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Sample records for therapies glp-1 receptor

  1. [Characteristics and types of GLP-1 receptor agonists. An opportunity for individualized therapy].

    PubMed

    Jdar, Esteban

    2014-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is secreted from enteroendocrine L-cells in response to oral nutrient intake and elicits glucose-stimulated insulin secretion while suppressing glucagon secretion. Moreover slows gastric emptying -reducing postprandial glycemic excursions-, reduces body weight, systolic blood pressure and has beneficial effects in the cardiovascular and central nervous systems. Since the 1990s, the efficacy of GLP-1 in reducing blood glucose levels in type 2 diabetes (DM2) was well known. However, GLP-1 should be administered by chronic subcutaneous infusion because of the rapid cleavage by the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4). Hence, DPP-4 inhibitors -which increase pseudo-physiologically endogenous GLP-1 levels- were developed. In addition, several GLP-1 receptor agonists have been designed to avoid DPP-4-breakdown and/or rapid renal elimination and, therefore, induce a pharmacologic effect in the GLP-1 receptor: short-acting, long-acting, and prolonged-acting GLP-1 analogs. Each class has different structural, pharmacodynamic and clinical properties and could be administered in different therapeutical regimens giving us the opportunity to individualize the therapy of DM2. PMID:25437460

  2. Combination therapy with GLP-1 receptor agonists and basal insulin: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Balena, R; Hensley, I E; Miller, S; Barnett, A H

    2013-01-01

    Treatment algorithms for type 2 diabetes call for intensification of therapy over time as the disease progresses and glycaemic control worsens. If diet, exercise and oral antihyperglycaemic medications (OAMs) fail to maintain glycaemic control then basal insulin is added and ultimately prandial insulin may be required. However, such an intensification strategy carries risk of increased hypoglycaemia and weight gain, both of which are associated with worse long-term outcomes. An alternative strategy is to intensify therapy by the addition of a short-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist (GLP-1 RA) rather than prandial insulin. Short-acting GLP-1 RAs such as exenatide twice daily are particularly effective at reducing postprandial glucose while basal insulin has a greater effect on fasting glucose, providing a physiological rationale for this complementary approach. This review analyzes the latest randomized controlled clinical trials of insulin/GLP-1 RA combination therapy and examines results from ‘real-world’ use of the combinations as reported through observational and clinical practice studies. The most common finding across all types of studies was that combination therapy improved glycaemic control without weight gain or an increased risk of hypoglycaemia. Many studies reported weight loss and a reduction in insulin use when a GLP-1 RA was added to existing insulin therapy. Overall, the relative degree of benefit to glycaemic control and weight was influenced by the insulin titration employed in conjunction with the GLP-1 RA. The greatest glycaemic benefits were observed in studies with structured titration of insulin to glycaemic targets while the greatest weight benefits were observed in studies with a protocol-specified focus on insulin sparing. The adverse event profile of GLP-1 RAs in the reviewed trials was similar to that reported with GLP-1 RAs as monotherapy or in combination with OAMs with gastrointestinal events being the most commonly reported. PMID:23061470

  3. GLP-1 based therapies: clinical implications for gastroenterologists.

    PubMed

    Smits, Mark M; van Raalte, Daniel H; Tonneijck, Lennart; Muskiet, Marcel H A; Kramer, Mark H H; Cahen, Djuna L

    2016-04-01

    The gut-derived incretin hormone, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) lowers postprandial blood glucose levels by stimulating insulin and inhibiting glucagon secretion. Two novel antihyperglycaemic drug classes augment these effects; GLP-1 receptor agonists and inhibitors of the GLP-1 degrading enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase 4. These so called GLP-1 based or incretin based drugs are increasingly used to treat type 2 diabetes, because of a low risk of hypoglycaemia and favourable effect on body weight, blood pressure and lipid profiles. Besides glucose control, GLP-1 functions as an enterogastrone, causing a wide range of GI responses. Studies have shown that endogenous GLP-1 and its derived therapies slow down digestion by affecting the stomach, intestines, exocrine pancreas, gallbladder and liver. Understanding the GI actions of GLP-1 based therapies is clinically relevant; because GI side effects are common and need to be recognised, and because these drugs may be used to treat GI disease. PMID:26786687

  4. From Theory to Clinical Practice in the Use of GLP-1 Receptor Agonists and DPP-4 Inhibitors Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dicembrini, Ilaria; Pala, Laura; Rotella, Carlo Maria

    2011-01-01

    Promoting long-term adherence to lifestyle modification and choice of antidiabetic agent with low hypoglycemia risk profile and positive weight profile could be the most effective strategy in achieving sustained glycemic control and in reducing comorbidities. From this perspective, vast interest has been generated by glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP-4i). In this review our ten-year clinical and laboratory experience by in vitro and in vivo studies is reported. Herein, we reviewed available data on the efficacy and safety profile of GLP-1 receptor agonists and DPP-4i. The introduction of incretin hormone-based therapies represents a novel therapeutic strategy, because these drugs not only improve glycemia with minimal risk of hypoglycemia but also have other extraglycemic beneficial effects. In clinical studies, both GLP-1 receptor agonists and DPP-4i, improve β cell function indexes. All these agents showed trophic effects on beta-cell mass in animal studies. The use of these drugs is associated with positive or neucral effect on body weight and improvements in blood pressure, diabetic dyslipidemia, hepatic steazosis markets, and myocardial function. These effects have the potential to reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease, which is a major cause of mortality in patients with diabetes. PMID:21747834

  5. Clinical and Patient-Related Variables Associated with Initiating GLP-1 Receptor Agonist Therapy in Type 2 Diabetes Patients in Primary Care in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Qing; Grandy, Susan; Hiller, Josh; Kostev, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Aims To investigate real-world clinical and patient-related variables associated with initiating GLP-1 receptor agonist (GLP-1RA) treatment relative to initiation of other glucose-lowering therapies in type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients of primary care in Germany. Methods Data for 938 T2D patients who started therapy with a GLP-1RA within 823 practices of primary care throughout Germany were retrospectively analyzed (Disease Analyser: 01/2011–03/2014). 5,197 T2D patients who initiated other non-GLP-1RA antidiabetic therapies were selected as controls. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were applied to identify factors associated with GLP-1RA initiation in primary care. Results Mean age (SD) of GLP-1RA users was 57.8 (11.8) years (males: 55.5%) and the average BMI was 36.1 (6.7) kg/m2. 22.8% were in diabetologist care and 12.0% had private health insurance. In multivariate regression, choice of GLP-1RA therapy instead of a different glucose-lowering drug class was associated with obesity (odds ratio: 1.68; 95% CI: 1.34–2.10), private health insurance (2.42; 1.89–3.09), younger age (0.94; 0.93–0.95 per year), male sex (0.85; 0.73–0.99), diabetologist care (2.11; 1.73–2.57), and geographic practice location (East vs. West-Germany; 1.25; 1.05–1.49). Among co-medication, angiotensin II antagonists (increased) and non-steroidal antirheumatic agents (decreased) were related to GLP-1RA prescriptions (both p<0.001). Conclusions Consistent with German guidelines, GLP-1RA is mainly prescribed preferentially in T2D patients who are obese. GLP-1RA drugs were more frequently used than other options in privately health insured patients and in patients seeing a diabetologist. PMID:27019360

  6. Physician perceptions of GLP-1 receptor agonists in the UK.

    PubMed

    Matza, Louis S; Curtis, Sarah E; Jordan, Jessica B; Adetunji, Omolara; Martin, Sherry A; Boye, Kristina S

    2016-05-01

    Objectives Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists have been used to treat type 2 diabetes for almost a decade, and new treatments in this class have recently been introduced. The purpose of this study was to examine perceptions of GLP-1 receptor agonists among physicians who treat patients with type 2 diabetes in the UK. Methods A total of 670 physicians (226 diabetes specialists; 444 general practice [GP] physicians) completed a survey in 2014. Results Almost all physicians had prescribed GLP-1 receptor agonists (95.4% total sample; 99.1% specialists; 93.5% GP), most frequently to patients whose glucose levels are not adequately controlled with oral medications (85.9% of physicians) and obese/overweight patients (83.7%). Physicians' most common reasons for prescribing a GLP-1 receptor agonist were: associated with weight loss (65.8%), good efficacy (55.7%), less hypoglycemia risk than insulin (55.2%), not associated with weight gain (34.5%), and better efficacy than oral medications (32.7%). Factors that most commonly cause hesitation when prescribing this class were: not considered first line therapy according to guidelines (56.9%), injectable administration (44.6%), cost (36.7%), gastrointestinal side effects (33.4%), and risk of pancreatitis (26.7%). Almost all specialists (99.1%) believed they had sufficient knowledge to prescribe a GLP-1 receptor agonist, compared with 76.1% of GPs. Conclusions Results highlight the widespread use of GLP-1 receptor agonists for treatment of type 2 diabetes in the UK. However, almost a quarter of GPs reported that they do not have enough knowledge to prescribe GLP-1s, suggesting a need for increased dissemination of information to targeted groups of physicians. Study limitations were that the generalizability of the clinician sample is unknown; survey questions required clinicians to select answers from multiple response options rather than generating the responses themselves; and responses to this survey conducted in 2014 do not reflect perceptions of the most recently introduced GLP-1 receptor agonists. PMID:26807507

  7. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of GLP-1-Based Therapies beyond Glucose Control

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Sun; Jun, Hee-Sook

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone mainly secreted from intestinal L cells in response to nutrient ingestion. GLP-1 has beneficial effects for glucose homeostasis by stimulating insulin secretion from pancreatic beta-cells, delaying gastric emptying, decreasing plasma glucagon, reducing food intake, and stimulating glucose disposal. Therefore, GLP-1-based therapies such as GLP-1 receptor agonists and inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase-4, which is a GLP-1 inactivating enzyme, have been developed for treatment of type 2 diabetes. In addition to glucose-lowering effects, emerging data suggests that GLP-1-based therapies also show anti-inflammatory effects in chronic inflammatory diseases including type 1 and 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, neurodegenerative disorders, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, diabetic nephropathy, asthma, and psoriasis. This review outlines the anti-inflammatory actions of GLP-1-based therapies on diseases associated with chronic inflammation in vivo and in vitro, and their molecular mechanisms of anti-inflammatory action. PMID:27110066

  8. Knockdown of GLP-1 Receptors in Vagal Afferents Affects Normal Food Intake and Glycemia.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Jean-Philippe; Arnold, Myrtha; Pettersen, Klaus G; Lossel, Pius; Langhans, Wolfgang; Lee, Shin J

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient stimulation of enteroendocrine L cells induces the release of the incretin and satiating peptide glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). The vagus nerve innervates visceral organs and may contribute to the mediation of gut-derived GLP-1's effects on food intake, energy homeostasis, and glycemic control. To test the hypothesis that vagal afferent neuron (VAN) GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1Rs) are necessary for these effects of endogenous GLP-1, we established a novel bilateral nodose ganglia injection technique to deliver a lentiviral vector and to knock down VAN GLP-1Rs in male Sprague Dawley rats. We found that a full expression of VAN GLP-1Rs is not necessary for the maintenance of long-term energy balance in normal eating conditions. VAN GLP-1R knockdown (kd) did, however, increase meal size and accelerated gastric emptying. Moreover, postmeal glycemia was elevated and insulin release was blunted in GLP-1R kd rats, suggesting that VAN GLP-1Rs are physiological contributors to the neuroincretin effect after a meal. Collectively, our results highlight a crucial role for the VANs in mediating the effects of endogenous GLP-1 on food intake and glycemia and may promote the further development of GLP-1-based therapies. PMID:26470787

  9. Systems-Level G Protein-Coupled Receptor Therapy Across a Neurodegenerative Continuum by the GLP-1 Receptor System

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, Jonathan; Etienne, Harmonie; Idriss, Sherif; Azmi, Abdelkrim; Martin, Bronwen; Maudsley, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    With our increasing appreciation of the true complexity of diseases and pathophysiologies, it is clear that this knowledge needs to inform the future development of pharmacotherapeutics. For many disorders, the disease mechanism itself is a complex process spanning multiple signaling networks, tissues, and organ systems. Identifying the precise nature and locations of the pathophysiology is crucial for the creation of systemically effective drugs. Diseases once considered constrained to a limited range of organ systems, e.g., central neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), and Huntington’ disease (HD), the role of multiple central and peripheral organ systems in the etiology of such diseases is now widely accepted. With this knowledge, it is increasingly clear that these seemingly distinct neurodegenerative disorders (AD, PD, and HD) possess multiple pathophysiological similarities thereby demonstrating an inter-related continuum of disease-related molecular alterations. With this systems-level appreciation of neurodegenerative diseases, it is now imperative to consider that pharmacotherapeutics should be developed specifically to address the systemic imbalances that create the disorders. Identification of potential systems-level signaling axes may facilitate the generation of therapeutic agents with synergistic remedial activity across multiple tissues, organ systems, and even diseases. Here, we discuss the potentially therapeutic systems-level interaction of the glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) ligand–receptor axis with multiple aspects of the AD, PD, and HD neurodegenerative continuum. PMID:25225492

  10. Chronic hyperglycemia downregulates GLP-1 receptor signaling in pancreatic β-cells via protein kinase A

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Sindhu; Dickson, Lorna M.; Mathew, Elizabeth; Orr, Caitlin M.O.; Ellenbroek, Johanne H.; Philipson, Louis H.; Wicksteed, Barton

    2015-01-01

    Objective Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) enhances insulin secretion and protects β-cell mass. Diabetes therapies targeting the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R), expressed in numerous tissues, have diminished dose-response in patients with type 2 diabetes compared with healthy human controls. The aim of this study was to determine the mechanistic causes underlying the reduced efficacy of GLP-1R ligands. Methods Using primary mouse islets and the β-cell line MIN6, outcomes downstream of the GLP-1R were analyzed: Insulin secretion; phosphorylation of the cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB); cAMP responses. Signaling systems were studied by immunoblotting and qRT-PCR, and PKA activity was assayed. Cell surface localization of the GLP-1R was studied by confocal microscopy using a fluorescein-tagged exendin-4 and GFP-tagged GLP-1R. Results Rodent β-cells chronically exposed to high glucose had diminished responses to GLP-1R agonists including: diminished insulin secretory response; reduced phosphorylation of (CREB); impaired cAMP response, attributable to chronically increased cAMP levels. GLP-1R signaling systems were affected by hyperglycemia with increased expression of mRNAs encoding the inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) and adenylyl cyclase 8, reduced PKA activity due to increased expression of the PKA-RIα subunit, reduced GLP-1R mRNA expression and loss of GLP-1R from the cell surface. To specifically examine the loss of GLP-1R from the plasma membrane a GLP-1R-GFP fusion protein was employed to visualize subcellular localization. Under low glucose conditions or when PKA activity was inhibited, GLP-1R-GFP was found at the plasma membrane. Conversely high glucose, expression of a constitutively active PKA subunit, or exposure to exendin-4 or forskolin led to GLP-1R-GFP internalization. Mutation of serine residue 301 of the GLP-1R abolished the glucose-dependent loss of the receptor from the plasma membrane. This was associated with a loss of an interaction between the receptor and the small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO), an interaction that was found to be necessary for internalization of the receptor. Conclusions These data show that glucose acting, at least in part, via PKA leads to the loss of the GLP-1R from the cell surface and an impairment of GLP-1R signaling, which may underlie the reduced clinical efficacy of GLP-1R based therapies in individuals with poorly controlled hyperglycemia. PMID:25830090

  11. The Cardiovascular Effects of GLP-1 Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Okerson, Theodore; Chilton, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists have been shown to regulate blood glucose concentrations by mechanisms including enhanced insulin synthesis/secretion, suppressed glucagon secretion, slowed gastric emptying, and enhanced satiety. GLP-1 receptors have also been identified in the heart, kidneys, and blood vessels, leading to the hypothesis that GLP-1R agonists may affect cardiovascular function or cardiovascular disease (CVD). The aim of this literature review was to assemble and assess preclinical and clinical data of potential medical importance regarding the cardiovascular effects of GLP-1R agonists. Preclinical studies with the GLP-1R agonists GLP-1, exenatide, or liraglutide provided evidence that GLP-1R stimulation favorably affects endothelial function, sodium excretion, recovery from ischemic injury, and myocardial function in animals. Similar observations have been made in exploratory studies on GLP-1 infusion in normal subjects and patients with type 2 diabetes. Post hoc analyses of phase III studies of patients with type 2 diabetes treated with exenatide(bid or qw) or liraglutide(qd) showed that these GLP-1R agonists reduced blood pressure, an effect largely independent of weight loss, and that liraglutide slightly increased heart rate. Preliminary data also indicated that GLP-1R agonists reduced markers of CVD risk such as C-reactive protein and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Ongoing studies are examining the effects of administering GLP-1R agonists to patients at risk of CVD, postangioplasty patients, post-CABG patients, and patients with heart failure. Additional studies should provide meaningful data to determine whether GLP-1R agonists provide unique treatment benefits to patients at risk for or with established CVD. PMID:21167014

  12. User's guide to mechanism of action and clinical use of GLP-1 receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Shaefer, Charles F; Kushner, Pamela; Aguilar, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) are injectable glucose-lowering medications approved for the treatment of adult patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This article provides practical information to guide primary care physicians on the use of GLP-1RAs in patients with T2DM. Two short-acting (once- or twice-daily administration; exenatide and liraglutide) and three long-acting (weekly administration; albiglutide, dulaglutide and exenatide) GLP-1RAs are currently approved in the US. These drugs provide levels of GLP-1 receptor agonism many times that of endogenous GLP-1. The GLP-1RAs have been shown to significantly improve glycemic parameters and reduce body weight. These agents work by activating GLP-1 receptors in the pancreas, which leads to enhanced insulin release and reduced glucagon release-responses that are both glucose-dependent-with a consequent low risk for hypoglycemia. Effects on GLP-1 receptors in the CNS and the gastrointestinal tract cause reduced appetite and delayed glucose absorption due to slower gastric emptying. The most common adverse effects are gastrointestinal, which are transient and less common with the long-acting drugs. GLP-1RAs are recommended as second-line therapy in combination with metformin, sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones or basal insulin, providing a means of enhancing glucose control while offsetting the weight gain associated with insulin and some oral agents. GLP-1RAs represent a useful tool that the primary care physician can use to help patients with T2DM achieve their therapeutic goals. PMID:26371721

  13. GLP-1-based therapy of type 2 diabetes: GLP-1 mimetics and DPP-IV inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ahrén, Bo

    2007-10-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-based therapy is a novel treatment for type 2 diabetes. It is executed either by GLP-1 mimetics or by dipeptidyl peptidase-IV inhibitors. In type 2 diabetes, the two strategies reduce hemoglobin A(1c) by 0.6% to 1.1% from baseline levels of 7.7% to 8.5%. They are efficient both in monotherapy and in combination with metformin or thiazolidinediones. Both treatments are well tolerated with low risk of hypoglycemia. PMID:18173966

  14. [Effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists on carbohydrate metabolism control].

    PubMed

    Fernndez-Garca, Jos Carlos; Colomo, Natalia; Tinahones, Francisco Jos

    2014-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are a new group of drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). In the present article, we review the available evidence on the efficacy of GLP-1 receptor agonists as glucose-lowering agents, their place in therapeutic algorithms, and the clinical factors associated with a favorable treatment response. Finally, we describe the clinical characteristics of patients who may benefit from these drugs. PMID:25437461

  15. [Effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists on carbohydrate metabolism control].

    PubMed

    Fernndez-Garca, Jos Carlos; Colomo, Natalia; Tinahones, Francisco Jos

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are a new group of drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). In the present article, we review the available evidence on the efficacy of GLP-1 receptor agonists as glucose-lowering agents, their place in therapeutic algorithms, and the clinical factors associated with a favorable treatment response. Finally, we describe the clinical characteristics of patients who may benefit from these drugs. PMID:25326839

  16. GLP-1 based therapy for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Arulmozhi, D K; Portha, B

    2006-05-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a major and growing health problem throughout the world. Current treatment approaches include diet, exercise, and a variety of pharmacological agents including insulin, biguanides, sulfonylureas and thiazolidinediones. New therapies are still needed to control metabolic abnormalities, and also to preserve beta-cell mass and to prevent loss of beta-cell function. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is a drug candidate which potentially fulfils these conditions. GLP-1 is an incretin hormone secreted by intestinal L-cells in response to meal ingestion is a novel pharmacological target with multiple antihyperglycemic actions. GLP-1 glucoregulatory actions include glucose-dependent enhancement of insulin secretion, inhibition of glucagon secretion, slowing of gastric emptying and reduction of food intake. GLP-1 is rapidly inactivated by amino peptidase, dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) and the utility of DPP-IV inhibitors are also under investigation. There is a recent upsurge in the development of GLP-1 mimetics and DPP-IV inhibitors as potential therapy for type 2 diabetes. However, both the strategies are having their own advantages and limitations. The present review summarizes the concepts of GLP-1 based therapy for type 2 diabetes and the current preclinical and clinical development in GLP-1 mimetics and DPP-IV inhibitors. Further, the potential advantages and the limitations of both the strategies are discussed. PMID:16488579

  17. Is incretin-based therapy ready for the care of hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes?: The time has come for GLP-1 receptor agonists!

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Stanley; DeFronzo, Ralph A

    2013-07-01

    Significant data suggest that overt hyperglycemia, either observed with or without a prior diagnosis of diabetes, contributes to an increase in mortality and morbidity in hospitalized patients. In this regard, goal-directed insulin therapy has remained as the standard of care for achieving and maintaining glycemic control in hospitalized patients with critical and noncritical illness. As such, protocols to assist in the management of hyperglycemia in the inpatient setting have become commonplace in hospital settings. Clearly, insulin is a known entity, has been in clinical use for almost a century, and is effective. However, there are limitations to its use. Based on the observed mechanisms of action and efficacy, there has been a great interest in using incretin-based therapy with glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists instead of, or complementary to, an insulin-based approach to improve glycemic control in hospitalized, severely ill diabetic patients. To provide an understanding of both sides of the argument, we provide a discussion of this topic as part of this two-part point-counterpoint narrative. In this point narrative as presented below, Drs. Schwartz and DeFronzo provide an opinion that now is the time to consider GLP-1 receptor agonists as a logical consideration for inpatient glycemic control. It is important to note the recommendations they propose under "incretin-based approach" with these agents represent their opinion for use and, as they point out, well-designed prospective studies comparing these agents with insulin will be required to establish their efficacy and safety. In the counterpoint narrative following Drs. Schwartz and DeFronzo's contribution, Drs. Umpierrez and Korytkowski provide a defense of insulin in the inpatient setting as the unquestioned gold standard for glycemic management in hospitalized settings. PMID:23801800

  18. Exendin-4, a GLP-1 receptor agonist, attenuates prostate cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Nomiyama, Takashi; Kawanami, Takako; Irie, Shinichiro; Hamaguchi, Yuriko; Terawaki, Yuichi; Murase, Kunitaka; Tsutsumi, Yoko; Nagaishi, Ryoko; Tanabe, Makito; Morinaga, Hidetaka; Tanaka, Tomoko; Mizoguchi, Makio; Nabeshima, Kazuki; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Yanase, Toshihiko

    2014-11-01

    Recently, pleiotropic benefits of incretin therapy beyond glycemic control have been reported. Although cancer is one of the main causes of death in diabetic patients, few reports describe the anticancer effects of incretin. Here, we examined the effect of the incretin drug exendin (Ex)-4, a GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist, on prostate cancer. In human prostate cancer tissue obtained from patients after they had undergone radical prostatectomy, GLP-1R expression colocalized with P504S, a marker of prostate cancer. In in vitro experiments, Ex-4 significantly decreased the proliferation of the prostate cancer cell lines LNCap, PC3, and DU145, but not that of ALVA-41. This antiproliferative effect depended on GLP-1R expression. In accordance with the abundant expression of GLP-1R in LNCap cells, a GLP-1R antagonist or GLP-1R knockdown with small interfering RNA abolished the inhibitory effect of Ex-4 on cell proliferation. Although Ex-4 had no effect on either androgen receptor activation or apoptosis, it decreased extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation in LNCap cells. Importantly, Ex-4 attenuated in vivo prostate cancer growth induced by transplantation of LNCap cells into athymic mice and significantly reduced the tumor expression of P504S, Ki67, and phosphorylated ERK-MAPK. These data suggest that Ex-4 attenuates prostate cancer growth through the inhibition of ERK-MAPK activation. PMID:24879833

  19. Role and development of GLP-1 receptor agonists in the management of diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Chee W; Egan, Josephine M

    2009-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a hormone secreted from enteroendocrine L cells of the intestine in response to food. Exogenous GLP-1 administration at pharmacological doses results in many effects that are beneficial for treating type 2 diabetes, these include: (1) an increase in insulin secretion from β cells; (2) a suppression of glucagon secretion from α cells in the presence of hyperglycemia but not hypoglycemia; (3) a delay in gastric emptying and gut motility which in turns delays absorption of ingested nutrients and dampens post-prandial glucose excursion; and (4) an increase in the duration of postprandial satiety therefore suppressing appetite and decreasing food intake which eventually leads to weight loss. However, GLP-1 is subject to rapid enzymatic degradation, and therefore, not suitable for long-term treatment. A synthetic enzyme-resistant GLP-1 receptor agonist that reproduces the biological effects of GLP-1 is in use and more are under development. This review aims at providing a summary of the properties of GLP-1 and the development of GLP-1-based therapies for treatment of diabetes. PMID:20148188

  20. Nucleus accumbens GLP-1 receptors influence meal size and palatability

    PubMed Central

    Dossat, Amanda M.; Diaz, Ryan; Gallo, Lindsay; Panagos, Alyssa; Kay, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) neuronal projection to the nucleus accumbens core (NAcC) contributes to food intake control. To investigate the role of endogenous stimulation of GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1R) in NAcC, we examined the effects of the GLP-1R antagonist exendin-(9–39) (Ex9) on meal pattern and microstructure of ingestive behavior in rats. Intra-NAcC Ex9 treatment selectively increased meal size relative to vehicle in rats consuming 0.25 M sucrose solution or sweetened condensed milk. Microstructural analysis revealed effects of NAcC Ex9 on initial lick rate and the size and duration of licking bursts in rats consuming 0.1 or 0.25 M sucrose, suggesting that blockade of NAcC GLP-1R increases palatability. Because NAcC Ex9 did not affect licking for nonnutritive saccharin (0.1%), we suggest that the presence of nutrients in the gut may be required for endogenous stimulation of NAcC GLP-1R. Consistent with this, we also found that the meal size-suppressive effects of intragastric nutrient infusion were attenuated by NAcC delivery of Ex9 at a dose that had no effect when delivered alone. Analysis of licking patterns revealed that NAcC Ex9 did not reverse intragastric nutrient-induced suppression of burst number but rather blunted the effect of nutrient infusion on meal size primarily by increasing the size and duration of licking bursts. Together, our results suggest that NAcC Ex9 influences taste evaluation. We conclude that GLP-1 released in NAcC in response to gastrointestinal nutrients reduces the hedonic value of food. PMID:23612998

  1. Nucleus accumbens GLP-1 receptors influence meal size and palatability.

    PubMed

    Dossat, Amanda M; Diaz, Ryan; Gallo, Lindsay; Panagos, Alyssa; Kay, Kristen; Williams, Diana L

    2013-06-15

    Recent evidence suggests that the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) neuronal projection to the nucleus accumbens core (NAcC) contributes to food intake control. To investigate the role of endogenous stimulation of GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1R) in NAcC, we examined the effects of the GLP-1R antagonist exendin-(9-39) (Ex9) on meal pattern and microstructure of ingestive behavior in rats. Intra-NAcC Ex9 treatment selectively increased meal size relative to vehicle in rats consuming 0.25 M sucrose solution or sweetened condensed milk. Microstructural analysis revealed effects of NAcC Ex9 on initial lick rate and the size and duration of licking bursts in rats consuming 0.1 or 0.25 M sucrose, suggesting that blockade of NAcC GLP-1R increases palatability. Because NAcC Ex9 did not affect licking for nonnutritive saccharin (0.1%), we suggest that the presence of nutrients in the gut may be required for endogenous stimulation of NAcC GLP-1R. Consistent with this, we also found that the meal size-suppressive effects of intragastric nutrient infusion were attenuated by NAcC delivery of Ex9 at a dose that had no effect when delivered alone. Analysis of licking patterns revealed that NAcC Ex9 did not reverse intragastric nutrient-induced suppression of burst number but rather blunted the effect of nutrient infusion on meal size primarily by increasing the size and duration of licking bursts. Together, our results suggest that NAcC Ex9 influences taste evaluation. We conclude that GLP-1 released in NAcC in response to gastrointestinal nutrients reduces the hedonic value of food. PMID:23612998

  2. Comparison of extended release GLP-1 receptor agonist therapy versus sitagliptin in the management of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Stolar, Mark W; Grimm, Michael; Chen, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Exenatide once weekly (EQW), the first glucose-lowering agent for type 2 diabetes that is dosed one time per week, contains exenatide encapsulated in microspheres of a dissolvable matrix, which release active agent slowly and continuously into the circulation following subcutaneous injection. In two direct head-to-head comparisons, EQW resulted in better long-term glucose control, greater reductions in fasting plasma glucose, and more significant weight loss than sitagliptin. In other trials, glucose-lowering effects of EQW compared favorably with those of metformin, pioglitazone, and basal insulin. Patients on EQW exhibited a higher incidence of nausea than those on sitagliptin, although gastrointestinal adverse events occurred primarily during the first 6–8 weeks of therapy and declined thereafter. EQW was also associated with a lower incidence of nausea than two other glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists, exenatide twice daily and liraglutide. Mild hypoglycemic episodes were uncommon with EQW, although risk of hypoglycemia increased in combination with sulfonylureas. When choosing between EQW and a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor, such as sitagliptin, clinicians and patients should consider the differences between the two medications in terms of glucose control (EQW superior to DPP-4 inhibitors), weight control (EQW superior to DPP-4 inhibitors), gastrointestinal tolerability during treatment initiation (EQW inferior to DPP-4 inhibitors), and mode of administration (once-weekly subcutaneous administration versus once-daily oral administration). PMID:24285927

  3. A clinical review of GLP-1 receptor agonists: efficacy and safety in diabetes and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Prasad-Reddy, Lalita; Isaacs, Diana

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing at an astounding rate. Many of the agents used to treat type 2 diabetes have undesirable adverse effects of hypoglycemia and weight gain. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists represent a unique approach to the treatment of diabetes, with benefits extending outside glucose control, including positive effects on weight, blood pressure, cholesterol levels, and beta-cell function. They mimic the effects of the incretin hormone GLP-1, which is released from the intestine in response to food intake. Their effects include increasing insulin secretion, decreasing glucagon release, increasing satiety, and slowing gastric emptying. There are currently four approved GLP-1 receptor agonists in the United States: exenatide, liraglutide, albiglutide, and dulaglutide. A fifth agent, lixisenatide, is available in Europe. There are important pharmacodynamic, pharmacokinetic, and clinical differences of each agent. The most common adverse effects seen with GLP-1 therapy include nausea, vomiting, and injection-site reactions. Other warnings and precautions include pancreatitis and thyroid cell carcinomas. GLP-1 receptor agonists are an innovative and effective option to improve blood glucose control, with other potential benefits of preserving beta-cell function, weight loss, and increasing insulin sensitivity. Once-weekly formulations may also improve patient adherence. Overall, these are effective agents for patients with type 2 diabetes, who are either uncontrolled on metformin or intolerant to metformin. PMID:26213556

  4. Hindbrain CART induces hypothermia mediated by GLP-1 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Skibicka, Karolina P.; Alhadeff, Amber L.; Grill, Harvey J.

    2009-01-01

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptides (CART) are widely distributed throughout the neuraxis, including regions associated with energy balance. CART’s classification as a catabolic neuropeptide is based on its inhibitory effects on feeding, co-expression with arcuate nucleus POMC neurons, and on limited analysis of its energy expenditure effects. Here we investigate whether: 1) caudal brainstem delivery of CART produces energetic, cardiovascular and glycemic effects, 2) forebrain – caudal brainstem neural communication is required for those effects and 3) GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1R) contribute to the mediation of CART-induced effects. Core temperature (Tc), heart rate (HR), activity and blood glucose were measured in rats injected 4th v. with CART (0.1, 1.0 and 2.0µg). Food was withheld during physiologic recording and returned for overnight measurement of intake and body weight. CART induced a long-lasting (> 6h); hypothermia; a 1.5°C and 1.6°C drop in TC for the 1.0 and 2.0µg doses. Hindbrain CART application reduced food intake and body weight and increased blood glucose levels; no change in HR or activity was observed. Supracollicular decerebration eliminated the hypothermic response observed in intact rats to hindbrain ventricular CART, suggesting that forebrain processing is required for hypothermia. Pretreatment with the GLP-1R antagonist (exendin-9-39) in control rats attenuated CART hypothermia and hypophagia, indicating that GLP-1R activation contributes to hypothermic and hypophagic effects of hindbrain CART while CART-induced hyperglycemia was not altered by GLP-1R blockade. Data reveal a novel function of CART in temperature regulation and open possibilities for future studies on the clinical potential of the hypothermic effect. PMID:19474324

  5. Molecular mechanisms underlying physiological and receptor pleiotropic effects mediated by GLP-1R activation.

    PubMed

    Pabreja, K; Mohd, M A; Koole, C; Wootten, D; Furness, S G B

    2014-03-01

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes in developed countries is increasing yearly with a significant negative impact on patient quality of life and an enormous burden on the healthcare system. Current biguanide and thiazolidinedione treatments for type 2 diabetes have a number of clinical limitations, the most serious long-term limitation being the eventual need for insulin replacement therapy (Table 1). Since 2007, drugs targeting the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor have been marketed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. These drugs have enjoyed a great deal of success even though our underlying understanding of the mechanisms for their pleiotropic effects remain poorly characterized even while major pharmaceutical companies actively pursue small molecule alternatives. Coupling of the GLP-1 receptor to more than one signalling pathway (pleiotropic signalling) can result in ligand-dependent signalling bias and for a peptide receptor such as the GLP-1 receptor this can be exaggerated with the use of small molecule agonists. Better consideration of receptor signalling pleiotropy will be necessary for future drug development. This is particularly important given the recent failure of taspoglutide, the report of increased risk of pancreatitis associated with GLP-1 mimetics and the observed clinical differences between liraglutide, exenatide and the newly developed long-acting exenatide long acting release, albiglutide and dulaglutide. PMID:23889512

  6. Modulation of Glucagon-like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Potency by Endocannabinoid-like Lipids Represents a Novel Mode of Regulating GLP-1 Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Hong; Ho, Mei-Shang; Huang, Wei-Ting; Chou, Ying-Ting; King, Klim

    2015-06-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogs are approved for treatment of type 2 diabetes and are in clinical trials for disorders including neurodegenerative diseases. GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is expressed in many peripheral and neuronal tissues and is activated by circulating GLP-1. Other than food intake, little is known about factors regulating GLP-1 secretion. Given a normally basal circulating level of GLP-1, knowledge of mechanisms regulating GLP-1R signaling, which has diverse functions in extrapancreatic tissues, remains elusive. In this study, we found that the potency of GLP-1, not exendin 4, is specifically enhanced by the endocannabinoid-like lipids oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and 2-oleoylglycerol but not by stearoylethanolamide (SEA) or palmitoylethanolamide. 9.2 μM OEA enhances the potency of GLP-1 in stimulating cAMP production by 10-fold but does not affect its receptor binding affinity. OEA and 2-oleoylglycerol, but not SEA, bind to GLP-1 in a dose-dependent and saturable manner. OEA but not SEA promoted GLP-1(7-36) amide to trypsin inactivation in a dose-dependent and saturable manner. Susceptibility of GLP-1(7-36) amide to trypsin inactivation is increased 40-fold upon binding to OEA but not to SEA. Our findings indicate that OEA binds to GLP-1(7-36) amide and enhances the potency that may result from a conformational change of the peptide. In conclusion, modulating potency of GLP-1 by physiologically regulated endocannabinoid-like lipids allows GLP-1R signaling to be regulated spatiotemporally at a constant basal GLP-1 level. PMID:25903129

  7. [Extrapancreatic effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists: an open window towards new treatment goals in type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Salvador, Javier; Andrada, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The wide ubiquity of GLP-1 receptors in the body has stimulated the search for different extrapancreatic actions of GLP-1 and its receptor agonists. Thus, severe cardioprotective effects directed on myocardial ischaemia and dysfunction as well as diverse antiaterogenic actions have been reported. Also, native and GLP-1 receptor agonists have demonstrated significant beneficial effects on liver steatosis and fibrosis and on neuronal protection in experimental models of Alzheimer, and Parkinson's disease as well as on cerebral ischaemia. Recent evidences suggest that these drugs may also be useful for prevention and treatment of diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy and peripheral neuropathy. Good results have also been reported in psoriasis. Despite we still need confirmation that these promising effects can be applied to clinical practice, they offer new interesting perspectives for treatment of type 2 diabetes associated complications and give to GLP-1 receptor agonists an even more integral position in diabetes therapy. PMID:25326841

  8. [Extrapancreatic effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists: an open window towards new treatment goals in type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Salvador, Javier; Andrada, Patricia

    2014-09-01

    The wide ubiquity of GLP-1 receptors in the body has stimulated the search for different extrapancreatic actions of GLP-1 and its receptor agonists. Thus, severe cardioprotective effects directed on myocardial ischaemia and dysfunction as well as diverse antiaterogenic actions have been reported. Also, native and GLP-1 receptor agonists have demonstrated significant beneficial effects on liver steatosis and fibrosis and on neuronal protection in experimental models of Alzheimer, and Parkinson's disease as well as on cerebral ischaemia. Recent evidences suggest that these drugs may also be useful for prevention and treatment of diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy and peripheral neuropathy. Good results have also been reported in psoriasis. Despite we still need confirmation that these promising effects can be applied to clinical practice, they offer new interesting perspectives for treatment of type 2 diabetes associated complications and give to GLP-1 receptor agonists an even more integral position in diabetes therapy. PMID:25437463

  9. Sustained expression of GLP-1 receptor differentially modulates ?-cell functions in diabetic and nondiabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Fumiyo; Miyatsuka, Takeshi; Sasaki, Shugo; Takahara, Mitsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Yuichi; Shimo, Naoki; Watada, Hirotaka; Kaneto, Hideaki; Gannon, Maureen; Matsuoka, Taka-Aki; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2016-02-26

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) has been shown to play important roles in maintaining ?-cell functions, such as insulin secretion and proliferation. While expression levels of GLP-1 receptor (Glp1r) are compromised in the islets of diabetic rodents, it remains unclear when and to what degree Glp1r mRNA levels are decreased during the progression of diabetes. In this study, we performed real-time PCR with the islets of db/db diabetic mice at different ages, and found that the expression levels of Glp1r were comparable to those of the islets of nondiabetic db/misty controls at the age of four weeks, and were significantly decreased at the age of eight and 12 weeks. To investigate whether restored expression of Glp1r affects the diabetic phenotypes, we generated the transgenic mouse model Pdx1(PB)-CreER(TM); CAG-CAT-Glp1r (?Glp1r) that allows for induction of Glp1r expression specifically in ? cells. Whereas the expression of exogenous Glp1r had no measurable effect on glucose tolerance in nondiabetic ?Glp1r;db/misty mice, ?Glp1r;db/db mice exhibited higher glucose and lower insulin levels in blood on glucose challenge test than control db/db littermates. In contrast, four weeks of treatment with exendin-4 improved the glucose profiles and increased serum insulin levels in ?Glp1r;db/db mice, to significantly higher levels than those in control db/db mice. These differential effects of exogenous Glp1r in nondiabetic and diabetic mice suggest that downregulation of Glp1r might be required to slow the progression of ?-cell failure under diabetic conditions. PMID:26854076

  10. Treatment potential of the GLP-1 receptor agonists in type 2 diabetes mellitus: a review.

    PubMed

    Østergaard, L; Frandsen, Christian S; Madsbad, S

    2016-02-01

    Over the last decade, the discovery of glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) has increased the treatment options for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). GLP-1 RAs mimic the effects of native GLP-1, which increases insulin secretion, inhibits glucagon secretion, increases satiety and slows gastric emptying. This review evaluates the phase III trials for all approved GLP-1 RAs and reports that all GLP-1 RAs decrease HbA1c, fasting plasma glucose, and lead to a reduction in body weight in the majority of trials. The most common adverse events are nausea and other gastrointestinal discomfort, while hypoglycaemia is rarely reported when GLP-1 RAs not are combined with sulfonylurea or insulin. Treatment options in the near future will include co-formulations of basal insulin and a GLP-1 RA. PMID:26573176

  11. Activation of GLP-1 Receptor Promotes Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Osteogenic Differentiation through β-Catenin.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jingru; Ma, Xue; Wang, Ning; Jia, Min; Bi, Long; Wang, Yunying; Li, Mingkai; Zhang, Huinan; Xue, Xiaoyan; Hou, Zheng; Zhou, Ying; Yu, Zhibin; He, Gonghao; Luo, Xiaoxing

    2016-04-12

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) plays an important role in regulating bone remodeling, and GLP-1 receptor agonist shows a positive relationship with osteoblast activity. However, GLP-1 receptor is not found in osteoblast, and the mechanism of GLP-1 receptor agonist on regulating bone remodeling is unclear. Here, we show that the GLP-1 receptor agonist exendin-4 (Ex-4) promoted bone formation and increased bone mass and quality in a rat unloading-induced bone loss model. These functions were accompanied by an increase in osteoblast number and serum bone formation markers, while the adipocyte number was decreased. Furthermore, GLP-1 receptor was detected in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), but not in osteoblast. Activation of GLP-1 receptor by Ex-4 promoted the osteogenic differentiation and inhibited BMSC adipogenic differentiation through regulating PKA/β-catenin and PKA/PI3K/AKT/GSK3β signaling. These findings reveal that GLP-1 receptor regulates BMSC osteogenic differentiation and provide a molecular basis for therapeutic potential of GLP-1 against osteoporosis. PMID:26947974

  12. Activation of GLP-1 Receptor Promotes Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Osteogenic Differentiation through β-Catenin

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jingru; Ma, Xue; Wang, Ning; Jia, Min; Bi, Long; Wang, Yunying; Li, Mingkai; Zhang, Huinan; Xue, Xiaoyan; Hou, Zheng; Zhou, Ying; Yu, Zhibin; He, Gonghao; Luo, Xiaoxing

    2016-01-01

    Summary Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) plays an important role in regulating bone remodeling, and GLP-1 receptor agonist shows a positive relationship with osteoblast activity. However, GLP-1 receptor is not found in osteoblast, and the mechanism of GLP-1 receptor agonist on regulating bone remodeling is unclear. Here, we show that the GLP-1 receptor agonist exendin-4 (Ex-4) promoted bone formation and increased bone mass and quality in a rat unloading-induced bone loss model. These functions were accompanied by an increase in osteoblast number and serum bone formation markers, while the adipocyte number was decreased. Furthermore, GLP-1 receptor was detected in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), but not in osteoblast. Activation of GLP-1 receptor by Ex-4 promoted the osteogenic differentiation and inhibited BMSC adipogenic differentiation through regulating PKA/β-catenin and PKA/PI3K/AKT/GSK3β signaling. These findings reveal that GLP-1 receptor regulates BMSC osteogenic differentiation and provide a molecular basis for therapeutic potential of GLP-1 against osteoporosis. PMID:26947974

  13. Pleiotropic effects of insulin and GLP-1 receptor agonists: Potential benefits of the association.

    PubMed

    Cariou, B

    2015-12-01

    The combination of basal insulin and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) is an emerging option for patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). GLP-1RAs have been shown to improve glycaemic control with a low risk of hypoglycaemia and to promote body weight loss. However, GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1Rs) are widely expressed in extrapancreatic tissues and could sustain pleiotropic actions of GLP-1RAs beyond glycaemic control. The underlying molecular mechanisms maintaining these extrapancreatic actions of GLP-1 are complex, and involve GLP-1R signalling in both the brain and several peripheral tissues. The present review focuses specifically on the role of GLP-1RAs in the cardiovascular system and liver. Preclinical data in rodents and pilot studies in humans suggest that GLP-1RAs may have potential beneficial effects on heart function, blood pressure, postprandial lipaemia, liver steatosis and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Long-term studies are now warranted to determine the safety and clinical relevance of the association between insulin and GLP-1RAs in T2D. PMID:26774017

  14. REVIEWMolecular mechanisms underlying physiological and receptor pleiotropic effects mediated by GLP-1R activation

    PubMed Central

    Pabreja, K; Mohd, M A; Koole, C; Wootten, D; Furness, S G B

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes in developed countries is increasing yearly with a significant negative impact on patient quality of life and an enormous burden on the healthcare system. Current biguanide and thiazolidinedione treatments for type 2 diabetes have a number of clinical limitations, the most serious long-term limitation being the eventual need for insulin replacement therapy (Table 1). Since 2007, drugs targeting the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor have been marketed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. These drugs have enjoyed a great deal of success even though our underlying understanding of the mechanisms for their pleiotropic effects remain poorly characterized even while major pharmaceutical companies actively pursue small molecule alternatives. Coupling of the GLP-1 receptor to more than one signalling pathway (pleiotropic signalling) can result in ligand-dependent signalling bias and for a peptide receptor such as the GLP-1 receptor this can be exaggerated with the use of small molecule agonists. Better consideration of receptor signalling pleiotropy will be necessary for future drug development. This is particularly important given the recent failure of taspoglutide, the report of increased risk of pancreatitis associated with GLP-1 mimetics and the observed clinical differences between liraglutide, exenatide and the newly developed long-acting exenatide long acting release, albiglutide and dulaglutide. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Molecular Pharmacology of GPCRs. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-5 PMID:23889512

  15. Differences in acute anorectic effects of long-acting GLP-1 receptor agonists in rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists have both glucose- and weight-lowering effects. The brain is poised to mediate both of these actions since GLP-1Rs are present in key areas known to control weight and glucose. Although some research has been performed on the effects of ...

  16. Topical Administration of GLP-1 Receptor Agonists Prevents Retinal Neurodegeneration in Experimental Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Cristina; Bogdanov, Patricia; Corraliza, Lidia; García-Ramírez, Marta; Solà-Adell, Cristina; Arranz, José A; Arroba, Ana I; Valverde, Angela M; Simó, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Retinal neurodegeneration is an early event in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR). Since glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) exerts neuroprotective effects in the central nervous system and the retina is ontogenically a brain-derived tissue, the aims of the current study were as follows: 1) to examine the expression and content of GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) in human and db/db mice retinas; 2) to determine the retinal neuroprotective effects of systemic and topical administration (eye drops) of GLP-1R agonists in db/db mice; and 3) to examine the underlying neuroprotective mechanisms. We have found abundant expression of GLP-1R in the human retina and retinas from db/db mice. Moreover, we have demonstrated that systemic administration of a GLP-1R agonist (liraglutide) prevents retinal neurodegeneration (glial activation, neural apoptosis, and electroretinographical abnormalities). This effect can be attributed to a significant reduction of extracellular glutamate and an increase of prosurvival signaling pathways. We have found a similar neuroprotective effect using topical administration of native GLP-1 and several GLP-1R agonists (liraglutide, lixisenatide, and exenatide). Notably, this neuroprotective action was observed without any reduction in blood glucose levels. These results suggest that GLP-1R activation itself prevents retinal neurodegeneration. Our results should open up a new approach in the treatment of the early stages of DR. PMID:26384381

  17. GLP-1 Receptor Agonists: Nonglycemic Clinical Effects in Weight Loss and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Donna; Acosta, Andres

    2015-01-01

    Obective Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are indicated for treatment of type 2 diabetes since they mimic the actions of native GLP-1 on pancreatic islet cells, stimulating insulin release, while inhibiting glucagon release, in a glucose-dependent manner. The observation of weight loss has led to exploration of their potential as antiobesity agents, with liraglutide 3.0 mg day−1 approved for weight management in the US on December 23, 2014, and in the EU on March 23, 2015. This review examines the potential nonglycemic effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists. Methods A literature search was conducted to identify preclinical and clinical evidence on nonglycemic effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists. Results GLP-1 receptors are distributed widely in a number of tissues in humans, and their effects are not limited to the well-recognized effects on glycemia. Nonglycemic effects include weight loss, which is perhaps the most widely recognized nonglycemic effect. In addition, effects on the cardiovascular, neurologic, and renal systems and on taste perception may occur independently of weight loss. Conclusions GLP-1 receptor agonists may provide other nonglycemic clinical effects besides weight loss. Understanding these effects is important for prescribers in using GLP-1 receptor agonists for diabetic patients, but also if approved for chronic weight management. PMID:25959380

  18. Nutrient induced type 2 and chemical induced type 1 experimental diabetes differently modulate gastric GLP-1 receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Olga; Broide, Efrat; Ben-Yehudah, Gilad; Cantrell, Dror; Shirin, Haim; Rapoport, Micha J

    2015-01-01

    T2DM patients demonstrate reduced GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) expression in their gastric glands. Whether induced T2DM and T1DM differently affect the gastric GLP-1R expression is not known. This study assessed extrapancreatic GLP-1R system in glandular stomach of rodents with different types of experimental diabetes. T2DM and T1DM were induced in Psammomys obesus (PO) by high-energy (HE) diet and by streptozotocin (STZ) in Sprague Dawly (SD) rats, respectively. GLP-1R expression was determined in glandular stomach by RT PCR and immunohistomorphological analysis. The mRNA expression and cellular association of the GLP-1R in principal glands were similar in control PO and SD rats. However, nutrient and chemical induced diabetes resulted in opposite alterations of glandular GLP-1R expression. Diabetic PO demonstrated increased GLP-1R mRNA expression, intensity of cellular GLP-1R immunostaining, and frequency of GLP-1R positive cells in the neck area of principal glands compared with controls. In contrast, SD diabetic rats demonstrated decreased GLP-1 mRNA, cellular GLP-1R immunoreactivity, and frequency of GLP-1R immunoreactive cells in the neck area compared with controls. In conclusion, nutrient and chemical induced experimental diabetes result in distinct opposite alterations of GLP-1R expression in glandular stomach. These results suggest that induced T1DM and T2DM may differently modulate GLP-1R system in enteropancreatic axis. PMID:25893200

  19. Nutrient Induced Type 2 and Chemical Induced Type 1 Experimental Diabetes Differently Modulate Gastric GLP-1 Receptor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Bloch, Olga; Broide, Efrat; Ben-Yehudah, Gilad; Cantrell, Dror; Shirin, Haim; Rapoport, Micha J.

    2015-01-01

    T2DM patients demonstrate reduced GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) expression in their gastric glands. Whether induced T2DM and T1DM differently affect the gastric GLP-1R expression is not known. This study assessed extrapancreatic GLP-1R system in glandular stomach of rodents with different types of experimental diabetes. T2DM and T1DM were induced in Psammomys obesus (PO) by high-energy (HE) diet and by streptozotocin (STZ) in Sprague Dawly (SD) rats, respectively. GLP-1R expression was determined in glandular stomach by RT PCR and immunohistomorphological analysis. The mRNA expression and cellular association of the GLP-1R in principal glands were similar in control PO and SD rats. However, nutrient and chemical induced diabetes resulted in opposite alterations of glandular GLP-1R expression. Diabetic PO demonstrated increased GLP-1R mRNA expression, intensity of cellular GLP-1R immunostaining, and frequency of GLP-1R positive cells in the neck area of principal glands compared with controls. In contrast, SD diabetic rats demonstrated decreased GLP-1 mRNA, cellular GLP-1R immunoreactivity, and frequency of GLP-1R immunoreactive cells in the neck area compared with controls. In conclusion, nutrient and chemical induced experimental diabetes result in distinct opposite alterations of GLP-1R expression in glandular stomach. These results suggest that induced T1DM and T2DM may differently modulate GLP-1R system in enteropancreatic axis. PMID:25893200

  20. Desensitization and phosphorylation of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor by GLP-1 and 4-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate.

    PubMed

    Widmann, C; Dolci, W; Thorens, B

    1996-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) stimulates glucose-induced insulin secretion by binding to a specific G protein-coupled receptor linked to activation of the adenylyl cyclase pathway. Here, using insulinoma cell lines, we studied homologous and heterologous desensitization of GLP-1-induced cAMP production. Preexposure of the cells to GLP-1 induced a decrease in GLP-1-mediated cAMP production, as assessed by a 3- to 5-fold rightward shift of the dose-response curve and an approximately 20 percent decrease in the maximal production of cAMP. Activation of protein kinase C by the phorbol ester phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) also induced desensitization of the GLP-1-mediated response, leading to a 6- to 9-fold shift in the EC50 and a 30% decrease in the maximal production of cAMP. Both forms of desensitization were additive, and the protein kinase C inhibitor RO-318220 inhibited PMA-induced desensitization, but not agonist-induced desensitization. GLP-1- and PMA-dependent desensitization correlated with receptor phosphorylation, and the levels of phosphorylation induced by the two agents were additive. Furthermore, PMA-induced, but not GLP-1-induced, phosphorylation was totally inhibited by RO-318220. Internalization of the GLP-1 receptor did not participate in the desensitization induced by PMA, as a mutant GLP-1 receptor lacking the last 20 amino acids of the cytoplasmic tail was found to be totally resistant to the internalization process, but was still desensitized after PMA preexposure. PMA and GLP-1 were not able to induce the phosphorylation of a receptor deletion mutant lacking the last 33 amino acids of the cytoplasmic tail, indicating that the phosphorylation sites were located within the deleted region. The cAMP production mediated by this deletion mutant was not desensitized by PMA and was only poorly desensitized by GLP-1. Together, our results indicate that the production of cAMP and, hence, the stimulation of insulin secretion induced by GLP-1 can be negatively modulated by homologous and heterologous desensitization, mechanisms that involve receptor phosphorylation. PMID:8838146

  1. Functional Characterization of N-Terminally GFP-Tagged GLP-1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Bavec, Aljoša; Ličar, Alenka

    2009-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1 receptor) mediates important effects on peripheral tissues and the central nervous system. It seems one of the most promising therapeutic targets for treatment of diabetes mellitus type 2. Surprisingly, very little is known about the cellular mechanisms that regulate its function in vivo. One of the approaches to study receptor dynamics, expression, or signaling is using GFP-tagged fluorescent proteins. In this study, we synthesized and characterized N-terminally GFP-tagged GLP-1 (GFP-GLP-1) receptor in CHO cells. We demonstrated that GFP-GLP-1 receptor is weakly expressed in the plasma membranes and is functionally coupled to adenylyl cyclase via heterotrimeric G-proteins, similarly as its wild type. PMID:19859570

  2. The arcuate nucleus mediates GLP-1 receptor agonist liraglutide-dependent weight loss

    PubMed Central

    Secher, Anna; Jelsing, Jacob; Baquero, Arian F.; Hecksher-Sørensen, Jacob; Cowley, Michael A.; Dalbøge, Louise S.; Hansen, Gitte; Grove, Kevin L.; Pyke, Charles; Raun, Kirsten; Schäffer, Lauge; Tang-Christensen, Mads; Verma, Saurabh; Witgen, Brent M.; Vrang, Niels; Bjerre Knudsen, Lotte

    2014-01-01

    Liraglutide is a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analog marketed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Besides lowering blood glucose, liraglutide also reduces body weight. It is not fully understood how liraglutide induces weight loss or to what degree liraglutide acts directly in the brain. Here, we determined that liraglutide does not activate GLP-1–producing neurons in the hindbrain, and liraglutide-dependent body weight reduction in rats was independent of GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1Rs) in the vagus nerve, area postrema, and paraventricular nucleus. Peripheral injection of fluorescently labeled liraglutide in mice revealed the presence of the drug in the circumventricular organs. Moreover, labeled liraglutide bound neurons within the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and other discrete sites in the hypothalamus. GLP-1R was necessary for liraglutide uptake in the brain, as liraglutide binding was not seen in Glp1r–/– mice. In the ARC, liraglutide was internalized in neurons expressing proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART). Electrophysiological measurements of murine brain slices revealed that GLP-1 directly stimulates POMC/CART neurons and indirectly inhibits neurotransmission in neurons expressing neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-related peptide (AgRP) via GABA-dependent signaling. Collectively, our findings indicate that the GLP-1R on POMC/CART-expressing ARC neurons likely mediates liraglutide-induced weight loss. PMID:25202980

  3. GLP-1 Receptor Agonists and the Thyroid: C-Cell Effects in Mice Are Mediated via the GLP-1 Receptor and not Associated with RET Activation

    PubMed Central

    Knauf, Jeffrey A.; Gotfredsen, Carsten; Pilling, Andrew; Sjögren, Ingrid; Andersen, Søren; Andersen, Lene; Sietske de Boer, Anne; Manova, Katia; Barlas, Afsar; Vundavalli, Sushil; Nyborg, Niels C. Berg; Bjerre Knudsen, Lotte; Moelck, Anne Marie

    2012-01-01

    Liraglutide and exenatide are glucagon-like peptide receptor (GLP-1R) agonists used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Both molecules have been associated with the development of thyroid C-cell tumors after lifetime exposure in rodents. Previously, it has been reported that these tumors are preceded by increased plasma calcitonin and C-cell hyperplasia. We can now document that the murine C-cell effects are mediated via GLP-1R. Thus, 13 wk of continuous exposure to GLP-1R agonists was associated with marked increases in plasma calcitonin and in the incidence of C-cell hyperplasia in wild-type mice. In contrast, similar effects were not seen in GLP-1R knockout mice. Human C-cell cancer is often caused by activating mutations in the rearranged-during-transfection (RET) protooncogene. We developed an immunohistochemical method to assess RET activation in tissues. Liraglutide dosing to mice was not found to activate RET. Further evaluation of the signaling pathways demonstrated that liraglutide increased ribosomal S6, but not MAPK kinase, phosphorylation. These observations are consistent with effects of GLP-1R agonists on rodent C cells being mediated via mammalian target of rapamycin activation in a RET- and MAPK-independent manner. PMID:22234463

  4. Endocrine and metabolic effects of Glucagon like peptide 1 receptor agonists (GLP1RA).

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay; Gupta, Yashdeep

    2016-03-01

    This brief review describes the potential non-glycaemic effects and benefits of glucagon like peptide 1 receptor agonists (GLP1RA). It lists various indications in which this class of drugs has been used, and explains the rationale behind this use. The potential uses of GLP1RA extend across the entire spectrum of endocrinology and metabolism, from hypothalamic obesity to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) to polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The article also discusses and addresses endocrine-related concerns related to the GLP1RAs. PMID:26968296

  5. Hindbrain GLP-1 receptor mediation of cisplatin-induced anorexia and nausea.

    PubMed

    De Jonghe, Bart C; Holland, Ruby A; Olivos, Diana R; Rupprecht, Laura E; Kanoski, Scott E; Hayes, Matthew R

    2016-01-01

    While chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting are clinically controlled in the acute (<24 h) phase following treatment, the anorexia, nausea, fatigue, and other illness-type behaviors during the delayed phase (>24 h) of chemotherapy are largely uncontrolled. As the hindbrain glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) system contributes to energy balance and mediates aversive and stressful stimuli, here we examine the hypothesis that hindbrain GLP-1 signaling mediates aspects of chemotherapy-induced nausea and reductions in feeding behavior in rats. Specifically, hindbrain GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) blockade, via 4th intracerebroventricular (ICV) exendin-(9-39) injections, attenuates the anorexia, body weight reduction, and pica (nausea-induced ingestion of kaolin clay) elicited by cisplatin chemotherapy during the delayed phase (48 h) of chemotherapy-induced nausea. Additionally, the present data provide evidence that the central GLP-1-producing preproglucagon neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) of the caudal brainstem are activated by cisplatin during the delayed phase of chemotherapy-induced nausea, as cisplatin led to a significant increase in c-Fos immunoreactivity in NTS GLP-1-immunoreactive neurons. These data support a growing body of literature suggesting that the central GLP-1 system may be a potential pharmaceutical target for adjunct anti-emetics used to treat the delayed-phase of nausea and emesis, anorexia, and body weight loss that accompany chemotherapy treatments. PMID:26522737

  6. Berberine induces GLP-1 secretion through activation of bitter taste receptor pathways.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yunli; Hao, Gang; Zhang, Quanying; Hua, Wenyan; Wang, Meng; Zhou, Wenjia; Zong, Shunlin; Huang, Ming; Wen, Xiaozhou

    2015-09-15

    Our previous studies revealed that berberine-mediated GLP-1 secretion was a possible mechanism for berberine exerting good effects on hyperglycemia. This study was designed to ascertain whether berberine-induced secretion of GLP-1 was related with activation of bitter taste receptors expressed in gastrointestinal tract. Western blotting results showed that TAS2R38, a subtype of bitter taste receptor, was expressed on human enteroendocrine NCI-H716 cells. GLP-1 secretion induced by berberine from NCI-H716 cells was inhibited by incubation with anti-TAS2R38 antibody. We further performed gene silencing using siRNA to knockdown TAS2R38 from NCI-H716 cells, which showed that siRNA knockdown of the TAS2R38 reduced berberine-mediated GLP-1 secretion. We adopted inhibitors of PLC and TRPM5 known to be involved in bitter taste transduction to investigate the underlying pathways mediated in berberine-induced GLP-1 secretion. It was found that PLC inhibitor U73122 inhibited berberine-induced GLP-1 release in NCI-H716 cells, while TRPM5 blocker quinine failed to attenuate berberine-induced secretion of GLP-1. The present results demonstrated that berberine stimulated GLP-1 secretion via activation of gut-expressed bitter taste receptors in a PLC-dependent manner. Because berberine was found to be a ligand of bitter taste receptor, the results of present study may provide an explanation for some bitter taste substance obtain hypoglycemic effect. PMID:26206195

  7. A Novel Humanized GLP-1 Receptor Model Enables Both Affinity Purification and Cre-LoxP Deletion of the Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Lucy S.; Showalter, Aaron D.; Ali, Nosher; Dai, Feihan; Ma, Wenzhen; Coskun, Tamer; Ficorilli, James V.; Wheeler, Michael B.; Michael, M. Dodson; Sloop, Kyle W.

    2014-01-01

    Class B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are important regulators of endocrine physiology, and peptide-based therapeutics targeting some of these receptors have proven effective at treating disorders such as hypercalcemia, osteoporosis, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). As next generation efforts attempt to develop novel non-peptide, orally available molecules for these GPCRs, new animal models expressing human receptor orthologs may be required because small molecule ligands make fewer receptor contacts, and thus, the impact of amino acid differences across species may be substantially greater. The objective of this report was to generate and characterize a new mouse model of the human glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (hGLP-1R), a class B GPCR for which established peptide therapeutics exist for the treatment of T2DM. hGLP-1R knock-in mice express the receptor from the murine Glp-1r locus. Glucose tolerance tests and gastric emptying studies show hGLP-1R mice and their wild-type littermates display similar physiological responses for glucose metabolism, insulin secretion, and gastric transit, and treatment with the GLP-1R agonist, exendin-4, elicits similar responses in both groups. Further, ex vivo assays show insulin secretion from humanized islets is glucose-dependent and enhanced by GLP-1R agonists. To enable additional utility, the targeting construct of the knock-in line was engineered to contain both flanking LoxP sites and a C-terminal FLAG epitope. Anti-FLAG affinity purification shows strong expression of hGLP-1R in islets, lung, and stomach. We crossed the hGLP-1R line with Rosa26Cre mice and generated global Glp-1r−/− animals. Immunohistochemistry of pancreas from humanized and knock-out mice identified a human GLP-1R-specific antibody that detects the GLP-1R in human pancreas as well as in the pancreas of hGLP-1r knock-in mice. This new hGLP-1R model will allow tissue-specific deletion of the GLP-1R, purification of potential GLP-1R partner proteins, and testing of novel therapeutic agents targeting the hGLP-1R. PMID:24695667

  8. Geniposide and its iridoid analogs exhibit antinociception by acting at the spinal GLP-1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Gong, Nian; Fan, Hui; Ma, Ai-Niu; Xiao, Qi; Wang, Yong-Xiang

    2014-09-01

    We recently discovered that the activation of the spinal glucagon-like peptide-1 receptors (GLP-1Rs) by the peptidic agonist exenatide produced antinociception in chronic pain. We suggested that the spinal GLP-1Rs are a potential target molecule for the management of chronic pain. This study evaluated the antinociceptive activities of geniposide, a presumed small molecule GLP-1R agonist. Geniposide produced concentration-dependent, complete protection against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative damage in PC12 and HEK293 cells expressing rat and human GLP-1Rs, but not in HEK293T cells that do not express GLP-1Rs. The orthosteric GLP-1R antagonist exendin(9-39) right-shifted the concentration-response curve of geniposide without changing the maximal protection, with identical pA2 values in both cell lines. Subcutaneous and oral geniposide dose-dependently blocked the formalin-induced tonic response but not the acute flinching response. Subcutaneous and oral geniposide had maximum inhibition of 72% and 68%, and ED50s of 13.1 and 52.7 mg/kg, respectively. Seven days of multidaily subcutaneous geniposide and exenatide injections did not induce antinociceptive tolerance. Intrathecal geniposide induced dose-dependent antinociception, which was completely prevented by spinal exendin(9-39), siRNA/GLP-1R and cyclic AMP/PKA pathway inhibitors. The geniposide iridoid analogs geniposidic acid, genipin methyl ether, 1,10-anhydrogenipin, loganin and catalpol effectively inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative damage and formalin pain in an exendin(9-39)-reversible manner. Our results suggest that geniposide and its iridoid analogs produce antinociception during persistent pain by activating the spinal GLP-1Rs and that the iridoids represented by geniposide are orthosteric agonists of GLP-1Rs that function similarly in humans and rats and presumably act at the same binding site as exendin(9-39). PMID:24747181

  9. Targeting Incretins in Type 2 Diabetes: Role of GLP-1 Receptor Agonists and DPP-4 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Pratley, Richard E.; Gilbert, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    Until recently, the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has been conceptualized in terms of the predominant defects in insulin secretion and insulin action. It is now recognized that abnormalities in other hormones also contribute to the development of hyperglycemia. For example, the incretin effect, mediated by glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP), is attenuated in T2DM. Intravenous administration of GLP-1 ameliorates hyperglycemia in patients with T2DM, but an extremely short half-life limits its utility as a therapeutic agent. Strategies to leverage the beneficial effects of GLP-1 include GLP-1 receptor agonists or analogs or dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors—agents that act by slowing the inactivation of endogenous GLP-1 and GIP. The GLP-1 agonist exenatide has been shown to improve HbA1c and decrease body weight. However, exenatide is limited by its relatively short pharmacologic half-life, various gastrointestinal (GI) side effects, and the development of antibodies. Studies of a long-acting exenatide formulation suggest that it has improved efficacy and also promotes weight loss. Another prospect is liraglutide, a once-daily human GLP-1 analog. In phase 2 studies, liraglutide lowered HbA1c by up to 1.7% and weight by approximately 3 kg, with apparently fewer GI side effects than exenatide. DPP-4 inhibitors such as sitagliptin and vildagliptin result in clinically significant reductions in HbA1c, and are weight neutral with few GI side effects. This review will provide an overview of current and emerging agents that augment the incretin system with a focus on the role of GLP-1 receptor agonists and DPP-4 inhibitors. PMID:18795210

  10. Effects of GLP-1 and Incretin-Based Therapies on Gastrointestinal Motor Function

    PubMed Central

    Marathe, Chinmay S.; Rayner, Christopher K.; Jones, Karen L.; Horowitz, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is a hormone secreted predominantly by the distal small intestine and colon and released in response to enteral nutrient exposure. GLP-1-based therapies are now used widely in the management of type 2 diabetes and have the potential to be effective antiobesity agents. Although widely known as an incretin hormone, there is a growing body of evidence that GLP-1 also acts as an enterogastrone, with profound effects on the gastrointestinal motor system. Moreover, the effects of GLP-1 on gastrointestinal motility appear to be pivotal to its effect of reducing postprandial glycaemic excursions and may, potentially, represent the dominant mechanism. This review summarizes current knowledge of the enterogastrone properties of GLP-1, focusing on its effects on gut motility at physiological and pharmacological concentrations, and the motor actions of incretin-based therapies. While of potential importance, the inhibitory action of GLP-1 on gastric acid secretion is beyond the scope of this paper. PMID:21747825

  11. Hippocampal GLP-1 Receptors Influence Food Intake, Meal Size, and Effort-Based Responding for Food through Volume Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Ted M; Hahn, Joel D; Konanur, Vaibhav R; Lam, Ashley; Kanoski, Scott E

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is produced in the small intestines and in nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) neurons. Activation of central GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1Rs) reduces feeding and body weight. The neural circuits mediating these effects are only partially understood. Here we investigate the inhibition of food intake and motivated responding for food in rats following GLP-1R activation in the ventral hippocampal formation (HPFv), a region only recently highlighted in food intake control. Increased HPFv GLP-1R activity following exendin-4 administration potently reduced food intake (both chow and Western diet) and body weight, whereas HPFv GLP-1R blockade increased food intake. These hypophagic effects were based on reduced meal size, and likely do not involve nausea as HPFv exendin-4 did not induce a conditioned flavor avoidance. HPFv GLP-1R activation also reduced effort-based responding for food under an operant progressive ratio reinforcement schedule, but did not affect food conditioned place preference expression. To investigate possible routes of HPFv GLP-1 signaling, immunohistochemical analysis revealed the absence of GLP-1 axon terminals in the HPFv, suggesting volume transmission as a mechanism of action. Consistent with this, the presence of active GLP-1 was detected in both the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and the HPFv. The source of CSF GLP-1 may be NTS GLP-1-producing neurons, as, (1) ∼30% of NTS GLP-1 neurons colocalized with the retrograde tracer fluorogold (FG) following lateral ventricle FG injection, and (2) GLP-1-immunoreactive axon terminals were observed adjacent to the ventricular ependymal layer. Collectively these findings illuminate novel neuronal and behavioral mechanisms mediating food intake reduction by GLP-1. PMID:25035078

  12. Hippocampal GLP-1 receptors influence food intake, meal size, and effort-based responding for food through volume transmission.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ted M; Hahn, Joel D; Konanur, Vaibhav R; Lam, Ashley; Kanoski, Scott E

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is produced in the small intestines and in nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) neurons. Activation of central GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1Rs) reduces feeding and body weight. The neural circuits mediating these effects are only partially understood. Here we investigate the inhibition of food intake and motivated responding for food in rats following GLP-1R activation in the ventral hippocampal formation (HPFv), a region only recently highlighted in food intake control. Increased HPFv GLP-1R activity following exendin-4 administration potently reduced food intake (both chow and Western diet) and body weight, whereas HPFv GLP-1R blockade increased food intake. These hypophagic effects were based on reduced meal size, and likely do not involve nausea as HPFv exendin-4 did not induce a conditioned flavor avoidance. HPFv GLP-1R activation also reduced effort-based responding for food under an operant progressive ratio reinforcement schedule, but did not affect food conditioned place preference expression. To investigate possible routes of HPFv GLP-1 signaling, immunohistochemical analysis revealed the absence of GLP-1 axon terminals in the HPFv, suggesting volume transmission as a mechanism of action. Consistent with this, the presence of active GLP-1 was detected in both the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and the HPFv. The source of CSF GLP-1 may be NTS GLP-1-producing neurons, as, (1) ∼30% of NTS GLP-1 neurons colocalized with the retrograde tracer fluorogold (FG) following lateral ventricle FG injection, and (2) GLP-1-immunoreactive axon terminals were observed adjacent to the ventricular ependymal layer. Collectively these findings illuminate novel neuronal and behavioral mechanisms mediating food intake reduction by GLP-1. PMID:25035078

  13. The Aversive Agent Lithium Chloride Suppresses Phasic Dopamine Release Through Central GLP-1 Receptors.

    PubMed

    Fortin, Samantha M; Chartoff, Elena H; Roitman, Mitchell F

    2016-02-01

    Unconditioned rewarding stimuli evoke phasic increases in dopamine concentration in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) while discrete aversive stimuli elicit pauses in dopamine neuron firing and reductions in NAc dopamine concentration. The unconditioned effects of more prolonged aversive states on dopamine release dynamics are not well understood and are investigated here using the malaise-inducing agent lithium chloride (LiCl). We used fast-scan cyclic voltammetry to measure phasic increases in NAc dopamine resulting from electrical stimulation of dopamine cell bodies in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Systemic LiCl injection reduced electrically evoked dopamine release in the NAc of both anesthetized and awake rats. As some behavioral effects of LiCl appear to be mediated through glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) activation, we hypothesized that the suppression of phasic dopamine by LiCl is GLP-1R dependent. Indeed, peripheral pretreatment with the GLP-1R antagonist exendin-9 (Ex-9) potently attenuated the LiCl-induced suppression of dopamine. Pretreatment with Ex-9 did not, however, affect the suppression of phasic dopamine release by the kappa-opioid receptor agonist, salvinorin A, supporting a selective effect of GLP-1R stimulation in LiCl-induced dopamine suppression. By delivering Ex-9 to either the lateral or fourth ventricle, we highlight a population of central GLP-1 receptors rostral to the hindbrain that are involved in the LiCl-mediated suppression of NAc dopamine release. PMID:26211731

  14. Treatment with a GLP-1 receptor agonist diminishes the decrease in free plasma leptin during maintenance of weight loss

    PubMed Central

    Iepsen, E W; Lundgren, J; Dirksen, C; Jensen, J-EB; Pedersen, O; Hansen, T; Madsbad, S; Holst, J J; Torekov, S S

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent studies indicate that glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 inhibits appetite in part through regulation of soluble leptin receptors. Thus, during weight loss maintenance, GLP-1 receptor agonist (GLP-1RA) administration may inhibit weight loss-induced increases in soluble leptin receptors thereby preserving free leptin levels and preventing weight regain. Methods: In a randomized controlled trial, 52 healthy obese individuals were, after a diet-induced 12% body weight loss, randomized to treatment with or without administration of the GLP-1RA liraglutide (1.2 mg per day). In case of weight gain, low-calorie diet products were allowed to replace up to two meals per day to achieve equal weight maintenance. Glucose tolerance and hormone responses were investigated before and after weight loss and after 52 weeks weight maintenance. Primary end points: increase in soluble leptin receptor plasma levels and decrease in free leptin index after 52 weeks weight loss maintenance. Results: Soluble leptin receptor increase was 59% lower; 2.1±0.7 vs 5.1±0.8 ng ml−1 (−3.0 (95% confidence interval (CI)=−0.5 to −5.5)), P<0.001 and free leptin index decrease was 43% smaller; −62±15 vs −109±20 (−47 (95% CI=−11 to −83)), P<0.05 with administration of GLP-1RA compared with control group. The 12% weight loss was successfully maintained in both the groups with no significant change in weight after 52 weeks follow-up. The GLP-1RA group had greater weight loss during the weight maintenance period (−2.3 kg (95% CI=−0.6 to −4.0)), and had fewer meal replacements per day compared with the control group (minus one meal per day (95% CI=−0.6 to −1)), P<0.001. Fasting glucose was decreased by an additional −0.2±0.1 mmol l−1 in the GLP-1RA group in contrast to the control group, where glucose increased 0.3±0.1 mmol l−1 to the level before weight loss (−0.5mmol l−1 (95% CI=−0.1 to −0.9)), P<0.005. Meal response of peptide PYY3–36 was higher at week 52 in the GLP-1RA group compared with the control group, P<0.05. Conclusions: The weight maintaining effect of GLP-1RAs may be mediated by smaller decrease in free leptin and higher PYY3–36 response. Low dose GLP-1RA therapy maintained 12% weight loss for 1 year and may prevent pre-diabetes in obesity. PMID:25287751

  15. GLP-1 receptor is expressed in human stomach mucosa: analysis of its cellular association and distribution within gastric glands.

    PubMed

    Broide, Efrat; Bloch, Olga; Ben-Yehudah, Gilad; Cantrell, Dror; Shirin, Haim; Rapoport, Micha J

    2013-09-01

    The stomach is a target organ of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). However, the cellular expression and glandular distribution of its receptor (GLP-1R) in human gastric mucosa are not known. We determined the expression of GLP-1R in different regions of human stomach mucosa and its specific cellular association and distribution within gastric glands. Tissue samples from stomach body and antrum were obtained from 20 patients during routine esophagogastroduodenoscopy. mRNA encoding GLP-1R protein expression was evaluated by RT-PCR. Determination of cell types bearing GLP-1R, their localization, and their frequency in gastric glands in different gastric regions were estimated by immunohistochemical morphological analysis. Levels of GLP-1R mRNA were similar in body and antrum. GLP-1R immunoreactivity was found throughout the gastric mucosa in various types of glandular cells. The highest frequency of GLP-1R immunoreactive cells was found in the neck area of the principal glands in cells morphologically identified as parietal cells. GLP-1R immunostaining was also found on enteroendocrine-like cells in the pyloric glands. This study provides the first description of GLP-1R expression in human gastric glands and its specific cellular association. Our data suggest that GLP-1 may act directly on the gastric mucosa to modulate its complex functions. PMID:23803499

  16. Assessment of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Analogue and Renin Inhibitor on the Binding and Regulation of GLP-1 Receptor in Type 1 Diabetic Rat Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Artinian, Shushan B.; Al Lafi, Sawsan M.; Boutary, Suzan S.; Bitar, Khalil M.; Zwainy, Nadine S.; Bikhazi, Anwar B.

    2011-01-01

    This study focuses on the effects of long-term renin-angiotensin system suppression and/or incretin mimetic therapies on the regulation and binding affinity of GLP-1 to its receptor in the coronary endothelium (CE) and cardiomyocytes (CMs) of type 1 diabetic male Sprague-Dawley rats. The groups assessed are normal (N), streptozotocin-induced diabetic (D), Insulin treated (DI), Exendin-4 treated (DE), Aliskiren treated (DA), cotreated with Insulin and Aliskiren (DIA) and cotreated with exendin-4 and Aliskiren (DEA). Heart perfusion with 125I-GLP-1 was performed to estimate GLP-1 binding affinity (τ = 1/k-n) to its receptor in the heart. Western Blotting was assessed to determine the expression variation of GLP-1 receptor in the heart. Plasma GLP-1 levels were measured using Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). Diabetes decreased the τ value on CE and increased it on CMs compared to normal. The combination of Exendin-4 with Aliskiren showed a normalizing effect on the binding affinity of GLP-1 at the coronary endothelium, while at the cardiomyocyte level Exendin-4 treatment alone was the most effective. PMID:21747829

  17. Ligand Binding Pocket Formed by Evolutionarily Conserved Residues in the Glucagon-like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Receptor Core Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Mi Jin; Lee, Yoo-Na; Park, Sumi; Reyes-Alcaraz, Arfaxad; Hwang, Jong-Ik; Millar, Robert Peter; Choe, Han; Seong, Jae Young

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) plays a pivotal role in glucose homeostasis through its receptor GLP1R. Due to its multiple beneficial effects, GLP-1 has gained great attention for treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism underlying the interaction of GLP-1 with the heptahelical core domain of GLP1R conferring high affinity ligand binding and ligand-induced receptor activation. Here, using chimeric and point-mutated GLP1R, we determined that the evolutionarily conserved amino acid residue Arg380 flanked by hydrophobic Leu379 and Phe381 in extracellular loop 3 (ECL3) may have an interaction with Asp9 and Gly4 of the GLP-1 peptide. The molecular modeling study showed that Ile196 at transmembrane helix 2, Met233 at ECL1, and Asn302 at ECL2 of GLP1R have contacts with His1 and Thr7 of GLP-1. This study may shed light on the mechanism underlying high affinity interaction between the ligand and the binding pocket that is formed by these conserved residues in the GLP1R core domain. PMID:25561730

  18. Ligand binding pocket formed by evolutionarily conserved residues in the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor core domain.

    PubMed

    Moon, Mi Jin; Lee, Yoo-Na; Park, Sumi; Reyes-Alcaraz, Arfaxad; Hwang, Jong-Ik; Millar, Robert Peter; Choe, Han; Seong, Jae Young

    2015-02-27

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) plays a pivotal role in glucose homeostasis through its receptor GLP1R. Due to its multiple beneficial effects, GLP-1 has gained great attention for treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism underlying the interaction of GLP-1 with the heptahelical core domain of GLP1R conferring high affinity ligand binding and ligand-induced receptor activation. Here, using chimeric and point-mutated GLP1R, we determined that the evolutionarily conserved amino acid residue Arg(380) flanked by hydrophobic Leu(379) and Phe(381) in extracellular loop 3 (ECL3) may have an interaction with Asp(9) and Gly(4) of the GLP-1 peptide. The molecular modeling study showed that Ile(196) at transmembrane helix 2, Met(233) at ECL1, and Asn(302) at ECL2 of GLP1R have contacts with His(1) and Thr(7) of GLP-1. This study may shed light on the mechanism underlying high affinity interaction between the ligand and the binding pocket that is formed by these conserved residues in the GLP1R core domain. PMID:25561730

  19. GLP-1 receptor agonists: a review of head-to-head clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Nuffer, Wesley; Ellis, Samuel L.

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RA) are attractive options for the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D) because they effectively lower A1C and weight while having a low risk of hypoglycemia. The GLP-1 RA class has grown in the last decade with several agents available for use in the US and Europe and several more in development. Since the efficacy and tolerability, dosing frequency, administration requirements, and cost may vary between agents within the class, each agent may offer unique advantages and disadvantages. Through a review of phase III clinical programs for exenatide twice daily, exenatide once weekly, liraglutide, albiglutide, lixisenatide, and dulaglutide, eight head-to-head trials have evaluated the safety and efficacy of GLP-1 RA active comparators. The purpose of this review is to provide an analysis of these trials. The GLP-1 RA head-to-head clinical studies have demonstrated that all GLP-1 RA agents are effective therapeutic options at reducing A1C. However, differences exist in terms of magnitude of effect on A1C and weight as well as frequency and severity of adverse effects. PMID:25678953

  20. Lixisenatide, a novel GLP-1 receptor agonist for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Mikkel; Knop, Filip K; Holst, Jens J; Vilsboll, Tina

    2009-08-01

    Lixisenatide, under development by sanofi-aventis, is a novel human glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM; non-insulin dependent diabetes). The structure of lixisenatide, based on exendin-4(1-39) modified C-terminally with six Lys residues, is able to withstand physiological degradation by dipeptidyl peptidase IV. In vitro, lixisenatide bound to human GLP-1R with a greater affinity than native human GLP-1 (7-36 amide). In various in vitro and in vivo models of T2DM, lixisenatide improved glycemic measures and demonstrated promising pancreatic beta-cell-preserving actions. In patients with T2DM, subcutaneously administered lixisenatide displayed linear pharmacokinetics. In two phase II clinical trials, lixisenatide improved glucose tolerance, resulted in weight loss and lowered HbA1C, thereby causing significantly more patients to achieve target HbA1C levels compared with placebo. Lixisenatide exhibited well-established GLP-1-related gastrointestinal side effects, with mild nausea occurring most frequently; a low frequency of hypoglycemia was also reported. The results of phase III trials are awaited for confirmation of the anticipated effects of lixisenatide on glycemic measures and weight; favorable results would place lixisenatide for consideration among other GLP-1R agonists in the treatment armamentarium for T2DM. PMID:19629885

  1. Glucagon-like peptide-1(GLP-1) receptor agonists: potential to reduce fracture risk in diabetic patients?

    PubMed

    Luo, Guojing; Liu, Hong; Lu, Hongyun

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes current knowledge about glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RA) and their effects on bone metabolism and fracture risk. Recent in vivo and in vitro experiments indicated that GLP-1 RA could improve bone metabolism. GLP-1 could affect the fat-bone axis by promoting osteogenic differentiation and inhibiting adipogenic differentiation of bone mesenchymal precursor cells (BMSCs), which express the GLP-1 receptor. GLP-1 RA may also influence the balance between osteoclasts and osteoblasts, thus leading to more bone formation and less bone resorption. Wnt/β-catenin signalling is involved in this process. Mature osteocytes, which also express the GLP-1 receptor, produce sclerostin which inhibits Wnt/β-catenin signalling by binding to low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) 5 and preventing the binding of Wnt. GLP-1 RA also decreases the expression of sclerostin (SOST) and circulating levels of SOST. In addition, GLP-1 receptors are expressed in thyroid C cells, where GLP-1 induces calcitonin release and thus indirectly inhibits bone resorption. Furthermore, GLP-1 RA influences the osteoprotegerin(OPG)/receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)/receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK) system by increasing OPG gene expression, and thus reverses the decreased bone mass in rats models. However, a recent meta-analysis and a cohort study did not show a significant relationship between GLP-RA use and fracture risk. Future clinical trials will be necessary to investigate thoroughly the relationship between GLP-1 RA use and fracture risk in diabetic patients. PMID:27099876

  2. Comparative Effects of the Endogenous Agonist Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1)-(7-36) Amide and the Small-Molecule Ago-Allosteric Agent “Compound 2” at the GLP-1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Coopman, Karen; Huang, Yan; Johnston, Neil; Bradley, Sophie J.; Wilkinson, Graeme F.

    2010-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) mediates antidiabetogenic effects through the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R), which is targeted for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Small-molecule GLP-1R agonists have been sought due to difficulties with peptide therapeutics. Recently, 6,7-dichloro-2-methylsulfonyl-3-N-tert-butylaminoquinoxaline (compound 2) has been described as a GLP-1R allosteric modulator and agonist. Using human embryonic kidney-293 cells expressing human GLP-1Rs, we extended this work to consider the impact of compound 2 on G protein activation, Ca2+ signaling and receptor internalization and particularly to compare compound 2 and GLP-1 across a range of functional assays in intact cells. GLP-1 and compound 2 activated Gαs in cell membranes and increased cellular cAMP in intact cells, with compound 2 being a partial and almost full agonist, respectively. GLP-1 increased intracellular [Ca2+] by release from intracellular stores, which was mimicked by compound 2, with slower kinetics. In either intact cells or membranes, the orthosteric antagonist exendin-(9-39), inhibited GLP-1 cAMP generation but increased the efficacy of compound 2. GLP-1 internalized enhanced green fluorescent protein-tagged GLP-1Rs, but the speed and magnitude evoked by compound 2 were less. Exendin-(9-39) inhibited internalization by GLP-1 and also surprisingly that by compound 2. Compound 2 displays GLP-1R agonism consistent with action at an allosteric site, although an orthosteric antagonist increased its efficacy on cAMP and blocked compound 2-mediated receptor internalization. Full assessment of the properties of compound 2 was potentially hampered by damaging effects that were particularly manifest in either longer term assays with intact cells or in acute assays with membranes. PMID:20507928

  3. Comparative effects of the endogenous agonist glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-(7-36) amide and the small-molecule ago-allosteric agent "compound 2" at the GLP-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Coopman, Karen; Huang, Yan; Johnston, Neil; Bradley, Sophie J; Wilkinson, Graeme F; Willars, Gary B

    2010-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) mediates antidiabetogenic effects through the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R), which is targeted for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Small-molecule GLP-1R agonists have been sought due to difficulties with peptide therapeutics. Recently, 6,7-dichloro-2-methylsulfonyl-3-N-tert-butylaminoquinoxaline (compound 2) has been described as a GLP-1R allosteric modulator and agonist. Using human embryonic kidney-293 cells expressing human GLP-1Rs, we extended this work to consider the impact of compound 2 on G protein activation, Ca(2+) signaling and receptor internalization and particularly to compare compound 2 and GLP-1 across a range of functional assays in intact cells. GLP-1 and compound 2 activated Galpha(s) in cell membranes and increased cellular cAMP in intact cells, with compound 2 being a partial and almost full agonist, respectively. GLP-1 increased intracellular [Ca(2+)] by release from intracellular stores, which was mimicked by compound 2, with slower kinetics. In either intact cells or membranes, the orthosteric antagonist exendin-(9-39), inhibited GLP-1 cAMP generation but increased the efficacy of compound 2. GLP-1 internalized enhanced green fluorescent protein-tagged GLP-1Rs, but the speed and magnitude evoked by compound 2 were less. Exendin-(9-39) inhibited internalization by GLP-1 and also surprisingly that by compound 2. Compound 2 displays GLP-1R agonism consistent with action at an allosteric site, although an orthosteric antagonist increased its efficacy on cAMP and blocked compound 2-mediated receptor internalization. Full assessment of the properties of compound 2 was potentially hampered by damaging effects that were particularly manifest in either longer term assays with intact cells or in acute assays with membranes. PMID:20507928

  4. A Novel GLP1 Receptor Interacting Protein ATP6ap2 Regulates Insulin Secretion in Pancreatic Beta Cells.

    PubMed

    Dai, Feihan F; Bhattacharjee, Alpana; Liu, Ying; Batchuluun, Battsetseg; Zhang, Ming; Wang, Xinye Serena; Huang, Xinyi; Luu, Lemieux; Zhu, Dan; Gaisano, Herbert; Wheeler, Michael B

    2015-10-01

    GLP1 activates its receptor, GLP1R, to enhance insulin secretion. The activation and transduction of GLP1R requires complex interactions with a host of accessory proteins, most of which remain largely unknown. In this study, we used membrane-based split ubiquitin yeast two-hybrid assays to identify novel GLP1R interactors in both mouse and human islets. Among these, ATP6ap2 (ATPase H(+)-transporting lysosomal accessory protein 2) was identified in both mouse and human islet screens. ATP6ap2 was shown to be abundant in islets including both alpha and beta cells. When GLP1R and ATP6ap2 were co-expressed in beta cells, GLP1R was shown to directly interact with ATP6ap2, as assessed by co-immunoprecipitation. In INS-1 cells, overexpression of ATP6ap2 did not affect insulin secretion; however, siRNA knockdown decreased both glucose-stimulated and GLP1-induced insulin secretion. Decreases in GLP1-induced insulin secretion were accompanied by attenuated GLP1 stimulated cAMP accumulation. Because ATP6ap2 is a subunit required for V-ATPase assembly of insulin granules, it has been reported to be involved in granule acidification. In accordance with this, we observed impaired insulin granule acidification upon ATP6ap2 knockdown but paradoxically increased proinsulin secretion. Importantly, as a GLP1R interactor, ATP6ap2 was required for GLP1-induced Ca(2+) influx, in part explaining decreased insulin secretion in ATP6ap2 knockdown cells. Taken together, our findings identify a group of proteins that interact with the GLP1R. We further show that one interactor, ATP6ap2, plays a novel dual role in beta cells, modulating both GLP1R signaling and insulin processing to affect insulin secretion. PMID:26272612

  5. GLP1- and GIP-producing cells rarely overlap and differ by bombesin receptor-2 expression and responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Svendsen, Berit; Pais, Ramona; Engelstoft, Maja S; Milev, Nikolay B; Richards, Paul; Christiansen, Charlotte B; Egerod, Kristoffer L; Jensen, Signe M; Habib, Abdella M; Gribble, Fiona M; Schwartz, Thue W; Reimann, Frank; Holst, Jens J

    2016-01-01

    The incretin hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) are secreted from intestinal endocrine cells, the so-called L- and K-cells. The cells are derived from a common precursor and are highly related, and co-expression of the two hormones in so-called L/K-cells has been reported. To investigate the relationship between the GLP1- and GIP-producing cells more closely, we generated a transgenic mouse model expressing a fluorescent marker in GIP-positive cells. In combination with a mouse strain with fluorescent GLP1 cells, we were able to estimate the overlap between the two cell types. Furthermore, we used primary cultured intestinal cells and isolated perfused mouse intestine to measure the secretion of GIP and GLP1 in response to different stimuli. Overlapping GLP1 and GIP cells were rare (?5%). KCl, glucose and forskolin+IBMX increased the secretion of both GLP1 and GIP, whereas bombesin/neuromedin C only stimulated GLP1 secretion. Expression analysis showed high expression of the bombesin 2 receptor in GLP1 positive cells, but no expression in GIP-positive cells. These data indicate both expressional and functional differences between the GLP1-producing 'L-cell' and the GIP-producing 'K-cell'. PMID:26483393

  6. Progesterone receptor membrane component 1 is a functional part of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor complex in pancreatic β cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming; Robitaille, Mélanie; Showalter, Aaron D; Huang, Xinyi; Liu, Ying; Bhattacharjee, Alpana; Willard, Francis S; Han, Junfeng; Froese, Sean; Wei, Li; Gaisano, Herbert Y; Angers, Stéphane; Sloop, Kyle W; Dai, Feihan F; Wheeler, Michael B

    2014-11-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone that regulates glucose homeostasis. Because of their direct stimulation of insulin secretion from pancreatic β cells, GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists are now important therapeutic options for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. To better understand the mechanisms that control the insulinotropic actions of GLP-1, affinity purification and mass spectrometry (AP-MS) were employed to uncover potential proteins that functionally interact with the GLP-1R. AP-MS performed on Chinese hamster ovary cells or MIN6 β cells, both expressing the human GLP-1R, revealed 99 proteins potentially associated with the GLP-1R. Three novel GLP-1R interactors (PGRMC1, Rab5b, and Rab5c) were further validated through co-immunoprecipitation/immunoblotting, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and immunofluorescence. Functional studies revealed that overexpression of PGRMC1, a novel cell surface receptor that associated with liganded GLP-1R, enhanced GLP-1-induced insulin secretion (GIIS) with the most robust effect. Knockdown of PGRMC1 in β cells decreased GIIS, indicative of positive interaction with GLP-1R. To gain insight mechanistically, we demonstrated that the cell surface PGRMC1 ligand P4-BSA increased GIIS, whereas its antagonist AG-205 decreased GIIS. It was then found that PGRMC1 increased GLP-1-induced cAMP accumulation. PGRMC1 activation and GIIS induced by P4-BSA could be blocked by inhibition of adenylyl cyclase/EPAC signaling or the EGF receptor-PI3K signal transduction pathway. These data reveal a dual mechanism for PGRMC1-increased GIIS mediated through cAMP and EGF receptor signaling. In conclusion, we identified several novel GLP-1R interacting proteins. PGRMC1 expressed on the cell surface of β cells was shown to interact with the activated GLP-1R to enhance the insulinotropic actions of GLP-1. PMID:25044020

  7. Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component 1 Is a Functional Part of the Glucagon-like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Receptor Complex in Pancreatic β Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ming; Robitaille, Mélanie; Showalter, Aaron D.; Huang, Xinyi; Liu, Ying; Bhattacharjee, Alpana; Willard, Francis S.; Han, Junfeng; Froese, Sean; Wei, Li; Gaisano, Herbert Y.; Angers, Stéphane; Sloop, Kyle W.; Dai, Feihan F.; Wheeler, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone that regulates glucose homeostasis. Because of their direct stimulation of insulin secretion from pancreatic β cells, GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists are now important therapeutic options for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. To better understand the mechanisms that control the insulinotropic actions of GLP-1, affinity purification and mass spectrometry (AP-MS) were employed to uncover potential proteins that functionally interact with the GLP-1R. AP-MS performed on Chinese hamster ovary cells or MIN6 β cells, both expressing the human GLP-1R, revealed 99 proteins potentially associated with the GLP-1R. Three novel GLP-1R interactors (PGRMC1, Rab5b, and Rab5c) were further validated through co-immunoprecipitation/immunoblotting, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and immunofluorescence. Functional studies revealed that overexpression of PGRMC1, a novel cell surface receptor that associated with liganded GLP-1R, enhanced GLP-1-induced insulin secretion (GIIS) with the most robust effect. Knockdown of PGRMC1 in β cells decreased GIIS, indicative of positive interaction with GLP-1R. To gain insight mechanistically, we demonstrated that the cell surface PGRMC1 ligand P4-BSA increased GIIS, whereas its antagonist AG-205 decreased GIIS. It was then found that PGRMC1 increased GLP-1-induced cAMP accumulation. PGRMC1 activation and GIIS induced by P4-BSA could be blocked by inhibition of adenylyl cyclase/EPAC signaling or the EGF receptor–PI3K signal transduction pathway. These data reveal a dual mechanism for PGRMC1-increased GIIS mediated through cAMP and EGF receptor signaling. In conclusion, we identified several novel GLP-1R interacting proteins. PGRMC1 expressed on the cell surface of β cells was shown to interact with the activated GLP-1R to enhance the insulinotropic actions of GLP-1. PMID:25044020

  8. Pancreatic GLP-1 receptor activation is sufficient for incretin control of glucose metabolism in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lamont, Benjamin J.; Li, Yazhou; Kwan, Edwin; Brown, Theodore J.; Gaisano, Herbert; Drucker, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) circulates at low levels and acts as an incretin hormone, potentiating glucose-dependent insulin secretion from islet β cells. GLP-1 also modulates gastric emptying and engages neural circuits in the portal region and CNS that contribute to GLP-1 receptor–dependent (GLP-1R–dependent) regulation of glucose homeostasis. To elucidate the importance of pancreatic GLP-1R signaling for glucose homeostasis, we generated transgenic mice that expressed the human GLP-1R in islets and pancreatic ductal cells (Pdx1-hGLP1R:Glp1r–/– mice). Transgene expression restored GLP-1R–dependent stimulation of cAMP and Akt phosphorylation in isolated islets, conferred GLP-1R–dependent stimulation of β cell proliferation, and was sufficient for restoration of GLP-1–stimulated insulin secretion in perifused islets. Systemic GLP-1R activation with the GLP-1R agonist exendin-4 had no effect on food intake, hindbrain c-fos expression, or gastric emptying but improved glucose tolerance and stimulated insulin secretion in Pdx1-hGLP1R:Glp1r–/– mice. i.c.v. GLP-1R blockade with the antagonist exendin(9–39) impaired glucose tolerance in WT mice but had no effect in Pdx1-hGLP1R:Glp1r–/– mice. Nevertheless, transgenic expression of the pancreatic GLP-1R was sufficient to normalize both oral and i.p. glucose tolerance in Glp1r–/– mice. These findings illustrate that low levels of endogenous GLP-1 secreted from gut endocrine cells are capable of augmenting glucoregulatory activity via pancreatic GLP-1Rs independent of communication with neural pathways. PMID:22182839

  9. Blockade of cannabinoid 1 receptor improves GLP-1R mediated insulin secretion in mice.

    PubMed

    González-Mariscal, Isabel; Krzysik-Walker, Susan M; Kim, Wook; Rouse, Michael; Egan, Josephine M

    2016-03-01

    The cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1) is an important regulator of energy metabolism. Reports of in vivo and in vitro studies give conflicting results regarding its role in insulin secretion, possibly due to circulatory factors, such as incretins. We hypothesized that this receptor may be a regulator of the entero-insular axis. We found that despite lower food consumption and lower body weight postprandial GLP-1 plasma concentrations were increased in CB1(-/-) mice compared to CB1(+/+) mice administered a standard diet or high fat/sugar diet. Upon exogenous GLP-1 treatment, CB1(-/-) mice had increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. In mouse insulinoma cells, cannabinoids reduced GLP-1R-mediated intracellular cAMP accumulation and subsequent insulin secretion. Importantly, such effects were also evident in human islets, and were prevented by pharmacologic blockade of CB1. Collectively, these findings suggest a novel mechanism in which endocannabinoids are negative modulators of incretin-mediated insulin secretion. PMID:26724516

  10. GLP-1 receptor antagonist as a potential probe for pancreatic {beta}-cell imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Mukai, Eri; Japan Association for the Advancement of Medical Equipment, Tokyo ; Toyoda, Kentaro; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Kawashima, Hidekazu; Fujimoto, Hiroyuki; Japan Association for the Advancement of Medical Equipment, Tokyo ; Ueda, Masashi; Temma, Takashi; Hirao, Konomu; Nagakawa, Kenji; Saji, Hideo; Inagaki, Nobuya; CREST of Japan Science and Technology Cooperation , Kyoto

    2009-11-20

    We examined exendin(9-39), an antagonist of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor (GLP-1R), as a potential probe for imaging of pancreatic {beta}-cells. To evaluate in vitro receptor specificity, binding assay was performed using dispersed mouse islet cells. Binding assay showed competitive inhibition of [{sup 125}I]BH-exendin(9-39) binding by non-radioactive exendin(9-39). To assess in vivo selectivity, the biodistribution was evaluated by intravenous administration of [{sup 125}I]BH-exendin(9-39) to mice. Radioactivity of harvested pancreas reached highest levels at 60 and 120 min among organs examined except lung. Pre-administration of excess non-radioactive exendin(9-39) remarkably and specifically blocked the radioactivity of pancreas. After [{sup 125}I]BH-exendin(9-39) injection into transgenic mice with pancreatic {beta}-cells expressing GFP, fluorescent and radioactive signals of sections of pancreas were evaluated with an image analyzer. Imaging analysis showed that the fluorescent GFP signals and the radioactive signals were correspondingly located. Thus, the GLP-1R antagonist exendin(9-39) may serve as a useful probe for pancreatic {beta}-cell imaging.

  11. Emerging role of GLP-1 receptor agonists in the treatment of obesity

    PubMed Central

    Neff, Lisa M; Kushner, Robert F

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity has increased dramatically in recent decades, both in the US and worldwide. Pharmacotherapy can augment the weight-reducing effects of lifestyle modification and can facilitate long-term weight maintenance. However, there is a paucity of pharmacologic agents approved for the treatment of obesity, and the use of existing weight loss medications is frequently limited by contraindications, drug interactions, adverse effects, limited coverage by third-party payers, and cost. In recent years, there has been an increased understanding and appreciation of the role of gastrointestinal hormones in the control of body weight. One such hormone, GLP-1, also plays an important role in glucose homeostasis. GLP-1 receptor agonists, such as exenatide and liraglutide, have been developed and are already approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. There has also been interest in the use of GLP-1 receptor agonists for the treatment of obesity in nondiabetic patients. This review explores the potential utility and limitations of exenatide and liraglutide as therapeutic agents for obesity. PMID:21437094

  12. SIRT1 mediates the effect of GLP-1 receptor agonist exenatide on ameliorating hepatic steatosis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fen; Li, Zhuo; Zheng, Xiaobin; Liu, Hongxia; Liang, Hua; Xu, Haixia; Chen, Zonglan; Zeng, Kejing; Weng, Jianping

    2014-11-01

    GLP-1 and incretin mimetics, such as exenatide, have been shown to attenuate hepatocyte steatosis in vivo and in vitro, but the specific underlying mechanism is unclear. SIRT1, an NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase, has been considered as a crucial regulator in hepatic lipid homeostasis by accumulated studies. Here, we speculate that SIRT1 might mediate the effect of the GLP-1 receptor agonist exenatide (exendin-4) on ameliorating hepatic steatosis. After 8 weeks of exenatide treatment in male SIRT1(+/-) mice challenged with a high-fat diet and their wild-type (WT) littermates, we found that lipid deposition and inflammation in the liver, which were improved dramatically in the WT group, diminished in SIRT1(+/-) mice. In addition, the protein expression of SIRT1 and phosphorylated AMPK was upregulated, whereas lipogenic-related protein, including SREBP-1c and PNPLA3, was downregulated in the WT group after exenatide treatment. However, none of these changes were observed in SIRT1(+/-) mice. In HepG2 cells, exendin-4-reversed lipid deposition induced by palmitate was hampered when SIRT1 was silenced by SIRT1 RNA interference. Our data demonstrate that SIRT1 mediates the effect of exenatide on ameliorating hepatic steatosis, suggesting the GLP-1 receptor agonist could serve as a potential drug for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), especially in type 2 diabetes combined with NAFLD, and SIRT1 could be a therapeutic target of NAFLD. PMID:24947350

  13. SIRT1 mediates the effect of GLP-1 receptor agonist exenatide on ameliorating hepatic steatosis.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Xu F; Li Z; Zheng X; Liu H; Liang H; Xu H; Chen Z; Zeng K; Weng J

    2014-11-01

    GLP-1 and incretin mimetics, such as exenatide, have been shown to attenuate hepatocyte steatosis in vivo and in vitro, but the specific underlying mechanism is unclear. SIRT1, an NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase, has been considered as a crucial regulator in hepatic lipid homeostasis by accumulated studies. Here, we speculate that SIRT1 might mediate the effect of the GLP-1 receptor agonist exenatide (exendin-4) on ameliorating hepatic steatosis. After 8 weeks of exenatide treatment in male SIRT1(+/-) mice challenged with a high-fat diet and their wild-type (WT) littermates, we found that lipid deposition and inflammation in the liver, which were improved dramatically in the WT group, diminished in SIRT1(+/-) mice. In addition, the protein expression of SIRT1 and phosphorylated AMPK was upregulated, whereas lipogenic-related protein, including SREBP-1c and PNPLA3, was downregulated in the WT group after exenatide treatment. However, none of these changes were observed in SIRT1(+/-) mice. In HepG2 cells, exendin-4-reversed lipid deposition induced by palmitate was hampered when SIRT1 was silenced by SIRT1 RNA interference. Our data demonstrate that SIRT1 mediates the effect of exenatide on ameliorating hepatic steatosis, suggesting the GLP-1 receptor agonist could serve as a potential drug for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), especially in type 2 diabetes combined with NAFLD, and SIRT1 could be a therapeutic target of NAFLD.

  14. A Novel Glucagon-like Peptide-1 (GLP-1)/Glucagon Hybrid Peptide with Triple-acting Agonist Activity at Glucose-dependent Insulinotropic Polypeptide, GLP-1, and Glucagon Receptors and Therapeutic Potential in High Fat-fed Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Gault, Victor A.; Bhat, Vikas K.; Irwin, Nigel; Flatt, Peter R.

    2013-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), and glucagon bind to related members of the same receptor superfamily and exert important effects on glucose homeostasis, insulin secretion, and energy regulation. The present study assessed the biological actions and therapeutic utility of novel GIP/glucagon/GLP-1 hybrid peptides. Nine novel peptides were synthesized and exhibited complete DPP-IV resistance and enhanced in vitro insulin secretion. The most promising peptide, [dA2]GLP-1/GcG, stimulated cAMP production in GIP, GLP-1, and glucagon receptor-transfected cells. Acute administration of [dA2]GLP-1/GcG in combination with glucose significantly lowered plasma glucose and increased plasma insulin in normal and obese diabetic (ob/ob) mice. Furthermore, [dA2]GLP-1/GcG elicited a protracted glucose-lowering and insulinotropic effect in high fat-fed mice. Twice daily administration of [dA2]GLP-1/GcG for 21 days decreased body weight and nonfasting plasma glucose and increased circulating plasma insulin concentrations in high fat-fed mice. Furthermore, [dA2]GLP-1/GcG significantly improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity by day 21. Interestingly, locomotor activity was increased in [dA2]GLP-1/GcG mice, without appreciable changes in aspects of metabolic rate. Studies in knock-out mice confirmed the biological action of [dA2]GLP-1/GcG via multiple targets including GIP, GLP-1, and glucagon receptors. The data suggest significant promise for novel triple-acting hybrid peptides as therapeutic options for obesity and diabetes. PMID:24165127

  15. Therapeutic approach of type 2 diabetes mellitus with GLP-1 based therapies.

    PubMed

    Penfornis, A; Borot, S; Raccah, D

    2008-02-01

    The goal of this review is to think about how to incorporate the GLP-1 based agents, represented by the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors or the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogs, in the guidelines for the management of type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Orally administered DPP-4 inhibitors, such as sitagliptin and vildagliptin, reduce HbA(1c) (absolute values) by 0.5-1.1% (5 to 12%, relative values), with few adverse events and no weight gain. The sub-cutaneous injected GLP-1 analogs show larger reductions in HbA(1c) (0.8-1.7%, absolute values; 9.4-20.0%, relative values), associated with weight loss (1.75-3.8 kg); their most common adverse events are gastrointestinal symptoms which contribute to a substantial treatment interruption. If they do not challenge the use of metformin as the initial therapy of T2DM, several studies argue in favour of the use of DPP-4 inhibitors, either in combination with metformin as the initial treatment or, in add-on therapy to metformin. The advantages of this combination over others currently used are reviewed. In patients not tolerating metformin, DPP-4 inhibitors seem to be an excellent alternative as a monotherapy. As long as oral triple therapy is concerned, the choice for the association metformin + thiazolidinedione + incretin-based drug, has again several theoretical advantages against other triple therapy combinations. Finally, in patients with T2DM inadequately controlled with maximal tolerated oral multi-therapies, GLP-1 agonists are a good alternative to insulin therapy, allowing reaching a better glycaemic control together with a weight loss. However, for patients who do not tolerate GLP-1 agonist treatment, and for those not reaching the HbA(1c) target, insulin will remain necessary, allowing getting a better metabolic control, with few adverse events. The long-term effect of these new agents on glycaemic control has not yet been established, and their potential impact on beta-cell function in humans remains an area of active investigation. So, further studies are needed and will allow progressively refining the use of incretin-based agents in T2DM treatment strategy. PMID:18640590

  16. Initial evidence that GLP-1 receptor blockade fails to suppress postprandial satiety or promote food intake in humans.

    PubMed

    Melhorn, Susan J; Tyagi, Vidhi; Smeraglio, Anne; Roth, Christian L; Schur, Ellen A

    2014-11-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) has incretin effects that are well-documented, but the independent role of GLP-1 action in human satiety perception is debated. We hypothesized that blockade of GLP-1 receptors would suppress postprandial satiety and increase voluntary food intake. After an overnight fast, eight normal weight participants (seven men, BMI 19-24.7 kg/m(2), age 19-29 year) were enrolled in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized crossover study of the GLP-1 antagonist Exendin-[9-39] (Ex-9) to determine if the satiating effects of a meal are dependent on GLP-1 signaling in humans. Following a fasting blood draw, iv infusion of Ex-9 (600-750 pmol/kg/min) or saline began. Thirty minutes later, subjects consumed a standardized breakfast followed 90 min later (at the predicted time of maximal endogenous circulating GLP-1) by an ad libitum buffet meal to objectively measure satiety. Infusions ended once the buffet meal was complete. Visual analog scale ratings of hunger and fullness and serial assessments of plasma glucose, insulin, and GLP-1 concentrations were done throughout the experiment. Contrary to the hypothesis, during Ex-9 infusion subjects reported a greater decrease in hunger due to consumption of the breakfast (Ex-9 -62 ± 5; placebo -41 ± 9; P=0.01) than during placebo. There were no differences in ad libitum caloric intake between Ex-9 and placebo. Ex-9 increased glucose, insulin, and endogenous GLP-1, which may have counteracted any effects of Ex-9 infusion to block satiety signaling. Blockade of GLP-1 receptors failed to suppress subjective satiety following a standardized meal or increase voluntary food intake in healthy, normal-weight subjects. PMID:25049134

  17. Incretin Receptor Null Mice Reveal Key Role of GLP-1 but Not GIP in Pancreatic Beta Cell Adaptation to Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Moffett, R. Charlotte; Vasu, Srividya; Thorens, Bernard; Drucker, Daniel J.; Flatt, Peter R.

    2014-01-01

    Islet adaptations to pregnancy were explored in C57BL6/J mice lacking functional receptors for glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP). Pregnant wild type mice and GIPRKO mice exhibited marked increases in islet and beta cell area, numbers of medium/large sized islets, with positive effects on Ki67/Tunel ratio favouring beta cell growth and enhanced pancreatic insulin content. Alpha cell area and glucagon content were unchanged but prohormone convertases PC2 and PC1/3 together with significant amounts of GLP-1 and GIP were detected in alpha cells. Knockout of GLP-1R abolished these islet adaptations and paradoxically decreased pancreatic insulin, GLP-1 and GIP. This was associated with abolition of normal pregnancy-induced increases in plasma GIP, L-cell numbers, and intestinal GIP and GLP-1 stores. These data indicate that GLP-1 but not GIP is a key mediator of beta cell mass expansion and related adaptations in pregnancy, triggered in part by generation of intra-islet GLP-1. PMID:24927416

  18. Inactivation of the cardiomyocyte glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) unmasks cardiomyocyte-independent GLP-1R-mediated cardioprotectionab

    PubMed Central

    Ussher, John R.; Baggio, Laurie L.; Campbell, Jonathan E.; Mulvihill, Erin E.; Kim, Minsuk; Kabir, M. Golam; Cao, Xiemin; Baranek, Benjamin M.; Stoffers, Doris A.; Seeley, Randy J.; Drucker, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    GLP-1R agonists improve outcomes in ischemic heart disease. Here we studied GLP-1R-dependent adaptive and cardioprotective responses to ventricular injury. Glp1r−/− hearts exhibited chamber-specific differences in gene expression, but normal mortality and left ventricular (LV) remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI) or experimental doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy. Selective disruption of the cardiomyocyte GLP-1R in Glp1rCM−/− mice produced no differences in survival or LV remodeling following LAD coronary artery occlusion. Unexpectedly, the GLP-1R agonist liraglutide still produced robust cardioprotection and increased survival in Glp1rCM−/− mice following LAD coronary artery occlusion. Although liraglutide increased heart rate (HR) in Glp1rCM−/− mice, basal HR was significantly lower in Glp1rCM−/− mice. Hence, endogenous cardiomyocyte GLP-1R activity is not required for adaptive responses to ischemic or cardiomyopathic injury, and is dispensable for GLP-1R agonist-induced cardioprotection or enhanced chronotropic activity. However the cardiomyocyte GLP-1R is essential for the control of HR in mice. PMID:25061556

  19. GLP-1 receptor agonism ameliorates hepatic VLDL overproduction and de novo lipogenesis in insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Taher, Jennifer; Baker, Christopher L.; Cuizon, Carmelle; Masoudpour, Hassan; Zhang, Rianna; Farr, Sarah; Naples, Mark; Bourdon, Celine; Pausova, Zdenka; Adeli, Khosrow

    2014-01-01

    Background/objectives Fasting dyslipidemia is commonly observed in insulin resistant states and mechanistically linked to hepatic overproduction of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL). Recently, the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has been implicated in ameliorating dyslipidemia associated with insulin resistance and reducing hepatic lipid stores. Given that hepatic VLDL production is a key determinant of circulating lipid levels, we investigated the role of both peripheral and central GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonism in regulation of VLDL production. Methods The fructose-fed Syrian golden hamster was employed as a model of diet-induced insulin resistance and VLDL overproduction. Hamsters were treated with the GLP-1R agonist exendin-4 by intraperitoneal (ip) injection for peripheral studies or by intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration into the 3rd ventricle for central studies. Peripheral studies were repeated in vagotomised hamsters. Results Short term (7–10 day) peripheral exendin-4 enhanced satiety and also prevented fructose-induced fasting dyslipidemia and hyperinsulinemia. These changes were accompanied by decreased fasting plasma glucose levels, reduced hepatic lipid content and decreased levels of VLDL-TG and -apoB100 in plasma. The observed changes in fasting dyslipidemia could be partially explained by reduced respiratory exchange ratio (RER) thereby indicating a switch in energy utilization from carbohydrate to lipid. Additionally, exendin-4 reduced mRNA markers associated with hepatic de novo lipogenesis and inflammation. Despite these observations, GLP-1R activity could not be detected in primary hamster hepatocytes, thus leading to the investigation of a potential brain–liver axis functioning to regulate lipid metabolism. Short term (4 day) central administration of exendin-4 decreased body weight and food consumption and further prevented fructose-induced hypertriglyceridemia. Additionally, the peripheral lipid-lowering effects of exendin-4 were negated in vagotomised hamsters implicating the involvement of parasympathetic signaling. Conclusion Exendin-4 prevents fructose-induced dyslipidemia and hepatic VLDL overproduction in insulin resistance through an indirect mechanism involving altered energy utilization, decreased hepatic lipid synthesis and also requires an intact parasympathetic signaling pathway. PMID:25506548

  20. GLP-1 receptor stimulation of the lateral parabrachial nucleus reduces food intake: neuroanatomical, electrophysiological, and behavioral evidence.

    PubMed

    Richard, Jennifer E; Farkas, Imre; Anesten, Fredrik; Anderberg, Rozita H; Dickson, Suzanne L; Gribble, Fiona M; Reimann, Frank; Jansson, John-Olov; Liposits, Zsolt; Skibicka, Karolina P

    2014-11-01

    The parabrachial nucleus (PBN) is a key nucleus for the regulation of feeding behavior. Inhibitory inputs from the hypothalamus to the PBN play a crucial role in the normal maintenance of feeding behavior, because their loss leads to starvation. Viscerosensory stimuli result in neuronal activation of the PBN. However, the origin and neurochemical identity of the excitatory neuronal input to the PBN remain largely unexplored. Here, we hypothesize that hindbrain glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) neurons provide excitatory inputs to the PBN, activation of which may lead to a reduction in feeding behavior. Our data, obtained from mice expressing the yellow fluorescent protein in GLP-1-producing neurons, revealed that hindbrain GLP-1-producing neurons project to the lateral PBN (lPBN). Stimulation of lPBN GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1Rs) reduced the intake of chow and palatable food and decreased body weight in rats. It also activated lPBN neurons, reflected by an increase in the number of c-Fos-positive cells in this region. Further support for an excitatory role of GLP-1 in the PBN is provided by electrophysiological studies showing a remarkable increase in firing of lPBN neurons after Exendin-4 application. We show that within the PBN, GLP-1R activation increased gene expression of 2 energy balance regulating peptides, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and IL-6. Moreover, nearly 70% of the lPBN GLP-1 fibers innervated lPBN CGRP neurons. Direct intra-lPBN CGRP application resulted in anorexia. Collectively, our molecular, anatomical, electrophysiological, pharmacological, and behavioral data provide evidence for a functional role of the GLP-1R for feeding control in the PBN. PMID:25116706

  1. GLP-1 Receptor Stimulation of the Lateral Parabrachial Nucleus Reduces Food Intake: Neuroanatomical, Electrophysiological, and Behavioral Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Jennifer E.; Farkas, Imre; Anesten, Fredrik; Anderberg, Rozita H.; Dickson, Suzanne L.; Gribble, Fiona M.; Reimann, Frank; Jansson, John-Olov; Liposits, Zsolt

    2014-01-01

    The parabrachial nucleus (PBN) is a key nucleus for the regulation of feeding behavior. Inhibitory inputs from the hypothalamus to the PBN play a crucial role in the normal maintenance of feeding behavior, because their loss leads to starvation. Viscerosensory stimuli result in neuronal activation of the PBN. However, the origin and neurochemical identity of the excitatory neuronal input to the PBN remain largely unexplored. Here, we hypothesize that hindbrain glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) neurons provide excitatory inputs to the PBN, activation of which may lead to a reduction in feeding behavior. Our data, obtained from mice expressing the yellow fluorescent protein in GLP-1-producing neurons, revealed that hindbrain GLP-1-producing neurons project to the lateral PBN (lPBN). Stimulation of lPBN GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1Rs) reduced the intake of chow and palatable food and decreased body weight in rats. It also activated lPBN neurons, reflected by an increase in the number of c-Fos-positive cells in this region. Further support for an excitatory role of GLP-1 in the PBN is provided by electrophysiological studies showing a remarkable increase in firing of lPBN neurons after Exendin-4 application. We show that within the PBN, GLP-1R activation increased gene expression of 2 energy balance regulating peptides, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and IL-6. Moreover, nearly 70% of the lPBN GLP-1 fibers innervated lPBN CGRP neurons. Direct intra-lPBN CGRP application resulted in anorexia. Collectively, our molecular, anatomical, electrophysiological, pharmacological, and behavioral data provide evidence for a functional role of the GLP-1R for feeding control in the PBN. PMID:25116706

  2. The GIP Receptor Displays Higher Basal Activity than the GLP-1 Receptor but Does Not Recruit GRK2 or Arrestin3 Effectively

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sabah, Suleiman; Al-Fulaij, Munya; Shaaban, Ghina; Ahmed, Hanadi A.; Mann, Rosalind J.; Donnelly, Dan; Bünemann, Moritz; Krasel, Cornelius

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) are important regulators of insulin secretion, and their functional loss is an early characteristic of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Pharmacological levels of GLP-1, but not GIP, can overcome this loss. GLP-1 and GIP exert their insulinotropic effects through their respective receptors expressed on pancreatic β-cells. Both the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) and the GIP receptor (GIPR) are members of the secretin family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and couple positively to adenylate cyclase. We compared the signalling properties of these two receptors to gain further insight into why GLP-1, but not GIP, remains insulinotropic in T2DM patients. Methods GLP-1R and GIPR were transiently expressed in HEK-293 cells, and basal and ligand-induced cAMP production were investigated using a cAMP-responsive luciferase reporter gene assay. Arrestin3 (Arr3) recruitment to the two receptors was investigated using enzyme fragment complementation, confocal microscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Results GIPR displayed significantly higher (P<0.05) ligand-independent activity than GLP-1R. Arr3 displayed a robust translocation to agonist-stimulated GLP-1R but not to GIPR. These observations were confirmed in FRET experiments, in which GLP-1 stimulated the recruitment of both GPCR kinase 2 (GRK2) and Arr3 to GLP-1R. These interactions were not reversed upon agonist washout. In contrast, GIP did not stimulate recruitment of either GRK2 or Arr3 to its receptor. Interestingly, arrestin remained at the plasma membrane even after prolonged (30 min) stimulation with GLP-1. Although the GLP-1R/arrestin interaction could not be reversed by agonist washout, GLP-1R and arrestin did not co-internalise, suggesting that GLP-1R is a class A receptor with regard to arrestin binding. Conclusions GIPR displays higher basal activity than GLP-1R but does not effectively recruit GRK2 or Arr3. PMID:25191754

  3. Bile Acids Trigger GLP-1 Release Predominantly by Accessing Basolaterally Located G Protein–Coupled Bile Acid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Brighton, Cheryl A.; Rievaj, Juraj; Kuhre, Rune E.; Glass, Leslie L.; Schoonjans, Kristina; Holst, Jens J.

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are well-recognized stimuli of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion. This action has been attributed to activation of the G protein–coupled bile acid receptor GPBAR1 (TGR5), although other potential bile acid sensors include the nuclear farnesoid receptor and the apical sodium-coupled bile acid transporter ASBT. The aim of this study was to identify pathways important for GLP-1 release and to determine whether bile acids target their receptors on GLP-1–secreting L-cells from the apical or basolateral compartment. Using transgenic mice expressing fluorescent sensors specifically in L-cells, we observed that taurodeoxycholate (TDCA) and taurolithocholate (TLCA) increased intracellular cAMP and Ca2+. In primary intestinal cultures, TDCA was a more potent GLP-1 secretagogue than taurocholate (TCA) and TLCA, correlating with a stronger Ca2+ response to TDCA. Using small-volume Ussing chambers optimized for measuring GLP-1 secretion, we found that both a GPBAR1 agonist and TDCA stimulated GLP-1 release better when applied from the basolateral than from the luminal direction and that luminal TDCA was ineffective when intestinal tissue was pretreated with an ASBT inhibitor. ASBT inhibition had no significant effect in nonpolarized primary cultures. Studies in the perfused rat gut confirmed that vascularly administered TDCA was more effective than luminal TDCA. Intestinal primary cultures and Ussing chamber–mounted tissues from GPBAR1-knockout mice did not secrete GLP-1 in response to either TLCA or TDCA. We conclude that the action of bile acids on GLP-1 secretion is predominantly mediated by GPBAR1 located on the basolateral L-cell membrane, suggesting that stimulation of gut hormone secretion may include postabsorptive mechanisms. PMID:26280129

  4. Bile Acids Trigger GLP-1 Release Predominantly by Accessing Basolaterally Located G Protein-Coupled Bile Acid Receptors.

    PubMed

    Brighton, Cheryl A; Rievaj, Juraj; Kuhre, Rune E; Glass, Leslie L; Schoonjans, Kristina; Holst, Jens J; Gribble, Fiona M; Reimann, Frank

    2015-11-01

    Bile acids are well-recognized stimuli of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion. This action has been attributed to activation of the G protein-coupled bile acid receptor GPBAR1 (TGR5), although other potential bile acid sensors include the nuclear farnesoid receptor and the apical sodium-coupled bile acid transporter ASBT. The aim of this study was to identify pathways important for GLP-1 release and to determine whether bile acids target their receptors on GLP-1-secreting L-cells from the apical or basolateral compartment. Using transgenic mice expressing fluorescent sensors specifically in L-cells, we observed that taurodeoxycholate (TDCA) and taurolithocholate (TLCA) increased intracellular cAMP and Ca(2+). In primary intestinal cultures, TDCA was a more potent GLP-1 secretagogue than taurocholate (TCA) and TLCA, correlating with a stronger Ca(2+) response to TDCA. Using small-volume Ussing chambers optimized for measuring GLP-1 secretion, we found that both a GPBAR1 agonist and TDCA stimulated GLP-1 release better when applied from the basolateral than from the luminal direction and that luminal TDCA was ineffective when intestinal tissue was pretreated with an ASBT inhibitor. ASBT inhibition had no significant effect in nonpolarized primary cultures. Studies in the perfused rat gut confirmed that vascularly administered TDCA was more effective than luminal TDCA. Intestinal primary cultures and Ussing chamber-mounted tissues from GPBAR1-knockout mice did not secrete GLP-1 in response to either TLCA or TDCA. We conclude that the action of bile acids on GLP-1 secretion is predominantly mediated by GPBAR1 located on the basolateral L-cell membrane, suggesting that stimulation of gut hormone secretion may include postabsorptive mechanisms. PMID:26280129

  5. Lixisenatide, a novel GLP-1 receptor agonist: efficacy, safety and clinical implications for type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bolli, G B; Owens, D R

    2014-07-01

    Recent advances in therapies for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have led to the development of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs), which, unlike insulin and sulphonylurea, are effective, with a low risk of hypoglycaemia. Lixisenatide is recommended as a once-daily GLP-1 RA for the treatment of T2DM. In persons with T2DM, lixisenatide 20 µg once-daily given by bolus subcutaneous injection improves insulin secretion and suppresses glucagon secretion in a glucose-dependent manner. Compared with the longer-acting GLP-1 RA liraglutide, lixisenatide achieved a significantly greater reduction in postprandial plasma glucose (PPG) during a standardized test breakfast in persons with T2DM otherwise insufficiently controlled on metformin alone. This is primarily due to the greater inhibition of gastric motility by lixisenatide compared with liraglutide. The efficacy and safety of lixisenatide was evaluated across a spectrum of T2DM in a series of phase III, randomized, placebo-controlled trials known as the GetGoal programme. Lixisenatide monotherapy or as add-on to oral antidiabetic agents or basal insulin achieved significant reductions in glycated haemoglobin, PPG and fasting plasma glucose, with either weight loss or no weight gain. The most frequent adverse events were gastrointestinal and transient in nature. Lixisenatide provides an easy, once-daily, single-dose, add-on treatment to oral antidiabetic agents or basal insulin for the management of T2DM, with little or no increased risk of hypoglycaemia and a potential beneficial effect on body weight. PMID:24373190

  6. An Orally Active Allosteric GLP-1 Receptor Agonist Is Neuroprotective in Cellular and Rodent Models of Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Di; Wang, Ling; Wang, Xinshang; Li, Xubo; Zhou, Shimeng; Zhou, Ying; Wang, Ning; Meng, Jingru; Ma, Xue

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a major risk factor for the development of stroke. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists have been in clinical use for the treatment of diabetes and also been reported to be neuroprotective in ischemic stroke. The quinoxaline 6,7-dichloro-2-methylsulfonyl-3-N-tert- butylaminoquinoxaline (DMB) is an agonist and allosteric modulator of the GLP-1R with the potential to increase the affinity of GLP-1 for its receptor. The aim of this study was to evaluate the neuroprotective effects of DMB on transient focal cerebral ischemia. In cultured cortical neurons, DMB activated the GLP-1R, leading to increased intracellular cAMP levels with an EC50 value about 100 fold that of exendin-4. Pretreatment of neurons with DMB protected against necrotic and apoptotic cell death was induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). The neuroprotective effects of DMB were blocked by GLP-1R knockdown with shRNA but not by GLP-1R antagonism. In C57BL/6 mice, DMB was orally administered 30 min prior to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) surgery. DMB markedly reduced the cerebral infarct size and neurological deficits caused by MCAO and reperfusion. The neuroprotective effects were mediated by activation of the GLP-1R through the cAMP-PKA-CREB signaling pathway. DMB exhibited anti-apoptotic effects by modulating Bcl-2 family members. These results provide evidence that DMB, a small molecular GLP-1R agonist, attenuates transient focal cerebral ischemia injury and inhibits neuronal apoptosis induced by MCAO. Taken together, these data suggest that DMB is a potential neuroprotective agent against cerebral ischemia. PMID:26863436

  7. Peptidic exenatide and herbal catalpol mediate neuroprotection via the hippocampal GLP-1 receptor/β-endorphin pathway.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yu; Gong, Nian; Li, Teng-Fei; Zhu, Bin; Wang, Yong-Xiang

    2015-12-01

    Both peptidic agonist exenatide and herbal agonist catalpol of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) are neuroprotective. We have previously shown that activation of spinal GLP-1Rs expresses β-endorphin in microglia to produce antinociception. The aim of this study was to explore whether exenatide and catalpol exert neuroprotection via activation of the hippocampal GLP-1R/β-endorphin pathway. The rat middle cerebral artery occlusion model was employed, and the GLP-1R immunofluorescence staining and β-endorphin measurement were assayed in the hippocampus and primary cultures of microglia, neurons and astrocytes. The immunoreactivity of GLP-1Rs on microglia in the hippocampus was upregulated after ischemia reperfusion. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of exenatide and catalpol produced neuroprotection in the rat transient ischemia/reperfusion model, reflected by a marked reduction in brain infarction size and a mild recovery in neurobehavioral deficits. In addition, i.c.v. injection of exenatide and catalpol significantly stimulated β-endorphin expression in the hippocampus and cultured primary microglia (but not primary neurons or astrocytes). Furthermore, exenatide and catalpol neuroprotection was completely blocked by i.c.v. injection of the GLP-1R orthosteric antagonist exendin (9-39), specific β-endorphin antiserum, and selective opioid receptor antagonist naloxone. Our results indicate, for the first time, that the neuroprotective effects of catalpol and exenatide are GLP-1R-specific, and that these effects are mediated by β-endorphin expression probably in hippocampal microglia. We postulate that in contrast to the peripheral tissue, where the activation of GLP-1Rs in pancreas islet β-cells causes secretion of insulin to perform glucoregulation, it leads to β-endorphin expression in microglial cells to produce neuroprotection and analgesia in the central nervous system. PMID:26546042

  8. Diverse signaling systems activated by the sweet taste receptor in human GLP-1-secreting cells.

    PubMed

    Ohtsu, Yoshiaki; Nakagawa, Yuko; Nagasawa, Masahiro; Takeda, Shigeki; Arakawa, Hirokazu; Kojima, Itaru

    2014-08-25

    Sweet taste receptor regulates GLP-1 secretion in enteroendocrine L-cells. We investigated the signaling system activated by this receptor using Hutu-80 cells. We stimulated them with sucralose, saccharin, acesulfame K and glycyrrhizin. These sweeteners stimulated GLP-1 secretion, which was attenuated by lactisole. All these sweeteners elevated cytoplasmic cyclic AMP ([cAMP]c) whereas only sucralose and saccharin induced a monophasic increase in cytoplasmic Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]c). Removal of extracellular calcium or sodium and addition of a Gq/11 inhibitor greatly reduced the [Ca(2+)]c responses to two sweeteners. In contrast, acesulfame K induced rapid and sustained reduction of [Ca(2+)]c. In addition, glycyrrhizin first reduced [Ca(2+)]c which was followed by an elevation of [Ca(2+)]c. Reductions of [Ca(2+)]c induced by acesulfame K and glycyrrhizin were attenuated by a calmodulin inhibitor or by knockdown of the plasma membrane calcium pump. These results indicate that various sweet molecules act as biased agonists and evoke strikingly different patterns of intracellular signals. PMID:25017733

  9. Activation of the GLP-1 Receptors in the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract Reduces Food Reward Behavior and Targets the Mesolimbic System

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Jennifer E.; Anderberg, Rozita H.; Göteson, Andreas; Gribble, Fiona M.; Reimann, Frank; Skibicka, Karolina P.

    2015-01-01

    The gut/brain peptide, glucagon like peptide 1 (GLP-1), suppresses food intake by acting on receptors located in key energy balance regulating CNS areas, the hypothalamus or the hindbrain. Moreover, GLP-1 can reduce reward derived from food and motivation to obtain food by acting on its mesolimbic receptors. Together these data suggest a neuroanatomical segregation between homeostatic and reward effects of GLP-1. Here we aim to challenge this view and hypothesize that GLP-1 can regulate food reward behavior by acting directly on the hindbrain, the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1R). Using two models of food reward, sucrose progressive ratio operant conditioning and conditioned place preference for food in rats, we show that intra-NTS microinjections of GLP-1 or Exendin-4, a stable analogue of GLP-1, inhibit food reward behavior. When the rats were given a choice between palatable food and chow, intra-NTS Exendin-4 treatment preferentially reduced intake of palatable food but not chow. However, chow intake and body weight were reduced by the NTS GLP-1R activation if chow was offered alone. The NTS GLP-1 activation did not alter general locomotor activity and did not induce nausea, measured by PICA. We further show that GLP-1 fibers are in close apposition to the NTS noradrenergic neurons, which were previously shown to provide a monosynaptic connection between the NTS and the mesolimbic system. Central GLP-1R activation also increased NTS expression of dopamine-β-hydroxylase, a key enzyme in noradrenaline synthesis, indicating a biological link between these two systems. Moreover, NTS GLP-1R activation altered the expression of dopamine-related genes in the ventral tegmental area. These data reveal a food reward-suppressing role of the NTS GLP-1R and indicate that the neurobiological targets underlying food reward control are not limited to the mesolimbic system, instead they are distributed throughout the CNS. PMID:25793511

  10. New screening strategy and analysis for identification of allosteric modulators for glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor using GLP-1 (9-36) amide.

    PubMed

    Nakane, Atsushi; Gotoh, Yusuke; Ichihara, Junji; Nagata, Hidetaka

    2015-12-15

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is an important physiologic regulator of insulin secretion and a major therapeutic target for diabetes mellitus. GLP-1 (7-36) amide (active form of GLP-1) is truncated to GLP-1 (9-36) amide, which has been described as a weak agonist of GLP-1R and the major form of GLP-1 in the circulation. New classes of positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) for GLP-1R may offer improved therapeutic profiles. To identify these new classes, we developed novel and robust primary and secondary high-throughput screening (HTS) systems in which PAMs were identified to enhance the GLP-1R signaling induced by GLP-1 (9-36) amide. Screening enabled identification of two compounds, HIT-465 and HIT-736, which possessed new patterns of modulation of GLP-1R. We investigated the ability of these compounds to modify GLP-1R signaling enhanced GLP-1 (9-36) amide- and/or GLP-1 (7-36) amide-mediated cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation. These compounds also had unique profiles with regard to allosteric modulation of multiple downstream signaling (PathHunter β-arrestin signaling, PathHunter internalization signaling, microscopy-based internalization assay). We found allosteric modulation patterns to be obviously different among HIT-465, HIT-736, and Novo Nordisk compound 2. This work may enable the design of new classes of drug candidates by targeting modulation of GLP-1 (7-36) amide and GLP-1 (9-36) amide. PMID:26341912

  11. The regions within the N-terminus critical for human glucagon like peptide-1 receptor (hGLP-1R) cell Surface expression

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Aiysha; Kanamarlapudi, Venkateswarlu

    2014-01-01

    The hGLP-1R is a target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and belongs to the class B family of GPCRs. Like other class B GPCRs, the GLP-1R contains an N-terminal signal peptide (SP) and undergoes N-linked glycosylation, which are important for its trafficking and maturation. This study analysed the role of the SP, the hydrophobic region after the SP (HRASP), glycosylation and the conserved residues within the N-terminus in GLP-1R trafficking. HGLP-1R targeted to the cell surface showed no SP, and the SP deleted mutant, but not the mutants defective in SP cleavage, showed cell surface expression, demonstrating the importance of SP cleavage for hGLP-1R cell surface expression. The N-terminal deletions of hGLP-1R revealed that the HRASP, not the SP, is essential for cell surface expression of GLP-1R. Further, inhibition of hGLP-1R glycosylation prevented cell surface expression of the receptor. Mutation of Trp39, Tyr69 and Tyr88, which are required for agonist binding, in the GLP-1R abolished cell surface expression of the receptor independent of the SP cleavage or N-linked glycosylation. In conclusion, the N-terminus of hGLP-1R regulates receptor trafficking and maturation. Therefore this study provides insight into the role of hGLP-1R N-terminus on the receptor cell surface expression. PMID:25502804

  12. The short chain fatty acid propionate stimulates GLP-1 and PYY secretion via free fatty acid receptor 2 in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Psichas, A; Sleeth, M L; Murphy, K G; Brooks, L; Bewick, G A; Hanyaloglu, A C; Ghatei, M A; Bloom, S R; Frost, G

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The gut hormones peptide YY (PYY) and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) acutely suppress appetite. The short chain fatty acid (SCFA) receptor, free fatty acid receptor 2 (FFA2) is present on colonic enteroendocrine L cells, and a role has been suggested for SCFAs in appetite regulation. Here, we characterise the in vitro and in vivo effects of colonic propionate on PYY and GLP-1 release in rodents, and investigate the role of FFA2 in mediating these effects using FFA2 knockout mice. Methods: We used Wistar rats, C57BL6 mice and free fatty acid receptor 2 knockout (FFA−/−) mice on a C57BL6 background to explore the impact of the SCFA propionate on PYY and GLP-1 release. Isolated colonic crypt cultures were used to assess the effects of propionate on gut hormone release in vitro. We subsequently developed an in vivo technique to assess gut hormone release into the portal vein following colonic infusion of propionate. Results: Propionate stimulated the secretion of both PYY and GLP-1 from wild-type primary murine colonic crypt cultures. This effect was significantly attenuated in cultures from FFA2−/− mice. Intra-colonic infusion of propionate elevated PYY and GLP-1 levels in jugular vein plasma in rats and in portal vein plasma in both rats and mice. However, propionate did not significantly stimulate gut hormone release in FFA2−/− mice. Conclusions: Intra-colonic administration of propionate stimulates the concurrent release of both GLP-1 and PYY in rats and mice. These data demonstrate that FFA2 deficiency impairs SCFA-induced gut hormone secretion both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25109781

  13. The anorexic effect of Ex4/Fc through GLP-1 receptor activation in high-fat diet fed mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Ma, Duan; Li, Yiming; Hu, Renming; Peng, Yongde; Wang, Qinghua

    2014-08-01

    Exendin-4 (Ex4), a peptide initially found in the saliva of the Gila monster, can activate the signaling pathway of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) through the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R). We previously reported that a chimera protein consisting of Ex4 and mouse IgG heavy chain constant regions (Ex4/Fc) can exert biological effects of GLP-1, such as improving glycemic control and ameliorating manifestations in diabetic mice. The aim of this study was to determine whether Ex4/Fc is effective in modulating energy homeostasis in mice. Our results showed that in vivo expression of Ex4/Fc by intramuscular injection of the plasmid encoding Ex4/Fc followed by local electroporation effectively decreased food intake in the mice on high-fat diet (HFD) feeding. In addition, the reduced energy intake was associated with the decreased excrements from the Ex4/Fc-treated HFD mice but not the Fc control mice. Remarkably, the Ex4/Fctreated HFD mice displayed significantly lower triglyceride (TG) levels when compared with the control mice. Interestingly, while the leptin levels were not changed, the circulating ghrelin levels were higher in Ex4/Fc mice than those in the Fc control mice. These results suggested that Ex4/Fc can improve energy metabolism and lipid metabolism through GLP-1R in mice under excessive nutrition conditions. PMID:24951724

  14. Mercaptoacetate blocks fatty acid-induced GLP-1 secretion in male rats by directly antagonizing GPR40 fatty acid receptors.

    PubMed

    Li, Ai-Jun; Wang, Qing; Dinh, Thu T; Simasko, Steve M; Ritter, Sue

    2016-04-15

    Mercaptoacetate (MA) is an orexigenic agent reported to block fatty acid (FA) oxidation. Recently, however, we reported evidence from isolated nodose ganglion neurons that MA antagonizes the G protein-coupled long- and medium-chain FA receptor GPR40. GPR40 mediates FA-induced secretion of the satietogenic incretin peptide glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), by enteroendocrine L cells, as well as FA-induced enhancement of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Our results in cultured nodose neurons suggest that MA would also block GPR40 in enteroendocrine cells controlling GLP-1 secretion. If so, this would suggest an alternative mechanism by which MA increases food intake. We tested the hypothesis that MA blocks FA-induced GLP-1 secretion in vitro using cultured STC-1 cells (a murine enteroendocrine cell line) and in vivo in adult male rats. In vitro, MA blocked the increase in both cytosolic Ca(2+)and GLP-1 release stimulated by FAs and also reduced (but less effectively) the response of STC-1 cells to grifolic acid, a partial agonist of the GPR120 FA receptor. In vivo, MA reduced GLP-1 secretion following olive oil gavage while also increasing glucose and decreasing insulin levels. The carnitine palmatoyltransferase 1 antagonist etomoxir did not alter these responses. Results indicate that MA's actions, including its orexigenic effect, are mediated by GPR40 (and possibly GPR120) receptor antagonism and not by blockade of fat oxidation, as previously believed. Analysis of MA's interaction with GPR40 may facilitate understanding of the multiple functions of this receptor and the manner in which FAs participate in the control of hunger and satiety. PMID:26791830

  15. Options for intensification of basal insulin in type 2 diabetes: Premeal insulin or short-acting GLP-1 receptor agonists?

    PubMed

    Darmon, P; Raccah, D

    2015-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes is an evolutive disease with a progressive defect of beta-cell insulin secretion. This characteristic points to a need for treatment that takes into account such a natural history. When oral antidiabetic drugs fail to achieve the patient's target HbA1c level, basal insulin treatment is usually initiated and titrated in association with oral drugs to manage fasting hyperglycaemia. Over a period of time, it is enough to simply achieve the HbA1c target. However, when even a good fasting blood glucose level is no longer sufficient to control overall glycaemia, then prandial treatment must be combined with the titrated basal insulin to deal with the postprandial hyperglycaemia responsible for the elevation of HbA1c. Of the different therapeutic options now available for this, rapid-acting insulins and GLP-1 receptor agonists (RAs) can be used. Rapid-acting insulins can be added either at each meal, achieving full insulin supplementation with a basal-bolus regimen, or at the main meal only as a "basal-plus" regimen. Compared with the full basal-bolus, the basal-plus strategy is associated with fewer injections, yet provides similar efficacy in terms of HbA1c improvement, but with less weight gain and lower hypoglycaemic risk. As for GLP-1 RAs, numerous studies, and especially those using short-acting GLP-1 RAs, have demonstrated more pronounced effects on postprandial hyperglycaemia, good complementary effects with basal insulin, and significant improvement of HbA1c with no weight gain and a low risk of hypoglycaemia. Similarly, direct and indirect comparisons of the use of rapid-acting insulins and GLP-1 RAs to intensify basal insulin have shown comparable efficacy in terms of HbA1c control, but with less weight gain and fewer hypoglycaemic episodes with GLP-1 RAs. PMID:26774016

  16. Geniposide, a novel agonist for GLP-1 receptor, prevents PC12 cells from oxidative damage via MAP kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianhui; Yin, Fei; Zheng, Xuxu; Jing, Jiajia; Hu, Yinhe

    2007-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) gives a new genre in therapeutic targets for intervention in AD with its neurotrophic and neuroprotective functions. In previous work, we identified that geniposide is a novel agonist for GLP-1 receptor, which shows neurotrophic characteristics to induce the neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells. The aim of this study is to determine whether geniposide prevents neurons from oxidative damage, and to explore its signaling pathways. The results demonstrated that geniposide increased the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins, including Bcl-2 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), to antagonize the oxidative damage in PC12 cells induced by hydrogen peroxide. LY294002 (a PI3K inhibitor) inhibited the effect of geniposide increasing of Bcl-2 level by activation of MAPK, MEK and c-Raf phosphorylation in hydrogen peroxide treated PC12 cells. U0126 (a selective inhibitor of MEK) also attenuated the enhancement of geniposide on Bcl-2 level by inhibiting the phosphorylation of p90RSK in the hydrogen peroxide treated PC12 cells. All these data demonstrate that geniposide, an agonist for GLP-1 receptor, regulates expression of anti-oxidative proteins including HO-1 and Bcl-2 by activating the transcriptor of p90RSK via MAPK signaling pathway in PC12 cells. PMID:17629357

  17. Peripheral activation of the Y2-receptor promotes secretion of GLP-1 and improves glucose tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Chandarana, Keval; Gelegen, Cigdem; Irvine, Elaine E.; Choudhury, Agharul I.; Amouyal, Chloé; Andreelli, Fabrizio; Withers, Dominic J.; Batterham, Rachel L.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of peptide tyrosine–tyrosine (PYY) on feeding is well established but currently its role in glucose homeostasis is poorly defined. Here we show in mice, that intraperitoneal (ip) injection of PYY3-36 or Y2R agonist improves nutrient-stimulated glucose tolerance and enhances insulin secretion; an effect blocked by peripheral, but not central, Y2R antagonist administration. Studies on isolated mouse islets revealed no direct effect of PYY3-36 on insulin secretion. Bariatric surgery in mice, enterogastric anastomosis (EGA), improved glucose tolerance in wild-type mice and increased circulating PYY and active GLP-1. In contrast, in Pyy-null mice, post-operative glucose tolerance and active GLP-1 levels were similar in EGA and sham-operated groups. PYY3-36 ip increased hepato-portal active GLP-1 plasma levels, an effect blocked by ip Y2R antagonist. Collectively, these data suggest that PYY3-36 therefore acting via peripheral Y2R increases hepato-portal active GLP-1 plasma levels and improves nutrient-stimulated glucose tolerance. PMID:24049729

  18. Brain GLP-1 and insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Darleen; Sisley, Stephanie R

    2015-12-15

    Type 2 diabetes is often treated with a class of drugs referred to as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogs. GLP-1 is a peptide secreted by the gut that acts through only one known receptor, the GLP-1 receptor. The primary function of GLP-1 is thought to be lowering of postprandial glucose levels. Indeed, medications utilizing this system, including the long-acting GLP-1 analogs liraglutide and exenatide, are beneficial in reducing both blood sugars and body weight. GLP-1 analogs were long presumed to affect glucose control through their ability to increase insulin levels through peripheral action on beta cells. However, multiple lines of data point to the ability of GLP-1 to act within the brain to alter glucose regulation. In this review we will discuss the evidence for a central GLP-1 system and the effects of GLP-1 in the brain on regulating multiple facets of glucose homeostasis including glucose tolerance, insulin production, insulin sensitivity, hepatic glucose production, muscle glucose uptake, and connections of the central GLP-1 system to the gut. Although the evidence indicates that GLP-1 receptors in the brain are not necessary for physiologic control of glucose regulation, we discuss the research showing a strong effect of acute manipulation of the central GLP-1 system on glucose control and how it is relevant to type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:25724479

  19. Exenatide Protects Against Glucose- and Lipid-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction: Evidence for Direct Vasodilation Effect of GLP-1 Receptor Agonists in Humans.

    PubMed

    Koska, Juraj; Sands, Michelle; Burciu, Camelia; D'Souza, Karen M; Raravikar, Kalyani; Liu, James; Truran, Seth; Franco, Daniel A; Schwartz, Eric A; Schwenke, Dawn C; D'Alessio, David; Migrino, Raymond Q; Reaven, Peter D

    2015-07-01

    GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists may improve endothelial function (EF) via metabolic improvement and direct vascular action. The current study determined the effect of GLP-1R agonist exenatide on postprandial EF in type 2 diabetes and the mechanisms underlying GLP-1R agonist-mediated vasodilation. Two crossover studies were conducted: 36 participants with type 2 diabetes received subcutaneous exenatide or placebo for 11 days and EF, and glucose and lipid responses to breakfast and lunch were determined; and 32 participants with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) or diet-controlled type 2 diabetes had EF measured before and after intravenous exenatide, with or without the GLP-1R antagonist exendin-9. Mechanisms of GLP-1R agonist action were studied ex vivo on human subcutaneous adipose tissue arterioles and endothelial cells. Subcutaneous exenatide increased postprandial EF independent of reductions in plasma glucose and triglycerides. Intravenous exenatide increased fasting EF, and exendin-9 abolished this effect. Exenatide elicited eNOS activation and NO production in endothelial cells, and induced dose-dependent vasorelaxation and reduced high-glucose or lipid-induced endothelial dysfunction in arterioles ex vivo. These effects were reduced with AMPK inhibition. In conclusion, exenatide augmented postprandial EF in subjects with diabetes and prevented high-glucose and lipid-induced endothelial dysfunction in human arterioles. These effects were largely direct, via GLP-1R and AMPK activation. PMID:25720388

  20. The peptide agonist-binding site of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor based on site-directed mutagenesis and knowledge-based modelling.

    PubMed

    Dods, Rachel L; Donnelly, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36)amide (GLP-1) plays a central role in regulating blood sugar levels and its receptor, GLP-1R, is a target for anti-diabetic agents such as the peptide agonist drugs exenatide and liraglutide. In order to understand the molecular nature of the peptide-receptor interaction, we used site-directed mutagenesis and pharmacological profiling to highlight nine sites as being important for peptide agonist binding and/or activation. Using a knowledge-based approach, we constructed a 3D model of agonist-bound GLP-1R, basing the conformation of the N-terminal region on that of the receptor-bound NMR structure of the related peptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating protein (PACAP21). The relative position of the extracellular to the transmembrane (TM) domain, as well as the molecular details of the agonist-binding site itself, were found to be different from the model that was published alongside the crystal structure of the TM domain of the glucagon receptor, but were nevertheless more compatible with published mutagenesis data. Furthermore, the NMR-determined structure of a high-potency cyclic conformationally-constrained 11-residue analogue of GLP-1 was also docked into the receptor-binding site. Despite having a different main chain conformation to that seen in the PACAP21 structure, four conserved residues (equivalent to His-7, Glu-9, Ser-14 and Asp-15 in GLP-1) could be structurally aligned and made similar interactions with the receptor as their equivalents in the GLP-1-docked model, suggesting the basis of a pharmacophore for GLP-1R peptide agonists. In this way, the model not only explains current mutagenesis and molecular pharmacological data but also provides a basis for further experimental design. PMID:26598711

  1. The peptide agonist-binding site of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor based on site-directed mutagenesis and knowledge-based modelling

    PubMed Central

    Dods, Rachel L.; Donnelly, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (7–36)amide (GLP-1) plays a central role in regulating blood sugar levels and its receptor, GLP-1R, is a target for anti-diabetic agents such as the peptide agonist drugs exenatide and liraglutide. In order to understand the molecular nature of the peptide–receptor interaction, we used site-directed mutagenesis and pharmacological profiling to highlight nine sites as being important for peptide agonist binding and/or activation. Using a knowledge-based approach, we constructed a 3D model of agonist-bound GLP-1R, basing the conformation of the N-terminal region on that of the receptor-bound NMR structure of the related peptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating protein (PACAP21). The relative position of the extracellular to the transmembrane (TM) domain, as well as the molecular details of the agonist-binding site itself, were found to be different from the model that was published alongside the crystal structure of the TM domain of the glucagon receptor, but were nevertheless more compatible with published mutagenesis data. Furthermore, the NMR-determined structure of a high-potency cyclic conformationally-constrained 11-residue analogue of GLP-1 was also docked into the receptor-binding site. Despite having a different main chain conformation to that seen in the PACAP21 structure, four conserved residues (equivalent to His-7, Glu-9, Ser-14 and Asp-15 in GLP-1) could be structurally aligned and made similar interactions with the receptor as their equivalents in the GLP-1-docked model, suggesting the basis of a pharmacophore for GLP-1R peptide agonists. In this way, the model not only explains current mutagenesis and molecular pharmacological data but also provides a basis for further experimental design. PMID:26598711

  2. The class B G-protein-coupled GLP-1 receptor: an important target for the treatment of type-2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Miller, L J; Sexton, P M; Dong, M; Harikumar, K G

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a gastrointestinal hormone secreted from L cells in the distal small intestine and proximal colon after a meal that acts as an incretin to augment the insulin response, while also inhibiting glucagon and slowing gastric emptying. These characteristics of GLP-1, as well as its ability to reduce islet beta cell apoptosis and expand beta cell mass and its cardioprotective and neuroprotective effects, provide a broad spectrum of actions potentially useful for the management of type-2 diabetes mellitus. GLP-1 also has the added advantage of having its incretin effects dependent on the level of serum glucose, only acting in the presence of hyperglycaemia, and thereby preventing hypoglycemic responses. Although natural GLP-1 has a very short half-life, limiting its therapeutic usefulness, a variety of analogues and formulations have been developed to provide extended actions and to limit side effects. However, all of these peptides require parenteral administration. Potentially orally active small-molecule agonists acting at the GLP-1 receptor are also being developed, but have not yet been approved for clinical use. Recent insights into the molecular nature of the class B G-protein-coupled GLP-1 receptor has provided insights into the modes of binding these types of ligands, as well as providing opportunities for rational enhancement. The advantages and disadvantages of each of these agents and their possible clinical utility will be explored. PMID:27152167

  3. Internalization and homologous desensitization of the GLP-1 receptor depend on phosphorylation of the receptor carboxyl tail at the same three sites.

    PubMed

    Widmann, C; Dolci, W; Thorens, B

    1997-07-01

    Homologous desensitization and internalization of the GLP-1 receptor correlate with phosphorylation of the receptor in a 33-amino acid segment of the cytoplasmic tail. Here, we identify the sites of phosphorylation as being three serine doublets located at positions 441/442, 444/445, and 451/452. The role of phosphorylation on homologous desensitization was assessed after stable expression in fibroblasts of the wild type or of mutant receptors in which phosphorylation sites were changed in various combinations to alanines. We showed that desensitization, as measured by a decrease in the maximal production of cAMP after a first exposure of the cells to GLP-1, was strictly dependent on phosphorylation. Furthermore, the number of phosphorylation sites correlated with the extent of desensitization with no, intermediate, or maximal desensitization observed in the presence of one, two, or three phosphorylation sites, respectively. Internalization of the receptor-ligand complex was assessed by measuring the rate of internalization of bound [125I]GLP-1 or the redistribution of the receptor to an endosomal compartment after agonist binding. Our data demonstrate that internalization was prevented in the absence of receptor phosphorylation and that intermediate rates of endocytosis were obtained with receptors containing one or two phosphorylation sites. Thus, homologous desensitization and internalization require phosphorylation of the receptor at the same three sites. However, the differential quantitative impairment of these two processes in the single and double mutants suggests different molecular mechanisms controlling desensitization and internalization. PMID:9212057

  4. Regulation of Glucose Homeostasis by GLP-1

    PubMed Central

    Nadkarni, Prashant; Chepurny, Oleg G.; Holz, George G.

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1(7–36)amide (GLP-1) is a secreted peptide that acts as a key determinant of blood glucose homeostasis by virtue of its abilities to slow gastric emptying, to enhance pancreatic insulin secretion, and to suppress pancreatic glucagon secretion. GLP-1 is secreted from L cells of the gastrointestinal mucosa in response to a meal, and the blood glucose-lowering action of GLP-1 is terminated due to its enzymatic degradation by dipeptidyl-peptidase-IV (DPP-IV). Released GLP-1 activates enteric and autonomic reflexes while also circulating as an incretin hormone to control endocrine pancreas function. The GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a G protein-coupled receptor that is activated directly or indirectly by blood glucose-lowering agents currently in use for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). These therapeutic agents include GLP-1R agonists (exenatide, liraglutide, lixisenatide, albiglutide, dulaglutide, and langlenatide) and DPP-IV inhibitors (sitagliptin, vildagliptin, saxagliptin, linagliptin, and alogliptin). Investigational agents for use in the treatment of T2DM include GPR119 and GPR40 receptor agonists that stimulate the release of GLP-1 from L cells. Summarized here is the role of GLP-1 to control blood glucose homeo-stasis, with special emphasis on the advantages and limitations of GLP-1-based therapeutics. PMID:24373234

  5. Effect of GLP-1 Receptor Activation on Offspring Kidney Health in a Rat Model of Maternal Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Glastras, Sarah J.; Chen, Hui; McGrath, Rachel T.; Zaky, Amgad A.; Gill, Anthony J.; Pollock, Carol A.; Saad, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Maternal obesity is associated with an increased risk of chronic disease in offspring, including type 2 diabetes (T2D). Exendin-4 (Exd-4) activates the glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor thereby decreasing serum glucose levels and body weight. In addition, Exd-4 has been shown to reduce renal and cardiac complications in experimental models of T2D. We hypothesized that treatment with Exd-4 would ameliorate the detrimental effects of maternal and diet-induced obesity on renal characteristics in offspring. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either normal or high-fat diet (HFD) for 6 weeks prior to pregnancy, during pregnancy and lactation, and their offspring were weaned to normal or HFD. The offspring were randomized to Exd-4 or placebo from weaning and their kidneys harvested at Week 9. We found that the kidneys of offspring from obese mothers, regardless of postnatal diet, had significantly increased markers of inflammation, oxidative stress and fibrosis. Exd-4 ameliorated the negative renal effects of maternal obesity and in particular, reduced renal inflammation, oxidative stress and fibrosis. In conclusion, maternal obesity has persisting effects on renal structure in the offspring. GLP-1 analogues are potentially useful for protecting against the deleterious effects of maternal obesity on renal physiology in offspring. PMID:27004609

  6. Effect of GLP-1 Receptor Activation on Offspring Kidney Health in a Rat Model of Maternal Obesity.

    PubMed

    Glastras, Sarah J; Chen, Hui; McGrath, Rachel T; Zaky, Amgad A; Gill, Anthony J; Pollock, Carol A; Saad, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Maternal obesity is associated with an increased risk of chronic disease in offspring, including type 2 diabetes (T2D). Exendin-4 (Exd-4) activates the glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor thereby decreasing serum glucose levels and body weight. In addition, Exd-4 has been shown to reduce renal and cardiac complications in experimental models of T2D. We hypothesized that treatment with Exd-4 would ameliorate the detrimental effects of maternal and diet-induced obesity on renal characteristics in offspring. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either normal or high-fat diet (HFD) for 6 weeks prior to pregnancy, during pregnancy and lactation, and their offspring were weaned to normal or HFD. The offspring were randomized to Exd-4 or placebo from weaning and their kidneys harvested at Week 9. We found that the kidneys of offspring from obese mothers, regardless of postnatal diet, had significantly increased markers of inflammation, oxidative stress and fibrosis. Exd-4 ameliorated the negative renal effects of maternal obesity and in particular, reduced renal inflammation, oxidative stress and fibrosis. In conclusion, maternal obesity has persisting effects on renal structure in the offspring. GLP-1 analogues are potentially useful for protecting against the deleterious effects of maternal obesity on renal physiology in offspring. PMID:27004609

  7. Conservation of glp-1 regulation and function in nematodes.

    PubMed Central

    Rudel, D; Kimble, J

    2001-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans (Ce) glp-1 gene encodes a Notch-like receptor. We have cloned glp-1 from C. briggsae (Cb) and C. remanei (Cr), two Caenorhabditis species that have diverged from C. elegans by roughly 20-40 million years. By sequence analysis, we find that the Cb-GLP-1 and Cr-GLP-1 proteins have retained the same motif architecture as Ce-GLP-1, including number of domains. In addition, two regions (CC-linker and regions flanking the ANK repeats) are as highly conserved as regions previously recognized as essential for signaling (e.g., ANK repeats). Phylogenetic analysis of glp-1 sequences suggests a C. briggsae/C. remanei clade with C. elegans as a sister taxon. Using RNAi to test biological functions, we find that Ce-glp-1, Cb-glp-1, and Cr-glp-1 are all required for proliferation of germline stem cells and for specifying blastomere fates in the embryo. In addition, certain biological roles of Cb-glp-1, e.g., in the vulva, have diverged from those of Ce-glp-1 and Cr-glp-1, suggesting a change in either regulation or function of the Cb-glp-1 gene during evolution. Finally, the regulation of glp-1 mRNA, previously analyzed for Ce-glp-1, is conserved in Cb-glp-1, and we identify conserved 3' UTR sequences that may serve as regulatory elements. PMID:11156985

  8. Is GLP-1 a hormone: Whether and When?

    PubMed

    D'Alessio, David

    2016-04-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a product of proglucagon cleavage synthesized in L cells in the intestinal mucosa, α-cells in the pancreatic islet, and neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract. GLP-1 is essential for normal glucose tolerance and acts through a specific GLP-1 receptor that is expressed by islet β-cells as well as other cell types. Because plasma concentrations of GLP-1 increase following meal ingestion it has been generally presumed that GLP-1 acts as a hormone, communicating information from the intestine to the endocrine pancreas through the circulation. However, there are a number of problems with this model including low circulating concentrations of GLP-1 in plasma, limited changes after meal ingestion and rapid metabolism in the plasma. Moreover, antagonism of systemic GLP-1 action impairs insulin secretion in the fasting state, suggesting that the GLP-1r is active even when plasma GLP-1 levels are low and unchanging. Consistent with these observations, deletion of the GLP-1r from islet β-cells causes intolerance after IP or IV glucose, challenges that do not induce GLP-1 secretion. Taken together, these data support a model whereby GLP-1 acts through neural or paracrine mechanisms to regulate physiologic insulin secretion. In contrast, bariatric surgery seems to be a condition in which circulating GLP-1 could have an endocrine effect. Both gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy are associated with substantial increases in postprandial GLP-1 release and in these conditions interference with GLP-1r signaling has a significant impact on glucose regulation after eating. Thus, with either bariatric surgery or treatment with long-acting GLP-1r agonists, circulating peptide mediates insulinotropic activity. Overall, a case can be made that physiologic actions of GLP-1 are not hormonal, but that an endocrine mechanism of GLP-1r activation can be co-opted for therapeutics. PMID:27186356

  9. Ghrelin Is a Novel Regulator of GLP-1 Secretion.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Jeffrey; Baggio, Laurie L; Drucker, Daniel J; Brubaker, Patricia L

    2015-05-01

    GLP-1 is a gastrointestinal L-cell hormone that enhances glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Hence, strategies that prevent GLP-1 degradation or activate the GLP-1 receptor are used to treat patients with type 2 diabetes. GLP-1 secretion occurs after a meal and is partly regulated by other circulating hormones. Ghrelin is a stomach-derived hormone that plays a key role in whole-body energy metabolism. Because ghrelin levels peak immediately before mealtimes, we hypothesized that ghrelin plays a role in priming the intestinal L-cell for nutrient-induced GLP-1 release. The intraperitoneal injection of ghrelin into mice 15 min before the administration of oral glucose enhanced glucose-stimulated GLP-1 release and improved glucose tolerance, whereas the ghrelin receptor antagonist D-Lys GHRP-6 reduced plasma levels of GLP-1 and insulin and diminished oral glucose tolerance. The ghrelin-mediated improvement in glucose tolerance was lost in mice coinjected with a GLP-1 receptor antagonist as well as in Glp1r(-/-) mice lacking the GLP-1 receptor. The impaired oral glucose tolerance in diet-induced obese mice was also improved by ghrelin preadministration. Importantly, ghrelin directly stimulated GLP-1 release from L-cell lines (murine GLUTag, human NCI-H716) through an extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2-dependent pathway. These studies demonstrate a novel role for ghrelin in enhancing the GLP-1 secretory response to ingested nutrients. PMID:25412624

  10. Cardiovascular effects of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Saraiva, Francisco Kerr; Sposito, Andrei C

    2014-01-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes have a several-fold increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease when compared with nondiabetic controls. Myocardial infarction and stroke are responsible for 75% of all death in patients with diabetes, who present a 2-4× increased incidence of death from coronary artery disease. Patients with diabetes are considered for cardiovascular disease secondary prevention because their risk level is similar to that reported in patients without diabetes who have already suffered a myocardial infarction. More recently, with a better risk factors control, mainly in intensive LDL cholesterol targets with statins, a significant decrease in acute cardiovascular events was observed in population with diabetes. Together with other major risk factors, type 2 diabetes must be considered as an important cause of cardiovascular disease.Glucagon like peptide-1 receptor agonists represent a novel class of anti-hyperglycemic agents that have a cardiac-friendly profile, preserve neuronal cells and inhibit neuronal degeneration, an anti-inflammatory effect in liver protecting it against steatosis, increase insulin sensitivity, promote weight loss, and increase satiety or anorexia.This review is intended to rationally compile the multifactorial cardiovascular effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists available for the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:25338737

  11. Leptin receptor expression in hindbrain Glp-1 neurons regulates food intake and energy balance in mice

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Michael M.; Williams, Kevin W.; Rossi, Jari; Lee, Charlotte E.; Elmquist, Joel K.

    2011-01-01

    Leptin is an adipose-derived hormone that signals to inform the brain of nutrient status; loss of leptin signaling results in marked hyperphagia and obesity. Recent work has identified several groups of neurons that contribute to the effects of leptin to regulate energy balance, but leptin receptors are distributed throughout the brain, and the function of leptin signaling in discrete neuronal populations outside of the hypothalamus has not been defined. In the current study, we produced mice in which the long form of the leptin receptor (Lepr) was selectively ablated using Cre-recombinase selectively expressed in the hindbrain under control of the paired-like homeobox 2b (Phox2b) promoter (Phox2b Cre Leprflox/flox mice). In these mice, Lepr was deleted from glucagon-like 1 peptide–expressing neurons resident in the nucleus of the solitary tract. Phox2b Cre Leprflox/flox mice were hyperphagic, displayed increased food intake after fasting, and gained weight at a faster rate than wild-type controls. Paradoxically, Phox2b Cre Leprflox/flox mice also exhibited an increased metabolic rate independent of a change in locomotor activity that was dependent on food intake, and glucose homeostasis was normal. Together, these data support a physiologically important role of direct leptin action in the hindbrain. PMID:21606595

  12. Anti-atherosclerotic effects of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) based therapies in patients with type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xiaoyan; Jia, Hetang; Jiang, Yuebo; Wang, Liang; Zhang, Yan; Mu, Yiming; Liu, Yu

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of GLP-1 based therapies on atherosclerotic markers in type 2 diabetes patients. 31 studies were selected to obtain data after multiple database searches and following inclusion and exclusion criteria. Age and BMI of the participants of longitudinal studies were 59.8 ± 8.3 years and 29.2 ± 5.7 kg/m2 (Mean±SD). Average duration of GLP-1 based therapies was 20.5 weeks. Percent flow-mediated diameter (%FMD) did not change from baseline significantly but when compared to controls, %FMD increased non-significantly following GLP-1-based therapies (1.65 [−0.89, 4.18]; P = 0.2; REM) in longitudinal studies and increased significantly in cross sectional studies (2.58 [1.68, 3.53]; P < 0.00001). Intima media thickness decreased statistically non-significantly by the GLP-1 based therapies. GLP-1 based therapies led to statistically significant reductions in the serum levels of brain natriuretic peptide (−40.16 [−51.50, −28.81]; P < 0.0001; REM), high sensitivity c-reactive protein (−0.27 [−0.48, −0.07]; P = 0.009), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (−12.90 [−25.98, 0.18]; P=0.05), total cholesterol (−5.47 [−9.55, −1.39]; P = 0.009), LDL-cholesterol (−3.70 [−7.39, −0.00]; P = 0.05) and triglycerides (−16.44 [−25.64, −7.23]; P = 0.0005) when mean differences with 95% CI in the changes from baselines were meta-analyzed. In conclusion, GLP-1-based therapies appear to provide beneficial effects against atherosclerosis. More randomized data will be required to arrive at conclusive evidence. PMID:26111974

  13. Neuroprotection by Exendin-4 Is GLP-1 Receptor Specific but DA D3 Receptor Dependent, Causing Altered BrdU Incorporation in Subventricular Zone and Substantia Nigra.

    PubMed

    Harkavyi, A; Rampersaud, N; Whitton, P S

    2013-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) activation by exendin-4 (EX-4) is effective in preclinical models of Parkinson's disease (PD) and appears to promote neurogenesis even in severely lesioned rats. In the present study, we determined the effects of EX-4 on cellular BrdU incorporation in the rat subventricular zone (SVZ) and substantia nigra (SN). We also determined the specificity of this effect with the GLP-1R antagonist EX-(9-39) as well as the potential role of dopamine (DA) D3 receptors. Rats were administered 6-OHDA and 1 week later given EX-4 alone, with EX-(9-39) or nafadotride (D3 antagonist) and BrdU. Seven days later, rats were challenged with apomorphine to evaluate circling. Extracellular DA was measured using striatal microdialysis and subsequently tissue DA measured. Tyrosine hydroxylase and BrdU were verified using immunohistochemistry. Apomorphine circling was reversed by EX-4 in lesioned rats, an effect reduced by EX-4, while both EX-(9-39) and NAF attenuated this. 6-OHDA decreased extracellular and tissue DA, both reversed by EX-4 but again attenuated by EX-(9-39) or NAF. Analysis of BrdU+ cells in the SVZ revealed increases in 6-OHDA-treated rats which were reversed by EX-4 and antagonised by either EX-(9-39) or NAF, while in the SN the opposite profile was seen. PMID:26316987

  14. Neuroprotection by Exendin-4 Is GLP-1 Receptor Specific but DA D3 Receptor Dependent, Causing Altered BrdU Incorporation in Subventricular Zone and Substantia Nigra

    PubMed Central

    Harkavyi, A.; Rampersaud, N.; Whitton, P. S.

    2013-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) activation by exendin-4 (EX-4) is effective in preclinical models of Parkinson's disease (PD) and appears to promote neurogenesis even in severely lesioned rats. In the present study, we determined the effects of EX-4 on cellular BrdU incorporation in the rat subventricular zone (SVZ) and substantia nigra (SN). We also determined the specificity of this effect with the GLP-1R antagonist EX-(9-39) as well as the potential role of dopamine (DA) D3 receptors. Rats were administered 6-OHDA and 1 week later given EX-4 alone, with EX-(9-39) or nafadotride (D3 antagonist) and BrdU. Seven days later, rats were challenged with apomorphine to evaluate circling. Extracellular DA was measured using striatal microdialysis and subsequently tissue DA measured. Tyrosine hydroxylase and BrdU were verified using immunohistochemistry. Apomorphine circling was reversed by EX-4 in lesioned rats, an effect reduced by EX-4, while both EX-(9-39) and NAF attenuated this. 6-OHDA decreased extracellular and tissue DA, both reversed by EX-4 but again attenuated by EX-(9-39) or NAF. Analysis of BrdU+ cells in the SVZ revealed increases in 6-OHDA-treated rats which were reversed by EX-4 and antagonised by either EX-(9-39) or NAF, while in the SN the opposite profile was seen. PMID:26316987

  15. Potential of Albiglutide, a Long-Acting GLP-1 Receptor Agonist, in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Rosenstock, Julio; Reusch, Jane; Bush, Mark; Yang, Fred; Stewart, Murray

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of incremental doses of albiglutide, a long-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, administered with three dosing schedules in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with diet and exercise or metformin monotherapy. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In this randomized multicenter double-blind parallel-group study, 356 type 2 diabetic subjects with similar mean baseline characteristics (age 54 years, diabetes duration 4.9 years, BMI 32.1 kg/m2, A1C 8.0%) received subcutaneous placebo or albiglutide (weekly [4, 15, or 30 mg], biweekly [15, 30, or 50 mg], or monthly [50 or 100 mg]) or exenatide twice daily as an open-label active reference (per labeling in metformin subjects only) over 16 weeks followed by an 11-week washout period. The main outcome measure was change from baseline A1C of albiglutide groups versus placebo at week 16. RESULTS Dose-dependent reductions in A1C were observed within all albiglutide schedules. Mean A1C was similarly reduced from baseline by albiglutide 30 mg weekly, 50 mg biweekly (every 2 weeks), and 100 mg monthly (−0.87, −0.79, and −0.87%, respectively) versus placebo (−0.17%, P < 0.004) and exenatide (−0.54%). Weight loss (−1.1 to −1.7 kg) was observed with these three albiglutide doses with no significant between-group effects. The incidence of gastrointestinal adverse events in subjects receiving albiglutide 30 mg weekly was less than that observed for the highest biweekly and monthly doses of albiglutide or exenatide. CONCLUSIONS Weekly albiglutide administration significantly improved glycemic control and elicited weight loss in type 2 diabetic patients, with a favorable safety and tolerability profile. PMID:19592625

  16. Efficacy and Safety of the Once-Daily GLP-1 Receptor Agonist Lixisenatide in Monotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Vivian A.; Alvarado-Ruiz, Ricardo; Raccah, Denis; Boka, Gabor; Miossec, Patrick; Gerich, John E.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess efficacy and safety of lixisenatide monotherapy in type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Randomized, double-blind, 12-week study of 361 patients not on glucose-lowering therapy (HbA1c 7–10%) allocated to one of four once-daily subcutaneous dose increase regimens: lixisenatide 2-step (10 μg for 1 week, 15 μg for 1 week, and then 20 μg; n = 120), lixisenatide 1-step (10 μg for 2 weeks and then 20 μg; n = 119), placebo 2-step (n = 61), or placebo 1-step (n = 61) (placebo groups were combined for analyses). Primary end point was HbA1c change from baseline to week 12. RESULTS Once-daily lixisenatide significantly improved HbA1c (mean baseline 8.0%) in both groups (least squares mean change vs. placebo: −0.54% for 2-step, −0.66% for 1-step; P < 0.0001). Significantly more lixisenatide patients achieved HbA1c <7.0% (52.2% 2-step, 46.5% 1-step) and ≤6.5% (31.9% 2-step, 25.4% 1-step) versus placebo (26.8% and 12.5%, respectively; P < 0.01). Lixisenatide led to marked significant improvements of 2-h postprandial glucose levels and blood glucose excursions measured during a standardized breakfast test. A significant decrease in fasting plasma glucose was observed in both lixisenatide groups versus placebo. Mean decreases in body weight (∼2 kg) were observed in all groups. The most common adverse events were gastrointestinal—nausea was the most frequent (lixisenatide 23% overall, placebo 4.1%). Symptomatic hypoglycemia occurred in 1.7% of lixisenatide and 1.6% of placebo patients, with no severe episodes. Safety/tolerability was similar for the two dose regimens. CONCLUSIONS Once-daily lixisenatide monotherapy significantly improved glycemic control with a pronounced postprandial effect (75% reduction in glucose excursion) and was safe and well tolerated in type 2 diabetes. PMID:22432104

  17. GLP-1, the Gut-Brain, and Brain-Periphery Axes

    PubMed Central

    Cabou, Cendrine; Burcelin, Remy

    2011-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is a gut hormone which directly binds to the GLP-1 receptor located at the surface of the pancreatic β-cells to enhance glucose-induced insulin secretion. In addition to its pancreatic effects, GLP-1 can induce metabolic actions by interacting with its receptors expressed on nerve cells in the gut and the brain. GLP-1 can also be considered as a neuropeptide synthesized by neuronal cells in the brain stem that release the peptide directly into the hypothalamus. In this environment, GLP-1 is assumed to control numerous metabolic and cardiovascular functions such as insulin secretion, glucose production and utilization, and arterial blood flow. However, the exact roles of these two locations in the regulation of glucose homeostasis are not well understood. In this review, we highlight the latest experimental data supporting the role of the gut-brain and brain-periphery axes in the control of glucose homeostasis. We also focus our attention on the relevance of β-cell and brain cell targeting by gut GLP-1 for the regulation of glucose homeostasis. In addition to its action on β-cells, we find that understanding the physiological role of GLP-1 will help to develop GLP-1-based therapies to control glycemia in type 2 diabetes by triggering the gut-brain axis or the brain directly. This pleiotropic action of GLP-1 is an important concept that may help to explain the observation that, during their treatment, type 2 diabetic patients can be identified as 'responders' and 'non-responders'. PMID:22262078

  18. GLP-1 Receptor Agonists

    MedlinePlus

    ... Silvio Inzucchi, MD Julio Rosenstock, MD What is type 2 diabetes? When you have type 2 diabetes, your blood glucose (sugar) levels are higher than ... hormone made by your pancreas. You can develop type 2 diabetes when your body Doesn’t make enough insulin ...

  19. The non-peptide GLP-1 receptor agonist WB4-24 blocks inflammatory nociception by stimulating β-endorphin release from spinal microglia

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Hui; Gong, Nian; Li, Teng-Fei; Ma, Ai-Niu; Wu, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Ming-Wei; Wang, Yong-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Two peptide agonists of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor, exenatide and GLP-1 itself, exert anti-hypersensitive effects in neuropathic, cancer and diabetic pain. In this study, we have assessed the anti-allodynic and anti-hyperalgesic effects of the non-peptide agonist WB4-24 in inflammatory nociception and the possible involvement of microglial β-endorphin and pro-inflammatory cytokines. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We used rat models of inflammatory nociception induced by formalin, carrageenan or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), to test mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Expression of β-endorphin and pro-inflammatory cytokines was measured using real-time quantitative PCR and fluorescent immunoassays. KEY RESULTS WB4-24 displaced the specific binding of exendin (9–39) in microglia. Single intrathecal injection of WB4-24 (0.3, 1, 3, 10, 30 and 100 μg) exerted dose-dependent, specific, anti-hypersensitive effects in acute and chronic inflammatory nociception induced by formalin, carrageenan and CFA, with a maximal inhibition of 60–80%. Spinal WB4-24 was not effective in altering nociceptive pain. Subcutaneous injection of WB4-24 was also antinociceptive in CFA-treated rats. WB4-24 evoked β-endorphin release but did not inhibit expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in either the spinal cord of CFA-treated rats or cultured microglia stimulated by LPS. WB4-24 anti-allodynia was prevented by a microglial inhibitor, β-endorphin antiserum and a μ-opioid receptor antagonist. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our results suggest that WB4-24 inhibits inflammatory nociception by releasing analgesic β-endorphin rather than inhibiting the expression of proalgesic pro-inflammatory cytokines in spinal microglia, and that the spinal GLP-1 receptor is a potential target molecule for the treatment of pain hypersensitivity including inflammatory nociception. PMID:25176008

  20. Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP1R) haplotypes correlate with altered response to multiple antipsychotics in the CATIE trial.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Timothy L; Brennan, Mark D

    2014-12-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP1R) signaling has been shown to have antipsychotic properties in animal models and to impact glucose-dependent insulin release, satiety, memory, and learning in man. Previous work has shown that two coding mutations (rs6923761 and rs1042044) are associated with altered insulin release and cortisol levels. We identified four frequently occurring haplotypes in Caucasians, haplotype 1 through haplotype 4, spanning exons 4-7 and containing the two coding variants. We analyzed response to antipsychotics, defined as predicted change in PANSS-Total (dPANSS) at 18 months, in Caucasian subjects from the Clinical Antipsychotic Trial of Intervention Effectiveness treated with olanzapine (n=139), perphenazine (n=78), quetiapine (n=14), risperidone (n=143), and ziprasidone (n=90). Haplotype trend regression analysis revealed significant associations with dPANSS for olanzapine (best p=0.002), perphenazine (best p=0.01), quetiapine (best p=0.008), risperidone (best p=0.02), and ziprasidone (best p=0.007). We also evaluated genetic models for the two most common haplotypes. Haplotype 1 (uniquely including the rs1042044 [Leu(260)] allele) was associated with better response to olanzapine (p=0.002), and risperidone (p=0.006), and worse response to perphenazine (p=.03), and ziprasidone (p=0.003), with a recessive genetic model providing the best fit. Haplotype 2 (uniquely including the rs6923761 [Ser(168)] allele) was associated with better response to perphenazine (p=0.001) and worse response to olanzapine (p=.02), with a dominant genetic model providing the best fit. However, GLP1R haplotypes were not associated with antipsychotic-induced weight gain. These results link functional genetic variants in GLP1R to antipsychotic response. PMID:25449714

  1. The central GLP-1: implications for food and drug reward

    PubMed Central

    Skibicka, Karolina P.

    2013-01-01

    Glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) and its long acting analogs comprise a novel class of type 2 diabetes (T2D) treatment. What makes them unique among other T2D drugs is their concurrent ability to reduce food intake, a great benefit considering the frequent comorbidity of T2D and obesity. The precise neural site of action underlying this beneficial effect is vigorously researched. In accordance with the classical model of food intake control GLP-1 action on feeding has been primarily ascribed to receptor populations in the hypothalamus and the hindbrain. In contrast to this common view, relevant GLP-1 receptor populations are distributed more widely, with a prominent mesolimbic complement emerging. The physiological relevance of the mesolimbic GLP-1 is suggested by the demonstration that similar anorexic effects can be obtained by independent stimulation of the mesolimbic and hypothalamic GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1R). Results reviewed here support the idea that mesolimbic GLP-1R are sufficient to reduce hunger-driven feeding, the hedonic value of food and food-motivation. In parallel, emerging evidence suggests that the range of action of GLP-1 on reward behavior is not limited to food-derived reward but extends to cocaine, amphetamine, and alcohol reward. The new discoveries concerning GLP-1 action on the mesolimbic reward system significantly extend the potential therapeutic range of this drug target. PMID:24133407

  2. Acting on Hormone Receptors with Minimal Side Effect on Cell Proliferation: A Timely Challenge Illustrated with GLP-1R and GPER

    PubMed Central

    Gigoux, Véronique; Fourmy, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a large family of receptors that sense molecules outside the cell and activate inside signal transduction pathways and cellular responses. GPCR are involved in a wide variety of physiological processes, including in the neuroendocrine system. GPCR are also involved in many diseases and are the target of 30% of marketed medicinal drugs. Whereas the majority of the GPCR-targeting drugs have proved their therapeutic benefit, some of them were associated with undesired effects. We develop two examples of used drugs whose therapeutic benefits are tarnished by carcinogenesis risks. The chronic administration of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogs widely used to treat type-2 diabetes was associated with an increased risk of pancreatic or thyroid cancers. The long-term treatment with the estrogen antagonist tamoxifen, developed to target breast cancer overexpressing estrogen receptors ER, presents agonist activity on the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor which is associated with an increased incidence of endometrial cancer and breast cancer resistance to hormonotherapy. We point out and discuss the need of pharmacological studies to understand and overcome the undesired effects associated with the chronic administration of GPCR ligands. In fact, biological effects triggered by GPCR often result from the activation of multiple intracellular signaling pathways. Deciphering which signaling networks are engaged following GPCR activation appears to be primordial to unveil their contribution in the physiological and physiopathological processes. The development of biased agonists to elucidate the role of the different signaling mechanisms mediated by GPCR activation will allow the generation of new therapeutic agents with improved efficacy and reduced side effects. In this regard, the identification of GLP-1R biased ligands promoting insulin secretion without inducing pro-tumoral effects would offer therapeutic benefit. PMID:23641235

  3. Release of GLP-1 and PYY in response to the activation of G protein-coupled bile acid receptor TGR5 is mediated by Epac/PLC-ε pathway and modulated by endogenous H2S

    PubMed Central

    Bala, Vanitha; Rajagopal, Senthilkumar; Kumar, Divya P.; Nalli, Ancy D.; Mahavadi, Sunila; Sanyal, Arun J.; Grider, John R.; Murthy, Karnam S.

    2014-01-01

    Activation of plasma membrane TGR5 receptors in enteroendocrine cells by bile acids is known to regulate gastrointestinal secretion and motility and glucose homeostasis. The endocrine functions of the gut are modulated by microenvironment of the distal gut predominantly by sulfur-reducing bacteria of the microbiota that produce H2S. However, the mechanisms involved in the release of peptide hormones, GLP-1 and PYY in response to TGR5 activation by bile acids and the effect of H2S on bile acid-induced release of GLP-1 and PYY are unclear. In the present study, we have identified the signaling pathways activated by the bile acid receptor TGR5 to mediate GLP-1 and PYY release and the mechanism of inhibition of their release by H2S in enteroendocrine cells. The TGR5 ligand oleanolic acid (OA) stimulated Gαs and cAMP formation, and caused GLP-1 and PYY release. OA-induced cAMP formation and peptide release were blocked by TGR5 siRNA. OA also caused an increase in PI hydrolysis and intracellular Ca2+. Increase in PI hydrolysis was abolished in cells transfected with PLC-ε siRNA. 8-pCPT-2′-O-Me-cAMP, a selective activator of Epac, stimulated PI hydrolysis, and GLP-1 and PYY release. L-Cysteine, which activates endogenous H2S producing enzymes cystathionine-γ-lyase and cystathionine-β-synthase, and NaHS and GYY4137, which generate H2S, inhibited PI hydrolysis and GLP-1 and PYY release in response to OA or 8-pCPT-2′-O-Me-cAMP. Propargylglycine, an inhibitor of CSE, reversed the effect of L-cysteine on PI hydrolysis and GLP-1 and PYY release. We conclude: (i) activation of Gαs-coupled TGR5 receptors causes stimulation of PI hydrolysis, and release of GLP-1 and PYY via a PKA-independent, cAMP-dependent mechanism involving Epac/PLC-ε/Ca2+ pathway, and (ii) H2S has potent inhibitory effects on GLP-1 and PYY release in response to TGR5 activation, and the mechanism involves inhibition of PLC-ε/Ca2+ pathway. PMID:25404917

  4. Release of GLP-1 and PYY in response to the activation of G protein-coupled bile acid receptor TGR5 is mediated by Epac/PLC-ε pathway and modulated by endogenous H2S.

    PubMed

    Bala, Vanitha; Rajagopal, Senthilkumar; Kumar, Divya P; Nalli, Ancy D; Mahavadi, Sunila; Sanyal, Arun J; Grider, John R; Murthy, Karnam S

    2014-01-01

    Activation of plasma membrane TGR5 receptors in enteroendocrine cells by bile acids is known to regulate gastrointestinal secretion and motility and glucose homeostasis. The endocrine functions of the gut are modulated by microenvironment of the distal gut predominantly by sulfur-reducing bacteria of the microbiota that produce H2S. However, the mechanisms involved in the release of peptide hormones, GLP-1 and PYY in response to TGR5 activation by bile acids and the effect of H2S on bile acid-induced release of GLP-1 and PYY are unclear. In the present study, we have identified the signaling pathways activated by the bile acid receptor TGR5 to mediate GLP-1 and PYY release and the mechanism of inhibition of their release by H2S in enteroendocrine cells. The TGR5 ligand oleanolic acid (OA) stimulated Gαs and cAMP formation, and caused GLP-1 and PYY release. OA-induced cAMP formation and peptide release were blocked by TGR5 siRNA. OA also caused an increase in PI hydrolysis and intracellular Ca(2+). Increase in PI hydrolysis was abolished in cells transfected with PLC-ε siRNA. 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP, a selective activator of Epac, stimulated PI hydrolysis, and GLP-1 and PYY release. L-Cysteine, which activates endogenous H2S producing enzymes cystathionine-γ-lyase and cystathionine-β-synthase, and NaHS and GYY4137, which generate H2S, inhibited PI hydrolysis and GLP-1 and PYY release in response to OA or 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP. Propargylglycine, an inhibitor of CSE, reversed the effect of L-cysteine on PI hydrolysis and GLP-1 and PYY release. We conclude: (i) activation of Gαs-coupled TGR5 receptors causes stimulation of PI hydrolysis, and release of GLP-1 and PYY via a PKA-independent, cAMP-dependent mechanism involving Epac/PLC-ε/Ca(2+) pathway, and (ii) H2S has potent inhibitory effects on GLP-1 and PYY release in response to TGR5 activation, and the mechanism involves inhibition of PLC-ε/Ca(2+) pathway. PMID:25404917

  5. GLP-1 and weight loss: unraveling the diverse neural circuitry.

    PubMed

    Kanoski, Scott E; Hayes, Matthew R; Skibicka, Karolina P

    2016-05-15

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is currently one of the most promising biological systems for the development of effective obesity pharmacotherapies. Long-acting GLP-1 analogs potently reduce food intake and body weight, and recent discoveries reveal that peripheral administration of these drugs reduces food intake largely through humoral pathways involving direct action on brain GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1R). Thus, it is of critical importance to understand the neural systems through which GLP-1 and long-acting GLP-1 analogs reduce food intake and body weight. In this review, we discuss several neural, physiological, cellular and molecular, as well as behavioral mechanisms through which peripheral and central GLP-1R signaling reduces feeding. Particular attention is devoted to discussion regarding the numerous neural substrates through which GLP-1 and GLP-1 analogs act to reduce food intake and body weight, including various hypothalamic nuclei (arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus, periventricular hypothalamus, lateral hypothalamic area), hindbrain nuclei (parabrachial nucleus, medial nucleus tractus solitarius), hippocampus (ventral subregion; vHP), and nuclei embedded within the mesolimbic reward circuitry [ventral tegmental area (VTA) and nucleus accumbens (NAc)]. In some of these nuclei [VTA, NAc, and vHP], GLP-1R activation reduces food intake and body weight without concomitant nausea responses, suggesting that targeting these specific pathways may be of particular interest for future obesity pharmacotherapy. The widely distributed neural systems through which GLP-1 and GLP-1 analogs act to reduce body weight highlight the complexity of the neural systems regulating energy balance, as well as the challenges for developing effective obesity pharmacotherapies that reduce feeding without producing parallel negative side effects. PMID:27030669

  6. Systemic bile acid sensing by G protein-coupled bile acid receptor 1 (GPBAR1) promotes PYY and GLP-1 release

    PubMed Central

    Ullmer, C; Alvarez Sanchez, R; Sprecher, U; Raab, S; Mattei, P; Dehmlow, H; Sewing, S; Iglesias, A; Beauchamp, J; Conde-Knape, K

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Nutrient sensing in the gut is believed to be accomplished through activation of GPCRs expressed on enteroendocrine cells. In particular, L-cells located predominantly in distal regions of the gut secrete glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and peptide tyrosine-tyrosine (PYY) upon stimulation by nutrients and bile acids (BA). The study was designed to address the mechanism of hormone secretion in L-cells stimulated by the BA receptor G protein-coupled bile acid receptor 1 (GPBAR1). Experimental Approach A novel, selective, orally bioavailable, and potent GPBAR1 agonist, RO5527239, was synthesized in order to investigate L-cell secretion in vitro and in vivo in mice and monkey. In analogy to BA, RO5527239 was conjugated with taurine to reduce p.o. bioavailability yet retaining its potency. Using RO5527239 and tauro-RO5527239, the acute secretion effects on L-cells were addressed via different routes of administration. Key Results GPBAR1 signalling triggers the co-secretion of PYY and GLP-1, and leads to improved glucose tolerance. The strong correlation of plasma drug exposure and plasma PYY levels suggests activation of GPBAR1 from systemically accessible compartments. In contrast to the orally bioavailable agonist RO5527239, we show that tauro-RO5527239 triggers PYY release only when applied intravenously. Compared to mice, a slower and more sustained PYY secretion was observed in monkeys. Conclusion and Implications Selective GPBAR1 activation elicits a strong secretagogue effect on L-cells, which primarily requires systemic exposure. We suggest that GPBAR1 is a key player in the intestinal proximal-distal loop that mediates the early phase of nutrient-evoked L-cell secretion effects. PMID:23488746

  7. Endogenous GLP1 and GLP1 analogue alter CNS responses to palatable food consumption.

    PubMed

    Ten Kulve, Jennifer S; Veltman, Dick J; van Bloemendaal, Liselotte; Groot, Paul F C; Ruhé, Henricus G; Barkhof, Frederik; Diamant, Michaela; Ijzerman, Richard G

    2016-04-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) affects appetite, supposedly mediated via the central nervous system (CNS). In this study, we investigate whether modulation of CNS responses to palatable food consumption may be a mechanism by which GLP1 contributes to the central regulation of feeding. Using functional MRI, we determined the effects of endogenous GLP1 and treatment with the GLP1 analogue liraglutide on CNS activation to chocolate milk receipt. Study 1 included 20 healthy lean individuals and 20 obese patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Scans were performed on two occasions: during infusion of the GLP1 receptor antagonist exendin 9-39 (blocking actions of endogenous GLP1) and during placebo infusion. Study 2 was a randomised, cross-over intervention study carried out in 20 T2DM patients, comparing treatment with liraglutide to insulin, after 10 days and 12 weeks. Compared with lean individuals, T2DM patients showed reduced activation to chocolate milk in right insula (P = 0.04). In lean individuals, blockade of endogenous GLP1 effects inhibited activation in bilateral insula (P ≤ 0.03). Treatment in T2DM with liraglutide, vs insulin, increased activation to chocolate milk in right insula and caudate nucleus after 10 days (P ≤ 0.03); however, these effects ceased to be significant after 12 weeks. Our findings in healthy lean individuals indicate that endogenous GLP1 is involved in the central regulation of feeding by affecting central responsiveness to palatable food consumption. In obese T2DM, treatment with liraglutide may improve the observed deficit in responsiveness to palatable food, which may contribute to the induction of weight loss observed during treatment. However, no long-term effects of liraglutide were observed. PMID:26769912

  8. Lesions of area postrema and subfornical organ alter exendin-4-induced brain activation without preventing the hypophagic effect of the GLP-1 receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Baraboi, Elena-Dana; Smith, Pauline; Ferguson, Alastair V; Richard, Denis

    2010-04-01

    The mechanism and route whereby glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists, such as GLP-1 and exendin-4 (Ex-4), access the central nervous system (CNS) to exert their metabolic effects have yet to be clarified. The primary objective of the present study was to investigate the potential role of two circumventricular organs (CVOs), the area postrema (AP) and the subfornical organ (SFO), in mediating the metabolic and CNS-stimulating effects of Ex-4. We demonstrated that electrolytic ablation of the AP, SFO, or AP + SFO does not acutely prevent the anorectic effects of Ex-4. AP + SFO lesion chronically decreased food intake and body weight and also modulated the effect of Ex-4 on the neuronal activation of brain structures involved in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and glucose metabolism. The results of the study also showed that CVO lesions blunted Ex-4-induced expression of c-fos mRNA (a widely used neuronal activity marker) in 1) limbic structures (bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and central amygdala), 2) hypothalamus (paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus, supraoptic nucleus, and arcuate nucleus), and 3) hindbrain (lateral and lateral-external parabrachial nucleus, medial nucleus of the solitary tract, and ventrolateral medulla). In conclusion, although the present results do not support a role for the CVOs in the anorectic effect induced by a single injection of Ex-4, they suggest that the CVOs play important roles in mediating the actions of Ex-4 in the activation of CNS structures involved in homeostatic control. PMID:20106992

  9. GLP1-derived nonapeptide GLP1(28-36)amide protects pancreatic ?-cells from glucolipotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhengu; Stanojevic, Violeta; Brindamour, Luke J; Habener, Joel F

    2012-05-01

    Type 2 diabetes, often associated with obesity, results from a deficiency of insulin production and action manifested in increased blood levels of glucose and lipids that further promote insulin resistance and impair insulin secretion. Glucolipotoxicity caused by elevated plasma glucose and lipid levels is a major cause of impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from pancreatic ?-cells, due to increased oxidative stress, and insulin resistance. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1), an insulinotropic glucoincretin hormone, is known to promote ?-cell survival via its actions on its G-protein-coupled receptor on ?-cells. Here, we report that a nonapeptide, GLP1(28-36)amide, derived from the C-terminal domain of the insulinotropic GLP1, exerts cytoprotective actions on INS-1 ?-cells and on dispersed human islet cells in vitro in conditions of glucolipotoxicity and increased oxidative stress independently of the GLP1 receptor. The nonapeptide appears to enter preferably stressed, glucolipotoxic cells compared with normal unstressed cells. It targets mitochondria and improves impaired mitochondrial membrane potential, increases cellular ATP levels, inhibits cytochrome c release, caspase activation, and apoptosis, and enhances the viability and survival of INS-1 ?-cells. We propose that GLP1(28-36)amide might be useful in alleviating ?-cell stress and might improve ?-cell functions and survival. PMID:22414687

  10. GLP-1(28-36)amide, the Glucagon-like peptide-1 metabolite: friend, foe, or pharmacological folly?

    PubMed Central

    Taing, Meng-Wong; Rose, Felicity J; Whitehead, Jonathan P

    2014-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) axis has emerged as a major therapeutic target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. GLP-1 mediates its key insulinotropic effects via a G-protein coupled receptor expressed on β-cells and other pancreatic cell types. The insulinotropic activity of GLP-1 is terminated via enzymatic cleavage by dipeptidyl peptidase-4. Until recently, GLP-1-derived metabolites were generally considered metabolically inactive; however, accumulating evidence indicates some have biological activity that may contribute to the pleiotropic effects of GLP-1 independent of the GLP-1 receptor. Recent reports describing the putative effects of one such metabolite, the GLP-1-derived nonapeptide GLP-1(28-36) amide, are the focus of this review. Administration of the nonapeptide elevates cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and activates protein kinase A, β-catenin, and cAMP response-element binding protein in pancreatic β-cells and hepatocytes. In stressed cells, the nonapeptide targets the mitochondria and, via poorly defined mechanisms, helps to maintain mitochondrial membrane potential and cellular adenosine triphosphate levels and to reduce cytotoxicity and apoptosis. In mouse models of diet-induced obesity, treatment with the nonapeptide reduces weight gain and ameliorates associated pathophysiology, including hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and hepatic steatosis. Nonapeptide administration in a streptozotocin-induced model of type 1 diabetes also improves glucose disposal concomitant with elevated insulin levels and increased β-cell mass and proliferation. Collectively, these results suggest some of the beneficial effects of GLP-1 receptor analogs may be mediated by the nonapeptide. However, the concentrations required to elicit some of these effects are in the micromolar range, leading to reservations about potentially related therapeutic benefits. Moreover, although controversial, concerns have been raised about the potential for incretin-based therapies to promote pancreatitis and pancreatic and thyroid cancers. The effects ascribed to the nonapeptide make it a potential contributor to such outcomes, raising additional questions about its therapeutic suitability. Notwithstanding, the nonapeptide, like other GLP-1 metabolites, appears to be biologically active. Increasing understanding of such noncanonical GLP-1 activities should help to improve future incretin-based therapeutics. PMID:24940046

  11. GLP-1 is both anxiogenic and antidepressant; divergent effects of acute and chronic GLP-1 on emotionality.

    PubMed

    Anderberg, Rozita H; Richard, Jennifer E; Hansson, Caroline; Nissbrandt, Hans; Bergquist, Filip; Skibicka, Karolina P

    2016-03-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), produced in the intestine and hindbrain, is known for its glucoregulatory and appetite suppressing effects. GLP-1 agonists are in clinical use for treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity. GLP-1, however, may also affect brain areas associated with emotionality regulation. Here we aimed to characterize acute and chronic impact of GLP-1 on anxiety and depression-like behavior. Rats were subjected to anxiety and depression behavior tests following acute or chronic intracerebroventricular or intra-dorsal raphe (DR) application of GLP-1 receptor agonists. Serotonin or serotonin-related genes were also measured in the amygdala, DR and the hippocampus. We demonstrate that both GLP-1 and its long lasting analog, Exendin-4, induce anxiety-like behavior in three rodent tests of this behavior: black and white box, elevated plus maze and open field test when acutely administered intraperitoneally, into the lateral ventricle, or directly into the DR. Acute central GLP-1 receptor stimulation also altered serotonin signaling in the amygdala. In contrast, chronic central administration of Exendin-4 did not alter anxiety-like behavior but significantly reduced depression-like behavior in the forced swim test. Importantly, this positive effect of Exendin-4 was not due to significant body weight loss and reduced food intake, since rats pair-fed to Exendin-4 rats did not show altered mood. Collectively we show a striking impact of central GLP-1 on emotionality and the amygdala serotonin signaling that is divergent under acute versus chronic GLP-1 activation conditions. We also find a novel role for the DR GLP-1 receptors in regulation of behavior. These results may have direct relevance to the clinic, and indicate that Exendin-4 may be especially useful for obese patients manifesting with comorbid depression. PMID:26724568

  12. Identification and characterisation of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor expressing cells using a new transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Paul; Parker, Helen E; Adriaenssens, Alice E; Hodgson, Joshua M; Cork, Simon C; Trapp, Stefan; Gribble, Fiona M; Reimann, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an intestinal hormone with widespread actions on metabolism. Therapies based on GLP-1 are highly effective because they increase glucose-dependent insulin secretion in people with type 2 diabetes, but many reports suggest that GLP-1 has additional beneficial, or in some cases potentially dangerous, actions on other tissues, including the heart, vasculature, exocrine pancreas, liver and central nervous system. Identifying which tissues express the GLP-1 receptor (GLP1R) is critical for the development of GLP-1 based therapies. Our objective was to identify and characterise the targets of GLP-1 in mice, using a method independent of GLP1R antibodies. Using newly-generated glp1r-cre mice crossed with fluorescent reporter strains, we show that major sites of glp1r expression include pancreatic β and δ-cells, vascular smooth muscle, cardiac atrium, gastric antrum/pylorus, enteric neurones and vagal and dorsal root ganglia. In the central nervous sytem, glp1r-fluorescent cells were abundant in the area postrema, arcuate nucleus, paraventricular nucleus and ventromedial hypothalamus. Sporadic glp1r-fluorescent cells were found in pancreatic ducts. No glp1r-fluorescence was observed in ventricular cardiomyocytes. Glp1r-positive enteric and vagal neurons were activated by GLP-1, and may contribute to intestinal and central responses to locally-released GLP-1, such as regulation of intestinal secretomotor activity and appetite. PMID:24296712

  13. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) induces M2 polarization of human macrophages via STAT3 activation.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Daisuke; Fujiwara, Yukio; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Takeya, Motohiro

    2012-08-24

    It is known that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a hormone secreted postprandially from the L-cells of the small intestine and regulates glucose homeostasis. GLP-1 is now used for the treatment of diabetes because of its beneficial role against insulin resistance. The GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is expressed on many cell types, including macrophages, and GLP-1 suppresses the development of atherosclerosis by inhibiting macrophage function. However, there have so far been few studies that have investigated the significance of GLP-1/GLP-1R signaling in macrophage activation. In the present study, we examined the effect of GLP-1 and exenatide, a GLP-1R agonist, on human monocyte-derived macrophage (HMDM) activation. We found that GLP-1 induced signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) activation. Silencing of GLP-1R suppressed the GLP-1-induced STAT3 activation. In addition, alternatively activated (M2) macrophage-related molecules, such as IL-10, CD163, and CD204 in HMDM, were significantly upregulated by GLP-1. Furthermore, the co-culture of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with GLP-1-treated RAW 264.7 macrophages increased the secretion of adiponectin compared to co-culture of the 3T3-L1 adipocytes with untreated RAW 264.7 macrophages. Our results demonstrate that GLP-1 induces macrophage polarization toward the M2 phenotype, which may contribute to the protective effects of GLP-1 against diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:22842565

  14. Proteomic analysis of INS-1 rat insulinoma cells: ER stress effects and the protective role of exenatide, a GLP-1 receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Kyung; Cho, Jin-Hwan; Lee, Jae-Jin; Son, Moon-Ho; Lee, Kong-Joo

    2015-01-01

    Beta cell death caused by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a key factor aggravating type 2 diabetes. Exenatide, a glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 receptor agonist, prevents beta cell death induced by thapsigargin, a selective inhibitor of ER calcium storage. Here, we report on our proteomic studies designed to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. We conducted comparative proteomic analyses of cellular protein profiles during thapsigargin-induced cell death in the absence and presence of exenatide in INS-1 rat insulinoma cells. Thapsigargin altered cellular proteins involved in metabolic processes and protein folding, whose alterations were variably modified by exenatide treatment. We categorized the proteins with thapsigargin initiated alterations into three groups: those whose alterations were 1) reversed by exenatide, 2) exaggerated by exenatide, and 3) unchanged by exenatide. The most significant effect of thapsigargin on INS-1 cells relevant to their apoptosis was the appearance of newly modified spots of heat shock proteins, thimet oligopeptidase and 14-3-3β, ε, and θ, and the prevention of their appearance by exenatide, suggesting that these proteins play major roles. We also found that various modifications in 14-3-3 isoforms, which precede their appearance and promote INS-1 cell death. This study provides insights into the mechanisms in ER stress-caused INS-1 cell death and its prevention by exenatide. PMID:25793496

  15. Proteomic Analysis of INS-1 Rat Insulinoma Cells: ER Stress Effects and the Protective Role of Exenatide, a GLP-1 Receptor Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Kyung; Cho, Jin-Hwan; Lee, Jae-Jin; Son, Moon-Ho; Lee, Kong-Joo

    2015-01-01

    Beta cell death caused by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a key factor aggravating type 2 diabetes. Exenatide, a glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 receptor agonist, prevents beta cell death induced by thapsigargin, a selective inhibitor of ER calcium storage. Here, we report on our proteomic studies designed to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. We conducted comparative proteomic analyses of cellular protein profiles during thapsigargin-induced cell death in the absence and presence of exenatide in INS-1 rat insulinoma cells. Thapsigargin altered cellular proteins involved in metabolic processes and protein folding, whose alterations were variably modified by exenatide treatment. We categorized the proteins with thapsigargin initiated alterations into three groups: those whose alterations were 1) reversed by exenatide, 2) exaggerated by exenatide, and 3) unchanged by exenatide. The most significant effect of thapsigargin on INS-1 cells relevant to their apoptosis was the appearance of newly modified spots of heat shock proteins, thimet oligopeptidase and 14-3-3β, ε, and θ, and the prevention of their appearance by exenatide, suggesting that these proteins play major roles. We also found that various modifications in 14-3-3 isoforms, which precede their appearance and promote INS-1 cell death. This study provides insights into the mechanisms in ER stress-caused INS-1 cell death and its prevention by exenatide. PMID:25793496

  16. Successful β cells islet regeneration in streptozotocin-induced diabetic baboons using ultrasound-targeted microbubble gene therapy with cyclinD2/CDK4/GLP1.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuyuan; Bastarrachea, Raul A; Roberts, Brad J; Voruganti, V Saroja; Frost, Patrice A; Nava-Gonzalez, Edna J; Arriaga-Cazares, Hector E; Chen, Jiaxi; Huang, Pintong; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Comuzzie, Anthony G; Grayburn, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    Both major forms of diabetes mellitus (DM) involve β-cell destruction and dysfunction. New treatment strategies have focused on replenishing the deficiency of β-cell mass common to both major forms of diabetes by islet transplantation or β-cell regeneration. The pancreas, not the liver, is the ideal organ for islet regeneration, because it is the natural milieu for islets. Since islet mass is known to increase during obesity and pregnancy, the concept of stimulating pancreatic islet regeneration in vivo is both rational and physiologic. This paper proposes a novel approach in which non-viral gene therapy is targeted to pancreatic islets using ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) in a non-human primate model (NHP), the baboon. Treated baboons received a gene cocktail comprised of cyclinD2, CDK, and GLP1, which in rats results in robust and durable islet regeneration with normalization of blood glucose, insulin, and C-peptide levels. We were able to generate important preliminary data indicating that gene therapy by UTMD can achieve in vivo normalization of the intravenous (IV) glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) curves in STZ hyperglycemic-induced conscious tethered baboons. Immunohistochemistry clearly demonstrated evidence of islet regeneration and restoration of β-cell mass. PMID:24553120

  17. [Impact of anti-diabetic therapy based on glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists on the cardiovascular risk of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Camafort-Babkowski, Miguel

    2013-08-17

    Anti-diabetic drugs have, in addition to their well-known glucose lowering-effect, different effects in the rest of cardiovascular factors that are associated with diabetes mellitus. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists have recently been incorporated to the therapeutic arsenal of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The objective of this review is to summarize the available evidence on the effect of the GLP-1 receptor agonists on different cardiovascular risk factors, mediated by the effect of GLP-1 receptor agonists on the control of hyperglycaemia and the GLP-1 receptor agonists effect on other cardiovascular risk factors (weight control, blood pressure control, lipid profile and all other cardiovascular risk biomarkers). In addition, we present the emerging evidence with regards to the impact that GLP-1 receptor agonists therapy could have in the reduction of cardiovascular events and the currently ongoing studies addressing this issue. PMID:23332622

  18. A novel dual GLP-1 and GIP incretin receptor agonist is neuroprotective in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease by reducing chronic inflammation in the brain.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lijun; Li, Dongfang; Feng, Peng; Li, Lin; Xue, Guo-Fang; Li, Guanglai; Hölscher, Christian

    2016-04-13

    The incretins glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) are growth factors. GLP-1 mimetics are on the market as treatments for type 2 diabetes. Both GLP-1 and GIP mimetics have shown neuroprotective properties in previous studies. In addition, the GLP-1 mimetic exendin-4 has shown protective effects in a clinical trial in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Novel GLP-1/GIP dual-agonist peptides have been developed to treat diabetes. Here, we report the neuroprotective effects of a novel dual agonist (DA-JC1) in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of PD. MPTP was injected once daily (20 mg/kg intraperitoneally) for 7 days and the dual agonist was coinjected once daily (50 nmol/kg intraperitoneally). We found that the drug reduced most of the MPTP-induced motor impairments in the rotarod, open-field locomotion, and muscle strength test. The number of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neurons in the substantia nigra and striatum was reduced by MPTP and increased by DA-JC1. Synapse numbers (synaptophysin expression) were reduced in the substantia nigra and the striatum by MPTP and DA-JC1 reversed this effect. The activation of a chronic inflammation response by MPTP was considerably reduced by the dual agonist (DA) (astroglia and microglia activation). Therefore, dual agonists show promise as a novel treatment of PD. PMID:26918675

  19. Ability of GLP-1 to Decrease Food Intake is Dependent on Nutritional Status

    PubMed Central

    Ronveaux, Charlotte C; de Lartigue, Guillaume; Raybould, Helen E

    2014-01-01

    Gut-derived glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) acts in the postprandial period to stimulate insulin secretion and inhibit gastrointestinal motor and secretory function; whether endogenous peripheral GLP-1 inhibits food intake is less clear. We hypothesized that GLP-1 inhibits food intake in the fed, but not fasted, state. There is evidence that GLP-1 acts via stimulation of vagal afferent neurons (VAN); we further hypothesized that the satiating effects of endogenous GLP-1 in the postprandial period is determined either by a change in GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) expression or localization to different cellular compartments in VAN. METHODS Food intake was recorded following administration of GLP-1 (50 ?g/kg or 100?g/kg) or saline (IP) in Wistar rats fasted for 18h or fasted then re-fed with 3g chow. GLP-1R protein expression and localization on VAN was determined by immunocytochemistry and immunoblots in animals fasted for 18h or fasted then re-fed for 40mins. GLP-1R mRNA level was detected in animals fasted for 18h or fasted and re-fed ad libitum for 2h. RESULTS GLP-1 (100?g/kg) significantly reduced 40 min food intake by 38% in re-fed but not fasted rats (p<0.05). GLP-1R mRNA or protein levels in VAN were unchanged in re-fed compared to fasted rats. However, GLP-1R localization to the plasma membrane was significantly increased in VAN by feeding. CONCLUSION Feeding changes the ability of peripheral GLP-1 to inhibit food intake. GLP-1Rs are trafficked to the plasma membrane in response to a meal. GLP-1 may play a role in regulating food intake in the postprandial period. PMID:24955496

  20. The Fate of Taspoglutide, a Weekly GLP-1 Receptor Agonist, Versus Twice-Daily Exenatide for Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Rosenstock, Julio; Balas, Bogdan; Charbonnel, Bernard; Bolli, Geremia B.; Boldrin, Mark; Ratner, Robert; Balena, Raffaella

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Taspoglutide is a long-acting glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist developed for treatment of type 2 diabetes. The efficacy and safety of once-weekly taspoglutide was compared with twice-daily exenatide. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Overweight adults with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes on metformin ± a thiazolidinedione were randomized to subcutaneous taspoglutide 10 mg weekly (n = 399), taspoglutide 20 mg weekly (n = 398), or exenatide 10 µg twice daily (n = 392) in an open-label, multicenter trial. The primary end point was change in HbA1c after 24 weeks. RESULTS Mean baseline HbA1c was 8.1%. Both doses of taspoglutide reduced HbA1c significantly more than exenatide (taspoglutide 10 mg: –1.24% [SE 0.09], difference –0.26, 95% CI –0.37 to –0.15, P < 0.0001; taspoglutide 20 mg: –1.31% [0.08], difference –0.33, –0.44 to –0.22, P < 0.0001; exenatide: –0.98% [0.08]). Both taspoglutide doses reduced fasting plasma glucose significantly more than exenatide. Taspoglutide reduced body weight (taspoglutide 10 mg, –1.6 kg; taspoglutide 20 mg, –2.3 kg) as did exenatide (–2.3 kg), which was greater than with taspoglutide 10 mg (P < 0.05). HbA1c and weight effects were maintained after 52 weeks. More adverse events with taspoglutide 10 and 20 mg than exenatide developed over time (nausea in 53, 59, and 35% and vomiting in 33, 37, and 16%, respectively). Allergic and injection-site reactions were more common with taspoglutide. Discontinuations were greater with taspoglutide. Antitaspoglutide antibodies were detected in 49% of patients. CONCLUSIONS Once-weekly taspoglutide demonstrated greater glycemic control than twice-daily exenatide with comparable weight loss, but with unacceptable levels of nausea/vomiting, injection-site reactions, and systemic allergic reactions. PMID:23139373

  1. Inflammation Meets Metabolic Disease: Gut Feeling Mediated by GLP-1

    PubMed Central

    Zietek, Tamara; Rath, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Chronic diseases, such as obesity and diabetes, cardiovascular, and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) share common features in their pathology. Metabolic disorders exhibit strong inflammatory underpinnings and vice versa, inflammation is associated with metabolic alterations. Next to cytokines and cellular stress pathways, such as the unfolded protein response (UPR), alterations in the enteroendocrine system are intersections of various pathologies. Enteroendocrine cells (EEC) have been studied extensively for their ability to regulate gastrointestinal motility, secretion, and insulin release by release of peptide hormones. In particular, the L-cell-derived incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) has gained enormous attention due to its insulinotropic action and relevance in the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Yet, accumulating data indicate a critical role for EEC and in particular for GLP-1 in metabolic adaptation and in orchestrating immune responses beyond blood glucose control. EEC sense the lamina propria and luminal environment, including the microbiota via receptors and transporters. Subsequently, mediating signals by secreting hormones and cytokines, EEC can be considered as integrators of metabolic and inflammatory signaling. This review focuses on L cell and GLP-1 functions in the context of metabolic and inflammatory diseases. The effects of incretin-based therapies on metabolism and immune system are discussed and the interrelation and common features of metabolic and immune-mediated disorders are highlighted. Moreover, it presents data on the impact of inflammation, in particular of IBD on EEC and discusses the potential role of the microbiota as link between nutrients, metabolism, immunity, and disease. PMID:27148273

  2. Lixisenatide: A New Member of the Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Receptor Agonist Class of Incretin Therapies.

    PubMed

    Shaefer, Charles F

    2016-04-01

    In Brief In the past decade, various incretin-based therapies have emerged in clinical practice. These drugs, including dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists lower A1C with weight-neutral or weight-lowering effects and a relatively lower risk of hypoglycemia. This article provides a review of lixisenatide, a once-daily GLP-1 receptor agonist for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:27092017

  3. A novel dual GLP-1 and GIP receptor agonist is neuroprotective in the MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease by increasing expression of BNDF.

    PubMed

    Ji, Chenhui; Xue, Guo-Fang; Lijun, Cao; Feng, Peng; Li, Dongfang; Li, Lin; Li, Guanglai; Hölscher, Christian

    2016-03-01

    The incretins glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and glucose dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) are growth factors with neuroprotective properties. GLP-1 mimetics are on the market as treatments for type 2 diabetes and are well tolerated. Both GLP-1 and GIP mimetics have shown neuroprotective properties in animal models of Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. In addition, the GLP-1 mimetic exendin-4 has shown protective effects in a clinical trial in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Novel GLP-1/GIP dual-agonist peptides have been developed and are tested in diabetic patients. Here we demonstrate the neuroprotective effects of a novel dual agonist (DA-JC1) in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of PD. MPTP was injected once-daily (20mg/kg i.p.) for 7 days, and the dual agonist was injected 30min later i.p. (50nmol/kg bw). The PI3k inhibitor LY294002 (0.6mg/kg i.v.) was co-injected in one group. DA-JC1 reduced or reversed most of the MPTP induced motor impairments in the rotarod and in a muscle strength test. The number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) was reduced by MPTP and increased by DA-JC1. The ratio of anti-inflammatory Bcl-2 to pro-inflammatory BAX as well as the activation of the growth factor kinase Akt was reduced by MPTP and reversed by DA-JC1. The PI3k inhibitor had only limited effect on the DA-JC1 drug effect. Importantly, levels of the neuroprotective brain derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) were reduced by MPTP and enhanced by DA-JC1. The results demonstrate that DA-JC1 shows promise as a novel treatment for PD. PMID:26453833

  4. GLP-1R agonism enhances adjustable gastric banding in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Habegger, Kirk M; Kirchner, Henriette; Yi, Chun-Xia; Heppner, Kristy M; Sweeney, Dan; Ottaway, Nickki; Holland, Jenna; Amburgy, Sarah; Raver, Christine; Krishna, Radhakrishna; Müller, Timo D; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Pfluger, Paul T; Obici, Silvana; DiMarchi, Richard D; D'Alessio, David A; Seeley, Randy J; Tschöp, Matthias H

    2013-09-01

    Bariatric procedures vary in efficacy, but overall are more effective than behavioral and pharmaceutical treatment. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass causes increased secretion of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and reduces body weight (BW) more than adjustable gastric banding (AGB), which does not trigger increased GLP-1 secretion. Since GLP-1-based drugs consistently reduce BW, we hypothesized that GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists would augment the effects of AGB. Male Long-Evans rats with diet-induced obesity received AGB implantation or sham surgery. GLP-1R agonism, cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1-R) antagonism, or vehicle was combined with inflation to evaluate interaction between AGB and pharmacological treatments. GLP1-R agonism reduced BW in both sham and AGB rats (left uninflated) compared with vehicle-treated animals. Subsequent band inflation was ineffective in vehicle-treated rats but enhanced weight loss stimulated by GLP1-R agonism. In contrast, there was no additional BW loss when CB1-R antagonism was given with AGB. We found band inflation to trigger neural activation in areas of the nucleus of the solitary tract known to be targeted by GLP-1R agonism, offering a potential mechanism for the interaction. These data show that GLP-1R agonism, but not CB1-R antagonism, improves weight loss achieved by AGB and suggest an opportunity to optimize bariatric surgery with adjunctive pharmacotherapy. PMID:23775764

  5. Endogenous GLP-1 acts on paraventricular nucleus to suppress feeding: projection from nucleus tractus solitarius and activation of corticotropin-releasing hormone, nesfatin-1 and oxytocin neurons.

    PubMed

    Katsurada, Kenichi; Maejima, Yuko; Nakata, Masanori; Kodaira, Misato; Suyama, Shigetomo; Iwasaki, Yusaku; Kario, Kazuomi; Yada, Toshihiko

    2014-08-22

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists have been used to treat type 2 diabetic patients and shown to reduce food intake and body weight. The anorexigenic effects of GLP-1 and GLP-1 receptor agonists are thought to be mediated primarily via the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). GLP-1, an intestinal hormone, is also localized in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) of the brain stem. However, the role of endogenous GLP-1, particularly that in the NTS neurons, in feeding regulation remains to be established. The present study examined whether the NTS GLP-1 neurons project to PVN and whether the endogenous GLP-1 acts on PVN to restrict feeding. Intra-PVN injection of GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin (9-39) increased food intake. Injection of retrograde tracer into PVN combined with immunohistochemistry for GLP-1 in NTS revealed direct projection of NTS GLP-1 neurons to PVN. Moreover, GLP-1 evoked Ca(2+) signaling in single neurons isolated from PVN. The majority of GLP-1-responsive neurons were immunoreactive predominantly to corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and nesfatin-1, and less frequently to oxytocin. These results indicate that endogenous GLP-1 targets PVN to restrict feeding behavior, in which the projection from NTS GLP-1 neurons and activation of CRH and nesfatin-1 neurons might be implicated. This study reveals a neuronal basis for the anorexigenic effect of endogenous GLP-1 in the brain. PMID:25089000

  6. Mechanisms of Action of GLP-1 in the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Máire E.; Egan, Josephine M.

    2007-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 is a hormone that is encoded in the proglucagon gene. It is mainly produced in enteroendocrine L cells of the gut and is secreted into the blood stream when food containing fat, protein hydrolysate and/or glucose enters the duodenum. Its particular effects on insulin and glucagon secretion have generated a flurry of research activity over the past twenty years culminating in a naturally occurring GLP-1 receptor agonist, exendin-4, now being used to treat type 2 diabetes. GLP-1 engages a specific G-protein coupled receptor that is present in tissues other than the pancreas (brain, kidney, lung, heart, major blood vessels). The most widely studied cell activated by GLP-1 is the insulin-secreting beta cell where its defining action is augmentation of glucose-induced insulin secretion. Upon GLP-1 receptor activation, adenylyl cyclase is activated and cAMP generated, leading, in turn, to cAMP-dependent activation of second messenger pathways, such as the PKA and Epac pathways. As well as short-term effects of enhancing glucose-induced insulin secretion, continuous GLP-1 receptor activation also increases insulin synthesis, and beta cell proliferation and neogenesis. Although these latter effects cannot be currently monitored in humans, there are substantial improvements in glucose tolerance and increases in both first phase and plateau phase insulin secretory responses in type 2 diabetic patients treated with exendin-4. This review we will focus on the effects resulting from GLP-1 receptor activation in islets of Langerhans PMID:17306374

  7. Impact of GLP-1 Receptor Agonists on Major Gastrointestinal Disorders for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Mixed Treatment Comparison Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Feng; Yu, Kai; Yang, Zhirong; Wu, Shanshan; Zhang, Yuan; Shi, Luwen; Ji, Linong; Zhan, Siyan

    2012-01-01

    Aim. We aimed to integrate evidence from all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and assess the impact of different doses of exenatide or liraglutide on major gastrointestinal adverse events (GIAEs) in type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Methods. RCTs evaluating different doses of exenatide and liraglutide against placebo or an active comparator with treatment duration ≥4 weeks were searched and reviewed. A total of 35, 32 and 28 RCTs met the selection criteria evaluated for nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea, respectively. Pairwise random-effects meta-analyses and mixed treatment comparisons (MTC) of all RCTs were performed. Results. All GLP-1 dose groups significantly increased the probability of nausea, vomiting and diarrhea relative to placebo and conventional treatment. MTC meta-analysis showed that there was 99.2% and 85.0% probability, respectively, that people with exenatide 10 μg twice daily (EX10BID) was more vulnerable to nausea and vomiting than those with other treatments. There was a 78.90% probability that liraglutide 1.2 mg once daily (LIR1.2) has a higher risk of diarrhea than other groups. A dose-dependent relationship of exenatide and liraglutide on GIAEs was observed. Conclusions. Our MTC meta-analysis suggests that patients should be warned about these GIAEs in early stage of treatment by GLP-1s, especially by EX10BID and LIR1.2, to promote treatment compliance. PMID:23365557

  8. (Val(8))GLP-1-Glu-PAL: a GLP-1 agonist that improves hippocampal neurogenesis, glucose homeostasis, and β-cell function in high-fat-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Lennox, Rachael; Porter, David W; Flatt, Peter R; Gault, Victor A

    2013-04-01

    This study examined the biological properties of a novel GLP-1 peptide, (Val(8))GLP-1-Glu-PAL, engineered with an Ala(8)→Val(8) substitution and additional incorporation of a C(16) fatty acid moiety at Lys(26) via a glutamic acid linker. GLP-1 underwent 75 % degradation by DPP-IV over 8 h, whereas (Val(8))GLP-1 and (Val(8))GLP-1-Glu-PAL remained intact. All GLP-1 peptides significantly stimulated insulin secretion at 5.6 mM (1.3- to 4.9-fold, p<0.01 to p<0.001) and 16.7 mM glucose (1.5- to 2.3-fold, p<0.001). At higher concentrations (Val(8))GLP-1-Glu-PAL was significantly more potent at stimulating insulin secretion (1.2- to 1.3-fold, p<0.05). In high-fat-fed mice, all GLP-1 peptides significantly lowered plasma glucose concentrations (41-66 % decrease, p<0.05 to p<0.001), with (Val(8))GLP-1-Glu-PAL eliciting protracted glucose-lowering actions (32-59 % decrease, p<0.05 to p<0.01) when administered 8 h prior to a glucose load. Twice-daily administration of (Val(8))GLP-1-Glu-PAL in high-fat-fed mice for 21 days had no effect on bodyweight or food intake, but significantly lowered non-fasting plasma glucose (43-46 % decrease, p<0.05). (Val(8))GLP-1-Glu-PAL markedly decreased glycemic excursion following intraperitoneal glucose (32-48 % decrease, p<0.05), enhanced insulin response to glucose (2- to 2.3-fold, p<0.05 to p<0.01), and improved insulin sensitivity (25-38 % decrease in plasma glucose, p<0.05). O(2) consumption, CO(2) production, RER, and energy expenditure were not altered by (Val(8))GLP-1-Glu-PAL therapy. Treatment with (Val(8))GLP-1-Glu-PAL resulted in a significant increase in BrdU-positive cells (1.3-fold, p<0.05) in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus. These data demonstrate that (Val(8))GLP-1-Glu-PAL is a long-acting GLP-1 peptide that significantly improves hippocampal neurogenesis, glucose homeostasis, and insulin secretion in high-fat-fed mice. PMID:23138973

  9. Incretin therapies: highlighting common features and differences in the modes of action of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Nauck, M

    2016-03-01

    Over the last few years, incretin-based therapies have emerged as important agents in the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D). These agents exert their effect via the incretin system, specifically targeting the receptor for the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), which is partly responsible for augmenting glucose-dependent insulin secretion in response to nutrient intake (the 'incretin effect'). In patients with T2D, pharmacological doses/concentrations of GLP-1 can compensate for the inability of diabetic β cells to respond to the main incretin hormone glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, and this is therefore a suitable parent compound for incretin-based glucose-lowering medications. Two classes of incretin-based therapies are available: GLP-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors. GLP-1RAs promote GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) signalling by providing GLP-1R stimulation through 'incretin mimetics' circulating at pharmacological concentrations, whereas DPP-4 inhibitors prevent the degradation of endogenously released GLP-1. Both agents produce reductions in plasma glucose and, as a result of their glucose-dependent mode of action, this is associated with low rates of hypoglycaemia; however, there are distinct modes of action resulting in differing efficacy and tolerability profiles. Furthermore, as their actions are not restricted to stimulating insulin secretion, these agents have also been associated with additional non-glycaemic benefits such as weight loss, improvements in β-cell function and cardiovascular risk markers. These attributes have made incretin therapies attractive treatments for the management of T2D and have presented physicians with an opportunity to tailor treatment plans. This review endeavours to outline the commonalities and differences among incretin-based therapies and to provide guidance regarding agents most suitable for treating T2D in individual patients. PMID:26489970

  10. PACAP intraperitoneal treatment suppresses appetite and food intake via PAC1 receptor in mice by inhibiting ghrelin and increasing GLP-1 and leptin.

    PubMed

    Vu, John P; Goyal, Deepinder; Luong, Leon; Oh, Suwan; Sandhu, Ravneet; Norris, Joshua; Parsons, William; Pisegna, Joseph R; Germano, Patrizia M

    2015-11-15

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) is expressed within the gastroenteric system, where it has profound physiological effects. PACAP was shown to regulate food intake and thermogenesis centrally; however, PACAP peripheral regulation of appetite and feeding behavior is unknown. Therefore, we studied PACAP's effect on appetite and food intake control by analyzing feeding behavior and metabolic hormones in PAC1-deficient (PAC1-/-) and age-matched wild-type (WT) mice intraperitoneally injected with PACAP1-38 or PACAP1-27 before the dark phase of feeding. Food intake and feeding behavior were analyzed using the BioDAQ system. Active ghrelin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), leptin, peptide YY, pancreatic polypeptide, and insulin were measured following PACAP1-38 administration in fasted WT mice. PACAP1-38/PACAP1-27 injected into WT mice significantly decreased in a dose-dependent manner cumulative food intake and reduced bout and meal feeding parameters. Conversely, PACAP1-38 injected into PAC1-/- mice failed to significantly change food intake. Importantly, PACAP1-38 reduced plasma levels of active ghrelin compared with vehicle in WT mice. In PAC1-/- mice, fasting levels of active ghrelin, GLP-1, insulin, and leptin and postprandial levels of active ghrelin and insulin were significantly altered compared with levels in WT mice. Therefore, PAC1 is a novel regulator of appetite/satiety. PACAP1-38/PACAP1-27 significantly reduced appetite and food intake through PAC1. In PAC1-/- mice, the regulation of anorexigenic/orexigenic hormones was abolished, whereas active ghrelin remained elevated even postprandially. PACAP significantly reduced active ghrelin in fasting conditions. These results establish a role for PACAP via PAC1 in the peripheral regulation of appetite/satiety and suggest future studies to explore a therapeutic use of PACAP or PAC1 agonists for obesity treatment. PMID:26336928

  11. Intestinal Bile Acid Composition Modulates Prohormone Convertase 1/3 (PC1/3) Expression and Consequent GLP-1 Production in Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Kohkichi; Watanabe, Mitsuhiro; Sugizaki, Taichi; Irie, Jun-Ichiro; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    Besides an established medication for hypercholesterolemia, bile acid binding resins (BABRs) present antidiabetic effects. Although the mechanisms underlying these effects are still enigmatic, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) appears to be involved. In addition to a few reported mechanisms, we propose prohormone convertase 1/3 (PC1/3), an essential enzyme of GLP-1 production, as a potent molecule in the GLP-1 release induced by BABRs. In our study, the BABR colestimide leads to a bile acid-specific G protein-coupled receptor TGR5-dependent induction of PC1/3 gene expression. Here, we focused on the alteration of intestinal bile acid composition and consequent increase of total TGR5 agonistic activity to explain the TGR5 activation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that nuclear factor of activated T cells mediates the TGR5-triggered PC1/3 gene expression. Altogether, our data indicate that the TGR5-dependent intestinal PC1/3 gene expression supports the BABR-stimulated GLP-1 release. We also propose a combination of BABR and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor in the context of GLP-1-based antidiabetic therapy. PMID:26789236

  12. The GLP-1 receptor agonist liraglutide reduces pathology-specific tau phosphorylation and improves motor function in a transgenic hTauP301L mouse model of tauopathy.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Henrik H; Barkholt, Pernille; Fabricius, Katrine; Jelsing, Jacob; Terwel, Dick; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Vrang, Niels

    2016-03-01

    In addition to a prominent role in glycemic control, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists exhibit neuroprotective properties. There is mounting experimental evidence that GLP-1 receptor agonists, including liraglutide, may enhance synaptic plasticity, counteract cognitive deficits and ameliorate neurodegenerative features in preclinical models of Alzheimer's disease (AD), predominantly in the context of ?-amyloid toxicity. Here we characterized the effects of liraglutide in a transgenic mutant tau (hTauP301L) mouse tauopathy model, which develops age-dependent pathology-specific neuronal tau phosphorylation and neurofibrillary tangle formation with progressively compromised motor function (limb clasping). Liraglutide (500g/kg/day, s.c., q.d., n=18) or vehicle (n=18) was administered to hTauP301L mice for 6 months from the age of three months. Vehicle-dosed wild-type FVB/N mice served as normal control (n=17). The onset and severity of hind limb clasping was markedly different in liraglutide and vehicle-dosed transgenic mice. Clasping behavior was observed in 61% of vehicle-dosed hTauP301L mice with a 55% survival rate in 9-month old transgenic mice. In contrast, liraglutide treatment reduced the clasping rate to 39% of hTauP301L mice, and fully prevented clasping-associated lethality resulting in a survival rate of 89%. Stereological analyses demonstrated that hTauP301L mice exhibited hindbrain-dominant neuronal accumulation of phosphorylated tau closely correlated to the severity of clasping behavior. In correspondence, liraglutide treatment significantly reduced neuronal phospho-tau load by 61.910.2% (p<0.001) in hTauP301L mice, as compared to vehicle-dosed controls. In conclusion, liraglutide significantly reduced tau pathology in a transgenic mouse tauopathy model. PMID:26746341

  13. Treatment of antipsychotic-associated obesity with a GLP-1 receptor agonist—protocol for an investigator-initiated prospective, randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blinded intervention study: the TAO study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Ishøy, Pelle L; Knop, Filip K; Broberg, Brian V; Baandrup, Lone; Fagerlund, Birgitte; Jørgensen, Niklas R; Andersen, Ulrik B; Rostrup, Egill; Glenthøj, Birte Y; Ebdrup, Bjørn H

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Antipsychotic medication is widely associated with dysmetabolism including obesity and type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular-related diseases and early death. Obesity is considered the single most important risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Interventions against antipsychotic-associated obesity are limited and insufficient. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, but their bodyweight-lowering effects have also been recognised in patients with non-diabetes. The primary endpoint of this trial is weight loss after 3 months of treatment with a GLP-1 receptor agonist (exenatide once weekly) in patients with non-diabetic schizophrenia with antipsychotic-associated obesity. Secondary endpoints include physiological and metabolic measurements, various psychopathological and cognitive measures, and structural and functional brain MRI. Methods and analysis 40 obese patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder treated with antipsychotic drugs will be randomised to subcutaneous injection of exenatide once weekly (2 mg) or placebo for 3 months, adjunctive to their antipsychotic treatment. Ethics and dissemination The trial has been approved by the Danish Health and Medicines Authority, the National Committee on Health Research Ethics and the Danish Data Protection Agency. Trial participation presupposes theoral and written patient informed consent. An external, independent monitoring committee (Good Clinical Practice Unit at Copenhagen University Hospital) will monitor the study according to the GCP Guidelines. Trial data, including positive, negative and inconclusive results, will be presented at national and international scientific meetings and conferences. Papers will be submitted to peer-reviewed journals. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01794429; National Committee on Health Research Ethics project number: 36378; EudraCT nr: 2012-005404-17; The Danish Data Protection Agency project number: RHP-2012-027. PMID:24401727

  14. Cyclic alpha-conotoxin peptidomimetic chimeras as potent GLP-1R agonists.

    PubMed

    Swedberg, Joakim E; Schroeder, Christina I; Mitchell, Justin M; Durek, Thomas; Fairlie, David P; Edmonds, David J; Griffith, David A; Ruggeri, Roger B; Derksen, David R; Loria, Paula M; Liras, Spiros; Price, David A; Craik, David J

    2015-10-20

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) results from compromised pancreatic β-cell function, reduced insulin production, and lowered insulin sensitivity in target organs resulting in hyperglycemia. The GLP-1 hormone has two biologically active forms, GLP-1-(7-37) and GLP-1-(7-36)amide, which are equipotent at the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R). These peptides are central both to normal glucose metabolism and dysregulation in T2DM. Several structurally modified GLP-1 analogues are now approved drugs, and a number of other analogues are in clinical trials. None of these compounds is orally bioavailable and all require parenteral delivery. Recently, a number of smaller peptidomimetics containing 11-12 natural and unnatural amino acids have been identified that have similar insulin regulating profiles as GLP-1. The α-conotoxins are a class of disulfide rich peptide venoms isolated from cone snails, and are known for their highly constrained structures and resistance to enzymatic degradation. In this study, we examined whether 11-residue peptidomimetics incorporated into α-conotoxin scaffolds, forming monocyclic or bicyclic compounds constrained by disulfide bonds and/or backbone cyclization, could activate the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R). Several compounds showed potent (nanomolar) agonist activity at GLP-1R, as evaluated via cAMP signaling. In addition, HPLC retention times and in silico calculations suggested that mono- and bicyclic compounds had more favorable n-octanol/water partition coefficients according to the virtual partition coefficient model (vLogP), while maintaining a smaller radius of gyration compared to corresponding uncyclized peptidomimetics. Our findings suggest that cyclic peptidomimetics provide a potential avenue for future design of potent, compact ligands targeting GLP-1R and possessing improved physicochemical properties. PMID:26352676

  15. Endogenous GLP-1 as a key self-defense molecule against lipotoxicity in pancreatic islets

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, CHENGHU; YUAN, LI; CAO, SHUYI

    2015-01-01

    The number of pro-α cells is known to increase in response to β cell injury and these cells then generate glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), thus attenuating the development of diabetes. The aim of the present study was to further examine the role and the mechanisms responsible for intra-islet GLP-1 production as a self-protective response against lipotoxicity. The levels of the key enzyme, prohormone convertase 1/3 (PC1/3), as well as the synthesis and release of GLP-1 in models of lipotoxicity were measured. Furthermore, islet viability, apoptosis, oxidative stress and inflammation, as well as islet structure were assessed after altering GLP-1 receptor signaling. Both prolonged exposure to palmitate and a high-fat diet facilitated PC1/3 expression, as well as the synthesis and release of GLP-1 induced by β cell injury and the generation of pro-α cells. Prolonged exposure to palmitate increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and the antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), partially prevented the detrimental effects induced by palmitate on β cells, resulting in decreased GLP-1 levels. Furthermore, the inhibition of GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) signaling by treatment with exendin-(9-39) further decreased cell viability, increased cell apoptosis and caused a stronger inhibition of the β cell-specific transcription factor, pancreatic duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX1). Moreover, treatment with the GLP-1R agonist, liraglutide, normalized islet structure and function, resulting in a decrease in cell death and in the amelioration of β cell marker expression. Importantly, liraglutide maintained the oxidative balance and decreased inflammatory factor and p65 expression. Overall, our data demonstrate that an increase in the number of pro-α cells and the activation of the intra-islet GLP-1 system comprise a self-defense mechanism for enhancing β cell survival to combat lipid overload, which is in part mediated by oxidative stress and inflammation. PMID:25976560

  16. Differential Stimulation of Insulin Secretion by GLP-1 and Kisspeptin-10

    PubMed Central

    Schwetz, Tara A.; Reissaus, Christopher A.; Piston, David W.

    2014-01-01

    β-cells in the pancreatic islet respond to elevated plasma glucose by secreting insulin to maintain glucose homeostasis. In addition to glucose stimulation, insulin secretion is modulated by numerous G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). The GPCR ligands Kisspeptin-10 (KP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) potentiate insulin secretion through Gq and Gs-coupled receptors, respectively. Despite many studies, the signaling mechanisms by which KP and GLP-1 potentiate insulin release are not thoroughly understood. We investigated the downstream signaling pathways of these ligands and their affects on cellular redox potential, intracellular calcium activity ([Ca2+]i), and insulin secretion from β-cells within intact murine islets. In contrast to previous studies performed on single β-cells, neither KP nor GLP-1 affect [Ca2+]i upon stimulation with glucose. KP significantly increases the cellular redox potential, while no effect is observed with GLP-1, suggesting that KP and GLP-1 potentiate insulin secretion through different mechanisms. Co-treatment with KP and the Gβγ-subunit inhibitor gallein inhibits insulin secretion similar to that observed with gallein alone, while co-treatment with gallein and GLP-1 does not differ from GLP-1 alone. In contrast, co-treatment with the Gβγ activator mSIRK and either KP or GLP-1 stimulates insulin release similar to mSIRK alone. Neither gallein nor mSIRK alter [Ca2+]i activity in the presence of KP or GLP-1. These data suggest that KP likely alters insulin secretion through a Gβγ-dependent process that stimulates glucose metabolism without altering Ca2+ activity, while GLP-1 does so, at least partly, through a Gα-dependent pathway that is independent of both metabolism and Ca2+. PMID:25401335

  17. Endogenous GLP-1 as a key self-defense molecule against lipotoxicity in pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chenghu; Yuan, Li; Cao, Shuyi

    2015-07-01

    The number of pro-α cells is known to increase in response to β cell injury and these cells then generate glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), thus attenuating the development of diabetes. The aim of the present study was to further examine the role and the mechanisms responsible for intra-islet GLP-1 production as a self-protective response against lipotoxicity. The levels of the key enzyme, prohormone convertase 1/3 (PC1/3), as well as the synthesis and release of GLP-1 in models of lipotoxicity were measured. Furthermore, islet viability, apoptosis, oxidative stress and inflammation, as well as islet structure were assessed after altering GLP-1 receptor signaling. Both prolonged exposure to palmitate and a high-fat diet facilitated PC1/3 expression, as well as the synthesis and release of GLP-1 induced by β cell injury and the generation of pro-α cells. Prolonged exposure to palmitate increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and the antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), partially prevented the detrimental effects induced by palmitate on β cells, resulting in decreased GLP-1 levels. Furthermore, the inhibition of GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) signaling by treatment with exendin‑(9-39) further decreased cell viability, increased cell apoptosis and caused a stronger inhibition of the β cell-specific transcription factor, pancreatic duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX1). Moreover, treatment with the GLP-1R agonist, liraglutide, normalized islet structure and function, resulting in a decrease in cell death and in the amelioration of β cell marker expression. Importantly, liraglutide maintained the oxidative balance and decreased inflammatory factor and p65 expression. Overall, our data demonstrate that an increase in the number of pro-α cells and the activation of the intra-islet GLP-1 system comprise a self-defense mechanism for enhancing β cell survival to combat lipid overload, which is in part mediated by oxidative stress and inflammation. PMID:25976560

  18. Options for prandial glucose management in type 2 diabetes patients using basal insulin: addition of a short-acting GLP-1 analogue versus progression to basal-bolus therapy.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, I B; Buse, J B; Leahy, J; McGill, J B; Peters, A; Rodbard, H W; Rubin, R R; Skyler, J S; Verderese, C A; Riddle, M C

    2014-03-01

    Integrating patient-centered diabetes care and algorithmic medicine poses particular challenges when optimized basal insulin fails to maintain glycaemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Multiple entwined physiological, psychosocial and systems barriers to insulin adherence are not easily studied and are not adequately considered in most treatment algorithms. Moreover, the limited number of alternatives to add-on prandial insulin therapy has hindered shared decision-making, a central feature of patient-centered care. This article considers how the addition of a glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) analogue to basal insulin may provide new opportunities at this stage of treatment, especially for patients concerned about weight gain and risk of hypoglycaemia. A flexible framework for patient-clinician discussions is presented to encourage development of decision-support tools applicable to both specialty and primary care practice. PMID:23711193

  19. GLP-1 Receptor Stimulation Reduces Amyloid-β Peptide Accumulation and Cytotoxicity in Cellular and Animal Models of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yazhou; Duffy, Kara B.; Ottinger, Mary Ann; Ray, Balmiki; Bailey, Jason A.; Holloway, Harold W.; Tweedie, David; Perry, TracyAnn; Mattson, Mark P.; Kapogiannis, Dimitrios; Sambamurti, Kumar; Lahiri, Debomoy K.; Greiga, Nigel H.

    2010-01-01

    Type 2 (T2) diabetes mellitus (DM) has been associated with an increased incidence of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Several pathological features are shared between diabetes and AD, including dysfunctional insulin signaling and a dysregulation of glucose metabolism. It has therefore been suggested that not only may the two conditions share specific molecular mechanisms but also that agents with proven efficacy in one may be useful against the other. Hence, the present study characterized the effects of a clinically approved long-acting analogue, exendin-4 (Ex-4), of the endogenous insulin releasing incretin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), on stress-induced toxicity in neuronal cultures and on amyloid-β protein (Aβ) and tau levels in triple transgenic AD (3xTg-AD) mice with and without streptozocin (STZ)-induced diabetes. Ex-4 ameliorated the toxicity of Aβ and oxidative challenge in primary neuronal cultures and human SH-SY5Y cells in a concentration-dependent manner. When 11 to 12.5 month old female 3xTg AD mice were challenged with STZ or saline, and thereafter treated with a continuous subcutaneous infusion of Ex-4 or vehicle, Ex-4 ameliorated the diabetic effects of STZ in 3xTg-AD mice, elevating plasma insulin and lowering both plasma glucose and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels. Furthermore, brain levels of Aβ protein precursor and Aβ, which were elevated in STZ 3xTg-AD mice, were significantly reduced in Ex-4 treated mice. Brain tau levels were unaffected following STZ challenge, but showed a trend toward elevation that was absent following Ex-4 treatment. Together, these results suggest a potential value of Ex-4 in AD, particularly when associated with T2DM or glucose intolerance. PMID:20308787

  20. Glucocorticoids suppress GLP-1 secretion: possible contribution to their diabetogenic effects.

    PubMed

    Kappe, Camilla; Fransson, Liselotte; Wolbert, Petra; Ortsäter, Henrik

    2015-09-01

    Evidence indicates that subtle abnormalities in GC (glucocorticoid) plasma concentrations and/or in tissue sensitivity to GCs are important in the metabolic syndrome, and it is generally agreed that GCs induce insulin resistance. In addition, it was recently reported that short-term exposure to GCs reduced the insulinotropic effects of the incretin GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide 1). However, although defective GLP-1 secretion has been correlated with insulin resistance, potential direct effects of GCs on GLP-1-producing L-cell function in terms of GLP-1 secretion and apoptosis have not been studied in any greater detail. In the present study, we sought to determine whether GCs could exert direct effects on GLP-1-producing L-cells in terms of GLP-1 secretion and cell viability. We demonstrate that the GR (glucocorticoid receptor) is expressed in GLP-1-producing cells, where GR activation in response to dexamethasone induces SGK1 (serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1) expression, but did not influence preproglucagon expression or cell viability. In addition, dexamethasone treatment of enteroendocrine GLUTag cells reduced GLP-1 secretion induced by glucose, 2-deoxy-D-glucose, fructose and potassium, whereas the secretory response to a phorbol ester was unaltered. Furthermore, in vivo administration of dexamethasone to rats reduced the circulating levels of GLP-1 concurrent with induction of insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. We can conclude that GR activation in GLP-1-producing cells will diminish the secretory responsiveness of these cells to subsequent carbohydrate stimulation. These effects may not only elucidate the pathogenesis of steroid diabetes, but could ultimately contribute to the identification of novel molecular targets for controlling incretin secretion. PMID:25853863

  1. Synaptotagmin-7 phosphorylation mediates GLP-1-dependent potentiation of insulin secretion from β-cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bingbing; Wei, Shunhui; Petersen, Natalia; Ali, Yusuf; Wang, Xiaorui; Bacaj, Taulant; Rorsman, Patrik; Hong, Wanjin; Südhof, Thomas C; Han, Weiping

    2015-08-11

    Glucose stimulates insulin secretion from β-cells by increasing intracellular Ca(2+). Ca(2+) then binds to synaptotagmin-7 as a major Ca(2+) sensor for exocytosis, triggering secretory granule fusion and insulin secretion. In type-2 diabetes, insulin secretion is impaired; this impairment is ameliorated by glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) or by GLP-1 receptor agonists, which improve glucose homeostasis. However, the mechanism by which GLP-1 receptor agonists boost insulin secretion remains unclear. Here, we report that GLP-1 stimulates protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent phosphorylation of synaptotagmin-7 at serine-103, which enhances glucose- and Ca(2+)-stimulated insulin secretion and accounts for the improvement of glucose homeostasis by GLP-1. A phospho-mimetic synaptotagmin-7 mutant enhances Ca(2+)-triggered exocytosis, whereas a phospho-inactive synaptotagmin-7 mutant disrupts GLP-1 potentiation of insulin secretion. Our findings thus suggest that synaptotagmin-7 is directly activated by GLP-1 signaling and may serve as a drug target for boosting insulin secretion. Moreover, our data reveal, to our knowledge, the first physiological modulation of Ca(2+)-triggered exocytosis by direct phosphorylation of a synaptotagmin. PMID:26216970

  2. Synaptotagmin-7 phosphorylation mediates GLP-1dependent potentiation of insulin secretion from ?-cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bingbing; Wei, Shunhui; Petersen, Natalia; Ali, Yusuf; Wang, Xiaorui; Bacaj, Taulant; Rorsman, Patrik; Hong, Wanjin; Sdhof, Thomas C.; Han, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    Glucose stimulates insulin secretion from ?-cells by increasing intracellular Ca2+. Ca2+ then binds to synaptotagmin-7 as a major Ca2+ sensor for exocytosis, triggering secretory granule fusion and insulin secretion. In type-2 diabetes, insulin secretion is impaired; this impairment is ameliorated by glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) or by GLP-1 receptor agonists, which improve glucose homeostasis. However, the mechanism by which GLP-1 receptor agonists boost insulin secretion remains unclear. Here, we report that GLP-1 stimulates protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent phosphorylation of synaptotagmin-7 at serine-103, which enhances glucose- and Ca2+-stimulated insulin secretion and accounts for the improvement of glucose homeostasis by GLP-1. A phospho-mimetic synaptotagmin-7 mutant enhances Ca2+-triggered exocytosis, whereas a phospho-inactive synaptotagmin-7 mutant disrupts GLP-1 potentiation of insulin secretion. Our findings thus suggest that synaptotagmin-7 is directly activated by GLP-1 signaling and may serve as a drug target for boosting insulin secretion. Moreover, our data reveal, to our knowledge, the first physiological modulation of Ca2+-triggered exocytosis by direct phosphorylation of a synaptotagmin. PMID:26216970

  3. In Vitro and In Vivo Effects of Natural Putative Secretagogues of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1)

    PubMed Central

    Rafferty, Eamon P.; Wylie, Alastair R.; Elliott, Chris T.; Chevallier, Olivier P.; Grieve, David J.; Green, Brian D.

    2011-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an intestinal hormone with well-established glucose-lowering activity. The in vitro and in vivo actions of natural putative secretagogues of GLP-1 were investigated. The acute GLP-1 releasing activity of olive leaf extract (OLE), glutamine (GLN), alpha casein (ACAS), beta casein (BCAS) and chlorogenic acid (CGA) were assessed in STC-1 cells and C57BL/6 mice. All compounds except ACAS significantly increased acute in vitro GLP-1 secretion (66–386%; P<0.05–0.001). Oral gavage of OLE and GLN modestly increased plasma GLP-1 concentrations (48% and 41%, respectively), but did not lower glycaemic excursions. OLE and GLN are potent stimulators of GLP-1 secretion both in vitro and in vivo and chronic studies should assess their suitability as nutritional therapies for type 2 diabetes. PMID:21886907

  4. Effects of endogenous GLP-1 and GIP on glucose tolerance after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Svane, Maria S; Bojsen-Møller, Kirstine N; Nielsen, Signe; Jørgensen, Nils B; Dirksen, Carsten; Bendtsen, Flemming; Kristiansen, Viggo B; Hartmann, Bolette; Holst, Jens J; Madsbad, Sten

    2016-04-01

    Exaggerated secretion of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is important for postprandial glucose tolerance after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), whereas the role of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) remains to be resolved. We aimed to explore the relative importance of endogenously secreted GLP-1 and GIP on glucose tolerance and β-cell function after RYGB. We used DPP-4 inhibition to enhance concentrations of intact GIP and GLP-1 and the GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin-(9-39) (Ex-9) for specific blockage of GLP-1 actions. Twelve glucose-tolerant patients were studied after RYGB in a randomized, placebo-controlled, 4-day crossover study with standard mixed-meal tests and concurrent administration of placebo, oral sitagliptin, Ex-9 infusion, or combined Ex-9-sitagliptin. GLP-1 receptor antagonism increased glucose excursions, clearly attenuated β-cell function, and aggravated postprandial hyperglucagonemia compared with placebo, whereas sitagliptin had no effect despite two- to threefold increased concentrations of intact GLP-1 and GIP. Similarly, sitagliptin did not affect glucose tolerance or β-cell function during GLP-1R blockage. This study confirms the importance of GLP-1 for glucose tolerance after RYGB via increased insulin and attenuated glucagon secretion in the postprandial state, whereas amplification of the GIP signal (or other DPP-4-sensitive glucose-lowering mechanisms) did not appear to contribute to the improved glucose tolerance seen after RYGB. PMID:26786780

  5. Effects of GLP-1 on Forearm Vasodilator Function and Glucose Disposal During Hyperinsulinemia in the Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tesauro, Manfredi; Schinzari, Francesca; Adamo, Angelo; Rovella, Valentina; Martini, Francesca; Mores, Nadia; Barini, Angela; Pitocco, Dario; Ghirlanda, Giovanni; Lauro, Davide; Campia, Umberto; Cardillo, Carmine

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Patients with the metabolic syndrome (MetS) have impaired insulin-induced enhancement of vasodilator responses. The incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), beyond its effects on blood glucose, has beneficial actions on vascular function. This study, therefore, aimed to assess whether GLP-1 affects insulin-stimulated vasodilator reactivity in patients with the MetS. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Forearm blood flow responses to acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were assessed in MetS patients before and after the addition of GLP-1 to an intra-arterial infusion of saline (n = 5) or insulin (n = 5). The possible involvement of oxidative stress in the vascular effects of GLP-1 in this setting was investigated by infusion of vitamin C (n = 5). The receptor specificity of GLP-1 effect during hyperinsulinemia was assessed by infusing its metabolite GLP-1(9-36) (n = 5). The metabolic actions of GLP-1 were also tested by analyzing forearm glucose disposal during hyperinsulinemia (n = 5). RESULTS In MetS patients, GLP-1 enhanced endothelium-dependent and -independent responses to ACh and SNP, respectively, during hyperinsulinemia (P < 0.001 for both), but not during saline (P > 0.05 for both). No changes in vasodilator reactivity to ACh and SNP were seen after GLP-1 was added to insulin and vitamin C (P > 0.05 for both) and after GLP-1(9-36) was given during hyperinsulinemia (P > 0.05 for both). Also, GLP-1 did not affect forearm glucose extraction and uptake during hyperinsulinemia (P > 0.05 for both). CONCLUSIONS In patients with the MetS, GLP-1 improves insulin-mediated enhancement of endothelium-dependent and -independent vascular reactivity. This effect may be influenced by vascular oxidative stress and is possibly exerted through a receptor-mediated mechanism. PMID:23069838

  6. Comparative effectiveness of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors and human glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogue as add-on therapies to sulphonylurea among diabetes patients in the Asia-Pacific region: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Wong, Martin C S; Wang, Harry H X; Kwan, Mandy W M; Zhang, Daisy D X; Liu, Kirin Q L; Chan, Sky W M; Fan, Carmen K M; Fong, Brian C Y; Li, Shannon T S; Griffiths, Sian M

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus is rising globally, and it induces a substantial public health burden to the healthcare systems. Its optimal control is one of the most significant challenges faced by physicians and policy-makers. Whereas some of the established oral hypoglycaemic drug classes like biguanide, sulphonylureas, thiazolidinediones have been extensively used, the newer agents like dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors and the human glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogues have recently emerged as suitable options due to their similar efficacy and favorable side effect profiles. These agents are widely recognized alternatives to the traditional oral hypoglycaemic agents or insulin, especially in conditions where they are contraindicated or unacceptable to patients. Many studies which evaluated their clinical effects, either alone or as add-on agents, were conducted in Western countries. There exist few reviews on their effectiveness in the Asia-Pacific region. The purpose of this systematic review is to address the comparative effectiveness of these new classes of medications as add-on therapies to sulphonylurea drugs among diabetic patients in the Asia-Pacific countries. We conducted a thorough literature search of the MEDLINE and EMBASE from the inception of these databases to August 2013, supplemented by an additional manual search using reference lists from research studies, meta-analyses and review articles as retrieved by the electronic databases. A total of nine randomized controlled trials were identified and described in this article. It was found that DPP-4 inhibitors and GLP-1 analogues were in general effective as add-on therapies to existing sulphonylurea therapies, achieving HbA1c reductions by a magnitude of 0.59-0.90% and 0.77-1.62%, respectively. Few adverse events including hypoglycaemic attacks were reported. Therefore, these two new drug classes represent novel therapies with great potential to be major therapeutic options. Future larger-scale research should be conducted among other Asia-Pacific region to evaluate their efficacy in other ethnic groups. PMID:24614606

  7. GLP-1R responsiveness predicts individual gastric bypass efficacy on glucose tolerance in rats.

    PubMed

    Habegger, Kirk M; Heppner, Kristy M; Amburgy, Sarah E; Ottaway, Nickki; Holland, Jenna; Raver, Christine; Bartley, Erin; Mller, Timo D; Pfluger, Paul T; Berger, Jose; Toure, Mouhamadoul; Benoit, Stephen C; Dimarchi, Richard D; Perez-Tilve, Diego; D'Alessio, David A; Seeley, Randy J; Tschp, Matthias H

    2014-02-01

    Several bariatric operations are currently used to treat obesity and obesity-related comorbidities. These vary in efficacy, but most are more effective than current pharmaceutical treatments. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) produces substantial body weight (BW) loss and enhanced glucose tolerance, and is associated with increased secretion of the gut hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). Given the success of GLP-1-based agents in lowering blood glucose levels and BW, we hypothesized that an individual sensitivity to GLP-1 receptor agonism could predict metabolic benefits of surgeries associated with increased GLP-1 secretion. One hundred ninety-seven high-fat diet-induced obese male Long-Evans rats were monitored for BW loss during exendin-4 (Ex4) administration. Stable populations of responders and nonresponders were identified based on Ex4-induced BW loss and GLP-1-induced improvements in glucose tolerance. Subpopulations of Ex4 extreme responders and nonresponders underwent RYGB surgery. After RYGB, responders and nonresponders showed similar BW loss compared with sham, but nonresponders retained impaired glucose tolerance. These data indicate that the GLP-1 response tests may predict some but not all of the improvements observed after RYGB. These findings present an opportunity to optimize the use of bariatric surgery based on an improved understanding of GLP-1 biology and suggest an opportunity for a more personalized therapeutic approach to the metabolic syndrome. PMID:24186863

  8. GLP-1R Responsiveness Predicts Individual Gastric Bypass Efficacy on Glucose Tolerance in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Habegger, Kirk M.; Heppner, Kristy M.; Amburgy, Sarah E.; Ottaway, Nickki; Holland, Jenna; Raver, Christine; Bartley, Erin; Mller, Timo D.; Pfluger, Paul T.; Berger, Jose; Toure, Mouhamadoul; Benoit, Stephen C.; DiMarchi, Richard D.; Perez-Tilve, Diego; DAlessio, David A.; Seeley, Randy J.; Tschp, Matthias H.

    2014-01-01

    Several bariatric operations are currently used to treat obesity and obesity-related comorbidities. These vary in efficacy, but most are more effective than current pharmaceutical treatments. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) produces substantial body weight (BW) loss and enhanced glucose tolerance, and is associated with increased secretion of the gut hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). Given the success of GLP-1based agents in lowering blood glucose levels and BW, we hypothesized that an individual sensitivity to GLP-1 receptor agonism could predict metabolic benefits of surgeries associated with increased GLP-1 secretion. One hundred ninety-seven high-fat dietinduced obese male Long-Evans rats were monitored for BW loss during exendin-4 (Ex4) administration. Stable populations of responders and nonresponders were identified based on Ex4-induced BW loss and GLP-1induced improvements in glucose tolerance. Subpopulations of Ex4 extreme responders and nonresponders underwent RYGB surgery. After RYGB, responders and nonresponders showed similar BW loss compared with sham, but nonresponders retained impaired glucose tolerance. These data indicate that the GLP-1 response tests may predict some but not all of the improvements observed after RYGB. These findings present an opportunity to optimize the use of bariatric surgery based on an improved understanding of GLP-1 biology and suggest an opportunity for a more personalized therapeutic approach to the metabolic syndrome. PMID:24186863

  9. Simultaneous quantification of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor agonists in rodent plasma by on-line solid phase extraction and LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Roth, Jonathan D; Taylor, Steven W

    2014-04-15

    Peptide agonists of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) and the cholecystokinin-1 receptor (CCK1-R) have therapeutic potential because of their marked anorexigenic and weight lowering effects. Furthermore, recent studies in rodents have shown that co-administration of these agents may prove more effective than treatment either of the peptide classes alone. To correlate the pharmacodynamic effects to the pharmacokinetics of these peptide drugs in vivo, a sensitive and robust bioanalytical method is essential. Furthermore, the simultaneous determination of both analytes in plasma samples by a single method offers obvious advantages. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is well suited to this goal through its ability to simultaneously monitor multiple analytes through selected reaction monitoring (SRM). However, it is a challenge to find appropriate conditions that allow two peptides with widely disparate physiochemical properties to be simultaneously analyzed while maintaining the necessary sensitivity for their accurate plasma concentrations. Herein, we report an on-line solid phase extraction (SPE) LC-MS/MS method for simultaneous quantification of the CCK1-R agonist AC170222 and the GLP-1R agonist AC3174 in rodent plasma. The assay has a linear range from 0.0975 to 100ng/mL, with lower limits of quantification of 0.0975ng/mL and 0.195ng/mL for AC3174 and AC170222, respectively. The intra- and inter-day precisions were below 15%. The developed LC-MS/MS method was used to simultaneously quantify AC3174 and AC170222, the results showed that the terminal plasma concentrations of AC3174 or AC170222 were comparable between groups of animals that were administered with the peptides alone (24715pg/mL of AC3174 and 130648pg/mL of AC170222), or in combination (22232pg/mL and 113647pg/mL of AC3174 and AC170222, respectively). These data provide information on the drug exposure to aid in assessing the combination effects of AC3174 and AC170222 on rodent metabolism. PMID:24657407

  10. Incorporating Incretin-Based Therapies Into Clinical Practice: Differences Between Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Receptor Agonists and Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Jaime A.

    2010-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is a prevalent disorder that affects children, adolescents, and adults worldwide. In addition to risks of microvascular disease, patients with type 2 DM often have multiple risk factors of macrovascular disease; for example, approximately 90% of patients with type 2 DM are overweight/obese. Type 2 DM is a complex disease that involves a variety of pathophysiologic abnormalities, including insulin resistance, increased hepatic glucose production, and abnormalities in the secretion of hormones, such as insulin, glucagon, amylin, and incretins. Incretins are gut-derived peptides with a variety of glucoregulatory functions. Incretin dysfunction can be treated with glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists (eg, exenatide and liraglutide) or inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) (eg, sitagliptin and saxagliptin), the enzyme that degrades GLP-1. The GLP-1 receptor agonists and DPP-4 inhibitors both elevate GLP-1 activity and substantially improve glycemic control. The GLP-1 receptor agonists are more effective in lowering blood glucose and result in substantial weight loss, whereas therapy with DPP-4 inhibitors lowers blood glucose levels to a lesser degree, and they are weight neutral. Treatment with GLP-1 receptor agonists has demonstrated durable glycemic control and improvement in multiple cardiovascular disease risk factors. In addition, unlike insulin or sulfonylureas, treatment with a GLP-1 receptor agonist or a DPP-4 inhibitor has not been associated with substantial hypoglycemia. These factors should be considered when selecting monotherapy or elements of combination therapy for patients with type 2 DM who are overweight/obese, for patients who have experienced hypoglycemia with other agents, and when achieving glycemic targets is difficult. PMID:21106865

  11. Myocardial regeneration in adriamycin cardiomyopathy by nuclear expression of GLP1 using ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shuyuan; Chen, Jiaxi; Huang, Pintong; Meng, Xing-Li; Clayton, Sandra; Shen, Jin-Song; Grayburn, Paul A.

    2015-03-20

    Recently GLP-1 was found to have cardioprotective effects independent of those attributable to tight glycemic control. Methods and results: We employed ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) to deliver piggybac transposon plasmids encoding the GLP-1 gene with a nuclear localizing signal to rat hearts with adriamycin cardiomyopathy. After a single UTMD treatment, overexpression of transgenic GLP-1 was found in nuclei of rat heart cells with evidence that transfected cardiac cells had undergone proliferation. UTMD-GLP-1 gene therapy restored LV mass, fractional shortening index, and LV posterior wall diameter to nearly normal. Nuclear overexpression of GLP-1 by inducing phosphorylation of FoxO1-S256 and translocation of FoxO1 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm significantly inactivated FoxO1 and activated the expression of cyclin D1 in nuclei of cardiac muscle cells. Reversal of adriamycin cardiomyopathy appeared to be mediated by dedifferentiation and proliferation of nuclear FoxO1-positive cardiac muscle cells with evidence of embryonic stem cell markers (OCT4, Nanog, SOX2 and c-kit), cardiac early differentiation markers (NKX2.5 and ISL-1) and cellular proliferation markers (BrdU and PHH3) after UTMD with GLP-1 gene therapy. Conclusions: Intranuclear myocardial delivery of the GLP-1gene can reverse established adriamycin cardiomyopathy by stimulating myocardial regeneration. - Highlights: • The activation of nuclear FoxO1 in cardiac muscle cells associated with adriamycin cardiomyopathy. • Myocardial nuclear GLP-1 stimulates myocardial regeneration and reverses adriamycin cardiomyopathy. • The process of myocardial regeneration associated with dedifferentiation and proliferation.

  12. GLP1 protects cardiomyocytes from palmitate-induced apoptosis via Akt/GSK3b/b-catenin pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Ying; Zhu, Huazhang; Liang, Zhen; Ma, Xiaosong; Li, Shiwei

    2015-01-01

    Activation of apoptosis in cardiomyocytes by saturated palmitic acids contributes to cardiac dysfunction in diabetic cardiomyopathy. Beta-catenin (b-catenin) is a transcriptional regulator of several genes involved in survival/anti-apoptosis. However, its role in palmitate-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis remains unclear. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) has been shown to exhibit potential cardioprotective properties. This study was designed to evaluate the role of b-catenin signalling in palmitate-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis and the molecular mechanism underlying the protective effects of GLP1 on palmitate-stressed cardiomyocytes. Exposure of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes to palmitate increased the fatty acid transporter CD36-mediated intracellular lipid accumulation and cardiomyocyte apoptosis, decreased accumulation and nuclear translocation of active b-catenin, and reduced expression of b-catenin target protein survivin and BCL2. These detrimental effects of palmitate were significantly attenuated by GLP1 co-treatment. However, the anti-apoptotic effects of GLP1 were markedly abolished when b-catenin was silenced with a specific short hairpin RNA. Furthermore, analysis of the upstream molecules and mechanisms responsible for GLP1-associated cardiac protection revealed that GLP1 restored the decreased phosphorylation of protein kinase B (Akt) and glycogen synthase kinase-3b (GSK3b) in palmitate-stimulated cardiomyocytes. In contrast, inhibition of Akt with an Akt-specific inhibitor MK2206 or blockade of GLP1 receptor (GLP1R) with a competitive antagonist exendin-(9–39) significantly abrogated the GLP1-mediated activation of GSK3b/b-catenin signalling, leading to increased apoptosis in palmitate-stressed cardiomyocytes. Collectively, our results demonstrated for the first time that the attenuated b-catenin signalling may contribute to palmitate-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis, while GLP1 can protect cardiomyocytes from palmitate-induced apoptosis through activation of GLP1R/Akt/GSK3b-mediated b-catenin signalling. PMID:26386043

  13. Autocrine selection of a GLP-1R G-protein biased agonist with potent antidiabetic effects

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongkai; Sturchler, Emmanuel; Zhu, Jiang; Nieto, Ainhoa; Cistrone, Philip A.; Xie, Jia; He, LinLing; Yea, Kyungmoo; Jones, Teresa; Turn, Rachel; Di Stefano, Peter S.; Griffin, Patrick R.; Dawson, Philip E.; McDonald, Patricia H.; Lerner, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor (GLP-1R) agonists have emerged as treatment options for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). GLP-1R signals through G-protein-dependent, and G-protein-independent pathways by engaging the scaffold protein β-arrestin; preferential signalling of ligands through one or the other of these branches is known as ‘ligand bias'. Here we report the discovery of the potent and selective GLP-1R G-protein-biased agonist, P5. We identified P5 in a high-throughput autocrine-based screening of large combinatorial peptide libraries, and show that P5 promotes G-protein signalling comparable to GLP-1 and Exendin-4, but exhibited a significantly reduced β-arrestin response. Preclinical studies using different mouse models of T2DM demonstrate that P5 is a weak insulin secretagogue. Nevertheless, chronic treatment of diabetic mice with P5 increased adipogenesis, reduced adipose tissue inflammation as well as hepatic steatosis and was more effective at correcting hyperglycaemia and lowering haemoglobin A1c levels than Exendin-4, suggesting that GLP-1R G-protein-biased agonists may provide a novel therapeutic approach to T2DM. PMID:26621478

  14. Autocrine selection of a GLP-1R G-protein biased agonist with potent antidiabetic effects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongkai; Sturchler, Emmanuel; Zhu, Jiang; Nieto, Ainhoa; Cistrone, Philip A; Xie, Jia; He, LinLing; Yea, Kyungmoo; Jones, Teresa; Turn, Rachel; Di Stefano, Peter S; Griffin, Patrick R; Dawson, Philip E; McDonald, Patricia H; Lerner, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor (GLP-1R) agonists have emerged as treatment options for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). GLP-1R signals through G-protein-dependent, and G-protein-independent pathways by engaging the scaffold protein β-arrestin; preferential signalling of ligands through one or the other of these branches is known as 'ligand bias'. Here we report the discovery of the potent and selective GLP-1R G-protein-biased agonist, P5. We identified P5 in a high-throughput autocrine-based screening of large combinatorial peptide libraries, and show that P5 promotes G-protein signalling comparable to GLP-1 and Exendin-4, but exhibited a significantly reduced β-arrestin response. Preclinical studies using different mouse models of T2DM demonstrate that P5 is a weak insulin secretagogue. Nevertheless, chronic treatment of diabetic mice with P5 increased adipogenesis, reduced adipose tissue inflammation as well as hepatic steatosis and was more effective at correcting hyperglycaemia and lowering haemoglobin A1c levels than Exendin-4, suggesting that GLP-1R G-protein-biased agonists may provide a novel therapeutic approach to T2DM. PMID:26621478

  15. Hyperglycemia after protein ingestion concurrent with injection of a GLP-1 receptor agonist in rats: a possible role for dietary peptides.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Alfred; Anderson, G Harvey; Giacca, Adria; Cho, France

    2005-09-01

    Protein ingestion after injection of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist Exendin-4 (Ex-4) causes hyperglycemia in rats. The objectives of this study were to determine the components of protein digestion responsible for this effect and to associate it with changes in the concentrations of other metabolites and hormones. Two experiments were conducted. In the first experiment, food-deprived rats were gavaged with intact whey (WP) or albumin protein, their hydrolysates, amino acid mixtures (1 g/2.5 ml), or water 5 min after injection of either PBS or Ex-4 (0.5 microg/rat). Tail vein blood was analyzed for glucose over 2 h. In the second experiment, food-deprived rats were gavaged with WP with or without Ex-4. Groups of conscious rats were killed by decapitation either before, or at selected times after gavage. Plasma concentrations of glucose, amino acids, free fatty acids (FFA), glycerol, insulin, glucagon, and leptin were measured. In experiment 1, blood glucose was higher when intact proteins and protein hydrolysates, but not amino acid mixtures, were given with than without Ex-4 (P < 0.05). In experiment 2, concentrations of glucose, FFA, and the ratio of tyrosine to branched-chain amino acid were higher (P < 0.01), but leptin and essential amino acid concentrations were lower (P < 0.05), and insulin, glucagon, and glycerol were similar when WP was given with or without Ex-4. We conclude that the hyperglycemia caused by the administration of Ex-4 concurrently with dietary protein arises from the action of peptides released during digestion and their interaction with Ex-4 in the regulation of glucose, fatty acid, and amino acid metabolism. PMID:15879053

  16. Comparison of safety and tolerability with continuous (exenatide once weekly) or intermittent (exenatide twice daily) GLP-1 receptor agonism in patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ridge, T; Moretto, T; MacConell, L; Pencek, R; Han, J; Schulteis, C; Porter, L

    2012-01-01

    Aims Exenatide is a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist shown to improve glycaemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Intermittent exenatide exposure is achieved with the twice-daily formulation (ExBID), while the once-weekly formulation (ExQW) provides continuous exenatide exposure. This integrated, retrospective analysis compared safety and tolerability of ExQW vs. ExBID in patients with T2DM. Methods Data were pooled from two open-label, randomized, comparator-controlled, trials directly comparing ExQW (N = 277) to ExBID (N = 268). Between-group differences in adverse event (AE) and hypoglycaemia incidences were calculated. Incidence over time and duration of selected AEs (nausea, vomiting, and injection-site-related AEs) were also summarized. Results The most common AEs were nausea, diarrhoea, injection-site pruritus, and vomiting. Nausea and vomiting occurred less frequently with ExQW vs. ExBID, peaking at initiation (ExQW) or at initiation and dose escalation (ExBID), and decreasing over time. Few patients discontinued because of gastrointestinal-related AEs. Injection-site AEs were more common with ExQW but decreased over time in both groups. No major hypoglycaemia occurred; minor hypoglycaemia occurred with low incidence in patients not using concomitant sulphonylurea, with no difference between ExQW and ExBID. Serious AEs and discontinuations because of AEs were reported with similar frequency in both groups. Conclusions Both exenatide formulations were generally safe and well-tolerated, with ExQW associated with less nausea and vomiting but more injection-site AEs. Continuous vs. intermittent exposure did not impact the overall tolerability profile of exenatide, with no evidence of prolonged duration or worsened intensities of AEs with continuous exposure. PMID:22734440

  17. Evaluating preferences for profiles of GLP-1 receptor agonists among injection-naïve type 2 diabetes patients in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Gelhorn, Heather L; Poon, Jiat-Ling; Davies, Evan W; Paczkowski, Rosirene; Curtis, Sarah E; Boye, Kristina S

    2015-01-01

    Objective To use a discrete choice experiment (DCE) to evaluate preferences for the actual treatment features and overall profiles of two injectable glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (dulaglutide and liraglutide) among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in the UK. Methods In-person interviews were conducted in the UK to administer a DCE to patients with self-reported T2DM, naïve to treatment with injectable medications. The DCE examined six attributes of T2DM treatment each described by two levels: “dosing frequency,” “hemoglobin A1c change,” “weight change,” “type of delivery system,” “frequency of nausea,” and “frequency of hypoglycemia.” Part-worth utilities were estimated using random effects logit models and were used to calculate relative importance (RI) values for each attribute. A chi-square test was used to determine differences in preferences for dulaglutide versus liraglutide profiles. Results A total of 243 participants [mean age: 60.5 (standard deviation 10.9) years; 76.1% male; mean body mass index: 29.8 (standard deviation 5.4) kg/m2] completed the study. RI values for the attributes in rank order were: “dosing frequency” (41.6%), “type of delivery system” (35.5%), “frequency of nausea” (10.4%), “weight change” (5.9%), “hemoglobin A1c change” (3.6%), and “frequency of hypoglycemia” (3.0%). Significantly more participants preferred the dulaglutide profile (83.1%) compared with the liraglutide profile (16.9%; P<0.0001). Conclusion This study elicited patients’ preferences for attributes and levels representing the actual characteristics of two specific glucagon-like peptide-1 medications. In this context, dosing frequency and type of delivery system were most important, accounting for over 75% of the RI. While previous studies have identified efficacy as highly important in T2DM medication decisions, this study suggests that when differences in efficacy between medications are small, other treatment features (eg, dosing frequency and delivery system) are of much greater importance to patients. PMID:26635470

  18. Radiolabelled GLP-1 analogues for in vivo targeting of insulinomas.

    PubMed

    Brom, Maarten; Joosten, Lieke; Oyen, Wim J G; Gotthardt, Martin; Boerman, Otto C

    2012-01-01

    Internalizing agonists are usually selected for peptide receptor targeting. There is increasing evidence that non-internalizing receptor antagonists can be used for this purpose. We investigated whether the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) antagonist exendin(9-39) can be used for in vivo targeting of GLP-1R expressing tumours and compared the in vitro and in vivo characteristics with the GLP-1R agonists exendin-3 and exendin-4. The binding and internalization kinetics of labelled [Lys(40) (DTPA)]exendin-3, [Lys(40) (DTPA)]exendin-4 and [Lys(40) (DTPA)]exendin(9-39) were determined in vitro using INS-1 cells. The in vivo targeting properties of [Lys(40) ((111) In-DTPA)]exendin-3, [Lys(40) ((111) In-DTPA)]exendin-4 and [Lys(40) ((111) In-DTPA)]exendin(9-39) were examined in BALB/c nude mice with subcutaneous INS-1 tumours. (nat) In-labelled [Lys(40) (DTPA)]exendin-3, [Lys(40) (DTPA)]exendin-4 and [Lys(40) (DTPA)]exendin(9-39) exhibited similar IC(50) values (13.5, 14.4 and 13.4 n m, respectively) and bound to 26 × 10(3) , 41 × 10(3) and 37 × 10(3) receptors per cell, respectively. [Lys(40) ((111) In-DTPA)]exendin-3 and [Lys(40) ((111) In-DTPA)]exendin-4 showed rapid in vitro binding and internalization kinetics, whereas [Lys(40) ((111) In-DTPA)]exendin(9-39) showed lower binding and minimal internalization in vitro. In mice, high specific uptake of [Lys(40) ((111) In-DTPA)]exendin-3 [25.0 ± 6.0% injected dose (ID) g(-1) ] in the tumour was observed at 0.5 h post-injection (p.i.) with similar uptake up to 4 h p.i. [Lys(40) ((111) In-DTPA)]exendin-4 showed higher tumour uptake at 1 and 4 h p.i. (40.8 ± 7.0 and 41.9 ± 7.2% ID g(-1), respectively). Remarkably, [Lys(40) ((111) In-DTPA)]exendin(9-39) showed only low specific uptake in the tumour at 0.5 h p.i. (3.2 ± 0.7% ID g(-1)), rapidly decreasing over time. In conclusion, the GLP-1R agonists [Lys(40) (DTPA)]exendin-3 and [Lys(40) (DTPA)]exendin-4 labelled with (111) In could be useful for in vivo GLP-1R targeting, whereas [Lys(40) (DTPA)]exendin(9-39) is not suited for in vivo targeting of the GLP-1R. PMID:22434628

  19. Alternative Agents in Type 1 Diabetes in Addition to Insulin Therapy: Metformin, Alpha-Glucosidase Inhibitors, Pioglitazone, GLP-1 Agonists, DPP-IV Inhibitors, and SGLT-2 Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    DeGeeter, Michelle; Williamson, Bobbie

    2016-04-01

    Insulin is the mainstay of current treatment for patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Due to increasing insulin resistance, insulin doses are often continually increased, which may result in weight gain for patients. Medications currently approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes offer varying mechanisms of action that can help to reduce insulin resistance and prevent or deter weight gain. A MEDLINE search was conducted to review literature evaluating the use of metformin, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, pioglitazone, glucagon-like peptide 1 agonists, dipeptidyl peptidase, and sodium-dependent glucose transporter 2 inhibitors, in patients with T1DM. Varying results were found with some benefits including reductions in hemoglobin A1c, decreased insulin doses, and favorable effects on weight. Of significance, a common fear of utilizing multiple therapies for diabetes treatment is the risk of hypoglycemia, and this review displayed limited evidence of hypoglycemia with multiple agents. PMID:25312263

  20. Regulation of adipocyte formation by GLP-1/GLP-1R signaling.

    PubMed

    Challa, Tenagne Delessa; Beaton, Nigel; Arnold, Myrtha; Rudofsky, Gottfried; Langhans, Wolfgang; Wolfrum, Christian

    2012-02-24

    Increased nutrient intake leads to excessive adipose tissue accumulation, obesity, and the development of associated metabolic disorders. How the intestine signals to adipose tissue to adapt to increased nutrient intake, however, is still not completely understood. We show here, that the gut peptide GLP-1 or its long-lasting analog liraglutide, function as intestinally derived signals to induce adipocyte formation, both in vitro and in vivo. GLP-1 and liraglutide activate the GLP-1R, thereby promoting pre-adipocyte proliferation and inhibition of apoptosis. This is achieved at least partly through activation of ERK, PKC, and AKT signaling pathways. In contrast, loss of GLP-1R expression causes reduction in adipogenesis, through induction of apoptosis in pre-adipocytes, by inhibition of the above mentioned pathways. Because GLP-1 and liraglutide are used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, these findings implicate GLP-1 as a regulator of adipogenesis, which could be an alternate pathway leading to improved lipid homeostasis and controlled downstream insulin signaling. PMID:22207759

  1. Endogenous PYY and GLP-1 mediate L-glutamine responses in intestinal mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, S; Tough, I R; Cox, H M

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose l-glutamine (Gln) is an energy source for gastrointestinal (GI) epithelia and can stimulate glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) release from isolated enteroendocrine L-cells. GLP-1 and peptide YY (PYY) are co-secreted postprandially and both peptides have functional roles in glucose homeostasis and energy balance. The primary aim of this project was to establish the endogenous mechanisms underpinning Gln responses within intact GI mucosae using selective receptor antagonists. Experimental Approach Mouse mucosae from different GI regions were voltage-clamped and short-circuit current (Isc) was recorded to Gln added to either surface in the absence or presence of antagonists, using wild-type (WT) or PYY-/- tissues. The glucose sensitivity of Gln responses was also investigated by replacement with mannitol. Key Results Colonic apical and basolateral Gln responses (at 0.1 and 1 mM) were biphasic; initial increases in Isc were predominantly GLP-1 mediated. GLP-1 receptor antagonism significantly reduced the initial Gln response in the PYY-/- colon. The slower reductions in Isc to Gln were PYY-Y1 mediated as they were absent from the PYY-/- colon and were blocked selectively in WT tissue by a Y1 receptor antagonist. In jejunum mucosa, Gln stimulated monophasic Isc reductions that were PYY-Y1 receptor mediated. Gln effects were partially glucose sensitive, and Calhex 231 inhibition indicated that the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) was involved. Conclusion and Implications Gln stimulates the co-release of endogenous GLP-1 and PYY from mucosal L-cells resulting in paracrine GLP-1 and Y1 receptor-mediated electrogenic epithelial responses. This glucose-sensitive mechanism appears to be CaSR mediated and could provide a significant therapeutic strategy releasing two endogenous peptides better known for their glucose-lowering and satiating effects. PMID:23992397

  2. Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Receptor Activation Attenuates Platelet Aggregation and Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Cameron-Vendrig, Alison; Reheman, Adili; Siraj, M Ahsan; Xu, Xiaohong Ruby; Wang, Yiming; Lei, Xi; Afroze, Talat; Shikatani, Eric; El-Mounayri, Omar; Noyan, Hossein; Weissleder, Ralph; Ni, Heyu; Husain, Mansoor

    2016-06-01

    Short-term studies in subjects with diabetes receiving glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1)-targeted therapies have suggested a reduced number of cardiovascular events. The mechanisms underlying this unexpectedly rapid effect are not known. We cloned full-length GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) mRNA from a human megakaryocyte cell line (MEG-01), and found expression levels of GLP-1Rs in MEG-01 cells to be higher than those in the human lung but lower than in the human pancreas. Incubation with GLP-1 and the GLP-1R agonist exenatide elicited a cAMP response in MEG-01 cells, and exenatide significantly inhibited thrombin-, ADP-, and collagen-induced platelet aggregation. Incubation with exenatide also inhibited thrombus formation under flow conditions in ex vivo perfusion chambers using human and mouse whole blood. In a mouse cremaster artery laser injury model, a single intravenous injection of exenatide inhibited thrombus formation in normoglycemic and hyperglycemic mice in vivo. Thrombus formation was greater in mice transplanted with bone marrow lacking a functional GLP-1R (Glp1r(-/-)), compared with those receiving wild-type bone marrow. Although antithrombotic effects of exenatide were partly lost in mice transplanted with bone marrow from Glp1r(-/-) mice, they were undetectable in mice with a genetic deficiency of endothelial nitric oxide synthase. The inhibition of platelet function and the prevention of thrombus formation by GLP-1R agonists represent potential mechanisms for reduced atherothrombotic events. PMID:26936963

  3. GLP-1 secretion is increased by inflammatory stimuli in an IL-6-dependent manner, leading to hyperinsulinemia and blood glucose lowering.

    PubMed

    Kahles, Florian; Meyer, Christina; Möllmann, Julia; Diebold, Sebastian; Findeisen, Hannes M; Lebherz, Corinna; Trautwein, Christian; Koch, Alexander; Tacke, Frank; Marx, Nikolaus; Lehrke, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia are both predictors for adverse outcome in critically ill patients. Hyperinsulinemia is induced by inflammatory stimuli as a relevant mechanism for glucose lowering in the critically ill. The incretine hormone GLP-1 was currently found to be induced by endotoxin, leading to insulin secretion and glucose lowering under inflammatory conditions in mice. Here, we describe GLP-1 secretion to be increased by a variety of inflammatory stimuli, including endotoxin, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and IL-6. Although abrogation of IL-1 signaling proved insufficient to prevent endotoxin-dependent GLP-1 induction, this was abolished in the absence of IL-6 in respective knockout animals. Hence, we found endotoxin-dependent GLP-1 secretion to be mediated by an inflammatory cascade, with IL-6 being necessary and sufficient for GLP-1 induction. Functionally, augmentation of the GLP-1 system by pharmacological inhibition of DPP-4 caused hyperinsulinemia, suppression of glucagon release, and glucose lowering under endotoxic conditions, whereas inhibition of the GLP-1 receptor led to the opposite effect. Furthermore, total GLP-1 plasma levels were profoundly increased in 155 critically ill patients presenting to the intensive care unit (ICU) in comparison with 134 healthy control subjects. In the ICU cohort, GLP-1 plasma levels correlated with markers of inflammation and disease severity. Consequently, GLP-1 provides a novel link between the immune system and the gut with strong relevance for metabolic regulation in context of inflammation. PMID:24947356

  4. GLP-1(7-36)-amide and Exendin-4 stimulate the HPA axis in rodents and humans.

    PubMed

    Gil-Lozano, Manuel; Pérez-Tilve, Diego; Alvarez-Crespo, Mayte; Martís, Aurelio; Fernandez, Ana M; Catalina, Pablo A F; Gonzalez-Matias, Lucas C; Mallo, Federico

    2010-06-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a potent insulinotropic peptide expressed in the gut and brain, which is secreted in response to food intake. The levels of GLP-1 within the brain have been related to the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, and hence, this peptide might mediate some responses to stress. Nevertheless, there is little information regarding the effects of circulating GLP-1 on the neuroendocrine control of HPA activity. Here, we have studied the response of corticoadrenal steroids to the peripheral administration of GLP-1 (7-36)-amide and related peptides [exendin (Ex)-3, Ex-4, and Ex-4(3-39)] in rats, mice, and humans. GLP-1 increases circulating corticosterone levels in a time-dependent manner, both in conscious and anaesthetized rats, and it has also increased aldosterone levels. Moreover, GLP-1 augmented cortisol levels in healthy subjects and diabetes mellitus (DM)-1 patients. The effects of GLP-1/Ex-4 on the HPA axis are very consistent after distinct means of administration (intracerebroventricular, iv, and ip), irrespective of the metabolic state of the animals (fasting or fed ad libitum), and they were reproduced by different peptides in this family, independent of glycaemic changes and their insulinotropic properties. Indeed, these effects were also observed in diabetic subjects (DM-1 patients) and in the DM-1 streptozotocin-rat or DM-2 muscle IGF-I receptor-lysine-arginine transgenic mouse animal models. The mechanisms whereby circulating GLP-1 activates the HPA axis remain to be elucidated, although an increase in ACTH after Ex-4 and GLP-1 administration implicates the central nervous system or a direct effect on the pituitary. Together, these findings suggest that GLP-1 may play an important role in regulating the HPA axis. PMID:20363879

  5. The role of GLP-1 mimetics and basal insulin analogues in type 2 diabetes mellitus: guidance from studies of liraglutide

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, A H

    2012-01-01

    In people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), the incretin effect is reduced, but the recent advent of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 agonists/analogues has enabled restoration of at least some of the function of the incretin system, with accompanying improvements in glycaemic control. Two GLP-1 receptor agonists/analogues are currently approved for the treatment of T2DM—exenatide (Byetta®, Eli Lilly & Co., Indianapolis, IN, US) and liraglutide (Victoza®, Novo Nordisk, Bagsvaerd, Denmark); a once-weekly formulation of exenatide (Bydureon®, Eli Lilly & Co.) has also been approved by the European Medicines Agency. The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) has recently published guidance on the use of liraglutide in T2DM, based on evidence from the Liraglutide Effect and Action in Diabetes (LEAD) Phase III trial programme, which compared liraglutide with existing glucose-lowering therapies, such as exenatide and insulin glargine. The LEAD programme reported HbA1c reductions from 0.8 to 1.5% with liraglutide (1.2 and 1.8 mg), accompanied by low rates of hypoglycaemia and some weight loss; side effects were primarily gastrointestinal in nature (e.g. nausea and diarrhoea). Based on the findings of the LEAD studies and the NICE recommendation, liraglutide now represents an important therapy widely available in the UK for certain patient groups, including those with a body mass index (BMI) ≥35.0 kg/m2, and patients with a BMI <35 kg/m2 who are considered unsuitable for insulin and are failing to meet targets for glycaemic control with oral agents. NICE guidelines still suggest that most patients without considerable obesity (BMI <35 kg/m2) are probably best managed using insulin therapy. Evidence also suggests a future role for GLP-1 mimetics in combination with basal insulin. PMID:22051096

  6. Lipid derivatives activate GPR119 and trigger GLP-1 secretion in primary murine L-cells

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Catherine E.; Glass, Leslie L.; Diakogiannaki, Eleftheria; Pais, Ramona; Lenaghan, Carol; Smith, David M.; Wedin, Marianne; Bohlooly-Y, Mohammad; Gribble, Fiona M.; Reimann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone derived from proglucagon, which is released from intestinal L-cells and increases insulin secretion in a glucose dependent manner. GPR119 is a lipid derivative receptor present in L-cells, believed to play a role in the detection of dietary fat. This study aimed to characterize the responses of primary murine L-cells to GPR119 agonism and assess the importance of GPR119 for the detection of ingested lipid. Methods GLP-1 secretion was measured from murine primary cell cultures stimulated with a panel of GPR119 ligands. Plasma GLP-1 levels were measured in mice lacking GPR119 in proglucagon-expressing cells and controls after lipid gavage. Intracellular cAMP responses to GPR119 agonists were measured in single primary L-cells using transgenic mice expressing a cAMP FRET sensor driven by the proglucagon promoter. Results L-cell specific knockout of GPR119 dramatically decreased plasma GLP-1 levels after a lipid gavage. GPR119 ligands triggered GLP-1 secretion in a GPR119 dependent manner in primary epithelial cultures from the colon, but were less effective in the upper small intestine. GPR119 agonists elevated cAMP in ∼70% of colonic L-cells and 50% of small intestinal L-cells. Conclusions/interpretation GPR119 ligands strongly enhanced GLP-1 release from colonic cultures, reflecting the high proportion of colonic L-cells that exhibited cAMP responses to GPR119 agonists. Less GPR119-dependence could be demonstrated in the upper small intestine. In vivo, GPR119 in L-cells plays a key role in oral lipid-triggered GLP-1 secretion. PMID:26144594

  7. GLP-1 Agonists and Blood Pressure: A Review of the Evidence.

    PubMed

    Goud, Aditya; Zhong, Jixin; Peters, Matthew; Brook, Robert D; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2016-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The presence of concomitant hypertension in diabetics is a major driver of excess cardiovascular risk. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1a) act on numerous pathways that intersect glycemic, weight, and blood pressure (BP) control. BP-lowering effects have been observed in mouse models of hypertension with a variety of GLP-1a. Acute administration of GLP-1a in humans has been shown to no effects and sometimes increased BP in humans. Chronic administration of GLP-1a, however, reduces clinic systolic BP (≈2 mmHg) at least when evaluated as a secondary end point in glycemia-lowering studies while simultaneously increasing heart rate. BP lowering has not been consistently observed in two recent double-blind controlled clinical trials evaluating ambulatory BP as the primary end point. While a number of mechanisms including vascular, myocardial, renal, and central nervous system pathways have been suggested in animal studies, these mechanistic pathways have not been sufficiently detailed in humans and it is unclear if the same pathways are operational. Further studies need to be conducted to unravel the full spectrum of effects of this drug class. An understanding of their effects on BP may help provide an explanation for the ability of GLP-1a to influence cardiovascular (CV) events in ongoing event-driven CV trials. PMID:26803771

  8. Intraportal Infusion of Ghrelin Could Inhibit Glucose-Stimulated GLP-1 Secretion by Enteric Neural Net in Wistar Rat

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiyao; Li, Wensong; Li, Ping; Chang, Manli; Huang, Xu; Li, Qiang; Cui, Can

    2014-01-01

    As a regulator of food intake and energy metabolism, the role of ghrelin in glucose metabolism is still not fully understood. In this study, we determined the in vivo effect of ghrelin on incretin effect. We demonstrated that ghrelin inhibited the glucose-stimulated release of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) when infused into the portal vein of Wistar rat. Hepatic vagotomy diminished the inhibitory effect of ghrelin on glucose-stimulated GLP-1 secretion. In addition, phentolamine, a nonselective α receptor antagonist, could recover the decrease of GLP-1 release induced by ghrelin infusion. Pralmorelin (an artificial growth hormone release peptide) infusion into the portal vein could also inhibit the glucose-stimulated release of GLP-1. And growth hormone secretagogue receptor antagonist, [D-lys3]-GHRP-6, infusion showed comparable increases of glucose stimulated GLP-1 release compared to ghrelin infusion into the portal vein. The data showed that intraportal infusion of ghrelin exerted an inhibitory effect on GLP-1 secretion through growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1α (GHS1α receptor), which indicated that the downregulation of ghrelin secretion after food intake was necessary for incretin effect. Furthermore, our results suggested that the enteric neural net involved hepatic vagal nerve and sympathetic nerve mediated inhibition effect of ghrelin on incretin effect. PMID:25247193

  9. Glucagon-like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Analogs: Recent Advances, New Possibilities, and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin that plays important physiological roles in glucose homeostasis. Produced from intestine upon food intake, it stimulates insulin secretion and keeps pancreatic β-cells healthy and proliferating. Because of these beneficial effects, it has attracted a great deal of attention in the past decade, and an entirely new line of diabetic therapeutics has emerged based on the peptide. In addition to the therapeutic applications, GLP-1 analogs have demonstrated a potential in molecular imaging of pancreatic β-cells; this may be useful in early detection of the disease and evaluation of therapeutic interventions, including islet transplantation. In this Perspective, we focus on GLP-1 analogs for their studies on improvement of biological activities, enhancement of metabolic stability, investigation of receptor interaction, and visualization of the pancreatic islets. PMID:25349901

  10. Minireview: Signal Bias, Allosterism, and Polymorphic Variation at the GLP-1R: Implications for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Koole, Cassandra; Savage, Emilia E.; Christopoulos, Arthur; Miller, Laurence J.

    2013-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) controls the physiological responses to the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 and is a major therapeutic target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, owing to the broad range of effects that are mediated upon its activation. These include the promotion of glucose-dependent insulin secretion, increased insulin biosynthesis, preservation of β-cell mass, improved peripheral insulin action, and promotion of weight loss. Regulation of GLP-1R function is complex, with multiple endogenous and exogenous peptides that interact with the receptor that result in the activation of numerous downstream signaling cascades. The current understanding of GLP-1R signaling and regulation is limited, with the desired spectrum of signaling required for the ideal therapeutic outcome still to be determined. In addition, there are several single-nucleotide polymorphisms (used in this review as defining a natural change of single nucleotide in the receptor sequence; clinically, this is viewed as a single-nucleotide polymorphism only if the frequency of the mutation occurs in 1% or more of the population) distributed within the coding sequence of the receptor protein that have the potential to produce differential responses for distinct ligands. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of GLP-1R function, in particular highlighting recent advances in the field on ligand-directed signal bias, allosteric modulation, and probe dependence and the implications of these behaviors for drug discovery and development. PMID:23864649

  11. The evolving place of incretin-based therapies in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Treatment options for type 2 diabetes based on the action of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) were first introduced in 2005. These comprise the injectable GLP-1 receptor agonists solely acting on the GLP-1 receptor on the one hand and orally active dipeptidyl-peptidase inhibitors (DPP-4 inhibitors) raising endogenous GLP-1 and other hormone levels by inhibiting the degrading enzyme DPP-4. In adult medicine, both treatment options are attractive and more commonly used because of their action and safety profile. The incretin-based therapies stimulate insulin secretion and inhibit glucagon secretion in a glucose-dependent manner and carry no intrinsic risk of hypoglycaemia. GLP-1 receptor agonists allow weight loss, whereas DPP-4 inhibitors are weight neutral. This review gives an overview of the mechanism of action and the substances and clinical data available. PMID:20130920

  12. The GLP-1 agonist, liraglutide, as a pharmacotherapy for obesity

    PubMed Central

    Crane, James; McGowan, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    There is a global obesity epidemic that will continue to be a financial burden on healthcare systems around the world. Tackling obesity through diet and exercise should always be the first intervention, but this has not proved to be effective for a large number of patients. Pharmacotherapeutic options have been limited and many previously available drugs have been withdrawn due to safety concerns. Currently, only bariatric surgery has the capability to induce both substantial and durable weight loss. This article briefly reviews the history of pharmacotherapy for obesity before focusing on the clinical trial evidence for the use of the GLP-1 agonist liraglutide as a weight loss agent and comparing its efficacy with other emerging drug therapies for obesity. PMID:26977279

  13. The effects of GLP-1 analogues in obese, insulin-using type 2 diabetes in relation to eating behaviour.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Stefanie Amarens; Lefrandt, Joop Daniel; Petersen, Japke Frida; Boersma, Hendrikus Hessel; Mulder, Douwe Johannes; Hoogenberg, Klaas

    2016-02-01

    Background Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RA) added to insulin in type 2 diabetes patients have shown to lower body weight, improve glycaemic control and reduce total daily insulin dose in short term studies, although the individual response greatly varies. Objective To evaluate GLP-1 RA treatment on body weight, glycaemic control and total daily insulin dose in obese, insulin-using type 2 diabetes patients after 2 years follow-up in a real life setting and to explore a possible relation with eating behaviour. Setting The Martini Hospital and the University Medical Center in Groningen in the Netherlands. Methods Eligible patients were at least 18 years of age, were on insulin therapy and obese (BMI > 30 kg/m(2)), started GLP-1 RA treatment. At baseline eating behaviour was classified according to the validated Dutch Eating Behaviour Questionnaire. A 2 years follow-up was performed. Main outcome measures Body weight, HbA1c and total daily insulin dose. Results 151 Patients started with exenatide or liraglutide. 120 patients completed the 2 years follow-up. From baseline to 2 years, body weight (mean ± SD) changed from 117.9 ± 22.1 to 107.9 ± 22.9 kg (P < 0.0001), HbA1c (median, IQR) changed from 7.9 (7.2-8.9) to 7.6 (6.9-8.3) % [63 (55-74) to 60 (52-67) mmol/mol] (P < 0.0001), total daily insulin dose changed from 90 (56-150) to 60 (0-100) Units/day (P < 0.0001). Weight change differed between eating behaviour groups (P < 0.001) in which external eating behaviour (n = 17) resulted in the smallest decline (-3.1 %) and restrained (n = 41) in the greatest (-10.3 %) in comparison with emotional (n = 37, -8.5 %) and indifferent (n = 25, -9.6 %) eating behaviours. Conclusion Two year of GLP-1 RA treatment resulted in a sustained reduction of weight, HbA1c and total daily insulin dose in obese, insulin-using type 2 diabetes patients in a real life setting. Largest weight loss was achieved in patients with a predominant restraint eating pattern while a predominant external eating pattern resulted in the smallest weight reduction. PMID:26597956

  14. Puerarin Protects Pancreatic β-Cells in Obese Diabetic Mice via Activation of GLP-1R Signaling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Yao, Dongdong; Yang, Haiyuan; Wei, Yingjie; Peng, Yunru; Ding, Yongfang; Shu, Luan

    2016-03-01

    Diabetes is characterized by a loss and dysfunction of the β-cell. Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1R) signaling plays an important role in β-cell survival and function. It is meaningful to identify promising agents from natural products which might activate GLP-1R signaling. In this study, puerarin, a diet isoflavone, was evaluated its beneficial effects on β-cell survival and GLP-1R pathway. We showed that puerarin reduced the body weight gain, normalized blood glucose, and improved glucose tolerance in high-fat diet-induced and db/db diabetic mice. Most importantly, increased β-cell mass and β-cell proliferation but decreased β-cell apoptosis were observed in puerarin-treated diabetic mice as examined by immunostaining of mice pancreatic sections. The protective effect of puerarin on β-cell survival was confirmed in isolated mouse islets treated with high glucose. Further mechanism studies showed that the circulating level of GLP-1 in mice was unaffected by puerarin. However, puerarin enhanced GLP-1R signaling by up-regulating expressions of GLP-1R and pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1, which subsequently led to protein kinase B (Akt) activation but forkhead box O1 inactivation, and promoted β-cell survival. The protective effect of puerarin was remarkably suppressed by Exendin(9-39), an antagonist of GLP-1R. Our study demonstrated puerarin improved glucose homeostasis in obese diabetic mice and identified a novel role of puerarin in protecting β-cell survival by mechanisms involving activation of GLP-1R signaling and downstream targets. PMID:26789107

  15. Resveratrol Increases Glucose Induced GLP-1 Secretion in Mice: A Mechanism which Contributes to the Glycemic Control

    PubMed Central

    Dao, Thi-Mai Anh; Waget, Aurélie; Klopp, Pascale; Serino, Matteo; Vachoux, Christelle; Pechere, Laurent; Drucker, Daniel J.; Champion, Serge; Barthélemy, Sylvain; Barra, Yves; Burcelin, Rémy; Sérée, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Resveratrol (RSV) is a potent anti-diabetic agent when used at high doses. However, the direct targets primarily responsible for the beneficial actions of RSV remain unclear. We used a formulation that increases oral bioavailability to assess the mechanisms involved in the glucoregulatory action of RSV in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed diabetic wild type mice. Administration of RSV for 5 weeks reduced the development of glucose intolerance, and increased portal vein concentrations of both Glucagon-like peptid-1 (GLP-1) and insulin, and intestinal content of active GLP-1. This was associated with increased levels of colonic proglucagon mRNA transcripts. RSV-mediated glucoregulation required a functional GLP-1 receptor (Glp1r) as neither glucose nor insulin levels were modulated in Glp1r-/- mice. Conversely, levels of active GLP-1 and control of glycemia were further improved when the Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor sitagliptin was co-administered with RSV. In addition, RSV treatment modified gut microbiota and decreased the inflammatory status of mice. Our data suggest that RSV exerts its actions in part through modulation of the enteroendocrine axis in vivo. PMID:21673955

  16. Resveratrol increases glucose induced GLP-1 secretion in mice: a mechanism which contributes to the glycemic control.

    PubMed

    Dao, Thi-Mai Anh; Waget, Aurélie; Klopp, Pascale; Serino, Matteo; Vachoux, Christelle; Pechere, Laurent; Drucker, Daniel J; Champion, Serge; Barthélemy, Sylvain; Barra, Yves; Burcelin, Rémy; Sérée, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Resveratrol (RSV) is a potent anti-diabetic agent when used at high doses. However, the direct targets primarily responsible for the beneficial actions of RSV remain unclear. We used a formulation that increases oral bioavailability to assess the mechanisms involved in the glucoregulatory action of RSV in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed diabetic wild type mice. Administration of RSV for 5 weeks reduced the development of glucose intolerance, and increased portal vein concentrations of both Glucagon-like peptid-1 (GLP-1) and insulin, and intestinal content of active GLP-1. This was associated with increased levels of colonic proglucagon mRNA transcripts. RSV-mediated glucoregulation required a functional GLP-1 receptor (Glp1r) as neither glucose nor insulin levels were modulated in Glp1r-/- mice. Conversely, levels of active GLP-1 and control of glycemia were further improved when the Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor sitagliptin was co-administered with RSV. In addition, RSV treatment modified gut microbiota and decreased the inflammatory status of mice. Our data suggest that RSV exerts its actions in part through modulation of the enteroendocrine axis in vivo. PMID:21673955

  17. Association of low GLP-1 with oxidative stress is related to cardiac disease and outcome in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ravassa, Susana; Beaumont, Javier; Huerta, Ana; Barba, Joaquín; Coma-Canella, Isabel; González, Arantxa; López, Begoña; Díez, Javier

    2015-04-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) contributes to cardiovascular damage in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The peptide glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) inhibits OS and exerts cardiovascular protective actions. Our aim was to investigate whether cardiac remodeling (CR) and cardiovascular events (CVE) are associated with circulating GLP-1 and biomarkers of OS in T2DM patients. We also studied GLP-1 antioxidant effects in a model of cardiomyocyte lipotoxicity. We examined 72 T2DM patients with no coronary or valve heart disease and 14 nondiabetic subjects. A median of 6 years follow-up information was obtained in 60 patients. Circulating GLP-1, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 activity, and biomarkers of OS were quantified. In T2DM patients, circulating GLP-1 decreased and OS biomarkers increased, compared with nondiabetics. Plasma GLP-1 was inversely correlated with serum 3-nitrotyrosine in T2DM patients. Patients showing high circulating 3-nitrotyrosine and low GLP-1 levels exhibited CR and higher risk for CVE, compared to the remaining patients. In palmitate-stimulated HL-1 cardiomyocytes, GLP-1 reduced cytosolic and mitochondrial oxidative stress, increased mitochondrial ATP synthase expression, partially restored mitochondrial membrane permeability and cytochrome c oxidase activity, blunted leakage of creatine to the extracellular medium, and inhibited oxidative damage in total and mitochondrial DNA. These results suggest that T2DM patients with reduced circulating GLP-1 and exacerbated OS may exhibit CR and be at higher risk for CVE. In addition, GLP-1 exerts antioxidant effects in HL-1 palmitate-overloaded cardiomyocytes. It is proposed that therapies aimed to increase GLP-1 may counteract OS, protect from CR, and prevent CVE in patients with T2DM. PMID:25595459

  18. A new GLP-1 analogue with prolonged glucose-lowering activity in vivo via backbone-based modification at the N-terminus.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiaohui; Niu, Youhong; Zhu, Jingjing; Yang, An-Qi; Wu, Yan-Fen; Ye, Xin-Shan

    2016-03-15

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an endogenous insulinotropic hormone with wonderful glucose-lowering activity. However, its clinical use in type II diabetes is limited due to its rapid degradation at the N-terminus by dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV). Among the N-terminal modifications of GLP-1, backbone-based modification was rarely reported. Herein, we employed two backbone-based strategies to modify the N-terminus of tGLP-1. Firstly, the amide N-methylated analogues 2-6 were designed and synthesized to make a full screening of the N-terminal amide bonds, and the loss of GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) activation indicated the importance of amide H-bonds. Secondly, with retaining the N-terminal amide H-bonds, the β-peptide replacement strategy was used and analogues 7-13 were synthesized. By two rounds of screening, analogue 10 was identified. Analogue 10 greatly improved the DPP-IV resistance with maintaining good GLP-1R activation in vitro, and showed approximately a 4-fold prolonged blood glucose-lowering activity in vivo in comparison with tGLP-1. This modification strategy will benefit the development of GLP-1-based anti-diabetic drugs. PMID:26895657

  19. Novel coumarin modified GLP-1 derivatives with enhanced plasma stability and prolonged in vivo glucose-lowering ability

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jing; Sun, Lidan; Huang, Xun; Li, Zheng; Zhang, Chenyu; Qian, Hai; Huang, Wenlong

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The short biological half-life limits the therapeutic use of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and chemical modification to improve the interaction of peptides with serum albumin represents an effective strategy to develop long-acting peptide analogues. Coumarin, a natural product, is known to bind tightly to plasma proteins and possesses many biological activities. Therefore, we designed and synthesized a series of coumarin-modified GLP-1 derivatives, hypothesizing that conjugation with coumarin would retain the therapeutic effects and prolong the biological half-life of the conjugates. Experimental Approach Four cysteine-modified GLP-1 analogues (1–4) were prepared using Gly8-GLP-1(7–36)-NH2 peptide as a starting point. These analogues were conjugated with two coumarin maleimides to yield eight compounds (conjugates 6–13) for testing. Activation of human GLP-1 receptors, stability to enzymic inactivation in plasma and binding to human albumin were assessed in vitro. In vivo, effects on oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) in rats and on blood glucose levels in db/db mice were studied. Key Results Most conjugates showed well preserved receptor activation efficacy, enhanced albumin-binding properties and improved in vitro plasma stability and conjugate 7 was selected to undergo further assessment. In rats, conjugate 7 had a longer circulating t1/2 than exendin-4 or liraglutide. A prolonged antidiabetic effect of conjugate 7 was observed after OGTT in rats and a prolonged hypoglycaemic effect in db/db mice. Conclusions and Implications Cysteine-specific coumarin conjugation with GLP-1 offers a useful approach to the development of long-acting incretin-based antidiabetic agents. Conjugate 7 is a promising long-lasting GLP-1 derivative deserving further investigation. PMID:25039358

  20. Altered expression of uncoupling protein 2 in GLP-1-producing cells after chronic high glucose exposure: implications for the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Francesca; Filippello, Agnese; Di Pino, Antonino; Barbagallo, Davide; Di Mauro, Stefania; Pappalardo, Alessandro; Rabuazzo, Agata Maria; Purrello, Michele; Purrello, Francesco; Piro, Salvatore

    2016-04-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a gut L-cell hormone that enhances glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Several approaches that prevent GLP-1 degradation or activate the GLP-1 receptor are being used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. In T2DM, GLP-1 secretion has been suggested to be impaired, and this defect appears to be a consequence rather than a cause of impaired glucose homeostasis. However, although defective GLP-1 secretion has been correlated with insulin resistance, little is known about the direct effects of chronic high glucose concentrations, which are typical in diabetes patients, on GLP-1-secreting cell function. In the present study, we demonstrate that glucotoxicity directly affects GLP-1 secretion in GLUTag cells chronically exposed to high glucose. Our results indicate that this abnormality is associated with a decrease in ATP production due to the elevated expression of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2). Furthermore, UCP2 inhibition using small interfering RNA (siRNA) and the application of glibenclamide, an ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP (+)) channel blocker, reverse the GLP-1 secretion defect induced by chronic high-glucose treatment. These results show that glucotoxicity diminishes the secretory responsiveness of GLP-1-secreting cells to acute glucose stimulation. We conclude that the loss of the incretin effect, as observed in T2DM patients, could at least partially depend on hyperglycemia, which is typical in diabetes patients. Such an understanding may not only provide new insight into diabetes complications but also ultimately contribute to the identification of novel molecular targets within intestinal L-cells for controlling and improving endogenous GLP-1 secretion. PMID:26739488

  1. Novel GLP-1 (Glucagon-Like Peptide-1) Analogues and Insulin in the Treatment for Alzheimer's Disease and Other Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Calsolaro, Valeria; Edison, Paul

    2015-12-01

    The link between diabetes mellitus and Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been known for the last few decades. Since insulin and insulin receptors are known to be present in the brain, the downstream signalling as well as the effect of hyperinsulinemia have been extensively studied in both AD and Parkinson's disease. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a hormone belonging to the incretin family, and its receptors (GLP-1Rs) can be found in pancreatic cells and in vascular endothelium. Interestingly, GLP-1Rs are found in the neuronal cell body and dendrites in the central nervous system (CNS), in particular in the hypothalamus, hippocampus, cerebral cortex and olfactory bulb. Several studies have shown the importance of both insulin and GLP-1 signalling on cognitive function, and many preclinical studies have been performed to evaluate the potential protective role of GLP-1 on the brain. Here we review the underlying mechanism of insulin and GLP-1 signalling in the CNS, as well as the preclinical data for the use of GLP-1 analogues such as liraglutide, exenatide and lixisenatide in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26666230

  2. Neurotensin Is Coexpressed, Coreleased, and Acts Together With GLP-1 and PYY in Enteroendocrine Control of Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Grunddal, Kaare V; Ratner, Cecilia F; Svendsen, Berit; Sommer, Felix; Engelstoft, Maja S; Madsen, Andreas N; Pedersen, Jens; Nøhr, Mark K; Egerod, Kristoffer L; Nawrocki, Andrea R; Kowalski, Timothy; Howard, Andrew D; Poulsen, Steen Seier; Offermanns, Stefan; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Holst, Jens J; Holst, Birgitte; Schwartz, Thue W

    2016-01-01

    The 2 gut hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide YY (PYY) are well known to be coexpressed, costored, and released together to coact in the control of key metabolic target organs. However, recently, it became clear that several other gut hormones can be coexpressed in the intestinal-specific lineage of enteroendocrine cells. Here, we focus on the anatomical and functional consequences of the coexpression of neurotensin with GLP-1 and PYY in the distal small intestine. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis, laser capture, and triple staining demonstrated that GLP-1 cells in the crypts become increasingly multihormonal, ie, coexpressing PYY and neurotensin as they move up the villus. Proglucagon promoter and pertussis toxin receptor-driven cell ablation and reappearance studies indicated that although all the cells die, the GLP-1 cells reappear more quickly than PYY- and neurotensin-positive cells. High-resolution confocal fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that neurotensin is stored in secretory granules distinct from GLP-1 and PYY storing granules. Nevertheless, the 3 peptides were cosecreted from both perfused small intestines and colonic crypt cultures in response to a series of metabolite, neuropeptide, and hormonal stimuli. Importantly, neurotensin acts synergistically, ie, more than additively together with GLP-1 and PYY to decrease palatable food intake and inhibit gastric emptying, but affects glucose homeostasis in a more complex manner. Thus, neurotensin is a major gut hormone deeply integrated with GLP-1 and PYY, which should be taken into account when exploiting the enteroendocrine regulation of metabolism pharmacologically. PMID:26469136

  3. GLP-1R–Targeting Magnetic Nanoparticles for Pancreatic Islet Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Yoo, Byunghee; Yang, Jingsheng; Zhang, Xueli; Ross, Alana; Pantazopoulos, Pamela; Dai, Guangping; Moore, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Noninvasive assessment of pancreatic β-cell mass would tremendously aid in managing type 1 diabetes (T1D). Toward this goal, we synthesized an exendin-4 conjugated magnetic iron oxide–based nanoparticle probe targeting glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1R), which is highly expressed on the surface of pancreatic β-cells. In vitro studies in βTC-6, the β-cell line, showed specific accumulation of the targeted probe (termed MN-Ex10-Cy5.5) compared with nontargeted (termed MN-Cy5.5). In vivo magnetic resonance imaging showed a significant transverse relaxation time (T2) shortening in the pancreata of mice injected with the MN-Ex10-Cy5.5 probe compared with control animals injected with the nontargeted probe at 7.5 and 24 h after injection. Furthermore, ΔT2 of the pancreata of prediabetic NOD mice was significantly higher than that of diabetic NOD mice after the injection of MN-Ex10-Cy5.5, indicating the decrease of probe accumulation in these animals due to β-cell loss. Of note, ΔT2 of prediabetic and diabetic NOD mice injected with MN-Cy5.5 was not significantly changed, reflecting the nonspecific mode of accumulation of nontargeted probe. We believe our results point to the potential for using this agent for monitoring the disease development and response of T1D to therapy. PMID:24458362

  4. Efficacy and tolerability of GLP-1 agonists in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: an Indian perspective

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonists have been able to address the unmet needs of type 2 diabetes patients across the world. Indian patients with type 2 diabetes have also been able to benefit from effects of GLP-1 analogues to a more or less similar extent compared with patients from other parts of the world. As there is no nationwide data on use of GLP-1 agonists in India, we used the clinical data from different studies and compared them with the global data on GLP-1 analogues. The review is limited to only two approved GLP-1 analogues in India: exenatide and liraglutide. The efficacy of GLP-1 analogues, in terms of glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and postprandial glucose (PPG), is found to be similar in Indian patients compared with the global data. The other beneficial effects such as weight loss, incidence of hypoglycaemia were found to be on similar lines in the Indian setting. In a single-centre study, liraglutide reduced the dose of antihypertensive medications due to its effect on blood pressure. The gastrointestinal adverse effects such as nausea and vomiting were major adverse events, but these were transient and varied from one particular agent to another. Liraglutide is found to be superior in terms of compliance compared with exenatide in the Indian setting. Overall, the GLP-1 analogues have presented a treatment option that gives patient a benefit of glycaemic control, weight loss and very low incidence of hypoglycaemia, but the cost of the therapy presents a major barrier. PMID:25489471

  5. Exenatide exerts a PKA-dependent positive inotropic effect in human atrial myocardium: GLP-1R mediated effects in human myocardium.

    PubMed

    Wallner, Markus; Kolesnik, Ewald; Ablasser, Klemens; Khafaga, Mounir; Wakula, Paulina; Ljubojevic, Senka; Thon-Gutschi, Eva Maria; Sourij, Harald; Kapl, Martin; Edmunds, Nicholas J; Kuzmiski, J Brent; Griffith, David A; Knez, Igor; Pieske, Burkert; von Lewinski, Dirk

    2015-12-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists are a rapidly growing class of drugs developed for treating type-2 diabetes mellitus. Patients with diabetes carry an up to 5-fold greater mortality risk compared to non-diabetic patients, mainly as a result of cardiovascular diseases. Although beneficial cardiovascular effects have been reported, exact mechanisms of GLP-1R-agonist action in the heart, especially in human myocardium, are poorly understood. The effects of GLP-1R-agonists (exenatide, GLP-1(7-36)NH2, PF-06446009, PF-06446667) on cardiac contractility were tested in non-failing atrial and ventricular trabeculae from 72 patients. The GLP-1(7-36)NH2 metabolite, GLP-1(9-36)NH2, was also examined. In electrically stimulated trabeculae, the effects of compounds on isometric force were measured in the absence and presence of pharmacological inhibitors of signal transduction pathways. The role of β-arrestin signaling was examined using a β-arrestin partial agonist, PF-06446667. Expression levels were tested by immunoblots. Translocation of GLP-1R downstream molecular targets, Epac2, GLUT-1 and GLUT-4, were assessed by fluorescence microscopy. All tested GLP-1R-agonists significantly increased developed force in human atrial trabeculae, whereas GLP-1(9-36)NH2 had no effect. Exendin(9-39)NH2, a GLP-1R-antagonist, and H-89 blunted the inotropic effect of exenatide. In addition, exenatide increased PKA-dependent phosphorylation of phospholamban (PLB), GLUT-1 and Epac2 translocation, but not GLUT-4 translocation. Exenatide failed to enhance contractility in ventricular myocardium. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) revealed a significant higher GLP-1R expression in the atrium compared to ventricle. Exenatide increased contractility in a dose-dependent manner via GLP-1R/cAMP/PKA pathway and induced GLUT-1 and Epac2 translocation in human atrial myocardium, but had no effect in ventricular myocardium. Therapeutic use of GLP-1R-agonists may therefore impart beneficial effects on myocardial function and remodelling. PMID:26432951

  6. Epac is required for GLP-1R-mediated inhibition of oxidative stress and apoptosis in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Mangmool, Supachoke; Hemplueksa, Piriya; Parichatikanond, Warisara; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2015-04-01

    Although the cardioprotective effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 and its analogs have been reported, the exact mechanisms of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) signaling pathway in the heart are still unclear. Activation of the GLP-1R has been shown to increase cAMP levels, thus eliciting protein kinase A- and exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac)-dependent signaling pathways in pancreatic β-cells. However, which pathway plays an important role in the antioxidant and antiapoptotic effects of GLP-1R activation in the heart is not known. In this study, we demonstrated that stimulation of GLP-1Rs with exendin-4 attenuated H2O2-induced reactive oxygen species production and increased the synthesis of antioxidant enzymes, catalase, glutathione peroxidase-1, and manganese superoxide dismutase that is dependent on Epac. Additionally, exendin-4 has an antiapoptotic effect by decreasing a number of apoptotic cells, inhibiting caspase-3 activity, and enhancing the expression of antiapoptotic protein B-cell lymphoma 2, which is mediated through both protein kinase A- and Epac-dependent pathways. These data indicate a critical role for Epac in GLP-1R-mediated cardioprotection. PMID:25719403

  7. Synthesis and Evaluation of a Series of Long-Acting Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Pentasaccharide Conjugates for the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Nigel; Patterson, Steven; de Kort, Martin; Moffett, R Charlotte; Wisse, Jeffry A J; Dokter, Wim H A; Bos, Ebo S; Miltenburg, André M M; Flatt, Peter R

    2015-08-01

    The present study details the development of a family of novel D-Ala(8) glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) peptide conjugates by site specific conjugation to an antithrombin III (ATIII) binding carrier pentasaccharide through tetraethylene glycol linkers. All conjugates were found to possess potent insulin-releasing activity. Peptides with short linkers (<25 atoms) conjugated at Lys(34) and Lys(37) displayed strong GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1-R) binding affinity. All D-Ala(8) GLP-1 conjugates exhibited prominent glucose-lowering action. Biological activity of the Lys(37) short-linker peptide was evident up to 72 h post-injection. In agreement, the pharmacokinetic profile of this conjugate (t1/2 , 11 h) was superior to that of the GLP-1-R agonist, exenatide. Once-daily injection of the Lys(37) short-linker peptide in ob/ob mice for 21 days significantly decreased food intake and improved HbA1c and glucose tolerance. Islet size was decreased, with no discernible change in islet number. The beneficial effects of the Lys(37) short-linker peptide were similar to or better than either exenatide or liraglutide, another GLP-1-R agonist. In conclusion, GLP-1 peptides conjugated to an ATIII binding carrier pentasaccharide have a substantially prolonged bioactive profile compatible for possible once-weekly treatment of type 2 diabetes in humans. PMID:26059252

  8. Coinfusion of low-dose GLP-1 and glucagon in man results in a reduction in food intake.

    PubMed

    Cegla, Jaimini; Troke, Rachel C; Jones, Ben; Tharakan, George; Kenkre, Julia; McCullough, Katherine A; Lim, Chung Thong; Parvizi, Nassim; Hussein, Mohamed; Chambers, Edward S; Minnion, James; Cuenco, Joyceline; Ghatei, Mohammad A; Meeran, Karim; Tan, Tricia M; Bloom, Stephen R

    2014-11-01

    Obesity is a growing epidemic, and current medical therapies have proven inadequate. Endogenous satiety hormones provide an attractive target for the development of drugs that aim to cause effective weight loss with minimal side effects. Both glucagon and GLP-1 reduce appetite and cause weight loss. Additionally, glucagon increases energy expenditure. We hypothesized that the combination of both peptides, administered at doses that are individually subanorectic, would reduce appetite, while GLP-1 would protect against the hyperglycemic effect of glucagon. In this double-blind crossover study, subanorectic doses of each peptide alone, both peptides in combination, or placebo was infused into 13 human volunteers for 120 min. An ad libitum meal was provided after 90 min, and calorie intake determined. Resting energy expenditure was measured by indirect calorimetry at baseline and during infusion. Glucagon or GLP-1, given individually at subanorectic doses, did not significantly reduce food intake. Coinfusion at the same doses led to a significant reduction in food intake of 13%. Furthermore, the addition of GLP-1 protected against glucagon-induced hyperglycemia, and an increase in energy expenditure of 53 kcal/day was seen on coinfusion. These observations support the concept of GLP-1 and glucagon dual agonism as a possible treatment for obesity and diabetes. PMID:24939425

  9. Protective effect of rhGLP-1 (7-36) on brain ischemia/reperfusion damage in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Libo; Xu, Jia; Wang, Qian; Qian, Zhonglian; Feng, Wanyu; Yin, Xiaoxing; Fang, Yi

    2015-03-30

    In recent years, GLP-1 and its analogs have been developed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. It has been reported that stimulating the GLP-1 receptor can protect neurons against metabolic and oxidative insults, and therefore can be used in the treatment of stroke and Parkinson׳s disease. The present study aimed to examine the neuroprotective effects of rhGLP-1 (7-36) and its possible mechanisms against acute ischemia/reperfusion injuries induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in diabetic rats. The type 2 diabetic rat model was established by a combination of a high-fat diet and low-dose streptozotocin (STZ). RhGLP-1 (7-36) (20, 40, 80μg/kg) was given intraperitoneally before reperfusion. The neuroprotective effects of rhGLP-1 (7-36) were evaluated by changes in neurological deficit scores and 2,3,5-Triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining. Changes in blood glucose were used to assess hypoglycemic effects. The content of malondialdehyde (MDA) and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX), inducible nitric oxide syntheses (iNOS) and endothelial nitric oxide syntheses (eNOS) after MCAO/R administration (2h and 46h) were examined to investigate the possible mechanisms of RhGLP-1 (7-36). Haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining was used for histopathological observation. Compared with the control group, rhGLP-1 (7-36)-treated groups decreased nerve function deficiency scores; significantly reduced infarction volume percentage, MDA, iNOS and blood glucose; and significantly increased SOD, GSH-PX and eNOS. In addition, rhGLP-1 (7-36) groups enhanced the density of surviving neurons and increased vascular proliferation. The current study suggests a neuroprotective effect of rhGLP-1 (7-36) in diabetic MCAO/R rats since anti-oxidative and anti-nitrosative stress effects can contribute to beneficial effects against ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:25601009

  10. Update: improvement strategies for peptide receptor scintigraphy and radionuclide therapy.

    PubMed

    de Visser, Monique; Verwijnen, Suzanne M; de Jong, Marion

    2008-04-01

    Somatostatin receptor-targeting peptides are widely used for the imaging and therapy of neuroendocrine tumors. Peptide-receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) in neuroendocrine tumor patients with radiolabeled somatostatin analogs has resulted in symptomatic improvement, prolonged survival, and enhanced quality of life. The side-effects of PRRT are few and mostly mild, certainly when using kidney protective agents. If a more widespread use of PRRT is possible, such therapy might become the therapy of first choice in patients with metastasized or inoperable neuroendocrine gastroenteropancreatic tumors. Yet, much profit can be gained from improving the receptor-targeting strategies available and developing new strategies. This review presents an overview of several options to optimize receptor-targeted imaging and radionuclide therapy. These include the optimization of peptide analogs, increasing the number of receptors on the tumor site, and combining PRRT with other treatment strategies. The development of new peptide analogs with increased receptor-binding affinity and improved stability might lead to a higher accumulation of radioactivity inside tumor cells. Analogs of somatostatin have been widely studied. However, much profit can be gained in improving peptide analogs targeting other tumor-related receptors, including gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) receptors, neurotensin (NT) receptors, cholecystokinin (CCK) receptors, and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptors. Several peptide analogs targeting these receptors are well on their way to clinical utilization. The literature shows that it is possible to increase the receptor density on tumor cells by using different methods, which results in higher binding and internalization rates and thus a higher contrast during peptide-receptor scintigraphy. In PRRT treatment, this would enable the administration of higher therapeutic doses to tumors, which might lead to a higher cure rate in patients. Combinations of radionuclide therapy with other treatment modalities, such as chemotherapy or pretreatment with radiosensitizers, might increase the impact of the treatment. Further, the administration of higher dosages of radioactivity to the patient, enabled by combinations of PRRT with strategies reducing the radiation dose to healthy organs, will improve the outcome of tumor treatment. Also, targeting one or several tumor-specific receptors by using combinations of therapeutic agents, as well as by reducing nontarget uptake of radioactivity, will enlarge the therapeutic window of PRRT. Clinical studies will provide more insight in the effects of combining treatment strategies in cancer patients. PMID:18454684

  11. Stimulation of GLP-1 secretion downstream of the ligand-gated ion channel TRPA1.

    PubMed

    Emery, Edward C; Diakogiannaki, Eleftheria; Gentry, Clive; Psichas, Arianna; Habib, Abdella M; Bevan, Stuart; Fischer, Michael J M; Reimann, Frank; Gribble, Fiona M

    2015-04-01

    Stimulus-coupled incretin secretion from enteroendocrine cells plays a fundamental role in glucose homeostasis and could be targeted for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Here, we investigated the expression and function of transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels in enteroendocrine L cells producing GLP-1. By microarray and quantitative PCR analysis, we identified trpa1 as an L cell-enriched transcript in the small intestine. Calcium imaging of primary L cells and the model cell line GLUTag revealed responses triggered by the TRPA1 agonists allyl-isothiocyanate (mustard oil), carvacrol, and polyunsaturated fatty acids, which were blocked by TRPA1 antagonists. Electrophysiology in GLUTag cells showed that carvacrol induced a current with characteristics typical of TRPA1 and triggered the firing of action potentials. TRPA1 activation caused an increase in GLP-1 secretion from primary murine intestinal cultures and GLUTag cells, an effect that was abolished in cultures from trpa1(-/-) mice or by pharmacological TRPA1 inhibition. These findings present TRPA1 as a novel sensory mechanism in enteroendocrine L cells, coupled to the facilitation of GLP-1 release, which may be exploitable as a target for treating diabetes. PMID:25325736

  12. GLP-1 plays a limited role in improved glycemia shortly after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass: a comparison with intensive lifestyle modification.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Marion L; Wadden, Thomas A; Teff, Karen L; Khan, Zahra F; Carvajal, Raymond; Ritter, Scott; Moore, Reneé H; Chittams, Jesse L; Iagnocco, Alex; Murayama, Kenric; Korus, Gary; Williams, Noel N; Rickels, Michael R

    2015-02-01

    Rapid glycemic improvements following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) are frequently attributed to the enhanced GLP-1 response, but causality remains unclear. To determine the role of GLP-1 in improved glucose tolerance after surgery, we compared glucose and hormonal responses to a liquid meal test in 20 obese participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus who underwent RYGB or nonsurgical intensive lifestyle modification (ILM) (n = 10 per group) before and after equivalent short-term weight reduction. The GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin(9-39)-amide (Ex-9) was administered, in random order and in double-blinded fashion, with saline during two separate visits after equivalent weight loss. Despite the markedly exaggerated GLP-1 response after RYGB, changes in postprandial glucose and insulin responses did not significantly differ between groups, and glucagon secretion was paradoxically augmented after RYGB. Hepatic insulin sensitivity also increased significantly after RYGB. With Ex-9, glucose tolerance deteriorated similarly from the saline condition in both groups, but postprandial insulin release was markedly attenuated after RYGB compared with ILM. GLP-1 exerts important insulinotropic effects after RYGB and ILM, but the enhanced incretin response plays a limited role in improved glycemia shortly after surgery. Instead, enhanced hepatic metabolism, independent of GLP-1 receptor activation, may be more important for early postsurgical glycemic improvements. PMID:25204975

  13. Gastrointestinal actions of glucagon-like peptide-1-based therapies: glycaemic control beyond the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Smits, M M; Tonneijck, L; Muskiet, M H A; Kramer, M H H; Cahen, D L; van Raalte, D H

    2016-03-01

    The gastrointestinal hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) lowers postprandial glucose concentrations by regulating pancreatic islet-cell function, with stimulation of glucose-dependent insulin and suppression of glucagon secretion. In addition to endocrine pancreatic effects, mounting evidence suggests that several gastrointestinal actions of GLP-1 are at least as important for glucose-lowering. GLP-1 reduces gastric emptying rate and small bowel motility, thereby delaying glucose absorption and decreasing postprandial glucose excursions. Furthermore, it has been suggested that GLP-1 directly stimulates hepatic glucose uptake, and suppresses hepatic glucose production, thereby adding to reduction of fasting and postprandial glucose levels. GLP-1 receptor agonists, which mimic the effects of GLP-1, have been developed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Based on their pharmacokinetic profile, GLP-1 receptor agonists can be broadly categorized as short- or long-acting, with each having unique islet-cell and gastrointestinal effects that lower glucose levels. Short-acting agonists predominantly lower postprandial glucose excursions, by inhibiting gastric emptying and intestinal glucose uptake, with little effect on insulin secretion. By contrast, long-acting agonists mainly reduce fasting glucose levels, predominantly by increased insulin and reduced glucagon secretion, with potential additional direct inhibitory effects on hepatic glucose production. Understanding these pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic differences may allow personalized antihyperglycaemic therapy in type 2 diabetes. In addition, it may provide the rationale to explore treatment in patients with no or little residual ?-cell function. PMID:26500045

  14. GLP-1 secretion is stimulated by 1,10-phenanthroline via colocalized T2R5 signal transduction in human enteroendocrine L cell.

    PubMed

    Park, Jiyoung; Kim, Ki-Suk; Kim, Kang-Hoon; Lee, In-Seung; Jeong, Hyeon-soo; Kim, Yumi; Jang, Hyeung-Jin

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) hormone is known to regulate blood glucose by an insulinotropic effect and increases proliferation as and also prevents apoptosis of pancreatic β cells. We know that GLP-1 is secreted by nutrients such as fatty acids and sweet compounds but also bitter compounds via stimulation of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the gut. Among these, bitter compounds are multiply-contained in phytochemicals or artificial materials and perceived as ligands of various bitter taste receptors. We hypothesized that GLP-1 hormone is secreted through stimulation of a single bitter taste receptor by 1,10-phenanthroline which is known agonist of taste receptor type 2 member 5 (T2R5). To prove this hypothesis, we used the representatively well-known 1,10-phenanthroline as ligand of single receptor and evaluated the existence of T2R5 by double-labeling immunofluorescence and then 1,10-phenanthroline is able to secrete GLP-1 hormone through stimulation of T2R5 in human enteroendocrine cells. Consequently, we verify that GLP-1 hormone is colocalized with T2R5 in the human duodenum and ileum tissue and is secreted by 1,10-phenanthroline via T2R5 signal transduction in differentiated human enteroendocrine L cells. PMID:26505793

  15. Discovery of (S)-2-Cyclopentyl-N-((1-isopropylpyrrolidin2-yl)-9-methyl-1-oxo-2,9-dihydro-1H-pyrrido[3,4-b]indole-4-carboxamide (VU0453379): A Novel, CNS Penetrant Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Receptor (GLP-1R) Positive Allosteric Modulator (PAM)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A duplexed, functional multiaddition high throughput screen and subsequent iterative parallel synthesis effort identified the first highly selective and CNS penetrant glucagon-like peptide-1R (GLP-1R) positive allosteric modulator (PAM). PAM (S)-9b potentiated low-dose exenatide to augment insulin secretion in primary mouse pancreatic islets, and (S)-9b alone was effective in potentiating endogenous GLP-1R to reverse haloperidol-induced catalepsy. PMID:25423411

  16. Basal insulin combined incretin mimetic therapy with glucagon-like protein 1 receptor agonists as an upcoming option in the treatment of type 2 diabetes: a practical guide to decision making

    PubMed Central

    Fleischmann, Holger

    2014-01-01

    The combination of basal insulin and glucagon-like protein 1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) is a new intriguing therapeutic option for patients with type 2 diabetes. In our daily practice we abbreviate this therapeutic concept with the term BIT (basal insulin combined incretin mimetic therapy) in a certain analogy to BOT (basal insulin supported oral therapy). In most cases BIT is indeed an extension of BOT, if fasting, prandial or postprandial blood glucose values have not reached the target range. In our paper we discuss special features of combinations of short- or prandial-acting and long- or continuous-acting GLP-1 RAs like exenatide, lixisenatide and liraglutide with basal insulin in relation to different glycemic targets. Overall it seems appropriate to use a short-acting GLP-1 RA if, after the near normalization of fasting blood glucose with BOT, the prandial or postprandial values are elevated. A long-acting GLP-1 RA might well be given, if fasting blood glucose values are the problem. Based on pathophysiological findings, recent clinical studies and our experience with BIT and BOT as well as BOTplus we developed chart-supported algorithms for decision making, including features and conditions of patients. The development of these practical tools was guided by the need for a more individualized antidiabetic therapy and the availability of the new BIT principle. PMID:25419451

  17. Extending residence time and stability of peptides by Protected Graft Copolymer (PGC) excipient: GLP-1 example

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Gerardo M.; Reichstetter, Sandra; Bolotin, Elijah M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to determine whether a Protected Graft Copolymer (PGC) containing fatty acid can be used as a stabilizing excipient for GLP-1 and whether PGC/GLP-1 given once a week can be an effective treatment for diabetes. Methods To create a PGC excipient, polylysine was grafted with methoxypolyethyleneglycol and fatty acid at the epsilon amino groups. We performed evaluation of 1) the binding of excipient to GLP-1, 2) the DPP IV sensitivity of GLP-1 formulated with PGC as the excipient, 3) the in vitro bio-activity of excipient-formulated GLP-1, 4) the in vivo pharmacokinetics of excipient-formulated GLP-1, and 5) the efficacy of the excipient-formulated GLP-1 in diabetic rats. Results We showed reproducible synthesis of PGC excipient, showed high affinity binding of PGC to GLP-1, slowed protease degradation of excipient-formulated GLP-1, and showed that excipient-formulated GLP-1 induced calcium influx in INS cells. Excipient-formulated GLP-1 stays in the blood for at least 4 days. When excipient-formulated GLP-1 was given subcutaneously once a week to diabetic ZDF rats, a significant reduction of HbA1c compared to control was observed. The reduction is similar to diabetic ZDF rats given exendin twice a day. Conclusions PGC can be an ideal in vivo stabilizing excipient for biologically labile peptides. PMID:21830140

  18. Glucagon-like receptor 1 agonists and DPP-4 inhibitors: potential therapies for the treatment of stroke.

    PubMed

    Darsalia, Vladimer; Larsson, Martin; Nathanson, David; Klein, Thomas; Nyström, Thomas; Patrone, Cesare

    2015-05-01

    During the past decades, candidate drugs that have shown neuroprotective efficacy in the preclinical setting have failed in clinical stroke trials. As a result, no treatment for stroke based on neuroprotection is available today. The activation of the glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1) for reducing stroke damage is a relatively novel concept that has shown neuroprotective effects in animal models. In addition, clinical studies are currently ongoing. Herein, we review this emerging research field and discuss the next milestones to be achieved to develop a novel antistroke therapy. PMID:25669907

  19. Clinical use of GLP-1 agonists and DPP4 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tuch, Bernard E

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a growing problem, with 387 million people currently affected, and 592 million by 2035. Whilst diet and exercise are the corner stones of treatment, oral hypoglycaemic agents are often needed to achieve glycaemic control, thereby reducing the chance of long term diabetic complications. Biguanides and sulfonylureas have been the standard tablets used for this disorder, until 2005-7 when glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4) inhibitors became available. Their major advantage over sulfonylureas is that they are weight lowering or weight neutral, and have a very low incidence of hypoglycaemia. GLP-1 agonists are injectables, whereas the DPP4 inhibitors are administered orally. Both agents are best used in combination with other hypoglycaemic medication, especially metformin and sodium glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibtors. Usage is increasing, being roughly equal to that of sulfonylureas, but less than that of metformin. Side effects appear to be minimal. PMID:26138513

  20. Bile acid sequestrants in type 2 diabetes: potential effects on GLP1 secretion.

    PubMed

    Sonne, David P; Hansen, Morten; Knop, Filip K

    2014-08-01

    Bile acid sequestrants have been used for decades for the treatment of hypercholesterolaemia. Sequestering of bile acids in the intestinal lumen interrupts enterohepatic recirculation of bile acids, which initiate feedback mechanisms on the conversion of cholesterol into bile acids in the liver, thereby lowering cholesterol concentrations in the circulation. In the early 1990s, it was observed that bile acid sequestrants improved glycaemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Subsequently, several studies confirmed the finding and recently - despite elusive mechanisms of action - bile acid sequestrants have been approved in the USA for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Nowadays, bile acids are no longer labelled as simple detergents necessary for lipid digestion and absorption, but are increasingly recognised as metabolic regulators. They are potent hormones, work as signalling molecules on nuclear receptors and G protein-coupled receptors and trigger a myriad of signalling pathways in many target organs. The most described and well-known receptors activated by bile acids are the farnesoid X receptor (nuclear receptor) and the G protein-coupled cell membrane receptor TGR5. Besides controlling bile acid metabolism, these receptors are implicated in lipid, glucose and energy metabolism. Interestingly, activation of TGR5 on enteroendocrine L cells has been suggested to affect secretion of incretin hormones, particularly glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1 (GCG)). This review discusses the role of bile acid sequestrants in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, the possible mechanism of action and the role of bile acid-induced secretion of GLP1 via activation of TGR5. PMID:24760535

  1. Changes in hypothalamic neurotransmitter and prostanoid levels in response to NMDA, CRF, and GLP-1 stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Fumio; Tachi, Masahiko; Gosho, Masahiko; Fukayama, Minoru; Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Okada, Shoshiro

    2015-07-01

    Determination of neuroactive substances, such as neurotransmitters and prostanoids, in the extracellular space of the living brain is a very important technique in neuroscience. The hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) is one of the most important autonomic control centers in the brain. Recently, we demonstrated that thromboxane (Tx) A2 in the PVN may play an important role in adrenomedullary outflow evoked by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF), and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) stimulation using microdialysis sampling and liquid chromatography-ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ITMS(n)). In the present study, we investigated whether centrally administered NMDA, CRF, and GLP-1 can release five neurotransmitters, acetylcholine (ACh), histamine, glutamate (Glu), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and serotonin (5-HT), along with six prostanoids, TxB2, prostaglandin (PG) E2, PGD2, 15-deoxy-∆(12,14) (15d)-PGJ2, 6-keto-PGF1α, and PGF2α in rat PVN microdialysates after optimization of LC-ITMS(n) conditions . All stimulations increased the levels of 5-HT, TxB2, PGE2, and PGF2α (except for 5-HT stimulated with GLP-1). Only NMDA increased the levels of ACh, Glu, and GABA. Treatment with dizocilpine maleate (MK-801), a noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist, attenuated the NMDA-induced increase in the levels of neuroactive substances except for Glu. This is the first study to use LC-ITMS(n) to analyze neurotransmitters and prostanoids in the same microdialysates from rat PVN. PMID:25633219

  2. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists in the treatment of type 2 diabetes: Past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay; Baruah, Manash P; Sahay, Rakesh K; Unnikrishnan, Ambika Gopalakrishnan; Uppal, Shweta; Adetunji, Omolara

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-based therapy improves glycaemic control through multiple mechanisms, with a low risk of hypoglycaemia and the additional benefit of clinically relevant weight loss. Since Starling and Bayliss first proposed the existence of intestinal secretions that stimulate the pancreas, tremendous progress has been made in the area of incretins. As a number of GLP-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) continue to become available, physicians will soon face the challenge of selecting the right option customized to their patient's needs. The following discussion, derived from an extensive literature search using the PubMed database, applying the terms incretin, GLP-1, exenatide, liraglutide, albiglutide, dulaglutide, lixisenatide, semaglutide, and taspoglutide, provides a comprehensive review of existing and upcoming molecules in the GLP-1 RA class in terms of their structure, pharmacological profiles, efficacy, safety, and convenience. Search Methodology: A literature search was conducted using the PubMed database, applying the terms incretin, GLP-1, exenatide, liraglutide, albiglutide, dulaglutide, lixisenatide, semaglutide, and taspoglutide. Relevant articles were those that discussed structural, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic differences, classification, long-acting and short-acting GLP-1 RAs, phase 3 trials, and expert opinions. Additional targeted searches were conducted on diabetes treatment guidelines and reviews on safety, as well as the American Diabetes Association/European Society for Study of Diabetes (ADA/EASD) statement on pancreatic safety. PMID:27042424

  3. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists in the treatment of type 2 diabetes: Past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Baruah, Manash P.; Sahay, Rakesh K.; Unnikrishnan, Ambika Gopalakrishnan; Uppal, Shweta; Adetunji, Omolara

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)–based therapy improves glycaemic control through multiple mechanisms, with a low risk of hypoglycaemia and the additional benefit of clinically relevant weight loss. Since Starling and Bayliss first proposed the existence of intestinal secretions that stimulate the pancreas, tremendous progress has been made in the area of incretins. As a number of GLP-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) continue to become available, physicians will soon face the challenge of selecting the right option customized to their patient's needs. The following discussion, derived from an extensive literature search using the PubMed database, applying the terms incretin, GLP-1, exenatide, liraglutide, albiglutide, dulaglutide, lixisenatide, semaglutide, and taspoglutide, provides a comprehensive review of existing and upcoming molecules in the GLP-1 RA class in terms of their structure, pharmacological profiles, efficacy, safety, and convenience. Search Methodology: A literature search was conducted using the PubMed database, applying the terms incretin, GLP-1, exenatide, liraglutide, albiglutide, dulaglutide, lixisenatide, semaglutide, and taspoglutide. Relevant articles were those that discussed structural, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic differences, classification, long-acting and short-acting GLP-1 RAs, phase 3 trials, and expert opinions. Additional targeted searches were conducted on diabetes treatment guidelines and reviews on safety, as well as the American Diabetes Association/European Society for Study of Diabetes (ADA/EASD) statement on pancreatic safety. PMID:27042424

  4. GLP-1(28-36)amide, a Long Ignored Peptide Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bilan; Ji, Kaige; Peng, Anlin; Yang, Xin; Huang, Kun

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), which has been extensively applied for treating type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), is an incretin hormone that regulates glucose homeostasis. GLP-1(28-36)amide, a C-terminal nonapeptide (FIAWLVKGRamide) of GLP-1, is a major product derived from the cleavage of GLP-1 by the neutral endopeptidase (NEP). GLP-1(28-36)amide has long been regarded as a metabolically inactive byproduct, however, recent findings reveal that GLP-1(28-36)amide plays multiple novel roles in ameliorating hepatic metabolism, protecting β cells, improving glucose disposal and inhibiting weight gain. Here, we summarize the latest progress on the effects of GLP-1(28-36)amide with a focus on its roles in regulating the Wnt and mitochondrial-mediated signaling pathways. PMID:25598850

  5. Palmitic acid acutely inhibits acetylcholine- but not GLP-1-stimulated insulin secretion in mouse pancreatic islets

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Wei; Vinogradov, Sergei A.; Wilson, David F.; Matschinsky, Franz M.

    2010-01-01

    Fatty acids, acetylcholine, and GLP-1 enhance insulin secretion in a glucose-dependent manner. However, the interplay between glucose, fatty acids, and the neuroendocrine regulators of insulin secretion is not well understood. Therefore, we studied the acute effects of PA (alone or in combination with glucose, acetylcholine, or GLP-1) on isolated cultured mouse islets. Two different sets of experiments were designed. In one, a fixed concentration of 0.5 mM of PA bound to 0.15 mM BSA was used; in the other, a PA ramp from 0 to 0.5 mM was applied at a fixed albumin concentration of 0.15 mM so that the molar PA/BSA ratio changed within the physiological range. At a fixed concentration of 0.5 mM, PA markedly inhibited acetylcholine-stimulated insulin release, the rise of intracellular Ca2+, and enhancement of cAMP production but did not influence the effects of GLP-1 on these parameters of islet cell function. 2-ADB, an IP3 receptor inhibitor, reduced the effect of acetylcholine on insulin secretion and reversed the effect of PA on acetylcholine-stimulated insulin release. Islet perfusion for 35–40 min with 0.5 mM PA significantly reduced the calcium storage capacity of ER measured by the thapsigargin-induced Ca2+ release. Oxygen consumption due to low but not high glucose was reduced by PA. When a PA ramp from 0 to 0.5 mM was applied in the presence of 8 mM glucose, PA at concentrations as low as 50 μM significantly augmented glucose-stimulated insulin release and markedly reduced acetylcholine's effects on hormone secretion. We thus demonstrate that PA acutely reduces the total oxygen consumption response to glucose, glucose-dependent acetylcholine stimulation of insulin release, Ca2+, and cAMP metabolism, whereas GLP-1's actions on these parameters remain unaffected or potentiated. We speculate that acute emptying of the ER calcium by PA results in decreased glucose stimulation of respiration and acetylcholine potentiation of insulin secretion. PMID:20606076

  6. Dissociation of GLP-1 and insulin association with food processing in the brain: GLP-1 sensitivity despite insulin resistance in obese humans

    PubMed Central

    Heni, Martin; Kullmann, Stephanie; Gallwitz, Baptist; Hring, Hans-Ulrich; Preissl, Hubert; Fritsche, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Objective Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is released into the bloodstream after food intake. In addition to stimulating insulin release, it causes satiety and contributes to the termination of food intake. In this study, we investigated whether endogenous GLP-1 affects food-related brain activity and hunger. Methods Twenty-four volunteers (12 lean; 12 obese) underwent a 75g oral glucose tolerance test that promotes GLP-1 secretion. Food cue-induced brain activity was assessed by functional magnetic resonance imaging and GLP-1 concentrations were measured before, 30, and 120min after glucose intake. Results The significant increase in GLP-1 levels negatively correlated with a change in the food cue-induced brain activity in the orbitofrontal cortex, a major reward area. This association was independent of simultaneous alterations in insulin and glucose concentrations. The association was present in lean and overweight participants. By contrast, postprandial insulin changes were associated with orbitofrontal activations in lean individuals only. Conclusions The postprandial release of GLP-1 might alter reward processes in the orbitofrontal cortex and might thereby support the termination of food intake and reduce hunger. While obese persons showed brain insulin resistance, no GLP-1 resistance was observed. Our study provides novel insight into the central regulation of food intake by the incretin hormone GLP-1. PMID:26909313

  7. Engineering a long-acting, potent GLP-1 analog for microstructure-based transdermal delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Peng-Yu; Zou, Huafei; Chao, Elizabeth; Sherwood, Lance; Nunez, Vanessa; Keeney, Michael; Ghartey-Tagoe, Esi; Ding, Zhongli; Quirino, Herlinda; Luo, Xiaozhou; Welzel, Gus; Chen, Guohua; Singh, Parminder; Woods, Ashley K.; Schultz, Peter G.; Shen, Weijun

    2016-01-01

    Antidiabetic treatments aiming to reduce body weight are currently gaining increased interest. Exendin-4, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist administered twice daily via s.c. injection, improves glycemic control, often with associated weight reduction. To further improve the therapeutic efficacy of exendin-4, we have developed a novel peptide engineering strategy that incorporates a serum protein binding motif onto a covalent side-chain staple and applied to the peptide to enhance its helicity and, as a consequence, its potency and serum half-life. We demonstrated that one of the resulting peptides, E6, has significantly improved half-life and glucose tolerance in an oral glucose tolerance test in rodents. Chronic treatment of E6 significantly decreased body weight and fasting blood glucose, improved lipid metabolism, and also reduced hepatic steatosis in diet-induced obese mice. Moreover, the high potency of E6 allowed us to administer this peptide using a dissolvable microstructure-based transdermal delivery system. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies in guinea pigs showed that a single 5-min application of a microstructure system containing E6 significantly improved glucose tolerance for 96 h. This delivery strategy may offer an effective and patient-friendly alternative to currently marketed GLP-1 injectables and can likely be extended to other peptide hormones. PMID:27035989

  8. Loss of Cyp8b1 improves glucose homeostasis by increasing GLP-1.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Achint; Patankar, Jay V; de Haan, Willeke; Ruddle, Piers; Wijesekara, Nadeeja; Groen, Albert K; Verchere, C Bruce; Singaraja, Roshni R; Hayden, Michael R

    2015-04-01

    Besides their role in facilitating lipid absorption, bile acids are increasingly being recognized as signaling molecules that activate cell-signaling receptors. Targeted disruption of the sterol 12α-hydroxylase gene (Cyp8b1) results in complete absence of cholic acid (CA) and its derivatives. Here we investigate the effect of Cyp8b1 deletion on glucose homeostasis. Absence of Cyp8b1 results in improved glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, and β-cell function, mediated by absence of CA in Cyp8b1(-/-) mice. In addition, we show that reduced intestinal fat absorption in the absence of biliary CA leads to increased free fatty acids reaching the ileal L cells. This correlates with increased secretion of the incretin hormone GLP-1. GLP-1, in turn, increases the biosynthesis and secretion of insulin from β-cells, leading to the improved glucose tolerance observed in the Cyp8b1(-/-) mice. Thus, our data elucidate the importance of Cyp8b1 inhibition on the regulation of glucose metabolism. PMID:25338812

  9. Co-culture of clonal beta cells with GLP-1 and glucagon-secreting cell line impacts on beta cell insulin secretion, proliferation and susceptibility to cytotoxins.

    PubMed

    Green, Alastair D; Vasu, Srividya; Moffett, R Charlotte; Flatt, Peter R

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the direct effects on insulin releasing MIN6 cells of chronic exposure to GLP-1, glucagon or a combination of both peptides secreted from GLUTag L-cell and αTC1.9 alpha-cell lines in co-culture. MIN6, GLUTag and αTC1.9 cell lines exhibited high cellular hormone content and release of insulin, GLP-1 and glucagon, respectively. Co-culture of MIN6 cells with GLUTag cells significantly increased cellular insulin content, beta-cell proliferation, insulin secretory responses to a range of established secretogogues and afforded protection against exposure cytotoxic concentrations of glucose, lipid, streptozotocin or cytokines. Benefits of co-culture of MIN6 cells with αTC1.9 alphacells were limited to enhanced beta-cell proliferation with marginal positive actions on both insulin secretion and cellular protection. In contrast, co-culture of MIN6 with GLUTag cells plus αTC1.9 cells, markedly enhanced both insulin secretory responses and protection against beta-cell toxins compared with co-culture with GLUTag cells alone. These data indicate important long-term effects of conjoint GLP-1 and glucagon exposure on beta-cell function. This illustrates the possible functional significance of alpha-cell GLP-1 production as well as direct beneficial effects of dual agonism at beta-cell GLP-1 and glucagon receptors. PMID:27015674

  10. Beneficial metabolic effects of a probiotic via butyrate-induced GLP-1 hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Hariom; Lee, Ji-Hyeon; Lloyd, John; Walter, Peter; Rane, Sushil G

    2013-08-30

    Obesity and diabetes are associated with excess caloric intake and reduced energy expenditure resulting in a negative energy balance. The incidence of diabetes has reached epidemic proportions, and childhood diabetes and obesity are increasing alarmingly. Therefore, it is important to develop safe, easily deliverable, and economically viable treatment alternatives for these diseases. Here, we provide data supporting the candidacy of probiotics as such a therapeutic modality against obesity and diabetes. Probiotics are live bacteria that colonize the gastrointestinal tract and impart beneficial effects for health. However, their widespread prescription as medical therapies is limited primarily because of the paucity of our understanding of their mechanism of action. Here, we demonstrate that the administration of a probiotic, VSL#3, prevented and treated obesity and diabetes in several mouse models. VSL#3 suppressed body weight gain and insulin resistance via modulation of the gut flora composition. VSL#3 promoted the release of the hormone GLP-1, resulting in reduced food intake and improved glucose tolerance. The VSL#3-induced changes were associated with an increase in the levels of a short chain fatty acid (SCFA), butyrate. Using a cell culture system, we demonstrate that butyrate stimulated the release of GLP-1 from intestinal L-cells, thereby providing a plausible mechanism for VSL#3 action. These findings suggest that probiotics such as VSL#3 can modulate the gut microbiota-SCFA-hormone axis. Moreover, our results indicate that probiotics are of potential therapeutic utility to counter obesity and diabetes. PMID:23836895

  11. Beneficial Metabolic Effects of a Probiotic via Butyrate-induced GLP-1 Hormone Secretion*

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Hariom; Lee, Ji-Hyeon; Lloyd, John; Walter, Peter; Rane, Sushil G.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and diabetes are associated with excess caloric intake and reduced energy expenditure resulting in a negative energy balance. The incidence of diabetes has reached epidemic proportions, and childhood diabetes and obesity are increasing alarmingly. Therefore, it is important to develop safe, easily deliverable, and economically viable treatment alternatives for these diseases. Here, we provide data supporting the candidacy of probiotics as such a therapeutic modality against obesity and diabetes. Probiotics are live bacteria that colonize the gastrointestinal tract and impart beneficial effects for health. However, their widespread prescription as medical therapies is limited primarily because of the paucity of our understanding of their mechanism of action. Here, we demonstrate that the administration of a probiotic, VSL#3, prevented and treated obesity and diabetes in several mouse models. VSL#3 suppressed body weight gain and insulin resistance via modulation of the gut flora composition. VSL#3 promoted the release of the hormone GLP-1, resulting in reduced food intake and improved glucose tolerance. The VSL#3-induced changes were associated with an increase in the levels of a short chain fatty acid (SCFA), butyrate. Using a cell culture system, we demonstrate that butyrate stimulated the release of GLP-1 from intestinal L-cells, thereby providing a plausible mechanism for VSL#3 action. These findings suggest that probiotics such as VSL#3 can modulate the gut microbiota-SCFA-hormone axis. Moreover, our results indicate that probiotics are of potential therapeutic utility to counter obesity and diabetes. PMID:23836895

  12. GLP-1 Increases Preovulatory LH Source and the Number of Mature Follicles, As Well As Synchronizing the Onset of Puberty in Female Rats.

    PubMed

    Outeiriño-Iglesias, Verónica; Romaní-Pérez, Marina; González-Matías, Lucas C; Vigo, Eva; Mallo, Federico

    2015-11-01

    Control of estrous cycle and reproductive capacity involves a large number of central and peripheral factors, integrating numerous nutritional and metabolic signals. Here we show that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a peptide with anorexigenic and insulinotropic actions, and the GLP-1 receptor agonist Exendin-4 (Ex4) exert a regulatory influence on the gonadal axis, in both adult and prepubertal female rats. In adult rats, Glp-1 receptor expression varies during the estrous cycle at the hypothalamus, pituitary, and ovary. Furthermore, acute treatment with GLP-1 in the morning proestrus doubled the amplitude of the preovulatory LH surge, as well as influencing estradiol and progesterone levels along the estrous cycle. These changes provoked an important increase in the number of Graafian follicles and corpora lutea, as well as in the litter size. Conversely, Ex4 diminished the levels of LH, later producing a partial blockade at the preovulatory surge, yet not affecting either the number of mature follicles or corpora lutea. Chronic administration of low doses of GLP-1 to prepubertal rats synchronized vaginal opening and increased LH levels on the 35th day of life, yet at these doses it did not modify their body weight, food intake, or ovarian and uterine weight. By contrast, chronic exposure to Ex4 produced a significant reduction in ovarian and uterine weight, and serum LH, and the animals treated chronically with Ex4 showed no vaginal opening in the period studied. Overall, our results demonstrate that GLP-1 and Ex4 act on the gonadal axis, involving the hypothalamic kisspeptin system, to influence reproductive efficiency in female rats. PMID:26252058

  13. Pathogenesis and management of postprandial hyperglycemia: role of incretin-based therapies

    PubMed Central

    Gerich, John

    2013-01-01

    Postprandial plasma glucose concentrations are an important contributor to glycemic control. There is evidence suggesting that postprandial hyperglycemia may be an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are antidiabetic agents that predominantly reduce postprandial plasma glucose levels. DPP-4 inhibitors are associated with fewer gastrointestinal side effects than GLP-1 receptor agonists and are administered orally, unlike GLP-1 analogs, which are administered as subcutaneous injections. GLP-1 receptor agonists are somewhat more effective than DPP-4 inhibitors in reducing postprandial plasma glucose and are usually associated with significant weight loss. For these reasons, GLP-1 receptor agonists are generally preferred over DPP-4 inhibitors as part of combination treatment regimens in patients with glycated hemoglobin levels above 8.0%. This article reviews the pathogenesis of postprandial hyperglycemia, the mechanisms by which GLP-1 receptor agonists and DPP-4 inhibitors reduce postprandial plasma glucose concentrations, and the results of recent clinical trials (ie, published 2008 to October 2012) that evaluated the effects of these agents on postprandial plasma glucose levels when evaluated as monotherapy compared with placebo or as add-on therapy to metformin, a sulfonylurea, or insulin. Findings from recent clinical studies suggest that both GLP-1 receptor agonists and DPP-4 inhibitors could become valuable treatment options for optimizing glycemic control in patients unable to achieve glycated hemoglobin goals on basal insulin, with the added benefits of weight loss and a low risk of hypoglycemia. PMID:24403842

  14. Blood pressure-lowering effects of incretin-based diabetes therapies.

    PubMed

    Lovshin, Julie A; Zinman, Bernard

    2014-10-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1) agonists and dipeptidyl-peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are therapies that are used to treat hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Although both of these medication types primarily lower prandial and fasting blood glucose levels by enhanced GLP-1 receptor signalling, they have distinct mechanisms of action. Whereas DPP-4 inhibitors boost patient levels of endogenously produced GLP-1 (and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide) by preventing its metabolism by DPP-4 enzymatic activity, GLP-1 receptor agonists are either synthetic analogues of human GLP-1 or exendin-4 based molecules. They are tailored to resist hydrolysis by DPP-4 activity and to provide longer durability in the circulation compared with native GLP-1. Several roles for incretin-based diabetes therapies beyond the endocrine pancreas and their glycemic-lowering properties have now been described, including attenuation of cardiac myocyte injury and reduction in post-ischemic infarction size after cardiovascular insult. Favourable outcomes have also been observed on systolic blood pressure reduction, postprandial intestinal lipoprotein metabolism, endothelial cell function, modulation of innate immune-mediated inflammation and surrogate markers of renal function. As hypertension is an independent risk factor for premature death in patients with type 2 diabetes, potential favourable extrapancreatic actions, particularly within the heart, blood vessels and kidney, for this drug class are of considerable clinical interest. Herein, we highlight and provide critical appraisal of the clinical data supporting the antihypertensive effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists and DPP-4 inhibitors and link possible mechanisms of action to clinical outcomes reported for this drug class. PMID:25284699

  15. GLP-1 stimulates insulin secretion by PKC-dependent TRPM4 and TRPM5 activation.

    PubMed

    Shigeto, Makoto; Ramracheya, Reshma; Tarasov, Andrei I; Cha, Chae Young; Chibalina, Margarita V; Hastoy, Benoit; Philippaert, Koenraad; Reinbothe, Thomas; Rorsman, Nils; Salehi, Albert; Sones, William R; Vergari, Elisa; Weston, Cathryn; Gorelik, Julia; Katsura, Masashi; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O; Vennekens, Rudi; Zaccolo, Manuela; Galione, Antony; Johnson, Paul R V; Kaku, Kohei; Ladds, Graham; Rorsman, Patrik

    2015-12-01

    Strategies aimed at mimicking or enhancing the action of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) therapeutically improve glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS); however, it is not clear whether GLP-1 directly drives insulin secretion in pancreatic islets. Here, we examined the mechanisms by which GLP-1 stimulates insulin secretion in mouse and human islets. We found that GLP-1 enhances GSIS at a half-maximal effective concentration of 0.4 pM. Moreover, we determined that GLP-1 activates PLC, which increases submembrane diacylglycerol and thereby activates PKC, resulting in membrane depolarization and increased action potential firing and subsequent stimulation of insulin secretion. The depolarizing effect of GLP-1 on electrical activity was mimicked by the PKC activator PMA, occurred without activation of PKA, and persisted in the presence of PKA inhibitors, the KATP channel blocker tolbutamide, and the L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker isradipine; however, depolarization was abolished by lowering extracellular Na(+). The PKC-dependent effect of GLP-1 on membrane potential and electrical activity was mediated by activation of Na(+)-permeable TRPM4 and TRPM5 channels by mobilization of intracellular Ca(2+) from thapsigargin-sensitive Ca(2+) stores. Concordantly, GLP-1 effects were negligible in Trpm4 or Trpm5 KO islets. These data provide important insight into the therapeutic action of GLP-1 and suggest that circulating levels of this hormone directly stimulate insulin secretion by β cells. PMID:26571400

  16. Ghrelin regulates GLP-1 production through mTOR signaling in L cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Geyang; Hong, Xiaosi; Tang, Hong; Jiang, Sushi; Liu, Fenting; Shen, Zhemin; Li, Ziru; Zhang, Weizhen

    2015-11-15

    Glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1), an intestinal incretin produced in L-cells and released in response to meal intake, functions to promote insulin secretion and to decrease plasma glucose. Ghrelin is an orexigenic hormone critical for glucose homeostasis. The molecular mechanism by which ghrelin alters GLP-1 production remains largely unknown. Here we showed that ghrelin attenuates GLP-1 production through mTOR signaling. In GHSR1a null mice, ileal mTOR signaling, proglucagon and circulating GLP-1 were significantly increased. Antagonism of the GHSR1a by D-Lys-3-GHRP-6 increased GLP-1 synthesis and release in STC-1 cells. Treatment of STC-1 cells with ghrelin decreased the production of GLP-1. This effect was associated with a significant inhibition of mTOR signaling. Overexpression of ghrelin inhibited proglucagon promoter activity and GLP-1 production. Inhibition of mTOR activity by mTOR siRNA blocked D-Lys-3-GHRP-6 induced GLP-1 production in STC-1 cells. Our results suggest that mTOR signaling mediates the inhibitory effect of ghrelin on GLP-1 production. PMID:26279396

  17. Quantitative trait loci for carbohydrate and total energy intake on mouse chromosome 17: congenic strain confirmation and candidate gene analyses (Glo1, Glp1r).

    PubMed

    Kumar, K Ganesh; Poole, Angela C; York, Barbara; Volaufova, Julia; Zuberi, Aamir; Richards, Brenda K Smith

    2007-01-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) for carbohydrate (Mnic1) and total energy (Kcal2) intake on proximal mouse chromosome 17 were identified previously from a C57BL/6J (B6) X CAST/Ei (CAST) intercross. Here we report that a new congenic strain developed in our laboratory has confirmed this complex locus by recapitulating the original linked phenotypes: B6.CAST-17 homozygous congenic mice consumed more carbohydrate (27%) and total energy (17%) compared with littermate wild-type mice. Positional gene candidates with relevance to carbohydrate metabolism, glyoxalase I (Glo1) and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (Glp1r), were evaluated. Glo1 expression was upregulated in liver and hypothalamus of congenic mice when compared with B6 mice. Analyses of Glp1r mRNA and protein expression revealed tissue-specific strain differences in pancreas (congenic>B6) and stomach (B6>congenic). These results suggest the possibility of separate mechanisms for enhanced insulin synthesis and gastric accommodation in the presence of high carbohydrate intake and larger food volume, respectively. Sequence analysis of Glp1r found a G insert at nt position 1349, which results in earlier termination of the open reading frame, thus revealing an error in the public sequence. Consequently, the predicted length of GLP-1R is 463 aa compared with 489 aa, as previously reported. Also, we found a polymorphism in Glp1r between parental strains that alters the amino acid sequence. Variation in Glp1r could influence nutrient intake in this model through changes in the regulatory or protein coding regions of the gene. These congenic mice offer a powerful tool for investigating gene interactions in the control of food intake. PMID:16946080

  18. Novel fusion of GLP-1 with a domain antibody to serum albumin prolongs protection against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury in the rat

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and its mimetics reduce infarct size in the setting of acute myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. However, the short serum half-life of GLP-1 and its mimetics may limit their therapeutic use in acute myocardial ischemia. Domain antibodies to serum albumin (AlbudAbs) have been developed to extend the serum half-life of short lived therapeutic proteins, peptides and small molecules. In this study, we compared the effect of a long acting GLP-1 agonist, DPP-IV resistant GLP-1 (7–36, A8G) fused to an AlbudAb (GAlbudAb), with the effect of the GLP-1 mimetic, exendin-4 (short half-life GLP-1 agonist) on infarct size following acute myocardial I/R injury. Methods Male Sprague–Dawley rats (8-week-old) were treated with vehicle, GAlbudAb or exendin-4. Myocardial ischemia was induced 2 h following the final dose for GAlbudAb and 30 min post the final dose for exendin-4. In a subgroup of animals, the final dose of exendin-4 was administered (1 μg/kg, SC, bid for 2 days) 6 h prior to myocardial ischemia when plasma exendin-4 was at its minimum concentration (Cmin). Myocardial infarct size, area at risk and cardiac function were determined 24 h after myocardial I/R injury. Results GAlbudAb and exendin-4 significantly reduced myocardial infarct size by 28% and 23% respectively, compared to vehicle (both p < 0.01 vs. vehicle) after I/R injury. Moreover, both GAlbudAb and exendin-4 markedly improved post-ischemic cardiac contractile function. Body weight loss and reduced food intake consistent with the activation of GLP-1 receptors was observed in all treatment groups. However, exendin-4 failed to reduce infarct size when administered 6 h prior to myocardial ischemia, suggesting continuous activation of the GLP-1 receptors is needed for cardioprotection. Conclusions Cardioprotection provided by GAlbudAb, a long acting GLP-1 mimetic, following myocardial I/R injury was comparable in magnitude, but more sustained in duration than that produced by short-acting exendin-4. Very low plasma concentrations of exendin-4 failed to protect the heart from myocardial I/R injury, suggesting that sustained GLP-1 receptor activation plays an important role in providing cardioprotection in the setting of acute myocardial I/R injury. Long-acting GLP-1 agonists such as GAlbudAb may warrant additional evaluation as novel therapeutic agents to reduce myocardial I/R injury during acute coronary syndrome. PMID:24125539

  19. Acute DPP-4 inhibition modulates vascular tone through GLP-1 independent pathways☆

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Zubair; Pineda, Colleen; Kampfrath, Thomas; Maiseyeu, Andrei; Ying, Zhekang; Racoma, Ira; Deiuliis, Jeffrey; Xu, Xiaohua; Sun, Qinghua; Moffatt-Bruce, Susan; Villamena, Frederick; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Evidence from both clinical and experimental studies indicates that Di-peptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-4) inhibition may mediate favorable effects on the cardiovascular system. The objective of this study was to examine the acute effects of DPP-4 inhibition on vascular responses and to study the underlying mechanisms of alteration in tone. Aortic segments from C57BL/6 mice were treated with vasoconstrictors and exposed to various doses of alogliptin, a selective DPP-4 inhibitor. Vasodilator responses were evaluated using pathway specific antagonists to elucidate mechanisms of response. In parallel experiments, cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were exposed to varying concentrations of alogliptin to evaluate the effects on candidate vasodilator pathways. Alogliptin relaxed phenylephrine and U46619 pre-constricted aortic segments in a dose dependent manner. Relaxation responses were not affected by the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor antagonist, exendin fragment 9–39 (88±6 vs. 91±2, p<0.001). Vascular relaxation to alogliptin was significantly decreased by endothelial denudation, L-NG-monomethyl-arginine citrate (L-NMMA) and by the soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor ODQ. DPP-4 inhibition induced relaxation was completely abolished by a combination of L-NMMA, charybdotoxin and apamin. Incubation of HUVECs with alogliptin resulted in eNOS and Akt phosphorylation (Ser1177 and Ser473 respectively) paralleled by a rapid increase in nitric oxide. Inhibition of Src kinase decreased eNOS and Akt phosphorylation, in contrast to a lack of any effect on insulin mediated activation of the eNOS-Akt, suggesting that alogliptin mediates vasodilation through Src kinase mediated effects on eNOS-Akt. DPP-4 inhibition by alogliptin mediates rapid vascular relaxation via GLP-1 independent, Src-Akt-eNOS mediated NO release and the activation of vascular potassium channels. PMID:21397040

  20. Intraportal GLP-1 stimulates insulin secretion predominantly through the hepatoportal-pancreatic vagal reflex pathways.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa, Makoto; Nakabayashi, Hajime; Uehara, Keigo; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Uchida, Kenzo; Koya, Daisuke

    2013-08-01

    We previously reported that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) appearance in the portal vein facilitates hepatic vagal afferent activity, and this further augments reflexively the pancreatic vagal efferents in anesthetized rats, suggesting a neuroincretin effect of GLP-1. To determine whether the GLP-1-induced vagal pathways lead to a neuronal-mediated component (NMC) of insulin secretion, we infused GLP-1 at a physiological or pharmacological dose (1 or 3 pmol·kg(-1)·min(-1), respectively) into the portal vein in conscious rats with selective hepatic vagotomy (Vagox) or sham operation (Sham). The experiments consisted of two sequential 10-min intraportal infusions (P1 and P2): glucose at a physiological rate (56 μmol·kg(-1)·min(-1)) in P1 and the glucose plus GLP-1 or vehicle in P2. Under arterial isoglycemia across the groups, the physiological GLP-1 infusion in Sham augmented promptly and markedly arterial insulin levels, approximately twofold the levels in glucose alone infusion (P < 0.005), and insulin levels in Vagox diminished apparently (P < 0.05). Almost 60% of the GLP-1-induced insulin secretion (AUC) in Sham met the NMC, i.e., difference between insulin secretion in Sham and Vagox, (AUC 976 ± 65 vs. 393 ± 94 pmol·min/l, respectively, P < 0.005). Intraportal pharmacological GLP-1 infusion further augmented insulin secretion in both groups, but the NMC remained in 46% (NS; Sham vs. Vagox). In contrast, "isoglycemic" intravenous GLP-1 infusion (3 pmol·kg(-1)·min(-1)) evoked an equal insulin secretion in both groups. Thus, the present results indicate that GLP-1 appearing in the portal vein evokes a powerful neuronal-mediated insulinotropic effect, suggesting the neuroincretin effect. PMID:23715725

  1. Oral L-glutamine increases active GLP-1 (7-36) amide secretion and improves glycemic control in stretpozotocin-nicotinamide induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Badole, Sachin L; Bagul, Pranita P; Mahamuni, Sagar P; Khose, Rekha D; Joshi, Anuja C; Jangam, Ganesh B; Ghule, Arvindkumar E; Raut, Chandrashekhar G; Khedkar, Vijay M; Coutinho, Evans C

    2013-04-25

    L-glutamine is a non-essential amino acid. It decreased blood sugar, stimulated insulin secretion in type 2 diabetic patients. The objective of the present investigation was to evaluate L-glutamine increases glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) (7-36) amide secretion in streptozotocin-nicotinamide (STZ-NTM) induced diabetic Sprague Dawley rats. Molecular docking study was performed to elucidate the molecular basis for GLP-1 receptor agonistic activity. Type 2 diabetes was induced in overnight fasted Sprague Dawley rats pre-treated with nicotinamide (100 mg/kg, i.p.) followed by 20 min after administration of streptozotocin (55 mg/kg, i.p.). The rats were divided into; I - nondiabetic, II - diabetic control, III - sitagliptin (5 mg/kg, p.o.), IV - L-glutamine (250 mg/kg, p.o.), V - L-glutamine (500 mg/kg, p.o.) and VI - L-glutamine (1000 mg/kg, p.o.). The L-glutamine and sitagliptin treatment was 8 week. Plasma glucose was estimated every week. Body weight, food and water intake were recorded daily. Glycosylated haemoglobin, lipid profile, plasma and colonic active (GLP-1) (7-36) amide, mRNA expression of proglucagon GLP-1, plasma and pancreatic insulin, histology of pancreata and biomarkers of oxidative stress (superoxidase dismutase, reduced glutathione, malondialdehyde, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione S transferase) were measured after 8 week. In acute study, the rats were divided into I - glucose (2.5 g/kg, p.o.), II - sitagliptin (5 mg/kg, p.o.), III - L-glutamine (250 mg/kg, p.o.), IV - L-glutamine (500 mg/kg, p.o.) and V - L-glutamine (1000 mg/kg, p.o.). Plasma glucose, active GLP-1 (7-36) amide concentration and insulin levels were measured after glucose loading. The docking data indicated that l-glutamine bind to the GLP-1 receptor. L-glutamine decreased plasma glucose, increased plasma and pancreatic insulin, increased plasma and colonic active GLP-1 (7-36) amide secretion as well as decreased oxidative stress in streptozotocin-nicotinamide induced diabetic rats. PMID:23466488

  2. Incretin Therapy – Present and Future

    PubMed Central

    Garber, Alan J.

    2011-01-01

    Although newer treatments for type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients have produced continual improvements in outcome, a large and growing population with prediabetes remains under-treated. In the last few years, incretin-based therapies have become an important treatment option for patients with T2D. There are two classes of incretin agents: the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors and the glucagon like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists. The ultimate goal of agents within both of these classes is to increase GLP-1 signaling, which results in augmented glucose-induced insulin secretion, inhibition of glucagon secretion, and decreased appetite. This should result in improved regulation of glucose homeostasis. GLP-1 receptor agonists enable patients to achieve significant weight loss. In contrast, DPP-4 inhibitors result in a less dramatic increase in GLP-1 levels; therefore, they are weight neutral. Incretin therapies are currently recommended for use early in the treatment algorithm for T2D patients whose disease is not manageable by diet and exercise alone, but the potential for these agents may be farther reaching. Current studies are evaluating the potential benefits of combining incretin therapies with basal insulin to provide continuous glucose control before and after meals. In addition, these agents may be promising for patients with prediabetes since they effectively reduce glycosylated hemoglobin levels and fasting plasma glucose levels, enable weight control, and have the potential to preserve β-cell function. Clearly, all of these properties are desirable for patients with prediabetes. PMID:22262069

  3. cAMP-independent effects of GLP-1 on β cells.

    PubMed

    Kolic, Jelena; MacDonald, Patrick E

    2015-12-01

    The ability of glucose to stimulate insulin secretion from the pancreatic islets of Langerhans is enhanced by the intestinal hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), which is secreted from the gut in response to nutrient ingestion. This action, called the incretin effect, accounts for as much as half of the postprandial insulin response and is exploited therapeutically for diabetes treatment through the use of incretin mimetic drugs and inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase 4, which degrades GLP-1. Despite a prominent role for incretin mimetics in diabetes treatment, several key questions remain about GLP-1-induced insulin secretion. Most studies have examined the effects of GLP-1 at concentrations several orders of magnitude higher than those found in vivo; therefore, one might question the physiological (and perhaps even pharmacological) relevance of pathways identified in these studies and whether other important mechanisms might have been obscured. In this issue of the JCI, Shigeto and colleagues demonstrate that physiological GLP-1 does indeed amplify the insulin secretory response. Intriguingly, while much of this response is PKA dependent, as might be expected, the use of picomolar GLP-1 reveals a new and important mechanism that contributes to GLP-1-induced insulin secretion. PMID:26571393

  4. GLP-1R activation for the treatment of stroke: updating and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Darsalia, Vladimer; Nathanson, David; Nyström, Thomas; Klein, Thomas; Sjöholm, Åke; Patrone, Cesare

    2014-09-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of adult disability in Westernized societies with increased incidence along ageing and it represents a major health and economical threat. Inactive lifestyle, smoking, hypertension, atherosclerosis, obesity and diabetes all dramatically increase the risk of stroke. While preventive strategies based on lifestyle changes and risk factor management can delay or decrease the likelihood of having a stroke, post stroke pharmacological strategies aimed at minimizing stroke-induced brain damage are highly needed. Unfortunately, several candidate drugs that have shown significant preclinical neuroprotective efficacy, have failed in clinical trials and no treatment for stroke based on neuroprotection is available today. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is a peptide originating in the enteroendocrine L-cells of the intestine and secreted upon nutrient ingestion. The activation of the GLP-1R by GLP-1 enhances glucose-dependent insulin secretion, suppresses glucagon secretion and exerts multifarious extrapancreatic effects. Stable GLP-1 analogues and inhibitors of the proteolytic enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) (which counteract endogenous GLP-1 degradation) have been developed clinically for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Besides their antidiabetic properties, experimental evidence has shown neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects of GLP-1R agonists and DPP-4 inhibitors in animal models of neurological disorders. Herein, we review recent experimental data on the neuroprotective effects mediated by GLP-1R activation in stroke. Due to the good safety profile of the drugs targeting the GLP-1R, we also discuss the high potential of GLP-1R stimulation in view of developing a safe clinical treatment against stroke based on neuroprotection in both diabetic and non-diabetic patients. PMID:24777909

  5. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor is present in pancreatic acinar cells and regulates amylase secretion through cAMP.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yanan; Ernst, Stephen A; Heidenreich, Kaeli; Williams, John A

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a glucoincretin hormone that can act through its receptor (GLP-1R) on pancreatic β-cells and increase insulin secretion and production. GLP-1R agonists are used clinically to treat type 2 diabetes. GLP-1 may also regulate the exocrine pancreas at multiple levels, including inhibition through the central nervous system, stimulation indirectly through insulin, and stimulation directly on acinar cells. However, it has been unclear whether GLP-1R is present in pancreatic acini and what physiological functions these receptors regulate. In the current study we utilized GLP-1R knockout (KO) mice to study the role of GLP-1R in acinar cells. RNA expression of GLP-1R was detected in acutely isolated pancreatic acini. Acinar cell morphology and expression of digestive enzymes were not affected by loss of GLP-1R. GLP-1 induced amylase secretion in wild-type (WT) acini. In GLP-1R KO mice, this effect was abolished, whereas vasoactive intestinal peptide-induced amylase release in KO acini showed a pattern similar to that in WT acini. GLP-1 stimulated cAMP production and increased protein kinase A-mediated protein phosphorylation in WT acini, and these effects were absent in KO acini. These data show that GLP-1R is present in pancreatic acinar cells and that GLP-1 can regulate secretion through its receptor and cAMP signaling pathway. PMID:26542397

  6. Expression of CTB-10×rolGLP-1 in E. coli and its therapeutic effect on type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tu, Peipei; Ma, Zhihua; Wang, Haisong; Ma, Baicheng; Li, Xiaodan; Duan, Huikun; Jiang, Pingzhe; Li, Miao; Wu, Ri; Zhu, Jianhong; Li, Minggang

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a short peptide that can significantly reduce blood glucose level. Recombination oral long-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 (rolGLP-1), is a GLP-1 analog generated from site-specific mutation of GLP-1. CTB is a non-toxic portion of the cholera toxin and an ideal protein antigen carrier. In this study, we firstly constructed a vector pET-22b (+)-CTB-10×rolGLP-1 to express a fusion protein composed of CTB and ten tandem repeated rolGLP-1 in BL21 (DE3) line of E. coli. The CTB-10×rolGLP-1 was expressed efficiently in the inclusion bodies. The expression product was analyzed by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis and Western blotting. The inclusion bodies were then denatured, refolded and purified by ion exchange chromatography to obtain a high-purity CTB- 10×rolGLP-1. The therapeutic effect of CTB-10×rolGLP-1 was assessed in comparison with 10×rolGLP-1 alone by daily oral-gavage administration up to 10 days in streptozotocin-induced type 2 diabetic mice. The results showed that the level of blood glucose was reduced more effectively and the oral glucose tolerance of mice was improved more significantly with the administration of CTB-10×rolGLP-1. Our results provided a potentially promising oral biological drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:25860067

  7. The effect of exogenous GLP-1 on food intake is lost in male truncally vagotomized subjects with pyloroplasty.

    PubMed

    Plamboeck, Astrid; Veedfald, Simon; Deacon, Carolyn F; Hartmann, Bolette; Wettergren, André; Svendsen, Lars B; Meisner, Søren; Hovendal, Claus; Vilsbøll, Tina; Knop, Filip K; Holst, Jens J

    2013-06-15

    Rapid degradation of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) by dipeptidyl peptidase-4 suggests that endogenous GLP-1 may act locally before being degraded. Signaling via the vagus nerve was investigated in 20 truncally vagotomized subjects with pyloroplasty and 10 matched healthy controls. Subjects received GLP-1 (7-36 amide) or saline infusions during and after a standardized liquid mixed meal and a subsequent ad libitum meal. Despite no effect on appetite sensations, GLP-1 significantly reduced ad libitum food intake in the control group but had no effect in the vagotomized group. Gastric emptying was accelerated in vagotomized subjects and was decreased by GLP-1 in controls but not in vagotomized subjects. Postprandial glucose levels were reduced by the same percentage by GLP-1 in both groups. Peak postprandial GLP-1 levels were approximately fivefold higher in the vagotomized subjects. Insulin secretion was unaffected by exogenous GLP-1 in vagotomized subjects but was suppressed in controls. GLP-1 significantly reduced glucagon secretion in both groups, but levels were approximately twofold higher and were nonsuppressible in the early phase of the meal in vagotomized subjects. Our results demonstrate that vagotomy with pyloroplasty impairs the effects of exogenous GLP-1 on food intake, gastric emptying, and insulin and glucagon secretion, suggesting that intact vagal innervation may be important for GLP-1's actions. PMID:23599045

  8. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) in the gastrointestinal tract of the pheasant (Phasianus colchicus).

    PubMed

    Pirone, Andrea; Ding, Bao An; Giannessi, Elisabetta; Coli, Alessandra; Stornelli, Maria Rita; di Cossato, Margherita Marzoni Fecia; Piano, Ilaria; Lenzi, Carla

    2012-10-01

    The distribution of Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) was investigated in the gastrointestinal tract of the pheasant using immunohistochemistry. GLP-1 immunoreactive cells were common in the small intestine, in the proventriculus and in the pancreas. Immunostained cells were not seen in the crop, in the gizzard and in the large intestine. Double labelling demonstrated that GLP-1 and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) were occasionally co-localized only in the duodenal villi. In contrast to what was previously described in the chicken and ostrich, we noted GLP-1 positive cells in the duodenum. These data were consistent with the presence of proglucagon mRNA in the chicken duodenum. Our findings indicate that GLP-1 might have an inhibitory effect on gastric and crop emptying and on acid secretion also in the pheasant. Moreover, the results of the present research regarding the initial region of the small intestine suggest a further direct mechanism of the GLP-1 release during the early digestion phase and an enhancement of its incretin role. PMID:22036174

  9. Molecular mechanisms of glucose-stimulated GLP-1 secretion from perfused rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Kuhre, Rune E; Frost, Charlotte R; Svendsen, Berit; Holst, Jens J

    2015-02-01

    Glucose is an important stimulus for glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) secretion, but the mechanisms of secretion have not been investigated in integrated physiological models. We studied glucose-stimulated GLP-1 secretion from isolated perfused rat small intestine. Luminal glucose (5% and 20% w/v) stimulated the secretion dose dependently, but vascular glucose was without significant effect at 5, 10, 15, and 25 mmol/L. GLP-1 stimulation by luminal glucose (20%) secretion was blocked by the voltage-gated Ca channel inhibitor, nifedipine, or by hyperpolarization with diazoxide. Luminal administration (20%) of the nonmetabolizable sodium-glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1) substrate, methyl-α-D-glucopyranoside (α-MGP), stimulated release, whereas the SGLT1 inhibitor phloridzin (luminally) abolished responses to α-MGP and glucose. Furthermore, in the absence of luminal NaCl, luminal glucose (20%) did not stimulate a response. Luminal glucose-stimulated GLP-1 secretion was also sensitive to luminal GLUT2 inhibition (phloretin), but in contrast to SGLT1 inhibition, phloretin did not eliminate the response, and luminal glucose (20%) stimulated larger GLP-1 responses than luminal α-MGP in matched concentrations. Glucose transported by GLUT2 may act after metabolization, closing KATP channels similar to sulfonylureas, which also stimulated secretion. Our data indicate that SGLT1 activity is the driving force for glucose-stimulated GLP-1 secretion and that KATP-channel closure is required to stimulate a full-blown glucose-induced response. PMID:25157092

  10. Incretin actions and consequences of incretin-based therapies: lessons from complementary animal models.

    PubMed

    Renner, Simone; Blutke, Andreas; Streckel, Elisabeth; Wanke, Rüdiger; Wolf, Eckhard

    2016-01-01

    The two incretin hormones, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1), were discovered 45 and 30 years ago. Initially, only their insulinotropic effect on pancreatic β cells was known. Over the years, physiological and pharmacological effects of GIP and GLP1 in numerous extrapancreatic tissues were discovered which partially overlap, but may also be specific for GIP or GLP1 in certain target tissues. While the insulinotropic effect of GIP was found to be blunted in patients with type 2 diabetes, the function of GLP1 is preserved and GLP1 receptor agonists and dipeptidyl-peptidase 4 (DPP4) inhibitors, which prolong the half-life of incretins, are widely used in diabetes therapy. Wild-type and genetically modified rodent models have provided important mechanistic insights into the incretin system, but may have limitations in predicting the clinical efficacy and safety of incretin-based therapies. This review summarizes insights from rodent and non-rodent models (pig, non-human primate) into physiological and pharmacological incretin effects, with a focus on the pancreas. Similarities and differences between species are discussed and the increasing potential of genetically engineered pig models for translational incretin research is highlighted. PMID:26455904

  11. Molecular Characterisation of Small Molecule Agonists Effect on the Human Glucagon Like Peptide-1 Receptor Internalisation

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Aiysha; Stephens, Jeffrey W.; Bain, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide receptor (GLP-1R), which is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), signals through both Gαs and Gαq coupled pathways and ERK phosphorylation to stimulate insulin secretion. The aim of this study was to determine molecular details of the effect of small molecule agonists, compounds 2 and B, on GLP-1R mediated cAMP production, intracellular Ca2+ accumulation, ERK phosphorylation and its internalisation. In human GLP-1R (hGLP-1R) expressing cells, compounds 2 and B induced cAMP production but caused no intracellular Ca2+ accumulation, ERK phosphorylation or hGLP-1R internalisation. GLP-1 antagonists Ex(9–39) and JANT-4 and the orthosteric binding site mutation (V36A) in hGLP-1R failed to inhibit compounds 2 and B induced cAMP production, confirming that their binding site distinct from the GLP-1 binding site on GLP-1R. However, K334A mutation of hGLP-1R, which affects Gαs coupling, inhibited GLP-1 as well as compounds 2 and B induced cAMP production, indicating that GLP-1, compounds 2 and B binding induce similar conformational changes in the GLP-1R for Gαs coupling. Additionally, compound 2 or B binding to the hGLP-1R had significantly reduced GLP-1 induced intracellular Ca2+ accumulation, ERK phosphorylation and hGLP-1R internalisation. This study illustrates pharmacology of differential activation of GLP-1R by GLP-1 and compounds 2 and B. PMID:27100083

  12. Intragenic Dominant Suppressors of Glp-1, a Gene Essential for Cell-Signaling in Caenorhabditis Elegans, Support a Role for Cdc10/Sw16/Ankyrin Motifs in Glp-1 Function

    PubMed Central

    Lissemore, J. L.; Currie, P. D.; Turk, C. M.; Maine, E. M.

    1993-01-01

    The glp-1 gene product mediates cell-cell interactions required for cell fate specification during development in Caenorhabditis elegans. To identify genes that interact with glp-1, we screened for dominant suppressors of two temperature-sensitive glp-1 alleles and recovered 18 mutations that suppress both germline and embryonic glp-1 phenotypes. These dominant suppressors are tightly linked to glp-1 and do not bypass the requirement for a distal tip cell, which is thought to be the source of a signal that is received and transduced by the GLP-1 protein. Using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and DNA sequencing, we found that at least 17 suppressors are second-site intragenic revertants. The suppressors, like the original glp-1(ts) mutations, are all located in the cdc10/SWI6/ankyrin domain of GLP-1. cdc10/SWI6/ankyrin motifs have been shown to mediate specific protein-protein interactions in other polypeptides. We propose that the glp-1(ts) mutations disrupt contact between GLP-1 and an as yet unidentified target protein(s) and that the dominant suppressor mutations restore appropriate protein-protein interactions. PMID:8307320

  13. The role of efferent cholinergic transmission for the insulinotropic and glucagonostatic effects of GLP-1.

    PubMed

    Plamboeck, Astrid; Veedfald, Simon; Deacon, Carolyn F; Hartmann, Bolette; Vilsbøll, Tina; Knop, Filip K; Holst, Jens J

    2015-09-01

    The importance of vagal efferent signaling for the insulinotropic and glucagonostatic effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) was investigated in a randomized single-blinded study. Healthy male participants (n = 10) received atropine to block vagal cholinergic transmission or saline infusions on separate occasions. At t = 15 min, plasma glucose was clamped at 6 mmol/l. GLP-1 was infused at a low dose (0.3 pmol·kg(-1)·min(-1)) from t = 45-95 min and at a higher dose (1 pmol·kg(-1)·min(-1)) from t = 95-145 min. Atropine blocked muscarinic, cholinergic transmission, as evidenced by an increase in heart rate [peak: 70 ± 2 (saline) vs. 90 ± 2 (atropine) beats/min, P < 0.002] and suppression of pancreatic polypeptide levels [area under the curve during the GLP-1 infusions (AUC45-145): 492 ± 85 (saline) vs. 247 ± 59 (atropine) pmol/l × min, P < 0.0001]. More glucose was needed to maintain the clamp during the high-dose GLP-1 infusion steady-state period on the atropine day [6.4 ± 0.9 (saline) vs. 8.7 ± 0.8 (atropine) mg·kg(-1)·min(-1), P < 0.0023]. GLP-1 dose-dependently increased insulin secretion on both days. The insulinotropic effect of GLP-1 was not impaired by atropine [C-peptide AUCs45-145: 99 ± 8 (saline) vs. 113 ± 13 (atropine) nmol/l × min, P = 0.19]. Atropine suppressed glucagon levels additively with GLP-1 [AUC45-145: 469 ± 70 (saline) vs. 265 ± 50 (atropine) pmol/l × min, P = 0.018], resulting in hypoglycemia when infusions were suspended [3.6 ± 0.2 (saline) vs. 2.7 ± 0.2 (atropine) mmol/l, P < 0.0001]. To ascertain whether atropine could independently suppress glucagon levels, control experiments (n = 5) were carried out without GLP-1 infusions [AUC45-145: 558 ± 103 (saline) vs. 382 ± 76 (atropine) pmol/l × min, P = 0.06]. Our results suggest that efferent muscarinic activity is not required for the insulinotropic effect of exogenous GLP-1 but that blocking efferent muscarinic activity independently suppresses glucagon secretion. In combination, GLP-1 and muscarinic blockade strongly affect glucose turnover. PMID:26136531

  14. GLP-1 as a satiety factor in children with eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Tomasik, P J; Sztefko, K; Malek, A

    2002-02-01

    GLP-1, with its insulinotropic properties and direct action on satiety center in the brain, may be the main hormone regulating the amount of ingested food. In this study, GLP-1 secretion was investigated in age-matched adolescent girls (14 +/- 2 years): 13 with anorexia nervosa (BMI 14.8 +/- 1.4 kg/m(2)), 13 with simple obesity (BMI 33.0 +/- 3.3 kg/m(2)) and 10 healthy girls as a control group (BMI 21.6 +/- 0.7 kg/m(2)). Each girl was subjected to OGTT and standard meal tests after a 12 h overnight fast. Blood samples were collected before and 15, 30, 60, and 120 min after the stimulation. The mean fasted GLP-1 levels in simple obesity group (1.6 +/- 0.3 pmol/l) and in anorexia nervosa group (1.7 +/- 0.3 pmol/l) were significantly lower than those in the control group (2.6 +/- 0.4 pmol/l) (p < 0.05 in both cases). The highest peak concentration of GLP-1 was observed in the control group after both stimuli. In each group, the mean integrated GLP-1 outputs were almost twice as high after OGTT than after the test meal (p < 0.001 in each case). In our opinion, low secretion of GLP-1 in girls with simple obesity may seriously and negatively influence the course of this disease. On the other hand, low GLP-1 levels in girls with anorexia nervosa are beneficial and promote appetite. PMID:11972291

  15. A Novel TGR5 Activator WB403 Promotes GLP-1 Secretion and Preserves Pancreatic β-Cells in Type 2 Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tongtong; You, Panpan; Zhao, Yongliang; Yang, Yiqing; Wang, Xin; Luo, Jian; Chen, Yihua; Liu, Mingyao; Chen, Huaqing

    2015-01-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor TGR5 is a membrane receptor for bile acids. Its agonism increases energy expenditure and controls blood glucose through secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 in enteroendocrine cells. In this study, we explored the therapeutic potential of WB403, a small compound activating TGR5 which was identified by combining TGR5 targeted luciferase assay and active GLP-1 assay, in treating type 2 diabetes. After confirmation of TGR5 and GLP-1 stimulating activities in various cell systems, WB403 was examined in oral glucose tolerance test, and tested on different mouse models of type 2 diabetes for glycemic control and pancreatic β-cell protection effect. As a result, WB403 exhibited a moderate TGR5 activation effect while promoting GLP-1 secretion efficiently. Interestingly, gallbladder filling effect, which was reported for some known TGR5 agonists, was not detected in this novel compound. In vivo results showed that WB403 significantly improved glucose tolerance and decreased fasting blood glucose, postprandial blood glucose and HbA1c in type 2 diabetic mice. Further analysis revealed that WB403 increased pancreatic β-cells and restored the normal distribution pattern of α-cell and β-cell in islets. These findings demonstrated that TGR5 activator WB403 effectively promoted GLP-1 release, improved hyperglycemia and preserved the mass and function of pancreatic β-cells, whereas it did not show a significant side effect on gallbladder. It may represent a promising approach for future type 2 diabetes mellitus drug development. PMID:26208278

  16. Minor Contribution of Endogenous GLP-1 and GLP-2 to Postprandial Lipemia in Obese Men

    PubMed Central

    Matikainen, Niina; Björnson, Elias; Söderlund, Sanni; Borén, Christofer; Eliasson, Björn; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H.; Bogl, Leonie H.; Hakkarainen, Antti; Lundbom, Nina; Rivellese, Angela; Riccardi, Gabriele; Després, Jean-Pierre; Alméras, Natalie; Holst, Jens Juul; Deacon, Carolyn F.; Borén, Jan; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta

    2016-01-01

    Context Glucose and lipids stimulate the gut-hormones glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1, GLP-2 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) but the effect of these on human postprandial lipid metabolism is not fully clarified. Objective To explore the responses of GLP-1, GLP-2 and GIP after a fat-rich meal compared to the same responses after an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and to investigate possible relationships between incretin response and triglyceride-rich lipoprotein (TRL) response to a fat-rich meal. Design Glucose, insulin, GLP-1, GLP-2 and GIP were measured after an OGTT and after a fat-rich meal in 65 healthy obese (BMI 26.5–40.2 kg/m2) male subjects. Triglycerides (TG), apoB48 and apoB100 in TG-rich lipoproteins (chylomicrons, VLDL1 and VLDL2) were measured after the fat-rich meal. Main Outcome Measures Postprandial responses (area under the curve, AUC) for glucose, insulin, GLP-1, GLP-2, GIP in plasma, and TG, apoB48 and apoB100 in plasma and TG-rich lipoproteins. Results The GLP-1, GLP-2 and GIP responses after the fat-rich meal and after the OGTT correlated strongly (r = 0.73, p<0.0001; r = 0.46, p<0.001 and r = 0.69, p<0.001, respectively). Glucose and insulin AUCs were lower, but the AUCs for GLP-1, GLP-2 and GIP were significantly higher after the fat-rich meal than after the OGTT. The peak value for all hormones appeared at 120 minutes after the fat-rich meal, compared to 30 minutes after the OGTT. After the fat-rich meal, the AUCs for GLP-1, GLP-2 and GIP correlated significantly with plasma TG- and apoB48 AUCs but the contribution was very modest. Conclusions In obese males, GLP-1, GLP-2 and GIP responses to a fat-rich meal are greater than following an OGTT. However, the most important explanatory variable for postprandial TG excursion was fasting triglycerides. The contribution of endogenous GLP-1, GLP-2 and GIP to explaining the variance in postprandial TG excursion was minor. PMID:26752550

  17. Intestinal GLP-1 and satiation: from man to rodents and back.

    PubMed

    Steinert, R E; Beglinger, C; Langhans, W

    2016-02-01

    In response to luminal food stimuli during meals, enteroendocrine cells release gastrointestinal (GI) peptides that have long been known to control secretory and motor functions of the gut, pancreas and liver. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has emerged as one of the most important GI peptides because of a combination of functions not previously ascribed to any other molecule. GLP-1 potentiates glucose-induced insulin secretion, suppresses glucagon release, slows gastric emptying and may serve as a satiation signal, although the physiological status of the latter function has not been fully established yet. Here we review the available evidence for intestinal GLP-1 to fulfill a number of established empirical criteria for assessing whether a hormone inhibits eating by eliciting physiological satiation in man and rodents. PMID:26315842

  18. GLP-1 promotes mitochondrial metabolism in vascular smooth muscle cells by enhancing endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria coupling.

    PubMed

    Morales, Pablo E; Torres, Gloria; Sotomayor-Flores, Cristian; Peña-Oyarzún, Daniel; Rivera-Mejías, Pablo; Paredes, Felipe; Chiong, Mario

    2014-03-28

    Incretin GLP-1 has important metabolic effects on several tissues, mainly through the regulation of glucose uptake and usage. One mechanism for increasing cell metabolism is modulating endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondria communication, as it allows for a more efficient transfer of Ca(2+) into the mitochondria, thereby increasing activity. Control of glucose metabolism is essential for proper vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) function. GLP-1 has been shown to produce varied metabolic actions, but whether it regulates glucose metabolism in VSMC remains unknown. In this report, we show that GLP-1 increases mitochondrial activity in the aortic cell line A7r5 by increasing ER-mitochondria coupling. GLP-1 increases intracellular glucose and diminishes glucose uptake without altering glycogen content. ATP, mitochondrial potential and oxygen consumption increase at 3h of GLP-1 treatment, paralleled by increased Ca(2+) transfer from the ER to the mitochondria. Furthermore, GLP-1 increases levels of Mitofusin-2 (Mfn2), an ER-mitochondria tethering protein, via a PKA-dependent mechanism. Accordingly, PKA inhibition and Mfn2 down-regulation prevented mitochondrial Ca(2+) increases in GLP-1 treated cells. Inhibiting both Ca(2+) release from the ER and Ca(2+) entry into mitochondria as well as diminishing Mfn2 levels blunted the increase in mitochondrial activity in response to GLP-1. Altogether, these results strongly suggest that GLP-1 increases ER-mitochondria communication in VSMC, resulting in higher mitochondrial activity. PMID:24613839

  19. Neuroprotective effects of (Val8)GLP-1-Glu-PAL in the MPTP Parkinson's disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, YanFang; Chen, YiMei; Li, Lin; Hölscher, Christian

    2015-10-15

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is a hormone and a growth factor. GLP-1 mimetics are currently on the market as treatments for type 2 diabetes. They also have shown neuroprotective properties in animal models of neurodegenerative disorders. In addition, the GLP-1 mimetic exendin-4 has shown protective effects in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD), and a first clinical trial in PD patients showed promising results. (Val8)GLP-1-glu-PAL is a new GLP-1 analogue which has a longer biological half-life than exendin-4. We previously showed that (Val8)GLP-1-glu-PAL has neuroprotective properties. Here we tested the drug in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of PD. MPTP was injected (30mg/kg i.p.) along with (Val8)GLP-1-glu-PAL (25nmol/kg i.p.) once-daily for 8 days. (Val8)GLP-1-glu-PAL showed good effects in preventing the MPTP-induced motor impairment (Rotarod, open field locomotion, swim test), reduction in tyrosine hydroxylase levels (dopamine synthesis) in the substantia nigra, a reduction of activated caspase 3 levels, of TUNEL positive cell numbers, of the pro-apoptotic signaling molecule BAX and an increase in the growth signaling molecule Bcl-2. The results demonstrate that (Val8)GLP-1-glu-PAL shows promise as a novel treatment of PD. PMID:26187689

  20. Functional consequences of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor cross-talk and trafficking.

    PubMed

    Roed, Sarah Noerklit; Nøhr, Anne Cathrine; Wismann, Pernille; Iversen, Helle; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Knudsen, Sanne Moeller; Waldhoer, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The signaling capacity of seven-transmembrane/G-protein-coupled receptors (7TM/GPCRs) can be regulated through ligand-mediated receptor trafficking. Classically, the recycling of internalized receptors is associated with resensitization, whereas receptor degradation terminates signaling. We have shown previously that the incretin glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) internalizes fast and is primarily resensitized through recycling back to the cell surface. GLP-1R is expressed in pancreatic islets together with the closely related glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIPR) and glucagon (GCGR) receptors. The interaction and cross-talk between coexpressed receptors is a wide phenomenon of the 7TM/GPCR superfamily. Numerous reports show functional consequences for signaling and trafficking of the involved receptors. On the basis of the high structural similarity and tissue coexpression, we here investigated the potential cross-talk between GLP-1R and GIPR or GCGR in both trafficking and signaling pathways. Using a real-time time-resolved FRET-based internalization assay, we show that GLP-1R, GIPR, and GCGR internalize with differential properties. Remarkably, upon coexpression of the internalizing GLP-1R and the non-internalizing GIPR, GLP-1-mediated GLP-1R internalization was impaired in a GIPR concentration-dependent manner. As a functional consequence of such impaired internalization capability, GLP-1-mediated GLP-1R signaling was abrogated. A similar compromised signaling was found when GLP-1R internalization was abrogated by a dominant-negative version of dynamin (dynamin-1 K44E), which provides a mechanistic link between GLP-1R trafficking and signaling. This study highlights the importance of receptor internalization for full functionality of GLP-1R. Moreover, cross-talk between the two incretin receptors GLP-1R and GIPR is shown to alter receptor trafficking with functional consequences for GLP-1R signaling. PMID:25451942

  1. Functional Consequences of Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Receptor Cross-talk and Trafficking*

    PubMed Central

    Roed, Sarah Noerklit; Nøhr, Anne Cathrine; Wismann, Pernille; Iversen, Helle; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Knudsen, Sanne Moeller; Waldhoer, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The signaling capacity of seven-transmembrane/G-protein-coupled receptors (7TM/GPCRs) can be regulated through ligand-mediated receptor trafficking. Classically, the recycling of internalized receptors is associated with resensitization, whereas receptor degradation terminates signaling. We have shown previously that the incretin glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) internalizes fast and is primarily resensitized through recycling back to the cell surface. GLP-1R is expressed in pancreatic islets together with the closely related glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIPR) and glucagon (GCGR) receptors. The interaction and cross-talk between coexpressed receptors is a wide phenomenon of the 7TM/GPCR superfamily. Numerous reports show functional consequences for signaling and trafficking of the involved receptors. On the basis of the high structural similarity and tissue coexpression, we here investigated the potential cross-talk between GLP-1R and GIPR or GCGR in both trafficking and signaling pathways. Using a real-time time-resolved FRET-based internalization assay, we show that GLP-1R, GIPR, and GCGR internalize with differential properties. Remarkably, upon coexpression of the internalizing GLP-1R and the non-internalizing GIPR, GLP-1-mediated GLP-1R internalization was impaired in a GIPR concentration-dependent manner. As a functional consequence of such impaired internalization capability, GLP-1-mediated GLP-1R signaling was abrogated. A similar compromised signaling was found when GLP-1R internalization was abrogated by a dominant-negative version of dynamin (dynamin-1 K44E), which provides a mechanistic link between GLP-1R trafficking and signaling. This study highlights the importance of receptor internalization for full functionality of GLP-1R. Moreover, cross-talk between the two incretin receptors GLP-1R and GIPR is shown to alter receptor trafficking with functional consequences for GLP-1R signaling. PMID:25451942

  2. High fat diet and GLP-1 drugs induce pancreatic injury in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Rouse, Rodney Xu, Lin; Stewart, Sharron; Zhang, Jun

    2014-04-15

    Glucagon Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) drugs are currently used to treat type-2 diabetes. Safety concerns for increased risk of pancreatitis and pancreatic ductal metaplasia have accompanied these drugs. High fat diet (HFD) is a type-2 diabetes risk factor that may affect the response to GLP-1 drug treatment. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of diet and GLP-1 based drugs on the exocrine pancreas in mice. Experiments were designed in a mouse model of insulin resistance created by feeding a HFD or standard diet (STD) for 6 weeks. The GLP-1 drugs, sitagliptin (SIT) and exenatide (EXE) were administered once daily for additional 6 weeks in both mice fed HFD or STD. The results showed that body weight, blood glucose levels, and serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNFα, IL-1β, and KC) were significantly greater in HFD mice than in STD mice regardless of GLP-1 drug treatment. The semi-quantitative grading showed that pancreatic changes were significantly greater in EXE and SIT-treated mice compared to control and that HFD exacerbated spontaneous exocrine pancreatic changes seen in saline-treated mice on a standard diet. Exocrine pancreatic changes identified in this study included acinar cell injury (hypertrophy, autophagy, apoptosis, necrosis, and atrophy), vascular injury, interstitial edema and inflammation, fat necrosis, and duct changes. These findings support HFD as a risk factor to increased susceptibility/severity for acute pancreatitis and indicate that GLP-1 drugs cause pancreatic injury that can be exacerbated in a HFD environment.

  3. A Tripeptide Diapin Effectively Lowers Blood Glucose Levels in Male Type 2 Diabetes Mice by Increasing Blood Levels of Insulin and GLP-1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jifeng; Xue, Changyong; Zhu, Tianqing; Vivekanandan, Anuradha; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Ma, Zhongmin Alex; Chen, Y. Eugene

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is rapidly increasing worldwide. Effective therapies, such as insulin and Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), require injections, which are costly and result in less patient compliance. Here, we report the identification of a tripeptide with significant potential to treat T2D. The peptide, referred to as Diapin, is comprised of three natural L-amino acids, GlyGlyLeu. Glucose tolerance tests showed that oral administration of Diapin effectively lowered blood glucose after oral glucose loading in both normal C57BL/6J mice and T2D mouse models, including KKay, db/db, ob/ob mice, and high fat diet-induced obesity/T2D mice. In addition, Diapin treatment significantly reduced casual blood glucose in KKay diabetic mice in a time-dependent manner without causing hypoglycemia. Furthermore, we found that plasma GLP-1 and insulin levels in diabetic models were significantly increased with Diapin treatment compared to that in the controls. In summary, our findings establish that a peptide with minimum of three amino acids can improve glucose homeostasis and Diapin shows promise as a novel pharmaceutical agent to treat patients with T2D through its dual effects on GLP-1 and insulin secretion. PMID:24386218

  4. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptors in the brain: controlling food intake and body weight

    PubMed Central

    Baggio, Laurie L.; Drucker, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    The peptide hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) enhances glucose-induced insulin secretion and inhibits both gastric emptying and glucagon secretion. GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists control glycemia via glucose-dependent mechanisms of action and promote weight loss in obese and diabetic individuals. Nevertheless, the mechanisms and cellular targets transducing the weight loss effects remain unclear. Two recent studies in the JCI provide insight into the neurons responsible for this effect. Sisley et al. reveal that GLP-1R agonist–induced weight loss requires GLP-1Rs in the CNS, while Secher et al. reveal that a small peptide GLP-1R agonist penetrates the brain and activates a subset of GLP-1R–expressing neurons in the arcuate nucleus to produce weight loss. Together, these two studies elucidate pathways that inform strategies coupling GLP-1R signaling to control of body weight in patients with diabetes or obesity. PMID:25202976

  5. Nucleotide levels regulate germline proliferation through modulating GLP-1/Notch signaling in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Chi, Congwu; Ronai, Diana; Than, Minh T; Walker, Cierra J; Sewell, Aileen K; Han, Min

    2016-02-01

    Animals alter their reproductive programs to accommodate changes in nutrient availability, yet the connections between known nutrient-sensing systems and reproductive programs are underexplored, and whether there is a mechanism that senses nucleotide levels to coordinate germline proliferation is unknown. We established a model system in which nucleotide metabolism is perturbed in both the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (cytidine deaminases) and its food (Escherichia coli); when fed food with a low uridine/thymidine (U/T) level, germline proliferation is arrested. We provide evidence that this impact of U/T level on the germline is critically mediated by GLP-1/Notch and MPK-1/MAPK, known to regulate germline mitotic proliferation. This germline defect is suppressed by hyperactivation of glp-1 or disruption of genes downstream from glp-1 to promote meiosis but not by activation of the IIS or TORC1 pathways. Moreover, GLP-1 expression is post-transcriptionally modulated by U/T levels. Our results reveal a previously unknown nucleotide-sensing mechanism for controlling reproductivity. PMID:26833730

  6. Neuroprotective Effects of rhGLP-1 in Diabetic Rats with Cerebral Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Daoli; Wang, Yitong; Zang, Yannan; Liu, Xiaofang; Zhao, Libo; Wang, Qian; Liu, Chang; Feng, Wanyu; Yin, Xiaoxing; Fang, Yi

    2016-05-01

    Preclinical Research The aim of the present study was to evaluate the neuroprotective benefits of rhGLP-1 in diabetic rats subjected to acute cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion/reperfusion (MCAO/R). Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats were pretreated with rhGLP-1 (10, 20, or 40 μg/kg ip, tid) for 14 days. During this time, body weight and fasting blood glucose levels were assessed. Rats were then subjected to MCAO 90 min/R 24 h. At 2 and 24 h of reperfusion, rats were evaluated for neurological deficits and blood samples were collected to analyze markers of brain injury. Rats were then sacrificed to assess the infarction volume. rhGLP-1 pretreatment lowered blood glucose levels, improved neurological scores, attenuated infarct volumes, and reduced the blood levels of S100 calcium-binding protein B (S100B), neuron-specific enolase (NSE), and myelin basic protein (MBP). rhGLP-1 has neuroprotective benefits in diabetic rats with cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury and could potentially be used as a prophylatic neuroprotectant in diabetic patients at high risk of ischemic stroke. Drug Dev Res 77 : 124-133, 2016.   © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26971396

  7. Unsaturated Glycoceramides as Molecular Carriers for Mucosal Drug Delivery of GLP-1

    PubMed Central

    te Welscher, Yvonne M.; Chinnapen, Daniel J.-F.; Kaoutzani, Lydia; Mrsny, Randall J.; Lencer, Wayne I.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The incretin hormone Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) requires delivery by injection for the treatment of Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Here, we test if the properties of glycosphingolipid trafficking in epithelial cells can be applied to convert GLP-1 into a molecule suitable for mucosal absorption. GLP-1 was coupled to the extracellular oligosaccharide domain of GM1 species containing ceramides with different fatty acids and with minimal loss of incretin bioactivity. When applied to apical surfaces of polarized epithelial cells in monolayer culture, only GLP-1 coupled to GM1-ceramides with short-or cis-unsaturated fatty acids trafficked efficiently across the cell to the basolateral membrane by transcytosis. In vivo studies showed mucosal absorption after nasal administration. The results substantiate our recently reported dependence on ceramide structure for trafficking the GM1 across polarized epithelial cells and support the idea that specific glycosphingolipids can be harnessed as molecular vehicles for mucosal delivery of therapeutic peptides. PMID:24370893

  8. Long-term metabolic benefits of exenatide in mice are mediated solely via the known glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Tatarkiewicz, Krystyna; Sablan, Emmanuel J; Polizzi, Clara J; Villescaz, Christiane; Parkes, David G

    2014-04-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptors (GLP-1R) are expressed in multiple tissues and activation results in metabolic benefits including enhanced insulin secretion, slowed gastric emptying, suppressed food intake, and improved hepatic steatosis. Limited and inconclusive knowledge exists regarding whether the effects of chronic exposure to a GLP-1R agonist are solely mediated via this receptor. Therefore, we examined 3-mo dosing of exenatide in mice lacking a functional GLP-1R (Glp1r(-/-)). Exenatide (30 nmol kg(-1) day(-1)) was infused subcutaneously for 12 wk in Glp1r(-/-) and wild-type (Glp1r(+/+)) control mice fed a high-fat diet. Glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), plasma glucose, insulin, amylase, lipase, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), body weight, food intake, terminal hepatic lipid content (HLC), and plasma exenatide levels were measured. At the end of the study, oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and rate of gastric emptying were assessed. Exenatide produced no significant changes in Glp1r(-/-) mice at study end. In contrast, exenatide decreased body weight, food intake, and glucose in Glp1r(+/+) mice. When compared with vehicle, exenatide reduced insulin, OGTT glucose AUC0-2h, ALT, and HLC in Glp1r(+/+) mice. Exenatide had no effect on plasma amylase or lipase levels. Exenatide concentrations were approximately eightfold higher in Glp1r(-/-) versus Glp1r(+/+) mice after 12 wk of infusion, whereas renal function was similar. These data support the concept that exenatide requires a functional GLP-1R to exert chronic metabolic effects in mice, and that novel "GLP-1" receptors may not substantially contribute to these changes. Differential exenatide plasma levels in Glp1r(+/+) versus Glp1r(-/-) mice suggest that GLP-1R may play an important role in plasma clearance of exenatide and potentially other GLP-1-related peptides. PMID:24477544

  9. Chronic administration of Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists improves trabecular bone mass and architecture in ovariectomised mice.

    PubMed

    Pereira, M; Jeyabalan, J; Jørgensen, C S; Hopkinson, M; Al-Jazzar, A; Roux, J P; Chavassieux, P; Orriss, I R; Cleasby, M E; Chenu, C

    2015-12-01

    Some anti-diabetic therapies can have adverse effects on bone health and increase fracture risk. In this study, we tested the skeletal effects of chronic administration of two Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RA), increasingly used for type 2 diabetes treatment, in a model of osteoporosis associated bone loss and examined the expression and activation of GLP-1R in bone cells. Mice were ovariectomised (OVX) to induce bone loss and four weeks later they were treated with Liraglutide (LIR) 0.3mg/kg/day, Exenatide (Ex-4) 10 μg/kg/day or saline for four weeks. Mice were injected with calcein and alizarin red prior to euthanasia, to label bone-mineralising surfaces. Tibial micro-architecture was determined by micro-CT and bone formation and resorption parameters measured by histomorphometric analysis. Serum was collected to measure calcitonin and sclerostin levels, inhibitors of bone resorption and formation, respectively. GLP-1R mRNA and protein expression were evaluated in the bone, bone marrow and bone cells using RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Primary osteoclasts and osteoblasts were cultured to evaluate the effect of GLP-1RA on bone resorption and formation in vitro. GLP-1RA significantly increased trabecular bone mass, connectivity and structure parameters but had no effect on cortical bone. There was no effect of GLP-1RA on bone formation in vivo but an increase in osteoclast number and osteoclast surfaces was observed with Ex-4. GLP-1R was expressed in bone marrow cells, primary osteoclasts and osteoblasts and in late osteocytic cell line. Both Ex-4 and LIR stimulated osteoclastic differentiation in vitro but slightly reduced the area resorbed per osteoclast. They had no effect on bone nodule formation in vitro. Serum calcitonin levels were increased and sclerostin levels decreased by Ex-4 but not by LIR. Thus, GLP-1RA can have beneficial effects on bone and the expression of GLP-1R in bone cells may imply that these effects are exerted directly on the tissue. PMID:26314515

  10. Neuroprotective role of (Val8)GLP-1-Glu-PAL in an in vitro model of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin; Liu, Ke; Zhao, Juan; Holscher, Christian; Li, Guang-lai; Liu, Yue-ze

    2016-01-01

    The growth factor glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is neuroprotective in several animal models of neurodegeneration. Here, we analyzed the neuroprotective effects of a novel protease-resistant GLP-1 analogue, (Val8)GLP-1-Glu-PAL, which has advantages over older analogues, such as improvement of hippocampal neurogenesis, glucose homeostasis, and insulin secretion. We established an in vitro model of Parkinson's disease using the mitochondrial stressor rotenone in primary cultured mouse neurons pretreated with (Val8)GLP-1-Glu-PAL. (Val8)GLP-1-Glu-PAL alone did not affect neuronal viability, but prevented the rotenone-induced reduction in cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, (Val8)GLP-1-Glu-PAL pretreatment prevented rotenone-induced proapoptotic changes manifesting as downregulation of procaspase-3 and Bcl-2 and upregulation of cleaved caspase-3. These results demonstrate that the novel agent (Val8)GLP-1-Glu-PAL shows promise as a drug treatment for Parkinson's disease. PMID:27073388

  11. GLP-1 responses are heritable and blunted in acquired obesity with high liver fat and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Matikainen, Niina; Bogl, Leonie H; Hakkarainen, Antti; Lundbom, Jesper; Lundbom, Nina; Kaprio, Jaakko; Rissanen, Aila; Holst, Jens J; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Impaired incretin response represents an early and uniform defect in type 2 diabetes, but the contributions of genes and the environment are poorly characterized. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We studied 35 monozygotic (MZ) and 75 dizygotic (DZ) twin pairs (discordant and concordant for obesity) to determine the heritability of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) responses to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and the influence of acquired obesity to GLP-1, glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP), and peptide YY (PYY) during OGTT or meal test. RESULTS The heritability of GLP-1 area under the curve was 67% (95% CI 45-80). Cotwins from weight-concordant MZ and DZ pairs and weight-discordant MZ pairs but concordant for liver fat content demonstrated similar glucose, insulin, and incretin profiles after the OGTT and meal tests. In contrast, higher insulin responses and blunted 60-min GLP-1 responses during the OGTT were observed in the heavier as compared with leaner MZ cotwins discordant for BMI, liver fat, and insulin sensitivity. Blunted GLP-1 response to OGTT was observed in heavier as compared with leaner DZ cotwins discordant for obesity and insulin sensitivity. CONCLUSIONS Whereas the GLP-1 response to the OGTT is heritable, an acquired unhealthy pattern of obesity characterized by liver fat accumulation and insulin resistance is closely related to impaired GLP-1 response in young adults. PMID:23990519

  12. Distinct action of the α-glucosidase inhibitor miglitol on SGLT3, enteroendocrine cells, and GLP1 secretion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Young; Kaneko, Shuji; Jutabha, Promsuk; Zhang, Xilin; Seino, Susumu; Jomori, Takahito; Anzai, Naohiko; Miki, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Oral ingestion of carbohydrate triggers glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) secretion, but the molecular mechanism remains elusive. By measuring GLP1 concentrations in murine portal vein, we found that the ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channel is not essential for glucose-induced GLP1 secretion from enteroendocrine L cells, while the sodium-glucose co-transporter 1 (SGLT1) is required, at least in the early phase (5 min) of secretion. By contrast, co-administration of the α-glucosidase inhibitor (α-GI) miglitol plus maltose evoked late-phase secretion in a glucose transporter 2-dependent manner. We found that GLP1 secretion induced by miglitol plus maltose was significantly higher than that by another α-GI, acarbose, plus maltose, despite the fact that acarbose inhibits maltase more potently than miglitol. As miglitol activates SGLT3, we compared the effects of miglitol on GLP1 secretion with those of acarbose, which failed to depolarize the Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing human SGLT3. Oral administration of miglitol activated duodenal enterochromaffin (EC) cells as assessed by immunostaining of phosphorylated calcium–calmodulin kinase 2 (phospho-CaMK2). In contrast, acarbose activated much fewer enteroendocrine cells, having only modest phospho-CaMK2 immunoreactivity. Single administration of miglitol triggered no GLP1 secretion, and GLP1 secretion by miglitol plus maltose was significantly attenuated by atropine pretreatment, suggesting regulation via vagal nerve. Thus, while α-GIs generally delay carbohydrate absorption and potentiate GLP1 secretion, miglitol also activates duodenal EC cells, possibly via SGLT3, and potentiates GLP1 secretion through the parasympathetic nervous system. PMID:25486965

  13. The glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist enhances intrinsic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ activity in endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Onuma, Hirohisa; Inukai, Kouichi Kitahara, Atsuko; Moriya, Rie; Nishida, Susumu; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Katsuta, Hidenori; Takahashi, Kazuto; Sumitani, Yoshikazu; Hosaka, Toshio; Ishida, Hitoshi

    2014-08-22

    Highlights: • PPARγ activation was involved in the GLP-1-mediated anti-inflammatory action. • Exendin-4 enhanced endogenous PPARγ transcriptional activity in HUVECs. • H89, a PKA inhibitor, abolished GLP-1-induced PPARγ enhancement. • The anti-inflammatory effects of GLP-1 may be explained by PPARγ activation. - Abstract: Recent studies have suggested glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) signaling to exert anti-inflammatory effects on endothelial cells, although the precise underlying mechanism remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we investigated whether PPARγ activation is involved in the GLP-1-mediated anti-inflammatory action on endothelial cells. When we treated HUVEC cells with 0.2 ng/ml exendin-4, a GLP-1 receptor agonist, endogenous PPARγ transcriptional activity was significantly elevated, by approximately 20%, as compared with control cells. The maximum PPARγ activity enhancing effect of exendin-4 was observed 12 h after the initiation of incubation with exendin-4. As H89, a PKA inhibitor, abolished GLP-1-induced PPARγ enhancement, the signaling downstream from GLP-1 cross-talk must have been involved in PPARγ activation. In conclusion, our results suggest that GLP-1 has the potential to induce PPARγ activity, partially explaining the anti-inflammatory effects of GLP-1 on endothelial cells. Cross-talk between GLP-1 signaling and PPARγ activation would have major impacts on treatments for patients at high risk for cardiovascular disease.

  14. [Combined treatment of insulin and GLP-1 analogs: what do we expect?].

    PubMed

    de Kalbermatten, Bénédicte; Jaafar, Jaafar; Jornayvaz, François R; Philippe, Jacques

    2014-06-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a progressive and heterogeneous disease. The decrease in insulin secretion by pancreatic beta cells and the increase of glucagon secretion by pancreatic beta cells, are the two major pathophysiologic characteristics. The majority of type 2 diabetics will therefore require insulin in the evolution of their disease, with weight gain and hypoglycaemia as side effects. GLP-1 analogs are effective therapeutic alternatives due to their actions on glucagon and insulin secretion, on satiety and gastric emptying. For patients inadequately controlled with conventional antidiabetics, GLP-1 analogs, introduced as an alternative or in combination with insulin, can prevent or reduce the side effects associated with insulin. Indeed, the risk of hypoglycaemia is reduced and the vicious circle of weight gain secondary to insulin/need to increase insulin doses is limited. PMID:25004768

  15. Postprandial GLP-1 Secretion After Bariatric Surgery in Three Cases of Severe Obesity Related to Craniopharyngiomas.

    PubMed

    Bretault, Marion; Laroche, Suzanne; Lacorte, Jean-Marc; Barsamian, Charles; Polak, Michel; Raffin-Sanson, Marie-Laure; Touraine, Philippe; Bouillot, Jean-Luc; Czernichow, Sebastien; Carette, Claire

    2016-05-01

    Craniopharyngiomas are rare cerebral tumors associated with severe obesity after hypothalamic surgery. A meta-analysis showed significant weight loss at 1 year after bariatric surgery in these patients even though more modest than in common causes of obesity. We hypothesized that this discrepancy could be partly explained by differences in GLP-1 secretion after surgery since patients with craniopharyngioma present a significantly higher degree of insulin resistance and hyperinsulinism than common obese control. We report three cases of bariatric surgery in patients presenting with hypothalamique obesity related to craniopharyngiomas. At 18 months, the mean weight loss was 20 kg with expected insulin resistance decrease. Before surgery, standardized test meal shows abolition of postprandial GLP-1 secretion in all patients with a progressive restoration in the patients with gastric bypass (GBP) surgery. PMID:26922186

  16. In Vivo Imaging of GLP-1R with a Targeted Bimodal PET/Fluorescence Imaging Agent

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Accurate visualization and quantification of β-cell mass is critical for the improved understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of both type 1 diabetes (T1D) and insulinoma. Here, we describe the synthesis of a bimodal imaging probe (PET/fluorescence) for imaging GLP-1R expression in the pancreas and in pancreatic islet cell tumors. The conjugation of a bimodal imaging tag containing a near-infrared fluorescent dye, and the copper chelator sarcophagine to the GLP-1R targeting peptide exendin-4 provided the basis for the bimodal imaging probe. Conjugation was performed via a novel sequential one-pot synthetic procedure including 64Cu radiolabeling and copper-catalyzed click-conjugation. The bimodal imaging agent 64Cu-E4-Fl was synthesized in good radiochemical yield and specific activity (RCY = 36%, specific activity: 141 μCi/μg, >98% radiochemical purity). The agent showed good performance in vivo and ex vivo, visualizing small xenografts (<2 mm) with PET and pancreatic β-cell mass by phosphor autoradiography. Using the fluorescent properties of the probe, we were able to detect individual pancreatic islets, confirming specific binding to GLP-1R and surpassing the sensitivity of the radioactive label. The use of bimodal PET/fluorescent imaging probes is promising for preoperative imaging and fluorescence-assisted analysis of patient tissues. We believe that our procedure could become relevant as a protocol for the development of bimodal imaging agents. PMID:24856928

  17. Appetite-related peptides in childhood and adolescence: role of ghrelin, PYY, and GLP-1.

    PubMed

    Horner, Katy; Lee, SoJung

    2015-11-01

    During childhood and adolescence, a number of factors, including age, puberty, sex, race, and body composition, may contribute to differences in satiety, food intake, and appetite-related peptides. These peptides include the orexigenic peptide ghrelin and anorexigenic gut peptides peptide YY (PYY) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). For example, lower fasting ghrelin levels, lower postprandial ghrelin suppression, and blunted PYY and GLP-1 responses to food intake could contribute to a dysregulation of appetite in already obese children and adolescents. Whereas, changes in these peptides observed during puberty could facilitate growth. A greater understanding of the major moderating factors of appetite-related peptides in the pediatric population is essential to improve interpretation of study findings and for effective tailoring of strategies targeting appetite control to individuals. While more studies are needed, there is some evidence to suggest that exercise-based lifestyle interventions could be a potential therapeutic strategy to improve appetite-peptide profiles in overweight and obese children and adolescents. The aim of this review is (i) to discuss the potential moderating factors of ghrelin, PYY, and GLP-1, including age and puberty, sex, race and body composition; and (ii) to examine the effects of exercise interventions on these appetite-related gut peptides in children and adolescents. PMID:26466085

  18. Glucagon Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Modulates OVA-Induced Airway Inflammation and Mucus Secretion Involving a Protein Kinase A (PKA)-Dependent Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB) Signaling Pathway in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Tao; Wu, Xiao-ling; Zhang, Wei; Xiao, Min

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a common chronic pulmonary inflammatory disease, featured with mucus hyper-secretion in the airway. Recent studies found that glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogs, including liraglutide and exenatide, possessed a potent anti-inflammatory property through a protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent signaling pathway. Therefore, the aim of current study was to investigate the value of GLP-1 analog therapy liraglutide in airway inflammation and mucus secretion in a murine model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma, and its underlying molecular mechanism. In our study, BALB/c mice were sensitized and challenged by OVA to induce chronic asthma. Pathological alterations, the number of cells and the content of inflammatory mediators in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and mucus secretion were observed and measured. In addition, the mRNA and protein expression of E-selectin and MUC5AC were analyzed by qPCR and Western blotting. Then, the phosphorylation of PKA and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 were also measured by Western blotting. Further, NF-κB p65 DNA binding activity was detected by ELISA. OVA-induced airway inflammation, airway mucus hyper-secretion, the up-regulation of E-selectin and MUC5AC were remarkably inhibited by GLP-1 in mice (all p < 0.01). Then, we also found that OVA-reduced phosphorylation of PKA, and OVA-enhanced NF-κB p65 activation and NF-κB p65 DNA binding activity were markedly improved by GLP-1 (all p < 0.01). Furthermore, our data also figured out that these effects of GLP-1 were largely abrogated by the PKA inhibitor H-89 (all p < 0.01). Taken together, our results suggest that OVA-induced asthma were potently ameliorated by GLP-1 possibly through a PKA-dependent inactivation of NF-κB in mice, indicating that GLP-1 analogs may be considered an effective and safe drug for the potential treatment of asthma in the future. PMID:26343632

  19. Agonist-induced internalisation of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor is mediated by the Gαq pathway.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Aiysha; Kanamarlapudi, Venkateswarlu

    2015-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) and an important target in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Upon stimulation with agonist, the GLP-1R signals through both Gαs and Gαq coupled pathways to stimulate insulin secretion. The agonist-induced GLP-1R internalisation has recently been shown to be important for insulin secretion. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying GLP-1R internalisation remain unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the role of GLP-1R downstream signalling pathways in its internalisation. Agonist-induced human GLP-1R (hGLP-1R) internalisation and activity were examined using a number of techniques including immunoblotting, ELISA, immunofluorescence and luciferase assays to determine cAMP production, intracellular Ca(2+) accumulation and ERK phosphorylation. Agonist-induced hGLP-1R internalisation is dependent on caveolin-1 and dynamin. Inhibition of the Gαq pathway but not the Gαs pathway affected hGLP-1R internalisation. Consistent with this, hGLP-1R mutant T149M and small-molecule agonists (compound 2 and compound B), which activate only the Gαs pathway, failed to induce internalisation of the receptor. Chemical inhibitors of the Gαq pathway, PKC and ERK phosphorylation significantly reduced agonist-induced hGLP-1R internalisation. These inhibitors also suppressed agonist-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation demonstrating that the phosphorylated ERK acts downstream of the Gαq pathway in the hGLP-1R internalisation. In summary, agonist-induced hGLP-1R internalisation is mediated by the Gαq pathway. The internalised hGLP-1R stimulates insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells, indicating the importance of GLP-1 internalisation for insulin secretion. PMID:25449603

  20. DPP-4 inhibitors and GLP-1 analogues: for whom? Which place for incretins in the management of type 2 diabetic patients?

    PubMed

    Halimi, S

    2008-02-01

    This review tries to delineate how to insert the GLP-1 based agents, DPP4-inhibitors (sitagliptin and vildagliptin) and GLP-1 analogues (exenatide and liraglutide), in the guidelines and the daily practice for the management of type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Orally administered DPP-4 inhibitors reduce HbA(1c) by 0.5-1.1%, without hypoglycaemic events and no weight gain. The subcutaneous injected GLP-1 analogues show larger reductions in HbA(1c) by 0.8-1.7% and a weight loss (1.75-3.8 kg) with most gastrointestinal common adverse events contributing to a significant treatment interruption. Regarding the efficacy, the cost and the safety of these drugs they will no challenge the use of metformin as the initial therapy of T2DM. In patients'not tolerating metformin or in older patients, DPP-4 inhibitors seem to be an excellent alternative monotherapy. Several studies argue in favour of the use of DPP-4 inhibitors in combination with metformin as a promising second line treatment. This combination offers advantages when compared to others currently used, particularly if one considers the more stringent guidelines with a higher risk of hypoglycaemic events in patient receiving sulfonylureas and mild hyperglycaemia or weight gain with thiazolidinedione (TZD). Oral triple therapy, metformin + TZD + incretin-based drug, has several theoretical advantages but is not supported by any published trial. Finally, obtaining the acceptance of injections once to twice daily vs. oral administration of OADs will probably remain difficult during the first years of treatment in many patients. Nevertheless a long-acting release exenatide formulation (i.e. once weekly), for subcutaneous injection in patients with type 2 diabetes under development shows promising preliminary results. If confirmed, the use of this new class of drugs should be largely developed from monotherapy to combinations (bitherapy or tritherapy), and even instead of insulin or in association with insulin. The long-term effect of GLP-1 based agents on glycaemic control has not yet been established, and their potential impact on beta-cell function in humans remains an area of active investigation. So, further studies are required and will allow progressively determining the use of incretin-based agents in T2DM treatment strategy. Their efficacy, safety and their cost vs. older strategies, will be really evaluated by physicians in the real daily practice and by large and long term systematic surveys, as recently shown in other therapeutic fields. PMID:18640591

  1. Chylomicron formation and secretion is required for lipid-stimulated release of incretins GLP-1 and GIP.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wendell J; Yang, Qing; Yang, Li; Lee, Dana; D'Alessio, David; Tso, Patrick

    2012-06-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) are incretins produced in the intestine that play a central role in glucose metabolism and insulin secretion. Circulating concentrations of GLP-1 and GIP are low and can be difficult to assay in rodents. These studies utilized the novel intestinal lymph fistula model we have established to investigate the mechanism of lipid-stimulated incretin secretion. Peak concentrations of GLP-1 and GIP following an enteral lipid stimulus (Liposyn) were significantly higher in intestinal lymph than portal venous plasma. To determine whether lipid-stimulated incretin secretion was related to chylomicron formation Pluronic L-81 (L-81), a surfactant inhibiting chylomicron synthesis, was given concurrently with Liposyn. The presence of L-81 almost completely abolished the increase in lymph triglyceride seen with Liposyn alone (P < 0.001). Inhibition of chylomicron formation with L-81 reduced GLP-1 secretion into lymph compared to Liposyn stimulation alone (P = 0.034). The effect of L-81 relative to Liposyn alone had an even greater effect on GIP secretion, which was completely abolished (P = 0.004). These findings of a dramatic effect of L-81 on lymph levels of GLP-1 and GIP support a strong link between intestinal lipid absorption and incretin secretion. The relative difference in the effect of L-81 on the two incretins provides further support that nutrient-stimulation of GIP and GLP-1 is via distinct mechanisms. PMID:22297815

  2. PEGylated Exendin-4, a Modified GLP-1 Analog Exhibits More Potent Cardioprotection than Its Unmodified Parent Molecule on a Dose to Dose Basis in a Murine Model of Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhongchan; Tong, Guang; Kim, Tae Hyung; Ma, Nan; Niu, Gang; Cao, Feng; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    A Site-specifically PEGylated exendin-4 (denoted as PEG-Ex4) is an exendin-4 (denoted as Ex4) analog we developed by site-specific PEGylation of exendin-4 with a high molecular weight trimeric poly(ethylene glycol) (tPEG). It has been shown to possess prolonged half-life in vivo with similar receptor binding affinity compared to unmodified exendin-4 by our previous work. This study is sought to test whether PEG-Ex4 is suitable for treating myocardial infarction (MI). In the MI model, PEG-Ex4 was administered every 3 days while equivalent amount of Ex4 was administered every 3 days or twice daily. Animal survival rate, heart function, remodeling and neoangiogenesis were evaluated and compared. Tube formation was examined in endothelial cells. In addition, Western blotting and histology were performed to determine the markers of cardiac hypertrophy and angiogenesis and to explore the possible molecular mechanism involved. PEG-Ex4 and Ex4 showed comparable binding affinity to GLP-1 receptor. In MI mice, PEG-Ex4 given at 3 days interval achieved similar extent of protection as Ex4 given twice daily, while Ex4 given at 3 days interval failed to produce protection. PEG-Ex4 elevated endothelial tube formation in vitro and capillary density in the border area of MI. PEG-Ex4 increased Akt activity and VEGF production in a GLP-1R dependent manner in endothelial cells and antagonism of GLP-1R, Akt or VEGF abolished the protection of PEG-Ex4 in the MI model. PEG-Ex4 is a potent long-acting GLP-1 receptor agonist for the treatment of chronic heart disease. Its protection might be attributed to enhanced angiogenesis mediated by the activation of Akt and VEGF. PMID:25553112

  3. Death receptors: Targets for cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, Zafar; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2010-04-01

    Apoptosis is the cell's intrinsic program to death, which plays an important role in physiologic growth control and homeostasis. Apoptosis can be triggered by death receptors (DRs), without any adverse effects. DRs are the members of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily, known to be involved in apoptosis signaling, independent of p53 tumor-supressor gene. Selective triggering of DR-mediated apoptosis in cancer cells is a novel approach in cancer therapy. So far, the best characterized DRs are CD95 (Fas/Apo1), TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand receptor (TRAILR) and tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR). Among these, TRAILR is emerging as most promising agent for cancer therapy, because it induces apoptosis in a variety of tumor and transformed cells without any toxicity to normal cells. TRAIL treatment in combination with chemotherapy or radiotherapy enhances TRAIL sensitivity or reverses TRAIL resistance by regulating downstream effectors. This review covers the current knowledge about the DRs, summarizes main signaling in DRs and also summarizes the preclinical approaches of these DRs in cancer therapy.

  4. Small-molecule agonists for the glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Kiel, Dan; Teng, Min; Behrens, Carsten; Bhumralkar, Dilip; Kodra, János T; Holst, Jens J; Jeppesen, Claus B; Johnson, Michael D; de Jong, Johannes Cornelis; Jorgensen, Anker Steen; Kercher, Tim; Kostrowicki, Jarek; Madsen, Peter; Olesen, Preben H; Petersen, Jacob S; Poulsen, Fritz; Sidelmann, Ulla G; Sturis, Jeppe; Truesdale, Larry; May, John; Lau, Jesper

    2007-01-16

    The peptide hormone glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 has important actions resulting in glucose lowering along with weight loss in patients with type 2 diabetes. As a peptide hormone, GLP-1 has to be administered by injection. Only a few small-molecule agonists to peptide hormone receptors have been described and none in the B family of the G protein coupled receptors to which the GLP-1 receptor belongs. We have discovered a series of small molecules known as ago-allosteric modulators selective for the human GLP-1 receptor. These compounds act as both allosteric activators of the receptor and independent agonists. Potency of GLP-1 was not changed by the allosteric agonists, but affinity of GLP-1 for the receptor was increased. The most potent compound identified stimulates glucose-dependent insulin release from normal mouse islets but, importantly, not from GLP-1 receptor knockout mice. Also, the compound stimulates insulin release from perfused rat pancreas in a manner additive with GLP-1 itself. These compounds may lead to the identification or design of orally active GLP-1 agonists. PMID:17213325

  5. Purification and bioactivity of exendin-4, a peptide analogue of GLP-1, expressed in Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jin; Wang, Yong-Hong; Wang, Hui; Zhuang, Ying-Ping; Zhang, Si-Liang

    2007-01-01

    Exendin-4, a peptide analogue of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), has been developed for treatment of type 2 diabetes. Herein, the secretive exendin-4 fusion protein, expressed by methanol induction in Pichia pastoris system, was purified to homogeneity by chromatography followed by enterokinase cleavage of the fusion protein and subsequent purification of the recombinant exendin-4. Purity of the recombinant exendin-4 was 95.6%. Bioactivity assay revealed that it had glucose-lowering and insulin-releasing action in vivo. PMID:18060365

  6. Circulating GLP-1 in infants born small-for-gestational-age: breast-feeding versus formula-feeding.

    PubMed

    Díaz, M; Bassols, J; Sebastiani, G; López-Bermejo, A; Ibáñez, L; de Zegher, F

    2015-10-01

    Prenatal growth restraint associates with the risk for later diabetes, particularly if such restraint is followed by postnatal formula-feeding (FOF) rather than breast-feeding (BRF). Circulating incretins can influence the neonatal programming of hypothalamic setpoints for appetite and energy expenditure, and are thus candidate mediators of the long-term effects exerted by early nutrition. We have tested this concept by measuring (at birth and at age 4 months) the circulating concentrations of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) in BRF infants born appropriate-for-gestational-age (AGA; n=63) and in small-for-gestational-age (SGA) infants receiving either BRF (n=28) or FOF (n=26). At birth, concentrations of GLP-1 were similar in AGA and SGA infants. At 4 months, pre-feeding GLP-1 concentrations were higher than at birth; SGA-BRF infants had GLP-1 concentrations similar to those in AGA-BRF infants but SGA-FOF infants had higher concentrations. In conclusion, nutrition appears to influence the circulating GLP-1 concentrations in SGA infants and may thereby modulate long-term diabetes risk. PMID:26088812

  7. Somatostatin Receptor Based Imaging and Radionuclide Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Somatostatin (SST) receptors (SSTRs) belong to the typical 7-transmembrane domain family of G-protein-coupled receptors. Five distinct subtypes (termed SSTR1-5) have been identified, with SSTR2 showing the highest affinity for natural SST and synthetic SST analogs. Most neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) have high expression levels of SSTRs, which opens the possibility for tumor imaging and therapy with radiolabeled SST analogs. A number of tracers have been developed for the diagnosis, staging, and treatment of NETs with impressive results, which facilitates the applications of human SSTR subtype 2 (hSSTr2) reporter gene based imaging and therapy in SSTR negative or weakly positive tumors to provide a novel approach for the management of tumors. The hSSTr2 gene can act as not only a reporter gene for in vivo imaging, but also a therapeutic gene for local radionuclide therapy. Even a second therapeutic gene can be transfected into the same tumor cells together with hSSTr2 reporter gene to obtain a synergistic therapeutic effect. However, additional preclinical and especially translational and clinical researches are needed to confirm the value of hSSTr2 reporter gene based imaging and therapy in tumors. PMID:25879040

  8. Structural and Molecular Conservation of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 and Its Receptor Confers Selective Ligand-Receptor Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Mi Jin; Park, Sumi; Kim, Dong-Kyu; Cho, Eun Bee; Hwang, Jong-Ik; Vaudry, Hubert; Seong, Jae Young

    2012-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a major player in the regulation of glucose homeostasis. It acts on pancreatic beta cells to stimulate insulin secretion and on the brain to inhibit appetite. Thus, it may be a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. Despite the physiological and clinical importance of GLP-1, molecular interaction with the GLP-1 receptor (GLP1R) is not well understood. Particularly, the specific amino acid residues within the transmembrane helices and extracellular loops of the receptor that may confer ligand-induced receptor activation have been poorly investigated. Amino acid sequence comparisons of GLP-1 and GLP1R with their orthologs and paralogs in vertebrates, combined with biochemical approaches, are useful to determine which amino acid residues in the peptide and the receptor confer selective ligand-receptor interaction. This article reviews how the molecular evolution of GLP-1 and GLP1R contributes to the selective interaction between this ligand-receptor pair, providing critical clues for the development of potent agonists for the treatment of diabetes mellitus and obesity. PMID:23181056

  9. The cardiovascular safety of incretin-based therapies: a review of the evidence

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in people with diabetes and therefore managing cardiovascular (CV) risk is a critical component of diabetes care. As incretin-based therapies are effective recent additions to the glucose-lowering treatment armamentarium for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), understanding their CV safety profiles is of great importance. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists have been associated with beneficial effects on CV risk factors, including weight, blood pressure and lipid profiles. Encouragingly, mechanistic studies in preclinical models and in patients with acute coronary syndrome suggest a potential cardioprotective effect of native GLP-1 or GLP-1 receptor agonists following ischaemia. Moreover, meta-analyses of phase 3 development programme data indicate no increased risk of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) with incretin-based therapies. Large randomized controlled trials designed to evaluate long-term CV outcomes with incretin-based therapies in individuals with T2D are now in progress, with the first two reporting as this article went to press. PMID:24011363

  10. Incretin based therapies: A novel treatment approach for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Blaslov, Kristina; Bulum, Tomislav; Zibar, Karin; Duvnjak, Lea

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome (MS). The current treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) principally includes amelioration of MS components by lifestyle modifications but the lack of success in their implementation and sustainment arises the need for effective pharmacological agent in fatty liver treatment. Incretins are gut derived hormones secreted into the circulation in response to nutrient ingestion that enhances glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is the most important incretin. Its receptor agonist and inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) are used in treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. DPP-4 serum activity and hepatic expression are shown to be elevated in several hepatic diseases. There are several experimental and clinical trials exploring the efficacy of incretin based therapies in NAFLD treatment. They suggest that GLP-1 analogues might have beneficial effect on hepatic steatosis acting as insulin sensitizers and directly by stimulating GLP-1 receptors expressed on hepatocytes. The use of DPP-4 inhibitors also results in hepatic fat reduction but the mechanism of action remains unclear. There is growing evidence that incretin based therapies have beneficial effects on hepatocytes, however further study analysis are needed to assess the long term effect of incretin based therapies on NAFLD. PMID:24966606

  11. Patient-reported outcomes in trials of incretin-based therapies in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Davies, M; Speight, J

    2012-10-01

    Incretin-based therapies have a glucose-dependent mode of action that results in excellent glucose-lowering efficacy with very low risk of hypoglycaemia, and weight neutrality [dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors] or weight loss [glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists], in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) complement physician evaluations of efficacy and tolerability and offer insights into the subjective experience of using modern diabetes treatments. We conducted a systematic search of clinical trials of the GLP-1 receptor agonists liraglutide, exenatide and long-acting exenatide, one of which included the oral DPP-4 inhibitor sitagliptin as a comparator. No other PRO data for DPP-4 inhibitors were identified. This review summarizes PRO data from eight clinical trials, the majority of which used the Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire (DTSQ) and/or Impact of Weight on Quality of Life-Lite (IWQOL-Lite) to evaluate patient experience. People with T2DM were highly satisfied with modern incretin-based therapies compared with traditional therapies. Treatment satisfaction (including perceptions of convenience and flexibility) was high and generally higher with GLP-1 agonists in association with their greater glucose-lowering efficacy and tendency to facilitate weight loss. Weight-related quality of life (QoL) also improved in people using incretin therapies. The glycaemic improvements achieved with GLP-1 receptor agonists, coupled with the low incidence of hypoglycaemia and ability to cause weight loss, seemed to offset potential concern about injections. It is plausible that superior patient-reported benefits found in clinical trials may translate into improved, clinically meaningful, long-term outcomes through increased treatment acceptability. Long-term, prospective data are needed to ascertain whether this is the case in practice. PMID:22420869

  12. The effect of gum chewing on blood GLP-1 concentration in fasted, healthy, non-obese men.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianping; Xiao, Xinhua; Li, Yuxiu; Zheng, Jia; Li, Wenhui; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Zhixin

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated the effect of chewing on blood GLP-1 concentration by having volunteers to chew sugarless gum. Our intention was to explore the neural mechanisms regulating the secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1(GLP-1). After fasting for 12 h, 12 healthy male, non-obese volunteers (18 < BMI < 30), were asked to chew sugarless gum at a frequency of 80 times every 2 min for a total of 30 min. Blood samples were collected before the start of chewing and 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 min after the start of chewing. Satiety and hunger were evaluated on a scale from 0 to 100 at each time point. Compared with the control group, the test group's satiety was increased at 15, 25, and 30 min (p = 0.043, p = 0.014 and p = 0.018, respectively) after they began chewing sugarless gum 80 times every 2 min. The blood GLP-1 level of the test group at 30 min was 49.6 ± 20.3 pmol/l, significantly higher than that of the control group (38.9 ± 20.9 pmol/l; p = 0.031). There was no significant difference in the test group's GLP-1 concentration at each time point. In the control group, compared to baseline, the GLP-1 concentrations at 15, 25, and 30 min were significantly decreased (p = 0.042, p = 0.0214 and p = 0.012, respectively). No significant differences in the blood concentration of glucose, insulin and GIP or hunger were observed between groups. Our study suggests that fasting sugarless gum chewing can increase satiety and reduce the decrease in GLP-1 concentration. PMID:25758865

  13. DPP-4 inhibition increases GIP and decreases GLP-1 incretin effects during intravenous glucose tolerance test in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Freyse, Ernst-Joachim; Berg, Sabine; Kohnert, Klaus-Dieter; Heinke, Peter; Salzsieder, Eckhard

    2011-03-01

    GIP metabolite [GIP (3-42)] and GLP-1 metabolite [GLP-1 (9-36) amide] have been reported to differ with regard to biological actions. Systemic DPP-4 inhibition can therefore reveal different actions of GIP and GLP-1. In catheter wearing Wistar rats, insulinotropic effects of equipotent doses of GIP (2.0 nmol/kg) and GLP-1 (7-36) amide (4.0 nmol/kg) and vehicle were tested in the absence/presence of DPP-4 inhibition. Blood glucose and insulin were frequently sampled. DPP-4 inhibitor was given at -20 min, the incretin at -5 min and the intravenous glucose tolerance test (0.4 g glucose/kg) commenced at 0 min. G-AUC and I-AUC, insulinogenic index and glucose efflux, were calculated from glucose and insulin curves. Systemic DPP-4 inhibition potentiated the acute GIP incretin effects: I-AUC (115±34 vs. 153±39 ng·min/ml), increased the insulinogenic index (0.74±0.24 vs. 0.99±0.26 ng/mmol), and improved glucose efflux (19.8±3.1 vs. 20.5±5.0 min⁻¹). The GLP-1 incretin effects were diminished: I-AUC (124±18 vs. 106±38 ng·min/ml), the insulinogenic index was decreased (0.70±0.18 vs. 0.50±0.19 ng/mmol), and glucose efflux declined (14.9±3.1 vs. 11.1±3.7 min⁻¹). GLP-1 and GIP differ remarkably in their glucoregulatory actions in healthy rats when DPP-4 is inhibited. These previously unrecognized actions of DPP-4 inhibitors could have implications for future use in humans. PMID:21281062

  14. Gut Hormones and Appetite Control: A Focus on PYY and GLP-1 as Therapeutic Targets in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    De Silva, Akila

    2012-01-01

    The global obesity epidemic has resulted in significant morbidity and mortality. However, the medical treatment of obesity is limited. Gastric bypass is an effective surgical treatment but carries significant perioperative risks. The gut hormones, peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY) and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), are elevated following gastric bypass and have been shown to reduce food intake. They may provide new therapeutic targets. This review article provides an overview of the central control of food intake and the role of PYY and GLP-1 in appetite control. Key translational animal and human studies are reviewed. PMID:22375166

  15. Structural insight into antibody-mediated antagonism of the Glucagon-like peptide-1 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Hennen, Stephanie; Kodra, János T; Soroka, Vladyslav; Krogh, Berit O; Wu, Xiaoai; Kaastrup, Peter; Ørskov, Cathrine; Rønn, Sif G; Schluckebier, Gerd; Barbateskovic, Silvia; Gandhi, Prafull S; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    The Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a member of the class B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family and a well-established target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The N-terminal extracellular domain (ECD) of GLP-1R is important for GLP-1 binding and the crystal structure of the GLP-1/ECD complex was reported previously. The first structure of a class B GPCR transmembrane (TM) domain was solved recently, but the full length receptor structure is still not well understood. Here we describe the molecular details of antibody-mediated antagonism of the GLP-1R using both in vitro pharmacology and x-ray crystallography. We showed that the antibody Fab fragment (Fab 3F52) blocked the GLP-1 binding site of the ECD directly and thereby acts as a competitive antagonist of native GLP-1. Interestingly, Fab 3F52 also blocked a short peptide agonist believed to engage primarily the transmembrane and extracellular loop region of GLP-1R, whereas functionality of an allosteric small-molecule agonist was not inhibited. This study has implications for the structural understanding of the GLP-1R and related class B GPCRs, which is important for the development of new and improved therapeutics targeting these receptors. PMID:27196125

  16. Resource use and outcomes associated with initiation of injectable therapies for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Brice, Richard; Shelley, Sharon; Chaturvedi, Pankaj; Glah, Divina; Ashley, Donna; Hadi, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) often requires intervention with oral and injectable therapies. Across National Health Service (NHS) England, injectable therapies may be initiated in secondary, intermediate or primary care. We wished to understand resource utilization, pathways of care, clinical outcomes, and experience of patients with T2DM initiated on injectable therapies. Method: We conducted three service evaluations of initiation of injectable therapies (glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) or basal insulin) for T2DM in primary, secondary and intermediate care. Evaluations included retrospective review of medical records and service administration; prospective evaluation of NHS staff time on each episode of patient contact during a 3-month initiation period; patient-experience survey for those attending for initiation. Data from each evaluation were analysed separately and results stratified by therapy type. Results: A total of 133 patients were included across all settings; 54 were basal-insulin initiations. After initiation, the mean HbA1c level fell for both types of therapies, and weight increased for patients on basal insulin yet fell for patients on GLP-1 RA. The mean cost of staff time per patient per initiation was: £43.81 for GLP-1 RA in primary care; £243.49 for GLP-1 RA and £473.63 for basal insulin in intermediate care; £518.99 for GLP-1 RA and £571.11 for basal insulin in secondary care. Patient-reported questionnaires were completed by 20 patients, suggesting that patients found it easy to speak to the diabetes team, had opportunities to discuss concerns, and felt that these concerns were addressed adequately. Conclusion: All three services achieved a reduction in HbA1c level after initiation. Patterns of weight gain with basal insulin and weight loss with GLP-1 RA were as expected. Primary care was less resource-intensive and costly, and was driven by lower staff costs and fewer clinic visits. PMID:25657811

  17. Advances in Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sabet, Amir; Biersack, Hans-Jürgen; Ezziddin, Samer

    2016-01-01

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is a very effective treatment modality for advanced neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), representing a teaching model for truly targeted antitumor therapy. With the growing cumulative evidence of PRRT in various treatment settings, we are witnessing increased perception of this modality as a potent treatment option in advanced disease. Although most data derives from retrospective analyses, results from prospective comparative evaluations, such as the NETTER-1 trial, are eagerly awaited and should help to raise PRRT to a higher level of evidence. At the same time, as increased levels of evidence are anticipated by prospective evaluations, further methodological improvements are going on in different ways and aspects of radionuclide therapy, mainly regarding the radiopharmaceuticals, the combination with other radionuclides or cytotoxic drugs, and the route of administration. Although diversity of PRRT increases-not supporting cumulative evidence as opposed to uniform treatment-it is very likely to achieve significant increase of efficacy by these efforts in the near future. As the intraarterial administration of PRRT agents in liver-dominant metastatic disease has the potential to improve outcome, it would have to be shown as to which patients would benefit from this approach, to what extent the benefit would be, and to when it would justify the increased efforts for patients and treating institutes. The approach of combining cytotoxic or radiosensitizing drugs with the PRRT agents seems to trigger a major boost of efficacy in pancreatic NET. The midterm future would show the extent of benefit in terms of long-term outcome and would probably lead to inclusion into clinical routine for this particular NET entity. The translation of somatostatin-receptor antagonists into human application represents another major source of significant improvement in terms of PRRT's benefit-toxicity ratio. Eventually, it may not be completely unlikely to see another radiopharmaceutical being regarded as the PRRT agent of choice in the midterm future. PMID:26687856

  18. Effects of PYY3-36 and GLP-1 on energy intake, energy expenditure, and appetite in overweight men.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Julie Berg; Gregersen, Nikolaj Ture; Pedersen, Sue D; Arentoft, Johanne L; Ritz, Christian; Schwartz, Thue W; Holst, Jens Juul; Astrup, Arne; Sjödin, Anders

    2014-06-01

    Our aim was to examine the effects of GLP-1 and PYY3-36, separately and in combination, on energy intake, energy expenditure, appetite sensations, glucose and fat metabolism, ghrelin, and vital signs in healthy overweight men. Twenty-five healthy male subjects participated in this randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, four-arm crossover study (BMI 29 ± 3 kg/m(2), age 33 ± 9 yr). On separate days they received a 150-min intravenous infusion of 1) 0.8 pmol·kg(-1)·min(-1) PYY3-36, 2) 1.0 pmol·kg(-1)·min(-1) GLP-1, 3) GLP-1 + PYY3-36, or 4) placebo. Ad libitum energy intake was assessed during the final 30 min. Measurements of appetite sensations, energy expenditure and fat oxidation, vital signs, and blood variables were collected throughout the infusion period. No effect on energy intake was found after monoinfusions of PYY3-36 (-4.2 ± 4.8%, P = 0.8) or GLP-1 (-3.0 ± 4.5%, P = 0.9). However, the coinfusion reduced energy intake compared with placebo (-30.4 ± 6.5%, P < 0.0001) and more than the sum of the monoinfusions (P < 0.001), demonstrating a synergistic effect. Coinfusion slightly increased sensation of nausea (P < 0.05), but this effect could not explain the effect on energy intake. A decrease in plasma ghrelin was found after all treatments compared with placebo (all P < 0.05); however, infusions of GLP-1 + PYY3-36 resulted in an additional decrease compared with the monoinfusions (both P < 0.01). We conclude that coinfusion of GLP-1 and PYY3-36 exerted a synergistic effect on energy intake. The satiating effect of the meal was enhanced by GLP-1 and PYY3-36 in combination compared with placebo. Coinfusion was accompanied by slightly increased nausea and a decrease in plasma ghrelin, but neither of these factors could explain the reduction in energy intake. PMID:24735885

  19. Supplementation with a fish protein hydrolysate (Micromesistius poutassou): effects on body weight, body composition, and CCK/GLP-1 secretion

    PubMed Central

    Nobile, Vincenzo; Duclos, Elisa; Michelotti, Angela; Bizzaro, Gioia; Negro, Massimo; Soisson, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Background Fish protein hydrolysates (FPHs) have been reported as a suitable source of proteins for human nutrition because of their balanced amino acid composition and positive effect on gastrointestinal absorption. Objective Here, we investigated the effect of a FPH, Slimpro®, obtained from blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou) muscle by enzymatic hydrolysis, on body composition and on stimulating cholecystokinin (CCK) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion. Design A randomized clinical study was carried out on 120, slightly overweight (25 kg/m2 ≤ BMI<30 kg/m2), male (25%) and female (75%) subjects. FPH was tested in a food supplement at two doses (1.4 and 2.8 g) to establish if a dose–effect relationship exists. Product use was associated with a mild hypocaloric diet (−300 kcal/day). Body composition (body weight; fat mass; extracellular water; and circumference of waist, thighs, and hips) and CCK/GLP-1 blood levels were measured at the beginning of the study and after 45 and 90 days of product use. CCK/GLP-1 levels were measured since they are involved in controlling food intake. Results Treated subjects reported an improvement of body weight composition and an increased blood concentration of both CCK and GLP-1. No differences were found between the 1.4 and 2.8 g FPH doses, indicating a plateau effect starting from 1.4 g FPH. Conclusions Both 1.4 and 2.8 g of FPH were effective in improving body composition and in increasing CCK and GLP-1 blood levels. PMID:26829186

  20. Acarbose, lente carbohydrate, and prebiotics promote metabolic health and longevity by stimulating intestinal production of GLP-1

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, Mark F; DiNicolantonio, James J

    2015-01-01

    The α-glucosidase inhibitor acarbose, which slows carbohydrate digestion and blunts postprandial rises in plasma glucose, has long been used to treat patients with type 2 diabetes or glucose intolerance. Like metformin, acarbose tends to aid weight control, postpone onset of diabetes and decrease risk for cardiovascular events. Acarbose treatment can favourably affect blood pressure, serum lipids, platelet aggregation, progression of carotid intima-media thickness and postprandial endothelial dysfunction. In mice, lifetime acarbose feeding can increase median and maximal lifespan—an effect associated with increased plasma levels of fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) and decreased levels of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). There is growing reason to suspect that an upregulation of fasting and postprandial production of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)—stemming from increased delivery of carbohydrate to L cells in the distal intestinal tract—is largely responsible for the versatile health protection conferred by acarbose. Indeed, GLP-1 exerts protective effects on vascular endothelium, the liver, the heart, pancreatic β cells, and the brain which can rationalise many of the benefits reported with acarbose. And GLP-1 may act on the liver to modulate its production of FGF21 and IGF-I, thereby promoting longevity. The benefits of acarbose are likely mimicked by diets featuring slowly-digested ‘lente’ carbohydrate, and by certain nutraceuticals which can slow carbohydrate absorption. Prebiotics that promote colonic generation of short-chain fatty acids represent an alternative strategy for boosting intestinal GLP-1 production. The health benefits of all these measures presumably would be potentiated by concurrent use of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors, which slow the proteolysis of GLP-1 in the blood. PMID:25685364

  1. Acarbose, lente carbohydrate, and prebiotics promote metabolic health and longevity by stimulating intestinal production of GLP-1.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F; DiNicolantonio, James J

    2015-01-01

    The α-glucosidase inhibitor acarbose, which slows carbohydrate digestion and blunts postprandial rises in plasma glucose, has long been used to treat patients with type 2 diabetes or glucose intolerance. Like metformin, acarbose tends to aid weight control, postpone onset of diabetes and decrease risk for cardiovascular events. Acarbose treatment can favourably affect blood pressure, serum lipids, platelet aggregation, progression of carotid intima-media thickness and postprandial endothelial dysfunction. In mice, lifetime acarbose feeding can increase median and maximal lifespan-an effect associated with increased plasma levels of fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) and decreased levels of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). There is growing reason to suspect that an upregulation of fasting and postprandial production of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-stemming from increased delivery of carbohydrate to L cells in the distal intestinal tract-is largely responsible for the versatile health protection conferred by acarbose. Indeed, GLP-1 exerts protective effects on vascular endothelium, the liver, the heart, pancreatic β cells, and the brain which can rationalise many of the benefits reported with acarbose. And GLP-1 may act on the liver to modulate its production of FGF21 and IGF-I, thereby promoting longevity. The benefits of acarbose are likely mimicked by diets featuring slowly-digested 'lente' carbohydrate, and by certain nutraceuticals which can slow carbohydrate absorption. Prebiotics that promote colonic generation of short-chain fatty acids represent an alternative strategy for boosting intestinal GLP-1 production. The health benefits of all these measures presumably would be potentiated by concurrent use of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors, which slow the proteolysis of GLP-1 in the blood. PMID:25685364

  2. Liraglutide: A review of its therapeutic use as a once daily GLP-1 analog for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Dharmalingam, Mala; Sriram, Usha; Baruah, Manash P.

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a progressive disease associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Even though progress have been accomplished in the management of type 2 diabetes, current treatment preferences for patients with this disease still fall short to address disease progression. With the present therapy, glycaemic control remains suboptimal and are often associated with weight gain and hypoglycaemia. Glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone secreted from the small intestine that lowers fasting and postprandial glucose through multiple mechanisms including glucose-dependent insulin secretion, reduction of glucagon secretion, delaying gastric emptying and increased satiety. Liraglutide, a human glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) analogue is a treatment for T2DM that is administered as a once-daily subcutaneous injection. The efficacy and tolerability of liraglutide at doses of 0.6, 1.2, and 1.8 mg for T2DM, in combination with, and compared with, other T2DM treatments were investigated in the Liraglutide Effect and Action in Diabetes (LEAD) Phase III clinical trial program. In the LEAD trial, treatment with liraglutide was associated with substantial improvements in glycaemic control and low risk of hypoglycaemia. In addition liraglutide significantly improved β-cell function, reduced systolic blood pressure (BP) and induced weight loss. Overall, liraglutide was well tolerated. Recent data on safety and efficacy of liraglutide from real-life clinical practice settings also reiterate the better therapeutic profile of this molecule. Based on results from the LEAD programme, and real-life clinical experience, liraglutide has been demonstrated as an effective therapeutic intervention even at the early stage of diabetes regardless of with what, it has been used. PMID:21584160

  3. The pepper GNA-related lectin and PAN domain protein gene, CaGLP1, is required for plant cell death and defense signaling during bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nak Hyun; Lee, Dong Hyuk; Choi, Du Seok; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-12-01

    Carbohydrate-binding proteins, commonly referred to as lectins or agglutinins, function in defense responses to microbial pathogens. Pepper (Capsicum annuum) GNA-related lectin and PAN-domain protein gene CaGLP1 was isolated and functionally characterized from pepper leaves infected with Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv). CaGLP1 contained an amine-terminus prokaryotic membrane lipoprotein lipid attachment site, a Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA)-related lectin domain responsible for the recognition of high-mannose N-glycans, and a carboxyl-terminus PAN/apple domain. RNA gel blot and immunoblot analyses determined that CaGLP1 was strongly induced in pepper by compatible and incompatible Xcv infection. CaGLP1 protein localized primarily to the plasma membrane and exhibited mannose-binding specificity. CaGLP1-silenced pepper plants were more susceptible to compatible or incompatible Xcv infection compared with that of non-silenced control plants. CaGLP1 silencing in pepper leaves did not accumulate H2O2 and induce cell death during incompatible Xcv infection. Defense-related CaDEF1 (defensin) gene expression was significantly reduced in CaGLP1-silenced pepper plants. CaGLP1-overexpression in Arabidopsis thaliana enhanced resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. Defense-related AtPDF1.2 expression was elevated in CaGLP1-overexpression lines. Together, these results suggest that CaGLP1 is required for plant cell death and defense responses through the reactive oxygen species burst and downstream defense-related gene expression in response to bacterial pathogen challenge. PMID:26706081

  4. Effects of high-fat diet and the anti-diabetic drug metformin on circulating GLP-1 and the relative number of intestinal L-cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Elevated serum free fatty acids (FFAs) contribute to the pathogenesis of type-2-diabetes (T2D), and lipotoxicity is observed in many cell types. We recently showed that simulated hyperlipidemia induces lipoapoptosis also in GLP-1-secreting L-cells in vitro, while metformin confers lipoprotection. The aim of this study was to determine if a high fat diet (HFD) reduces the number of enteroendocrine L-cells and/or GLP-1 plasma levels in a rodent model, and potential effects thereupon of metformin treatment. Methods C57/Bl6 mice received control/HFD for 12-weeks, and oral administration of metformin/saline for the last 14 days. Blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin and plasma insulin and GLP-1 were determined before and after treatment with metformin using ELISAs. GLP-1-immunopositive cells in intestinal tissue sections were quantified using immunohistochemistry. Results A HFD increased blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, and fasting plasma insulin (33%, 15% and 70% increase, respectively), in conjunction with reduced oral glucose tolerance, indicating the manifestation of insulin resistance. Metformin counteracted these adverse effects, while also reducing prandial plasma FFAs. The number of GLP-1-positive cells was indicated to be reduced (55% reduction of the number of GLP-1-positive cells, p = 0.134), while there was a trend toward increased prandial plasma GLP-1 despite reduced food intake following a HFD. Conclusion HFD-fed mice rapidly develop insulin resistance. Metformin exerts beneficial glucose lowering effects, and is indicated to improve the incretin response. Albeit no significant effect, a HFD tends to reduce the number of GLP-1-positive cells. However, considering concurrent normal or increased plasma GLP-1, any reduction in the number of GLP-1-positive cells, probably does not contribute to development of the glucose intolerance, but may contribute to progression of the diabetic state through eventual loss of a functional incretin response. PMID:25028601

  5. Real-time trafficking and signaling of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Roed, Sarah Noerklit; Wismann, Pernille; Underwood, Christina Rye; Kulahin, Nikolaj; Iversen, Helle; Cappelen, Karen Arevad; Schäffer, Lauge; Lehtonen, Janne; Hecksher-Soerensen, Jacob; Secher, Anna; Mathiesen, Jesper Mosolff; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Whistler, Jennifer L; Knudsen, Sanne Moeller; Waldhoer, Maria

    2014-02-15

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 incretin receptor (GLP-1R) of family B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is a major drug target in type-2-diabetes due to its regulatory effect on post-prandial blood-glucose levels. The mechanism(s) controlling GLP-1R mediated signaling are far from fully understood. A fundamental mechanism controlling the signaling capacity of GPCRs is the post-endocytic trafficking of receptors between recycling and degradative fates. Here, we combined microscopy with novel real-time assays to monitor both receptor trafficking and signaling in living cells. We find that the human GLP-1R internalizes rapidly and with similar kinetics in response to equipotent concentrations of GLP-1 and the stable GLP-1 analogues exendin-4 and liraglutide. Receptor internalization was confirmed in mouse pancreatic islets. GLP-1R is shown to be a recycling receptor with faster recycling rates mediated by GLP-1 as compared to exendin-4 and liraglutide. Furthermore, a prolonged cycling of ligand-activated GLP-1Rs was observed and is suggested to be correlated with a prolonged cAMP signal. PMID:24275181

  6. Role of the Glucagon-Like-Peptide-1 Receptor in the Control of Energy Balance

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Matthew R.; De Jonghe, Bart C.; Kanoski, Scott E.

    2010-01-01

    The peripheral and central glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) systems play an essential role in glycemic and energy balance regulation. Thus, pharmacological targeting of peripheral and/or central GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1R) may represent a potential long-term treatment option for both obesity and type-II diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Uncovering and understanding the neural pathways, physiological mechanisms, specific GLP-1R populations, and intracellular signaling cascades that mediate the food intake inhibitory and incretin effects produced by GLP-1R activation are vital to the development of these potential successful therapeutics. Particular focus will be given to the essential role of the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) in the caudal brainstem, as well as the gut-to-brain communication by vagal afferent fibers in mediating the physiological and behavioral responses following GLP-1R activation. PMID:20226203

  7. Relief of diabetes by duodenal-jejunal bypass sleeve implantation in the high-fat diet and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat model is associated with an increase in GLP-1 levels and the number of GLP-1-positive cells

    PubMed Central

    SHUANG, JINQUAN; ZHANG, YING; MA, LIMEI; TAN, XUEMING; HUANG, JING; WANG, XIANG; XIONG, GUANYIN; JIANG, ZHONGHUA; ZHANG, XIUHUA; DU, SHIQING; GU, YONGSONG; SHI, XIANGYANG; FAN, ZHINING

    2015-01-01

    A recently invented duodenal-jejunal bypass sleeve (DJBS) implanted in the duodenum and proximal jejunum has exhibited good glycemic control in diabetes mellitus. However, the specific mechanism by which DJBS placement induces the remission of diabetes is not well known. Previous studies have indicated that changes in the pattern of gut hormone secretion may play a role. The aim of the present study was to explore the role of intestinal L cells and the production of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) by these cells in DJBS implantation-induced glycemic control in diabetic rats. A DJBS was placed in the proximal small intestine of rats with diabetes induced by a high-fat diet and low-dose streptozotocin (STZ), and the effects of the DJBS on the remission of diabetes and the GLP-1 levels of plasma and intestinal tissues were investigated 12 weeks after DJBS placement. The number of intestinal GLP-1 positive cells was also counted. When the DJBS had been in place for 12 weeks, the plasma glucose level of the DJBS-implanted rats decreased significantly from 23.33±1.56 mmol/l prior to surgery to 7.70±0.84 mmol/l and the diabetes mellitus was relieved completely; however, diabetic control rats and diabetic rats subjected to sham surgery did not show any improvement. Parallel with the remission of diabetes, the plasma and distal ileum GLP-1 levels of rats in the DJBS implantation group were also higher than those of rats in the diabetic control and sham surgery groups. The number of GLP-1-positive cells in the distal ileum was also higher in the DJBS implantation group than in the diabetic control and sham surgery groups (31.0±2.6 vs. 23.5±4.4 vs. 23.0±3.2 respectively; P<0.01). DJBS implantation effectively led to the remission of diabetes in rats with diabetes induced by a high-fat diet and low-dose STZ when implanted for 12 weeks. The remission of diabetes may be associated with the increase in the number of L cells and elevation of GLP-1 levels induced by DJBS implantation. PMID:26622491

  8. Synergism of peptide receptor-targeted Auger electron radiation therapy with anti-angiogenic compounds in a mouse model of neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuroendocrine tumors are well vascularized and express specific cell surface markers, such as somatostatin receptors and the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R). Using the Rip1Tag2 transgenic mouse model of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET), we have investigated the potential benefit of a combination of anti-angiogenic treatment with targeted internal radiotherapy. Methods [Lys40(Ahx-DTPA-111In)NH2]-exendin-4, a radiopeptide that selectively binds to GLP-1R expressed on insulinoma and other neuroendocrine tumor cells, was co-administered with oral vatalanib (an inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR)) or imatinib (a c-kit/PDGFR inhibitor). The control groups included single-agent kinase inhibitor treatments and [Lys40(Ahx-DTPA-natIn)NH2]-exendin-4 monotherapy. For biodistribution, Rip1Tag2 mice were pre-treated with oral vatalanib or imatinib for 0, 3, 5, or 7 days at a dose of 100 mg/kg. Subsequently, [Lys40(Ahx-DTPA-111In)NH2]-exendin-4 was administered i.v., and the biodistribution was assessed after 4 h. For therapy, the mice were injected with 1.1 MBq [Lys40(Ahx-DTPA-111In)NH2]-exendin-4 and treated with vatalanib or imatinib 100 mg/kg orally for another 7 days. Tumor volume, tumor cell apoptosis and proliferation, and microvessel density were quantified. Results Combination of [Lys40(Ahx-DTPA-111In)NH2]-exendin-4 and vatalanib was significantly more effective than single treatments (p < 0.05) and reduced the tumor volume by 97% in the absence of organ damage. The pre-treatment of mice with vatalanib led to a reduction in the tumor uptake of [Lys40(Ahx-DTPA-111In)NH2]-exendin-4, indicating that concomitant administration of vatalanib and the radiopeptide was the best approach. Imatinib did not show a synergistic effect with [Lys40(Ahx-DTPA-111In)NH2]-exendin-4. Conclusion The combination of 1.1 MBq of [Lys40(Ahx-DTPA-111In)NH2]-exendin-4 with 100 mg/kg vatalanib had the same effect on a neuroendocrine tumor as the injection of 28 MBq of the radiopeptide alone but without any apparent side effects, such as radiation damage of the kidneys. PMID:24528513

  9. Somatostatin Analogues for Receptor Targeted Photodynamic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kaščáková, Slávka; Hofland, Leo J.; De Bruijn, Henriette S.; Ye, Yunpeng; Achilefu, Samuel; van der Wansem, Katy; van der Ploeg-van den Heuvel, Angelique; van Koetsveld, Peter M.; Brugts, Michael P.; van der Lelij, Aart-Jan; Sterenborg, Henricus J. C. M.; ten Hagen, Timo L. M.; Robinson, Dominic J.; van Hagen, Martin P.

    2014-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an established treatment modality, used mainly for anticancer therapy that relies on the interaction of photosensitizer, light and oxygen. For the treatment of pathologies in certain anatomical sites, improved targeting of the photosensitizer is necessary to prevent damage to healthy tissue. We report on a novel dual approach of targeted PDT (vascular and cellular targeting) utilizing the expression of neuropeptide somatostatin receptor (sst2) on tumor and neovascular-endothelial cells. We synthesized two conjugates containing the somatostatin analogue [Tyr3]-octreotate and Chlorin e6 (Ce6): Ce6-K3-[Tyr3]-octreotate (1) and Ce6-[Tyr3]-octreotate-K3-[Tyr3]-octreotate (2). Investigation of the uptake and photodynamic activity of conjugates in-vitro in human erythroleukemic K562 cells showed that conjugation of [Tyr3]-octreotate with Ce6 in conjugate 1 enhances uptake (by a factor 2) in cells over-expressing sst2 compared to wild-type cells. Co-treatment with excess free Octreotide abrogated the phototoxicity of conjugate 1 indicative of a specific sst2-mediated effect. In contrast conjugate 2 showed no receptor-mediated effect due to its high hydrophobicity. When compared with un-conjugated Ce6, the PDT activity of conjugate 1 was lower. However, it showed higher photostability which may compensate for its lower phototoxicity. Intra-vital fluorescence pharmacokinetic studies of conjugate 1 in rat skin-fold observation chambers transplanted with sst2+ AR42J acinar pancreas tumors showed significantly different uptake profiles compared to free Ce6. Co-treatment with free Octreotide significantly reduced conjugate uptake in tumor tissue (by a factor 4) as well as in the chamber neo-vasculature. These results show that conjugate 1 might have potential as an in-vivo sst2 targeting photosensitizer conjugate. PMID:25111655

  10. A Comparison of the Effects of the GLP-1 Analogue Liraglutide and Insulin Glargine on Endothelial Function and Metabolic Parameters: A Randomized, Controlled Trial Sapporo Athero-Incretin Study 2 (SAIS2)

    PubMed Central

    Nomoto, Hiroshi; Miyoshi, Hideaki; Furumoto, Tomoo; Oba, Koji; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki; Miyoshi, Arina; Kondo, Takuma; Tsuchida, Kenichi; Atsumi, Tatsuya; Manda, Naoki; Kurihara, Yoshio; Aoki, Shin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives GLP-1 improves hyperglycemia, and it has been reported to have favorable effects on atherosclerosis. However, it has not been fully elucidated whether GLP-1 is able to improve endothelial function in patients with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, we investigated the efficacy of the GLP-1 analogue, liraglutide on endothelial function and glycemic metabolism compared with insulin glargine therapy. Materials and Methods In this multicenter, prospective randomized parallel-group comparison study, 31 diabetic outpatients (aged 60.3 ± 10.3 years with HbA1c levels of 8.6 ± 0.8%) with current metformin and/or sulfonylurea treatment were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive liraglutide or glargine therapy once daily for 14 weeks. Flow mediated dilation (FMD), a comprehensive panel of hemodynamic parameters (Task Force Monitor), and serum metabolic markers were assessed before and after the treatment period. Results A greater reduction (worsening) in %FMD was observed in the glargine group, although this change was not statistically different from the liraglutide group (liraglutide; 5.7 to 5.4%, glargine 6.7 to 5.7%). The augmentation index, C-peptide index, derivatives of reactive oxygen metabolites and BMI were significantly improved in the liraglutide group. Central systolic blood pressure and NT-proBNP also tended to be improved in the liraglutide-treated group, while improvements in HbA1c levels were similar between groups. Cardiac index, blood pressure and most other metabolic parameters were not different. Conclusions Regardless of glycemic improvement, early liraglutide therapy did not affect endothelial function but may provide favorable effects on beta-cell function and cardioprotection in type 2 diabetics without advanced atherosclerosis. Trial Registration UMIN Clinical Trials Registry System as trial ID UMIN000005331. PMID:26284918

  11. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy for metastatic paragangliomas.

    PubMed

    Pinato, David J; Black, James R M; Ramaswami, Ramya; Tan, Tricia M; Adjogatse, Delali; Sharma, Rohini

    2016-05-01

    There is little evidence to direct the management of malignant paragangliomas (mPGL) beyond initial surgical treatment. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT), using somatostatin analogues, is effective in other neuroendocrine tumours, but data on its efficacy in treating mPGL are scarce. We report safety and efficacy outcomes from a case series of five patients with advanced mPGLs treated with (177)Lu-DOTATATE PRRT. The mean age of our cohort was 34 years (range 16-47); 4 patients were male with bone disease being the most prevalent metastatic site. PRRT scheme varied between 1 and 4 cycles, with premature cessation due to suspected pneumonitis in one case and disease progression in another. Three patients with previously documented progressive disease achieved stabilization following treatment; one had partial response and one was treatment refractory. Median progression-free survival was 17 months (range 0-78 months). 177-Lu-DOTATATE is an effective therapy in mPGLs in this molecularly defined patient cohort, warranting further investigation in larger studies including hereditary and sporadic mPGL. PMID:27059363

  12. Recent developments in receptor tyrosine kinases targeted anticancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Raval, Samir H.; Singh, Ratn D.; Joshi, Dilip V.; Patel, Hitesh B.; Mody, Shailesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Novel concepts and understanding of receptors lead to discoveries and optimization of many small molecules and antibodies as anti-cancerous drugs. Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are such a promising class of receptors under the investigation in past three decades. RTKs are one of the essential mediators of cell signaling mechanism for various cellular processes. Transformations such as overexpression, dysregulation, or mutations of RTKs may result into malignancy, and thus are an important target for anticancer therapy. Numerous subfamilies of RTKs, such as epidermal growth factor receptor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, fibroblast growth factor receptors, insulin-like growth factor receptor, and hepatocyte growth factor receptor, have been being investigated in recent years as target for anticancer therapy. The present review focuses several small molecules drugs as well as monoclonal antibodies targeting aforesaid subfamilies either approved or under investigation to treat the various cancers. PMID:27051190

  13. Neural effects of gut- and brain-derived glucagon-like peptide-1 and its receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Katsurada, Kenichi; Yada, Toshihiko

    2016-04-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is derived from both the enteroendocrine L cells and preproglucagon-expressing neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) of the brain stem. As GLP-1 is cleaved by dipeptidyl peptidase-4 yielding a half-life of less than 2 min, it is plausible that the gut-derived GLP-1, released postprandially, exerts its effects on the brain mainly by interacting with vagal afferent neurons located at the intestinal or hepatic portal area. GLP-1 neurons in the NTS widely project in the central nervous system and act as a neurotransmitter. One of the physiological roles of brain-derived GLP-1 is restriction of feeding. GLP-1 receptor agonists have recently been used to treat type 2 diabetic patients, and have been shown to exhibit pleiotropic effects beyond incretin action, which involve brain functions. GLP-1 receptor agonist administered in the periphery is stable because of its resistance to dipeptidyl peptidase-4, and is highly likely to act on the brain by passing through the blood-brain barrier (BBB), as well as interacting with vagal afferent nerves. Central actions of GLP-1 have various roles including regulation of feeding, weight, glucose and lipid metabolism, cardiovascular functions, cognitive functions, and stress and emotional responses. In the present review, we focus on the source of GLP-1 and the pathway by which peripheral GLP-1 informs the brain, and then discuss recent findings on the central effects of GLP-1 and GLP-1 receptor agonists. PMID:27186358

  14. Agonist-induced internalization and recycling of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor in transfected fibroblasts and in insulinomas.

    PubMed

    Widmann, C; Dolci, W; Thorens, B

    1995-08-15

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is the most potent stimulator of glucose-induced insulin secretion and its pancreatic beta-cell receptor is a member of a new subfamily of G-protein-coupled receptors which includes the receptors for vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, secretin and glucagon. Here we studied agonist-induced GLP-1 receptor internalization in receptor-transfected Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts using three different approaches. First, iodinated GLP-1 bound at 4 degrees C to transfected cells was internalized with a t 1/2 of 2-3 min following warming up of the cells to 37 degrees C. Secondly, exposure to GLP-1 induced a shift in the distribution of the receptors from plasma membrane-enriched to endosomes-enriched membrane fractions, as assessed by Western blot detection of the receptors using specific antibodies. Thirdly, continuous exposure of GLP-1 receptor-expressing cells to iodinated GLP-1 led to a linear accumulation of peptide degradation products in the medium following a lag time of 20-30 min, indicating a continuous cycling of the receptor between the plasma membrane and endosomal compartments. Potassium depletion and hypertonicity inhibited transferrin endocytosis, a process known to occur via coated pit formation, as well as GLP-1 receptor endocytosis. In contrast to GLP-1, the antagonist exendin-(9-39) did not lead to receptor endocytosis. Surface re-expression following one round of GLP-1 receptor endocytosis occurred with a half-time of about 15 min. The difference in internalization and surface re-expression rates led to a progressive redistribution of the receptor in intracellular compartments upon continuous exposure to GLP-1. Finally, endogenous GLP-1 receptors expressed by insulinoma cells were also found to be internalized upon agonist binding. Together our data demonstrate that the GLP-1 receptor is internalized upon agonist binding by a route similar to that taken by single transmembrane segment receptors. The characterization of the pathway and kinetics of GLP-1-induced receptor endocytosis will be helpful towards understanding the role of internalization and recycling in the control of signal transduction by this receptor. PMID:7646446

  15. Expression and Distribution of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor mRNA, Protein and Binding in the Male Nonhuman Primate (Macaca mulatta) Brain

    PubMed Central

    Heppner, Kristy M.; Kirigiti, Melissa; Secher, Anna; Paulsen, Sarah Juel; Buckingham, Rikley; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte B.

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is released from endocrine L-cells lining the gut in response to food ingestion. However, GLP-1 is also produced in the nucleus of the solitary tract, where it acts as an anorectic neurotransmitter and key regulator of many autonomic and neuroendocrine functions. The expression and projections of GLP-1-producing neurons is highly conserved between rodent and primate brain, although a few key differences have been identified. The GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) has been mapped in the rodent brain, but no studies have described the distribution of GLP-1Rs in the nonhuman primate central nervous system. Here, we characterized the distribution of GLP-1R mRNA and protein in the adult macaque brain using in situ hybridization, radioligand receptor autoradiography, and immunohistochemistry with a primate specific GLP-1R antibody. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the GLP-1R is localized to cell bodies and fiber terminals in a very selective distribution throughout the brain. Consistent with the functional role of the GLP-1R system, we find the highest concentration of GLP-1R-immunoreactivity present in select hypothalamic and brainstem regions that regulate feeding, including the paraventricular and arcuate hypothalamic nuclei, as well as the area postrema, nucleus of the solitary tract, and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus. Together, our data demonstrate that GLP-1R distribution is highly conserved between rodent and primate, although a few key species differences were identified, including the amygdala, where GLP-1R expression is much higher in primate than in rodent. PMID:25380238

  16. Therapeutic stimulation of GLP-1 and GIP protein with DPP-4 inhibitors for type-2 diabetes treatment.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Alok; Paliwal, Geetanjali; Upadhyay, Nisha; Tiwari, Archana

    2015-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibition is a new treatment for type-2 diabetes. DPP-4 inhibition increases levels of active GLP-1. GLP-1 enhances insulin secretion and diminishes glucagon secretion, in this manner reducing glucose concentrations in blood. A number of DPP-4 inhibitors are under clinical development. However, the durability and long-term safety of DPP-4 inhibition remain to be established. These synthetic DPP-4 inhibitors are showing some side effects. Herbal medicines are alternative medicine over synthetic drugs that can relieve the patients. Various research studies have been carried all over the world to evaluate the efficacy of herbs in the treatment of Type II diabetes mellitus. For a long time type II diabetes mellitus has been treated orally with herbal medicines, because plant products are frequently prescribed due to their less toxicity than conventional medicines. PMID:26473146

  17. Therapy in the Early Stage: Incretins

    PubMed Central

    Cernea, Simona; Raz, Itamar

    2011-01-01

    The complex pathological mechanisms responsible for development of type 2 diabetes are not fully addressed by conventional drugs, which are also associated with inconvenient side effects such as weight gain or hypoglycemia. Two types of incretin-based therapies are now in use: incretin mimetics (glucagon-like peptide-1 [GLP-1] receptor agonists that bind specific receptors and mimic the action of natural GLP-1) and incretin enhancers (inhibitors of the enzyme that degrade the incretin hormones and thus prolong their activity). Both offer important advantages over previous agents. In addition to the proven glucose-lowering efficacy, they promote weight loss (or are weight neutral) by slowing gastric emptying and inducing satiety, inhibit glucagon secretion with maintenance of counterregulatory mechanisms, and exhibit cardiovascular benefits, while having a low risk profile. Importantly, short-term studies have shown that incretins/incretin-based therapies protect β-cells (by enhancing cell proliferation and differentiation and inhibiting apoptosis) and stimulate their function (by recruiting β-cells to the secretory process and increasing insulin biosynthesis/secretion). These therapies have the opportunity to interfere with the disease progression if used as an early intervention, when enough β-cell mass/function can still be preserved or restored. PMID:21525466

  18. The major determinant of exendin-4/glucagon-like peptide 1 differential affinity at the rat glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor N-terminal domain is a hydrogen bond from SER-32 of exendin-4*

    PubMed Central

    Mann, RJ; Nasr, NE; Sinfield, JK; Paci, E; Donnelly, D

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Exendin-4 (exenatide, Ex4) is a high-affinity peptide agonist at the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R), which has been approved as a treatment for type 2 diabetes. Part of the drug/hormone binding site was described in the crystal structures of both GLP-1 and Ex4 bound to the isolated N-terminal domain (NTD) of GLP-1R. However, these structures do not account for the large difference in affinity between GLP-1 and Ex4 at this isolated domain, or for the published role of the C-terminal extension of Ex4. Our aim was to clarify the pharmacology of GLP-1R in the context of these new structural data. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The affinities of GLP-1, Ex4 and various analogues were measured at human and rat GLP-1R (hGLP-1R and rGLP-1R, respectively) and various receptor variants. Molecular dynamics coupled with in silico mutagenesis were used to model and interpret the data. KEY RESULTS The membrane-tethered NTD of hGLP-1R displayed similar affinity for GLP-1 and Ex4 in sharp contrast to previous studies using the soluble isolated domain. The selectivity at rGLP-1R for Ex4(9–39) over Ex4(9–30) was due to Ser-32 in the ligand. While this selectivity was not observed at hGLP-1R, it was regained when Glu-68 of hGLP-1R was mutated to Asp. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS GLP-1 and Ex4 bind to the NTD of hGLP-1R with similar affinity. A hydrogen bond between Ser32 of Ex4 and Asp-68 of rGLP-1R, which is not formed with Glu-68 of hGLP-1R, is responsible for the improved affinity of Ex4 at the rat receptor. PMID:20649595

  19. GLP-1 Cleavage Product Reverses Persistent ROS Generation After Transient Hyperglycemia by Disrupting an ROS-Generating Feedback Loop.

    PubMed

    Giacco, Ferdinando; Du, Xueliang; Carrat, Anna; Gerfen, Gary J; D'Apolito, Maria; Giardino, Ida; Rasola, Andrea; Marin, Oriano; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Murphy, Anne N; Shah, Manasi S; Brownlee, Michael

    2015-09-01

    The assumption underlying current diabetes treatment is that lowering the level of time-averaged glucose concentrations, measured as HbA1c, prevents microvascular complications. However, 89% of variation in risk of retinopathy, microalbuminuria, or albuminuria is due to elements of glycemia not captured by mean HbA1c values. We show that transient exposure to high glucose activates a multicomponent feedback loop that causes a stable left shift of the glucose concentration-reactive oxygen species (ROS) dose-response curve. Feedback loop disruption by the GLP-1 cleavage product GLP-1(9-36)(amide) reverses the persistent left shift, thereby normalizing persistent overproduction of ROS and its pathophysiologic consequences. These data suggest that hyperglycemic spikes high enough to activate persistent ROS production during subsequent periods of normal glycemia but too brief to affect the HbA1c value are a major determinant of the 89% of diabetes complications risk not captured by HbA1c. The phenomenon and mechanism described in this study provide a basis for the development of both new biomarkers to complement HbA1c and novel therapeutic agents, including GLP-1(9-36)(amide), for the prevention and treatment of diabetes complications. PMID:26294429

  20. [Neuroendocrine tumors: Peptide receptors radionuclide therapy (PRRT)].

    PubMed

    Papamichail, Dimitris G; Exadaktylou, Paraskevi E; Chatzipavlidou, Vasiliki D

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (neuroendocrine tumors-NET) are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms with a common embryological origin and diverse biological behavior, derived from cells of the neuroendocrine system, the system APUD (amine precursor uptake and decarboxylation). They are characterized by overexpression of all five somatostatin receptors (SSTR1-SSTR5), particularly type 2 (SST2). Surgical resection of the tumor is the treatment option, with a possibility of complete remission in patients with limited disease. Somatostatin analogs (octreotide and lanreotide) are the treatment of choice in patients with residual disease, particularly when it comes to NET non-pancreatic origin. Systemic chemotherapy is administered primarily to patients with poorly differentiated carcinomas. PRRT treatment is recommended in case of non-responsiveness of the disease. The ideal candidates for PRRT are patients with unresectable disease of high and intermediate differentiation. Somatostatine analogs radiolabelled with Indium-111 ((111)In), Yttrium-90 ((90)Y), Lutetium-177 ((177)Lu) and Bismuth-213 ((213)Bi), are selectively concentrated in the tumor cells, causing maximum tissue damage to tumors and with fewer effects on healthy tissue and the immune system. In the current review, it was demonstrated that patients with unresectable grade 1 or 2 disease showed increased PFS (progression free survival) and OS (overall survival), while quality of life was improved after PRRT treatment as compared to somatostatin analogs, chemotherapy and other targeted therapies. PMID:27035909

  1. Evidence for glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor signaling to activate ATP-sensitive potassium channels in pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hye-Jung; Park, Hyun-Sun; Park, Sung-Hee; Park, Jae-Hyung; Shin, Su-Kyung; Song, Seung Eun; Hwang, Meeyul; Cho, Ho-Chan; Song, Dae-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a gut peptide that promotes insulin release from pancreatic beta cells. GLP-1 has been shown to confer glucose-insensitive beta cells with glucose sensitivity by modulation of the activity of the ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel. The channel closing effect of GLP-1, interacting with corresponding G-protein-coupled receptors, has been well established; however, to our knowledge, no study has shown whether GLP-1 directly induces activation of beta-cell KATP channels. Here, we aimed to evaluate whether the activation of beta-cell KATP channels by GLP-1 exists and affects intracellular Ca(2+) levels ([Ca(2+)]i). KATP channel activity was measured in isolated rat pancreatic beta cells by whole-cell perforated patch-clamp recordings with a diazoxide-containing pipette solution. Changes in [Ca(2+)]i and the subcellular localization of KATP channels were observed using the calcium-sensitive dye fura-4/AM and anti-Kir6.2 antibodies in INS-1 beta cells, respectively. To eliminate the well-known inhibitory effects of GLP-1 on KATP channel activity, channels were fully inhibited by pretreatment with methyl pyruvate and epigallocatechin-3-gallate. In the pretreated beta cells, GLP-1 and exendin-4 promptly activated the channels, reducing [Ca(2+)]i. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002 blocked the effects of GLP-1 on channel activity. Moreover, phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate mimicked the effects of GLP-1. These results suggested that beta-cell GLP-1 receptor signaling involved activation of KATP channels via a PI3K-dependent pathway. This alternative mechanism of GLP-1 function may act as a negative feedback pathway, modulating the glucose-dependent GLP-1 inhibition on KATP channel activity. PMID:26655814

  2. ErbB receptors: from oncogenes to targeted cancer therapies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongtao; Berezov, Alan; Wang, Qiang; Zhang, Geng; Drebin, Jeffrey; Murali, Ramachandran; Greene, Mark I.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the genetic origin of cancer at the molecular level has facilitated the development of novel targeted therapies. Aberrant activation of the ErbB family of receptors is implicated in many human cancers and is already the target of several anticancer therapeutics. The use of mAbs specific for the extracellular domain of ErbB receptors was the first implementation of rational targeted therapy. The cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase domain is also a preferred target for small compounds that inhibit the kinase activity of these receptors. However, current therapy has not yet been optimized, allowing for opportunities for optimization of the next generation of targeted therapy, particularly with regards to inhibiting heteromeric ErbB family receptor complexes. PMID:17671639

  3. Triple therapy in type 2 diabetes; a systematic review and network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bettington, Emilie K.; Gunton, Jenny E.; Turkstra, Erika

    2015-01-01

    Aims. The purpose was to evaluate the evidence for triple therapy regimen using medicines available in Australia for type 2 diabetes. Methods. A systematic literature review was performed to update the relevant evidence from 2002 to 2014 on triple therapy for type 2 diabetes. A multiple-treatments network meta-analysis was undertaken to summarise the comparative efficacy and harms of different triple therapies. Results. Twenty seven trials were identified, most were six months of duration. The following combinations were included in the network meta-analysis: metformin (MET) + sulfonylureas (SU) (used as reference combination); MET + SU+ dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors (DPP-4-i); MET + SU+ thiazolidinediones (TZD); MET + SU+ glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1-RA); MET + SU+ insulins; MET + TZD + DPP-4-i; and MET + SU+ sodium/glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors (SGLT2-i). For HbA1c reduction, all triple therapies were statistically superior to MET+SU dual therapy, except for MET + TZD + DPP-4-i. None of the triple therapy combinations demonstrated differences in HbA1c compared with other triple therapies. MET + SU + SGLT2-i and MET + SU + GLP-1-RA resulted in significantly lower body weight than MET + SU + DPP-4-i, MET+SU+insulin and MET + SU + TZDs; MET + SU + DPP-4-i resulted in significantly lower body weight than MET + SU + insulin and MET + SU + TZD. MET + SU + insulin, MET + SU + TZD and MET + SU + DPP-4-i increased the odds of hypoglycaemia when compared to MET + SU. MET + SU + GLP-1-RA reduced the odds of hypoglycaemia compared to MET + SU + insulin. Conclusion. Care when choosing a triple therapy combination is needed as there is often a risk of increased hypoglycaemia events associated with this regimen and there are very limited data surrounding the long-term effectiveness and safety of combined therapies. PMID:26664803

  4. Positive Allosteric Modulation of the Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Receptor by Diverse Electrophiles.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Ana B; Showalter, Aaron D; Wainscott, David B; Stutsman, Cynthia; Marín, Aranzazu; Ficorilli, James; Cabrera, Over; Willard, Francis S; Sloop, Kyle W

    2016-05-13

    Therapeutic intervention to activate the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) enhances glucose-dependent insulin secretion and improves energy balance in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Studies investigating mechanisms whereby peptide ligands activate GLP-1R have utilized mutagenesis, receptor chimeras, photo-affinity labeling, hydrogen-deuterium exchange, and crystallography of the ligand-binding ectodomain to establish receptor homology models. However, this has not enabled the design or discovery of drug-like non-peptide GLP-1R activators. Recently, studies investigating 4-(3-benzyloxyphenyl)-2-ethylsulfinyl-6-(trifluoromethyl)pyrimidine (BETP), a GLP-1R-positive allosteric modulator, determined that Cys-347 in the GLP-1R is required for positive allosteric modulator activity via covalent modification. To advance small molecule activation of the GLP-1R, we characterized the insulinotropic mechanism of BETP. In guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate binding and INS1 832-3 insulinoma cell cAMP assays, BETP enhanced GLP-1(9-36)-NH2-stimulated cAMP signaling. Using isolated pancreatic islets, BETP potentiated insulin secretion in a glucose-dependent manner that requires both the peptide ligand and GLP-1R. In studies of the covalent mechanism, PAGE fluorography showed labeling of GLP-1R in immunoprecipitation experiments from GLP-1R-expressing cells incubated with [(3)H]BETP. Furthermore, we investigated whether other reported GLP-1R activators and compounds identified from screening campaigns modulate GLP-1R by covalent modification. Similar to BETP, several molecules were found to enhance GLP-1R signaling in a Cys-347-dependent manner. These chemotypes are electrophiles that react with GSH, and LC/MS determined the cysteine adducts formed upon conjugation. Together, our results suggest covalent modification may be used to stabilize the GLP-1R in an active conformation. Moreover, the findings provide pharmacological guidance for the discovery and characterization of small molecule GLP-1R ligands as possible therapeutics. PMID:26975372

  5. Positive Allosteric Modulation of the Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Receptor by Diverse Electrophiles*

    PubMed Central

    Showalter, Aaron D.; Wainscott, David B.; Stutsman, Cynthia; Marín, Aranzazu; Ficorilli, James; Cabrera, Over

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic intervention to activate the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) enhances glucose-dependent insulin secretion and improves energy balance in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Studies investigating mechanisms whereby peptide ligands activate GLP-1R have utilized mutagenesis, receptor chimeras, photo-affinity labeling, hydrogen-deuterium exchange, and crystallography of the ligand-binding ectodomain to establish receptor homology models. However, this has not enabled the design or discovery of drug-like non-peptide GLP-1R activators. Recently, studies investigating 4-(3-benzyloxyphenyl)-2-ethylsulfinyl-6-(trifluoromethyl)pyrimidine (BETP), a GLP-1R-positive allosteric modulator, determined that Cys-347 in the GLP-1R is required for positive allosteric modulator activity via covalent modification. To advance small molecule activation of the GLP-1R, we characterized the insulinotropic mechanism of BETP. In guanosine 5′-3-O-(thio)triphosphate binding and INS1 832-3 insulinoma cell cAMP assays, BETP enhanced GLP-1(9–36)-NH2-stimulated cAMP signaling. Using isolated pancreatic islets, BETP potentiated insulin secretion in a glucose-dependent manner that requires both the peptide ligand and GLP-1R. In studies of the covalent mechanism, PAGE fluorography showed labeling of GLP-1R in immunoprecipitation experiments from GLP-1R-expressing cells incubated with [3H]BETP. Furthermore, we investigated whether other reported GLP-1R activators and compounds identified from screening campaigns modulate GLP-1R by covalent modification. Similar to BETP, several molecules were found to enhance GLP-1R signaling in a Cys-347-dependent manner. These chemotypes are electrophiles that react with GSH, and LC/MS determined the cysteine adducts formed upon conjugation. Together, our results suggest covalent modification may be used to stabilize the GLP-1R in an active conformation. Moreover, the findings provide pharmacological guidance for the discovery and characterization of small molecule GLP-1R ligands as possible therapeutics. PMID:26975372

  6. Muscarinic receptors control glucagon-like peptide 1 secretion by human endocrine L cells.

    PubMed

    Anini, Younes; Brubaker, Patricia L

    2003-07-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) released from distal intestinal endocrine L cells after food intake is a potent glucose-dependent stimulant of insulin secretion. Plasma levels of GLP-1 rise rapidly after nutrient ingestion through an indirect mechanism triggered from the proximal intestine and involving the vagus nerve. Our previous studies showed the involvement of M1 muscarinic receptors expressed by the L cells in the regulation of postprandial GLP-1 secretion in rats. The goal of this study was to explore the involvement of muscarinic receptors in the regulation of GLP-1 secretion by human L cells using a newly described human L cell line (NCI-H716). Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (positive control) stimulated GLP-1 secretion to 252 +/- 38% of the control (P < 0.001). Bethanechol, a nonselective muscarinic agonist, significantly stimulated GLP-1 secretion to 187 +/- 20% of the control (P < 0.01, n = 8). Pirenzepine (M1 antagonist; 10-1000 microM) and gallamine (M2 antagonist; 10-1000 microM) completely inhibited bethanechol-induced GLP-1 secretion, whereas 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine (M3 antagonist) had no effect on bethanechol-stimulated GLP-1 secretion. McN-A-343 (M1 muscarinic agonist) dose dependently stimulated GLP-1 secretion (to 252 +/- 50% of control at 1000 microM; P < 0.01), whereas oxotremorine (M3 agonist) had no effect. M1, M2, and M3 muscarinic receptors were shown to be expressed in NCI-H716 cells by Western blot, immunohystochemistry, and RT-PCR. Expression of the M1, M2, and M3 muscarinic receptor subtypes was also confirmed in paraffin-embedded human small intestine sections by double immunofluorescent staining. These results demonstrate the role of M1 and M2 muscarinic receptors expressed by human L cells in the control of GLP-1 secretion. PMID:12810581

  7. Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy Is Effective in Two Genetic Mouse Models of Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Receptor Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Wilson-Prez, Hilary E.; Chambers, Adam P.; Ryan, Karen K.; Li, Bailing; Sandoval, Darleen A.; Stoffers, Doris; Drucker, Daniel J.; Prez-Tilve, Diego; Seeley, Randy J.

    2013-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is a peptide hormone that is released from the gut in response to nutrient ingestion and that has a range of metabolic effects, including enhancing insulin secretion and decreasing food intake. Postprandial GLP-1 secretion is greatly enhanced in rats and humans after some bariatric procedures, including vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG), and has been widely hypothesized to contribute to reduced intake, weight loss, and the improvements in glucose homeostasis after VSG. We tested this hypothesis using two separate models of GLP-1 receptor deficiency. We found that VSG-operated GLP-1 receptordeficient mice responded similarly to wild-type controls in terms of body weight and body fat loss, improved glucose tolerance, food intake reduction, and altered food selection. These data demonstrate that GLP-1 receptor activity is not necessary for the metabolic improvements induced by VSG surgery. PMID:23434938

  8. Incretin-based therapies.

    PubMed

    Neumiller, Joshua J

    2015-01-01

    Incretin-based therapies are steadily gaining clinical popularity, with many more products in the developmental pipeline. Current treatment recommendations incorporate GLP-1 RAs and DPP-4 inhibitors as important agents for consideration in the treatment of T2DM owing to their low hypoglycemia risk, ability to address postprandial hyperglycemia (DPP-4 inhibitors and short-acting GLP-1 RAs), and potential for weight reduction (GLP-1 RAs). These properties may likewise prove advantageous in older adults in whom hypoglycemia is particularly undesirable, although older adults may be more prone to the nausea and vomiting associated with GLP-1 RA therapy. Other safety issues for incretin-based therapies, such as pancreatitis, C-cell hyperplasia, and renal failure, should be considered when choosing an appropriate patient to receive such therapies. Ongoing CV outcome studies will further inform the health care community regarding the CV safety of incretin-based therapies. The availability of both short-acting and long-acting GLP-1 RAs currently allows practitioners to consider individualized blood glucose trends and therapeutic needs when choosing an optimal agent. PMID:25456646

  9. Type 2 Diabetes and ADP Receptor Blocker Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Samoš, Matej; Fedor, Marián; Kovář, František; Mokáň, Michal; Bolek, Tomáš; Galajda, Peter; Kubisz, Peter; Mokáň, Marián

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is associated with several abnormalities in haemostasis predisposing to thrombosis. Moreover, T2D was recently connected with a failure in antiplatelet response to clopidogrel, the most commonly used ADP receptor blocker in clinical practice. Clopidogrel high on-treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR) was repeatedly associated with the risk of ischemic adverse events. Patients with T2D show significantly higher residual platelet reactivity on ADP receptor blocker therapy and are more frequently represented in the group of patients with HTPR. This paper reviews the current knowledge about possible interactions between T2D and ADP receptor blocker therapy. PMID:26824047

  10. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor decreases abdominal aortic aneurysm formation through GLP-1-dependent monocytic activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hsin Ying; Huang, Chun Yao; Shih, Chun Ming; Chang, Wei Hung; Tsai, Chein Sung; Lin, Feng Yen; Shih, Chun Che

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a life-threatening situation affecting almost 10% of elders. There has been no effective medication for AAA other than surgical intervention. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors have been shown to have a protective effect on cardiovascular disease. Whether DPP-4 inhibitors may be beneficial in the treatment of AAA is unclear. We investigated the effects of DPP-4 inhibitor sitagliptin on the angiotensin II (Ang II)-infused AAA formation in apoE-deficient (apoE-/-) mice. Mice with induced AAA were treated with placebo or 2.5, 5 or 10 mg/kg/day sitagliptin. Ang II-infused apoE-/- mice exhibited a 55.6% incidence of AAA formation, but treatment with sitagliptin decreased AAA formation. Specifically, administered sitagliptin in Ang II-infused mice exhibited decreased expansion of the suprarenal aorta, reduced elastin lamina degradation of the aorta, and diminished vascular inflammation by macrophage infiltration. Treatment with sitagliptin decreased gelatinolytic activity and apoptotic cells in aorta tissues. Sitaglipitn, additionally, was associated with increased levels of plasma active glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). In vitro studies, GLP-1 decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, cell migration, and MMP-2 as well as MMP-9 activity in Ang II-stimulated monocytic cells. The results conclude that oral administration of sitagliptin can prevent abdominal aortic aneurysm formation in Ang II-infused apoE-/-mice, at least in part, by increasing of GLP-1 activity, decreasing MMP-2 and MMP-9 production from macrophage infiltration. The results indicate that sitagliptin may have therapeutic potential in preventing the development of AAA. PMID:25876091

  11. Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitor Decreases Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Formation through GLP-1-Dependent Monocytic Activity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hsin Ying; Huang, Chun Yao; Shih, Chun Ming; Chang, Wei Hung; Tsai, Chein Sung; Lin, Feng Yen; Shih, Chun Che

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a life-threatening situation affecting almost 10% of elders. There has been no effective medication for AAA other than surgical intervention. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors have been shown to have a protective effect on cardiovascular disease. Whether DPP-4 inhibitors may be beneficial in the treatment of AAA is unclear. We investigated the effects of DPP-4 inhibitor sitagliptin on the angiotensin II (Ang II)-infused AAA formation in apoE-deficient (apoE-/-) mice. Mice with induced AAA were treated with placebo or 2.5, 5 or 10 mg/kg/day sitagliptin. Ang II-infused apoE-/- mice exhibited a 55.6% incidence of AAA formation, but treatment with sitagliptin decreased AAA formation. Specifically, administered sitagliptin in Ang II-infused mice exhibited decreased expansion of the suprarenal aorta, reduced elastin lamina degradation of the aorta, and diminished vascular inflammation by macrophage infiltration. Treatment with sitagliptin decreased gelatinolytic activity and apoptotic cells in aorta tissues. Sitaglipitn, additionally, was associated with increased levels of plasma active glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). In vitro studies, GLP-1 decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, cell migration, and MMP-2 as well as MMP-9 activity in Ang II-stimulated monocytic cells. The results conclude that oral administration of sitagliptin can prevent abdominal aortic aneurysm formation in Ang II-infused apoE-/-mice, at least in part, by increasing of GLP-1 activity, decreasing MMP-2 and MMP-9 production from macrophage infiltration. The results indicate that sitagliptin may have therapeutic potential in preventing the development of AAA. PMID:25876091

  12. Proglucagon Promoter Cre-Mediated AMPK Deletion in Mice Increases Circulating GLP-1 Levels and Oral Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Sayers, Sophie R.; Reimann, Frank; Gribble, Fiona M.; Parker, Helen; Zac-Varghese, Sagen; Bloom, Stephen R.; Foretz, Marc; Viollet, Benoit; Rutter, Guy A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Enteroendocrine L-cells synthesise and release the gut hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) in response to food transit. Deletion of the tumour suppressor kinase LKB1 from proglucagon-expressing cells leads to the generation of intestinal polyps but no change in circulating GLP-1 levels. Here, we explore the role of the downstream kinase AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in these cells. Method Loss of AMPK from proglucagon-expressing cells was achieved using a preproglucagon promoter-driven Cre (iGluCre) to catalyse recombination of floxed alleles of AMPKα1 and α2. Oral and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance were measured using standard protocols. L-cell mass was measured by immunocytochemistry. Hormone and peptide levels were measured by electrochemical-based luminescence detection or radioimmunoassay. Results Recombination with iGluCre led to efficient deletion of AMPK from intestinal L- and pancreatic alpha-cells. In contrast to mice rendered null for LKB1 using the same strategy, mice deleted for AMPK displayed an increase (WT: 0.05 ± 0.01, KO: 0.09±0.02%, p<0.01) in L-cell mass and elevated plasma fasting (WT: 5.62 ± 0.800 pg/ml, KO: 14.5 ± 1.870, p<0.01) and fed (WT: 15.7 ± 1.48pg/ml, KO: 22.0 ± 6.62, p<0.01) GLP-1 levels. Oral, but not intraperitoneal, glucose tolerance was significantly improved by AMPK deletion, whilst insulin and glucagon levels were unchanged despite an increase in alpha to beta cell ratio (WT: 0.23 ± 0.02, KO: 0.33 ± 0.03, p<0.01). Conclusion AMPK restricts L-cell growth and GLP-1 secretion to suppress glucose tolerance. Targeted inhibition of AMPK in L-cells may thus provide a new therapeutic strategy in some forms of type 2 diabetes. PMID:27010458

  13. Metabolic Syndrome Abolishes Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Receptor Agonist Stimulation of SERCA in Coronary Smooth Muscle.

    PubMed

    Dineen, Stacey L; McKenney, Mikaela L; Bell, Lauren N; Fullenkamp, Allison M; Schultz, Kyle A; Alloosh, Mouhamad; Chalasani, Naga; Sturek, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) doubles the risk of adverse cardiovascular events. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists induce weight loss, increase insulin secretion, and improve glucose tolerance. Studies in healthy animals suggest cardioprotective properties of GLP-1 receptor agonists, perhaps partially mediated by improved sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase (SERCA) activity. We examined the acute effect of GLP-1 receptor agonists on coronary smooth muscle cells (CSM) enzymatically isolated from lean, healthy Ossabaw miniature swine. Intracellular Ca(2+) handling was interrogated with fura-2. The GLP-1 receptor agonist exenatide activated SERCA but did not alter other Ca(2+) transporters. Further, we tested the hypothesis that chronic, in vivo treatment with GLP-1 receptor agonist AC3174 would attenuate coronary artery disease (CAD) in swine with MetS. MetS was induced in 20 swine by 6 months' feeding of a hypercaloric, atherogenic diet. Swine were then randomized (n = 10/group) into placebo or AC3174 treatment groups and continued the diet for an additional 6 months. AC3174 treatment attenuated weight gain, increased insulin secretion, and improved glucose tolerance. Intravascular ultrasound and histology showed no effect of AC3174 on CAD. MetS abolished SERCA activation by GLP-1 receptor agonists. We conclude that MetS confers vascular resistance to GLP-1 receptor agonists, partially through impaired cellular signaling steps involving SERCA. PMID:25845661

  14. Developmental stimuli and stress factors affect expression of ClGLP1, an emerging allergen-related gene in Citrus limon.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Leonardo; Spadafora, Natasha Damiana; Iaria, Domenico; Chiappetta, Adriana; Bitonti, Maria Beatrice

    2014-06-01

    Germins and germin-like proteins (GLPs) constitute an ubiquitous family of plant proteins that seem to be involved in many developmental and stress related processes. A novel GLP cDNA was isolated from Citrus limon and structural features and genomic organization were investigated by in silico and Southern blots analysis. In lemon, the ClGLP1 encodes a 24.38 kDa which possesses a conserved motif of plant GLPs proteins. A phylogetic analysis mapped ClGLP1 as belonging to the GER3 subfamily into the GLP1 group of large GLP family. ClGLP1 was differentially expressed in the various organs and was highest in mature fruit. Moreover, expression in the fruit was tissue- and stage-related as well as dependent on agricultural practice (organic vs conventional). ClGLP1 transcripts increased during the transition from the green (180 days after blooming) to the yellow (240 days after blooming) mature fruit and were strongly enhanced in yellow mature fruit from organic compared with conventional culture. A sudden and systemic increase in ClGLP1 expression level was observed in leaves injured by wounding, together with an increase of endogenous H2O2 amount. Notably, an enhancement of H202 was observed in fruit peel during transition from green to yellow fruit stage. All together our data showed that ClGLP1 expression can be modulated in relation to both developmental stimuli and culture practices; evidence is also provided that through an oxidase activity this gene could play a role in fruit maturation as well as in stress responses. PMID:24681751

  15. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Ligand Interactions: Structural Cross Talk between Ligands and the Extracellular Domain

    PubMed Central

    West, Graham M.; Willard, Francis S.; Sloop, Kyle W.; Showalter, Aaron D.; Pascal, Bruce D.; Griffin, Patrick R.

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) in pancreatic β-cells potentiates insulin production and is a current therapeutic target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Like other class B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), the GLP-1R contains an N-terminal extracellular ligand binding domain. N-terminal truncations on the peptide agonist generate antagonists capable of binding to the extracellular domain, but not capable of activating full length receptor. The main objective of this study was to use Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) to identify how the amide hydrogen bonding network of peptide ligands and the extracellular domain of GLP-1R (nGLP-1R) were altered by binding interactions and to then use this platform to validate direct binding events for putative GLP-1R small molecule ligands. The HDX studies presented here for two glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) peptide ligands indicates that the antagonist exendin-4[9-39] is significantly destabilized in the presence of nonionic detergents as compared to the agonist exendin-4. Furthermore, HDX can detect stabilization of exendin-4 and exendin-4[9-39] hydrogen bonding networks at the N-terminal helix [Val19 to Lys27] upon binding to the N-terminal extracellular domain of GLP-1R (nGLP-1R). In addition we show hydrogen bonding network stabilization on nGLP-1R in response to ligand binding, and validate direct binding events with the extracellular domain of the receptor for putative GLP-1R small molecule ligands. PMID:25180755

  16. Efficacy and safety of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist liraglutide added to insulin therapy in poorly regulated patients with type 1 diabetes—a protocol for a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study: The Lira-1 study

    PubMed Central

    Dejgaard, Thomas Fremming; Knop, Filip Krag; Tarnow, Lise; Frandsen, Christian Seerup; Hansen, Tanja Stenbæk; Almdal, Thomas; Holst, Jens Juul; Madsbad, Sten; Andersen, Henrik Ullits

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Intensive insulin therapy is recommended for the treatment of type 1 diabetes (T1D). Hypoglycaemia and weight gain are the common side effects of insulin treatment and may reduce compliance. In patients with insulin-treated type 2 diabetes, the addition of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist (GLP-1RA) therapy has proven effective in reducing weight gain and insulin dose. The present publication describes a protocol for a study evaluating the efficacy and safety of adding a GLP-1RA to insulin treatment in overweight patients with T1D in a randomised, double-blinded, controlled design. Methods and analysis In total, 100 patients with type 1 diabetes, poor glycaemic control (glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) >8%) and overweight (body mass index >25 kg/m2) will be randomised to either liraglutide 1.8 mg once daily or placebo as an add-on to intensive insulin therapy in this investigator initiated, double-blinded, placebo-controlled parallel study. The primary end point is glycaemic control as measured by changes in HbA1c. Secondary end points include changes in the insulin dose, hypoglyacemic events, body weight, lean body mass, fat mass, food preferences and adverse events. Glycaemic excursions, postprandial glucagon levels and gastric emptying rate during a standardised liquid meal test will also be studied. Ethics and dissemination The study is approved by the Danish Medicines Authority, the Regional Scientific-Ethical Committee of the Capital Region of Denmark and the Data Protection Agency. The study will be carried out under the surveillance and guidance of the good clinical practice (GCP) unit at Copenhagen University Hospital Bispebjerg in accordance with the ICH-GCP guidelines and the Helsinki Declaration. Trial registration number NCT01612468. PMID:25838513

  17. Resistant starch and pullulan reduce postprandial glucose, insulin, and GLP-1, but have no effect on satiety in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Klosterbuer, Abby S; Thomas, William; Slavin, Joanne L

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of three novel fibers on satiety and serum parameters. In a randomized, double-blind, crossover design, fasted subjects (n=20) consumed a low-fiber control breakfast or one of four breakfasts containing 25 g of fiber from soluble corn fiber (SCF) or resistant starch (RS), alone or in combination with pullulan (SCF+P and RS+P). Visual analog scales assessed appetite, and blood samples were collected to measure glucose, insulin, ghrelin, and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). The fiber treatments did not influence satiety or energy intake compared to control. RS+P significantly reduced glucose, insulin, and GLP-1, but neither SCF treatment differed from control. To conclude, these fibers have little impact on satiety when provided as a mixed meal matched for calories and macronutrients. Additional research regarding the physiological effects of these novel fibers is needed to guide their use as functional ingredients in food products. PMID:23136915

  18. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Signaling in the Lateral Parabrachial Nucleus Contributes to the Control of Food Intake and Motivation to Feed

    PubMed Central

    Alhadeff, Amber L; Baird, John-Paul; Swick, Jennifer C; Hayes, Matthew R; Grill, Harvey J

    2014-01-01

    Central glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) activation reduces food intake and the motivation to work for food, but the neurons and circuits mediating these effects are not fully understood. Although lateral parabrachial nucleus (lPBN) neurons are implicated in the control of food intake and reward, the specific role of GLP-1R-expressing lPBN neurons is unexplored. Here, neuroanatomical tracing, immunohistochemical, and behavioral/pharmacological techniques are used to test the hypothesis that lPBN neurons contribute to the anorexic effect of central GLP-1R activation. Results indicate that GLP-1-producing neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius project monosynaptically to the lPBN, providing a potential endogenous mechanism by which lPBN GLP-1R signaling may exert effects on food intake control. Pharmacological activation of GLP-1R in the lPBN reduced food intake, and conversely, antagonism of GLP-1R in the lPBN increased food intake. In addition, lPBN GLP-1R activation reduced the motivation to work for food under a progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement. Taken together, these data establish the lPBN as a novel site of action for GLP-1R-mediated control of food intake and reward. PMID:24681814

  19. Glucagon-like Peptide-1 receptor signaling in the lateral parabrachial nucleus contributes to the control of food intake and motivation to feed.

    PubMed

    Alhadeff, Amber L; Baird, John-Paul; Swick, Jennifer C; Hayes, Matthew R; Grill, Harvey J

    2014-08-01

    Central glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) activation reduces food intake and the motivation to work for food, but the neurons and circuits mediating these effects are not fully understood. Although lateral parabrachial nucleus (lPBN) neurons are implicated in the control of food intake and reward, the specific role of GLP-1R-expressing lPBN neurons is unexplored. Here, neuroanatomical tracing, immunohistochemical, and behavioral/pharmacological techniques are used to test the hypothesis that lPBN neurons contribute to the anorexic effect of central GLP-1R activation. Results indicate that GLP-1-producing neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius project monosynaptically to the lPBN, providing a potential endogenous mechanism by which lPBN GLP-1R signaling may exert effects on food intake control. Pharmacological activation of GLP-1R in the lPBN reduced food intake, and conversely, antagonism of GLP-1R in the lPBN increased food intake. In addition, lPBN GLP-1R activation reduced the motivation to work for food under a progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement. Taken together, these data establish the lPBN as a novel site of action for GLP-1R-mediated control of food intake and reward. PMID:24681814

  20. Multifunctional receptor-targeting antibodies for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanni; Choi, Sung Hugh; Shah, Khalid

    2015-11-01

    During the past decade, monospecific antibodies targeting cell-surface receptors in different tumour types have achieved substantial success and have been at the forefront of cancer treatment. However, redundant signalling and crosstalk between different pathways within tumour cells and between tumour cells and their microenvironment can limit the efficacy of receptor-targeted monospecific-based therapies. Advances in antibody engineering technologies have enabled strategies that simultaneously target multiple receptors to circumvent the limitations of conventional monospecific therapies and achieve enhanced therapeutic efficacy. In the past 5 years, a range of multifunctional, receptor-targeting, antibody-based molecules have emerged, which allow targeting of multiple surface receptors on tumour cells and endothelial or immune cells in the tumour microenvironment. In this Review, we discuss the rationales and strategies for the use of multifunctional receptor-targeting antibodies, their mechanisms of action, and the promises and challenges they hold as cancer therapeutics. This knowledge provides opportunities to improve current targeted therapy outcomes for patients with cancer. PMID:26545843

  1. Islet-selectivity of G-protein coupled receptor ligands evaluated for PET imaging of pancreatic {beta}-cell mass

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, Gary W.; Zhao, Xiaojian; Jakowski, Amy B.; Soeller, Walter C.; Treadway, Judith L.

    2011-09-02

    Highlights: {yields} We screened G-protein coupled receptors for imaging pancreatic. {yields} Database mining and immunohistochemistry identified GPCRs enriched in {beta}-cells. {yields} In vitro and in vivo assays were used to determine exocrine vs endocrine specificity. {yields} GPCR candidates for imaging of {beta}-cell mass are Prokineticin-1R, mGluR5, and GLP-1R. -- Abstract: A critical unmet need exists for methods to quantitatively measure endogenous pancreatic {beta}-cell mass (BCM) for the clinical evaluation of therapies to prevent or reverse loss of BCM and diabetes progression. Our objective was to identify G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that are expressed with a high degree of specificity to islet {beta}-cells for receptor-targeted imaging of BCM. GPCRs enriched in pancreatic islets relative to pancreas acinar and hepatic tissue were identified using a database screen. Islet-specific expression was confirmed by human pancreas immunohistochemistry (IHC). In vitro selectivity assessment was determined from the binding and uptake of radiolabeled ligands to the rat insulinoma INS-1 832/13 cell line and isolated rat islets relative to the exocrine pancreas cell-type, PANC-1. Tail-vein injections of radioligands into rats were used to determine favorable image criteria of in vivo biodistribution to the pancreas relative to other internal organs (i.e., liver, spleen, stomach, and lungs). Database and IHC screening identified four candidate receptors for further in vitro and in vivo evaluation for PET imaging of BCM: prokineticin-1 receptor (PK-1R), metabotropic glutamate receptor type-5 (mGluR5), neuropeptide Y-2 receptor (NPY-2R), and glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1R). In vitro specificity ratios gave the following receptor rank order: PK-1R > GLP-1R > NPY-2R > mGluR5. The biodistribution rank order of selectivity to the pancreas was found to be PK-1R > VMAT2 {approx} GLP-1R > mGluR5. Favorable islet selectivity and biodistribution characteristics suggest several GPCRs as potential targets for PET imaging of pancreatic BCM.

  2. Dosimetry of exendin-4 based radiotracer for glucagonlike peptide-1 receptor imaging: an initial report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaszuk, M.; Sowa-Staszczak, A.; Lenda-Tracz, W.; Glowa, B.; Pach, D.; Buziak-Bereza, M.; Stefanska, A.; Janota, B.; Pawlak, D.; Mikolajczak, R.; Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, A. B.

    2011-09-01

    Overexpression of glucagonlike peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptors in human tumours is a potential target for future imaging and therapy. The GLP-1 receptor imaging using [Lys40(Ahx-HYNIC-99mTc/EDDA)NH2]-exendin-4 could be useful in the localization of unknown insulinoma focus. The aim of this study was to present the first experience of our unit with the new radiopharmaceutical and its dose estimates. Imaging studies and dose assessment, according to the MIRD schema and MIRD Pamphlet No.11, were performed for 3 patients (2 with suspicion of insulinoma, 1 with suspected insulinoma recurrence). In the first case suspicion of insulinoma was not confirmed. In the second case localized accumulation of tracer in the pancreas was removed by surgery and the clinical symptoms of insulinoma receded. In the third case, pathological accumulation of tracer was localized and recurrence of insulinoma was confirmed in fusion with CT images. The biological half-time did not exceed 2.7.h. The effective half-time did not exceed 4.8 h. The total-body radiation dose did not exceed 0.0038 mGy/MBq and is comparable with the radiation dose to patient after somatostatin receptor scintigraphy. The highest radiation dose was calculated for kidneys (~ 0.070 mGy/MBq). [Lys40(Ahx-HYNIC-99mTc/EDDA)NH2]-exendin-4 is a good candidate for clinical GLP-1 receptor imaging studies and appears safe for the patient from radiological safety point of view.

  3. Aldosterone receptor antagonists: current perspectives and therapies.

    PubMed

    Guichard, Jason L; Clark, Donald; Calhoun, David A; Ahmed, Mustafa I

    2013-01-01

    Aldosterone is a downstream effector of angiotensin II in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and binds to the mineralocorticoid receptor. The classical view of aldosterone primarily acting at the level of the kidneys to regulate plasma potassium and intravascular volume status is being supplemented by evidence of new "off-target" effects of aldosterone in other organ systems. The genomic effects of aldosterone are well known, but there is also evidence for non-genomic effects and these recently identified effects of aldosterone have required a revision in the traditional view of aldosterone's role in human health and disease. The aim of this article is to review the biological action of aldosterone and the mineralocorticoid receptor leading to subsequent physiologic and pathophysiologic effects involving the vasculature, central nervous system, heart, and kidneys. Furthermore, we outline current evidence evaluating the use of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists in the treatment of primary aldosteronism, primary hypertension, resistant hypertension, obstructive sleep apnea, heart failure, and chronic kidney disease. PMID:23836977

  4. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Activation in the Ventral Tegmental Area Decreases the Reinforcing Efficacy of Cocaine.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Heath D; Mietlicki-Baase, Elizabeth G; Ige, Kelsey Y; Maurer, John J; Reiner, David J; Zimmer, Derek J; Van Nest, Duncan S; Guercio, Leonardo A; Wimmer, Mathieu E; Olivos, Diana R; De Jonghe, Bart C; Hayes, Matthew R

    2016-06-01

    Cocaine addiction continues to be a significant public health problem for which there are currently no effective FDA-approved treatments. Thus, there is a clear need to identify and develop novel pharmacotherapies for cocaine addiction. Recent evidence indicates that activation of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptors in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) reduces intake of highly palatable food. As the neural circuits and neurobiological mechanisms underlying drug taking overlap to some degree with those regulating food intake, these findings suggest that activation of central GLP-1 receptors may also attenuate cocaine taking. Here, we show that intra-VTA administration of the GLP-1 receptor agonist exendin-4 (0.05 μg) significantly reduced cocaine, but not sucrose, self-administration in rats. We also demonstrate that cocaine taking is associated with elevated plasma corticosterone levels and that systemic infusion of cocaine activates GLP-1-expressing neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), a hindbrain nucleus that projects monosynaptically to the VTA. To determine the potential mechanisms by which cocaine activates NTS GLP-1-expressing neurons, we microinjected corticosterone (0.5 μg) directly into the hindbrain fourth ventricle. Intraventricular corticosterone attenuated cocaine self-administration and this effect was blocked in animals pretreated with the GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin-(9-39) (10 μg) in the VTA. Finally, AAV-shRNA-mediated knockdown of VTA GLP-1 receptors was sufficient to augment cocaine self-administration. Taken together, these findings indicate that increased activation of NTS GLP-1-expressing neurons by corticosterone may represent a homeostatic response to cocaine taking, thereby reducing the reinforcing efficacy of cocaine. Therefore, central GLP-1 receptors may represent a novel target for cocaine addiction pharmacotherapies. PMID:26675243

  5. Receptor mediated tumor targeting: an emerging approach for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Chandana; Das, Manasi; Kanwar, Jagat R; Sahoo, Sanjeeb K

    2011-01-01

    Receptor-mediated tumor targeting has received major attention in the field of cancer drug delivery in the past few years. Receptors, as molecular target has opened new opportunities for cellular or intracellular targeting of drug loaded delivery systems conjugated with targeting moieties i.e. ligand. This receptor mediated targeting of cancer drug through nano carrier systems to cancerous tissue offer protection and improves the pharmacokinetics of various drugs and help to overcome the systemic toxicity and adverse effects that result from the non-selective nature of most current cancer therapeutic agents. The article reviews the scope of receptor mediated targeting of anticancer drug loaded in various nanocarriers and also summarize recent perspective and challenges in the field of nanocarrier-aided drug delivery and drug targeting for cancer therapy. PMID:21034422

  6. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor-mediated endosomal cAMP generation promotes glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Kuna, Ramya S; Girada, Shravan Babu; Asalla, Suman; Vallentyne, Joyprashant; Maddika, Subbareddy; Patterson, James T; Smiley, David L; DiMarchi, Richard D; Mitra, Prasenjit

    2013-07-15

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) plays a major role in promoting glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. In the present study, we synthesized a novel functional analog of GLP-1 conjugated to tetramethyl rhodamine to monitor the internalization of the receptor. Our data show that after being internalized the receptor is sorted to lysosomes. In endosomes, receptor-ligand complex is found to be colocalized with adenylate cyclase. Pharmacological inhibition of endocytosis attenuates GLP-1R-mediated cAMP generation and consequent downstream protein kinase A substrate phosphorylation and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Our study underlines a paradigm shift in GLP-1R signaling and trafficking. The receptor ligand complex triggers cAMP generation both in plasma membrane and in endosomes, which has implications for receptor-mediated regulation of insulin secretion. PMID:23592482

  7. Modulation of Glucagon Receptor Pharmacology by Receptor Activity-modifying Protein-2 (RAMP2)*

    PubMed Central

    Weston, Cathryn; Lu, Jing; Li, Naichang; Barkan, Kerry; Richards, Gareth O.; Roberts, David J.; Skerry, Timothy M.; Poyner, David; Pardamwar, Meenakshi; Reynolds, Christopher A.; Dowell, Simon J.; Willars, Gary B.; Ladds, Graham

    2015-01-01

    The glucagon and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptors play important, opposing roles in regulating blood glucose levels. Consequently, these receptors have been identified as targets for novel diabetes treatments. However, drugs acting at the GLP-1 receptor, although having clinical efficacy, have been associated with severe adverse side-effects, and targeting of the glucagon receptor has yet to be successful. Here we use a combination of yeast reporter assays and mammalian systems to provide a more complete understanding of glucagon receptor signaling, considering the effect of multiple ligands, association with the receptor-interacting protein receptor activity-modifying protein-2 (RAMP2), and the role of individual G protein α-subunits. We demonstrate that RAMP2 alters both ligand selectivity and G protein preference of the glucagon receptor. Importantly, we also uncover novel cross-reactivity of therapeutically used GLP-1 receptor ligands at the glucagon receptor that is abolished by RAMP2 interaction. This study reveals the glucagon receptor as a previously unidentified target for GLP-1 receptor agonists and highlights a role for RAMP2 in regulating its pharmacology. Such previously unrecognized functions of RAMPs highlight the need to consider all receptor-interacting proteins in future drug development. PMID:26198634

  8. Distribution and characterisation of Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor expressing cells in the mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Cork, Simon C.; Richards, James E.; Holt, Marie K.; Gribble, Fiona M.; Reimann, Frank; Trapp, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Although Glucagon-like peptide 1 is a key regulator of energy metabolism and food intake, the precise location of GLP-1 receptors and the physiological relevance of certain populations is debatable. This study investigated the novel GLP-1R-Cre mouse as a functional tool to address this question. Methods Mice expressing Cre-recombinase under the Glp1r promoter were crossed with either a ROSA26 eYFP or tdRFP reporter strain to identify GLP-1R expressing cells. Patch-clamp recordings were performed on tdRFP-positive neurons in acute coronal brain slices from adult mice and selective targeting of GLP-1R cells in vivo was achieved using viral gene delivery. Results Large numbers of eYFP or tdRFP immunoreactive cells were found in the circumventricular organs, amygdala, hypothalamic nuclei and the ventrolateral medulla. Smaller numbers were observed in the nucleus of the solitary tract and the thalamic paraventricular nucleus. However, tdRFP positive neurons were also found in areas without preproglucagon-neuronal projections like hippocampus and cortex. GLP-1R cells were not immunoreactive for GFAP or parvalbumin although some were catecholaminergic. GLP-1R expression was confirmed in whole-cell recordings from BNST, hippocampus and PVN, where 100 nM GLP-1 elicited a reversible inward current or depolarisation. Additionally, a unilateral stereotaxic injection of a cre-dependent AAV into the PVN demonstrated that tdRFP-positive cells express cre-recombinase facilitating virally-mediated eYFP expression. Conclusions This study is a comprehensive description and phenotypic analysis of GLP-1R expression in the mouse CNS. We demonstrate the power of combining the GLP-1R-CRE mouse with a virus to generate a selective molecular handle enabling future in vivo investigation as to their physiological importance. PMID:26500843

  9. Endogenous Hindbrain Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Activation Contributes to the Control of Food Intake by Mediating Gastric Satiation Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Matthew R.; Bradley, Lauren; Grill, Harvey J.

    2009-01-01

    Exogenous activation of central nervous system glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptors (GLP-1Rs) reduces food intake. Experiments addressed whether endogenous central GLP-1R activity is involved in the control of normal feeding and examined which gastrointestinal satiation signals contribute to this control. Given that nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) neurons are the source of central GLP-1, that caudal brainstem circuits mediate the intake suppression triggered by exogenous hindbrain GLP-1R activation, and that these neurons process gastrointestinal vagal signals, the role of endogenous hindbrain GLP-1R activation to intake control was the focus of the analysis. Food intake increased with GLP-1R antagonist [Exendin-(9-39) (Ex-9)] [10 μg, fourth intracerebroventricular (icv)] delivery to overnight food-deprived rats after ingestion of 9 ml Ensure diet. Direct medial NTS injection of a ventricle subthreshold dose (1.0 μg) of Ex-9 increased food intake and established the contribution of this GLP-1R population to the effect observed with ventricular administration. To determine whether satiation signals of gastric vs. intestinal origin drive the GLP-1R-mediated NTS effect on food intake, two experiments were performed in overnight-fasted rats. In one, Ensure was infused intraduodenally (0.4 ml/min for 20 min); in another, the stomach was distended (9 ml SILASTIC brand balloon) for 15 min before fourth icv Ex-9. The intake suppression by duodenal nutrient infusion was not affected by GLP-1R blockade, but the feeding suppression after gastric distension was significantly attenuated by fourth icv Ex-9. We conclude that endogenous NTS GLP-1R activation driven by gastric satiation signals contributes to the control of normal feeding. PMID:19264875

  10. Death receptors as targets for anti-cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Papenfuss, Kerstin; Cordier, Stefanie M; Walczak, Henning

    2008-01-01

    Human tumour cells are characterized by their ability to avoid the normal regulatory mechanisms of cell growth, division and death. The classical chemotherapy aims to kill tumour cells by causing DNA damage-induced apoptosis. However, as many tumour cells posses mutations in intracellular apoptosis-sensing molecules like p53, they are not capable of inducing apoptosis on their own and are therefore resistant to chemotherapy. With the discovery of the death receptors the opportunity arose to directly trigger apoptosis from the outside of tumour cells, thereby circumventing chemotherapeutic resistance. Death receptors belong to the tumour necrosis factor receptor superfamily, with tumour necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-1, CD95 and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand-R1 and -R2 being the most prominent members. This review covers the current knowledge about these four death receptors, summarizes pre-clinical approaches engaging these death receptors in anti-cancer therapy and also gives an overview about their application in clinical trials conducted to date. PMID:19210756

  11. No Significant Increase in the Δ4- and Δ7-Dafachronic Acid Concentration in the Long-Lived glp-1 Mutant, nor in the Mutants Defective in Dauer Formation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tie-Mei; Liu, Weilong; Lu, Shan; Zhang, Yan-Ping; Jia, Le-Mei; Chen, Jie; Li, Xiangke; Lei, Xiaoguang; Dong, Meng-Qiu

    2015-01-01

    The steroid hormone dafachronic acid (DA) regulates dauer formation and lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans by binding to the nuclear receptor DAF-12. However, little is known about how DA concentrations change under various physiologic conditions and about how DA/DAF-12 signaling interacts with other signaling pathways that also regulate dauer formation and lifespan. Using a sensitive bioanalytical method, we quantified the endogenous DA concentrations in a long-lived germline-less glp-1 mutant and in the Dauer formation-defective (Daf-d) mutants daf-12, daf-16, daf-5, and daf-3. We found that the DA concentration in the glp-1 mutant was similar to that in the wild type (WT). This result is contrary to the long-held belief that germline loss-induced longevity involves increased DA production and suggests instead that this type of longevity involves an enhanced response to DA. We also found evidence suggesting that increased DA sensitivity underlies lifespan extension triggered by exogenous DA. At the L2/L3 stage, the DA concentration in a daf-12 null mutant decreased to 22% of the WT level. This finding is consistent with the previously proposed positive feedback regulation between DAF-12 and DA production. Surprisingly, the DA concentrations in the daf-16, daf-5, and daf-3 mutants were only 19–34% of the WT level at the L2/L3 stage, slightly greater than those in the Dauer formation-constitutive (Daf-c) mutants at the pre-dauer stage (4–15% of the WT L2 control). Our experimental evidence suggested that the positive feedback between DA and DAF-12 was partially induced in the three Daf-d mutants. PMID:25971936

  12. Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cell Therapy in Hematology

    PubMed Central

    Ataca, Pınar; Arslan, Önder

    2015-01-01

    It is well demonstrated that the immune system can control and eliminate cancer cells. Immune-mediated elimination of tumor cells has been discovered and is the basis of both cancer vaccines and cellular therapies including hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Adoptive T cell transfer has been improved to be more specific and potent and to cause less off-target toxicity. Currently, there are two forms of engineered T cells being tested in clinical trials: T cell receptor (TCR) and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) modified T cells. On 1 July 2014, the United States Food and Drug Administration granted ‘breakthrough therapy’ designation to anti-CD19 CAR T cell therapy. Many studies were conducted to evaluate the benefits of this exciting and potent new treatment modality. This review summarizes the history of adoptive immunotherapy, adoptive immunotherapy using CARs, the CAR manufacturing process, preclinical and clinical studies, and the effectiveness and drawbacks of this strategy. PMID:26377367

  13. Adoptive T Cell Therapies: A Comparison of T Cell Receptors and Chimeric Antigen Receptors.

    PubMed

    Harris, Daniel T; Kranz, David M

    2016-03-01

    The tumor-killing properties of T cells provide tremendous opportunities to treat cancer. Adoptive T cell therapies have begun to harness this potential by endowing a functionally diverse repertoire of T cells with genetically modified, tumor-specific recognition receptors. Normally, this antigen recognition function is mediated by an αβ T cell receptor (TCR), but the dominant therapeutic forms currently in development are synthetic constructs called chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). While CAR-based adoptive cell therapies are already showing great promise, their basic mechanistic properties have been studied in less detail compared with those of αβ TCRs. In this review, we compare and contrast various features of TCRs versus CARs, with a goal of highlighting issues that need to be addressed to fully exploit the therapeutic potential of both. PMID:26705086

  14. Significance of interleukin-13 receptor alpha 2targeted glioblastoma therapy

    PubMed Central

    Thaci, Bart; Brown, Christine E.; Binello, Emanuela; Werbaneth, Katherine; Sampath, Prakash; Sengupta, Sadhak

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains one of the most lethal primary brain tumors despite surgical and therapeutic advancements. Targeted therapies of neoplastic diseases, including GBM, have received a great deal of interest in recent years. A highly studied target of GBM is interleukin-13 receptor ? chain variant 2 (IL13R?2). Targeted therapies against IL13R?2 in GBM include fusion chimera proteins of IL-13 and bacterial toxins, nanoparticles, and oncolytic viruses. In addition, immunotherapies have been developed using monoclonal antibodies and cell-based strategies such as IL13R?2-pulsed dendritic cells and IL13R?2-targeted chimeric antigen receptormodified T cells. Advanced therapeutic development has led to the completion of phase I clinical trials for chimeric antigen receptormodified T cells and phase III clinical trials for IL-13conjugated bacterial toxin, with promising outcomes. Selective expression of IL13R?2 on tumor cells, while absent in the surrounding normal brain tissue, has motivated continued study of IL13R?2 as an important candidate for targeted glioma therapy. Here, we review the preclinical and clinical studies targeting IL13R?2 in GBM and discuss new advances and promising applications. PMID:24723564

  15. [Albiglutide (Eperzan): a new once-weekly agonist of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptors].

    PubMed

    Scheen, A J

    2015-04-01

    Albiglutide (Eperzan) is a new once-weekly agonist of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptors that is indicated in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Two doses are available, 30 mg and 50 mg, to be injected subcutaneously once a week. It has been extensively evaluated in the HARMONY programme of eight large randomised controlled trials that were performed at different stages of type 2 diabetes, in comparison with placebo or an active comparator. The endocrine and metabolic effects of albiglutide are similar to those of other GLP-1 receptor agonists: stimulation of insulin secretion (incretin effect) and inhibition of glucagon secretion, both in a glucose-dependent manner, retardation of gastric emptying and increase of satiety. These effects lead to a reduction in glycated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)) levels, combined with a weight reduction. The overall tolerance profile is good. Albiglutide is currently reimbursed in Belgium after failure (HbA(1c) > 7.5%) of and in combination with a dual therapy with metformin and a sulfonylurea as well as in combination with a basal insulin (with or without oral antidiabetic drugs). To avoid hypoglycaemia, a reduction in the dose of sulfonylurea or insulin may be recommended. A once-weekly administration should increase patient's acceptance of injectable therapy and improve compliance. PMID:26054173

  16. EP4 receptor as a new target for bronchodilator therapy

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, James; Birrell, Mark A; Maher, Sarah A; Nials, Anthony T; Clarke, Deborah L

    2011-01-01

    Background Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are airway inflammatory diseases characterised by airflow obstruction. Currently approved bronchodilators such as long-acting β2 adrenoceptor agonists are the mainstay treatments but often fail to relieve symptoms of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and severe asthma and safety concerns have been raised over long-term use. The aim of the study was to identify the receptor involved in prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)-induced relaxation in guinea pig, murine, monkey, rat and human airways in vitro. Methods Using an extensive range of pharmacological tools, the relaxant potential of PGE2 and selective agonists for the EP1–4 receptors in the presence and absence of selective antagonists in guinea pig, murine, monkey, rat and human isolated airways was investigated. Results In agreement with previous studies, it was found that the EP2 receptor mediates PGE2-induced relaxation of guinea pig, murine and monkey trachea and that the EP4 receptor mediates PGE2-induced relaxation of the rat trachea. These data have been confirmed in murine airways from EP2 receptor-deficient mice (Ptger2). In contrast to previous publications, a role for the EP4 receptor in relaxant responses in human airways in vitro was found. Relaxant activity of AH13205 (EP2 agonist) was also demonstrated in guinea pig but not human airway tissue, which may explain its failure in clinical studies. Conclusion Identification of the receptor mediating PGE2-induced relaxation represents a key step in developing a novel bronchodilator therapy. These data explain the lack of bronchodilator activity observed with selective EP2 receptor agonists in clinical studies. PMID:21606476

  17. Brain insulin resistance in Alzheimer's disease and its potential treatment with GLP-1 analogs.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Konrad

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of Alzheimer's disease is increasing rapidly in the absence of truly effective therapies. A promising strategy for developing such therapies is the treatment of brain insulin resistance, a common and early feature of Alzheimer's disease, closely tied to cognitive decline and capable of promoting many biological abnormalities in the disorder. The proximal cause of brain insulin resistance appears to be neuronal elevation in the serine phosphorylation of IRS-1, most likely due to amyloid-β-triggered microglial release of proinflammatory cytokines. Preclinically, the first line of defense is behavior-lowering peripheral insulin resistance (e.g., physical exercise and a Mediterranean diet supplemented with foods rich in flavonoids, curcumin and ω-3 fatty acids). More potent remediation is required, however, at clinical stages. Fortunately, the US FDA-approved antidiabetics exenatide (Byetta; Amylin Pharmaceuticals, Inc., CA, USA) and liraglutide (Victoza; Novo Nordisk A/S, Bagsvaerd, Denmark) are showing much promise in reducing Alzheimer's disease pathology and in restoring normal brain insulin responsiveness and cognitive function. PMID:24640977

  18. Glycolipid receptor depletion as an approach to specific antimicrobial therapy.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Majlis; Platt, Frances M; Svanborg, Catharina

    2006-05-01

    Mucosal pathogens recognize glycoconjugate receptors at the site of infection, and attachment is an essential first step in disease pathogenesis. Inhibition of attachment may prevent disease, and several approaches have been explored. This review discusses the prevention of bacterial attachment and disease by agents that modify the glycosylation of cell surface glycoconjugates. Glycosylation inhibitors were tested in the urinary tract infection model, where P-fimbriated Escherichia coli rely on glycosphingolipid receptors for attachment and tissue attack. N-butyldeoxynojirimycin blocked the expression of glucosylceramide-derived glycosphingolipids and attachment was reduced. Bacterial persistence in the kidneys was impaired and the inflammatory response was abrogated. N-butyldeoxynojirimycin was inactive against strains which failed to engage these receptors, including type 1 fimbriated or nonadhesive strains. In vivo attachment has been successfully prevented by soluble receptor analogues, but there is little clinical experience of such inhibitors. Large-scale synthesis of complex carbohydrates, which could be used as attachment inhibitors, remains a technical challenge. Antibodies to bacterial lectins involved in attachment may be efficient inhibitors, and fimbrial vaccines have been developed. Glycosylation inhibitors have been shown to be safe and efficient in patients with lipid storage disease and might therefore be tested in urinary tract infection. This approach differs from current therapies, including antibiotics, in that it targets the pathogens which recognize these receptors. PMID:16630247

  19. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and the cardiometabolic syndrome: impact of incretin-based therapies

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Stanley; Kohl, Benjamin A

    2010-01-01

    The rates of type 2 diabetes mellitus, obesity, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) continue to increase at epidemic proportions. It has become clear that these disease states are not independent but are frequently interrelated. By addressing conditions such as obesity, insulin resistance, stress hyperglycemia, impaired glucose tolerance, and diabetes mellitus, with its micro- and macrovascular complications, a specific treatment strategy can be developed. These conditions can be addressed by early identification of patients at high risk for type 2 diabetes, prompt and aggressive treatment of their hyperglycemia, recognition of the pleiotropic and synergistic benefits of certain antidiabetes agents on CVD, and thus, avoiding potential complications including hypoglycemia and weight gain. Incretin-based therapies, which include glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) inhibitors, have the potential to alter the course of type 2 diabetes and associated CVD complications. Advantages of these therapies include glucose-dependent enhancement of insulin secretion, infrequent instances of hypoglycemia, weight loss with GLP-1 receptor agonists, weight maintenance with DPP-IV inhibitors, decreased blood pressure, improvements in dyslipidemia, and potential beneficial effects on CV function. PMID:21437091

  20. Chronic Toxicity and Carcinogenicity Studies of the Long-Acting GLP-1 Receptor Agonist Dulaglutide in Rodents.

    PubMed

    Byrd, Richard A; Sorden, Steven D; Ryan, Thomas; Pienkowski, Thomas; LaRock, Richard; Quander, Ricardo; Wijsman, John A; Smith, Holly W; Blackbourne, Jamie L; Rosol, Thomas J; Long, Gerald G; Martin, Jennifer A; Vahle, John L

    2015-07-01

    The tumorigenic potential of dulaglutide was evaluated in rats and transgenic mice. Rats were injected sc twice weekly for 93 weeks with dulaglutide 0, 0.05, 0.5, 1.5, or 5 mg/kg corresponding to 0, 0.5, 7, 20, and 58 times, respectively, the maximum recommended human dose based on plasma area under the curve. Transgenic mice were dosed sc twice weekly with dulaglutide 0, 0.3, 1, or 3 mg/kg for 26 weeks. Dulaglutide effects were limited to the thyroid C-cells. In rats, diffuse C-cell hyperplasia and adenomas were statistically increased at 0.5 mg/kg or greater (P ≤ .01 at 5 mg/kg), and C-cell carcinomas were numerically increased at 5 mg/kg. Focal C-cell hyperplasia was higher compared with controls in females given 0.5, 1.5, and 5 mg/kg. In transgenic mice, no dulaglutide-related C-cell hyperplasia or neoplasia was observed at any dose; however, minimal cytoplasmic hypertrophy of C cells was observed in all dulaglutide groups. Systemic exposures decreased over time in mice, possibly due to an antidrug antibody response. In a 52-week study designed to quantitate C-cell mass and plasma calcitonin responses, rats received twice-weekly sc injections of dulaglutide 0 or 5 mg/kg. Dulaglutide increased focal C-cell hyperplasia; however, quantitative increases in C-cell mass did not occur. Consistent with the lack of morphometric changes in C-cell mass, dulaglutide did not affect the incidence of diffuse C-cell hyperplasia or basal or calcium-stimulated plasma calcitonin, suggesting that diffuse increases in C-cell mass did not occur during the initial 52 weeks of the rat carcinogenicity study. PMID:25860029

  1. The complexity of signalling mediated by the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Madeleine M; Halls, Michelle L; Christopoulos, Arthur; Sexton, Patrick M; Wootten, Denise

    2016-04-15

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a class B GPCR that is a major therapeutic target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The receptor is activated by the incretin peptide GLP-1 promoting a broad range of physiological effects including glucose-dependent insulin secretion and biosynthesis, improved insulin sensitivity of peripheral tissues, preservation of β-cell mass and weight loss, all of which are beneficial in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Despite this, existing knowledge surrounding the underlying signalling mechanisms responsible for the physiological actions downstream of GLP-1R activation is limited. Here, we review the current understanding around GLP-1R-mediated signalling, in particular highlighting recent contributions to the field on biased agonism, the spatial and temporal aspects for the control of signalling and how these concepts may influence future drug development. PMID:27068973

  2. Estrogen receptors in breast carcinogenesis and endocrine therapy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bo; Warner, Margaret; Gustafsson, Jan-ke

    2015-12-15

    Excessive exposure to estrogen has long been associated with an increased risk for developing breast cancer and anti-estrogen therapy is the gold standard of care in the treatment of estrogen receptor (ER) ?-positive breast cancers. However, there are several mysteries concerning both anti-estrogen, tamoxifen, and estrogen. The most important of these are: (1) some ER?-positive breast cancers do not respond to tamoxifen; (2) some ER?-negative breast cancers do respond to tamoxifen; (3) initial or acquired resistance to tamoxifen occurs with recurrent tumors; (4) estrogen can cause marked tumor regression in long-term tamoxifen-resistant ER?-positive breast cancer. These mysteries indicate that we do not know enough about estrogen signaling to understand the effects of targeting these receptors in cancer. The discovery of ER?, the second estrogen receptor, has added another level of complexity to estrogen signaling. This review summarizes recent publications and makes an updated portrait of ER? and ER? in breast carcinogenesis and endocrine cancer therapy. PMID:25433206

  3. Current status of chimeric antigen receptor therapy for haematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Maude, Shannon; Barrett, David M

    2016-01-01

    The field of adoptive cell transfer includes chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) engineered T cells, constructs that emerged from basic research into principles of immunology and have transformed into clinically effective therapies for haematological malignancies. T cells engineered to express these artificial receptors hold great promise, but also carry significant risk. While permanent genetic modification of mature T cells appears safe, modulating their in vivo function is difficult, partly because the robust response can trigger other arms of the immune system. Suicide systems and toxicity management with cytokine blockade or signal transduction modulators have emerged as a new frontier in this field, a far cry from early problems getting CAR T cells to work at all. Currently, clinical trials in patients with relapsed or refractory B cell malignancies treated with CD19-specific CAR T cells have induced durable remissions in adults and children. Results from these trials indicate that more work needs to be done to understand biomarkers of efficacy, the role of T cell persistence and how to integrate this care into standard practice. Cell therapy will not be a 'one size fits all' class of medicine, and here we will discuss the development of this therapy and important questions for its future. PMID:26560054

  4. New radiopharmaceuticals for receptor scintigraphy and radionuclide therapy.

    PubMed

    Virgolini, I; Traub, T; Leimer, M; Novotny, C; Pangerl, T; Ofluoglu, S; Halvadjieva, E; Smith-Jones, P; Flores, J; Li, S R; Angelberger, P; Havlik, E; Andreae, F; Raderer, M; Kurtaran, A; Niederle, B; Dudczak, R

    2000-03-01

    In vitro data have demonstrated a high amount of receptors for various hormones and peptides on malignant cells of neuroendocrine origin. Among these, binding sites for members of the SST-family (hSSTR1-5) are frequently found, and their expression has led to therapeutic and diagnostic attempts to specifically target these receptors. Receptor scintigraphy using radiolabeled peptide ligands has proven its effectiveness in clinical practice. In addition, initial results have indicated a clinical potential for receptor-targeted radiotherapy. Based on somatostatin (SST) receptor (R) recognition, the novel radiopharmaceuticals 111In/90Y-DOTA-lanreotide developed at the University of Vienna as well as 111In/90Y-DOTA-DPhe1-Tyr3-octreotide (NOVARTIS) both have provided promising data for diagnosis and treatment of hSSTR-positive tumors. SSTR scintigraphy using 111In-DTPA-DPhe1-octreotide has a high positive predictive value for the vast majority of neuroendocrine tumors and has gained its place in the diagnostic work-up as well as follow-up of patients. We have used 111In-DOTA-lanreotide scintigraphy in 166 patients since 1997 and have seen positive results in 93% of patients. In 42 patients with neuroendocrine tumors comparative data were obtained. As opposed to 111In-DTPA-DPhe1-octreotide and 111In-DOTA-DPhe1-Tyr3-octreotide, discrepancies in the scintigraphic results were seen in about one third of patients concerning both the tumor uptake as well as tumor lesion detection. Initial results both with 90Y-DOTA-lanreotide as well as 90Y-DOTA-DPhe1-Tyr3-octreotide has pointed out the clinical potential of radionuclide receptor-targeted radiotherapy. This new therapy could offer palliation and disease control at a reduced cost. The final peptide therapy strategy is most probably cheaper than conventional radiotherapies or prolonged chemotherapies. Overall, receptor-mediated radiotherapy with 90Y-DOTA-lanreotide/90Y-DOTA-DPhe1-Tyr3-octre otide might also be effective in patients refractory to conventional strategies. PMID:10932601

  5. Incretin-based therapies in prediabetes: Current evidence and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Papaetis, Georgios S

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is evolving globally at an alarming rate. Prediabetes is an intermediate state of glucose metabolism that exists between normal glucose tolerance (NGT) and the clinical entity of T2D. Relentless β-cell decline and failure is responsible for the progression from NGT to prediabetes and eventually T2D. The huge burden resulting from the complications of T2D created the need of therapeutic strategies in an effort to prevent or delay its development. The beneficial effects of incretin-based therapies, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists, on β-cell function in patients with T2D, together with their strictly glucose-depended mechanism of action, suggested their possible use in individuals with prediabetes when greater β-cell mass and function are preserved and the possibility of β-cell salvage is higher. The present paper summarizes the main molecular intracellular mechanisms through which GLP-1 exerts its activity on β-cells. It also explores the current evidence of incretin based therapies when administered in a prediabetic state, both in animal models and in humans. Finally it discusses the safety of incretin-based therapies as well as their possible role in order to delay or prevent T2D. PMID:25512784

  6. Endothelin B Receptor, a New Target in Cancer Immune Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kandalaft, Lana E.; Facciabene, Andrea; Buckanovich, Ron J.; Coukos, George

    2010-01-01

    The endothelins and their G protein-coupled receptors A and B have been implicated innumerous diseases and have recently emerged as pivotal players in a variety of malignancies. Tumors over-express the endothelin 1 (ET-1) ligand and the endothelin-A-receptor (ETAR). Their interaction induces tumor growth and metastasis by promoting tumor cell survival and proliferation, angiogenesis, and tissue remodeling. On the basis of results from xenograft models, drug development efforts have focused on antagonizing the autocrine-paracrine effects mediated by ET-1/ETAR. In this review, we discuss a novel role of the endothelin-B-receptor (ETBR) in tumorigenesis and the effect of its blockade during cancer immune therapy. We highlight key characteristics of the B receptor such as its specific overexpression in the tumor compartment; and specifically, in the tumor endothelium, where its activation by ET-1 suppresses T-cell adhesion and homing to tumors. We also review our recent findings on the effects of ETBR-specific blockade in increasing T-cell homing to tumors and enhancing the efficacy of otherwise ineffective immunotherapy. PMID:19567593

  7. The mu opioid receptor: A new target for cancer therapy?

    PubMed

    Singleton, Patrick A; Moss, Jonathan; Karp, Daniel D; Atkins, Johnique T; Janku, Filip

    2015-08-15

    Mu opioids are among the most widely used drugs for patients with cancer with both acute and chronic pain as well as in the perioperative period. Several retrospective studies have suggested that opioid use might promote tumor progression and as a result negatively impact survival in patients with advanced cancer; however, in the absence of appropriate prospective validation, any changes in recommendations for opioid use are not warranted. In this review, the authors present preclinical and clinical data that support their hypothesis that the mu opioid receptor is a potential target for cancer therapy because of its plausible role in tumor progression. The authors also propose the hypothesis that peripheral opioid antagonists such as methylnaltrexone, which reverses the peripheral effects of mu opioids but maintains centrally mediated analgesia and is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of opioid-induced constipation, can be used to target the mu opioid receptor. PMID:26043235

  8. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist gene therapy for arthritis.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, B R

    1999-08-01

    Rheumtatoid arthritis (RA) is a crippling, autoimmune disease, and is characterized by inflammation and destruction of joint tissue. Interleukin-1 (IL-1) has been identified as a key pro-inflammatory cytokine responsible for inflammation. One of the mechanisms of regulation of activity of IL-1 is IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra)-mediated: IL-1RA competes with IL-1 for binding to the IL-1 receptor. Significant progress has been made in the potential application of IL-1ra gene therapyfor the treatment of arthritis. Various vectors have been tested for the delivery of the IL-1ra gene to the intra-articular region. Recent studies in humans have provided encouraging prospects for IL-1ra-mediated arthritis gene therapy. PMID:11713759

  9. Novel drugs targeting Toll-like receptors for antiviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mira C; Shirey, Kari Ann; Pletneva, Lioubov M; Boukhvalova, Marina S; Garzino-Demo, Alfredo; Vogel, Stefanie N; Blanco, Jorge CG

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are sentinel receptors of the host innate immune system that recognize conserved ‘pathogen-associated molecular patterns’ of invading microbes, including viruses. The activation of TLRs establishes antiviral innate immune responses and coordinates the development of long-lasting adaptive immunity in order to control viral pathogenesis. However, microbe-induced damage to host tissues may release ‘danger-associated molecular patterns’ that also activate TLRs, leading to an overexuberant inflammatory response and, ultimately, to tissue damage. Thus, TLRs have proven to be promising targets as therapeutics for the treatment of viral infections that result in inflammatory damage or as adjuvants in order to enhance the efficacy of vaccines. Here, we explore recent advances in TLR biology with a focus on novel drugs that target TLRs (agonists and antagonists) for antiviral therapy. PMID:25620999

  10. Treatment of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors with peptide receptor radionuclide therapy.

    PubMed

    van Vliet, Esther I; Teunissen, Jaap J M; Kam, Boen L R; de Jong, Marion; Krenning, Eric P; Kwekkeboom, Dik J

    2013-01-01

    The primary treatment of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEPNETs) is surgery with curative intent or debulking of the tumor mass. In case of metastatic disease, cytoreductive options are limited. A relatively new therapeutic modality, peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) with radiolabeled somatostatin analogs, is currently available in a number of mostly European centers. Complete and partial responses obtained after treatment with [90Y-DOTA0,Tyr3]octreotide are in the same range as after treatment with [177Lu-DOTA0,Tyr3]octreotate (i.e. 10-30%). However, significant nephrotoxicity has been observed after treatment with [90Y-DOTA0,Tyr3]octreotide. Options to improve PRRT may include combinations of radioactive labeled somatostatin analogs, intra-arterial administration, and the use of radiosensitizing drugs combined with PRRT. Other therapeutic applications of PRRT may include additional therapy cycles in patients with progressive disease after benefit from initial therapy, PRRT in adjuvant or neoadjuvant setting, or PRRT combined with new targeted therapies, such as sunitinib or everolimus. Randomized clinical trials comparing PRRT with other treatment modalities, or comparing various radioactive labeled somatostatin analogs should be undertaken to determine the best treatment options and treatment sequelae for patients with GEPNETs. PMID:22237390

  11. Activation of Transmembrane Bile Acid Receptor TGR5 Modulates Pancreatic Islet α Cells to Promote Glucose Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Divya P; Asgharpour, Amon; Mirshahi, Faridoddin; Park, So Hyun; Liu, Sichen; Imai, Yumi; Nadler, Jerry L; Grider, John R; Murthy, Karnam S; Sanyal, Arun J

    2016-03-25

    The physiological role of the TGR5 receptor in the pancreas is not fully understood. We previously showed that activation of TGR5 in pancreatic β cells by bile acids induces insulin secretion. Glucagon released from pancreatic α cells and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) released from intestinal L cells regulate insulin secretion. Both glucagon and GLP-1 are derived from alternate splicing of a common precursor, proglucagon by PC2 and PC1, respectively. We investigated whether TGR5 activation in pancreatic α cells enhances hyperglycemia-induced PC1 expression thereby releasing GLP-1, which in turn increases β cell mass and function in a paracrine manner. TGR5 activation augmented a hyperglycemia-induced switch from glucagon to GLP-1 synthesis in human and mouse islet α cells by GS/cAMP/PKA/cAMP-response element-binding protein-dependent activation of PC1. Furthermore, TGR5-induced GLP-1 release from α cells was via an Epac-mediated PKA-independent mechanism. Administration of the TGR5 agonist, INT-777, to db/db mice attenuated the increase in body weight and improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. INT-777 augmented PC1 expression in α cells and stimulated GLP-1 release from islets of db/db mice compared with control. INT-777 also increased pancreatic β cell proliferation and insulin synthesis. The effect of TGR5-mediated GLP-1 from α cells on insulin release from islets could be blocked by GLP-1 receptor antagonist. These results suggest that TGR5 activation mediates cross-talk between α and β cells by switching from glucagon to GLP-1 to restore β cell mass and function under hyperglycemic conditions. Thus, INT-777-mediated TGR5 activation could be leveraged as a novel way to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:26757816

  12. Acute effect of 3β-hidroxihop-22(29)ene on insulin secretion is mediated by GLP-1, potassium and calcium channels for the glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Castro, Allisson Jhonatan Gomes; Cazarolli, Luisa Helena; de Carvalho, Francieli Kanumfre; da Luz, Gabrielle; Altenhofen, Delsi; dos Santos, Adair Roberto Soares; Pizzolatti, Moacir Geraldo; Silva, Fátima Regina Mena Barreto

    2015-06-01

    The effect of 3β-hidroxihop-22(29)ene (3-BHO) on insulin and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) secretion as well as the mechanism of action of the compound in pancreatic islet on glucose homeostasis was investigated. The data from in vivo treatment show that 3-BHO significantly reduces the hyperglycemia by increasing the insulin and GLP-1 secretion, as well as by accumulating hepatic glycogen in hyperglycemic rats. In rat pancreatic β-cell, 3-BHO stimulates the glucose uptake, insulin vesicles translocation to the plasma membrane and thus the insulin secretion through the involvement of potassium channels (ATP- and Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channels) and calcium channels (L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels (L-VDCC)). Furthermore, this study also provides evidence for a crosstalk between intracellular high calcium concentration, PKA and PKC in the signal transduction of 3-BHO to stimulate insulin secretion. In conclusion, 3-BHO diminishes glycaemia, stimulates GLP-1 secretion and potentiates insulin secretion and increase hepatic glycogen content. Moreover, this triterpene modulates calcium influx characterizing ATP-K(+), Ca(2+)-K(+) and L-VDCC channels-dependent pathways as well as PKA and PKC activity in pancreatic islets underlying the signaling of 3-BHO for the secretory activity and contribution on glucose homeostasis. PMID:25843210

  13. Evaluation of radioiodinated vesamicol analogs for sigma receptor imaging in tumor and radionuclide receptor therapy.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Kazuma; Shiba, Kazuhiro; Akhter, Nasima; Yoshimoto, Mitsuyoshi; Washiyama, Kohshin; Kinuya, Seigo; Kawai, Keiichi; Mori, Hirofumi

    2009-11-01

    It has been reported that sigma receptors are highly expressed in a variety of human tumors. In this study, we selected (+)-2-[4-(4-iodophenyl)piperidino] cyclohexanol [(+)-pIV] as a sigma receptor ligand and evaluated the potential of radioiodinated (+)-pIV for tumor imaging and therapy. (+)-[(125/131)I]pIV was prepared by an iododestannylation reaction under no-carrier-added conditions with radiochemical purity over 99% after HPLC purification. Biodistribution experiments were performed by the intravenous injection of (+)-[(125)I]pIV into mice bearing human prostate tumors (DU-145). Blocking studies were performed by intravenous injection of (+)-[(125)I]pIV mixed with an excess amount of unlabeled sigma ligand into DU-145 tumor-bearing mice. For therapeutic study, (+)-[(131)I]pIV was injected at a dose of 7.4 MBq followed by measurement of the tumor size. In biodistribution experiments, (+)-[(125)I]pIV showed high uptake and long residence in the tumor. High tumor to blood and muscle ratios were achieved because the radioactivity levels of blood and muscle were low. However, the accumulations of radioactivity in non-target tissues, such as liver and kidney, were high. The radioactivity in the non-target tissues slowly decreased over time. Co-injection of (+)-[(125)I]pIV with an excess amount of unlabeled sigma ligand resulted in a significant decrease in the tumor/blood ratio, indicating sigma receptor-mediated tumor uptake. In therapeutic study, tumor growth in mice treated with (+)-[(131)I]pIV was significantly inhibited compared to that of an untreated group. These results indicate that radioiodinated (+)-pIV has a high potential for sigma receptor imaging in tumor and radionuclide receptor therapy. PMID:19659515

  14. Prospects in folate receptor-targeted radionuclide therapy.

    PubMed

    Mller, Cristina; Schibli, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Targeted radionuclide therapy is based on systemic application of particle-emitting radiopharmaceuticals which are directed toward a specific tumor-associated target. Accumulation of the radiopharmaceutical in targeted cancer cells results in high doses of absorbed radiation energy whereas toxicity to non-targeted healthy tissue is limited. This strategy has found widespread application in the palliative treatment of neuroendocrine tumors using somatostatin-based radiopeptides. The folate receptor (FR) has been identified as a target associated with a variety of frequent tumor types (e.g., ovarian, lung, brain, renal, and colorectal cancer). In healthy organs and tissue FR-expression is restricted to only a few sites such as for instance the kidneys. This demonstrates why FR-targeting is an attractive strategy for the development of new therapy concepts. Due to its high FR-binding affinity (K D?therapy, a therapeutic concept with folate radioconjugates has not yet been envisaged for clinical application. The reason is the generally high accumulation of folate radioconjugates in the kidneys where emission of particle-radiation may result in damage to the renal tissue. Therefore, the design of more sophisticated folate radioconjugates providing improved tissue distribution profiles are needed. This review article summarizes recent developments with regard to a therapeutic application of folate radioconjugates. A new construct of a folate radioconjugate and an application protocol which makes use of a pharmacological interaction allowed the first preclinical therapy experiments with radiofolates. These results raise hope for future application of such new concepts also in the clinic. PMID:24069581

  15. Prospects in Folate Receptor-Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Cristina; Schibli, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Targeted radionuclide therapy is based on systemic application of particle-emitting radiopharmaceuticals which are directed toward a specific tumor-associated target. Accumulation of the radiopharmaceutical in targeted cancer cells results in high doses of absorbed radiation energy whereas toxicity to non-targeted healthy tissue is limited. This strategy has found widespread application in the palliative treatment of neuroendocrine tumors using somatostatin-based radiopeptides. The folate receptor (FR) has been identified as a target associated with a variety of frequent tumor types (e.g., ovarian, lung, brain, renal, and colorectal cancer). In healthy organs and tissue FR-expression is restricted to only a few sites such as for instance the kidneys. This demonstrates why FR-targeting is an attractive strategy for the development of new therapy concepts. Due to its high FR-binding affinity (KD < 10−9 M) the vitamin folic acid has emerged as an almost ideal targeting agent. Therefore, a variety of folic acid radioconjugates for nuclear imaging have been developed. However, in spite of the large number of cancer patients who could benefit of a folate-based radionuclide therapy, a therapeutic concept with folate radioconjugates has not yet been envisaged for clinical application. The reason is the generally high accumulation of folate radioconjugates in the kidneys where emission of particle-radiation may result in damage to the renal tissue. Therefore, the design of more sophisticated folate radioconjugates providing improved tissue distribution profiles are needed. This review article summarizes recent developments with regard to a therapeutic application of folate radioconjugates. A new construct of a folate radioconjugate and an application protocol which makes use of a pharmacological interaction allowed the first preclinical therapy experiments with radiofolates. These results raise hope for future application of such new concepts also in the clinic. PMID:24069581

  16. Chimeric Antigen Receptors Modified T-Cells for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Dai, Hanren; Wang, Yao; Lu, Xuechun; Han, Weidong

    2016-07-01

    The genetic modification and characterization of T-cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) allow functionally distinct T-cell subsets to recognize specific tumor cells. The incorporation of costimulatory molecules or cytokines can enable engineered T-cells to eliminate tumor cells. CARs are generated by fusing the antigen-binding region of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) or other ligand to membrane-spanning and intracellular-signaling domains. They have recently shown clinical benefit in patients treated with CD19-directed autologous T-cells. Recent successes suggest that the modification of T-cells with CARs could be a powerful approach for developing safe and effective cancer therapeutics. Here, we briefly review early studies, consider strategies to improve the therapeutic potential and safety, and discuss the challenges and future prospects for CAR T-cells in cancer therapy. PMID:26819347

  17. Chimeric Antigen Receptors Modified T-Cells for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Hanren; Wang, Yao; Lu, Xuechun

    2016-01-01

    The genetic modification and characterization of T-cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) allow functionally distinct T-cell subsets to recognize specific tumor cells. The incorporation of costimulatory molecules or cytokines can enable engineered T-cells to eliminate tumor cells. CARs are generated by fusing the antigen-binding region of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) or other ligand to membrane-spanning and intracellular-signaling domains. They have recently shown clinical benefit in patients treated with CD19-directed autologous T-cells. Recent successes suggest that the modification of T-cells with CARs could be a powerful approach for developing safe and effective cancer therapeutics. Here, we briefly review early studies, consider strategies to improve the therapeutic potential and safety, and discuss the challenges and future prospects for CAR T-cells in cancer therapy. PMID:26819347

  18. The glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist liraglutide attenuates the reinforcing properties of alcohol in rodents.

    PubMed

    Vallöf, Daniel; Maccioni, Paola; Colombo, Giancarlo; Mandrapa, Minja; Jörnulf, Julia Winsa; Egecioglu, Emil; Engel, Jörgen A; Jerlhag, Elisabet

    2016-03-01

    The incretin hormone, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), regulates gastric emptying, glucose-dependent stimulation of insulin secretion and glucagon release, and GLP-1 analogs are therefore approved for treatment of type II diabetes. GLP-1 receptors are expressed in reward-related areas such as the ventral tegmental area and nucleus accumbens, and GLP-1 was recently shown to regulate several alcohol-mediated behaviors as well as amphetamine-induced, cocaine-induced and nicotine-induced reward. The present series of experiments were undertaken to investigate the effect of the GLP-1 receptor agonist, liraglutide, on several alcohol-related behaviors in rats that model different aspects of alcohol use disorder in humans. Acute liraglutide treatment suppressed the well-documented effects of alcohol on the mesolimbic dopamine system, namely alcohol-induced accumbal dopamine release and conditioned place preference in mice. In addition, acute administration of liraglutide prevented the alcohol deprivation effect and reduced alcohol intake in outbred rats, while repeated treatment of liraglutide decreased alcohol intake in outbred rats as well as reduced operant self-administration of alcohol in selectively bred Sardinian alcohol-preferring rats. Collectively, these data suggest that GLP-1 receptor agonists could be tested for treatment of alcohol dependence in humans. PMID:26303264

  19. The ERBB3 receptor in cancer and cancer gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sithanandam, G; Anderson, LM

    2009-01-01

    ERBB3, a member of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family, is unique in that its tyrosine kinase domain is functionally defective. It is activated by neuregulins, by other ERBB and nonERBB receptors as well as by other kinases, and by novel mechanisms. Downstream it interacts prominently with the phosphoinositol 3-kinase/AKT survival/mitogenic pathway, but also with GRB, SHC, SRC, ABL, rasGAP, SYK and the transcription regulator EBP1. There are likely important but poorly understood roles for nuclear localization and for secreted isoforms. Studies of ERBB3 expression in primary cancers and of its mechanistic contributions in cultured cells have implicated it, with varying degrees of certainty, with causation or sustenance of cancers of the breast, ovary, prostate, certain brain cells, retina, melanocytes, colon, pancreas, stomach, oral cavity and lung. Recent results link high ERBB3 activity with escape from therapy targeting other ERBBs in lung and breast cancers. Thus a wide and centrally important role for ERBB3 in cancer is becoming increasingly apparent. Several approaches for targeting ERBB3 in cancers have been tested or proposed. Small inhibitory RNA (siRNA) to ERBB3 or AKT is showing promise as a therapeutic approach to treatment of lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:18404164

  20. Toll-Like Receptor 7-Targeted Therapy in Respiratory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lebold, Katie M.; Jacoby, David B.; Drake, Matthew G.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Allergic asthma and allergic rhinitis are inflammatory diseases of the respiratory tract characterized by an excessive type-2 T helper cell (Th2) immune response. Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) is a single-stranded viral RNA receptor expressed in the airway that initiates a Th1 immune response and has garnered interest as a novel therapeutic target for treatment of allergic airway diseases. In animal models, synthetic TLR7 agonists reduce airway hyperreactivity, eosinophilic inflammation, and airway remodeling while decreasing Th2-associated cytokines. Furthermore, activation of TLR7 rapidly relaxes airway smooth muscle via production of nitric oxide. Thus, TLR7 has dual bronchodilator and anti-inflammatory effects. Two TLR7 ligands with promising pharmacologic profiles have entered clinical trials for the treatment of allergic rhinitis. Moreover, TLR7 agonists are potential antiviral therapies against respiratory viruses. TLR7 agonists enhance influenza vaccine efficacy and also reduce viral titers when given during an active airway infection. In this review, we examine the current data supporting TLR7 as a therapeutic target in allergic airway diseases. PMID:27226793

  1. Regulation of death receptors-Relevance in cancer therapies

    SciTech Connect

    Thonel, A. de; Eriksson, J.E. . E-mail: john.eriksson@btk.fi

    2005-09-01

    Apoptosis is an essential non-inflammatory mechanism for cell removal, which occurs during both physiological and pathological conditions. Apoptosis is characteristically executed by cysteine proteases, termed caspases. The most specific way to activate the caspases machinery is through death receptors (DRs), such as the tumor necrosis factor (TNFR), Fas receptor (FasR), and TRAIL (TRAIL-R). The apoptotic signaling is tightly regulated by the balance of pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic proteins and an imbalance between cell death and proliferation may cause numerous diseases, including cancers. The intensive research during the past decade has delineated the basic mechanisms of apoptosis and outlined many important molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of apoptosis. There is also a better understanding of how the regulation of apoptosis can be disturbed in human cancer cells. The interplay between DRs signaling and anticancer drugs has offered new concepts for the development of highly specific therapeutical agents. Here we review the current understanding of the different molecular mechanisms that regulate DR-mediated apoptosis and the defects in apoptotic signaling discovered in cancer cells. In light of this knowledge, new promising target-based agents for future cancer therapies have been developed.

  2. Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) as targets for antiplatelet therapy.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Margaret; McIntosh, Kathryn; Bushell, Trevor; Sloan, Graeme; Plevin, Robin

    2016-04-15

    Since the identification of the proteinase-activated receptor (PAR) family as mediators of serine protease activity in the 1990s, there has been tremendous progress in the elucidation of their pathophysiological roles. The development of drugs that target PARs has been the focus of many laboratories for the potential treatment of thrombosis, cancer and other inflammatory diseases. Understanding the mechanisms of PAR activation and G protein signalling pathways evoked in response to the growing list of endogenous proteases has yielded great insight into receptor regulation at the molecular level. This has led to the development of new selective modulators of PAR activity, particularly PAR1. The mixed success of targeting PARs has been best exemplified in the context of inhibiting PAR1 as a new antiplatelet therapy. The development of the competitive PAR1 antagonist, vorapaxar (Zontivity), has clearly shown the value in targeting PAR1 in acute coronary syndrome (ACS); however the severity of associated bleeding with this drug has limited its use in the clinic. Due to the efficacy of thrombin acting via PAR1, strategies to selectively inhibit specific PAR1-mediated G protein signalling pathways or to target the second thrombin platelet receptor, PAR4, are being devised. The rationale behind these alternative approaches is to bias downstream thrombin activity via PARs to allow for inhibition of pro-thrombotic pathways but maintain other pathways that may preserve haemostatic balance and improve bleeding profiles for widespread clinical use. This review summarizes the structural determinants that regulate PARs and the modulators of PAR activity developed to date. PMID:27068977

  3. Receptor targeting for tumor localisation and therapy with radiopeptides.

    PubMed

    Heppeler, A; Froidevaux, S; Eberle, A N; Maecke, H R

    2000-09-01

    Receptor targeting with radiolabeled peptides has become very important in nuclear oncology in the past few years. The most frequently used peptides in the clinic are analogs of somatostatin (SRIF), e.g. OctreoScan, which contain chelators for the radioisotopes 111In, 86Y, 90Y, 67Ga, 68Ga and 64Cu or for 99mTc and 188Re. and were labelled with the halogens 123I and 18F. Radiolabeled analogs of &alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (&alpha-MSH), neurotensin, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), bombesin (BN), substance P (SP) and gastrin/cholecystokinin (CCK) are also being developed, evaluated in vitro and in vivo and tested for clinical application. This review focuses on the expression in tumors and the regulation of receptors for these neuropeptides as well as the development of novel chelator-peptide conjugates suitable for in vivo scintigraphy or internal radiotherapy. The state of the art of radiopeptide pharmaceuticals is illustrated with four SRIF analogs, modified with the macrocyclic chelator 1, 4, 7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane-1, 4, 7, 10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA): [D-Phe1]-octreotide (DOTAOC), [D-Phe1, Tyr3]-octreotide (DOTATOC), vapreotide (DOTAVAP) and lanreotide (DOTALAN). DOTA is almost a universal chelator capable of strongly encapsulating hard metals such as 111In and 67Ga for Single Photon Emission Tomography (SPET), 68Ga, 86Y and 64Cu for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) as well as 90Y for receptor-mediated radionuclide therapy and radiolanthanides which exhibit different interesting decay schemes. From biodistribution studies in experimental animals and from clinical data it is concluded that DOTATOC is currently the most suitable SRIF radiopeptide with the best potential in the clinic. PMID:10911025

  4. The Effect of Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Receptor Agonists on Weight Loss in Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review and Mixed Treatment Comparison Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Potts, Jessica E.; Gray, Laura J.; Brady, Emer M.; Khunti, Kamlesh; Davies, Melanie J.; Bodicoat, Danielle H.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To determine the effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists compared with placebo and other anti-diabetic agents on weight loss in overweight or obese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods Electronic searches were conducted for randomised controlled trials that compared a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist therapy at a clinically relevant dose with a comparator treatment (other type 2 diabetes treatment or placebo) in adults with type 2 diabetes and a mean body mass index ≥ 25kg/m2. Pair-wise meta-analyses and mixed treatment comparisons were conducted to examine the difference in weight change at six months between the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and each comparator. Results In the mixed treatment comparison (27 trials), the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists were the most successful in terms of weight loss; exenatide 2mg/week: -1.62kg (95% CrI: -2.95kg, -0.30kg), exenatide 20μg: -1.37kg (95% CI: -222kg, -0.52kg), liraglutide 1.2mg: -1.01kg (95%CrI: -2.41kg, 0.38kg) and liraglutide 1.8mg: -1.51 kg (95% CI: -2.67kg, -0.37kg) compared with placebo. There were no differences between the GLP-1 receptor agonists in terms of weight loss. Conclusions This review provides evidence that glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist therapies are associated with weight loss in overweight or obese patients with type 2 diabetes with no difference in weight loss seen between the different types of GLP-1 receptor agonists assessed. PMID:26121478

  5. Monoclonal T-cell receptors: new reagents for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Stauss, Hans J; Cesco-Gaspere, Michela; Thomas, Sharyn; Hart, Daniel P; Xue, Shao-An; Holler, Angelika; Wright, Graham; Perro, Mario; Little, Ann-Margaret; Pospori, Constantina; King, Judy; Morris, Emma C

    2007-10-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T lymphocytes is an effective form of immunotherapy for persistent virus infections and cancer. A major limitation of adoptive therapy is the inability to isolate antigen-specific T lymphocytes reproducibly. The demonstration that cloned T-cell receptor (TCR) genes can be used to produce T lymphocyte populations of desired specificity offers new opportunities for antigen-specific T-cell therapy. TCR gene-modified lymphocytes display antigen-specific function in vitro, and were shown to protect against virus infection and tumor growth in animal models. A recent trial in humans demonstrated that TCR gene-modified T cells persisted in all and reduced melanoma burden in 2/15 patients. In future trials, it may be possible to use TCR gene transfer to equip helper and cytotoxic T cells with new antigen-specificity, allowing both T-cell subsets to cooperate in achieving improved clinical responses. Sequence modifications of TCR genes are being explored to enhance TCR surface expression, while minimizing the risk of pairing between introduced and endogenous TCR chains. Current T-cell transduction protocols that trigger T-cell differentiation need to be modified to generate "undifferentiated" T cells, which, upon adoptive transfer, display improved in vivo expansion and survival. Both, expression of only the introduced TCR chains and the production of naïve T cells may be possible in the future by TCR gene transfer into stem cells. PMID:17637721

  6. Agavins from Agave angustifolia and Agave potatorum affect food intake, body weight gain and satiety-related hormones (GLP-1 and ghrelin) in mice.

    PubMed

    Santiago-García, Patricia Araceli; López, Mercedes G

    2014-12-01

    Agavins act as a fermentable dietary fiber and have attracted attention due to their potential for reducing the risk of disease. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of supplementation using 10% agavins with a short-degree of polymerization (SDP) from Agave angustifolia Haw. (AASDP) or Agave potatorum Zucc. (APSDP) along with chicory fructans (RSE) as a reference for 5 weeks, on the energy intake, body weight gain, satiety-related hormones from the gut and blood (GLP-1 and ghrelin), blood glucose and lipids, and short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) from the gut of ad libitum-fed mice. We evaluated the energy intake daily and weight gain every week. At the end of the experiment, portal vein blood samples as well as intestinal segments and the stomach were collected to measure glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and ghrelin using RIA and ELISA kits, respectively. Colon SCFAs were measured using gas chromatography. The energy intake, body weight gain, and triglycerides were lower in the fructan-fed mice than in the STD-fed mice. The AASDP, APSDP, and RSE diets increased the serum levels of GLP-1 (40, 93, and 16%, respectively vs. STD) (P ≤ 0.05), whereas ghrelin was decreased (16, 38, and 42%, respectively) (P ≤ 0.05). Butyric acid increased significantly in the APSDP-fed mice (26.59 mmol g(-1), P ≤ 0.001) compared with that in the AASDP- and RSE-fed mice. We concluded that AASDP and APSDP are able to promote the secretion of the peptides involved in appetite regulation, which might help to control obesity and its associated metabolic disorder. PMID:25367106

  7. Neurochemical modulation involved in the beneficial effect of liraglutide, GLP-1 agonist on PTZ kindling epilepsy-induced comorbidities in mice.

    PubMed

    Koshal, Prashant; Kumar, Puneet

    2016-04-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder which occurs due to excessive firing of excitatory neurons in specific region of brain and associated with cognitive impairment and depression. GLP-1 has been reported to maintain hyperexcitability of neurons. Therefore, this study was designed to investigate the neuroprotective effect of liraglutide, GLP-1 analogue in PTZ kindling epilepsy-induced comorbidities and neurochemical alteration in mice. Male albino mice were administered PTZ (35 mg/kg) on every alternate day up to 29th days and challenge test was performed on 33rd day. From 1st day liraglutide (75 and 150 µg/kg) and diazepam (3 mg/kg) were administered up to 33rd day, 30 min prior to PTZ treatment. On 30th day animals were trained on elevated plus maze and passive shock avoidance paradigm and retention was recorded on 31st and 33rd day. On 32nd day tail suspension test was performed. Animals were sacrificed on 34th day for biochemical (LPO, GSH, and nitrite) and neurotransmitters (GABA, glutamate, DA, NE, 5-HT and their metabolites) estimation. Chronic treatment with PTZ developed generalized tonic-clonic seizures, reduced cognitive skills, increased oxidative stress and alteration in the level of neurotransmitters. Pre-treatment with liraglutide (75 and 150 μg/kg) significantly prevented the seizure severity, restored behavioural activity, oxidative defence enzymes, and altered level of neurochemicals in mice brain. The protective effect of liraglutide is attributed to restoration of altered level of GABA, glutamate, DA, NE, and 5-HT by the up-regulation of GLP-1Rs in mice brain. PMID:26965494

  8. Cardiac metastases of neuroendocrine tumors treated with 177Lu DOTATATE peptide receptor radionuclide therapy or 131I-MIBG therapy.

    PubMed

    Makis, William; McCann, Karey; Bryanton, Mark; McEwan, Alexander J B

    2015-12-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors have a propensity to metastasize to the heart, although the reason for this remains unknown. A review of 251 neuroendocrine tumor patients treated with Lu DOTATATE peptide receptor radionuclide therapy or I-MIBG therapy at our institution since 2003 revealed 2 patients with cardiac metastases (incidence, 0.8%), one treated with Lu DOTATATE and one with I-MIBG. We present the imaging findings of these 2 patients, as well as their management and responses to therapy. PMID:26359563

  9. Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor activation regulates cocaine actions and dopamine homeostasis in the lateral septum by decreasing arachidonic acid levels.

    PubMed

    Reddy, I A; Pino, J A; Weikop, P; Osses, N; Sørensen, G; Bering, T; Valle, C; Bluett, R J; Erreger, K; Wortwein, G; Reyes, J G; Graham, D; Stanwood, G D; Hackett, T A; Patel, S; Fink-Jensen, A; Torres, G E; Galli, A

    2016-01-01

    Agonism of the glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor (GLP-1R) has been effective at treating aspects of addictive behavior for a number of abused substances, including cocaine. However, the molecular mechanisms and brain circuits underlying the therapeutic effects of GLP-1R signaling on cocaine actions remain elusive. Recent evidence has revealed that endogenous signaling at the GLP-1R within the forebrain lateral septum (LS) acts to reduce cocaine-induced locomotion and cocaine conditioned place preference, both considered dopamine (DA)-associated behaviors. DA terminals project from the ventral tegmental area to the LS and express the DA transporter (DAT). Cocaine acts by altering DA bioavailability by targeting the DAT. Therefore, GLP-1R signaling might exert effects on DAT to account for its regulation of cocaine-induced behaviors. We show that the GLP-1R is highly expressed within the LS. GLP-1, in LS slices, significantly enhances DAT surface expression and DAT function. Exenatide (Ex-4), a long-lasting synthetic analog of GLP-1 abolished cocaine-induced elevation of DA. Interestingly, acute administration of Ex-4 reduces septal expression of the retrograde messenger 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG), as well as a product of its presynaptic degradation, arachidonic acid (AA). Notably, AA reduces septal DAT function pointing to AA as a novel regulator of central DA homeostasis. We further show that AA oxidation product γ-ketoaldehyde (γ-KA) forms adducts with the DAT and reduces DAT plasma membrane expression and function. These results support a mechanism in which postsynaptic septal GLP-1R activation regulates 2-AG levels to alter presynaptic DA homeostasis and cocaine actions through AA. PMID:27187231

  10. Targeting ryanodine receptors for anti-arrhythmic therapy

    PubMed Central

    McCauley, Mark D; Wehrens, Xander H T

    2011-01-01

    Antiarrhythmic drugs are a group of pharmaceuticals that suppress or prevent abnormal heart rhythms, which are often associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Current antiarrhythmic drugs that typically target plasma membrane ion channels have limited clinical success and in some cases have been described as being pro-arrhythmic. However, recent studies suggest that pathological release of calcium (Ca2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum via cardiac ryanodine receptors (RyR2) could represent a promising target for antiarrhythmic therapy. Diastolic SR Ca2+ release has been linked to arrhythmogenesis in both the inherited arrhythmia syndrome 'catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia' and acquired forms of heart disease (eg, atrial fibrillation, heart failure). Several classes of pharmaceuticals have been shown to reduce abnormal RyR2 activity and may confer protection against triggered arrhythmias through reduction of SR Ca2+ leak. In this review, we will evaluate the current pharmacological methods for stabilizing RyR2 and suggest treatment modalities based on current evidence of molecular mechanisms. PMID:21642946

  11. Folate Receptor Targeted Alpha-Therapy Using Terbium-149

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Cristina; Reber, Josefine; Haller, Stephanie; Dorrer, Holger; Köster, Ulli; Johnston, Karl; Zhernosekov, Konstantin; Türler, Andreas; Schibli, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Terbium-149 is among the most interesting therapeutic nuclides for medical applications. It decays by emission of short-range α-particles (Eα = 3.967 MeV) with a half-life of 4.12 h. The goal of this study was to investigate the anticancer efficacy of a 149Tb-labeled DOTA-folate conjugate (cm09) using folate receptor (FR)-positive cancer cells in vitro and in tumor-bearing mice. 149Tb was produced at the ISOLDE facility at CERN. Radiolabeling of cm09 with purified 149Tb resulted in a specific activity of ~1.2 MBq/nmol. In vitro assays performed with 149Tb-cm09 revealed a reduced KB cell viability in a FR-specific and activity concentration-dependent manner. Tumor-bearing mice were injected with saline only (group A) or with 149Tb-cm09 (group B: 2.2 MBq; group C: 3.0 MBq). A significant tumor growth delay was found in treated animals resulting in an increased average survival time of mice which received 149Tb-cm09 (B: 30.5 d; C: 43 d) compared to untreated controls (A: 21 d). Analysis of blood parameters revealed no signs of acute toxicity to the kidneys or liver in treated mice over the time of investigation. These results demonstrated the potential of folate-based α-radionuclide therapy in tumor-bearing mice. PMID:24633429

  12. Glucose Variability and β- Cell Response by GLP-1 Analogue added-on CSII for Patients with Poorly Controlled Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Hung; Hsieh, Sheng-Hwu; Sun, Jui-Hung; Tsai, Jir-Shiong; Huang, Yu-Yao

    2015-01-01

    The effects of twice-daily GLP-1 analogue injections added on continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) in patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes (T2DM) were unknown. After optimization of blood glucose in the first 3 days by CSII during hospitalization, patients with poorly controlled T2DM were randomized to receive CSII combined with injections of exenatide or placebo for another 3 days. A total of 51 patients (30 in exenatide and 21 in placebo groups) with mean A1C 11% were studied. There was no difference in mean glucose but a significant higher standard deviation of plasma glucose (SDPG) was found in the exenatide group (50.51 ± 2.43 vs. 41.49 ± 3.00 mg/dl, p = 0.027). The improvement of incremental area under the curve (AUC) of glucose and insulinogenic index (Insulin 0-peak/ Glucose 0-peak) in 75 g oral glucose tolerance test was prominent in the exenatide group (p < 0.01). The adiponectin level was significantly increased with exenatide added on (0.39 ± 0.32 vs. -1.62 ± 0.97 μg/mL, in exenatide and placebo groups, respectively, p = 0.045). In conclusion, the add-on of GLP-1 analogue to CSII increased glucose variability and the β - cell response in patients with poorly controlled T2DM. PMID:26607841

  13. Analysis of the multiple roles of gld-1 in germline development: Interactions with the sex determination cascade and the glp-