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Sample records for thermoplastic puncture-healing polymers

  1. Recent Advances in Thermoplastic Puncture-Healing Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, K. L.; Working, D. C.; Wise, K. E.; Bogert, P. B.; Britton, S. M.; Topping, C.C.; Smith, J. Y.; Siochi, E. J.

    2009-01-01

    Self-healing materials provide a route for enhanced damage tolerance in materials for aerospace applications. In particular, puncture-healing upon impact has the potential to mitigate significant damage caused by high velocity micrometeoroid impacts. This type of material also has the potential to improve damage tolerance in load bearing structures to enhance vehicle health and aircraft durability. The materials being studied are those capable of instantaneous puncture healing, providing a mechanism for mechanical property retention in lightweight structures. These systems have demonstrated healing capability following penetration of fast moving projectiles -- velocities that range from 9 mm bullets shot from a gun (approx.330 m/sec) to close to micrometeoroid debris velocities of 4800 m/sec. In this presentation, we report on a suite of polymeric materials possessing this characteristic. Figure 1 illustrates the puncture healing concept. Puncture healing in these materials is dependent upon how the combination of a polymer's viscoelastic properties responds to the energy input resulting from the puncture event. Projectile penetration increases the temperature in the vicinity of the impact. Self-healing behavior occurs following puncture, whereby energy must be transferred to the material during impact both elastically and inelastically, thus establishing two requirements for puncture healing to occur: a.) The need for the puncture event to produce a local melt state in the polymer material and b.) The molten material has to have sufficient melt elasticity to snap back and close the hole. 1,2 Previous ballistic testing studies revealed that Surlyn materials warmed up to a temperature approx.98 C during projectile puncture (3 C higher than it s melting temperature). 1,2 The temperature increase produces a localized flow state and the melt elasticity to snap back thus sealing the hole. Table 1 lists the commercially polymers studied here, together with their physical properties. The polymers were selected based on chemical structure, tensile strengths, tensile moduli, glass transition temperature, melting temperatures, and impact strength. The thermal properties of the polymers were characterized by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA). Mechanical properties were assessed by a Sintech 2W instron according to ASTM D1708 or D638 at crosshead speeds of 5.08 cm/min. 7.6 cm x 7.6 cm panels of the different materials were prepared and ballistic testing was performed at various temperatures. The panels were shot with a .223 caliber semiautomatic rifle from a distance of 23 meters at various temperatures. Chronographs were used to measure initial and final bullet velocity. Temperatures at the site of impact were measured using a FLIR ThermaCAM S60 thermal camera. A Vision Research model Phantom 9 high speed video camera was used to capture high speed video footage of ballistics testing.

  2. Recent Advances in Thermoplastic Puncture-Healing Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogert, Philip B.; Working, Dennis C.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Smith, Janice Y.; Topping, Crystal C.; Britton, Sean M.; Bagby, Paul R.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2010-01-01

    The motivation for this work is to develop self-healing polymeric materials to enable damage tolerant systems, and to tailor puncture healing for use temperatures and applications. This will be a benefit in environments and conditions where access for manual repair is limited or impossible, or where damage may not be detected.

  3. Puncture-Healing Thermoplastic Resin Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Keith L. (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Grimsley, Brian W. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Czabaj, Michael W. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A composite comprising a combination of a self-healing polymer matrix and a carbon fiber reinforcement is described. In one embodiment, the matrix is a polybutadiene graft copolymer matrix, such as polybutadiene graft copolymer comprising poly(butadiene)-graft-poly(methyl acrylate-co-acrylonitrile). A method of fabricating the composite is also described, comprising the steps of manufacturing a pre-impregnated unidirectional carbon fiber preform by wetting a plurality of carbon fibers with a solution, the solution comprising a self-healing polymer and a solvent, and curing the preform. A method of repairing a structure made from the composite of the invention is described. A novel prepreg material used to manufacture the composite of the invention is described.

  4. Bonding thermoplastic polymers

    DOEpatents

    Wallow, Thomas I. (Fremont, CA); Hunter, Marion C. (Livermore, CA); Krafcik, Karen Lee (Livermore, CA); Morales, Alfredo M. (Livermore, CA); Simmons, Blake A. (San Francisco, CA); Domeier, Linda A. (Danville, CA)

    2008-06-24

    We demonstrate a new method for joining patterned thermoplastic parts into layered structures. The method takes advantage of case-II permeant diffusion to generate dimensionally controlled, activated bonding layers at the surfaces being joined. It is capable of producing bonds characterized by cohesive failure while preserving the fidelity of patterned features in the bonding surfaces. This approach is uniquely suited to production of microfluidic multilayer structures, as it allows the bond-forming interface between plastic parts to be precisely manipulated at micrometer length scales. The bond enhancing procedure is easily integrated in standard process flows and requires no specialized equipment.

  5. Diamond turning of thermoplastic polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, E.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    Single point diamond turning studies were made using a series of thermoplastic polymers with different glass transition temperatures. Variations in surface morphology and surface roughness were observed as a function of cutting speed. Lower glass transition temperatures facilitate smoother surface cuts and better surface finish. This can be attributed to the frictional heating that occurs during machining. Because of the very low glass transition temperatures in polymeric compared to inorganic glasses, the precision machining response can be very speed sensitive.

  6. Tough, High-Performance, Thermoplastic Addition Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, Ruth H.; Proctor, K. Mason; Gleason, John; Morgan, Cassandra; Partos, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Series of addition-type thermoplastics (ATT's) exhibit useful properties. Because of their addition curing and linear structure, ATT polymers have toughness, like thermoplastics, and easily processed, like thermosets. Work undertaken to develop chemical reaction forming stable aromatic rings in backbone of ATT polymer, combining high-temperature performance and thermo-oxidative stability with toughness and easy processibility, and minimizing or eliminating necessity for tradeoffs among properties often observed in conventional polymer syntheses.

  7. Dynamically cured thermoplastic olefin polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Hazelton, D.R.; Puydak, R.C.; Booth, D.A.

    1986-08-19

    A thermoplastic composition is described comprising a polyolefin resin, a first rubber component selected from the group consisting of polyisobutylene, and ethylene propylene copolymer (EPM) and EPDM and a second rubber component selected from the group consisting of halogenated butyl rubber and polychoroprene, the second rubber component being cured utilizing a curative other than a peroxide, which is a vulcanizing agent for the second rubber but not for the first rubber, the second rubber being cured to a fully vulcanized state by dynamic vulcanization in the presence of the polyolefin resin and first rubber compound.

  8. Predicting Wear From Mechanical Properties of Thermoplastic Polymers

    E-print Network

    North Texas, University of

    Predicting Wear From Mechanical Properties of Thermoplastic Polymers Witold Brostow,1,2 Haley E Texas, Denton, Texas 76203-5310 The wear of polymer-based materials is connected to their brittleness to visco- elastic recovery (healing) after sliding wear. Our model fits a selection of ten thermoplastics

  9. Improved adhesion for thermoplastic polymers using oxyfluorination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achereiner, F.; Münstedt, H.; Zeiler, T.

    2008-03-01

    Industrial applications of thermoplastic polymers are often limited by their poor adhesion properties. In this work the effect of surface oxyfluorination on the adhesion properties was investigated for polyethylene (PE), polyoxymethylene (POM), polybutylene terephthalate (PBT) and polyamide 6 (PA6). The adhesive joint strength was quantified using lap-shear tests. These results were correlated with the changes in the chemical composition of the surface, determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), in the surface free energy, measured by the contact angle method, and in the topography, using white-light confocal microscopy. The adhesive strength is strongly improved for all four polymers, but the degree of this increase depends on the polymer type. The surface free energy shows a similar trend for all four polymers. A high surface free energy exceeding 50 mN/m was observed after oxy-fluorination, whereby the polar component was strongly predominant. Surface topography measurements show no significant increase of the surface roughness. So the effect of oxyfluorination results primarily in increased wettability and polarity, due to changes of the chemical composition of the surface. XPS measurements confirm the integration of fluorine and oxygen groups in the polymer chain, which correlates with the increased polarity.

  10. Microscale patterning of thermoplastic polymer surfaces by selective solvent swelling.

    PubMed

    Rahmanian, Omid; Chen, Chien-Fu; DeVoe, Don L

    2012-09-01

    A new method for the fabrication of microscale features in thermoplastic substrates is presented. Unlike traditional thermoplastic microfabrication techniques, in which bulk polymer is displaced from the substrate by machining or embossing, a unique process termed orogenic microfabrication has been developed in which selected regions of a thermoplastic surface are raised from the substrate by an irreversible solvent swelling mechanism. The orogenic technique allows thermoplastic surfaces to be patterned using a variety of masking methods, resulting in three-dimensional features that would be difficult to achieve through traditional microfabrication methods. Using cyclic olefin copolymer as a model thermoplastic material, several variations of this process are described to realize growth heights ranging from several nanometers to tens of micrometers, with patterning techniques include direct photoresist masking, patterned UV/ozone surface passivation, elastomeric stamping, and noncontact spotting. Orogenic microfabrication is also demonstrated by direct inkjet printing as a facile photolithography-free masking method for rapid desktop thermoplastic microfabrication. PMID:22900539

  11. Novel polymer blends with thermoplastic starch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghizadeh, Ata

    A new class of polymers known as "bioplastics" has emerged and is expanding rapidly. This class consists of polymers that are either bio-based or biodegradable, or both. Among these, polysaccharides, namely starch, are of great interest for several reasons. By gelatinizing starch via plasticizers, it can be processed in the same way as thermoplastic polymers with conventional processing equipment. Hence, these bio-based and biodegradable plastics, with their low source and refinery costs, as well as relatively easy processability, have made them ideal candidates for incorporation into various current plastic products. Four different plasticizers have been chosen here for gelatinization of thermoplastic starch (TPS): glycerol, sorbitol, diglycerol and polyglycerol, with the latter two being used for the first time in such a process. Two methodological categories are used. The first involves a calorimetric method (Differential Scanning Calorimetry) as well as optical microscopy; these are "static" methods where no shear is applied A wide range of starch/water/plasticizer compositions were prepared to explore the gelatinization regime for each plasticizer. The onset and conclusion gelatinization temperatures for sorbitol and glycerol were found to be in the same vicinity, while diglycerol and polyglycerol showed significantly higher transition temperatures. The higher molecular weight and viscosity of polyglycerol allow this transition to occur at an even higher temperature than with diglycerol. This is due to the increase in molecular weight and viscosity of the two new plasticizers, as well as their significant decrease in water solubility. It is demonstrated that the water/plasticizer ratio has a pronounced effect on gelatinization temperatures. When plasticizer content was held constant and water content was increased, it was found that the gelatinization temperature decreased for all the plasticizers. Meanwhile, when the water content was held constant and the plasticizer content was increased, the gelatinization temperature increased for glycerol, sorbitol and diglycerol, but it moved in the opposite direction in the case of polyglycerol. The gelatinization temperature variation for glycerol, sorbitol and diglycerol caused by changing water and plasticizer content indicates that water is the primary agent causing granular swell and plasticization in the gelatinization process. Due to the high molecular weight and viscosity, as well as the low hydroxyl group density (~ one --OH per two carbon) and borderline solubility of polyglycerol in water, it is believed that water-aided penetration of the plasticizer among the crystalline structure of starch molecules is significantly decelerated. So it is proposed that in the case of low-water solubility of the plasticizers, gelatinization temperature is determined more by the total amount of the plasticizer and water, rather than the water/plasticizer ratio. Increasing the miscibility of polyglycerol in water by increasing the temperature of the initial slurry, results in a return of the system to the typical thermal dependence of gelatinization with plasticizer/water ratio. Secondly, the gelatinization of starch under "dynamic conditions" was studied. In this case, a constant shear is applied to the slurry, along with a temperature ramp to induce gelatinization. This is, in fact, a rheological technique that heats up the slurry, while a mechanical shear is applied throughout. The reason for using this method is that in the plastic industry, thermoplastic starch is produced via processes involving shear such as extrusion, but, to date, there has not yet been a thorough study on the effect of pure shear on the gelatinization process. Glycerol, diglycerol and sorbitol were subjected to different dynamic gelatinization treatments in a couette flow system, and the results were compared with static gelatinization. Applying shear showed virtually no effect on the onset gelatinization temperature. However, the conclusion temperature was remarkably reduced

  12. Thermodynamics of deformation for thermoplastic polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, G.W.

    1987-01-01

    The post-yielding behavior of some common thermoplastics was examined in uniaxial tension to determine if these materials were ideally plastic from a thermodynamic viewpoint. Various polyethylenes, poly(methyl methacrylate) and polycarbonate, polyarylate and polysulfone based on bisphenol A were studied. Thermodynamic measurements were made during deformation using a novel isothermal deformation calorimeter capable of measuring the work and heat of deformation. Thermodynamically ideal plasticity was not observed for any of the polymers examined. The polyethylenes stored approximately 30% of the input work as a latent internal energy change while this value was 40-50% for the amorphous glasses. Differential-scanning-calorimetry results for the deformed polyethylenes indicated that the heats of transition were less for the drawn samples than for the isotropic samples. This result was primarily due to the stored deformation energy and was not necessarily indicative of a change in crystallinity. Additional experiments were performed to determine the mechanism of deformation energy storage and to ascertain the implications of this stored energy in engineering applications.

  13. Effects of Surface Plasma Treatment on Tribology of Thermoplastic Polymers

    E-print Network

    North Texas, University of

    Effects of Surface Plasma Treatment on Tribology of Thermoplastic Polymers Alexander Bismarck,1 Engineering and Chemical Technology, Imperial College London, London SW7, UK 2 Laboratory of Advanced Polymers and Optimized Materials (LAPOM), Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Department of Physics

  14. Photoinitiated grafting of porous polymer monoliths and thermoplastic polymers for microfluidic devices

    DOEpatents

    Frechet, Jean M. J. (Oakland, CA); Svec, Frantisek (Alameda, CA); Rohr, Thomas (Leiden, NL)

    2008-10-07

    A microfluidic device preferably made of a thermoplastic polymer that includes a channel or a multiplicity of channels whose surfaces are modified by photografting. The device further includes a porous polymer monolith prepared via UV initiated polymerization within the channel, and functionalization of the pore surface of the monolith using photografting. Processes for making such surface modifications of thermoplastic polymers and porous polymer monoliths are set forth.

  15. Puncture-Healing Properties of Carbon Nanotube-Filled Ionomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, Thomas C.

    2003-01-01

    Ionomers are polymers that contain ionic groups in relatively low concentrations along the polymer backbone. These ionic groups, in the presence of oppositely charged ions, form aggregates that lead to novel physical properties of the polymer. React-A-Seal(trademark) and Surlyn(trademark) are poly(ethylene-co-methacrylic acid) (EMAA) ionomer-based materials and Nucrel(trademark) is the EMAA acid copolymer neutralized to produce Surlyn(trademark). React-A-Seal(trademark), Surlyn(trademark), and Nucrel(trademark) recover into their original shapes following a high impact puncture at velocities ranging from 300 to 1200 ft/s ('self-healing'). This self-healing process may be of great benefit in space applications where structures are exposed to matter impacts. A thermal IR camera indicated a temperature increase to 98 C for Nucrel(trademark) 925, Surlyn(trademark) 8940, React-A-Seal(trademark), and Surlyn(trademark) 8920 after initial penetration. To understand and generalize the observed phenomena, questions concerning the mechanism of the puncture resealing must be answered. One suggestion is that the elastic character of the melt created by the puncture drives the self-healing. This inference is based on the observed temperature rise of approx. 3 C above the melting temperature of the samples (approx. 95 C) during the impact. With the expectation of gaining additional insight into the self-healing phenomenon, a thermodynamic and viscoelastic investigation was conducted using primarily DSC and DMA. Surlyn(trademark) and React-A-Seal(trademark) showed the characteristic order-disorder transition at approx. 52 C that has been reported in literature. Master curves were constructed from the creep isotherms for the four EMAA samples. An aging study was performed to investigate the irreproducibility and "tailing effect" observed in the creep data. The aging study indicated that, with increased aging time and temperature, changes in the polyethylene matrix lead to complexities in morphology resulting in changes in the magnitude and shape of the creep curves.

  16. Mechanical properties of a new thermoplastic polymer orthodontic archwire.

    PubMed

    Varela, Juan Carlos; Velo, Marcos; Espinar, Eduardo; Llamas, Jose Maria; Rúperez, Elisa; Manero, Jose Maria; Javier Gil, F

    2014-09-01

    A new thermoplastic polymer for orthodontic applications was obtained and extruded into wires with round and rectangular cross sections. We evaluated the potential of new aesthetic archwire: tensile, three point bending, friction and stress relaxation behaviour, and formability characteristics were assessed. Stresses delivered were generally slightly lower than typical beta-titanium and nickel-titanium archwires. The polymer wire has good instantaneous mechanical properties; tensile stress decayed about 2% over 2h depending on the initial stress relaxation for up to 120h. High formability allowed shape bending similar to that associated with stainless steel wires. The friction coefficients were lower than the metallic conventional archwires improving the slipping with the brackets. This new polymer could be a good candidate for aesthetic orthodontic archwires. PMID:25063084

  17. Biodegradable polymer blends based on corn starch and thermoplastic chitosan processed by extrusion.

    PubMed

    Mendes, J F; Paschoalin, R T; Carmona, V B; Sena Neto, Alfredo R; Marques, A C P; Marconcini, J M; Mattoso, L H C; Medeiros, E S; Oliveira, J E

    2016-02-10

    Blends of thermoplastic cornstarch (TPS) and chitosan (TPC) were obtained by melt extrusion. The effect of TPC incorporation in TPS matrix and polymer interaction on morphology and thermal and mechanical properties were investigated. Possible interactions between the starch molecules and thermoplastic chitosan were assessed by XRD and FTIR techniques. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analyses showed a homogeneous fracture surface without the presence of starch granules or chitosan aggregates. Although the incorporation of thermoplastic chitosan caused a decrease in both tensile strength and stiffness, films with better extensibility and thermal stability were produced. PMID:26686150

  18. Review of potential processing techniques for the encapsulation of wastes in thermoplastic polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, B.R.; Lageraaen, P.R.; Kalb, P.D.

    1995-08-01

    Thermoplastic encapsulation has been extensively studied at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s (BNL) Environmental and Waste Technology Center (EWTC) as a waste encapsulation technology applicable to a wide range of waste types including radioactive, hazardous and mixed wastes. Encapsulation involves processing thermoplastic and waste materials into a waste form product by heating and mixing both materials into a homogeneous molten mixture. Cooling of the melt results in a solid monolithic waste form in which contaminants have been completely surrounded by a polymer matrix. Heating and mixing requirements for successful waste encapsulation can be met using proven technologies available in various types of commercial equipment. Processing techniques for thermoplastic materials, such as low density polyethylene (LDPE), are well established within the plastics industry. The majority of commercial polymer processing is accomplished using extruders, mixers or a combination of these technologies. Extruders and mixers are available in a broad range of designs and are used during the manufacture of consumer and commercial products as well as for compounding applications. Compounding which refers to mixing additives such as stabilizers and/or colorants with polymers, is analogous to thermoplastic encapsulation. Several processing technologies were investigated for their potential application in encapsulating residual sorbent waste in selected thermoplastic polymers, including single-screw extruders, twin-screw extruders, continuous mixers, batch mixers as well as other less conventional devices. Each was evaluated based on operational ease, quality control, waste handling capabilities as well as degree of waste pretreatment required. Based on literature review, this report provides a description of polymer processing technologies, a discussion of the merits and limitations of each and an evaluation of their applicability to the encapsulation of sorbent wastes.

  19. Thermodynamics of water sorption in high performance glassy thermoplastic polymers

    PubMed Central

    Scherillo, Giuseppe; Petretta, Mauro; Galizia, Michele; La Manna, Pietro; Musto, Pellegrino; Mensitieri, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Sorption thermodynamics of water in two glassy polymers, polyetherimide (PEI) and polyetheretherketone (PEEK), is investigated by coupling gravimetry and on line FTIR spectroscopy in order to gather information on the total amount of sorbed water as well as on the different species of water molecules absorbed within the polymers, addressing the issue of cross- and self-interactions occurring in the polymer/water systems. Water sorption isotherms have been determined at temperatures ranging from 30 to 70°C while FTIR spectroscopy has been performed only at 30°C. The experimental analysis provided information on the groups present on the polymer backbones involved in hydrogen bonding interactions with absorbed water molecules. Moreover, it also supplied qualitative indications about the different “populations” of water molecules present within the PEEK and a quantitative assessment of these “populations” in the case of PEI. The results of the experimental analysis have been interpreted using an equation of state theory based on a compressible lattice fluid model for the Gibbs energy of the polymer-water mixture, developed by extending to the case of out of equilibrium glassy polymers a previous model intended for equilibrium rubbery polymers. The model accounts for the non-equilibrium nature of glassy polymers as well as for mean field and for hydrogen bonding interactions, providing a satisfactory quantitative interpretation of the experimental data. PMID:24860802

  20. Thermodynamics of Water Sorption in High Performance Glassy Thermoplastic Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mensitieri, Giuseppe; Scherillo, Giuseppe; Petretta, Mauro; Galizia, Michele; La Manna, Pietro; Musto, Pellegrino

    2014-05-01

    Sorption thermodynamics of water in two glassy polymers, polyetherimide (PEI) and polyetheretherketone (PEEK), is investigated by coupling gravimetry and on line FTIR spectroscopy in order to gather information on the total amount of sorbed water as well as on the different species of water molecules absorbed within the polymers, addressing the issue of cross- and self-interactions occurring in the polymer/water systems. Water sorption isotherms have been determined at temperatures ranging fro 30 to 70°C while FTIR spectroscopy has been performed only at 30°C. The experimental analysis provided information on the groups present on the polymer backbones involved in hydrogen bonding interactions with absorbed water molecules. Moreover, it also supplied qualitative indications about the different’populations’ of water molecules present within the PEEK and a quantitative assessment of these ‘populations’ in the case of PEI.The results of the experimental analysis have been interpreted using an equation of state theory based on a compressible lattice fluid model for the Gibbs energy of the polymer-water mixture, developed by extending to the case of out of equilibrium glassy polymers a previous model intended for equilibrium rubbery polymers. The model accounts for the non equilibrium nature of glassy poymers as well as for mean field and for hydrogen bonding interactions, providing a satisfactory quantitative interpretation of the experimental data.

  1. Turning Renewable Resources into Recyclable Polymer: Development of Lignin-Based Thermoplastic

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Tomonori; Brown, Rebecca H; Hunt, Marcus A; Pickel, Deanna L; Pickel, Joseph M; Messman, Jamie M; Baker, Frederick S; Keller, Martin; Naskar, Amit K

    2012-01-01

    Productive uses of lignin, the third most abundant natural polymer, have been sought for decades. One especially attractive possibility is that of developing value-added products including thermoplastics based on lignin. This possibility warrants special attention due to growth of the modern biofuel industries. However, the polydisperse molecular weight and hyper-branched structure of lignin has hindered the creation of high-performance biopolymers. Here, we report the preparation and characterization of novel lignin-based, partially carbon-neutral thermoplastics. We first altered the molecular weight of lignin, either by fractionation with methanol, or by formaldehyde crosslinking. A crosslinking of lignin increases the molecular weight, exhibiting Mn = 31000 g/mol, whereas that of native lignin is 1840 g/mol. Tuning the molecular weight of lignin enabled successful preparation of novel lignin-derived thermoplastics, when coupled with telechelic polybutadiene soft-segments at proper feed ratios. Characteristic to thermoplastic rubbers, free-standing films of the resulting copolymers exhibit two-phase morphology and associated relaxations in the dynamic mechanical loss spectrum. To our knowledge this article is the first report to demonstrate phase immiscibility, melt-processibility, and biphasic morphology of soft and hard segments in a lignin-based copolymer for all feed ratios of two macromolecular components. The use of higher molecular weight lignin enhanced the resulting shear modulus due to efficient network formation of telechelic polybutadiene bridges. The storage modulus in the rubbery plateau region increased with increasing lignin content. The successful synthesis of novel lignin-based thermoplastics will open a new pathway to biomass utilization and will help conserve petrochemicals.

  2. Photocleavable junctions in complex polymer architectures and photoetchable thermoplastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterner, Elizabeth Surles

    Polymer materials have become important tools in nanomanufacturing due to their facile processing and ready attainment of the necessary feature sizes. The development of cleavable junctions has led to advances in the production of polymer nanotemplates. Photocleavage strategies have come to the forefront of the field because photons, as a cleavage stimulus, do not have the mass-transport limitations of chemical methods, and provide for targeted two- and three-dimensional feature control. This dissertation presents a method for producing photocleavable materials by one-pot copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne "click" chemistry (CuAAC), activator regenerated by electron transfer atom transfer radical polymerization (ARGET ATRP) and activated ester substitution methods that have each block labeled with a fluorescent dye, enabling exploration of the polymer physics of these systems by correlation fluorescence spectroscopy. It also introduces a novel photocleavable linker, the o-nitrobenzyl-1,2,3-triazole, its behavior on photocleavage, and a facile method for the production of the o-nitrobenzyl azides necessary for their synthesis. The synthesis and properties of a bulk photodegradable polytriazole are reported, as are proof of concept experiments demonstrating its potential as a directly photoetchable material. Lastly, this dissertation contains a perspective on possible avenues of new research on the topics presented.

  3. Adhesion between thermoplastic polymer particles and carbon and glass fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Colton, J.S.

    1996-12-31

    High performance composites consist of polymer matrices reinforced with continuous fibers. Polymer powders can be coated and fused onto the fibers by various techniques to produce these composites. One such technique consists of spreading the fibers with an air banding jet, and then running the fibers through a fluidized bed of the powder. The fluidizing air is typically charged, imparting a charge to the powder particles. The fibers are grounded which leads to an attraction between the particles and the fibers. The particle-coated fibers then go through a tunnel oven, sintering the particles onto the fibers, leaving a flexible {open_quotes}tow-preg{close_quotes} which can then be processed into a preform for manufacture into a final part. To develop an initial understanding of the powder coating process, the adhesion of uncharged particles and fibers was studied. Contact mechanics predicts that the adhesion force between uncharged particles depends on the mutual (or equivalent) radius of curvature between the contacting objects, as well as their surface energies. For the materials of interest, the Derjaguin approximation is appropriate and is applied. PEEK (poly ether ether ketone) and PET (poly ethylene terephthalate) particles, cryogenically ground to nominal diameters of 10 to 100 {mu}m were brought into contact with themselves, with E-glass fibers (nominal diameter of 20 {mu}m), carbon fibers (nominal diameter of 8 {mu}m), and glass microscope slides using an AFM. Adhesion forces were measured and compared to predictions using Derjaguin`s approximation. SEM micrographs were used to determine the scale of the radii of curvature of contacting sites.

  4. Selecting and designing with the right thermoplastic polymer for your microfluidic chip: a close look into cyclo-olefin polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevitt, Mark

    2013-03-01

    Engineers who are developing microfluidic devices and bioMEMs for life science applications have many aspects to consider when selecting the proper base materials for constructing a device. While glass and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) are the staple materials for proof-of-concept and prototype chip fabrication, they are not a feasible solution for commercial production due to their slow, labor-intensive production rate. Alternatively, a molded or extruded thermoplastic solution can deliver the precision, consistency, and high volume capability required for commercial scale production. Traditional thermoplastics, such as polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), polycarbonate (PC), and polystyrene (PS), are well known by development engineers in the bioscience community; however, cyclo-olefin polymer (COP), a relative newcomer in the world of plastics, is gaining increasing attention for use in microfluidic devices due to its unique balance of key properties compared to conventional thermoplastics. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive look at the properties which make COP an excellent candidate for providing the flow cell support and reagent storage functions in microfluidic assays. We also explore the processing attributes and capabilities of COP resin and film which are crucial for manufacturing high-performance microfluidic devices.

  5. Modeling morphology evolution during injection molding of thermoplastic polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantani, R.; De Santis, F.; Speranza, V.; Titomanlio, G.

    2015-05-01

    The effect of temperature, pressure and flow on relaxation time (or spectrum), crystallization time, nucleation density and rate, spherulite growth rate, the interrelation among these quantities and the distributions of deformation rate and cooling time during the process all together determine the morphology distribution in the final object. A simple model linking all these quantities was developed to describe morphology evolution during polymer processing. The effect of flow on nucleation density and growth rate of an isotactic polypropylene (iPP) is described on the basis of a molecular stretch parameter and the stretch evolution is described by a simple nonlinear Maxwell model, whose relaxation time, in its turn, is determined by the molecular stretch and, obviously, temperature pressure and crystallinity [1]. The model is applied to the description of morphology evolution during the injection molding process of a very accurately characterized iPP as far as rheology, quiescent crystallization and effect of flow on nucleation and spherulitic growth rates. Main characteristics of final morphology are reproduced by the simulations.

  6. Universal hydrophilic coating of thermoplastic polymers currently used in microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Zilio, Caterina; Sola, Laura; Damin, Francesco; Faggioni, Lucia; Chiari, Marcella

    2014-02-01

    A number of materials used to fabricate disposable microfluidic devices are hydrophobic in nature with water contact angles on their surface ranging from 80° to over 100°. This characteristic makes them unsuitable for a number of microfluidic applications. Both the wettability and analyte adsorption parameters are highly dependent on the surface hydrophobicity. In this article, we propose a general method to coat the surface of five materials: polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), cyclic olefin copolymer (COC), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polycarbonate (PC), and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). This fast and robust process, which is easily implementable in any laboratory including microfabrication clean room facilities, was devised by combining gas-phase and wet chemical modification processes. Two different coatings that improve the surface hydrophilicity were prepared via the "dip and rinse" approach by immersing the plasma oxidized materials into an aqueous solution of two different poly(dimethylacrylamide) copolymers incorporating a silane moiety and functionalized with either N-acryloyloxysuccinimide (NAS) (poly(DMA-NAS-MAPS) or glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) (poly(DMA-GMA-MAPS). The coating formation was confirmed by contact angle (CA) analysis comparing the variation of CAs of uncoated and coated surfaces subjected to different aging treatments. The antifouling character of the polymer was demonstrated by fluorescence and interferometric detection of proteins adsorbed on the surafce. This method is of great interest in microfluidics due to its broad applicability to a number of materials with varying chemical compositions. PMID:24037663

  7. The influence of recycled material on the crystallization kinetics of semi-crystalline thermoplastic polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Janoschek, J.; Kaisersbergen, E.; Knappe, S.; Opfermann, J.

    1993-12-31

    The injection moulding of semi-crystalline thermoplastic polymers requires an exact knowledge of the thermodynamic data and of the crystallization kinetics. The behavior of the polymer melt during rapid cooling in the mould determines, to a great extent, the quality and usability of a final product. Technical raw materials are often equipped with nucleating agents in order to obtained crystallization within the desired temperature range at the required rate. The use of recycled material (regranulate) shows an analogous effect such as the addition of nucleating agents, i.e. crystallization begins at a higher temperature and a higher crystallization rate is detected compared to materials without added regranulate. Heat flux DSC was used to study the crystallization of polyamides, polyolefins and polyoxymethylene during cooling at various cooling rates. Although the temperature gradient and pressures which occur in the processing machine cannot be realized in DSC tests, the DSC results reproduce the direction of influence of the regranulate additive very clearly.

  8. Initiation of shape-memory effect by inductive heating of magnetic nanoparticles in thermoplastic polymers

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, R.; Kratz, K.; Weigel, T.; Lucka-Gabor, M.; Moneke, M.; Lendlein, A.

    2006-01-01

    In shape-memory polymers, changes in shape are mostly induced by heating, and exceeding a specific switching temperature, Tswitch. If polymers cannot be warmed up by heat transfer using a hot liquid or gaseous medium, noncontact triggering will be required. In this article, the magnetically induced shape-memory effect of composites from magnetic nanoparticles and thermoplastic shape-memory polymers is introduced. A polyetherurethane (TFX) and a biodegradable multiblock copolymer (PDC) with poly(p-dioxanone) as hard segment and poly(?-caprolactone) as soft segment were investigated as matrix component. Nanoparticles consisting of an iron(III)oxide core in a silica matrix could be processed into both polymers. A homogeneous particle distribution in TFX could be shown. Compounds have suitable elastic and thermal properties for the shape-memory functionalization. Temporary shapes of TFX compounds were obtained by elongating at increased temperature and subsequent cooling under constant stress. Cold-drawing of PDC compounds at 25°C resulted in temporary fixation of the mechanical deformation by 50–60%. The shape-memory effect of both composite systems could be induced by inductive heating in an alternating magnetic field (f = 258 kHz; H = 30 kA·m?1). The maximum temperatures achievable by inductive heating in a specific magnetic field depend on sample geometry and nanoparticle content. Shape recovery rates of composites resulting from magnetic triggering are comparable to those obtained by increasing the environmental temperature. PMID:16537442

  9. Study of Double-Side Ultrasonic Embossing for Fabrication of Microstructures on Thermoplastic Polymer Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yi; Yan, Xu; Qi, Na; Wang, Xiaodong; Wang, Liangjiang

    2013-01-01

    Double-side replication of polymer substrates is beneficial to the design and the fabrication of 3-demensional devices. The ultrasonic embossing method is a promising, high efficiency and low cost replication method for thermoplastic substrates. It is convenient to apply silicon molds in ultrasonic embossing, because microstructures can be easily fabricated on silicon wafers with etching techniques. To reduce the risk of damaging to silicon molds and to improve the replication uniformity on both sides of the polymer substrates, thermal assisted ultrasonic embossing method was proposed and tested. The processing parameters for the replication of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), including ultrasonic amplitude, ultrasonic force, ultrasonic time, and thermal assisted temperature were studied using orthogonal array experiments. The influences of the substrate thickness, pattern style and density were also investigated. The experiment results show that the principal parameters for the upper and lower surface replication are ultrasonic amplitude and thermal assisted temperature, respectively. As to the replication uniformity on both sides, the ultrasonic force has the maximal influence. Using the optimized parameters, the replication rate reached 97.5% on both sides of the PMMA substrate, and the cycle time was less than 50 s. PMID:23630605

  10. Hemocompatibility of Inorganic Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) Coatings on Thermoplastic Polyurethane Polymers.

    PubMed

    Lackner, Juergen M; Waldhauser, Wolfgang; Hartmann, Paul; Bruckert, Franz; Weidenhaupt, Marianne; Major, Roman; Sanak, Marek; Wiesinger, Martin; Heim, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Biocompatibility improvements for blood contacting materials are of increasing interest for implanted devices and interventional tools. The current study focuses on inorganic (titanium, titanium nitride, titanium oxide) as well as diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating materials on polymer surfaces (thermoplastic polyurethane), deposited by magnetron sputtering und pulsed laser deposition at room temperature. DLC was used pure (a-C:H) as well as doped with silicon, titanium, and nitrogen + titanium (a-C:H:Si, a-C:H:Ti, a-C:H:N:Ti). In-vitro testing of the hemocompatibility requires mandatory dynamic test conditions to simulate in-vivo conditions, e.g., realized by a cone-and-plate analyzer. In such tests, titanium- and nitrogen-doped DLC and titanium nitride were found to be optimally anti-thrombotic and better than state-of-the-art polyurethane polymers. This is mainly due to the low tendency to platelet microparticle formation, a high content of remaining platelets in the whole blood after testing and low concentration of platelet activation and aggregation markers. Comparing this result to shear-flow induced cell motility tests with e.g., Dictostelium discoideum cell model organism reveals similar tendencies for the investigated materials. PMID:24955532

  11. Thermal properties of thermoplastic starch/synthetic polymer blends with potential biomedical applicability.

    PubMed

    Mano, J F; Koniarova, D; Reis, R L

    2003-02-01

    Previous studies shown that thermoplastic blends of corn starch with some biodegradable synthetic polymers (poly(epsilon-caprolactone), cellulose acetate, poly(lactic acid) and ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer) have good potential to be used in a series of biomedical applications. In this work the thermal behavior of these structurally complex materials is investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). In addition, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to investigate the chemical interactions between the different components. The endothermic gelatinization process (or water evaporation) observed by DSC in starch is also observed in the blends. Special attention was paid to the structural relaxation that can occur in the blends with poly(lactic acid) at body temperature that may change the physical properties of the material during its application as a biomaterial. At least three degradation mechanisms were identified in the blends by means of using TGA, being assigned to the mass loss due to the plasticizer leaching, and to the degradation of the starch and the synthetic polymer fractions. The non-isothermal kinetics of the decomposition processes was analyzed using two different integral methods. The analysis included the calculation of the activation energy of the correspondent reactions. PMID:15348484

  12. Remotely actuated polymer nanocomposites-stress-recovery of carbon-nanotube-filled thermoplastic elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koerner, Hilmar; Price, Gary; Pearce, Nathan A.; Alexander, Max; Vaia, Richard A.

    2004-02-01

    Stimuli-responsive (active) materials undergo large-scale shape or property changes in response to an external stimulus such as stress, temperature, light or pH. Technological uses range from durable, shape-recovery eye-glass frames, to temperature-sensitive switches, to the generation of stress to induce mechanical motion. Here, we demonstrate that the uniform dispersion of 1-5 vol.% of carbon nanotubes in a thermoplastic elastomer yields nanocomposites that can store and subsequently release, through remote means, up to 50% more recovery stress than the pristine resin. The anisotropic nanotubes increase the rubbery modulus by a factor of 2 to 5 (for 1-5 vol.%) and improve shape fixity by enhancing strain-induced crystallization. Non-radiative decay of infrared photons absorbed by the nanotubes raises the internal temperature, melting strain-induced polymer crystallites (which act as physical crosslinks that secure the deformed shape) and remotely trigger the release of the stored strain energy. Comparable effects occur for electrically induced actuation associated with Joule heating of the matrix when a current is passed through the conductive percolative network of the nanotubes within the resin. This unique combination of properties, directly arising from the nanocomposite morphology, demonstrates new opportunities for the design and fabrication of stimuli-responsive polymers, which are otherwise not available in one material system.

  13. Membrane consisting of polyquaternary amine ion exchange polymer network interpenetrating the chains of thermoplastic matrix polymer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.; Wallace, C. J. (inventors)

    1978-01-01

    An ion exchange membrane was formed from a solution containing dissolved matrix polymer and a set of monomers which are capable of reacting to form a polyquaternary ion exchange material; for example vinyl pyride and a dihalo hydrocarbon. After casting solution and evaporation of the volatile component's, a relatively strong ion exchange membrane was obtained which is capable of removing anions, such as nitrate or chromate from water. The ion exchange polymer forms an interpenetrating network with the chains of the matrix polymer.

  14. Lignin-derived thermoplastic co-polymers and methods of preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Naskar, Amit K.; Saito, Tomonori; Pickel, Joseph M.; Baker, Frederick S.; Eberle, Claude Clifford; Norris, Robert E.; Mielenz, Jonathan Richard

    2014-06-10

    The present invention relates to a crosslinked lignin comprising a lignin structure having methylene or ethylene linking groups therein crosslinking between phenyl ring carbon atoms, wherein said crosslinked lignin is crosslinked to an extent that it has a number-average molecular weight of at least 10,000 g/mol, is melt-processible, and has either a glass transition temperature of at least 100.degree. C., or is substantially soluble in a polar organic solvent or aqueous alkaline solution. Thermoplastic copolymers containing the crosslinked lignin are also described. Methods for producing the crosslinked lignin and thermoplastic copolymers are also described.

  15. Thermoplastics Properties J. D. Muzzy

    E-print Network

    Colton, Jonathan S.

    a thermoplastic rubber should be considered. 2.3.2 GENERAL FEATURES The mechanical properties of polymers 3. However, crosslinks are permanent covalent bonds which cannot be "melted" like polymer crystals __________________________________________________________________________ 2.3.1 INTRODUCTION 2.3.2 GENERAL FEATURES 2.3.3 GUIDELINES FOR SELECTION OF POLYMERS AND PROPERTIES

  16. Melt-electrospinning of thermoplastic polymers: An experimental and theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, Jason Michael

    Over the past decade, there have been significant advancements in the area of electrospinning. A variety of polymers are being electrospun to form fibers on the nanoscale believed to have mechanical properties superior to those commercially available. Past research has focused on forming these fibers from a polymer solution but ever increasing demands for a cheaper, more environmentally friendly and safer alternative increases the demand to understand the feasibility of electrospinning from a polymer melt where very little research has been performed. The effects of various melt-electrospinning parameters, including electric field strength, flow rate, and processing temperature on the morphology and fiber diameter of polypropylene of different tacticities and molecular weights and poly(ethylene terephthalate) were experimentally studied. It was shown that molecular weight was the predominant factor in determining the obtainable fiber diameter of the collected fibers. Observations prove that the tacticity also significantly influences the fiber diameter. Atactic polymers having molecular chains incapable of a high degree of orientation tend to produce larger diameter fibers than isotactic polymers capable of a high degree of orientation, despite the effect of molecular weights. In addition, a model based on experimental and polymeric parameters and observations has been developed in an attempt to predict the diameter of the fibers that are being produced through the melt-electrospinning process. The model has been tested over all electric field strengths used in experimentation and has proven accurate for atactic polypropylene at small electric field strengths. By understanding the effects of each processing parameter on a specific response such as fiber diameter and being able to theoretically predict the fiber diameter being produced, the efficiency of the electrospinning process has been enhanced and it makes it a much more attractive alternative from many commercial applications were nonwoven materials are currently used.

  17. Evaluation of the economic feasibility of core-shell baroplastic polymers and a comparison to traditional thermoplastic elastomers

    E-print Network

    Ibrahim, Sarah H

    2005-01-01

    Baroplastic materials are pressure miscible systems that can be molded by the application of pressure at low/room temperature. They have the potential to replace traditional thermoplastic elastomers in many applications. ...

  18. Derivation of heating rate dependent exposure strategies for the selective laser melting of thermoplastic polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummer, Dietmar; Drexler, Maximilian; Wudy, Katrin

    2015-05-01

    The selective laser melting of polymer powder is for rapid prototyping applications an established technology, although a lack in basic process knowledge appears. Considering demands of series production the selective laser melting technique is faced with varies challenges concerning processable material systems, process strategies and part properties. Consequently basic research is necessary to shift from rapid prototyping to rapid manufacturing of small lot sized series. Based on basic research the high potential of selective laser melting for the production of complex parts without any tools can be opened up. For the derivation of part quality increasing process strategies knowledge about interactions between sub-processes of selective laser melting and resulting part properties is necessary. The selective laser melting consists of three major sub-processes: Geometry exposure, tempering and powder feeding. According to the interaction of sub-processes resulting temperature fields during the selective laser melting process determine the part properties by changing micro structural pore number and distribution. Beneath absolute temperatures also the time-dependency of the thermal fields influences the porosity of molten parts. Present process strategies tend to decrease building time by increasing scanning speed and laser power. Although the absolute energy input into the material is constant for increasing scanning speed and laser power in the same ratio, time dependent material effects are neglected. The heating rate is a combined parameter derived from absolute temperature and time. Within the paper the authors analyze the basic interactions between different heating rates and part properties (e.g. porosity, mechanical strengths). Therefore with different heating rates produced specimens are analyzed with imaging technologies as well as mechanical tests. Based on the done basic investigations new heating rate dependent process strategies can be established considering time dependent material behavior.

  19. A high throughput, controllable and environmentally benign fabrication process of thermoplastic nanofibers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Continuous and uniform yarns of thermoplastic nanofibers were prepared via direct melt extrusion of immiscible blends of thermoplastic polymers with CAB and subsequent extraction removal of CAB. Ratios of thermoplastic/sacrificial polymers, melt viscosity, and interfacial tensions affect the formati...

  20. Investigation of physical properties of thermoplastic polyimides

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, J.J.; Stoakley, D.M.

    1987-12-01

    Thermoplastic polyimides are a class of promising high temperature polymers for aerospace applications. NASA-developed LARC-TPI is a prominent member of this family of polymers. Its physical characteristics have been measured as a function of its curing schedule. The results and their possible interpretations are discussed.

  1. Electrostatic prepregging of thermoplastic matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muzzy, John D.; Varughese, Babu; Thammongkol, Vivan; Tincher, Wayne

    1989-01-01

    Thermoplastic towpregs of PEEK/AS-4, PEEK/S-2 glass and LaRC-TPI/AS-4, produced by electrostatic deposition of charged and fluidized polymer powders on spread continuous fiber tows, are described. Processing parameters for combining PEEK 150 powder with unsized 3k AS-4 carbon fiber are presented. The experimental results for PEEK 150/AS-4 reveal that electrostatic fluidized bed coating may be an economically attractive process for producing towpreg.

  2. Aerogel/polymer composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K. (Inventor); Smith, Trent M. (Inventor); Fesmire, James E. (Inventor); Roberson, Luke B. (Inventor); Clayton, LaNetra M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The invention provides new composite materials containing aerogels blended with thermoplastic polymer materials at a weight ratio of aerogel to thermoplastic polymer of less than 20:100. The composite materials have improved thermal insulation ability. The composite materials also have better flexibility and less brittleness at low temperatures than the parent thermoplastic polymer materials.

  3. Surface characterization in composite and titanium bonding: Carbon fiber surface treatments for improved adhesion to thermoplastic polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devilbiss, T. A.; Wightman, J. P.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of anodization in NaOH, H2SO4, and amine salts on the surface chemistry of carbon fibers was examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The surfaces of carbon fibers after anodization in NaOH and H2SO4 were examined by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), angular dependent XPS, UV absorption spectroscopy of the anodization bath, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and polar/dispersive surface energy analysis. Hercules AS-4, Dexter Hysol XAS, and Union Carbide T-300 fibers were examined by STEM, angular dependent XPS, and breaking strength measurement before and after commercial surface treatment. Oxygen and nitrogen were added to the fiber surfaces by anodization in amine salts. Analysis of the plasmon peak in the carbon 1s signal indicated that H2SO4 anodization affected the morphological structure of the carbon fiber surface. The work of adhesion of carbon fibers to thermoplastic resins was calculated using the geometric mean relationship. A correlation was observed between the dispersive component of the work of adhesion and the interfacial adhesion.

  4. A thermoplastic copolyimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, D. J.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1985-01-01

    A copolyimide, STPI/LARC, was prepared from the reaction of 3,3'4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride (BTDA), equimolar quantities of m-phenylenediamine and 4,4'-oxydianiline, and a small amount of phthalic anhydride to control the molecular weight. The processability and adhesive properties of STPI/LARC were compared to those of a commercially available form of LARC-TPI. LARC-TPI, a thermoplastic polyimide, from the reaction of BTDA and 3,3'-diaminobenzophenone, had previously shown promise as a high temperature structural adhesive. Lap shear specimens were fabricated using adhesive tape prepared from each of the two polymers. Lap shear tests were performed at room temperature, 177 C, and 204 C before and after exposure to a 72-hour water-boil and to aging at 204 C.

  5. Thermoplastic-carbon fiber hybrid yarn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ketterer, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Efforts were directed to develop processing methods to make carbon fiber/thermoplastic fiber preforms that are easy to handle and drapeable, and to consolidate them into low void content laminates. The objectives were attained with the development of the hybrid yarn concept; whereby, thermoplastic fiber can be intimately intermixed with carbon fiber into a hybrid yarn. This was demonstrated with the intermixing of Celion 3000 with a Celanese liquid crystal polymer fiber, polybutylene terepthalate fiber, or polyetheretherketone fiber. The intermixing of the thermoplastic matrix fiber and the reinforcing carbon fiber gives a preform that can be easily fabricated into laminates with low void content. Mechanical properties of the laminates were not optimized; however, initial results indicated properties typical of a thermoplastic/carbon fiber composites prepared by more conventional methods.

  6. Nanocellular thermoplastic foam and process for making the same

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Lingbo; Costeux, Stephane; Patankar, Kshitish A.; Moore, Jonathan D.

    2015-09-29

    Prepare a thermoplastic polymer foam having a porosity of 70% or more and at least one of: (i) an average cell size of 200 nanometers or less; and (ii) a nucleation density of at least 1.times.1015 effective nucleation sites per cubic centimeter of foamable polymer composition not including blowing agent using a foamable polymer composition containing a thermoplastic polymer selected from styrenic polymer and (meth)acrylic polymers, a blowing agent comprising at least 20 mole-percent carbon dioxide based on moles of blowing agent and an additive having a Total Hansen Solubility Parameter that differs from that of carbon dioxide by less than 2 and that is present at a concentration of 0.01 to 1.5 weight parts per hundred weight parts thermoplastic polymer.

  7. 1MSE 2090: Introduction to Materials Science Chapter 14, Polymer Structures Chapter Outline: Polymer Structures

    E-print Network

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    1 1MSE 2090: Introduction to Materials Science Chapter 14, Polymer Structures Chapter Outline: Polymer Structures Hydrocarbon and polymer molecules Chemistry of polymer molecules Molecular weight and shape Molecular structure and configurations Thermoplastic and thermosetting polymers Copolymers Polymer

  8. Thermoplastic coating of carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edie, D. D.; Lickfield, G. C.; Allen, L. E.; Mccollum, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    A continuous powder coating system was developed for coating carbon fiber with LaRC-TPI (Langley Research Center-Thermoplastic Polyimide), a high-temperature thermoplastic polymide invented by NASA-Langley. The coating line developed used a pneumatic fiber spreader to separate the individual fibers. The polymer was applied within a recirculating powder coating chamber then melted using a combination of direct electrical resistance and convective heating to make it adhere to the fiber tow. The tension and speed of the line were controlled with a dancer arm and an electrically driven fiber wind-up and wind-off. The effects of heating during the coating process on the flexibility of the prepreg produced were investigated. The uniformity with which the fiber tow could be coated with polymer also was examined. Composite specimens were fabricated from the prepreg and tested to determine optimum process conditions. The study showed that a very uniform and flexible prepeg with up to 50 percent by volume polymer could be produced with this powder coating system. The coating line minimized powder loss and produced prepeg in lengths of up to 300 m. The fiber spreading was found to have a major effect on the coating uniformity and flexibility. Though test results showed low composite tensile strengths, analysis of fracture surfaces under scanning electron microscope indicated that fiber/matrix adhesion was adequate.

  9. Thermoplastic coated carbon fibers for textile preforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, L. E.; Edie, D. D.; Lickfield, G. C.; Mccollum, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    A continuous process for producing prepreg from carbon fiber and thermoplastic matrix is described. After the tow has been spread using a pneumatic device, the process utilizes a fluidized bed to apply thermoplastic powder to the bundle. Finally, direct electrical heating of the coated fiber tow melts the polymer on the individual fibers, creating a uniform and extremely flexible prepreg. The efficiency of the process was evaluated during initial trials in which a thermoplastic polyimide, LaRC-TPI, was applied to T-300, 3K (3000 filament) carbon fiber tow. The physical properties of unidirectional composite specimens fabricated from this prepreg were measured, and the matrix uniformity and void content of the samples was determined. The results of these evaluations are detailed and discussed.

  10. Interface reactions and the reaction processing of engineering thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect

    Kumpf, R.J.; Archey, R.L.; Lau, C.J.; Jonsson, E.H.

    1996-12-31

    As a class of materials engineering thermoplastics have enjoyed phenomenal growth in sales since their introduction and above average growth over the past decades. Much of this growth has been driven by inter-material substitution as polymers have replaced metal, glass, and ceramics. The benefits engineering thermoplastics offer are primarily improved strength/weight ratio, material toughness, improved manufacturing productivity, and increased design flexibility. A striking example is the weight reduction that has been achieved in automobiles. Modern automobiles are both more fuel efficient and safer because of substitution of plastic for metal. Another example is notebook computers. The housings for these devices must be tough, lightweight, and stable to the high temperatures generated by high-performance microprocessors. Advanced polymers have also been integral in the proliferation of optical memory. Engineering thermoplastics have played a key role - sometimes an enabling role - in these, and many other, technology advances. Chemically, most engineering thermoplastics share common characteristics: they are mostly condensation polymers; they contain functional groups which impart a significant polarity to the molecule; and they often contain aromatic rings in the polymer backbone. Introduction of entirely new classes of engineering thermoplastics has slowed significantly. The cost of developing and commercializing a new engineering thermoplastic has been estimated to be $100 million, a daunting investment even for the largest manufacturers. At the same time, however, the price / performance demands of end users and the emergence of attractive niche markets has continued apace.

  11. Recent Developments on Thermoplastic Elastomers by Dynamic Vulcanization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, R. Rajesh; Naskar, Kinsuk

    A comprehensive overview is given of the recent developments of thermoplastic vulcanizates (TPVs) with special reference to the technological advancements. TPVs combine the high volume molding capability of thermoplastics with the elastomeric properties of thermoset rubber. Therefore, they lend themselves to a broad range of applications in various fields. TPVs represent the second largest group of soft thermoplastic elastomers, after styrenic-based block copolymers. TPVs have undergone evolutionary changes in terms of the selection of polymers, design of crosslinking, compounding techniques, and methods of production, and have achieved better elastic recovery, easy processability and low hardness etc.

  12. An investigation of physical properties of thermoplastic polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Stoakley, Diane M.

    1987-01-01

    Thermoplastic polyimides are a class of promising high temperature polymers for aerospace applications. NASA-developed LARC-TPI is a prominent member of this family of polymers. Its physical characteristics have been measured as a function of its curing schedule. The results and their possible interpretations are discussed.

  13. Fiber reinforced thermoplastic resin matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Robert J. (Inventor); Chang, Glenn E. C. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Polyimide polymer composites having a combination of enhanced thermal and mechanical properties even when subjected to service temperatures as high as 700.degree. F. are described. They comprise (a) from 10 to 50 parts by weight of a thermoplastic polyimide resin prepared from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane and (b) from 90 to 50 parts by weight of continuous reinforcing fibers, the total of (a) and (b) being 100 parts by weight. Composites based on polyimide resin formed from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane and pyromellitic dianhydride and continuous carbon fibers retained at least about 50% of their room temperature shear strength after exposure to 700.degree. F. for a period of 16 hours in flowing air. Preferably, the thermoplastic polyimide resin is formed in situ in the composite material by thermal imidization of a corresponding amide-acid polymer prepared from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane. It is also preferred to initially size the continuous reinforcing fibers with up to about one percent by weight of an amide-acid polymer prepared from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane. In this way imidization at a suitable elevated temperature results in the in-situ formation of a substantially homogeneous thermoplastic matrix of the polyimide resin tightly and intimately bonded to the continuous fibers. The resultant composites tend to have optimum thermo-mechanical properties.

  14. Pen microfluidics: rapid desktop manufacturing of sealed thermoplastic microchannels

    PubMed Central

    Rahmanian, Omid

    2013-01-01

    A unique technique for the rapid fabrication of thermoplastic microfluidic chips is described. The method enables the realization of fully-sealed microchannels in around one hour while requiring only minimal infrastructure by taking advantage of a solvent swelling mechanism that allows raised features to be patterned on the surface of homogeneous thermoplastic materials. Patterning is achieved without photolithography by simply drawing the desired microchannel pattern onto the polymer surface using a suitable ink as a masking layer, either manually or under robotic control, followed by timed exposure to solvent vapor to yield a desired depth for the masked channel features. The channels are then permanently sealed through solvent bonding of the microchannel chip to a mating thermoplastic substrate. The process is demonstrated using cyclic olefin copolymer as a thermoplastic material, with fully operational microfluidic devices fabricated following a true desktop manufacturing model suitable for rapid prototyping. PMID:23344819

  15. LARC-I-TPI: A New Thermoplastic Polyimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, Terry L.; Progar, Donald J.; Pratt, J. Richard

    1990-01-01

    "LARC-I-TPI" denotes improved version of LARC-TPI class of thermoplastic polyimides: high-performance polymers developed for manufacture of strong, lightweight aircraft structures. Melt-flow and adhesive properties of new polymers make them attractive for use as matrix resins for composites, molding powders, adhesives, and coating films. Less toxic, improved LARC-I-TPI polymers formulated without 3, 3'-diaminobenzophenone, which is mutagenic and commercially unavailable.

  16. Materials selection and manufacturing of thermoplastic elastomer microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sameoto, D.; Wasay, A.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we outline some of the manufacturing advantages and challenges of working with thermoplastic elastomers as an alternative to traditional polydimethysiloxane (PDMS) for flexible and reversibly bonded microfluidic systems. Unlike PDMS, thermoplastic elastomers can be processed with many industrial polymer manufacturing technologies such as extrusion, injection molding, hot embossing and others, potentially permitting much more scalable production and cheaper costs per part. Unlike a more rigid thermoplastic, these thermoplastic elastomers are typically much easier to bond, either reversibly or permanently due to their inherent compliance and subsequent low pressures necessary to seal channels and reservoirs. Unlike PDMS however, where one material (Sylgard 184) dominates the literature, there have not been many in depth investigations into thermoplastic elastomers and their relative performance and applicability to microfabrication. We show a comparison between several categories of thermoplastic elastomer to demonstrate what issues may be encountered and to demonstrate that even for labs with minimal equipment, academic prototyping with these materials is not necessarily any more challenging than PDMS.

  17. Azobenzene-Containing Thermoplastic Elastomers: Coupling Mechanical and Optical Effects

    E-print Network

    Zhao, Yue

    expect could result in interesting properties. For in- stance, elastic deformation of azobenzene polymers through elastic extension or retraction of the films. Introduction Photoisomerization of azobenzene In this paper, we report on the preparation of a system of azobenzene thermoplastic elastomers

  18. Morphological, mechanical properties and biodegradability of biocomposite thermoplastic starch and polycaprolactone reinforced with sisal fibers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The incorporation of fibers as reinforcements in polymer composites has increased due to their renewability, low cost and biodegradability. In this study, sisal fibers were added to a polymer matrix of thermoplastic starch and polycaprolactone, both biodegradable polymers. Sisal fibers (5% and 10%) ...

  19. A 69 cent look at thermoplastic softening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanasupa, Linda S.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives are to demonstrate the change in mechanical properties of a thermoplastic polymer when the polymer is heated above the glass transition temperature. The instructor or student can perform this demonstration. In preparation for the demonstration, fill the flask or beaker 3/4 full with water and bring the water to a boil. First observe the initial stiffness of the toothbrush by slightly flexing it. Note that it is fairly stiff and retains its initial shape when the forces are removed. If you were to apply enough force, the toothbrush would break in a somewhat brittle fashion. Now place the toothbrush in the boiling water for 2 minutes. After the 2 minutes are up, remove the toothbrush from the boiling water with the washcloth. At this time, you will be able to bend the toothbrush easily. When it cools it will retain this bent shape. You've just demonstrated heating the polymer above the glass transition temperature, demonstrating thermoplastic softening. Instructor notes are provided.

  20. Absorption depth profile of water on thermoplastic starch films

    SciTech Connect

    Bonno, B.; Laporte, J.L.; Paris, D.; D'Leon, R.T.

    2000-01-01

    It is well known that petroleum derived polymers are primary environmental contaminants. The study of new packing biodegradable materials has been the object of numerous papers in past years. Some of these new materials are the thermoplastic films derived from wheat starch. In the present paper, the authors study some of properties of wheat starch thermoplastic films, with various amounts of absorbed water, using photoacoustic spectroscopy techniques. The absorption depth profile of water in the starch substrate is determined for samples having a variable water level.

  1. Adsorption depth profile of water on thermoplastic starch films

    SciTech Connect

    Bonno, B.; Laporte, J.L.; Paris, D.; D'Leon, R.T.

    2000-01-01

    It is well known that petroleum derived polymers are primary environmental contaminants. The study of new packing biodegradable materials has been the object of numerous papers in past years. Some of these new materials are the thermoplastic films derived from wheat starch. In the present paper, the authors study some of properties of wheat starch thermoplastic films, with various amounts of absorbed water, using photoacoustic spectroscopy techniques. The absorption depth profile of water in the starch substrate is determined for samples having a variable water level.

  2. Use of Melt Flow Rate Test in Reliability Study of Thermoplastic Encapsulation Materials in Photovoltaic Modules

    SciTech Connect

    Moseley, J.; Miller, D.; Shah, Q.-U.-A. S. J.; Sakurai, K.; Kempe, M.; Tamizhmani, G.; Kurtz, S.

    2011-10-01

    Use of thermoplastic materials as encapsulants in photovoltaic (PV) modules presents a potential concern in terms of high temperature creep, which should be evaluated before thermoplastics are qualified for use in the field. Historically, the issue of creep has been avoided by using thermosetting polymers as encapsulants, such as crosslinked ethylene-co-vinyl acetate (EVA). Because they lack crosslinked networks, however, thermoplastics may be subject to phase transitions and visco-elastic flow at the temperatures and mechanical stresses encountered by modules in the field, creating the potential for a number of reliability and safety issues. Thermoplastic materials investigated in this study include PV-grade uncured-EVA (without curing agents and therefore not crosslinked); polyvinyl butyral (PVB); thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU); and three polyolefins (PO), which have been proposed for use as PV encapsulation. Two approaches were used to evaluate the performance of these materials as encapsulants: module-level testing and a material-level testing.

  3. Analyzing Nonisothermal Crystallization of Thermoplastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebe, Peggy

    1987-01-01

    Method developed for analysis of nonisothermal cold crystallization in thermoplastics. Does not require prior knowledge of isothermal kinetic parameters. Based upon observation: During nonisothermal crystallization at constant rate, relative crystallinity develops with time dependence sigmoidal at low degrees of conversion. Application for method is study of cold crystallization in advanced thermoplastics.

  4. THERMOPLASTIC WAVES IN MAGNETARS

    SciTech Connect

    Beloborodov, Andrei M.; Levin, Yuri E-mail: yuri.levin@monash.edu.au

    2014-10-20

    Magnetar activity is generated by shear motions of the neutron star surface, which relieve internal magnetic stresses. An analogy with earthquakes and faults is problematic, as the crust is permeated by strong magnetic fields which greatly constrain crustal displacements. We describe a new deformation mechanism that is specific to strongly magnetized neutron stars. The magnetically stressed crust begins to move because of a thermoplastic instability, which launches a wave that shears the crust and burns its magnetic energy. The propagating wave front resembles the deflagration front in combustion physics. We describe the conditions for the instability, the front structure, and velocity, and discuss implications for observed magnetar activity.

  5. The crystallization of tough thermoplastic resins in the presence of carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theil, M. H.

    1986-01-01

    The crystallization kinetics of the thermoplastic resins poly(phenylene sulfide) (PPS) and poly(aryl-ether-ether-ketone) (PEEK) in the presence and in the abscence of carbon fibers was studied. How carbon fiber surfaces in composites affect the crystallization of tough thermoplastic polymers that may serve as matrix resins were determined. The crystallization kinetics of such substances can provide useful information about the crystallization mechanisms and, thus, indicate if the presence of carbon fibers cause any changes in such mechanisms.

  6. On the Influence of Chain Morphology on the Shock Response of Three Thermoplastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, N. K.; Millett, J. C. F.

    2008-02-01

    It is increasingly important to understand the dynamic response of polymers and polymer composites as their engineering application increases. This work aims to investigate the effects of additions to thermoplastic carbon chains on the response of the resulting polymer at the continuum scale. Polyethylene, polyvinyldichloride, and polymethylmethacrylate are shocked, and their equation of state and strength properties is presented. An explanation is sought for the greater hardening observed in polymethylmethacrylate by looking at tacticity and electronic attractive forces, as well as entanglement of chains as a result of the large pendent side group. It is concluded that this entanglement has the greatest effect upon the observed strengthening in these thermoplastics.

  7. Graphite fiber reinforced thermoplastic resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Mechanical properties of neat resin samples and graphite fiber reinforced samples of thermoplastic resins were characterized with particular emphasis directed to the effects of environmental exposure (humidity, temperature and ultraviolet radiation). Tensile, flexural, interlaminar shear, creep and impact strengths were measured for polysulfone, polyarylsulfone and a state-of-the-art epoxy resin samples. In general, the thermoplastic resins exhibited environmental degradation resistance equal to or superior to the reference epoxy resin. Demonstration of the utility and quality of a graphite/thermoplastic resin system was accomplished by successfully thermoforming a simulated compressor blade and a fan exit guide vane.

  8. Thermoplastic bonding of microfluidic substrates

    E-print Network

    Judge, Benjamin Michael

    2012-01-01

    The assembly of microfluidic components for lab on a chip (LOC) applications that are manufactured from commodity thermoplastics is challenging. A survey of plastic welding techniques validates that contour transmission ...

  9. Graphite/Thermoplastic-Pultrusion Die

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Maywood L.; Frye, Mark W.; Johnson, Gary S.; Stanfield, Clarence E.

    1990-01-01

    Attachment to extruder produces thermoplastic-impregnated graphite tape. Consists of profile die, fiber/resin collimator, and crosshead die body. Die designed to be attached to commercially available extrusion machine capable of extruding high-performance thermoplastics. Simple attachment to commercial extruder enables developers of composites to begin experimenting with large numbers of proprietary resins, fibers, and hybrid composite structures. With device, almost any possible fiber/resin combination fabricated.

  10. Laminated thermoplastic composite material from recycled high density polyethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Ping; Waskom, Tommy L.

    1994-01-01

    The design of a materials-science, educational experiment is presented. The student should understand the fundamentals of polymer processing and mechanical property testing of materials. The ability to use American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards is also necessary for designing material test specimens and testing procedures. The objectives of the experiment are (1) to understand the concept of laminated composite materials, processing, testing, and quality assurance of thermoplastic composites and (2) to observe an application example of recycled plastics.

  11. 1MSE 2090: Introduction to Materials Science Chapter 15, Processing of Polymers Chapter Outline: Characteristics, Applications, and

    E-print Network

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    : Characteristics, Applications, and Processing of Polymers Mechanical properties Stress-Strain Behavior Deformation of Semicrystalline Polymers Crystallization, Melting, Glass Transition Thermoplastic and Thermosetting Polymers Mechanical properties of polymers change dramatically with temperature, going from glass-like brittle

  12. Characterization of thermoplastic polyimide NEW-TPI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, T. H.; Reddy, R. M.

    1991-01-01

    Thermal and rheological properties of a commercial thermoplastic polyimide, NEW-TPI, were characterized. The as-received material possesses initially a transient crystallite form with a bimodal distribution in peak melting temperatures. After the meltings of the initial crystallite structures, the sample can be recrystallized by various thermal treatments. A bimodal or single-modal melting peak distribution is formed for annealing temperatures below or above 360 C, respectively. The recrystallized crystallinities are all transient in nature. The polymers are unable to be recrystallized after being subjected to elevated temperature annealing above 450 C. The recrystallization mechanism was postulated, and a simple kinetics model was found to describe the behavior satisfactorily under conditions of prolonged thermal annealing.

  13. Thermoplastic polyimide NEW-TPI (trademark)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Tan-Hung; Reddy, Rakasi M.

    1990-01-01

    Thermal and rheological properties of a commercial thermoplastic polyimide, NEW-TPI (trademark), were characterized. The as-received material possesses initially a transient crystallite form with a bimodal distribution in peak melting temperatures. After the melting of the initial crystallite structure, the sample can be recrystallized by various thermal treatments. A bimodal or single modal melting peak distribution is formed for annealing temperatures below or above 360 C, respectively. The recrystallized crystallinities are all transient in nature. The polymers are unable to be recrystallized after being subjected to elevated temperature annealing above 450 C. The recrystallization mechanism was postulated, and a simple kinetics model was found to describe the behavior rather satisfactory under the conditions of prolonged thermal annealing. Rheological measurements made in the linear viscoelastic range support the evidence observed in the thermal analysis. Furthermore, the measurements sustain the manufacturer's recommended processing window of 400 to 420 C for this material.

  14. Thermoplastic Ribbon-Ply Bonding Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Marchello, Joseph M.; Messier, Bernadette C.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to identify key variables in rapid weldbonding of thermoplastic tow (ribbon) and their relationship to matrix polymer properties and to ribbon microstructure. Theoretical models for viscosity, establishment of ply-ply contact, instantaneous (Velcro) bonding, molecular interdiffusion (healing), void growth suppression, and gap filling were reviewed and synthesized. Consideration of the theoretical bonding mechanisms and length scales and of the experimental weld/peel data allow the prediction of such quantities as the time and pressure required to achieve good contact between a ribbon and a flat substrate, the time dependence of bond strength, pressures needed to prevent void growth from dissolved moisture and conditions for filling gaps and smoothing overlaps.

  15. Thermoplastic tape compaction device

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Vincent W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01

    A device for bonding a thermoplastic tape to a substrate to form a fully consolidated composite. This device has an endless chain associated with a frame so as to rotate in a plane that is perpendicular to a long dimension of the tape, the chain having pivotally connected chain links with each of the links carrying a flexible foot member that extends outwardly from the chain. A selected number of the foot members contact the tape, after the heating thereof, to cause the heated tape to bond to the substrate. The foot members are each a thin band of metal oriented transversely to the chain, with a flexibility and width and length to contact the tape so as to cause the tape to conform to the substrate to achieve consolidation of the tape and the substrate. A biased leaf-type spring within the frame bears against an inner surface of the chain to provide the compliant pressure necessary to bond the tape to the substrate. The chain is supported by sprockets on shafts rotatably supported in the frame and, in one embodiment, one of the shafts has a drive unit to produce rotation such that the foot members in contact with the tape move at the same speed as the tape. Cooling jets are positioned along the frame to cool the resultant consolidated composite.

  16. Thermoplastic tape compaction device

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, V.W.

    1994-12-27

    A device is disclosed for bonding a thermoplastic tape to a substrate to form a fully consolidated composite. This device has an endless chain associated with a frame so as to rotate in a plane that is perpendicular to a long dimension of the tape, the chain having pivotally connected chain links with each of the links carrying a flexible foot member that extends outwardly from the chain. A selected number of the foot members contact the tape, after the heating thereof, to cause the heated tape to bond to the substrate. The foot members are each a thin band of metal oriented transversely to the chain, with a flexibility and width and length to contact the tape so as to cause the tape to conform to the substrate to achieve consolidation of the tape and the substrate. A biased leaf-type spring within the frame bears against an inner surface of the chain to provide the compliant pressure necessary to bond the tape to the substrate. The chain is supported by sprockets on shafts rotatably supported in the frame and, in one embodiment, one of the shafts has a drive unit to produce rotation such that the foot members in contact with the tape move at the same speed as the tape. Cooling jets are positioned along the frame to cool the resultant consolidated composite. 5 figures.

  17. Advanced thermoplastic resins, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, C. L.; Hill, S. G.; Falcone, A.; Gerken, N. T.

    1991-01-01

    Eight thermoplastic polyimide resin systems were evaluated as composite matrix materials. Two resins were selected for more extensive mechanical testing and both were versions of LaRC-TPI (Langley Research Center - Thermoplastic Polyimide). One resin was made with LaRC-TPI and contained 2 weight percent of a di(amic acid) dopant as a melt flow aid. The second system was a 1:1 slurry of semicrystalline LaRC-TPI powder in a polyimidesulfone resin diglyme solution. The LaRC-TPI powder melts during processing and increases the melt flow of the resin. Testing included dynamic mechanical analysis, tension and compression testing, and compression-after-impact testing. The test results demonstrated that the LaRC-TPI resins have very good properties compared to other thermoplastics, and that they are promising matrix materials for advanced composite structures.

  18. Graphite fiber reinforced thermoplastic resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navak, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a program designed to optimize the fabrication procedures for graphite thermoplastic composites are described. The properties of the composites as a function of temperature were measured and graphite thermoplastic fan exit guide vanes were fabricated and tested. Three thermoplastics were included in the investigation: polysulfone, polyethersulfone, and polyarylsulfone. Type HMS graphite was used as the reinforcement. Bending fatigue tests of HMS graphite/polyethersulfone demonstrated a gradual shear failure mode which resulted in a loss of stiffness in the specimens. Preliminary curves were generated to show the loss in stiffness as a function of stress and number of cycles. Fan exit guide vanes of HMS graphite polyethersulfone were satisfactorily fabricated in the final phase of the program. These were found to have stiffness and better fatigue behavior than graphite epoxy vanes which were formerly bill of material.

  19. Process for Preparing a Tough, Soluble, Aromatic, Thermoplastic Copolyimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A process for preparing a tough, soluble, aromatic, thermoplastic copolyimide is provided. The process comprises the steps of (a) providing 4.4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride to 3,4,3',4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride at a mole ratio ranging from about 25 mole percent to 75 mole percent to 75 mole percent to about 25 mole percent; (b) adding 3,4'-oxydianiline to form a mixture; (c) adding a polar aprotic or polar protic solvent to the mixture to form a solution having a percentage of solids capable of maintaining polymer solubility; (d) stirring the solution to allow it to react; (e) adding an azeotropic solvent to the solution and heating to remove water; (f) cooling the solution of step (e) to room temperature and recovering the tough, soluble, aromatic, thermoplastic copolyimide.

  20. Polymers Are Everywhere.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Raymond B.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the history of the human understanding of polymers from alchemy to modern times. Discusses renaissance chemistry, polymers in the nineteenth century, synthetic elastomers, thermoplastic elastomers, fibers, coatings, adhesives, derivatives of natural rubber, thermosets, step-reaction, and chain polymerization. (CW)

  1. Fully integrated single-walled carbon nanotube thermoplastic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Macias, Fernando J.

    The development of composites of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with thermoplastics requires methods for good dispersion and achieving good interaction between SWNTs and the matrix. This thesis presents a new method to achieve good dispersion by a preliminary treatment called incipient wetting. The SWNTs dispersed in a solvent are mixed with polymer particles and deposited over them as the solvent is evaporated to give an initial dispersion. Factors that make this more effective are: good wetting of the polymer by the solvent, swelling of the polymer, high surface area of the polymer. Swelling enhances the initial dispersion with some initial mixing. A high surface area is achieved using polymer powder. High shear mixing alone does not achieve the same uniform and repeatable level of dispersion that the combination with incipient wetting allows. The incipient wetting method was studied and applied to different polymers. The possibility of recovering SWNTs from thermoplastics by dissolving or burning away the matrix is an extension of this study. A new comprehensive approach to control the interface of thermoplastics with SWNTs is studied. This is based on achieving direct chemical bonding between polymer molecules and functional groups on oxidized open ends, sidewalls, or both, in the SWNTs. Different concepts and approaches to these "fully integrated nanotube composites" are discussed. The concepts have been applied to epoxies elsewhere and are tested here with nylon-6,6 as a model system. Nylon was synthesized by interfacial polymerization in the presence of SWNTs resulting in excellent dispersion in the composite without further processing. The essential requirement for good dispersion is that the SWNTs are well dispersed in the solvent. Interfacial polymerization opens the way to many types of polymer-SWNT composites. Tests of full integration of SWNTs with open ended nanotubes showed promising results and hints of integration but were limited by dispersion in the solvent. Fluorinated SWNTs were dispersed effectively with dichlorobenzene, another solvent may be better. There is no conclusive evidence of integration with F-SWNTs but they may react with the polymer chain with thermal post-processing.

  2. Nanofibrous Electrospun Polymers for Reprogramming Human Cells TRAVIS CORDIE,1,2

    E-print Network

    Saha, Krishanu

    oriented and aligned structures was prepared by electrospinning four polymers [polylactic acid (PLA), polyc- aprolactone (PCL), thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) and polypropylene carbonate (PPC)] into nanofiber

  3. Multidimensional Characterization of Thermally Actuated Shape Memory Polymer Stents 

    E-print Network

    Nash, Landon 1990-

    2012-04-23

    thermoplastic polymer solution and subsequently covalently crosslinking the polymer using UV irradiation to yield thermoset tubes. These crosslinked tubes were CO2 laser engraved to produce the complex stent geometry. Experiments were conducted to determine...

  4. Thermally modulated nanostructure of poly(-caprolactone)ePOSS multiblock thermoplastic polyurethanes

    E-print Network

    Mather, Patrick T.

    polymer coatings, devices with enlarged data storage capacity, drug delivery systems and tissue storage [8], and drug delivery [9e11]. Thermoplastic polyurethanes (TPUs), a focus of the present work. The multiblock and alternating sequence structures provided nano-confined environments for PCL and POSS domains

  5. Nanoscale pattern fidelity and transfer of hierarchically patterned thermoplastics films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying; Kulkarni, Manish; Marshall, Allan; Douglas, Jack; Karim, Alamgir; the university of akron Team

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a versatile and inexpensive method for controlling the surface relief structure of both flexible elastomeric and glassy polymer films over large areas through a two-step imprinting process. First, nanoscale patterns were formed by nanoimprinting polymer films with a pattern on a DVD disk, obtained originally by nanoimprinting from a lithographically etched master pattern on a silicon wafer; micron-scale patterns were then superimposed on the nanoimprinted films by exposing them to ultraviolet radiation in oxygen (UVO) through a TEM grid mask having variable micron-scale patterning. This simple two-stage imprinting method allows for facile fabrication of hierarchically structured elastomer and thermoplastic polymer films. Besides, the thermodynamic properties of dewetting phenomenon of polystyrene film under the confinement of hierarchically patterned PDMS is studied.

  6. Tough, Soluble, Aromatic, Thermoplastic Copolyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Tough, soluble, aromatic, thermoplastic copolyimides were prepared by reacting 4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride, 3,4,3',4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride and 3,4'-oxydianiline. These copolyimides were found to be soluble in common amide solvents such as N,N'-dimethyl acetamide, N-methylpyrrolidinone, and dimethylformamide allowing them to be applied as the fully imidized copolymer and to be used to prepare a wide range of articles.

  7. Thermoplastic adhesives based on 4,4'-isophthaloyldiphthalic anhydride (IDPA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, Donald J.; Stclair, Terry L.; Pratt, J. Richard

    1988-01-01

    Thermoplastic polyimides were prepared and evaluated as adhesives. These materials are based on 4,4'-isophthaloyldiphathalic anhydride (IDAP) and either metaphenylene diamine (MPD) or 3,3'-diaminobenzophenone (DBAP). Both polymers exhibit excellent adhesive properties; however, the IDPA-MPD is the more attractive system because of a combination of high mechanical and physical properties as well as being made from commercially attractive monomers. The IDPA-MPD is an isomeric form of the commercially available adhesive and matrix resin, LARC-TPI and both systems have the same glass transition temperature and exhibit similar adhesive properties.

  8. Final Report: Interphase Analysis and Control in Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastic Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jon J. Kellar; William M. Cross; Lidvin Kjerengtroen

    2009-03-14

    This research program builds upon a multi-disciplinary effort in interphase analysis and control in thermoplastic matrix polymer matrix composites (PMC). The research investigates model systems deemed of interest by members of the Automotive Composites Consortium (ACC) as well as samples at the forefront of PMC process development (DRIFT and P4 technologies). Finally, the research investigates, based upon the fundamental understanding of the interphases created during the fabrication of thermoplastic PMCs, the role the interphase play in key bulk properties of interest to the automotive industry.

  9. Determination of adhesion between thermoplastic and liquid silicone rubbers in hard-soft-combinations via mechanical peeling test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühr, C.; Spörrer, A.; Altstädt, V.

    2014-05-01

    The production of hard-soft-combinations via multi injection molding gained more and more importance in the last years. This is attributed to different factors. One principle reason is that the use of two-component injection molding technique has many advantages such as cancelling subsequent and complex steps and shortening the process chain. Furthermore this technique allows the combination of the properties of the single components like the high stiffness of the hard component and the elastic properties of the soft component. Because of the incompatibility of some polymers the adhesion on the interface has to be determined. Thereby adhesion is not only influenced by the applied polymers, but also by the injection molding parameters and the characteristics of the mold. Besides already known combinations of thermoplastics with thermoplastic elastomers (TPE), there consists the possibility to apply liquid silicone rubber (LSR) as soft component. A thermoplastic/LSR combination gains in importance due to the specific advantages of LSR to TPE. The faintly adhesion between LSR and thermoplastics is currently one of the key challenges when dealing with those combinations. So it is coercively necessary to improve adhesion between the two components by adding an adhesion promoter. To determine the promoters influence, it is necessary to develop a suitable testing method to investigate e.g. the peel resistance. The current German standard "VDI Richtlinie 2019', which is actually only employed for thermoplastic/TPE combinations, can serve as a model to determine the adhesion of thermoplastic/LSR combinations.

  10. Development of a characterization approach for the sintering behavior of new thermoplastics for selective laser sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummer, Dietmar; Rietzel, Dominik; Kühnlein, Florian

    Currently the standard thermoplastic powders for selective laser sintering are based on polyamide12. This leads to restrictions for many applications e.g. in the industrial or medical field. Thus, research on further polymers with enhanced chemical or higher thermal stability plays a major role for applying additive manufacturing to serial production of individual components. Currently, great efforts are made to process new technical thermoplastics like polypropylene or polyetherketones by selective laser sintering. In this paper, the suitability and processing behavior by means of melting and (isothermal) crystallization are studied, and a method for the qualification of new materials is presented. Based on this method processing parameters for new thermoplastics can systematically be found.

  11. Multi-scale thermal stability of a hard thermoplastic protein-based material.

    PubMed

    Latza, Victoria; Guerette, Paul A; Ding, Dawei; Amini, Shahrouz; Kumar, Akshita; Schmidt, Ingo; Keating, Steven; Oxman, Neri; Weaver, James C; Fratzl, Peter; Miserez, Ali; Masic, Admir

    2015-01-01

    Although thermoplastic materials are mostly derived from petro-chemicals, it would be highly desirable, from a sustainability perspective, to produce them instead from renewable biopolymers. Unfortunately, biopolymers exhibiting thermoplastic behaviour and which preserve their mechanical properties post processing are essentially non-existent. The robust sucker ring teeth (SRT) from squid and cuttlefish are one notable exception of thermoplastic biopolymers. Here we describe thermoplastic processing of squid SRT via hot extrusion of fibres, demonstrating the potential suitability of these materials for large-scale thermal forming. Using high-resolution in situ X-ray diffraction and vibrational spectroscopy, we elucidate the molecular and nanoscale features responsible for this behaviour and show that SRT consist of semi-crystalline polymers, whereby heat-resistant, nanocrystalline ?-sheets embedded within an amorphous matrix are organized into a hexagonally packed nanofibrillar lattice. This study provides key insights for the molecular design of biomimetic protein- and peptide-based thermoplastic structural biopolymers with potential biomedical and 3D printing applications. PMID:26387704

  12. Multi-scale thermal stability of a hard thermoplastic protein-based material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latza, Victoria; Guerette, Paul A.; Ding, Dawei; Amini, Shahrouz; Kumar, Akshita; Schmidt, Ingo; Keating, Steven; Oxman, Neri; Weaver, James C.; Fratzl, Peter; Miserez, Ali; Masic, Admir

    2015-09-01

    Although thermoplastic materials are mostly derived from petro-chemicals, it would be highly desirable, from a sustainability perspective, to produce them instead from renewable biopolymers. Unfortunately, biopolymers exhibiting thermoplastic behaviour and which preserve their mechanical properties post processing are essentially non-existent. The robust sucker ring teeth (SRT) from squid and cuttlefish are one notable exception of thermoplastic biopolymers. Here we describe thermoplastic processing of squid SRT via hot extrusion of fibres, demonstrating the potential suitability of these materials for large-scale thermal forming. Using high-resolution in situ X-ray diffraction and vibrational spectroscopy, we elucidate the molecular and nanoscale features responsible for this behaviour and show that SRT consist of semi-crystalline polymers, whereby heat-resistant, nanocrystalline ?-sheets embedded within an amorphous matrix are organized into a hexagonally packed nanofibrillar lattice. This study provides key insights for the molecular design of biomimetic protein- and peptide-based thermoplastic structural biopolymers with potential biomedical and 3D printing applications.

  13. Multi-scale thermal stability of a hard thermoplastic protein-based material

    PubMed Central

    Latza, Victoria; Guerette, Paul A.; Ding, Dawei; Amini, Shahrouz; Kumar, Akshita; Schmidt, Ingo; Keating, Steven; Oxman, Neri; Weaver, James C.; Fratzl, Peter; Miserez, Ali; Masic, Admir

    2015-01-01

    Although thermoplastic materials are mostly derived from petro-chemicals, it would be highly desirable, from a sustainability perspective, to produce them instead from renewable biopolymers. Unfortunately, biopolymers exhibiting thermoplastic behaviour and which preserve their mechanical properties post processing are essentially non-existent. The robust sucker ring teeth (SRT) from squid and cuttlefish are one notable exception of thermoplastic biopolymers. Here we describe thermoplastic processing of squid SRT via hot extrusion of fibres, demonstrating the potential suitability of these materials for large-scale thermal forming. Using high-resolution in situ X-ray diffraction and vibrational spectroscopy, we elucidate the molecular and nanoscale features responsible for this behaviour and show that SRT consist of semi-crystalline polymers, whereby heat-resistant, nanocrystalline ?-sheets embedded within an amorphous matrix are organized into a hexagonally packed nanofibrillar lattice. This study provides key insights for the molecular design of biomimetic protein- and peptide-based thermoplastic structural biopolymers with potential biomedical and 3D printing applications. PMID:26387704

  14. Thermoplastic polymides and composites therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Frank W. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A new class polyimide and polyimide precursors based on diaryl oxyalkylene diamines, such as 1,3-bis[4-aminophenoxy]-2,2-dimethyl propane, a process for their preparation and their use as the continuous phase for the manufacture of composites and composite laminates reinforced by reinforcing agents such as carbon fibers, Kevlar.TM., and other similar high strength reinforcing agents. The polyimides and molecular composites obtained from the diamines according to the invention show thermoplastic properties, excellent flex fatigue and fracture resistance, and excellent thermal and oxidative stability.

  15. Improved Thermoplastic/Iron-Particle Transformer Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A.; Bryant, Robert G.; Namkung, Min

    2004-01-01

    A method of fabricating improved transformer cores from composites of thermoplastic matrices and iron-particles has been invented. Relative to commercially available laminated-iron-alloy transformer cores, the cores fabricated by this method weigh less and are less expensive. Relative to prior polymer-matrix/ iron-particle composite-material transformer cores, the cores fabricated by this method can be made mechanically stronger and more magnetically permeable. In addition, whereas some prior cores have exhibited significant eddy-current losses, the cores fabricated by this method exhibit very small eddy-current losses. The cores made by this method can be expected to be attractive for use in diverse applications, including high-signal-to-noise transformers, stepping motors, and high-frequency ignition coils. The present method is a product of an experimental study of the relationships among fabrication conditions, final densities of iron particles, and mechanical and electromagnetic properties of fabricated cores. Among the fabrication conditions investigated were molding pressures (83, 104, and 131 MPa), and molding temperatures (250, 300, and 350 C). Each block of core material was made by uniaxial-compression molding, at the applicable pressure/temperature combination, of a mixture of 2 weight percent of LaRC (or equivalent high-temperature soluble thermoplastic adhesive) with 98 weight percent of approximately spherical iron particles having diameters in the micron range. Each molded block was cut into square cross-section rods that were used as core specimens in mechanical and electromagnetic tests. Some of the core specimens were annealed at 900 C and cooled slowly before testing. For comparison, a low-carbon-steel core was also tested. The results of the tests showed that density, hardness, and rupture strength generally increased with molding pressure and temperature, though the correlation was rather weak. The weakness of the correlation was attributed to the pores in the specimens. The maximum relative permeabilities of cores made without annealing ranged from 30 to 110, while those of cores made with annealing ranged from 900 to 1,400. However, the greater permeabilities of the annealed specimens were not associated with noticeably greater densities. The major practical result of the investigation was the discovery of an optimum distribution of iron-particle sizes: It was found that eddy-current losses in the molded cores were minimized by using 100 mesh (corresponding to particles with diameters less than or equal to 100 m) iron particles. The effect of optimization of particle sizes on eddy-current losses is depicted in the figure.

  16. 78 FR 29387 - Government-Owned Inventions, Available for Licensing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-20

    ... Generator; NASA Case No.: LAR-18131-1: Puncture-Healing Thermoplastic Resin Carbon-Fiber Reinforced... Control and Deposition Measurement for the Electron Beam Free Form Fabrication (EBF3) Process; NASA...

  17. Multiple-length-scale deformation analysis in a thermoplastic polyurethane

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Tan; Baimpas, Nikolaos; Dolbnya, Igor P.; Prisacariu, Cristina; Korsunsky, Alexander M.

    2015-01-01

    Thermoplastic polyurethane elastomers enjoy an exceptionally wide range of applications due to their remarkable versatility. These block co-polymers are used here as an example of a structurally inhomogeneous composite containing nano-scale gradients, whose internal strain differs depending on the length scale of consideration. Here we present a combined experimental and modelling approach to the hierarchical characterization of block co-polymer deformation. Synchrotron-based small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering and radiography are used for strain evaluation across the scales. Transmission electron microscopy image-based finite element modelling and fast Fourier transform analysis are used to develop a multi-phase numerical model that achieves agreement with the combined experimental data using a minimal number of adjustable structural parameters. The results highlight the importance of fuzzy interfaces, that is, regions of nanometre-scale structure and property gradients, in determining the mechanical properties of hierarchical composites across the scales. PMID:25758945

  18. Thermoplastic film prevents proppant flowback

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, P.D.; Weaver, J.D.; Parker, M.A.; King, D.G.

    1996-02-05

    Thermoplastic film added to proppants is effective and economical for preventing proppant flowback after an hydraulic fracturing treatment. Most other methods, such as resin-coated proppant and fiber, for controlling proppant flowback have drawbacks that added to treatment costs by requiring long downtime, costly additives, or frequent equipment replacement. Thermoplastic film does not react chemically with fracturing fluids. After the proppant is placed in the fracture, the film strips intertwine with the proppant grains or at higher temperatures, the strips become adhesive and shrink forming consolidated clusters that hold open the newly created fractures and prevent proppant from flowing back. The low cost of the film means that the strips can be used throughout the fracturing job or in selected stages. The strips are compatible with fracturing fluid chemistry, including breakers and crosslinkers, and can be used in wells with a wide range of bottom hole temperatures. The end result is a well that can be brought back on-line in a short time with little proppant flowback. This paper reviews the cost benefits and performance of these proppants.

  19. Joining of thermoplastic substrates by microwaves

    DOEpatents

    Paulauskas, Felix L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Meek, Thomas T. (Knoxville, TN)

    1997-01-01

    A method for joining two or more items having surfaces of thermoplastic material includes the steps of depositing an electrically-conductive material upon the thermoplastic surface of at least one of the items, and then placing the other of the two items adjacent the one item so that the deposited material is in intimate contact with the surfaces of both the one and the other items. The deposited material and the thermoplastic surfaces contacted thereby are then exposed to microwave radiation so that the thermoplastic surfaces in contact with the deposited material melt, and then pressure is applied to the two items so that the melted thermoplastic surfaces fuse to one another. Upon discontinuance of the exposure to the microwave energy, and after permitting the thermoplastic surfaces to cool from the melted condition, the two items are joined together by the fused thermoplastic surfaces. The deposited material has a thickness which is preferably no greater than a skin depth, .delta..sub.s, which is related to the frequency of the microwave radiation and characteristics of the deposited material in accordance with an equation.

  20. Rapid, controllable and environmentally benign fabrication of thermoplastic nanofibers and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong

    In situ fibrillar and lamellar hybrid morphology was found in various immiscible polymer blends prepared by melt ram extrusion of cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB)/Thermoplastics at a weight ratio of 80 to 20. The formation process was analyzed and proposed. The presence of the elongational flow field determines the formation of the fibrils, and the improvement of the mixing efficiency can significantly reduce the dimensions of formed fibrils into the submicro- or nano-scale. With above results, continuous and uniform yarns of thermoplastic nanofibers were prepared via direct melt twin-screw extrusion, providing better mixing efficiency of immiscible blends of thermoplastic polymers with cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB), and subsequent extraction removal of CAB matrix. The thermoplastics which can be made into nanofibers include polyesters, polyolefins, thermoplastic polyurethane and functional copolymers, such as PE-co-GMA (Poly(Ethylene-co-Glycidyl Methacrylate)), PVA-co-PE (Poly(Vinyl Alcohol-co-Ethylene)). Ratios of thermoplastics to sacrificial CAB matrix, melt viscosity, and interfacial tensions affect formation of the nanofibers. Moreover, the crystal structures of isotactic polypropylene (iPP) nanofiber prepared were characterized with DSC and WAXD. To further demonstrate the size and shape controllability of the thermoplastic nanomaterials, polyethylene materials were selected and prepared into micro- or submicrospheres or nanofibers with different diameters and shapes by varying the composition ratio and modifying the interface properties via melt blending or extrusion of cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB)/LDPE melt blends and subsequent removal of the CAB. The surface structures of the LDPE micro- or submicrospheres and nanofibers were analyzed using SEM, FTIR-ATR spectroscopy, DSC and torque rheometer. The biotechnological applications of the thermoplastic nanofibers are also exploited. Poly(ethylene-co-glycidyl methacrylate) (PE-co-GMA) nanofibers with abundant active epoxy groups on surfaces were fabricated through above technique. The prepared PE-co-GMA nanofibers were aminated by reacting the epoxy groups with 1,3-diaminopropane. The resulting aminated PE-co-GMA nanofibers were subsequently biotinylated and then successfully applied to immobilize streptavidin-horseradish peroxidase (HRP) conjugate via specific, strong and rapid binding of biotin and streptavidin. The high activity, efficiency, sensitivity as well as good reusability of the streptavidin-HRP immobilized PE-co-GMA nanofibers demonstrated that PE-co-GMA nanofibers could be a promising candidate as solid support materials for potential biosensor applications.

  1. Polymers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, David C.

    1986-01-01

    Presents an open-ended experiment which has students exploring polymer chemistry and reverse osmosis. This activity involves construction of a polymer membrane, use of it in a simple osmosis experiment, and application of its principles in solving a science-technology-society problem. (ML)

  2. Thermoplastic matrix composite processing model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dara, P. H.; Loos, A. C.

    1985-01-01

    The effects the processing parameters pressure, temperature, and time have on the quality of continuous graphite fiber reinforced thermoplastic matrix composites were quantitatively accessed by defining the extent to which intimate contact and bond formation has occurred at successive ply interfaces. Two models are presented predicting the extents to which the ply interfaces have achieved intimate contact and cohesive strength. The models are based on experimental observation of compression molded laminates and neat resin conditions, respectively. Identified as the mechanism explaining the phenomenon by which the plies bond to themselves is the theory of autohesion (or self diffusion). Theoretical predictions from the Reptation Theory between autohesive strength and contact time are used to explain the effects of the processing parameters on the observed experimental strengths. The application of a time-temperature relationship for autohesive strength predictions is evaluated. A viscoelastic compression molding model of a tow was developed to explain the phenomenon by which the prepreg ply interfaces develop intimate contact.

  3. Tough soluble aromatic thermoplastic copolyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Tough, soluble, aromatic, thermoplastic copolyimides were prepared by reacting 4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride, 3,4,3',4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride and 3,4'-oxydianiline. Alternatively, these copolyimides may be prepared by reacting 4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride with 3,4,3',4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride and 3,4'-oxydiisocyanate. Also, the copolyimide may be prepared by reacting the corresponding tetra acid and ester precursors of 4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride and 3,4,3',4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride with 3,4'-oxydianiline. These copolyimides were found to be soluble in common amide solvents such as N,N'-dimethyl acetamide, N-methylpyrrolidinone, and dimethylformamide allowing them to be applied as the fully imidized copolymer and to be used to prepare a wide range of articles.

  4. Interlaminar fracture toughness of thermoplastic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Johnston, Norman J.; O'Brien, T. Kevin

    1989-01-01

    Edge delamination tension and double cantilever beam tests were used to characterize the interlaminar fracture toughness of continuous graphite-fiber composites made from experimental thermoplastic polyimides and a model thermoplastic. Residual thermal stresses, known to be significant in materials processed at high temperatures, were included in the edge delamination calculations. In the model thermoplastic system (polycarbonate matrix), surface properties of the graphite fiber were shown to be significant. Cricital strain energy release rates for two different fibers having similar nominal tensile properties differed by 30 to 60 percent. The reason for the difference is not clear. Interlaminar toughness values for the thermoplastic polyimide composites (LARC-TPI and polyimidesulfone) were 3 to 4 in-lb/sq in. Scanning electron micrographs of the EDT fracture surfaces suggest poor fiber/matrix bonding. Residual thermal stresses account for up to 32 percent of the strain energy release in composites made from these high-temperature resins.

  5. Interlaminar fracture toughness of thermoplastic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkley, J.A.; Johnston, N.J.; Obrien, T.K.

    1988-02-01

    Edge delamination tension and double cantilever beam tests were used to characterize the interlaminar fracture toughness of continuous graphite-fiber composites made from experimental thermoplastic polyimides and a model thermoplastic. Residual thermal stresses, known to be significant in materials processed at high temperatures, were included in the edge delamination calculations. In the model thermoplastic system (polycarbonate matrix), surface properties of the graphite fiber were shown to be significant. Critical strain energy release rates for two different fibers having similar nominal tensile properties differed by 30 to 60%. The reason for the difference is not clear. Interlaminar toughness values for the thermoplastic polyimide composites (LARC-TPI and polyimidesulfone) were 3 to 4 in-lb/sq in. Scanning electron micrographs of the EDT fracture surfaces suggest poor fiber/matrix bonding. Residual thermal stresses account for up to 32% of the strain energy release in composites made from these high-temperature resins.

  6. Interlaminar fracture toughness of thermoplastic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, J. A.; Johnston, N. J.; Obrien, T. K.

    1988-01-01

    Edge delamination tension and double cantilever beam tests were used to characterize the interlaminar fracture toughness of continuous graphite-fiber composites made from experimental thermoplastic polyimides and a model thermoplastic. Residual thermal stresses, known to be significant in materials processed at high temperatures, were included in the edge delamination calculations. In the model thermoplastic system (polycarbonate matrix), surface properties of the graphite fiber were shown to be significant. Critical strain energy release rates for two different fibers having similar nominal tensile properties differed by 30 to 60 percent. The reason for the difference is not clear. Interlaminar toughness values for the thermoplastic polyimide composites (LARC-TPI and polyimidesulfone) were 3 to 4 in-lb/sq in. Scanning electron micrographs of the EDT fracture surfaces suggest poor fiber/matrix bonding. Residual thermal stresses account for up to 32 percent of the strain energy release in composites made from these high-temperature resins.

  7. Thermoplastic rubberlike material produced at low cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendel, F. J.

    1966-01-01

    Thermoplastic rubberlike material is prepared by blending a copolymer of ethylene and vinyl acetate with asphalt and a petroleum distillate. This low cost material is easily molded or extruded and is compatible with a variety of fillers.

  8. Optical sensing system for thermoplastic composites manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, R.D.; Kychakoff, G.

    1986-01-01

    An optical sensing system for a new method of manufacturing thermoplastic composite material is presented. The manufacturing process and its sensing requirements are discussed. The system architecture and several sensors which have been developed are described. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Process for preparing thermoplastic aromatic polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, V. L. (inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A method of preparing insoluble thermoplastic aromatic polyimides is described, having uniquely low softening temperatures by reacting, in a suitable solvent, an aromatic dianhydride, and a meta-substituted aromatic diamine.

  10. Energy recovery from thermoplastic waste sites

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, R.P.

    1994-12-31

    There are an estimated 500 million pounds of landfilled thermoplastic waste in private industrial landfills in the southeastern US. How to efficiently and effectively reduce the number of existing industrial thermoplastic waste landfill sites and recover the energy associated with the manufacturing of the waste thermoplastic materials buried in these landfills is the problem addressed by this proposed project. The project addresses the problem in three ways: (1) how to clean up industrial landfills where one-type product is buried; (2) how to recover the energy from waste thermoplastics buried in these landfills; and (3) how innovative technology can effectively recycle the waste materials in these landfills. Nylon is the most energy consuming thermoplastic to manufacture. Nylon requires 90,400 BTUs of energy per pound to manufacture. Compared with all other thermoplastics, it takes an average of 2.8 times more energy to manufacture than any other plastic. The project will recover 200 million pounds of waste nylon buried for 30 years in privately owned industrial landfills. This recovery process demonstrates energy savings, utilization of innovative technology developed specifically for this purpose, effective recycling of recovered waste materials into commercially marketable products, and creation of jobs in an economically depressed area, as a case study will show.

  11. Graphene-polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carotenuto, G.; Romeo, V.; Cannavaro, I.; Roncato, D.; Martorana, B.; Gosso, M.

    2012-09-01

    Graphene is a novel nanostructured material that can be conveniently used as filler for thermoplastic polymers or thermosetting resins, and the resulting nanocomposite material has unique mechanical and chemical/physical properties. Industrial production of graphene/polymer materials requires the availability of a chemical route to produce massive amount of graphene. Natural graphite flakes can be the best starting material for a bulk-production of graphene to be used in the polymeric nanocomposite preparation.

  12. Modelling laser light propagation in thermoplastics using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, Alexander

    Laser welding has great potential as a fast, non-contact joining method for thermoplastic parts. In the laser transmission welding of thermoplastics, light passes through a semi-transparent part to reach the weld interface. There, it is absorbed as heat, which causes melting and subsequent welding. The distribution and quantity of light reaching the interface are important for predicting the quality of a weld, but are experimentally difficult to estimate. A model for simulating the path of this laser light through these light-scattering plastic parts has been developed. The technique uses a Monte-Carlo approach to generate photon paths through the material, accounting for absorption, scattering and reflection between boundaries in the transparent polymer. It was assumed that any light escaping the bottom surface contributed to welding. The photon paths are then scaled according to the input beam profile in order to simulate non-Gaussian beam profiles. A method for determining the 3 independent optical parameters to accurately predict transmission and beam power distribution at the interface was established using experimental data for polycarbonate at 4 different glass fibre concentrations and polyamide-6 reinforced with 20% long glass fibres. Exit beam profiles and transmissions predicted by the simulation were found to be in generally good agreement (R2>0.90) with experimental measurements. The simulations allowed the prediction of transmission and power distributions at other thicknesses as well as information on reflection, energy absorption and power distributions at other thicknesses for these materials.

  13. Investigations on laser transmission welding of absorber-free thermoplastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamuschkin, Viktor; Olowinsky, Alexander; Britten, Simon W.; Engelmann, Christoph

    2014-03-01

    Within the plastic industry laser transmission welding ranks among the most important joining techniques and opens up new application areas continuously. So far, a big disadvantage of the process was the fact that the joining partners need different optical properties. Since thermoplastics are transparent for the radiation of conventional beam sources (800- 1100 nm) the absorbance of one of the joining partners has to be enhanced by adding an infrared absorber (IR-absorber). Until recently, welding of absorber-free parts has not been possible. New diode lasers provide a broad variety of wavelengths which allows exploiting intrinsic absorption bands of thermoplastics. The use of a proper wavelength in combination with special optics enables laser welding of two optically identical polymer parts without absorbers which can be utilized in a large number of applications primarily in the medical and food industry, where the use of absorbers usually entails costly and time-consuming authorization processes. In this paper some aspects of the process are considered as the influence of the focal position, which is crucial when both joining partners have equal optical properties. After a theoretical consideration, an evaluation is carried out based on welding trials with polycarbonate (PC). Further aspects such as gap bridging capability and the influence of thickness of the upper joining partner are investigated as well.

  14. Computational modelling of a thermoforming process for thermoplastic starch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szegda, D.; Song, J.; Warby, M. K.; Whiteman, J. R.

    2007-05-01

    Plastic packaging waste currently forms a significant part of municipal solid waste and as such is causing increasing environmental concerns. Such packaging is largely non-biodegradable and is particularly difficult to recycle or to reuse due to its complex composition. Apart from limited recycling of some easily identifiable packaging wastes, such as bottles, most packaging waste ends up in landfill sites. In recent years, in an attempt to address this problem in the case of plastic packaging, the development of packaging materials from renewable plant resources has received increasing attention and a wide range of bioplastic materials based on starch are now available. Environmentally these bioplastic materials also reduce reliance on oil resources and have the advantage that they are biodegradable and can be composted upon disposal to reduce the environmental impact. Many food packaging containers are produced by thermoforming processes in which thin sheets are inflated under pressure into moulds to produce the required thin wall structures. Hitherto these thin sheets have almost exclusively been made of oil-based polymers and it is for these that computational models of thermoforming processes have been developed. Recently, in the context of bioplastics, commercial thermoplastic starch sheet materials have been developed. The behaviour of such materials is influenced both by temperature and, because of the inherent hydrophilic characteristics of the materials, by moisture content. Both of these aspects affect the behaviour of bioplastic sheets during the thermoforming process. This paper describes experimental work and work on the computational modelling of thermoforming processes for thermoplastic starch sheets in an attempt to address the combined effects of temperature and moisture content. After a discussion of the background of packaging and biomaterials, a mathematical model for the deformation of a membrane into a mould is presented, together with its finite element discretisation. This model depends on material parameters of the thermoplastic and details of tests undertaken to determine these and the results produced are given. Finally the computational model is applied for a thin sheet of commercially available thermoplastic starch material which is thermoformed into a specific mould. Numerical results of thickness and shape for this problem are given.

  15. ADVANCED NANOIMPRINT TECHNIQUE FOR MULTILAYER STRUCTURES AND FUNCTIONAL POLYMER APPLICATIONS 

    E-print Network

    Park, Hyunsoo

    2010-07-14

    in thermoplastic polymers using optimized nanoimprint lithography techniques such as layer-transfer and transfer-bonding methods are developed in this dissertation work. The capability and flexibility of the techniques developed here are expected to have deep...

  16. Characterization of thermoplastic polyimide NEW-TPI reg sign

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, T.H. ); Reddy, R.M. )

    1991-01-01

    Thermal and rheological properties of a commercial thermoplastic polyimide, NEW-TPI{reg sign}, were characterized. The as-received material possesses initially a transient crystallite form with a bimodal distribution in peak melting temperatures. After the meltings of the initial crystallite structures, the sample can be recrystallized by various thermal treatments. A bi-modal or single modal melting peak distribution is formed for annealing temperatures below or above 360C respectively. The recrystallized crystallinities are all transient in nature. The polymers are unable to be recrystallized after being subjected to elevated temperature annealing above 450C. The recrystallization mechanism was postulated, and a simple kinetics model was found to describe the behavior rather satisfactorily under the conditions of prolonged thermal annealing.

  17. Effect of halogenation on the shock properties of semicrystalline thermoplastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, N. K.; Millett, J. C. F.; Brown, E. N.; Gray, G. T.

    2007-09-01

    The high-strain rate response of polymers is a subject that has gathered interest over recent years due to their increasing engineering importance, particularly in the transport industries. This work explores the effect of fluorination upon semicrystalline thermoplastics. Polyethylene, with its simple hydrocarbon chain, is considered; with increasing fluorination of the carbon backbone polyvinylidene difluoride, and then polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) is also compared. All three show a nonlinear equation of state behavior, which may be related to partial crystallinity. PTFE is shown to have anomalous release speed, which reflects its transformation from phase II to phase III transition at 0.7 GPa. Strength effects show a different ordering of behavior between the three materials. The first results are accountable purely using van der Waals forces between the chains. However, strength effects show the effect of further attractive forces that indicate some tacticity in the material associated with the state behind the shock.

  18. Production and properties of micro-cellulose reinforced thermoplastic starch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kmetty, Á.; Karger-Kocsis, J.; Czigány, T.

    2015-02-01

    Thermoplastic starch (TPS)/micro-fibrillated cellulose (MFC) composites were prepared from maize starch with different amount of distilled water, glycerol and cellulose reinforcement. The components were homogenized by kneader and twin roll technique. The produced TPS and TPS-based polymer composites were qualified by static and dynamic mechanical tests and their morphology was analysed by microscopic techniques. The results showed that the amount of water and the order of the production steps control the properties of both the TPS and its MFC reinforced version. With increasing content of MFC the stiffness and strength of the TPS matrix increased, as expected. Microscopic inspection revealed that the TPS has a homogenous structure and the MFC is well dispersed therein when suitable preparation conditions were selected.

  19. Thermoplastic Elastomers via polyolefin/Layered Silicate Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalluru, Sri; Cochran, Eric

    2013-03-01

    Here we report the synthesis of fully exfoliated polyolefin nanocomposites via Surface-Initiated Ring Opening Metathesis Polymerization (SI-ROMP). Montmorillonite (MMT) clay platelets were rendered hydrophobic through ion exchange with alkyl-ammonium surfactants terminated with norbornene. We were then able to form block copolymer brushes of (substituted) norbornenes and cyclopentene via SI-ROMP. Subsequent hydrogenation yielded highly crystalline polyethylene and rubbery saturated polynorbornenes, thus giving a thermoplastic elastomer. Nanocomposites were prepared with different nanofiller percentages and were characterized for morphological (XRD, TEM), thermal (TGA, DSC), and mechanical (DMA, Rheology) properties. Complete exfoliation of nanocomposites was confirmed by XRD and TEM. A fraction of the polymer brushes were subsequently removed from their substrate by reverse ion exchange and characterized in parallel with their corresponding nanocomposite analogs. In this way we were able to directly assess the role of the filler particle in the thermal properties, melt rheology, morphology, and tensile properties.

  20. Plastic wastes as modifiers of the thermoplasticity of coal

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Diez; C. Barriocanal; R. Alvarez

    2005-12-01

    Plastic waste recycling represents a major challenge in environmental protection with different routes now available for dealing with mechanical, chemical, and energy recycling. New concepts in plastic waste recycling have emerged so that now such wastes can be used to replace fossil fuels, either as an energy source or as a secondary raw material. Our objective is to explore the modification of the thermoplastic properties of coal in order to assess the possibility of adding plastic waste to coal for the production of metallurgical coke. Two bituminous coals of different rank and thermoplastic properties were used as a base component of blends with plastic wastes such as high-density polyethylene (HDPE), low-density polyethylene (LDPE), polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS), poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), and acrilonitrile-butadiene-styrene copolymer (ABS). In all cases, the addition of plastic waste led to a reduction in Gieseler maximum fluidity, the extent of the reduction depending on the fluidity of the base coal, and the amount, the molecular structure, and the thermal behavior of the polymer. As a consequence, the amount of volatile matter released by the plastic waste before, during, and after the maximum fluidity of the coal and the hydrogen-donor and hydrogen-acceptor capacities of the polymer were concluded to be key factors in influencing the extent of the reduction in fluidity and the development of anisotropic carbons. The incorporation of the plastic to the carbon matrix was clearly established in semicokes produced from blends of a high-fluid coal and the plastic tested by SEM examination. 42 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Semi-interpenetrating polymer network's of polyimides: Fracture toughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Marion Glenn

    1988-01-01

    The objective was to improve the fracture toughness of the PMR-15 thermosetting polyimide by co-disolving LaRC-TPI, a thermoplastic polyimide. The co-solvation of a thermoplastic into a thermoset produces an interpenetration of the thermoplastic polymer into the thermoset polyimide network. A second research program was planned around the concept that to improve the fracture toughness of a thermoset polyimide polymer, the molecular weight between crosslink points would be an important macromolecular topological parameter in producing a fracture toughened semi-IPN polyimide.

  2. Post polymerization cure shape memory polymers

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Thomas S; Hearon, Michael Keith; Bearinger, Jane P

    2014-11-11

    This invention relates to chemical polymer compositions, methods of synthesis, and fabrication methods for devices regarding polymers capable of displaying shape memory behavior (SMPs) and which can first be polymerized to a linear or branched polymeric structure, having thermoplastic properties, subsequently processed into a device through processes typical of polymer melts, solutions, and dispersions and then crossed linked to a shape memory thermoset polymer retaining the processed shape.

  3. Environmentally degradable, high-performance thermoplastics from phenolic phytomonomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Tatsuo; Thi, Tran Hang; Shi, Dong Jian; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2006-12-01

    Aliphatic polyesters, such as poly(lactic acid), which degrade by hydrolysis, from naturally occurring molecules form the main components of biodegradable plastics. However, these polyesters have become substitutes for only a small percentage of the currently used plastic materials because of their poor thermal and mechanical properties. Polymers that degrade into natural molecules and have a performance closer to that of engineering plastics would be highly desirable. Although the use of a high-strength filler such as a bacterial cellulose or modified lignin greatly increases the plastic properties, it is the matrix polymer that determines the intrinsic properties of the composite. The introduction of an aromatic component into the thermoplastic polymer backbone is an efficient method to intrinsically improve the material performance. Here, we report the preparation of environmentally degradable, liquid crystalline, wholly aromatic polyesters. The polyesters were derived from polymerizable plant-derived chemicals-in other words, `phytomonomers' that are widely present as lignin biosynthetic precursors. The mechanical performance of these materials surpasses that of current biodegradable plastics, with a mechanical strength, ?, of 63MPa, a Young's modulus, E, of 16GPa, and a maximum softening temperature of 169?C. On light irradiation, their mechanical properties improved further and the rate of hydrolysis accelerated.

  4. Polyurethane thermoplastic elastomers with inherent radiopacity for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Kiran, S; James, Nirmala R; Jayakrishnan, A; Joseph, Roy

    2012-12-01

    Synthesis and characterization of three different radiopaque thermoplastic polyurethane elastomers are reported. Radiopacity was introduced to the polyurethanes by incorporating an iodinated chain extender, namely, 4,4'-isopropylidinedi-(2,6-diiodophenol) (IBPA), into the polymer chain during polyurethane synthesis. Radiopaque polyurethanes (RPUs) were synthesized by reacting 4,4'-methylenebis(phenyl isocyanate) (MDI), IBPA, and three different diols. The polyols used for the synthesis were polypropylene glycol, polycaprolactone diol, and poly(hexamethylene carbonate) diol. RPUs were characterized by infrared spectroscopy, contact angle measurements, thermogravimetry, dynamic mechanical analysis, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, gel permeation chromatography, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, and X-radiography. X-ray images showed that all RPUs prepared using IBPA as the chain extender are highly radiopaque compared with an Aluminum wedge of equivalent thickness. Elemental analysis revealed that the polyurethanes contained 18-19% iodine in the polymer matrix. The RPUs developed have radiopacity equivalent to that of a polymer filled with 20 wt % barium sulfate. Results revealed that RPUs of wide range of properties may be produced by incorporating different diols as the soft chain segment. Cell culture cytotoxicity studies conducted using L929 cells by direct contact test and MTT assay proved that these RPUs are noncytotoxic in nature. PMID:22815186

  5. Laser transmission welding of long glass fiber reinforced thermoplastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Straeten, Kira; Engelmann, Christoph; Olowinsky, Alexander; Gillner, Arnold

    2015-03-01

    Joining fiber reinforced polymers is an important topic for lightweight construction. Since classical laser transmission welding techniques for polymers have been studied and established in industry for many years joint-strengths within the range of the base material can be achieved. Until now these processes are only used for unfilled and short glass fiber-reinforced thermoplastics using laser absorbing and laser transparent matrices. This knowledge is now transferred to joining long glass fiber reinforced PA6 with high fiber contents without any adhesive additives. As the polymer matrix and glass fibers increase the scattering of the laser beam inside the material, their optical properties, changing with material thickness and fiber content, influence the welding process and require high power lasers. In this article the influence of these material properties (fiber content, material thickness) and the welding parameters like joining speed, laser power and clamping pressure are researched and discussed in detail. The process is also investigated regarding its limitations. Additionally the gap bridging ability of the process is shown in relation to material properties and joining speed.

  6. A multi-purpose thermoplastic polyimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saint Clair, A. K.; Saint Clair, T. L.

    1981-01-01

    A linear thermoplastic polyimide, LARC-TPI, has been characterized and developed for a variety of high-temperature applications. In its fully imidized form, this new material can be used as an adhesive for bonding metals such as titanium, aluminum, copper, brass, and stainless steel. LARC-TPI is being evaluated as a thermoplastic for bonding large pieces of polyimide film to produce flexible, 100% void-free laminates for flexible circuit applications. The further development of LARC-TPI as a potential molding powder, composite matrix resin, high-temperature film and fiber will also be discussed.

  7. A multi-purpose thermoplastic polyimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saint Clair, A. K.; Saint Clair, T. L.

    1981-01-01

    A linear thermoplastic polyimide, LARC-TPI, has been characterized and developed for a variety of high-temperature applications. In its fully imidized form, this new material can be used as an adhesive for bonding metals such as titanium, aluminum, copper, brass, and stainless steel. LARC-TPI is being evaluated as a thermoplastic for bonding large pieces of polyimide film to produce flexible, 100% void-free laminates for flexible circuit applications. The further development of LARC-TPI as a potential molding powder, composite matrix resin, high-temperature film and fiber is also discussed.

  8. Biopolymer-based thermoplastic mixture for producing solid biodegradable shaped bodies and its photo degradation stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulong, Nurulsaidatulsyida; Rus, Anika Zafiah M.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, biopolymers with controllable lifetimes have become increasingly important for many applications in the areas of agriculture, biomedical implants and drug release, forestry, wild life conservation and waste management. Natural oils are considered to be the most important class of renewable sources. They can be obtained from naturally occurring plants, such as sunflower, cotton, linseed and palm oil. In Malaysia, palm oil is an inexpensive and commodity material. Biopolymer produced from palm oil (Bio-VOP) is a naturally occurring biodegradable polymer and readily available from agriculture. For packaging use however, Bio-VOP is not thermoplastic and its granular form is unsuitable for most uses in the plastics industry, mainly due to processing difficulties during extrusion or injection moulding. Thus, research workers have developed several methods to blend Bio-VOP appropriately for industrial uses. In particular, injections moulding processes, graft copolymerisation, and preparation of blends with thermoplastic polymers have been studied to produce solid biodegradable shaped bodies. HDPE was chosen as commercial thermoplastic materials and was added with 10% Bio-VOP for the preparation of solid biodegradable shaped bodies named as HD-VOP. The UV light exposure of HD-VOP at 12 minutes upon gives the highest strength of this material that is 17.6 MPa. The morphological structure of HD-VOP shows dwi structure surface fracture which is brittle and ductile properties.

  9. Process for crosslinking and extending conjugated diene-containing polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Vernon L. (inventor); Havens, Stephen J. (inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A process using a Diels-Alder reaction which increases the molecular weight and/or crosslinks polymers by reacting the polymers with bisunsaturated dienophiles is developed. The polymer comprises at least 75% by weight based on the reaction product, has a molecular weight of at least 5000 and a plurality of conjugated 1,3-diene systems incorporated into the molecular structure. A dienophile reaction with the conjugated 1,3-diene of the polymer is at least 1% by weight based on the reaction product. Examples of the polymer include polyesters, polyamides, polyethers, polysulfones and copolymers. The bisunsaturated dienophiles may include bis-maleimides, bis maleic and bis tumaric esters and amides. This method for expanding the molecular weight chains of the polymers, preferable thermoplastics, is advantageous for processing or fabricating thermoplastics. A low molecular weight thermoplastic is converted to a high molecular weight plastic having improved strength and toughness for use in the completed end use article.

  10. In-Plane Shear Characterisation of Uni-Directionally Reinforced Thermoplastic Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haanappel, S. P.; ten Thije, R.; Sachs, U.; Rietman, A. D.; Akkerman, R.

    2011-05-01

    Intra-ply shear is an important mechanism in hot stamp forming processes of UD fibre reinforced thermoplastic laminates. Various methods have been developed to characterise this shear mechanism, but measured properties may differ for several orders of magnitude. Therefore, an alternative method to characterise the longitudinal shearing viscosity is presented. Straight fibre reinforced thermoplastic bars with a rectangular cross section are subjected to torsional loadings. The specimens' response can be used to characterise the shear properties of the fibre reinforced polymer melt. Different geometries and clamping conditions were modelled to show the sensitivity of the measured viscosity. Based on this, experiments were performed with thick bars with a PEI-AS4 and PEEK-AS4 composition. Frequency sweeps were applied at different temperatures. All measurements showed a clear shear thinning behaviour, which can conveniently be described with a power law model.

  11. Characterization of flammability properties of some thermoplastic and thermoset resins. [for aircraft interiors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    The thermochemical and flammability properties of some thermally stable polymers considered for use in aircraft interiors are described. The properties studied include: (1) thermomechanical properties such as glass transition and melt temperature; (2) dynamic thermogravimetric analysis in anaerobic environment; (3) flammability properties such as oxygen index, flame spread, and smoke evolution; and (4) selected physical properties. The thermoplastic polymers evaluated included polyphenylene sulfide, polyaryl sulfone, 9,9-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-fluorene polycarbonate-poly(dimethylsiloxane) and polyether sulfone. The thermoset polymers evaluated included epoxy, bismaleimide, a modified phenolic and polyaromatic melamine resin. These resins were primarily used in the fabrication of glass reinforced prepregs for the construction of experimental panels. Test results and relative rankings of some of the flammability parameters are presented and the relationship of the molecular structure, char yield, and flammability properties of these polymers are discussed.

  12. Deformational characteristics of thermoplastic elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indukuri, Kishore K.

    This thesis focuses primarily on the structure-property relationships of poly (styrene-ethylene-butylene-styrene) triblock copolymer TPEs. First evidence for strain-induced crystallization occurring in certain SEBS block copolymers has been established using unique techniques like deformation calorimetry, combined in-situ small angle X-ray and wide angle X-ray diffraction (SAXD/WAXD). Also the ramifications of such strain-induced crystallization on the mechanical properties like cyclic hysteresis, stress relaxation/creep retention of these SEBS systems have been studied. In addition, the structural changes in the morphology of these systems on deformation have been investigated using combined SAXD/WAXD setup. Small angle X-ray diffraction probed the changes at the nano-scale of polystyrene (PS) cylinders, while wide angle X-ray diffraction probed the changes at molecular length scales of the amorphous/crystalline domains of the elastomeric mid-block in these systems. New structural features at both these length scales have been observed and incorporated into the overall deformation mechanisms of the material. Continuous processing techniques like extrusion have been used to obtain ultra long-range order and orientation in these SEBS systems. Thus well ordered crystal like hexagonal packing of cylinders, where in each element in this hexagonal lattice can be individually addressed without any grain boundaries can be realized using these robust techniques. The effect of long-range order/orientation on the mechanical properties has been studied. In addition, these well ordered systems serve as model systems for evaluating deformation mechanisms of these SEBS systems, where the relative contributions of each of the phases can be estimated. EPDM/i-PP thermoplastic vulcanizates (TPVs) have micron size scale phase separated morphologies of EPDM rubber dispersed in a semicrystalline i-PP matrix as a result of the dynamic vulcanization process. Confocal microscopy studies, along with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies show that the morphology of these EPDM/i-PP systems resembles a microcellular "filled" foam in which i-PP occupies the strut regions and EPDM the inner core. Based on this, an analytical model has been developed that takes into account composition information, molecular weight, cure state and morphology into account.

  13. Thermoplastic Composite Materials for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casula, G.; Lenzi, F.; Vitiello, C.

    2008-08-01

    Mechanical and thermo-physical properties of composites materials with thermoplastic matrix (PEEK/IM7, TPI/IM7 and PPS/IM7) used for aerospace applications have been analyzed as function of two different process techniques: compression molding and fiber placement process "hot gas assisted."

  14. Biodegradation Of thermoplastic polyurethanes from vegetable oils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermoplastic urethanes based on polyricinoleic acid soft segments and MDI/BD hard segments with varied soft segment concentration were prepared. Soft segment concentration was varied fro, 40 to 70 wt %. Biodegradation was studied by respirometry. Segmented polyurethanes with soft segments based ...

  15. Ultrasonic Welding of Graphite/Thermoplastic Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, S. S.; Page, D. B.

    1982-01-01

    Ultrasonic welding of graphite/thermoplastic composite materials eliminates need for fasteners (which require drilling or punching, add weight, and degrade stiffness) and can be totally automated in beam fabrication and assembly jigs. Feasibility of technique has been demonstrated in laboratory tests which show that neither angular orientation nor vacuum affect weld quality.

  16. Biodegradable Thermoplastic Polyurethanes Incorporating Polyhedral Oligosilsesquioxane

    E-print Network

    Mather, Patrick T.

    Biodegradable Thermoplastic Polyurethanes Incorporating Polyhedral Oligosilsesquioxane Pamela T polyurethane (TPU) system that incorporates an organic, biodegradable poly(D,L- lactide) soft block with a hard other biodegradable materials. This elasticity is attributed to physical cross-links formed in the hard

  17. Vegetable Oil Derived Solvent, and Catalyst Free “Click Chemistry” Thermoplastic Polytriazoles

    PubMed Central

    Floros, Michael C.; Leão, Alcides Lopes; Narine, Suresh S.

    2014-01-01

    Azide-alkyne Huisgen “click” chemistry provides new synthetic routes for making thermoplastic polytriazole polymers—without solvent or catalyst. This method was used to polymerize three diester dialkyne monomers with a lipid derived 18 carbon diazide to produce a series of polymers (labelled C18C18, C18C9, and C18C4 based on monomer chain lengths) free of residual solvent and catalyst. Three diester dialkyne monomers were synthesized with ester chain lengths of 4, 9, and 18 carbons from renewable sources. Significant differences in thermal and mechanical properties were observed between C18C9 and the two other polymers. C18C9 presented a lower melting temperature, higher elongation at break, and reduced Young's modulus compared to C18C4 and C18C18. This was due to the “odd-even” effect induced by the number of carbon atoms in the monomers which resulted in orientation of the ester linkages of C18C9 in the same direction, thereby reducing hydrogen bonding. The thermoplastic polytriazoles presented are novel polymers derived from vegetable oil with favourable mechanical and thermal properties suitable for a large range of applications where no residual solvent or catalyst can be tolerated. Their added potential biocompatibility and biodegradability make them ideal for applications in the medical and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:25032224

  18. Thermoplastic shape-memory polyurethanes based on natural oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saralegi, Ainara; Foster, E. Johan; Weder, Christoph; Eceiza, Arantxa; Corcuera, Maria Angeles

    2014-02-01

    A new family of segmented thermoplastic polyurethanes with thermally activated shape-memory properties was synthesized and characterized. Polyols derived from castor oil with different molecular weights but similar chemical structures and a corn-sugar-based chain extender (propanediol) were used as starting materials in order to maximize the content of carbon from renewable resources in the new materials. The composition was systematically varied to establish a structure-property map and identify compositions with desirable shape-memory properties. The thermal characterization of the new polyurethanes revealed a microphase separated structure, where both the soft (by convention the high molecular weight diol) and the hard phases were highly crystalline. Cyclic thermo-mechanical tensile tests showed that these polymers are excellent candidates for use as thermally activated shape-memory polymers, in which the crystalline soft segments promote high shape fixity values (close to 100%) and the hard segment crystallites ensure high shape recovery values (80-100%, depending on the hard segment content). The high proportion of components from renewable resources used in the polyurethane formulation leads to the synthesis of bio-based polyurethanes with shape-memory properties.

  19. 3-D stamp forming of thermoplastic matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, M.; Friedrich, K.

    1994-03-01

    In this investigation a mould with hemispherical cavity and 80 kN hydraulic press, allowing variable stamping speeds, are employed for experimentally studying of the 3-D stamp forming process of continuous fiber reinforced thermoplastic laminates. In particular, glass fiber (GF) reinforced polyetherimide (PEI) woven fabric made of sheath surrounded, polymer powder impregnated fiber bundles manufactured by Enichem, Italy, is used. Pre-consolidated laminates are heated by contact heating in an external heater up to about 120°C above the glass transition temperature ( T g) of the polymer matrix; they are then stamp formed in a cold matched metal tool. Typical cycle times (including preheating time of the preconsolidated laminates) are in the range of 3 min. Useful processing conditions, such as stamping temperature, stamping velocity and hold-down pressure required for stamp forming of this composite are determined. In addition the effect of die geometries (deformation radian) and original laminate dimensions are studied. The results describe the correlations between processing parameters and fiber buckling. Finally the thickness distribution in stamped parts are investigated in relation to different directions of fiber orientation.

  20. Novel compostable materials based upon thermoplastic polyurethanes and native starch and the production of films thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Seidenstuecker, T.; Fritz, H.G.

    1996-12-31

    Certain types of thermoplastic poly(urethanes) (TPU) are biodegradable. The biodegradability depends upon the structure of the polymer chains. Effective chain scission can only be catalysed by enzymes, which occur abundantly in compost environments, if functional groups are present in the backbone that are highly prone to hydrolysis. Especially certain thermoplastic polyesters were found to be biodegradable. In terms of TPUs the proneness to hydrolysis can be achieved be synthesizing thermoplastic poly(ester-urethanes) that contain as many aster-bonds as possible alongside the backbone. We have investigated the degradability of different types of TPUs in various environments. The incorporation of native starch not only increases the rate of degradation but alters the material properties. This alternation of properties depends upon the filler content and type of starch incorporated. For instance, the higher the starch content is the stiffer the compound becomes. Here it was possible to incorporate up to 70 wt. % of starch. Also, using these components it could be confirmed that special types of starch with small medium particle diameters (< 10 {mu}m) have higher tensile properties and are stiffer compared to native starch with particle diameters above 10 {mu}m. The production of films with various compounds is possible and important film properties as well as applications will be introduced.

  1. Production of continuous fiber thermoplastic composites by in-situ pultrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epple, S.; Bonten, C.

    2014-05-01

    The constructive design in the automotive industry, but also in many other industrial sectors has changed steadily over the past decades. It became much more complex due to e.g. increased use of hybrid materials. Combined with the desire to minimize the weight of vehicles and thus the CO2 emissions, the use of low density materials and especially fiber-reinforced plastics is increasing. E.g. Continuous fiber thermoplastic composites are used to reinforce injection molded parts. Low viscosity monomers like caprolactam, which is used to produce polyamide 6 by anionic polymerization are able to easily impregnate and penetrate the textile reinforcement. After wetting the fibers, the ring-opening polymerization starts and the matrix is becoming a polymer. At IKT, a method based on the RIM process (reaction injection molding) was developed to produce continuous fiber thermoplastic composites with high contents of continuous glass fibers. The anionic polymerization of polyamide 6 was now combined with the pultrusion process. Continuous glass fibers are pulled through a mold and wetted with caprolactam (including activator and catalyst). After the material polymerized in the mould, the finished continuous fiber thermoplastic composites can be pulled out and is finally sawn off.

  2. Thermoplastics-moving into series production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offringa, Arnt R.

    Continuous fiber reinforced thermoplastic products are gradually moving from the development phase into series production. The relative simplicity and cost-effectiveness of a number of innovative manufacturing technologies provides the incentive for their application. Examples of technologies developed and in production are thermofolding, deep-drawing, press forming, transition molding and welding. These manufacturing methods are dependable and reproducible. The development of a product must be closely tuned to its final application. Therefore, close cooperation between the part manufacturer, the material supplier and the end-user is essential. Thermoplastics are presently applied in a number of civil aircraft programs in both structural and non-structural components. Examples are aircraft flap ribs, ice protection plates and wing panels.

  3. LARC-TPI and new thermoplastic polyimides

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, A.; Ohta, M.

    1987-02-01

    The LARC-TPI linear thermoplastic polyimide has been developed by NASA for high temperature adhesive applications in aerospace structures in the forms of varnish, films, powders, and prepregs. LARC-TPI improves adhesive processability and lowers glass transition temperature, while retaining mechanical, thermal and electrical properties inherent in the polyimides. It may be used as a structural adhesive for metals, composites, ceramics, and films. 8 references.

  4. Thermoforming of Continuous Fibre Reinforced Thermoplastic Composites

    SciTech Connect

    McCool, Rauri; Murphy, Adrian; Wilson, Ryan; Jiang Zhenyu; Price, Mark

    2011-05-04

    The introduction of new materials, particularly for aerospace products, is not a simple, quick or cheap task. New materials require extensive and expensive qualification and must meet challenging strength, stiffness, durability, manufacturing, inspection and maintenance requirements. Growth in industry acceptance for fibre reinforced thermoplastic composite systems requires the determination of whole life attributes including both part processing and processed part performance data. For thermoplastic composite materials the interactions between the processing parameters, in-service structural performance and end of life recyclability are potentially interrelated. Given the large number and range of parameters and the complexity of the potential relationships, understanding for whole life design must be developed in a systematic building block approach. To assess and demonstrate such an approach this article documents initial coupon level thermoforming trials for a commercially available fibre reinforced thermoplastic laminate, identifying the key interactions between processing and whole life performance characteristics. To examine the role of the thermoforming process parameters on the whole life performance characteristics of the formed part requires a series of manufacturing trials combined with a series of characterisation tests on the manufacturing trial output. Using a full factorial test programme and considering all possible process parameters over a range of potential magnitudes would result in a very large number of manufacturing trials and accompanying characterisation tests. Such an approach would clearly be expensive and require significant time to complete, therefore failing to address the key requirement for a future design methodology capable of rapidly generating design knowledge for new materials and processes. In this work the role of mould tool temperature and blank forming temperature on the thermoforming of a commercially available thermoplastic based composite laminate is investigated followed by post processed part characterization. Key findings include an optimized composite processing window, and the influence of raw material blank forming temperature and mould tool temperature on part crystallinity and flexural strength. This process study forms one element of a major project structure which has been designed to address the gap between design, analysis and manufacturing, using at its core, a digital framework for the creation and management of performance parameters related to the lifecycle performance of thermoplastic composite structures.

  5. Biosynthesis of novel thermoplastic polythioesters by engineered Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lütke-Eversloh, Tina; Fischer, Andreas; Remminghorst, Uwe; Kawada, Jumpei; Marchessault, Robert H.; Bögershausen, Ansgar; Kalwei, Martin; Eckert, Hellmut; Reichelt, Rudolf; Liu, Shuang-Jiang; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2002-12-01

    The development of non-petrochemical sources for the plastics industry continues to progress as large multinationals focus on renewable resources to replace fossil carbon. Many bacteria are known to accumulate polyoxoesters as water-insoluble granules in the cytoplasm. The thermoplastic and/or elastomeric behaviour of these biodegradable polymers holds promise for the development of various technological applications. Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of microbial polythioesters (PTEs), a novel class of biopolymers of general technological relevance. Biosynthesis of PTE homopolymers was achieved using a recombinant strain of Escherichia coli that expressed a non-natural pathway consisting of a butyrate kinase, a phosphotransbutyrylase, and a PHA synthase. Different homopolymers were produced, consisting of either 3-mercaptopropionate, 3-mercaptobutyrate, or 3-mercaptovalerate repeating units, if the respective mercaptoalkanoic acids were provided as precursor substrates to the fermentative process. The PTEs contributed up to 30% (w/w) of the cellular dry weight and were identified as hydrophobic inclusions in the cytoplasm. The chemical and stereochemical homogeneity of the purified PTEs were identified by different methods, and the estimated physical properties were compared to the oxypolyester equivalents, revealing low crystalline order and, for the poly(3-mercaptopropionate) improved thermal stability. The ability to produce PTEs through a biosynthetic route opens up new avenues in the field of biomaterials.

  6. Thermoplastic encapsulation of waste surrogates by high-shear mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Lageraaen, P.R.; Kalb, P.D.; Patel, B.R.

    1995-12-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has developed a robust, extrusion-based polyethylene encapsulation process applicable to a wide range of solid and aqueous low-level radioactive, hazardous and mixed wastes. However, due to the broad range of physical and chemical properties of waste materials, pretreatment of these wastes is often required to make them amenable to processing with polyethylene. As part of the scope of work identified in FY95 {open_quotes}Removal and Encapsulation of Heavy Metals from Ground Water,{close_quotes} EPA SERDP No. 387, that specifies a review of potential thermoplastic processing techniques, and in order to investigate possible pretreatment alternatives, BNL conducted a vendor test of the Draiswerke Gelimat (thermokinetic) mixer on April 25, 1995 at their test facility in Mahwah, NJ. The Gelimat is a batch operated, high-shear, high-intensity fluxing mixer that is often used for mixing various materials and specifically in the plastics industry for compounding additives such as stabilizers and/or colorants with polymers.

  7. Polymer Selection for Biphenyl Degradation in a Solid-Liquid Two-Phase Partitioning Bioreactor

    E-print Network

    Daugulis, Andrew J.

    Polymer Selection for Biphenyl Degradation in a Solid-Liquid Two-Phase Partitioning Bioreactor Lars, Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6 The commercially available thermoplastic polymer Hytrel was selected biphenyl. The partitioning of biphenyl between the selected polymers and water was analogous

  8. Tough poly(arylene ether) thermoplastics as modifiers for bismaleimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenzenberger, H. D.; Roemer, W.; Hergenrother, P. M.; Jensen, B. J.

    1989-01-01

    Several aspects of research on thermoplastics as toughness modifiers are discussed, including the contribution of the backbone chemistry and the concentration of the poly(arylene ether) thermoplastic to fracture toughness, influence of the molecular weight of the poly(arylene ether) thermoplastic on neat resin fracture toughness, and the morphology of the thermoplastic modified networks. The results show that fracture toughness of brittle bismaleimide resins can be improved significantly with poly(arylene ether) thermoplastic levels of 20 percent by weight, and that high molecular weight poly(arylene ether) based on bisphenol A provides the highest degree of toughening. Preliminary composite evaluation shows that improvements in neat resin toughness translate into carbon fabric composite.

  9. Multiblock thermoplastic polyurethanes for biomedical and shape memory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xinzhu

    Polyurethanes are a class of polymers that are capable of tailoring the overall polymer structure and thus final properties by many factors. The great potential in tailoring polymer structures imparts PUs unique mechanical properties and good cytocompatibility, which make them good candidates for many biomedical devices. In this dissertation, three families of multiblock thermoplastic polyurethanes are synthesized and characterized for biomedical and shape memory applications. In the first case described in Chapters 2, 3 and 4, a novel family of multiblock thermoplastic polyurethanes consisting of poly(?-caprolactone) (PCL) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) are presented. These materials were discovered to be very durable, with strain-to-break higher than 1200%. Heat-triggered reversible plasticity shape memory (RPSM) was observed, where the highly deformed samples completely recovered their as-cast shape within one minute when heating above the transition temperature. Instead of conventional "hard" blocks, entanglements, which result from high molecular weight, served as the physical crosslinks in this system, engendering shape recovery and preventing flow. Moreover, water-triggered shape memory effect of PCL-PEG TPUs is explored, wherein water permeated into the initially oriented PEG domains, causing rapid shape recovery toward the equilibrium shape upon contact with liquid water. The recovery behavior is found to be dependent on PEG weight percentage in the copolymers. By changing the material from bulk film to electrospun fibrous mat, recovery speed was greatly accelerated. The rate of water recovery was manipulated through structural variables, including thickness of bulk film and diameter of e-spun webs. A new, yet simple shape memory cycle, "wet-fixing" is also reported, where both the fixing and recovery ratios can be greatly improved. A detailed microstructural study on one particular composition is presented, revealing the evolution of microphase morphology during the shape memory cycle. Then, in Chapter 5, the role of Polyhedral oligosilsesquioxane (POSS) in suppressing enzymatic degradation of PCL-PEG TPUs is investigated. In vitro enzymatic hydrolytic biodegradation revealed that POSS incorporation significantly suppressed degradation of PCL-PEG TPUs. All TPUs were surface-eroded by enzymatic attack in which the chemical composition and the bulk mechanical properties exhibited little changes. A surface passivation mechanism is proposed to explain the protection of POSS-containing TPUs from enzymatic degradation. Finally, Chapter 6 presents another POSS-based TPUs system with PLA-based polyol as the glassy soft block. Manipulation of the final thermal and mechanical properties is discussed in terms of different polyols and POSS used. The free recovery and the constrained recovery responses of the polymer films were demonstrated as a function of the prior "fixing" deformation temperature. In addition, this family of materials was capable of memorizing their T g., where optimal recovery breadth and recovery stress were achieved when pre-deformation occurred right at Tg.

  10. Radiation effects on carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect

    Sasuga, Tsuneo; Udagawa, Akira; Seguchi, Tadao

    1993-12-31

    Polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) and a newly developed thermoplastic polyimide ``new-TPI`` were applied to carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) as a matrix resin. PEEK and new-TPI showed excellent resistance over 50 MGy to electron irradiation and the crosslinking proceeded predominantly by irradiation. The changes in mechanical properties induced by electron irradiation of the CFRP with the two resins were examined at various temperatures. The flexural strength and modulus measured at {minus}196 and 25{degree}C were scarcely affected up to 120 MGy and both the values measured at high temperature were increased with dose.

  11. Thermoplastic starch/polyester films: effects of extrusion process and poly (lactic acid) addition.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Marianne Ayumi; Olivato, Juliana Bonametti; Garcia, Patrícia Salomão; Müller, Carmen Maria Olivera; Grossmann, Maria Victória Eiras; Yamashita, Fabio

    2013-10-01

    Biodegradable films were produced using the blown extrusion method from blends that contained cassava thermoplastic starch (TPS), poly(butylene adipate-co-terephthalate) (PBAT) and poly(lactic acid) (PLA) with two different extrusion processes. The choice of extrusion process did not have a significant effect on the mechanical properties, water vapor permeability (WVP) or viscoelasticity of the films, but the addition of PLA decreased the elongation, blow-up ratio (BUR) and opacity and increased the elastic modulus, tensile strength and viscoelastic parameters of the films. The films with 20% PLA exhibited a lower WVP due to the hydrophobic nature of this polymer. Morphological analyses revealed the incompatibility between the polymers used. PMID:23910321

  12. Thermoplastic polyurethanes from undecylenic acid-based soft segments: structural features and release properties.

    PubMed

    Lluch, Cristina; Lligadas, Gerard; Ronda, Joan C; Galià, Marina; Cádiz, Virginia

    2013-05-01

    A set of thermoplastic polyurethanes is synthesized, combining undecylenic acid-derived telechelic diols as soft segments and 1,4-butanediol/4,4'-methylenebis(phenylisocyanate) as a hard segment (HS). These polymers are fully chemically and physically characterized by means of NMR and Fourier transform IR (FTIR) spectroscopy, size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), DSC, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), tensile testing, and contact angle measurements. The obtained results reveal that both the molecular weight of the diol and the HS content greatly influence the physical and mechanical properties of these polymers. In addition, given the potential use of these materials for biomedical applications, hydrolytic degradation, their biocompatibility using a human fibroblast cell line, and performance as drug delivery carriers are evaluated. PMID:23460383

  13. Acetylation of rice straw for thermoplastic applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guangzhi; Huang, Kai; Jiang, Xue; Huang, Dan; Yang, Yiqi

    2013-07-01

    An inexpensive and biodegradable thermoplastic was developed through acetylation of rice straw (RS) with acetic anhydride. Acetylation conditions were optimized. The structure and properties of acetylated RS were characterized by fourier transform infrared (FTIR), solid-state (13)C NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results showed that acetylation of RS has successfully taken place, and comparing with raw RS, the degree of crystallinity decreased and the decomposition rate was slow. The acetylated RS has got thermoplasticity when weight ratio of RS and acetic anhydride was 1:3, using sulphuric acid (9% to RS) as catalyst in glacial acetic acid 35°C for 12h, and the dosage of solvent was 9 times RS, in which weight percent gain (WPG) of the modified RS powder was 35.5% and its percent acetyl content was 36.1%. The acetylated RS could be formed into transparent thin films with different amount of plasticizer diethyl phthalate (DEP) using tape casting technology. PMID:23688473

  14. Supportability evaluation of thermoplastic and thermoset composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chanani, G. R.; Boldi, D.; Cramer, S. G.; Heimerdinger, M. W.

    1990-01-01

    Nearly 300 advanced composite components manufactured by Northrop Corporation are flying on U.S. Air Force and U.S. Navy supersonic aircraft as part of a three-year Air Force/Navy/Northrop supportability evaluation. Both thermoplastic and high-temperature thermoset composites were evaluated for their in-service performance on 48 USAF and Navy F-5E fighter and USAFT-38 trainer aircraft in the first large-scale, long-term maintenance evaluation of these advanced materials. Northrop manufactured four types of doors for the project-avionics bay access, oil fill, inlet duct inspection, and a main landing gear door. The doors are made of PEEK (polyetheretherketone) thermoplastic, which is tougher and potentially less expensive to manufacture than conventional composites; and 5250-3 BMI (bismaleimide) thermoset, which is manufactured like a conventional epoxy composite but can withstand higher service temperatures. Results obtained so far indicate that both the BMI and PEEK are durable with PEEK being somewhat better than BMI.

  15. Microgravity Effects on Combustion of Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirsch, David; Williams, Jim; Beeson, Harold

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing various microgravity effects on the combustion of polymers is shown. The topics include: 1) Major combustion processes and controlling mechanisms in normal and microgravity environments; 2) Review of some buoyancy effects on combustion: melting of thermoplastics; flame strength, geometry and temperature; smoldering combustion; 3) Video comparing polymeric rods burning in normal and microgravity environments; and 4) Relation to spacecraft fire safety of current knowledge of polymers microgravity combustion.

  16. Thermal stabilities of drops of burning thermoplastics under the UL 94 vertical test conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Zhang, Jun

    2013-02-15

    The properties of polymer melts will strongly affect the fire hazard of the pool induced by polymer melt flow. In this study the thermal stabilities of eight thermoplastic polymers as well as their melting drops generated under the UL 94 vertical burning test conditions were investigated by thermogravimetric experiments. It was found that the kinetic compensation effect existed for the decomposition reactions of the polymers and their drops. For polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), high impact polystyrene (HIPS), poly(acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene) (ABS), polyamide 6 (PA6), polypropylene (PP) and low density polyethylene (LDPE), the onset decomposition temperature and the two decomposition kinetic parameters (the pre-exponential factor and the activation energy) of the drop were less than those of the polymer. However, the onset decomposition temperature and the two kinetic parameters of PC's drop were greater than those of polycarbonate (PC). Interestingly, for polyethylenevinylacetate (EVA18) the drop hardly contained the vinyl acetate chain segments. Similarly, for the PMMA/LDPE blends and the PMMA/PP blends, when the volume fraction of PMMA was less than 50% the drop hardly contained PMMA, implying that the blend would not drip until PMMA burned away and its surface temperature approached the decomposition temperature of the continuous phase composed of LDPE or PP. PMID:23298738

  17. Polymer International Polym Int 53:16931703 (2004) DOI: 10.1002/pi.1530

    E-print Network

    North Texas, University of

    2004-01-01

    and elongation at break are respectively improved by 31 % and 63 %. The PB-NCO modifier participates in co-vulcanization Society of Chemical Industry Keywords: recycling; dynamic vulcanization; reactive compatibilization; LDPE blends consisting of non-vulcanized virgin rubber and thermoplastic polymers such as polyolefins.1

  18. Monitoring impact damaging of thermoplastic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccardi, S.; Carlomagno, G. M.; Meola, C.; Russo, P.; Simeoli, G.

    2015-11-01

    Thermoplastic composites are becoming ever more attractive also to the aeronautical sector. The main advantage lies in the possibility to modify the interface strength of polypropylene based laminates by adjusting the composition of the matrix. Understanding these aspects is of great importance to establish a possible link between the material toughness and the matrix ingredients. The aim of the present work is to ascertain the ability of an infrared imaging device to visualize any change, in the material behaviour to low energy impact, induced by changes in the matrix composition. Attention is given to image processing algorithms; in particular, an original procedure to measure the extension of the impact-affected area is proposed.

  19. Thermoplastic starch films reinforced with talc nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Luciana; López, Olivia; López, Cintia; Zaritzky, Noemí; García, M Alejandra; Barbosa, Silvia; Villar, Marcelo

    2013-06-20

    Nanocomposite films of thermoplastic corn starch (TPS) with talc particles were obtained by thermo-compression in order to study the effect of filler on structure, optical, and thermal properties. Talc increased the films rigid phase, thus their cross-sections resulted more irregular. Talc preferential orientation within matrix and good compatibility between particles and TPS was observed by SEM. Slight crystalline structure changes in TPS matrix were measured by XRD and DSC, due to talc nucleating effect. Randomly dispersed talc nanoagglomerates and individual platelets were assessed by TEM. Laminar morphology and nano-sized particles allowed that nanocomposite films were optically transparent. TPS-talc films resulted heterogeneous materials, presenting domains rich in glycerol and others rich in starch. Talc incorporation higher than 3%, w/w increased softening resistance of the nanocomposites as stated by DMA. Relaxation temperatures of glycerol-rich phase shifted to higher values since talc reduces the mobility of starch chains. PMID:23648028

  20. Thermoplastic microcantilevers fabricated by nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greve, Anders; Keller, Stephan; Vig, Asger L.; Kristensen, Anders; Larsson, David; Yvind, Kresten; Hvam, Jørn M.; Cerruti, Marta; Majumdar, Arunava; Boisen, Anja

    2010-01-01

    Nanoimprint lithography has been exploited to fabricate micrometre-sized cantilevers in thermoplastic. This technique allows for very well defined microcantilevers and gives the possibility of embedding structures into the cantilever surface. The microcantilevers are fabricated in TOPAS and are up to 500 µm long, 100 µm wide, and 4.5 µm thick. Some of the cantilevers have built-in ripple surface structures with heights of 800 nm and pitches of 4 µm. The yield for the cantilever fabrication is 95% and the initial out-of-plane bending is below 10 µm. The stiffness of the cantilevers is measured by deflecting the cantilever with a well-characterized AFM probe. An average stiffness of 61.3 mN m-1 is found. Preliminary tests with water vapour indicate that the microcantilevers can be used directly for vapour sensing applications and illustrate the influence of surface structuring of the cantilevers.

  1. Thermoplastic Single-Ply Roof Relieves Water Damage and Inconvenience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Jennifer Lynn

    2002-01-01

    Assesses use of thermoplastic single-ply roofs by North Carolina's Mars Hill College to prevent leaks, reduce maintenance costs, and enhance the value of their older historic buildings. Administrators comment on the roof's installation efficiency and cleanliness. (GR)

  2. Induction Consolidation/Molding of Thermoplastic Composites Using Smart Susceptors

    SciTech Connect

    2009-02-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose objective is to explore and define the technical and economic viability of induction consolidation for thermoplastic composites and to fabricate a wide spectrum of components in an energy-efficient manner.

  3. Atomically smooth surfaces through thermoplastic forming of metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Golden; Staffier, Peter A.; Blawzdziewicz, Jerzy; Schwarz, Udo D.; Schroers, Jan

    2010-09-01

    We demonstrate that atomically smooth surfaces can be generated by thermoplastic forming of metallic glasses. This is enabled by the flow associated with the contact-line motion which removes rough surface layer from the advancing metallic glass-air interface. The thermoplastically formed surface is two orders of magnitude smoother than a polished surface of the same alloy. This process is capable of generating atomically smooth surfaces and replicating nanoscale features in a single processing step, providing a versatile toolbox for nanofabrication.

  4. A thermo-mechanically-coupled large-deformation theory for amorphous polymers in a temperature range which spans their glass transition

    E-print Network

    Srivastava, Vikas

    Amorphous thermoplastic polymers are important engineering materials; however, their non-linear, strongly temperature- and rate-dependent elastic-viscoplastic behavior is still not very well understood, and is modeled by ...

  5. Conducting polymer ultracapacitor

    DOEpatents

    Shi, Steven Z. (Latham, NY); Davey, John R. (Los Alamos, NM); Gottesfeld, Shimshon (Los Alamos, NM); Ren, Xiaoming (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A sealed ultracapacitor assembly is formed with first and second electrodes of first and second conducting polymers electrodeposited on porous carbon paper substrates, where the first and second electrodes each define first and second exterior surfaces and first and second opposing surfaces. First and second current collector plates are bonded to the first and second exterior surfaces, respectively. A porous membrane separates the first and second opposing surfaces, with a liquid electrolyte impregnating the insulating membrane. A gasket formed of a thermoplastic material surrounds the first and second electrodes and seals between the first and second current collector plates for containing the liquid electrolyte.

  6. Effect of thermal history on the rheology of thermoplastic polyurethanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Pil Joong

    The effect of thermal history on the rheological behavior of ester- and, ether-based commercial thermoplastic polyurethanes (TPUs) was investigated. It was found from 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy that the ester-based TPU consisted of 4,4'-diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI) and butane diol (BDO) as hard segments and poly(butylene adipate) as soft segments, and the ether-based TPU consisted of MDT-BDO as hard segments and poly(oxytetramethylene) as soft segments. During isothermal annealing, the dynamic storage and loss moduli (G' and G'' ) of specimens, which had been prepared by injection molding at different temperatures, were monitored at a fixed angular frequency. It was found that thermal history of specimens had a profound influence on the variations of G' and G' ' with time observed during isothermal annealing. Isochronal dynamic temperature sweep experiments indicated that the TPUs exhibit hysteresis effect during heating and cooling, very similar to that observed in microphase-separated block polymers and thermotropic liquid-crystalline polymers reported in the literature. It was found that time-temperature superposition failed to produce reduced (or master) plots for the TPUs employed. This conclusion was reinforced by the temperature dependence of log G ' versus log G'' plots over the entire range of temperatures (110--190°C) investigated, suggesting that the morphological state of the TPU specimens varied with temperature. Little evidence was found from differential scanning calorimetry that thermal transitions took place in the TPU specimens during isothermal annealing, while values of G' and G' ' were found to vary with time. Measurements were taken of N-H stretching absorption bands in the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra during isothermal annealing at 170°C for specimens prepared by injection molding at different temperatures. The analysis of FTIR spectra indicated that variations of hydrogen bonding with time during isothermal annealing resemble very much variations of G' with time during isothermal annealing. Little evidence was found from 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy that exchange reactions took place in the TPU specimens during isothermal annealing at elevated temperatures. It is concluded from the present study that microphase separation transition or order-disorder transition in TPU cannot be determined from oscillatory shear rheometry.

  7. Improvement of bonding properties of laser transmission welded, dissimilar thermoplastics by plasma surface treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Hopmann, Ch.; Weber, M.; Schöngart, M.; Sooriyapiragasam, S.; Behm, H.; Dahlmann, R.

    2015-05-22

    Compared to different welding methods such as ultrasonic welding, laser transmission welding is a relatively new technology to join thermoplastic parts. The most significant advantages over other methods are the contactless energy input which can be controlled very precisely and the low mechanical loads on the welded parts. Therefore, laser transmission welding is used in various areas of application, for example in medical technology or for assembling headlights in the automotive sector. However, there are several challenges in welding dissimilar thermoplastics. This may be due to different melting points on the one hand and different polarities on the other hand. So far these problems are faced with the intermediate layer technique. In this process a layer bonding together the two components is placed between the components. This means that an additional step in the production is needed to apply the extra layer. To avoid this additional step, different ways of joining dissimilar thermoplastics are investigated. In this regard, the improvement in the weldability of the dissimilar thermoplastics polyamide 6 (PA 6) and polypropylene (PP) by means of plasma surface modification and contour welding is examined. To evaluate the influence of the plasma surface modification process on the subsequent welding process of the two dissimilar materials, the treatment time as well as the storage time between treatment and welding are varied. The treatment time in pulsed micro wave excited oxygen plasmas with an electron density of about 1x10{sup 17} m{sup ?3} is varied from 0.5 s to 120 s and the time between treatment and welding is varied from a few minutes up to a week. As reference, parts being made of the same polymer (PP and PA 6) are welded and tested. For the evaluation of the results of the welding experiments, short-time tensile tests are used to determine the bond strength. Without plasma treatment the described combination of PA 6/PP cannot be welded with sufficient bond strength to withstand handling of the samples. In contrast, the tear-out force of previously plasma treated samples can be determined to up to 1400 N. The achieved bond strengths are higher than of untreated PP/PP welded parts (about 1000 N)

  8. Improvement of bonding properties of laser transmission welded, dissimilar thermoplastics by plasma surface treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopmann, Ch.; Weber, M.; Schöngart, M.; Sooriyapiragasam, S.; Behm, H.; Dahlmann, R.

    2015-05-01

    Compared to different welding methods such as ultrasonic welding, laser transmission welding is a relatively new technology to join thermoplastic parts. The most significant advantages over other methods are the contactless energy input which can be controlled very precisely and the low mechanical loads on the welded parts. Therefore, laser transmission welding is used in various areas of application, for example in medical technology or for assembling headlights in the automotive sector. However, there are several challenges in welding dissimilar thermoplastics. This may be due to different melting points on the one hand and different polarities on the other hand. So far these problems are faced with the intermediate layer technique. In this process a layer bonding together the two components is placed between the components. This means that an additional step in the production is needed to apply the extra layer. To avoid this additional step, different ways of joining dissimilar thermoplastics are investigated. In this regard, the improvement in the weldability of the dissimilar thermoplastics polyamide 6 (PA 6) and polypropylene (PP) by means of plasma surface modification and contour welding is examined. To evaluate the influence of the plasma surface modification process on the subsequent welding process of the two dissimilar materials, the treatment time as well as the storage time between treatment and welding are varied. The treatment time in pulsed micro wave excited oxygen plasmas with an electron density of about 1x1017 m-3 is varied from 0.5 s to 120 s and the time between treatment and welding is varied from a few minutes up to a week. As reference, parts being made of the same polymer (PP and PA 6) are welded and tested. For the evaluation of the results of the welding experiments, short-time tensile tests are used to determine the bond strength. Without plasma treatment the described combination of PA 6/PP cannot be welded with sufficient bond strength to withstand handling of the samples. In contrast, the tear-out force of previously plasma treated samples can be determined to up to 1400 N. The achieved bond strengths are higher than of untreated PP/PP welded parts (about 1000 N).

  9. A new technology for sandwich plates and structures based on the use of in-situ foamable thermoplastic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beukers, Adriaan

    The cost effectiveness of structures in transports is basically depending on the operational capability and availability, the so called structure effectiveness, per unit cost. These costs are mainly determined by the cost to manufacture (acquisition costs) and the costs to operate (mass) and to maintain (damage sensitivity). In this paper the attention is focused on a new approach leading to efficiency improving sandwich material concepts, structures and related manufacturing processes, satisfying the value for money criterion as formulated by the cost effectiveness criterion. The sandwich materials and technology applied are based on the use of thermoformable continuous fiber reinforced thermoplastic polymers, in particular E-glass reinforced polyetherimide (PEI).

  10. Polymer alloys with balanced heat storage capacity and engineering attributes and applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Soroushian, Parviz (Lansing, MI)

    2002-01-01

    A thermoplastic polymer of relatively low melt temperature is blended with at least one of thermosets, elastomers, and thermoplastics of relatively high melt temperature in order to produce a polymer blend which absorbs relatively high quantities of latent heat without melting or major loss of physical and mechanical characteristics as temperature is raised above the melting temperature of the low-melt-temperature thermoplastic. The polymer blend can be modified by the addition of at least one of fillers, fibers, fire retardants, compatibilisers, colorants, and processing aids. The polymer blend may be used in applications where advantage can be taken of the absorption of excess heat by a component which remains solid and retains major fractions of its physical and mechanical characteristics while absorbing relatively high quantities of latent heat.

  11. Modeling and controlling topographical nonuniformity in thermoplastic micro- and nano-embossing

    E-print Network

    Taylor, Hayden Kingsley

    2009-01-01

    The embossing of thermoplastic polymeric plates is valuable for manufacturing micro- and nanofluidic devices and diffractive optics. Meanwhile, the imprinting of sub-micrometer-thickness thermoplastic layers has emerged ...

  12. Highly conductive thermoplastic composites for rapid production of fuel cell bipolar plates

    DOEpatents

    Huang, Jianhua [Blacksburg, VA; Baird, Donald G [Blacksburg, VA; McGrath, James E [Blacksburg, VA

    2008-04-29

    A low cost method of fabricating bipolar plates for use in fuel cells utilizes a wet lay process for combining graphite particles, thermoplastic fibers, and reinforcing fibers to produce a plurality of formable sheets. The formable sheets are then molded into a bipolar plates with features impressed therein via the molding process. The bipolar plates formed by the process have conductivity in excess of 150 S/cm and have sufficient mechanical strength to be used in fuel cells. The bipolar plates can be formed as a skin/core laminate where a second polymer material is used on the skin surface which provides for enhanced conductivity, chemical resistance, and resistance to gas permeation.

  13. Shear Strength of Single Lap Joint Aluminium-Thermoplastic Natural Rubber (Al-TPNR) Laminated Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzakkar, M. Z.; Ahmad, S.; Yarmo, M. A.; Jalar, A.; Bijarimi, M.

    2013-04-01

    In this work, we studied the effect of surface treatment on the aluminium surface and a coupling agent to improve adhesion between aluminium with organic polymer. Thermoplastic natural rubber (TPNR) matrix was prepared by melt blending of natural rubber (NR), liquid natural rubber (LNR) compatibilizer, linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE) and polyethylene grafted maleic anhydride (PE-g-MAH). The PEgMAH concentration used was varied from 0% - 25%. In addition, the aluminium surface was pre-treated with 3-glycidoxy propyl trimethoxy silane (3-GPS) to enhance the mechanical properties of laminated composite. It was found that the shear strength of single lap joint Al-TPNR laminated composite showing an increasing trend as a function of PE-g-MAH contents for the 3-GPS surface treated aluminium. Moreover, the scanning electron microscope (SEM) revealed that the strength improvement was associated with the chemical state of the compound involved.

  14. Biodegradable thermoplastic polyurethanes incorporating polyhedral oligosilsesquioxane.

    PubMed

    Knight, Pamela T; Lee, Kyung Min; Qin, Haihu; Mather, Patrick T

    2008-09-01

    A new hybrid thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) system that incorporates an organic, biodegradable poly(D, L-lactide) soft block with a hard block bearing the inorganic polyhedral oligosilsesquioxane (POSS) moiety is introduced and studied. Changes in the polyol composition made through variation of the hydrophilic initiator molecular weight show direct control of the final transition temperatures. Incorporating POSS into the hard segments allows for excellent elasticity above T(g), as evidenced with dynamic mechanical analysis, not seen in most other biodegradable materials. This elasticity is attributed to physical cross-links formed in the hard block through POSS crystallization, as revealed with wide-angle X-ray diffraction. Increasing the POSS incorporation level in the TPU hard block was observed to increase crystallinity and also the rigidity of the material. The highest incorporation, using a statistical average of three POSS units per hard block, demonstrated one-way shape memory with excellent shape fixing capabilities. In vitro degradation of this sample was also investigated during a two month period. Moderate water uptake and dramatic molecular weight decrease were immediately observed although large mass loss (approximately 20 wt %) was not observed until the two month time point. PMID:18698847

  15. Development of thermoplastic composite aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renieri, Michael P.; Burpo, Steven J.; Roundy, Lance M.; Todd, Stephanie A.; Kim, H. J.

    1992-01-01

    Efforts focused on the use of thermoplastic composite materials in the development of structural details associated with an advanced fighter fuselage section with applicability to transport design. In support of these designs, mechanics developments were conducted in two areas. First, a dissipative strain energy approach to material characterization and failure prediction, developed at the Naval Research Laboratory, was evaluated as a design/analysis tool. Second, a finite element formulation for thick composites was developed and incorporated into a lug analysis method which incorporates pin bending effects. Manufacturing concepts were developed for an upper fuel cell cover. A detailed trade study produced two promising concepts: fiber placement and single-step diaphragm forming. Based on the innovative design/manufacturing concepts for the fuselage section primary structure, elements were designed, fabricated, and structurally tested. These elements focused on key issues such as thick composite lugs and low cost forming of fastenerless, stiffener/moldine concepts. Manufacturing techniques included autoclave consolidation, single diaphragm consolidation (SDCC) and roll-forming.

  16. Materials for Heated Head Automated Thermoplastic Tape Placement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Brian J.; Kinney, Megan C.; Cano, Roberto J.; Grimsley, Brian W.

    2012-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) is currently pursuing multiple paths to develop out of autoclave (OOA) polymeric composite materials and processes. Polymeric composite materials development includes the synthesis of new and/or modified thermosetting and thermoplastic matrix resins designed for specific OOA processes. OOA processes currently under investigation include vacuum bag only (VBO) prepreg/composite fabrication, resin transfer molding (RTM), vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) and heated head automated thermoplastic tape placement (HHATP). This paper will discuss the NASA Langley HHATP facility and capabilities and recent work on characterizing thermoplastic tape quality and requirements for quality part production. Samples of three distinct versions of APC-2 (AS4/PEEK) thermoplastic dry tape were obtained from two materials vendors, TENCATE, Inc. and CYTEC Engineered Materials** (standard grade and an experimental batch). Random specimens were taken from each of these samples and subjected to photo-microscopy and surface profilometry. The CYTEC standard grade of APC-2 tape had the most voids and splits and the highest surface roughness and/or waviness. Since the APC-2 tape is composed of a thermoplastic matrix, it offers the flexibility of reprocessing to improve quality, and thereby improve final quality of HHATP laminates. Discussions will also include potential research areas and future work that is required to advance the state of the art in the HHATP process for composite fabrication.

  17. Development and testing of thermoplastic structural components for modular prostheses.

    PubMed

    Coombes, A G; MacCoughlan, J

    1988-04-01

    The wider use of thermoplastic structural components in modular artificial limbs would enable their general properties of low density, corrosion resistance and mouldability and more specific properties of certain thermoplastics such as shock absorption, fatigue and wear resistance to be used to the advantage of patients and manufacturers. They provide an alternative to metal and carbon fibre reinforced resin systems. Emphasis has been placed on the development of rotationally moulded Nylon 11 shank sections, using Philadelphia recommended load levels as the design criteria for structural integrity. Laboratory testing underlined the importance of fatigue testing of thermoplastic components since structural deterioration due to creep--a time dependent mechanical property of thermoplastics--can be ascertained in fatigue testing but would not be evident on the shorter timescale of the static test. Experimental below-knee prostheses incorporating suitably designed plastic shanks and alignment devices can withstand high static loads and exhibit long fatigue lifetimes in excess of 2 million cycles. The shank design offered an opportunity for testing under service conditions the validity of the Philadelphia Static Load level (2.5 kN) since shank failure loads are around this figure. Patient trials of experimental prostheses based on various combinations of plastic shanks and alignment devices and conducted over 33 months indicate that the Static Load Level along with fatigue testing is a satisfactory test criterion for general service use of thermoplastic prosthetic components. PMID:3399367

  18. Process for preparing solvent resistant, thermoplastic aromatic poly(imidesulfone)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, T. L.; Yamaki, D. A. (inventors)

    1984-01-01

    A process for preparing a thermoplastic poly(midesulfone) is disclosed. This resulting material has thermoplastic properties which are generally associated with polysulfones but not polyimides, and solvent resistant which is generally associated with polyimides but not polysulfones. This system is processable in the 250 to 350 C range for molding, adhesive and laminating applications. This unique thermoplastic poly(imidesulfone) is obtained by incorporating an aromatic sulfone moiety into the backbone of an aromatic linear polyimide by dissolving a quantity of a 3,3',4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride (BTDA) in a solution of 3,3'-diaminodiphenylsulfone and bis(2-methoxyethyl)ether, precipitating the reactant product in water, filtering and drying the recovered poly(amide-acid sulfone) and converting it to the poly(imidesulfone) by heating.

  19. Comprehensive Welding of Thermoplastics by a Diode Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kimitoshi; Saito, Takushi; Kurosaki, Yasuo

    This paper deals with a development of “comprehensive" laser welding of thermoplastics with versatility in color and shape of products. Overlap welding of thermoplastics is one of the features of application of diode lasers. Most of thermoplastics are transparent to diode lasers; therefore it is need to weld plastic article with colorant. The influence of absorptance and transmittance of overlapping colored plastics were studied. Various colored plastics with infrared-transparent pigments were tested as the welding material. The appropriate absorptance and transmittance of overlapping colored plastic were examined. The feasibility of the technique of welding of transparent plastics using infrared-absorbing layer was also investigated. The temperature distribution within the plastics was calculated by numerical simulation in order to estimate the validity of the proposing experimental systems. It was confirmed by the experiments that the 35?m film, which shows only 10% in absorptance is enough to weld a pair of transparent articles as infrared-absorbing layer.

  20. LARC-TPI: A multi-purpose thermoplastic polyimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L.

    1982-01-01

    A linear thermoplastic polyimide, LARC-TPI, was characterized and developed for a variety of high temperature applications. In its fully imidized form, this material can be used as an adhesive for bonding metals such as titanium, aluminum, copper, brass, and stainless steel. LARC-TPI was evaluated as a thermoplastic for bonding large pieces of polyimide film to produce flexible, 100 void-free laminates for flexible circuit applications. The development of LARC-TPI as a potential molding powder, composite matrix resin, high temperature film and fiber is also discussed.

  1. Investigations into the mechanical and physical behavior of thermoplastic elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Kathryn Janelle

    This thesis describes investigations into the physical and mechanical characteristics of two commercial thermoplastic elastomer (TPE) systems. Both systems studied exhibit elastomeric behavior similar to more traditional crosslinked elastomers; however, in these TPEs non-conventional polymer architectures and morphologies are used to produce their elastomeric behavior. The two TPEs of interest are ethylene-propylene random copolymers and dynamically vulcanized blends of ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM) and isotactic polypropylene (iPP). Very few studies have examined the mechanical behavior of these materials in terms of their composition and morphology. As such, the primary goal of this research is to both qualitatively and quantitatively understand the influence of composition and morphology on mechanical behavior. In additional very little information is available that compares their performance with that of crosslinked elastomers. As a result, the secondary goal is to qualitatively compare the mechanical responses of these TPEs with that of their more traditional counterparts. The ethylene-propylene copolymers studied have very high comonomer contents and exhibit slow crystallization kinetics. Their morphology consists of nanoscale crystallites embedded in an amorphous rubbery matrix. These crystallites act as physical crosslinks that allow for elasticity. Slow crystallization causes subsequent changes in mechanical behavior that take place over days and even weeks. Physical responses (e.g., density, crystallization kinetics, and crystal structure) of five copolymer compositions are investigated. Mechanical responses (e.g., stiffness, ductility, yielding, and reversibility) are also examined. Finally, the influence of morphology on deformation is studied using in situ analytical techniques. The EPDM/iPP blends are dynamically vulcanized which produces a complex morphology consisting of chemically crosslinked EPDM domains embedded within a semicrystalline iPP matrix. Six compositions are investigated as a function of three parameters: major volume fraction, iPP molecular weight, and EPDM cure state. The influence of these parameters on morphology and resulting mechanical behavior is examined. This work culminates in the development of a morphological model to describe the steady-state reversibility of these EPDM/iPP blends. The model is then evaluated in terms of composition and cure state.

  2. Continuation of tailored composite structures of ordered staple thermoplastic material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santare, Michael H.; Pipes, R. Byron

    1992-01-01

    The search for the cost effective composite structure has motivated the investigation of several approaches to develop composite structure from innovative material forms. Among the promising approaches is the conversion of a planar sheet to components of complex curvature through sheet forming or stretch forming. In both cases, the potential for material stretch in the fiber direction appears to offer a clear advantage in formability over continuous fiber systems. A framework was established which allows the simulation of the anisotropic mechanisms of deformation of long discontinuous fiber laminates wherein the matrix phase is a viscous fluid. Predictions for the effective viscosities of a hyper-anisotropic medium consisting of collimated, discontinuous fibers suspended in viscous matrix were extended to capture the characteristics of typical polymers including non-Newtonian behavior and temperature dependence. In addition, the influence of fiber misorientation was also modeled by compliance averaging to determine ensemble properties for a given orientation distribution. A design tool is presented for predicting the effect of material heterogeneity on the performance of curved composite beams such as those used in aircraft fuselage structures. Material heterogeneity can be induced during manufacturing processes such as sheet forming and stretch forming of thermoplastic composites. This heterogeneity can be introduced in the form of fiber realignment and spreading during the manufacturing process causing radial and tangential gradients in material properties. Two analysis procedures are used to solve the beam problems. The first method uses separate two-dimensional elasticity solutions for the stresses in the flange and web sections of the beam. The separate solutions are coupled by requiring that forces and displacements match section boundaries. The second method uses an approximate Rayleigh-Ritz technique to find the solutions for more complex beams. Analyses are performed for curved beams of various cross-sections loaded in pure bending and with a uniform distributed load. Preliminary results show that the geometry of the beam dictates the effect of heterogeneity on performance. The role of heterogeneity is larger in beams with a small average radius-to-depth ration, R/t, where R is the average radius of the beam and t is the difference between the inside and outside radii. Results of the anlysis are in the form of stresses and displacements and are compared to both mechanics of materials and numerical solutions obtained using finite element analysis.

  3. Cure kinetics, morphologies, and mechanical properties of thermoplastic/MWCNT modified multifunctional glassy epoxies prepared via continuous reaction methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xiaole

    The primary goal of this dissertation is to develop a novel continuous reactor method to prepare partially cured epoxy prepolymers for aerospace prepreg applications with the aim of replacing traditional batch reactors. Compared to batch reactors, the continuous reactor is capable of solubilizing and dispersing a broad range of additives including thermoplastic tougheners, stabilizers, nanoparticles and curatives and advancing epoxy molecular weights and viscosities while reducing energy consumption. In order to prove this concept, polyethersulfone (PES) modified 4, 4'-diaminodiphenylsulfone (44DDS)/tetraglycidyl-4, 4'-diaminodiphenylmethane (TGDDM) epoxy prepolymers were firstly prepared using both continuous reactor and batch reactor methods. Kinetic studies confirmed the chain extension reaction in the continuous reactor is similar to the batch reactor, and the molecular weights and viscosities of prepolymers were readily controlled through reaction kinetics. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) confirmed similar cured network morphologies for formulations prepared from batch and continuous reactors. Additionally tensile strength, tensile modulus and fracture toughness analyses concluded mechanical properties of cured epoxy matrices produced from both reactors were equivalent. Effects of multifunctional epoxy compositions on thermoplastics phase-separated morphologies were systematically studied using a combination of AFM with nanomechanical mapping, spectroscopic and calorimetric techniques to provide new insights to tailor cured reaction induced phase separation (CRIPS) in multifunctional epoxy blend networks. Furthermore, how resultant crosslinked glassy polymer network and phase-separated morphologies correlated with mechanical properties are discussed in detail. Multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/TGDDM epoxy prepolymers were further prepared by combining the successful strategies for advancing epoxy chemistries and dispersing nanotubes using the continuous reactor. Optical microscopy (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to characterize the MWCNT dispersion states and stabilization in epoxy prepolymer matrix after continuous process and during curing cycles. Additionally, electrical conductivities and mechanical properties of final cured MWCNT/TGDDM composites were measured and discussed in view of their corresponding MWCNT dispersion states. Ternary blends of MWCNT reinforced thermoplastic/epoxy prepolymers were prepared by the continuous reactor. Influence of MWCNT on the CRIPS mechanism and the cured morphologies were systematically investigated using SEM and rheological analysis. Incorporation of MWCNT in thermoplastic/epoxy matrices can lead to a morphological transformation from phase inverted, to co-continuous, and to droplet dispersed morphology. In additional, dynamic mechanical analysis revealed the heterogeneity of MWCNT dispersion in thermoplastic/thermosets systems.

  4. A new synthetic route to a family of non-classical addition-type thermoplastics. I - Concept and demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, Ruth H.

    1988-01-01

    A synthesis scheme was developed for a host of nonclassical addition-type thermoplastics (ATT) that can be cured by an addition reaction, leading to a linear polymer structure. The synthesis involves the reaction of an acetylene-terminated prepolymer with either a bismaleimide (BMI) or a biscitraconimide. A new polymer, designated LaRC-RP80, synthesized using this scheme, was found to exhibit several significantly improved properties over the commercial BMI, Kerimid 601, including an eight-fold increase in toughness while maintaining a high Tg, a higher (by 167 C) heat stability, and a 50-percent increase in moisture resistance. In addition, LaRC-RP80 has good hot/wet lap shear strength and processes easily at 288 C without voids in the finished product.

  5. On-line consolidation of thermoplastic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Po-Jen

    An on-line consolidation system, which includes a computer-controlled filament winding machine and a consolidation head assembly, has been designed and constructed to fabricate composite parts from thermoplastic towpregs. A statistical approach was used to determine the significant processing parameters and their effect on the mechanical and physical properties of composite cylinders fabricated by on-line consolidation. A central composite experimental design was used to select the processing conditions for manufacturing the composite cylinders. The thickness, density, void content, degree of crystallinity and interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) were measured for each composite cylinder. Micrographs showed that complete intimate contact and uniform fiber-matrix distribution were achieved. The degree of crystallinity of the cylinders was found to be in the range of 25-30%. Under optimum processing conditions, an ILSS of 58 MPa and a void content of <1% were achieved for APC-2 (PEEK/Carbon fiber) composite cylinders. An in-situ measurement system which uses a slip ring assembly and a computer data acquisition system was developed to obtain temperature data during winding. Composite cylinders were manufactured with eight K-type thermocouples installed in various locations inside the cylinder. The temperature distribution inside the composite cylinder during winding was measured for different processing conditions. ABAQUS finite element models of the different processes that occur during on-line consolidation were constructed. The first model was used to determine the convective heat transfer coefficient for the hot-air heat source. A convective heat transfer coefficient of 260 w/msp{2°}K was obtained by matching the calculated temperature history to the in-situ measurement data. To predict temperature distribution during winding an ABAQUS winding simulation model was developed. The winding speed was modeled by incrementally moving the convective boundary conditions around the outer surface of the composite cylinder. A towpreg heating model was constructed to predict the temperature distribution on the cross section of the incoming towpreg. For the process-induced thermal stresses analysis, a thermoelastic finite element model was constructed. Using the temperature history obtained from thermal analysis as the initial conditions, the thermal stresses during winding and cooling were investigated.

  6. Processing and characterization of unidirectional thermoplastic nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimhan, Kameshwaran

    The manufacture of continuous fibre-reinforced thermoplastic nanocomposites is discussed for the case of E-Glass reinforced polypropylene (PP) matrix and for E-Glass reinforced Polyamide-6 (Nylon-6), with and without dispersed nanoclay (montmorillonite) platelets. The E-Glass/PP nanocomposite was manufactured using pultrusion, whereas the E-Glass/Nylon-6 nanocomposite was manufactured using compression molding. Mechanical characterization of nanocomposites were performed and compared with traditional microcomposites. Compressive as well as shear strength of nanocomposites was improved by improving the yield strength of the surrounding matrix through the dispersion of nanoclay. Significant improvements were achieved in compressive strength and shear strength with relatively low nanoclay loadings. Initially, polypropylene with and without nanoclay were melt intercalated using a single-screw extruder and the pultruded nanocomposite was fabricated using extruded pre-impregnated (pre-preg) tapes. Compression tests were performed as mandated by ASTM guidelines. SEM and TEM characterization revealed presence of nanoclay in an intercalated and partially exfoliated morphology. Mechanical tests confirmed significant improvements in compressive strength (˜122% at 10% nanoclay loading) and shear strength (˜60% at 3% nanoclay loading) in modified pultruded E-Glass/PP nanocomposites in comparison with baseline properties. Uniaxial tensile tests showed a small increase in tensile strength (˜3.4%) with 3% nanoclay loading. Subsequently, E-Glass/Nylon-6 nanocomposite panels were manufactured by compression molding. Compression tests were performed according to IITRI guidelines, whereas short beam shear and uni-axial tensile tests were performed according to ASTM standards. Mechanical tests confirmed strength enhancement with nanoclay addition, with a significant improvement in compressive strength (50% at 4% nanoclay loading) and shear strength (˜36% at 4% nanoclay loading) when compared with the baseline E-Glass/Nylon-6. Uni-axial tensile tests resulted in a small increase in tensile strength (˜3.2%) with 4% nanoclay loading. Also, hygrothermal aging (50°C and 100% RH) of baseline and nanoclay modified (4%) E-Glass/Nylon-6 was studied. It was observed that the moisture diffusion process followed Fickian diffusion. E-Glass/Nylon-6 modified with 4% nanoclay loading showed improved barrier performance with a significant reduction (˜30%) in moisture uptake compared to baseline E-Glass/Nylon-6 composites. Significant improvement in mechanical properties was also observed in hygrothermally aged nanocomposite specimens when compared with the aged baseline composite.

  7. EMAA thermoplastic powder coatings in shop and field applications

    SciTech Connect

    Loustaunau, P.J.; Horton, D. )

    1994-07-01

    This article deals with ethylene methacrylic acid thermoplastic powder coatings, which allow asset owners to meet tightening environmental regulations while solving some of the most difficult coating problems. It discusses the versatility of traditional shop application methods and field application methods in the rail, water, and wastewater treatment industries.

  8. Simulation of shrinkage and warpage of semi-crystalline thermoplastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopmann, Ch.; Borchmann, N.; Spekowius, M.; Weber, M.; Schöngart, M.

    2015-05-01

    Today, the simulation of the injection molding process is state of the art. Besides the simulation of the manufacturing process, commercial simulation tools allow a prediction of the structural properties of the final part. Especially the complex shrinkage and warpage behavior is of interest as it significantly influences the part quality. Although modern simulation tools provide qualitatively correct results for several materials and processing conditions, significant deviations from the real component's behavior can occur for semi-crystalline thermoplastics. One underlying reason is the description on the macro scale used in these simulation tools. However, in semi-crystalline materials significant effects take place on the micro scale, e.g. crystalline superstructures that cannot be neglected. As part of a research project at IKV, investigations are carried out to improve the simulation accuracy of shrinkage and warpage. To point out differences in the accuracy of commercially available simulation tools, a reference part is computed for the materials polypropylene and polyoxymethylene. The results are validated by injection molding experiments. The shrinkage and warpage behavior is characterized by optical measuring technology. In future, models for the description of the pvT behavior of semi-crystalline thermoplastics will be implemented into the software package SphäroSim which was developed at IKV. With this software, crystallization kinetics for semi-crystalline thermoplastics can be calculated on the micro scale. With the newly implemented pvT models the calculation of shrinkage and warpage for semi-crystalline thermoplastics will be enabled on the micro scale.

  9. Development and evaluation of thermoplastic street maintenance material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siemens, W. D.

    1973-01-01

    An all-weather permanent street patching material was investigated for flexible and rigid pavements. The economic, operational, and material requirements are discussed along with the results of field tests with various mixtures of EVA resins and asphalt. Cost analyses for thermoplastic patching methods are included.

  10. Mathematical Analysis of Thermoplasticity with Linear Kinematic Hardening

    E-print Network

    Racke, Reinhard

    Mathematical Analysis of Thermoplasticity with Linear Kinematic Hardening Krzysztof Che lmi#19;nski and with a linear evo- lution equation for the kinematic hardening. The yield function associated with the system hardening property and the evolution equation for the backstress (new internal variable enlarging locally

  11. Thermal Phenomena in Fiber-reinforced Thermoplastic Tape Winding Process

    E-print Network

    Daraio, Chiara

    matrix and automated placement of thermoset pre-impregnated tapes are established processes. Their course-line bonding can be applied to the automated tape winding (Figure 1) and the automated tape placement (Figure 2Thermal Phenomena in Fiber-reinforced Thermoplastic Tape Winding Process: Computational Simulations

  12. Modification of wood fiber with thermoplastics by reactive steam-explosion processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renneckar, Scott H.

    For the first time, a novel processing method of co-refining wood and polyolefin (PO) by steam-explosion was scientifically explored for wood-thermoplastic composites without a coupling agent. Traditional studies have addressed the improvement of adhesion between components of wood thermoplastic composites through the use of coupling agents such as maleated PO. The objective of this study was to increase adhesion between wood and PO through reactive processing conditions of steam-explosion. PO characteristics, such as type (polyethylene or polypropylene), form (pellet, fiber, or powder) and melt viscosity were studied along with oxygen gas content of the steam-explosion reactor vessel. Modification of co-processed wood fiber was characterized in four studies: microscopy analysis of dispersion of PO with wood fiber, sorption properties of co-processed material, chemical analysis of fractionated components, and morphological investigation of co-processed material. Two additional studies are listed in the appendices that relate to adsorption of amphiphilic polymers to the cellulose fiber surface, which is one hypothesis of fiber surface modification by co-steam-explosion. Microscopy studies revealed that PO melt viscosity was found to influence the degree of dispersion and uniformity of the steam-exploded material. The hygroscopic nature of the co-processed fiber declined as shown by sorption isotherm data. Furthermore, a water vapor kinetics study found that all co-refined material had increased initial diffusion coefficients compared to the control fiber. Chemical changes in fractionated components were PO-type dependent. Lignin extracted from co-processed wood and polyethylene showed PO enrichment determined from an increase of methylene stretching in the Fourier Transform infrared subtraction spectra, while lignin from co-processed wood and polypropylene did not. Additionally, extracted PO showed indirect signs of oxidation as reflected by fluorescence studies. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed a number of differences in the co-processed materials such as increased cellulose crystallinity, new covalent linkages and an alternative distribution of components on the nanoscale reflected in the T1rho relaxation parameter. Steam-explosion was shown to modify wood fiber through the addition of "non-reactive" polyolefins without the need for coupling agents. In light of these findings, co-refining by steam-explosion should be viewed as a new reactive processing method for wood thermoplastic composites.

  13. Electron Beam Crosslinked Polyurethane Shape Memory Polymers with Tunable Mechanical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Hearon, Keith; Nash, Landon D.; Volk, Brent L.; Ware, Taylor; Lewicki, James P.; Voit, Walter E.; Wilson, Thomas S.

    2014-01-01

    Novel electron beam crosslinked polyurethane shape memory polymers with advanced processing capabilities and tunable thermomechanical properties have been synthesized and characterized. We demonstrate the ability to manipulate crosslink density in order to finely tune rubbery modulus, strain capacity, ultimate tensile strength, recovery stress, and glass transition temperature. This objective is accomplished for the first time in a low-molecular-weight polymer system through the precise engineering of thermoplastic resin precursors suitable for mass thermoplastic processing. Neurovascular stent prototypes were fabricated by dip-coating and laser machining to demonstrate processability. PMID:25411531

  14. The crystallization of tough thermoplastic resins in the presence of carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theil, Michael H.

    1988-01-01

    The presence of carbon fibers increased the crystallization rates of both PEEK and PPS thermoplastic polymers. The effect was most pronounced at higher crystallization temperatures. Isothermal crystallization rates were analyzed by applying classical phenomenological nucleation theory. Unusually high values of the so-called Avrami exponent were found for neat PEEK. Isothermal crystallization of PEEK and PPS polymers produced crystalline samples having a wide variety of melting temperatures. The melting as observed by differential scanning calorimetry occurred as dual endotherms which were called primary (higher temperature) and secondary melting peaks. Each primary peak accounted for most of the crystallinity present. The secondary peaks represented the melting of crystallites formed later than those attributable to the primary endotherms. The presence of carbon fibers increased the thermal stability of both PEEK and PPS crystallites as manifested by higher temperatures for the primary melting peaks. This may be attributable to increased crystallite size, greater crystallite perfection, and/or favorable modification of the crystallite interface. Over the range studied, crystallization temperature strongly influenced the positions of the secondary peaks but not the primary peaks.

  15. Interfacial strength development in thermoplastic resins and fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howes, Jeremy C.; Loos, Alfred C.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental program to develop test methods to be used to characterize interfacial (autohesive) strength development in polysulfone thermoplastic resin and graphite-polysulfone prepreg during processing is reported. Two test methods were used to examine interfacial strength development in neat resin samples. These included an interfacial tension test and a compact tension (CT) fracture toughness test. The interfacial tensile test proved to be very difficult to perform with a considerable amount of data scatter. Thus, the interfacial test was discarded in favor of the fracture toughness test. Interfacial strength development was observed by measuring the refracture toughness of precracked compact tension specimens that were rehealed at a given temperature and contact time. The measured refracture toughness was correlated with temperature and contact time. Interfacial strength development in graphite-polysulfone unidirectional composites was measured using a double cantilever beam (DCB) interlaminar fracture toughness test. The critical strain energy release rate of refractured composite specimens was measured as a function of healing temperature and contact time.

  16. Method for shaping sheet thermoplastic and the like

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akilian, Mireille K. (Inventor); Schattenburg, Mark L. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Processes and apparati for shaping sheet glass or thermoplastic materials use force from a layer of a flowing fluid, such as air, between the sheet and a mandrel at close to the softening temperature of the thermoplastic. The shape is preserved by cooling. The shape of the air bearing mandrel and the pressure distribution of the fluid contribute to the final shape. A process can be conducted on one or two surfaces such that the force from the air layer is on one or two surfaces of the sheet. The gap size between the sheet and mandrel determines the pressure profile in the gap, which also determines the final sheet shape. In general, smaller gaps lead to larger viscous forces. The pressure profile depends on the shape of the mandrel, the size of the fluid gap and the sheet and the fluid supply pressure.

  17. Toroid Joining Gun. [thermoplastic welding system using induction heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, J. D.; Fox, R. L.; Swaim, R J.

    1985-01-01

    The Toroid Joining Gun is a low cost, self-contained, portable low powered (100-400 watts) thermoplastic welding system developed at Langley Research Center for joining plastic and composite parts using an induction heating technique. The device developed for use in the fabrication of large space sructures (LSST Program) can be used in any atmosphere or in a vacuum. Components can be joined in situ, whether on earth or on a space platform. The expanded application of this welding gun is in the joining of thermoplastic composites, thermosetting composites, metals, and combinations of these materials. Its low-power requirements, light weight, rapid response, low cost, portability, and effective joining make it a candidate for solving many varied and unique bonding tasks.

  18. Evaluation of the effect of reprocessing on the structure and properties of low density polyethylene/thermoplastic starch blends.

    PubMed

    Peres, Anderson M; Pires, Ruthe R; Oréfice, Rodrigo L

    2016-01-20

    The great quantity of synthetic plastic discarded inappropriately in the environment is forcing the search for materials that can be reprocessable and biodegradable. Blends between synthetic polymers and natural and biodegradable polymers can be good candidates of such novel materials because they can combine processability with biodegradation and the use of renewable raw materials. However, traditional polymers usually present high levels of recyclability and use the well-established recycling infrastructure that can eventually be affected by the introduction of systems containing natural polymers. Thus, this work aims to evaluate the effect of reprocessing (simulated here by multiple extrusions) on the structure and properties of a low density polyethylene/thermoplastic starch (LDPE/TPS) blend compared to LDPE. The results indicated that multiple extrusion steps led to a reduction in the average size of the starch-rich phases of LDPE/TPS blends and minor changes in the mechanical and rheological properties of the materials. Such results suggest that the LDPE/TPS blend presents similar reprocessability to the LDPE for the experimental conditions used. PMID:26572348

  19. Method to determine factors contributing to thermoplastic sheet shrinkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rensch, Greg J.; Frye, Brad A.

    A test method is presented for the determination of shrinkage behavior in vacuum-formed thermoplastic resin sheeting, as presently simulated for various resin lots, sheet-gage thicknesses, sheet orientations, and mold profiles. The thermoforming machine and vacuum-forming mold characteristics are discussed. It is established that the four variable factors exert statistically significant effects on the shrinkage response of three Declar resin lots, but that these are of no real practical significance for either engineering or manufacturing operations.

  20. Structural response of bead-stiffened thermoplastic shear webs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouse, Marshall

    1991-01-01

    The results of an experimental and analytical study of the structural response and failure characteristics of selected bead-stiffened thermoplastic shear-webs are presented. Results are given for specimens with one stiffeneer, with two stiffeners, and different stiffener geometries. Selected analytical results that were obtained with the Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM) Testbed computer code are presented. Analytical results that describe normal and transverse shear stress are also presented.

  1. Modified Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes for Reinforce Thermoplastic Polyimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebron-COlon, Marisabel; Meador, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    A significant improvement in the mechanical properties of the thermoplastic polyimide film was obtained by the addition of noncovalently functionalized single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Polyimide films were reinforced using pristine SWNTs and functionalized SWNTs (F-SWNTs). The tensile strengths of the polyimide films containing F-SWNTs were found to be approximately 1.4 times higher than those prepared from pristine SWNTs.

  2. Ultrasonic assisted consolidation of commingled thermoplastic/glass fibers rovings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lionetto, Francesca; Dell'Anna, Riccardo; Montagna, Francesco; Maffezzoli, Alfonso

    2015-04-01

    Thermoplastic matrix composites are finding new applications in different industrial area thanks to their intrinsic advantages related to environmental compatibility and processability. The approach presented in this work consists in the development of a technology for the simultaneous deposition and consolidation of commingled thermoplastic rovings through to the application of high energy ultrasound. An experimental equipment, integrating both fiber impregnation and ply consolidation in a single process, has been designed and tested. It is made of an ultrasonic welder, whose titanium sonotrode is integrated on a filament winding machine. During winding, the commingled roving is at the same time in contact with the mandrel and the horn. The intermolecular friction generated by ultrasound is able to melt the thermoplastic matrix and impregnate the reinforcement fibers. The heat transfer phenomena occurring during the in situ consolidation were simulated solving by finite element (FE) analysis an energy balance accounting for the heat generated by ultrasonic waves and the melting characteristics of the matrix. To this aim, a calorimetric characterization of the thermoplastic matrix has been carried out to obtain the input parameters for the model. The FE analysis has enabled to predict the temperature distribution in the composite during heating and cooling The simulation results have been validated by the measurement of the temperature evolution during ultrasonic consolidation. The reliability of the developed consolidation equipment was proved by producing hoop wound cylinder prototypes using commingled continuous E-glass rovings and Polypropylene (PP) filaments. The consolidated composite cylinders are characterized by high mechanical properties, with values comparable with the theoretical ones predicted by the micromechanical analysis.

  3. Processing and Damage Tolerance of Continuous Carbon Fiber Composites Containing Puncture Self-Healing Thermoplastic Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimsley, Brian W.; Gordon, Keith L.; Czabaj, Michael W.; Cano, Roberto J.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2012-01-01

    Research at NASA Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) has identified several commercially available thermoplastic polymers that self-heal after ballistic impact and through-penetration. One of these resins, polybutadiene graft copolymer (PB(sub g)), was processed with unsized IM7 carbon fibers to fabricate reinforced composite material for further evaluation. Temperature dependent characteristics, such as the degradation point, glass transition (T(sub g)), and viscosity of the PBg polymer were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and dynamic parallel plate rheology. The PBg resin was processed into approximately equal to 22.0 cm wide unidirectional prepreg tape in the NASA LaRC Advanced Composites Processing Research Laboratory. Data from polymer thermal characterization guided the determination of a processing cycle used to fabricate quasi-isotropic 32-ply laminate panels in various dimensions up to 30.5cm x 30.5cm in a vacuum press. The consolidation quality of these panels was analyzed by optical microscopy and acid digestion. The process cycle was further optimized based on these results and quasi-isotropic, [45/0/-45/90]4S, 15.24cm x 15.24cm laminate panels were fabricated for mechanical property characterization. The compression strength after impact (CAI) of the IM7/pBG composites was measured both before and after an elevated temperature and pressure healing cycle. The results of the processing development effort of this composite material as well as the results of the mechanical property characterization are presented in this paper.

  4. Thermoplastic vulcanizate nanocomposites based on polypropylene/ethylene propylene diene terpolymer (PP/EPDM) prepared by reactive extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzadeh, Amin

    For this work, different grades of polypropylene-g-maleic anhydride polymers were chosen to elucidate the effect of compatibilizer on the nanoclay dispersion level in thermoplastic phase. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns along with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) micrographs confirmed that prepared PP nanocomposites ranged from intercalated structure to a coexistence of intercalated tactoids and exfoliated layers namely “partially exfoliated” nanocomposite. Among various factors affecting the compatibilizer performance, it is shown that only the relaxation behaviour of compatibilizer correlates directly with the nanocomposites characterization results; higher relaxation times of the compatibilizer are associated with better dispersion of nanoclay. To study the co-continuity development of the nonreactive blends, EPDM and the mentioned PP nanocomposites at various compositions were melt blended using an internal mixer. Based on continuity measurements of TPEs and TPE nanocomposites for both thermoplastic and rubber phase, it is shown that the presence of nanoclay decreases the co-continuity composition range and alters its symmetrical feature. However, this effect is more pronounced in the intercalated nanocomposites than in partially exfoliated nanocomposites. It seems that better nanoclay dispersion limits the reduction of the thermoplastic phase continuity in a manner that the continuity index of the thermoplastic phase for partially exfoliated TPE nanocomposite prepared at high EPDM content (i.e. at 70 wt%) is greater than that of corresponding TPE without nanoclay. According to these results, it is possible to shift to higher EPDM content using partially exfoliated system before formation of matrix-dispersed particle structure which limits thermoplastic vulcanizate production. This should be mentioned that gamma irradiation was carried out in order to fix the EPDM morphology to estimate the continuity of PP using the solvent extraction and gravimetry technique. Additionally, the effect of continuity on rheological behaviour of TPE nanocomposites was investigated. The ultimate goal in this field is to maximize the rubber like behaviour by controlling the blend morphology and the level of crosslinking. Therefore, this study also covers the effects of nanoclay presence and its dispersion level on the crosslinking reaction of thermoplastic vulcanizate nanocomposites prepared by reactive extrusion. Here, the rubber phase was dynamically vulcanized using dimethylol phenolic resin or octylphenol-formaldehyde resin along with stannous chloride dihydrate as the catalyst. In the present study, the dynamic vulcanization of the prepared TPVs and corresponding nanocomposites are characterized using different criteria, such as gel content, viscosity and normalized storage modulus in the time sweep tests, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal line width, bound curative content and residual diene concentration. The combination of the above parameters appears to be sufficient to provide a clear description of the systems. The last part of the present study is devoted to find how the dispersion level of nanoclay and consequently the extent of crosslinking change the rubber like behaviour and the morphology of the prepared TPVs. Therefore, recently developed method named temperature scanning stress relaxation (TSSR) was used to estimate the rubber indices of TPVs and TPV nanocomposites. The mentioned method also successfully provided information about the extent of crosslinking reaction. It is shown that the rubber like behaviour of the blends containing 50wt% and 60wt% of EPDM in which morphological studies suggest the presence of the rubber droplets in vicinity of irregular shape rubber particles with a low level of interconnectivity, correlates with the rubber droplet size. Therefore, the nanoclay presence affects the rubber index values mainly through its effect on the size of the rubber droplets that controls the number of retraction points in the proposed buckling mechanism duri

  5. Morphology of Thermoplastic Elastomers:Stereoblock Polypropylene

    SciTech Connect

    Pople, John A

    2002-08-06

    The morphologies of low-density (0.86 g/cm{sup 3}), elastomeric polypropylene (ePP) derived from bis(2-arylindenyl) hafnium dichloride were investigated using a combination of polarized optical microscopy (OM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and tapping mode atomic force microscopy (TMAFM). These low-crystallinity polypropylenes, when crystallized isothermally from the melt, exhibit morphologies reminiscent of classical semi-crystalline polymers. The presence of lamellae, cross-hatching, hedrites, and spherulites was revealed by high resolution TM-AFM. These elastomeric polypropylenes can be fractionated into components of different average tacticities and crystallinities, but similar molecular mass. The analysis of the morphologies of all of the fractions revealed both large hierarchical structures and cross-hatching typical of the {alpha}-modification of crystalline isotactic polypropylene for all but the lowest crystalline ether soluble fraction. Evidence for high-melting crystals in all of the fractions are most consistent with a stereoblock microstructure of atactic and isotactic sequences.

  6. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Jjj of... - Group 1 Storage Vessels at Existing Affected Sources Producing the Listed Thermoplastics

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Thermoplastics Thermoplastic Chemical a Vessel capacity (cubic meters) Vapor pressure b (kilopascals) ASA/AMSAN c... chemicals vapor pressure criteria are specific to the listed chemical or to “all chemicals,” as indicated. b Maximum true...

  7. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Jjj of... - Known Organic HAP Emitted From the Production of Thermoplastic Products

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Organic HAP Emitted From the Production of Thermoplastic Products...Organic HAP Emitted From the Production of Thermoplastic Products... ? ? ABS using a batch emulsion process ? ? ? ABS... ABS using a continuous emulsion process ? ? ?...

  8. LaRC TPI 1500 series polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Tan-Hung; Bai, Jia-Mo

    1990-01-01

    The crystallization behavior and the melt flow properties of two batches of 1500 series LaRC-TPI polymers from Mitsui Toatsu Chemicals (MTC) were investigated. The characterization methods include Differential Scanning Calorimetry, the x ray diffractography and the melt rheology. The as-received materials possess initial crystalline melting peak temperatures of 295 and 305 C, respectively. These materials are less readily recrystallizable at elevated temperatures when compared to other semicrystalline thermoplastics. For the samples annealed at temperatures below 330 C, a semicrystalline polymer can be obtained. On the other hand, a purely amorphous structure is realized in the samples annealed at temperatures above 330 C. Isothermal crystallization kinetics were studied by means of the simple Avrami equation. The viscoelastic properties at elevated temperatures below and above glass transition temperature of the polymers were measured. Information with regard to the molecule sizes and distributions in these polymers were also extracted from melt rheology.

  9. Polymer composites prepared from heat-treated starch and styrene-butadiene latex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermoplastic starch/latex polymer composites were prepared using styrene–butadiene (SB) latex and heat-treated cornstarch. The composites were prepared in a compression mold at 130 °C, with starch content 20%. An amylose-free cornstarch, waxy maize, was used for this research and the heat treatment...

  10. Thermal Degradation, Mechanical Properties and Morphology of Wheat Straw Flour Filled Recycled Thermoplastic Composites

    PubMed Central

    Mengeloglu, Fatih; Karakus, Kadir

    2008-01-01

    Thermal behaviors of wheat straw flour (WF) filled thermoplastic composites were measured applying the thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. Morphology and mechanical properties were also studied using scanning electron microscope and universal testing machine, respectively. Presence of WF in thermoplastic matrix reduced the degradation temperature of the composites. One for WF and one for thermoplastics, two main decomposition peaks were observed. Morphological study showed that addition of coupling agent improved the compatibility between WFs and thermoplastic. WFs were embedded into the thermoplastic matrix indicating improved adhesion. However, the bonding was not perfect because some debonding can also be seen on the interface of WFs and thermoplastic matrix. In the case of mechanical properties of WF filled recycled thermoplastic, HDPE and PP based composites provided similar tensile and flexural properties. The addition of coupling agents improved the properties of thermoplastic composites. MAPE coupling agents performed better in HDPE while MAPP coupling agents were superior in PP based composites. The composites produced with the combination of 50-percent mixture of recycled HDPE and PP performed similar with the use of both coupling agents. All produced composites provided flexural properties required by the ASTM standard for polyolefin-based plastic lumber decking boards.

  11. Recycling of ligno-cellulosic and polyethylene wastes from agricultural operations in thermoplastic composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the US, wood plastic composites (WPC) represent one of the successful markets for natural fiber-filled thermoplastic composites. The WPC typically use virgin or recycled thermoplastic as the substrate and wood fiber as the filler. A major application of the WPC is in non-structural building appli...

  12. Fabrication of robust and thermally stable superhydrophobic nanocomposite coatings based on thermoplastic polyurethane and silica nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyfi, Javad; Jafari, Seyed Hassan; Khonakdar, Hossein Ali; Sadeghi, Gity Mir Mohamad; Zohuri, Gholamhossein; Hejazi, Iman; Simon, Frank

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, superhydrophobic nanocomposite coatings based on thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) and modified nanosilica were fabricated using a simple solution-based method. The main challenge was to impart superhydrophobicity to an intrinsically hydrophilic polymer substrate. The prepared nanocomposite coatings were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy, confocal microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Based on the obtained results, it was proved that in order to achieve superhydrophobicity, no TPU macromolecule should be present on the coating's top layer, thus a complete coverage of coating's top layer by nanosilica particles was necessary for achieving ultra water repellent coatings. Mechanical and thermal resistance of the coatings, which are the main challenges in commercializing superhydrophobic surfaces, were also studied by drop impact and thermal annealing tests, respectively. It was proved that using TPU as a sublayer results in improving mechanical resistance of the coatings as compared with the pure silica nanocoating. Moreover, the samples showed an excellent resistance against elevated temperatures (150 °C) and remained superhydrophobic; however, further increment of the annealing temperatures to 200 °C caused the TPU macromolecules to migrate onto the top layer of the coatings significantly reducing the water repellency, which was visually proved by SEM.

  13. Study on ternary low density polyethylene/linear low density polyethylene/thermoplastic starch blend films.

    PubMed

    Sabetzadeh, Maryam; Bagheri, Rouhollah; Masoomi, Mahmood

    2015-03-30

    In this work, low-density polyethylene/linear low-density polyethylene/thermoplastic starch (LDPE/LLDPE/TPS) films are prepared with the aim of obtaining environmentally friendly materials containing high TPS content with required packaging properties. Blending of LDPE/LLDPE (70/30 wt/wt) with 5-20 wt% of TPS and 3 wt% of PE-grafted maleic anhydride (PE-g-MA) is performed in a twin-screw extruder, followed by the blowing process. Differential scanning calorimetric results indicate starch has more pronounced effect on crystallization of LLDPE than LDPE. Scanning electron micrograph shows a fairly good dispersion of TPS in PE matrices. Fourier transfer infrared spectra confirm compatibility between polymers using PE-g-MA as the compatibilizer. Storage modulus, loss modulus and complex viscosity increase with incorporation of starch. Tensile strength and elongation-at-break decrease from 18 to 10.5 MPa and 340 to 200%, respectively when TPS increases from 5 to 20%. However, the required mechanical properties for packaging applications are attained when 15 wt% starch is added, as specified in ASTM D4635. Finally 12% increase in water uptake is achieved with inclusion of 15 wt% starch. PMID:25563952

  14. Corn protein-based thermoplastic resins: effect of some polar and amphiphilic plasticizers.

    PubMed

    Di Gioia, L; Guilbert, S

    1999-03-01

    Homogeneous blends of corn gluten meal (CGM) and "polar" plasticizers (water, glycerol) or "amphiphilic" plasticizers [octanoic and palmitic acids, dibutyl tartrate and phthalate, and diacetyl tartaric acid ester of mono-diglycerides (DATEM)] were obtained by a hot-mixing procedure. The glass transition temperature (T(g)) of the blends was measured by modulated differential scanning calorimetry and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis, as a function of plasticizer type and content (0-30%, dwb). The plasticizing efficiency (i.e., decrease of T(g)) at equal molar content was found to be proportional to the molecular weight and inversely proportional to the percent of hydrophilic groups of the plasticizer. The migration rate of the plasticizers in the polymer was related to their physicochemical characteristics. It was assumed that polar substances interacted with readily accessible polar amino acids, whereas amphiphilic ones interacted with nonpolar zones, which are buried and accessible with difficulty. The temperature at which a thermoplastic resin of plasticized CGM could be formed was closely connected to the T(g) of the blend. PMID:10552446

  15. SEM evaluation of thermoplastic endodontic materials alterations after disinfection: a new experimental model.

    PubMed

    Grecca, Fabiana Soares; Porto, Marcos; Fontanella, Vania Regina Camargo; Scarparo, Roberta Kochenborger

    2011-01-01

    This study assessed a new experimental model to analyze the effects of sodium hypochlorite solution 2.5% for 10 min and chlorhexidine 2% for 15 s on cones surface alterations. Twenty five gutta-percha and 25 thermoplastic synthetic polymer-based cones had their last 1 mm from the tapered end examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) before and after being exposed to the disinfectant solutions. To allow the surfaces to be compared, the samples were not metalized, a voltage of 1 kV was used and the images were captured within standardized angles. The samples were immersed on the test solutions. The comparison of the alterations of the cones was performed using the software program Adobe Photoshop CS. A measurement was taken of the standard deviations of the pixel intensity in this area, higher standard deviations represent more irregular areas. Differences in standard deviation before and after disinfection for each cone were compared between groups by means of analysis of variance supplemented by the Tukey test. Gutta-percha cones showed higher standard deviations than Resilon cones (P < 0.001). In the gutta-percha cones, sodium hypochlorite generated more irregular areas than chlorhexidine and the control group (P < 0.001). The present study has demonstrated the feasibility of using a modified SEM method. This opens opportunities to the use of new and precise tools for evaluating a sample in different moments. PMID:21181716

  16. Impact Behavior of Composite Fan Blade Leading Edge Subcomponent with Thermoplastic Polyurethane Interleave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Roberts, Gary D.; Kohlman, Lee W.; Heimann, Paula J.; Pereira, J. Michael; Ruggeri, Charles R.; Martin, Richard E.; McCorkle, Linda S.

    2015-01-01

    Impact damage tolerance and damage resistance is a critical metric for application of polymer matrix composites where failure caused by impact damage could compromise structural performance and safety. As a result, several materials and/or design approaches to improve impact damage tolerance have been investigated over the past several decades. Many composite toughening methodologies impart a trade-off between increased fracture toughness and compromised in-plane strength and modulus. In large part, mechanical tests to evaluate composite damage tolerance include static methods such as Mode I, Mode II, and mixed mode failures. However, ballistic impact damage resistance does not always correlate with static properties. The intent of this paper is to evaluate the influence of a thermoplastic polyurethane veil interleave on the static and dynamic performance of composite test articles. Static coupon tests included tension, compression, double cantilever beam, and end notch flexure. Measurement of the resistance to ballistic impact damage were made to evaluate the composites response to high speed impact. The interlayer material showed a decrease of in-plane performance with only a moderate improvement to Mode I and Mode II fracture toughness. However, significant benefit to impact damage tolerance was observed through ballistic tests.

  17. Development of LaRC (TM): IA thermoplastic polyimide coated aerospace wiring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keating, Jack

    1995-01-01

    NASA Langley has invented LaRC(exp TM) IA and IAX which are thermoplastic polyimides with good melting, thermal and chemical resistance properties. It was the objective of this contract to prepare and extrude LaRC (exp TM) polyimide onto aircraft wire and evaluate the polymers performance in this critical application. Based on rheology and chemical resistance studies at Imitec, LaRC (exp TM) IAX melts readily in an extruder, facilitating the manufacture of thin wall coatings. The polyimide does not corode the extruder, develop gel particles nor advance in viscosity. The insulated wire was tested according to MiL-W-22759E test specifications. The resulting wire coated with LaRC (exp TM) IAX displayed exceptional properties: surface resistance, non blocking, non burning, hot fluid resistance, impulse dielectric, insulation resistance, low temperature flexibility, thermal aging, wire weight, dimensions, negligible high temperature shrinkage and stripability. The light weight and other properties merit its application in satellites, missiles and aircraft applications. The extruded IAX results in a polyimide aircraft insulation without seams, outstanding moisture resistance, continuous lengths and abrasion resistance.

  18. Sensitivity Studies for In-Situ Automated Tape Placement of Thermoplastic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costen, Robert C.; Marchello, Joseph M.

    2004-01-01

    This modeling effort seeks to improve the interlaminate bond strength of thermoplastic carbon composites produced by the in-situ automated tape placement (ATP) process. An existing high productivity model is extended to lower values of the Peclet number that correspond to the present operating conditions of the Langley ATP robot. (The Peclet number is the dimensionless ratio of inertial to diffusive heat transfer.) In sensitivity studies, all of the process and material parameters are individually varied. The model yields the corresponding variations in the effective bonding time (EBT) referred to the glass transition temperature. According to reptation theory, the interlaminate bond strength after wetting occurs is proportional to the one-fourth power of EBT. The model also computes the corresponding variations in the thermal input power (TIP) and the mass and volumetric process rates. Process studies show that a 10 percent increase in the consolidation length results in a 20 percent increase in EBT and a 5 percent increase in TIP. A surprising result is that a 10 K decrease in the tooling temperature results in a 25 percent increase in EBT and an 8 percent increase in TIP. Material studies show that a 10 K decrease in glass transition temperature results in an 8 percent increase in EBT and a 8 percent decrease in TIP. A 20 K increase in polymer degradation temperature results in a 23 percent increase in EBT with no change in TIP.

  19. Effect of carboxylic acids as compatibilizer agent on mechanical properties of thermoplastic starch and polypropylene blends.

    PubMed

    Martins, Andréa Bercini; Santana, Ruth Marlene Campomanes

    2016-01-01

    In this work, polypropylene/thermoplastic starch (PP/TPS) blends were prepared as an alternative material to use in disposable packaging, reducing the negative polymeric environmental impact. Unfortunately, this material displays morphological characteristics typical of immiscible polymer blends and a compatibilizer agent is needed. Three different carboxyl acids: myristic (C14), palmitic (C16) and stearic acids (C18) were used as natural compatibilizer agent (NCA). The effects of NCA on the mechanical, physical, thermal and morphological properties of PP/TPS blends were investigated and compared against PP/TPS with and without PP-grafted maleic anhydride (PPgMA). When compared to PP/TPS, blends with C18, PPgMA and C14 presented an improvement of 25, 22 and 17% in tensile strength at break and of 180, 194 and 259% in elongation at break, respectively. The highest increase, 54%, in the impact strength was achieved with C14 incorporation. Improvements could be seen, through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images, in the compatibility between the immiscible components by acids incorporation. These results showed that carboxylic acids, specifically C14, could be used as compatibilizer agent and could substitute PPgMA. PMID:26453854

  20. All-thermoplastic nanoplasmonic microfluidic device for transmission SPR biosensing.

    PubMed

    Malic, Lidija; Morton, Keith; Clime, Liviu; Veres, Teodor

    2013-03-01

    Early and accurate disease diagnosis still remains a major challenge in clinical settings. Biomarkers could potentially provide useful tools for the detection and monitoring of disease progression, treatment safety and efficacy. Recent years have witnessed prodigious advancement in biosensor development with research directed towards rapid, real-time, label-free and sensitive biomarker detection. Among emerging techniques, nanoplasmonic biosensors pose tremendous potential to accelerate clinical diagnosis with real-time multiplexed analysis, rapid and miniaturized assays, low sample consumption and high sensitivity. In order to translate these technologies from the proof-of-principle concept level to point of care clinical diagnosis, integrated, portable devices having small footprint cartridges that house low-cost disposable consumables are sought. Towards this goal, we developed an all-polymeric nanoplasmonic microfluidic (NMF) transmission surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor. The device was fabricated in thermoplastics using a simple, single step and cost-effective hot embossing technique amenable to mass production. The novel 3D hierarchical mold fabrication process enabled monolithic integration of blazed nanogratings within the detection chambers of a multichannel microfluidic system. Consequently, a single hard thermoplastic bottom substrate comprising plasmonic and fluidic features allowed integration of active fluidic elements, such as pneumatic valves, in the top soft thermoplastic cover, increasing device functionality. A simple and compact transmission-based optical setup was employed with multiplexed end-point or dual-channel kinetic detection capability which did not require stringent angular accuracy. The sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility of the transmission SPR biosensor was demonstrated through label-free immunodetection of soluble cell-surface glycoprotein sCD44 at clinically relevant picomolar to nanomolar concentrations. PMID:23287840

  1. ZnO Nanorod Thermoplastic Polyurethane Nanocomposites: Morphology and Shape Memory Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Koerner, H.; Kelley, J; George, J; Drummy, L; Mirau, P; Bell, N; Hsu, J; Vaia, R

    2009-01-01

    The impact of dispersed alkylthiol-modified ZnO nanorods, as a function of rod aspect ratio and concentration, on the shape memory character of a thermoplastic polyurethane with low hard-segment density (LHS-TPU) is examined relative to the enhanced performance occurring for carbon nanofiber (CNF) dispersion. Solution blending resulted in uniform dispersion within the LHS-TPU of the ZnO nanorods at low volume (weight) fractions (<2.9% v/v (17.75% w/w)). Tensile modulus enhancements were modest though, comparable to values observed for spherical nanofillers. Shape memory characteristics, which in this LHS-TPU result when strain-induced crystallites retard the entropic recovery of the deformed chains, were unchanged for these low volume fraction ZnO nanocomposites. Higher ZnO loadings (12% v/v (50% w/w)) exhibited clustering of ZnO nanorods into a mesh-like structure. Here, tensile modulus and shape recovery characteristics were improved, although not as great as seen for comparable CNF addition. Wide angle X-ray diffraction and NMR revealed that the addition of ZnO nanorods did not impact the inherent strain induced crystallization of the LHS-TPU, which is in contrast to the impact of CNFs and emphasizes the impact of interactions at the polymer-nanoparticle interface. Overall, these findings reinforce the hypothesis that the shape memory properties of polymer nanocomposites are governed by the extent to which nanoparticle addition, via nanoparticle aspect ratio, hierarchical morphology, and interfacial interactions, impacts the molecular mechanism responsible for trapping elastic strain.

  2. Polylactide?Poly(6-methyl-[espilson]-caprolactone)?Polylactide Thermoplastic Elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Martello, Mark T.; Hillmyer, Marc A.

    2012-11-14

    Amorphous ABA type block aliphatic polyesters can be useful as degradable and biorenewable thermoplastic elastomers. These materials can be prepared by sequential ring-opening transesterification polymerization (ROTEP) reactions and can exhibit a range of physical properties and morphologies. In this work a set of amorphous polylactide-poly(6-methyl-{epsilon}-caprolactone)-polylactide aliphatic polyester ABA triblock copolymers were prepared by consecutive controlled ring-opening polymerizations. Ring-opening polymerization of neat 6-methyl-{epsilon}-caprolactone in the presence of 1,4-benzenedimethanol and tin(II) octoate afforded {alpha},{omega}-hydroxyl-terminated poly(6-methyl-{epsilon}-caprolactone). High conversions of 6-methyl-{epsilon}-caprolactone (>96%) afforded polymers with molar masses ranging from 12 to 98 kg mol{sup -1}, depending on monomer-to-initiator ratios, polymers with narrow, monomodal molecular weight distributions. An array of polylactide-poly(6-methyl-{epsilon}-caprolactone)-polylactide triblock copolymers with controlled molecular weights and narrow molecular weight distributions were synthesized using the telechelic poly(6-methyl-{epsilon}-caprolactone) samples as macroinitiators for the ring-opening polymerization of D,L-lactide. The morphological, thermal, and mechanical behaviors of these materials were explored. Several triblocks adopted well-ordered microphase-separated morphologies, and both hexagonally packed cylindrical and lamellar structures were observed. The Flory-Huggins interaction parameter was determined, x(T) = 61.2 T{sup -1} - 0.1, based on the order-to-disorder transition temperatures of two symmetric triblocks using the calculated mean field theory result. The elastomeric mechanical behavior of two high molecular weight triblocks was characterized by tensile and elastic recovery experiments.

  3. Temperature dependence of the thermoplastic formability in bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryn Pitt, E.; Kumar, Golden; Schroers, Jan

    2011-08-01

    The temperature dependence of the maximum strain a bulk metallic glass (BMG) can undergo in its supercooled liquid state under specified conditions is determined. This formability is measured experimentally over a wide temperature range using Zr35Ti30Cu8.25Be26.75 as an example BMG. When considering five different BMG formers, we found that the formability continuously increases with temperature. This behavior is ubiquitous among BMGs whose crystallization behavior can be described by steady state nucleation and diffusion limited growth. Therefore, in order to maximize the formability during thermoplastic forming of BMGs, the highest processing temperature should be chosen at which crystallization can still be avoided.

  4. Induction Consolidation of Thermoplastic Composites Using Smart Susceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Matsen, Marc R

    2012-06-14

    This project has focused on the area of energy efficient consolidation and molding of fiber reinforced thermoplastic composite components as an energy efficient alternative to the conventional processing methods such as autoclave processing. The expanding application of composite materials in wind energy, automotive, and aerospace provides an attractive energy efficiency target for process development. The intent is to have this efficient processing along with the recyclable thermoplastic materials ready for large scale application before these high production volume levels are reached. Therefore, the process can be implemented in a timely manner to realize the maximum economic, energy, and environmental efficiencies. Under this project an increased understanding of the use of induction heating with smart susceptors applied to consolidation of thermoplastic has been achieved. This was done by the establishment of processing equipment and tooling and the subsequent demonstration of this fabrication technology by consolidating/molding of entry level components for each of the participating industrial segments, wind energy, aerospace, and automotive. This understanding adds to the nation's capability to affordably manufacture high quality lightweight high performance components from advanced recyclable composite materials in a lean and energy efficient manner. The use of induction heating with smart susceptors is a precisely controlled low energy method for the consolidation and molding of thermoplastic composites. The smart susceptor provides intrinsic thermal control based on the interaction with the magnetic field from the induction coil thereby producing highly repeatable processing. The low energy usage is enabled by the fact that only the smart susceptor surface of the tool is heated, not the entire tool. Therefore much less mass is heated resulting in significantly less required energy to consolidate/mold the desired composite components. This energy efficiency results in potential energy savings of {approx}75% as compared to autoclave processing in aerospace, {approx}63% as compared to compression molding in automotive, and {approx}42% energy savings as compared to convectively heated tools in wind energy. The ability to make parts in a rapid and controlled manner provides significant economic advantages for each of the industrial segments. These attributes were demonstrated during the processing of the demonstration components on this project.

  5. Nonlinear mechanical behavior of thermoplastic matrix materials for advanced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arenz, R. J.; Landel, R. F.

    1989-01-01

    Two recent theories of nonlinear mechanical response are quantitatively compared and related to experimental data. Computer techniques are formulated to handle the numerical integration and iterative procedures needed to solve the associated sets of coupled nonlinear differential equations. Problems encountered during these formulations are discussed and some open questions described. Bearing in mind these cautions, the consequences of changing parameters that appear in the formulations on the resulting engineering properties are discussed. Hence, engineering approaches to the analysis of thermoplastic matrix material can be suggested.

  6. Novel sustainable polymers derived from renewable rosin and fatty acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilbon, Perry

    In the work of this dissertation, polymers derived from renewable bio-based resources prepared by various polymerization techniques were investigated. The properties of these polymeric materials were characterized and discussed. Rosin was first converted into acrylate or methacrylate monomers for atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). Second, rosin was combined with vegetable oil to produce completely renewable novel polyesters by acyclic diene metathesis (ADMET) polymerization. Third, degradable block copolymers were synthesized composed of polycaprolactone and rosin grafted polycaprolactone with the aid of ring-opening polymerization (ROP). Finally, degradable polyesters were produced using vegetable oil derivatives as starting materials. These new rosin and fatty acid based renewable polymer materials will have potential applications as sustainable thermoplastics, thermoplastic elastomers, etc.

  7. Advanced Laser Transmission Welding Strategies for Fibre Reinforced Thermoplastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wippo, V.; Jaeschke, P.; Brueggmann, M.; Suttmann, O.; Overmeyer, L.

    Laser transmission welding can be used to join endless fibre reinforced thermoplastics. The welding temperature is affected by the heat conduction along carbon fibresand depends on the local orientation of the fibres in the weld seam and the laser welding technique itself. In these investigations the heat development during the welding with quasi-static temperature fields, which is a combination of two laser welding techniques, is evaluated and compared to welding with a homogenized intensity distribution. In order to optimize the temperature distribution over the weld seam width for both linear and curved weld seams, different scanning structures have beenadapted. The experiments were conducted with a diode laser emitting at a wavelength of 940 nm and the process was monitored by aninfrared camera. The used thermoplastics consist of laminates based on unidirectional carbon fibre reinforced polyphenylenesulfide. With the developed scanning structures, a near-homogeneous temperature distribution was generated over the width of the weld seam for curved weld seams, which is not possible by welding with a homogenized laser radiation intensity distribution.

  8. CREEP MODELING FOR INJECTION-MOLDED LONG-FIBER THERMOPLASTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Kunc, Vlastimil; Bapanapalli, Satish K.

    2008-06-30

    This paper proposes a model to predict the creep response of injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics (LFTs). The model accounts for elastic fibers embedded in a thermoplastic resin that exhibits the nonlinear viscoelastic behavior described by the Schapery’s model. It also accounts for fiber length and orientation distributions in the composite formed by the injection-molding process. Fiber length and orientation distributions were measured and used in the analysis that applies the Eshelby’s equivalent inclusion method, the Mori-Tanaka assumption (termed as the Eshelby-Mori-Tanaka approach) and the fiber orientation averaging technique to compute the overall strain increment resulting from an overall constant applied stress during a given time increment. The creep model for LFTs has been implemented in the ABAQUS finite element code via user-subroutines and has been validated against the experimental creep data obtained for long-glass-fiber/polypropylene specimens. The effects of fiber orientation and length distributions on the composite creep response are determined and discussed.

  9. 3D thermoplastic elastomer microfluidic devices for biological probe immobilization.

    PubMed

    Brassard, Daniel; Clime, Liviu; Li, Kebin; Geissler, Matthias; Miville-Godin, Caroline; Roy, Emmanuel; Veres, Teodor

    2011-12-01

    Microfluidics has emerged as a valuable tool for the high-resolution patterning of biological probes on solid supports. Yet, its widespread adoption as a universal biological immobilization tool is still limited by several technical challenges, particularly for the patterning of isolated spots using three-dimensional (3D) channel networks. A key limitation arises from the difficulties to adapt the techniques and materials typically used in prototyping to low-cost mass-production. In this paper, we present the fabrication of thin thermoplastic elastomer membranes with microscopic through-holes using a hot-embossing process that is compatible with high-throughput manufacturing. The membranes provide the basis for the fabrication of highly integrated 3D microfluidic devices with a footprint of only 1 × 1 cm(2). When placed on a solid support, the device allows for the immobilization of up to 96 different probes in the form of a 10 × 10 array comprising isolated spots of 50 × 50 ?m(2). The design of the channel network is optimized using 3D simulations based on the Lattice-Boltzmann method to promote capillary action as the sole force distributing the liquid in the device. Finally, we demonstrate the patterning of DNA and protein arrays on hard thermoplastic substrates yielding spots of excellent definition that prove to be highly specific in subsequent hybridization experiments. PMID:22041708

  10. Magnetostrictive pressure device for thermoplastic fiber placement process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrens, Markus; Mallick, Vishal

    1999-07-01

    Fiber reinforced composites offer excellent specific stiffness and strength and are therefore interesting for rotating machinery applications. The main disadvantage of high performance composites is the manufacturing process which is labor intensive and thus slow and expensive. The Thermoplastic Fiber Placement process overcomes these difficulties due to its high degree of automation. During the process, an impregnated tape is heated up and then consolidated in-situ under pressure. The process which is used at ABB consists of a six axis robot, a heat source and a pressure device for consolidation. Today mechanical roller element are used to apply the forces normal to the surface to the composite part. These forces are necessary for proper consolidation. The roller action prevents damage due to shearing of the tape during lay down. To improve the processing sped, and to expand the use of the Thermoplastic Fiber Placement process for more complex structures, two severe drawbacks of the solid roller approach need to be overcome; the small pressure contact area which limits the speed of the process and the poor conformability which prevents the process from being applied to highly 3D surfaces. Smart materials such as piezoelectrics, electrostrictives and magnetostrictives can produce high forces at high operating frequencies and enable a large, conformable actuated surface to be realized. A pressure device made with a magnetostrictive actuator has been tested. The main design goal is to apply the consolidation pressure correctly, without introducing shear forces on the tape, in order to produce parts with optimal mechanical properties.

  11. Manufacturing of a REBCO racetrack coil using thermoplastic resin aiming at Maglev application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Katsutoshi; Ogata, Masafumi; Hasegawa, Hitoshi

    2015-11-01

    The REBCO coated conductor is a promising technology for the Maglev application in terms of its high critical temperature. The operating temperature of the on-board magnets can be around 40-50 K with the coated conductor. The REBCO coils are cooled by cryocoolers directly, and hence the thermal design of the REBCO coils significantly changes from that of LTS coils. We have developed a novel REBCO coil structure using thermoplastic resin. The coil is not impregnated and the thermoplastic resin is used to bond the coil winding and the heat transfer members, e.g. copper and aluminum plates. The viscosity of the thermoplastic resin is high enough for the thermoplastic resin not to permeate between the turns in the coil. Therefore, the thermal stress does not occur and the risk of degradation is removed. This paper contains the following three topics. First, the thermal resistance of the thermoplastic resin was measured at cryogenic temperature. Then, a small round REBCO coil was experimentally produced. It has been confirmed that the thermoplastic resin does not cause the degradation and, the adhesion between the coil winding and copper plates withstands the thermal stress. Finally, we successfully produced a full-scale racetrack REBCO coil applying the coil structure with the thermoplastic resin.

  12. Dielectric Characterization of PCL-Based Thermoplastic Materials for Microwave Diagnostic and Therapeutic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Suzette M.; Shea, Jacob D.; Al-Joumayly, Mudar A.; Van Veen, Barry D.; Behdad, Nader; Hagness, Susan C.

    2011-01-01

    We propose the use of a polycaprolactone (PCL)-based thermoplastic mesh as a tissue-immobilization interface for microwave imaging and microwave hyperthermia treatment. An investigation of the dielectric properties of two PCL-based thermoplastic materials in the frequency range of 0.5 – 3.5 GHz is presented. The frequency-dependent dielectric constant and effective conductivity of the PCL-based thermoplastics are characterized using measurements of microstrip transmission lines fabricated on substrates comprised of the thermoplastic meshes. We also examine the impact of the presence of a PCL-based thermoplastic mesh on microwave breast imaging. We use a numerical test bed comprised of a previously reported three-dimensional anatomically realistic breast phantom and a multi-frequency microwave inverse scattering algorithm. We demonstrate that the PCL-based thermoplastic material and the assumed biocompatible medium of vegetable oil are sufficiently well matched such that the PCL layer may be neglected by the imaging solution without sacrificing imaging quality. Our results suggest that PCL-based thermoplastics are promising materials as tissue immobilization structures for microwave diagnostic and therapeutic applications. PMID:21622068

  13. Sub-second thermoplastic forming of bulk metallic glasses by ultrasonic beating

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jiang; Liang, Xiong; Wu, Xiaoyu; Liu, Zhiyuan; Gong, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The work proposed a novel thermoplastic forming approach–the ultrasonic beating forming (UBF) method for bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) in present work. The rapid forming approach can finish the thermoplastic forming of BMGs in less than one second, avoiding the time-dependent crystallization and oxidation to the most extent. Besides, the UBF is also proved to be competent in the fabrication of structures with the length scale ranging from macro scale to nano scale. Our results propose a novel route for the thermoplastic forming of BMGs and have promising applications in the rapid fabrication of macro to nano scale products and devices. PMID:26644149

  14. Polymer research at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, T. L.; Johnston, N. J.

    1982-01-01

    Polymer synthesis programs involve the development of Novel thermoplastics, pseudothermoplastics, and thermosets. These systems are prepared to elucidate structure-property relationships involving thermal capabilities, toughness, processability and environmental stability. Easily processable polyimides, solvent-resistant polysulfones and polyphenylquinoxalines, and tougher high and intermediate temperature polymers were developed. Characterization efforts included high pressure liquid chromatography methodology, the development of toughness tests for fiber reinforced composites, a study of electrical properties of metal ion filled polyimides, and a study of the mutagenicity of aromatic diamines. Also the mechanism of cure/degradation of experimental polymers was studied by rheology, mechanical behavior, separation techniques and spectroscopy. The degradative crosslinking of alkyl-containing polyimides, the separation and identification of crosslinked phenylquinoxalines, the rheological behavior of hot-melt polyimides, and the elucidation of the cure of norbornene endcapped imides were also studied.

  15. Polymer films

    DOEpatents

    Granick, Steve (Champaign, IL); Sukhishvili, Svetlana A. (Maplewood, NJ)

    2008-12-30

    A film contains a first polymer having a plurality of hydrogen bond donating moieties, and a second polymer having a plurality of hydrogen bond accepting moieties. The second polymer is hydrogen bonded to the first polymer.

  16. Preparation and rheological behavior of polymer-modified asphalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefi, Ali Akbar

    1999-09-01

    Different materials and methods were used to prepare and stabilize polymer-modified asphalts. Addition of thermoplastic elastomers improved some technically important properties of asphalt. Due to inherent factors like large density difference between asphalt and polyethylene, many physical methods in which the structure of asphalt is unchanged, failed to stabilize this system. The effect of addition of copolymers and a pyrolytic oil residue derived from used tire rubber were also studied and found to be ineffective on the storage stability of the polymer-asphalt emulsions while high and moderate temperature properties of the asphalt were found to be improved. Finally, the technique of catalytic grafting of polymer on the surface of high-density particles (e.g. carbon black) was used to balance the large density difference between asphalt and polymer. The resulting polymer-asphalts were stable at high temperatures and showed enhanced properties at low and high temperatures.

  17. High-Temperature Shape Memory Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoonessi, Mitra; Weiss, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    physical conformation changes when exposed to an external stimulus, such as a change in temperature. Such materials have a permanent shape, but can be reshaped above a critical temperature and fixed into a temporary shape when cooled under stress to below the critical temperature. When reheated above the critical temperature (Tc, also sometimes called the triggering or switching temperature), the materials revert to the permanent shape. The current innovation involves a chemically treated (sulfonated, carboxylated, phosphonated, or other polar function group), high-temperature, semicrystalline thermoplastic poly(ether ether ketone) (Tg .140 C, Tm = 340 C) mix containing organometallic complexes (Zn++, Li+, or other metal, ammonium, or phosphonium salts), or high-temperature ionic liquids (e.g. hexafluorosilicate salt with 1-propyl-3- methyl imidazolium, Tm = 210 C) to form a network where dipolar or ionic interactions between the polymer and the low-molecular-weight or inorganic compound forms a complex that provides a physical crosslink. Hereafter, these compounds will be referred to as "additives". The polymer is semicrystalline, and the high-melt-point crystals provide a temporary crosslink that acts as a permanent crosslink just so long as the melting temperature is not exceeded. In this example case, the melting point is .340 C, and the shape memory critical temperature is between 150 and 250 C. PEEK is an engineering thermoplastic with a high Young fs modulus, nominally 3.6 GPa. An important aspect of the invention is the control of the PEEK functionalization (in this example, the sulfonation degree), and the thermal properties (i.e. melting point) of the additive, which determines the switching temperature. Because the compound is thermoplastic, it can be formed into the "permanent" shape by conventional plastics processing operations. In addition, the compound may be covalently cross - linked after forming the permanent shape by S-PEEK by applying ionizing radiation ( radiation, neutrons), or by chemical crosslinking to form a covalent permanent network. With respect to other shape memory polymers, this invention is novel in that it describes the use of a thermoplastic composition that can be thermally molded or solution-cast into complex "permanent" shapes, and then reheated or redissolved and recast from solution to prepare another shape. It is also unique in that the shape memory behavior is provided by a non-polymer additive.

  18. Analysis of a space-exposed thermoplastic resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Philip R.; Slemp, Wayne S.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Davis, Judith R. J.

    1992-01-01

    The chemical characterization of a thermoplastic resin exposed to the low Earth orbit (LEO) environment for 10 months and for 5.8 years is reported. The resin, processed as a thick film and as a matrix for a graphite fiber reinforced composite, few exposed in the RAM direction on the NASA Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Differences attributable to environmental exposure were detected in infrared spectra and in various molecular weight parameters of film after 10 months in LEO. Those effects were not as apparent in composites after 5.8 years in LEO. Increased exposure to atomic oxygen toward the end of the LDEF mission probably scrubbed these effects from specimens exposed for 5.8 years. The intent of this study is to increase our fundamental understanding of space environmental effects on polymeric materials and to develop a benchmark for enhancing our methodology for and understanding of the ground-based simulation of space environmental effects.

  19. Modeling Fatigue Damage in Long-Fiber Thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Kunc, Vlastimil; Bapanapalli, Satish K.

    2009-10-30

    This paper applies a fatigue damage model recently developed for injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics (LFTs) to predict the modulus reduction and fatigue lifetime of glass/polyamide 6,6 (PA6,6) specimens. The fatigue model uses a multiscale mechanistic approach to describe fatigue damage accumulation in these materials subjected to cyclic loading. Micromechanical modeling using a modified Eshelby-Mori-Tanaka approach combined with averaging techniques for fiber length and orientation distributions is performed to establish the stiffness reduction relation for the composite as a function of the microcrack volume fraction. Next, continuum damage mechanics and a thermodynamic formulation are used to derive the constitutive relations and the damage evolution law. The fatigue damage model has been implemented in the ABAQUS finite element code and has been applied to analyze fatigue of the studied glass/PA6,6 specimens. The predictions agree well with the experimental results.

  20. Starch and cellulose nanocrystals together into thermoplastic starch bionanocomposites.

    PubMed

    González, Kizkitza; Retegi, Aloña; González, Alba; Eceiza, Arantxa; Gabilondo, Nagore

    2015-03-01

    In the present work, thermoplastic maize starch based bionanocomposites were prepared as transparent films, plasticized with 35% of glycerol and reinforced with both waxy starch (WSNC) and cellulose nanocrystals (CNC), previously extracted by acidic hydrolysis. The influence of the nanofiller content was evaluated at 1 wt.%, 2.5 wt.% and 5 wt.% of WSNC. The effect of adding the two different nanoparticles at 1 wt.% was also investigated. As determined by tensile measurements, mechanical properties were improved at any composition of WSNC. Water vapour permeance values maintained constant, whereas barrier properties to oxygen reduced in a 70%, indicating the effectiveness of hydrogen bonding at the interphase. The use of CNC or CNC and WSNC upgraded mechanical results, but no significant differences in barrier properties were obtained. A homogeneous distribution of the nanofillers was demonstrated by atomic force microscopy, and a shift of the two relaxation peaks to higher temperatures was detected by dynamic mechanical analysis. PMID:25498612

  1. Tape Placement Head for Applying Thermoplastic Tape to an Object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cope, Ralph D. (Inventor); Funck, Steve B. (Inventor); Gruber, Mark B. (Inventor); Lamontia, Mark A. (Inventor); Johnson, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A tape placement head for applying thermoplastic tape to an object includes a heated feeder which guides the tape/tow to a heated zone. The heated zone has a line compactor having a single row of at least one movable heated member. An area compactor is located in the heated zone downstream from the line compactor. The area compactor includes a plurality of rows of movable feet which are extendable toward the tape/tow different distances with respect to each other to conform to the shape of the object. A shim is located between the heated compactors and the tape/tow. A chilled compactor is in a chilled zone downstream from the heated zone. The chilled zone includes a line chilled compactor and an area chilled compactor. A chilled shim is mounted between the chilled compactor and the tape/tow.

  2. Monitoring the resistance welding of thermoplastic composites through acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Antonio, Luigi; Sabatino, Claudio; Ortona, Alberto; Gillespie, John W., Jr.

    This paper investigates the monitoring of thermoplastic composite's resistance welding through acoustic emission. An amorphous bonding technique (Thermobond TM) is used to join AS4 graphite fiber reinforced polyetheretherketone (APC2). By placing acoustic emission sensors next to the weld region, the influence of welding parameters on the acoustic emission output was determined. Discrete parameters as well as complete waveforms were acquired through dedicated hardware and software. Results indicate a strong relationship between acoustic phenomena and welding history. Experimental observations show that change in the cumulative representation of some discrete parameters (ring down counts in the case under study) occurs at the glass transition temperature of the PEI that was comolded on the surface of the parts. The ability to correlate AE with process conditions, quality, and performance gives rise to the potential for further automation and control of the resistance welding process through on-line acoustic measurements.

  3. SIMULATION OF ORIENTATION IN INJECTION MOLDING OF A HIGHLY CONCENTRATED, SHORT GLASS FIBER THERMOPLASTIC COMPOSITES

    E-print Network

    Wapperom, Peter

    SIMULATION OF ORIENTATION IN INJECTION MOLDING OF A HIGHLY CONCENTRATED, SHORT GLASS FIBER approximation for predicting the flow-induced orientation of injection molded composite parts within of the fiber orientation. Introduction Fiber reinforced thermoplastic made by injection molding

  4. 40 CFR 414.40 - Applicability; description of the thermoplastic resins subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the products classified under SIC 28213 thermoplastic resins including those resins and resin groups... *ABS-SAN Resins *Acrylate-Methacrylate Latexes *Acrylic Latex *Acrylic Resins *Cellulose Acetate Butyrates Cellulose Acetate Resin *Cellulose Acetates *Cellulose Acetates Propionates Cellulose...

  5. THERMAL DEGRADATION EFFECTS ON CONSOLIDATION AND BONDING IN THE THERMOPLASTIC FIBER-PLACEMENT PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of elevated temperature exposure during thermoplastic fiber placement on bonding and consolidation are investigated experimentally for AS 4/ polyetherketoneketone (PEKK) composite. Coupons of 24 layers are consolidated on the University of Delaware Center for Composite Ma...

  6. Adjustable forming of thermoplastic composites for orthopaedic applications.

    PubMed

    Hou, M; Friedrich, K

    1998-02-01

    The present study was focused on the development of a special thermoforming technique for manufacturing of continuous fibre reinforced thermoplastic composite parts with complex surface contours. In particular, a stamp forming process was modified to investigate the potential manufacturing advantages of thermoplastic composites in orthopaedic applications. An apparatus was designed which allowed the thermoforming procedure to be fully automatic, i.e. a cold pre-consolidated laminate panel, as the feed material, was heated up in an infrared heating zone and then transferred into a cold mould system, where it was stamp formed. Both halves of the mould were made of many tiny round metal sticks in a metal frame. This needle-bed mould allowed one to copy any contour by pushing it slightly on spring fixed sticks. The desired position of these sticks could then be adjusted by forcing the side plates of the metal frame together. To prevent any press mark of stick-tops on the composite, i.e. to achieve smooth surfaces of the themoformed composite parts, flexible rubber pads were needed to cover the mould surfaces. Experimental results showed that the surface profile of CF/PP and GF/PP composites formed by the needle-bed mould reproduced fairly well the contour of a saddle shaped, complex model sample. Unique properties of this needle-bed mould are that it can be repeatedly used, and that it can copy any complex surface contours, for example a bone surface, by simply adjusting the stick positions according to the special surface requirements. PMID:15348912

  7. Color stability, water sorption and cytotoxicity of thermoplastic acrylic resin for non metal clasp denture

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Dae-Eun; Lee, Ji-Young; Jang, Hyun-Seon; Lee, Jang-Jae

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to compare the color stability, water sorption and cytotoxicity of thermoplastic acrylic resin for the non-metal clasp dentures to those of thermoplastic polyamide and conventional heat-polymerized denture base resins. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three types of denture base resin, which are conventional heat-polymerized acrylic resin (Paladent 20), thermoplastic polyamide resin (Bio Tone), thermoplastic acrylic resin (Acrytone) were used as materials for this study. One hundred five specimens were fabricated. For the color stability test, specimens were immersed in the coffee and green tee for 1 and 8 weeks. Color change was measured by spectrometer. Water sorption was tested after 1 and 8 weeks immersion in the water. For the test of cytotoxicity, cell viability assay was measured and cell attachment was analyzed by FE-SEM. RESULTS All types of denture base resin showed color changes after 1 and 8 weeks immersion. However, there was no significant difference between denture base resins. All specimens showed significant color changes in the coffee than green tee. In water sorption test, thermoplastic acrylic resin showed lower values than conventional heat-polymerized acrylic resin and thermoplastic polyamide resin. Three types of denture base showed low cytotoxicity in cell viability assay. Thermoplastic acrylic resin showed the similar cell attachment but more stable attachment than conventional heat-polymerized acrylic resin. CONCLUSION Thermoplastic acrylic resin for the non-metal clasp denture showed acceptable color stability, water sorption and cytotoxicity. To verify the long stability in the mouth, additional in vitro studies are needed. PMID:26330974

  8. Thermoplastic matrix composites for aeronautical applications - The amorphous/semi-crystalline blends option

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iannone, Michele; Esposito, Floriana; Cammarano, Aniello

    2014-05-01

    Blends obtained by mixing high temperature applications thermoplastics have been investigated. Namely the blends considered in this work are made by semi-crystalline thermoplastics PEEK with amorphous PEI. The final goal is to analyse the mechanical, chemical-physical and environmental resistance characteristics of these blends to evaluate their suitability as matrices of carbon reinforced composites for aeronautical structural applications. The first collected results are very promising.

  9. FIBER LENGTH DISTRIBUTION MEASUREMENT FOR LONG GLASS AND CARBON FIBER REINFORCED INJECTION MOLDED THERMOPLASTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Kunc, Vlastimil; Frame, Barbara J; Nguyen, Ba N.; TuckerIII, Charles L.; Velez-Garcia, Gregorio

    2007-01-01

    Procedures for fiber length distribution (FLD) measurement of long fiber reinforced injection molded thermoplastics were refined for glass and carbon fibers. Techniques for sample selection, fiber separation, digitization and length measurement for both fiber types are described in detail. Quantitative FLD results are provided for glass and carbon reinforced polypropylene samples molded with a nominal original fiber length of 12.7 mm (1/2 in.) using equipment optimized for molding short fiber reinforced thermoplastics.

  10. Interpenetrating polymer network approach to tougher and more microcracking resistant high temperature polymers. I - LaRC-RP40

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, Ruth H.; Morgan, Cassandra D.

    1988-01-01

    Interpenetrating polymer networks in the form of the LaRC-RP40 resin, prepared by the in situ polymerization of a thermosetting imide prepolymer and thermoplastic monomer reactants, are presently used to obtain toughness and microcracking resistance in a high-temperature polymer. Attention is presently given to the processing, physical, and mechanical properties, as well as the thermooxidative stability, of both the neat resin and the resin as a graphite fiber-reinforced matrix. Microcracking after thermal cycling was also tested. LaRC-RP40 exhibits significant resin fracture toughness improvements over the PMR-15 high-temperature matrix resin.

  11. Evaluation of adhesion of reline resins to the thermoplastic denture base resin for non-metal clasp denture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Hye; Choe, Han Cheol; Son, Mee Kyoung

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the tensile and transverse bond strength of chairside reline resins (Tokuyama Rebase II, Mild Rebaron LC) to a thermoplastic acrylic resin (Acrytone) used for non metal clasp denture. The results were compared with those of a conventional heat polymerized acrylic resin (Paladent 20) and a thermoplastic polyamide resin (Biotone). The failure sites were examined by scanning electron microscopy to evaluate the mode of failure. As results, the bond strength of reline resins to a thermoplastic acrylic resin was similar to the value of a conventional heat polymerized acrylic resin. However, thermoplastic polyamide resin showed the lowest value. The results of this study indicated that a thermoplastic acrylic resin for non metal clasps denture allows chairside reline and repair. It was also found that the light-polymerized reline resin had better bond strength than the autopolymerizing reline resin in relining for a conventional heat polymerized acrylic resin and a thermoplastic acrylic resin. PMID:24492109

  12. Modelling of the glass fiber length and the glass fiber length distribution in the compounding of short glass fiber-reinforced thermoplastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloke, P.; Herken, T.; Schöppner, V.; Rudloff, J.; Kretschmer, K.; Heidemeyer, P.; Bastian, M.; Walther, Dridger, A.

    2014-05-01

    The use of short glass fiber-reinforced thermoplastics for the production of highly stressed parts in the plastics processing industry has experienced an enormous boom in the last few years. The reasons for this are primarily the improvements to the stiffness and strength properties brought about by fiber reinforcement. These positive characteristics of glass fiber-reinforced polymers are governed predominantly by the mean glass fiber length and the glass fiber length distribution. It is not enough to describe the properties of a plastics component solely as a function of the mean glass fiber length [1]. For this reason, a mathematical-physical model has been developed for describing the glass fiber length distribution in compounding. With this model, it is possible on the one hand to optimize processes for the production of short glass fiber-reinforced thermoplastics, and, on the other, to obtain information on the final distribution, on the basis of which much more detailed statements can be made about the subsequent properties of the molded part. Based on experimental tests, it was shown that this model is able to accurately describe the change in glass fiber length distribution in compounding.

  13. Flow properties of a series of experimental thermoplastic polymides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burks, H. D.; Nelson, J. B.; Price, H. L.

    1981-01-01

    The softening temperature to degradation temperature range of the polymers was about 440 to 650 K. All of the polymers retained small amounts of solvent as indicated by an increase in T(sub g) as the polymers were dried. The flow properties showed that all three polymers had very high apparent viscosities and would require high pressures and/or high temperatures and/or long times to obtain adequate flow in prepregging and molding. Although none was intended for such application, two of the polymers were combined with carbon fibers by solution prepregging. The prepregs were molded into laminates at temperatures and times, the selection of which was guided by the results from the flow measurements. These laminates had room temperature short beam shear strength similar to that of carbon fiber laminates with a thermosetting polyimide matrix. However, the strength had considerable scatter, and given the difficult processing, these polymides probably would not be suitable for continuous fiber composites.

  14. The influence of different screw concepts while processing fibre reinforced thermoplastics with the concept of inline-compounding on an injection moulding machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritzer, E.; Müller, E.; Kleeschulte, R.

    2014-05-01

    Today, the global market poses major challenges for industrial product development. Complexity, the wide range of variants, flexibility and individuality are just some of the features that products have to fulfil. Product series additionally have shorter and shorter lifetimes. Because of their high capacity for adaptation, polymers are increasingly able to substitute traditional materials such as wood, glass and metals in various fields of application [1]. But polymers can only substitute other materials if they are optimally suited to the applications in question. Hence, product-specific material development is becoming increasingly important [2]. The problem is that the traditional development process for new polymer formulations is much too complex, too slow and therefore too expensive. Product-specific material development is thus out of the question for most processors. Integrating the compounding step in the injection moulding process would lead to a more efficient and faster development process for a new polymer formulation, providing an opportunity to create new product-specific materials. This process is called inline-compounding on an injection moulding machine. In order to develop this innovative formulation concept, with the focus on fibre reinforced thermoplastics, different screw-concepts are compared with regard to the resultant performance characteristics in the part, such as mechanical properties and fibre length distribution.

  15. Ceramic coatings on polymers by high energy beam for tribology application

    SciTech Connect

    Ayrault, S.; Chabert, B.; Soulier, J.P.; Treheux, D.; Vannes, A.B.; Chevallier, P.

    1995-10-01

    Aluminum oxide powder has been deposited on a thermoplastic polymer (PET) using atmospheric plasma and laser (CO{sub 2}, {lambda} = 10.6 {micro}m). The results have shown that there exists a mechanical anchorage of ceramic on the surface of the polymer whatever the technique used with different ceramic structures. To characterize the ceramic coating, two techniques have been used by tribological solicitation with little displacement (fretting) and by erosion. In this case, ceramic influence on the surface has been noted like protective substance in addition to the polymer structure interaction.

  16. Study of thermal stability and degradation of fire resistant candidate polymers for aircraft interiors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, M. T. S.

    1976-01-01

    The thermochemistry of bismaleimide resins and phenolphthalein polycarbonate was studied. Both materials are fire-resistant polymers and may be suitable for aircraft interiors. The chemical composition of the polymers has been determined by nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopy and by elemental analysis. Thermal properties of these polymers have been characterized by thermogravimetric analyses. Qualitative evaluation of the volatile products formed in pyrolysis under oxidative and non-oxidative conditions has been made using infrared spectrometry. The residues after pyrolysis were analyzed by elemental analysis. The thermal stability of composite panel and thermoplastic materials for aircraft interiors was studied by thermogravimetric analyses.

  17. Shape memory polymers with high and low temperature resistant properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xinli; Kong, Deyan; Qiu, Xueying; Zhang, Wenbo; Liu, Yanju; Zhang, Shen; Zhang, Fenghua; Hu, Yang; Leng, Jinsong

    2015-09-01

    High temperature shape memory polymers that can withstand the harsh temperatures for durable applications are synthesized, and the aromatic polyimide chains with flexible linkages within the backbone act as reversible phase. High molecular weight (Mn) is demanded to form physical crosslinks as fixed phase of thermoplastic shape memory polyimide, and the relationship between Mn and glass transition temperature (Tg) is explored. Thermoset shape memory polyimide shows higher Tg and storage modulus, better shape fixity than thermoplastic counterpart due to the low-density covalent crosslinking, and the influence of crosslinking on physical properties are studied. The mechanism of high temperature shape memory effects based on chain flexibility, molecular weight and crosslink density is proposed. Exposure to thermal cycling from +150?°C to -150?°C for 200?h produces negligible effect on the properties of the shape memory polyimide, and the possible mechanism of high and low temperature resistant property is discussed.

  18. Shape memory polymers with high and low temperature resistant properties

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xinli; Kong, Deyan; Qiu, Xueying; Zhang, Wenbo; Liu, Yanju; Zhang, Shen; Zhang, Fenghua; Hu, Yang; Leng, Jinsong

    2015-01-01

    High temperature shape memory polymers that can withstand the harsh temperatures for durable applications are synthesized, and the aromatic polyimide chains with flexible linkages within the backbone act as reversible phase. High molecular weight (Mn) is demanded to form physical crosslinks as fixed phase of thermoplastic shape memory polyimide, and the relationship between Mn and glass transition temperature (Tg) is explored. Thermoset shape memory polyimide shows higher Tg and storage modulus, better shape fixity than thermoplastic counterpart due to the low-density covalent crosslinking, and the influence of crosslinking on physical properties are studied. The mechanism of high temperature shape memory effects based on chain flexibility, molecular weight and crosslink density is proposed. Exposure to thermal cycling from +150?°C to ?150?°C for 200?h produces negligible effect on the properties of the shape memory polyimide, and the possible mechanism of high and low temperature resistant property is discussed. PMID:26382318

  19. Imprint of sub-25 nm vias and trenches in polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Stephen Y.; Krauss, Peter R.; Renstrom, Preston J.

    1995-11-01

    A nanoimprint process that presses a mold into a thin thermoplastic polymer film on a substrate to create vias and trenches with a minimum size of 25 nm and a depth of 100 nm in the polymer has been demonstrated. Furthermore, the imprint process has been used as a lithography process to fabricate sub-25 nm diameter metal dot arrays of a 100 nm period in a lift-off process. It was found that the nanostructures imprinted in the polymers conform completely with the geometry of the mold. At present, the imprinted size is limited by the size of the mold being used; with a suitable mold, the imprint process should mold sub-10 nm structures with a high aspect ratio in polymers. The nanoimprint process offers a low cost method for mass producing sub-25 nm structures and has the potential to become a key nanolithography method for future manufacturing of integrated circuits and integrated optics.

  20. Antimicrobial Polymers with Metal Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Palza, Humberto

    2015-01-01

    Metals, such as copper and silver, can be extremely toxic to bacteria at exceptionally low concentrations. Because of this biocidal activity, metals have been widely used as antimicrobial agents in a multitude of applications related with agriculture, healthcare, and the industry in general. Unlike other antimicrobial agents, metals are stable under conditions currently found in the industry allowing their use as additives. Today these metal based additives are found as: particles, ions absorbed/exchanged in different carriers, salts, hybrid structures, etc. One recent route to further extend the antimicrobial applications of these metals is by their incorporation as nanoparticles into polymer matrices. These polymer/metal nanocomposites can be prepared by several routes such as in situ synthesis of the nanoparticle within a hydrogel or direct addition of the metal nanofiller into a thermoplastic matrix. The objective of the present review is to show examples of polymer/metal composites designed to have antimicrobial activities, with a special focus on copper and silver metal nanoparticles and their mechanisms. PMID:25607734

  1. Combustion of a Polymer (PMMA) Sphere in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Jiann C.; Hamins, Anthony; Donnelly, Michelle K.

    1999-01-01

    A series of low gravity, aircraft-based, experiments was conducted to investigate the combustion of supported thermoplastic polymer spheres under varying ambient conditions. The three types of thermoplastic investigated were polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), polypropylene (PP). and polystyrene (PS). Spheres with diameters ranging from 2 mm to 6.35 mm were tested. The total initial pressure varied from 0.05 MPa to 0. 15 MPa whereas the ambient oxygen concentration varied from 19 % to 30 % (by volume). The ignition system consisted of a pair of retractable energized coils. Two CCD cameras recorded the burning histories of the spheres. The video sequences revealed a number of dynamic events including bubbling and sputtering, as well as soot shell formation and break-up during combustion of the spheres at reduced gravity. The ejection of combusting material from the burning spheres represents a fire hazard that must be considered at reduced gravity. The ejection process was found to be sensitive to polymer type. All average burning rates were measured to increase with initial sphere diameter and oxygen concentration, whereas the initial pressure had little effect. The three thermoplastic types exhibited different burning characteristics. For the same initial conditions, the burning rate of PP was slower than PMMA, whereas the burning rate of PS was comparable to PMMA. The transient diameter of the burning thermoplastic exhibited two distinct periods: an initial period (enduring approximately half of the total burn duration) when the diameter remained approximately constant, and a final period when the square of the diameter linearly decreased with time. A simple homogeneous two-phase model was developed to understand the changing diameter of the burning sphere. Its value is based on a competition between diameter reduction due to mass loss from burning and sputtering, and diameter expansion due to the processes of swelling (density decrease with heating) and bubble growth. The model relies on empirical parameters for input, such as the burning rate and the duration of the initial and final burning periods.

  2. Large-Strain Transparent Magnetoactive Polymer Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses polymer nano - composite superparamagnetic actuators that were prepared by the addition of organically modified superparamagnetic nanoparticles to the polymer matrix. The nanocomposite films exhibited large deformations under a magnetostatic field with a low loading level of 0.1 wt% in a thermoplastic polyurethane elastomer (TPU) matrix. The maximum actuation deformation of the nanocomposite films increased exponentially with increasing nanoparticle concentration. The cyclic deformation actuation of a high-loading magnetic nanocomposite film was examined in a low magnetic field, and it exhibited excellent reproducibility and controllability. Low-loading TPU nanocomposite films (0.1-2 wt%) were transparent to semitransparent in the visible wavelength range, owing to good dispersion of the magnetic nanoparticles. Magnetoactuation phenomena were also demonstrated in a high-modulus, high-temperature polyimide resin with less mechanical deformation.

  3. Comparison of Piezoresistive Monofilament Polymer Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Melnykowycz, Mark; Koll, Birgit; Scharf, Dagobert; Clemens, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The development of flexible polymer monofilament fiber strain sensors have many applications in both wearable computing (clothing, gloves, etc.) and robotics design (large deformation control). For example, a high-stretch monofilament sensor could be integrated into robotic arm design, easily stretching over joints or along curved surfaces. As a monofilament, the sensor can be woven into or integrated with textiles for position or physiological monitoring, computer interface control, etc. Commercially available conductive polymer monofilament sensors were tested alongside monofilaments produced from carbon black (CB) mixed with a thermo-plastic elastomer (TPE) and extruded in different diameters. It was found that signal strength, drift, and precision characteristics were better with a 0.3 mm diameter CB/TPE monofilament than thick (?2 mm diameter) based on the same material or commercial monofilaments based on natural rubber or silicone elastomer (SE) matrices. PMID:24419161

  4. Comparison of piezoresistive monofilament polymer sensors.

    PubMed

    Melnykowycz, Mark; Koll, Birgit; Scharf, Dagobert; Clemens, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The development of flexible polymer monofilament fiber strain sensors have many applications in both wearable computing (clothing, gloves, etc.) and robotics design (large deformation control). For example, a high-stretch monofilament sensor could be integrated into robotic arm design, easily stretching over joints or along curved surfaces. As a monofilament, the sensor can be woven into or integrated with textiles for position or physiological monitoring, computer interface control, etc. Commercially available conductive polymer monofilament sensors were tested alongside monofilaments produced from carbon black (CB) mixed with a thermo-plastic elastomer (TPE) and extruded in different diameters. It was found that signal strength, drift, and precision characteristics were better with a 0.3 mm diameter CB/TPE monofilament than thick (~2 mm diameter) based on the same material or commercial monofilaments based on natural rubber or silicone elastomer (SE) matrices. PMID:24419161

  5. Thermoplastic Starch Films with Vegetable Oils of Brazilian Cerrado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlemmer, D.; Sales, M. J. A.

    2008-08-01

    Biodegradable polymers are one of the most promising ways to replace non-degradable polymers. TPS films were prepared by casting from cassava starch and three different vegetable oils of Brazilian Cerrado as plasticizer: buriti, macaúba and pequi. In this preliminary work it was investigated materials thermal characteristics by TG and TMA. Thermal properties of oils depends on their chemical structures. Starch and vegetable oils are natural resources that can be used how alternative to producing materials that cause minor environmental impact.

  6. The development of an alternative thermoplastic powder prepregging technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogden, A. L.; Hyer, M. W.; Wilkes, G. L.; Loos, A. C.

    1992-01-01

    An alternative powder prepregging technique is discussed that is based on the deposition of powder onto carbon fibers that have been moistened using an ultrasonic humidifier. The dry fiber tow is initially spread to allow a greater amount of the fiber surface to be exposed to the powder, thus ensuring a significant amount of intimate contact between the fiber and the matrix. Moisture in the form of ultrafine water droplets is then deposited onto the spread fiber tow. The moisture promotes adhesion to the fiber until the powder can be tacked to the fibers by melting. Powdered resin is then sieved onto the fibers and then tacked onto the fibers by quick heating in a convective oven. This study focuses on the production of prepregs and laminates made with LaRC-TPI (thermoplastic polyimide) using this process. Although the process appears to be successful, early evaluation was hampered by poor interfacial adhesion. The adhesion problem, however, seems to be the result of a material system incompatibility, rather than being influenced by the process.

  7. Development of thermoplastic starch blown film by incorporating plasticized chitosan.

    PubMed

    Dang, Khanh Minh; Yoksan, Rangrong

    2015-01-22

    The objective of the present work was to improve blown film extrusion processability and properties of thermoplastic starch (TPS) film by incorporating plasticized chitosan, with a content of 0.37-1.45%. The effects of chitosan on extrusion processability and melt flow ability of TPS, as well as that on appearance, optical properties, thermal properties, viscoelastic properties and tensile properties of the films were investigated. The possible interactions between chitosan and starch molecules were evaluated by FTIR and XRD techniques. Chitosan and starch molecules could interact via hydrogen bonds, as confirmed from the blue shift of OH bands and the reduction of V-type crystal formation. Although the incorporation of chitosan caused decreased extensibility and melt flow ability, as well as increased yellowness and opacity, the films possessed better extrusion processability, increased tensile strength, rigidity, thermal stability and UV absorption, as well as reduced water absorption and surface stickiness. The obtained TPS/chitosan-based films offer real potential application in the food industry, e.g. as edible films. PMID:25439934

  8. Microstructure and thermomechanical properties relationship of segmented thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU)

    SciTech Connect

    Frick, Achim Borm, Michael Kaoud, Nouran Kolodziej, Jan Neudeck, Jens

    2014-05-15

    Thermoplastic polyurethanes (TPU) are important polymeric materials for seals. In competition with Acrylonitrile butadiene rubbers (NBR), TPU exhibits higher strength and a considerable better abrasion resistance. The advantage of NBR over TPU is a smaller compression set but however TPU excels in its much shorter processing cycle times. Generally a TPU is a block copolymer composed of hard and soft segments, which plays an important role in determining the material properties. TPU can be processed either to ready moulded parts or can be incorporated by multi component moulding, in both cases it shows decent mechanical properties. In the present work, the relationship between melt-process induced TPU morphology and resultant thermo mechanical properties were examined and determined by means of quasi-static tensile test, creep experiment, tension test and dynamical mechanical analysis (DMA). Scanning electron beam microscope (SEM) and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) were used to study the morphology of the samples. A significant mathematical description of the stress-strain behaviour of TPU was found using a 3 term approach. Moreover it became evident that processing conditions such as processing temperature have crucial influence on morphology as well as short and long-term performance. To be more precise, samples processed at higher temperatures showed a lack of large hard segment agglomerates, a smaller strength for strains up to 250% and higher creep compliance.

  9. Fabrication of Closed Hollow Bulb Obturator Using Thermoplastic Resin Material

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Bidhan; Hughes, E. Richard; Kumar Singh, Raj; Suwal, Pramita; Parajuli, Prakash Kumar; Shrestha, Pragya; Sharma, Arati; Adhikari, Galav

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Closed hollow bulb obturators are used for the rehabilitation of postmaxillectomy patients. However, the time consuming process, complexity of fabrication, water leakage, and discoloration are notable disadvantages of this technique. This paper describes a clinical report of fabricating closed hollow bulb obturator using a single flask and one time processing method for an acquired maxillary defect. Hard thermoplastic resin sheet has been used for the fabrication of hollow bulb part of the obturator. Method. After fabrication of master cast conventionally, bulb and lid part of the defect were formed separately and joined by autopolymerizing acrylic resin to form one sized smaller hollow body. During packing procedure, the defect area was loaded with heat polymerizing acrylic resin and then previously fabricated smaller hollow body was adapted over it. The whole area was then loaded with heat cure acrylic. Further processes were carried out conventionally. Conclusion. This technique uses single flask which reduces laboratory time and makes the procedure simple. The thickness of hollow bulb can be controlled and light weight closed hollow bulb prosthesis can be fabricated. It also minimizes the disadvantages of closed hollow bulb obturator such as water leakage, bacterial infection, and discoloration. PMID:26491575

  10. Consolidation of graphite thermoplastic textile preforms for primary aircraft structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, J.; Mahon, J.

    1991-01-01

    The use of innovative cost effective material forms and processes is being considered for fabrication of future primary aircraft structures. Processes that have been identified as meeting these goals are textile preforms that use resin transfer molding (RTM) and consolidation forming. The Novel Composites for Wing and Fuselage Applications (NCWFA) program has as its objective the integration of innovative design concepts with cost effective fabrication processes to develop damage-tolerant structures that can perform at a design ultimate strain level of 6000 micro-inch/inch. In this on-going effort, design trade studies were conducted to arrive at advanced wing designs that integrate new material forms with innovative structural concepts and cost effective fabrication methods. The focus has been on minimizing part count (mechanical fasteners, clips, number of stiffeners, etc.), by using cost effective textile reinforcement concepts that provide improved damage tolerance and out-of-plane load capability, low-cost resin transfer molding processing, and thermoplastic forming concepts. The fabrication of representative Y spars by consolidation methods will be described. The Y spars were fabricated using AS4 (6K)/PEEK 150g commingled angle interlock 0/90-degree woven preforms with +45-degree commingled plies stitched using high strength Toray carbon thread and processed by autoclave consolidation.

  11. Thermoplastic polyurethane:polythiophene nanomembranes for biomedical and biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Madrigal, Maria M; Giannotti, Marina I; del Valle, Luis J; Franco, Lourdes; Armelin, Elaine; Puiggalí, Jordi; Sanz, Fausto; Alemán, Carlos

    2014-06-25

    Nanomembranes have been prepared by spin-coating mixtures of a polythiophene (P3TMA) derivative and thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) using 20:80, 40:60, and 60:40 TPU:P3TMA weight ratios. After structural, topographical, electrochemical, and thermal characterization, properties typically related with biomedical applications have been investigated: swelling, resistance to both hydrolytic and enzymatic degradation, biocompatibility, and adsorption of type I collagen, which is an extra cellular matrix protein that binds fibronectin favoring cell adhesion processes. The swelling ability and the hydrolytic and enzymatic degradability of TPU:P3TMA membranes increases with the concentration of P3TMA. Moreover, the degradation of the blends is considerably promoted by the presence of enzymes in the hydrolytic medium, TPU:P3TMA blends behaving as biodegradable materials. On the other hand, TPU:P3TMA nanomembranes behave as bioactive platforms stimulating cell adhesion and, especially, cell viability. Type I collagen adsorption largely depends on the substrate employed to support the nanomembrane, whereas it is practically independent of the chemical nature of the polymeric material used to fabricate the nanomembrane. However, detailed microscopy study of the morphology and topography of adsorbed collagen evidence the formation of different organizations, which range from fibrils to pseudoregular honeycomb networks depending on the composition of the nanomembrane that is in contact with the protein. Scaffolds made of electroactive TPU:P3TMA nanomembranes are potential candidates for tissue engineering biomedical applications. PMID:24857815

  12. Rapid and inexpensive blood typing on thermoplastic chips.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun-You; Huang, Yi-Ting; Chou, Hsin-Hao; Wang, Cheng-Po; Chen, Chien-Fu

    2015-12-21

    A portable and cost-effective colorimetric diagnostic device was fabricated for rapid ABO and Rh blood typing. Using microfluidic construction on a thermoplastic chip, blood antibodies were preloaded into a reaction channel and exposed to blood samples to initiate a haemagglutination reaction. Downstream high-aspect ratio filters, composed of 2 ?m high microslits, block agglutinated red blood cells (RBCs) to turn the reaction channel red, indicating the presence of the corresponding blood antigen. Users manually actuate the blood sample using a simple screw pump that drives the solution through serpentine reaction channels and chaotic micromixers for maximum interaction of the preloaded antibodies with the blood sample antigens. Mismatched RBCs and antibodies elute from the channel into an outlet reservoir based on the rheological properties of RBCs with no colorimetric change. As a result, unambiguous blood typing tests can be distinguished by the naked eye in as little as 1 min. Blood disorders, such as thalassemia, can also be distinguished using the device. The required blood volume for the test is just 1 ?L, which can be obtained by the less invasive finger pricking method. The low reagent consumption, manual driving force, low-cost of parts, high yield, and robust fabrication process make this device sensitive, accurate, and simple enough to use without specialized training in resource constrained settings. PMID:26530285

  13. SUPER HARD SURFACED POLYMERS

    SciTech Connect

    Mansur, Louis K; Bhattacharya, R; Blau, Peter Julian; Clemons, Art; Eberle, Cliff; Evans, H B; Janke, Christopher James; Jolly, Brian C; Lee, E H; Leonard, Keith J; Trejo, Rosa M; Rivard, John D

    2010-01-01

    High energy ion beam surface treatments were applied to a selected group of polymers. Of the six materials in the present study, four were thermoplastics (polycarbonate, polyethylene, polyethylene terephthalate, and polystyrene) and two were thermosets (epoxy and polyimide). The particular epoxy evaluated in this work is one of the resins used in formulating fiber reinforced composites for military helicopter blades. Measures of mechanical properties of the near surface regions were obtained by nanoindentation hardness and pin on disk wear. Attempts were also made to measure erosion resistance by particle impact. All materials were hardness tested. Pristine materials were very soft, having values in the range of approximately 0.1 to 0.5 GPa. Ion beam treatment increased hardness by up to 50 times compared to untreated materials. For reference, all materials were hardened to values higher than those typical of stainless steels. Wear tests were carried out on three of the materials, PET, PI and epoxy. On the ion beam treated epoxy no wear could be detected, whereas the untreated material showed significant wear.

  14. Thermoplastic polymer nanocomposites with montmorillonite-Lab vs industrial scale fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomelli, M.; Pielichowski, K.; Leszczy?ska, A.

    2012-09-01

    Fabrication of polypropylene or polyamide-6/montmorillonite nanocomposites in a laboratory- and industrial-scale by melt processing has been described. Depending on the fabrication scale, different technological problems were observed that need to be taken into account during production of PP and PA-6-based nanocomposites with MMT which constitute a promising class of modern materials for engineering and packaging applications. Fabrication of PP and PA-6 nanocomposites with montmorillonite both on laboratory and industrial scale needs to be optimized in terms of processing conditions that include pre-mixing parameters, feeding rate, temperature of the barrel zone and extrusion die, screw speed and head pressure. Proper cleaning procedures need to be applied and the selection of the 'main' fraction enables to get nanostructured materials with enhanced properties.

  15. Dispersion and Characterization of Nickel Nanostrands in Thermoset and Thermoplastic Polymers 

    E-print Network

    Whalen, Casey Allen

    2012-02-14

    Nickel Nanostrands (NiNS) are nano-particles that are highly branched and have a high aspect ratio. These particles show promise as excellent additives to composites when electrical conductivity is desired. Unfortunately, there is very little...

  16. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Jjj of... - Group 1 Storage Vessels at Existing Affected Sources Producing the Listed Thermoplastics

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Thermoplastics Thermoplastic Chemical a Vessel capacity (cubic meters) Vapor pressure b (kilopascals) ASA/AMSAN c... vapor pressure criteria are specific to the listed chemical or to “all chemicals,” as indicated. b Maximum true vapor pressure of total organic HAP at storage temperature. c The applicability criteria...

  17. Adhesion study of thermoplastic polyimides with Ti-6Al-4V alloy and PEEK-graphite composites

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon Taeho.

    1991-01-01

    High glass transition (e.g. 360C) melt processable thermoplastic polyimide homopolymers and poly(imide-siloxane) segmented copolymers were prepared from a number of diamines and dianhydrides via solution imidization, polydimethylsilxane segment incorporation and molecular weight control with non-reactive phthalimide end-groups. The adhesive bond performance of these polyimides was investigated as a function of molecular weight, siloxane incorporation, residual solvent, test temperature, and polyimide structure via single-lap shear samples prepared from treated Ti-6Al-4V alloy adherends and compression-molded film adhesives of scrim-cloth adhesives. The adhesive bond strengths increased greatly with siloxane-segment incorporation at 10, 20 and 30 wt% and decreased slightly with total polymer molecular weight. As the test temperature was increased, adhesive bond strength increased, decreased or showed a maximum at some temperatures depending on the polyimide structure and siloxane content. The poly(imide-30% siloxane) segmented copolymer and a miscible poly(ether-imide) also demonstrated excellent adhesive bond strength with poly(arylene ether ketone) PEEK{reg sign}-graphite composites.

  18. Characterization of thermoplastic polyurethane/polylactic acid (TPU/PLA) tissue engineering scaffolds fabricated by microcellular injection molding.

    PubMed

    Mi, Hao-Yang; Salick, Max R; Jing, Xin; Jacques, Brianna R; Crone, Wendy C; Peng, Xiang-Fang; Turng, Lih-Sheng

    2013-12-01

    Polylactic acid (PLA) and thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) are two kinds of biocompatible and biodegradable polymers that can be used in biomedical applications. PLA has rigid mechanical properties while TPU possesses flexible mechanical properties. Blended TPU/PLA tissue engineering scaffolds at different ratios for tunable properties were fabricated via twin screw extrusion and microcellular injection molding techniques for the first time. Multiple test methods were used to characterize these materials. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) confirmed the existence of the two components in the blends; differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) confirmed the immiscibility between the TPU and PLA. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images verified that, at the composition ratios studied, PLA was dispersed as spheres or islands inside the TPU matrix and that this phase morphology further influenced the scaffold's microstructure and surface roughness. The blends exhibited a large range of mechanical properties that covered several human tissue requirements. 3T3 fibroblast cell culture showed that the scaffolds supported cell proliferation and migration properly. Most importantly, this study demonstrated the feasibility of mass producing biocompatible PLA/TPU scaffolds with tunable microstructures, surface roughnesses, and mechanical properties that have the potential to be used as artificial scaffolds in multiple tissue engineering applications. PMID:24094186

  19. Characterization of thermoplastic polyurethane/polylactic acid (TPU/PLA) tissue engineering scaffolds fabricated by microcellular injection molding

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Hao-Yang; Salick, Max R.; Jing, Xin; Jacques, Brianna R.; Crone, Wendy C.; Peng, Xiang-Fang; Turng, Lih-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Polylactic acid (PLA) and thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) are two kinds of biocompatible and biodegradable polymers that can be used in biomedical applications. PLA has rigid mechanical properties while TPU possesses flexible mechanical properties. Blended TPU/PLA tissue engineering scaffolds at different ratios for tunable properties were fabricated via twin screw extrusion and microcellular injection molding techniques for the first time. Multiple test methods were used to characterize these materials. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) confirmed the existence of the two components in the blends; differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) confirmed the immiscibility between the TPU and PLA. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images verified that, at the composition ratios studied, PLA was dispersed as spheres or islands inside the TPU matrix and that this phase morphology further influenced the scaffold’s microstructure and surface roughness. The blends exhibited a large range of mechanical properties that covered several human tissue requirements. 3T3 fibroblast cell culture showed that the scaffolds supported cell proliferation and migration properly. Most importantly, this study demonstrated the feasibility of mass producing biocompatible PLA/TPU scaffolds with tunable microstructures, surface roughnesses, and mechanical properties that have the potential to be used as artificial scaffolds in multiple tissue engineering applications. PMID:24094186

  20. Preparation of cotton linter nanowhiskers by high-pressure homogenization process and its application in thermoplastic starch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savadekar, N. R.; Karande, V. S.; Vigneshwaran, N.; Kadam, P. G.; Mhaske, S. T.

    2015-03-01

    The present work deals with the preparation of cotton linter nanowhiskers (CLNW) by acid hydrolysis and subsequent processing in a high-pressure homogenizer. Prepared CLNW were then used as a reinforcing material in thermoplastic starch (TPS), with an aim to improve its performance properties. Concentration of CLNW was varied as 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 wt% in TPS. TPS/CLNW nanocomposite films were prepared by solution-casting process. The nanocomposite films were characterized by tensile, differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), water vapor permeability (WVP), oxygen permeability (OP), X-ray diffraction and light transmittance properties. 3 wt% CLNW-loaded TPS nanocomposite films demonstrated 88 % improvement in the tensile strength as compared to the pristine TPS polymer film; whereas, WVP and OP decreased by 90 and 92 %, respectively, which is highly appreciable compared to the quantity of CLNW added. DSC thermograms of nanocomposite films did not show any significant effect on melting temperature as compared to the pristine TPS. Light transmittance ( T r) value of TPS decreased with increased content of CLNW. Better interaction between CLNW and TPS, caused due to the hydrophilic nature of both the materials, and uniform distribution of CLNW in TPS were the prime reason for the improvement in properties observed at 3 wt% loading of CLNW in TPS. However, CLNW was seen to have formed agglomerates at higher concentration as determined from SEM analysis. These nanocomposite films can have potential use in food and pharmaceutical packaging applications.

  1. Synthesis of bio-based thermoplastic polyurethane elastomers containing isosorbide and polycarbonate diol and their biocompatible properties.

    PubMed

    Oh, So-Yeon; Kang, Min-Sil; Knowles, Jonathan C; Gong, Myoung-Seon

    2015-09-01

    A new family of highly elastic polyurethanes (PUs) partially based on renewable isosorbide were prepared by reacting hexamethylene diisocyanate with a various ratios of isosorbide and polycarbonate diol 2000 (PCD) via a one-step bulk condensation polymerization without catalyst. The influence of the isorsorbide/PCD ratio on the properties of the PU was evaluated. The successful synthesis of the PUs was confirmed by Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance. The resulting PUs showed high number-average molecular weights ranging from 56,320 to 126,000?g mol(-1) and tunable Tg values from -34 to -38?. The thermal properties were determined by differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis. The PU films were flexible with breaking strains from 955% to 1795% at from 13.5 to 54.2?MPa tensile stress. All the PUs had 0.9-2.8% weight lost over 4 weeks and continual slow weight loss of 1.1-3.6% was observed within 8 weeks. Although the cells showed a slight lower rate of proliferation than that of the tissue culture polystyrene as a control, the PU films were considered to be cytocompatible and nontoxic. These thermoplastic PUs were soft, flexible and biocompatible polymers, which open up a range of opportunities for soft tissue augmentation and regeneration. PMID:26055962

  2. Microgravity Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    A one-day, interactive workshop considering the effects of gravity on polymer materials science was held in Cleveland, Ohio, on May 9, 1985. Selected programmatic and technical issues were reviewed to introduce the field to workshop participants. Parallel discussions were conducted in three disciplinary working groups: polymer chemistry, polymer physics, and polymer engineering. This proceedings presents summaries of the workshop discussions and conclusions.

  3. One-pot synthesis of thermoplastic mixed paramylon esters using trifluoroacetic anhydride.

    PubMed

    Shibakami, Motonari; Tsubouchi, Gen; Sohma, Mitsugu; Hayashi, Masahiro

    2015-03-30

    Mixed paramylon esters prepared from paramylon (a storage polysaccharide of Euglena), acetic acid, and a long-chain fatty acid by one-pot synthesis using trifluoroacetic anhydride as a promoter and solvent were shown to have thermoplasticity. Size exclusion chromatography indicated that the mixed paramylon esters had a weight average molecular weight of approximately 4.9-6.7×10(5). Thermal analysis showed that these esters were stable in terms of the glass transition temperature (>90°C) and 5% weight loss temperature (>320°C). The degree of substitution of the long alkyl chain group, a dominant factor determining thermoplasticity, was controlled by tuning the feed molar ratio of acetic acid and long-chain fatty acid to paramylon. These results implied that the one-pot synthesis is useful for preparing structurally-well defined thermoplastic mixed paramylon esters with high molecular weight. PMID:25563938

  4. Solvent resistant thermoplastic aromatic poly(imidesulfone) and process for preparing same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, T. L.; Yamaki, D. A. (inventors)

    1983-01-01

    A process for preparing a thermoplastic poly(imidesulfone) is disclosed. This resulting material has thermoplastic properties which are generally associated with polysulfones but not polyimides, and solvent resistance which is generally associated with polyimides but not polysulfones. This system is processable in the 250 to 350 C range for molding, adhesive and laminating applications. This unique thermoplastic poly(imidesulfone) is obtained by incorporating an aromatic sulfone moiety into the backbone of an aromatic linear polyimide by dissolving a quantity of a 3,3',4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride (BTDA) in a solution of 3,3'-diaminodiphenylsulfone and bis(2-methoxyethyl)ether, precipitating the reactant product in water, filtering and drying the recovered poly(amide-acid sulfone) and converting it to the poly(imidesulfone) by heating.

  5. Design considerations for manufacturing carbon-fiber thermoplastic composites using microwave heating

    SciTech Connect

    Lind, A.C.; Wear, F.C.

    1995-12-01

    In an effort to lower the cost of manufacturing carbon-fiber thermoplastic composites, McDonnell Douglas Aerospace is investigating automated tape and fiber placement manufacturing methods. In these methods, structures are fabricated one ply at a time by applying heat to raise the bond line to the softening point of the thermoplastic and applying pressure to consolidate the ply to the structure being fabricated. Infrared, microwave, radio frequency and laser methods are being considered to quickly heat the thermoplastic resin to its consolidation temperature. The penetration of the heating power is different in each of these methods. We are currently conducting studies to determine if microwave heating has significant advantages over alternate heating methods and if so, how it should be incorporated into an actual manufacturing process. This paper describes the results of our studies concerning how the power density and penetration depth affect the manufacturing process.

  6. Tailoring the degradation kinetics of poly(ester-carbonate urethane)urea thermoplastic elastomers for tissue engineering scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yi; Guan, Jianjun; Fujimoto, Kazuro L.; Hashizume, Ryotaro; Pelinescu, Anca L.; Wagner, William R.

    2010-01-01

    Biodegradable elastomeric scaffolds are of increasing interest for applications in soft tissue repair and regeneration, particularly in mechanically active settings. The rate at which such a scaffold should degrade for optimal outcomes, however, is not generally known and the ability to select from similar scaffolds that vary in degradation behavior to allow such optimization is limited. Our objective was to synthesize a family of biodegradable polyurethane elastomers where partial substitution of polyester segments with polycarbonate segments in the polymer backbone would lead to slower degradation behavior. Specifically, we synthesized poly(ester carbonate)urethane ureas (PECUUs) using a blended soft segment of poly(caprolactone) (PCL) and poly(1,6-hexamethylene carbonate) (PHC), a 1,4-diisocyanatobutane hard segment and chain extension with putrescine. Soft segment PCL/PHC molar ratios of 100/0, 75/25, 50/50, 25/75, and 0/100 were investigated. Polymer tensile strengths varied from 14-34 MPa with breaking strains of 660-875%, initial moduli of 8-24 MPa and 100% recovery after 10% strain. Increased PHC content was associated with softer, more distensible films. Scaffolds produced by salt leaching supported smooth muscle cell adhesion and growth in vitro. PECUU in aqueous buffer in vitro and subcutaneous implants in rats of PECUU scaffolds showed degradation slower than comparable poly(ester urethane)urea and faster than poly(carbonate urethane)urea. These slower degrading thermoplastic polyurethanes provide opportunities to investigate the role of relative degradation rates for mechanically supportive scaffolds in a variety of soft tissue repair and reconstructive procedures. PMID:20188411

  7. Tailoring the degradation kinetics of poly(ester carbonate urethane)urea thermoplastic elastomers for tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yi; Guan, Jianjun; Fujimoto, Kazuro L; Hashizume, Ryotaro; Pelinescu, Anca L; Wagner, William R

    2010-05-01

    Biodegradable elastomeric scaffolds are of increasing interest for applications in soft tissue repair and regeneration, particularly in mechanically active settings. The rate at which such a scaffold should degrade for optimal outcomes, however, is not generally known and the ability to select from similar scaffolds that vary in degradation behavior to allow such optimization is limited. Our objective was to synthesize a family of biodegradable polyurethane elastomers where partial substitution of polyester segments with polycarbonate segments in the polymer backbone would lead to slower degradation behavior. Specifically, we synthesized poly(ester carbonate)urethane ureas (PECUUs) using a blended soft segment of poly(caprolactone) (PCL) and poly(1,6-hexamethylene carbonate) (PHC), a 1,4-diisocyanatobutane hard segment and chain extension with putrescine. Soft segment PCL/PHC molar ratios of 100/0, 75/25, 50/50, 25/75, and 0/100 were investigated. Polymer tensile strengths varied from 14 to 34 MPa with breaking strains of 660-875%, initial moduli of 8-24 MPa and 100% recovery after 10% strain. Increased PHC content was associated with softer, more distensible films. Scaffolds produced by salt leaching supported smooth muscle cell adhesion and growth in vitro. PECUU in aqueous buffer in vitro and subcutaneous implants in rats of PECUU scaffolds showed degradation slower than comparable poly(ester urethane)urea and faster than poly(carbonate urethane)urea. These slower degrading thermoplastic polyurethanes provide opportunities to investigate the role of relative degradation rates for mechanically supportive scaffolds in a variety of soft tissue repair and reconstructive procedures. PMID:20188411

  8. Chemical Modification and Structure-property Relationships of Acrylic and Ionomeric Thermoplastic Elastomer Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargantwar, Pruthesh Hariharrao

    Block copolymers (BCs) have remained at the forefront of materials research due to their versatility in applications ranging from hot-melt/pressure-sensitive adhesives and impact modifiers to compatibilizing agents and vibration-dampening/nanotemplating media. Of particular interest are macromolecules composed of two or more chemically dissimilar blocks covalently linked together to form triblock or pentablock copolymers. If the blocks are sufficiently incompatible and the copolymer behaves as a thermoplastic elastomer, the molecules can spontaneously self-assemble to form nanostructured materials that exhibit shape memory due to the formation of a supramolecular network. The BCs of these types are termed as conventional. When BCs contain blocks having ionic moieties such as sulfonic acid groups, they are termed as block ionomers. Designing new systems based on either conventional or ionic BCs, characterizing their structure-property relationships and later using them as electroacive polymers form the essential objectives of this work. Electroactive polymers (EAPs) exhibit electromechanical actuation when stimulated by an external electric field. In the first part of this work, it is shown that BCs resolve some of the outstanding problems presently encountered in the design of two different classes of EAP actuators: dielectric elastomers (DEs) and ionic polymer metal composites (IPMCs). All-acrylic triblock copolymer gels used as DEs actuate with high efficacy without any requirement of mechanical prestrain and, thus, eliminate the need for bulky and heavy hardware essential with prestrained dielectric actuators, as well as material problems associated with stress relaxation. The dependence of actuation behavior on gel morphology as evaluated from mechanical and microstructure studies is observed. In the case of IPMCs, ionic BCs employed in this study greatly facilitate processing compared to other contenders such as NafionRTM, which is commonly used in this class of EAPs. The unique copolymer investigated here (i) retains its mechanical integrity when highly solvated by polar solvents, (ii) demonstrates a high degree of actuation when tested in a cantilever configuration, and (iii) avoids the shortcomings of back-relaxation/overshoot within the testing conditions when used in combination with an appropriate solvent. In the second part of this work, two chemical strategies to design midblock sulfonated block ionomers are explored. In one case, selective sulfonation of the midblocks in triblock copolymers is achieved via a dioxane:sulfur trioxide chemistry, while in the other acetyl sulfate is used for the same purpose. Excellent control on the degree of sulfonation (DOS) is achieved. The block ionomers swell in different solvents while retaining their mechanical integrity. They show disorder-order, order-order, and order-reduced order morphological transitions as DOS varies. These transitions in morphologies are reflected in their thermal behavior as well. The microstructures show periodicity, which is, again, a function of DOS. The transitions are explained in terms of the molar volume expansion and volume densification of the blocks on sulfonation. The ionic levels, morphology and periodicity in microstructure are important for applications such as actuators, sensors and fuel cell membranes. The ability to tune these aspects in the ionomers designed in this work make them potential candidates for these applications.

  9. Characterization of glass-filled engineering thermoplastic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Whitaker, R.B.; Nease, A.B.; Yelton, R.O.

    1983-01-01

    Characterization of three engineering thermoplastic (TP) materials has been carried out to assess suitability for Mound applications: Poly(etheretherketone) (PEEK), Poly(etherimide) (PEI), and Poly(ethersulfone) (PES). Analyses included: thermogravimetric (TG), thermomechanical (TMA), direct probe/mass spectroscopy (DIP/MS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and other chemical analyses. Both neat and glass-filled PEEK and PES were studied; only unfilled PEI was examined. Thermogravimetric analysis of the three TP's in N/sub 2/ showed that all were greater than or equal to 525/sup 0/C in decomposition onset temperature, with PEEK > PEI > PES. Both glass-filled PEEK and PEI showed <1% weight loss in the melt after two hours (N/sub 2/). TMA analyses were used to determine expansion coefficients below T/sub g/ for all three TP's. The glass-filled PEEK exhibited a low temperature (approx. 60 to 70/sup 0/C) transition below T/sub g/ (approx. 150/sup 0/C) on the first TMA runs. This disappeared on subsequent TMA runs and did not reappear on aging/RT. DIP/MS analyses showed both water and phenyl sulfone to be present in PES and PEEK. Water only was observed in PEI. The presence of phenylsulfone in PEEK was confirmed by FT-IR, and sulfur was found to be present in amounts up to 0.23% in 30% glass-filled molding compounds. Residual polymerization solvent is a probable source. Fluoride (from a monomer in the PEEK polymerization) was also detected.

  10. Long-term in vitro hydrolytic stability of thermoplastic polyurethanes.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Abhinay; Seethamraju, Kasyap; Delaney, Joseph; Willoughby, Patrick; Faust, Rudolf

    2015-12-01

    Long-term in vitro stability of thermoplastic polyurethanes (TPUs) was studied for up to 52 weeks in phosphate buffer solution at 37, 55, and 80°C. Water uptake, molecular weights, and tensile properties were measured at regular intervals of 4, 8, 16, 32, and 52 weeks. The rate of molecular weight reduction increased with increasing temperature, and after 52 weeks at 80°C, all commercial polycarbonate (Bionate-55D, Quadrathane-80A, and Chronoflex-80A), poly(dimethylsiloxane) (ElastEon-2A) and polyether (Elasthane-55D) TPUs showed significant (43-51%) molecular weight (Mn ) reduction. The polyisobutylene (PIB)-based TPU exhibited a significantly lower decrease in Mn (26%) after 52 weeks at 80°C. For Bionate-55D and ElastEon-2A, at 80°C in dry nitrogen atmosphere substantial thermal degradation was observed, while for the other TPUs the effect of thermal degradation is small. The temperature dependent reduction of molecular weight was interpreted by simple second order kinetics. From the approximately linear Arrhenius plots the activation energies were calculated, which were highest for PIB-PU-020 and lowest for ElastEon-2A. For Elasthane-55D the in vitro molecular weight reduction was compared with that of explanted leads. The molecular weight reduction in vivo was much smaller than that predicted from in vitro data, which may suggest that the in vitro model does not adequately describe the hydrolysis in vivo. In the absence of validation for the other TPUs that in vitro methods closely reproduce in vivo degradation, it is unknown how these results correlate with in vivo performance. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 103A: 3798-3806, 2015. PMID:26097127

  11. Biodegradable, thermoplastic polyurethane grafts for small diameter vascular replacements.

    PubMed

    Bergmeister, Helga; Seyidova, Nargiz; Schreiber, Catharina; Strobl, Magdalena; Grasl, Christian; Walter, Ingrid; Messner, Barbara; Baudis, Stefan; Fröhlich, Sophie; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Griesser, Markus; di Franco, Matt; Krssak, Martin; Liska, Robert; Schima, Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradable vascular grafts with sufficient in vivo performance would be more advantageous than permanent non-degradable prostheses. These constructs would be continuously replaced by host tissue, leading to an endogenous functional implant which would adapt to the need of the patient and exhibit only limited risk of microbiological graft contamination. Adequate biomechanical strength and a wall structure which promotes rapid host remodeling are prerequisites for biodegradable approaches. Current approaches often reveal limited tensile strength and therefore require thicker or reinforced graft walls. In this study we investigated the in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility of thin host-vessel-matched grafts (n=34) formed from hard-block biodegradable thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU). Expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) conduits (n=34) served as control grafts. Grafts were analyzed by various techniques after retrieval at different time points (1 week; 1, 6, 12 months). TPU grafts showed significantly increased endothelial cell proliferation in vitro (P<0.001). Population by host cells increased significantly in the TPU conduits within 1 month of implantation (P=0.01). After long-term implantation, TPU implants showed 100% patency (ePTFE: 93%) with no signs of aneurysmal dilatation. Substantial remodeling of the degradable grafts was observed but varied between subjects. Intimal hyperplasia was limited to ePTFE conduits (29%). Thin-walled TPU grafts offer a new and desirable form of biodegradable vascular implant. Degradable grafts showed equivalent long-term performance characteristics compared to the clinically used, non-degradable material with improvements in intimal hyperplasia and ingrowth of host cells. PMID:25218664

  12. Characterization of elastic-viscoplastic properties of an AS4/PEEK thermoplastic composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, K. J.; Sun, C. T.

    1991-01-01

    The elastic-viscoplastic properties of an AS4/PEEK (APC-2) thermoplastic composite were characterized at 24 C (75 F) and 121 C (250 F) by using a one-parameter viscoplasticity model. To determine the strain-rate effects, uniaxial tension tests were performed on unidirectional off-axis coupon specimens with different monotonic strain rates. A modified Bodner and Partom's model was also used to describe the viscoplasticity of the thermoplastic composite. The experimental results showed that viscoplastic behavior can be characterized quite well using the one-parameter overstress viscoplasticity model.

  13. Sensitivity analysis for the process integrated online polarization of piezoceramic modules in thermoplastic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hufenbach, W.; Gude, M.; Modler, N.; Heber, T.; Tyczynski, T.

    2010-10-01

    The use of active composite structures in high-volume applications requires novel robust manufacturing processes as well as specially adapted functional modules. The paper presents actual research results with regard to the process-immanent polarization of novel thermoplastic-compatible piezoceramic modules (TPM) during the consolidation process of active fibre-reinforced thermoplastic composite structures. In particular the influence of varying manufacture process parameters of a hot-press process on the polarization behaviour is investigated. The main principal objective is the purposeful utilization of process parameters for polarization support.

  14. Thermoplastic nanoclay-modified vulcanizates based on polypropylene and nitrile-butadiene rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volfson, Svetoslav I.; Okhotina, Natalya A.; Nigmatullina, Alina I.; Panfilova, Olga A.

    2014-05-01

    Thermoplastic vulcanizates based on polypropylene and nitrile-butadiene rubber, containing modified organoclay were developed. It was shown that composites containing 1 to 5 pbw of Cloisite 15A montmorillonite added to rubber show improved physical-mechanical characteristics. Their swelling degree in AI-92 and motor oil was determined. The swelling degree of composites in petrol and motor oil decreases substantially, by 20-63%, due to the introduction of Cloisite 15A montmorillonite. Modification of thermoplastic vulcanizates using layered silicates raised the degradation onset temperature and decreases weight loss upon high temperature heating.

  15. The reclaiming of butyl rubber and in-situ compatibilization of thermoplastic elastomer by power ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Wenlai

    This is a study of the continuous ultrasound aided extrusion process for the in-situ compatibilization of isotactic polypropylene (iPP)/ethylene-propylene diene rubber (EPDM) thermoplastic elastomer (TPE) using a newly developed ultrasonic treatment reactor. The rheological, mechanical properties and morphology of the TPE with and without ultrasonic treatment were studied. In-situ compatibilization in the ultrasonically treated blends was observed as evident by their more stable morphology after annealing, improved mechanical properties and IR spectra. The obtained results indicated that ultrasonic treatment induced the thermo-mechanical degradations and led to the possibility of enhanced molecular transport and chemical reactions at the interfaces. Processing conditions were established for enhanced in situ compatibilization of the PP/EPDM TPE. The ultrasonic treatments of butyl rubber gum and ultrasonic devulcanization of butyl rubber, tire-curing bladder during extrusion using a grooved barrel ultrasonic reactor were carried out. The ultrasonic treatment of gum caused degradation of the polymer main chain leading to lower molecular weight, broader molecular weight distribution, less unsaturation and changes in physical properties. The devulcanization of butyl rubber was successfully accomplished only at severe conditions of ultrasonic treatment. The mechanical properties of vulcanizates prepared from devulcanized butyl rubber are comparable to that of the virgin vulcanizate. The molecular characterization of sol fraction of devulcanized butyl rubber showed the devulcanization and degradation of butyl rubber occurred simultaneously. 1H NMR transverse relaxation was also used to study butyl rubber gum before and after ultrasonic treatment, and ultrasonically devulcanized unfilled butyl rubber. The T2 relaxation decays were successfully described using a two-component model. The recyclability of tire-curing bladder was also investigated. Gel fraction, crosslink density, cure behavior, dynamic properties and mechanical properties were measured. Good mechanical properties of revulcanized rubber were achieved by blending devulcanized rubber with the carbon black filled virgin butyl rubber. The structural characteristics of devulcanized butyl rubber were simulated using the Dobson-Gordon theory of rubber network statistics. A fairly good agreement between experimental data and theoretical prediction on normalized gel fraction vs. normalized crosslink density was achieved. The simulation of devulcanized butyl rubber indicated that the rate of crosslink rupture is much higher than that of the main chain.

  16. Morphological control of inter-penetrating polymer networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Marion

    1989-01-01

    Synthetic organic polymer chemistry has been successful in producing composition of matter with thermal oxidation stability and progressively higher glass transition temperatures. In part, this was done by increasing the steric-hindrance of moieties in the chain of a macromolecule. The resulting polymers are usually quite insoluble and produce molten polymers of very high viscosities. These types of polymers are not easily processed into graphite fiber prepregs by melt or solution impregnation methods. Hence, a technological need exists to produce new knowledge of how to produce polymer-fiber composites from this class of polymers. The concept of freeze drying amic-acid prepolymers with reactive thermoplastic was proposed as a research topic for the ASEE/NASA Summer Faculty Program of 1989 as a means of producing polymer-fiber composites. This process scheme has the thermodynamic attribute that the magnitude of phase separation due to differences in solubility of two organic constituents in solution will be greatly reduced by removing a solvent not by evaporation but by sublimation. Progress to date on evaluating this polymer processing concept is briefly outlined.

  17. Functionalization of polymers using an atmospheric plasma jet in a fluidized bed reactor and the impact on SLM-processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachs, M.; Schmitt, A.; Schmidt, J.; Peukert, W.; Wirth, K.-E.

    2014-05-01

    In order to improve thermoplastics (e.g. Polyamide, Polypropylene and Polyethylene) for Selective Laser Beam Melting (SLM) processes a new approach to functionalize temperature sensitive polymer powders in a large scale is investigated. This is achieved by combining an atmospheric pressure plasma jet and a fluidized bed reactor. Using pressurized air as the plasma gas, radicals like OH* are created. The functionalization leads to an increase of the hydrophilicity of the treated polymer powder without changing the bulk properties. Using the polymers in a SLM process to build single layers of melted material leads to an improvement of the melted layers.

  18. Functionalization of polymers using an atmospheric plasma jet in a fluidized bed reactor and the impact on SLM-processes

    SciTech Connect

    Sachs, M. Schmitt, A. Schmidt, J. Peukert, W. Wirth, K-E

    2014-05-15

    In order to improve thermoplastics (e.g. Polyamide, Polypropylene and Polyethylene) for Selective Laser Beam Melting (SLM) processes a new approach to functionalize temperature sensitive polymer powders in a large scale is investigated. This is achieved by combining an atmospheric pressure plasma jet and a fluidized bed reactor. Using pressurized air as the plasma gas, radicals like OH* are created. The functionalization leads to an increase of the hydrophilicity of the treated polymer powder without changing the bulk properties. Using the polymers in a SLM process to build single layers of melted material leads to an improvement of the melted layers.

  19. Space environmental effects on polymer composites: Research needs and opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jang, Bor Z.; Bianchi, J.; Liu, Y. M.; Chang, C. P.

    1993-01-01

    The long-term performance of polymer-based composites in the space environment is discussed. Both thermoset and thermoplastic matrix composites are included in this discussion. Previous efforts on the space environmental effects on composites are briefly reviewed. Focus of this review is placed on the effects of hygrothermal stresses, atomic oxygen, ultraviolet (UV), and space debris/micrometeoroid impacts along with the potential synergism. Potential approaches to estimating the residual strength of polymer composites after exposure to atomic oxygen erosion or space debris/micrometeoroid impact are evaluated. New ground-based data are then utilized to illustrate the effects of atomic oxygen and thermal cycling on the failure behavior of polymer composites. Finally, research needs, challenges, and opportunities in the field of space environmental effects on composite materials are highlighted.

  20. Making insoluble polymer networks malleable via olefin metathesis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi-Xuan; Tournilhac, François; Leibler, Ludwik; Guan, Zhibin

    2012-05-23

    Covalently cross-linked polymers have many technological applications for their excellent properties, but they suffer from the lack of processability and adaptive properties. We report a simple, efficient method of generating adaptive cross-linked polymers via olefin metathesis. By introducing a very low level of the Grubbs' second-generation Ru metathesis catalyst, a chemically cross-linked polybutadiene network becomes malleable at room temperature while retaining its insolubility. The stress relaxation capability increases with increasing level of catalyst loading. In sharp contrast, catalyst-free control samples with identical network topology and cross-linking density do not show any adaptive properties. This chemistry should offer a possibility to combine the dimensional stability and solvent resistance of cross-linked polymers and the processability/adaptibility of thermoplastics. PMID:22568481

  1. Bursting Bubbles from Combustion of Thermoplastic Materials in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, K. B.

    1999-01-01

    Many thermoplastic materials in common use for a wide range of applications, including spacecraft, develop bubbles internally as they burn due to chemical reactions taking place within the bulk. These bubbles grow and migrate until they burst at the surface, forceably ejecting volatile gases and, occasionally, molten fuel. In experiments in normal gravity, Kashiwagi and Ohlemiller observed vapor jets extending a few centimeters from the surface of a radiatively heated polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) sample, with some molten material ejected into the gas phase. These physical phenomena complicated the combustion process considerably. In addition to the non-steady release of volatiles, the depth of the surface layer affected by oxygen was increased, attributed to the roughening of the surface by bursting events. The ejection of burning droplets in random directions presents a potential fire hazard unique to microgravity. In microgravity combustion experiments on nylon Velcro fasteners and on polyethylene wire insulation, the presence of bursting fuel vapor bubbles was associated with the ejection of small particles of molten fuel as well as pulsations of the flame. For the nylon fasteners, particle velocities were higher than 30 cm/sec. The droplets burned robustly until all fuel was consumed, demonstrating the potential for the spread of fire in random directions over an extended distance. The sequence of events for a bursting bubble has been photographed by Newitt et al.. As the bubble reaches the fluid surface, the outer surface forms a dome while the internal bubble pressure maintains a depression at the inner interface. Liquid drains from the dome until it breaks into a cloud of droplets on the order of a few microns in size. The bubble gases are released rapidly, generating vortices in the quiescent surroundings and transporting the tiny droplets. The depression left by the escaping gases collapses into a central jet, which rises with a high velocity and may break up, releasing one or more relatively large drops (on the order of a millimeter in these experiments). A better understanding of bubble development and bursting processes, the effects of bursting behavior on burning rate of the bulk material, and the circumstances under which large droplets are expelled, as well as their trajectories, sizes, and burning rates, is sought through computer modeling compared with experiment.

  2. Recycling of ligno-cellulosic and polythylene wastes from agricultural operations in thermoplastic composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the US, wood plastic composites (WPC) represent one of the successful markets for natural fiber-filled thermoplastic composites. In the past several years, the availability of good quality wood fiber has been diminishing and prices of wood and plastic have been increasing. Therefore, the vast qua...

  3. 40 CFR 414.40 - Applicability; description of the thermoplastic resins subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Applicability; description of the thermoplastic resins subcategory. 414.40 Section 414.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORGANIC CHEMICALS, PLASTICS, AND SYNTHETIC...

  4. Simulation of Orientation in Injection Molding of High Aspect Ratio Particle Thermoplastic Composites

    E-print Network

    Wapperom, Peter

    Simulation of Orientation in Injection Molding of High Aspect Ratio Particle Thermoplastic-induced orientation of high aspect ratio particles in injection molded composite parts is presented. For a highly; Hele-Shaw approximation; DGFEM; Coupling effect; Injection molding; Composites INTRODUCTION High aspect

  5. Thermoplastic rubber comprising ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer, asphalt and fluxing oil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendel, F. J. (inventor)

    1970-01-01

    A thermoplastic rubber is made from a mixture of between about 10 percent and about 50 percent of asphalt, between about 5 percent and about 30 percent fluxing oil, and between about 35 percent and about 70 percent of a copolymer of polyethylene and vinyl acetate.

  6. Properties of thermoplastic starch and TPS/polycaprolactone blend reinforced with sisal whiskers using extrusion processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sisal whiskers (SW) were prepared by acid hydrolysis for subsequent evaluation as reinforcing material for biodegradable matrices of thermoplastic starch (TPS) and TPS/polycaprolactone (TPS/PCL) blends. The acid hydrolyzed SW had dimensions of 5±2 nm in diameter and 210±60 nm in length and 78% cryst...

  7. Vacuum forming of thermoplastic sheet results in low-cost investment casting patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, A. E., Jr.

    1964-01-01

    Vacuum forming of a sheet of thermoplastic material around a mandrel conforming to the shape of the finished object provides a pattern for an investment mold. The thickness of the metal part is determined by the thickness of the plastic pattern.

  8. SOLVENTLESS MANUFACTURE OF ARTILLERY PROPELLANT USING THERMOPLASTIC ELASTOMER BINDER, PP-867

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multi-base gun propellant for artillery ammunition creates 0.3 lb of solvent emissions per lb of propellant, and at expected production rates of 3 million lb/yr, this represents the largest source of VOC emissions due to gun propellant production. New thermoplastic elastomer (TP...

  9. A Thermoplastic/Thermoset Blend Exhibiting Thermal Mending and Reversible Adhesion

    E-print Network

    Mather, Patrick T.

    A Thermoplastic/Thermoset Blend Exhibiting Thermal Mending and Reversible Adhesion Xiaofan Luo that the DEB phenomenon enables strong and facile adhesion of the same material to itself and to a variety separation · epoxy · self-healing · fracture · adhesion INTRODUCTION P olymeric materials, such as high

  10. Evaluation of a Thermoplastic Immobilization System for Breast and Chest Wall Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Strydhorst, Jared H.; Caudrelier, Jean-Michel; Clark, Brenda G.; Montgomery, Lynn A.; Fox, Greg; MacPherson, Miller S.

    2011-04-01

    We report on the impact of a thermoplastic immobilization system on intra- and interfraction motion for patients undergoing breast or chest wall radiation therapy. Patients for this study were treated using helical tomotherapy. All patients were immobilized using a thermoplastic shell extending from the shoulders to the ribcage. Intrafraction motion was assessed by measuring maximum displacement of the skin, heart, and chest wall on a pretreatment 4D computed tomography, while inter-fraction motion was inferred from patient shift data arising from daily image guidance procedures on tomotherapy. Using thermoplastic immobilization, the average maximum motion of the external contour was 1.3 {+-} 1.6 mm, whereas the chest wall was found to be 1.6 {+-} 1.9 mm. The day-to-day setup variation was found to be large, with random errors of 4.0, 12.0, and 4.5 mm in the left-right, superior-inferior, and anterior-posterior directions, respectively, and the standard deviations of the systematic errors were found to be 2.7, 9.8, and 4.1 mm. These errors would be expected to dominate any respiratory motion but can be mitigated by daily online image guidance. Using thermoplastic immobilization can effectively reduce respiratory motion of the chest wall and external contour, but these gains can only be realized if daily image guidance is used.

  11. IMPROVEMENT IN THE SIMULATION OF INJECTION MOLDED SHORT GLASS FIBER THERMOPLASTIC COMPOSITES

    E-print Network

    Wapperom, Peter

    Page 1 IMPROVEMENT IN THE SIMULATION OF INJECTION MOLDED SHORT GLASS FIBER THERMOPLASTIC COMPOSITES axisymmetric simulation using Folgar Tucker model for predicting the flow-induced orientation of glass fibers as flow induced orientation. The fibers considered here are short glass fibers defined as fibers with high

  12. Preparing composite materials from matrices of processable aromatic polyimide thermoplastic blends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Norman J. (inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (inventor); Baucom, Robert M. (inventor); Gleason, John R. (inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Composite materials with matrices of tough, thermoplastic aromatic polyimides are obtained by blending semi-crystalline polyimide powders with polyamic acid solutions to form slurries, which are used in turn to prepare prepregs, the consolidation of which into finished composites is characterized by excellent melt flow during processing.

  13. Recycling of ligno-cellulosic and polyethylene wastes from agricultural operations in thermoplastic composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the US, wood plastic composites (WPC) represent one of the successful markets for natural fiber-filled thermoplastic composites. In the past several years, the availability of good quality wood fiber has been diminishing and prices of wood and plastic have been increasing. Therefore, the vast qua...

  14. PROCESSING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF WELDED BONDS BETWEEN THERMOSET AND THERMOPLASTIC COMPOSITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    To assemble complex structures with short cycle times, the feasibility of welding thermoplastic (TP) to thermoset (TS) composites is demonstrated using a phenomenological approach. The effect of the thermal degradation of the TS composite (AS4/3501-6) on its shear strength is ass...

  15. [Laboratory assessment of deformational features in thermoplastic materials for removable dentures].

    PubMed

    Poiurovskaia, I Ia; Sutugina, T F; Babaev, S A; Ron, O S

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents the results of laboratory tests of base thermoplastic materials Acry F711 and Flexi N512 in comparison with the traditional acrylic base material Ftoracs to study their deformational properties when loaded by repetitive forces close to the functional chewing loads. PMID:25588331

  16. Three-dimensional microstructuring of carbon by thermoplastic spacer evaporation during pyrolysis

    E-print Network

    Chung, Deborah D.L.

    Three-dimensional microstructuring of carbon by thermoplastic spacer evaporation during pyrolysis pyrolysis of an epoxy-based film that coated the spacer and parts of the sub- strate. Fillers were chosen to reduce the shrinkage during pyrolysis and to increase the electrical conductivity. Multiwalled carbon

  17. SULFUR POLYMER ENCAPSULATION.

    SciTech Connect

    KALB, P.

    2001-08-22

    Sulfur polymer cement (SPC) is a thermoplastic polymer consisting of 95 wt% elemental sulfur and 5 wt% organic modifiers to enhance long-term durability. SPC was originally developed by the U.S. Bureau of Mines as an alternative to hydraulic cement for construction applications. Previous attempts to use elemental sulfur as a construction material in the chemical industry failed due to premature degradation. These failures were caused by the internal stresses that result from changes in crystalline structure upon cooling of the material. By reacting elemental sulfur with organic polymers, the Bureau of Mines developed a product that successfully suppresses the solid phase transition and significantly improves the stability of the product. SPC, originally named modified sulfur cement, is produced from readily available, inexpensive waste sulfur derived from desulfurization of both flue gases and petroleum. The commercial production of SPC is licensed in the United States by Martin Resources (Odessa, Texas) and is marketed under the trade name Chement 2000. It is sold in granular form and is relatively inexpensive ({approx}$0.10 to 0.12/lb). Application of SPC for the treatment of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes was initially developed and patented by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in the mid-1980s (Kalb and Colombo, 1985; Colombo et al., 1997). The process was subsequently investigated by the Commission of the European Communities (Van Dalen and Rijpkema, 1989), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (Darnell, 1991), and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Mattus and Mattus, 1994). SPC has been used primarily in microencapsulation applications but can also be used for macroencapsulation of waste. SPC microencapsulation has been demonstrated to be an effective treatment for a wide variety of wastes, including incinerator hearth and fly ash; aqueous concentrates such as sulfates, borates, and chlorides; blowdown solutions; soils; and sludges. It is not recommended for treatment of wastes containing high concentrations of nitrates because of potentially dangerous reactions between sulfur, nitrate, and trace quantities of organics. Recently, the process has been adapted for the treatment of liquid elemental mercury and mercury contaminated soil and debris.

  18. On the recovery and recrystallization of two thermoplastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Eric; Rau, Christoph; Townsend, David; Bourne, Neil; Withers, Phil

    2015-06-01

    The well-known Taylor test, that follows the impact of a flat-ended cylindrical rod onto a rigid stationary anvil, is conducted over a range of impact speeds for two polymers, PTFE and PEEK. In previous work experiments and a model were developed to capture the deformation behavior of the rod after impact. A distinctive feature of these works was that a region in which there was both spatial and temporal variation of both longitudinal and radial deformation showed evidence of order in an otherwise amorphous matrix within the material. This region is imaged in a range of impacted targets at the I13 Imaging and Coherence beamline at the Diamond synchrotron. Resolution beyond the limitations given by the detector and X-ray optics were achieved using methods working in reciprocal space. Further techniques were fielded to resolve crystalline regions within the recovered polymer cylinders.

  19. Piezoelectric Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, J. S.; Ounaies, Z.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to detail the current theoretical understanding of the origin of piezoelectric and ferroelectric phenomena in polymers; to present the state-of-the-art in piezoelectric polymers and emerging material systems that exhibit promising properties; and to discuss key characterization methods, fundamental modeling approaches, and applications of piezoelectric polymers. Piezoelectric polymers have been known to exist for more than forty years, but in recent years they have gained notoriety as a valuable class of smart materials.

  20. Transparent Large Strain Thermoplastic Polyurethane Magneto-Active Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoonessi, Mitra; Carpen, Ileana; Peck, John; Sola, Francisco; Bail, Justin; Lerch, Bradley; Meador, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Smart adaptive materials are an important class of materials which can be used in space deployable structures, morphing wings, and structural air vehicle components where remote actuation can improve fuel efficiency. Adaptive materials can undergo deformation when exposed to external stimuli such as electric fields, thermal gradients, radiation (IR, UV, etc.), chemical and electrochemical actuation, and magnetic field. Large strain, controlled and repetitive actuation are important characteristics of smart adaptive materials. Polymer nanocomposites can be tailored as shape memory polymers and actuators. Magnetic actuation of polymer nanocomposites using a range of iron, iron cobalt, and iron manganese nanoparticles is presented. The iron-based nanoparticles were synthesized using the soft template (1) and Sun's (2) methods. The nanoparticles shape and size were examined using TEM. The crystalline structure and domain size were evaluated using WAXS. Surface modifications of the nanoparticles were performed to improve dispersion, and were characterized with IR and TGA. TPU nanocomposites exhibited actuation for approximately 2wt% nanoparticle loading in an applied magnetic field. Large deformation and fast recovery were observed. These nanocomposites represent a promising potential for new generation of smart materials.

  1. Simplified tube models for entangled supramolecular polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudara, Victor; Read, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    This presentation describes current efforts investigating non-linear rheology of entangled, supramolecular polymeric materials. We describe two recently developed models: 1) We have developed a simplified model for the rheology of entangled telechelic star polymers. This is based on a pre-averaged orientation tensor, a stretch equation, and stretch-dependant probability of detachment of the sticker. In both linear and non-linear regimes, we produce maps of the whole parameter space, indicating the parameter values for which qualitative changes in response to flow are predicted. Results in the linear rheology regime are consistent with previous more detailed models and are in qualitative agreement with experimental data. 2) Using the same modelling framework, we investigate entangled linear polymers with stickers along the backbone. We use a set of coupled equations to describe the stretch between each stickers, and use equations similar to our star model for attachment/detachment of the sticky groups. This model is applicable to industrial polymers such as entangled thermoplastic elasomers, or functionalised model linear polymers. The work leading to these results has received funding from the People Programme (Marie Curie Actions) of the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under REA Grant Agreement No. 607937 (SUPOLEN).

  2. High-precision flexible fabrication of tissue engineering scaffolds using distinct polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Chuang; Cai, Lei; Sonawane, Bhushan; Wang, Shanfeng; Dong, Jingyan

    2012-01-01

    Three-dimensional porous structures using biodegradable materials with excellent biocompatibility are critically important for tissue engineering applications. We present a multi-nozzle-based versatile deposition approach to flexibly construct porous tissue engineering scaffolds using distinct polymeric biomaterials such as thermoplastic and photo-crosslinkable polymers. We first describe the development of the deposition system and fabrication of scaffolds from two types of biodegradable polymers using this system. The thermoplastic sample is semi-crystalline poly({var_epsilon}-caprolactone) (PCL) that can be processed at a temperature higher than its melting point and solidifies at room temperature. The photo-crosslinkable one is polypropylene fumarate (PPF) that has to be dissolved in a reactive solvent as a resin for being cured into solid structures. Besides the direct fabrication of thermoplastic PCL scaffolds, we specifically develop a layer molding approach for the fabrication of crosslinkable polymers, which traditionally can only be fabricated by stereolithography. In this approach, a thermoplastic supporting material (paraffin wax) is first deposited to make a mold for each specific layer, and then PPF is deposited on demand to fill the mold and cured by the UV light. The supporting material can be removed to produce a porous scaffold of crosslinked PPF. Both PCL and crosslinked PPF scaffolds fabricated using the developed system have been characterized in terms of compressive mechanical properties, morphology, pore size and porosity. Mouse MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblastic cell studies on the fabricated scaffolds have been performed to demonstrate their capability of supporting cell proliferation and ingrowth, aiming for bone tissue engineering applications.

  3. Polymers: an excellent and increasingly used material for microsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bley, Peter

    1999-08-01

    Microsystems, whose main components are made of polymers, have meanwhile found a firm place in microsystems technology, both as important niche products and as bulk commodities. A large number of structuring techniques are available, on the one hand, for primary structuring (electron beam, UV and X-ray lithography, laser patterning, stereo lithography, etc.) and, on the other hand, as replication techniques for low-cost mass production (reactive injection molding, thermoplastic injection molding, hot embossing techniques, etc.). Microstructures made of polymers may be clearly cheaper to manufacture than those made of any other material. Besides polymers structured on a micrometer scale, also membranes made of polymers are becoming increasingly more important in microsystems technology. The development of microstructure technology with the use of polymers began at what is now Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Karlsruhe Research Center) in the early eighties. The development of both, deep X-ray lithography and various molding techniques (LIGA) process started back then already. The large variety of possible uses will be shown by examples of developments originating from Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. These mainly comprise micro- optics (lenses, distance sensors, spectrometers, micro-optical benches, etc.), microfluidics (capillaries for 'labs on chip,' polymer membranes as basis for pumps, valves, pressure sensors, flow sensors, and separating systems), and actuators based on selectively inflatable chambers. Another example for the possible application of polymers in microsystems is their use as functional coating for electrochemical transducers [e.g. surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors].

  4. Selective separation of virgin and post-consumer polymers (PET and PVC) by flotation method

    SciTech Connect

    Burat, Firat; Gueney, Ali; Olgac Kangal, M.

    2009-06-15

    More and more polymer wastes are generated by industry and householders today. Recycling is an important process to reduce the amount of waste resulting from human activities. Currently, recycling technologies use relatively homogeneous polymers because hand-sorting waste is costly. Many promising technologies are being investigated for separating mixed thermoplastics, but they are still uneconomical and unreliable. At present, most waste polymers cause serious environmental problems. Burning polymers for recycling is not practiced since poisonous gases are released during the burning process. Particularly, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) materials among waste polymers generate hazardous HCl gas, dioxins containing Cl, etc., which lead to air pollution and shorten the life of the incinerator. In addition, they make other polymers difficult to recycle. Both polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and PVC have densities of 1.30-1.35 g/cm{sup 3} and cannot be separated using conventional gravity separation techniques. For this reason, polymer recycling needs new techniques. Among these techniques, froth flotation, which is also used in mineral processing, can be useful because of its low cost and simplicity. The main objective of this research is to recycle PET and PVC selectively from post-consumer polymer wastes and virgin polymers by using froth flotation. According to the results, all PVC particles were floated with 98.8% efficiency in virgin polymer separation while PET particles were obtained with 99.7% purity and 57.0% efficiency in post-consumer polymer separation.

  5. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Jjj of... - Group 1 Storage Vessels at Existing Affected Sources Producing the Listed Thermoplastics

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Thermoplastic Chemical a Vessel capacity (cubic meters) Vapor pressure b (kilopascals) ASA/AMSAN c styrene... vapor pressure criteria are specific to the listed chemical or to “all chemicals,” as indicated. b Maximum true...

  6. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Jjj of... - Group 1 Storage Vessels at Existing Affected Sources Producing the Listed Thermoplastics

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Thermoplastic Chemical a Vessel capacity (cubic meters) Vapor pressure b (kilopascals) ASA/AMSAN c styrene... vapor pressure criteria are specific to the listed chemical or to “all chemicals,” as indicated. b Maximum true...

  7. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Jjj of... - Group 1 Storage Vessels at Existing Affected Sources Producing the Listed Thermoplastics

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Thermoplastic Chemical a Vessel capacity (cubic meters) Vapor pressure b (kilopascals) ASA/AMSAN c styrene... vapor pressure criteria are specific to the listed chemical or to “all chemicals,” as indicated. b Maximum true...

  8. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Jjj of... - Group 1 Storage Vessels at New Affected Sources Producing the Listed Thermoplastics

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Thermoplastic Chemical a Vessel capacity(cubic meters) Vapor pressure b (kilopascals) ASA/AMSAN c Styrene... All other chemicals ?38 and vapor pressure criteria... Maximum true vapor pressure of total organic HAP at storage temperature. c The applicability criteria...

  9. Functionalized Materials From Elastomers to High Performance Thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect

    Laura Ann Salazar

    2003-05-31

    Synthesis and incorporation of functionalized materials continues to generate significant research interest in academia and in industry. If chosen correctly, a functional group when incorporated into a polymer can deliver enhanced properties, such as adhesion, water solubility, thermal stability, etc. The utility of these new materials has been demonstrated in drug-delivery systems, coatings, membranes and compatibilizers. Two approaches exist to functionalize a material. The desired moiety can be added to the monomer either before or after polymerization. The polymers used range from low glass transition temperature elastomers to high glass transition temperature, high performance materials. One industrial example of the first approach is the synthesis of Teflon(reg. sign). Poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE or Teflon(reg. sign)) is synthesized from tetrafluoroethylene, a functionalized monomer. The resulting material has significant property differences from the parent, poly(ethylene). Due to the fluorine in the polymer, PTFE has excellent solvent and heat resistance, a low surface energy and a low coefficient of friction. This allows the material to be used in high temperature applications where the surface needs to be nonabrasive and nonstick. This material has a wide spread use in the cooking industry because it allows for ease of cooking and cleaning as a nonstick coating on cookware. One of the best examples of the second approach, functionalization after polymerization, is the vulcanization process used to make tires. Natural rubber (from the Hevea brasiliensis) has a very low glass transition temperature, is very tacky and would not be useful to make tires without synthetic alteration. Goodyear's invention was the vulcanization of polyisoprene by crosslinking the material with sulfur to create a rubber that was tough enough to withstand the elements of weather and road conditions. Due to the development of polymerization techniques to make cis-polyisoprene, natural rubber is no longer needed for the manufacturing of tires, but vulcanization is still utilized.

  10. Numerical prediction of fiber orientation in injection-molded short-fiber/thermoplastic composite parts with experimental validation

    SciTech Connect

    Thi, Thanh Binh Nguyen; Morioka, Mizuki; Yokoyama, Atsushi; Hamanaka, Senji; Yamashita, Katsuhisa; Nonomura, Chisato

    2015-05-22

    Numerical prediction of the fiber orientation in the short-glass fiber (GF) reinforced polyamide 6 (PA6) composites with the fiber weight concentration of 30%, 50%, and 70% manufactured by the injection molding process is presented. And the fiber orientation was also directly observed and measured through X-ray computed tomography. During the injection molding process of the short-fiber/thermoplastic composite, the fiber orientation is produced by the flow states and the fiber-fiber interaction. Folgar and Tucker equation is the well known for modeling the fiber orientation in a concentrated suspension. They included into Jeffrey’s equation a diffusive type of term by introducing a phenomenological coefficient to account for the fiber-fiber interaction. Our developed model for the fiber-fiber interaction was proposed by modifying the rotary diffusion term of the Folgar-Tucker equation. This model was presented in a conference paper of the 29{sup th} International Conference of the Polymer Processing Society published by AIP conference proceeding. For modeling fiber interaction, the fiber dynamic simulation was introduced in order to obtain a global fiber interaction coefficient, which is sum function of the fiber concentration, aspect ratio, and angular velocity. The fiber orientation is predicted by using the proposed fiber interaction model incorporated into a computer aided engineering simulation package C-Mold. An experimental program has been carried out in which the fiber orientation distribution has been measured in 100 x 100 x 2 mm injection-molded plate and 100 x 80 x 2 mm injection-molded weld by analyzed with a high resolution 3D X-ray computed tomography system XVA-160?, and calculated by X-ray computed tomography imaging. The numerical prediction shows a good agreement with experimental validation. And the complex fiber orientation in the injection-molded weld was investigated.

  11. Numerical prediction of fiber orientation in injection-molded short-fiber/thermoplastic composite parts with experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thi, Thanh Binh Nguyen; Morioka, Mizuki; Yokoyama, Atsushi; Hamanaka, Senji; Yamashita, Katsuhisa; Nonomura, Chisato

    2015-05-01

    Numerical prediction of the fiber orientation in the short-glass fiber (GF) reinforced polyamide 6 (PA6) composites with the fiber weight concentration of 30%, 50%, and 70% manufactured by the injection molding process is presented. And the fiber orientation was also directly observed and measured through X-ray computed tomography. During the injection molding process of the short-fiber/thermoplastic composite, the fiber orientation is produced by the flow states and the fiber-fiber interaction. Folgar and Tucker equation is the well known for modeling the fiber orientation in a concentrated suspension. They included into Jeffrey's equation a diffusive type of term by introducing a phenomenological coefficient to account for the fiber-fiber interaction. Our developed model for the fiber-fiber interaction was proposed by modifying the rotary diffusion term of the Folgar-Tucker equation. This model was presented in a conference paper of the 29th International Conference of the Polymer Processing Society published by AIP conference proceeding. For modeling fiber interaction, the fiber dynamic simulation was introduced in order to obtain a global fiber interaction coefficient, which is sum function of the fiber concentration, aspect ratio, and angular velocity. The fiber orientation is predicted by using the proposed fiber interaction model incorporated into a computer aided engineering simulation package C-Mold. An experimental program has been carried out in which the fiber orientation distribution has been measured in 100 x 100 x 2 mm injection-molded plate and 100 x 80 x 2 mm injection-molded weld by analyzed with a high resolution 3D X-ray computed tomography system XVA-160?, and calculated by X-ray computed tomography imaging. The numerical prediction shows a good agreement with experimental validation. And the complex fiber orientation in the injection-molded weld was investigated.

  12. Extrusion foaming of thermoplastic cellulose acetate from renewable resources using a two-component physical blowing agent system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopmann, Ch.; Windeck, C.; Hendriks, S.; Zepnik, S.; Wodke, T.

    2014-05-01

    Thermoplastic cellulose acetate (CA) is a bio-based polymer with optical, mechanical and thermal properties comparable to those of polystyrene (PS). The substitution of the predominant petrol-based PS in applications like foamed food trays can lead to a more sustainable economic practice. However, CA is also suitable for more durable applications as the biodegradability rate can be controlled by adjusting the degree of substitutions. The extrusion foaming of CA still has to overcome certain challenges. CA is highly hydrophilic and can suffer from hydrolytic degradation if not dried properly. Therefore, the influence of residual moisture on the melt viscosity is rather high. Beyond, the surface quality of foam CA sheets is below those of PS due to the particular foaming behaviour. This paper presents results of a recent study on extrusion foamed CA, using a two-component physical blowing agent system compromising HFO 1234ze as blowing agent and organic solvents as co-propellant. Samples with different co-propellants are processed on a laboratory single screw extruder at IKV. Morphology and surface topography are investigated with respect to the blowing agent composition and the die pressure. In addition, relationships between foam density, foam morphology and the propellants are analysed. The choice of the co-propellant has a significant influence on melt-strength, foaming behaviour and the possible blow-up ratio of the sheet. Furthermore, a positive influence of the co-propellant on the surface quality can be observed. In addition, the focus is laid on the effect of external contact cooling of the foamed sheets after the die exit.

  13. Polymer adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joanny, Jean-Francois

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this talk is to review Pierre-Gilles deGennes' work on polymer adsorption and the impact that it has now in our understanding of this problem. We will first present the self-consistent mean-field theory and its applications to adsorption and depletion. De Gennes most important contribution is probably the derivation of the self-similar power law density profile for adsorbed polymer layers that we will present next, emphasizing the differences between the tail sections and the loop sections of the adsorbed polymers. We will then discuss the kinetics of polymer adsorption and the penetration of a new polymer chain in an adsobed layer that DeGennes described very elegantly in analogy with a quantum tunneling problem. Finally, we will discuss the role of polymer adsorption for colloid stabilization.

  14. Debinding mechanisms in thermoplastic processing of a Ba(0.5)Sr(0.5)Co(0.8)Fe(0.2)O(3-?)- stearic acid-polystyrene mixture.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Mehdi; Clemens, Frank; Otal, Eugenio H; Ferri, Davide; Graule, Thomas; Grobéty, Bernard

    2013-02-01

    In the present study, we address the interaction between a thermoplastic binder system and Ba(0.5)Sr(0.5)Co(0.8)Fe(0.2)O(3-?) (BSCF) during thermal treatment of the thermoplastic feedstock. BSCF powder was coated with different amounts of stearic acid (SA) acting as a surfactant. Oxygen release from the uncoated BSCF surface changes the decomposition of polystyrene (PS) in inert atmospheres from a pyrolytic to a thermoxidative mechanism, thereby decreasing the break-down temperature and the activation energy. In mixtures with coated BSCF powder, the decomposition products of SA carbonatize the BSCF surface, which inhibits oxygen release. Mass spectrometry of the breakdown products indicates that the decomposition of SA in the presence of BSCF also modifies the decomposition pathway of PS. The influence of BSCF on the polymer decomposition reaction in air is not as strong. Oxygen diffusion seems to be responsible for the differences to pure PS in reaction rates and the activation energies. PMID:23281298

  15. Improving processing and toughness of a high performance composite matrix through an interpenetrating polymer network. VI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, Ruth H.

    1990-01-01

    A simultaneous semi-interpenetrating polymer network (semi-IPN) concept is presented which combines easy-to-process, but brittle, thermosetting polyimides with tough, but difficult to process, linear thermoplastic polyimides. The combination results in a semi-IPN with the easy processability of a thermoset and good toughness of a thermoplastic. Four simultaneous semi-IPN systems were developed from commercially available NR-150B2 combined with each of the four Thermid materials (LR-600, AL-600, MC-600, and FA-700). It is concluded that there is a significant improvement in resin fracture toughness of Thermid-polyimide-based semi-IPN systems and some improvement in composite microcracking resistance compared to Thermid LR-600. Excellent composite mechanical properties have been achieved. These new semi-IPN materials have the potential to be used as composite matrices, adhesives, and molding materials.

  16. Active bilayer films of thermoplastic starch and polycaprolactone obtained by compression molding.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Toro, Rodrigo; Morey, Iris; Talens, Pau; Chiralt, Amparo

    2015-08-20

    Bilayer films consisting of one layer of PCL with either one of thermoplastic starch (S) or one of thermoplastic starch with 5% PCL (S95) were obtained by compression molding. Before compression, aqueous solutions of ascorbic acid or potassium sorbate were sprayed onto the S or S95 layers in order to plasticize them and favor layer adhesion. S95 films formed bilayers with PCL with very good adhesion and good mechanical performance, especially when potassium sorbate was added at the interface. All bilayers enhanced their barrier properties to water vapour (up to 96% compared to net starch films) and oxygen (up to 99% compared to PCL pure). Bilayers consisting of PCL and starch containing 5% PCL, with potassium sorbate at the interface, showed the best mechanical and barrier properties and interfacial adhesion while having active properties, associated with the antimicrobial action of potassium sorbate. PMID:25965485

  17. Thermal Joining of Thermoplastic Metal Hybrids by Means Of Mono- and Polychromatic Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amend, P.; Pfindel, S.; Schmidt, M.

    In recent years, joining of plastics and metals for lightweight constructions has become more and more important for industrial applications. This paper presents a novel approach for thermal joining of thermoplastic metal hybrids by means of a combination of mono- and polychromatic radiation. During this work, hybrid joints of aluminum (EN AW-5182) and technical thermoplastics (PC, PA6, PA66-GF30) are studied. Thereby experiments for transmission and heat-conduction joining are performed. Besides, the influences of laser structuring of the metal surface on the joint connections are investigated. Additionally, climate tests according to BMW PR 308.2 from -30 °C to 90 °C and from -40 °C to 120 °C are performed to analyze the long-term durability of the hybrid joint connections.

  18. Thermoplastic matrix composites - LARC-TPI, polyimidesulfone and their blends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Norman J.; St. Clair, Terry L.

    1987-01-01

    Composites were fabricated from unidirectional unsized AS-4 carbon fiber and two baseline polyimides: benzophenone dianhydride-3,3'-diaminodiphenylsulfone (PISO2) and benzophenone dianhydride-3,3'-diaminobenzophenone (LARC-TPI). In addition, each polymer solution prior to prepregging was doped with various amounts of crystalline LARC-TPI powder to enhance melt flow during press molding. The 2:1, 1:1, and 1:2 ratios of crystalline to amorphous resin, respectively, were studied in the LARC-TPI system and the 1:2 ratio in the PISO2 system. Matrix characterization, prepreg fabrication/characterization and composite fabrication and physical/mechanical properties are described. The latter include three point short beam shear and flexure, dry and wet, as well as fracture toughness properties in selected compositions.

  19. Functionalized Graphenes and Thermoplastic Nanocomposites Based upon Expanded Graphite Oxide.

    PubMed

    Steurer, Peter; Wissert, Rainer; Thomann, Ralf; Mülhaupt, Rolf

    2009-02-18

    Exfoliation of expanded GO represents an attractive route to functionalized graphenes as versatile 2D carbon nanomaterials and components of a wide variety of polymer nanocomposites. Thermally reduced graphite oxides (TrGO) with specific surface areas of 600 to 950 m(2) ?·?g(-1) were obtained by oxidation of graphite followed by thermal expansion at 600?°C. Thermal post treatment at 700?°C and 1?000?°C increased carbon content (81 to 97 wt.-%) and lowered resistivity (1?600 to 50 ??·?cm). During melt extrusion with PC, iPP, SAN and PA6, exfoliation afforded uniformly dispersed graphenes with aspect ratio?>?200. In comparison to conventional 0D and 1D carbon nanoparticles, TrGO afforded nanocomposites with improved stiffness and lower percolation threshold. Recent progress and new strategies in development of functionalized graphenes and graphene-based nanocomposites are highlighted. PMID:21706607

  20. Biodegradable thermoplastic composites based on polyvinyl alcohol and algae.

    PubMed

    Chiellini, Emo; Cinelli, Patrizia; Ilieva, Vassilka I; Martera, Martina

    2008-03-01

    Algae constitute a largely available, low value material from renewable resources of marine origin to be used for the production of eco-compatible composites. Fibers of the green alga Ulva armoricana from the French coast were positively evaluated for the production of composites with a hydrophilic, eco-compatible polymer, such as poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) as continuous matrix by casting of aqueous suspensions and compression molding. PVA, Ulva, and starch were also successfully processed by the melt in the presence of glycerol. Positive results were obtained for film-forming properties and mechanical characteristics also with limited amounts of PVA (40%) attesting for Ulva suitability to be introduced in composites (up to 30%). Degradation in soil of Ulva and an Ulva-based composites outlined a rapid mineralization of Ulva in the selected medium (over 80% in 100 days) while the composite samples underwent a mineralization rate affected by the different component propensity to degradation. PMID:18257530

  1. Synthesis and characterization of aryl phosphine oxide containing thermoplastic polyimides and thermosetting polyimides with controlled reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Hong

    1998-11-01

    Phosphorus containing monomers, bis(3-aminophenyl)methyl phosphine oxide (m-DAMPO) and bis(3-aminophenyl)phenyl phosphine oxide (m-DAPPO), were synthesized and incorporated into a thermoplastic poly(arylene ether imide) based upon 2,2sp'-bis (4-(3,4-dicarboxyphenoxy)phenyl) propane dianhydride and 1,3-phenylene diamine, in order to study their influence on flame resistance and other properties. DAMPO or DAPPO were quantitatively incorporated in concentrations of 25, 50, 75 and 100 mole percent, using the "one pot" ester-acid method. The number average molecular weights of the prepared materials were controlled to 20,000g/mol by off-setting the stoichiometry and endcapping with phthalic anhydride. This strategy enabled one to distinguish the effects of the phosphine oxide incorporation from the influence of molecular weight. The resulting copolymers demonstrated a significant increase in char yield as a function of the phosphine oxide content, thus suggesting improved fire resistance. Glass transition temperatures similar to the control were determined by DSC analysis. Analysis of the mechanical behavior of the DAMPO system at room temperature showed that tensile strength and elongation at failure values were comparable to the control system, while the DAPPO containing copolymers were surprisingly brittle. The influence of the reactive endgroup on the synthesis, cure behavior and network properties of thermosetting polyetherimides was investigated. Reactive phenylacetylene, acetylene and maleimide terminated poly(ether imide) oligomers were prepared and characterized. Optimal reaction conditions were established to produce fully endcapped oligomers with imidized structures and controlled molecular weight. The phenylacetylene endcapped system was synthesized by a conventional ester-acid method. The acetylene endcapped system was prepared via modified ester-acid method and the maleimide endcapped system was fabricated utilizing an amic-acid route. It was determined that phenylethynyl endcapped polymers could be thermally cured at high temperatures (350{-}380sp°C) providing good processibility. The networks exhibited thermal stability, chemical resistance and good adhesion strength, ideal as "primary" bonding adhesives. Acetylene and maleimide endcapped systems were prepared for application as "secondary" bonding materials, meaning that they are cured at a lower temperature than that of the Tg of the primary structure. Lap shear test results indicated good adhesion to titanium when cured at 250sp° C{-}280sp° C. The cured materials showed high glass transition temperatures and good thermal and thermo-oxidative stability as determined by DSC, TGA and DMA. Good chemical resistance was demonstrated via solvent extraction measurements. The influence of molecular weight between crosslinks (/line{M}sb{c}) on thermal and mechanical behavior was also investigated. Lower molecular weight oligomers exhibited lower Tg and cure temperatures, whereas the cured networks resulting from lower molecular weight oligomers afforded higher Tg and higher gel fractions, but reduced toughness.

  2. Polymer Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha; Roberson, Luke; Caraccio, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes new technologies in polymer and material chemistry that benefits NASA programs and missions. The topics include: 1) What are Polymers?; 2) History of Polymer Chemistry; 3) Composites/Materials Development at KSC; 4) Why Wiring; 5) Next Generation Wiring Materials; 6) Wire System Materials and Integration; 7) Self-Healing Wire Repair; 8) Smart Wiring Summary; 9) Fire and Polymers; 10) Aerogel Technology; 11) Aerogel Composites; 12) Aerogels for Oil Remediation; 13) KSC's Solution; 14) Chemochromic Hydrogen Sensors; 15) STS-130 and 131 Operations; 16) HyperPigment; 17) Antimicrobial Materials; 18) Conductive Inks Formulations for Multiple Applications; and 19) Testing and Processing Equipment.

  3. A study on thermal properties of biodegradable polymers using photothermal methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siqueira, A. P. L.; Poley, L. H.; Sanchez, R.; da Silva, M. G.; Vargas, H.

    2005-06-01

    In this work is reported the use of photothermal techniques applied to the thermal characterization of biodegradable polymers of Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) family. This is a family of polymer produced by bacteria using renewable resources. It exhibits thermoplastic properties and therefore it can be an alternative product for engineering plastics, being also applied as packages for food industry and fruits. Thermal diffusivities were determined using the open photoacoustic cell (OPC) configuration. Specific heat capacity measurements were performed monitoring temperature of the samples under white light illumination against time. Typical values obtained for the thermal properties are in good agreement with those found in the literature for other polymers. Due to the incorporation of hydroxyvalerate in the monomer structure, the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity increase reaching a saturation value, otherwise the specific thermal capacity decreases as the concentration of the hydroxyvalerate (HV) increases. These results can be explained by polymers internal structure and are allowing new applications of these materials.

  4. Ultrasonic Attenuation Results of Thermoplastic Resin Composites Undergoing Thermal and Fatigue Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madaras, Eric I.

    1998-01-01

    As part of an effort to obtain the required information about new composites for aviation use, materials and NDE researchers at NASA are jointly performing mechanical and NDE measurements on new composite materials. The materials testing laboratory at NASA is equipped with environmental chambers mounted on load frames that can expose composite materials to thermal and loading cycles representative of flight protocols. Applying both temperature and load simultaneously will help to highlight temperature and load interactions during the aging of these composite materials. This report highlights our initial ultrasonic attenuation results from thermoplastic composite samples that have undergone over 4000 flight cycles to date. Ultrasonic attenuation measurements are a standard method used to assess the effects of material degradation. Recently, researchers have shown that they could obtain adequate contrast in the evaluation of thermal degradation in thermoplastic composites by using frequencies of ultrasound on the order of 24 MHz. In this study, we address the relationship of attenuation measured at lower frequencies in thermoplastic composites undergoing both thermal and mechanical loading. We also compare these thermoplastic results with some data from thermoset composites undergoing similar protocols. The composite s attenuation is reported as the slope of attenuation with respect to frequency, defined as b = Da(f)/Df. The slope of attenuation is an attractive parameter since it is quantitative, yet does not require interface corrections like conventional quantitative attenuation measurements. This latter feature is a consequence of the assumption that interface correction terms are frequency independent. Uncertainty in those correction terms can compromise the value of conventional quantitative attenuation data. Furthermore, the slope of the attenuation more directly utilizes the bandwidth information and in addition, the bandwidth can be adjusted in the post processing stage to compensate for the loss of dynamic range of the signal as the composites age.

  5. Surface charge, electroosmotic flow and DNA extension in chemically modified thermoplastic nanoslits and nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Uba, Franklin I; Pullagurla, Swathi R; Sirasunthorn, Nichanun; Wu, Jiahao; Park, Sunggook; Chantiwas, Rattikan; Cho, Yoon-Kyoung; Shin, Heungjoo; Soper, Steven A

    2015-01-01

    Thermoplastics have become attractive alternatives to glass/quartz for microfluidics, but the realization of thermoplastic nanofluidic devices has been slow in spite of the rather simple fabrication techniques that can be used to produce these devices. This slow transition has in part been attributed to insufficient understanding of surface charge effects on the transport properties of single molecules through thermoplastic nanochannels. We report the surface modification of thermoplastic nanochannels and an assessment of the associated surface charge density, zeta potential and electroosmotic flow (EOF). Mixed-scale fluidic networks were fabricated in poly(methylmethacrylate), PMMA. Oxygen plasma was used to generate surface-confined carboxylic acids with devices assembled using low temperature fusion bonding. Amination of the carboxylated surfaces using ethylenediamine (EDA) was accomplished via EDC coupling. XPS and ATR-FTIR revealed the presence of carboxyl and amine groups on the appropriately prepared surfaces. A modified conductance equation for nanochannels was developed to determine their surface conductance and was found to be in good agreement with our experimental results. The measured surface charge density and zeta potential of these devices were lower than glass nanofluidic devices and dependent on the surface modification adopted, as well as the size of the channel. This property, coupled to an apparent increase in fluid viscosity due to nanoconfinement, contributed to the suppression of the EOF in PMMA nanofluidic devices by an order of magnitude compared to the micro-scale devices. Carboxylated PMMA nanochannels were efficient for the transport and elongation of ?-DNA while these same DNA molecules were unable to translocate through aminated nanochannels. PMID:25369728

  6. Development of ACP reinforced thermoplastic composites as an alternative to open mold processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    Thermoplastic/foam/glass composite technology provides a method of producing large structural parts without styrene or volatile organic compounds (VOCs). High-quality parts can be molded at a low cost by combining vacuum forming technology with a low-pressure urethane reinforcement technique. This process eliminates atomization of paint or gelcoats, styrene emissions from FRP, and associated solvents and chemicals required in the normal processing of fiberglass. Secondary operations also can be streamlined by parts consolidation in the reinforcement process.

  7. Hybrid joining technology - A new method for joining thermoplastic-metal-mixed components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, S.; Georgi, W.; Gehde, M.; Mayer, P.

    2014-05-01

    This article deals with the clinching and hot-melt adhesive bonding of thermoplastic-metal mixed joints. Specimens made of the PA6-GF15 plastic and the DC04 steel were joined not only with the single methods but also in the combination of methods. Their mechanical properties were investigated afterwards by means of peel and tensile shear tests. It is demonstrated that a suitable combination of both joining methods can achieve an increase in strength compared to the single methods.

  8. Polymers All Around You!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gertz, Susan

    Background information on natural polymers, synthetic polymers, and the properties of polymers is presented as an introduction to this curriculum guide. Details are provided on the use of polymer products in consumer goods, polymer recycling, polymer densities, the making of a polymer such as GLUEP, polyvinyl alcohol, dissolving plastics, polymers

  9. Multiple-objective optimization in precision laser cutting of different thermoplastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamrin, K. F.; Nukman, Y.; Choudhury, I. A.; Shirley, S.

    2015-04-01

    Thermoplastics are increasingly being used in biomedical, automotive and electronics industries due to their excellent physical and chemical properties. Due to the localized and non-contact process, use of lasers for cutting could result in precise cut with small heat-affected zone (HAZ). Precision laser cutting involving various materials is important in high-volume manufacturing processes to minimize operational cost, error reduction and improve product quality. This study uses grey relational analysis to determine a single optimized set of cutting parameters for three different thermoplastics. The set of the optimized processing parameters is determined based on the highest relational grade and was found at low laser power (200 W), high cutting speed (0.4 m/min) and low compressed air pressure (2.5 bar). The result matches with the objective set in the present study. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) is then carried out to ascertain the relative influence of process parameters on the cutting characteristics. It was found that the laser power has dominant effect on HAZ for all thermoplastics.

  10. Finite element analysis as a design tool for thermoplastic vulcanizate glazing seals

    SciTech Connect

    Gase, K.M.; Hudacek, L.L.; Pesevski, G.T.

    1998-12-31

    There are three materials that are commonly used in commercial glazing seals: EPDM, silicone and thermoplastic vulcanizates (TPVs). TPVs are a high performance class of thermoplastic elastomers (TPEs), where TPEs have elastomeric properties with thermoplastic processability. TPVs have emerged as materials well suited for use in glazing seals due to ease of processing, economics and part design flexibility. The part design and development process is critical to ensure that the chosen TPV provides economics, quality and function in demanding environments. In the design and development process, there is great value in utilizing dual durometer systems to capitalize on the benefits of soft and rigid materials. Computer-aided design tools, such as Finite Element Analysis (FEA), are effective in minimizing development time and predicting system performance. Examples of TPV glazing seals will illustrate the benefits of utilizing FEA to take full advantage of the material characteristics, which results in functional performance and quality while reducing development iterations. FEA will be performed on two glazing seal profiles to confirm optimum geometry.

  11. Preparation and properties of blends composed of lignosulfonated layered double hydroxide/plasticized starch and thermoplastics.

    PubMed

    Privas, Edwige; Leroux, Fabrice; Navard, Patrick

    2013-07-01

    Layered double hydroxide prepared with lignosulfonate (LDH/LS) can be easily dispersed down to the nanometric scale in thermoplastic starch, at concentration of 1 up to 4 wt% of LDH/LS. They can thus be used as a bio-based reinforcing agent of thermoplastic starch. Incorporation of LDH/LS in starch must be done using LDH/LS slurry instead of powder on order to avoid secondary particles aggregation, the water of the paste being used as the starch plasticizer. This reinforced starch was used for preparing a starch-polyolefine composite. LDH/LS-starch nanocomposites were mixed in a random terpolymer of ethylene, butyl acrylate (6%) and maleic anhydride (3%) at concentrations of 20 wt% and 40 wt%. With a 20% loading of (1 wt% LDH/LS in thermoplastic starch), the ternary copolymer is partially bio-based while keeping nearly its original processability and mechanical properties and improving oxygen barrier properties. The use of layered double hydroxides is also removing most odours linked to the lignin phase. PMID:23688458

  12. Tough, processable semi-interpenetrating polymer networks from monomer reactants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, Ruth H. (inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A high temperature semi-interpenetrating polymer network (semi-IPN) was developed which had significantly improved processability, damage tolerance, and mechanical performance, when compared to the commercial Thermid materials. This simultaneous semi-IPN was prepared by mixing the monomer precursors of Thermid AL-600 (a thermoset) and NR-150B2 (a thermoplastic) and allowing the monomers to react randomly upon heating. This reaction occurs at a rate which decreases the flow and broadens the processing window. Upon heating at a higher temperature, there is an increase in flow. Because of the improved flow properties, broadened processing window and enhanced toughness, high strength polymer matrix composites, adhesives and molded articles can now be prepared from the acetylene end-capped polyimides which were previously inherently brittle and difficult to process.

  13. Polymer powder prepregging: Scoping study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Throne, James L.

    1988-01-01

    Early on, it was found that NEAT LARC-TPI thermoplastic polyimide powder behaved elastoplastically at pressures to 20 ksi and temperatures to 260 degrees celcius (below MP). At high resin assay, resin powder could be continuously cold-flowed around individual carbon fibers in a metal rolling mill. At low resin assay (2:1, C:TPI), fiber breakage was prohibitive. Thus, although processing of TPI below MP would be quite unique, it appears that the polymer must be melted and flowed to produce low resin assay prepreg. Fiber tow was spread to 75 mm using a venturi slot tunnel. This allowed intimate powder/fiber interaction. Two techniques were examined for getting room temperature powder onto the room temperature fiber surface. Electrostatic powder coating allows the charged powder to cling tenaciously to the fiber, even while heated with a hot air gun to above its melt temperature. A variant of the wet slurry coating process was also explored. The carbon fibers are first wetted with water. Then dry powder is sprinkled onto the wet tow and doctor-rolled between the fibers. The wet structure is then taken onto a heated roll, with hot air guns drying and sinter-melting the powder onto the fiber surfaces. In both cases SEM shows individual fibers coated with powder particles that have melted in place and flowed along the fiber surface via surface tension.

  14. Polymers & People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lentz, Linda; Robinson, Thomas; Martin, Elizabeth; Miller, Mary; Ashburn, Norma

    2004-01-01

    Each Tuesday during the fall of 2002, teams of high school students from three South Carolina counties conducted a four-hour polymer institute for their peers. In less than two months, over 300 students visited the Charleston County Public Library in Charleston, South Carolina, to explore DNA, nylon, rubber, gluep, and other polymers. Teams of…

  15. Shock, release and Taylor impact of the semicrystalline thermoplastic polytetrafluoroethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, N. K.; Brown, E. N.; Millett, J. C. F.; Gray, G. T.

    2008-04-01

    The high strain-rate response of polymers is a subject that has gathered interest over recent years due to their increasing engineering importance, particularly in load bearing applications subject to extremes of pressure and strain rate. The current work presents two specific sets of experiments interrogating the effect of dynamic, high-pressure loading in the regime of the phase II to phase III pressure-induced crystalline phase transition in polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). These are gas-gun driven plate- and Taylor impact. Together these experiments highlight several effects associated with the dynamic, pressure-induced phase transitions in PTFE. An elevated release wave speed shows evidence of a pressure-induced phase change at a stress commensurate with that observed statically. It is shown that convergence between analytic derivations of release wave speed and the data requires the phase II to III transition to occur. Taylor impact is an integrated test that highlights continuum behavior that has origin in mesoscale response. There is a rapid transition from ductile to brittle behavior observed that occurs at a pressure consistent with this phase transition.

  16. High performance addition-type thermoplastics (ATTs) - Evidence for the formation of a Diels-Alder adduct in the reaction of an acetylene-terminated material and a bismaleimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, R. H.; Soucek, M. D.; Chang, A. C.; Partos, R. D.

    1991-01-01

    Recently, the concept and demonstration of a new versatile synthetic reaction for making a large number of high-performance addition-type thermoplastics (ATTs) were reported. The synthesis shows promise for providing polymers having an attractive combination of easy processability, good toughness, respectable high temperature mechanical performance, and excellent thermo-oxidative stability. The new chemistry involves the reaction of an acetylene-terminated material with a bismaleimide or benzoquinone. In order to clarify the reaction mechanism, model compound studies were undertaken in solutions as well as in the solid state. The reaction products were purified by flash chromatography and characterized by conventional analytical techniques including NMR, FT-IR, UV-visible, mass spectroscopy, and high pressure liquid chromatography. The results are presented of the model compound studies which strongly support the formation of a Diels-Alder adduct in the reaction of an acetylene-terminated compound and a bismaleimide or benzoquinone.

  17. Phenylene ring dynamics in phenoxy and the effect of intramolecular linkages on the dynamics of some engineering thermoplastics below the glass transition temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Arrese-Igor, Silvia; Arbe, Arantxa; Alegria, Angel; Frick, Bernhard

    2007-05-15

    We have investigated the dynamics of phenylene rings in the engineering thermoplastic bisphenol-A poly(hydroxyether)--phenoxy--below its glass transition temperature by means of neutron scattering techniques. A relatively wide dynamic range has been covered thanks to the combination of two different types of neutron spectrometers, time of flight and backscattering. Partially deuterated samples have been used in order to isolate the phenylene ring dynamics. The resulting neutron scattering signal of phenoxy has been described by a model that considers {pi} flips and oscillation motions for phenylene rings. The associated time scales are broadly distributed with mean activation energies equal to 0.41 and 0.21 eV, respectively. Finally, a comparative study with the literature shows that the dielectric and mechanical {gamma} relaxation in phenoxy exhibit good correlation with the characteristic times of the aliphatic chain published elsewhere and with the characteristic times observed for the motion of phenylene rings by neutron scattering. These findings are discussed in a more general framework that considers, in addition, previous results on other polymers, which also contain the bisphenol-A unit.

  18. Semiconducting polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, A. M.

    A review is presented of the electrical properties of those polymers whose conductivities occupy the middle ground between polymeric insulators and polymeric superconductors. Attention is confined to polymers in which conduction occurs through electronic, rather than ionic, transport. Four classes of semiconductors are discussed: (1) highly-conjugated polymers, including those formed by pyrolysis; (2) polymeric charge-transfer complexes and radical-ion salts; (3) organometallic polymeric semiconductors; and (4) composite polymer systems containing carbon or other highly conducting media. The possible applications discussed include cathodes in solid-state metal/halogen primary batteries, cathodes in lithium/poly-p-phenylene or polyacetylene secondary batteries, conductive coatings and epoxies, and chemical sensing agents. Other applications are Peltier cooling devices, pressure transducers, photovoltaic devices, infrared radiation detectors, and switches and resistors.

  19. Organometallic Polymers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carraher, Charles E., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Reactions utilized to incorporate a metal-containing moiety into a polymer chain (addition, condensation, and coordination) are considered, emphasizing that these reactions also apply to smaller molecules. (JN)

  20. Branched Polymers

    E-print Network

    Richard Kenyon; Peter Winkler

    2007-09-14

    Building on and from the work of Brydges and Imbrie, we give an elementary calculation of the volume of the space of branched polymers of order $n$ in the plane and in 3-space. Our development reveals some more general identities, and allows exact random sampling. In particular we show that a random 3-dimensional branched polymer of order $n$ has diameter of order $\\sqrt{n}$.

  1. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research. Section B; Microstructural Characterization of Semi-Interpenetrating Polymer Networks by Positron Lifetime Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Pater, Ruth H.; Eftekhari, Abe

    1998-01-01

    Thermoset and thermoplastic polyimides have complementary physical/mechanical properties. Whereas thermoset polyimides are brittle and generally easier to process, thermoplastic polyimides are tough but harder to process. It is expected that a combination of these two types of polyimides may help produce polymers more suitable for aerospace applications. Semi-Interpenetrating Polymer Networks (S-IPNs) of thermoset LaRC(Trademark)-RP46 and thermoplastic LARC(Trademark)-IA polyimides were prepared in weight percent ratios ranging from 100:0 to 0: 100. Positron lifetime measurements were made in these samples to correlate their free volume features with physical/mechanical properties. As expected, positronium atoms are not formed in these samples. The second life time component has been used to infer the positron trap dimensions. The "free volume" goes through a minimum at about 50:50 ratio, suggesting that S-IPN samples are not merely solid solutions of the two polymers. These data and related structural properties of the S-IPN samples have been discussed in this paper.

  2. CO2-laser-assisted processing of glass fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, Christian; Emonts, Michael; Schares, Richard Ludwig; Stimpfl, Joffrey

    2013-02-01

    To fully exploit the potential of fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites (FRTC) and to achieve a broad industrial application, automated manufacturing systems are crucial. Investigations at Fraunhofer IPT have proven that the use of laser system technology in processing FRTC allows to achieve high throughput, quality, flexibility, reproducibility and out-of-autoclave processing simultaneously. As 90% of the FRP in Europe1 are glass fiber-reinforced a high impact can be achieved by introducing laser-assisted processing with all its benefits to glass fiber-reinforced thermoplastics (GFRTC). Fraunhofer IPT has developed the diode laser-assisted tape placement (laying and winding) to process carbon fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites (CFRTC) for years. However, this technology cannot be transferred unchanged to process milky transparent GFRTC prepregs (preimpregnated fibers). Due to the short wavelength (approx. 980 nm) and therefore high transmission less than 20% of the diode laser energy is absorbed as heat into non-colored GFRTC prepregs. Hence, the use of a different wave length, e.g. CO2-laser (10.6 ?m) with more than 90% laser absorption, is required to allow the full potential of laser-assisted processing of GFRTC. Also the absorption of CO2-laser radiation at the surface compared to volume absorption of diode laser radiation is beneficial for the interlaminar joining of GFRTC. Fraunhofer IPT is currently developing and investigating the CO2-laser-assisted tape placement including new system, beam guiding, process and monitoring technology to enable a resource and energy efficient mass production of GFRP composites, e.g. pipes, tanks, masts. The successful processing of non-colored glass fiber-reinforced Polypropylene (PP) and Polyphenylene Sulfide (PPS) has already been proven.

  3. Production and characterization of thermoplastic cassava starch, functionalized poly(lactic acid), and their reactive compatibilized blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detyothin, Sukeewan

    Cassava starch was blended with glycerol using a co-rotating twin-screw extruder (TSE). Thermoplastic cassava starch (TPCS) at a ratio of 70/30 by weight of cassava/glycerol was selected and further blended with other polymers. TPCS sheets made from compression molding had low tensile strength (0.45 +/- 0.05 MPa) and Young's modulus (1.24 +/- 0.58 MPa), but moderate elongation at break (83.0 +/- 0.18.6%), medium level of oxygen permeability, and high water vapor permeability with a very high rate of water absorption. TPCS was blended with poly(lactic acid) (PLA) at various ratios by using a TSE. The blend resins exhibited good properties such as increased thermal stability (Tmax) and crystallinity of PLA, and improved water sensitivity and processability of TPCS. PLA and TPCS exhibited a high interfacial tension between the two phases of 7.9 mJ·m -2, indicating the formation of an incompatible, immiscible blend. SEM micrographs showed a non-homogeneous distribution of TPCS droplets in the PLA continuous phase. TEM micrographs of the blend films made by cast-film extrusion showed coalescence of the TPCS droplets in the PLA continuous phase of the blend, indicating that the compatibility between the polymer pair needs to be improved. A response surface methodology (RSM) design was used to analyze the effects of maleic anhydride (MA) and 2,5-bis(tert-butylperoxy)-2,5-dimethylhexane (Luperox or L101) contents, and TSE screw speed on the degree of grafted MA and number average molecular weight (Mn) of functionalized PLA (PLA-g-MA), a reactive compatibilizer. PLA-g- MA made by reactive extrusion had an array of colors depending on the content of L101 and MA used. New FTIR peaks suggested that MA was grafted onto the PLA backbone and oligomeric MA may occur. Increasing L101 increased the degree of grafting and decreased Mn, but the Mn of the PLA-g-MA's produced with a high amount of L101 was stable during storage. MA exhibited an optimum concentration for maximizing the degree of grafted MA, and increasing MA content retarded the reduction of Mn during processing. However, the Mn of PLA-g-MA during storage decreased more rapidly with a high content of MA. TSE screw speed had an impact on the Mn with the maximum value predicted at 20 rpm. PLA-g-MA compounds differing in Mn and/or grafted MA content were used as reactive polymers with TPCS (to produce binary blends) and as reactive compatibilizers (to produce ternary blends of PLA/TPCS/PLA-g-MA) with TPCS content of 30 wt% using a TSE. As a result of maleation, PLA-g-MA had a higher grafted MA content with a lower Mn, and higher PI. The interaction of anhydride groups from PLA-g-MA and hydroxyl groups from TPCS was found by FTIR. The reactive binary blends exhibited a change in thermal stability, decrease of Tcc, the presence of double melting peaks, and an increase of the Tgs of glycerol and starch. The higher the grafted MA content and/or the higher Mn of the PLA- g-MA used, the better were the distribution and smaller the TPCS domains obtained in the blends. The highest elongation at break was achieved when 30 wt% TPCS was blended with 70 wt% of PLA having 0.1 wt% of grafted MA and Mn of PLA-g-MA with a 45 kDa. Finally, the optimum PLA-g-MA was determined by using the results from PLA-g-MA RSM design and the reactive blending.

  4. Monitoring processing properties of high performance thermoplastics using frequency dependent electromagnetic sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kranbuehl, D. E.; Delos, S. E.; Hoff, M. S.; Weller, L. W.; Haverty, P. D.

    1987-01-01

    An in situ NDE dielectric impedance measurement method has been developed for ascertaining the cure processing properties of high temperature advanced thermoplastic and thermosetting resins, using continuous frequency-dependent measurements and analyses of complex permittivity over 9 orders of magnitude and 6 decades of frequency at temperatures up to 400 C. Both ionic and Debye-like dipolar relaxation processes are monitored. Attention is given to LARC-TPI, PEEK, and poly(arylene ether) resins' viscosity, glass transition temperature, recrystallization, and residual solvent content and evolution properties.

  5. X-ray diffraction studies of model compounds of thermoplastic polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakelyn, N. T.; Pratt, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    Several model compounds which represent aspects of the chemical structure of the Langley Research Center thermoplastic (LARC-TPI) have been synthesized for comparison studies using wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) as the discriminatory tool. The model compounds included N-phenylphthalimide, 3,3',4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic diphthalimide, and N,N'-diphenyl-3,3',4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic diphthalimide. X-ray diffraction studies of appropriate model compounds can yield information to aid in the understanding of polymeric crystallographic structure. Crystallinity and physical property changes can thus be induced into materials having complicated structures by chemical and thermal processes.

  6. Evaluating distributed fibre optic sensors integrated into thermoplastic composites for structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilder, Constanze; Schukar, Marcus; Steffen, Milan; Krebber, Katerina

    2014-05-01

    Strain sensors used for structural health monitoring (SHM) must provide reliable measurement data during their entire service lifetime. To achieve this for fibre optic sensors integrated into composites, the integration of the sensor has to be adapted according to the process conditions. This paper describes the fabrication of thermoplastic composite samples with integrated distributed fibre optic sensors (DFOS) based on copper-nickel and polyimide coated silica optical fibres. The performance of these DFOS as SHM sensors is evaluated in terms of reliability by measurements derived from comparative measurements with resistance strain gauges and from fatigue tests with 10 million load cycles.

  7. Nonlinear analysis of AS4/PEEK thermoplastic composite laminate using a one parameter plasticity model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, C. T.; Yoon, K. J.

    1990-01-01

    A one-parameter plasticity model was shown to adequately describe the orthotropic plastic deformation of AS4/PEEK (APC-2) unidirectional thermoplastic composite. This model was verified further for unidirectional and laminated composite panels with and without a hole. The nonlinear stress-strain relations were measured and compared with those predicted by the finite element analysis using the one-parameter elastic-plastic constitutive model. The results show that the one-parameter orthotropic plasticity model is suitable for the analysis of elastic-plastic deformation of AS4/PEEK composite laminates.

  8. Temperature rise due to mechanical energy dissipation in undirectional thermoplastic composites(AS4/PEEK)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgious, I. T.; Sun, C. T.

    1992-01-01

    The history of temperature rise due to internal dissipation of mechanical energy in insulated off-axis uniaxial specimens of the unidirectional thermoplastic composite (AS4/PEEK) has been measured. The experiment reveals that the rate of temperature rise is a polynomial function of stress amplitude: It consists of a quadratic term and a sixth power term. This fact implies that the specific heat of the composite depends on the stretching its microstructure undergoes during deformation. The Einstein theory for specific heat is used to explain the dependence of the specific heat on the stretching of the microstructure.

  9. Characterization of elastic-plastic behavior of AS4/PEEK thermoplastic composite for temperature variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, C. T.; Yoon, K. J.

    1991-01-01

    Inelastic and strength properties of AS4/PEEK composites were characterized with respect to temperature variation by using a one-parameter orthotropic plasticity model and a one-parameter failure criterion. Simple uniaxial off-axis tension tests were performed on coupon specimens of unidirectional AS4/PEEK thermoplastic composite at various temperatures. To avoid the complication caused by the extension-shear coupling effect in off-axis testing, new tabs were designed and used on the test specimens. Experimental results showed that the nonlinear behavior of constitutive relations and the strength can be characterized quite well using the one-parameter plasticity model and the failure criterion, respectively.

  10. Dissipation of mechanical work and temperature rise in AS4/PEEK thermoplastic composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiou, I.; Sun, C. T.

    1990-01-01

    The dissipated mechanical work per cycle of sinusoidal stress in the thermoplastic composite material AS4/PEEK was measured as a function of stress amplitude for fixed frequency and fiber orientation. The experimental result shows that the dissipated work per cycle is proportional to the square of the stress amplitude. Using the concept of the equivalent isotropic material, it is shown that the relaxation modulus satisfies a proportionality condition. Also, the rate of temperature rise due to sinusoidal stresses has been measured as a function of stress amplitude. The result shows that the rate of temperature rise is not proportional to the square of the stress amplitude.

  11. Characterization of elastic-plastic properties of AS4/APC-2 thermoplastic composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, C. T.; Yoon, K. J.

    1988-01-01

    Elastic and inelastic properties of AS4/APC-2 composites were characterized with respect to temperature variation by using a one-parameter orthotropic plasticity model and a one parameter failure criterion. Simple uniaxial off-axis tension tests were performed on coupon specimens of unidirectional AS4/APC-2 thermoplastic composite at various temperatures. To avoid the complication caused by the extension-shear coupling effect in off-axis testing, new tabs were designed and used on the test specimens. The experimental results showed that the nonlinear behavior of constitutive relations and the failure strengths can be characterized quite well using the one parameter plasticity model and the failure criterion, respectively.

  12. LaRC-I-TPI - A status report on a new high performance, thermoplastic polyimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. Richard; Saint Clair, Terry L.

    1990-01-01

    A new thermoplastic polyimide designated LaRC-I-TPI has been prepared from 4,4'-isophthaloyldiphthalic anhydride (IDPA) and 1,3-phenylenediamine (m-PDA), phthalic anhydride endcapped or unendcapped. It is closely related to the well-known commercial LaRC-TPI. A survey of the synthesis and some thermal, film, adhesive, fracture toughness, and composite properties of this new polyimide is presented. While both materials have similar properties at comparable stages of development, LaRC-I-TPI should be less expensive to manufacture as a result of the use of lower cost readily available monomers.

  13. Melt dispersion and electrospinning of non-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes in thermoplastic polyurethane.

    PubMed

    Hunley, Matthew T; Pötschke, Petra; Long, Timothy E

    2009-12-16

    Nanoscale fibers with embedded, aligned, and percolated non-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were fabricated through electrospinning dispersions based on melt-compounded thermoplastic polyurethane/MWCNT nanocomposite, with up to 10?wt.-% MWCNTs. Transmission electron microscopy indicated that the nanotubes were highly oriented and percolated throughout the fibers, even at high MWCNT concentrations. The coupling of efficient melt compounding with electrospinning eliminated the need for intensive surface functionalization or sonication of the MWCNTs, and the high aspect ratio as well as the electrical and mechanical properties of the nanotubes were retained. This method provides a more efficient technique to generate one-dimensional nanofibers with aligned MWCNTs. PMID:21638501

  14. Novel layer-by-layer procedure for making nylon-6 nanofiber reinforced high strength, tough, and transparent thermoplastic polyurethane composites.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shaohua; Duan, Gaigai; Hou, Haoqing; Greiner, Andreas; Agarwal, Seema

    2012-08-01

    We highlight a novel composite fabrication method based on solution casting, electrospinning, and film stacking for preparing highly transparent nylon-6 nanofiber reinforced thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) composite films. The procedure is simple and can be extended to the other thermoplastics. The morphology of fiber/matrix interface and the properties of composite films were also investigated. The method led to a significant reinforcement in mechanical properties of TPU like tensile strength, E modulus, strain, and toughness just using very small amounts of nylon fibers (about 0.4-1.7 wt %; 150-300 nm diameter). The enhanced mechanical properties were achieved without sacrificing optical properties like transparency of TPU. PMID:22817392

  15. Effect of Polymer Form and its Consolidation on Mechanical Properties and Quality of Glass/PBT Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durai Prabhakaran, R. T.; Pillai, Saju; Charca, Samuel; Oshkovr, Simin Ataollahi; Knudsen, Hans; Andersen, Tom Løgstrup; Bech, Jakob Ilsted; Thomsen, Ole Thybo; Lilholt, Hans

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the role of the processing in determining the mechanical properties of glass fibre reinforced polybutylene terephthalate composites (Glass/PBT). Unidirectional (UD) composite laminates were manufactured by the vacuum consolidation technique using three different material systems included in this study; Glass/CBT (CBT160 powder based resin), Glass/PBT (prepreg tapes), and Glass/PBT (commingled yarns). The different types of thermoplastic polymer resin systems used for the manufacturing of the composite UD laminate dictate the differences in final mechanical properties which were evaluated by through compression, flexural and short beam transverse bending tests. Microscopy was used to evaluate the quality of the processed laminates, and fractography was used to characterize the observed failure modes. The study provides an improved understanding of the relationships between processing methods, resin characteristics, and mechanical performance of thermoplastic resin composite materials.

  16. Composites of multi-walled carbon nanotubes with polypropylene and thermoplastic olefin blends prepared by melt compounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, Kyle G.

    Composites of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with polypropylene (PP) and thermoplastic olefins (TPOs) were prepared by melt compounding. Two non-covalent functionalization methods were employed to improve nanotube dispersion and the resulting composite properties are reported. The first functionalization approach involved partial coating of the surface of the nanotubes with a hyperbranched polyethylene (HBPE). MWCNT functionalization with HBPE was only moderately successful in breaking up the large aggregates that formed upon melt mixing with PP. In spite of the formation of large aggregates, the samples were conductive above a percolation threshold of 7.3 wt%. MWCNT functionalization did not disrupt the electrical conductivity of the nanotubes. The composite strength was improved with addition of nanotubes, but ductility was severely compromised because of the existence of aggregates. The second method involved PP matrix functionalization with aromatic moieties capable of pi-pi interaction with MWCNT sidewalls. Various microscopy techniques revealed the addition of only 25 wt% of PP-g-pyridine (Py) to the neat PP was capable of drastically reducing nanotube aggregate size and amount. Raman spectroscopy confirmed improved polymer/nanotube interaction with the PP-g-Py matrix. Electrical percolation threshold was obtained at a MWCNT loading of approximately 1.2 wt%. Electrical conductivity on the order of 10 -2 S/m was achieved, suggesting possible use in semi-conducting applications. Composite strength was improved upon addition of MWCNTs. The matrix functionalization with Py resulted in a significant improvement in composite ductility when filled with MWCNTs in comparison to its maleic anhydride (MA) counterpart. Preliminary investigations suggest that the use of alternating current (AC) electric fields may be effective in aligning nanotubes in PP to reduce the filler loading required for electrical percolation. Composites containing MWCNT within PP/ethylene-octene copolymer (EOC) blends were prepared. Microscopy revealed that MWCNTs localized preferentially in the EOC phase. This was explained by the tendency of the system to minimize interfacial energy when the MWCNTs reside in the thermodynamically preferential phase. A kinetic approach, which involved pre-mixing the MWCNTs with PP and adding the EOC phase subsequently was attempted to monitor the migration of MWCNTs. MWCNTs began to migrate after two minutes of melt mixing with the EOC. The PP-g-Py matrix functionalization appears to slightly delay the migration. A reduction in electrical percolation threshold to 0.5 wt% MWCNTs was achieved with a co-continuous blend morphology, consisting of a 50/50 by weight ratio of PP and EOC.

  17. USE OF RECYCLED POLYMERS FOR ENCAPSULATION OF RADIOACTIVE, HAZARDOUS AND MIXED WASTES

    SciTech Connect

    LAGERRAAEN,P.R.; KALB,P.D.

    1997-11-01

    Polyethylene encapsulation is a waste treatment technology developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory using thermoplastic polymers to safely and effectively solidify hazardous, radioactive and mixed wastes for disposal. Over 13 years of development and demonstration with surrogate wastes as well as actual waste streams on both bench and full scale have shown this to be a viable and robust technology with wide application. Process development efforts have previously focused on the use of virgin polymer feedstocks. In order to potentially improve process economics and serve to lessen the municipal waste burden, recycled polymers were investigated for use as encapsulating agents. Recycled plastics included low-density polyethylene, linear low-density polyethylene, high-density polyethylene and polypropylene, and were used as a direct substitute for or blended together with virgin resin. Impacts on processing and final waste form performance were examined.

  18. Solid particle erosion of polymers and composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, K.; Almajid, A. A.

    2014-05-01

    After a general introduction to the subject of solid particle erosion of polymers and composites, the presentation focusses more specifically on the behavior of unidirectional carbon fiber (CF) reinforced polyetheretherketone (PEEK) composites under such loadings, using different impact conditions and erodents. The data were analyzed on the basis of a newly defined specific erosive wear rate, allowing a better comparison of erosion data achieved under various testing conditions. Characteristic wear mechanisms of the CF/PEEK composites consisted of fiber fracture, matrix cutting and plastic matrix deformation, the relative contribution of which depended on the impingement angles and the CF orientation. The highest wear rates were measured for impingement angles between 45 and 60°. Using abrasion resistant neat polymer films (in this case PEEK or thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) ones) on the surface of a harder substrate (e.g. a CF/PEEK composite plate) resulted in much lower specific erosive wear rates. The use of such polymeric films can be considered as a possible method to protect composite surfaces from damage caused by minor impacts and erosion. In fact, they are nowadays already successfully applied as protections for wind energy rotor blades.

  19. The effect of free radical inhibitor on the sensitized radiation crosslinking and thermal processing stabilization of polyurethane shape memory polymers

    PubMed Central

    Hearon, Keith; Smith, Sarah E.; Maher, Cameron A.; Wilson, Thomas S.; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of free radical inhibitor on the electron beam crosslinking and thermal processing stabilization of novel radiation crosslinkable polyurethane shape memory polymers (SMPs) blended with acrylic radiation sensitizers have been determined. The SMPs in this study possess novel processing capabilities—that is, the ability to be melt processed into complex geometries as thermoplastics and crosslinked in a secondary step using electron beam irradiation. To increase susceptibility to radiation crosslinking, the radiation sensitizer pentaerythritol triacrylate (PETA) was solution blended with thermoplastic polyurethane SMPs made from 2-butene-1,4-diol and trimethylhexamethylene diisocyanate (TMHDI). Because thermoplastic melt processing methods such as injection molding are often carried out at elevated temperatures, sensitizer thermal instability is a major processing concern. Free radical inhibitor can be added to provide thermal stabilization; however, inhibitor can also undesirably inhibit radiation crosslinking. In this study, we quantified both the thermal stabilization and radiation crosslinking inhibition effects of the inhibitor 1,4-benzoquinone (BQ) on polyurethane SMPs blended with PETA. Sol/gel analysis of irradiated samples showed that the inhibitor had little to no inverse effects on gel fraction at concentrations of 0-10,000 ppm, and dynamic mechanical analysis showed only a slight negative correlation between BQ composition and rubbery modulus. The 1,4-benzoquinone was also highly effective in thermally stabilizing the acrylic sensitizers. The polymer blends could be heated to 150°C for up to five hours or to 125°C for up to 24 hours if stabilized with 10,000 ppm BQ and could also be heated to 125°C for up to 5 hours if stabilized with 1000 ppm BQ without sensitizer reaction occurring. We believe this study provides significant insight into methods for manipulation of the competing mechanisms of radiation crosslinking and thermal stabilization of radiation sensitizers, thereby facilitating further development of radiation crosslinkable thermoplastic SMPs. PMID:23226930

  20. The Cost of Automotive Polymer Composites: A Review and Assessment of DOE's Lightweight Materials Composites Research

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S.

    2001-01-26

    Polymer composite materials have been a part of the automotive industry for several decades, with early application in the 1953 Corvette. These materials have been used for applications with low production volumes, because of their shortened lead times and lower investment costs relative to conventional steel fabrication. Important drivers of the growth of polymer composites have been the reduced weight and parts consolidation opportunities the material offers, as well as design flexibility, corrosion resistance, material anisotropy, and mechanical properties. Although these benefits are well recognized by the industry, polymer composite use has been dampened by high material costs, slow production rates, and to a lesser extent, concerns about recyclability. Also impeding large scale automotive applications is a curious mixture of concerns about material issues such as crash energy absorption, recycling challenges, competitive and cost pressures, the industry's general lack of experience and comfort with the material, and industry concerns about its own capabilities (Flynn and Belzowski 1995). Polymer composite materials are generally made of two or more material components--fibers, either glass or carbon, reinforced in the matrix of thermoset or thermoplastic polymer materials. The glass-reinforced thermoset composites are the most commonly used composite in automotive applications today, but thermoplastic composites and carbon fiber-reinforced thermosets also hold potential. It has been estimated that significant use of glass-reinforced polymers as structural components could yield a 20-35% reduction in vehicle weight. More importantly, the use of carbon fiber-reinforced materials could yield a 40-65% reduction in weight.

  1. Polymer inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Syed Moeez; Husain, Viqar; Seahra, Sanjeev S.

    2015-03-01

    We consider the semiclassical dynamics of a free massive scalar field in a homogeneous and isotropic cosmological spacetime. The scalar field is quantized using the polymer quantization method assuming that it is described by a Gaussian coherent state. For quadratic potentials, the semiclassical equations of motion yield a universe that has an early "polymer inflation" phase which is generic and almost exactly de Sitter, followed by an epoch of slow-roll inflation. We compute polymer corrections to the slow-roll formalism, and discuss the probability of inflation in this model using a physical Hamiltonian arising from time gauge fixing. We also show how in this model, it is possible to obtain a significant amount of slow-roll inflation from sub-Planckian initial data, hence circumventing some of the criticisms of standard scenarios. These results show the extent to which a quantum gravity motivated quantization method affects early universe dynamics.

  2. Polymer inflation

    E-print Network

    Syed Moeez Hassan; Viqar Husain; Sanjeev S. Seahra

    2015-03-05

    We consider the semi-classical dynamics of a free massive scalar field in a homogeneous and isotropic cosmological spacetime. The scalar field is quantized using the polymer quantization method assuming that it is described by a gaussian coherent state. For quadratic potentials, the semi-classical equations of motion yield a universe that has an early "polymer inflation" phase which is generic and almost exactly de Sitter, followed by a epoch of slow-roll inflation. We compute polymer corrections to the slow roll formalism, and discuss the probability of inflation in this model using a physical Hamiltonian arising from time gauge fixing. We also show how in this model, it is possible to obtain a significant amount of slow-roll inflation from sub-Planckain initial data, hence circumventing some of the criticisms of standard scenarios. These results show the extent to which a quantum gravity motivated quantization method affects early universe dynamics.

  3. Antimocrobial Polymer

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, William F. (Utica, OH); Huang, Zhi-Heng (Walnut Creek, CA); Wright, Stacy C. (Columbus, GA)

    2005-09-06

    A polymeric composition having antimicrobial properties and a process for rendering the surface of a substrate antimicrobial are disclosed. The composition comprises a crosslinked chemical combination of (i) a polymer having amino group-containing side chains along a backbone forming the polymer, (ii) an antimicrobial agent selected from quaternary ammonium compounds, gentian violet compounds, substituted or unsubstituted phenols, biguanide compounds, iodine compounds, and mixtures thereof, and (iii) a crosslinking agent containing functional groups capable of reacting with the amino groups. In one embodiment, the polymer is a polyamide formed from a maleic anhydride or maleic acid ester monomer and alkylamines thereby producing a polyamide having amino substituted alkyl chains on one side of the polyamide backbone; the crosslinking agent is a phosphine having the general formula (A)3P wherein A is hydroxyalkyl; and the antimicrobial agent is chlorhexidine, dimethylchlorophenol, cetyl pyridinium chloride, gentian violet, triclosan, thymol, iodine, and mixtures thereof.

  4. Antimicrobial Polymer

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, William F. (Utica, OH); Wright, Stacy C. (Flint, MI); Taylor, Andrew C. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2004-09-28

    A polymeric composition having antimicrobial properties and a process for rendering the surface of a substrate antimicrobial are disclosed. The polymeric composition comprises a crosslinked chemical combination of (i) a polymer having amino group-containing side chains along a backbone forming the polymer, (ii) an antimicrobial agent selected from metals, metal alloys, metal salts, metal complexes and mixtures thereof, and (iii) a crosslinking agent containing functional groups capable of reacting with the amino groups. In one example embodiment, the polymer is a polyamide formed from a maleic anhydride or maleic acid ester monomer and alkylamines thereby producing a polyamide having amino substituted alkyl chains on one side of the polyamide backbone; the crosslinking agent is a phosphine having the general formula (A).sub.3 P wherein A is hydroxyalkyl; and the metallic antimicrobial agent is selected from chelated silver ions, silver metal, chelated copper ions, copper metal, chelated zinc ions, zinc metal and mixtures thereof.

  5. Influence of different crosslinking systems on the mechanical and morphological properties of thermoplastic vulcanizates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patermann, Simone; Altstädt, Volker

    2015-05-01

    Thermoplastic vulcanizates (TPVs) combine the elastic properties of thermoset cross-linked rubbers with the melt processability of thermoplastics. The most representative examples of this class are the TPVs based on polypropylene (PP) and ethylene-propylene-diene terpolymer rubber (EPDM). The PP/EPDM blends were produced by dynamic vulcanization in a continuous extrusion process. The influence of different crosslinking systems was studied with regard to cross-link density, compression set, tensile strength/elongation at break and morphology. With increasing peroxide concentration, the cross-link density increases, leading to a reduction of the compression set by 50 %. The same improvement is only reachable with twice the concentration of phenolic resin. Only the peroxide cross-linked blends show smaller dispersed EPDM particles with increasing peroxide concentration. With a peroxide concentration between 0.2 and 0.5 wt. %, a maximum in tensile strength and elongation at break was found. For the phenolic resin cross-linked blends, the tensile strength stays almost constant with increasing phenolic resin concentration and the elongation at break shows best results at 0.5 wt. % phenolic resin. Compared to batch processes, the results show different values, but comparable trends.

  6. Enhancement of thermoplastic starch final properties by blending with poly(?-caprolactone).

    PubMed

    Ninago, Mario D; López, Olivia V; Lencina, M M Soledad; García, María A; Andreucetti, Noemí A; Ciolino, Andrés E; Villar, Marcelo A

    2015-12-10

    Final properties of two thermoplastic corn starch matrices were improved by adding poly(?-caprolactone), PCL, at 2.5, 5, and 10% w/w. One of the thermoplastic starch matrices was processed using water and glycerol as plasticizers (SG) and the other one was plasticized with a mixture of glycerol and sodium alginate (SGA). Blends were suitably processed by melt mixing and further injected. Films obtained by thermo-compression were flexible and easy to handle. Microstructure studies (SEM and FTIR) revealed a nice distribution of PCL within both matrices and also a good starch-PCL compatibility, attributed to the lower polyester concentration. The crystalline character of PCL was the responsible of the increment in the degree of crystallinity of starch matrices, determined by XRD. Moreover, it was demonstrated by TGA that PCL incorporation did not affect the thermal stability of these starch-based materials. In addition, a shift of Tg values of both glycerol and starch-rich phases to lower values was determined by DSC and DMA tests, attributed to the PCL plasticizing action. Besides, PCL blocking effect to visible and UV radiations was evident by the incremented opacity and the UV-barrier capacity of the starch films. Finally, water vapor permeability and water solubility values were reduced by PCL incorporation. PMID:26428117

  7. An Elastic-Plastic Damage Model for Long-Fiber Thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Kunc, Vlastimil

    2009-08-11

    This article proposes an elastic-plastic damage model that combines micromechanical modeling with continuum damage mechanics to predict the stress-strain response of injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics. The model accounts for distributions of orientation and length of elastic fibers embedded in a thermoplastic matrix whose behavior is elastic-plastic and damageable. The elastic-plastic damage behavior of the matrix is described by the modified Ramberg-Osgood relation and the three-dimensional damage model in deformation assuming isotropic hardening. Fiber/matrix debonding is accounted for using a parameter that governs the fiber/matrix interface compliance. A linear relationship between this parameter and the matrix damage variable is assumed. First, the elastic-plastic damage behavior of the reference aligned-fiber composite containing the same fiber volume fraction and length distribution as the actual composite is computed using an incremental Eshelby-Mori-Tanaka mean field approach. The incremental response of the latter is then obtained from the solution for the aligned-fiber composite by averaging over all fiber orientations. The model is validated against the experimental stress-strain results obtained for long-glass-fiber/polypropylene specimens.

  8. Glue-free assembly of glass fiber reinforced thermoplastics using laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binetruy, C.; Clement, S.; Deleglise, M.; Franz, C.; Knapp, W.; Oumarou, M.; Renard, J.; Roesner, A.

    2011-05-01

    The use of laser light for bonding of continuous fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites (CFTPC) offers new possibilities to overcome the constraints of conventional joining technologies. Laser bonding is environmentally friendly as no chemical additive or glue is necessary. Accuracy and flexibility of the laser process as well as the quality of the weld seams provide benefits which are already used in many industrial applications. Laser transmission welding has already been introduced in manufacturing of short fiber thermoplastic composites. The laser replaces hot air in tapelaying systems for pre-preg carbon fiber placement. The paper provides an overview concerning the technical basics of the joining process and outline some material inherent characteristics to be considered when using continuous glass fiber reinforced composites The technical feasibility and the mechanical characterization of laser bonded CFTPC are demonstrated. The influence of the different layer configurations on the laser interaction with the material is investigated and the dependency on the mechanical strength of the weld seem is analyzed. The results show that the laser provides an alternative joining technique and offers new perspectives to assemble structural components emerging in automotive or aeronautical manufacturing. It overcomes the environmental and technical difficulties related to existing gluing processes.

  9. Preparation and characterization of thermoplastic starches and their blends with poly(lactic acid).

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong; Tang, Zhaobin; Xiong, Zhu; Zhu, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Two different thermoplastic starches (TPS), namely maleic anhydride grafted starch (MA-g-starch) and epoxidized cardanol grafted starch (Epicard-g-starch), were successfully prepared by chemical modification without the addition of any plasticizer. The structure and properties were characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), hot press testing, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and contact angle meter, respectively. Results from XRD showed that the highly crystalline structure of native starch was destroyed after modification. Continuous phase was obtained from both of the chemically modified starches after hot pressing at 130°C, indicating that they have good thermoplasticity. Subsequently, they were melt-blended with PLA. It was found that the Epicard-g-starch had a much finer dispersed phase size than MA-g-starch in PLA matrix due to its better hydrophobicity. As a result, the mechanical properties of PLA/Epicard-g-starch blend were superior to those of PLA/MA-g-starch blend. PMID:25840151

  10. Bio-thermoplastics from grafted chicken feathers for potential biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Narendra; Jiang, Qiuran; Jin, Enqi; Shi, Zhen; Hou, Xiuliang; Yang, Yiqi

    2013-10-01

    This research demonstrated the feasibility of using bio-thermoplastics developed from chicken feathers grafted with acrylates and methacrylates as scaffolds for tissue engineering. Keratin, the major protein in feathers, is a highly crosslinked biopolymer that has been reported to be biocompatible. However, it is difficult to break the disulfide bonds and make keratin soluble to develop materials for tissue engineering and other medical applications. Previously, keratin extracted from feathers using alkaline hydrolysis has been made into scaffolds but with poor water stability and mechanical properties. In this study, thermoplastic films were compression molded from chicken feathers grafted with 6 different acrylate monomers. The influence of the concentration and structures of grafted monomers on grafting parameters and the tensile strength, water stability and cytocompatibility of grafted feathers compression molded into films were investigated. It was found that the grafted feather films were water stable and had good strength and better supported cell growth than poly(lactic acid) films. Grafted feathers demonstrated the potential to be used for fabrication of biomaterials for various biomedical applications. PMID:23707850

  11. An Elastic-Plastic and Strength Prediction Model for Injection-Molded Long-Fiber Thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Kunc, Vlastimil; Phelps, Jay; Tucker III, Charles L.; Bapanapalli, Satish K.

    2008-09-01

    This paper applies a recently developed model to predict the elastic-plastic stress/strain response and strength of injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics (LFTs). The model combines a micro-macro constitutive modeling approach with experimental characterization and modeling of the composite microstructure to determine the composite stress/strain response and strength. Specifically, it accounts for elastic fibers embedded in a thermoplastic resin that exhibits the elastic-plastic behavior obeying the Ramberg-Osgood relation and J-2 deformation theory of plasticity. It also accounts for fiber length, orientation and volume fraction distributions in the composite formed by the injection-molding process. Injection-molded-long-glass-fiber/polypropylene (PP) specimens were prepared for mechanical characterization and testing. Fiber length, orientation, and volume fraction distributions were then measured at some selected locations for use in the computation. Fiber orientations in these specimens were also predicted using an anisotropic rotary diffusion model developed for LFTs. The stress-strain response of the as-formed composite was computed by an incremental procedure that uses the Eshelby’s equivalent inclusion method, the Mori-Tanaka assumption and a fiber orientation averaging technique. The model has been validated against the experimental stress-strain results obtained for these long-glass-fiber/PP specimens.

  12. Field Evaluation of the Potential for Creep in Thermoplastic Encapsulant Materials: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kempe, M. D.; Miller, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J.; Kurtz, S. R.; Moseley, J. M.; Shah, Q.; Tamizhmani, G.; Sakurai, K.; Inoue, M.; Doi, T.; Masuda, A.; Samuels, S. L.; Vanderpan, C. E.

    2012-06-01

    There has been recent interest in the use of thermoplastic encapsulant materials in photovoltaic modules to replace chemically crosslinked materials, e.g., ethylene-vinyl acetate. The related motivations include the desire to: reduce lamination time or temperature; use less moisture-permeable materials; use materials with better corrosion characteristics or with improved electrical resistance. However, the use of any thermoplastic material in a high-temperature environment raises safety and performance concerns, as the standardized tests currently do not expose the modules to temperatures in excess of 85 degrees C, though fielded modules may experience temperatures above 100 degrees C. Here we constructed eight pairs of crystalline-silicon modules and eight pairs of glass/encapsulation/glass thin-film mock modules using different encapsulant materials of which only two were designed to chemically crosslink. One module set was exposed outdoors with insulation on the back side in Arizona in the summer, and an identical set was exposed in environmental chambers. High precision creep measurements (+/- 20 um) and performance measurements indicate that despite many of these polymeric materials being in the melt state during outdoor deployment, very little creep was seen because of their high viscosity, temperature heterogeneity across the modules, and the formation of chemical crosslinks in many of the encapsulants as they aged. In the case of the crystalline silicon modules, the physical restraint of the backsheet reduced the creep further.

  13. Method and apparatus for producing composites of materials exhibiting thermoplastic properties

    DOEpatents

    Garvey, Raymond E. (Knoxville, TN); Grostick, Edmund T. (Faragut, TN)

    1992-01-01

    A mobile device for the complete consolidation of layers of material which exhibit thermoplastic properties for the formation of a composite of the layers upon a complex contoured substrate. The principal of the device is to provide heating into the molten temperature range of the thermoplastic material, applying sufficient pressure to the layers to cause flow of the plastic for a time sufficient to achieve full consolidation of the layers, and quickly cooling the structure to prevent delamination or other non-consolidation action. In the preferred form, there is an element to deposit a layer of the mateiral against another layer in close proximity. The two layers are pre-heated to near the melting temperature, and then further heated into the melting temperature range as they are brought into intimate contact with sufficient pressure to cause flow of the plastic for a time sufficient to achieve the full consolidation. The structure is then cooled. The mechanism for the application of pressure is selected such that the layers can be deformed to conform to a complex contour. In the preferred form, this pressurization is produced using a compliant hood that supplies both the pressure and at least a portion of the melting temperature, as well as the cooling. The apparatus, and method of operation, are described relative to the use of fiber-reinforced PEEK in the making of fully-consolidated composites. Other applications are discussed.

  14. A Complex Shaped Reinforced Thermoplastic Composite Part Made of Commingled Yarns With Integrated Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risicato, Jean-Vincent; Kelly, Fern; Soulat, Damien; Legrand, Xavier; Trümper, Wolfgang; Cochrane, Cedric; Koncar, Vladan

    2015-02-01

    This paper focuses on the design and one shot manufacturing process of complex shaped composite parts based on the overbraiding of commingled yarns. The commingled yarns contain thermoplastic fibres used as the matrix and glass fibres as the reinforcement material. This technology reduces the flow path length for the melted thermoplastic and aims to improve the impregnation of materials with high viscosity. The tensile strength behaviour of the material was firstly investigated in order to evaluate the influence of the manufacturing parameters on flat structured braids that have been consolidated on a heating press. A good compatibility between the required geometry and the braiding process was observed. Additionally, piezo-resistive sensor yarns, based on glass yarns coated with PEDOT: PSS, have been successfully integrated within the composite structure. The sensor yarns have been inserted into the braided fabric, before consolidation. The inserted sensors provide the ability to monitor the structural health of the composite part in a real time. The design and manufacture of the complete complex shaped part has then been successfully achieved.

  15. Accessing thermoplastic processing windows in metallic glasses using rapid capacitive discharge

    PubMed Central

    Kaltenboeck, Georg; Harris, Thomas; Sun, Kerry; Tran, Thomas; Chang, Gregory; Schramm, Joseph P.; Demetriou, Marios D.; Johnson, William L.

    2014-01-01

    The ability of the rapid-capacitive discharge approach to access optimal viscosity ranges in metallic glasses for thermoplastic processing is explored. Using high-speed thermal imaging, the heating uniformity and stability against crystallization of Zr35Ti30Cu7.5Be27.5 metallic glass heated deeply into the supercooled region is investigated. The method enables homogeneous volumetric heating of bulk samples throughout the entire supercooled liquid region at high rates (~105?K/s) sufficient to bypass crystallization throughout. The crystallization onsets at temperatures in the vicinity of the “crystallization nose” were identified and a Time-Temperature-Transformation diagram is constructed, revealing a “critical heating rate” for the metallic glass of ~1000?K/s. Thermoplastic process windows in the optimal viscosity range of 100–104?Pa·s are identified, being confined between the glass relaxation and the eutectic crystallization transition. Within this process window, near-net forging of a fine precision metallic glass part is demonstrated. PMID:25269892

  16. Thermoplastic impact property improvement in hybrid natural fibre epoxy composite bumper beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davoodi, M. M.; Sapuan, S. M.; Ali, Aidy; Ahmad, D.; Khalina, A.

    2010-05-01

    Utilization of thermoset resin as a bumper beam composite matrix is currently more dominated in car manufacturer suppliers, because of availability, easy processing, low material cost and production equipment investment. Moreover, low viscosity, shrinkage and excellent flow facilitate better fibre impregnation and proper surface resin wetting. Three-dimensional cross linking curing increase impact, creep and environmental stress cracking resistance properties. Low impact properties of natural fibre epoxy composite, are main issues in its employment for automotive structural components. Impact properties in epoxy composite bumper beam could be increased by modifying the resin, reinforcement and manufacturing process as well as geometry parameters such as cross section, thickness, added ribs and fixing method optimizations could strengthen impact resistance. There are two main methods, flexibilisation and toughening, as modifying the resin in order to improve the impact properties of epoxy composite, which form single phase or two-phase morphology to make modifier as epoxy or from separate phase to keep the thermo-mechanical properties. Liquid rubber, thermoplastic, core shell particle and rigid particle are different methods of toughening improvements. In this research, thermoplastic toughening has used to improve impact properties in hybrid natural fibre epoxy composite for automotive bumper beam and has achieved reasonable impact improvements.

  17. Effects of HyperCoal addition on coke strength and thermoplasticity of coal blends

    SciTech Connect

    Toshimasa Takanohashi; Takahiro Shishido; Ikuo Saito

    2008-05-15

    Ashless coal, also known as HyperCoal (HPC), was produced by thermal extraction of three coals of different ranks (Gregory caking coal, Warkworth steam coal, and Pasir subbituminous coal) with 1-methylnaphthalene (1-MN) at 360, 380, and 400{sup o}C. The effects of blending these HPCs into standard coal blends were investigated. Blending HPCs as 5-10% of a standard blend (Kouryusho:Goonyella:K9) enhanced the thermoplasticity over a wide temperature range. For blends made with the Pasir-HPC, produced from a noncaking coal, increasing the extraction temperature from 360 to 400{sup o}C increased the thermoplasticity significantly. Blends containing Warkworth-HPC, produced from a slightly caking coal, had a higher tensile strength than the standard blend in semicoke strength tests. The addition of 10% Pasir-HPC, extracted at 400{sup o}C, increased the tensile strength of the semicokes to the same degree as those made with Gregory-HPC. Furthermore, all HPC blends had a higher tensile strength and smaller weight loss during carbonization. These results suggest that the HPC became integrated into the coke matrix, interacting strongly with the other raw coals. 14 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Nanocellulose in Polymer Composites and Biomedical: Research and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yuan; Tekinalp, Halil L; Peter, William H; Eberle, Cliff; Naskar, Amit K; Ozcan, Soydan

    2014-01-01

    Nanocellulose materials are nano-sized cellulose fibers or crystals that are produced by bacteria or derived from plants. These materials exhibit exceptional strength characteristics, light weight, transparency, and excellent biocompatibility. Compared to some other nanomaterials, nanocellulose is renewable and less expensive to produce. As such, a wide range of applications for nanocellulose has been envisioned. Most extensively studied areas include polymer composites and biomedical applications. Cellulose nanofibrils and nanocrystals have been used to reinforce both thermoplastic and thermoset polymers. Given the hydrophilic nature of these materials, the interfacial properties with most polymers are often poor. Various surface modification procedures have thus been adopted to improve the interaction between polymer matrix and cellulose nanofibrils or nanocrystals. In addition, the applications of nanocellulose as biomaterials have been explored including wound dressing, tissue repair, and medical implants. Nanocellulose materials for wound healing and periodontal tissue recovery have become commercially available, demonstrating the great potential of nanocellulose as a new generation of biomaterials. In this review, we highlight the applications of nanocellulose as reinforcing fillers for composites and the effect of surface modification on the mechanical properties as well as the application as biomaterials.

  19. 2-D Simulations of Orientation in Highly Concentrated Short Glass Fiber Thermoplastic Composites Made by Injection Molding

    E-print Network

    Wapperom, Peter

    Made by Injection Molding Gregorio M. Vélez-Garcíaa , Kevin C. Ortmanb , Aaron P.R. Eberleb , Peter fiber composites is required in order to optimize the mold design of injection molding composites microscopy. Introduction Injection molded, short-glass fiber thermoplastic composites are an attractive

  20. Biodegradation of thermoplastic starch and its blends with poly(lactic acid) and polyethylene: influence of morphology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The room temperature mineralization of thermoplastic starch (TPS) with a high glycerol content and its blends with low-density polyethylene (LDPE) and polylactic acid (PLA) are examined under controlled degradation conditions. These results are correlated with the morphologies and continuity behavio...

  1. Morphological and mechanical characterization of thermoplastic starch and its blends with polylactic acid using cassava starch and bagasse

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study aims the use of an agro waste coming from the industrialization of cassava starch, known as cassava bagasse (BG). This material contains residual starch and cellulose fibers which can be used to obtain thermoplastic starch (TPS) and /or blends reinforced with fibers. In this context, it w...

  2. Long-term performance of thermoplastic composite material with cotton burr and stem (CBS) as a partial filler

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rationale: Cotton burr and stem (CBS) fraction of cotton gin byproducts has shown promise as a fiber filler in thermoplastic composites, with physical and mechanical properties comparable to that made with wood fiber fillers. However, the long-term performance of this composite material is not known...

  3. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Jjj of... - Group 1 Storage Vessels at New Affected Sources Producing the Listed Thermoplastics

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Thermoplastic Chemical a Vessel capacity(cubic meters) Vapor pressure b (kilopascals) ASA/AMSAN c Styrene... vapor pressure criteria are specific to the listed chemical, to “all chemicals,” or to “all other chemicals,” as indicated. b Maximum true vapor pressure of total organic HAP at storage temperature. c...

  4. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Jjj of... - Known Organic HAP Emitted From the Production of Thermoplastic Products

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 true Known Organic HAP Emitted From the Production...Subpart JJJ of Part 63—Known Organic HAP Emitted From the Production...Thermoplastic product/Subcategory Organic HAP/chemical name(CAS No...PET using a batch terephthalic acid process ? ? ?...

  5. Long glass fiber orientation in thermoplastic composites using a model that accounts for the flexibility of the fibers

    E-print Network

    Wapperom, Peter

    Long glass fiber orientation in thermoplastic composites using a model that accounts Mechanical properties of long glass fiber composites, used in various industrial applications, are dependant are explored to predict the orientation of long glass fibers in the concentrated regime that take the flexible

  6. Antimicrobial polymers.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anjali; Duvvuri, L Sailaja; Farah, Shady; Beyth, Nurit; Domb, Abraham J; Khan, Wahid

    2014-12-01

    Better health is basic requirement of human being, but the rapid growth of harmful pathogens and their serious health effects pose a significant challenge to modern science. Infections by pathogenic microorganisms are of great concern in many fields such as medical devices, drugs, hospital surfaces/furniture, dental restoration, surgery equipment, health care products, and hygienic applications (e.g., water purification systems, textiles, food packaging and storage, major or domestic appliances etc.) Antimicrobial polymers are the materials having the capability to kill/inhibit the growth of microbes on their surface or surrounding environment. Recently, they gained considerable interest for both academic research and industry and were found to be better than their small molecular counterparts in terms of enhanced efficacy, reduced toxicity, minimized environmental problems, resistance, and prolonged lifetime. Hence, efforts have focused on the development of antimicrobial polymers with all desired characters for optimum activity. In this Review, an overview of different antimicrobial polymers, their mechanism of action, factors affecting antimicrobial activity, and application in various fields are given. Recent advances and the current clinical status of these polymers are also discussed. PMID:25408272

  7. Polymers Pushing Polymers: Polymer Mixtures in Thermodynamic Equilibrium with a Pore

    E-print Network

    Podgornik, Rudolf

    Polymers Pushing Polymers: Polymer Mixtures in Thermodynamic Equilibrium with a Pore R. Podgornik, 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia Polymer Science and Engineering Department, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003, United States ABSTRACT: We investigate polymer partitioning from polymer

  8. POLYMER PROGRAM SEMINAR "Nanomanufacturing with Polymers"

    E-print Network

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    POLYMER PROGRAM SEMINAR "Nanomanufacturing with Polymers" Prof. Joey Mead University Lowell has developed a suite of processes to enable the nanomanufacturing of polymer based products of properties (e.g. biocompatibility, polarity, and modulus). Polymer materials can be used as substrates

  9. High Pressure Gas Permeation and Liquid Diffusion Studies of Coflon and Tefzel Thermoplastics. Revision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, G. J.; Campion, R. P.

    1997-01-01

    The life of fluid-carrying flexible or umbilical pipes during service at elevated temperatures and pressures depends inter alia on their resistance to attack by the fluids present and the rate at which these fluids are absorbed by the pipe lining materials. The consequences of fluid ingress into the thermoplastic lining could mean a) a reduction in its mechanical strength, to increase chances of crack formation and growth and thus a loss of integrity, b) the occurrence of permeation right through the lining material, with pressure build- up in the outer pipe wall construction (of flexible pipes) or chemical attack (from a hostile permeant) on outer layers of reinforcements. Therefore it is important within this project to have relevant permeation data for Coflon and Tefzel thermoplastics: the former is plasticised, the latter is not. A previous report (CAPP/M.2) described experimental equipment and techniques used by MERL when measuring high pressure (up to 5000 psi) gas permeation and liquid diffusion through thermoplastic samples cut from extruded bar or pipe, and provided the basic theory involved. Norsk Hydro are also performing gas permeation tests on pipe sections, at up to 100 bars (1450 psi) pressure or so, and reporting separately. Some comparisons between data from Norsk Hydro and MERL have been made herein. The tests should be considered as complementary, as the Norsk Hydro test has the obvious benefit of using complete pipe sections, whilst MERL can test at much higher pressures, up to 1000 bar if necessary. The sophisticated analytical measuring equipment of Norsk Hydro can distinguish the individual components of mixed gases and hence the various permeation-linked coefficients whereas MERL, in using pressure increase at constant volume to determine permeation rate, is limited to obtaining single gas data, or apparent (or representative) coefficients for a mixed gas as a whole. Except for the initial fluid diffusion data for Tefzel described in CAPP/M.2, the present report covers all aspects of fluid permeation and diffusion for Coflon and Tefzel, including all the pen-neation data accumulated in the project to date. Test gases have mainly been methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2). More high pressure (HP) gas permeation tests have been performed since the last issue of this report, most being concerned with changes in permeation characteristics brought about by ageing in various relevant fluids. This revision supersedes previous issues.

  10. Electrically Conductive Metal Polymer Nanocomposites for Electronics Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karttunen, Mikko; Ruuskanen, Pekka; Pitkänen, Ville; Albers, Willem M.

    2008-07-01

    An electrically conductive nanocomposite composed of thermoplastic elastomer and nanosized silver particles was developed. Nanosized silver particles were produced by the liquid flame spraying method. Nanocomposites were produced employing a batch mixing process in the melt state. The percolation curve and the minimum resistivity as a function of silver content were defined. A plasticized styrene block-copolymer was used as the matrix polymer. The results showed that the agglomeration of the silver particles has a major influence on the percolation threshold and the resistivity of the compound. With slightly agglomerated silver particles a percolation threshold with a silver content of 13 16 vol.% was achieved. The corresponding resistivity was 2.0 × 10-1 ? cm. With heavily agglomerated particles the resistivity is high (2.9 × 103 ? cm), even with a silver content of 20 vol.%. With a low primary silver particle size (under 100 nm), the resistivity of the compound was high (5.6 × 105 ? cm).

  11. Applications of polymer extrusion technology to coal processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, D. W.

    1981-01-01

    Upon heating, many of the middle-aged bituminous coals exhibit a plasticity very similar to polyethylene for a few minutes. Plastic coal can be extruded, pelletized or molded using common plastics technology and equipment. Investigations concerning the plastic state of coals are conducted with the objective to develop techniques which will make useful commercial applications of this property possible. Experiments which show the characteristics of plastic-state coal are discussed, and problems related to a continuous extrusion of coal are considered. Probably the most significant difference between the continuous extrusion of coal and the extrusion of a thermoplastic polymer is that volatiles are continuously being released from the coal. Attention is given to aspects of dragflow, solids feeding, and melt pumping. Application potentials for plastic coal extrusion might be related to coal gasification, direct liquefaction, and coal combustion.

  12. Factors influencing the Mode I interlaminar fracture toughness of a rubber toughened thermoplastic matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, D. S.; Yee, A. F.

    1989-01-01

    The use of a rubber modified thermoplastic resin has been investigated as a method to improve the Mode I interlaminar fracture toughness of a unidirectional continuous carbon fiber composite. Test results show that the improvement in the fracture toughness is less than expected due to rubber particle agglomeration, solvent and molding induced crystallization of the matrix and poor fiber/matrix adhesion. The plastic zone in composites utilizing tough matrices can extend well beyond a single interfibrillar spacing. However, the development of the plastic zone is limited due to the failure of the fiber/matrix interface. In order to fully evaluate the potential of tough composites using toughened matrices, any improvement made in the matrix toughness must be coupled with improvements in the fiber/matrix adhesion.

  13. Characterizing the rheological properties of thermoplastic elastomers (TPE) by thermomechanical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Penn, J.

    1993-12-31

    The increasing demand for products with qualities of functional performance of rubber coupled with ease of processability have enabled thermoplastic elastomers (TPE) to be used more often in traditional application usually reserved for natural and synthetic rubbers. The economic advantages of TPE of few steps to manufacture, processed on less costly equipment that also allows for faster production than versus slow-cycling, capital intensive rubber processing equipment and recyclability for scrap have enhanced its appeal to manufacturers. However, TPE are relatively new to some manufacturers that are unaware of the attributes of this class of materials. The study conducted will characterize the rheological properties of TPE to exhibit the stiffness or hardness, damping factors and other mechanical properties.

  14. A constitutive model for AS4/PEEK thermoplastic composites under cyclic loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rui, Yuting; Sun, C. T.

    1990-01-01

    Based on the basic and essential features of the elastic-plastic response of the AS4/PEEK thermoplastic composite subjected to off-axis cyclic loadings, a simple rate-independent constitutive model is proposed to describe the orthotropic material behavior for cyclic loadings. A one-parameter memory surface is introduced to distinguish the virgin deformation and the subsequent deformation process and to characterize the loading range effect. Cyclic softening is characterized by the change of generalized plastic modulus. By the vanishing yield surface assumption, a yield criterion is not needed and it is not necessary to consider loading and unloading separately. The model is compared with experimental results and good agreement is obtained.

  15. Bonding and nondestructive evaluation of graphite/PEEK composite and titanium adherends with thermoplastic adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, W. T.; Tyeryar, J. R.; Berry, M.

    1985-01-01

    Bonded single overlap shear specimens were fabricated from Graphite/PEEK (Polyetheretherketone) composite adherends and titanium adherends. Six advanced thermoplastic adhesives were used for the bonding. The specimens were bonded by an electromagnetic induction technique producing high heating rates and high-strength bonds in a few minutes. This contrasts with conventionally heated presses or autoclaves that take hours to process comparable quality bonds. The Graphite/PEEK composites were highly resistant to delamination during the testing. This allowed the specimen to fail exclusively through the bondline, even at very high shear loads. Nondestructive evaluation of bonded specimens was performed ultrasonically by energizing the entire thickness of the material through the bondline and measuring acoustic impedance parameters. Destructive testing confirmed the unique ultrasonic profiles of strong and weak bonds, establishing a standard for predicting relative bond strength in subsequent specimens.

  16. Effects of ?-cyclodextrin on selected properties of electrospun thermoplastic polyurethane nanofibres.

    PubMed

    Akçakoca Kumbasar, E Perrin; Akduman, Ci?dem; Cay, Ahmet

    2014-04-15

    Cyclodextrins are one of the most promising materials for the development of products with advanced properties due to inclusion complex formation ability with a wide variety of substances. More specifically, incorporation of cyclodextrins into electrospun nanofibrous materials is considered as potential candidates for functional textile applications. This study examines the electrospinning of thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) nanofibres including ?-cyclodextrin and investigates the effects of ?-cyclodextrin (?-CD) on resultant fibre properties. TPU/CD nanofibres were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, FTIR, TGA and DSC analysis. Additionally phenolphthalein absorption tests were applied. It was observed that the incorporation of ?-CD increased the mean fibre diameter and heterogeneity of nanofibrous membranes. The effects of ?-CD on the thermal properties of TPU membranes were shown. It was proven that ?-CD within TPU nanostructure could be able to form inclusion complexes. TPU/CD nanofibres are believed to have good potentials for functional textile applications. PMID:24607158

  17. Influence of Molecular Weight on the Mechanical Performance of a Thermoplastic Glassy Polyimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholson, Lee M.; Whitley, Karen S.; Gates, Thomas S.; Hinkley, Jeffrey A.

    1999-01-01

    Mechanical Testing of an advanced thermoplastic polyimide (LaRC-TM-SI) with known variations in molecular weight was performed over a range of temperatures below the glass transition temperature. The physical characterization, elastic properties and notched tensile strength were all determined as a function of molecular weight and test temperature. It was shown that notched tensile strength is a strong function of both temperature and molecular weight, whereas stiffness is only a strong function of temperature. A critical molecular weight (Mc) was observed to occur at a weight-average molecular weight (Mw) of approx. 22000 g/mol below which, the notched tensile strength decreases rapidly. This critical molecular weight transition is temperature-independent. Furthermore, inelastic analysis showed that low molecular weight materials tended to fail in a brittle manner, whereas high molecular weight materials exhibited ductile failure. The microstructural images supported these findings.

  18. From Process Modeling to Elastic Property Prediction for Long-Fiber Injection-Molded Thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Kunc, Vlastimil; Frame, Barbara J.; Phelps, Jay; Tucker III, Charles L.; Bapanapalli, Satish K.; Holbery, James D.; Smith, Mark T.

    2007-09-13

    This paper presents an experimental-modeling approach to predict the elastic properties of long-fiber injection-molded thermoplastics (LFTs). The approach accounts for fiber length and orientation distributions in LFTs. LFT samples were injection-molded for the study, and fiber length and orientation distributions were measured at different locations for use in the computation of the composite properties. The current fiber orientation model was assessed to determine its capability to predict fiber orientation in LFTs. Predicted fiber orientations for the studied LFT samples were also used in the calculation of the elastic properties of these samples, and the predicted overall moduli were then compared with the experimental results. The elastic property prediction was based on the Eshelby-Mori-Tanaka method combined with the orientation averaging technique. The predictions reasonably agree with the experimental LFT data

  19. Horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum L.) starch: Basic physico-chemical characteristics and use as thermoplastic material.

    PubMed

    Castaño, J; Rodríguez-Llamazares, S; Contreras, K; Carrasco, C; Pozo, C; Bouza, R; Franco, C M L; Giraldo, D

    2014-11-01

    Starch isolated from non-edible Aesculus hippocastanum seeds was characterized and used for preparing starch-based materials. The apparent amylose content of the isolated starch was 33.1%. The size of starch granules ranged from 0.7 to 35 ?m, and correlated with the shape of granules (spherical, oval and irregular). The chain length distribution profile of amylopectin showed two peaks, at polymerization degree (DP) of 12 and 41-43. Around 53% of branch unit chains had DP in the range of 11-20. A. hippocastanum starch displayed a typical C-type pattern and the maximum decomposition temperature was 317 °C. Thermoplastic starch (TPS) prepared from A. hippocastanum with glycerol and processed by melt blending exhibited adequate mechanical and thermal properties. In contrast, plasticized TPS with glycerol:malic acid (1:1) showed lower thermal stability and a pasty and sticky behavior, indicating that malic acid accelerates degradation of starch during processing. PMID:25129797

  20. Control of Compressive Fatigue Delamination Propagation of Impact Damaged Composites Using Discrete Thermoplastic Interleaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasaee, M.; Killock, C.; Hartley, J.; Bond, I. P.

    2015-10-01

    A delamination damage control and management concept is demonstrated showing how, through selective placement of discrete thermoplastic film interleaves, it is possible to manipulate the formation of impact damage and control its subsequent propagation during compressive fatigue cyclic loading. Under cyclic loading the gradual growth of impact damaged delamination was shown to be arrested by the discretely embedded interleaved strips. This technique then resulted in the growth of delamination away from the arrested sites effectively moving the damage zones and thus confirming the concept of delamination damage control. By managing the propagation of delamination, significant improvements to the compression after impact fatigue life of the composite were achieved. The proposed method is cost-effective and can be implemented with minimal disturbance to the global laminated composite properties. With an optimised design approach to managing delamination damage, safe `damage tolerant' composite structures can be realised with significant weight saving benefits.

  1. Thermoplastic deformation of silicon surfaces induced by ultrashort pulsed lasers in submelting conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Tsibidis, G. D.; Stratakis, E.; Aifantis, K. E.

    2012-03-01

    A hybrid theoretical model is presented to describe thermoplastic deformation effects on silicon surfaces induced by single and multiple ultrashort pulsed laser irradiation in submelting conditions. An approximation of the Boltzmann transport equation is adopted to describe the laser irradiation process. The evolution of the induced deformation field is described initially by adopting the differential equations of dynamic thermoelasticity while the onset of plastic yielding is described by the von Mises stress. Details of the resulting picometre sized crater, produced by irradiation with a single pulse, are discussed as a function of the imposed conditions and thresholds for the onset of plasticity are computed. Irradiation with multiple pulses leads to ripple formation of nanometre size that originates from the interference of the incident and a surface scattered wave. It is suggested that ultrafast laser induced surface modification in semiconductors is feasible in submelting conditions, and it may act as a precursor of the incubation effects observed at multiple pulse irradiation of materials surfaces.

  2. Polypropylene/natural rubber thermoplastic vulcanizates by eco-friendly and sustainable electron induced reactive processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Manas; Gohs, Uwe; Wagenknecht, Udo; Heinrich, Gert

    2013-07-01

    TPVs are a special class of thermoplastic and elastomer blend where cross-linking of elastomeric phase takes place during melt mixing process known as dynamic vulcanization (DV). A 50/50 blend of natural rubber (NR) and polypropylene (PP) were dynamically vulcanized using Electron Induced Reactive Processing (EIReP) as a function of absorbed dose (150, 250, and 350 kGy) at fixed electron energy (1.5 MeV) and dose per rotation. Different methods like tensile test, DSC, melt rheology, and SEM have been employed to understand the structure-property relationship of the prepared samples. The results suggest that EIReP is a novel technique to offer handful of additional features without compromising the end user property.

  3. Isosorbide, a green plasticizer for thermoplastic starch that does not retrogradate.

    PubMed

    Battegazzore, Daniele; Bocchini, Sergio; Nicola, Gabriele; Martini, Eligio; Frache, Alberto

    2015-03-30

    Isosorbide is a non-toxic biodegradable diol derived from bio-based feedstock. It can be used for preparing thermoplastic starch through a semi-industrial process of extrusion. Isosorbide allows some technological advantages with respect to classical plasticizers: namely, direct mixing with starch, energy savings for the low processing temperature required and lower water uptake. Indeed, maize starch was directly mixed with the solid plasticizer and direct fed in the main hopper of a co-rotating twin screw extruder. Starch plasticization was assessed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and dynamic-mechanical analysis (DMTA). Oxygen permeability, water uptake and mechanical properties were measured at different relative humidity (R.H.) values. These three properties turned out to be highly depending on the R.H. No retrogradation and changing of the material properties were occurred from XRD and DMTA after 9 months. PMID:25563947

  4. Phthalocyanine polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achar, B. N.; Fohlen, G. M.; Parker, J. A. (inventors)

    1985-01-01

    A method of forming 4,4',4'',4''' -tetraamino phthalocyanines involves reducing 4,4',4'',4''' -tetranitro phthalocyanines, polymerizing the metal tetraamino phthalocyanines with a tetracarboxylic dianhydride (preferably aromatic) or copolymerizing with a tetracarboxylic dianhydride and a diamine (preferably also aromatic) to produce amic acids which are then dehydrocyclized to imides. Thermally and oxidatively stable polymers result which form tough, flexible films, varnishes, adhesives, and fibers.

  5. Conductive Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Bohnert, G.W.

    2002-11-22

    Electroluminescent devices such as light-emitting diodes (LED) and high-energy density batteries. These new polymers offer cost savings, weight reduction, ease of processing, and inherent rugged design compared to conventional semiconductor materials. The photovoltaic industry has grown more than 30% during the past three years. Lightweight, flexible solar modules are being used by the U.S. Army and Marine Corps for field power units. LEDs historically used for indicator lights are now being investigated for general lighting to replace fluorescent and incandescent lights. These so-called solid-state lights are becoming more prevalent across the country since they produce efficient lighting with little heat generation. Conductive polymers are being sought for battery development as well. Considerable weight savings over conventional cathode materials used in secondary storage batteries make portable devices easier to carry and electric cars more efficient and nimble. Secondary battery sales represent an $8 billion industry annually. The purpose of the project was to synthesize and characterize conductive polymers. TRACE Photonics Inc. has researched critical issues which affect conductivity. Much of their work has focused on production of substituted poly(phenylenevinylene) compounds. These compounds exhibit greater solubility over the parent polyphenylenevinylene, making them easier to process. Alkoxy substituted groups evaluated during this study included: methoxy, propoxy, and heptyloxy. Synthesis routes for production of alkoxy-substituted poly phenylenevinylene were developed. Considerable emphasis was placed on final product yield and purity.

  6. Assessment of interfractional prostate motion in patients immobilized in the prone position using a thermoplastic shell

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Itaru; Mizowaki, Takashi; Sawada, Yohei; Nakata, Manabu; Norihisa, Yoshiki; Ogura, Masakazu; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the interfractional prostate motion of patients immobilized in the prone position using a thermoplastic shell. A total of 24 patients with prostate calcifications detectable using a kilo-voltage X-ray image-guidance system (ExacTrac X-ray system) were examined. Daily displacements of the calcification within the prostate relative to pelvic bony structures were calculated by the ExacTrac X-ray system. The average displacement and standard deviation (SD) in each of the left–right (LR), anterior–posterior (AP), and superior–inferior (SI) directions were calculated for each patient. Based on the results of interfractional prostate motion, we also calculated planning target volume (PTV) margins using the van Herk formula and examined the validity of the PTV margin of our institute (a 9-mm margin everywhere except posteriorly, where a 6-mm margin was applied). In total, 899 data measurements from 24 patients were obtained. The average prostate displacements ± SD relative to bony structures were 2.8 ± 3.3, ?2.0 ± 2.0 and 0.2 ± 0.4 mm, in the SI, AP and LR directions, respectively. The required PTV margins were 9.7, 6.1 and 1.4 mm in the SI, AP and LR directions, respectively. The clinical target volumes of 21 patients (87.5%) were located within the PTV for 90% or more of all treatment sessions. Interfractional prostate motion in the prone position with a thermoplastic shell was equivalent to that reported for the supine position. The PTV margin of our institute is considered appropriate for alignment, based on bony structures. PMID:23860549

  7. Assessment of interfractional prostate motion in patients immobilized in the prone position using a thermoplastic shell.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Itaru; Mizowaki, Takashi; Sawada, Yohei; Nakata, Manabu; Norihisa, Yoshiki; Ogura, Masakazu; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the interfractional prostate motion of patients immobilized in the prone position using a thermoplastic shell. A total of 24 patients with prostate calcifications detectable using a kilo-voltage X-ray image-guidance system (ExacTrac X-ray system) were examined. Daily displacements of the calcification within the prostate relative to pelvic bony structures were calculated by the ExacTrac X-ray system. The average displacement and standard deviation (SD) in each of the left-right (LR), anterior-posterior (AP), and superior-inferior (SI) directions were calculated for each patient. Based on the results of interfractional prostate motion, we also calculated planning target volume (PTV) margins using the van Herk formula and examined the validity of the PTV margin of our institute (a 9-mm margin everywhere except posteriorly, where a 6-mm margin was applied). In total, 899 data measurements from 24 patients were obtained. The average prostate displacements ± SD relative to bony structures were 2.8 ± 3.3, -2.0 ± 2.0 and 0.2 ± 0.4 mm, in the SI, AP and LR directions, respectively. The required PTV margins were 9.7, 6.1 and 1.4 mm in the SI, AP and LR directions, respectively. The clinical target volumes of 21 patients (87.5%) were located within the PTV for 90% or more of all treatment sessions. Interfractional prostate motion in the prone position with a thermoplastic shell was equivalent to that reported for the supine position. The PTV margin of our institute is considered appropriate for alignment, based on bony structures. PMID:23860549

  8. In vitro retention of a new thermoplastic titratable mandibular advancement device.

    PubMed

    Braem, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Oral appliance (OA) therapy with a mandibular advancement device (OAm) is a non-invasive, alternative approach to maintaining upper airway patency. The main requirement for an OAm to be effective is the adequate retention on the teeth while the patient is asleep. We evaluated the retentive forces of a new low-cost, customizable, titratable, thermoplastic OAm (BluePro (®); BlueSom, France). Dental impressions and casts were made for one patient with complete upper and lower dental arches including the third molars and class II bite proportions. A setup based on Frasaco ANA-4 models was also used. Two protrusive positions of the mandible were investigated: 3 mm and 8 mm, representing respectively 25% and 65% of the maximal protrusion. The forces required to remove the BluePro (®) device from the carriers were recorded continuously over 730 cycles (=365 days, twice a day) to simulate 1 year of clinical use. At 8 mm protrusion the BluePro (®) device showed retentive forces of ~27N. There was a slight but non-significant decrease in retentive forces in the tests on the epoxified carriers which was not found on the ANA-4 carriers. There were no significant differences between the carriers as a function of protrusion. The BluePro (®) device tested in the present study possesses sufficient retention forces to resist initial jaw opening forces and full mouth opening forces estimated to be ~20N. It could therefore broaden the indications for use of thermoplastic OAms. It could provide a temporary OAm while a custom-made OAm is being manufactured or repaired. Patients could be provided with a low-cost try-out device capable of reliable titration, providing an indication of effectiveness and of patient acceptance of an OAm, although the effect of device shape and size on therapeutic outcome is not yet known. Finally it could provide an affordable OAm solution in resource-restricted healthcare settings. PMID:25901281

  9. Non-isothermal process simulation for compression moulding with glass fiber reinforced thermoplastic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Michaeli, W.; Heber, M.

    1993-12-31

    One of the main important processes for the large scale production of fiber reinforced parts is the compression moulding process. In the last years the production of parts for the automotive industry showed a big growth especially for the reinforced thermoplastic materials. For a further growth of this material it will be necessary, according to the requirements of the automotive industry, to predict the influence of the process on the part properties and account it during part design. Therefore it is necessary to simulate the production process for these materials. This paper presents a coupled flow-temperature calculation model for the compression moulding process for thermoplastic materials, which takes the temperature and shear-rate dependency of the viscosity, the freeze-in of the material, the heat conductivity, the heat convectivity and the dissipation into account. The model is able to predict the flow fronts and temperature distribution for complex parts. With the aid of the simulation it is possible to detect difficulties, such as flow lines or entrapped air, and also mould filling problems, such as those caused by premature solidification of the melt. The temperature calculation is also important to check if it is possible to fill the mould and how long the cycle time will be. The process simulation leads to a better part and process design. Another advantage is, that the results of the simulation may be an important input for quality management and for the cost calculation. The basic principles of the non-isothermal, non-Newtonian mould filling simulation for the compression moulding process are summed up in the chapters that follow.

  10. Genome Regions Associated with Functional Performance of Soybean Stem Fibers in Polypropylene Thermoplastic Composites

    PubMed Central

    Reinprecht, Yarmilla; Arif, Muhammad; Simon, Leonardo C.; Pauls, K. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Plant fibers can be used to produce composite materials for automobile parts, thus reducing plastic used in their manufacture, overall vehicle weight and fuel consumption when they replace mineral fillers and glass fibers. Soybean stem residues are, potentially, significant sources of inexpensive, renewable and biodegradable natural fibers, but are not curretly used for biocomposite production due to the functional properties of their fibers in composites being unknown. The current study was initiated to investigate the effects of plant genotype on the performance characteristics of soybean stem fibers when incorporated into a polypropylene (PP) matrix using a selective phenotyping approach. Fibers from 50 lines of a recombinant inbred line population (169 RILs) grown in different environments were incorporated into PP at 20% (wt/wt) by extrusion. Test samples were injection molded and characterized for their mechanical properties. The performance of stem fibers in the composites was significantly affected by genotype and environment. Fibers from different genotypes had significantly different chemical compositions, thus composites prepared with these fibers displayed different physical properties. This study demonstrates that thermoplastic composites with soybean stem-derived fibers have mechanical properties that are equivalent or better than wheat straw fiber composites currently being used for manufacturing interior automotive parts. The addition of soybean stem residues improved flexural, tensile and impact properties of the composites. Furthermore, by linkage and in silico mapping we identified genomic regions to which quantitative trait loci (QTL) for compositional and functional properties of soybean stem fibers in thermoplastic composites, as well as genes for cell wall synthesis, were co-localized. These results may lead to the development of high value uses for soybean stem residue. PMID:26167917

  11. Polymer Coats Leads on Implantable Medical Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Langley Research Center s Soluble Imide (LaRC-SI) was discovered by accident. While researching resins and adhesives for advanced composites for high-speed aircraft, Robert Bryant, a Langley engineer, noticed that one of the polymers he was working with did not behave as predicted. After putting the compound through a two-stage controlled chemical reaction, expecting it to precipitate as a powder after the second stage, he was surprised to see that the compound remained soluble. This novel characteristic ended up making this polymer a very significant finding, eventually leading Bryant and his team to win several NASA technology awards, and an "R&D 100" award. The unique feature of this compound is the way that it lends itself to easy processing. Most polyimides (members of a group of remarkably strong and incredibly heat- and chemical-resistant polymers) require complex curing cycles before they are usable. LaRC-SI remains soluble in its final form, so no further chemical processing is required to produce final materials, like thin films and varnishes. Since producing LaRC-SI does not require complex manufacturing techniques, it has been processed into useful forms for a variety of applications, including mechanical parts, magnetic components, ceramics, adhesives, composites, flexible circuits, multilayer printed circuits, and coatings on fiber optics, wires, and metals. Bryant s team was, at the time, heavily involved with the aircraft polymer project and could not afford to further develop the polymer resin. Believing it was worth further exploration, though, he developed a plan for funding development and submitted it to Langley s chief scientist, who endorsed the experimentation. Bryant then left the high-speed civil transport project to develop LaRC-SI. The result is an extremely tough, lightweight thermoplastic that is not only solvent-resistant, but also has the ability to withstand temperature ranges from cryogenic levels to above 200 C. The thermoplastic s unique characteristics lend it to many commercial applications; uses that Bryant believed would ultimately benefit industry and the Nation. "LaRC-SI," he explains, "is a product created in a government laboratory, funded with money from the tax-paying public. What we discovered helps further the economic competitiveness of the United States, and it was our goal to initiate the technology transfer process to ensure that our work benefited the widest range of people." Several NASA centers, including Langley, have explored methods for using LaRC-SI in a number of applications from radiation shielding and as an adhesive to uses involving replacement of conventional rigid circuit boards. In the commercial realm, LaRC-SI can now be found in several commercial products, including the thin-layer composite unimorph ferroelectric driver and sensor (THUNDER) piezoelectric actuator, another "R&D 100" award winner (Spinoff 2005).

  12. High Strain Rate Deformation Modeling of a Polymer Matrix Composite. Part 1; Matrix Constitutive Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Stouffer, Donald C.

    1998-01-01

    Recently applications have exposed polymer matrix composite materials to very high strain rate loading conditions, requiring an ability to understand and predict the material behavior under these extreme conditions. In this first paper of a two part report, background information is presented, along with the constitutive equations which will be used to model the rate dependent nonlinear deformation response of the polymer matrix. Strain rate dependent inelastic constitutive models which were originally developed to model the viscoplastic deformation of metals have been adapted to model the nonlinear viscoelastic deformation of polymers. The modified equations were correlated by analyzing the tensile/ compressive response of both 977-2 toughened epoxy matrix and PEEK thermoplastic matrix over a variety of strain rates. For the cases examined, the modified constitutive equations appear to do an adequate job of modeling the polymer deformation response. A second follow-up paper will describe the implementation of the polymer deformation model into a composite micromechanical model, to allow for the modeling of the nonlinear, rate dependent deformation response of polymer matrix composites.

  13. Crash simulation of hybrid structures considering the stress and strain rate dependent material behavior of thermoplastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopmann, Ch.; Schöngart, M.; Weber, M.; Klein, J.

    2015-05-01

    Thermoplastic materials are more and more used as a light weight replacement for metal, especially in the automotive industry. Since these materials do not provide the mechanical properties, which are required to manufacture supporting elements like an auto body or a cross bearer, plastics are combined with metals in so called hybrid structures. Normally, the plastics components are joined to the metal structures using different technologies like welding or screwing. Very often, the hybrid structures are made of flat metal parts, which are stiffened by a reinforcement structure made of thermoplastic materials. The loads on these structures are very often impulsive, for example in the crash situation of an automobile. Due to the large stiffness variation of metal and thermoplastic materials, complex states of stress and very high local strain rates occur in the contact zone under impact conditions. Since the mechanical behavior of thermoplastic materials is highly dependent on these types of load, the crash failure of metal plastic hybrid parts is very complex. The problem is that the normally used strain rate dependent elastic/plastic material models are not capable to simulate the mechanical behavior of thermoplastic materials depended on the state of stress. As part of a research project, a method to simulate the mechanical behavior of hybrid structures under impact conditions is developed at the IKV. For this purpose, a specimen for the measurement of mechanical properties dependet on the state of stress and a method for the strain rate depended characterization of thermoplastic materials were developed. In the second step impact testing is performed. A hybrid structure made from a metal sheet and a reinforcement structure of a Polybutylenterephthalat Polycarbonate blend is tested under impact conditions. The measured stress and strain rate depended material data are used to simulate the mechanical behavior of the hybrid structure under highly dynamic load with impact velocities up to 5 m/s. The mechanical behavior of the plastics structure is simulated using a quadratic yield surface, which takes the state of stress and the strain rate into account. The FE model is made from mid surface elements to reduce the computing time.

  14. Recycling and processing of several typical crosslinked polymer scraps with enhanced mechanical properties based on solid-state mechanochemical milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Canhui; Zhang, Xinxing; Zhang, Wei

    2015-05-01

    The partially devulcanization or de-crosslinking of ground tire rubber (GTR), post-vulcanized fluororubber scraps and crosslinked polyethylene from cable scraps through high-shear mechanochemical milling (HSMM) was conducted by a modified solid-state mechanochemical reactor. The results indicated that the HSMM treated crosslinked polymer scraps can be reprocessed as virgin rubbers or thermoplastics to produce materials with high performance. The foamed composites of low density polyethylene/GTR and the blend of post-vulcanized flurorubber (FKM) with polyacrylate rubber (ACM) with better processability and mechanical properties were obtained. The morphology observation showed that the dispersion and compatibility between de-crosslinked polymer scraps and matrix were enhanced. The results demonstrated that HSMM is a feasible alternative technology for recycling post-vulcanized or crosslinked polymer scraps.

  15. Recycling and processing of several typical crosslinked polymer scraps with enhanced mechanical properties based on solid-state mechanochemical milling

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Canhui; Zhang, Xinxing; Zhang, Wei

    2015-05-22

    The partially devulcanization or de-crosslinking of ground tire rubber (GTR), post-vulcanized fluororubber scraps and crosslinked polyethylene from cable scraps through high-shear mechanochemical milling (HSMM) was conducted by a modified solid-state mechanochemical reactor. The results indicated that the HSMM treated crosslinked polymer scraps can be reprocessed as virgin rubbers or thermoplastics to produce materials with high performance. The foamed composites of low density polyethylene/GTR and the blend of post-vulcanized flurorubber (FKM) with polyacrylate rubber (ACM) with better processability and mechanical properties were obtained. The morphology observation showed that the dispersion and compatibility between de-crosslinked polymer scraps and matrix were enhanced. The results demonstrated that HSMM is a feasible alternative technology for recycling post-vulcanized or crosslinked polymer scraps.

  16. High-Performance Polymers Having Low Melt Viscosities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Brian J.

    2005-01-01

    High-performance polymers that have improved processing characteristics, and a method of making them, have been invented. One of the improved characteristics is low (relative to corresponding prior polymers) melt viscosities at given temperatures. This characteristic makes it possible to utilize such processes as resin-transfer molding and resin-film infusion and to perform autoclave processing at lower temperatures and/or pressures. Another improved characteristic is larger processing windows that is, longer times at low viscosities. Other improved characteristics include increased solubility of uncured polymer precursors that contain reactive groups, greater densities of cross-links in cured polymers, improved mechanical properties of the cured polymers, and greater resistance of the cured polymers to chemical attack. The invention is particularly applicable to poly(arylene ether)s [PAEs] and polyimides [PIs] that are useful as adhesives, matrices of composite materials, moldings, films, and coatings. PAEs and PIs synthesized according to the invention comprise mixtures of branched, linear, and star-shaped molecules. The monomers of these polymers can be capped with either reactive end groups to obtain thermosets or nonreactive end groups to obtain thermoplastics. The synthesis of a polymeric mixture according to the invention involves the use of a small amount of a trifunctional monomer. In the case of a PAE, the trifunctional monomer is a trihydroxy- containing compound for example, 1,3,5-trihydroxybenzene (THB). In the case of a PI, the trifunctional monomer is a triamine for example, triamino pyrimidine or melamine. In addition to the aforementioned trifunctional monomer, one uses the difunctional monomers of the conventional formulation of the polymer in question (see figure). In cases of nonreactive end caps, the polymeric mixtures of the invention have melt viscosities and melting temperatures lower than those of the corresponding linear polymers of equal molecular weights. The lower melting temperatures and melt viscosities provide larger processing windows. In cases of reactive end caps, the polymeric mixtures of the invention have lower melt viscosities before curing and the higher cross-link densities after curing (where branching in the uncured systems would become cross-links in the cured systems), relative to the corresponding linear polymers of equal molecular weights. The greater cross-link densities afford increased resistance to chemical attack and improved mechanical properties.

  17. Polymer/clay/wood nanocomposites: The effect of incorporation of nanoclay into the wood/polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetzer, Max E.

    Thermoplastic composites play an important role in our society. The uses of these composites range from cookware to components for the space shuttle. In recent years, researchers at Toyota developed numerous methods of preparation for composites made from olefins and inorganic fillers such as clay and calcium carbonate. Wood fibers have been used as reinforcing filler in polymer matrices for the past several decades. The advantages of using wood fibers as reinforcing fillers are: the low cost of the fibers (or flour), low density, and resistance to breakage. The disadvantage of using wood as a filler is the thermal instability of wood above 200 °C. The majority of thermoplastics exhibit melting points between 160 and 220 °C, which is in the range of thermal decomposition of wood. Nanoclay was first successfully used as a filler in polyolefin materials by the Toyota research team in early 90s. It was found that the addition of a small amount (< 5 wt.%) of nanoclay increased the mechanical properties of a Nylon-6 matrix dramatically. Since Nylon-6 is a hydrophilic material no compatibilizer was necessary to exfoliate the nanoclay. The use of compatibilizers such as maleic modified polyethylenes (MAPEs) is necessary upon addition of nanoclay to a hydrophobic polyolefin systems such polyethylene (PE) or polypropylene (PP). Few researchers have attempted to reinforce the polymer matrix via the use of the nanoclay for use as a matrix in wood/polymer composites. High molecular weight and low molecular weight MAPEs have been used to enhance the bonding between the nanoclay and the polymer matrix as well as between the wood flour and the polymer matrix. The effects of combinations of the high and low molecular weight MAPEs on the mechanical and thermal properties of polymer/clay nanocomposites (PCNs) and of wood/polymer/clay composites (WPCs) were investigated. The effects of adding nanoclay to wood/polymer systems on the mechanical and thermal properties of the composites were also investigated. A model based on the Halpin-Tsai model was developed that predicts the (Young's) modulus-temperature relationship of the composites based on discontinuous fillers. It was found that the molecular weight of the compatibilizer significantly affects the exfoliation/dispersion of the nanoclay within the polymer matrix. A compatibilizer containing a high Mw fraction based on high density polyethylene (HDPE) and a low Mw fraction based on linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE) was found to be the most effective at enhancing the thermal and mechanical properties of PCNs and WPCs. A compatibilizer containing greater than 60 wt.% high Mw fraction resulted in a 30% increase of the modulus and a 15°C increase of the heat deflection temperature (HDT). The addition of the nanoclay had a detrimental effect on the moduli of PCNs and WPCs when a low Mw compatibilizer based on LLDPE was used. The moduli of these composites increased with increasing high Mw content of the compatibilizer and increasing nanoclay content. The addition of the nanoclay to wood/polymer composites resulted in an increased modulus of elasticity and HDT of these composites. The developed model quantitatively predicts the modulus-temperature relationship of the fiber containing composites. It was found that the modulus of the composites varies linearly with temperature and was highly dependent on the exfoliation of the nanoclay within the polymer matrix.

  18. Diode laser welding for packaging of transparent micro-structured polymer chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klotzbuecher, T.; Letschert, M.; Braune, T.; Drese, K.-S.; Doll, T.

    2006-02-01

    Laser transmission welding in recent years has been established as a versatile method for interconnection of thermoplastics, at least for macroscopic parts. The technology also offers interesting possibilities for packaging of transparent, micro-structured polymer chips, as used for life science or biotechnology applications. A method for transmission welding, based on a diode laser bar in combination with a thin layer of IR-absorbing dye, is introduced, that allows for fast, mask-less welding of two thermoplastic substrates, at least one of which contains micro structures. The process strongly depends on the ratio of the IR-absorbing dye layer thickness to the depth of the microstructures and should be <<1. Detailed results of the absorption of the dye layers as a function of the spin coating parameters used for preparation of the films are presented, including depth profile analysis. It is demonstrated that the formation of good quality weld seams mainly depends on the energy per unit length coupled to the substrate, which is adjustable by the feed rate and the laser power applied. As an example the process window for welding CGE chips made of PMMA, containing 50 ?m wide and deep channels, separated by 100 ?m wide webs is shown. The applicability of the technology to other polymer chip geometries together with concepts for further improvement is demonstrated.

  19. Polymer Physics Research Profile

    E-print Network

    Giger, Christine

    Polymer Physics Research Profile Our main interests are the theory of simplification and some behavior on different autonomous levels of description. Our favorite applications range from polymer + Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics + Coarse Graining + Soft Matter + Polymer Physics + Rheology + Competences

  20. Mechanisms of shark skin suppression by novel polymer processing aids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, M. H.; Himmel, T.; Kulikov, O.; Hornung, K.

    2014-05-01

    The extrusion rate of polyethylene (PE) with narrow molar weight distribution, as e.g. metallocen catalysed polyethylene (m-PE), is limited by melt fracture. The first level of fracture is a surface defect called sharkskin. Common polymer processing aids based on fluorinated polymers shift the onset of sharkskin to higher extrusion rates by creating a "low energy surface" at the die wall and promoting wall slip. Alternatively, Kulikov et al. [1, 2] suggested thermoplastic elastomers (TPE) for sharkskin suppression, and Müller [3] showed the suitability of some TPEs as polymer processing aids. We investigated the slip velocity of several TPEs against steel, and the slip velocity in a polymeric interface between polyethylene (PE) and TPE by rotational plate-plate rheometry in the Newtonian flow regime. TPEs with lower viscosities showed higher slip velocities against steel. However, the interfacial slip velocities between PE and TPE were found to be viscosity independent. In both cases, the slip velocity was found to be proportional to the applied shear stress.

  1. A Rubber-Modified Thermoplastic where the Morphology Produced by Phase-Separation Induced by Polymerization Disappears at High Conversions

    E-print Network

    E. R. Soule; G. E. Elicabe; R. J. J. Williams

    2013-11-21

    An unexpected experimental finding is reported where the primary morphology developed during polymerization-induced phase separation in a rubber-modified thermoplastic disappears at high conversions. This process was evidenced by light scattering (LS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for a particular composition of solutions of polyisobutylene oligomers (PIB) in isobornylmethacrylate (IBoMA), during the free-radical polymerization of the monomer. The primary phase separation produced a dispersion of domains rich in PIB containing significant amounts of the monomer (IBoMA). Polymerization of the monomer in these domains occurred at high overall conversions producing the filling of dispersed domains with a PIBoMA-PIB blend. Under these conditions the final material had the appearance of a homogeneous blend. The process might be adapted to produce new types of rubber-modified thermoplastics where rubber particles are replaced by rubber-rich domains that do not exhibit definite boundaries. Keywords:

  2. Interpretations of Polymer-Polymer Miscibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olabisi, Olagoke

    1981-01-01

    Discusses various aspects of polymeric mixtures, mixtures of structurally different homopolymers, copolymers, terpolymers, and the like. Defines concepts of polymer-polymer miscibility from practical and theoretical viewpoints, and ways of predicting such miscibility. (JN)

  3. Polymer Matrix Composite Lines and Ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.

    2001-01-01

    Since composite laminates are beginning to be identified for use in reusable launch vehicle propulsion systems, a task was undertaken to assess the feasibility of making cryogenic feedlines with integral flanges from polymer matrix composite materials. An additional level of complexity was added by having the feedlines be elbow shaped. Four materials, each with a unique manufacturing method, were chosen for this program. Feedlines were to be made by hand layup (HLU) with standard autoclave cure, HLU with electron beam cure, solvent-assisted resin transfer molding (SARTM), and thermoplastic tape laying (TTL). A test matrix of fill and drain cycles with both liquid nitrogen and liquid helium, along with a heat up to 250 F, was planned for each of the feedlines. A pressurization to failure was performed on any feedlines that passed the cryogenic cycling testing. A damage tolerance subtask was also undertaken in this study. The effects of foreign object impact to the materials used was assessed by cross-sectional examination and by permeability after impact testing. At the end of the program, the manufacture of the electron beam-cured feedlines never came to fruition. All of the TTL feedlines leaked heavily before any cryogenic testing, all of the SARTM feedlines leaked heavily after one cryogenic cycle. Thus, only the HLU with autoclave cure feedlines underwent the complete test matrix. They passed the cyclic testing and were pressurized to failure.

  4. Laser cutting of carbon fiber reinforced thermo-plastics (CFRTP) by single-mode fiber laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niino, Hiroyuki; Kawaguchi, Yoshizo; Sato, Tadatake; Narazaki, Aiko; Kurosaki, Ryozo; Muramatsu, Mayu; Harada, Yoshihisa; Anzai, Kenji; Aoyama, Mitsuaki; Matsushita, Masafumi; Furukawa, Koichi; Nishino, Michiteru; Fujisaki, Akira; Miyato, Taizo; Kayahara, Takashi

    2014-03-01

    We report on the laser cutting of carbon fiber reinforced thermo-plastics (CFRTP) with a cw IR fiber laser (single-mode fiber laser, average power: 350 W). CFRTP is a high strength composite material with a lightweight, and is increasingly being used various applications. A well-defined cutting of CFRTP which were free of debris and thermal-damages around the grooves, were performed by the laser irradiation with a fast beam galvanometer scanning on a multiple-scanpass method.

  5. Silicone-containing aqueous polymer dispersions with hybrid particle structure.

    PubMed

    Kozakiewicz, Janusz; Ofat, Izabela; Trzaskowska, Joanna

    2015-09-01

    In this paper the synthesis, characterization and application of silicone-containing aqueous polymer dispersions (APD) with hybrid particle structure are reviewed based on available literature data. Advantages of synthesis of dispersions with hybrid particle structure over blending of individual dispersions are pointed out. Three main processes leading to silicone-containing hybrid APD are identified and described in detail: (1) emulsion polymerization of organic unsaturated monomers in aqueous dispersions of silicone polymers or copolymers, (2) emulsion copolymerization of unsaturated organic monomers with alkoxysilanes or polysiloxanes with unsaturated functionality and (3) emulsion polymerization of alkoxysilanes (in particular with unsaturated functionality) and/or cyclic siloxanes in organic polymer dispersions. The effect of various factors on the properties of such hybrid APD and films as well as on hybrid particles composition and morphology is presented. It is shown that core-shell morphology where silicones constitute either the core or the shell is predominant in hybrid particles. Main applications of silicone-containing hybrid APD and related hybrid particles are reviewed including (1) coatings which show specific surface properties such as enhanced water repellency or antisoiling or antigraffiti properties due to migration of silicone to the surface, and (2) impact modifiers for thermoplastics and thermosets. Other processes in which silicone-containing particles with hybrid structure can be obtained (miniemulsion polymerization, polymerization in non-aqueous media, hybridization of organic polymer and polysiloxane, emulsion polymerization of silicone monomers in silicone polymer dispersions and physical methods) are also discussed. Prospects for further developments in the area of silicone-containing hybrid APD and related hybrid particles are presented. PMID:26094081

  6. Variation of mechanical and thermal properties of the thermoplastics reinforced with natural fibers by electron beam processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sok Won; Oh, Seungmin; Lee, Kyuse

    2007-11-01

    With restrictions for environmental protection being strengthened, the thermoplastics reinforced with natural fibers (NFs) such as jute, kenaf, flax, etc., appeared as an automobile interior material instead of the chemical plastics. Regardless of many advantages, one shortcoming is the deformation after being formed in high temperature of about 200 °C, caused by the poor adhesion between the natural fibers and thermoplastics. Also, the energy saving in connection with car air-conditioning becomes very important. In this study, the thermal conductivity, tensile strength, and deformation of several kinds of thermoplastic composites composing of 50% polypropylene (PP) and 50% natural fiber irradiated by the electron beam (energy: 0.5 MeV, dose: 0-20 kGy) were measured. The length and thickness of PP and NF are 80±10 mm and 40-120 ?m, respectively. The results show that the thermal conductivity and the tensile strength changed and became minimum when the dose of electron beam is 10 kGy, and the deformation after the thermal cycle were reduced by the electron beam.

  7. Solvent-free thermoplastic-poly(dimethylsiloxane) bonding mediated by UV irradiation followed by gas-phase chemical deposition of an adhesion linker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, S. Y.; Lee, N. Y.

    2015-07-01

    Here, we introduce a solvent-free strategy for bonding various thermoplastic substrates with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) using ultraviolet (UV) irradiation followed by the gas-phase chemical deposition of aminosilane on the UV-irradiated thermoplastic substrates. The thermoplastic substrates were first irradiated with UV for surface hydrophilic treatment and were then grafted with vacuum-evaporated aminosilane, where the alkoxysilane side reacted with the oxidized surface of the thermoplastic substrate. Next, the amine-terminated thermoplastic substrates were treated with corona discharge to oxidize the surface and were bonded with PDMS, which was also oxidized via corona discharge. The two substrates were then hermetically sealed and pressed under atmospheric pressure for 30?min at 60?°C. This process enabled the formation of a robust siloxane bond (Si-O-Si) between the thermoplastic substrate and PDMS under relatively mild conditions using an inexpensive and commercially available UV lamp and Tesla coil. Various thermoplastic substrates were examined for bonding with PDMS, including poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA), polycarbonate (PC), poly(ethyleneterephthalate) (PET) and polystyrene (PS). Surface characterizations were performed by measuring the contact angle and performing x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, and the bond strength was analyzed by conducting various mechanical force measurements such as pull, delamination, leak and burst tests. The average bond strengths for the PMMA-PDMS, PC-PDMS, PET-PDMS and PS-PDMS assemblies were measured at 823.6, 379.3, 291.2 and 229.0?kPa, respectively, confirming the highly reliable performance of the introduced bonding strategy.

  8. Shape memory polymers

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Thomas S.; Bearinger, Jane P.

    2015-06-09

    New shape memory polymer compositions, methods for synthesizing new shape memory polymers, and apparatus comprising an actuator and a shape memory polymer wherein the shape memory polymer comprises at least a portion of the actuator. A shape memory polymer comprising a polymer composition which physically forms a network structure wherein the polymer composition has shape-memory behavior and can be formed into a permanent primary shape, re-formed into a stable secondary shape, and controllably actuated to recover the permanent primary shape. Polymers have optimal aliphatic network structures due to minimization of dangling chains by using monomers that are symmetrical and that have matching amine and hydroxyl groups providing polymers and polymer foams with clarity, tight (narrow temperature range) single transitions, and high shape recovery and recovery force that are especially useful for implanting in the human body.

  9. Nanoparticle and Gelation Stabilized Functional Composites of an Ionic Salt in a Hydrophobic Polymer Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Kanyas, Selin; Ayd?n, Derya; Kizilel, Riza; Demirel, A. Levent; Kizilel, Seda

    2014-01-01

    Polymer composites consisted of small hydrophilic pockets homogeneously dispersed in a hydrophobic polymer matrix are important in many applications where controlled release of the functional agent from the hydrophilic phase is needed. As an example, a release of biomolecules or drugs from therapeutic formulations or release of salt in anti-icing application can be mentioned. Here, we report a method for preparation of such a composite material consisted of small KCOOH salt pockets distributed in the styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) polymer matrix and demonstrate its effectiveness in anti-icing coatings. The mixtures of the aqueous KCOOH and SBS-cyclohexane solutions were firstly stabilized by adding silica nanoparticles to the emulsions and, even more, by gelation of the aqueous phase by agarose. The emulsions were observed in optical microscope to check its stability in time and characterized by rheological measurements. The dry composite materials were obtained via casting the emulsions onto the glass substrates and evaporations of the organic solvent. Composite polymer films were characterized by water contact angle (WCA) measurements. The release of KCOOH salt into water and the freezing delay experiments of water droplets on dry composite films demonstrated their anti-icing properties. It has been concluded that hydrophobic and thermoplastic SBS polymer allows incorporation of the hydrophilic pockets/phases through our technique that opens the possibility for controlled delivering of anti-icing agents from the composite. PMID:24516593

  10. Thermoplastic deformation and structural evolutions in nanoimprinting metallic glasses using molecular dynamics analysis

    E-print Network

    Li, Mo

    ), which have no size limiting factor, are superplastic in the super-cooled liquid region, showing,10]. The imprint objects are mainly alloy or polymer and the influence of capillary force is rarely noted. Some

  11. New melt-processable thermoplastic polyimides for opto-electronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Aditya; Haralur, Gurulingamurthy

    2012-10-01

    The rapid development and adoption of digital technology is leading to an increase in demand for smaller, faster digital data devices and faster digital telecommunication networks. This trend requires increased network bandwidth to handle large amounts of data and seamless integration of network devices with compatible end-user devices. This need is being met by using fiber-optic and photonics technology, infra-red (IR) signals to transmit information, and is fundamental changing the communication industry, thereby creating a need for new polymeric materials. New ULTEM* polyetherimide (PEI) and EXTEM* thermoplastic polyimide (TPI) resins meet the material requirements for the optoelectronics industry. These resins have building blocks enabling IR light transmission without degrading signal quality. They can be injection-molded into thin, precision optical lenses and connectors. ULTEM* resins are been widely used in this industry as fiber-optic components in trans-receivers. EXTEM* resins are amenable to lead-free soldering (LFS), a greener industrial assembly process. While still being IR-transparent, EXTEM* resin is an ideal material for LFS capable substrates, connectors and lenses. An optical product portfolio has been developed and is being presented as a solution to the opto-electronics component industry and some of the successful applications therein.

  12. Synchrotron X-ray Studies of Vulcanized Rubbers and Thermoplastic Elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Toki,S.; Hsiao, B.; Kohjiya, S.; Tosaka, M.; Tosaka, A.; Tsou, A.; Datta, S.

    2006-01-01

    Synchrotron X-ray diffraction technique has revealed strain-induced crystallization and molecular orientation in vulcanized rubbers and thermoplastic elastomers (TPE) during deformation in real time. The stress-strain curves and wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) patterns in vulcanized rubbers and TPE were measured simultaneously. In-situ WAXD patterns were taken not only at different strains during uniaxial deformation but also at different temperatures at a constant strain. Results lead to several new insights. (i) Strain-induced crystallization is a common phenomenon in vulcanized rubbers, except SBR (styrene-butadiene rubber), and in TPE (with crystalline hard segments). (ii) Strain-induced crystallization decreases the stress and increases the elongation in the strained rubber. (iii) The hybrid structure of chemical networks and strain-induced crystallites is responsible to the tensile strength and elongation at break for both systems. (iiii) Some original crystal fraction (hard segment domain) in TPE is destroyed. During deformation, strain-induced crystallization increases with strain. Upon retraction even to stress zero, the majority of oriented strain-induced crystallites remains in tack with preferred orientation.

  13. Screening of matrices and fibers for reinforced thermoplastics intended for dental applications.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, A J; Burstone, C J; Hadjinikolaou, I; Jancar, J

    1994-02-01

    Plastics reinforced with continuous fibers (FRC) are being developed for dental applications, such as prosthodontic frameworks and orthodontic retainers. Flexure properties, stress relaxation and hydrolytic stability of FRC based on six thermoplastic matrices, three types of fibers, and three fiber volume fractions were evaluated. Samples with clinically relevant dimensions were tested. Polycarbonate was the preferred matrix material. Polycarbonate reinforced with 42 volume percent glass fibers exhibited the highest combination of flexure modulus (17.9 +/- 2.6 GPa), flexure strength (426 +/- 40 MPa), reinforcing efficiency (0.79), and resistance to stress relaxation. No statistically significant difference was observed between E and S2 glass reinforced composites under the experimental conditions used. Kevlar reinforced materials exhibited a low flexure modulus and strength. The apparent flexure moduli of all composites decreased with span length in the range of clinical interest. Generally, the prevalent mode of failure for all FRC investigated was brittle failure under flexure loading. Relatively large sample-to-sample variation in both composition and properties indicated that improved fabrication methods will be needed in future studies. The combination of good flexure properties, formability, and translucency suggests that novel appliance designs for dentistry are feasible with FRC, but further studies of its properties and particularly the effects of fiber/matrix interfacial quality are needed. PMID:8207027

  14. Thermal Edge-Effects Model for Automated Tape Placement of Thermoplastic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costen, Robert C.

    2000-01-01

    Two-dimensional thermal models for automated tape placement (ATP) of thermoplastic composites neglect the diffusive heat transport that occurs between the newly placed tape and the cool substrate beside it. Such lateral transport can cool the tape edges prematurely and weaken the bond. The three-dimensional, steady state, thermal transport equation is solved by the Green's function method for a tape of finite width being placed on an infinitely wide substrate. The isotherm for the glass transition temperature on the weld interface is used to determine the distance inward from the tape edge that is prematurely cooled, called the cooling incursion Delta a. For the Langley ATP robot, Delta a = 0.4 mm for a unidirectional lay-up of PEEK/carbon fiber composite, and Delta a = 1.2 mm for an isotropic lay-up. A formula for Delta a is developed and applied to a wide range of operating conditions. A surprise finding is that Delta a need not decrease as the Peclet number Pe becomes very large, where Pe is the dimensionless ratio of inertial to diffusive heat transport. Conformable rollers that increase the consolidation length would also increase Delta a, unless other changes are made, such as proportionally increasing the material speed. To compensate for premature edge cooling, the thermal input could be extended past the tape edges by the amount Delta a. This method should help achieve uniform weld strength and crystallinity across the width of the tape.

  15. Large space structures fabrication experiment. [on-orbit fabrication of graphite/thermoplastic beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The fabrication machine used for the rolltrusion and on-orbit forming of graphite thermoplastic (CTP) strip material into structural sections is described. The basic process was analytically developed parallel with, and integrated into the conceptual design of, a flight experiment machine for producing a continuous triangular cross section truss. The machine and its associated ancillary equipment are mounted on a Space Lab pallet. Power, thermal control, and instrumentation connections are made during ground installation. Observation, monitoring, caution and warning, and control panels and displays are installed at the payload specialist station in the orbiter. The machine is primed before flight by initiation of beam forming, to include attachment of the first set of cross members and anchoring of the diagonal cords. Control of the experiment will be from the orbiter mission specialist station. Normal operation is by automatic processing control software. Machine operating data are displayed and recorded on the ground. Data is processed and formatted to show progress of the major experiment parameters including stable operation, physical symmetry, joint integrity, and structural properties.

  16. Laser-Marking Mechanism of Thermoplastic Polyurethane/Bi2O3 Composites.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Wei; Cao, Zheng; Qiu, Pengfei; Wu, Dun; Liu, Chunlin; Li, Huili; Zhu, He

    2015-11-01

    Using bismuth oxide (Bi2O3) as a laser-marking additive and thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) as the matrix, TPU/Bi2O3 composite materials were prepared by melt blending in a torque rheometer. The sheet samples prepared from the TPU/Bi2O3 composites were treated in air by scanning with a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd: YAG) pulsed laser beam at a wavelength of 1064 nm. Compared with the pure TPU sample, the laser-marked composite samples exhibited differences in marking contrast as the Bi2O3 content increased from 0.1% to 1.0% based on stereomicroscope analysis. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, thermogravimetry analysis, and X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the laser-marked surface material of the composite samples. Furthermore, a mechanism for the laser-effected darkening of the TPU/Bi2O3 composites was proposed. The results herein indicated that the addition of the Bi2O3 laser-sensitive additive to TPU resulted in laser darkening of the TPU/Bi2O3 composites. The marking contrast and visual appearance of the surface of the TPU/Bi2O3 composites after laser irradiation was due to a synergistic effect consisting of carbonization via TPU pyrolysis and reduction of Bi2O3 to black bismuth metal. PMID:26467090

  17. Micromechanical modeling of short glass-fiber reinforced thermoplastics-Isotropic damage of pseudograins

    SciTech Connect

    Kammoun, S.; Brassart, L.; Doghri, I.; Delannay, L.; Robert, G.

    2011-05-04

    A micromechanical damage modeling approach is presented to predict the overall elasto-plastic behavior and damage evolution in short fiber reinforced composite materials. The practical use of the approach is for injection molded thermoplastic parts reinforced with short glass fibers. The modeling is proceeded as follows. The representative volume element is decomposed into a set of pseudograins, the damage of which affects progressively the overall stiffness and strength up to total failure. Each pseudograin is a two-phase composite with aligned inclusions having same aspect ratio. A two-step mean-field homogenization procedure is adopted. In the first step, the pseudograins are homogenized individually according to the Mori-Tanaka scheme. The second step consists in a self-consistent homogenization of homogenized pseudograins. An isotropic damage model is applied at the pseudograin level. The model is implemented as a UMAT in the finite element code ABAQUS. Model is shown to reproduce the strength and the anisotropy (Lankford coefficient) during uniaxial tensile tests on samples cut under different directions relative to the injection flow direction.

  18. DAMAGE MODELING OF INJECTION-MOLDED SHORT- AND LONG-FIBER THERMOPLASTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Kunc, Vlastimil; Bapanapalli, Satish K.; Phelps, Jay; Tucker III, Charles L.

    2009-10-30

    This article applies the recent anisotropic rotary diffusion – reduced strain closure (ARD-RSC) model for predicting fiber orientation and a new damage model for injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics (LFTs) to analyze progressive damage leading to total failure of injection-molded long-glass-fiber/polypropylene (PP) specimens. The ARD-RSC model was implemented in a research version of the Autodesk Moldflow Plastics Insight (MPI) processing code, and it has been used to simulate injection-molding of a long-glass-fiber/PP plaque. The damage model combines micromechanical modeling with a continuum damage mechanics description to predict the nonlinear behavior due to plasticity coupled with damage in LFTs. This model has been implemented in the ABAQUS finite element code via user-subroutines and has been used in the damage analyses of tensile specimens removed from the injection-molded long-glass-fiber/PP plaques. Experimental characterization and mechanical testing were performed to provide input data to support and validate both process modeling and damage analyses. The predictions are in agreement with the experimental results.

  19. Enhancing distributive mixing of immiscible polyethylene/thermoplastic starch blend through zeolite ZSM-5 compounding sequence.

    PubMed

    Thipmanee, Ranumas; Lukubira, Sam; Ogale, Amod A; Sane, Amporn

    2016-01-20

    The aim of this work was to explore the effect of zeolite ZSM-5 (ZSM5) incorporation sequence on the phase morphology, microstructure, and performance of polyethylene/thermoplastic starch (PE/TPS) films. Two processing sequences were used for preparing PE/TPS/ZSM5 composites at a weight ratio of PE to TPS of 70:30 and ZSM5 concentrations of 1-5wt%: (i) melt compounding of PE with ZSM5 prior to melt blending with TPS (SI); and (ii) TPS was compounded with ZSM5 prior to blending with PE (SII). Distributive mixing and mechanical properties of PE/TPS blend were greatly enhanced when ZSM5 was incorporated via SII. These were caused by both the higher affinity between PE and ZSM5, compared to that of TPS and ZSM5, and the reduction of TPS viscosity after compounding with ZSM5, leading to migration of ZSM5 from TPS dispersed phase toward PE matrix and increase in breakup of TPS droplets during SII sequence. PMID:26572416

  20. Effect of EMA and antioxidants on properties of thermoplastic starch blown films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Threepopnatkul, P.; Kulsetthanchalee, C.; Sittattrakul, A.; Kaewjinda, E.

    2015-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of poly(ethylene-co-methyl acrylate) (EMA) at 10, 30 and 50 wt% on the morphological properties, moisture sorption, water vapor permeability and biodegradability of thermoplastic starch (TPS). Urea and formamide were used as a mixed plasticizer. In addition, the effect of antioxidants namely, 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyhydrocinnamate (DTBH), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and bis(octadecyl)hydroxylamine (BOH) at 1 wt% on the properties of TPS/EMA film was investigated. TPS/EMA films were produced by a blown film molding machine and characterized by scanning electron microscropy, moisture sorption, water vapor permeability and biodegradability measurement. Results found that the increment of EMA content in the TPS matrix could improve the water sorption, water vapor permeability and biodegradability properties of TPS/EMA films. For biodegradation, the weight loss of the blended films was directly proportional to TPS content. Regarding the antioxidants effect, the water vapor permeability of TPS/EMA films containing DTBH was higher than the one with BOH and BHT. However, the antioxidants contributed little to the biodegradability of TPS/EMA films and had no effect on the moisture sorption of TPS/EMA films.

  1. Structure and properties of thermoplastic polyurethanes based on poly(dimethylsiloxane): assessment of biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Pergal, Marija V; Nestorov, Jelena; Tovilovi?, Gordana; Ostoji?, Sanja; Go?evac, Dejan; Vasiljevi?-Radovi?, Dana; Djonlagi?, Jasna

    2014-11-01

    Properties and biocompatibility of a series of thermoplastic poly(urethane-siloxane)s (TPUSs) based on ?,?-dihydroxy ethoxy propyl poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) for potential biomedical application were studied. Thin films of TPUSs with a different PDMS soft segment content were characterized by (1) H NMR, quantitative (13) C NMR, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), atomic force microscopy (AFM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), contact angle, and water absorption measurements. Different techniques (FTIR, AFM, and DMA) showed that decrease of PDMS content promotes microphase separation in TPUSs. Samples with a higher PDMS content have more hydrophobic surface and better waterproof performances, but lower degree of crystallinity. Biocompatibility of TPUSs was examined after attachment of endothelial cells to the untreated copolymer surface or surface pretreated with multicomponent protein mixture, and by using competitive protein adsorption assay. TPUSs did not exhibit any cytotoxicity toward endothelial cells, as measured by lactate dehydrogenase and 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assays. The untreated and proteins preadsorbed TPUS samples favored endothelial cells adhesion and growth, indicating good biocompatibility. All TPUSs adsorbed more albumin than fibrinogen in competitive protein adsorption experiment, which is feature regarded as beneficial for biocompatibility. The results indicate that TPUSs have good surface, thermo-mechanical, and biocompatible properties, which can be tailored for biomedical application requirements by adequate selection of the soft/hard segments ratio of the copolymers. PMID:24376027

  2. Ultrafast Microwave Welding/Reinforcing Approach at the Interface of Thermoplastic Materials.

    PubMed

    Poyraz, Selcuk; Zhang, Lin; Schroder, Albrecht; Zhang, Xinyu

    2015-10-14

    As an attempt to address the needs and tackle the challenges in welding of thermoplastic materials (TPMs), a novel process was performed via short-term microwave (MW) heating of a specific composite, made up of conducting polypyrrole nanogranule (PPy NG) coated carbon and catalyst source precursor (ferrocene) fine particles, at substrate polypropylene (PP) dog bone pieces' interface. Upon vigorous interactions between MWs and electromagnetic absorbent PPy NG coating, the energy was transformed into a large amount of heat leading to a drastic temperature increase that was simultaneously used for the instant carbonization of PPy and the decomposition of fine ferrocene particles, which resulted in multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) growth at the interface. Meanwhile, the as-grown CNTs on the surface conveyed the heat into the adjacent bulk PP and caused locally molten surface layers' formation. Eventually, the light pressure applied at the interface during the heating process squeezed the molten layers together and a new weld was generated. The method is considerably advantageous compared to other alternatives due to (i) its fast, straightforward, and affordable nature, (ii) its applicability at ambient conditions without the need of any extra equipment or chemicals, and also (iii) its ability to provide clean, durable, and functional welds, via precisely controlling process parameters, without causing any thermal distortion or physical alterations in the bulk TPM. Thus, it is believed that this novel welding process will become much preferable for the manufacturing of next-generation TPM composites in large scale, through short-term MW heating. PMID:26372303

  3. Establishing the relationship between manufacturing and component performance in stretch formed thermoplastic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santare, Michael H.; Pipes, R. Byron; Beaussart, A. J.; Coffin, D. W.; Otoole, B. J.; Shuler, S. F.

    1993-01-01

    Flexible manufacturing methods are needed to reduce the cost of using advanced composites in structural applications. One method that allows for this is the stretch forming of long discontinuous fiber materials with thermoplastic matrices. In order to exploit this flexibility in an economical way, a thorough understanding of the relationship between manufacturing and component performance must be developed. This paper reviews some of the recent work geared toward establishing this understanding. Micromechanics models have been developed to predict the formability of the material during processing. The latest improvement of these models includes the viscoelastic nature of the matrix and comparison with experimental data. A finite element scheme is described which can be used to model the forming process. This model uses equivalent anisotropic viscosities from the micromechanics models and predicts the microstructure in the formed part. In addition, structural models have been built to account for the material property gradients that can result from the manufacturing procedures. Recent developments in this area include the analysis of stress concentrations and a failure model each accounting for the heterogeneous material fields.

  4. Method and apparatus for producing composites of materials exhibiting thermoplastic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Garvey, R.E.; Grostick, E.T.

    1992-01-07

    This patent describes a mobile device for the complete consolidation of layers of material which exhibit thermoplastic properties to form a fully consolidated juncture of the layers upon selected regular and irregular contours selected from conical surfaces, sylindrical surfaces and flat surfaces. It comprises: support means to support one of the layers, the support means having the selected contour; frame means; first heating means associated with the frame means; further heating means associated with the frame means; pressure means associated with the frame means in proximity of the further heating means; it also comprises a compliant roller having a deformable surface to achieve an extended contact with the second layer. It comprises: a central compliant bladder means; a compliant bladder restraint means surrounding the bladder means; and a compliant surface mans surrounding the bladder restraint means for contact with the second layer; and means for causing the compliant roller to resolve about an axis and maintain a position proximate the further heating means; and means for cooling the layers after pressing by such pressure means to achieve complete consolidation thereof.

  5. Thermal analysis for resistance welding of large-scale thermoplastic composite joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Scott T.; Gillespie, John W., Jr.

    1993-06-01

    The need for effective and reliable joining methods continues to grow as the use of thermoplastic composites becomes widespread. It is now possible to join large-scale components with the development of an automated sequential resistance welding process. The thermal history generated by the heating element placed at the interface between adherends determines the quality and performance of the welded joint. This article presents a thermal analysis for the resistance welding of large-scale components that overcomes the limitations of previous models. To simulate welding of the interface, a heat generation term was incorporated that accounts for the Joule heating of graphite fibers in the heating element. A parametric study was conducted to investigate the influence of welding parameters and assess the uniformity of interface temperatures. Components were joined by the resistance welding process to obtain experimental verification. Regions of localized overheating where potential current leakage may occur were identified as a function of process parameters. Insights on promoting more uniform heating for the resistance welding process are discussed.

  6. Reduction of Noise from Disc Brake Systems Using Composite Friction Materials Containing Thermoplastic Elastomers (TPEs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoomi, Mohsen; Katbab, Ali Asghar; Nazockdast, Hossein

    2006-09-01

    Attempts have been made for the first time to prepare a friction material with the characteristic of thermal sensitive modulus, by the inclusion of thermoplastic elastomers (TPE) as viscoelastic polymeric materials into the formulation in order to the increase the damping behavior of the cured friction material. Styrene butadiene styrene (SBS), styrene ethylene butylene styrene (SEBS) and nitrile rubber/polyvinyl chloride (NBR/PVC) blend system were used as TPE materials. In order to evaluate the viscoelastic parameters such as loss factor (tan ?) and storage modulus (E?) for the friction material, dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA) were used. Natural frequencies and mode shapes of friction material and brake disc were determined by modal analysis. However, NBR/PVC and SEBS were found to be much more effective in damping behavior. The results from this comparative study suggest that the damping characteristics of commercial friction materials can be strongly affected by the TPE ingredients. This investigation also confirmed that the specimens with high TPE content had low noise propensity.

  7. Effect of high pressure on acoustic properties of several polymers: Use of impulsive stimulated light scattering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreger, Z. A.; Zhou, J.; Dang, N. C.; Gupta, Y. M.

    2011-04-01

    The acoustic properties of four polymers compressed to high pressures in a diamond anvil cell were determined using the impulsive stimulated light scattering (ISLS) method. Despite the weak scattering efficiency of these polymers, good signal quality was obtained by using a continuous wave probe and an optical heterodyne detection. We provide, for the first time, longitudinal acoustic velocities up to 5 GPa for two thermoplasts: poly(methyl-methacrylate) and poly(styrene), and two elastomers: poly(butadiene) and triblock copolymer of polystyrene-block-polybutadiene-block-polystyrene. The longitudinal acoustic velocities for all of these polymers displayed nonlinear pressure dependence. Despite the significant differences in the initial acoustic velocities these velocities converged above 2.5 GPa. This convergence is associated with the ultimate reduction of free volume in the studied polymers. We explored the possibility of measuring shear acoustic waves in these polymers using ISLS in a depolarized geometry. The data obtained here are important for modeling the response of polymers at extreme conditions.

  8. Lipid-absorbing Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, H. E., Jr.; Wallace, C. J.

    1973-01-01

    The removal of bile acids and cholesterol by polymeric absorption is discussed in terms of micelle-polymer interaction. The results obtained with a polymer composed of 75 parts PEO and 25 parts PB plus curing ingredients show an absorption of 305 to 309%, based on original polymer weight. Particle size effects on absorption rate are analyzed. It is concluded that crosslinked polyethylene oxide polymers will absorb water, crosslinked polybutadiene polymers will absorb lipids; neither polymer will absorb appreciable amounts of lipids from micellar solutions of lipids in water.

  9. Healable thermoset polymer composite embedded with stimuli-responsive fibres

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guoqiang; Meng, Harper; Hu, Jinlian

    2012-01-01

    Severe wounds in biological systems such as human skin cannot heal themselves, unless they are first stitched together. Healing of macroscopic damage in thermoset polymer composites faces a similar challenge. Stimuli-responsive shape-changing polymeric fibres with outstanding mechanical properties embedded in polymers may be able to close macro-cracks automatically upon stimulation such as heating. Here, a stimuli-responsive fibre (SRF) with outstanding mechanical properties and supercontraction capability was fabricated for the purpose of healing macroscopic damage. The SRFs and thermoplastic particles (TPs) were incorporated into regular thermosetting epoxy for repeatedly healing macroscopic damages. The system works by mimicking self-healing of biological systems such as human skin, close (stitch) then heal, i.e. close the macroscopic crack through the thermal-induced supercontraction of the SRFs, and bond the closed crack through melting and diffusing of TPs at the crack interface. The healing efficiency determined using tapered double-cantilever beam specimens was 94 per cent. The self-healing process was reasonably repeatable. PMID:22896563

  10. 3. Advanced Polymer Molecular Science

    E-print Network

    Duh, Kevin

    3. Advanced Polymer Molecular Science Advanced Polymer Science 4. Photo-Functional Elements Supplies with New Functions Achieved with Artificial Collagen and Nano-structured Polymers Biocompatible. Organic Semi- conducting Polymer Creation through Precursor Methods Photofunctional Organic Chemistry

  11. Thermo-mechanical Characterization of Metal/Polymer Composite Filaments and Printing Parameter Study for Fused Deposition Modeling in the 3D Printing Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Seyeon; Reyes, Edgar I.; Moon, Kyoung-sik; Rumpf, Raymond C.; Kim, Nam Soo

    2015-03-01

    New metal/polymer composite filaments for fused deposition modeling (FDM) processes were developed in order to observe the thermo-mechanical properties of the new filaments. The acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) thermoplastic was mixed with copper and iron particles. The percent loading of the metal powder was varied to confirm the effects of metal particles on the thermo-mechanical properties of the filament, such as tensile strength and thermal conductivity. The printing parameters such as temperature and fill density were also varied to see the effects of the parameters on the tensile strength of the final product which was made with the FDM process. As a result of this study, it was confirmed that the tensile strength of the composites is decreased by increasing the loading of metal particles. Additionally, the thermal conductivity of the metal/polymer composite filament was improved by increasing the metal content. It is believed that the metal/polymer filament could be used to print metal and large-scale 3-dimensional (3D) structures without any distortion by the thermal expansion of thermoplastics. The material could also be used in 3D printed circuits and electromagnetic structures for shielding and other applications.

  12. Aliphatic polyester block polymers: renewable, degradable, and sustainable.

    PubMed

    Hillmyer, Marc A; Tolman, William B

    2014-08-19

    Nearly all polymers are derived from nonrenewable fossil resources, and their disposal at their end of use presents significant environmental problems. Nonetheless, polymers are ubiquitous, key components in myriad technologies and are simply indispensible for modern society. An important overarching goal in contemporary polymer research is to develop sustainable alternatives to "petro-polymers" that have competitive performance properties and price, are derived from renewable resources, and may be easily and safely recycled or degraded. Aliphatic polyesters are particularly attractive targets that may be prepared in highly controlled fashion by ring-opening polymerization of bioderived lactones. However, property profiles of polyesters derived from single monomers (homopolymers) can limit their applications, thus demanding alternative strategies. One such strategy is to link distinct polymeric segments in an A-B-A fashion, with A and B chosen to be thermodynamically incompatible so that they can self-organize on a nanometer-length scale and adopt morphologies that endow them with tunable properties. For example, such triblock copolymers can be useful as thermoplastic elastomers, in pressure sensitive adhesive formulations, and as toughening modifiers. Inspired by the tremendous utility of petroleum-derived styrenic triblock copolymers, we aimed to develop syntheses and understand the structure-property profiles of sustainable alternatives, focusing on all renewable and all readily degradable aliphatic polyester triblocks as targets. Building upon oxidation chemistry reported more than a century ago, a constituent of the peppermint plant, (-)-menthol, was converted to the ?-caprolactone derivative menthide. Using a diol initiator and controlled catalysis, menthide was polymerized to yield a low glass transition temperature telechelic polymer (PM) that was then further functionalized using the biomass-derived monomer lactide (LA) to yield fully renewable PLA-PM-PLA triblock copolymers. These new materials were microphase-separated and could be fashioned as high-performing thermoplastic elastomers, with properties comparable to commercial styrenic triblock copolymers. Examination of their hydrolytic degradation (pH 7.4, 37 °C) revealed retention of properties over a significant period, indicating potential utility in biomedical devices. In addition, they were shown to be useful in pressure-sensitive adhesives formulations and as nucleating agents for crystallization of commercially relevant PLA. More recently, new triblocks have been prepared through variation of each of the segments. The natural product ?-methylene-?-butyrolactone (MBL) was used to prepare triblocks with poly(?-methylene-?-butyrolactone) (PMBL) end blocks, PMBL-PM-PMBL. These materials exibited impressive mechanical properties that were largely retained at 100 °C, thus offering application advantages over triblock copolymers comprising poly(styrene) end blocks. In addition, replacements for PM were explored, including the polymer derived from 6-methyl caprolactone (MCL). In sum, success in the synthesis of fully renewable and degradable ABA triblock copolymers with useful properties was realized. This approach has great promise for the development of new, sustainable polymeric materials as viable alternatives to nonrenewable petroleum-derived polymers in numerous applications. PMID:24852135

  13. Processing-microstructure models for short- and long-fiber thermoplastic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelps, Jay H.

    The research for this thesis has explored the important microstructural variables for injection-molded thermoplastic composites with discontinuous fiber reinforcement. Two variables, the distributions of fiber orientation and fiber length after processing, have proven to be not only important for correct material property prediction but also difficult to predict using currently available modeling and simulation techniques. In this work, we develop new models for the prediction of these two microstructural variables. Previously, the Folgar-Tucker model has been widely used to predict fiber orientation in injection molded SFT composites. This model accounts for the effects of both hydrodynamics and fiber-fiber interactions in order to give a prediction for a tensorial measure of fiber orientation. However, when applied to at least some classes of LFTs, this model does not match all components of experimental fiber orientation tensor data. In order to address this shortcoming of the model, we hypothesize that Folgar and Tucker's phenomenological treatment of the effects of fiber-fiber interactions with an isotropic rotary diffusion contribution to the rate of change of orientation is insufficient for materials with longer fibers. Instead, this work develops a fiber orientation model that incorporates anisotropic rotary diffusion (ARD). From kinetic theory we derive a general family of evolution equations for the second-order orientation tensor, correcting errors in earlier treatments, and identify a specific equation that is useful for predicting orientation in LFTs. The amount of diffusivity in this model used to approximate the effect of fiber-fiber interactions in each direction is assumed to depend on a second-order space tensor, which is taken to be a function of the orientation state and the rate of deformation. Also, concentrated fiber suspensions align more slowly with respect to strain than the Folgar-Tucker model predicts. Here, we borrow the technique of Wang et al. (2008) to incorporate this behavior in an objective fashion in this new model. Model parameters are selected by matching the experimental steady-state orientation in simple shear flow, and by requiring stable steady states and physically realizable solutions. Utilizing two separate techniques, we identify model parameters for three different materials. We then show that once a set of parameters that meets all previously established criteria has been identified, the differences in model behavior are negligible within that set of parameters. The final model with the proper parameter set is suitable for use in mold filling and other flow simulations, and does give improved predictions of fiber orientation for injection molded LFTs. Although significant fiber length degradation in LFTs has been observed both in literature and in this work, there are no quantitative fiber breakage models to predict either fiber length distributions or average fiber length measures. This work reviews the suspected causes of fiber breakage during the processing of discontinuously-reinforced thermoplastics, specifically LFTs, and introduces a phenomenological fiber breakage model based on the buckling force in a hydrodynamically loaded fiber. This breakage model is incorporated into a conservation equation for total fiber length, and a phenomenological model for the evolution of the fiber length distribution is developed. From this model, we also develop separate, approximate models for the evolution of both the number-average and weight-average fiber length measures. By applying these models to both a simple numerical example and a more complex mold-filling simulation, a qualitative agreement between experiment and prediction is observed. Although these results are promising, the breakage models have only been applied to the mold cavity in injection molding simulation. Both a literature review and our experimental data strongly suggest that the majority of fiber length degradation occurs in the earlier stages of injection molding, in the screw nozzle, runners, and gate. A be

  14. A process to recover carbon fibers from polymer-matrix composites in end-of-life vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jody, Bassam J.; Pomykala, Joseph A.; Daniels, Edward J.; Greminger, Jessica L.

    2004-08-01

    Because of their high strength-to-weight ratios, carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer-matrix composite (PMC) materials are being evaluated for use in the automotive industry. The major barriers to their widespread use are their relatively high cost and the uncertainty about whether they can be recycled. A process to recover carbon fibers from obsolete PMC materials has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The process was tested using PMC samples made with different thermoset or thermoplastic substrates. For most mixtures of PMCs, the process can be energy self-sufficient using the polymer substrate as an energy source. An evaluation of the recovered samples found that the fibers appear to have retained good properties and characteristics and are suitable for short fiber applications. This paper describes the process and the characteristics and properties of the recovered fibers.

  15. Development of Rapid Pipe Moulding Process for Carbon Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastics by Direct Resistance Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kazuto; Harada, Ryuki; Uemura, Toshiki; Katayama, Tsutao; Kuwahara, Hideyuki

    To deal with environmental issues, the gasoline mileage of passenger cars can be improved by reduction of the car weight. The use of car components made of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics (CFRP) is increasing because of its superior mechanical properties and relatively low density. Many vehicle structural parts are pipe-shaped, such as suspension arms, torsion beams, door guard bars and impact beams. A reduction of the car weight is expected by using CFRP for these parts. Especially, when considering the recyclability and ease of production, Carbon Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastics are a prime candidate. On the other hand, the moulding process of CFRTP pipes for mass production has not been well established yet. For this pipe moulding process an induction heating method has been investigated already, however, this method requires a complicated coil system. To reduce the production cost, another system without such complicated equipment is to be developed. In this study, the pipe moulding process of CFRTP using direct resistance heating was developed. This heating method heats up the mould by Joule heating using skin effect of high-frequency current. The direct resistance heating method is desirable from a cost perspective, because this method can heat the mould directly without using any coils. Formerly developed Non-woven Stitched Multi-axial Cloth (NSMC) was used as semi-product material. NSMC is very suitable for the lamination process due to the fact that non-crimp stitched carbon fiber of [0°/+45°/90°/-45°] and polyamide 6 non-woven fabric are stitched to one sheet, resulting in a short production cycle time. The use of the pipe moulding process with the direct resistance heating method in combination with the NSMC, has resulted in the successful moulding of a CFRTP pipe of 300 mm in length, 40 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness.

  16. Effect of thermoplastic filling techniques on the push-out strength of root sealing materials.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Zigomar Hideo Fecchio Nasser; Silva-Sousa, Yara Teresinha Correa; Raucci Neto, Walter; Rached-Junior, Fuad Jacob Abi; Souza-Gabriel, Aline Evangelista; Silva, Silvio Rocha Corrêa da; Alfredo, Edson

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates the effect of two thermoplastic obturation systems (MicroSeal and Obtura II) on bond strength of different sealers to intraradicular dentin. Sixty root canals of human canines were prepared using ProTaper rotary files (crown-down technique) and irrigated with 2.5% sodium hypochlorite and 17% EDTA. The root canals were filled by MicroSeal, Obtura II, or lateral compaction techniques using AH Plus and Epiphany SE. 1.5 mm thick root slices were subjected to the push-out test. ANOVA and Tukey's test showed that the bond strength values (MPa) observed in the groups obturated with MicroSeal (2.96 ± 2.72) and Obtura II (2.68 ± 2.18) did not significantly differ from each other (p > 0.05) but were significantly higher than that observed in the group obturated with lateral condensation (2.01 ± 1.48; p < 0.05). There were no statistically significant differences in strength (p > 0.05) among the root canal thirds (cervical: 2.44 ± 2.03; middle: 2.50 ± 2.27; and apical: 2.70 ± 2.34). Adhesive failures were predominant (60%) in all groups. In conclusion, MicroSeal and Obtura II techniques, using AH plus sealer, increased the resistance to displacement of the filling material, when compared with lateral compaction. Moreover, when used with Epiphany SE, these obturation systems did not affect the bond strength of the material to root dentin. PMID:26676199

  17. Automatic building of a web-like structure based on thermoplastic adhesive.

    PubMed

    Leach, Derek; Wang, Liyu; Reusser, Dorothea; Iida, Fumiya

    2014-09-01

    Animals build structures to extend their control over certain aspects of the environment; e.g., orb-weaver spiders build webs to capture prey, etc. Inspired by this behaviour of animals, we attempt to develop robotics technology that allows a robot to automatically builds structures to help it accomplish certain tasks. In this paper we show automatic building of a web-like structure with a robot arm based on thermoplastic adhesive (TPA) material. The material properties of TPA, such as elasticity, adhesiveness, and low melting temperature, make it possible for a robot to form threads across an open space by an extrusion-drawing process and then combine several of these threads into a web-like structure. The problems addressed here are discovering which parameters determine the thickness of a thread and determining how web-like structures may be used for certain tasks. We first present a model for the extrusion and the drawing of TPA threads which also includes the temperature-dependent material properties. The model verification result shows that the increasing relative surface area of the TPA thread as it is drawn thinner increases the heat loss of the thread, and that by controlling how quickly the thread is drawn, a range of diameters can be achieved from 0.2-0.75 mm. We then present a method based on a generalized nonlinear finite element truss model. The model was validated and could predict the deformation of various web-like structures when payloads are added. At the end, we demonstrate automatic building of a web-like structure for payload bearing. PMID:24960453

  18. Elastic mesh with thermoplastic polyurethane filaments preserves effective porosity of textile implants.

    PubMed

    Lambertz, Andreas; Vogels, Ruben R M; Binnebösel, Marcel; Schöb, Dominik S; Kossel, Klas; Klinge, Uwe; Neumann, Ulf P; Klink, Christian D

    2015-08-01

    In hernia surgery, meshes with small pores tend to be filled by fibrous tissue, which reduces their stretchability and causes patient complaints. Because of the inelasticity of current meshes, mechanical strain might cause pores to collapse even in large-pore mesh constructions. In this study, a mesh with elastic thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) filaments was constructed to prevent pore size changes even under mechanical strain, and its biocompatibility in comparison with polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) was evaluated. A mesh was constructed using PVDF with elastic TPU filaments and mechanically tested. After midline laparotomy in 20 rabbits, we placed a 15 cm × 3 cm mesh as inlay in the defect. Animals were randomized to either the TPU or PVDF group. After 7 or 21 days, mesh expansion was measured under pneumoperitoneum, and abdominal walls were explanted for immunohistochemical investigations. In vitro, TPU meshes showed a slight reduction in effective porosity from 46% at tension-free conditions to 26% under longitudinal and to 34% under transverse strain. The nonelastic PVDF meshes showed a marked reduction in effective porosity from 70% to 7% and 52%, respectively. The TPU mesh had a breaking elongation of 101% and a tensile strength of 35 N/cm. In vivo, both meshes achieved healing of the incision without hernial defect. The TPU mesh maintained its elasticity under pneumoperitoneum. The amount of CD68-positive, Ki67-positive, and apoptotic cells was significantly lower in the TPU group after 7 and 21 days. The newly developed TPU mesh shows elasticity, structural stability, and preserved effective porosity under mechanical strain. Immunohistochemistry indicates superior biocompatibility of TPU mesh compared with PVDF after 7 and 21 days. PMID:25630828

  19. Thermoplastic Composites Reinforced with Textile Grids: Development of a Manufacturing Chain and Experimental Characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhm, R.; Hufnagl, E.; Kupfer, R.; Engler, T.; Hausding, J.; Cherif, C.; Hufenbach, W.

    2013-12-01

    A significant improvement in the properties of plastic components can be achieved by introducing flexible multiaxial textile grids as reinforcement. This reinforcing concept is based on the layerwise bonding of biaxially or multiaxially oriented, completely stretched filaments of high-performance fibers, e.g. glass or carbon, and thermoplastic components, using modified warp knitting techniques. Such pre-consolidated grid-like textiles are particularly suitable for use in injection moulding, since the grid geometry is very robust with respect to flow pressure and temperature on the one hand and possesses an adjustable spacing to enable a complete filling of the mould cavity on the other hand. The development of pre-consolidated textile grids and their further processing into composites form the basis for providing tailored parts with a large number of additional integrated functions like fibrous sensors or electroconductive fibres. Composites reinforced in that way allow new product groups for promising lightweight structures to be opened up in future. The article describes the manufacturing process of this new composite class and their variability regarding reinforcement and function integration. An experimentally based study of the mechanical properties is performed. For this purpose, quasi-static and highly dynamic tensile tests have been carried out as well as impact penetration experiments. The reinforcing potential of the multiaxial grids is demonstrated by means of evaluating drop tower experiments on automotive components. It has been shown that the load-adapted reinforcement enables a significant local or global improvement of the properties of plastic components depending on industrial requirements.

  20. Radiation processing of thermoplastic starch by blending aromatic additives: Effect of blend composition and radiation parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandal, Dhriti; Mikus, Pierre-Yves; Dole, Patrice; Coqueret, Xavier

    2013-03-01

    This paper reports on the effects of electron beam (EB) irradiation on poly ?-1,4-glucose oligomers (maltodextrins) in the presence of water and of various aromatic additives, as model blends for gaining a better understanding at a molecular level the modifications occurring in amorphous starch-lignin blends submitted to ionizing irradiation for improving the properties of this type of bio-based thermoplastic material. A series of aromatic compounds, namely p-methoxy benzyl alcohol, benzene dimethanol, cinnamyl alcohol and some related carboxylic acids namely cinnamic acid, coumaric acid, and ferulic acid, was thus studied for assessing the ability of each additive to counteract chain scission of the polysaccharide and induce interchain covalent linkages. Gel formation in EB-irradiated blends comprising of maltodextrin was shown to be dependent on three main factors: the type of aromatic additive, presence of glycerol, and irradiation dose. The chain scission versus grafting phenomenon as a function of blend composition and dose were studied using Size Exclusion Chromatography by determining the changes in molecular weight distribution (MWD) from Refractive Index (RI) chromatograms and the presence of aromatic grafts onto the maltodextrin chains from UV chromatograms. The occurrence of crosslinking was quantified by gel fraction measurements allowing for ranking the cross-linking efficiency of the additives. When applying the method to destructurized starch blends, gel formation was also shown to be strongly affected by the moisture content of the sample submitted to irradiation. The results demonstrate the possibility to tune the reactivity of tailored blend for minimizing chain degradation and control the degree of cross-linking.

  1. New understanding of microstructure formation of the rubber phase in thermoplastic vulcanizates (TPV).

    PubMed

    Wu, Hanguang; Tian, Ming; Zhang, Liqun; Tian, Hongchi; Wu, Youping; Ning, Nanying

    2014-03-21

    The breakup of the rubber phase in an ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM)/polypropylene (PP) blend at the early stage of dynamic vulcanization is similar to that in an unvulcanized EPDM/PP blend because of the low crosslink density of the EPDM phase. In this work, the minimum size of the rubber phase in the unvulcanized EPDM/PP blend was first calculated by using the critical breakup law of viscoelastic droplets in a matrix. The calculated results showed that the minimum size of the rubber phase in the unvulcanized blend was in the nanometer scale (25-46 nm), not the micrometer scale as reported in many works. Meanwhile, the actual size of the rubber phase in the thermoplastic vulcanizate (TPV) at both the early stage and the final stage of dynamic vulcanization was observed by using peak force tapping atomic force microscopy (PF-AFM). The results indicated that the EPDM phase indeed broke up into nanoparticles at the early stage of dynamic vulcanization, in good agreement with the calculated results. More interestingly, we first revealed that the micrometer-sized rubber particles commonly observed in TPV were actually the agglomerates of rubber nanoparticles with diameters between 40 and 60 nm. The mechanism for the formation of rubber nanoparticles and their agglomerates during dynamic vulcanization was then discussed. Our work provides guidance to control the microstructure of the rubber phase in TPV to prepare high performance TPV products for a wide range of applications in the automobile and electronic industries. PMID:24652229

  2. Application of Image And X-Ray Microtomography Technique To Quantify Filler Distribution In Thermoplastic-Natural Rubber Blend Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Sahrim; Rasid, Rozaidi; Mouad, A. T.; Aziz Mohamed, A.; Abdullah, Jaafar; Dahlan, M.; Mohamad, Mahathir; Jamro, Rafhayudi; Hamzah Harun, M.; Yazid, Hafizal; Abdullah, W. Saffiey W.

    2010-01-05

    X-ray microtomography and ImageJ 1.39 u is used as a tool to quantify volume percentage of B{sub 4}C as fillers in thermoplastic-natural rubber blend composites. The use of percentage of area occupied by fillers as obtain from ImageJ from the microtomography sliced images enables the proposed technique to easily obtain the amount volume percentage of B{sub 4}C in the composite non-destructively. Comparison with other technique such as density measurement and chemical analysis proves the proposed technique as one of the promising approach.

  3. Influence of Structuring by Laser and Plasma Torch on the Adhesion of Metallic Films on Thermoplastic Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, W.; Djomani, D.; Coulon, J. F.; Grunchec, R.

    In this study three different types of thermoplastics haven been investigated: polypropylene (PP, used in automotive industry), poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK, used in aerospace applications) and polyethylene (PE, used in medical applications). Surface preparation prior to thin film coating was realized using industrial plasma torch and ultra-short pulse laser. Whereas the plasma torch is a very cost efficient tool the laser light allows precise and localized surface modification. The adhesion measurements of an Al-film deposited on the substrate show that laser structuring can yield in a cohesive rupture. Adhesion can be increased by a factor of 4 to 7 with regard to conventional joining techniques.

  4. Anion exchange polymer electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Yu Seung; Kim, Dae Sik

    2015-06-02

    Anion exchange polymer electrolytes that include guanidinium functionalized polymers may be used as membranes and binders for electrocatalysts in preparation of anodes for electrochemical cells such as solid alkaline fuel cells.

  5. Polymer composites containing nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bley, Richard A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to polymer composite materials containing carbon nanotubes, particularly to those containing singled-walled nanotubes. The invention provides a polymer composite comprising one or more base polymers, one or more functionalized m-phenylenevinylene-2,5-disubstituted-p-phenylenevinylene polymers and carbon nanotubes. The invention also relates to functionalized m-phenylenevinylene-2,5-disubstituted-p-phenylenevinylene polymers, particularly to m-phenylenevinylene-2,5-disubstituted-p-phenylenevinylene polymers having side chain functionalization, and more particularly to m-phenylenevinylene-2,5-disubstituted-p-phenylenevinylene polymers having olefin side chains and alkyl epoxy side chains. The invention further relates to methods of making polymer composites comprising carbon nanotubes.

  6. Stiff Quantum Polymers

    E-print Network

    H. Kleinert

    2007-05-01

    At ultralow temperatures, polymers exhibit quantum behavior, which is calculated here for the moments and of the end-to-end distribution in the large-stiffness regime. The result should be measurable for polymers in wide optical traps.

  7. Introduction to Polymer Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Frank W.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews the physical and chemical properties of polymers and the two major methods of polymer synthesis: addition (chain, chain-growth, or chain-reaction), and condensation (step-growth or step-reaction) polymerization. (JN)

  8. Polymer Fluid Dynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, R. Byron

    1980-01-01

    Problems in polymer fluid dynamics are described, including development of constitutive equations, rheometry, kinetic theory, flow visualization, heat transfer studies, flows with phase change, two-phase flow, polymer unit operations, and drag reduction. (JN)

  9. Mechanical Properties of Polymers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aklonis, J. J.

    1981-01-01

    Mechanical properties (stress-strain relationships) of polymers are reviewed, taking into account both time and temperature factors. Topics include modulus-temperature behavior of polymers, time dependence, time-temperature correspondence, and mechanical models. (JN)

  10. Development of an impact- and solvent-resistant thermoplastic composite matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delano, C. B.; Kiskiras, C. J.

    1984-01-01

    Synthesis, moldability and chloroform, acetone and tricresyl phosphate resistance of 16 polymer compositions are described. These aliphatic heterocyclic polymers include polyimides, polybenzimidazoles, and N-arylenepolybenzimidazoles. A solution condensation (cresol) method to prepare imidized aliphaic polyimides is described. Two polyimides and one polybenzimidazole demonstrate no crazing or cracking during 500 hr exposure to the cited solvents under stress. Modification of one aliphatic polyimide with several aromatic amines suggests that m-phenylenediamine is singular in its behavior to improve the chloroform resistance of that class of polyimides.

  11. A Damage Resistance Comparison Between Candidate Polymer Matrix Composite Feedline Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T

    2000-01-01

    As part of NASAs focused technology programs for future reusable launch vehicles, a task is underway to study the feasibility of using the polymer matrix composite feedlines instead of metal ones on propulsion systems. This is desirable to reduce weight and manufacturing costs. The task consists of comparing several prototype composite feedlines made by various methods. These methods are electron-beam curing, standard hand lay-up and autoclave cure, solvent assisted resin transfer molding, and thermoplastic tape laying. One of the critical technology drivers for composite components is resistance to foreign objects damage. This paper presents results of an experimental study of the damage resistance of the candidate materials that the prototype feedlines are manufactured from. The materials examined all have a 5-harness weave of IM7 as the fiber constituent (except for the thermoplastic, which is unidirectional tape laid up in a bidirectional configuration). The resin tested were 977-6, PR 520, SE-SA-1, RS-E3 (e-beam curable), Cycom 823 and PEEK. The results showed that the 977-6 and PEEK were the most damage resistant in all tested cases.

  12. Selective light sintering of Aerosol-Jet printed silver nanoparticle inks on polymer substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Schuetz, K. E-mail: hoerber@faps.uni-erlangen.de Hoerber, J. E-mail: hoerber@faps.uni-erlangen.de Franke, J. E-mail: hoerber@faps.uni-erlangen.de

    2014-05-15

    Printing silver nanoparticle inks to generate conductive structures for electronics on polymer substrates has gained increasing relevance in recent years. In this context, the Aerosol-Jet Technology is well suited to print silver ink on 3D-Molded Interconnect Devices (MID). The deposited ink requires thermal post-treatment to obtain sufficient electrical conductivity and adhesion. However, commonly used oven sintering cannot be applied for many thermoplastic substrates due to low melting temperatures. In this study a new sintering technology, selective light sintering, is presented, based on the focused, continuous light beam of a xenon lamp. Sintering experiments were conducted with Aerosol-Jet printed structures on various polycarbonate (PC) substrates. Especially on neat, light transparent PC, silver tracks were evenly sintered with marginal impact to the substrate. Electrical conductivities significantly exceed the values obtained with conventional oven sintering. Adhesive strength is sufficient for conductive tracks. Experiments with non-transparent PC substrates led to substrate damage due to increased light absorption. Therefore a concept for a variation of light sintering was developed, using optical filters. First experiments showed significant reduction of substrate damage and good sintering qualities. The highly promising results of the conducted experiments provide a base for further investigations to increase adhesion and qualifying the technology for MID applications and a broad spectrum of thermoplastic substrates.

  13. Nonaligned carbon nanotubes partially embedded in polymer matrixes: a novel route to superhydrophobic conductive surfaces.

    PubMed

    Peng, Mao; Liao, Zhangjie; Qi, Ji; Zhou, Zhi

    2010-08-17

    A new method for transforming common polymers into superhydrophobic conductive surfaces, with both a high static water contact angle (approximately 160 degrees) and a low sliding angle (2.0 degrees-4.5 degrees), and a low sheet resistance on the order of 10(1)-10(3) ohms/sq is presented. A layer of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) is first distributed on the surface of a polymer substrate, then by a single step of pressing, the MWNTs are partially embedded inside the substrate surface and form a superhydrophobic coating with a "carpet-" or "hair"-like morphology. The infiltration of polymer melts into the porous MWNT layer follows Darcy's law, and the pressing time greatly influence the morphology and superhydrophobicity. Moreover, the coating can be electrically heated by 20-70 degrees C with a voltage as low as 4-8 V at an electric energy density below 1.6 J/cm(2) and therefore can be used for deicing applications. Hydroxylation and fluoroalkylsilane treatment can greatly improve the stability of the superhydrophobicity of MWNTs. This method is convenient and applicable to a variety of thermoplastic polymers and nonpolymer substrates coated by silicone rubber. PMID:20695606

  14. Fused filament 3D printing of ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrico, James D.; Traeden, Nicklaus W.; Aureli, Matteo; Leang, Kam K.

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes a new three-dimensional (3D) fused filament additive manufacturing (AM) technique in which electroactive polymer filament material is used to build soft active 3D structures, layer by layer. Specifically, the unique actuation and sensing properties of ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs) are exploited in 3D printing to create electroactive polymer structures for application in soft robotics and bio-inspired systems. The process begins with extruding a precursor material (non-acid Nafion precursor resin) into a thermoplastic filament for 3D printing. The filament is then used by a custom-designed 3D printer to manufacture the desired soft polymer structures, layer by layer. Since at this stage the 3D-printed samples are not yet electroactive, a chemical functionalization process follows, consisting in hydrolyzing the precursor samples in an aqueous solution of potassium hydroxide and dimethyl sulfoxide. Upon functionalization, metal electrodes are applied on the samples through an electroless plating process, which enables the 3D-printed IPMC structures to be controlled by voltage signals for actuation (or to act as sensors). This innovative AM process is described in detail and the performance of 3D printed IPMC actuators is compared to an IPMC actuator fabricated from commercially available Nafion sheet material. The experimental results show comparable performance between the two types of actuators, demonstrating the potential and feasibility of creating functional 3D-printed IPMCs.

  15. Polymer Reaction & Colloidal Engineering

    E-print Network

    Giger, Christine

    Polymer Reaction & Colloidal Engineering Research Profile The Morbidelli Group is carrying out research in numerous areas related to polymer and colloid science and enginee- ring. Our research activity combines a variety of experimen- tal techniques for polymers and particles characterization with advanced

  16. Metal-polymer and polymer-polymer interfaces: Application to conjugated polymer electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smallfield, Julie Anne Osladil

    The study of metal-polymer and polymer-polymer interfaces is applied to conjugated polymer electronic devices. Conjugated polymers are a class of organic materials which have metallic or semiconducting properties which are being investigated as alternatives to traditional semiconducting materials. When conjugated polymers are used in devices, the interfaces are found to be critical to device performance. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), which give information about the atomic and chemical composition, workfunction, and ionization potential of materials, are used to study these interfaces. In studying metal-polymer interfaces, it is shown that the interface between the conjugated polymer fully sulfonated polyaniline (NSPAN) and an aluminum alloy is an active interface, in which copper is extracted by the polymer from the aluminum alloy. This results in the aluminum alloy becoming more resistant to corrosion in a salty environment. The interface between aluminum and NSPAN, as it is found in some light emitting devices (LEDS), is also studied. It is concluded that negative charge is transferred from the aluminum to the polymer, resulting in a thin layer of oxidized aluminum and a more reduced form of the polymer at the interface. In studying polymer-polymer interfaces, it is proposed that NSPAN protonates a pyridine containing polymer at an interface which is also found in some LEDs. This is proposed to be responsible for color variation found in some LEDs. A model system was studied, and protonation at the polymer-polymer interface was directly observed, supporting the earlier proposals. Polymer-polymer interfaces found in SCALE devices, which are LEDs made with three polymer layers, are studied by UPS to determine the band structure of these devices. It is concluded that the EB layers decrease the hole barrier and increase the electron barrier, which leads to better charge balance and a better device. The EB layers also create a symmetric device, which enables it to emit light under both forward and reverse bias. Finally, a new type of all polymer transistor device is studied, with an emphasis on how modifying the charge on the polymer surface affects device performance.

  17. Development of an impact- and solvent-resistant thermoplastic composite matrix, phase 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delano, C. B.

    1987-01-01

    Polyimides from BTDA with m-phenylenediamine and three aliphatic diamines were prepared in cresol and characterized. Characterization tests included compression strength and modulus, stressed solvent resistance, and melt-flow tests. Efforts to reduce the molecular weights of these polymers by either stoichiometric imbalance or phthalic anhydride end capping produced opacity in the polymer moldings when the stoichiometry was less than 99 percent. Use of 2,4-diaminotoluene in place of the m-phenylenediamine allowed clear polymer moldings to be obtained at all stoichiometries by end capping or stoichiometric imbalance. After melt-flow/molecular-weight studies, carbon fabric composites were prepared from three polyimide compositions containing BTDA, 2,4-diaminotoluene and two aliphatic diamines. Flexural strengths of two of the resins were in excess of 689 MPa (100 ksi) at both room temperature and 93 C. The polyimide from BTDA was selected for scale-up and neat resin characterization tests. The Tg of this polymer was 233 C.

  18. Nanoporous polymer electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Brian (Wheat Ridge, CO); Nguyen, Vinh (Wheat Ridge, CO)

    2012-04-24

    A nanoporous polymer electrolyte and methods for making the polymer electrolyte are disclosed. The polymer electrolyte comprises a crosslinked self-assembly of a polymerizable salt surfactant, wherein the crosslinked self-assembly includes nanopores and wherein the crosslinked self-assembly has a conductivity of at least 1.0.times.10.sup.-6 S/cm at 25.degree. C. The method of making a polymer electrolyte comprises providing a polymerizable salt surfactant. The method further comprises crosslinking the polymerizable salt surfactant to form a nanoporous polymer electrolyte.

  19. Durability-Based Design Criteria for a Quasi-Isotropic Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Thermoplastic Automotive Composite

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, Dan J; Corum, James; Klett, Lynn B; Davenport, Mike; Battiste, Rick; Simpson, Jr., William A

    2006-04-01

    This report provides recommended durability-based design properties and criteria for a quais-isotropic carbon-fiber thermoplastic composite for possible automotive structural applications. The composite consisted of a PolyPhenylene Sulfide (PPS) thermoplastic matrix (Fortron's PPS - Ticona 0214B1 powder) reinforced with 16 plies of carbon-fiber unidirectional tape, [0?/90?/+45?/-45?]2S. The carbon fiber was Hexcel AS-4C and was present in a fiber volume of 53% (60%, by weight). The overall goal of the project, which is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Freedom Car and Vehicle Technologies and is closely coordinated with the Advanced Composites Consortium, is to develop durability-driven design data and criteria to assure the long-term integrity of carbon-fiber-based composite systems for automotive structural applications. This document is in two parts. Part 1 provides design data and correlations, while Part 2 provides the underlying experimental data and models. The durability issues addressed include the effects of short-time, cyclic, and sustained loadings; temperature; fluid environments; and low-energy impacts (e.g., tool drops and kickups of roadway debris) on deformation, strength, and stiffness. Guidance for design analysis, time-independent and time-dependent allowable stresses, rules for cyclic loadings, and damage-tolerance design guidance are provided.

  20. Prediction of the Elastic-Plastic Stress/Strain Response for Injection-Molded Long-Fiber Thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba N.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Phelps, Jay H; TuckerIII, Charles L.; Bapanapalli, Satish K

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes a model to predict the elastic-plastic response of injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics (LFTs). The model accounts for elastic fibers embedded in a thermoplastic resin that exhibits the elastic-plastic behavior obeying the Ramberg-Osgood relation and J-2 deformation theory of plasticity. It also accounts for fiber length and orientation distributions in the composite formed by the injection-molding process. Fiber orientation was predicted using an anisotropic rotary diffusion model recently developed for LFTs. An incremental procedure using Eshelby's equivalent inclusion method and the Mori-Tanaka assumption is proposed to compute the overall stress increment resulting from an overall strain increment for an aligned-fiber composite that contains the same fiber volume fraction and length distribution as the actual composite. The incremental response of the latter is then obtained from the solution for the aligned-fiber composite by averaging over all fiber orientations. Failure during incremental loading is predicted using the Van Hattum-Bernado model. The model is validated against the experimental stress-strain results obtained for long-glass-fiber/polypropylene specimens.