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Sample records for thermodynamics quantum mechanics

  1. Thermodynamic integration from classical to quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Habershon, Scott; Manolopoulos, David E.

    2011-12-14

    We present a new method for calculating quantum mechanical corrections to classical free energies, based on thermodynamic integration from classical to quantum mechanics. In contrast to previous methods, our method is numerically stable even in the presence of strong quantum delocalization. We first illustrate the method and its relationship to a well-established method with an analysis of a one-dimensional harmonic oscillator. We then show that our method can be used to calculate the quantum mechanical contributions to the free energies of ice and water for a flexible water model, a problem for which the established method is unstable.

  2. Black hole thermodynamics from near-horizon conformal quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Camblong, Horacio E.; Ordonez, Carlos R.

    2005-05-15

    The thermodynamics of black holes is shown to be directly induced by their near-horizon conformal invariance. This behavior is exhibited using a scalar field as a probe of the black hole gravitational background, for a general class of metrics in D spacetime dimensions (with D{>=}4). The ensuing analysis is based on conformal quantum mechanics, within a hierarchical near-horizon expansion. In particular, the leading conformal behavior provides the correct quantum statistical properties for the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy, with the near-horizon physics governing the thermodynamics from the outset. Most importantly: (i) this treatment reveals the emergence of holographic properties; (ii) the conformal coupling parameter is shown to be related to the Hawking temperature; and (iii) Schwarzschild-like coordinates, despite their 'coordinate singularity', can be used self-consistently to describe the thermodynamics of black holes.

  3. Probing phase-space noncommutativity through quantum mechanics and thermodynamics of free particles and quantum rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Jonas F. G.; Bernardini, Alex E.; Bastos, Catarina

    2015-11-01

    Novel quantization properties related to the state vectors and the energy spectrum of a two-dimensional system of free particles are obtained in the framework of noncommutative (NC) quantum mechanics (QM) supported by the Weyl-Wigner formalism. Besides reproducing the magnetic field aspect of a Zeeman-like effect, the momentum space NC parameter introduces mutual information properties quantified by the quantum purity related to the relevant coordinates of the corresponding Hilbert space. Supported by the QM in the phase-space, the thermodynamic limit is obtained, and the results are extended to three-dimensional systems. The noncommutativity imprints on the thermodynamic variables related to free particles are identified and, after introducing some suitable constraints to fix an axial symmetry, the analysis is extended to two- and- three dimensional quantum rotor systems, for which the quantization aspects and the deviation from standard QM results are verified.

  4. Similarity between quantum mechanics and thermodynamics: entropy, temperature, and Carnot cycle.

    PubMed

    Abe, Sumiyoshi; Okuyama, Shinji

    2011-02-01

    The similarity between quantum mechanics and thermodynamics is discussed. It is found that if the Clausius equality is imposed on the Shannon entropy and the analog of the quantity of heat, then the value of the Shannon entropy comes to formally coincide with that of the von Neumann entropy of the canonical density matrix, and pure-state quantum mechanics apparently transmutes into quantum thermodynamics. The corresponding quantum Carnot cycle of a simple two-state model of a particle confined in a one-dimensional infinite potential well is studied, and its efficiency is shown to be identical to the classical one. PMID:21405832

  5. Quantum Statistical Mechanical Derivation of the Second Law of Thermodynamics: A Hybrid Setting Approach.

    PubMed

    Tasaki, Hal

    2016-04-29

    Based on quantum statistical mechanics and microscopic quantum dynamics, we prove Planck's and Kelvin's principles for macroscopic systems in a general and realistic setting. We consider a hybrid quantum system that consists of the thermodynamic system, which is initially in thermal equilibrium, and the "apparatus" which operates on the former, and assume that the whole system evolves autonomously. This provides a satisfactory derivation of the second law for macroscopic systems. PMID:27176507

  6. Quantum Statistical Mechanical Derivation of the Second Law of Thermodynamics: A Hybrid Setting Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasaki, Hal

    2016-04-01

    Based on quantum statistical mechanics and microscopic quantum dynamics, we prove Planck's and Kelvin's principles for macroscopic systems in a general and realistic setting. We consider a hybrid quantum system that consists of the thermodynamic system, which is initially in thermal equilibrium, and the "apparatus" which operates on the former, and assume that the whole system evolves autonomously. This provides a satisfactory derivation of the second law for macroscopic systems.

  7. Developing and assessing research-based tools for teaching quantum mechanics and thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Benjamin R.

    Research-based tools to educate college students in physics courses from introductory level to graduate level are essential for helping students with a diverse set of goals and backgrounds learn physics. This thesis explores issues related to student common difficulties with some topics in undergraduate quantum mechanics and thermodynamics courses. Student difficulties in learning quantum mechanics and thermodynamics are investigated by administering written tests and surveys to many classes and conducting individual interviews with a subset of students outside the class to unpack the cognitive mechanisms of the difficulties. The quantum mechanics research also focuses on using the research on student difficulties for the development and evaluation of a Quantum Interactive Learning Tutorial (QuILT) to help students learn about the time-dependence of expectation values using the context of Larmor precession of spin and evaluating the role of asking students to self-diagnose their mistakes on midterm examination on their performance on subsequent problem solving. The QuILT on Larmor precession of spin has both paper-pencil activities and a simulation component to help students learn these foundational issues in quantum mechanics. Preliminary evaluations suggest that the QuILT, which strives to help students build a robust knowledge structure of time-dependence of expectation values in quantum mechanics using a guided approach, is successful in helping students learn these topics in the junior-senior level quantum mechanics courses. The technique to help upper-level students in quantum mechanics courses effectively engage in the process of learning from their mistakes is also found to be effective. In particular, research shows that the self-diagnosis activity in upper-level quantum mechanics significantly helps students who are struggling and this activity can reduce the gap between the high and low achieving students on subsequent problem solving. Finally, a survey

  8. Non-hermitian quantum thermodynamics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gardas, Bartłomiej; Deffner, Sebastian; Saxena, Avadh

    2016-03-22

    Thermodynamics is the phenomenological theory of heat and work. Here we analyze to what extent quantum thermodynamic relations are immune to the underlying mathematical formulation of quantum mechanics. As a main result, we show that the Jarzynski equality holds true for all non-hermitian quantum systems with real spectrum. This equality expresses the second law of thermodynamics for isothermal processes arbitrarily far from equilibrium. In the quasistatic limit however, the second law leads to the Carnot bound which is fulfilled even if some eigenenergies are complex provided they appear in conjugate pairs. Lastly, we propose two setups to test our predictions,more » namely with strongly interacting excitons and photons in a semiconductor microcavity and in the non-hermitian tight-binding model.« less

  9. Non-hermitian quantum thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardas, Bartłomiej; Deffner, Sebastian; Saxena, Avadh

    2016-03-01

    Thermodynamics is the phenomenological theory of heat and work. Here we analyze to what extent quantum thermodynamic relations are immune to the underlying mathematical formulation of quantum mechanics. As a main result, we show that the Jarzynski equality holds true for all non-hermitian quantum systems with real spectrum. This equality expresses the second law of thermodynamics for isothermal processes arbitrarily far from equilibrium. In the quasistatic limit however, the second law leads to the Carnot bound which is fulfilled even if some eigenenergies are complex provided they appear in conjugate pairs. Furthermore, we propose two setups to test our predictions, namely with strongly interacting excitons and photons in a semiconductor microcavity and in the non-hermitian tight-binding model.

  10. Non-hermitian quantum thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Gardas, Bartłomiej; Deffner, Sebastian; Saxena, Avadh

    2016-01-01

    Thermodynamics is the phenomenological theory of heat and work. Here we analyze to what extent quantum thermodynamic relations are immune to the underlying mathematical formulation of quantum mechanics. As a main result, we show that the Jarzynski equality holds true for all non-hermitian quantum systems with real spectrum. This equality expresses the second law of thermodynamics for isothermal processes arbitrarily far from equilibrium. In the quasistatic limit however, the second law leads to the Carnot bound which is fulfilled even if some eigenenergies are complex provided they appear in conjugate pairs. Furthermore, we propose two setups to test our predictions, namely with strongly interacting excitons and photons in a semiconductor microcavity and in the non-hermitian tight-binding model. PMID:27003686

  11. Non-hermitian quantum thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Gardas, Bartłomiej; Deffner, Sebastian; Saxena, Avadh

    2016-01-01

    Thermodynamics is the phenomenological theory of heat and work. Here we analyze to what extent quantum thermodynamic relations are immune to the underlying mathematical formulation of quantum mechanics. As a main result, we show that the Jarzynski equality holds true for all non-hermitian quantum systems with real spectrum. This equality expresses the second law of thermodynamics for isothermal processes arbitrarily far from equilibrium. In the quasistatic limit however, the second law leads to the Carnot bound which is fulfilled even if some eigenenergies are complex provided they appear in conjugate pairs. Furthermore, we propose two setups to test our predictions, namely with strongly interacting excitons and photons in a semiconductor microcavity and in the non-hermitian tight-binding model. PMID:27003686

  12. Perspective on quantum thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millen, James; Xuereb, André

    2016-01-01

    Classical thermodynamics is unrivalled in its range of applications and relevance to everyday life. It enables a description of complex systems, made up of microscopic particles, in terms of a small number of macroscopic quantities, such as work and entropy. As systems get ever smaller, fluctuations of these quantities become increasingly relevant, prompting the development of stochastic thermodynamics. Recently we have seen a surge of interest in exploring the quantum regime, where the origin of fluctuations is quantum rather than thermal. Many questions, such as the role of entanglement and the emergence of thermalisation, lie wide open. Answering these questions may lead to the development of quantum heat engines and refrigerators, as well as to vitally needed simple descriptions of quantum many-body systems.

  13. Coherence and measurement in quantum thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kammerlander, P.; Anders, J.

    2016-01-01

    Thermodynamics is a highly successful macroscopic theory widely used across the natural sciences and for the construction of everyday devices, from car engines to solar cells. With thermodynamics predating quantum theory, research now aims to uncover the thermodynamic laws that govern finite size systems which may in addition host quantum effects. Recent theoretical breakthroughs include the characterisation of the efficiency of quantum thermal engines, the extension of classical non-equilibrium fluctuation theorems to the quantum regime and a new thermodynamic resource theory has led to the discovery of a set of second laws for finite size systems. These results have substantially advanced our understanding of nanoscale thermodynamics, however putting a finger on what is genuinely quantum in quantum thermodynamics has remained a challenge. Here we identify information processing tasks, the so-called projections, that can only be formulated within the framework of quantum mechanics. We show that the physical realisation of such projections can come with a non-trivial thermodynamic work only for quantum states with coherences. This contrasts with information erasure, first investigated by Landauer, for which a thermodynamic work cost applies for classical and quantum erasure alike. Repercussions on quantum work fluctuation relations and thermodynamic single-shot approaches are also discussed. PMID:26916503

  14. Coherence and measurement in quantum thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Kammerlander, P; Anders, J

    2016-01-01

    Thermodynamics is a highly successful macroscopic theory widely used across the natural sciences and for the construction of everyday devices, from car engines to solar cells. With thermodynamics predating quantum theory, research now aims to uncover the thermodynamic laws that govern finite size systems which may in addition host quantum effects. Recent theoretical breakthroughs include the characterisation of the efficiency of quantum thermal engines, the extension of classical non-equilibrium fluctuation theorems to the quantum regime and a new thermodynamic resource theory has led to the discovery of a set of second laws for finite size systems. These results have substantially advanced our understanding of nanoscale thermodynamics, however putting a finger on what is genuinely quantum in quantum thermodynamics has remained a challenge. Here we identify information processing tasks, the so-called projections, that can only be formulated within the framework of quantum mechanics. We show that the physical realisation of such projections can come with a non-trivial thermodynamic work only for quantum states with coherences. This contrasts with information erasure, first investigated by Landauer, for which a thermodynamic work cost applies for classical and quantum erasure alike. Repercussions on quantum work fluctuation relations and thermodynamic single-shot approaches are also discussed. PMID:26916503

  15. Coherence and measurement in quantum thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammerlander, P.; Anders, J.

    2016-02-01

    Thermodynamics is a highly successful macroscopic theory widely used across the natural sciences and for the construction of everyday devices, from car engines to solar cells. With thermodynamics predating quantum theory, research now aims to uncover the thermodynamic laws that govern finite size systems which may in addition host quantum effects. Recent theoretical breakthroughs include the characterisation of the efficiency of quantum thermal engines, the extension of classical non-equilibrium fluctuation theorems to the quantum regime and a new thermodynamic resource theory has led to the discovery of a set of second laws for finite size systems. These results have substantially advanced our understanding of nanoscale thermodynamics, however putting a finger on what is genuinely quantum in quantum thermodynamics has remained a challenge. Here we identify information processing tasks, the so-called projections, that can only be formulated within the framework of quantum mechanics. We show that the physical realisation of such projections can come with a non-trivial thermodynamic work only for quantum states with coherences. This contrasts with information erasure, first investigated by Landauer, for which a thermodynamic work cost applies for classical and quantum erasure alike. Repercussions on quantum work fluctuation relations and thermodynamic single-shot approaches are also discussed.

  16. Experimental opto-mechanics with levitated nanoparticles: towards quantum control and thermodynamic cycles (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiesel, Nikolai; Blaser, Florian; Delic, Uros; Grass, David; Dechant, Andreas; Lutz, Eric; Bathaee, Marzieh; Aspelmeyer, Markus

    2015-08-01

    Combining optical levitation and cavity optomechanics constitutes a promising approach to prepare and control the motional quantum state of massive objects (>10^9 amu). This, in turn, would represent a completely new type of light-matter interface and has, for example, been predicted to enable experimental tests of macrorealistic models or of non-Newtonian gravity at small length scales. Such ideas have triggered significant experimental efforts to realizing such novel systems. To this end, we have recently successfully demonstrated cavity-cooling of a levitated sub-micron silica particle in a classical regime at a pressure of approximately 1mbar. Access to higher vacuum of approx. 10^-6 mbar has been demonstrated using 3D-feedback cooling in optical tweezers without cavity-coupling. Here we will illustrate our strategy towards trapping, 3D-cooling and quantum control of nanoparticles in ultra-high vacuum using cavity-based feedback cooling methods and clean particle loading with hollow-core photonic crystal fibers. We will also discuss the current experimental progress both in 3D-cavity cooling and HCPCF-based transport of nanoparticles. As yet another application of cavity-controlled levitated nanoparticles we will show how to implement a thermodynamic Sterling cycle operating in the underdamped regime. We present optimized protocols with respect to efficiency at maximum power in this little explored regime. We also show that the excellent level of control in our system will allow reproducing all relevant features of such optimized protocols. In a next step, this will enable studies of thermodynamics cycles in a regime where the quantization of the mechanical motion becomes relevant.

  17. Quantum Statistical Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schieve, William C.; Horwitz, Lawrence P.

    2009-04-01

    1. Foundations of quantum statistical mechanics; 2. Elementary examples; 3. Quantum statistical master equation; 4. Quantum kinetic equations; 5. Quantum irreversibility; 6. Entropy and dissipation: the microscopic theory; 7. Global equilibrium: thermostatics and the microcanonical ensemble; 8. Bose-Einstein ideal gas condensation; 9. Scaling, renormalization and the Ising model; 10. Relativistic covariant statistical mechanics of many particles; 11. Quantum optics and damping; 12. Entanglements; 13. Quantum measurement and irreversibility; 14. Quantum Langevin equation: quantum Brownian motion; 15. Linear response: fluctuation and dissipation theorems; 16. Time dependent quantum Green's functions; 17. Decay scattering; 18. Quantum statistical mechanics, extended; 19. Quantum transport with tunneling and reservoir ballistic transport; 20. Black hole thermodynamics; Appendix; Index.

  18. A hierarchical approach to accurate predictions of macroscopic thermodynamic behavior from quantum mechanics and molecular simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, Stephen L.

    2005-07-01

    The combination of molecular simulations and potentials obtained from quantum chemistry is shown to be able to provide reasonably accurate thermodynamic property predictions. Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo simulations are used to understand the effects of small perturbations to various regions of the model Lennard-Jones 12-6 potential. However, when the phase behavior and second virial coefficient are scaled by the critical properties calculated for each potential, the results obey a corresponding states relation suggesting a non-uniqueness problem for interaction potentials fit to experimental phase behavior. Several variations of a procedure collectively referred to as quantum mechanical Hybrid Methods for Interaction Energies (HM-IE) are developed and used to accurately estimate interaction energies from CCSD(T) calculations with a large basis set in a computationally efficient manner for the neon-neon, acetylene-acetylene, and nitrogen-benzene systems. Using these results and methods, an ab initio, pairwise-additive, site-site potential for acetylene is determined and then improved using results from molecular simulations using this initial potential. The initial simulation results also indicate that a limited range of energies important for accurate phase behavior predictions. Second virial coefficients calculated from the improved potential indicate that one set of experimental data in the literature is likely erroneous. This prescription is then applied to methanethiol. Difficulties in modeling the effects of the lone pair electrons suggest that charges on the lone pair sites negatively impact the ability of the intermolecular potential to describe certain orientations, but that the lone pair sites may be necessary to reasonably duplicate the interaction energies for several orientations. Two possible methods for incorporating the effects of three-body interactions into simulations within the pairwise-additivity formulation are also developed. A low density

  19. Quantum thermodynamics of general quantum processes.

    PubMed

    Binder, Felix; Vinjanampathy, Sai; Modi, Kavan; Goold, John

    2015-03-01

    Accurately describing work extraction from a quantum system is a central objective for the extension of thermodynamics to individual quantum systems. The concepts of work and heat are surprisingly subtle when generalizations are made to arbitrary quantum states. We formulate an operational thermodynamics suitable for application to an open quantum system undergoing quantum evolution under a general quantum process by which we mean a completely positive and trace-preserving map. We derive an operational first law of thermodynamics for such processes and show consistency with the second law. We show that heat, from the first law, is positive when the input state of the map majorizes the output state. Moreover, the change in entropy is also positive for the same majorization condition. This makes a strong connection between the two operational laws of thermodynamics. PMID:25871066

  20. Quantum thermodynamics of general quantum processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, Felix; Vinjanampathy, Sai; Modi, Kavan; Goold, John

    2015-03-01

    Accurately describing work extraction from a quantum system is a central objective for the extension of thermodynamics to individual quantum systems. The concepts of work and heat are surprisingly subtle when generalizations are made to arbitrary quantum states. We formulate an operational thermodynamics suitable for application to an open quantum system undergoing quantum evolution under a general quantum process by which we mean a completely positive and trace-preserving map. We derive an operational first law of thermodynamics for such processes and show consistency with the second law. We show that heat, from the first law, is positive when the input state of the map majorizes the output state. Moreover, the change in entropy is also positive for the same majorization condition. This makes a strong connection between the two operational laws of thermodynamics.

  1. Thermodynamics and equilibrium structure of Ne38 cluster: quantum mechanics versus classical.

    PubMed

    Predescu, Cristian; Frantsuzov, Pavel A; Mandelshtam, Vladimir A

    2005-04-15

    The equilibrium properties of classical Lennard-Jones (LJ38) versus quantum Ne38 Lennard-Jones clusters are investigated. The quantum simulations use both the path-integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) and the recently developed variational-Gaussian wave packet Monte Carlo (VGW-MC) methods. The PIMC and the classical MC simulations are implemented in the parallel tempering framework. The classical heat capacity Cv(T) curve agrees well with that of Neirotti et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 112, 10340 (2000)], although a much larger confining sphere is used in the present work. The classical Cv(T) shows a peak at about 6 K, interpreted as a solid-liquid transition, and a shoulder at approximately 4 K, attributed to a solid-solid transition involving structures from the global octahedral (Oh) minimum and the main icosahedral (C5v) minimum. The VGW method is used to locate and characterize the low energy states of Ne38, which are then further refined by PIMC calculations. Unlike the classical case, the ground state of Ne38 is a liquidlike structure. Among the several liquidlike states with energies below the two symmetric states (Oh and C5v), the lowest two exhibit strong delocalization over basins associated with at least two classical local minima. Because the symmetric structures do not play an essential role in the thermodynamics of Ne38, the quantum heat capacity is a featureless curve indicative of the absence of any structural transformations. Good agreement between the two methods, VGW and PIMC, is obtained. The present results are also consistent with the predictions by Calvo et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 114, 7312 (2001)] based on the quantum superposition method within the harmonic approximation. However, because of its approximate nature, the latter method leads to an incorrect assignment of the Ne38 ground state as well as to a significant underestimation of the heat capacity. PMID:15945633

  2. Reply to "Comment on 'Similarity between quantum mechanics and thermodynamics: Entropy, temperature, and Carnot cycle' ''.

    PubMed

    Abe, Sumiyoshi

    2015-05-01

    In their Comment on the paper [Abe and Okuyama, Phys. Rev. E 83, 021121 (2011)], González-Díaz and Díaz-Solórzano discuss that the initial state of the quantum-mechanical analog of the Carnot cycle should be not in a pure state but in a mixed state due to a projective measurement of the system energy. Here, first the Comment is shown to miss the point. Then, second, multiple projective measurements are discussed as a generalization of the Comment, although they are not relevant to the work commented. PMID:26066283

  3. Quantum dynamics in the thermodynamic limit

    SciTech Connect

    Wezel, Jasper van

    2008-08-01

    The description of spontaneous symmetry breaking that underlies the connection between classically ordered objects in the thermodynamic limit and their individual quantum-mechanical building blocks is one of the cornerstones of modern condensed-matter theory and has found applications in many different areas of physics. The theory of spontaneous symmetry breaking, however, is inherently an equilibrium theory, which does not address the dynamics of quantum systems in the thermodynamic limit. Here, we will use the example of a particular antiferromagnetic model system to show that the presence of a so-called thin spectrum of collective excitations with vanishing energy - one of the well-known characteristic properties shared by all symmetry-breaking objects - can allow these objects to also spontaneously break time-translation symmetry in the thermodynamic limit. As a result, that limit is found to be able, not only to reduce quantum-mechanical equilibrium averages to their classical counterparts, but also to turn individual-state quantum dynamics into classical physics. In the process, we find that the dynamical description of spontaneous symmetry breaking can also be used to shed some light on the possible origins of Born's rule. We conclude by describing an experiment on a condensate of exciton polaritons which could potentially be used to experimentally test the proposed mechanism.

  4. Comment on "Similarity between quantum mechanics and thermodynamics: Entropy, temperature, and Carnot cycle".

    PubMed

    González-Díaz, L A; Díaz-Solórzano, S

    2015-05-01

    In the paper by Abe and Okuyama [Phys. Rev. E 83, 021121 (2011)], the quantum Carnot cycle of a simple two-state model of a particle confined in a one-dimensional infinite potential well is discussed. It is claimed that the state at the beginning of the quantum Carnot cycle is pure. After that, it is apparently transmuted to a mixed state if Clausius equality is imposed. We prove that this statement is incorrect. In particular, we prove that the state at the beginning of the cycle is mixed due to the process of measuring energy. PMID:26066282

  5. Comment on "Similarity between quantum mechanics and thermodynamics: Entropy, temperature, and Carnot cycle"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Díaz, L. A.; Díaz-Solórzano, S.

    2015-05-01

    In the paper by Abe and Okuyama [Phys. Rev. E 83, 021121 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevE.83.021121], the quantum Carnot cycle of a simple two-state model of a particle confined in a one-dimensional infinite potential well is discussed. It is claimed that the state at the beginning of the quantum Carnot cycle is pure. After that, it is apparently transmuted to a mixed state if Clausius equality is imposed. We prove that this statement is incorrect. In particular, we prove that the state at the beginning of the cycle is mixed due to the process of measuring energy.

  6. Higher Derivative Corrections to Black Hole Thermodynamics from Supersymmetric Matrix Quantum Mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Hanada, Masanori; Hyakutake, Yoshifumi; Nishimura, Jun; Takeuchi, Shingo

    2009-05-15

    We perform a direct test of the gauge-gravity duality associated with the system of N D0-branes in type IIA superstring theory at finite temperature. Based on the fact that higher derivative corrections to the type IIA supergravity action start at the order of {alpha}{sup '3}, we derive the internal energy in expansion around infinite 't Hooft coupling up to the subleading term with one unknown coefficient. The power of the subleading term is shown to be nicely reproduced by the Monte Carlo data obtained nonperturbatively on the gauge theory side at finite but large effective (dimensionless) 't Hooft coupling constant. This suggests, in particular, that the open strings attached to the D0-branes provide the microscopic origin of the black hole thermodynamics of the dual geometry including {alpha}{sup '} corrections. The coefficient of the subleading term extracted from the fit to the Monte Carlo data provides a prediction for the gravity side.

  7. Higher derivative corrections to black hole thermodynamics from supersymmetric matrix quantum mechanics.

    PubMed

    Hanada, Masanori; Hyakutake, Yoshifumi; Nishimura, Jun; Takeuchi, Shingo

    2009-05-15

    We perform a direct test of the gauge-gravity duality associated with the system of N D0-branes in type IIA superstring theory at finite temperature. Based on the fact that higher derivative corrections to the type IIA supergravity action start at the order of alpha;{'3}, we derive the internal energy in expansion around infinite 't Hooft coupling up to the subleading term with one unknown coefficient. The power of the subleading term is shown to be nicely reproduced by the Monte Carlo data obtained nonperturbatively on the gauge theory side at finite but large effective (dimensionless) 't Hooft coupling constant. This suggests, in particular, that the open strings attached to the D0-branes provide the microscopic origin of the black hole thermodynamics of the dual geometry including alpha;{'} corrections. The coefficient of the subleading term extracted from the fit to the Monte Carlo data provides a prediction for the gravity side. PMID:19518941

  8. Thermodynamics of quantum heat engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Himangshu Prabal; Harbola, Upendra

    2013-07-01

    We consider a recently proposed four-level quantum heat engine (QHE) model to analyze the role of quantum coherences in determining the thermodynamic properties of the engine, such as flux, output power, and efficiency. A quantitative analysis of the relative effects of the coherences induced by the two thermal baths is brought out. By taking account of the dissipation in the cavity mode, we define useful work obtained from the QHE and present some analytical results for the optimal values of relative coherences that maximizes flux (hence output power) through the engine. We also analyze the role of quantum effects in inducing population inversion (lasing) between the states coupled to the cavity mode. The universal behavior of the efficiency at maximum power (EMP) is examined. In accordance with earlier theoretical predictions, to leading order, we find that EMP˜ηc/2, where ηc is Carnot efficiency. However, the next higher order coefficient is system dependent and hence nonuniversal.

  9. Towards quantum thermodynamics in electronic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekola, Jukka P.

    2015-02-01

    Electronic circuits operating at sub-kelvin temperatures are attractive candidates for studying classical and quantum thermodynamics: their temperature can be controlled and measured locally with exquisite precision, and they allow experiments with large statistical samples. The availability and rapid development of devices such as quantum dots, single-electron boxes and superconducting qubits only enhance their appeal. But although these systems provide fertile ground for studying heat transport, entropy production and work in the context of quantum mechanics, the field remains in its infancy experimentally. Here, we review some recent experiments on quantum heat transport, fluctuation relations and implementations of Maxwell's demon, revealing the rich physics yet to be fully probed in these systems.

  10. Quantum Maxwell's demon in thermodynamic cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, H.; Xu, D. Z.; Cai, C. Y.; Sun, C. P.

    2011-06-01

    We study the physical mechanism of Maxwell’s demon (MD), which helps do extra work in thermodynamic cycles with the heat engine. This is exemplified with one molecule confined in an infinitely deep square potential with a movable solid wall. The MD is modeled as a two-level system (TLS) for measuring and controlling the motion of the molecule. The processes in the cycle are described in a quantum fashion. It is discovered that a MD with quantum coherence or one at a temperature lower than the molecule’s heat bath can enhance the ability of the whole working substance, formed by the heat engine plus the MD, to do work outside. This observation reveals that the essential role of the MD is to drive the whole working substance off equilibrium, or equivalently, to work between two heat baths with different effective temperatures. The elaborate studies with this model explicitly reveal the effect of finite size off the classical limit or thermodynamic limit, which contradicts common sense on a Szilard heat engine (SHE). The quantum SHE’s efficiency is evaluated in detail to prove the validity of the second law of thermodynamics.

  11. Quantum Maxwell's demon in thermodynamic cycles.

    PubMed

    Dong, H; Xu, D Z; Cai, C Y; Sun, C P

    2011-06-01

    We study the physical mechanism of Maxwell's demon (MD), which helps do extra work in thermodynamic cycles with the heat engine. This is exemplified with one molecule confined in an infinitely deep square potential with a movable solid wall. The MD is modeled as a two-level system (TLS) for measuring and controlling the motion of the molecule. The processes in the cycle are described in a quantum fashion. It is discovered that a MD with quantum coherence or one at a temperature lower than the molecule's heat bath can enhance the ability of the whole working substance, formed by the heat engine plus the MD, to do work outside. This observation reveals that the essential role of the MD is to drive the whole working substance off equilibrium, or equivalently, to work between two heat baths with different effective temperatures. The elaborate studies with this model explicitly reveal the effect of finite size off the classical limit or thermodynamic limit, which contradicts common sense on a Szilard heat engine (SHE). The quantum SHE's efficiency is evaluated in detail to prove the validity of the second law of thermodynamics. PMID:21797303

  12. Quantum thermodynamics: a nonequilibrium Green's function approach.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Massimiliano; Ochoa, Maicol A; Galperin, Michael

    2015-02-27

    We establish the foundations of a nonequilibrium theory of quantum thermodynamics for noninteracting open quantum systems strongly coupled to their reservoirs within the framework of the nonequilibrium Green's functions. The energy of the system and its coupling to the reservoirs are controlled by a slow external time-dependent force treated to first order beyond the quasistatic limit. We derive the four basic laws of thermodynamics and characterize reversible transformations. Stochastic thermodynamics is recovered in the weak coupling limit. PMID:25768745

  13. Thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. [thermodynamic properties of gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The basic thermodynamic properties of gases are reviewed and the relations between them are derived from the first and second laws. The elements of statistical mechanics are then formulated and the partition function is derived. The classical form of the partition function is used to obtain the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution of kinetic energies in the gas phase and the equipartition of energy theorem is given in its most general form. The thermodynamic properties are all derived as functions of the partition function. Quantum statistics are reviewed briefly and the differences between the Boltzmann distribution function for classical particles and the Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein distributions for quantum particles are discussed.

  14. Fundamental limitations for quantum and nanoscale thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Horodecki, Michał; Oppenheim, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between thermodynamics and statistical physics is valid in the thermodynamic limit-when the number of particles becomes very large. Here we study thermodynamics in the opposite regime-at both the nanoscale and when quantum effects become important. Applying results from quantum information theory, we construct a theory of thermodynamics in these limits. We derive general criteria for thermodynamical state transitions, and, as special cases, find two free energies: one that quantifies the deterministically extractable work from a small system in contact with a heat bath, and the other that quantifies the reverse process. We find that there are fundamental limitations on work extraction from non-equilibrium states, owing to finite size effects and quantum coherences. This implies that thermodynamical transitions are generically irreversible at this scale. As one application of these methods, we analyse the efficiency of small heat engines and find that they are irreversible during the adiabatic stages of the cycle. PMID:23800725

  15. Fundamental limitations for quantum and nanoscale thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horodecki, Michał; Oppenheim, Jonathan

    2013-06-01

    The relationship between thermodynamics and statistical physics is valid in the thermodynamic limit—when the number of particles becomes very large. Here we study thermodynamics in the opposite regime—at both the nanoscale and when quantum effects become important. Applying results from quantum information theory, we construct a theory of thermodynamics in these limits. We derive general criteria for thermodynamical state transitions, and, as special cases, find two free energies: one that quantifies the deterministically extractable work from a small system in contact with a heat bath, and the other that quantifies the reverse process. We find that there are fundamental limitations on work extraction from non-equilibrium states, owing to finite size effects and quantum coherences. This implies that thermodynamical transitions are generically irreversible at this scale. As one application of these methods, we analyse the efficiency of small heat engines and find that they are irreversible during the adiabatic stages of the cycle.

  16. Thermodynamic universality of quantum Carnot engines.

    PubMed

    Gardas, Bartłomiej; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-01

    The Carnot statement of the second law of thermodynamics poses an upper limit on the efficiency of all heat engines. Recently, it has been studied whether generic quantum features such as coherence and quantum entanglement could allow for quantum devices with efficiencies larger than the Carnot efficiency. The present study shows that this is not permitted by the laws of thermodynamics-independent of the model. We will show that rather the definition of heat has to be modified to account for the thermodynamic cost of maintaining non-Gibbsian equilibrium states. Our theoretical findings are illustrated for two experimentally relevant examples. PMID:26565187

  17. Thermodynamic universality of quantum Carnot engines

    SciTech Connect

    Gardas, Bartłomiej; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-12

    The Carnot statement of the second law of thermodynamics poses an upper limit on the efficiency of all heat engines. Recently, it has been studied whether generic quantum features such as coherence and quantum entanglement could allow for quantum devices with efficiencies larger than the Carnot efficiency. The present study shows that this is not permitted by the laws of thermodynamic —independent of the model. We will show that rather the definition of heat has to be modified to account for the thermodynamic cost of maintaining non-Gibbsian equilibrium states. As a result, our theoretical findings are illustrated for two experimentally relevant examples.

  18. Thermodynamic universality of quantum Carnot engines

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gardas, Bartłomiej; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-12

    The Carnot statement of the second law of thermodynamics poses an upper limit on the efficiency of all heat engines. Recently, it has been studied whether generic quantum features such as coherence and quantum entanglement could allow for quantum devices with efficiencies larger than the Carnot efficiency. The present study shows that this is not permitted by the laws of thermodynamic —independent of the model. We will show that rather the definition of heat has to be modified to account for the thermodynamic cost of maintaining non-Gibbsian equilibrium states. As a result, our theoretical findings are illustrated for two experimentallymore » relevant examples.« less

  19. Thermodynamic analysis of quantum light amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukobza, E.; Tannor, D. J.

    2006-12-01

    Thermodynamics of a three-level maser was studied in the pioneering work of Scovil and Schulz-DuBois [Phys. Rev. Lett. 2, 262 (1959)]. In this work we consider the same three-level model, but treat both the matter and the light quantum mechanically. Specifically, we analyze an extended (three-level) dissipative (ED) Jaynes-Cummings model (JCM) within the framework of a quantum heat engine, using formulas for heat flux and power in bipartite systems introduced in our previous work [E. Boukobza and D. J. Tannor Phys. Rev. A 74, 063823 (2006)] Amplification of the selected cavity mode occurs even in this simple model, as seen by a positive steady state power. However, initial field coherence is lost, as seen by the decaying off-diagonal field density matrix elements, and by the Husimi-Kano Q function. We show that after an initial transient time the field’s entropy rises linearly during the operation of the engine, which we attribute to the dissipative nature of the evolution and not to matter-field entanglement. We show that the second law of thermodynamics is satisfied in two formulations (Clausius, Carnot) and that the efficiency of the ED JCM heat engine agrees with that defined intuitively by Scovil and Schulz-DuBois. Finally, we compare the steady state heat flux and power of the fully quantum model with the semiclassical counterpart of the ED JCM, and derive the engine efficiency formula of Scovil and Schulz-DuBois analytically from fundamental thermodynamic fluxes.

  20. Thermodynamics of projective quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erez, Noam

    2012-11-01

    Quantum measurement of a system can change its mean energy as well as entropy. A selective measurement (classical or quantum) can be used as a ‘Maxwell's demon’ to power a single-temperature heat engine by decreasing the entropy. Quantum mechanically, so can a non-selective measurement, despite increasing the entropy of a thermal state. The maximal amount of work extractable following the measurement is given by the change in free energy: W(non-)selmax = ΔEmeas - TBathΔS(non-)selmeas. This follows from the ‘generalized 2nd law for nonequilibrium initial state’ (Hasegawa et al 2010 Phys. Lett. A 374 1001-4), an elementary reduction of which to the standard law is given here. It is shown that Wselmax - Wnon-selmax is equal to the work required for resetting the memory of the measuring device and that no such resetting is needed in the non-selective case. Consequently, a single-bath engine powered by either kind of measurement works at a net loss of TBathΔSnon-selmeas per cycle. By replacing the measurement by a reversible ‘pre-measurement’ and allowing a work source to couple to the system and memory, the cycle can be rendered completely reversible.

  1. Quantum work and the thermodynamic cost of quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deffner, Sebastian; Paz, Juan Pablo; Zurek, Wojciech H.

    2016-07-01

    Quantum work is usually determined from two projective measurements of the energy at the beginning and at the end of a thermodynamic process. However, this paradigm cannot be considered thermodynamically consistent as it does not account for the thermodynamic cost of these measurements. To remedy this conceptual inconsistency we introduce a paradigm that relies only on the expected change of the average energy given the initial energy eigenbasis. In particular, we completely omit quantum measurements in the definition of quantum work, and hence quantum work is identified as a thermodynamic quantity of only the system. As main results we derive a modified quantum Jarzynski equality and a sharpened maximum work theorem in terms of the information free energy. A comparison of our results with the standard approach allows one to quantify the informational cost of projective measurements.

  2. Quantum work and the thermodynamic cost of quantum measurements.

    PubMed

    Deffner, Sebastian; Paz, Juan Pablo; Zurek, Wojciech H

    2016-07-01

    Quantum work is usually determined from two projective measurements of the energy at the beginning and at the end of a thermodynamic process. However, this paradigm cannot be considered thermodynamically consistent as it does not account for the thermodynamic cost of these measurements. To remedy this conceptual inconsistency we introduce a paradigm that relies only on the expected change of the average energy given the initial energy eigenbasis. In particular, we completely omit quantum measurements in the definition of quantum work, and hence quantum work is identified as a thermodynamic quantity of only the system. As main results we derive a modified quantum Jarzynski equality and a sharpened maximum work theorem in terms of the information free energy. A comparison of our results with the standard approach allows one to quantify the informational cost of projective measurements. PMID:27575061

  3. Thermodynamic universality of quantum Carnot engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardas, Bartłomiej; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-01

    The Carnot statement of the second law of thermodynamics poses an upper limit on the efficiency of all heat engines. Recently, it has been studied whether generic quantum features such as coherence and quantum entanglement could allow for quantum devices with efficiencies larger than the Carnot efficiency. The present study shows that this is not permitted by the laws of thermodynamics—independent of the model. We will show that rather the definition of heat has to be modified to account for the thermodynamic cost of maintaining non-Gibbsian equilibrium states. Our theoretical findings are illustrated for two experimentally relevant examples.

  4. Thermodynamics of Weakly Measured Quantum Systems.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Jose Joaquin; Lutz, Eric; Romito, Alessandro

    2016-02-26

    We consider continuously monitored quantum systems and introduce definitions of work and heat along individual quantum trajectories that are valid for coherent superposition of energy eigenstates. We use these quantities to extend the first and second laws of stochastic thermodynamics to the quantum domain. We illustrate our results with the case of a weakly measured driven two-level system and show how to distinguish between quantum work and heat contributions. We finally employ quantum feedback control to suppress detector backaction and determine the work statistics. PMID:26967399

  5. Thermodynamics of Weakly Measured Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, Jose Joaquin; Lutz, Eric; Romito, Alessandro

    2016-02-01

    We consider continuously monitored quantum systems and introduce definitions of work and heat along individual quantum trajectories that are valid for coherent superposition of energy eigenstates. We use these quantities to extend the first and second laws of stochastic thermodynamics to the quantum domain. We illustrate our results with the case of a weakly measured driven two-level system and show how to distinguish between quantum work and heat contributions. We finally employ quantum feedback control to suppress detector backaction and determine the work statistics.

  6. Quantum stochastic thermodynamic on harmonic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deffner, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Fluctuation theorems are symmetry relations for the probability to observe an amount of entropy production in a finite-time process. In a recent paper Pigeon et al (2016 New. J. Phys. 18 013009) derived fluctuation theorems for harmonic networks by means of the large deviation theory. Their novel approach is illustrated with various examples of experimentally relevant systems. As a main result, however, Pigeon et al provide new insight how to consistently formulate quantum stochastic thermodynamics, and provide new and robust tools for the study of the thermodynamics of quantum harmonic networks.

  7. Quantum mechanics of black holes.

    PubMed

    Witten, Edward

    2012-08-01

    The popular conception of black holes reflects the behavior of the massive black holes found by astronomers and described by classical general relativity. These objects swallow up whatever comes near and emit nothing. Physicists who have tried to understand the behavior of black holes from a quantum mechanical point of view, however, have arrived at quite a different picture. The difference is analogous to the difference between thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. The thermodynamic description is a good approximation for a macroscopic system, but statistical mechanics describes what one will see if one looks more closely. PMID:22859480

  8. Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A development of quantum theory that was initiated in the 1920s by Werner Heisenberg (1901-76) and Erwin Schrödinger (1887-1961). The theory drew on a proposal made in 1925 Prince Louis de Broglie (1892-1987), that particles have wavelike properties (the wave-particle duality) and that an electron, for example, could in some respects be regarded as a wave with a wavelength that depended on its mo...

  9. Nonequilibrium critical scaling in quantum thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayat, Abolfazl; Apollaro, Tony J. G.; Paganelli, Simone; De Chiara, Gabriele; Johannesson, Henrik; Bose, Sougato; Sodano, Pasquale

    2016-05-01

    The emerging field of quantum thermodynamics is contributing important results and insights into archetypal many-body problems, including quantum phase transitions. Still, the question whether out-of-equilibrium quantities, such as fluctuations of work, exhibit critical scaling after a sudden quench in a closed system has remained elusive. Here, we take a novel approach to the problem by studying a quench across an impurity quantum critical point. By performing density matrix renormalization group computations on the two-impurity Kondo model, we are able to establish that the irreversible work produced in a quench exhibits finite-size scaling at quantum criticality. This scaling faithfully predicts the equilibrium critical exponents for the crossover length and the order parameter of the model, and, moreover, implies an exponent for the rescaled irreversible work. By connecting the irreversible work to the two-impurity spin correlation function, our findings can be tested experimentally.

  10. Dynamics and thermodynamics in spinor quantum gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmaljohann, H.; Erhard, M.; Kronjäger, J.; Sengstock, K.; Bongs, K.

    2004-12-01

    We discuss magnetism in spinor quantum gases theoretically and experimentally with emphasis on temporal dynamics of the spinor order parameter in the presence of an external magnetic field. In a simple coupled Gross Pitaevskii picture we observe a dramatic suppression of spin dynamics due to quadratic Zeeman “dephasing”. In view of an inhomogeneous density profile of the trapped condensate we present evidence of spatial variations of spin dynamics. In addition we study spinor quantum gases as a model system for thermodynamics of Bose Einstein condensation. As a particular example we present measurements on condensate magnetisation due to the interaction with a thermal bath.

  11. Learning in quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, David E.

    This thesis describes qualitative research conducted to understand the problems students have when learning quantum mechanics. It differs from previous studies on educational issues associated with quantum mechanics in that I have examined the difficulties from the students' perspective. Three questions guided this research: What are the experiences of students learning quantum mechanics? What conceptual difficulties do students have with quantum mechanics? and, How do students approach learning quantum mechanics? From these questions, two themes emerged. First, students do not consider the quantum mechanical concepts of wave-particle duality or the uncertainty principle to be important sources of difficulties for them. Second, many of the difficulties students encounter are not related to conceptual understanding of specific topics, but stem from a mindset that is incongruent with the nature and structure of quantum mechanics. The implications for teaching are that the nature and structure of quantum mechanics should be emphasized and be an explicit part of instruction.

  12. Quantum walk, entanglement and thermodynamic laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanelli, Alejandro

    2015-09-01

    We consider a special dynamics of a quantum walk (QW) on a line. The walker, initially localized at the origin of the line with arbitrary chirality, evolves to an asymptotic stationary state. In this stationary state a measurement is performed and the state resulting from this measurement is used to start a second QW evolution to achieve a second asymptotic stationary state. In previous works, we developed the thermodynamics associated with the entanglement between the coin and position degrees of freedom in the QW. Here we study the application of the first and second laws of thermodynamics to the process between the two stationary states mentioned above. We show that: (i) the entropy change has upper and lower bounds that are obtained analytically as functions of the initial conditions. (ii) the energy change is associated to a heat-transfer process.

  13. Low-temperature thermodynamics with quantum coherence

    PubMed Central

    Narasimhachar, Varun; Gour, Gilad

    2015-01-01

    Thermal operations are an operational model of non-equilibrium quantum thermodynamics. In the absence of coherence between energy levels, exact state transition conditions under thermal operations are known in terms of a mathematical relation called thermo-majorization. But incorporating coherence has turned out to be challenging, even under the relatively tractable model wherein all Gibbs state-preserving quantum channels are included. Here we find a mathematical generalization of thermal operations at low temperatures, ‘cooling maps', for which we derive the necessary and sufficient state transition condition. Cooling maps that saturate recently discovered bounds on coherence transfer are realizable as thermal operations, motivating us to conjecture that all cooling maps are thermal operations. Cooling maps, though a less-conservative generalization to thermal operations, are more tractable than Gibbs-preserving operations, suggesting that cooling map-like models at general temperatures could be of use in gaining insight about thermal operations. PMID:26138621

  14. Nonthermal Quantum Channels as a Thermodynamical Resource.

    PubMed

    Navascués, Miguel; García-Pintos, Luis Pedro

    2015-07-01

    Quantum thermodynamics can be understood as a resource theory, whereby thermal states are free and the only allowed operations are unitary transformations commuting with the total Hamiltonian of the system. Previous literature on the subject has just focused on transformations between different state resources, overlooking the fact that quantum operations which do not commute with the total energy also constitute a potentially valuable resource. In this Letter, given a number of nonthermal quantum channels, we study the problem of how to integrate them in a thermal engine so as to distill a maximum amount of work. We find that, in the limit of asymptotically many uses of each channel, the distillable work is an additive function of the considered channels, computable for both finite dimensional quantum operations and bosonic channels. We apply our results to bound the amount of distillable work due to the natural nonthermal processes postulated in the Ghirardi-Rimini-Weber (GRW) collapse model. We find that, although GRW theory predicts the possibility of extracting work from the vacuum at no cost, the power which a collapse engine could, in principle, generate is extremely low. PMID:26182086

  15. Periodic thermodynamics of open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandner, Kay; Seifert, Udo

    2016-06-01

    The thermodynamics of quantum systems coupled to periodically modulated heat baths and work reservoirs is developed. By identifying affinities and fluxes, the first and the second law are formulated consistently. In the linear response regime, entropy production becomes a quadratic form in the affinities. Specializing to Lindblad dynamics, we identify the corresponding kinetic coefficients in terms of correlation functions of the unperturbed dynamics. Reciprocity relations follow from symmetries with respect to time reversal. The kinetic coefficients can be split into a classical and a quantum contribution subject to an additional constraint, which follows from a natural detailed balance condition. This constraint implies universal bounds on efficiency and power of quantum heat engines. In particular, we show that Carnot efficiency cannot be reached whenever quantum coherence effects are present, i.e., when the Hamiltonian used for work extraction does not commute with the bare system Hamiltonian. For illustration, we specialize our universal results to a driven two-level system in contact with a heat bath of sinusoidally modulated temperature.

  16. Periodic thermodynamics of open quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Brandner, Kay; Seifert, Udo

    2016-06-01

    The thermodynamics of quantum systems coupled to periodically modulated heat baths and work reservoirs is developed. By identifying affinities and fluxes, the first and the second law are formulated consistently. In the linear response regime, entropy production becomes a quadratic form in the affinities. Specializing to Lindblad dynamics, we identify the corresponding kinetic coefficients in terms of correlation functions of the unperturbed dynamics. Reciprocity relations follow from symmetries with respect to time reversal. The kinetic coefficients can be split into a classical and a quantum contribution subject to an additional constraint, which follows from a natural detailed balance condition. This constraint implies universal bounds on efficiency and power of quantum heat engines. In particular, we show that Carnot efficiency cannot be reached whenever quantum coherence effects are present, i.e., when the Hamiltonian used for work extraction does not commute with the bare system Hamiltonian. For illustration, we specialize our universal results to a driven two-level system in contact with a heat bath of sinusoidally modulated temperature. PMID:27415235

  17. Nonthermal Quantum Channels as a Thermodynamical Resource

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navascués, Miguel; García-Pintos, Luis Pedro

    2015-07-01

    Quantum thermodynamics can be understood as a resource theory, whereby thermal states are free and the only allowed operations are unitary transformations commuting with the total Hamiltonian of the system. Previous literature on the subject has just focused on transformations between different state resources, overlooking the fact that quantum operations which do not commute with the total energy also constitute a potentially valuable resource. In this Letter, given a number of nonthermal quantum channels, we study the problem of how to integrate them in a thermal engine so as to distill a maximum amount of work. We find that, in the limit of asymptotically many uses of each channel, the distillable work is an additive function of the considered channels, computable for both finite dimensional quantum operations and bosonic channels. We apply our results to bound the amount of distillable work due to the natural nonthermal processes postulated in the Ghirardi-Rimini-Weber (GRW) collapse model. We find that, although GRW theory predicts the possibility of extracting work from the vacuum at no cost, the power which a collapse engine could, in principle, generate is extremely low.

  18. Friction Force: From Mechanics to Thermodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrari, Christian; Gruber, Christian

    2010-01-01

    We study some mechanical problems in which a friction force is acting on a system. Using the fundamental concepts of state, time evolution and energy conservation, we explain how to extend Newtonian mechanics to thermodynamics. We arrive at the two laws of thermodynamics and then apply them to investigate the time evolution and heat transfer of…

  19. Thermodynamics of Maximum Transition Entropy for Quantum Assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, David

    2015-03-01

    We present one possible unifying framework for the statistics of driven quantum systems in terms of a stochastic propagator for the density matrix. Its classical limit [Rogers, Beck and Rempe, J. Stat. Phys 145:385, 2011] takes the form of a Langevin equation with an associated large-deviation functional intimately related to the partition function of statistical mechanics. Surprising results of this quantum theory are that work is a measurable quantity, and that a precise form of the second law of thermodynamics can be stated for dynamical systems. Numerical results are presented for the time-course of work and heat production for trapped 1D particles. Properties of the large deviation functional are discussed in the context of the quantum measurement problem.

  20. Thermodynamics of Quantum Gases for the Entire Range of Temperature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biswas, Shyamal; Jana, Debnarayan

    2012-01-01

    We have analytically explored the thermodynamics of free Bose and Fermi gases for the entire range of temperature, and have extended the same for harmonically trapped cases. We have obtained approximate chemical potentials for the quantum gases in closed forms of temperature so that the thermodynamic properties of the quantum gases become…

  1. Statistical mechanics based on fractional classical and quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Korichi, Z.; Meftah, M. T.

    2014-03-15

    The purpose of this work is to study some problems in statistical mechanics based on the fractional classical and quantum mechanics. At first stage we have presented the thermodynamical properties of the classical ideal gas and the system of N classical oscillators. In both cases, the Hamiltonian contains fractional exponents of the phase space (position and momentum). At the second stage, in the context of the fractional quantum mechanics, we have calculated the thermodynamical properties for the black body radiation, studied the Bose-Einstein statistics with the related problem of the condensation and the Fermi-Dirac statistics.

  2. Is quantum mechanics exact?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapustin, Anton

    2013-06-01

    We formulate physically motivated axioms for a physical theory which for systems with a finite number of degrees of freedom uniquely lead to quantum mechanics as the only nontrivial consistent theory. Complex numbers and the existence of the Planck constant common to all systems arise naturally in this approach. The axioms are divided into two groups covering kinematics and basic measurement theory, respectively. We show that even if the second group of axioms is dropped, there are no deformations of quantum mechanics which preserve the kinematic axioms. Thus, any theory going beyond quantum mechanics must represent a radical departure from the usual a priori assumptions about the laws of nature.

  3. Relativity and Quantum Mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Braendas, Erkki J.

    2007-12-26

    The old dilemma of quantum mechanics versus the theory of relativity is reconsidered via a first principles relativistically invariant theory. By analytic extension of quantum mechanics into the complex plane one may (i) include dynamical features such as time- and length-scales and (ii) examine the possibility and flexibility of so-called general Jordan block formations. The present viewpoint asks for a new perspective on the age-old problem of quantum mechanics versus the theory of relativity. To bring these ideas together, we will establish the relation with the Klein-Gordon-Dirac relativistic theory and confirm some dynamical features of both the special and the general relativity theory.

  4. Quantum-trajectory thermodynamics with discrete feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Zongping; Ashida, Yuto; Ueda, Masahito

    2016-07-01

    We employ the quantum-jump-trajectory approach to construct a systematic framework to study the thermodynamics at the trajectory level in a nonequilibrium open quantum system under discrete feedback control. Within this framework, we derive quantum versions of the generalized Jarzynski equalities, which are demonstrated in an isolated pseudospin system and a coherently driven two-level open quantum system. Due to quantum coherence and measurement backaction, a fundamental distinction from the classical generalized Jarzynski equalities emerges in the quantum versions, which is characterized by a large negative information gain reflecting genuinely quantum rare events. A possible experimental scheme to test our findings in superconducting qubits is discussed.

  5. Mechanics and thermodynamics in lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, A.; Gentle, C. R.

    1973-01-01

    The causes for breakdown in the lubricant film of mineral oils are discussed. It is stated that the critical point is caused by desorption of the naturally occurring surface active agent and can be described by thermodynamic analysis. The effect of different metals in lubrication is surveyed. The problem of breakdown in elastohydrodynamic lubrication is treated phenomenologically by studying traction. The topics considered are classical and non-Newtonian explanations, anomalous film thickness and viscosity effects, surface roughness contributions, and solidification of the lubricant. Reasons for the apparent granular traction characteristics are examined.

  6. Phase space quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Błaszak, Maciej; Domański, Ziemowit

    2012-02-01

    This paper develops an alternative formulation of quantum mechanics known as the phase space quantum mechanics or deformation quantization. It is shown that the quantization naturally arises as an appropriate deformation of the classical Hamiltonian mechanics. More precisely, the deformation of the point-wise product of observables to an appropriate noncommutative ⋆-product and the deformation of the Poisson bracket to an appropriate Lie bracket are the key elements in introducing the quantization of classical Hamiltonian systems. The formalism of the phase space quantum mechanics is presented in a very systematic way for the case of any smooth Hamiltonian function and for a very wide class of deformations. The considered class of deformations and the corresponding ⋆-products contains as a special case all deformations which can be found in the literature devoted to the subject of the phase space quantum mechanics. Fundamental properties of ⋆-products of observables, associated with the considered deformations are presented as well. Moreover, a space of states containing all admissible states is introduced, where the admissible states are appropriate pseudo-probability distributions defined on the phase space. It is proved that the space of states is endowed with a structure of a Hilbert algebra with respect to the ⋆-multiplication. The most important result of the paper shows that developed formalism is more fundamental than the axiomatic ordinary quantum mechanics which appears in the presented approach as the intrinsic element of the general formalism. The equivalence of two formulations of quantum mechanics is proved by observing that the Wigner-Moyal transform has all properties of the tensor product. This observation allows writing many previous results found in the literature in a transparent way, from which the equivalence of the two formulations of quantum mechanics follows naturally. In addition, examples of a free particle and a simple harmonic

  7. Quantum Mechanics From the Cradle?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, John L.

    1974-01-01

    States that the major problem in learning quantum mechanics is often the student's ignorance of classical mechanics and that one conceptual hurdle in quantum mechanics is its statistical nature, in contrast to the determinism of classical mechanics. (MLH)

  8. Quantum Coherence, Time-Translation Symmetry, and Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lostaglio, Matteo; Korzekwa, Kamil; Jennings, David; Rudolph, Terry

    2015-04-01

    The first law of thermodynamics imposes not just a constraint on the energy content of systems in extreme quantum regimes but also symmetry constraints related to the thermodynamic processing of quantum coherence. We show that this thermodynamic symmetry decomposes any quantum state into mode operators that quantify the coherence present in the state. We then establish general upper and lower bounds for the evolution of quantum coherence under arbitrary thermal operations, valid for any temperature. We identify primitive coherence manipulations and show that the transfer of coherence between energy levels manifests irreversibility not captured by free energy. Moreover, the recently developed thermomajorization relations on block-diagonal quantum states are observed to be special cases of this symmetry analysis.

  9. Fundamentals of Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, C. L.

    2005-06-01

    Quantum mechanics has evolved from a subject of study in pure physics to one with a wide range of applications in many diverse fields. The basic concepts of quantum mechanics are explained in this book in a concise and easy-to-read manner emphasising applications in solid state electronics and modern optics. Following a logical sequence, the book is focused on the key ideas and is conceptually and mathematically self-contained. The fundamental principles of quantum mechanics are illustrated by showing their application to systems such as the hydrogen atom, multi-electron ions and atoms, the formation of simple organic molecules and crystalline solids of practical importance. It leads on from these basic concepts to discuss some of the most important applications in modern semiconductor electronics and optics. Containing many homework problems and worked examples, the book is suitable for senior-level undergraduate and graduate level students in electrical engineering, materials science and applied physics. Clear exposition of quantum mechanics written in a concise and accessible style Precise physical interpretation of the mathematical foundations of quantum mechanics Illustrates the important concepts and results by reference to real-world examples in electronics and optoelectronics Contains homeworks and worked examples, with solutions available for instructors

  10. Empirical quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Hirokazu

    1996-06-01

    Machida and Namiki developed a many-Hilbert-spaces formalism for dealing with the interaction between a quantum object and a measuring apparatus. Their mathematically rugged formalism was polished first by Araki from an operator-algebraic standpoint and then by Ozawa for Boolean quantum mechanics, which approaches a quantum system with a compatible family of continuous superselection rules from a notable and perspicacious viewpoint. On the other hand, Foulis and Randall set up a formal theory for the empirical foundation of all sciences, at the hub of which lies the notion of a manual of operations. They deem an operation as the set of possible outcomes and put down a manual of operations at a family of partially overlapping operations. Their notion of a manual of operations was incorporated into a category-theoretic standpoint into that of a manual of Boolean locales by Nishimura, who looked upon an operation as the complete Boolean algebra of observable events. Considering a family of Hilbert spaces not over a single Boolean locale but over a manual of Boolean locales as a whole, Ozawa's Boolean quantum mechanics is elevated into empirical quantum mechanics, which is, roughly speaking, the study of quantum systems with incompatible families of continuous superselection rules. To this end, we are obliged to develop empirical Hilbert space theory. In particular, empirical versions of the square root lemma for bounded positive operators, the spectral theorem for (possibly unbounded) self-adjoint operators, and Stone's theorem for one-parameter unitary groups are established.

  11. Gravity and Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blencowe, Miles

    The emergence of the macroscopic classical world from the microscopic quantum world is commonly understood to be a consequence of the fact that any given quantum system is open, unavoidably interacting with unobserved environmental degrees of freedom that will cause initial quantum superposition states of the system to decohere, resulting in classical mixtures of either-or alternatives. A fundamental question concerns how large a macroscopic object can be placed in a manifest quantum state, such as a center of mass quantum superposition state, under conditions where the effects of the interacting environmental degrees of freedom are reduced (i.e. in ultrahigh vacuum and at ultralow temperatures). Recent experiments have in fact demonstrated manifest quantum behavior in nano-to-micron-scale mechanical systems. Gravity has been invoked in various ways as playing a possible fundamental role in enforcing classicality of matter systems beyond a certain scale. Adopting the viewpoint that the standard perturbative quantization of general relativity provides an effective description of quantum gravity that is valid at ordinary energies, we show that it is possible to describe quantitatively how gravity as an environment can induce the decoherence of matter superposition states. The justification for such an approach follows from the fact that we are considering laboratory scale systems, where the matter is localized to regions of small curvature. As with other low energy effects, such as the quantum gravity correction to the Newtonian potential between two ordinary masses, it should be possible to quantitatively evaluate gravitationally induced decoherence rates by employing standard perturbative quantum gravity as an effective field theory; whatever the final form the eventual correct quantum theory of gravity takes, it must converge in its predictions with the effective field theory description at low energies. Research supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF

  12. Grassmann matrix quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anninos, Dionysios; Denef, Frederik; Monten, Ruben

    2016-04-01

    We explore quantum mechanical theories whose fundamental degrees of freedom are rectangular matrices with Grassmann valued matrix elements. We study particular models where the low energy sector can be described in terms of a bosonic Hermitian matrix quantum mechanics. We describe the classical curved phase space that emerges in the low energy sector. The phase space lives on a compact Kähler manifold parameterized by a complex matrix, of the type discovered some time ago by Berezin. The emergence of a semiclassical bosonic matrix quantum mechanics at low energies requires that the original Grassmann matrices be in the long rectangular limit. We discuss possible holographic interpretations of such matrix models which, by construction, are endowed with a finite dimensional Hilbert space.

  13. Classical and thermodynamic limits for generalised quantum spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffield, N. G.

    1990-01-01

    We prove that the rescaled upper and lower symbols for arbitrary generalised quantum spin systems converge in the classical limit. For a large class of models this enables us to derive the asyptotics of quantum free energies in the classical and in the thermodynamic limit.

  14. Noncommutative quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamboa, J.; Loewe, M.; Rojas, J. C.

    2001-09-01

    A general noncommutative quantum mechanical system in a central potential V=V(r) in two dimensions is considered. The spectrum is bounded from below and, for large values of the anticommutative parameter θ, we find an explicit expression for the eigenvalues. In fact, any quantum mechanical system with these characteristics is equivalent to a commutative one in such a way that the interaction V(r) is replaced by V=V(HHO,Lz), where HHO is the Hamiltonian of the two-dimensional harmonic oscillator and Lz is the z component of the angular momentum. For other finite values of θ the model can be solved by using perturbation theory.

  15. Quantum mechanics over sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellerman, David

    2014-03-01

    In models of QM over finite fields (e.g., Schumacher's ``modal quantum theory'' MQT), one finite field stands out, Z2, since Z2 vectors represent sets. QM (finite-dimensional) mathematics can be transported to sets resulting in quantum mechanics over sets or QM/sets. This gives a full probability calculus (unlike MQT with only zero-one modalities) that leads to a fulsome theory of QM/sets including ``logical'' models of the double-slit experiment, Bell's Theorem, QIT, and QC. In QC over Z2 (where gates are non-singular matrices as in MQT), a simple quantum algorithm (one gate plus one function evaluation) solves the Parity SAT problem (finding the parity of the sum of all values of an n-ary Boolean function). Classically, the Parity SAT problem requires 2n function evaluations in contrast to the one function evaluation required in the quantum algorithm. This is quantum speedup but with all the calculations over Z2 just like classical computing. This shows definitively that the source of quantum speedup is not in the greater power of computing over the complex numbers, and confirms the idea that the source is in superposition.

  16. Quantum Rényi relative entropies affirm universality of thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Misra, Avijit; Singh, Uttam; Bera, Manabendra Nath; Rajagopal, A K

    2015-10-01

    We formulate a complete theory of quantum thermodynamics in the Rényi entropic formalism exploiting the Rényi relative entropies, starting from the maximum entropy principle. In establishing the first and second laws of quantum thermodynamics, we have correctly identified accessible work and heat exchange in both equilibrium and nonequilibrium cases. The free energy (internal energy minus temperature times entropy) remains unaltered, when all the entities entering this relation are suitably defined. Exploiting Rényi relative entropies we have shown that this "form invariance" holds even beyond equilibrium and has profound operational significance in isothermal process. These results reduce to the Gibbs-von Neumann results when the Rényi entropic parameter α approaches 1. Moreover, it is shown that the universality of the Carnot statement of the second law is the consequence of the form invariance of the free energy, which is in turn the consequence of maximum entropy principle. Further, the Clausius inequality, which is the precursor to the Carnot statement, is also shown to hold based on the data processing inequalities for the traditional and sandwiched Rényi relative entropies. Thus, we find that the thermodynamics of nonequilibrium state and its deviation from equilibrium together determine the thermodynamic laws. This is another important manifestation of the concepts of information theory in thermodynamics when they are extended to the quantum realm. Our work is a substantial step towards formulating a complete theory of quantum thermodynamics and corresponding resource theory. PMID:26565222

  17. Quantum Rényi relative entropies affirm universality of thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Avijit; Singh, Uttam; Bera, Manabendra Nath; Rajagopal, A. K.

    2015-10-01

    We formulate a complete theory of quantum thermodynamics in the Rényi entropic formalism exploiting the Rényi relative entropies, starting from the maximum entropy principle. In establishing the first and second laws of quantum thermodynamics, we have correctly identified accessible work and heat exchange in both equilibrium and nonequilibrium cases. The free energy (internal energy minus temperature times entropy) remains unaltered, when all the entities entering this relation are suitably defined. Exploiting Rényi relative entropies we have shown that this "form invariance" holds even beyond equilibrium and has profound operational significance in isothermal process. These results reduce to the Gibbs-von Neumann results when the Rényi entropic parameter α approaches 1. Moreover, it is shown that the universality of the Carnot statement of the second law is the consequence of the form invariance of the free energy, which is in turn the consequence of maximum entropy principle. Further, the Clausius inequality, which is the precursor to the Carnot statement, is also shown to hold based on the data processing inequalities for the traditional and sandwiched Rényi relative entropies. Thus, we find that the thermodynamics of nonequilibrium state and its deviation from equilibrium together determine the thermodynamic laws. This is another important manifestation of the concepts of information theory in thermodynamics when they are extended to the quantum realm. Our work is a substantial step towards formulating a complete theory of quantum thermodynamics and corresponding resource theory.

  18. Internal dissipation and heat leaks in quantum thermodynamic cycles.

    PubMed

    Correa, Luis A; Palao, José P; Alonso, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    The direction of the steady-state heat currents across a generic quantum system connected to multiple baths may be engineered to realize virtually any thermodynamic cycle. In spite of their versatility, such continuous energy-conversion systems are generally unable to operate at maximum efficiency due to non-negligible sources of irreversible entropy production. In this paper we introduce a minimal model of irreversible absorption chiller. We identify and characterize the different mechanisms responsible for its irreversibility, namely heat leaks and internal dissipation, and gauge their relative impact in the overall cooling performance. We also propose reservoir engineering techniques to minimize these detrimental effects. Finally, by looking into a known three-qubit embodiment of the absorption cooling cycle, we illustrate how our simple model may help to pinpoint the different sources of irreversibility naturally arising in more complex practical heat devices. PMID:26465455

  19. Internal dissipation and heat leaks in quantum thermodynamic cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, Luis A.; Palao, José P.; Alonso, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    The direction of the steady-state heat currents across a generic quantum system connected to multiple baths may be engineered to realize virtually any thermodynamic cycle. In spite of their versatility, such continuous energy-conversion systems are generally unable to operate at maximum efficiency due to non-negligible sources of irreversible entropy production. In this paper we introduce a minimal model of irreversible absorption chiller. We identify and characterize the different mechanisms responsible for its irreversibility, namely heat leaks and internal dissipation, and gauge their relative impact in the overall cooling performance. We also propose reservoir engineering techniques to minimize these detrimental effects. Finally, by looking into a known three-qubit embodiment of the absorption cooling cycle, we illustrate how our simple model may help to pinpoint the different sources of irreversibility naturally arising in more complex practical heat devices.

  20. Epigenetics: Biology's Quantum Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, Richard A

    2011-01-01

    The perspective presented here is that modern genetics is at a similar stage of development as were early formulations of quantum mechanics theory in the 1920s and that in 2010 we are at the dawn of a new revolution in genetics that promises to enrich and deepen our understanding of the gene and the genome. The interrelationships and interdependence of two views of the gene - the molecular biological view and the epigenetic view - are explored, and it is argued that the classical molecular biological view is incomplete without incorporation of the epigenetic perspective and that in a sense the molecular biological view has been evolving to include the epigenetic view. Intriguingly, this evolution of the molecular view toward the broader and more inclusive epigenetic view of the gene has an intriguing, if not precise, parallel in the evolution of concepts of atomic physics from Newtonian mechanics to quantum mechanics that are interesting to consider. PMID:22639577

  1. Quantum Chemical Approach to Estimating the Thermodynamics of Metabolic Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinich, Adrian; Rappoport, Dmitrij; Dunn, Ian; Sanchez-Lengeling, Benjamin; Olivares-Amaya, Roberto; Noor, Elad; Even, Arren Bar; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-11-01

    Thermodynamics plays an increasingly important role in modeling and engineering metabolism. We present the first nonempirical computational method for estimating standard Gibbs reaction energies of metabolic reactions based on quantum chemistry, which can help fill in the gaps in the existing thermodynamic data. When applied to a test set of reactions from core metabolism, the quantum chemical approach is comparable in accuracy to group contribution methods for isomerization and group transfer reactions and for reactions not including multiply charged anions. The errors in standard Gibbs reaction energy estimates are correlated with the charges of the participating molecules. The quantum chemical approach is amenable to systematic improvements and holds potential for providing thermodynamic data for all of metabolism.

  2. Thermodynamical properties of Strunz’s quantum dissipative models

    SciTech Connect

    Zen, Freddy P.; Sulaiman, A.

    2015-09-30

    The existence of the negative of specific heat from quantum dissipative theory is investigated. Strunz’s quantum dissipative model will be used in this studies. The thermodynamical properties will be studied starts out from the thermo-dynamic partition function of the dissipative system. The path integral technique is used to calculate the partition function under consideration. The results shows that the specific heat can be negative if the damping parameter more than a half the oscillator frequency and also occur at low temperatures. For damping factor greater than the frequency of harmonic oscillator then specific heat will oscillate at low temperatures and approaching normal conditions at a high temperature.

  3. Supersymmetry in quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Lahiri, A. ); Roy, P.K. ); Bagghi, B. )

    1990-04-20

    A pedagogical review on supersymmetry in quantum mechanics is presented which provides a comprehensive coverage of the subject. First, the key ingredients of the quantization of the systems with anticommuting variables are discussed. The supersymmetric Hamiltonian in quantum mechanics is then constructed by emphasizing the role of partner potentials and the superpotentials. The authors also make explicit the mathematical formulation of the Hamiltonian by considering in detail the N = 1 and N = 2 supersymmetric (quantum) mechanics. Supersymmetry is then discussed in the context of one-dimensional problems and the importance of the factorization method is highlighted. They treat in detail the technique of constructing a hierarchy of Hamiltonians employing the so-called 'shape-invariance' of potentials. To make transparent the relationship between supersymmetry and solvable potentials, they also solve several examples. They then go over the formulation of supersymmetry in radial problems, paying a special attention to the Coulomb and isotropic oscillator potentials. They show that the ladder operator technique may be suitable modified in higher dimensions for generating isospectral Hamiltonians. Next, the criteria for the breaking of supersymmetry is considered and their range of applicability is examined by suitably modifying he definition of Witten's index. Finally, the authors perform some numerical calculations for a class of potentials to show how a modified WKB approximation works in supersymmetric cases.

  4. Feynman's simple quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Edwin F.

    1997-03-01

    This sample class presents an alternative to the conventional introduction to quantum mechanics and describes its current use in a credit course. This alternative introduction rests on theory presented in professional and popular writings by Richard Feynman. Feynman showed that Nature gives a simple command to the electron: "Explore all paths." All of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics, among other fundamental results, comes from this command. With a desktop computer the student points and clicks to tell a modeled electron which paths to follow. The computer then shows the results, which embody the elemental strangeness and paradoxical behaviors of the world of the very small. Feynman's approach requires few equations and provides a largely non-mathematical introduction to the wave function of conventional quantum mechanics. Draft software and materials already used for two semesters in an e-mail computer conference credit university course show that Feynman's approach works well with a variety of students. The sample class explores computer and written material and describes the next steps in its development.

  5. The second laws of quantum thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Fernando; Horodecki, Michał; Ng, Nelly; Oppenheim, Jonathan; Wehner, Stephanie

    2015-03-17

    The second law of thermodynamics places constraints on state transformations. It applies to systems composed of many particles, however, we are seeing that one can formulate laws of thermodynamics when only a small number of particles are interacting with a heat bath. Is there a second law of thermodynamics in this regime? Here, we find that for processes which are approximately cyclic, the second law for microscopic systems takes on a different form compared to the macroscopic scale, imposing not just one constraint on state transformations, but an entire family of constraints. We find a family of free energies which generalize the traditional one, and show that they can never increase. The ordinary second law relates to one of these, with the remainder imposing additional constraints on thermodynamic transitions. We find three regimes which determine which family of second laws govern state transitions, depending on how cyclic the process is. In one regime one can cause an apparent violation of the usual second law, through a process of embezzling work from a large system which remains arbitrarily close to its original state. These second laws are relevant for small systems, and also apply to individual macroscopic systems interacting via long-range interactions. By making precise the definition of thermal operations, the laws of thermodynamics are unified in this framework, with the first law defining the class of operations, the zeroth law emerging as an equivalence relation between thermal states, and the remaining laws being monotonicity of our generalized free energies. PMID:25675476

  6. The second laws of quantum thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Brandão, Fernando; Horodecki, Michał; Ng, Nelly; Oppenheim, Jonathan; Wehner, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    The second law of thermodynamics places constraints on state transformations. It applies to systems composed of many particles, however, we are seeing that one can formulate laws of thermodynamics when only a small number of particles are interacting with a heat bath. Is there a second law of thermodynamics in this regime? Here, we find that for processes which are approximately cyclic, the second law for microscopic systems takes on a different form compared to the macroscopic scale, imposing not just one constraint on state transformations, but an entire family of constraints. We find a family of free energies which generalize the traditional one, and show that they can never increase. The ordinary second law relates to one of these, with the remainder imposing additional constraints on thermodynamic transitions. We find three regimes which determine which family of second laws govern state transitions, depending on how cyclic the process is. In one regime one can cause an apparent violation of the usual second law, through a process of embezzling work from a large system which remains arbitrarily close to its original state. These second laws are relevant for small systems, and also apply to individual macroscopic systems interacting via long-range interactions. By making precise the definition of thermal operations, the laws of thermodynamics are unified in this framework, with the first law defining the class of operations, the zeroth law emerging as an equivalence relation between thermal states, and the remaining laws being monotonicity of our generalized free energies. PMID:25675476

  7. Statistical Mechanics and Thermodynamics of Viral Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Barbara; Kaufman, James

    Using methods drawn from physics we study the life cycle of viruses. We analyze a model of viral infection and evolution using the ``grand canonical ensemble'' and formalisms from statistical mechanics and thermodynamics. Using this approach we determine possible genetic states of a model virus and host as a function of two independent pressures-immune response and system temperature. We show the system has a real thermodynamic temperature, and discover a new phase transition between a positive temperature regime of normal replication and a negative temperature ``disordered'' phase of the virus. We distinguish this from previous observations of a phase transition that arises as a function of mutation rate. From an evolutionary biology point of view, at steady state the viruses naturally evolve to distinct quasispecies. The approach used here could be refined to apply to real biological systems, perhaps providing insight into immune escape, the emergence of novel pathogens and other results of viral evolution.

  8. Bulk-phase thermodynamic properties and dielectric constant of ethanol: an ab initio quantum mechanical approach combined with a statistical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Prasenjit; Chakraborty, Tanmoy; Mukherjee, Asok K.

    2013-10-01

    Ab initio theory at the HF/6-311G(d,p) level has been used to compute the hydrogen bonding thermodynamics in bulk liquid ethanol. Inter-cluster hydrogen bonding is assumed to mimic the H-bonding in bulk ethanol. Rotation of the clusters has been neglected, but translational and vibrational motions are taken into account for calculating bulk thermodynamic parameters. Results are well in agreement with an earlier report [J. Chem. Phys. 116, 4212 (2002)]. For a more accurate dipole moment of monomer, MP2/6-311++G(d,p) calculation was done. Use of the computed thermodynamic data in a statistical model yields the Kirkwood-Frohlich correlation factor and the dielectric constant of ethanol (21.0) close to the experimental value, 24.3 at 298 K.

  9. Second law of thermodynamics with discrete quantum feedback control.

    PubMed

    Sagawa, Takahiro; Ueda, Masahito

    2008-02-29

    A new thermodynamic inequality is derived which leads to the maximum work that can be extracted from multi-heat-baths with the assistance of discrete quantum feedback control. The maximum work is determined by the free-energy difference and a generalized mutual information content between the thermodynamic system and the feedback controller. This maximum work can exceed that in conventional thermodynamics and, in the case of a heat cycle with two heat baths, the heat efficiency can be greater than that of the Carnot cycle. The consistency of our results with the second law of thermodynamics is ensured by the fact that work is needed for information processing of the feedback controller. PMID:18352605

  10. Emergent mechanics, quantum and un-quantum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralston, John P.

    2013-10-01

    There is great interest in quantum mechanics as an "emergent" phenomenon. The program holds that nonobvious patterns and laws can emerge from complicated physical systems operating by more fundamental rules. We find a new approach where quantum mechanics itself should be viewed as an information management tool not derived from physics nor depending on physics. The main accomplishment of quantum-style theory comes in expanding the notion of probability. We construct a map from macroscopic information as data" to quantum probability. The map allows a hidden variable description for quantum states, and efficient use of the helpful tools of quantum mechanics in unlimited circumstances. Quantum dynamics via the time-dependent Shroedinger equation or operator methods actually represents a restricted class of classical Hamiltonian or Lagrangian dynamics, albeit with different numbers of degrees of freedom. We show that under wide circumstances such dynamics emerges from structureless dynamical systems. The uses of the quantum information management tools are illustrated by numerical experiments and practical applications

  11. Advanced Concepts in Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Giampiero; Marmo, Giuseppe; Miele, Gennaro; Sudarshan, George

    2014-11-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction: the need for a quantum theory; 2. Experimental foundations of quantum theory; 3. Waves and particles; 4. Schrödinger picture, Heisenberg picture and probabilistic aspects; 5. Integrating the equations of motion; 6. Elementary applications: 1-dimensional problems; 7. Elementary applications: multidimensional problems; 8. Coherent states and related formalism; 9. Introduction to spin; 10. Symmetries in quantum mechanics; 11. Approximation methods; 12. Modern pictures of quantum mechanics; 13. Formulations of quantum mechanics and their physical implications; 14. Exam problems; Glossary of geometric concepts; References; Index.

  12. New Formulation of Statistical Mechanics Using Thermal Pure Quantum States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Sho; Shimizu, Akira

    2014-03-01

    We formulate statistical mechanics based on a pure quantum state, which we call a "thermal pure quantum (TPQ) state". A single TPQ state gives not only equilibrium values of mechanical variables, such as magnetization and correlation functions, but also those of genuine thermodynamic variables and thermodynamic functions, such as entropy and free energy. Among many possible TPQ states, we discuss the canonical TPQ state, the TPQ state whose temperature is specified. In the TPQ formulation of statistical mechanics, thermal fluctuations are completely included in quantum-mechanical fluctuations. As a consequence, TPQ states have much larger quantum entanglement than the equilibrium density operators of the ensemble formulation. We also show that the TPQ formulation is very useful in practical computations, by applying the formulation to a frustrated two-dimensional quantum spin system.

  13. Information Thermodynamics applied to the MERA quantum circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passias, Vasilios; Chua, Victor; Tiwari, Apoorv; Ryu, Shinsei

    We interpret the MERA (Multiscale Entanglement Renormalization Ansatz) tensor network as a unitary quantum circuit to study excited states of quantum spin-chains. Contrary to the common use of MERA as a variational ground state ansatz, the quantum circuit defined by MERA - adapted to a fixed ground state - is employed as a diagnostic tool to study dynamically evolving excited state wavefunctions. Outputs of the quantum computation emanating from the isometry tensors, which are normally approximate tensor product states, now fluctuate strongly. These ``bulk'' degrees of freedom in the MERA which act as logical qubits are studied using tools from quantum information theory and information thermodynamics. A local temperature scale based on Landauer's information erasure principle is defined to measure their degree of fluctuation. We investigate properties of this temperature against the expectations of Luttinger's theorem which relates weak field gravity to heat flow. This work was supported by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

  14. Quantum Mechanics as Dualism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Robert

    2011-03-01

    I do not agree with mind-body dualism. Today the consensus view is that thought and mind is a combination of processes like memory, generalization, comparison, deduction, organization, induction, classification, feature detection, analogy, etc. performed by computational machinery. (R. Jones, Trans. of the Kansas Acad. Sci., vol. 109, # 3/4, 2006 and www.robert-w-jones.com, philosopher, theory of thought) But I believe that quantum mechanics is a more plausible dualist theory of reality. The quantum mechanical wave function is nonphysical, it exists in a 3N space (for an N body system) not in (x,y,z,t) 4-space, and does not possess physical properties. But real physical things like energy (which do exist in our 4-space world) influence the wave function and the wave function, in its turn, influences real physical things, like where a particle can be found in 4-space. The coupling between the spirit-like wave function and things found in the real (4-space) world (like energy) is via mathematical equations like the Schrodinger equation and Born normalization.

  15. Diagrammatic quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffman, Louis H.; Lomonaco, Samuel J.

    2015-05-01

    This paper explores how diagrams of quantum processes can be used for modeling and for quantum epistemology. The paper is a continuation of the discussion where we began this formulation. Here we give examples of quantum networks that represent unitary transformations by dint of coherence conditions that constitute a new form of non-locality. Local quantum devices interconnected in space can form a global quantum system when appropriate coherence conditions are maintained.

  16. Thermodynamics and mechanics of photochemcially reacting polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Rong; Qi, H. Jerry; Dunn, Martin L.

    2013-11-01

    We develop a thermodynamics and mechanics theory for polymers that when irradiated with light, undergo photochemical reactions that alter their macromolecular structure, e.g., by bond breaking and/or reformation, and in turn affect their mechanical and physical behavior. This emerging class of highly-engineered active materials shows great promise for myriad applications and is a subset of a broader class of polymers with covalent bonds that can be dynamically tuned with various environmental stimuli. We formulate a general thermodynamic and kinetic framework to model the complex photochemical-thermal-mechanical coupling in these materials. Our theory considers the behavior of a polymer that is subjected to the combination of mechanical and thermal loading while simultaneously irradiated by light with multiple frequency components and directions. We introduce an approach to model the photochemical reactions that can change the network topology, resulting chemical species transport, heat conduction and finite deformation. We describe the interaction of the material with light via a radiometric description and show how it can be linked to a full electromagnetic treatment when appropriate and if desired. Our approach is sufficiently general to permit the modeling of various materials that operate via different photochemical reaction mechanisms. After formulating the general theory, we specialize it to a polymer that when irradiated with light undergoes a series of photochemical reactions that cause chain scission and reformation which continuously rearrange the polymer network into a stress-free configuration. Based on the operant physical mechanisms we develop a constitutive model using a polymer chain decomposition and evolution approach to track the molecular structure changes during simultaneous irradiation and mechanical loading. In the special case of isothermal conditions with monochromatic and unidirectional irradiation, we recover a previous model based on

  17. Dynamical and thermodynamical control of open quantum Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petruccione, Francesco; Sinayskiy, Ilya

    Open quantum Brownian motion was introduced as a new type of quantum Brownian motion for Brownian particles with internal quantum degrees of freedom. Recently, an example of the microscopic derivation of open quantum Brownian motion has been presented [I. Sinayskiy and F. Petruccione, Phys. Scr. T165, 014017 (2015)]. The microscopic derivation allows to relate the dynamical properties of open Quantum Brownian motion and the thermodynamical properties of the environment. In the present work, we study the possibility of control of the external degrees of freedom of the ''walker'' (position) by manipulating the internal one, e.g. spin, polarization, occupation numbers. In the particular example of the known microscopic derivation the connection between dynamics of the ''walker'' and thermodynamical parameters of the system is established. For the system of open Brownian walkers coupled to the same environment controllable creation of quantum correlations is investigated. This work is based upon research supported by the South African Research Chair Initiative of the Department of Science and Technology and National Research Foundation.

  18. Quantum thermodynamics at the breakdown of integrability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grisins, Pjors; Davidson, Shainen; Polkovnikov, Anatoli

    2014-03-01

    We present a numerical study (exact diagonalization) of thermalization of a one-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model after a quantum quench to a highly non-equilibrium state. In contrast to the existing studies, which mostly concentrate on integrable limiting cases of either non-interacting or hard-core bosons, we study the system in the crossover regime of integrability breaking. We show that non-integrable phase is characterized with increased entanglement entropy in the eigenbasis, meaning that in this regime the system retains less memory about its initial state. Additionally we identify the region of small integrability breaking where the momentum modes are close to being in Gaussian state, supporting the claim that close-to-integrable systems relax to the generalized Gibbs ensemble, which in turn allows kinetic theory applications. In the end we verify the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis and argue about the possibility of semiclassical description of quantum quenches.

  19. The second law of quantum thermodynamics as an equality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppenheim, Jonathan

    The traditional second law of thermodynamics says that the average amount of work required to change one state into another while in contact with a heat reservoir, must be at least as large as the change in free energy of the system. Here, we consider a fine-grained notion of the free energy, and show that in terms of it, the second law can be written as an equality. We also obtain a generalisation of the Jarzynski fluctuation theorem which holds for arbitrary initial states, not just the case of an initial thermal state. We derive a generalisation of Gibbs-stochasticity, a condition originally found in the approach to thermodynamics inspired by quantum information theory. This generalisation directly incorporates the case of fluctuating work and serves as a parent equation which can be used to derive the second law equality and the generalisation of the Jarzynski equation. We further show that each of these three generalisations can be seen as the quasi-classical limit of three fully quantum identities. This allows for more general and fully quantum fluctuation relations from the information theoretic approach to quantum thermodynamics.

  20. On Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics of Space-Time and Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munkhammar, Joakim

    Based on recent results from general relativistic statistical mechanics and black hole information transfer limits, a space-time entropy-action equivalence is proposed as a generalization of the holographic principle. With this conjecture, the action principle can be replaced by the second law of thermodynamics, and for the Einstein-Hilbert action the Einstein field equations are conceptually the result of thermodynamic equilibrium. For non-equilibrium situations, Jaynes' information-theoretic approach to maximum entropy production is adopted instead of the second law of thermodynamics. As it turns out for appropriate choices of constants, quantum gravity is obtained. For the special case of a free particle the Bekenstein-Verlinde entropy-to-displacement relation of holographic gravity and thus the traditional holographic principle emerges. Although Jacobson's original thermodynamic equilibrium approach proposed that gravity might not necessarily be quantized, this particular non-equilibrium treatment might require it.

  1. PT quantum mechanics.

    PubMed

    Bender, Carl M; DeKieviet, Maarten; Klevansky, S P

    2013-04-28

    PT-symmetric quantum mechanics (PTQM) has become a hot area of research and investigation. Since its beginnings in 1998, there have been over 1000 published papers and more than 15 international conferences entirely devoted to this research topic. Originally, PTQM was studied at a highly mathematical level and the techniques of complex variables, asymptotics, differential equations and perturbation theory were used to understand the subtleties associated with the analytic continuation of eigenvalue problems. However, as experiments on PT-symmetric physical systems have been performed, a simple and beautiful physical picture has emerged, and a PT-symmetric system can be understood as one that has a balanced loss and gain. Furthermore, the PT phase transition can now be understood intuitively without resorting to sophisticated mathematics. Research on PTQM is following two different paths: at a fundamental level, physicists are attempting to understand the underlying mathematical structure of these theories with the long-range objective of applying the techniques of PTQM to understanding some of the outstanding problems in physics today, such as the nature of the Higgs particle, the properties of dark matter, the matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe, neutrino oscillations and the cosmological constant; at an applied level, new kinds of PT-synthetic materials are being developed, and the PT phase transition is being observed in many physical contexts, such as lasers, optical wave guides, microwave cavities, superconducting wires and electronic circuits. The purpose of this Theme Issue is to acquaint the reader with the latest developments in PTQM. The articles in this volume are written in the style of mini-reviews and address diverse areas of the emerging and exciting new area of PT-symmetric quantum mechanics. PMID:23509390

  2. Dissipation effects in mechanics and thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güémez, J.; Fiolhais, M.

    2016-07-01

    With the discussion of three examples, we aim at clarifying the concept of energy transfer associated with dissipation in mechanics and in thermodynamics. The dissipation effects due to dissipative forces, such as the friction force between solids or the drag force in motions in fluids, lead to an internal energy increase of the system and/or to heat transfer to the surroundings. This heat flow is consistent with the second law, which states that the entropy of the universe should increase when those forces are present because of the irreversibility always associated with their actions. As far as mechanics is concerned, the effects of the dissipative forces are included in Newton’s equations as impulses and pseudo-works.

  3. Decoherence in quantum mechanics and quantum cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartle, James B.

    1992-01-01

    A sketch of the quantum mechanics for closed systems adequate for cosmology is presented. This framework is an extension and clarification of that of Everett and builds on several aspects of the post-Everett development. It especially builds on the work of Zeh, Zurek, Joos and Zeh, and others on the interactions of quantum systems with the larger universe and on the ideas of Griffiths, Omnes, and others on the requirements for consistent probabilities of histories.

  4. Thermodynamic properties of a quantum Hall anti-dot interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy Schreier, Sarah; Stern, Ady; Rosenow, Bernd; Halperin, Bertrand I.

    2016-02-01

    We study quantum Hall interferometers in which the interference loop encircles a quantum anti-dot. We base our study on thermodynamic considerations, which we believe reflect the essential aspects of interference transport phenomena. We find that similar to the more conventional Fabry-Perot quantum Hall interferometers, in which the interference loop forms a quantum dot, the anti-dot interferometer is affected by the electro-static Coulomb interaction between the edge modes defining the loop. We show that in the Aharonov-Bohm regime, in which effects of fractional statistics should be visible, is easier to access in interferometers based on anti-dots than in those based on dots. We discuss the relevance of our results to recent measurements on anti-dots interferometers.

  5. Quantum gravity effects on charged microblack holes thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasvandi, Niloofar; Soleimani, M. J.; Radiman, Shahidan; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.

    2016-08-01

    The charged black hole thermodynamics is corrected in terms of the quantum gravity effects. Most of the quantum gravity theories support the idea that near the Planck scale, the standard Heisenberg uncertainty principle should be reformulated by the so-called Generalized Uncertainty Principle (GUP) which provides a perturbation framework to perform required modifications of the black hole quantities. In this paper, we consider the effects of the minimal length and maximal momentum as GUP type I and the minimal length, minimal momentum and maximal momentum as GUP type II on thermo dynamics of the charged TeV-scale black holes. We also generalized our study to the universe with the extra dimensions based on the ADD model. In this framework, the effect of the electrical charge on thermodynamics of the black hole and existence of the charged black hole remnants as a potential candidate for the dark matter particles are discussed.

  6. Principles of Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landé, Alfred

    2013-10-01

    ödinger's equation for non-conservative systems; 46. Pertubation theory; 47. Orthogonality, normalization and Hermitian conjugacy; 48. General matrix elements; Part IV. The Principle of Correspondence: 49. Contact transformations in classical mechanics; 50. Point transformations; 51. Contact transformations in quantum mechanics; 52. Constants of motion and angular co-ordinates; 53. Periodic orbits; 54. De Broglie and Schrödinger function; correspondence to classical mechanics; 55. Packets of probability; 56. Correspondence to hydrodynamics; 57. Motion and scattering of wave packets; 58. Formal correspondence between classical and quantum mechanics; Part V. Mathematical Appendix: Principle of Invariance: 59. The general theorem of transformation; 60. Operator calculus; 61. Exchange relations; three criteria for conjugacy; 62. First method of canonical transformation; 63. Second method of canonical transformation; 64. Proof of the transformation theorem; 65. Invariance of the matrix elements against unitary transformations; 66. Matrix mechanics; Index of literature; Index of names and subjects.

  7. Dissipative Forces and Quantum Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eck, John S.; Thompson, W. J.

    1977-01-01

    Shows how to include the dissipative forces of classical mechanics in quantum mechanics by the use of non-Hermetian Hamiltonians. The Ehrenfest theorem for such Hamiltonians is derived, and simple examples which show the classical correspondences are given. (MLH)

  8. Thermodynamic properties of Th xU 1-xO 2 (0 < x < 1) based on quantum-mechanical calculations and Monte-Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuller, Lindsay C.; Ewing, Rodney C.; Becker, Udo

    2011-05-01

    Th xU 1-xO 2+y binary compositions occur in nature, uranothorianite, and as a mixed oxide nuclear fuel. As a nuclear fuel, important properties, such as the melting point, thermal conductivity, and the thermal expansion coefficient change as a function of composition. Additionally, for direct disposal of Th xU 1-xO 2, the chemical durability changes as a function of composition, with the dissolution rate decreasing with increasing thoria content. UO 2 and ThO 2 have the same isometric structure, and the ionic radii of 8-fold coordinated U 4+ and Th 4+ are similar (1.14 nm and 1.19 nm, respectively). Thus, this binary is expected to form a complete solid solution. However, atomic-scale measurements or simulations of cation ordering and the associated thermodynamic properties of the Th xU 1-xO 2 system have yet to be determined. A combination of density-functional theory, Monte-Carlo methods, and thermodynamic integration are used to calculate thermodynamic properties of the Th xU 1-xO 2 binary (Δ H mix, Δ G mix, Δ S mix, phase diagram). The Gibbs free energy of mixing (Δ G mix) shows a miscibility gap at equilibration temperatures below 1000 K (e.g., E exsoln = 0.13 kJ/(mol cations) at 750 K). Such a miscibility gap may indicate possible exsolution (i.e., phase separation upon cooling). A unique approach to evaluate the likelihood and kinetics of forming interfaces between U-rich and Th-rich has been chosen that compares the energy gain of forming separate phases with estimated energy losses of forming necessary interfaces. The result of such an approach is that the thermodynamic gain of phase separation does not overcome the increase in interface energy between exsolution lamellae for thin exsolution lamellae (10 Å). Lamella formation becomes energetically favorable with a reduction of the interface area and, thus, an increase in lamella thickness to >45 Å. However, this increase in lamellae thickness may be diffusion limited. Monte-Carlo simulations converge

  9. Communication: Quantum mechanics without wavefunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Schiff, Jeremy; Poirier, Bill

    2012-01-21

    We present a self-contained formulation of spin-free non-relativistic quantum mechanics that makes no use of wavefunctions or complex amplitudes of any kind. Quantum states are represented as ensembles of real-valued quantum trajectories, obtained by extremizing an action and satisfying energy conservation. The theory applies for arbitrary configuration spaces and system dimensionalities. Various beneficial ramifications--theoretical, computational, and interpretational--are discussed.

  10. Entangled states in quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruža, Jānis

    2010-01-01

    In some circles of quantum physicists, a view is maintained that the nonseparability of quantum systems-i.e., the entanglement-is a characteristic feature of quantum mechanics. According to this view, the entanglement plays a crucial role in the solution of quantum measurement problem, the origin of the “classicality” from the quantum physics, the explanation of the EPR paradox by a nonlocal character of the quantum world. Besides, the entanglement is regarded as a cornerstone of such modern disciplines as quantum computation, quantum cryptography, quantum information, etc. At the same time, entangled states are well known and widely used in various physics areas. In particular, this notion is widely used in nuclear, atomic, molecular, solid state physics, in scattering and decay theories as well as in other disciplines, where one has to deal with many-body quantum systems. One of the methods, how to construct the basis states of a composite many-body quantum system, is the so-called genealogical decomposition method. Genealogical decomposition allows one to construct recurrently by particle number the basis states of a composite quantum system from the basis states of its forming subsystems. These coupled states have a structure typical for entangled states. If a composite system is stable, the internal structure of its forming basis states does not manifest itself in measurements. However, if a composite system is unstable and decays onto its forming subsystems, then the measurables are the quantum numbers, associated with these subsystems. In such a case, the entangled state has a dynamical origin, determined by the Hamiltonian of the corresponding decay process. Possible correlations between the quantum numbers of resulting subsystems are determined by the symmetries-conservation laws of corresponding dynamical variables, and not by the quantum entanglement feature.

  11. Phase space quantum mechanics - Direct

    SciTech Connect

    Nasiri, S.; Sobouti, Y.; Taati, F.

    2006-09-15

    Conventional approach to quantum mechanics in phase space (q,p), is to take the operator based quantum mechanics of Schroedinger, or an equivalent, and assign a c-number function in phase space to it. We propose to begin with a higher level of abstraction, in which the independence and the symmetric role of q and p is maintained throughout, and at once arrive at phase space state functions. Upon reduction to the q- or p-space the proposed formalism gives the conventional quantum mechanics, however, with a definite rule for ordering of factors of noncommuting observables. Further conceptual and practical merits of the formalism are demonstrated throughout the text.

  12. Gravitational Thermodynamics for Interstellar Gas and Weakly Degenerate Quantum Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ding Yu; Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-03-01

    The temperature distribution of an ideal gas in gravitational fields has been identified as a longstanding problem in thermodynamics and statistical physics. According to the principle of entropy increase (i.e., the principle of maximum entropy), we apply a variational principle to the thermodynamical entropy functional of an ideal gas and establish a relationship between temperature gradient and gravitational field strength. As an illustrative example, the temperature and density distributions of an ideal gas in two simple but typical gravitational fields (i.e., a uniform gravitational field and an inverse-square gravitational field) are considered on the basis of entropic and hydrostatic equilibrium conditions. The effect of temperature inhomogeneity in gravitational fields is also addressed for a weakly degenerate quantum gas (e.g., Fermi and Bose gas). The present gravitational thermodynamics of a gas would have potential applications in quantum fluids, e.g., Bose-Einstein condensates in Earth’s gravitational field and the temperature fluctuation spectrum in cosmic microwave background radiation.

  13. Quantum mechanics from classical statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Wetterich, C.

    2010-04-15

    Quantum mechanics can emerge from classical statistics. A typical quantum system describes an isolated subsystem of a classical statistical ensemble with infinitely many classical states. The state of this subsystem can be characterized by only a few probabilistic observables. Their expectation values define a density matrix if they obey a 'purity constraint'. Then all the usual laws of quantum mechanics follow, including Heisenberg's uncertainty relation, entanglement and a violation of Bell's inequalities. No concepts beyond classical statistics are needed for quantum physics - the differences are only apparent and result from the particularities of those classical statistical systems which admit a quantum mechanical description. Born's rule for quantum mechanical probabilities follows from the probability concept for a classical statistical ensemble. In particular, we show how the non-commuting properties of quantum operators are associated to the use of conditional probabilities within the classical system, and how a unitary time evolution reflects the isolation of the subsystem. As an illustration, we discuss a classical statistical implementation of a quantum computer.

  14. Quantum Mechanics in Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aeppli, G.

    2009-08-01

    Atomic physics is undergoing a large revival because of the possibility of trapping and cooling ions and atoms both for individual quantum control as well as collective quantum states, such as Bose-Einstein condensates. The present lectures start from the `atomic' physics of isolated atoms in semiconductors and insulators and proceed to coupling them together to yield magnets undergoing quantum phase transitions as well as displaying novel quantum states with no classical analogs. The lectures are based on: G.-Y. Xu et al., Science 317, 1049-1052 (2007); G. Aeppli, P. Warburton, C. Renner, BT Technology Journal, 24, 163-169 (2006); H. M. Ronnow et al., Science 308, 392-395 (2005) and N. Q. Vinh et al., PNAS 105, 10649-10653 (2008).

  15. Quantum Mechanics in Insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Aeppli, G.

    2009-08-20

    Atomic physics is undergoing a large revival because of the possibility of trapping and cooling ions and atoms both for individual quantum control as well as collective quantum states, such as Bose-Einstein condensates. The present lectures start from the 'atomic' physics of isolated atoms in semiconductors and insulators and proceed to coupling them together to yield magnets undergoing quantum phase transitions as well as displaying novel quantum states with no classical analogs. The lectures are based on: G.-Y. Xu et al., Science 317, 1049-1052 (2007); G. Aeppli, P. Warburton, C. Renner, BT Technology Journal, 24, 163-169 (2006); H. M. Ronnow et al., Science 308, 392-395 (2005) and N. Q. Vinh et al., PNAS 105, 10649-10653 (2008).

  16. The thermodynamic cost of driving quantum systems by their boundaries.

    PubMed

    Barra, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    The laws of thermodynamics put limits to the efficiencies of thermal machines. Analogues of these laws are now established for quantum engines weakly and passively coupled to the environment providing a framework to find improvements to their performance. Systems whose interaction with the environment is actively controlled do not fall in that framework. Here we consider systems actively and locally coupled to the environment, evolving with a so-called boundary-driven Lindblad equation. Starting from a unitary description of the system plus the environment we simultaneously obtain the Lindblad equation and the appropriate expressions for heat, work and entropy-production of the system extending the framework for the analysis of new, and some already proposed, quantum heat engines. We illustrate our findings in spin 1/2 chains and explain why an XX chain coupled in this way to a single heat bath relaxes to thermodynamic-equilibrium while and XY chain does not. Additionally, we show that an XX chain coupled to a left and a right heat baths behaves as a quantum engine, a heater or refrigerator depending on the parameters, with efficiencies bounded by Carnot efficiencies. PMID:26445899

  17. The thermodynamic cost of driving quantum systems by their boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barra, Felipe

    2015-10-01

    The laws of thermodynamics put limits to the efficiencies of thermal machines. Analogues of these laws are now established for quantum engines weakly and passively coupled to the environment providing a framework to find improvements to their performance. Systems whose interaction with the environment is actively controlled do not fall in that framework. Here we consider systems actively and locally coupled to the environment, evolving with a so-called boundary-driven Lindblad equation. Starting from a unitary description of the system plus the environment we simultaneously obtain the Lindblad equation and the appropriate expressions for heat, work and entropy-production of the system extending the framework for the analysis of new, and some already proposed, quantum heat engines. We illustrate our findings in spin 1/2 chains and explain why an XX chain coupled in this way to a single heat bath relaxes to thermodynamic-equilibrium while and XY chain does not. Additionally, we show that an XX chain coupled to a left and a right heat baths behaves as a quantum engine, a heater or refrigerator depending on the parameters, with efficiencies bounded by Carnot efficiencies.

  18. The thermodynamic cost of driving quantum systems by their boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Barra, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    The laws of thermodynamics put limits to the efficiencies of thermal machines. Analogues of these laws are now established for quantum engines weakly and passively coupled to the environment providing a framework to find improvements to their performance. Systems whose interaction with the environment is actively controlled do not fall in that framework. Here we consider systems actively and locally coupled to the environment, evolving with a so-called boundary-driven Lindblad equation. Starting from a unitary description of the system plus the environment we simultaneously obtain the Lindblad equation and the appropriate expressions for heat, work and entropy-production of the system extending the framework for the analysis of new, and some already proposed, quantum heat engines. We illustrate our findings in spin 1/2 chains and explain why an XX chain coupled in this way to a single heat bath relaxes to thermodynamic-equilibrium while and XY chain does not. Additionally, we show that an XX chain coupled to a left and a right heat baths behaves as a quantum engine, a heater or refrigerator depending on the parameters, with efficiencies bounded by Carnot efficiencies. PMID:26445899

  19. Thermodynamics of information exchange between two coupled quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutvonen, Aki; Sagawa, Takahiro; Ala-Nissila, Tapio

    2016-03-01

    We propose a setup based on two coupled quantum dots where thermodynamics of a measurement can be quantitatively characterized. The information obtained in the measurement can be utilized by performing feedback in a manner apparently breaking the second law of thermodynamics. In this way the setup can be operated as a Maxwell's demon, where both the measurement and feedback are performed separately by controlling an external parameter. This is analogous to the case of the original Szilard engine. Since the setup contains both the microscopic demon and the engine itself, the operation of the whole measurement-feedback cycle can be explained in detail at the level of single realizations. In addition, we derive integral fluctuation relations for both the bare and coarse-grained entropy productions in the setup.

  20. Quantum mechanics from invariance principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldoveanu, Florin

    2015-07-01

    Quantum mechanics is an extremely successful theory of nature and yet it lacks an intuitive axiomatization. In contrast, the special theory of relativity is well understood and is rooted into natural or experimentally justified postulates. Here we introduce an axiomatization approach to quantum mechanics which is very similar to special theory of relativity derivation. The core idea is that a composed system obeys the same laws of nature as its components. This leads to a Jordan-Lie algebraic formulation of quantum mechanics. The starting assumptions are minimal: the laws of nature are invariant under time evolution, the laws of nature are invariant under tensor composition, the laws of nature are relational, together with the ability to define a physical state (positivity). Quantum mechanics is singled out by a fifth experimentally justified postulate: nature violates Bell's inequalities.

  1. An Introduction to Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics - 2nd Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stowe, Keith

    2003-03-01

    This introductory textbook for standard undergraduate courses in thermodynamics has been completely rewritten. Starting with an overview of important quantum behaviours, the book teaches students how to calculate probabilities, in order to provide a firm foundation for later chapters. It introduces the ideas of classical thermodynamics and explores them both in general and as they are applied to specific processes and interactions. The remainder of the book deals with statistical mechanics - the study of small systems interacting with huge reservoirs. The changes to this second edition have been made after more than 10 years classroom testing and student feedback. Each topic ends with a boxed summary of ideas and results, and every chapter contains numerous homework problems, covering a broad range of difficulties. Answers are given to odd numbered problems, and solutions to even problems are available to instructors at www.cambridge.org/9780521865579. The entire book has been re-written and now covers more topics It has a greater number of homework problems which range in difficulty from warm-ups to challenges It is concise and has an easy reading style

  2. Quantum Mechanical Analysis of Nonenzymatic Nucleotidyl Transfer Reactions: Kinetic and Thermodynamic Effects of β–γ Bridging Groups of dNTP Substrates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Rate (k) and equilibrium (K) constants for the reaction of tetrahydrofuranol with a series of Mg2+ complexes of methyl triphosphate analogues, CH3O-P(O2)-O-P(O2)-X-PO34–, X = O, CH2, CHCH3, C(CH3)2, CFCH3, CHF, CHCl, CHBr, CFCl, CF2, CCl2, and CBr2, forming phosphate diester and pyrophosphate or bisphosphonate in aqueous solution were evaluated by B3LYP/TZVP//HF/6-31G* quantum chemical calculations and Langevin dipoles and polarized continuum solvation models. The calculated log k and log K values were found to depend linearly on the experimental pKa4 of the conjugate acid of the corresponding pyrophosphate or bisphosphonate leaving group. The calculated slopes of these Brønsted linear free energy relationships were βlg = −0.89 and βeq = −0.93, respectively. The studied compounds also followed the linear relationship Δlog k = 0.8Δlog K, which became less steep, Δlog k = 0.6Δlog K, after the range of studied compounds was extended to include analogues that were doubly protonated on γ-phosphate, CH3O-P(O2)-O-P(O2)-X-PO3H22–. The scissile Pα–Olg bond length in studied methyl triphosphate analogues slightly increases with decreasing pKa of the leaving group; concomitantly, the CH3OPα(O2) moiety becomes more positive. These structural effects indicate that substituents with low pKa can facilitate both Pα–Olg bond breaking and the Pα–Onuc bond forming process, thus explaining the large negative βlg calculated for the transition state geometry that has significantly longer Pα–Onuc distance than the Pα–Olg distance. PMID:24901652

  3. Emergent quantum mechanics without wavefunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesa Pascasio, J.; Fussy, S.; Schwabl, H.; Grössing, G.

    2016-03-01

    We present our model of an Emergent Quantum Mechanics which can be characterized by “realism without pre-determination”. This is illustrated by our analytic description and corresponding computer simulations of Bohmian-like “surreal” trajectories, which are obtained classically, i.e. without the use of any quantum mechanical tool such as wavefunctions. However, these trajectories do not necessarily represent ontological paths of particles but rather mappings of the probability density flux in a hydrodynamical sense. Modelling emergent quantum mechanics in a high-low intesity double slit scenario gives rise to the “quantum sweeper effect” with a characteristic intensity pattern. This phenomenon should be experimentally testable via weak measurement techniques.

  4. Thermodynamics of quantum systems with multiple conserved quantities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guryanova, Yelena; Popescu, Sandu; Short, Anthony J.; Silva, Ralph; Skrzypczyk, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Recently, there has been much progress in understanding the thermodynamics of quantum systems, even for small individual systems. Most of this work has focused on the standard case where energy is the only conserved quantity. Here we consider a generalization of this work to deal with multiple conserved quantities. Each conserved quantity, which, importantly, need not commute with the rest, can be extracted and stored in its own battery. Unlike the standard case, in which the amount of extractable energy is constrained, here there is no limit on how much of any individual conserved quantity can be extracted. However, other conserved quantities must be supplied, and the second law constrains the combination of extractable quantities and the trade-offs between them. We present explicit protocols that allow us to perform arbitrarily good trade-offs and extract arbitrarily good combinations of conserved quantities from individual quantum systems.

  5. Thermodynamics of quantum systems with multiple conserved quantities.

    PubMed

    Guryanova, Yelena; Popescu, Sandu; Short, Anthony J; Silva, Ralph; Skrzypczyk, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Recently, there has been much progress in understanding the thermodynamics of quantum systems, even for small individual systems. Most of this work has focused on the standard case where energy is the only conserved quantity. Here we consider a generalization of this work to deal with multiple conserved quantities. Each conserved quantity, which, importantly, need not commute with the rest, can be extracted and stored in its own battery. Unlike the standard case, in which the amount of extractable energy is constrained, here there is no limit on how much of any individual conserved quantity can be extracted. However, other conserved quantities must be supplied, and the second law constrains the combination of extractable quantities and the trade-offs between them. We present explicit protocols that allow us to perform arbitrarily good trade-offs and extract arbitrarily good combinations of conserved quantities from individual quantum systems. PMID:27384384

  6. Thermodynamics of quantum systems with multiple conserved quantities

    PubMed Central

    Guryanova, Yelena; Popescu, Sandu; Short, Anthony J.; Silva, Ralph; Skrzypczyk, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Recently, there has been much progress in understanding the thermodynamics of quantum systems, even for small individual systems. Most of this work has focused on the standard case where energy is the only conserved quantity. Here we consider a generalization of this work to deal with multiple conserved quantities. Each conserved quantity, which, importantly, need not commute with the rest, can be extracted and stored in its own battery. Unlike the standard case, in which the amount of extractable energy is constrained, here there is no limit on how much of any individual conserved quantity can be extracted. However, other conserved quantities must be supplied, and the second law constrains the combination of extractable quantities and the trade-offs between them. We present explicit protocols that allow us to perform arbitrarily good trade-offs and extract arbitrarily good combinations of conserved quantities from individual quantum systems. PMID:27384384

  7. Quantum Mechanics of the Einstein-Hopf Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milonni, P. W.

    1981-01-01

    The Einstein-Hopf model for the thermodynamic equilibrium between the electromagnetic field and dipole oscillators is considered within the framework of quantum mechanics. Both the wave and particle aspects of the Einstein fluctuation formula are interpreted in terms of the fundamental absorption and emission processes. (Author/SK)

  8. Quantum refrigerators and the third law of thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Levy, Amikam; Alicki, Robert; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2012-06-01

    The rate of temperature decrease of a cooled quantum bath is studied as its temperature is reduced to absolute zero. The third law of thermodynamics is then quantified dynamically by evaluating the characteristic exponent ζ of the cooling process dT(t)/dt∼-T^{ζ} when approaching absolute zero, T→0. A continuous model of a quantum refrigerator is employed consisting of a working medium composed either by two coupled harmonic oscillators or two coupled two-level systems. The refrigerator is a nonlinear device merging three currents from three heat baths: a cold bath to be cooled, a hot bath as an entropy sink, and a driving bath which is the source of cooling power. A heat-driven refrigerator (absorption refrigerator) is compared to a power-driven refrigerator. When optimized, both cases lead to the same exponent ζ, showing a lack of dependence on the form of the working medium and the characteristics of the drivers. The characteristic exponent is therefore determined by the properties of the cold reservoir and its interaction with the system. Two generic heat bath models are considered: a bath composed of harmonic oscillators and a bath composed of ideal Bose/Fermi gas. The restrictions on the interaction Hamiltonian imposed by the third law are discussed. In the Appendices, the theory of periodically driven open systems and its implication for thermodynamics are outlined. PMID:23005070

  9. Quantum Mechanics and Narratability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myrvold, Wayne C.

    2016-05-01

    As has been noted by several authors, in a relativistic context, there is an interesting difference between classical and quantum state evolution. For a classical system, a state history of a quantum system given along one foliation uniquely determines, without any consideration of the system's dynamics, a state history along any other foliation. This is not true for quantum state evolution; there are cases in which a state history along one foliation is compatible with multiple distinct state histories along some other, a phenomenon that David Albert has dubbed "non-narratability." In this article, we address the question of whether non-narratability is restricted to the sorts of special states that so far have been used to illustrate it. The results of the investigation suggest that there has been a misplaced emphasis on underdetermination of state histories; though this is generic for the special cases that have up until now been considered, involving bipartite systems in pure entangled states, it fails generically in cases in which more component systems are taken into account, and for bipartite systems that have some entanglement with their environment. For such cases, if we impose relativistic causality constraints on the evolution, then, except for very special states, a state history along one foliation uniquely determines a state history along any other. But this in itself is a marked difference between classical and quantum state evolution, because, in a classical setting, no considerations of dynamics at all are needed to go from a state history along one foliation to a state history along another.

  10. Quantum Mechanics and Narratability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myrvold, Wayne C.

    2016-07-01

    As has been noted by several authors, in a relativistic context, there is an interesting difference between classical and quantum state evolution. For a classical system, a state history of a quantum system given along one foliation uniquely determines, without any consideration of the system's dynamics, a state history along any other foliation. This is not true for quantum state evolution; there are cases in which a state history along one foliation is compatible with multiple distinct state histories along some other, a phenomenon that David Albert has dubbed "non-narratability." In this article, we address the question of whether non-narratability is restricted to the sorts of special states that so far have been used to illustrate it. The results of the investigation suggest that there has been a misplaced emphasis on underdetermination of state histories; though this is generic for the special cases that have up until now been considered, involving bipartite systems in pure entangled states, it fails generically in cases in which more component systems are taken into account, and for bipartite systems that have some entanglement with their environment. For such cases, if we impose relativistic causality constraints on the evolution, then, except for very special states, a state history along one foliation uniquely determines a state history along any other. But this in itself is a marked difference between classical and quantum state evolution, because, in a classical setting, no considerations of dynamics at all are needed to go from a state history along one foliation to a state history along another.

  11. Kowalevski top in quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuyama, A.

    2013-09-15

    The quantum mechanical Kowalevski top is studied by the direct diagonalization of the Hamiltonian. The spectra show different behaviors depending on the region divided by the bifurcation sets of the classical invariant tori. Some of these spectra are nearly degenerate due to the multiplicity of the invariant tori. The Kowalevski top has several symmetries and symmetry quantum numbers can be assigned to the eigenstates. We have also carried out the semiclassical quantization of the Kowalevski top by the EBK formulation. It is found that the semiclassical spectra are close to the exact values, thus the eigenstates can be also labeled by the integer quantum numbers. The symmetries of the system are shown to have close relations with the semiclassical quantum numbers and the near-degeneracy of the spectra. -- Highlights: •Quantum spectra of the Kowalevski top are calculated. •Semiclassical quantization is carried out by the EBK formulation. •Quantum states are labeled by the semiclassical integer quantum numbers. •Multiplicity of the classical torus makes the spectra nearly degenerate. •Symmetries, quantum numbers and near-degenerate spectra are closely related.

  12. PT quantum mechanics - Recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Carl M.

    2012-09-01

    Most quantum physicists believe that a quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian must be Dirac Hermitian (invariant under matrix transposition and complex conjugation) to be sure that the energy eigenvalues are real and that time evolution is unitary. However, the non-Dirac-hermitian Hamiltonian H = p2+ix3 has a real positive discrete spectrum and generates unitary time evolution and defines a fully consistent and physical quantum theory. Evidently, Dirac Hermiticity is too restrictive. While H = p2+ix3 is not Dirac Hermitian, it is PT symmetric (invariant under combined space reflection P and time reversal T). Another PT-symmetric Hamiltonian whose energy levels are real, positive and discrete is H = p2-x4, which contains an upside-down potential. The quantum mechanics defined by a PT-symmetric Hamiltonian is a complex generalization of ordinary quantum mechanics. When quantum mechanics and quantum field theory are extended into the complex domain, new kinds of theories having strange and remarkable properties emerge. In the past two years some of these properties have been verified in laboratory experiments. Here, we first discuss PT-symmetric Hamiltonians at a simple intuitive level and explain why the energy levels of such Hamiltonians may be real, positive, and discrete. Second, we describe a recent experiment in which the PT phase transition was observed. Third, we briefly mention that PT-symmetric theories can be useful at a fundamental level. While the double-scaling limit of an O(N)-symmetric gφ4 quantum field theory appears to be inconsistent because the critical value of g is negative, this limit is in fact not inconsistent because the critical theory is PT symmetric.

  13. Energy conservation in quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prentis, Jeffrey J.; Fedak, William A.

    2004-05-01

    In the classical mechanics of conservative systems, the position and momentum evolve deterministically such that the sum of the kinetic energy and potential energy remains constant in time. This canonical trademark of energy conservation is absent in the standard presentations of quantum mechanics based on the Schrödinger picture. We present a purely canonical proof of energy conservation that focuses exclusively on the time-dependent position x(t) and momentum p(t) operators. This treatment of energy conservation serves as an introduction to the Heisenberg picture and illuminates the classical-quantum connection. We derive a quantum-mechanical work-energy theorem and show explicitly how the time dependence of x and p and the noncommutivity of x and p conspire to bring about a perfect temporal balance between the evolving kinetic and potential parts of the total energy operator.

  14. Quantum Mechanical Earth: Where Orbitals Become Orbits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeports, David

    2012-01-01

    Macroscopic objects, although quantum mechanical by nature, conform to Newtonian mechanics under normal observation. According to the quantum mechanical correspondence principle, quantum behavior is indistinguishable from classical behavior in the limit of very large quantum numbers. The purpose of this paper is to provide an example of the…

  15. BOOK REVIEW: Relativistic Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoine, J.-P.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of relativistic quantum mechanics is to describe the finer details of the structure of atoms and molecules, where relativistic effects become nonnegligible. It is a sort of intermediate realm, between the familiar nonrelativistic quantum mechanics and fully relativistic quantum field theory, and thus it lacks the simplicity and elegance of both. Yet it is a necessary tool, mostly for quantum chemists. Pilkuhn's book offers to this audience an up-to-date survey of these methods, which is quite welcome since most previous textbooks are at least ten years old. The point of view of the author is to start immediately in the relativistic domain, following the lead of Maxwell's equations rather than classical mechanics, and thus to treat the nonrelativistic version as an approximation. Thus Chapter 1 takes off from Maxwell's equations (in the noncovariant Coulomb gauge) and gradually derives the basic aspects of Quantum Mechanics in a rather pedestrian way (states and observables, Hilbert space, operators, quantum measurement, scattering,. Chapter 2 starts with the Lorentz transformations, then continues with the Pauli spin equation and the Dirac equation and some of their applications (notably the hydrogen atom). Chapter 3 is entitled `Quantum fields and particles', but falls short of treating quantum field theory properly: only creation/annihilation operators are considered, for a particle in a box. The emphasis is on two-electron states (the Pauli principle, the Foldy--Wouthuysen elimination of small components of Dirac spinors, Breit projection operators. Chapter 4 is devoted to scattering theory and the description of relativistic bound states. Chapter 5, finally, covers hyperfine interactions and radiative corrections. As we said above, relativistic quantum mechanics is by nature limited in scope and rather inelegant and Pilkuhn's book is no exception. The notation is often heavy (mostly noncovariant) and the mathematical level rather low. The central topic

  16. Faster than Hermitian quantum mechanics.

    PubMed

    Bender, Carl M; Brody, Dorje C; Jones, Hugh F; Meister, Bernhard K

    2007-01-26

    Given an initial quantum state |psi(I)> and a final quantum state |psi(F)>, there exist Hamiltonians H under which |psi(I)> evolves into |psi(F)>. Consider the following quantum brachistochrone problem: subject to the constraint that the difference between the largest and smallest eigenvalues of H is held fixed, which H achieves this transformation in the least time tau? For Hermitian Hamiltonians tau has a nonzero lower bound. However, among non-Hermitian PT-symmetric Hamiltonians satisfying the same energy constraint, tau can be made arbitrarily small without violating the time-energy uncertainty principle. This is because for such Hamiltonians the path from |psi(I)> to |psi(F)> can be made short. The mechanism described here is similar to that in general relativity in which the distance between two space-time points can be made small if they are connected by a wormhole. This result may have applications in quantum computing. PMID:17358747

  17. The quantum and thermodynamical characteristics of fission taking into account adiabatic and nonadiabatic modes of motion

    SciTech Connect

    Kadmensky, S. G.

    2007-09-15

    In the framework of the quantum theory of spontaneous and low-energy induced fission, the nature of quantum and thermodynamical properties of a fissioning system is analyzed taking into account adiabatic and nonadiabatic modes of motion for different fission stages. It is shown that, owing to the influence of the Coriolis interaction, the states of the fissile nucleus and of primary fission products are cold and strongly nonequilibrium. The important role of superfluid and pairing nucleon-nucleon correlations for binary and ternary fission is demonstrated. The mechanism of pumping of high values of relative orbital momenta and spins of fission fragments for binary and ternary fission and the nonevaporation mechanism of formation of third particles for ternary fission are investigated. The anisotropies and P-odd, P-even, and T-odd asymmetries for angular distributions of fission products are analyzed.

  18. Thermodynamics of trajectories of open quantum systems, step by step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pigeon, Simon; Xuereb, André

    2016-06-01

    Thermodynamics of trajectories promises to make possible the thorough analysis of the dynamical properties of an open quantum system, a sought-after goal in modern physics. Unfortunately, calculation of the relevant quantities presents severe challenges. Determining the large-deviation function that gives access to the full counting statistics associated with a dynamical order parameter is challenging, if not impossible, even for systems evolving in a restricted Liouville space. Acting on the realisation that the salient features of most dynamical systems are encoded in the first few moments of the counting statistics, in this article we present a method that gives sequential access to these moments. Our method allows for obtaining analytical result in several cases, as we illustrate, and allows using large deviation theory to reinterpret certain well-known results.

  19. Irreversible Work and Inner Friction in Quantum Thermodynamic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plastina, F.; Alecce, A.; Apollaro, T. J. G.; Falcone, G.; Francica, G.; Galve, F.; Lo Gullo, N.; Zambrini, R.

    2014-12-01

    We discuss the thermodynamics of closed quantum systems driven out of equilibrium by a change in a control parameter and undergoing a unitary process. We compare the work actually done on the system with the one that would be performed along ideal adiabatic and isothermal transformations. The comparison with the latter leads to the introduction of irreversible work, while that with the former leads to the introduction of inner friction. We show that these two quantities can be treated on an equal footing, as both can be linked with the heat exchanged in thermalization processes and both can be expressed as relative entropies. Furthermore, we show that a specific fluctuation relation for the entropy production associated with the inner friction exists, which allows the inner friction to be written in terms of its cumulants.

  20. Irreversible work and inner friction in quantum thermodynamic processes.

    PubMed

    Plastina, F; Alecce, A; Apollaro, T J G; Falcone, G; Francica, G; Galve, F; Lo Gullo, N; Zambrini, R

    2014-12-31

    We discuss the thermodynamics of closed quantum systems driven out of equilibrium by a change in a control parameter and undergoing a unitary process. We compare the work actually done on the system with the one that would be performed along ideal adiabatic and isothermal transformations. The comparison with the latter leads to the introduction of irreversible work, while that with the former leads to the introduction of inner friction. We show that these two quantities can be treated on an equal footing, as both can be linked with the heat exchanged in thermalization processes and both can be expressed as relative entropies. Furthermore, we show that a specific fluctuation relation for the entropy production associated with the inner friction exists, which allows the inner friction to be written in terms of its cumulants. PMID:25615295

  1. Hermeneutics, Underdetermination and Quantum Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cushing, James T.

    1995-01-01

    States that the existence of an essential underdetermination in the interpretation of the formalism of quantum mechanics, in spite of the widespread belief that logic and empirical considerations alone demand an indeterministic world view in physics, legitimizes the analysis of hermeneutics in science education. (LZ)

  2. Renormalization group in quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Polony, J.

    1996-12-01

    The running coupling constants are introduced in quantum mechanics and their evolution is described with the help of the renormalization group equation. The harmonic oscillator and the propagation on curved spaces are presented as examples. The Hamiltonian and the Lagrangian scaling relations are obtained. These evolution equations are used to construct low energy effective models. Copyright {copyright} 1996 Academic Press, Inc.

  3. The Grammatical Universe and the Laws of Thermodynamics and Quantum Entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Marcer, Peter J.; Rowlands, Peter

    2010-11-24

    The universal nilpotent computational rewrite system (UNCRS) is shown to formalize an irreversible process of evolution in conformity with the First, Second and Third Laws of Thermodynamics, in terms of a single algebraic creation operator (ikE+ip+jm) which delivers the whole quantum mechanical language apparatus, where k, i, j are quaternions units and E, p, m are energy, momentum and rest mass. This nilpotent evolution describes 'a dynamic zero totality universe' in terms of its fermion states (each of which, by Pauli exclusion, is unique and nonzero), where, together with their boson interactions, these define physics at the fundamental level. (The UNCRS implies that the inseparability of objects and fields in the quantum universe is based on the fact that the only valid mathematical representations are all automorphisms of the universe itself, and that this is the mathematical meaning of quantum entanglement. It thus appears that the nilpotent fermion states are in fact what is called the splitting field in Quantum Mechanics of the Galois group which leads to the roots of the corresponding algebraic equation, and concerns in this case the alternating group of even permutations which are themselves automorphisms). In the nilpotent evolutionary process: (i) the Quantum Carnot Engine (QCE) extended model of thermodynamic irreversibility, consisting of a single heat bath of an ensemble of Standard Model elementary particles, retains a small amount of quantum coherence / entanglement, so as to constitute new emergent fermion states of matter, and (ii) the metric (E{sup 2}-p{sup 2}m{sup 2}) = 0 ensures the First Law of the conservation of energy operates at each nilpotent stage, so that (iii) prior to each creation (and implied corresponding annihilation / conserve operation), E and m can be postulated to constitute dark energy and matter respectively. It says that the natural language form of the rewrite grammar of the evolution consists of the well known precepts

  4. An Introduction to Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stowe, Keith

    2013-10-01

    Preface; Part I. Introduction: 1. Introduction; Part II. Small Systems: 2. Statistics for small systems; 3. Systems with many elements; Part III. Energy and the First Law: 4. Internal energy; 5. Interactions between systems; Part IV. States and the Second Law: 6. Internal energy and the number of accessible states; 7. Entropy and the second law; 8. Entropy and thermal interactions; Part V. Constraints: 9. Natural constraints; 10. Models; 11. Choice of variables; 12. Special processes; 13. Engines; 14. Diffusive interactions; Part VI. Classical Statistics: 15. Probabilities and microscopic behaviours; 16. Kinetic theory and transport processes in gases; 17. Magnetic properties of materials; 18. The partition function; Part VII. Quantum Statistics: 19. Introduction to quantum statistics; 20. Quantum gases; 21. Blackbody radiation; 22. The thermal properties of solids; 23. The electrical properties of materials; 24. Low temperatures and degenerate systems; Appendices; Further reading; Problem solutions; Index.

  5. An Introduction to Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stowe, Keith

    2007-05-01

    Preface; Part I. Introduction: 1. Introduction; Part II. Small Systems: 2. Statistics for small systems; 3. Systems with many elements; Part III. Energy and the First Law: 4. Internal energy; 5. Interactions between systems; Part IV. States and the Second Law: 6. Internal energy and the number of accessible states; 7. Entropy and the second law; 8. Entropy and thermal interactions; Part V. Constraints: 9. Natural constraints; 10. Models; 11. Choice of variables; 12. Special processes; 13. Engines; 14. Diffusive interactions; Part VI. Classical Statistics: 15. Probabilities and microscopic behaviours; 16. Kinetic theory and transport processes in gases; 17. Magnetic properties of materials; 18. The partition function; Part VII. Quantum Statistics: 19. Introduction to quantum statistics; 20. Quantum gases; 21. Blackbody radiation; 22. The thermal properties of solids; 23. The electrical properties of materials; 24. Low temperatures and degenerate systems; Appendices; Further reading; Problem solutions; Index.

  6. On determining absolute entropy without quantum theory or the third law of thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steane, Andrew M.

    2016-04-01

    We employ classical thermodynamics to gain information about absolute entropy, without recourse to statistical methods, quantum mechanics or the third law of thermodynamics. The Gibbs–Duhem equation yields various simple methods to determine the absolute entropy of a fluid. We also study the entropy of an ideal gas and the ionization of a plasma in thermal equilibrium. A single measurement of the degree of ionization can be used to determine an unknown constant in the entropy equation, and thus determine the absolute entropy of a gas. It follows from all these examples that the value of entropy at absolute zero temperature does not need to be assigned by postulate, but can be deduced empirically.

  7. Effective equations for the quantum pendulum from momentous quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, Hector H.; Chacon-Acosta, Guillermo

    2012-08-24

    In this work we study the quantum pendulum within the framework of momentous quantum mechanics. This description replaces the Schroedinger equation for the quantum evolution of the system with an infinite set of classical equations for expectation values of configuration variables, and quantum dispersions. We solve numerically the effective equations up to the second order, and describe its evolution.

  8. The Effects of Quantum Delocalization on the Structural and Thermodynamic Properties of Many-Body Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deckman, Jason

    The following dissertation is an account of my research in the Mandelshtam group at UC Irvine beginning in the Fall of 2006 and ending in the Summer of 2011. My general area of study falls within the realm of equilibrium quantum statistical mechanics, a discipline which attempts to relate molecular-scale properties to time averaged, macroscopic observables. The major tools used herein are the Variational Gaussian Wavepacket (VGW) approximation for quantum calculations, and Monte-Carlo methods, particularly parallel tempering, for global optimization and the prediction of equilibrium thermodynamic properties. Much of my work used these two methods to model both small and bulk systems at equilibrium where quantum effects are significant. All the systems considered are characterized by inter-molecular van der Waals forces, which are weak but significant electrostatic attractions between atoms and molecules and posses a 1/r6 dependence. The research herein begins at the microscopic level, starting with Lennard-Jones (LJ) clusters, then later shifts to the macroscopic for a study involving bulk para-hydrogen. For the LJ clusters the structural transitions induced by a changing deBoer parameter, Λ, a measure of quantum delocalization of the constituent particles, are investigated over a range of cluster sizes, N. From the data a "phase" diagram as a function of Λ and N is constructed, which depicts the structural motifs favored at different size and quantum parameter. Comparisons of the "quantum induced" structural transitions depicted in the latter are also made with temperature induced transitions and those caused by varying the range of the Morse potential. Following this, the structural properties of binary para-Hydrogen/ ortho-Deuterium clusters are investigated using the VGW approximation and Monte-Carlo methods within the GMIN framework. The latter uses the "Basin-Hopping" algorithm, which simplifies the potential energy landscape, and coupled with the VGW

  9. Thermodynamics, reversibility and Jaynes' approach to statistical mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Daniel N.

    This dissertation contests David Albert's recent arguments that the proposition that the universe began in a particularly low entropy state (the "past hypothesis") is necessary and sufficient to ground the thermodynamic asymmetry against the reversibility objection, which states that the entropy of thermodynamic systems was previously larger than it is now. In turn, it argues that this undermines Albert's suggestion that the past hypothesis can underwrite other temporal asymmetries such as those of records and causation. This thesis thus concerns the broader philosophical problem of understanding the interrelationships among the various temporal asymmetries that we find in the world, such as those of thermodynamic phenomena, causation, human agency and inference. The position argued for is that the thermodynamic asymmetry is nothing more than an inferential asymmetry, reflecting a distinction between the inferences made towards the past and the future. As such, it cannot be used to derive a genuine physical asymmetry. At most, an inferential asymmetry can provide evidence for an asymmetry not itself forthcoming from the formalism of statistical mechanics. The approach offered here utilises an epistemic, information-theoretic interpretation of thermodynamics applied to individual "branch" systems in order to ground irreversible thermodynamic behaviour (Branch systems are thermodynamic systems quasi-isolated from their environments for short periods of time). I argue that such an interpretation solves the reversibility objection by treating thermodynamics as part of a more general theory of statistical inference supported by information theory and developed in the context of thermodynamics by E.T. Jaynes. It is maintained that by using an epistemic interpretation of probability (where the probabilities reflect one's knowledge about a thermodynamic system rather than a property of the system itself), the reversibility objection can be disarmed by severing the link

  10. Statistical thermodynamics of quantum Brownian motion: construction of perpetuum mobile of the second kind.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuizen, Th M; Allahverdyan, A E

    2002-09-01

    (B)T is larger than or comparable to other time scales of the system. They show that there is no general consensus between standard thermodynamics and quantum mechanics. The known agreements occur only due to the weak coupling limit, which does not pertain to low temperatures. Experimental setups for testing the effects are discussed. PMID:12366179

  11. Sharpening the second law of thermodynamics with the quantum Bayes theorem.

    PubMed

    Gharibyan, Hrant; Tegmark, Max

    2014-09-01

    We prove a generalization of the classic Groenewold-Lindblad entropy inequality, combining decoherence and the quantum Bayes theorem into a simple unified picture where decoherence increases entropy while observation decreases it. This provides a rigorous quantum-mechanical version of the second law of thermodynamics, governing how the entropy of a system (the entropy of its density matrix, partial-traced over the environment and conditioned on what is known) evolves under general decoherence and observation. The powerful tool of spectral majorization enables both simple alternative proofs of the classic Lindblad and Holevo inequalities without using strong subadditivity, and also novel inequalities for decoherence and observation that hold not only for von Neumann entropy, but also for arbitrary concave entropies. PMID:25314413

  12. Reexamination of the purity entanglement measure: Peculiarities of a truly thermodynamic quantum correlation measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batle, J.; Ooi, C. H. Raymond; Abdalla, S.

    2015-12-01

    The purity entanglement measure introduced by Los Alamos group a decade ago is reexamined in the light of interesting features. The role played by purity, reaching a real thermodynamic limit, in detecting quantum phase transitions is studied with a different system, the bond-alternating X Y model in an external magnetic field. The properties of this system are described as well. By considering the dynamics of the original X Y model, we observe that nonergodicity is also grasped by the purity measure, in accordance with other quantum correlation measures that have no common physical or mathematical relation. Adiabaticity is not recovered from the dynamic to the static case, in accordance with one of the consequences of the celebrated Kibble-Zurek mechanism.

  13. Three-space from quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Chew, G.F.; Stapp, H.P.

    1988-08-01

    We formulate a discrete quantum-mechanical precursor to spacetime geometry. The objective is to provide the foundation for a quantum mechanics that is rooted exclusively in quantum-mechanical concepts, with all classical features, including the three-dimensional spatial continuum, emerging dynamically.

  14. Geometrical Phases in Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, Joy Julius

    In quantum mechanics, the path-dependent geometrical phase associated with a physical system, over and above the familiar dynamical phase, was initially discovered in the context of adiabatically changing environments. Subsequently, Aharonov and Anandan liberated this phase from the original formulation of Berry, which used Hamiltonians, dependent on curves in a classical parameter space, to represent the cyclic variations of the environments. Their purely quantum mechanical treatment, independent of Hamiltonians, instead used the non-trivial topological structure of the projective space of one-dimensional subspaces of an appropriate Hilbert space. The geometrical phase, in their treatment, results from a parallel transport of the time-dependent pure quantum states along a curve in this space, which is endowed with an abelian connection. Unlike Berry, they were able to achieve this without resort to an adiabatic approximation or to a time-independent eigenvalue equation. Prima facie, these two approaches are conceptually quite different. After a review of both approaches, an exposition bridging this apparent conceptual gap is given; by rigorously analyzing a model composite system, it is shown that, in an appropriate correspondence limit, the Berry phase can be recovered as a special case from the Aharonov-Anandan phase. Moreover, the model composite system is used to show that Berry's correction to the traditional Born-Oppenheimer energy spectra indeed brings the spectra closer to the exact results. Then, an experimental arrangement to measure geometrical phases associated with cyclic and non-cyclic variations of quantum states of an entangled composite system is proposed, utilizing the fundamental ideas of the recently opened field of two-particle interferometry. This arrangement not only resolves the controversy regarding the true nature of the phases associated with photon states, but also unequivocally predicts experimentally accessible geometrical phases in a

  15. Quantum Mechanics Beyond Hilbert Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoine, J.-P.

    Going Beyond Hilbert Space Why? The Different Formalisms What Does One Obtain? The Mathematical Formalism Rigged Hilbert Spaces Scales and Lattices of Hilbert Spaces Partial Inner Product Spaces Operators on PIP-Spaces Application in Quantum Mechanics: The Fock-Bargmann Representation - Revisited A RHS of Entire Functions A LHS of Entire Functions Around ℑ Application in Scattering Theory RHS: Resonances, Gamow Vectors, Arrow of Time LHS: Integral Equations vs. Complex Scaling Conclusion

  16. Hermeneutics, underdetermination and quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cushing, James T.

    1995-04-01

    There exists an essential underdetermination in the interpretation of the formalism of quantum mechanics and this extends even to the question of whether or not physical phenomena at the most fundamental level are irreducibly and ineliminably indeterministic or absolutely deterministic. This is true in spite of the widespread belief that logic and empirical considerations alone demand an indeterministic world view in physics. This lends support to Martin Eger's analysis of a role for hermeneutics in science education.

  17. Quantum mechanics and heat conduction

    SciTech Connect

    Bajpai, S.D. ); Mishra, S. )

    1991-08-01

    One of the fundamental problems in quantum mechanics is to find a solution of Schroedinger equation for different forms of potentials. The object of this paper is to obtain a series solution of a particular one-dimensional, time-dependent Schroedinger equation involving Hermite polynomials. The authors also show a relationship of their particular one-dimensional, time-dependent Schroedinger equation with an equation of heat conduction.

  18. Complementarity in Categorical Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heunen, Chris

    2012-07-01

    We relate notions of complementarity in three layers of quantum mechanics: (i) von Neumann algebras, (ii) Hilbert spaces, and (iii) orthomodular lattices. Taking a more general categorical perspective of which the above are instances, we consider dagger monoidal kernel categories for (ii), so that (i) become (sub)endohomsets and (iii) become subobject lattices. By developing a `point-free' definition of copyability we link (i) commutative von Neumann subalgebras, (ii) classical structures, and (iii) Boolean subalgebras.

  19. Thermodynamical analysis of a quantum heat engine based on harmonic oscillators.

    PubMed

    Insinga, Andrea; Andresen, Bjarne; Salamon, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Many models of heat engines have been studied with the tools of finite-time thermodynamics and an ensemble of independent quantum systems as the working fluid. Because of their convenient analytical properties, harmonic oscillators are the most frequently used example of a quantum system. We analyze different thermodynamical aspects with the final aim of the optimization of the performance of the engine in terms of the mechanical power provided during a finite-time Otto cycle. The heat exchange mechanism between the working fluid and the thermal reservoirs is provided by the Lindblad formalism. We describe an analytical method to find the limit cycle and give conditions for a stable limit cycle to exist. We explore the power production landscape as the duration of the four branches of the cycle are varied for short times, intermediate times, and special frictionless times. For short times we find a periodic structure with atolls of purely dissipative operation surrounding islands of divergent behavior where, rather than tending to a limit cycle, the working fluid accumulates more and more energy. For frictionless times the periodic structure is gone and we come very close to the global optimal operation. The global optimum is found and interestingly comes with a particular value of the cycle time. PMID:27575089

  20. Thermodynamical analysis of a quantum heat engine based on harmonic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Insinga, Andrea; Andresen, Bjarne; Salamon, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Many models of heat engines have been studied with the tools of finite-time thermodynamics and an ensemble of independent quantum systems as the working fluid. Because of their convenient analytical properties, harmonic oscillators are the most frequently used example of a quantum system. We analyze different thermodynamical aspects with the final aim of the optimization of the performance of the engine in terms of the mechanical power provided during a finite-time Otto cycle. The heat exchange mechanism between the working fluid and the thermal reservoirs is provided by the Lindblad formalism. We describe an analytical method to find the limit cycle and give conditions for a stable limit cycle to exist. We explore the power production landscape as the duration of the four branches of the cycle are varied for short times, intermediate times, and special frictionless times. For short times we find a periodic structure with atolls of purely dissipative operation surrounding islands of divergent behavior where, rather than tending to a limit cycle, the working fluid accumulates more and more energy. For frictionless times the periodic structure is gone and we come very close to the global optimal operation. The global optimum is found and interestingly comes with a particular value of the cycle time.

  1. Description of quantum coherence in thermodynamic processes requires constraints beyond free energy

    PubMed Central

    Lostaglio, Matteo; Jennings, David; Rudolph, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have developed fundamental limitations on nanoscale thermodynamics, in terms of a set of independent free energy relations. Here we show that free energy relations cannot properly describe quantum coherence in thermodynamic processes. By casting time-asymmetry as a quantifiable, fundamental resource of a quantum state, we arrive at an additional, independent set of thermodynamic constraints that naturally extend the existing ones. These asymmetry relations reveal that the traditional Szilárd engine argument does not extend automatically to quantum coherences, but instead only relational coherences in a multipartite scenario can contribute to thermodynamic work. We find that coherence transformations are always irreversible. Our results also reveal additional structural parallels between thermodynamics and the theory of entanglement. PMID:25754774

  2. Faster than Hermitian Quantum Mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, Carl M.; Brody, Dorje C.; Jones, Hugh F.; Meister, Bernhard K.

    2007-01-26

    Given an initial quantum state vertical bar {psi}{sub I}> and a final quantum state vertical bar {psi}{sub F}>, there exist Hamiltonians H under which vertical bar {psi}{sub I}> evolves into vertical bar {psi}{sub F}>. Consider the following quantum brachistochrone problem: subject to the constraint that the difference between the largest and smallest eigenvalues of H is held fixed, which H achieves this transformation in the least time {tau}? For Hermitian Hamiltonians {tau} has a nonzero lower bound. However, among non-Hermitian PT-symmetric Hamiltonians satisfying the same energy constraint, {tau} can be made arbitrarily small without violating the time-energy uncertainty principle. This is because for such Hamiltonians the path from vertical bar {psi}{sub I}> to vertical bar {psi}{sub F}> can be made short. The mechanism described here is similar to that in general relativity in which the distance between two space-time points can be made small if they are connected by a wormhole. This result may have applications in quantum computing.

  3. Facets of contextual realism in quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Alok Kumar; Home, Dipankar

    2011-09-23

    In recent times, there is an upsurge of interest in demonstrating the quantum contextuality. In this proceedings, we explore the two different forms of arguments that have been used for showing the contextual character of quantum mechanics. First line of study concerns the violations of the noncontextual realist models by quantum mechanics, where second line of study that is qualitatively distinct from the earlier one, demonstrates the contextuality within the formalism of quantum mechanics.

  4. Sampling Molecular Conformers in Solution with Quantum Mechanical Accuracy at a Nearly Molecular-Mechanics Cost.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Marta; Micciarelli, Marco; Laio, Alessandro; Baroni, Stefano

    2016-09-13

    We introduce a method to evaluate the relative populations of different conformers of molecular species in solution, aiming at quantum mechanical accuracy, while keeping the computational cost at a nearly molecular-mechanics level. This goal is achieved by combining long classical molecular-dynamics simulations to sample the free-energy landscape of the system, advanced clustering techniques to identify the most relevant conformers, and thermodynamic perturbation theory to correct the resulting populations, using quantum-mechanical energies from density functional theory. A quantitative criterion for assessing the accuracy thus achieved is proposed. The resulting methodology is demonstrated in the specific case of cyanin (cyanidin-3-glucoside) in water solution. PMID:27494227

  5. Treating time travel quantum mechanically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, John-Mark A.

    2014-10-01

    The fact that closed timelike curves (CTCs) are permitted by general relativity raises the question as to how quantum systems behave when time travel to the past occurs. Research into answering this question by utilizing the quantum circuit formalism has given rise to two theories: Deutschian-CTCs (D-CTCs) and "postselected" CTCs (P-CTCs). In this paper the quantum circuit approach is thoroughly reviewed, and the strengths and shortcomings of D-CTCs and P-CTCs are presented in view of their nonlinearity and time-travel paradoxes. In particular, the "equivalent circuit model"—which aims to make equivalent predictions to D-CTCs, while avoiding some of the difficulties of the original theory—is shown to contain errors. The discussion of D-CTCs and P-CTCs is used to motivate an analysis of the features one might require of a theory of quantum time travel, following which two overlapping classes of alternate theories are identified. One such theory, the theory of "transition probability" CTCs (T-CTCs), is fully developed. The theory of T-CTCs is shown not to have certain undesirable features—such as time-travel paradoxes, the ability to distinguish nonorthogonal states with certainty, and the ability to clone or delete arbitrary pure states—that are present with D-CTCs and P-CTCs. The problems with nonlinear extensions to quantum mechanics are discussed in relation to the interpretation of these theories, and the physical motivations of all three theories are discussed and compared.

  6. BOOK REVIEWS: Quantum Mechanics: Fundamentals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, A.

    2004-02-01

    This review is of three books, all published by Springer, all on quantum theory at a level above introductory, but very different in content, style and intended audience. That of Gottfried and Yan is of exceptional interest, historical and otherwise. It is a second edition of Gottfried’s well-known book published by Benjamin in 1966. This was written as a text for a graduate quantum mechanics course, and has become one of the most used and respected accounts of quantum theory, at a level mathematically respectable but not rigorous. Quantum mechanics was already solidly established by 1966, but this second edition gives an indication of progress made and changes in perspective over the last thirty-five years, and also recognises the very substantial increase in knowledge of quantum theory obtained at the undergraduate level. Topics absent from the first edition but included in the second include the Feynman path integral, seen in 1966 as an imaginative but not very useful formulation of quantum theory. Feynman methods were given only a cursory mention by Gottfried. Their practical importance has now been fully recognised, and a substantial account of them is provided in the new book. Other new topics include semiclassical quantum mechanics, motion in a magnetic field, the S matrix and inelastic collisions, radiation and scattering of light, identical particle systems and the Dirac equation. A topic that was all but totally neglected in 1966, but which has flourished increasingly since, is that of the foundations of quantum theory. John Bell’s work of the mid-1960s has led to genuine theoretical and experimental achievement, which has facilitated the development of quantum optics and quantum information theory. Gottfried’s 1966 book played a modest part in this development. When Bell became increasingly irritated with the standard theoretical approach to quantum measurement, Viki Weisskopf repeatedly directed him to Gottfried’s book. Gottfried had devoted a

  7. Teaching Quantum Mechanics on an Introductory Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Rainer; Wiesner, Hartmut

    2002-01-01

    Presents a new research-based course on quantum mechanics in which the conceptual issues of quantum mechanics are taught at an introductory level. Involves students in the discovery of how quantum phenomena deviate from classical everyday experiences. (Contains 31 references.) (Author/YDS)

  8. Quantum Mechanical Observers and Time Reparametrization Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konishi, Eiji

    2012-07-01

    We propose that the degree of freedom of measurement by quantum mechanical observers originates in the Goldstone mode of the spontaneously broken time reparametrization symmetry. Based on the classification of quantum states by their nonunitary temporal behavior as seen in the measurement processes, we describe the concepts of the quantum mechanical observers via the time reparametrization symmetry.

  9. Jarzynski equality in PT-symmetric quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Deffner, Sebastian; Saxena, Avadh

    2015-04-13

    We show that the quantum Jarzynski equality generalizes to PT -symmetric quantum mechanics with unbroken PT -symmetry. In the regime of broken PT -symmetry the Jarzynski equality does not hold as also the CPT -norm is not preserved during the dynamics. These findings are illustrated for an experimentally relevant system – two coupled optical waveguides. It turns out that for these systems the phase transition between the regimes of unbroken and broken PT -symmetry is thermodynamically inhibited as the irreversible work diverges at the critical point.

  10. Unifying mechanical and thermodynamic descriptions across the thioredoxin protein family

    PubMed Central

    Mottonen, James M.; Xu, Minli; Jacobs, Donald J.; Livesay, Dennis R.

    2010-01-01

    We compare various predicted mechanical and thermodynamic properties of nine oxidized thioredoxins (TRX) using a Distance Constraint Model (DCM). The DCM is based on a nonadditive free energy decomposition scheme, where entropic contributions are determined from rigidity and flexibility of structure based on distance constraints. We perform averages over an ensemble of constraint topologies to calculate several thermodynamic and mechanical response functions that together yield quantitative stability/flexibility relationships (QSFR). Applied to the TRX protein family, QSFR metrics display a rich variety of similarities and differences. In particular, backbone flexibility is well conserved across the family, whereas cooperativity correlation describing mechanical and thermodynamic couplings between residue pairs exhibit distinctive features that readily standout. The diversity in predicted QSFR metrics that describe cooperativity correlation between pairs of residues is largely explained by a global flexibility order parameter describing the amount of intrinsic flexibility within the protein. A free energy landscape is calculated as a function of the flexibility order parameter, and key values are determined where the native-state, transition-state and unfolded-state are located. Another key value identifies a mechanical transition where the global nature of the protein changes from flexible to rigid. The key values of the flexibility order parameter help characterize how mechanical and thermodynamic response is linked. Variation in QSFR metrics, and key characteristics of global flexibility are related to the native state x-ray crystal structure primarily through the hydrogen bond network. Furthermore, comparison of three TRX redox pairs reveals differences in thermodynamic response (i.e., relative melting point) and mechanical properties (i.e., backbone flexibility and cooperativity correlation) that are consistent with experimental data on thermal stabilities and

  11. Time dependent quantum thermodynamics of a coupled quantum oscillator system in a small thermal environment

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, George L.; Kellman, Michael E.

    2013-12-07

    Simulations are performed of a small quantum system interacting with a quantum environment. The system consists of various initial states of two harmonic oscillators coupled to give normal modes. The environment is “designed” by its level pattern to have a thermodynamic temperature. A random coupling causes the system and environment to become entangled in the course of time evolution. The approach to a Boltzmann distribution is observed, and effective fitted temperatures close to the designed temperature are obtained. All initial pure states of the system are driven to equilibrium at very similar rates, with quick loss of memory of the initial state. The time evolution of the von Neumann entropy is calculated as a measure of equilibration and of quantum coherence. It is pointed out using spatial density distribution plots that quantum interference is eliminated only with maximal entropy, which corresponds thermally to infinite temperature. Implications of our results for the notion of “classicalizing” behavior in the approach to thermal equilibrium are briefly considered.

  12. Time dependent quantum thermodynamics of a coupled quantum oscillator system in a small thermal environment.

    PubMed

    Barnes, George L; Kellman, Michael E

    2013-12-01

    Simulations are performed of a small quantum system interacting with a quantum environment. The system consists of various initial states of two harmonic oscillators coupled to give normal modes. The environment is "designed" by its level pattern to have a thermodynamic temperature. A random coupling causes the system and environment to become entangled in the course of time evolution. The approach to a Boltzmann distribution is observed, and effective fitted temperatures close to the designed temperature are obtained. All initial pure states of the system are driven to equilibrium at very similar rates, with quick loss of memory of the initial state. The time evolution of the von Neumann entropy is calculated as a measure of equilibration and of quantum coherence. It is pointed out using spatial density distribution plots that quantum interference is eliminated only with maximal entropy, which corresponds thermally to infinite temperature. Implications of our results for the notion of "classicalizing" behavior in the approach to thermal equilibrium are briefly considered. PMID:24320365

  13. Quantum localization of classical mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batalin, Igor A.; Lavrov, Peter M.

    2016-07-01

    Quantum localization of classical mechanics within the BRST-BFV and BV (or field-antifield) quantization methods are studied. It is shown that a special choice of gauge fixing functions (or BRST-BFV charge) together with the unitary limit leads to Hamiltonian localization in the path integral of the BRST-BFV formalism. In turn, we find that a special choice of gauge fixing functions being proportional to extremals of an initial non-degenerate classical action together with a very special solution of the classical master equation result in Lagrangian localization in the partition function of the BV formalism.

  14. Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics of Macromolecular Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Michael

    2014-04-01

    Preface and outline; 1. Introduction; 2. Statistical mechanics: a modern review; 3. The complexity of minimalistic lattice models for protein folding; 4. Monte Carlo and chain growth methods for molecular simulations; 5. First insights to freezing and collapse of flexible polymers; 6. Crystallization of elastic polymers; 7. Structural phases of semiflexible polymers; 8. Generic tertiary folding properties of proteins in mesoscopic scales; 9. Protein folding channels and kinetics of two-state folding; 10. Inducing generic secondary structures by constraints; 11. Statistical analyses of aggregation processes; 12. Hierarchical nature of phase transitions; 13. Adsorption of polymers at solid substrates; 14. Hybrid protein-substrate interfaces; 15. Concluding remarks and outlook; Notes; References; Index.

  15. Quantum mechanical light harvesting mechanisms in photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholes, Gregory

    2012-02-01

    More than 10 million billion photons of light strike a leaf each second. Incredibly, almost every red-coloured photon is captured by chlorophyll pigments and initiates steps to plant growth. Last year we reported that marine algae use quantum mechanics in order to optimize photosynthesis [1], a process essential to its survival. These and other insights from the natural world promise to revolutionize our ability to harness the power of the sun. In a recent review [2] we described the principles learned from studies of various natural antenna complexes and suggested how to utilize that knowledge to shape future technologies. We forecast the need to develop ways to direct and regulate excitation energy flow using molecular organizations that facilitate feedback and control--not easy given that the energy is only stored for a billionth of a second. In this presentation I will describe new results that explain the observation and meaning of quantum-coherent energy transfer. [4pt] [1] Elisabetta Collini, Cathy Y. Wong, Krystyna E. Wilk, Paul M. G. Curmi, Paul Brumer, and Gregory D. Scholes, ``Coherently wired light-harvesting in photosynthetic marine algae at ambient temperature'' Nature 463, 644-648 (2010).[0pt] [2] Gregory D. Scholes, Graham R. Fleming, Alexandra Olaya-Castro and Rienk van Grondelle, ``Lessons from nature about solar light harvesting'' Nature Chem. 3, 763-774 (2011).

  16. Quantum mechanics in complex systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoehn, Ross Douglas

    This document should be considered in its separation; there are three distinct topics contained within and three distinct chapters within the body of works. In a similar fashion, this abstract should be considered in three parts. Firstly, we explored the existence of multiply-charged atomic ions by having developed a new set of dimensional scaling equations as well as a series of relativistic augmentations to the standard dimensional scaling procedure and to the self-consistent field calculations. Secondly, we propose a novel method of predicting drug efficacy in hopes to facilitate the discovery of new small molecule therapeutics by modeling the agonist-protein system as being similar to the process of Inelastic Electron Tunneling Spectroscopy. Finally, we facilitate the instruction in basic quantum mechanical topics through the use of quantum games; this method of approach allows for the generation of exercises with the intent of conveying the fundamental concepts within a first year quantum mechanics classroom. Furthermore, no to be mentioned within the body of the text, yet presented in appendix form, certain works modeling the proliferation of cells types within the confines of man-made lattices for the purpose of facilitating artificial vascular transplants. In Chapter 2, we present a theoretical framework which describes multiply-charged atomic ions, their stability within super-intense laser fields, also lay corrections to the systems due to relativistic effects. Dimensional scaling calculations with relativistic corrections for systems: H, H-, H 2-, He, He-, He2-, He3- within super-intense laser fields were completed. Also completed were three-dimensional self consistent field calculations to verify the dimensionally scaled quantities. With the aforementioned methods the system's ability to stably bind 'additional' electrons through the development of multiple isolated regions of high potential energy leading to nodes of high electron density is shown

  17. Mechanism for quantum speedup in open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hai-Bin; Yang, W. L.; An, Jun-Hong; Xu, Zhen-Yu

    2016-02-01

    The quantum speed limit (QSL) time for open system characterizes the most efficient response of the system to the environmental influences. Previous results showed that the non-Markovianity governs the quantum speedup. Via studying the dynamics of a dissipative two-level system, we reveal that the non-Markovian effect is only the dynamical way of the quantum speedup, while the formation of the system-environment bound states is the essential reason for the quantum speedup. Our attribution of the quantum speedup to the energy-spectrum character can supply another vital path for experiments when the quantum speedup shows up without any dynamical calculations. The potential experimental observation of our quantum speedup mechanism in the circuit QED system is discussed. Our results may be of both theoretical and experimental interest in exploring the ultimate QSL in realistic environments, and may open new perspectives for devising active quantum speedup devices.

  18. Quantum squeezing of a mechanical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Chan U.; Weinstein, Aaron; Suh, Junho; Wollman, Emma; Schwab, Keith

    Generating nonclassical states of a macroscopic object has been a subject of considerable interest. It offers a route toward fundamental test of quantum mechanics in an unexplored regime. However, a macroscopic quantum state is very susceptible to decoherence due to the environment. One way to generate robust quantum states is quantum reservoir engineering. In this work, we utilize the reservoir engineering scheme developed by Kronwald et al. to generate a steady quantum squeezed state of a micron-scale mechanical oscillator in an electromechanical system. Together with the backaction evading measurement technique, we demonstrate a quantum nondemolition measurement of the mechanical quadratures to characterize the quantum squeezed state. By measuring the quadrature variances of the mechanical motion, more than 3dB squeezing below the zero-point level has been achieved.

  19. Heisenberg and the Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camilleri, Kristian

    2009-02-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; Part I. The Emergence of Quantum Mechanics: 2. Quantum mechanics and the principle of observability; 3. The problem of interpretation; Part II. The Heisenberg-Bohr Dialogue: 4. The wave-particle duality; 5. Indeterminacy and the limits of classical concepts: the turning point in Heisenberg's thought; 6. Heisenberg and Bohr: divergent viewpoints of complementarity; Part III. Heisenberg's Epistemology and Ontology of Quantum Mechanics: 7. The transformation of Kantian philosophy; 8. The linguistic turn in Heisenberg's thought; Conclusion; References; Index.

  20. Heisenberg and the Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camilleri, Kristian

    2011-09-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; Part I. The Emergence of Quantum Mechanics: 2. Quantum mechanics and the principle of observability; 3. The problem of interpretation; Part II. The Heisenberg-Bohr Dialogue: 4. The wave-particle duality; 5. Indeterminacy and the limits of classical concepts: the turning point in Heisenberg's thought; 6. Heisenberg and Bohr: divergent viewpoints of complementarity; Part III. Heisenberg's Epistemology and Ontology of Quantum Mechanics: 7. The transformation of Kantian philosophy; 8. The linguistic turn in Heisenberg's thought; Conclusion; References; Index.

  1. Speakable and Unspeakable in Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, J. S.; Aspect, Introduction by Alain

    2004-06-01

    List of papers on quantum philosophy by J. S. Bell; Preface; Acknowledgements; Introduction by Alain Aspect; 1. On the problem of hidden variables in quantum mechanics; 2. On the Einstein-Rosen-Podolsky paradox; 3. The moral aspects of quantum mechanics; 4. Introduction to the hidden-variable question; 5. Subject and object; 6. On wave packet reduction in the Coleman-Hepp model; 7. The theory of local beables; 8. Locality in quantum mechanics: reply to critics; 9. How to teach special relativity; 10. Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen experiments; 11. The measurement theory of Everett and de Broglie's pilot wave; 12. Free variables and local causality; 13. Atomic-cascade photons and quantum-mechanical nonlocality; 14. de Broglie-Bohm delayed choice double-slit experiments and density matrix; 15. Quantum mechanics for cosmologists; 16. Bertlmann's socks and the nature of reality; 17. On the impossible pilot wave; 18. Speakable and unspeakable in quantum mechanics; 19. Beables for quantum field theory; 20. Six possible worlds of quantum mechanics; 21. EPR correlations and EPR distributions; 22. Are there quantum jumps?; 23. Against 'measurement'; 24. La Nouvelle cuisine.

  2. Thermodynamic Optimization of Flow Geometry in Mechanical and Civil Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejan, Adrian; Lorente, Sylvie

    2001-12-01

    Recent developments in thermodynamic optimization are reviewed by focusing on the generation of optimal geometric form (shape, structure, topology) in flow systems. The flow configuration is free to vary. The principle that generates geometric form is the pursuit of maximum global performance (e.g., minimum flow resistance, minimum irreversibility) subject to global finiteness constraints (volume, weight, time). The resulting structures constructed in this manner have been named constructal designs. The thought that the same objective and constraints principle accounts for the optimally shaped flow paths that occur in natural systems (animate and inanimate) has been named constructal theory. Examples of large classes of applications are drawn from various sectors of mechanical and civil engineering: the distribution of heat transfer area in power plants, optimal sizing and shaping of flow channels and fins, optimal aspect ratios of heat exchanger core structures, aerodynamic and hydrodynamic shapes, tree-shaped assemblies of convective fins, treeshaped networks for fluid flow and other currents, optimal configurations for streams that undergo bifurcation or pairing, insulated pipe networks for the distribution of hot water and exergy over a fixed territory, and distribution networks for virtually everything that moves in society (goods, currency, information). The principle-based generation of flow geometry unites the thermodynamic optimization developments known in mechanical engineering with lesser known applications in civil engineering and social organization. This review extends thermodynamics, because it shows how thermodynamic principles of design optimization account for the development of optimal configurations in civil engineering and social organization.

  3. A Bit of Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oss, Stefano; Rosi, Tommaso

    2015-04-01

    We have developed an app for iOS-based smart-phones/tablets that allows a 3-D, complex phase-based colorful visualization of hydrogen atom wave functions. Several important features of the quantum behavior of atomic orbitals can easily be made evident, thus making this app a useful companion in introductory modern physics classes. There are many reasons why quantum mechanical systems and phenomena are difficult both to teach and deeply understand. They are described by equations that are generally hard to visualize, and they often oppose the so-called "common sense" based on the human perception of the world, which is built on mental images such as locality and causality. Moreover students cannot have direct experience of those systems and solutions, and generally do not even have the possibility to refer to pictures, videos, or experiments to fill this gap. Teachers often encounter quite serious troubles in finding out a sensible way to speak about the wonders of quantum physics at the high school level, where complex formalisms are not accessible at all. One should however consider that this is quite a common issue in physics and, more generally, in science education. There are plenty of natural phenomena whose models (not only at microscopic and atomic levels) are of difficult, if not impossible, visualization. Just think of certain kinds of waves, fields of forces, velocities, energy, angular momentum, and so on. One should also notice that physical reality is not the same as the images we make of it. Pictures (formal, abstract ones, as well as artists' views) are a convenient bridge between these two aspects.

  4. BOOK REVIEWS: Quantum Mechanics: Fundamentals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, A.

    2004-02-01

    This review is of three books, all published by Springer, all on quantum theory at a level above introductory, but very different in content, style and intended audience. That of Gottfried and Yan is of exceptional interest, historical and otherwise. It is a second edition of Gottfried’s well-known book published by Benjamin in 1966. This was written as a text for a graduate quantum mechanics course, and has become one of the most used and respected accounts of quantum theory, at a level mathematically respectable but not rigorous. Quantum mechanics was already solidly established by 1966, but this second edition gives an indication of progress made and changes in perspective over the last thirty-five years, and also recognises the very substantial increase in knowledge of quantum theory obtained at the undergraduate level. Topics absent from the first edition but included in the second include the Feynman path integral, seen in 1966 as an imaginative but not very useful formulation of quantum theory. Feynman methods were given only a cursory mention by Gottfried. Their practical importance has now been fully recognised, and a substantial account of them is provided in the new book. Other new topics include semiclassical quantum mechanics, motion in a magnetic field, the S matrix and inelastic collisions, radiation and scattering of light, identical particle systems and the Dirac equation. A topic that was all but totally neglected in 1966, but which has flourished increasingly since, is that of the foundations of quantum theory. John Bell’s work of the mid-1960s has led to genuine theoretical and experimental achievement, which has facilitated the development of quantum optics and quantum information theory. Gottfried’s 1966 book played a modest part in this development. When Bell became increasingly irritated with the standard theoretical approach to quantum measurement, Viki Weisskopf repeatedly directed him to Gottfried’s book. Gottfried had devoted a

  5. Quantum mechanics without potential function

    SciTech Connect

    Alhaidari, A. D.; Ismail, M. E. H.

    2015-07-15

    In the standard formulation of quantum mechanics, one starts by proposing a potential function that models the physical system. The potential is then inserted into the Schrödinger equation, which is solved for the wavefunction, bound states energy spectrum, and/or scattering phase shift. In this work, however, we propose an alternative formulation in which the potential function does not appear. The aim is to obtain a set of analytically realizable systems, which is larger than in the standard formulation and may or may not be associated with any given or previously known potential functions. We start with the wavefunction, which is written as a bounded infinite sum of elements of a complete basis with polynomial coefficients that are orthogonal on an appropriate domain in the energy space. Using the asymptotic properties of these polynomials, we obtain the scattering phase shift, bound states, and resonances. This formulation enables one to handle not only the well-known quantum systems but also previously untreated ones. Illustrative examples are given for two- and three-parameter systems.

  6. Phase space view of quantum mechanical systems and Fisher information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Á.

    2016-06-01

    Pennini and Plastino showed that the form of the Fisher information generated by the canonical distribution function reflects the intrinsic structure of classical mechanics. Now, a quantum mechanical generalization of the Pennini-Plastino theory is presented based on the thermodynamical transcription of the density functional theory. Comparing to the classical case, the phase-space Fisher information contains an extra term due to the position dependence of the temperature. However, for the special case of constant temperature, the expression derived bears resemblance to the classical one. A complete analogy to the classical case is demonstrated for the linear harmonic oscillator.

  7. Quantum Fluctuations and Thermodynamic Processes in the Presence of Closed Timelike Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Tsunefumi

    1997-10-01

    A closed timelike curve (CTC) is a closed loop in spacetime whose tangent vector is everywhere timelike. A spacetime which contains CTC's will allow time travel. One of these spacetimes is Grant space. It can be constructed from Minkowski space by imposing periodic boundary conditions in spatial directions and making the boundaries move toward each other. If Hawking's chronology protection conjecture is correct, there must be a physical mechanism preventing the formation of CTC's. Currently the most promising candidate for the chronology protection mechanism is the back reaction of the metric to quantum vacuum fluctuations. In this thesis the quantum fluctuations for a massive scalar field, a self-interacting field, and for a field at nonzero temperature are calculated in Grant space. The stress-energy tensor is found to remain finite everywhere in Grant space for the massive scalar field with sufficiently large field mass. Otherwise it diverges on chronology horizons like the stress-energy tensor for a massless scalar field. If CTC's exist they will have profound effects on physical processes. Causality can be protected even in the presence of CTC's if the self-consistency condition is imposed on all processes. Simple classical thermodynamic processes of a box filled with ideal gas in the presence of CTC's are studied. If a system of boxes is closed, its state does not change as it travels through a region of spacetime with CTC's. But if the system is open, the final state will depend on the interaction with the environment. The second law of thermodynamics is shown to hold for both closed and open systems. A similar problem is investigated at a statistical level for a gas consisting of multiple selves of a single particle in a spacetime with CTC's.

  8. Statistical mechanical studies on the information processing with quantum fluctuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsubo, Yosuke; Inoue, Jun-Ichi; Nagata, Kenji; Okada, Masato

    2014-03-01

    Quantum fluctuation induces the tunneling between states in a system and then can be used in combinatorial optimization problems. Such an algorithm is called quantum adiabatic computing. In this work, we investigate the quality of an information processing based on Bayes inference with the quantum fluctuation through the statistical mechanical approach. We then focus on the error correcting codes and CDMA multiuser demodulation which are described by conventional solvable spin glass models and can be analyzed by replica method in the thermodynamic limit. Introducing the quantum fluctuation into the decoding process of each problem, which is called quantum maximizer of the posteriori probability (QMPM) estimate, we analyze the decoding quality and then compare the results with those by the conventional MPM estimate which corresponds to finite temperature decoding From our limited results, the MPM based on the quantum fluctuation seems to achieve the same decoding quality as the thermal MPM does. We clarify the relationship between the optimal amplitude of transverse field and temperature for the mixture of quantum and classical MPMs. This work is supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Numbers 12J06501, 25330283, 25120009.

  9. Quantum thermodynamics of the driven resonant level model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruch, Anton; Thomas, Mark; Viola Kusminskiy, Silvia; von Oppen, Felix; Nitzan, Abraham

    2016-03-01

    We present a consistent thermodynamic theory for the resonant level model in the wide-band limit, whose level energy is driven slowly by an external force. The problem of defining "system" and "bath" in the strong-coupling regime is circumvented by considering as the system everything that is influenced by the externally driven level. The thermodynamic functions that are obtained to first order beyond the quasistatic limit fulfill the first and second law with a positive entropy production, successfully connect to the forces experienced by the external driving, and reproduce the correct weak-coupling limit of stochastic thermodynamics.

  10. The Measurement Problem in Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Shuzo

    2001-02-01

    Since the establishment of quantum mechanics in the 20s of this century, the controversial discussions 1 have ever continued about its basis, that is the measurement problem of quantum mechanics. Strangely those discussions are prevailed mainly in the circle of theoretical group, while the experimental physicists who are directly concerned with the measurement, indifferently to the discussion have performed their study works, showing firmly the validity of quantum theory. This curious affair seems to be stemmed from the situation that the discussions overlooked by basing on what quantum theoretic ground the experimental equipments are installed, its sure operations are examined and the obtained results are explained, etc. In this talk 2 we shall aim to make clear the relation between the experiment and the structure of quantum mechanics, and to present some epistemological considerations on the quantum mechanics.

  11. Limitations on the Evolution of Quantum Coherences: Towards Fully Quantum Second Laws of Thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Ćwikliński, Piotr; Studziński, Michał; Horodecki, Michał; Oppenheim, Jonathan

    2015-11-20

    The second law of thermodynamics places a limitation into which states a system can evolve into. For systems in contact with a heat bath, it can be combined with the law of energy conservation, and it says that a system can only evolve into another if the free energy goes down. Recently, it's been shown that there are actually many second laws, and that it is only for large macroscopic systems that they all become equivalent to the ordinary one. These additional second laws also hold for quantum systems, and are, in fact, often more relevant in this regime. They place a restriction on how the probabilities of energy levels can evolve. Here, we consider additional restrictions on how the coherences between energy levels can evolve. Coherences can only go down, and we provide a set of restrictions which limit the extent to which they can be maintained. We find that coherences over energy levels must decay at rates that are suitably adapted to the transition rates between energy levels. We show that the limitations are matched in the case of a single qubit, in which case we obtain the full characterization of state-to-state transformations. For higher dimensions, we conjecture that more severe constraints exist. We also introduce a new class of thermodynamical operations which allow for greater manipulation of coherences and study its power with respect to a class of operations known as thermal operations. PMID:26636834

  12. Limitations on the Evolution of Quantum Coherences: Towards Fully Quantum Second Laws of Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ćwikliński, Piotr; Studziński, Michał; Horodecki, Michał; Oppenheim, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    The second law of thermodynamics places a limitation into which states a system can evolve into. For systems in contact with a heat bath, it can be combined with the law of energy conservation, and it says that a system can only evolve into another if the free energy goes down. Recently, it's been shown that there are actually many second laws, and that it is only for large macroscopic systems that they all become equivalent to the ordinary one. These additional second laws also hold for quantum systems, and are, in fact, often more relevant in this regime. They place a restriction on how the probabilities of energy levels can evolve. Here, we consider additional restrictions on how the coherences between energy levels can evolve. Coherences can only go down, and we provide a set of restrictions which limit the extent to which they can be maintained. We find that coherences over energy levels must decay at rates that are suitably adapted to the transition rates between energy levels. We show that the limitations are matched in the case of a single qubit, in which case we obtain the full characterization of state-to-state transformations. For higher dimensions, we conjecture that more severe constraints exist. We also introduce a new class of thermodynamical operations which allow for greater manipulation of coherences and study its power with respect to a class of operations known as thermal operations.

  13. Quantum mechanics in complex systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoehn, Ross Douglas

    This document should be considered in its separation; there are three distinct topics contained within and three distinct chapters within the body of works. In a similar fashion, this abstract should be considered in three parts. Firstly, we explored the existence of multiply-charged atomic ions by having developed a new set of dimensional scaling equations as well as a series of relativistic augmentations to the standard dimensional scaling procedure and to the self-consistent field calculations. Secondly, we propose a novel method of predicting drug efficacy in hopes to facilitate the discovery of new small molecule therapeutics by modeling the agonist-protein system as being similar to the process of Inelastic Electron Tunneling Spectroscopy. Finally, we facilitate the instruction in basic quantum mechanical topics through the use of quantum games; this method of approach allows for the generation of exercises with the intent of conveying the fundamental concepts within a first year quantum mechanics classroom. Furthermore, no to be mentioned within the body of the text, yet presented in appendix form, certain works modeling the proliferation of cells types within the confines of man-made lattices for the purpose of facilitating artificial vascular transplants. In Chapter 2, we present a theoretical framework which describes multiply-charged atomic ions, their stability within super-intense laser fields, also lay corrections to the systems due to relativistic effects. Dimensional scaling calculations with relativistic corrections for systems: H, H-, H 2-, He, He-, He2-, He3- within super-intense laser fields were completed. Also completed were three-dimensional self consistent field calculations to verify the dimensionally scaled quantities. With the aforementioned methods the system's ability to stably bind 'additional' electrons through the development of multiple isolated regions of high potential energy leading to nodes of high electron density is shown

  14. Quantum Mechanics with a Little Less Mystery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cropper, William H.

    1969-01-01

    Suggests the "route of the inquiring mind in presenting the esoteric quantum mechanical postulates and concepts in an understandable form. Explains that the quantum mechanical postulates are but useful mathematical forms to express thebroader principles of superposition and correspondence. Briefly describes some of the features which makes the…

  15. Relativity of representations in quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Torre, A. C.

    2002-03-01

    Only the position representation is used in introductory quantum mechanics and the momentum representation is not usually presented until advanced undergraduate courses. To emphasize the relativity of the representations of the abstract formulation of quantum mechanics, two examples of representations related to the operators αX+(1-α)P and 1/2(XP+PX) are presented.

  16. Quantum mechanics of open systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melikidze, Akakii

    In quantum mechanics, there is a set of problems where the system of interest interacts with another system, usually called "environment". This interaction leads to the exchange of energy and information and makes the dynamics of the system of interest essentially non-unitary. Such problems often appeared in condensed matter physics and attracted much attention after recent advances in nanotechnology. As broadly posed as they are, these problems require a variety of different approaches. This thesis is an attempt to examine several of these approaches in applications to different condensed matter problems. The first problem concerns the so-called "Master equation" approach which is very popular in quantum optics. I show that analytic properties of environmental correlators lead to strong restrictions on the applicability of the approach to the strong-coupling regime of interest in condensed matter physics. In the second problem, I use path integrals to treat the localization of particles on attractive short-range potentials when the environment produces an effective viscous friction force. I find that friction changes drastically the localization properties and leads to much stronger localization in comparison to the non-dissipative case. This has implications for the motion of heavy particles in fermionic liquids and, as will be argued below, is also relevant to the problem of high-temperature superconductivity. Finally, the third problem deals with the interplay of geometric phases and energy dissipation which occurs in the motion of vortices in superconductors. It is shown that this interplay leads to interesting predictions for vortex tunneling in high-temperature superconductors which have been partially confirmed by experiments.

  17. The laws of thermodynamics deduced from statistical mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diu, B.; Guthmann, C.; Lederer, D.; Roulet, B.

    Since the advent of statistical mechanics, the laws of thermodynamics are consequences of more fundamental postulates. Nevertheless, the logical link between statistical mechanics and thermodynamics is far from being precisely described in the literature, at an elementary level. The present paper tries to clarify this subject. It is necessary to recall some basic notions and results of statistical mechanics, but also the main definitions concerning thermodynamic transformations (which are partly ignored in too many cases). The laws of thermodynamics, especially the second one, are then derived and analyzed in statistical terms, and the statistical meaning of heat and work is discussed. Depuis l'avènement de la mécanique statistique, les principes de la thermodynamique sont des conséquences de postulats plus fondamentaux. Pourtant, le lien logique entre mécanique statistique et thermodynamique est loin d'etre explicité de façon précise, à un niveau élémentaire, dans la littérature. L'article que voici tente de clarifier le sujet. Il s'avère nécessaire de rappeler quelques notions et résultats de base en mécanique statistique, mais aussi les principales définitions (trop souvent ignorées pour certaines d'entre elles) relatives aux transformations thermodynamiques. Les principes de la thermodynamique, en particulier le second, sont ensuite démontrés et analysés en termes statistiques, et l'interprétation statistique de la chaleur et du travail est discutée.

  18. Quantum-mechanical Brayton engine working with a particle in a one-dimensional harmonic trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.

    2013-05-01

    Based on the quantum version of thermodynamic processes, a quantum-mechanical Brayton engine model has been established. Expressions for the power output and efficiency of the engine are derived. Some fundamental optimal relations and general performance characteristic curves of the cycle are obtained. Furthermore, we note that it is possible to resist the reduction in efficiency, caused by compression of the adiabatic process, by decreasing the amount of energy levels of the quantum system. The results obtained here will provide theoretical guidance for the design of some new quantum-mechanical engines.

  19. Polymer quantum mechanics and its continuum limit

    SciTech Connect

    Corichi, Alejandro; Vukasinac, Tatjana; Zapata, Jose A.

    2007-08-15

    A rather nonstandard quantum representation of the canonical commutation relations of quantum mechanics systems, known as the polymer representation, has gained some attention in recent years, due to its possible relation with Planck scale physics. In particular, this approach has been followed in a symmetric sector of loop quantum gravity known as loop quantum cosmology. Here we explore different aspects of the relation between the ordinary Schroedinger theory and the polymer description. The paper has two parts. In the first one, we derive the polymer quantum mechanics starting from the ordinary Schroedinger theory and show that the polymer description arises as an appropriate limit. In the second part we consider the continuum limit of this theory, namely, the reverse process in which one starts from the discrete theory and tries to recover back the ordinary Schroedinger quantum mechanics. We consider several examples of interest, including the harmonic oscillator, the free particle, and a simple cosmological model.

  20. Improving students' understanding of quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guangtian

    2011-12-01

    Learning physics is challenging at all levels. Students' difficulties in the introductory level physics courses have been widely studied and many instructional strategies have been developed to help students learn introductory physics. However, research shows that there is a large diversity in students' preparation and skills in the upper-level physics courses and it is necessary to provide scaffolding support to help students learn advanced physics. This thesis explores issues related to students' common difficulties in learning upper-level undergraduate quantum mechanics and how these difficulties can be reduced by research-based learning tutorials and peer instruction tools. We investigated students' difficulties in learning quantum mechanics by administering written tests and surveys to many classes and conducting individual interviews with a subset of students. Based on these investigations, we developed Quantum Interactive Learning Tutorials (QuILTs) and peer instruction tools to help students build a hierarchical knowledge structure of quantum mechanics through a guided approach. Preliminary assessments indicate that students' understanding of quantum mechanics is improved after using the research-based learning tools in the junior-senior level quantum mechanics courses. We also designed a standardized conceptual survey that can help instructors better probe students' understanding of quantum mechanics concepts in one spatial dimension. The validity and reliability of this quantum mechanics survey is discussed.

  1. Experiments on cloaking in optics, thermodynamics and mechanics.

    PubMed

    Kadic, Muamer; Bückmann, Tiemo; Schittny, Robert; Wegener, Martin

    2015-08-28

    Spatial coordinate transformations can be used to transform boundaries, material parameters or discrete lattices. We discuss fundamental constraints in regard to cloaking and review our corresponding experiments in optics, thermodynamics and mechanics. For example, we emphasize three-dimensional broadband visible-frequency carpet cloaking, transient thermal cloaking, three-dimensional omnidirectional macroscopic broadband cloaking for diffuse light throughout the entire visible range, cloaking for flexural waves in thin plates and three-dimensional elasto-static core-shell cloaking using pentamode mechanical metamaterials. PMID:26217050

  2. Realist model approach to quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hájíček, P.

    2013-06-01

    The paper proves that quantum mechanics is compatible with the constructive realism of modern philosophy of science. The proof is based on the observation that properties of quantum systems that are uniquely determined by their preparations can be assumed objective without the difficulties that are encountered by the same assumption about values of observables. The resulting realist interpretation of quantum mechanics is made rigorous by studying the space of quantum states—the convex set of state operators. Prepared states are classified according to their statistical structure into indecomposable and decomposable instead of pure and mixed. Simple objective properties are defined and showed to form a Boolean lattice.

  3. Quantum Mechanical Models Of The Fermi Shuttle

    SciTech Connect

    Sternberg, James

    2011-06-01

    The Fermi shuttle is a mechanism in which high energy electrons are produced in an atomic collision by multiple collisions with a target and a projectile atom. It is normally explained purely classically in terms of the electron's orbits prescribed in the collision. Common calculations to predict the Fermi shuttle use semi-classical methods, but these methods still rely on classical orbits. In reality such collisions belong to the realm of quantum mechanics, however. In this paper we discuss several purely quantum mechanical calculations which can produce the Fermi shuttle. Being quantum mechanical in nature, these calculations produce these features by wave interference, rather than by classical orbits.

  4. An analysis of quantum effects on the thermodynamic properties of cryogenic hydrogen using the path integral method.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, H; Tsuda, S; Tsuboi, N; Koshi, M; Hayashi, K A; Tokumasu, T

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we describe the analysis of the thermodynamic properties of cryogenic hydrogen using classical molecular dynamics (MD) and path integral MD (PIMD) method to understand the effects of the quantum nature of hydrogen molecules. We performed constant NVE MD simulations across a wide density-temperature region to establish an equation of state (EOS). Moreover, the quantum effect on the difference of molecular mechanism of pressure-volume-temperature relationship was addressed. The EOS was derived based on the classical mechanism idea only using the MD simulation results. Simulation results were compared with each MD method and experimental data. As a result, it was confirmed that although the EOS on the basis of classical MD cannot reproduce the experimental data of saturation property of hydrogen in the high-density region, the EOS on the basis of PIMD well reproduces those thermodynamic properties of hydrogen. Moreover, it was clarified that taking quantum effects into account makes the repulsion force larger and the potential well shallower. Because of this mechanism, the intermolecular interaction of hydrogen molecules diminishes and the virial pressure increases. PMID:24712800

  5. An analysis of quantum effects on the thermodynamic properties of cryogenic hydrogen using the path integral method

    SciTech Connect

    Nagashima, H.; Tsuda, S.; Tsuboi, N.; Koshi, M.; Hayashi, K. A.; Tokumasu, T.

    2014-04-07

    In this paper, we describe the analysis of the thermodynamic properties of cryogenic hydrogen using classical molecular dynamics (MD) and path integral MD (PIMD) method to understand the effects of the quantum nature of hydrogen molecules. We performed constant NVE MD simulations across a wide density–temperature region to establish an equation of state (EOS). Moreover, the quantum effect on the difference of molecular mechanism of pressure–volume–temperature relationship was addressed. The EOS was derived based on the classical mechanism idea only using the MD simulation results. Simulation results were compared with each MD method and experimental data. As a result, it was confirmed that although the EOS on the basis of classical MD cannot reproduce the experimental data of saturation property of hydrogen in the high-density region, the EOS on the basis of PIMD well reproduces those thermodynamic properties of hydrogen. Moreover, it was clarified that taking quantum effects into account makes the repulsion force larger and the potential well shallower. Because of this mechanism, the intermolecular interaction of hydrogen molecules diminishes and the virial pressure increases.

  6. Causal structure in categorical quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, Raymond Ashwin

    Categorical quantum mechanics is a way of formalising the structural features of quantum theory using category theory. It uses compound systems as the primitive notion, which is formalised by using symmetric monoidal categories. This leads to an elegant formalism for describing quantum protocols such as quantum teleportation. In particular, categorical quantum mechanics provides a graphical calculus that exposes the information flow of such protocols in an intuitive way. However, the graphical calculus also reveals surprising features of these protocols; for example, in the quantum teleportation protocol, information appears to flow `backwards-in-time'. This leads to question of how causal structure can be described within categorical quantum mechanics, and how this might lead to insight regarding the structural compatibility between quantum theory and relativity. This thesis is concerned with the project of formalising causal structure in categorical quantum mechanics. We begin by studying an abstract view of Bell-type experiments, as described by `no-signalling boxes', and we show that under time-reversal no-signalling boxes generically become signalling. This conflicts with the underlying symmetry of relativistic causal structure. This leads us to consider the framework of categorical quantum mechanics from the perspective of relativistic causal structure. We derive the properties that a symmetric monoidal category must satisfy in order to describe systems in such a background causal structure. We use these properties to define a new type of category, and this provides a formal framework for describing protocols in spacetime. We explore this new structure, showing how it leads to an understanding of the counter-intuitive information flow of protocols in categorical quantum mechanics. We then find that the formal properties of our new structure are naturally related to axioms for reconstructing quantum theory, and we show how a reconstruction scheme based on

  7. Operational Axioms for Quantum Mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro

    2007-02-21

    The mathematical formulation of Quantum Mechanics in terms of complex Hilbert space is derived for finite dimensions, starting from a general definition of physical experiment and from five simple Postulates concerning experimental accessibility and simplicity. For the infinite dimensional case, on the other hand, a C*-algebra representation of physical transformations is derived, starting from just four of the five Postulates via a Gelfand-Naimark-Segal (GNS) construction. The present paper simplifies and sharpens the previous derivation in Ref. [1]. The main ingredient of the axiomatization is the postulated existence of faithful states that allows one to calibrate the experimental apparatus. Such notion is at the basis of the operational definitions of the scalar product and of the transposed of a physical transformation. What is new in the present paper with respect to Ref. [1], is the operational deduction of an involution corresponding to the complex-conjugation for effects, whose extension to transformations allows to define the adjoint of a transformation when the extension is composition-preserving. The existence of such composition-preserving extension among possible extensions is analyzed.

  8. The transactional interpretation of quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, John G.

    1986-07-01

    The interpretational problems of quantum mechanics are considered. The way in which the standard Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics deals with these problems is reviewed. A new interpretation of the formalism of quantum mechanics, the transactional interpretation, is presented. The basic element of this interpretation is the transaction describing a quantum event as an exchange of advanced and retarded waves, as implied by the work of Wheeler and Feynman, Dirac, and others. The transactional interpretation is explicitly nonlocal and thereby consistent with recent tests of the Bell inequality, yet is relativistically invariant and fully causal. A detailed comparison of the transactional and Copenhagen interpretations is made in the context of well-known quantum-mechanical Gedankenexperimente and "paradoxes." The transactional interpretation permits quantum-mechanical wave functions to be interpreted as real waves physically present in space rather than as "mathematical representations of knowledge" as in the Copenhagen interpretation. The transactional interpretation is shown to provide insight into the complex character of the quantum-mechanical state vector and the mechanism associated with its "collapse." It also leads in a natural way to justification of the Heisenberg uncertainty principle and the Born probability law (P=ψψ*), basic elements of the Copenhagen interpretation.

  9. Consecutive Measurements in Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glick, Jennifer R.; Adami, Christoph

    The physics of quantum measurement still continues to puzzle with no resolution in sight between competing interpretations, in particular because no interpretation has so far produced predictions that would be falsifiable via experiment. Here we present an analysis of consecutive projective measurements performed on a quantum state using quantum information theory, where the entanglement between the quantum system and a measuring device is explicitly taken into account, and where the consecutive measurements increase the joint Hilbert space while the wavefunction of the joint system never collapses. Using this relative-state formalism we rederive well-known results for the pairwise correlation between any two measurement devices, but show that considering the joint as well as conditional entropy of three devices reveals a difference between the collapse and no-collapse pictures of quantum measurement that is experimentally testable. This research was funded by a Michigan State University Enrichment Fellowship.

  10. On the tomographic picture of quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibort, A.; Man'ko, V. I.; Marmo, G.; Simoni, A.; Ventriglia, F.

    2010-06-01

    We formulate necessary and sufficient conditions for a symplectic tomogram of a quantum state to determine the density state. We establish a connection between the (re)construction by means of symplectic tomograms with the construction by means of Naimark positive definite functions on the Weyl-Heisenberg group. This connection is used to formulate properties which guarantee that tomographic probabilities describe quantum states in the probability representation of quantum mechanics.

  11. Strange Bedfellows: Quantum Mechanics and Data Mining

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, Marvin; /SLAC

    2009-12-16

    Last year, in 2008, I gave a talk titled Quantum Calisthenics. This year I am going to tell you about how the work I described then has spun off into a most unlikely direction. What I am going to talk about is how one maps the problem of finding clusters in a given data set into a problem in quantum mechanics. I will then use the tricks I described to let quantum evolution lets the clusters come together on their own.

  12. Strange Bedfellows: Quantum Mechanics and Data Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinstein, Marvin

    2010-02-01

    Last year, in 2008, I gave a talk titled Quantum Calisthenics. This year I am going to tell you about how the work I described then has spun off into a most unlikely direction. What I am going to talk about is how one maps the problem of finding clusters in a given data set into a problem in quantum mechanics. I will then use the tricks I described to let quantum evolution lets the clusters come together on their own.

  13. Dynamical Casimir effect and minimal temperature in quantum thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benenti, Giuliano; Strini, Giuliano

    2015-02-01

    We study the fundamental limitations of cooling to absolute zero for a qubit, interacting with a single mode of the electromagnetic field. Our results show that the dynamical Casimir effect, which is unavoidable in any finite-time thermodynamic cycle, forbids the attainability of the absolute zero of temperature, even in the limit of an infinite number of cycles.

  14. Probing phase-space noncommutativity through quantum beating, missing information, and the thermodynamic limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardini, A. E.; Bertolami, O.

    2013-07-01

    In this work we examine the effect of phase-space noncommutativity on some typically quantum properties such as quantum beating, quantum information, and decoherence. To exemplify these issues we consider the two-dimensional noncommutative quantum harmonic oscillator whose component behavior we monitor in time. This procedure allows us to determine how the noncommutative parameters are related to the missing information quantified by the linear quantum entropy and by the mutual information between the relevant Hilbert space coordinates. Particular questions concerning the thermodynamic limit of some relevant properties are also discussed in order to evidence the effects of noncommutativity. Finally, through an analogy with the Zeeman effect, we identify how some aspects of the axial symmetry of the problem suggest the possibility of decoupling the noncommutative quantum perturbations from unperturbed commutative well-known solutions.

  15. Consistency of PT-symmetric quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brody, Dorje C.

    2016-03-01

    In recent reports, suggestions have been put forward to the effect that parity and time-reversal (PT) symmetry in quantum mechanics is incompatible with causality. It is shown here, in contrast, that PT-symmetric quantum mechanics is fully consistent with standard quantum mechanics. This follows from the surprising fact that the much-discussed metric operator on Hilbert space is not physically observable. In particular, for closed quantum systems in finite dimensions there is no statistical test that one can perform on the outcomes of measurements to determine whether the Hamiltonian is Hermitian in the conventional sense, or PT-symmetric—the two theories are indistinguishable. Nontrivial physical effects arising as a consequence of PT symmetry are expected to be observed, nevertheless, for open quantum systems with balanced gain and loss.

  16. Optimization of a relativistic quantum mechanical engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña, Francisco J.; Ferré, Michel; Orellana, P. A.; Rojas, René G.; Vargas, P.

    2016-08-01

    We present an optimal analysis for a quantum mechanical engine working between two energy baths within the framework of relativistic quantum mechanics, adopting a first-order correction. This quantum mechanical engine, with the direct energy leakage between the energy baths, consists of two adiabatic and two isoenergetic processes and uses a three-level system of two noninteracting fermions as its working substance. Assuming that the potential wall moves at a finite speed, we derive the expression of power output and, in particular, reproduce the expression for the efficiency at maximum power.

  17. Quantum mechanics and the generalized uncertainty principle

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, Jang Young; Berger, Micheal S.

    2006-12-15

    The generalized uncertainty principle has been described as a general consequence of incorporating a minimal length from a theory of quantum gravity. We consider a simple quantum mechanical model where the operator corresponding to position has discrete eigenvalues and show how the generalized uncertainty principle results for minimum uncertainty wave packets.

  18. Symmetry and the thermodynamics of currents in open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzano, Daniel; Hurtado, Pablo I.

    2014-09-01

    Symmetry is a powerful concept in physics, and its recent application to understand nonequilibrium behavior is providing deep insights and groundbreaking exact results. Here we show how to harness symmetry to control transport and statistics in open quantum systems. Such control is enabled by a first-order-type dynamic phase transition in current statistics and the associated coexistence of different transport channels (or nonequilibrium steady states) classified by symmetry. Microreversibility then ensues, via the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem, a twin dynamic phase transition for rare current fluctuations. Interestingly, the symmetry present in the initial state is spontaneously broken at the fluctuating level, where the quantum system selects the symmetry sector that maximally facilitates a given fluctuation. We illustrate these results in a qubit network model motivated by the problem of coherent energy harvesting in photosynthetic complexes, and introduce the concept of a symmetry-controlled quantum thermal switch, suggesting symmetry-based design strategies for quantum devices with controllable transport properties.

  19. Mixed 2D molecular systems: Mechanic, thermodynamic and dielectric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beňo, Juraj; Weis, Martin; Dobročka, Edmund; Haško, Daniel

    2008-08-01

    Study of Langmuir monolayers consisting of stearic acid (SA) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) molecules was done by surface pressure-area isotherms ( π- A), the Maxwell displacement current (MDC) measurement, X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate the selected mechanic, thermodynamic and dielectric properties based on orientational structure of monolayers. On the base of π- A isotherms analysis we explain the creation of stable structures and found optimal monolayer composition. The dielectric properties represented by MDC generated monolayers were analyzed in terms of excess dipole moment, proposing the effect of dipole-dipole interaction. XRR and AFM results illustrate deposited film structure and molecular ordering.

  20. Continuum mechanics beyond the second law of thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ostoja-Starzewski, M.; Malyarenko, A.

    2014-01-01

    The results established in contemporary statistical physics indicating that, on very small space and time scales, the entropy production rate may be negative, motivate a generalization of continuum mechanics. On account of the fluctuation theorem, it is recognized that the evolution of entropy at a material point is stochastically (not deterministically) conditioned by the past history, with an increasing trend of average entropy production. Hence, the axiom of Clausius–Duhem inequality is replaced by a submartingale model, which, by the Doob decomposition theorem, allows classification of thermomechanical processes into four types depending on whether they are conservative or not and/or conventional continuum mechanical or not. Stochastic generalizations of thermomechanics are given in the vein of either thermodynamic orthogonality or primitive thermodynamics, with explicit models formulated for Newtonian fluids with, respectively, parabolic or hyperbolic heat conduction. Several random field models of the martingale component, possibly including spatial fractal and Hurst effects, are proposed. The violations of the second law are relevant in those situations in continuum mechanics where very small spatial and temporal scales are involved. As an example, we study an acceleration wavefront of nanoscale thickness which randomly encounters regions in the medium characterized by a negative viscosity coefficient. PMID:25383037

  1. Continuum mechanics beyond the second law of thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Ostoja-Starzewski, M; Malyarenko, A

    2014-11-01

    The results established in contemporary statistical physics indicating that, on very small space and time scales, the entropy production rate may be negative, motivate a generalization of continuum mechanics. On account of the fluctuation theorem, it is recognized that the evolution of entropy at a material point is stochastically (not deterministically) conditioned by the past history, with an increasing trend of average entropy production. Hence, the axiom of Clausius-Duhem inequality is replaced by a submartingale model, which, by the Doob decomposition theorem, allows classification of thermomechanical processes into four types depending on whether they are conservative or not and/or conventional continuum mechanical or not. Stochastic generalizations of thermomechanics are given in the vein of either thermodynamic orthogonality or primitive thermodynamics, with explicit models formulated for Newtonian fluids with, respectively, parabolic or hyperbolic heat conduction. Several random field models of the martingale component, possibly including spatial fractal and Hurst effects, are proposed. The violations of the second law are relevant in those situations in continuum mechanics where very small spatial and temporal scales are involved. As an example, we study an acceleration wavefront of nanoscale thickness which randomly encounters regions in the medium characterized by a negative viscosity coefficient. PMID:25383037

  2. Quantum thermodynamic functions for an oscillator coupled to a heat bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, G. W.; O'Connell, R. F.

    2007-04-01

    Small systems (of interest in the areas of nanophysics, quantum information, etc.) are particularly vulnerable to environmental effects. Thus, we determine various thermodynamic functions for an oscillator in an arbitrary heat bath at arbitrary temperatures. Explicit results are presented for the most commonly discussed heat bath models: Ohmic, single relaxation time, and blackbody radiation.

  3. Thermodynamical properties of triangular quantum wires: entropy, specific heat, and internal energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khordad, R.

    2016-07-01

    In the present work, thermodynamical properties of a GaAs quantum wire with equilateral triangle cross section are studied. First, the energy levels of the system are obtained by solving the Schrödinger equation. Second, the Tsallis formalism is applied to obtain entropy, internal energy, and specific heat of the system. We have found that the specific heat and entropy have certain physically meaningful values, which mean thermodynamic properties cannot take any continuous value, unlike classical thermodynamics in which they are considered as continuous quantities. Maximum of entropy increases with increasing the wire size. The specific heat is zero at special temperatures. Specific heat decreases with increasing temperature. There are several peaks in specific heat, and these are dependent on quantum wire size.

  4. Lasing process in a closed bipartite quantum system: A thermodynamical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldherr, G.; Mahler, G.

    2010-06-01

    Closed weakly bound bipartite quantum systems typically exhibit relaxation behavior with respect to the smaller subsystem. Here, we investigate a model composed of a finite spin network with one interfacing spin being coupled to a single electromagnetic field mode via the Jaynes-Cummings interaction. The initial pure state of the system can be chosen such that the resulting thermodynamical relaxation process is lasing/nonlasing relaxation or energy back flow from the field mode. We examine the properties of the field mode with quantum optical methods. During the lasing process, the field mode is in a phase-diffused Glauber state with no optical coherence. The thermodynamical analysis of our system is consistent with this finding: The total energy exchanged between both subsystems is found to be heat only. Yet the mapping of this function onto a thermodynamic heat engine appears to be of limited value.

  5. Mechanical equivalent of quantum heat engines.

    PubMed

    Arnaud, Jacques; Chusseau, Laurent; Philippe, Fabrice

    2008-06-01

    Quantum heat engines employ as working agents multilevel systems instead of classical gases. We show that under some conditions quantum heat engines are equivalent to a series of reservoirs at different altitudes containing balls of various weights. A cycle consists of picking up at random a ball from one reservoir and carrying it to the next, thereby performing or absorbing some work. In particular, quantum heat engines, employing two-level atoms as working agents, are modeled by reservoirs containing balls of weight 0 or 1. The mechanical model helps us prove that the maximum efficiency of quantum heat engines is the Carnot efficiency. Heat pumps and negative temperatures are considered. PMID:18643212

  6. A Reconstruction of Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochen, Simon

    2015-05-01

    We show that exactly the same intuitively plausible definitions of state, observable, symmetry, dynamics, and compound systems of the classical Boolean structure of intrinsic properties of systems lead, when applied to the structure of extrinsic, relational quantum properties, to the standard quantum formalism, including the Schrödinger equation and the von Neumann-Lüders Projection Rule. This approach is then applied to resolving the paradoxes and difficulties of the orthodox interpretation.

  7. Intrusion Detection with Quantum Mechanics: A Photonic Quantum Fence

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S; Bennink, Ryan S; Grice, Warren P; Owens, Israel J

    2008-01-01

    We describe the use of quantum-mechanically entangled photons for sensing intrusions across a physical perimeter. Our approach to intrusion detection uses the no-cloning principle of quantum information science as protection against an intruder s ability to spoof a sensor receiver using a classical intercept-resend attack. We explore the bounds on detection using quantum detection and estimation theory, and we experimentally demonstrate the underlying principle of entanglement-based detection using the visibility derived from polarization-correlation measurements.

  8. Predicting Thermodynamic Properties of PBXTHs with New Quantum Topological Indexes

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Guowen; Yu, Limei

    2016-01-01

    Novel group quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models on the thermodynamic properties of PBXTHs were presented, by the multiple linear regression (MLR) analysis method. Four thermodynamic properties were studied: the entropy (Sθ), the standard enthalpy of formation (ΔfHθ), the standard Gibbs energy of formation (ΔfGθ), and the relative standard Gibbs energy of formation (ΔRGθ). The results by the formula indicate that the calculated and predicted data in this study are in good agreement with those in literature and the deviation is within the experimental errors. To validate the estimation reliability for internal samples and the predictive ability for other samples, leave-one-out (LOO) cross validation (CV) and external validation were performed, and the results show that the models are satisfactory. PMID:26900689

  9. Interpretation and Predictability of Quantum Mechanics and Quantum Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Sumio

    A non-probabilistic interpretation of quantum mechanics asserts that we get a prediction only when a wave function has a peak. Taking this interpretation seriously, we discuss how to find a peak in the wave function of the universe, by using some minisuperspace models with homogeneous degrees of freedom and also a model with cosmological perturbations. Then we show how to recover our classical picture of the universe from the quantum theory, and comment on the physical meaning of the backreaction equation.

  10. Fundamental Quantum Mechanics--A Graphic Presentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, M. N.; Kelley, T. G.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a presentation of basic quantum mechanics for nonscience majors that relies on a computer-generated graphic display to circumvent the usual mathematical difficulties. It allows a detailed treatment of free-particle motion in a wave picture. (MLH)

  11. How Rutherford missed discovering quantum mechanical identity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temmer, G. M.

    1989-03-01

    An interesting quirk in the energy dependence of alpha-particle scattering from helium caused Lord Rutherford to miss a major discovery—namely, the consequences of quantum mechanical identity—before their prediction by Mott a short time later.

  12. Quantum mechanical streamlines. I - Square potential barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirschfelder, J. O.; Christoph, A. C.; Palke, W. E.

    1974-01-01

    Exact numerical calculations are made for scattering of quantum mechanical particles hitting a square two-dimensional potential barrier (an exact analog of the Goos-Haenchen optical experiments). Quantum mechanical streamlines are plotted and found to be smooth and continuous, to have continuous first derivatives even through the classical forbidden region, and to form quantized vortices around each of the nodal points. A comparison is made between the present numerical calculations and the stationary wave approximation, and good agreement is found between both the Goos-Haenchen shifts and the reflection coefficients. The time-independent Schroedinger equation for real wavefunctions is reduced to solving a nonlinear first-order partial differential equation, leading to a generalization of the Prager-Hirschfelder perturbation scheme. Implications of the hydrodynamical formulation of quantum mechanics are discussed, and cases are cited where quantum and classical mechanical motions are identical.

  13. Student Difficulties in Learning Quantum Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, I. D.; Crawford, K.; Fletcher, P. R.

    1998-01-01

    Reports on a preliminary project that uses a phenomenographic approach to explore the ways in which a small number of fundamental ideas are conceptualized by students who are judged to have mastered quantum mechanics material. (DDR)

  14. Quantum mechanical stabilization of Minkowski signature wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, M.

    1989-05-19

    When one attempts to construct classical wormholes in Minkowski signature Lorentzian spacetimes violations of both the weak energy hypothesis and averaged weak energy hypothesis are encountered. Since the weak energy hypothesis is experimentally known to be violated quantum mechanically, this suggests that a quantum mechanical analysis of Minkowski signature wormholes is in order. In this note I perform a minisuperspace analysis of a simple class of Minkowski signature wormholes. By solving the Wheeler-de Witt equation for pure Einstein gravity on this minisuperspace the quantum mechanical wave function of the wormhole is obtained in closed form. The wormhole is shown to be quantum mechanically stabilized with an average radius of order the Planck length. 8 refs.

  15. Uncertainty in quantum mechanics: faith or fantasy?

    PubMed

    Penrose, Roger

    2011-12-13

    The word 'uncertainty', in the context of quantum mechanics, usually evokes an impression of an essential unknowability of what might actually be going on at the quantum level of activity, as is made explicit in Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, and in the fact that the theory normally provides only probabilities for the results of quantum measurement. These issues limit our ultimate understanding of the behaviour of things, if we take quantum mechanics to represent an absolute truth. But they do not cause us to put that very 'truth' into question. This article addresses the issue of quantum 'uncertainty' from a different perspective, raising the question of whether this term might be applied to the theory itself, despite its unrefuted huge success over an enormously diverse range of observed phenomena. There are, indeed, seeming internal contradictions in the theory that lead us to infer that a total faith in it at all levels of scale leads us to almost fantastical implications. PMID:22042902

  16. On the geometrization of quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavernelli, Ivano

    2016-08-01

    Nonrelativistic quantum mechanics is commonly formulated in terms of wavefunctions (probability amplitudes) obeying the static and the time-dependent Schrödinger equations (SE). Despite the success of this representation of the quantum world a wave-particle duality concept is required to reconcile the theory with observations (experimental measurements). A first solution to this dichotomy was introduced in the de Broglie-Bohm theory according to which a pilot-wave (solution of the SE) is guiding the evolution of particle trajectories. Here, I propose a geometrization of quantum mechanics that describes the time evolution of particles as geodesic lines in a curved space, whose curvature is induced by the quantum potential. This formulation allows therefore the incorporation of all quantum effects into the geometry of space-time, as it is the case for gravitation in the general relativity.

  17. Experimental status of quaternionic quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumby, S. P.; Joshi, G. C.

    1996-05-01

    Analysis of the logical foundations of quantum mechanics indicates the possibility of constructing a theory using quaternionic Hilbert spaces. Whether this mathematical structure reflects reality is a matter for experiment to decide. We review the only direct search for quaternionic quantum mechanics yet carried out and outline a recent proposal by the present authors to look for quaternionic effects in correlated multi-particle systems. We set out how such experiments might distinguish between the several quaternionic models proposed in the literature.

  18. Thermodynamic signatures of an underlying quantum phase transition: A grand canonical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, Kevin; Reslen, Jose

    2016-08-01

    The grand canonical formalism is employed to study the thermodynamic structure of a model displaying a quantum phase transition when studied with respect to the canonical formalism. A numerical survey shows that the grand partition function diverges following a power law when the interaction parameter approaches a limiting constant. The power-law exponent takes a distinctive value when such limiting constant coincides with the critical point of the subjacent quantum phase transition. An approximated expression for the grand partition function is derived analytically implementing a mean field scheme and a number of thermodynamic observables are obtained. The system observables show signatures that can be used to track the critical point of the underlying transition. This result provides a simple fact that can be exploited to verify the existence of a quantum phase transition avoiding the zero temperature regime.

  19. Testing foundations of quantum mechanics with photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadbolt, Peter; Mathews, Jonathan C. F.; Laing, Anthony; O'Brien, Jeremy L.

    2014-04-01

    Quantum mechanics continues to predict effects at odds with a classical understanding of nature. Experiments with light at the single-photon level have historically been at the forefront of fundamental tests of quantum theory and the current developments in photonic technologies enable the exploration of new directions. Here we review recent photonic experiments to test two important themes in quantum mechanics: wave-particle duality, which is central to complementarity and delayed-choice experiments; and Bell nonlocality, where the latest theoretical and technological advances have allowed all controversial loopholes to be separately addressed in different experiments.

  20. Relativistic Quantum Mechanics and Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Franz

    1999-04-01

    An accessible, comprehensive reference to modern quantum mechanics and field theory. In surveying available books on advanced quantum mechanics and field theory, Franz Gross determined that while established books were outdated, newer titles tended to focus on recent developments and disregard the basics. Relativistic Quantum Mechanics and Field Theory fills this striking gap in the field. With a strong emphasis on applications to practical problems as well as calculations, Dr. Gross provides complete, up-to-date coverage of both elementary and advanced topics essential for a well-rounded understanding of the field. Developing the material at a level accessible even to newcomers to quantum mechanics, the book begins with topics that every physicist should know-quantization of the electromagnetic field, relativistic one body wave equations, and the theoretical explanation of atomic decay. Subsequent chapters prepare readers for advanced work, covering such major topics as gauge theories, path integral techniques, spontaneous symmetry breaking, and an introduction to QCD, chiral symmetry, and the Standard Model. A special chapter is devoted to relativistic bound state wave equations-an important topic that is often overlooked in other books. Clear and concise throughout, Relativistic Quantum Mechanics and Field Theory boasts examples from atomic and nuclear physics as well as particle physics, and includes appendices with background material. It is an essential reference for anyone working in quantum mechanics today.

  1. Lagrangian dynamics for classical, Brownian, and quantum mechanical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavon, Michele

    1996-07-01

    In the framework of Nelson's stochastic mechanics [E. Nelson, Dynamical Theories of Brownian Motion (Princeton University, Princeton, 1967); F. Guerra, Phys. Rep. 77, 263 (1981); E. Nelson, Quantum Fluctuations (Princeton University, Princeton, 1985)] we seek to develop the particle counterpart of the hydrodynamic results of M. Pavon [J. Math. Phys. 36, 6774 (1995); Phys. Lett. A 209, 143 (1995)]. In particular, a first form of Hamilton's principle is established. We show that this variational principle leads to the correct equations of motion for the classical particle, the Brownian particle in thermodynamical equilibrium, and the quantum particle. In the latter case, the critical process q satisfies a stochastic Newton law. We then introduce the momentum process p, and show that the pair (q,p) satisfies canonical-like equations.

  2. Dynamical and thermodynamical control of Open Quantum Walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petruccione, Francesco; Sinayskiy, Ilya

    2014-03-01

    Over the last few years dynamical properties and limit distributions of Open Quantum Walks (OQWs), quantum walks driven by dissipation, have been intensely studied [S. Attal et. al. J. Stat. Phys. 147, Issue 4, 832 (2012)]. For some particular cases of OQWs central limit theorems have been proven [S. Attal, N. Guillotin, C. Sabot, ``Central Limit Theorems for Open Quantum Random Walks,'' to appear in Annales Henri Poincaré]. However, only recently the connection between the rich dynamical behavior of OQWs and the corresponding microscopic system-environment models has been established. The microscopic derivation of an OQW as a reduced system dynamics on a 2-nodes graph [I. Sinayskiy, F. Petruccione, Open Syst. Inf. Dyn. 20, 1340007 (2013)] and its generalization to arbitrary graphs allow to explain the dependance of the dynamical behavior of the OQW on the temperature and coupling to the environment. For thermal environments we observe Gaussian behaviour, whereas at zero temperature population trapping and ``soliton''-like behaviour are possible. Physical realizations of OQWs in quantum optical setups will be also presented. This work is based on research supported by the South African Research Chair Initiative of the Department of Science and Technology and National Research Foundation.

  3. Conformal quantum mechanics and holographic quench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Järvelä, Jarkko; Keränen, Ville; Keski-Vakkuri, Esko

    2016-02-01

    Recently, there has been much interest in holographic computations of two-point nonequilibrium Green functions from anti-de Sitter- (AdS-)Vaidya backgrounds. In the strongly coupled quantum field theory on the boundary, the dual interpretation of the background is an equilibration process called a holographic quench. The two-dimensional AdS-Vaidya spacetime is a special case, dual to conformal quantum mechanics. We study how the quench is incorporated into a Hamiltonian H +θ (t )Δ H and into correlation functions. With the help of recent work on correlation functions in conformal quantum mechanics, we first rederive the known two-point functions, and then compute nonequilibrium three- and four-point functions. We also compute the three-point function Witten diagram in the two-dimensional AdS-Vaidya background, and find agreement with the conformal quantum mechanics result.

  4. Quantum Probability Theory and the Foundations of Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröhlich, Jürg; Schubnel, Baptiste

    By and large, people are better at coining expressions than at filling them with interesting, concrete contents. Thus, it may not be very surprising that there are many professional probabilists who may have heard the expression but do not appear to be aware of the need to develop "quantum probability theory" into a thriving, rich, useful field featured at meetings and conferences on probability theory. Although our aim, in this essay, is not to contribute new results on quantum probability theory, we hope to be able to let the reader feel the enormous potential and richness of this field. What we intend to do, in the following, is to contribute some novel points of view to the "foundations of quantum mechanics", using mathematical tools from "quantum probability theory" (such as the theory of operator algebras).

  5. A "Bit" of Quantum Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oss, Stefano; Rosi, Tommaso

    2015-01-01

    We have developed an app for iOS-based smart-phones/tablets that allows a 3-D, complex phase-based colorful visualization of hydrogen atom wave functions. Several important features of the quantum behavior of atomic orbitals can easily be made evident, thus making this app a useful companion in introductory modern physics classes. There are many…

  6. Quantum Mechanics Based Multiscale Modeling of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Gang

    2013-03-01

    We present two quantum mechanics based multiscale approaches that can simulate extended defects in metals accurately and efficiently. The first approach (QCDFT) can treat multimillion atoms effectively via density functional theory (DFT). The method is an extension of the original quasicontinuum approach with DFT as its sole energetic formulation. The second method (QM/MM) has to do with quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics coupling based on the constrained density functional theory, which provides an exact framework for a self-consistent quantum mechanical embedding. Several important materials problems will be addressed using the multiscale modeling approaches, including hydrogen-assisted cracking in Al, magnetism-controlled dislocation properties in Fe and Si pipe diffusion along Al dislocation core. We acknowledge the support from the Office of Navel Research and the Army Research Office.

  7. Optimal guidance law in quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ciann-Dong Cheng, Lieh-Lieh

    2013-11-15

    Following de Broglie’s idea of a pilot wave, this paper treats quantum mechanics as a problem of stochastic optimal guidance law design. The guidance scenario considered in the quantum world is that an electron is the flight vehicle to be guided and its accompanying pilot wave is the guidance law to be designed so as to guide the electron to a random target driven by the Wiener process, while minimizing a cost-to-go function. After solving the stochastic optimal guidance problem by differential dynamic programming, we point out that the optimal pilot wave guiding the particle’s motion is just the wavefunction Ψ(t,x), a solution to the Schrödinger equation; meanwhile, the closed-loop guidance system forms a complex state–space dynamics for Ψ(t,x), from which quantum operators emerge naturally. Quantum trajectories under the action of the optimal guidance law are solved and their statistical distribution is shown to coincide with the prediction of the probability density function Ψ{sup ∗}Ψ. -- Highlights: •Treating quantum mechanics as a pursuit-evasion game. •Reveal an interesting analogy between guided flight motion and guided quantum motion. •Solve optimal quantum guidance problem by dynamic programming. •Gives a formal proof of de Broglie–Bohm’s idea of a pilot wave. •The optimal pilot wave is shown to be a wavefunction solved from Schrödinger equation.

  8. Computations in quantum mechanics made easy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korsch, H. J.; Rapedius, K.

    2016-09-01

    Convenient and simple numerical techniques for performing quantum computations based on matrix representations of Hilbert space operators are presented and illustrated by various examples. The applications include the calculations of spectral and dynamical properties for one-dimensional and two-dimensional single-particle systems as well as bosonic many-particle and open quantum systems. Due to their technical simplicity these methods are well suited as a tool for teaching quantum mechanics to undergraduates and graduates. Explicit implementations of the presented numerical methods in Matlab are given.

  9. Hot Fluids and Nonlinear Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Swadesh M.; Asenjo, Felipe A.

    2015-05-01

    A hot relativistic fluid is viewed as a collection of quantum objects that represent interacting elementary particles. We present a conceptual framework for deriving nonlinear equations of motion obeyed by these hypothesized objects. A uniform phenomenological prescription, to affect the quantum transition from a corresponding classical system, is invoked to derive the nonlinear Schrödinger, Klein-Gordon, and Pauli-Schrödinger and Feynman-GellMaan equations. It is expected that the emergent hypothetical nonlinear quantum mechanics would advance, in a fundamental way, both the conceptual understanding and computational abilities, particularly, in the field of extremely high energy-density physics.

  10. Quantum Mechanics, Spacetime Locality, and Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Yasunori

    2013-08-01

    Quantum mechanics introduces the concept of probability at the fundamental level, yielding the measurement problem. On the other hand, recent progress in cosmology has led to the "multiverse" picture, in which our observed universe is only one of the many, bringing an apparent arbitrariness in defining probabilities, called the measure problem. In this paper, we discuss how these two problems are related with each other, developing a picture for quantum measurement and cosmological histories in the quantum mechanical universe. In order to describe the cosmological dynamics correctly within the full quantum mechanical context, we need to identify the structure of the Hilbert space for a system with gravity. We argue that in order to keep spacetime locality, the Hilbert space for dynamical spacetime must be defined only in restricted spacetime regions: in and on the (stretched) apparent horizon as viewed from a fixed reference frame. This requirement arises from eliminating all the redundancies and overcountings in a general relativistic, global spacetime description of nature. It is responsible for horizon complementarity as well as the "observer dependence" of horizons/spacetime—these phenomena arise to represent changes of the reference frame in the relevant Hilbert space. This can be viewed as an extension of the Poincaré transformation in the quantum gravitational context. Given an initial condition, the evolution of the multiverse state obeys the laws of quantum mechanics—it evolves deterministically and unitarily. The beginning of the multiverse, however, is still an open issue.