As Built) - Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by N. Shartel Avenue to the West, N. Hudson Avenue to the East, Couch Drive to the North, and Colcord Drive to the South, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK

151

Preliminary assessment report for Camp Swift Military Reservation, Installation 48070, Bastrop County, Texas. Installation Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Texas Army National Guard property in Bastrop County, Texas. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Camp Swift property, the requirement of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program (IRP). The review of both historical and current practices at the property indicated that the activities at Camp Swift include no operations considered to have an adverse impact to the environment. The recommendation, therefore, is that no further IRP action is necessary at this property.

Dennis, C.B.

1993-08-01

152

Petroleum geology of Arbuckle Group Ordovician, Healdton Field, Carter County, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Healdton Field, in the NE. half of T. 4 S., R. 3 W., Carter County, Okla., produces oil principally from the Hoxbar Group of Pennsylvanian age and the Arbuckle Group of Early Ordovician age. Oil production was established first in 1913 from four Healdton sandstones (Hoxbar). Several of the earlier development wells were drilled into the pre-Pennsylvanian rocks and

Latham

1968-01-01

153

Records of ground-water levels and effects of pumping in the Ardmore well-field area, Carter County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The purpose of this report is to outline the results of work done by the U.S. Geological Survey in the Ardmore well-field area, near Newport, Carter County. The work, completed in two periods between April 1964 and June 1965, was done as part of the ground-water program carried out by the Geological Survey in cooperation with the Oklahoma Water Resources Board. The study in the report area included: (1) a physical inventory of wells in the vicinity of the Ardmore well field (fig. 1); (2) information on depths, perforated intervals, ground-water levels, and water use (table 1); (3) records of water-level fluctuations in deep and shallow wells (table 2) to determine if there is a hydraulic connection between the deep zones tapped by Ardmore's wells and the shallow and intermediate zones tapped by domestic and stock wells in the surrounding area; and (4) general information on the geologic and hydrologic features that may be of use in evaluating the ground-water potential of the Wichita Formation, the principal aquifer in the area. (available as photostat copy only)

Wood, P. R.

1965-01-01

154

Irrigation scheduling, freeze warning and soil salinity detecting. [in Cameron County Texas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author has identified the following significant results. Correlations of multispectral scanner (MSS) digital data differences between vegetated and bare soil areas with salinity levels from the eight saline areas using MSS bands seven and ten in the infrared region were significant. Correlations were derived for Cameron County, Texas. Detection of saline soils may be possible, using either film density readings or multispectral scanner data, when the lower reflectance of vegetation on highly saline soil and the higher reflectance of vegetation on lower saline soil are considered by using film on MSS contrasts between vegetation and bare soil.

Wiegand, C. L. (principal investigator)

1975-01-01

155

First report of West Nile virus in mosquitoes from Lubbock County, Texas.  

PubMed

Since July 2002, ongoing surveillance efforts have been conducted to determine potential vectors of West Nile virus (WNV) and Saint Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) in the mosquito population occurring in Lubbock County, Texas. Adult mosquitoes collected in Lubbock County during 2002 and 2003 represented 7 genera, with Culex tarsalis and Ochlerotatus sollicitans being the predominant species collected. Mosquitoes were initially screened for WNV and SLEV by using the VecTest antigen panel assay. Positive VecTest results were confirmed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. West Nile virus-positive pools of mosquitoes were detected in 2002 and 2003, with the majority of the positive pools consisting of Cx. tarsalis. None of the mosquito pools tested positive for SLEV. PMID:15825772

Bradford, Carrie M; Nascarella, Marc A; Burns, Teresa H; Montford, John R; Marsland, Eric J; Pepper, Christopher B; Presley, Steven M

2005-03-01

156

West Central Texas. Homework pays off for Originala in Haskell County  

SciTech Connect

Originala Petroleum Corp., Fort Worth, is finding Bend Conglomerate and Caddo oil in NW Haskell County, Texas. The most encouraging find to date is the company's No. 1 June L. White, which potentialed in Sept. 1981 for 493 bopd from perforations in the Caddo at 5638-60 ft. This discovery, along with promising Bend Conglomerate drill stem test and log shows in other wells in the region, support continued exploration efforts in this geologically complex province. The key to overcoming the exploration challenges in NW. Haskell County is to depend primarily upon seismic data to give structural control. Accurate seismic interpretation is only a part of the preparation, and is integrated with other geologic data-collecting methods such as gravity and structural mapping based solely on subsurface control.

Mickey, V.

1983-03-01

157

Upper Strawn (Desmoinesian) carbonte and clastic depositional environments, southeastern King County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Pennsylvanian upper Strawn Group of southeastern King County, Texas, provides a unique setting to study interactions between coeval carbonate and clastic deposition during the Desmoinesian. One of the most perplexing problems is the relationship of massive Pennsylvanian platform carbonates to shallow-water terrigenous clastic sediments. Within the study area, carbonate facies were deposited along the northern edge of the Knox-Baylor trough on the Spur platform, and terrigenous clastics were carried toward the Midland basin through the Knox-Baylor trough. Based on the analysis of subsurface cores, five carbonate lithofacies and four clastic lithofacies were recognized in southeastern King County, Texas. The distribution and geometry of these lithofacies are related to variations in the rate of subsidence in the Knox-Baylor trough, Pennsylvanian tectonics, deltaic progradation, avulsion, and compaction. The platform carbonates within the northern region of southeastern King County record environments within the carbonate platform complex, including middle platform, outer platform, algal mound, and platform margin. The quartzarenitic sandstones within the southern region of southeastern King County occur in a variety of complex depositional geometries, including distributary-bar fingers, lobate deltas, and offshore bars. Cores of these sandstones represent mainly the uppermost portion of the various sandstone bodies. The upper Strawn Group provides an attractive area for exploration geology. Both carbonates and clastics provide excellent reservoirs from a depth of approximately 5,000-6,000 ft. Total production within the area is over 100 million bbl of oil since the early 1940s. Multiple pay zones within a 600-ft interval also provide an added incentive for exploration. Areas within and around the Knox-Baylor trough deserve a detailed study due to these relatively shallow, unexplored, multiple pay zones.

Boring, T.H. (Oryx Energy Co., Oklahoma City, OK (USA))

1990-02-01

158

Preliminary appraisal of the hydrology of the Blocker area, Pittsburg County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Bedrock in the Blocker area of southeastern Oklahoma consists principally of shale, siltstone, and sandstone of the Boggy and Savanna Formations of Pennsylvanian age. These rocks have been folded to form the Panther Mountain syncline on the south and the Kinta anticline on the north. Alluvium along streams is less than 15 feet thick and consists mainly of sandy silt. Water in bedrock is under artesian conditions. Well depths range from 11 to 213 feet and average 75 feet. In 86% of the wells measured, the water level was less than 30 feet below the land surface. Because the rocks have minimal permeability, well yields probably are less than 5 gallons per minute. Ground water is commonly a mixed cation bicarbonate type with dissolved solids ranging from about 300 to 2,000 milligrams per liter. No relationship between water chemistry and well depth or geographic distribution is apparent. Streams in the area are ephemeral and there are extended periods of no flow. Blue Creek was dry 30% of the time during 1976-80 and had flows of less than 0.1 cubic foot per second for at least 80 consecutive days. Stream water is generally a mixed cation sulfate type. The maximum dissolved-solids concentration determined in stream water was 3670 milligrams per liter. Maximum suspended sediment discharge, in tons per day, was about 235 for Blue Creek, 40 for Blue Creek tributary, and 630 for Mathuldy Creek. Silt-clay particles (diameters less than 0.062 millimeter) are the dominant sediment size. Surface mining for coal undoubtedly will have some effect on the environment. The most likely deleterious effects are increased sediment loads in streams and increased mineralization of stream waters. However, these effects should be of only limited extent and duration if appropriate mining and reclamation practices are followed. (USGS)

Marcher, Melvin V.; Bergman, D. L.; Stoner, J. D.; Blumer, S. P.

1981-01-01

159

Water Flow in the High Plains Aquifer in Northwestern Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The High Plains is a major agricultural area, supported primarily by water from the High Plains aquifer, which is used to irrigate wheat and corn and to raise cattle and swine. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB) began a study of the High Plains aquifer in 1996. One purpose of the study was to develop a ground-water flow model that the OWRB could use to allocate the amount of water withdrawn from the a aquifer. The study area in Oklahoma covers all or parts of Beaver, Cimarron, Dewey, Ellis, Harper, Texas, and Woodward Counties. To provide appropriate hydrologic boundaries for the ground-water flow model, the study area was expanded to include parts of Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, and Texas.

Luckey, Richard R.; Osborn, Noel I.; Becker, Mark F.; Andrews, William J.

2000-01-01

160

Excess leukemia and multiple myeloma in a mining county in northeast Texas.  

PubMed

From 1950 to 1979, cancer mortality rates in Titus County, Texas, increased with a significant excess of deaths from leukemia, lymphoma, brain and liver cancers, and melanoma. County residents requested this study to verify the apparent excess of cancer. Newly diagnosed cases of cancer among white residents from 1977 to 1984 were ascertained from the Texas Cancer Registry, hospital records, and death certificates. Direct and indirect methods were used to calculate incidence rates and standardized incidence ratios (SIR). We identified 663 cancers for 148,470 person-years of observation. No overall excess of cancer was found. However, we found a significant excess of leukemia (SIR = 2.53, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.86, 3.30) and multiple myeloma (SIR = 1.87, 95% CI = 1.02, 3.14). The reasons for the increased SIRs are unknown. However, the excess of cancers in this mining community may be relevant to the ongoing debate on the health effects of the disposal of combustion wastes from mining and fossil fuel and on the need for stricter regulations. Other potential risk factors include the presence of petrochemical and poultry industries. regulations. Other potential risk factors include the presence of petrochemical and poultry industries. PMID:8165588

Strom, S S; Spitz, M R; Cech, I M; Annegers, J F; Downs, T D

1994-02-01

161

Disparities of Food Availability and Affordability within Convenience Stores in Bexar County, Texas  

PubMed Central

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends healthful food choices; however, some geographic areas are limited in the types of foods they offer. Little is known about the role of convenience stores as viable channels to provide healthier foods in our “grab and go” society. The purposes of this study were to (1) identify foods offered within convenience stores located in two Bexar County, Texas, ZIP Codes and (2) compare the availability and cost of ADA-recommended foods including beverages, produce, grains, and oils/fats. Data were analyzed from 28 convenience store audits performed in two sociodemographically diverse ZIP Codes in Bexar County, Texas. Chi-squared tests were used to compare food availability, and t-tests were used to compare food cost in convenience stores between ZIP Codes. A significantly larger proportion of convenience stores in more affluent areas offered bananas (?2 = 4.17, P = 0.003), whole grain bread (?2 = 8.33, P = 0.004), and baked potato chips (?2 = 13.68, P < 0.001). On average, the price of diet cola (t = ?2.12, P = 0.044) and certain produce items (e.g., bananas, oranges, tomatoes, broccoli, and cucumber) was significantly higher within convenience stores in more affluent areas. Convenience stores can play an important role to positively shape a community's food environment by stocking healthier foods at affordable prices.

Smith, Matthew Lee; Sunil, T. S.; Salazar, Camerino I.; Rafique, Sadaf; Ory, Marcia G.

2013-01-01

162

Hydrologic and geochemical data for the Big Brown lignite mine area, Freestone County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Lignite mining in east and east-central Texas is increasing in response to increased energy needs throughout the State. Associated with the increase in mining activities is a greater need to know the effects of mining activities on the water quantity and quality of near surface aquifers. The near surface lignite beds mined at the Big Brown Lignite Mine are from the Calvert Bluff Formation of the Wilcox Group of Eocene age, which is a minor aquifer generally having water suitable for all uses, in eastern Freestone County, Texas. One of the potential hydrologic effects of surface coal mining is a change in the quality of groundwater associated with replacement of aquifer materials by mine spoils. The purpose of this report is to compile and categorize geologic, mineralogic, geochemical, and hydrologic data for the Big Brown Lignite Mine and surrounding area in east-central Texas. Included are results of paste-extract analyses, constituent concentrations in water from batch-mixing experiments, sulfur analyses, and minerals or mineral groups detected by X-ray diffraction in 12 spoil material samples collected from 3 locations at the mine site. Also, common-constituent and trace-constituent concentrations in water from eight selected wells, located updip and downdip from the mine, are presented. Dissolved solids concentrations in water from batch-mixing experiments vary from 12 to 908 mg/L. Water from selected wells contains dissolved solids concentrations ranging from 75 to 510 mg/L. (Author 's abstract)

Dorsey, M. E.

1985-01-01

163

Fate and groundwater impacts of produced water releases at OSPER "B" site, Osage County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

For the last 5 a, the authors have been investigating the transport, fate, natural attenuation and ecosystem impacts of inorganic and organic compounds in releases of produced water and associated hydrocarbons at the Osage-Skiatook Petroleum Environmental Research (OSPER) "A" and "B" sites, located in NE Oklahoma. Approximately 1.0 ha of land at OSPER "B", located within the active Branstetter lease, is visibly affected by salt scarring, tree kills, soil salinization, and brine and petroleum contamination. Site "B" includes an active production tank battery and adjacent large brine pit, two injection well sites, one with an adjacent small pit, and an abandoned brine pit and tank battery site. Oil production in this lease started in 1938, and currently there are 10 wells that produce 0.2-0.5 m3/d (1-3 bbl/d) oil, and 8-16 m3/d (50-100 bbl/d) brine. Geochemical data from nearby oil wells show that the produced water source is a Na-Ca-Cl brine (???150,000 mg/L TDS), with high Mg, but low SO4 and dissolved organic concentrations. Groundwater impacts are being investigated by detailed chemical analyses of water from repeated sampling of 41 boreholes, 1-71 m deep. The most important results at OSPER "B" are: (1) significant amounts of produced water from the two active brine pits percolate into the surficial rocks and flow towards the adjacent Skiatook reservoir, but only minor amounts of liquid petroleum leave the brine pits; (2) produced-water brine and minor dissolved organics have penetrated the thick (3-7 m) shale and siltstone units resulting in the formation of three interconnected plumes of high-salinity water (5000-30,000 mg/L TDS) that extend towards the Skiatook reservoir from the two active and one abandoned brine pits; and (3) groundwater from the deep section of only one well, BR-01 located 330 m upslope and west of the site, appear not to be impacted by petroleum operations. ?? 2007.

Kharaka, Y. K.; Kakouros, E.; Thordsen, J. J.; Ambats, G.; Abbott, M. M.

2007-01-01

164

Preliminary appraisal of the hydrology of the Stigler area, Haskell County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Bed rock in the Stigler area of southeastern Oklahoma consists principally of shale, siltstone, and sandstone of the McAlester, Savanna, and Boggy Formations of Pennsylvanian age. These rocks have been folded to form the Stigler syncline on the north and the Antioch anticline on the south. An area of several square miles is underlain by terrace deposits, mostly sandy silt, as much as 25 feet thick. Alluvium along the streams is 5 to 10 feet thick and consists mainly of sandy silt. Neither the terrace deposits nor the alluvium are hydrologically significant. Water in the bedrock is under artesian conditions. Well depths range from 34 to 235 feet and average 95 feet. The water level in most wells is less than 30 feet below the land surface. Because the rocks have minimal permeability, well yields probably are less than 5 gallons per minute. Much of the area is provided with water by a rural water district. Based on specific-conductance measurements, dissolved-solids concentrations in ground water are estimated to range from 200 to 2,500 milligrams per liter. Nor relationship between variations in specific conductance and well depth, geographic distribution, or geologic formation is apparent. Streams in the area are ephemeral and extended periods of no flow can be expected. During much of the period of record, streamflow in Taloka Creek was maintained by water pumped from an active coal mine. Water upstream from the mine area had a mean dissolved-solids concentration of 72 milligrams per liter whereas water downstream from the mine area had a mean concentration of 1,323 milligrams per liter. At times, downstream concentrations of some toxic metals exceeded the standards for drinking water set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Samples of water collected from Taloka Creek since mining ceased did not have excessive concentrations of toxic metals. Maximum suspended-sediment discharge of Taloka Creek was about 1,660 tons per day. Silt-clay particles (diameters less than 0.062 millimeter) were the dominant grain size. Observed and measured effects of surface mining for coal on the hydrologic system include (1) creation of additional water storage in the surface mine pond, (2) disruption of drainage in an area of about 1 square mile, and (3) increased mineralization of water in Taloka Creek. Other possible effects include (4) changes in permeability and storage of water in mine spoil, (5) minor changes in streamflow and runoff characteristics, and (6) temporary increase in the sediment load of Taloka Creek.

Marcher, M. V.; Huntzinger, t. L.; Stoner, J. D.; Blumer, S. P.

1983-01-01

165

Records of water-level measurements in wells in the Oklahoma Panhandle, 1971-72  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Investigations of the ground-water resources of the Oklahoma panhandle by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Oklahoma Water Resources Board includes collection of water-level records; the systematic collection of these records began in 1937. Records of many shallow wells were compiled in 1937 and periodic measurements were made in a few wells until 1966. Owing to the heavy development of irrigation during the 1960's (fig. 1) an expanded network of observation wells established in Texas County in 1966 and in Beaver and Cimarron Counties in 1967; measurement of water levels have been made on an annual basis since those times. This report contains water-level records for the period 1971-72 and the water-level change for the period 1966-72 in Texas County, and for the period 1967-72 in Beaver and Cimarron Counties. At the present time (1972) the annual observation-well network includes 521 wells, of which 97 are in Beaver County, 203 are in Cimarron County, and 221 are in Texas County. These data provide an index to available ground-water supplies; they will be useful in planning and studying water resources development; and they will serve as a framework of data for the detailed hydrologic investigation now in progress in the panhandle. (available as photostat copy only)

Hart, Donald L., Jr.; Hoffman, George L.; Goemaat, Robert L.

1972-01-01

166

Records of water-level measurements in wells in the Oklahoma panhandle, 1966-70  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Investigations of the ground-water resources of the Oklahoma panhandle by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Oklahoma Water Resources Board includes collection of water-level records; the systematic collection of these records began in 1937. Records of many shallow wells were compiled in 1937 and periodic measurements were made in a few wells until 1966. Owing to the heavy development of irrigation during the 1960's (fig. 1) an expanded network of observation wells established in Texas County in 1966 and in Beaver and Cimarron Counties in 1967; measurement of water levels have been made on an annual basis since those times. This report contains water-level records for the period 1966-70 in Texas County, and for the period 1967-70 in Beaver and Cimarron Counties. At the present time (1971) the annual observation-well network includes 528 wells, of which 98 are in Beaver County, 211 are in Cimarron County, and 219 are in Texas County. These data provide an index to available ground-water supplies; they will be useful in planning and studying water resources development; and they will serve as a framework of data for the detailed hydrologic investigation now in progress in the panhandle. (available as photostat copy only)

Hart, Donald L., Jr.

1972-01-01

167

Contamination of wells completed in the Roubidoux aquifer by abandoned zinc and lead mines, Ottawa County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Roubidoux aquifer in Ottawa County Oklahoma is used extensively as a source of water for public supplies, commerce, industry, and rural water districts. Water in the Roubidoux aquifer in eastern Ottawa County has relatively low dissolved-solids concentrations (less than 200 mg/L) with calcium, magnesium, and bicarbonate as the major ions. The Boone Formation is stratigraphically above the Roubidoux aquifer and is the host rock for zinc and lead sulfide ores, with the richest deposits located in the vicinity of the City of Picher. Mining in what became known as the Picher mining district began in the early 1900's and continued until about 1970. The water in the abandoned zinc and lead mines contains high concentrations of calcium, magnesium, bicarbonate, sulfate, fluoride, cadmium, copper, iron, lead, manganese, nickel, and zinc. Water from the abandoned mines is a potential source of contamination to the Roubidoux aquifer and to wells completed in the Roubidoux aquifer. Water samples were collected from wells completed in the Roubidoux aquifer in the Picher mining district and from wells outside the mining district to determine if 10 public supply wells in the mining district are contaminated. The chemical analyses indicate that at least 7 of the 10 public supply wells in the Picher mining district are contaminated by mine water. Application of the Mann-Whitney test indicated that the concentrations of some chemical constituents that are indicators of mine-water contamination are different in water samples from wells in the mining area as compared to wells outside the mining area. Application of the Wilcoxon signed-rank test showed that the concentrations of some chemical constituents that are indicators of mine-water contamination were higher in current (1992-93) data than in historic (1981-83) data, except for pH, which was lower in current than in historic data. pH and sulfate, alkalinity, bicarbonate, magnesium, iron, and tritium concentrations consistently indicate that the Cardin, Commerce 1, Commerce 3, Picher 2, Picher 3, Picher 4, and Quapaw 2 wells are contaminated.

Christenson, Scott C.

1995-01-01

168

Impact of Hispanic Ethnic Concentration and Socioeconomic Status on Obesity Prevalence in Texas Countie  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this study is to determine whether Hispanic ethnic concentration is associated with a higher prevalence of obesity and, if this relationship exists, whether it is affected by the socioeconomic environment. The study uses the Texas Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) linked to 2000 census data to access the relationship between prevalence of obesity, Hispanic ethnic concentration, poverty and level of education at a county-level. The findings suggest that the association of Hispanic ethnic concentration and obesity varies by socioeconomic environment. Although little influence was observed for % poverty, the relationship between Hispanic ethnic concentration and obesity differed by county-level educational attainment. High proportion of residents with a bachelor’s degree is associated with a low prevalence of obesity; counties with both high % Hispanic and high % with Bachelor’s degrees had the lowest prevalence of obesity. Our results suggest that promoting and improving education, perhaps including training on healthful living, may serve as an effective means of curbing current obesity trends and associated health problems in Hispanic and possibly other ethnic communities.

Salinas, Jennifer J.; Rocha, Elizabeth; Abdelbary, Bassent E.; Gay, Jennifer; Sexton, Ken

2012-01-01

169

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 6): Brio Refining Site, Harris County, Texas, March 1988. First Remedial Action.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The 58-acre Brio Refining site is located in Harris County, Texas, approximately 20 miles southeast of Houston. The site is broken into two parcels, 49-acre Brio North and 9-acre Brio South, separated by Drive Farm Road. Between 1957 and 1982 the site ref...

1988-01-01

170

North and west central Texas. Mitchell EOR (enhanced oil recovery) projects yield tertiary oil in Wise and Jack counties  

Microsoft Academic Search

An enhanced oil recovery project utilizing a miscible LPG process provides Mitchell Energy and Development Corp. engineers with a springboard for other miscible flood projects while yielding incremental tertiary oil that otherwise would remain in the ground. The LPG flood project is in the Alvord (3,000-ft Strawn) Unit in Wise County, Texas. The field had been waterflooded for 14 yr,

Mickey

1982-01-01

171

Training Preachers in the Ellis County Baptist Missionary Association of Texas in the Basics of Expository Preaching  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This project was designed to train active and potential preachers in the Ellis County Baptist Missionary Association of Texas in the basics of expository preaching. Chapter 1 outlines the ministry context at Heritage Baptist Church, the project's purpose, and the project's goals. Chapter 2 examines the biblical and theological rationale that…

Gibson, Timothy Darryle

2011-01-01

172

Environmental Impacts of Petroleum Production: Initial Results from the Osage-Skiatook Petroleum Environmental Research Sites, Osage County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Exploration for and production of petroleum have caused major detrimental impacts to soils, surface and ground waters, and the local ecosystems in the United States. These impacts arise primarily from the improper disposal of large volumes of saline water produced with oil and gas, from accidental hydrocarbon and produced water releases, and from abandoned oil wells that were not correctly sealed. It is important to understand the long-term and short-term effects of produced water and hydrocarbon releases from these sites in order to develop risk-based remediation plans. Remediation is particularly needed in aging and depleted fields where land use is changing from petroleum production to residential, agricultural or recreational uses. About 20 scientists from the USGS and other governmental agencies and academia are involved in a multidisciplinary investigation to study the transport, fate, and natural attenuation of inorganic salts, trace metals, organic compounds and radionuclides present in produced water, and their impacts at the Osage-Skiatook Petroleum Environmental Research (OSPER) 'A' and 'B' sites, located on the Osage Reservation in Osage County, Oklahoma. Stakeholders in the project include the Osage Nation, which holds the mineral rights, the Bureau of Indian Affairs with trust responsibility, and the Army Corps of Engineers, which owns the surface rights at these sites and manages adjacent Skiatook Lake. The 4250-hectare Skiatook Lake provides drinking water to local Tulsa suburban communities and a rural water district, and offers recreational fishing and boating opportunities to tens of thousands of visitors each year. Approximately 1.5 and 1.0 hectare of land at the OSPER 'A' (depleted Lester lease) and 'B' (active Branstetter lease) sites, respectively, are affected by salt scarring, tree kills, soil salinization and brine and petroleum contamination due to the leakage of produced water and associated hydrocarbons from brine pits and accidental releases from active and inactive pipes and tank batteries. The leases are typical of many depleted and aging petroleum fields in Osage County, which ranks among the top oil and gas producing counties in Oklahoma with about 39,000 wells. Oil and gas production has occurred in Osage county for over one hundred years, but current production is mainly from stripper wells (averaging ~2.8 bbl/d oil and >30 bbl/d brine) that are shallow, mostly 300-700 m in depth, and produce from several sandstones of Pennsylvanian age. Results to date show that the produced water source is a Na-Ca-Cl brine (~150,000 mg/L total dissolved solids), with relatively high concentrations of Mg, Sr, and NH4, but low SO4 and H2S. With the exception of Fe and Mn, the concentrations of trace metals are low. Results also show that some and, eventually, the bulk, of inorganic salts and some dissolved organic species in the released brine from both sites will reach Skiatook Lake. Results at the 'A' site show that the salts have essentially been removed from the sandy soil which formed in a surficial layer of eolian sand, but degraded and weathered oil persists on the surface of old oil and brine pits, close to sites of old tanks, on old channels that carried oil from tanks to the oil pits and other impacted areas. Results also show a plume of high salinity water (5,000-30,600 mg/L TDS) is present at intermediate depths that extend from below the old oil and brine pits to Skiatook Lake. No liquid petroleum was found in the contaminated groundwater, but soluble petroleum byproducts, including organic acid anions and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are present. Results to date clearly show that significant amounts of salts from produced-water releases and petroleum hydrocarbons still remain in the soils and rocks of the impacted area after more than 60 years of natural attenuation. At the 'B' site significant amounts of produced water from the two active brine pits percolate into th

edited by Kharaka, Yousif K.; Otton, James K.

2003-01-01

173

Assessment of manure phosphorus export through turfgrass sod production in Erath County, Texas.  

PubMed

A best management practice (BMP) for exporting manure phosphorus (P) in turfgrass sod from the North Bosque River (NBR) watershed in central Texas was assessed using a geographic information system (GIS). The NBR watershed has a mandate to reduce the total annual P load to the NBR by 50% as a result of total maximum daily load regulation. Since dairy waste applications to fields are identified as the major nonpoint source of P to the river, innovative BMPs, such as export of manure P in turfgrass, will be needed to achieve the 50% reduction. However, methods are needed to evaluate the feasibility of these innovative management practices prior to their implementation. A geospatial database of suitable turfgrass production sites was developed for Erath County using GIS. Erath County largely encompasses the upper portion of the NBR watershed. Information from field experiments, production practices, and ground-truthing was used to search, analyze, and verify a geospatial database developed from national and regional sources. The integration and analyses of large databases supports the search by turf producers for sites suitable for turfgrass sod production in Erath County. In addition, GIS enables researchers and regulators to estimate manure P exports and reduced P loading due to implementation of the manure export BMP on a county scale. Under optimal conditions 198,000 kg manure P yr(-1) could be used and 114,840 kg manure P yr(-1) exported from the NBR watershed through implementation of a system using dairy manure to produce turfgrass sod. This is the equivalent of the manure P applied from 10,032 dairy cows yr(-1) and exported from 5808 dairy cows yr(-1). Application of GIS to large-scale planning and decision-making transcends traditional field-scale applications in precision agriculture. PMID:15380316

Munster, C L; Hanzlik, J E; Vietor, D M; White, R H; McFarland, A

2004-11-01

174

Wilcox depth prediction at Katy Field, Waller County, Texas: problem and solution  

SciTech Connect

Velocity anomalies large enough to cause severe errors in depth maps may not be recognized from prior drilling experience, from regional velocity control, or from seismic reflection configurations. A chastening example of one such anomaly is an outpost well near the Katy field in Waller County, Texas. This outpost well, the Exxon 1 Sparks, tested Wilcox sands, which were both dry and 500 ft low to seismic prediction from Vibroseis data. The well came in structurally low as a result of incorrect predictions of both near-surface and post-Wilcox velocities. Additional studies indicated that the Sparks well was drilled on the flank of a structure that was later drilled and proved to be the discovery of a new Wilcox field. Accurate velocities are becoming increasingly important in all phases of oil and gas exploration, particularly in mature exploration areas where prospects are subtle and difficult to find.

Olander, A.M.

1985-02-01

175

Fracture orientation determination in Sandhills (McKnight) field, Crane County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

A fracture identification log (FILMAP, Schlumberger) provided an orientation of vertical fracturing in the Sandhills (McKnight) field, Crane County, Texas. During workover operations to deepen an existing well bore to test a lower porosity interval, a 200-ft core was obtained that intersected a fracture plane in several sections of the core. Verification of this fracture having been hydraulically induced (or enhanced through hydraulic stimulation) was established with the discovery of frac-sand grains along the face of the fracture. The 300-ft open-hole section of the original well bore had been fracture stimulated with 30,000 gal of refined oil and 45,000 lb of sand. The fracture identification log was included as a part of the formation evaluation program to ascertain the orientation of the fracture(s). This tool measures the differences in resistivities along a horizontal plane of the bore hole by detecting fractures that bisect the hold and determines their orientation.

Olive, C.

1988-01-01

176

Uranium series disequilibrium in the Bargmann property area of Karnes County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Historical evidence is presented for natural uranium series radioactive disequilibrium in uranium bearing soils in the Bargmann property area of karnes County on the Gulf Coastal Plain of south Texas. The early history of uranium exploration in the area is recounted and records of disequilibrium before milling and mining operations began are given. The property contains an open pit uranium mine associated with a larger ore body. In 1995, the US Department of Energy (DOE) directed Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to evaluate the Bargmann tract for the presence of uranium mill tailings (ORNL 1996). There was a possibility that mill tailings had washed onto or blown onto the property from the former tailings piles in quantities that would warrant remediation under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remediation Action Project. Activity ratios illustrating disequilibrium between {sup 226}Ra and {sup 238}U in background soils during 1986 are listed and discussed. Derivations of uranium mass-to-activity conversion factors are covered in detail.

Davidson, J.R.

1998-02-01

177

Rainfall and evapotranspiration data for southwest Medina County, Texas, August 2006-December 2009  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During August 2006-December 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Fort Worth District, collected rainfall and evapotranspiration data to help characterize the hydrology of the Nueces River Basin, Texas. The USGS installed and operated a station to collect continuous (30-minute interval) rainfall and evapotranspiration data in southwest Medina County approximately 14 miles southwest of D'Hanis, Texas, and 23 miles northwest of Pearsall, Texas. Rainfall data were collected by using an 8-inch tipping bucket raingage. Meteorological and surface-energy flux data used to calculate evapotranspiration were collected by using an extended Open Path Eddy Covariance system from Campbell Scientific, Inc. Data recorded by the system were used to calculate evapotranspiration by using the eddy covariance and Bowen ratio closure methods and to analyze the surface energy budget closure. During August 2006-December 2009 (excluding days of missing record), measured rainfall totaled 86.85 inches. In 2007, 2008, and 2009, annual rainfall totaled 40.98, 12.35, and 27.15 inches, respectively. The largest monthly rainfall total, 12.30 inches, occurred in July 2007. During August 2006-December 2009, evapotranspiration calculated by using the eddy covariance method totaled 69.91 inches. Annual evapotranspiration calculated by using the eddy covariance method totaled 34.62 inches in 2007, 15.24 inches in 2008, and 15.57 inches in 2009. During August 2006-December 2009, evapotranspiration calculated by using the Bowen ratio closure method (the more refined of the two datasets) totaled 68.33 inches. Annual evapotranspiration calculated by using the Bowen ratio closure method totaled 32.49, 15.54, and 15.80 inches in 2007, 2008, and 2009, respectively (excluding days of missing record).

Slattery, Richard N.; Asquith, William H.; Ockerman, Darwin J.

2011-01-01

178

Geology of the Seventy-Six, West field, Duval County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Seventy-Six, West field in Duval County, Texas, is a significant example of the Jackson barrier-bar/strandplain shorezone System of South Texas with a complex heterogeneous reservoir. This field is a typical instance of a combination stratigraphic structural trap. The facies sequence reflects a mosaic of mud-rich marsh, beach-ridge plain, distributary channel and levee, lagoonal, and backbarrier environments. Compartments caused by these facies distinctions (undrained areas of recoverable reserves) are a prime objective; however, any improvement in production is a boon. The field has produced more than 4,600,000 barrels of oil since its discovery in 1954. In many older fields such as this, the mobile oil left in the reservoir can be one third or more of the original oil in place after economic limits are reached. The economics are widely variable between major operators and small independents as illustrated by this study. Reevaluation using a synergistic approach to a completely developed oil field has led to additional waterflooding, improved recovery through infill drilling, and economic water disposal in a mature oil and gas province.

Hyatt, D.B. (Texas General Land Office, Austin (USA))

1990-09-01

179

Disability in Rural America: A Four-County Needs Assessment. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study assessed the needs of disabled persons living in four rural counties in Arkansas, Texas, and Oklahoma. Using a combination of forced-choice and in-depth probe questions, researchers surveyed a sample of 456 disabled Americans to identify the problems that these people were facing in their day-to-day living, the consequences of their…

Omohundro, Julie; And Others

180

Late diagenetic indicators of buried oil and gas: II, Direct detection experiment at Cement and Garza oil fields, Oklahoma and Texas, using enhanced LANDSAT I and II images  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Cement oil field, Oklahoma, was a test site for an experiment designed to evaluate LANDSAT's capability to detect an alteration zone in surface rocks caused by hydrocarbon microseepage. Loss of iron and impregnation of sandstone by carbonate cements and replacement of gypsum by calcite are the major alteration phenomena at Cement. The bedrock alterations are partially masked by unaltered overlying beds, thick soils, and dense natural and cultivated vegetation. Interpreters biased by detailed ground truth were able to map the alteration zone subjectively using a magnified, filtered, and sinusoidally stretched LANDSAT composite image; other interpreters, unbiased by ground truth data, could not duplicate that interpretation. Similar techniques were applied at a secondary test site (Garza oil field, Texas), where similar alterations in surface rocks occur. Enhanced LANDSAT images resolved the alteration zone to a biased interpreter and some individual altered outcrops could be mapped using higher resolution SKYLAB color and conventional black and white aerial photographs suggesting repeat experiments with LANDSAT C and D.

Donovan, Terrence J.; Termain, Patricia A.; Henry, Mitchell E.

1979-01-01

181

Did Divorces Decline after the Oklahoma City Bombing?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Oklahoma City bombing in April 1995 was an act of terrorism that had many potential influences on the city and state, including influences on families. We analyzed divorce data from 1985 to 2000 for all 77 counties in Oklahoma to assess the divorce response to the Oklahoma City bombing. Our prediction was that divorce rates in Oklahoma would…

Nakonezny, Paul A.; Reddick, Rebecca; Rodgers, Joseph Lee

2004-01-01

182

Aquatic Vegetation Restoration in Arcadia Lake, Oklahoma: A Case Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Arcadia Lake is located within the metropolitan area of Oklahoma City and Edmund, in Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, about 2.4 km (1.5 miles) southwest of Arcadia, Oklahoma (Figure 1). Construction of the earth-filled dam was authorized by the Flood Control Ac...

G. O. Dick R. M. Smart E. R. Gilliland

2004-01-01

183

Architecture, internal heterogeneity, and resulting drainage efficiency of Upper Oligocene Frio Formation inner-shelf sandstone reservoirs in West Fulton Beach Field, Aransas County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The architecture, internal heterogeneity, and production history of selected reservoirs in West Fulton Beach field, Copano Bay, Aransas County, Texas, were examined as part of a project to identify additional oil and gas reserves on Texas state lands. Upper Oligocene Frio Formation reservoirs in this field have yielded more than 146 bcf of gas and 8 MMbbl of oil. A

Paul R. Knox

1994-01-01

184

Stratigraphic sequence of transgressive barrier bar complex and model for hydrocarbon exploration, Red Fork sandstone, Wakita trend, Grant County, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Desmoinesian Red Fork sandstone (Boggy Formation, Krebs Group), on the northern shelf of the Anadarko basin, Oklahoma, represents a transgressive barrier bar system. The base of the Red Fork interval is marked by the Inola Limestone (Boggy Formation); the top is marked by the Tiawah (Pink) Limestone (Senora Formation, Cabaniss Group). Upper shoreface and foreshore deposits, in which porosity

K. L. OReilly; P. C. Franks

1986-01-01

185

Identification of diabetic retinopathy genes through a genome-wide association study among Mexican-Americans from Starr County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

To identify genetic susceptibility loci for severe diabetic retinopathy, 286 Mexican-Americans with type 2 diabetes from Starr County, Texas completed detailed physical and ophthalmologic examinations including fundus photography for diabetic retinopathy grading. 103 individuals with moderate-to-severe non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy or proliferative diabetic retinopathy were defined as cases for this study. DNA samples extracted from study subjects were genotyped using the

Yi-Ping Fu

2009-01-01

186

Statistics of Oklahoma's petroleum industry, 1966  

Microsoft Academic Search

Exploratory wells were drilled in all but 9 counties of Oklahoma during 1966. The concentration of discoveries, extensions, outposts, and new pay horizons was in NW. Oklahoma in Beaver, Ellis, Roger Mills, Woods, and Woodward Counties. This area had a 40% success ratio, whereas the state-wide success ratio was 28% for exploratory wells. Tonkawa completions were the most numerous, followed

1967-01-01

187

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 6): Hardage/Criner, McClain County, Oklahoma, November 1986. First remedial action. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Hardage/Criner site is located in McClain County, Oklahoma, approximately 15 miles southwest of Norman, Oklahoma. The area is agricultural with land on all sides of the site used for grazing cattle. From September 1972 to November 1980, the site was operated by the Royal Hardage Industrial - Hazardous Wasteland and Disposal Facility and was permitted to accept all types of industrial and hazardous wastes except radioactive materials. The types of waste included: oil, recycling wastes, chlorinated solvents, styrene tars, acids, caustics, paint sludges, lead, chromium, cyanide, arsenic, pesticides, inks, PCBs, and large quantities of unknown wastes from injection wells and other facilities including what became the Brio and Bioecology Superfund sites. Originally, two pits were excavated; liquids and sludges from drums and tank trucks were discharged directly into these unlined pits. However, both pits filled to capacity. Wastes from the pits were transferred to temporary ponds and then piled on a sludge mound. A total of 18 to 20 million gallons of waste was disposed at the site.

Not Available

1986-11-14

188

Deep Wilcox structure and stratigraphy in Fandango field area, Zapata County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Fandango field in Zapata County, Texas, is a new deep Wilcox trend extension. The deep Wilcox sands are commonly found at depths of 15,000-20,000 ft (4500-6100 m). Enough well log and seismic control exists to make an accurate integrated interpretation of regional deep Wilcox structure and stratigraphy. Deep Wilcox structure and stratigraphy are controlled by regionally extensive shale anticlines. These shale uplifts control deep Wilcox sand distribution, create large anticlines, and cause regional growth faults which frequently influence local structure. Each regional uplift presents a new exploration frontier holding the promise of vast reserves in the deep Wilcox. The history of Frio-Vicksburg exploration is analogous to the deep Wilcox trend of today. It took 40 years to expand Frio exploration from shallow stratigraphic traps down into enormous reserves in the Gulf of Mexico, because each new fault block extension was considered to mark the downdip limit of Frio production. This assumption was not true, and is not true in the deep Wilcox today. The deep Wilcox trend remains virtually unexplored, and it is my belief that continued work will prove the existence of much more deep Wilcox potential than is currently thought to exist.

Levin, D.M.

1984-04-01

189

Deep Wilcox structure and stratigraphy in Fandango field area, Zapata County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Fandango field in Zapata County, Texas, is a new deep Wilcox trend extension. The deep Wilcox sands are commonly found at depths of 15,000 to 20,000 ft (4,500 to 6,100 m). Enough well log and seismic control now exists to make an accurate integrated interpretation of regional deep Wilcox structure and stratigraphy. Deep Wilcox structure and stratigraphy are controlled by regionally extensive shale anticlines. These shale uplifts control deep Wilcox sand distribution, create large anticlines, and cause regional growth faults which commonly influence local structure. Each regional uplift presents a new exploration frontier holding the promise of vast reserves in the deep Wilcox. The history of Frio-Vicksburg exploration is an analogy to the deep Wilcox trend today. It took 40 years to expand Frio exploration from shallow stratigraphic tramps down into the enormous reserves in the Gulf of Mexico, because each new fault-block extension was considered to mark the downdip limit of Frio production. This was, of course, not true and is not true in the deep Wilcox today. The deep Wilcox trend remains virtually unexplored and it is the author's belief that continued work will prove the existence of much more deep Wilcox potential than is currently thought to exist.

Levin, D.M.

1983-09-01

190

Fracture orientation determination in Sandhills (McKnight) field, Crane County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

A fracture identification log (FILMAP, Schlumberger) provided an orientation of vertical fracturing in the Sandhills (McKnight) field, Crane County, Texas. During workover operations to deepen an existing well bore to test a lower porosity interval, a 200-ft core was obtained that intersected a fracture plane in several sections of the core. Verification of this fracture having been hydraulically induced (or enhanced through hydraulic stimulation) was established with the discovery of frac-sand grains along the face of the fracture. The 300-ft open-hole section of the original well bore had been fracture stimulated with 30,000 gal of refined oil and 45,000 lb of sand. the fracture identification log was included as a part of the formation evaluation program to ascertain the orientation of the fracture(s). This tool measures the difference in resistivities along a horizontal plane of the bore hole by detecting fractures that bisect the hole and determines their orientation. Interpretation of the data indicated an east-west fracture, which was concluded to be the basic orientation of the natural fracture system within the northern portion of the Sandhills (McKnight) field. Prior to this physical evidence, the orientation of the fracture system was inferred only by early water breakthrough in an east-west direction within areas of previous waterflooding.

Olive, C.

1988-02-01

191

Reservoir geology of Devonian carbonates and chert: Implications for tertiary recovery, Dollarhide field, Andrews County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Devonian strata of the Thirtyone Formation at Dollarhide field, Andrews County, Texas, originally contained 144 million bbl of oil in place, with 18.6 million bbl produced by primary recovery, 39.3 million bbl projected to be produced by secondary recovery (waterflood), and 27.4 million bbl projected to be produced by tertiary recovery (CO{sub 2} flood). Devonian strata contain five main lithologies (from bottom to top): (1) carbonate-chert mudstone; (2) burrowed chert-dolomite; (3) laminated tripolitic chert; (4) bioclastic limestone; and (5) upper dolomite. Deposition of the 180-ft-thick (55 m) reservoir section occurred during a basinward progradation of shelf and slope facies. Porosity within Devonian strata is controlled mainly by depositional facies. The upper porosity zone (0-90 ft or 0-27 m thick) is within the upper dolomite and is heterogeneous, with stratified porosity that bifurcates, coalesces, and pinches out in several different intervals. The relative homogeneity and moderate permeability of the lower reservoir should help achieve a uniform sweep during CO{sub 2} flooding. Higher permeabilities near the base of the lower reservoir should minimize CO{sub 2} override, thereby improving sweep efficiency. the thinner, more heterogeneous, less continuous, more stratified, more permeable pay in the upper reservoir will result in more rapid and less uniform CO{sub 2} sweep.

Saller, A.H.; Miller, J.A. (Unocal Science and Tech., Brea, CA (United States)); Horn, D.V. (Unocal Oil and Gas, Farmington, NM (United States)); Guy, B.T. (Unocal Oil and Gas, Midland, TX (United States))

1991-01-01

192

2-D seismic revolutionizes structural model of Cordona Lake (Devonian) unit, Crane County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Since its discovery in 1949, Cordona Lake (Devonian) Unit located in Crane County, Texas, has produced 18 million bbl of oil under primary, secondary, and tertiary recovery programs. The field produces from a complexly faulted subunconformity truncation trap where Devonian tripolitic chert subcrops basal Permian shales and tight carbonates. A field wide CO{sub 2} project implemented in 1985, provided new well control that enabled modest refinements in the geologic reservoir model. Recent acquisition of a two-dimensional seismic survey has significantly improved the structural interpretation of the field and has altered the model from a fairly simple horst-graben feature with three major faults to a fault complex possessing over 21 isolated fault segments. Because many of the faults possess relatively small displacements ({plus minus}50 ft) and the subsurface mapping was hindered by problematic correlations using mostly partial penetrations, the new interpretation would have been impossible without the seismic data. The improved structural reservoir model resulting from the integration of seismic and well log control has yielded new development drilling opportunities. Programs are underway to capture oil previously bypassed due to flooding along restricted or no-flow boundaries or trapped in isolated fault segments.

Branton, T.W.; Christiansen, D.J.; Scheubel, F.R. (Exxon Co., Midland, TX (USA))

1990-05-01

193

B. C. Canyon field, Howard County, Texas: An ancient analogy to modern tropical tower karst terrains  

SciTech Connect

Late in the early deposition of sediments in Canyon field, a series of glacio-eustatically controlled sea level lowstands resulted in a carbonate buildup seaward of the Horseshoe Atoll in Howard County, Texas. The resulting satellite reef tract consists of fringing boundstone; high-energy shelf grainstones; lower energy shelf packstones and wackestones; and thin, highstand, black shales and mudstones. The original extent and thickness of deposits were extensively modified during karstification coincident with successive sea level lowstands. The resulting paleotopographic landforms appear to be similar to tower karst features of Puerto Rico. During the beginning of each sea level highstand, the paleoterrain was modified by erosion. The basinal foreshelf conglomerates resulting from initial highstand erosion contain dipping strata that commonly can be detected by the dipmeter tool. The mechanism for the formation of these strata may be depositional or the result of diagenetic alteration of the rock fabric in the burial environment. Using dipmeter data, an uneconomic producer has been offset by one of the better producing wells in the field.

Mozynski, D.C.; Reid, A.M. (Deminex U.S. Oil Company, Dallas, TX (United States))

1992-04-01

194

Hylton northwest field's tectonic effect on Suggs Ellenburger producing area, Nolan County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation of the geology of Hylton Northwest field in southeastern Nolan County, Texas, indicates that the pre-Pennsylvanian tectonics associated with this field may have affected the producing zone of Suggs Ellenburger field 6 mi (9 km) west. Both fields are located along the Fort Chadbourne fault system of the Eastern shelf of the Midland basin. The study of the depositional environment of the Suggs Ellenburger field reveals some interesting aspects of the tectonostratigraphic terrane that appears to have in part influenced the development of the reservoir rock. The tectonics of the Cambrian-Ordovician (Ellenburger) period in Hylton Northwest field created a southwest-trending fault system with associated fractures. The fractures allowed percolating surface waters to leach carbonate rocks in the area, creating vuggy secondary porosity in the intercrystalline rock fabric. The faults were modified to a karst topography by periods of subaerial erosion of the Cambrian-Ordovician depositional plain. Sea level fluctuations that occurred in the area were associated with the alternating uplift and subsidence of the Hylton Northwest field's tectonic feature. As a result, environmental zones of porosity with varying vertical subaerial erosion formed within the overall Cambrian-Ordovician (Ellenburger) interval. The producing zone of the Suggs Ellenburger field occurs at approximately 6,400 ft (1,951 m).

Hoffacker, B.F. Jr.

1987-02-01

195

Ore petrography of a sedimentary uranium deposit, Live Oak County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Samples from the McLean 5 open-pit uranium mine, a small high-grade deposit located along a normal fault in the Miocene Oakville sandstone of Live Oak County, Texas, have been studied for uranium abundance, distribution, and nature of occurrence on the microscopic level. The host sandstone is composed of quartz, feldspars, and volcanic rock fragments, cemented by sparry calcite. Authigenic minerals include iron disulfide minerals (dominantly pyrite and some marcasite) and small amounts of clays, Ti oxides, and opal. High-grade ore (to 3% U) occurs along the fault, decreasing to less than 1,000 ppm within 10 m from the fault. The ore mineral is amorphous pitchblende and exhibits botryoidal morphology. The microscopic occurrence of uranium, documented by fission-track mapping of petrographic thin sections, is presented in detail. Uranium occurs abundantly as grain coatings and fillings in intergranular spaces in samples with high uranium content, where calcite cement has been partially or totally leached as mineralization proceeded. Lesser amounts are adsorbed onto leucoxene (microcrystalline anatase), mud clasts, and altered igneous rock fragments. Adsorbed uranium is the major code of occurrence in samples, with lower uranium contents farther from the orebody. Textural relations indicate that iron sulfides formed both before and after mineralization. Initial mineralization was by adsorption onto aggregates of fine particles of Ti oxide and clay minerals of various origins. With dissolution of cement and continued uranium influx, uranium precipitated as grain coatings and pore fillings.

Bomber, B.J.; Ledger, E.B.; Tieh, T.T.

1986-01-01

196

Depositional environments of Pennsylvanian Upper Strawn Group in McCulloch and San Saba Counties, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Upper Strawn Group (Desmoinesean) represents a transition to fluvial facies from progradational deltaic facies. The lower part of the upper Strawn is composed mostly of horizontally bedded, fine-grained sandstones and shales of a distal delta-front origin. These sandstones and shales exhibit foreset bed dips of up to 15/sup 0/. In addition to the dipping foreset beds, the delta-front facies on occasion contain small listric normal faults, resulting from periodic higher rates of sedimentation. The middle parts of the upper Strawn consist predominantly of massive, fine to medium-grained, mature sandstones which represent distributary-mouth-bar deposits, as well as other proximal delta-front deposits such as distributary channels. The upper part of the upper Strawn consists of fluvial trough cross-bedded sandstones and chert-pebble conglomerates. These overlie the deltaic facies and indicate the final stages of upper Strawn deposition. The upper Strawn is overlain by the Adams Branch limestone and shales which represent marine transgression and subsequent shallow-marine deposition. The upper Strawn Group in McCulloch and San Saba Counties, Texas, represents continued filling of the Fort Worth basin during Desmoinesean time. The upper Strawn overlies the lower Strawn, an older, deeper water facies, in most parts of the study area. The upper Strawn overlies the Atokan age Marble Falls Limestone in an isolated section of the study area due to its position there on the Concho arch.

Jamieson, W.H. Jr.

1983-03-01

197

A higher resolution stratigraphic and sedimentological study of the subsurface Queen City Formation (Eocene), Nacogdoches and Angelina Counties, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Eocene Queen City Formation is a regressive fluvial-deltaic and shallow-marine depositional unit in the East Texas basin. Subsurface core and electric well log data are being used in a detailed subsurface stratigraphic study of the Queen City Formation in a portion of East Texas. Log data from approximately 250 wells across a seven county area of east Texas were used to produce stratigraphic cross sections plus structure, formation, and net sands isopach maps showing the regional structure and distribution of Queen City facies. Structure contour maps on the Formation top and base indicate progradation onto a gently sloping, structurally uniform shelf. Formation and net sand isopach maps reveal two lobate centers, of deposition extending basinward along southeast-trending depositional axes in Houston, Trinity, and Angelina Counties. These maps also indicate interval thicknesses greater than 200 feet in southwest Houston and Trinity Counties but thinning dramatically to the east and downdip to the southeast. Net sand thicknesses vary from greater than 100 ft proximal to the Formation thicks to less than 10 ft in the more distal areas. Cores from producing fields in Angelina and Nacogdoches Counties are being used in a study of the sedimentology and depositional history of subsurface Queen City Facies. Previous studies were primarily based on well log data sets alone. Core studies indicate the Queen City Formation in this area is a dominantly fine-grained interval comprised of mudstones, siltstones, and very fine sandstones. Very thin (< 2 ft) sandstones and siltstones are generally located in the uppermost Queen City interval and are attractive shallow production targets.

Garner, R.D.; Roberts, H.H. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge (USA))

1990-09-01

198

Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Coverage Among Females Aged 11 to 17 in Texas Counties: An Application of Multilevel, Small Area Estimation  

PubMed Central

Background Local data are often used to plan and evaluate public health interventions and policy. With increasingly fewer public resources to collect sufficient data to support direct estimation of local outcomes, methods for deriving small area estimates are vital. The purpose of this study is to describe the county-level geographic distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine coverage among adolescent females in Texas using multilevel small area estimation. Methods Multilevel (individual, county, public health region) random-intercept logit models were fit to HPV vaccination data (?1 dose Gardasil) from the 2008 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Using the parameter estimates from the final model, we simulated 10,000 data sets for each regression coefficient from the normal distribution and applied them to the logit model to estimate HPV vaccine coverage in each county. Results County-level coverage estimates ranged from 7% to 29%, compared with the state average of 18% (95% confidence interval [CI], 13.59–21.88). Many Southwestern border and metropolitan counties exhibited high coverage estimates. Low coverage estimates were noted in the Panhandle, Southeastern border region, and Northeast. Significant correlations were observed between HPV vaccination and Hispanic ethnicity, county poverty, and public health region poverty. Conclusion Harnessing the flexibility of multilevel small area models to estimate HPV vaccine coverage at the county level, we have provided data that may inform the development of health education programs/policies, the provision of health services, and the planning of new research studies. Additionally, we have provided a framework for modeling other health outcomes at the county level using national survey data.

Eberth, Jan M.; Hossain, Md Monir; Tiro, Jasmin A.; Zhang, Xingyou; Holt, James B.; Vernon, Sally W.

2013-01-01

199

Microfacies and seismic interpretation of Caddo lime (Desmoinesian) in Chalky Mountain field, Taylor County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

A detailed microfacies and seismic interpretation was conducted for the Caddo lime, a relatively unstudied Middle Pennsylvanian hydrocarbon reservoir in north-central Texas. Five cores from Chalky Mountain field in Taylor County were studied and found to contain six distinct but gradational facies: (1) shale, (2) dark, clay-rich limestone, (3) algal wackestone-boundstone, (4) algal grainstone, (5) skeletal packstone-grainstone, and (6) oolitic grainstone. The limestone facies form three cyclic packages, each of which contain shoaling-upward regressive facies followed by deepening-upward transgressive facies. The cycles are bounded by the transgressive, clay-rich limestone facies identified in the gamma-ray logs as positive radioactive kicks that can be correlated between wells. Well logs, synthetic seismograms, and high-frequency seismic reflection profiles were used to map the subsurface structure of the Caddo lime in the Chalky Mountain field area. Layercaking, a method which divides the seismic section into intervals of similar lithology and velocity, was used to correct for an overlying high-velocity wedge of Missourian Palo Pinto Limestone, found to cause erroneous pull-up and distortion of the underlying seismic signal of the Caddo lime. Structure mapping revealed a series of lobate features trending northeast-southwest. The combination of the residual topography and modeling of carbonate deposition indicates that the lobate highs are shoaling oolitic and skeletal carbonate sand bodies deposited in a high-energy, shallow marine environment. Algal bioherms and restricted lagoonal facies were deposited in a quieter water environment behind the shoals. An algal grainstone facies accumulated at the margins of the algal bioherms and now form the hydrocarbon reservoir in Chalky Mountain field.

Lewis, E.G. (Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (USA))

1987-02-01

200

Depositional environments and diagenesis of lower Pennsylvanian Caddo Formation, Stephens County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Since its discovery in 1916, the Lower Pennsylvanian Caddo limestone has been one of the most prolific producing intervals in the central Texas region. Favorable reservoir characteristics, with porosities from 9 to 24% and permeabilities from 0.1 to 1,000 md in the pay interval, have enabled many oil companies to initiate successful secondary recovery waterflood projects. Since its discovery, more than 200 million bbl of oil has been recovered from this formation in Stephens County alone. The Caddo reef trend developed during the Early Pennsylvanian, generally along the axis of the Bend flexure. Close examination of whole core and thin sections reveals the formation to be a series of small reef mounds characterized by wackestones. The wackestones consist of green algae, brachiopods, and some rugose corals, which are found on the leeward side (back reef). This sequence is commonly found in the top segment of the Caddo. Deeper into the formation the sequence grades into a packstone/wackestone, characteristic of an oceanward margin (fore reef), and is distinguished by red algae, foraminifera (fusulinids and miliolids), and crinoid hash. The basal sequence is a series of alternating lime mudstones and shales that are heavily silicified. Diagenesis is the key to reservoir rock quality. Moldic porosity was created through dissolution of organisms composed of low magnesium calcite (brachiopods) and aragonite (corals) during periods of subaerial exposure of the back reef. During this period of low sea level, fore-reef sediments were partly cemented by CaCO{sub 3} and were not subaerially exposed. Therefore, moldic porosity was not created in the fore-reef sediments. Porosity in the fore reef was later created in places by dissolution of this cement. Secondary dolomite was later precipitated along pore walls, and in places it occluded porosity in the pore spaces.

Guzan, M.; Humphrey, J. (Sun Exploration and Production Co., Abilene, TX (USA))

1987-02-01

201

Geologic characterization of Caddo Limestone Reservoir, Curry Unit, Stephens County, north-central Texas  

SciTech Connect

Three classic carbonate models (carbonate bank, oolitic shoal, and tidal flat) are applied to interpret the depositional environments and diagenesis of the Caddo limestone (Middle Pennsylvanian). The study area is located in west-central Stephens County, approximately 4 mi southwest of Breckenridge, Texas. Phylloid algal mounds developed on a lower Caddo ramp, along the transition of the Concho platform and Fort Worth basin. Within the area defined as the Curry unit, phylloid algal mounds and intermound facies aggraded to sea level. This led to the development of an areally restricted carbonate bank. Some phylloid algal buildups underwent subaerial exposure, and fresh water leached unstable carbonate minerals, creating minor secondary porosity (<10%). An oolitic shoal (0-9.2 m thick) overlies and partially intergrades with the phylloid algal bank. Ooids were deposited along the margin of the preexisting bank, whereas fine-grained oolitic and peloidal packstone were deposited on the bank. The bank margin oolite exhibits oomoldic porosity in excess of 15%. The uppermost 6.1-24.4 m of the Caddo represents intertidal deposition. Sediment, primarily algal remains and carbonate mud, was deposited on a preexisting surface of ooids and peloids. Fenestral fabric. rhizoliths, brecciated zones, and small-scale channels are common features. A wide variety of pore types are present in the intertidal zone; intraskeletal, framework, biomoldic, and vuggy pores are most important. Throughout this zone, porosity exceeds 10% and permeability averages 12 md. The Curry unit has produced approximately 28 million bbl of oil (primary and secondary) from the upper Caddo. Depositional environments and diagenesis of the Caddo are complex. A greater understanding of these complexities may enable geoscientists to evaluate remaining future potential within the Caddo and in other similar carbonate accumulations.

Weber, J.L. (Mobil Exploration and Producing U.S. Inc., Midland, TX (USA)); Schwartz, C.K.

1990-02-01

202

"Deeply woven roots": health initiatives and community social services of faith-based organizations of the Hidalgo County, Texas.  

PubMed

Faith-based organizations (FBO) continue to play a significant role in the lives of individuals and communities in the United States. This study focused on the contributions of FBO to the health and well-being of residents of Rio Grande Valley, South Texas. Specifically, this study examined two main areas of involvement of FBO in Hidalgo County, Texas: health initiatives and community social services. Despite their influential and historical involvement, FBO partnership in the delivery of health and social services is not well accounted for. This study explores the characteristics of the clergy, parishioners, and FBO that are associated with community health initiatives and social services. Analyses revealed that FBO deliver a remarkably wide range of services. On a weekly basis, one in six or 17% of Hidalgo County residents were reported as receiving some form of health assistance or social services from county FBO. Variations exist depending on the characteristics of the clergy and the FBO. Policy and practice recommendations include engaging in additional networking, organizing resources, and strengthening FBO health initiatives. PMID:24343238

Ramírez-Johnson, Johnny; Park, John; Wilson, Colwick; Pittman, Sharon; Díaz, Héctor Luis

2014-08-01

203

Altitude and configuration of the 1980 water table in the High Plains regional aquifer, northwestern Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During 1978, the U.S. Geological Survey began a 5-year study of the High Plains regional aquifer system to provide hydrologic information for evaluation of the effects of long-term development of the aquifer and to develop computer models for prediction of aquifer response to alternative changes in ground-water management (Weeks, 1978). This report is one of a series presenting hydrologic information of the High Plains aquifer in Oklahoma. The altitude and configuration of the water table are shown for the eastern area, consisting of Harper, Ellis, Woodward, Dewey, and Roger Mills Counties (sheet 1), and for the Panhandle area, consisting of Cimarron, Texas, and Beaver Counties (sheet 2). Water levels were measured in January, February, and March 1980 by the Oklahoma Water Resources Board.

Havens, John S.

1982-01-01

204

Subsurface migration of oil and gas drilling wastes from an abandoned strip pit, Gowen, Latimer county, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This study confirmed that there have been large amounts of oil and gas drilling wastes deposited in the Fluid Haulers pit near Gowen, Oklahoma. The pit adjacent to Fluid Haulers pit also has been contaminated by similar type wastes; but the origin is not known. After reviewing the analytic data available, there is high probability that a hydrologic connection exists between the Fluid Haulers pit and the underground mines. Since this connection passes twice through the aquifer zone of the area (going down to the mines and also coming back up in seep areas), any contamination of the pit or water in the underground mines poses a threat to local ground-water supplies. Any contaminants migrating from the pit into the underground mines would be difficult to detect because the quantity of water contained in the underground mines would serve as a dilutent. Recommendations for dealing with this problem are outlined.

Heitman, F.J.

1984-01-01

205

Evaluation of Hydraulically Significant Discontinuities in Dockum Group Mudrocks in Andrews County, Texas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Triassic mudrocks of the Dockum Group (Cooper Canyon Formation) host four, below-grade landfills at the Waste Control Specialists (WSC) site in Andrews County, Texas, including: a hazardous waste landfill and three radioactive waste landfills. At the study site, the Dockum consists of mudrocks with sparse siltstone/sandstone interbeds that developed in a semi-arid environment from an ephemeral meandering fluvial system. Sedimentary studies reveal that the mudrocks are ancient floodplain vertisols (soils with swelling clays) and siltstone/sandstone interbeds are fluvial channel deposits that were frequently subaerially exposed. Rock discontinuities, including fractures and syndepositional slickensided surfaces, were mapped during the excavation of the WCS radioactive waste landfills along vertical faces prepared by the construction contractor. Face locations were selected to insure a sampled area with nearly complete vertical coverage for each landfill. Individual discontinuities were mapped and their strike, dip, length, roughness, curvature, staining, and evidence of displacement were described. In the three radioactive waste disposal landfills, over 1750 discontinuities across 35 excavated faces were mapped and described, where each face was nominally 8 to 10 ft tall and 50 to 100 ft long. Genetic units related to paleosol development were identified. On average, the orientation of the discontinuities was horizontal, and no other significant trends were observed. Mapping within the landfill excavations shows that most discontinuities within Dockum rocks are horizontal, concave upward, slickensided surfaces that developed in the depositional environment, as repeated wetting and drying cycles led to shrinking and swelling of floodplain vertisols. Fractures that showed staining (a possible indicator of past or present hydraulic activity) are rare, vertical to near-vertical, and occur mainly in, and adjacent to, mechanically stiff siltstone and sandstone interbeds. No interconnected fracture networks were observed during mapping. A series of pressurized air tests conducted in three pairs of vertical and three pairs of inclined boreholes were tested at depths, ranging from 40 to 215 feet below ground surface, also showed no evidence of fracture interconnection. Genetic units generally consist of fining upward sequences that show increasing pedogenic alteration upward. Arcuate, slickensided discontinuities are more abundant near the top of genetic units, while stained fractures are more common in the more mechanically competent materials near the base of genetic units. A statistical analysis of fractures and discontinuities revealed limited differences between most genetic units. A series of discrete fracture network models were developed to evaluate the uncertainty in our fracture observations. Slickensided discontinuities showing no evidence of staining or past fluid movement were excluded from the analysis. Monte Carlo simulations show no continuous fracture interconnections across the landfill depth intervals.

Holt, R. M.; Kuszmaul, J. S.; Cao, S.; Powers, D. W.

2013-12-01

206

Map Showing Geology and Hydrostratigraphy of the Edwards Aquifer Catchment Area, Northern Bexar County, South-Central Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Rock units forming the Edwards and Trinity aquifers in northern Bexar County, Texas, are exposed within all or parts of seven 7.5-minute quadrangles: Bulverde, Camp Bullis, Castle Hills, Helotes, Jack Mountain, San Geronimo, and Van Raub. The Edwards aquifer is the most prolific ground-water source in Bexar County, whereas the Trinity aquifer supplies water for residential, commercial, and industrial uses for areas north of the San Antonio. The geologic map of northern Bexar County shows the distribution of informal hydrostratigraphic members of the Edwards Group and the underlying upper member of the Glen Rose Limestone. Exposures of the Glen Rose Limestone, which forms the Trinity aquifer alone, cover approximately 467 km2 in the county. This study also describes and names five informal hydrostratigraphic members that constitute the upper member of the Glen Rose Limestone; these include, in descending order, the Caverness, Camp Bullis, Upper evaporite, Fossiliferous, and Lower evaporite members. This study improves our understanding of the hydrogeologic connection between the two aquifers as it describes the geology that controls the infiltration of surface water and subsurface flow of ground water from the catchment area (outcropping Trinity aquifer rocks) to the Edwards water-bearing exposures.

Clark, Amy R.; Blome, Charles D.; Faith, Jason R.

2009-01-01

207

The reason God made Oklahoma?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hot. Dusty. Shimmering north Texas noontime. Waves of heat flowing over my car, now making its fourth trip from Sarasota, Florida to Edmond, Oklahoma in the baking summer sun. Trunk of the car loaded with mountains of computer equipment for the Institute. Me praying it's cool enough in there for laser printer, monitor, modem, system case and accessories to survive

Anne M. Parker

1996-01-01

208

Data collection and compilation for a geodatabase of groundwater, surface-water, water-quality, geophysical, and geologic data, Pecos County Region, Texas, 1930-2011  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Middle Pecos Groundwater Conservation District, Pecos County, City of Fort Stockton, Brewster County, and Pecos County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1, compiled groundwater, surface-water, water-quality, geophysical, and geologic data for site locations in the Pecos County region, Texas, and developed a geodatabase to facilitate use of this information. Data were compiled for an approximately 4,700 square mile area of the Pecos County region, Texas. The geodatabase contains data from 8,242 sampling locations; it was designed to organize and store field-collected geochemical and geophysical data, as well as digital database resources from the U.S. Geological Survey, Middle Pecos Groundwater Conservation District, Texas Water Development Board, Texas Commission on Environmental Quality,and numerous other State and local databases. The geodatabase combines these disparate database resources into a simple data model. Site locations are geospatially enabled and stored in a geodatabase feature class for cartographic visualization and spatial analysis within a Geographic Information System. The sampling locations are related to hydrogeologic information through the use of geodatabase relationship classes. The geodatabase relationship classes provide the ability to perform complex spatial and data-driven queries to explore data stored in the geodatabase.

Pearson, Daniel K.; Bumgarner, Johnathan R.; Houston, Natalie A.; Stanton, Gregory P.; Teeple, Andrew P.; Thomas, Jonathan V.

2012-01-01

209

76 FR 9640 - Prevailing Rate Systems: Santa Clara, CA, Tulsa County, OK, and Angelina County, TX  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Systems: Santa Clara, CA, Tulsa County, OK, and Angelina County, TX AGENCY: U...an area of application to the Oklahoma, OK, nonappropriated fund (NAF) Federal Wage...an area of application to the Oklahoma, OK, nonappropriated fund (NAF) Federal...

2011-02-22

210

75 FR 45557 - Prevailing Rate Systems; Definition of Tulsa County, OK, and Angelina County, TX, to...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Rate Systems; Definition of Tulsa County, OK, and Angelina County, TX, to Nonappropriated...an area of application to the Oklahoma, OK, nonappropriated fund (NAF) Federal Wage...an area of application to the Oklahoma, OK, nonappropriated fund (NAF) Federal...

2010-08-03

211

Aquifer Tests and Characterization of Transmissivity, Ada-Vamoosa Aquifer on the Osage Reservation, Osage County, Oklahoma, 2006  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Ada-Vamoosa aquifer of northeastern Oklahoma is a sedimentary bedrock aquifer of Pennsylvanian age that crops out over 800 square miles of the Osage Reservation. The Osage Nation needed additional information regarding the production potential of the aquifer to aid them in future development planning. To address this need, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Osage Nation, conducted a study of aquifer properties in the Ada-Vamoosa aquifer. This report presents the results of the aquifer tests from 20 wells in the Ada-Vamoosa aquifer and one well in a minor aquifer east of the Ada-Vamoosa outcrop on the Osage Reservation. Well information for 17 of the 21 wells in this report was obtained from the Indian Health Service. Data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey during this investigation are pumping well data from four domestic wells collected during the summer of 2006. Transmissivity values were calculated from well pumping data or were estimated from specific capacity values depending on the reliability of the data. The estimated transmissivity values are 1.1 to 4.3 times greater than the calculated transmissivity values. The calculated and estimated transmissivity values range from 5 to 1,000 feet squared per day.

Abbott, Marvin M.; DeHay, Kelli

2008-01-01

212

Oklahoma Today  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Published since the 1950s, Oklahoma Today is a production of several state agencies, and it is designed to showcase various cultural, historical, and social aspects of Oklahoma. Over the past several years, Oklahoma State University has digitized back issues of the magazine, and visitors can now read all the way back to the first issue from 1956. Visitors can browse back issues by decade, and they can also perform key-word searches. First-time visitors should start by reading through the spring 1960 issue, which contains pieces on rattlesnakes, Oklahoma wildflowers, and the Washington Irving Trail. While the name Washington Irving may not be commonly associated with Oklahoma, the author spent part of 1832 wandering through the state with a Native American guide. More recent issues feature profiles of singer Vince Gill and Route 66.

213

OUTCROP-BASED HIGH RESOLUTION GAMMA-RAY CHARACTERIZATION OF ARSENIC-BEARING LITHOFACIES IN THE PERMIAN GARBER SANDSTONE AND WELLINGTON FORMATION, CENTRAL OKLAHOMA AQUIFER (COA). CLEVELAND COUNTY, OKLAHOMA  

EPA Science Inventory

The COA supplies drinking water to a number of municipalities in central Oklahoma. Two major stratigraphic units in the COA, the Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formation, contain naturally occurring arsenic that exceeds government mandated drinking-water standards (EPA, 2001). ...

214

East Lawn Site and Planting Plan with Section Oklahoma ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

East Lawn Site and Planting Plan with Section - Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by N. Shartel Avenue to the West, N. Hudson Avenue to the East, Couch Drive to the North, and Colcord Drive to the South, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK

215

Aquifer characteristics, water availability, and water quality of the Quaternary aquifer, Osage County, northeastern Oklahoma, 2001-2002  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Additional sources of water are needed on the Osage Reservation for future growth and development. The Quaternary aquifer along the Arkansas River in the Osage Reservation may represent a substantial water resource, but limited amounts of hydrogeologic data were available for the aquifer. The study area is about 116 square miles of the Quaternary aquifer in the Arkansas River valley and the nearby upland areas along the Osage Reservation. The study area included the Arkansas River reach downstream from Kaw Lake near Ponca City, Oklahoma to upstream from Keystone Lake near Cleveland, Oklahoma. Electrical conductivity logs were produced for 103 test holes. Water levels were determined for 49 test holes, and 105 water samples were collected for water-quality field analyses at 46 test holes. Water-quality data included field measurements of specific conductance, pH, water temperature, dissolved oxygen, and nitrate (nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen). Sediment cores were extracted from 20 of the 103 test holes. The Quaternary aquifer consists of alluvial and terrace deposits of sand, silt, clay, and gravel. The measured thickness of the alluvium ranged from 13.7 to 49.8 feet. The measured thickness of the terrace sediments ranged from 7 to 93.8 feet. The saturated thickness of all sediments ranged from 0 to 38.2 feet with a median of 24.8 feet. The weighted-mean grain size for cores from the alluvium ranged from 3.69 to 0.64 f, (0.08- 0.64 millimeter), and ranged from 4.02 to 2.01 f (0.06-0.25 millimeter) for the cores from terrace deposits. The mean of the weighted-mean grain sizes for cores from the alluvium was 1.67 f (0.31 millimeter), and the terrace deposits was 2.73 f (0.15 millimeter). The hydraulic conductivity calculated from grain size of the alluvium ranged from 2.9 to 6,000 feet per day and of the terrace deposits ranged from 2.9 to 430 feet per day. The calculated transmissivity of the alluvium ranged from 2,000 to 26,000 feet squared per day with a median of 5,100 feet squared per day. Water in storage in the alluvium was estimated to be approximately 200,000 acre-feet. The amount of water annually recharging the aquifer was estimated to be approximately 4,800 acre-feet. Specific conductance for all water samples ranged from 161 to 6,650 microsiemens per centimeter. Median specific conductance for the alluvium was 683 microsiemens per centimeter and for the terrace deposits was 263 microsiemens per centimeter. Dissolved-solids concentrations, estimated from specific conductance, for water samples from the aquifer ranged from 88 to 3,658 milligrams per liter. Estimated median dissolved- solids concentration for the alluvium was 376 milligrams per liter and for the terrace deposits was 145 milligrams per liter. More than half of the samples from the Quaternary aquifer were estimated to contain less than 500 milligrams per liter dissolved solids. Field-screened nitrate concentrations for the sampling in December 2001-August 2002 ranged from 0 to 15 milligrams per liter. The field-screened nitrate concentrations for the second sampling in September 2002 were less than corresponding laboratory reported values.

Mashburn, Shana L.; Cope, Caleb C.; Abbott, Marvin M.

2003-01-01

216

Environmental impacts of oil production on soil, bedrock, and vegetation at the U.S. Geological Survey Osage-Skiatook Petroleum Environmental Research site A, Osage County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey is investigating the impacts of oil and gas production on soils, groundwater, surface water, and ecosystems in the United States. Two sites in northeastern Oklahoma (sites A and B) are presently being investigated under the Osage-Skiatook Petroleum Environmental Research project. Oil wells on the lease surrounding site A in Osage County, Oklahoma, produced about 100,000 bbl of oil between 1913 ard 1981. Prominent production features on the 1.5-ha (3.7-ac) site A include a tank battery, an oil-filled trench, pipelines, storage pits for both produced water and oil, and an old power unit. Site activities and historic releases have left open areas in the local oak forest adjacent to these features and a deeply eroded salt scar downslope from the pits that extends to nearby Skiatook Lake. The site is underlain by surficial sediments comprised of very fine-grained eolian sand and colluvium as much as 1.4 m (4.6 ft) thick, which, in turn, overlie flat-lying, fractured bedrock comprised of sandstone, clayey sandstone, mudstone, and shale. A geophysical survey of ground conductance and concentration measurements of aqueous extracts (1:1 by weight) of core samples taken in the salt scar and adjacent areas indicate that unusual concentrations of NaCl-rich salt are present at depths to at least 8 m (26 ft) in the bedrock; however, little salt occurs in the eolian sand. Historic aerial photographs, anecdotal reports from oil-lease operators, and tree-ring records indicate that the surrounding oak forest was largely established after 1935 and thus postdates the majority of surface damage at the site. Blackjack oaks adjacent to the salt scar have anomalously elevated chloride (>400 ppm) in their leaves and record the presence of NaCl-rich salt or salty water in the shallow subsurface. The geophysical measurements also indicate moderately elevated conductance beneath the oak forest adjoining the salt scar. Copyright ?? 2005. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists/Division of Environmental Geosciences. All rights reserved.

Otton, J. K.; Zielinski, R. A.; Smith, B. D.; Abbott, M. M.; Keeland, B. D.

2005-01-01

217

Stratigraphic sequence of transgressive barrier bar complex and model for hydrocarbon exploration, Red Fork sandstone, Wakita trend, Grant County, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The Desmoinesian Red Fork sandstone (Boggy Formation, Krebs Group), on the northern shelf of the Anadarko basin, Oklahoma, represents a transgressive barrier bar system. The base of the Red Fork interval is marked by the Inola Limestone (Boggy Formation); the top is marked by the Tiawah (Pink) Limestone (Senora Formation, Cabaniss Group). Upper shoreface and foreshore deposits, in which porosity and permeability range from 8 to 18% and 0.03 to 9.7 md, respectively, produce significant amounts of oil and natural gas along the east-west Wakita trend. Effective porosity (mainly secondary dissolution porosity) is well developed in these deposits. Successful hydrocarbon exploration requires a solid understanding of the stratigraphic sequences and depositional environments within the barrier system. Cored sequences, from bottom to top, include: (1) Inola biomicrite, containing brachiopod, trilobite, and echinoderm fragments, and worm tubes (shallow marine); (2) black fossiliferous shale and nonfossiliferous variegated claystone (lagoonal. open marine); (3) coarsening upward sequences of fine to medium-grained sandstone showing low-angle (< 15/sup 0/) bidirectional cross-stratification and flat laminae (shoreface to foreshore); and, locally, (4) very fine-grained sandstone showing flaser and current-ripple laminae (sand flats). Enclosed in the inferred shoreface or foreshore deposits is a local, 1-ft-thick, flat-laminated, very fine-grained sandstone that may represent washover deposits. Lateral facies equivalents of the shoreface and foreshore deposits include ripple-laminated, very fine-grained sandstone, some of which is overlain by glauconitic siltstone and shale (back barrier or lower shoreface.).

O'Reilly, K.L.; Franks, P.C.

1986-05-01

218

Analysis of Vertical Flow During Ambient and Pumped Conditions in Four Monitoring Wells at the Pantex Plant, Carson County, Texas, July-September 2008.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Pantex Plant is a U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (USDOE/NNSA)-owned, contractor-operated facility managed by Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Pantex, LLC (B&W Pantex) in Carson County, Texas, approximately 17 mil...

2009-01-01

219

Three-Dimensional Geologic Model of Complex Fault Structures in the Upper Seco Creek Area, Medina and Uvalde Counties, South-Central Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This multimedia report shows and describes digital three-dimensional faulted geologic surfaces and volumes of the lithologic units of the Edwards aquifer in the upper Seco Creek area of Medina and Uvalde Counties in south-central Texas. This geologic fram...

B. D. Smith C. D. Blome J. C. Cole J. R. Faith M. P. Pantea

2009-01-01

220

Topics Project T 9017 (2) in Port Arthur, Ninth Avenue: From 17th Street, North to St. Mary's Hospital, Jefferson County, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The project consists of the widening of Ninth Avenue from 17th Street, North to St. Mary's Hospital in Jefferson County, Texas. A small tract of right of way will be needed from the St. Mary's Hospital property, but the hospital has no objections. All pos...

1971-01-01

221

Diagenesis, morphology and reservoir effects of authigenic illite and chlorite in the Cherry Canyon Formation, Delaware Mountain Group, Screwbean Field, Reeves County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oil and gas production in the Screwbean Field of Reeves County, Texas, is predominately from the subarkosic Bell Canyon (Ramsey Sand member) and upper Cherry Canyon sandstones of the Permian Delaware Mountain Group. Authigenic clays constitute up to 10% of the bulk rock and can seriously degrade production potential and performance of reservoir rock. Illite and chlorite clays may have

M. D. Thomerson; S. K. Henderson

1995-01-01

222

Composition, diagenesis, and morphology of chlorite and illite\\/smectite mixed-layer clays in the Cherry Canyon Formation, Delaware Mountain Group, Screwbean field, Reeves County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oil and gas production in the Screwbean field of Reeves County, Texas, is predominantly from the subarkosic Bell Canyon (Ramsey sand member) and upper Cherry Canyon sandstones of the Permian (Guadalupian) Delaware Mountain Group. Authigenic clays compromise up to 10% of the bulk rock and can seriously degrade the production potential and performance of reservoir rock. The chlorite and illite\\/smectite

M. D. Thomerson; S. K. Henderson

1993-01-01

223

Analytical Study of the Ogallala Aquifer in Hemphill County, Texas: Projections of Saturated Thickness, Volume of Water in Storage, Pumpage Rates, Pumping Lifts, and Well Yields.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is one of numerous planned county studies covering the declining ground-water resources of the Ogallala aquifer in the High Plains of Texas. The report contains maps, charts, and tabulations which reflect estimates of the volume of water in storage i...

A. E. Bell S. Morrison

1982-01-01

224

Oligocene Volcanism and Multiple Caldera Formation in the Chinati Mountains, Presidio County, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Chinati Mountains caldera, which lies in Trans-Pecos Texas in the southern Basin and Range Province, was formed by eruption of the Mitchell Mesa Rhyolite. Volcanism in the Chinati Mountains area began several million years before formation of the Chin...

J. C. Cepeda C. D. Henry

1983-01-01

225

Strategic Petroleum Reserve Seaway Complex Distribution Enhancements, Brazoria, Galveston and Harris Counties, Texas. Revised Environmental Assessment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to construct and operate a 40-inch diameter, 46-mile long buried crude oil pipeline from existing facilities of the SPR Seaway Complex located near Freeport, Texas, to an ...

1986-01-01

226

An evaluation of the personal response system program for the elderly in Harris County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Personal Response System Program at Huffington Center on Aging, Baylor College of Medicine, provides emergency call systems for elderly people living independently in Houston, Texas. The goal of the project was to complete a formative evaluation of the Personal Response System Program. The specific aims of the evaluation were three-fold. One aim was to evaluate participant health status and

Gail Meredith Fraser Chanpong

1999-01-01

227

A Comprehensive Evaluation of the Community Action Program in Austin and Travis County, Texas. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Produced in four parts, this report covers a study of poor people in Austin, Texas, begun in 1967. Initial research efforts defined the problem and identified the population to be studied. An interim report was then made on the first year's findings. This involved evaluating some of the community action programs (CAP) and identifying and analyzing…

Tracor, Inc., Austin, TX.

228

Depositional environments and diagenesis of lower Pennsylvanian Caddo Formation, Stephens County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since its discovery in 1916, the Lower Pennsylvanian Caddo limestone has been one of the most prolific producing intervals in the central Texas region. Favorable reservoir characteristics, with porosities from 9 to 24% and permeabilities from 0.1 to 1,000 md in the pay interval, have enabled many oil companies to initiate successful secondary recovery waterflood projects. Since its discovery, more

M. Guzan; J. Humphrey

1987-01-01

229

Assessment of manure phosphorus export through turfgrass sod production in Erath County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

A best management practice (BMP) for exporting manure phosphorus (P) in turfgrass sod from the North Bosque River (NBR) watershed in central Texas was assessed using a geographic information system (GIS). The NBR watershed has a mandate to reduce the total annual P load to the NBR by 50% as a result of total maximum daily load regulation. Since dairy

C. L. Munster; J. E. Hanzlik; D. M. Vietor; R. H. White; A. McFarland

2004-01-01

230

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 6): Brio Refining Site, Harris County, Texas, March 1988. First remedial action. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The 58-acre Brio Refining site is located in Harris County, Texas, approximately 20 miles southeast of Houston. The site is broken into two parcels, 49-acre Brio North and 9-acre Brio South, separated by Drive Farm Road. Between 1957 and 1982 the site refined crude oil and styrene tars to produce toluene, ethylbenzene, solvents, naphthalene, diesel fuel and kerosene. Site investigation indicate that between 500,000-700,000 sq yds of onsite soil have measurable contamination, and that high levels of VOCs exist in ground water underlying the site. The selected remedial action for the Brio Refining site includes: Excavation and incineration or biological treatment of all onsite soils, sludges, and liquids found to be above action levels defined in the Endangerment Assessment, with backfilling of all treated material passing the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP).

Not Available

1988-03-31

231

Monocrotophpos and dicrotophos residues in birds as a result of misuse of organophosphates in Matagorda County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

About 1100 birds of 12 species died from organophosphate poisoning in Matagorda County on the Texas Gulf Coast in March and May 1982. Birds died from feeding on rice seed that was illegally treated with dicrotophos or monocrotophos and placed near rice fields as bait to attract and kill birds. Brain acetylcholinesterase inhibition of affected birds averaged 87% (range 82-89%), and contents of gastrointestinal tracts contained residues of dicrotophos (5.6-14 ppm) or monocrotophos (2.1-13 ppm). Rice seed collected at mortality sites contained 210 ppm dicrotophos or 950 ppm monocrotophos. Mortality from dicrotophos poisoning continued for almost 3 weeks. The practice of illegally treating rice seed with either of these 2 organophosphates appears to be infrequent but widespread at present.

Flickinger, E.L.; White, D.H.; Mitchell, C.A.; Lamont, T.G.

1984-01-01

232

Environmental assessment for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Big Hill facility storage of commercial crude oil project, Jefferson County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Big Hill SPR facility located in Jefferson County, Texas has been a permitted operating crude oil storage site since 1986 with benign environmental impacts. However, Congress has not authorized crude oil purchases for the SPR since 1990, and six storage caverns at Big Hill are underutilized with 70 million barrels of available storage capacity. On February 17, 1999, the Secretary of Energy offered the 70 million barrels of available storage at Big Hill for commercial use. Interested commercial users would enter into storage contracts with DOE, and DOE would receive crude oil in lieu of dollars as rental fees. The site could potentially began to receive commercial oil in May 1999. This Environmental Assessment identified environmental changes that potentially would affect water usage, power usage, and air emissions. However, as the assessment indicates, changes would not occur to a major degree affecting the environment and no long-term short-term, cumulative or irreversible impacts have been identified.

NONE

1999-03-01

233

Impacts of petroleum production on ground and surface waters: Results from the Osage-Skiatook Petroleum Environmental Research A site, Osage County Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

As part of a multidisciplinary group of about 20 scientists, we are investigating the transport, fate, natural attenuation, and ecosystem impacts of inorganic salts and organic compounds present in releases of produced water and associated hydrocarbons at the Osage-Skiatook Petroleum Environmental Research (OSPER) sites, located in Osage County, Oklahoma. Geochemical data collected from nearby oil wells show that the produced water source is a Na-Ca-Cl brine (???150,000 mg/L total dissolved solids [TDS]), with relatively high concentrations of Mg, Sr, and NH4, but low SO4 and H2S. Results from the depleted OSPER A site show that the salts continue to be removed from the soil and surficial rocks, but degraded oil persists on the contaminated surface. Eventually, the bulk of inorganic salts and dissolved organics in the brine will reach the adjacent Skiatook Lake, a 4250-ha (10,501-ac) potable water reservoir. Repeated sampling of 44 wells show a plume of high-salinity water (2000-30,000 mg/L TDS) at intermediate depths that intersects Skiatook Lake and extends beyond the visibly impacted areas. No liquid petroleum was observed in this plume, but organic acid anions, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX), and other volatile organic carbon (VOC) are present. The chemical composition of released brine is modified by sorption, mineral precipitation and dissolution, evapotranspiration, volatilization, and bacterially mediated oxidation-reduction reactions, in addition to mixing with percolating precipitation water, lake water, and pristine groundwater. Results show that only minor amounts of salt are removed by runoff, supporting the conclusion that significant amounts of salts from produced water and petroleum releases still remain in the soils and rocks of the impacted area after more than 65 yr of natural attenuation. Copyright ?? 2005. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists/Division of Environmental Geosciences. All rights reserved.

Kharaka, Y. K.; Thordsen, J. J.; Kakouros, E.; Herkelrath, W. N.

2005-01-01

234

Oklahoma Digital Maps  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A team of talented librarians at the Oklahoma State University Library have created this collection of 3,600 maps, a true find for those with an interest in Sooner history, geography, culture, and more. The cartographic resources are divided into four collections, including the WPA Collection and the USGS Collection. This first collection consists of almost 2,400 detailed county maps produced in the 1930s by the Works Progress Administration and the Oklahoma Tax Commission to determine real estate values. Moving on, the USGS Collection is made up of 300 detailed maps generated from 1892 to the 1950s documenting topographical conditions throughout the state. Interested parties can view all of the maps here via a nice digital image tool and are also welcome to search across the entire collection by keyword.

235

Depositional environments of Schuler Formation (Cotton Valley Sands), Upshur County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Exploration for tight gas (FERC Section 107) production from the Schuler Formation (Cotton Valley sands) has provided recent data for the recognition of the lower Schuler (Shongaloo member) shoreface facies and delineation of the upper Schuler (Dorcheat member) delta plain complex in Upshur County. Shoreface facies within the lower Schuler have a typical funnel-shaped log pattern (coarsening-upward clastic). In core,

Joe A. Kast

1983-01-01

236

Discussion of minor fields in McMullen County, Texas, and their production histories  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is the purpose of this discussion to set out detail on several minor areas, none of which by itself is worthy of special attention but in composite, they present a historical summary that might be of value in future exploration of the County. An appendix shows recent oil and gas production that points out the value of fields in

Pinkley

1975-01-01

237

Urbanization pressure increases potential for soils-related hazards, Denton County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Dallas-Fort Worth region was the fastest growing metropolitan area in the US in the decade 1990–2000. Rapid urbanization accompanied this population growth. A GIS-based analysis of urban growth in Denton County revealed that 53% of new urban development was on soils rated of low suitability for urban uses by the Soil Conservation Service. This compares to only 15% of

Harry F. L. Williams

2003-01-01

238

Geologic framework and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Edwards Aquifer outcrop, Medina County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The hydrogeologic subdivisions of the Edwards aquifer outcrop in Medina County generally are porous and permeable. The most porous and permeable appear to be hydrogeologic subdivision VI, the Kirschberg evaporite member of the Kainer Formation; and hydrogeologic subdivision III, the leached and collapsed members, undivided, of the Person Formation. The most porous and permeable rocks of the Devils River Formation in Medina County appear to be in the top layer. The upper member of the Glen Rose Limestone, the lower confining unit, has much less porosity and permeability than that observed in the Edwards aquifer. The Edwards aquifer has relatively large porosity and permeability resulting, in part, from the development or redistribution of secondary porosity. Lithology, stratigraphy, diagenesis, and karstification account for the effective porosity and permeability in the Edwards aquifer outcrop. Karst features that can greatly enhance effective porosity and permeability in the Edwards aquifer outcrop include sinkholes, dolines, and caves. The Edwards aquifer rocks in Medina County change from the eight-member Edwards Group to the essentially indivisible Devils River Formation. The facies change occurs along a line extending northwestward from just south of Medina Lake.

Small, Ted A.; Clark, Allan K.

2000-01-01

239

Can seismic velocities predict sweet spots in the Woodford Shale? A case study from McNeff 2–28 Well, Grady County, Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In shale, predicting sweet spots (brittle, organic-rich, and hydrocarbon-filled porous zones) ahead of the drill bit using non-intrusive methods such as seismic has been a long-standing challenge. In principle, rock properties can be inferred from P- and S-wave velocities with an appropriate rock physics model, which is a way of expressing the elastic moduli as a function of attributes such as porosity (?), mineralogy and pore-fluid type and saturation. Using high-fidelity logs from McNeff 2–28 well, Grady County, Oklahoma, we demonstrate that ? and composition of the Woodford Shale can be inferred from dipole sonic log using the stiff-sand model. The stiff-sand model takes ? and composition as input and, in conjunction with Gassman's substitution, outputs elastic velocities. We find that the up-scaled McNeff 2–28 log velocities can be closely predicted by two compositional end-member input scenarios differing in location of organic matter (OM). The first scenario comprises 0–2.5% OM, 65–84% Quartz and 0% Calcite in matrix and 30–34% gas in pore-fluid. The second scenario comprises 76–20% Quartz and 1.5–3.9% Calcite in matrix and 16–35% gas and 10–40% OM in pore-fluid. In both compositional scenarios, the remainder in matrix is Illite and in pore-fluid is brine. While the input ? in both scenarios is close to the density-porosity (??) log, the input density (?) is closer to the ? log in the second scenario. The second scenario also gives rise to the concept of effective ? (total ? ? ??) which pertains to the proportion occupied by mobile components such as gas and brine, and is up to 40% lower than the total ?. We conclude that from a modeling perspective in the Woodford a) OM should be a part of pore fluid rather than the rock matrix, and b) realistic ? and composition can be inferred from the stiff-sand model. Determining a rock physics model for the Woodford enables an examination of various what-if scenarios by consistently changing the inputs and computing elastic velocities which may eventually help in creating a field guide to quantitative interpretation of the field seismic data.

Jaiswal, P.; Varacchi, B.; Ebrahimi, P.; Dvorkin, J.; Puckette, J.

2014-05-01

240

Influence of structural evolution on reservoir development and distribution in the Silurian Fusselman: Vermejo-Moore Hopper field, Loving and Ward Counties, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Vermejo-Moore Hooper field lies in the deep Delaware basin adjacent to the Pecos River in Loving and Ward counties, Texas. Discovered in 1973, the field produces dry gas from the Fusselman and Ellenburger formations. The Fusselman reservoir has produced over 400 bcf of gas from depths between 18,500 and 19,200 ft. The field primarily is a structural trap, but

W. M. Colleary; J. R. Hulme; J. W. Crafton

1992-01-01

241

Reservoir characteristics and depositional environments of upper Strawn Series (Pennsylvanian) Capps limestone and Fry sandstone core, Lake Abilene field, Taylor County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Detailed geologic and special core analyses were conducted on cores from the McIver, Inc., Sears 9 well, Lake Abilene field, Taylor County, Texas. The total Fry-Capps primary production from the Sears lease was approximately 473,000 bbl of oil and 737 mmcf of gas. Primary recovery was 109 bbl\\/ac-ft. Waterflood susceptibility tests indicate a 39% residual oil saturation after flooding and

Hughbert Collier

1987-01-01

242

Occurrence, distribution, and concentrations of selected contaminants in streambed- and suspended-sediment samples collected in Bexar County, Texas, 2007-09  

USGS Publications Warehouse

High concentrations of sediment-associated contaminants are typically associated with urban areas such as San Antonio, Texas, in Bexar County, the seventh most populous city in the United States. U.S. Geological Survey personnel periodically collected surficial streambed-sediment samples during 2007-09 and collected suspended-sediment samples from selected streams after storms during 2008 and 2009. All sediment samples were analyzed for major and trace elements, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

Wilson, Jennifer T.

2011-01-01

243

Evaluation of geopressured brine injectability: Department of Energy, Pleasant Bayou No. 2 well, Brazoria County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

A field evaluation of geopressured brine injectability was completed during September 22 to 25, 1980 at the DOE, Brazoria test site in Texas. Membrane filters, with pore sizes of 0.4-..mu..m and 10.0-..mu..m, were used as the basis for obtaining suspended solids data and for developing performance-life estimates of typical spent brine injection wells. Field measurements were made at 130/sup 0/C and line pressures up to 3800 psig. Scale inhibited (phosphonate-polyacrylate threshold-type, carbonate scale inhibitor), prefiltered-scale-inhibited, and untreated brine were evaluated. Test results indicated that raw brine was highly injectable, while scale-inhibited brine had extremely low quality. The poor injectability of scale-inhibited brine resulted from partial precipitation of the scale inhibitor.

Owen, L.B.; Blair, C.K.; Harrar, J.E.; Netherton, R.

1980-10-28

244

Campanian ammonites from the Upper Cretaceous Gober Chalk of Lamar County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Roxton Limestone Member at the top of the Gober Chalk in northeast Texas yields a rich fauna, dominated by Baculites haresi Reeside, 1927, and Inoceramus balticus Boehm, 1909, with sparse occurrences of pachydiscus cf. P. paulsoni (Young, 1963), Anapachydiscus sp.juv., Placenticeras placenta (DeKay, 1828), Hoplitoplacenticeras aff. H. plasticum (Paulcke, 1907), Menabites (Delawarella) delawarensis (Morton, 1830), M.(D.) danei (Young, 1963), M.(D.) aff. M.(D.) vanuxemi (Morton, 1830), Submortoniceras vandalinaense Young, 1963, Submortoniceras sp., Eubostrychoceras sp., and Scaphites hippocrepis (DeKay, 1828) III. The presence of S. hippocrepis III suggests a late early Campanian age assignment for the fauna. The assemblage includes species known from the Western Interior, Gulf Coast, Atlantic seaboard, and western Europe. -Authors

Cobban, W. A.; Kennedy, W. J.

1992-01-01

245

A pilot study of symptoms of neurotoxicity and injury among adolescent farmworkers in Starr County, Texas.  

PubMed

Little is known regarding the relationship between neurotoxicity symptoms and injury, particularly among adolescent farmworkers. This pilot study utilized logistic regression to analyze injury prevalence in relation to self-reported symptoms of neurotoxicity among adolescent farmworkers along the US-Mexico border in Texas. Respondents reporting at least five symptoms had 8.75 (95% CI, 1.89-40.54) times the prevalence of injury compared with those reporting zero or one symptom. Significant associations were observed for six items: trouble remembering things, family noticing memory loss, making notes, irritated for no reason, heart pounding, and tingling. This pilot study suggests a relationship between symptoms of neurotoxicity and injury among adolescent farmworkers, supporting the need for more rigorous investigations. PMID:20465058

Whitworth, Kristina W; Shipp, Eva M; Cooper, Sharon P; Del Junco, Deborah J

2010-01-01

246

Availability of more healthful food alternatives in traditional, convenience, and nontraditional types of food stores in two rural Texas counties.  

PubMed

Limited research has focused on the availability of more healthful food alternatives in traditional food stores (supermarkets and grocery stores) in rural areas. Current market trends suggest that food items may be available for purchase in stores other than traditional food stores. An observational survey was developed and used on-site to document the availability and variety of fruit and vegetables (fresh, canned, and frozen), meats (meat, poultry, fish, and eggs), dairy (milk, yogurt, and cheese), and grains (whole grains and refined grains) in all traditional food stores, convenience stores, and nontraditional food stores (dollar stores and mass merchandisers) in two rural Texas counties. Descriptive statistics and t tests identified that although the widest selection of more healthful food items was available in supermarkets, not all supermarkets carried all items. Grocery stores carried less variety of fresh fruits (8+/-0.7 vs 4.7+/-0.3; P<0.01) and vegetables (10.7+/-0.2 vs 6+/-0; P<0.001) than supermarkets. Fresh fruits and vegetables were not readily available in convenience or nontraditional food stores. Among convenience and nontraditional food stores, "dollar" stores offered the best variety of more healthful canned fruits and vegetables, whole-wheat bread, and whole-grain cereal. Mass merchandisers and dollar stores offered a greater variety of more healthful types of canned tuna and poultry, reduced-fat and skim milk, and low-fat tortillas. In these rural counties, traditional food stores offered greater availability of more healthful food choices across food groups. More healthful food choices in canned fruits and vegetables, canned meat and fish, milk, and grains were also available in dollar stores, mass merchandisers, and convenience stores. Results suggest that a complete understanding of the food environment, especially in rural areas, requires knowledge of the availability and variety of healthful food in all types of stores that are accessible to families. PMID:19394475

Bustillos, Brenda; Sharkey, Joseph R; Anding, Jenna; McIntosh, Alex

2009-05-01

247

Site handbook: data acquisition system information, Comal County Mental Health Mental Retardation Center, New Braunfels, Texas  

SciTech Connect

This report gives the status of the data acquisition task of Comal County MHMR Solar Retrofit project and a description of the data acquisition hardware. The data acquisition system will be used to monitor the heating and cooling load and equipment at the Comal County MHMR Center will investigate the performance of the passive solar modifications to the structure and heating/cooling control strategy. The passive solar and conservation options included in the building retrofit program were ceiling insulation, weather proofing, fluorescent lighting, roof evaporative spray cooling system, awnings, and ceiling fans. In addition, night ventilation and night flushing cooling were used to reduce the cooling load. Natural daylighting was utilized to replace artificial lighting where possible. The major conservation options that were utilized include: the creation of a new ceiling 6 inches lower than the original and insulating it to an R-22 level in the process; the installation of an evaporation roof spray system; the installation of ceiling fans for destratification; and the creation of fixed awnings.

Not Available

1985-01-01

248

Discriminant analysis of components of El Paso Group rocks in southern Hueco Mountains, Hudspeth County, Texas - approach to depositional environments  

SciTech Connect

The El Paso Group of the Southern Hueco Mountains, Hudspeth County, Texas, crops out over an area of about 57 km/sup 2/ (22 mi/sup 2/) and is divided into three informal units - lower, middle, and upper. The lower contains the lower calcareous sandstone member and an overlying sandy limestone member; the middle is cherty limestone; and the upper unit contains two members: sandy dolomite and an upper silty dolomite. The El Paso Group rocks are classified into seven microfacies based on thin section studies of the rocks' components. These are organic allochems (peloids, gastropods, trilobite fragments, pelmatozoan ossicles, algae, and unidentifiable bioclasts); inorganic allochems (glauconite, stylolites, quartz grains, voids, lithoclasts, and ooids); matrix (micrite, microspar, recrystallized sparite, micritic size dolomite, microsparitic size dolomite, and sparitic size dolomite). Discriminant analysis of the components of the rocks tests the classification of the rocks into seven microfacies. Six discriminant functions, discriminant function scores for each sample, and probability of the sample's membership in each classification group are calculated during the study to discriminate among the groups. The eigenvalues, plots of discriminant scores, chi-square tests, Wilk's lambda, and the territorial map proved effective in classifying the components of the El Paso Group rocks; 100% of the grouped cases are correctly classified into seven microfacies. The components/microfacies indicate that the rocks of El Paso Group were deposited in shelf lagoon with open circulation, restricted circulation in shelf, subtidal, intertidal, and tidal flat environments.

Aluka, I.J.

1987-08-01

249

Geodatabase and characteristics of springs within and surrounding the Trinity aquifer outcrops in northern Bexar County, Texas, 2010--11  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Trinity Glen Rose Groundwater Conservation District, the Edwards Aquifer Authority, and the San Antonio River Authority, developed a geodatabase of springs within and surrounding the Trinity aquifer outcrops in a 331-square-mile study area in northern Bexar County, Texas. The data used to develop the geodatabase were compiled from existing reports and databases, along with spring data collected between October 2010 and September 2011. Characteristics including the location, discharge, and water-quality properties were collected for known springs and documented in the geodatabase. A total of 141 springs were located within the study area, and 46 springs were field verified. The discharge at springs with flow ranged from 0.003 to 1.46 cubic feet per second. The specific conductance of the water discharging from the springs ranged from 167 to 1,130 microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius with a majority of values in the range of 500 microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius.

Clark, Allan K.; Pedraza, Diana E.; Morris, Robert R.; Garcia, Travis J.

2013-01-01

250

Induction conductivity and natural gamma logs collected in 15 wells at Camp Stanley Storage Activity, Bexar County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Camp Stanley Storage Activity conducted electromagnetic induction conductivity and natural gamma logging of 15 selected wells on the Camp Stanley Storage Activity, located in northern Bexar County, Texas, during March 28-30, 2005. In late 2004, a helicopter electromagnetic survey was flown of the Camp Stanley Storage Activity as part of a U.S. Geological Survey project to better define subsurface geologic units, the structure, and the catchment area of the Trinity aquifer. The electromagnetic induction conductivity and natural gamma log data in this report were collected to constrain the calculation of resistivity depth sections and to provide subsurface controls for interpretation of the helicopter electromagnetic data collected for the Camp Stanley Storage Activity. Logs were recorded digitally while moving the probe in an upward direction to maintain proper depth control. Logging speed was no greater than 30 feet per minute. During logging, a repeat section of at least 100 feet was recorded to check repeatability of log responses. Several of the wells logged were completed with polyvinyl chloride casing that can be penetrated by electromagnetic induction fields and allows conductivity measurement. However, some wells were constructed with steel centralizers and stainless steel screen that caused spikes on both conductivity and resulting resistivity log curves. These responses are easily recognizable and appear at regular intervals on several logs.

Stanton, Gregory P.

2005-01-01

251

Monocrotophos and dicrotophos residues in birds as a result of misuse of organophosphates in Matagorda county Texas USA  

USGS Publications Warehouse

About 1100 birds of 12 spp. [Red-winged blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus), great-tailed grackle (Quiscalus mexicanus), brown-headed cowbird (Molothrus ater), mourning dove (Zenaida macrours), Eastern meadowlark (Sturnella magna), vesper sparrow (Pooecetes gramineus), common snipe (Gallinago gallinago), blue-winged teal (Anas discors), mottled duck (Anas fulvigula), common moorhen (Gallinula chloropus), redhead (Aythya americana) and ruddy turnstone (Arenaria interpres)] died from organophosphate poisoning in Matagorda County on the Texas Gulf Coast in March and May 1982. Birds died from feeding on rice seed that was illegally treated with dicrotophos or monocrotophos and placed near rice fields as bait to attract and kill birds. Brain acetylcholinesterase inhibition of affected birds averaged 87% (range 82-89%), and contents of gastrointestinal tracts contained residues of dicrotophos (5.6-14 ppm) or monocrotophos (2.1-13 ppm). Rice seed collected at mortality sites contained 210 ppm dicrotophos or 950 ppm monocrotophos. Mortality from dicrotophos poisoning continued for almost 3 wk. The practice of illegally treating rice seed with either of the 2 organophosphates appears to be infrequent but widespread at present.

Flickinger, E. L.; White, D. H.; Mitchell, C. A.; Lamont, T. G.

1984-01-01

252

Identification of Diabetic Retinopathy Genes through a Genome-Wide Association Study among Mexican-Americans from Starr County, Texas  

PubMed Central

To identify genetic loci for severe diabetic retinopathy, 286 Mexican-Americans with type 2 diabetes from Starr County, Texas, completed physical examinations including fundus photography for diabetic retinopathy grading. Individuals with moderate-to-severe non-proliferative and proliferative diabetic retinopathy were defined as cases. Direct genotyping was performed using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 100?K Set, and SNPs passing quality control criteria were used to impute markers available in HapMap Phase III Mexican population (MXL) in Los Angeles, California. Two directly genotyped markers were associated with severe diabetic retinopathy at a P-value less than .0001: SNP rs2300782 (P = 6.04 × 10?5) mapped to an intron region of CAMK4 (calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV) on chromosome 5, and SNP rs10519765 (P = 6.21 × 10?5) on chromosomal 15q13 in the FMN1 (formin 1) gene. Using well-imputed markers based on the HapMap III Mexican population, we identified an additional 32 SNPs located in 11 chromosomal regions with nominal association with severe diabetic retinopathy at P-value less than .0001. None of these markers were located in traditional candidate genes for diabetic retinopathy or diabetes itself. However, these signals implicate genes involved in inflammation, oxidative stress and cell adhesion for the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy.

Fu, Yi-Ping; Hallman, D. Michael; Gonzalez, Victor H.; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Klein, Ronald; Hayes, M. Geoffrey; Cox, Nancy J.; Bell, Graeme I.; Hanis, Craig L.

2010-01-01

253

Reservoir characterization of tight gas sand: Taylor sandstone (upper Cotton Valley group, upper Jurassic), Rusk County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

An integrated petrographic, sedimentologic, and log analysis study of the Taylor sandstone in Rusk County, Texas, was conducted to understand the geologic controls on reservoir performance and to identify pay zones for reserves calculations. The Taylor sandstone interval consists of tightly cemented, fine-grained quartzose sandstones interbedded with mudstones, siltstones, and carbonates that occur in upward-coarsening sequences. Helium permeability rarely exceeds 0.1 md, and porosity is rarely greater than 10%. Relationships between porosity and permeability are diffuse because of a string diagenetic overprint. Six major rock types or petrofacies are distinguished on the basis of pore type and dominant cement mineralogy. Three sandstone petrofacies - primary macroporous quartz cemented, moldic macroporous quartz cemented, and microporous clay cemented - have reservoir potential. Although these petrofacies have similar porosities and permeabilities, fluid saturations differ considerably due to differences in pore geometry as indicated by petrographic and capillary pressure analyses. These three reservoir-quality petrofacies can each be identified directly on wireline logs by applying cutoffs to the porosity and normalized gamma-ray logs.

Vavra, C.L.; Scheihing, M.H.; Klein, J.D.

1989-03-01

254

Public health assessment for Longhorn Army Ammunition Plant, Karnack, Harrison County, Texas, Region 6, CERCLIS number TX6213820529. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Longhorn Army Ammunition Plant (Longhorn) is an 8,493 acre government-owned former industrial facility approximately 14 miles northeast of Marshall, Harrison County, Texas. Longhorn has been intermittently in operation since 1942 when it was established to produce the explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). Pyrotechnic ammunition also was produced at Longhorn and Morton Thiokol Corporation produced a plastic explosive at the facility until August 1997. According to document record for the hazardous ranking system, releases of 1,3-dinitrobenzene, 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene, arsenic, barium, chromium, and lead occurred. The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) reviewed available environmental information for the site and evaluated several potential exposure situations. These exposure situations include potential contact with site contaminants in surface water, sediment, surface soil, wasteline material, and groundwater. Although site-related contaminants have been found in these various environmental media, currently the contaminants are not accessible, on or off the site, at levels that would pose a public health threat. Based on available information, the authors have concluded that overall, the Longhorne Army Ammunition Plant poses on apparent public health hazard. In the future, the conclusion category for this site could change if additional data were to indicate that contaminants from the site were migrating towards the public water supply wells near the site.

NONE

1999-07-09

255

Geology and hydrostratigraphy of Guadalupe River State Park and Honey Creek State Natural Area, Kendall and Comal Counties, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Hydrogeologic mapping and descriptions of the lithostratigraphy and hydrostratigraphy of Guadalupe River State Park and Honey Creek State Natural Area, Kendall and Comal Counties, Texas, are presented in this first detailed 1:24,000 geologic map, along with proposed names and descriptions of the hydrostratigraphic units in the study area. Variations in the amount and type of porosity of the lithostratigraphic unit, which vary depending on the depositional environment, lithology, structural history and diagenesis support the resulting hydrostratigraphy proposed herein. Rocks exposed in the study area consist of Early Cretaceous sedimentary rocks that are assigned to the Trinity Group. The lithostratigraphy includes the Hammett Shale, Cow Creek Limestone, Hensell Sand Members of the Pearsall Formation, and the lower member of the Glen Rose Limestone. These lithologic units contain shale, grainstone, sandstone, and fossiliferous limestone, alternating and interfingering with mudstone, wackestone, packstone, and grainstone. The Trinity aquifer hydrostratigraphic units shown on the map and described herein are characterized by their porosity types. Porosity types were first determined from an analysis of two boreholes conducted in comparison with 143 geophysical logs from northern Bexar County, Texas. The cores and geophysical log comparison resulted in division of the lower member of the Glen Rose Limestone into six hydrostratigraphic units, designated A through F. Of those six units, only three remain in the study area because of erosion. The proposed naming of these three hydrostratigraphic units is based on topographic or historical features that occur in the outcrop area of those units. Hydrostratigraphic units that correlate with the boundaries of the formation have been given formational names excluding the lithologic modifier. The Doeppenschmidt hydrostratigraphic unit is stratigraphically the highest interval in the study area, characterized by interparticle, moldic, burrowed, bedding plane, fracture, and cave porosity. The underlying Rust hydrostratigraphic unit appears to be a confining unit with springs/seeps issuing near the contact with the overlying Doeppenschmidt unit. The Rust unit has interparticle, fracture, and cave porosity with cave porosity primarily associated with faulting. The Honey Creek hydrostratigraphic unit is an aquifer in the subsurface and exhibits extremely, well developed porosity and permeability including— interparticle, moldic, burrowed, bedding plane, fracture, channel, and cave porosity. This unit is named for Honey Creek Cave, which discharges water into Honey Creek. The Hensell hydrostratigraphic unit contains primarily interparticle porosity, but also exhibits some moldic and cave porosity in its upper parts. The Cow Creek hydrostratigraphic unit contains interparticle, moldic, vug, burrowed, fracture, bedding plane, channel, and cave porosity. The Cow Creek hydrostratigraphic unit is an aquifer in the subsurface and is the primary target for water-well drillers in the area. The Hammett hydrostratigraphic unit is not exposed in the study area but is thought to underlie parts of the Guadalupe River, based on mapping of the overlying units and comparisons with subsurface thicknesses obtained from the geophysical log. The Hammett unit restricts the downward migration of groundwater, resulting in springs that discharge at the base of the Cow Creek unit. These springs also create some base flow to the Guadalupe River during periods of extreme drought. The faulting and fracturing in the study area are part of the Miocene Balcones Fault Zone, which is an extensional system of faults that generally trend southwest to northeast in south-central Texas. An igneous dike, containing aphanitic texture, cuts through the center of the study area near the confluence of Honey Creek and the Guadalupe River. The dike penetrates the Cow Creek Limestone and the lower part of the Hensell Sand, which outcrops at three locations.

Clark, Allan K.; Blome, Charles D.; Morris, Robert R.

2014-01-01

256

Geologic and engineering characterization of Geraldine Ford field, Reeves and Culberson Counties, Texas. Topical report -- 1997  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this Class III project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of clastic reservoirs in basinal sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost-effective way to recover more of the original oil in place by strategic infill-well placement and geologically based field development. The study focused on Geraldine Ford field, which produces from the upper Bell Canyon formation (Ramsey sandstone). Petrophysical characterization of the Ford Geraldine unit was accomplished by integrating core and log data and quantifying petrophysical properties from wireline logs. The petrophysical data were used to map porosity, permeability, net pay, water saturation, mobile oil saturation, and other reservoir properties. Once the reservoir-characterization study was completed, a demonstration area of approximately 1 mi{sup 2} in the northern part of the unit was chosen for reservoir modeling/simulation. A quarter of a five-spot injection pattern in the demonstration area was selected for flow simulations, and two cases of permeability distribution were considered, one using stochastic permeability distribution generated by conditional simulation and the other using layered permeabilities. Flow simulations were performed using UTCOMP, an isothermal, three-dimensional, compositional simulator for miscible gas flooding. Results indicate that 10--30% (1 to 3 MMbbl) of remaining oil in place in the demonstration area can be produced by CO{sub 2} injection.

Dutton, S.P.; Malik, M.A.; Asquith, G.B.; Barton, M.D.; Cole, A.G.; Gogas, J.; Clift, S.J.; Guzman, J.I.

1998-04-01

257

Outbreak of cryptosporidiosis associated with a man-made chlorinated lake--Tarrant County, Texas, 2008.  

PubMed

In July 2008, clusters of laboratory-confirmed cryptosporidiosis cases and reports of gastrointestinal illness in persons who visited a lake were reported to Tarrant County Public Health. In response, epidemiologic, laboratory, and environmental health investigations were initiated. A matched case-control study determined that swallowing the lake water was associated with illness (adjusted odds ratio = 16.3; 95% confidence interval: 2.5-infinity). The environmental health investigation narrowed down the potential sources of contamination. Laboratory testing detected Cryptosporidium hominis in case-patient stool specimens and Cryptosporidium species in lake water. It was only through the joint effort that epidemiologic, laboratory, and environmental health investigators could determine that >1 human diarrheal fecal incidents in the lake likely led to contamination of the water. This same collaborative effort will be needed to develop and maintain an effective national Model Aquatic Health Code. PMID:23210393

Cantey, Paul T; Kurian, Anita K; Jefferson, David; Moerbe, Micky M; Marshall, Karen; Blankenship, William R; Rothbarth, Gary R; Hwang, Jimee; Hall, Rebecca; Yoder, Jonathan; Brunkard, Joan; Johnston, Stephanie; Xiao, Lihua; Hill, Vincent R; Sarisky, John; Zarate-Bermudez, Max A; Otto, Charles; Hlavsa, Michele C

2012-11-01

258

Foss Reservoir, Custer County, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Annual total phosphorus and total nitrogen loadings to the lake were estimated and subdivided according to either point or non-point source origin. An assessment of the lake's trophic condition and limiting nutrient is also provided. All data collected by...

1977-01-01

259

THE OKLAHOMA MESONET  

EPA Science Inventory

The Oklahoma Mesonet, operated and maintained by the Oklahoma Climatological Survey, is Oklahoma's premier climatological data collection system. For the area covered, which includes the entire state, no other system within the United States or internationally has the degree of ...

260

Morphology and sedimentology of a central Brazos River point bar, Boxley Bend, Brazos County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

A reconnaissance of Brazos River point bars reveals great variety in their morphology and sedimentology, owing to the complex interaction of climate, local hydrography, and local sediment sources. This paper presents the first in a series of studies of point bars of the Brazos River and concentrates on the Boxley Bend point bar near Snook, Texas. The summer morphology of the point bar is complex, consisting of an upper and lower tier separated by a scarp but connected by a central ramp. The surfaces of the lower tier and ramp display numerous large gravel bars and shallow scour pools as well as low-amplitude sand waves, ripples, and current lineations. In cross section, the lower tier and ramp are characterized by (1) trough cross-bedded, medium to fine sand produced by megaripple migration during floods; (2) massive gravel beds, the product of formation and migration of gravel bars during floods; and (3) fine rippled sand and clay drapes formed during falling flood. The surface of the upper tier displays ripple-laminated eolian sand and deflation deposits of mud clasts. In cross section, the upper tier is characterized by thick beds of horizontally stratified fine sand. During the winter, the entire surface of the point bar is covered by large (2 m high) transverse bars separated by deep scour troughs. Transverse bars migrate into the troughs to produce a sequence of fine sand with backflow ripple cross-stratification overlain by thick beds of tabular cross-bedded medium sand. The transverse bars appear to be transitory features with little net effect on sedimentation, because they are removed from the surface of the point bar by summertime.

Connolly, W.M.; Mazzullo, J.

1986-09-01

261

Late diagenetic indicators of buried oil and gas. 2: Direct detection experiment at Cement and Garza fields, Oklahoma and Texas, using enhanced LANDSAT 1 and 2 images  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author has identified the following significant results. The Cement oil field, Oklahoma, was a test site for an experiment designed to evaluate LANDSAT's capability to detect an alteration zone in surface rocks caused by hydrocarbon microseepage. Loss of iron and impregnation of sandstone by carbonate cements and replacement of gypsum by calcite were the major alteration phenomena at Cement. The bedrock alterations were partially masked by unaltered overlying beds, thick soils, and dense natural and cultivated vegetation. Interpreters, biased by detailed ground truth, were able to map the alteration zone subjectively using a magnified, filtered, and sinusoidally stretched LANDSAT composite image; other interpreters, unbiased by ground truth data, could not duplicate that interpretation.

Donovan, T. J.; Termain, P. A.; Henry, M. E. (principal investigators)

1979-01-01

262

Technical procedures for implementation of aesthetics site studies, Deaf Smith County site, Texas: Environmental Field Program  

SciTech Connect

This chapter introduces the purpose and scope of the visually affected areas determination, as well as definitions, interfaces, and concurrent data needs. This procedure provides a method for determining the extent of visibility of the project. This area is identified as the visually affected area, and becomes the area within which all visual analysis is conducted. The visually affected area analysis of the Deaf Smith County site will involve identifying and mapping the visibility of all major proposed project features. Baseline analysis will be conducted within the overall visually affected area; impact assessment will be conducted within the visually affected area of each major project feature. This procedure presents the guidelines for determining the visually affected area will be in computer data base construction; viewshed modeling, and site visit and verification of results. Computer data base construction will involve digitizing topographic and project facility data from available data source. The extent of the visible area from each major project feature will then be plotted. Finally, these computer-generated visibility plots will be verified in the field.

Not Available

1987-06-01

263

Estimation of volume and mass and of changes in volume and mass of selected chat piles in the Picher mining district, Ottawa County, Oklahoma, 2005-10  

USGS Publications Warehouse

From the 1890s through the 1970s the Picher mining district in northeastern Ottawa County, Oklahoma, was the site of mining and processing of lead and zinc ore. When mining ceased in about 1979, as much as 165–300 million tons of mine tailings, locally referred to as “chat,” remained in the Picher mining district. Since 1979, some chat piles have been mined for aggregate materials and have decreased in volume and mass. Currently (2013), the land surface in the Picher mining district is covered by thousands of acres of chat, much of which remains on Indian trust land owned by allottees. The Bureau of Indian Affairs manages these allotted lands and oversees the sale and removal of chat from these properties. To help the Bureau of Indian Affairs better manage the sale and removal of chat, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Bureau of Indian Affairs, estimated the 2005 and 2010 volumes and masses of selected chat piles remaining on allotted lands in the Picher mining district. The U.S. Geological Survey also estimated the changes in volume and mass of these chat piles for the period 2005 through 2010. The 2005 and 2010 chat-pile volume and mass estimates were computed for 34 selected chat piles on 16 properties in the study area. All computations of volume and mass were performed on individual chat piles and on groups of chat piles in the same property. The Sooner property had the greatest estimated volume (4.644 million cubic yards) and mass (5.253 ± 0.473 million tons) of chat in 2010. Five of the selected properties (Sooner, Western, Lawyers, Skelton, and St. Joe) contained estimated chat volumes exceeding 1 million cubic yards and estimated chat masses exceeding 1 million tons in 2010. Four of the selected properties (Lucky Bill Humbah, Ta Mee Heh, Bird Dog, and St. Louis No. 6) contained estimated chat volumes of less than 0.1 million cubic yards and estimated chat masses of less than 0.1 million tons in 2010. The total volume of all selected chat piles was estimated to be 18.073 million cubic yards in 2005 and 16.171 million cubic yards in 2010. The total mass of all selected chat piles was estimated to be 20.445 ± 1.840 million tons in 2005 and 18.294 ± 1.646 million tons in 2010. All of the selected chat piles decreased in volume and mass for the period 2005 through 2010. Chat piles CP022 (Ottawa property) and CP013 (Sooner property) had some within-property chat-pile redistribution, with both chat piles having net decreases in volume and mass for the period 2005 through 2010. The Sooner property and the St. Joe property had the greatest volume (and mass) changes, with 1.266 million cubic yards and 0.217 million cubic yards (1.432 ± 0.129 million tons and 0.246 ± 0.022 million tons) of chat being removed, respectively. The chat removed from the Sooner and St. Joe properties accounts for about 78 percent of the chat removed from all selected chat piles and properties. The total volume and mass removed from all selected chat piles for the period 2005 through 2010 were estimated to be 1.902 million cubic yards and 2.151 ± 0.194 million tons, respectively.

Smith, S. Jerrod

2013-01-01

264

Evaluation of groundwater and surface-water interactions in the Caddo Nation Tribal Jurisdictional Area, Caddo County, Oklahoma, 2010-13  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Streamflows, springs, and wetlands are important natural and cultural resources to the Caddo Nation. Consequently, the Caddo Nation is concerned about the vulnerability of the Rush Springs aquifer to overdrafting and whether the aquifer will continue to be a viable source of water to tribal members and other local residents in the future. Interest in the long-term viability of local water resources has resulted in ongoing development of a comprehensive water plan by the Caddo Nation. As part of a multiyear project with the Caddo Nation to provide information and tools to better manage and protect water resources, the U.S. Geological Survey studied the hydraulic connection between the Rush Springs aquifer and springs and streams overlying the aquifer. The Caddo Nation Tribal Jurisdictional Area is located in southwestern Oklahoma, primarily in Caddo County. Underlying the Caddo Nation Tribal Jurisdictional Area is the Permian-age Rush Springs aquifer. Water from the Rush Springs aquifer is used for irrigation, public, livestock and aquaculture, and other supply purposes. Groundwater from the Rush Springs aquifer also is withdrawn by domestic (self-supplied) wells, although domestic use was not included in the water-use summary in this report. Perennial streamflow in many streams and creeks overlying the Rush Springs aquifer, such as Cobb Creek, Lake Creek, and Willow Creek, originates from springs and seeps discharging from the aquifer. This report provides information on the evaluation of groundwater and surface-water resources in the Caddo Nation Jurisdictional Area, and in particular, information that describes the hydraulic connection between the Rush Springs aquifer and springs and streams overlying the aquifer. This report also includes data and analyses of base flow, evidence for groundwater and surface-water interactions, locations of springs and wetland areas, groundwater flows interpreted from potentiometric-surface maps, and hydrographs of water levels monitored in the Caddo Nation Tribal Jurisdictional Area from 2010 to 2013. Flow in streams overlying the Rush Springs aquifer, on average, were composed of 50 percent base flow in most years. Monthly mean base flow appeared to maintain streamflows throughout each year, but periods of zero flow were documented in daily hydrographs at each measured site, typically in the summer months. A pneumatic slug-test technique was used at 15 sites to determine the horizontal hydraulic conductivity of streambed sediments in streams overlying the Rush Springs aquifer. Converting horizontal hydraulic conductivities (Kh) from the slug-test analyses to vertical hydraulic conductivities (Kv) by using a ratio of Kv/Kh = 0.1 resulted in estimates of vertical streambed hydraulic conductivity ranging from 0.1 to 8.6 feet per day. Data obtained from a hydraulic potentiomanometer in streambed sediments and streams in August 2012 indicate that water flow was from the streambed sediments to the stream (gaining) at 6 of 15 sites, and that water flow was from the stream to the streambed sediments (losing) at 9 of 15 sites. The groundwater and surface-water interaction data collected at the Cobb Creek near Eakly, Okla., streamflow gaging station (07325800), indicate that the bedrock groundwater, alluvial groundwater, and surface-water resources are closely connected. Because of this hydrologic connection, large perennial streams in the study area may change from gaining to losing streams in the summer. The timing and severity of this change from a gaining to a losing condition probably is affected by the local or regional withdrawal of groundwater for irrigation in the summer growing season. Wells placed closer to streams have a greater and more immediate effect on alluvial groundwater levels and stream stages than wells placed farther from streams. Large-capacity irrigation wells, even those completed hundreds of feet below land surface in the bedrock aquifer, can induce surface-water flow from nearby streams by lowering alluvial groundwater levels below the stream altitude. Twenty-five ne

Mashburn, Shana L.; Smith, S. Jerrod

2014-01-01

265

Helicopter Electromagnetic and Magnetic Surveys of the Upper and Middle Zones of the Trinity Aquifer, Uvalde and Bexar Counties, Texas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Detailed helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic surveys (HEM) were conducted in northern Uvalde and Bexar Counties, Texas, as part of a geologic mapping and hydrologic study being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The aquifers of the Lower Cretaceous Trinity Group (collectively termed the Trinity aquifer) are an important regional water source in the Hill Country of south-central Texas. Rock units comprising the middle aquifer segment are represented by the lower member of the Glen Rose Formation and the Cow Creek Limestone and Hensel Sandstone members of the Pearsall Formation. The lower Trinity hydrologic segment is composed of the Hosston and Sligo Limestones and is confined by the overlying Hammet Shale. Karst features commonly occur in the Trinity Group because of the dissolution of gypsum- and anhydrite-rich beds. Faults and fractures have not been sufficiently analyzed to evaluate the effects these structures have on inter- and intra-formational groundwater flow. The survey in the north Seco Creek area covers the recharge zone of the Edwards aquifer and part of the catchment zone composed of the upper Trinity segment. These data augment the scant geologic mapping in the area by delineating faults, collapse features, and hydrostratigraphic units. The HEM survey in northern Bexar County covered the Camp Stanley Storage Activity, the Camp Bullis Training Site, parts of the recharge zone of the Edwards aquifer south of the military bases, and part of Cibolo Creek to the north. Basic line spacing was 200 meters using six frequencies. In-fill lines were flown with a spacing of 100 meters in the central part of the study area to better resolve geologic structures and karst features. The data processing took into account high EM interference and cultural noise. Apparent resistivity (?a) maps are used in interpretation of geologic structures, trends, and in the identification of electrical properties of lithologic units. The ?a maps show the northwest trending faults of the Balcones fault zone as well as oblique trending cross faults. Though many of the major faults had been identified in previous geologic mapping, other possibly significant faults were not recognized from traditional techniques. High resistivities within the Glen Rose Limestone are indicative of more competent lithologies which have a greater limestone content. During the evolution of the groundwater system the limestone units are most likely to have developed secondary porosity conducive to establishing flow paths. In contrast, lower resistivities are associated with clay, marl, and mudstone units which have lower porosity and permeability. Resistivity depth sections along flight lines and 3D visualization of resistive zones define reefal structures in the middle Trinity segment. Detailed hydrogeologic mapping and HEM depth modeling illustrate the approach to be taken in future studies of the Trinity.

Smith, D. V.; Blome, C. D.; Smith, B. D.; Clark, A. C.

2009-12-01

266

Quantitative geophysical investigations at the Diamond M field, Scurry County, Texas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Diamond M field over the Horseshoe Atoll reservoir of west Texas has produced oil since 1942. Even with some 210 well penetrations, complex reservoir compartmentalization has justified an ongoing drilling program with three wells drilled within the last three years. Accurate reservoir characterization requires accurate description of the geometry, geological facies, and petrophysical property distribution ranging from core, through log to the seismic scale. The operator has conducted a careful logging and coring process including dipole sonic logs in addition to acquiring a modern 3D vertical phone - vertical vibrator "P-wave" seismic data volume and an equivalent size 2-component by 2-componet "S-wave" seismic data volume. I analyze these data at different scales, integrating them into a whole. I begin with core analysis of the petrophysical properties of the Horseshoe Atoll reservoir. Measuring porosity, permeability, NMR T2 relaxation and velocities (Vp and Vs) as a function of pressure and find that porosity measurements are consistent when measured with different techniques. When upscaled, these measurements are in excellent agreement with properties measured at the log scale. Together, these measurements provide a lithology-porosity template against which I correlate my seismic P- and S-impedance measurements. Careful examination of P- and S-impedances as well as density from prestack inversion of the P-wave survey of the original time migrated gathers showed lower vertical resolution for S-impedance and density. These latter two parameters are controlled by the far-offset data, which suffers from migration stretch. I address this shortcoming by applying a recently developed non-stretch NMO technique which not only improved the bandwidth of the data but also resulted in inversions that better match the S-impedance and density well log data. The operator hypothesized that 2C by 2C S-wave data would better delineate lithology than conventional P-wave seismic data. Although introduced in the mid-1980s, 2C by 2C data are rarely acquired, with most surveys showing less vertical resolution than conventional (and prior to slip-sweep technology more economically acquired) P-wave data. Initial processing by the service company showed a comparable, but lower frequency, image for the "transverse" component, and poor images for the "radial" component. Although the dipole sonic logs did not indicate the presence of significant anisotropy, shear wave splitting is readily observed on the surface seismic stacks. I therefore developed a prestack Alford rotation algorithm that minimizes the cross-talk between components, resulting vertical resolution comparable to the P-wave data, and independent measure of lithology, and also a direct measure of the direction of the principal axes of anisotropy. The direction of azimuthal anisotropy is aligned N45E consistent with the regional maximum horizontal stress axis obtained from the world stress map database. On average, the Cisco Formation appears 10% thicker on the slow shear (S2) volume than on the fast shear (S1 ) volume and between 70% and 100% thicker on the P-wave volume. Cross-plotting cumulative production against the various seismic attributes, I find a strong negative correlation to S-impedance and P-impedance. Zones of low S-impedance and low P-impedance correlate to better producing wells. More quantitative correlation will require the analysis of the role fractures versus porosity contribute to production.

Davogustto Cataldo, Oswaldo Ernesto

267

Digital atlas of Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This compact disc contains 25 digital map data sets covering the State of Oklahoma that may be of interest to the general public, private industry, schools, and government agencies. Fourteen data sets are statewide. These data sets include: administrative boundaries; 104th U.S. Congressional district boundaries; county boundaries; latitudinal lines; longitudinal lines; geographic names; indexes of U.S. Geological Survey 1:100,000, and 1:250,000-scale topographic quadrangles; a shaded-relief image; Oklahoma State House of Representatives district boundaries; Oklahoma State Senate district boundaries; locations of U.S. Geological Survey stream gages; watershed boundaries and hydrologic cataloging unit numbers; and locations of weather stations. Eleven data sets are divided by county and are located in 77 county subdirectories. These data sets include: census block group boundaries with selected demographic data; city and major highways text; geographic names; land surface elevation contours; elevation points; an index of U.S. Geological Survey 1:24,000-scale topographic quadrangles; roads, streets and address ranges; highway text; school district boundaries; streams, river and lakes; and the public land survey system. All data sets are provided in a readily accessible format. Most data sets are provided in Digital Line Graph (DLG) format. The attributes for many of the DLG files are stored in related dBASE(R)-format files and may be joined to the data set polygon attribute or arc attribute tables using dBASE(R)-compatible software. (Any use of trade names in this publication is for descriptive purposes only and does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.) Point attribute tables are provided in dBASE(R) format only, and include the X and Y map coordinates of each point. Annotation (text plotted in map coordinates) are provided in AutoCAD Drawing Exchange format (DXF) files. The shaded-relief image is provided in TIFF format. All data sets except the shaded-relief image also are provided in ARC/INFO export-file format.

Rea, A. H.; Becker, C. J.

1997-01-01

268

Groundwater Quality and Water-Well Characteristics in the Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma Jurisdictional Area, Central Oklahoma, 1948-2011.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In 2012, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma, compiled historical groundwater-quality data collected from 1948 to 2011 and water-well completion information in parts of Lincoln, Oklahoma, and Pottawatomie Countie...

C. J. Becker

2013-01-01

269

Public health assessment for Odessa Superfund Site (a/k/a Sprague Road Groundwater Plume) Ector, Ector County, Texas, Region 6: CERCLIS number TX0001407444. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Sprague Road Groundwater Plume National Priorities List site, consists of three plumes of chromium contaminated water just outside the northern city limits of Odessa, Ector County, Texas. The chromium in the groundwater is a public health hazard to people who continue to use the chromium-contaminated water wells for drinking. Chromium in soil at Leigh Metal Plating Inc. presents a potential public health hazard. Although this facility is surrounded by a fence, access to the site is not entirely restricted. There is a five-foot pit on the National Chromium Corporation site that could present a physical hazard to children trespassing on the site.

NONE

1998-12-28

270

Water-level altitudes in wells completed in the northern segment of the Edwards Aquifer, Travis, Williamson, and Bell Counties, Texas, March-June 2005  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During March-June 2005, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ), measured water levels in 80 Edwards aquifer wells in the outcrop of the northern segment of the aquifer in Travis, Williamson, and Bell Counties. Public-supply and private wells were selected in areas where outcrop water-level data were sparse. The altitude data can be used in the TCEQ Source Water Assessment and Protection program to help delineate zones of capture around sources of public water supply. Altitudes range from about 490 to about 935 feet above North American Vertical Datum of 1988.

Shah, Sachin D.

2005-01-01

271

The case of the missing flood: the unrecorded flood of 1935 on the James River, Mason County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

A substantial flood occurred on the James River in 1935, a south bank tributary to the Llano River in central Texas. No record of it exists in the official records although it took place at the same time as record-breaking floods elsewhere in the Colorado River basin and throughout Texas. The flood depth is estimated from oral records of water

Keith J. Tinkler

2001-01-01

272

Public and Private Recreational Potentials on Perimeter of SAM Rayburn Reservoir, Angelina, Jasper, Nacogdoches, Sabine and San Augustine Counties, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The construction of the Sam Rayburn Reservoir establishes the Piney Woods Region of Deep East Texas as a water recreation center of national importance. It will be the largest body of water within the State of Texas, placed in a setting of stately pine fo...

R. E. O'Brien L. A. White

1965-01-01

273

Geodatabase design and characteristics of geologic information for a geodatabase of selected wells penetrating the Austin Group in central Bexar County, Texas, 2010  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the San Antonio Water System, developed a geodatabase of geologic and hydrogeologic information for selected wells penetrating the Austin Group in central Bexar County, Texas. The Austin Group functions as an upper confining unit to the Edwards aquifer and is the thickest and most permeable of the Edwards aquifer confining units. The geologic and hydrogeologic information pertains to a 377-square-mile study area that encompasses central Bexar County. Data were compiled primarily from drillers' and borehole geophysical logs from federal, State, and local agencies and published reports. Austin Group characteristics compiled for 523 unique wells are documented (if known), including year drilled, well depth, altitude of top and base of the Austin Group, and thickness of the Austin Group.

Pedraza, Diana E.; Shah, Sachin D.

2010-01-01

274

Chemical analyses of surface waters in Oklahoma, September - December 1944  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A preliminary survey of the industrial quality of surface waters in Oklahoma was started in August, 1944, by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Oklahoma Resources and Planning Board, with the Oklahoma A. & M. College, Engineering Experiment Station and Department of Chemistry. From September to December, 1944, three hundred and fifteen samples were obtained at eighty-four points where gages are maintained for measurement of discharge. Daily samples were collected at six stations, namely: Illinois River near Gore, Oklahoma Cimarron River near Oilton, Oklahoma Canadian River near Whitefield, Oklahoma Washita River near Durwood, Oklahoma Red River near Gainesville, Texas Red River at Denison Dam, Texas Sport samples were collected at the remainder of the stations. The analyses of the spot samples were made largely in a laboratory provided by the Oklahoma A. & M. College, under the supervision of Dr. O.M. Smith, Head, Department of Chemistry; Dr. S.R. Wood, Associate Professor of Chemistry; and W.W. Hastings, U.S. Geological Survey. The daily samples were analyzed in the water resources laboratory of the Geological Survey at Austin, Texas. These data have been summarized in a report to the Oklahoma Planning and Resources Board prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey, March 1, 1945. The streams of Oklahoma are classified into two major drainage basins: the Arkansas River and the Red River and their tributaries. The attached analyses are arranged in geographical order for their respective drainage basins, with records listed in downstream order for stations on the main stem first, followed by the analyses for the tributaries. When available, the mean daily discharge is given for the analyses. (available as photostat copy only)

Geological Survey (U.S.)

1945-01-01

275

Stable Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Composition of Soil and Shell from an Archeological Site in Kimble County, Texas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report stable carbon (?13C) and oxygen (?18O) isotopic composition of inorganic carbonates, soil organic matter (SOM), and terrestrial gastropod shells present in a 130cm soil profile (radiocarbon date of 2340-2120 B.P) recovered from archeological site 41KM69, Kimble County, Texas. Prior to soil carbonate and SOM analyses, samples were treated with 5% sodium hypochlorite to remove organic matter and treated with 4% HCl to remove inorganic carbonate, respectively. Isotopic compositions of samples were obtained utilizing a Gasbench II (for carbonate-acid reaction technique) and a CHNS Elemental Analyzer (for SOM) coupled with a DeltaPlus XP Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer in continuous-flow. ?13C of carbonates in the soil profile varies in the range -2.15 to -4.63 ‰. ?18O of carbonates (ranging from -3.22 to -3.92‰) show little variation within the profile. ?13C of SOM (-25.61‰ to -22.83‰) suggests that C3 plants were predominant in the study area. There is ~3‰ enrichment in 13C of SOM at the bottom of profile relative to the top. Previous studies have shown that ?13C of modern soil carbonates are higher by 14-16‰ than SOM, whereas our results show about 20‰ difference. ?13C of land snail shells ( Rabdotus, Polygyra, Helicina) recovered from the soil show strong linear correlation with depth (R2= 0.88): -9.46‰ at 60cm to -5.4‰ at 112cm. ?18O of shells show no correlation with depth and range from - 3.34‰ to 0.62‰. Excluding one shell analysis, ?13C of shells and SOM exhibit good correlation (R2= 0.80). Previous studies of variation in ?13C in land snail shell document that carbon isotopic composition in shell are primarily a function of snail diet. Balakrishnan et al. (2005) have shown that ?13C of shells in C3 vegetation regimes range from -10.0‰ to -8.8‰, which is consistent with our results. Although, the interpretation of ?18O values in land snails is not straightforward, values are probably related to several different climate signals including temperature, rainfall, and relative humidity and may be used for potential markers of local climate conditions.

Salazar, K. K.; Paul, D.; Skrzypek, G.; Tomka, S. A.

2007-12-01

276

An Examination of the Cooperative Cognation Between Vocational Agriculture Instructors and County Extension Agents in Planning and Conducting the Adult Prospectus of Instruction in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To investigate present operating relationships and make suggestions for improving these relationships among county extension workers and vocational agricultural teachers, an hypothesis was made that county extension agents have more positive attitudes than teachers toward cooperation. A questionnaire, evaluated in the preparation by state…

Smith, Wendell Lee

277

Audit of Compliance with Standards Governing Combined DNA Index System Activities at the Tarrant County Medical Examiner's Office Tarrant County, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Department of Justice Office of the Inspector General (OIG), Audit Division, has completed an audit of compliance with standards governing Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) activities at the Tarrant County Medical Examiners Office Laboratory (Laborato...

2011-01-01

278

Simulation of streamflow and water quality in the Leon Creek watershed, Bexar County, Texas, 1997-2004  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the San Antonio River Authority, configured, calibrated, and tested a Hydrological Simulation Program ? FORTRAN watershed model for the approximately 238-square-mile Leon Creek watershed in Bexar County, Texas, and used the model to simulate streamflow and water quality (focusing on loads and yields of selected constituents). Streamflow in the model was calibrated and tested with available data from five U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations for 1997-2004. Simulated streamflow volumes closely matched measured streamflow volumes at all streamflow-gaging stations. Total simulated streamflow volumes were within 10 percent of measured values. Streamflow volumes are greatly influenced by large storms. Two months that included major floods accounted for about 50 percent of all the streamflow measured at the most downstream gaging station during 1997-2004. Water-quality properties and constituents (water temperature, dissolved oxygen, suspended sediment, dissolved ammonia nitrogen, dissolved nitrate nitrogen, and dissolved and total lead and zinc) in the model were calibrated using available data from 13 sites in and near the Leon Creek watershed for varying periods of record during 1992-2005. Average simulated daily mean water temperature and dissolved oxygen at the most downstream gaging station during 1997-2000 were within 1 percent of average measured daily mean water temperature and dissolved oxygen. Simulated suspended-sediment load at the most downstream gaging station during 2001-04 (excluding July 2002 because of major storms) was 77,700 tons compared with 74,600 tons estimated from a streamflow-load regression relation (coefficient of determination = .869). Simulated concentrations of dissolved ammonia nitrogen and dissolved nitrate nitrogen closely matched measured concentrations after calibration. At the most downstream gaging station, average simulated monthly mean concentrations of dissolved ammonia and nitrate concentrations during 1997-2004 were 0.03 and 0.37 milligram per liter, respectively. For the most downstream station, the measured and simulated concentrations of dissolved and total lead and zinc for stormflows during 1993-97 after calibration do not match particularly closely. For base-flow conditions during 1997-2004 at the most downstream station, the simulated/measured match is better. For example, median simulated concentration of total lead (for 2,041 days) was 0.96 microgram per liter, and median measured concentration (for nine samples) of total lead was 1.0 microgram per liter. To demonstrate an application of the Leon Creek watershed model, streamflow constituent loads and yields for suspended sediment, dissolved nitrate nitrogen, and total lead were simulated at the mouth of Leon Creek (outlet of the watershed) for 1997-2004. The average suspended-sediment load was 51,800 tons per year. The average suspended-sediment yield was 0.34 ton per acre per year. The average load of dissolved nitrate at the outlet of the watershed was 802 tons per year. The corresponding yield was 10.5 pounds per acre per year. The average load of lead at the outlet was 3,900 pounds per year. The average lead yield was 0.026 pound per acre per year. The degree to which available rainfall data represent actual rainfall is potentially the most serious source of measurement error associated with the Leon Creek model. Major storms contribute most of the streamflow loads for certain constituents. For example, the three largest stormflows contributed about 64 percent of the entire suspended-sediment load at the most downstream station during 1997-2004.

Ockerman, Darwin J.; Roussel, Meghan C.

2009-01-01

279

Hydrologic conditions and water quality in an agricultural area in Kleberg and Nueces Counties, Texas, 1996-98  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During 1996?98, rainfall and runoff were monitored on a 49,680-acre agricultural watershed in Kleberg and Nueces Counties in South Texas. Nineteen rainfall samples were analyzed for selected nutrients, and runoff samples from 29 storms were analyzed for major ions, nutrients, and pesticides. Loads of nutrients in rainfall and loads of nutrients and pesticides in runoff were computed. For a 40,540-acre part of the watershed (lower study area), constituent loads entering the watershed in rainfall, in runoff from the upper study area, and from agricultural chemical applications to the lower study area were compared with runoff loads exiting the lower study area. Total rainfall for 1996?98 averaged 25.86 inches per year, which is less than the long-term annual average rainfall of 29.80 inches for the area. Rainfall and runoff during 1996?98 were typical of historical patterns, with periods of below average rainfall and runoff interspersed with extreme events. Five individual storms accounted for about 38 percent of the total rainfall and 94 percent of the total runoff. During the 3-year study, the total nitrogen runoff yield from the lower study area was 1.3 pounds per acre per year, compared with 49 pounds per acre per year applied as fertilizer and 3.1 pounds per acre per year from rainfall. While almost all of the fertilizer and rainfall nitrogen was ammonia and nitrate, most of the nitrogen in runoff was particulate organic nitrogen, associated with crop residue. Total nitrogen exiting the lower study area in surface-water runoff was about 2.5 percent of the nitrogen inputs (fertilizer and rainfall nitrogen). Annual deposition of total nitrogen entering the lower study area in rainfall exceeded net yields of total nitrogen exiting the watershed in runoff because most of the rainfall does not contribute to runoff. During the study, the total phosphorus runoff yield from the lower study area was 0.48 pound per acre per year compared with 4.2 pounds per acre per year applied as fertilizer and 0.03 pound per acre per year from rainfall. Twenty-one pesticides were detected in runoff with varying degrees of frequency during the study. The herbicide atrazine was detected in all runoff samples. All of the most frequently detected pesticides (atrazine, trifluralin, simazine, pendimethalin, and diuron) exhibited higher concentrations during the pre-harvest period (March? May) than during the post-harvest period (August? October). During 1996?98, an average of 0.37 pound per acre per year of atrazine was applied to the lower study area. During the same period, 0.0027 pound per acre per year of atrazine and its breakdown product deethylatrazine exited the lower study area in runoff (about 0.7 percent of the total atrazine applied to the cropland). During 1997, when heavy rainfall occurred during the months of April and May, the atrazine plus deethylatrazine exiting the lower study area was 1.8 percent of the applied atrazine. The 1996?98 average sediment yield was 610 pounds per acre per year. Sediment loads from the study area are associated with large storm events. Of the 45,300 tons of sediment transported from the study area during 1996?98 about 87 percent was transported during the three largest runoff events (April 1997, October 1997, and October 1998). Runoff-weighted average concentrations were computed for selected nutrients and pesticides. The 1996?98 runoff-weighted concentrations for total nitrogen and total phosphorus were 1.3 and 0.50 milligrams per liter, respectively. The 1996?98 runoff-weighted concentration for atrazine plus deethylatrazine was 2.7 micrograms per liter.

Ockerman, Darwin J.; Petri, Brian L.

2001-01-01

280

Effects of geologic heterogeneity on waterflood efficiency at Jordan field, University lands, Ector and Crane Counties, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Jordan field produces oil from the Permian (Guadalupian) San Andres Formation at a depth of approximately 3500 ft on the east flank of a low, broad anticline located on the eastern side of the Central Basin platform in the Permian basin of west Texas. Since discovery in 1937, the portion of the field on university lands has produced 68 million

R. P. Major; M. H. Holtz

1989-01-01

281

Geologic Map of the Edwards Aquifer in Northern Medina and Northeastern Uvalde Counties, South-Central Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The southern segment of the Edwards aquifer in south-central Texas is one of the most productive subsurface reservoirs of ground water in the world, providing water to more than a million people in the San Antonio region. The Environmental Protection Agen...

A. K. Clark C. D. Blome D. E. Pedraza J. R. Faith

2006-01-01

282

Architecture, internal heterogeneity, and resulting drainage efficiency of Upper Oligocene Frio Formation inner-shelf sandstone reservoirs in West Fulton Beach Field, Aransas County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The architecture, internal heterogeneity, and production history of selected reservoirs in West Fulton Beach field, Copano Bay, Aransas County, Texas, were examined as part of a project to identify additional oil and gas reserves on Texas state lands. Upper Oligocene Frio Formation reservoirs in this field have yielded more than 146 bcf of gas and 8 MMbbl of oil. A high-resolution genetic stratigraphic analysis of inner-shelf sandstone reservoirs used well log and petrophysical data to locate uncontacted or incompletely drained reservoir compartments. Shelf sandstone reservoirs are composed of thin (2-6 ft) sandstones that are laterally isolated but commonly vertically stacked and amalgamated into units as much as 16 ft thick. Individual sandstones constitute separate reservoir compartments that are vertically isolated if surrounded by inner-shelf shales or are in partial communication if vertically stacked, separated by a low-permeability bioturbated sandstone or siltstone layer of varying thickness. Heterogeneity within individual sandstone units is low. Deposition of inner-shelf sandstones varies - from proximal settings, below fair-weather wave base but above storm wave base, where the sandstones are thicker, more commonly amalgamated, and form well-interconnected compartments - to distal settings below storm wave base, where they are thinner and more commonly isolated. Production histories indicate that completions in proximal settings can drain more than 600 ac in a gas reservoir, whereas those in distal settings drain less than 200 ac. High-resolution stratigraphic analysis of inner-shelf sand-stone reservoirs at West Fulton Beach field has identified 11 bcf of additional reserves in untapped and incompletely drained reservoir compartments. The 63 other major fields of the downdip Frio barrier-bar/strandplain play of the central Texas Gulf Coast may contain as much as 500 bcf of additional gas that could be identified through similar efforts.

Knox, P.R. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1994-09-01

283

76 FR 6837 - Exelon Nuclear Texas Holdings, LLC; Establishment of Atomic Safety and Licensing Board  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...proceeding: Exelon Nuclear Texas Holdings, LLC (Victoria County Station Site) This proceeding concerns...pursuant to Subpart A of 10 CFR part 52 for the Victoria County Station Site, to be located in Victoria County, Texas. A petition to...

2011-02-08

284

Aquifer tests in the flood-plain alluvium and Santa Fe group at the Rio Grande near Canutillo, El Paso County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An aquifer system consisting of the Rio Grande flood-plain alluvium and Santa Fe Group underlying the southern Mesilla Valley in Dona Ana County, New Mexico and El Paso County, Texas has become an important source of water for both municipal and agricultural uses. Determination of aquifer properties is essential in order to evaluate groundwater potential for increasing water demand and potential streamflow depletion of the Rio Grande due to groundwater development. The aquifer system at the Canutillo well field hydrologic section was divided into a shallow, intermediate, and deep zone based on geohydrologic characteristics. Aquifer properties of specific zones at the test site were determined from a series of multiple-well aquifer tests conducted from December 3, 1985 through January 20, 1986. The Rio Grande is hydraulically connected to the shallow flood-plain alluvium. Water generally occurs within the shallow zone under unconfined conditions, within the intermediate zone under semiconfined conditions, and within the deep zone under confined conditions. (USGS)

Nickerson, Edward L.

1989-01-01

285

Simulation of streamflow and estimation of streamflow constituent loads in the San Antonio River watershed, Bexar County, Texas, 1997-2001  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey developed watershed models (Hydrological Simulation Program?FORTRAN) to simulate streamflow and estimate streamflow constituent loads from five basins that compose the San Antonio River watershed in Bexar County, Texas. Rainfall and streamflow data collected during 1997?2001 were used to calibrate and test the model. The model was configured so that runoff from various land uses and discharges from other sources (such as wastewater recycling facilities) could be accounted for to indicate sources of streamflow. Simulated streamflow volumes were used with land-use-specific, water-quality data to compute streamflow loads of selected constituents from the various streamflow sources. Model simulations for 1997?2001 indicate that inflow from the upper Medina River (originating outside Bexar County) represents about 22 percent of total streamflow. Recycled wastewater discharges account for about 20 percent and base flow (ground-water inflow to streams) about 18 percent. Storm runoff from various land uses represents about 33 percent. Estimates of sources of streamflow constituent loads indicate recycled wastewater as the largest source of dissolved solids and nitrate plus nitrite nitrogen (about 38 and 66 percent, respectively, of the total loads) during 1997?2001. Stormwater runoff from urban land produced about 49 percent of the 1997?2001 total suspended solids load. Stormwater runoff from residential and commercial land (about 23 percent of the land area) produced about 70 percent of the total lead streamflow load during 1997?2001.

Ockerman, Darwin J.; McNamara, Kenna C.

2003-01-01

286

Hydrology and subsurface transport of oil-field brine at the U.S. Geological Survey OSPER site "A", Osage County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Spillage and improper disposal of saline produced water from oil wells has caused environmental damage at thousands of sites in the United States. In order to improve understanding of the fate and transport of contaminants at these sites, the U.S. Geological Survey carried out multidisciplinary investigations at two oil production sites near Skiatook Lake, Oklahoma. As a part of this effort, the hydrology and subsurface transport of brine at OSPER site "A", a tank battery and pit complex that was abandoned in 1973, was investigated. Based on data from 41 new boreholes that were cored and completed with monitoring wells, a large (???200 m ?? 200 m ?? 20 m) plume of saline ground water was mapped. The main dissolved species are Na and Cl, with TDS in the plume ranging as high as 30,000 mg/L. Analysis of the high barometric efficiency of the wells indicated a confined aquifer response. Well-slug tests indicated the hydraulic conductivity is low (0.3-7.0 cm/day). Simplified flow and transport modeling supports the following conceptual model: (1) prior to the produced water releases, recharge was generally low (???1 cm/a); (2) in ???60 a of oil production enough saline produced water in pits leaked into the subsurface to create the plume; (3) following abandonment of the site in 1973 and filling of Skiatook Reservoir in the mid-1980s, recharge and lateral flow of water through the plume returned to low values; (4) as a result, spreading of the brine plume caused by mixing with fresh ground water recharge, as well as natural attenuation, are very slow.

Herkelrath, W. N.; Kharaka, Y. K.; Thordsen, J. J.; Abbott, M. M.

2007-01-01

287

Geographic risk modeling of childhood cancer relative to county-level crops, hazardous air pollutants and population density characteristics in Texas  

PubMed Central

Background Childhood cancer has been linked to a variety of environmental factors, including agricultural activities, industrial pollutants and population mixing, but etiologic studies have often been inconclusive or inconsistent when considering specific cancer types. More specific exposure assessments are needed. It would be helpful to optimize future studies to incorporate knowledge of high-risk locations or geographic risk patterns. The objective of this study was to evaluate potential geographic risk patterns in Texas accounting for the possibility that multiple cancers may have similar geographic risks patterns. Methods A spatio-temporal risk modeling approach was used, whereby 19 childhood cancer types were modeled as potentially correlated within county-years. The standard morbidity ratios were modeled as functions of intensive crop production, intensive release of hazardous air pollutants, population density, and rapid population growth. Results There was supportive evidence for elevated risks for germ cell tumors and "other" gliomas in areas of intense cropping and for hepatic tumors in areas of intense release of hazardous air pollutants. The risk for Hodgkin lymphoma appeared to be reduced in areas of rapidly growing population. Elevated spatial risks included four cancer histotypes, "other" leukemias, Central Nervous System (CNS) embryonal tumors, CNS other gliomas and hepatic tumors with greater than 95% likelihood of elevated risks in at least one county. Conclusion The Bayesian implementation of the Multivariate Conditional Autoregressive model provided a flexible approach to the spatial modeling of multiple childhood cancer histotypes. The current study identified geographic factors supporting more focused studies of germ cell tumors and "other" gliomas in areas of intense cropping, hepatic cancer near Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP) release facilities and specific locations with increased risks for CNS embryonal tumors and for "other" leukemias. Further study should be performed to evaluate potentially lower risk for Hodgkin lymphoma and malignant bone tumors in counties with rapidly growing population.

Thompson, James A; Carozza, Susan E; Zhu, Li

2008-01-01

288

A conceptual hydrogeologic model for the hydrogeologic framework, geochemistry, and groundwater-flow system of the Edwards-Trinity and related aquifers in the Pecos County region, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Edwards-Trinity aquifer is a vital groundwater resource for agricultural, industrial, and municipal uses in the Trans-Pecos region of west Texas. A conceptual model of the hydrogeologic framework, geochemistry, and groundwater-flow system in the 4,700 square-mile study area was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Middle Pecos Groundwater Conservation District, Pecos County, City of Fort Stockton, Brewster County, and Pecos County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1. The model was developed to gain a better understanding of the groundwater system and to establish a scientific foundation for resource-management decisions. Data and information were collected or obtained from various sources to develop the model. Lithologic information obtained from well reports and geophysical data were used to describe the hydrostratigraphy and structural features of the groundwater system, and aquifer-test data were used to estimate aquifer hydraulic properties. Groundwater-quality data were used to evaluate groundwater-flow paths, water and rock interaction, aquifer interaction, and the mixing of water from different sources. Groundwater-level data also were used to evaluate aquifer interaction as well as to develop a potentiometric-surface map, delineate regional groundwater divides, and describe regional groundwater-flow paths. Several previous studies have been done to compile or collect physical and chemical data, describe the hydrogeologic processes, and develop conceptual and numerical groundwater-flow models of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer in the Trans-Pecos region. Documented methods were used to compile and collect groundwater, surface-water, geochemical, geophysical, and geologic information that subsequently were used to develop this conceptual model.

Thomas, Jonathan V.; Stanton, Gregory P.; Bumgarner, Johnathan R.; Pearson, Daniel K.; Teeple, Andrew P.; Houston, Natalie A.; Payne, Jason D.; Musgrove, MaryLynn

2013-01-01

289

Simulation of runoff and recharge and estimation of constituent loads in runoff, Edwards aquifer recharge zone (outcrop) and catchment area, Bexar County, Texas, 1997-2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey developed a watershed model (Hydrological Simulation Program?FORTRAN) to simulate runoff and recharge and to estimate constituent loads in surface-water runoff in the Edwards aquifer recharge zone (outcrop) and catchment area in Bexar County, Texas. Rainfall and runoff data collected during 1970?98 from four gaged basins in the outcrop and catchment area were used to calibrate and test the model. The calibration parameters were applied in simulations of the four calibration basins and six ungaged basins that compose the study area to obtain runoff and recharge volumes for 4 years, 1997?2000. In 1997, simulated runoff from the study area was 5.62 inches. Simulated recharge in the study area was 7.85 inches (20 percent of rainfall). In 1998, simulated runoff was 11.05 inches; simulated recharge was 10.99 inches (25 percent of rainfall). In 1999, simulated runoff was 0.66 inch; simulated recharge was 3.03 inches (19 percent of rainfall). In 2000, simulated runoff was 5.29 inches; simulated recharge was 7.19 inches (21 percent of rainfall). During 1997?2000, direct infiltration of rainfall accounted for about 56 percent of the total Edwards aquifer recharge in Bexar County. Streamflow losses contributed about 37 percent of the recharge; flood impoundment contributed 7 percent. The simulated runoff volumes were used with event-mean-concentration data from basins in the study area and from other Bexar County basins to compute constituent loads and yields for various land uses. Annual loads for suspended solids, dissolved solids, dissolved nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen, and total lead were consistently largest from undeveloped land and smallest from commercial land or transportation corridors. Annual loads and yields varied with rainfall, with the maximum loads produced in the wettest year (1998) and the minimum loads produced in the driest year (1999).

Ockerman, Darwin J.

2002-01-01

290

40 CFR 81.337 - Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...County Johnston County Latimer County Love County Marshall County McIntosh County...County Johnston County Latimer County Love County Marshall County McIntosh County...County Johnston County Latimer County Love County Marshall County McIntosh...

2009-07-01

291

40 CFR 81.337 - Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...County Johnston County Latimer County Love County Marshall County McIntosh County...County Johnston County Latimer County Love County Marshall County McIntosh County...County Johnston County Latimer County Love County Marshall County McIntosh...

2010-07-01

292

Urban flood analysis in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Flood insurance study information from the Federal Emergency Management Agency is utilized to estimate future flood hazard in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Techniques are described for estimating future urban runoff estimates. A method of developing stream cross section rating curves is explained. Future runoff estimates are used in conjuction with the rating curves to develop an estimate of 50- and 100- year flood profiles that would result from future urban development.

Tortorelli, Robert L.; Huntzinger, T. L.; Bergman, D. L.; Patneaude, A. L.

1983-01-01

293

Porosity trends of nonreservoir and reservoir sandstones, Anadarko basin, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The porosity of nonreservoir sandstones in Caddo County, Oklahoma, is determined using compensated-neutron and formation-density logs. The authors preliminary data set represents more than 3,000 net ft of Pennsylvanian and Permian age sandstones from 12 well locations. These porosity data and the average porosities of sandstone oil and gas reservoirs within the Anadarko basin of Oklahoma are each compared to

T. C. Hester; J. W. Schmoker

1991-01-01

294

Composition of pore water in lake sediments, research site "B", Osage County, Oklahoma: Implications for lake water quality and benthic organisms  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Shallow ground water at US Geological Survey research site B in northeastern Oklahoma is contaminated with NaCl-rich brine from past and present oil production operations. Contaminated ground water provides a potential source of salts, metals, and hydrocarbons to sediment and water of adjacent Skiatook Lake. A former brine storage pit 10 m in diameter that is now submerged just offshore from site B provides an additional source of contamination. Cores of the upper 16-40 cm of lake sediment were taken at the submerged brine pit, near an offshore saline seep, and at a location containing relatively uncontaminated lake sediment. Pore waters from each 2-cm interval were separated by centrifugation and analyzed for dissolved anions, cations, and trace elements. High concentrations of dissolved Cl- in pore waters (200-5000 mg/L) provide the most direct evidence of contamination, and contrast sharply with an average value of only about 37 mg/L in Skiatook Lake. Chloride/Br- mass ratios of 220-240 in contaminated pore waters are comparable to values in contaminated well waters collected onshore. Dissolved concentrations of Se, Pb, Cu and Ni in Cl--rich pore waters exceed current US Environmental Protection Agency criteria for probable toxicity to aquatic life. At the submerged brine storage pit, the increase of Cl- concentration with depth is consistent with diffusion-dominant transport from deeper contaminated sediments. Near the offshore saline seep, pore water Cl- concentrations are consistently high and vary irregularly with depth, indicating probable Cl- transport by layer-directed advective flow. Estimated annual contributions of Cl- to the lake from the brine storage pit (???20 kg) and the offshore seep (???9 kg) can be applied to any number of similar sources. Generous estimates of the number of such sources at site B indicate minimal impact on water quality in the local inlet of Skiatook Lake. Similar methodologies can be applied at other sites of NaCl contamination surrounding Skiatook Lake and elsewhere.

Zielinski, R. A.; Herkelrath, W. N.; Otton, J. K.

2007-01-01

295

Distribution and characterization of Heterobilharzia americana in dogs in Texas.  

PubMed

Heterobilharzia americana is a trematode parasite (family Schistosomatidae) that infects a wide range of wild mammalian hosts. Canine cases have been reported in the Gulf coast and south Atlantic states, Kansas, and Oklahoma. A total of 238 canine H. americana cases in Texas were retrospectively collected for a period of approximately 22 years from case records at the Texas Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory and the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital pathology service, diagnostic parasitology service, and Gastrointestinal Laboratory at Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine. Of these cases, 26 patients had 1-2 repeat positive tests for a total of 268 positive tests (26 biopsies, 39 necropsies, 160 fecal examinations, and 43 PCR). Multiple dogs were infected in 12 households. Cases were distributed primarily in the eastern region of Texas in 42 of 254 counties. Cases were seen as far west as Kerr county and in counties bordering Oklahoma, Louisiana, Mexico, and the Gulf of Mexico. The median dog age was 5.6 years (2.7 months to 17.2 years) and the median weight was 20.5kg (1-61.6kg). All American Kennel Club (AKC) breed groups were represented (n=186): crossbred (20%), herding (17.8%), sporting (16.1%), toy (10.8%), hounds (10.8%), working (10.1%), terrier (8.5%), non-sporting (4.9%), and miscellaneous (1%). No seasonal pattern of diagnosis was apparent. Clinical signs reported (n=90) were diarrhea (67%), weight loss (38%), anorexia/hyporexia (27%), vomiting (22%), hematochezia (20%), lethargy (17%), polyuria/polydipsia (6%), and collapse (3%). In 39 necropsy cases, trematode eggs were identified by histopathology in the small intestine (84%), liver (84%), large intestine (39%), pancreas (35%), lung (9%), lymph node (8%), spleen (4%), and stomach (3%). Adult parasites were identified histologically in four cases. Granulomatous inflammation associated with the eggs was the most commonly reported histopathologic change. Other changes reported were fibrosis, pigment in macrophages, and organ mineralization. Glomerulonephritis was identified in four cases. Of 20 necropsy cases where death was attributable to H. americana infection, only one case was diagnosed ante mortem. Eleven of these dogs were examined by a veterinarian but H. americana was included as a differential diagnosis in only two cases. Reported differential diagnoses included ethylene glycol toxicity, cholecalciferol toxicity, lymphoma, and pancreatitis. These data indicate that this parasite is more widely distributed and more common than is generally recognized. Increased awareness may aid in more diagnoses and timely therapy. PMID:24746236

Rodriguez, J Y; Lewis, B C; Snowden, K F

2014-06-16

296

3-D seismic delineation and geologic explanation of channelization in the Frio Formation of Javelina/East McCook Field, Hidalgo County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Sinuous, channel-form features were recognized on seismic amplitude time-slice maps of the shallow Oligocene Frio Formation on several Shell proprietary 3-D seismic surveys in west-central Hidalgo County, Texas. A case study of channel morphologies observed in the Frio Formation within the 50 mi{sup 2} 3-D seismic survey over Javelina/East McCook field was undertaken to better understand the distribution, lithology, origin, and hydrocarbon potential of these features. Ten separate channel-like amplitude features are observed in flattened time slices within a 200 m (approximately 1100 ft) interval on 3-D seismic. The channels have various azimuthal orientations and varying degrees of sinuosity. Several of the features have lengths that span the 3-D survey area (10 mi); apparent channel widths range from 200 to 2000 ft. The channelized seismic events tie to an interval of interbedded mudstones and claystones with siltstones. Two of the channels seen on seismic, and which were penetrated by wells, correlate to siftstone and mudstone intervals that have gross thicknesses of 30 to 60 ft. The lithologies and dimensions of the two channels indicate that they are probably small mudstone/siltstone-filled tributary/distributary channels deposited in a coastal floodplain environment; a comparison of the apparent channel dimensions to the dimensions of small channels/bayous of the modern-day Texas Gulf Coast supports this interpretation. Correlation of wells adjacent to the channels indicates that sandy point-bar facies are not present in association with the channel fill, which discounts the idea that high-quality reservoirs are flanking these particular mud-filled channels.

Gibson, J.L. [Shell Western Exploration and Production, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1994-09-01

297

Groundwater withdrawals 1976, 1990, and 2000--10 and land-surface-elevation changes 2000--10 in Harris, Galveston, Fort Bend, Montgomery, and Brazoria Counties, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The study area comprising Harris County and parts of Galveston, Fort Bend, Montgomery, and Brazoria Counties in southeastern Texas forms part of one of the largest areas of land-surface-elevation change in the United States. Land-surface-elevation change in the study area primarily is caused by the withdrawal of groundwater. Groundwater withdrawn from the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers has been the primary source of water for municipal supply, industrial and commercial use, and irrigation in the study area. Groundwater withdrawals cause compaction of clay and silt layers abundant in the aquifers, which has in turn resulted in the widespread, substantial land-surface-elevation changes in the region with increased flooding. To estimate land-surface-elevation changes, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Harris-Galveston Subsidence District (HGSD), documented land-surface-elevation changes in the study area that occurred during 2000–10 and 2005–10 based on elevation data measured by 11 USGS borehole-extensometer sites, a National Geodetic Survey Continuously Operating Reference Station, and Global Positioning System Port-A-Measure (PAM) sites operated by the HGSD and the Fort Bend Subsidence District. Groundwater withdrawals in the study area also were documented for 1976, 1990, and 2000–10. In 1976, about 428.9 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) were withdrawn from the aquifer system in Harris County, but by 2000, because of HGSD regulation, withdrawals had decreased to about 337.8 Mgal/d, or about a 21-percent reduction since 1976. By 2010, withdrawals had decreased to about 227.1 Mgal/d, or about a 47-percent reduction since 1976. Among the counties in the study area, the largest decrease in groundwater withdrawals has occurred in Galveston County since 1976. In 1976, about 27.4 Mgal/d were withdrawn from the aquifer system, and by 2000, withdrawals had decreased to about 4.12 Mgal/d, or about an 85-percent reduction since 1976. By 2010, withdrawals had decreased to about 0.626 Mgal/d, or about a 98-percent decrease since 1976. Since the mid-1970s, Fort Bend and Montgomery Counties have undergone extensive urban development and corresponding large increases in groundwater withdrawals. Total groundwater withdrawal for Fort Bend County in 1976 was about 16.0 Mgal/d, and by 2000, withdrawals had increased to about 86.5 Mgal/d, or about a 441-percent increase since 1976. By 2010, withdrawals in Fort Bend County had increased to about 99.8 Mgal/d, or about a 524-percent increase since 1976. Total groundwater withdrawal for Montgomery County in 1976 was about 7.84 Mgal/d, and by 2000, withdrawals had increased to about 43.6 Mgal/d, or about a 456-percent increase since 1976. By 2010, withdrawals in Montgomery County had increased to about 64.2 Mgal/d, or about a 719-percent increase since 1976. Total groundwater withdrawal in Brazoria County in 1976 was about 18.0 Mgal/d, and by 2000, withdrawals had increased to about 26.0 Mgal/d, or about a 44-percent increase. By 2010, withdrawals in Brazoria County had increased to about 24.7 Mgal/d, or about a 37-percent increase since 1976. Measured land-surface-elevation changes from December 31, 2000, to December 31, 2010, ranged from an elevation increase of 0.06 feet (ft), or an average increase in elevation of 0.006 ft per year, at the Seabrook borehole extensometer located near Seabrook, Tex., to an elevation decrease of 1.28 ft, or an average decrease in elevation of 0.128 ft per year, at a PAM station north of Jersey Village, Tex. (PAM 07). Measured land-surface-elevation changes from December 31, 2005, to December 31, 2010, ranged from an elevation increase of 0.07 ft, or an average increase in elevation of 0.014 ft per year, at PAM 09 in far northeastern Harris County to an elevation decrease of 0.51 ft, or an average decrease in elevation of 0.102 ft per year, at PAM 07.

Kasmarek, Mark C.; Johnson, Michaela R.

2013-01-01

298

Pride in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet is intended to be used as background material by social studies and history classroom teachers as they develop and implement educational programs on Oklahoma's heritage. It includes background information on the land and people of Oklahoma (geology, climate, topography, vegetation, animals, prehistoric peoples, French explorers,…

Moore, Gordon; Blackburn, Bob L.

299

75 FR 48384 - Texas Disaster #TX-00361  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...determined to be adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties (Physical Damage and Economic Injury Loans): Cameron, Hidalgo, Jim Hogg, Maverick, Starr, Val Verde, Webb, Zapata. Contiguous Counties (Economic Injury Loans Only): Texas:...

2010-08-10

300

75 FR 1421 - Texas Disaster # TX-00354  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...announced locations. The following areas have been determined to be adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Angelina. Contiguous Counties: Texas: Cherokee, Houston, Jasper, Nacogdoches, Polk, San Augustine, Trinity, Tyler. The...

2010-01-11

301

Digital geologic map of Oklahoma City Quadrangle, central Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This data set consists of digital data and accompanying documentation of the surficial geology of the 1:250,000-scale Oklahoma City quadrangle, Oklahoma. The original data are from the Geologic Map, sheet 1 of 4, included in the Oklahoma Geological Survey publication, 'Reconnaissance of the water resources of the Oklahoma City quadrangle, central Oklahoma', Hydrologic Atlas 4, Bingham and Moore, 1975. The geology was compiled by R.H. Bingham and R.O. Fay, in 1973.

Cederstrand, J. R.

1997-01-01

302

APPLICATION OF WATER-JET HORIZONTAL DRILLING TECHNOLOGY TO DRILL AND ACIDIZE HORIZONTAL DRAIN HOLES, TEDBIT (SAN ANDRES) FIELD, GAINES COUNTY, TEXAS  

SciTech Connect

The San Andres Formation is one of the major hydrocarbon-producing units in the Permian Basin, with multiple reservoirs contained within the dolomitized subtidal portions of upward shoaling carbonate shelf cycles. The test well is located in Tedbit (San Andres) Field in northeastern Gaines County, Texas, in an area of scattered San Andres production associated with local structural highs. Selected on the basis of geological and historical data, the Oil and Gas Properties Wood No. 1 well is considered to be typical of a large number of San Andres stripper wells in the Permian Basin. Thus, successful completion of horizontal drain holes in this well would demonstrate a widely applicable enhanced recovery technology. Water-jet horizontal drilling is an emerging technology with the potential to provide significant economic benefits in marginal wells. Forecast benefits include lower recompletion costs and improved hydrocarbon recoveries. The technology utilizes water under high pressure, conveyed through small-diameter coiled tubing, to jet horizontal drain holes into producing formations. Testing of this technology was conducted with inconclusive results. Paraffin sludge and mechanical problems were encountered in the wellbore, initially preventing the water-jet tool from reaching the kick-off point. After correcting these problems and attempting to cut a casing window with the water-jet milling assembly, lateral jetting was attempted without success.

Michael W. Rose

2005-09-22

303

Shallow stratigraphy, structure, and salt-related features, Yates oil field area, Pecos and Crockett counties, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Yates oil field is situated at the southern tip of the Central Basin platform, a Late Pennsylvanian to Late Permian structural and paleotopographic high separating the Midland and Delaware basins in west Texas and southeastern New Mexico. During Leonardian and early Guadalupian times, carbonate sedimentation occurred in a bank environment on the platform edge. Latest Guadalupian sedimentation consisted largely of anhydrite, probably deposited in sabkha and salina environments. Later Ochoan evaporite deposition filled the remaining basins with halite (the Salado Formation), but may have failed to cover the Central Basin platform entirely. Upper Triassic( ) siltstones and shales were deposited disconformably over the area. Minor erosion during the Jurassic was followed by a major marine transgression during the Early Cretaceous. Trinity Group shales and sandstones, deposited as marine and nonmarine facies, were overlain by carbonates of the Ft. Terrett, Ft. Lancaster, and Buda Formations. Surface mapping combined with well information led to the discovery that upper Trinity Group sediments are significantly thinner in areas of intense fracturing. Where not affected by dissolution, overthickened Salado salt is also present. Differential loading of basin-center versus basin-edge sediments apparently produced minor salt movement during the time of deposition of the upper Trinity Group, resulting in associated thinning of the Trinity Group near the pinch-out of the Salado salt. Minor post-carbonate salt movement extensionally fractured the brittle carbonates and produced some of the joints visible today. The join sets became sites of subsequent salt dissolution, leading to extensive collapse, fracturing, and faulting.

Wessel, G.R.

1988-01-01

304

A Unique Yttrofluorite-Hosted Giant Heavy Rare Earth Deposit: Round Top Mountain, Hudspeth County, Texas, USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Round Top Mountain is a surface-exposed peraluminous rhyolite laccolith, enriched in heavy rare earth elements, as well as niobium-tantalum, beryllium, lithium, fluorine, tin, rubidium, thorium, and uranium. The extreme extent of the deposit (diameter one mile) makes it a target for recovery of valuable yttrium and HREEs, and possibly other scarce elements. The Texas Bureau of Economic Geology estimated the laccolith mass as at least 1.6 billion tons. A Preliminary Economic Assessment for Texas Rare Earth Resources listed an inferred mineral resource of 430,598,000 kg REOs (rare earth oxides), with over 70% Y+HREEs (YHREE). Put in global perspective, China is thought to produce ~25,000 tons YHREE per year, and exports but a small fraction of that. Because of the extremely fine grain size of the late-phase fluorine-carried critical fluid mineralization, it has not been clear which minerals host the YHREEs. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy experiments at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource revealed that virtually all of the YHREE content resides in yttrofluorite, rather than in the other reported REE minerals in the deposit, bastnaesite and xenotime. The extended x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectra of the sample suite were all quite similar, and proved a close match to known model compound specimens of yttrofluorite from two locations, in Sweden and New Mexico. Small spectral variation between the two model compounds and among the samples is attributable to the variable elemental composition and altervalent substitutional nature of yttrofluorite (Ca [1-x] Y,REE [x])F[2+x]. We found no other reported deposit in the world in which yttrofluorite is the exclusive, or even more than a minor, YHREE host mineral. Leaching experiments show that the YHREEs are easily liberated by dissolution with dilute sulfuric acid, due to the solubility of yttrofluorite. Flotation separation of the yttrofluorite had been demonstrated, but was rendered inefficient by the micron-scale grain size of the yttrofluorite. Our laboratory leaching experiments with different acid strengths, grain sizes, and exposure times showed up to 90% recovery of the YHREEs. As expected, similar recoveries were obtained from longer exposure times at lower sulfuric acid concentration. Optimal grain size is in the 2-10 mm range. Thus a heap leach of the deposit is likely feasible, aided by the fact that 90-95% of the rock comprises insoluble and unreactive quartz and feldspars. The absence of overburden, proximity (a few km) to an interstate highway and major rail systems, temperate climate, and favorable political location enhance the potential and appeal for development of a heap leach operation. The grade of the deposit is just over 0.05% total rare earth elements plus yttrium. Although some might consider this sub-economic, it is in the range of the South China ionic clay deposits that supply essentially all of the world's YHREEs. Further, the grade is remarkably consistent through 1657 samples from 64 reverse-circulation drill holes with a total sampled interval of 30,353 feet. This consistency of grade permits accurate economic assessment and prediction, an unchanging ore grade and mine feedstock over life of mine, and a single REE separation chemistry to be developed. Thus mine and separation procedures need only be developed and optimized once.

Pingitore, N. E.; Clague, J. W.; Gorski, D.

2013-12-01

305

Strategic Petroleum Reserve Texoma Complex distribution enhancements: Orange and Jefferson Counties, Texas; Calcasieu and Cameron Parishes, Louisiana: Environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy is proposing to construct and operate two buried crude oil pipelines to provide for unconstrained drawdown of three Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) crude oil storage facilities of the Texoma Complex located in portions of Louisiana and Texas. The project is required to provide a crude oil distribution system capable of meeting a planned increase in the Texoma Complex drawdown rate to 2,340,000 barrels-per-day (bpd). The EA addresses a no-action alternative and alternative pipeline routes. Potential impacts from pipeline construction concern disturbances to prime farmlands, floodplains and wetlands. A very small acreage of prime farmlands is involved; the total is not considered significant. The Floodplain/Wetlands Assessment states that the effects of pipeline construction and operation on floodplains and associated wetlands will be temporary and localized. DOE determined in a Floodplain Statement of Findings that for the project as a whole there is no practicable alternative to locating in a floodplain, and that the proposal conforms to appropriate state and local floodplain protection standards. Potential impacts from pipeline operation are primarily concerned with accidental releases of crude oil to the environment. Because the pipelines will be buried, the probability of a major pipeline break releasing large quantities of crude oil is small and pipeline testing and the development of an oil spill contingency plan will reduce the seriousness of any oil spill. The proposed pipelines are expected to involve no other environmental concerns. It is the determination of DOE that the proposed Texoma Complex Distribution Enhancements do not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment; therefore an environmental impact statement will not be prepared. 27 refs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1987-03-01

306

Texas Historic Sites Atlas  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Most everything is a bit bigger down around the Rio Grande, and the Texas Historic Sites Atlas fits neatly into that bit of folk wisdom about things in the Lone Star state. All told, the Atlas contains close to 300,000 historic and archaeological site records documenting Texas history. As all of this information is linked up to mapping software, visitors can find a historic site's location and its current condition. To give users a sense of what they can locate here, the database includes records for Texas Historical Markers, county courthouses, cemeteries, and even the fabled East Texas sawmills. For persons with a penchant for historic preservation, cultural geography, or just the state of Texas, this site is a real treat.

307

Herps of Texas  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Funded by the University of Texas and the Texas Memorial Museum, this Website offers useful life history information on the Herps (lizards, turtles, snakes, crocodilians, salamanders, frogs, and toads) of Texas. Each broad group is further classified into Families, and each species is identified by scientific (Latin) and common name. To access descriptive and graphical information, click on the species of choice. Each species entry includes one or more color photograph(s), diagnostic features, natural history information, and a color range map (presence:absence, by county). The concise information in this useful resource should be helpful to seasoned researchers and beginners, alike.

308

Hydrologic Conditions and Quality of Rainfall and Storm Runoff in Agricultural and Rangeland Areas in San Patricio County, Texas, 2000-2001  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During 2000?2001, rainfall and runoff were monitored in one mixed agricultural watershed and two rangeland watersheds in San Patricio County, located in the Coastal Bend area of South Texas. During this period, five rainfall samples were collected and analyzed for selected nutrients. Ten runoff samples from nine runoff events were collected at the three watershed monitoring stations. Runoff samples were analyzed for selected nutrients, major ions, trace elements, pesticides, and bacteria. Study area rainfall during 2000 and 2001 was 33.27 and 28.20 inches, respectively, less than the long-term average annual of 36.31 inches. Total runoff from the study area watersheds during 2000?2001 was 2.46 inches; the regional average is about 2 inches per year. Rainfall and runoff during the study period was typical of historical patterns, with periods of below average rainfall interspersed with extreme events. Three individual storm events accounted for about 29 percent of the total rainfall and 86 percent of the total runoff during 2000?2001. Runoff concentrations of nutrients, major ions, and trace elements generally were larger in the mixed agricultural watershed than runoff concentrations in the rangeland watersheds. Pesticides were detected in two of eight runoff samples. Three pesticides (atrazine, deethylatrazine, and trifluralin) were detected in very small concentrations; only deethylatrazine was detected in a concentration greater than the laboratory minimum reporting level. Bacteria in agricultural and rangeland runoff is a potential water-quality concern as all fecal coliform and E. coli densities in the runoff samples exceeded Texas Surface Water Quality Standards for receiving waters. However, runoff and relatively large bacteria densities represent very brief and infrequent conditions, and the effect on downstream water is not known. Rainfall deposition is a major source of nitrogen delivered to the study area. Rainfall nitrogen (mostly ammonia and nitrate) exceeded the runoff yield. The average annual rainfall deposition of total nitrogen on the study area watersheds was 1.3 pounds per acre. In contrast, an average annual yield of 0.57 and 0.21 pound per acre of total nitrogen in runoff exited the mixed agricultural watershed and the rangeland watersheds, respectively.

Ockerman, Darwin J.

2002-01-01

309

Washita Basin Project, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Located adjacent to Americas arid west/humid east division line known as the 100th meridian, western Oklahomas rolling uplands are susceptible to unpredictable weather cycles. Erratic best describes seasonal and annual rainfall patterns, with periods of p...

J. M. Bailey

2008-01-01

310

Physicochemical and Analytical Data for Tributary Water, Lake Water, and Lake Sediment, Lake Arrowhead, Clay and Archer Counties, Texas, 2006  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Lake Arrowhead is a reservoir about 24 kilometers southeast of Wichita Falls, Texas, that provides drinking water for the city of Wichita Falls and surrounding areas. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Wichita Falls, did a study in 2006 to assess conditions contributing to elevated arsenic concentrations in Lake Arrowhead. This report describes the sampling and analytical methods, quality assurance, and physicochemical and analytical data. Physiochemical properties were measured in and water samples were collected from five tributaries to Lake Arrowhead (Little Wichita River, West Little Post Oak Creek, East Little Post Oak Creek, Deer Creek, and an unnamed tributary) immediately after storms. Lake water measuring and sampling were done approximately monthly from January through September 2006 at three deep-water sites and seasonally, in January and August 2006, at three shallow-water sites. Cores of lake bottom sediment were collected from five sites on August 30, 2006. Arsenic concentrations in tributary water samples ranged from 1.5 to 6.3 and 0.5 to 4.8 micrograms per liter for unfiltered and filtered samples, respectively. The highest arsenic concentrations were in samples collected from the West Little Post Oak Creek sampling site. Physicochemical properties in lake water varied with depth and season. Dissolved arsenite plus arsenate concentrations in lake water samples generally were between 3 and 5 micrograms per liter. Arsenite concentrations typically were below the laboratory reporting level of 0.6 microgram per liter. There were no detections of monomethylarsonate or dimethylarsinate. The concentration of arsenic in lake sediment samples ranged from 4.4 to 11.2 milligrams per kilogram, with a median of 6.4 milligrams per kilogram. The median arsenic concentration of the five top-interval sediment samples was 8.8 milligrams per kilogram, which generally is higher than the concentrations estimated to be on suspended sediment in the tributaries. Sediment concentrations of seven trace elements were compared to two consensus-based sediment quality guidelines for each: the threshold effect concentration and the probable effect concentration. Arsenic concentration exceeded the threshold effect concentration in one top-interval sediment sample.

Wilson, Jennifer T.; Musgrove, MaryLynn; Haynie, Monti M.; Van Metre, Peter C.

2008-01-01

311

Ground water available in the Davenport area, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This memorandum describes the ground-water resources in the vicinity of Davenport, Lincoln County, Oklahoma. It is based on a one-day trip to Davenport made by the writer on February 11, 1948, to obtain information in addition to that in the ground-water files in Norman on the availability of ground water for public supply or other uses in the Davenport area. Davenport is a town of about 1,000 in east-central Lincoln County, Oklahoma, on U.S. Highway 66, about half way between Oklahoma City and Tulsa. It is in an area of undulating to gently rolling topography underlain by rocks of Pennsylvanian age. The area is drained into Deep Fork of the Canadian River, by Dry Creek and its tributary, Chuckaho Creek.

Schoff, Stuart L.

1948-01-01

312

Geophysical Delineation of the Freshwater/Saline-Water Transition Zone in the Barton Springs Segment of the Edwards Aquifer, Travis and Hays Counties, Texas, September 2006  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During September 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Barton Springs/Edwards Aquifer Conservation District, conducted a geophysical pilot study to determine whether time-domain electromagnetic (TDEM) sounding could be used to delineate the freshwater/saline-water transition zone in the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards aquifer in Travis and Hays Counties, Texas. There was uncertainty regarding the application of TDEM sounding for this purpose because of the depth of the aquifer (200-500 feet to the top of the aquifer) and the relatively low-resistivity clayey units in the upper confining unit. Twenty-five TDEM soundings were made along four 2-3-mile-long profiles in a study area overlying the transition zone near the Travis-Hays County boundary. The soundings yield measurements of subsurface electrical resistivity, the variations in which were correlated with hydrogeologic and stratigraphic units, and then with dissolved solids concentrations in the aquifer. Geonics Protem 47 and 57 systems with 492-foot and 328-foot transmitter-loop sizes were used to collect the TDEM soundings. A smooth model (vertical delineation of calculated apparent resistivity that represents an estimate [non-unique] of the true resistivity) for each sounding site was created using an iterative software program for inverse modeling. The effectiveness of using TDEM soundings to delineate the transition zone was indicated by comparing the distribution of resistivity in the aquifer with the distribution of dissolved solids concentrations in the aquifer along the profiles. TDEM sounding data show that, in general, the Edwards aquifer in the study area is characterized by a sharp change in resistivity from west to east. The western part of the Edwards aquifer in the study area shows higher resistivity than the eastern part. The higher resistivity regions correspond to lower dissolved solids concentrations (freshwater), and the lower resistivity regions correspond to higher dissolved solids concentrations (saline water). On the basis of reasonably close matches between the inferred locations of the freshwater/saline-water transition zone in the Edwards aquifer in the study area from resistivities and from dissolved solids concentrations in three of the four profiles, TDEM sounding appears to be a suitable tool for delineating the transition zone.

Payne, J.D., Kress, W.H., Shah, S.D., Stefanov, J.E., Smith, B.A., and Hunt, B.B.

2007-01-01

313

Hydrologic conditions and water quality of rainfall and storm runoff for two agricultural areas of the Oso Creek watershed, Nueces County, Texas, 2005-08  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board, Coastal Bend Bays and Estuaries Program, and Texas AgriLife Research and Extension Center at Corpus Christi, studied hydrologic conditions and water quality of rainfall and storm runoff of two primarily agricultural subwatersheds of the Oso Creek watershed in Nueces County, Texas. One area, the upper West Oso Creek subwatershed, is about 5,145 acres. The other area, a subwatershed drained by an unnamed tributary to Oso Creek (hereinafter, Oso Creek tributary), is about 5,287 acres. Rainfall and runoff (streamflow) were continuously monitored at the outlets of the two subwatersheds during the study period October 2005-September 2008. Seventeen rainfall samples were collected and analyzed for nutrients and major inorganic ions. Twenty-four composite runoff water-quality samples (12 at West Oso Creek, 12 at Oso Creek tributary) were collected and analyzed for nutrients, major inorganic ions, and pesticides. Twenty-six discrete suspended-sediment samples (12 West Oso Creek, 14 Oso Creek tributary) and 17 bacteria samples (10 West Oso Creek, 7 Oso Creek tributary) were collected and analyzed. These data were used to estimate, for selected constituents, rainfall deposition to and runoff loads and yields from the two subwatersheds. Quantities of fertilizers and pesticides applied in the two subwatersheds were compared with quantities of nutrients and pesticides in rainfall and runoff. For the study period, total rainfall was greater than average. Most of the runoff from the two subwatersheds occurred in response to a few specific storm periods. The West Oso Creek subwatershed produced more runoff during the study period than the Oso Creek tributary subwatershed, 13.95 inches compared with 9.45 inches. Runoff response was quicker and peak flows were higher in the West Oso Creek subwatershed than in the Oso Creek tributary subwatershed. Total nitrogen runoff yield for the 3-year study period averaged 2.62 pounds per acre per year from the West Oso Creek subwatershed and 0.839 pound per acre per year from the Oso Creek tributary subwatershed. Total phosphorus yields from the West Oso Creek and Oso Creek tributary subwatersheds for the 3-year period were 0.644 and 0.419 pound per acre per year, respectively. Runoff yields of nitrogen and phosphorus were relatively small compared to inputs of nitrogen in fertilizer and rainfall deposition. Average annual runoff yield of total nitrogen (subwatersheds combined) represents about 2.5 percent of nitrogen applied as fertilizer to cropland in the watershed and nitrogen entering the subwatersheds through rainfall deposition. Average annual runoff yield of total phosphorus (subwatersheds combined) represents about 4.0 percent of the phosphorus in applied fertilizer and rainfall deposition. Suspended-sediment yields from the West Oso Creek subwatershed were more than twice those from the Oso Creek tributary subwatershed. The average suspended-sediment yield from the West Oso Creek subwatershed was 522 pounds per acre per year and from the Oso Creek tributary subwatershed was 139 pounds per acre per year. Twenty-four herbicides and eight insecticides were detected in runoff samples collected at the two subwatershed outlets. At the West Oso Creek site, 19 herbicides and 4 insecticides were detected; at the Oso Creek tributary site, 18 herbicides and 6 insecticides were detected. Fourteen pesticides were detected in only one sample at low concentrations (near the laboratory reporting level). Atrazine and atrazine degradation byproduct 2-chloro-4-isopropylamino-6-amino-s-triazine (CIAT) were detected in all samples. Glyphosate and glyphosate byproduct aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) were detected in all samples collected and analyzed during water years 2006-07 but were not included in analysis for samples collected in water year 2008. Of all pesticides detected in runoff, the highest runoff yields w

Ockerman, Darwin J.; Fernandez, Carlos J.

2010-01-01

314

Hydrologic Conditions and Quality of Rainfall and Storm Runoff for Two Agricultural Areas of the Oso Creek Watershed, Nueces County, Texas, 2005-07  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board, Coastal Bend Bays and Estuaries Program, and Texas AgriLife Research and Extension Center at Corpus Christi, studied hydrologic conditions and quality of rainfall and storm runoff of two (primarily) agricultural areas (subwatersheds) of the Oso Creek watershed in Nueces County, Texas. One area, the upper West Oso Creek subwatershed, is 5,145 acres. The other area, a subwatershed drained by an unnamed Oso Creek tributary (hereinafter, Oso Creek tributary), is 5,287 acres. Rainfall and runoff (streamflow) were continuously monitored at the outlets of the two subwatersheds during October 2005-September 2007. Fourteen rainfall samples were collected and analyzed for nutrients and major inorganic ions. Nineteen composite runoff samples (10 West Oso Creek, nine Oso Creek tributary) were collected and analyzed for nutrients, major inorganic ions, and pesticides. Twenty-two discrete suspended-sediment samples (10 West Oso Creek, 12 Oso Creek tributary) and 13 bacteria samples (eight West Oso Creek, five Oso Creek tributary) were collected and analyzed. These data were used to estimate, for selected constituents, rainfall deposition to and runoff loads and yields from the study subwatersheds. Quantities of fertilizers and pesticides applied in the subwatersheds were compared with quantities of nutrients and pesticides in rainfall and runoff. For the study period, total rainfall was greater than average. Most of the runoff at both subwatershed outlet sites occurred in response to a few specific storm periods. The West Oso Creek subwatershed produced more runoff during the study period than the Oso Creek tributary subwatershed, 10.83 inches compared with 7.28 inches. Runoff response was quicker and peak flows were higher in the West Oso Creek subwatershed than in the Oso Creek tributary subwatershed. Total nitrogen runoff yield for the 2-year study period averaged 2.61 pounds per acre per year from the West Oso Creek subwatershed and 0.966 pound per acre per year from the Oso Creek tributary subwatershed. Total phosphorus yields from the West Oso Creek and the Oso Creek tributary subwatersheds for the 2-year period were 0.776 and 0.498 pound per acre per year. Runoff yields of nitrogen and phosphorus were relatively small compared to inputs of nitrogen in fertilizer and rainfall deposition. Average annual runoff yield of total nitrogen (subwatersheds combined) represents about 2.4 percent of nitrogen applied as fertilizer and nitrogen entering the subwatersheds through rainfall deposition. Average annual runoff yield of total phosphorus (subwatersheds combined) represents about 4.4 percent of the phosphorus in applied fertilizer and rainfall deposition. Suspended-sediment yields from the West Oso Creek subwatershed were more than twice those from the Oso Creek tributary subwatershed. The average suspended-sediment yield from the West Oso Creek subwatershed was 582 pounds per acre per year. The average suspended-sediment yield from the Oso Creek tributary subwatershed was 257 pounds per acre per year. Twenty-two herbicides and eight insecticides were detected in runoff samples collected from the two subwatershed outlet sites. At the West Oso Creek site, 18 herbicides and four insecticides were detected, and at the Oso Creek tributary site, 17 herbicides and six insecticides. Seventeen pesticides were detected in only one sample at low concentrations (near the laboratory reporting level). Atrazine, atrazine degradation byproducts 2-chloro-4-isopropylamino-6-amino-s-triazine (CIAT) and 2-hydroxy-4-isopropylamino-6-ethylamino-s-triazine (OIET), glyphosate, and glyphosate byproduct aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) were detected in all samples. Of all pesticides detected in runoff, the highest runoff yields were for glyphosate, 0.013 pound per acre per year for the West Oso Creek subwatershed and 0.001 pound per acre per year for the Oso Creek t

Ockerman, Darwin J.

2008-01-01

315

Comparison of irrigation pumpage and change in water storage of the High Plains Aquifer in Castro and Parmer counties, Texas, 1975-83  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An understanding of the relationship between irrigation pumpage and change in groundwater storage was needed to quantify the amount of water returning to the High Plains aquifer as a result of intensive irrigation in Castro and Parmer Counties, Texas. Irrigation pumpage for the 9-yr period, 1975-83, was estimated by using the Blaney-Criddle consumptive-use formula adjusted by a factor to account for irrigation demand and field-measured crop applications. Total estimated pumpage for the 9-yr period was 11,269,000 acre-ft and 8,914,000 acre-ft. The estimated pumpage was based on reported crop acreage data and LANDSAT acreage data, respectively. Aquifer storage for the same period was estimated as the product of specific yield, net water level change, and area. Change in storage was 5,168,00 acre-ft. Many of the areas of the largest change in storage also were the areas of the largest saturated thickness. The only locations that did not experience substantial water level declines were the northwest and northeast parts of the study area. A comparison was made of water returning to the aquifer by calculating the difference between irrigation pumpage and the change in aquifer storage. Two estimates of this comparison, expressed as a percentage of irrigation pumpage, were obtained on the basis of two different sources of acreage data. This comparison was 54% of pumpage based on reported crop acreage data and 42% of pumpage based on LANDSAT interpreted acreage data. (Author 's abstract)

Mackey, G. W.

1987-01-01

316

Geologic and hydrologic data for the municipal solid waste landfill facility, U.S. Army Air Defense Artillery Center and Fort Bliss, El Paso County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Geologic and hydrologic data for the Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Facility on the U.S. Army Air Defense Artillery Center and Fort Bliss in El Paso County, Texas, were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Department of the Army. The 106.03-acre landfill has been in operation since January 1974. The landfill contains household refuse, Post solid wastes, bulky items, grass and tree trimmings from family housing, refuse from litter cans, construction debris, classified waste (dry), dead animals, asbestos, and empty oil cans. The depth of the filled areas is about 30 feet and the cover, consisting of locally derived material, is 2 to 3 feet thick. Geologic and hydrologic data were collected at or adjacent to the landfill during (1) drilling of 10 30- to 31-foot boreholes that were completed with gas-monitoring probes, (2) drilling of a 59-foot borehole, (3) drilling of a 355-foot borehole that was completed as a ground-water monitoring well, and (4) in situ measurements made on the landfill cover. After completion, the gas- monitoring probes were monitored on a quarterly basis (1 year total) for gases generated by the landfill. Water samples were collected from the ground-water monitoring well for chemical analysis. Data collection is divided into two elements: geologic data and hydrologic data. Geologic data include lithologic descriptions of cores and cuttings, geophysical logs, soil- gas and ambient-air analyses, and chemical analyses of soil. Hydrologic data include physical properties, total organic carbon, and pH of soil and sediment samples; soil-water chloride and soil-moisture analyses; physical properties of the landfill cover; measurements of depth to ground water; and ground-water chemical analyses. Interpretation of data is not included in this report.

Abeyta, Cynthia G.; Frenzel, P. F.

1999-01-01

317

Economic Impact of Interstate Highway 35 on Tonkawa, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This interim report shows economic data gathered and analyzed, covering a 48 month period, involving the effects of the opening of Interstate 35 on Tonkawa, Oklahoma and compares these data with the control city of Woodward and the control county of Woodw...

1968-01-01

318

Child and Family Resource Program (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma). Program Description.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report describes the Oklahoma City, Oklahoma site of the Child and Family Resource Program (CFRP), a Head Start-affiliated program designed to elicit community and family involvement in fostering optimum development of preschool children and their families. The Oklahoma City site, serving a rural black community, is one of 11 demonstration…

Development Associates, Inc., Washington, DC.

319

75 FR 68398 - Texas, Oklahoma & Eastern Railroad, LLC-Acquisition and Operation Exemption-Texas, Oklahoma...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...in Control Exemption--Columbia & Cowlitz Railway, LLC, DeQueen and Eastern...Docket No. FD 35426, Columbia & Cowlitz Railway, LLC--Acquisition and Operation Exemption--Columbia & Cowlitz Railway Company; (2) Docket...

2010-11-05

320

Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the High Plains Aquifer in western Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

ARC/INFO export files This diskette contains digitized aquifer boundaries and maps of hydraulic conductivity, recharge, and ground-water level elevation contours for the High Plains aquifer in western Oklahoma. This area encompasses the panhandle counties of Cimarron, Texas, and Beaver, and the western counties of Harper, Ellis, Woodward, Dewey, and Roger Mills. The High Plains aquifer underlies approximately 7,000 square miles of Oklahoma and is used extensively for irrigation. The High Plains aquifer is a water-table aquifer and consists predominately of the Tertiary-age Ogallala Formation and overlying Quaternary-age alluvial and terrace deposits. In some areas the aquifer is absent and the underlying Triassic, Jurassic, or Cretaceous-age rocks are exposed at the surface. These rocks are hydraulically connected with the aquifer in some areas. The High Plains aquifer is composed of interbedded sand, siltstone, clay, gravel, thin limestones, and caliche. The proportion of various lithological materials changes rapidly from place to place, but poorly sorted sand and gravel predominate. The rocks are poorly to moderately well cemented by calcium carbonate. The aquifer boundaries, hydraulic conductivity, and recharge data sets were created by extracting geologic contact lines from published digital surficial geology maps based on a scale of 1:125,000 for the panhandle counties and 1:250,000 for the western counties. The water-level elevation contours and some boundary lines were digitized from maps in a published water-level elevation map for 1980 based on a scale of 1:250,000. The hydraulic conductivity and recharge values in this report were used as input to the ground-water flow model on the High Plains aquifer. Ground-water flow models are numerical representations that simplify and aggregate natural systems. Models are not unique; different combinations of aquifer characteristics may produce similar results. Therefore, values of hydraulic conductivity and recharge used in the model and presented in this data set are not precise, but are within a reasonable range when compared to independently collected data.

Becker, C. J.; Runkle, D. L.; Rea, Alan

1997-01-01

321

Assessment of potential for natural attenuation of chlorinated ethenes and ethanes in ground water at a petrochemical reclamation site, Harris County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Redox conditions in the Numerous Sand Channels Zone beneath a petrochemical reclamation site in Harris County, Texas, range from sulfate reducing to methanogenic as indicated by the presence of methane in ground water and the range of molecular hydrogen concentrations. Assessment of the potential for reductive dechlorination using BIOCHLOR as a screening tool indicated conditions favoring anaerobic degradation of chlorinated organic compounds in the Numerous Sand Channels Zone. Evidence supporting reductive dechlorination includes apparently biogenic cis-1,2-dichloroethene; an increased ratio of 1,2-dichloroethane to 1,1,2-trichloroethane downgradient from the assumed contaminant source area; ethene and methane concentrations greater than background concentrations within the area of the contaminant plume; and a positive correlation of the ratio of ethene to vinyl chloride as a function of methane concentrations. The body of evidence presented in this report argues for hydrogenolysis of trichloroethene to cis-1,2-dichloroethene; of 1,1,2-trichloroethane to 1,2-dichloroethane; and of vinyl chloride to ethene within the Numerous Sand Channels Zone. Simulations using BIOCHLOR yielded apparent first-order decay constants for reductive dechlorination in the sequence Tetrachloroethene --> trichloroethene --> cis-1,2-dichloroethene --> vinyl chloride --> ethene within the range of literature values reported for each compound and apparent first-order decay constants for reductive dechlorination in the sequence 1,1,2-trichloroethane --> 1,2-dichloroethane slightly greater than literature values reported for each compound along the upgradient segment of a simulated ground-water flowpath. Except for vinyl chloride, apparent rates of reductive dechlorination for all simulated species show a marked decrease along the downgradient segment of the simulated ground-water flowpath. Evidence for reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethenes within the Numerous Sand Channels Zone indicates potential for natural attenuation of chlorinated ethenes. Reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethanes apparently occurs to a lesser extent, indicating relatively less potential for natural attenuation of chlorinated ethanes. Additional data are needed on the concentrations and distribution of chlorinated ethenes and ethanes in individual fine sand intervals of the Numerous Sand Channels Zone. This information, combined with lower minimum reporting levels for future chloroethane analyses, might enable a more complete and quantitative assessment of the potential for natural attenuation at the site.

Huff, Glenn F.; Braun, Christopher L.; Lee, Roger W.

2000-01-01

322

Comparative analysis of wind energy production in Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Scope and method of study. In the last decades humanity has realized the necessity of developing alternative energy sources for its efficient economic development and simple survival in the future. During the last 30 years major improvements were made in renewable energy technologies and they started to become competitive with traditional energy sources (fossil fuels), especially with consideration of external costs. Among the renewable energy sources, wind energy is one of the cheapest and fastest growing nowadays. Oklahoma is a very promising site for wind energy development considering its excellent wind resources. Developing wind energy can allow not only electricity production for in-state consumption, but also exporting to other states. The development of wind energy could encourage economic growth with very few adverse impacts on the environment. However, traditional energy sources are still the cheapest and, thus, the introduction of the wind energy in Oklahoma should be critically analyzed from economic, ecological and social points of view. The goal of this study is to conduct analysis of wind energy electricity production in Oklahoma on the four main stages: (1) Investment Analysis from Private Perspective: Calculate present value net benefits for wind energy and traditional energy (natural gas), make sure that both of them are positive. (2) Investment Analysis from Social Perspective: Evaluate present value net private benefits (PVNPB) and present value net social benefit from both projects (PVNSB). (3) Government Subsidy Analysis: recognize the necessity of the subsidies and evaluate the amount of subsidies if any. (4) Investment Analysis from a Geographic Perspective: determine economic feasibility of wind power generation for 77 Oklahoma counties. Findings and conclusions. The final output of the study is the recommendations concerning wind energy development in Oklahoma with consideration of economic efficiency, ecological and social impacts. Study not only analyze possibilities for wind energy development in the state, but make recommendations on the county by county basis with consideration of wind power density, land cost, property tax and infrastructure development in each county.

Ermilova, Ekaterina Alexeevna

323

Developments in the Oklahoma portion of the Arkoma basin, 1960 to 1965  

Microsoft Academic Search

The first natural-gas production in the Arkoma basin in eastern Oklahoma was near Poteau in Le Flore County in 1910. In the next few years several fields were discovered and developed as far west as Quinton in Pittsburg County. Production was from Hartshorne and upper Atoka sandstones at depths of less than 3000 ft. The first deep natural-gas production was

1966-01-01

324

Minerals Yearbook, 1992: Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The value of Oklahoma nonfuel mineral production was nearly $252.6 million in 1992, a decrease of $22.9 million from that reported to the U.S. Bureau of Mines by State mineral producers in 1991. The value of the top three commodities produced, crushed sto...

J. E. Zelten R. H. Arndt

1994-01-01

325

Oklahoma's Quest for Quality.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The passage of Bill 1706 by the Oklahoma State Legislature is a major step toward building professional schools of education and a true profession. Through the specifications of this law, the total process is to be strengthened, since changes in teacher education are severely limited if done in a piecemeal fashion. There are five major points…

Wisniewski, Richard

326

76 FR 68188 - Valero Refining-Texas, L.P. v. Port of Corpus Christi Authority of Nueces County, TX; Notice of...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...petroleum refinery at two locations along the Corpus Christi Ship Channel. Complainant alleges that Respondent is a marine terminal operator and a ``navigation district and political sub-division of the State of Texas.'' Complainant...

2011-11-03

327

Approximate water-level changes in wells in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, 1977-79, and measured compaction, 1973-79, in Harris and Galveston Counties, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report consists of: (1) Four maps that present data on water-level changes during 1977-79 in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers and; (2) one set of graphs that present data on the compaction of subsurface materials for 1973-79. During 1977-79, groundwater pumping decreased in Galveston County and southern Harris County, Tex., and increased in northern and western Harris County. (Woodard-USGS)

Gabrysch, R. K.

1979-01-01

328

Heat flow in Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Twenty new heat flow values are incorporated, along with 40 previously published data, into a heat flow map of Oklahoma. The new heat flow data were estimated using previous temperature measurements in boreholes made by American Petroleum Institute researchers and 1,498 thermal conductivity measurements on drill cuttings. The mean of 20 average thermal gradients is 30.50sp°C/km. In general, thermal gradients increase from SW (14.11sp°C/km) to NE (42.24sp°C/km). The range of 1,498 in situ thermal conductivity measurements (after corrections for anisotropy, in situ temperature, and porosity) is 0.90-6.1 W/m-K; the average is 1.68 W/m-K. Estimated near-surface heat flow (±20%) at 20 new sites in Oklahoma varies between 22 ± 4 mW/msp2 and 86 ± 17 mW/msp2; the average is 50 mW/msp2. Twenty-seven new heat-generation estimates, along with 22 previously published data, are used to create a heat generation map of Oklahoma. The range of heat production estimates is 1.1-3.5 muW/msp3, with an average of 2.5 muW/msp3. The heat flow regime in Oklahoma is primarily conductive in nature, except for a zone in northeast. Transient effects due to sedimentary processes and metamorphic/igneous activity, as well as past climatic changes, do not significantly influence the thermal state of the Oklahoma crust. Heat flow near the margins of the Arkoma and Anadarko Basins may be depressed or elevated by 5-13 mW/msp2 by refraction of heat from sedimentary rocks of relatively low thermal conductivity (1-2 W/m-K) into crystalline basement rocks of relatively high thermal conductivity (˜3-4 W/m-K). The heat generation-heat flow relationship shows a modest correlation. The relatively high heat flow (˜70-80 mW/msp2) in part of northeastern Oklahoma suggests that the thermal regime there may be perturbed by regional groundwater flow originating in the fractured outcrops of the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in the Arbuckle Mountains.

Cranganu, Constantin

329

Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History & Culture  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The 46th state, Oklahoma, presents its unusual history with the online version of The Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. The Encyclopedia was prepared by over 500 "university-based scholars and independent historians and scholars," and was a joint effort by The Oklahoma Historical Society and Oklahoma State University Library Electronic Publishing Center. Visitors can click on the "Table of Contents" link near the bottom of the homepage to "Browse Entries Alphabetically", "Browse Entries Chronologically", or "Browse Entries by Subject". Browsing via chronology introduces visitors to Oklahoma starting with the "Precontact Era", through the "Westward Expansion" and on to "Twentieth Century to Present". Subject categories include "African Americans", "Farming", "Military", and "Petroleum". When searching, visitors will be taken to the Electronic Publishing Center Search Page, so they will need to choose the specific collection, Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture, from the drop down box, to confine the search to the Encyclopedia.

330

40 CFR 81.337 - Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Unclassifiable/Attainment Beckham County Caddo County Comanche County Cotton County...Unclassifiable/Attainment Beckham County Caddo County Comanche County Cotton County...County Unclassifiable/Attainment. Caddo County...

2013-07-01

331

Quality of Groundwater at and near an Aquifer Storage and Recovery Site, Bexar, Atascosa, and Wilson Counties, Texas, June 2004-August 2008  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the San Antonio Water System, did a study during 2004-08 to characterize the quality of native groundwater from the Edwards aquifer and pre- and post-injection water from the Carrizo aquifer at and near an aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) site in Bexar, Atascosa, and Wilson Counties, Texas. Groundwater samples were collected and analyzed for selected physical properties and constituents to characterize the quality of native groundwater from the Edwards aquifer and pre- and post-injection water from the Carrizo aquifer at and near the ASR site. Geochemical and isotope data indicated no substantial changes in major-ion, trace-element, and isotope chemistry occurred as the water from the Edwards aquifer was transferred through a 38-mile pipeline to the aquifer storage and recovery site. The samples collected from the four ASR recovery wells were similar in major-ion and stable isotope chemistry compared to the samples collected from the Edwards aquifer source wells and the ASR injection well. The similarity could indicate that as Edwards aquifer water was injected, it displaced native Carrizo aquifer water, or, alternatively, if mixing of Edwards and Carrizo aquifer waters was occurring, the major-ion and stable isotope signatures for the Carrizo aquifer water might have been obscured by the signatures of the injected Edwards aquifer water. Differences in the dissolved iron and dissolved manganese concentrations indicate that either minor amounts of mixing occurred between the waters from the two aquifers, or as Edwards aquifer water displaced Carrizo aquifer water it dissolved the iron and manganese directly from the Carrizo Sand. Concentrations of radium-226 in the samples collected at the ASR recovery wells were smaller than the concentrations in samples collected from the Edwards aquifer source wells and from the ASR injection well. The smaller radium-226 concentrations in the samples collected from the ASR recovery wells likely indicate some degree of mixing of the two waters occurred rather than continued decay of radium-226 in the injected water. Geochemical and isotope data measured in samples collected in May 2005 from two Carrizo aquifer monitoring wells and in July 2008 from the three ASR production-only wells in the northern section of the ASR site indicate that injected Edwards aquifer water had not migrated to these five sites. Geochemical and isotope data measured in samples collected from Carrizo aquifer wells in 2004, 2005, and 2008 were graphically analyzed to determine if changes in chemistry could be detected. Major-ion, trace element, and isotope chemistry varied spatially in the samples collected from the Carrizo aquifer. With the exception of a few samples, major-ion concentrations measured in samples collected in Carrizo aquifer wells in 2004, 2005, and 2008 were similar. A slightly larger sulfate con-centration and a slightly smaller bicarbonate concentration were measured in samples collected in 2005 and 2008 from well NC1 compared to samples collected at well NC1 in 2004. Larger sodium concentrations and smaller calcium, magnesium, bicarbonate, and sulfate concentrations were measured in samples collected in 2008 from well WC1 than in samples collected at this well in 2004 and 2005. Larger calcium and magnesium concentrations and a smaller sodium concentration were measured in the samples collected in 2008 at well EC2 compared to samples collected at this well in 2004 and 2005. While in some cases the computed percent differences (compared to concentrations from June 2004) in dissolved iron and dissolved manganese concentrations in 11 wells sampled in the Carrizo aquifer in 2005 and 2008 were quite large, no trends that might have been caused by migration of injected Edwards aquifer water were observed. Because of the natural variation in geochemical data in the Carrizo aquifer and the small data set collected for this study, differences in major-ion and

Otero, Cassi L.; Petri, Brian L.

2010-01-01

332

A conceptual model of the hydrogeologic framework, geochemistry, and groundwater-flow system of the Edwards-Trinity and related aquifers in the Pecos County region, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A conceptual model of the hydrogeologic framework, geochemistry, and groundwater-flow system of the Edwards-Trinity and related aquifers, which include the Pecos Valley, Igneous, Dockum, Rustler, and Capitan Reef aquifers, was developed as the second phase of a groundwater availability study in the Pecos County region in west Texas. The first phase of the study was to collect and compile groundwater, surface-water, water-quality, geophysical, and geologic data in the area. The third phase of the study involves a numerical groundwater-flow model of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer in order to simulate groundwater conditions based on various groundwater-withdrawal scenarios. Resource managers plan to use the results of the study to establish management strategies for the groundwater system. The hydrogeologic framework is composed of the hydrostratigraphy, structural features, and hydraulic properties of the groundwater system. Well and geophysical logs were interpreted to define the top and base surfaces of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer units. Elevations of the top and base of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer generally decrease from the southwestern part of the study area to the northeast. The thicknesses of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer units were calculated using the interpolated top and base surfaces of the hydrostratigraphic units. Some of the thinnest sections of the aquifer were in the eastern part of the study area and some of the thickest sections were in the Pecos, Monument Draw, and Belding-Coyanosa trough areas. Normal-fault zones, which formed as growth and collapse features as sediments were deposited along the margins of more resistant rocks and as overlying sediments collapsed into the voids created by the dissolution of Permian-age evaporite deposits, were delineated based on the interpretation of hydrostratigraphic cross sections. The lowest aquifer transmissivity values were measured in the eastern part of the study area; the highest transmissivity values were measured in a faulted area of the Monument Draw trough. Hydraulic conductivity values generally exhibited the same trends as the transmissivity values. Groundwater-quality data and groundwater-level data were used in context with the hydrogeologic framework to assess the chemical characteristics of water from different sources, regional groundwater-flow paths, recharge sources, the mixing of water from different sources, and discharge in the study area. Groundwater-level altitudes generally decrease from southwest to northeast and regional groundwater flow is from areas of recharge south and west to the north and northeast. Four principal sources of recharge to the Edwards-Trinity aquifer were identified: (1) regional flow that originated as recharge northwest of the study area, (2) runoff from the Barilla, Davis, and Glass Mountains, (3) return flow from irrigation, and (4) upwelling from deeper aquifers. Results indicated Edwards-Trinity aquifer water in the study area was dominated by mineralized, regional groundwater flow that most likely recharged during the cooler, wetter climates of the Pleistocene with variable contributions of recent, local recharge. Groundwater generally flows into the down-dip extent of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer where it discharges into overlying or underlying aquifer units, discharges from springs, discharges to the Pecos River, follows a regional flow path east out of the study area, or is withdrawn by groundwater wells. Structural features such as mountains, troughs, and faults play a substantial role in the distribution of recharge, local and regional groundwater flow, spring discharge, and aquifer interaction.

Bumgarner, Johnathan R.; Stanton, Gregory P.; Teeple, Andrew P.; Thomas, Jonathan V.; Houston, Natalie A.; Payne, Jason D.; Musgrove, MaryLynn

2012-01-01

333

Geophysical Analysis of the Salmon Peak Formation Near Amistad Reservoir Dam, Val Verde County, Texas, and Coahuila, Mexico, March 2006, to Aid in Piezometer Placement  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Since 1992, numerous sinkholes have developed northwest of the Amistad Reservoir dam on the Rio Grande. Increases in the discharge of springs south of the dam, on the western side of the Rio Grande, in Coahuila, Mexico, have been documented. In 1995 the Mexico Section of the International Boundary and Water Commission (IBWC) completed a study of the western embankment (Coahuila, Mexico) of the dam that included surface geophysics, borehole geophysics, and installation of piezometers to learn more about subsurface conditions. As part of a 5-year safety inspection in 2005, technical advisors recommended that one line of similarly constructed piezometers be installed on the eastern embankment (Val Verde County, Texas) of the dam for comparison of water levels (potentiometric head) on both the western and eastern embankments of Amistad Reservoir dam. To provide technical assistance for the horizontal and vertical placement of piezometers on the eastern embankment of Amistad Reservoir dam, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Section of the IBWC, conducted a study along both the western and eastern embankments of Amistad Reservoir dam. The study involved an integrated approach using surface and borehole geophysical methods. In the western embankment investigation, geological and geophysical characteristics that indicate relatively large water-yielding properties of the Salmon Peak Formation were identified. The direct-current (DC) resistivity method was selected as the surface geophysical reconnaissance technique to correlate relatively large water-yielding properties of the Salmon Peak Formation, identified from analysis of borehole geophysical logs, with variations in subsurface resistivity. The dipole-dipole array and the reciprocal Schlumberger array were selected as the most applicable DC resistivity arrays. Two resistivity units were identified in both the dipole-dipole array data and the reciprocal Schlumberger array data along DC resistivity profiles on both embankments. Resistivity unit 1 generally is of relatively low resistivity, ranging from 45 to 150 ohm-meters compared with resistivity unit 2, which ranges from 120 to 345 ohm-meters (depending on the DC array type). The presence of mapped sinkholes in the reservoir north of the western embankment study area and the zone of increased water content (as indicated by zones of low neutron log count rates in nearby piezometers) leads to the conclusion that resistivity unit 1 is a preferential flow path where surface water from Amistad Reservoir is forced into the ground-water system (because of increased head from the reservoir). In the eastern embankment investigation, trends in the spatial distribution of sinkholes and the occurrence of weathered zones were identified from geologic descriptions of cores. The correlation of surface geophysical DC resistivity, historical lithologic data, and general trend of documented sinkholes along the eastern end of the eastern embankment profile were used to justify further exploration (drilling of piezometers) in the eastern expression of resistivity unit 1. The spatial location of the piezometers and the screened intervals were selected to best match the locations of the screened intervals of the western embankment piezometers. Six piezometers were installed on the eastern embankment and logged using borehole geophysical techniques. Surface DC resistivity sections superimposed on the resistivity logs for two piezometers indicate three discernible resistivity units that correlate with resistivity units 2, 1, and 2, respectively, identified in the western embankment study area. Resistivity units 1 and 2 in the DC resistivity profiles generally correspond with low and high resistivity zones, respectively, on the normal and lateral resistivity logs collected in the nearby piezometers at the time of installation.

Stanton, Gregory P.; Kress, Wade H.; Teeple, Andrew P.; Greenslate, Michael L.; Clark, Allan K.

2007-01-01

334

Chagas Disease Risk in Texas  

PubMed Central

Background Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, remains a serious public health concern in many areas of Latin America, including México. It is also endemic in Texas with an autochthonous canine cycle, abundant vectors (Triatoma species) in many counties, and established domestic and peridomestic cycles which make competent reservoirs available throughout the state. Yet, Chagas disease is not reportable in Texas, blood donor screening is not mandatory, and the serological profiles of human and canine populations remain unknown. The purpose of this analysis was to provide a formal risk assessment, including risk maps, which recommends the removal of these lacunae. Methods and Findings The spatial relative risk of the establishment of autochthonous Chagas disease cycles in Texas was assessed using a five–stage analysis. 1. Ecological risk for Chagas disease was established at a fine spatial resolution using a maximum entropy algorithm that takes as input occurrence points of vectors and environmental layers. The analysis was restricted to triatomine vector species for which new data were generated through field collection and through collation of post–1960 museum records in both México and the United States with sufficiently low georeferenced error to be admissible given the spatial resolution of the analysis (1 arc–minute). The new data extended the distribution of vector species to 10 new Texas counties. The models predicted that Triatoma gerstaeckeri has a large region of contiguous suitable habitat in the southern United States and México, T. lecticularia has a diffuse suitable habitat distribution along both coasts of the same region, and T. sanguisuga has a disjoint suitable habitat distribution along the coasts of the United States. The ecological risk is highest in south Texas. 2. Incidence–based relative risk was computed at the county level using the Bayesian Besag–York–Mollié model and post–1960 T. cruzi incidence data. This risk is concentrated in south Texas. 3. The ecological and incidence–based risks were analyzed together in a multi–criteria dominance analysis of all counties and those counties in which there were as yet no reports of parasite incidence. Both analyses picked out counties in south Texas as those at highest risk. 4. As an alternative to the multi–criteria analysis, the ecological and incidence–based risks were compounded in a multiplicative composite risk model. Counties in south Texas emerged as those with the highest risk. 5. Risk as the relative expected exposure rate was computed using a multiplicative model for the composite risk and a scaled population county map for Texas. Counties with highest risk were those in south Texas and a few counties with high human populations in north, east, and central Texas showing that, though Chagas disease risk is concentrated in south Texas, it is not restricted to it. Conclusions For all of Texas, Chagas disease should be designated as reportable, as it is in Arizona and Massachusetts. At least for south Texas, lower than N, blood donor screening should be mandatory, and the serological profiles of human and canine populations should be established. It is also recommended that a joint initiative be undertaken by the United States and México to combat Chagas disease in the trans–border region. The methodology developed for this analysis can be easily exported to other geographical and disease contexts in which risk assessment is of potential value.

Sarkar, Sahotra; Strutz, Stavana E.; Frank, David M.; Rivaldi, Chissa-Louise; Sissel, Blake; Sanchez-Cordero, Victor

2010-01-01

335

Oklahoma Healthy Homes Initiative  

PubMed Central

Compelling scientific evidence suggests that a strong association exists between housing-related hazards and the health and safety of their residents. Health, safety, and environmental hazards (such as asthma and allergy triggers), unintentional injury hazards, lead-based paint hazards, and poor indoor air quality are interrelated with substandard housing conditions. This article describes a Healthy Homes initiative to address these hazards in a coordinated fashion in the home, rather than taking a categorical approach, even in the presence of multiple hazards. It also provides an overview of Oklahoma's Healthy Homes initiative and its pilot project, the Tulsa Safe and Healthy Housing Project, which is currently administered in Tulsa in collaboration with Children First, Oklahoma's Nurse-Family Partnership program. This pilot project seeks to open new areas of research that can lead to a greater understanding of environmental health issues related to substandard housing in the United States, which will eventually make homes safer and healthier.

Khan, Fahad

2011-01-01

336

Heat flow in Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oklahoma is one area in which terrestrial heat flow data are sparse. The thermal state of the southern mid-continent, however, is a key to understanding several important geologic problems. These include thermal anomalies associated with Paleozoic fluid migrations and the formation of Mississippi Valley-type lead-zinc deposits, the thermal evolution of the Arkoma and Anadarko sedimentary basins, and the history of

C. Cranganu; D. Deming

1996-01-01

337

Heat flow in Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Twenty new heat flow values are incorporated, along with 40 previously published data, into a heat flow map of Oklahoma. The new heat flow data were estimated using previous temperature measurements in boreholes made by American Petroleum Institute researchers and 1,498 thermal conductivity measurements on drill cuttings. The mean of 20 average thermal gradients is 30.50sp°C\\/km. In general, thermal gradients

Constantin Cranganu

1997-01-01

338

Control of Pocket Gopher in Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Five hundred acres of longleaf pine plantations on the Angelina National Forest in Angelina, Jasper, and San Augustine Counties, Texas are being destroyed by Pocket Gophers. Gopher control will consist of placing strychnine-treated grain in artificially c...

1972-01-01

339

A REVOLUTION IN CADDO ARCHAEOLOGY: THE REMOTE SENSING AND ARCHAEOLOGICAL VIEW FROM THE HILL FARM SITE (41BW169) IN BOWIE COUNTY, TEXAS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of remote sensing technologies on prehistoric and early historic Caddo sites is allowing for new and unprecedented views of the spatial structure and internal organization of Caddo villages and mound centers. Recent remote sensing work at the Hill Farm site (41BW169) on the Red River in northeast Texas, along with available archaeological information from the shallowly buried site,

Timothy K. Perttula; Chester P. Walker; T. Clay Schultz

340

Potential for Bed-Material Entrainment in Selected Streams of the Edwards Plateau - Edwards, Kimble, and Real Counties, Texas, and Vicinity  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Texas Department of Transportation spends considerable money for maintenance and replacement of low-water crossings of streams in the Edwards Plateau in Central Texas as a result of damages caused in part by the transport of cobble- and gravel-sized bed material. An investigation of the problem at low-water crossings was made by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Texas Department of Transportation, and in collaboration with Texas Tech University, Lamar University, and the University of Houston. The bed-material entrainment problem for low-water crossings occurs at two spatial scales - watershed scale and channel-reach scale. First, the relative abundance and activity of cobble- and gravel-sized bed material along a given channel reach becomes greater with increasingly steeper watershed slopes. Second, the stresses required to mobilize bed material at a location can be attributed to reach-scale hydraulic factors, including channel geometry and particle size. The frequency of entrainment generally increases with downstream distance, as a result of decreasing particle size and increased flood magnitudes. An average of 1 year occurs between flows that initially entrain bed material as large as the median particle size, and an average of 1.5 years occurs between flows that completely entrain bed material as large as the median particle size. The Froude numbers associated with initial and complete entrainment of bed material up to the median particle size approximately are 0.40 and 0.45, respectively.

Heitmuller, Franklin T.; Asquith, William H.

2008-01-01

341

Tight gas sands research program: Field operations and analysis. Cooperative well report. ARCO Oil and Gas B. F. Phillips No. 1 Chapel Hill Field Smith County, Texas, March 1985. Topical report  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented from an analysis of the ARCO Oil Gas B.F. Phillips Well No. 1 which is completed in the upper Travis Peak formation in Chapel Hill Field, Smith County, Texas. The Phillips No. 1 was the first cooperative well in the GRI program which was monitored with the Mobile Testing and Control (T C) Facility during pre-fracture and post-fracture testing, and fracture treatment. In addition to coring and logging, activities included performing an in-situ stress test in a sandstone interval, performing a mini-frac, running post fracture gamma ray and temperature surveys, and monitoring hydraulic fracture treatment. Fracture treatment summaries and the pressure buildup test analysis are included in appendixes.

Holditch, S.A.; Robinson, B.M.; Whitehead, W.S.

1985-04-01

342

BLACK FORK MOUNTAIN ROADLESS AREA, ARAKANSAS AND OKLAHOMA.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Black Fork Mountain Roadless Area covers about 21 sq mi in the Ouachita National Forest in Polk County, Arkansas and LeFlore County, Oklahoma. On the basis of a mineral survey the area has little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral resources. Stone and sand and gravel suitable for construction purposes occur in the Jackfork Sandstone and the Stanley Shale which also occur outside the roadless area. Although the potential for gas and oil is unknown and no resource potential was identified, some investigators believe that there is a possibility for the occurrence of gas and oil in the roadless area.

Miller, Mary, H.

1984-01-01

343

78 FR 32007 - Environmental Impact Statement for Tulsa-Oklahoma City Passenger Rail Corridor, Oklahoma, Lincoln...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Statement for Tulsa--Oklahoma City Passenger Rail Corridor, Oklahoma, Lincoln, Creek...Oklahoma Department of Transportation (ODOT) Rail Division intend to prepare an EIS pursuant...for the State of Oklahoma High-Speed Rail Initiative: Tulsa--Oklahoma City...

2013-05-28

344

Oil and gas developments in south Texas in 1981  

Microsoft Academic Search

The south Texas report includes 58 counties within Texas Railroad Commission Districts 1, 2, and 4, and portions of the Texas offshore. Overall exploratory activity decreased 9% from 1980 totals. District 1 experienced an increase in activity of 7%; in both Districts 2 and 4 there was a downturn of 9%. Average depth figures continued to increase; in Districts 1,

Fergeson

1982-01-01

345

Analysis of Vertical Flow During Ambient and Pumped Conditions in Four Monitoring Wells at the Pantex Plant, Carson County, Texas, July-September 2008  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Pantex Plant is a U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (USDOE/NNSA)-owned, contractor-operated facility managed by Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Pantex, LLC (B&W Pantex) in Carson County, Texas, approximately 17 miles northeast of Amarillo. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with B&W Pantex through the USDOE/NNSA, made a series of flowmeter measurements and collected other borehole geophysical logs during July-September 2008 to analyze vertical flow in screened intervals of four selected monitoring wells (PTX01-1012, PTX06-1044, PTX06-1056, and PTX06-1068) at the Pantex Plant. Hydraulic properties (transmissivity values) of the section of High Plains (Ogallala) aquifer penetrated by the wells also were computed. Geophysical data were collected under ambient and pumped flow conditions in the four monitoring wells. Unusually large drawdowns occurred at two monitoring wells (PTX06-1044 and PTX06-1056) while the wells were pumped at relatively low rates. A decision was made to redevelop those wells, and logs were run again after redevelopment in the two monitoring wells. Logs collected in monitoring well PTX01-1012 during ambient conditions indicate a dynamic environment that probably was affected by pumping of nearby irrigation or public-supply wells. During pumping, downward vertical flow of 0.2 to 2.1 gallons per minute that occurred during ambient conditions was either reversed or reduced. During pumping, a gradual trend of more positive flowmeter values (upward flow) with distance up the well was observed. Estimated total transmissivity for four production zones identified from Flow-B numerical model results taken together was calculated to be about 3,100 feet squared per day. Logs collected in monitoring well PTX06-1044 during ambient conditions before redevelopment indicate a static environment with no flow. During pumping there was upward vertical flow at rates ranging from 0.1 to about 1.5 gallons per minute. During pumping, a gradual trend of more positive flowmeter values (upward flow) with distance up the well was observed. Estimated total transmissivity before redevelopment for five production zones identified from Flow-B numerical model results, and transmissivity values for each zone, are considered to be in error because of the lack of communication between the well and the aquifer before redevelopment. After redevelopment, logs for well PTX06-1044 during ambient conditions indicate a near-static environment with minimal downward flow. During pumping there was upward vertical flow at rates ranging from 0.5 to about 4.8 gallons per minute. During pumping, a gradual trend of more positive flowmeter values with distance up the well was observed. Estimated total transmissivity after redevelopment for the same five identified production zones taken together was calculated to be about 520 feet squared per day. Logs collected in monitoring well PTX06-1056 during ambient conditions before redevelopment indicate a static environment with no flow. During pumping there was upward vertical flow at rates ranging from 0.3 to about 1.5 gallons per minute. During pumping, a gradual trend of more positive flowmeter values (upward flow) with distance up the well was observed. Estimated total transmissivity before redevelopment for four production zones identified from Flow-B numerical model results taken together was calculated to be about 450 feet squared per day. After redevelopment, logs collected in monitoring well PTX06-1056 during ambient conditions indicate a near-static environment with no flow except for a very small amount of downward flow near the bottom of the well. During pumping there was upward vertical flow at rates ranging from 0.7 to about 2.9 gallons per minute. Estimated total transmissivity after redevelopment for five production zones identified from Flow-B numerical model results taken together was calculated to be about 330 feet squared per day.

Stanton, Gregory P.; Thomas, Jonathan V.; Stoval, Jeffery

2009-01-01

346

Geohydrologic site characterization of the municipal solid waste landfill facility, US Army Air Defense Artillery Center and Fort Bliss, El Paso County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Geohydrologic conditions of the Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Facility (MSWLF) on the U.S. Army Air Defense Artillery Center and Fort Bliss, El Paso County, Texas, were evaluated by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Army. The 106.03-acre MSWLF has been in operation since January 1974. The landfill contains household refuse, Post solid wastes, bulky items, grass and tree trimmings from family housing, refuse from litter cans, construction debris, classified waste (dry), dead animals, asbestos, and empty oil cans. The MSWLF, located about 1,200 feet east of the nearest occupied structure, is estimated to receive an average of approximately 56 tons of municipal solid waste per day and, at a fill rate of 1-4 acres per year, is expected to reach its capacity by the year 2004. The MSWLF is located in the Hueco Bolson, 4 miles east of the Franklin Mountains. Elevations at the MSWLF range from 3,907 to 3,937 feet above sea level. The climate at the MSWLF and vicinity is arid continental, characterized by an abundance of sunny days, high summer temperatures, relatively cool winters typical of arid areas, scanty rainfall, and very low humidity throughout the year. Average annual temperature near the MSWLF and vicinity is 63.3 degrees Fahrenheit and annual precipitation is 7.8 inches. Potential evaporation in the El Paso area was estimated to be 65 inches per year. Soils at and adjacent to the MSWLF are nearly level to gently sloping, have a fine sandy loam subsoil, and are moderately deep over caliche. The MSWLF is underlain by Hueco Bolson deposits of Tertiary age and typically are composed of unconsolidated to slightly consolidated interbedded sands, clay, silt, gravel, and caliche. Individual beds are not well defined and range in thickness from a fraction of an inch to about 100 feet. The primary source of ground water in the MSWLF area is in the deposits of the Hueco Bolson. A relatively thick vadose zone of approximately 300 feet overlies the aquifer of the Hueco Bolson deposits in the vicinity of the MSWLF. A deep water table prevails for all of the study area. Whether any perched water zones exist below the MSWLF is unknown. Under current conditions, extensive ground-water development by the City of El Paso encompasses the MSWLF. Hydraulic characteristics of the Hueco Bolson vary significantly as a result of the nonuniform nature of the individual beds. Wells in the vicinity of the MSWLF range in depth from about 600 feet to greater than 1,200 feet. Recharge resulting from direct infiltration of precipitation is minor due to the high evaporation and low precipitation rates. The hydraulic gradient in the vicinity of the MSWLF is generally to the south but may vary due to pumpage of a well located on the northeast corner of the perimeter boundary. Ground-water monitoring data for the MSWLF vicinity show a water-level decline of 55.65 feet from November 1958 to December 1987. Depth to water at the northeast corner of the MSWLF as of July 26, 1994, was 325.8 feet below land surface. The city-operated Shearman Well Field, located north of the MSWLF, is a primary source of ground water for the City of El Paso. The test-pumping rate of well JL-49-05-914 (the well nearest to the MSWLF having test-pumping data) was 1,972 gallons per minute on July 20, 1992; the static water level prior to pumping was 317.54 feet below land surface. El Paso Water Utilities reports that the pumping level after 8 hours of pumping was 367.80 feet below land surface, resulting in a drawdown of 50.26 feet, transmissivity of 22,200 feet squared per day (166,000 gallons per day per foot), and specific capacity of 39.2 gallons per minute per foot of drawdown. After the well was shut off, the well recovered to a static water level of 317.46 feet below land surface on July 21, 1992. Ground wat

Abeyta, Cynthia G.

1996-01-01

347

The State of Texas Children: Texas KIDS COUNT Annual Data Book--The Importance of Investing in Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

On February 4, the Center for Public Policy Priorities (CPPP) released the 18th annual Texas KIDS COUNT data book, "The State of Texas Children 2011." The annual data book and free data warehouse provide the latest look at more than 80 different measures of child well-being in Texas and every county in the state. This year, the opening essay,…

Deviney, Frances; Phillips, Pace; Dickerson, Carrie; Tibbitt, Laura

2011-01-01

348

Depositional and diagenetic controls on porosity permeability and oil production in McFarland\\/Magutex (Queen) reservoirs, Andrews County, west Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The McFarland\\/Magutex Queen reservoir complex lies along the northeastern edge of the Central basin platform in the west Texas Permian basin and produces oil from the Permian Queen Formation. Current production from this complex totals 42 million stock-tank barrels (MMSTB) of an estimated 219 MMSTB of original oil in place, with an estimated 90 MMSTB of remaining mobile oil (RMO).

1991-01-01

349

Environmental Assessment for Central Power and Light Company`s proposed Military Highway-CFE tie 138/69-kV transmission line project Brownsville, Cameron County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Central Power and Light Company (CPL) intends to upgrade its existing transmission line ties with the Commision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) system in Mexico. CPL currently has a single 69-kilovolt (kV) transmission line in the Brownsville area which connects CPL`s system with the system of CFE. This existing line runs between the Brownsville Switching Station, located on Laredo Road in Brownsville, Cameron County, Texas, and an existing CFE 69-kV line at the Rusteberg Bend of the Rio Grande in Cameron County. Under current conditions of need, the existing 69-kV line does not possess sufficient capability to engage in appropriate power exchanges. Therefore, CPL is proposing to build a new line to link up with CFE. This proposed line would be a double-circuit line, which would (1) continue (on a slightly relocated route) the existing 69-kV tie from CPL`s Brownsville Switching Station to CFE`s facilities, and (2) add a 138-kV tie from the Military Highway Substation, located on Military Highway (US Highway 281), to CFE`s facilities. The proposed 138/69-kV line, which will be constructed and operated by CPL, will be built primarily on steel single-pole structures within an average 60-foot (ft) wide right-of-way (ROW). It will be approximately 6900--9200 ft (1.3--1.7 miles) in length, depending on the alternative route constructed.

Not Available

1992-04-01

350

A SURVEY OF THE SPEECH AND HEARING NEEDS OF RESIDENTS IN FOUR COUNTIES OF AN ECONOMICALLY DEPRESSED AREA. FINAL REPORT.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THE PURPOSE OF THE SURVEY CONDUCTED BY THE SPEECH AND HEARING CLINIC, NORTHEASTERN STATE COLLEGE, TAHLEQUAH, OKLAHOMA, WAS TO DETERMINE THE NEED FOR SPEECH AND HEARING SERVICES IN FOUR ECONOMICALLY DEPRESSED OKLAHOMA COUNTIES AND TO FIND ECONOMICAL AND EFFECTIVE WAYS OF PROVIDING THE SERVICES. COUNTY SCHOOLS AND DEPARTMENTS OF PUBLIC HEALTH AND…

BLANK, EARL W.; BLANK, GEORGIANA D.

351

Records of wells, drillers' logs, water-level measurements, and chemical analyses of ground water in Chambers, Liberty, and Montgomery counties, Texas, 1980-84  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Information on major new water wells in Chambers, Liberty, and Montgomery Counties was compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey from 1980 through 1984. This report presents the results of the hydrologic data collection on new large-capacity and other selected wells, including well location and completion data, drillers ' logs of the strata penetrated, water levels, and chemical quality of the produced water. These water-well data are supplementary to similar data on older wells in these counties and descriptive evaluations of the groundwater resources which have been published previously. (USGS)

Williams, J. F., III; Coplin, L. S.; Ranzau, C. E., Jr.; Lind, W. B.

1986-01-01

352

Records of wells, drillers' logs, water-level measurements, and chemical analyses of ground water in Brazoria, Fort Bend, and Waller counties, Texas, 1980-84  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Information on major new water wells in Brazoria, Fort Bend, and Waller Counties was compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey from 1980 through 1984. This report presents the results of the hydrologic data collection on new large-capacity and other selected wells, including well location and completion data, drillers ' logs of the strata penetrated, water levels, and chemical quality of the produced water. These water-well data are supplementary to similar data on older wells in these counties and descriptive evaluations of the groundwater resources which have been published previously. (USGS)

Williams, J. F., III; Ranzau, C. F., Jr.; Lind, W. B.; Coplin, L. S.

1986-01-01

353

Development of ground water from the Carrizo sand and Wilcox group in Dimmit, Zavala, Maverick, Frio, Atacosa, Median, Bexar, Live Oak, McMullen, La Salle, and Webb Counties, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The development of ground water for irrigation from the Carrizo sand south and southwest of San Antonio, Tex., has increased rapidly during the past few years. Declining pumping water levels in irrigation wells, caused by increased withdrawals, have caused considerable concern among the residents of the area. In response, the Nueces River Conservation and Reclamation District entered into a cooperative agreement with the Texas Board of Water Engineers and the United States Geological Survey to determine the extent of development and the rate of withdrawal that has cause the decline. All wells that discharged more than 150 gallons per minute for extended periods of time in 1955 from either the Carrizo sand or sands of the Wilcox group were studied and are shown on [late 1. Estimates were made of the total withdrawals by county and are given in table 2. Similar estimates of withdrawals in some of the counties for the irrigation years 1929-30, 1938-39, 1944-45, and 1947-48 are presented for comparison in table 3. Although the Carrizo sand is the principal source of ground water pumped in the area, estimate of withdrawals of water from the Wilcox were included in this inventory because (1) the formation appears to be hydraulically connected to the Carrizo sand, (2) the quality of water generally is good in the outcrop area of the Wilcox, and (3) appreciable withdrawals are being made from the Wilcox for irrigation in a few areas. The investigation covered an area of about 7,500 square miles and included all or parts of the following counties: Dimmit, Zavala, Maverick, Frio, Atascosa, Medina, Bexar, Live Oak, McMullen, La Salle, and Webb (fig. 1).

Moulder, E. A.

1957-01-01

354

Approximate altitude of water levels in wells completed in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers in Fort Bend County and adjacent areas, Texas,January-February 1991  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Measurements of water levels in 106 wells completed in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers were used to construct maps showing the approximate altitude of the piezometric surface of the two aquifers in Fort Bend County and adjacent areas during January and February 1991. (USGS)

Locke, Glenn L.

1993-01-01

355

West Nile Virus, Texas, USA, 2012  

PubMed Central

During the 2012 West Nile virus outbreak in Texas, USA, 1,868 cases were reported. Male patients, persons >65 years of age, and minorities were at highest risk for neuroinvasive disease. Fifty-three percent of counties reported a case; 48% of case-patients resided in 4 counties around Dallas/Fort Worth. The economic cost was >$47.6 million.

Ruktanonchai, Duke; Hesalroad, Dawn; Fonken, Eric; Nolan, Melissa S.

2013-01-01

356

Field project to obtain pressure core, wireline log, and production test data for evaluation of CO/sub 2/ flooding potential. Texas Pacific Bennett Ranch Unit well No. 310, Wasson (San Andres) Field, Yoakum County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The coring, logging and testing of Bennett Ranch Unit well No. 310 was a cooperative effort between Texas Pacific, owner of the well, and Gruy Federal, Inc. The requirements of the contract, which are summarized in Enclosure 1, Appendix A, include drilling and coring activities. The pressure-coring and associated logging and testing programs in selected wells are intended to provide data on in-situ oil saturation, porosity and permeability distribution, and other data needed for resource characterization of fields and reservoirs in which CO/sub 2/ injection might have a high probability of success. This report presents detailed information on the first such project. This project demonstrates the usefulness of integrating pressure core, log and production data to realistically evaluate a reservoir for carbon dioxide flood. The engineering of tests and analysis of such experimental data requires original thinking, but the reliability of the results is higher than data derived from conventional tests.

Swift, T.E.; Goodrich, J.H.; Kumar, R.M.; McCoy, R.L.; Wilhelm, M.H.; Glascock, M.R.

1982-01-01

357

Medical marijuana: the Will Foster case in Oklahoma.  

PubMed

Oklahoma prosecuted Will Foster in 1997 for growing marijuana in his basement to treat his severe rheumatoid arthritis. Although he had no criminal record, he was sentenced to 93 years in prison, 20 of which were for growing the marijuana in the presence of his own children, a charge he denies. Foster refused to plead guilty and accept a 12-year sentence, and instead demanded a jury trial. Since conviction, he has been moved to a Texas prison, was refused medications or minimal care for his arthritis, and the governor has rejected requests for clemency. PMID:11365004

James, J S

1998-01-23

358

77 FR 61645 - Exelon Generation Company, LLC, Victoria County Station Site; Notice of Withdrawal of Application...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...NRC-2012-0165] Exelon Generation Company, LLC, Victoria County Station Site; Notice of Withdrawal...for an Early Site Permit (ESP) for the Victoria County Station (VCS) site located in Victoria County, Texas to the U.S. Nuclear...

2012-10-10

359

Heat flow in Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Oklahoma is one area in which terrestrial heat flow data are sparse. The thermal state of the southern mid-continent, however, is a key to understanding several important geologic problems. These include thermal anomalies associated with Paleozoic fluid migrations and the formation of Mississippi Valley-type lead-zinc deposits, the thermal evolution of the Arkoma and Anadarko sedimentary basins, and the history of hydrocarbon generation and overpressuring in the Anadarko Basin. In the late 1920s, the American Petroleum Institute made a set of equilibrium temperature logs in idle oil wells. These temperature data are generally regarded as being high quality, accurate estimates of rock temperature and they cover the entire central part of Oklahoma. Average thermal gradients in the API survey range from 14 to 43 [sup 0]C/km (average 31.2 [sup 0]C/km) over depth intervals that extend from the surface to a an average depth of 961 m. Geothermal gradients decrease from NNE to SSW. The observed change in thermal gradients could be due to a number of factors. The change in thermal gradients could simply reflect changes in lithology and thermal conductivity. Alternatively, the variation in thermal gradients could be indicative of a change in heat flow related perhaps to variations in the concentration of radioactive heat-producing elements in the crust or heat transport by one or more regional groundwater flow systems. We are proceeding to reduce ambiguity in interpretation by estimating heat flow from thermal conductivity measurements on drill cuttings and heat production from available gamma-ray logs which penetrate basement rocks.

Cranganu, C.; Deming, D. (Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States))

1996-01-01

360

Promoting School Readiness in Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The results of the research, conducted on Oklahoma's universal Pre-kindergarten (Pre-k) program, on children of Tulsa Public Schools (TPS), the largest school district in the state to increase the school readiness are presented.

Gormley, William T., Jr.; Gayer, Ted

2005-01-01

361

Strategies for reservoir characterization and identification of incremental recovery opportunities in mature reservoirs in Frio Fluvial-Deltaic sandstones, south Texas: An example from Rincon Field, Starr County. Topical report  

SciTech Connect

Fluvial-deltaic sandstone reservoirs in the United States are being abandoned at high rates, yet they still contain more than 34 billion barrels of unrecovered oil. The mature Oligocene-age fluvial-deltaic reservoirs of the Frio Formation along the Vicksburg Fault Zone in South Texas are typical of this class in that, after more than three decades of production, they still contain 61 percent of the original mobile oil in place, or 1.6 billion barrels. This resource represents a tremendous target for advanced reservoir characterization studies that integrate geological and engineering analysis to locate untapped and incompletely drained reservoir compartments isolated by stratigraphic heterogeneities. The D and E reservoir intervals of Rincon field, Starr County, South Texas, were selected for detailed study to demonstrate the ability of advanced characterization techniques to identify reservoir compartmentalization and locate specific infield reserve-growth opportunities. Reservoir architecture, determined through high-frequency genetic stratigraphy and facies analysis, was integrated with production history and facies-based petrophysical analysis of individual flow units to identify recompletion and geologically targeted infill drilling opportunities. Estimates of original oil in place versus cumulative production in D and E reservoirs suggest that potential reserve growth exceeds 4.5 million barrels. Comparison of reservoir architecture and the distribution of completions in each flow unit indicates a large number of reserve-growth opportunities. Potential reserves can be assigned to each opportunity by constructing an Sooh map of remaining mobile oil, which is the difference between original oil in place and the volumes drained by past completions.

McRae, L.; Holtz, M.; Hentz, T. [and others

1995-11-01

362

Continued support of the Natural Resources Information System (NRIS) for the State of Oklahoma: Inclusion of a Native American focused effort. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research program was to continue developing, editing, maintaining, utilizing and making publicly available the Oil and Gas Well History file portion of the Natural Resources Information System (NRIS) for the State of Oklahoma, with a special emphasis on the Osage County records through the Osage Tribal council. The NRIS Well history file contains historical and recent completion records for oil and gas wells reported to the Oklahoma Corporation commission on Form 1002-A, and for wells in Osage County that have been reported to the Osage Tribal Council. At the start of this grant, the Well History file contained 378,243 records, providing historical coverage for all of Oklahoma except Osage County. During this grant period, the well record count increased by 33,301, to a new total of 411,544 records. Coverage is now completed for all Oklahoma counties. Through NRIS, the Oklahoma Geological survey (OGS) and the University of Oklahoma (OU) have developed a system with demonstrated value as a data resource for industry exploration and development, policy considerations, scientific research, conservation and other related issues. Because of the ongoing support of the US Department of Energy, the initial development phase of the NRIS Well History has been completed. Through the ongoing support of the federal and state governments as well as industry, it is fully expected that NRIS will continue to be a growing resource for Oklahoma and the nation.

Mankin, C.J. [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States); Banken, M.K. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)

1996-02-29

363

Usage and administration manual for a geodatabase compendium of water-resources data-Rio Grande Basin from the Rio Arriba-Sandoval County line, New Mexico, to Presidio, Texas, 1889-2009  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the New Mexico Interstate Stream Commission, developed a geodatabase compendium (hereinafter referred to as the 'geodatabase') of available water-resources data for the reach of the Rio Grande from Rio Arriba-Sandoval County line, New Mexico, to Presidio, Texas. Since 1889, a wealth of water-resources data has been collected in the Rio Grande Basin from Rio Arriba-Sandoval County line, New Mexico, to Presidio, Texas, for a variety of purposes. Collecting agencies, researchers, and organizations have included the U.S. Geological Survey, Bureau of Reclamation, International Boundary and Water Commission, State agencies, irrigation districts, municipal water utilities, universities, and other entities. About 1,750 data records were recently (2010) evaluated to enhance their usability by compiling them into a single geospatial relational database (geodatabase). This report is intended as a user's manual and administration guide for the geodatabase. All data available, including water quality, water level, and discharge data (both instantaneous and daily) from January 1, 1889, through December 17, 2009, were compiled for the study area. A flexible and efficient geodatabase design was used, enhancing the ability of the geodatabase to handle data from diverse sources and helping to ensure sustainability of the geodatabase with long-term maintenance. Geodatabase tables include daily data values, site locations and information, sample event information, and parameters, as well as data sources and collecting agencies. The end products of this effort are a comprehensive water-resources geodatabase that enables the visualization of primary sampling sites for surface discharges, groundwater elevations, and water-quality and associated data for the study area. In addition, repeatable data processing scripts, Structured Query Language queries for loading prepared data sources, and a detailed process for refreshing all data in the compendium have been developed. The geodatabase functionality allows users to explore spatial characteristics of the data, conduct spatial analyses, and pose questions to the geodatabase in the form of queries. Users can also customize and extend the geodatabase, combine it with other databases, or use the geodatabase design for other water-resources applications.

Burley, Thomas E.

2011-01-01

364

Hyrogeology and Leachate Plume Delineation at a Closed Municipal Landfill, Norman, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The City of Norman operated a solid-waste municipal landfill at two sites in the Canadian River alluvium in Cleveland County, Oklahoma from 1970 to 1985. The sites, referred to as the west and east cells of the landfill, were originally excavations in the...

C. J. Becker

2002-01-01

365

A Comparison of Needs Among Town Dwelling and Rural Elderly in South-Central Oklahoma 1980.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A 1980 sample of 271 elderly (133 rural, 138 urban) in 3 south-central Oklahoma counties (Coal, Murray, and Pontotoc) was surveyed to see if: an economical tool could be devised to assess program effectiveness; professionals providing services to the elderly were influenced by, and influenced the opinions of, recipients in urban areas due to their…

Eckert, Mark S.

366

Final report for the geothermal well site restoration and plug and abandonment of wells: DOE Pleasant Bayou test site, Brazoria County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

For a variety of reasons, thousands of oil and gas wells have been abandoned in the Gulf Coast Region of the United States. Many of these wells penetrated geopressured zones whose resource potential for power generation was undervalued or ignored. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geopressured-Geothermal Research Program was chartered to improve geothermal technology to the point where electricity could be commercially produced from a substantial number of geopressured resource sites. This research program focused on relatively narrow technical issues that are unique to geopressured resources such as the ability to predict reservoir production capacity based on preliminary flow tests. Three well sites were selected for the research program. These are the Willis Hulin and Gladys McCall sites in Louisiana, and the Pleasant Bayou site in Texas. The final phase of this research project consists of plug and abandonment (P&A) of the wells and site restoration.

Rinehart, Ben N.; Seigel, Ben H.

1994-03-13

367

Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Saldana well No. 2, Zapata County, Texas. Volume I. Completion and testing. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Saldana Well No. 2, approximately 35 miles Southeast of the city of Laredo, Texas, was the sixth successful test of a geopressured-geothermal aquifer under the DOE Wells of Opportunity Program. The well was tested through the annulus between 7-inch casing and 2-3/8 inch tubing. The interval tested was from 9745 to 9820 feet. The geological section was the 1st Hinnant Sand, an upper member of the Wilcox Group. Produced water was injected into the Saldana Well No. 1, which was also acquired from Riddle Oil Company and converted to a disposal well. A Miocene salt water sand was perforated from 3005 to 3100 feet for disposal. One pressure drawdown flow test and one pressure buildup test were conducted during a 10-day period. A total of 9328 barrels of water was produced. The highest sustained flow rate was 1950 BWPD.

Not Available

1981-10-07

368

Depositional environments and paleoecology of the Oil Creek Formation (Middle Ordovician), Arbuckle Mountains and Criner Hills, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Oil Creek Formation (Whiterockian) is the second oldest of the five formations which make up the Simpson Group. Although widespread in the subsurface, it is exposed only in the study area and possibly in West Texas. The formation was deposited in a linear basin known as the Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen during a phase of apparent episodic subsidence. Deposition occurred

1982-01-01

369

Geoscience/engineering characterization of the interwell environment in carbonate reservoirs based on outcrop analogs, Permian Basin, West Texas and New Mexico--waterflood performance analysis for the South Cowden Grayburg Reservoir, Ector County, Texas. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A reservoir engineering study was conducted of waterflood performance in the South Cowden field, an Upper Permian Grayburg reservoir on the Central Basin Platform in West Texas. The study was undertaken to understand the historically poor waterflood performance, evaluate three techniques for incorporating petrophysical measurements and geological interpretation into heterogeneous reservoir models, and identify issues in heterogeneity modeling and fluid-flow scaleup that require further research. The approach included analysis of relative permeability data, analysis of injection and production data, heterogeneity modeling, and waterflood simulation. The poor South Cowden waterflood recovery is due, in part, to completion of wells in only the top half of the formation. Recompletion of wells through the entire formation is estimated to improve recovery in ten years by 6 percent of the original oil in place in some areas of the field. A direct three-dimensional stochastic approach to heterogeneity modeling produced the best fit to waterflood performance and injectivity, but a more conventional model based on smooth mapping of layer-averaged properties was almost as good. The results reaffirm the importance of large-scale heterogeneities in waterflood modeling but demonstrate only a slight advantage for stochastic modeling at this scale. All the flow simulations required a reduction to the measured whole-core k{sub v}/k{sub h} to explain waterflood behavior, suggesting the presence of barriers to vertical flow not explicitly accounted for in any of the heterogeneity models. They also required modifications to the measured steady-state relative permeabilities, suggesting the importance of small-scale heterogeneities and scaleup. Vertical flow barriers, small-scale heterogeneity modeling, and relative permeability scaleup require additional research for waterflood performance prediction in reservoirs like South Cowden.

Jennings, J.W. Jr.

1997-05-01

370

Training primary care physicians for local health authority duties in Texas.  

PubMed

Only one fourth of Texas counties have a local health authority (LHA) or health district. Primary care physicians in the remaining counties could be trained in public health basics by providing an online LHA training course and courses at annual meetings of the Texas Medical Association and the Texas Academy of Family Physicians. The Texas Department of State Health Services should develop a web portal for LHAs. The Texas Association of Local Health Officials should also provide automatic limited membership for LHAs. These initiatives would provide public health training to primary care physicians and would greatly improve availability of public health services for the citizens of Texas. PMID:22594741

Mobley, James; Zuniga, Miguel A

2012-07-01

371

Training Primary Care Physicians for Local Health Authority Duties in Texas  

PubMed Central

Only one fourth of Texas counties have a local health authority (LHA) or health district. Primary care physicians in the remaining counties could be trained in public health basics by providing an online LHA training course and courses at annual meetings of the Texas Medical Association and the Texas Academy of Family Physicians. The Texas Department of State Health Services should develop a web portal for LHAs. The Texas Association of Local Health Officials should also provide automatic limited membership for LHAs. These initiatives would provide public health training to primary care physicians and would greatly improve availability of public health services for the citizens of Texas.

Zuniga, Miguel A.

2012-01-01

372

Petrography, geochemistry, and depositional setting of the San Pedro and Santo Tomas coal zones: anomalous algae-rich coals in the middle part of the Claiborne Group (Eocene) of Webb County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Two coal zones, the San Pedro and the overlying Santo Tomas, are presented for nearly 35 km in outcrop, surface and underground mines, and shallow drill holes along the strike of the middle part of the Claiborne Group (Eocene) in Webb County, Texas. A sandstone-dominated interval of 25 to 35 m separates the two coal zones, which range up to 3 m in thickness. The coal-bearing portion of the middle Claiborne Group in the Rio Grande area represents a fining-upward transition from sandstone-dominated, marine-influenced, lower delta plain depositional environments to more inland, mudstone-rich, predominantly freshwater deltaic settings. The less variable nature of the Santo Tomas coal zone reflects its origin in the upper part of an interlobe basin that received only minor clastic influx. Petrographic attributes of the nonbanded coals indicate that they formed subaqueously in fresh to possibly brackish waters. Petrographic study of polished blocks indicates that approximately 10% of the nonbanded coal from both coal zones is composed of green algae fructifications. -from Authors

Warwick, P. D.; Hook, R. W.

1995-01-01

373

Design and Compilation of a Geodatabase of Existing Salinity Information for the Rio Grande Basin, from the Rio Arriba-Sandoval County Line, New Mexico, to Presidio, Texas, 2010  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, compiled salinity-related water-quality data and information in a geodatabase containing more than 6,000 sampling sites. The geodatabase was designed as a tool for water-resource management and includes readily available digital data sources from the U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, New Mexico Interstate Stream Commission, Sustainability of semi-Arid Hydrology and Riparian Areas, Paso del Norte Watershed Council, numerous other State and local databases, and selected databases maintained by the University of Arizona and New Mexico State University. Salinity information was compiled for an approximately 26,000-square-mile area of the Rio Grande Basin from the Rio Arriba-Sandoval County line, New Mexico, to Presidio, Texas. The geodatabase relates the spatial location of sampling sites with salinity-related water-quality data reported by multiple agencies. The sampling sites are stored in a geodatabase feature class; each site is linked by a relationship class to the corresponding sample and results stored in data tables.

Shah, Sachin D.; Maltby, David R. II

2010-01-01

374

Oklahoma Higher Education: Challenging the Conventional Wisdom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A major headline in recent years has been that cash-strapped state governments are cutting back support for many services, including public higher education. Oklahoma is no different. Indeed, in the most recent state budget crafted by Oklahoma policymakers, Oklahoma's public colleges and universities received a 5.8 percent cut in state…

Denhart, Matthew; Matgouranis, Christopher

2011-01-01

375

Fluctuations in densities of the invasive gill parasite Centrocestus formosanus (Trematoda: Heterophyidae) in the Comal River, Comal County, Texas, U.S.A.  

PubMed

Centrocestus formosanus (Trematoda: Heterophyidae) is an invasive fish parasite in the Comal River, Texas, and is considered a threat to the federally endangered fountain darter, Etheostoma fonticola . Monitoring densities of C. formosanus cercariae is crucial to determining levels of infection pressure. We sampled 3 sites in the Comal River during 2 sampling periods, the first during 2006-2007, and again during 2009-2010. Two of the sites were located in the upstream reach of Landa Lake, sites HS and LA, and the third site was located downstream of Landa Lake in the old channel of the river. Cercariae densities were highest at the downstream most site (EA), followed by sites LA and HS, during both sampling periods, but a significant decline in cercariae density was observed between the first and second sampling periods. Several abiotic factors were monitored, including total stream discharge, wading discharge, temperature, and dissolved oxygen, but no river-wide trends were observed. Therefore, we speculate that these factors do not adequately explain the observed long-term decline in cercariae density. We propose that the decline is simply a reflection of a typical pattern followed by most invasive species as they gradually become integrated into the local community following an initial explosive growth in population size. Although cercariae densities may be abating, fountain darters in the Comal River are still threatened by the parasite, and conservation efforts must focus on reducing levels of infection pressure from the parasite whenever possible. PMID:21851264

Johnson, Matthew S; Bolick, Anne; Alexander, Mara; Huffman, David; Oborny, Ed; Monroe, Allen

2012-02-01

376

Depositional and diagenetic controls on porosity permeability and oil production in McFarland/Magutex (Queen) reservoirs, Andrews County, west Texas  

SciTech Connect

The McFarland/Magutex Queen reservoir complex lies along the northeastern edge of the Central basin platform in the west Texas Permian basin and produces oil from the Permian Queen Formation. Current production from this complex totals 42 million stock-tank barrels (MMSTB) of an estimated 219 MMSTB of original oil in place, with an estimated 90 MMSTB of remaining mobile oil (RMO). The gross pay interval contains two parasequences consisting of progradational, 30-ft-thick, upward-shoaling facies packages. Facies include shoreface, mixed tidal channel and intertidal flat, and supratidal. Elongate shoreface facies are characterized by poorly consolidated, massive to thinly laminated sandstones. The supratidal facies, which act as permeability barriers, are characterized by algal-laminated dolostone and nodular, laminated, and massive anhydrite containing halite and gypsum pseudomorphs. Highest production and the largest amount of the 90 MMSTB of RMO is associated with the shoreface and tidal-channel facies. Bulk pore volume storage capacity and permeability are also highest within these two facies. Sandstones are arkosic, containing anhydrite and dolomite cements. Accessory minerals are clays, authigenic feldspar, and dolomite. Three main pore types are recognized: interparticle, moldic and intraconstituent, and micropores. Moldic and intraconstituent porosity is associated with leached feldspars and anhydrite cement dissolution. Microporosity is associated with syndepositional, grain-coating corrensite, dissolution-enhanced feldspar cleavage planes, and authigenic multifaceted dolomite. Microporosity derived from clays and dolomite is formed preferentially in tidal-channel and intertidal flat facies.

Holtz, M.H. (Bureau of Economic Geology, Austin, TX (United States))

1991-03-01

377

Groundwater quality and water-well characteristics in the Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma Jurisdictional Area, central Oklahoma, 1948--2011  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2012, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma, compiled historical groundwater-quality data collected from 1948 to 2011 and water-well completion information in parts of Lincoln, Oklahoma, and Pottawatomie Counties in central Oklahoma to support the development of a comprehensive water-management plan for the Tribe’s jurisdictional area. In this study, water-quality data from 155 water wells, collected from 1948 to 2011, were retrieved from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System database; these data include measurements of pH, specific conductance, and hardness and concentrations of the major ions, trace elements, and radionuclides that have Maximum Contaminant Levels or Secondary Maximum Contaminant Levels in public drinking-water supplies. Information about well characteristics includes ranges of well yield and well depth of private water wells in the study area and was compiled from the Oklahoma Water Resources Board Multi-Purpose Well Completion Report database. This report also shows depth to water from land surface by using shaded 30-foot contours that were created by using a geographic information system and spatial layers of a 2009 potentiometric surface (groundwater elevation) and land-surface elevation. Wells in the study area produce water from the North Canadian River alluvial and terrace aquifers, the underlying Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formation that compose the Garber–Wellington aquifer, and the Chase, Council Grove, and Admire Groups. Water quality varies substantially between the alluvial and terrace aquifers and bedrock aquifers in the study area. Water from the alluvial aquifer has relatively high concentrations of dissolved solids and generally is used for livestock only, whereas water from the terrace aquifer has low concentrations of dissolved solids and is used extensively by households in the study area. Water from the bedrock aquifer also is used extensively by households but may have high concentrations of trace elements, including uranium, in some areas where groundwater pH is above 8.0. Well yields vary and are dependent on aquifer characteristics and well-completion practices. Well yields in the unconsolidated alluvial and terrace aquifers generally are higher than yields from bedrock aquifers but are limited by the thickness and extent of these river deposits. Well yields in the alluvium and terrace aquifers commonly range from 50 to 150 gallons per minute and may exceed 300 gallons per minute, whereas well yields in the bedrock aquifers commonly range from 25 to 50 gallons per minute in the western one-third of study area (Oklahoma County) and generally less than 25 gallons per minute in the eastern two-thirds of the study area (Lincoln and Pottawatomie Counties).

Becker, Carol J.

2013-01-01

378

Fluorescein Dye Penetration in Round Top Rhyolite (Hudspeth County, Texas, USA) to Reveal Micro-permeability and Optimize Grain Size for Heavy REE Heap Leach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Millimeter- and micrometer-scale permeability of fine-grained igneous rocks has generated limited research interest. Nonetheless, the scale and distribution of such micro-permeability determines fluid penetration and pathways, parameters that define both the ability to heap leach a rock and the optimal grain size for such an operation. Texas Rare Earth Resources is evaluating the possibility of heap leaching of yttrium and heavy rare earth elements (YHREE) from the peraluminous rhyolite laccolith that forms one-mile-diameter Round Top Mountain. The YHREEs in this immense, surface-exposed deposit (minimum 1.6 billion tons, Texas Bureau Economic Geology) are dilute and diffuse, suggesting leaching as the best option for recovery. The REE grade is 0.05% and YHREEs comprise more than 70% of the total REE content. The YHREEs are hosted exclusively in micron-scale yttrofluorite grains, which proved soluble in dilute sulfuric acid. Laboratory experiments showed YHREE recoveries of up to 90%. Within limits, recoveries decrease with larger grain sizes, and increase with acid strength and exposure time. Our research question centers on dissolution effectiveness: Is YHREE recovery, relative to grain size, limited by (1) diffusion time of acid into, and dissolved solids, including YHREEs, out of the micro-permeability paths inherent in the rock particles; (2) the effective lengths of the natural micro-permeability paths in the rock; or (3) the putative role of the acid in dissolving new micro-paths into the grains? The maximum grain size should not exceed twice the typical path length (unless acid creates new paths), lest YHREEs in the core of a larger grain than that not be reached by acid. If instead diffusion time is limiting, longer leach time may prove effective. Rather than perform an extensive and expensive series of laboratory leaching experiments--some of which would be several months in duration--to determine optimal grain size, we developed a technique to efficiently determine the limits of penetration of water into the rhyolite. We cut parallel-sided slabs of Round Top rhyolite at staged thickness up to 10 mm. We then wet one side and view the opposite side over time under UV light to detect breakthrough of the fluorescein dye. Because of its extremely low visual detection limits, well below the ppm level, the dye has been widely used in biochemical research, as a tracer in surface and ground water studies, in delineating invisible cracks in such structural material as motor blocks, and in detecting corneal abrasions. We have been successful in detecting breakthrough at different rhyolite thicknesses. Continuing studies focus on mapping of the 2-dimensional distribution of the permeability via hand lens and low-power microscope; use of visible light dyes; and examination of specimens pre- and post-acid leaching to determine whether acid exposure produced significant new micro-permeability.

Negron, L. M.; Clague, J. W.; Gorski, D.; Amaya, M. A.; Pingitore, N. E.

2013-12-01

379

Estimate of self-supplied domestic water use in Oklahoma during 1980  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Reported or measured water-use data for the domestic self-supplied user were not available for Oklahoma; therefore estimates of water use within this classification were derived. The total self-supplied population in Oklahoma during 1980 was estimated to be 343,615, which was 11.4 percent of the total 1980 State population. The rate of water use by this group was estimated to be 56 gallons per capita per day. The estimated annual domestic self-supplied water use by county ranged from 10 to 1,180 acre-feet, with a total statewide use of 21,610 acre-feet.

Stoner, J. D.

1984-01-01

380

Abandoned Texas oil fields  

SciTech Connect

Data for Texas abandoned oil fields were primarily derived from two sources: (1) Texas Railroad Commission (TRRC), and (2) Dwight's ENERGYDATA. For purposes of this report, abandoned oil fields are defined as those fields that had no production during 1977. The TRRC OILMASTER computer tapes were used to identify these abandoned oil fields. The tapes also provided data on formation depth, gravity of oil production, location (both district and county), discovery date, and the cumulative production of the field since its discovery. In all, the computer tapes identified 9211 abandoned fields, most of which had less than 250,000 barrel cumulative production. This report focuses on the 676 abandoned onshore Texas oil fields that had cumulative production of over 250,000 barrels. The Dwight's ENERGYDATA computer tapes provided production histories for approximately two-thirds of the larger fields abandoned in 1966 and thereafter. Fields which ceased production prior to 1966 will show no production history nor abandonment date in this report. The Department of Energy hopes the general availability of these data will catalyze the private sector recovery of this unproduced resource.

Not Available

1980-12-01

381

Effects of stratal architecture and diagenesis on reservoir development in the Grayburg formation: SSouth Cowden field, Ector County, Texas. Annual report, 1 October 1994--30 September 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of geological characterization studies in a typical Grayburg reservior in the Permian Basin. The work applies geological models developed in outcrop studies to better constrain the geological reservoir framework and heterogeneity in a typical Grayburg reservoir, The South Cowden Grayburg reservoir. This framework provides a strong basis for defining petrophysical and flow unit properties in the reservior and serves as a prototype model for other Grayburg reservoir characterization studies. The Grayburg Formation in the South Cowden field of eastern Ector County displays an internal stratal architecture that typifies Grayburg shallow-water platform successions throughout the Permian Basin. Study of core and wireline logs in South Cowden field documents three orders of cyclicity in the Grayburg. The entire Grayburg constitutes a single long-duration accommodation cycle that commenced with a major sea-level rise. Two major diagenetic events strongly affect reservoir character in some parts of the field. Recrystallized dolomite is developed along vertical burrows in highly cyclic mud-dominated packstones and wackestones of the HFS 4 Grayburg highstand succussion. Later alteration and removal of anhydrite are focused in structurally low sections along the eastern and southern margins of the field.

Ruppel, S.; Bebout, D.

1996-02-01

382

TARRANT COUNTY EVALUATION STUDY { FINAL REPORT  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study described in this report is one component of a larger ef- fort to evaluate the efiectiveness of a regional syndromic surveillance reporting network in North Central Texas that is currently housed in the o-ces of the Tarrant County Public Health Department (Fort Worth, Texas). In the cur- rent study, we aimed to assess the ability of the surveillance

DAVID BUCKERIDGE; AMAN VERMA; DAVID SIEGRIST

383

Digital Atlas of the Upper Washita River Basin, Southwestern Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Numerous types of environmental data have been collected in the upper Washita River basin in southwestern Oklahoma. However, to date these data have not been compiled into a format that can be comprehensively queried for the purpose of evaluating the effects of various conservation practices implemented to reduce agricultural runoff and erosion in parts of the upper Washita River basin. This U.S. Geological Survey publication, 'Digital atlas of the upper Washita River basin, southwestern Oklahoma' was created to assist with environmental analysis. This atlas contains 30 spatial data sets that can be used in environmental assessment and decision making for the upper Washita River basin. This digital atlas includes U.S. Geological Survey sampling sites and associated water-quality, biological, water-level, and streamflow data collected from 1903 to 2005. The data were retrieved from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System database on September 29, 2005. Data sets are from the Geology, Geography, and Water disciplines of the U.S. Geological Survey and cover parts of Beckham, Caddo, Canadian, Comanche, Custer, Dewey, Grady, Kiowa, and Washita Counties in southwestern Oklahoma. A bibliography of past reports from the U.S. Geological Survey and other State and Federal agencies from 1949 to 2004 is included in the atlas. Additionally, reports by Becker (2001), Martin (2002), Fairchild and others (2004), and Miller and Stanley (2005) are provided in electronic format.

Becker, Carol J.; Masoner, Jason R.; Scott, Jonathon C.

2008-01-01

384

Ground-water records for eastern Oklahoma, Part 2; water-quality records for wells, test-holes, and springs  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U. S. Geological Survey has collected data on Oklahoma's ground-water resources since 1934. Most of these data were collected as part of specific ground-water studies conducted in cooperation with various Federal, State, and local agencies. Data on construction, yield, water levels, and other physical well parameters are given in 'Ground-Water Records for Northeastern Oklahoma, Part 1 - Records of Wells, Test Holes, and Springs' and in 'Ground-Water Records for Southeastern Oklahoma, Part 1 - Records of Wells, Test Holes, and Springs.' These reports are available from the U.S. Department of the Interior, Geological Survey, Rm. 621, 201 N.W. Third, Oklahoma City, OK 73102. Although some water-quality data for wells, test-holes, and springs have been published, they are scattered through a variety of reports and are not readily available on a regional basis. Furthermore, a considerable amount of data have never been published and can be obtained only from the files of the Geological Survey. The purpose of this report is to make available both published and unpublished water-quality records for approximately 1,740 wells, test-holes, and springs in 23 counties in northeastern Oklahoma and 16 counties in southeastern Oklahoma. Acknowledgment is extended to the many hundreds of individuals who have provided the data compiled in this report.

Havens, John S.

1978-01-01

385

76 FR 62130 - Texas Disaster Number TX-00381  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Counties: (Economic Injury Loans Only): Texas: Bosque, Ellis, Gonzales, Guadalupe, Johnson, Kaufman, Mclennan, Nacogdoches...Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Numbers 59002 and 59008) James E. Rivera, Associate Administrator for Disaster...

2011-10-06

386

Seismic exploration in the Dalhart Basin, western Texas panhandle  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Dalhart basin, the Texas panhandle's [open quotes]other[close quotes] basin, is accountable for over 17 million bbl of oil production since the 1954 discovery of Rehm field by Standard Oil of Texas in Hartley County, Texas. The primary objective in most of the seismic exploration has been the Pennsylvanian\\/Missourian granite washes, one of several sequences of wash deposition that occurred

1993-01-01

387

Developments in south Texas in 1979. [Tabular data and map  

Microsoft Academic Search

The South Texas report includes 58 counties in Texas Railroad Districts 1, 2, and 4 and parts of the Texas offshore. District 1 exploration activity increased 8.9% from 1978. However, the success rate was down from 30.7% in 1978 to 23.1% for this year. Drilling for Upper Cretaceous pays was the focus of activity in 1979. Average well depth was

Fergeson

1980-01-01

388

Oil and gas developments in south Texas in 1986  

Microsoft Academic Search

Exploratory drilling in south Texas (Texas Railroad Commission - RRC - Districts 1, 2, and 4) in 1986 was off 23% from 1985, whereas development drilling fell 36%. The Taylor sand play in Bastrop County gave RRC District 1 an increase in exploratory wells. Continued activity and success in the Yegua and Eocene Wilcox sand play resulted in a total

J. H. Morris; A. M. Raring

1987-01-01

389

Comprehensive Housing Market Analysis: Austin-Round Rock, Texas As of July 1, 2009.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Austin-Round Rock, Texas Housing Market Area (HMA) comprises five counties in central Texas. The principal city of Austin, the state capital, is located in Travis County approximately 200 miles south of Dallas-Fort Worth. The HMA is home to three Fort...

2009-01-01

390

NATURAL HISTORY OF THE TEXAS HORNED LIZARD, PHRYNOSOMA CORNUTUM (PHRYNOSOMATIDAE), IN SOUTHEASTERN COLORADO  

Microsoft Academic Search

Colorado Division of Wildlife currently considers the Texas horned lizard a species of special concern. From May 1995 to October 1997, Texas horned lizards were captured or collected during the active season from 6 counties in Colorado to document abundance and distribution of the species. We captured or collected 290 Texas horned lizards (170 alive and 120 dead on road).

VAN DEVENDER; R. S. FELGER; A. BURQUEZ

391

Texas beckons.  

PubMed Central

Many Canadian medical families have been approached by US headhunters anxious to recruit family physicians to practise in the US. Lynne Sears Williams and her husband, Calgary family physician Jim Williams, went to Texas to see what opportunities awaited. In this article she describes the high and low points of recruitment efforts south of the border.

Williams, L S

1995-01-01

392

40 CFR 282.86 - Oklahoma State-Administered Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...following elements submitted to EPA in Oklahoma's program application for final...Underground Storage Tank Program, Oklahoma Corporation Commission, Jim Thorpe Building, Room 238, Oklahoma City, OK 73105. (1) State...

2010-07-01

393

40 CFR 282.86 - Oklahoma State-Administered Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...following elements submitted to EPA in Oklahoma's program application for final...Underground Storage Tank Program, Oklahoma Corporation Commission, Jim Thorpe Building, Room 238, Oklahoma City, OK 73105. (1) State...

2009-07-01

394

Genetic sequence stratigraphy of upper Desmoinesian Oswego limestone along northern shelf margin of Anadarko basin, West-Central Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Pennsylvania Oswego limestone (upper Desmoinesian) in the vicinity of the northern shelf break of the Anadarko basin contains stratigraphic sequences and associated depositional facies that were controlled by eustatic variations in a slowly subsiding basin. Core descriptions, detailed well-log correlations, and facies maps of Oswego limestone in Dewey and Custer Counties, Oklahoma, supplemented by seismic data along dip profile,

Timothy P. Derstine

1988-01-01

395

75 FR 22434 - Exelon Nuclear Texas Holdings, LLC; Notice of Receipt and Availability of Application for an...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Approvals for Nuclear Power Plants,'' an application for an early site permit (ESP) for the Victoria County Station Site (VCS) located in Victoria County, Texas. An applicant may seek an ESP in accordance with Subpart A of 10 CFR part...

2010-04-28

396

Mexican-Americans of South Texas.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Hogg Foundation for Mental Health sponsored and financed the Hidalgo Project on Differential Culture Change and Mental Health during the 4-year period from 1957 to 1961; this document is an abbreviated report of that study of Mexican-American culture in Hidalgo County, Texas. Acculturation levels of various classes of the Mexican-American…

Madsen, William

397

Locating an Internet Cafe In Houston Texas  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students analyze population, streets, and proximity to high schools and universities to locate an Internet Cafe in Houston, Texas. The concepts could be applied to any county in the USA for for different types of businesses. Through this analysis, students understand patterns of population and the application of geography to everyday business decisions.

Kerski, Joseph

398

Texas Legislature Adopts School Funding Plan.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper analyzes Texas Senate Bill 351 that reforms public school funding. The bill provides for additional state funding and significant increases in local property taxes. The bill creates county education taxing units to neutralize the enormous property wealth differences found among the state's 1,056 school districts. It also provides a…

Cortez, Albert

1991-01-01

399

Determination of reserves of methane from coal beds for use in rural communities in eastern Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Coal-bed methane has been classified as an unconventional source of gas by the U.S. Congress, and it has no Federal price limit. Thus, it is attracting considerable interest concerning its reserves, potential recovery, and use. Previous work in Oklahoma showed that approx. 1.3 tcf of identified coal-bed-methane resources is present in Haskell and Le Flore counties. Thus, the present study

1981-01-01

400

Porosity trends of nonreservoir and reservoir sandstones, Anadarko basin, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The porosity of nonreservoir sandstones in Caddo County, Oklahoma, is determined using compensated-neutron and formation-density logs. The authors preliminary data set represents more than 3,000 net ft of Pennsylvanian and Permian age sandstones from 12 well locations. These porosity data and the average porosities of sandstone oil and gas reservoirs within the Anadarko basin of Oklahoma are each compared to a broad, composite set of porosity data from numerous basins that represent sandstones in general, and they are also compared to each other. The porosity of nonreservoir sandstones in Caddo County declines predictably as a power function of increasing thermal maturity for vitrinite reflectance (R{sub 0}) of 0.5 to 1.3%. The rate of porosity decrease with increasing thermal maturity is more rapid than that of the average porosity-R{sub 0} trend of the composite set, but is still within the porosity-R{sub 0} envelope of sandstones in general. Hydrocarbon reservoir sandstones of the Anadarko basin, however, follow a different pattern. Their rate of porosity loss is much slower than that of both sandstones in general, and nonreservoir sandstones of Caddo County. This slow rate of porosity decline with increasing R{sub 0} could be due to inhibiting effects of early hydrocarbon emplacement on diagenesis and (or) to the bias of economic selection. In any case, as R{sub 0} increases beyond about 1%, the porosity of Anadarko basin reservoir sandstones is anomalously high compared to both nonreservoir Anadarko basin sandstones and sandstones in general.

Hester, T.C.; Schmoker, J.W. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

1991-03-01

401

40 CFR 81.424 - Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Oklahoma. 81.424 Section 81.424 Protection of Environment...Areas Where Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.424 Oklahoma. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing...

2013-07-01

402

Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Oklahoma, 2010  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper profiles the student subgroup achievement and gap trends in Oklahoma for 2010. Oklahoma made progress in narrowing achievement gaps for most major subgroups on the End-of-Instruction (EOI) test in Algebra I. Trends in achievement gaps could not be determined for other grades in math, or for any grades in reading, because the state…

Center on Education Policy, 2010

2010-01-01

403

Travis County Mental Retardation Services Plan of the Travis County Mental Retardation Planning Council.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presented is a county wide (Travis County, Texas) plan developed by 12 human service agencies to provide comprehensive educational, maintenance, and prevention services to the mentally retarded of all ages. Described are three underlying principles: human ecology (which stresses an individual approach to fulfillment), normalization, and community…

Austin - Travis County Mental Health - Mental Retardation Center, TX.

404

Lake Colorado City, Mitchell County, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Annual total phosphorus and total nitrogen loadings to the lake were estimated and subdivided according to either point or non-point source origin. An assessment of the lake's trophic condition and limiting nutrient is also provided. All data collected by...

1977-01-01

405

A preliminary appraisal of the Garber-Wellington Aquifer, southern Logan and northern Oklahoma counties, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Garber-Wellington aquifer, which dips westward at 30 to 40 feet per mile, consists of about 900 feet of interbedded sandstone, shale, and siltstone. Sandstone comprises 35 to 75 percent of the aquifer and averages about 50 percent. Water-table conditions generally exist in the upper 200 feet in the outcrop area of the aquifer; semi-artesian or artesian conditions exist below a depth of 200 feet and beneath rocks of the Hennessey Group (predominantly shale) where the aquifer is fully saturated. Water containing more than 1,000 milligrams per liter dissolved solids occurs at various depths through the area. The altitude of the base of fresh water ranges from 250 feet above sea level in the south-central part of the area to 950 feet in the northwestern part. The thickness of the fresh-water zone ranges from less than 150 feet in the northern part of the area to about 850 feet in the southern part. The total amount of water stored in the fresh-water zone is estimated to be 21 million acre-feet based on specific yield of 0.20. Minimum recharge to the aquifer in 1975 is estimated to be 190 acre-feet per square mile or about 10 percent of the annual precipitation. Total minimum recharge to the aquifer in the study area in 1975 is estimated to be 129,000 acre-feet. Streams in the area are the principal means of ground-water discharge; the amount of discharge is essentially the same as recharge. The amount of groundwater used for municipal and rural water supply in 1975 is estimated to have been 5,000 acre-feet; a similar amount may have been used for industrial purposes. As a result of pumping, the potentiometric surface in 1975 had been lowered about 200 feet in the vicinity of Edmond and about 100 feet in the vicinity of Nichols Hills. Chemical analyses of water from the aquifer indicates that hardness is greater in the upper part of the aquifer than in the lower part, and that sulfate, chloride, and dissolved solids increase with depth. Reported yields of wells more than 250 feet deep range from 70 to 475 gallons per minute and average 240 gallons per minute. Potential well yields range from 225 gallons per minute when the fresh-water zone is 350 feet thick to about 550 gallons per minute where the fresh water zone is 850 feet thick. These estimates of potential yield are based on an available drawdown of half the thickness of the fresh-water zone and a specific capacity of 1.3 gallons per minute per foot. Intrusion of saline water into the fresh-water zone is a potential threat to water quality in the aquifer if the pressure head in the fresh-water zone is reduced sufficiently to allow upconing of saline water. One way to avoid the problem of upconing is by steady pumping at low rates from widely spaced wells; however, information required to determine pumping rates and well spacing is not available. For proper aquifer management the distribution of wells and rates of withdrawals should be designed to capture maximum recharge to the ground-water system. This may be accomplished by developing regional ground-water gradients that are sufficiently large to move water to pumpage centers but not so steep as to cause upconing of saline water or excessive water-level declines.

Carr, Jerry E.; Marcher, Melvin V.

1977-01-01

406

40 CFR 81.123 - Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Carter County, Choctaw County, Coal County, Garvin County, Haskell County, Hughes County, Johnston County, Latimer County, Love County, McIntosh County, Marshall County, Murray County, Okfuskee County, Pittsburg County, Pontotoc County,...

2013-07-01

407

Restoration of One-Room School Facilities in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Within the last 4 years, four one-room school houses have been restored for use as educational museum facilities. These include the Pleasant Valley School in Stillwater, Oklahoma; the Rose Hill School at Perry, Oklahoma; the old school located on the grounds of the Harn Homestead Museum in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; and the Old Roll School, located…

McKinley, Kenneth H.

408

Capital Improvements Program, Clinton, Custer County, Oklahoma. Volume IV.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: Capital improvements programming; Methods of financing needed improvements; Financial capacity of Clinton; Policies for financing; Capital improvement needs 1971 - 1975; Capital improvement needs 1975 - 1990.

1971-01-01

409

Geologic map of Chickasaw National Recreation Area, Murray County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This 1:24,000-scale geologic map is a compilation of previous geologic maps and new geologic mapping of areas in and around Chickasaw National Recreation Area. The geologic map includes revisions of numerous unit contacts and faults and a number of previously “undifferentiated” rock units were subdivided in some areas. Numerous circular-shaped hills in and around Chickasaw National Recreation Area are probably the result of karst-related collapse and may represent the erosional remnants of large, exhumed sinkholes. Geospatial registration of existing, smaller scale (1:72,000- and 1:100,000-scale) geologic maps of the area and construction of an accurate Geographic Information System (GIS) database preceded 2 years of fieldwork wherein previously mapped geology (unit contacts and faults) was verified and new geologic mapping was carried out. The geologic map of Chickasaw National Recreation Area and this pamphlet include information pertaining to how the geologic units and structural features in the map area relate to the formation of the northern Arbuckle Mountains and its Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer. The development of an accurate geospatial GIS database and the use of a handheld computer in the field greatly increased both the accuracy and efficiency in producing the 1:24,000-scale geologic map.

Blome, Charles D.; Lidke, David J.; Wahl, Ronald R.; Golab, James A.

2013-01-01

410

Tulia, Texas  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The PBS series Independent Lens features documentaries and dramas by independent filmmakers. The documentary, TULIA, TEXAS, which will air in February 2009, is about a small town in Texas that experienced a rash of arrests by an undercover narcotics agent ten years ago. The arrests were for cocaine sales, and were mainly of the town's African American residents. On the homepage for the film, visitors can click on "Watch Preview", on the top right side of the page, to see a trailer. To learn about the people in the film, visitors can click on "Read More About the Film" in the middle of the page. There are several short clip provided, which can be viewed by rolling over still pictures from the clips, and clicking on the "Watch Video" prompt as it appears. For visitors interested in seeing a screening of the documentary in their community, click on the "Get Involved" tab near the top of the page. In addition to a list of locations throughout the United States where the film will be screened, there are also links to PDFs of a "Discussion Guide" and a "Facilitator's Guide".

2009-01-01

411

P and S Travel Time Tomography Using a Dense Array of Portable Seismographs and Earthquake Sources in Central Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two pockets of increased seismicity rates in Central Oklahoma provide a unique opportunity to study the deep crustal structure of the area using passive travel-time tomography to analyze data from 156 single-channel seismic recorders with spacings between 0.4 and 0.8 km. The consistency of the seismicity in these areas provided the equivalent of a detailed, reversed seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection profile. The November 5, 2011, M5.6 earthquake in Lincoln County, Oklahoma, was followed by a series of aftershocks, which provided the sources on the eastern end of the profile, and an earthquake swarm 50km to the west, which has been ongoing since October 2009 in Oklahoma County, provided the western sources. Previous studies of these earthquake sequences, using the Oklahoma Geological Survey's Regional Seismic Network, aided by additional stations from the U. S. Geological Survey, provided reasonably well-constrained velocity models and double-differenced relocations for each earthquake. During the four nights the instruments were recording, eight earthquakes with magnitudes between M0.9 and M2.3 were recorded for this study: two were a part of the Oklahoma County swarm, and the other six were of the Lincoln County sequence. These earthquakes yielded a combined total of approximately 2,500 travel times for direct and refracted P and S phases, and provided ray coverage into the Conrad discontinuity, as well as arrivals that appear to be deep reflections. The earthquake sources also provided strong S-wave arrivals.

Toth, C. R.; Holland, A. A.; Keller, G. R.; Holloway, S. D.

2012-12-01

412

Balloon-borne electric field and microphysics measurements in the 29-30 May 2012 supercell storm in Oklahoma during DC3  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During May-June 2012, the National Severe Storms Laboratory in-storm ballooning team flew balloon-borne instruments into thunderstorms in Oklahoma and Texas during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Experiment (DC3) field campaign. The balloon-borne instruments consisted of a standard Vaisala RS92-SGP radiosonde to measure location and standard thermodynamic variables, an electric field meter (EFM) to measure the vector electric field, and a particle imager to measure the particle size distribution. The purpose of the particle imager was to provide verification data for model microphysics and for hydrometeor classification schemes of polarimetric radars, as well as to provide data needed to improve understanding of storm electrification processes. Additional measurements made in the Oklahoma-Texas venue of DC3 included mobile environmental soundings, mobile mesonets, three mobile radars, and the Oklahoma and West Texas Lightning Mapping Arrays. On 29-30 May 2012, several supercell storms occurred in central Oklahoma and produced extraordinary lightning flash rates. One of these storms was sampled by DC3 aircraft and by the ground-based systems described above. In particular, a balloon carried an EFM and a particle imager up to approximately 375 mb before being struck by lightning. This paper presents the particle size distributions for various types of particles relative to the lightning, electric field, and kinematic structure of the 29 May storm on which DC3 focused.

Waugh, S.; Ziegler, C.; MacGorman, D. R.; Biggerstaff, M. I.; DiGangi, E.

2013-12-01

413

Water-level altitudes and continuous and discrete water quality at and near an aquifer storage and recovery site, Bexar, Atascosa, and Wilson Counties, Texas, June 2004-September 2011  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the San Antonio Water System (SAWS), collected data during 2004–11 to characterize the quality of native groundwater from the San Antonio segment of the Edwards aquifer (hereinafter, Edwards aquifer) and preinjection and postinjection water from the Carrizo aquifer (informal name commonly applied to the upper part of the Carrizo-Wilcox aquifer in the area) at and near an aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) site in Bexar, Atascosa, and Wilson Counties, Texas. Daily mean water-level altitude, water temperature, and specific conductance were measured continuously in a monitoring well on the ASR site to determine how injection and withdrawal at the ASR site might affect local groundwater. Groundwater samples were collected and analyzed for selected physical properties and constituents to characterize the quality of native groundwater from the Edwards aquifer and preinjection and postinjection water from the Carrizo aquifer near the ASR site to provide a better understanding of possible changes in the quality of groundwater near an active ASR site that might result from the mixing of water from different aquifers. During injection periods, the water-level altitude in the monitoring well generally increased as the amount of water being injected into all wells at the ASR site increased and decreased as the amount of water being injected into all wells at the ASR site decreased. During withdrawal periods, the water-level altitude in the monitoring well generally increased as the total volume of water being withdrawn from all wells at the ASR site decreased and generally decreased as the total volume of water being withdrawn from all wells increased. Daily mean water temperature fluctuated by less than 1 degree Celsius and was determined to be independent of injection or withdrawal conditions at the ASR site. Changes in daily mean specific-conductance values measured at four depths in the monitoring well at the ASR site occurred without regard to total ASR site injection or withdrawal volumes. No substantial differences were measured over time in major-ion, trace-element, or isotope chemistry of water samples collected from the wells that supplied water from the Edwards aquifer. Little variation in water chemistry was detected in the samples collected from four wells designed to inject and withdraw water at the ASR site, regardless of whether the ASR site was injecting or withdrawing water. The similarity of major-ion and isotope chemistry between the Edwards aquifer source wells and the four ASR wells indicates that little, if any, migration of injected water away from the ASR wells has occurred. In a well located closest to the ASR site in the direction of regional flow for the Carrizo aquifer, a greater alkalinity value and a smaller concentration of chloride were measured in the most recent sample than in all other samples collected at this well. Substantial increases in dissolved iron and manganese concentrations also were observed in this well. The increased alkalinity value and dissolved iron and manganese concentrations and the decreased chloride concentration in the well could indicate that the injected water from the Edwards aquifer had begun to move into at least a part of the strata supplying these wells and might be causing iron and manganese mobilization in the Carrizo aquifer.

Crow, Cassi L.

2012-01-01

414

Ultradeep Anadarko exploration returns in highly pressured Washita County area  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses how ultradeep exploration is slowly returning to the Anadarko basin. An Oklahoma City independent spudded a wildcat in Washita County last week that is scheduled to evaluate mainly Siluro-Devonian Hunton and Cambro-Ordovician Arbuckle. The well is about 6 miles southeast of Cordell, Okla. Drilling time to 26,000 ft is estimated at 320-365 days.

Petzet, G.A.

1990-12-17

415

Genetic diversity in the 3'-terminal region of papaya ringspot virus (PRSV-W) isolates from watermelon in Oklahoma.  

PubMed

The 3'-terminal region (1191 nt) containing part of the NIb gene, complete coat protein (CP) and poly-A tail of 64 papaya ringspot virus (PRSV-W) isolates collected during 2008-2009 from watermelon in commercial fields of four different counties of Oklahoma were cloned and sequenced. Nucleotide and amino acid sequence identities ranged from 95.2-100% and 97.1-100%, respectively, among the Oklahoman PRSV-W isolates. Phylogenetic analysis showed that PRSW-W isolates clustered according to the locations where they were collected within Oklahoma, and each cluster contained two subgroups. All subgroups of Oklahoman PRSV-W isolates were on separate branches when compared to 35 known isolates originating from other parts of the world, including the one reported previously from the USA. This study helps in our understanding about the genetic diversity of PRSV-W isolates infecting cucurbits in Oklahoma. PMID:22160129

Abdalla, Osama A; Ali, Akhtar

2012-03-01

416

Jim Driver, Panola County Oil and Gas Boom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Written by history students at Gary High School, Gary, Texas, this volume presents several diverse pictures of life in East Texas. The first article, "Jim Driver, Panola County Oil and Gas Boom," (Bobby Kelly and Billy Anderson) talks about drilling for oil and gas and the concerns of an employee of the drilling company. "When I Was Nine Years…

Wyatt, Bobbie, Ed.

1981-01-01

417

Oklahoma seismic network. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has established rigorous guidelines that must be adhered to before a permit to construct a nuclear-power plant is granted to an applicant. Local as well as regional seismicity and structural relationships play an integral role in the final design criteria for nuclear power plants. The existing historical record of seismicity is inadequate in a number of areas of the Midcontinent region because of the lack of instrumentation and (or) the sensitivity of the instruments deployed to monitor earthquake events. The Nemaha Uplift/Midcontinent Geophysical Anomaly is one of five principal areas east of the Rocky Mountain front that has a moderately high seismic-risk classification. The Nemaha uplift, which is common to the states of Oklahoma, Kansas, and Nebraska, is approximately 415 miles long and 12-14 miles wide. The Midcontinent Geophysical Anomaly extends southward from Minnesota across Iowa and the southeastern corner of Nebraska and probably terminates in central Kansas. A number of moderate-sized earthquakes--magnitude 5 or greater--have occurred along or west of the Nemaha uplift. The Oklahoma Geological Survey, in cooperation with the geological surveys of Kansas, Nebraska, and Iowa, conducted a 5-year investigation of the seismicity and tectonic relationships of the Nemaha uplift and associated geologic features in the Midcontinent. This investigation was intended to provide data to be used to design nuclear-power plants. However, the information is also being used to design better large-scale structures, such as dams and high-use buildings, and to provide the