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1

Geohydrology of the Oklahoma Panhandle, Beaver, Cimarron, and Texas Counties.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Ogallala aquifer is the principal source of ground water in the Oklahoma Panhandle. Based on an estimated average storage coefficient of 0.1, the quantity of water stored in the Ogallala aquifer was computed at approximately 50 million acre-feet (6.17...

D. L. Hart G. L. Hoffman R. L. Goemaat

1976-01-01

2

Reservoir geology of upper Mississippian St. Louis Limestone, South Mouser field, Texas County, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Five porosity zones in the upper 80 ft (24.4 m) of the St. Louis Limestone have a cumulative production of over 1 million bbl of oil since St. Louis production was discovered at South Mouser field, Texas County, Oklahoma, in April 1983. Porosity in the cored St. Louis Limestone includes primary intergranular, leached grain, and minor vuggy, intragranular, and fracture. Within the five porosity zones, core porosity generally ranges from 6 to 14% and permeability from 1 to 100 md. Porosity development and cementation reflect, for the most part, meteoric diagenesis. Deposition and diagenesis of the upper 100 + ft (30.5 + m) of the St. Louis Limestone were markedly influenced by a local St. Louis paleohigh in approximately the same location as the present structural high at South Mouser field. Cementation, compaction, and a significant amount of ineffective moldic porosity in the cored interval of the St. Louis Limestone result in increased pore system tortuosity. This indicates that an m value greater than 2.0 may be appropriate in S/sub W/ calculations. Additionally, in one porosity zone, ooids contain microporosity visible in SEM study. This porosity may hold irreducible water affecting S/sub W/ calculations made from wireline logs and resulting in an inaccurate assessment of the zone's ability to produce hydrocarbons. Two distinct oil-water contacts occur in the upper St. Louis Limestone at South Mouser. The corresponding reservoirs are separated by a low porosity and permeability layer seen in core and correlated across the field using neutron-density logs.

Caldwell, C.D.; Vick, H.O. III

1987-08-01

3

Groundwater impacts due to conservation reserve program in Texas County, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) is one of the largest programs of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) that encourages farmers and ranchers to establish resource-conserving vegetative covers to address soil, water and related resource issues on their lands. This research study examines the relationship between the CRP and the changes in the groundwater levels within Texas County in the

Mahesh N. Rao; Zhiming Yang

2010-01-01

4

Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Development through High-Resolution 3C3D Seismic and Horizontal Drilling: Eva South Marrow Sand Unit, Texas County, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The Eva South Morrow Sand Unit is located in western Texas County, Oklahoma. The field produces from an upper Morrow sandstone, termed the Eva sandstone, deposited in a transgressive valley-fill sequence. The field is defined as a combination structural stratigraphic trap; the reservoir lies in a convex up -dip bend in the valley and is truncated on the west side by the Teepee Creek fault. Although the field has been a successful waterflood since 1993, reservoir heterogeneity and compartmentalization has impeded overall sweep efficiency. A 4.25 square mile high-resolution, three component three-dimensional (3C3D) seismic survey was acquired in order to improve reservoir characterization and pinpoint the optimal location of a new horizontal producing well, the ESU 13-H.

Wheeler,David M.; Miller, William A.; Wilson, Travis C.

2002-03-11

5

Annotated bibliography of the Anadarko basin area; Kansas - Oklahoma - Texas  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains 118 additional records related to the geology of the Anadarko basin area of Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas. Specific topics include, but are not limited to: petroleum, and natural gas deposits; mineralogy; lithology; petrology; tectonics; and geochemistry. The subject index provides listings of records related to each county and the geologic ages covered by this area.

McLaughlin, J.E.

1985-01-01

6

Geographic Distribution Records for Scolopendromorph Centipedes (Arthropoda:Chilopoda) from Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

During 2001-2003,we collected eight species of scolopendromorph centipedes from 17counties of Arkansas (AR), seven counties of Oklahoma(OK), and 17 counties of Texas(TX). The followingtaxa were collected: Cryptops leucopodus (Rafinesque) from Bowie and Cass counties, TX, and Pulaski County,AR; Hemiscolopendra marginata (Say)from Columbia, Garland, Hempstead, Little River, Pike, Polk, and Yellcounties, AR, and Cass, Cherokee, Coryell, Houston, Johnson, Kimble, Marion, Nacogdoches,

Chris T. McAllister

7

Archeological Testing in Atoka County, Southeastern Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Proposed Impoundment 20 of the Lower Clear Boggy Creek Watershed Project is a single purpose floodwater retarding structure on Birch Creek in Atoka County, Oklahoma. Three archeological sites in the direct impact zone of the maximum flood pool were tested...

D. T. Hughes

1977-01-01

8

78 FR 16036 - Service Level Environmental Impact Statement for the Texas Oklahoma Passenger Rail Study Corridor...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Statement for the Texas Oklahoma Passenger Rail Study Corridor, South Texas to Oklahoma...improved high- speed intercity passenger rail service along an 850-mile corridor...Level EIS, the Texas Oklahoma Passenger Rail Study (Study) also includes...

2013-03-13

9

Digital Atlas of Texas Counties  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created by the Center for Geosptial Technology at Texas Tech University, this digital atlas is a fantastic find. It brings together information about all of Texas's counties, including satellite relief maps and data sets about the roads, rivers, lakes, and other features in each area. Visitors can use the interactive map to click on a county of interest, or use the drop down menu to select a region. Once users select a county, they can download information about it for future use. The site also contains a number of Featured Links to resources from the U.S. Census Bureau, the Texas Association of Counties, and several tourism agencies.

10

National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Sherman Quadrangle, Texas and Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Uranium favorability of the Sherman Quadrangle, Texas and Oklahoma, was evaluated using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria. Surface and subsurface geologic studies were supplemented by aerial radiometric surveys and hydrogeochemical and stream-...

D. K. Hobday F. G. Rose

1982-01-01

11

Detection of Trichinella murrelli in coyotes ( Canis latrans) from Oklahoma and North Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

We determined the prevalence and mean intensity of Trichinella sp. infection in coyotes from six counties in Oklahoma and one in northern Texas. Tongues from 77 coyotes were examined using histology and artificial tissue digestion. Histological examination showed a prevalence of 3.9% (3 of 77) whereas the prevalence was 6.5% (5 of 77) based on artificial digestion of 5.0g of

Mason V. Reichard; Kathryn E. Tiernan; Kelsey L. Paras; Maria Interisano; Michael H. Reiskind; Roger J. Panciera; Edoardo Pozio

2011-01-01

12

77 FR 21154 - BNSF Railway Company-Abandonment Exemption-in Oklahoma County, OK  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Railway Company--Abandonment Exemption--in Oklahoma County, OK BNSF Railway Company (BNSF) has filed...between milepost 541.69 and milepost 542.91 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, Okla. (the Line).\\1\\ The Line...

2012-04-09

13

Ground-water in the Beggs area, Okmulgee County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This memorandum discusses the geology of the Beggs area in Okmulgee County, Oklahoma, as it is related to the availability of ground water. Geological reports and unpublished data from the files of the Oklahoma Geological Survey, together with local information furnished by R.W. Steinman, Beggs Water Superintendent, are the basis for the statements that follow. (available as photostat copy only)

Schoff, Stuart L.

1948-01-01

14

Seaway conversion moves Oklahoma gas to Texas plant  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purchase and conversion to natural gas transmission of the Seaway crude oil pipeline was an effort to capitalize on the line's location to gather raw gas in Oklahoma and Texas for use as fuel at Phillips Petroleum Co.'s Sweeny, Tex., refinery. The Seaway pipeline was planned during the early 1970s as a major midwest oil artery. The purpose of the

G. L. II Bazin; R. L. Ince

1986-01-01

15

DWARF BUFO AMERICANUS AMERICANUS FROM CLEVELAND COUNTY, OKLAHOMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The American toad, Bv,!o americanus americanv,s (Holbrook), i8 an eastern form, ranging from southeastern Canada southward along the coast to eastern Texas, and westward through the prairie states to eastern Kansas and central Oklahoma. It is the common toad in New England, New York, Wisconsin, and Missouri and is the commonest species of B.fo in eastern Oklahoma, especially in the

ARTHUR N. BRAGG

16

Summary of proceedings: Oklahoma and Texas wind energy forum, April 2-3, 1981  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Wind Energy Forum for Oklahoma and Texas was held at the Amarillo Quality Inn in Amarillo, Texas on April 2-3, 1981. Its purpose was to bring together the diverse groups involved in wind energy development in the Oklahoma and Texas region to explore the future commercial potential and current barriers to achieving this potential. Major topics of discussion included

S. C. Nelson; D. E. Ball

1981-01-01

17

County Profiles. Health Service Area 7 Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Information is provided by county on disease, mortality, and morbidity to accompany the health systems plan and annual implementation plan developed by the Northeast Texas Health Systems Agency, Inc. The section titled Profiles by County contains statisti...

1978-01-01

18

National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Sherman Quadrangle, Texas and Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Uranium favorability of the Sherman Quadrangle, Texas and Oklahoma, was evaluated using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria. Surface and subsurface geologic studies were supplemented by aerial radiometric surveys and hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance studies. A total of 1537 rock, soil, and stream-sediment samples were analyzed for 30 elements. Environments favorable for sandstone-type uranium deposits are present in the Cretaceous Antlers

D. K. Hobday; F. G. Jr. Rose

1982-01-01

19

Hydrogeologic subdivision of the Wolfcamp series and Pennsylvanian system of eastern Texas Panhandle, north-central Texas, and southwestern Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The Pennsylvanian-Wolfcamp section in the Palo Duro Basin includes brine aquifers that are considered to be the most important ground-water flow paths in the deep-basin system. This report is the fifth in a series providing summary documentation of studies that subdivide the section into hydrogeologic units based on their judged relative capacities for transmitting water. This report extends the hydrogeologic study area to the eastern Texas Panhandle, north-central Texas, and southwestern Oklahoma. It includes 37 counties in Texas and Oklahoma. Underground patterns of rock distribution are delineated from a hydrologic perspective and at a level of detail appropriate for numerical modeling of regional ground-water flow. Hydrogeologic units are defined and characterized so that appropriate porosity and permeability values can be assigned to each unit during construction of the numerical models (not part of this study), and so that modelers can combine units where necessary. In this study, hydrogeologic units have been defined as mappable, physically continuous rock bodies that function in bulk as water-transmitting or water-retarding units relative to adjacent rocks. Interpretations are made primarily from geophysical logs. Hydrologic characteristics are assessed on the basis of properties typically associated with certain lithologies (e.g., sandstones are more pervious than shales) and on the basis of gross variations in effective porosity (particularly in carbonate sequences). 44 refs., 32 figs., 1 tab.

Kayal, R.R.; Kistner, D.J.; Kranes, R.; Verock, F.P.

1987-03-01

20

Hydrogeology of Webb County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Introduction: Webb County, in semiarid South Texas on the U.S.-Mexico border, is a region confronted by increasing stresses on natural resources. Laredo (fig. 1), the largest city in Webb County (population 193,000 in 2000), was one of the 10 fastest-growing metropolitan areas in the country during 1990-2000 (Perry and Mackun, 2001). Commercial and industrial activities have expanded throughout the region to support the maquiladora industry (manufacturing plants in Mexico) along the border and other growth as a result of the passage of the North American Free Trade Agreement. The Rio Grande currently (2002) is the primary source of public water supply for Laredo and other cities along the border in Webb County (fig. 1). Other cities, such as Bruni and Mirando City in the southeastern part of the county, rely on ground-water supplies to meet municipal demands. Increased water demand associated with development and population growth in the region has increased the need for the City of Laredo and Webb County to evaluate alternative water sources to meet future demand. Possible options include (1) supplementing the surface-water supply with ground water, and (2) applying artificial storage and recovery (ASR) technology to recharge local aquifers. These options raise issues regarding the hydraulic capability of the aquifers to store economically substantial quantities of water, current or potential uses of the resource, and possible effects on the quality of water resulting from mixing ground water with alternative source waters. To address some of these issues, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the City of Laredo, began a study in 1996 to assess the ground-water resources of Webb County. A hydrogeologic study was conducted to review and analyze available information on the hydrogeologic units (aquifers and confining units) in Webb County, to locate available wells in the region with water-level and water-quality information from the aquifers, and to analyze the hydraulic properties of the aquifers. The purpose of this report is to document the findings of the study. The information is organized by hydrogeologic unit and presented on this and six other sheets.

Lambert, Rebecca B.

2004-01-01

21

Survey of Fishes in the Oklahoma Panhandle and Harper County, Northwestern Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

A survey of the fishes of the Panhandle and Harper County in Northwestern Oklahoma produced 33 species representing 12 families. Sixteen additional species have been reported by others or have been stocked in lakes, for a total of 48 known species. Only seven were new records for the region. A description of the Cimarron and North Canadian River Systems, a

Jimmie Pigg

22

Reproductive Cycle of the Red Shiner, Notropis lutrensis, in Central Texas and South Central Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The breeding season of red shiner extended from April to September in south central Oklahoma and central Texas in both 1976 and 1977. Ovarian regression occurred in midsummer of 1977; this coincided with hot, dry weather. In Oklahoma, but not in Texas, ovarian regression was followed by recrudescence during a brief period of rainfall. The midseason regression did not occur

Russel T. Farringer III; Anthony A. Echelle; Steven F. Lehtinen

1979-01-01

23

Geology of the Cottonwood Creek field, Carter County, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

In late 1987, the Cottonwood Creek field, Carter County, Oklahoma, was heralded by flows of nearly 4,000 BOPD and 3 MMCFGD from the upper Arbuckle Group. The field structure is part of the buried Criner uplift along the southwest flank of the Ardmore basin. The uplift formed during a Late Mississippian\\/Early Pennsylvanian episode of bidirectional thrusting (northeast and southwest) probably

M. T. Roberts; D. L. Read

1990-01-01

24

Hydrocarbon accumulation along the Cumberland Thrust, Bryan County, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bryan County is in the Coastal Plain Province in S. Oklahoma. Surface rocks are Cretaceous in age and are superimposed over preexisting Paleozoic folds and faults which control the oil and gas accumulation. Cretaceous strata dip gently into the Cumberland-Kingston Syncline, a southeastern extension of the Ardmore-Anadarko Basin. The folds and faults of the subsurface trend northwest to southeast from

Huffman

1976-01-01

25

Hydrogeologic data for the Blaine aquifer and associated units in southwestern Oklahoma and northwestern Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report is a compilation of hydrogeologic data collected for an areal ground-water investigation of the Blaine aquifer and associated units in southwestern Oklahoma and northwestern Texas. The study area includes parts of Greer, Harmon, and Jackson counties in Oklahoma and parts of Childress, Collingsworth, Hall, Hardeman, and Wilbarger counties in Texas. The Blaine aquifer consists of cavernous gypsum and dolomite beds. Water from the Blaine aquifer supports a local agriculture based mainly on irrigated cotton and wheat. The purpose of the study was to determine the availability, quantity, and quality of ground water from the Blaine aquifer and associated units. This report provides a reference for some of the data that was used as input into a computer ground-water flow model that simulates ground-water flow in the Blaine aquifer. The data in this report consists of: (1) Monthly or periodic water-level measurements in 134 wells; (2) daily mean water-level measurements for 11 wells equipped with water-level recorders; (3) daily total precipitation measurements from five precipitation gages; (4) low-flow stream-discharge measurements for 89 stream sites; (5) miscellaneous stream-discharge measurements at seven stream sites; (6) chemical analyses of surface water from 78 stream sites during low-flow periods; (7) chemical analyses of ground water from 41 wells; and (8) chemical analyses of runoff water collected at five sites.

Runkle, D. L.; Bergman, D. L.; Fabian, R. S.

1997-01-01

26

A FLORISTIC STUDY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY, OKLAHOMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The county is located principally within the Claremore Cuesta Plains geomorphic province. The Eastern Sandstone Cuesta Plains province extends into the western edge of the county at various points. These two provinces contain Pennsylvanian series sandstones and limestones that cap ridges between broad shale plains (3). The ridges have a steep face on the east and a gentle backslope with

Charles B. McDonald

1976-01-01

27

Detection of Trichinella murrelli in coyotes (Canis latrans) from Oklahoma and North Texas.  

PubMed

We determined the prevalence and mean intensity of Trichinella sp. infection in coyotes from six counties in Oklahoma and one in northern Texas. Tongues from 77 coyotes were examined using histology and artificial tissue digestion. Histological examination showed a prevalence of 3.9% (3 of 77) whereas the prevalence was 6.5% (5 of 77) based on artificial digestion of 5.0 g of muscle from coyote tongues. One sample was positive for Trichinella sp. on histology but negative by artificial digestion. Combining data from both diagnostic techniques showed that six of 77 (7.8%) coyotes were infected with Trichinella spp. The mean intensity of Trichinella sp. larvae ranged from 0.2 to 66.2 with an average of 16.0 larvae per gram (LPG) of tongue. Genotyping results demonstrated that the coyotes were infected with Trichinella murrelli. This is the first report of T. murrelli infection in coyotes in Oklahoma. T. murrelli had previously been isolated from coyotes in Texas. PMID:21723041

Reichard, Mason V; Tiernan, Kathryn E; Paras, Kelsey L; Interisano, Maria; Reiskind, Michael H; Panciera, Roger J; Pozio, Edoardo

2011-06-13

28

Fish and Habitat Heterogeneity in Four Streams in the Central Oklahoma\\/Texas Plains Ecoregion  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined fish assemblages and habitat characteristics in four streams within the Oklahoma portion of the Central Oklahoma\\/Texas Plains Ecoregion. Our objective was to evaluate the heterogeneity of habitat and fish assemblages within a single ecoregion. We were also interested in whether observed patterns in habitat and fish assemblages were related. We measured habitat characteristics and sampled fish at four

Conrad S. Toepfer; Lance R. Williams; A. David Martinez; William L. Fisher

1998-01-01

29

Environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas  

SciTech Connect

In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and the eight other potentially sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Deaf Smith County site as one of the five sites suitable for characterization. 591 refs., 147 figs., 173 tabs.

Not Available

1986-05-01

30

Summary of proceedings: Oklahoma and Texas wind energy forum, April 2-3, 1981  

SciTech Connect

The Wind Energy Forum for Oklahoma and Texas was held at the Amarillo Quality Inn in Amarillo, Texas on April 2-3, 1981. Its purpose was to bring together the diverse groups involved in wind energy development in the Oklahoma and Texas region to explore the future commercial potential and current barriers to achieving this potential. Major topics of discussion included utility interconnection of wind machines and the buy-back rate for excess power, wind system reliability and maintenance concerns, machine performance standards, and state governmental incentives. A short summary of each presentation is included.

Nelson, S.C.; Ball, D.E.

1981-06-01

31

Environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas  

SciTech Connect

In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines.

Not Available

1986-05-01

32

Archaeological Investigations of the Waterfall-Gilford Creeks Watershed, McCurtain County, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Archaeological investigations in the Waterfall-Gilford Creeks Watershed, McCurtain County, Oklahoma, produced information on the culture history and settlement ecology of the region along the Red River drainage. Three archaeological sites yielded componen...

T. J. Prewitt F. E. Kirby D. J. Gaston

1982-01-01

33

Fish Assemblages of Reservoirs, Illustrated by Lake Texoma (Oklahoma-Texas, USA) as a Representative System  

Microsoft Academic Search

We suggest six generalizations about the ecology of fishes of large, warm, reservoirs in the southern United States. We test these postulates with examples from more than 20 years of our studies in Lake Texoma (Oklahoma-Texas), and previous historic work in this impoundment. Such impoundments are dynamic systems in which precise predictions about fish faunas, local assemblages, or their potential

William J. Matthews; Keith B. Gido; Frances P. Gelwick

2004-01-01

34

Estimated transportation routes to a candidate salt repository site in Deaf Smith County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a preliminary analysis of possible highway and rail transportation routes within Texas, Oklahoma, and New Mexico for shipments of spent fuel to the candidate repository site in Deaf Smith County, Texas. Two cases are examined for highway shipments. The initial case analyzes shipments following the Department of Transportation's HM-164 regulations for shipment of spent fuel. The second case analyzes normal commercial routes. Three rail cases are also examined. Each case analyzes potential routes that would be used based for different access spurs into the repository site. Two appendices are included which examine additional scenarios generated by restricting routes from passing through various metropolitan areas. The major finding is that most shipments to the Deaf Smith site will pass through Amarillo, Texas. There are few, if any, feasible alternative routes which would significantly reduce the amount of traffic passing through Amarillo.

Joy, D.S.; Johnson, P.E.

1987-10-01

35

Left-lateral intraplate deformation along the Amarillo-Wichita Uplift. Texas Panhandle and Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The west-northwest trending Amarillo-Wichita Uplift in the Texas Panhandle and southwestern Oklahoma was produced as a result of recurrent large-scale intraplate deformation during the Late Paleozoic Ancestral Rocky Mountain orogeny. The area was broadly folded in the Late Devonian to Early Mississippian. Cambrian through Devonian units were downwarped into the Anadarko Basin, truncated by erosion, and unconformably overlain by Upper Devonian to Mississippian strata. To the south, Mississippian units overlie Ordovician strata and Precambrian basement along the axis of the Texas Arch. Strike-slip faulting along the axis of the Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen formed the Amarillo-Wichita Uplift during the Pennsylvanian. In the Texas Panhandle, the uplift has been internally deformed into a series of pull-apart grabens which are filled with up to 1500 m of Pennsylvanian arkosic debris. The Whittenburg Trough, a large pull-apart basin along the southwest flank of the uplift, contains about 2300 m of syntectonic deposits. Erosional edges of older units beneath the Mississippian are presently offset 120 km in a left-lateral sense along the uplift. Pre-Mississippian units located in the Hardeman Basin of southwestern Oklahoma originally aligned with those in the western Anadarko Basin of the Texas Panhandle. Restoration to the pre-faulting configuration also realigns offset Proterozoic basement terranes. The orientation of strike-slip and reverse faults and related folds indicate northeast-southwest directed compression during the Pennsylvanian.

Budnik, R.T.

1985-01-01

36

Geology of the Cottonwood Creek field, Carter County, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

In late 1987, the Cottonwood Creek field, Carter County, Oklahoma, was heralded by flows of nearly 4,000 BOPD and 3 MMCFGD from the upper Arbuckle Group. The field structure is part of the buried Criner uplift along the southwest flank of the Ardmore basin. The uplift formed during a Late Mississippian/Early Pennsylvanian episode of bidirectional thrusting (northeast and southwest) probably related to convergent strike-slip faulting. The basic field structure formed as a northeast-directed thrust plate, cored with Arbuckle Group carbonates and cut by a backthrust. The Cottonwood Creek anticline was near the crest of the uplift. It was erosionally denuded of its Simpson through Caney cover and karsted to depths of at least 1,600 ft. Subthrust strata include the Woodford source rocks. In the Middle to Late Pennsylvanian the uplift was buried by clastics (about 8,000 ft thick over cottonwood Creek). Culminating in the late Pennsylvanian, a second episode of wrench faulting sliced through the Criner uplift. About 3 mi of left-lateral slip occurred on this Criner-Healdton fault, which also dropped the anticline about 3,000 ft relative to the block to the south, completing the trap at Cottonwood Creek field. Fourteen wells have found oil in the anticline over an approximately 2.5 by 0.5-mi area. The oil column is at least 900 ft thick. Eight of the wells tested for 1,200-3,700 BOPD plus associated gas from a complex of fractures, Brown Zone dolomite, and karst-enhanced porosity in the West Spring Creek and Kindblade formations.

Roberts, M.T.; Read, D.L. (CNG Producing Co., Denver, CO (USA))

1990-05-01

37

Predictability of littoral-zone fish communities through ontogeny in Lake Texoma, Oklahoma-Texas, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Synopsis  We sampled larval, juvenile and adult fishes from littoral-zone areas of a large reservoir (Lake Texoma, Oklahoma-Texas) (1) to characterize environmental factors that influenced fish community structure, (2) to examine how consistent fish–environment relationships were through ontogeny (i.e., larval vs. juvenile and adult), and (3) to measure the concordance of larval communities sampled during spring to juvenile and adult communities

Michael A. Eggleton; Raul Ramirez; Chad W. Hargrave; Keith B. Gido; Jason R. Masoner; Gary D. Schnell; William J. Matthews

2005-01-01

38

National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) performance in southern Arizona, Texas, and Oklahoma in 2003-2004  

Microsoft Academic Search

Four field campaigns were conducted in southern Arizona (AZ) and in northern Texas and southern Oklahoma (TX-OK) in 2003 and 2004 to evaluate the performance of the U.S. National Lightning Detection Network™ (NLDN) in detecting cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning after an upgrade in 2002 and 2003. The 2-year average flash detection efficiency (DE) in AZ was 93% (1024\\/1097), and the measured

Christopher J. Biagi; Kenneth L. Cummins; Kenneth E. Kehoe; E. Philip Krider

2007-01-01

39

National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) performance in southern Arizona, Texas, and Oklahoma in 2003–2004  

Microsoft Academic Search

Four field campaigns were conducted in southern Arizona (AZ) and in northern Texas and southern Oklahoma (TX-OK) in 2003 and 2004 to evaluate the performance of the U.S. National Lightning Detection Network™ (NLDN) in detecting cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning after an upgrade in 2002 and 2003. The 2-year average flash detection efficiency (DE) in AZ was 93% (1024\\/1097), and the measured

Christopher J. Biagi; Kenneth L. Cummins; Kenneth E. Kehoe; E. Philip Krider

2007-01-01

40

Left-lateral intraplate deformation along the Amarillo-Wichita Uplift. Texas Panhandle and Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The west-northwest trending Amarillo-Wichita Uplift in the Texas Panhandle and southwestern Oklahoma was produced as a result of recurrent large-scale intraplate deformation during the Late Paleozoic Ancestral Rocky Mountain orogeny. The area was broadly folded in the Late Devonian to Early Mississippian. Cambrian through Devonian units were downwarped into the Anadarko Basin, truncated by erosion, and unconformably overlain by Upper

Budnik

1985-01-01

41

Linear features determined from Landsat imagery in the Texas and Oklahoma panhandles  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A map (scale 1:500,000) shows the linear features determined from Landsat imagery in the Texas and Oklahoma panhandles. The linear features, sometimes called linear trends or lineaments, are not identified as to type or origin. Most probably represent fractures or fracture zones, which may affect the movement of water or other fluids through rocks. The linear features are classified as to length--less than 30 mi/mg and more than 30 mi/mg. (USGS)

Cooley, M. E.

1984-01-01

42

Ground water in the Blanchard area, McClain County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A letter from Lloyd L. Bowser, City Clerk, dated January 8, 1948, in behalf of the town council and Mayor Walter Casey, indicates that a serious shortage of water is faced by the town of Blanchard, McClain County, Oklahoma. The town is near the eastern boundary of Grady County, where an investigation of the ground-water resources is being made by the Oklahoma Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey as part of a State-wide investigation. Information obtained thus far may aid the town by showing where additional ground water for municipal supply may be sought. (available as photostat copy only)

Davis, Leon Virgil; Schoff, Stuart L.

1948-01-01

43

Artesian water in Somervell County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Somervell County is part of the Grand Prairie region of north-central Texas. An excellent supply of artesian water is available from the Trinity reservoir at no great depth. The first flowing well in Somervell County was drilled in 1880, and the first flowing well in Glen Rose, the county seat, was drilled in 1881. Since 1880 more than 500 wells have been constructed, probably more than half of them prior to 1900. Many of these early wells have been abandoned, either because the well hole caved in as a result of the absence or deterioration of casing or because the wells ceased to yield water by natural flow. The artesian water has always been used chiefly for domestic supply and for watering stock. Only a comparatively small area of farm land is now irrigated. The quantity used to supply the needs of tourist camps and outdoor swimming pools forms a relatively large percentage of the total amount withdrawn from the artesian reservoir in Somervell County. The artesian water is contained chiefly in the permeable sandstone beds--the basal sands for the Trinity group. Some shallow wells of small capacity are supplied by water in the crevices and solution channels in limestone that apparently is near the base of the Glen Rose formation and probably derives its water by leakage from the underlying Trinity reservoir. The wells encounter from one to three aquifers, the number depending upon their depth and location. At and around Glen Rose, the area in which most of the flowing wells are concentrated, the first aquifer is the creviced portion of the limestone, which is encountered at about 50 feet but does not everywhere yield water. The second and third aquifers, both of which are part of the 'basal sands' of the Trinity group, are much more uniform and persistent; the second is encountered at Glen Rose at depths of 100 to 135 feet, and the third at depths of about 275 to 330 feet. The artesian reservoir is supplied by water that falls as rain or snow upon the outcrop of the 'basal sands' on the higher lands west and north of Somervell County. These permeable beds dip eastward and southeastward beneath the county and are covered by the less permeable beds of the overlying Glen Rose formation. As the water that reaches the zone of saturation percolates down the dip of the beds it is confined under artesian pressure, and wells that penetrate these beds at lower altitudes yield water by natural flow. Originally the artesian pressure was sufficient to raise the water in tightly cased wells in the northwestern part of Somervell County to a maximum altitude of about 750 feet above sea level, but at Glen Rose the original artesian head was probably not more than 710 feet. From the information avail- able it would appear that the original head of the water in the upper aquifers was not nearly as great as that of the lower aquifer. The head has declined generally throughout the county. At Glen Rose in June 1930 the artesian head of the water from the deepest aquifer of the Trinity reservoir was about 639 feet above sea level, and the head of the water from the upper aquifers was about 15 feet less. The decline in head still continues, but at a very much slower rate than formerly. With the decline in head the size of the area of artesian flow has decreased, though in recent years the shrinkage has been comparatively little. The draft from the artesian reservoir in Somervell County during the summer is estimated at about 1,000,000 gallons a day, distributed as follows: Domestic use, 150,000 gallons; stock use, 60,000 gallons; recreation pools, 250,000 gallons; irrigation, 180,000 gallons; and waste, not including underground leakage, 360,000 gallons. In winter the daily draft is probably about 370,000 gallons less than in summer. The 360,000 gallons a day permitted to flow from wells without being used for any beneficial purposes is an unnecessary drain upon the artesian reservoir. The head of many of the flowing wells in Glen R

Fiedler, Albert George

1934-01-01

44

The Economic Feasibility of a Manufacturing Plant Utilizing Wood Residues in McCURTAIN County, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this study is to ascertain the economic feasibility of a plant to be located in McCurtain County, Oklahoma, which will manufacture products from the saw mill residue of the area. The area has a number of saw mills, ample supplies of forest ...

1965-01-01

45

Ravia nappe, Bryan County, Oklahoma: a gravity slide block off the Tishomingo uplift  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Ravia nappe in Bryan County, Oklahoma, is located along the southwestern flank of the Tishomingo uplift, between the Cumberland and East Durant oil fields. This mass of Cambrian-Ordovician through Mississippian sediments tectonically overlies younger Springer shales (Pennsylvanian) of the Ardmore basin. Previously, this feature has been interpreted to have been thrust southward along the Cumberland fault, a fault parallel

1983-01-01

46

Rock and soil discrimination by low altitude airborne gamma-ray spectrometry in Payne County, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ability to identify and discriminate rock and soil types from the ; air using gamma spectrometry was investigated in Payne County, Oklahoma. The ; data, which were reduced to concentration values for K, U, and Th, were obtained ; from a helicopter at an average altitude of 75 feet above the ground. The area ; investigated was underlain by

T. F. Schwarzer; J. A. S. Adams

1973-01-01

47

NOTES ON FOODS OF GREAT HORNED OWLS (BUBO VIRGINIANUS) IN JACKSON COUNTY, OKLAHOMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prey species were identified from 169 pellets cast by a pair of great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) and their young in Jackson County, southwestern Oklahoma. Pellets were collected monthly between February and August, 1977. In decreasing order of importance, prey species were: cottontails (Sylvilagus spp.), cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus), and mice (Perognathus hispidus, Peromyscus spp., and Reithrodontomys spp.).

Jack D. Tyler; Jill F. Jensen

1981-01-01

48

The microdistribution of mayflies (Ephemeroptera) in myriophyllum beds in Pennington Creek, Johnston County, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

I studied the population densities and the microdistributions of the four most abundant mayfly (Ephemeroptera) nymphs in Myriophyllum heterophyllum beds in Pennington Creek, Johnston County, Oklahoma, from May to December, 1977. The section of the stream studied has relatively constant flow rates and temperatures throughout the year due to continuous inflow from groundwater. This uniform physical environment allows the plant

William P. Magdych

1979-01-01

49

Hydrogeologic Investigation of the Ogallala Aquifer in Roger Mills and Beckham Counties, Western Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Ogallala aquifer underlies portions of 10 counties in western Oklahoma. Regionally, it is part of the High Plains aquifer that underlies 174,000 square miles in eight states in the central United States. The study area for this investigation, defined ...

M. Belden N. I. Osborn

2002-01-01

50

Ground water in the Anadarko area [Caddo County], Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report offers a preliminary interpretation of the geology and ground-water hydrology of the Anadarko area, Oklahoma. L.V. Davis prepared the accompanying map from aerial photographs and furnished much of the geologic information, and records of the State Mineral Survey (WPA) were used in the preparation of the section on the Rush Springs sandstone. (available as photostat copy only)

Schoff, Stuart L.

1948-01-01

51

Case report: Emergence of autochthonous cutaneous leishmaniasis in northeastern Texas and southeastern Oklahoma.  

PubMed

Autochthonous human cases of leishmaniasis in the United States are uncommon. We report three new cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis and details of a previously reported case, all outside the known endemic range in Texas. Surveys for enzootic rodent reservoirs and sand fly vectors were conducted around the residences of three of the case-patients during the summer of 2006; female Lutzomyia anthophora sand flies were collected at a north Texas and southeast Oklahoma residence of a case-patient, indicating proximity of a suitable vector. Urban sprawl, climatologic variability, or natural expansion of Leishmania mexicana are possible explanations for the apparent spread to the north and east. Enhanced awareness among healthcare providers in the south central region of the United States is important to ensure clinical suspicion of leishmaniasis, diagnosis, and appropriate patient management. PMID:23185078

Clarke, Carmen F; Bradley, Kristy K; Wright, James H; Glowicz, Janet

2012-11-26

52

Public Health Assessment for National Zinc Company, Bartlesville, Washington County, Oklahoma, Region 6. CERCLIS No. OKD000829440.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The proposed National Zinc Company (NZC) National Priorities List (NPL) Site is located in the City of Bartlesville in Washington and Osage Counties, Oklahoma. Based on the available information, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR...

1995-01-01

53

Congential syphilis in Harris County, Texas, 1993--1996  

Microsoft Academic Search

The specific aims of this study were to: (1) To determine the incidence of congenital syphilis (CS) for the 1993-96 birth cohorts in Houston\\/Harris County, based on the newly revised 1989 CS surveillance definition in Houston\\/Harris County, Texas; (2) To study the distribution of selected variables listed in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Congenital Syphilis Case Investigation

Rachel Komala Moodey

1998-01-01

54

Ground-Water Data in Orange County and Adjacent Counties, Texas, 1985- 90.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The lower unit of the Chicot aquifer is a major source of freshwater for Orange County Texas. In 1989 the average rate of ground-water withdrawal from the lower unit of the Chicot aquifer in Orange County for municipal and industrial use was 13.8 million ...

M. C. Kasmarek

1999-01-01

55

Five Nonceramic Sites in Western Atoka County, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Five nonceramic archaeological sites were tested in western Atoka County. These sites are located in proposed floodwater retaining structure No. 21 of the Lower Clear Boggy Creek Watershed. Sites tested appear to range in temporal and cultural affiliation...

W. Young

1977-01-01

56

Ground-Water Resources of Coke County, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Coke County, located in semiarid west-central Texas, where large ranches, small farms, and oil production are the main bases of the economy, has a small supply of ground and surface water. Of the approximately 1,900 acre-feet of fresh to moderately saline...

C. A. Wilson

1973-01-01

57

Ground-water resources of Cass and Marion Counties, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Cass and Marion Counties, an area of 1,325 square miles in northeast Texas, are underlain by the Cypress aquifer which is composed of the Wilcox Group, Carrizo Sand, Reklaw Formation, and Queen City Sand, all of Eocene age. These geologic units are for the most part hydraulically interconnected and generally function as a single aquifer.

Broom, Mathew E.

1971-01-01

58

Daily Fish and Zooplankton Abundances in the Littoral Zone of Lake Texoma, Oklahoma-Texas, in Relation to Abiotic Variables  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many studies have shown the effects of yearly or monthly environmental conditions on the structure of fish and zooplankton communities. Environmental conditions can also vary greatly on much shorter time scales. We tested the effects of abiotic conditions on the daily abundance of fish and zooplankton in the littoral zone of Lake Texoma, Oklahoma-Texas. After date was removed statistically from

Philip W. Lienesch; William J. Matthews

2000-01-01

59

Depth Distribution of Striped Bass and Other Fish in Lake Texoma (Oklahoma-Texas) during Summer Stratification  

Microsoft Academic Search

In May and June 1982, before stratification, echolocator charts indicated that fish in the main basin of Lake Texoma (Oklahoma-Texas) were distributed from the surface to the bottom. With the onset of stratification and oxygen depletion in the hypolimnion in July, fish moved upward in the water column, avoiding anoxic conditions near the bottom. Stratification (defined more conspicuously by dissolved

William J. Matthews; Loren G. Hill; Scott M. Schellhaass

1985-01-01

60

Mapping surface alteration effects associated with hydrocarbon reservoirs at Gypsum Plain, Texas, and Cement, Oklahoma, using multispectral information  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two test sites, Gypsum Plain, Texas, and Cement, Oklahoma, were selected to evaluate combined use of airborne visible\\/infrared imaging spectrometer (AVIRIS) and thermal infrared multispectral scanner (TIMS) for detection of alteration effects associated with hydrocarbon microseepage. Bleaching of redbuds, variations in carbonate cement, replacement of gypsum, exidation of iron, and changes in clay mineralogy may correlate spatially with oil and

V. Carrerre; H. R. Lang; M. F. Crawford

1991-01-01

61

Ground-Water Quality in the Central High Plains Aquifer, Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas, 1999.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this report is to describe the ground-water quality of the central High Plains aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. Water samples collected during April- August 1999 from 74 randomly distributed domestic wa...

M. F. Becker B. W. Bruce L. M. Pope W. J. Andrews

2002-01-01

62

Environmental assessment, Deaf Smith County site, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (42 USC sections 10101-10226) requires the environmental assessment of a proposed site to include a statement of the basis for nominating a site as suitable for characterization. Volume 2 provides a detailed statement evaluating the site suitability of the Deaf Smith County Site under DOE siting guidelines, as well as a comparison of the Deaf Smith County Site to the other sites under consideration. The evaluation of the Deaf Smith County Site is based on the impacts associated with the reference repository design, but the evaluation will not change if based on the Mission Plan repository concept. The second part of this document compares the Deaf Smith County Site to Davis Canyon, Hanford, Richton Dome and Yucca Mountain. This comparison is required under DOE guidelines and is not intended to directly support subsequent recommendation of three sites for characterization as candidate sites. 259 refs., 29 figs., 66 refs. (MHB)

Not Available

1986-05-01

63

Edwards Aquifer Evaluation: Kinney County, Texas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Edwards Aquifer is one of the most studied and most prolific aquifers in the United States. The aquifer is a heavily fractured and faulted carbonate aquifer with transmissivities in excess of 100 ft2/s. The City of San Antonio relies upon the Edwards Aquifer as its sole source for water. Much work has been done on quantifying recharge to the aquifer and discharge from wells and acquiring aquifer characteristics from pumping tests, specific capacity tests, and geophysical logs. Although the aquifer has been well studied in Bexar County, much less is known about the Edwards Aquifer in Kinney County. This is partly due to the lower population within the county (approximately 3,500 people) relative to the eastern counties (Uvalde, Medina, Bexar, Comal, and Hays) and the great distance of Kinney County from high profile discharge areas such as the City of San Antonio and Comal and San Marcos Springs. Three key products resulted from this study: (1) exploratory well drilling and the largest aquifer test in the county that were conducted to evaluate the well yields within a 10,000 acre study area in which a drawdown of 2.5 ft approximately 1.2 miles away was observed while pumping at approximately 4,600 gpm; (2) a recharge estimate for the Edwards Aquifer within Kinney County of approximately 71,382 ac-ft/yr; and (3) locating the Brackettville Groundwater Divide from an evaluation of ground water flow direction and hydrograph analysis. These results help evaluate the complex hydraulics occurring within Kinney County and aid in development of ground water modeling that will be used in managing the Edwards Aquifer.

Khorzad, Kaveh

2003-10-01

64

Environmental assessment overview, Deaf Smith County site, Texas  

SciTech Connect

In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Deaf Smith County site as one of five sites suitable for characterization. 3 figs.

Not Available

1986-05-01

65

Description of floodplains and wetlands, Deaf Smith County site, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Floodplains and wetlands are important features of the Texas Panhandle landscape, and are found on the Deaf Smith County site and in its vicinity. Use or disturbance of floodplains and wetlands in relation to the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program is subject to environmental review requirements implementing two Executive Orders. This report provides general information on playa wetlands in the Texas Panhandle, and describes and maps floodplains and wetlands on the Deaf Smith site and in its vicinity. The report is based on the published literature, with information from limited field reconnaissance included.

Not Available

1986-11-01

66

Natural gas in Texas part of Marietta syncline, Cooke and Grayson counties, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The area of the Marietta syncline in Cooke and Grayson counties, Tex., appears to have the greatest potential for future gas production in N. Texas. Extensive exploration for gas in this area began in 1951, although it long had been important for oil production. Both oil and gas accumulations are controlled mainly by structure. Solution gas is the main type

Bakker

1968-01-01

67

76 FR 13271 - DeQueen and Eastern Railroad, LLC-Corporate Family Transaction Exemption-Texas, Oklahoma...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Oklahoma-Arkansas border) and milepost 0.0 (Valliant, Okla.), including auxiliary, storage, and spur tracks, in McCurtain County, Okla. DQ&E and TOE are Class III rail carriers and are wholly owned subsidiaries of Tennessee Southern...

2011-03-10

68

Field Evaluation of Gas Well Stimulation Methods Sutton County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Attempts to stimulate marginal gas producers in Sutton County, Texas, has provided an opportunity to evaluate several types of stimulation fluids on a comparative basis. The fluids used included water-base, oil-base, and acid-base fluids. A thorough study of the production history of wells following treatment demonstrates the effectiveness of the different fluids on a long term basis. Conclusions drawn from

C. F. Smith; D. L. Murphy

1974-01-01

69

Archaeological Survey of Laughlin Air Force Base, Val Verde County, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Center for Archaeological Research of the University of Texas at San Antionio conducted a 100-percent pedestrian survey of Laughlin Air Force Recreation Area and Marina in Val Verde County, Texas. In addition to the survey, limited paleontological and...

C. L. Tennis M. Renner R. J. Hard

1996-01-01

70

Did fertility go up after the Oklahoma City bombing? An analysis of births in metropolitan counties in Oklahoma, 1990-1999.  

PubMed

Political and sociocultural events (e.g., Brown v. Board of Education in 1954 and the German reunification in 1989) and natural disasters (e.g., Hurricane Hugo in 1989) can affect fertility. In our research, we addressed the question of whether the Oklahoma City bombing in April 1995, a man-made disaster, influenced fertility patterns in Oklahoma. We defined three theoretical orientations--replacement theory, community influence theory, and terror management theory--that motivate a general expectation of birth increases, with different predictions emerging from time and geographic considerations. We used two different empirical methodologies. First, we fitted dummy-variable regression models to monthly birth data from 1990 to 1999 in metropolitan counties. We used birth counts to frame the problem and general fertility rates to address the problem formally. These analyses were organized within two design structures: a control-group interrupted time-series design and a difference-in-differences design. In these analyses, Oklahoma County showed an interpretable, consistent, and significant increase in births. Second, we used graphical smoothing models to display these effects visually. In combination, these methods provide compelling support for a fertility response to the Oklahoma City bombing. Certain parts of each theory helped us organize and understand the pattern of results. PMID:16463916

Rodgers, Joseph Lee; St John, Craig A; Coleman, Ronnie

2005-11-01

71

Reservoir characterization, porosity, and recovery efficiency of deeply-buried paleozoic carbonates: Examples from Oklahoma, Texas and New Mexico  

Microsoft Academic Search

Capillary-pressure data from the Early Ordovician Ellenburger Dolomite (west Texas and New Mexico) and the Late Ordovician-Early\\u000a Devonian Hunton Group carbonates (Oklahoma) are used to calculate or infer petrophysical characteristics, such as median pore-throat\\u000a size, pore-throat size distribution, effective porosity, and recovery efficiency (RE). For both data sets, porosity and RE\\u000a are inversely related. A positive relationship between RE and

Joachim E. Amthor; David C. Kopaska-Merkel; Gerald M. Friedman

1988-01-01

72

Geological notes, Boory field, Cameron County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The gas fields of the Lower Miocene sands of Cameron County have gained enough maturity in their production experience to afford a consideration of their performance and characteristics. The Holy Beach field in the Laguna Madre has produced over 100 billion cu ft of gas, and others have produced over 25 billion; several are smaller. The characteristics of these fields include the modest cost of drilling in the range of pays 3000 ft to 7500 ft depth, and the small area of production, with several pay sands, usually a few feet thick but being very porous (over 30%) and permeable (streaks of over 800 md). A fairly dry gas is produced with normal pressures. The Boory field may be singled out as a small but interesting field in this trend. It was found in 1973 and produced 4-1/2 billion cu ft of gas from a 310-acre area with 8 pay sands in depths 4750 to 6200 ft depth. The field was abandoned in 1980.

Stapp, W.L.

1981-12-01

73

Occurrence of Chlorothalonil, Its Transformation Products, and Selected Other Pesticides in Texas and Oklahoma Streams, 2003-2004  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The primary purpose of the study described in this report was to determine if the fungicide chlorothalonil (2,4,5,6-tetrachloroisophthalonitrile), three of its transformation products, or selected other pesticides are transported to surface water after use on peanuts or other crops in Texas and Oklahoma. The results summarized here are part of a larger study that includes data from sites in Alabama, Florida, and Georgia. Chlorothalonil is classified as a probable carcinogen, and the 4-hydroxy of chlorothalonil transformation product is more soluble, more stable, and, for some species, more toxic than its parent compound. In 2003, water samples were collected from three surface-water sites in Texas and two surface-water sites in Oklahoma; in 2004, samples were collected from the two Oklahoma sites. Chlorothalonil was not detected in any of the 20 samples analyzed. The 4-hydroxy of chlorothalonil transformation product was detected in three samples collected in 2004, with a maximum concentration of 0.018 microgram per liter (?g/L); the other two transformation products (diamide chlorothalonil and 1-amide-4-hydroxy chlorothalonil) were not detected in any sample. In addition, 19 samples were analyzed for as many as 109 other pesticides and transformation products. Atrazine was detected in 13 samples and had a maximum concentration of 0.122 ?g/L. Deethylatrazine was detected in 10 samples and had a maximum concentration of 0.04 ?g/L. Metolachlor was detected in eight samples and had a maximum concentration of 0.019 ?g/L. Fifteen other pesticides or pesticide transformation products also were detected. In general, concentrations of pesticides were less than concentrations that are commonly observed in Midwestern streams. The results indicate that the use of chlorothalonil on peanut crops has not resulted in substantial contamination of the studied streams in Texas and Oklahoma.

Battaglin, William A.; Kuivila, Kathryn; Winton, Kim; Meyer, Michael

2008-01-01

74

A contribution to the geology of northeastern Texas and southern Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The region in central and northeastern Texas and southern Oklahoma known as the Black and Grand prairies abounds in features of interest to physiographers, geologists, and paleontologists, and the pioneer investigators of this region must have experienced renewed satisfaction in each day's exploration. The reports of Joseph A. Taff, Robert T. Hill, and others, published chiefly under the auspices of State and Federal surveys, represent with approximate accuracy at most places the general distribution of the outcrops of the formations in this region, and contain detailed descriptions of many sections that constitute a mine of useful information. The reader of the present paper is urged, therefore, to hold as most important the general excellence of the earlier reports of these authors and to relegate the inaccuracies and mistakes to which his attention will be called to the relatively unimportant place in which they belong, remembering at the same time that a future generation of investigators may find our own shortcomings as great as those we now criticize.

Stephenson, Lloyd William

1919-01-01

75

Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibrations Stimulation in Osage County, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This Technical Quarterly Report is for the reporting period July 1, 2001 to September 30, 2001. The report provides details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma''. The project is divided into nine separate tasks. Several of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, while other tasks are dependent on earlier tasks being completed. The vibration stimulation well is permitted as Well 111-W-27, section 8 T26N R6E Osage County Oklahoma. It was spud July 28, 2001 with Goober Drilling Rig No. 3. The well was drilled to 3090-feet cored, logged, cased and cemented. The Rig No.3 moved off August 6, 2001. Phillips Petroleum Co. has begun analyzing the cores recovered from the test well. Standard porosity, permeability and saturation measurements will be conducted. They will then begin the sonic stimulation core tests Calumet Oil Company, the operator of the NBU, has begun to collect both production and injection wells information to establish a baseline for the project in the pilot field test area. Green Country Submersible Pump Company, a subsidiary of Calumet Oil Company, will provide both the surface equipment and downhole tools to allow the Downhole Vibration Tool to be operated by a surface rod rotating system. The 7-inch Downhole Vibration Tool (DHVT) has been built and is ready for initial shallow testing. The shallow testing will be done in a temporarily abandoned well operated by Calumet Oil Co. in the Wynona waterflood unit. The data acquisition doghouse and rod rotating equipment have been placed on location in anticipation of the shallow test in Well No.20-12 Wynona Waterflood Unit. A notice of invention disclosure was submitted to the DOE Chicago Operations Office. DOE Case No.S-98,124 has been assigned to follow the documentation following the invention disclosure. A paper covering the material presented to the Oklahoma Geologic Survey (OGS)/DOE Annual Workshop in Oklahoma City May 8,9 2001 has been submitted for publication to the OGS. A technical paper draft has been submitted for the ASME/ETCE conference (Feb 2002) Production Technology Symposium. A one-day SPE sponsored short course which is planned to cover seismic stimulation efforts around the world, will be offered at the SPE/DOE Thirteenth Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery in Tulsa, OK, April 13-17, 2002. Dan Maloney, Phillips and Bob Westermark, OGCI will be the instructors. In addition, a proposed technical paper has been submitted for this meeting.

J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

2001-09-30

76

78 FR 31998 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00071  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...be adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties (Physical Damage and Economic Injury Loans): Cleveland, Lincoln, McClain, Oklahoma, Pottawatomie. Contiguous Counties (Economic Injury Loans Only): Oklahoma:...

2013-05-28

77

75 FR 47650 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00042  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...determined to be adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Oklahoma. Contiguous Counties: Oklahoma: Canadian, Cleveland, Kingfisher, Lincoln, Logan, Pottawatomie. The Interest Rates are: [[Page...

2010-08-06

78

The Relation of Certain Personality Traits to Selected Professional and Social Attributes of Oklahoma Male County Field Extension Personnel.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study assessed the personality traits of Oklahoma field extension personnel as related to certain professional and social attributes and to job involvement. A special background questionnaire, a job involvement inventory, and a true false test called the California Psychological Inventory (CPI) were administered to 77 county extension…

Bajaj, Dev Raj

79

The Bible No. 1 and No. 3 Sites (Mc-200 and Mc-202), McCurtain County, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The materials obtained from evaluative tests of archeological sites Mc-200 and Mc-202 in McCurtain County, Oklahoma, are described. Site Mc-202 represents an early Caddo, Gibson or Fulton stage, single component hunting camp. Site Mc-200 represents a prob...

D. T. Hughes

1976-01-01

80

An integrated study of seismic anisotropy and the natural fracture system at the Conoco Borehole Test Facility, Kay County, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

A significant body of published work has developed establishing fracture-related seismic anisotropy as an observable effect. To further the understanding of seismic birefringence techniques in characterizing natural fracture systems at depth, an integrated program of seismic and geologic measurements has been conducted at Conoco's Borehole Test Facility in Kay County, Oklahoma. Birefringence parameters inferred from the seismic data are consistent

John H. Queen; William D. Rizer

1990-01-01

81

Land-use and ground-water data, Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribes, Concho Reserve, Canadian County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes, conducted the present study to determine the vulnerability to contamination of ground water beneath tribal lands within the 3,991-acre Concho Reserve in Canadian County, Oklahoma (map A).

Bergman, DeRoy L.; Savoca, Mark E.

1993-01-01

82

Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This Technical Quarterly Report is for the reporting period March 31, 2002 to June 30, 2002. The report provides details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma''. The project is divided into nine separate tasks. Several of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, while other tasks are dependent on earlier tasks being completed. The vibration stimulation Well 111-W-27 is located in section 8 T26N R6E of the North Burbank Unit (NBU), Osage County Oklahoma. It was drilled to 3090-feet cored, logged, cased and cemented. The rig moved off August 6, 2001. Phillips Petroleum Co. has performed several core studies on the cores recovered from the test well. Standard porosity, permeability and saturation measurements have been conducted. In addition Phillips has prepared a Core Petrology Report, detailing the lithology, stratigraphy and sedimentology for Well 111-W27, NBU. Phillips has also conducted the sonic stimulation core tests, the final sonic stimulation report has not yet been released. Calumet Oil Company, the operator of the NBU, began collecting both production and injection wells information to establish a baseline for the project in the pilot field test area since May 2001. The original 7-inch Downhole Vibration Tool (DHVT) has been thoroughly tested and it has been concluded that it needs to be redesigned. An engineering firm from Fayetteville AR has been retained to assist in developing a new design for the DHVT. The project participants requested from the DOE, a no-cost extension for the project through December 31, 2002. The no-cost extension amendment to the contract was signed during this reporting period. A technical paper SPE 75254 ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation, Osage County, Oklahoma'' was presented at the 2002 SPE/DOE Thirteenth Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery, in Tulsa OK, April 17, 2002. A one-day short course was conducted at the SPE/DOE Thirteenth Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery in Tulsa, OK, April 13-14, 2002. Dan Maloney, Phillips and Bob Westermark, OGCI, Brett Davidson and Tim Spanos, Prism Production Technologies, were the instructors. The sixteen attendees also participated in the half-day field trip to the test facility near Tulsa.

J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

2002-06-30

83

Petroleum geology of Woodbine Formation, Freestone County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Upper Cretaceous Woodbine Formation consists of clastics deposited in various southwestward-prograding environments on the margin of the subsiding East Texas basin. Depositional environments range from fluvial (in the north) to deltaic and a shelf strandplain (in the southwest). The Woodbine unconformably overlies the Lower Cretaceous Washita Group except in the basin axis and south of the Angelina-Caldwell flexure where deposition may have been continuous. Transgression by Eagle Ford seas closed the Woodbine deposition. Structural features in Freestone County include the East Texas basin, the Sabine uplift, the Mexia-Talco fault zone, and the East Texas salt province. Isopach thicknesses of the Woodbine range from 375 ft in the west to more than 900 ft in the east (basinward). Thickening on the downthrown side of the Mexia-Talco faults indicates syndepositional faulting, related to allochthonous rocks sliding over the Jurassic Louann Salt. Structural accumulations of petroleum have been discovered against faults and salt domes, but stratigraphic pinch-outs of the Woodbine's discontinuous lenticular sand bodies remain as excellent exploration opportunities.

Carden, M.

1986-05-01

84

Pesticide safety training among farmworker adolescents from Starr County, Texas.  

PubMed

This study of adolescent farmworkers describes employer compliance with pesticide safety training, a requirement of the EPA-mandated Worker Protection Standard (WPS), and identifies variables associated with having received training within the prior five years. Data are from "A Study of Work Injuries in Farmworker Children, " a three-year cohort study of high school students living along the Texas-Mexico border in Starr County. Data were collected using a web-based, self-administered, confidential survey. Of 324 students who participated in field work between January 1 and September 30, 2003, 68 (21.0%) reported ever receiving pesticide safety training. Overall, the 61 (18.8%) students who reported training within the prior five years also reported that their most recent instruction covered at least three key WPS areas (i.e., entry into a recently treated field, pesticide-related injuries/illnesses, and emergency care for pesticide exposure). Based on a multiple logistic regression, students who were male (OR = 1.97), worked only outside of Texas (OR = 2.73), worked only for commercial growers/owners (OR = 4.35), worked only for contractors (OR = 3.18), worked corn crops (OR = 2.93), and worked potato crops (OR = 3.11) were more likely to report receipt of training within the prior five years. Results suggest that increased enforcement may be needed, especially in Texas, and special educational efforts may be needed to reach female farmworker youth. PMID:17892073

Shipp, E M; Cooper, S P; del Junco, D J; Bolin, J N; Whitworth, R E; Cooper, C J

2007-07-01

85

Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This Technical Quarterly Report is for the reporting period July 1, 2000 to September 30, 2000. The report provides details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma''. The project is divided into nine separate tasks. Since this is the first Quarterly report, much of the work done is of a preliminary nature. Several of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, while other tasks are dependent on earlier tasks being completed. The selection of the pilot test area has been completed. The drilling of the test well is waiting on rig availability. Phillips has begun sonic core testing of offset cores, waiting on the core from the well to be drilled. Design work is progressing for the tool, which will be built to fit the test well. Installation of monitoring equipment and the downhole vibration tool will occur after the well is drilled. Technical transfer efforts have begun with the submission of an abstract for a technical paper for the Oklahoma City Society of Petroleum Engineers meeting in March 2001.

J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

2000-09-30

86

Bromide, Chloride, and Sulfate Concentrations, and Specific Conductance, Lake Texoma, Texas and Oklahoma, 2007-08  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Dallas Water Utilities Division, collected water-quality data from 11 sites on Lake Texoma, a reservoir on the Texas-Oklahoma border, during April 2007-September 2008. At 10 of the sites, physical properties (depth, specific conductance, pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, and alkalinity) were measured and samples were collected for analysis of selected dissolved constituents (bromide, calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, carbonate, bicarbonate, chloride, and sulfate); at one site, only physical properties were measured. The primary constituent of interest was bromide. Bromate can form when ozone is used to disinfect raw water containing bromide, and bromate is a suspected human carcinogen. Chloride and sulfate were of secondary interest. Only the analytical results for bromide, chloride, sulfate, and measured specific conductance are discussed in this report. Median dissolved bromide concentrations ranged from 0.28 to 0.60 milligrams per liter. The largest median dissolved bromide concentration (0.60 milligram per liter at site 11) was from the Red River arm of Lake Texoma. Dissolved bromide concentrations generally were larger in the Red River arm of Lake Texoma than in the Washita arm of the lake. Median dissolved chloride concentrations were largest in the Red River arm of Lake Texoma at site 11 (431 milligrams per liter) and smallest at site 8 (122 milligrams per liter) in the Washita arm. At site 11 in the Red River arm, the mean and median chloride concentrations exceeded the secondary maximum contaminant level of 300 milligrams per liter for chloride established by the 'Texas Surface Water Quality Standards' for surface-water bodies designated for the public water supply use. Median dissolved sulfate concentrations ranged from 182 milligrams per liter at site 4 in the Big Mineral arm to 246 milligrams per liter at site 11 in the Red River arm. None of the mean or median sulfate concentrations exceeded the secondary maximum contaminant level of 300 milligrams per liter. Median specific conductance measurements at sites ranged from 1,120 microsiemens per centimeter at site 8 in the Washita arm to 2,100 microsiemens per centimeter in the Red River arm. The spatial distribution of specific conductance in Lake Texoma was similar to that of bromide and chloride, with larger specific conductance values in the Red River arm compared to those in the Washita arm.

Baldys, Stanley, III

2009-01-01

87

Cancer mortality in a Texas county with prior uranium mining and milling activities, 1950–2001  

Microsoft Academic Search

Uranium was discovered in Karnes County, Texas, in 1954 and the first uranium mill began operating in 1961 near Falls City. Uranium milling and surface and in situ mining continued in Karnes County until the early 1990s. Remediation of uranium tailings ponds was completed in the 1990s. There were three mills and over 40 mines operating in Karnes County over

John D Boice Jr; Michael Mumma; Sarah Schweitzer; William J Blot

2003-01-01

88

The anomalous health status of Texas border counties.  

PubMed

The health status of Texas border counties is anomalous in that the combination of poor health care services, low socioeconomic status, and low education rate does not result in the expected increase in age-adjusted mortality rate and shortened life expectancy. The anomaly appears to be due largely to the combination of a high Hispanic population density in this region, specifically Mexican-Americans, and to the phenomenon of Hispanic longevity. The latter is considered to be based on a variety of possible cultural factors. In the face of continuing escalations in the cost of health care, further definition of what those factors are and how they could be incorporated into the delivery of health care in our state should be a priority for state health policy. PMID:14650721

Homan, Richard W

2003-11-01

89

77 FR 26598 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00059  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Disaster Declaration 13069 and 13070] Oklahoma Disaster OK-00059 AGENCY: U...declaration of a disaster for the State of Oklahoma. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes...Counties: Woodward. Contiguous Counties: Oklahoma: Dewey, Ellis, Harper, Major,...

2012-05-04

90

Petrocalcic paleosols, Hensel (Gillespie) Sand, Gillespie County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Paleocalcretes are common in all sediment types of the Hensel Sand in Gillespie County, Texas. Calcretes in mudstone are nodular, grading from rhizoconcretions to total replacement. In sandstone the paleosols tend to form undulating hardpans having cracked upper surfaces. Massive calcretes in basal conglomerates have greatly reduced the original permeability, restricting groundwater flow. Hensel Sand overlies upper Precambrian to Middle Pennsylvanian rocks; displacive crystallization of the calcitic globules and fibers was able to lift and displace 1m2 to 2m2 blocks of flaggy Upper Cambrian limestone in to spectacular teepee structures. Gillespie Sand is that portion of the basal Cretaceous Hensel Sand that stratigraphically overlies the middle Glen Rose Salenia/Corbula beds', and underlies upper Glen Rose or basal Fredericksburg rocks. It formed as non-marine valley fill during prolonged, episodic marine transgression. This study documents ubiquitous calcrete development in Central Texas during the lower part of the Middle Albian State; calcretes are now known from the Lower Aptian (Sycamore Sand) through the Middle Albian (Paluxy and upper Antlers Sands). A seasonal arid to semi-arid climate is indicated for at least 5 million years.

Wolff, E.C. (Raba-Kistner Consultants, Inc., San Antonio, TX (United States)); Jones, J.O. (Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States). Geology Dept.); Amsbury, D.L.

1993-02-01

91

THE DISTRIBUTION OF NOTROPIS BAIRDI ALONG THE CIMARRON RIVER IN LOGAN COUNTY, OKLAHOMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Recognition is respectfully given to Mr. William Mathews of the University of Oklahoma,for identifying the N. bairdi in our sample. The help of James Magovern and Gregory Steele of the University of Oklahoma is also acknowledged,for their efforts in data collection of the N. bairdi distribution. Our gratitude is expressed to Drs. Loren Hill, University of Oklahoma, and George

Charles L. Marshall

1978-01-01

92

Role of sea surface temperature and soil-moisture feedback in the 1998 Oklahoma-Texas drought.  

PubMed

The drought that affected the US states of Oklahoma and Texas in the summer of 1998 was strong and persistent, with soil moisture reaching levels comparable to those of the 1930s 'dust bowl'. Although other effects of the record-strength 1997-98 El Nińo were successfully predicted over much of the United States, the Oklahoma-Texas drought was not. Whereas the response of the tropical atmosphere to strong anomalies in sea surface temperature is quite predictable, the response of the extratropical atmosphere is more variable. Here we present results from mechanistic experiments to clarify the origin and maintenance of this extratropical climate extreme. In addition to global atmospheric models, we use a regional model to isolate regional climate feedbacks. We conclude that during April and May 1998, sea surface temperature anomalies combined with a favourable atmospheric circulation to establish the drought. In June-August, the regional positive feedback associated with lower evaporation and precipitation contributed substantially to the maintenance of the drought. The drought ended in the autumn, when stronger large-scale weather systems were able to penetrate the region and overwhelm the soil-moisture feedback. Our results show the potential for numerical models including appropriate physical processes to make skillful predictions of regional climate. PMID:11130719

Hong, S Y; Kalnay, E

2000-12-14

93

Role of sea surface temperature and soil-moisture feedback in the 1998 Oklahoma-Texas drought  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The drought that affected the US states of Oklahoma and Texas in the summer of 1998 was strong and persistent, with soil moisture reaching levels comparable to those of the 1930s `dust bowl'. Although other effects of the record-strength 1997-98 El Nińo were successfully predicted over much of the United States, the Oklahoma-Texas drought was not. Whereas the response of the tropical atmosphere to strong anomalies in sea surface temperature is quite predictable, the response of the extratropical atmosphere is more variable. Here we present results from mechanistic experiments to clarify the origin and maintenance of this extratropical climate extreme. In addition to global atmospheric models, we use a regional model to isolate regional climate feedbacks. We conclude that during April and May 1998, sea surface temperature anomalies combined with a favourable atmospheric circulation to establish the drought. In June-August, the regional positive feedback associated with lower evaporation and precipitation contributed substantially to the maintenance of the drought. The drought ended in the autumn, when stronger large-scale weather systems were able to penetrate the region and overwhelm the soil-moisture feedback. Our results show the potential for numerical models including appropriate physical processes to make skilful predictions of regional climate.

Hong, Song-You; Kalnay, Eugenia

2000-12-01

94

National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) performance in southern Arizona, Texas, and Oklahoma in 2003-2004  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Four field campaigns were conducted in southern Arizona (AZ) and in northern Texas and southern Oklahoma (TX-OK) in 2003 and 2004 to evaluate the performance of the U.S. National Lightning Detection Network™ (NLDN) in detecting cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning after an upgrade in 2002 and 2003. The 2-year average flash detection efficiency (DE) in AZ was 93% (1024/1097), and the measured (first plus subsequent) stroke DE was 76% (2746/3620). The corresponding values in TX-OK were 92% (338/367) and 86% (755/882), respectively. After correcting for the time resolution of the video camera (16.7 ms), we estimate that the actual NLDN stroke DE and video multiplicities were about 68% and 3.71 in AZ and 77% and 2.80 in TX-OK. The average DE for negative first strokes (92%) was larger than the measured DE for subsequent strokes that produced a new ground contact (81%) and the DE for subsequent strokes that remained in a preexisting channel (67%). The primary cause of the NLDN missing strokes was that the peak of the radiated electromagnetic field was below the NLDN detection threshold. The average estimated peak current (Ip) of negative first strokes and the average multiplicity of negative flashes varied from storm to storm and between the two regions, but this variability did not affect the DE as long as the recording sessions had more than 60 flashes. By analyzing the NLDN locations of subsequent strokes that remained in the same channel as the first stroke we infer that the median random position error of the NLDN was 424 m in AZ and 282 m in TX-OK. An evaluation of the classification of lightning type by the NLDN (i.e., CG stroke versus cloud pulse) showed that 1.4-7% (6/420 to 6/86) of the positive NLDN reports with an Ip ? 10 kA in TX-OK were produced by CG strokes; 4.7-26% (5/106 to 5/19) of the positive reports with 10 kA < Ip ? 20 kA were CGs; and 67-95% (30/45 to 30/32) of the reports with Ip ? +20 kA were CG strokes. Some 50-87% (52/104 to 52/60) of the negative, single-stroke NLDN reports in AZ and TX-OK with ?Ip? ? 10 kA were produced by CG flashes. Both the upper and lower bounds in these classification studies have observational biases.

Biagi, Christopher J.; Cummins, Kenneth L.; Kehoe, Kenneth E.; Krider, E. Philip

2007-03-01

95

Sooner rather than later. Oklahoma County hospitals and health agencies take immediate action on the uninsured problem by collaborating.  

PubMed

In reality TV, contestants are constantly forming an alliance--with mixed results. In Oklahoma County, it seemed like a good idea for physicians, hospitals and other leaders to come together to provide care for the uninsured. And it has been. Evan Collins, left, whose organization is part of that alliance, says: "We hope if this model works well, we can export it to other communities to replicate the same thing. PMID:17477189

Zigmond, Jessica

2007-04-23

96

Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This Technical Quarterly Report is for the reporting period September 30, 2001 to December 31, 2001. The report provides details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma''. The project is divided into nine separate tasks. Several of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, while other tasks are dependent on earlier tasks being completed. The vibration stimulation well was permitted as Well 111-W-27, section 8 T26N R6E Osage County Oklahoma. It was spud July 28, 2001 with Goober Drilling Rig No. 3. The well was drilled to 3090-feet cored, logged, cased and cemented. The Rig No.3 moved off August 6, 2001. Phillips Petroleum Co. has performed standard core analysis on the cores recovered from the test well. Standard porosity, permeability and saturation measurements have been conducted. Phillips has begun the sonic stimulation core tests. Calumet Oil Company, the operator of the NBU, has been to collecting both production and injection wells information to establish a baseline for the project in the pilot field test area since May 2001. The 7-inch Downhole Vibration Tool (DHVT) has been built and has been run in a shallow well for initial power source testing. This testing was done in a temporarily abandoned well, Wynona Waterflood Unit, Well No.20-12 operated by Calumet Oil Co both in October and December 2001. The data acquisition system, and rod rotating equipment performed as designed. However, the DHVT experienced two internal failures during vibration operations. The DHVT has been repaired with modifications to improve its functionality. A proposed technical paper abstract has been accepted by the SPE to be presented at the 2002 SPE/DOE Thirteenth Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery, in Tulsa OK, 13-17 April 2002. A one-day SPE sponsored short course which is planned to cover seismic stimulation efforts around the world, will be offered at the SPE/DOE Thirteenth Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery in Tulsa, OK, April 13-17, 2002. Dan Maloney, Phillips and Bob Westermark, OGCI will be the instructors.

J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

2001-12-31

97

40 CFR 81.47 - Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Oklahoma: Canadian County, Cleveland County, Grady County, Lincoln County, Logan County, Kingfisher County, McClain County, Oklahoma County, Pottawatomie...

2010-07-01

98

40 CFR 81.47 - Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Oklahoma: Canadian County, Cleveland County, Grady County, Lincoln County, Logan County, Kingfisher County, McClain County, Oklahoma County, Pottawatomie...

2009-07-01

99

Prevalence and trends of substance abuse in Harris County, Texas, 1989 to 1991  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the late 1980s, Harris County, Texas began experiencing an escalation of drug-related activities. Various indicators used in this analysis tracked drug-related trends from 1989 to 1991 to determine patterns for comparison of local (Houston\\/Harris County, Texas) to national levels.^ An important indicator of the drug scenario was drug-related activities among youths, which increased during the period of this study.

James Goldman

1994-01-01

100

Oil-productive basal Pennsylvanian valley-fill sandstones - southern Baylor County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

In north Texas, the Mississippian limestone terrain of the Texas craton was subaerially exposed and diastrophically deformed prior to Pennsylvanian marine transgression. The depositional environments of the Lower Pennsylvanian Bend conglomerates subsequently deposited on this dissected Mississippian surface were exceptionally diverse. In southern Baylor County, these oil productive sandstone bodies are morphologically and stratigraphically similar to both ancient and modern

Marcus E. Staples

1986-01-01

101

Ravia nappe, Bryan County, Oklahoma: a gravity slide block off the Tishomingo uplift  

SciTech Connect

The Ravia nappe in Bryan County, Oklahoma, is located along the southwestern flank of the Tishomingo uplift, between the Cumberland and East Durant oil fields. This mass of Cambrian-Ordovician through Mississippian sediments tectonically overlies younger Springer shales (Pennsylvanian) of the Ardmore basin. Previously, this feature has been interpreted to have been thrust southward along the Cumberland fault, a fault parallel to the Ravia thrust. Reinterpretation of this area, with additional well data, indicates the Ravia nappe is a gravity slide block off the uplifted Tishomingo mountains. The Ravia nappe is interpreted to have been originally the southwest overturned limb of the Tishomingo uplift. Prior to the major thrusting on the Ravia thrust, but after compressional folding and uplift of the Tishomingo mountains, a breakaway fault formed across the most intensely folded beds. The breakaway fault undercut the overturned southwestern limb of the Tishomingo uplift in a concave-upward fault surface. Gravitational forces caused the Ravia nappe Mississippian Caney rocks to Cambrian-Ordoviciena Arbuckle rocks to slide rotationally southwestward 2.5 mi (4 km). Topographic relief prior to the slide may have been as much as 9000 ft (2700 m). The slide occurred sometime during late Morrowan to early Desmoinesian.

Jacobson, M.I.

1983-08-01

102

Successful practices in title III implementation. Chemical Emergency Preparedness and Prevention Technical Assistance Bulletin. Cameron County, Texas; Bucks County, Pennsylvania; Harford County, Maryland; Dallas County, Texas. Series 6, Number 7  

SciTech Connect

This is another in a series of bulletins EPA is issuing to provide examples of implementation programs and strategies of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, known as Title III, that are innovative or have proven effective. The purpose of these bulletins is to share information on successful practices with Local Emergency Planning Committees (LEPCs), State Emergency Response Commissions (SERCs), fire departments, and other Title III implementing agencies throughout the country in the hope that such information will prove useful to other SERCs and LEPCs as their programs develop and evolve. The bulletin discusses Title III implementation for Cameron County in Texas, Bucks County in Pennsylvania, Harford County in Maryland, and Dallas County in Texas.

Not Available

1991-02-01

103

Geology of north Personville field, Limestone County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

In excess of 50 Mitchell Energy Corporation wells have been drilled in the North Personville field, Limestone County, Texas. In order to understand the variables that affect the ultimate reserves within the carbonate section, two conventional cores from Mitchell Energy Corporation wells were analyzed. The Mitchell Energy Corporation 1 Muse-Duke and 1 Ralph Spence limestone sections were studied to determine the relationship between log-derived reservoir parameters and the limestone lithologies for field wide application. Production at North Personville field is lithology selective. Five distinct oolitic grainstone shoal cycles are identified and correlate field wide. The sequence of events that led to the development of reservoir quality grainstones are (1) the infilling by oolitic grainstone shoals on an irregular Buckner Formation paleosurface. This surface was modified by pre-Cotton Valley limestone salt activity such that carbonate deposition did not take place or was eroded over structurally high areas, (2) Cotton Valley limestone deposition culminating with the deposition of a narrow belt of ooid grainstones, (3) nearly complete occlusion of primary porosity and permeability by the deposition of marine cements followed by chalky microporosity formation, (4) post-depositional salt and basement tectonics that pervasively fracture the more competent ooid grainstone facies producing additional secondary porosity and permeability, (5) hydrocarbon generation from the overlying Bossier marine shales migrates into the porous permeable Cotton Valley Limestone. The uppermost shoal cycle is preferentially charged due to their proximity to the source beds.

Zamboras, R.L.

1988-02-01

104

Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate the impact of downhole vibration stimulation on oil production rates in a mature waterflood field. Oil & Gas Consultants International, Inc. (OGCI) will manage the project in close cooperation with the Osage Tribe as the tests will be conducted in Osage County, Oklahoma, the mineral estate of the Osage Tribe. The field is owned and operated by Calumet Oil Company. Phillips Petroleum Company will contribute their proprietary vibration core analysis of cores recovered from the pilot test area. To achieve the project objectives, the work has been divided into nine tasks, some are concurrent, while other tasks rely on completion of previous steps. The operator, Calumet Oil Company operates several field in Osage County Oklahoma. The North Burbank Unit will be the site of the test. The team will then determine where within the field to optimally locate the vibration test well. With the location determined, the test well will be drilled, cored, logged and 7-inch production casing run and cemented. In a parallel effort, OGCI will be designing, building, and testing a new version of the downhole vibration tool based on their patented and field proven whirling orbital vibrator. With the field test tool built to run in 7-inch casing. Reliability testing of the downhole tool and surface power source will be conducted in nearby field operated by Calumet Oil Company. After the core is recovered, Phillips Petroleum Company will be conducting laboratory tests utilizing their proprietary sonic core apparatus to determine fluid flow response to a range of vibration frequencies. These results, in turn, will allow final adjustments to the frequency generation mechanisms of the downhole vibration tool. One or more offset wells, near to the vibration test well, will be equipped with downhole geophones and or hydro-phones to determine the strength of signal and if the producing formation has a characteristic resonant frequency response. Surface geophones will also be set out and arranged to pick up the signal generated by the downhole vibration tool. The downhole vibrator will be installed in the test well. Monitoring the production and injection for the pilot test area will continue. As the frequency of the downhole tool is changed, the recording of seismic signals, both on the surface and downhole, will also be conducted. The results of the data collection will be a matrix of varying vibration stimulation conditions corresponding to changes in production fluid rates and seismic responses. The report on the results of the downhole vibration stimulation will be prepared and delivered using several venues. Technical papers will be submitted to the Society of Petroleum Engineers. Workshops are planned to be held for operators in Osage County and surrounding areas. A dedicated technical session on vibration stimulation may be offered at the 2002 SPE/DOE/IOR Conference, bringing together the world's experts in this emerging technology. The final task will be to close out the project.

J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

2001-03-31

105

78 FR 60826 - Foreign-Trade Zone 155-Calhoun/Victoria Counties, Texas; Authorization of Production Activity...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Calhoun/Victoria Counties, Texas; Authorization of Production Activity; Caterpillar, Inc. (Excavator and Frame Assembly Production); Victoria, Texas On May 29, 2013, The Calhoun-Victoria Foreign Trade Zone, Inc., grantee of FTZ...

2013-10-02

106

Mitigation Case Studies: Hardened First Responder Facility. 911 Communication and Emergency Operations Center, Smith County, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Smith County is located in east Texas, approximately 100 miles east of Dallas. It is largely rural, with only one metropolitan area, the City of Tyler. The Sheriff of Smith County and the Police Chief of the City of Tyler saw a need for a consolidated eme...

2003-01-01

107

Water Supply and Use in Deaf Smith, Swisher, and Nearby Counties in the Texas Panhandle.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Irrigation for agriculture is the primary water use in the area of Deaf Smith and Swisher Counties, Texas, and the Ogallala Formation is the main water source. The availability of water in the 12-county area is projected to decrease markedly over the next...

1985-01-01

108

40 CFR 81.337 - Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Interstate Unclassifiable/Attainment McCurtain County AQCR 184 Central Oklahoma Intrastate...Intrastate Unclassifiable/Attainment McCurtain County AQCR 184 Central Oklahoma Intrastate...022Shreveport-Texarkana-Tyler Intrastate: McCurtain County...

2009-07-01

109

40 CFR 81.337 - Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Interstate Unclassifiable/Attainment McCurtain County AQCR 184 Central Oklahoma Intrastate...Intrastate Unclassifiable/Attainment McCurtain County AQCR 184 Central Oklahoma Intrastate...022Shreveport-Texarkana-Tyler Intrastate: McCurtain County...

2010-07-01

110

Ground-water resources of Rusk County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Fresh to slightly saline water is available in most parts of Rusk County, which is located in the Piney Woods region of northeast Texas. The Wilcox aquifer, which underlies the entire county, was the source of most of the ground water withdrawn during 1980. Other units capable of yielding fresh ground water are the Carrizo, Queen City, and Sparta aquifers and the Reklaw Formation. About 5.4 million gallons per day (20,440 cubic meters per day) of ground water was used for all purposes during 1980. Of this amount, about 78 percent was used for public supply, 10 percent for mining, 8 percent for industrial purposes, and 4 percent for rural domestic use. Water levels have declined extensively at the city of Henderson, which used about 38 percent of all ground water consumed in Rusk County. Generally, the ground water is of acceptable quality. Water in some of the near-surface beds and some of the deeper sands in the Wilcox aquifer may have become mineralized because of oilfield operations. Ground-water contamination by oilfield brines at Henderson Oil Field has been documented. Two separate instances of streamflow contamination at Striker Creek and Henderson Oil Field have been documented. Moderate amounts of ground water are available for development. The amount that is available perennially is not known, but it is greater than that being withdrawn. Assuming a hydraulic gradient of about 8 feet per mile (1.5 meters per kilometer), at least 12 million gallons per day (45,420 cubic meters per day) of fresh ground water is being transmitted through the Wilcox and about 3 million gallons per day (11,350 cubic meters per day) through the Carrizo. About 20 million acre-feet (24,660 cubic hectometers) of freshwater is available from storage in the Wilcox and about 4 million acre-feet (4,930 cubic hectometers) from storage in the Carrizo. Additional amounts of slightly saline water are available from the major aquifers. Smaller but undetermined amounts of fresh ground water are available from the Sparta and Queen City aquifers and from the Reklaw Formation. Properly constructed wells in the Wilcox and Carrizo aquifers can be expected to yield more than 500 gallons per minute (32 liters per second) if the wells are properly spaced. Development of additional resources around the city of Henderson and the Mount Enterprise Fault System should be considered cautiously because of the probability of saltwater encroachment. Ground water in other parts of the county is practically undeveloped. Some mineralization of ground water is due to natural causes. Other mineralization of ground water is due to contamination. A program needs to be initiated to determine the extent and cause of mineralization that has taken place in freshwater sands. Water-quality data is needed at Henderson in order to monitor saltwater encroachment.

Sandeen, W. M.

1984-01-01

111

Depositional environments of the Mississippian Chappel bioherms, Hardeman County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Numerous crinoid-fenestrate bryozoan banks are developed within the Mississippian Chappel Formation, located in the Hardeman basin, Hardeman and Wilbarger Counties, Texas. The banks are oval in shape and range in size from 2 to 12 mi (3 to 19 km) in diameter. Stratigraphic, hydrocarbon entrapment in the banks has resulted in cumulative production exceeding 6 million bbl of oil plus 13 bcf of gas. The Chappel Formation is a shallow-water limestone, overlain by the oolitic grainstones of the Mississippian St. Louis Formation. Three distinct Chappel facies can be identified: the bank core, flank, and interbank facies. Bank growth began in a low-energy environment with the mechanical accumulation of lime mud which was baffled and trapped by crinoids and fenestate bryozoan. Once the bank core reached wave-base, the crinoid-bryozoan mudstones and wackestones were reworked and redeposited as the crinoid-bryozoan grainstones and packstones of the flank facies. The extensive development of the flank facies, compared with bank core development, indicates that the top of the bank remained at or near wave-base for an extended period of time. Porosity development in the Chappel banks is secondary and results from dolomitizaiton of the micritic bank core, fracturing and leaching. The Chappel banks can be located in the subsurface by using isopach maps which help identify interval thickening within the Chappel. In subsurface exploration, the bank facies can be differentiated from the interbank facies by petrographic analysis and by noting the more massive and also lower gamma ray log response. The lower gamma ray log response is caused by a lack of argillaceous material in the bank facies.

Asquith, G.B.; Allison, M.D.

1983-03-01

112

Gravity and Magnetic Survey of Southern Oklahoma Alcugen in Texas Panhandle, Near the 2000 earthquake swarm North of Amarillo  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Texas panhandle is not a region normally thought of as being prone to seismic activity. Earthquakes with magnitudes of 3 to 4 do however occur in this region every year or so and are felt by residents in the area. There are historical reports of earthquakes of magnitude 5 during the early twentieth century. The earthquakes in this region are most likely associated with displacement on old faults related to the Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen (SOA, 600 Ma) which was deformed during the Ouachita orogeny to form the Wichita Mts. During the summer of 2000 there were an unusually large number of earthquakes for this region, five, all from the same location a few kilometers north of Amarillo Texas, 35.39 degrees north latitude and 101.81 degrees west longitude according to the NEIC catalogue. The non-seismic exploration class at Texas Tech University collected and interpreted gravity and magnetic data along a dirt road crossing the location of this earthquake "swarm" (yes in Texas 5 is a swarm) to determine if the old faults of the SOA coincide with the location of these earthquakes. The survey was conducted along a service road of the Santa Fe Railroad that crosses US 87 approximately 20 miles north of Amarillo, Texas trending in a south-southwest direction. Gravity data were collected every 100m along a 5 km profile using Warden and Lacoste gravity meters with elevation control provided by leveling survey tied to elevation markers on the map. Gravity data were colleted, using GPS elevation location and elevation, on roads over more than 20 km surrounding the local survey to provide regional control. Magnetic data were collected along the 5 km profile. Models derived from these data indicate a 200 m thick layer of poorly consolidated sediments with densities of 2.0 g/cc that can be interpreted as the Ogallala aquifer overlaying a layer with density of 2.6 g/cc. The interface between these layers is very structured and has at least three sharp ridges that we interpret as faults with as much as 50 meters of offset along this interface that could only be interpreted as offset on faults in the Wichita prior to their erosion and burial. We are planning additional work related to this project to use electrical methods (EM34 and GPR) to determine if there is offset in shallower layers that would indicate more recent seismicity. .

Manns, S.; Gurrola, H.; Robinson, R.; Horton, M.; Herrmann, M.; Seshhadri, S.; Anderson, H.; Bribiesca, E.; Lindsey, C.; Montalvo, R.; Cyrek, C.; Allen, T.; Hoemberg, J.; Hassan, A.

2005-12-01

113

Digital map of water levels in 1980 for the High Plains Aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report contains digital data and accompanying documentation for contours for 1980 water-level elevations for the High Plains aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. This digital data set was created by digitizing the 1980 water-level elevation contours from a 1:1,000,000-scale base map created by the U.S. Geological Survey High Plains Regional Aquifer Systems-Analysis (RASA) project (Gutentag, E.D., Heimes, F.J., Krothe, N.C., Luckey, R.R., and Weeks, J.B., 1984, Geohydrology of the High Plains aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1400-B, 63 p.) The data are not intended for use at scales larger than 1:1,000,000.

Cederstrand, Joel R.; Becker, Mark F.

1999-01-01

114

Physician Assistant Distribution in Texas-Mexico Border Counties: Public Health Implications  

PubMed Central

Purpose. Texas Medical Board physician assistant (PA) data were assessed to assist workforce education and planning strategies for PA programs in regions with high percentages of Hispanic populations. Methods. Data were assessed for gender, ethnicity, program attended and current employment addresses within the 14 Texas-Mexico border counties. Results. Of the 329 border county PAs, 227 self-reported as Hispanic (69%), and 53% were female. Remarkably, 72% of all Hispanic PAs attended two of the six public Texas PA Programs. Conclusions. The Sullivan Commission report of 2004 concluded that the primary cause of poor public health care for minorities resulted from unequal representation of minorities in the health care professions. Two public Texas PA programs have made substantial contributions to public health care access in poverty-stricken border areas by educating and placing Hispanic PAs within medically underserved communities.

Jones, P. Eugene; Mulitalo, Karen E.

2010-01-01

115

Ground-Water Resources of Guadalupe County, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The economy of Guadalupe county depends largely on agriculture and the production of oil. The principal water-bearing units underlying the county are the Wilcox Group, Carrizo Sand, Edwards and associated limestones, Austin Chalk, and the alluvium and Leo...

G. H. Shafer

1966-01-01

116

Comprehensive Hosing Market Analysis: Oklahoma City, Oklahome As of October 1, 2009.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Housing Market Area (HMA) is coterminous with the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Statistical Area and comprises Canadian, Cleveland, Grady, Lincoln, Logan, McClain, and Oklahoma Counties in central Oklahoma. The HMA includes the st...

2009-01-01

117

Dolomites formed under conditions of deep burial: Hunton Group carbonate rocks (Upper Ordovician to Lower Devonian) in the deep Anadarko Basin of Oklahoma and Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Progressive burial diagenesis of Hunton Group (Upper Ordovician to Lower Devonian) rocks of the deep Anadarko Basin of Oklahoma\\u000a and the Texas Panhandle is evident from petrographic and geochemical study of cores and cuttings from more than 25 boreholes\\u000a up to 30,000 ft deep. Limestone of the Hunton Group, which originated as shallow shelf carbonates, has been replaced, chiefly\\u000a below

Charles A. Sternbach; Gerald M. Friedman

1986-01-01

118

Digital map of hydraulic conductivity for the High Plains Aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This digital data set consists of hydraulic conductivity contours and polygons for the High Plains aquifer in the central United States. The High Plains aquifer extends from south of 32 degrees to almost 45 degrees north latitude and from 96 degrees 30 minutes to almost 104 degrees west longitude. The area covers 174,000 square miles and is present in Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Kansas, Colorado, Nebraska, Wyoming, and South Dakota.

Cederstrand, J. R.; Becker, M. F.

1998-01-01

119

ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY WITH DOWNHOLE VIBRATION STIMULATION IN OSAGE COUNTY OKLAHOMA  

SciTech Connect

This Final Report covers the entire project from July 13, 2000 to June 30, 2003. The report summarizes the details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma'' under DOE Contract Number DE-FG26-00BC15191. The project was divided into nine separate tasks. This report is written in an effort to document the lessons learned during the completion of each task. Therefore each task will be discussed as the work evolved for that task throughout the duration of the project. Most of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, but certain tasks were dependent on earlier tasks being completed. During the three years of project activities, twelve quarterly technical reports were submitted for the project. Many individual topic and task specific reports were included as appendices in the quarterly reports. Ten of these reports have been included as appendices to this final report. Two technical papers, which were written and accepted by the Society of Petroleum Engineers, have also been included as appendices. The three primary goals of the project were to build a downhole vibration tool (DHVT) to be installed in seven inch casing, conduct a field test of vibration stimulation in a mature waterflooded field and evaluate the effects of the vibration on both the produced fluid characteristics and injection well performance. The field test results are as follows: In Phase I of the field test the DHVT performed exceeding well, generating strong clean signals on command and as designed. During this phase Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory had installed downhole geophones and hydrophones to monitor the signal generated by the downhole vibrator. The signals recorded were strong and clear. Phase II was planned to be ninety-day reservoir stimulation field test. This portion of the field tests was abruptly ended after one week of operations, when the DHVT became stuck in the well during a routine removal activity. The tool cannot operate in this condition and remains in the well. There was no response measured during or afterwards to either the produced fluids from the five production wells or in the injection characteristics of the two injection wells in the pilot test area. Monitoring the pilot area injection and production wells ceased when the field test was terminated March 14, 2003. Thus, a key goal of this project, which was to determine the effects of vibration stimulation on improving oil recovery from a mature waterflood, was not obtained. While there was no improved oil recovery effect measured, there was insufficient vibration stimulation time to expect a change to occur. No conclusion can be drawn about the effectiveness of vibration stimulation in this test.

Robert Westermark; J. Ford Brett

2003-11-01

120

Effects of municipal ground-water withdrawals on the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer, Pontotoc County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in south-central Oklahoma consists of a thick sequence of folded and faulted carbonate and clastic rocks of Upper Cambrian to Middle Ordovician age. Fractures and karst features locally increase the aquifer's capacity to transmit and store ground water. The aquifer is a principal source of water for municipal and rural users. A hydrologic study was conducted to evaluate the effects of municipal ground-water withdrawal from the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer on local ground-water levels and discharge from nearby springs and streams in south-central Pontotoc County. A municipal well was pumped for 63 hours at an average rate of 1,170 gallons per minute. A maximum observed drawdown of 0.3 feet was recorded half a mile from the pumping well. Drawdown was observed as far as 1.2 miles from the pumping well. No measurable response was observed at any of the surface-water-discharge measurement sites; however, recharge from precipitation may have masked any decreases in discharge caused by the pumping. Simultaneous pumping of two municipal wells for 241 hours at average rates of 1,170 and 2,730 gallons per minute resulted in a maximum observed drawdown of 1.3 feet recorded at an average distance of 0.80 miles from the pumping wells. The most distant drawdown observed was at an average distance 1.1 miles from the pumped wells. Less that 2 days after pumping stopped, increases in springflow were recorded at two springs; it is unknown whether these discharge responses reflect the effects of recharge from precipitation, or the combined effects of precipitation and the cessation of ground-water withdrawal. The effects of the stress tests on the hydrologic system were offset by recharge from concurrent precipitation. The maximum observed drawdown represents about 6 percent of the median natural water-level fluctuation during the study period. The effect of drawdown could become critical during extended periods of low precipitation, if water levels are already near the bottom of domestic wells in the area. However, a comparison of maximum observed drawdown (1.3 ft) with the minimum saturated thickness of fresh ground water (1,500 ft) suggests that municipal pumping had little effect on the amount of ground water stored in the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in the study area. This evaluation is based on the limited pumping rates and times of the stress tests.

Savoca, M. E.; Bergman, D. L.

1994-01-01

121

Statistical summaries of streamflow records in Oklahoma and parts of Arkansas, Missouri, and Texas through 1984  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Statistical summaries of streamflow records through 1984 for gaging stations in Oklahoma and parts of adjacent states are presented in this report. Records are presented for 148 stations with at least 10 years of unregulated or regulated streamflow. Streamflow at 70 of the stations is regulated for certain perdiods. Data for these periods were analyzed separately to account for changes in streamflow due to regulating structures. For each gaging station, a brief description of the location, drainage area and period of record is given. For those stations with a regulated streamflow record, a brief regulation history is given also. This information is followed by tables of monthly and annual discharge statistics, low- and high-flow frequency statistics, peak-flow frequency statistics, and flow-duration statistics. Daily flow-duration hydrographs are included for most stations.

Heimann, D. C.; Tortorelli, R. L.

1988-01-01

122

Environmental Analysis for Development Planning in Chambers County, Texas. Volume 3. Coastal Zone Management: A Proposed Incremental Change Systems for Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper attempts to unify Texas' present land use system, Chambers County preference for local control, and federal requirements into a coherent response to the Coastal Zone Management Act (CZMA). It proposes an incremental change process to balance de...

J. Mixon

1974-01-01

123

Ground-Water Resources of Johnson County, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The use of ground water for irrigation is limited by the low yield of most of the wells and the high sodium content of most of the ground water. In 1965, the population of Johnson County was about 40,100. The economy of the county is based primarily on ag...

G. L. Thompson

1969-01-01

124

Ground-Water Resources of Navarro County, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The economy of Navarro County is based primarily on oil production, agriculture, and some manufacturing. The county has a dry subhumid climate in the west and moist subhumid in the east. Annual rainfall, which averages 35 inches in the western part of the...

G. L. Thompson

1972-01-01

125

Ground-Water Resources of Atascosa and Frio Counties, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

To evaluate the present and future ground-water resources of Atascosa and Frio Counties a comprehensive study of the area has been conducted. The economy of both counties is based on diversified agriculture and on the production of oil and gas. Ground wat...

W. H. Alexander D. E. White

1966-01-01

126

Ground-Water Resources of Hardeman County, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Blaine Formation of Permian age and the alluvial terrace deposits of Quaternary age are the most important sources of large quantities of ground water in Hardeman County. In a broad sense, ground water moves eastward from Childress and Cottle Counties...

M. L. Maderak

1972-01-01

127

Ground-Water Resources of Kimble County, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The aquifer formed by the Edwards and associated limestones, which underlies all of the upland areas in Kimble County, is the most extensive source of fresh ground water in the county. In addition to the flow of springs, this aquifer supplies water for ru...

W. H. Alexander J. H. Patman

1969-01-01

128

The Viper Marsh Site (Mc-205) McCurtain County, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

During the summer of 1975, archaeological salvage operations were conducted at the Viper Marsh site, which is located in southeast Oklahoma. The site was situated in the dam and emergency spillway area of Impoundment No. 12 for the Waterfall-Gilford Creek...

S. J. Bobalik

1978-01-01

129

Discrimination against and Adaptation of Italians in the Coal Counties of Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the late 1800s and early 1900s coal reigned supreme in what is now southeastern Oklahoma. As was the case in the northeastern United States, Italians and other immigrants from southern and eastern Europe were brought in as a form of inexpensive labor to work the mines. Italians had different customs, a different language, a unique appearance,…

LoConto, David G.

2004-01-01

130

The Glasscock Site, 34-Ps-96 and Two Other Prehistoric Sites in Pittsburg County, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Archaeological sites Ps-86, Ps-88, and Ps-96 have been tested by the Oklahoma Conservation Commission. These tests indicated Ps-86 and Ps-88 are minor sites that were only minimally used. Site Ps-96 however, may represent an intensive occupation with comp...

D. T. Hughes

1978-01-01

131

Discrimination against and Adaptation of Italians in the Coal Counties of Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In the late 1800s and early 1900s coal reigned supreme in what is now southeastern Oklahoma. As was the case in the northeastern United States, Italians and other immigrants from southern and eastern Europe were brought in as a form of inexpensive labor to work the mines. Italians had different customs, a different language, a unique appearance,…

LoConto, David G.

2004-01-01

132

Horizontal drilling in the Lower Glen Rose Formation, Maverick County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents preliminary results of a project to assess the economic viability of horizontal drilling in the Lower Glen Rose Formation of Maverick County, Texas. This project is part of an ongoing Department of Energy investigation of directional drilling in the development of gas resources within the United States. The paper includes: project description; results covering geologic setting, reservoir

C. E. Drimal; G. Muncey

1992-01-01

133

A multidiscipline look at the Thistle field area, Pecos County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

To allow an evaluation of the perspective provided by certain nonseismic methods in the Val Verde basin, the synergistic interpretation of gravimetric and magnetic data, surface geomorphology, and the Ellenburgger surface are compared to surface geochemical data and drilling immediate to the Thistle field, Pecos County, Texas.

Land, J.P. (J.P. Land and Associates, Inc., Houston, TX (United States))

1992-04-01

134

Clay mineralogy and its controls on production, Pennsylvanian upper Morrow sandstone, Farnsworth field, Ochiltree County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Farnsworth field in Ochiltree County, Texas, is the most prolific upper Morrow oil field in the Anadarko basin, producing more than 36 million bbl of oil and 27 billion ftÂł of gas since its discovery in 1955. The bulk of the production comes from an upper Morrow-aged sandstone locally referred to as the Buckhaults sandstone. The Buckhaults sandstone is a

Tim W. Munson

1989-01-01

135

Risk Factors for Neonatal Seizures: A Population-based Study, Harris County, Texas, 1992-1994  

Microsoft Academic Search

Risk factors for neonatal seizures were evaluated in 116,048 infants born between 1992 and 1994 to residents of Harris County, Texas; 207 of these infants were diagnosed with clinical neonatal seizures. Information was obtained from the infant's birth certificate to assess the relation between seizures and birth weight, gender, ethnicity, place of birth, mother's age, method of delivery, parity, and

Rima M. Saliba; F. John Annegers; D. Kim Waller; Jon E. Tyson; Eli M. Mizrahi

136

Public Health Assessment for Rockwool Industries, Belton, Bell County, Texas, Region 6. CERCLIS No. TXD066379645.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Rockwool Industries, Inc. (RWI) National Priorities List site is a 100 acre site one-mile east of downtown Belton in Bell County, Texas. The Facility manufactured two types of mineral wool insulation: Blow wool and batt wool. Three main contaminant so...

1999-01-01

137

Baseline Biological Study of Brooks Air Force Base and Bexar County, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Bexar County is relatively unique in that it contains three of the 10 major soil types which occur in Texas. This geologic diversity in turn produces diversity in local plant and animal life. Brooks AFB lies in the middle of the three soil zones, on the o...

R. W. Clegern

1978-01-01

138

75 FR 67406 - Exelon Nuclear Texas Holdings, LLC; Victoria County Station Early Site Permit Application; Notice...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...an application for an early site permit (ESP) for Victoria County Station (VCS) site...Victoria, Texas. The application for the ESP was submitted by Exelon by letter dated...for docketing of the application for the ESP was published in the Federal Register...

2010-11-02

139

Reaction of sorghum hybrids to anthracnose, grain mold and grain weathering in Burleson County, Texas, 2007  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Thirty commercial hybrids were evaluated for resistance against anthracnose, caused by Colletotrichum sublineolum and grain mold or grain weathering caused by a number of fungal species at the Texas A&M University Agricultural Experiment Station in College Station (Burleson County). Six hybrids wer...

140

76 FR 34799 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00050  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties (Physical Damage and Economic Injury...Kingfisher, Logan, Mcclain, Contiguous Counties (Economic Injury Loans Only): Oklahoma...Oklahoma, Ottawa, Payne, Pontotoc, Pottawatomie, Stephens. Arkansas: Benton....

2011-06-14

141

Ground-Water Resources of Aransas County, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The aquifers that yield water to wells are the Gulf Coast aquifer, mostly of Pliocene and Pleistocene age, that underlies the entire county; the Pleistocene barrier island and beach deposits, which are restricted to the peninsulas; and the Holocene barrie...

G. H. Shafer

1970-01-01

142

Ground-Water Resources of Montgomery County, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Ground water in Montgomery County is contained in sands of the Catahoula Sandstone, lower part of the Jasper aquifer, upper part of the Jasper aquifer, Burkeville aquiclude, Evangeline aquifer, and Chicot aquifer. The Chicot, Evangeline, and upper part of...

B. P. Popkin

1971-01-01

143

Fate and groundwater impacts of produced water releases at OSPER “B” site, Osage County, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

For the last 5a, the authors have been investigating the transport, fate, natural attenuation and ecosystem impacts of inorganic and organic compounds in releases of produced water and associated hydrocarbons at the Osage-Skiatook Petroleum Environmental Research (OSPER) “A” and “B” sites, located in NE Oklahoma. Approximately 1.0ha of land at OSPER “B”, located within the active Branstetter lease, is visibly

Yousif K. Kharaka; Evangelos Kakouros; James J. Thordsen; Gil Ambats; Marvin M. Abbott

2007-01-01

144

Ben South (Tannehill) oil field, Stonewall, County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ben South is one of 157 Tannehill oil fields on the northeastern shelf of the Permian basin. Texas Railroad Commission District 7B has 66 Tannehill oil fields while District 8A has 21. The discovery well for the Ben South field was the Ryder Scott Management (Sauder) 1 McMeans, completed in 1973. Ben South field production has totaled 749,340 bbl of

Hillock

1984-01-01

145

Ground-Water Resources of Bee County, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Ground water in the county moves southeastward from areas of recharge to areas of discharge at about 10 feet per year. Precipitation on the outcrop of the formations is the primary source of recharge; and because the water table averages about 50 feet bel...

B. N. Myers O. C. Dale

1966-01-01

146

Ground-water resources of Brazoria County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Chicot and Evangeline aquifers are the only hydrologic units bearing fresh (less than 1,000 milligrams per liter dissolved solids) or slightly saline water (1,000-3,000 milligrams per liter dissolved solids in Brazoria County. These aquifers are composed of gravel, sand, silt, and clay of Pliocene, Pleistocene, and Holocene age.

Sandeen, William M.; Wesselman, John B.

1973-01-01

147

ANALYSIS OF RETAIL TRENDS AND TAXABLE SALES FOR STROUD, OKLAHOMA AND LINCOLN COUNTY  

Microsoft Academic Search

The goal of this paper is to provide an analysis of taxable sales for Stroud and Lincoln County. Basic data is used to provide estimates of trade area capture and pull factors. Reported sales tax data is also used to analyze trends in the county and area. \\

Mindy Moore; CED Jack Frye; Mike D. Woods

148

Cancer mortality in a Texas county with prior uranium mining and milling activities, 1950-2001.  

PubMed

Uranium was discovered in Karnes County, Texas, in 1954 and the first uranium mill began operating in 1961 near Falls City. Uranium milling and surface and in situ mining continued in Karnes County until the early 1990s. Remediation of uranium tailings ponds was completed in the 1990s. There were three mills and over 40 mines operating in Karnes County over these years and potential exposure to the population was from possible environmental releases into the air and ground water. From time to time concerns have been raised in Karnes County about potential increased cancer risk from these uranium mining and milling activities. To evaluate the possibility of increased cancer deaths associated with these uranium operations, a mortality survey was conducted. The numbers and rates of cancer deaths were determined for Karnes County and for comparison for four 'control' counties in the same region with similar age, race, urbanisation and socioeconomic distributions reported in the 1990 US Census. Comparisons were also made with US and Texas general population rates. Following similar methods to those used by the National Cancer Institute, standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) were computed as the ratio of observed numbers of cancers in the study and control counties compared to the expected number derived from general population rates for the United States. Relative risks (RRs) were computed as the ratios of the SMRs for the study and the control counties. Overall, 1223 cancer deaths occurred in the population residing in Karnes County from 1950 to 2001 compared with 1392 expected based on general population rates for the US. There were 3857 cancer deaths in the four control counties during the same 52 year period compared with 4389 expected. There was no difference between the total cancer mortality rates in Karnes County and those in the control counties (RR = 1.0; 95% confidence interval 0.9-1.1). There were no significant increases in Karnes County for any cancer when comparisons were made with either the US population, the State of Texas or the control counties. In particular, deaths due to cancers of the lung, bone, liver and kidney were not more frequent in Karnes County than in the control counties. These are the cancers of a priori interest given that uranium might be expected to concentrate more in these tissues than in others. Further, any radium intake would deposit primarily in the bone and radon progeny primarily in the lung. Deaths from all cancers combined also were not increased in Karnes County and the RRs of cancer mortality in Karnes County before and in the early years of operations (1950-64), shortly after the uranium activities began (1965-79) and in two later time periods (1980-89, 1990-2001) were similar, 1.0, 0.9, 1.1 and 1.0, respectively. No unusual patterns of cancer mortality could be seen in Karnes County over a period of 50 years, suggesting that the uranium mining and milling operations had not increased cancer rates among residents. PMID:14582717

Boice, John D; Mumma, Michael; Schweitzer, Sarah; Blot, William J

2003-09-01

149

Predicting Diagenetic History and Reservoir Quality in the Frio Formation of Brazoria County, Texas and Pleasant Bayou Test Wells.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Good-quality geothermal reservoirs displaying secondary porosity exist on the upper Texas coast (Brazoria County), site of the Pleasant Bayou No. 1 and No. 2 wells, and are attributed to a moderately stable mineral assemblage, normal geothermal gradients,...

W. R. Kaiser D. L. Richmann

1981-01-01

150

Did fertility go up after the oklahoma city bombing? An analysis of births in metropolitan counties in Oklahoma, 1990–1999  

Microsoft Academic Search

Political and sociocultural events (e.g., Brown v. Board of Education in 1954 and the German reunification in 1989) and natural disasters (e.g., Hurricane Hugo in 1989) can affect fertility.\\u000a In our research, we addressed the question of whether the Oklahoma City bombing in April 1995, a man-made disaster, influenced\\u000a fertility patterns in Oklahoma. We defined three theoretical orientations—replacement theory, community

Joseph Lee Rodgers; Craig A. St. John; Ronnie Coleman

2005-01-01

151

Getting Accountability and School Improvement on Track in Texas: A Report by the School Superintendents of Bexar County.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Determining the limits of accountability and how schools should be assessed is one of the most difficult problems in education. The state of Texas has attempted accountability by rewarding some schools and punishing others without justification. The school superintendents of Bexar County (Texas) and the Center for Educational Leadership at…

Trinity Univ., San Antonio, TX. Center for Educational Leadership.

152

Horizontal drilling in the Lower Glen Rose Formation, Maverick County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents preliminary results of a project to assess the economic viability of horizontal drilling in the Lower Glen Rose Formation of Maverick County, Texas. This project is part of an ongoing Department of Energy investigation of directional drilling in the development of gas resources within the United States. The paper includes: project description; results covering geologic setting, reservoir engineering, and seismic surveys; and future work on drilling location selection, drilling, and well completion. (AT)

Drimal, C.E.; Muncey, G.

1992-10-01

153

Horizontal drilling in the Lower Glen Rose Formation, Maverick County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents preliminary results of a project to assess the economic viability of horizontal drilling in the Lower Glen Rose Formation of Maverick County, Texas. This project is part of an ongoing Department of Energy investigation of directional drilling in the development of gas resources within the United States. The paper includes: project description; results covering geologic setting, reservoir engineering, and seismic surveys; and future work on drilling location selection, drilling, and well completion. (AT)

Drimal, C.E.; Muncey, G.

1992-01-01

154

Food-frequency questionnaire validation among Mexican-Americans: Starr County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

A food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ) for low-income Mexican- Americans in Starr County, Texas, was developed as part of an epidemiologic study of gallbladder disease during 1985 and 1986. The FFQ was developed from 7-day food records collected from the first sample. In the validity study, using the second sample, correlations between nutrients calculated from 3-day food records and the FFQ were

R. Sue McPherson; Harold W. Kohl III; Gloria Garcia; Milton Z. Nichaman; Craig L. Hanis

1995-01-01

155

Wildfire Risk Analysis at the Wildland Urban Interface in Travis County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The term, “wildland urban interface” (WUI) refers to the area where structures and other human development meet or intermingle\\u000a with undeveloped wildland or vegetative fuel. When development encroaches into wildland – areas that have been minimally impacted\\u000a by human activities – the wildfire threat to life and property increases. A wildfire risk profile for the WUI in Travis County,\\u000a Texas

Yongmei Lu; Lori Carter; Pamela S. Showalter

156

Ben South (Tannehill) oil field, Stonewall, County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Ben South is one of 157 Tannehill oil fields on the northeastern shelf of the Permian basin. Texas Railroad Commission District 7B has 66 Tannehill oil fields while District 8A has 21. The discovery well for the Ben South field was the Ryder Scott Management (Sauder) 1 McMeans, completed in 1973. Ben South field production has totaled 749,340 bbl of oil through March 1983 from 13 wells. Oil production is from the lower Tannehill (lower Wolfcamp) sands underlying the Stockwether Limestone. These Tannehill sands were deposited in a fluvial environment. Channel-fill and point-bar deposits make up the pay sands. The trapping mechanism is both stratigraphic and structural.

Hillock, R.T.

1984-01-01

157

Granite Monument Plaza Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Granite Monument Plaza - Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by N. Shartel Avenue to the West, N. Hudson Avenue to the East, Couch Drive to the North, and Colcord Drive to the South, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK

158

Typical Raised Planter Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Typical Raised Planter - Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by N. Shartel Avenue to the West, N. Hudson Avenue to the East, Couch Drive to the North, and Colcord Drive to the South, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK

159

Site Plans (1936 and 2001) Oklahoma City Civic Center, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Site Plans (1936 and 2001) - Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by N. Shartel Avenue to the West, N. Hudson Avenue to the East, Couch Drive to the North, and Colcord Drive to the South, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK

160

Municipal Building Planting Plan Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Municipal Building Planting Plan - Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by N. Shartel Avenue to the West, N. Hudson Avenue to the East, Couch Drive to the North, and Colcord Drive to the South, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK

161

Site Plans (2008 As Built) Oklahoma City Civic Center, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Site Plans (2008 As Built) - Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by N. Shartel Avenue to the West, N. Hudson Avenue to the East, Couch Drive to the North, and Colcord Drive to the South, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK

162

West Lawn Site and Planting Plans Oklahoma City Civic ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

West Lawn Site and Planting Plans - Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by N. Shartel Avenue to the West, N. Hudson Avenue to the East, Couch Drive to the North, and Colcord Drive to the South, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK

163

Spatial Analysis of County-Level Breast Cancer Mortality in Texas  

PubMed Central

Objective. The objectives of the study were to detect high-risk areas and to examine how racial and ethnic status affect the geographic distribution of female breast cancer mortality in Texas. Analyses were based on county-level data for the years from 2000 to 2008. Materials and Methods. Breast cancer mortality data were obtained from the Texas Cancer Registry, and the Spatial Scan Statistics method was used to run Purely Spatial Analyses using the Discrete Poisson, Bernoulli, and Multinomial models. Results and Conclusions. Highest rates of female breast cancer mortality in Texas have shifted over time from southeastern areas towards northern and eastern areas, and breast cancer mortality at the county level is distributed heterogeneously based on racial/ethnic status. Non-Hispanic blacks were at highest risk in the northeastern region and lowest risk in the southern region, while Hispanics were at highest risk in the southern region along the border with Mexico and lowest risk in the northeastern region.

Bambhroliya, Arvind B.; Burau, Keith D.; Sexton, Ken

2012-01-01

164

Air pollution and lung cancer mortality in Harris County, Texas, 1979-1981.  

PubMed

Elevated lung cancer mortality rates in Harris County, Texas compared with other US counties and previously published reports that suggested a causal relation between air pollution and lung cancer in Houston prompted this ecologic analysis. A weighted regression analysis was used to examine the air pollution-lung cancer mortality relation for white males in Harris County, Texas, 1979-1981. The regression model included the following census tract-specific characteristics: median age for white males, two social and demographic factors not strongly correlated with pollution (family life cycle and migration), an age-dependent smoking index, and a pollution measure based on total suspended particulates. This model indicated a statistically significant contribution of the pollution measure in explaining the intracounty variation in lung cancer mortality rates. The relation between air pollution and lung cancer mortality, however, appeared to be highly dependent on which social and demographic factors were selected for inclusion in the analysis. Air pollution was not demonstrated to be a strong determinant of lung cancer mortality in this study in that the presence of air pollution accounted for less than 5% of the total variation in intraurban lung cancer mortality. In addition, the interpretation of geographic analysis must be guarded due to the introduction of potential bias due to aggregation. The hypothesis that air pollution is contributory to lung cancer cannot be tested until other, stronger individual risk factors for lung cancer can be better measured and controlled in studies of this association. PMID:3421235

Buffler, P A; Cooper, S P; Stinnett, S; Contant, C; Shirts, S; Hardy, R J; Agu, V; Gehan, B; Burau, K

1988-10-01

165

Air pollution and lung cancer mortality in Harris County, Texas, 1979-1981  

SciTech Connect

Elevated lung cancer mortality rates in Harris County, Texas compared with other US counties and previously published reports that suggested a causal relation between air pollution and lung cancer in Houston prompted this ecologic analysis. A weighted regression analysis was used to examine the air pollution-lung cancer mortality relation for white males in Harris County, Texas, 1979-1981. The regression model included the following census tract-specific characteristics: median age for white males, two social and demographic factors not strongly correlated with pollution (family life cycle and migration), an age-dependent smoking index, and a pollution measure based on total suspended particulates. This model indicated a statistically significant contribution of the pollution measure in explaining the intracounty variation in lung cancer mortality rates. The relation between air pollution and lung cancer mortality, however, appeared to be highly dependent on which social and demographic factors were selected for inclusion in the analysis. Air pollution was not demonstrated to be a strong determinant of lung cancer mortality in this study in that the presence of air pollution accounted for less than 5% of the total variation in intraurban lung cancer mortality. In addition, the interpretation of geographic analysis must be guarded due to the introduction of potential bias due to aggregation. The hypothesis that air pollution is contributory to lung cancer cannot be tested until other, stronger individual risk factors for lung cancer can be better measured and controlled in studies of this association.

Buffler, P.A.; Cooper, S.P.; Stinnett, S.; Contant, C.; Shirts, S.; Hardy, R.J.; Agu, V.; Gehan, B.; Burau, K.

1988-10-01

166

Water supplies of East Central and Southeastern Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

To plan effectively for future growth in East Central and Southeastern Oklahoma, sound information on public water systems is imperative. This report evaluates the 229 public water systems in 24 counties in East Central and Southeastern Oklahoma. Areas included are: the Central Oklahoma Economic Development District, the Kiamichi Economic Development District of Oklahoma, and the Southern Oklahoma Development Authority. Quantity,

J. W. Ferrell; J. B. Perry; W. F. Harris

1984-01-01

167

Preliminary appraisal of the hydrology of the Blocker area, Pittsburg County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Bedrock in the Blocker area of southeastern Oklahoma consists principally of shale, siltstone, and sandstone of the Boggy and Savanna Formations of Pennsylvanian age. These rocks have been folded to form the Panther Mountain syncline on the south and the Kinta anticline on the north. Alluvium along streams is less than 15 feet thick and consists mainly of sandy silt. Water in bedrock is under artesian conditions. Well depths range from 11 to 213 feet and average 75 feet. In 86% of the wells measured, the water level was less than 30 feet below the land surface. Because the rocks have minimal permeability, well yields probably are less than 5 gallons per minute. Ground water is commonly a mixed cation bicarbonate type with dissolved solids ranging from about 300 to 2,000 milligrams per liter. No relationship between water chemistry and well depth or geographic distribution is apparent. Streams in the area are ephemeral and there are extended periods of no flow. Blue Creek was dry 30% of the time during 1976-80 and had flows of less than 0.1 cubic foot per second for at least 80 consecutive days. Stream water is generally a mixed cation sulfate type. The maximum dissolved-solids concentration determined in stream water was 3670 milligrams per liter. Maximum suspended sediment discharge, in tons per day, was about 235 for Blue Creek, 40 for Blue Creek tributary, and 630 for Mathuldy Creek. Silt-clay particles (diameters less than 0.062 millimeter) are the dominant sediment size. Surface mining for coal undoubtedly will have some effect on the environment. The most likely deleterious effects are increased sediment loads in streams and increased mineralization of stream waters. However, these effects should be of only limited extent and duration if appropriate mining and reclamation practices are followed. (USGS)

Marcher, Melvin V.; Bergman, D. L.; Stoner, J. D.; Blumer, S. P.

1981-01-01

168

Site study plan for Playa investigations, Deaf Smith County, Texas: Salt Repository Project  

SciTech Connect

This plan defines the purpose and objectives of the Playa Investigation Study, presents a plan of work to provide the information necessary to resolve issues, and discusses the rationale for test method selection. The required information will be obtained from existing well drilling records, describing and testing of soil and rock samples recovered from project test holes, geophysical well logs, seismic surveys, and shallow test pits excavated at ground surface. There have been numerous, often conflicting, theories presented to explain the origin(s) of the playas of the Texas High Plains. The primary purpose of this study is to establish if existing playas and playa alignments are related to deeper subsurface structure, such as faulting or salt dissolution, the potential for future playa development, and the significance of existing and/or future playas on siting a repository in Deaf Smith County, Texas. 11 refs.

Not Available

1987-04-02

169

Preliminary assessment report for Camp Swift Military Reservation, Installation 48070, Bastrop County, Texas. Installation Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Texas Army National Guard property in Bastrop County, Texas. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Camp Swift property, the requirement of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program (IRP). The review of both historical and current practices at the property indicated that the activities at Camp Swift include no operations considered to have an adverse impact to the environment. The recommendation, therefore, is that no further IRP action is necessary at this property.

Dennis, C.B.

1993-08-01

170

Southwest Freeway, From I-35W to Tarrant, Johnson County Line, Tarrant County, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report describes the proposed project located in the City of Fort Worth and South Tarrant County. The proposed highway improvements will comprise a basic six-lane freeway having controlled access and frontage roads for selected areas to establish loca...

1972-01-01

171

Pesticide safety training and access to field sanitation among migrant farmworker mothers from Starr County, Texas.  

PubMed

Very little published research describes employer compliance with EPA-mandated Worker Protection Standard (WPS) pesticide safety training and the OSHA Field Sanitation Standard among farmworker women in general and mothers specifically. A goal of both standards is limiting farmworkers' exposure to potentially hazardous agricultural pesticides. Data from a NIOSH-supported cohort study ("Injury and Illness Surveillance in Migrant Farmworker Families") allowed for examining these issues. The cohort included 267 migrant farmworker families who usually reside along the Texas-Mexico border (Starr County, Texas). Data were collected in Starr County during in-home interviews. Of 102 mothers who participated in migrant farm work during summer 2001, 57 (55.9%) reported having ever received training/instruction in the safe use of pesticides, while 47 (46.1%) reported having received training within the previous five years, as required by WPS. Of trained mothers, 91.5% to 93.6% reported that their training covered key WPS areas: (1) entry into a recently treated field, (2) pesticide related injuries/illnesses, and (3) where to go and who to contact for emergency care following exposure. Regarding access to field sanitation, 67.5% to 84.2% of 77 mothers who worked outside Texas reported employer-provided decontamination supplies (e.g., soap, wash water, towels, and toilet facilities). However, a strikingly smaller proportion (12% to 28%) of 25 mothers who worked within Texas reported access to the same resources, suggesting discrepancies in compliance across the U.S. Due to the low level of employer compliance with both WPS and OSHA mandated standards, increased enforcement and an alternate delivery of pesticide training is recommended. PMID:15782888

Shipp, E M; Cooper, S P; Burau, K D; Bolin, J N

2005-02-01

172

Feldspar diagenesis in the Frio Formation, Brazoria County, Texas Gulf Coast  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tremendous quantities of detrital feldspar have been dissolved or albitized below about 14,000 ft (4,267 m) in the Frio Formation (Oligocene), Chocolate Bayou Field, Brazoria County, Texas. Some sandstones no longer contain any unmodified detrital feldspar grains. Material transfer involved in these reactions is immense, affecting at least 15% of the rock volume. Thus, albitization has important implications for several other diagenetic processes that involve feldspars or their components. These processes include formation of secondary porosity, precipitation of quartz and carbonate cements, and the evolution of Na-Ca-Cl formation water.

Land, Lynton S.; Milliken, Kitty L.

1981-07-01

173

Hydrogeologic testing plan for Deep Hydronest Test Wells, Deaf Smith County site, Texas  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses methods of hydraulic testing which are recommended for use in the Deep Hydronest Test Wells at the proposed high level nuclear waste repository site in Deaf Smith County, Texas. The deep hydronest wells are intended to provide geologic, geophysical and hydrologic information on the interval from the Upper San Andres Formation to the base of the Pennsylvanian system at the site. Following the period of drilling and testing, the wells will be converted into permanent monitoring installations through which fluid pressures and water quality can be monitored at various depths in the section. 19 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

Not Available

1987-12-01

174

Jurassic salt tectonism within Mt. Enterprise fault system, Rusk County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

A synthesis of seismic, bore-hole, and gravity data in southeastern Rusk County, Texas, indicates that faulting within the Mt. Enterprise fault system was the result of Jurassic salt tectonism. Faults were developed in response to salt movement and subsequent collapse of the overlying section into areas of salt withdrawal, resulting in the formation of a graben containing no Louann Salt. An abnormally thick Bossier Formation within the graben indicates a Late Jurassic age for significant structural deformation within the fault zone. The potential exists for numerous untested traps within the Jurassic section associated with salt-generated structures along the Mt. Enterprise fault system.

Ferguson, J.D.

1985-02-01

175

Feldspar diagenesis in the Frio Formation, Brazoria County, Texas Gulf Coast  

SciTech Connect

Tremendous quantities of detrital feldspar have been dissolved or albitized below about 14000 ft (4267 m) in the Frio Formation (Oligocene), Chocolate Bayou Field, Brazoria County, Texas. Some sandstones no longer contain any unmodified detrital feldspar grains. Material transfer involved in these reactions is immense, affecting at least 15% of the rock volume. Thus, albitization has important implications for several other diagenetic processes that involve feldspars or their components. These processes include formation of secondary porosity, precipitation of quartz and carbonate cements, and the evolution of Na-Ca-Cl formation water.

Land, L.S.; Milliken, K.L.

1981-07-01

176

Determinants of delayed detection of cancers in Texas Counties in the United States of America  

PubMed Central

Introduction Previous studies have shown that delayed detection of several cancers is related to socioeconomic deprivation as measured by the Wellbeing Index (WI) in Texas, the United States of America (USA). The current study investigates whether delayed cancer detection is related to lack of health insurance, physician shortage and higher percentages of Hispanics rather than WI per se since these factors are directly related to delayed cancer detection and may confound WI. Methods Cancer data and potential determinants of delayed cancer detection are derived from Texas Cancer Registry, Texas State Data Center, and Texas Department of State Health Services and U.S. Census Bureau. Texas cancer data from 1997 to 2003 are aggregated to calculate age-adjusted late- and early-stage cancer detection rates. The WI for each county is computed using data from the USA Census 2000. A weighted Tobit regression model is used to account for population size and censoring. The percentage of late-stage cancer cases is the dependent variable while independent variables include WI and the aforementioned potential confounders. Results Delayed detection of breast, lung, colorectal and female genital cancers is associated with higher percentage of uninsured residents (p?

2012-01-01

177

West Central Texas. Homework pays off for Originala in Haskell County  

SciTech Connect

Originala Petroleum Corp., Fort Worth, is finding Bend Conglomerate and Caddo oil in NW Haskell County, Texas. The most encouraging find to date is the company's No. 1 June L. White, which potentialed in Sept. 1981 for 493 bopd from perforations in the Caddo at 5638-60 ft. This discovery, along with promising Bend Conglomerate drill stem test and log shows in other wells in the region, support continued exploration efforts in this geologically complex province. The key to overcoming the exploration challenges in NW. Haskell County is to depend primarily upon seismic data to give structural control. Accurate seismic interpretation is only a part of the preparation, and is integrated with other geologic data-collecting methods such as gravity and structural mapping based solely on subsurface control.

Mickey, V.

1983-03-01

178

Plan of study for the High Plains regional aquifer-system analysis in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Ogallala Formation and associated Tertiary and Quarternary deposits from the principal aquifers supporting irrigation in the High Plains of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. The volume of water in storage within the aquifers is declining in most of the High Plains because water is being withdrawn in excess of the rate of replenishment. The U.S. Geological Survey has initiated a 5-year study of the High Plains aquifer system to develop the geohydrologic data base and computer models of the ground-water flow system needed to evaluate the response of the aquifer system to ground-water management alternatives. This report describes the objectives, plan, and organization of the study and outlines the work to be accomplished in each State in the study area. (Woodard-USGS)

Weeks, John B.

1978-01-01

179

Upper Strawn (Desmoinesian) carbonte and clastic depositional environments, southeastern King County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Pennsylvanian upper Strawn Group of southeastern King County, Texas, provides a unique setting to study interactions between coeval carbonate and clastic deposition during the Desmoinesian. One of the most perplexing problems is the relationship of massive Pennsylvanian platform carbonates to shallow-water terrigenous clastic sediments. Within the study area, carbonate facies were deposited along the northern edge of the Knox-Baylor trough on the Spur platform, and terrigenous clastics were carried toward the Midland basin through the Knox-Baylor trough. Based on the analysis of subsurface cores, five carbonate lithofacies and four clastic lithofacies were recognized in southeastern King County, Texas. The distribution and geometry of these lithofacies are related to variations in the rate of subsidence in the Knox-Baylor trough, Pennsylvanian tectonics, deltaic progradation, avulsion, and compaction. The platform carbonates within the northern region of southeastern King County record environments within the carbonate platform complex, including middle platform, outer platform, algal mound, and platform margin. The quartzarenitic sandstones within the southern region of southeastern King County occur in a variety of complex depositional geometries, including distributary-bar fingers, lobate deltas, and offshore bars. Cores of these sandstones represent mainly the uppermost portion of the various sandstone bodies. The upper Strawn Group provides an attractive area for exploration geology. Both carbonates and clastics provide excellent reservoirs from a depth of approximately 5,000-6,000 ft. Total production within the area is over 100 million bbl of oil since the early 1940s. Multiple pay zones within a 600-ft interval also provide an added incentive for exploration. Areas within and around the Knox-Baylor trough deserve a detailed study due to these relatively shallow, unexplored, multiple pay zones.

Boring, T.H. (Oryx Energy Co., Oklahoma City, OK (USA))

1990-02-01

180

Mini-shelves in Taylor shale: stratigraphy of Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary units, Bastrop County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Several well-log cross sections and isopach maps demonstrate the spatial relationships among the Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary stratigraphic units in Bastrop County, Texas. Each of the major structural features that are present partially within the county - the San Marcos arch, Round Rock syncline, East Texas basin, Mexia-Talco and Luling fault systems, and Travis volcanic field - has influenced the units investigated. Most of the stratigraphic units follow normal stratigraphic patterns (i.e., they thin toward the outcrop and toward the San Marcos arch). There are some notable exceptions, however. These exceptions are discussed.

Tucker, D.R.; Hencey, D.

1987-09-01

181

Contamination of wells completed in the Roubidoux aquifer by abandoned zinc and lead mines, Ottawa County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Roubidoux aquifer in Ottawa County Oklahoma is used extensively as a source of water for public supplies, commerce, industry, and rural water districts. Water in the Roubidoux aquifer in eastern Ottawa County has relatively low dissolved-solids concentrations (less than 200 mg/L) with calcium, magnesium, and bicarbonate as the major ions. The Boone Formation is stratigraphically above the Roubidoux aquifer and is the host rock for zinc and lead sulfide ores, with the richest deposits located in the vicinity of the City of Picher. Mining in what became known as the Picher mining district began in the early 1900's and continued until about 1970. The water in the abandoned zinc and lead mines contains high concentrations of calcium, magnesium, bicarbonate, sulfate, fluoride, cadmium, copper, iron, lead, manganese, nickel, and zinc. Water from the abandoned mines is a potential source of contamination to the Roubidoux aquifer and to wells completed in the Roubidoux aquifer. Water samples were collected from wells completed in the Roubidoux aquifer in the Picher mining district and from wells outside the mining district to determine if 10 public supply wells in the mining district are contaminated. The chemical analyses indicate that at least 7 of the 10 public supply wells in the Picher mining district are contaminated by mine water. Application of the Mann-Whitney test indicated that the concentrations of some chemical constituents that are indicators of mine-water contamination are different in water samples from wells in the mining area as compared to wells outside the mining area. Application of the Wilcoxon signed-rank test showed that the concentrations of some chemical constituents that are indicators of mine-water contamination were higher in current (1992-93) data than in historic (1981-83) data, except for pH, which was lower in current than in historic data. pH and sulfate, alkalinity, bicarbonate, magnesium, iron, and tritium concentrations consistently indicate that the Cardin, Commerce 1, Commerce 3, Picher 2, Picher 3, Picher 4, and Quapaw 2 wells are contaminated.

Christenson, Scott C.

1995-01-01

182

Environmental regulatory compliance plan, Deaf County site, Texas: Draft revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The DOE is committed to conduct its operation in an environmentally safe and sound manner and comply with the letter and spirit of applicable environmental statues and regulations. These objectives are codified in DOE order N 5400.2, ''Environmental Policy Statement.'' This document, the Deaf Smith County site (Texas) Environmental Regulatory Compliance Plam (ERCP), is one means of implementing that policy. The ERCP describes the environmental regulatory requirements applicable to the Deaf Smith County site (Texas), and presented the framework within which the Salt Repository Project Office (SRPO) will comply with the requirements. The plan also discusses how DOE will address State and local environmental requirements. To achieve this purpose the ERCP will be developed in phases. This version of the ERCP is the first phase in the delopment of the ERCP. It represents the Salt Repository Project Office's understanding of environmental requirements for the site characterization phase of repository development. After consultation with the appropriate federal and state agencies and affected Indian tribes, the ERCP will be updated to reflect the results of consultation with these agencies and affected Indian tribes. 6 refs., 38 figs.

Not Available

1987-12-14

183

Visual assessments for Swisher County and Deaf Smith County locations, Palo Duro Basin, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The area of the Swisher and Deaf Smith County locations is characterized by vast open spaces with limited vertical relief and vegetative cover. The stream valleys and areas around the playa lakes provide the only significant topographical relief in either location, and the areas in range vegetation provide the only major contrast to the dominant land cover of agricultural crops. Tree stands occur almost exclusively in association with orchards, country clubs, farmsteads, and urban areas. Because of climatic conditions in the region, there are few permanent water bodies in either location. Grain elevators, farmsteads, and other cultural modifications (roads, utility lines, fence rows, etc.) are scattered throughout both locations, but they constitute a very small portion of the visible landscape. These features help provide scale in the landscape and also serve as visual landmarks.

Not Available

1984-12-01

184

Use of landsat thematic mapper data to identify crop types and estimate irrigated acreage, Uvalde and Medina counties, Texas, 1991  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) data were used to estimate that about 51,000 acres of crops were irrigated with water pumped from the Edwards aquifer in Uvalde and Medina Counties, Texas in 1991. Areas calculated for irrigated crops were 31,000 acres for Uvalde County and 20,000 acres for Medina County. Quantities of water pumped from the Edwards aquifer to irrigate crops in 1991 were estimated as 65,000 acre-feet for Uvalde County and 18,000 acre-feet for Medina County. Differences in estimates of ground water used for irrigation in the two counties were attributed primarily to greater pre- cipitation in Medina County than in Uvalde County. The total number of acres of irrigated crops estimated using Landsat TM data was about 9 percent lower in Uvalde County and about 13 percent lower in Medina County than the number of acres calculated from data reported by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service (ASCS). The total quantity of water pumped from the Edwards aquifer in 1991 for irrigation in the two counties, about 83,000 acre- feet, was about 5 percent greater developed than the quantity calculated from data reported by the ASCS.

Raymond, L. H.; McFarlane, S. I.

1994-01-01

185

Impact of Hispanic ethnic concentration and socioeconomic status on obesity prevalence in Texas counties.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study is to determine whether Hispanic ethnic concentration is associated with a higher prevalence of obesity and, if this relationship exists, whether it is affected by the socioeconomic environment. The study uses the Texas Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) linked to 2000 census data to access the relationship between prevalence of obesity, Hispanic ethnic concentration, poverty and level of education at a county-level. The findings suggest that the association of Hispanic ethnic concentration and obesity varies by socioeconomic environment. Although little influence was observed for % poverty, the relationship between Hispanic ethnic concentration and obesity differed by county-level educational attainment. High proportion of residents with a bachelor's degree is associated with a low prevalence of obesity; counties with both high % Hispanic and high % with Bachelor's degrees had the lowest prevalence of obesity. Our results suggest that promoting and improving education, perhaps including training on healthful living, may serve as an effective means of curbing current obesity trends and associated health problems in Hispanic and possibly other ethnic communities. PMID:22690191

Salinas, Jennifer J; Rocha, Elizabeth; Abdelbary, Bassent E; Gay, Jennifer; Sexton, Ken

2012-04-11

186

Water supply and use in Deaf Smith, Swisher, and nearby counties in the Texas Panhandle  

SciTech Connect

Irrigation for agriculture is the primary water use in the area of Deaf Smith and Swisher Counties, Texas, and the Ogallala Formation is the main water source. The availability of water in the 12-county area is projected to decrease markedly over the next 5 decades because of the steady depletion of ground water in recoverable storage. Water requirements in the 12-county area are projected to exceed available supplies from about 1990 through 2030. The shortage for the year 2030 is estimated to be approximately 4 million acre-feet under high-growth-rate conditions. Because of its semiarid climate, the area has little available surface water to augment the supply of the Ogallala Formation, which, despite its depletion, could be the principal source of water for the repository. There are, however, other potential sources of water: (1) Lake Mackenzie, on Tule Creek; (2) the Santa Rosa Formation, which underlies much of the Southern High Plains and locally yields moderate amounts of good-quality water; and (3) the Wolfcamp Series, which yields low amounts of highly saline water. The effluents of municipal wastewater treatment plants and municipal water systems may also be useful as supplements to the repository's primary water supply.

Not Available

1985-02-01

187

Impact of Hispanic Ethnic Concentration and Socioeconomic Status on Obesity Prevalence in Texas Countie  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this study is to determine whether Hispanic ethnic concentration is associated with a higher prevalence of obesity and, if this relationship exists, whether it is affected by the socioeconomic environment. The study uses the Texas Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) linked to 2000 census data to access the relationship between prevalence of obesity, Hispanic ethnic concentration, poverty and level of education at a county-level. The findings suggest that the association of Hispanic ethnic concentration and obesity varies by socioeconomic environment. Although little influence was observed for % poverty, the relationship between Hispanic ethnic concentration and obesity differed by county-level educational attainment. High proportion of residents with a bachelor’s degree is associated with a low prevalence of obesity; counties with both high % Hispanic and high % with Bachelor’s degrees had the lowest prevalence of obesity. Our results suggest that promoting and improving education, perhaps including training on healthful living, may serve as an effective means of curbing current obesity trends and associated health problems in Hispanic and possibly other ethnic communities.

Salinas, Jennifer J.; Rocha, Elizabeth; Abdelbary, Bassent E.; Gay, Jennifer; Sexton, Ken

2012-01-01

188

Estimated Land-Surface Subsidence in Harris County, Texas, 1915-17 to 2001  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Land-surface subsidence, or land subsidence, in Harris County, Texas, which encompasses much of the Houston area, has been occurring for decades. Land subsidence has increased the frequency and extent of flooding, damaged buildings and transportation infrastructure, and caused adverse environmental effects. The primary cause of land subsidence in the Houston area is withdrawal of groundwater, although extraction of oil and gas also has contributed. Throughout most of the 20th century, groundwater was the primary source of municipal, agricultural, and industrial water supply for Harris County. Currently (2009) a transition to surface water as the primary source of supply, guided by a groundwater regulatory plan developed by the Harris-Galveston Subsidence District (2001), is in effect. The aquifers in Harris County contain an abundant amount of potable groundwater, but they also contain layers of clay. Groundwater withdrawals caused compaction of the clay layers, which in turn resulted in the widespread, substantial land-surface subsidence that has occurred in the Houston area.

Kasmarek, Mark C.; Gabrysch, Robert K.; Johnson, Michaela R.

2009-01-01

189

Predicting diagenetic history and reservoir quality in the Frio Formation of Brazoria County, Texas and Pleasant Bayou test wells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Good-quality geothermal reservoirs displaying secondary porosity exist on the upper Texas coast (Brazoria County), site of the Pleasant Bayou No. 1 and No. 2 wells, and are attributed to a moderately stable mineral assemblage, normal geothermal gradients, and low in situ pH. Major authigenic minerals are calcite, quartz, and kaolinite. Detrital feldspar has been extensively albitized at depth. Major diagenetic

W. R. Kaiser; D. L. Richmann

1981-01-01

190

SH 33 in Mayes and Delaware Counties, From US 69 at Chouteau in Mayes County, Easterly 31.8 Miles to SH 10 Near Kansas in Delaware County, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The proposed project recommends development of a Primary State Highway, SH 33, on a new alignment from Chouteau, Oklahoma, east 31.8 miles bisecting the Ft. Gibson Hunting area to its termination at Kansas, Oklahoma. Adverse effects include: displacement ...

1971-01-01

191

Assessment of manure phosphorus export through turfgrass sod production in Erath County, Texas.  

PubMed

A best management practice (BMP) for exporting manure phosphorus (P) in turfgrass sod from the North Bosque River (NBR) watershed in central Texas was assessed using a geographic information system (GIS). The NBR watershed has a mandate to reduce the total annual P load to the NBR by 50% as a result of total maximum daily load regulation. Since dairy waste applications to fields are identified as the major nonpoint source of P to the river, innovative BMPs, such as export of manure P in turfgrass, will be needed to achieve the 50% reduction. However, methods are needed to evaluate the feasibility of these innovative management practices prior to their implementation. A geospatial database of suitable turfgrass production sites was developed for Erath County using GIS. Erath County largely encompasses the upper portion of the NBR watershed. Information from field experiments, production practices, and ground-truthing was used to search, analyze, and verify a geospatial database developed from national and regional sources. The integration and analyses of large databases supports the search by turf producers for sites suitable for turfgrass sod production in Erath County. In addition, GIS enables researchers and regulators to estimate manure P exports and reduced P loading due to implementation of the manure export BMP on a county scale. Under optimal conditions 198,000 kg manure P yr(-1) could be used and 114,840 kg manure P yr(-1) exported from the NBR watershed through implementation of a system using dairy manure to produce turfgrass sod. This is the equivalent of the manure P applied from 10,032 dairy cows yr(-1) and exported from 5808 dairy cows yr(-1). Application of GIS to large-scale planning and decision-making transcends traditional field-scale applications in precision agriculture. PMID:15380316

Munster, C L; Hanzlik, J E; Vietor, D M; White, R H; McFarland, A

2004-11-01

192

Elements of high constructive deltaic sedimentation, lower Frio Formation, Brazoria County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The lower Frio Formation in eastern Brazoria County, upper Texas Gulf Coast, was deposited in a high constructive deltaic environment in the Houston delta system. Constructive elements of the stacked, elongate to lobate deltas that were intersected in core are storm induced delta front splays, delta front slump deposits, and distributary mouth bar, distributary channel and delta plain assemblages. Reworked and winnowed abandonment facies that are volumetrically insignificant relative to constructive elements are subdivided into a crossbedded shoreface-foreshore subfacies and a fine grained cyclic sequence of storm deposits on the lower shoreface that represent a distal abandonment subfacies. Micropaleontological evidence indicates that deposition of constructive and abandonment facies took place in water depths of less than 120 feet.

Tyler, N.; Han, J.H.

1982-01-01

193

Stratigraphy of early ordovician El Paso group of the southern Hueco Mountains, Hudspeth County, Texas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Early Ordovician El Paso Group of the southern Hueco Mountains, Hudspeth County, Texas, crops out over an area of about 57 sq km. (22 sq mi) at longitude 105 deg. 53 min. 30 sec. latitude 31 deg. 40 min. 15 sec and 31 deg 47 min. 30 sec. N. It is divided into three informal units (oldest to youngest): lower, middle and upper. The lower unit contains the lower calcareous sandstone member and an overlying sandy limestone member. The middle unit is cherty limestone. The upper unit contains two members: sandy dolomite and an upper silty dolomite. The calcareous sandstone member is 36 m (118 ft) thick and conformably overlies the Bliss Sandstone. It is thin- to medium-bedded, grayish-orange-pink to pale-blue, glauconitic, dolomitic, and siliciclastic sandstone. The calcareous sandstone member was deposited in subtidal and intertidal environments and is to Early Early Ordovician age.

Aluka, M. I. J.

1984-12-01

194

Site Study Plan for laboratory soil mechanics, Deaf Smith County site, Texas: Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This Site Study Plan for laboratory soil mechanics describes the laboratory testing to be conducted on soil samples collected as part of the characterization of the Deaf Smith County site, Texas. This study provides for measurements of index, mechanical, thermal, hydrologic, chemical, and mineral properties of soils from boring throughout the site. Samples will be taken from Playa Borings/Trenching, Transportation/Utilities Foundation Borings, Repository Surface Facilities Design Foundation Borings, and Exploratory Shaft Facilities Design Foundation Borings. Data from the laboratory tests will be used for soil strata characterization, design of foundations for surface structures, design of transportation facilities and utility structures, design of impoundments, design of shaft lining, design of the shaft freeze wall, shaft permitting, performance assessment calculations, and other program requirements. A tentative testing schedule and milestone log are given. A quality assurance program will be utilized to assure that activities affecting quality are performed correctly and that appropriate documentation is maintained. 18 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1987-12-01

195

Uranium series disequilibrium in the Bargmann property area of Karnes County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Historical evidence is presented for natural uranium series radioactive disequilibrium in uranium bearing soils in the Bargmann property area of karnes County on the Gulf Coastal Plain of south Texas. The early history of uranium exploration in the area is recounted and records of disequilibrium before milling and mining operations began are given. The property contains an open pit uranium mine associated with a larger ore body. In 1995, the US Department of Energy (DOE) directed Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to evaluate the Bargmann tract for the presence of uranium mill tailings (ORNL 1996). There was a possibility that mill tailings had washed onto or blown onto the property from the former tailings piles in quantities that would warrant remediation under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remediation Action Project. Activity ratios illustrating disequilibrium between {sup 226}Ra and {sup 238}U in background soils during 1986 are listed and discussed. Derivations of uranium mass-to-activity conversion factors are covered in detail.

Davidson, J.R.

1998-02-01

196

Paleoecology of Eocene Wheelock Member of Cook Mountain Formation in western Houston County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Sixty-nine foraminifera species and 49 mollusk species were recovered from the Wheelock Member of the Cook Mountain Formation, in the Porter's Springs area of Houston County, Texas, and along the Little Brazos River in Brazos County, Texas. The Wheelock Member is primarily a regressive unit. A thin shell lag deposit at the base of the member, consisting of abraded mollusk fragments and subrounded pebbles of impure fossiliferous limestone, is all that remains of the transgressive part of the sequence. Above the shell lag deposit, the lower part of the member consists dominantly of bioturbated, glauconitic, fossiliferous mudstone. The species composition and diversity of benthic foraminifera and the planktonic/benthic ratio, suggest deposition in a normal marine inner or inner-middle shelf environment. Dominant benthic foraminifera include: Ceratobulimina eximia, Cibicides mauricensis, Eponides mexicanus, Gyroidina octocamerata, Melonis planatum, Siphonina claibornensis, and Spiroplectammina mississippiensis. The mollusk population has a low diversity and is dominated by only a few species. These include: Buccitriton texanum, Mesalia claibornensis, Polinices aratus, Notocorbula texana, Vokesula petropolitana, and Cadulus subcoarevatus. The low diversity and high dominance of the mollusk population suggest deposition in an unstable environment. This instability, however, had little or no effect on the foraminifera. The upper part of the Wheelock Member consists dominantly of regularly layered mudstone and siltstone and contains only a low-diversity assemblage of agglutinated foraminifera. This part of the member was probably deposited in a shallow brackish-water environment with a high sedimentation rate. Dominant agglutinated species include: Haplophragmoides mauricensis, Trochammina claibornensis, and Verneuilina cushmanii.

Gaskell, B.A.

1989-09-01

197

Determination of natural radioactivity in a Wilcox lignite (Eocene), Rusk County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Natural radioactivity was determined in a Wilcox (Eocene) lignite in southern Rusk County, Texas. Natural radioactivity consists mostly of U-235, U-238, Th-232, and K-40. The mode(s) of occurrence of these isotopes in lignite is as follows. Uranium isotopes may occur in two ways: in heavy mineral crystals carried by streams and deposited with the lignite as it forms, and trapped in the complex molecules of organic matter in the lignite. Thorium occurs only in the heavy minerals in a known concentration ratio with uranium. Potassium occurs in association with the plant remains of the lignite. Eleven samples were analyzed by gamma-ray spectrophotometry for uranium, thorium, and potassium. Uranium averages 1.18 ppm U and ranges from 0.91 to 1.37 ppm U. Thorium averages 7.32 ppm Th and ranges from 6.30 to 8.87 ppm Th. Potassium averages 0.55 wt. % K and ranges from 0.51 to 0.61 wt. % K. The Th:U ratio of 6.2 is within the range of common heavy minerals like zircon, monazite, and allanite, showing that little organic uranium is present in this lignite. If organic uranium were present, the Th:U ratio would be less than about 4. Wilcox lignite is lower in uranium than the average United States lignite, and strikingly lower than lignite from south Texas where the sediment enclosing the lignite is a low-level source of uranium. In east Texas, uranium-rich sediments are about 100 km south of the main Wilcox lignites.

Bartow, P.M.; Ledger, E.B.S.F. [Austin State Univ., Nacogdoches, TX (United States)

1994-09-01

198

Site study plan for Transportation, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Preliminary draft  

SciTech Connect

This site study plan describes transportation field studies to be conducted during the characterization of the Deaf Smith County, Texas, site for the US Department of Energy's Salt Repository Project. The studies are needed to identify and assess potential project impacts to transportation infrastructure and systems in the project vicinity and along potential transportation routes to the site across the State of Texas. The studies are also needed to locate and design project transportation facilities, and to evaluate and design impact mitigation. After identifying the transportation information requirements needed to comply with Federal, State, and local regulations and repository program requirements, the site study plan describes the study design and rationale, the field data collection procedures and equipment, the data analysis methods and application of results, the data management strategy, the schedule of field activities, the management of the study, and the study's quality assurance program. The field data collection activities are organized into programs for the characterization of site vicinity rail corridors and highway corridors, characterization of alternative statewide transportation routes, monitoring of site characterization effects on transportation, characterization of aircraft overflight patterns and hazardous material transportation patterns, and assessment of emergency response preparedness along alternative statewide transportation routes. 34 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Not Available

1987-06-01

199

Geology of the Seventy-Six, West field, Duval County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Seventy-Six, West field in Duval County, Texas, is a significant example of the Jackson barrier-bar/strandplain shorezone System of South Texas with a complex heterogeneous reservoir. This field is a typical instance of a combination stratigraphic structural trap. The facies sequence reflects a mosaic of mud-rich marsh, beach-ridge plain, distributary channel and levee, lagoonal, and backbarrier environments. Compartments caused by these facies distinctions (undrained areas of recoverable reserves) are a prime objective; however, any improvement in production is a boon. The field has produced more than 4,600,000 barrels of oil since its discovery in 1954. In many older fields such as this, the mobile oil left in the reservoir can be one third or more of the original oil in place after economic limits are reached. The economics are widely variable between major operators and small independents as illustrated by this study. Reevaluation using a synergistic approach to a completely developed oil field has led to additional waterflooding, improved recovery through infill drilling, and economic water disposal in a mature oil and gas province.

Hyatt, D.B. (Texas General Land Office, Austin (USA))

1990-09-01

200

Survey of Groundwater Concentrations of Uranium, Radon and other Constituents in Kleberg County, Texas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Uranium in the Southwest Texas coastal plains has been mined using in-situ recovery (ISR) for several decades. There is at least 36 closed and 3 active uranium mines in the region. Since the major source of drinking and irrigation water in the area is groundwater, the public is concerned about restoration of groundwater at uranium mining sites to baseline levels to prevent contamination of private wells by migration of contaminants such as uranium, molybdenum, selenium, strontium, and arsenic. One objective of this study is to determine the quality of the groundwater around ISR mining sites. 50 private drinking water wells were tested in areas near the Kingsville Dome uranium mining in Kleberg County, Texas during 2010 and 2011, and the concentrations of parameters of interest (U, Th, Mo, As, Se, Sr, Ca, Mg, Na, K, Cl , SO42-, NO3-, Br-, F-, radon, thoron, alkalinity, pH, conductivity and temperature) were determined. The results to date have shown that 58% of the wells surveyed had uranium concentrations greater than 10 ppb, and 22% had uranium concentrations greater than the EPA drinking water standard of 30 ppb, including four wells with uranium concentrations between 160 and 771 ppb. There was no significant correlation between the measured uranium concentrations and either distance or direction from the mining site. The measured concentrations will be compared with data in the USGS National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) database for groundwater samples collected in the late 1970s.

Gamboa, Y.; Fernandez, W.; Clapp, L. W.

2011-12-01

201

Geology and geophysics of south-central Zavala and adjoining parts of Dimmit Counties, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Gravity, magnetic, and seismic surveys combined with subsurface geologic investigations resulted in very intriguing interpretations of an area east of Crystal City, Texas. The study area includes the south-central part of Zavala County east of the Nueces River and the adjoining parts of Dimmit County to the south. The Elaine field is included in the study area. Gravity and magnetic residuals were calculated using the least-squares method, and the magnetic surveys revealed several serpentine plugs, which are confirmed by seismic interpretations. Although no geophysics work was done, subsurface study shows that Elaine field is the largest of these plugs. Seismic studies also show that the Austin Chalk, on whose surface the lava was extruded, is highly fractured and faulted. The Austin under the Elaine field is the lowest structural feature in the area. The Anacacho was deposited on the lava surface, and in the Elaine area it has a reeflike appearance. Isopachs of younger sediments show that they are draped and differentially compacted over the plugs, and that the Elaine plug affects sediments as young as Escondido. Production in the area is mainly from the San Miguel, but significant amounts of hydrocarbons have also been produced from Eagle Ford, Austin, Anacacho, and Olmos reservoirs.

Noel, J.A.

1984-09-01

202

Site study plan for borehole search and characterization, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This site study plan describes the Borehole Search and Characterization field activities to be conducted during the early stages of Site Characterization at the Deaf Smith County site, Texas. The field program has been designed to provide data useful in addressing information/data needs resulting from Federal/State/Local regulatory requirements and repository program requirements. Air and ground surveys, an extensive literature search, and landowner interviews will be conducted to locate wells within and adjacent to the proposed nuclear waste repository site in Deaf Smith County. Initially, the study will center around the planned Exploratory Shaft Facilities location and will expand outward from that location. Findings from this study may lead to preparation of a new site study plan to search suspected borehole locations, and excavate or reenter known boreholes for additional characterization or remedial action. The Salt Repository Project (SRP) Networks specify the schedule under which the program will operate. The Technical Field Services Contractor (TFSC) is responsible for conducting the field program. Data will be handled and reported in accordance with established SRP procedures. A quality assurance program will be utilized to assure that activities affecting quality are performed correctly and that appropriate documentation is maintained. 13 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1987-12-22

203

Characteristics of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems of two locations in Deaf Smith and Swisher Counties, Texas  

SciTech Connect

According to the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program and the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (P.L. 97-425), a potential nuclear waste repository site must be chosen with consideration of potential impacts on terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. This report is a preliminary environmental characterization of two locations in the Texas Panhandle, one in Deaf Smith County and the other in Swisher County, that have been recommended for further study. A description of important natural areas is offered as a basis for comparative studies of the two locations and for the identification and screening of potential repository sites. Information on current land uses, potential habitats, and expected plant and wildlife species is provided to assist field investigators in the collection of baseline data in support of further siting activities. The results of limited field surveys are also included. The report is in two parts. Part I contains a characterization of terrestrial ecological resources based upon limited field surveys aimed at verifying the presence of plant communities and wildlife habitats. It also presents inventories of species with special status, species with recreational and economic importance, and species of ecological value to important or special-status species. Part II presents information on aquatic ecosystems and resources derived primarily from a review of the literature, interviews, and limited field surveys. 21 figures, 18 tables.

Not Available

1984-11-01

204

Aquatic Vegetation Restoration in Arcadia Lake, Oklahoma: A Case Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Arcadia Lake is located within the metropolitan area of Oklahoma City and Edmund, in Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, about 2.4 km (1.5 miles) southwest of Arcadia, Oklahoma (Figure 1). Construction of the earth-filled dam was authorized by the Flood Control Ac...

G. O. Dick R. M. Smart E. R. Gilliland

2004-01-01

205

75 FR 19667 - Oklahoma Disaster # OK-00036 Declaration of Economic Injury  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12115] Oklahoma Disaster OK-00036 Declaration...EIDL) declaration for the State of Oklahoma, dated 04/09/2010. Incident...Jefferson, Stephens. Contiguous Counties: Oklahoma Beckham, Caddo, Carter, Cotton,...

2010-04-15

206

Streamflow, Water Quality, and Metal Loads from Chat Leachate and Mine Outflow into Tar Creek, Ottawa County, Oklahoma, 2005  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Picher mining district is an abandoned lead and zinc mining area located in Ottawa County, northeastern Oklahoma. During the first half of the 20th century, the area was a primary producer of lead and zinc in the United States. Large accumulations of mine tailings, locally referred to as chat, produce leachate containing cadmium, iron, lead, and zinc that enter drainages within the mining area. Metals also seep to local ground water and streams from unplugged shafts, vent holes, seeps, and abandoned mine dewatering wells. Streamflow measurements were made and water-quality samples were collected and analyzed from two locations in Picher mining district from August 16 to August 29 following a rain event beginning on August 14, 2005, to determine likely concentrations and loads of metals from tailings and mine outflows in the part of Picher mining district near Tar Creek. Locations selected for sampling included a tailings pile with an adjacent mill pond, referred to as the Western location, and a segment of Tar Creek from above the confluence with Lytle Creek to below Douthat bridge, referred to as Tar Creek Study Segment. Measured streamflow was less than 0.01 cubic foot per second at the Western location, with streamflow only being measurable at that site on August 16, 2005. Measured streamflows ranged from <0.01 to 2.62 cubic feet per second at Tar Creek Study Segment. One water-quality sample was collected from runoff at the Western location. Total metals concentrations in that sample were 95.3 micrograms per liter cadmium, 182 micrograms per liter iron, 170 micrograms per liter lead, 1,760 micrograms per liter zinc. Total mean metals concentrations in 29 water-quality samples collected from Tar Creek Study Segment from August 16-29, 2005, were 21.8 micrograms per liter cadmium, 7,924 micrograms per liter iron, 7.68 micrograms per liter lead, and 14,548 micrograms per liter zinc. No metals loading values were calculated for the Western location. Metals loading to Tar Creek Study Segment were calculated based on instantaneous streamflow and metals concentrations. Total metals loading to Tar Creek from chat leachate ranged from 0.062 to 0.212 pound per day of cadmium, <0.001 to 0.814 pound per day of iron, 0.003 to 0.036 pound per day of lead, and 10.6 to 47.9 pounds per day of zinc. Metals loading to Tar Creek Study Segment from chat leachate and mine outflow was determined by subtracting values at appropriate upstream and downstream stations. Four sources of calculated metal loads are from Tar Creek and Lytle Creek entering the study segment, from chat pile leachate, and from old Lytle Creek mine outflow. Less than 1 percent of total and dissolved iron loading came from chat leachate, while about 99 percent of total iron loading came from mine outflow. Total and dissolved lead loading percentages from chat leachate were greater than total and dissolved lead loading percentages from mine outflow. About 19 percent of total zinc loading came from chat leachate, about 29 percent of total zinc loading came from mine outflow, and about 52 percent of total zinc loading came from Lytle Creek.

Cope, Caleb C.; Becker, Mark F.; Andrews, William J.; DeHay, Kelli

2008-01-01

207

Late diagenetic indicators of buried oil and gas: II, Direct detection experiment at Cement and Garza oil fields, Oklahoma and Texas, using enhanced LANDSAT I and II images  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Cement oil field, Oklahoma, was a test site for an experiment designed to evaluate LANDSAT's capability to detect an alteration zone in surface rocks caused by hydrocarbon microseepage. Loss of iron and impregnation of sandstone by carbonate cements and replacement of gypsum by calcite are the major alteration phenomena at Cement. The bedrock alterations are partially masked by unaltered overlying beds, thick soils, and dense natural and cultivated vegetation. Interpreters biased by detailed ground truth were able to map the alteration zone subjectively using a magnified, filtered, and sinusoidally stretched LANDSAT composite image; other interpreters, unbiased by ground truth data, could not duplicate that interpretation. Similar techniques were applied at a secondary test site (Garza oil field, Texas), where similar alterations in surface rocks occur. Enhanced LANDSAT images resolved the alteration zone to a biased interpreter and some individual altered outcrops could be mapped using higher resolution SKYLAB color and conventional black and white aerial photographs suggesting repeat experiments with LANDSAT C and D.

Donovan, Terrence J.; Termain, Patricia A.; Henry, Mitchell E.

1979-01-01

208

An evaluation of (226)Ra and (228)Ra in drinking water in several counties in Texas, USA.  

PubMed

Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) or Technology Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (TENORM) can be a potential health risk. It is now well known that the underlying geology in many parts of Texas has given rise to levels of (226)Ra and (228)Ra that often exceed the limits set by the US Environmental Protection Agency. A detailed literature search was undertaken to assess the levels of (226)Ra and (228)Ra in all of the Texas counties. Several statistical evaluations of the data were performed. The Hickory aquifer in the Llano Uplift region of Texas has consistently had the highest number of (226)Ra and (228)Ra concentrations above the legal limit. As well many of the affected rural communities may not have the financial resources to rectify the problem. PMID:23490545

Landsberger, S G; George, G

2013-03-13

209

Integrated Analysis of Production Potential and Profitability of a Horizontal Well in the Lower Glen Rose Formation, Maverick County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The U.S. Department of Energy\\/Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE\\/METC) awarded a contract in 1991 to Prime Energy Corporation (PEC) to demonstrate the benefit of using horizontal wells to recover gas from low permeability formations. The project area was located in the Chittim field of Maverick County, Texas. The Lower Glen Rose Formation in the Chittim field was a promising horizontal

J. R. Ammer; T. H. Mroz; A. M. Zammerilli; Yost A. B; J. G. Muncey; P. S. Hegeman

1995-01-01

210

Technical procedures for the implementation of cultural resource site studies, Deaf Smith County, Texas: Preliminary draft  

SciTech Connect

Cultural resources at the Deaf Smith County site will be identified, evaluated and managed through the implementation of studies detailed in the Site Study Plan for Cultural Resources. This technical procedure outlines the conduct of pedestrian survey and the documentation of identified cultural resources. The purpose of the field surveys is to identify and document cultural resources in the areas that will be affected by site characterization activities and to record the environmental setting of identified cultural resources. Three pedestrian surveys will cover 100 percent of the on-site and off-site project areas. Survey 1 will provide coverage of the Repository Surface Facility (RSF) area, which includes the Exploratory Shaft Facility (ESF) and two linear engineering design borehole (EDBH) seismic survey corridors. Survey 2 will provide coverage of a 39 km/sup 2/ (15 mi/sup 2/) area that includes the 23 km/sup 2/ (9 mi/sup 2/) Deaf Smith County site plus a 0.4 to 0.8 kM (1/4 to 1/2 mi) border area but excludes the area covered by Survey 1. Survey 3 will cover offsite geotechnical test areas, such as the locations of playa boreholes, deep playa wells, hydrologic tests, site foundation borings, and their access routes. The purpose of site documentation or recording is to address the project information needs for land use permits and approvals, engineering design support, and cultural resource evaluation for National Register of Historic Places eligibility. Site documentation will consist of gathering sufficient data on identified resources to complete Texas Natural Resource Information System (TNRIS). 7 refs., 3 figs.

Not Available

1987-09-30

211

Tuberculosis in the foreign-born population of Tarrant county, Texas by immigration status.  

PubMed

The epidemiology of tuberculosis is changing in the United States as a result of immigration, yet the extent to which different classes of immigrants contribute to overall morbidity is unknown. Tuberculosis in nonimmigrant visitors is of particular interest as they are currently exempt from screening requirements. We conducted a prospective survey of all culture-positive tuberculosis patients in Tarrant County, Texas from 1/98 to 12/00. Immigration status of foreign-born patients was classified as permanent residents, undocumented, or nonimmigrant visitors. Of 274 eligible participants, 114 (42%) were foreign-born; of these, 67 (59%) were permanent residents, 28 (25%) were undocumented, and 19 (17%) were nonimmigrant visitors. Among the foreign-born, we observed significant differences by immigration status in multidrug resistance (p = 0.02), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (p = 0.0007), and hospitalization (p = 0.03 for ever/never, 0.01 for duration). Compared with other immigrants, more nonimmigrant visitors were multi-drug-resistant (16 % versus 11% of undocumented residents and 1% of permanent residents), were HIV-positive (32% versus 0% of undocumented and 5% of permanent residents), were hospitalized (47% versus 36% of undocumented and 19% of permanent residents), and had lengthy hospitalizations (median [midspread] days = 87 [25 to 153] versus 8.5 [4 to 28] for undocumented and 10 [7 to 24 d] for permanent residents). We found nonimmigrant visitors to be an important source of tuberculosis morbidity in Tarrant County. Further studies in other regions of the U.S. are needed to determine if screening and treatment recommendations of persons who spend extended periods in the U.S. should be raised to the standards set for permanent residents. PMID:11587977

Weis, S E; Moonan, P K; Pogoda, J M; Turk, L; King, B; Freeman-Thompson, S; Burgess, G

2001-09-15

212

Cultural resources survey and assessment of the proposed Department of Energy Freeport to Texas City pipeline, Brazoria and Galveston Counties, Texas. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An intensive survey and testing program of selected segments of a proposed Department of Energy pipeline were conducted by Coastal Environments, Inc., Baton Rouge, Louisiana, during December 1985 and January 1986. The proposed pipeline runs from Texas City, Galveston County to Bryan Mound, Brazoria County. The pedestrian survey was preceded by historical records survey to locate possible historic sites within the DOE righ-of-way. Four prehistoric sites within the ROW (41BO159, 160, 161, 162) and one outside the ROW (41BO163) were located. All are Rangia cuneata middens. The survey results are discussed with particular reference to the environmental settings of the sites and the effectiveness of the survey procedure. Two of the sites located within the ROW were subjected to additional testing. The results of the backhoe testing program are included in the site descriptions, and the scientific value of the sites are presented. 52 refs., 20 figs., 10 tabs.

Castille, G.J.; Whelan, J.P. Jr.

1986-01-01

213

Unsaturated flow modeling for performance assessment of a radioactive waste disposal facility in Andrews County, Texas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Quantitifying infiltration rates is a key component of the performance assessment for radioactive waste disposal facilities. In arid regions with scarce infiltration data, this is a challenging problem because of the computational limitations of available numerical implementations to solve water flow and transport equations. This work summarizes methodology and analysis performed to overcome some of these challenges and to generate infiltration scenarios for a low level waste disposal site in Andrews County, Texas. The work presented here includes preparation of a two dimensional finite element model in HYDRUS that includes the cover system and adjacent geologic units, calibration of hydraulic properties and root water uptake parameters based on soft information, preparation of atmospheric forcings based on current and hypothesized future climatic conditions, evaluation of impacts related to temporal and spatial discretization of forcings and model domain, and definition of scenarios for cover degradation and wetter climate conditions. Results of this work include a sensitivity analysis of infiltration rates to changes in boundary conditions under quasi-steady state, evaluation of the impact of temporal discretization of the atmospheric forcings in terms of water balance error and computational efficiency, and the estimation of infiltration rates under different scenarios. Infiltration rates from this work are being incorporated into a transport model to estimate potential radiological doses based on performance assessment modeling analyses. Findings from this work seek to contribute towards robust approaches to estimate infiltration in arid regions.

Martinez Baquero, G. F.; Singh, A.; Holt, R. M.; grisak, G. E.

2011-12-01

214

History of burial diagenesis determined from isotopic geochemistry, Frio Formation, Brazoria County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Progressive burial diagenesis of the Oligocene Frio Formation in Brazoria County, Texas, has resulted in extensive reaction between pore fluids and sediment in a major shift toward water/rock equilibrium. Carbon and oxygen isotopic data, combined with fluid isotopic data from the literature, indicate that quartz cement formed at 75 to 80/sup 0/C and kaolinite at approximately 100/sup 0/C. The zone of most rapid albitization is near 150/sup 0/C. Authigenic carbonates formed over a wide range of temperatures, and those within the peak zone of hydrocarbon generation are depleted in /sup 13/C. At depths shallower than approximately 2600 m, quartz and carbonate cementation in primary intergranular pore spaces (passive diagenesis) dominated. Below 2600 m, within the geopressured zone, reaction of detrital components (active diagenesis) is the major process. Organic maturation, albitization, and the transition of smectite to illite are the processes that contribute most of the components required for precipitation of cements. Quartz cementation occurred quite early in the burial history of the Frio (beginning at approximately 1500 m of burial), when the rates of fluid expulsion were at a maximum and when little of the Frio sandstone section had reached the zone of albitization.

Milliken, K.L. (Univ. of Texas, Austin); Land, L.S.; Loucks, R.G.

1981-08-01

215

Clay minerals as indicators for depositional environment in the south Hallettsville Field, Lavaca County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The South Hallettsville Field, Lavaca County, Texas, produces gas and condensate from Lower Wilcox sandstones and shales which have been interpreted as either channel turbidite deposits in outer-shelf to slope locations or as delta to pro-delta sands and muds. Thirteen core samples were analyzed by X-ray diffraction methods to determine whether a semiquantitative estimate of clay mineral content would aid in determining the depositional environment. Discrete illite, kaolinite, and chlorite are of particular interest because the presence of these minerals is interpreted as being due to original deposition. If a turbidity-type event occurred, the weight percents of nondiagenetic clays in this sequence should: (1) decrease significantly as the boundary is crossed between the shale and the overlying sandstone; and (2) gradually increase in progressively shallower samples within the sandstone. However, the weight percents for kaolinite and chlorite do not vary significantly; the illite content gradually decreases with shallower depths. This sequence is more compatible with a deltaic environment of deposition. 10 references.

Freed, R.L.

1980-01-01

216

Site study plan for exploratory shaft monitoring wells, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Preliminary Draft  

SciTech Connect

As part of site characterization studies, two exploratory shafts will be constructed at the Deaf Smith County site, Texas. Twelve wells at five locations have been proposed to monitor potential impacts of shaft construction on water-bearing zones in the Ogallala Formation and the Dockum Group. In addition, tests have been proposed to determine the hydraulic properties of the water-bearing zones for use in design and construction of the shafts. Samples of the Blackwater Draw Formation, Ogallala Formation, and Dockum Group will be obtained during construction of these wells. Visual indentification, laboratory testing, and in situ testing will yield data necessary for Exploratory Shaft Facility design and construction. This activity provides the earliest data on the Blackwater Drew Formation, Ogallala Formation, and Dockum Group near the exploratory shaft locations. Drilling and hydrologic testing are scheduled prior to other subsurface activity at the Exploratory Shaft Facility to establish ground-water baseline conditions. The Technical Field Services Contractor is responsible for conducting the field program of drilling and testing. Samples and data will be handled and reported in accordance with established Salt Repository Project procedures. A quality assurance program will be utilized to assure that activities affecting quality are performed correctly and that the appropriate documentation is maintained. 45 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

Not Available

1988-01-01

217

Perriwinkle and Perriwinkle North fields, Martin County, Texas: A Cisco-Canyon lowstand reef complex  

SciTech Connect

During the middle-early through early-middle deposition of sediments in Canyon field, a series of glacio-eustatically controlled sea level lowstands resulted in carbonate buildups seaward of the Horseshoe Atoll in Martin County, Texas. The resulting reef tracts consist of algal-bryozoan boundstones, clean forereef talus conglomerates, and other high-energy shelf carbonates. The reef complex was chemically eroded into a tower karst terrain during subsequent sea level lowstands and associated subaerial exposure. The highly sculptured paleotopography was mechanically eroded during the onset of a sea level highstand, filling lows with locally derived conglomerates. In addition, highstand basinal foreshelf conglomerates from the atoll were deposited. These conglomerates contain at least one reservoir-size upper Strawn high-energy shelf allochthon. A transgressive-regressive shelf margin reef tract was deposited seaward of the now exhumed Canyon paleokarst surface during a lowstand that occurred early in Cisco deposition. The tract consists of an algal-bryozoan boundstone, associated forereef talus conglomerates, immediate backreef grainstones and packstones, and erosional foreshelf detritus. Although subaerially exposed, the Cisco reef tract is not as highly solutioned as the Canyon tract, resulting in a lower relief paleotopographic surface. During subsequent sea level highstands, both the Cisco and Canyon reef tracts were buried under lower Cisco basinal foreshelf conglomeraters, masking the stratigraphic intricacies of the paleobathymetric surface and obscuring the relationship of time correlative reservoirs within the shelf-edge complex.

Mozynski, D.C.; Reid, A.M. (Deminex U.S. Oil Co., Dallas, TX (United States))

1992-04-01

218

Draft environmental assessment: Swisher County site, Texas. Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 112). [Contains Glossary  

SciTech Connect

In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Swisher County, Texas, as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The potentially acceptable site was subsequently narrowed to an area of 9 square miles. To determine their suitability, the Swisher site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations are reported in this draft environmental assessment (EA), which is being issued for public review and comment. The DOE findings and determinations that are based on these evaluations are preliminary and subject to public review and comment. A final EA will be prepared after considering the comments received. On the basis of the evaluations contained in this draft EA, the DOE has found that the Swisher site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The site is contained in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. This setting contains one other potentially acceptable site - the Deaf Smith site. Although the Swisher site appears to be suitable for site characterization, the DOE has concluded that the Deaf Smith site is the preferred site in the Permian Basin and is proposing to nominate the Deaf Smith site rather than the Swisher site as one of the five sites suitable for characterization.

Not Available

1984-12-01

219

Site study plan for routine laboratory rock mechanics, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This Site Study Plan for Routine Laboratory Rock Mechanics describes routine laboratory testing to be conducted on rock samples collected as part of the characterization of the Deaf Smith County site, Texas. This study plan describes the early laboratory testing. Additional testing may be required and the type and scope of testing will be dependent upon the results of the early testing. This study provides for measurements of index, hydrological, mechanical, and chemical properties with tests which are standardized and used widely in geotechnical investigations. Another Site Study Plan for Nonroutine Laboratory Rock Mechanics describes laboratory testing of samples from the site to determine mechanical, thermomechanical, and thermal properties by less widely used methods, many of which have been developed specifically for characterization of the site. Data from laboratory tests will be used for characterization of rock strata, design of shafts and underground facilities, and modeling of repository behavior in support of resolution of both preclosure and postclosure issues. A tentative testing schedule and milestone log are given. A quality assurance program will be utilized to assure that activities affecting quality are performed correctly and that appropriate documentation is maintained. 18 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1987-12-01

220

Site study plan for intermediate hydrology clusters tests wells Deaf Smith County Site, Texas  

SciTech Connect

To characterize the geologic, geochemical, and hydrologic characteristics of intermediate-depth formations at the proposed Deaf Smith County, Texas, repository site, wells called Intermediate Hydrology clusters will test the Dewey Lake, Alibates, Salado, Yates, Upper and Lower Seven Rivers, and Queen Grayburg Formations. Sixteen wells will be installed at six locations. One location will have four wills, two locations will have three wells, and three locations will have two wells for a total of 16 wells. Testing of the formations is to proceed from the bottom up, with 2-day pumping tests at the less permeable formations. Tracer tests and tests for verticall hydraulic properties will be designed and performed after other hydrologic tests are completed. After testing, selected wells are to be completed as single or possibly dual monitoring wells to observe water-level trends. To develop a hydrogeologic testing plan, the response of each formation to potential testing procedures was evaluated using design values and an assumend range for hydraulic parameters. These evaluations indicate that hydraulic properties of a sandy zone of the Dockum, the lower Sever Rivers, and possibly the Alibates and Queen/Grayburg can be determined by pumping tests. Standard of shut-in slug tests must be conducted in the remaining formations. Tests of very long duration would be required to determine the verticla properties of less permeable formations. Tracer tests would also require weeks or months. 61 figs., 34 refs., 4 tabs.

Not Available

1988-01-01

221

B. C. Canyon field, Howard County, Texas: An ancient analogy to modern tropical tower karst terrains  

SciTech Connect

Late in the early deposition of sediments in Canyon field, a series of glacio-eustatically controlled sea level lowstands resulted in a carbonate buildup seaward of the Horseshoe Atoll in Howard County, Texas. The resulting satellite reef tract consists of fringing boundstone; high-energy shelf grainstones; lower energy shelf packstones and wackestones; and thin, highstand, black shales and mudstones. The original extent and thickness of deposits were extensively modified during karstification coincident with successive sea level lowstands. The resulting paleotopographic landforms appear to be similar to tower karst features of Puerto Rico. During the beginning of each sea level highstand, the paleoterrain was modified by erosion. The basinal foreshelf conglomerates resulting from initial highstand erosion contain dipping strata that commonly can be detected by the dipmeter tool. The mechanism for the formation of these strata may be depositional or the result of diagenetic alteration of the rock fabric in the burial environment. Using dipmeter data, an uneconomic producer has been offset by one of the better producing wells in the field.

Mozynski, D.C.; Reid, A.M. (Deminex U.S. Oil Company, Dallas, TX (United States))

1992-04-01

222

Fatal cocaine interactions: a review of cocaine-related deaths in Bexar County, Texas.  

PubMed

Although cocaine is a widely abused illicit substance that is known to cause death, deaths due to its use appear to occur in a minority of those who use it. This report was designed to review drug-related deaths due to cocaine, and the concomitant use of other drugs/medications. A retrospective review of drug deaths at the Bexar County Medical Examiner's Office in San Antonio, Texas, was undertaken for cases where cocaine was one of the drugs implicated in causing death. Analysis was performed comparing the concentrations of cocaine and benzoylecgonine present and the absence or presence of other drugs. The data obtained showed that cocaine was toxic over a large range with deaths occurring at concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 78 mg/L. Analyses also indicated an increased lethality when cocaine is used in combination with ethanol, heroin, opiates, and antidepressant/antipsychotic medications, which is consistent with previous reports and research. Antihistamine data showed that there may be relationship between increased toxicity and co-ingestion, although more research is necessary. PMID:21394957

Molina, D Kimberley; Hargrove, Veronica M

2011-03-01

223

A higher resolution stratigraphic and sedimentological study of the subsurface Queen City Formation (Eocene), Nacogdoches and Angelina Counties, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Eocene Queen City Formation is a regressive fluvial-deltaic and shallow-marine depositional unit in the East Texas basin. Subsurface core and electric well log data are being used in a detailed subsurface stratigraphic study of the Queen City Formation in a portion of East Texas. Log data from approximately 250 wells across a seven county area of east Texas were used to produce stratigraphic cross sections plus structure, formation, and net sands isopach maps showing the regional structure and distribution of Queen City facies. Structure contour maps on the Formation top and base indicate progradation onto a gently sloping, structurally uniform shelf. Formation and net sand isopach maps reveal two lobate centers, of deposition extending basinward along southeast-trending depositional axes in Houston, Trinity, and Angelina Counties. These maps also indicate interval thicknesses greater than 200 feet in southwest Houston and Trinity Counties but thinning dramatically to the east and downdip to the southeast. Net sand thicknesses vary from greater than 100 ft proximal to the Formation thicks to less than 10 ft in the more distal areas. Cores from producing fields in Angelina and Nacogdoches Counties are being used in a study of the sedimentology and depositional history of subsurface Queen City Facies. Previous studies were primarily based on well log data sets alone. Core studies indicate the Queen City Formation in this area is a dominantly fine-grained interval comprised of mudstones, siltstones, and very fine sandstones. Very thin (< 2 ft) sandstones and siltstones are generally located in the uppermost Queen City interval and are attractive shallow production targets.

Garner, R.D.; Roberts, H.H. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge (USA))

1990-09-01

224

Summer sound-level characterization of the Deaf Smith County and Swisher County locations in the Palo Duro Basin, Texas  

SciTech Connect

A description of sound levels and sound sources in the Deaf Smith County and Swisher County locations in the Palo Duro Basin during a period representative of the summer season is presented. Included are data collected during the period August 4 through 8, 1982, for both locations. 3 references, 2 figures, 3 tables.

Not Available

1984-03-01

225

Environment of deposition of an Eocene lignite-bearing sedimentary sequence in northeast Rusk County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The stratigraphy and environment of deposition of the undivided Wilcox Group (lower Eocene) and Carrizo Formation (Eocene) were studied in an 88 km/sup 2/ (34 mi/sup 2/) area in northeastern Rusk County, Texas. Seven cores and 300 boreholes logs were used in the study. The undivided Wilcox Group is the predominant geologic unit in the study area and consists of poorly lithified, interlaminated sandstones, siltstone, claystones, and lignite seams. Lignite seams range in thickness from 0.1 to 2.2 m (4 in. to 7 ft) and are conformable with the overlying and underlying strata. Subtle coarsening-upward sequences, 1.8-31.3 m (6-103 ft) thick, occur between lignite seams; however, the individual sandstone units, 0.3-1.8 m (4 in.-6 ft) thick, within these sequences fine upward. The fine-grained rocks of the Wilcox Group are overlain unconformably by well-sorted, medium to coarse-grained sandstones of the Carrizo Formation. The small-scale sedimentary structures, fine-grain size, and matrix-rich nature of the undivided Wilcox units are characteristic of fluvial overbank deposits. Peat beds probably accumulated in interchannel swamps on a lower alluvial plain, distal from overbank discharge. As streams meandered across the area, overbank discharge buried the swamps. The coarsening-upward sequences between lignite seams indicate overbank deposition from a prograding stream. Swamps were reestablished as the stream was abandoned or migrated away. Fining-upward trends in grain size and the upward decrease in scale of sedimentary structures indicate the Carrizo Formation was deposited in fluvial channels.

Cole, W.F.; Kersey, D.G.; Mathewson, C.C.

1984-04-01

226

Linkage analysis of candidate obesity genes among the Mexican-American population of Starr County, Texas.  

PubMed

Recent advances in the molecular basis of body fat regulation have identified several genes in which genetic variation may influence obesity and related measures in human populations. Genes that have been shown to have a regulatory function in the control of body fat utilization, eating behavior, and/or metabolic rate in rodent models of obesity include leptin (LEP), leptin receptor (LEPR), neuropeptide Y (NPY), NPY Y1 receptor (NPYY1), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), GLP-1 receptor (GLP1R), and uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1). We have typed microsatellite markers located within or near these seven candidate obesity genes in 302 non-diabetic individuals from 59 Mexican-American families from Starr County, Texas. Sib pair linkage analysis was used to examine linkage between these genes and obesity status (obese siblings only; n = 170 pairs) and several obesity-related quantitative variables (all siblings; n = 545 total sibling pairs). Significant linkage (P = 0.042) was found between obesity and NPY within the obese sibling pairs. No other candidate gene was linked to obesity status in this subsample. Consistent with the obese sib pair linkage results, NPY showed evidence of linkage to body weight (P = 0.020), abdominal circumference (P = 0.031), hip circumference (P = 0.012), diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.005), and a composite measure of body mass and size (P = 0.048) in the entire sibling sample. Other significant linkages observed were between LEP and waist/hip ratio (P = 0.010), total cholesterol (P = 0.030), and HDL cholesterol (P = 0.026) and between LEPR and fasting blood glucose (P = 0.018) and diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.003). These results support further investigation of NPY, LEP, and LEPR to identify genetic variation that may influence obesity status, glucose and lipid metabolism, and blood pressure in Mexican Americans. PMID:10207720

Bray, M S; Boerwinkle, E; Hanis, C L

1999-01-01

227

Rail transportation corridor analysis report: Deaf Smith County location in the Palo Duro Basin, Texas  

SciTech Connect

An environmental data base was developed for the purpose of preliminary siting of potential rail access corridors between existing rail lines and the potential repository site in Deaf Smith County, Texas. The categories of the data base were environmental conditions considered significant in rail line construction and operation. These included land cover, population areas, slope, surface hydrology, cultivated prime agricultural lands, cultural features, and utility rights-of-way. The categories were divided into avoidance, constraint, and opportunity features, and the constraint features were then weighted for environmental impact potential. An environmental screening analysis using the computerized Geographical Information System (GIS) was then performed. The analysis involved applying the GIS overlay process to the various constraint data categories to produce a composite constraint map of the study area. The composite constraint map, color coded for various levels of constraint to corridor siting, was subsequently used as a guide for the selection of a series of alternative corridors. By means of a further application of GIS procedures, the corridor alternatives were statistically analyzed for adherence to corridor selection guidelines. In addition, a supplementary analysis was performed to compare the alternatives in terms of four impact categories: road crossings, construction costs, degree of land disruption, and population impact. The statistical and supplementary impact analyses led to a preliminary selection of a preferred corridor. The corridor assessment process indicated the importance of analyzing alternative trade-offs, as well as the need for more detailed investigation of certain conditions and a detailed comparison of alternatives prior to final corridor siting.

Not Available

1986-10-01

228

Draft environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas. Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 112). [Contains Glossary  

SciTech Connect

In February 1983, the US Department of Energy identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The potentially acceptable site was subsequently narrowed to an area of 9 square miles. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations are reported in this draft environmental assessment, which is being issued for public review and comment. The DOE findings and determinations that are based on these evaluations are preliminary and subject to public review and comment. A final EA will be prepared after considering the comments received. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this draft EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. This setting contains one other potentially acceptable site - the Swisher site. Although the Swisher site appears to be suitable for site characterization, DOE has concluded that the Deaf Smith site is the preferred site. The DOE finds that the site is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is proposing to nominate the Deaf Smith site as one of five sites suitable for characterization. Having compared the Deaf Smith site with the other four sites proposed for nomination, the DOE has determined that the Deaf Smith site is one of the three preferred sites for recommendation to the President as candidates for characterization.

Not Available

1984-12-01

229

Geologic characterization of Caddo Limestone Reservoir, Curry Unit, Stephens County, north-central Texas  

SciTech Connect

Three classic carbonate models (carbonate bank, oolitic shoal, and tidal flat) are applied to interpret the depositional environments and diagenesis of the Caddo limestone (Middle Pennsylvanian). The study area is located in west-central Stephens County, approximately 4 mi southwest of Breckenridge, Texas. Phylloid algal mounds developed on a lower Caddo ramp, along the transition of the Concho platform and Fort Worth basin. Within the area defined as the Curry unit, phylloid algal mounds and intermound facies aggraded to sea level. This led to the development of an areally restricted carbonate bank. Some phylloid algal buildups underwent subaerial exposure, and fresh water leached unstable carbonate minerals, creating minor secondary porosity (<10%). An oolitic shoal (0-9.2 m thick) overlies and partially intergrades with the phylloid algal bank. Ooids were deposited along the margin of the preexisting bank, whereas fine-grained oolitic and peloidal packstone were deposited on the bank. The bank margin oolite exhibits oomoldic porosity in excess of 15%. The uppermost 6.1-24.4 m of the Caddo represents intertidal deposition. Sediment, primarily algal remains and carbonate mud, was deposited on a preexisting surface of ooids and peloids. Fenestral fabric. rhizoliths, brecciated zones, and small-scale channels are common features. A wide variety of pore types are present in the intertidal zone; intraskeletal, framework, biomoldic, and vuggy pores are most important. Throughout this zone, porosity exceeds 10% and permeability averages 12 md. The Curry unit has produced approximately 28 million bbl of oil (primary and secondary) from the upper Caddo. Depositional environments and diagenesis of the Caddo are complex. A greater understanding of these complexities may enable geoscientists to evaluate remaining future potential within the Caddo and in other similar carbonate accumulations.

Weber, J.L. (Mobil Exploration and Producing U.S. Inc., Midland, TX (USA)); Schwartz, C.K.

1990-02-01

230

Effect of fractures on reserve calculations as determined by petrology: Birthright field, Hopkins County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Birthright field in Hopkins County, Texas, produces oil and gas from Jurassic carbonate grainstone deposits of the upper Smackover Formation. The field was discovered in 1965 by the drilling of the Schneider and Corey 1 E.M. Strode well. This well initially tested 491 BOPD from a 34-ft interval at 9,519 ft. The field has an oil-water contact at subsea 9,090 ft and a gas-oil contact at subsea 8,980 ft. Ten wells were originally drilled in the 800-ac field, but only six oil and one gas wells were put on production. The estimated in-place reserves in 1969 were 6.4 million bbl oil, 1.3 million bbl condensate, and 14.97 bcf gas, with an estimated primary recovery of 22%. The total cumulative oil production to 1986 was 3.19 million bbl oil. The grainstones of the producing interval are composed of ooids, pisoids, pelecypod fragments, grapestones, and fecal pellets. This shallow marine bar deposit has been extensively leached and cemented. Fracturing and brecciation have taken place causing many grains to be broken and sheared. Many grains have been coated by early diagenetic fibrous rim cement indicative of leaching in vadose and phreatic conditions. These conditions have caused significant variations in the structural conditions and sizes of the coated grains. Anhydrite and sparry calcite have subsequently filled many of the pores, especially below the oil-water contact. It is though that these factors may have affected actual recoverable reserves, and that petrology can be an effective tool in reservoir evaluation, especially where recovered reserves are greater than had been initially calculated.

Mitchell-Tapping, H.J. (GeoResearch International, Dallas, TX (USA))

1989-09-01

231

A unique Austin Chalk reservoir, Van field, Van Zandt County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Significant shallow oil production from the Austin Chalk was established in the Van field, Van Zandt County, in East Texas in the late 1980s. The Van field structure is a complexly faulted domal anticline created by salt intrusion. The Woodbine sands, which underlie the Austin Chalk, have been and continue to be the predominant reservoir rocks in the field. Evidence indicates that faults provided vertical conduits for migration of Woodbine oil into the Austin Chalk where it was trapped along the structural crest. The most prolific Austin Chalk production is on the upthrown side of the main field fault, as is the Woodbine. The Austin Chalk is a soft, white to light gray limestone composed mostly of coccoliths with some pelecypods. Unlike the Austin Chalk in the Giddings and Pearsall fields, the chalk at Van was not as deeply buried and therefore did not become brittle and susceptible to tensional or cryptic fracturing. The shallow burial in the Van field was also important in that it allowed the chalk to retain primary microporosity. The production comes entirely from this primary porosity. In addition to the structural position and underlying oil source from the Woodbine, the depositional environment and associated lithofacies are also keys to the reservoir quality in the Van field as demonstrated by cores from the upthrown and downthrown (less productive) sides of the main field fault. It appears that at the time of Austin Chalk deposition, the main field fault was active and caused the upthrown side to be a structural high and a more agreeable environment for benthonic organisms such as pelecypods and worms. The resulting bioturbation enhanced the reservoir's permeability enough to allow migration and entrapment of the oil. Future success in exploration for analogous Austin Chalk reservoirs will require the combination of a favorable environment of deposition, a nearby Woodbine oil source, and a faulted trap that will provide the conduit for migration.

Lowe, J.T. (Unocal Corp., Houston, TX (USA))

1990-09-01

232

Characterization and origin of dissolved organic carbon in Yegua ground water in Brazos County, Texas.  

PubMed

Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in five shallow (< 20 m) and three deeper wells (27 to 30 m) in the Eocene Yegua Formation (Brazos County in east-central Texas) ranged from 92 to 500 microns. Characterization of high, intermediate, and low molecular weight DOC fractions (HMW > 3000 amu, IMW 1000 to 3000 amu, and LMW 500 to 1000 amu) and combined neutral sugar analyses provide information on organic matter sources in the Yegua aquifers. Combined neutral sugars ranged in concentration from 0.6 to 2.7 mumol/L and comprised 0.8% to 6.7% of DOC in ground water. Glucose was the most abundant neutral sugar, followed by xylose and galactose, arabinose, mannose, rhamnose, and fucose. These combined neutral sugars were more diagenetically altered in shallow, oxic ground water as indicated by high mole % fucose + rhamnose and low neutral sugar yield. The precursors for neutral sugars are most probably angiosperm leaves, which show a similar distribution pattern of neutral sugars. Ground water DOC was depleted in 13C relative to soil-zone organic matter (OM) (-16@1000 to -19@1000). The delta 13C values of bulk DOC and HMW DOC ranged from -24@1000 to -32@1000, whereas LMW and IMW DOC ranged from -32@1000 to -34@1000 and -16@1000 to -28@1000, respectively. This variability in delta 13C values is probably related to microbial processes and selective preservation of OM. Carbon isotope analyses in bulk and different molecular weight DOC fractions imply a predominantly C3 OM source and a low contribution of soil-zone OM to DOC. PMID:11554255

Routh, J; Grossman, E L; Murphy, E M; Benner, R

233

Stability of salt in the Permian salt basin of Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas and New Mexico, with a section on dissolved salts in surface water  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Permian salt basin in the Western Interior of the United States is defined as that region comprising a series of sedimentary basins in which halite and associated salts accumulated during Permian time. The region includes the western parts of Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas, and eastern parts of Colorado and New Mexico. Following a long period of general tectonic stability throughout the region during most of early Paleozoic time, there was much tectonic activity in the area of the Permian salt basin during Late Pennsylvanian and Early Permian time just before bedded salt was deposited. The Early Permian tectonism was followed by stabilization of the basins in which the salt was deposited. These salt basins were neither contemporaneous nor continuous throughout the region, so that many salt beds are also discontinuous. In general, beds in the northern part of the basin (Kansas and northern Oklahoma) are older and the salt is progressively younger towards the south. Since Permian time the Permian salt basin has been relatively stable tectonically. Regionally, the area of the salt basin has been tilted and warped, has undergone periods of erosion, and has been subject to a major incursion of the sea; but deep-seated faults or igneous intrusions that postdate Permian salt are rare. In areas of the salt basin where salt is near the surface, such as southeastern New Mexico and central Kansas, there are no indications of younger deep-seated faulting and only a few isolated igneous intrusives of post-Permian age. On the other hand, subsidence or collapse of the land surface resulting from dissolution has been commonplace in the Permian salt basin. Some dissolution of salt deposits has probably been taking place ever since deposition of the salt more than 230 million years ago. Nevertheless, the subsurface dissolution fronts of the thick bedded-salt deposits of the Permian basin have retreated at a very slow average rate during that 230 million years. The preservation of bedded salt from subsurface dissolution depends chiefly on the isolation of the salt from moving ground water that is not completely saturated with salt. Karst topography is a major criterion for recognizing areas where subsurface dissolution has been active in the past; therefore, the age of the karst development is needed to provide the most accurate estimate of the dissolution rate. The Ogallala Formation-of Pliocene age is probably the most widespread deposit in the Permian salt basin that can be used as a point of reference for dating the development of recent topography. It is estimated that salt has been dissolved laterally in the vicinity of Carlsbad, New Mexico, at an average rate of about 6-8 miles per million years. Estimates of future rates of salt dissolution and the resulting lateral retreat of the underground dissolution front can be projected with reasonable confidence for southeastern New Mexico on the assumption that the climatic changes there in the past 4 million years are representative of climatic changes that may be expected in the near future of geologic time. Large amounts of salt are carried by present-day rivers in the Permian salt basin; some of the salt is derived from subsurface salt beds, but dissolution is relatively slow. Ground-water movement through the Permian salt basin is also relatively slow.

Bachman, George Odell; Johnson, Ross Byron.

1973-01-01

234

Profiles showing potentiometric surfaces and changes in effective stress in aquifers in Harris and Galveston Counties, Texas, 1971-78  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Profiles were prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Harris-Galveston Counties Coastal Subsidence District and the Texas Department of Water Resources to show the changes in the altitudes of the potentiometric surfaces and, consequently, the changes in effective stress on the framework of the aquifers as a result of changes in the distribution and amount of ground-water pumping. In general, and in most areas, the profiles show for the dates indicated that water levels have increased and that the effective stress has decreased. (Woodard-USGS)

Gabrysch, R. K.

1978-01-01

235

Technical procedures for implementation of acoustics site studies, Deaf Smith County site, Texas: Environmental Field Program: Preliminary draft  

SciTech Connect

The purpose and scope of the technical procedure for processing data from the tethered meteorological system are covered. Definitions, interfaces, and concurrent data needs are also addressed. This technical procedure describes how to control, organize, verify, and archive tethered meteorological system data. These data will be received at the processing location from the field measurement location and are part of the characterization of the Deaf Smith County Site, Texas for the salt repository program. These measurements will be made in support of the sound propagation study and are a result of environmental data requirements for acoustics. 6 refs., 15 figs., 5 tabs.

Not Available

1987-09-01

236

Time-lapse density prediction for reservoir characterization using probabilistic neural networks at Postle Field, Texas County, Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At Postle Field the main challenge has been to map the Morrow A sandstone. By using a non-linear approach to predict density values from p-wave seismic. I was able to discriminate the reservoir sandstones and identify areas of high quality reservoir. My work conrms the connectivity of the two northern sandstone bodies, increasing the potential resource volume in the study area. The baseline density prediction showed the dry wells were drilled in areas of poor reservoir quality. With the results of this work future drilling locations can be located with less uncertainty. The application of time-lapse neural network prediction successfully predicted changes in the reservoir. Analysis of reservoir modeling and simulation suggest that the time-lapse density changes shown in the neural network prediction at Postle Field are related to pressure changes in the reservoir. Two areas of high quality reservoir have been identied and proposed for future drilling programs. Further engineering evaluation is recommended.

Vega Diaz, Andrea C.

237

CENSUS AND STATISTICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF SOIL AND WATER QUALITY AT ABANDONED AND OTHER CENTRALIZED AND COMMERCIAL DRILLING-FLUID DISPOSAL SITES IN LOUISIANA, NEW MEXICO, OKLAHOMA, AND TEXAS  

SciTech Connect

Commercial and centralized drilling-fluid disposal (CCDD) sites receive a portion of spent drilling fluids for disposal from oil and gas exploration and production (E&P) operations. Many older and some abandoned sites may have operated under less stringent regulations than are currently enforced. This study provides a census, compilation, and summary of information on active, inactive, and abandoned CCDD sites in Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas, intended as a basis for supporting State-funded assessment and remediation of abandoned sites. Closure of abandoned CCDD sites is within the jurisdiction of State regulatory agencies. Sources of data used in this study on abandoned CCDD sites mainly are permit files at State regulatory agencies. Active and inactive sites were included because data on abandoned sites are sparse. Onsite reserve pits at individual wells for disposal of spent drilling fluid are not part of this study. Of 287 CCDD sites in the four States for which we compiled data, 34 had been abandoned whereas 54 were active and 199 were inactive as of January 2002. Most were disposal-pit facilities; five percent were land treatment facilities. A typical disposal-pit facility has fewer than 3 disposal pits or cells, which have a median size of approximately 2 acres each. Data from well-documented sites may be used to predict some conditions at abandoned sites; older abandoned sites might have outlier concentrations for some metal and organic constituents. Groundwater at a significant number of sites had an average chloride concentration that exceeded nonactionable secondary drinking water standard of 250 mg/L, or a total dissolved solids content of >10,000 mg/L, the limiting definition for underground sources of drinking water source, or both. Background data were lacking, however, so we did not determine whether these concentrations in groundwater reflected site operations. Site remediation has not been found necessary to date for most abandoned CCDD sites; site assessments and remedial feasibility studies are ongoing in each State. Remediation alternatives addressed physical hazards and potential for groundwater transport of dissolved salt and petroleum hydrocarbons that might be leached from wastes. Remediation options included excavation of wastes and contaminated adjacent soils followed by removal to permitted disposal facilities or land farming if sufficient on-site area were available.

Alan R. Dutton; H. Seay Nance

2003-06-01

238

Confirmation of Aedes taeniorhynchus in Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

A single female collected in 1971 confirms the presence of Aedes taeniorhynchus (Wiedemann) in Oklahoma. This species was also collected from inland localities in Arkansas, Louisiana and Texas. During the 1971 Venezuelan equine encephalitis epizootic in Texas a U. S. Army sponsored surveillance program resulted in the collection, identification and processing of 501,992 mosquitoes comprising 51 species from Arkansas, Louisiana,

Bruce A. Harrison; John F. Reinertl; Edward S. Saugstad; Joseph E. Farlow

239

Associations between two mosquito populations and West Nile virus in Harris County, Texas, 2003-06.  

PubMed

Associations between Culex quinquefasciatus, Aedes albopictus and West Nile virus (WNV) activity, temperature, and rainfall in Harris County, Texas 2003-06 are discussed. Human cases were highly correlated to Cx. quinquefasciatus (r = 0.87) and Ae. albopictus (r = 0.78) pools, blue jays (r = 0.83), and Ae. albopictus collected (r = 0.71), but not Cx. quinquefasciatus collected (r = 0.45). Human cases were associated with temperature (r = 0.71), not rainfall (r = 0.29), whereas temperature correlated with Ae. albopictus and Cx. quinquefasciatus collections (r = 0.88 and 0.70, respectively) and Cx. quinqueftsciatus pools (r = 0.75), but not Ae. albopictus pools (r = 0.55). Both species (collections and pools) and blue jays were weakly correlated (r 5 0.41) with rainfall, but blue jays were better correlated with Cx. quinquefasciatus pools (r = 0.87), compared with Ae. albopictus pools (r = 0.67), Ae. albopictus collections (r = 0.69), and Cx. quinquefasciatus collections (r = 0.46). Peak minimum infection rate for Cx. quinquefasciatus (4.55), and Ae. albopictus (4.41) was in August with highest human cases (17.87), blue jays (55.58), and temperature (29.01 degrees C). Between both species, blood meal analysis indicated 68.18% of Cx. quinquefasciatus mammalian hosts were dog, while 22.72% were human, whereas Ae. albopictus had higher human (44.44%) but fewer dog hosts (22.22%). Ten bird species were identified as hosts for Cx. quinquefasciatus, with northern cardinal and blue jay representing 26.66% and 20.00%, respectively. No bird feeding activity was observed in Ae. albopictus. The earliest and latest human blood meal occurred in May (Ae. albopictus) and November (Cx. quinquefasciatus); 66.66% of human host identifications between both species occurred in October-November, after the seasonal human case peak. Based upon our data, WNV activity in both mosquito species warrants further investigation of their individual roles in WNV ecology within this region. PMID:17939505

Dennett, James A; Bala, Adilelkhidir; Wuithiranyagool, Taweesak; Randle, Yvonne; Sargent, Christopher B; Guzman, Hilda; Siirin, Marina; Hassan, Hassan K; Reyna-Nava, Martin; Unnasch, Thomas R; Tesh, Robert B; Parsons, Ray E; Bueno, Rudy

2007-09-01

240

ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN TWO MOSQUITO POPULATIONS AND WEST NILE VIRUS IN HARRIS COUNTY, TEXAS, 2003-061  

PubMed Central

Associations between Culex quinquefasciatus, Aedes albopictus and West Nile virus (WNV) activity, temperature, and rainfall in Harris County, Texas 2003–06 are discussed. Human cases were highly correlated to Cx. quinquefasciatus (r = 0.87) and Ae. albopictus (r = 0.78) pools, blue jays (r = 0.83), and Ae. albopictus collected (r = 0.71), but not Cx. quinquefasciatus collected (r = 0.45). Human cases were associated with temperature (r = 0.71), not rainfall (r = 0.29), whereas temperature correlated with Ae. albopictus and Cx. quinquefasciatus collections (r = 0.88 and 0.70, respectively) and Cx. quinquefasciatus pools (r = 0.75), but not Ae. albopictus pools (r = 0.55). Both species (collections and pools) and blue jays were weakly correlated (r ? 0.41) with rainfall, but blue jays were better correlated with Cx. quinquefasciatus pools (r = 0.87), compared with Ae. albopictus pools (r = 0.67), Ae. albopictus collections (r = 0.69), and Cx. quinquefasciatus collections (r = 0.46). Peak minimum infection rate for Cx. quinquefasciatus (4.55), and Ae. albopictus (4.41) was in August with highest human cases (17.87), blue jays (55.58), and temperature (29.01°C). Between both species, blood meal analysis indicated 68.18% of Cx. quinquefasciatus mammalian hosts were dog, while 22.72% were human, whereas Ae. albopictus had higher human (44.44%) but fewer dog hosts (22.22%). Ten bird species were identified as hosts for Cx. quinquefasciatus, with northern cardinal and blue jay representing 26.66% and 20.00%, respectively. No bird feeding activity was observed in Ae. albopictus. The earliest and latest human blood meal occurred in May (Ae. albopictus) and November (Cx. quinquefasciatus); 66.66% of human host identifications between both species occurred in October–November, after the seasonal human case peak. Based upon our data, WNV activity in both mosquito species warrants further investigation of their individual roles in WNV ecology within this region.

DENNETT, JAMES A.; BALA, ADILELKHIDIR; WUITHIRANYAGOOL, TAWEESAK; RANDLE, YVONNE; SARGENT, CHRISTOPHER B.; GUZMAN, HILDA; SIIRIN, MARINA; HASSAN, HASSAN K.; REYNA-NAVA, MARTIN; UNNASCH, THOMAS R.; TESH, ROBERT B.; PARSONS, RAY E.; BUENO, RUDY

2008-01-01

241

An Industrial Access Road in McCurtain County, Oklahoma. From 2.5 Miles East of Wright City North-easterly 3.7 Miles to SH 3, and SH 7, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The project recommends development of an adequate industrial access road on new alignment east of Wright City, Oklahoma. Adverse environmental impacts include slightly increased air and noise pollution along the proposed corridor and a slight potential fo...

1971-01-01

242

East Lawn Site and Planting Plan with Section Oklahoma ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

East Lawn Site and Planting Plan with Section - Oklahoma City Civic Center, Bounded by N. Shartel Avenue to the West, N. Hudson Avenue to the East, Couch Drive to the North, and Colcord Drive to the South, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, OK

243

76 FR 59766 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00056  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Oklahoma dated 09/21/2011. Incident: Oklahoma County Wildfire. Incident Period: 08/30/2011 through 09/01/2011. Effective Date: 09/21/2011. Physical Loan Application...

2011-09-27

244

Meteorological and air quality characterization of the Deaf Smith and Swisher County locations in the Palo Duro Basin, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The meteorological and air quality characteristics of the Permian Basin locations in Deaf Smith County and Swisher County, Texas, are described using data from eight climatological stations in the vicinity. Meteorological conditions are reasonably represented by these data because of the generally flat terrain over the area and the geographical proximity of the climatological stations to the locations. Information regarding atmospheric transport and dispersion conditions is derived from data for the period 1976 to 1980 provided by the National Weather Service station at Amarillo, Texas. On an annual basis, southerly winds predominate and the average wind speed is 6.1 m/s (13.7 mph). The analysis of dispersion climatology indicates that neutral atmospheric stability also predominates over the year. This, in combination with high average wind speeds, is characteristic of relatively good dispersion conditions in the area. Significant topographic features are far enough away from the locations that their effects on local dispersion conditions are negligible. The closest available air quality data were collected around population centers and may not accurately represent conditions at these rural and undeveloped locations. The area has been declared ''attaining'' for particulate and sulfur dioxide standards and ''cannot be classified as better than ambient standard'' for nitrogen oxides, ozone, and carbon monoxide. 49 references, 5 figures, 18 tables.

Not Available

1984-03-01

245

Consultation draft: Site characterization plan overview, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 113)  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing a site characterization plan for the candidate site in Deaf Smith County, Texas. The DOE has provided, for information and review, a consultation draft of the plan to the State of Texas and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The site characterization plan is a lengthy document that describes in considerable detail the program that will be conducted to characterize the geologic, hydrologic, and other conditions relevant to the suitability of the site for a repository. The overview presented here consists of brief summaries of important topics covered in the consultation draft of the site characterization plan; it is not a substitute for the site characterization plan. The arrangement of the overview is similar to that of the plan itself, with brief descriptions of the repository system - the site, the repository, and the waste package - preceding the discussion of the characterization program to be carried out at the Deaf Smith County site. It is intended primarily for the management staff of organizations involved in the DOE's repository program or other persons who might wish to understand the general scope of the site-characterization program, the activities to be conducted, and the facilities to be constructed rather than the technical details of site characterization. 15 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1988-01-01

246

Aquifer characteristics, water availability, and water quality of the Quaternary aquifer, Osage County, northeastern Oklahoma, 2001-2002  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Additional sources of water are needed on the Osage Reservation for future growth and development. The Quaternary aquifer along the Arkansas River in the Osage Reservation may represent a substantial water resource, but limited amounts of hydrogeologic data were available for the aquifer. The study area is about 116 square miles of the Quaternary aquifer in the Arkansas River valley and the nearby upland areas along the Osage Reservation. The study area included the Arkansas River reach downstream from Kaw Lake near Ponca City, Oklahoma to upstream from Keystone Lake near Cleveland, Oklahoma. Electrical conductivity logs were produced for 103 test holes. Water levels were determined for 49 test holes, and 105 water samples were collected for water-quality field analyses at 46 test holes. Water-quality data included field measurements of specific conductance, pH, water temperature, dissolved oxygen, and nitrate (nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen). Sediment cores were extracted from 20 of the 103 test holes. The Quaternary aquifer consists of alluvial and terrace deposits of sand, silt, clay, and gravel. The measured thickness of the alluvium ranged from 13.7 to 49.8 feet. The measured thickness of the terrace sediments ranged from 7 to 93.8 feet. The saturated thickness of all sediments ranged from 0 to 38.2 feet with a median of 24.8 feet. The weighted-mean grain size for cores from the alluvium ranged from 3.69 to 0.64 f, (0.08- 0.64 millimeter), and ranged from 4.02 to 2.01 f (0.06-0.25 millimeter) for the cores from terrace deposits. The mean of the weighted-mean grain sizes for cores from the alluvium was 1.67 f (0.31 millimeter), and the terrace deposits was 2.73 f (0.15 millimeter). The hydraulic conductivity calculated from grain size of the alluvium ranged from 2.9 to 6,000 feet per day and of the terrace deposits ranged from 2.9 to 430 feet per day. The calculated transmissivity of the alluvium ranged from 2,000 to 26,000 feet squared per day with a median of 5,100 feet squared per day. Water in storage in the alluvium was estimated to be approximately 200,000 acre-feet. The amount of water annually recharging the aquifer was estimated to be approximately 4,800 acre-feet. Specific conductance for all water samples ranged from 161 to 6,650 microsiemens per centimeter. Median specific conductance for the alluvium was 683 microsiemens per centimeter and for the terrace deposits was 263 microsiemens per centimeter. Dissolved-solids concentrations, estimated from specific conductance, for water samples from the aquifer ranged from 88 to 3,658 milligrams per liter. Estimated median dissolved- solids concentration for the alluvium was 376 milligrams per liter and for the terrace deposits was 145 milligrams per liter. More than half of the samples from the Quaternary aquifer were estimated to contain less than 500 milligrams per liter dissolved solids. Field-screened nitrate concentrations for the sampling in December 2001-August 2002 ranged from 0 to 15 milligrams per liter. The field-screened nitrate concentrations for the second sampling in September 2002 were less than corresponding laboratory reported values.

Mashburn, Shana L.; Cope, Caleb C.; Abbott, Marvin M.

2003-01-01

247

Non-Highway Implications of Roadside Vending Activity in Selected Texas Counties.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report documents non-highway and non-maintenance issues associated with roadside vending within five high activity locations in Texas. The issues under investigation included an assessment of the extent of sales tax avoidance by itinerant merchants, p...

S. Roop D. Burke

1991-01-01

248

78 FR 42147 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00073  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...determined to be adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Atoka, Canadian, Cleveland, Coal, Hughes, Latimer...McClain, Nowata, Okfuskee, Oklahoma, Okmulgee, Pittsburg, Pottawatomie, Pushmataha, Seminole. The Interest Rates...

2013-07-15

249

Petroleum potential of two sites in Deaf Smith and Swisher Counties, Texas Panhandle: Volume 1: Technical report  

SciTech Connect

This is the third in a series of regional geologic studies to assess the petroleum resources of two potentially acceptable sites under study for a nuclear waste disposal facility. Site 1 is in northeastern Deaf Smith County, Texas, and Site 2 is in northeastern Swisher County, Texas. Although potential reservoir zones are present under Site 1, the likelihood of hydrocarbon charge and structural or stratigraphic entrapment is low. The probability of a commercial petroleum discovery is estimated at 1:1000, and expected net present value of potential production is about $700,000. Little future industry drilling activity is foreseen around Site 1. Five potential reservoir zones are present under Site 2, and some may contain hydrocarbons. Anticlines are adjacent to Site 2, and some may contain hydrocarbons. Anticlines are adjacent to Site 2 on the northeast, southeast, and northwest, but the middle of the acreage block is synclinal, and its petroleum potential is very low. Discovery probability of the structures adjacent to Site 2 is higher, but the chance of developing commercial production is only about 2:100. Such accumulations might extend into the northeast and southeast corners of the block; expected net present value of such conjectured reserves is about $1,100,000 and $650,000, respectively. Continued industry activity pursuant to these three structures is expected, including seismic surveys and drilling. Considering the potential loss of petroleum resources through withdrawal of acreage from exploration, and the possibility of adjacent drilling, Site 1 in Deaf Smith County is clearly preferable for location of the proposed nuclear waste disposal facility.

Rose, P.R.

1986-09-01

250

75 FR 11904 - Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Noble, Nowata, Okfuskee, Okmulgee, Ottawa, Payne, Pontotoc, Pottawatomie, Rogers, Sequoyah, Stephens, Tillman, and Tulsa Counties for Public Assistance. All counties within the State of Oklahoma are eligible to apply for...

2010-03-12

251

Analytical Study of the Ogallala Aquifer in Moore County, Texas: Projections of Saturated Thickness, Volume of Water in Storage, Pumpage Rates, Pumping Lifts, and Well Yields.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is one of numerous planned county studies covering the declining ground-water resource of the Ogallala aquifer in the High Plains of Texas. The report contains maps, charts, and tabulations which reflect estimates of the volume of water in storage in...

A. E. Bell S. Morrison

1980-01-01

252

Analytical Study of the Ogallala Aquifer in Hansford County, Texas: Projections of Saturated Thickness, Volume of Water in Storage, Pumpage Rates, Pumping Lifts, and Well Yields.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is one of numerous planned county studies covering the declining ground-water resource of the Ogallala aquifer in the High Plains of Texas. The report contains maps, charts, and tabulations which reflect estimates of the volume of water in storage in...

A. E. Bell S. Morrison

1980-01-01

253

Analytical Study of the Ogallala Aquifer in Sherman County, Texas: Projections of Saturated Thickness, Volume of Water in Storage, Pumpage Rates, Pumping Lifts, and Well Yields.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is one of numerous planned county studies covering the declining ground-water resource of the Ogallala aquifer in the High Plains of Texas. The report contains maps, charts, and tabulations which reflect estimates of the volume of water in storage in...

A. E. Bell S. Morrison

1980-01-01

254

Analytical Study of the Ogallala Aquifer in Yoakum County, Texas. Projections of Saturated Thickness, Volume of Water in Storage, Pumpage Rates, Pumping Lifts, and Well Yields.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is one of numerous planned county studies covering the declining ground-water resource of the Ogallala aquifer in the High Plains of Texas. The report contains maps, charts, and tabulations which reflect estimates of the volume of water in storage in...

A. E. Bell S. Morrison

1978-01-01

255

Analytical Study of the Ogallala Aquifer in Bailey County, Texas: Projections of Saturated Thickness, Volume of Water in Storage, Pumpage Rates, Pumping Lifts, and Well Yields.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is one of numerous planned county studies covering the declining ground-water resource of the Ogallala aquifer in the High Plains of Texas. The report contains maps, charts, and tabulations which reflect estimates of the volume of water in storage in...

A. W. Wyatt A. E. Bell S. Morrison

1976-01-01

256

Impacts of petroleum production on ground and surface waters: Results from the Osage-Skiatook Petroleum Environmental Research A site, Osage County Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

As part of a multidisciplinary group of about 20 scientists, we are investigating the transport, fate, natural attenuation, and ecosystem impacts of inorganic salts and organic compounds present in releases of produced water and associated hydrocarbons at the Osage-Skiatook Petroleum Environmental Research (OSPER) sites, located in Osage County, Oklahoma. Geochemical data collected from nearby oil wells show that the produced water source is a Na-Ca-Cl brine (???150,000 mg/L total dissolved solids [TDS]), with relatively high concentrations of Mg, Sr, and NH4, but low SO4 and H2S. Results from the depleted OSPER A site show that the salts continue to be removed from the soil and surficial rocks, but degraded oil persists on the contaminated surface. Eventually, the bulk of inorganic salts and dissolved organics in the brine will reach the adjacent Skiatook Lake, a 4250-ha (10,501-ac) potable water reservoir. Repeated sampling of 44 wells show a plume of high-salinity water (2000-30,000 mg/L TDS) at intermediate depths that intersects Skiatook Lake and extends beyond the visibly impacted areas. No liquid petroleum was observed in this plume, but organic acid anions, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX), and other volatile organic carbon (VOC) are present. The chemical composition of released brine is modified by sorption, mineral precipitation and dissolution, evapotranspiration, volatilization, and bacterially mediated oxidation-reduction reactions, in addition to mixing with percolating precipitation water, lake water, and pristine groundwater. Results show that only minor amounts of salt are removed by runoff, supporting the conclusion that significant amounts of salts from produced water and petroleum releases still remain in the soils and rocks of the impacted area after more than 65 yr of natural attenuation. Copyright ?? 2005. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists/Division of Environmental Geosciences. All rights reserved.

Kharaka, Y. K.; Thordsen, J. J.; Kakouros, E.; Herkelrath, W. N.

2005-01-01

257

Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook, 2001.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This Kids Count Factbook details county and statewide trends in the well-being of Oklahoma's children. The statistical portrait is based on seven indicators or benchmarks of child well-being: (1) low birth weight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) births to young teens; (4) child abuse and neglect; (5) child and teen death; (6) high school…

Ingraham, Sandy

258

Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook, 2002.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This Kids Count Factbook details county and statewide trends in the well-being of children in Oklahoma. The statistical portrait is based on seven indicators or benchmarks of child well-being: (1) low birthweight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) births to young teens; (4) child abuse and neglect; (5) child and teen death; (6) high school…

Ingraham, Sandy

259

Clayton Lake, Jackfork Creek, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The proposed Clayton damsite is located at mile 2.8 on Jackfork Creek in Pushmataha County, Oklahoma, about 6 miles northwest of Clayton. The project consists of construction of a flood control, water supply, recreation, and fish and wildlife lake located...

1971-01-01

260

Water-level changes in the high plains aquifer underlying parts of South Dakota, Wyoming, Nebraska, Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas; predevelopment through nonirrigation season 1987-88  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The changes in water levels in the High Plains aquifer from the nonirrigation season 1986-87 through the nonirrigation season 1987-88 and from the nonirrigation season 1979-80 through the nonirrigation season 1987-88 are presented in maps for the entire High Plains aquifer area. Water level changes are caused by interacting changes in precipitation, land use, and annual pumpage. Water levels declined from conditions prior to development until 1980 through parts of the High Plains of Nebraska, Colorado, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. From 1980 through 1987 water level changes were mixed, with declines of more than 10 ft in the highly developed areas of Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas and relatively stable to rising water tables throughout the remaining aquifer area. The net change was a rise of 0.8 ft. The 1981-87 period was generally wetter than normal and pumping for irrigated agriculture was therefore reduced. Water level changes were mixed during 1987. Declines continued in some highly developed areas, but water levels generally rose throughout most of the aquifer. The average area-weighted change was a rise of 0.28 ft. This rise was due to the generally greater than normal precipitation, decreased acreage under irrigation, and decreased pumpage for those areas irrigated. At the end of the growing season, the drought in the Midwest in 1988 affected only limited areas of the High Plains. The effects of the drought on water levels can not be assessed until the water-level measurements for the nonirrigation season of 1988-89 are compiled. (USGS)

Kastner, W. M.; Schild, D. E.; Spahr, D. S.

1989-01-01

261

An evaluation of the personal response system program for the elderly in Harris County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Personal Response System Program at Huffington Center on Aging, Baylor College of Medicine, provides emergency call systems for elderly people living independently in Houston, Texas. The goal of the project was to complete a formative evaluation of the Personal Response System Program. The specific aims of the evaluation were three-fold. One aim was to evaluate participant health status and

Gail Meredith Fraser Chanpong

1999-01-01

262

Depositional environments and diagenesis of lower Pennsylvanian Caddo Formation, Stephens County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since its discovery in 1916, the Lower Pennsylvanian Caddo limestone has been one of the most prolific producing intervals in the central Texas region. Favorable reservoir characteristics, with porosities from 9 to 24% and permeabilities from 0.1 to 1,000 md in the pay interval, have enabled many oil companies to initiate successful secondary recovery waterflood projects. Since its discovery, more

M. Guzan; J. Humphrey

1987-01-01

263

Integrated analysis of production potential and profitability of a horizontal well in the Lower Glen Rose Formation, Maverick County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy/Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE/METC) awarded a contract in 1991 to Prime Energy Corporation (PEC) to demonstrate the benefit of using horizontal wells to recover gas from low permeability formations. The project area was located in the Chittim field of Maverick County, Texas. The Lower Glen Rose Formation in the Chittim field was a promising horizontal well candidate based on the heterogenous nature of the reservoir (suggested by large well-to-well variances in reserves) and the low percentage of economical vertical wells. Since there was substantial evidence of reservoir heterogeneity, it was unknown whether the selected, wellsite would penetrate a reservoir with the desired properties for a horizontal well. Thus, an integrated team was formed to combine geologic analysis, seismic interpretation, reservoir engineering, reservoir simulation, and economic assessment to analyze the production potential and profitability of completing a horizontal well in the Lower Glen Rose formation.

Ammer, J.R.; Mroz, T.H.; Zammerilli, A.M.; Yost, A.B. II [Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States); Muncey, J.G.; Hegeman, P.S.

1995-03-01

264

Evaluation of geophysical techniques for identifying fractures in program wells in Deaf Smith County, Texas: Revision 1, Topical report  

SciTech Connect

Quantitative information about the presence and orientation of fractures is essential for the understanding of the geomechanical and geohydrological behavior of rocks. This report evaluates various borehole geophysical techniques for characterizing fractures in three Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (CRWM) Program test wells in the Palo Duro Basin in Deaf Smith County, Texas. Emphasis has been placed on the Schlumberger Fracture Identification Log (FIL) which detects vertical fractures and provides data for calculation of orientation. Depths of FIL anomalies were compared to available core. It was found that the application of FIL results to characterize fracture frequency or orientation is inappropriate at this time. The uncertainties associated with the FIL information render the information unreliable. No geophysical logging tool appears to unequivocally determine the location and orientation of fractures in a borehole. Geologic mapping of the exploratory shafts will ultimately provide the best data on fracture frequency and orientation at the proposed repository site. 22 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Gillespie, R.P.; Siminitz, P.C.

1987-08-01

265

Some effects of groundwater discharge through Mount Enterprise Fault Zone on surface water composition in southern Rusk County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Mount Enterprise fault zone increases vertical permeability of groundwater resources in southern Rusk County, Texas. Groundwater discharges through the fault zone and affects the chemical composition of small streams. Fault-related springs prove that groundwater migrates vertically upward along the faults. The chemical characteristics of fault-related springs differentiate them from perched water table springs and identify their groundwater source. The radon content of springs results from the radioactive content of their source rocks and surrounding sediment. Water composition of major streams is unaffected by groundwater discharge. Groundwater input does alter the chemical composition of small streams. Two small streams change in iron, radon, and ionic ratios due to fault zone discharge. The percentage of groundwater seepage from the fault zone to total stream flow at these sites is 5-14%. Other small streams are affected by effluent groundwaters but not necessarily from the fault zone.

Reiner, S.R. (Chevron Exploration and Production Services, San Ramon, CA (USA)); Crocker, M.C. (Stephen F. Austin State Univ., Nacogdoches, TX (USA))

1990-05-01

266

Health Reform and Primary Care Capacity: Evidence from Houston\\/Harris County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study estimated the possible surge in demand for primary care among the low-income population in Houston\\/Harris County under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, and related it to existing supply by safety-net providers. A model of the demand for primary care visits was developed based on California Health Interview Survey data and applied to the Houston\\/Harris County population.

Charles Begley; Phuc Le; David Lairson; Jeanne Hanks; Anthony Omojasola

2012-01-01

267

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 6): Crystal City Airport, Zavala County, Texas (first remedial action), September 1987. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Crystal City Airport (CAA) site, comprising approximately 120 acres, is located in Zavala County, Texas. CCA began operations during World War II as a military installation for transporting and detailing persons of Japanese descent. In 1949, the U.S. Government deeded the airport to Crystal City. Since then, the city has operated the facility as a municipal airport. Several private aerial pesticide-applicating companies conducted business at the airport until 1982. In April 1983, the Texas Department of Water Resources investigated the site because of the potential threat to local residents of waste pesticides left by applicating companies no longer in operation. Surficial soil at the site was found to be highly contaminated with pesticides. In October 1983, an Immediate Removal Action, initiated by the U.S. EPA, consolidated 40 cu. yds of waste and 50-70 drums in two onsite disposal cells. In May 1984, a second removal action disposed of 19 drums offsite and secured the site with a fence. Approximately 12,000 cu. yds of surface soil are contaminated with pesticides including: DDT, toxaphene and arsenic. The selected remedial action includes: onsite consolidation of contaminated soil, drums and buildings; multi-layer RCRA capping; offsite injection well; disposal of decontaminated liquids; and fencing. The estimated present worth cost for the remedy is $1,600,000.

Not Available

1987-09-29

268

Low-level arsenic exposure, AS3MT gene polymorphism and cardiovascular diseases in rural Texas counties.  

PubMed

Most Americans living in rural areas use groundwater for drinking. Exposure to low-level (around the current U.S. standard 10 ?g/L) arsenic in drinking water is associated with increased mortality of cardiovascular diseases. The current study was to determine if coronary heart disease, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia were associated with low-level arsenic exposure and AS3MT gene single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) A35991G (rs10748835) in rural Texas. Subjects (156 men, 343 women, 40-96 years of age with a mean of 61) were residents from rural counties Cochran, Palmer, and Bailey, Texas. Groundwater arsenic concentration at each subject's home was estimated with ArcGIS inverse distance weighted interpolation based on the residential location's distances to surrounding wells with known water arsenic concentrations. The estimated groundwater arsenic concentration ranged from 2.2 to 15.3 (mean 6.2) ?g/L in this cohort. Logistic regression analysis showed that coronary heart disease was associated with higher arsenic exposure (p<0.05) and with AS3MT genotype GG vs. AA (p<0.05) after adjustments for age, ethnicity, gender, education, smoking status, alcoholism, and anti-hyperlipidemia medication. Hypertension was associated with higher arsenic exposure, while hyperlipidemia was associated with genotype AG vs. AA of the AS3MT gene (p<0.05). Thus, coronary heart disease and its main risk factors were associated with low-level arsenic exposure, AS3MT polymorphism or both. PMID:22341486

Gong, Gordon; O'Bryant, Sid E

2012-02-15

269

75 FR 21015 - Oklahoma; Amendment No. 2 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FEMA-1883-DR; Docket ID FEMA-2010-0002] Oklahoma; Amendment No...Oklahoma (FEMA-1883-DR), dated March 5, 2010, and related determinations. DATES...President in his declaration of March 5, 2010. Tillman County for Public...

2010-04-22

270

Evaluation of geopressured brine injectability: Department of Energy, Pleasant Bayou No. 2 well, Brazoria County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

A field evaluation of geopressured brine injectability was completed during September 22 to 25, 1980 at the DOE, Brazoria test site in Texas. Membrane filters, with pore sizes of 0.4-..mu..m and 10.0-..mu..m, were used as the basis for obtaining suspended solids data and for developing performance-life estimates of typical spent brine injection wells. Field measurements were made at 130°C and

L. B. Owen; C. K. Blair; J. E. Harrar; R. Netherton

1980-01-01

271

Clay mineralogy and depositional history of the Frio Formation in two geopressured wells, Brazoria County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Twenty-three shale samples ranging in depth from 5194 ft to 13,246 ft from Gulf Oil Corporation No. 2 Texas State Lease 53034 well and 33 shale samples ranging in depth from 2185 ft to 15,592 ft from General Crude Oil Company\\/Department of Energy No. 1 Pleasant Bayou well were examined by x-ray techniques to determine the mineralogy of the geopressured

Robert L. Freed

1982-01-01

272

Predicting diagenetic history and reservoir quality in the Frio Formation of Brazoria County, Texas and Pleasant Bayou test wells  

SciTech Connect

Good-quality geothermal reservoirs displaying secondary porosity exist on the upper Texas coast (Brazoria County), site of the Pleasant Bayou No. 1 and No. 2 wells, and are attributed to a moderately stable mineral assemblage, normal geothermal gradients, and low in situ pH. Major authigenic minerals are calcite, quartz, and kaolinite. Detrital feldspar has been extensively albitized at depth. Major diagenetic events overlapped, occurring in the general order-precipitation of calcite, formation of quartz overgrowths, albitization, leaching of calcite to form secondary porosity, and precipitation of kaolinite. Seventeen Brazoria County water analyses including two from the Pleasant Bayou No. 2 well were thermodynamically tested. Predictions based on equilibrium thermodynamics add new insight on mineral stabilities and are consistent with the paragenetic sequence developed from petrographic data. Early precipitation of calcite at shallow depths of burial is predicted. Low temperture and low in situ pH explain the general absence of chlorite. The use of solution-mineral equilibria as a predictor of reservoir quality is inconclusive, but well-defined clustering of waters indicates that identification of regional trends will probably be possible. Shallow waters may be the key to predicting reservoir quality at depth.

Kaiser, W.R.; Richmann, D.L.

1981-01-01

273

Tight gas sands research program: Field operations and analysis. Analysis of selected wells surrounding SFE No. 3, Waskom Cotton Valley Field, Harrison County, Texas. Topical report  

SciTech Connect

In preparation for the Gas Research Institute sponsored Staged Field Experiment (SFE) No. 3 in the Waskom Cotton Valley Field of Harrison County, Texas, a comprehensive study was performed on six wells surrounding the site for SFE No. 3. Data from the six wells was provided by Mobil Producing Texas New Mexico. The data were analyzed using a two-dimensional, single-phase, finite difference reservoir simulator to determine reservoir and fracture properties, which include formation permeability, fracture half-length, fracture conductivity, and reservoir drainage area. The report details the analyses.

Wolters, B.C.; Robinson, B.M.; Holditch, S.A.

1989-12-27

274

78 FR 41073 - Oklahoma; Amendment No. 7 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Pittsburg, Pushmataha, and Seminole Counties for Public Assistance, including...Canadian, Okfuskee, and Okmulgee Counties for Public Assistance, including...Lincoln, McClain, Oklahoma, and Pottawatomie Counties for Public Assistance...

2013-07-09

275

Site Handbook: Data Acquisition System Information, Comal County Mental Health Mental Retardation Center, New Braunfels, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report gives the status of the data acquisition task of Comal County MHMR Solar Retrofit project and a description of the data acquisition hardware. The data acquisition system will be used to monitor the heating and cooling load and equipment at the...

1985-01-01

276

Ground-Water Data for Harris County, Texas. Volume II. Records of Wells, 1892-1972.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report presents records of 2,635 wells in 10 areas in Harris County that have been collected as part of the inventory from 1929 to 1972. Information includes the owner, driller, date completed, depth in feet of the well, casing diameter and depth, wat...

R. K. Gabrysch W. L. Naftel G. D. McAdoo C. W. Bonnet

1974-01-01

277

Subsurface geology of the Seminole area. [Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study area includes N. Seminole County and portions of Pottawatomie and Okfuskee counties, which are in the Greater Seminole District of central Oklahoma and in the NW. part of the Arkoma Basin. The subsurface stratigraphy, structure, and conditions of oil accumulation of Desmoinesian and older rocks in the Seminole Area are discussed. Subsurface structure maps, isopach maps, and cross

Cutolo-Lozano

1969-01-01

278

Commercial Space Port Planning in Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Texas Legislature is providing funding to support research and planning activities aimed at creating a commercial spaceport in the state. These monies have been allocated to regional Spaceport Development Corporations that have been established in three countries containing candidate site locations: Willacy County (in South Texas); Brazoria County (East Texas); and Pecos County (West Texas). This program is being

L. Bell; B. Looke

2002-01-01

279

Clay mineralogy and depositional history of the Frio Formation in two geopressured wells, Brazoria County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Twenty-three shale samples ranging in depth from 5194 ft to 13,246 ft from Gulf Oil Corporation No. 2 Texas State Lease 53034 well and 33 shale samples ranging in depth from 2185 ft to 15,592 ft from General Crude Oil Company/Department of Energy No. 1 Pleasant Bayou well were examined by x-ray techniques to determine the mineralogy of the geopressured zone in the Brazoria Fairway. Both wells have similar weight-percent trends with depth for a portion of the mineralogy. Calcite decreases, and plagioclase, quartz and total clay increase slightly. Within the clays, illite in mixed-layer illite/smectite (I/S) increases and smectite in mixed-layer I/S decreases. Four minerals have distinctly different trends with depth for each well. In the No. 2 Texas State Lease 53034 well, potassium feldspar and mixed-layer I/S decrease, kaolinite increases, and discrete illite is constant. In the No. 1 Pleasant Bayou well, potassium feldspar and kaolinite are constant, mixed-layer I/S increases, and discrete illite decreases.

Freed, R.L.

1982-01-01

280

Eustatic cycles, shoreline stacking, and stratigraphic traps: Atkinson field, Live Oak and Karnes Counties, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Atkinson field in south Texas produces gas from the updip pinch-out of a shoreline sand body deposited during a stillstand or minor regression within the early middle Eocene transgression of the Texas Gulf Coast. The sand body is elongate parallel to depositional strike and pinches out downdip into marine shales of the Reklaw Formation. The sand has a maximum thickness of 60 ft, extends 9 mi along strike, and reaches a width of 2 mi. Electric log patterns indicate interfingering between sand and shale on the updip edge of the sand body and a coarsening-upward sequence from shale to sand on the downdip edge of the sand body. Most logs from wells in the central part of the sand body have blocky patterns, indicating abrupt transitions with the overlying and underlying shales and no systematic variation in grain size. Many ancient shoreline sandstones have similar characteristics. The producing sand in Atkinson field occurs in the regressive phase of a fourth-order cycle of change in relative sea level, within the transgressive phase of the third-order cycle that comprises the early middle Eocene advance and retreat of the sea in the Gulf Coast region. Other shoreline sand bodies occur at the same stratigraphic zone along depositional strike. Models of shoreline stacking patterns within third-order cycles indicate that similar sand bodies and traps should be present in younger fourth-order cycles higher on paleoslope.

Bulling, T.P.; Smith, W.M.; Breyer, J.A. (Texas Christian Univ., Fort Worth (USA))

1987-02-01

281

The Astronomy Laboratory Program At Collin County Community College, Plano, Texas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The laboratory program at Collin County Community College is designed to engage the student in a variety of indoor and outdoor activities. Indoor tasks include up to fifteen investigations, some of which have been contributed by our staff and are performed on the computer. Day and evening classes are involved in outdoor observations. Field trips to observatories and planetariums combined with jointly sponsored special astronomy events enhance the student's experience.

Broyles, M. L.

2006-06-01

282

Compliance status summaries for federal and state statutory directives that apply to the Salt Repository Project at the Deaf Smith County Site, Texas  

SciTech Connect

This document contains statutory summaries, checklists of compliance requirements, status summaries, and lists of information needs for the environmental and health and safety statutory directives at Federal and State levels that apply to the Salt Repository Project at the Deaf Smith County Site, Texas. Statutes that apply in general to any repository project but not specifically to the Deaf Smith are not included. The information herein supplements the Salt Repository Project Statutory Compliance Plan and the Salt Repository Project Permitting Management Plan by providing lengthy details on statutory directives, compliance requirements, information needs, and the overall status of the environmental and health and safety compliance program for the Salt Repository Project at the Deaf Smith County Site, Texas.

Not Available

1986-07-01

283

Site specific statutory compliance planning for the salt repository project at the Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Requirements, strategy, and status: Revision 4  

SciTech Connect

This document and the requirements and actions it presents are addressed to the Deaf Smith County Site, Texas. The proposed actions upon which the plan is based are those described in Chapters 4 and 5 of the final EA for the site. Similarly, the environmental and health and safety requirements covered in the plan are those identified in the EA as being potentially applicable to the salt repository project at the Deaf Smith site. 12 figs., 8 tabs.

Not Available

1986-06-01

284

Time-stratigraphic correlation of lower Wilcox valley-fill sequences, Colorado and Lavaca Counties, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Late Paleocene and early Eocene lower Wilcox strata in southeast Texas are characterized principally by sandstone-rich deposits of fluvial and deltaic systems that prograded from a stable platform area into an unstable growth-faulted shelf margin setting. In contrast, incised valley systems, initiated during episodes of sea level lowering and filled dominantly with mud during subsequent transgressions, punctuate several lower Wilcox intervals. Further, valley-fill sequences are known to provide seals and/or reservoirs for a number of stratigraphically trapped hydrocarbon accumulations. Time-stratigraphic correlation of lower Wilcox strata provides improved differentiation of stacked valley-fill sequences and thereby more refined interpretation of depositional history and more accurate mapping for exploration purposes.

Devine, P.E.; Wheeler, D.M. (RPI International, Boulder, CO (USA))

1989-09-01

285

Geologic and Engineering Characterization of East Ford Field, Reeves County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this Class III project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost-effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through geologically based field development. The project focused on reservoir characterization of the East Ford unit, a representative Delaware Mountain Group field that produces from the upper Bell Canyon Formation (Ramsey Sandstone). The field, discovered in 1960, is operated by Oral Petco, Inc., as the East Ford unit: it contained an estimated 18.4 million barrels (MMbbl) of original oil in place.

Dutton, Shirley P.; Flanders, William A.; Guzman, Jose I.; Zirczy, Helena

1999-08-16

286

Campanian ammonites from the Upper Cretaceous Gober Chalk of Lamar County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Roxton Limestone Member at the top of the Gober Chalk in northeast Texas yields a rich fauna, dominated by Baculites haresi Reeside, 1927, and Inoceramus balticus Boehm, 1909, with sparse occurrences of pachydiscus cf. P. paulsoni (Young, 1963), Anapachydiscus sp.juv., Placenticeras placenta (DeKay, 1828), Hoplitoplacenticeras aff. H. plasticum (Paulcke, 1907), Menabites (Delawarella) delawarensis (Morton, 1830), M.(D.) danei (Young, 1963), M.(D.) aff. M.(D.) vanuxemi (Morton, 1830), Submortoniceras vandalinaense Young, 1963, Submortoniceras sp., Eubostrychoceras sp., and Scaphites hippocrepis (DeKay, 1828) III. The presence of S. hippocrepis III suggests a late early Campanian age assignment for the fauna. The assemblage includes species known from the Western Interior, Gulf Coast, Atlantic seaboard, and western Europe. -Authors

Cobban, W. A.; Kennedy, W. J.

1992-01-01

287

Arbuckle Lake, Murray County, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Annual total phosphorus and total nitrogen loadings to the lake were estimated and subdivided according to either point or non-point source origin. An assessment of the lake's trophic condition and limiting nutrient is also provided. All data collected by...

1977-01-01

288

Hydrology and subsurface transport of oil-field brine at the U.S. Geological Survey OSPER site “A”, Osage County, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Spillage and improper disposal of saline produced water from oil wells has caused environmental damage at thousands of sites in the United States. In order to improve understanding of the fate and transport of contaminants at these sites, the U.S. Geological Survey carried out multidisciplinary investigations at two oil production sites near Skiatook Lake, Oklahoma. As a part of this

W. N. Herkelrath; Y. K. Kharaka; J. J. Thordsen; M. M. Abbott

2007-01-01

289

Site handbook: data acquisition system information, Comal County Mental Health Mental Retardation Center, New Braunfels, Texas  

SciTech Connect

This report gives the status of the data acquisition task of Comal County MHMR Solar Retrofit project and a description of the data acquisition hardware. The data acquisition system will be used to monitor the heating and cooling load and equipment at the Comal County MHMR Center will investigate the performance of the passive solar modifications to the structure and heating/cooling control strategy. The passive solar and conservation options included in the building retrofit program were ceiling insulation, weather proofing, fluorescent lighting, roof evaporative spray cooling system, awnings, and ceiling fans. In addition, night ventilation and night flushing cooling were used to reduce the cooling load. Natural daylighting was utilized to replace artificial lighting where possible. The major conservation options that were utilized include: the creation of a new ceiling 6 inches lower than the original and insulating it to an R-22 level in the process; the installation of an evaporation roof spray system; the installation of ceiling fans for destratification; and the creation of fixed awnings.

Not Available

1985-01-01

290

Identification of Diabetic Retinopathy Genes through a Genome-Wide Association Study among Mexican-Americans from Starr County, Texas  

PubMed Central

To identify genetic loci for severe diabetic retinopathy, 286 Mexican-Americans with type 2 diabetes from Starr County, Texas, completed physical examinations including fundus photography for diabetic retinopathy grading. Individuals with moderate-to-severe non-proliferative and proliferative diabetic retinopathy were defined as cases. Direct genotyping was performed using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 100?K Set, and SNPs passing quality control criteria were used to impute markers available in HapMap Phase III Mexican population (MXL) in Los Angeles, California. Two directly genotyped markers were associated with severe diabetic retinopathy at a P-value less than .0001: SNP rs2300782 (P = 6.04 × 10?5) mapped to an intron region of CAMK4 (calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV) on chromosome 5, and SNP rs10519765 (P = 6.21 × 10?5) on chromosomal 15q13 in the FMN1 (formin 1) gene. Using well-imputed markers based on the HapMap III Mexican population, we identified an additional 32 SNPs located in 11 chromosomal regions with nominal association with severe diabetic retinopathy at P-value less than .0001. None of these markers were located in traditional candidate genes for diabetic retinopathy or diabetes itself. However, these signals implicate genes involved in inflammation, oxidative stress and cell adhesion for the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy.

Fu, Yi-Ping; Hallman, D. Michael; Gonzalez, Victor H.; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Klein, Ronald; Hayes, M. Geoffrey; Cox, Nancy J.; Bell, Graeme I.; Hanis, Craig L.

2010-01-01

291

Technical procedures for utilities and solid waste: Environmental Field Program, Deaf Smith County site, Texas: Final draft  

SciTech Connect

The evaluation of environmental issues and concerns and the addressing of statutory requirements are fundamental parts in the characterization of the site in Deaf Smith County, Texas for the US Department of Energy's Salt Repository Project (SRP). To ensure that the environmental field program comprehensively addresses the issues and requirements of the project, a site study plan (SSP) has been prepared for Utilities and Solid Waste considerations. This technical procedure (TP) has been developed to implement the field program described in the Utilities and Solid Waste Site Study Plan. The purpose and scope of the Utilities and Solid Waste Technical Procedure is to develop and implement a data collection procedure to fulfill the data base needs of the Utilities and Solid Waste SSP. The procedure describes a method of obtaining, assessing and verifying the capabilities of the regional service utilities and disposal contractors. This data base can be used to identify a preferred service source for the engineering contractor. The technical procedure was produced under the guidelines established in Technical Administrative Procedure No. 1.0, Preparation, Review and Approval of Technical Procedures.

Not Available

1987-08-01

292

Site study plan for utilities and solid waste, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Environmental Field Program: Preliminary draft  

SciTech Connect

This site plan describes utilities and solid waste studies to be conducted during the characterization of the Deaf Smith County, Texas, site for the US Department of Energy's Salt Repository Project. After utilities and solid waste information needs derived from Federal, State, and local statutes and regulations and the project specifications are briefly described, the site study plan describes the study design and rationale, the field data collection procedures and equipment, and data analysis methods and application of results, the data management strategy, the schedule of field activities, the management of the study, and the study's quality assurance program. The field data collection activities are organized into programs to characterize electrical power, natural gas, communication, water, wastewater sludge, nonradiological solid waste, nonradiological hazardous waste, and low-level radiological waste. These programs include details for the collection of project needs, identification of utilities and solid waste disposal contractor capabilities, and verification of the obtained data. Utilities and solid waste field activities will begin approximately at the time of site access. Utilities and solid waste characterization will be completed within the first year of activity. 29 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Not Available

1987-06-01

293

Site study plan for non-routine laboratory rock mechanics, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This Site Study Plan describes the non-routine rock mechanics and thermal properties laboratory testing program planned for the characterization of site-specific geologic materials for the Deaf Smith County site, Texas. The study design provides for measurements of index, mechanical, thermomechanical, thermal and special properties for the host salt, and where appropriate, for nonhost lithologies. The types of tests which will be conducted are constant stress (creep) tests, constant strain (stress relaxation) tests, constant strain-rate tests, constant stress-rate tests, cyclic loading tests, hollow cylinder tests, uniaxial and triaxial compression tests, direct tension tests, indirect (triaxial) shear tests, thermal property determinations (conductivity, specific heat, expansivity, and diffusivity), fracture healing tests, thermal decrepitation tests, moisture content determinations, and petrographic and micromechanics analyses. Tests will be conducted at confining pressures up to 30 MPa and temperatures up to 300/degree/C. These data are used to construct mathematical models for the phenomenology of salt deformation. The models are then used in finite-element codes to predict repository response. A tentative testing schedule and milestone log are given. The duration of the testing program is expected to be approximately 5 years. 44 refs., 13 figs., 13 tabs.

Not Available

1987-12-01

294

Hydrologic and water-quality data at Government Canyon State Natural Area, Bexar County, Texas, 2002-10  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service, the Edwards Aquifer Authority, and the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, collected rainfall, streamflow, evapotranspiration, and stormflow water-quality data at the Laurel Canyon Creek watershed, within the Government Canyon State Natural Area, Bexar County, Tex. The purpose of the data collection was to support evaluations of the effects of brush management conservation practices on components of the hydrologic budget and water quality. One component of brush management was to take endangered wildlife into consideration, specifically the golden-cheeked warbler (Dendroica chrysoparia). Much of the area that may have been considered for brush management was left intact to protect habitat for the golden-cheeked warbler. The area identified for brush management was approximately 10 percent of the study watershed. The hydrologic data presented here (2002–10) represent pre- and post-treatment periods, with brush management treatment occurring from winter 2006–07 to spring 2008.

Banta, J. Ryan; Slattery, Richard N.

2012-01-01

295

Discriminant analysis of components of El Paso Group rocks in southern Hueco Mountains, Hudspeth County, Texas - approach to depositional environments  

SciTech Connect

The El Paso Group of the Southern Hueco Mountains, Hudspeth County, Texas, crops out over an area of about 57 km/sup 2/ (22 mi/sup 2/) and is divided into three informal units - lower, middle, and upper. The lower contains the lower calcareous sandstone member and an overlying sandy limestone member; the middle is cherty limestone; and the upper unit contains two members: sandy dolomite and an upper silty dolomite. The El Paso Group rocks are classified into seven microfacies based on thin section studies of the rocks' components. These are organic allochems (peloids, gastropods, trilobite fragments, pelmatozoan ossicles, algae, and unidentifiable bioclasts); inorganic allochems (glauconite, stylolites, quartz grains, voids, lithoclasts, and ooids); matrix (micrite, microspar, recrystallized sparite, micritic size dolomite, microsparitic size dolomite, and sparitic size dolomite). Discriminant analysis of the components of the rocks tests the classification of the rocks into seven microfacies. Six discriminant functions, discriminant function scores for each sample, and probability of the sample's membership in each classification group are calculated during the study to discriminate among the groups. The eigenvalues, plots of discriminant scores, chi-square tests, Wilk's lambda, and the territorial map proved effective in classifying the components of the El Paso Group rocks; 100% of the grouped cases are correctly classified into seven microfacies. The components/microfacies indicate that the rocks of El Paso Group were deposited in shelf lagoon with open circulation, restricted circulation in shelf, subtidal, intertidal, and tidal flat environments.

Aluka, I.J.

1987-08-01

296

Saline fluid flow and hydrocarbon migration and maturation as related to geopressure, Frio Formation, Brazoria County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Pleasant Bayou geopressured-geothermal test wells in Brazoria County, Texas, display a prominent thermal-maturity anomaly in the Oligocene Anahuac and Frio Formations. Highly geopressured, more-mature shales are interbedded with hydropressured to moderately geopressured sandstones in the upper Frio and Anahuac. In contrast, shales and sandstones in the lower Frio, including the Andrau geopressured-geothermal production zone, are highly geopressured but exhibit lower thermal maturities. Vitrinite-reflectance data, supported by hydrocarbon-maturation data and anomalous concentrations of C/sub 5/ to C/sub 7/ hydrocarbons at Pleasant Bayou, indicate that the upper Frio was subjected to an extended period of hot, extremely saline, basinal fluid flow which caused the above thermal anomaly. Regional salinity studies (Morton and others, 1983) suggest that regional growth faults were the conduits for vertical basinal brine movement at depth. At shallower levels the upwelling waters migrated laterally through permeable sandstone-rich sections such as the upper Frio. Anomalously mature gasoline-range (C/sub 5/-C/sub 7/) hydrocarbons were introduced into the upper Frio by this process. Fluid influx in the lower Frio was probably limited by high geopressure, consequently maturity in the deep Frio section (greater than 14,000 ft) remained consistent with the regional geothermal gradient.

Tyler, N.; Light, M.P.R.; Ewing, T.E.

1985-01-01

297

Ichnology and paleosubstrates of Austin Chalk (Cretaceous) outcrops: Southern Dallas and Ellis Counties, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Ichnofossils are abundant in outcrops of the Austin Chalk near Waxahachie, Texas (designated site of the Super-Conducting Super Collider). The abundance and diversity of ichnofossils in Austin strata contrast with the paucity of other macrofossils, except large inoceramids. The lower Austin Chalk (Coniacian) disconformably overlies the Eagle Ford Shale (Turonian). Planolites, Thalassinoides, and Chondrites are conspicuous in the lower Austin. Some lower Austin strata contain well-preserved burrows having menicus fillings. However, most lower Austin ichnofossils are poorly preserved and have compacted. The middle Austin Marl and upper Austin Chalk (Santonain) contain Planolites, Chondrites, Thalassinoides, and Pseudobilobites. Several thin, intensely burrowed, Fe-stained, horizons within the middle Austin represent omission surfaces having postomission Thalassinoides. The upper Austin disconformably underlies the Taylor Marl (Campanian). The Austin-Taylor contact is a Rhizocorallium-infested omission surface overlain by a condensed bed of phosphatic and pyritic bioclasts. Upper Austin occurrences of Rhizocorallium and Pseudobilobites are unique for North American Cretaceous chalks. Based on cross-cutting relationships and differences in morphology, diameter, and burrow-filling sediments, numerous ichnospecies of Thalassinoides are discernable throughout the Austin. Variations in preservation quality exhibited by successive generations of ichnofossils record progressive changes in substrate consistency. Earliest formed burrows have diffuse outlines representing an initial thixotropic (softground) Austin substrate. Subsequent generations of burrows have more distinct outlines recording a gradual increase in substrate firmness. Paleo-firmgrounds are common in Austin outcrops; evidence of hardgrounds is lacking. The Thalassinoides-dominated Austin ichnoassemblage represents an inner shelf paleoenvironment.

Dawson, W.C. (Texaco, Houston, TX (United States)); Reaser, D.F. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (United States))

1991-03-01

298

Geologic and engineering characterization of Geraldine Ford field, Reeves and Culberson Counties, Texas. Topical report -- 1997  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this Class III project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of clastic reservoirs in basinal sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost-effective way to recover more of the original oil in place by strategic infill-well placement and geologically based field development. The study focused on Geraldine Ford field, which produces from the upper Bell Canyon formation (Ramsey sandstone). Petrophysical characterization of the Ford Geraldine unit was accomplished by integrating core and log data and quantifying petrophysical properties from wireline logs. The petrophysical data were used to map porosity, permeability, net pay, water saturation, mobile oil saturation, and other reservoir properties. Once the reservoir-characterization study was completed, a demonstration area of approximately 1 mi{sup 2} in the northern part of the unit was chosen for reservoir modeling/simulation. A quarter of a five-spot injection pattern in the demonstration area was selected for flow simulations, and two cases of permeability distribution were considered, one using stochastic permeability distribution generated by conditional simulation and the other using layered permeabilities. Flow simulations were performed using UTCOMP, an isothermal, three-dimensional, compositional simulator for miscible gas flooding. Results indicate that 10--30% (1 to 3 MMbbl) of remaining oil in place in the demonstration area can be produced by CO{sub 2} injection.

Dutton, S.P.; Malik, M.A.; Asquith, G.B.; Barton, M.D.; Cole, A.G.; Gogas, J.; Clift, S.J.; Guzman, J.I.

1998-04-01

299

The geologic structure of part of the southern Franklin Mountains, El Paso County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Franklin Mountains are a west tilted fault block mountain range which extends northwards from the city of El Paso, Texas. Geologic mapping in the southern portion of the Franklin Mountains has revealed many previously unrecognized structural complexities. Three large high-angle faults define the boundaries of map. Twenty lithologic units are present in the field area, including the southernmost Precambrian meta-sedimentary rocks in the Franklin Mountains (Lanoria Quartzite and Thunderbird group conglomerates). The area is dominated by Precambrian igneous rocks and lower Paleozoic carbonates, but Cenozoic ( ) intrusions are also recognized. Thin sections and rock slabs were used to describe and identify many of the lithologic units. The Franklin Mountains are often referred to as a simple fault block mountain range related to the Rio Grande Rift. Three critical regions within the study area show that these mountains contain structural complexities. In critical area one, Precambrian granites and rhyolites are structurally juxtaposed, and several faults bisecting the area affect the Precambrian/Paleozoic fault contact. Critical area two contains multiple NNW-trending faults, three sills and a possible landslide. This area also shows depositional features related to an island of Precambrian rock exposed during deposition of the lower Paleozoic rocks. Critical area three contains numerous small faults which generally trend NNE. They appear to be splays off of one of the major faults bounding the area. Cenozoic kaolinite sills and mafic intrusion have filled many of the fault zones.

Smith, W.R.; Julian, F.E. (Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States). Dept. of Geosciences)

1993-02-01

300

Cultural resources: Deaf Smith and Swisher County locations, Palo Duro Basin, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Cultural resources are prehistoric and historic sites, including archeological and paleontological sites, that are important to a group of people. They are protected by both federal and state legislation. In the area covered by the Deaf Smith and Swisher County locations, four stages of cultural development have been identified: Paleo-Indian, Archaic, Ceramic (Neo-Indian or Neo-American), and Historic. Areas where undiscovered cultural resources are most likely to be found include sources of water, playa lakes, and historic trails. Because extensive surveying has not been done in either location, the number of identified sites is low. However, the potential for finding undiscovered sites is high for significant parts of both locations.

Not Available

1984-12-01

301

Commander field: Case study of a gas productive landsat and geochemical anomaly, Parker County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Landsat data for a mature area of southern Parker County were analyzed for structural anomalies and lineaments in order to determine the relationship of these data to gas production and the possible fracturing of Atoka sand reservoirs. Interstitial soil gas data gathered over a 160 acre tract revealed a strong surface anomaly situated at the intersection of two lineaments. The drilling of this anomaly resulted in gas production from a Bend conglomerate and excellent mudlog shows of gas from shallower sands in the Atoka and Strawn intervals. A subsequent offset well, located within the original surface soil gas anomaly, also proved gas productive in the shallow Strawn interval. Well data from the productive gas zones are discussed in relation to local stratigraphy and structure. The limitations and advantages of Landsat/soil gas data are considered in terms of future applicability to other mature areas.

Crowder, W.T. Jr. [Consulting Geologist, Dallas, TX (United States)

1995-06-01

302

Correlation of the ratio of metastatic to non-metastatic cancer cases with the degree of socioeconomic deprivation among Texas counties  

PubMed Central

Background Previous studies have demonstrated that cancer registrations and hospital discharge rate are closely correlated with census data-based socioeconomic deprivation indices. We hypothesized that communities with higher degrees of socioeconomic deprivation tend to have a higher ratio of metastatic to non-metastatic cancer cases (lung, breast, prostate, female genital system, colorectal cancers or all types of cancers combined). In this study, we investigate the potential link between this ratio and the Wellbeing Index (WI) among Texas counties. Results Cancer data in 2000 were provided by the Texas Cancer Registry, while data on the ten socioeconomic variables among the 254 Texas counties in 2000 for building the WI were obtained from U.S. Census Bureau. The ten socioeconomic status variables were subjected to the principal component analysis, and the first principal component scores were grouped into deciles for the WI (1 to 10) and the 254 Texas counties were classified into 10 corresponding groups. Weighted linear regression analyses and a Cochran-Armitage trend test were performed to determine the relationship between the ratio of age-adjusted metastatic to non-metastatic cancer incidence cases and WI. The ratios of metastatic to non-metastatic cases of female genital system cancer (r2 = 0.84, p = 0.0002), all-type cancers (r2= 0.73, p = 0.0017) and lung cancer (r2= 0.54, p = 0.0156) at diagnosis were positively correlated with WI. Conclusions The ratios of metastatic to non-metastatic cases of all-type, female genital system and lung cancers at diagnosis were statistically correlated with socioeconomic deprivation. Potential mediators for the correlation warrant further investigation in order to reduce health disparities associated with socioeconomic inequality.

2011-01-01

303

Analysis of borehole geophysical information across a uranium deposit in the Jackson Group, Karnes County, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Borehole geophysical studies across a uranium deposit in the Jackson Group, South Texas, show the three geochemical environments often associated with uranium roll-type deposits: an altered (oxidized) zone, an ore zone, and an unaltered (reduced) zone. Mineralogic analysis of the total sulfides contained in the drill core shows only slight changes in the total sulfide content among the three geochemical regimes. However, induced polarization measurements on the core samples indicate that samples obtained from the reduced side of the ore zone are more electrically polarizable than those from the oxidized side of the ore zone, and therefore probably contain more pyrite. Analysis of the clay-size fraction in core samples indicates that montmorillonite is the dominant clay mineral. High resistivity values within the ore zone indicate the presence of calcite cement concentrations that are higher than those seen outside of the ore zone. Between-hole resistivity and induced polarization measurements show the presence of an extensive zone of calcite cement within the ore zone, and electrical polarizable material (such as pyrite) within and on the reduced side of the ore zone. A quantitative analysis of the between-hole resistivity data, using a layered-earth model, and a qualitative analysis of the between-hole induced polarization measurements showed that mineralogic variations among the three geochemical environments were more pronounced than were indicated by the geophysical and geologic well logs. Uranium exploration in the South Texas Coastal Plain area has focused chiefly in three geologic units: the Oakville Sandstone, the Catahoula Tuff, and the Jackson Group. The Oakville Sandstone and the Catahoula Tuff are of Miocene age, and the Jackson Group is of Eocene age (Eargle and others, 1971). Most of the uranium mineralization in these formations is low grade (often less than 0.02 percent U3O8) and occurs in shallow deposits that are found by concentrated exploratory drilling programs. The sporadic occurrence of these deposits makes it desirable to develop borehole geophysical techniques that will help to define the depositional environments of the uranium ore, which is characterized by geochemical changes near the uranium deposits. Geochemical changes are accompanied by changes in the physical characteristics of the rocks that can be detected with borehole geophysical tools. This study is concerned with a uranium deposit within the Jackson Group that is located just east of Karnes City, Tex. Five holes were drilled on this property to obtain borehole geophysical data and cores. The cores were analyzed for mineralogic and electrical properties. The borehole geophysical information at this property included induced polarization, resistivity, gamma-gamma density, neutron-neutron, gamma-ray, caliper, and single-point-resistance logs. Between-hole resistivity and induced polarization measurements were made between hole pairs across the ore deposit and off the ore deposit.

Daniels, Jeffrey J.; Scott, James Henry; Smith, Bruce D.

1979-01-01

304

Morphology and sedimentology of a central Brazos River point bar, Boxley Bend, Brazos County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

A reconnaissance of Brazos River point bars reveals great variety in their morphology and sedimentology, owing to the complex interaction of climate, local hydrography, and local sediment sources. This paper presents the first in a series of studies of point bars of the Brazos River and concentrates on the Boxley Bend point bar near Snook, Texas. The summer morphology of the point bar is complex, consisting of an upper and lower tier separated by a scarp but connected by a central ramp. The surfaces of the lower tier and ramp display numerous large gravel bars and shallow scour pools as well as low-amplitude sand waves, ripples, and current lineations. In cross section, the lower tier and ramp are characterized by (1) trough cross-bedded, medium to fine sand produced by megaripple migration during floods; (2) massive gravel beds, the product of formation and migration of gravel bars during floods; and (3) fine rippled sand and clay drapes formed during falling flood. The surface of the upper tier displays ripple-laminated eolian sand and deflation deposits of mud clasts. In cross section, the upper tier is characterized by thick beds of horizontally stratified fine sand. During the winter, the entire surface of the point bar is covered by large (2 m high) transverse bars separated by deep scour troughs. Transverse bars migrate into the troughs to produce a sequence of fine sand with backflow ripple cross-stratification overlain by thick beds of tabular cross-bedded medium sand. The transverse bars appear to be transitory features with little net effect on sedimentation, because they are removed from the surface of the point bar by summertime.

Connolly, W.M.; Mazzullo, J.

1986-09-01

305

Site study plan for Deep Hydronest Test Wells, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Preliminary draft  

SciTech Connect

Wells called Deep Hydronest Wells will be installed at six locations at the Deaf Smith County Site to characterize hydraulic parameters in the geologic column between the top of the San Andres Formation and the base of Pennsylvanian System. Three hydronests will be drilled during early stages of site characterization to provide data for performance assessment modeling. Four wells are proposed for each of these 3 nests. Results of drilling, testing, and preliminary modeling will direct drilling and testing activities at the last 3 nests. Two wells are proposed at each of the last 3 nests for a total of 18 wells. The Salt Repository Project (SRP) Networks specify the schedule under which this program will operate. Drilling and hydrologic testing of the first Deep Hydronest will begin early in the Surface Investigation Program. Drilling and testing of the first three Deep Hydronests will require about 18 months. After 12 months of evaluating and analyzing data from the first three hydronests, the remaining three hydronests will be drilled during a 12-month period. The Technical Field Services Contractor is responsible for conducting the field program. Samples and data will be handled and reported in accordance with established SRP procedures. A quality assurance program will be used to assure that activities affecting quality are performed correctly and that the appropriate documentation is maintained. 36 refs., 20 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1987-05-01

306

Technical procedures for implementation of aesthetics site studies, Deaf Smith County site, Texas: Environmental Field Program  

SciTech Connect

This chapter introduces the purpose and scope of the visually affected areas determination, as well as definitions, interfaces, and concurrent data needs. This procedure provides a method for determining the extent of visibility of the project. This area is identified as the visually affected area, and becomes the area within which all visual analysis is conducted. The visually affected area analysis of the Deaf Smith County site will involve identifying and mapping the visibility of all major proposed project features. Baseline analysis will be conducted within the overall visually affected area; impact assessment will be conducted within the visually affected area of each major project feature. This procedure presents the guidelines for determining the visually affected area will be in computer data base construction; viewshed modeling, and site visit and verification of results. Computer data base construction will involve digitizing topographic and project facility data from available data source. The extent of the visible area from each major project feature will then be plotted. Finally, these computer-generated visibility plots will be verified in the field.

Not Available

1987-06-01

307

Scanning electron microscope examination of shale in core from the Frio Formation, Brazoria County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Scanning electron microscope (SEM) examination of additional core from shallower geopressured and nongeopressured Frio Formation wells in Brazoria County shows similar fracture patterns and clay textures to those reported earlier in the Skrabanek 1 well. The additional wells examined by SEM are 1-B Minnie Mettler, 2847 to 3254 m; Pleasant Bayou 1, 3532 to 4750 m; and Phillips Petroleum JJ 1, 4919 to 5128 m. We noted that shales occurring from 2744 to 5488 in have similar grain orientation and fracture patterns. Pleasant Bayou 1 is strikingly similar to Skrabanek 1, having coarse flakes and grains of quartz and feldspar disbursed throughout. Phillips Petroleum JJ 1 is more uniform in appearance, lacking distinct clay flakes and scattered grains. 1-B Minnie Mettler is similar in appearance to Phillips Petroleum JJ 1, having a uniform distribution of components; however, the clay flakes are less densely packed. Fractures are present in all three wells. The abundance of both horizontal and vertical fractures at varying depths could act as avenues of fluid flow within geopressured shales.

Alley-McReynolds, P.D. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States)

1994-09-01

308

Helicopter Electromagnetic and Magnetic Surveys of the Upper and Middle Zones of the Trinity Aquifer, Uvalde and Bexar Counties, Texas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Detailed helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic surveys (HEM) were conducted in northern Uvalde and Bexar Counties, Texas, as part of a geologic mapping and hydrologic study being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The aquifers of the Lower Cretaceous Trinity Group (collectively termed the Trinity aquifer) are an important regional water source in the Hill Country of south-central Texas. Rock units comprising the middle aquifer segment are represented by the lower member of the Glen Rose Formation and the Cow Creek Limestone and Hensel Sandstone members of the Pearsall Formation. The lower Trinity hydrologic segment is composed of the Hosston and Sligo Limestones and is confined by the overlying Hammet Shale. Karst features commonly occur in the Trinity Group because of the dissolution of gypsum- and anhydrite-rich beds. Faults and fractures have not been sufficiently analyzed to evaluate the effects these structures have on inter- and intra-formational groundwater flow. The survey in the north Seco Creek area covers the recharge zone of the Edwards aquifer and part of the catchment zone composed of the upper Trinity segment. These data augment the scant geologic mapping in the area by delineating faults, collapse features, and hydrostratigraphic units. The HEM survey in northern Bexar County covered the Camp Stanley Storage Activity, the Camp Bullis Training Site, parts of the recharge zone of the Edwards aquifer south of the military bases, and part of Cibolo Creek to the north. Basic line spacing was 200 meters using six frequencies. In-fill lines were flown with a spacing of 100 meters in the central part of the study area to better resolve geologic structures and karst features. The data processing took into account high EM interference and cultural noise. Apparent resistivity (?a) maps are used in interpretation of geologic structures, trends, and in the identification of electrical properties of lithologic units. The ?a maps show the northwest trending faults of the Balcones fault zone as well as oblique trending cross faults. Though many of the major faults had been identified in previous geologic mapping, other possibly significant faults were not recognized from traditional techniques. High resistivities within the Glen Rose Limestone are indicative of more competent lithologies which have a greater limestone content. During the evolution of the groundwater system the limestone units are most likely to have developed secondary porosity conducive to establishing flow paths. In contrast, lower resistivities are associated with clay, marl, and mudstone units which have lower porosity and permeability. Resistivity depth sections along flight lines and 3D visualization of resistive zones define reefal structures in the middle Trinity segment. Detailed hydrogeologic mapping and HEM depth modeling illustrate the approach to be taken in future studies of the Trinity.

Smith, D. V.; Blome, C. D.; Smith, B. D.; Clark, A. C.

2009-12-01

309

Deaths due to sharp force injuries in bexar county, Texas, with respect to manner of death.  

PubMed

In the United States, there is a paucity of studies examining sharp force injuries (SFIs), defined as an injury inflicted by cutting or stabbing with a sharp instrument. Few studies exist that discriminate between the injury patterns of suicidal or homicidal deaths incurred by SFI. In this retrospective study, all deaths secondary to SFI were evaluated at the Bexar County Medical Examiner's Office from January 1988 through May 2010. Exclusion criteria were deaths occurring more than 24 hours after injury and wounds obscured by healing or extensive medical intervention. The following data were analyzed: age of decedent, sex, wound location, number of wounds, type of SFI (stab vs incised), visceral organ or vascular injury, concomitant injuries, and manner of death. Defensive injuries in homicides and hesitation marks in suicides were also recorded. A total of 418 deaths met inclusion criteria: 349 homicides, 54 suicides, 12 accidents, and 2 where the manner of death could not be determined.The average age of homicide victims was 35 years, whereas that of suicide victims was 47 years. Gender was not significantly different between the homicide and suicide groups. Homicide victims incurred a greater number of wounds per case compared with suicides, 5.3 versus 4.1, respectively, and had a greater number of stab wounds, 3.3 per case compared with 0.7 per case, respectively. Incisional wounds were statistically greater in suicides, with an average number of 3.3 per case compared with 2.1 in homicides.Injuries to the head, chest, and back were more common in homicides when compared with suicides, whereas injuries to the abdomen and extremities were more frequent in suicides. Comparison of major visceral and vascular damage between homicides and suicides revealed statistically greater injury to the heart, lungs, and thoracic vessels in homicides, but there was a greater frequency of injury to the vasculature of the extremities in suicides. The presence of additional (non-SFI) injuries was more common in homicides than in suicides. Hesitation marks/tentative wounds occurred in 35% of suicides, whereas defensive injuries occurred in 31% of homicides. This epidemiological study can assist the forensic pathologist in determining the most probable manner of death from SFI but does not substitute for a thorough examination of the circumstances of death and a meticulous autopsy. PMID:23629405

Kemal, Cameron J; Patterson, Tyler; Molina, D Kimberley

2013-09-01

310

Contaminant Studies on Endangered Bats in Northeastern Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Three federally listed endangered bat species are known to inhabit Oklahoma. The gray bat (Mvotis qrisescens) is probably the most abundant, and is presently known to occur in Adair, Cherokee, Delaware, and Ottawa Counties. Gray bats are almost unknown ou...

D. B. Martin

1992-01-01

311

Petrographic report on samples from units 4 and 5 salt, lower San Andres formation, J. Friemel No. 1 well, Deaf Smith County, Palo Duro Basin, Texas  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of mineralogic and petrographic analyses performed on samples of salt-bearing rock from a potential repository site in the Palo Duro Basin, Texas. The samples are from Permian Units 4 and 5 salt, Lower San Andres Formation, J. Friemel No. 1 well, Deaf Smith County, Texas. The mineralogic and petrographic data were obtained from polished thin sections cut parallel to the axis of the core for each sample. The polished thin sections were examined in order to determine the abundances of soluble (halite) and insoluble components (anhydrite, clay, carbonate, quartz, gypsum, etc.). The information reported here includes mineral associations (detrital, authigenic, cement, alteration, etc.), texture, grain size, and sedimentary fabrics. The report also includes representative photomicrographs with superimposed bar scales. Photomicrographs of polished thin sections have the up-core direction designated. X-ray diffraction was also used for identification of soluble and insoluble minerals. 7 refs., 2 tabs.

Fukui, L.M.; Hopping, R.B.

1985-01-01

312

75 FR 45695 - Final Federal Agency Actions on Trans-Texas Corridor 35 (TTC-35) in Texas  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...project, TTC-35, extending from the Texas- Oklahoma line to the City of Laredo, generally paralleling existing I...generally parallels I-35 from the Texas-Oklahoma state line to the City of Laredo. TTC-35 was envisioned as a...

2010-08-03

313

Chemical analyses of surface waters in Oklahoma, September - December 1944  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A preliminary survey of the industrial quality of surface waters in Oklahoma was started in August, 1944, by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Oklahoma Resources and Planning Board, with the Oklahoma A. & M. College, Engineering Experiment Station and Department of Chemistry. From September to December, 1944, three hundred and fifteen samples were obtained at eighty-four points where gages are maintained for measurement of discharge. Daily samples were collected at six stations, namely: Illinois River near Gore, Oklahoma Cimarron River near Oilton, Oklahoma Canadian River near Whitefield, Oklahoma Washita River near Durwood, Oklahoma Red River near Gainesville, Texas Red River at Denison Dam, Texas Sport samples were collected at the remainder of the stations. The analyses of the spot samples were made largely in a laboratory provided by the Oklahoma A. & M. College, under the supervision of Dr. O.M. Smith, Head, Department of Chemistry; Dr. S.R. Wood, Associate Professor of Chemistry; and W.W. Hastings, U.S. Geological Survey. The daily samples were analyzed in the water resources laboratory of the Geological Survey at Austin, Texas. These data have been summarized in a report to the Oklahoma Planning and Resources Board prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey, March 1, 1945. The streams of Oklahoma are classified into two major drainage basins: the Arkansas River and the Red River and their tributaries. The attached analyses are arranged in geographical order for their respective drainage basins, with records listed in downstream order for stations on the main stem first, followed by the analyses for the tributaries. When available, the mean daily discharge is given for the analyses. (available as photostat copy only)

Geological Survey (U.S.)

1945-01-01

314

Public health assessment for Odessa Superfund Site (a/k/a Sprague Road Groundwater Plume) Ector, Ector County, Texas, Region 6: CERCLIS number TX0001407444. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Sprague Road Groundwater Plume National Priorities List site, consists of three plumes of chromium contaminated water just outside the northern city limits of Odessa, Ector County, Texas. The chromium in the groundwater is a public health hazard to people who continue to use the chromium-contaminated water wells for drinking. Chromium in soil at Leigh Metal Plating Inc. presents a potential public health hazard. Although this facility is surrounded by a fence, access to the site is not entirely restricted. There is a five-foot pit on the National Chromium Corporation site that could present a physical hazard to children trespassing on the site.

NONE

1998-12-28

315

Funding for Local Government and Schools in Rural Oklahoma. ERS Staff Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Oil, gas, and agriculture are the bases of rural Oklahoma's economy, and income from these sectors varied widely during the 1980s. This study investigated revenue sources and the effects of changing revenues for county and town governments and school systems in 36 rural Oklahoma counties. Major sources of local revenue were sales taxes, property…

Sloggett, Gordon; Doeksen, Gerald

316

76 FR 60959 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00055  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Oklahoma dated 09/21/2011. Incident: Pawnee County Wildfire. Incident Period: 08/07/2011 through 08/14/2011. Effective Date: 09/21/2011. Physical Loan Application...

2011-09-30

317

Huminite reflectance measurements of Paleocene and Upper Cretaceous coals from borehole cuttings, Zavala and Dimmit counties, South Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The reflectance of huminite in 19 cuttings samples was determined in support of ongoing investigations into the coal bed methane potential of subsurface Paleocene and Upper Cretaceous coals of South Texas. Coal cuttings were obtained from the Core Research Center of the Bureau of Economic Geology, The University of Texas at Austin. Geophysical logs, mud-gas logs, driller's logs, completion cards, and scout tickets were used to select potentially coal-bearing sample suites and to identify specific sample depths. Reflectance measurements indicate coals of subbituminous rank are present in a wider area in South Texas than previously recognized.

Hackley, Paul C.; Hook, Robert W.; Warwick, Peter D.

2005-01-01

318

Alternative methods to manage waste salt from repository excavation in the Deaf Smith County and Swisher County locations, Texas: A scoping study: Technical report. [Salt and salt-laden material  

SciTech Connect

This report describes and qualitatively evaluates eight options for managing the large volumes of salt and salt-laden rock that would result from the excavation of a high-level radioactive waste repository in Deaf Smith County or Swisher County, Texas. The options are: distribution for commercial use; ocean disposal; deep-well injection; disposal in multilevel mines on the site; disposal in abandoned salt mines off the site; disposal off the site in abandoned mines developed for minerals other than salt; disposal in excavated landfills; and surface disposal on alkali flats. The main features of each option are described, as well as the associated environmental and economic impacts, and regulatory constraints. The options are evaluated in terms of 11 factors that jointly constitute a test of relative suitability. The results of the evaluation and implications for further study are indicated. This document does not consider or include the actual numbers, findings, or conclusions contained in the final Deaf Smith County Environmental Assessment (DOE, 1986). 43 refs., 8 tabs.

Not Available

1987-01-01

319

Water-Quality, Stream-Habitat, and Biological Data for Highland and Marchand Bayous, Galveston County, Texas, 2006-07.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Houston-Galveston Area Council and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, collected water-quality, stream-habitat, and biological data from five sites on Highland and Marchand Bayous in Galveston...

D. W. Brown J. A. Mabe M. J. Turco

2007-01-01

320

Petrographic report on clay-rich samples from Permian Unit 4 salt, G. Friemel No. 1 well, Palo Duro Basin, Deaf Smith County, Texas: unanalyzed data  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of mineralogic and petrographic analyses performed on five samples of clay-rich rock from salt-bearing Permian strata sampled by drill core from G. Friemel No. 1 Well, Deaf Smith County, Texas. Five samples of clay-rich rock from depths of about 2457, 2458, 2521, 2548, and 2568 feet were analyzed to determine the amounts of soluble phase (halite) and the amounts and mineralogy of the insoluble phases. The amounts of halite found were 59, 79, 47, 40, and 4 weight percent, respectively, for the samples. The insoluble minerals are predominately clay (20 to 60 volume percent) and anhydrite (up to 17 volume percent), with minor (about 1.0%) and trace amounts of quartz, dolomite, muscovite, and gypsum. The clays include illite, chlorite, and interstratified chlorite-smectite. The results presented in this petrographic report are descriptive, uninterpreted data. 2 references, 7 tables.

Fukui, L.M.

1983-09-01

321

An epidemic of congenital syphilis in Jefferson County, Texas, 1994-1995: inadequate prenatal syphilis testing after an outbreak in adults.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES: After a syphilis epidemic in Jefferson County, Texas, in 1993 and 1994, congenital syphilis prevalence and risk factors were determined and local prenatal syphilis screening practices were assessed. METHODS: Medical records were reviewed, pregnant women with syphilis were interviewed, and prenatal care providers were surveyed. RESULTS: Of 91 women, 59 (65%) had infants with congenital syphilis. Among African Americans, the prevalence per 1000 live births was 24.1 in 1994 and 17.9 in 1995. Of the 50 women with at least 2 prenatal care visits who had infants with congenital syphilis, 15 (30%) had received inadequate testing. Only 16% of 31 providers obtained an early third-trimester syphilis test on all patients. CONCLUSIONS: Inadequate prenatal testing contributed to this outbreak of congenital syphilis.

Southwick, K L; Guidry, H M; Weldon, M M; Mert, K J; Berman, S M; Levine, W C

1999-01-01

322

Three-dimensional geometry and kinematics of the Gale-Buckeye thrust system, ouachita fold and thrust belt, Latimer and Pittsburg counties, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The Gale-Buckeye thrust system consists of a series of blind thrusts and folds near the boundary between the Ouachita fold and thrust belt and the Arkoma basin in Oklahoma. A dense grid of high-resolution seismic reflection data, augumented by data from exploration and production wells, provides an opportunity to analyze the three-dimensional geometry and kinematics of these structures in detail. We recognized two previously unmapped transverse structures in the Gale-Buckeye thrust system: a sharp, left-stepping zone of oblique ramps and a tear fault within the Gale thrust sheet. These transverse structures are spatially coincident with similar structural trends in lower Paleozoic strata beneath the thrust system as well as outcropping structural trends on the surface. This interpretation extends thrust in the Gale-Buckeye system to minimum strike lengths of 7-9 mi (11- 15 km) and fault length-to-displacement ratios of about 10:1. Interpreted structural relationships suggest that the Gale and Buckeye thrusts formed in a backward-stepping manner. Measurement of differential transport angles from our interpretations of the Gale-Buckeye thrust system indicates that along-strike displacement variations of the Gale and Buckeye thrusts are consistent with thrusts from other nonmetamorphic fold and thrust belts. Using the differential transport model, we infer that the tear fault in the Gale thrust sheet indicates a region that became segmented to accommodate excessive along-strike differences in displacement. In addition, we use the model to explain errors in previous interpretations of the Gale-Buckeye thrust system that resulted in the drilling of dry holes. Integrating realistic differential transport angles with our interpretations for extent, style and sequence of thrusting provides new strategies for hydrocarbon exploration throughout the region. 43 refs., 17 figs., 4 tabs.

Wilkerson, M.S. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana (United States) Exxon Production Research, Houston, TX (United States)); Wellman, P.C. (Exxon Exploration Company, Houston, TX (United States))

1993-06-01

323

Architecture, internal heterogeneity, and resulting drainage efficiency of Upper Oligocene Frio Formation inner-shelf sandstone reservoirs in West Fulton Beach Field, Aransas County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The architecture, internal heterogeneity, and production history of selected reservoirs in West Fulton Beach field, Copano Bay, Aransas County, Texas, were examined as part of a project to identify additional oil and gas reserves on Texas state lands. Upper Oligocene Frio Formation reservoirs in this field have yielded more than 146 bcf of gas and 8 MMbbl of oil. A high-resolution genetic stratigraphic analysis of inner-shelf sandstone reservoirs used well log and petrophysical data to locate uncontacted or incompletely drained reservoir compartments. Shelf sandstone reservoirs are composed of thin (2-6 ft) sandstones that are laterally isolated but commonly vertically stacked and amalgamated into units as much as 16 ft thick. Individual sandstones constitute separate reservoir compartments that are vertically isolated if surrounded by inner-shelf shales or are in partial communication if vertically stacked, separated by a low-permeability bioturbated sandstone or siltstone layer of varying thickness. Heterogeneity within individual sandstone units is low. Deposition of inner-shelf sandstones varies - from proximal settings, below fair-weather wave base but above storm wave base, where the sandstones are thicker, more commonly amalgamated, and form well-interconnected compartments - to distal settings below storm wave base, where they are thinner and more commonly isolated. Production histories indicate that completions in proximal settings can drain more than 600 ac in a gas reservoir, whereas those in distal settings drain less than 200 ac. High-resolution stratigraphic analysis of inner-shelf sand-stone reservoirs at West Fulton Beach field has identified 11 bcf of additional reserves in untapped and incompletely drained reservoir compartments. The 63 other major fields of the downdip Frio barrier-bar/strandplain play of the central Texas Gulf Coast may contain as much as 500 bcf of additional gas that could be identified through similar efforts.

Knox, P.R. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1994-09-01

324

Urban flood analysis in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Flood insurance study information from the Federal Emergency Management Agency is utilized to estimate future flood hazard in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Techniques are described for estimating future urban runoff estimates. A method of developing stream cross section rating curves is explained. Future runoff estimates are used in conjuction with the rating curves to develop an estimate of 50- and 100- year flood profiles that would result from future urban development.

Tortorelli, Robert L.; Huntzinger, T. L.; Bergman, D. L.; Patneaude, A. L.

1983-01-01

325

Texas Almanac, 2002-2003.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The 61st edition of the "Texas Almanac" has a reputation as the definitive source for Texas information since 1857. It contains details of the Census 2000 official population count, including statewide, county and town counts, plus an analysis of the numbers by experts at Texas's State Data Center. It includes information about politics,…

Ramos, Mary G., Ed.

326

Chronicles of Oklahoma  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Developed through a partnership between the Oklahoma Historical Society and the Oklahoma State University Library Electronic Publishing Center, this site makes 20 volumes of the Chronicles of Oklahoma available for researchers and the general public. Originally published by the Oklahoma State Historical Society, the available volumes range in date from 1921 to 1942. Users may search the volumes indices provided online, or search by keyword. The volumes contain a number of compelling articles on Oklahoma history, such as "Oklahoma as a Part of the Spanish Dominion, 1763-1803" and "My Experience with the Cheyenne Indians." The table of contents for each volume is a helpful way to browse through the different volumes. Along with the volumes currently available online, more volumes will be added in the future, time and money permitting.

327

Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Central Oklahoma Aquifer in central Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

ARC/INFO export files The data sets in this report include digitized aquifer boundaries and maps of hydraulic conductivity, recharge, and ground-water level elevation contours for the Central Oklahoma aquifer in central Oklahoma. This area encompasses all or part of Cleveland, Lincoln, Logan, Oklahoma, Payne, and Pottawatomie Counties. The Central Oklahoma aquifer includes the alluvial and terrace deposits along major streams, the Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formations, and the Chase, Council Grove, and Admire Groups. The Quaternary-age alluvial and terrace deposits consist of unconsolidated clay, silt, sand, and gravel. The Permian-age Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formations consist of sandstone with interbedded siltstone and mudstone. The Permian-age Chase, Council Grove, and Admire Groups consist of sandstone, shale, and thin limestone. The Central Oklahoma aquifer underlies about 3,000 square miles of central Oklahoma where the aquifer is used extensively for municipal, industrial, commercial, and domestic water supplies. Most of the usable ground water within the aquifer is from the Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formations. Substantial quantities of usable ground water also are present in the Chase, Council Grove, and Admire Groups, and in alluvial and terrace deposits associated with the major streams. The aquifer boundaries, hydraulic conductivity and recharge values, and ground-water level elevation contours are from previously published reports.

Runkle, D. L.; Christenson, S. C.; Rea, Alan

1997-01-01

328

Reservoir heterogeneity in the middle Frio Formation: Case studies in Stratton and Agua Dulce fields, Nueces County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Selected middle Frio (Oligocene) reservoirs of Stratton field and the contiguous Agua Dulce field are being studied as part of a Gas Research Institute\\/Department of Energy\\/State of Texas cosponsored program designed to improve reserve growth in mature gas fields. Over the past four decades, Stratton has produced 2.0 tcf of gas from 113 middle Frio reservoirs, and Agua Dulce has

D. R. Kerr

1990-01-01

329

Geographic risk modeling of childhood cancer relative to county-level crops, hazardous air pollutants and population density characteristics in Texas  

PubMed Central

Background Childhood cancer has been linked to a variety of environmental factors, including agricultural activities, industrial pollutants and population mixing, but etiologic studies have often been inconclusive or inconsistent when considering specific cancer types. More specific exposure assessments are needed. It would be helpful to optimize future studies to incorporate knowledge of high-risk locations or geographic risk patterns. The objective of this study was to evaluate potential geographic risk patterns in Texas accounting for the possibility that multiple cancers may have similar geographic risks patterns. Methods A spatio-temporal risk modeling approach was used, whereby 19 childhood cancer types were modeled as potentially correlated within county-years. The standard morbidity ratios were modeled as functions of intensive crop production, intensive release of hazardous air pollutants, population density, and rapid population growth. Results There was supportive evidence for elevated risks for germ cell tumors and "other" gliomas in areas of intense cropping and for hepatic tumors in areas of intense release of hazardous air pollutants. The risk for Hodgkin lymphoma appeared to be reduced in areas of rapidly growing population. Elevated spatial risks included four cancer histotypes, "other" leukemias, Central Nervous System (CNS) embryonal tumors, CNS other gliomas and hepatic tumors with greater than 95% likelihood of elevated risks in at least one county. Conclusion The Bayesian implementation of the Multivariate Conditional Autoregressive model provided a flexible approach to the spatial modeling of multiple childhood cancer histotypes. The current study identified geographic factors supporting more focused studies of germ cell tumors and "other" gliomas in areas of intense cropping, hepatic cancer near Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP) release facilities and specific locations with increased risks for CNS embryonal tumors and for "other" leukemias. Further study should be performed to evaluate potentially lower risk for Hodgkin lymphoma and malignant bone tumors in counties with rapidly growing population.

Thompson, James A; Carozza, Susan E; Zhu, Li

2008-01-01

330

Bureau of Health Professions Area Resource File (ARF) (for Microcomputers): Demographic State by County--New Mexico, Texas (West).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is the diskette version of the Area Resource File (ARF), which is a county-unit database with over 6,000 data elements. The purpose of ARF is to summarize data from many sources into a single file to facilitate health analysis. ARF on diskette is com...

R. B. Cole M. Morris

1986-01-01

331

Bureau of Health Professions Area Resource File (ARF) (for Microcomputers): Demographic State by County--Texas (East).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is the diskette version of the Area Resource File (ARF), which is a county-unit database with over 6,000 data elements. The purpose of ARF is to summarize data from many sources into a single file to facilitate health analysis. ARF on diskette is com...

R. B. Cole M. Morris

1986-01-01

332

Winter sound-level characterization of the Deaf Smith County location in the Palo Duro Basin, Texas  

SciTech Connect

A description of sound levels and sound sources in the Deaf Smith County location in the Palo Duro Basin during a period representative of the winter season is presented. Data were collected during the period February 26 through March 1, 1983. 4 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

Not Available

1984-03-01

333

75 FR 71467 - Exelon Nuclear Texas Holdings, LLC, Early Site Permit Application for the Victoria County Station...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...County Station Site, Notice of Hearing, Opportunity To Petition for Leave To Intervene...Commission). ACTION: Notice of hearing and opportunity to petition for leave to intervene...and procedures, and may include the opportunity to present the party's legal and...

2010-11-23

334

Oklahoma's Ouachita area beginning to stir  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on exploration of Ouachita rocks of southeastern Oklahoma. Wells are completed or planned in the Potato Hills, Moyers, and Atoka areas of the Ouachita Province. Deep and shallow drilling will start soon in a 9 sq mile area in the Potato Hills area of southern Latimer County. The shallow drilling program will consist of eight wells to about 6,000 ft to assess potential in Ordovician Big Fork, Womble, and Mississippian-Devonian Arkansas Novaculite.

Petzet, G.A.

1991-02-18

335

Oklahoma Tribes: A History  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Oklahoma is a microcosm of American Indian country. Water rights, tribal government impotence, jurisdiction, tribal membership, treaty rights, taxation, sovereignty, racism, and poor housing, education, and health are all vital issues facing the Indian tribes of Oklahoma. In order to understand the complexity of these issues, a review of the…

Gover, Kevin

1977-01-01

336

Oklahoma Tribes: A History  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Oklahoma is a microcosm of American Indian country. Water rights, tribal government impotence, jurisdiction, tribal membership, treaty rights, taxation, sovereignty, racism, and poor housing, education, and health are all vital issues facing the Indian tribes of Oklahoma. In order to understand the complexity of these issues, a review of the…

Gover, Kevin

1977-01-01

337

West Central Texas Developmental Disability Plan.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A developmental disability plan is presented for the 19 counties represented by the West Central Texas Council of Governments. The region is 60 percent rural with one population center in Abilene, Texas. The plan presents an analysis of demographic charac...

D. Karpe

1973-01-01

338

Oklahoma Historical Society  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The mission of the Oklahoma Historical Society is "to preserve and perpetuate the history of Oklahoma and its people by collecting, interpreting and disseminating knowledge of Oklahoma and the Southwest." The Society maintains over 20 museums and historic sites, and they are also responsible for maintaining this website. On the homepage, visitors can learn about the sites they maintain, including the Pawnee Bill Ranch and the Pioneer Woman Museum. In the "Publications" area, visitors can read back issues of "The Chronicles of Oklahoma" dating from 1921 to 1962, and they can also find the "Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture". The Society's "Found in Collections" blog is a great way to learn about their current archival work, and visitors can read about textile preservation techniques and the Civil War. Also, the site includes podcasts created to profile various aspects of the state's history. Finally, visitors can sign up to receive email updates on new additions, programs, and exhibits.

339

Report on the Economic Impact of American Indians in the State of Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report assesses the economic impact created by the presence of American Indians in Oklahoma. In 1980, American Indians in Oklahoma numbered 169,459, or 5.6% of the state's population. Most Indians lived in central and eastern counties. Compared to the general population, Indians were younger, less educated, and had higher unemployment and…

Green, Margaret Abudu; And Others

340

Factors associated with condom use among African-American women in Harris County, Texas: Cross-sectional study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection continues to disproportionately affect African-American communities. While African-Americans represent only 18.5% of Harris County population, they account for 54% of the HIV cases and continue to outnumber whites in new HIV cases. The lack of consistent and correct condom use is the leading mode of transmission for HIV in African-Americans. The first paper focuses on

Angela Branch-Vital

2008-01-01

341

Molecular detection of Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) from Tom Green County in central Texas.  

PubMed

Serologic and molecular evidence suggest that white-tailed deer in South Texas and North Mexico carry the agents of bovine babesiosis, Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina. To determine if white-tailed deer in central Texas, which is outside the known occurrence of the vector tick at this time, harbor these parasites, blood samples from free-ranging and captive white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in Tom Green County were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for B. bovis and B. bigemina 18S rDNA. Of the 25 samples tested, three (12%) were positive by nested PCR for B. bovis. This identity was confirmed by sequence analysis of the cloned 18S rDNA PCR product. Further confirmation was made by sequence analysis of the rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) 1, 5.8S rRNA gene, and ITS 2 genomic region in two (representing samples from two different ranches) of the B. bovis positive samples. Three samples were positive by B. bigemina nested PCR, but sequencing of the cloned products confirmed only one animal positive for B. bigemina; Theileria spp. DNA was amplified from the other two animal samples. In addition to Theileria spp., two genotypically unique Babesia species sequences were identified among the cloned sequences produced by the B. bigemina primers in one sample. Phylogenetic analysis showed no separation of the deer B. bovis or B. bigemina 18S rDNA, or deer B. bovis ITS region sequences from those of bovine origin. Clarification of the possible role of white-tailed deer as reservoir hosts in maintaining these important pathogens of cattle is critical to understanding whether or not deer contribute to the epidemiology of bovine babesiosis. PMID:21194841

Holman, Patricia J; Carroll, Juliette E; Pugh, Roberta; Davis, Donald S

2010-12-04

342

3-D seismic delineation and geologic explanation of channelization in the Frio Formation of Javelina/East McCook Field, Hidalgo County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Sinuous, channel-form features were recognized on seismic amplitude time-slice maps of the shallow Oligocene Frio Formation on several Shell proprietary 3-D seismic surveys in west-central Hidalgo County, Texas. A case study of channel morphologies observed in the Frio Formation within the 50 mi{sup 2} 3-D seismic survey over Javelina/East McCook field was undertaken to better understand the distribution, lithology, origin, and hydrocarbon potential of these features. Ten separate channel-like amplitude features are observed in flattened time slices within a 200 m (approximately 1100 ft) interval on 3-D seismic. The channels have various azimuthal orientations and varying degrees of sinuosity. Several of the features have lengths that span the 3-D survey area (10 mi); apparent channel widths range from 200 to 2000 ft. The channelized seismic events tie to an interval of interbedded mudstones and claystones with siltstones. Two of the channels seen on seismic, and which were penetrated by wells, correlate to siftstone and mudstone intervals that have gross thicknesses of 30 to 60 ft. The lithologies and dimensions of the two channels indicate that they are probably small mudstone/siltstone-filled tributary/distributary channels deposited in a coastal floodplain environment; a comparison of the apparent channel dimensions to the dimensions of small channels/bayous of the modern-day Texas Gulf Coast supports this interpretation. Correlation of wells adjacent to the channels indicates that sandy point-bar facies are not present in association with the channel fill, which discounts the idea that high-quality reservoirs are flanking these particular mud-filled channels.

Gibson, J.L. [Shell Western Exploration and Production, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1994-09-01

343

Groundwater withdrawals 1976, 1990, and 2000--10 and land-surface-elevation changes 2000--10 in Harris, Galveston, Fort Bend, Montgomery, and Brazoria Counties, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The study area comprising Harris County and parts of Galveston, Fort Bend, Montgomery, and Brazoria Counties in southeastern Texas forms part of one of the largest areas of land-surface-elevation change in the United States. Land-surface-elevation change in the study area primarily is caused by the withdrawal of groundwater. Groundwater withdrawn from the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers has been the primary source of water for municipal supply, industrial and commercial use, and irrigation in the study area. Groundwater withdrawals cause compaction of clay and silt layers abundant in the aquifers, which has in turn resulted in the widespread, substantial land-surface-elevation changes in the region with increased flooding. To estimate land-surface-elevation changes, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Harris-Galveston Subsidence District (HGSD), documented land-surface-elevation changes in the study area that occurred during 2000–10 and 2005–10 based on elevation data measured by 11 USGS borehole-extensometer sites, a National Geodetic Survey Continuously Operating Reference Station, and Global Positioning System Port-A-Measure (PAM) sites operated by the HGSD and the Fort Bend Subsidence District. Groundwater withdrawals in the study area also were documented for 1976, 1990, and 2000–10. In 1976, about 428.9 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) were withdrawn from the aquifer system in Harris County, but by 2000, because of HGSD regulation, withdrawals had decreased to about 337.8 Mgal/d, or about a 21-percent reduction since 1976. By 2010, withdrawals had decreased to about 227.1 Mgal/d, or about a 47-percent reduction since 1976. Among the counties in the study area, the largest decrease in groundwater withdrawals has occurred in Galveston County since 1976. In 1976, about 27.4 Mgal/d were withdrawn from the aquifer system, and by 2000, withdrawals had decreased to about 4.12 Mgal/d, or about an 85-percent reduction since 1976. By 2010, withdrawals had decreased to about 0.626 Mgal/d, or about a 98-percent decrease since 1976. Since the mid-1970s, Fort Bend and Montgomery Counties have undergone extensive urban development and corresponding large increases in groundwater withdrawals. Total groundwater withdrawal for Fort Bend County in 1976 was about 16.0 Mgal/d, and by 2000, withdrawals had increased to about 86.5 Mgal/d, or about a 441-percent increase since 1976. By 2010, withdrawals in Fort Bend County had increased to about 99.8 Mgal/d, or about a 524-percent increase since 1976. Total groundwater withdrawal for Montgomery County in 1976 was about 7.84 Mgal/d, and by 2000, withdrawals had increased to about 43.6 Mgal/d, or about a 456-percent increase since 1976. By 2010, withdrawals in Montgomery County had increased to about 64.2 Mgal/d, or about a 719-percent increase since 1976. Total groundwater withdrawal in Brazoria County in 1976 was about 18.0 Mgal/d, and by 2000, withdrawals had increased to about 26.0 Mgal/d, or about a 44-percent increase. By 2010, withdrawals in Brazoria County had increased to about 24.7 Mgal/d, or about a 37-percent increase since 1976. Measured land-surface-elevation changes from December 31, 2000, to December 31, 2010, ranged from an elevation increase of 0.06 feet (ft), or an average increase in elevation of 0.006 ft per year, at the Seabrook borehole extensometer located near Seabrook, Tex., to an elevation decrease of 1.28 ft, or an average decrease in elevation of 0.128 ft per year, at a PAM station north of Jersey Village, Tex. (PAM 07). Measured land-surface-elevation changes from December 31, 2005, to December 31, 2010, ranged from an elevation increase of 0.07 ft, or an average increase in elevation of 0.014 ft per year, at PAM 09 in far northeastern Harris County to an elevation decrease of 0.51 ft, or an average decrease in elevation of 0.102 ft per year, at PAM 07.

Kasmarek, Mark C.; Johnson, Michaela R.

2013-01-01

344

Superfund at work: Hazardous waste cleanup efforts nationwide, spring 1993 (French Limited Site Profile, Harris County, Texas)  

SciTech Connect

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) negotiated a major cleanup at the French Limited site, working with the Texas Water Commission (TWC) and the French Limited Task Group (FLTG). EPA's Superfund program: employed an innovative technology to clean up 300,000 cubic yards of hazardous waste; negotiated an agreement, known as a consent decree, in which FLTG pays for all cleanup costs and future oversight expenses; ensured the planting and preservation of 23 acres of wetlands near the site; and awarded the nation's 75th Superfund Technical Assistance Grant to a local group so that the community is kept informed. Cooperation between all parties demonstrates how the Superfund program cleans up hazardous waste sites.

Not Available

1993-01-01

345

An Integrated Study of the Grayburg/San Andres Reservoir, Foster and South Cowden Fields, Ector County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

A project to recover economic amounts of oil from a very mature oil field is being conducted by Laguna Petroleum Corporation of Midland, Texas, with partial funding from a U. S. Department of Energy grant to study shallow carbonate rock reservoirs. The objectives of the project are to use modern engineering methods to optimize oil field management and to use geological and geophysical data to recover untapped potential within the petroleum reservoirs. The integration of data and techniques from these disciplines has yielded results greater than those achievable without their cooperation. The cost of successfully accomplishing these goals is to be low enough for even small independent operators to afford. This article is a report describing accomplishments for the fiscal year 1997-1998.

Robinson, William C.; Trentham, Robert C.; Widner, Kevin; Wienbrandt, Richard

1999-06-22

346

An integrated study of the Grayburg/San Andres reservoir, Foster and South Cowden fields, Ector County, Texas, Class II  

SciTech Connect

A project to recover economic amounts of oil from a very mature oil field is being conducted by Laguna Petroleum Corporation of Midland, Texas, with partial funding from a U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) grant to study shallow carbonate rock reservoirs. The objectives of the project are to use modern engineering methods to optimize oil field management and to use geological and geophysical data to recover untapped potential within the petroleum reservoirs. The integration of data and techniques from these disciplines has yielded results greater than those achievable without their cooperation. The cost of successfully accomplishing these goals is to be low enough for even small independent operators to afford. This article is a report describing accomplishments for the fiscal year 1998-1999.

Trentham, DGS, Robert C.; Robinson, M.S., William C.; Wider, Kevin; Weinbrandt, Ph.D.,PE, Richard

2000-04-14

347

Fluvial architecture and reservoir heterogeneity of middle Frio sandstones, Seeligson field, Jim Wells and Kleberg Counties, south Texas  

SciTech Connect

Evaluation of fluvial Frio reservoirs in south Texas reveals a complex architectural style potentially suited to the addition of incremental gas reserves through recognition of untapped compartments or bypassed gas zones. Seeligson field is being studied as part of a GRI/DOE/Texas-sponsored program, in cooperation with Oryx Energy Company and Mobil Exploration and Production U.S., Inc., and is designed to develop technologies and methodologies for increasing gas reserves from conventional reservoirs in mature fields. Seeligson field, discovered in 1937, has produced 2.2 tcf of gas from more than 50 middle Frio reservoirs. Cross sections as well as net sand and log facies maps illustrate depositional style, sandstone geometry, and reservoir heterogeneities. Far-offset vertical seismic profiles show laterally discontinuous reflections corresponding to the reservoirs. Lenticular lateral-bar sandstones dominate channel-fill deposits that together are commonly less than 50 ft thick, forming belts of sandstone approximately 2,500 ft wide. Crevasse-splay deposits commonly extend a few thousand feet beyond the channel system. Sand-rich channel-fill deposits are flanked by levee and overbank mudstones, isolating the reservoirs in narrow, dip-elongate trends. Deposition on an aggrading coastal plain resulted in a pattern of laterally stacked sandstone bodies that are widespread across the study area. Alternating periods of more rapid aggradation resulted in deposition of vertically stacked sandstones with limited areal distribution. Facies architecture of both depositional styles has implications for reservoir compartmentalization. Reservoir compartments within a laterally stacked system may be leaky, resulting from sandstone contact from producing wells along depositional axes. This effect is a major factor controlling incremental recovery. Reservoirs in vertically stacked systems should be better isolated.

Jirik, L.A.; Kerr, D.R.; Zinke, S.G.; Finley, R.J. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (USA))

1990-05-01

348

The Prehistory of the Proposed Clayton Lake Area, Southeast Oklahoma. Phase I Investigations.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report describes archaeological field work conducted in southeast Oklahoma (Latimer, Pushmataha, and Pittsburg Counties) between July and September 1978 for the Tulsa District. Excavations were undertaken at seven sites that will be directly impacted...

R. Vehik J. R. Galm

1979-01-01

349

Assessing Groundwater Storage Changes in Edwards-Trinity Aquifer, Texas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Existing water supplies in Texas are projected to decline by about 18 percent by 2060, a trend caused primarily by increases in water demand and depletion of aquifers. The Edwards-Trinity regional aquifer system, a 200,000-km2 carbonate and clastic rock aquifer extending from southeastern Oklahoma to western Texas, provides water to all or parts of 38 counties in Texas. The extensive use of the Edwards-Trinity Aquifer has already resulted in relatively large artesian pressure declines near population centers. Although numerous studies have been conducted on the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system, significant uncertainty remains about the spatiotemporal replenishment characteristics of the aquifer. The U.S.-German Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission provides a unique opportunity to infer terrestrial water storage (TWS) variations on a regional basis. Previous studies have demonstrated the viability of using GRACE-derived TWS anomalies to conduct water budget analysis at both regional and continental scales. The purposes of our study are to (a) assess the potential of using GRACE, North America Land Assimilation System data, and in situ measurements to infer groundwater storage variations in the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system and (b) utilize remotely sensed data for informed groundwater resources management. Our preliminary results indicate that GRACE-derived TWS anomalies correlate well with results obtained through other means and, thus, the GRACE data could be a valuable tool for further calibrating a regional groundwater availability model developed for the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system.

Sun, A. Y.; Green, R. T.; Rodell, M.; Michaels, T. I.

2009-12-01

350

Environmental analysis of geopressured-geothermal prospect areas, De Witt and Colorado counties, Texas. Final report, March 1 - August 31, 1979  

SciTech Connect

Information collected and analyzed for a preliminary environmental analysis of geopressured geothermal prospect areas in Colorado and DeWitt Counties, Texas is presented. Specific environmental concerns for each geopressured geothermal prospect area are identified and discussed. Approximately 218 km/sup 2/(85 mi/sup 2/) were studied in the vicinity of each prospect area to: (1) conduct an environmental analysis to identify more and less suited areas for geopressured test wells; and (2) provide an environmental data base for future development of geopressured geothermal energy resources. A series of maps and tables are included to illustrate environmental characteristics including: geology, water resources, soils, current land use, vegetation, wildlife, and meteorological characteristics, and additional relevant information on cultural resources, power- and pipelines, and regulatory agencies. A series of transparent overlays at the scale of the original mapping has also been produced for the purposes of identifying and ranking areas of potential conflict between geopressured geothermal development and environmental characteristics. The methodology for ranking suitability of areas within the two prospect areas is discussed in the appendix. (MHR)

Gustavson, T.C.; Reeder, F.S.; Badger, E.A.

1980-02-01

351

Site study plan for Upper Aquifer Hydrology Clusters, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Surface-based geotechnical field program: Preliminary draft  

SciTech Connect

As part of site characterization studies, at the Deaf Smith County site, Texas, 15 wells at 5 locations will be completed in the Ogallala Formation and Dockum Group. The purposes of the wells, which are called Upper Aquifer (2) establish background hydrologic and water quality conditions, (3) provide analysis, (4) monitor responses of the shallow hydrologic system to site activities and nearby pumpage for irrigation, (5) collect water samples from both saturated and unsaturated materials to help define recharge rates and ground-water flow patterns, (6) monitor variations on water quality, and (7) define ground-water resources near the site. The test wells will be installed during a 14-month period starting about 1-1/2 years after site characterization activities begin. The Technical Field Services Contractor is responsible for conducting the field program of drilling and testing. Samples and data will be handled and reported in accordance with established Salt Repository Project procedures. A quality assurance program will assure that activities affecting quality are performed correctly and that the appropriate documentation is maintained. 44 refs., 19 figs., 5 tabs.

Not Available

1988-01-01

352

APPLICATION OF WATER-JET HORIZONTAL DRILLING TECHNOLOGY TO DRILL AND ACIDIZE HORIZONTAL DRAIN HOLES, TEDBIT (SAN ANDRES) FIELD, GAINES COUNTY, TEXAS  

SciTech Connect

The San Andres Formation is one of the major hydrocarbon-producing units in the Permian Basin, with multiple reservoirs contained within the dolomitized subtidal portions of upward shoaling carbonate shelf cycles. The test well is located in Tedbit (San Andres) Field in northeastern Gaines County, Texas, in an area of scattered San Andres production associated with local structural highs. Selected on the basis of geological and historical data, the Oil and Gas Properties Wood No. 1 well is considered to be typical of a large number of San Andres stripper wells in the Permian Basin. Thus, successful completion of horizontal drain holes in this well would demonstrate a widely applicable enhanced recovery technology. Water-jet horizontal drilling is an emerging technology with the potential to provide significant economic benefits in marginal wells. Forecast benefits include lower recompletion costs and improved hydrocarbon recoveries. The technology utilizes water under high pressure, conveyed through small-diameter coiled tubing, to jet horizontal drain holes into producing formations. Testing of this technology was conducted with inconclusive results. Paraffin sludge and mechanical problems were encountered in the wellbore, initially preventing the water-jet tool from reaching the kick-off point. After correcting these problems and attempting to cut a casing window with the water-jet milling assembly, lateral jetting was attempted without success.

Michael W. Rose

2005-09-22

353

East Taft Field, San Patricio County, Texas - a subtle stratigraphic trap: implications for exploration in a supermature province  

SciTech Connect

The shallow upper Frio producing trend along the downthrown side of the Vicksburg flexure in the lower Texas Gulf Coast is certainly one of the world's supermature provinces for oil and gas exploration. Current emphasis in exploration must be for the subtle trap, the discovery of which has been selected against during the many years of intensive exploration. East Taft field is an excellent example of one such subtle trap. A stratigraphic oil accumulation in a barrier-bar washover sand, East Taft has produced 2.5 million bbl of oil from 35 wells completed in an average of 3 ft of net oil sand. Traps of this type are numerous along the trend due to the nature of the barrier-bar and adjacent lagoonal environments. These traps remain largely undiscovered because they are never specifically explored for and are commonly passed over as noncommercial when penetrated by wells. The economic potential of these subtle traps is enormous; however, exploration programs geared toward finding these reserves must realistically assess the unique risks involved. Innovative geologic and engineering practices will also be required to discover and develop these fields profitably. For the explorationist who is willing to do the detailed structural and stratigraphic analysis required to identify these prospects, who understands the risks involved in exploration for these traps, and who is willing to innovate, these subtle stratigraphic traps represent a new frontier in an old producing province.

Railsback, R.R.

1986-07-01

354

Depositional environment of the downdip Queen City (Eocene) Sandstone, Mestena Grande Field Area, Jim Hogg and Duval Counties, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The downdip Queen City sandstone interval in the Mestena Grande field area of the south Texas Gulf Coast basin comprises two sandstone depositional units, referred to in this paper as A Lobe and B Lobe. A total of 583 ft (179 m) of conventional core from 11 wells containing predominantly B Lobe deposits were examined macroscopically. The A Lobe is a thin (6-34 ft; 1.8-10.4 m) fine- to very fine-grained, mostly bioturbated, well-sorted sandstone. The B Lobe is composed of fine to very fine, well-sorted sandstone interbedded with siltstone and mudstone. The trace fossil assemblage of the B Lobe indicates that sediments were deposited in the cruziana ichnofacies. Trace fossils and authigenic minerals also suggest oxygen stratification during deposition. B Lobe contains five subunits, each up to 13.5 ft (4 m) net sand thickness. These units were deposited as part of a highstands systems tract during the early Lutetian Stage (lower middle Eocene). B Lobe is a primarily aggradational unit composed of storm-generated sandstone and heterolithic deposits of the lower shoreface to inner shelf environment. A Lobe is a coarsening upward unit and represents progradation of the shoreface during late highstand systems tract development. An interlobal mudstone, which separates the units, marks the transition from early to late highstand systems tract development.

McCormack, J. [SSOE, Inc., Flint, MI (United States)

1994-09-01

355

Oklahoma Geological Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Oklahoma Geological Survey is a state agency dedicated to geological research and public service. This site contains information on earthquakes, geographic names, general Oklahoma geology, and the mountains and water resources of the state. There are educational materials available to order, many of which are free. Geologic maps indicate rock types and ages, as well as the geologic provinces of the state. Links are provided for more resources.

356

Estimated rates of groundwater recharge to the Chicot, Evangeline and Jasper aquifers by using environmental tracers in Montgomery and adjacent counties, Texas, 2008 and 2011  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Montgomery County is in the northern part of the Houston, Texas, metropolitan area, the fourth most populous metropolitan area in the United States. As populations have increased since the 1980s, groundwater has become an important resource for public-water supply and industry in the rapidly growing area of Montgomery County. Groundwater availability from the Gulf Coast aquifer system is a primary concern for water managers and community planners in Montgomery County and requires a better understanding of the rate of recharge to the system. The Gulf Coast aquifer system in Montgomery County consists of the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers, the Burkeville confining unit, and underlying Catahoula confining system. The individual sand and clay sequences of the aquifers composing the Gulf Coast aquifer system are not laterally or vertically continuous on a regional scale; however, on a local scale, individual sand and clay lenses can extend over several miles. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Lone Star Groundwater Conservation District, collected groundwater-quality samples from selected wells within or near Montgomery County in 2008 and analyzed these samples for concentrations of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), tritium (3H), helium-3/tritium (3He/3H), helium-4 (4He), and dissolved gases (DG) that include argon, carbon dioxide, methane, nitrogen and oxygen. Groundwater ages, or apparent age, representing residence times since time of recharge, were determined by using the assumption of a piston-flow transport model. Most of the environmental tracer data indicated the groundwater was recharged prior to the 1950s, limiting the usefulness of CFCs, SF6, and 3H concentrations as tracers. In many cases, no tracer was usable at a well for the purpose of estimating an apparent age. Wells not usable for estimating an apparent age were resampled in 2011 and analyzed for concentrations of major ions and carbon-14 (14C). At six of these wells, additional 4He and DG samples were collected and analyzed. Recharge rates estimated from environmental tracer data are dependent upon several hydrogeologic variables and have inherent uncertainties. By using the recharge estimates derived from samples collected from 14 wells completed in the Chicot aquifer for which apparent groundwater ages could be determined, recharge to the Chicot aquifer ranged from 0.2 to 7.2 inches (in.) per year (yr). Based on data from one well, estimated recharge to the unconfined zone of the Evangeline aquifer (outcrop) was 0.1 in./yr. Based on data collected from eight wells, estimated rates of recharge to the confined zone of the Evangeline aquifer ranged from less than 0.1 to 2.8 in./yr. Based on data from one well, estimated recharge to the unconfined zone of the Jasper aquifer (outcrop) was 0.5 in./yr. Based on data collected from nine wells, estimated rates of recharge to the confined zone of the Jasper aquifer ranged from less than 0.1 to 0.1 in./yr. The complexity of the hydrogeology in the area, uncertainty in the conceptual model, and numerical assumptions required in the determination of the recharge rates all pose limitations and need to be considered when evaluating these data on a countywide or regional scale. The estimated recharge rates calculated for this study are specific to each well location and should not be extrapolated or inferred as a countywide average. Local variations in the hydrogeology and surficial conditions can affect the recharge rate at a local scale.

Oden, Timothy D.; Truini, Margot

2013-01-01

357

Ground water available in the Davenport area, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This memorandum describes the ground-water resources in the vicinity of Davenport, Lincoln County, Oklahoma. It is based on a one-day trip to Davenport made by the writer on February 11, 1948, to obtain information in addition to that in the ground-water files in Norman on the availability of ground water for public supply or other uses in the Davenport area. Davenport is a town of about 1,000 in east-central Lincoln County, Oklahoma, on U.S. Highway 66, about half way between Oklahoma City and Tulsa. It is in an area of undulating to gently rolling topography underlain by rocks of Pennsylvanian age. The area is drained into Deep Fork of the Canadian River, by Dry Creek and its tributary, Chuckaho Creek. (available in photostat copy only)

Schoff, Stuart L.

1948-01-01

358

Remote Sensing Analysis of the Sierra Blanca (Faskin Ranch) Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Site, Hudspeth County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Remote sensing images provide useful physical information, revealing such features as geological structure, vegetation, drainage patterns, and variations in consolidated and unconsolidated lithologies. That technology has been applied to the failed Sierra Blanca (Faskin Ranch) shallow burial low-level radioactive waste disposal site selected by the Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority. It has been re-examined using data from LANDSAT satellite series. The comparison of the earlier LANDSAT V (5/20/86) (30-m resolution) with the later new, higher resolution ETM imagery (10/23/99) LANDSAT VII data (15-m resolution) clearly shows the superiority of the LANDSAT VII data. The search for surficial indications of evidence of fatal flaws at the Sierra Blanca site utilizing was not successful, as it had been in the case of the earlier remote sensing analysis of the failed Fort Hancock site utilizing LANDSAT V data. The authors conclude that the tectonic activity at the Sierra Blanca site is much less recent and active than in the previously studied Fort Hancock site. The Sierra Blanca site failed primarily on the further needed documentation concerning a subsurface fault underneath the site and environmental justice issues. The presence of this fault was not revealed using the newer LANDSAT VII data. Despite this fact, it must be remembered that remote sensing provides baseline documentation for determining future physical and financial remediation responsibilities. On the basis of the two sites examined by LANDSAT remote sensing imaging, it is concluded that it is an essential, cost-effective tool that should be utilized not only in site examination but also in all nuclear-related facilities.

LeMone, D. V.; Dodge, R.; Xie, H.; Langford, R. P.; Keller, G. R.

2002-02-26

359

Reservoir heterogeneity in the middle Frio Formation: Case studies in Stratton and Agua Dulce fields, Nueces County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Selected middle Frio (Oligocene) reservoirs of Stratton field and the contiguous Agua Dulce field are being studied as part of a Gas Research Institute/Department of Energy/State of Texas cosponsored program designed to improve reserve growth in mature gas fields. Over the past four decades, Stratton has produced 2.0 tcf of gas from 113 middle Frio reservoirs, and Agua Dulce has produced 1.6 tcf from 116 reservoirs. Recent drilling and workover activities, however, suggest the presence of additional untapped or bypassed middle Frio reservoirs. Four reservoirs, the E18/6,020-ft, E21/6,050-ft, E31/6,100-ft, and E41/Bertram, were evaluated over a 13,000-acre tract that includes areas adjacent to both fields. The middle Frio is composed of sand-rich channel-fill and splay deposits interstratified with floodplain mudstones, all forming part of the Gueydan fluvial system. Channel-fill deposits are 30 ({plus minus}15) ft thick and 2,500 ({plus minus}500) ft wide. Splay deposits are up to 30 ft thick proximal to channels and extend as much as 2 mi from channels. Channel-fill and associated splay sandstones are reservoir facies (porosity 20%; permeability = 10s to 100s md); floodplain mudstones and levee sandy mudstones are barriers to flow facies separating individual reservoirs vertically and laterally. The E41/Bertram reservoir is an example of a laterally stacked channel system deposited during relatively slow aggradation. This reservoir includes sand-on-sand contacts and is composed of mostly leaky compartments. The E 18/6,020-ft, E21/6,050-ft, and E31/6,100ft reservoirs are examples of vertically stacked channel systems reflecting higher rates of aggradation. Vertically stacked architectures are more favorable for isolated compartments and therefore are better candidates for infield reserve growth.

Kerr, D.R. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (USA))

1990-09-01

360

Annotated bibliography of the Ardmore and Marietta basins - Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

This bibliography contains 828 records related to the geology of the Ardmore and Marietta basins, Oklahoma. Specific topics include, but are not limited to: coal, petroleum, and natural gas deposits; mineralogy; lithology; paleontology; petrology; stratigraphy; tectonics; electric logs; fossils;geophysics; geologic structures; uranium deposits; and ground water. The subject index provides listings of records related to each county and the geologic

1982-01-01

361

Archaeological Investigations at Clayton Lake, Southeast Oklahoma. Phase II.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The results of excavations and analyses at five prehistoric sites in Pushmataha County, Oklahoma are described in this report. The fieldwork was conducted between July and October 1979. These sites (34Pu-74, 34Pu-100, 34Pu-102, 34Pu-105, and 34Pu-111) wil...

R. Vehik S. J. Bobalik C. Lintz

1982-01-01

362

Hydrologic and geologic data for the Edwards Aquifer Recharge Zone near Georgetown, Williamson County, Texas, 1986-87  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report presents a compilation and summary of data related to the interchange of water between the Edwards aquifer and streams, and to the hydraulics of vertical movement of water in the Georgetown Limestone in the Georgetown area of Williamson County. It presents hydrologic, geologic, hydraulic, physical, and water quality data collected from selected wells and stream sites in the study area from January 1986 to June 1987. Included are the results from six streamflow gain and loss surveys, two groundwater level surveys representing low and high water-level conditions, inorganic chemical analyses of water from selected wells and streams, and bulk specific gravity and permeability tests of cores taken at three test well sites. Water level altitudes differed by an average of 38 feet between low and high water-level conditions in the confined zone, and by an average of 13 feet in the unconfined zone. Dissolved solids of water from selected wells ranged from 320 to 1,300 milligrams per liter and from 251 to 290 milligrams per liter in water from selected streams. (USGS)

Dorsey, M. E.; Slagle, D. L.

1987-01-01

363

Site study plan for EDBH (Engineering Design Boreholes) seismic surveys, Deaf Smith County site, Texas: Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This site study plan describes seismic reflection surveys to run north-south and east-west across the Deaf Smith County site, and intersecting near the Engineering Design Boreholes (EDBH). Both conventional and shallow high-resolution surveys will be run. The field program has been designed to acquire subsurface geologic and stratigraphic data to address information/data needs resulting from Federal and State regulations and Repository program requirements. The data acquired by the conventional surveys will be common-depth- point, seismic reflection data optimized for reflection events that indicate geologic structure near the repository horizon. The data will also resolve the basement structure and shallow reflection events up to about the top of the evaporite sequence. Field acquisition includes a testing phase to check/select parameters and a production phase. The field data will be subjected immediately to conventional data processing and interpretation to determine if there are any anamolous structural for stratigraphic conditions that could affect the choice of the EDBH sites. After the EDBH's have been drilled and logged, including vertical seismic profiling, the data will be reprocessed and reinterpreted for detailed structural and stratigraphic information to guide shaft development. The shallow high-resulition seismic reflection lines will be run along the same alignments, but the lines will be shorter and limited to immediate vicinity of the EDBH sites. These lines are planned to detect faults or thick channel sands that may be present at the EDBH sites. 23 refs. , 7 figs., 5 tabs.

Hume, H.

1987-12-01

364

Herps of Texas  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Funded by the University of Texas and the Texas Memorial Museum, this Website offers useful life history information on the Herps (lizards, turtles, snakes, crocodilians, salamanders, frogs, and toads) of Texas. Each broad group is further classified into Families, and each species is identified by scientific (Latin) and common name. To access descriptive and graphical information, click on the species of choice. Each species entry includes one or more color photograph(s), diagnostic features, natural history information, and a color range map (presence:absence, by county). The concise information in this useful resource should be helpful to seasoned researchers and beginners, alike.

365

Texas Historic Sites Atlas  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Most everything is a bit bigger down around the Rio Grande, and the Texas Historic Sites Atlas fits neatly into that bit of folk wisdom about things in the Lone Star state. All told, the Atlas contains close to 300,000 historic and archaeological site records documenting Texas history. As all of this information is linked up to mapping software, visitors can find a historic site's location and its current condition. To give users a sense of what they can locate here, the database includes records for Texas Historical Markers, county courthouses, cemeteries, and even the fabled East Texas sawmills. For persons with a penchant for historic preservation, cultural geography, or just the state of Texas, this site is a real treat.

366

Site study plan for Exploratory shaft facilities design foundation boreholes (shaft surface facility foundation borings), Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Surface-based geotechnical field program: Preliminary draft  

SciTech Connect

This site study plan describes the Exploratory Shaft Facilities (ESF) Design Foundation Boreholes field activities to be conducted during early stages of Site Characterization at the Deaf Smith County, Texas, site. The field program has been designed to provide data useful in addressing information/data needs resulting from federal/state/local regulations, and repository program requirements. Approximately 50 foundation boreholes will be drilled within the ESP location to provide data necessary for design of the ESF and to satisfy applicable shaft permitting requirements. Soils and subsurface rock will be sampled as the foundation boreholes are advanced. Soil samples or rock core will be taken through the Blackwater Draw and Ogallala Formations and the Dockum Group. Hydrologic testing will be performed in boreholes that penetrates the water table. In-situ elastic properties will be determined from both the soil strata and rock units along the length of the boreholes. Field methods/tests are chosen that provide the best or only means of obtaining the required data. The Salt Repository Project (SRP) Networks specify the schedule under which the program will operate. Drilling will not begin until after site ground water baseline conditions have been established. The Technical Field Services Contractor is responsible for conducting the field program of drilling and testing. Samples and data will be handled and reported in accordance with established SRP procedures. A quality assurance program will be utilized to assure that activities affecting quality are performed correctly and that the appropriate documentation is maintained. 25 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1987-12-01

367

An integrated study of the Grayburg/San Andres Reservoir, Foster and South Cowden Fields, Ector County, Texas. Annual report, August 1, 1996--July 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this two-phase study is to demonstrate an integrated methodology for reservoir characterization of shallow shelf carbonate reservoir that is feasible, and cost effective for the independent operator. Furthermore, it will provide one of the first public demonstrations of the enhancement of reservoir characterization using high-resolution three dimensional (3D) seismic data. This particular project is evaluating the Grayburg and San Andres reservoirs in the Foster and South Cowden Fields, Ector County, Texas. This 68 year old field was approaching its economic limit and the leases evaluated would have been abandoned in 10 years. A multidisciplinary approach to waterflood design and implementation, along with the addition of reserves by selective infill drilling and deepening, is being applied to this field. This approach in reservoir development will be applicable to a wide range of shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs throughout the US. The first phase of the project included the design, acquisition, and interpretation of the 3D seismic survey, the collection and evaluation of geologic (core and log) data, and engineering (historical production, well test, injection) data from a variety of sources. From this work, a geologically based production history model was simulated. Based on the recommendations made at the end of Phase One, three new wells were drilled, one existing well was deepened, two wells were worked over, one TA`d well was re-entered, and one well was converted to injection. In addition, the quality of the injection water was greatly improved, a step necessary prior to increasing injection in the project area. The realignment of the waterflood and all additional well work await the completion of the seismic based history match and engineering simulation.

Trentham, R.C.; Weinbrandt, R.; Robinson, W.

1997-12-01

368

Use of aquifer stratigraphy for building numerical models of groundwater flow: Case study of the heterogeneous Gulf Coast Aquifer in Matagorda and Wharton Counties, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Deterministic models of groundwater flow require assigned values of hydrological properties. Assigning hydraulic properties on the basis of spatial stratigraphic variables such as sand-bed thickness allows hydrologic properties to be continuously distributed for simulation of aquifer heterogeneity. Aquifer stratigraphy, hydrologic properties, and groundwater availability are complexly interrelated in the heterogeneous Gulf Coast aquifer. The aquifer is made of a coastward-thickening wedge of Pliocene and Pleistocene formations deposited in fluvial meander-belt, fluvio-deltaic, and wave-dominated delta systems. To evaluate groundwater resources in the aquifer underlying Matagorda and Wharton counties, Texas, a quasi-three-dimensional numerical model that accounts for aquifer heterogeneity was based on detailed maps and cross sections of sand-bed distribution, hydraulic head, and hydrochemical facies. Transmissivity, storativity, and compaction potential were initially assigned to model blocks as functions of sand percentage mapped for each aquifer unit. Transmissivity, vertical conductance, river leakage rates, and head-dependent recharge and discharge rates were then adjusted to match simulated and {open_quotes}observed prepumping{close_quotes} hydraulic heads. With future pumping rates assumed to be as much as 639,000 ac-ft/yr through 2030, average drawdown rate might reach 1.2 to 2 ft/yr by 2000 but decrease to about 0.5 ft/yr by 2020. Hydraulic head might decline in some areas by another 110 to 240 ft, falling to elevations below the tops of confined aquifers. Land-surface subsidence might increase locally to as much as 2.5 ft by 2030. The model indicates that 18% of the decrease in stored water is nonrecoverable because of clay-bed compaction.

Dutton, A.R. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1994-09-01

369

Comparison of irrigation pumpage and change in water storage of the High Plains Aquifer in Castro and Parmer counties, Texas, 1975-83  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An understanding of the relationship between irrigation pumpage and change in groundwater storage was needed to quantify the amount of water returning to the High Plains aquifer as a result of intensive irrigation in Castro and Parmer Counties, Texas. Irrigation pumpage for the 9-yr period, 1975-83, was estimated by using the Blaney-Criddle consumptive-use formula adjusted by a factor to account for irrigation demand and field-measured crop applications. Total estimated pumpage for the 9-yr period was 11,269,000 acre-ft and 8,914,000 acre-ft. The estimated pumpage was based on reported crop acreage data and LANDSAT acreage data, respectively. Aquifer storage for the same period was estimated as the product of specific yield, net water level change, and area. Change in storage was 5,168,00 acre-ft. Many of the areas of the largest change in storage also were the areas of the largest saturated thickness. The only locations that did not experience substantial water level declines were the northwest and northeast parts of the study area. A comparison was made of water returning to the aquifer by calculating the difference between irrigation pumpage and the change in aquifer storage. Two estimates of this comparison, expressed as a percentage of irrigation pumpage, were obtained on the basis of two different sources of acreage data. This comparison was 54% of pumpage based on reported crop acreage data and 42% of pumpage based on LANDSAT interpreted acreage data. (Author 's abstract)

Mackey, G. W.

1987-01-01

370

Oklahoma Climate Data  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Produced by the Oklahoma Climatological Survey, the Oklahoma Climate Data Web site offers information on various weather topics for the state that include normals and extremes, a rainfall update, monthly summaries, climate event summaries, and a weather timeline. The data is presented in tables, charts, illustrations, or Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) files (e.g., the timeline that goes back to 1900). A very interesting collection of facts, this site is a great example of a public agency offering quality information of their work to the public.

1996-01-01

371

Oklahoma Biological Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Associated with the state of Oklahoma and the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Oklahoma, this Web site provides a wealth of information on the flora, fauna, and ecological communities found throughout the state. The site offers a variety of databases and literature collections on a variety of subjects including rare species, woody plants, breeding birds, and much more. The site is easy to navigate, and most searches can be executed simply. Some general information on biodiversity and tips on information sources for the non-specialist make this site valuable to a broader audience.

1969-12-31

372

Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the High Plains Aquifer in western Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

ARC/INFO export files This diskette contains digitized aquifer boundaries and maps of hydraulic conductivity, recharge, and ground-water level elevation contours for the High Plains aquifer in western Oklahoma. This area encompasses the panhandle counties of Cimarron, Texas, and Beaver, and the western counties of Harper, Ellis, Woodward, Dewey, and Roger Mills. The High Plains aquifer underlies approximately 7,000 square miles of Oklahoma and is used extensively for irrigation. The High Plains aquifer is a water-table aquifer and consists predominately of the Tertiary-age Ogallala Formation and overlying Quaternary-age alluvial and terrace deposits. In some areas the aquifer is absent and the underlying Triassic, Jurassic, or Cretaceous-age rocks are exposed at the surface. These rocks are hydraulically connected with the aquifer in some areas. The High Plains aquifer is composed of interbedded sand, siltstone, clay, gravel, thin limestones, and caliche. The proportion of various lithological materials changes rapidly from place to place, but poorly sorted sand and gravel predominate. The rocks are poorly to moderately well cemented by calcium carbonate. The aquifer boundaries, hydraulic conductivity, and recharge data sets were created by extracting geologic contact lines from published digital surficial geology maps based on a scale of 1:125,000 for the panhandle counties and 1:250,000 for the western counties. The water-level elevation contours and some boundary lines were digitized from maps in a published water-level elevation map for 1980 based on a scale of 1:250,000. The hydraulic conductivity and recharge values in this report were used as input to the ground-water flow model on the High Plains aquifer. Ground-water flow models are numerical representations that simplify and aggregate natural systems. Models are not unique; different combinations of aquifer characteristics may produce similar results. Therefore, values of hydraulic conductivity and recharge used in the model and presented in this data set are not precise, but are within a reasonable range when compared to independently collected data.

Becker, C. J.; Runkle, D. L.; Rea, Alan

1997-01-01

373

Comparative analysis of wind energy production in Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Scope and method of study. In the last decades humanity has realized the necessity of developing alternative energy sources for its efficient economic development and simple survival in the future. During the last 30 years major improvements were made in renewable energy technologies and they started to become competitive with traditional energy sources (fossil fuels), especially with consideration of external costs. Among the renewable energy sources, wind energy is one of the cheapest and fastest growing nowadays. Oklahoma is a very promising site for wind energy development considering its excellent wind resources. Developing wind energy can allow not only electricity production for in-state consumption, but also exporting to other states. The development of wind energy could encourage economic growth with very few adverse impacts on the environment. However, traditional energy sources are still the cheapest and, thus, the introduction of the wind energy in Oklahoma should be critically analyzed from economic, ecological and social points of view. The goal of this study is to conduct analysis of wind energy electricity production in Oklahoma on the four main stages: (1) Investment Analysis from Private Perspective: Calculate present value net benefits for wind energy and traditional energy (natural gas), make sure that both of them are positive. (2) Investment Analysis from Social Perspective: Evaluate present value net private benefits (PVNPB) and present value net social benefit from both projects (PVNSB). (3) Government Subsidy Analysis: recognize the necessity of the subsidies and evaluate the amount of subsidies if any. (4) Investment Analysis from a Geographic Perspective: determine economic feasibility of wind power generation for 77 Oklahoma counties. Findings and conclusions. The final output of the study is the recommendations concerning wind energy development in Oklahoma with consideration of economic efficiency, ecological and social impacts. Study not only analyze possibilities for wind energy development in the state, but make recommendations on the county by county basis with consideration of wind power density, land cost, property tax and infrastructure development in each county.

Ermilova, Ekaterina Alexeevna

374

Oklahoma Forest Industries, 1978.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Oklahoma supplied 73 million cu ft of roundwood to forest industries in 1978, an increase of 13 percent since 1972, and 35 percent since 1975 (fig. 1). Pine made up four-fifths of the total. Sawlogs and pulpwood were the major products, accounting for 81 ...

J. G. Jones V. A. Rudis

1978-01-01

375

Wolfcampian fusulinid biostratigraphy of the Edwards Plateau, central Texas  

SciTech Connect

Seven late Paleozoic inliers are shown on various published maps to occur in three areas of the Edwards Plateau of central Texas. Two of these inliers are early Wolfcampian (Permian) and contain a rich, well preserved, undescribed fusulinacean fauna including Pseudoschwagerina, Paraschwagerina, and Leptotriticities. These inliers are near the eastern boundary of Sutton County in the beds of Epps and West Copperas creeks. The carbonate rock of these inliers consist of thin to medium bedded wackestone and grainstone. A sponge-bryozoan-crinoid mound and a phylloid algal mound or bank are present in the Epps Creek section. Other fossils include gastropods, corals, brachiopods, smaller foraminifers, and conodonts. Depositional setting is interpreted to have been in the shallow, normal marine, middle shelf of the southern Eastern Shelf of the Midland Basin. These inliers are dominated by carbonate deposition with much less terrigenous clastic input than is characteristic of most exposures of Eastern Shelf rocks. Fusulinid correlations can be made with similar faunas from the middle part of the Wichita Group of north-central Texas and the middle part of the Council Grove Group of Oklahoma and Kansas. Other correlations can be made with rocks in the Hueco and Glasss mountains, the Eastern Shelf, and the Big Hatchet Mountains of New Mexico. Several species resemble forms described from Asiatic fusulinacean faunas of Asselian age.

Ford, J.W.; Nestell, M.

1988-01-01

376

Terlinguacreekite, Hg32+O2 Cl2, a new mineral species from the Perry pit, Mariposa mine, Terlingua mining district, Brewster County, Texas, U.S.A  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Terlinguacreekite, ideally Hg32+O2 Cl2, has a very pronounced subcell that is orthorhombic, space-group choices Imam, Imcm, Ima2 and 12cm, with unit-cell parameters refined from powder data: a 6.737(3), b 25.528(10), c 5.533(2) A??, V951.6(6) A??3, a:b:c 0.2639:1:0.2167, Z=8. The true symmetry, supercell unit-cell parameters, and details regarding the crystal structure are unknown. The strongest nine lines of the X-ray powder-diffraction pattern [d in A?? (I)(subcell hkl)] are: 5.413(30)(011), 4.063(80)(121), 3.201(50)(080), 3.023(50)(161), 2.983(60)(240), 2.858(30)(211), 2.765(50)(002), 2.518(100b)(091, 251) and 2.026(30)(242). The mineral is found in an isolated area measuring approximately 1 ?? 0.5 m in the lower level of the Perry pit, Mariposa mine, Terlingua mining district, Brewster County, Texas (type locality), as mm-sized anhedral dark orange to reddish orange crusts of variable thickness on calcite, and rarely as 0.5 mm-sized aggregates of crystals of the same color. It has also been identified at the McDermitt mine, Humboldt County, Nevada, U.S.A., where it occurs with kleinite and calomel in silicified volcanic rocks and sediments. Terlinguacreekite is a secondary phase, most probably formed from the alteration of primary cinnabar or native mercury. At Terlingua, most crusts are thin, almost cryptocrystalline, with no discernable forms, and are resinous and translucent to opaque. Crystals are up to 0.2 mm in length, subhedral, acicular to prismatic, elongation [001], with a maximum length-to-width ratio of 4:1. They are vitreous, transparent, and some crystals have brightly reflecting faces, which may be {010} and {110}. The streak is yellow, and the mineral is brittle with an uneven fracture, no observable cleavage, and is soft, nonfluorescent under both long- and short-wave ultraviolet light. D (calc.) is 9.899 g/cm3 (empirical formula). Material from the McDermitt mine is reversibly photosensitive, and turns from vivid orange to black in strong light. In reflected plane-polarized light, it is bluish grey, with very weak (in air) to distinct (in oil) bireflectance, nonpleochroic, and distinctly anisotropic, with colors masked by ubiquitous yellowish orange to orange internal reflections. Measured values of reflectance obtained in air and in oil are tabulated. Averaged results of electron-microprobe analysis give HgO 92.03, Cl 9.54, Br 1.22, sum 102.79, less O = Cl + Br 2.28, total 100.51 wt.%. The empirical formula is Hg2+3.00O2.00(Cl1.90Br0.11) ??2.01, based on O + Cl + Br = 4 atoms per formula unit. The mineral name recalls the creek that flows through the Terlingua mining district and into the Rio Grande River.

Roberts, A. C.; Gault, R. A.; Paar, W. H.; Cooper, M. A.; Hawthorne, F. C.; Burns, P. C.; Cisneros, S.; Foord, E. E.

2005-01-01

377

Origin and Characteristics of Discahrge at San Marcos Springs Based on Hydrologic and Geochemical Data (2008-10), Bexar, Comal, and Hays Counties, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Edwards aquifer in south-central Texas is a productive and important water resource. Several large springs issuing from the aquifer are major discharge points, popular locations for recreational activities, and habitat for threatened and endangered sp...

C. L. Crow M. Musgrove

2012-01-01

378

Effects of Brush Management on the Hydrologic Budget and Water Quality in and Adjacent to Honey Creek State Natural Area, Comal County, Texas, 2001-10.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service, the Edwards Region Grazing Lands Conservation Initiative, the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board, the San Antonio ...

J. R. Banta R. N. Slattery

2011-01-01

379

Oklahoma DOE EPSCoR Trainees.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report presents the results of the State of Oklahoma DOE EPSCOR Traineeship program. The program was carried out at the three major research universities in the state: the University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma State University, and the University of Tulsa...

R. C. Knox

2000-01-01

380

76 FR 24555 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00045  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...24555-24556] [FR Doc No: 2011-10490... 12536 and 12537] Oklahoma Disaster OK-00045...disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-1970-DR...Injury Loans Only): Oklahoma: Bryan, Choctaw...Disaster Assistance. [FR Doc. 2011-10490...

2011-05-02

381

Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History & Culture  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The 46th state, Oklahoma, presents its unusual history with the online version of The Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. The Encyclopedia was prepared by over 500 "university-based scholars and independent historians and scholars," and was a joint effort by The Oklahoma Historical Society and Oklahoma State University Library Electronic Publishing Center. Visitors can click on the "Table of Contents" link near the bottom of the homepage to "Browse Entries Alphabetically", "Browse Entries Chronologically", or "Browse Entries by Subject". Browsing via chronology introduces visitors to Oklahoma starting with the "Precontact Era", through the "Westward Expansion" and on to "Twentieth Century to Present". Subject categories include "African Americans", "Farming", "Military", and "Petroleum". When searching, visitors will be taken to the Electronic Publishing Center Search Page, so they will need to choose the specific collection, Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture, from the drop down box, to confine the search to the Encyclopedia.

382

Differential alcohol-related mortality among American Indian tribes in Oklahoma, 1968-1978  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tribal differences in alcohol-related mortality were examined among 11 Indian tribes living in Oklahoma. Data on alcohol-related deaths from 1968 to 1978 were compiled and assigned to various tribes on the basis of population distributions by county. Results showed significant differences in alcohol-related mortality among the various tribes. Of the 267,238 total deaths in Oklahoma during the study period, 9.3%

Charles M. Christian; Mary Dufour; Darryl Bertolucci

1989-01-01

383

Oklahoma Healthy Homes Initiative  

PubMed Central

Compelling scientific evidence suggests that a strong association exists between housing-related hazards and the health and safety of their residents. Health, safety, and environmental hazards (such as asthma and allergy triggers), unintentional injury hazards, lead-based paint hazards, and poor indoor air quality are interrelated with substandard housing conditions. This article describes a Healthy Homes initiative to address these hazards in a coordinated fashion in the home, rather than taking a categorical approach, even in the presence of multiple hazards. It also provides an overview of Oklahoma's Healthy Homes initiative and its pilot project, the Tulsa Safe and Healthy Housing Project, which is currently administered in Tulsa in collaboration with Children First, Oklahoma's Nurse-Family Partnership program. This pilot project seeks to open new areas of research that can lead to a greater understanding of environmental health issues related to substandard housing in the United States, which will eventually make homes safer and healthier.

Khan, Fahad

2011-01-01

384

USGS Water Resources of Oklahoma  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS): Water Resources of Oklahoma contains hydrologic data; information on current state water-resource projects; USGS maps and aerial photo images; USGS publications and presentations; technical resources; and information on the general climate and water quality monitoring programs. There is also a form for making water data requests; a drought watch for Oklahoma; analysis of daily and monthly water conditions for Oklahoma; and a Water Science for Schools site.

385

THREATENED FISHES OF OKLAHOMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

A survey of museum coUecdoos aod recent inteDSive c:ollectiq throqbout Oklahoma have revealed a Dumber of fish species to be threateD.ed by mao·, aetiYities. AD lUUlOCated list of the 34 forms c:oosidered threatened in the ._ is presented. Five species are believed to be rare and endaqered. Hopefallyz dariJicaeion of the scatus of these 34 forms will aid in their

Henry W. Robison; George A. Moore; Rudolph J. Miller

386

Sulfate and chloride concentrations in Texas aquifers.  

PubMed

Median sulfate and chloride concentrations in groundwater were calculated for 244 Texas counties from measurements at 8236 water wells. The data were mapped and analyzed with a geographic information system (GIS). Concentration clusters for both solutes were highest in north-central, west, and south Texas. Thirty-four counties had median sulfate levels above the secondary standard of 250 mg/L, and 31 counties registered median chloride concentrations above 250 mg/L. County median concentrations ranged from < 1.5 to 1,953 mg/L for sulfate, and from 6 to 1,275 mg/L for chloride. Various factors contribute to high sulfate and chloride levels in Texas aquifers, including mineral constitutents of aquifers, seepage of saline water from nearby formations, coastal saltwater intrusion, irrigation return flow, and oil/gas production. Ten counties in central and northeast Texas lack data and warrant additional monitoring. PMID:11345739

Hudak, P F

2000-08-01

387

Geologic factors which may affect gas occurrence in Anadarko Basin, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Anadarko Basin in Oklahoma, the Texas Panhandle, and in SW. Kansas contains many reservoirs which produce commercial quantities of gas with subordinate quantities of oil. The producing formations are Permian; Upper, Middle, and Lower Pennsylvanian; Upper and middle Mississippian; Hunton; and Ordovician. Each of these groupings can be considered a genetic stratigraphic unit in which the depositional and structural

1971-01-01

388

Social Security Reform: Experience of the Alternate Plans in Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In 1981, the employees of three Texas counties-Galveston, Matagorda, and Brazoria-withdrew from Social Security. The counties replaced Social Security with a system of individual accounts that provided retirement, survivor, and disability benefits. Under ...

1999-01-01

389

A conceptual model of the hydrogeologic framework, geochemistry, and groundwater-flow system of the Edwards-Trinity and related aquifers in the Pecos County region, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A conceptual model of the hydrogeologic framework, geochemistry, and groundwater-flow system of the Edwards-Trinity and related aquifers, which include the Pecos Valley, Igneous, Dockum, Rustler, and Capitan Reef aquifers, was developed as the second phase of a groundwater availability study in the Pecos County region in west Texas. The first phase of the study was to collect and compile groundwater, surface-water, water-quality, geophysical, and geologic data in the area. The third phase of the study involves a numerical groundwater-flow model of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer in order to simulate groundwater conditions based on various groundwater-withdrawal scenarios. Resource managers plan to use the results of the study to establish management strategies for the groundwater system. The hydrogeologic framework is composed of the hydrostratigraphy, structural features, and hydraulic properties of the groundwater system. Well and geophysical logs were interpreted to define the top and base surfaces of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer units. Elevations of the top and base of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer generally decrease from the southwestern part of the study area to the northeast. The thicknesses of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer units were calculated using the interpolated top and base surfaces of the hydrostratigraphic units. Some of the thinnest sections of the aquifer were in the eastern part of the study area and some of the thickest sections were in the Pecos, Monument Draw, and Belding-Coyanosa trough areas. Normal-fault zones, which formed as growth and collapse features as sediments were deposited along the margins of more resistant rocks and as overlying sediments collapsed into the voids created by the dissolution of Permian-age evaporite deposits, were delineated based on the interpretation of hydrostratigraphic cross sections. The lowest aquifer transmissivity values were measured in the eastern part of the study area; the highest transmissivity values were measured in a faulted area of the Monument Draw trough. Hydraulic conductivity values generally exhibited the same trends as the transmissivity values. Groundwater-quality data and groundwater-level data were used in context with the hydrogeologic framework to assess the chemical characteristics of water from different sources, regional groundwater-flow paths, recharge sources, the mixing of water from different sources, and discharge in the study area. Groundwater-level altitudes generally decrease from southwest to northeast and regional groundwater flow is from areas of recharge south and west to the north and northeast. Four principal sources of recharge to the Edwards-Trinity aquifer were identified: (1) regional flow that originated as recharge northwest of the study area, (2) runoff from the Barilla, Davis, and Glass Mountains, (3) return flow from irrigation, and (4) upwelling from deeper aquifers. Results indicated Edwards-Trinity aquifer water in the study area was dominated by mineralized, regional groundwater flow that most likely recharged during the cooler, wetter climates of the Pleistocene with variable contributions of recent, local recharge. Groundwater generally flows into the down-dip extent of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer where it discharges into overlying or underlying aquifer units, discharges from springs, discharges to the Pecos River, follows a regional flow path east out of the study area, or is withdrawn by groundwater wells. Structural features such as mountains, troughs, and faults play a substantial role in the distribution of recharge, local and regional groundwater flow, spring discharge, and aquifer interaction.

Bumgarner, Johnathan R.; Stanton, Gregory P.; Teeple, Andrew P.; Thomas, Jonathan V.; Houston, Natalie A.; Payne, Jason D.; Musgrove, MaryLynn

2012-01-01

390

34. At Willard, Oklahoma Road north of Willard Road, at ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

34. At Willard, Oklahoma Road north of Willard Road, at the site of the former Cook House for Willard Mill (upper mill that cut cants for Broughton Lumber Company's flume). Section of feeder after Lava Creek, looking down flume. Note extra large size of "V" in water supply vs. cant portions of flume. South/southeast 170 degrees. - Broughton Flume, Hood River Junction on Columbia River at Washington/Oregon border, Hood, Skamania County, WA

391

Oklahoma Pediatric Injury Control Project.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of the Oklahoma Pediatric Injury Control Project was to increase the functional capacity of the Maternal and Child Health Service of the Oklahoma State Department of Health to address the problem of pediatric injuries. The objectives of the pr...

M. L. Brown

1994-01-01

392

Backtalk: Adult Services in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Describes projects of Oklahoma libraries designed to combat the problem of illiteracy among adults and explains Oklahoma Image, a humanities effort aimed at attracting out-of-school adults to public libraries by focusing on the state's multicultural heritage. Column also reports adult service news from other states. (JD)|

Giblon, Della L.; Henke, Esther Mae

1980-01-01

393

Coal-bed methane resources in Arkoma basin, southeastern Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

A major federal tax incentive for unconventional gas production has interested entrepreneurs, geologists, and engineers in the occurrence and distribution of coal-bed methane resources in the Arkoma basin. Because the methane is trapped in coal beds, geology of the coal resources also has received renewed attention. The Arkoma basin contains most of the coal-bed methane resources in Oklahoma: 76% of the 7.9 billion short tons of the remaining, identified Middle Pennsylvanian coal resources of the state. This paper briefly reviews previous estimates of coal-bed methane resources in Oklahoma and presents an updated estimate for Haskell and LeFlore Counties and a new estimate for Latimer County. Rieke and Kirr indicated that 2.8 tcf of coal-bed methane is present in 10 coals in eight Oklahoma counties of the Arkoma basin, 500-3,000 ft deep. Iannacchione and Puglio estimated that a maximum of 1.5 tcf of coal-bed methane occurs in the Hartshorne coals in Haskell and LeFlore Counties from 500-3,000 ft deep. The present investigation shows that the Hartshorne and 11 other coals contain at least 1.8 tcf of coal-bed methane resources, based on identified coal resources 500-3,000 ft deep in Haskell, Latimer, and LeFlore Counties. An additional 1.2 tcf of coal-bed methane resources occur in the Hartshorne and four other coals from 3,000-7,000 ft deep, based on assumed stratigraphic and thickness continuity. Thus, a revised estimate indicates that Haskell, Latimer, and LeFlore Counties alone contain about 3 tcf of coal-bed methane resources in 12 coal beds from 500-7,000 ft deep. Undoubtedly additional coal-bed methane resources are present in the westernmost part of the Arkoma basin.

Friedman, S.A. (Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman (USA))

1989-08-01

394

78 FR 32007 - Environmental Impact Statement for Tulsa-Oklahoma City Passenger Rail Corridor, Oklahoma, Lincoln...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Statement for Tulsa--Oklahoma City Passenger Rail Corridor, Oklahoma, Lincoln, Creek...Oklahoma Department of Transportation (ODOT) Rail Division intend to prepare an EIS pursuant...for the State of Oklahoma High-Speed Rail Initiative: Tulsa--Oklahoma City...

2013-05-28

395

Evaluation and Rehabilitation of Historic Metal Truss Bridges: A Case Study of an Off-System Historic Metal Truss Bridge in Shackelford County, Texas. (Revised).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report documents the results of a case study of an off-system historic metal truss bridge in Texas. Off-system bridges are not on the state highway system and are typically located on country roads or city streets. There are a large number of older o...

D. E. Leary D. R. Manier M. D. Engelhardt

2003-01-01

396

An integrated study of the Grayburg/San Andres Reservoir, Foster and South Cowden Fields, Ector County, Texas. Quarterly technical progress report No. 3, February 1, 1995--April 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study is to demonstrate a methodology for reservoir characterization of shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs which is feasible for the independent operator. Furthermore, it will provide one of the first public demonstrations of the enhancement of reservoir characterization using high resolution 3-D seismic data. This particular project will evaluate the Grayburg and San Andres reservoirs in the Foster and South Cowden Fields of Ector County, Texas. We intend to showcase a multi-disciplinary approach to waterflood design and implementation, along with the addition of reserves by selective infill drilling. We believe this approach in reservoir development will be applicable to a wide range of shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs throughout the United States. Technology transfer will take place through all phases of the project. Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: geological; reservoir engineering; and geophysics.

Reeves, J.J.; Rowland, D.A.; Trentham, R.C.

1995-08-01

397

76 FR 28841 - Texas Disaster # TX-00376  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Texas dated 05/09/2011. Incident: Wichita County Complex Wildfires. Incident Period: 04/15/2011 through 04/20/2011. Effective Date: 05/09/2011. Physical Loan...

2011-05-18

398

75 FR 48384 - Texas Disaster #TX-00361  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Starr, Val Verde, Webb, Zapata. Contiguous Counties (Economic Injury Loans Only): Texas: Brooks, Crockett, Dimmit Duval, Edwards, Kenedy, Kinney La Salle Mcmullen, Sutton, Terrell, Uvalde, Willacy, Zavala. The Interest Rates...

2010-08-10

399

Environmental Assessment for Central Power and Light Company`s proposed Military Highway-CFE tie 138/69-kV transmission line project Brownsville, Cameron County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Central Power and Light Company (CPL) intends to upgrade its existing transmission line ties with the Commision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) system in Mexico. CPL currently has a single 69-kilovolt (kV) transmission line in the Brownsville area which connects CPL`s system with the system of CFE. This existing line runs between the Brownsville Switching Station, located on Laredo Road in Brownsville, Cameron County, Texas, and an existing CFE 69-kV line at the Rusteberg Bend of the Rio Grande in Cameron County. Under current conditions of need, the existing 69-kV line does not possess sufficient capability to engage in appropriate power exchanges. Therefore, CPL is proposing to build a new line to link up with CFE. This proposed line would be a double-circuit line, which would (1) continue (on a slightly relocated route) the existing 69-kV tie from CPL`s Brownsville Switching Station to CFE`s facilities, and (2) add a 138-kV tie from the Military Highway Substation, located on Military Highway (US Highway 281), to CFE`s facilities. The proposed 138/69-kV line, which will be constructed and operated by CPL, will be built primarily on steel single-pole structures within an average 60-foot (ft) wide right-of-way (ROW). It will be approximately 6900--9200 ft (1.3--1.7 miles) in length, depending on the alternative route constructed.

Not Available

1992-04-01

400

75 FR 49506 - Texas; Major Disaster and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...disaster exists in the State of Texas. In order to provide Federal...following areas of the State of Texas have been designated as adversely...counties within the State of Texas are eligible to apply for assistance under the Hazard Mitigation Grant Program. The following...

2010-08-13

401

78 FR 50437 - Texas; Major Disaster and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...disaster exists in the State of Texas. In order to provide Federal...following areas of the State of Texas have been designated as adversely...counties within the State of Texas are eligible to apply for assistance under the Hazard Mitigation Grant Program. The following...

2013-08-19

402

Socioeconomic Status and Infant Mortality in Texas, 1970-80.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Results suggested that socioeconomic factors were not major determinants of differences in infant mortality in Texas in the 1970's. Data on live births and infant deaths for 254 Texas counties were obtained from the Texas Department of Health for each of the 11 years from 1970 to 1980. Infant, neonatal, and postneonatal mortality rates were…

Parpia, Banoo; And Others

403

Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Texas, Fire Management Plan, August 2005.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Guadalupe Mountains National Park sits at the southwest end of the Guadalupe Mountains in Hudspeth and Culberson Counties, Texas. The range rises abruptly from Chihuahuan Desert plains on the Texas-New Mexico border about 110 miles east of El Paso, Texas ...

2005-01-01

404

Galveston County Birth Data, 2002  

Microsoft Academic Search

The total of 3,872 county resident births in 2002 was 152 (4%) more than in 2001. Texas births increased 2%. By ethnicity, Galveston County increases were 11% among black residents, 5% among Hispanics, and 2% among all other residents. \\

Warren J. Holland; Chief Operating Officer

405

Distribution of indoor radon concentrations and uranium-bearing rocks in Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to compare regional patterns of indoor radon concentration with uranium-bearing rock zones\\u000a and county populations in Texas. Zones yielding radon concentrations that are relatively high for Texas include shale and\\u000a sandstone in northwest Texas; red beds in north-central Texas; felsic volcanic rocks in west Texas; and sandstone, limestone,\\u000a and igneous rocks in central Texas.

P. F. Hudak

1996-01-01

406

Promoting School Readiness in Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The results of the research, conducted on Oklahoma's universal Pre-kindergarten (Pre-k) program, on children of Tulsa Public Schools (TPS), the largest school district in the state to increase the school readiness are presented.

Gormley, William T., Jr.; Gayer, Ted

2005-01-01

407

Approximate altitude of water levels in wells completed in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers in Fort Bend County and adjacent areas, Texas,January-February 1991  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Measurements of water levels in 106 wells completed in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers were used to construct maps showing the approximate altitude of the piezometric surface of the two aquifers in Fort Bend County and adjacent areas during January and February 1991. (USGS)

Locke, Glenn L.

1993-01-01

408

Health Hazard Evaluation Report: HETA 2001-0496-2866, Oklahoma City Community College, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) received a request for a health hazard evaluation from employees at the Oklahoma City Community College Bookstore on August 13, 2001. Employees were concerned that the temporary location of...

2001-01-01

409

Continued support of the Natural Resources Information System (NRIS) for the State of Oklahoma: Inclusion of a Native American focused effort. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research program was to continue developing, editing, maintaining, utilizing and making publicly available the Oil and Gas Well History file portion of the Natural Resources Information System (NRIS) for the State of Oklahoma, with a special emphasis on the Osage County records through the Osage Tribal council. The NRIS Well history file contains historical and recent completion records for oil and gas wells reported to the Oklahoma Corporation commission on Form 1002-A, and for wells in Osage County that have been reported to the Osage Tribal Council. At the start of this grant, the Well History file contained 378,243 records, providing historical coverage for all of Oklahoma except Osage County. During this grant period, the well record count increased by 33,301, to a new total of 411,544 records. Coverage is now completed for all Oklahoma counties. Through NRIS, the Oklahoma Geological survey (OGS) and the University of Oklahoma (OU) have developed a system with demonstrated value as a data resource for industry exploration and development, policy considerations, scientific research, conservation and other related issues. Because of the ongoing support of the US Department of Energy, the initial development phase of the NRIS Well History has been completed. Through the ongoing support of the federal and state governments as well as industry, it is fully expected that NRIS will continue to be a growing resource for Oklahoma and the nation.

Mankin, C.J. [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States); Banken, M.K. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)

1996-02-29

410

Field project to obtain pressure core, wireline log, and production test data for evaluation of CO/sub 2/ flooding potential. Texas Pacific Bennett Ranch Unit well No. 310, Wasson (San Andres) Field, Yoakum County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The coring, logging and testing of Bennett Ranch Unit well No. 310 was a cooperative effort between Texas Pacific, owner of the well, and Gruy Federal, Inc. The requirements of the contract, which are summarized in Enclosure 1, Appendix A, include drilling and coring activities. The pressure-coring and associated logging and testing programs in selected wells are intended to provide data on in-situ oil saturation, porosity and permeability distribution, and other data needed for resource characterization of fields and reservoirs in which CO/sub 2/ injection might have a high probability of success. This report presents detailed information on the first such project. This project demonstrates the usefulness of integrating pressure core, log and production data to realistically evaluate a reservoir for carbon dioxide flood. The engineering of tests and analysis of such experimental data requires original thinking, but the reliability of the results is higher than data derived from conventional tests.

Swift, T.E.; Goodrich, J.H.; Kumar, R.M.; McCoy, R.L.; Wilhelm, M.H.; Glascock, M.R.

1982-01-01

411

Fossile Energy: Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This work presents work done so far on the Hunton Formation in the West Caney Field in Lincoln County, Oklahoma. This field produces oil and gas from the Hunton Formation. The field was developed starting in 1995. Some of the unique characteristics of the...

M. Kelkar

2001-01-01

412

EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA  

SciTech Connect

The West Carney Field in Lincoln County, Oklahoma is one of few newly discovered oil fields in Oklahoma. Although profitable, the field exhibits several unusual characteristics. These include decreasing water-oil ratios, decreasing gas-oil ratios, decreasing bottomhole pressures during shut-ins in some wells, and transient behavior for water production in many wells. This report explains the unusual characteristics of West Carney Field based on detailed geological and engineering analyses. We propose a geological history that explains the presence of mobile water and oil in the reservoir. The combination of matrix and fractures in the reservoir explains the reservoir's flow behavior. We confirm our hypothesis by matching observed performance with a simulated model and develop procedures for correlating core data to log data so that the analysis can be extended to other, similar fields where the core coverage may be limited.

Mohan Kelkar

2002-03-31

413

Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Hunton formation in Oklahoma has been the subject of attention for the last ten years. The new interest started with the drilling of the West Carney field in 1995 in Lincoln County. Subsequently, many other operators have expanded the search for oil and gas in Hunton formation in other parts of Oklahoma. These fields exhibit many unique production characteristics, including: (1) decreasing water-oil or water-gas ratio over time; (2) decreasing gas-oil ratio followed by an increase; (3) poor prediction capability of the reserves based on the log data; and (4) low geological connectivity but high hydrodynamic connectivity. The purpose of this investigation is to understand the principal mechanisms affecting the production, and propose methods by which we can optimize the production from fields with similar characteristics.

Mohan Kelkar

2007-06-30

414

Healthcare Inspection: Review of a Patient with Pulmonary Embolism Oklahoma City VA Medical Center Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The VA Office of Inspector General (OIG) Office of Healthcare Inspections reviewed allegations of misdiagnosis by providers at the Oklahoma City VA Medical Center, (facility) in Oklahoma City, OK. The purpose of the inspection was to determine if the alle...

2011-01-01

415

76 FR 44345 - Texas; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...declaration for the State of Texas is hereby amended to include the Hazard Mitigation Grant Program for the following...counties in the State of Texas are eligible to apply for...under the Hazard Mitigation Grant Program. The...

2011-07-25

416

76 FR 63938 - Texas; Amendment No. 4 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...declaration for the State of Texas is hereby amended to include the Hazard Mitigation Grant Program and the Public Assistance...counties in the State of Texas are eligible to apply for...under the Hazard Mitigation Grant Program. (The...

2011-10-14

417

Winter Ecology of the Western Burrowing Owl ('Athene cunicularia hypugaea') in Southern Texas 1999-2004.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study examines the winter ecology of the western burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia hypugaea) in five Texas counties surrounding Corpus Christi, in southern Texas. There is a substantial gap in information on the owls life cycle during migration and n...

G. C. Hickman M. C. Woodin M. K. Skoruppa

2007-01-01

418

Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Saldana well No. 2, Zapata County, Texas. Volume I. Completion and testing. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Saldana Well No. 2, approximately 35 miles Southeast of the city of Laredo, Texas, was the sixth successful test of a geopressured-geothermal aquifer under the DOE Wells of Opportunity Program. The well was tested through the annulus between 7-inch casing and 2-3/8 inch tubing. The interval tested was from 9745 to 9820 feet. The geological section was the 1st Hinnant Sand, an upper member of the Wilcox Group. Produced water was injected into the Saldana Well No. 1, which was also acquired from Riddle Oil Company and converted to a disposal well. A Miocene salt water sand was perforated from 3005 to 3100 feet for disposal. One pressure drawdown flow test and one pressure buildup test were conducted during a 10-day period. A total of 9328 barrels of water was produced. The highest sustained flow rate was 1950 BWPD.

Not Available

1981-10-07

419

Final report for the geothermal well site restoration and plug and abandonment of wells: DOE Pleasant Bayou test site, Brazoria County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

For a variety of reasons, thousands of oil and gas wells have been abandoned in the Gulf Coast Region of the United States. Many of these wells penetrated geopressured zones whose resource potential for power generation was undervalued or ignored. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geopressured-Geothermal Research Program was chartered to improve geothermal technology to the point where electricity could be commercially produced from a substantial number of geopressured resource sites. This research program focused on relatively narrow technical issues that are unique to geopressured resources such as the ability to predict reservoir production capacity based on preliminary flow tests. Three well sites were selected for the research program. These are the Willis Hulin and Gladys McCall sites in Louisiana, and the Pleasant Bayou site in Texas. The final phase of this research project consists of plug and abandonment (P&A) of the wells and site restoration.

Rinehart, Ben N.; Seigel, Ben H.

1994-03-13

420

Geoscience/engineering characterization of the interwell environment in carbonate reservoirs based on outcrop analogs, Permian Basin, West Texas and New Mexico - petrophysical characterization of the South Cowden Grayburg Reservoir, Ector County, Texas. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Reservoir performance of the South Cowden Grayburg field suggests that only 21 percent of the original oil in place has been recovered. The purpose of this study is to construct a realistic reservoir model to be used to predict the location of the remaining mobile oil. Construction of reservoir models for fluid-flow simulation of carbonate reservoirs is difficult because they typically have complicated and unpredictable permeability patterns. Much of the difficulty results from the degree to which diagenetic overprinting masks depositional textures and patterns. For example, the task of constructing a reservoir model of a limestone reservoir that has undergone only cementation and compaction is easier than constructing a model of a karsted reservoir that has undergone cavern formation and collapse as well as cementation and compaction. The Permian-age carbonate-ramp reservoirs in the Permian Basin, West Texas and New Mexico, are typically anhydritic dolomitized limestone. Because the dolomitization occurred soon after deposition, depositional fabrics and patterns are often retained, and a reservoir model can be constructed using depositional concepts. Recent studies of the San Andres outcrop in the Guadalupe Mountains and the Seminole San Andres reservoir in the Permian Basin illustrate how depositional fabrics and patterns can be used to construct a reservoir model when depositional features are retained.

Lucia, F.J.

1997-06-01

421

Origin and characteristics of discharge at San Marcos Springs based on hydrologic and geochemical data (2008–10), Bexar, Comal, and Hays Counties, Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Edwards aquifer in south-central Texas is a productive and important water resource. Several large springs issuing from the aquifer are major discharge points, popular locations for recreational activities, and habitat for threatened and endangered species. Discharges from Comal and San Marcos Springs, the first and second largest spring complexes in Texas, are used as thresholds in groundwater management strategies for the Edwards aquifer. Comal Springs is generally understood to be supplied by predominantly regional groundwater flow paths; the hydrologic connection of San Marcos Springs with the regional flow system, however, is less understood. During November 2008–December 2010, a hydrologic and geochemical investigation of San Marcos Springs was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the San Antonio Water System. The primary objective of this study was to define and characterize sources of discharge from San Marcos Springs. During this study, hydrologic conditions transitioned from exceptional drought (the dry period, November 1, 2008 to September 8, 2009) to wetter than normal (the wet period, September 9, 2009 to December 31, 2010), which provided the opportunity to investigate the hydrogeology of San Marcos Springs under a wide range of hydrologic conditions. Water samples were collected from streams, groundwater wells, and springs at and in the vicinity of San Marcos Springs, including periodic (routine) sampling (every 3–7 weeks) and sampling in response to storms. Samples were analyzed for major ions, trace elements, nutrients, and selected stable and radiogenic isotopes (deuterium, oxygen, carbon, strontium). Additionally, selected physicochemical properties were measured continuously at several sites, and hydrologic data were compiled from other USGS efforts (stream and spring discharge). Potential aquifer recharge was evaluated from local streams, and daily recharge or gain/loss estimates were computed for several local streams. Local rainfall and recharge events were compared with physicochemical properties and geochemical variability at San Marcos Springs, with little evidence for dilution by local recharge.

Musgrove, MaryLynn; Crow, Cassi L.

2012-01-01

422

Oklahoma's Federally-Recognized Indian Tribes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document compiles lesson plans, classroom activities, and facts from previous Oklahoma state publications about Oklahoma's American Indian peoples. "Oklahoma's Indian People: Images of Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow" contains brief presentations and related class activities and writing assignments about the histories of approximately 29…

Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City. Indian Education Section.

423

76 FR 23522 - Oklahoma Regulatory Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...OK-033-FOR; Docket ID: OSM-2011-0001] Oklahoma Regulatory Program AGENCY: Office of...receipt of a proposed amendment to the Oklahoma regulatory program under the Surface...Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA or the Act). Oklahoma proposes revisions to its program...

2011-04-27

424

Gender, Crime and Incarceration in Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Why is Oklahoma ranked No. 1 in the rate of incarcerating its female population. Senate Bill No. 810 of the 2003 Legislature created the Special Task Force for Women Incarcerated in Oklahoma to answer that question. The Oklahoma Criminal Justice Resource ...

D. Simpson M. Boling N. Warren L. Byrum

2004-01-01

425

Phylogeographic Structure and Color Pattern Variation among Populations of Plethodon albagula on the Edwards Plateau of Central Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Texas populations of slimy salamanders are isolated from other members of the Plethodon glutinosus complex and are currently placed in the species P. albagula with populations from the Ozark Plateau and Ouachita Mountains of Missouri, Oklahoma, and Arkansas. We sequenced a portion of the mitochondrial protein-coding gene ND4 for 52 P. albagula from 25 localities in Texas and one locality

Amy B. Baird; Jean K. Krejca; James R. Reddell; Colin E. Peden; Meredith J. Mahoney; David M. Hillis; M. J. Lannoo

2006-01-01

426

Geoscience/engineering characterization of the interwell environment in carbonate reservoirs based on outcrop analogs, Permian Basin, West Texas and New Mexico--waterflood performance analysis for the South Cowden Grayburg Reservoir, Ector County, Texas. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A reservoir engineering study was conducted of waterflood performance in the South Cowden field, an Upper Permian Grayburg reservoir on the Central Basin Platform in West Texas. The study was undertaken to understand the historically poor waterflood performance, evaluate three techniques for incorporating petrophysical measurements and geological interpretation into heterogeneous reservoir models, and identify issues in heterogeneity modeling and fluid-flow scaleup that require further research. The approach included analysis of relative permeability data, analysis of injection and production data, heterogeneity modeling, and waterflood simulation. The poor South Cowden waterflood recovery is due, in part, to completion of wells in only the top half of the formation. Recompletion of wells through the entire formation is estimated to improve recovery in ten years by 6 percent of the original oil in place in some areas of the field. A direct three-dimensional stochastic approach to heterogeneity modeling produced the best fit to waterflood performance and injectivity, but a more conventional model based on smooth mapping of layer-averaged properties was almost as good. The results reaffirm the importance of large-scale heterogeneities in waterflood modeling but demonstrate only a slight advantage for stochastic modeling at this scale. All the flow simulations required a reduction to the measured whole-core k{sub v}/k{sub h} to explain waterflood behavior, suggesting the presence of barriers to vertical flow not explicitly accounted for in any of the heterogeneity models. They also required modifications to the measured steady-state relative permeabilities, suggesting the importance of small-scale heterogeneities and scaleup. Vertical flow barriers, small-scale heterogeneity modeling, and relative permeability scaleup require additional research for waterflood performance prediction in reservoirs like South Cowden.

Jennings, J.W. Jr.

1997-05-01

427

Design and Compilation of a Geodatabase of Existing Salinity Information for the Rio Grande Basin, from the Rio Arriba-Sandoval County Line, New Mexico, to Presidio, Texas, 2010  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, compiled salinity-related water-quality data and information in a geodatabase containing more than 6,000 sampling sites. The geodatabase was designed as a tool for water-resource management and includes readily available digital data sources from the U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, New Mexico Interstate Stream Commission, Sustainability of semi-Arid Hydrology and Riparian Areas, Paso del Norte Watershed Council, numerous other State and local databases, and selected databases maintained by the University of Arizona and New Mexico State University. Salinity information was compiled for an approximately 26,000-square-mile area of the Rio Grande Basin from the Rio Arriba-Sandoval County line, New Mexico, to Presidio, Texas. The geodatabase relates the spatial location of sampling sites with salinity-related water-quality data reported by multiple agencies. The sampling sites are stored in a geodatabase feature class; each site is linked by a relationship class to the corresponding sample and results stored in data tables.

Shah, Sachin D.; Maltby, David R. II

2010-01-01

428

Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the work done so far on Hunton Formation in West Carney Field in Lincoln County, Oklahoma. West Carney Field produces oil and gas from the Hunton Formation. The field was developed starting in 1995. Some of the unique characteristics of the field include decreasing water oil and ratio over time, decreasing gas-oil ratio at the beginning of production, inability to calculate oil reserves in the field based on long data, and sustained oil rates over long periods of time.

Kelkar, Mohan

2001-05-08

429

75 FR 55599 - Little River National Wildlife Refuge, McCurtain County, OK; Revised Comprehensive Conservation...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Little River National Wildlife Refuge, McCurtain County, OK; Revised Comprehensive Conservation...National Wildlife Refuge, located in McCurtain County, Oklahoma. We provide this notice...Little River NWR (Refuge), located in McCurtain County, OK. This notice complies...

2010-09-13

430

Fluctuations in densities of the invasive gill parasite Centrocestus formosanus (Trematoda: Heterophyidae) in the Comal River, Comal County, Texas, U.S.A.  

PubMed

Centrocestus formosanus (Trematoda: Heterophyidae) is an invasive fish parasite in the Comal River, Texas, and is considered a threat to the federally endangered fountain darter, Etheostoma fonticola . Monitoring densities of C. formosanus cercariae is crucial to determining levels of infection pressure. We sampled 3 sites in the Comal River during 2 sampling periods, the first during 2006-2007, and again during 2009-2010. Two of the sites were located in the upstream reach of Landa Lake, sites HS and LA, and the third site was located downstream of Landa Lake in the old channel of the river. Cercariae densities were highest at the downstream most site (EA), followed by sites LA and HS, during both sampling periods, but a significant decline in cercariae density was observed between the first and second sampling periods. Several abiotic factors were monitored, including total stream discharge, wading discharge, temperature, and dissolved oxygen, but no river-wide trends were observed. Therefore, we speculate that these factors do not adequately explain the observed long-term decline in cercariae density. We propose that the decline is simply a reflection of a typical pattern followed by most invasive species as they gradually become integrated into the local community following an initial explosive growth in population size. Although cercariae densities may be abating, fountain darters in the Comal River are still threatened by the parasite, and conservation efforts must focus on reducing levels of infection pressure from the parasite whenever possible. PMID:21851264

Johnson, Matthew S; Bolick, Anne; Alexander, Mara; Huffman, David; Oborny, Ed; Monroe, Allen

2011-08-18

431

Researching the Oklahoma City bombing.  

PubMed

The authors present a literature retrieval strategy for investigators who plan to conduct research on the Oklahoma City bombing. To facilitate a comprehensive review of the scholarly research on disasters, mass emergencies, and terrorism, a multidatabase search strategy is strongly encouraged. Secondly, a wealth of current information and data on the bombing are available on "popular" and "news" files. PMID:8643773

Piotrowski, C; Perdue, B

1995-12-01

432

Oklahoma Commercial Fishing Development Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contract commercial fisheries were established in two small recreational and industrial impoundments in Oklahoma to remove over abundant commercial species and evaluate the use of the experimental whip-set trammel net and the 1.2 meter trap net by commerc...

D. L. Combs

1977-01-01

433

Hunton oil and gas fields, Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Panhandle Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Hunton Limestone was discovered to be productive in the Beebe, Okla., area in 1921. Since that time it is estimated that 4,300 Hunton wells in 200 fields have produced 277 million bbl of oil. The largest Hunton field is West Edmond, where 736 wells have produced more than 106 million barrels of oil. The depth of Hunton development ranges

Kunsman

1967-01-01

434

40 CFR 81.344 - Texas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...County, Calhoun County, De Witt County, Duval County, Goliad County, Gonzales...County, Calhoun County, De Witt County, Duval County, GoliadCounty, Gonzales County...CountyCalhoun County DeWitt CountyDuval County Goliad CountyGonzales...

2010-07-01

435

40 CFR 81.344 - Texas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...County, Calhoun County, De Witt County, Duval County, Goliad County, Gonzales...County, Calhoun County, De Witt County, Duval County, GoliadCounty, Gonzales County...CountyCalhoun County DeWitt CountyDuval County Goliad CountyGonzales...

2009-07-01

436

Effects of stratal architecture and diagenesis on reservoir development in the Grayburg formation: SSouth Cowden field, Ector County, Texas. Annual report, 1 October 1994--30 September 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of geological characterization studies in a typical Grayburg reservior in the Permian Basin. The work applies geological models developed in outcrop studies to better constrain the geological reservoir framework and heterogeneity in a typical Grayburg reservoir, The South Cowden Grayburg reservoir. This framework provides a strong basis for defining petrophysical and flow unit properties in the reservior and serves as a prototype model for other Grayburg reservoir characterization studies. The Grayburg Formation in the South Cowden field of eastern Ector County displays an internal stratal architecture that typifies Grayburg shallow-water platform successions throughout the Permian Basin. Study of core and wireline logs in South Cowden field documents three orders of cyclicity in the Grayburg. The entire Grayburg constitutes a single long-duration accommodation cycle that commenced with a major sea-level rise. Two major diagenetic events strongly affect reservoir character in some parts of the field. Recrystallized dolomite is developed along vertical burrows in highly cyclic mud-dominated packstones and wackestones of the HFS 4 Grayburg highstand succussion. Later alteration and removal of anhydrite are focused in structurally low sections along the eastern and southern margins of the field.

Ruppel, S.; Bebout, D.

1996-02-01

437

Abandoned Texas oil fields  

SciTech Connect

Data for Texas abandoned oil fields were primarily derived from two sources: (1) Texas Railroad Commission (TRRC), and (2) Dwight's ENERGYDATA. For purposes of this report, abandoned oil fields are defined as those fields that had no production during 1977. The TRRC OILMASTER computer tapes were used to identify these abandoned oil fields. The tapes also provided data on formation depth, gravity of oil production, location (both district and county), discovery date, and the cumulative production of the field since its discovery. In all, the computer tapes identified 9211 abandoned fields, most of which had less than 250,000 barrel cumulative production. This report focuses on the 676 abandoned onshore Texas oil fields that had cumulative production of over 250,000 barrels. The Dwight's ENERGYDATA computer tapes provided production histories for approximately two-thirds of the larger fields abandoned in 1966 and thereafter. Fields which ceased production prior to 1966 will show no production history nor abandonment date in this report. The Department of Energy hopes the general availability of these data will catalyze the private sector recovery of this unproduced resource.

Not Available

1980-12-01

438

75 FR 32821 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00038  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Disaster Declaration 12194 and 12195] Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00038 AGENCY...of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA--1917--DR), dated 05...disaster declaration for the State of Oklahoma, dated 05/24/2010 is hereby...

2010-06-09

439

75 FR 5015 - Television Broadcasting Services; Oklahoma City, OK  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...RM-11589] Television Broadcasting Services; Oklahoma City, OK AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission...the licensee of KWTV-DT, channel 9, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Griffin requests the substitution of channel...

2010-02-01

440

40 CFR 282.86 - Oklahoma State-Administered Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...following elements submitted to EPA in Oklahoma's program application for final...Underground Storage Tank Program, Oklahoma Corporation Commission, Jim Thorpe Building, Room 238, Oklahoma City, OK 73105. (1) State...

2009-07-01

441

40 CFR 282.86 - Oklahoma State-Administered Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...following elements submitted to EPA in Oklahoma's program application for final...Underground Storage Tank Program, Oklahoma Corporation Commission, Jim Thorpe Building, Room 238, Oklahoma City, OK 73105. (1) State...

2010-07-01

442

40 CFR 282.86 - Oklahoma State-Administered Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...following elements submitted to EPA in Oklahoma's program application for final...Underground Storage Tank Program, Oklahoma Corporation Commission, Jim Thorpe Building, Room 238, Oklahoma City, OK 73105. (1) State...

2012-07-01

443

Economic Adjustment Strategies, City of Big Spring, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The President's Economic Adjustment Committee initiated an assistance program to help alleviate the economic impact of closure of Webb Air Force Base in the Big Spring/Howard County, Texas, area. The Committee's Executive Director was prepared to work clo...

1980-01-01

444

Texas Trailing Phlox(Phlox nivalis ssp. texensis) Recovery Plan.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Current Status: The Texas trailing phlox is listed as endangered. Once occurring at 17 sites in Hardin, Polk, and Typer counties, only two populations are currently known to properties owned by the nature Conservancy and private landowners, and on highway...

M. J. Warnock

1995-01-01

445

Jimson weed abuse in an Oklahoma teen.  

PubMed

Jimson weed, a plant often abused by teenagers and young adults, grows wild throughout Oklahoma. It is best known for its hallucinogenic properties; however intoxication can lead to anticholinergic manifestations that are potentially dangerous. Over the past six years, sixty-three individuals in Oklahoma have been hospitalized for jimson weed intoxication, including this Oklahoma teen. Importance lies in proper identification, understanding, and management in persons presenting with jimson weed poisoning. PMID:20131730

Honey, Brooke L; Hagemann, Tracy M; Lobb, Kelley M; McGoodwin, Lee

2009-12-01

446