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Sample records for therapies glp-1 receptor

  1. Increasing GLP-1 Circulating Levels by Bariatric Surgery or by GLP-1 Receptor Agonists Therapy: Why Are the Clinical Consequences so Different?

    PubMed Central

    Amouyal, Chloé; Andreelli, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    The “incretin effect” is used to describe the observation that more insulin is secreted after the oral administration of glucose compared to that after the intravenous administration of the same amount of glucose. During the absorption of meals, the gut is thought to regulate insulin secretion by secreting a specific factor that targets pancreatic beta cells. Additional research confirmed this hypothesis with the discovery of two hormones called incretins: gastric inhibitory peptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). During meals, specific cells in the gut (L and K enteroendocrine cells) secrete incretins, causing an increase in the blood concentrations of, respectively, GLP-1 and GIP. Bariatric surgery is now proposed during the therapeutic management of type 2 diabetes in obese or overweight populations. It has been hypothesized that restoration of endogenous GLP-1 secretion after the surgery may contribute to the postsurgical resolution of diabetes. In 2005, the commercialization of GLP-1 receptor agonists gave the possibility to test this hypothesis. A few years later, it is now accepted that GLP-1 receptor agonists and bariatric surgery differently improve type 2 diabetes. These differences between endogenous and exogenous GLP-1 on glucose homeostasis emphasized the dual properties of GLP-1 as a peptide hormone and as a neurotransmitter. PMID:27382574

  2. Markers of beta cell failure predict poor glycemic response to GLP-1 receptor agonist therapy in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Angus G; McDonald, Timothy J; Shields, Beverley M; Hill, Anita V; Hyde, Christopher J; Knight, Bridget A; Hattersley, Andrew T

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess whether clinical characteristics and simple biomarkers of beta cell failure are associated with individual variation in glycemic response to GLP-1 receptor agonist therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes. Research Design and Methods We prospectively studied 620 participants with type 2 diabetes and HbA1c ≥58mmol/mol (7.5%) commencing GLP-1 receptor agonist therapy as part of their usual diabetes care and assessed response to therapy over 6 months. We assessed the association between baseline clinical measurements associated with beta cell failure and glycemic response (HbA1c change 0 to 6 months, primary outcome) with change in weight (0 to 6 months) as a secondary outcome using linear regression and ANOVA with adjustment for baseline HbA1c and co-treatment change. Results Reduced glycemic response to GLP-1R agonists was associated with longer duration diabetes, insulin co-treatment, lower fasting C-peptide, lower post meal urine C-peptide creatinine ratio and positive GAD or IA2 islet autoantibodies (p≤0.01 for all). Participants with positive autoantibodies or severe insulin deficiency (fasting C-peptide ≤0.25nmol/L) had markedly reduced glycemic response to GLP-1RA therapy (autoantibodies: mean HbA1c change -5.2 vs -15.2 mmol/mol (-0.5 vs -1.4%), p=0.005 C-peptide <0.25nmol/L: mean change -2.1 vs -15.3mmol/mol (-0.2 vs -1.4%), p=0.002). These markers were predominantly present in insulin treated participants and were not associated with weight change. Conclusions Clinical markers of low beta cell function are associated with reduced glycemic response to GLP-1R agonist therapy. C-peptide and islet autoantibodies represent potential biomarkers for the stratification of GLP-1R agonist therapy in insulin treated diabetes. PMID:26242184

  3. Peptide binding at the GLP-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Mann, R; Nasr, N; Hadden, D; Sinfield, J; Abidi, F; Al-Sabah, S; de Maturana, R López; Treece-Birch, J; Willshaw, A; Donnelly, D

    2007-08-01

    The receptor for GLP-1 [glucagon-like peptide-1-(7-36)-amide] is a member of the 'Family B' of GPCRs (G-protein-coupled receptors) comprising an extracellular N-terminal domain containing six conserved cysteine residues (the N-domain) and a core domain (or J-domain) comprising the seven transmembrane helices and interconnecting loop regions. According to the two-domain model for peptide binding, the N-domain is primarily responsible for providing most of the peptide binding energy, whereas the core domain is responsible for binding the N-terminal region of the peptide agonists and transmitting the signal to the intracellular G-protein. Two interesting differences between the binding properties of two GLP-1 receptor agonists, GLP-1 and EX-4 (exendin-4), can be observed. First, while GLP-1 requires its full length to maintain high affinity, the eight N-terminal residues of EX-4 can be removed with little reduction in affinity. Secondly, EX-4 (but not GLP-1) can bind to the fully isolated N-domain of the receptor with an affinity matching that of the full-length receptor. In order to better understand these differences, we have studied the interaction between combinations of full-length or truncated ligands with full-length or truncated receptors. PMID:17635131

  4. Clinical and Patient-Related Variables Associated with Initiating GLP-1 Receptor Agonist Therapy in Type 2 Diabetes Patients in Primary Care in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Qing; Grandy, Susan; Hiller, Josh; Kostev, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Aims To investigate real-world clinical and patient-related variables associated with initiating GLP-1 receptor agonist (GLP-1RA) treatment relative to initiation of other glucose-lowering therapies in type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients of primary care in Germany. Methods Data for 938 T2D patients who started therapy with a GLP-1RA within 823 practices of primary care throughout Germany were retrospectively analyzed (Disease Analyser: 01/2011–03/2014). 5,197 T2D patients who initiated other non-GLP-1RA antidiabetic therapies were selected as controls. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were applied to identify factors associated with GLP-1RA initiation in primary care. Results Mean age (SD) of GLP-1RA users was 57.8 (11.8) years (males: 55.5%) and the average BMI was 36.1 (6.7) kg/m2. 22.8% were in diabetologist care and 12.0% had private health insurance. In multivariate regression, choice of GLP-1RA therapy instead of a different glucose-lowering drug class was associated with obesity (odds ratio: 1.68; 95% CI: 1.34–2.10), private health insurance (2.42; 1.89–3.09), younger age (0.94; 0.93–0.95 per year), male sex (0.85; 0.73–0.99), diabetologist care (2.11; 1.73–2.57), and geographic practice location (East vs. West-Germany; 1.25; 1.05–1.49). Among co-medication, angiotensin II antagonists (increased) and non-steroidal antirheumatic agents (decreased) were related to GLP-1RA prescriptions (both p<0.001). Conclusions Consistent with German guidelines, GLP-1RA is mainly prescribed preferentially in T2D patients who are obese. GLP-1RA drugs were more frequently used than other options in privately health insured patients and in patients seeing a diabetologist. PMID:27019360

  5. When Intensive Insulin Therapy (MDI) Fails in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: Switching to GLP-1 Receptor Agonist Versus Insulin Pump.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ohad; Filetti, Sebastiano; Castañeda, Javier; Maranghi, Marianna; Glandt, Mariela

    2016-08-01

    Treatment with insulin, alone or with oral or injectable hypoglycemic agents, is becoming increasingly common in patients with type 2 diabetes. However, approximately 40% of patients fail to reach their glycemic targets with the initially prescribed regimen and require intensification of insulin therapy, which increases the risks of weight gain and hypoglycemia. Many of these patients eventually reach a state in which further increases in the insulin dosage fail to improve glycemic control while increasing the risks of weight gain and hypoglycemia. The recently completed OpT2mise clinical trial showed that continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) is more effective in reducing glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) than intensification of multiple daily injection (MDI) insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes who do not respond to intensive insulin therapy. CSII therapy may also be useful in patients who do not reach glycemic targets despite multidrug therapy with basal-bolus insulin and other agents, including glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 receptor agonists; current guidelines offer no recommendations for the treatment of such patients. Importantly, insulin and GLP-1 receptor agonists have complementary effects on glycemia and, hence, can be used either sequentially or in combination in the initial management of diabetes. Patients who have not previously failed GLP-1 receptor agonist therapy may show reduction in weight and insulin dose, in addition to moderate improvement in HbA1c, when GLP-1 receptor agonist therapy is added to MDI regimens. In subjects with long-standing type 2 diabetes who do not respond to intensive insulin therapies, switching from MDI to CSII and/or the addition of GLP-1 receptor agonists to MDI have the potential to improve glycemic control without increasing the risk of adverse events. PMID:27440831

  6. Physician perceptions of GLP-1 receptor agonists in the UK.

    PubMed

    Matza, Louis S; Curtis, Sarah E; Jordan, Jessica B; Adetunji, Omolara; Martin, Sherry A; Boye, Kristina S

    2016-05-01

    Objectives Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists have been used to treat type 2 diabetes for almost a decade, and new treatments in this class have recently been introduced. The purpose of this study was to examine perceptions of GLP-1 receptor agonists among physicians who treat patients with type 2 diabetes in the UK. Methods A total of 670 physicians (226 diabetes specialists; 444 general practice [GP] physicians) completed a survey in 2014. Results Almost all physicians had prescribed GLP-1 receptor agonists (95.4% total sample; 99.1% specialists; 93.5% GP), most frequently to patients whose glucose levels are not adequately controlled with oral medications (85.9% of physicians) and obese/overweight patients (83.7%). Physicians' most common reasons for prescribing a GLP-1 receptor agonist were: associated with weight loss (65.8%), good efficacy (55.7%), less hypoglycemia risk than insulin (55.2%), not associated with weight gain (34.5%), and better efficacy than oral medications (32.7%). Factors that most commonly cause hesitation when prescribing this class were: not considered first line therapy according to guidelines (56.9%), injectable administration (44.6%), cost (36.7%), gastrointestinal side effects (33.4%), and risk of pancreatitis (26.7%). Almost all specialists (99.1%) believed they had sufficient knowledge to prescribe a GLP-1 receptor agonist, compared with 76.1% of GPs. Conclusions Results highlight the widespread use of GLP-1 receptor agonists for treatment of type 2 diabetes in the UK. However, almost a quarter of GPs reported that they do not have enough knowledge to prescribe GLP-1s, suggesting a need for increased dissemination of information to targeted groups of physicians. Study limitations were that the generalizability of the clinician sample is unknown; survey questions required clinicians to select answers from multiple response options rather than generating the responses themselves; and responses to this survey conducted

  7. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of GLP-1-Based Therapies beyond Glucose Control

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Sun; Jun, Hee-Sook

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone mainly secreted from intestinal L cells in response to nutrient ingestion. GLP-1 has beneficial effects for glucose homeostasis by stimulating insulin secretion from pancreatic beta-cells, delaying gastric emptying, decreasing plasma glucagon, reducing food intake, and stimulating glucose disposal. Therefore, GLP-1-based therapies such as GLP-1 receptor agonists and inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase-4, which is a GLP-1 inactivating enzyme, have been developed for treatment of type 2 diabetes. In addition to glucose-lowering effects, emerging data suggests that GLP-1-based therapies also show anti-inflammatory effects in chronic inflammatory diseases including type 1 and 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, neurodegenerative disorders, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, diabetic nephropathy, asthma, and psoriasis. This review outlines the anti-inflammatory actions of GLP-1-based therapies on diseases associated with chronic inflammation in vivo and in vitro, and their molecular mechanisms of anti-inflammatory action. PMID:27110066

  8. Systems-Level G Protein-Coupled Receptor Therapy Across a Neurodegenerative Continuum by the GLP-1 Receptor System

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, Jonathan; Etienne, Harmonie; Idriss, Sherif; Azmi, Abdelkrim; Martin, Bronwen; Maudsley, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    With our increasing appreciation of the true complexity of diseases and pathophysiologies, it is clear that this knowledge needs to inform the future development of pharmacotherapeutics. For many disorders, the disease mechanism itself is a complex process spanning multiple signaling networks, tissues, and organ systems. Identifying the precise nature and locations of the pathophysiology is crucial for the creation of systemically effective drugs. Diseases once considered constrained to a limited range of organ systems, e.g., central neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), and Huntington’ disease (HD), the role of multiple central and peripheral organ systems in the etiology of such diseases is now widely accepted. With this knowledge, it is increasingly clear that these seemingly distinct neurodegenerative disorders (AD, PD, and HD) possess multiple pathophysiological similarities thereby demonstrating an inter-related continuum of disease-related molecular alterations. With this systems-level appreciation of neurodegenerative diseases, it is now imperative to consider that pharmacotherapeutics should be developed specifically to address the systemic imbalances that create the disorders. Identification of potential systems-level signaling axes may facilitate the generation of therapeutic agents with synergistic remedial activity across multiple tissues, organ systems, and even diseases. Here, we discuss the potentially therapeutic systems-level interaction of the glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) ligand–receptor axis with multiple aspects of the AD, PD, and HD neurodegenerative continuum. PMID:25225492

  9. Perspectives in GLP-1 Research: New Targets, New Receptors.

    PubMed

    Cantini, Giulia; Mannucci, Edoardo; Luconi, Michaela

    2016-06-01

    The incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) binds to and activates its G-protein-coupled-receptor GLP-1R to reduce glycaemia through the stimulation of insulin and suppression of pancreatic glucagon secretion. Recently, GLP-1 effects unrelated to glucose homeostasis have been discovered in myocardium, bone, adipose tissue, and other target organs, which appear to be mainly mediated by GLP-1R-independent pathways. Here, we summarize knowledge on GLP-1R agonists (GLP-1RAs) as they relate to the improvement of glucose control, and focus on the most recently described effects, discussing the preclinical evidence of the involvement of alternative receptors and signalling mechanisms. It is now evident that the universe of GLP-1RAs is expanding further from the initial incretin effect, opening new unforeseen avenues for research and clinical applications. PMID:27091492

  10. [Effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists on carbohydrate metabolism control].

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, José Carlos; Colomo, Natalia; Tinahones, Francisco José

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are a new group of drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). In the present article, we review the available evidence on the efficacy of GLP-1 receptor agonists as glucose-lowering agents, their place in therapeutic algorithms, and the clinical factors associated with a favorable treatment response. Finally, we describe the clinical characteristics of patients who may benefit from these drugs. PMID:25326839

  11. [Effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists on carbohydrate metabolism control].

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, José Carlos; Colomo, Natalia; Tinahones, Francisco José

    2014-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are a new group of drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). In the present article, we review the available evidence on the efficacy of GLP-1 receptor agonists as glucose-lowering agents, their place in therapeutic algorithms, and the clinical factors associated with a favorable treatment response. Finally, we describe the clinical characteristics of patients who may benefit from these drugs. PMID:25437461

  12. Nucleus accumbens GLP-1 receptors influence meal size and palatability.

    PubMed

    Dossat, Amanda M; Diaz, Ryan; Gallo, Lindsay; Panagos, Alyssa; Kay, Kristen; Williams, Diana L

    2013-06-15

    Recent evidence suggests that the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) neuronal projection to the nucleus accumbens core (NAcC) contributes to food intake control. To investigate the role of endogenous stimulation of GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1R) in NAcC, we examined the effects of the GLP-1R antagonist exendin-(9-39) (Ex9) on meal pattern and microstructure of ingestive behavior in rats. Intra-NAcC Ex9 treatment selectively increased meal size relative to vehicle in rats consuming 0.25 M sucrose solution or sweetened condensed milk. Microstructural analysis revealed effects of NAcC Ex9 on initial lick rate and the size and duration of licking bursts in rats consuming 0.1 or 0.25 M sucrose, suggesting that blockade of NAcC GLP-1R increases palatability. Because NAcC Ex9 did not affect licking for nonnutritive saccharin (0.1%), we suggest that the presence of nutrients in the gut may be required for endogenous stimulation of NAcC GLP-1R. Consistent with this, we also found that the meal size-suppressive effects of intragastric nutrient infusion were attenuated by NAcC delivery of Ex9 at a dose that had no effect when delivered alone. Analysis of licking patterns revealed that NAcC Ex9 did not reverse intragastric nutrient-induced suppression of burst number but rather blunted the effect of nutrient infusion on meal size primarily by increasing the size and duration of licking bursts. Together, our results suggest that NAcC Ex9 influences taste evaluation. We conclude that GLP-1 released in NAcC in response to gastrointestinal nutrients reduces the hedonic value of food. PMID:23612998

  13. Nucleus accumbens GLP-1 receptors influence meal size and palatability

    PubMed Central

    Dossat, Amanda M.; Diaz, Ryan; Gallo, Lindsay; Panagos, Alyssa; Kay, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) neuronal projection to the nucleus accumbens core (NAcC) contributes to food intake control. To investigate the role of endogenous stimulation of GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1R) in NAcC, we examined the effects of the GLP-1R antagonist exendin-(9–39) (Ex9) on meal pattern and microstructure of ingestive behavior in rats. Intra-NAcC Ex9 treatment selectively increased meal size relative to vehicle in rats consuming 0.25 M sucrose solution or sweetened condensed milk. Microstructural analysis revealed effects of NAcC Ex9 on initial lick rate and the size and duration of licking bursts in rats consuming 0.1 or 0.25 M sucrose, suggesting that blockade of NAcC GLP-1R increases palatability. Because NAcC Ex9 did not affect licking for nonnutritive saccharin (0.1%), we suggest that the presence of nutrients in the gut may be required for endogenous stimulation of NAcC GLP-1R. Consistent with this, we also found that the meal size-suppressive effects of intragastric nutrient infusion were attenuated by NAcC delivery of Ex9 at a dose that had no effect when delivered alone. Analysis of licking patterns revealed that NAcC Ex9 did not reverse intragastric nutrient-induced suppression of burst number but rather blunted the effect of nutrient infusion on meal size primarily by increasing the size and duration of licking bursts. Together, our results suggest that NAcC Ex9 influences taste evaluation. We conclude that GLP-1 released in NAcC in response to gastrointestinal nutrients reduces the hedonic value of food. PMID:23612998

  14. Comparison of extended release GLP-1 receptor agonist therapy versus sitagliptin in the management of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Stolar, Mark W; Grimm, Michael; Chen, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Exenatide once weekly (EQW), the first glucose-lowering agent for type 2 diabetes that is dosed one time per week, contains exenatide encapsulated in microspheres of a dissolvable matrix, which release active agent slowly and continuously into the circulation following subcutaneous injection. In two direct head-to-head comparisons, EQW resulted in better long-term glucose control, greater reductions in fasting plasma glucose, and more significant weight loss than sitagliptin. In other trials, glucose-lowering effects of EQW compared favorably with those of metformin, pioglitazone, and basal insulin. Patients on EQW exhibited a higher incidence of nausea than those on sitagliptin, although gastrointestinal adverse events occurred primarily during the first 6–8 weeks of therapy and declined thereafter. EQW was also associated with a lower incidence of nausea than two other glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists, exenatide twice daily and liraglutide. Mild hypoglycemic episodes were uncommon with EQW, although risk of hypoglycemia increased in combination with sulfonylureas. When choosing between EQW and a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor, such as sitagliptin, clinicians and patients should consider the differences between the two medications in terms of glucose control (EQW superior to DPP-4 inhibitors), weight control (EQW superior to DPP-4 inhibitors), gastrointestinal tolerability during treatment initiation (EQW inferior to DPP-4 inhibitors), and mode of administration (once-weekly subcutaneous administration versus once-daily oral administration). PMID:24285927

  15. A clinical review of GLP-1 receptor agonists: efficacy and safety in diabetes and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Prasad-Reddy, Lalita; Isaacs, Diana

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing at an astounding rate. Many of the agents used to treat type 2 diabetes have undesirable adverse effects of hypoglycemia and weight gain. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists represent a unique approach to the treatment of diabetes, with benefits extending outside glucose control, including positive effects on weight, blood pressure, cholesterol levels, and beta-cell function. They mimic the effects of the incretin hormone GLP-1, which is released from the intestine in response to food intake. Their effects include increasing insulin secretion, decreasing glucagon release, increasing satiety, and slowing gastric emptying. There are currently four approved GLP-1 receptor agonists in the United States: exenatide, liraglutide, albiglutide, and dulaglutide. A fifth agent, lixisenatide, is available in Europe. There are important pharmacodynamic, pharmacokinetic, and clinical differences of each agent. The most common adverse effects seen with GLP-1 therapy include nausea, vomiting, and injection-site reactions. Other warnings and precautions include pancreatitis and thyroid cell carcinomas. GLP-1 receptor agonists are an innovative and effective option to improve blood glucose control, with other potential benefits of preserving beta-cell function, weight loss, and increasing insulin sensitivity. Once-weekly formulations may also improve patient adherence. Overall, these are effective agents for patients with type 2 diabetes, who are either uncontrolled on metformin or intolerant to metformin. PMID:26213556

  16. Choosing between GLP-1 Receptor Agonists and DPP-4 Inhibitors: A Pharmacological Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Dominique Xavier; Evans, Marc

    2012-01-01

    In recent years the incretin therapies have provided a new treatment option for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The incretin therapies focus on the increasing levels of the two incretin hormones, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP). This results in increased glucose dependent insulin synthesis and release. GLP-1 receptor agonists such as liraglutide and exenatide exert an intrinsic biological effect on GLP-1 receptors directly stimulating the release of insulin from pancreatic beta cells. DPP-4 inhibitors such as sitagliptin and linagliptin prevent the inactivation of endogenous GLP-1 and GIP through competitive inhibition of the DPP-4 enzyme. Both incretin therapies have good safety and tolerability profiles and interact minimally with a number of medications commonly prescribed in T2DM. This paper focuses on the pharmacological basis by which the incretin therapies function and how this knowledge can inform and benefit clinical decisions. Each individual incretin agent has benefits and pitfalls relating to aspects such as glycaemic and nonglycaemic efficacy, safety and tolerability, ease of administration, and cost. Overall, a personalized medicine approach has been found to be favourable, tailoring the incretin agent to benefit and suit patient's needs such as renal impairment (RI) or hepatic impairment (HI). PMID:23125920

  17. Combining GLP-1 receptor agonists with insulin: therapeutic rationales and clinical findings.

    PubMed

    Holst, J J; Vilsbøll, T

    2013-01-01

    Due to the increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), the emergent trend towards diagnosis in younger patients and the progressive nature of this disease, many more patients than before now require insulin to maintain glycaemic control. However, there is a degree of inertia among physicians and patients regarding the initiation and intensification of insulin therapy, in part due to concerns about the associated weight gain and increased risk of hypoglycaemia. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) increase insulin release and suppress glucagon secretion in a glucose-dependent manner, thus conferring glycaemic control with a low incidence of hypoglycaemia. GLP-1RAs also promote weight loss, and have beneficial effects on markers of β cell function, lipid levels, blood pressure and cardiovascular risk markers. However, the durability of their effectiveness is unknown and, compared with insulin, the antihyperglycaemic efficacy of GLP-1RAs is limited. The combination of a GLP-1RA and insulin might thus be highly effective for optimal glucose control, ameliorating the adverse effects typically associated with insulin. Data from clinical studies support the therapeutic potential of GLP-1RA-insulin combination therapy, typically showing beneficial effects on glycaemic control and body weight, with a low incidence of hypoglycaemia and, in established insulin therapy, facilitating reductions in insulin dose. In this review, the physiological and pharmacological rationale for using GLP-1RA and insulin therapies in combination is discussed, and data from clinical studies that have assessed the efficacy and safety of this treatment strategy are outlined. PMID:22646532

  18. Modulation of Glucagon-like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Potency by Endocannabinoid-like Lipids Represents a Novel Mode of Regulating GLP-1 Receptor Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yu-Hong; Ho, Mei-Shang; Huang, Wei-Ting; Chou, Ying-Ting; King, Klim

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogs are approved for treatment of type 2 diabetes and are in clinical trials for disorders including neurodegenerative diseases. GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is expressed in many peripheral and neuronal tissues and is activated by circulating GLP-1. Other than food intake, little is known about factors regulating GLP-1 secretion. Given a normally basal circulating level of GLP-1, knowledge of mechanisms regulating GLP-1R signaling, which has diverse functions in extrapancreatic tissues, remains elusive. In this study, we found that the potency of GLP-1, not exendin 4, is specifically enhanced by the endocannabinoid-like lipids oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and 2-oleoylglycerol but not by stearoylethanolamide (SEA) or palmitoylethanolamide. 9.2 μm OEA enhances the potency of GLP-1 in stimulating cAMP production by 10-fold but does not affect its receptor binding affinity. OEA and 2-oleoylglycerol, but not SEA, bind to GLP-1 in a dose-dependent and saturable manner. OEA but not SEA promoted GLP-1(7–36) amide to trypsin inactivation in a dose-dependent and saturable manner. Susceptibility of GLP-1(7–36) amide to trypsin inactivation is increased 40-fold upon binding to OEA but not to SEA. Our findings indicate that OEA binds to GLP-1(7–36) amide and enhances the potency that may result from a conformational change of the peptide. In conclusion, modulating potency of GLP-1 by physiologically regulated endocannabinoid-like lipids allows GLP-1R signaling to be regulated spatiotemporally at a constant basal GLP-1 level. PMID:25903129

  19. Modulation of Glucagon-like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Potency by Endocannabinoid-like Lipids Represents a Novel Mode of Regulating GLP-1 Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Hong; Ho, Mei-Shang; Huang, Wei-Ting; Chou, Ying-Ting; King, Klim

    2015-06-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogs are approved for treatment of type 2 diabetes and are in clinical trials for disorders including neurodegenerative diseases. GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is expressed in many peripheral and neuronal tissues and is activated by circulating GLP-1. Other than food intake, little is known about factors regulating GLP-1 secretion. Given a normally basal circulating level of GLP-1, knowledge of mechanisms regulating GLP-1R signaling, which has diverse functions in extrapancreatic tissues, remains elusive. In this study, we found that the potency of GLP-1, not exendin 4, is specifically enhanced by the endocannabinoid-like lipids oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and 2-oleoylglycerol but not by stearoylethanolamide (SEA) or palmitoylethanolamide. 9.2 μM OEA enhances the potency of GLP-1 in stimulating cAMP production by 10-fold but does not affect its receptor binding affinity. OEA and 2-oleoylglycerol, but not SEA, bind to GLP-1 in a dose-dependent and saturable manner. OEA but not SEA promoted GLP-1(7-36) amide to trypsin inactivation in a dose-dependent and saturable manner. Susceptibility of GLP-1(7-36) amide to trypsin inactivation is increased 40-fold upon binding to OEA but not to SEA. Our findings indicate that OEA binds to GLP-1(7-36) amide and enhances the potency that may result from a conformational change of the peptide. In conclusion, modulating potency of GLP-1 by physiologically regulated endocannabinoid-like lipids allows GLP-1R signaling to be regulated spatiotemporally at a constant basal GLP-1 level. PMID:25903129

  20. Dual melanocortin-4 receptor and GLP-1 receptor agonism amplifies metabolic benefits in diet-induced obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Clemmensen, Christoffer; Finan, Brian; Fischer, Katrin; Tom, Robby Zachariah; Legutko, Beata; Sehrer, Laura; Heine, Daniela; Grassl, Niklas; Meyer, Carola W; Henderson, Bart; Hofmann, Susanna M; Tschöp, Matthias H; Van der Ploeg, Lex HT; Müller, Timo D

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the efficacy of simultaneous agonism at the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) and the melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) for the treatment of obesity and diabetes in rodents. Diet-induced obese (DIO) mice were chronically treated with either the long-acting GLP-1R agonist liraglutide, the MC4R agonist RM-493 or a combination of RM-493 and liraglutide. Co-treatment of DIO mice with RM-493 and liraglutide improves body weight loss and enhances glycemic control and cholesterol metabolism beyond what can be achieved with either mono-therapy. The superior metabolic efficacy of this combination therapy is attributed to the anorectic and glycemic actions of both drugs, along with the ability of RM-493 to increase energy expenditure. Interestingly, compared to mice treated with liraglutide alone, hypothalamic Glp-1r expression was higher in mice treated with the combination therapy after both acute and chronic treatment. Further, RM-493 enhanced hypothalamic Mc4r expression. Hence, co-dosing with MC4R and GLP-1R agonists increases expression of each receptor, indicative of minimized receptor desensitization. Together, these findings suggest potential opportunities for employing combination treatments that comprise parallel MC4R and GLP-1R agonism for the treatment of obesity and diabetes. PMID:25652173

  1. [Extrapancreatic effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists: an open window towards new treatment goals in type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Salvador, Javier; Andrada, Patricia

    2014-09-01

    The wide ubiquity of GLP-1 receptors in the body has stimulated the search for different extrapancreatic actions of GLP-1 and its receptor agonists. Thus, severe cardioprotective effects directed on myocardial ischaemia and dysfunction as well as diverse antiaterogenic actions have been reported. Also, native and GLP-1 receptor agonists have demonstrated significant beneficial effects on liver steatosis and fibrosis and on neuronal protection in experimental models of Alzheimer, and Parkinson's disease as well as on cerebral ischaemia. Recent evidences suggest that these drugs may also be useful for prevention and treatment of diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy and peripheral neuropathy. Good results have also been reported in psoriasis. Despite we still need confirmation that these promising effects can be applied to clinical practice, they offer new interesting perspectives for treatment of type 2 diabetes associated complications and give to GLP-1 receptor agonists an even more integral position in diabetes therapy. PMID:25437463

  2. [Preparation and the biological effect of fusion protein GLP-1-exendin-4/ IgG4(Fc) fusion protein as long acting GLP-1 receptor agonist].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yun-cheng

    2015-12-01

    GLP-1 has a variety of anti-diabetic effects. However, native GLP-1 is not suitable for treatment of diabetes due to its short half-life (t½, 2-5 min). Exendin-4 is a polypeptide isolated from lizard saliva, which can bind to GLP-1 receptor, produce physiological effects similar to GLP-1, t½ up to 2.5 h, therefore, we developed a long-lasting GLP-1 receptor agonists and GLP-1-exendin-4 fusion IgG4 Fc [GLP-1-exendin-4/ IgG4(Fc)]. We constructed the eukaryotic expression vector of human GLP-1-exendin-4/IgG4(Fc)-pOptiVEC- TOPO by gene recombination technique and expressed the fusion protein human GLP-1-IgG4 (Fc) in CHO/DG44 cells. The fusion protein stimulated the INS-1 cells secretion of insulin, GLP-1, exendin-4 and fusion protein in CD1 mice pharmacokinetic experiments, as well as GLP-1, exendin-4 and fusion protein did anti-diabetic effect on streptozotocin induced mice. Results demonstrated that the GLP-1-exendin-4/IgG4(Fc) positive CHO/DG44 clones were chosen and the media from these positive clones. Western blotting showed that one protein band was found to match well with the predicted relative molecular mass of human GLP-1-exendin-4/IgG4(Fc). Insulin RIA showed that GLP-1-exendin-4/IgG4(Fc) dose-dependently stimulated insulin secretion from INS-1 cells. Pharmacokinetic studies in CD1 mice showed that with intraperitoneal injection (ip), the fusion protein peaked at 30 min in circulation and maintained a plateau for 200 h. Natural biological half-life of exendin-4 was (1.39 ± 0.28) h, GLP-1 in vivo t½ 4 min, indicating that fusion protein has long-lasting effects on the modulation of glucose homeostasis. GLP-1-exendin-4/IgG4(Fc) was found to be effective in reducing the incidence of diabetes in multiple-low-dose streptozotocin-induced diabetes in mice, longer duration of the biological activity of the fusion protein. The biological activity was significantly higher than that of GLP-1 and exendin-4. GLP-1-exendin-4/IgG4(Fc) has good anti-diabetic activity

  3. Activation of GLP-1 Receptor Promotes Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Osteogenic Differentiation through β-Catenin

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jingru; Ma, Xue; Wang, Ning; Jia, Min; Bi, Long; Wang, Yunying; Li, Mingkai; Zhang, Huinan; Xue, Xiaoyan; Hou, Zheng; Zhou, Ying; Yu, Zhibin; He, Gonghao; Luo, Xiaoxing

    2016-01-01

    Summary Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) plays an important role in regulating bone remodeling, and GLP-1 receptor agonist shows a positive relationship with osteoblast activity. However, GLP-1 receptor is not found in osteoblast, and the mechanism of GLP-1 receptor agonist on regulating bone remodeling is unclear. Here, we show that the GLP-1 receptor agonist exendin-4 (Ex-4) promoted bone formation and increased bone mass and quality in a rat unloading-induced bone loss model. These functions were accompanied by an increase in osteoblast number and serum bone formation markers, while the adipocyte number was decreased. Furthermore, GLP-1 receptor was detected in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), but not in osteoblast. Activation of GLP-1 receptor by Ex-4 promoted the osteogenic differentiation and inhibited BMSC adipogenic differentiation through regulating PKA/β-catenin and PKA/PI3K/AKT/GSK3β signaling. These findings reveal that GLP-1 receptor regulates BMSC osteogenic differentiation and provide a molecular basis for therapeutic potential of GLP-1 against osteoporosis. PMID:26947974

  4. Induction of Energy Expenditure by Sitagliptin Is Dependent on GLP-1 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Felicia; Keenan, Michael J; Raggio, Anne M; Ye, Xin; Hao, Zheng; Durham, Holiday; Geaghan, James; Jia, Weiping; Martin, Roy J; Ye, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Sitagliptin (SG) increases serum GLP-1 (Glucagon-like peptide-1) through inhibition of the hormone degradation. Resistant starch (RS) induces GLP-1 expression by stimulating L-cells in the intestine. Sitagliptin and resistant starch may have a synergistic interaction in the induction of GLP-1. This possibility was tested in current study in a mouse model of type 2 diabetes. Hyperglycemia was induced in the diet-induced obese mice by a signal injection of streptozotocin (STZ). Sitagliptin (0.4g/100g diet) was tested in the mice (n = 55) with dietary RS (HAM-RS2) at three dosages (0, 15, or 28g/100g diet). Energy and glucose metabolism were monitored in the evaluation of synergistic activity, and GLP-1 activity was determined in the GLP-1 receptor knockout (KO) mice. In the wild type mice, body weight and adiposity were reduced by sitagliptin, which was enhanced by RS (28g). Serum GLP-1 was induced and energy expenditure was enhanced by sitagliptin. Fasting glucose, insulin, and leptin levels were decreased by sitagliptin. The sitagliptin effects were lost in the KO mice (n = 25) although induction of serum GLP-1 by sitagliptin was even stronger in KO mice. The data suggests that sitagliptin is able to reduce adiposity and insulin resistance through induction of energy expenditure. The effect of sitagliptin is partially enhanced by RS. GLP-1 receptor may regulate serum GLP-1 by facilitating the hormone clearance. PMID:25938560

  5. Differences in acute anorectic effects of long-acting GLP-1 receptor agonists in rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists have both glucose- and weight-lowering effects. The brain is poised to mediate both of these actions since GLP-1Rs are present in key areas known to control weight and glucose. Although some research has been performed on the effects of ...

  6. Expression and Characterization of a Potent Long-Acting GLP-1 Receptor Agonist, GLP-1-IgG2σ-Fc.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Chen, Fang; Wan, Deyou; Liu, Yunhui; Yang, Li; Feng, Hongru; Cui, Xinling; Gao, Xin; Song, Haifeng

    2016-01-01

    Human GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide-1) can produce a remarkable improvement in glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. However, its clinical benefits are limited by its short half-life, which is less than 2 min because of its small size and rapid enzymatic inactivation by dipeptidyl peptidase IV. We engineered GLP-1-IgG2σ-Fc, a 68-kDa fusion protein linking a variant human GLP-1 (A8G/G26E/R36G) to a human IgG2σ constant heavy-chain. A stably transfected Chinese hamster ovary cell line was obtained using electroporation. Western blotting showed that the expressed protein was immunoreactive to both GLP-1 and IgG antibodies. GLP-1-IgG2σ-Fc stimulated insulin secretion from INS-1 cells in a dose- and glucose-dependent manner and increased insulin mRNA expression. The half-life of GLP-1-IgG2σ-Fc in cynomolgus monkeys was approximately 57.1 ± 4.5 h. In the KKAy mouse model of diabetes, one intraperitoneal injection of GLP-1-IgG2σ-Fc (1 mg/kg) reduced blood glucose levels for 5 days. A 4-week repeat-administration study identified sustained effects on blood glucose levels. Oral glucose tolerance tests conducted at the beginning and end of this 4-week period showed that GLP-1-IgG2σ-Fc produced a stable glucose lowering effect. In addition, KKAy mice treated with GLP-1-IgG2σ-Fc showed statistically significant weight loss from day 23. In conclusion, these properties of GLP-1-IgG2σ-Fc demonstrated that it represented a potential long-acting GLP-1 receptor agonist for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:27232339

  7. Expression and Characterization of a Potent Long-Acting GLP-1 Receptor Agonist, GLP-1-IgG2σ-Fc

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Chen, Fang; Wan, Deyou; Liu, Yunhui; Yang, Li; Feng, Hongru; Cui, Xinling; Gao, Xin; Song, Haifeng

    2016-01-01

    Human GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide-1) can produce a remarkable improvement in glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. However, its clinical benefits are limited by its short half-life, which is less than 2 min because of its small size and rapid enzymatic inactivation by dipeptidyl peptidase IV. We engineered GLP-1-IgG2σ-Fc, a 68-kDa fusion protein linking a variant human GLP-1 (A8G/G26E/R36G) to a human IgG2σ constant heavy-chain. A stably transfected Chinese hamster ovary cell line was obtained using electroporation. Western blotting showed that the expressed protein was immunoreactive to both GLP-1 and IgG antibodies. GLP-1-IgG2σ-Fc stimulated insulin secretion from INS-1 cells in a dose- and glucose-dependent manner and increased insulin mRNA expression. The half-life of GLP-1-IgG2σ-Fc in cynomolgus monkeys was approximately 57.1 ± 4.5 h. In the KKAy mouse model of diabetes, one intraperitoneal injection of GLP-1-IgG2σ-Fc (1 mg/kg) reduced blood glucose levels for 5 days. A 4-week repeat-administration study identified sustained effects on blood glucose levels. Oral glucose tolerance tests conducted at the beginning and end of this 4-week period showed that GLP-1-IgG2σ-Fc produced a stable glucose lowering effect. In addition, KKAy mice treated with GLP-1-IgG2σ-Fc showed statistically significant weight loss from day 23. In conclusion, these properties of GLP-1-IgG2σ-Fc demonstrated that it represented a potential long-acting GLP-1 receptor agonist for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:27232339

  8. GLP-1 Receptor Agonists: Nonglycemic Clinical Effects in Weight Loss and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Donna; Acosta, Andres

    2015-01-01

    Obective Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are indicated for treatment of type 2 diabetes since they mimic the actions of native GLP-1 on pancreatic islet cells, stimulating insulin release, while inhibiting glucagon release, in a glucose-dependent manner. The observation of weight loss has led to exploration of their potential as antiobesity agents, with liraglutide 3.0 mg day−1 approved for weight management in the US on December 23, 2014, and in the EU on March 23, 2015. This review examines the potential nonglycemic effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists. Methods A literature search was conducted to identify preclinical and clinical evidence on nonglycemic effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists. Results GLP-1 receptors are distributed widely in a number of tissues in humans, and their effects are not limited to the well-recognized effects on glycemia. Nonglycemic effects include weight loss, which is perhaps the most widely recognized nonglycemic effect. In addition, effects on the cardiovascular, neurologic, and renal systems and on taste perception may occur independently of weight loss. Conclusions GLP-1 receptor agonists may provide other nonglycemic clinical effects besides weight loss. Understanding these effects is important for prescribers in using GLP-1 receptor agonists for diabetic patients, but also if approved for chronic weight management. PMID:25959380

  9. Nutrient induced type 2 and chemical induced type 1 experimental diabetes differently modulate gastric GLP-1 receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Olga; Broide, Efrat; Ben-Yehudah, Gilad; Cantrell, Dror; Shirin, Haim; Rapoport, Micha J

    2015-01-01

    T2DM patients demonstrate reduced GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) expression in their gastric glands. Whether induced T2DM and T1DM differently affect the gastric GLP-1R expression is not known. This study assessed extrapancreatic GLP-1R system in glandular stomach of rodents with different types of experimental diabetes. T2DM and T1DM were induced in Psammomys obesus (PO) by high-energy (HE) diet and by streptozotocin (STZ) in Sprague Dawly (SD) rats, respectively. GLP-1R expression was determined in glandular stomach by RT PCR and immunohistomorphological analysis. The mRNA expression and cellular association of the GLP-1R in principal glands were similar in control PO and SD rats. However, nutrient and chemical induced diabetes resulted in opposite alterations of glandular GLP-1R expression. Diabetic PO demonstrated increased GLP-1R mRNA expression, intensity of cellular GLP-1R immunostaining, and frequency of GLP-1R positive cells in the neck area of principal glands compared with controls. In contrast, SD diabetic rats demonstrated decreased GLP-1 mRNA, cellular GLP-1R immunoreactivity, and frequency of GLP-1R immunoreactive cells in the neck area compared with controls. In conclusion, nutrient and chemical induced experimental diabetes result in distinct opposite alterations of GLP-1R expression in glandular stomach. These results suggest that induced T1DM and T2DM may differently modulate GLP-1R system in enteropancreatic axis. PMID:25893200

  10. GLP-1 Receptor Agonists and the Thyroid: C-Cell Effects in Mice Are Mediated via the GLP-1 Receptor and not Associated with RET Activation

    PubMed Central

    Knauf, Jeffrey A.; Gotfredsen, Carsten; Pilling, Andrew; Sjögren, Ingrid; Andersen, Søren; Andersen, Lene; Sietske de Boer, Anne; Manova, Katia; Barlas, Afsar; Vundavalli, Sushil; Nyborg, Niels C. Berg; Bjerre Knudsen, Lotte; Moelck, Anne Marie

    2012-01-01

    Liraglutide and exenatide are glucagon-like peptide receptor (GLP-1R) agonists used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Both molecules have been associated with the development of thyroid C-cell tumors after lifetime exposure in rodents. Previously, it has been reported that these tumors are preceded by increased plasma calcitonin and C-cell hyperplasia. We can now document that the murine C-cell effects are mediated via GLP-1R. Thus, 13 wk of continuous exposure to GLP-1R agonists was associated with marked increases in plasma calcitonin and in the incidence of C-cell hyperplasia in wild-type mice. In contrast, similar effects were not seen in GLP-1R knockout mice. Human C-cell cancer is often caused by activating mutations in the rearranged-during-transfection (RET) protooncogene. We developed an immunohistochemical method to assess RET activation in tissues. Liraglutide dosing to mice was not found to activate RET. Further evaluation of the signaling pathways demonstrated that liraglutide increased ribosomal S6, but not MAPK kinase, phosphorylation. These observations are consistent with effects of GLP-1R agonists on rodent C cells being mediated via mammalian target of rapamycin activation in a RET- and MAPK-independent manner. PMID:22234463

  11. SGLT2 inhibitors or GLP-1 receptor agonists as second-line therapy in type 2 diabetes: patient selection and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Gurgle, Holly E; White, Karen; McAdam-Marx, Carrie

    2016-01-01

    Controversy exists regarding the selection of second-line therapy for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) who are unable to achieve glycemic control with metformin therapy alone. Newer pharmacologic treatments for T2DM include glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and sodium–glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors. Both the classes of medication are efficacious, exhibit positive effects on weight, and are associated with minimal risk of hypoglycemia. The purpose of this review is to compare the clinical trial and real-world effectiveness data of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists versus sodium–glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors related to A1c reduction, weight loss, cost-effectiveness, cardiovascular outcomes, and safety in patients with T2DM. This review summarizes comparative evidence for providers who are determining which of the two classes may be the most appropriate for a specific patient. PMID:27350752

  12. Hindbrain GLP-1 receptor mediation of cisplatin-induced anorexia and nausea.

    PubMed

    De Jonghe, Bart C; Holland, Ruby A; Olivos, Diana R; Rupprecht, Laura E; Kanoski, Scott E; Hayes, Matthew R

    2016-01-01

    While chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting are clinically controlled in the acute (<24 h) phase following treatment, the anorexia, nausea, fatigue, and other illness-type behaviors during the delayed phase (>24 h) of chemotherapy are largely uncontrolled. As the hindbrain glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) system contributes to energy balance and mediates aversive and stressful stimuli, here we examine the hypothesis that hindbrain GLP-1 signaling mediates aspects of chemotherapy-induced nausea and reductions in feeding behavior in rats. Specifically, hindbrain GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) blockade, via 4th intracerebroventricular (ICV) exendin-(9-39) injections, attenuates the anorexia, body weight reduction, and pica (nausea-induced ingestion of kaolin clay) elicited by cisplatin chemotherapy during the delayed phase (48 h) of chemotherapy-induced nausea. Additionally, the present data provide evidence that the central GLP-1-producing preproglucagon neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) of the caudal brainstem are activated by cisplatin during the delayed phase of chemotherapy-induced nausea, as cisplatin led to a significant increase in c-Fos immunoreactivity in NTS GLP-1-immunoreactive neurons. These data support a growing body of literature suggesting that the central GLP-1 system may be a potential pharmaceutical target for adjunct anti-emetics used to treat the delayed-phase of nausea and emesis, anorexia, and body weight loss that accompany chemotherapy treatments. PMID:26522737

  13. Berberine induces GLP-1 secretion through activation of bitter taste receptor pathways.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yunli; Hao, Gang; Zhang, Quanying; Hua, Wenyan; Wang, Meng; Zhou, Wenjia; Zong, Shunlin; Huang, Ming; Wen, Xiaozhou

    2015-09-15

    Our previous studies revealed that berberine-mediated GLP-1 secretion was a possible mechanism for berberine exerting good effects on hyperglycemia. This study was designed to ascertain whether berberine-induced secretion of GLP-1 was related with activation of bitter taste receptors expressed in gastrointestinal tract. Western blotting results showed that TAS2R38, a subtype of bitter taste receptor, was expressed on human enteroendocrine NCI-H716 cells. GLP-1 secretion induced by berberine from NCI-H716 cells was inhibited by incubation with anti-TAS2R38 antibody. We further performed gene silencing using siRNA to knockdown TAS2R38 from NCI-H716 cells, which showed that siRNA knockdown of the TAS2R38 reduced berberine-mediated GLP-1 secretion. We adopted inhibitors of PLC and TRPM5 known to be involved in bitter taste transduction to investigate the underlying pathways mediated in berberine-induced GLP-1 secretion. It was found that PLC inhibitor U73122 inhibited berberine-induced GLP-1 release in NCI-H716 cells, while TRPM5 blocker quinine failed to attenuate berberine-induced secretion of GLP-1. The present results demonstrated that berberine stimulated GLP-1 secretion via activation of gut-expressed bitter taste receptors in a PLC-dependent manner. Because berberine was found to be a ligand of bitter taste receptor, the results of present study may provide an explanation for some bitter taste substance obtain hypoglycemic effect. PMID:26206195

  14. A Novel Humanized GLP-1 Receptor Model Enables Both Affinity Purification and Cre-LoxP Deletion of the Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Lucy S.; Showalter, Aaron D.; Ali, Nosher; Dai, Feihan; Ma, Wenzhen; Coskun, Tamer; Ficorilli, James V.; Wheeler, Michael B.; Michael, M. Dodson; Sloop, Kyle W.

    2014-01-01

    Class B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are important regulators of endocrine physiology, and peptide-based therapeutics targeting some of these receptors have proven effective at treating disorders such as hypercalcemia, osteoporosis, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). As next generation efforts attempt to develop novel non-peptide, orally available molecules for these GPCRs, new animal models expressing human receptor orthologs may be required because small molecule ligands make fewer receptor contacts, and thus, the impact of amino acid differences across species may be substantially greater. The objective of this report was to generate and characterize a new mouse model of the human glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (hGLP-1R), a class B GPCR for which established peptide therapeutics exist for the treatment of T2DM. hGLP-1R knock-in mice express the receptor from the murine Glp-1r locus. Glucose tolerance tests and gastric emptying studies show hGLP-1R mice and their wild-type littermates display similar physiological responses for glucose metabolism, insulin secretion, and gastric transit, and treatment with the GLP-1R agonist, exendin-4, elicits similar responses in both groups. Further, ex vivo assays show insulin secretion from humanized islets is glucose-dependent and enhanced by GLP-1R agonists. To enable additional utility, the targeting construct of the knock-in line was engineered to contain both flanking LoxP sites and a C-terminal FLAG epitope. Anti-FLAG affinity purification shows strong expression of hGLP-1R in islets, lung, and stomach. We crossed the hGLP-1R line with Rosa26Cre mice and generated global Glp-1r−/− animals. Immunohistochemistry of pancreas from humanized and knock-out mice identified a human GLP-1R-specific antibody that detects the GLP-1R in human pancreas as well as in the pancreas of hGLP-1r knock-in mice. This new hGLP-1R model will allow tissue-specific deletion of the GLP-1R, purification of potential GLP-1R partner

  15. Adherence to GLP-1 receptor agonist therapy administered by once-daily or once-weekly injection in patients with type 2 diabetes in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Qing; Ouwens, Mario JNM; Grandy, Susan; Johnsson, Kristina; Kostev, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Aim This study aimed to compare 6-month adherence to therapy with exenatide once weekly (Bydureon®) vs liraglutide once daily (Victoza®) in patients with type 2 diabetes under primary care in Germany. Methods A nationwide longitudinal prescription database (LRx), (between January 2011 and September 2014) was used to analyze adherence to therapy. The proportion of days covered (PDC) by prescription was used as a measure of adherence in the 6-month postindex period. Logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate the associations between glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist therapy adjusting for age, sex, and cotherapy. Results Therapy was initiated in 5,449 patients with exenatide once weekly (age: 59.7±11.8 years; 51.4% were male) and in 24,648 patients with liraglutide once daily (age: 59.4±11.4 years; 49.7% were male). The median PDC was 0.88 for exenatide once weekly and 0.77 for liraglutide once daily (P<0.05). Once-weekly exenatide was associated with significantly higher adherence. Odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for having a PDC of ≥0.80 was 1.78 (1.62–1.96) for exenatide once weekly compared with liraglutide once daily after adjusting for age, sex, and cotherapy. Conclusion Adherence to treatment with exenatide once weekly was significantly increased compared to that with liraglutide once daily over 6 months in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:27418849

  16. Targeting Incretins in Type 2 Diabetes: Role of GLP-1 Receptor Agonists and DPP-4 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Pratley, Richard E.; Gilbert, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    Until recently, the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has been conceptualized in terms of the predominant defects in insulin secretion and insulin action. It is now recognized that abnormalities in other hormones also contribute to the development of hyperglycemia. For example, the incretin effect, mediated by glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP), is attenuated in T2DM. Intravenous administration of GLP-1 ameliorates hyperglycemia in patients with T2DM, but an extremely short half-life limits its utility as a therapeutic agent. Strategies to leverage the beneficial effects of GLP-1 include GLP-1 receptor agonists or analogs or dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors—agents that act by slowing the inactivation of endogenous GLP-1 and GIP. The GLP-1 agonist exenatide has been shown to improve HbA1c and decrease body weight. However, exenatide is limited by its relatively short pharmacologic half-life, various gastrointestinal (GI) side effects, and the development of antibodies. Studies of a long-acting exenatide formulation suggest that it has improved efficacy and also promotes weight loss. Another prospect is liraglutide, a once-daily human GLP-1 analog. In phase 2 studies, liraglutide lowered HbA1c by up to 1.7% and weight by approximately 3 kg, with apparently fewer GI side effects than exenatide. DPP-4 inhibitors such as sitagliptin and vildagliptin result in clinically significant reductions in HbA1c, and are weight neutral with few GI side effects. This review will provide an overview of current and emerging agents that augment the incretin system with a focus on the role of GLP-1 receptor agonists and DPP-4 inhibitors. PMID:18795210

  17. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1)-based therapy upregulates LXR-ABCA1/ABCG1 cascade in adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Ahmed M; Hamdy, Nadia M; El-Mesallamy, Hala O; Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z

    2015-12-25

    A promising treatment for obesity involves the use of therapeutic agents that increase the level of the glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1) which reduces appetite and food intake. Native GLP-1 is rapidly metabolized by the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) enzyme and, as such, GLP-1 mimetics or DPP-4 inhibitors represent promising treatment approaches. Interestingly, obese patient receiving such medications showed improved lipid profiles and cholesterol homeostasis, however the mechanism(s) involved are not known. Members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, including ABCA1 and ABCG1, play essential roles in reverse cholesterol transport and in high density lipoprotein (HDL) formation. These transporters are under the transcriptional regulation of liver X receptor alpha (LXR-α). We hypothesize that GLP-1 mimetics and/or DPP-4 inhibitors modulate ABCA1/ABCG1 expression in adipocytes through an LXR-α mediated process and thus affecting cholesterol homeostasis. 3T3-L1 adipocytes were treated with the DPP-4 inhibitor vildagliptin (2 nM) or the GLP-1 mimetic exendin-4 (5 nM). Gene and protein expression of ABCA1, ABCG1 and LXR-α were determined and correlated with cholesterol efflux. Expression levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), leptin and the glucose transporter-4 (GLUT-4) were also determined. Treatment with both medications significantly increased the expression of ABCA1, ABCG1, LXR-α and GLUT-4, decreased IL-6 and leptin, and improved cholesterol efflux from adipocytes (P < 0.05). Our data suggest that GLP-1-based therapy modulate ABCA1/ABCG1 expression in adipocytes potentially through an LXR-α mediated process. PMID:26603933

  18. Effects of GLP-1 and Incretin-Based Therapies on Gastrointestinal Motor Function

    PubMed Central

    Marathe, Chinmay S.; Rayner, Christopher K.; Jones, Karen L.; Horowitz, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is a hormone secreted predominantly by the distal small intestine and colon and released in response to enteral nutrient exposure. GLP-1-based therapies are now used widely in the management of type 2 diabetes and have the potential to be effective antiobesity agents. Although widely known as an incretin hormone, there is a growing body of evidence that GLP-1 also acts as an enterogastrone, with profound effects on the gastrointestinal motor system. Moreover, the effects of GLP-1 on gastrointestinal motility appear to be pivotal to its effect of reducing postprandial glycaemic excursions and may, potentially, represent the dominant mechanism. This review summarizes current knowledge of the enterogastrone properties of GLP-1, focusing on its effects on gut motility at physiological and pharmacological concentrations, and the motor actions of incretin-based therapies. While of potential importance, the inhibitory action of GLP-1 on gastric acid secretion is beyond the scope of this paper. PMID:21747825

  19. Sustained expression of GLP-1 receptor differentially modulates β-cell functions in diabetic and nondiabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Fumiyo; Miyatsuka, Takeshi; Sasaki, Shugo; Takahara, Mitsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Yuichi; Shimo, Naoki; Watada, Hirotaka; Kaneto, Hideaki; Gannon, Maureen; Matsuoka, Taka-aki; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2016-02-26

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) has been shown to play important roles in maintaining β-cell functions, such as insulin secretion and proliferation. While expression levels of GLP-1 receptor (Glp1r) are compromised in the islets of diabetic rodents, it remains unclear when and to what degree Glp1r mRNA levels are decreased during the progression of diabetes. In this study, we performed real-time PCR with the islets of db/db diabetic mice at different ages, and found that the expression levels of Glp1r were comparable to those of the islets of nondiabetic db/misty controls at the age of four weeks, and were significantly decreased at the age of eight and 12 weeks. To investigate whether restored expression of Glp1r affects the diabetic phenotypes, we generated the transgenic mouse model Pdx1(PB)-CreER(TM); CAG-CAT-Glp1r (βGlp1r) that allows for induction of Glp1r expression specifically in β cells. Whereas the expression of exogenous Glp1r had no measurable effect on glucose tolerance in nondiabetic βGlp1r;db/misty mice, βGlp1r;db/db mice exhibited higher glucose and lower insulin levels in blood on glucose challenge test than control db/db littermates. In contrast, four weeks of treatment with exendin-4 improved the glucose profiles and increased serum insulin levels in βGlp1r;db/db mice, to significantly higher levels than those in control db/db mice. These differential effects of exogenous Glp1r in nondiabetic and diabetic mice suggest that downregulation of Glp1r might be required to slow the progression of β-cell failure under diabetic conditions. PMID:26854076

  20. Hippocampal GLP-1 Receptors Influence Food Intake, Meal Size, and Effort-Based Responding for Food through Volume Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Ted M; Hahn, Joel D; Konanur, Vaibhav R; Lam, Ashley; Kanoski, Scott E

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is produced in the small intestines and in nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) neurons. Activation of central GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1Rs) reduces feeding and body weight. The neural circuits mediating these effects are only partially understood. Here we investigate the inhibition of food intake and motivated responding for food in rats following GLP-1R activation in the ventral hippocampal formation (HPFv), a region only recently highlighted in food intake control. Increased HPFv GLP-1R activity following exendin-4 administration potently reduced food intake (both chow and Western diet) and body weight, whereas HPFv GLP-1R blockade increased food intake. These hypophagic effects were based on reduced meal size, and likely do not involve nausea as HPFv exendin-4 did not induce a conditioned flavor avoidance. HPFv GLP-1R activation also reduced effort-based responding for food under an operant progressive ratio reinforcement schedule, but did not affect food conditioned place preference expression. To investigate possible routes of HPFv GLP-1 signaling, immunohistochemical analysis revealed the absence of GLP-1 axon terminals in the HPFv, suggesting volume transmission as a mechanism of action. Consistent with this, the presence of active GLP-1 was detected in both the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and the HPFv. The source of CSF GLP-1 may be NTS GLP-1-producing neurons, as, (1) ∼30% of NTS GLP-1 neurons colocalized with the retrograde tracer fluorogold (FG) following lateral ventricle FG injection, and (2) GLP-1-immunoreactive axon terminals were observed adjacent to the ventricular ependymal layer. Collectively these findings illuminate novel neuronal and behavioral mechanisms mediating food intake reduction by GLP-1. PMID:25035078

  1. GLP-1 receptor is expressed in human stomach mucosa: analysis of its cellular association and distribution within gastric glands.

    PubMed

    Broide, Efrat; Bloch, Olga; Ben-Yehudah, Gilad; Cantrell, Dror; Shirin, Haim; Rapoport, Micha J

    2013-09-01

    The stomach is a target organ of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). However, the cellular expression and glandular distribution of its receptor (GLP-1R) in human gastric mucosa are not known. We determined the expression of GLP-1R in different regions of human stomach mucosa and its specific cellular association and distribution within gastric glands. Tissue samples from stomach body and antrum were obtained from 20 patients during routine esophagogastroduodenoscopy. mRNA encoding GLP-1R protein expression was evaluated by RT-PCR. Determination of cell types bearing GLP-1R, their localization, and their frequency in gastric glands in different gastric regions were estimated by immunohistochemical morphological analysis. Levels of GLP-1R mRNA were similar in body and antrum. GLP-1R immunoreactivity was found throughout the gastric mucosa in various types of glandular cells. The highest frequency of GLP-1R immunoreactive cells was found in the neck area of the principal glands in cells morphologically identified as parietal cells. GLP-1R immunostaining was also found on enteroendocrine-like cells in the pyloric glands. This study provides the first description of GLP-1R expression in human gastric glands and its specific cellular association. Our data suggest that GLP-1 may act directly on the gastric mucosa to modulate its complex functions. PMID:23803499

  2. Structural Determinants of Binding the Seven-transmembrane Domain of the Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Receptor (GLP-1R).

    PubMed

    Yang, Dehua; de Graaf, Chris; Yang, Linlin; Song, Gaojie; Dai, Antao; Cai, Xiaoqing; Feng, Yang; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen; Hanson, Michael A; Yang, Huaiyu; Jiang, Hualiang; Stevens, Raymond C; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2016-06-17

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) belongs to the secretin-like (class B) family of G protein-coupled receptors. Members of the class B family are distinguished by their large extracellular domain, which works cooperatively with the canonical seven-transmembrane (7TM) helical domain to signal in response to binding of various peptide hormones. We have combined structure-based site-specific mutational studies with molecular dynamics simulations of a full-length model of GLP-1R bound to multiple peptide ligand variants. Despite the high sequence similarity between GLP-1R and its closest structural homologue, the glucagon receptor (GCGR), nearly half of the 62 stably expressed mutants affected GLP-1R in a different manner than the corresponding mutants in GCGR. The molecular dynamics simulations of wild-type and mutant GLP-1R·ligand complexes provided molecular insights into GLP-1R-specific recognition mechanisms for the N terminus of GLP-1 by residues in the 7TM pocket and explained how glucagon-mimicking GLP-1 mutants restored binding affinity for (GCGR-mimicking) GLP-1R mutants. Structural analysis of the simulations suggested that peptide ligand binding mode variations in the 7TM binding pocket are facilitated by movement of the extracellular domain relative to the 7TM bundle. These differences in binding modes may account for the pharmacological differences between GLP-1 peptide variants. PMID:27059958

  3. Degradation, receptor binding, insulin secreting and antihyperglycaemic actions of palmitate-derivatised native and Ala8-substituted GLP-1 analogues.

    PubMed

    Green, Brian D; Gault, Victor A; Mooney, Mark H; Irwin, Nigel; Harriott, Patrick; Greer, Brett; Bailey, Cliff J; O'Harte, Finbarr P M; Flatt, Peter R

    2004-02-01

    The hormone glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36)amide (GLP-1) is released in response to ingested nutrients and acts to promote glucose-dependent insulin secretion ensuring efficient postprandial glucose homeostasis. Unfortunately, the beneficial actions of GLP-1 which give this hormone many of the desirable properties of an antidiabetic drug are short lived due to degradation by dipeptidyl-peptidase IV (DPP IV) and rapid clearance by renal filtration. In this study we have attempted to extend GLP-1 action through the attachment of palmitoyl moieties to the epsilon-amino group in the side chain of the Lys26 residue and to combine this modification with substitutions of the Ala8 residue, namely Val or amino-butyric acid (Abu). In contrast to native GLP-1, which was rapidly degraded, [Lys(pal)26]GLP-1, [Abu8, Lys(pal)26]GLP-1 and [Val8 Lys(pal)26]GLP-1 all exhibited profound stability during 12 h incubations with DPP IV and human plasma. Receptor binding affinity and the ability to increase cyclic AMP in the clonal beta-cell line BRIN-BD11 were decreased by 86- to 167-fold and 15- to 62-fold, respectively compared with native GLP-1. However, insulin secretory potency tested using BRIN-BD11 cells was similar, or in the case of [Val8,Lys(pal)26]GLP-1 enhanced. Furthermore, when administered in vivo together with glucose to diabetic (ob/ob) mice, [Lys(pal)26]GLP-1, [Abu8,Lys(pal)26]GLP-1 and [Val8,Lys(pal)26]GLP-1 did not demonstrate acute glucose-lowering or insulinotropic activity as observed with native GLP-1. These studies support the potential usefulness of fatty acid linked analogues of GLP-1 but indicate the importance of chain length for peptide kinetics and bioavailability. PMID:15101559

  4. Molecular mechanisms redirecting the GLP-1 receptor signalling profile in pancreatic β-cells during type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Roussel, Morgane; Mathieu, Julia; Dalle, Stéphane

    2016-05-01

    Treatments with β-cell preserving properties are essential for the management of type 2 diabetes (T2D), and the new therapeutic avenues, developed over the last years, rely on the physiological role of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). Sustained pharmacological levels of GLP-1 are achieved by subcutaneous administration of GLP-1 analogues, while transient and lower physiological levels of GLP-1 are attained following treatment with inhibitors of dipeptidylpeptidase 4 (DPP4), an endoprotease which degrades the peptide. Both therapeutic classes display a sustained and durable hypoglycaemic action in patients with T2D. However, the GLP-1 incretin effect is known to be reduced in patients with T2D, and GLP-1 analogues and DPP4 inhibitors were shown to lose their effectiveness over time in some patients. The pathological mechanisms behind these observations can be either a decrease in GLP-1 secretion from intestinal L-cells and, as a consequence, a reduction in GLP-1 plasma concentrations, combined or not with a reduced action of GLP-1 in the β-cell, the so-called GLP-1 resistance. Much evidence for a GLP-1 resistance of the β-cell in subjects with T2D have emerged. Here, we review the potential roles of the genetic background, the hyperglycaemia, the hyperlipidaemia, the prostaglandin E receptor 3, the nuclear glucocorticoid receptor, the GLP-1R desensitization and internalisation processes, and the β-arrestin-1 expression levels on GLP-1 resistance in β-cells during T2D. PMID:26953712

  5. PPG neurons of the lower brain stem and their role in brain GLP-1 receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Trapp, Stefan; Cork, Simon C

    2015-10-15

    Within the brain, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) affects central autonomic neurons, including those controlling the cardiovascular system, thermogenesis, and energy balance. Additionally, GLP-1 influences the mesolimbic reward system to modulate the rewarding properties of palatable food. GLP-1 is produced in the gut and by hindbrain preproglucagon (PPG) neurons, located mainly in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) and medullary intermediate reticular nucleus. Transgenic mice expressing glucagon promoter-driven yellow fluorescent protein revealed that PPG neurons not only project to central autonomic control regions and mesolimbic reward centers, but also strongly innervate spinal autonomic neurons. Therefore, these brain stem PPG neurons could directly modulate sympathetic outflow through their spinal inputs to sympathetic preganglionic neurons. Electrical recordings from PPG neurons in vitro have revealed that they receive synaptic inputs from vagal afferents entering via the solitary tract. Vagal afferents convey satiation to the brain from signals like postprandial gastric distention or activation of peripheral GLP-1 receptors. CCK and leptin, short- and long-term satiety peptides, respectively, increased the electrical activity of PPG neurons, while ghrelin, an orexigenic peptide, had no effect. These findings indicate that satiation is a main driver of PPG neuronal activation. They also show that PPG neurons are in a prime position to respond to both immediate and long-term indicators of energy and feeding status, enabling regulation of both energy balance and general autonomic homeostasis. This review discusses the question of whether PPG neurons, rather than gut-derived GLP-1, are providing the physiological substrate for the effects elicited by central nervous system GLP-1 receptor activation. PMID:26290108

  6. Comparative Effects of the Endogenous Agonist Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1)-(7-36) Amide and the Small-Molecule Ago-Allosteric Agent “Compound 2” at the GLP-1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Coopman, Karen; Huang, Yan; Johnston, Neil; Bradley, Sophie J.; Wilkinson, Graeme F.

    2010-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) mediates antidiabetogenic effects through the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R), which is targeted for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Small-molecule GLP-1R agonists have been sought due to difficulties with peptide therapeutics. Recently, 6,7-dichloro-2-methylsulfonyl-3-N-tert-butylaminoquinoxaline (compound 2) has been described as a GLP-1R allosteric modulator and agonist. Using human embryonic kidney-293 cells expressing human GLP-1Rs, we extended this work to consider the impact of compound 2 on G protein activation, Ca2+ signaling and receptor internalization and particularly to compare compound 2 and GLP-1 across a range of functional assays in intact cells. GLP-1 and compound 2 activated Gαs in cell membranes and increased cellular cAMP in intact cells, with compound 2 being a partial and almost full agonist, respectively. GLP-1 increased intracellular [Ca2+] by release from intracellular stores, which was mimicked by compound 2, with slower kinetics. In either intact cells or membranes, the orthosteric antagonist exendin-(9-39), inhibited GLP-1 cAMP generation but increased the efficacy of compound 2. GLP-1 internalized enhanced green fluorescent protein-tagged GLP-1Rs, but the speed and magnitude evoked by compound 2 were less. Exendin-(9-39) inhibited internalization by GLP-1 and also surprisingly that by compound 2. Compound 2 displays GLP-1R agonism consistent with action at an allosteric site, although an orthosteric antagonist increased its efficacy on cAMP and blocked compound 2-mediated receptor internalization. Full assessment of the properties of compound 2 was potentially hampered by damaging effects that were particularly manifest in either longer term assays with intact cells or in acute assays with membranes. PMID:20507928

  7. A Novel GLP1 Receptor Interacting Protein ATP6ap2 Regulates Insulin Secretion in Pancreatic Beta Cells.

    PubMed

    Dai, Feihan F; Bhattacharjee, Alpana; Liu, Ying; Batchuluun, Battsetseg; Zhang, Ming; Wang, Xinye Serena; Huang, Xinyi; Luu, Lemieux; Zhu, Dan; Gaisano, Herbert; Wheeler, Michael B

    2015-10-01

    GLP1 activates its receptor, GLP1R, to enhance insulin secretion. The activation and transduction of GLP1R requires complex interactions with a host of accessory proteins, most of which remain largely unknown. In this study, we used membrane-based split ubiquitin yeast two-hybrid assays to identify novel GLP1R interactors in both mouse and human islets. Among these, ATP6ap2 (ATPase H(+)-transporting lysosomal accessory protein 2) was identified in both mouse and human islet screens. ATP6ap2 was shown to be abundant in islets including both alpha and beta cells. When GLP1R and ATP6ap2 were co-expressed in beta cells, GLP1R was shown to directly interact with ATP6ap2, as assessed by co-immunoprecipitation. In INS-1 cells, overexpression of ATP6ap2 did not affect insulin secretion; however, siRNA knockdown decreased both glucose-stimulated and GLP1-induced insulin secretion. Decreases in GLP1-induced insulin secretion were accompanied by attenuated GLP1 stimulated cAMP accumulation. Because ATP6ap2 is a subunit required for V-ATPase assembly of insulin granules, it has been reported to be involved in granule acidification. In accordance with this, we observed impaired insulin granule acidification upon ATP6ap2 knockdown but paradoxically increased proinsulin secretion. Importantly, as a GLP1R interactor, ATP6ap2 was required for GLP1-induced Ca(2+) influx, in part explaining decreased insulin secretion in ATP6ap2 knockdown cells. Taken together, our findings identify a group of proteins that interact with the GLP1R. We further show that one interactor, ATP6ap2, plays a novel dual role in beta cells, modulating both GLP1R signaling and insulin processing to affect insulin secretion. PMID:26272612

  8. Dual elimination of the glucagon and GLP-1 receptors in mice reveals plasticity in the incretin axis.

    PubMed

    Ali, Safina; Lamont, Benjamin J; Charron, Maureen J; Drucker, Daniel J

    2011-05-01

    Disordered glucagon secretion contributes to the symptoms of diabetes, and reduced glucagon action is known to improve glucose homeostasis. In mice, genetic deletion of the glucagon receptor (Gcgr) results in increased levels of the insulinotropic hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), which may contribute to the alterations in glucose homeostasis observed in Gcgr-/- mice. Here, we assessed the contribution of GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) signaling to the phenotype of Gcgr-/- mice by generating Gcgr-/-Glp1r-/- mice. Although insulin sensitivity was similar in all genotypes, fasting glucose was increased in Gcgr-/-Glp1r-/- mice. Elimination of the Glp1r normalized gastric emptying and impaired intraperitoneal glucose tolerance in Gcgr-/- mice. Unexpectedly, deletion of Glp1r in Gcgr-/- mice did not alter the improved oral glucose tolerance and increased insulin secretion characteristic of that genotype. Although Gcgr-/-Glp1r-/- islets exhibited increased sensitivity to the incretin glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), mice lacking both Glp1r and the GIP receptor (Gipr) maintained preservation of the enteroinsular axis following reduction of Gcgr signaling. Moreover, Gcgr-/-Glp1r-/- islets expressed increased levels of the cholecystokinin A receptor (Cckar) and G protein-coupled receptor 119 (Gpr119) mRNA transcripts, and Gcgr-/-Glp1r-/- mice exhibited increased sensitivity to exogenous CCK and the GPR119 agonist AR231453. Our data reveal extensive functional plasticity in the enteroinsular axis via induction of compensatory mechanisms that control nutrient-dependent regulation of insulin secretion. PMID:21540554

  9. GLP1- and GIP-producing cells rarely overlap and differ by bombesin receptor-2 expression and responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Svendsen, Berit; Pais, Ramona; Engelstoft, Maja S; Milev, Nikolay B; Richards, Paul; Christiansen, Charlotte B; Egerod, Kristoffer L; Jensen, Signe M; Habib, Abdella M; Gribble, Fiona M; Schwartz, Thue W; Reimann, Frank; Holst, Jens J

    2016-01-01

    The incretin hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) are secreted from intestinal endocrine cells, the so-called L- and K-cells. The cells are derived from a common precursor and are highly related, and co-expression of the two hormones in so-called L/K-cells has been reported. To investigate the relationship between the GLP1- and GIP-producing cells more closely, we generated a transgenic mouse model expressing a fluorescent marker in GIP-positive cells. In combination with a mouse strain with fluorescent GLP1 cells, we were able to estimate the overlap between the two cell types. Furthermore, we used primary cultured intestinal cells and isolated perfused mouse intestine to measure the secretion of GIP and GLP1 in response to different stimuli. Overlapping GLP1 and GIP cells were rare (∼5%). KCl, glucose and forskolin+IBMX increased the secretion of both GLP1 and GIP, whereas bombesin/neuromedin C only stimulated GLP1 secretion. Expression analysis showed high expression of the bombesin 2 receptor in GLP1 positive cells, but no expression in GIP-positive cells. These data indicate both expressional and functional differences between the GLP1-producing 'L-cell' and the GIP-producing 'K-cell'. PMID:26483393

  10. GLP-1 based therapeutics: simultaneously combating T2DM and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Heppner, Kristy M.; Perez-Tilve, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) enhances meal-related insulin secretion, which lowers blood glucose excursions. In addition to its incretin action, GLP-1 acts on the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) in the brain to suppress feeding. These combined actions of GLP-1R signaling cause improvements in glycemic control as well as weight loss in type II diabetes (T2DM) patients treated with GLP-1R agonists. This is a superior advantage of GLP-1R pharmaceuticals as many other drugs used to treat T2DM are weight neutral or actual cause weight gain. This review summarizes GLP-1R action on energy and glucose metabolism, the effectiveness of current GLP-1R agonists on weight loss in T2DM patients, as well as GLP-1R combination therapies. PMID:25852463

  11. Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component 1 Is a Functional Part of the Glucagon-like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Receptor Complex in Pancreatic β Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ming; Robitaille, Mélanie; Showalter, Aaron D.; Huang, Xinyi; Liu, Ying; Bhattacharjee, Alpana; Willard, Francis S.; Han, Junfeng; Froese, Sean; Wei, Li; Gaisano, Herbert Y.; Angers, Stéphane; Sloop, Kyle W.; Dai, Feihan F.; Wheeler, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone that regulates glucose homeostasis. Because of their direct stimulation of insulin secretion from pancreatic β cells, GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists are now important therapeutic options for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. To better understand the mechanisms that control the insulinotropic actions of GLP-1, affinity purification and mass spectrometry (AP-MS) were employed to uncover potential proteins that functionally interact with the GLP-1R. AP-MS performed on Chinese hamster ovary cells or MIN6 β cells, both expressing the human GLP-1R, revealed 99 proteins potentially associated with the GLP-1R. Three novel GLP-1R interactors (PGRMC1, Rab5b, and Rab5c) were further validated through co-immunoprecipitation/immunoblotting, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and immunofluorescence. Functional studies revealed that overexpression of PGRMC1, a novel cell surface receptor that associated with liganded GLP-1R, enhanced GLP-1-induced insulin secretion (GIIS) with the most robust effect. Knockdown of PGRMC1 in β cells decreased GIIS, indicative of positive interaction with GLP-1R. To gain insight mechanistically, we demonstrated that the cell surface PGRMC1 ligand P4-BSA increased GIIS, whereas its antagonist AG-205 decreased GIIS. It was then found that PGRMC1 increased GLP-1-induced cAMP accumulation. PGRMC1 activation and GIIS induced by P4-BSA could be blocked by inhibition of adenylyl cyclase/EPAC signaling or the EGF receptor–PI3K signal transduction pathway. These data reveal a dual mechanism for PGRMC1-increased GIIS mediated through cAMP and EGF receptor signaling. In conclusion, we identified several novel GLP-1R interacting proteins. PGRMC1 expressed on the cell surface of β cells was shown to interact with the activated GLP-1R to enhance the insulinotropic actions of GLP-1. PMID:25044020

  12. Pancreatic GLP-1 receptor activation is sufficient for incretin control of glucose metabolism in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lamont, Benjamin J.; Li, Yazhou; Kwan, Edwin; Brown, Theodore J.; Gaisano, Herbert; Drucker, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) circulates at low levels and acts as an incretin hormone, potentiating glucose-dependent insulin secretion from islet β cells. GLP-1 also modulates gastric emptying and engages neural circuits in the portal region and CNS that contribute to GLP-1 receptor–dependent (GLP-1R–dependent) regulation of glucose homeostasis. To elucidate the importance of pancreatic GLP-1R signaling for glucose homeostasis, we generated transgenic mice that expressed the human GLP-1R in islets and pancreatic ductal cells (Pdx1-hGLP1R:Glp1r–/– mice). Transgene expression restored GLP-1R–dependent stimulation of cAMP and Akt phosphorylation in isolated islets, conferred GLP-1R–dependent stimulation of β cell proliferation, and was sufficient for restoration of GLP-1–stimulated insulin secretion in perifused islets. Systemic GLP-1R activation with the GLP-1R agonist exendin-4 had no effect on food intake, hindbrain c-fos expression, or gastric emptying but improved glucose tolerance and stimulated insulin secretion in Pdx1-hGLP1R:Glp1r–/– mice. i.c.v. GLP-1R blockade with the antagonist exendin(9–39) impaired glucose tolerance in WT mice but had no effect in Pdx1-hGLP1R:Glp1r–/– mice. Nevertheless, transgenic expression of the pancreatic GLP-1R was sufficient to normalize both oral and i.p. glucose tolerance in Glp1r–/– mice. These findings illustrate that low levels of endogenous GLP-1 secreted from gut endocrine cells are capable of augmenting glucoregulatory activity via pancreatic GLP-1Rs independent of communication with neural pathways. PMID:22182839

  13. GLP-1 receptor antagonist as a potential probe for pancreatic {beta}-cell imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Mukai, Eri; Toyoda, Kentaro; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Kawashima, Hidekazu; Fujimoto, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Masashi; Temma, Takashi; Hirao, Konomu; Nagakawa, Kenji; Saji, Hideo; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2009-11-20

    We examined exendin(9-39), an antagonist of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor (GLP-1R), as a potential probe for imaging of pancreatic {beta}-cells. To evaluate in vitro receptor specificity, binding assay was performed using dispersed mouse islet cells. Binding assay showed competitive inhibition of [{sup 125}I]BH-exendin(9-39) binding by non-radioactive exendin(9-39). To assess in vivo selectivity, the biodistribution was evaluated by intravenous administration of [{sup 125}I]BH-exendin(9-39) to mice. Radioactivity of harvested pancreas reached highest levels at 60 and 120 min among organs examined except lung. Pre-administration of excess non-radioactive exendin(9-39) remarkably and specifically blocked the radioactivity of pancreas. After [{sup 125}I]BH-exendin(9-39) injection into transgenic mice with pancreatic {beta}-cells expressing GFP, fluorescent and radioactive signals of sections of pancreas were evaluated with an image analyzer. Imaging analysis showed that the fluorescent GFP signals and the radioactive signals were correspondingly located. Thus, the GLP-1R antagonist exendin(9-39) may serve as a useful probe for pancreatic {beta}-cell imaging.

  14. Blockade of cannabinoid 1 receptor improves GLP-1R mediated insulin secretion in mice.

    PubMed

    González-Mariscal, Isabel; Krzysik-Walker, Susan M; Kim, Wook; Rouse, Michael; Egan, Josephine M

    2016-03-01

    The cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1) is an important regulator of energy metabolism. Reports of in vivo and in vitro studies give conflicting results regarding its role in insulin secretion, possibly due to circulatory factors, such as incretins. We hypothesized that this receptor may be a regulator of the entero-insular axis. We found that despite lower food consumption and lower body weight postprandial GLP-1 plasma concentrations were increased in CB1(-/-) mice compared to CB1(+/+) mice administered a standard diet or high fat/sugar diet. Upon exogenous GLP-1 treatment, CB1(-/-) mice had increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. In mouse insulinoma cells, cannabinoids reduced GLP-1R-mediated intracellular cAMP accumulation and subsequent insulin secretion. Importantly, such effects were also evident in human islets, and were prevented by pharmacologic blockade of CB1. Collectively, these findings suggest a novel mechanism in which endocannabinoids are negative modulators of incretin-mediated insulin secretion. PMID:26724516

  15. Characteristics of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus newly treated with GLP-1 receptor agonists (CHADIG Study): a cross-sectional multicentre study in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Conget, Ignacio; Mauricio, Dídac; Ortega, Rafael; Detournay, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Objective Several glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists (GLP-1Ra) have been made recently available in Spain for type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) treatment. There are no published data on the clinical and sociodemographic profile of patients initiating treatment with GLP-1Ra in Spain. Our objective was to understand these patients' characteristics in a real-world clinical practice setting. Design Cross-sectional observational study. Setting Spanish specialist outpatient clinics. Participants 403 adults with DM2 initiating GLP-1Ra treatment were included. Primary and secondary outcome measures Sociodemographic and DM2-related clinical data, including treatment at and after GLP-1Ra initiation and comorbidities, were collected. Results Evaluable patients (n=403; 50.9% female) were included (July 2013 to March 2014) at 24 centres by 53 specialists (47 endocrinology, 6 internal medicine), with the following profile (value±SD): age (58.3±10.4 years), diabetes duration (9.9±7 years), body mass index (BMI; 36.2±5.5) and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c; 8.4±1.4%); 14% had HbA1c≤7%. Previous antidiabetic treatment: 53.8% only oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs), 5.2% insulin and 40% insulin and OAD; of those receiving OAD, 35% single drug, 38.2% 2 drugs and 24% 3 drugs. Concomitant to GLP-1Ra, 55.3% were only on OAD, 36.2% on insulin and OAD, and 7.2% only on insulin. Of those receiving OAD, the GLP-1Ra was mainly associated with 1 drug (65%) or 2 drugs (31.8%). GLP-1Ra are frequently added to existing antidiabetic drugs, with dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors being the OAD most frequently switched (45% receiving 1 before starting GLP-1Ra, only 2.7% receiving it concomitantly). Conclusions In Spain, GLP-1Ra therapy is usually started in combination with OADs or OADs and insulin. These drugs are used in relatively young patients often not reaching therapeutic goals with other treatment combinations, roughly a decade after diagnosis and with a relatively high BMI

  16. A Novel Glucagon-like Peptide-1 (GLP-1)/Glucagon Hybrid Peptide with Triple-acting Agonist Activity at Glucose-dependent Insulinotropic Polypeptide, GLP-1, and Glucagon Receptors and Therapeutic Potential in High Fat-fed Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Gault, Victor A.; Bhat, Vikas K.; Irwin, Nigel; Flatt, Peter R.

    2013-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), and glucagon bind to related members of the same receptor superfamily and exert important effects on glucose homeostasis, insulin secretion, and energy regulation. The present study assessed the biological actions and therapeutic utility of novel GIP/glucagon/GLP-1 hybrid peptides. Nine novel peptides were synthesized and exhibited complete DPP-IV resistance and enhanced in vitro insulin secretion. The most promising peptide, [dA2]GLP-1/GcG, stimulated cAMP production in GIP, GLP-1, and glucagon receptor-transfected cells. Acute administration of [dA2]GLP-1/GcG in combination with glucose significantly lowered plasma glucose and increased plasma insulin in normal and obese diabetic (ob/ob) mice. Furthermore, [dA2]GLP-1/GcG elicited a protracted glucose-lowering and insulinotropic effect in high fat-fed mice. Twice daily administration of [dA2]GLP-1/GcG for 21 days decreased body weight and nonfasting plasma glucose and increased circulating plasma insulin concentrations in high fat-fed mice. Furthermore, [dA2]GLP-1/GcG significantly improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity by day 21. Interestingly, locomotor activity was increased in [dA2]GLP-1/GcG mice, without appreciable changes in aspects of metabolic rate. Studies in knock-out mice confirmed the biological action of [dA2]GLP-1/GcG via multiple targets including GIP, GLP-1, and glucagon receptors. The data suggest significant promise for novel triple-acting hybrid peptides as therapeutic options for obesity and diabetes. PMID:24165127

  17. Incretin Receptor Null Mice Reveal Key Role of GLP-1 but Not GIP in Pancreatic Beta Cell Adaptation to Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Moffett, R. Charlotte; Vasu, Srividya; Thorens, Bernard; Drucker, Daniel J.; Flatt, Peter R.

    2014-01-01

    Islet adaptations to pregnancy were explored in C57BL6/J mice lacking functional receptors for glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP). Pregnant wild type mice and GIPRKO mice exhibited marked increases in islet and beta cell area, numbers of medium/large sized islets, with positive effects on Ki67/Tunel ratio favouring beta cell growth and enhanced pancreatic insulin content. Alpha cell area and glucagon content were unchanged but prohormone convertases PC2 and PC1/3 together with significant amounts of GLP-1 and GIP were detected in alpha cells. Knockout of GLP-1R abolished these islet adaptations and paradoxically decreased pancreatic insulin, GLP-1 and GIP. This was associated with abolition of normal pregnancy-induced increases in plasma GIP, L-cell numbers, and intestinal GIP and GLP-1 stores. These data indicate that GLP-1 but not GIP is a key mediator of beta cell mass expansion and related adaptations in pregnancy, triggered in part by generation of intra-islet GLP-1. PMID:24927416

  18. GLP-1 receptor stimulation of the lateral parabrachial nucleus reduces food intake: neuroanatomical, electrophysiological, and behavioral evidence.

    PubMed

    Richard, Jennifer E; Farkas, Imre; Anesten, Fredrik; Anderberg, Rozita H; Dickson, Suzanne L; Gribble, Fiona M; Reimann, Frank; Jansson, John-Olov; Liposits, Zsolt; Skibicka, Karolina P

    2014-11-01

    The parabrachial nucleus (PBN) is a key nucleus for the regulation of feeding behavior. Inhibitory inputs from the hypothalamus to the PBN play a crucial role in the normal maintenance of feeding behavior, because their loss leads to starvation. Viscerosensory stimuli result in neuronal activation of the PBN. However, the origin and neurochemical identity of the excitatory neuronal input to the PBN remain largely unexplored. Here, we hypothesize that hindbrain glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) neurons provide excitatory inputs to the PBN, activation of which may lead to a reduction in feeding behavior. Our data, obtained from mice expressing the yellow fluorescent protein in GLP-1-producing neurons, revealed that hindbrain GLP-1-producing neurons project to the lateral PBN (lPBN). Stimulation of lPBN GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1Rs) reduced the intake of chow and palatable food and decreased body weight in rats. It also activated lPBN neurons, reflected by an increase in the number of c-Fos-positive cells in this region. Further support for an excitatory role of GLP-1 in the PBN is provided by electrophysiological studies showing a remarkable increase in firing of lPBN neurons after Exendin-4 application. We show that within the PBN, GLP-1R activation increased gene expression of 2 energy balance regulating peptides, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and IL-6. Moreover, nearly 70% of the lPBN GLP-1 fibers innervated lPBN CGRP neurons. Direct intra-lPBN CGRP application resulted in anorexia. Collectively, our molecular, anatomical, electrophysiological, pharmacological, and behavioral data provide evidence for a functional role of the GLP-1R for feeding control in the PBN. PMID:25116706

  19. Bile Acids Trigger GLP-1 Release Predominantly by Accessing Basolaterally Located G Protein-Coupled Bile Acid Receptors.

    PubMed

    Brighton, Cheryl A; Rievaj, Juraj; Kuhre, Rune E; Glass, Leslie L; Schoonjans, Kristina; Holst, Jens J; Gribble, Fiona M; Reimann, Frank

    2015-11-01

    Bile acids are well-recognized stimuli of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion. This action has been attributed to activation of the G protein-coupled bile acid receptor GPBAR1 (TGR5), although other potential bile acid sensors include the nuclear farnesoid receptor and the apical sodium-coupled bile acid transporter ASBT. The aim of this study was to identify pathways important for GLP-1 release and to determine whether bile acids target their receptors on GLP-1-secreting L-cells from the apical or basolateral compartment. Using transgenic mice expressing fluorescent sensors specifically in L-cells, we observed that taurodeoxycholate (TDCA) and taurolithocholate (TLCA) increased intracellular cAMP and Ca(2+). In primary intestinal cultures, TDCA was a more potent GLP-1 secretagogue than taurocholate (TCA) and TLCA, correlating with a stronger Ca(2+) response to TDCA. Using small-volume Ussing chambers optimized for measuring GLP-1 secretion, we found that both a GPBAR1 agonist and TDCA stimulated GLP-1 release better when applied from the basolateral than from the luminal direction and that luminal TDCA was ineffective when intestinal tissue was pretreated with an ASBT inhibitor. ASBT inhibition had no significant effect in nonpolarized primary cultures. Studies in the perfused rat gut confirmed that vascularly administered TDCA was more effective than luminal TDCA. Intestinal primary cultures and Ussing chamber-mounted tissues from GPBAR1-knockout mice did not secrete GLP-1 in response to either TLCA or TDCA. We conclude that the action of bile acids on GLP-1 secretion is predominantly mediated by GPBAR1 located on the basolateral L-cell membrane, suggesting that stimulation of gut hormone secretion may include postabsorptive mechanisms. PMID:26280129

  20. Bile Acids Trigger GLP-1 Release Predominantly by Accessing Basolaterally Located G Protein–Coupled Bile Acid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Brighton, Cheryl A.; Rievaj, Juraj; Kuhre, Rune E.; Glass, Leslie L.; Schoonjans, Kristina; Holst, Jens J.

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are well-recognized stimuli of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion. This action has been attributed to activation of the G protein–coupled bile acid receptor GPBAR1 (TGR5), although other potential bile acid sensors include the nuclear farnesoid receptor and the apical sodium-coupled bile acid transporter ASBT. The aim of this study was to identify pathways important for GLP-1 release and to determine whether bile acids target their receptors on GLP-1–secreting L-cells from the apical or basolateral compartment. Using transgenic mice expressing fluorescent sensors specifically in L-cells, we observed that taurodeoxycholate (TDCA) and taurolithocholate (TLCA) increased intracellular cAMP and Ca2+. In primary intestinal cultures, TDCA was a more potent GLP-1 secretagogue than taurocholate (TCA) and TLCA, correlating with a stronger Ca2+ response to TDCA. Using small-volume Ussing chambers optimized for measuring GLP-1 secretion, we found that both a GPBAR1 agonist and TDCA stimulated GLP-1 release better when applied from the basolateral than from the luminal direction and that luminal TDCA was ineffective when intestinal tissue was pretreated with an ASBT inhibitor. ASBT inhibition had no significant effect in nonpolarized primary cultures. Studies in the perfused rat gut confirmed that vascularly administered TDCA was more effective than luminal TDCA. Intestinal primary cultures and Ussing chamber–mounted tissues from GPBAR1-knockout mice did not secrete GLP-1 in response to either TLCA or TDCA. We conclude that the action of bile acids on GLP-1 secretion is predominantly mediated by GPBAR1 located on the basolateral L-cell membrane, suggesting that stimulation of gut hormone secretion may include postabsorptive mechanisms. PMID:26280129

  1. Peptidic exenatide and herbal catalpol mediate neuroprotection via the hippocampal GLP-1 receptor/β-endorphin pathway.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yu; Gong, Nian; Li, Teng-Fei; Zhu, Bin; Wang, Yong-Xiang

    2015-12-01

    Both peptidic agonist exenatide and herbal agonist catalpol of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) are neuroprotective. We have previously shown that activation of spinal GLP-1Rs expresses β-endorphin in microglia to produce antinociception. The aim of this study was to explore whether exenatide and catalpol exert neuroprotection via activation of the hippocampal GLP-1R/β-endorphin pathway. The rat middle cerebral artery occlusion model was employed, and the GLP-1R immunofluorescence staining and β-endorphin measurement were assayed in the hippocampus and primary cultures of microglia, neurons and astrocytes. The immunoreactivity of GLP-1Rs on microglia in the hippocampus was upregulated after ischemia reperfusion. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of exenatide and catalpol produced neuroprotection in the rat transient ischemia/reperfusion model, reflected by a marked reduction in brain infarction size and a mild recovery in neurobehavioral deficits. In addition, i.c.v. injection of exenatide and catalpol significantly stimulated β-endorphin expression in the hippocampus and cultured primary microglia (but not primary neurons or astrocytes). Furthermore, exenatide and catalpol neuroprotection was completely blocked by i.c.v. injection of the GLP-1R orthosteric antagonist exendin (9-39), specific β-endorphin antiserum, and selective opioid receptor antagonist naloxone. Our results indicate, for the first time, that the neuroprotective effects of catalpol and exenatide are GLP-1R-specific, and that these effects are mediated by β-endorphin expression probably in hippocampal microglia. We postulate that in contrast to the peripheral tissue, where the activation of GLP-1Rs in pancreas islet β-cells causes secretion of insulin to perform glucoregulation, it leads to β-endorphin expression in microglial cells to produce neuroprotection and analgesia in the central nervous system. PMID:26546042

  2. Brain GLP-1 and insulin sensitivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Type 2 diabetes is often treated with a class of drugs referred to as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogs. GLP-1 is a peptide secreted by the gut that acts through only one known receptor, the GLP-1 receptor. The primary function of GLP-1 is thought to be lowering of postprandial glucose levels....

  3. Diverse signaling systems activated by the sweet taste receptor in human GLP-1-secreting cells.

    PubMed

    Ohtsu, Yoshiaki; Nakagawa, Yuko; Nagasawa, Masahiro; Takeda, Shigeki; Arakawa, Hirokazu; Kojima, Itaru

    2014-08-25

    Sweet taste receptor regulates GLP-1 secretion in enteroendocrine L-cells. We investigated the signaling system activated by this receptor using Hutu-80 cells. We stimulated them with sucralose, saccharin, acesulfame K and glycyrrhizin. These sweeteners stimulated GLP-1 secretion, which was attenuated by lactisole. All these sweeteners elevated cytoplasmic cyclic AMP ([cAMP]c) whereas only sucralose and saccharin induced a monophasic increase in cytoplasmic Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]c). Removal of extracellular calcium or sodium and addition of a Gq/11 inhibitor greatly reduced the [Ca(2+)]c responses to two sweeteners. In contrast, acesulfame K induced rapid and sustained reduction of [Ca(2+)]c. In addition, glycyrrhizin first reduced [Ca(2+)]c which was followed by an elevation of [Ca(2+)]c. Reductions of [Ca(2+)]c induced by acesulfame K and glycyrrhizin were attenuated by a calmodulin inhibitor or by knockdown of the plasma membrane calcium pump. These results indicate that various sweet molecules act as biased agonists and evoke strikingly different patterns of intracellular signals. PMID:25017733

  4. Activation of the GLP-1 Receptors in the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract Reduces Food Reward Behavior and Targets the Mesolimbic System

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Jennifer E.; Anderberg, Rozita H.; Göteson, Andreas; Gribble, Fiona M.; Reimann, Frank; Skibicka, Karolina P.

    2015-01-01

    The gut/brain peptide, glucagon like peptide 1 (GLP-1), suppresses food intake by acting on receptors located in key energy balance regulating CNS areas, the hypothalamus or the hindbrain. Moreover, GLP-1 can reduce reward derived from food and motivation to obtain food by acting on its mesolimbic receptors. Together these data suggest a neuroanatomical segregation between homeostatic and reward effects of GLP-1. Here we aim to challenge this view and hypothesize that GLP-1 can regulate food reward behavior by acting directly on the hindbrain, the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1R). Using two models of food reward, sucrose progressive ratio operant conditioning and conditioned place preference for food in rats, we show that intra-NTS microinjections of GLP-1 or Exendin-4, a stable analogue of GLP-1, inhibit food reward behavior. When the rats were given a choice between palatable food and chow, intra-NTS Exendin-4 treatment preferentially reduced intake of palatable food but not chow. However, chow intake and body weight were reduced by the NTS GLP-1R activation if chow was offered alone. The NTS GLP-1 activation did not alter general locomotor activity and did not induce nausea, measured by PICA. We further show that GLP-1 fibers are in close apposition to the NTS noradrenergic neurons, which were previously shown to provide a monosynaptic connection between the NTS and the mesolimbic system. Central GLP-1R activation also increased NTS expression of dopamine-β-hydroxylase, a key enzyme in noradrenaline synthesis, indicating a biological link between these two systems. Moreover, NTS GLP-1R activation altered the expression of dopamine-related genes in the ventral tegmental area. These data reveal a food reward-suppressing role of the NTS GLP-1R and indicate that the neurobiological targets underlying food reward control are not limited to the mesolimbic system, instead they are distributed throughout the CNS. PMID:25793511

  5. The anorexic effect of Ex4/Fc through GLP-1 receptor activation in high-fat diet fed mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Ma, Duan; Li, Yiming; Hu, Renming; Peng, Yongde; Wang, Qinghua

    2014-08-01

    Exendin-4 (Ex4), a peptide initially found in the saliva of the Gila monster, can activate the signaling pathway of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) through the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R). We previously reported that a chimera protein consisting of Ex4 and mouse IgG heavy chain constant regions (Ex4/Fc) can exert biological effects of GLP-1, such as improving glycemic control and ameliorating manifestations in diabetic mice. The aim of this study was to determine whether Ex4/Fc is effective in modulating energy homeostasis in mice. Our results showed that in vivo expression of Ex4/Fc by intramuscular injection of the plasmid encoding Ex4/Fc followed by local electroporation effectively decreased food intake in the mice on high-fat diet (HFD) feeding. In addition, the reduced energy intake was associated with the decreased excrements from the Ex4/Fc-treated HFD mice but not the Fc control mice. Remarkably, the Ex4/Fctreated HFD mice displayed significantly lower triglyceride (TG) levels when compared with the control mice. Interestingly, while the leptin levels were not changed, the circulating ghrelin levels were higher in Ex4/Fc mice than those in the Fc control mice. These results suggested that Ex4/Fc can improve energy metabolism and lipid metabolism through GLP-1R in mice under excessive nutrition conditions. PMID:24951724

  6. Activation of the GLP-1 receptor signalling pathway: a relevant strategy to repair a deficient beta-cell mass.

    PubMed

    Portha, Bernard; Tourrel-Cuzin, Cécile; Movassat, Jamileh

    2011-01-01

    Recent preclinical studies in rodent models of diabetes suggest that exogenous GLP-1R agonists and DPP-4 inhibitors have the ability to increase islet mass and preserve beta-cell function, by immediate reactivation of beta-cell glucose competence, as well as enhanced beta-cell proliferation and neogenesis and promotion of beta-cell survival. These effects have tremendous implication in the treatment of T2D because they directly address one of the basic defects in T2D, that is, beta-cell failure. In human diabetes, however, evidence that the GLP-1-based drugs alter the course of beta-cell function remains to be found. Several questions surrounding the risks and benefits of GLP-1-based therapy for the diabetic beta-cell mass are discussed in this review and require further investigation. PMID:21716694

  7. Activation of the GLP-1 Receptor Signalling Pathway: A Relevant Strategy to Repair a Deficient Beta-Cell Mass

    PubMed Central

    Portha, Bernard; Tourrel-Cuzin, Cécile; Movassat, Jamileh

    2011-01-01

    Recent preclinical studies in rodent models of diabetes suggest that exogenous GLP-1R agonists and DPP-4 inhibitors have the ability to increase islet mass and preserve beta-cell function, by immediate reactivation of beta-cell glucose competence, as well as enhanced beta-cell proliferation and neogenesis and promotion of beta-cell survival. These effects have tremendous implication in the treatment of T2D because they directly address one of the basic defects in T2D, that is, beta-cell failure. In human diabetes, however, evidence that the GLP-1-based drugs alter the course of beta-cell function remains to be found. Several questions surrounding the risks and benefits of GLP-1-based therapy for the diabetic beta-cell mass are discussed in this review and require further investigation. PMID:21716694

  8. Mercaptoacetate blocks fatty acid-induced GLP-1 secretion in male rats by directly antagonizing GPR40 fatty acid receptors.

    PubMed

    Li, Ai-Jun; Wang, Qing; Dinh, Thu T; Simasko, Steve M; Ritter, Sue

    2016-04-15

    Mercaptoacetate (MA) is an orexigenic agent reported to block fatty acid (FA) oxidation. Recently, however, we reported evidence from isolated nodose ganglion neurons that MA antagonizes the G protein-coupled long- and medium-chain FA receptor GPR40. GPR40 mediates FA-induced secretion of the satietogenic incretin peptide glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), by enteroendocrine L cells, as well as FA-induced enhancement of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Our results in cultured nodose neurons suggest that MA would also block GPR40 in enteroendocrine cells controlling GLP-1 secretion. If so, this would suggest an alternative mechanism by which MA increases food intake. We tested the hypothesis that MA blocks FA-induced GLP-1 secretion in vitro using cultured STC-1 cells (a murine enteroendocrine cell line) and in vivo in adult male rats. In vitro, MA blocked the increase in both cytosolic Ca(2+)and GLP-1 release stimulated by FAs and also reduced (but less effectively) the response of STC-1 cells to grifolic acid, a partial agonist of the GPR120 FA receptor. In vivo, MA reduced GLP-1 secretion following olive oil gavage while also increasing glucose and decreasing insulin levels. The carnitine palmatoyltransferase 1 antagonist etomoxir did not alter these responses. Results indicate that MA's actions, including its orexigenic effect, are mediated by GPR40 (and possibly GPR120) receptor antagonism and not by blockade of fat oxidation, as previously believed. Analysis of MA's interaction with GPR40 may facilitate understanding of the multiple functions of this receptor and the manner in which FAs participate in the control of hunger and satiety. PMID:26791830

  9. Options for intensification of basal insulin in type 2 diabetes: Premeal insulin or short-acting GLP-1 receptor agonists?

    PubMed

    Darmon, P; Raccah, D

    2015-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes is an evolutive disease with a progressive defect of beta-cell insulin secretion. This characteristic points to a need for treatment that takes into account such a natural history. When oral antidiabetic drugs fail to achieve the patient's target HbA1c level, basal insulin treatment is usually initiated and titrated in association with oral drugs to manage fasting hyperglycaemia. Over a period of time, it is enough to simply achieve the HbA1c target. However, when even a good fasting blood glucose level is no longer sufficient to control overall glycaemia, then prandial treatment must be combined with the titrated basal insulin to deal with the postprandial hyperglycaemia responsible for the elevation of HbA1c. Of the different therapeutic options now available for this, rapid-acting insulins and GLP-1 receptor agonists (RAs) can be used. Rapid-acting insulins can be added either at each meal, achieving full insulin supplementation with a basal-bolus regimen, or at the main meal only as a "basal-plus" regimen. Compared with the full basal-bolus, the basal-plus strategy is associated with fewer injections, yet provides similar efficacy in terms of HbA1c improvement, but with less weight gain and lower hypoglycaemic risk. As for GLP-1 RAs, numerous studies, and especially those using short-acting GLP-1 RAs, have demonstrated more pronounced effects on postprandial hyperglycaemia, good complementary effects with basal insulin, and significant improvement of HbA1c with no weight gain and a low risk of hypoglycaemia. Similarly, direct and indirect comparisons of the use of rapid-acting insulins and GLP-1 RAs to intensify basal insulin have shown comparable efficacy in terms of HbA1c control, but with less weight gain and fewer hypoglycaemic episodes with GLP-1 RAs. PMID:26774016

  10. Insulin-releasing and metabolic effects of small molecule GLP-1 receptor agonist 6,7-dichloro-2-methylsulfonyl-3-N-tert-butylaminoquinoxaline.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Nigel; Flatt, Peter R; Patterson, Steven; Green, Brian D

    2010-02-25

    Much recent attention has focused on the GLP-1 receptor as a potential target for antidiabetic drugs. Enzyme resistant GLP-1 mimetics such as exenatide are now employed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, but must be administered by injection. The present study has examined and compared the in vitro and in vivo metabolic actions of a small molecule GLP-1 receptor agonist 6,7-dichloro-2-methylsulfonyl-3-N-tert-butylaminoquinoxaline (DMB), with native GLP-1, exenatide and liraglutide. DMB significantly stimulated in vitro insulin secretion from BRIN-BD11 cells but with decreased molar potency compared to native GLP-1 or related mimetics. Administration of DMB in combination with glucose to mice significantly (P<0.05) decreased the overall glucose excursion compared to controls. Exenatide and liraglutide evoked similar (P<0.001) reductions of the overall glycaemic excursion, but were significantly (P<0.001 and P<0.05; respectively) more effective than DMB. These observations were associated with prominently (P<0.05) enhanced glucose-mediated insulin release by exenatide and liraglutide, but not by DMB. Combined injection of DMB with either liraglutide or exenatide did not substantially improve glucose-lowering or insulin-releasing responses. However, administration of DMB in combination with exendin(9-39) did not impair its glucoregulatory actions. These results provide evidence to support the development and potential use of low molecular weight GLP-1 receptor agonists for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:19917278

  11. Grape powder attenuates the negative effects of GLP-1 receptor antagonism by exendin-3 (9-39) in a normoglycemic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Haufe, T C; Gilley, A D; Goodrich, K M; Ryan, C M; Smithson, A T; Hulver, M W; Liu, D; Neilson, A P

    2016-06-15

    Prediabetes is a condition affecting 35% of US adults and about 50% of US adults age 65+. Foods rich in polyphenols, including flavanols and other flavonoids, have been studied for their putative beneficial effects on many different health conditions including type 2 diabetes mellitus and prediabetes. Studies have shown that some flavanols increase glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) secretion. GLP-1 is a feeding hormone that increases insulin secretion after carbohydrate consumption, and increased GLP-1 secretion may be responsible for some of the beneficial effects on glycemic control after flavanol consumption. The present study explored the effects of grape powder consumption on metrics of glycemic health in normoglycemic and prediabetic C57BL/6J mice; additionally, the mechanism of action of grape powder polyphenols was investigated. Grape powder significantly reduced (p < 0.01) blood glucose levels following oral glucose gavage after GLP-1 receptor antagonism by exendin-3 (9-39) compared to sugar-matched control, indicating that it was able to attenuate the hyperglycemic effects of GLP-1 receptor antagonism. Grape powder was employed in acute (1.6 g grape powder per kg bodyweight) and long-term high fat diet (grape powder incorporated into treatment diets at 5% w/w) feeding studies in normoglycemic and prediabetic (diet-induced obesity) mice; grape powder did not impove glycemic control in these studies versus sugar-matched control. The mechanisms by which grape powder ameliorates the deleterious effects of GLP-1 receptor antagonism warrant further study. PMID:27189193

  12. The evolving world of GLP-1 agonist therapies for type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Baynes, Kevin C. R.

    2010-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonist drugs have attractions as a treatment for type 2 diabetes since they positively alter a number of key pathophysiological defects. These include increasing insulin release, reducing glucagon release, slowing gastric emptying and reducing food intake. In numerous clinical trials these agents have been shown to reduce DCCT-aligned HbA1c between 0.8% and 1.1% in patients with moderately controlled type 2 diabetes, whilst also being associated with some weight loss. Whilst medium-term safety and side-effect profiles are now well established, there are as yet no long-term studies on the safety of this group of drugs. The place of the GLP-1 agonists in the treatment paradigm for type 2 diabetes will evolve over the next decade. PMID:23148151

  13. The peptide agonist-binding site of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor based on site-directed mutagenesis and knowledge-based modelling

    PubMed Central

    Dods, Rachel L.; Donnelly, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (7–36)amide (GLP-1) plays a central role in regulating blood sugar levels and its receptor, GLP-1R, is a target for anti-diabetic agents such as the peptide agonist drugs exenatide and liraglutide. In order to understand the molecular nature of the peptide–receptor interaction, we used site-directed mutagenesis and pharmacological profiling to highlight nine sites as being important for peptide agonist binding and/or activation. Using a knowledge-based approach, we constructed a 3D model of agonist-bound GLP-1R, basing the conformation of the N-terminal region on that of the receptor-bound NMR structure of the related peptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating protein (PACAP21). The relative position of the extracellular to the transmembrane (TM) domain, as well as the molecular details of the agonist-binding site itself, were found to be different from the model that was published alongside the crystal structure of the TM domain of the glucagon receptor, but were nevertheless more compatible with published mutagenesis data. Furthermore, the NMR-determined structure of a high-potency cyclic conformationally-constrained 11-residue analogue of GLP-1 was also docked into the receptor-binding site. Despite having a different main chain conformation to that seen in the PACAP21 structure, four conserved residues (equivalent to His-7, Glu-9, Ser-14 and Asp-15 in GLP-1) could be structurally aligned and made similar interactions with the receptor as their equivalents in the GLP-1-docked model, suggesting the basis of a pharmacophore for GLP-1R peptide agonists. In this way, the model not only explains current mutagenesis and molecular pharmacological data but also provides a basis for further experimental design. PMID:26598711

  14. Quantification of the Contribution of GLP-1 to Mediating Insulinotropic Effects of DPP-4 Inhibition With Vildagliptin in Healthy Subjects and Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Using Exendin [9-39] as a GLP-1 Receptor Antagonist.

    PubMed

    Nauck, Michael A; Kind, Joachim; Köthe, Lars D; Holst, Jens J; Deacon, Carolyn F; Broschag, Matthias; He, Yan Ling; Kjems, Lise; Foley, James

    2016-08-01

    We quantified the contribution of GLP-1 as a mediator of the therapeutic effects of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibition (vildagliptin) by using the GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin [9-39] in patients with type 2 diabetes and in healthy subjects. Thirty-two patients with type 2 diabetes and 29 age- and weight-matched healthy control subjects were treated in randomized order with 100 mg once daily vildagliptin or placebo for 10 days. Meal tests were performed (days 9 and 10) without and with a high-dose intravenous infusion of exendin [9-39]. The main end point was the ratio of the areas under the curve (AUCs) of integrated insulin secretion rates (total AUCISR) and glucose (total AUCglucose) over 4 h after the meal. Vildagliptin treatment more than doubled responses of intact GLP-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and lowered glucose responses without changing AUCISR/AUCglucose in healthy subjects. Vildagliptin significantly increased this ratio by 10.5% in patients with type 2 diabetes, and exendin [9-39] reduced it (both P < 0.0001). The percentage reduction in the AUCISR/AUCglucose ratio achieved with exendin [9-39] was significantly smaller after vildagliptin treatment than after placebo treatment (P = 0.026) and was equivalent to 47 ± 5% of the increments due to vildagliptin. Thus, other mediators appear to contribute significantly to the therapeutic effects of DPP-4 inhibition. PMID:27207543

  15. Regulation of Glucose Homeostasis by GLP-1

    PubMed Central

    Nadkarni, Prashant; Chepurny, Oleg G.; Holz, George G.

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1(7–36)amide (GLP-1) is a secreted peptide that acts as a key determinant of blood glucose homeostasis by virtue of its abilities to slow gastric emptying, to enhance pancreatic insulin secretion, and to suppress pancreatic glucagon secretion. GLP-1 is secreted from L cells of the gastrointestinal mucosa in response to a meal, and the blood glucose-lowering action of GLP-1 is terminated due to its enzymatic degradation by dipeptidyl-peptidase-IV (DPP-IV). Released GLP-1 activates enteric and autonomic reflexes while also circulating as an incretin hormone to control endocrine pancreas function. The GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a G protein-coupled receptor that is activated directly or indirectly by blood glucose-lowering agents currently in use for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). These therapeutic agents include GLP-1R agonists (exenatide, liraglutide, lixisenatide, albiglutide, dulaglutide, and langlenatide) and DPP-IV inhibitors (sitagliptin, vildagliptin, saxagliptin, linagliptin, and alogliptin). Investigational agents for use in the treatment of T2DM include GPR119 and GPR40 receptor agonists that stimulate the release of GLP-1 from L cells. Summarized here is the role of GLP-1 to control blood glucose homeo-stasis, with special emphasis on the advantages and limitations of GLP-1-based therapeutics. PMID:24373234

  16. Effect of GLP-1 Receptor Activation on Offspring Kidney Health in a Rat Model of Maternal Obesity.

    PubMed

    Glastras, Sarah J; Chen, Hui; McGrath, Rachel T; Zaky, Amgad A; Gill, Anthony J; Pollock, Carol A; Saad, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Maternal obesity is associated with an increased risk of chronic disease in offspring, including type 2 diabetes (T2D). Exendin-4 (Exd-4) activates the glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor thereby decreasing serum glucose levels and body weight. In addition, Exd-4 has been shown to reduce renal and cardiac complications in experimental models of T2D. We hypothesized that treatment with Exd-4 would ameliorate the detrimental effects of maternal and diet-induced obesity on renal characteristics in offspring. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either normal or high-fat diet (HFD) for 6 weeks prior to pregnancy, during pregnancy and lactation, and their offspring were weaned to normal or HFD. The offspring were randomized to Exd-4 or placebo from weaning and their kidneys harvested at Week 9. We found that the kidneys of offspring from obese mothers, regardless of postnatal diet, had significantly increased markers of inflammation, oxidative stress and fibrosis. Exd-4 ameliorated the negative renal effects of maternal obesity and in particular, reduced renal inflammation, oxidative stress and fibrosis. In conclusion, maternal obesity has persisting effects on renal structure in the offspring. GLP-1 analogues are potentially useful for protecting against the deleterious effects of maternal obesity on renal physiology in offspring. PMID:27004609

  17. Effect of GLP-1 Receptor Activation on Offspring Kidney Health in a Rat Model of Maternal Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Glastras, Sarah J.; Chen, Hui; McGrath, Rachel T.; Zaky, Amgad A.; Gill, Anthony J.; Pollock, Carol A.; Saad, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Maternal obesity is associated with an increased risk of chronic disease in offspring, including type 2 diabetes (T2D). Exendin-4 (Exd-4) activates the glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor thereby decreasing serum glucose levels and body weight. In addition, Exd-4 has been shown to reduce renal and cardiac complications in experimental models of T2D. We hypothesized that treatment with Exd-4 would ameliorate the detrimental effects of maternal and diet-induced obesity on renal characteristics in offspring. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either normal or high-fat diet (HFD) for 6 weeks prior to pregnancy, during pregnancy and lactation, and their offspring were weaned to normal or HFD. The offspring were randomized to Exd-4 or placebo from weaning and their kidneys harvested at Week 9. We found that the kidneys of offspring from obese mothers, regardless of postnatal diet, had significantly increased markers of inflammation, oxidative stress and fibrosis. Exd-4 ameliorated the negative renal effects of maternal obesity and in particular, reduced renal inflammation, oxidative stress and fibrosis. In conclusion, maternal obesity has persisting effects on renal structure in the offspring. GLP-1 analogues are potentially useful for protecting against the deleterious effects of maternal obesity on renal physiology in offspring. PMID:27004609

  18. [GLP-1 receptor agonists versus SGLT-2 inhibitors in obese type 2 diabetes patients].

    PubMed

    Marques, Ana Rita Forte; Jaafar, Jaafar; de Kalbermatten, Bénédicte; Philippe, Jacques

    2015-06-01

    Who never had a type 2 obese diabetic patient, treated by several oral antidiabetic drugs and insulin, with consequent weight gain associated with the therapeutic escalation and uncontrolled diabetes? The arrival of GLP-1 agonists and SGLT-2 inhibitors allows to reevaluate the management of these patients, with their favorable effects on glycemic control, weight and the risk of hypoglycemia and their complementary mechanisms to conventional treatments. The vicious cycle of weight gain and increased need of insulin is limited. The choice between these two molecules must be based on several factors (glycemic target, weight, comorbidities, route of administration, side effects, etc.), and the balanced enthusiasm of these new treatments with the insufficient data regarding their long-term safety and their impact on micro- and macrovascular complications. PMID:26211282

  19. A bitter pill for type 2 diabetes? The activation of bitter taste receptor TAS2R38 can stimulate GLP-1 release from enteroendocrine L-cells.

    PubMed

    Pham, Hung; Hui, Hongxiang; Morvaridi, Susan; Cai, Jiena; Zhang, Sanqi; Tan, Jun; Wu, Vincent; Levin, Nancy; Knudsen, Beatrice; Goddard, William A; Pandol, Stephen J; Abrol, Ravinder

    2016-07-01

    The bitter taste receptor TAS2R38 is a G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) that has been found in many extra-oral locations like the gastrointestinal (GI) system, respiratory system, and brain, though its function at these locations is only beginning to be understood. To probe the receptor's potential metabolic role, immunohistochemistry of human ileum tissues was performed, which showed that the receptor was co-localized with glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) in L-cells. In a previous study, we had modeled the structure of this receptor for its many taste-variant haplotypes (Tan et al. 2011), including the taster haplotype PAV. The structure of this haplotype was then used in a virtual ligand screening pipeline using a collection of ∼2.5 million purchasable molecules from the ZINC database. Three compounds (Z7, Z3, Z1) were purchased from the top hits and tested along with PTU (known TAS2R38 agonist) in in vitro and in vivo assays. The dose-response study of the effect of PTU and Z7 on GLP-1 release using wild-type and TAS2R38 knockout HuTu-80 cells showed that the receptor TAS2R38 plays a major role in GLP-1 release due to these molecules. In vivo studies of PTU and the three compounds showed that they each increase GLP-1 release. PTU was also chemical linked to cellulose to slow its absorption and when tested in vivo, it showed an enhanced and prolonged GLP-1 release. These results suggest that the GI lumen location of TAS2R38 on the L-cell makes it a relatively safe drug target as systemic absorption is not needed for a TAS2R38 agonist drug to effect GLP-1 release. PMID:27208775

  20. A bitter pill for type 2 diabetes? The activation of bitter taste receptor TAS2R38 can stimulate GLP-1 release from enteroendocrine L-cells

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Hung; Hui, Hongxiang; Morvaridi, Susan; Cai, Jiena; Zhang, Sanqi; Tan, Jun; Wu, Vincent; Levin, Nancy; Knudsen, Beatrice; Goddard, William A.; Pandol, Stephen J.; Abrol, Ravinder

    2016-01-01

    The bitter taste receptor TAS2R38 is a G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) that has been found in many extra-oral locations like the gastrointestinal (GI) system, respiratory system, and brain, though its function at these locations is only beginning to be understood. To probe the receptor’s potential metabolic role, immunohistochemistry of human ileum tissues was performed, which showed that the receptor was co-localized with glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) in L-cells. In a previous study, we had modeled the structure of this receptor for its many taste-variant haplotypes (Tan et al. 2011), including the taster haplotype PAV. The structure of this haplotype was then used in a virtual ligand screening pipeline using a collection of ~2.5 million purchasable molecules from the ZINC database. Three compounds (Z7, Z3, Z1) were purchased from the top hits and tested along with PTU (known TAS2R38 agonist) in in vitro and in vivo assays. The dose-response study of the effect of PTU and Z7 on GLP-1 release using wild-type and TAS2R38 knockout HuTu-80 cells showed that the receptor TAS2R38 plays a major role in GLP-1 release due to these molecules. In vivo studies of PTU and the three compounds showed that they each increase GLP-1 release. PTU was also chemical linked to cellulose to slow its absorption and when tested in vivo, it showed an enhanced and prolonged GLP-1 release. These results suggest that the GI lumen location of TAS2R38 on the L-cell makes it a relatively safe drug target as systemic absorption is not needed for a TAS2R38 agonist drug to effect GLP-1 release. PMID:27208775

  1. Conservation of glp-1 regulation and function in nematodes.

    PubMed Central

    Rudel, D; Kimble, J

    2001-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans (Ce) glp-1 gene encodes a Notch-like receptor. We have cloned glp-1 from C. briggsae (Cb) and C. remanei (Cr), two Caenorhabditis species that have diverged from C. elegans by roughly 20-40 million years. By sequence analysis, we find that the Cb-GLP-1 and Cr-GLP-1 proteins have retained the same motif architecture as Ce-GLP-1, including number of domains. In addition, two regions (CC-linker and regions flanking the ANK repeats) are as highly conserved as regions previously recognized as essential for signaling (e.g., ANK repeats). Phylogenetic analysis of glp-1 sequences suggests a C. briggsae/C. remanei clade with C. elegans as a sister taxon. Using RNAi to test biological functions, we find that Ce-glp-1, Cb-glp-1, and Cr-glp-1 are all required for proliferation of germline stem cells and for specifying blastomere fates in the embryo. In addition, certain biological roles of Cb-glp-1, e.g., in the vulva, have diverged from those of Ce-glp-1 and Cr-glp-1, suggesting a change in either regulation or function of the Cb-glp-1 gene during evolution. Finally, the regulation of glp-1 mRNA, previously analyzed for Ce-glp-1, is conserved in Cb-glp-1, and we identify conserved 3' UTR sequences that may serve as regulatory elements. PMID:11156985

  2. GLP-1 receptor agonist liraglutide reverses long-term atypical antipsychotic treatment associated behavioral depression and metabolic abnormalities in rats.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ajaykumar N; Ligade, Sagar S; Sharma, Jay N; Shukla, Praveen; Elased, Khalid M; Lucot, James B

    2015-04-01

    Mood disorder patients that are on long-term atypical antipsychotics treatment frequently experience metabolic dysfunctions. In addition to this, accumulating evidences points to increased risk of structural abnormalities, brain volume changes, altered neuroplasticity and behavioral depression with long-term antipsychotics use. However, there is paucity of preclinical evidences for long-term antipsychotic associated depression-like behavior. The objectives of the present study were: (1) to evaluate influence of long-term antipsychotic (olanzapine) treatment on rat behavior in forced swim test (FST) as a model for depression and; (2) to examine impact of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist liraglutide - an antidiabetic medication for type II diabetes, on long-term olanzapine associated metabolic and behavioral changes in rats. Daily olanzapine treatment (0.5 mg/kg; p.o.) for 8-9 weeks significantly increased body weights, food and water intake, plasma cholesterol and triglycerides and immobility time in FST with parallel reduction in plasma HDL cholesterol levels. These results points to development of metabolic abnormalities and depression-like behavior with long-term olanzapine treatment. Acute liraglutide (50 μg/kg; i.p.) and imipramine (10 mg/kg, i. p.) treatment per se significantly decreased duration of immobility in FST compared to vehicle treated rats. Additionally, 3-week liraglutide treatment (50 μg/kg; i.p., daily) partially reversed metabolic abnormalities and depression-like behavior with long-term olanzapine-treatment in rats. None of these treatment regimens affected locomotor behavior of rats. In summary, add-on GLP-1 receptor agonists promise novel alternatives to counteract long-term antipsychotics associated behavioral and metabolic complications. PMID:25023888

  3. Mosapride, a selective serotonin 5-HT4 receptor agonist, and alogliptin, a selective dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, exert synergic effects on plasma active GLP-1 levels and glucose tolerance in mice.

    PubMed

    Nonogaki, Katsunori; Kaji, Takao

    2015-12-01

    Pharmacologic stimulation of serotonin 5-HT4 receptors increased plasma active glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels independent of feeding, and that pharmacologic stimulation of 5-HT4 receptors and pharmacologic inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 exerted synergic effects on plasma active GLP-1 levels and glucose tolerance in mice. PMID:26497774

  4. Exenatide exerts direct protective effects on endothelial cells through the AMPK/Akt/eNOS pathway in a GLP-1 receptor-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Wei, Rui; Ma, Shifeng; Wang, Chen; Ke, Jing; Yang, Jin; Li, Weihong; Liu, Ye; Hou, Wenfang; Feng, Xinheng; Wang, Guang; Hong, Tianpei

    2016-06-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) may have direct favorable effects on cardiovascular system. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the GLP-1 analog exenatide on improving coronary endothelial function in patients with type 2 diabetes and to investigate the underlying mechanisms. The newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic subjects were enrolled and given either lifestyle intervention or lifestyle intervention plus exenatide treatment. After 12-wk treatment, coronary flow velocity reserve (CFVR), an important indicator of coronary endothelial function, was improved significantly, and serum levels of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1) were remarkably decreased in the exenatide treatment group compared with the baseline and the control group. Notably, CFVR was correlated inversely with hemoglobin A1c (Hb A1c) and positively with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). In human umbilical vein endothelial cells, exendin-4 (a form of exenatide) significantly increased NO production, endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation, and GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GTPCH1) level in a dose-dependent manner. The GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) antagonist exendin (9-39) or GLP-1R siRNA, adenylyl cyclase inhibitor SQ-22536, AMPK inhibitor compound C, and PI3K inhibitor LY-294002 abolished the effects of exendin-4. Furthermore, exendin-4 reversed homocysteine-induced endothelial dysfunction by decreasing sICAM-1 and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and upregulating NO production and eNOS phosphorylation. Likewise, exendin (9-39) diminished the protective effects of exendin-4 on the homocysteine-induced endothelial dysfunction. In conclusion, exenatide significantly improves coronary endothelial function in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes. The effect may be mediated through activation of AMPK/PI3K-Akt/eNOS pathway via a GLP-1R/cAMP-dependent mechanism. PMID:27072494

  5. The Extracellular Surface of the GLP-1 Receptor Is a Molecular Trigger for Biased Agonism.

    PubMed

    Wootten, Denise; Reynolds, Christopher A; Smith, Kevin J; Mobarec, Juan C; Koole, Cassandra; Savage, Emilia E; Pabreja, Kavita; Simms, John; Sridhar, Rohan; Furness, Sebastian G B; Liu, Mengjie; Thompson, Philip E; Miller, Laurence J; Christopoulos, Arthur; Sexton, Patrick M

    2016-06-16

    Ligand-directed signal bias offers opportunities for sculpting molecular events, with the promise of better, safer therapeutics. Critical to the exploitation of signal bias is an understanding of the molecular events coupling ligand binding to intracellular signaling. Activation of class B G protein-coupled receptors is driven by interaction of the peptide N terminus with the receptor core. To understand how this drives signaling, we have used advanced analytical methods that enable separation of effects on pathway-specific signaling from those that modify agonist affinity and mapped the functional consequence of receptor modification onto three-dimensional models of a receptor-ligand complex. This yields molecular insights into the initiation of receptor activation and the mechanistic basis for biased agonism. Our data reveal that peptide agonists can engage different elements of the receptor extracellular face to achieve effector coupling and biased signaling providing a foundation for rational design of biased agonists. PMID:27315480

  6. Exendin-4, a GLP-1 receptor agonist, interacts with proteins and their products of digestion to suppress food intake in rats.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Alfred; Anderson, G Harvey

    2003-07-01

    This study investigated the hypotheses that dietary proteins suppress food intake partly through the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) signaling pathway, and that this effect is mediated by products of protein digestion. The GLP-1 receptor agonist, Exendin-4 (Ex-4) (0.5 micro g/rat), was given intraperitoneally to male Wistar rats, and food intake was measured when Ex-4 was given alone or with preloads of intact whey and casein proteins, their hydrolysates and amino acid mixtures (0.5 g x 4 mL(-1) x rat(-1)). Both Ex-4 and the preloads suppressed food intake (P < 0.05), but the effect of Ex-4 on food intake was reduced when coadministered with the preloads (P < 0.05). Because the effect of Ex-4 was reduced by the protein hydrolysates and by the amino acid preloads, the results support a role for the end products of protein digestion and GLP-1 release in the suppression of food intake in response to protein ingestion. We concluded that the GLP-1 signaling pathway, activated by the release of products of protein digestion, is another mechanism accounting for the reduction of food intake after protein ingestion. PMID:12840201

  7. Is GLP-1 a hormone: Whether and When?

    PubMed

    D'Alessio, David

    2016-04-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a product of proglucagon cleavage synthesized in L cells in the intestinal mucosa, α-cells in the pancreatic islet, and neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract. GLP-1 is essential for normal glucose tolerance and acts through a specific GLP-1 receptor that is expressed by islet β-cells as well as other cell types. Because plasma concentrations of GLP-1 increase following meal ingestion it has been generally presumed that GLP-1 acts as a hormone, communicating information from the intestine to the endocrine pancreas through the circulation. However, there are a number of problems with this model including low circulating concentrations of GLP-1 in plasma, limited changes after meal ingestion and rapid metabolism in the plasma. Moreover, antagonism of systemic GLP-1 action impairs insulin secretion in the fasting state, suggesting that the GLP-1r is active even when plasma GLP-1 levels are low and unchanging. Consistent with these observations, deletion of the GLP-1r from islet β-cells causes intolerance after IP or IV glucose, challenges that do not induce GLP-1 secretion. Taken together, these data support a model whereby GLP-1 acts through neural or paracrine mechanisms to regulate physiologic insulin secretion. In contrast, bariatric surgery seems to be a condition in which circulating GLP-1 could have an endocrine effect. Both gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy are associated with substantial increases in postprandial GLP-1 release and in these conditions interference with GLP-1r signaling has a significant impact on glucose regulation after eating. Thus, with either bariatric surgery or treatment with long-acting GLP-1r agonists, circulating peptide mediates insulinotropic activity. Overall, a case can be made that physiologic actions of GLP-1 are not hormonal, but that an endocrine mechanism of GLP-1r activation can be co-opted for therapeutics. PMID:27186356

  8. Evaluation of an [18F]AlF-NOTA Analog of Exendin-4 for Imaging of GLP-1 Receptor in Insulinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kiesewetter, Dale O.; Guo, Ning; Guo, Jinxia; Gao, Haokao; Zhu, Lei; Ma, Ying; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The GLP-1 receptor plays an important role in glucose homeostasis and thus is a very important target for diabetes therapy. The receptor is also overexpressed in insulinoma, a tumor of pancreatic beta-cells. We previously evaluated two fluorine-18-labeled analogs of exendin-4 prepared by conjugation with [18F]FBEM (N-[2-(4-[18F]fluorobenzamide)ethyl]maleimide). Both compounds demonstrated good tumor uptake, but the synthesis of the radiotracers was time consuming. To overcome this challenge, we developed a NOTA analog and performed radiolabeling using aluminum [18F]fluoride complexation. Methods: Cys40-exendin-4 was conjugated with NOTA mono N-ethylmaleimide. [18F]AlF conjugation was conducted and the radiolabeled product purified by preparative HPLC. Dynamic and static PET imaging scans were conducted on nude mice with established INS-1 xenografts. Uptake of tumor and other major organs in static images was quantitated (%ID/g) and comparison with blocking studies was made. PET quantification was also compared with ex vivo biodistribution results. Results: The radiosynthesis provided [18F]AlF-NOTA-MAL-cys40-exendin-4 in 23.6 ± 2.4 % radiochemical yield (uncorrected, n = 3) after HPLC; the process required about 55 min. The specific activity at time of injection ranged from 19.6 to 31.4 GBq (0.53-0.85 Ci)/µmol. Tumor uptake had reached its maximum (16.09 ± 1.18% ID/g, n = 4) by 5 min and remained nearly constant for the duration of the study. Kidney uptake continued to increase throughout the entire one hour time course. Pre-injection of exendin-4 caused a marked reduction in tissue uptake with the major exception of liver and kidneys, in which uptake was not affected. HPLC analysis of the radioactive components in extracts of the tumor and plasma showed primarily parent compound at 60 min post-injection, whereas extracts of kidney and urine contained exclusively one polar radioactive component. Conclusion: The radiotracer is prepared in a simple

  9. Pancreatic and extrapancreatic effects of GLP-1.

    PubMed

    Valverde, I; Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L; Malaisse, W J

    2002-12-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), an incretin hormone which helps to regulate plasma glucose levels, is considered a potential agent for the treatment of type-2 diabetes mellitus, because of its insulinotropic capacity and insulinomimetic actions. In normal conditions, the beta-cell secretory response to GLP-1 is modulated by the extracellular concentration of D-glucose; however, the recognition of D-glucose by the beta-cell is often impaired in type-2 diabetes, and this could impede the full GLP-1 insulinotropic action. Non-glucidic substrates, such as the dimethyl ester of succinic acid, restore the effect of GLP-1 in the isolated perfused rat pancreas of normal or diabetic rats, in the absence of any other exogenous nutrient; likewise, the dimethyl ester of succinic or L-glutamic acid, and the monomethyl ester of pyruvic acid, potentiate the in vivo beta-cell secretory response to GLP-1 in normal and diabetic rats. Therefore, it was proposed that nutrients susceptible to bypass the site-specific defects of the diabetic beta-cell, could be used to potentiate and/or prolong the insulinotropic action of antidiabetic agents such as GLP-1. In vitro, GLP-1 insulin-like effects on glucose metabolism have been documented in normal and diabetic rat liver, and in rat and human skeletal muscle. In rat and human adipocytes, GLP-1 is lipolytic and/or lipogenic, and also stimulates parameters involved in the glucose metabolism. In liver, muscle and fat, GLP-1 seems to act through specific receptors, apparently different--at least in liver and muscle--in structure or signaling pathway from the pancreatic one. It is proposed that an inositolphosphoglycan might be a second messenger of GLP-1 action in extrapancreatic tissues. PMID:12688638

  10. Neuroprotection by Exendin-4 Is GLP-1 Receptor Specific but DA D3 Receptor Dependent, Causing Altered BrdU Incorporation in Subventricular Zone and Substantia Nigra.

    PubMed

    Harkavyi, A; Rampersaud, N; Whitton, P S

    2013-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) activation by exendin-4 (EX-4) is effective in preclinical models of Parkinson's disease (PD) and appears to promote neurogenesis even in severely lesioned rats. In the present study, we determined the effects of EX-4 on cellular BrdU incorporation in the rat subventricular zone (SVZ) and substantia nigra (SN). We also determined the specificity of this effect with the GLP-1R antagonist EX-(9-39) as well as the potential role of dopamine (DA) D3 receptors. Rats were administered 6-OHDA and 1 week later given EX-4 alone, with EX-(9-39) or nafadotride (D3 antagonist) and BrdU. Seven days later, rats were challenged with apomorphine to evaluate circling. Extracellular DA was measured using striatal microdialysis and subsequently tissue DA measured. Tyrosine hydroxylase and BrdU were verified using immunohistochemistry. Apomorphine circling was reversed by EX-4 in lesioned rats, an effect reduced by EX-4, while both EX-(9-39) and NAF attenuated this. 6-OHDA decreased extracellular and tissue DA, both reversed by EX-4 but again attenuated by EX-(9-39) or NAF. Analysis of BrdU+ cells in the SVZ revealed increases in 6-OHDA-treated rats which were reversed by EX-4 and antagonised by either EX-(9-39) or NAF, while in the SN the opposite profile was seen. PMID:26316987

  11. Neuroprotection by Exendin-4 Is GLP-1 Receptor Specific but DA D3 Receptor Dependent, Causing Altered BrdU Incorporation in Subventricular Zone and Substantia Nigra

    PubMed Central

    Harkavyi, A.; Rampersaud, N.; Whitton, P. S.

    2013-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) activation by exendin-4 (EX-4) is effective in preclinical models of Parkinson's disease (PD) and appears to promote neurogenesis even in severely lesioned rats. In the present study, we determined the effects of EX-4 on cellular BrdU incorporation in the rat subventricular zone (SVZ) and substantia nigra (SN). We also determined the specificity of this effect with the GLP-1R antagonist EX-(9-39) as well as the potential role of dopamine (DA) D3 receptors. Rats were administered 6-OHDA and 1 week later given EX-4 alone, with EX-(9-39) or nafadotride (D3 antagonist) and BrdU. Seven days later, rats were challenged with apomorphine to evaluate circling. Extracellular DA was measured using striatal microdialysis and subsequently tissue DA measured. Tyrosine hydroxylase and BrdU were verified using immunohistochemistry. Apomorphine circling was reversed by EX-4 in lesioned rats, an effect reduced by EX-4, while both EX-(9-39) and NAF attenuated this. 6-OHDA decreased extracellular and tissue DA, both reversed by EX-4 but again attenuated by EX-(9-39) or NAF. Analysis of BrdU+ cells in the SVZ revealed increases in 6-OHDA-treated rats which were reversed by EX-4 and antagonised by either EX-(9-39) or NAF, while in the SN the opposite profile was seen. PMID:26316987

  12. Both stimulation of GLP-1 receptors and inhibition of glycogenolysis additively contribute to a protective effect of oral miglitol against ischaemia-reperfusion injury in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Iwasa, Masamitsu; Yamada, Yoshihisa; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Shinji; Kawamura, Itta; Sumi, Shohei; Shiraki, Takeru; Yamaki, Takahiko; Ushikoshi, Hiroaki; Hattori, Arihiro; Aoyama, Takuma; Nishigaki, Kazuhiko; Takemura, Genzou; Fujiwara, Hisayoshi; Minatoguchi, Shinya

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE We previously reported that pre-ischaemic i.v. miglitol reduces myocardial infarct size through the inhibition of glycogenolysis during ischaemia. Oral administration of miglitol has been reported to produce glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). We hypothesized that p.o. administration of miglitol, an absorbable antidiabetic drug, reduces myocardial infarct size by stimulating GLP-1 receptors and inhibiting glycogenolysis in the myocardium. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The effects of p.o. and i.v. administration of miglitol on myocardial infarct size were compared in a rabbit model of ischaemia induced by 30 min of coronary occlusion and 48 h of reperfusion. The levels of phospho(p)-PI3kinase and p-Akt were measured in cardiac tissue by use of Western blot analysis. RESULTS Both p.o. and i.v. administration of miglitol reduced the infarct size, and this effect was greater after p.o. than after i.v. administration under similar plasma miglitol concentrations. The reduction in infarct size induced by p.o. miglitol but not that induced by i.v. miglitol was partially inhibited by treatment with exendin(9-39), a GLP-1 receptor blocker. Both p.o. and i.v. miglitol improved ejection fraction and ±dP/dt after myocardial infarction. Miglitol administered p.o. but not i.v. up-regulated the myocardial expression of phospho(p)-PI3kinase and p-Akt following myocardial infarction; an effect that was inhibited by exendin(9-39). CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Administration of miglitol p.o. reduces myocardial infarct size through stimulation of GLP-1 receptors and activation of PI3kinase-Akt pathway in addition to the inhibition of glycogenolysis. These findings may have clinical implications for the p.o. administration of miglitol for the treatment of patients with diabetes mellitus combined with coronary artery disease. PMID:21426318

  13. Efficacy and Safety of the Once-Daily GLP-1 Receptor Agonist Lixisenatide in Monotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Vivian A.; Alvarado-Ruiz, Ricardo; Raccah, Denis; Boka, Gabor; Miossec, Patrick; Gerich, John E.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess efficacy and safety of lixisenatide monotherapy in type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Randomized, double-blind, 12-week study of 361 patients not on glucose-lowering therapy (HbA1c 7–10%) allocated to one of four once-daily subcutaneous dose increase regimens: lixisenatide 2-step (10 μg for 1 week, 15 μg for 1 week, and then 20 μg; n = 120), lixisenatide 1-step (10 μg for 2 weeks and then 20 μg; n = 119), placebo 2-step (n = 61), or placebo 1-step (n = 61) (placebo groups were combined for analyses). Primary end point was HbA1c change from baseline to week 12. RESULTS Once-daily lixisenatide significantly improved HbA1c (mean baseline 8.0%) in both groups (least squares mean change vs. placebo: −0.54% for 2-step, −0.66% for 1-step; P < 0.0001). Significantly more lixisenatide patients achieved HbA1c <7.0% (52.2% 2-step, 46.5% 1-step) and ≤6.5% (31.9% 2-step, 25.4% 1-step) versus placebo (26.8% and 12.5%, respectively; P < 0.01). Lixisenatide led to marked significant improvements of 2-h postprandial glucose levels and blood glucose excursions measured during a standardized breakfast test. A significant decrease in fasting plasma glucose was observed in both lixisenatide groups versus placebo. Mean decreases in body weight (∼2 kg) were observed in all groups. The most common adverse events were gastrointestinal—nausea was the most frequent (lixisenatide 23% overall, placebo 4.1%). Symptomatic hypoglycemia occurred in 1.7% of lixisenatide and 1.6% of placebo patients, with no severe episodes. Safety/tolerability was similar for the two dose regimens. CONCLUSIONS Once-daily lixisenatide monotherapy significantly improved glycemic control with a pronounced postprandial effect (75% reduction in glucose excursion) and was safe and well tolerated in type 2 diabetes. PMID:22432104

  14. GLP-1, the Gut-Brain, and Brain-Periphery Axes

    PubMed Central

    Cabou, Cendrine; Burcelin, Remy

    2011-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is a gut hormone which directly binds to the GLP-1 receptor located at the surface of the pancreatic β-cells to enhance glucose-induced insulin secretion. In addition to its pancreatic effects, GLP-1 can induce metabolic actions by interacting with its receptors expressed on nerve cells in the gut and the brain. GLP-1 can also be considered as a neuropeptide synthesized by neuronal cells in the brain stem that release the peptide directly into the hypothalamus. In this environment, GLP-1 is assumed to control numerous metabolic and cardiovascular functions such as insulin secretion, glucose production and utilization, and arterial blood flow. However, the exact roles of these two locations in the regulation of glucose homeostasis are not well understood. In this review, we highlight the latest experimental data supporting the role of the gut-brain and brain-periphery axes in the control of glucose homeostasis. We also focus our attention on the relevance of β-cell and brain cell targeting by gut GLP-1 for the regulation of glucose homeostasis. In addition to its action on β-cells, we find that understanding the physiological role of GLP-1 will help to develop GLP-1-based therapies to control glycemia in type 2 diabetes by triggering the gut-brain axis or the brain directly. This pleiotropic action of GLP-1 is an important concept that may help to explain the observation that, during their treatment, type 2 diabetic patients can be identified as 'responders' and 'non-responders'. PMID:22262078

  15. GLP-1 Receptor Agonists

    MedlinePlus

    ... confused. You can learn what to eat or drink to bring your blood glucose level back up to normal. Exenatide and liraglutide can cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, headache, weakness, or dizziness. Some side effects are warning signs of serious conditions. For example, ...

  16. Geniposide acutely stimulates insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells by regulating GLP-1 receptor/cAMP signaling and ion channels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Ding, Yaqin; Zhong, Xiangqin; Guo, Qing; Wang, Hui; Gao, Jingying; Bai, Tao; Ren, Lele; Guo, Yangyan; Jiao, Xiangying; Liu, Yunfeng

    2016-07-15

    Geniposide, an iridoid glycoside, has antidiabetic effects. The present study aimed to evaluate whether geniposide has direct effects on insulin secretion from rat pancreatic islets. The results demonstrated that geniposide potentiated insulin secretion via activating the glucagon-like-1 receptor (GLP-1R) as well as the adenylyl cyclase (AC)/cAMP signaling pathway. Inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA) suppressed the insulinotropic effect of geniposide. Geniposide also inhibited voltage-dependent potassium (Kv) channels, and this effect could be attenuated by inhibition of GLP-1R or PKA. Current-clamp recording showed that geniposide prolonged action potential duration. These results collectively imply that inhibition of Kv channels is linked to geniposide-potentiated insulin secretion by acting downstream of the GLP-1R/cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. Moreover, activation of Ca(2+) channels by geniposide was observed, indicating that the Ca(2+) channel is also an important player in the geniposide effects. Together, these findings provide new insight into the mechanism underlying geniposide-regulated insulin secretion. PMID:27126219

  17. Unraveling oxyntomodulin, GLP1's enigmatic brother

    PubMed Central

    Pocai, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Oxyntomodulin (OXM) is a peptide secreted from the L cells of the gut following nutrient ingestion. OXM is a dual agonist of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP1R) and the glucagon receptor (GCGR) combining the effects of GLP1 and glucagon to act as a potentially more effective treatment for obesity than GLP1R agonists. Injections of OXM in humans cause a significant reduction in weight and appetite, as well as an increase in energy expenditure. Activation of GCGR is classically associated with an elevation in glucose levels, which would be deleterious in patients with T2DM, but the antidiabetic properties of GLP1R agonism would be expected to counteract this effect. Indeed, OXM administration improved glucose tolerance in diet-induced obese mice. Thus, dual agonists of the GCGR and GLP1R represent a new therapeutic approach for diabetes and obesity with the potential for enhanced weight loss and improvement in glycemic control beyond those of GLP1R agonists. PMID:23019069

  18. The non-peptide GLP-1 receptor agonist WB4-24 blocks inflammatory nociception by stimulating β-endorphin release from spinal microglia

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Hui; Gong, Nian; Li, Teng-Fei; Ma, Ai-Niu; Wu, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Ming-Wei; Wang, Yong-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Two peptide agonists of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor, exenatide and GLP-1 itself, exert anti-hypersensitive effects in neuropathic, cancer and diabetic pain. In this study, we have assessed the anti-allodynic and anti-hyperalgesic effects of the non-peptide agonist WB4-24 in inflammatory nociception and the possible involvement of microglial β-endorphin and pro-inflammatory cytokines. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We used rat models of inflammatory nociception induced by formalin, carrageenan or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), to test mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Expression of β-endorphin and pro-inflammatory cytokines was measured using real-time quantitative PCR and fluorescent immunoassays. KEY RESULTS WB4-24 displaced the specific binding of exendin (9–39) in microglia. Single intrathecal injection of WB4-24 (0.3, 1, 3, 10, 30 and 100 μg) exerted dose-dependent, specific, anti-hypersensitive effects in acute and chronic inflammatory nociception induced by formalin, carrageenan and CFA, with a maximal inhibition of 60–80%. Spinal WB4-24 was not effective in altering nociceptive pain. Subcutaneous injection of WB4-24 was also antinociceptive in CFA-treated rats. WB4-24 evoked β-endorphin release but did not inhibit expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in either the spinal cord of CFA-treated rats or cultured microglia stimulated by LPS. WB4-24 anti-allodynia was prevented by a microglial inhibitor, β-endorphin antiserum and a μ-opioid receptor antagonist. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our results suggest that WB4-24 inhibits inflammatory nociception by releasing analgesic β-endorphin rather than inhibiting the expression of proalgesic pro-inflammatory cytokines in spinal microglia, and that the spinal GLP-1 receptor is a potential target molecule for the treatment of pain hypersensitivity including inflammatory nociception. PMID:25176008

  19. Glucogon-like Peptide 1 Receptor (GLP1R) haplotypes correlate with altered response to multiple antipsychotics in the CATIE trial

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Timothy; Brennan, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    Glucogon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP1R) signaling has been shown to have antipsychotic properties in animal models and to impact glucose-dependent insulin release, satiety, memory, and learning in man. Previous work has shown that two coding mutations (rs6923761 and rs1042044) are associated with altered insulin release and cortisol levels. We identified four frequently occurring haplotypes in Caucasians, haplotype 1 through haplotype 4, spanning exons 4-7 and containing the two coding variants. We analyzed response to antiapsychotics, as defined as predicted change in PANSS-Total (dPANSS) at 18 months, in Caucasian subjects from Clinical Antipsychotic Trial of Intervention Effectiveness treated with (olanzapine, n=139; perphenazine, n=78; quetiapine, n=14; risperidone, n=143; and ziprasidone, n=90). Haplotype trend regression analysis revealed significant associations with dPANSS for olanzapine (best p=0.002), perphenazine (best p=0.01), quetiapine (best p=0.008), risperidone (best p=0.02), and ziprasidone (best p=0.007). We also evaluated genetic models for the two most common haplotypes. Haplotype 1 (uniquely including the rs1042044 [Leu260] allele) was associated with better response to olanzapine (p=0.002), and risperidone (p=0.006), and worse response to perphenazine (p=.03), and ziprasidone (p=0.003), with a recessive genetic model providing the best fit. Haplotype 2 (uniquely including the rs6923761 [Ser168] allele) was associated with better response to perphenazine (p=0.001) and worse response to olanzapine (p=.02), with a dominant genetic model providing the best fit. However, GLP1R haplotypes were not associated with antipsychotic-induced weight gain. These results link functional genetic variants in GLP1R to antipsychotic response. PMID:25449714

  20. Type 2 diabetes-induced neuronal pathology in the piriform cortex of the rat is reversed by the GLP-1 receptor agonist exendin-4

    PubMed Central

    Lietzau, Grazyna; Nyström, Thomas; Östenson, Claes-Göran; Darsalia, Vladimer; Patrone, Cesare

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients often present olfactory dysfunction. However, the histopathological basis behind this has not been previously shown. Since the piriform cortex plays a crucial role in olfaction, we hypothesize that pathological changes in this brain area can occur in T2D patients along aging. Thus, we determined potential neuropathology in the piriform cortex of T2D rats, along aging. Furthermore, we determined the potential therapeutic role of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP1-R) agonist exendin-4 to counteract the identified T2D-induced neuropathology. Young-adult and middle-aged T2D Goto-Kakizaki rats were compared to age-matched Wistars. Additional Goto-Kakizaki rats were treated for six weeks with exendin-4/vehicle before sacrifice. Potential T2D-induced neuropathology was assessed by quantifying NeuN-positive neurons and Calbindin-D28k-positive interneurons by immunohistochemistry and stereology methods. We also quantitatively measured Calbindin-D28k neuronal morphology and JNK phosphorylation-mediated cellular stress. PI3K/AKT signalling was assessed by immunohistochemistry, and potential apoptosis by TUNEL. We show T2D-induced neuronal pathology in the piriform cortex along aging, characterized by atypical nuclear NeuN staining and increased JNK phosphorylation, without apoptosis. We also demonstrate the specific vulnerability of Calbindin-D28k interneurons. Finally, chronic treatment with exendin-4 substantially reversed the identified neuronal pathology in correlation with decreased JNK and increased AKT phosphorylation. Our results reveal the histopathological basis to explain T2D olfactory dysfunction. We also show that the identified T2D-neuropathology can be counteracted by GLP-1R activation supporting recent research promoting the use of GLP-1R agonists against brain diseases. Whether the identified neuropathology could represent an early hallmark of cognitive decline in T2D remains to be determined. PMID:26744321

  1. Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP1R) haplotypes correlate with altered response to multiple antipsychotics in the CATIE trial.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Timothy L; Brennan, Mark D

    2014-12-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP1R) signaling has been shown to have antipsychotic properties in animal models and to impact glucose-dependent insulin release, satiety, memory, and learning in man. Previous work has shown that two coding mutations (rs6923761 and rs1042044) are associated with altered insulin release and cortisol levels. We identified four frequently occurring haplotypes in Caucasians, haplotype 1 through haplotype 4, spanning exons 4-7 and containing the two coding variants. We analyzed response to antipsychotics, defined as predicted change in PANSS-Total (dPANSS) at 18 months, in Caucasian subjects from the Clinical Antipsychotic Trial of Intervention Effectiveness treated with olanzapine (n=139), perphenazine (n=78), quetiapine (n=14), risperidone (n=143), and ziprasidone (n=90). Haplotype trend regression analysis revealed significant associations with dPANSS for olanzapine (best p=0.002), perphenazine (best p=0.01), quetiapine (best p=0.008), risperidone (best p=0.02), and ziprasidone (best p=0.007). We also evaluated genetic models for the two most common haplotypes. Haplotype 1 (uniquely including the rs1042044 [Leu(260)] allele) was associated with better response to olanzapine (p=0.002), and risperidone (p=0.006), and worse response to perphenazine (p=.03), and ziprasidone (p=0.003), with a recessive genetic model providing the best fit. Haplotype 2 (uniquely including the rs6923761 [Ser(168)] allele) was associated with better response to perphenazine (p=0.001) and worse response to olanzapine (p=.02), with a dominant genetic model providing the best fit. However, GLP1R haplotypes were not associated with antipsychotic-induced weight gain. These results link functional genetic variants in GLP1R to antipsychotic response. PMID:25449714

  2. Density distribution of free fatty acid receptor 2 (FFA2)-expressing and GLP-1-producing enteroendocrine L cells in human and rat lower intestine, and increased cell numbers after ingestion of fructo-oligosaccharide.

    PubMed

    Kaji, Izumi; Karaki, Shin-Ichiro; Tanaka, Ryo; Kuwahara, Atsukazu

    2011-02-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is a multifunctional hormone in glucose metabolism and intestinal function released by enteroendocrine L-cells. The plasma concentration of GLP-1 is increased by indigestible carbohydrates and luminal infusion of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). However, the triggers and modulators of the GLP-1 release remain unclear. We hypothesized that SCFAs produced by bacterial fermentation are involved in enteroendocrine cell proliferation and hormone release through free fatty acid receptor 2 (FFA2, also known as FFAR2 or GPR43) in the large intestine. Fructo-oligosaccharide (Fructo-OS), fermentable indigestible carbohydrate, was used as a source of SCFAs. Rats were fed an indigestible-carbohydrate-free diet (control) or a 5% Fructo-OS-containing diet for 28 days. FFA2-, GLP-1-, and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-positive enteroendocrine cells were quantified immunohistochemically in the colon, cecum, and terminal ileum. The same analysis was performed in surgical specimens from human lower intestine. The coexpression of FFA2 with GLP-1 was investigated both in rats and humans. Fructo-OS supplementation in rats increased the densities of FFA2-positive enteroendocrine cells in rat proximal colon, by over two-fold, relative to control, in parallel with GLP-1-containing L-cells. The segmental distributions of these cells in human were similar to rats fed the control diet. The FFA2-positive enteroendocrine cells were GLP-1-containing L-cells, but not 5-HT-containing EC cells, in both human and rat colon and terminal ileum. Fermentable indigestible carbohydrate increases the number of FFA2-positive L-cells in the proximal colon. FFA2 activation by SCFAs might be an important trigger for produce and release GLP-1 by enteroendocrine L-cells in the lower intestine. PMID:21113792

  3. Long-Term Exposure of Pancreatic β-Cells to Palmitate Results in SREBP-1C-Dependent Decreases in GLP-1 Receptor Signaling via CREB and AKT and Insulin Secretory Response.

    PubMed

    Natalicchio, Annalisa; Biondi, Giuseppina; Marrano, Nicola; Labarbuta, Rossella; Tortosa, Federica; Spagnuolo, Rosaria; D'Oria, Rossella; Carchia, Emanuele; Leonardini, Anna; Cignarelli, Angelo; Perrini, Sebastio; Laviola, Luigi; Giorgino, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    The effects of prolonged exposure of pancreatic β-cells to high saturated fatty acids on glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) action were investigated. Murine islets, human pancreatic 1.1B4 cells, and rat INS-1E cells were exposed to palmitate for 24 hours. mRNA and protein expression/phosphorylation were measured by real-time RT-PCR and immunoblotting, respectively. Specific short interfering RNAs were used to knockdown expression of the GLP-1 receptor (Glp1r) and Srebf1. Insulin release was assessed with a specific ELISA. Exposure of murine islets, as well as of human and INS-1E β-cells, to palmitate reduced the ability of exendin-4 to augment insulin mRNA levels, protein content, and release. In addition, palmitate blocked exendin-4-stimulated cAMP-response element-binding protein and v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog phosphorylation, whereas phosphorylation of MAPK-ERK kinase-1/2 and ERK-1/2 was not altered. Similarly, RNA interference-mediated suppression of Glp1r expression prevented exendin-4-induced cAMP-response element-binding protein and v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog phosphorylation, but did not impair exendin-4 stimulation of MAPK-ERK kinase-1/2 and ERK-1/2. Both islets from mice fed a high fat diet and human and INS-1E β-cells exposed to palmitate showed reduced GLP-1 receptor and pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1 (PDX-1) and increased sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP-1C) mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, suppression of SREBP-1C protein expression prevented the reduction of PDX-1 and GLP-1 receptor levels and restored exendin-4 signaling and action. Finally, treatment of INS-1E cells with metformin for 24 h resulted in inhibition of SREBP-1C expression, increased PDX-1 and GLP-1 receptor levels, consequently, enhancement of exendin-4-induced insulin release. Palmitate impairs exendin-4 effects on β-cells by reducing PDX-1 and GLP-1 receptor expression and signaling in a SREBP-1C-dependent manner. Metformin

  4. Acting on Hormone Receptors with Minimal Side Effect on Cell Proliferation: A Timely Challenge Illustrated with GLP-1R and GPER

    PubMed Central

    Gigoux, Véronique; Fourmy, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a large family of receptors that sense molecules outside the cell and activate inside signal transduction pathways and cellular responses. GPCR are involved in a wide variety of physiological processes, including in the neuroendocrine system. GPCR are also involved in many diseases and are the target of 30% of marketed medicinal drugs. Whereas the majority of the GPCR-targeting drugs have proved their therapeutic benefit, some of them were associated with undesired effects. We develop two examples of used drugs whose therapeutic benefits are tarnished by carcinogenesis risks. The chronic administration of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogs widely used to treat type-2 diabetes was associated with an increased risk of pancreatic or thyroid cancers. The long-term treatment with the estrogen antagonist tamoxifen, developed to target breast cancer overexpressing estrogen receptors ER, presents agonist activity on the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor which is associated with an increased incidence of endometrial cancer and breast cancer resistance to hormonotherapy. We point out and discuss the need of pharmacological studies to understand and overcome the undesired effects associated with the chronic administration of GPCR ligands. In fact, biological effects triggered by GPCR often result from the activation of multiple intracellular signaling pathways. Deciphering which signaling networks are engaged following GPCR activation appears to be primordial to unveil their contribution in the physiological and physiopathological processes. The development of biased agonists to elucidate the role of the different signaling mechanisms mediated by GPCR activation will allow the generation of new therapeutic agents with improved efficacy and reduced side effects. In this regard, the identification of GLP-1R biased ligands promoting insulin secretion without inducing pro-tumoral effects would offer therapeutic benefit. PMID

  5. GLP-1 and weight loss: unraveling the diverse neural circuitry.

    PubMed

    Kanoski, Scott E; Hayes, Matthew R; Skibicka, Karolina P

    2016-05-15

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is currently one of the most promising biological systems for the development of effective obesity pharmacotherapies. Long-acting GLP-1 analogs potently reduce food intake and body weight, and recent discoveries reveal that peripheral administration of these drugs reduces food intake largely through humoral pathways involving direct action on brain GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1R). Thus, it is of critical importance to understand the neural systems through which GLP-1 and long-acting GLP-1 analogs reduce food intake and body weight. In this review, we discuss several neural, physiological, cellular and molecular, as well as behavioral mechanisms through which peripheral and central GLP-1R signaling reduces feeding. Particular attention is devoted to discussion regarding the numerous neural substrates through which GLP-1 and GLP-1 analogs act to reduce food intake and body weight, including various hypothalamic nuclei (arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus, periventricular hypothalamus, lateral hypothalamic area), hindbrain nuclei (parabrachial nucleus, medial nucleus tractus solitarius), hippocampus (ventral subregion; vHP), and nuclei embedded within the mesolimbic reward circuitry [ventral tegmental area (VTA) and nucleus accumbens (NAc)]. In some of these nuclei [VTA, NAc, and vHP], GLP-1R activation reduces food intake and body weight without concomitant nausea responses, suggesting that targeting these specific pathways may be of particular interest for future obesity pharmacotherapy. The widely distributed neural systems through which GLP-1 and GLP-1 analogs act to reduce body weight highlight the complexity of the neural systems regulating energy balance, as well as the challenges for developing effective obesity pharmacotherapies that reduce feeding without producing parallel negative side effects. PMID:27030669

  6. Endogenous GLP1 and GLP1 analogue alter CNS responses to palatable food consumption.

    PubMed

    Ten Kulve, Jennifer S; Veltman, Dick J; van Bloemendaal, Liselotte; Groot, Paul F C; Ruhé, Henricus G; Barkhof, Frederik; Diamant, Michaela; Ijzerman, Richard G

    2016-04-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) affects appetite, supposedly mediated via the central nervous system (CNS). In this study, we investigate whether modulation of CNS responses to palatable food consumption may be a mechanism by which GLP1 contributes to the central regulation of feeding. Using functional MRI, we determined the effects of endogenous GLP1 and treatment with the GLP1 analogue liraglutide on CNS activation to chocolate milk receipt. Study 1 included 20 healthy lean individuals and 20 obese patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Scans were performed on two occasions: during infusion of the GLP1 receptor antagonist exendin 9-39 (blocking actions of endogenous GLP1) and during placebo infusion. Study 2 was a randomised, cross-over intervention study carried out in 20 T2DM patients, comparing treatment with liraglutide to insulin, after 10 days and 12 weeks. Compared with lean individuals, T2DM patients showed reduced activation to chocolate milk in right insula (P = 0.04). In lean individuals, blockade of endogenous GLP1 effects inhibited activation in bilateral insula (P ≤ 0.03). Treatment in T2DM with liraglutide, vs insulin, increased activation to chocolate milk in right insula and caudate nucleus after 10 days (P ≤ 0.03); however, these effects ceased to be significant after 12 weeks. Our findings in healthy lean individuals indicate that endogenous GLP1 is involved in the central regulation of feeding by affecting central responsiveness to palatable food consumption. In obese T2DM, treatment with liraglutide may improve the observed deficit in responsiveness to palatable food, which may contribute to the induction of weight loss observed during treatment. However, no long-term effects of liraglutide were observed. PMID:26769912

  7. The GLP-1 Receptor Agonist Liraglutide Improves Memory Function and Increases Hippocampal CA1 Neuronal Numbers in a Senescence-Accelerated Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Henrik H.; Fabricius, Katrine; Barkholt, Pernille; Niehoff, Michael L.; Morley, John E.; Jelsing, Jacob; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Farr, Susan A.; Vrang, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies indicate that glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists, currently used in the management of type 2 diabetes, exhibit neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects in amyloid-β (Aβ) toxicity models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We investigated the potential pro-cognitive and neuroprotective effects of the once-daily GLP-1 receptor agonist liraglutide in senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) mice, a model of age-related sporadic AD not dominated by amyloid plaques. Six-month-old SAMP8 mice received liraglutide (100 or 500 μg/kg/day, s.c.) or vehicle once daily for 4 months. Vehicle-dosed age-matched 50% back-crossed as well as untreated young (4-month-old) SAMP8 mice were used as control groups for normal memory function. Vehicle-dosed 10-month-old SAMP8 mice showed significant learning and memory retention deficits in an active-avoidance T-maze, as compared to both control groups. Also, 10-month-old SAMP8 mice displayed no immunohistological signatures of amyloid-β plaques or hyperphosphorylated tau, indicating the onset of cognitive deficits prior to deposition of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in this AD model. Liraglutide significantly increased memory retention and total hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neuron numbers in SAMP8 mice, as compared to age-matched vehicle-dosed SAMP8 mice. In conclusion, liraglutide delayed or partially halted the progressive decline in memory function associated with hippocampal neuronal loss in a mouse model of pathological aging with characteristics of neurobehavioral and neuropathological impairments observed in early-stage sporadic AD. PMID:25869785

  8. Characterization of liraglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, in rat partial and full nigral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Henrik H; Fabricius, Katrine; Barkholt, Pernille; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Jelsing, Jacob; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Vrang, Niels

    2016-09-01

    Exendin-4, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, have been demonstrated to promote neuroprotection in the rat 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) neurotoxin model of Parkinson's disease (PD), a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive nigrostriatal dopaminergic neuron loss. In this report, we characterized the effect of a long-acting GLP-1 receptor agonist, liraglutide (500µg/kg/day, s.c.) in the context of a partial or advanced (full) 6-OHDA induced nigral lesion in the rat. Rats received a low (3µg, partial lesion) or high (13.5µg, full lesion) 6-OHDA dose stereotaxically injected into the right medial forebrain bundle (n=17-20 rats per experimental group). Six weeks after induction of a partial nigral dopaminergic lesion, vehicle or liraglutide was administered for four weeks. In the full lesion model, vehicle dosing or liraglutide treatment was applied for a total of six weeks starting three weeks pre-lesion, or administered for three weeks starting on the lesion day. Quantitative stereology was applied to assess the total number of midbrain tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive dopaminergic neurons. As compared to vehicle controls, liraglutide had no effect on the rotational responsiveness to d-amphetamine or apomorphine, respectively. In correspondence, while numbers of TH-positive nigral neurons were significantly reduced in the lesion side (partial lesion ≈55%; full lesion ≈90%) liraglutide administration had no influence dopaminergic neuronal loss in either PD model setting. In conclusion, liraglutide showed no neuroprotective effects in the context of moderate or substantial midbrain dopaminergic neuronal loss and associated functional motor deficits in the rat 6-OHDA lesion model of PD. PMID:27233809

  9. The GLP-1 Receptor Agonist Liraglutide Improves Memory Function and Increases Hippocampal CA1 Neuronal Numbers in a Senescence-Accelerated Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Henrik H; Fabricius, Katrine; Barkholt, Pernille; Niehoff, Michael L; Morley, John E; Jelsing, Jacob; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Farr, Susan A; Vrang, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists, currently used in the management of type 2 diabetes, exhibit neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects in amyloid-β (Aβ) toxicity models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We investigated the potential pro-cognitive and neuroprotective effects of the once-daily GLP-1 receptor agonist liraglutide in senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) mice, a model of age-related sporadic AD not dominated by amyloid plaques. Six-month-old SAMP8 mice received liraglutide (100 or 500 μg/kg/day, s.c.) or vehicle once daily for 4 months. Vehicle-dosed age-matched 50% back-crossed as well as untreated young (4-month-old) SAMP8 mice were used as control groups for normal memory function. Vehicle-dosed 10-month-old SAMP8 mice showed significant learning and memory retention deficits in an active-avoidance T-maze, as compared to both control groups. Also, 10-month-old SAMP8 mice displayed no immunohistological signatures of amyloid-β plaques or hyperphosphorylated tau, indicating the onset of cognitive deficits prior to deposition of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in this AD model. Liraglutide significantly increased memory retention and total hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neuron numbers in SAMP8 mice, as compared to age-matched vehicle-dosed SAMP8 mice. In conclusion, liraglutide delayed or partially halted the progressive decline in memory function associated with hippocampal neuronal loss in a mouse model of pathological aging with characteristics of neurobehavioral and neuropathological impairments observed in early-stage sporadic AD. PMID:25869785

  10. Pharmacologic stimulation of central GLP-1 receptors has opposite effects on the alterations of plasma FGF21 levels induced by feeding and fasting.

    PubMed

    Nonogaki, Katsunori; Kaji, Takao; Yamazaki, Tomoe; Murakami, Mari

    2016-01-26

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) functions as an endocrine hormone to regulate energy metabolism. Circulating FGF21 is derived from the liver and is produced in response to alterations of nutritional status. Here we show the effects of liraglutide, a human glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, injected into the third cerebral ventricle on body weight and plasma FGF21 levels in free-feeding mice, food-deprived mice, and mice provided 1g after the injection. In free-feeding mice, liraglutide (5-100μg/kg) injected into the third cerebral ventricle suppressed food intake and body weight after 24h in a dose-dependent manner. Liraglutide (50 and 100μg/kg) significantly increased plasma FGF21 levels and hepatic FGF21 expression, whereas smaller doses (5 and 10μg/kg) had no effect. In food-deprived mice, body weight did not differ significantly between the saline control and liraglutide-treated groups, but liraglutide (100μg/kg) significantly decreased plasma FGF21 levels at 24h compared with the saline control. In mice provided 1g food, body weight did not differ significantly between the saline control and liraglutide-treated groups, but liraglutide (50μg/kg) significantly decreased plasma FGF21 levels at 24h compared with the saline control. These findings suggest that intracerebral injection of liraglutide decreases body weight by inhibiting food intake and increases plasma FGF21 levels in free-feeding mice, whereas it suppresses the elevations of plasma FGF21 levels induced by fasting or the restricted feeding. Thus, pharmacologic stimulation of central GLP-1 receptors has opposite effects on the alterations of plasma FGF21 levels induced by feeding and fasting. PMID:26683903

  11. Systemic bile acid sensing by G protein-coupled bile acid receptor 1 (GPBAR1) promotes PYY and GLP-1 release

    PubMed Central

    Ullmer, C; Alvarez Sanchez, R; Sprecher, U; Raab, S; Mattei, P; Dehmlow, H; Sewing, S; Iglesias, A; Beauchamp, J; Conde-Knape, K

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Nutrient sensing in the gut is believed to be accomplished through activation of GPCRs expressed on enteroendocrine cells. In particular, L-cells located predominantly in distal regions of the gut secrete glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and peptide tyrosine-tyrosine (PYY) upon stimulation by nutrients and bile acids (BA). The study was designed to address the mechanism of hormone secretion in L-cells stimulated by the BA receptor G protein-coupled bile acid receptor 1 (GPBAR1). Experimental Approach A novel, selective, orally bioavailable, and potent GPBAR1 agonist, RO5527239, was synthesized in order to investigate L-cell secretion in vitro and in vivo in mice and monkey. In analogy to BA, RO5527239 was conjugated with taurine to reduce p.o. bioavailability yet retaining its potency. Using RO5527239 and tauro-RO5527239, the acute secretion effects on L-cells were addressed via different routes of administration. Key Results GPBAR1 signalling triggers the co-secretion of PYY and GLP-1, and leads to improved glucose tolerance. The strong correlation of plasma drug exposure and plasma PYY levels suggests activation of GPBAR1 from systemically accessible compartments. In contrast to the orally bioavailable agonist RO5527239, we show that tauro-RO5527239 triggers PYY release only when applied intravenously. Compared to mice, a slower and more sustained PYY secretion was observed in monkeys. Conclusion and Implications Selective GPBAR1 activation elicits a strong secretagogue effect on L-cells, which primarily requires systemic exposure. We suggest that GPBAR1 is a key player in the intestinal proximal-distal loop that mediates the early phase of nutrient-evoked L-cell secretion effects. PMID:23488746

  12. Peripheral, but not central, GLP-1 receptor signaling is required for improvement in glucose tolerance after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass in mice.

    PubMed

    Carmody, Jill S; Muñoz, Rodrigo; Yin, Huali; Kaplan, Lee M

    2016-05-15

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) causes profound weight loss and remission of diabetes by influencing metabolic physiology, yet the mechanisms behind these clinical improvements remain undefined. After RYGB, levels of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a hormone that enhances insulin secretion and promotes satiation, are substantially elevated. Because GLP-1 signals in both the periphery and the brain to influence energy balance and glucose regulation, we aimed to determine the relative requirements of these systems to weight loss and improved glucose tolerance following RYGB surgery in mice. By pharmacologically blocking peripheral or central GLP-1R signaling, we examined whether GLP-1 action is necessary for the metabolic improvements observed after RYGB. Diet-induced obese mice underwent RYGB or sham operation and were implanted with osmotic pumps delivering the GLP-1R antagonist exendin-(9-39) (2 pmol·kg(-1)·min(-1) peripherally; 0.5 pmol·kg(-1)·min(-1) centrally) for up to 10 wk. Blockade of peripheral GLP-1R signaling partially reversed the improvement in glucose tolerance after RYGB. In contrast, fasting glucose and insulin sensitivity, as well as body weight, were unaffected by GLP-1R antagonism. Central GLP-1R signaling did not appear to be required for any of the metabolic improvements seen after this operation. Collectively, these results suggest a detectable but only modest role for GLP-1 in mediating the effects of RYGB and that this role is limited to its well-described action on glucose regulation. PMID:27026085

  13. GLP-1 is both anxiogenic and antidepressant; divergent effects of acute and chronic GLP-1 on emotionality.

    PubMed

    Anderberg, Rozita H; Richard, Jennifer E; Hansson, Caroline; Nissbrandt, Hans; Bergquist, Filip; Skibicka, Karolina P

    2016-03-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), produced in the intestine and hindbrain, is known for its glucoregulatory and appetite suppressing effects. GLP-1 agonists are in clinical use for treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity. GLP-1, however, may also affect brain areas associated with emotionality regulation. Here we aimed to characterize acute and chronic impact of GLP-1 on anxiety and depression-like behavior. Rats were subjected to anxiety and depression behavior tests following acute or chronic intracerebroventricular or intra-dorsal raphe (DR) application of GLP-1 receptor agonists. Serotonin or serotonin-related genes were also measured in the amygdala, DR and the hippocampus. We demonstrate that both GLP-1 and its long lasting analog, Exendin-4, induce anxiety-like behavior in three rodent tests of this behavior: black and white box, elevated plus maze and open field test when acutely administered intraperitoneally, into the lateral ventricle, or directly into the DR. Acute central GLP-1 receptor stimulation also altered serotonin signaling in the amygdala. In contrast, chronic central administration of Exendin-4 did not alter anxiety-like behavior but significantly reduced depression-like behavior in the forced swim test. Importantly, this positive effect of Exendin-4 was not due to significant body weight loss and reduced food intake, since rats pair-fed to Exendin-4 rats did not show altered mood. Collectively we show a striking impact of central GLP-1 on emotionality and the amygdala serotonin signaling that is divergent under acute versus chronic GLP-1 activation conditions. We also find a novel role for the DR GLP-1 receptors in regulation of behavior. These results may have direct relevance to the clinic, and indicate that Exendin-4 may be especially useful for obese patients manifesting with comorbid depression. PMID:26724568

  14. Proteomic Analysis of INS-1 Rat Insulinoma Cells: ER Stress Effects and the Protective Role of Exenatide, a GLP-1 Receptor Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Kyung; Cho, Jin-Hwan; Lee, Jae-Jin; Son, Moon-Ho; Lee, Kong-Joo

    2015-01-01

    Beta cell death caused by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a key factor aggravating type 2 diabetes. Exenatide, a glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 receptor agonist, prevents beta cell death induced by thapsigargin, a selective inhibitor of ER calcium storage. Here, we report on our proteomic studies designed to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. We conducted comparative proteomic analyses of cellular protein profiles during thapsigargin-induced cell death in the absence and presence of exenatide in INS-1 rat insulinoma cells. Thapsigargin altered cellular proteins involved in metabolic processes and protein folding, whose alterations were variably modified by exenatide treatment. We categorized the proteins with thapsigargin initiated alterations into three groups: those whose alterations were 1) reversed by exenatide, 2) exaggerated by exenatide, and 3) unchanged by exenatide. The most significant effect of thapsigargin on INS-1 cells relevant to their apoptosis was the appearance of newly modified spots of heat shock proteins, thimet oligopeptidase and 14-3-3β, ε, and θ, and the prevention of their appearance by exenatide, suggesting that these proteins play major roles. We also found that various modifications in 14-3-3 isoforms, which precede their appearance and promote INS-1 cell death. This study provides insights into the mechanisms in ER stress-caused INS-1 cell death and its prevention by exenatide. PMID:25793496

  15. [Impact of anti-diabetic therapy based on glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists on the cardiovascular risk of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Camafort-Babkowski, Miguel

    2013-08-17

    Anti-diabetic drugs have, in addition to their well-known glucose lowering-effect, different effects in the rest of cardiovascular factors that are associated with diabetes mellitus. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists have recently been incorporated to the therapeutic arsenal of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The objective of this review is to summarize the available evidence on the effect of the GLP-1 receptor agonists on different cardiovascular risk factors, mediated by the effect of GLP-1 receptor agonists on the control of hyperglycaemia and the GLP-1 receptor agonists effect on other cardiovascular risk factors (weight control, blood pressure control, lipid profile and all other cardiovascular risk biomarkers). In addition, we present the emerging evidence with regards to the impact that GLP-1 receptor agonists therapy could have in the reduction of cardiovascular events and the currently ongoing studies addressing this issue. PMID:23332622

  16. A novel dual GLP-1 and GIP incretin receptor agonist is neuroprotective in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease by reducing chronic inflammation in the brain.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lijun; Li, Dongfang; Feng, Peng; Li, Lin; Xue, Guo-Fang; Li, Guanglai; Hölscher, Christian

    2016-04-13

    The incretins glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) are growth factors. GLP-1 mimetics are on the market as treatments for type 2 diabetes. Both GLP-1 and GIP mimetics have shown neuroprotective properties in previous studies. In addition, the GLP-1 mimetic exendin-4 has shown protective effects in a clinical trial in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Novel GLP-1/GIP dual-agonist peptides have been developed to treat diabetes. Here, we report the neuroprotective effects of a novel dual agonist (DA-JC1) in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of PD. MPTP was injected once daily (20 mg/kg intraperitoneally) for 7 days and the dual agonist was coinjected once daily (50 nmol/kg intraperitoneally). We found that the drug reduced most of the MPTP-induced motor impairments in the rotarod, open-field locomotion, and muscle strength test. The number of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neurons in the substantia nigra and striatum was reduced by MPTP and increased by DA-JC1. Synapse numbers (synaptophysin expression) were reduced in the substantia nigra and the striatum by MPTP and DA-JC1 reversed this effect. The activation of a chronic inflammation response by MPTP was considerably reduced by the dual agonist (DA) (astroglia and microglia activation). Therefore, dual agonists show promise as a novel treatment of PD. PMID:26918675

  17. Inflammation Meets Metabolic Disease: Gut Feeling Mediated by GLP-1

    PubMed Central

    Zietek, Tamara; Rath, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Chronic diseases, such as obesity and diabetes, cardiovascular, and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) share common features in their pathology. Metabolic disorders exhibit strong inflammatory underpinnings and vice versa, inflammation is associated with metabolic alterations. Next to cytokines and cellular stress pathways, such as the unfolded protein response (UPR), alterations in the enteroendocrine system are intersections of various pathologies. Enteroendocrine cells (EEC) have been studied extensively for their ability to regulate gastrointestinal motility, secretion, and insulin release by release of peptide hormones. In particular, the L-cell-derived incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) has gained enormous attention due to its insulinotropic action and relevance in the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Yet, accumulating data indicate a critical role for EEC and in particular for GLP-1 in metabolic adaptation and in orchestrating immune responses beyond blood glucose control. EEC sense the lamina propria and luminal environment, including the microbiota via receptors and transporters. Subsequently, mediating signals by secreting hormones and cytokines, EEC can be considered as integrators of metabolic and inflammatory signaling. This review focuses on L cell and GLP-1 functions in the context of metabolic and inflammatory diseases. The effects of incretin-based therapies on metabolism and immune system are discussed and the interrelation and common features of metabolic and immune-mediated disorders are highlighted. Moreover, it presents data on the impact of inflammation, in particular of IBD on EEC and discusses the potential role of the microbiota as link between nutrients, metabolism, immunity, and disease. PMID:27148273

  18. In vivo dual-delivery of glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4) inhibitor through composites prepared by microfluidics for diabetes therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, F.; Shrestha, N.; Gomes, M. J.; Herranz-Blanco, B.; Liu, D.; Hirvonen, J. J.; Granja, P. L.; Santos, H. A.; Sarmento, B.

    2016-05-01

    Oral delivery of proteins is still a challenge in the pharmaceutical field. Nanoparticles are among the most promising carrier systems for the oral delivery of proteins by increasing their oral bioavailability. However, most of the existent data regarding nanosystems for oral protein delivery is from in vitro studies, lacking in vivo experiments to evaluate the efficacy of these systems. Herein, a multifunctional composite system, tailored by droplet microfluidics, was used for dual delivery of glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor (iDPP4) in vivo. Oral delivery of GLP-1 with nano- or micro-systems has been studied before, but the simultaneous nanodelivery of GLP-1 with iDPP4 is a novel strategy presented here. The type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) rat model, induced through the combined administration of streptozotocin and nicotinamide, a non-obese model of T2DM, was used. The combination of both drugs resulted in an increase in the hypoglycemic effects in a sustained, but prolonged manner, where the iDPP4 improved the therapeutic efficacy of GLP-1. Four hours after the oral administration of the system, blood glucose levels were decreased by 44%, and were constant for another 4 h, representing half of the glucose area under the curve when compared to the control. An enhancement of the plasmatic insulin levels was also observed 6 h after the oral administration of the dual-drug composite system and, although no statistically significant differences existed, the amount of pancreatic insulin was also higher. These are promising results for the oral delivery of GLP-1 to be pursued further in a chronic diabetic model study.

  19. A new angle for glp-1 receptor agonist: the medical economics argument. Editorial on: Huetson P, Palmer JL, Levorsen A, et al. Cost-effectiveness of the once-daily glp-1 receptor agonist lixisenatide compared to bolus insulin both in combination with basal insulin for the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes in Norway. J Med Econ 2015: 1-13 [Epub ahead of print].

    PubMed

    Valencia, Willy Marcos; Florez, Hermes Jose

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RA) are relatively new medications for diabetes that offer a weight-loss profile that can be considered desirable for patients with both type 2 diabetes (T2D) and obesity. GLP-1 RA are effective in combination with insulin, and even slightly superior or at least equal to short-acting insulin in T2D; however, since they work in the incretin system, they may not be effective in long-standing disease. Additionally, only recently have publications reported their cardiovascular safety, and there is limited evidence for long-term effectiveness. The work presented by Huetson et al. offers a much needed perspective through a medical economic model for the long term cost-effectiveness of GLP-1 RA. The authors found benefits in quality-adjusted life years and reduced lifetime healthcare costs. While there are a few limitations, this study contributes to the understanding of these agents and their impact on the epidemics of obesity in T2D, where weight management is no longer an option, but an essential component of the diabetes plan of care. PMID:26337323

  20. Incretin therapies: highlighting common features and differences in the modes of action of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Nauck, M

    2016-03-01

    Over the last few years, incretin-based therapies have emerged as important agents in the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D). These agents exert their effect via the incretin system, specifically targeting the receptor for the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), which is partly responsible for augmenting glucose-dependent insulin secretion in response to nutrient intake (the 'incretin effect'). In patients with T2D, pharmacological doses/concentrations of GLP-1 can compensate for the inability of diabetic β cells to respond to the main incretin hormone glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, and this is therefore a suitable parent compound for incretin-based glucose-lowering medications. Two classes of incretin-based therapies are available: GLP-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors. GLP-1RAs promote GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) signalling by providing GLP-1R stimulation through 'incretin mimetics' circulating at pharmacological concentrations, whereas DPP-4 inhibitors prevent the degradation of endogenously released GLP-1. Both agents produce reductions in plasma glucose and, as a result of their glucose-dependent mode of action, this is associated with low rates of hypoglycaemia; however, there are distinct modes of action resulting in differing efficacy and tolerability profiles. Furthermore, as their actions are not restricted to stimulating insulin secretion, these agents have also been associated with additional non-glycaemic benefits such as weight loss, improvements in β-cell function and cardiovascular risk markers. These attributes have made incretin therapies attractive treatments for the management of T2D and have presented physicians with an opportunity to tailor treatment plans. This review endeavours to outline the commonalities and differences among incretin-based therapies and to provide guidance regarding agents most suitable for treating T2D in individual patients. PMID:26489970

  1. The DPP-4 inhibitor linagliptin and the GLP-1 receptor agonist exendin-4 improve endothelium-dependent relaxation of rat mesenteric arteries in the presence of high glucose.

    PubMed

    Salheen, S M; Panchapakesan, U; Pollock, C A; Woodman, O L

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of the DPP-4 inhibitors and GLP-1R agonist, exendin-4 on the mechanism(s) of endothelium-dependent relaxation in rat mesenteric arteries exposed to high glucose concentration (40 mM). Organ bath techniques were employed to investigate vascular endothelial function in rat mesenteric arteries in the presence of normal (11 mM) or high (40 mM) glucose concentrations. Pharmacological tools (1μM TRAM-34, 1μM apamin, 100 nM Ibtx, 100 μM l-NNA, 10 μM ODQ) were used to distinguish between NO and EDHF-mediated relaxation. Superoxide anion levels were assessed by L-012 and lucigenin enhanced-chemiluminescence techniques. Incubation of mesenteric rings with high glucose for 2 h caused a significant increase in superoxide anion generation and a significant impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxation. Exendin-4 and DPP-4 inhibitor linagliptin, but not sitagliptin or vildagliptin, significantly reduced vascular superoxide and improved endothelium-dependent relaxation in the presence of high glucose. The beneficial actions of exendin-4, but not linagliptin, were attenuated by the GLP-1R antagonist exendin fragment (9-39). Further experiments demonstrated that the presence of high glucose impaired the contribution of both nitric oxide and endothelium-dependent hyperpolarisation to relaxation and that linagliptin improved both mechanisms involved in endothelium-dependent relaxation. These findings demonstrate that high glucose impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation can be improved by exendin-4 and linagliptin, likely due to their antioxidant activity and independently of any glucose lowering effect. PMID:25697548

  2. Heterobivalent GLP-1/Glibenclamide for Targeting Pancreatic β-cells

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Nathaniel J.; Chung, Woo Jin; Weber, Craig; Ananthakrishnan, Kameswari; Anderson, Miranda; Patek, Renata; Zhang, Zhanyu; Limesand, Sean W.; Vagner, Josef; Lynch, Ronald M.

    2014-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide (G)-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) linked cell signaling cascades are initiated upon binding of a specific agonist ligand to its cell surface receptor. Linking multiple heterologous ligands that simultaneously bind and potentially cross-link different receptors on the cell surface is a unique approach to modulate cell responses. Moreover, if the target receptors are pre-selected, based on analysis of cell specific expression of a receptor combination, then the linked binding elements may provide enhanced specificity of targeting to the cell type of interest; i.e., only to cells that express the complementary receptors. Two receptors whose expression is relatively specific, as a combination, to the insulin secreting β-cell of the pancreas, are the sulfonylurea-1 (SUR1) and the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptors. A heterobivalent ligand was assembled of the active fragment of GLP-1 ([Phe12, Arg36] 7-36 GLP-1) and glibenclamide,a small organic ligand to the SUR1. The synthetic construct was labelled with Cy5 or Europium chelated in DTPA to evaluate binding to β-cell lines using fluorescence microscopy or time-resolved saturation and competition binding assays, respectively. Once the ligand binds to β-cells, it is rapidly capped and presumably removed from the cell surface via endocytosis. The bivalent ligand had an affinity ~3 fold higher than monomeric Europium labelled GLP-1, likely due to cooperative binding to the complimentary receptors on the βTC3 cells. The high affinity binding was lost in the presence of either unlabelled monomer demonstrating that interaction with both receptors is required for the enhanced binding at low concentrations. Importantly, bivalent enhancement was accomplished in a cell system with physiological levels of expression of the complementary receptors, indicating that this approach may be applicable for β-cell targeting in vivo. PMID:24259278

  3. Functional coupling of Cys-226 and Cys-296 in the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor indicates a disulfide bond that is close to the activation pocket.

    PubMed

    Mann, Rosalind J; Al-Sabah, Suleiman; de Maturana, Rakel López; Sinfield, John K; Donnelly, Dan

    2010-12-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven transmembrane α-helical (7TM) integral membrane proteins that play a central role in both cell signaling and in the action of many pharmaceuticals. The crystal structures of several Family A GPCRs have shown the presence of a disulfide bond linking transmembrane helix 3 (TM3) to the second extracellular loop (ECL2), enabling ECL2 to stabilize and contribute to the ligand binding pocket. Family B GPCRs share no significant sequence identity with those in Family A but nevertheless share two conserved cysteines in topologically equivalent positions. Since there are no available crystal structures for the 7TM domain of any Family B GPCR, we used mutagenesis alongside pharmacological analysis to investigate the role of ECL2 and the conserved cysteine residues. We mutated Cys-226, at the extracellular end of TM3 of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor, to alanine and observed a 38-fold reduction in GLP-1 potency. Interestingly, this potency loss was restored by the additional substitution of Cys-296 in ECL2 to alanine. Alongside the complete conservation of these cysteine residues in Family B GPCRs, this functional coupling suggested the presence of a disulfide bond. Further mutagenesis demonstrated that the low potency observed at the C226A mutant, compared with the C226A-C296A double mutant, was the result of the bulky nature of the released Cys-296 side chain. Since this suggested that ECL2 was in close proximity to the agonist activation pocket, an alanine scan of ECL2 was carried out which confirmed the important role of this loop in agonist-induced receptor activation. PMID:20869417

  4. Intestinal Bile Acid Composition Modulates Prohormone Convertase 1/3 (PC1/3) Expression and Consequent GLP-1 Production in Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Kohkichi; Watanabe, Mitsuhiro; Sugizaki, Taichi; Irie, Jun-ichiro; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    Besides an established medication for hypercholesterolemia, bile acid binding resins (BABRs) present antidiabetic effects. Although the mechanisms underlying these effects are still enigmatic, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) appears to be involved. In addition to a few reported mechanisms, we propose prohormone convertase 1/3 (PC1/3), an essential enzyme of GLP-1 production, as a potent molecule in the GLP-1 release induced by BABRs. In our study, the BABR colestimide leads to a bile acid-specific G protein-coupled receptor TGR5-dependent induction of PC1/3 gene expression. Here, we focused on the alteration of intestinal bile acid composition and consequent increase of total TGR5 agonistic activity to explain the TGR5 activation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that nuclear factor of activated T cells mediates the TGR5-triggered PC1/3 gene expression. Altogether, our data indicate that the TGR5-dependent intestinal PC1/3 gene expression supports the BABR-stimulated GLP-1 release. We also propose a combination of BABR and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor in the context of GLP-1-based antidiabetic therapy. PMID:26789236

  5. Treatment of antipsychotic-associated obesity with a GLP-1 receptor agonist—protocol for an investigator-initiated prospective, randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blinded intervention study: the TAO study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Ishøy, Pelle L; Knop, Filip K; Broberg, Brian V; Baandrup, Lone; Fagerlund, Birgitte; Jørgensen, Niklas R; Andersen, Ulrik B; Rostrup, Egill; Glenthøj, Birte Y; Ebdrup, Bjørn H

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Antipsychotic medication is widely associated with dysmetabolism including obesity and type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular-related diseases and early death. Obesity is considered the single most important risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Interventions against antipsychotic-associated obesity are limited and insufficient. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, but their bodyweight-lowering effects have also been recognised in patients with non-diabetes. The primary endpoint of this trial is weight loss after 3 months of treatment with a GLP-1 receptor agonist (exenatide once weekly) in patients with non-diabetic schizophrenia with antipsychotic-associated obesity. Secondary endpoints include physiological and metabolic measurements, various psychopathological and cognitive measures, and structural and functional brain MRI. Methods and analysis 40 obese patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder treated with antipsychotic drugs will be randomised to subcutaneous injection of exenatide once weekly (2 mg) or placebo for 3 months, adjunctive to their antipsychotic treatment. Ethics and dissemination The trial has been approved by the Danish Health and Medicines Authority, the National Committee on Health Research Ethics and the Danish Data Protection Agency. Trial participation presupposes theoral and written patient informed consent. An external, independent monitoring committee (Good Clinical Practice Unit at Copenhagen University Hospital) will monitor the study according to the GCP Guidelines. Trial data, including positive, negative and inconclusive results, will be presented at national and international scientific meetings and conferences. Papers will be submitted to peer-reviewed journals. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01794429; National Committee on Health Research Ethics project number: 36378; EudraCT nr: 2012-005404-17; The

  6. Cyclic alpha-conotoxin peptidomimetic chimeras as potent GLP-1R agonists.

    PubMed

    Swedberg, Joakim E; Schroeder, Christina I; Mitchell, Justin M; Durek, Thomas; Fairlie, David P; Edmonds, David J; Griffith, David A; Ruggeri, Roger B; Derksen, David R; Loria, Paula M; Liras, Spiros; Price, David A; Craik, David J

    2015-10-20

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) results from compromised pancreatic β-cell function, reduced insulin production, and lowered insulin sensitivity in target organs resulting in hyperglycemia. The GLP-1 hormone has two biologically active forms, GLP-1-(7-37) and GLP-1-(7-36)amide, which are equipotent at the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R). These peptides are central both to normal glucose metabolism and dysregulation in T2DM. Several structurally modified GLP-1 analogues are now approved drugs, and a number of other analogues are in clinical trials. None of these compounds is orally bioavailable and all require parenteral delivery. Recently, a number of smaller peptidomimetics containing 11-12 natural and unnatural amino acids have been identified that have similar insulin regulating profiles as GLP-1. The α-conotoxins are a class of disulfide rich peptide venoms isolated from cone snails, and are known for their highly constrained structures and resistance to enzymatic degradation. In this study, we examined whether 11-residue peptidomimetics incorporated into α-conotoxin scaffolds, forming monocyclic or bicyclic compounds constrained by disulfide bonds and/or backbone cyclization, could activate the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R). Several compounds showed potent (nanomolar) agonist activity at GLP-1R, as evaluated via cAMP signaling. In addition, HPLC retention times and in silico calculations suggested that mono- and bicyclic compounds had more favorable n-octanol/water partition coefficients according to the virtual partition coefficient model (vLogP), while maintaining a smaller radius of gyration compared to corresponding uncyclized peptidomimetics. Our findings suggest that cyclic peptidomimetics provide a potential avenue for future design of potent, compact ligands targeting GLP-1R and possessing improved physicochemical properties. PMID:26352676

  7. GLP-1 Receptor Stimulation Reduces Amyloid-β Peptide Accumulation and Cytotoxicity in Cellular and Animal Models of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yazhou; Duffy, Kara B.; Ottinger, Mary Ann; Ray, Balmiki; Bailey, Jason A.; Holloway, Harold W.; Tweedie, David; Perry, TracyAnn; Mattson, Mark P.; Kapogiannis, Dimitrios; Sambamurti, Kumar; Lahiri, Debomoy K.; Greiga, Nigel H.

    2010-01-01

    Type 2 (T2) diabetes mellitus (DM) has been associated with an increased incidence of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Several pathological features are shared between diabetes and AD, including dysfunctional insulin signaling and a dysregulation of glucose metabolism. It has therefore been suggested that not only may the two conditions share specific molecular mechanisms but also that agents with proven efficacy in one may be useful against the other. Hence, the present study characterized the effects of a clinically approved long-acting analogue, exendin-4 (Ex-4), of the endogenous insulin releasing incretin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), on stress-induced toxicity in neuronal cultures and on amyloid-β protein (Aβ) and tau levels in triple transgenic AD (3xTg-AD) mice with and without streptozocin (STZ)-induced diabetes. Ex-4 ameliorated the toxicity of Aβ and oxidative challenge in primary neuronal cultures and human SH-SY5Y cells in a concentration-dependent manner. When 11 to 12.5 month old female 3xTg AD mice were challenged with STZ or saline, and thereafter treated with a continuous subcutaneous infusion of Ex-4 or vehicle, Ex-4 ameliorated the diabetic effects of STZ in 3xTg-AD mice, elevating plasma insulin and lowering both plasma glucose and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels. Furthermore, brain levels of Aβ protein precursor and Aβ, which were elevated in STZ 3xTg-AD mice, were significantly reduced in Ex-4 treated mice. Brain tau levels were unaffected following STZ challenge, but showed a trend toward elevation that was absent following Ex-4 treatment. Together, these results suggest a potential value of Ex-4 in AD, particularly when associated with T2DM or glucose intolerance. PMID:20308787

  8. Aerosolized GLP-1 for treatment of diabetes mellitus and irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Siekmeier, Rüdiger; Hofmann, Thomas; Scheuch, Gerhard; Pokorski, Mieczyslaw

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a global burden and the prevalence of the disease, in particular diabetes mellitus type 2 is rapidly increasing worldwide. After introduction of insulin into clinical therapy about 90 years ago a major number of pharmaceuticals has been developed for treatment of diabetes mellitus type 2. One of these, the incretin glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), like insulin, needs subcutaneous administration causing inconvenience to patients. However, administration of GLP-1 plays also a role for treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). To improve patient convenience inhaled insulin (Exubera(®)) was developed and approved but failed market acceptance some years ago. Recently, another inhalative insulin (Afrezza(®)) received market approval and GLP-1 may serve as another candidate drug for inhalative administration. This review analyzes the current literature investigating alternative administration of GLP-1 and GLP-1 analogs focusing on inhalation. Several formulations for inhalative administration of GLP-1 and analogs were investigated in animal studies, whereas there are only few clinical data. However, feasibility of GLP-1 inhalation has been shown and should be further investigated as such type of drug administration may serve for improvement of therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus or irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:25427821

  9. Effects of endogenous GLP-1 and GIP on glucose tolerance after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Svane, Maria S; Bojsen-Møller, Kirstine N; Nielsen, Signe; Jørgensen, Nils B; Dirksen, Carsten; Bendtsen, Flemming; Kristiansen, Viggo B; Hartmann, Bolette; Holst, Jens J; Madsbad, Sten

    2016-04-01

    Exaggerated secretion of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is important for postprandial glucose tolerance after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), whereas the role of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) remains to be resolved. We aimed to explore the relative importance of endogenously secreted GLP-1 and GIP on glucose tolerance and β-cell function after RYGB. We used DPP-4 inhibition to enhance concentrations of intact GIP and GLP-1 and the GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin-(9-39) (Ex-9) for specific blockage of GLP-1 actions. Twelve glucose-tolerant patients were studied after RYGB in a randomized, placebo-controlled, 4-day crossover study with standard mixed-meal tests and concurrent administration of placebo, oral sitagliptin, Ex-9 infusion, or combined Ex-9-sitagliptin. GLP-1 receptor antagonism increased glucose excursions, clearly attenuated β-cell function, and aggravated postprandial hyperglucagonemia compared with placebo, whereas sitagliptin had no effect despite two- to threefold increased concentrations of intact GLP-1 and GIP. Similarly, sitagliptin did not affect glucose tolerance or β-cell function during GLP-1R blockage. This study confirms the importance of GLP-1 for glucose tolerance after RYGB via increased insulin and attenuated glucagon secretion in the postprandial state, whereas amplification of the GIP signal (or other DPP-4-sensitive glucose-lowering mechanisms) did not appear to contribute to the improved glucose tolerance seen after RYGB. PMID:26786780

  10. In Vitro and In Vivo Effects of Natural Putative Secretagogues of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1)

    PubMed Central

    Rafferty, Eamon P.; Wylie, Alastair R.; Elliott, Chris T.; Chevallier, Olivier P.; Grieve, David J.; Green, Brian D.

    2011-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an intestinal hormone with well-established glucose-lowering activity. The in vitro and in vivo actions of natural putative secretagogues of GLP-1 were investigated. The acute GLP-1 releasing activity of olive leaf extract (OLE), glutamine (GLN), alpha casein (ACAS), beta casein (BCAS) and chlorogenic acid (CGA) were assessed in STC-1 cells and C57BL/6 mice. All compounds except ACAS significantly increased acute in vitro GLP-1 secretion (66–386%; P<0.05–0.001). Oral gavage of OLE and GLN modestly increased plasma GLP-1 concentrations (48% and 41%, respectively), but did not lower glycaemic excursions. OLE and GLN are potent stimulators of GLP-1 secretion both in vitro and in vivo and chronic studies should assess their suitability as nutritional therapies for type 2 diabetes. PMID:21886907

  11. Effects of GLP-1 on Forearm Vasodilator Function and Glucose Disposal During Hyperinsulinemia in the Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tesauro, Manfredi; Schinzari, Francesca; Adamo, Angelo; Rovella, Valentina; Martini, Francesca; Mores, Nadia; Barini, Angela; Pitocco, Dario; Ghirlanda, Giovanni; Lauro, Davide; Campia, Umberto; Cardillo, Carmine

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Patients with the metabolic syndrome (MetS) have impaired insulin-induced enhancement of vasodilator responses. The incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), beyond its effects on blood glucose, has beneficial actions on vascular function. This study, therefore, aimed to assess whether GLP-1 affects insulin-stimulated vasodilator reactivity in patients with the MetS. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Forearm blood flow responses to acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were assessed in MetS patients before and after the addition of GLP-1 to an intra-arterial infusion of saline (n = 5) or insulin (n = 5). The possible involvement of oxidative stress in the vascular effects of GLP-1 in this setting was investigated by infusion of vitamin C (n = 5). The receptor specificity of GLP-1 effect during hyperinsulinemia was assessed by infusing its metabolite GLP-1(9-36) (n = 5). The metabolic actions of GLP-1 were also tested by analyzing forearm glucose disposal during hyperinsulinemia (n = 5). RESULTS In MetS patients, GLP-1 enhanced endothelium-dependent and -independent responses to ACh and SNP, respectively, during hyperinsulinemia (P < 0.001 for both), but not during saline (P > 0.05 for both). No changes in vasodilator reactivity to ACh and SNP were seen after GLP-1 was added to insulin and vitamin C (P > 0.05 for both) and after GLP-1(9-36) was given during hyperinsulinemia (P > 0.05 for both). Also, GLP-1 did not affect forearm glucose extraction and uptake during hyperinsulinemia (P > 0.05 for both). CONCLUSIONS In patients with the MetS, GLP-1 improves insulin-mediated enhancement of endothelium-dependent and -independent vascular reactivity. This effect may be influenced by vascular oxidative stress and is possibly exerted through a receptor-mediated mechanism. PMID:23069838

  12. Glucagon like peptide-1 receptor agonists may ameliorate the metabolic adverse effect associated with antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Culha, Mehmet Gokhan; Inkaya, Ahmet Cagkan; Yildirim, Emre; Unal, Serhat; Serefoglu, Ege Can

    2016-09-01

    The number of people living with HIV and AIDS (PLWHA) reached to almost 40 million, half of which are under antiretroviral treatment (ART). Although the introduction of this therapy significantly improved the life span and quality of PLWHA, metabolic complications of these people remains to be an important issue. These metabolic complications include hyperlipidemia, abnormal fat redistribution and diabetes mellitus, which are defined as lipodystrophy syndrome. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a neuropeptide secreted from intestinal L cells and recently developed GLP-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) stimulate insulin secretion, improve weight control and reduce cardiovascular outcomes. This class of drugs may be a valuable medication in the treatment of HIV-associated metabolic adverse effects and extend the life expectancy of patients infected with HIV. PMID:27515222

  13. Long-Term Treatment with Liraglutide, a Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Receptor Agonist, Has No Effect on β-Amyloid Plaque Load in Two Transgenic APP/PS1 Mouse Models of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Barkholt, Pernille; Kongsbak-Wismann, Pernille; Schlumberger, Chantal; Jelsing, Jacob; Terwel, Dick; Termont, Annelies; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Vrang, Niels

    2016-01-01

    One of the major histopathological hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is cerebral deposits of extracellular β-amyloid peptides. Preclinical studies have pointed to glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptors as a potential novel target in the treatment of AD. GLP-1 receptor agonists, including exendin-4 and liraglutide, have been shown to promote plaque-lowering and mnemonic effects of in a number of experimental models of AD. Transgenic mouse models carrying genetic mutations of amyloid protein precursor (APP) and presenilin-1 (PS1) are commonly used to assess the pharmacodynamics of potential amyloidosis-lowering and pro-cognitive compounds. In this study, effects of long-term liraglutide treatment were therefore determined in two double APP/PS1 transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease carrying different clinical APP/PS1 mutations, i.e. the ‘London’ (hAPPLon/PS1A246E) and ‘Swedish’ mutation variant (hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9) of APP, with co-expression of distinct PS1 variants. Liraglutide was administered in 5 month-old hAPPLon/PS1A246E mice for 3 months (100 or 500 ng/kg/day, s.c.), or 7 month-old hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice for 5 months (500 ng/kg/day, s.c.). In both models, regional plaque load was quantified throughout the brain using stereological methods. Vehicle-dosed hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice exhibited considerably higher cerebral plaque load than hAPPLon/PS1A246E control mice. Compared to vehicle-dosed transgenic controls, liraglutide treatment had no effect on the plaque levels in hAPPLon/PS1A246E and hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice. In conclusion, long-term liraglutide treatment exhibited no effect on cerebral plaque load in two transgenic mouse models of low- and high-grade amyloidosis, which suggests differential sensitivity to long-term liraglutide treatment in various transgenic mouse models mimicking distinct pathological hallmarks of AD. PMID:27421117

  14. Long-Term Treatment with Liraglutide, a Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Receptor Agonist, Has No Effect on β-Amyloid Plaque Load in Two Transgenic APP/PS1 Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Henrik H; Fabricius, Katrine; Barkholt, Pernille; Kongsbak-Wismann, Pernille; Schlumberger, Chantal; Jelsing, Jacob; Terwel, Dick; Termont, Annelies; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Vrang, Niels

    2016-01-01

    One of the major histopathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is cerebral deposits of extracellular β-amyloid peptides. Preclinical studies have pointed to glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptors as a potential novel target in the treatment of AD. GLP-1 receptor agonists, including exendin-4 and liraglutide, have been shown to promote plaque-lowering and mnemonic effects of in a number of experimental models of AD. Transgenic mouse models carrying genetic mutations of amyloid protein precursor (APP) and presenilin-1 (PS1) are commonly used to assess the pharmacodynamics of potential amyloidosis-lowering and pro-cognitive compounds. In this study, effects of long-term liraglutide treatment were therefore determined in two double APP/PS1 transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease carrying different clinical APP/PS1 mutations, i.e. the 'London' (hAPPLon/PS1A246E) and 'Swedish' mutation variant (hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9) of APP, with co-expression of distinct PS1 variants. Liraglutide was administered in 5 month-old hAPPLon/PS1A246E mice for 3 months (100 or 500 ng/kg/day, s.c.), or 7 month-old hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice for 5 months (500 ng/kg/day, s.c.). In both models, regional plaque load was quantified throughout the brain using stereological methods. Vehicle-dosed hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice exhibited considerably higher cerebral plaque load than hAPPLon/PS1A246E control mice. Compared to vehicle-dosed transgenic controls, liraglutide treatment had no effect on the plaque levels in hAPPLon/PS1A246E and hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice. In conclusion, long-term liraglutide treatment exhibited no effect on cerebral plaque load in two transgenic mouse models of low- and high-grade amyloidosis, which suggests differential sensitivity to long-term liraglutide treatment in various transgenic mouse models mimicking distinct pathological hallmarks of AD. PMID:27421117

  15. Efficient GLP-1 gene delivery using two-step transcription amplification plasmid system with a secretion signal peptide and arginine-grafted bioreducible polymer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Il; Lee, Minhyung; Kim, Sung Wan

    2012-01-30

    Glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1) encoding dual plasmid (pDNA) system (TSTA (SP-GLP-1)) which is composed of pβ-Gal4-p65 and pUAS-SP-GLP-1 was constructed to improve the production and secretion of expressed GLP-1 by combining the advantages of signal peptide (SP) and two-step transcription amplification (TSTA) system. Its potential for GLP-1 gene delivery system was investigated with employment of arginine-grafted bioreducible polymer (ABP) as a gene carrier. Their polyplexes have about 140nm-sizes and 20mV Zeta-potential values. ABP showed no cytotoxicity contrary to PEI25k. It was found in RT-PCR experiments that TSTA-SP pDNA systems showed increased GLP-1 gene transcription level in comparison with mono pDNA system (pβ-GLP-1). It was also observed in GLP-1 ELISA that GLP-1 secretion level of TSTA (SP-GLP-1) pDNA system was 2.7-3.4 times higher than those of pβ-GLP-1 and 1.5-1.7 times than TSTA (GLP-1). Additionally, 2.5-3.5 folds increased level of GLP-1 secretion was found in ABP gene carrier system in comparison with PEI25k. When transfection medium containing secreted GLP-1 was transferred to NIT-1 insulinoma cells, the highest secretion level of insulin was induced in ABP/TSTA (SP-GLP-1) polyplex medium-treated cells. Therefore, this novel system could be utilized as a safe and efficient GLP-1 gene delivery system for type 2 diabetes therapy. PMID:21945681

  16. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose metabolism in human myocytes.

    PubMed

    Luque, M A; González, N; Márquez, L; Acitores, A; Redondo, A; Morales, M; Valverde, I; Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L

    2002-06-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has been shown to have insulin-like effects upon the metabolism of glucose in rat liver, muscle and fat, and on that of lipids in rat and human adipocytes. These actions seem to be exerted through specific receptors which, unlike that of the pancreas, are not - at least in liver and muscle - cAMP-associated. Here we have investigated the effect, its characteristics, and possible second messengers of GLP-1 on the glucose metabolism of human skeletal muscle, in tissue strips and primary cultured myocytes. In muscle strips, GLP-1, like insulin, stimulated glycogen synthesis, glycogen synthase a activity, and glucose oxidation and utilization, and inhibited glycogen phosphorylase a activity, all of this at physiological concentrations of the peptide. In cultured myotubes, GLP-1 exerted, from 10(-13) mol/l, a dose-related increase of the D-[U-(14)C]glucose incorporation into glycogen, with the same potency as insulin, together with an activation of glycogen synthase a; the effect of 10(-11) mol/l GLP-1 on both parameters was additive to that induced by the equimolar amount of insulin. Synthase a was still activated in cells after 2 days of exposure to GLP-1, as compared with myotubes maintained in the absence of peptide. In human muscle cells, exendin-4 and its truncated form 9-39 amide (Ex-9) are both agonists of the GLP-1 effect on glycogen synthesis and synthase a activity; but while neither GLP-1 nor exendin-4 affected the cellular cAMP content after 5-min incubation in the absence of 3-isobutyl-1-methylxantine (IBMX), an increase was detected with Ex-9. GLP-1, exendin-4, Ex-9 and insulin all induced the prompt hydrolysis of glycosylphosphatidylinositols (GPIs). This work shows a potent stimulatory effect of GLP-1 on the glucose metabolism of human skeletal muscle, and supports the long-term therapeutic value of the peptide. Further evidence for a GLP-1 receptor in this tissue, different from that of the pancreas, is also illustrated

  17. GLP-1(32-36)amide Pentapeptide Increases Basal Energy Expenditure and Inhibits Weight Gain in Obese Mice.

    PubMed

    Tomas, Eva; Stanojevic, Violeta; McManus, Karen; Khatri, Ashok; Everill, Paul; Bachovchin, William W; Habener, Joel F

    2015-07-01

    The prevalence of obesity-related diabetes is increasing worldwide. Here we report the identification of a pentapeptide, GLP-1(32-36)amide (LVKGRamide), derived from the glucoincretin hormone GLP-1, that increases basal energy expenditure and curtails the development of obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes, and hepatic steatosis in diet-induced obese mice. The pentapeptide inhibited weight gain, reduced fat mass without change in energy intake, and increased basal energy expenditure independent of physical activity. Analyses of tissues from peptide-treated mice reveal increased expression of UCP-1 and UCP-3 in brown adipose tissue and increased UCP-3 and inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase in skeletal muscle, findings consistent with increased fatty acid oxidation and thermogenesis. In palmitate-treated C2C12 skeletal myotubes, GLP-1(32-36)amide activated AMPK and inhibited acetyl-CoA carboxylase, suggesting activation of fat metabolism in response to energy depletion. By mass spectroscopy, the pentapeptide is rapidly formed from GLP-1(9-36)amide, the major form of GLP-1 in the circulation of mice. These findings suggest that the reported insulin-like actions of GLP-1 receptor agonists that occur independently of the GLP-1 receptor might be mediated by the pentapeptide, and the previously reported nonapeptide (FIAWLVKGRamide). We propose that by increasing basal energy expenditure, GLP-1(32-36)amide might be a useful treatment for human obesity and associated metabolic disorders. PMID:25858562

  18. GLP-1(32-36)amide Pentapeptide Increases Basal Energy Expenditure and Inhibits Weight Gain in Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tomas, Eva; Stanojevic, Violeta; McManus, Karen; Khatri, Ashok; Everill, Paul; Bachovchin, William W.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity-related diabetes is increasing worldwide. Here we report the identification of a pentapeptide, GLP-1(32-36)amide (LVKGRamide), derived from the glucoincretin hormone GLP-1, that increases basal energy expenditure and curtails the development of obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes, and hepatic steatosis in diet-induced obese mice. The pentapeptide inhibited weight gain, reduced fat mass without change in energy intake, and increased basal energy expenditure independent of physical activity. Analyses of tissues from peptide-treated mice reveal increased expression of UCP-1 and UCP-3 in brown adipose tissue and increased UCP-3 and inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase in skeletal muscle, findings consistent with increased fatty acid oxidation and thermogenesis. In palmitate-treated C2C12 skeletal myotubes, GLP-1(32-36)amide activated AMPK and inhibited acetyl-CoA carboxylase, suggesting activation of fat metabolism in response to energy depletion. By mass spectroscopy, the pentapeptide is rapidly formed from GLP-1(9-36)amide, the major form of GLP-1 in the circulation of mice. These findings suggest that the reported insulin-like actions of GLP-1 receptor agonists that occur independently of the GLP-1 receptor might be mediated by the pentapeptide, and the previously reported nonapeptide (FIAWLVKGRamide). We propose that by increasing basal energy expenditure, GLP-1(32-36)amide might be a useful treatment for human obesity and associated metabolic disorders. PMID:25858562

  19. Myocardial regeneration in adriamycin cardiomyopathy by nuclear expression of GLP1 using ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shuyuan; Chen, Jiaxi; Huang, Pintong; Meng, Xing-Li; Clayton, Sandra; Shen, Jin-Song; Grayburn, Paul A.

    2015-03-20

    Recently GLP-1 was found to have cardioprotective effects independent of those attributable to tight glycemic control. Methods and results: We employed ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) to deliver piggybac transposon plasmids encoding the GLP-1 gene with a nuclear localizing signal to rat hearts with adriamycin cardiomyopathy. After a single UTMD treatment, overexpression of transgenic GLP-1 was found in nuclei of rat heart cells with evidence that transfected cardiac cells had undergone proliferation. UTMD-GLP-1 gene therapy restored LV mass, fractional shortening index, and LV posterior wall diameter to nearly normal. Nuclear overexpression of GLP-1 by inducing phosphorylation of FoxO1-S256 and translocation of FoxO1 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm significantly inactivated FoxO1 and activated the expression of cyclin D1 in nuclei of cardiac muscle cells. Reversal of adriamycin cardiomyopathy appeared to be mediated by dedifferentiation and proliferation of nuclear FoxO1-positive cardiac muscle cells with evidence of embryonic stem cell markers (OCT4, Nanog, SOX2 and c-kit), cardiac early differentiation markers (NKX2.5 and ISL-1) and cellular proliferation markers (BrdU and PHH3) after UTMD with GLP-1 gene therapy. Conclusions: Intranuclear myocardial delivery of the GLP-1gene can reverse established adriamycin cardiomyopathy by stimulating myocardial regeneration. - Highlights: • The activation of nuclear FoxO1 in cardiac muscle cells associated with adriamycin cardiomyopathy. • Myocardial nuclear GLP-1 stimulates myocardial regeneration and reverses adriamycin cardiomyopathy. • The process of myocardial regeneration associated with dedifferentiation and proliferation.

  20. CNS GLP-1 Regulation of Peripheral Glucose Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval, Darleen

    2008-01-01

    Current models hold that peripheral and CNS GLP-1 signaling operate as distinct systems whereby CNS GLP-1 regulates food intake and circulating GLP-1 regulates glucose homeostasis. There is accumulating evidence that the arcuate nucleus, an area of the CNS that regulates energy homeostasis, responds to hormones and nutrients to regulate glucose homeostasis as well. Recent data suggest that GLP-1 may be another signal acting on the arcuate to regulate glucose homeostasis challenging the conventional model of GLP-1 physiology. This review discusses the peripheral and central GLP-1 systems and presents a model whereby these systems are integrated in regulation of glucose homeostasis. PMID:18508100

  1. GLP1 protects cardiomyocytes from palmitate-induced apoptosis via Akt/GSK3b/b-catenin pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Ying; Zhu, Huazhang; Liang, Zhen; Ma, Xiaosong; Li, Shiwei

    2015-01-01

    Activation of apoptosis in cardiomyocytes by saturated palmitic acids contributes to cardiac dysfunction in diabetic cardiomyopathy. Beta-catenin (b-catenin) is a transcriptional regulator of several genes involved in survival/anti-apoptosis. However, its role in palmitate-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis remains unclear. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) has been shown to exhibit potential cardioprotective properties. This study was designed to evaluate the role of b-catenin signalling in palmitate-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis and the molecular mechanism underlying the protective effects of GLP1 on palmitate-stressed cardiomyocytes. Exposure of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes to palmitate increased the fatty acid transporter CD36-mediated intracellular lipid accumulation and cardiomyocyte apoptosis, decreased accumulation and nuclear translocation of active b-catenin, and reduced expression of b-catenin target protein survivin and BCL2. These detrimental effects of palmitate were significantly attenuated by GLP1 co-treatment. However, the anti-apoptotic effects of GLP1 were markedly abolished when b-catenin was silenced with a specific short hairpin RNA. Furthermore, analysis of the upstream molecules and mechanisms responsible for GLP1-associated cardiac protection revealed that GLP1 restored the decreased phosphorylation of protein kinase B (Akt) and glycogen synthase kinase-3b (GSK3b) in palmitate-stimulated cardiomyocytes. In contrast, inhibition of Akt with an Akt-specific inhibitor MK2206 or blockade of GLP1 receptor (GLP1R) with a competitive antagonist exendin-(9–39) significantly abrogated the GLP1-mediated activation of GSK3b/b-catenin signalling, leading to increased apoptosis in palmitate-stressed cardiomyocytes. Collectively, our results demonstrated for the first time that the attenuated b-catenin signalling may contribute to palmitate-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis, while GLP1 can protect cardiomyocytes from palmitate-induced apoptosis through

  2. Autocrine selection of a GLP-1R G-protein biased agonist with potent antidiabetic effects

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongkai; Sturchler, Emmanuel; Zhu, Jiang; Nieto, Ainhoa; Cistrone, Philip A.; Xie, Jia; He, LinLing; Yea, Kyungmoo; Jones, Teresa; Turn, Rachel; Di Stefano, Peter S.; Griffin, Patrick R.; Dawson, Philip E.; McDonald, Patricia H.; Lerner, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor (GLP-1R) agonists have emerged as treatment options for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). GLP-1R signals through G-protein-dependent, and G-protein-independent pathways by engaging the scaffold protein β-arrestin; preferential signalling of ligands through one or the other of these branches is known as ‘ligand bias'. Here we report the discovery of the potent and selective GLP-1R G-protein-biased agonist, P5. We identified P5 in a high-throughput autocrine-based screening of large combinatorial peptide libraries, and show that P5 promotes G-protein signalling comparable to GLP-1 and Exendin-4, but exhibited a significantly reduced β-arrestin response. Preclinical studies using different mouse models of T2DM demonstrate that P5 is a weak insulin secretagogue. Nevertheless, chronic treatment of diabetic mice with P5 increased adipogenesis, reduced adipose tissue inflammation as well as hepatic steatosis and was more effective at correcting hyperglycaemia and lowering haemoglobin A1c levels than Exendin-4, suggesting that GLP-1R G-protein-biased agonists may provide a novel therapeutic approach to T2DM. PMID:26621478

  3. Hyperglycemia after protein ingestion concurrent with injection of a GLP-1 receptor agonist in rats: a possible role for dietary peptides.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Alfred; Anderson, G Harvey; Giacca, Adria; Cho, France

    2005-09-01

    Protein ingestion after injection of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist Exendin-4 (Ex-4) causes hyperglycemia in rats. The objectives of this study were to determine the components of protein digestion responsible for this effect and to associate it with changes in the concentrations of other metabolites and hormones. Two experiments were conducted. In the first experiment, food-deprived rats were gavaged with intact whey (WP) or albumin protein, their hydrolysates, amino acid mixtures (1 g/2.5 ml), or water 5 min after injection of either PBS or Ex-4 (0.5 microg/rat). Tail vein blood was analyzed for glucose over 2 h. In the second experiment, food-deprived rats were gavaged with WP with or without Ex-4. Groups of conscious rats were killed by decapitation either before, or at selected times after gavage. Plasma concentrations of glucose, amino acids, free fatty acids (FFA), glycerol, insulin, glucagon, and leptin were measured. In experiment 1, blood glucose was higher when intact proteins and protein hydrolysates, but not amino acid mixtures, were given with than without Ex-4 (P < 0.05). In experiment 2, concentrations of glucose, FFA, and the ratio of tyrosine to branched-chain amino acid were higher (P < 0.01), but leptin and essential amino acid concentrations were lower (P < 0.05), and insulin, glucagon, and glycerol were similar when WP was given with or without Ex-4. We conclude that the hyperglycemia caused by the administration of Ex-4 concurrently with dietary protein arises from the action of peptides released during digestion and their interaction with Ex-4 in the regulation of glucose, fatty acid, and amino acid metabolism. PMID:15879053

  4. Comparison of safety and tolerability with continuous (exenatide once weekly) or intermittent (exenatide twice daily) GLP-1 receptor agonism in patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ridge, T; Moretto, T; MacConell, L; Pencek, R; Han, J; Schulteis, C; Porter, L

    2012-01-01

    Aims Exenatide is a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist shown to improve glycaemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Intermittent exenatide exposure is achieved with the twice-daily formulation (ExBID), while the once-weekly formulation (ExQW) provides continuous exenatide exposure. This integrated, retrospective analysis compared safety and tolerability of ExQW vs. ExBID in patients with T2DM. Methods Data were pooled from two open-label, randomized, comparator-controlled, trials directly comparing ExQW (N = 277) to ExBID (N = 268). Between-group differences in adverse event (AE) and hypoglycaemia incidences were calculated. Incidence over time and duration of selected AEs (nausea, vomiting, and injection-site-related AEs) were also summarized. Results The most common AEs were nausea, diarrhoea, injection-site pruritus, and vomiting. Nausea and vomiting occurred less frequently with ExQW vs. ExBID, peaking at initiation (ExQW) or at initiation and dose escalation (ExBID), and decreasing over time. Few patients discontinued because of gastrointestinal-related AEs. Injection-site AEs were more common with ExQW but decreased over time in both groups. No major hypoglycaemia occurred; minor hypoglycaemia occurred with low incidence in patients not using concomitant sulphonylurea, with no difference between ExQW and ExBID. Serious AEs and discontinuations because of AEs were reported with similar frequency in both groups. Conclusions Both exenatide formulations were generally safe and well-tolerated, with ExQW associated with less nausea and vomiting but more injection-site AEs. Continuous vs. intermittent exposure did not impact the overall tolerability profile of exenatide, with no evidence of prolonged duration or worsened intensities of AEs with continuous exposure. PMID:22734440

  5. Comparison of GLP-1 Analogues versus Sitagliptin in the Management of Type 2 Diabetes: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Head-to-Head Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tiansheng; Gou, Zhuoyue; Wang, Fei; Ma, Manling; Zhai, Suo-di

    2014-01-01

    Background Incretin–based therapies which include glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are recommended by several practice guidelines as second-line agents for add-on therapy to metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) who do not achieve glycemic control with metformin plus lifestyle interventions alone. The purpose of this study is to perform a systematic review with meta-analysis of existing head to head studies to compare the efficacy and safety of GLP-1 analogues with DPP-4 inhibitors. Methods We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of head-to-head studies to compare GLP-1 analogues with DPP-4 inhibitors in the management of type 2 diabetes. A random effects model was selected to perform the meta-analyses, results were expressed as weighted mean differences for continuous outcomes and relative risks for dichotomous outcomes, both with 95% confidence intervals, and with I2 values and P values as markers of heterogeneity. Results Four head-to-head randomized controlled studies with 1755 patients were included. Compared to sitagliptin, GLP-1 analogues are more effective in reducing HbA1C (weight mean difference −0.41%, 95% CI −0.51 to −0.31) and body weight (weight mean difference −1.55 kg, 95% CI −1.98 to −1.12). Conversely, GLP-1 analogues are associated with a higher incidence of gastrointestinal adverse events compared to sitagliptin: nausea (relative risk 3.14, 95% CI 2.15 to 4.59), vomiting (relative risk 2.60, 95% CI 1.48 to 4.56), diarrhea (relative risk 1.82, 95% CI 1.24 to 2.69), and constipation (relative risk 2.50, 95% CI 1.33 to 4.70). Conclusions The result of this meta-analysis demonstrates that compared to sitagliptin, GLP-1 analogues are more effective for glycemic control and weight loss, but have similar efficacy in reducing blood pressure and lipid parameters, however, GLP-1 analogues are associated with a higher incidence of gastrointestinal adverse

  6. Evaluating preferences for profiles of GLP-1 receptor agonists among injection-naïve type 2 diabetes patients in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Gelhorn, Heather L; Poon, Jiat-Ling; Davies, Evan W; Paczkowski, Rosirene; Curtis, Sarah E; Boye, Kristina S

    2015-01-01

    Objective To use a discrete choice experiment (DCE) to evaluate preferences for the actual treatment features and overall profiles of two injectable glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (dulaglutide and liraglutide) among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in the UK. Methods In-person interviews were conducted in the UK to administer a DCE to patients with self-reported T2DM, naïve to treatment with injectable medications. The DCE examined six attributes of T2DM treatment each described by two levels: “dosing frequency,” “hemoglobin A1c change,” “weight change,” “type of delivery system,” “frequency of nausea,” and “frequency of hypoglycemia.” Part-worth utilities were estimated using random effects logit models and were used to calculate relative importance (RI) values for each attribute. A chi-square test was used to determine differences in preferences for dulaglutide versus liraglutide profiles. Results A total of 243 participants [mean age: 60.5 (standard deviation 10.9) years; 76.1% male; mean body mass index: 29.8 (standard deviation 5.4) kg/m2] completed the study. RI values for the attributes in rank order were: “dosing frequency” (41.6%), “type of delivery system” (35.5%), “frequency of nausea” (10.4%), “weight change” (5.9%), “hemoglobin A1c change” (3.6%), and “frequency of hypoglycemia” (3.0%). Significantly more participants preferred the dulaglutide profile (83.1%) compared with the liraglutide profile (16.9%; P<0.0001). Conclusion This study elicited patients’ preferences for attributes and levels representing the actual characteristics of two specific glucagon-like peptide-1 medications. In this context, dosing frequency and type of delivery system were most important, accounting for over 75% of the RI. While previous studies have identified efficacy as highly important in T2DM medication decisions, this study suggests that when differences in efficacy between medications are small

  7. Radiolabelled GLP-1 analogues for in vivo targeting of insulinomas

    PubMed Central

    Brom, Maarten; Joosten, Lieke; Oyen, Wim J.G.; Gotthardt, Martin; Boerman, Otto C.

    2012-01-01

    For peptide receptor targeting usually internalizing agonists are selected. There is increasing evidence that non-internalizing receptor antagonists can be used for this purpose. We investigated whether the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) antagonist exendin(9-39) can be used for in vivo targeting of GLP-1R expressing tumours and compared the in vitro and in vivo characteristics to the GLP-1R agonists exendin-3 and exendin-4. The binding and internalization kinetics of labelled [Lys40(DTPA)]exendin-3, [Lys40(DTPA)]exendin-4 and [Lys40(DTPA)]exendin(9-39) were determined in vitro using INS-1 cells. The in vivo targeting properties of [Lys40(111In-DTPA)]exendin-3, [Lys40(111In-DTPA)]exendin-4 and [Lys40(111In-DTPA)]exendin(9-39) were examined in BALB/c nude mice with subcutaneous INS-1 tumours. natIn-labelled [Lys40(DTPA)]exendin-3, [Lys40(DTPA)]exendin-4 and [Lys40(DTPA)]exendin(9-39) exhibited similar IC50 values (13.5, 14.4 and 13.4 nM, respectively) and bound to 26 × 103, 41 × 103 and 37 × 103 receptors/cell, respectively. [Lys40(111In-DTPA)]exendin-3 and [Lys40(111In-DTPA)]exendin-4 showed rapid in vitro binding and internalization kinetics, whereas [Lys40(111In-DTPA)]exendin(9-39) showed lower binding and minimal internalization in vitro. In mice, high specific uptake of [Lys40(111In-DTPA)]exendin-3 (25.0 ± 6.0 %ID/g) in the tumour was observed at 0.5 h p.i. with similar uptake up to 4 h p.i.. [Lys40(111In-DTPA)]exendin-4 showed higher tumour uptake at 1 and 4 h p.i. (40.8 ± 7.0 and 41.9 ± 7.2 %ID/g, respectively). Remarkably, [Lys40(111In-DTPA)]exendin(9-39) showed only low specific uptake in the tumour at 0.5 h p.i. (3.2 ± 0.7 %ID/g), rapidly decreasing over time. In conclusion, the GLP-1R agonists [Lys40(DTPA)]exendin-3 and [Lys40(DTPA)]exendin-4 labelled with 111In could be useful for in vivo GLP-1R targeting, whereas [Lys40(DTPA)]exendin(9-39) is not suited for in vivo targeting of the GLP-1R. PMID:22434628

  8. Regulation of adipocyte formation by GLP-1/GLP-1R signaling.

    PubMed

    Challa, Tenagne Delessa; Beaton, Nigel; Arnold, Myrtha; Rudofsky, Gottfried; Langhans, Wolfgang; Wolfrum, Christian

    2012-02-24

    Increased nutrient intake leads to excessive adipose tissue accumulation, obesity, and the development of associated metabolic disorders. How the intestine signals to adipose tissue to adapt to increased nutrient intake, however, is still not completely understood. We show here, that the gut peptide GLP-1 or its long-lasting analog liraglutide, function as intestinally derived signals to induce adipocyte formation, both in vitro and in vivo. GLP-1 and liraglutide activate the GLP-1R, thereby promoting pre-adipocyte proliferation and inhibition of apoptosis. This is achieved at least partly through activation of ERK, PKC, and AKT signaling pathways. In contrast, loss of GLP-1R expression causes reduction in adipogenesis, through induction of apoptosis in pre-adipocytes, by inhibition of the above mentioned pathways. Because GLP-1 and liraglutide are used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, these findings implicate GLP-1 as a regulator of adipogenesis, which could be an alternate pathway leading to improved lipid homeostasis and controlled downstream insulin signaling. PMID:22207759

  9. Alternative Agents in Type 1 Diabetes in Addition to Insulin Therapy: Metformin, Alpha-Glucosidase Inhibitors, Pioglitazone, GLP-1 Agonists, DPP-IV Inhibitors, and SGLT-2 Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    DeGeeter, Michelle; Williamson, Bobbie

    2016-04-01

    Insulin is the mainstay of current treatment for patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Due to increasing insulin resistance, insulin doses are often continually increased, which may result in weight gain for patients. Medications currently approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes offer varying mechanisms of action that can help to reduce insulin resistance and prevent or deter weight gain. A MEDLINE search was conducted to review literature evaluating the use of metformin, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, pioglitazone, glucagon-like peptide 1 agonists, dipeptidyl peptidase, and sodium-dependent glucose transporter 2 inhibitors, in patients with T1DM. Varying results were found with some benefits including reductions in hemoglobin A1c, decreased insulin doses, and favorable effects on weight. Of significance, a common fear of utilizing multiple therapies for diabetes treatment is the risk of hypoglycemia, and this review displayed limited evidence of hypoglycemia with multiple agents. PMID:25312263

  10. Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Receptor Activation Attenuates Platelet Aggregation and Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Cameron-Vendrig, Alison; Reheman, Adili; Siraj, M Ahsan; Xu, Xiaohong Ruby; Wang, Yiming; Lei, Xi; Afroze, Talat; Shikatani, Eric; El-Mounayri, Omar; Noyan, Hossein; Weissleder, Ralph; Ni, Heyu; Husain, Mansoor

    2016-06-01

    Short-term studies in subjects with diabetes receiving glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1)-targeted therapies have suggested a reduced number of cardiovascular events. The mechanisms underlying this unexpectedly rapid effect are not known. We cloned full-length GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) mRNA from a human megakaryocyte cell line (MEG-01), and found expression levels of GLP-1Rs in MEG-01 cells to be higher than those in the human lung but lower than in the human pancreas. Incubation with GLP-1 and the GLP-1R agonist exenatide elicited a cAMP response in MEG-01 cells, and exenatide significantly inhibited thrombin-, ADP-, and collagen-induced platelet aggregation. Incubation with exenatide also inhibited thrombus formation under flow conditions in ex vivo perfusion chambers using human and mouse whole blood. In a mouse cremaster artery laser injury model, a single intravenous injection of exenatide inhibited thrombus formation in normoglycemic and hyperglycemic mice in vivo. Thrombus formation was greater in mice transplanted with bone marrow lacking a functional GLP-1R (Glp1r(-/-)), compared with those receiving wild-type bone marrow. Although antithrombotic effects of exenatide were partly lost in mice transplanted with bone marrow from Glp1r(-/-) mice, they were undetectable in mice with a genetic deficiency of endothelial nitric oxide synthase. The inhibition of platelet function and the prevention of thrombus formation by GLP-1R agonists represent potential mechanisms for reduced atherothrombotic events. PMID:26936963

  11. The role of GLP-1 mimetics and basal insulin analogues in type 2 diabetes mellitus: guidance from studies of liraglutide

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, A H

    2012-01-01

    In people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), the incretin effect is reduced, but the recent advent of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 agonists/analogues has enabled restoration of at least some of the function of the incretin system, with accompanying improvements in glycaemic control. Two GLP-1 receptor agonists/analogues are currently approved for the treatment of T2DM—exenatide (Byetta®, Eli Lilly & Co., Indianapolis, IN, US) and liraglutide (Victoza®, Novo Nordisk, Bagsvaerd, Denmark); a once-weekly formulation of exenatide (Bydureon®, Eli Lilly & Co.) has also been approved by the European Medicines Agency. The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) has recently published guidance on the use of liraglutide in T2DM, based on evidence from the Liraglutide Effect and Action in Diabetes (LEAD) Phase III trial programme, which compared liraglutide with existing glucose-lowering therapies, such as exenatide and insulin glargine. The LEAD programme reported HbA1c reductions from 0.8 to 1.5% with liraglutide (1.2 and 1.8 mg), accompanied by low rates of hypoglycaemia and some weight loss; side effects were primarily gastrointestinal in nature (e.g. nausea and diarrhoea). Based on the findings of the LEAD studies and the NICE recommendation, liraglutide now represents an important therapy widely available in the UK for certain patient groups, including those with a body mass index (BMI) ≥35.0 kg/m2, and patients with a BMI <35 kg/m2 who are considered unsuitable for insulin and are failing to meet targets for glycaemic control with oral agents. NICE guidelines still suggest that most patients without considerable obesity (BMI <35 kg/m2) are probably best managed using insulin therapy. Evidence also suggests a future role for GLP-1 mimetics in combination with basal insulin. PMID:22051096

  12. Lipid derivatives activate GPR119 and trigger GLP-1 secretion in primary murine L-cells

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Catherine E.; Glass, Leslie L.; Diakogiannaki, Eleftheria; Pais, Ramona; Lenaghan, Carol; Smith, David M.; Wedin, Marianne; Bohlooly-Y, Mohammad; Gribble, Fiona M.; Reimann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone derived from proglucagon, which is released from intestinal L-cells and increases insulin secretion in a glucose dependent manner. GPR119 is a lipid derivative receptor present in L-cells, believed to play a role in the detection of dietary fat. This study aimed to characterize the responses of primary murine L-cells to GPR119 agonism and assess the importance of GPR119 for the detection of ingested lipid. Methods GLP-1 secretion was measured from murine primary cell cultures stimulated with a panel of GPR119 ligands. Plasma GLP-1 levels were measured in mice lacking GPR119 in proglucagon-expressing cells and controls after lipid gavage. Intracellular cAMP responses to GPR119 agonists were measured in single primary L-cells using transgenic mice expressing a cAMP FRET sensor driven by the proglucagon promoter. Results L-cell specific knockout of GPR119 dramatically decreased plasma GLP-1 levels after a lipid gavage. GPR119 ligands triggered GLP-1 secretion in a GPR119 dependent manner in primary epithelial cultures from the colon, but were less effective in the upper small intestine. GPR119 agonists elevated cAMP in ∼70% of colonic L-cells and 50% of small intestinal L-cells. Conclusions/interpretation GPR119 ligands strongly enhanced GLP-1 release from colonic cultures, reflecting the high proportion of colonic L-cells that exhibited cAMP responses to GPR119 agonists. Less GPR119-dependence could be demonstrated in the upper small intestine. In vivo, GPR119 in L-cells plays a key role in oral lipid-triggered GLP-1 secretion. PMID:26144594

  13. GLP-1 Agonists and Blood Pressure: A Review of the Evidence.

    PubMed

    Goud, Aditya; Zhong, Jixin; Peters, Matthew; Brook, Robert D; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2016-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The presence of concomitant hypertension in diabetics is a major driver of excess cardiovascular risk. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1a) act on numerous pathways that intersect glycemic, weight, and blood pressure (BP) control. BP-lowering effects have been observed in mouse models of hypertension with a variety of GLP-1a. Acute administration of GLP-1a in humans has been shown to no effects and sometimes increased BP in humans. Chronic administration of GLP-1a, however, reduces clinic systolic BP (≈2 mmHg) at least when evaluated as a secondary end point in glycemia-lowering studies while simultaneously increasing heart rate. BP lowering has not been consistently observed in two recent double-blind controlled clinical trials evaluating ambulatory BP as the primary end point. While a number of mechanisms including vascular, myocardial, renal, and central nervous system pathways have been suggested in animal studies, these mechanistic pathways have not been sufficiently detailed in humans and it is unclear if the same pathways are operational. Further studies need to be conducted to unravel the full spectrum of effects of this drug class. An understanding of their effects on BP may help provide an explanation for the ability of GLP-1a to influence cardiovascular (CV) events in ongoing event-driven CV trials. PMID:26803771

  14. Ywhaz/14-3-3ζ Deletion Improves Glucose Tolerance Through a GLP-1-Dependent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lim, Gareth E; Piske, Micah; Lulo, James E; Ramshaw, Hayley S; Lopez, Angel F; Johnson, James D

    2016-07-01

    Multiple signaling pathways mediate the actions of metabolic hormones to control glucose homeostasis, but the proteins that coordinate such networks are poorly understood. We previously identified the molecular scaffold protein, 14-3-3ζ, as a critical regulator of in vitro β-cell survival and adipogenesis, but its metabolic roles in glucose homeostasis have not been studied in depth. Herein, we report that Ywhaz gene knockout mice (14-3-3ζKO) exhibited elevated fasting insulin levels while maintaining normal β-cell responsiveness to glucose when compared with wild-type littermate controls. In contrast with our observations after an ip glucose bolus, glucose tolerance was significantly improved in 14-3-3ζKO mice after an oral glucose gavage. This improvement in glucose tolerance was associated with significantly elevated fasting glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels. 14-3-3ζ knockdown in GLUTag L cells elevated GLP-1 synthesis and increased GLP-1 release. Systemic inhibition of the GLP-1 receptor attenuated the improvement in oral glucose tolerance that was seen in 14-3-3ζKO mice. When taken together these findings demonstrate novel roles of 14-3-3ζ in the regulation of glucose homeostasis and suggest that modulating 14-3-3ζ levels in intestinal L cells may have beneficial metabolic effects through GLP-1-dependent mechanisms. PMID:27167773

  15. Removal of Duodenum Elicits GLP-1 Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Mezza, Teresa; Prioletta, Annamaria; Sorice, Gian Pio; Clemente, Gennaro; Sarno, Gerardo; Nuzzo, Gennaro; Pontecorvi, Alfredo; Holst, Jens J.; Giaccari, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effect of removal of the duodenum on the complex interplay between incretins, insulin, and glucagon in nondiabetic subjects. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS For evaluation of hormonal secretion and insulin sensitivity, 10 overweight patients without type 2 diabetes (age 61 ± 19.3 years and BMI 27.9 ± 5.3 kg/m2) underwent a mixed-meal test and a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp before and after pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy for ampulloma. RESULTS All patients experienced a reduction in insulin (P = 0.002), C-peptide (P = 0.0002), and gastric inhibitory peptide (GIP) secretion (P = 0.0004), while both fasting and postprandial glucose levels increased (P = 0.0001); GLP-1 and glucagon responses to the mixed meal increased significantly after surgery (P = 0.02 and 0.031). While changes in GIP levels did not correlate with insulin, glucagon, and glucose levels, the increase in GLP-1 secretion was inversely related to the postsurgery decrease in insulin secretion (R2 = 0.56; P = 0.012) but not to the increased glucagon secretion, which correlated inversely with the reduction of insulin (R2 = 0.46; P = 0.03) and C-peptide (R2 = 0.37; P = 0.04). Given that the remaining pancreas presumably has preserved intraislet anatomy, insulin secretory capacity, and α- and β-cell interplay, our data suggest that the increased glucagon secretion is related to decreased systemic insulin. CONCLUSIONS Pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy was associated with a decrease in GIP and a remarkable increase in GLP-1 levels, which was not translated into increased insulin secretion. Rather, the hypoinsulinemia may have caused an increase in glucagon secretion. PMID:23393218

  16. Glucagon-like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Analogs: Recent Advances, New Possibilities, and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin that plays important physiological roles in glucose homeostasis. Produced from intestine upon food intake, it stimulates insulin secretion and keeps pancreatic β-cells healthy and proliferating. Because of these beneficial effects, it has attracted a great deal of attention in the past decade, and an entirely new line of diabetic therapeutics has emerged based on the peptide. In addition to the therapeutic applications, GLP-1 analogs have demonstrated a potential in molecular imaging of pancreatic β-cells; this may be useful in early detection of the disease and evaluation of therapeutic interventions, including islet transplantation. In this Perspective, we focus on GLP-1 analogs for their studies on improvement of biological activities, enhancement of metabolic stability, investigation of receptor interaction, and visualization of the pancreatic islets. PMID:25349901

  17. Improving function and survival of pancreatic islets by endogenous production of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1).

    PubMed

    Wideman, Rhonda D; Yu, Irene L Y; Webber, Travis D; Verchere, C Bruce; Johnson, James D; Cheung, Anthony T; Kieffer, Timothy J

    2006-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is a hormone that has received significant attention as a therapy for diabetes because of its ability to stimulate insulin biosynthesis and release and to promote growth and survival of insulin-producing beta cells. While GLP-1 is produced from the proglucagon precursor by means of prohormone convertase (PC) 1/3 activity in enteroendocrine L cells, the same precursor is differentially processed by PC2 in pancreatic islet alpha cells to release glucagon, leaving GLP-1 trapped within a larger fragment with no known function. We hypothesized that we could induce GLP-1 production directly within pancreatic islets by means of delivery of PC1/3 and, further, that this intervention would improve the viability and function of islets. Here, we show that adenovirus-mediated expression of PC1/3 in alpha cells increases islet GLP-1 secretion, resulting in improved glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and enhanced survival in response to cytokine treatment. PC1/3 expression in alpha cells also improved performance after islet transplantation in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes, possibly by enhancing nuclear Pdx1 and insulin content of islet beta cells. These results demonstrate a unique strategy for liberating GLP-1 from directly within the target organ and highlight the potential for up-regulating islet GLP-1 production as a means of treating diabetes. PMID:16938896

  18. Brain GLP-1 Signaling Regulates Femoral Artery Blood Flow and Insulin Sensitivity Through Hypothalamic PKC-δ

    PubMed Central

    Cabou, Cendrine; Vachoux, Christelle; Campistron, Gérard; Drucker, Daniel J.; Burcelin, Rémy

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is a gut-brain hormone that regulates food intake, energy metabolism, and cardiovascular functions. In the brain, through a currently unknown molecular mechanism, it simultaneously reduces femoral artery blood flow and muscle glucose uptake. By analogy to pancreatic β-cells where GLP-1 activates protein kinase C (PKC) to stimulate insulin secretion, we postulated that PKC enzymes would be molecular targets of brain GLP-1 signaling that regulate metabolic and vascular function. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We used both genetic and pharmacological approaches to investigate the role of PKC isoforms in brain GLP-1 signaling in the conscious, free-moving mouse simultaneous with metabolic and vascular measurements. RESULTS In normal wild-type (WT) mouse brain, the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist exendin-4 selectively promotes translocation of PKC-δ (but not -βII, -α, or -ε) to the plasma membrane. This translocation is blocked in Glp1r−/− mice and in WT mice infused in the brain with exendin-9, an antagonist of the GLP-1R. This mechanism coordinates both blood flow in the femoral artery and whole-body insulin sensitivity. Consequently, in hyperglycemic, high-fat diet–fed diabetic mice, hypothalamic PKC-δ activity was increased and its pharmacological inhibition improved both insulin-sensitive metabolic and vascular phenotypes. CONCLUSIONS Our studies show that brain GLP-1 signaling activates hypothalamic glucose-dependent PKC-δ to regulate femoral artery blood flow and insulin sensitivity. This mechanism is attenuated during the development of experimental hyperglycemia and may contribute to the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes. PMID:21810595

  19. A continued saga of Boc5, the first non-peptidic glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist with in vivo activities

    PubMed Central

    He, Min; Guan, Ni; Gao, Wei-wei; Liu, Qing; Wu, Xiao-yan; Ma, Da-wei; Zhong, Da-fang; Ge, Guang-bo; Li, Chuan; Chen, Xiao-yan; Yang, Ling; Liao, Jia-yu; Wang, Ming-wei

    2012-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-based therapy presents a promising option for treating type 2 diabetes. However, there are several limitations relative to the peptidic GLP-1 mimetics currently on the market or under development. This concern has led to a continued interest in the search for non-peptidic agonists for GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R). Here, we briefly review the discovery, characterization and current status of a novel class of cyclobutane-derivative-based non-peptidic agonists for GLP-1R, including Boc5 and its newly discovered analogue WB4–24. Although the oral bioavailability of such compounds still poses great challenges, the progress made so far encourages us to identify a truly 'druggable' small molecule agonist for GLP-1R. PMID:22301855

  20. A genomic approach to therapeutic target validation identifies a glucose-lowering GLP1R variant protective for coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Scott, Robert A; Freitag, Daniel F; Li, Li; Chu, Audrey Y; Surendran, Praveen; Young, Robin; Grarup, Niels; Stancáková, Alena; Chen, Yuning; Varga, Tibor V; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Luan, Jian'an; Zhao, Jing Hua; Willems, Sara M; Wessel, Jennifer; Wang, Shuai; Maruthur, Nisa; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Pirie, Ailith; van der Lee, Sven J; Gillson, Christopher; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Amouyel, Philippe; Arriola, Larraitz; Arveiler, Dominique; Aviles-Olmos, Iciar; Balkau, Beverley; Barricarte, Aurelio; Barroso, Inês; Garcia, Sara Benlloch; Bis, Joshua C; Blankenberg, Stefan; Boehnke, Michael; Boeing, Heiner; Boerwinkle, Eric; Borecki, Ingrid B; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Bowden, Sarah; Caldas, Carlos; Caslake, Muriel; Cupples, L Adrienne; Cruchaga, Carlos; Czajkowski, Jacek; den Hoed, Marcel; Dunn, Janet A; Earl, Helena M; Ehret, Georg B; Ferrannini, Ele; Ferrieres, Jean; Foltynie, Thomas; Ford, Ian; Forouhi, Nita G; Gianfagna, Francesco; Gonzalez, Carlos; Grioni, Sara; Hiller, Louise; Jansson, Jan-Håkan; Jørgensen, Marit E; Jukema, J Wouter; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kee, Frank; Kerrison, Nicola D; Key, Timothy J; Kontto, Jukka; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Kraja, Aldi T; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Kuusisto, Johanna; Linneberg, Allan; Liu, Chunyu; Marenne, Gaëlle; Mohlke, Karen L; Morris, Andrew P; Muir, Kenneth; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Munroe, Patricia B; Navarro, Carmen; Nielsen, Sune F; Nilsson, Peter M; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Packard, Chris J; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Peloso, Gina M; Perola, Markus; Peters, Annette; Poole, Christopher J; Quirós, J Ramón; Rolandsson, Olov; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Salomaa, Veikko; Sánchez, María-José; Sattar, Naveed; Sharp, Stephen J; Sims, Rebecca; Slimani, Nadia; Smith, Jennifer A; Thompson, Deborah J; Trompet, Stella; Tumino, Rosario; van der A, Daphne L; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Virtamo, Jarmo; Walker, Mark; Walter, Klaudia; Abraham, Jean E; Amundadottir, Laufey T; Aponte, Jennifer L; Butterworth, Adam S; Dupuis, Josée; Easton, Douglas F; Eeles, Rosalind A; Erdmann, Jeanette; Franks, Paul W; Frayling, Timothy M; Hansen, Torben; Howson, Joanna M M; Jørgensen, Torben; Kooner, Jaspal; Laakso, Markku; Langenberg, Claudia; McCarthy, Mark I; Pankow, James S; Pedersen, Oluf; Riboli, Elio; Rotter, Jerome I; Saleheen, Danish; Samani, Nilesh J; Schunkert, Heribert; Vollenweider, Peter; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Deloukas, Panos; Danesh, John; Goodarzi, Mark O; Kathiresan, Sekar; Meigs, James B; Ehm, Margaret G; Wareham, Nicholas J; Waterworth, Dawn M

    2016-06-01

    Regulatory authorities have indicated that new drugs to treat type 2 diabetes (T2D) should not be associated with an unacceptable increase in cardiovascular risk. Human genetics may be able to guide development of antidiabetic therapies by predicting cardiovascular and other health endpoints. We therefore investigated the association of variants in six genes that encode drug targets for obesity or T2D with a range of metabolic traits in up to 11,806 individuals by targeted exome sequencing and follow-up in 39,979 individuals by targeted genotyping, with additional in silico follow-up in consortia. We used these data to first compare associations of variants in genes encoding drug targets with the effects of pharmacological manipulation of those targets in clinical trials. We then tested the association of those variants with disease outcomes, including coronary heart disease, to predict cardiovascular safety of these agents. A low-frequency missense variant (Ala316Thr; rs10305492) in the gene encoding glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP1R), the target of GLP1R agonists, was associated with lower fasting glucose and T2D risk, consistent with GLP1R agonist therapies. The minor allele was also associated with protection against heart disease, thus providing evidence that GLP1R agonists are not likely to be associated with an unacceptable increase in cardiovascular risk. Our results provide an encouraging signal that these agents may be associated with benefit, a question currently being addressed in randomized controlled trials. Genetic variants associated with metabolic traits and multiple disease outcomes can be used to validate therapeutic targets at an early stage in the drug development process. PMID:27252175

  1. The GLP-1 agonist, liraglutide, as a pharmacotherapy for obesity

    PubMed Central

    Crane, James; McGowan, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    There is a global obesity epidemic that will continue to be a financial burden on healthcare systems around the world. Tackling obesity through diet and exercise should always be the first intervention, but this has not proved to be effective for a large number of patients. Pharmacotherapeutic options have been limited and many previously available drugs have been withdrawn due to safety concerns. Currently, only bariatric surgery has the capability to induce both substantial and durable weight loss. This article briefly reviews the history of pharmacotherapy for obesity before focusing on the clinical trial evidence for the use of the GLP-1 agonist liraglutide as a weight loss agent and comparing its efficacy with other emerging drug therapies for obesity. PMID:26977279

  2. The GLP-1 agonist, liraglutide, as a pharmacotherapy for obesity.

    PubMed

    Crane, James; McGowan, Barbara

    2016-03-01

    There is a global obesity epidemic that will continue to be a financial burden on healthcare systems around the world. Tackling obesity through diet and exercise should always be the first intervention, but this has not proved to be effective for a large number of patients. Pharmacotherapeutic options have been limited and many previously available drugs have been withdrawn due to safety concerns. Currently, only bariatric surgery has the capability to induce both substantial and durable weight loss. This article briefly reviews the history of pharmacotherapy for obesity before focusing on the clinical trial evidence for the use of the GLP-1 agonist liraglutide as a weight loss agent and comparing its efficacy with other emerging drug therapies for obesity. PMID:26977279

  3. Role of GLP-1 in the Hypoglycemic Effects of Wild Bitter Gourd

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Kan-Ni; Pai, Yi-Ping; Chin Hsu

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the role of GLP-1 in the hypoglycemic activity of wild bitter gourd (Momordica charantia L., BG). In vitro, the GLP-1 secretion in STC-1, a murine enteroendocrine cell line, was dose dependently stimulated by water extract (WE), its fractions (WEL, >3 kD and WES, <3 kD), and a bitter compounds-rich fraction of BG. These stimulations were partially inhibited by probenecid, a bitter taste receptor inhibitor, and by U-73122, a phospholipase Cβ2 inhibitor. These results suggested that the stimulation might involve, at least in part, certain bitter taste receptors and/or PLCβ2-signaling pathway. Two cucurbitane triterpenoids isolated from BG, 19-nor-cucurbita-5(10),6,8,22-(E),24-pentaen-3β-ol, and 5β,19-epoxycucurbita-6,24-diene-3β,23ξ-diol (karavilagenine E,) showed relative high efficacy in the stimulation. In vivo, mice fed BG diet showed higher insulinogenic index in an oral glucose tolerance test. A single oral dose of WE or WES pretreatment significantly improved intraperitoneal glucose tolerance. A single oral dose of WES significantly decreased glucose and increased insulin and GLP-1 in serum after 30 min. This acute hypoglycemic effect of WES was abolished by pretreatment with exendin-9, a GLP-1 receptor antagonist. Our data provide evidence that BG stimulates GLP-1 secretion which contributes, at least in part, to the antidiabetic activity of BG through an incretin effect. PMID:23589719

  4. Role of GLP-1 in the Hypoglycemic Effects of Wild Bitter Gourd.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ting-Ni; Lu, Kan-Ni; Pai, Yi-Ping; Chin Hsu; Huang, Ching-Jang

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the role of GLP-1 in the hypoglycemic activity of wild bitter gourd (Momordica charantia L., BG). In vitro, the GLP-1 secretion in STC-1, a murine enteroendocrine cell line, was dose dependently stimulated by water extract (WE), its fractions (WEL, >3 kD and WES, <3 kD), and a bitter compounds-rich fraction of BG. These stimulations were partially inhibited by probenecid, a bitter taste receptor inhibitor, and by U-73122, a phospholipase C β 2 inhibitor. These results suggested that the stimulation might involve, at least in part, certain bitter taste receptors and/or PLC β 2-signaling pathway. Two cucurbitane triterpenoids isolated from BG, 19-nor-cucurbita-5(10),6,8,22-(E),24-pentaen-3 β -ol, and 5 β ,19-epoxycucurbita-6,24-diene-3 β ,23 ξ -diol (karavilagenine E,) showed relative high efficacy in the stimulation. In vivo, mice fed BG diet showed higher insulinogenic index in an oral glucose tolerance test. A single oral dose of WE or WES pretreatment significantly improved intraperitoneal glucose tolerance. A single oral dose of WES significantly decreased glucose and increased insulin and GLP-1 in serum after 30 min. This acute hypoglycemic effect of WES was abolished by pretreatment with exendin-9, a GLP-1 receptor antagonist. Our data provide evidence that BG stimulates GLP-1 secretion which contributes, at least in part, to the antidiabetic activity of BG through an incretin effect. PMID:23589719

  5. Novel coumarin modified GLP-1 derivatives with enhanced plasma stability and prolonged in vivo glucose-lowering ability

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jing; Sun, Lidan; Huang, Xun; Li, Zheng; Zhang, Chenyu; Qian, Hai; Huang, Wenlong

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The short biological half-life limits the therapeutic use of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and chemical modification to improve the interaction of peptides with serum albumin represents an effective strategy to develop long-acting peptide analogues. Coumarin, a natural product, is known to bind tightly to plasma proteins and possesses many biological activities. Therefore, we designed and synthesized a series of coumarin-modified GLP-1 derivatives, hypothesizing that conjugation with coumarin would retain the therapeutic effects and prolong the biological half-life of the conjugates. Experimental Approach Four cysteine-modified GLP-1 analogues (1–4) were prepared using Gly8-GLP-1(7–36)-NH2 peptide as a starting point. These analogues were conjugated with two coumarin maleimides to yield eight compounds (conjugates 6–13) for testing. Activation of human GLP-1 receptors, stability to enzymic inactivation in plasma and binding to human albumin were assessed in vitro. In vivo, effects on oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) in rats and on blood glucose levels in db/db mice were studied. Key Results Most conjugates showed well preserved receptor activation efficacy, enhanced albumin-binding properties and improved in vitro plasma stability and conjugate 7 was selected to undergo further assessment. In rats, conjugate 7 had a longer circulating t1/2 than exendin-4 or liraglutide. A prolonged antidiabetic effect of conjugate 7 was observed after OGTT in rats and a prolonged hypoglycaemic effect in db/db mice. Conclusions and Implications Cysteine-specific coumarin conjugation with GLP-1 offers a useful approach to the development of long-acting incretin-based antidiabetic agents. Conjugate 7 is a promising long-lasting GLP-1 derivative deserving further investigation. PMID:25039358

  6. Insulin and GLP-1 infusions demonstrate the onset of adipose-specific insulin resistance in a large fasting mammal: potential glucogenic role for GLP-1.

    PubMed

    Viscarra, Jose A; Rodriguez, Ruben; Vazquez-Medina, Jose Pablo; Lee, Andrew; Tift, Michael S; Tavoni, Stephen K; Crocker, Daniel E; Ortiz, Rudy M

    2013-08-01

    Prolonged food deprivation increases lipid oxidation and utilization, which may contribute to the onset of the insulin resistance associated with fasting. Because insulin resistance promotes the preservation of glucose and oxidation of fat, it has been suggested to be an adaptive response to food deprivation. However, fasting mammals exhibit hypoinsulinemia, suggesting that the insulin resistance-like conditions they experience may actually result from reduced pancreatic sensitivity to glucose/capacity to secrete insulin. To determine whether fasting results in insulin resistance or in pancreatic dysfunction, we infused early- and late-fasted seals (naturally adapted to prolonged fasting) with insulin (0.065 U/kg), and a separate group of late-fasted seals with low (10 pM/kg) or high (100 pM/kg) dosages of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) immediately following a glucose bolus (0.5g/kg), and measured the systemic and cellular responses. Because GLP-1 facilitates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, these infusions provide a method to assess pancreatic insulin-secreting capacity. Insulin infusions increased the phosphorylation of insulin receptor and Akt in adipose and muscle of early and late fasted seals; however the timing of the signaling response was blunted in adipose of late fasted seals. Despite the dose-dependent increases in insulin and increased glucose clearance (high dose), both GLP-1 dosages produced increases in plasma cortisol and glucagon, which may have contributed to the glucogenic role of GLP-1. Results suggest that fasting induces adipose-specific insulin resistance in elephant seal pups, while maintaining skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity, and therefore suggests that the onset of insulin resistance in fasting mammals is an evolved response to cope with prolonged food deprivation. PMID:23997935

  7. Altered expression of uncoupling protein 2 in GLP-1-producing cells after chronic high glucose exposure: implications for the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Francesca; Filippello, Agnese; Di Pino, Antonino; Barbagallo, Davide; Di Mauro, Stefania; Pappalardo, Alessandro; Rabuazzo, Agata Maria; Purrello, Michele; Purrello, Francesco; Piro, Salvatore

    2016-04-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a gut L-cell hormone that enhances glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Several approaches that prevent GLP-1 degradation or activate the GLP-1 receptor are being used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. In T2DM, GLP-1 secretion has been suggested to be impaired, and this defect appears to be a consequence rather than a cause of impaired glucose homeostasis. However, although defective GLP-1 secretion has been correlated with insulin resistance, little is known about the direct effects of chronic high glucose concentrations, which are typical in diabetes patients, on GLP-1-secreting cell function. In the present study, we demonstrate that glucotoxicity directly affects GLP-1 secretion in GLUTag cells chronically exposed to high glucose. Our results indicate that this abnormality is associated with a decrease in ATP production due to the elevated expression of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2). Furthermore, UCP2 inhibition using small interfering RNA (siRNA) and the application of glibenclamide, an ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP(+)) channel blocker, reverse the GLP-1 secretion defect induced by chronic high-glucose treatment. These results show that glucotoxicity diminishes the secretory responsiveness of GLP-1-secreting cells to acute glucose stimulation. We conclude that the loss of the incretin effect, as observed in T2DM patients, could at least partially depend on hyperglycemia, which is typical in diabetes patients. Such an understanding may not only provide new insight into diabetes complications but also ultimately contribute to the identification of novel molecular targets within intestinal L-cells for controlling and improving endogenous GLP-1 secretion. PMID:26739488

  8. Neurotensin Is Coexpressed, Coreleased, and Acts Together With GLP-1 and PYY in Enteroendocrine Control of Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Grunddal, Kaare V; Ratner, Cecilia F; Svendsen, Berit; Sommer, Felix; Engelstoft, Maja S; Madsen, Andreas N; Pedersen, Jens; Nøhr, Mark K; Egerod, Kristoffer L; Nawrocki, Andrea R; Kowalski, Timothy; Howard, Andrew D; Poulsen, Steen Seier; Offermanns, Stefan; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Holst, Jens J; Holst, Birgitte; Schwartz, Thue W

    2016-01-01

    The 2 gut hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide YY (PYY) are well known to be coexpressed, costored, and released together to coact in the control of key metabolic target organs. However, recently, it became clear that several other gut hormones can be coexpressed in the intestinal-specific lineage of enteroendocrine cells. Here, we focus on the anatomical and functional consequences of the coexpression of neurotensin with GLP-1 and PYY in the distal small intestine. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis, laser capture, and triple staining demonstrated that GLP-1 cells in the crypts become increasingly multihormonal, ie, coexpressing PYY and neurotensin as they move up the villus. Proglucagon promoter and pertussis toxin receptor-driven cell ablation and reappearance studies indicated that although all the cells die, the GLP-1 cells reappear more quickly than PYY- and neurotensin-positive cells. High-resolution confocal fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that neurotensin is stored in secretory granules distinct from GLP-1 and PYY storing granules. Nevertheless, the 3 peptides were cosecreted from both perfused small intestines and colonic crypt cultures in response to a series of metabolite, neuropeptide, and hormonal stimuli. Importantly, neurotensin acts synergistically, ie, more than additively together with GLP-1 and PYY to decrease palatable food intake and inhibit gastric emptying, but affects glucose homeostasis in a more complex manner. Thus, neurotensin is a major gut hormone deeply integrated with GLP-1 and PYY, which should be taken into account when exploiting the enteroendocrine regulation of metabolism pharmacologically. PMID:26469136

  9. GLP-1R–Targeting Magnetic Nanoparticles for Pancreatic Islet Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Yoo, Byunghee; Yang, Jingsheng; Zhang, Xueli; Ross, Alana; Pantazopoulos, Pamela; Dai, Guangping; Moore, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Noninvasive assessment of pancreatic β-cell mass would tremendously aid in managing type 1 diabetes (T1D). Toward this goal, we synthesized an exendin-4 conjugated magnetic iron oxide–based nanoparticle probe targeting glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1R), which is highly expressed on the surface of pancreatic β-cells. In vitro studies in βTC-6, the β-cell line, showed specific accumulation of the targeted probe (termed MN-Ex10-Cy5.5) compared with nontargeted (termed MN-Cy5.5). In vivo magnetic resonance imaging showed a significant transverse relaxation time (T2) shortening in the pancreata of mice injected with the MN-Ex10-Cy5.5 probe compared with control animals injected with the nontargeted probe at 7.5 and 24 h after injection. Furthermore, ΔT2 of the pancreata of prediabetic NOD mice was significantly higher than that of diabetic NOD mice after the injection of MN-Ex10-Cy5.5, indicating the decrease of probe accumulation in these animals due to β-cell loss. Of note, ΔT2 of prediabetic and diabetic NOD mice injected with MN-Cy5.5 was not significantly changed, reflecting the nonspecific mode of accumulation of nontargeted probe. We believe our results point to the potential for using this agent for monitoring the disease development and response of T1D to therapy. PMID:24458362

  10. Rice protein hydrolysates stimulate GLP-1 secretion, reduce GLP-1 degradation, and lower the glycemic response in rats.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Yuki; Hira, Tohru; Inoue, Daisuke; Harada, Yukikazu; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Mikio; Kadowaki, Motoni; Hara, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Rice has historically been consumed in Asia as a major source of carbohydrates, however, little is known regarding the functional roles of rice proteins as dietary factors. In the present study, we investigated whether peptides derived from rice proteins could stimulate GLP-1 secretion, which results in reducing glycemia via the incretin effect in normal rats. Hydrolysates were prepared from the protein fraction of rice endosperm or rice bran, and the effects of these hydrolysates on GLP-1 secretion were examined in a murine enteroendocrine cell line GLUTag. Plasma was collected after oral administration of the rice protein hydrolysates, under anesthesia, or during glucose tolerance tests in rats. In anesthetized rats, plasma dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) activity was measured after ileal administration of the rice protein hydrolysates. GLP-1 secretion from GLUTag cells was potently stimulated by the rice protein hydrolysates, especially by the peptic digest of rice endosperm protein (REPH) and that of rice bran protein (RBPH). Oral administration of REPH or RBPH elevated plasma GLP-1 concentrations, which resulted in the reduction of glycemia under the intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. In addition, the plasma DPP-IV activity was attenuated after ileal administration of REPH or RBPH, which resulted in a higher ratio of intact (active) GLP-1 to total GLP-1 in the plasma. These results demonstrate that rice proteins exert potent stimulatory effects on GLP-1 secretion, which could contribute to the reduction of postprandial glycemia. The inhibitory effect of these peptides on the plasma DPP-IV activity may potentiate the incretin effect of GLP-1. PMID:26107658

  11. A missense variant in GLP1R gene is associated with the glycaemic response to treatment with gliptins.

    PubMed

    Javorský, M; Gotthardová, I; Klimčáková, L; Kvapil, M; Židzik, J; Schroner, Z; Doubravová, P; Gala, I; Dravecká, I; Tkáč, I

    2016-09-01

    Gliptins act by increasing endogenous incretin levels. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP1R) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide receptor (GIPR) are their indirect drug targets. Variants of GLP1R and GIPR have previously been associated with the incretin effect. The aim of the present pilot study was to examine associations of the GLP1R and GIPR gene variants with the glycaemic response to gliptins. A total of 140 consecutive patients with type 2 diabetes were followed-up 6 months after initiation of gliptin treatment. GLP1R rs6923761 (Gly168Ser) and GIPR rs10423928 genotyping was performed using real-time PCR, with subsequent high-resolution melting analysis. The main study outcome was reduction in glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) after treatment. GLP1R Gly168Ser variant was significantly associated with reduction in HbA1c in an additive model (β = -0.33, p = 0.011). The mean reduction in HbA1c in Ser/Ser homozygotes was significantly lower compared with Gly-allele carriers [0.12 ± 0.23% vs. 0.80 ± 0.09% (1.3 ± 2.5 mmol/mol vs. 8.7 ± 1.0 mmol/mol); p = 0.008]. In conclusion, GLP1R missense variant was associated with a reduced response to gliptin treatment. The genotype-related effect size of ∼0.7% (8 mmol/mol) is equal to an average effect of gliptin treatment and makes this variant a candidate for use in precision medicine. PMID:27160388

  12. Identification of a proglucagon cDNA from Rana tigrina rugulosa that encodes two GLP-1s and that is alternatively spliced in a tissue-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Yeung, C M; Chow, B K

    2001-11-01

    Glucagon plays a pivotal role in the regulation of metabolism. A glucagon receptor has been previously characterized in the frog, Rana tigrina rugulosa, and the frog and human glucagon receptors have been shown to possess similar binding affinities toward human glucagon. To study the structural evolution of glucagon peptide and its receptor in vertebrates, in the current study, a proglucagon cDNA from the same frog species was cloned. Interestingly, in contrast to the mammalian proglucagons that contain only one GLP-1 peptide, the frog proglucagon cDNA encodes two GLP-1 peptides (GLP-1A and GLP-1B) in addition to a glucagon peptide and a glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2). By reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR) analysis, the proglucagon gene expression was widely detected in the brain, colon, small intestine, liver, lung, and pancreas, suggesting that the proglucagon-derived peptides have diverse functions in frogs. Moreover, tissue-specific alternative mRNA splicing was observed in the brain, colon, and pancreas. In these tissues, proglucagon transcripts with a 135 bp in frame deletion encoding GLP-1A were found. This splicing event in R. tigrina rugulosa is novel because it deletes a GLP-1 encoding sequence instead of the GLP-2 observed in other vertebrates. These findings should enhance understanding of the proglucagon evolution, structure, and expression in vertebrates. PMID:11703080

  13. GLP-1 secretion is stimulated by 1,10-phenanthroline via colocalized T2R5 signal transduction in human enteroendocrine L cell.

    PubMed

    Park, Jiyoung; Kim, Ki-Suk; Kim, Kang-Hoon; Lee, In-Seung; Jeong, Hyeon-soo; Kim, Yumi; Jang, Hyeung-Jin

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) hormone is known to regulate blood glucose by an insulinotropic effect and increases proliferation as and also prevents apoptosis of pancreatic β cells. We know that GLP-1 is secreted by nutrients such as fatty acids and sweet compounds but also bitter compounds via stimulation of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the gut. Among these, bitter compounds are multiply-contained in phytochemicals or artificial materials and perceived as ligands of various bitter taste receptors. We hypothesized that GLP-1 hormone is secreted through stimulation of a single bitter taste receptor by 1,10-phenanthroline which is known agonist of taste receptor type 2 member 5 (T2R5). To prove this hypothesis, we used the representatively well-known 1,10-phenanthroline as ligand of single receptor and evaluated the existence of T2R5 by double-labeling immunofluorescence and then 1,10-phenanthroline is able to secrete GLP-1 hormone through stimulation of T2R5 in human enteroendocrine cells. Consequently, we verify that GLP-1 hormone is colocalized with T2R5 in the human duodenum and ileum tissue and is secreted by 1,10-phenanthroline via T2R5 signal transduction in differentiated human enteroendocrine L cells. PMID:26505793

  14. Discovery of (S)-2-Cyclopentyl-N-((1-isopropylpyrrolidin2-yl)-9-methyl-1-oxo-2,9-dihydro-1H-pyrrido[3,4-b]indole-4-carboxamide (VU0453379): A Novel, CNS Penetrant Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Receptor (GLP-1R) Positive Allosteric Modulator (PAM)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A duplexed, functional multiaddition high throughput screen and subsequent iterative parallel synthesis effort identified the first highly selective and CNS penetrant glucagon-like peptide-1R (GLP-1R) positive allosteric modulator (PAM). PAM (S)-9b potentiated low-dose exenatide to augment insulin secretion in primary mouse pancreatic islets, and (S)-9b alone was effective in potentiating endogenous GLP-1R to reverse haloperidol-induced catalepsy. PMID:25423411

  15. GLP-1: broadening the incretin concept to involve gut motility.

    PubMed

    Hellström, Per M

    2009-08-01

    The incretin effect of the gut peptide hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a combined result of inhibition of gastric emptying and stimulation of insulin secretion via an incretin mechanism. The temporal pattern of these events implicate that gastric emptying is primarily delayed, while later in the digestive process insulin is released for nutrient disposal. Since the inhibitory effect of GLP-1 on gastric motility is very outspoken, we considered it of value to study its effects on gut motility. Animal experimentation in the rat clearly showed that not only gastric emptying, but also small bowel motility with the migrating myoelectric complex was profoundly inhibited by GLP-1 at low doses. Similar effects were seen with analogues of the peptide. Extending the studies to man supported our earliest data indicating that the migrating motor complex of the small intestine was affected, and even more noticeable, the summarized motility index inhibited. Further extension of our studies to patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) displayed similar results. This encouraged us to embark on a clinical pain-relief multi-centre study in IBS patients using a GLP-1 analogue, ROSE-010, with longer half-life than the native peptide. The outcome of the IBS study proved ROSE-010 to be superior to placebo with a pain-relief response rate of 24% for ROSE-010 compared to 12% for placebo. Taken together, the GLP-1 analogue ROSE-010 is believed to cause relaxation of the gut and can thereby relieve an acute pain attack of IBS, even though its precise mechanism is yet to be defined. PMID:19362109

  16. Effects of the glucagon-like polypeptide-1 analogue (Val8)GLP-1 on learning, progenitor cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the C57B/16 mouse brain.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Stephen F J; Hunter, Kerry; Hölscher, Christian

    2012-09-14

    Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) has been identified as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. Here, we tested the properties of the glucagon-like polypetide-1 (GLP-1) analogue (Val8)GLP-1, a drug originally developed as a treatment for T2DM at a range of doses (2.5 nmol; 25 nmol; 100 nmol; or 250 nmol/kg bw ip.) in an acute memory study in wild type C57B/l6 mice. We also tested (Val8)GLP-1 and the GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin (9-39) in a chronic study (3 weeks at 25 nmol/kg bw ip. once-daily). We found that (Val8)GLP-1 crossed the blood brain barrier readily and that peripheral injection increased levels in the brain 30 min post-injection ip. but not 2h post-injection in rats. In the acute study, the low dose of 2.5 nmol/kg ip. enhanced motor activity in the open field task, while total distance travelled, exploratory behaviour and anxiety was not affected at any dose. Learning an object recognition task was not affected either. In the chronic study, no effect was observed in the open field assessment. The antagonist exendin (9-39) impaired object recognition learning and spatial learning in a water maze task, demonstrating the importance of GLP-1 signalling in memory formation. Locomotor activity was also affected in some cases. Blood sugar levels and insulin sensitivity was not affected in chronically treated mice. Neuronal stem cells and neurogenesis was enhanced by (Val8)GLP-1 in the dentate gyrus of wild type mice. The results demonstrate that (Val8)GLP-1 is safe in a range of doses, crosses the BBB and has potentially beneficial effects in the CNS by enhancing neurogenesis. PMID:22867941

  17. Theoretical Investigations into the Quantitative Mechanisms Underlying the Regulation of [cAMP]i, Membrane Excitability and [Ca(2+)]i during GLP-1 Stimulation in Pancreatic β Cells.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Yukari

    2016-01-01

      Upon elevation of plasma glucose concentration, pancreatic β-cells generate bursts of action potentials to induce cyclic changes in [Ca(2+)]i regulating insulin release. Glucose-dependent insulin secretion is synergistically enhanced by glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), which increases [cAMP]i and activates protein kinase A (PKA) and exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac). The insulinotropic effect of GLP-1 is mediated, at least in part, by modulating multiple ion channels/transporters at the plasma membrane and ER through PKA- and EPAC-dependent mechanisms, which increase membrane excitability and intracellular Ca(2+) release. However, because of complex interactions between multiple cellular factors involved in the GLP-1 effects, quantitative aspects of the molecular/ionic mechanisms have not yet been determined. We thus performed simulation studies and mathematical analysis to investigate how GLP-1 signals control [cAMP]i and subsequently modify the bursting activities and Ca(2+) dynamics. First, a GLP-1 receptor signal transduction model was developed and introduced to our β-cells model. Secondly, modulatory effects of PKA/Epac on ion channels/transporters were incorporated based on experimental studies. Increases in the frequency and duration of the bursting activity observed during GLP-1 stimulation were well reconstructed by our model, and lead potential analysis quantitatively determined the functional role of each ion channel/transporter in modifying the burst pattern. Finally, an IP3R model was developed to reproduce GLP-1-induced Ca(2+) transients/oscillations. Instantaneous equilibrium analysis and bifurcation analysis also elucidated the quantitative mechanisms involved in generating IP3R-mediated Ca(2+) mobilization. The results of this theoretical analysis of the effects of GLP-1 on membrane excitability/Ca(2+) dynamics are discussed in this review. PMID:26935088

  18. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rowzee, Anne M.; Cawley, Niamh X.; Chiorini, John A.; Di Pasquale, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is a small peptide component of the prohormone, proglucagon, that is produced in the gut. Exendin-4, a GLP-1 receptor agonist originally isolated from the saliva of H. suspectum or Gila monster, is a peptide that shares sequence and functional homology with GLP-1. Both peptides have been demonstrated to stimulate insulin secretion, inhibit glucagon secretion, promote satiety and slow gastric emptying. As such, GLP-1 and Exendin-4 have become attractive pharmaceutical targets as an adjunctive therapy for individuals with type II diabetes mellitus, with several products currently available clinically. Herein we summarize the cell biology leading to GLP-1 production and secretion from intestinal L-cells and the endocrine functions of this peptide and Exendin-4 in humans. Additionally, gene therapeutic applications of GLP-1 and Exendin-4 are discussed with a focus on recent work using the salivary gland as a gene therapy target organ for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. PMID:21747830

  19. Basal insulin combined incretin mimetic therapy with glucagon-like protein 1 receptor agonists as an upcoming option in the treatment of type 2 diabetes: a practical guide to decision making

    PubMed Central

    Fleischmann, Holger

    2014-01-01

    The combination of basal insulin and glucagon-like protein 1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) is a new intriguing therapeutic option for patients with type 2 diabetes. In our daily practice we abbreviate this therapeutic concept with the term BIT (basal insulin combined incretin mimetic therapy) in a certain analogy to BOT (basal insulin supported oral therapy). In most cases BIT is indeed an extension of BOT, if fasting, prandial or postprandial blood glucose values have not reached the target range. In our paper we discuss special features of combinations of short- or prandial-acting and long- or continuous-acting GLP-1 RAs like exenatide, lixisenatide and liraglutide with basal insulin in relation to different glycemic targets. Overall it seems appropriate to use a short-acting GLP-1 RA if, after the near normalization of fasting blood glucose with BOT, the prandial or postprandial values are elevated. A long-acting GLP-1 RA might well be given, if fasting blood glucose values are the problem. Based on pathophysiological findings, recent clinical studies and our experience with BIT and BOT as well as BOTplus we developed chart-supported algorithms for decision making, including features and conditions of patients. The development of these practical tools was guided by the need for a more individualized antidiabetic therapy and the availability of the new BIT principle. PMID:25419451

  20. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonists: Beta-Cell Protection or Exhaustion?

    PubMed

    van Raalte, Daniël H; Verchere, C Bruce

    2016-07-01

    Glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 receptor agonists enhance insulin secretion and may improve pancreatic islet cell function. However, GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist treatment may have more complex, and sometimes deleterious, effects on beta cells. We discuss the concepts of beta cell protection versus exhaustion for different GLP-1R agonists based on recent data. PMID:27160799

  1. GPR119 Agonist AS1269574 Activates TRPA1 Cation Channels to Stimulate GLP-1 Secretion.

    PubMed

    Chepurny, Oleg G; Holz, George G; Roe, Michael W; Leech, Colin A

    2016-06-01

    GPR119 is a G protein-coupled receptor expressed on intestinal L cells that synthesize and secrete the blood glucose-lowering hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). GPR119 agonists stimulate the release of GLP-1 from L cells, and for this reason there is interest in their potential use as a new treatment for type 2 diabetes mellitus. AS1269574 is one such GPR119 agonist, and it is the prototype of a series of 2,4,6 trisubstituted pyrimidines that exert positive glucoregulatory actions in mice. Here we report the unexpected finding that AS1269574 stimulates GLP-1 release from the STC-1 intestinal cell line by directly promoting Ca(2+) influx through transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) cation channels. These GPR119-independent actions of AS1269574 are inhibited by TRPA1 channel blockers (AP-18, A967079, HC030031) and are not secondary to intracellular Ca(2+) release or cAMP production. Patch clamp studies reveal that AS1269574 activates an outwardly rectifying membrane current with properties expected of TRPA1 channels. However, the TRPA1 channel-mediated action of AS1269574 to increase intracellular free calcium concentration is not replicated by GPR119 agonists (AR231453, oleoylethanolamide) unrelated in structure to AS1269574. Using human embryonic kidney-293 cells expressing recombinant rat TRPA1 channels but not GPR119, direct TRPA1 channel activating properties of AS1269574 are validated. Because we find that AS1269574 also acts in a conventional GPR119-mediated manner to stimulate proglucagon gene promoter activity in the GLUTag intestinal L cell line, new findings reported here reveal the surprising capacity of AS1269574 to act as a dual agonist at two molecular targets (GPR119/TRPA1) important to the control of L-cell function and type 2 diabetes mellitus drug discovery research. PMID:27082897

  2. Extending residence time and stability of peptides by Protected Graft Copolymer (PGC) excipient: GLP-1 example

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Gerardo M.; Reichstetter, Sandra; Bolotin, Elijah M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to determine whether a Protected Graft Copolymer (PGC) containing fatty acid can be used as a stabilizing excipient for GLP-1 and whether PGC/GLP-1 given once a week can be an effective treatment for diabetes. Methods To create a PGC excipient, polylysine was grafted with methoxypolyethyleneglycol and fatty acid at the epsilon amino groups. We performed evaluation of 1) the binding of excipient to GLP-1, 2) the DPP IV sensitivity of GLP-1 formulated with PGC as the excipient, 3) the in vitro bio-activity of excipient-formulated GLP-1, 4) the in vivo pharmacokinetics of excipient-formulated GLP-1, and 5) the efficacy of the excipient-formulated GLP-1 in diabetic rats. Results We showed reproducible synthesis of PGC excipient, showed high affinity binding of PGC to GLP-1, slowed protease degradation of excipient-formulated GLP-1, and showed that excipient-formulated GLP-1 induced calcium influx in INS cells. Excipient-formulated GLP-1 stays in the blood for at least 4 days. When excipient-formulated GLP-1 was given subcutaneously once a week to diabetic ZDF rats, a significant reduction of HbA1c compared to control was observed. The reduction is similar to diabetic ZDF rats given exendin twice a day. Conclusions PGC can be an ideal in vivo stabilizing excipient for biologically labile peptides. PMID:21830140

  3. Yhhu4488, a novel GPR40 agonist, promotes GLP-1 secretion and exerts anti-diabetic effect in rodent models.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dan-yang; Li, De-wen; Ning, Meng-meng; Dang, Xiang-yu; Zhang, Li-na; Zeng, Li-min; Hu, You-hong; Leng, Ying

    2015-10-30

    G protein-coupled receptor 40 (GPR40) is predominantly expressed in pancreatic β-cells and activated by long-chain fatty acids. GPR40 has drawn considerable interest as a potential therapeutic target for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) due to its important role in enhancing glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Encouragingly, GPR40 is also proven to be highly expressed in glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-producing enteroendocrine cells afterwards, which opens a potential role of GPR40 in enhancing GLP-1 secretion to exert additional anti-diabetic efficacy. In the present study, we discovered a novel GPR40 agonist, yhhu4488, which is structurally different from other reported GPR40 agonists. Yhhu4488 showed potent agonist activity with EC50 of 49.96 nM, 70.83 nM and 58.68 nM in HEK293 cells stably expressing human, rat and mouse GPR40, respectively. Yhhu4488 stimulated GLP-1 secretion from fetal rat intestinal cells (FRIC) via triggering endogenous calcium store mobilization and extracellular calcium influx. The effect of yhhu4488 on GLP-1 secretion was further confirmed in type 2 diabetic db/db mice. Yhhu4488 exhibited satisfactory potency in in vivo studies. Single administration of yhhu4488 improved glucose tolerance in SD rats. Chronic administration of yhhu4488 effectively decreased fasting blood glucose level, improved β-cell function and lipid homeostasis in type 2 diabetic ob/ob mice. Taken together, yhhu4488 is a novel GPR40 agonist that enhances GLP-1 secretion, improves metabolic control and β-cell function, suggesting its promising potential for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:26417688

  4. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists in the treatment of type 2 diabetes: Past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay; Baruah, Manash P; Sahay, Rakesh K; Unnikrishnan, Ambika Gopalakrishnan; Uppal, Shweta; Adetunji, Omolara

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-based therapy improves glycaemic control through multiple mechanisms, with a low risk of hypoglycaemia and the additional benefit of clinically relevant weight loss. Since Starling and Bayliss first proposed the existence of intestinal secretions that stimulate the pancreas, tremendous progress has been made in the area of incretins. As a number of GLP-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) continue to become available, physicians will soon face the challenge of selecting the right option customized to their patient's needs. The following discussion, derived from an extensive literature search using the PubMed database, applying the terms incretin, GLP-1, exenatide, liraglutide, albiglutide, dulaglutide, lixisenatide, semaglutide, and taspoglutide, provides a comprehensive review of existing and upcoming molecules in the GLP-1 RA class in terms of their structure, pharmacological profiles, efficacy, safety, and convenience. Search Methodology: A literature search was conducted using the PubMed database, applying the terms incretin, GLP-1, exenatide, liraglutide, albiglutide, dulaglutide, lixisenatide, semaglutide, and taspoglutide. Relevant articles were those that discussed structural, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic differences, classification, long-acting and short-acting GLP-1 RAs, phase 3 trials, and expert opinions. Additional targeted searches were conducted on diabetes treatment guidelines and reviews on safety, as well as the American Diabetes Association/European Society for Study of Diabetes (ADA/EASD) statement on pancreatic safety. PMID:27042424

  5. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists in the treatment of type 2 diabetes: Past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Baruah, Manash P.; Sahay, Rakesh K.; Unnikrishnan, Ambika Gopalakrishnan; Uppal, Shweta; Adetunji, Omolara

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)–based therapy improves glycaemic control through multiple mechanisms, with a low risk of hypoglycaemia and the additional benefit of clinically relevant weight loss. Since Starling and Bayliss first proposed the existence of intestinal secretions that stimulate the pancreas, tremendous progress has been made in the area of incretins. As a number of GLP-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) continue to become available, physicians will soon face the challenge of selecting the right option customized to their patient's needs. The following discussion, derived from an extensive literature search using the PubMed database, applying the terms incretin, GLP-1, exenatide, liraglutide, albiglutide, dulaglutide, lixisenatide, semaglutide, and taspoglutide, provides a comprehensive review of existing and upcoming molecules in the GLP-1 RA class in terms of their structure, pharmacological profiles, efficacy, safety, and convenience. Search Methodology: A literature search was conducted using the PubMed database, applying the terms incretin, GLP-1, exenatide, liraglutide, albiglutide, dulaglutide, lixisenatide, semaglutide, and taspoglutide. Relevant articles were those that discussed structural, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic differences, classification, long-acting and short-acting GLP-1 RAs, phase 3 trials, and expert opinions. Additional targeted searches were conducted on diabetes treatment guidelines and reviews on safety, as well as the American Diabetes Association/European Society for Study of Diabetes (ADA/EASD) statement on pancreatic safety. PMID:27042424

  6. GLP-1(28-36)amide, a Long Ignored Peptide Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bilan; Ji, Kaige; Peng, Anlin; Yang, Xin; Huang, Kun

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), which has been extensively applied for treating type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), is an incretin hormone that regulates glucose homeostasis. GLP-1(28-36)amide, a C-terminal nonapeptide (FIAWLVKGRamide) of GLP-1, is a major product derived from the cleavage of GLP-1 by the neutral endopeptidase (NEP). GLP-1(28-36)amide has long been regarded as a metabolically inactive byproduct, however, recent findings reveal that GLP-1(28-36)amide plays multiple novel roles in ameliorating hepatic metabolism, protecting β cells, improving glucose disposal and inhibiting weight gain. Here, we summarize the latest progress on the effects of GLP-1(28-36)amide with a focus on its roles in regulating the Wnt and mitochondrial-mediated signaling pathways. PMID:25598850

  7. Engineering a long-acting, potent GLP-1 analog for microstructure-based transdermal delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Peng-Yu; Zou, Huafei; Chao, Elizabeth; Sherwood, Lance; Nunez, Vanessa; Keeney, Michael; Ghartey-Tagoe, Esi; Ding, Zhongli; Quirino, Herlinda; Luo, Xiaozhou; Welzel, Gus; Chen, Guohua; Singh, Parminder; Woods, Ashley K.; Schultz, Peter G.; Shen, Weijun

    2016-01-01

    Antidiabetic treatments aiming to reduce body weight are currently gaining increased interest. Exendin-4, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist administered twice daily via s.c. injection, improves glycemic control, often with associated weight reduction. To further improve the therapeutic efficacy of exendin-4, we have developed a novel peptide engineering strategy that incorporates a serum protein binding motif onto a covalent side-chain staple and applied to the peptide to enhance its helicity and, as a consequence, its potency and serum half-life. We demonstrated that one of the resulting peptides, E6, has significantly improved half-life and glucose tolerance in an oral glucose tolerance test in rodents. Chronic treatment of E6 significantly decreased body weight and fasting blood glucose, improved lipid metabolism, and also reduced hepatic steatosis in diet-induced obese mice. Moreover, the high potency of E6 allowed us to administer this peptide using a dissolvable microstructure-based transdermal delivery system. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies in guinea pigs showed that a single 5-min application of a microstructure system containing E6 significantly improved glucose tolerance for 96 h. This delivery strategy may offer an effective and patient-friendly alternative to currently marketed GLP-1 injectables and can likely be extended to other peptide hormones. PMID:27035989

  8. Co-culture of clonal beta cells with GLP-1 and glucagon-secreting cell line impacts on beta cell insulin secretion, proliferation and susceptibility to cytotoxins.

    PubMed

    Green, Alastair D; Vasu, Srividya; Moffett, R Charlotte; Flatt, Peter R

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the direct effects on insulin releasing MIN6 cells of chronic exposure to GLP-1, glucagon or a combination of both peptides secreted from GLUTag L-cell and αTC1.9 alpha-cell lines in co-culture. MIN6, GLUTag and αTC1.9 cell lines exhibited high cellular hormone content and release of insulin, GLP-1 and glucagon, respectively. Co-culture of MIN6 cells with GLUTag cells significantly increased cellular insulin content, beta-cell proliferation, insulin secretory responses to a range of established secretogogues and afforded protection against exposure cytotoxic concentrations of glucose, lipid, streptozotocin or cytokines. Benefits of co-culture of MIN6 cells with αTC1.9 alphacells were limited to enhanced beta-cell proliferation with marginal positive actions on both insulin secretion and cellular protection. In contrast, co-culture of MIN6 with GLUTag cells plus αTC1.9 cells, markedly enhanced both insulin secretory responses and protection against beta-cell toxins compared with co-culture with GLUTag cells alone. These data indicate important long-term effects of conjoint GLP-1 and glucagon exposure on beta-cell function. This illustrates the possible functional significance of alpha-cell GLP-1 production as well as direct beneficial effects of dual agonism at beta-cell GLP-1 and glucagon receptors. PMID:27015674

  9. GLP-1 and GLP-2 as Yin and Yang of Intestinal Lipoprotein Production

    PubMed Central

    Hein, Gustavo J.; Baker, Chris; Hsieh, Joanne; Farr, Sarah; Adeli, Khosrow

    2013-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptides (GLP-1 and GLP-2) are processed from the proglucagon polypeptide and secreted in equimolar amounts but have opposite effects on chylomicron (CM) production, with GLP-1 significantly reducing and GLP-2 increasing postprandial chylomicronemia. In the current study, we evaluated the apparent paradoxical roles of GLP-1 and GLP-2 under physiological conditions in the Syrian golden hamster, a model with close similarity to humans in terms of lipoprotein metabolism. A short (30-min) intravenous infusion of GLP-2 resulted in a marked increase in postprandial apolipoprotein B48 (apoB48) and triglyceride (TG) levels in the TG-rich lipoprotein (TRL) fraction, whereas GLP-1 infusion decreased lipid absorption and levels of TRL-TG and apoB48. GLP-1 and GLP-2 coinfusion resulted in net increased lipid absorption and an increase in TRL-TG and apoB48. However, prolonged (120-min) coinfusion of GLP-1 and GLP-2 decreased postprandial lipemia. Blocking dipeptidyl peptidase-4 activity resulted in decreased postprandial lipemia. Interestingly, fructose-fed, insulin-resistant hamsters showed a more pronounced response, including possible hypersensitivity to GLP-2 or reduced sensitivity to GLP-1. In conclusion, under normal physiological conditions, the actions of GLP-2 predominate; however, when GLP-1 activity is sustained, the hypolipidemic action of GLP-1 predominates. Pharmacological inhibition of GLP-1 degradation tips the balance toward an inhibitory effect on intestinal production of atherogenic CM particles. PMID:23028139

  10. Pathogenesis and management of postprandial hyperglycemia: role of incretin-based therapies

    PubMed Central

    Gerich, John

    2013-01-01

    Postprandial plasma glucose concentrations are an important contributor to glycemic control. There is evidence suggesting that postprandial hyperglycemia may be an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are antidiabetic agents that predominantly reduce postprandial plasma glucose levels. DPP-4 inhibitors are associated with fewer gastrointestinal side effects than GLP-1 receptor agonists and are administered orally, unlike GLP-1 analogs, which are administered as subcutaneous injections. GLP-1 receptor agonists are somewhat more effective than DPP-4 inhibitors in reducing postprandial plasma glucose and are usually associated with significant weight loss. For these reasons, GLP-1 receptor agonists are generally preferred over DPP-4 inhibitors as part of combination treatment regimens in patients with glycated hemoglobin levels above 8.0%. This article reviews the pathogenesis of postprandial hyperglycemia, the mechanisms by which GLP-1 receptor agonists and DPP-4 inhibitors reduce postprandial plasma glucose concentrations, and the results of recent clinical trials (ie, published 2008 to October 2012) that evaluated the effects of these agents on postprandial plasma glucose levels when evaluated as monotherapy compared with placebo or as add-on therapy to metformin, a sulfonylurea, or insulin. Findings from recent clinical studies suggest that both GLP-1 receptor agonists and DPP-4 inhibitors could become valuable treatment options for optimizing glycemic control in patients unable to achieve glycated hemoglobin goals on basal insulin, with the added benefits of weight loss and a low risk of hypoglycemia. PMID:24403842

  11. Analysis of Germline Stem Cell Differentiation Following Loss of GLP-1 Notch Activity in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Paul M.; Schedl, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells generate the differentiated progeny cells of adult tissues. Stem cells in the Caenorhabditis elegans hermaphrodite germline are maintained within a proliferative zone of ∼230 cells, ∼20 cell diameters in length, through GLP-1 Notch signaling. The distal tip cell caps the germline and supplies GLP-1-activating ligand, and the distal-most germ cells that occupy this niche are likely self-renewing stem cells with active GLP-1 signaling. As germ cells are displaced from the niche, GLP-1 activity likely decreases, yet mitotically cycling germ cells are found throughout the proliferative zone prior to overt meiotic differentiation. Following loss of GLP-1 activity, it remains unclear whether stem cells undergo transit-amplifying (TA) divisions or more directly enter meiosis. To distinguish between these possibilities we employed a temperature-sensitive (ts) glp-1 mutant to manipulate GLP-1 activity. We characterized proliferative zone dynamics in glp-1(ts) mutants at permissive temperature and then analyzed the kinetics of meiotic entry of proliferative zone cells after loss of GLP-1. We found that entry of proliferative zone cells into meiosis following loss of GLP-1 activity is largely synchronous and independent of their distal-proximal position. Furthermore, the majority of cells complete only a single mitotic division before entering meiosis, independent of their distal-proximal position. We conclude that germ cells do not undergo TA divisions following loss of GLP-1 activity. We present a model for the dynamics of the proliferative zone that utilizes cell cycle rate and proliferative zone size and output and incorporates the more direct meiotic differentiation of germ cells following loss of GLP-1 activity. PMID:26158953

  12. GLP-1 stimulates insulin secretion by PKC-dependent TRPM4 and TRPM5 activation

    PubMed Central

    Shigeto, Makoto; Ramracheya, Reshma; Tarasov, Andrei I.; Cha, Chae Young; Chibalina, Margarita V.; Hastoy, Benoit; Philippaert, Koenraad; Reinbothe, Thomas; Rorsman, Nils; Salehi, Albert; Sones, William R.; Vergari, Elisa; Weston, Cathryn; Gorelik, Julia; Katsura, Masashi; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O.; Vennekens, Rudi; Zaccolo, Manuela; Galione, Antony; Johnson, Paul R.V.; Kaku, Kohei; Ladds, Graham; Rorsman, Patrik

    2015-01-01

    Strategies aimed at mimicking or enhancing the action of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) therapeutically improve glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS); however, it is not clear whether GLP-1 directly drives insulin secretion in pancreatic islets. Here, we examined the mechanisms by which GLP-1 stimulates insulin secretion in mouse and human islets. We found that GLP-1 enhances GSIS at a half-maximal effective concentration of 0.4 pM. Moreover, we determined that GLP-1 activates PLC, which increases submembrane diacylglycerol and thereby activates PKC, resulting in membrane depolarization and increased action potential firing and subsequent stimulation of insulin secretion. The depolarizing effect of GLP-1 on electrical activity was mimicked by the PKC activator PMA, occurred without activation of PKA, and persisted in the presence of PKA inhibitors, the KATP channel blocker tolbutamide, and the L-type Ca2+ channel blocker isradipine; however, depolarization was abolished by lowering extracellular Na+. The PKC-dependent effect of GLP-1 on membrane potential and electrical activity was mediated by activation of Na+-permeable TRPM4 and TRPM5 channels by mobilization of intracellular Ca2+ from thapsigargin-sensitive Ca2+ stores. Concordantly, GLP-1 effects were negligible in Trpm4 or Trpm5 KO islets. These data provide important insight into the therapeutic action of GLP-1 and suggest that circulating levels of this hormone directly stimulate insulin secretion by β cells. PMID:26571400

  13. Impact of Diabetes-Specific Nutritional Formulas versus Oatmeal on Postprandial Glucose, Insulin, GLP-1 and Postprandial Lipidemia.

    PubMed

    Mottalib, Adham; Mohd-Yusof, Barakatun-Nisak; Shehabeldin, Mohamed; Pober, David M; Mitri, Joanna; Hamdy, Osama

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes-specific nutritional formulas (DSNFs) are frequently used as part of medical nutrition therapy for patients with diabetes. This study aims to evaluate postprandial (PP) effects of 2 DSNFs; Glucerna (GL) and Ultra Glucose Control (UGC) versus oatmeal (OM) on glucose, insulin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), free fatty acids (FFA) and triglycerides (TG). After an overnight fast, 22 overweight/obese patients with type 2 diabetes were given 200 kcal of each of the three meals on three separate days in random order. Blood samples were collected at baseline and at 30, 60, 90, 120, 180 and 240 min. Glucose area under the curve (AUC0-240) after GL and UGC was lower than OM (p < 0.001 for both). Insulin positive AUC0-120 after UGC was higher than after OM (p = 0.02). GLP-1 AUC0-120 and AUC0-240 after GL and UGC was higher than after OM (p < 0.001 for both). FFA and TG levels were not different between meals. Intake of DSNFs improves PP glucose for 4 h in comparison to oatmeal of similar caloric level. This is achieved by either direct stimulation of insulin secretion or indirectly by stimulating GLP-1 secretion. The difference between their effects is probably related to their unique blends of amino acids, carbohydrates and fat. PMID:27455318

  14. Impact of Diabetes-Specific Nutritional Formulas versus Oatmeal on Postprandial Glucose, Insulin, GLP-1 and Postprandial Lipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Mottalib, Adham; Mohd-Yusof, Barakatun-Nisak; Shehabeldin, Mohamed; Pober, David M.; Mitri, Joanna; Hamdy, Osama

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes-specific nutritional formulas (DSNFs) are frequently used as part of medical nutrition therapy for patients with diabetes. This study aims to evaluate postprandial (PP) effects of 2 DSNFs; Glucerna (GL) and Ultra Glucose Control (UGC) versus oatmeal (OM) on glucose, insulin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), free fatty acids (FFA) and triglycerides (TG). After an overnight fast, 22 overweight/obese patients with type 2 diabetes were given 200 kcal of each of the three meals on three separate days in random order. Blood samples were collected at baseline and at 30, 60, 90, 120, 180 and 240 min. Glucose area under the curve (AUC0–240) after GL and UGC was lower than OM (p < 0.001 for both). Insulin positive AUC0–120 after UGC was higher than after OM (p = 0.02). GLP-1 AUC0–120 and AUC0–240 after GL and UGC was higher than after OM (p < 0.001 for both). FFA and TG levels were not different between meals. Intake of DSNFs improves PP glucose for 4 h in comparison to oatmeal of similar caloric level. This is achieved by either direct stimulation of insulin secretion or indirectly by stimulating GLP-1 secretion. The difference between their effects is probably related to their unique blends of amino acids, carbohydrates and fat. PMID:27455318

  15. Novel fusion of GLP-1 with a domain antibody to serum albumin prolongs protection against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury in the rat

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and its mimetics reduce infarct size in the setting of acute myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. However, the short serum half-life of GLP-1 and its mimetics may limit their therapeutic use in acute myocardial ischemia. Domain antibodies to serum albumin (AlbudAbs) have been developed to extend the serum half-life of short lived therapeutic proteins, peptides and small molecules. In this study, we compared the effect of a long acting GLP-1 agonist, DPP-IV resistant GLP-1 (7–36, A8G) fused to an AlbudAb (GAlbudAb), with the effect of the GLP-1 mimetic, exendin-4 (short half-life GLP-1 agonist) on infarct size following acute myocardial I/R injury. Methods Male Sprague–Dawley rats (8-week-old) were treated with vehicle, GAlbudAb or exendin-4. Myocardial ischemia was induced 2 h following the final dose for GAlbudAb and 30 min post the final dose for exendin-4. In a subgroup of animals, the final dose of exendin-4 was administered (1 μg/kg, SC, bid for 2 days) 6 h prior to myocardial ischemia when plasma exendin-4 was at its minimum concentration (Cmin). Myocardial infarct size, area at risk and cardiac function were determined 24 h after myocardial I/R injury. Results GAlbudAb and exendin-4 significantly reduced myocardial infarct size by 28% and 23% respectively, compared to vehicle (both p < 0.01 vs. vehicle) after I/R injury. Moreover, both GAlbudAb and exendin-4 markedly improved post-ischemic cardiac contractile function. Body weight loss and reduced food intake consistent with the activation of GLP-1 receptors was observed in all treatment groups. However, exendin-4 failed to reduce infarct size when administered 6 h prior to myocardial ischemia, suggesting continuous activation of the GLP-1 receptors is needed for cardioprotection. Conclusions Cardioprotection provided by GAlbudAb, a long acting GLP-1 mimetic, following myocardial I/R injury was comparable in magnitude, but more sustained in

  16. 99mTc Labeled Glucagon-Like Peptide-1-Analogue (99mTc-GLP1) Scintigraphy in the Management of Patients with Occult Insulinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sowa-Staszczak, Anna; Trofimiuk-Müldner, Małgorzata; Stefańska, Agnieszka; Tomaszuk, Monika; Buziak-Bereza, Monika; Gilis-Januszewska, Aleksandra; Jabrocka-Hybel, Agata; Głowa, Bogusław; Małecki, Maciej; Bednarczuk, Tomasz; Kamiński, Grzegorz; Kowalska, Aldona; Mikołajczak, Renata; Janota, Barbara; Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, Alicja

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to assess the utility of [Lys40(Ahx-HYNIC-99mTc/EDDA)NH2]-exendin-4 scintigraphy in the management of patients with hypoglycemia, particularly in the detection of occult insulinoma. Materials and Methods Forty patients with hypoglycemia and increased/confusing results of serum insulin and C-peptide concentration and negative/inconclusive results of other imaging examinations were enrolled in the study. In all patients GLP-1 receptor imaging was performed to localise potential pancreatic lesions. Results Positive results of GLP-1 scintigraphy were observed in 28 patients. In 18 patients postsurgical histopathological examination confirmed diagnosis of insulinoma. Two patients had contraindications to the surgery, one patient did not want to be operated. One patient, who presented with postprandial hypoglycemia, with positive result of GLP-1 imaging was not qualified for surgery and is in the observational group. Eight patients were lost for follow up, among them 6 patients with positive GLP-1 scintigraphy result. One patient with negative scintigraphy was diagnosed with malignant insulinoma. In two patients with negative scintigraphy Munchausen syndrome was diagnosed (patients were taking insulin). Other seven patients with negative results of 99mTcGLP-1 scintigraphy and postprandial hypoglycemia with C-peptide and insulin levels within the limits of normal ranges are in the observational group. We would like to mention that 99mTc-GLP1-SPECT/CT was also performed in 3 pts with nesidioblastosis (revealing diffuse tracer uptake in two and a focal lesion in one case) and in two patients with malignant insulinoma (with the a focal uptake in the localization of a removed pancreatic headin one case and negative GLP-1 1 scintigraphy in the other patient). Conclusions 99mTc-GLP1-SPECT/CT could be helpful examination in the management of patients with hypoglycemia enabling proper localization of the pancreatic lesion and effective

  17. GLP-1 increases microvascular recruitment but not glucose uptake in human and rat skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sjøberg, Kim A.; Holst, Jens J.; Rattigan, Stephen; Richter, Erik A.

    2013-01-01

    The insulinotropic gut hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has been proposed to have effects on vascular function and glucose disposal. However, whether GLP-1 is able to increase microvascular recruitment (MVR) in humans has not been investigated. GLP-1 was infused in the femoral artery in overnight-fasted, healthy young men. Microvascular recruitment was measured with real-time contrast-enhanced ultrasound and leg glucose uptake by the leg balance technique with and without inhibition of the insulinotropic response of GLP-1 by coinfusion of octreotide. As a positive control, MVR and leg glucose uptake were measured during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Infusion of GLP-1 caused a rapid increase (P < 0.05) of 20 ± 12% (mean ± SE) in MVR in the vastus lateralis muscle of the infused leg after 5 min, and MVR further increased to 60 ± 8% above preinfusion levels by 60 min infusion. The effect was slightly slower but similar in magnitude in the noninfused contralateral leg, in which GLP-1 concentration was within the physiological range. Octreotide infusion did not prevent the GLP-1-induced increase in MVR. GLP-1 infusion did not increase leg glucose uptake with or without octreotide coinfusion. GLP-1 infusion in rats increased MVR by 28% (P < 0.05) but did not increase muscle glucose uptake. During the hyperinsulinemic clamp, MVR increased ∼40%, and leg glucose uptake increased 35-fold. It is concluded that GLP-1 in physiological concentrations causes a rapid insulin-independent increase in muscle MVR but does not affect muscle glucose uptake. PMID:24302010

  18. Inositolphosphoglycans and diacyglycerol are possible mediators in the glycogenic effect of GLP-1(7-36)amide in BC3H-1 myocytes.

    PubMed

    Galera, C; Clemente, F; Alcantara, A; Trapote, M A; Perea, A; Lopez-Delgado, M I; Villanueva-Penacarrillo, M L; Valverde, I

    1996-03-01

    A potent glycogenic effect of GLP-1(7-36)amide has been found in rat hepatocytes and skeletal muscle, and specific receptors for this peptide, which do not seem to be associated with the adenylate cyclase-cAMP system, have been detected in these tissue membranes. On the other hand, inositolphosphoglycan molecules (IPGs) have been implicated as second messengers of the action of insulin. In this work, we have found, in differentiated BC3H-1 myocytes, specific binding of [125I]GLP-1(7-36)amide, and a stimulatory effect of the peptide on glycogen synthesis, confirming the findings in rat skeletal muscle. Also, GLP-1(7-36)amide modulates the cell content of radiolabelled glycosylphosphatidylinositols (GPIs) and increases the production of diacylglycerol (DAG), in the same manner as insulin acts, indicating hydrolysis of GPIs and an immediate and short-lived generation of IPGs. Thus, IPGs and DAG could be mediators in the glycogenic action of GLP-1(7-36)amide in skeletal muscle. PMID:8907253

  19. cAMP-independent effects of GLP-1 on β cells.

    PubMed

    Kolic, Jelena; MacDonald, Patrick E

    2015-12-01

    The ability of glucose to stimulate insulin secretion from the pancreatic islets of Langerhans is enhanced by the intestinal hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), which is secreted from the gut in response to nutrient ingestion. This action, called the incretin effect, accounts for as much as half of the postprandial insulin response and is exploited therapeutically for diabetes treatment through the use of incretin mimetic drugs and inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase 4, which degrades GLP-1. Despite a prominent role for incretin mimetics in diabetes treatment, several key questions remain about GLP-1-induced insulin secretion. Most studies have examined the effects of GLP-1 at concentrations several orders of magnitude higher than those found in vivo; therefore, one might question the physiological (and perhaps even pharmacological) relevance of pathways identified in these studies and whether other important mechanisms might have been obscured. In this issue of the JCI, Shigeto and colleagues demonstrate that physiological GLP-1 does indeed amplify the insulin secretory response. Intriguingly, while much of this response is PKA dependent, as might be expected, the use of picomolar GLP-1 reveals a new and important mechanism that contributes to GLP-1-induced insulin secretion. PMID:26571393

  20. Miglitol administered before breakfast increased plasma active glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels after lunch in patients with type 2 diabetes treated with sitagliptin.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Kazutaka; Kamiyama, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Kouichiro; Shibuya, Makoto; Masuda, Kiyomi; Terauchi, Yasuo

    2012-06-01

    We recently reported that the administration of miglitol alone just before breakfast improved postprandial hyperglycemia and increased active glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels after lunch in men without diabetes. Miglitol and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, such as sitagliptin, enhance plasma active GLP-1 concentrations via different mechanisms; therefore, combined therapy with these agents was more effective than monotherapy. In this study, we compared the effectiveness of the administration of miglitol alone just before breakfast on the plasma glucose, serum insulin and glucagon, and plasma incretin levels in sitagliptin-treated patients with type 2 diabetes. We measured the plasma glucose, serum insulin and glucagon, plasma active GLP-1, and total glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide levels before breakfast, at 120 min after breakfast, before lunch, and 60 and 120 min after lunch in patients with diabetes who are receiving sitagliptin. This trial was performed for the following 2 days on each subject (Day 1: no miglitol, Day 2: miglitol alone [50 mg] administered just before breakfast). The area under the curve (AUC) of the plasma glucose levels after lunch in the miglitol-treated group tended to be lower than that in the miglitol-untreated group, but the difference was not statistically significant. Miglitol alone administered at breakfast increased the AUC of the active plasma GLP-1 levels after lunch in sitagliptin-treated patients with diabetes. Our results suggest that the once-daily administration of miglitol as a "GLP-1 enhancer" in combination with sitagliptin was effective for the treatment for patients with diabetes. PMID:21898126

  1. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor is present in pancreatic acinar cells and regulates amylase secretion through cAMP.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yanan; Ernst, Stephen A; Heidenreich, Kaeli; Williams, John A

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a glucoincretin hormone that can act through its receptor (GLP-1R) on pancreatic β-cells and increase insulin secretion and production. GLP-1R agonists are used clinically to treat type 2 diabetes. GLP-1 may also regulate the exocrine pancreas at multiple levels, including inhibition through the central nervous system, stimulation indirectly through insulin, and stimulation directly on acinar cells. However, it has been unclear whether GLP-1R is present in pancreatic acini and what physiological functions these receptors regulate. In the current study we utilized GLP-1R knockout (KO) mice to study the role of GLP-1R in acinar cells. RNA expression of GLP-1R was detected in acutely isolated pancreatic acini. Acinar cell morphology and expression of digestive enzymes were not affected by loss of GLP-1R. GLP-1 induced amylase secretion in wild-type (WT) acini. In GLP-1R KO mice, this effect was abolished, whereas vasoactive intestinal peptide-induced amylase release in KO acini showed a pattern similar to that in WT acini. GLP-1 stimulated cAMP production and increased protein kinase A-mediated protein phosphorylation in WT acini, and these effects were absent in KO acini. These data show that GLP-1R is present in pancreatic acinar cells and that GLP-1 can regulate secretion through its receptor and cAMP signaling pathway. PMID:26542397

  2. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) in the gastrointestinal tract of the pheasant (Phasianus colchicus).

    PubMed

    Pirone, Andrea; Ding, Bao An; Giannessi, Elisabetta; Coli, Alessandra; Stornelli, Maria Rita; di Cossato, Margherita Marzoni Fecia; Piano, Ilaria; Lenzi, Carla

    2012-10-01

    The distribution of Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) was investigated in the gastrointestinal tract of the pheasant using immunohistochemistry. GLP-1 immunoreactive cells were common in the small intestine, in the proventriculus and in the pancreas. Immunostained cells were not seen in the crop, in the gizzard and in the large intestine. Double labelling demonstrated that GLP-1 and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) were occasionally co-localized only in the duodenal villi. In contrast to what was previously described in the chicken and ostrich, we noted GLP-1 positive cells in the duodenum. These data were consistent with the presence of proglucagon mRNA in the chicken duodenum. Our findings indicate that GLP-1 might have an inhibitory effect on gastric and crop emptying and on acid secretion also in the pheasant. Moreover, the results of the present research regarding the initial region of the small intestine suggest a further direct mechanism of the GLP-1 release during the early digestion phase and an enhancement of its incretin role. PMID:22036174

  3. Combination therapy of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors and metformin in type 2 diabetes: rationale and evidence.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Hong, T

    2014-02-01

    The main pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) includes insulin resistance and pancreatic islet dysfunction. Metformin, which attenuates insulin resistance, has been recommended as the first-line antidiabetic medication. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are novel oral hypoglycaemic agents that protect glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) from degradation, maintain the bioactivity of endogenous GLP-1, and thus improve islet dysfunction. Results from clinical trials have shown that the combination therapy of DPP-4 inhibitors and metformin [as an add-on, an initial combination or a fixed-dose combination (FDC)] provides excellent efficacy and safety in patients with T2DM. Moreover, recent studies have suggested that metformin enhances the biological effect of GLP-1 by increasing GLP-1 secretion, suppressing activity of DPP-4 and upregulating the expression of GLP-1 receptor in pancreatic β-cells. Conversely, DPP-4 inhibitors have a favourable effect on insulin sensitivity in patients with T2DM. Therefore, the combination of DPP-4 inhibitors and metformin provides an additive or even synergistic effect on metabolic control in patients with T2DM. This article provides an overview of clinical evidence and discusses the rationale for the combination therapy of DPP-4 inhibitors and metformin. PMID:23668534

  4. Molecular Characterisation of Small Molecule Agonists Effect on the Human Glucagon Like Peptide-1 Receptor Internalisation

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Aiysha; Stephens, Jeffrey W.; Bain, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide receptor (GLP-1R), which is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), signals through both Gαs and Gαq coupled pathways and ERK phosphorylation to stimulate insulin secretion. The aim of this study was to determine molecular details of the effect of small molecule agonists, compounds 2 and B, on GLP-1R mediated cAMP production, intracellular Ca2+ accumulation, ERK phosphorylation and its internalisation. In human GLP-1R (hGLP-1R) expressing cells, compounds 2 and B induced cAMP production but caused no intracellular Ca2+ accumulation, ERK phosphorylation or hGLP-1R internalisation. GLP-1 antagonists Ex(9–39) and JANT-4 and the orthosteric binding site mutation (V36A) in hGLP-1R failed to inhibit compounds 2 and B induced cAMP production, confirming that their binding site distinct from the GLP-1 binding site on GLP-1R. However, K334A mutation of hGLP-1R, which affects Gαs coupling, inhibited GLP-1 as well as compounds 2 and B induced cAMP production, indicating that GLP-1, compounds 2 and B binding induce similar conformational changes in the GLP-1R for Gαs coupling. Additionally, compound 2 or B binding to the hGLP-1R had significantly reduced GLP-1 induced intracellular Ca2+ accumulation, ERK phosphorylation and hGLP-1R internalisation. This study illustrates pharmacology of differential activation of GLP-1R by GLP-1 and compounds 2 and B. PMID:27100083

  5. Intragenic Dominant Suppressors of Glp-1, a Gene Essential for Cell-Signaling in Caenorhabditis Elegans, Support a Role for Cdc10/Sw16/Ankyrin Motifs in Glp-1 Function

    PubMed Central

    Lissemore, J. L.; Currie, P. D.; Turk, C. M.; Maine, E. M.

    1993-01-01

    The glp-1 gene product mediates cell-cell interactions required for cell fate specification during development in Caenorhabditis elegans. To identify genes that interact with glp-1, we screened for dominant suppressors of two temperature-sensitive glp-1 alleles and recovered 18 mutations that suppress both germline and embryonic glp-1 phenotypes. These dominant suppressors are tightly linked to glp-1 and do not bypass the requirement for a distal tip cell, which is thought to be the source of a signal that is received and transduced by the GLP-1 protein. Using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and DNA sequencing, we found that at least 17 suppressors are second-site intragenic revertants. The suppressors, like the original glp-1(ts) mutations, are all located in the cdc10/SWI6/ankyrin domain of GLP-1. cdc10/SWI6/ankyrin motifs have been shown to mediate specific protein-protein interactions in other polypeptides. We propose that the glp-1(ts) mutations disrupt contact between GLP-1 and an as yet unidentified target protein(s) and that the dominant suppressor mutations restore appropriate protein-protein interactions. PMID:8307320

  6. Antiplatelet therapy: thrombin receptor antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Tello-Montoliu, Antonio; Tomasello, Salvatore D; Ueno, Masafumi; Angiolillo, Dominick J

    2011-01-01

    Activated platelets stimulate thrombus formation in response to rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque or endothelial cell erosion, promoting atherothrombotic disease. Multiple pathways contribute to platelet activation. Aspirin, an irreversible inhibitor of thromboxane A2 synthesis, in combination with clopidogrel, an inhibitor of P2Y12 adenosine diphosphate platelet receptors, represent the current standard-of-care of antiplatelet therapy for patients with acute coronary syndrome and for those undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. Although these agents have demonstrated significant clinical benefit, the increased risk of bleeding and the recurrence of thrombotic events represent substantial limitations. Thrombin is one of the most important platelet activators. The inhibition of protease-activated receptor 1 showed a good safety profile in preclinical studies. In fact, phase II studies with vorapaxar (SCH530348) and atopaxar (E5555) showed no increase of bleeding events in addition to the current standard-of-care of antiplatelet therapy. Although the results of phase III trials for both drugs are awaited, this family is a promising new addition to the current clinical practice for patients with atherothrombotic disease, not only as an alternative, but also as additional therapy. PMID:21906120

  7. Peptide complex containing GLP-1 exhibited long-acting properties in the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xuemin; Li, Ying; Li, Xin; Tang, Lida; Xu, Weiren; Gong, Min

    2011-09-01

    The multiple physiological characterizations of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) make it a promising drug candidate for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. However, in vivo, the half-life of GLP-1 is short, which is caused by the degradation of dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) and renal clearance. Thus, the stabilization of GLP-1 is critical for its utility in drug development. Peptides known as GLP-1 protectors are predicted to increase the half-life of GLP-1 in vivo. Protecting peptides are able to form stable complexes by non-covalent interactions with human GLP-1. In this study, the stability of the complex was investigated, and the physiological functions of the GLP-1/peptide 1 complex were compared to those of exenatide and liraglutide in animals. The results indicated that the GLP-1/peptide 1 complex remarkably raised the half-life of GLP-1 in vivo and showed better glucose tolerance and higher HbA(1c) reduction than exenatide and liraglutide in rodents. Based upon these results, it is suggested that the GLP-1/peptide 1 complex might be utilized as a possible potent anti-diabetic drug in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:21641071

  8. A Novel TGR5 Activator WB403 Promotes GLP-1 Secretion and Preserves Pancreatic β-Cells in Type 2 Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tongtong; You, Panpan; Zhao, Yongliang; Yang, Yiqing; Wang, Xin; Luo, Jian; Chen, Yihua; Liu, Mingyao; Chen, Huaqing

    2015-01-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor TGR5 is a membrane receptor for bile acids. Its agonism increases energy expenditure and controls blood glucose through secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 in enteroendocrine cells. In this study, we explored the therapeutic potential of WB403, a small compound activating TGR5 which was identified by combining TGR5 targeted luciferase assay and active GLP-1 assay, in treating type 2 diabetes. After confirmation of TGR5 and GLP-1 stimulating activities in various cell systems, WB403 was examined in oral glucose tolerance test, and tested on different mouse models of type 2 diabetes for glycemic control and pancreatic β-cell protection effect. As a result, WB403 exhibited a moderate TGR5 activation effect while promoting GLP-1 secretion efficiently. Interestingly, gallbladder filling effect, which was reported for some known TGR5 agonists, was not detected in this novel compound. In vivo results showed that WB403 significantly improved glucose tolerance and decreased fasting blood glucose, postprandial blood glucose and HbA1c in type 2 diabetic mice. Further analysis revealed that WB403 increased pancreatic β-cells and restored the normal distribution pattern of α-cell and β-cell in islets. These findings demonstrated that TGR5 activator WB403 effectively promoted GLP-1 release, improved hyperglycemia and preserved the mass and function of pancreatic β-cells, whereas it did not show a significant side effect on gallbladder. It may represent a promising approach for future type 2 diabetes mellitus drug development. PMID:26208278

  9. Glucagon-like-peptide-1 receptor expression in normal and diseased human thyroid and pancreas.

    PubMed

    Waser, Beatrice; Blank, Annika; Karamitopoulou, Eva; Perren, Aurel; Reubi, Jean C

    2015-03-01

    Glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP1) analogs may induce thyroid or pancreatic diseases in animals, raising questions about their use in diabetic patients. There is, however, controversy regarding expression of GLP1 receptors (GLP1R) in human normal and diseased thyroid and pancreas. Here, 221 human thyroid and pancreas samples were analyzed for GLP1R immunohistochemistry and compared with quantitative in vitro GLP1R autoradiography. Neither normal nor hyperplastic human thyroids containing parafollicular C cells express GLP1R with either method. Papillary thyroid cancer do not, and medullary thyroid carcinomas rarely express GLP1R. Insulin- and somatostatin-producing cells in the normal pancreas express a high density of GLP1R, whereas acinar cells express them in low amounts. Ductal epithelial cells do not express GLP1R. All benign insulinomas express high densities of GLP1R, whereas malignant insulinomas rarely express them. All ductal pancreatic carcinomas are GLP1R negative, whereas 6/20 PanIN 1/2 and 0/12 PanIN 3 express GLP1R. Therefore, normal thyroid, including normal and hyperplastic C cells, or papillary thyroid cancer are not targets for GLP1 analogs in humans. Conversely, all pancreatic insulin- and somatostatin-producing cells are physiological GLP1 targets, as well as most acini. As normal ductal epithelial cells or PanIN 3 or ductal pancreatic carcinomas do not express GLP1R, it seems unlikely that GLP1R is related to neoplastic transformation in pancreas. GLP1R-positive medullary thyroid carcinomas and all benign insulinomas are candidates for in vivo GLP1R targeting. PMID:25216224

  10. Minor Contribution of Endogenous GLP-1 and GLP-2 to Postprandial Lipemia in Obese Men

    PubMed Central

    Matikainen, Niina; Björnson, Elias; Söderlund, Sanni; Borén, Christofer; Eliasson, Björn; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H.; Bogl, Leonie H.; Hakkarainen, Antti; Lundbom, Nina; Rivellese, Angela; Riccardi, Gabriele; Després, Jean-Pierre; Alméras, Natalie; Holst, Jens Juul; Deacon, Carolyn F.; Borén, Jan; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta

    2016-01-01

    Context Glucose and lipids stimulate the gut-hormones glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1, GLP-2 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) but the effect of these on human postprandial lipid metabolism is not fully clarified. Objective To explore the responses of GLP-1, GLP-2 and GIP after a fat-rich meal compared to the same responses after an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and to investigate possible relationships between incretin response and triglyceride-rich lipoprotein (TRL) response to a fat-rich meal. Design Glucose, insulin, GLP-1, GLP-2 and GIP were measured after an OGTT and after a fat-rich meal in 65 healthy obese (BMI 26.5–40.2 kg/m2) male subjects. Triglycerides (TG), apoB48 and apoB100 in TG-rich lipoproteins (chylomicrons, VLDL1 and VLDL2) were measured after the fat-rich meal. Main Outcome Measures Postprandial responses (area under the curve, AUC) for glucose, insulin, GLP-1, GLP-2, GIP in plasma, and TG, apoB48 and apoB100 in plasma and TG-rich lipoproteins. Results The GLP-1, GLP-2 and GIP responses after the fat-rich meal and after the OGTT correlated strongly (r = 0.73, p<0.0001; r = 0.46, p<0.001 and r = 0.69, p<0.001, respectively). Glucose and insulin AUCs were lower, but the AUCs for GLP-1, GLP-2 and GIP were significantly higher after the fat-rich meal than after the OGTT. The peak value for all hormones appeared at 120 minutes after the fat-rich meal, compared to 30 minutes after the OGTT. After the fat-rich meal, the AUCs for GLP-1, GLP-2 and GIP correlated significantly with plasma TG- and apoB48 AUCs but the contribution was very modest. Conclusions In obese males, GLP-1, GLP-2 and GIP responses to a fat-rich meal are greater than following an OGTT. However, the most important explanatory variable for postprandial TG excursion was fasting triglycerides. The contribution of endogenous GLP-1, GLP-2 and GIP to explaining the variance in postprandial TG excursion was minor. PMID:26752550

  11. Presence and dynamics of leptin, GLP-1, and PYY in human breast milk at early postpartum

    PubMed Central

    Schueler, Jessica; Alexander, Brenda; Hart, Ann Marie; Austin, Kathleen; Enette Larson-Meyer, D

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The presence of appetite hormones, namely glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), peptide YY (PYY), and leptin in breast milk may be important in infant feeding regulation and infant growth. This study evaluated whether concentrations of GLP-1, PYY, and leptin change across a single feeding (from fore- to hindmilk), and are associated with maternal and infant anthropometrics. Design and Methods: Thirteen postpartum women (mean ± SD: 25.6 ± 4.5 years, 72.0 ± 11.9 kg) provided fore- and hindmilk samples 4-5 weeks after delivery and underwent measurements of body weight and composition by Dual X-ray Absorptiometry. GLP-1, PYY, and leptin concentrations were measured using radioimmunoassay, and milk fat content was determined by creamatocrit. Results: Concentration of GLP-1 and content of milk fat was higher in hindmilk than foremilk (P ≤ 0.05). PYY and leptin concentrations did not change between fore- and hindmilk. Both leptin concentration and milk fat content were correlated with indices of maternal adiposity, including body mass index (r = 0.65-0.85, P < 0.02), and fat mass (r = 0.65-0.84, P < 0.02). Hindmilk GLP-1 was correlated with infant weight gain from birth to 6 months (r = −0.67, P = 0.034). Conclusion: The presence of appetite hormones in breast milk may be important in infant appetite and growth regulation. PMID:23408760

  12. GLP-1 promotes mitochondrial metabolism in vascular smooth muscle cells by enhancing endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria coupling.

    PubMed

    Morales, Pablo E; Torres, Gloria; Sotomayor-Flores, Cristian; Peña-Oyarzún, Daniel; Rivera-Mejías, Pablo; Paredes, Felipe; Chiong, Mario

    2014-03-28

    Incretin GLP-1 has important metabolic effects on several tissues, mainly through the regulation of glucose uptake and usage. One mechanism for increasing cell metabolism is modulating endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondria communication, as it allows for a more efficient transfer of Ca(2+) into the mitochondria, thereby increasing activity. Control of glucose metabolism is essential for proper vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) function. GLP-1 has been shown to produce varied metabolic actions, but whether it regulates glucose metabolism in VSMC remains unknown. In this report, we show that GLP-1 increases mitochondrial activity in the aortic cell line A7r5 by increasing ER-mitochondria coupling. GLP-1 increases intracellular glucose and diminishes glucose uptake without altering glycogen content. ATP, mitochondrial potential and oxygen consumption increase at 3h of GLP-1 treatment, paralleled by increased Ca(2+) transfer from the ER to the mitochondria. Furthermore, GLP-1 increases levels of Mitofusin-2 (Mfn2), an ER-mitochondria tethering protein, via a PKA-dependent mechanism. Accordingly, PKA inhibition and Mfn2 down-regulation prevented mitochondrial Ca(2+) increases in GLP-1 treated cells. Inhibiting both Ca(2+) release from the ER and Ca(2+) entry into mitochondria as well as diminishing Mfn2 levels blunted the increase in mitochondrial activity in response to GLP-1. Altogether, these results strongly suggest that GLP-1 increases ER-mitochondria communication in VSMC, resulting in higher mitochondrial activity. PMID:24613839

  13. Neuroprotective effects of (Val8)GLP-1-Glu-PAL in the MPTP Parkinson's disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, YanFang; Chen, YiMei; Li, Lin; Hölscher, Christian

    2015-10-15

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is a hormone and a growth factor. GLP-1 mimetics are currently on the market as treatments for type 2 diabetes. They also have shown neuroprotective properties in animal models of neurodegenerative disorders. In addition, the GLP-1 mimetic exendin-4 has shown protective effects in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD), and a first clinical trial in PD patients showed promising results. (Val8)GLP-1-glu-PAL is a new GLP-1 analogue which has a longer biological half-life than exendin-4. We previously showed that (Val8)GLP-1-glu-PAL has neuroprotective properties. Here we tested the drug in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of PD. MPTP was injected (30mg/kg i.p.) along with (Val8)GLP-1-glu-PAL (25nmol/kg i.p.) once-daily for 8 days. (Val8)GLP-1-glu-PAL showed good effects in preventing the MPTP-induced motor impairment (Rotarod, open field locomotion, swim test), reduction in tyrosine hydroxylase levels (dopamine synthesis) in the substantia nigra, a reduction of activated caspase 3 levels, of TUNEL positive cell numbers, of the pro-apoptotic signaling molecule BAX and an increase in the growth signaling molecule Bcl-2. The results demonstrate that (Val8)GLP-1-glu-PAL shows promise as a novel treatment of PD. PMID:26187689

  14. Mechanisms of surgical control of type 2 diabetes: GLP-1 is the key factor-Maybe.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Marzieh; D'Alessio, David A

    2016-07-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for obesity and diabetes. The 2 most commonly performed weight-loss procedures, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and sleeve gastrectomy, improve glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes independent of weight loss. One of the early hypotheses raised to explain the immediate antidiabetic effect of RYGB was that rapid delivery of nutrients from the stomach pouch into the distal small intestine enhances enteroinsular signaling to promote insulin signaling. Given the tenfold increase in postmeal glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) response compared to unchanged integrated levels of postprandial glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide after RYGB, enhanced meal-induced insulin secretion after this procedure was thought to be the result of elevated glucose and GLP-1 levels. In this contribution to the larger point-counterpoint debate about the role of GLP-1 after bariatric surgery, most of the focus will be on RYGB. PMID:27568473

  15. GLP-1(7-36)amide binding in skeletal muscle membranes from streptozotocin diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L; Delgado, E; Vicent, D; Mérida, E; Alcántara, A I; Valverde, I

    1995-09-01

    A higher specific binding of GLP-1(7-36)amide is found in skeletal muscle plasma membranes from adult streptozotocin (STZ)-treated rats (insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus model) and from neonatal STZ-treated rats (non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus model), as compared to that in normal controls; no apparent change in the affinity was observed, that indicating the presence in both diabetic models of an increased number of high affinity binding sites for the peptide. The maximal specific GLP-1(7-16)amide binding in the non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus model was found to be significantly higher than that in the insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus model. As GLP-1(7-36)amide exerts a glycogenic effect in the rat skeletal muscle, the present data suggest that the action of the peptide in the muscle glucose metabolism may be increased in states of insulin deficiency accompanied or not by insulin resistance. PMID:21153227

  16. High fat diet and GLP-1 drugs induce pancreatic injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Rouse, Rodney; Xu, Lin; Stewart, Sharron; Zhang, Jun

    2014-04-15

    Glucagon Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) drugs are currently used to treat type-2 diabetes. Safety concerns for increased risk of pancreatitis and pancreatic ductal metaplasia have accompanied these drugs. High fat diet (HFD) is a type-2 diabetes risk factor that may affect the response to GLP-1 drug treatment. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of diet and GLP-1 based drugs on the exocrine pancreas in mice. Experiments were designed in a mouse model of insulin resistance created by feeding a HFD or standard diet (STD) for 6weeks. The GLP-1 drugs, sitagliptin (SIT) and exenatide (EXE) were administered once daily for additional 6weeks in both mice fed HFD or STD. The results showed that body weight, blood glucose levels, and serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNFα, IL-1β, and KC) were significantly greater in HFD mice than in STD mice regardless of GLP-1 drug treatment. The semi-quantitative grading showed that pancreatic changes were significantly greater in EXE and SIT-treated mice compared to control and that HFD exacerbated spontaneous exocrine pancreatic changes seen in saline-treated mice on a standard diet. Exocrine pancreatic changes identified in this study included acinar cell injury (hypertrophy, autophagy, apoptosis, necrosis, and atrophy), vascular injury, interstitial edema and inflammation, fat necrosis, and duct changes. These findings support HFD as a risk factor to increased susceptibility/severity for acute pancreatitis and indicate that GLP-1 drugs cause pancreatic injury that can be exacerbated in a HFD environment. PMID:24534256

  17. High fat diet and GLP-1 drugs induce pancreatic injury in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Rouse, Rodney Xu, Lin; Stewart, Sharron; Zhang, Jun

    2014-04-15

    Glucagon Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) drugs are currently used to treat type-2 diabetes. Safety concerns for increased risk of pancreatitis and pancreatic ductal metaplasia have accompanied these drugs. High fat diet (HFD) is a type-2 diabetes risk factor that may affect the response to GLP-1 drug treatment. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of diet and GLP-1 based drugs on the exocrine pancreas in mice. Experiments were designed in a mouse model of insulin resistance created by feeding a HFD or standard diet (STD) for 6 weeks. The GLP-1 drugs, sitagliptin (SIT) and exenatide (EXE) were administered once daily for additional 6 weeks in both mice fed HFD or STD. The results showed that body weight, blood glucose levels, and serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNFα, IL-1β, and KC) were significantly greater in HFD mice than in STD mice regardless of GLP-1 drug treatment. The semi-quantitative grading showed that pancreatic changes were significantly greater in EXE and SIT-treated mice compared to control and that HFD exacerbated spontaneous exocrine pancreatic changes seen in saline-treated mice on a standard diet. Exocrine pancreatic changes identified in this study included acinar cell injury (hypertrophy, autophagy, apoptosis, necrosis, and atrophy), vascular injury, interstitial edema and inflammation, fat necrosis, and duct changes. These findings support HFD as a risk factor to increased susceptibility/severity for acute pancreatitis and indicate that GLP-1 drugs cause pancreatic injury that can be exacerbated in a HFD environment.

  18. Effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists on non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xing-Chun; Gusdon, Aaron M; Liu, Huan; Qu, Shen

    2014-10-28

    Glucagon-like peptide1 (GLP-1) is secreted from Langerhans cells in response to oral nutrient intake. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) are a new class of incretin-based anti-diabetic drugs. They function to stimulate insulin secretion while suppressing glucagon secretion. GLP-1-based therapies are now well established in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and recent literature has suggested potential applications of these drugs in the treatment of obesity and for protection against cardiovascular and neurological diseases. As we know, along with change in lifestyles, the prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in China is rising more than that of viral hepatitis and alcoholic fatty liver disease, and NAFLD has become the most common chronic liver disease in recent years. Recent studies further suggest that GLP-1RAs can reduce transaminase levels to improve NAFLD by improving blood lipid levels, cutting down the fat content to promote fat redistribution, directly decreasing fatty degeneration of the liver, reducing the degree of liver fibrosis and improving inflammation. This review shows the NAFLD-associated effects of GLP-1RAs in animal models and in patients with T2DM or obesity who are participants in clinical trials. PMID:25356042

  19. Unsaturated Glycoceramides as Molecular Carriers for Mucosal Drug Delivery of GLP-1

    PubMed Central

    te Welscher, Yvonne M.; Chinnapen, Daniel J.-F.; Kaoutzani, Lydia; Mrsny, Randall J.; Lencer, Wayne I.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The incretin hormone Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) requires delivery by injection for the treatment of Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Here, we test if the properties of glycosphingolipid trafficking in epithelial cells can be applied to convert GLP-1 into a molecule suitable for mucosal absorption. GLP-1 was coupled to the extracellular oligosaccharide domain of GM1 species containing ceramides with different fatty acids and with minimal loss of incretin bioactivity. When applied to apical surfaces of polarized epithelial cells in monolayer culture, only GLP-1 coupled to GM1-ceramides with short-or cis-unsaturated fatty acids trafficked efficiently across the cell to the basolateral membrane by transcytosis. In vivo studies showed mucosal absorption after nasal administration. The results substantiate our recently reported dependence on ceramide structure for trafficking the GM1 across polarized epithelial cells and support the idea that specific glycosphingolipids can be harnessed as molecular vehicles for mucosal delivery of therapeutic peptides. PMID:24370893

  20. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and protective effects in cardiovascular disease: a new therapeutic approach for myocardial protection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a member of the proglucagon incretin family implicated in the control of appetite and satiety. GLP-1 has insulinotropic, insulinomimetic, and glucagonostatic effects, thereby exerting multiple complementary actions to lower blood glucose in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus. A major advantage over conventional insulin is the fact that the insulinotropic actions of GLP-1 are dependent upon ambient glucose concentration, mitigating the risks of hypoglycemia. Recently, the crucial role of GLP-1 in cardiovascular disease has been suggested in both preclinical and clinical studies. The experimental data indicate GLP-1 and its analogs to have direct effects on the cardiovascular system, in addition to their classic glucoregulatory actions. Clinically, beneficial effects of GLP-1 have also been demonstrated in patients with myocardial ischemia and heart failure. GLP-1 has recently been demonstrated to be a more effective alternative in treating myocardial injury. This paper provides a review on the current evidence supporting the use of GLP-1 in experimental animal models and human trials with the ischemic and non-ischemic heart and discusses their molecular mechanisms and potential as a new therapeutic approach. PMID:23777457

  1. Gliptin and GLP-1 analog treatment improves survival and vascular inflammation/dysfunction in animals with lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Steven, Sebastian; Hausding, Michael; Kröller-Schön, Swenja; Mader, Michael; Mikhed, Yuliya; Stamm, Paul; Zinßius, Elena; Pfeffer, Amanda; Welschof, Philipp; Agdauletova, Saule; Sudowe, Stephan; Li, Huige; Oelze, Matthias; Schulz, Eberhard; Klein, Thomas; Münzel, Thomas; Daiber, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitors are used to treat hyperglycemia by increasing the incretin glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). Previous studies showed anti-inflammatory and antiatherosclerotic effects of DPP-4 inhibitors. Here, we compared the effects of linagliptin versus sitagliptin and liraglutide on survival and vascular function in animal models of endotoxic shock by prophylactic therapy and treatment after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection. Gliptins were administered either orally or subcutaneously: linagliptin (5 mg/kg/day), sitagliptin (50 mg/kg/day) or liraglutide (200 µg/kg/day). Endotoxic shock was induced by LPS injection (mice 17.5-20 mg/kg i.p., rats 10 mg/kg/day). Linagliptin and liraglutide treatment or DPP-4 knockout improved the survival of endotoxemic mice, while sitagliptin was ineffective. Linagliptin, liraglutide and sitagliptin ameliorated LPS-induced hypotension and vascular dysfunction in endotoxemic rats, suppressed inflammatory parameters such as whole blood nitrosyl-iron hemoglobin (leukocyte-inducible nitric oxide synthase activity) or aortic mRNA expression of markers of inflammation as well as whole blood and aortic reactive oxygen species formation. Hemostasis (tail bleeding time, activated partial thromboplastin time) was impaired in endotoxemic rats and recovered under cotreatment with linagliptin and liraglutide. Finally, the beneficial effects of linagliptin on vascular function and inflammatory parameters in endotoxemic mice were impaired in AMP-activated kinase (alpha1) knockout mice. The improved survival of endotoxemic animals and other data shown here may warrant further clinical evaluation of these drugs in patients with septic shock beyond the potential improvement of inflammatory complications in diabetic individuals with special emphasis on the role of AMP-activated kinase (alpha1) in the DPP-4/GLP-1 cascade. PMID:25600227

  2. GLP-1 responses are heritable and blunted in acquired obesity with high liver fat and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Matikainen, Niina; Bogl, Leonie H; Hakkarainen, Antti; Lundbom, Jesper; Lundbom, Nina; Kaprio, Jaakko; Rissanen, Aila; Holst, Jens J; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Impaired incretin response represents an early and uniform defect in type 2 diabetes, but the contributions of genes and the environment are poorly characterized. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We studied 35 monozygotic (MZ) and 75 dizygotic (DZ) twin pairs (discordant and concordant for obesity) to determine the heritability of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) responses to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and the influence of acquired obesity to GLP-1, glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP), and peptide YY (PYY) during OGTT or meal test. RESULTS The heritability of GLP-1 area under the curve was 67% (95% CI 45-80). Cotwins from weight-concordant MZ and DZ pairs and weight-discordant MZ pairs but concordant for liver fat content demonstrated similar glucose, insulin, and incretin profiles after the OGTT and meal tests. In contrast, higher insulin responses and blunted 60-min GLP-1 responses during the OGTT were observed in the heavier as compared with leaner MZ cotwins discordant for BMI, liver fat, and insulin sensitivity. Blunted GLP-1 response to OGTT was observed in heavier as compared with leaner DZ cotwins discordant for obesity and insulin sensitivity. CONCLUSIONS Whereas the GLP-1 response to the OGTT is heritable, an acquired unhealthy pattern of obesity characterized by liver fat accumulation and insulin resistance is closely related to impaired GLP-1 response in young adults. PMID:23990519

  3. The glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist enhances intrinsic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ activity in endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Onuma, Hirohisa; Inukai, Kouichi Kitahara, Atsuko; Moriya, Rie; Nishida, Susumu; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Katsuta, Hidenori; Takahashi, Kazuto; Sumitani, Yoshikazu; Hosaka, Toshio; Ishida, Hitoshi

    2014-08-22

    Highlights: • PPARγ activation was involved in the GLP-1-mediated anti-inflammatory action. • Exendin-4 enhanced endogenous PPARγ transcriptional activity in HUVECs. • H89, a PKA inhibitor, abolished GLP-1-induced PPARγ enhancement. • The anti-inflammatory effects of GLP-1 may be explained by PPARγ activation. - Abstract: Recent studies have suggested glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) signaling to exert anti-inflammatory effects on endothelial cells, although the precise underlying mechanism remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we investigated whether PPARγ activation is involved in the GLP-1-mediated anti-inflammatory action on endothelial cells. When we treated HUVEC cells with 0.2 ng/ml exendin-4, a GLP-1 receptor agonist, endogenous PPARγ transcriptional activity was significantly elevated, by approximately 20%, as compared with control cells. The maximum PPARγ activity enhancing effect of exendin-4 was observed 12 h after the initiation of incubation with exendin-4. As H89, a PKA inhibitor, abolished GLP-1-induced PPARγ enhancement, the signaling downstream from GLP-1 cross-talk must have been involved in PPARγ activation. In conclusion, our results suggest that GLP-1 has the potential to induce PPARγ activity, partially explaining the anti-inflammatory effects of GLP-1 on endothelial cells. Cross-talk between GLP-1 signaling and PPARγ activation would have major impacts on treatments for patients at high risk for cardiovascular disease.

  4. Postprandial GLP-1 Secretion After Bariatric Surgery in Three Cases of Severe Obesity Related to Craniopharyngiomas.

    PubMed

    Bretault, Marion; Laroche, Suzanne; Lacorte, Jean-Marc; Barsamian, Charles; Polak, Michel; Raffin-Sanson, Marie-Laure; Touraine, Philippe; Bouillot, Jean-Luc; Czernichow, Sebastien; Carette, Claire

    2016-05-01

    Craniopharyngiomas are rare cerebral tumors associated with severe obesity after hypothalamic surgery. A meta-analysis showed significant weight loss at 1 year after bariatric surgery in these patients even though more modest than in common causes of obesity. We hypothesized that this discrepancy could be partly explained by differences in GLP-1 secretion after surgery since patients with craniopharyngioma present a significantly higher degree of insulin resistance and hyperinsulinism than common obese control. We report three cases of bariatric surgery in patients presenting with hypothalamique obesity related to craniopharyngiomas. At 18 months, the mean weight loss was 20 kg with expected insulin resistance decrease. Before surgery, standardized test meal shows abolition of postprandial GLP-1 secretion in all patients with a progressive restoration in the patients with gastric bypass (GBP) surgery. PMID:26922186

  5. Appetite-related peptides in childhood and adolescence: role of ghrelin, PYY, and GLP-1.

    PubMed

    Horner, Katy; Lee, SoJung

    2015-11-01

    During childhood and adolescence, a number of factors, including age, puberty, sex, race, and body composition, may contribute to differences in satiety, food intake, and appetite-related peptides. These peptides include the orexigenic peptide ghrelin and anorexigenic gut peptides peptide YY (PYY) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). For example, lower fasting ghrelin levels, lower postprandial ghrelin suppression, and blunted PYY and GLP-1 responses to food intake could contribute to a dysregulation of appetite in already obese children and adolescents. Whereas, changes in these peptides observed during puberty could facilitate growth. A greater understanding of the major moderating factors of appetite-related peptides in the pediatric population is essential to improve interpretation of study findings and for effective tailoring of strategies targeting appetite control to individuals. While more studies are needed, there is some evidence to suggest that exercise-based lifestyle interventions could be a potential therapeutic strategy to improve appetite-peptide profiles in overweight and obese children and adolescents. The aim of this review is (i) to discuss the potential moderating factors of ghrelin, PYY, and GLP-1, including age and puberty, sex, race and body composition; and (ii) to examine the effects of exercise interventions on these appetite-related gut peptides in children and adolescents. PMID:26466085

  6. Glucagon Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Modulates OVA-Induced Airway Inflammation and Mucus Secretion Involving a Protein Kinase A (PKA)-Dependent Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB) Signaling Pathway in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Tao; Wu, Xiao-ling; Zhang, Wei; Xiao, Min

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a common chronic pulmonary inflammatory disease, featured with mucus hyper-secretion in the airway. Recent studies found that glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogs, including liraglutide and exenatide, possessed a potent anti-inflammatory property through a protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent signaling pathway. Therefore, the aim of current study was to investigate the value of GLP-1 analog therapy liraglutide in airway inflammation and mucus secretion in a murine model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma, and its underlying molecular mechanism. In our study, BALB/c mice were sensitized and challenged by OVA to induce chronic asthma. Pathological alterations, the number of cells and the content of inflammatory mediators in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and mucus secretion were observed and measured. In addition, the mRNA and protein expression of E-selectin and MUC5AC were analyzed by qPCR and Western blotting. Then, the phosphorylation of PKA and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 were also measured by Western blotting. Further, NF-κB p65 DNA binding activity was detected by ELISA. OVA-induced airway inflammation, airway mucus hyper-secretion, the up-regulation of E-selectin and MUC5AC were remarkably inhibited by GLP-1 in mice (all p < 0.01). Then, we also found that OVA-reduced phosphorylation of PKA, and OVA-enhanced NF-κB p65 activation and NF-κB p65 DNA binding activity were markedly improved by GLP-1 (all p < 0.01). Furthermore, our data also figured out that these effects of GLP-1 were largely abrogated by the PKA inhibitor H-89 (all p < 0.01). Taken together, our results suggest that OVA-induced asthma were potently ameliorated by GLP-1 possibly through a PKA-dependent inactivation of NF-κB in mice, indicating that GLP-1 analogs may be considered an effective and safe drug for the potential treatment of asthma in the future. PMID:26343632

  7. New physiological effects of the incretin hormones GLP-1 and GIP.

    PubMed

    Asmar, Meena

    2011-02-01

    With approximately 400 million people worldwide today being obese, we are facing a major public health problem due to the increasing prevalence of the related comorbidities such as type 2 diabetes, hypertension and coronary heart disease. To date, pharmacological treatment of obesity has been largely unsuccessful, only achieving modest and short-lasting reductions in body weight and with adverse effects. Scientific interest in recent years has concentrated on both the secretion and function of the incretin hormones, GLP-1 and GIP, and their suitability as new target drugs. The potential of GLP-1 to reduce gastric emptying, appetite and food intake makes it an attractive tool in the fight against obesity and several companies are developing weight lowering drugs based on GLP-1. Currently, it is not known whether the inhibiting effects of GLP-1 on gastric emptying, appetite and food intake are directly mediated by GLP-1, or if the effects are secondary to the robust insulin responses, and thereby amylin responses, elicited by GLP-1. The first study aimed to further elucidate the mechanisms of these effects in order to strengthen the development of anti-diabetic drugs with potential weight lowering capabilities. We found that GLP-1 mediates its effect on gastrointestinal motility, appetite, food intake and glucagon secretion directly and thereby in an amylin-independent fashion. In vitro and animal studies indicate that GIP exerts direct effects on adipose tissue and lipid metabolism, promoting fat deposition. Due to its therapeutic potential in obesity treatment, a rapidly increasing number of functional studies are investigating effects of acute and chronic loss of GIP signaling in glucose and lipid homeostasis. However, the physiological significance of GIP as a regulator of lipid metabolism in humans remains unclear. In the second study, we investigated the effects of GIP on the removal rate of plasma TAG and FFA concentrations, which were increased after either a

  8. Chylomicron formation and secretion is required for lipid-stimulated release of incretins GLP-1 and GIP.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wendell J; Yang, Qing; Yang, Li; Lee, Dana; D'Alessio, David; Tso, Patrick

    2012-06-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) are incretins produced in the intestine that play a central role in glucose metabolism and insulin secretion. Circulating concentrations of GLP-1 and GIP are low and can be difficult to assay in rodents. These studies utilized the novel intestinal lymph fistula model we have established to investigate the mechanism of lipid-stimulated incretin secretion. Peak concentrations of GLP-1 and GIP following an enteral lipid stimulus (Liposyn) were significantly higher in intestinal lymph than portal venous plasma. To determine whether lipid-stimulated incretin secretion was related to chylomicron formation Pluronic L-81 (L-81), a surfactant inhibiting chylomicron synthesis, was given concurrently with Liposyn. The presence of L-81 almost completely abolished the increase in lymph triglyceride seen with Liposyn alone (P < 0.001). Inhibition of chylomicron formation with L-81 reduced GLP-1 secretion into lymph compared to Liposyn stimulation alone (P = 0.034). The effect of L-81 relative to Liposyn alone had an even greater effect on GIP secretion, which was completely abolished (P = 0.004). These findings of a dramatic effect of L-81 on lymph levels of GLP-1 and GIP support a strong link between intestinal lipid absorption and incretin secretion. The relative difference in the effect of L-81 on the two incretins provides further support that nutrient-stimulation of GIP and GLP-1 is via distinct mechanisms. PMID:22297815

  9. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy of neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Brabander, Tessa; Teunissen, Jaap J M; Van Eijck, Casper H J; Franssen, Gaston J H; Feelders, Richard A; de Herder, Wouter W; Kwekkeboom, Dik J

    2016-01-01

    In the past decades, the number of neuroendocrine tumours that are detected is increasing. A relative new and promising therapy for patients with metastasised or inoperable disease is peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). This therapy involves an infusion of somatostatin analogues linked to radionuclides like Yttrium-90 or Lutetium-177. Objective response rates are reported in 15-35%. Response rates may vary between type of tumour and radionuclide. Besides the objective response rate, overall survival and progression free survival increase significantly. Also, the quality of life improves as well. Serious side-affects are rare. PRRT is usually well tolerated, also in patients with extensive metastasised disease. Recent studies combined PRRT with other types of therapies. Unfortunately no randomised trials comparing these strategies are available. In the future, more research is needed to evaluate the best therapy combinations or sequence of therapies. PMID:26971847

  10. PEGylated Exendin-4, a Modified GLP-1 Analog Exhibits More Potent Cardioprotection than Its Unmodified Parent Molecule on a Dose to Dose Basis in a Murine Model of Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhongchan; Tong, Guang; Kim, Tae Hyung; Ma, Nan; Niu, Gang; Cao, Feng; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    A Site-specifically PEGylated exendin-4 (denoted as PEG-Ex4) is an exendin-4 (denoted as Ex4) analog we developed by site-specific PEGylation of exendin-4 with a high molecular weight trimeric poly(ethylene glycol) (tPEG). It has been shown to possess prolonged half-life in vivo with similar receptor binding affinity compared to unmodified exendin-4 by our previous work. This study is sought to test whether PEG-Ex4 is suitable for treating myocardial infarction (MI). In the MI model, PEG-Ex4 was administered every 3 days while equivalent amount of Ex4 was administered every 3 days or twice daily. Animal survival rate, heart function, remodeling and neoangiogenesis were evaluated and compared. Tube formation was examined in endothelial cells. In addition, Western blotting and histology were performed to determine the markers of cardiac hypertrophy and angiogenesis and to explore the possible molecular mechanism involved. PEG-Ex4 and Ex4 showed comparable binding affinity to GLP-1 receptor. In MI mice, PEG-Ex4 given at 3 days interval achieved similar extent of protection as Ex4 given twice daily, while Ex4 given at 3 days interval failed to produce protection. PEG-Ex4 elevated endothelial tube formation in vitro and capillary density in the border area of MI. PEG-Ex4 increased Akt activity and VEGF production in a GLP-1R dependent manner in endothelial cells and antagonism of GLP-1R, Akt or VEGF abolished the protection of PEG-Ex4 in the MI model. PEG-Ex4 is a potent long-acting GLP-1 receptor agonist for the treatment of chronic heart disease. Its protection might be attributed to enhanced angiogenesis mediated by the activation of Akt and VEGF. PMID:25553112

  11. Oral hypoglycaemic effect of GLP-1 and DPP4 inhibitor based nanocomposites in a diabetic animal model.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Neha; Araújo, Francisca; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Mäkilä, Ermei; Gomes, Maria João; Airavaara, Mikko; Kauppinen, Esko I; Raula, Janne; Salonen, Jarno; Hirvonen, Jouni; Sarmento, Bruno; Santos, Hélder A

    2016-06-28

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), an incretin hormone, is used for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) treatment because of its ability to stimulate insulin secretion and release in a glucose-dependent manner. Despite of its potent insulinotropic effect, oral GLP-1 delivery is greatly limited by its instability in the gastrointestinal tract, poor absorption efficiency and rapid degradation by dipeptidylpeptidase-4 (DPP4) enzyme leading to a short half-life (~2min). Thus, a multistage dual-drug delivery nanosystem was developed to deliver GLP-1 and DPP4 inhibitor simultaneously. The system comprised of chitosan-modified porous silicon (CSUn) nanoparticles, which were coated by an enteric polymer, hydroxypropylmethylcellulose acetate succinate MF, using aerosol flow reactor technology. A non-obese T2DM rat model induced by co-administration of nicotinamide and streptozotocin was used to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of the nanosystem. The oral administration of H-CSUn nanoparticles resulted in 32% reduction in blood glucose levels and ~6.0-fold enhancement in pancreatic insulin content, as compared to the GLP-1+DPP4 inhibitor solution. Overall, these results present a promising system for oral co-delivery of GLP-1 and DPP4 inhibitor that could be further evaluated in a chronic diabetic study. PMID:27091697

  12. Circulating GLP-1 in infants born small-for-gestational-age: breast-feeding versus formula-feeding.

    PubMed

    Díaz, M; Bassols, J; Sebastiani, G; López-Bermejo, A; Ibáñez, L; de Zegher, F

    2015-10-01

    Prenatal growth restraint associates with the risk for later diabetes, particularly if such restraint is followed by postnatal formula-feeding (FOF) rather than breast-feeding (BRF). Circulating incretins can influence the neonatal programming of hypothalamic setpoints for appetite and energy expenditure, and are thus candidate mediators of the long-term effects exerted by early nutrition. We have tested this concept by measuring (at birth and at age 4 months) the circulating concentrations of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) in BRF infants born appropriate-for-gestational-age (AGA; n=63) and in small-for-gestational-age (SGA) infants receiving either BRF (n=28) or FOF (n=26). At birth, concentrations of GLP-1 were similar in AGA and SGA infants. At 4 months, pre-feeding GLP-1 concentrations were higher than at birth; SGA-BRF infants had GLP-1 concentrations similar to those in AGA-BRF infants but SGA-FOF infants had higher concentrations. In conclusion, nutrition appears to influence the circulating GLP-1 concentrations in SGA infants and may thereby modulate long-term diabetes risk. PMID:26088812

  13. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists increase pancreatic mass by induction of protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Jacqueline A; Baggio, Laurie L; Cao, Xiemin; Abdulla, Tahmid; Campbell, Jonathan E; Secher, Thomas; Jelsing, Jacob; Larsen, Brett; Drucker, Daniel J

    2015-03-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) controls glucose homeostasis by regulating secretion of insulin and glucagon through a single GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R). GLP-1R agonists also increase pancreatic weight in some preclinical studies through poorly understood mechanisms. Here we demonstrate that the increase in pancreatic weight following activation of GLP-1R signaling in mice reflects an increase in acinar cell mass, without changes in ductal compartments or β-cell mass. GLP-1R agonists did not increase pancreatic DNA content or the number of Ki67(+) cells in the exocrine compartment; however, pancreatic protein content was increased in mice treated with exendin-4 or liraglutide. The increased pancreatic mass and protein content was independent of cholecystokinin receptors, associated with a rapid increase in S6 phosphorylation, and mediated through the GLP-1R. Rapamycin abrogated the GLP-1R-dependent increase in pancreatic mass but had no effect on the robust induction of Reg3α and Reg3β gene expression. Mass spectrometry analysis identified GLP-1R-dependent upregulation of Reg family members, as well as proteins important for translation and export, including Fam129a, eIF4a1, Wars, and Dmbt1. Hence, pharmacological GLP-1R activation induces protein synthesis, leading to increased pancreatic mass, independent of changes in DNA content or cell proliferation in mice. PMID:25277394

  14. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy: an overview.

    PubMed

    Dash, Ashutosh; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Pillai, Maroor Raghavan Ambikalmajan; Knapp, Furn F Russ

    2015-03-01

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is a site-directed targeted therapeutic strategy that specifically uses radiolabeled peptides as biological targeting vectors designed to deliver cytotoxic levels of radiation dose to cancer cells, which overexpress specific receptors. Interest in PRRT has steadily grown because of the advantages of targeting cellular receptors in vivo with high sensitivity as well as specificity and treatment at the molecular level. Recent advances in molecular biology have not only stimulated advances in PRRT in a sustainable manner but have also pushed the field significantly forward to several unexplored possibilities. Recent decades have witnessed unprecedented endeavors for developing radiolabeled receptor-binding somatostatin analogs for the treatment of neuroendocrine tumors, which have played an important role in the evolution of PRRT and paved the way for the development of other receptor-targeting peptides. Several peptides targeting a variety of receptors have been identified, demonstrating their potential to catalyze breakthroughs in PRRT. In this review, the authors discuss several of these peptides and their analogs with regard to their applications and potential in radionuclide therapy. The advancement in the availability of combinatorial peptide libraries for peptide designing and screening provides the capability of regulating immunogenicity and chemical manipulability. Moreover, the availability of a wide range of bifunctional chelating agents opens up the scope of convenient radiolabeling. For these reasons, it would be possible to envision a future where the scope of PRRT can be tailored for patient-specific application. While PRRT lies at the interface between many disciplines, this technology is inextricably linked to the availability of the therapeutic radionuclides of required quality and activity levels and hence their production is also reviewed. PMID:25710506

  15. Cardiovascular Effects of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yu Mi

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a member of the proglucagon incretin family, and GLP-1 receptor agonists (RAs) have been introduced as a new class of antidiabetic medications in the past decade. The benefits of GLP-1 RAs are derived from their pleiotropic effects, which include glucose-dependent insulin secretion, suppressed glucagon secretion, and reduced appetite. Moreover, GLP-1 RAs also exert beneficial roles on multiple organ systems in which the GLP-1 receptors exist, including the cardiovascular system. Cardiovascular effects of GLP-1 RAs have been of great interest since the burden from cardiovascular diseases (CVD) has been unbearably increasing in a diabetic population worldwide, despite strict glycemic control and advanced therapeutic techniques to treat CVD. Preclinical studies have already demonstrated the beneficial effects of GLP-1 on myocardium and vascular endothelium, and many clinical studies evaluating changes in surrogate markers of CVD have suggested potential benefits from the use of GLP-1 RAs. Data from numerous clinical trials primarily evaluating the antihyperglycemic effects of multiple GLP-1 RAs have also revealed that changes in most CVD risk markers reported as secondary outcomes have been in favor of GLP-1 RAs treatment. However, to date, there is only one randomized clinical trial of GLP-1 RAs (the ELIXA study) evaluating major cardiovascular events as their primary outcomes, and in this study, a neutral cardiovascular effect of lixisenatide was observed in high-risk diabetic subjects. Therefore, the results of ongoing CVD outcome trials with the use of GLP-1 RAs should be awaited to elucidate the translation of benefits previously seen in CVD risk marker studies into large clinical trials with primary cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:27118277

  16. Cardiovascular Effects of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonists.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yu Mi; Jung, Chang Hee

    2016-06-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a member of the proglucagon incretin family, and GLP-1 receptor agonists (RAs) have been introduced as a new class of antidiabetic medications in the past decade. The benefits of GLP-1 RAs are derived from their pleiotropic effects, which include glucose-dependent insulin secretion, suppressed glucagon secretion, and reduced appetite. Moreover, GLP-1 RAs also exert beneficial roles on multiple organ systems in which the GLP-1 receptors exist, including the cardiovascular system. Cardiovascular effects of GLP-1 RAs have been of great interest since the burden from cardiovascular diseases (CVD) has been unbearably increasing in a diabetic population worldwide, despite strict glycemic control and advanced therapeutic techniques to treat CVD. Preclinical studies have already demonstrated the beneficial effects of GLP-1 on myocardium and vascular endothelium, and many clinical studies evaluating changes in surrogate markers of CVD have suggested potential benefits from the use of GLP-1 RAs. Data from numerous clinical trials primarily evaluating the antihyperglycemic effects of multiple GLP-1 RAs have also revealed that changes in most CVD risk markers reported as secondary outcomes have been in favor of GLP-1 RAs treatment. However, to date, there is only one randomized clinical trial of GLP-1 RAs (the ELIXA study) evaluating major cardiovascular events as their primary outcomes, and in this study, a neutral cardiovascular effect of lixisenatide was observed in high-risk diabetic subjects. Therefore, the results of ongoing CVD outcome trials with the use of GLP-1 RAs should be awaited to elucidate the translation of benefits previously seen in CVD risk marker studies into large clinical trials with primary cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:27118277

  17. Somatostatin Receptor Based Imaging and Radionuclide Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Somatostatin (SST) receptors (SSTRs) belong to the typical 7-transmembrane domain family of G-protein-coupled receptors. Five distinct subtypes (termed SSTR1-5) have been identified, with SSTR2 showing the highest affinity for natural SST and synthetic SST analogs. Most neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) have high expression levels of SSTRs, which opens the possibility for tumor imaging and therapy with radiolabeled SST analogs. A number of tracers have been developed for the diagnosis, staging, and treatment of NETs with impressive results, which facilitates the applications of human SSTR subtype 2 (hSSTr2) reporter gene based imaging and therapy in SSTR negative or weakly positive tumors to provide a novel approach for the management of tumors. The hSSTr2 gene can act as not only a reporter gene for in vivo imaging, but also a therapeutic gene for local radionuclide therapy. Even a second therapeutic gene can be transfected into the same tumor cells together with hSSTr2 reporter gene to obtain a synergistic therapeutic effect. However, additional preclinical and especially translational and clinical researches are needed to confirm the value of hSSTr2 reporter gene based imaging and therapy in tumors. PMID:25879040

  18. The cardiovascular safety of incretin-based therapies: a review of the evidence

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in people with diabetes and therefore managing cardiovascular (CV) risk is a critical component of diabetes care. As incretin-based therapies are effective recent additions to the glucose-lowering treatment armamentarium for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), understanding their CV safety profiles is of great importance. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists have been associated with beneficial effects on CV risk factors, including weight, blood pressure and lipid profiles. Encouragingly, mechanistic studies in preclinical models and in patients with acute coronary syndrome suggest a potential cardioprotective effect of native GLP-1 or GLP-1 receptor agonists following ischaemia. Moreover, meta-analyses of phase 3 development programme data indicate no increased risk of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) with incretin-based therapies. Large randomized controlled trials designed to evaluate long-term CV outcomes with incretin-based therapies in individuals with T2D are now in progress, with the first two reporting as this article went to press. PMID:24011363

  19. Incretin based therapies: A novel treatment approach for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Blaslov, Kristina; Bulum, Tomislav; Zibar, Karin; Duvnjak, Lea

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome (MS). The current treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) principally includes amelioration of MS components by lifestyle modifications but the lack of success in their implementation and sustainment arises the need for effective pharmacological agent in fatty liver treatment. Incretins are gut derived hormones secreted into the circulation in response to nutrient ingestion that enhances glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is the most important incretin. Its receptor agonist and inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) are used in treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. DPP-4 serum activity and hepatic expression are shown to be elevated in several hepatic diseases. There are several experimental and clinical trials exploring the efficacy of incretin based therapies in NAFLD treatment. They suggest that GLP-1 analogues might have beneficial effect on hepatic steatosis acting as insulin sensitizers and directly by stimulating GLP-1 receptors expressed on hepatocytes. The use of DPP-4 inhibitors also results in hepatic fat reduction but the mechanism of action remains unclear. There is growing evidence that incretin based therapies have beneficial effects on hepatocytes, however further study analysis are needed to assess the long term effect of incretin based therapies on NAFLD. PMID:24966606

  20. The effect of gum chewing on blood GLP-1 concentration in fasted, healthy, non-obese men.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianping; Xiao, Xinhua; Li, Yuxiu; Zheng, Jia; Li, Wenhui; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Zhixin

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated the effect of chewing on blood GLP-1 concentration by having volunteers to chew sugarless gum. Our intention was to explore the neural mechanisms regulating the secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1(GLP-1). After fasting for 12 h, 12 healthy male, non-obese volunteers (18 < BMI < 30), were asked to chew sugarless gum at a frequency of 80 times every 2 min for a total of 30 min. Blood samples were collected before the start of chewing and 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 min after the start of chewing. Satiety and hunger were evaluated on a scale from 0 to 100 at each time point. Compared with the control group, the test group's satiety was increased at 15, 25, and 30 min (p = 0.043, p = 0.014 and p = 0.018, respectively) after they began chewing sugarless gum 80 times every 2 min. The blood GLP-1 level of the test group at 30 min was 49.6 ± 20.3 pmol/l, significantly higher than that of the control group (38.9 ± 20.9 pmol/l; p = 0.031). There was no significant difference in the test group's GLP-1 concentration at each time point. In the control group, compared to baseline, the GLP-1 concentrations at 15, 25, and 30 min were significantly decreased (p = 0.042, p = 0.0214 and p = 0.012, respectively). No significant differences in the blood concentration of glucose, insulin and GIP or hunger were observed between groups. Our study suggests that fasting sugarless gum chewing can increase satiety and reduce the decrease in GLP-1 concentration. PMID:25758865

  1. Structural insight into antibody-mediated antagonism of the Glucagon-like peptide-1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hennen, Stephanie; Kodra, János T.; Soroka, Vladyslav; Krogh, Berit O.; Wu, Xiaoai; Kaastrup, Peter; Ørskov, Cathrine; Rønn, Sif G.; Schluckebier, Gerd; Barbateskovic, Silvia; Gandhi, Prafull S.; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    The Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a member of the class B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family and a well-established target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The N-terminal extracellular domain (ECD) of GLP-1R is important for GLP-1 binding and the crystal structure of the GLP-1/ECD complex was reported previously. The first structure of a class B GPCR transmembrane (TM) domain was solved recently, but the full length receptor structure is still not well understood. Here we describe the molecular details of antibody-mediated antagonism of the GLP-1R using both in vitro pharmacology and x-ray crystallography. We showed that the antibody Fab fragment (Fab 3F52) blocked the GLP-1 binding site of the ECD directly and thereby acts as a competitive antagonist of native GLP-1. Interestingly, Fab 3F52 also blocked a short peptide agonist believed to engage primarily the transmembrane and extracellular loop region of GLP-1R, whereas functionality of an allosteric small-molecule agonist was not inhibited. This study has implications for the structural understanding of the GLP-1R and related class B GPCRs, which is important for the development of new and improved therapeutics targeting these receptors. PMID:27196125

  2. Structural insight into antibody-mediated antagonism of the Glucagon-like peptide-1 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Hennen, Stephanie; Kodra, János T; Soroka, Vladyslav; Krogh, Berit O; Wu, Xiaoai; Kaastrup, Peter; Ørskov, Cathrine; Rønn, Sif G; Schluckebier, Gerd; Barbateskovic, Silvia; Gandhi, Prafull S; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    The Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a member of the class B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family and a well-established target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The N-terminal extracellular domain (ECD) of GLP-1R is important for GLP-1 binding and the crystal structure of the GLP-1/ECD complex was reported previously. The first structure of a class B GPCR transmembrane (TM) domain was solved recently, but the full length receptor structure is still not well understood. Here we describe the molecular details of antibody-mediated antagonism of the GLP-1R using both in vitro pharmacology and x-ray crystallography. We showed that the antibody Fab fragment (Fab 3F52) blocked the GLP-1 binding site of the ECD directly and thereby acts as a competitive antagonist of native GLP-1. Interestingly, Fab 3F52 also blocked a short peptide agonist believed to engage primarily the transmembrane and extracellular loop region of GLP-1R, whereas functionality of an allosteric small-molecule agonist was not inhibited. This study has implications for the structural understanding of the GLP-1R and related class B GPCRs, which is important for the development of new and improved therapeutics targeting these receptors. PMID:27196125

  3. Engineering AAV receptor footprints for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Madigan, Victoria J; Asokan, Aravind

    2016-06-01

    Adeno-associated viruses (AAV) are currently at the forefront of human gene therapy clinical trials as recombinant vectors. Significant progress has been made in elucidating the structure, biology and tropisms of different naturally occurring AAV isolates in the past decade. In particular, a spectrum of AAV capsid interactions with host receptors have been identified and characterized. These studies have enabled a better understanding of key determinants of AAV cell recognition and entry in different hosts. This knowledge is now being applied toward engineering new, lab-derived AAV capsids with favorable transduction profiles. The current review conveys a structural perspective of capsid-glycan interactions and provides a roadmap for generating synthetic strains by engineering AAV receptor footprints. PMID:27262111

  4. Effects of PYY3-36 and GLP-1 on energy intake, energy expenditure, and appetite in overweight men.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Julie Berg; Gregersen, Nikolaj Ture; Pedersen, Sue D; Arentoft, Johanne L; Ritz, Christian; Schwartz, Thue W; Holst, Jens Juul; Astrup, Arne; Sjödin, Anders

    2014-06-01

    Our aim was to examine the effects of GLP-1 and PYY3-36, separately and in combination, on energy intake, energy expenditure, appetite sensations, glucose and fat metabolism, ghrelin, and vital signs in healthy overweight men. Twenty-five healthy male subjects participated in this randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, four-arm crossover study (BMI 29 ± 3 kg/m(2), age 33 ± 9 yr). On separate days they received a 150-min intravenous infusion of 1) 0.8 pmol·kg(-1)·min(-1) PYY3-36, 2) 1.0 pmol·kg(-1)·min(-1) GLP-1, 3) GLP-1 + PYY3-36, or 4) placebo. Ad libitum energy intake was assessed during the final 30 min. Measurements of appetite sensations, energy expenditure and fat oxidation, vital signs, and blood variables were collected throughout the infusion period. No effect on energy intake was found after monoinfusions of PYY3-36 (-4.2 ± 4.8%, P = 0.8) or GLP-1 (-3.0 ± 4.5%, P = 0.9). However, the coinfusion reduced energy intake compared with placebo (-30.4 ± 6.5%, P < 0.0001) and more than the sum of the monoinfusions (P < 0.001), demonstrating a synergistic effect. Coinfusion slightly increased sensation of nausea (P < 0.05), but this effect could not explain the effect on energy intake. A decrease in plasma ghrelin was found after all treatments compared with placebo (all P < 0.05); however, infusions of GLP-1 + PYY3-36 resulted in an additional decrease compared with the monoinfusions (both P < 0.01). We conclude that coinfusion of GLP-1 and PYY3-36 exerted a synergistic effect on energy intake. The satiating effect of the meal was enhanced by GLP-1 and PYY3-36 in combination compared with placebo. Coinfusion was accompanied by slightly increased nausea and a decrease in plasma ghrelin, but neither of these factors could explain the reduction in energy intake. PMID:24735885

  5. Synergism by individual macronutrients explains the marked early GLP-1 and islet hormone responses to mixed meal challenge in mice.

    PubMed

    Ahlkvist, L; Vikman, J; Pacini, G; Ahrén, B

    2012-10-10

    Apart from glucose, proteins and lipids also stimulate incretin and islet hormone secretion. However, the glucoregulatory effect of macronutrients in combination is poorly understood. We therefore developed an oral mixed meal model in mice to 1) explore the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and islet hormone responses to mixed meal versus isocaloric glucose, and 2) characterize the relative contribution of individual macronutrients to these responses. Anesthetized C57BL/6J female mice were orally gavaged with 1) a mixed meal (0.285 kcal; glucose, whey protein and peanut oil; 60/20/20% kcal) versus an isocaloric glucose load (0.285 kcal), and 2) a mixed meal (0.285 kcal) versus glucose, whey protein or peanut oil administered individually in their mixed meal caloric quantity, i.e., 0.171, 0.055 and 0.055 kcal, respectively. Plasma was analyzed for glucose, insulin and intact GLP-1 before and during oral challenges. Plasma glucose was lower after mixed meal versus after isocaloric glucose ingestion. In spite of this, the peak insulin response (P=0.02), the peak intact GLP-1 levels (P=0.006) and the estimated β-cell function (P=0.005) were higher. Furthermore, the peak insulin (P=0.004) and intact GLP-1 (P=0.006) levels were higher after mixed meal ingestion than the sum of responses to individual macronutrients. Compared to glucose alone, we conclude that there is a marked early insulin response to mixed meal ingestion, which emanates from a synergistic, rather than an additive, effect of the individual macronutrients in the mixed meal and is in part likely caused by increased levels of GLP-1. PMID:22750278

  6. Acarbose, lente carbohydrate, and prebiotics promote metabolic health and longevity by stimulating intestinal production of GLP-1.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F; DiNicolantonio, James J

    2015-01-01

    The α-glucosidase inhibitor acarbose, which slows carbohydrate digestion and blunts postprandial rises in plasma glucose, has long been used to treat patients with type 2 diabetes or glucose intolerance. Like metformin, acarbose tends to aid weight control, postpone onset of diabetes and decrease risk for cardiovascular events. Acarbose treatment can favourably affect blood pressure, serum lipids, platelet aggregation, progression of carotid intima-media thickness and postprandial endothelial dysfunction. In mice, lifetime acarbose feeding can increase median and maximal lifespan-an effect associated with increased plasma levels of fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) and decreased levels of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). There is growing reason to suspect that an upregulation of fasting and postprandial production of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-stemming from increased delivery of carbohydrate to L cells in the distal intestinal tract-is largely responsible for the versatile health protection conferred by acarbose. Indeed, GLP-1 exerts protective effects on vascular endothelium, the liver, the heart, pancreatic β cells, and the brain which can rationalise many of the benefits reported with acarbose. And GLP-1 may act on the liver to modulate its production of FGF21 and IGF-I, thereby promoting longevity. The benefits of acarbose are likely mimicked by diets featuring slowly-digested 'lente' carbohydrate, and by certain nutraceuticals which can slow carbohydrate absorption. Prebiotics that promote colonic generation of short-chain fatty acids represent an alternative strategy for boosting intestinal GLP-1 production. The health benefits of all these measures presumably would be potentiated by concurrent use of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors, which slow the proteolysis of GLP-1 in the blood. PMID:25685364

  7. Supplementation with a fish protein hydrolysate (Micromesistius poutassou): effects on body weight, body composition, and CCK/GLP-1 secretion

    PubMed Central

    Nobile, Vincenzo; Duclos, Elisa; Michelotti, Angela; Bizzaro, Gioia; Negro, Massimo; Soisson, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Background Fish protein hydrolysates (FPHs) have been reported as a suitable source of proteins for human nutrition because of their balanced amino acid composition and positive effect on gastrointestinal absorption. Objective Here, we investigated the effect of a FPH, Slimpro®, obtained from blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou) muscle by enzymatic hydrolysis, on body composition and on stimulating cholecystokinin (CCK) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion. Design A randomized clinical study was carried out on 120, slightly overweight (25 kg/m2 ≤ BMI<30 kg/m2), male (25%) and female (75%) subjects. FPH was tested in a food supplement at two doses (1.4 and 2.8 g) to establish if a dose–effect relationship exists. Product use was associated with a mild hypocaloric diet (−300 kcal/day). Body composition (body weight; fat mass; extracellular water; and circumference of waist, thighs, and hips) and CCK/GLP-1 blood levels were measured at the beginning of the study and after 45 and 90 days of product use. CCK/GLP-1 levels were measured since they are involved in controlling food intake. Results Treated subjects reported an improvement of body weight composition and an increased blood concentration of both CCK and GLP-1. No differences were found between the 1.4 and 2.8 g FPH doses, indicating a plateau effect starting from 1.4 g FPH. Conclusions Both 1.4 and 2.8 g of FPH were effective in improving body composition and in increasing CCK and GLP-1 blood levels. PMID:26829186

  8. Inhibiting receptor for advanced glycation end product (AGE) and oxidative stress involved in the protective effect mediated by glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor on AGE induced neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Song; Yin, Lei; Xu, Zheng; An, Feng-Mao; Liu, Ai-Ran; Wang, Ying; Yao, Wen-Bing; Gao, Xiang-Dong

    2016-01-26

    Our previous study has demonstrated that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist could protect neurons from advanced glycation end products (AGEs) toxicity in vitro. However, further studies are still needed to clarify the molecular mechanism of this GLP-1 receptor -dependent action. The present study mainly focused on the effect of GLP-1 receptor agonists against the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) signal pathway and the mechanism underlying this effect of GLP-1. Firstly the data based on the SH-GLP-1R(+) and SH-SY5Y cells confirmed our previous finding that GLP-1 receptor could mediate the protective effect against AGEs. The assays of the protein activity and of the mRNA level revealed that apoptosis-related proteins such as caspase-3, caspase-9, Bax and Bcl-2 were involved. Additionally, we found that both GLP-1 and exendin-4 could reduce AGEs-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation by suppressing the activity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase. Interestingly, we also found that GLP-1 receptor activation could attenuate the abnormal expression of the RAGE in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, based on the analysis of the protein expression and translocation level of transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), and the use of GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin(9-39) and NF-κB inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, we found that the effect mediated by GLP-1 receptor could alleviate the over expression of RAGE induced by ligand via the suppression of NF-κB. In summary, the results indicated that inhibiting RAGE/oxidative stress was involved in the protective effect of GLP-1 on neuron cells against AGEs induced apoptosis. PMID:26679229

  9. Liraglutide: A review of its therapeutic use as a once daily GLP-1 analog for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Dharmalingam, Mala; Sriram, Usha; Baruah, Manash P.

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a progressive disease associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Even though progress have been accomplished in the management of type 2 diabetes, current treatment preferences for patients with this disease still fall short to address disease progression. With the present therapy, glycaemic control remains suboptimal and are often associated with weight gain and hypoglycaemia. Glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone secreted from the small intestine that lowers fasting and postprandial glucose through multiple mechanisms including glucose-dependent insulin secretion, reduction of glucagon secretion, delaying gastric emptying and increased satiety. Liraglutide, a human glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) analogue is a treatment for T2DM that is administered as a once-daily subcutaneous injection. The efficacy and tolerability of liraglutide at doses of 0.6, 1.2, and 1.8 mg for T2DM, in combination with, and compared with, other T2DM treatments were investigated in the Liraglutide Effect and Action in Diabetes (LEAD) Phase III clinical trial program. In the LEAD trial, treatment with liraglutide was associated with substantial improvements in glycaemic control and low risk of hypoglycaemia. In addition liraglutide significantly improved β-cell function, reduced systolic blood pressure (BP) and induced weight loss. Overall, liraglutide was well tolerated. Recent data on safety and efficacy of liraglutide from real-life clinical practice settings also reiterate the better therapeutic profile of this molecule. Based on results from the LEAD programme, and real-life clinical experience, liraglutide has been demonstrated as an effective therapeutic intervention even at the early stage of diabetes regardless of with what, it has been used. PMID:21584160

  10. The pepper GNA-related lectin and PAN domain protein gene, CaGLP1, is required for plant cell death and defense signaling during bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nak Hyun; Lee, Dong Hyuk; Choi, Du Seok; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-12-01

    Carbohydrate-binding proteins, commonly referred to as lectins or agglutinins, function in defense responses to microbial pathogens. Pepper (Capsicum annuum) GNA-related lectin and PAN-domain protein gene CaGLP1 was isolated and functionally characterized from pepper leaves infected with Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv). CaGLP1 contained an amine-terminus prokaryotic membrane lipoprotein lipid attachment site, a Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA)-related lectin domain responsible for the recognition of high-mannose N-glycans, and a carboxyl-terminus PAN/apple domain. RNA gel blot and immunoblot analyses determined that CaGLP1 was strongly induced in pepper by compatible and incompatible Xcv infection. CaGLP1 protein localized primarily to the plasma membrane and exhibited mannose-binding specificity. CaGLP1-silenced pepper plants were more susceptible to compatible or incompatible Xcv infection compared with that of non-silenced control plants. CaGLP1 silencing in pepper leaves did not accumulate H2O2 and induce cell death during incompatible Xcv infection. Defense-related CaDEF1 (defensin) gene expression was significantly reduced in CaGLP1-silenced pepper plants. CaGLP1-overexpression in Arabidopsis thaliana enhanced resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. Defense-related AtPDF1.2 expression was elevated in CaGLP1-overexpression lines. Together, these results suggest that CaGLP1 is required for plant cell death and defense responses through the reactive oxygen species burst and downstream defense-related gene expression in response to bacterial pathogen challenge. PMID:26706081