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Sample records for thoracic fusion surgery

  1. Spinal Epidural Hematoma after Thoracolumbar Posterior Fusion Surgery without Decompression for Thoracic Vertebral Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Minato, Tsuyoki; Miyagi, Masayuki; Saito, Wataru; Shoji, Shintaro; Nakazawa, Toshiyuki; Inoue, Gen; Imura, Takayuki; Minehara, Hiroaki; Matsuura, Terumasa; Kawamura, Tadashi; Namba, Takanori; Takahira, Naonobu; Takaso, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    We present a rare case of spinal epidural hematoma (SEH) after thoracolumbar posterior fusion without decompression surgery for a thoracic vertebral fracture. A 42-year-old man was hospitalized for a thoracic vertebral fracture caused by being sandwiched against his back on broken concrete block. Computed tomography revealed a T12 dislocation fracture of AO type B2, multiple bilateral rib fractures, and a right hemopneumothorax. Four days after the injury, in order to promote early orthostasis and to improve respiratory status, we performed thoracolumbar posterior fusion surgery without decompression; the patient had back pain but no neurological deficits. Three hours after surgery, he complained of acute pain and severe weakness of his bilateral lower extremities; with allodynia below the level of his umbilicus, postoperative SEH was diagnosed. We performed immediate revision surgery. After removal of the hematoma, his symptoms improved gradually, and he was discharged ambulatory one month after revision surgery. Through experience of this case, we should strongly consider the possibility of preexisting SEH before surgery, even in patients with no neurological deficits. We should also consider perioperative coagulopathy in patients with multiple trauma, as in this case. PMID:26989542

  2. [Single Port Thoracic Surgery and Reduced Port Thoracic Surgery].

    PubMed

    Onodera, Ken; Noda, Masafumi

    2016-07-01

    Single port thoracic surgery, reduced port surgery and needlescopic surgery attract attention as one of the minimally invasive surgery in thoracic surgery recently. Single port thoracic surgery was advocated by Rocco in 2004, it was reported usefulness of single port thoracic surgery for primary spontaneous pneumothorax. The surgical procedure as single (or reduced) port thoracic surgery is roughly divided into the following. One is operated with instruments inserted from the single extended incision, and the other is operated with instruments punctured without extending incision. It is not generally complicated procedures in single port thoracic surgery. Primary spontaneous pneumothorax and biopsy for lung and pleura are considered the surgical indication for single (or reduced) port surgery. It is revealed that single port surgery for primary spontaneous pneumothorax is less invasive than conventional surgery. Single port and reduced port thoracic surgery will spread furthermore in the future. PMID:27440029

  3. Nonintubated anesthesia for thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bei

    2014-01-01

    Nonintubated thoracic surgery has been used in procedures including pleura, lungs and mediastinum. Appropriate anesthesia techniques with or without sedation allow thoracic surgery patients to avoid the potential risks of intubated general anesthesia, particularly for the high-risk patients. However, nonintubated anesthesia for thoracic surgery has some benefits as well as problems. In this review, the background, indication, perioperative anesthetic consideration and management, and advantages and disadvantages are discussed and summarized. PMID:25589994

  4. Nanotechnology applications in thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Hofferberth, Sophie C; Grinstaff, Mark W; Colson, Yolonda L

    2016-07-01

    Nanotechnology is an emerging, rapidly evolving field with the potential to significantly impact care across the full spectrum of cancer therapy. Of note, several recent nanotechnological advances show particular promise to improve outcomes for thoracic surgical patients. A variety of nanotechnologies are described that offer possible solutions to existing challenges encountered in the detection, diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer. Nanotechnology-based imaging platforms have the ability to improve the surgical care of patients with thoracic malignancies through technological advances in intraoperative tumour localization, lymph node mapping and accuracy of tumour resection. Moreover, nanotechnology is poised to revolutionize adjuvant lung cancer therapy. Common chemotherapeutic drugs, such as paclitaxel, docetaxel and doxorubicin, are being formulated using various nanotechnologies to improve drug delivery, whereas nanoparticle (NP)-based imaging technologies can monitor the tumour microenvironment and facilitate molecularly targeted lung cancer therapy. Although early nanotechnology-based delivery systems show promise, the next frontier in lung cancer therapy is the development of 'theranostic' multifunctional NPs capable of integrating diagnosis, drug monitoring, tumour targeting and controlled drug release into various unifying platforms. This article provides an overview of key existing and emerging nanotechnology platforms that may find clinical application in thoracic surgery in the near future. PMID:26843431

  5. Evolution of thoracic surgery in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Deslauriers, Jean; Griffith Pearson, F; Nelems, Bill

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Canada’s contributions toward the 21st century’s practice of thoracic surgery have been both unique and multilayered. Scattered throughout are tales of pioneers where none had gone before, where opportunities were greeted by creativity and where iconic figures followed one another. OBJECTIVE: To describe the numerous and important achievements of Canadian thoracic surgeons in the areas of surgery for pulmonary tuberculosis, thoracic oncology, airway surgery and lung transplantation. METHOD: Information was collected through reading of the numerous publications written by Canadian thoracic surgeons over the past 100 years, interviews with interested people from all thoracic surgery divisions across Canada and review of pertinent material form the archives of several Canadian hospitals and universities. RESULTS: Many of the developments occurred by chance. It was the early and specific focus on thoracic surgery, to the exclusion of cardiac and general surgery, that distinguishes the Canadian experience, a model that is now emerging everywhere. From lung transplantation in chimera twin calves to ex vivo organ preservation, from the removal of airways to tissue regeneration, and from intensive care research to complex science, Canadians have excelled in their commitment to research. Over the years, the influence of Canadian thoracic surgery on international practice has been significant. CONCLUSIONS: Canada spearheaded the development of thoracic surgery over the past 100 years to a greater degree than any other country. From research to education, from national infrastructures to the regionalization of local practices, it happened in Canada.

  6. Results of hemivertebrectomy and fusion for symptomatic thoracic disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Debnath, U K; McConnell, J R; Sengupta, D K; Mehdian, S M H; Webb, J K

    2003-06-01

    We retrospectively analysed ten consecutive patients (age range 32-77 years) treated surgically from 1994 to 1999 for symptomatic thoracic disc herniation between the 6th and 12th thoracic discs. Clinically, eight patients had varying grades of back pain and eight patients had paraparesis. Radiography showed calcification in 50% of the herniated discs. Two patients had two-level thoracic disc herniation. Hemivertebrectomy followed by discectomy and fusion was carried out in all patients. Instrumentation with cages was performed in eight patients and bone grafting alone in two patients. The average follow-up was 24 months (range 13-36 months). Six patients had an excellent or good outcome, three had a fair outcome and one had a poor outcome. One patient had atelectasis, which recovered within 2 days of surgery. Another patient had developed complete paraplegia, detected at surgery by SSEPs, and underwent resurgery following magnetic resonance (MR) scan with complete corpectomy and instrumented fusion. At 2 years, she had a functional recovery. The patient with poor outcome had undergone a previous discectomy at T9/10. He developed severe back pain and generalised hyper-reflexia following corpectomy and fusion for disc herniation at T10/11. We advocate anterior transthoracic discectomy following partial corpectomy for symptomatic thoracic disc herniation between the 6th and 12th thoracic discs. This procedure offers improved access to the thoracic disc for an instrumented fusion, which is likely to decrease the risk of iatrogenic injury to the spinal cord. PMID:12800003

  7. Nonintubated anesthesia in thoracic surgery: general issues

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Anesthetic management for awake thoracic surgery (ATS) is more difficult than under general anesthesia (GA), being technically extremely challenging for the anesthesiologist. Therefore, thorough preparation and vigilance are paramount for successful patient management. In this review, important considerations of nonintubated anesthesia for thoracic surgery are discussed in view of careful patient selection, anesthetic preparation, potential perioperative difficulties and the management of its complications. PMID:26046051

  8. The History of Duke Thoracic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Smith, Peter K; Mulvihill, Michael S; D'Amico, Thomas A

    2015-01-01

    Since 1931, Duke Thoracic Surgery has been defined by excellence in patient care, research, and the education of leaders in surgery. In this work, the history, contributions, historic figures, and current structure of the program are reviewed. The program has cultivated a commitment to surgical investigation and training that persists to the present day. This commitment is manifest by the program's contributions to the field of cardiothoracic surgery, from the fundamental investigation of the coronary circulation and the development of the heat exchanger for myocardial preservation, to large-scale clinical trials in cardiac and thoracic surgery. PMID:26811042

  9. Modern impact of video assisted thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    D’Amico, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    With advancement in technology, experience and training over the last two decades, video assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) has become widely accepted and utilized all over the world. VATS started as a diagnostic tool in the early 1990s, technique of VATS lobectomy evolved and became safer over the next 10-15 years and now it is being used for more advanced and hybrid operations. VATS has contributed to the development of minimally invasive surgical interventions for other thoracic disorders like mediastinal tumors and esophageal cancer as well. This article looks at the advantages of VATS, technique advancements and its applications in other thoracic operations and its influence on the present and future of thoracic surgery. PMID:25379201

  10. [Video-assisted thoracic surgery, lung transplantation and mediastinitis: major issues in thoracic surgery in 2010].

    PubMed

    Borro, José M; Moreno, Ramón; Gómez, Ana; Duque, José Luis

    2011-01-01

    We reviewed the major issues in thoracic surgery relating to the advances made in our specialty in 2010. To do this, the 43(rd) Congress of the Spanish Society of Pneumology and Thoracic Surgery held in La Coruña and the articles published in the Society's journal, Archivos de Bronconeumología, were reviewed. The main areas of interest were related to the development of video-assisted thoracic surgery, lung transplantation and descending mediastinitis. The new tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) classification (7(th) edition), presented last year, was still a topical issue this year. The First Forum of Thoracic Surgeons and the Update in Thoracic Surgery together with the Nurses' Area have constituted an excellent teaching program. PMID:21300211

  11. European institutional accreditation of general thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Brunelli, Alessandro; Falcoz, Pierre Emmanuel

    2014-05-01

    To improve standardization of general thoracic surgery (GTS) practice across Europe, the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) has implemented a program of Institutional Accreditation. We reviewed the methods and rules of engagement of this program. A composite performance score (CPS) including outcome and process indicators is used to measure institutional performance and assess eligibility for accreditation. Eligible units are invited to participate and accept a local audit performed by an external auditors team composed by data inspectors and thoracic surgeons. In addition to data quality, a series of structural, procedural and qualification characteristics are inspected. Once the visit is complete, the team will produce an audit report to be sent to the members of the database committee for deliberation on the institutional accreditation of that unit. The Database committee will send an executive report to the ESTS Executive Committee for their final decision on the accreditation. PMID:24868447

  12. The European educational platform on thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rocco, Gaetano; Venuta, Federico

    2014-01-01

    As the largest scientific organisation world-wide exclusively dedicated to general thoracic surgery (GTS), the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) recognized that one of its priorities is education. The educational platform designed ESTS addresses not only trainees, but also confirmed thoracic surgeons. The two main aims are (I) to prepare trainees to graduation and to the certification by the European Board of Thoracic Surgery and (II) to offer opportunities for continuous medical education in the perspective of life-long learning and continuous professional development to certified thoracic surgeons. It is likely that recertification will become an obligation during the coming decade. At its inception, the platform differentiated two different events. A 6-day course emphasizing on theoretic knowledge was created in Antalya in 2007. The same year, a 2-day school oriented to practical issues with hands-on in the animal lab was launched in Antalya. These two teaching tracks need further development. In the knowledge track, we intend to organize highly specialized 2-day courses to deepen insight into theoretical questions. The skill track will be implemented by specialized courses for high technology such as tracheal surgery, ECMO, robotics or chest wall reconstruction. In order to promote tomorrows’ leadership, we created an academic competence track giving an insight into medical communication, methodology and management. We also had to respond to an increasing demand from the Russian speaking countries, where colleagues may face problems to attend western meetings, and where the language bareer may be a major impediment. We initiated a Russian school with three events yearly in 2012. Contemporary teaching must be completed with an e-learning platform, which is currently under development. The school activities are organized by the educational committee, which is headed by the ESTS Director of Education, assisted by coordinators of the teaching tracks

  13. The European educational platform on thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Massard, Gilbert; Rocco, Gaetano; Venuta, Federico

    2014-05-01

    As the largest scientific organisation world-wide exclusively dedicated to general thoracic surgery (GTS), the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) recognized that one of its priorities is education. The educational platform designed ESTS addresses not only trainees, but also confirmed thoracic surgeons. The two main aims are (I) to prepare trainees to graduation and to the certification by the European Board of Thoracic Surgery and (II) to offer opportunities for continuous medical education in the perspective of life-long learning and continuous professional development to certified thoracic surgeons. It is likely that recertification will become an obligation during the coming decade. At its inception, the platform differentiated two different events. A 6-day course emphasizing on theoretic knowledge was created in Antalya in 2007. The same year, a 2-day school oriented to practical issues with hands-on in the animal lab was launched in Antalya. These two teaching tracks need further development. In the knowledge track, we intend to organize highly specialized 2-day courses to deepen insight into theoretical questions. The skill track will be implemented by specialized courses for high technology such as tracheal surgery, ECMO, robotics or chest wall reconstruction. In order to promote tomorrows' leadership, we created an academic competence track giving an insight into medical communication, methodology and management. We also had to respond to an increasing demand from the Russian speaking countries, where colleagues may face problems to attend western meetings, and where the language bareer may be a major impediment. We initiated a Russian school with three events yearly in 2012. Contemporary teaching must be completed with an e-learning platform, which is currently under development. The school activities are organized by the educational committee, which is headed by the ESTS Director of Education, assisted by coordinators of the teaching tracks and

  14. Developing the academic thoracic surgeon: teaching surgery.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, W A; Greene, P S

    2000-04-01

    Teaching surgery can be a very gratifying experience for those of us involved in academic thoracic surgery. Fundamentals of a good residency program require that patients should always be placed in the highest priority. However, the residency program should also be committed to teaching as a priority. Creating the proper operating room environment is essential for optimal conduct of the operation. This environment is similar to that of the airline industry, which is known as crew or cockpit resource management. The design of a teaching program needs to have evaluation as one of its key elements. In addition to resident evaluation, it is also important to have faculty evaluation by the residents. The goal of any residency program should be to foster the development of the future leaders in our specialty. The information contained within this article represents the art and science of teaching thoracic surgery as applied by the faculty in the Division of Cardiac Surgery at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. PMID:10727957

  15. Management of a Left Internal Thoracic Artery Graft Injury during Left Thoracotomy for Thoracic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Oates, Matthew; Yadav, Sumit; Saxena, Pankaj

    2016-07-01

    There have been some recent reports on the surgical treatment of lung cancer in patients following previous coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Use of internal thoracic artery graft is a gold standard in cardiac surgery with superior long-term patency. Left internal thoracic artery graft is usually patent during left lung resection in patients who present to the surgeon with an operable lung cancer. We have presented our institutional experience with left-sided thoracic surgery in patients who have had previous coronary artery surgery with a patent internal thoracic artery graft. PMID:26907619

  16. Video-assisted thoracic surgery complications

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Józef

    2014-01-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is a miniinvasive technique commonly applied worldwide. Indications for VATS are very broad and include the diagnosis of mediastinal, lung and pleural diseases, as well as large resection procedures such as pneumonectomy. The most frequent complication is prolonged postoperative air leak. The other significant complications are bleeding, infections, postoperative pain and recurrence at the port site. Different complications of VATS procedures can occur with variable frequency in various diseases. Despite the large number of their types, such complications are rare and can be avoided through the proper selection of patients and an appropriate surgical technique. PMID:25561984

  17. The European general thoracic surgery database project

    PubMed Central

    Brunelli, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    The European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) Database is a free registry created by ESTS in 2001. The current online version was launched in 2007. It runs currently on a Dendrite platform with extensive data security and frequent backups. The main features are a specialty-specific, procedure-specific, prospectively maintained, periodically audited and web-based electronic database, designed for quality control and performance monitoring, which allows for the collection of all general thoracic procedures. Data collection is the “backbone” of the ESTS database. It includes many risk factors, processes of care and outcomes, which are specially designed for quality control and performance audit. The user can download and export their own data and use them for internal analyses and quality control audits. The ESTS database represents the gold standard of clinical data collection for European General Thoracic Surgery. Over the past years, the ESTS database has achieved many accomplishments. In particular, the database hit two major milestones: it now includes more than 235 participating centers and 70,000 surgical procedures. The ESTS database is a snapshot of surgical practice that aims at improving patient care. In other words, data capture should become integral to routine patient care, with the final objective of improving quality of care within Europe. PMID:24868445

  18. The European general thoracic surgery database project.

    PubMed

    Falcoz, Pierre Emmanuel; Brunelli, Alessandro

    2014-05-01

    The European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) Database is a free registry created by ESTS in 2001. The current online version was launched in 2007. It runs currently on a Dendrite platform with extensive data security and frequent backups. The main features are a specialty-specific, procedure-specific, prospectively maintained, periodically audited and web-based electronic database, designed for quality control and performance monitoring, which allows for the collection of all general thoracic procedures. Data collection is the "backbone" of the ESTS database. It includes many risk factors, processes of care and outcomes, which are specially designed for quality control and performance audit. The user can download and export their own data and use them for internal analyses and quality control audits. The ESTS database represents the gold standard of clinical data collection for European General Thoracic Surgery. Over the past years, the ESTS database has achieved many accomplishments. In particular, the database hit two major milestones: it now includes more than 235 participating centers and 70,000 surgical procedures. The ESTS database is a snapshot of surgical practice that aims at improving patient care. In other words, data capture should become integral to routine patient care, with the final objective of improving quality of care within Europe. PMID:24868445

  19. Robotic thoracic surgery: from the perspectives of European chest surgeons

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Although thoracic surgery is one of the fastest growing programs, the results of robotic thoracic surgery reports are presented very rarely. In this manuscript, the development of robotic thoracic surgery programs in Europe and the initial results are discussed. Several European countries lead the development of robotic surgery in the world, especially for lung cancer surgery and for thymus—thymoma surgery. Yet, we may not recognize any major advantage in the outcome when compared to video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS). But, certainly, the superior capabilities of the intraoperative instrumentation of robotic surgery will be beneficial. More experience in robotic surgery may provide superior results in oncological, physiological and life quality measurements. PMID:24868438

  20. Mayo Clinic: An Institutional History of General Thoracic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Gillaspie, Erin A; Nichols, Francis C; Allen, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    The Mayo Clinic was started in Rochester, MN after a 1883 tornado disaster. The Mayo brothers, William and Charles began thoracic surgical procedures early in their career. Dr. Samuel Robinson is recognized as the first thoracic surgeon at Mayo. He was followed by Drs. Harrington and Claret who became famous surgeons. Many other notable surgeons have help to build the thoracic surgical practice into what is today a world renown center of excellence in thoracic surgery. PMID:26811041

  1. History and current status of mini-invasive thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    He, Jianxing

    2011-01-01

    Mini-invasive thoracic technique mainly refers to a technique involving the significant reduction of the chest wall access-related trauma. Notably, thoracoscope is the chief representative. The development of thoracoscope technique is characterized by: developing from direct peep to artificial lighting, then combination with image and video technique in equipments; technically developing from diagnostic to therapeutic approaches; developing from simpleness to complexity in application scope; and usually developing together with other techniques. At present, the widely used mini-invasive thoracic surgery refers to the mini-open thoracic surgery performed mainly by using some instruments to control target tissues and organs based on the vision associated with multi-limb coordination, which may be hand-assisted if necessary. The mini-invasive thoracic surgery consists of three approaches including video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS), video-assisted Hybrid and hand-assisted VATS. So far the mini-invasive thoracic technique has achieved great advances due to the development in instruments of mini-invasive thoracic surgery which has the following features: instruments of mini-invasive thoracic surgery appear to be safe and practical, and have successive improvement and diversification in function; the specific instruments of open surgeries has been successively developed into dedicated instruments of endoscopic surgery; the application of endoscopic mechanical suture device generates faster fragmentation and reconstruction of organ tissues; the specific delicated instruments of endoscopic surgery have rapid development and application; and the simple instruments structurally similar to the conventional instruments are designed according to the mini-incison. In addition, the mini-invasive thoracic technique is widely used in five aspects including diseases of pleura membrane and chest wall, lung diseases, esophageal diseases, mediastinal diseases and heart diseases

  2. Possibilities of scar treatment after thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Maragakis, M; Willital, G H; Michel, G; Görtelmeyer, R

    1995-01-01

    During a ten year observation period it was found that scar formation after thoracic surgery is influenced by various factors: metabolism, operative technique and factors of a general nature. On the basis of these findings, a study was carried out to investigate the effect of the scar-specific Contractubex gel (Merz+Co., D-Frankfurt/Main), containing 10% onion extract, 50 U sodium heparin per g of gel and 1% allantoin, in the treatment of children who underwent thoracic surgery and to evaluate its effect on scar development. Before and during the six-month treatment period, both macromorphology and scar colour were assessed; furthermore, a global evaluation of the therapeutic result was made. Additionally, the scars were characterized after a six-month treatment-free follow-up period. The results of 38 Contractubex-treated and 27 untreated patients were compared. In the treated scars, the global evaluation of the therapeutic result was better than in the untreated scars. In the Contractubex group, the rating was "good" and "very good" in 84% of cases, as compared to 59% of the untreated cases. In the treated group, the increase in scar size was markedly lower than in the untreated patients. The treated scars showed a tendency towards quicker paling than the untreated scars. In the treated group, the conversion of primary physiological scars to unphysiological scars (hypertrophic or keloidal scars) was less frequent than in the untreated group. The tolerability of the product was very good in 37 of the 38 treated patients, and good in one patient. All scar-specific effects of Contractubex continued to persist after the end of treatment. PMID:8846750

  3. Guillain-Barre Syndrome Following Spinal Fusion for Thoracic Vertebral Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Son, Dong Wuk; Sung, Sun Ki; Kim, Sung Hoon

    2011-01-01

    There have been very few reports in the literature of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) after spinal surgery. We present a unique case of GBS following spinal fusion for thoracic vertebral fracture. The aim of this report is to illustrate the importance of early neurological assessment and determining the exact cause of a new neurological deficit that occurs after an operation. PMID:22259696

  4. Selective lung intubation during paediatric thoracic surgeries.

    PubMed

    Mixa, V; Nedomova, B; Rygl, M

    2016-01-01

    Selective lung intubation is a necessary prerequisite for the completion of most interventions comprising thoracotomy and thoracoscopy. In paediatric care, our site uses Univent tubes for children up to the age of three years and double-lumen tubes (DLT) for children from 6-8 years of age. In younger children, we usually use regular endotracheal intubation, with the lung being held in the hemithorax position being operated on using a surgical retractor. The article presents the analysis of 860 thoracic surgeries, of which 491 comprised selective intubation (Univent 57 cases, DLT 434 cases). The use of the aforementioned devices is connected with certain complications. Univent tube can be connected with intraoperative dislocation of the obturating balloon (29.8%) and balloon perforation (5.2%). DLT insertion may be connected with failure of tube fitting. In 84 cases we had to repeat DLT insertion (20.6%). In 8 cases we were not able to insert DLT at all (1.8%). Standard use of selective intubation methods in paediatric patients from two years of age improved the conditions for surgical interventions (Tab. 2, Fig. 2, Ref. 19). PMID:27546541

  5. Robotic thoracic surgery: The state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arvind; Asaf, Belal Bin

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive thoracic surgery has come a long way. It has rapidly progressed to complex procedures such as lobectomy, pneumonectomy, esophagectomy, and resection of mediastinal tumors. Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) offered perceptible benefits over thoracotomy in terms of less postoperative pain and narcotic utilization, shorter ICU and hospital stay, decreased incidence of postoperative complications combined with quicker return to work, and better cosmesis. However, despite its obvious advantages, the General Thoracic Surgical Community has been relatively slow in adapting VATS more widely. The introduction of da Vinci surgical system has helped overcome certain inherent limitations of VATS such as two-dimensional (2D) vision and counter intuitive movement using long rigid instruments allowing thoracic surgeons to perform a plethora of minimally invasive thoracic procedures more efficiently. Although the cumulative experience worldwide is still limited and evolving, Robotic Thoracic Surgery is an evolution over VATS. There is however a lot of concern among established high-volume VATS centers regarding the superiority of the robotic technique. We have over 7 years experience and believe that any new technology designed to make minimal invasive surgery easier and more comfortable for the surgeon is most likely to have better and safer outcomes in the long run. Our only concern is its cost effectiveness and we believe that if the cost factor is removed more and more surgeons will use the technology and it will increase the spectrum and the reach of minimally invasive thoracic surgery. This article reviews worldwide experience with robotic thoracic surgery and addresses the potential benefits and limitations of using the robotic platform for the performance of thoracic surgical procedures. PMID:25598601

  6. Medicolegal Corner: When minimally invasive thoracic surgery leads to paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Nancy E

    2014-01-01

    A patient with mild cervical myelopathy due to multilevel ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) initially underwent a cervical C3-T1 laminectomy with C2-T2 fusion utilizing lateral mass screws. The patient's new postoperative right upper extremity paresis largely resolved within several postoperative months. However, approximately 6 months later, the patient developed increased paraparesis attributed to thoracic OPLL and Ossification of the yellow ligament (OYL) at the T2-T5 and T10-T11 levels. The patient underwent simultaneous minimally invasive (MIS) unilateral MetRx approaches to both regions. Postoperatively, the patient was paraplegic and never recovered function. Multiple mistakes led to permanent paraplegia due to MIS MetRx decompressions for T2-T5 and T10-11 OPLL/OYL in this patient. First, both thoracic procedures should have been performed "open" utilizing a full laminectomy rather than MIS; adequate visualization would have likely averted inadvertent cord injury, and the resultant CSF leak. Second, the surgeon should have used an operating microscope. Third, the operation should have been monitored with somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP), motor evoked potentials (MEP), and EMG (electromyography). Fourth, preoperatively the patient should have received a 1-gram dose of Solumedrol for cord "protection". Fifth, applying Gelfoam as part of the CSF leak repair is contraindicated (e.g. due to swelling in confined spaces- see insert). Sixth, if the patient had not stopped Excedrin prior to the surgery, the surgery should have been delayed to avoid the increased perioperative risk of bleeding/hematoma. PMID:24843811

  7. Clinical pathway for thoracic surgery in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The paradigm for postoperative care for thoracic surgical patients in the United States has shifted with efforts to reduce hospital length of stay and improve quality of life. The increasing usage of minimally invasive techniques in thoracic surgery has been an important part of this. In this review we will examine our standard practices as well as the evidence behind both general contemporary postoperative care principles and those specific to certain operations. PMID:26941967

  8. Current costs of video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) lobectomy.

    PubMed

    Lacin, Tunc; Swanson, Scott

    2013-08-01

    Video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy has many benefits over open surgery such as smaller incisions, less pain, less blood loss, faster postoperative recovery, shortened hospital stay, similar or superior survival rates. In contrast video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) has higher equipment costs, increased operating room times, at least initially, and a learning curve for the team. However when an experienced surgeon performs the surgery, significant hospital savings combined with better outcomes are achieved by video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy. PMID:24040522

  9. Thoracic outlet syndrome after corrective surgery for pectus excavatum.

    PubMed

    Donders, H P; Geelen, J A

    1988-02-01

    Two patients are described who developed a thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) after undergoing Ravitch's operation for the correction of pectus excavatum. In one case the syndrome developed a few days after surgery, whereas in the second patient it manifested more gradually. A third patient presented with latent TOS and pectus excavatum. It is recommended that prior to the correction of pectus excavatum, the patient should be examined to detect signs of neurovascular compression due to latent thoracic outlet syndrome. After surgery the possibility of this complication should be kept in mind to avoid permanent lesions of the cervicobrachial plexus. PMID:3352940

  10. Research and education in thoracic surgery: the European trainees’ perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ilonen, Ilkka K.

    2015-01-01

    Thoracic surgery training within Europe is diverse and a consensus may help to harmonise the training. Currently, training for thoracic surgery compromises thoracic, cardiothoracic and aspects of general surgical training. The recognition of specialist degrees should be universal and equal. Between different nations significant differences in training exist, especially in general surgery rotations and in the role of oesophageal surgery. The European board examination for thoracic surgery is one of the key ways to achieve harmonisation within the European Union (EU) and internationally. Further support and encouragement may be beneficial to promote diverse and engaging fellowships and clinical exchange programmes between nations. International fellowships may even benefit young residents, in both clinical and academic settings. Many studies currently would benefit from multi-centre and multi-national design, enhancing the results and giving better understanding of clinical scenarios. Educational content provided by independent organisations should be more recognised as an integral part in both resident training and continuing development throughout surgeons’ careers. During annual society meetings, trainees should have some sessions that are aimed at enhancing their training and establishing networks of international peers. PMID:25984356

  11. Video-assisted thoracic surgery for mediastinal extramedullary haematopoiesis.

    PubMed Central

    Ng, C. S. H.; Wan, S.; Lee, T. W.; Sihoe, A. D. L.; Wan, I. Y. P.; Arifi, A. A.; Yim, A. P. C.

    2002-01-01

    Extramedullary haematopoiesis is a rare cause of an intrathoracic mass. We report a case of posterior mediastinal extramedullary haematopoietic mass in a 50-year-old man who presented with non-specific symptoms and a paravertebral mass on chest X-ray. Diagnosis was achieved by using video-assisted thoracic surgery. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:12092864

  12. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Case Log: General Surgery Resident Thoracic Surgery Experience

    PubMed Central

    Kansier, Nicole; Varghese, Thomas K.; Verrier, Edward D.; Drake, F. Thurston; Gow, Kenneth W.

    2014-01-01

    Background General surgery resident training has changed dramatically over the past 2 decades, with likely impact on specialty exposure. We sought to assess trends in general surgery resident exposure to thoracic surgery using the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) case logs over time. Methods The ACGME case logs for graduating general surgery residents were reviewed from academic year (AY) 1989–1990 to 2011–2012 for defined thoracic surgery cases. Data were divided into 5 eras of training for comparison: I, AY89 to 93; II, AY93 to 98; III, AY98 to 03; IV, AY03 to 08; V, AY08 to 12. We analyzed quantity and types of cases per time period. Student t tests compared averages among the time periods with significance at a p values less than 0.05. Results A total of 21,803,843 general surgery cases were reviewed over the 23-year period. Residents averaged 33.6 thoracic cases each in period I and 39.7 in period V. Thoracic cases accounted for nearly 4% of total cases performed annually (period I 3.7% [134,550 of 3,598,574]; period V 4.1% [167,957 of 4,077,939]). For the 3 most frequently performed procedures there was a statistically significant increase in thoracoscopic approach from period II to period V. Conclusions General surgery trainees today have the same volume of thoracic surgery exposure as their counterparts over the last 2 decades. This maintenance in caseload has occurred in spite of work-hour restrictions. However, general surgery graduates have a different thoracic surgery skill set at the end of their training, due to the predominance of minimally invasive techniques. Thoracic surgery educators should take into account these differences when training future cardiothoracic surgeons. PMID:24968766

  13. Clinical Analysis of Video-assisted Thoracoscopic Spinal Surgery in the Thoracic or Thoracolumbar Spinal Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Jin; Ryoo, Ji-Yoon; Kim, Yeon-Soo; Whang, Choong Jin

    2007-01-01

    Objective Thoracoscopic spinal surgery provides minimally invasive approaches for effective vertebral decompression and reconstruction of the thoracic and thoracolumbar spine, while surgery related morbidity can be significantly lowered. This study analyzes clinical results of thoracoscopic spinal surgery performed at our institute. Methods Twenty consecutive patients underwent video-assisted thoracosopic surgery (VATS) to treat various thoracic and thoracolumbar pathologies from April 2000 to July 2006. The lesions consisted of spinal trauma (13 cases), thoracic disc herniation (4 cases), tuberculous spondylitis (1 case), post-operative thoracolumbar kyphosis (1 case) and thoracic tumor (1 case). The level of operation included upper thoracic lesions (3 cases), midthoracic lesions (6 cases) and thoracolumbar lesions (11 cases). We classified the procedure into three groups: stand-alone thoracoscopic discectomy (3 cases), thoracoscopic fusion (11 cases) and video assisted mini-thoracotomy (6 cases). Results Analysis on the Frankel performance scale in spinal trauma patients (13 cases), showed a total of 7 patients who had neurological impairment preoperatively : Grade D (2 cases), Grade C (2 cases), Grade B (1 case), and Grade A (2 cases). Four patients were neurologically improved postoperatively, two patients were improved from C to E, one improved from grade D to E and one improved from grade B to grade D. The preoperative Cobb's and kyphotic angle were measured in spinal trauma patients and were 18.9±4.4° and 18.8±4.6°, respectively. Postoperatively, the angles showed statistically significant improvement, 15.1±3.7° and 11.3±2.4°, respectively (P<0.001). Conclusion Although VATS requires a steep learning curve, it is an effective and minimally invasive procedure which provides biomechanical stability in terms of anterior column decompression and reconstruction for anterior load bearing, and preservation of intercostal muscles and diaphragm. PMID

  14. Single-Port Thoracic Surgery: A New Direction

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Calvin S. H.

    2014-01-01

    Single-port video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) has slowly established itself as an alternate surgical approach for the treatment of an increasingly wide range of thoracic conditions. The potential benefits of fewer surgical incisions, better cosmesis, and less postoperative pain and paraesthesia have led to the technique’s popularity worldwide. The limited single small incision through which the surgeon has to operate poses challenges that are slowly being addressed by improvements in instrument design. Of note, instruments and video-camera systems that are narrower and angulated have made single-port VATS major lung resection easier to perform and learn. In the future, we may see the development of subcostal or embryonic natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery access, evolution in anaesthesia strategies, and cross-discipline imaging-assisted lesion localization for single-port VATS procedures. PMID:25207240

  15. The evolution of minimally invasive thoracic surgery: implications for the practice of uniportal thoracoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The history of Minimally Invasive Surgery in the thorax is one of evolution, not revolution. The concept of video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) to greatly reduce the trauma of chest operations was born over two decades ago. Since then, it has undergone a series of step-wise modifications and improvement. The original practice of three access ports in a ‘baseball diamond’ pattern was modified to suit operational needs, and gradually developed into ‘next generation’ approaches, including Needlescopic and 2-port VATS. The logical, incremental progression has culminated in the Uniportal VATS approach which has stirred considerable interest within the field of Thoracic Surgery in recent years. This measured, evolutionary process has significant implications on how the surgeon should approach, master and realize the full potential of the Uniportal technique. This article gives a précis of the evolutionary history of minimally invasive thoracic surgery, and highlights the lessons it provides about its future. PMID:25379198

  16. Effect of Massage on Pain Management for Thoracic Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dion, Liza; Rodgers, Nancy; Cutshall, Susanne M.; Cordes, Mary Ellen; Bauer, Brent; Cassivi, Stephen D.; Cha, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Background: Integrative therapies such as massage have gained support as interventions that improve the overall patient experience during hospitalization. Thoracic surgery patients undergo long procedures and commonly have postoperative back, neck, and shoulder pain. Purpose: Given the promising effects of massage therapy for alleviation of pain, we studied the effectiveness and feasibility of massage therapy delivered in the postoperative thoracic surgery setting. Methods: Patients who received massage in the postoperative setting had pain scores evaluated pre and post massage on a rating scale of 0 to 10 (0 = no pain, 10 = worst possible pain). Results: In total, 160 patients completed the pilot study and received massage therapy that was individualized. Patients receiving massage therapy had significantly decreased pain scores after massage (p ≤ .001), and patients’ comments were very favorable. Patients and staff were highly satisfied with having massage therapy available, and no major barriers to implementing massage therapy were identified. Conclusions: Massage therapy may be an important additional pain management component of the healing experience for patients after thoracic surgery. PMID:21847428

  17. Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging of Thoracic Duct Anatomy and Function in Open Surgery and Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ashitate, Yoshitomo; Tanaka, Eiichi; Stockdale, Alan; Choi, Hak Soo; Frangioni, John V.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Chylothorax resulting from damage to the thoracic duct is often difficult to identify and repair. We hypothesized that near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent light could provide sensitive, real-time, high-resolution intraoperative imaging of thoracic duct anatomy and function. Methods In 16 rats (n=16), four potential NIR fluorescent lymphatic tracers were compared in terms of signal strength and imaging time: indocyanine green (ICG), the carboxylic acid of CW800, ICG adsorbed to human serum albumin (HSA), and CW800 conjugated covalently to HSA (HSA800). The optimal agent was validated in eight pigs approaching the size of humans, n = 6 by open surgery using the Fluorescence-Assisted Resection and Exploration (FLARE) imaging system and n = 2 by video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) using the minimally invasive imaging system (m-FLARE). Lymphatic tracer injection site, dose, and timing were optimized. Results For signal strength, sustained imaging time, and clinical translatability, the best lymphatic tracer was ICG, which is already FDA-approved for other indications. In pigs, a simple subcutaneous injection of ICG into the lower leg, at a dose ≥36 μg/kg, provided thoracic duct imaging with an onset of 5 min after injection, sustained imaging for at least 60 min after injection, and a signal-to-background ratio ≥2. Using this technology, normal thoracic duct flow, collateral flow, injury models, and repair models could all be observed under direct visualization. Conclusions NIR fluorescent light could provide sensitive, sustained, real-time imaging of thoracic duct anatomy and function during both open surgery and VATS in animal models. PMID:21477818

  18. [Echographic Examination for Leg Vein Thromboembolism in Thoracic Surgery].

    PubMed

    Mawatari, Tohru; Narayama, Kouhei; Shibata, Tsuyoshi; Saga, Toshifumi; Baba, Toshio; Morishita, Kiyofumi; Niwa, Jun; Watanabe, Yuusuke; Yamashita, Tatsushi; Hirakata, Natsuko; Watanabe, Atsushi

    2016-07-01

    Echographic examination for leg vein thromboembolism was carried out in 123 patients scheduled for thoracic surgery. Preventive measures for thromboembolism were conducted after the risk assessment. Echography was done after surgery in 72 cases, most of which were cases of lung malignant tumors, and thromboembolism was detected in 4 cases. Thus, the incidence rate of venous thromboembolism was 5.6%( 4/72). There was no patients who developed pulmonary thromboembolism during the examination period, suggesting reasonable risk assessment and preventive measures in our procedure. PMID:27365057

  19. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for acute thoracic trauma

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Michael; Lewis, Jaime; Guitron, Julian; Reed, Michael; Pritts, Timothy; Starnes, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Background: Operative intervention for thoracic trauma typically requires thoracotomy. We hypothesized that thoracoscopy may be safely and effectively utilized for the acute management of thoracic injuries. Materials and Methods: The Trauma Registry of a Level I trauma center was queried from 1999 through 2010 for all video-assisted thoracic procedures within 24 h of admission. Data collected included initial vital signs, operative indication, intraoperative course, and postoperative outcome. Results: Twenty-three patients met inclusion criteria: 3 (13%) following blunt injury and 20 (87%) after penetrating trauma. Indications for urgent thoracoscopy included diaphragmatic/esophageal injury, retained hemothorax, ongoing hemorrhage, and open/persistent pneumothorax. No conversions to thoracotomy were required and no patient required re-operation. Mean postoperative chest tube duration was 2.9 days and mean length of stay was 5.6 days. Conclusion: Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery is safe and effective for managing thoracic trauma in hemodynamically stable patients within the first 24 h post-injury. PMID:23723618

  20. Minimally Invasive Direct Thoracic Interbody Fusion (MIS-DTIF): Technical Notes of a Single Surgeon Study

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Background Minimally invasive direct thoracic interbody fusion (MIS-DTIF) is a new single surgeon procedure for fusion of the thoracic vertebrae below the scapula (T6/7) to the thoracolumbar junction. In this proof of concept study, we describe the surgical technique for MIS-DTIF and report our experience and the perioperative outcomes of the first four patients who underwent this procedure. Study design/setting In this study we attempt to establish the safety and efficacy of MIS-DTIF. We have performed MIS-DTIF on six spinal levels in four patients with degenerative disk disease or disk herniation. We recorded surgery time, blood loss, fluoroscopy time, complications, and patient-reported pain. Methods Throughout the MIS-DTIF procedure, the surgeon is aided by biplanar fluoroscopic imaging and electrophysiological monitoring. The surgeon approaches the spine with a series of gentle tissue dilations and inserts a working tube that establishes a direct connection from the outside of the skin to the disk space. Through this working tube, the surgeon performs a discectomy and inserts an interbody graft or cage. The procedure is completed with minimally invasive (MI) posterior pedicle screw fixation. Results For the single level patients the mean blood loss was 90 ml, surgery time 43 minutes, fluoroscopy time 293 seconds, and hospital stay two days. For the two-level surgeries, the mean blood loss was 27 ml, surgery time 61 minutes, fluoroscopy time 321 seconds, and hospital stay three days. We did not encounter any clinically significant complications. Thirty days post-surgery, the patients reported a statistically significant reduction of 5.3 points on a 10-point sliding pain scale. Conclusions MIS-DTIF with pedicle screw fixation is a safe and clinically effective procedure for fusions of the thoracic spine. The procedure is technically straightforward and overcomes many of the limitations of the current minimally invasive (MI) approaches to the thoracic spine. MIS

  1. Mid- to long-term outcomes of posterior decompression with instrumented fusion for thoracic ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament.

    PubMed

    Koda, Masao; Furuya, Takeo; Okawa, Akihiko; Inada, Taigo; Kamiya, Koshiro; Ota, Mitsutoshi; Maki, Satoshi; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Yamazaki, Masashi; Aramomi, Masaaki; Ikeda, Osamu; Mannoji, Chikato

    2016-05-01

    Posterior decompression with instrumented fusion (PDF) surgery has been previously reported as a relatively safe surgical procedure for any type of thoracic ossification of the longitudinal ligament (OPLL). However, mid- to long-term outcomes are still unclear. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the mid- to long-term clinical outcome of PDF surgery for thoracic OPLL patients. The present study included 20 patients who had undergone PDF for thoracic OPLL and were followed for at least 5years. Increment change and recovery rate of the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score were assessed. Revision surgery during the follow-up period was also recorded. Average JOA scores were 3.5 preoperatively and 7.1 at final follow-up. The average improvement in JOA score was 3.8 points and the average recovery rate was 47.0%. The JOA score showed gradual increase after surgery, and took 9months to reach peak recovery. As for neurological complications, two patients suffered postoperative paralysis, but both recovered without intervention. Six revision surgeries in four patients were related to OPLL. Additional anterior thoracic decompression for remaining ossification at the same level of PDF surgery was performed in one patient. Decompression surgery for deterioration of symptoms of pre-existing cervical OPLL was performed in three patients. One patient had undergone lumbar and cervical PDF surgery for de novo ossification foci of the lumbar and cervical spine. PDF surgery for thoracic OPLL is thus considered a relatively safe and stable surgical procedure considering the mid- to long-term outcomes. PMID:26794690

  2. Anesthetic management for thoracic surgery in Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Blazquez, E; Narváez, D; Fernandez-Lopez, A; Garcia-Aparicio, L

    2016-01-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS) is a chromosomopathy associated to molecular mutations or microdeletions of chromosome 16. It has an incidence of 1:125,000-700,000 live births. RTS patients present craniofacial and thoracic anomalies that lead to a probable difficult-to-manage airway and ventilation. They also present mental retardation and comorbidity, such as congenital cardiac defects, pulmonary structural anomalies and recurrent respiratory infections, which increase the risk of aspiration pneumonia. Cardiac arrhythmias have been reported after the use of certain drugs such as succinylcholine and atropine, in a higher incidence than in general population. There is an increased risk of postoperative apnea-hypopnea in these patients. We report the anesthetic management in a RTS patient undergoing emergent thoracic surgery due to oesophageal perforation and mediastinitis. Lung isolation was achieved with a bronchial blocker guided with a fiberoptic bronchoscope and one-lung ventilation was performed successfully. PMID:27062171

  3. Needlescopic video-assisted thoracic surgery pleurodesis for primary pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Sihoe, Alan D L; Hsin, Michael K Y; Yu, Peter S Y

    2014-01-01

    Conventional video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is already well established as the approach of choice for definitive surgical management for primary pneumothorax. However, VATS itself is a constantly evolving technique. The needlescopic VATS (nVATS) approach uses the existing chest drain wound as a working port and adds only two 3-mm ports to provide equally effective pleurodesis as conventional VATS. Staple resection of bullae or blebs plus complete mechanical parietal pleural abrasion is achievable using nVATS. By potentially reducing morbidity for the individual patient, the nVATS approach may lower thresholds for surgical candidacy-even for first episodes of primary pneumothorax. PMID:24969616

  4. Posterior decompression with instrumented fusion for thoracic myelopathy caused by ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Masashi; Okawa, Akihiko; Fujiyoshi, Takayuki; Furuya, Takeo; Koda, Masao

    2010-05-01

    We evaluated the clinical results of posterior decompression with instrumented fusion (PDF) for thoracic myelopathy due to ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). A total of 24 patients underwent PDF, and their surgical outcomes were evaluated by the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores (0-11 points) and by recovery rates calculated at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after surgery and at a mean final follow-up of 4 years and 5 months. The mean JOA score before surgery was 3.7 points. Although transient paralysis occurred immediately after surgery in one patient (3.8%), all patients showed neurological recovery at the final follow-up with a mean JOA score of 8.0 points and a mean recovery rate of 58.1%. The mean recovery rate at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after surgery was 36.7, 48.8, 54.0 and 56.8%, respectively. The median time point that the JOA score reached its peak value was 9 months after surgery. No patient chose additional anterior decompression surgery via thoracotomy. The present findings demonstrate that despite persistent anterior impingement of the spinal cord by residual OPLL, PDF can result in considerable neurological recovery with a low risk of postoperative paralysis. Since neurological recovery progresses slowly after PDF, we suggest that additional anterior decompression surgery is not desirable during the early stage of recovery. PMID:20049486

  5. Pulmonary Complications following Thoracic Spinal Surgery: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Gabel, Brandon C.; Schnell, Eric C.; Dettori, Joseph R.; Jeyamohan, Shiveindra; Oskouian, Rod

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Objective To determine the frequency of pulmonary effusion, pneumothorax, and hemothorax in adult patients undergoing thoracic corpectomy or osteotomy for any condition and to determine if these frequencies vary by surgical approach (i.e., anterior, posterior, or lateral). Methods Electronic databases and reference lists of key articles were searched through September 21, 2015, to identify studies specifically evaluating the frequency of pulmonary effusion, pneumothorax, and hemothorax in patients undergoing thoracic spine surgery. Results Fourteen studies, 13 retrospective and 1 prospective, met inclusion criteria. The frequency across studies of pulmonary effusion ranged from 0 to 77%; for hemothorax, 0 to 77%; and for pneumothorax, 0 to 50%. There was no clear pattern of pulmonary complications with respect to surgical approach. Conclusions There is insufficient data to determine the risk of pulmonary complications following anterior, posterior, or lateral approaches to the thoracic spine. Methods for assessing pulmonary complications were not well reported, and data is sparse. PMID:27099821

  6. Resection of Posterior Mediastinal Tumors by Video Assisted Thoracic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Ali, Taimur Asif; Fatimi, Saulat Hasnain; Naeem, Syed Saad

    2015-07-01

    This case report illustrates successful Video Assisted Thoracic Surgery (VATS) performed on a 45-year-old woman and 52-year-old man presenting with a mass in left and right paravertebral space on the CT scan respectively. VATS has many benefits over traditional open operation (thoracotomy), resulting in less pain and shorten recovery time. However, VATS has higher equipment cost but when an experienced surgeon performs the surgery, better outcomes are achieved. VATS is not common in Pakistan's surgical setup as it is an expensive method of eradicating mediastinal pathologies and not every patient undergoes VATS. The primary objective of presenting these cases is to promote the use of VATS specifically for removal of posterior mediastinal tumors and improve the surgical outcomes. PMID:26208561

  7. Enhanced recovery pathway for thoracic surgery in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Solli, Piergiorgio

    2016-01-01

    Background Enhanced recovery (ER) refers to a combination of perioperative interventions designed to minimise the impact of surgery on patients’ recovery in order to reduce postoperative complications and to allow an early discharge reducing hospital costs. Methods An ER protocol was established at our institution following a review of the best evidence available. We introduced a multi-disciplinary integrated perioperative pathway by engaging with every person involved, including the patients themselves. The programme was monitored using specifically-designed patients related outcome measures (PROMs). Results One-hundred and fifty-four ER patients were compared with 171 controls from the year before ER was introduced. There was an 80% increase in same-day admissions, with a net gain of more than 300 patient bed-days. The ER group had a significantly higher number of procedures performed by video assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) (ER, 32.9% vs. 9.4%, P=0.0001) and a lower rate of admission to the intensive care unit (ER, 5.8% versus 12.9%, P=0.04). Patients on the ER programme had a significantly reduced postoperative length of stay (mean ER, 5.2 vs. 11.7 days, P<0.0001). Patient satisfaction was higher in the ER group after a patient survey. The project resulted in a net saving of £214,000 for the Trust for the 2013/2014 financial year. We were also able to increase the number of patients who underwent thoracic surgery in 2013/2014 by 30% (159 patients) compared with 2012/2013. Conclusions The ER pathway has proven to be a safe perioperative management strategy to improve patient satisfaction and to reduce the length of hospital stay and cost after major thoracic surgery, without increasing morbidity or mortality. PMID:26941974

  8. Assessment of spontaneous correction of lumbar curve after fusion of the main thoracic in Lenke 1 adolescent idiopathic scoliosis☆

    PubMed Central

    Mizusaki, Danilo; Gotfryd, Alberto Ofenhejm

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical and radiographic response of the lumbar curve after fusion of the main thoracic, in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis of Lenke type 1. Methods Forty-two patients with Lenke 1 adolescent idiopathic scoliosis who underwent operations via the posterior route with pedicle screws were prospectively evaluated. Clinical measurements (size of the hump and translation of the trunk in the coronal plane, by means of a plumb line) and radiographic measurements (Cobb angle, distal level of arthrodesis, translation of the lumbar apical vertebral and Risser) were made. The evaluations were performed preoperatively, immediately postoperatively and two years after surgery. Results The mean Cobb angle of the main thoracic curve was found to have been corrected by 68.9% and the lumbar curve by 57.1%. Eighty percent of the patients presented improved coronal trunk balance two years after surgery. In four patients, worsening of the plumb line measurements was observed, but there was no need for surgical intervention. Less satisfactory results were observed in patients with lumbar modifier B. Conclusions In Lenke 1 patients, fusion of the thoracic curve alone provided spontaneous correction of the lumbar curve and led to trunk balance. Less satisfactory results were observed in curves with lumbar modifier B, and this may be related to overcorrection of the main thoracic curve. PMID:26962505

  9. [Early discharge following major thoracic surgery: identification of related factors].

    PubMed

    de Lima, Nuno Fevereiro Ferreira; Carvalho, André Luís de Aquino

    2003-01-01

    There is a direct relation between hospital costs and hospital length of stay after the operation. In the other hand, reduced stay increases the productivity of the public hospitals with high service demanding. The objective of this study was to identify factors determining the decrease in hospital stay after major thoracic surgery. A two-phase retrospective study was conducted on analysis of medical records. In the first phase, data on length of hospital stay and related factors were collected from a consecutive series of 169 patients divided into group I (n=81)--patients operated on between June 1990 and 1995, and group II (n=88)--1996 through May 2000. In the second phase, data were collected from a consecutive series of 20 patients (group III) starting backwards from March 2002, for analysis and comparison with a internet survey sent to 21 thoracic surgeons. Intensive care unit was avoided for most patients in the immediate post operative period. The mean hospital stay decreased from 7.6 days (median 7) in group I to 5.1 days (median 4) in group II (p<0.001). The more frequent utilization of epidural analgesia and less traumatic thoracotomy in group II reached statistic significance (p<0.001). In group III, the mean hospital stay was 4.2 days (median 4), and there was a more effective use of epidural analgesia (75%) and muscle-sparing thoracotomy (90%). Eight thoracic surgeons answered the survey: the mean hospital stay varied from 5 to 9 days and all patients were sent to intensive care or similar units. Only two surgeons utilize muscle-sparing thoracotomy. This study confirms that pain control and less traumatic surgical approach are important for faster functional recovery of the patients. It suggests that the IC units may be used only for selected patients. PMID:14685631

  10. Systematic survey of opinion regarding the thoracic surgery residency.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, B R; Stritter, F T; Anderson, R P; Gay, W A; Kaiser, G C; Orringer, M B; Rainer, W G; Replogle, R L

    1993-05-01

    To summarize this rather wide-ranging study, let us review the high points. The future practice of thoracic surgery will be increasingly affected by governmental factors and will have even greater technological dimensions. To do this work, we must continue to attract high-caliber individuals, and this is best accomplished by the early and continuing involvement in the educational process of strong role models from our field. These future surgeons must be motivated to do good work and should have high ethical standards as well as maturity and high intelligence. Experienced, involved faculty leading the residents through a broad program that offers graduated assumption of clinical and leadership responsibilities will facilitate the development of mature clinical judgment. Residents must be taught the clinical skills necessary to do all thoracic operations, leaving subspecialization to postresidency fellowships. The educational program should be humane in its demands and collegial in its application. It should incorporate experiences beyond the operating room, including the opportunity to read, think, and interact with local mentors and colleagues from around the country. The requirements of certification should not be so rigid as to preclude the development of different pathways to the same end. Likewise, although the accreditation process must protect the resident from exploitation, it must not be so restrictive that it does not allow for educational innovation and justifiable differences among programs. These are the thoughtful opinions of our colleagues. They deserve serious consideration. PMID:8494460

  11. Tuberculosis, the Adirondacks, and coming of age for thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Meyer, J A

    1991-10-01

    "The Captain of all these men of death," wrote John Bunyan in 1680, "that came against him to take him away, was the Consumption, for it was that that brought him down to the grave." Until the twentieth century tuberculosis, or the Consumption, was the foremost cause of death among adults. It had not been recognized as a specific infectious process until 1882. The sanatorium movement for segregation and treatment of tuberculous patients originated in the late nineteenth century. Locations in the mountains were thought to be especially favorable, for the sake of fresh air, sunshine, and the aromas of pine and spruce. Long before the epidemic of lung cancer, or the possibilities of correction for cardiac disease, development of thoracic surgery was closely intertwined with the history of the sanatoriums. All of them had disappeared, however, soon after the middle of the twentieth century. PMID:1929650

  12. Advances in Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery, Thoracoscopy.

    PubMed

    Case, Joseph Brad

    2016-01-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is an evolving modality in the treatment and management of a variety of pathologies affecting dogs and cats. Representative disease processes include pericardial effusion, pericardial neoplasia, cranial mediastinal neoplasia, vascular ring anomaly, pulmonary neoplasia, pulmonary blebs and bullae, spontaneous pneumothorax, and chylothorax. Several descriptive and small case reports have been published on the use of VATS in veterinary medicine. More recently, larger case series and experimental studies have revealed potential benefits and limitations not documented previously. Significant technological advances over the past 5 years have made possible a host of new applications in VATS. This article focuses on updates and cutting-edge applications in VATS. PMID:26410560

  13. From Diagnosis to Treatment: Clinical Applications of Nanotechnology in Thoracic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Digesu, Christopher S; Hofferberth, Sophie C; Grinstaff, Mark W; Colson, Yolonda L

    2016-05-01

    Nanotechnology is an emerging field with potential as an adjunct to cancer therapy, particularly thoracic surgery. Therapy can be delivered to tumors in a more targeted fashion, with less systemic toxicity. Nanoparticles may aid in diagnosis, preoperative characterization, and intraoperative localization of thoracic tumors and their lymphatics. Focused research into nanotechnology's ability to deliver both diagnostics and therapeutics has led to the development of nanotheranostics, which promises to improve the treatment of thoracic malignancies through enhanced tumor targeting, controlled drug delivery, and therapeutic monitoring. This article reviews nanoplatforms, their unique properties, and the potential for clinical application in thoracic surgery. PMID:27112260

  14. A comparison of thoracic or lumbar patient-controlled epidural analgesia methods after thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We aimed to compare patient-controlled thoracic or lumbar epidural analgesia methods after thoracotomy operations. Methods One hundred and twenty patients were prospectively randomized to receive either thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA group) or lumbar epidural analgesia (LEA group). In both groups, epidural catheters were administered. Hemodynamic measurements, visual analog scale scores at rest (VAS-R) and after coughing (VAS-C), analgesic consumption, and side effects were compared at 0, 2, 4, 8, 16, and 24 hours postoperatively. Results The VAS-R and VAS-C values were lower in the TEA group in comparison to the LEA group at 2, 4, 8, and 16 hours after surgery (for VAS-R, P = 0.001, P = 0.01, P = 0.008, and P = 0.029, respectively; and for VAS-C, P = 0.035, P = 0.023, P = 0.002, and P = 0.037, respectively). Total 24-hour analgesic consumption was different between groups (175 +/- 20 mL versus 185 +/- 31 mL; P = 0.034). The comparison of postoperative complications revealed that the incidence of hypotension (21/57, 36.8% versus 8/63, 12.7%; P = 0.002), bradycardia (9/57, 15.8% versus 2/63, 3.2%; P = 0.017), atelectasis (1/57, 1.8% versus 7/63, 11.1%; P = 0.04), and the need for intensive care unit (ICU) treatment (0/57, 0% versus 5/63, 7.9%; P = 0.03) were lower in the TEA group in comparison to the LEA group. Conclusions TEA has beneficial hemostatic effects in comparison to LEA after thoracotomies along with more satisfactory pain relief profile. PMID:24885545

  15. [Lung function changes during anesthesia and thoracic surgery].

    PubMed

    Bigler, Dennis R

    2003-01-13

    After anaesthesia and thorax surgery, a significant reduction in pulmonary function with up to a 50% decrease in FEV1, FVC, and FRC is seen, leading to a high risk of atelectasis and hypoxia, and therefore making respiratory complications the major course of perioperative morbidity and mortality in this group of patients. This severe reduction in lung function gradually diminishes within three weeks, but postoperative pain and sedation increase the deterioration in lung function, and treatment is therefore based on anaesthetic drugs with a short elimination time and effective postoperative pain treatment with epidural analgesia or other regional blockade, and minimal use of opioids. Together with more sparing surgical methods, it is possible to operate on patients with severely reduced preoperative lung function (FEV1 = 0.651 or 22% of predicted value) with lung resection and immediate extubation. A reduction in pulmonary complications after thoracic surgery from 25-30% down to 10-15% is also seen, depending on age and preoperative lung function. PMID:12555706

  16. Posterior convex release and interbody fusion for thoracic scoliosis: technical note.

    PubMed

    Mac-Thiong, Jean-Marc; Asghar, Jahangir; Parent, Stefan; Shufflebarger, Harry L; Samdani, Amer; Labelle, Hubert

    2016-09-01

    Anterior release and fusion is sometimes required in pediatric patients with thoracic scoliosis. Typically, a formal anterior approach is performed through open thoracotomy or video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery. The authors recently developed a technique for anterior release and fusion in thoracic scoliosis referred to as "posterior convex release and interbody fusion" (PCRIF). This technique is performed via the posterior-only approach typically used for posterior instrumentation and fusion and thus avoids a formal anterior approach. In this article the authors describe the technique and its use in 9 patients-to prevent a crankshaft phenomenon in 3 patients and to optimize the correction in 6 patients with a severe thoracic curve showing poor reducibility. After Ponte osteotomies at the levels requiring anterior release and fusion, intervertebral discs are approached from the convex side of the scoliosis. The annulus on the convex side of the scoliosis is incised from the lateral border of the pedicle to the lateral annulus while visualizing and protecting the pleura and spinal cord. The annulus in contact with the pleura and the anterior longitudinal ligament are removed before completing the discectomies and preparing the endplates. The PCRIF was performed at 3 levels in 4 patients and at 4 levels in 5 patients. Mean correction of the main thoracic curve, blood loss, and length of stay were 74.9%, 1290 ml, and 7.6 days, respectively. No neurological deficit, implant failure, or pseudarthrosis was observed at the last follow-up. Two patients had pleural effusion postoperatively, with 1 of them requiring placement of a chest tube. One patient had pulmonary edema secondary to fluid overload, while another patient underwent reoperation for a deep wound infection 3 weeks after the initial surgery. The technique is primarily indicated in skeletally immature patients with open triradiate cartilage and/or severe scoliosis. It can be particularly useful if there is

  17. New uses of the laser in thoracic and cardiovascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Michaelis, L L; LoCicero, J; Hartz, R S; McCarthy, W J

    1990-11-01

    Lasers have been accepted in general thoracic surgery as resectional tools which allow precise hemostasis and maximal salvage of normal lung tissue. Used endoscopically, with or without associated photodynamic therapy, we have provided acceptable palliation in some patients with obstructing tumors of the tracheobronchial tree and esophagus. Cardiovascular uses of the laser have been under extensive investigation at our medical center for many years. We have demonstrated that laser-assisted anastomosis of small vessels is possible, that early tensile strength and patency are excellent, but that long-term aneurysm formation is excessive. In addition, CO2 laser injury of the arterial intima leads to a marked increase in atheromata formation in animal models of atherosclerosis; this may be eliminated with the excimer laser. We have begun using the excimer laser to open obstructed peripheral and coronary arteries. New technology is emerging which allows dual fiber catheters which allow identification of tissue in an artery, ie calcium, atheromata, clot, media, etc. and instantaneous computer sensing/integration which initiates "fire" or "no fire" signals in the enclosed laser system, thus decreasing the chance of vessel perforation. These technologies, in association with balloon angioplasty, intravascular stents, and atherectomy devices are offering exciting alternate therapy for patients with obstructing atherosclerosis. PMID:2084286

  18. Video-assisted thoracic surgery for pulmonary sequestration: a safe alternative procedure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu-Ming; Cao, Jin-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Background Pulmonary sequestration (PS), a rare congenital anatomic anomaly of the lung, is usually treated through resection by a conventional thoracotomy procedure. The efficacy and safety of video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) in PS treatment has seldom been evaluated. To address this research gap, we assessed the efficacy and safety of VATS in the treatment of PS in a large Chinese cohort. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 58 patients with PS who had undergone surgical resection in our department between January 2003 and April 2014. Of these patients, 42 (72.4%) underwent thoracotomy, and 16 (27.6%) underwent attempted VATS resection. Clinical and demographic data, including patients’ age, sex, complaints, sequestration characteristics, approach and procedures, operative time, resection range, blood loss, drainage volume, chest tube duration, hospital stay, and complications were collected, in addition to short-term follow-up data. Results Of the 58 participating patients, 55 accepted anatomic lobectomy, 2 accepted wedge resection, and 1 accepted left lower lobectomy combined with lingular segmentectomy. All lesions were located in the lower lobe, with 1–4 aberrant arteries, except one right upper lobe sequestration. Three cases (18.8%) in the VATS group were converted to thoracotomy because of dense adhesion (n=1), hilar fusion (n=1), or bleeding (n=1). No significant differences in operative time, postoperative hospital stay, or perioperative complications were observed between the VATS and thoracotomy groups, although the VATS patients had less blood loss (P=0.032), a greater drainage volume (P=0.001), and a longer chest tube duration (P=0.001) than their thoracotomy counterparts. Conclusions VATS is a viable alternative procedure for PS in some patients. Simple sequestration without a thoracic cavity or hilum adhesion is a good indication for VATS resection, particularly for VATS anatomic lobectomy. Thoracic cavity and hilum adhesion remain a

  19. Robotic thoracic surgery: technical considerations and learning curve for pulmonary resection.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, Giulia

    2014-05-01

    Retrospective series indicate that robot-assisted approaches to lung cancer resection offer comparable radicality and safety to video-assisted thoracic surgery or open surgery. More intuitive movements, greater flexibility, and high-definition three-dimensional vision overcome limitations of video-assisted thoracic surgery and may encourage wider adoption of robotic surgery for lung cancer, particularly as more early stage cases are diagnosed by screening. High capital and running costs, limited instrument availability, and long operating times are important disadvantages. Entry of competitor companies should drive down costs. Studies are required to assess quality of life, morbidity, oncologic radicality, and cost effectiveness. PMID:24780416

  20. Patient safety in thoracic surgery and European Society of Thoracic Surgeons checklist

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Improving patient safety seems to be a new interesting clinical subject but, in fact, it is no new. It has to do with one of the oldest ethical principles of our profession: curing and not harming. The important research that has been done in a short period of time has brought in new insight to this complex area that is fast developing. The creation of safety managing systems will allow coordinating efforts from very different, although complementary, areas to create real safety culture and safety climate in every organization. In the surgical settings, teamwork is basic to provide good quality of care. Safety leaders in every team have an important role in establishing priorities, summarizing proposals, coordinating efforts, launching new initiatives and transmitting that safety efforts are worth taken. Preparedness and anticipation are key points for avoiding most of the diverse types of patient harm that can occur. As has been published, a great number of errors can be avoided simply using crosscheck based on specialized checklist that reviews every important detail of the procedure. This strategy has been demonstrated very useful at other high risk industries such as aviation, nuclear or food management. The Safe Surgery Saves Lives program launched in 2002 by the WHO has taught us that improvement is possible using a simple checklist. More complex and detail checklist can be more adequate for more complex procedures and settings. The proposed ESTS checklist reviews different areas of possible error in deeper detail allowing the finest adjustment of the patient before the skin incision. It has been recently released to the general thoracic community and monitors its use and usefulness has to be warrantied. PMID:25984360

  1. Patient safety in thoracic surgery and European Society of Thoracic Surgeons checklist.

    PubMed

    Novoa, Nuria M

    2015-04-01

    Improving patient safety seems to be a new interesting clinical subject but, in fact, it is no new. It has to do with one of the oldest ethical principles of our profession: curing and not harming. The important research that has been done in a short period of time has brought in new insight to this complex area that is fast developing. The creation of safety managing systems will allow coordinating efforts from very different, although complementary, areas to create real safety culture and safety climate in every organization. In the surgical settings, teamwork is basic to provide good quality of care. Safety leaders in every team have an important role in establishing priorities, summarizing proposals, coordinating efforts, launching new initiatives and transmitting that safety efforts are worth taken. Preparedness and anticipation are key points for avoiding most of the diverse types of patient harm that can occur. As has been published, a great number of errors can be avoided simply using crosscheck based on specialized checklist that reviews every important detail of the procedure. This strategy has been demonstrated very useful at other high risk industries such as aviation, nuclear or food management. The Safe Surgery Saves Lives program launched in 2002 by the WHO has taught us that improvement is possible using a simple checklist. More complex and detail checklist can be more adequate for more complex procedures and settings. The proposed ESTS checklist reviews different areas of possible error in deeper detail allowing the finest adjustment of the patient before the skin incision. It has been recently released to the general thoracic community and monitors its use and usefulness has to be warrantied. PMID:25984360

  2. From “awake” to “monitored anesthesia care” thoracic surgery: A 15 year evolution

    PubMed Central

    Mineo, Tommaso C; Tacconi, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Although general anesthesia still represents the standard when performing thoracic surgery, the interest toward alternative methods is increasing. These have evolved from the employ of just local or regional analgesia techniques in completely alert patients (awake thoracic surgery), to more complex protocols entailing conscious sedation and spontaneous ventilation. The main rationale of these methods is to prevent serious complications related to general anesthesia and selective ventilation, such as tracheobronchial injury, acute lung injury, and cardiovascular events. Trends toward shorter hospitalization and reduced overall costs have also been indicated in preliminary reports. Monitored anesthesia care in thoracic surgery can be successfully employed to manage diverse oncologic conditions, such as malignant pleural effusion, peripheral lung nodules, and mediastinal tumors. Main non-oncologic indications include pneumothorax, emphysema, pleural infections, and interstitial lung disease. Furthermore, as the familiarity with this surgical practice has increased, major operations are now being performed this way. Despite the absence of randomized controlled trials, there is preliminary evidence that monitored anesthesia care protocols in thoracic surgery may be beneficial in high-risk patients, with non-inferior efficacy when compared to standard operations under general anesthesia. Monitored anesthesia care in thoracic surgery should enter the armamentarium of modern thoracic surgeons, and adequate training should be scheduled in accredited residency programs. PMID:26766966

  3. Postoperative paralysis following posterior decompression with instrumented fusion for thoracic myelopathy caused by ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Masashi; Okawa, Akihiko; Mannoji, Chikato; Fujiyoshi, Takayuki; Furuya, Takeo; Koda, Masao

    2011-02-01

    A 60-year-old man presented with thoracic myelopathy due to ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). His spinal cord was severely impinged anteriorly by a beak-type OPLL and posteriorly by ossification of the ligamentum flavum at T4/5. He underwent surgical posterior decompression with instrumented fusion (PDF). Immediately after surgery, he developed a Brown-Séquard-type paralysis, which spontaneously resolved without requiring the addition of OPLL extirpation. This example highlights that the risk of postoperative neurological deterioration cannot be eliminated even when PDF is selected as the surgical procedure for thoracic OPLL, especially in instances in which the spinal cord is severely compressed. PMID:21030260

  4. Design and implementation of an enhanced recovery program in thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Giménez-Milà, Marc; Klein, Andrew A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite significant improvements in perioperative care, major surgery is still associated with major complications. Enhanced recovery after surgery was introduced by the National Health Service in the UK with the aim of improving patient outcomes and reducing length of stay in hospital. The degree of applicability differs between surgical specialties, and in thoracic surgery it has not been developed until recently. We have therefore reviewed recent literature specific to thoracic surgery, and will discuss key elements of the design, implementation and monitoring of an enhanced recovery (ER) program based on our recent experience. The program is divided into several high impact intervention measures that involve the preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative periods. Physical activity promotion and educational programs that provide information about the surgery and the surgical pathway are an essential part of the preoperative strategies. During surgery, an optimal pain control strategy, antibiotic prophylaxis and protective ventilation are important. Minimally invasive surgery and well-planned postoperative care including early drain removal and planned discharge are also important. Overall, we have shown that ER in thoracic surgery can facilitate early discharge from hospital and possibly reduce postoperative complications. Further studies are required to understand the extent of ER benefits when applied to thoracic surgery, and to test individual components in a prospective manner. PMID:26941969

  5. Update on three-dimensional image reconstruction for preoperative simulation in thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chen-Yoshikawa, Toyofumi F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) technologies have been developed and refined over time. Recently, high-speed and high-quality 3D-CT technologies have also been introduced to the field of thoracic surgery. The purpose of this manuscript is to demonstrate several examples of these 3D-CT technologies in various scenarios in thoracic surgery. Methods A newly-developed high-speed and high-quality 3D image analysis software system was used in Kyoto University Hospital. Simulation and/or navigation were performed using this 3D-CT technology in various thoracic surgeries. Results Preoperative 3D-CT simulation was performed in most patients undergoing video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Anatomical variation was frequently detected preoperatively, which was useful in performing VATS procedures when using only a monitor for vision. In sublobar resection, 3D-CT simulation was more helpful. In small lung lesions, which were supposedly neither visible nor palpable, preoperative marking of the lesions was performed using 3D-CT simulation, and wedge resection or segmentectomy was successfully performed with confidence. This technique also enabled virtual-reality endobronchial ultrasonography (EBUS), which made the procedure more safe and reliable. Furthermore, in living-donor lobar lung transplantation (LDLLT), surgical procedures for donor lobectomy were simulated preoperatively by 3D-CT angiography, which also affected surgical procedures for recipient surgery. New surgical techniques such as right and left inverted LDLLT were also established using 3D models created with this technique. Conclusions After the introduction of 3D-CT technology to the field of thoracic surgery, preoperative simulation has been developed for various thoracic procedures. In the near future, this technique will become more common in thoracic surgery, and frequent use by thoracic surgeons will be seen in worldwide daily practice. PMID:27014477

  6. Moving beyond the boundary: the emerging role of video-assisted thoracic surgery for bronchoplastic resections

    PubMed Central

    Viti, Andrea; Terzi, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Sleeve resections with parenchymal sparing should be attempted whenever possible when operating a central lung cancer rather than performing a pneumonectomy. Long-term results conclusively favored sleeve procedures in improved survival, quality of life, reduced loss in lung function, and improved operative mortality. Therefore, all surgeons should own this technique in their surgical armamentarium. In the last two decades, the minimally invasive surgical approach has slowly gained positions in Thoracic Surgery and now more and more patients ask for a minimally invasive procedure when surgery is required. This technical revolution in thoracic surgery advocates that almost every open procedure could be done in video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS). Nevertheless, like all other minimally invasive procedures, VATS sleeve lobectomy has a long learning curve. With the skills and the experience derived from major VATS procedures, these demanding surgical operations may also be performed with a minimally invasive approach. PMID:25276356

  7. Maximizing use of robot-arm no. 3 in daVinci-assisted thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, Naohiro; Maeda, Junichi; Yoshida, Koichi; Kato, Yasufumi; Hagiwara, Masaru; Kakihana, Masatoshi; Ohira, Tatsuo; Kawate, Norihiko; Ikeda, Norihiko

    2015-05-01

    We have previously reported on the importance of appropriate robot-arm settings and replacement of instrument ports in robot-assisted thoracic surgery, because the thoracic cavity requires a large space to access all lesions in various areas of the thoracic cavity from the apex to the diaphragm and mediastinum and the chest wall. (1 - 3) Moreover, it can be difficult to manipulate the da Vinci Surgical System using only arms No. 1 and No. 2 depending on the tumor location. However, arm No. 3 is usually positioned on the same side as arm No. 2, and sometimes it is only used as an assisting-arm to avoid conflict with other arms ( Fig. 1 ). In this report, we show how robot-arm No. 3 can be used with maximum effectiveness in da Vinci-assisted thoracic surgery. [Figure: see text]. PMID:26011219

  8. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database: 2016 Update on Outcomes and Quality.

    PubMed

    D'Agostino, Richard S; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Badhwar, Vinay; Paone, Gaetano; Rankin, J Scott; Han, Jane M; McDonald, Donna; Shahian, David M

    2016-01-01

    The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Database is one of the longest-standing, largest, and most highly regarded clinical data registries in health care. It serves as the foundation for all quality measurement and improvement activities of The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. This report summarizes current aggregate national outcomes in adult cardiac surgery and reviews database-related activities in the areas of quality measurement and performance improvement. PMID:26616408

  9. Overview of uniportal video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS): past and present

    PubMed Central

    Reinersman, J. Matthew; Passera, Eliseo

    2016-01-01

    Single incision video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS), better known as uniportal VATS, has taken the world of thoracic surgery by storm over the previous few years. Through advances in techniques and technology, surgeons have been able to perform increasingly complex thoracic procedures utilizing a single small incision, hence avoiding the inherent morbidity of the standard open thoracotomy. This was a natural extension of what most recognize as the standard of care for early stage lung cancer, the VATS lobectomy, generally performed through a three- or four-incision technique. Improved camera optics have allowed the use of smaller cameras, making the uniportal approach technically easier. Improvement in articulating staplers and the development of other roticulator instruments have also aided working through a small single access point. The uniportal technique further brings the operative fulcrum inside the chest cavity, enabling better visualization, and creates working conditions similar to the open thoracotomy. Currently, uniportal VATS is being used for minor thoracic procedures and lung resections up to complex thoracic procedures typically requiring open approaches, such as chest wall resections, pneumonectomy, and bronchoplastic and pulmonary artery sleeve resections. Uniportal VATS is a clear advance in the field of general thoracic surgery and provides but a glimpse into the untold future. PMID:27134837

  10. Overview of uniportal video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS): past and present.

    PubMed

    Reinersman, J Matthew; Passera, Eliseo; Rocco, Gaetano

    2016-03-01

    Single incision video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS), better known as uniportal VATS, has taken the world of thoracic surgery by storm over the previous few years. Through advances in techniques and technology, surgeons have been able to perform increasingly complex thoracic procedures utilizing a single small incision, hence avoiding the inherent morbidity of the standard open thoracotomy. This was a natural extension of what most recognize as the standard of care for early stage lung cancer, the VATS lobectomy, generally performed through a three- or four-incision technique. Improved camera optics have allowed the use of smaller cameras, making the uniportal approach technically easier. Improvement in articulating staplers and the development of other roticulator instruments have also aided working through a small single access point. The uniportal technique further brings the operative fulcrum inside the chest cavity, enabling better visualization, and creates working conditions similar to the open thoracotomy. Currently, uniportal VATS is being used for minor thoracic procedures and lung resections up to complex thoracic procedures typically requiring open approaches, such as chest wall resections, pneumonectomy, and bronchoplastic and pulmonary artery sleeve resections. Uniportal VATS is a clear advance in the field of general thoracic surgery and provides but a glimpse into the untold future. PMID:27134837

  11. Penetrating thoracic injury with retained foreign body: can video-assisted thoracic surgery take up the leading role in acute management?

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Peter S. Y.; Chan, Herman H. M.; Lau, Rainbow W. H.; Capili, Freddie G.; Underwood, Malcolm J.

    2016-01-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is widely adopted in acute management of patient with thoracic trauma, but its use in penetrating thoracic injuries with retained foreign bodies were rarely reported. We described three of such cases using VATS as the first line approach. Identification of injuries, control of bleeders, clot evacuation, resection of damaged lung parenchyma and safe retrieval of foreign bodies were all performed via complete VATS within short operative time. Patient were uneventfully discharged during early post-operative period. We suggest that, for haemodynamically stable patients, VATS offers a safe and minimally-invasive alternative to conventional thoracotomy for penetrating thoracic injury with retained foreign bodies. PMID:27621884

  12. Penetrating thoracic injury with retained foreign body: can video-assisted thoracic surgery take up the leading role in acute management?

    PubMed

    Yu, Peter S Y; Chan, Herman H M; Lau, Rainbow W H; Capili, Freddie G; Underwood, Malcolm J; Wan, Innes Y P

    2016-08-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is widely adopted in acute management of patient with thoracic trauma, but its use in penetrating thoracic injuries with retained foreign bodies were rarely reported. We described three of such cases using VATS as the first line approach. Identification of injuries, control of bleeders, clot evacuation, resection of damaged lung parenchyma and safe retrieval of foreign bodies were all performed via complete VATS within short operative time. Patient were uneventfully discharged during early post-operative period. We suggest that, for haemodynamically stable patients, VATS offers a safe and minimally-invasive alternative to conventional thoracotomy for penetrating thoracic injury with retained foreign bodies. PMID:27621884

  13. Electroacupuncture Reduces Postoperative Pain and Analgesic Consumption in Patients Undergoing Thoracic Surgery: A Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tongyu; Xu, Jianjun; Ma, Wen; Zhou, Jia

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) on postoperative pain management in patients undergoing thoracic surgery. A randomized study was conducted. Ninety-two thoracic surgical patients were randomly divided into an EA group and a sham group. Postoperative intravenous analgesia was applied with a half dose of the conventional drug concentration in both groups. In the EA group, EA treatment was administered for three consecutive days after the surgery with 6 sessions of 30 min each. Compared with the sham group, patients in the EA group had a lower visual analogue scale (VAS) score at 2, 24, 48, and 72 hours and consumed less analgesic after surgery. The incidence of opioid-related adverse effects of nausea was lower in the EA group. The time to first flatus and defecation was also shorter in the EA group. Furthermore, the plasma β-endorphin (β-EP) level was higher by radioimmunoassay and the plasma 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) level was lower in the EA group by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay during the first 72 hr after thoracic surgery. Therefore, EA is suitable as an adjunct treatment for postoperative pain management after thoracic surgery. PMID:27073400

  14. Video-assisted thoracic surgery lobectomy preserves more latissimus dorsi muscle than conventional surgery.

    PubMed

    Karasaki, Takahiro; Nakajima, Jun; Murakawa, Tomohiro; Fukami, Takeshi; Yoshida, Yukihiro; Kusakabe, Masashi; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Takamoto, Shinichi

    2009-03-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) lobectomy for early lung cancer has become technically feasible. We sought to determine if VATS preserved chest wall muscle postoperatively better than thoracotomy. Consecutive patients who underwent lobectomy between 2004 and 2006 for clinical Stage IA non-small cell lung cancer through VATS (VATS group) or posterolateral thoracotomy (PLT group) at our institution were eligible for the study. The cross-sectional areas of bilateral latissimus dorsi muscle (LDM) at the lower end of the scapula were obtained by computed tomography preoperatively and one year after surgery. These were quantified with image analysis by two researchers in a blinded manner. Fourteen patients in the VATS group (mean age, 68 years; 8 men, 6 women) and 24 patients in the PLT group (mean age, 62 years; 14 men, 10 women) were assessed. Postoperative/preoperative ratios of the LDM cross-section areas on the surgical side were 89+/-20% (Mean+/-S.D.) in the VATS group and 57+/-16% in the PLT group (P<0.001). Those on the non-surgical side were 89+/-23% in the VATS group and 97+/-16% in the PLT group (P=0.23). We conclude that VATS may prevent atrophy of LDM on the surgical side better than conventional thoracotomy. PMID:19059949

  15. [Prevention and treatment of intraoperative complications of thoracic surgery].

    PubMed

    Lampl, L

    2015-05-01

    In order to achieve a minimal complication rate there is a need for a comprehensive strategy. This means in the first line preventive steps which include patient positioning, suitable approaches and access, an appropriately qualified surgical team as well as a carefully planned dissection and preparation. Furthermore, a supply of additional instrumentation, such as thrombectomy catheters, special vascular clamps and even extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and a heart-lung machine (HLM) in cases of centrally located lesions should be on stand-by. Control instruments, such as a bronchoscope and esophagoscope should not be forgotten. In selected cases a preoperative embolization (vascular malformation) or cream swallow (thoracic duct injury) can be helpful. Special interventions to overcome complications arising are described for the chest wall, lung parenchyma, pulmonary vessels, great vessels, bronchial arteries, trachea and bronchi, esophagus, thoracic duct, heart, vertebral column and sternum corresponding to the topography. PMID:25691227

  16. The history of surgery of the thoracic aorta.

    PubMed

    Cooley, D A

    1999-11-01

    Until the late 19th century, treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms relied on ligation of the parent vessel or introduction of foreign materials to promote coagulation or fibrosis. A major breakthrough occurred in 1888, when Rudolph Matas reported an internal repair technique known as endoaneurysmorrhaphy. In this approach, the clot was excised from the aneurysmal sac, and the orifices of the arteries that entered the sac were sutured from within, reestablishing continuous blood flow. At the beginning of the 20th century, Alexis Carrel and Charles Guthrie began to lay the foundation for modern vascular anastomotic techniques. Although isolated successes were reported, optimal treatment of thoracic aortic disease awaited the development of reliable synthetic grafts in the 1950s and 1960s. During the past 15 years, the treatment goal has reverted to endoaneurysmorrhaphy, involving the use of a suitable graft to restore aortic continuity. PMID:10589335

  17. Complications corner: Anterior thoracic disc surgery with dural tear/CSF fistula and low-pressure pleural drain led to severe intracranial hypotension

    PubMed Central

    Oudeman, Eline A.; Tewarie, Rishi D. S. Nandoe; Jöbsis, G. Joost; Arts, Mark P.; Kruyt, Nyika D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Thoracic disc surgery can lead to a life-threatening complication: intracranial hypotension due to a subarachnoid-pleural fistula. Case Description: We report a 63-year-old male with paraparesis due to multiple herniated thoracic discs, with compressive myelopathy. The patient required a circumferential procedure including a laminectomy/fusion followed by an anterior thoracic decompression to address both diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) anteriorly and posterior stenosis. The postoperative course was complicated by severe intracranial hypotension attributed to the erroneous placement of a low-pressure drain placed in the pleural cavity instead of a lumbar drain; this resulted in subdural hematoma's necessitating subsequent surgery. Conclusion: Severe neurological deterioration occurring after thoracic decompressive surgery may rarely be attributed to intracranial hypotension due to a subarachnoid-pleural fistula. Patients should be treated with external lumbar drainage of cerebrospinal fluid for 3–5 days rather than a low-pressure pleural drain to avoid the onset of intracranial hypotension leading to symptomatic subdural hematomas. PMID:26005575

  18. Treatment of intrathoracic grass awn migration with video-assisted thoracic surgery in two dogs.

    PubMed

    Shamir, Shelly; Mayhew, Philipp D; Zwingenberger, Allison; Johnson, Lynelle R

    2016-07-15

    CASE DESCRIPTION A 17-month-old sexually intact male Vizsla and a 2-year-old spayed female mixed-breed dog were examined because of suspected intrathoracic grass awn migration. CLINICAL FINDINGS Thoracic CT revealed focal areas of pulmonary infiltration in the right caudal lung lobe in one dog and in the left caudal lung lobe in the other. In 1 patient, bronchoscopy revealed 2 grass awns in the bronchi. Results of thoracic radiography and bronchoscopy were unremarkable in the second patient; however, a grass awn was recovered from the tonsillar crypt during oropharyngeal examination. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME In both dogs, grass awns were successfully retrieved from the pleural cavity by means of video-assisted thoracic surgery during 1-lung ventilation. In one patient, a grass awn was recovered bronchoscopically from the left caudal lung lobe bronchus and another was visualized distally in an accessory lung lobe bronchus but could not be retrieved. This dog underwent accessory lung lobectomy. The second dog underwent left caudal lung lobectomy. Both patients recovered uneventfully from surgery, were discharged from the hospital, and had no apparent recurrence of clinical signs at telephone follow-up 31 months and 18 months after surgery. CLINICAL RELEVANCE With careful case selection, successful management of intrathoracic grass awn migration in dogs can be achieved by means of video-assisted thoracic surgery. Comprehensive preoperative evaluation including both computed tomography and bronchoscopy is suggested. Further investigation is necessary to evaluate whether treatment of this condition with video-assisted thoracic surgery is as effective as with traditional open thoracotomy. PMID:27379598

  19. [Single-port video-assisted thoracic surgery in an awake patient].

    PubMed

    Alonso-García, F J; Navarro-Martínez, J; Gálvez, C; Rivera-Cogollos, M J; Sgattoni, C; Tarí-Bas, I M

    2016-03-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgery is traditionally carried out with general anaesthesia and endotracheal intubation with double lumen tube. However, in the last few years procedures, such as lobectomies, are being performed with loco-regional anaesthesia, with and without sedation, maintaining the patient awake and with spontaneous breathing, in order to avoid the inherent risks of general anaesthesia, double lumen tube intubation and mechanical ventilation. This surgical approach has also shown to be effective in that it allows a good level of analgesia, maintaining a correct oxygenation and providing a better post-operative recovery. Two case reports are presented in which video-assisted thoracic surgery was used, a lung biopsy and a lung resection, both with epidural anaesthesia and maintaining the patient awake and with spontaneous ventilation, as part of a preliminary evaluation of the anaesthetic technique in this type of surgery. PMID:26298720

  20. Current Trend of Robotic Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgeries in Korea: Analysis of Seven-Year National Data

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Chang Hyun; Bok, Jin San; Lee, Na Rae; Kim, Young Tae; Lee, Seon Heui; Lim, Cheong

    2015-01-01

    Background Robotic surgery is an alternative to minimally invasive surgery. The aim of this study was to report on current trends in robotic thoracic and cardiovascular surgical techniques in Korea. Methods Data from the National Evidence-based Healthcare Collaborating Agency (NECA) between January 2006 and June 2012 were used in this study, including a total of 932 cases of robotic surgeries reported to NECA. The annual trends in the case volume, indications for robotic surgery, and distribution by hospitals and surgeons were analyzed in this study. Results Of the 932 cases, 591 (63%) were thoracic operations and 340 (37%) were cardiac operations. The case number increased explosively in 2007 and 2008. However, the rate of increase regained a steady state after 2011. The main indications for robotic thoracic surgery were pulmonary disease (n=271, 46%), esophageal disease (n=199, 34%), and mediastinal disease (n=117, 20%). The main indications for robotic cardiac surgery were valvular heart disease (n=228, 67%), atrial septal defect (n=79, 23%), and cardiac myxoma (n=27, 8%). Robotic thoracic and cardiovascular surgeries were performed in 19 hospitals. Three large volume hospitals performed 94% of the case volume of robotic cardiac surgery and 74% of robotic thoracic surgery. Centralization of robotic operation was significantly (p<0.0001) more common in cardiac surgery than in thoracic surgery. A total of 39 surgeons performed robotic surgeries. However, only 27% of cardiac surgeons and 23% of thoracic surgeons performed more than 10 cases of robotic surgery. Conclusion Trend analysis of robotic and cardiovascular operations demonstrated a gradual increase in the surgical volume in Korea. Meanwhile, centralization of surgical cases toward specific surgeons in specific hospitals was observed. PMID:26509124

  1. Electromagnetic navigational bronchoscopy and robotic-assisted thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Christie, Sara

    2014-06-01

    With the use of electromagnetic navigational bronchoscopy and robotics, lung lesions can be diagnosed and resected during one surgical procedure. Global positioning system technology allows surgeons to identify and mark a thoracic tumor, and then robotics technology allows them to perform minimally invasive resection and cancer staging procedures. Nurses on the perioperative robotics team must consider the logistics of providing safe and competent care when performing combined procedures during one surgical encounter. Instrumentation, OR organization and room setup, and patient positioning are important factors to consider to complete the procedure systematically and efficiently. This revolutionary concept of combining navigational bronchoscopy with robotics requires a team of dedicated nurses to facilitate the sequence of events essential for providing optimal patient outcomes in highly advanced surgical procedures. PMID:24875210

  2. Open aortic surgery after thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

    PubMed

    Coselli, Joseph S; Spiliotopoulos, Konstantinos; Preventza, Ourania; de la Cruz, Kim I; Amarasekara, Hiruni; Green, Susan Y

    2016-08-01

    In the last decade, thoracic endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (TEVAR) has emerged as an appealing alternative to the traditional open aortic aneurysm repair. This is largely due to generally improved early outcomes associated with TEVAR, including lower perioperative mortality and morbidity. However, it is relatively common for patients who undergo TEVAR to need a secondary intervention. In select circumstances, these secondary interventions are performed as an open procedure. Although it is difficult to assess the rate of open repairs after TEVAR, the rates in large series of TEVAR cases (>300) have ranged from 0.4 to 7.9 %. Major complications of TEVAR that typically necessitates open distal aortic repair (i.e., repair of the descending thoracic or thoracoabdominal aorta) include endoleak (especially type I), aortic fistula, endograft infection, device collapse or migration, and continued expansion of the aneurysm sac. Conversion to open repair of the distal aorta may be either elective (as for many endoleaks) or emergent (as for rupture, retrograde complicated dissection, malperfusion, and endograft infection). In addition, in select patients (e.g., those with a chronic aortic dissection), unrepaired sections of the aorta may progressively dilate, resulting in the need for multiple distal aortic repairs. Open repairs after TEVAR can be broadly classified as full extraction, partial extraction, or full salvage of the stent-graft. Although full and partial stent-graft extraction imply failure of TEVAR, such failure is generally absent in cases where the stent-graft can be fully salvaged. We review the literature regarding open repair after TEVAR and highlight operative strategies. PMID:27314956

  3. Bilateral Internal Thoracic Artery Configuration for Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Boodhwani, Munir; Hanet, Claude; de Kerchove, Laurent; Navarra, Emiliano; Astarci, Parla; Noirhomme, Philippe; El Khoury, Gebrine

    2016-01-01

    Background— Bilateral internal thoracic arteries (BITA) have demonstrated superior patency and improved survival in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. However, the optimal configuration for BITA utilization and its effect on long-term outcome remains uncertain. Methods and Results— We randomly assigned 304 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting using BITA to either in situ or Y grafting configurations. The primary end point was 3-year angiographic patency. Secondary end points included major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (ie, death from any cause, stroke, myocardial infarction, or repeat revascularization) at 7 years. More coronary targets were able to be revascularized using internal thoracic arteries in patients randomized to Y grafting versus in situ group (3.2±0.8 versus 2.4±0.5 arteries/patient; P<0.01). The primary end point did not show significant differences in graft patency between groups. Secondary end points occurred more frequently in the in situ group (P=0.03), with 7-year rates of 34±10% in the in situ and 25±12% in the Y grafting groups, driven largely by a higher incidence of repeat revascularization in the in situ group (14±4.5% versus 7.4±3.2% at 7 years; P=0.009). There were no significant differences in hospital mortality or morbidity or in late survival, myocardial infarction, or stroke between groups. Conclusions— Three-year systematic angiographic follow-up revealed no significant difference in graft patency between the 2 BITA configurations. However, compared with in situ configuration, the use of BITA in a Y grafting configuration results in lower rates of major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events at 7 years. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01666366. PMID:27406988

  4. Minimally Invasive Thoracic Surgery in Pediatric Patients: The Taiwan Experience

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu-Kai; Chou, Chieh; Li, Chung-Liang; Chiu, Hui-Gin; Chang, Yu-Tang

    2013-01-01

    Minimally invasive technology or laparoscopic surgery underwent a major breakthrough over the past two decades. The first experience of thoracoscopy in children was reported around 1980 for diagnosis of intrathoracic pathology and neoplasia. Up until the middle of the 1990s, the surgical community in Taiwan was still not well prepared to accept the coming era of minimally invasive surgery. In the beginning, laparoscopy was performed in only a few specialties and only relatively short or simple surgeries were considered. But now, the Taiwan's experiences over the several different clinical scenarios were dramatically increased. Therefore, we elaborated on the experience about pectus excavatum: Nuss procedure, primary spontaneous hemopneumothorax, thoracoscopic thymectomy, and empyema in Taiwan. PMID:23819123

  5. Office-Based Intracordal Hyaluronate Injections Improve Quality of Life in Thoracic-Surgery-Related Unilateral Vocal Fold Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Tuan-Jen; Hsin, Li-Jen; Chung, Hsiu-Feng; Chiang, Hui-Chen; Li, Hsueh-Yu; Wong, Alice M.K.; Pei, Yu-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Thoracic-surgery-related unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVFP) may cause severe morbidity and can cause profound functional impairment and psychosocial stress in patients with pre-existing thoracic diseases. In-office intracordal hyaluronate (HA) injections have recently been applied to improve voice and quality of life in patients with vocal incompetence, but their effect on thoracic-surgery-related UVFP remains inconclusive. We therefore conducted a prospective study to clarify the effect of early HA injection on voice and quality of life in patients with thoracic-surgery-related UVFP. Patients with UVFP within 3 months after thoracic surgery who received office-based HA injection were recruited. Quantitative laryngeal electromyography, videolaryngostroboscopy, voice-related life quality (voice outcome survey), laboratory voice analysis, and health-related quality of life (SF-36) were evaluated at baseline, and at 1 month postinjection. A total of 104 consecutive patients accepted office-based HA intracordal injection during the study period, 34 of whom were treated in relation to thoracic surgery and were eligible for inclusion. Voice-related life quality, voice laboratory analysis, and most generic quality of life domains were significantly improved at 1 month after in-office HA intracordal injection. No HA-related complications were reported. Single office-based HA intracordal injection is a safe and effective treatment for thoracic-surgery-related UVFP, resulting in immediate improvements in patient quality of life, voice quality, and swallowing ability. PMID:26448034

  6. Office-Based Intracordal Hyaluronate Injections Improve Quality of Life in Thoracic-Surgery-Related Unilateral Vocal Fold Paralysis.

    PubMed

    Fang, Tuan-Jen; Hsin, Li-Jen; Chung, Hsiu-Feng; Chiang, Hui-Chen; Li, Hsueh-Yu; Wong, Alice M K; Pei, Yu-Chen

    2015-10-01

    Thoracic-surgery-related unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVFP) may cause severe morbidity and can cause profound functional impairment and psychosocial stress in patients with pre-existing thoracic diseases. In-office intracordal hyaluronate (HA) injections have recently been applied to improve voice and quality of life in patients with vocal incompetence, but their effect on thoracic-surgery-related UVFP remains inconclusive. We therefore conducted a prospective study to clarify the effect of early HA injection on voice and quality of life in patients with thoracic-surgery-related UVFP. Patients with UVFP within 3 months after thoracic surgery who received office-based HA injection were recruited. Quantitative laryngeal electromyography, videolaryngostroboscopy, voice-related life quality (voice outcome survey), laboratory voice analysis, and health-related quality of life (SF-36) were evaluated at baseline, and at 1 month postinjection. A total of 104 consecutive patients accepted office-based HA intracordal injection during the study period, 34 of whom were treated in relation to thoracic surgery and were eligible for inclusion. Voice-related life quality, voice laboratory analysis, and most generic quality of life domains were significantly improved at 1 month after in-office HA intracordal injection. No HA-related complications were reported. Single office-based HA intracordal injection is a safe and effective treatment for thoracic-surgery-related UVFP, resulting in immediate improvements in patient quality of life, voice quality, and swallowing ability. PMID:26448034

  7. Impact on Neurological Recovery of Transforaminal Debridement and Interbody Fusion versus Transpedicular Decompression in Combination with Pedicle Screw Instrumentation for Treating Thoracic and Lumbar Spinal Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Choovongkomol, Kongtush; Piyapromdee, Urawit; Leownorasate, Manoon

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To compare the neurological outcome of transforaminal debridement and interbody fusion with transpedicular decompression for treatment of thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis. Overview of Literature Few articles have addressed the impact of neurological recovery in patients with tuberculosis who were treated by two different operative methods via the posterior-only approach. Methods Clinical and radiographic results of one-stage posterior instrumented spinal fusion for treatment of tuberculous spondylodiscitis with neurological deficits were reviewed and analyzed from 2009 to 2013. The extensive (E) group consisted of patients who received transforaminal debridement and interbody fusion, whereas transpedicular decompression was performed on limited (L) group. Rapid recovery was improvement of at least one Frankel grade within 6 weeks after operation. Otherwise, it was slow recovery. Results All 39 patients had improved neurological signs. The median follow-up period was 24 months. Proportionately younger patients (under 65 years of age) received extensive surgery (15 of 18, 83.3% vs. 11 of 21, 52.4%; p=0.04). The mean operative time and blood loss in the group E were higher than in the group L (both p<0.01). With regard to type of procedure, especially at thoracic and thoracolumbar spine, patients who underwent extensive surgery had rapid neurological recovery significantly different from those of limited surgery (p=0.01; Relative Risk, 3.06; 95% Confidence Interval, 1.13 to 8.29). Conclusions Transforaminal debridement and interbody fusion provides more rapid neurological recovery in patients with thoracic and thoracolumbar spinal tuberculosis compared to transpedicular decompression. PMID:27340536

  8. Effects of Intraoperative Dexmedetomidine on Postoperative Pain in Highly Nicotine-Dependent Patients After Thoracic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xingzhi; Zhang, Ping; Lu, Sufen; Zhang, Zongwang; Yu, Ailan; Liu, Donghua; Wu, Shanshan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the effects of intraoperative dexmedetomidine on pain in highly nicotine-dependent patients after thoracic surgery. Highly nicotine-dependent men underwent thoracic surgery and received postoperative patient-controlled intravenous analgesia with sufentanil. In dexmedetomidine group (experimental group, n = 46), dexmedetomidine was given at a loading dose of 1 μg/kg for 10 minutes, followed by continuous infusion at 0.5 μg/kg/h until 30 minutes before the end of surgery. The saline group (control group, n = 48) received the same volume of saline. General anesthesia was administered via a combination of inhalation and intravenous anesthetics. If necessary, patients were administered a loading dose of sufentanil by an anesthesiologist immediately after surgery (0 hours). Patient-controlled analgesia was started when the patient's resting numerical rating scale (NRS) score was less than 4. Resting and coughing NRS scores and sufentanil dosage were recorded 0, 1, 4 hours, and every 4 hours until 48 hours after surgery. Dosages of other rescue analgesics were converted to the sufentanil dosage. Surgical data, adverse effects, and degree of satisfaction were obtained. Cumulative sufentanil dosage, resting NRS, and coughing NRS in the first 24 hours after surgery and heart rate were lower in the experimental compared with the control group (P <0.05). No patient experienced sedation or respiratory depression. Frequency of nausea and vomiting and degree of satisfaction were similar in both groups. Intraoperative dexmedetomidine was associated with reduced resting and coughing NRS scores and a sufentanil-sparing effect during the first 24 hours after thoracic surgery. PMID:27258524

  9. Pulmonary function after less invasive anterior instrumentation and fusion for idiopathic thoracic scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Standard thoracotomy for anterior instrumentation and fusion of the thoracic spine in idiopathic scoliosis may have detrimental effects on pulmonary function. In this study we describe a less invasive anterior surgical technique and show the pre- and postoperative pulmonary function with a minimum follow-up of 2 years. Methods Twenty patients with Lenke type 1 adolescent thoracic idiopathic scoliosis were treated with anterior spinal fusion and instrumentation. The mean preoperative Cobb angle of the thoracic curve was 53° ± 5.8. Pulmonary function tests (PFT) and radiographic evaluation was performed. Results The mean postoperative correction in Cobb angle of the thoracic curve was 27° ± 8.2 (49%). The mean preoperative FEV1 was 2.81 ± 0.43 L, which increased to 3.14 ± 0.50 L at 2 years postoperatively (P = 0.000). The mean FEV1% did not change (89.60 ± 7.49% preoperatively, versus 90.53 ± 5.95% at 2 years follow-up, P = 0.467). The TLC increased from 4.62 ± 0.62 L preoperatively to 5.17 ± 0.63 L at 2 years follow-up (P = 0.000). The FEV1% at two years of follow-up improved to 104% of the FEV1% predicted value. The FEV1 improved to 97% of the FEV1 predicted value. Conclusion Anterior spinal fusion for idiopathic scoliosis by means of a minimal open thoracotomy proved to be a safe surgical technique that resulted in an improvement of pulmonary function. Our results are similar to those of thoracoscopic procedures reported in literature. PMID:23965278

  10. Left lower sleeve lobectomy and systematic lymph node dissection by complete video-assisted thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jun-Qiang; Chang, Zhi-Bo; Wang, Qi; Zhao, Bai-Qin

    2014-01-01

    Sleeve lobectomy for selected cases of central lung cancer has better functional outcomes comparing to pneumonectomy. With improved technology and increased experiences in complete video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) lobectomy, complete VATS sleeve lobectomy has been applied in major medical centers recently. A 64-year-old male patient with left lower central lung cancer underwent thoracoscopic sleeve lobectomy and systemic mediastinal lymph node dissection. The major incision, of four incisions in total, was a 4 cm mini-incision in the 4th intercostal space of anterior axillary line. The patient had recovered uneventfully after the surgery. PMID:25589982

  11. Thoracic surgery: single-port video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yong; Xu, Guo-Bing; Lei, Cheng-Gang; Xie, Jin-Bao; Zheng, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Single-port video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) has been increasingly applied in clinical settings in the past two years along with the improvements in both endoscopic instruments and surgical skills. Our center began to perform single-port VATS lobectomy in May 2014 and had performed this procedure in 121 patients till January 2015. The surgical incision (3.5-4.5 cm in length) was created in the 4th or 5th intercostal space at the anterior axillary line at the diseased side. The operator standed at the abdominal side of the patient and operated using the endoscopic instruments only. The surgical steps of single-port VATS lobectomy were same as those of the triple-port VATS lobectomy. There was no fixed mode in handling the three major structures of the pulmonary lobes, and the resection sequence can be scheduled based on the development status of pulmonary fissures and on the difficulties in dissecting the relevant structures. We believe the single-port VATS lobectomy is a safe and feasible procedure and warrants further clinical applications after finishing these surgeries. PMID:26207236

  12. Thoracic surgery and the war against smoking: Richard H. Overholt, MD.

    PubMed

    Berger, R L; Dunton, R F; Ashraf, M M; Leonardi, H K; Karlson, K J; Neptune, W B

    1992-04-01

    Richard H. Overholt was born at the beginning of the twentieth century when thoracic surgery hardly existed. During the first 20 years of his life progress in the field was slow. The next 20 years, which coincided with Overholt's surgical training and his early years as a thoracic surgeon, saw a rapid and almost explosive growth. Overholt's contributions were legion. They included the world's first successful right pneumonectomy, advancements in surgical treatment of tuberculosis, development of segmental resection, and introduction of the prone operative position. He was a bold and creative pioneer thoracic surgeon with consumate technical skills. Sixty years ago, when Overholt started his career as a thoracic surgeon, the hazards of smoking were not appreciated, the habit was fashionable, and consumption of tobacco was rapidly rising. In the early 1930s Overholt was among the very few physicians who recognized the perils of smoking and initiated a long but initially unrewarding antismoking crusade. By the early 1950s evidence about the ill effects of tobacco use began to accumulate. Organized medicine, voluntary health groups, and governmental agencies joined in a concerted effort to educate and to contain smoking. During the ensuing 30 years the antismoking movement achieved ever-increasing success. Today, it is widely recognized that smoking is a major health hazard and tobacco consumption is on the decline. Richard Overholt issued the first warning signals about the perils of tobacco and served as an indefatigable leader of the antismoking crusade throughout his professional career. PMID:1554293

  13. [Cross-sectoral Approach of a Perioperative Management Center for General Thoracic Surgery].

    PubMed

    Shimoda, Atsushi; Soh, Junichi; Ashiba, Takako; Murata, Naomichi; Fukuda, Tomomi; Kobayashi, Motomu; Torigoe, Hidejiro; Maki, Yuho; Sugimoto, Seiichiro; Yamane, Masaomi; Toyooka, Shinichi; Oto, Takahiro; Miyoshi, Shinichiro

    2016-01-01

    Perioperative assessment and care, such as enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS), is very important for improving the clinical outcomes of patients who have undergone surgery. However, professional assessments and care cannot be achieved through the actions of only 1 surgical department. We established a perioperative management center(PERIO) comprised of surgeons, dedicated nurses, anesthesiologists, dentists, physiotherapists, pharmacists, and nutritionists to perform intensive cross-sectoral perioperative management. In this manuscript, we investigated the impact of PERIO on the clinical outcomes of 127 elderly patients who underwent thoracic surgery for the resection of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We categorized these 127 patients into 3 groups:① those treated before the introduction of PERIO (between January 2006 to August 2008), ② those treated during the early phase after PERIO introduction (September 2008 to December 2011), and ③ those treated during the late phase after PERIO introduction( January 2012 to December 2014). Radical operations were performed significantly more frequently after PERIO introduction than before PERIO introduction, while the postoperative complication rates were similar among the 3 groups. The duration of postoperative hospitalization was reduced after the introduction of PERIO, and the hospital surplus increased after the introduction of PERIO. In conclusion, PERIO may play an important role in improving the clinical outcomes of thoracic surgery, especially for elderly patients with NSCLC. PMID:26975638

  14. Opportunities and challenges for thoracic surgery collaborations in China: a commentary

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Through a unique combination of factors—including a huge population, rapid social development, and concentration of resources in its mega-cities—China is witnessing phenomenal developments in the field of thoracic surgery. Ultra-high-volume centers are emerging that provide fantastic new opportunities for surgical training and clinical research to surgeons in China and partners from other countries. However, there are also particular shortcomings that are limiting clinical and academic developments. To realize the potential and reap the rewards, the challenges posed by these limitations must be overcome. Thoracic surgeons from Europe may be particularly well-placed to achieve this through multi-dimensional exchanges with their Chinese counterparts. PMID:27195139

  15. Cerebrospinal Fluid Leakage after Surgeries on the Thoracic Spine: A Review of 362 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Panpan; Yu, Miao; Liu, Zhongjun; Jiang, Liang; Wei, Feng; Chen, Zhongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective clinical review. Purpose To describe the incidence of cerebrospinal fluid leakage (CSFL) after thoracic decompression and examine the CSFL predisposing clinical factors. Overview of Literature CSFL is a common complication following thoracic decompression but has not been sufficiently addressed in former studies. Methods A cohort of 362 cases of thoracic decompression from February of 2005 to June of 2013 was examined. The case medical records were reviewed and the occurrence of CSFL and the related clinical parameters were noted. The incidence of CSFL for the entire cohort and each surgical approach were described. Besides, the relationship between CSFL and other clinical parameters were assessed, of which odds ratio values of all CSFL-associated parameters were calculated using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results The incidence of CSFL for the entire cohort was 32.3%. Different surgical approaches had different incidences of CSFL, and circumferential decompression had the highest incidence. Though many different clinical parameters were related to the occurrences of CSFL, being older than 52 years, having ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament or having longer operative segments than 3 vertebrae were significant risk factors for CSFL (p<0.05). Besides, surgeries on the mid-thoracic spine had an increased risk of CSFL (p<0.05). Conclusions From our analysis, CSFL was a common complication after thoracic decompression with the incidence of up to 32.3%. This study identified the predisposing clinical factors, and spinal surgeons should be aware of these risk factors to reduce its incidence. PMID:27340526

  16. [Recent Advances of Biomechanical Studies on Cervical Fusion and Non-fusion Surgery].

    PubMed

    Liao, Zhenhua; Liu, Weiqiang

    2016-02-01

    This article reviews the progress of biomechanical studies on anterior cervical fusion and non-fusion surgery in recent years. The similarities and differences between animal and human cervical spines as well as the major three biomechanical test methods are introduced. Major progresses of biomechanical evaluation in anterior cervical fusion and non-fusion devices, hybrid surgery, coupled motion and biomechanical parameters, such as the instant center of rotation, are classified and summarized. Future development of loading method, multilevel hybrid surgery and coupling character are also discussed. PMID:27382760

  17. True Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery for Early–Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Christopher Q.; Stine, Munkholm-Larsen; Yan, Tristan D.

    2009-01-01

    Since its inception, minimally invasive surgery has made a dramatic impact on all branches of surgery. Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) lobectomy for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was first described in the early 1990s and has since become popular in a number of tertiary referral centers. Proponents of this relatively new procedure cite a number of potentially favorable perioperative outcomes, possibly due to reduced surgical trauma and stress. However, a significant proportion of the cardiothoracic community remains skeptical, as there is still a paucity of robust clinical data on long-term survival and recurrence rates. The definition of ‘true’ VATS has also been under scrutiny, with a number of previous studies being considered ‘mini-thoracotomy lobectomy’ rather than VATS lobectomy. We hereby examine the literature on true VATS lobectomy, with a particular focus on comparative studies that directly compared VATS lobectomy with conventional open lobectomy. PMID:22263000

  18. Transumbilical scarless surgery with thoracic trocar: easy and low-cost

    PubMed Central

    Okur, Mehmet Hanifi; Aydogdu, Bahattin; Arslan, Mehmet Serif; Cimen, Hasan; Otcu, Selcuk

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Single-site laparoscopic surgery has become increasingly common. We herein report an easy and low-cost thoracic trocar technique (TTT) for these types of procedures and recommend the simpler name "transumbilical scarless surgery" (TUSS) to minimize confusion in nomenclature. Methods We retrospectively reviewed patients who underwent TUSS by TTT using a thoracic trocar and surgical glove in our hospital between November 2011 and November 2012. Operating time, postoperative stay, and complications were detailed. Results A total of 101 TUSS by TTT were successfully performed, comprising appendectomy (n = 63), ovarian cyst excision (n = 7), splenectomy (n = 5), nephroureterectomy (n = 5), orchidopexy (n = 4), pyeloplasty (n = 3), nephrolithotomy (n = 2), orchiectomy (n = 2), varicocelectomy (n = 2), lymphangioma excision (n = 2), ureterectomy (n = 1), Morgagni diaphragmatic hernia repair (n = 1), ovarian detorsion (n = 1), antegrade continence enema (n = 1), intestinal resection anastomosis (n = 1), and intestinal duplication excision (n = 1). Kirschner wires were used for some organ traction. Nine patients required an additional port, but no major complications occurred. The postoperative stay (mean ± standard deviation) was 3.2 ± 1.4 days, and operating time was 58.9 ± 38.3 minutes. Conclusion We recommend the simpler name of TUSS to minimize confusion in nomenclature for all transumbilical single-incision laparoendoscopic surgeries. TTT is an easy and low-cost TUSS technique. PMID:23741694

  19. A comparative cost analysis study of lobectomy performed via video-assisted thoracic surgery versus thoracotomy in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Lacin, Tunc; Teker, Dilek; Okur, Erdal; Baysungur, Volkan; Kanbur, Serda; Misirlioglu, Aysun Kosif; Sonmez, Hakan; Yalcinkaya, Irfan; Kiyak, Mithat

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cost analysis studies performed in western countries report that the overall cost of lobectomies performed via video-assisted thoracic surgery is similar to or less than those performed via thoracotomy. The situation may be different in a developing country. Aim We evaluated the cost differences of these two surgical methods. Material and methods We retrospectively reviewed the hospital records of 81 patients who underwent lobectomy either via video-assisted thoracic surgery (n = 32) or via thoracotomy (n = 49). Patient characteristics, pathology, perioperative complications, additional surgical procedures, length of hospital and intensive care unit stay, and outcomes of both groups were recorded. Detailed cost data for medications, anesthesia, laboratory, surgical instruments, disposable instruments and surgery cost itself were also documented. Statistical analyses were performed to compare the groups. Results The two groups were homogeneous in regard to age, sex, pathology and perioperative morbidity. The mean duration of hospitalization in the video-assisted thoracic surgery group was significantly shorter than that of the thoracotomy group (7.78 ±5.11 days vs. 10.65 ±6.57 days, p < 0.05). Overall final mean cost in the video-assisted thoracic surgery group was significantly higher than that of the thoracotomy group ($3970 ±1873 vs. $3083 ±1013, p = 0.002). This significant difference relies mostly on the cost of disposable surgical instruments, which were used much more in the video-assisted thoracic surgery group than the thoracotomy group ($2252 ±1856 vs. $427 ±47, p < 0.05). Conclusions In contrast to western countries, a video-assisted thoracic surgical lobectomy may cost more than a lobectomy via thoracotomy in a developing country. More expensive disposable surgical instruments and cheaper hospital stay charges lead to higher overall costs in video-assisted thoracic surgical lobectomy patients. PMID:25337166

  20. Pulmonary arterioplasty using video-assisted thoracic surgery mechanical suture technique

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xin; Huang, Jun; Yin, Weiqiang; Zhang, Xin; Chen, Hanzhang; Mo, Lili

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer invading pulmonary trunk is a locally advanced condition, which may indicate poor prognosis. Surgical resection of the lesion can significantly improve survival for some patients. Lobectomy/Pneumonectomy with pulmonary arterioplasty via thoracotomy were generally accepted and used in the past. As the rapid development of minimally invasive techniques and devices, pulmonary arterioplasty is feasible via video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS). However, few studies have reported the VATS surgical techniques. In this study, we reported the techniques of pulmonary arterioplasty via VATS. PMID:27076961

  1. Compact light-emitting diode lighting ring for video-assisted thoracic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ming-Kuan; Chang, Feng-Chen; Wang, Wen-Zhe; Hsieh, Chih-Cheng; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2014-10-01

    In this work, a foldable ring-shaped light-emitting diode (LED) lighting assembly, designed to attach to a rubber wound retractor, is realized and tested through porcine animal experiments. Enabled by the small size and the high efficiency of LED chips, the lighting assembly is compact, flexible, and disposable while providing direct and high brightness lighting for more uniform background illumination in video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS). When compared with a conventional fiber bundle coupled light source that is usually used in laparoscopy and endoscopy, the much broader solid angle of illumination enabled by the LED assembly allows greatly improved background lighting and imaging quality in VATS.

  2. Patients' satisfaction: customer relationship management as a new opportunity for quality improvement in thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Rocco, Gaetano; Brunelli, Alessandro

    2012-11-01

    Clinical and nonclinical indicators of performance are meant to provide the surgeon with tools to identify weaknesses to be improved. The World Health Organization's Performance Evaluation Systems represent a multidimensional approach to quality measurement based on several categories made of different indicators. Indicators for patient satisfaction may include overall perceived quality, accessibility, humanization and patient involvement, communication, and trust in health care providers. Patient satisfaction is included among nonclinical indicators of performance in thoracic surgery and is increasingly recognized as one of the outcome measures for delivered quality of care. PMID:23084619

  3. The Use of Oxidized Regenerated Cellulose for Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yugo; Tane, Shinya; Hokka, Daisuke; Ogawa, Hiroyuki; Maniwa, Yoshimasa

    2016-02-01

    Disturbance of the surgical view during video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) as a result of blood oozing from the wound surface of the access port may lead to additional stress on surgeons and is difficult to prevent. We used a wound edge protector with oxidized regenerated cellulose (ORC) rings for the wound surfaces of the access ports and eliminated the problem. Furthermore, no hemostatic procedure was required for the wound surface before wound closure because the ORC rings completely stopped wound surface bleeding during the operation. ORC rings enhanced protection of the thoracoscopic port and the quality of VATS. PMID:26777946

  4. Single-port video-assisted thoracic surgery for early lung cancer: initial experience in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Shingo; Usuda, Jitsuo

    2016-01-01

    Background Single-port video-assisted thoracic surgery (SPVATS) emerged several years ago as a new, minimally invasive surgery for diseases in the field of respiratory surgery, and is increasingly becoming a subject of interest for some thoracic surgeons in Europe and Asia. However, the adoption rate of this procedure in the United States and Japan remains low. We herein reviewed our experience of SPVATS for early lung cancer in our center, and evaluated the safety and minimal invasiveness of this technique. Methods We retrospectively analyzed patients who had undergone SPVATS for pathological stage I lung cancer in Nippon Medical School Chiba Hokusoh Hospital between September 2012 and October 2015. In SPVATS, an approximately 4-cm incision was made at the 4th or 5th intercostal space between the anterior and posterior axillary lines. A rib spreader was not used at the incision site, and surgical manipulation was performed very carefully in order to avoid contact between surgical instruments and the intercostal nerves. The same surgeon performed surgery on all patients, and analyzed laboratory data before and after surgery. Results Eighty-four patients underwent anatomical lung resection for postoperative pathological stage I lung cancer. The mean wound length was 4.2 cm. Eighty-four patients underwent lobectomy and segmentectomy, respectively. The mean preoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1%) was 1.85%±0.36%. Our patients consisted of 49 men (58.3%) and 35 women (41.7%), with 64, 18, 1, and 1 having adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, adenosquamous carcinoma, and small-cell lung cancer, respectively. The mean operative time was 175±21 min, operative blood loss 92±18 mL, and duration of drain placement 1.9±0.6 days. The duration of the postoperative hospital stay was 7.1±1.7 days, numeric rating scale (NRS) 1 week after surgery 2.8±0.6, and occurrence rate of allodynia 1 month after surgery 10.7%. No patient developed serious

  5. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery in the management of penetrating and blunt thoracic trauma

    PubMed Central

    Milanchi, S; Makey, I; McKenna, R; Margulies, D R

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of video-assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery (VATS) is still being defined in the management of thoracic trauma. We report our trauma cases managed by VATS and review the role of VATS in the management of thoracic trauma. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All the trauma patients who underwent VATS from 2000 to 2007 at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center were retrospectively studied. RESULTS: Twenty-three trauma patients underwent 25 cases of VATS. The most common indication for VATS was retained haemothorax. Thoracotomy was avoided in 21 patients. VATS failed in two cases. On an average VATS was performed on trauma day seven (range 1-26) and the length of hospital stay was 20 days (range 3-58). There was no mortality. VATS was performed in an emergency (day 1-2), or in the early (day 2-7) or late (after day 7) phases of trauma. CONCLUSION: VATS can be performed safely for the management of thoracic traumas. VATS can be performed before or after thoracotomy and at any stage of trauma. The use of VATS in trauma has a trimodal distribution (emergent, early, late), each with different indications. PMID:20040799

  6. Clinical Experiences of Non-fusion Dynamic Stabilization Surgery for Adjacent Segmental Pathology after Lumbar Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soo Eon; Kim, Hyun-Jib

    2016-01-01

    Background As an alternative to spinal fusion, non-fusion dynamic stabilization surgery has been developed, showing good clinical outcomes. In the present study, we introduce our surgical series, which involves non-fusion dynamic stabilization surgery for adjacent segment pathology (ASP) after lumbar fusion surgery. Methods Fifteen patients (13 female and 2 male, mean age of 62.1 years) who underwent dynamic stabilization surgery for symptomatic ASP were included and medical records, magnetic resonance images (MRI), and plain radiographs were retrospectively evaluated. Results Twelve of the 15 patients had the fusion segment at L4-5, and the most common segment affected by ASP was L3-4. The time interval between prior fusion and later non-fusion surgery was mean 67.0 months. The Visual Analog Scale and Oswestry Disability Index showed values of 7.4 and 58.5% before the non-fusion surgery and these values respectively declined to 4.2 and 41.3% postoperatively at 36 months (p=0.027 and p=0.018, respectively). During the mean 44.8 months of follow-up, medication of analgesics was also significantly reduced. The MRI grade for disc and central stenosis identified significant degeneration at L3-4, and similar disc degeneration from lateral radiographs was determined at L3-4 between before the prior fusion surgery and the later non-fusion surgery. After the non-fusion surgery, the L3-4 segment and the proximal segment of L2-3 were preserved in the disc, stenosis and facet joint whereas L1-2 showed disc degeneration on the last MRI (p=0.032). Five instances of radiologic ASP were identified, showing characteristic disc-space narrowing at the proximal segments of L1-2 and L2-3. However, no patient underwent additional surgery for ASP after non-fusion dynamic stabilization surgery. Conclusion The proposed non-fusion dynamic stabilization system could be an effective surgical treatment for elderly patients with symptomatic ASP after lumbar fusion. PMID:27162710

  7. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database: 2016 Update on Outcomes and Quality.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Mayer, John E; Mavroudis, Constantine; O'Brien, Sean M; Austin, Erle H; Pasquali, Sara K; Hill, Kevin D; He, Xia; Overman, David M; St Louis, James D; Karamlou, Tara; Pizarro, Christian; Hirsch-Romano, Jennifer C; McDonald, Donna; Han, Jane M; Dokholyan, Rachel S; Tchervenkov, Christo I; Lacour-Gayet, Francois; Backer, Carl L; Fraser, Charles D; Tweddell, James S; Elliott, Martin J; Walters, Hal; Jonas, Richard A; Prager, Richard L; Shahian, David M; Jacobs, Marshall L

    2016-03-01

    The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database is the largest congenital and pediatric cardiac surgical clinical data registry in the world. It is the platform for all activities of The Society of Thoracic Surgeons related to the analysis of outcomes and the improvement of quality in this subspecialty. This article summarizes current aggregate national outcomes in congenital and pediatric cardiac surgery and reviews related activities in the areas of quality measurement, performance improvement, and transparency. The reported data about aggregate national outcomes are exemplified by an analysis of 10 benchmark operations performed from January 2011 to December 2014 and documenting overall discharge mortality (interquartile range among programs with more than 9 cases): off-bypass coarctation, 1.0% (0.0% to 0.9%); ventricular septal defect repair, 0.7% (0.0% to 1.1%); tetralogy of Fallot repair, 1.0% (0.0% to 1.7%); complete atrioventricular canal repair, 3.2% (0.0% to 6.5%); arterial switch operation, 2.7% (0.0% to 5.6%); arterial switch operation plus ventricular septal defect, 5.3% (0.0% to 6.7%); Glenn/hemiFontan, 2.1% (0.0% to 3.8%); Fontan operation, 1.4% (0.0% to 2.4%); truncus arteriosus repair, 9.6% (0.0 % to 11.8%); and Norwood procedure, 15.6% (10.0% to 21.4%). PMID:26897186

  8. Non-intubated video-assisted thoracic surgery management of secondary spontaneous pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Bolufer, Sergio; Navarro-Martinez, Jose; Lirio, Francisco; Corcoles, Juan Manuel; Rodriguez-Paniagua, Jose Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Secondary spontaneous pneumothorax (SSP) is serious entity, usually due to underlying disease, mainly chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Its morbidity and mortality is high due to the pulmonary compromised status of these patients, and the recurrence rate is almost 50%, increasing mortality with each episode. For persistent or recurrent SSP, surgery under general anesthesia (GA) and mechanical ventilation (MV) with lung isolation is the gold standard, but ventilator-induced damages and dependency, and postoperative pulmonary complications are frequent. In the last two decades, several groups have reported successful results with non-intubated video-assisted thoracic surgery (NI-VATS) with thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA) and/or local anesthesia under spontaneous breathing. Main benefits reported are operative time, operation room time and hospital stay reduction, and postoperative respiratory complications decrease when comparing to GA, thus encouraging for further research in these moderate to high risk patients many times rejected for the standard regimen. There are also reports of special situations with satisfactory results, as in contralateral pneumonectomy and lung transplantation. The aim of this review is to collect, analyze and discuss all the available evidence, and seek for future lines of investigation. PMID:26046045

  9. Minimally invasive (robotic assisted thoracic surgery and video-assisted thoracic surgery) lobectomy for the treatment of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hao-Xian; Woo, Kaitlin M.; Sima, Camelia S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Insufficient data exist on the results of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) traditionally approached by thoracotomy. The use of telerobotic surgical systems may allow for greater utilization of MIS approaches to locally advanced disease. We will review the existing literature on MIS for locally advanced disease and briefly report on the results of a recent study conducted at our institution. Methods We performed a retrospective review of a prospective single institution database to identify patients with clinical stage II and IIIA NSCLC who underwent lobectomy following induction chemotherapy. The patients were classified into two groups (MIS and thoracotomy) and were compared for differences in outcomes and survival. Results From January 2002 to December 2013, 428 patients {397 thoracotomy, 31 MIS [17 robotic and 14 video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS)]} underwent induction chemotherapy followed by lobectomy. The conversion rate in the MIS group was 26% (8/31) The R0 resection rate was similar between the groups (97% for MIS vs. 94% for thoracotomy; P=0.71), as was postoperative morbidity (32% for MIS vs. 33% for thoracotomy; P=0.99). The median length of hospital stay was shorter in the MIS group (4 vs. 5 days; P<0.001). The 3-year overall survival (OS) was 48.3% in the MIS group and 56.6% in the thoracotomy group (P=0.84); the corresponding 3-year DFS were 49.0% and 42.1% (P=0.19). Conclusions In appropriately selected patients with NSCLC, MIS approaches to lobectomy following induction therapy are feasible and associated with similar disease-free and OS to those following thoracotomy. PMID:27195138

  10. Complications of Minimally Invasive, Tubular Access Surgery for Cervical, Thoracic, and Lumbar Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Donald A.

    2014-01-01

    The object of the study was to review the author's large series of minimally invasive spine surgeries for complication rates. The author reviewed a personal operative database for minimally access spine surgeries done through nonexpandable tubular retractors for extradural, nonfusion procedures. Consecutive cases (n = 1231) were reviewed for complications. There were no wound infections. Durotomy occurred in 33 cases (2.7% overall or 3.4% of lumbar cases). There were no external or symptomatic internal cerebrospinal fluid leaks or pseudomeningoceles requiring additional treatment. The only motor injuries were 3 C5 root palsies, 2 of which resolved. Minimally invasive spine surgery performed through tubular retractors can result in a low wound infection rate when compared to open surgery. Durotomy is no more common than open procedures and does not often result in the need for secondary procedures. New neurologic deficits are uncommon, with most observed at the C5 root. Minimally invasive spine surgery, even without benefits such as less pain or shorter hospital stays, can result in considerably lower complication rates than open surgery. PMID:25097785

  11. Local anaesthetic toxicity after bilateral thoracic paravertebral block in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Am-H, Ho; Mk, Karmakar; Sk, Ng; S, Wan; Csh, Ng; Rhl, Wong; Skc, Chan; Gm, Joynt

    2016-09-01

    We conducted a small pilot observational study of the effects of bilateral thoracic paravertebral block (BTPB) as an adjunct to perioperative analgesia in coronary artery bypass surgery patients. The initial ropivacaine dose prior to induction of general anaesthesia was 3 mg/kg, which was followed at the end of the surgery by infusion of ropivacaine 0.25% 0.1 ml/kg/hour on each side (e.g. total 35 mg/hour for a 70 kg person). The BTPB did not eliminate the need for supplemental opioids after CABG in the eight patients studied. Moreover, in spite of boluses that were within the manufacturer's recommendation for epidural and major nerve blocks, and an infusion rate that was only slightly higher than what appeared to be safe for epidural infusion, potentially toxic total plasma ropivacaine concentrations were common. We also could not exclude the possibility that the high ropivacaine concentrations were contributing to postoperative mental state changes in the postoperative period. Also, one patient developed local anaesthetic toxicity after the bilateral paravertebral dose. As a result, the study was terminated early after four days. The question of whether paravertebral block confers benefits in cardiac surgery remains unanswered. However, we believe that the bolus dosage and the injection rate we used for BTPB were both too high, and caution other clinicians against the use of these doses. Future studies on the use of BTPB in cardiac surgery patients should include reduced ropivacaine doses injected over longer periods. PMID:27608346

  12. Thoracic Outlet Syndrome: Past and Present—88 Surgeries in 30 Years at Chang Gung

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Frank; Nai-Jen Chang, Tommy; Chuieng-Yi Lu, Johnny

    2016-01-01

    Background: Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a highly controversial clinical entity. There is much debate on its terminology, existence, diagnosis, and treatment. The purpose of this study was to describe our opinions about these controversial topics of TOS and the treatment of TOS over the past 30 years. Methods: From 1985 to 2014, a total of 80 patients underwent decompressive surgery for TOS. Eight patients requested a second surgery on the contralateral limb. They all had at least 1-year follow-up. Preoperative evaluation included provocative tests, plain X-ray, magnetic resonance angiography/computed tomography angiography, and electromyography. Surgical intervention for each patient involved a supraclavicular approach and near-total resection of the anterior scalene muscle and the first rib and of any cervical rib if it was present. Rib resection was performed with the use of Kerrison bone punch forceps. The operative time was typically 2 hours. Results: Major postoperative complications were rare. Nearly all patients (98%) experienced significant symptom relief, with improvement in soreness and tightness of the shoulder, neck, and arm immediately on the first postoperative day or within a few weeks thereafter. There were no cases with symptoms recurring. Conclusions: It is evident that decompressive surgery through a supraclavicular approach for TOS not only is an effective and safe procedure but also provides a diagnosis of the cause of TOS. For a patient who meets the criteria for surgical indication, decompressive surgery usually results in resolution of symptoms and no recurrence. PMID:27482476

  13. Static and Dynamic Parameters in Patients With Degenerative Flat Back and Change After Corrective Fusion Surgery

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate characteristics of static and dynamic parameters in patients with degenerative flat back (DFB) and to compare degree of their improvement between successful and unsuccessful surgical outcome groups Methods Forty-seven patients with DFB were included who took whole spine X-ray and three-dimensional motion analysis before and 6 months after corrective surgery. Forty-four subjects were selected as a control group. As static parameters, thoracic kyphosis (TK), thoracolumbar junction (TLJ), lumbar lordosis (LL), pelvic incidence (PI), sacral slope (SS), and pelvic tilt (PT) were measured. As dynamic parameters, maximal and minimal angle of pelvic tilt, lower limb joints, and thoracic and lumbar vertebrae column (dynamic TK and LL) in sagittal plane were obtained. Results The DFB group showed smaller TK and larger LL, pelvic posterior tilt, hip flexion, knee flexion, and ankle dorsiflexion than the control group. Most of these parameters were significantly corrected by fusion surgery. Dynamic spinal parameters correlated with static spinal parameters. The successful group obtained significant improvement in maximal and minimal dynamic LL than the unsuccessful group. Conclusion The DFB group showed characteristic lower limb and spinal angles in dynamic and static parameters. Correlation between static and dynamic parameters was found in spinal segment. Dynamic LL was good predictor of successful surgical outcomes. PMID:27606275

  14. Risk Factors for Major Adverse Events of Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery Lobectomy for Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jie; Xia, Yan; Yang, Yang; Ni, Zheng-zheng; He, Wen-xin; Wang, Hai-feng; Xu, Xiao-xiong; Yang, Yu-ling; Fei, Ke; Jiang, Ge-ning

    2014-01-01

    Aims: The purpose of this study was to identify the risk factors for major adverse events of VATS (Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery) lobectomy for primary lung cancer. Methods: 1806 Patients (1032 males, 57.1%) planned to undergo VATS lobectomy for stage IA-IIIA lung cancer from July 2007 to June 2012. The Thoracic Morbidity and Mortality Classification TM&M system was used to evaluate the presence and severity of complications. Postoperative complications were observed during a 30-day follow up. Univariate and multivariate analysis were used to analyze the independent risk factors for major adverse events. Results: Successful rate of VATS lobectomy was 97.6% (1763/1806). Major complications occurred in 129 patients (7.3%), with a mortality of 0.3% (5/1763). Pulmonary complications contribute up to 90.7% of the major complications and 80% of mortality. Logistic regression indicated that comorbidities, elder age ≥70y, operative time ≥240min and hybrid VATS were predictors for major adverse events (P<0.05). Hybrid and converted VATS lobectomy result in higher major adverse events compared with complete VATS, 15.1%, 20.9% and 7.4% respectively (P=0.013). Conclusions: The overall complication rate and mortality of VATS lobectomy are low, while major complications sometimes occur. Pulmonary complications are the most common major complications and cause of mortality. Age ≥70y, comorbidities, operative time ≥240min and Hybrid VATS are predictors of major adverse events. PMID:25013365

  15. Uniportal video-assisted thoracic surgery left superior segmentectomy with systematic lymphadenectomy in the semiprone position

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Junjie; Xu, Songtao; Wang, Qun

    2016-01-01

    A 63-year-old male was referred to our hospital with two existing lesions in bilateral lungs. Computed tomography (CT) showed a 15-mm ground-glass opacity (GGO) in the superior segment of left lower lung (S6) and a 5-mm GGO in the center of the right upper lobe. The preoperative clinical diagnosis was stage I primary lung cancer for the left lesion while the right lesion needed follow-up. Uniportal video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) left superior segmentectomy in the semiprone position was performed in this case and the right upper lobe was kept untouched. Frozen section examination confirmed the diagnosis of lung adenocarcinoma, and systematic lymphadenectomy with non-grasping en bloc dissection technique was then performed. A chest tube was placed at the posterior part of the incision through the dorsal thoracic cavity to the apex. The postoperative pathologic diagnosis was minimally invasive adenocarcinoma, staged T1aN0M0. PMID:27621886

  16. Complications after video-assisted thoracic surgery in patients with pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease who underwent preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Morino, Akira; Murase, Kazuma; Yamada, Katsuo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Video-assisted thoracic surgery and preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation are effective in preventing postoperative complications in patients with cardiopulmonary disease. The present study aims to elucidate the presence of postoperative pneumonia and atelectasis in patients with nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease who underwent lung resection with video-assisted thoracic surgery and preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation. [Subjects and Methods] Nineteen patients with nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease who had undergone lung resection with video-assisted thoracic surgery and preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation were enrolled in this study. The presence of postoperative pneumonia and atelectasis was evaluated, and preoperative and postoperative pulmonary functions were compared. [Results] Postoperative pneumonia and postoperative atelectasis were not observed. Decreases of pulmonary function were 5.9% (standard deviation, 8.5) in forced vital capacity (percent predicted) and 9.6% (standard deviation, 11.1) in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (percent predicted). [Conclusion] The present study indicates that the combination of lung resection with video-assisted thoracic surgery and preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease may be effective in preventing postoperative complications. PMID:26357436

  17. A Minimally Invasive Endoscopic Surgery for Infectious Spondylodiscitis of the Thoracic and Upper Lumbar Spine in Immunocompromised Patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Chuan; Huang, Teng-Le; Chen, Yen-Jen; Tsou, Hsi-Kai; Lin, Wei-Ching; Hung, Chih-Hung; Tsai, Chun-Hao; Hsu, Horng-Chaung; Chen, Hsien-Te

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the safety and effectiveness of computed tomography- (CT-) assisted endoscopic surgery in the treatment of infectious spondylodiscitis of the thoracic and upper lumbar spine in immunocompromised patients. From October 2006 to March 2014, a total of 41 patients with infectious spondylodiscitis underwent percutaneous endoscopic surgery under local anesthesia, and 13 lesions from 13 patients on the thoracic or upper lumbar spine were selected for evaluation. A CT-guided catheter was placed before percutaneous endoscopic surgery as a guide to avoid injury to visceral organs, major vessels, and the spinal cord. All 13 patients had quick pain relief after endoscopic surgery without complications. The bacterial culture rate was 77%. Inflammatory parameters returned to normal after adequate antibiotic treatment. Postoperative radiographs showed no significant kyphotic deformity when compared with preoperative films. As of the last follow-up visit, no recurrent infections were noted. Traditional transthoracic or diaphragmatic surgery with or without posterior instrumentation is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, especially in elderly patients, patients with multiple comorbidities, or immunocompromised patients. Percutaneous endoscopic surgery assisted by a CT-guided catheter provides a safe and effective alternative treatment for infectious spondylodiscitis of the thoracic and upper lumbar spine. PMID:26273644

  18. Outcome Management in Cardiac Surgery Using the Society of Thoracic Surgeons National Database.

    PubMed

    Halpin, Linda S; Gallardo, Bret E; Speir, Alan M; Ad, Niv

    2016-09-01

    Health care reform has helped streamline patient care and reimbursement by encouraging providers to provide the best outcome for the best value. Institutions with cardiac surgery programs need a methodology to monitor and improve outcomes linked to reimbursement. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons National Database (STSND) is a tool for monitoring outcomes and improving care. This article identifies the purpose, goals, and reporting system of the STSND and ways these data can be used for benchmarking, linking outcomes to the effectiveness of treatment, and identifying factors associated with mortality and complications. We explain the methodology used at Inova Heart and Vascular Institute, Falls Church, Virginia, to perform outcome management by using the STSND and address our performance-improvement cycle through discussion of data collection, analysis, and outcome reporting. We focus on the revision of clinical practice and offer examples of how patient outcomes have been improved using this methodology. PMID:27568532

  19. Clinical pathway for video-assisted thoracic surgery: the Hong Kong story

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A clinical pathway provides a scheduled, objective protocol for the multi-disciplinary, evidence-based management of patients with a specific condition or undergoing a specific procedure. In implementing a clinical pathway for the care of patients receiving video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) in Hong Kong, many insights were gained into what makes a clinical pathway work: meticulous preparation and team-building are keys to success; the pathway must be constantly reviewed and revisions made in response to evolving clinical need; and data collection is a key element to allow auditing and clinical research. If these can be achieved, a clinical pathway delivers not only measurable improvements in patient outcomes, but also fundamentally complements clinical advances such as VATS. This article narrates the story of how the clinical pathway for VATS in Hong Kong was created and evolved, highlighting how the above lessons were learned. PMID:26941965

  20. Unusual cause of shortness of breath after surgery for thoracic outlet syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Jonathan Ryan; Kumar, Anjan; Savage, Edward; Rahaghi, Franck F

    2012-01-01

    A 31-year-old postal worker was diagnosed with bilateral thoracic outlet syndrome and scheduled for the first of two surgeries. The first procedure involved removal of the right first cervical rib, anterior and middle scalenes. On postoperative day 4, he developed shortness of breath. Chest radiograph showed a new pleural effusion on the right. Thoracentesis revealed a yellowish-red thick effusion. Based on the initial look of the fluid it was thought to be a haemorrhagic effusion with a purulent component, further testing revealed that he had developed a chylothorax. The patient was placed on a medium-chain triglyceride diet followed by chest tube drainage. After one day, the chest tube was removed due to minimal drainage, and he was discharged home the next day. Keeping this patient without food, on total parental nutrition, or pursuing surgical intervention was not necessary, as he had an excellent outcome from a very rare surgical complication. PMID:23047993

  1. Statistical modelling for thoracic surgery using a nomogram based on logistic regression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Run-Zhong; Zhao, Ze-Rui; Ng, Calvin S H

    2016-08-01

    A well-developed clinical nomogram is a popular decision-tool, which can be used to predict the outcome of an individual, bringing benefits to both clinicians and patients. With just a few steps on a user-friendly interface, the approximate clinical outcome of patients can easily be estimated based on their clinical and laboratory characteristics. Therefore, nomograms have recently been developed to predict the different outcomes or even the survival rate at a specific time point for patients with different diseases. However, on the establishment and application of nomograms, there is still a lot of confusion that may mislead researchers. The objective of this paper is to provide a brief introduction on the history, definition, and application of nomograms and then to illustrate simple procedures to develop a nomogram with an example based on a multivariate logistic regression model in thoracic surgery. In addition, validation strategies and common pitfalls have been highlighted. PMID:27621910

  2. Statistical modelling for thoracic surgery using a nomogram based on logistic regression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Run-Zhong; Zhao, Ze-Rui

    2016-01-01

    A well-developed clinical nomogram is a popular decision-tool, which can be used to predict the outcome of an individual, bringing benefits to both clinicians and patients. With just a few steps on a user-friendly interface, the approximate clinical outcome of patients can easily be estimated based on their clinical and laboratory characteristics. Therefore, nomograms have recently been developed to predict the different outcomes or even the survival rate at a specific time point for patients with different diseases. However, on the establishment and application of nomograms, there is still a lot of confusion that may mislead researchers. The objective of this paper is to provide a brief introduction on the history, definition, and application of nomograms and then to illustrate simple procedures to develop a nomogram with an example based on a multivariate logistic regression model in thoracic surgery. In addition, validation strategies and common pitfalls have been highlighted. PMID:27621910

  3. Clinical pathway for video-assisted thoracic surgery: the Hong Kong story.

    PubMed

    Sihoe, Alan D L

    2016-02-01

    A clinical pathway provides a scheduled, objective protocol for the multi-disciplinary, evidence-based management of patients with a specific condition or undergoing a specific procedure. In implementing a clinical pathway for the care of patients receiving video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) in Hong Kong, many insights were gained into what makes a clinical pathway work: meticulous preparation and team-building are keys to success; the pathway must be constantly reviewed and revisions made in response to evolving clinical need; and data collection is a key element to allow auditing and clinical research. If these can be achieved, a clinical pathway delivers not only measurable improvements in patient outcomes, but also fundamentally complements clinical advances such as VATS. This article narrates the story of how the clinical pathway for VATS in Hong Kong was created and evolved, highlighting how the above lessons were learned. PMID:26941965

  4. Awake video-assisted thoracic surgery in acute infectious pulmonary destruction

    PubMed Central

    Egorov, Vladimir; Deynega, Igor; Ionov, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Background Many of thoracic minimally invasive interventions have been proven to be possible without general anesthesia. This article presents results of video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) application under local anesthesia in patients with lung abscesses and discusses its indications in detail. Methods The study involved prospective analysis of treatment outcomes for all acute infectious pulmonary destruction (AIPD) patients undergoing VATS under local anesthesia and sedation since January 1, 2010, till December 31, 2013. Patients with pulmonary destruction cavity at periphery of large size (>5 cm) underwent non-intubated video abscessoscopy (NIVAS). Patients with pyopneumothorax (lung abscess penetration into pleural cavity) underwent non-intubated video thoracoscopy (NIVTS). Indications for NIVAS and NIVTS were as follows: cavity debridement and washing, necrotic sequestra removal, adhesion split, biopsy. All interventions were done under local anesthesia and sedation without trachea intubation and epidural anesthesia. Results Sixty-five enrolled patients had 42 NIVAS and 32 NIVTS interventions, nine patients underwent two surgeries. None of the patients required trachea intubation or epidural anesthesia. In none of our cases with conversion to thoracotomy was required. Post-surgical complications developed after 11 interventions (13%): subcutaneous emphysema (five cases), chest wall phlegmon (three cases), pulmonary bleeding (two cases), and pneumothorax (one case). One patient died due to the main disease progression. In 50 patients NIVAS and NIVTS were done within 5 to 8 days after abscess/pleural cavity draining, while in other 15 patients—immediately prior to draining; both pulmonary bleeding episodes and all cases of chest wall phlegmon took place in the latter group. Conclusions NIVAS and NIVTS under local anesthesia and sedation are well tolerated by patients, safe and should be used more often in AIPD cases. Timing of NIVAS and NIVTS procedures

  5. Cardiac Surgery in Germany during 2014: A Report on Behalf of the German Society for Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Andreas; Funkat, Anne-Kathrin; Lewandowski, Jana; Frie, Michael; Ernst, Markus; Hekmat, Khosro; Schiller, Wolfgang; Gummert, Jan F; Cremer, Joachim Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Based on a voluntary registry of the German Society for Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery (GSTCVS), data of all heart surgery procedures performed in 78 German cardiac surgical units during the year 2014 are presented. In 2014, a total of 100,398 cardiac surgical procedures (implantable cardioverter-defibrillator and pacemaker procedures excluded) were submitted to the registry. More than 14.2% of the patients were older than 80 years, describing an increase of 0.4% compared with the previous year. The unadjusted in-hospital mortality for 40,006 isolated coronary artery bypass grafting procedures (84.7% on-pump, 15.3% off-pump) was 2.6%. In 31,359 isolated valve procedures (including 9,194 catheter-based procedures), an in-hospital mortality of 4.4% was observed. This annual updated registry of the GSTCVS is published since 1989. It is an important tool for quality assurance and voluntary public reporting by illustrating current standards and actual developments for nearly all cardiac surgical procedures in Germany. PMID:26011675

  6. Cardiac surgery in Germany during 2013: a report on behalf of the German Society for Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery.

    PubMed

    Funkat, A; Beckmann, A; Lewandowski, J; Frie, M; Ernst, M; Schiller, W; Gummert, J F; Cremer, J

    2014-08-01

    On the basis of a voluntary registry of the German Society for Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery (GSTCVS), data of all cardiac surgical procedures performed in 79 German cardiac surgical units during the year 2013 are presented. In 2013, a total of 99,128 cardiac surgical procedures (implantable cardioverter defibrillator [ICD] and pacemaker procedures excluded) were submitted to the registry. More than 13.8% of the patients were older than 80 years, which remains equal in comparison to the previous year. In-hospital mortality in 40,410 isolated coronary artery bypass grafting procedures (84.5% on-pump and 15.5% off-pump) was 2.9%. In 29,672 isolated valve procedures (including 7,722 catheter-based procedures), an in-hospital mortality of 4.7% was observed. This long-lasting registry of the GSTCVS will continue to be an important tool for quality control and voluntary public reporting by illustrating current facts and developments of cardiac surgery in Germany. PMID:24995534

  7. Cardiac surgery in Germany during 2012: a report on behalf of the German Society for Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Andreas; Funkat, Anne-Kathrin; Lewandowski, Jana; Frie, Michael; Schiller, Wolfgang; Hekmat, Khosro; Gummert, Jan F; Mohr, Friedrich Wilhelm

    2014-02-01

    On the basis of a voluntary registry of the German Society for Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery (GSTCVS), data of all cardiac surgical procedures performed in 79 German cardiac surgical units during the year 2012 are presented. In 2012, a total of 98,792 cardiac surgical procedures (ICD and pacemaker procedures excluded) were submitted to the registry. More than 13.8% of the patients were older than 80 years, which is a further increase in comparison to previous years. In-hospital mortality in 42,060 isolated coronary artery bypass grafting procedures (84.6% on-pump and 15.4% off-pump) was 2.9%. In 28,521 isolated valve procedures (including 6,804 catheter-based procedures), an in-hospital mortality of 4.8% was observed. This long-lasting registry of the GSTCVS will continue to be an important tool for quality control and voluntary public reporting by illustrating current facts and developments of cardiac surgery in Germany. PMID:24323696

  8. Development of a CD-ROM Internet Hybrid: a new thoracic surgery curriculum.

    PubMed

    Gold, Jeffrey P; Verrier, Edward A; Olinger, Gordon N; Orringer, Mark B

    2002-11-01

    The TSDA Prerequisite Curriculum Committee has successfully developed the content for a didactic curriculum to be mastered by the residents before their matriculation in a thoracic surgical residency program. In addition the committee assembled an innovative electronic format consisting of a CD-ROM Internet Hybrid to teach this curricular material. By use of a serialized CD-ROM Internet Hybrid it is possible to store relatively dense high bandwidth portions of the curriculum including video and audio materials on the CD-ROM and yet allow constant updating and interaction of the other portions of the curriculum. In addition, it is possible to track the performance and utilization by the residents during the entire course of their residency program. By studying the relationship between the utilization of the curriculum, particularly as it relates to certain subject areas, and comparing that to performance or standardized examinations as well as other measurements of resident satisfaction, the efficacy of the prerequisite curriculum will be tracked during the upcoming years. It is anticipated that the process of developing the content of the prerequisite curriculum will allow the residents and program directors to focus on the subject material currently deemed necessary for successful initiation of a thoracic surgery residency, and that by keeping this subject material outline up-to-date, the changing spectrum of what we anticipate our residents will know at the time of their matriculation will continue to mature. Although electronic-based education has been available for a number of years, a prospective randomized study comparing it with traditional textbook-based learning is novel. Multiple attempts have been made to implement Web-based or CD-ROM-based educational tools in other specialties with variable results. It is our anticipation that successful completion of this project will not only allow for the use of an innovative highly technical means of education for

  9. Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian Society of Cardiac Surgeons/Canadian Society for Vascular Surgery Joint Position Statement on Open and Endovascular Surgery for Thoracic Aortic Disease.

    PubMed

    Appoo, Jehangir J; Bozinovski, John; Chu, Michael W A; El-Hamamsy, Ismail; Forbes, Thomas L; Moon, Michael; Ouzounian, Maral; Peterson, Mark D; Tittley, Jacques; Boodhwani, Munir

    2016-06-01

    In 2014, the Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) published a position statement on the management of thoracic aortic disease addressing size thresholds for surgery, imaging modalities, medical therapy, and genetics. It did not address issues related to surgical intervention. This joint Position Statement on behalf of the CCS, Canadian Society of Cardiac Surgeons, and the Canadian Society for Vascular Surgery provides recommendations about thoracic aortic disease interventions, including: aortic valve repair, perfusion strategies for arch repair, extended arch hybrid reconstruction for acute type A dissection, endovascular management of arch and descending aortic aneurysms, and type B dissection. The position statement is constructed using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology, and has been approved by the primary panel, an international secondary panel, and the CCS Guidelines Committee. Advent of endovascular technology has improved aortic surgery safety and extended the indications of minimally invasive thoracic aortic surgery. The combination of safer open surgery with endovascular treatment has improved patient outcomes in this rapidly evolving subspecialty field of cardiovascular surgery. PMID:27233892

  10. Left lower sleeve lobectomy and systematic lymph node dissection by single-incision video-assisted thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Junqiang; Yao, Jie; Chang, Zhibo

    2015-01-01

    Sleeve lobectomy for selected cases of intratracheal tumor has better parenchyma preservation compared to pneumonectomy. And the left lower sleeve lobectomy is considered one of the most complex resections. Thanks to the advancement of equipment and accumulation of skills, video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) sleeve lobectomy has become safe and feasible. Typically, 3-4 ports are used, but the surgery can also be completed through one incision. A 51-year-old male patient with left lower central lung cancer underwent sleeve lobectomy and systematic mediastinal lymphadenectomy by single-incision VATS and recovered uneventfully. Sleeve lobectomy by single-incision video-assisted thoracic surgery is feasible and safe. PMID:26623113

  11. Anterior surgery in the thoracic and lumbar spine: endoscopic techniques in children.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Alvin H

    2005-01-01

    Therapeutic modalities for disorders of the pediatric spine must include video-assisted thoracoscopy. The endoscopic approach to the spine has involved an evolutionary approach. What began as an isolated drainage of a vertebral abscess has continued as a method of single diskectomy, release of the anulus fibrosus with or without ligation of segmental vessels, rib resection for costoplasty, rib harvesting for intervertebral fusion and, most recently, insertion of correctional implants with or without spinal fusion. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery offers the potential to decrease surgical morbidity associated with traditional open procedures. The ability of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery to achieve spinal release and the results of early outcomes and cost are comparable to those of open thoracotomy. The improvement in video technology with multichip cameras has significantly improved and enhanced the ability to identify structures in the chest through small incisions (portals). This technology allows spine surgeons to perform surgical intervention comparable to thoracotomy. Instead of using a 9- to 12-inch incision, four to five portals of approximately 2 cm are used; thus, the cosmetic efects of the scoliosis surgery are enhanced. The potential benefits of this procedure include diminished postoperative pain, decreased length of hospitalization, increased wound care, and early return to prehospital activities. PMID:15948482

  12. Outcomes of Acute Type A Dissection Repair Before and After Implementation of a Multidisciplinary Thoracic Aortic Surgery Program

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Nicholas D.; Ganapathi, Asvin M.; Hanna, Jennifer M.; Williams, Judson B.; Gaca, Jeffrey G.; Hughes, G. Chad

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to compare the results of acute type A aortic dissection (ATAAD) repair before and after implementation of a multidisciplinary thoracic aortic surgery program (TASP) at our institution, with dedicated high-volume thoracic aortic surgeons, a multidisciplinary approach to thoracic aortic disease management, and a standardized protocol for ATAAD repair. Background Outcomes of ATAAD repair may be improved when operations are performed at specialized high-volume thoracic aortic surgical centers. Methods Between 1999 and 2011, 128 patients underwent ATAAD repair at our institution. Records of patients who underwent ATAAD repair 6 years before (n = 56) and 6 years after (n = 72) implementation of the TASP were retrospectively compared. Expected operative mortality rates were calculated using the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection pre-operative prediction model. Results Baseline risk profiles and expected operative mortality rates were comparable between patients who underwent surgery before and after implementation of the TASP. Operative mortality before TASP implementation was 33.9% and was statistically equivalent to the expected operative mortality rate of 26.0% (observed-to-expected mortality ratio 1.30; p = 0.54). Operative mortality after TASP implementation fell to 2.8% and was statistically improved compared with the expected operative mortality rate of 18.2% (observed-to-expected mortality ratio 0.15; p = 0.005). Differences in survival persisted over long-term follow-up, with 5-year survival rates of 85% observed for TASP patients compared with 55% for pre-TASP patients (p = 0.002). Conclusions ATAAD repair can be performed with results approximating those of elective proximal aortic surgery when operations are performed by a high-volume multidisciplinary thoracic aortic surgery team. Efforts to standardize or centralize care of patients undergoing ATAAD are warranted. PMID:24412454

  13. Single-stage bilateral pulmonary resections by video-assisted thoracic surgery for multiple small nodules

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Feng; Yang, Haitang

    2016-01-01

    Background Surgical treatment is thought to be the most effective strategy for multiple small nodules. However, in general, one-stage bilateral resection is not recommended due to its highly invasive nature. Methods Clinical records of patients undergoing one-stage bilateral resections of multiple pulmonary nodules between January 2009 and September 2014 in a single institution were retrospectively reviewed. Results Simultaneous bilateral pulmonary resection by conventional video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) was undertaken in 29 patients. Ground glass opacity (GGO) accounted for 71.9% (46/64) of total lesions, including 26 pure GGO and 20 mixed GGO lesions. One case underwent bilateral lobectomy that was complicated by postoperative dyspnea. Lobar-sublobar (L/SL) resection and bilateral sublobar resection (SL-SL) were conducted in 16 and 12 cases, respectively, and most of these cases had uneventful postoperative courses. There was no significant difference with regard to postoperative complications (P=0.703), duration of use of chest drains (P=0.485), between one- and two-stage groups. Mean postoperative follow-up in cases of primary lung cancer was 31.4 (range, 10–51) months. There was neither recurrence nor deaths at final follow-up. Conclusions Single-stage bilateral surgery in selected cases with synchronous bilateral multiple nodules (SBMNs) is feasible and associated with satisfactory outcomes. PMID:27076942

  14. Trainees Can Safely Learn Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery Lobectomy despite Limited Experience in Open Lobectomy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Woo Sik; Lee, Chang Young; Lee, Seokkee; Kim, Do Jung; Chung, Kyung Young

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to establish whether pulmonary lobectomy using video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) can be safely performed by trainees with limited experience with open lobectomy. Methods Data were retrospectively collected from 251 patients who underwent VATS lobectomy at a single institution between October 2007 and April 2011. The surgical outcomes of the procedures that were performed by three trainee surgeons were compared to the outcomes of procedures performed by a surgeon who had performed more than 150 VATS lobectomies. The cumulative failure graph of each trainee was used for quality assessment and learning curve analysis. Results The surgery time, estimated blood loss, final pathologic stage, thoracotomy conversion rate, chest tube duration, duration of hospital stay, complication rate, and mortality rate were comparable between the expert surgeon and each trainee. Cumulative failure graphs showed that the performance of each trainee was acceptable and that all trainees reached proficiency in performing VATS lobectomy after 40 cases. Conclusion This study shows that trainees with limited experience with open lobectomy can safely learn to perform VATS lobectomy for the treatment of lung cancer under expert supervision without compromising outcomes. PMID:25883893

  15. The Use of Robotic-Assisted Thoracic Surgery for Lung Resection: A Comprehensive Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Agzarian, John; Fahim, Christine; Shargall, Yaron; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro; Waddell, Thomas K; Hanna, Waël C

    2016-01-01

    The primary objective of this study is to systematically review all pertinent literature related to robotic-assisted lung resection. Robotic-assisted thoracic surgery (RATS) case series and studies comparing RATS with video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) or thoracotomy were included in the search. In accordance with preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses guidelines, 2 independent reviewers performed the search and review of resulting titles and abstracts. Following full-text screening, a total of 20 articles met the inclusion criteria and are presented in the review. Amenable results were pooled and presented as a single outcome, and meta-analyses were performed for outcomes having more than 3 comparative analyses. Data are presented in the following 4 categories: technical outcomes, perioperative outcomes, oncological outcomes, and cost comparison. RATS was associated with longer operative time, but did not result in a greater rate of conversion to thoracotomy than VATS. RATS was superior to thoracotomy and equivalent to VATS for the incidence of prolonged air leak and hospital length-of-stay. Oncological outcomes like nodal upstaging and survival were no different between VATS and RATS. RATS was more costly than VATS, with most of the costs attributed to capital and disposable expenses of the robotic platform. Although limited by a lack of prospective analysis, lung resection via RATS compares favorably with thoracotomy and appears to be no different than VATS. Prospective studies are required to determine if there are outcome differences between RATS and VATS. PMID:27568159

  16. Has Microsoft® Left Behind Risk Modeling in Cardiac and Thoracic Surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Poullis, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: This concept paper examines a number of key areas central to quality and risk assessment in cardiac surgery. The effect of surgeon and institutional factors with regard to outcomes in cardiac surgery is utilized to demonstrate the need to sub analyze cardiac surgeons performance in a more sophisticated manner than just operation type and patient risk factors, as in current risk models. By utilizing the mathematical/engineering concept of Fourier analysis in the breakdown of cardiac surgical results the effects of each of the core components that makes up the care package of a patient’s experiences are examined. The core components examined include: institutional, regional, patient, and surgeon effects. The limitations of current additive (Parsonnet, Euroscore) and logistic (Euroscore, Southern Thoracic Society) regression risk analysis techniques are discussed. The inadequacy of current modeling techniques is demonstrated via the use of known medical formula for calculating flow in the internal mammary artery and the calculation of blood pressure. By examining the fundamental limitations of current risk analysis techniques a new technique is proposed that embraces modern software computer technology via the use of structured query language. PMID:21449233

  17. Non-intubated video-assisted thoracoscopic lung resections: the future of thoracic surgery?

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Rivas, Diego; Bonome, Cesar; Fieira, Eva; Aymerich, Humberto; Fernandez, Ricardo; Delgado, Maria; Mendez, Lucia; de la Torre, Mercedes

    2016-03-01

    Thanks to the experience gained through the improvement of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) technique, and the enhancement of surgical instruments and high-definition cameras, most pulmonary resections can now be performed by minimally invasive surgery. The future of the thoracic surgery should be associated with a combination of surgical and anaesthetic evolution and improvements to reduce the trauma to the patient. Traditionally, intubated general anaesthesia with one-lung ventilation was considered necessary for thoracoscopic major pulmonary resections. However, thanks to the advances in minimally invasive techniques, the non-intubated thoracoscopic approach has been adapted even for use with major lung resections. An adequate analgesia obtained from regional anaesthesia techniques allows VATS to be performed in sedated patients and the potential adverse effects related to general anaesthesia and selective ventilation can be avoided. The non-intubated procedures try to minimize the adverse effects of tracheal intubation and general anaesthesia, such as intubation-related airway trauma, ventilation-induced lung injury, residual neuromuscular blockade, and postoperative nausea and vomiting. Anaesthesiologists should be acquainted with the procedure to be performed. Furthermore, patients may also benefit from the efficient contraction of the dependent hemidiaphragm and preserved hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction during surgically induced pneumothorax in spontaneous ventilation. However, the surgical team must be aware of the potential problems and have the judgement to convert regional anaesthesia to intubated general anaesthesia in enforced circumstances. The non-intubated anaesthesia combined with the uniportal approach represents another step forward in the minimally invasive strategies of treatment, and can be reliably offered in the near future to an increasing number of patients. Therefore, educating and training programmes in VATS with non

  18. Video-assisted thoracic surgery reduces early postoperative stress. A single-institutional prospective randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Asteriou, Christos; Lazopoulos, Achilleas; Rallis, Thomas; Gogakos, Apostolos S; Paliouras, Dimitrios; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Tsavlis, Drosos; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Kioumis, Ioannis; Organtzis, John; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Barbetakis, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    Background Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) has been shown to effectively reduce postoperative pain, enhance mobilization of the patients, shorten in-hospital length of stay, and minimize postoperative morbidity rates. The aim of this prospective study is to evaluate neuroendocrine and respiratory parameters as stress markers in cancer patients who underwent lung wedge resections, using both mini muscle-sparing thoracotomy and VATS approach. Methods The patients were randomly allocated into two groups: Group A (n=30) involved patients who were operated on using the VATS approach, while in group B (n=30), the mini muscle-sparing thoracotomy approach was used. Neuroendocrine and biological variables assessed included blood glucose levels, C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, cortisol, epinephrine, and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels. Arterial oxygen (PaO2) and carbon dioxide (PaCO2) partial pressure were also evaluated. All parameters were measured at the following time points: 24 hours preoperatively (T1), 4 hours (T2), 24 hours (T3), 48 hours (T4), and 72 hours (T5), after the procedure. Results PaO2 levels were significantly higher 4 and 24 hours postoperatively in group A vs group B, respectively (T2: 94.3 vs 77.9 mmHg, P=0.015, T3: 96.4 vs 88.7 mmHg, P=0.034). Blood glucose (T2: 148 vs 163 mg/dL, P=0.045, T3: 133 vs 159 mg/dL, P=0.009) and CRP values (T2: 1.6 vs 2.5 mg/dL, P=0.024, T3: 1.5 vs 2.1 mg/dL, P=0.044) were found increased in both groups 4 and 24 hours after the procedure. However, their levels were significantly lower in the VATS group of patients. ACTH and cortisol values were elevated immediately after the operation and became normal after 48 hours in both groups, without significant difference. Postoperative epinephrine levels measured in group A vs group B, respectively, (T2: 78.9 vs 115.6 ng/L, P=0.007, T3: 83.4 vs 122.5 ng/L, P=0.012, T4: 67.4 vs 102.6 ng/L, P=0.021). The levels were significantly higher in group B. Conclusion This

  19. High-performance C-arm cone-beam CT guidance of thoracic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, Sebastian; Otake, Yoshito; Uneri, Ali; Mirota, Daniel J.; Nithiananthan, Sajendra; Stayman, J. W.; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Kleinszig, Gerhard; Graumann, Rainer; Sussman, Marc; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2012-02-01

    Localizing sub-palpable nodules in minimally invasive video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) presents a significant challenge. To overcome inherent problems of preoperative nodule tagging using CT fluoroscopic guidance, an intraoperative C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT) image-guidance system has been developed for direct localization of subpalpable tumors in the OR, including real-time tracking of surgical tools (including thoracoscope), and video-CBCT registration for augmentation of the thoracoscopic scene. Acquisition protocols for nodule visibility in the inflated and deflated lung were delineated in phantom and animal/cadaver studies. Motion compensated reconstruction was implemented to account for motion induced by the ventilated contralateral lung. Experience in CBCT-guided targeting of simulated lung nodules included phantoms, porcine models, and cadavers. Phantom studies defined low-dose acquisition protocols providing contrast-to-noise ratio sufficient for lung nodule visualization, confirmed in porcine specimens with simulated nodules (3-6mm diameter PE spheres, ~100-150HU contrast, 2.1mGy). Nodule visibility in CBCT of the collapsed lung, with reduced contrast according to air volume retention, was more challenging, but initial studies confirmed visibility using scan protocols at slightly increased dose (~4.6-11.1mGy). Motion compensated reconstruction employing a 4D deformation map in the backprojection process reduced artifacts associated with motion blur. Augmentation of thoracoscopic video with renderings of the target and critical structures (e.g., pulmonary artery) showed geometric accuracy consistent with camera calibration and the tracking system (2.4mm registration error). Initial results suggest a potentially valuable role for CBCT guidance in VATS, improving precision in minimally invasive, lungconserving surgeries, avoid critical structures, obviate the burdens of preoperative localization, and improve patient safety.

  20. Recovery of gastrointestinal function with thoracic epidural vs. systemic analgesia following gastrointestinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Shi, W-Z; Miao, Y-L; Yakoob, M Y; Cao, J-B; Zhang, H; Jiang, Y-G; Xu, L-H; Mi, W-D

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this review was to systematically assess the effect of thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) vs. systemic analgesia (SA) on the recovery of gastrointestinal (GI) function in patients following GI surgery. We performed a comprehensive literature search to identify randomized controlled trials of adult patients undergoing GI surgery, comparing the effect of two postoperative analgesia regimens. Patients postoperatively receiving local anesthesia-based TEA with or without opioids were compared to patients receiving opioid-based SA. The outcomes considered were times to GI function recovery, GI complications, and specific side effects. Twelve studies with 331 patients in the TEA group and 319 in the SA group were included. Compared to SA, TEA improved the GI recovery after GI procedures by shortening the time to first passage of flatus by 31.3 h, 95% confidence intervals (CIs): -33.2 to -29.4, P < 0.01; and shortening the time to first passage of stool by 24.1 h, 95% CIs: -27.2 to -20.9, P < 0.001. There was no difference between the groups in the incidence of anastomotic leakage and ileus. The occurrence of postoperative hypotension was relatively higher in the TEA group, risk ratio: 7.9, 95% CIs: 2.4 to 26.5, P = 0.001; other side effects (such as pruritus and vomiting) were similar in the two groups. There is evidence that TEA (compared to SA) improves the recovery of GI function after GI procedures without any increased risk of GI complications. To further confirm these effects, larger, better quality randomized controlled trials with standard outcome measurements are needed. PMID:25060245

  1. Real-time endoscopic guidance using near-infrared fluorescent light for thoracic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, Vivek; Stockdale, Alan; Neacsu, Florin; Kettenring, Frank; Frangioni, John V.; Gangadharan, Sidharta P.; Gioux, Sylvain

    2013-03-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States, accounting for 28% of all cancer deaths. Standard of care for potentially curable lung cancer involves preoperative radiographic or invasive staging, followed by surgical resection. With recent adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation studies showing a survival advantage in nodepositive patients, it is crucial to accurately stage these patients surgically in order to identify those who may benefit. However, lymphadenectomy in lung cancer is currently performed without guidance, mainly due to the lack of tools permitting real-time, intraoperative identification of lymph nodes. In this study we report the design and validation of a novel, clinically compatible near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence thoracoscope for real-time intraoperative guidance during lymphadenectomy. A novel, NIR-compatible, clinical rigid endoscope has been designed and fabricated, and coupled to a custom source and a dual channel camera to provide simultaneous color and NIR fluorescence information to the surgeon. The device has been successfully used in conjunction with a safe, FDA-approved fluorescent tracer to detect and resect mediastinal lymph nodes during thoracic surgery on Yorkshire pigs. Taken together, this study lays the foundation for the clinical translation of endoscopic NIR fluorescence intraoperative guidance and has the potential to profoundly impact the management of lung cancer patients.

  2. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database: 2016 Update on Research.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Marshall L; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Pasquali, Sara K; Hill, Kevin D; Hornik, Christoph; O'Brien, Sean M; Shahian, David M; Habib, Robert H; Edwards, Fred H

    2016-09-01

    The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database (STS CHSD) is the largest congenital and pediatric cardiac surgical clinical data registry in the world. With more than 400,000 total operations from nearly all centers performing pediatric and congenital heart operations in North America, the STS CHSD is an unparalleled platform for clinical investigation, outcomes research, and quality improvement activities in this subspecialty. In 2015, several major original publications reported analyses of data in the CHSD pertaining to specific diagnostic and procedural groups, age-defined cohorts, or the entire population of patients in the database. Additional publications reported the most recent development, evaluation, and application of metrics for quality measurement and reporting of pediatric and congenital heart operation outcomes. This use of the STS CHSD for outcomes research and for quality measurement continues to expand as database participation and the available wealth of data in it continue to grow. This article reviews outcomes research and quality improvement articles published in 2015 based on STS CHSD data. PMID:27492669

  3. Non-intubated video-assisted thoracic surgery: where does evidence stand?

    PubMed Central

    Tacconi, Federico

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, non-intubated video-assisted thoracic surgery (NIVATS) strategies are gaining popularity worldwide. The main goal of this surgical practice is to achieve an overall improvement of patients’ management and outcome thanks to the avoidance of side-effects related to general anesthesia (GA) and one-lung ventilation. The spectrum of expected benefits is multifaceted and includes reduced postoperative morbidity, faster discharge, decreased hospital costs and a globally reduced perturbation of patients’ well-being status. We have conducted a literature search to evaluate the available evidence on this topic. Meta-analysis of collected results was also done where appropriate. Despite some fragmentation of data and potential biases, the available data suggest that NIVATS operations can reduce operative morbidity and hospital stay when compared to equipollent procedures performed under GA. Larger, well designed prospective studies are thus warranted to assess the effectiveness of NIVATS as far as to investigate comprehensively the various outcomes. Multi-institutional and multidisciplinary cooperation will be welcome to establish uniform study protocols and to help address the questions that are to be answered yet. PMID:27195134

  4. Could CCI or FBCI Fully Eliminate the Impact of Curve Flexibility When Evaluating the Surgery Outcome for Thoracic Curve Idiopathic Scoliosis Patient? A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Haijian; Zhu, Xiaodong; Li, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To clarify if CCI or FBCI could fully eliminate the influence of curve flexibility on the coronal correction rate. Methods We reviewed medical record of all thoracic curve AIS cases undergoing posterior spinal fusion with all pedicle screw systems from June 2011 to July 2013. Radiographical data was collected and calculated. Student t test, Pearson correlation analysis and linear regression analysis were used to analyze the data. Results 60 were included in this study. The mean age was 14.7y (10-18y) with 10 males (17%) and 50 females (83%). The average Risser sign was 2.7. The mean thoracic Cobb angle before operation was 51.9°. The mean bending Cobb angle was 27.6° and the mean fulcrum bending Cobb angle was 17.4°. The mean Cobb angle at 2 week after surgery was 16.3°. The Pearson correlation coefficient r between CCI and BFR was -0.856(P<0.001), and between FBCI and FFR was -0.728 (P<0.001). A modified FBCI (M-FBCI) = (CR-0.513)/BFR or a modified CCI (M-CCI) = (CR-0.279)/FFR was generated by curve estimation has no significant correlation with FFR (r=-0.08, p=0.950) or with BFR (r=0.123, p=0.349). Conclusions Fulcrum-bending radiographs may better predict the outcome of AIS coronal correction than bending radiographs in thoracic curveAIS patients. Neither CCI nor FBCI can fully eliminate the impact of curve flexibility on the outcome of correction. A modified CCI or FBCI can better evaluating the corrective effects of different surgical techniques or instruments. PMID:25984945

  5. Transient long thoracic nerve injury during posterior spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: A report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Tsirikos, Athanasios I; Al-Hourani, Khalid

    2013-11-01

    We present the transient long thoracic nerve (LTN) injury during instrumented posterior spinal arthrodesis for idiopathic scoliosis. The suspected mechanism of injury, postoperative course and final outcome is discussed. The LTN is susceptible to injury due to its long and relatively superficial course across the thoracic wall through direct trauma or tension. Radical mastectomies with resection of axillary lymph nodes, first rib resection to treat thoracic outlet syndrome and cardiac surgery can be complicated with LTN injury. LTN injury producing scapular winging has not been reported in association with spinal deformity surgery. We reviewed the medical notes and spinal radiographs of two adolescent patients with idiopathic scoliosis who underwent posterior spinal arthrodesis and developed LTN neuropraxia. Scoliosis surgery was uneventful and intraoperative spinal cord monitoring was stable throughout the procedure. Postoperative neurological examination was otherwise normal, but both patients developed winging of the scapula at 4 and 6 days after spinal arthrodesis, which did not affect shoulder function. Both patients made a good recovery and the scapular winging resolved spontaneously 8 and 11 months following surgery with no residual morbidity. We believe that this LTN was due to positioning of our patients with their head flexed, tilted and rotated toward the contralateral side while the arm was abducted and extended. The use of heavy retractors may have also applied compression or tension to the nerve in one of our patients contributing to the development of neuropraxia. This is an important consideration during spinal deformity surgery to prevent potentially permanent injury to the nerve, which can produce severe shoulder dysfunction and persistent pain. PMID:24379470

  6. Uniportal video-assisted thoracic surgery lobectomy in semiprone position: primary experience of 105 cases

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zongwu; Xi, Junjie; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Lin; Wang, Qun

    2015-01-01

    Background Uniportal video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is becoming popular, and uniportal lobectomy in semiprone position was reported in 2014. This study aimed to investigate the feasibility and safety of uniportal VATS in semiprone position. Methods From May 28, 2014 to October 19, 2015, we attempted uniportal VATS lobectomy in semiprone position in 105 cases. Forty-five patients were male, and 60 patients were female. Average age was 57.1±10.6 years (24–76 years). Perioperative parameters were documented. Results There were two conversions to three-port lobectomy, one conversion to double-port lobectomy, and three conversions to thoracotomy. Among the patients who received uniportal VATS in semiprone position, mean operation duration was 137.4±47.8 minutes. Mean estimated blood loss was 60.7±102.7 mL. Mean time of drainage was 3.0±2.1 days, and postoperative length of stay averaged 4.9±2.3 days. In the cases of primary lung cancer, the mean number of nodal stations explored was 7.2±1.3, with a mean of 20.8±6.3 lymph nodes resected. As to the mediastinal lymph node specifically, a mean of 4.4±1.0 nodal stations were explored, and the number of resected mediastinal lymph nodes averaged 12.8±5.1. No perioperative death or major complication occurred. Conclusions Uniportal VATS lobectomy in semiprone position is feasible and safe. PMID:26793366

  7. Optimizing postoperative care protocols in thoracic surgery: best evidence and new technology.

    PubMed

    French, Daniel G; Dilena, Michael; LaPlante, Simon; Shamji, Farid; Sundaresan, Sudhir; Villeneuve, James; Seely, Andrew; Maziak, Donna; Gilbert, Sebastien

    2016-02-01

    Postoperative clinical pathways have been shown to improve postoperative care and decrease length of stay in hospital. In thoracic surgery there is a need to develop chest tube management pathways. This paper considers four aspects of chest tube management: (I) appraising the role of chest X-rays in the management of lung resection patients with chest drains; (II) selecting of a fluid output threshold below which chest tubes can be removed safely; (III) deciding whether suction should be applied to chest tubes; (IV) and selecting the safest method for chest tube removal. There is evidence that routine use of chest X-rays does not influence the management of chest tubes. There is a lack of consensus on the highest fluid output threshold below which chest tubes can be safely removed. The optimal use of negative intra-pleural pressure has not yet been established despite multiple randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses. When attempting to improve efficiency in the management of chest tubes, evidence in support of drain removal without a trial of water seal should be considered. Inconsistencies in the interpretation of air leaks and in chest tube management are likely contributors to the conflicting results found in the literature. New digital pleural drainage systems, which provide a more objective air leak assessment and can record air leak trend over time, will likely contribute to the development of new evidence-based guidelines. Technology should be combined with continued efforts to standardize care, create clinical pathways, and analyze their impact on postoperative outcomes. PMID:26941968

  8. Optimizing postoperative care protocols in thoracic surgery: best evidence and new technology

    PubMed Central

    French, Daniel G.; Dilena, Michael; LaPlante, Simon; Shamji, Farid; Sundaresan, Sudhir; Villeneuve, James; Seely, Andrew; Maziak, Donna

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative clinical pathways have been shown to improve postoperative care and decrease length of stay in hospital. In thoracic surgery there is a need to develop chest tube management pathways. This paper considers four aspects of chest tube management: (I) appraising the role of chest X-rays in the management of lung resection patients with chest drains; (II) selecting of a fluid output threshold below which chest tubes can be removed safely; (III) deciding whether suction should be applied to chest tubes; (IV) and selecting the safest method for chest tube removal. There is evidence that routine use of chest X-rays does not influence the management of chest tubes. There is a lack of consensus on the highest fluid output threshold below which chest tubes can be safely removed. The optimal use of negative intra-pleural pressure has not yet been established despite multiple randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses. When attempting to improve efficiency in the management of chest tubes, evidence in support of drain removal without a trial of water seal should be considered. Inconsistencies in the interpretation of air leaks and in chest tube management are likely contributors to the conflicting results found in the literature. New digital pleural drainage systems, which provide a more objective air leak assessment and can record air leak trend over time, will likely contribute to the development of new evidence-based guidelines. Technology should be combined with continued efforts to standardize care, create clinical pathways, and analyze their impact on postoperative outcomes. PMID:26941968

  9. In patients undergoing thoracic surgery is paravertebral block as effective as epidural analgesia for pain management?

    PubMed

    Scarci, Marco; Joshi, Abhishek; Attia, Rizwan

    2010-01-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: in patients undergoing thoracic surgery is paravertebral block (PVB) as effective as epidural analgesia for pain management? Altogether >184 papers were found using the reported search, seven of which represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. All studies agreed that PVB is at least as effective as epidural analgesia for pain control post-thoracotomy. In one paper, the visual analogue pain score (VAS) at rest and on cough was significantly lower in the paravertebral group (P=0.02 and 0.0001, respectively). Pulmonary function, as assessed by peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), was significantly better preserved in the paravertebral group. The lowest PEFR as a fraction of preoperative control was 0.73 in the paravertebral group in contrast with 0.54 in the epidural group (P<0.004). Oximetric recordings were better in the paravertebral group (96%) compared to the epidural group (95%) (P=0.0001). Another article reported that statistically significant differences (forced vital capacity 46.8% for PVB and 39.3% for epidural group P<0.05; forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) 48.4% in PVB group and 35.9% in epidural group, P<0.05) were reached in day 2 and continued until day 3. Plasma concentrations of cortisol, as marker of postoperative stress, increased markedly in both groups, but the increment was statistically different in favour of the paravertebral group (P=0.003). Epidural block was associated with frequent side-effects [urinary retention (42%), nausea (22%), itching (22%) and hypotension (3%) and, rarely, respiratory depression (0.07%)]. Additionally, it prolonged operative time and was associated with technical failure or displacement (8%). Epidurals were also related to a higher complication rate (atelectasis/pneumonia) compared to the PVB (2 vs. 0). PVB was found to be of equal efficacy to epidural anaesthesia, but with a

  10. Occipitocervical Fusion Surgery: Review of Operative Techniques and Results.

    PubMed

    Kukreja, Sunil; Ambekar, Sudheer; Sin, Anthony H; Nanda, Anil

    2015-09-01

    Objective Varying types of clinicoradiologic presentations at the craniovertebral junction (CVJ) influence the decision process for occipitocervical fusion (OCF) surgery. We discuss the operative techniques and decision-making process in OCF surgery based on our clinical experience and a literature review. Material and Methods A total of 49 consecutive patients who underwent OCF participated in the study. Sagittal computed tomography images were used to illustrate and measure radiologic parameters. We measured Wackenheim clivus baseline (WCB), clivus-canal angle (CCA), atlantodental distance (ADD), and Powers ratio (PR) in all the patients. Results Clinical improvement on Nurick grading was recorded in 36 patients. Patients with better preoperative status (Nurick grades 1-3) had better functional outcomes after the surgery (p = 0.077). Restoration of WCB, CCA, ADD, and PR parameters following the surgery was noted in 39.2%, 34.6%, 77.4%, and 63.3% of the patients, respectively. Complications included deep wound infections (n = 2), pseudoarthrosis (n = 2), and deaths (n = 4). Conclusion Conventional wire-based constructs are superseded by more rigid screw-based designs. Odontoidectomy is associated with a high incidence of perioperative complications. The advent of newer implants and reduction techniques around the CVJ has obviated the need for this procedure in most patients. PMID:26401473

  11. Comparison Between Phenylephrine and Dopamine in Maintaining Cerebral Oxygen Saturation in Thoracic Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji Won; Joo Ahn, Hyun; JooAhn, Hyun; Yang, Mikyung; Kim, Jie Ae; Lee, Sangmin M; Ahn, Jin Hee

    2015-12-01

    Fluid is usually restricted during thoracic surgery, and vasoactive agents are often administered to maintain blood pressure. One-lung ventilation (OLV) decreases arterial oxygenation; thus oxygen delivery to the brain can be decreased. In this study, we compared phenylephrine and dopamine with respect to maintaining cerebral oxygenation during OLV in major thoracic surgery.Sixty-three patients undergoing lobectomies were randomly assigned to the dopamine (D) or phenylephrine (P) group. The patients' mean arterial pressure was maintained within 20% of baseline by a continuous infusion of dopamine or phenylephrine. Maintenance fluid was kept at 5 mL/kg/h. The depth of anesthesia was maintained with desflurane 1MAC and remifentanil infusion under bispectral index guidance. Regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rScO2) and hemodynamic variables were recorded using near-infrared spectroscopy and esophageal cardiac Doppler.The rScO2 was higher in the D group than the P group during OLV (OLV 60 min: 71 ± 6% vs 63 ± 12%; P = 0.03). The number of patients whose rScO2 dropped more than 20% from baseline was 0 and 6 in the D and P groups, respectively (P = 0.02). The D group showed higher cardiac output, but lower mean arterial pressure than the P group (4.7 ± 1.0 vs 3.9 ± 1.2 L/min; 76.7 ± 8.1 vs 84.5 ± 7.5 mm Hg; P = 0.02, P = 0.02). Among the variables, age, hemoglobin concentration, and cardiac output were associated with rScO2 by correlation analysis.Dopamine was superior to phenylephrine in maintaining cerebral oxygenation during OLV in thoracic surgery. PMID:26656357

  12. Resection of the sidewall of superior vena cava using video-assisted thoracic surgery mechanical suture technique

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xin; Qiu, Yuan; Pan, Hui; Mo, Lili; Chen, Hanzhang

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer invading the superior vena cava (SVC) is a locally advanced condition, for which poor prognosis is expected with conservative treatment alone. Surgical resection of the lesion can rapidly relieve the symptoms and significantly improve survival for some patients. Replacement, repair and partial resection of SVC via thoracotomy were generally accepted and used in the past. As the rapid development of minimally invasive techniques and devices, partial resection and repair of SVC are feasible via video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS). However, few studies have reported the VATS surgical techniques. In this study, we reported the crucial techniques of partial resection of SVC via VATS. PMID:27076960

  13. Ipsilateral shoulder pain after thoracic surgery procedures under general and regional anesthesia – a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Misiołek, Hanna; Karpe, Jacek; Marcinkowski, Adrian; Jastrzębska, Aleksandra; Szelka, Anna; Czarnożycka, Adrianna; Długaszek, Michał

    2014-01-01

    Background Ipsilateral shoulder pain (ISP) is a common complication of mixed etiology after thoracic surgery (its prevalence is estimated in the literature at between 42% and 97%). It is severe and resistant to treatment (patients complain of pain despite effective epidural analgesia at the surgical site). Aim of the study The aim of this retrospective, observational study was to evaluate the prevalence of ISP in patients operated on in our facility and to determine the risk factors for ISP development. Material and methods 68 patients after thoracotomy or videothoracoscopy (video-assisted thoracic surgery – VATS) conducted under general and regional anesthesia were enrolled in the study and divided into two groups: group I without ISP and group II with postoperative ISP. We recorded age, sex, BMI, duration of surgery, type of surgery, type of regional anesthesia, and, in patients with epidural anesthesia, level of catheter placement. Results Statistically significant differences between the groups were obtained for BMI (24.67 and 27.68, respectively; p = 0.049), type of surgery (24% for thoracotomy and 0% for VATS, p = 0.026), and level of epidural catheter placement (4.35% for catheters placed at the level of Th5 or higher and 40.47% for catheters placed below Th5; p = 0.003). Conclusions The prevalence of ISP in our medical center amounts to 24% of thoracotomy patients. The fact that the difference in ISP prevalence was significantly related to the level of epidural catheter placement is consistent with the theory that ISP is related to phrenic nerve innervation. Moreover, epidural catheter placement is a modifiable factor, which can be used to reduce the prevalence of post-thoracotomy ISP. PMID:26336393

  14. [Thoracic duct collaterals of lymphatic and pulmonary origin. Anatomy and chylothorax after pulmonary surgery].

    PubMed

    Riquet, M; Hidden, G; Debesse, B

    1989-01-01

    Dye injection of lung segments reveals the existence of lymphatic drainage of the lungs generally into cervical venous confluents and more rarely into the arch of the thoracic duct in the neck and also occasionally into the thoracic duct in the mediastinum. Direct drainage of the lymph into the thoracic duct was observed in 10 cases out of a series of 589 injections of lung segments in adult cadavers. In one half of cases, the thoracic duct was injected from the left suprabronchial lymph node chain, the origin of the left recurrent chain, and in one quarter of cases from the lateral anteroposterior right major azygos and left azygo-aortic lymph node chains, not recognised by the classical authors. More rarely, direct lymphatic collaterals drained certain segments of the lower lobes into the thoracic duct via the triangular ligament. Analysis of cases of chylothorax occurring after lung resection and observed in the authors' department or in the literature reveals that most of them can be attributed to a chyle leak from one of these pulmonary lymph collaterals. These pathways are probably also involved in the development of medical or idiopathic chylothorax. PMID:2686514

  15. Effects of Multilevel Facetectomy and Screw Density on Postoperative Changes in Spinal Rod Contour in Thoracic Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kokabu, Terufumi; Sudo, Hideki; Abe, Yuichiro; Ito, Manabu; Ito, Yoichi M.; Iwasaki, Norimasa

    2016-01-01

    Flattening of the preimplantation rod contour in the sagittal plane influences thoracic kyphosis (TK) restoration in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) surgery. The effects of multilevel facetectomy and screw density on postoperative changes in spinal rod contour have not been documented. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of multilevel facetectomy and screw density on changes in spinal rod contour from before implantation to after surgical correction of thoracic curves in patients with AIS prospectively. The concave and convex rod shapes from patients with thoracic AIS (n = 49) were traced prior to insertion. Postoperative sagittal rod shape was determined by computed tomography. The angle of intersection of the tangents to the rod end points was measured. Multiple stepwise linear regression analysis was used to identify variables independently predictive of change in rod contour (Δθ). Average Δθ at the concave and convex side were 13.6° ± 7.5° and 4.3° ± 4.8°, respectively. The Δθ at the concave side was significantly greater than that of the convex side (P < 0.0001) and significantly correlated with Risser sign (P = 0.032), the preoperative main thoracic Cobb angle (P = 0.031), the preoperative TK angle (P = 0.012), and the number of facetectomy levels (P = 0.007). Furthermore, a Δθ at the concave side ≥14° significantly correlated with the postoperative TK angle (P = 0.003), the number of facetectomy levels (P = 0.021), and screw density at the concave side (P = 0.008). Rod deformation at the concave side suggests that corrective forces acting on that side are greater than on the convex side. Multilevel facetectomy and/or screw density at the concave side have positive effects on reducing the rod deformation that can lead to a loss of TK angle postoperatively. PMID:27564683

  16. Effects of Multilevel Facetectomy and Screw Density on Postoperative Changes in Spinal Rod Contour in Thoracic Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kokabu, Terufumi; Sudo, Hideki; Abe, Yuichiro; Ito, Manabu; Ito, Yoichi M; Iwasaki, Norimasa

    2016-01-01

    Flattening of the preimplantation rod contour in the sagittal plane influences thoracic kyphosis (TK) restoration in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) surgery. The effects of multilevel facetectomy and screw density on postoperative changes in spinal rod contour have not been documented. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of multilevel facetectomy and screw density on changes in spinal rod contour from before implantation to after surgical correction of thoracic curves in patients with AIS prospectively. The concave and convex rod shapes from patients with thoracic AIS (n = 49) were traced prior to insertion. Postoperative sagittal rod shape was determined by computed tomography. The angle of intersection of the tangents to the rod end points was measured. Multiple stepwise linear regression analysis was used to identify variables independently predictive of change in rod contour (Δθ). Average Δθ at the concave and convex side were 13.6° ± 7.5° and 4.3° ± 4.8°, respectively. The Δθ at the concave side was significantly greater than that of the convex side (P < 0.0001) and significantly correlated with Risser sign (P = 0.032), the preoperative main thoracic Cobb angle (P = 0.031), the preoperative TK angle (P = 0.012), and the number of facetectomy levels (P = 0.007). Furthermore, a Δθ at the concave side ≥14° significantly correlated with the postoperative TK angle (P = 0.003), the number of facetectomy levels (P = 0.021), and screw density at the concave side (P = 0.008). Rod deformation at the concave side suggests that corrective forces acting on that side are greater than on the convex side. Multilevel facetectomy and/or screw density at the concave side have positive effects on reducing the rod deformation that can lead to a loss of TK angle postoperatively. PMID:27564683

  17. Blunt thoracic trauma.

    PubMed

    Weyant, Michael J; Fullerton, David A

    2008-01-01

    Blunt thoracic trauma represents a significant portion of trauma admissions to hospitals in the United States. These injuries are encountered by physicians in many specialities such as emergency medicine, pediatrics, general surgery and thoracic surgery. Accurate diagnosis and treatment improves the chances of favorable outcomes and it is desirable for all treating physicians to have current knowledge of all aspects of blunt thoracic trauma. Cardiothoracic surgeons often treat the most severe forms of blunt thoracic injuries and we review the aspects of blunt thoracic trauma that are pertinent to the practicing cardiothoracic surgeon. PMID:18420123

  18. Postoperative Atrial fibrillation in Patients undergoing Non-cardiac Non-thoracic Surgery: A Practical Approach for the Hospitalist

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Kirti K.; Tiru, Mihaela; Chin, Thomas; Fox, Marshal T.; Stefan, Mihaela S.

    2016-01-01

    New postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF) is the most common perioperative arrhythmia and its reported incidence ranges from 0.4%–26% in patients undergoing non-cardiac non-thoracic surgery. The incidence varies according to patient characteristics such as age, presence of structural heart disease and other co-morbidities, as well as the type of surgery performed. POAF occurs as a consequence of adrenergic stimulation, systemic inflammation, or autonomic activation in the intra or postoperative period (e.g. due to pain, hypotension, infection) in the setting of a susceptible myocardium and other predisposing factors (e.g. electrolyte abnormalities). POAF develops between day 1 and day 4 post-surgery and it is often considered a self-limited entity. Its acute management involves many of the same strategies used in non-surgical patients but the optimal long-term management is challenging because of the limited available evidence. Several studies have shown an association between occurrence of POAF and in-hospital morbidity, mortality, and length of stay. Although, traditionally, POAF was considered to have a generally favorable long-term prognosis, recent data have shown an association with an increased risk of stroke at one year after hospitalization. It is unknown, however, whether strategies to prevent POAF or for rate/rhythm control when it does occur, lead to a reduction in morbidity or mortality. This suggests the need for future studies to better understand the risks associated with POAF and to determine optimal strategies to minimize long-term thromboembolic risk. In this article, we summarize the current knowledge on epidemiology, pathophysiology, and short- and long-term management of POAF after non-cardiac non-thoracic surgery with the goal of providing a practical approach to managing these patients for the non-cardiologist clinician. PMID:26414594

  19. Endovascular Surgery for Traumatic Thoracic Aortic Injury: Our Experience with Five Cases, Two of Whom were Young Patients

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Takashi; Matsuyama, Sho; Fukumura, Fumio; Ando, Hiromi; Tanaka, Jiro; Uchida, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: We present our experience of endovascular surgery for traumatic aortic injury and the results of our procedures. Materials and Methods: From January 2009 to December 2013, we performed endovascular repairs of traumatic thoracic aortic injury on 5 male patients 16–75 years old (mean, 50.8), two of whom were young. Three of the patients had multiple organ injuries. The mean interval time to the operation is 22.0 hours (range, 10–36). All patients underwent endovascular repair with heparinization. The isthmus regions were seen in three cases and all of them were needed left subclavian artery (LSA) coverage. In the two young patients, the deployed stent graft was 22 mm (22.2% oversizing for diameter of aorta) and 26 mm (36.8% oversizing), respectively. Results: The procedures were successful in all patients, with no early mortality, paraplegia or stroke. During 3–63 months (mean, 30.8) follow-up period, no one experienced stent graft-related complications. One patient with LSA coverage experienced arm ischemia but the symptom improved with time. Conclusion: Endovascular surgery for traumatic thoracic aortic injury can be performed safely with low mortality or morbidity even in young small aorta. Accumulation of clinical experience and evaluation of long-term outcomes are necessary. PMID:25298833

  20. Thoracic Paravertebral Block, Multimodal Analgesia, and Monitored Anesthesia Care for Breast Cancer Surgery in Primary Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Primary lateral sclerosis (PLS) is a rare idiopathic neurodegenerative disorder affecting upper motor neurons and characterized by spasticity, muscle weakness, and bulbar involvement. It can sometimes mimic early stage of more common and fatal amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Surgical patients with a history of neurodegenerative disorders, including PLS, may be at increased risk for general anesthesia related ventilatory depression and postoperative respiratory complications, abnormal response to muscle relaxants, and sensitivity to opioids, sedatives, and local anesthetics. We present a case of a patient with PLS and recent diagnosis of breast cancer who underwent a simple mastectomy surgery uneventfully under an ultrasound guided thoracic paravertebral block, multimodal analgesia, and monitored anesthesia care. Patient reported minimal to no pain or discomfort in the postoperative period and received no opioids for pain management before being discharged home. In patients with PLS, thoracic paravertebral block and multimodal analgesia can provide reliable anesthesia and effective analgesia for breast surgery with avoidance of potential risks associated with general anesthesia, muscle paralysis, and opioid use. PMID:27200193

  1. Efficacy of Contractubex gel in the treatment of fresh scars after thoracic surgery in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Willital, G H; Heine, H

    1994-01-01

    Scar development was investigated in 45 young patients who had undergone thoracic surgery. Patients were randomly assigned either to a group which was treated topically with Contractubex gel (Merz + Co., D-Frankfurt/Main), containing 10% onion extract, 50/U of sodium heparin per one g of gel and 1% allantoin, or to a group receiving no treatment. The treatment began on average 26 days after the operation and was continued for one year. The scars of all treated and untreated patients were evaluated at monthly intervals. The appearance of the scar, including scar type and scar size as well as scar colour, was assessed by the physician. A reduction of the increase of scar width was seen in the Contractubex-treated group as compared with the untreated group. Further, physiological scars and skin-coloured scars were more frequent in the treated group than in the untreated group. Hypertrophic or keloidal scars were less frequent in the treated group. No differences in scar length and scar height were seen. At the end of the observation period, the clinical course of scar development was rated as "very good" or "good" in more than 90% of the treated patients, "good" in less than 40% and "moderate" or "bad" in more than 60% of the untreated cases. The tolerability of the drug was "good" or "very good" in all cases. In conclusion, Contractubex gel is useful in scar treatment after thoracic surgery. PMID:7672876

  2. Successful salvage surgery for failed transforaminal lumbosacral interbody fusion using the anterior transperitoneal approach.

    PubMed

    Hozumi, Takashi; Orita, Sumihisa; Inage, Kazuhide; Fujimoto, Kazuki; Sato, Jun; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Kanamoto, Hirohito; Abe, Koki; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Aoki, Yasuchika; Nakamura, Junichi; Matsuura, Yusuke; Suzuki, Takane; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Ohtori, Seiji; Sainoh, Takeshi

    2016-05-01

    Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) is a popular posterior spinal fusion technique, but sometimes require salvage surgery when implant failure occurs, which involves possible neural damage due to postoperative adhesion. The current report deals with successful anterior transperitoneal salvage surgery for failed L5-S TLIF with less neural invasiveness. PMID:27190611

  3. Reporting standards of the Society for Vascular Surgery for thoracic outlet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Illig, Karl A; Donahue, Dean; Duncan, Audra; Freischlag, Julie; Gelabert, Hugh; Johansen, Kaj; Jordan, Sheldon; Sanders, Richard; Thompson, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a group of disorders all having in common compression at the thoracic outlet. Three structures are at risk: the brachial plexus, the subclavian vein, and the subclavian artery, producing neurogenic (NTOS), venous (VTOS), and arterial (ATOS) thoracic outlet syndromes, respectively. Each of these three are separate entities, though they can coexist and possibly overlap. The treatment of NTOS, in particular, has been hampered by lack of data, which in turn is the result of inconsistent definitions and diagnosis, uncertainty with regard to treatment options, and lack of consistent outcome measures. The Committee has defined NTOS as being present when three of the following four criteria are present: signs and symptoms of pathology occurring at the thoracic outlet (pain and/or tenderness), signs and symptoms of nerve compression (distal neurologic changes, often worse with arms overhead or dangling), absence of other pathology potentially explaining the symptoms, and a positive response to a properly performed scalene muscle test injection. Reporting standards for workup, treatment, and assessment of results are presented, as are reporting standards for all phases of VTOS and ATOS. The overall goal is to produce consistency in diagnosis, description of treatment, and assessment of results, in turn then allowing more valuable data to be presented. PMID:27565607

  4. Reporting standards of the Society for Vascular Surgery for thoracic outlet syndrome: Executive summary.

    PubMed

    Illig, Karl A; Donahue, Dean; Duncan, Audra; Freischlag, Julie; Gelabert, Hugh; Johansen, Kaj; Jordan, Sheldon; Sanders, Richard; Thompson, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a group of disorders all having in common compression at the thoracic outlet. Three structures are at risk: the brachial plexus, the subclavian vein, and the subclavian artery, producing neurogenic (NTOS), venous (VTOS), and arterial (ATOS) thoracic outlet syndromes, respectively. Each of these three are separate entities, though they can coexist and possibly overlap. The treatment of NTOS, in particular, has been hampered by lack of data, which in turn is the result of inconsistent definitions and diagnosis, uncertainty with regard to treatment options, and lack of consistent outcome measures. The Committee has defined NTOS as being present when three of the following four criteria are present: signs and symptoms of pathology occurring at the thoracic outlet (pain and/or tenderness), signs and symptoms of nerve compression (distal neurologic changes, often worse with arms overhead or dangling), absence of other pathology potentially explaining the symptoms, and a positive response to a properly performed scalene muscle test injection. Reporting standards for workup, treatment, and assessment of results are presented, as are reporting standards for all phases of VTOS and ATOS. The overall goal is to produce consistency in diagnosis, description of treatment, and assessment of results, in turn then allowing more valuable data to be presented. PMID:27565596

  5. Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion as a Salvage Technique for Pseudarthrosis following Posterior Lumbar Fusion Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mobbs, Ralph J.; Phan, Kevin; Thayaparan, Ganesha K.; Rao, Prashanth J.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected observational data. Objective To assess the safety and efficacy of anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) as a salvage option for lumbar pseudarthrosis following failed posterior lumbar fusion surgery. Methods From 2009 to 2013, patient outcome data was collected prospectively over 5 years from 327 patients undergoing ALIF performed by a single surgeon (R.J.M.) with 478 levels performed. Among these, there were 20 cases of failed prior posterior fusion that subsequently underwent ALIF. Visual analog score (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and Short Form 12-item health survey (SF-12) were measured pre- and postoperatively. The verification of fusion was determined by utilizing a fine-cut computed tomography scan at 12-month follow-up. Results There was a significant difference between the preoperative (7.25 ± 0.8) and postoperative (3.1 ± 2.1) VAS scores (p < 0.0001). The ODI scale also demonstrated a statistically significant reduction from preoperative (56.3 ± 16.5) and postoperative (30.4 ± 19.3) scores (p < 0.0001). The SF-12 scores were significantly improved after ALIF salvage surgery: Physical Health Composite Score (32.18 ± 5.5 versus 41.07 ± 9.67, p = 0.0003) and Mental Health Composite Score (36.62 ± 12.25 versus 50.89 ± 10.86, p = 0.0001). Overall, 19 patients (95%) achieved successful fusion. Conclusions Overall, our results suggest that the ALIF procedure results not only in radiographic improvements in bony fusion but in significant improvements in the patient's physical and mental experience of pain secondary to lumbar pseudarthrosis. Future multicenter registry studies and randomized controlled trials should be conducted to confirm the long-term benefit of ALIF as a salvage option for failed posterior lumbar fusion. PMID:26835197

  6. Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion as a Salvage Technique for Pseudarthrosis following Posterior Lumbar Fusion Surgery.

    PubMed

    Mobbs, Ralph J; Phan, Kevin; Thayaparan, Ganesha K; Rao, Prashanth J

    2016-02-01

    Study Design Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected observational data. Objective To assess the safety and efficacy of anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) as a salvage option for lumbar pseudarthrosis following failed posterior lumbar fusion surgery. Methods From 2009 to 2013, patient outcome data was collected prospectively over 5 years from 327 patients undergoing ALIF performed by a single surgeon (R.J.M.) with 478 levels performed. Among these, there were 20 cases of failed prior posterior fusion that subsequently underwent ALIF. Visual analog score (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and Short Form 12-item health survey (SF-12) were measured pre- and postoperatively. The verification of fusion was determined by utilizing a fine-cut computed tomography scan at 12-month follow-up. Results There was a significant difference between the preoperative (7.25 ± 0.8) and postoperative (3.1 ± 2.1) VAS scores (p < 0.0001). The ODI scale also demonstrated a statistically significant reduction from preoperative (56.3 ± 16.5) and postoperative (30.4 ± 19.3) scores (p < 0.0001). The SF-12 scores were significantly improved after ALIF salvage surgery: Physical Health Composite Score (32.18 ± 5.5 versus 41.07 ± 9.67, p = 0.0003) and Mental Health Composite Score (36.62 ± 12.25 versus 50.89 ± 10.86, p = 0.0001). Overall, 19 patients (95%) achieved successful fusion. Conclusions Overall, our results suggest that the ALIF procedure results not only in radiographic improvements in bony fusion but in significant improvements in the patient's physical and mental experience of pain secondary to lumbar pseudarthrosis. Future multicenter registry studies and randomized controlled trials should be conducted to confirm the long-term benefit of ALIF as a salvage option for failed posterior lumbar fusion. PMID:26835197

  7. The contributions of the Second Auxiliary Surgical Group to military surgery during World War II with special reference to thoracic surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, L A

    1983-01-01

    The outstanding scientific and surgical accomplishments of the Second Auxiliary Surgical Group in the Mediterranean Theater of Operations and the 7th Army in World War II were not exceeded by any other group in the United States Army Medical Corps. In the final 921-page report to the Surgeon General with 550 tables, 8801 severely wounded casualties out of a total of 22,000 treated were reviewed. In addition, the major portion of three books on war surgery and over 60 scientific articles were written by this group. The contributions in thoracic surgery that focused attention on physiologic principles and limited the indications for thoracotomy have stood the test of time. The author made the original description of the reaction of the lung to severe trauma of the brain, abdomen, and extremities by the development of "the wet lung of trauma" (RDS), while his introduction of a hand-operated, intermittent positive pressure oxygen respirator to treat the advanced form of this syndrome (pulmonary edema) ushered in a new form of treatment. Long-term, follow-up studies by the author confirm the validity of the physiologic approach to the treatment of thoracic trauma. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. Fig. 7A and B. Fig. 8. PMID:6338843

  8. Miniature stereoscopic video system provides real-time 3D registration and image fusion for minimally invasive surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaron, Avi; Bar-Zohar, Meir; Horesh, Nadav

    2007-02-01

    Sophisticated surgeries require the integration of several medical imaging modalities, like MRI and CT, which are three-dimensional. Many efforts are invested in providing the surgeon with this information in an intuitive & easy to use manner. A notable development, made by Visionsense, enables the surgeon to visualize the scene in 3D using a miniature stereoscopic camera. It also provides real-time 3D measurements that allow registration of navigation systems as well as 3D imaging modalities, overlaying these images on the stereoscopic video image in real-time. The real-time MIS 'see through tissue' fusion solutions enable the development of new MIS procedures in various surgical segments, such as spine, abdomen, cardio-thoracic and brain. This paper describes 3D surface reconstruction and registration methods using Visionsense camera, as a step toward fully automated multi-modality 3D registration.

  9. Probabilistic sparse matching for robust 3D/3D fusion in minimally invasive surgery.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Dominik; Grbic, Sasa; John, Matthias; Navab, Nassir; Hornegger, Joachim; Ionasec, Razvan

    2015-01-01

    Classical surgery is being overtaken by minimally invasive and transcatheter procedures. As there is no direct view or access to the affected anatomy, advanced imaging techniques such as 3D C-arm computed tomography (CT) and C-arm fluoroscopy are routinely used in clinical practice for intraoperative guidance. However, due to constraints regarding acquisition time and device configuration, intraoperative modalities have limited soft tissue image quality and reliable assessment of the cardiac anatomy typically requires contrast agent, which is harmful to the patient and requires complex acquisition protocols. We propose a probabilistic sparse matching approach to fuse high-quality preoperative CT images and nongated, noncontrast intraoperative C-arm CT images by utilizing robust machine learning and numerical optimization techniques. Thus, high-quality patient-specific models can be extracted from the preoperative CT and mapped to the intraoperative imaging environment to guide minimally invasive procedures. Extensive quantitative experiments on 95 clinical datasets demonstrate that our model-based fusion approach has an average execution time of 1.56 s, while the accuracy of 5.48 mm between the anchor anatomy in both images lies within expert user confidence intervals. In direct comparison with image-to-image registration based on an open-source state-of-the-art medical imaging library and a recently proposed quasi-global, knowledge-driven multi-modal fusion approach for thoracic-abdominal images, our model-based method exhibits superior performance in terms of registration accuracy and robustness with respect to both target anatomy and anchor anatomy alignment errors. PMID:25095250

  10. Deformable registration of the inflated and deflated lung for cone-beam CT-guided thoracic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uneri, Ali; Nithiananthan, Sajendra; Schafer, Sebastian; Otake, Yoshito; Stayman, J. Webster; Kleinszig, Gerhard; Sussman, Marc S.; Taylor, Russell H.; Prince, Jerry L.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2012-02-01

    Intraoperative cone-beam CT (CBCT) could offer an important advance to thoracic surgeons in directly localizing subpalpable nodules during surgery. An image-guidance system is under development using mobile C-arm CBCT to directly localize tumors in the OR, potentially reducing the cost and logistical burden of conventional preoperative localization and facilitating safer surgery by visualizing critical structures surrounding the surgical target (e.g., pulmonary artery, airways, etc.). To utilize the wealth of preoperative image/planning data and to guide targeting under conditions in which the tumor may not be directly visualized, a deformable registration approach has been developed that geometrically resolves images of the inflated (i.e., inhale or exhale) and deflated states of the lung. This novel technique employs a coarse model-driven approach using lung surface and bronchial airways for fast registration, followed by an image-driven registration using a variant of the Demons algorithm to improve target localization to within ~1 mm. Two approaches to model-driven registration are presented and compared - the first involving point correspondences on the surface of the deflated and inflated lung and the second a mesh evolution approach. Intensity variations (i.e., higher image intensity in the deflated lung) due to expulsion of air from the lungs are accounted for using an a priori lung density modification, and its improvement on the performance of the intensity-driven Demons algorithm is demonstrated. Preliminary results of the combined model-driven and intensity-driven registration process demonstrate accuracy consistent with requirements in minimally invasive thoracic surgery in both target localization and critical structure avoidance.

  11. Thoracic epidural anesthesia improves outcomes in patients undergoing cardiac surgery: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shengsuo; Wu, Xinmin; Guo, Hang; Ma, Li

    2015-01-01

    To assess the efficacy of thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA) with or without general anesthesia (GA) versus GA in patients who underwent cardiac surgery, PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane online database, and Web of Science were searched with the limit of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) relevant to 'thoracic epidural anesthesia' and 'cardiac surgery'. Studies were identified and data were extracted by two reviewers independently. The quality of included studies was also assessed according to the Cochrane handbook. Outcomes of mortality, cardiac and respiratory functions, and treatment-associated complications were pooled and analyzed. The comprehensive search yielded 2,230 citations, and 25 of them enrolling 3,062 participants were included according to the inclusion criteria. Compared with GA alone, patients received TEA and GA showed reduced risks of death, myocardial infarction, and stroke, though there were no significant differences (P > 0.05). With regard to treatment-related complications, the pooled results for respiratory complications (risk ratio (RR), 0.69; 95% CI: 0.51, 0.91, P < 0.05), supraventricular arrhythmias (RR, 0.61; 95% CI: 0.42, 0.87, P < 0.05), and pain (mean difference (MD), -1.27; 95% CI: -2.20, -0.35, P < 0.05) were 0.69, 0.61, and -1.27, respectively. TEA was also associated with significant reduction of stays in intensive care unit (MD, -2.36; 95% CI: -4.20, -0.52, P < 0.05) and hospital (MD, -1.51; 95% CI: -3.03, 0.02, P > 0.05) and time to tracheal extubation (MD, -2.06; 95% CI:-2.68, -1.45, P < 0.05). TEA could reduce the risk of complications such as supraventricular arrhythmias, stays in hospital or intensive care unit, and time to tracheal extubation in patients who experienced cardiac surgery. PMID:25888937

  12. Serial Peak Expiratory Flow Rates in Patients Undergoing Upper Abdominal Surgeries Under General Anaesthesia and Thoracic Epidural Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Rammoorthi; Ribeiro, Karl SA

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Anaesthesia and upper abdominal surgeries alter lung compliance and functional residual capacity resulting from atelectasis. Upper abdominal surgeries also cause a decrease in peak expiratory flow rates, cough reflex due to pain limited inspiration. Aim This study aimed to study the effect of thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) on the peak expiratory flow rates in patients undergoing upper abdominal surgeries. Materials and Methods A total of 44 patients posted for elective surgery were enrolled. Group 1 patients received GA + 0.125% bupivacaine infusion TEA and Group 2 received GA + Inj. Diclofenac sodium 50 mg slow i.v. TID for Postoperative analgesia. Haemodynamics, VAS pain score, PEFR measurements were done at 60 minutes, 24 hours, 48 hours and 4 days after surgery in both groups. ABG analysis was taken pre operatively and 24 hours after surgery. Results The SBP and DBP values obtained at 60 minutes (p<0.016) 24 and 48 hours (p<0.001) and day 4 (p<0.02) postoperative showed highly significant difference between the two groups which indicate better haemodynamic parameters in patients receiving epidural analgesia. Postoperatively the difference in PEFR values at 60 minutes, 24 hour, 48 hour and day 4 were very highly significant. (p<0.001). Group1 had a 10.739% deficit on day 4 from its pre operative baseline value while group 2 showed a 34.825 % deficit which was very highly significant (p<0.001). The difference in VAS scores recorded at 60 minutes, 24 hours, 48 hours and day 4 post op were very highly statistically significant (p < 0.001). The ABG taken at 24 hours shows statistically significant difference with patients in group 2 showing decreased values in pCO2 and pO2 reflecting poorer ventilation and oxygenation. Conclusion Thoracic epidural analgesia provides superior analgesia, better cough reflex as seen by better PEFR values, were haemodynamically more stable and their ABG values were better than the NSAID group. PMID:27042561

  13. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database Mortality Risk Model: Part 2—Clinical Application

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P.; O’Brien, Sean M.; Pasquali, Sara K.; Gaynor, J. William; Mayer, John E.; Karamlou, Tara; Welke, Karl F.; Filardo, Giovanni; Han, Jane M.; Kim, Sunghee; Quintessenza, James A.; Pizarro, Christian; Tchervenkov, Christo I.; Lacour-Gayet, Francois; Mavroudis, Constantine; Backer, Carl L.; Austin, Erle H.; Fraser, Charles D.; Tweddell, James S.; Jonas, Richard A.; Edwards, Fred H.; Grover, Frederick L.; Prager, Richard L.; Shahian, David M.; Jacobs, Marshall L.

    2016-01-01

    Background The empirically derived 2014 Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database Mortality Risk Model incorporates adjustment for procedure type and patient-specific factors. The purpose of this report is to describe this model and its application in the assessment of variation in outcomes across centers. Methods All index cardiac operations in The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database (January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2013) were eligible for inclusion. Isolated patent ductus arteriosus closures in patients weighing less than or equal to 2.5 kg were excluded, as were centers with more than 10% missing data and patients with missing data for key variables. The model includes the following covariates: primary procedure, age, any prior cardiovascular operation, any noncardiac abnormality, any chromosomal abnormality or syndrome, important preoperative factors (mechanical circulatory support, shock persisting at time of operation, mechanical ventilation, renal failure requiring dialysis or renal dysfunction (or both), and neurological deficit), any other preoperative factor, prematurity (neonates and infants), and weight (neonates and infants). Variation across centers was assessed. Centers for which the 95% confidence interval for the observed-to-expected mortality ratio does not include unity are identified as lower-performing or higher-performing programs with respect to operative mortality. Results Included were 52,224 operations from 86 centers. Overall discharge mortality was 3.7% (1,931 of 52,224). Discharge mortality by age category was neonates, 10.1% (1,129 of 11,144); infants, 3.0% (564 of 18,554), children, 0.9% (167 of 18,407), and adults, 1.7% (71 of 4,119). For all patients, 12 of 86 centers (14%) were lower-performing programs, 67 (78%) were not outliers, and 7 (8%) were higher-performing programs. Conclusions The 2014 Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database Mortality Risk Model

  14. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery resection and reconstruction of thoracic trachea in the management of a tracheal neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuben; Liu, Jun; He, Jiaxi; Dong, Qinglong; Liang, Lixia; Yin, Weiqiang; Pan, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Intratracheal tumor is a rare tumor, accounting for only 2% of upper respiratory tract neoplasms. Its symptoms are similar to those of head and neck cancers, including coughing up blood, sore throat, and airway obstruction. The diagnosis of this disease is often based on the findings of fibrobronchoscopy or computed tomography (CT). Surgery remains the treatment of choice for tracheal tumor. In patients with benign neoplasms or if the tumors have limited involvement, fibrobronchoscopic resection of the tumor can be performed. For malignant tumors, however, radical resection is required. In the past, open incision is used during the surgery for tumors located in thoracic trachea. Along with advances in video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) minimally invasive techniques and devices, VATS resection and reconstruction of the trachea can achieve the radical resection of the tumor and meanwhile dramatically reduce the injury to the patients. In this article we describe the application of VATS resection and reconstruction of trachea in the management of a tracheal neoplasm. PMID:27076958

  15. [Lung Segmentectomy Using Video-assisted Thoracic Surgery for Lung Cancer in a Patient with Situs Inversus Totalis].

    PubMed

    Kakegawa, Seiichi; Kawashima, Osamu; Tomizawa, Yoshio; Sugano, Masayuki; Shimizu, Kimihiro

    2016-07-01

    The case was 83-year-old man who had complete situs inversus, and was pointed out to have peripheral adenocarcinoma with the size of 1.8 cm at the left upper lobe( S3). Because of severe emphysema and other multiple comorbidities, left S3 segmentectomy with hilar lymph node sampling was performed using video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS). Preoperatively, the simulation of operation was performed using the 3 dimension computed tomography images of pulmonary arteriovenous and bronchus (3DCTAB). Postoperative course was uneventful. 3DCTAB was thought to be useful in understanding the anatomical location of pulmonary arteriovenous and bronchus directly, and in performing segmentectomy in the case of situs inversus like this. PMID:27365064

  16. Non-intubated video-assisted thoracic surgery as the modality of choice for treatment of recurrent pleural effusions.

    PubMed

    Cox, Solange E; Katlic, Mark R

    2015-05-01

    This review will establish that the best mode of treatment for recurrent pleural effusions is non-intubated video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) with chemical talc pleurodesis. The nature of recurrent pleural effusions mandates that any definitive and effective treatment of this condition should ideally provide direct visualization of the effusion, complete initial drainage, a low risk outpatient procedure, a high patient satisfaction rate, a high rate of pleurodesis and a high diagnostic yield for tissue diagnosis. There are various methods available for treatment of this condition including thoracostomy tube placement with bedside chemical pleurodesis, thoracentesis, placement of an indwelling pleural catheter, pleurectomy and VATS drainage with talc pleurodesis. Of these treatment options VATS drainage with the use of local anesthetic and intravenous sedation is the method that offers most of the desired outcomes, thus making it the best treatment modality. PMID:26046044

  17. Radiotherapy With or Without Concurrent Chemotherapy for Lymph Node Recurrence After Radical Surgery of Thoracic Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Jincheng; Kong Cheng; Tao Hua

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively compare the outcomes of patients with lymph node recurrence after radical surgery of esophageal cancer, when given radiotherapy with or without concurrent chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between January 1996 and December 2005, the data from 73 patients with lymph node recurrence after radical surgery of thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were separated into two groups: radiochemotherapy (RC, 31 patients) and radiotherapy alone (RA, 42 patients). Patients in the RC group received at least two cycles of 5-fluorouracil/cisplatin chemotherapy concurrently with radiotherapy. Results: The median duration of follow-up was 11 months (range, 2-48). The overall survival rate for all patients was 46.7% and 4.7% at 1 and 3 years, respectively. The median overall survival time was 9 months (95% confidence interval, 6.96-11.04) and 17 months (95% confidence interval, 13.61-20.39) for RA and RC groups, respectively. The survival rate at 1 and 3 years was 62.5% and 10.5% in the RC group and 33.8% and 0% in the RA group (p = .0049, log-rank test; hazard ratio for death, 0.52; 95% confidence interval, 0.30-0.92). Acute toxicities were more frequent in the RC group than in the RA group. No significant differences were found in the late toxicity profiles between the two groups. Conclusion: The results of the present retrospective analysis suggest that RC should be considered an effective and well-tolerated treatment of patients with thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and postoperative lymph node recurrence.

  18. Sternal and costochondral infections with gentamicin and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus following thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Cafferkey, M T; Luke, D A; Keane, C T

    1983-01-01

    Six patients in a thoracic unit developed sternal osteomyelitis and costochondritis following median sternotomy. Five of the patients were operated on in another hospital. Gentamicin and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in pure culture in each case. The S. aureus isolate from 2 patients was of the same phage type suggesting cross-infection. Antibiotic prophylaxis administered in the perioperative period was ineffective. One patient, treated with amikacin (to which all of the strains were sensitive in vitro) and cefuroxime, died from overwhelming infection in spite of débridement and resuturing of the wound. The remaining 5 patients were cured with vancomycin therapy usually coupled with surgical intervention. PMID:6557667

  19. [Thoracic tumor-like fungal mycetoma: interest of large surgery with terbinafine].

    PubMed

    Diatta, B A; Ndiaye, M; Sarr, L; Diatta, B J M; Gueye, A B; Diop, A; Bangoura, M; Diouf, A B; Djioumoi, H; Hakim, H; Diallo, M; Sané, A D; Dieng, M T; Kane, A

    2014-12-01

    Fungal mycetoma are inflammatory pseudo-tumors of subcutaneous tissues and possibly bones due to exogenous fungi. They have a chronic course, often poly-fistulated with an emission of fungal grains. We report the case of a 65-year-old farmer with a thoracic fungal mycetoma discovered incidentally, associated with bone involvement. The diagnosis was confirmed by the positive culture to Madurella mycetomatis. The outcome was favorable with terbinafine 1g per day for 12 months associated with complete excision of oncologic type followed by a skin graft. PMID:25467818

  20. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database: 2016 Update on Research.

    PubMed

    Badhwar, Vinay; Rankin, J Scott; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Shahian, David M; Habib, Robert H; D'Agostino, Richard S; Thourani, Vinod H; Suri, Rakesh M; Prager, Richard L; Edwards, Fred H

    2016-07-01

    The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Database (ACSD) is an international voluntary effort that is the foundation of our specialty's efforts in clinical performance assessment and quality improvement. Containing nearly 6,000,000 patient records, the ACSD is a robust resource for clinical research. Seven major original publications and four review articles were generated from the ACSD in 2015. The risk-adjusted outcome analyses and quality measures reported in these studies have made substantial contributions to inform daily clinical practice. This report summarizes the ACSD-based research efforts published in 2015. PMID:27262913

  1. Application of positive airway pressure in restoring pulmonary function and thoracic mobility in the postoperative period of bariatric surgery: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Brigatto, Patrícia; Carbinatto, Jéssica C.; Costa, Carolina M.; Montebelo, Maria I. L.; Rasera-Júnior, Irineu; Pazzianotto-Forti, Eli M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether the application of bilevel positive airway pressure in the postoperative period of bariatric surgery might be more effective in restoring lung volume and capacity and thoracic mobility than the separate application of expiratory and inspiratory positive pressure. Method: Sixty morbidly obese adult subjects who were hospitalized for bariatric surgery and met the predefined inclusion criteria were evaluated. The pulmonary function and thoracic mobility were preoperatively assessed by spirometry and cirtometry and reevaluated on the 1st postoperative day. After preoperative evaluation, the subjects were randomized and allocated into groups: EPAP Group (n=20), IPPB Group (n=20) and BIPAP Group (n=20), then received the corresponding intervention: positive expiratory pressure (EPAP), inspiratory positive pressure breathing (IPPB) or bilevel inspiratory positive airway pressure (BIPAP), in 6 sets of 15 breaths or 30 minutes twice a day in the immediate postoperative period and on the 1st postoperative day, in addition to conventional physical therapy. Results: There was a significant postoperative reduction in spirometric variables (p<0.05), regardless of the technique used, with no significant difference among the techniques (p>0.05). Thoracic mobility was preserved only in group BIPAP (p>0.05), but no significant difference was found in the comparison among groups (p>0.05). Conclusion: The application of positive pressure does not seem to be effective in restoring lung function after bariatric surgery, but the use of bilevel positive pressure can preserve thoracic mobility, although this technique was not superior to the other techniques. PMID:25590448

  2. Thoracic epidural analgesia for off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Yatin; Vats, Mayank; Sharma, Munish; Arora, Reetesh; Trehan, Naresh

    2010-01-01

    The benefits of thoracic epidural analgesia in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting are well documented. However, the literature available on the role of high thoracic epidural analgesia (HTEA) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass graft (OPCAB) surgery is scarce. We conducted a randomized clinical trial to establish whether HTEA is beneficial in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease undergoing elective OPCAB surgery. After institutional ethics board approval and informed consent, 62 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients undergoing elective OPCAB were randomly grouped into two (n = 31 each). Both groups received general anesthesia (GA), but in the HTEA group patients, TEA was also administered. Standardized surgical and anesthetic techniques were used for both the groups. Pulmonary function tests were performed pre-operatively, 6 h and 24 h post-extubation and on days 2, 3, 4 and 5 along with arterial blood gas analysis (ABG) analysis. Time for extubation (h) and time for oxygen withdrawal (h) were recorded. Pain score was assessed by the 10-cm visual analogue scale. All hemodynamic/oxygenation parameters were noted. Any complications related to the TEA were also recorded. Patients in the HTEA group were extubated earlier (10.8 h vs. 13.5 h, P < 0.01) and their oxygen withdrawal time was also significantly lower (26.26 h vs. 29.87 h, P < 0.01). The VAS score, both at rest and on coughing, was significantly lower in the HTEA group at all times, post-operatively (P < 0.01). The forced vital capacity improved significantly at 6 h post-operatively in the HTEA group (P = 0.026) and remained significantly higher thereafter. A similar trend was observed in forced expiratory volume in the first second on day 2 in the HTEA group (P = 0.024). We did not observe any significant side-effects/mortality in either group. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients undergoing

  3. Major thoracic surgery in Jehovah's witness: A multidisciplinary approach case report

    PubMed Central

    Rispoli, Marco; Bergaminelli, Carlo; Nespoli, Moana Rossella; Esposito, Mariana; Mattiacci, Dario Maria; Corcione, Antonio; Buono, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A bloodless surgery can be desirable also for non Jehovah’s witnesses patients, but requires a team approach from the very first assessment to ensure adequate planning. Presentation of the case Our patient, a Jehovah’s witnesses, was scheduled for right lower lobectomy due to pulmonary adenocarcinoma. Her firm denies to receive any kind of transfusions, forced clinicians to a bloodless management of the case. Discussion Before surgery a meticulous coagulopathy research and hemodynamic optimization are useful to prepare patient to operation. During surgery, controlled hypotension can help to obtain effective hemostasis. After surgery, clinicians monitored any possible active bleeding, using continuous noninvasive hemoglobin monitoring, limiting the blood loss due to serial in vitro testing. The optimization of cardiac index and delivery of oxygen were continued to grant a fast recovery. Conclusion Bloodless surgery is likely to gain popularity, and become standard practice for all patients. The need for transfusion should be targeted on individual case, avoiding strictly fixed limit often leading to unnecessary transfusion. PMID:27107502

  4. Risk of adjacent-segment disease requiring surgery after short lumbar fusion: results of the French Spine Surgery Society Series.

    PubMed

    Scemama, Caroline; Magrino, Baptiste; Gillet, Philippe; Guigui, Pierre

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Adjacent-segment disease (ASD) is an increasingly problematic complication following lumbar fusion surgery. The purpose of the current study was to determine the risk of ASD requiring surgical treatment after short lumbar or lumbosacral fusion. Primary spinal disease and surgical factors associated with an increased risk of revision were also investigated. METHODS This was a retrospective cohort study using the French Spine Surgery Society clinical data that included 3338 patients, with an average follow-up duration of 7 years (range 4-10 years). Clinical ASD requiring surgery was the principal judgment criterion; the length of follow-up time and initial spinal disease were also recorded. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed. The correlation between primary spinal disease and surgery with an increased risk of revision was investigated. RESULTS During the follow-up period, 186 patients required revision surgery for ASD (5.6%). The predicted risk of ASD requiring revision surgery was 1.7% (95% CI 1.3%-2.2%) at 2 years, 3.8% (95% CI 4.9%-6.7%) at 4 years, 5.7% (95% CI 4.9%-6.7%) at 6 years, and 9% (95% CI 8.7%-10.6%) at 8 years. Initial spinal disease affected the risk of ASD requiring surgery (p = 0.0003). The highest risk was observed for degenerative spondylolisthesis. CONCLUSIONS ASD requiring revision surgery was predicted in 5.6% of patients 7 years after index short lumbar spinal fusion in the French Spine Surgery Society retrospective series. An increased risk of ASD requiring revision surgery associated with initial spinal disease showed the significance of the influence of natural degenerative history on adjacent-segment pathology. PMID:26967992

  5. Determining optimal fluid and air leak cut off values for chest drain management in general thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mesa-Guzman, Miguel; Periklis, Perikleous; Niwaz, Zakiyah; Socci, Laura; Raubenheimer, Hilgardt; Adams, Ben; Gurung, Lokesh; Uzzaman, Mohsin

    2015-01-01

    Background Chest drain duration is one of the most important influencing aspects of hospital stay but the management is perhaps one of the most variable aspects of thoracic surgical care. The aim of our study is to report outcomes associated with increasing fluid and air leak criteria of protocol based management. Methods A 6-year retrospective analysis of protocolised chest drain management starting in 2007 with a fluid criteria of 3 mL/kg increasing to 7 mL/kg in 2011 to no fluid criteria in 2012, and an air leak criteria of 24 hours without leak till 2012 when digital air leak monitoring was introduced with a criteria of <20 mL/min of air leak for more than 6 hours. Patient data were obtained from electronic hospital records and digital chest films were reviewed to determine the duration of chest tube drainage and post-drain removal complications. Results From 2009 to 2012, 626 consecutive patients underwent thoracic surgery procedures under a single consultant. A total of 160 did not require a chest drain and data was missing in 22, leaving 444 for analysis. The mean age [standard deviation (SD)] was 57±19 years and 272 (61%) were men. There were no differences in the incidence of pneumothoraces (P=0.191), effusion (P=0.344) or re-interventions (P=0.431) for drain re-insertions as progressively permissive criteria were applied. The median drain duration dropped from 1-3 days (P<0.001) and accordingly hospital stay reduced from 4-6 days (P<0.001). Conclusions Our results show that chest drains can be safely removed without fluid criteria and air leak of less than 20 mL/min with median drain duration of 1 day, associated with a reduced length of hospital stay. PMID:26716045

  6. [Comprehensive Treatment for Lung Cancer 
Based on Minimally Invasive Thoracic Surgery].

    PubMed

    He, Jianxing

    2016-06-20

    The treatment for resectable lung cancer has developed to the era of comprehensive treatment based on minimally invasive surgery (MIS). MIS is not only manifested by the "shrink" of incisions, but also by the individualization and meticulous of incisions. Meanwhile, the minimal invasiveness of other procedures in MIS, such as the minimally invasive anesthesia (tubeless anesthesia) and minimally invasive, meticulous and individualized surgical instruments represented by 3D thoracoscope with naked eye. Even advanced stage lung cancer patients could receive precision treatment based on molecular information of their cancer tissue obtained by surgery. Therefore, the treatment for lung cancer should be comprehensive treatment based on MIS. PMID:27335290

  7. The Importance of Patient-Specific Preoperative Factors: An Analysis of The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Jeffrey Phillip; O'Brien, Sean M.; Pasquali, Sara K.; Kim, Sunghee; Gaynor, J. William; Tchervenkov, Christo Ivanov; Karamlou, Tara; Welke, Karl F.; Lacour-Gayet, Francois; Mavroudis, Constantine; Mayer, John E.; Jonas, Richard A.; Edwards, Fred H.; Grover, Frederick L.; Shahian, David M.; Jacobs, Marshall Lewis

    2014-01-01

    Background The most common fonns of risk adjustment for pediatric and congenital heart surgery used today are based mainly on the estimated risk of mortality of the primary procedure of the operation. The goals of this analysis were to assess the association of patient-specific preoperative factors with mortality and to determine which of these preoperative factors to include in future pediatric and congenital cardiac surgical risk models. Methods All index cardiac operations in The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database (STS-CHSD) during 2010 through 2012 were eligible for inclusion. Patients weighing less than 2.5 kg undergoing patent ductus arteriosus closure were excluded. Centers with more than 10% missing data and patients with missing data for discharge mortality or other key variables were excluded. Rates of discharge mortality for patients with or without specific preoperative factors were assessed across age groups and were compared using Fisher's exact test. Results In all, 25,476 operations were included (overall discharge mortality 3.7%, n = 943). The prevalence of common preoperative factors and their associations with discharge mortality were determined. Associations of the following preoperative factors with discharge mortality were all highly significant (p < 0.0001) for neonates, infants, and children: mechanical circulatory support, renal dysfunction, shock, and mechanical ventilation. Conclusions Current STS-CHSD risk adjustment is based on estimated risk of mortality of the primary procedure of the operation as well as age, weight, and prematurity. The inclusion of additional patient-specific preoperative factors in risk models for pediatric and congenital cardiac surgery could lead to increased precision in predicting risk of operative mortality and comparison of observed to expected outcomes. PMID:25262395

  8. Robotic-Assisted Thoracic Surgery for Early-Stage Lung Cancer: A Review.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Paula

    2015-07-01

    This review evaluates the benefits and disadvantages associated with the use of robotic-assisted technology in performing lobectomies in patients with early-stage lung cancer. The author conducted a literature search of Ovid®, MEDLINE®, PubMed®, and CINAHL® for articles published from 2005 to 2013. Search criteria included key terms such as robot, robotic, robotic-assisted lobectomy, and lung cancer. Of 922 articles, the author included a total of 12 research-based published studies in the analysis and incorporated the findings into an evidence table. Results showed that robotic-assisted lobectomies are feasible safe procedures for patients with stage 1A or 1B lung cancer; however, there is a steep learning curve and long-term randomized studies evaluating robotic-assisted lobectomy and conventional posterolateral thoracotomy or video-assisted thoracic lobectomy are needed. For patient safety, perioperative nurses should be aware of the length of time and experience required to perform these procedures, the costs, techniques, benefits, and disadvantages. PMID:26119608

  9. [Updates of ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament. Clinical results and complication of surgery for thoracic myelopathy due to ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament].

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Masashi

    2009-10-01

    We performed 3 types of surgical procedures for thoracic myelopathy due to OPLL : posterior decompression, OPLL-extirpation, and posterior decompression with instrumented fusion (PDF) . A considerable degree of neurological recovery was obtained in all patients who underwent PDF, despite the anterior impingement of the spinal cord by OPLL remaining. In addition, the rate of post-operative complications was extremely low with PDF, when compared with posterior decompression and OPLL-extirpation groups. We recommend that one stage posterior decompression with instrumented fusion be selected for cases in whom the spinal cord is severely damaged pre-operatively. PMID:19794260

  10. Symptomatic pericardial schwannoma treated with video-assisted thoracic surgery: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yun, Po-Jen; Huang, Tsai-Wang; Li, Yao-Feng; Chang, Hung; Lee, Shih-Chun; Kuo, Yen-Liang

    2016-05-01

    Intrathoracic schwannomas are neurogenic tumors derived from the Schwann cells of the nerve sheath, most often seen in the posterior mediastinum with anatomical correlations to nerves. Although they are typically benign, a malignant transformation can occur, and thoracotomy instead of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) is required to achieve a complete resection. Only a few cases of pericardial schwannoma have been reported so far. We present a rare case of pericardial schwannoma confirmed by video-assisted thoracoscopic resection. PMID:27162698

  11. Symptomatic pericardial schwannoma treated with video-assisted thoracic surgery: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Po-Jen; Huang, Tsai-Wang; Li, Yao-Feng; Chang, Hung; Lee, Shih-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Intrathoracic schwannomas are neurogenic tumors derived from the Schwann cells of the nerve sheath, most often seen in the posterior mediastinum with anatomical correlations to nerves. Although they are typically benign, a malignant transformation can occur, and thoracotomy instead of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) is required to achieve a complete resection. Only a few cases of pericardial schwannoma have been reported so far. We present a rare case of pericardial schwannoma confirmed by video-assisted thoracoscopic resection. PMID:27162698

  12. Uniportal video-assisted thoracic surgery right upper lobectomy with systemic lymphadenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ding-Pei; Xiang, Jie; Hang, Jun-Biao

    2016-01-01

    This video demonstrated a performance of uniportal video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) right upper lobectomy with systemic lymphadenectomy. The patient had a malignant mass in his right upper lobe. The operator took a posterior to anterior approach to dissection the right upper lobe, the adjacent structures were clearly demonstrated after the entire dissection of mediastinal lymph nodes. Postoperative pathological report suggested the stage of the tumor was T1bN0M0 (stage IA). PMID:27621890

  13. Spinal fusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Anterior spinal fusion; Spine surgery - spinal fusion; Low back pain - fusion; Herniated disk - fusion ... If you had chronic back pain before surgery, you will likely still have some pain afterward. Spinal fusion is unlikely to take away all your pain ...

  14. Mediastinal lymph node detection on thoracic CT scans using spatial prior from multi-atlas label fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiamin; Zhao, Jocelyn; Hoffman, Joanne; Yao, Jianhua; Zhang, Weidong; Turkbey, Evrim B.; Wang, Shijun; Kim, Christine; Summers, Ronald M.

    2014-03-01

    Lymph nodes play an important role in clinical practice but detection is challenging due to low contrast surrounding structures and variable size and shape. We propose a fully automatic method for mediastinal lymph node detection on thoracic CT scans. First, lungs are automatically segmented to locate the mediastinum region. Shape features by Hessian analysis, local scale, and circular transformation are computed at each voxel. Spatial prior distribution is determined based on the identification of multiple anatomical structures (esophagus, aortic arch, heart, etc.) by using multi-atlas label fusion. Shape features and spatial prior are then integrated for lymph node detection. The detected candidates are segmented by curve evolution. Characteristic features are calculated on the segmented lymph nodes and support vector machine is utilized for classification and false positive reduction. We applied our method to 20 patients with 62 enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes. The system achieved a significant improvement with 80% sensitivity at 8 false positives per patient with spatial prior compared to 45% sensitivity at 8 false positives per patient without a spatial prior.

  15. Postoperative complications and clinical outcomes among patients undergoing thoracic and gastrointestinal cancer surgery: A prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Martos-Benítez, Frank Daniel; Gutiérrez-Noyola, Anarelys; Echevarría-Víctores, Adisbel

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study sought to determine the influence of postoperative complications on the clinical outcomes of patients who underwent thoracic and gastrointestinal cancer surgery. Methods A prospective cohort study was conducted regarding 179 consecutive patients who received thorax or digestive tract surgery due to cancer and were admitted to an oncological intensive care unit. The Postoperative Morbidity Survey was used to evaluate the incidence of postoperative complications. The influence of postoperative complications on both mortality and length of hospital stay were also assessed. Results Postoperative complications were found for 54 patients (30.2%); the most common complications were respiratory problems (14.5%), pain (12.9%), cardiovascular problems (11.7%), infectious disease (11.2%), and surgical wounds (10.1%). A multivariate logistic regression found that respiratory complications (OR = 18.68; 95%CI = 5.59 - 62.39; p < 0.0001), cardiovascular problems (OR = 5.06, 95%CI = 1.49 - 17.13; p = 0.009), gastrointestinal problems (OR = 26.09; 95%CI = 6.80 - 100.16; p < 0.0001), infectious diseases (OR = 20.55; 95%CI = 5.99 - 70.56; p < 0.0001) and renal complications (OR = 18.27; 95%CI = 3.88 - 83.35; p < 0.0001) were independently associated with hospital mortality. The occurrence of at least one complication increased the likelihood of remaining hospitalized (log-rank test, p = 0.002). Conclusions Postoperative complications are frequent disorders that are associated with poor clinical outcomes; thus, structural and procedural changes should be implemented to reduce postoperative morbidity and mortality. PMID:27096675

  16. Long-term survival outcomes of video-assisted thoracic surgery for patients with non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Wenlong; Xiong, Xinguo; Chen, Hanzhang; Liu, Jun; Yin, Weiqiang; Li, Shuben; Xu, Xin; Zhang, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Background Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) has been shown to be a safe alternative to conventional thoracotomy for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, popularization of this relatively novel technique has been slow, partly due to concerns about its long-term outcomes. The present study aimed to evaluate the long-term survival outcomes of patients with NSCLC after VATS, and to determine the significant prognostic factors on overall survival. Methods Consecutive patients diagnosed with NSCLC referred to one institution for VATS were identified from a central database. Patients were treated by either complete-VATS or assisted-VATS, as described in previous studies. A number of baseline patient characteristics, clinicopathologic data and treatment-related factors were analyzed as potential prognostic factors on overall survival. Results Between January 2000 and December 2007, 1,139 patients with NSCLC who underwent VATS and fulfilled a set of predetermined inclusion criteria were included for analysis. The median age of the entire group was 60 years, with 791 male patients (69%). The median 5-year overall survival for Stage I, II, III and IV disease according to the recently updated TNM classification system were 72.2%, 47.5%, 29.8% and 28.6%, respectively. Female gender, TNM stage, pT status, and type of resection were found to be significant prognostic factors on multivariate analysis. Conclusions VATS offers a viable alternative to conventional open thoracotomy for selected patients with clinically resectable NSCLC. PMID:25232210

  17. Ethical concerns of congresses and joint winter meetings of the Spanish Society of Pneumology and Thoracic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Chiner, Eusebi; Fernández-Fabrellas, Estrella; de Lucas, Pilar

    2013-05-01

    The pharmaceutical industry contributes to the development of new drugs, provides funding for research and collaborates in continuing medical education. Although this relationship with medical practice is beneficial and desirable, commercial interests could potentially eclipse patient benefits and compromise professional integrity. Congresses and meetings of the Spanish Society of Pneumology and Thoracic Surgery (SEPAR) agglutinate different spheres of knowledge, including aspects such as bioethics, management and communication, always centered on patient and their well-being. SEPAR congresses and meetings should provide sufficient economic benefits to be reinvested in research and other purposes which are reflected in SEPAR statutes in order to ensure the solvency, sustainability and economic independence of the Society. SEPAR has developed strict regulations governing the sponsorship and accreditation of training activities while striving for a balance between the interests of the industry and its own necessary independence, which results from the constant concern for maintaining good medical practice and complying with ethical aspects. This regulation is useful from an organizational and logistical standpoint, and it is necessary to prevent or resolve any possible conflicts of interest. Scientific societies should regulate common practices that could potentially result in conflicts of interest. PMID:23298823

  18. Predictors of survival in patients who underwent video‐assisted thoracic surgery talc pleurodesis for malignant pleural effusion

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Dong Woog; Choi, Yong Soo; Kim, Jhingook; Kim, Hong Kwan; Zo, Jae Ill; Shim, Young Mog

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with malignant pleural effusion have a limited life expectancy. An increase in pleural and oncological treatment options and more accurate prognostic evaluation may help individualize treatment strategies. The aim of this study was to identify the prognostic indicators of overall survival (OS) after video‐assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) talc pleurodesis for malignant pleural effusion. Methods We examined the medical records of all consecutive patients with malignant pleural effusion who underwent VATS talc pleurodesis from 2006 to 2008 at the Samsung Medical Center. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify predictors of OS after VATS talc pleurodesis. Results During the study period, 91 patients underwent VATS talc pleurodesis to treat malignant pleural effusion. Early (within 30 days) and late (within 90 days) postoperative mortality rates were 9.9% (9 patients), and 25.3% (23), respectively. Median survival time after VATS talc pleurodesis was 10.5 months. The postoperative respiratory complication rate was 11% (10 patients), and included pneumonia (9) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (4). Multivariate analysis revealed that preoperative chemotherapy (P = 0.012), preoperative radiotherapy (P = 0.003), and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance score 3 or 4 (P = 0.013) were independent risk factors of OS after VATS talc pleurodesis. Conclusions We identified previous chemotherapy or radiotherapy and poor performance status (ECOG 3 or 4) as significant predictors of OS after VATS talc pleurodesis. These prognostic factors can help surgeons select candidates for VATS pleurodesis for malignant pleural effusion.

  19. Left upper lobectomy and systematic lymph nodes dissection in enlarged pulmonary hilar lymph nodes in primary lung cancer patient by uniportal video-assisted thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jie; Chang, Zhi-Bo; Wang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Uniportal video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) anatomical pulmonary resection, with only one small incision for surgery instruments and camera insertion, requires higher operative skills, especially in the cases of the enlarged pulmonary hilar lymph nodes. With improved technology and increased experiences in VATS lobectomy, uniportal VATS lobectomy has been applied in major medical centers recently. A 67-year-old male patient with left upper peripheral lung cancer and enlarged hilar lymph nodes underwent unipotal VATS lobectomy and systemic mediastinal lymph node dissection. The patient recovered uneventfully.

  20. European perspective in Thoracic surgery-eso-coloplasty: when and how?

    PubMed

    Gust, Lucile; Ouattara, Moussa; Coosemans, Willy; Nafteux, Philippe; Thomas, Pascal Alexandre; D'Journo, Xavier Benoit

    2016-04-01

    Colon interposition has been used since the beginning of the 20(th) century as a substitute for esophageal replacement. Colon interposition is mainly chosen as a second line treatment when the stomach cannot be used, when the stomach has to be resected for oncological or technical reasons, or when the stomach is deliberately kept intact for benign diseases in young patients with long-life expectancy. During the surgery the vascularization of the colon must be carefully assessed, as well as the type of the graft (right or left colon), the length of the graft, the surgical approach and the route of the reconstruction. Early complications such as graft necrosis or anastomotic leaks, and late complications such as redundancy depend on the quality of the initial surgery. Despite a complex and time-consuming procedure requiring at least three or four digestive anastomoses, reported long term functional outcomes of colon interposition are good, with an acceptable operative risk. Thus, in very selected indications, colon interposition could be seen as a valuable alternative for esophageal replacement when stomach cannot be considered. This review aims at briefly defining "when" and "how" to perform a coloplasty through demonstrative videos. PMID:27195136

  1. Association of genetic and psychological factors with persistent pain after cosmetic thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Dimova, Violeta; Lötsch, Jörn; Hühne, Kathrin; Winterpacht, Andreas; Heesen, Michael; Parthum, Andreas; Weber, Peter G; Carbon, Roman; Griessinger, Norbert; Sittl, Reinhard; Lautenbacher, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The genetic control of pain has been repeatedly demonstrated in human association studies. In the present study, we assessed the relative contribution of 16 single nucleotide polymorphisms in pain-related genes, such as cathechol-O-methyl transferase gene (COMT), fatty acid amino hydrolase gene (FAAH), transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 gene (TRPV1), and δ-opioid receptor gene (OPRD1), for postsurgical pain chronification. Ninety preoperatively pain-free male patients were assigned to good or poor outcome groups according to their intensity or disability score assessed at 1 week, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year after funnel chest correction. The genetic effects were compared with those of two psychological predictors, the attentional bias toward positive words (dot-probe task) and the self-reported pain vigilance (Pain Vigilance and Awareness Questionnaire [PVAQ]), which were already shown to be the best predictors for pain intensity and disability at 6 months after surgery in the same sample, respectively. Cox regression analyses revealed no significant effects of any of the genetic predictors up to the end point of survival time at 1 year after surgery. Adding the genetics to the prediction by the attentional bias to positive words for pain intensity and the PVAQ for pain disability, again no significant additional explanation could be gained by the genetic predictors. In contrast, the preoperative PVAQ score was also, in the present enlarged sample, a meaningful predictor for lasting pain disability after surgery. Effect size measures suggested some genetic variables, for example, the polymorphism rs1800587G>A in the interleukin 1 alpha gene (IL1A) and the COMT haplotype rs4646312T>C/rs165722T>C/rs6269A>G/rs4633T>C/rs4818C>G/rs4680A>G, as possible relevant modulators of long-term postsurgical pain outcome. A comparison between pathophysiologically different predictor groups appears to be helpful in identifying clinically relevant

  2. [VIDEO-ASSISTED THORACIC SURGERY USING LOCAL ANESTHESIA IN LUNG ABSCESSES AND PYOPNEUMOTHORAX].

    PubMed

    Akopov, A L; Egorov, V I; Deĭnega, I V; Ionov, P M

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the results of 42 video-abscessoscopies (VAS) in acute and gangrenous lung abscess and 32 video-thoracoscopies (VTS) in pyopneumothorax, which were performed using local anesthesia and sedation. There were several indication to operation: sanation of cavities, removal of necrotic sequestration and fibrin, decollement, biopsy. Perioperative complications developed after 11 surgeries (13%): emphysema of soft tissues of pectoral cells (5), phlegmon of the thorax (3), bronchial hemorrhage (2), pneumothorax (1). One of the patients died, because of progressing of main disease. VAS and VTS were carried out in 5-8 days after cavity drainage of abscess or pleural cavity in 50 patients.. In other 15 cases operations were performed directly before drainage. The bronchial hemorrhage and phlegmons of the thorax were noted in patients of second group. The patients had good tolerance of VAS and VTS operations fulfilled using local anesthesia and sedation. They are safe in case that operation follows drainage of abscess or pleural cavity after decrease of inflammatory processes. PMID:26390589

  3. [Tracheo-bronchial intubation for surgery of the esophagus via a thoracic approach].

    PubMed

    Bornet, J L; Desprats, R

    1977-01-01

    Tracheo-bronchial intubation using a double-lumen Carlens tube provides the surgeon with a mediastinal operating field free of any obstruction by the lung and provides greater surgical ease than that of an assistant retracting a constantly invasive lung with tracheal intubation. This anaesthetic technique involving the ventilation of only one lung during the endothoracic period of the surgical procedure has not been used routinely for extra-pulmonary surgery since the shunt which is created leads to a fear of dangerous hypoxia. The aim of this study involving 30 patients is to demonstrate that the blood oxygen saturation obtained by the careful ventilation of a single lung, that of the side on which the patient is lying, is perfectly acceptable and comparable with the preoperative oxygen saturation of the subject at rest. This is obtained at the price of an increase in insufflation pressures of the order of 100 percent. Re-expansion of the collapsed lung without visual confirmation after careful endobronchial aspiration makes it possible to prevent the development of areas of micro-atelectasia and to ensure the absence of any pulmonary postoperative complications. PMID:22287

  4. A prospective, randomized comparison of interpleural and paravertebral analgesia in thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Richardson, J; Sabanathan, S; Mearns, A J; Shah, R D; Goulden, C

    1995-10-01

    We have undertaken a prospective, randomized comparison of the superficially similar techniques of interpleural and paravertebral (extrapleural) analgesia in 53 patients undergoing posterolateral thoracotomy. Local anaesthetic placed anterior to the superior costotransverse ligament and posterior to the parietal pleura produces a paravertebral block and instilled between the parietal and visceral pleurae produces an interpleural block. Patients received preoperative and postoperative continuous bupivacaine paravertebral blocks in group 1 and interpleural blocks in group 2. Premedication comprised diclofenac and morphine, and after operation all patients had regular diclofenac and patient-controlled morphine (PCM). Analgesia was assessed by visual analogue pain scores (VAS), PCM requirements, ratio of preoperative to postoperative spirometric values (PFT), rates of postoperative respiratory morbidity (PORM) and hospital stay, all recorded by blinded observers. Eight patients were withdrawn and data from 45 patients were analysed. Patient characteristics, surgery, VAS scores and PCM use were similar in both groups. PFT were significantly better (P = 0.03-0.0001) in group 1, and PORM was lower and hospital stay approximately 1 day less in this group. Five patients in group 2 became temporarily confused, probably because of bupivacaine toxicity (P = 0.02). We conclude that bupivacaine deposited paravertebrally produced greater preservation of lung function and fewer side effects than bupivacaine administered interpleurally. PMID:7488477

  5. Who Needs to Be Allocated in ICU after Thoracic Surgery? An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Liana; Faresin, Sonia Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background. The effective use of ICU care after lung resections has not been completely studied. The aims of this study were to identify predictive factors for effective use of ICU admission after lung resection and to develop a risk composite measure to predict its effective use. Methods. 120 adult patients undergoing elective lung resection were enrolled in an observational prospective cohort study. Preoperative evaluation and intraoperative assessment were recorded. In the postoperative period, patients were stratified into two groups according to the effective and ineffective use of ICU. The use of ICU care was considered effective if a patient experienced one or more of the following: maintenance of controlled ventilation or reintubation; acute respiratory failure; hemodynamic instability or shock; and presence of intraoperative or postanesthesia complications. Results. Thirty patients met the criteria for effective use of ICU care. Logistic regression analysis identified three independent predictors of effective use of ICU care: surgery for bronchiectasis, pneumonectomy, and age ≥ 57 years. In the absence of any predictors the risk of effective need of ICU care was 6%. Risk increased to 25–30%, 66–71%, and 93% with the presence of one, two, or three predictors, respectively. Conclusion. ICU care is not routinely necessary for all patients undergoing lung resection. PMID:27493477

  6. Norman Barrett (1903-79): unorthodox pioneer of thoracic and oesophageal surgery.

    PubMed

    Edison, E; Agha, R A; Camm, C F

    2013-05-01

    It is an interesting quirk of medical history that the legacy of Norman Barrett most ostensibly lies in the name of a disease the he was quite emphatically wrong about, at least when he first described it. Indeed, there are those who argue to remove the eponym in favour of the title 'Columnar Lined Epithelium', in part because of what little Barrett actually had to do with the correct initial characterization of this disease. Yet the sum of Norman Barrett's contributions to modern medicine is much more than a mistaken characterization of a pathological process. Barrett was truly a pioneer of chest surgery in the UK - a specialty in its embryonic stages when he first qualified. He was also renowned as a teacher and academic of the highest calibre. In tracing the story of his life we can see how his natural attributes, life experiences and keen appreciation of the arts (especially history) facilitated personal success and such sharp insight into the vagaries of modern academic medicine. PMID:24585744

  7. Norman Barrett (1903-1979): Unorthodox pioneer of thoracic and oesophageal surgery.

    PubMed

    Edison, E; Agha, R; Camm, C

    2016-05-01

    It is an interesting quirk of medical history that the legacy of Norman Barrett most ostensibly lies in the name of a disease the he was quite emphatically wrong about, at least when he first described it. Indeed, there are those who argue to remove the eponym in favour of the title 'Columnar Lined Epithelium', in part because of what little Barrett actually had to do with the correct initial characterisation of this disease. Yet the sum of Norman Barrett's contributions to modern medicine is much more than a mistaken characterisation of a pathological process. Barrett was truly a pioneer of chest surgery in the UK - a speciality in its embryonic stages when he first qualified. He was also renowned as a teacher and academic of the highest calibre. In tracing the story of his life we can see how his natural attributes, life experiences and keen appreciation of the arts (especially history) facilitated personal success and such sharp insight into the vagaries of modern academic medicine. PMID:24802356

  8. Does Previous Surgical Training Impact the Learning Curve in Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery Lobectomy for Trainees?

    PubMed

    Billè, Andrea; Okiror, Lawrence; Harrison-Phipps, Karen; Routledge, Tom

    2016-06-01

    Background To analyze if the number of open lung resections performed by trainees before starting video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) lobectomy training program has any impact on intraoperative and postoperative outcomes. Materials and Methods Retrospective analysis of 46 consecutive patients who underwent VATS lobectomies between December 2011 and September 2012 by two trainees (A.B. and L.O.). The previous surgical experience of the two trainees was evaluated to assess for any difference in terms of learning curve. Group A comprised 25 VATS lobectomies performed by one trainee (A.B.) and group B comprised 21 VATS lobectomies performed by the other trainee (L.O.). Results There was no statistical difference in terms of operating time and intraoperative bleeding between the two groups (p = 0.16 and p = 0.6). The conversion rate was 8% (2 out of 25 cases) in group A and 23.8% (5 out of 21 cases) in group B (p = 0.002). Evaluation of vascular injury showed no difference in the conversion rate (p = 0.56). The median length of the drainage and of hospital stay were 4 days and 7 days in group A and 4 days and 8 days in group B, respectively (p = 0.36 and p = 0.24). The complication rate was 44% in group A and 47.6% in group B (p = 0.52). A.B. had performed 139 and L.O. 70 operations as first operator before starting their VATS lobectomy training; the surgical experience had an impact only on the conversion rate. Conclusion Our study showed that a training program in VATS lobectomy is feasible, and previous surgical training has a minimal impact on intraoperative and postoperative outcomes. PMID:25463356

  9. Effects of high thoracic epidural anesthesia on mixed venous oxygen saturation in coronary artery bypass grafting surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gurses, Ercan; Berk, Derviş; Sungurtekin, Hülya; Mete, Asli; Serin, Simay

    2013-01-01

    Background To investigate possible effects of high thoracic epidural anesthesia (HTEA) on mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO2) in coronary artery bypass grafting surgery (CABGS). Material/Methods Sixty-four patients scheduled for CABGS were randomly assigned to either test (HTEA) or control group. Standard balanced general anesthesia was applied in both groups. Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), oxygen saturation (SpO2), central venous pressure (CVP), cardiac output (CO), cardiac index (CI), systemic vascular resistance (SVR), pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR), mean pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP), pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP), pulmonary compliance (C), bispectral index (BIS), body temperature, SvO2, hematocrit values were recorded before induction. Postoperative hemodynamic changes, inotropic agent, need for vasodilatation, transfusion and additional analgesics, recovery score, extubation time, visual analogue scale (VAS) values, duration of stay in intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital were recorded. Results Study groups were similar in SpO2, CVP, PCWP, PAP, C, body temperature, BIS values, development of intraoperative bradycardia. In HTEA group, intraoperative MAP, SVR, PVR, need for transfusion were lower, whereas CO, CI, SvO2, hematocrit values were higher (p<0.05). Postoperative MAP, HR, hypertension development, need for vasodilatator, transfusion, analgesics, extubation time, recovery data, duration of stay in ICU, hospital were lower in HTEA group (p<0.05). VAS score decreased in 30 minutes and 12 hours following extubation in HTEA and control group, respectively. Conclusions HTEA may improve balance between oxygen presentation and usage by suppressing neuroendocrin stress response; provide efficient postoperative analgesia, more stabile hemodynamic, respiratory conditions, lower duration of stay in ICU, hospital. PMID:23531633

  10. Evidence regarding patient compliance with incentive spirometry interventions after cardiac, thoracic and abdominal surgeries: A systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Aqilah Leela T; Hamid, Syed Rasul G Syed; Supriyanto, Eko

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence regarding the effectiveness of incentive spirometry (ISy) on postoperative pulmonary outcomes after thoracic, cardiac and abdominal surgery remains inconclusive. This is attributed to various methodological issues inherent in ISy trials. Patient compliance has also been highlighted as a possible confounding factor; however, the status of evidence regarding patient compliance in these trials is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To explore the status of evidence on patient compliance with ISy interventions in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in the above contexts. METHOD: A systematic search using MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL databases was conducted to obtain relevant RCTs from 1972 to 2015 using the inclusion criteria. These were examined for specific ISy parameters, methods used for determining compliance and reporting on compliance. Main outcome measures were comparison of ISy parameters prescribed and assessed, and reporting on compliance. RESULTS: Thirty-six relevant RCTs were obtained. Six ISy parameters were identified in ISy prescriptions from these trials. Almost all (97.2%) of the trials had ISy prescriptions with specific parameters. Wilcoxon signed-rank test revealed that the ISy parameters assessed were significantly lower (Z=−5.433; P<0.001) than those prescribed; 66.7% of the trials indicated use of various methods to assess these parameters. Only six (16.7%) trials included reports on compliance; however, these were also incomprehensive. CONCLUSIONS: There is a scarcity and inconsistency of evidence regarding ISy compliance. Compliance data should be obtained using reliable and standardized methods to facilitate comparisons between and among trials. These should be reported comprehensively to facilitate valid inferences regarding ISy intervention effectiveness. PMID:26909010

  11. Effectiveness of brain natriuretic peptide in predicting postoperative atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing non-cardiac thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Toufektzian, Levon; Zisis, Charalambos; Balaka, Christina; Roussakis, Antonios

    2015-05-01

    A best evidence topic was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels could effectively predict the occurrence of postoperative atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients undergoing non-cardiac thoracic surgery. A total of 14 papers were identified using the reported search, of which 5 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, date, journal, country, study type, population, outcomes and key results are tabulated. All studies were prospective observational, and all reported a significant association between BNP and N-terminal (NT)-proBNP plasma levels measured in the immediate preoperative period and the incidence of postoperative AF in patients undergoing either anatomical lung resections or oesophagectomy. One study reported a cut-off value of 30 pg/ml above which significantly more patients suffered from postoperative AF (P < 0.0001), while another one reported that this value could predict postoperative AF with a sensitivity of 77% and a specificity of 93%. Another study reported that patients with NT-proBNP levels of 113 pg/ml or above had an 8-fold increased risk of developing postoperative AF. These findings support that BNP or NT-proBNP levels, especially when determined during the preoperative period, if increased, are able to identify patients at risk for the development of postoperative AF after anatomical major lung resection or oesophagectomy. The same does not seem to be true for lesser lung resections. These high-risk patients might have a particular benefit from the administration of prophylactic antiarrhythmic therapy. PMID:25630332

  12. [Nursing Care of Lumbar Spine Fusion Surgery Using a Semi-Rigid Device (ISOBAR)].

    PubMed

    Wu, Meng-Shan; Su, Shu-Fen

    2016-04-01

    Aging frequently induces degenerative changes in the spine. Patients who suffer from lumbar degenerative disease tend to have lower back pain, neurological claudication, and neuropathy. Furthermore, incontinence may be an increasing issue as symptoms become severe. Lumbar spine fusion surgery is necessary if clinical symptoms continue to worsen or if the patient fails to respond to medication, physical therapy, or alternative treatments. However, this surgical procedure frequently induces adjacent segment disease (ASD), which is evidenced by the appearance of pathological changes in the upper and lower sections of the spinal surgical sites. In 1997, ISOBAR TTL dynamic rod stabilization was developed for application in spinal fusion surgery to prevent ASD-related complications. The device has proven effective in reducing pain in the lower back and legs, decreasing functional disability, improving quality of life, and retarding disc degeneration. However, the effectiveness of this intervention in decreasing the incidence of ASD requires further research investigation, and relevant literature and research in Taiwan is still lacking. This article discusses lumbar degenerative disease, its indications, the contraindications of lumbar spine fusion surgery using ISOBAR, and related postoperative nursing care. We hope this article provides proper and new knowledge to clinical nurses for the care of patients undergoing lumbar spine fusion surgery with ISOBAR. PMID:27026564

  13. Uniportal video-assisted thoracic surgery resection of small ground-glass opacities (GGOs) localized with CT-guided placement of microcoils and palpation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zhe; Jiang, Sen; Jiang, Gening

    2016-01-01

    Although uniportal video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is becoming more popular, it’s still very challenging to conduct a wedge resection of small pulmonary ground-glass opacities (GGOs), especially deeply situated subpleural GGOs, via uniportal VATS. We successfully performed thirteen uniportal VATS wedge resections through an approach that combines radiologically guided microcoil localization with palpation, and we encountered no complications related to the new approach. Based on our experience, a combination of CT-guided microcoil localization with palpation in uniportal VATS for deeply situated subpleural GGOs is a safe and effective procedure for accurate diag¬nosis and resection of indeterminate GGOs. PMID:27499978

  14. Postoperative patient-controlled epidural analgesia in patients with spondylodiscitis and posterior spinal fusion surgery.

    PubMed

    Gessler, Florian; Mutlak, Haitham; Tizi, Karima; Senft, Christian; Setzer, Matthias; Seifert, Volker; Weise, Lutz

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE The value of postoperative epidural analgesia after major spinal surgery is well established. Thus far, the use of patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) has been denied to patients undergoing debridement and instrumentation in spondylodiscitis, with the risk of increased postoperative pain resulting in prolonged recovery. The value of PCEA with special regard to infectious complications remains to be clarified. The present study examined the value of postoperative PCEA in comparison with intravenous analgesia in patients with spondylodiscitis undergoing posterior spinal surgery. METHODS Thirty-two patients treated surgically for spondylodiscitis of the thoracic and lumbar spine were prospectively included in a database and retrospectively reviewed for this study. Postoperative antibiotic treatment, functional capacity, pain levels, side effects, and complications were documented. Sixteen patients were given patient-demanded intravenous analgesia (PIA) followed by 16 patients assigned to PCEA. If PCEA was applied, the insertion of an epidural catheter was performed under the direct visual guidance of the surgeon at the end of the surgery. RESULTS Three patients intended for PCEA treatment were excluded due to predefined exclusion criteria. Postoperative pain was significantly lower in the PCEA group during the first 48 hours after surgery (p = 0.03). As determined by the trunk control test conducted at 8 (p < 0.001), 24 (p = 0.004), 48 (p = 0.015), 72 (p = 0.0031), and 96 hours (p < 0.001), patients in the PCEA treatment group displayed significantly increased mobilization capacity compared with those of the PIA group. Time until normal accomplishment of all mobilization maneuvers was reduced in the PCEA group compared with that in the PIA group (p = 0.04). No differences in complication rates were observed between the 2 groups (p = 0.52). CONCLUSIONS PCEA may reduce postoperative pain and lead to earlier achievement of functional capacity at a low

  15. Effect of Intraoperative and Postoperative Infusion of Dexmedetomidine on the Quality of Postoperative Analgesia in Highly Nicotine-Dependent Patients After Thoracic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Chunguang; Zhang, Xuejun; Liu, Zhong; Li, Changying; Zhang, Zongwang; Qi, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Smoking is one of the most common addictions in the world. Nicotine inhalation could increase the risk of cardiorespiratory diseases. However, the solution that improved postoperative analgesia for highly nicotine-dependent patients undergoing thoracic surgery has not been specifically addressed. This CONSORT-prospective, randomized, double-blinded, controlled trial investigated the efficacy of combination of dexmedetomidine and sufentanil for highly nicotine (Fagerstrom test of nicotine dependence ≥6)-dependent patients after thoracic surgery. One hundred seventy-four male patients who underwent thoracic surgery were screened between February 2014 and November 2014, and a total of forty-nine were excluded. One hundred thirty-two highly nicotine-dependent male patients who underwent thoracic surgery and received postoperative patient-controlled intravenous analgesia were divided into 3 groups after surgery in this double-blind, randomized study: sufentanil (0.02 μg/kg/h, Group S), sufentanil plus dexmedetomidine (0.02 μg/kg/h each, Group D1), or sufentanil (0.02 μg/kg/h) plus dexmedetomidine (0.04 μg/kg/h) (Group D2). The patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) program was programmed to deliver a bolus dose of 2 ml, with background infusion of 2 ml/h and a lockout of 5 min, 4-hour limit of 40 ml, as our retrospective study. The primary outcome measure was the cumulative amount of self-administered sufentanil; the secondary outcome measures were pain intensity (numerical rating scale, NRS), level of sedation (LOS), Bruggrmann comfort scale (BCS), functional activity score (FAS), and concerning adverse effects. The amount of self-administered sufentanil were lower in group D2 compared with S and D1 groups during the 72 hours after surgery (P < 0.05), whereas the total dosage and dosage per body weight of sufentanil were significantly lower in D1 group than that of S group only at 4, 8, and 16 hours after surgery (P < 0.05). Compared

  16. [Spontaneous Rupture of the Thoracic Aorta after Surgery of Rectal Cancer in an Elderly Patient;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Tokumo, Masaki; Okada, Koichiro; Kunisue, Hironori; Teruta, Shoma; Kakishita, Tomokazu; Naito, Minoru

    2016-03-01

    We reported a case of a 90-year-old man who underwent abdominoperineal resection of the rectum for advanced rectal cancer. On the 16th postoperative day, he suddenly lost consciousness during an exchange of the colostomy pouches. His heart arrested in a moment, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation was immediately performed, but in vain. The autopsy imaging revealed collapse of the heart and the thoracic aorta, as well as profuse blood-like effusion in the left pleural cavity. We considered that hemorrhagic shock due to spontaneous rupture of the thoracic aorta was the cause of his death. PMID:27075292

  17. Stratification of complexity in congenital heart surgery: comparative study of the Risk Adjustment for Congenital Heart Surgery (RACHS-1) method, Aristotle basic score and Society of Thoracic Surgeons-European Association for Cardio- Thoracic Surgery (STS-EACTS) mortality score

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcanti, Paulo Ernando Ferraz; Sá, Michel Pompeu Barros de Oliveira; dos Santos, Cecília Andrade; Esmeraldo, Isaac Melo; Chaves, Mariana Leal; Lins, Ricardo Felipe de Albuquerque; Lima, Ricardo de Carvalho

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether stratification of complexity models in congenital heart surgery (RACHS-1, Aristotle basic score and STS-EACTS mortality score) fit to our center and determine the best method of discriminating hospital mortality. Methods Surgical procedures in congenital heart diseases in patients under 18 years of age were allocated to the categories proposed by the stratification of complexity methods currently available. The outcome hospital mortality was calculated for each category from the three models. Statistical analysis was performed to verify whether the categories presented different mortalities. The discriminatory ability of the models was determined by calculating the area under the ROC curve and a comparison between the curves of the three models was performed. Results 360 patients were allocated according to the three methods. There was a statistically significant difference between the mortality categories: RACHS-1 (1) - 1.3%, (2) - 11.4%, (3)-27.3%, (4) - 50 %, (P<0.001); Aristotle basic score (1) - 1.1%, (2) - 12.2%, (3) - 34%, (4) - 64.7%, (P<0.001); and STS-EACTS mortality score (1) - 5.5 %, (2) - 13.6%, (3) - 18.7%, (4) - 35.8%, (P<0.001). The three models had similar accuracy by calculating the area under the ROC curve: RACHS-1- 0.738; STS-EACTS-0.739; Aristotle- 0.766. Conclusion The three models of stratification of complexity currently available in the literature are useful with different mortalities between the proposed categories with similar discriminatory capacity for hospital mortality. PMID:26107445

  18. Osteoconductive hydroxyapatite coated PEEK for spinal fusion surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Byung-Dong; Park, Dong-Soo; Choi, Jong-Jin; Ryu, Jungho; Yoon, Woon-Ha; Choi, Joon-Hwan; Kim, Jong-Woo; Ahn, Cheol-Woo; Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Yoon, Byung-Ho; Jung, In-Kwon

    2013-10-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has attracted much interest as biomaterial for interbody fusion cages due to its similar stiffness to bone and good radio-transparency for post-op visualization. Hydroxyapatite (HA) coating stimulates bone growth to the medical implant. The objective of this work is to make an implant consisting of biocompatible PEEK with an osteoconductive HA surface for spinal or orthopedic applications. Highly dense and well-adhered HA coating was developed on medical-grade PEEK using aerosol deposition (AD) without thermal degradation of the PEEK. The HA coating had a dense microstructure with no cracks or pores, and showed good adhesion to PEEK at adhesion strengths above 14.3 MPa. The crystallinity of the HA coating was remarkably enhanced by hydrothermal annealing as post-deposition heat-treatment. In addition, in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility of PEEK, in terms of cell adhesion morphology, cell proliferation, differentiation, and bone-to-implant contact ratio, were remarkably enhanced by the HA coating through AD.

  19. Changes in postoperative night bispectral index of patients undergoing thoracic surgery with different types of anaesthesia management: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wen-fei; Guo, Bing; Ma, Hong; Li, Xiao-Qian; Fang, Bo; Lv, Huang-Wei

    2016-03-01

    This study hypothesized that different types of anaesthesia management would result in similar postoperative sleep quality. In this prospective single-blind investigation, 219 patients undergoing elective thoracic surgery were randomized into three arms: general anaesthesia, as the control group (group C); general anaesthesia combined with thoracic epidural anaesthesia (TEA) (group E); and general anaesthesia combined with infusion of 1 μg/kg dexmedetomidine (group D). Plasma samples were obtained to measure the amine and inflammatory cytokine concentrations. All patients underwent assessment with the bispectral index (BIS) for sleep quality and the visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain. The primary outcomes were inflammatory cytokine [interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)] secretion and postoperative sleep quality on the first and second postoperative nights. The secondary outcomes were amine (adrenaline and noradrenaline) secretion during the surgical period and haemodynamic stability. The postoperative BIS area under the curve was significantly lower in group E (75.7%) than in group C (87.3%) or group D (86.5%). Patients in group E had the highest BIS of sleep efficiency index (29.2%, P < 0.05) and the lowest VAS scores (3.5, P < 0.05). Group E had lower IL-6 levels than the other two groups 24 h after surgery (P < 0.05). Patients given TEA may show reduced sleep disturbances on the first night after surgery, perhaps due to better pain management and inhibition of IL-6 release. PMID:26699690

  20. Ultrasound-Assisted Thoracic Paravertebral Block Reduces Intraoperative Opioid Requirement and Improves Analgesia after Breast Cancer Surgery: A Randomized, Controlled, Single-Center Trial

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Gang; Mao, Feng; Yang, Dongsheng; Guan, Jinghong; Lin, Yan; Wang, Xuejing; Zhang, Yanna; Zhang, Xiaohui; Shen, Songjie; Xu, Zhonghuang; Sun, Qiang; Huang, Yuguang

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The contribution of ultrasound-assisted thoracic paravertebral block to postoperative analgesia remains unclear. We compared the effect of a combination of ultrasound assisted-thoracic paravertebral block and propofol general anesthesia with opioid and sevoflurane general anesthesia on volatile anesthetic, propofol and opioid consumption, and postoperative pain in patients having breast cancer surgery. Methods Patients undergoing breast cancer surgery were randomly assigned to ultrasound-assisted paravertebral block with propofol general anesthesia (PPA group, n = 121) or fentanyl with sevoflurane general anesthesia (GA group, n = 126). Volatile anesthetic, propofol and opioid consumption, and postoperative pain intensity were compared between the groups using noninferiority and superiority tests. Results Patients in the PPA group required less sevoflurane than those in the GA group (median [interquartile range] of 0 [0, 0] vs. 0.4 [0.3, 0.6] minimum alveolar concentration [MAC]-hours), less intraoperative fentanyl requirements (100 [50, 100] vs. 250 [200, 300]μg,), less intense postoperative pain (median visual analog scale score 2 [1, 3.5] vs. 3 [2, 4.5]), but more propofol (median 529 [424, 672] vs. 100 [100, 130] mg). Noninferiority was detected for all four outcomes; one-tailed superiority tests for each outcome were highly significant at P<0.001 in the expected directions. Conclusions The combination of propofol anesthesia with ultrasound-assisted paravertebral block reduces intraoperative volatile anesthetic and opioid requirements, and results in less post operative pain in patients undergoing breast cancer surgery. Trial Registration ClinicalTrial.gov NCT00418457 PMID:26588217

  1. Foot Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Feet » Foot Health Information Surgery When is Foot Surgery Necessary? Many foot problems do not respond ... restore the function of your foot. Types of Foot Surgery Fusions: Fusions are usually performed to treat ...

  2. Thoracic epidural analgesia in obese patients with body mass index of more than 30 kg/m2 for off pump coronary artery bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Munish; Mehta, Yatin; Sawhney, Ravinder; Vats, Mayank; Trehan, Naresh

    2010-01-01

    Perioperative Thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) is an important part of a multimodal approach to improve analgesia and patient outcome after cardiac and thoracic surgery. This is particularly important for obese patients undergoing off pump coronary artery bypass surgery (OPCAB). We conducted a randomized clinical trial at tertiary care cardiac institute to compare the effect of TEA and conventional opioid based analgesia on perioperative lung functions and pain scores in obese patients undergoing OPCAB. Sixty obese patients with body mass index >30 kg/m2 for elective OPCAB were randomized into two groups (n=30 each). Patients in both the groups received general anesthesia but in group 1, TEA was also administered. We performed spirometry as preoperative assessment and at six hours, 24 hours, second, third, fourth and fifth day after extubation, along with arterial blood gases analysis. Visual analogue scale at rest and on coughing was recorded to assess the degree of analgesia. The other parameters observed were: time to endotracheal extubation, oxygen withdrawal time and intensive care unit length of stay. On statistical analysis there was a significant difference in Vital Capacity at six hours, 24 hours, second and third day postextubation. Forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in one second followed the same pattern for first four postoperative days and peak expiratory flow rate remained statistically high till second postoperative day. ABG values and PaO2/FiO2 ratio were statistically higher in the study group up to five days. Visual analogue scale at rest and on coughing was significantly lower till fourth and third postoperative day respectively. Tracheal extubation time, oxygen withdrawal time and ICU stay were significantly less in group 1. The use of TEA resulted in better analgesia, early tracheal extubation and shorter ICU stay and should be considered for obese patients undergoing OPCAB. PMID:20075532

  3. Near-infrared optical monitoring of cardiac oxygen sufficiency through thoracic wall without open-chest surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakihana, Yasuyuki; Tamura, Mamoru

    1991-05-01

    The cardiac function is exquisitely sensitive to oxygen, because its energy production mainly depends on the oxidative phosphorylation at mitochondria. Thus, oxygenation state of the tissue is critical. Cytochrome a,a3, hemoglobin and myoglobin, which play indispensable role in the oxygen metabolism, have the broad absorption band in near infrared (NIR) region and the light in this region easily penetrates biological tissues. Using NIR spectrophotometry, we attempted to measure the redox state of the copper in cytochrome a,a3 in rat heart through thoracic wall without open chest. The result is given in this paper.

  4. Screw Placement Accuracy for Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion Surgery: A Study on 3-D Neuronavigation-Guided Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Jorge; James, Andrew R.; Alimi, Marjan; Tsiouris, Apostolos John; Geannette, Christian; Härtl, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the impact of 3-D navigation for pedicle screw placement accuracy in minimally invasive transverse lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF). Methods A retrospective review of 52 patients who had MIS-TLIF assisted with 3D navigation is presented. Clinical outcomes were assessed with the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Visual Analog Scales (VAS), and MacNab scores. Radiographic outcomes were assessed using X-rays and thin-slice computed tomography. Result The mean age was 56.5 years, and 172 screws were implanted with 16 pedicle breaches (91.0% accuracy rate). Radiographic fusion rate at a mean follow-up of 15.6 months was 87.23%. No revision surgeries were required. The mean improvement in the VAS back pain, VAS leg pain, and ODI at 11.3 months follow-up was 4.3, 4.5, and 26.8 points, respectively. At last follow-up the mean postoperative disc height gain was 4.92 mm and the mean postoperative disc angle gain was 2.79 degrees. At L5–S1 level, there was a significant correlation between a greater disc space height gain and a lower VAS leg score. Conclusion Our data support that application of 3-D navigation in MIS-TLIF is associated with a high level of accuracy in the pedicle screw placement. PMID:24353961

  5. The game theory in thoracic surgery: from the intuitions of Luca Pacioli to the operating rooms management.

    PubMed

    Ciocci, Argante; Viti, Andrea; Terzi, Alberto; Bertolaccini, Luca

    2015-11-01

    Game theory is a formal way to analyze the interactions among groups of subjects who behave each other. It has historically been of great interest in the economic fields in which decisions are made in a competitive environment. Game theory has fascinating potential if applied in the medical science. Few papers have been written about the application of game theory in surgery. The majority of scenarios of game theory in surgery fall into two main groups: cooperative and no cooperative games. PMID:26716049

  6. The game theory in thoracic surgery: from the intuitions of Luca Pacioli to the operating rooms management

    PubMed Central

    Ciocci, Argante; Viti, Andrea; Terzi, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Game theory is a formal way to analyze the interactions among groups of subjects who behave each other. It has historically been of great interest in the economic fields in which decisions are made in a competitive environment. Game theory has fascinating potential if applied in the medical science. Few papers have been written about the application of game theory in surgery. The majority of scenarios of game theory in surgery fall into two main groups: cooperative and no cooperative games. PMID:26716049

  7. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Deep Vein Thrombosis in Patients Undergoing Lumbar Interbody Fusion Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Si-Dong; Ding, Wen-Yuan; Yang, Da-Long; Shen, Yong; Zhang, Ying-Ze; Feng, Shi-Qing; Zhao, Feng-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This cross-sectional study was designed to obtain the current prevalence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and analyze related risk factors in patients undergoing lumbar interbody fusion. Medical record data were collected from Department of Spinal Surgery, The Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University, between July 2014 and March 2015. Both univariate analysis and binary logistic regression analysis were performed to determine risk factors for DVT. A total of 995 patients were admitted into this study, including 484 men and 511 women, aged from 14 to 89 years old (median 50, IQR 19). The detection rate of lower limb DVT by ultrasonography was 22.4% (223/995) in patients undergoing lumbar interbody fusion. Notably, average VAS (visual analog scale) score in the first 3 days after surgery in the DVT group was more than that in the non-DVT group (Z = −21.69, P < 0.001). The logistic regression model was established as logit P = −13.257 + 0.056∗X1 − 0.243∗X8 + 2.085∗X10 + 0.001∗X12, (X1 = age; X8 = HDL; X10 = VAS; X12 = blood transfusion; x2 = 677.763, P < 0.001). In conclusion, advanced age, high postoperative VAS scores, and blood transfusion were risk factors for postoperative lower limb DVT. As well, the logistic regression model may contribute to an early evaluation postoperatively to ascertain the risk of lower limb DVT in patients undergoing lumbar interbody fusion surgery. PMID:26632909

  8. Evaluation of current surgeon practice for patients undergoing lumbar spinal fusion surgery in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Rushton, Alison; White, Louise; Heap, Alison; Heneghan, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To ascertain current surgeon practice in the United Kingdom National Health Service for the management of patients undergoing lumbar spinal fusion surgery. METHODS: Descriptive survey methodology utilised an online questionnaire administered through SurveyMonkey. Eligible participants were all surgeons currently carrying out lumbar spinal fusion surgery in the National Health Service. Two previous surveys and a recent systematic review informed questions. Statistical analyses included responder characteristics and pre-planned descriptive analyses. Open question data were interpreted using thematic analysis. RESULTS: The response rate was 73.8%. Most surgeons (84%) were orthopaedic surgeons. Range of surgeon experience (1-15 years), number of operations performed in the previous 12 mo (4-250), and range of information used to predict outcome was broad. There was some consistency of practice: most patients were seen preoperatively; all surgeons ensured patients are mobile within 3 d of surgery; and there was agreement for the value of post-operative physiotherapy. However, there was considerable variability of practice: variability of protocols, duration of hospital stay, use of discharge criteria, frequency and timing of outpatient follow up, use of written patient information and outcome measures. Much variability was explained through patient-centred care, for example, 62% surgeons tailored functional advice to individual patients. CONCLUSION: Current United Kingdom surgeon practice for lumbar spinal fusion is described. The surgical procedure and patient population is diverse, and it is therefore understandable that management varies. It is evident that care should be patient-centred. However with high costs and documented patient dissatisfaction it is important that further research evaluates optimal management. PMID:26191495

  9. Interdisciplinary Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy as Part of Lumbar Spinal Fusion Surgery Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Lindgreen, Pil; Rolving, Nanna; Nielsen, Claus Vinther; Lomborg, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients receiving lumbar spinal fusion surgery often have persisting postoperative pain negatively affecting their daily life. These patients may be helped by interdisciplinary cognitive-behavioral therapy which is recognized as an effective intervention for improving beneficial pain coping behavior, thereby facilitating the rehabilitation process of patients with chronic pain. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to describe the lived experience of patients recovering from lumbar spinal fusion surgery and to explore potential similarities and disparities in pain coping behavior between receivers and nonreceivers of interdisciplinary cognitive-behavioral group therapy. METHODS: We conducted semistructured interviews with 10 patients; 5 receiving cognitive-behavioral therapy in connection with their lumbar spinal fusion surgery and 5 receiving usual care. We conducted a phenomenological analysis to reach our first aim and then conducted a comparative content analysis to reach our second aim. RESULTS: Patients' postoperative experience was characterized by the need to adapt to the limitations imposed by back discomfort (coexisting with the back), need for recognition and support from others regarding their pain, a relatively long rehabilitation period during which they “awaited the result of surgery”, and ambivalence toward analgesics. The patients in both groups had similar negative perception of analgesics and tended to abstain from them to avoid addiction. Coping behavior apparently differed among receivers and nonreceivers of interdisciplinary cognitive-behavioral group therapy. Receivers prevented or minimized pain by resting before pain onset, whereas nonreceivers awaited pain onset before resting. CONCLUSION: The postoperative experience entailed ambivalence, causing uncertainty, worry and insecurity. This ambivalence was relieved when others recognized the patient's pain and offered support. Cognitive-behavioral therapy as part of

  10. Thoracic epidural anesthesia during coronary artery bypass surgery: effects on cardiac sympathetic activity, myocardial blood flow and metabolism, and central hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Kirnö, K; Friberg, P; Grzegorczyk, A; Milocco, I; Ricksten, S E; Lundin, S

    1994-12-01

    The effects of high thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA) on cardiac sympathetic nerve activity, myocardial blood flow and metabolism, and central hemodynamics were studied in 20 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). In 10 of the patients, TEA (T1-5 block) was used as an adjunct to a standardized fentanyl-nitrous oxide anesthesia. Hemodynamic measurements and blood sampling were performed after induction of anesthesia but prior to skin incision and after sternotomy. Assessment of total and cardiac sympathetic activity was performed by means of the norepinephrine kinetic approach. Prior to surgery, mean arterial pressure (MAP), great cardiac vein flow (GCVF), and regional myocardial oxygen consumption (Reg-MVO2) were lower in the TEA group compared to the control group. During sternotomy there was a pronounced increase in cardiac norepinephrine spillover, MAP, systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI), pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP), GCVF, and Reg-MVO2 in the control group. These changes were clearly attenuated in the TEA group. None of the patients in the TEA group had metabolic (lactate) or electrocardiographic signs of myocardial ischemia. Three patients in the control group had indices of myocardial ischemia prior to and/or during surgery. We conclude that TEA attenuates the surgically mediated sympathetic stress response to sternotomy, thereby preventing the increase in myocardial oxygen demand in the pre-bypass period without jeopardizing myocardial perfusion. PMID:7978429

  11. Understanding Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Freischlag, Julie

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of thoracic outlet syndrome was once debated in the world of vascular surgery. Today, it is more understood and surprisingly less infrequent than once thought. Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is composed of three types: neurogenic, venous, and arterial. Each type is in distinction to the others when considering patient presentation and diagnosis. Remarkable advances have been made in surgical approach, physical therapy, and rehabilitation of these patients. Dedicated centers of excellence with multidisciplinary teams have been developed and continue to lead the way in future research. PMID:25140278

  12. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome Resolving Within 48 Hours in a Normotensive Patient Who Underwent Thoracic Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Vakharia, Kunal; Siasios, Ioannis; Dimopoulos, Vassilios G.; Pollina, John

    2016-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) usually manifests with severe headaches, seizures, and visual disturbances due to uncontrollable hypertension. A patient (age in the early 60s) with a history of renal cell cancer presented with lower-extremity weakness and paresthesias. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the thoracic spine revealed a T8 vertebral body metastatic lesion with cord compression at that level. The patient underwent preoperative embolization of the tumor followed by posterior resection and placement of percutaneous pedicle screws and rods. Postoperatively, the patient experienced decreased visual acuity bilaterally. Abnormal MRI findings consisted of T2 hyperintense lesions and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery changes in both occipital lobes, consistent with the unique brain imaging pattern associated with PRES. The patient’s blood pressure was normal and stable from the first day of hospitalization. The patient was kept on high-dose steroid therapy, which was started intraoperatively, and improved within 48 hours after symptom onset. PMID:26858804

  13. Recurrence of cervical spine instability in rheumatoid arthritis following previous fusion: can disease progression be prevented by early surgery?

    PubMed

    Agarwal, A K; Peppelman, W C; Kraus, D R; Pollock, B H; Stolzer, B L; Eisenbeis, C H; Donaldson, W F

    1992-09-01

    In a retrospective study, 110 patients with rheumatoid arthritis who had cervical spine fusion were evaluated for recurrence of cervical spine instability and resultant need for further surgery. Recurrence of cervical instability was correlated with initial radiographic abnormality, primary surgical procedure and interval between the 2 surgeries. There were 55 patients who had atlantoaxial subluxation (AAS) and required C1-C2 fusion as primary surgery. Three of these patients (5.5%) developed subaxial subluxation (SAS) and had a second procedure after a mean interval of 9 years. Twenty-two patients had AAS with superior migration of the odontoid (AAS-SMO) and had initial surgery of occiput-C3 fusion. Eight of these patients (36%) developed SAS and had a second surgery after a mean interval of 2.6 years. Of the 19 patients with primary radiographic deformity of SAS, one required further surgery for subluxation of an adjacent superior vertebra after a period of 6 years. Fourteen patients had combined deformity of AAS-SMO-SAS, and one required further surgery for SAS after an interval of 22 months. Recurrence of cervical instability following a previous fusion occurred in 15% of these 110 patients. It was seen in 5.5% of patients with initial deformity of AAS vs 36% of patients with AAS-SMO. No patients with C1-C2 fusion for AAS progressed to develop superior migration of the odontoid. We conclude that early C1-C2 fusion for AAS before development of SMO decreases the risk of further progression of cervical spine instability. The pattern of progression of cervical spine involvement, as discussed in the literature, is reviewed. PMID:1433002

  14. The Superiority of Intraoperative O-arm Navigation-assisted Surgery in Instrumenting Extremely Small Thoracic Pedicles of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhen; Jin, Mengran; Qiu, Yong; Yan, Huang; Han, Xiao; Zhu, Zezhang

    2016-01-01

    -arm intraoperative navigation system should be acknowledged for its superiority in scoliosis surgery, since it permits more accurate and safer instrumentation for AIS patients with small and extremely small thoracic pedicles. PMID:27149486

  15. Comparison of minimally invasive surgery with standard open surgery for vertebral thoracic metastases causing acute myelopathy in patients with short- or mid-term life expectancy: surgical technique and early clinical results.

    PubMed

    Miscusi, Massimo; Polli, Filippo Maria; Forcato, Stefano; Ricciardi, Luca; Frati, Alessandro; Cimatti, Marco; De Martino, Luca; Ramieri, Alessandro; Raco, Antonino

    2015-05-01

    OBJECT Spinal metastasis is common in patients with cancer. About 70% of symptomatic lesions are found in the thoracic region of the spine, and cord compression presents as the initial symptom in 5%-10% of patients. Minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS) has recently been advocated as a useful approach for spinal metastases, with the aim of decreasing the morbidity associated with more traditional open spine surgery; furthermore, the recovery time is reduced after MISS, such that postoperative chemotherapy and radiotherapy can begin sooner. METHODS Two series of oncological patients, who presented with acute myelopathy due to vertebral thoracic metastases, were compared in this study. Patients with complete paraplegia for more than 24 hours and with a modified Bauer score greater than 2 were excluded from the study. The first group (n = 23) comprised patients who were prospectively enrolled from May 2010 to September 2013, and who were treated with minimally invasive laminotomy/laminectomy and percutaneous stabilization. The second group (n = 19) comprised patients from whom data were retrospectively collected before May 2010, and who had been treated with laminectomy and stabilization with traditional open surgery. Patient groups were similar regarding general characteristics and neurological impairment. Results were analyzed in terms of neurological recovery (American Spinal Injury Association grade), complications, pain relief (visual analog scale), and quality of life (European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer [EORTC] QLQ-C30 and EORTC QLQ-BM22 scales) at the 30-day follow-up. Operation time, postoperative duration of bed rest, duration of hospitalization, intraoperative blood loss, and the need and length of postoperative opioid administration were also evaluated. RESULTS There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in terms of neurological recovery and complications. Nevertheless, the MISS group showed a clear and significant

  16. The role of thoracic surgery in the management of mesothelioma: an expert opinion on the limited evidence.

    PubMed

    Bertoglio, Pietro; Waller, David A

    2016-06-01

    Surgery has a key role at different points in the management of Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma. Diagnosis with video assisted thoracoscopy offers excellent sensitivity and specificity and a direct view of the pleural cavity to verify the extent of the tumor. Nodal involvement can be assessed by mediastinoscopy and either talc pleurodesis or partial pleurectomy can be used for symptom control in advanced stage disease. Extra Pleural Pneumonectomy (EPP) and Extended Pleurectomy Decortication (EPD) are used to prolong survival although the benefit of radical surgery has not has been fully clarified; EPP failed to show its benefit in the MARS trial and EPD is currently under investigation in the MARS2 trial. More randomized prospective trial data are needed to fully understand the role of radical surgery in the treatment of pleural mesothelioma. PMID:27015594

  17. The Latest in Surgical Management of Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery and Tumor Molecular Profiling.

    PubMed

    Woodard, Gavitt A; Jablons, David M

    2015-01-01

    Stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains a treatment challenge and requires a multidisciplinary care team to optimize survival outcomes. Thoracic surgeons play an important role in selecting operative candidates and assisting with pathologic mediastinal staging via cervical mediastinoscopy, endobronchial ultrasound, or esophageal ultrasound with fine needle aspiration. The majority of patients with stage IIIA disease will receive induction therapy followed by repeat staging before undergoing lobectomy or pneumonectomy; occasionally, a patient with an incidentally found, single-station microscopic IIIA tumor will undergo resection as the primary initial therapy. Multiple large clinical trials, including SWOG-8805, EORTC-8941, INT-0139, and ANITA, have shown 5-year overall survival rates of up to 30% to 40% using triple-modality treatments, and the best outcomes repeatedly are seen among patients who respond to induction treatment or who have tumors amenable to lobectomy instead of pneumonectomy. The need for a pneumonectomy is not a reason to deny patients an operation, because current operative mortality and morbidity rates are acceptably low at 5% and 30%, respectively. In select patients with stage IIIA disease, video-assisted thoracic surgery and open resections have been shown to have comparable rates of local recurrence and long-term survival. New developments in genetic profiling and personalized medicine are exciting areas of research, and early data suggest that molecular profiling of stage IIIA NSCLC tumors can accurately stratify patients by risk within this stage and predict survival outcomes. Future advances in treating stage IIIA disease will involve developing better systemic therapies and customizing treatment plans on the basis of an individual tumor's genetic profile. PMID:25993207

  18. Efficacy of Surgical Decompression in the Setting of Complete Thoracic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa

    2005-01-01

    Background/Objective: An assessment of neurological improvement after surgical intervention in the setting of traumatic thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods: A retrospective evaluation of a nonconsecutive cohort of patients with a thoracic SCI from T2 to T11. The analysis included a total of 12 eligible patients. The neurologic and functional outcomes were recorded from the acute hospital admission to the most recent follow-up. Data included patient age, level of injury, neurologic examination according to the Frankel grading system, the performance of surgery, and the mechanism of the time-related SCI decompression. Results: All patients had a complete thoracic SCI. The median interval from injury to surgery was 11 days (range, 1–36 days). Decompression, bone fusion, and instrumentation were the most common surgical procedures performed. The median length of follow-up was 18 months after surgery (range, 9–132 months). Motor functional improvement was seen in 1 patient (Frankel A to C). Conclusion: Surgical decompression and fusion imparts no apparent benefit in terms of neurologic improvement (spinal cord) in the setting of a complete traumatic thoracic SCI. To better define the role of surgical decompression and stabilization in the setting of a complete SCI, randomized, controlled, prospective studies are necessary. PMID:16869088

  19. Effect of Psychological Status on Outcome of Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lakkol, Sandesh; Budithi, Chakra; Bhatia, Chandra; Krishna, Manoj

    2012-01-01

    Study Design Prospective longitudinal study. Purpose To determine if preoperative psychological status affects outcome in spinal surgery. Overview of Literature Low back pain is known to have a psychosomatic component. Increased bodily awareness (somatization) and depressive symptoms are two factors that may affect outcome. It is possible to measure these components using questionnaires. Methods Patients who underwent posterior interbody fusion (PLIF) surgery were assessed preoperatively and at follow-up using a self-administered questionnaire. The visual analogue scale (VAS) for back and leg pain severity and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were used as outcome measures. The psychological status of patients was classified into one of four groups using the Distress and Risk Assessment Method (DRAM); normal, at-risk, depressed somatic and distressed depressive. Results Preoperative DRAM scores showed 14 had no psychological disturbance (normal), 39 were at-risk, 11 distressed somatic, and 10 distressed depressive. There was no significant difference between the 4 groups in the mean preoperative ODI (analysis of variance, p = 0.426). There was a statistically and clinically significant improvement in the ODI after surgery for all but distressed somatic patients (9.8; range, -5.2 to 24.8; p = 0.177). VAS scores for all groups apart from the distressed somatic showed a statistically and clinically significant improvement. Our results show that preoperative psychological state affects outcome in PLIF surgery. Conclusions Patients who were classified as distressed somatic preoperatively had a less favorable outcome compared to other groups. This group of patients may benefit from formal psychological assessment before undergoing PLIF surgery. PMID:22977697

  20. [Thoracic endometriosis and catamenial pneumothorax].

    PubMed

    Voskresenskiĭ, O V; Smoliar, A N; Damirov, M M; Galankina, I E; Zhelev, I G

    2014-01-01

    It was analyzed own experience of diagnosis and treatment of catamenial (menstrual) pneumothorax and thoracic endometriosis and literature review. It is shown that catamenial pneumothorax has specific clinical and instrumental signs allowing to establish the diagnosis before surgery. It was proposed surgical treatment including the removal of trans diaphragmatic way of pneumothorax development, removal of thoracic endometriosis and the establishment of reliable pleurodesis. It was demonstrated that this volume of surgery can be successfully implemented by using of thoracoscopic access. Relapse prevention includes hormonal therapy for the 6 months after surgery under the supervision of an obstetrician-gynecologist. PMID:25484144

  1. Economic Effects of Anti-Depressant Usage on Elective Lumbar Fusion Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sayadipour, Amirali; Kepler, Chrisopher K.; Mago, Rajnish; Certa, Kenneth M.; Rasouli, Mohammad R.; Vaccaro, Alexander R.; Albert, Todd J.; Anderson, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: It has been suggested, although not proven, that presence of concomitant psychiatric disorders may increase the inpatient costs for patients undergoing elective surgery. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that elective lumbar fusion surgery is more costly in patients with under treatment for depression. Methods: This is a retrospective case-control study of 142 patients who underwent elective lumbar fusion. Of those 142 patients, 41 patients were chronically using an antidepressant medication that considered as a “study group”, and 101 patients were not taking an antidepressant medication that considered as a “control group”. Data was collected for this cohort regarding antidepressant usage patient demographics, length of stay (LOS), age-adjusted Charlson comorbidity index scores and cost. Costs were compared between those with a concomitant antidepressant usage and those without antidepressant usage using multivariate analysis. Results: Patients using antidepressants and those with no history of antidepressant usage were similar in terms of gender, age and number of operative levels. The LOS demonstrated a non-significant trend towards longer stays in those using anti-depressants. Total charges, payments, variable costs and fixed costs were all higher in the antidepressant group but none of the differences reached statistical significance. Using Total Charges as the dependent variable, gender and having psychiatric comorbidities were retained independent variables. Use of an antidepressant was independently predictive of a 36% increase in Total Charges. Antidepressant usage as an independent variable also conferred a 22% increase in cost and predictive of a 19% increase in Fixed Cost. Male gender was predictive of a 30% increase in Total Charges. Conclusion: This study suggests use of antidepressant in patients who undergo elective spine fusion compared with control group is associated with increasing total cost and length of

  2. Recommendations for fitness for work medical evaluations in chronic respiratory patients. Spanish Society of Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery (SEPAR).

    PubMed

    Martínez González, Cristina; González Barcala, Francisco Javier; Belda Ramírez, José; González Ros, Isabel; Alfageme Michavila, Inmaculada; Orejas Martínez, Cristina; González Rodríguez-Moro, José Miguel; Rodríguez Portal, José Antonio; Fernández Álvarez, Ramón

    2013-11-01

    Chronic respiratory diseases often cause impairment in the functions and/or structure of the respiratory system, and impose limitations on different activities in the lives of persons who suffer them. In younger patients with an active working life, these limitations can cause problems in carrying out their normal work. Article 41 of the Spanish Constitution states that «the public authorities shall maintain a public Social Security system for all citizens guaranteeing adequate social assistance and benefits in situations of hardship». Within this framework is the assessment of fitness for work, as a dual-nature process (medico-legal) that aims to determine whether it is appropriate or not to recognise a person's right to receive benefits which replace the income that they no longer receive as they cannot carry out their work, due to loss of health. The role of the pulmonologist is essential in evaluating the diagnosis, treatment, prognosis and functional capacity of respiratory patients. These recommendations seek to bring the complex setting of fitness for work evaluation to pulmonologists and thoracic surgeons, providing action guidelines that allow them to advise their own patients about their incorporation into working life. PMID:24120308

  3. One-stage surgical treatment for thoracic and lumbar Spinal tuberculosis by transpedicular fixation, debridement, and combined interbody and posterior fusion via a posterior-only approach.

    PubMed

    Ran, Bing; Xie, Yuan-Long; Yan, Lei; Cai, Lin

    2016-08-01

    This study examined the clinical outcomes of one-stage surgical treatment for patients with spinal tuberculosis via a posterior-only approach. Twenty-four patients with thoracic or lumbar spinal tuberculosis whose lesions were confined to adjacent segments were admitted to our hospital and treated. The American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) impairment scale was used to assess the neurological function. All patients were treated with one-stage surgical treatment via a posterior-only approach. The clinical efficacy was evaluated by the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores and oswestry disability index (ODI) of nerve function. Patients were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively by measurement of spinal deformity using Cobb angle and radiological examination. All the patients were followed up for 13 to 27 months. They had significantly postoperative improvement in JOA score, ODI and ASIA classification scores. The kyphotic angles were significantly corrected and maintained at the final follow-up. Bone fusion was achieved within 4-12 months. It was concluded that one-stage surgical treatment via a posterior-only approach is effective and feasible for the treatment of spinal tuberculosis. PMID:27465330

  4. [Commentary by the German Society for Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery on the positions statement by the German Cardiology Society on quality criteria for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI)].

    PubMed

    Cremer, Jochen; Heinemann, Markus K; Mohr, Friedrich Wilhelm; Diegeler, Anno; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Niehaus, Heidi; Ensminger, Stephan; Schlensak, Christian; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Rastan, Ardawan; Trummer, Georg; Walther, Thomas; Lange, Rüdiger; Falk, Volkmar; Beckmann, Andreas; Welz, Armin

    2014-12-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement is still considered the first-line treatment for patients suffering from severe aortic valve stenosis. In recent years, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has emerged as an alternative for selected high-risk patients. According to the latest results of the German external quality assurance program, mandatory by law, the initially very high mortality and procedural morbidity have now decreased to approximately 6 and 12%, respectively. Especially in Germany, the number of patients treated by TAVI has increased exponentially. In 2013, a total of 10.602 TAVI procedures were performed. TAVI is claimed to be minimally invasive. This is true concerning the access, but it does not describe the genuine complexity of the procedure, defined by the close neighborhood of the aortic valve to delicate intracardiac structures. Hence, significant numbers of life-threatening complications may occur and have been reported. Owing to the complexity of TAVI, there is a unanimous concordance between cardiologists and cardiac surgeons in the Western world demanding a close heart team approach for patient selection, intervention, handling of complications, and pre- as well as postprocedural care, respectively. The prerequisite is that TAVI should not be performed in centers with no cardiac surgery on site. This is emphasized in all international joint guidelines and expert consensus statements. Today, a small number of patients undergo TAVI procedures in German hospitals without a department of cardiac surgery on site. To be noted, most of these hospitals perform less than 20 cases per year. Recently, the German Cardiac Society (DGK) published a position paper supporting this practice pattern. Contrary to this statement and concerned about the safety of patients treated this way, the German Society for Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery (DGTHG) still fully endorses the European (ESC/EACTS) and other actual international guidelines and

  5. Reduce chest pain using modified silicone fluted drain tube for chest drainage after video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) lung resection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Hu, Bin; Miao, Jinbai

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility, efficacy and safety of a modified silicone fluted drain tube after video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) lung resection. Methods The prospective randomized study included 50 patients who underwent VATS lung resection between March 2015 and June 2015. Eligible patients were randomized into two groups: experimental group (using the silicone fluted drain tubes for chest drainage) and control group (using standard drain tubes for chest drainage). The volume and characteristics of drainage, postoperative (PO) pain scores and hospital stay were recorded. All patients received standard care during hospital admission. Results In accordance with the exit criteria, three patients were excluded from study. The remaining 47 patients included in the final analysis were divided into two groups: experiment group (N=24) and control group (N=23). There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of age, sex, height, weight, clinical diagnosis and type of surgical procedure. There was a trend toward less PO pain in experimental group on postoperative day (POD) 1, with a statistically significant difference. Patients in experimental group had a reduced occurrence of fever [temperature (T) >37.4 °C] compared to the control group. Conclusions The silicone fluted drain tube is feasible and safe and may relieve patient PO pain and reduce occurrence of fever without the added risk of PO complications. PMID:26941976

  6. [Standards of care in pulmonary hypertension. Consensus statement of the Spanish Society of Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery (SEPAR) and the Spanish Society of Cardiology (SEC)].

    PubMed

    Barberà, Joan A; Escribano, Pilar; Morales, Pilar; Gómez, Miguel A; Oribe, Mikel; Martínez, Angel; Román, Antonio; Segovia, Javier; Santos, Francisco; Subirana, María T

    2008-02-01

    Substantial progress in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with pulmonary hypertension in recent years has led to significant improvement in survival. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines issued by scientific societies reflect these new developments. However, certain clinically relevant issues have not been covered in consensus guidelines because of the lack of conclusive scientific evidence. Therefore, the Spanish Society of Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery (SEPAR) and the Spanish Society of Cardiology (SEC) have promoted the present consensus statement in order to define national standards of care in the evaluation and management of pulmonary hypertension in its various forms, as well as to outline a clinical pathway and the basic principles for organizing health care in this clinical setting, with special emphasis on the requirements for and functions of specialized referral units. To prepare the statement, SEPAR and SEC formed a task force composed of national experts in various aspects of pulmonary hypertension. The resulting consensus is based on international clinical guidelines, a review of available scientific evidence, and panel discussion among the task force members. The final statement, approved by all participants, underwent external review. PMID:18364186

  7. The electronic cigarette. Official statement of the Spanish Society of Pneumology and Thoracic Surgery (SEPAR) on the efficacy, safety and regulation of electronic cigarettes.

    PubMed

    Jimenez Ruiz, Carlos A; Solano Reina, Segismundo; de Granda Orive, Jose Ignacio; Signes-Costa Minaya, Jaime; de Higes Martinez, Eva; Riesco Miranda, Juan Antonio; Altet Gómez, Neus; Lorza Blasco, Jose Javier; Barrueco Ferrero, Miguel; de Lucas Ramos, Pilar

    2014-08-01

    The electronic cigarette (EC) is a device formed by three basic elements: battery, atomizer and cartridge. When assembled, it looks like a cigarette. The cartridge contains different substances: propylene glycol, glycerine and, sometimes, nicotine. When the user "vapes", the battery is activated, the atomizer is heated and the liquid is drawn in and vaporized. The smoker inhales the mist produced. Various substances have been detected in this mist: formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and acrolein and some heavy metals. Although these are found in lower concentrations than in cigarettes, they may still be harmful for the human body. Several surveys show that 3-10% of smokers regularly use e-cigarettes. A randomized study has shown that the efficacy of e-cigarettes for helping smokers to quit is similar to nicotine patches. Nevertheless, the study has relevant methodological limitations and reliable conclusions cannot be deduced. This report sets down the Position Statement of the Spanish Society of Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery (SEPAR) on the efficacy and safety of e-cigarettes. This statement declares that e-cigarettes should be regulated as medicinal products. PMID:24684764

  8. Hybrid Surgery Combined with Dynamic Stabilization System and Fusion for the Multilevel Degenerative Disease of the Lumbosacral Spine

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soo Eon; Kim, Hyun Jib

    2015-01-01

    Background As motion-preserving technique has been developed, the concept of hybrid surgery involves simultaneous application of two different kinds of devices, dynamic stabilization system and fusion technique. In the present study, the application of hybrid surgery for lumbosacral degenerative disease involving two-segments and its long-term outcome were investigated. Methods Fifteen patients with hybrid surgery (Hybrid group) and 10 patients with two-segment fusion (Fusion group) were retrospectively compared. Results Preoperative grade for disc degeneration was not different between the two groups, and the most common operated segment had the most degenerated disc grade in both groups; L4-5 and L5-S1 in the Hybrid group, and L3-4 and L4-5 in Fusion group. Over 48 months of follow-up, lumbar lordosis and range of motion (ROM) at the T12-S1 global segment were preserved in the Hybrid group, and the segmental ROM at the dynamic stabilized segment maintained at final follow-up. The Fusion group had a significantly decreased global ROM and a decreased segmental ROM with larger angles compared to the Hybrid group. Defining a 2-mm decrease in posterior disc height (PDH) as radiologic adjacent segment pathology (ASP), these changes were observed in 6 and 7 patients in the Hybrid and Fusion group, respectively. However, the last PDH at the above adjacent segment had statistically higher value in Hybrid group. Pain score for back and legs was much reduced in both groups. Functional outcome measured by Oswestry disability index (ODI), however, had better improvement in Hybrid group. Conclusion Hybrid surgery, combined dynamic stabilization system and fusion, can be effective surgical treatment for multilevel degenerative lumbosacral spinal disease, maintaining lumbar motion and delaying disc degeneration. PMID:26484008

  9. Perioperative lung-protective ventilation strategy reduces postoperative pulmonary complications in patients undergoing thoracic and major abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Heon

    2016-02-01

    The occurrence of postoperative pulmonary complications is strongly associated with increased hospital mortality and prolonged postoperative hospital stays. Although protective lung ventilation is commonly used in the intensive care unit, low tidal volume ventilation in the operating room is not a routine strategy. Low tidal volume ventilation, moderate positive end-expiratory pressure, and repeated recruitment maneuvers, particularly for high-risk patients undergoing major abdominal surgery, can reduce postoperative pulmonary complications. Facilitating perioperative bundle care by combining prophylactic and postoperative positive-pressure ventilation with intraoperative lung-protective ventilation may be helpful to reduce postoperative pulmonary complications. PMID:26885294

  10. Perioperative lung-protective ventilation strategy reduces postoperative pulmonary complications in patients undergoing thoracic and major abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of postoperative pulmonary complications is strongly associated with increased hospital mortality and prolonged postoperative hospital stays. Although protective lung ventilation is commonly used in the intensive care unit, low tidal volume ventilation in the operating room is not a routine strategy. Low tidal volume ventilation, moderate positive end-expiratory pressure, and repeated recruitment maneuvers, particularly for high-risk patients undergoing major abdominal surgery, can reduce postoperative pulmonary complications. Facilitating perioperative bundle care by combining prophylactic and postoperative positive-pressure ventilation with intraoperative lung-protective ventilation may be helpful to reduce postoperative pulmonary complications. PMID:26885294

  11. Thoracic emergencies.

    PubMed

    Worrell, Stephanie G; Demeester, Steven R

    2014-02-01

    This article discusses thoracic emergencies, including the anatomy, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, examination, diagnosis, technique, management, and treatment of acute upper airway obstruction, massive hemoptysis, spontaneous pneumothorax, and pulmonary empyema. PMID:24267505

  12. Predictors of outcome after decompressive lumbar surgery and instrumented posterolateral fusion.

    PubMed

    Cobo Soriano, Javier; Sendino Revuelta, Marcos; Fabregate Fuente, Martín; Cimarra Díaz, Ignacio; Martínez Ureña, Paloma; Deglané Meneses, Roberto

    2010-11-01

    There has been no agreement among different authors on guidelines to specify the situations in which arthrodesis is justified in terms of results, risks and complications. The aim of this study was to identify preoperative predictors of outcome after decompressive lumbar surgery and instrumented posterolateral fusion. A prospective observational study design was performed on 203 consecutive patients. Potential preoperative predictors of outcome included sociodemographic factors as well as variables pertaining to the preoperative clinical situation, diagnosis, expectations and surgery. Separate multiple linear regression models were used to assess the association between selected predictors and outcome variables, defined as the improvement after 1 year on the visual analog scale (VAS) for back pain, VAS for leg pain, physical component scores (PCS) of SF-36 and Oswestry disability index (ODI). Follow-up was available for 184 patients (90.6%). Patients with higher educational level and optimistic preoperative expectations had a more favourable postoperative leg pain (VAS) and ODI. Smokers had less leg pain relief. Patients with better mental component score (emotional health) had greater ODI improvement. Less preoperative walking capacity predicted more leg pain relief. Patients with disc herniation had greater relief from back pain and more PCS and ODI improvement. More severe lumbar pain was predictive of less improvement on ODI and PCS. Age, sex, body mass index, analgesic use, surgeon, self-rated health, the number of decompressed levels and the length of fusion had no association with outcome. This study concludes that a higher educational level, optimistic expectations for improvement, the diagnosis of "disc herniation", less walking capacity and good emotional health may significantly improve clinical outcome. Smoking and more severe lumbar pain are predictors of worse results. PMID:20135333

  13. Predictors of outcome after decompressive lumbar surgery and instrumented posterolateral fusion

    PubMed Central

    Sendino Revuelta, Marcos; Cimarra Díaz, Ignacio; Martínez Ureña, Paloma; Deglané Meneses, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    There has been no agreement among different authors on guidelines to specify the situations in which arthrodesis is justified in terms of results, risks and complications. The aim of this study was to identify preoperative predictors of outcome after decompressive lumbar surgery and instrumented posterolateral fusion. A prospective observational study design was performed on 203 consecutive patients. Potential preoperative predictors of outcome included sociodemographic factors as well as variables pertaining to the preoperative clinical situation, diagnosis, expectations and surgery. Separate multiple linear regression models were used to assess the association between selected predictors and outcome variables, defined as the improvement after 1 year on the visual analog scale (VAS) for back pain, VAS for leg pain, physical component scores (PCS) of SF-36 and Oswestry disability index (ODI). Follow-up was available for 184 patients (90.6%). Patients with higher educational level and optimistic preoperative expectations had a more favourable postoperative leg pain (VAS) and ODI. Smokers had less leg pain relief. Patients with better mental component score (emotional health) had greater ODI improvement. Less preoperative walking capacity predicted more leg pain relief. Patients with disc herniation had greater relief from back pain and more PCS and ODI improvement. More severe lumbar pain was predictive of less improvement on ODI and PCS. Age, sex, body mass index, analgesic use, surgeon, self-rated health, the number of decompressed levels and the length of fusion had no association with outcome. This study concludes that a higher educational level, optimistic expectations for improvement, the diagnosis of “disc herniation”, less walking capacity and good emotional health may significantly improve clinical outcome. Smoking and more severe lumbar pain are predictors of worse results. PMID:20135333

  14. Population pharmacokinetics of ϵ-aminocaproic acid in adolescents undergoing posterior spinal fusion surgery

    PubMed Central

    Stricker, P. A.; Gastonguay, M. R.; Singh, D.; Fiadjoe, J. E.; Sussman, E. M.; Pruitt, E. Y.; Goebel, T. K.; Zuppa, A. F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite demonstrated efficacy of ϵ-aminocaproic acid (EACA) in reducing blood loss in adolescents undergoing spinal fusion, there are no population-specific pharmacokinetic data to guide dosing. The aim of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetics of EACA in adolescents undergoing spinal fusion surgery and make dosing recommendations. Methods Twenty children ages 12–17 years were enrolled, with 10 children in each of two groups based on diagnosis (idiopathic scoliosis or non-idiopathic scoliosis). Previously reported data from infants undergoing craniofacial surgery were included in the model to enable dosing recommendations over a wide range of weights, ages, and diagnoses. A population non-linear mixed effects modelling approach was used to characterize EACA pharmacokinetics. Results Population pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated using a two-compartment disposition model with allometrically scaled weight and an age effect on clearance. Pharmacokinetic parameters for the typical patient were a plasma clearance of 153 ml min−1 70 kg−1 (6.32 ml min−1 kg−0.75), intercompartmental clearance of 200 ml min−1 70 kg−1 (8.26 ml min−1 kg−0.75), central volume of distribution of 8.78 litre 70 kg−1 (0.13 litre kg−1), and peripheral volume of distribution of 15.8 litre 70 kg−1 (0.23 litre kg−1). Scoliosis aetiology did not have a clinically significant effect on drug pharmacokinetics. Conclusions The following dosing schemes are recommended according to patient weight: weight <25 kg, 100 mg kg−1 loading dose and 40 mg kg−1 h−1 infusion; weight ≤25 kg–<50 kg, 100 mg kg−1 loading dose and 35 mg kg−1 h−1 infusion; and weight ≥50 kg, 100 mg kg−1 loading dose and 30 mg kg−1 h−1 infusion. An efficacy trial employing this dosing strategy is warranted. Clinical trial registration NCT01408823. PMID:25586726

  15. Significance and function of different spinal collateral compartments following thoracic aortic surgery: immediate versus long-term flow compensation.

    PubMed

    Meffert, Philipp; Bischoff, Moritz S; Brenner, Robert; Siepe, Matthias; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Kari, Fabian A

    2014-05-01

    Iatrogenic paraplegia has been accompanying cardiovascular surgery since its beginning. As a result, surgeons have been developing many theories about the exact mechanisms of this devastating complication. Thus, the impact of single arteries that contribute to the spinal perfusion is one of the most discussed subjects in modern surgery. The subsequent decision of reattachment or the permanent disconnection of these intercostal arteries divides the surgical community. On the one hand, the anatomical or vascular approach pleads for the immediate reimplantation to reconstruct the anatomical situation. On the other hand, the decision of the permanent disconnection aims at avoiding stealing phenomenon away from the spinal vascular network. This spinal collateral network can be described as consisting of three components-the intraspinal and two paraspinal compartments-that feed the nutrient arteries of the spinal cord. The exact functional impact of the different compartments of the collateral network remains poorly understood. In this review, the function of the intraspinal compartment in the context of collateral network principle as an immediate emergency backup system is described. The exact structure and architectural principles of the intraspinal compartment are described. The critical parameters with regard to the risk of postoperative spinal cord ischaemia are the number of anterior radiculomedullary arteries (ARMAs) and the distance between them in relation to the longitudinal extent of aortic disease. The paraspinal network as a sleeping reserve is proposed as the long-term backup system. This sleeping reserve has to be activated by arteriogenic stimuli. These are presented briefly, and prior findings regarding arteriogenesis are discussed in the light of the collateral network concept. Finally, the role of preoperative visualization of the ARMAs in order to evaluate the risk of postoperative paraplegia is emphasized. PMID:24078102

  16. Presence of fusion in albinism after strabismus surgery augmented with botulinum toxin (type a) injection.

    PubMed

    Tavakolizadeh, Sepideh; Farahi, Azadeh

    2013-08-01

    It is commonly accepted that albino patients with strabismus rarely achieve binocularity and depth perception after strabismus surgery. The presence of retino-geniculo-cortical misrouting, a hallmark of the visual system in albinism, does not necessarily cause total loss of binocular vision, however, not even in albino patients with strabismus. Recently some degrees of stereopsis were reported in albinism patients with minimal clinical nystagmus, if any, in the absence of strabismus. It is possible that patients with albinism and strabismus have binocular visual potential which appears after strabismus correction and provides appropriate postoperative alignment in the long term. Here we present two cases of clinically diagnosed oculocutaneous albinism, an 18-year-old girl and a 16-year-old boy, both with exotropia ≥40 prism diopter, who gained acceptable alignment and fusion after surgical correction of their strabismus as demonstrated on Bagolini testing. In cases of albinism accompanied by visual pathway abnormalities and strabismus, binocular visual potential is not impossible, and some levels can be expected. Thus, these patients, like other cases of strabismus, may benefit from treatment of strabismus at an earlier age to achieve appropriate alignment, cosmetic satisfaction, and a possibly increased chance of fusion. PMID:23908581

  17. Effect of intraoperative navigation on operative time in 1-level lumbar fusion surgery.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Arjun R; Yanamadala, Vijay; Coumans, Jean-Valery

    2016-10-01

    The use of intraoperative image guided navigation (NAV) in spine surgery is increasing. NAV is purported to improve the accuracy of pedicle screw placement but has been criticized for potentially increasing surgical cost, a component of which may be prolongation of total operative time due to time required for setup and intra-operative imaging and registration. In this study, we examine the effect of the introduction of O-Arm conical CT spinal navigation on surgical duration. We retrospectively analyzed consecutive freehand (FH) (n=63) and NAV (n=70) 1-level lumbar transpedicular instrumentation cases at a single institution by a single surgeon. We recorded setup and procedure time for each case. NAV was associated with significantly shorter total operative time for 1-level lumbar fusions compared to FH (4:30+/-0:42 hours vs. 4:53+/-0:39hours, p=0.0013). This shortening of total operative time was realized despite a trend toward slightly longer setup times with NAV. We also found a significant decrease in operative length over time in NAV but not FH cases, indicative of a "learning curve" associated with NAV. The use of NAV in 1-level lumbar transpedicular instrumentation surgery is associated with significantly shorter total operative time compared to the FH technique, and its efficiency improves over time. These data should factor into cost-effectiveness analyses of the use of NAV for these cases. PMID:27364319

  18. A Modified EXIT-to-ECMO with Optional Reservoir Circuit for Use during an EXIT Procedure Requiring Thoracic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Matte, Gregory S; Connor, Kevin R; Toutenel, Nathalia A; Gottlieb, Danielle; Fynn-Thompson, Francis

    2016-03-01

    A 34 year old mother with a history of polyhydraminos and premature rupture of membranes presented for an ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) procedure to deliver her 34 week gestation fetus. The fetus had been diagnosed with a large cervical mass which significantly extended into the right chest. The mass compressed and deviated the airway and major neck vessels posteriorly. Imaging also revealed possible tumor involvement with the superior vena cava and right atrium. The plan was for potential extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) during the EXIT procedure (EXIT-to-ECMO) and the potential for traditional cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) for mediastinal tumor resection. A Modified EXIT-To-ECMO with Optional Reservoir (METEOR) circuit was devised to satisfy both therapies. A fetal airway could not be established during the EXIT procedure and so the EXIT-to-ECMO strategy was utilized. The fetus was then delivered and transferred to an adjoining operating room (OR). Traditional cardiopulmonary bypass with a cardiotomy venous reservoir (CVR) was utilized during the establishment of an airway, tumor biopsy and partial resection. The patient was eventually transitioned to our institution's standard ECMO circuit and then transferred to the intensive care unit. The patient was weaned from ECMO on day of life (DOL) eight and had a successful tumor resection on DOL 11. The patient required hospitalization for numerous interventions including cardiac surgery at 4 months of age. She was discharged to home at 5 months of age. PMID:27134307

  19. A Modified EXIT-to-ECMO with Optional Reservoir Circuit for Use during an EXIT Procedure Requiring Thoracic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Matte, Gregory S.; Connor, Kevin R.; Toutenel, Nathalia A.; Gottlieb, Danielle; Fynn-Thompson, Francis

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: A 34 year old mother with a history of polyhydraminos and premature rupture of membranes presented for an ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) procedure to deliver her 34 week gestation fetus. The fetus had been diagnosed with a large cervical mass which significantly extended into the right chest. The mass compressed and deviated the airway and major neck vessels posteriorly. Imaging also revealed possible tumor involvement with the superior vena cava and right atrium. The plan was for potential extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) during the EXIT procedure (EXIT-to-ECMO) and the potential for traditional cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) for mediastinal tumor resection. A Modified EXIT-To-ECMO with Optional Reservoir (METEOR) circuit was devised to satisfy both therapies. A fetal airway could not be established during the EXIT procedure and so the EXIT-to-ECMO strategy was utilized. The fetus was then delivered and transferred to an adjoining operating room (OR). Traditional cardiopulmonary bypass with a cardiotomy venous reservoir (CVR) was utilized during the establishment of an airway, tumor biopsy and partial resection. The patient was eventually transitioned to our institution's standard ECMO circuit and then transferred to the intensive care unit. The patient was weaned from ECMO on day of life (DOL) eight and had a successful tumor resection on DOL 11. The patient required hospitalization for numerous interventions including cardiac surgery at 4 months of age. She was discharged to home at 5 months of age. PMID:27134307

  20. Uniportal video-assisted thoracic surgery for left upper lobe: single-direction lobectomy with systematic lymphadenectomy.

    PubMed

    Feng, Mingxiang; Lin, Miao; Shen, Yaxin; Wang, Hao

    2016-08-01

    A 62-year-old female was admitted to our hospital after computed tomography (CT) revealed a 2.5 cm × 2.1 cm mass in the left upper lobe. PET/CT scan diagnosed as malignant lesion with no signs of metastasis. Under general anesthesia, the patient was placed in right lateral decubitus position. A 4cm incision was made in the 4th intercostal space with plastic protector. The camera was placed in the upper part of the incision and the instruments were inserted below the camera. Left upper lobectomy along with systematic lymphadenectomy was performed. Total surgical time was 135 min and estimated blood loss was 70 mL. The chest tube was removed on the 2nd postoperative day and the patient was discharged on the 3rd postoperative day with no complication. This uniportal VATS single-direction lobectomy for the left upper lobe is feasible and amplifies the concept of thoracotomy-like minimally invasive surgery. PMID:27621892

  1. Uniportal video-assisted thoracic surgery for left upper lobe: single-direction lobectomy with systematic lymphadenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Miao; Shen, Yaxin; Wang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    A 62-year-old female was admitted to our hospital after computed tomography (CT) revealed a 2.5 cm × 2.1 cm mass in the left upper lobe. PET/CT scan diagnosed as malignant lesion with no signs of metastasis. Under general anesthesia, the patient was placed in right lateral decubitus position. A 4cm incision was made in the 4th intercostal space with plastic protector. The camera was placed in the upper part of the incision and the instruments were inserted below the camera. Left upper lobectomy along with systematic lymphadenectomy was performed. Total surgical time was 135 min and estimated blood loss was 70 mL. The chest tube was removed on the 2nd postoperative day and the patient was discharged on the 3rd postoperative day with no complication. This uniportal VATS single-direction lobectomy for the left upper lobe is feasible and amplifies the concept of thoracotomy-like minimally invasive surgery. PMID:27621892

  2. TEVAR: Endovascular Repair of the Thoracic Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Nation, David A.; Wang, Grace J.

    2015-01-01

    The development of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has allowed a minimally invasive approach for management of an array of thoracic aortic pathologies. Initially developed specifically for exclusion of thoracic aortic aneurysms, TEVAR is now used as an alternative to open surgery for a variety of disease pathologies due to the lower morbidity of this approach. Advances in endograft technology continue to broaden the applications of this technique. PMID:26327745

  3. Risk Factors for Postoperative Infections Following Single Level Lumbar Fusion Surgery.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seokchun; Edelstein, Adam I; Patel, Alpesh A; Kim, Bobby D; Kim, John Y S

    2014-09-29

    Study Design. Retrospective multivariate analysis of a prospectively collected, multi-center database.Objective. To identify patient characteristics and perioperative risk factors associated with postoperative infectious complications following single level lumbar fusion (SLLF) surgery.Summary of Background Data. Postoperative infection is a known complication following lumbar fusion. Risk factors for infectious complications following lumbar fusion have not been investigated using select set of SLLF procedures.Methods. Patients who underwent SLLF between 2006 and 2011 were identified from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify pre- and intra-operative risk factors associated with postoperative infection.Results. 3,353 patients were analyzed in this study. Overall, 173 (5.2%) patients experienced a postoperative infection, including 86 (2.6%) surgical site infections (SSI) and 111 (3.3%) non-SSI infectious complications (pneumonia, UTI, sepsis/septic shock). Twenty four (0.7%) patients experienced both SSI and non-SSI infectious complications. Postoperative SSI were associated with obesity (OR 1.628, 95% CI 1.042-2.544), American Society of Anesthesiologist (ASA) class>2 (OR 2.078, 95% CI 1.309-3.299), and operative time >6 hrs (OR 2.573, 95% CI 1.310-5.056). Risk factors for non-SSI infectious complications included age (60-69 yrs, OR 3.279, 95% CI 1.541-6.980;≥70 yrs, OR 3.348, 95% CI 1.519-7.378), female gender (OR 1.791, 95% CI 1.183-2.711), creatinine>1.5mg/dL (OR 2.400, 95% CI 1.138-5.062), ASA >2 (OR 1.835, 95% CI 1.177-2.860), and operative time >6hrs (OR 3.563, 95% CI 2.082-6.097).Conclusions. Across a wide study population, we identified that obesity, advanced ASA classification, and longer operative time were predictive of postoperative SSI. We also demonstrated that increased age, female gender, serum creatinine>1.5mg/dL, and

  4. Comparison of robotic and video-assisted thoracic surgery for lung cancer: a propensity-matched analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Feichao; Zhang, Chong; Yang, Yunhai; He, Zhehao; Wang, Luming

    2016-01-01

    Background Reports of comparison between robotic and thoracoscopic surgery for lung cancer are limited, we aimed to compare the perioperative outcomes of robotic and thoracoscopic anatomic pulmonary resection for lung cancer. Methods A total of 184 patients with lung cancer underwent anatomic pulmonary resection by robotics or thoracoscopy. A propensity-matched analysis with incorporated preoperative variables was used to compare the perioperative outcomes between the two procedures. Results Overall, 71 patients underwent robotic pulmonary resection, including 64 lobectomies and 7 segmentectomies, while 113 patients underwent thoracoscopic lobectomy and segmentectomy. Propensity match produced 69 pairs. The mean length of postoperative stay (7.6±4.6 vs. 6.4±2.6 d, P=0.078), chest tube duration (5.3±3.7 vs. 4.4±1.7 d, P=0.056), number of lymph nodes retrieved (17.9±6.9 vs. 17.4±7.0, P=0.660), stations of lymph nodes resected (7.4±1.6 vs. 7.6±1.7, P=0.563), operative blood loss (53.9±29.3 vs. 50.3±37.9 mL, P=0.531), morbidity rates (42.0% vs. 30.4%, P=0.157) were similar between the robotics and thoracoscopy. However, robotics was associated with higher cost ($12,067±1,610 vs. $8,328±1,004, P<0.001), and longer operative time (136±40 vs. 111±28 min, P<0.001). Conclusions Robotics seems to have higher hospital costs and longer operative time, without superior advantages in morbidity rates and oncologic efficiency. Further prospective randomized clinical trials were needed to validate both of its short- and long-term oncologic efficiency. PMID:27499971

  5. Long-term outcomes after video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) lobectomy versus lobectomy via open thoracotomy for clinical stage IA non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) lobectomy is a standard treatment for lung cancer. This study retrospectively compared long-term outcomes after VATS lobectomy versus lobectomy via open thoracotomy for clinical stage IA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods From July 2002 to June 2012, 160 patients were diagnosed with clinical stage IA NSCLC and underwent lobectomy. Of these, 114 underwent VATS lobectomy and 46 underwent lobectomy via open thoracotomy. Results The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate was 88.0% in the VATS group and 77.1% in the thoracotomy group for clinical stage IA NSCLC (p = 0.1504), and 91.5% in the VATS group and 93.8% in the thoracotomy group for pathological stage IA NSCLC (p = 0.2662). The 5-year overall survival (OS) rate was 94.1% in the VATS group and 81.8% in the thoracotomy group for clinical stage IA NSCLC (p = 0.0268), and 94.8% in the VATS group and 96.2% in the thoracotomy group for pathological stage IA NSCLC (p = 0.5545). The rate of accurate preoperative staging was 71.9% in the VATS group and 56.5% in the thoracotomy group (p = 0.2611). Inconsistencies between the clinical and pathological stages were mainly related to tumor size, nodal status, and pleural invasion. Local recurrence occurred for one lesion in the VATS group and six lesions (five patients) in the thoracotomy group (p = 0.0495). Conclusions The DFS and OS were not inferior after VATS compared with thoracotomy. Local control was significantly better after VATS than after thoracotomy. Preoperative staging lacked sufficient accuracy. PMID:24886655

  6. A randomized trial to assess the utility of preintubation adult fiberoptic bronchoscope assessment in patients for thoracic surgery requiring one-lung ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Nayana; Tarwade, Pritee; Shetmahajan, Madhavi; Pramesh, C. S.; Jiwnani, Sabita; Mahajan, Abhishek; Purandare, Nilendu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Confirmation of placement of Double lumen endobronchial tubes (DLETT) and bronchial blockers (BBs) with the pediatric fiberoptic bronchoscope (FOB) is the most preferred practice worldwide. Most centers possess standard adult FOBs, some, particularly in developing countries might not have access to the pediatric-sized devices. We have evaluated the role of preintubation airway assessment using the former, measuring the distance from the incisors to the carina and from carina to the left and right upper lobe bronchus in deciding the depth of insertion of the lung isolation device. Methods: The study was a randomized, controlled, double-blind trial consisting of 84 patients (all >18 years) undergoing thoracic surgery over a 12-month period. In the study group (n = 38), measurements obtained during FOB with the adult bronchoscope decided the depth of insertion of the lung isolation device. In the control group (n = 46), DLETTs and BBs were placed blindly followed by clinical confirmation by auscultation. Selection of the type and size of the lung isolation device was at the discretion of the anesthesiologist conducting the case. In all cases, pediatric FOB was used to confirm accurate placement of devices. Results: Of 84 patients (DLETT used in 76 patients; BB used in 8 patients), preintubation airway measurements significantly improved the success rate of optimal placement of lung isolation device from 25% (11/44) to 50% (18/36) (P = 0.04). Our incidence of failed device placement at initial insertion was 4.7% (4/84). Incidence of malposition was 10% (8/80) with 4 cases in each group. The incidence of suboptimal placement was lower in the study group at 38.9% (14/36) versus 65.9% (29/44). Conclusions: Preintubation airway measurements with the adult FOB reduces airway manipulations and improves the success rate of optimal placement of DLETT and BB. PMID:27052065

  7. [Thoracic actinomycosis: three cases].

    PubMed

    Herrak, L; Msougar, Y; Ouadnouni, Y; Bouchikh, M; Benosmane, A

    2007-09-01

    Actinomycosis is a rare condition which, in the thoracic localisation, can mimic cancer or tuberculosis. We report a series of three case of thoracic actinomycosis treated in the Ibn Sina University Thoracic Surgery Unit in Rabat, Morocco. CASE N degrees 1: This 45-year-old patient presented a tumefaction on the left anterior aspect of the chest. Physical examination identified a parietal mass with fistulisation to the skin. Radiography demonstrated a left pulmonary mass. Transparietal puncture led to the pathological diagnosis of actinomycosis. The patient was given medical treatment and improved clinically and radiographically. CASE N degrees 2: This 68-year-old patient presented repeated episodes of hemoptysis. The chest x-ray revealed atelectasia of the middle lobe and bronchial fibroscopy demonstrated the presence of a bud in the middle lobar bronchus. Biopsies were negative. The patient underwent surgery and the histology examination of the operative specimen revealed pulmonary actinomycosis. The patient recovered well clinically and radiographically with antibiotic therapy. CASE N degrees 3: This 56-year-old patient presented cough and hemoptysis. Physical examination revealed a left condensation and destruction of the left lung was noted on the chest x-ray. Left pleuropulmonectomy was performed. Histological analysis of the surgical specimen identified associated Aspergillus and Actinomyces. The outcome was favorable with medical treatment. The purpose of this work was to recall the radiological, clinical, histological, therapeutic, outcome aspects of this condition and to relate the problems of differential diagnosis when can suggest other diseases. PMID:17978739

  8. Lhermitte Sign as a Presenting Symptom of Thoracic Spinal Pathology: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Hills, Adam; Al-Hakim, Mazen

    2015-01-01

    A 54-year-old male with ankylosing spondylitis presented with complaints of progressively worsening bilateral leg weakness and difficulty ambulating of 2-week duration. He also felt a sharp, electric, shock-like sensation radiating from his lower back into his legs upon flexing the trunk. There was no history of trauma or other inciting events within the 2 weeks prior to presentation. Thoracic MRI at this visit showed a three-column fracture at T11-T12. He underwent spinal fusion surgery and within 2 days after surgery the radiating electrical sensation with spinal flexion had completely resolved. PMID:26339515

  9. Effectiveness and safety of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 for adults with lumbar spine pseudarthrosis following spinal fusion surgery

    PubMed Central

    Balaji, V.; Kaila, R.; Wilson, L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We performed a systematic review of the literature to determine the safety and efficacy of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) compared with bone graft when used specifically for revision spinal fusion surgery secondary to pseudarthrosis. Methods The MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library databases were searched using defined search terms. The primary outcome measure was spinal fusion, assessed as success or failure in accordance with radiograph, MRI or CT scan review at 24-month follow-up. The secondary outcome measure was time to fusion. Results A total of six studies (three prospective and three retrospective) reporting on the use of BMP2 met the inclusion criteria (203 patients). Of these, four provided a comparison of BMP2 and bone graft whereas the other two solely investigated the use of BMP2. The primary outcome was seen in 92.3% (108/117) of patients following surgery with BMP2. Although none of the studies showed superiority of BMP2 to bone graft for fusion, its use was associated with a statistically quicker time to achieving fusion. BMP2 did not appear to increase the risk of complication. Conclusion The use of BMP2 is both safe and effective within the revision setting, ideally in cases where bone graft is unavailable or undesirable. Further research is required to define its optimum role. Cite this article: Mr P. Bodalia. Effectiveness and safety of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 for adults with lumbar spine pseudarthrosis following spinal fusion surgery: A systematic review. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:145–152. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.54.2000418. PMID:27121215

  10. Hybrid Surgery Versus Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion in Multilevel Cervical Disc Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianfeng; Meng, Fanxin; Ding, Yan; Li, Jie; Han, Jian; Zhang, Xintao; Dong, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the outcomes and reliability of hybrid surgery (HS) versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for the treatment of multilevel cervical spondylosis and disc diseases. Hybrid surgery, combining cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) with fusion, is a novel treatment to multilevel cervical degenerated disc disease in recent years. However, the effect and reliability of HS are still unclear compared with ACDF. To investigate the studies of HS versus ACDF in patients with multilevel cervical disease, electronic databases (Medline, Embase, Pubmed, Cochrane library, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) were searched. Studies were included when they compared HS with ACDF and reported at least one of the following outcomes: functionality, neck pain, arm pain, cervical range of motion (ROM), quality of life, and incidence of complications. No language restrictions were used. Two authors independently assessed the methodological quality of included studies and extracted the relevant data. Seven clinical controlled trials were included in this study. Two trials were prospective and the other 5 were retrospective. The results of the meta-analysis indicated that HS achieved better recovery of NDI score (P = 0.038) and similar recovery of VAS score (P = 0.058) compared with ACDF at 2 years follow-up. Moreover, the total cervical ROM (C2–C7) after HS was preserved significantly more than the cervical ROM after ACDF (P = 0.000) at 2 years follow-up. Notably, the compensatory increase of the ROM of superior and inferior adjacent segments was significant in ACDF groups at 2-year follow-up (P < 0.01), compared with HS. The results demonstrate that HS provides equivalent outcomes and functional recovery for cervical disc diseases, and significantly better preservation of cervical ROM compared with ACDF in 2-year follow-up. This suggests the HS is an effective alternative invention for the treatment of multilevel cervical

  11. Vasculopathy, Ischemia, and the Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion Surgery: Report of Three Cases.

    PubMed

    Allison, David W; Allen, Richard T; Kohanchi, David D; Skousen, Collin B; Lee, Yu-Po; Gertsch, Jeffrey H

    2015-12-01

    Multi-modal neurophysiologic monitoring consisting of triggered and spontaneous electromyography and transcranial motor-evoked potentials may detect and prevent both acute and slow developing mechanical and vascular nerve injuries in lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) surgery. In case report 1, a marked reduction in the transcranial motor-evoked potentials on the operative side alerted to a 28% decrease in mean arterial blood pressure in a 54-year-old woman during an L3-4, L4-5 LLIF. After hemodynamic stability was regained, transcranial motor-evoked potentials returned to baseline and the patient suffered no postoperative complications. In case report 2, a peroneal nerve train-of-four stimulation threshold of 95 mA portended the potential for a triggered electromyography false negative in a 70-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes, peripheral neuropathy, and body mass index of 30.7 kg/m undergoing an L3-4, L4-5 LLIF. Higher triggered electromyography threshold values were applied to this patient's relatively quiescent triggered electromyography and the patient suffered no postoperative complications. In case report 3, the loss of right quadriceps motor-evoked potentials detected a retractor related nerve injury in a 59-year-old man undergoing an L4-5 LLIF. The surgery was aborted, but the patient suffered persistent postoperative right leg paresthesia and weakness. These reports highlight the sensitivity of peripheral nerve elements to ischemia (particularly in the presence of vascular risk factors) during the LLIF procedure and the need for dynamic multi-modal intraoperative monitoring. PMID:26629762

  12. More nerve root injuries occur with minimally invasive lumbar surgery, especially extreme lateral interbody fusion: A review

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the lumbar spine, do more nerve root injuries occur utilizing minimally invasive surgery (MIS) techniques versus open lumbar procedures? To answer this question, we compared the frequency of nerve root injuries for multiple open versus MIS operations including diskectomy, laminectomy with/without fusion addressing degenerative disc disease, stenosis, and/or degenerative spondylolisthesis. Methods: Several of Desai et al. large Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial studies showed the frequency for nerve root injury following an open diskectomy ranged from 0.13% to 0.25%, for open laminectomy/stenosis with/without fusion it was 0%, and for open laminectomy/stenosis/degenerative spondylolisthesis with/without fusion it was 2%. Results: Alternatively, one study compared the incidence of root injuries utilizing MIS transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) versus posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) techniques; 7.8% of PLIF versus 2% of TLIF patients sustained root injuries. Furthermore, even higher frequencies of radiculitis and nerve root injuries occurred during anterior lumbar interbody fusions (ALIFs) versus extreme lateral interbody fusions (XLIFs). These high frequencies were far from acceptable; 15.8% following ALIF experienced postoperative radiculitis, while 23.8% undergoing XLIF sustained root/plexus deficits. Conclusions: This review indicates that MIS (TLIF/PLIF/ALIF/XLIF) lumbar surgery resulted in a higher incidence of root injuries, radiculitis, or plexopathy versus open lumbar surgical techniques. Furthermore, even a cursory look at the XLIF data demonstrated the greater danger posed to neural tissue by this newest addition to the MIS lumbar surgical armamentariu. The latter should prompt us as spine surgeons to question why the XLIF procedure is still being offered to our patients? PMID:26904372

  13. Thoracic textilomas: CT findings*

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Dianne Melo; Zanetti, Gláucia; Araujo, Cesar Augusto; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Meirelles, Gustavo de Souza Portes; Pereira e Silva, Jorge Luiz; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Souza, Arthur Soares; Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyze chest CT scans of patients with thoracic textiloma. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of 16 patients (11 men and 5 women) with surgically confirmed thoracic textiloma. The chest CT scans of those patients were evaluated by two independent observers, and discordant results were resolved by consensus. RESULTS: The majority (62.5%) of the textilomas were caused by previous heart surgery. The most common symptoms were chest pain (in 68.75%) and cough (in 56.25%). In all cases, the main tomographic finding was a mass with regular contours and borders that were well-defined or partially defined. Half of the textilomas occurred in the right hemithorax and half occurred in the left. The majority (56.25%) were located in the lower third of the lung. The diameter of the mass was ≤ 10 cm in 10 cases (62.5%) and > 10 cm in the remaining 6 cases (37.5%). Most (81.25%) of the textilomas were heterogeneous in density, with signs of calcification, gas, radiopaque marker, or sponge-like material. Peripheral expansion of the mass was observed in 12 (92.3%) of the 13 patients in whom a contrast agent was used. Intraoperatively, pleural involvement was observed in 14 cases (87.5%) and pericardial involvement was observed in 2 (12.5%). CONCLUSIONS: It is important to recognize the main tomographic aspects of thoracic textilomas in order to include this possibility in the differential diagnosis of chest pain and cough in patients with a history of heart or thoracic surgery, thus promoting the early identification and treatment of this postoperative complication. PMID:25410842

  14. Uniportal video-assisted thoracic (VATS) lobectomy.

    PubMed

    Sihoe, Alan D L

    2016-03-01

    Uniportal video assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) has become one of the most exciting new developments in minimally invasive thoracic surgery in recent years. While the debate over its purported advantages continues, this chapter instead focuses on the technical aspects of performing a lobectomy via the uniportal approach. Using clear medical illustrations to show how each step is performed, the key tips and tricks are laid out for the beginner hoping to learn the technique. PMID:27134841

  15. Uniportal video-assisted thoracic (VATS) lobectomy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Uniportal video assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) has become one of the most exciting new developments in minimally invasive thoracic surgery in recent years. While the debate over its purported advantages continues, this chapter instead focuses on the technical aspects of performing a lobectomy via the uniportal approach. Using clear medical illustrations to show how each step is performed, the key tips and tricks are laid out for the beginner hoping to learn the technique. PMID:27134841

  16. Long-Term Objective Physical Activity Measurements using a Wireless Accelerometer Following Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Interbody Fusion Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mobbs, Ralph J.

    2016-01-01

    We report on a case of a patient who underwent minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (mi-TLIF) with objective physical activity measurements performed preoperatively and postoperatively at up to 12-months using wireless accelerometer technology. In the first postoperative month following surgery, the patient had reduced mobility, taking 2,397 steps over a distance of 1.8 km per day. However, the number of steps taken and distance travelled per day had returned to baseline levels by the second postoperative month. At one-year follow-up, the patient averaged 5,095 steps per day in the month over a distance of 3.8 km; this was a 60% improvement in both steps taken and distance travelled compared to the preoperative status. The use of wireless accelerometers is feasible in obtaining objective physical activity measurements before and after lumbar interbody fusion and may be applicable to other related spinal surgeries as well. PMID:27114781

  17. Non-intubated anesthesia in thoracic surgery—technical issues

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Performing awake thoracic surgery (ATS) is technically more challenging than thoracic surgery under general anesthesia (GA), but it can result in a greater benefit for the patient. Local wound infiltration and lidocaine administration in the pleural space can be considered for ATS. More invasive techniques are local wound infiltration with wound catheter insertion, thoracic wall blocks, selective intercostal nerve blockade, thoracic paravertebral blockade and thoracic epidural analgesia, offering the advantage of a catheter placement which can also be continued for postoperative analgesia. PMID:26046050

  18. Robust model-based 3d/3D fusion using sparse matching for minimally invasive surgery.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Dominik; Grbic, Sasa; John, Matthias; Navab, Nassir; Hornegger, Joachim; Ionasec, Razvan

    2013-01-01

    Classical surgery is being disrupted by minimally invasive and transcatheter procedures. As there is no direct view or access to the affected anatomy, advanced imaging techniques such as 3D C-arm CT and C-arm fluoroscopy are routinely used for intra-operative guidance. However, intra-operative modalities have limited image quality of the soft tissue and a reliable assessment of the cardiac anatomy can only be made by injecting contrast agent, which is harmful to the patient and requires complex acquisition protocols. We propose a novel sparse matching approach for fusing high quality pre-operative CT and non-contrasted, non-gated intra-operative C-arm CT by utilizing robust machine learning and numerical optimization techniques. Thus, high-quality patient-specific models can be extracted from the pre-operative CT and mapped to the intra-operative imaging environment to guide minimally invasive procedures. Extensive quantitative experiments demonstrate that our model-based fusion approach has an average execution time of 2.9 s, while the accuracy lies within expert user confidence intervals. PMID:24505663

  19. Evaluation of the stress distribution change at the adjacent facet joints after lumbar fusion surgery: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianxiong; Jia, Haobo; Ma, Xinlong; Xu, Weiguo; Yu, Jingtao; Feng, Rui; Wang, Jie; Xing, Dan; Wang, Ying; Zhu, Shaowen; Yang, Yang; Chen, Yang; Ma, Baoyi

    2014-07-01

    Spinal fusion surgery has been widely applied in clinical treatment, and the spinal fusion rate has improved markedly. However, its postoperative complications, especially adjacent segment degeneration, have increasingly attracted the attention of spinal surgeons. The most common pathological condition at adjacent segments is hypertrophic degenerative arthritis of the facet joint. To study the stress distribution changes at the adjacent facet joint after lumbar fusion with pedicle screw fixation, human cadaver lumbar spines were used in the present study, and electrical resistance strain gauges were attached on L1-L4 articular processes parallel or perpendicular to the articular surface of facet joints. Subsequently, electrical resistance strain gauge data were measured using anYJ-33 static resistance strain indicator with three types of models: the intact model, the laminectomy model, and the fusion model with pedicle screw fixation. The strain changes in the measurement sites indirectly reflect the stress changes. Significant differences in strain were observed between the normal and laminectomy state at all facet joints. Significant differences in strain were observed between the normal and the pedicle screw fixation fusion state at the L1/2 and L3/4 facet joints. The increased stress on the facet joints after lumbar fusion with pedicle screw fixation may be the cause of adjacent segment degeneration. PMID:24963037

  20. Comparison of a tube-holder (Rescuefix) versus tape-tying for minimizing double-lumen tube displacement during lateral positioning in thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Sung Hye; Kang, Su Hwang; Kim, Jong Hae; Ryu, Taeha; Kim, Baek Jin; Jung, Jin Yong

    2016-01-01

    lower the incidence of DLT repositioning compared with the tape-tying method. Therefore, Rescuefix appears to be an effective alternative to minimizing DLT displacement during lateral positioning in thoracic surgery. Trial registration: http://cris.nih.go.kr identifier: KCT0001949. PMID:27495093

  1. A Decade’s Experience With Quality Improvement in Cardiac Surgery Using the Veterans Affairs and Society of Thoracic Surgeons National Databases

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Frederick L.; Shroyer, A. Laurie W.; Hammermeister, Karl; Edwards, Fred H.; Ferguson, T. Bruce; Dziuban, Stanley W.; Cleveland, Joseph C.; Clark, Richard E.; McDonald, Gerald

    2001-01-01

    Objective To review the Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) national databases over the past 10 years to evaluate their relative similarities and differences, to appraise their use as quality improvement tools, and to assess their potential to facilitate improvements in quality of cardiac surgical care. Summary Background Data The VA developed a mandatory risk-adjusted database in 1987 to monitor outcomes of cardiac surgery at all VA medical centers. In 1989 the STS developed a voluntary risk-adjusted database to help members assess quality and outcomes in their individual programs and to facilitate improvements in quality of care. Methods A short data form on every veteran operated on at each VA medical center is completed and transmitted electronically for analysis of unadjusted and risk-adjusted death and complications, as well as length of stay. Masked, confidential semiannual reports are then distributed to each program’s clinical team and the associated administrator. These reports are also reviewed by a national quality oversight committee. Thus, VA data are used both locally for quality improvement and at the national level with quality surveillance. The STS dataset (217 core fields and 255 extended fields) is transmitted for each patient semiannually to the Duke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI) for warehousing, analysis, and distribution. Site-specific reports are produced with regional and national aggregate comparisons for unadjusted and adjusted surgical deaths and complications, as well as length of stay for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), valvular procedures, and valvular/CABG procedures. Both databases use the logistic regression modeling approach. Data for key processes of care are also captured in both databases. Research projects are frequently carried out using each database. Results More than 74,000 and 1.6 million cardiac surgical patients have been entered into the VA and STS databases

  2. In patients undergoing video-assisted thoracic surgery for pleurodesis in primary spontaneous pneumothorax, how long should chest drains remain in place prior to safe removal and subsequent discharge from hospital?

    PubMed Central

    Dearden, Alexander S.; Sammon, Peter M.; Matthew, Eleanor F.

    2013-01-01

    A best evidence topic in thoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was how long chest drains should be left in place following video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) pleurodesis for primary spontaneous pneumothorax. Altogether, a total of 730 papers were found using the reported search, of which eight represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. We report that the main determining factor for the length of hospital stay following VATS pleurodesis is chest-drain duration. Providing no postoperative complications occur, and chest X-ray appearances of lung inflation are satisfactory, there is no documented contraindication to removing chest drains as early as 2 days postoperatively, with discharge the following day. Furthermore, leaving chest drains on water seal after a brief period of suction has been shown to benefit in reducing postoperative chest-drain duration and subsequent hospital stay. There is a paucity of literature directly addressing early vs late chest-drain removal protocols in this patient group. Hence, we conclude that, in clinical practice, the decision of when to remove chest drains postoperatively should remain guided empirically towards the individual patient. PMID:23403769

  3. Aneurysms: thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Chun, Kevin C; Lee, Eugene S

    2015-04-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) have many possible etiologies, including congenital heart defects (eg, bicuspid aortic valves, coarctation of the aorta), inherited connective tissue disorders (eg, Marfan, Ehlers-Danlos, Loeys-Dietz syndromes), and degenerative conditions (eg, medial necrosis, atherosclerosis of the aortic wall). Symptoms of rupture include a severe tearing pain in the chest, back, or neck, sometimes associated with cardiovascular collapse. Before rupture, TAAs may exert pressure on other thoracic structures, leading to a variety of symptoms. However, most TAAs are asymptomatic and are found incidentally during imaging for other conditions. Diagnosis is confirmed with computed tomography scan or echocardiography. Asymptomatic TAAs should be monitored with imaging at specified intervals and patients referred for repair if the TAAs are enlarging rapidly (greater than 0.5 cm in diameter over 6 months for heritable etiologies; greater than 0.5 cm over 1 year for degenerative etiologies) or reach a critical aortic diameter threshold for elective surgery (5.5 cm for TAAs due to degenerative etiologies, 5.0 cm when associated with inherited syndromes). Open surgery is used most often to treat asymptomatic TAAs in the ascending aorta and aortic arch. Asymptomatic TAAs in the descending aorta often are treated medically with aggressive blood pressure control, though recent data suggest that endovascular procedures may result in better long-term survival rates. PMID:25860136

  4. Thoracic aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    Aortic aneurysm - thoracic; Syphilitic aneurysm; Aneurysm - thoracic aortic ... The most common cause of a thoracic aortic aneurysm is hardening of the ... with high cholesterol, long-term high blood pressure, or who ...

  5. Thoracic actinomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Slade, P. R.; Slesser, B. V.; Southgate, J.

    1973-01-01

    Six cases of pulmonary infection with Actinomyces Israeli and one case of infection with Nocardia asteroides are described. The incidence of thoracic actinomycosis has declined recently and the classical presentation with chronic discharging sinuses is now uncommon. The cases described illustrate some of the forms which the disease may take. Actinomycotic infection has been noted, not infrequently, to co-exist with bronchial carcinoma and a case illustrating this association is described. Sputum cytology as practised for the diagnosis of bronchial carcinoma has helped to identify the fungi in the sputum. Treatment is discussed, particularly the possible use of oral antibiotics rather than penicillin by injection. Images PMID:4568119

  6. A comprehensive assessment of the risk of bone morphogenetic protein use in spinal fusion surgery and postoperative cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Kevin S; McCormick, Paul C; Levi, Allan D

    2015-07-01

    The risk of postoperative cancer following the use of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 in spinal fusion is one potential complication that has received significant interest. Until recently, there has been little clinical evidence to support the assertion of potential cancer induction after BMP use in spinal surgery. This report aims to summarize the findings from clinical data available to date from the Yale University Open Data Access (YODA) project as well as more recently published large database studies regarding the association of BMP use in spinal fusion and the risk of postoperative cancer. A detailed review was based on online databases, primary studies, FDA reports, and bibliographies of key articles for studies that assessed the efficacy and safety of BMP in spinal fusion. In an analysis of the YODA project, one meta-analysis detected a statistically significant increase in cancer occurrence at 24 months but not at 48 months, and the other meta-analysis did not detect a significant increase in postoperative cancer occurrence. Analysis of 3 large health care data sets (Medicare, MarketScan, and PearlDiver) revealed that none were able to detect a significant increase in risk of malignant cancers when BMP was used compared with controls. The potential risk of postoperative cancer formation following the use of BMP in spinal fusion must be interpreted on an individual basis for each patient by the surgeon. There is no conclusive evidence that application of the common formulations of BMP during spinal surgery results in the formation of cancer locally or at a distant site. PMID:25860517

  7. Indirect Neuromonitoring of the Spinal Cord by Near-Infrared Spectroscopy of the Paraspinous Thoracic and Lumbar Muscles in Aortic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Luehr, Maximilian; Mohr, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Etz, Christian D

    2016-06-01

    Paraplegia remains the most devastating complication of open and endovascular thoracic/thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAA/A) repair. However, the assessment of currently available neuromonitoring modalities remains challenging and difficult to interpret. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been introduced as a strategy for noninvasive, real-time monitoring of the paraspinous collateral network (CN) to detect potential spinal cord ischemia at our institution. Prior to TAA/A repair, a cerebrospinal fluid catheter is placed and four NIRS optodes are bilaterally positioned on the patient's back to transcutaneously monitor regional muscle oxygenation at the thoracic and lumbar levels. Indirect surveillance of the spinal cord by NIRS seems to be a tempting option with increasing evidence supporting the CN concept. PMID:26011674

  8. Thoracic Wall Reconstruction in Advanced Breast Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Daigeler, A.; Harati, K.; Goertz, O.; Hirsch, T.; Behr, B.; Lehnhardt, M.; Kolbenschlag, J.

    2014-01-01

    In advanced mammary tumours, extensive resections, sometimes involving sections of the thoracic wall, are often necessary. Plastic surgery reconstruction procedures offer sufficient opportunities to cover even large thoracic wall defects. Pedicled flaps from the torso but also free flap-plasties enable, through secure defect closure, the removal of large, ulcerated, painful or bleeding tumours with moderate donor site morbidity. The impact of thoracic wall resection on the respiratory mechanism can be easily compensated for and patientsʼ quality of life in the palliative stage of disease can often be improved. PMID:24976636

  9. Outcome of posterior decompression with instrumented fusion surgery for K-line (-) cervical ossification of the longitudinal ligament.

    PubMed

    Saito, Junya; Maki, Satoshi; Kamiya, Koshiro; Furuya, Takeo; Inada, Taigo; Ota, Mitsutoshi; Iijima, Yasushi; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Yamazaki, Masashi; Aramomi, Masaaki; Mannoji, Chikato; Koda, Masao

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the outcome of posterior decompression and instrumented fusion (PDF) surgery for patients with K-line (-) ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) of the cervical spine, who may have a poor surgical prognosis. We retrospectively analyzed the outcome of a series of 27 patients who underwent PDF without correction of cervical alignment for K-line (-) OPLL and were followed-up for at least 1 year after surgery. We had performed double-door laminoplasty followed by posterior instrumented fusion without excessive correction of cervical spine alignment. The preoperative Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score for cervical myelopathy was 8.0 points and postoperative JOA score was 11.9 points on average. The mean JOA score recovery rate was 43.6%. The average C2-C7 angle was 2.2° preoperatively and 3.1° postoperatively. The average maximum occupation ratio of OPLL was 56.7%. In conclusion, PDF without correcting cervical alignment for patients with K-line (-) OPLL showed moderate neurological recovery, which was acceptable considering K-line (-) predicts poor surgical outcomes. Thus, PDF is a surgical option for such patients with OPLL. PMID:27591553

  10. Comparison Between Posterior Short-segment Instrumentation Combined With Lateral-approach Interbody Fusion and Traditional Wide-open Anterior-Posterior Surgery for the Treatment of Thoracolumbar Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Zhang, Junwei; Tang, Hehu; Lu, Zhen; Liu, Shujia; Chen, Shizheng; Hong, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to compare the radiographic and clinical outcomes between posterior short-segment pedicle instrumentation combined with lateral-approach interbody fusion and traditional anterior-posterior (AP) surgery for the treatment of thoracolumbar fractures. Lateral-approach interbody fusion has achieved satisfactory results for thoracic and lumbar degenerative disease. However, few studies have focused on the use of this technique for the treatment of thoracolumbar fractures. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were established. All patients who meet the above criteria were prospectively treated by posterior short-segment instrumentation and secondary-staged minimally invasive lateral-approach interbody fusion, and classified as group A. A historical group of patients who were treated by traditional wide-open AP approach was used as a control group and classified as group B. The radiological and clinical outcomes were compared between the 2 groups. There were 12 patients in group A and 18 patients in group B. The mean operative time and intraoperative blood loss of anterior reconstruction were significantly higher in group B than those in group A (127.1 ± 21.7 vs 197.5 ± 47.7 min, P < 0.01; 185.8 ± 62.3 vs 495 ± 347.4 mL, P < 0.01). Two of the 12 (16.7%) patients in group A experienced 2 surgical complications: 1 (8.3%) major and 1 (8.3%) minor. Six of the 18 (33%) patients in group B experienced 9 surgical complications: 3 (16.7%) major and 6 (33.3%) minor. There was no significant difference between the 2 groups regarding loss of correction (4.3 ± 2.1 vs 4.2 ± 2.4, P = 0.89) and neurological function at final follow-up (P = 0.77). In both groups, no case of instrumentation failure, pseudarthrosis, or nonunion was noted. Compared with the wide-open AP surgery, posterior short-segment pedicle instrumentation, combined with minimally invasive lateral-approach interbody fusion, can achieve similar

  11. Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Robin

    1990-10-01

    The book abounds with fascinating anecdotes about fusion's rocky path: the spurious claim by Argentine dictator Juan Peron in 1951 that his country had built a working fusion reactor, the rush by the United States to drop secrecy and publicize its fusion work as a propaganda offensive after the Russian success with Sputnik; the fortune Penthouse magazine publisher Bob Guccione sank into an unconventional fusion device, the skepticism that met an assertion by two University of Utah chemists in 1989 that they had created "cold fusion" in a bottle. Aimed at a general audience, the book describes the scientific basis of controlled fusion--the fusing of atomic nuclei, under conditions hotter than the sun, to release energy. Using personal recollections of scientists involved, it traces the history of this little-known international race that began during the Cold War in secret laboratories in the United States, Great Britain and the Soviet Union, and evolved into an astonishingly open collaboration between East and West.

  12. Single-stage posterior-only approach treating single-segment thoracic tubercular spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiongjie; Liu, Hongzhe; Wang, Guoping; Liu, Xiangyang

    2015-01-01

    There are quite a few controversies on surgical management of single-segment thoracic spinal tuberculosis (STB) with neurological deficits. The present study was to compare single-stage posterior-only transpedicular debridement, interbody fusion and posterior instrumentation (posterior-only surgery) with a combined posterior-anterior surgical approach for treatment of single-segment thoracic STB with neurological deficits and to determinethe clinical feasibility and effectiveness of posterior-only surgical treatment. Sixty patients with single-segment thoracic STB with neurological deficits were treated with one of two surgical procedures in our center from January 2003 to January 2013. Thirty patients were treated with posterior-only surgery (Group A) andthirty were treated with combined posterior-anterior surgery (Group B). The American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) score system to evaluate the neurological deficits, thevisual analogue scale (VAS) to assess the degree of pain, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) to judge the activity of tuberculosis (TB), surgery duration, intraoperative blood loss, length of hospitalization, bonyfusion rates, and kyphosis correction of the two groups were compared. The average follow-up period was 36.5 ± 9.2 months for Group A and 34.6 ± 10.2 months for Group B. Under the ASIA score system, all patients improved with treatment. STB was completely cured and grafted bones were fused within 5-11 months in allpatients. There were no persistent or recurrent infections orobvious differences in radiological results between thegroups. The kyphosis deformity was significantly corrected after surgical management. The average operative duration, blood loss, length of hospital stay, and postoperative complication rateof Group A were lower than those of Group B. In conclusions, posterior-only surgery is feasible and effective, resulting in better clinical outcomes than combined posterior-anterior surgeries

  13. Hybrid surgery versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion for multilevel cervical degenerative disc diseases: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Peng; Fu, Xin; Li, Zhi-Jun; Sun, Xiao-Lei; Ma, Xin-Long

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this meta-analysis is to compare hybrid surgery (HS) and cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for multilevel cervical degenerative disc diseases (DDD). Systematic searches of all published studies through March 2015 were identified from Cochrane Library, Medline, PubMed, Embase, ScienceDirect, CNKI, WANFANG DATA and CQVIP. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and non-RCTs involving HS and ACDF for multilevel DDD were included. All literature was searched and assessed by two independent reviewers according to the standard of Cochrane systematic review. Data of functional and radiological outcomes in two groups were pooled, which was then analyzed by RevMan 5.2 software. One RCT and four non-RCTs encompassing 160 patients met the inclusion criteria. Meta-analysis revealed significant differences in blood loss (p = 0.005), postoperative C2-C7 ROM (p = 0.002), ROM of superior adjacent segment (p < 0.00001) and ROM of inferior adjacent segment (p = 0.0007) between the HS group and the ACDF group. No significant differences were found regarding operation time (p = 0.75), postoperative VAS (p = 0.18) and complications (p = 0.73) between the groups. Hybrid surgery demonstrated excellent clinical efficacy and radiological results. Postoperative C2-C7 ROM was closer to the physiological status. No decrease in the ROM of the adjacent segment was noted in the hybrid surgery group. PMID:26307360

  14. Thoracoscopic Ligation of the Thoracic Duct

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Julio A.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: When nonoperative treatment of chylothorax fails, thoracic duct ligation is usually performed through a thoracotomy. We describe two cases of persistent chylothorax, in a child and an adult, successfully treated with thoracoscopic ligation of the thoracic duct. Methods: A 4-year-old girl developed a right chylothorax following a Fontan procedure. Aggressive nonoperative management failed to eliminate the persistent chyle loss. A 72-year-old insulin-dependent diabetic man was involved in a motor vehicle accident, in which he sustained multiple fractured ribs, a right hemopneumothorax, a right femoral shaft fracture, and a T-11 thoracic vertebral fracture. Subsequently, he developed a right chylothorax, which did not respond to nonoperative management. Both patients were successfully treated with thoracoscopic ligation of the thoracic duct. Results: The child had significant decrease of chyle drainage following surgery. Increased drainage that appeared after the introduction of full feedings five days postoperatively was controlled with the somatostatin analog octreotide. The chest tube was removed two weeks after surgery. After two years' follow-up, she has had no recurrence of chylothorax. The adult had no chyle drainage following surgery. He was maintained on a medium-chain triglyceride diet postoperatively for two weeks. The chest tube was removed four days after surgery. After six months' follow-up, he has had no recurrence of chylothorax. Conclusions: Thoracoscopic ligation of the thoracic duct provides a safe and effective treatment of chylothorax and may avoid thoracotomy and its associated morbidity. PMID:10987402

  15. Mid-Thoracic Spinal Injuries during Horse Racing: Report of 3 Cases and Review of Causative Factors and Prevention Measurements.

    PubMed

    Triantafyllopoulos, Ioannis; Panagopoulos, Andreas; Sapkas, George

    2013-01-01

    We report three cases of a rare pattern of mid-thoracic spine injuries after horse racing falls and discuss possible causative factors and prevention measurements to reduce injury rates in professional riding and racing. Three patients, 2 male and 1 female with a mean age of 28 years old, underwent surgical treatment for mid-thoracic fractures after professional equestrian activities. The ASIA scale was E in one patient, B in the other one and A in the third. Multilevel posterior fusion was used in two patients and somatectomy plus fusion in the other. Follow up evaluation included changing of the ASIA scale, functional outcome and participation in equestrian activities. One patient fully recovered after surgery. Two patients remained paraplegic despite early surgical treatment and prolonged rehabilitation therapy. All patients had ended their professional equestrian career. This report analyzes possible mechanisms of injury and the pattern of mid-thoracic spine fractures after professional horse riding injuries. Despite skill improvements and continued safety education for horse riding, prophylactic measures for both the head and the spine should be refined. According to our study, additional mid-thoracic spinal protection should be added. PMID:23841001

  16. Postoperative Increase in Occiput–C2 Angle Negatively Impacts Subaxial Lordosis after Occipito–Upper Cervical Posterior Fusion Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Inada, Taigo; Furuya, Takeo; Kamiya, Koshiro; Ota, Mitsutoshi; Maki, Satoshi; Suzuki, Takane; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Yamazaki, Masashi; Aramomi, Masaaki; Mannoji, Chikato

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Purpose To elucidate the impact of postoperative occiput–C2 (O–C2) angle change on subaxial cervical alignment. Overview of Literature In the case of occipito–upper cervical fixation surgery, it is recommended that the O–C2 angle should be set larger than the preoperative value postoperatively. Methods The present study included 17 patients who underwent occipito–upper cervical spine (above C4) posterior fixation surgery for atlantoaxial subluxation of various etiologies. Plain lateral cervical radiographs in a neutral position at standing were obtained and the O–C2 angle and subaxial lordosis angle (the angle between the endplates of the lowest instrumented vertebra (LIV) and C7 vertebrae) were measured preoperatively and postoperatively soon after surgery and ambulation and at the final follow-up visit. Results There was a significant negative correlation between the average postoperative alteration of O–C2 angle (DO–C2) and the average postoperative alteration of subaxial lordosis angle (Dsubaxial lordosis angle) (r=–0.47, p=0.03). Conclusions There was a negative correlation between DO–C2 and Dsubaxial lordosis angles. This suggests that decrease of mid-to lower-cervical lordosis acts as a compensatory mechanism for lordotic correction between the occiput and C2. In occipito-cervical fusion surgery, care must be taken to avoid excessive O–C2 angle correction because it might induce mid-to-lower cervical compensatory decrease of lordosis. PMID:27559456

  17. Injection of Bupivacaine into Disc Space to Detect Painful Nonunion after Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion (ALIF) Surgery in Patients with Discogenic Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Seiji; Orita, Sumihisa; Inoue, Gen; Eguchi, Yawara; Takaso, Masashi; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Kuniyoshi, Kazuki; Aoki, Yasuchika; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Kamoda, Hiroto; Suzuki, Miyako; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Kubota, Gou; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Toyone, Tomoaki; Nakamura, Junichi; Kishida, Shunji; Sato, Jun; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Bupivacaine is commonly used for the treatment of back pain and the diagnosis of its origin. Nonunion is sometimes observed after spinal fusion surgery; however, whether the nonunion causes pain is controversial. In the current study, we aimed to detect painful nonunion by injecting bupivacaine into the disc space of patients with nonunion after anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) surgery for discogenic low back pain. Materials and Methods From 52 patients with low back pain, we selected 42 who showed disc degeneration at only one level (L4-L5 or L5-S1) on magnetic resonance imaging and were diagnosed by pain provocation on discography and pain relief by discoblock (the injection of bupivacaine). They underwent ALIF surgery. If the patients showed low back pain and nonunion 2 years after surgery, we injected bupivacaine into the nonunion disc space. Patients showing pain relief after injection of bupivacaine underwent additional posterior fixation using pedicle screws. These patients were followed up 2 years after the revision surgery. Results Of the 42 patient subjects, 7 showed nonunion. Four of them did not show low back pain; whereas 3 showed moderate or severe low back pain. These 3 patients showed pain reduction after injection of bupivacaine into their nonunion disc space and underwent additional posterior fixation. They showed bony union and pain relief 2 years after the revision surgery. Conclusion Injection of bupivacaine into the nonunion disc space after ALIF surgery for discogenic low back pain is useful for diagnosis of the origin of pain. PMID:24532522

  18. Mortality from isolated coronary bypass surgery: a comparison of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the EuroSCORE risk prediction algorithms.

    PubMed

    Qadir, Irfan; Salick, Muhammad Musa; Perveen, Shazia; Sharif, Hasanat

    2012-03-01

    We compared the performances of the additive European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation, EuroSCORE (AES) and logistic EuroSCORE (LES) with the Society of Thoracic Surgeons' risk prediction algorithm in terms of discrimination and calibration in predicting mortality in patients undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) at a single institution in Pakistan. Both models were applied to 380 patients, operated upon at the Aga Khan University Hospital from August 2009 to July 2010. The actual mortality was 2.89%. The mean AES of all patients was 4.36 ± 3.58%, the mean LES was 5.96 ± 9.18% and the mean Society of Thoracic Surgeons' (STS) score was 2.30 ± 4.16%. The Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test gave a P-value of 0.801 for AES, 0.699 for LES and 0.981 for STS. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.866 for AES, 0.842 for LES and 0.899 for STS. STS outperformed AES and LES both in terms of calibration and discrimination. STS, however, underestimated mortality in the top 20% of patients having an STS score >2.88, thus overall STS estimates were lower than actual mortality. We conclude that STS is a more accurate model for risk assessment as compared to additive and logistic EuroSCORE models in the Pakistani population. PMID:22184465

  19. Society of Thoracic Surgeons

    MedlinePlus

    ... With Its Intense Demands New Website from The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Puts the Power of Information ... Hotel Discount for STS Members Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. All rights reserved. Expanded Proprietary ...

  20. Fusion with the Cross-Gender Group Predicts Genital Sex Reassignment Surgery.

    PubMed

    Swann, William B; Gómez, Ángel; Vázquez, Alexandra; Guillamón, Antonio; Segovia, Santiago; Carrillo, Beatriz; Carillo, Beatriz

    2015-07-01

    Transsexuals vary in the sacrifices that they make while transitioning to their cross-gender group. We suggest that one influence on the sacrifices they make is identity fusion. When people fuse with a group, a visceral and irrevocable feeling of oneness with the group develops. The personal self (the sense of "I" and "me") remains potent and combines synergistically with the social self to motivate behavior. We hypothesized that transsexuals who felt fused with the cross-gender group would be especially willing to make sacrifices while transitioning to that group. Our sample included 22 male-to-female (MtF) and 16 female-to-male (FtM) transsexuals. Consistent with expectation, those who were fused with their cross-gender group (1) expressed more willingness to sacrifice close relationships in the process of changing sex than non-fused transsexuals and (2) actually underwent irreversible surgical change of their primary sexual characteristics (vaginoplasty for MtF transsexuals and hysterectomy for FtM transsexuals). These outcomes were not predicted by a measure of "group identification," which occurs when membership in the group eclipses the personal self (the "I" and "me" is subsumed by the group; in the extreme case, brainwashing occurs). These findings confirm and extend earlier evidence that identity fusion is uniquely effective in tapping a propensity to make substantial sacrifices for the group. We discuss identity fusion as a social psychological determinant of the choices of transsexuals. PMID:25666854

  1. Hybrid surgery versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion for multilevel cervical degenerative disc diseases: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Peng; Fu, Xin; Li, Zhi-Jun; Sun, Xiao-Lei; Ma, Xin-Long

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this meta-analysis is to compare hybrid surgery (HS) and cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for multilevel cervical degenerative disc diseases (DDD). Systematic searches of all published studies through March 2015 were identified from Cochrane Library, Medline, PubMed, Embase, ScienceDirect, CNKI, WANFANG DATA and CQVIP. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and non-RCTs involving HS and ACDF for multilevel DDD were included. All literature was searched and assessed by two independent reviewers according to the standard of Cochrane systematic review. Data of functional and radiological outcomes in two groups were pooled, which was then analyzed by RevMan 5.2 software. One RCT and four non-RCTs encompassing 160 patients met the inclusion criteria. Meta-analysis revealed significant differences in blood loss (p = 0.005), postoperative C2–C7 ROM (p = 0.002), ROM of superior adjacent segment (p < 0.00001) and ROM of inferior adjacent segment (p = 0.0007) between the HS group and the ACDF group. No significant differences were found regarding operation time (p = 0.75), postoperative VAS (p = 0.18) and complications (p = 0.73) between the groups. Hybrid surgery demonstrated excellent clinical efficacy and radiological results. Postoperative C2–C7 ROM was closer to the physiological status. No decrease in the ROM of the adjacent segment was noted in the hybrid surgery group. PMID:26307360

  2. Acute Shingles after Resection of Thoracic Schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Muesse, Jason L.; Blackmon, Shanda H.; Harris, Richard L.; Kim, Min P.

    2012-01-01

    Herpes zoster is relatively uncommon after surgery in immunocompetent patients. To our knowledge, there have been no reports of herpes zoster after the resection of a thoracic schwannoma. We report the case of a 48-year-old woman in whom acute shingles developed after the video-assisted thoracic surgical resection of a posterior mediastinal schwannoma adjacent to the 4th thoracic vertebral body. The patient recovered after receiving timely antiviral therapy. Rash and pain are common in patients who have wound infections and contact dermatitis after surgery, so the possible reactivation of varicella virus might not be prominent in the surgeon's mind. This case serves as a reminder that viral infections such as shingles should be considered in the differential diagnosis of postoperative erythema and pain. PMID:22740749

  3. Three-dimensional reconstruction of thoracic structures: based on Chinese Visible Human.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi; Luo, Na; Tan, Liwen; Fang, Binji; Li, Ying; Xie, Bing; Liu, Kaijun; Chu, Chun; Li, Min; Zhang, Shaoxiang

    2013-01-01

    We managed to establish three-dimensional digitized visible model of human thoracic structures and to provide morphological data for imaging diagnosis and thoracic and cardiovascular surgery. With Photoshop software, the contour line of lungs and mediastinal structures including heart, aorta and its ramus, azygos vein, superior vena cava, inferior vena cava, thymus, esophagus, diaphragm, phrenic nerve, vagus nerve, sympathetic trunk, thoracic vertebrae, sternum, thoracic duct, and so forth were segmented from the Chinese Visible Human (CVH)-1 data set. The contour data set of segmented thoracic structures was imported to Amira software and 3D thorax models were reconstructed via surface rendering and volume rendering. With Amira software, surface rendering reconstructed model of thoracic organs and its volume rendering reconstructed model were 3D reconstructed and can be displayed together clearly and accurately. It provides a learning tool of interpreting human thoracic anatomy and virtual thoracic and cardiovascular surgery for medical students and junior surgeons. PMID:24369489

  4. Surgical approaches for the management of idiopathic thoracic scoliosis and the indications for combined anterior-posterior technique.

    PubMed

    Rauzzino, M J; Shaffrey, C I; Wagner, J; Nockels, R; Abel, M

    1999-05-15

    The indications for surgical intervention in patients with idiopathic scoliosis have been well defined. The goals of surgery are to achieve fusion and arrest progressive curvature while restoring normal coronal and sagittal balance. As first introduced by Harrington, posterior fusion, the gold standard of treatment, has a proven record of success. More recently, anterior techniques for performing fusion procedures via either a thoracotomy or a retroperitoneal approach have been popularized in attempts to achieve better correction of curvature, preserve motion segments, and avoid some of the complications of posterior fusion such as the development of the flat-back syndrome. Anterior instrumentation alone, although effective, can be kyphogenic and has been shown to be associated with complications such as pseudarthrosis and instrumentation failure. Performing a combined approach in patients with scoliosis and other deformities has become an increasingly popular procedure to achieve superior correction of deformity and to minimize later complications. Indications for a combined approach (usually consisting of anterior release, arthrodesis with or without use of instrumentation, and posterior segmental fusion) include: prevention of crankshaft phenomenon in juvenile or skeletally immature adolescents; correction of large curves (75 degrees ) or excessively rigid curves in skeletally mature or immature patients; correction of curves with large sagittal-plane deformities such as thoracic kyphosis (> 90 degrees ) or thoracic lordosis (> 20 degrees ); and correction of thoracolumbar curves that need to be fused to the sacrum. Surgery may be performed either in a staged proceedure or, more commonly, in a single sitting. The authors discuss techniques for combined surgery and complication avoidance. PMID:17031912

  5. Anterior instrumentation for the treatment of pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis of thoracic and lumbar spine

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Hua; Jiang, Lei-Sheng

    2008-01-01

    Anterior radical debridement and bone grafting is popular in the treatment of pyogenic infection of the spine, but there remains great concern of placing instrumentation in the presence of infection because of the potentiality of infection recurrence after surgery. The objective of this study was to prospectively evaluate the efficacy and safety of anterior instrumentation in patients who underwent simultaneous anterior debridement and autogenous bone grafting for the treatment of pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis. The series consisted of 22 consecutive patients who were treated with anterior debridement, interbody fusion with autogenous bone grafting and anterior instrumentation for pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis of thoracic and lumbar spine. The patients were prospectively followed up for a minimum of 3 years (average 46.1 months; range 36–74 months). Data were obtained for assessing clinically the neurological function and pain and radiologically the spinal alignment and fusion progress as well as recurrence of the infection. All the patients experienced complete or significant relief of back pain with rapid improvement of neurological function. Kyphosis was improved with an average correction rate of 93.1% (range 84–100%). Solid fusion and healing of the infection was achieved in all the patients without any evidence of recurrent or residual infection. The study shows that combined with perioperative antibiotic regimen, anterior instrumentation is effective and safe in the treatment of pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis of thoracic and lumbar spine directly following radical debridement and autogenous bone grafting. PMID:18575900

  6. Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery Plus Lumbar Mini-Open Surgery for Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Hyon Su; Kim, Hak Sun; Ankur, Nanda; Kho, Phillip Anthony; Kim, Sung Jun; Kim, Do Yeon; Park, Jin Oh; Moon, Seong Hwan; Lee, Hwan Mo

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The objectives of this study are to describe the outcome of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) patients treated with Video Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery (VATS) plus supplementary minimal incision in the lumbar region for thoracic and lumbar deformity correction and fusion. Materials and Methods This is a case series of 13 patients treated with VATS plus lumbar mini-open surgery for AIS. A total of 13 patients requiring fusions of both the thoracic and lumbar regions were included in this study: 5 of these patients were classified as Lenke type 1A and 8 as Lenke type 5C. Fusion was performed using VATS up to T12 or L1 vertebral level. Lower levels were accessed via a small mini-incision in the lumbar area to gain access to the lumbar spine via the retroperitoneal space. All patients had a minimum follow-up of 1 year. Results The average number of fused vertebrae was 7.1 levels. A significant correction in the Cobb angle was obtained at the final follow-up (p = 0.001). The instrumented segmental angle in the sagittal plane was relatively well-maintained following surgery, albeit with a slight increase. Scoliosis Research Society-22 (SRS-22) scores were noted have significantly improved at the final follow-up (p < 0.05). Conclusion Indications for the use of VATS may be extended from patients with localized thoracic scoliosis to those with thoracolumbar scoliosis. By utilizing a supplementary minimal incision in the lumbar region, a satisfactory deformity correction may be accomplished with minimal post-operative scarring. PMID:21155045

  7. Contemporary role of minimally invasive thoracic surgery in the management of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations: report of two cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bakhos, Charles T; Wang, Stephani C; Rosen, Jonathan M

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVM) can have potentially serious neurological and cardiac consequences if left untreated. Embolization has supplanted surgical resection as the first line treatment modality. However, this technique is not always successful and carries risks of air embolism, migration of the coil, myocardial rupture, vascular injury, pulmonary hypertension, and pulmonary infarction. We present two patients with symptomatic PAVM despite multiple embolizations: the first one with recurrent and persistent hemoptysis who underwent a thoracoscopic lobectomy, and the second one with chronic debilitating pleuritic pain subsequent to embolization who underwent a thoracoscopic wedge resection. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) with lung resection was successfully performed in both patients, with complete resolution of their symptoms. We also review the literature regarding the contemporary role of surgery in PAVM, particularly thoracoscopy. PMID:26904229

  8. In-hospital complications and mortality after elective spinal fusion surgery in the united states: a study of the nationwide inpatient sample from 2001 to 2005.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yang; Silverstein, Jonathan C; Roth, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Spinal fusion surgery has increased dramatically and patients presenting for surgery are often more medically challenging. We hypothesized that advanced age and coexisting morbidities have increased in the population undergoing spinal fusion and are associated with greater risks for immediate complications and mortality. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample was retrospectively reviewed for discharges after a principal procedure code for elective spinal fusion. Total records meeting study inclusion criteria were 254,640. Coexisting morbidities were tabulated using Elixhauser comorbidities and the Charlson comorbidity index. Logistic regression identified risk factors associated with in-hospital mortality and early complications. The largest increase in spinal fusion surgery was in patients >65 years. Overall, those with at least 1 comorbidity increased (49% to 62%; P=0.002), as did mean Charlson index (0.146 to 0.202; P<0.001). In-hospital mortality was 0.13%, but 0.29%, and 0.64% for patients of 65 to 74, and those >or=75 years, respectively. Adjusted odds ratios for complications in 65-year to 74-year olds versus <65 years was 1.78 (95% confidence interval, 1.71-1.84; P<0.001), and for mortality 3.81 (95% confidence interval, 2.62-5.55; P<0.001); risks increased with the number of coexisting morbidities. Congestive heart failure, chronic pulmonary disease, coagulopathy, metastatic cancer, renal failure, and weight loss significantly correlated with in-hospital mortality, whereas hypertension or hypothyroidism had, unexpectedly, the opposite effect. Although it is known for some other forms of complex surgery, we showed that elderly and medically complex spinal fusion patients were at increased risk for in-hospital mortality and early complications. The majority of complications were operative, pulmonary, cardiovascular, or genito-urinary. Patient risk correlated with the number and nature of coexisting morbidities. PMID:19098620

  9. Real-time video fusion using a distributed architecture in robotic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwartowitz, David M.; Rettmann, Maryam E.; Holmes, David R., III; Robb, Richard A.

    2009-02-01

    The use of medical robotics has been increasing in recent years. This increase in popularity can be attributed to the improvement in dexterity robots provide over traditional laparoscopy, as well as the increasing number of applications of robotic surgery. The daVinci from Intuitive Surgical, one of the more commonly used robotic surgery systems, relies on stereo laparoscopic video for guidance, which restricts visualization to only surface anatomy. Oftentimes the localization of subsurface anatomic structures is critical to the success of surgical intervention. The implementation of image guidance in medical robotics adds the ability to see into the surface; however, current implementations are restrictive in terms of flexibility or scalability, especially in the ability to process real-time video data. We present a system architecture which allows for use of multiple computers through a centralized database; which can fuse additional information to the real-time video stream. This architecture is independent of hardware or software and is extensible to a large number of clinical applications.

  10. Lumbar instrumented fusion compared with cognitive intervention and exercises in patients with chronic back pain after previous surgery for disc herniation: a prospective randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Brox, Jens Ivar; Reikerås, Olav; Nygaard, Øystein; Sørensen, Roger; Indahl, Aage; Holm, Inger; Keller, Anne; Ingebrigtsen, Tor; Grundnes, Oliver; Lange, Johan Emil; Friis, Astrid

    2006-05-01

    The effectiveness of lumbar fusion for chronic low back pain after surgery for disc herniation has not been evaluated in a randomized controlled trial. The aim of the present study was to compare the effectiveness of lumbar fusion with posterior transpedicular screws and cognitive intervention and exercises. Sixty patients aged 25-60 years with low back pain lasting longer than 1 year after previous surgery for disc herniation were randomly allocated to the two treatment groups. Experienced back surgeons performed transpedicular fusion. Cognitive intervention consisted of a lecture intended to give the patient an understanding that ordinary physical activity would not harm the disc and a recommendation to use the back and bend it. This was reinforced by three daily physical exercise sessions for 3 weeks. The primary outcome measure was the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Outcome data were analyzed on an intention-to-treat basis. Ninety-seven percent of the patients, including seven of eight patients who had either not attended treatment (n=5) or changed groups (n=2), completed 1-year follow-up. ODI was significantly improved from 47 to 38 after fusion and from 45 to 32 after cognitive intervention and exercises. The mean difference between treatments after adjustment for gender was -7.3 (95% CI -17.3 to 2.7, p=0.15). The success rate was 50% in the fusion group and 48% in the cognitive intervention/exercise group. For patients with chronic low back pain after previous surgery for disc herniation, lumbar fusion failed to show any benefit over cognitive intervention and exercises. PMID:16545523

  11. Hybrid Surgery Versus Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion in Multilevel Cervical Disc Diseases: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianfeng; Meng, Fanxin; Ding, Yan; Li, Jie; Han, Jian; Zhang, Xintao; Dong, Wei

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the outcomes and reliability of hybrid surgery (HS) versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for the treatment of multilevel cervical spondylosis and disc diseases.Hybrid surgery, combining cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) with fusion, is a novel treatment to multilevel cervical degenerated disc disease in recent years. However, the effect and reliability of HS are still unclear compared with ACDF.To investigate the studies of HS versus ACDF in patients with multilevel cervical disease, electronic databases (Medline, Embase, Pubmed, Cochrane library, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) were searched. Studies were included when they compared HS with ACDF and reported at least one of the following outcomes: functionality, neck pain, arm pain, cervical range of motion (ROM), quality of life, and incidence of complications. No language restrictions were used. Two authors independently assessed the methodological quality of included studies and extracted the relevant data.Seven clinical controlled trials were included in this study. Two trials were prospective and the other 5 were retrospective. The results of the meta-analysis indicated that HS achieved better recovery of NDI score (P = 0.038) and similar recovery of VAS score (P = 0.058) compared with ACDF at 2 years follow-up. Moreover, the total cervical ROM (C2-C7) after HS was preserved significantly more than the cervical ROM after ACDF (P = 0.000) at 2 years follow-up. Notably, the compensatory increase of the ROM of superior and inferior adjacent segments was significant in ACDF groups at 2-year follow-up (P < 0.01), compared with HS.The results demonstrate that HS provides equivalent outcomes and functional recovery for cervical disc diseases, and significantly better preservation of cervical ROM compared with ACDF in 2-year follow-up. This suggests the HS is an effective alternative invention for the treatment of multilevel cervical spondylosis to

  12. Single-incision video-assisted thoracic surgery lobectomy in the treatment of adult communicating bronchopulmonary foregut malformation with large aberrant artery.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang Wan; Kim, Do Hyung

    2016-01-01

    Single-incision thoracoscopic surgery (SITS) is not yet widely used for treating pulmonary sequestration due to the difficulty of manipulating an aberrant systemic artery or working around inflamed tissue. It is also difficult to control massive bleeding if the aberrant artery ruptures during excision. We modified the SITS lobectomy technique so that it was suitable for treating pulmonary sequestration. We changed the order of excision of anatomical structures and introduced two-stage stapling of the aberrant artery for easy, safe stapling in SITS lobectomy. Single-port VATS is an acceptable method for major pulmonary resection for the treatment of intrapulmonary sequestration. PMID:26904246

  13. Flow capacity of skeletonized versus pedicled internal thoracic artery in coronary artery bypass graft surgery: systematic review, meta-analysis and meta-regression.

    PubMed

    Sá, Michel Pompeu Barros Oliveira; Cavalcanti, Paulo Ernando Ferraz; Santos, Henrique José de Andrade Costa; Soares, Artur Freire; Miranda, Rodrigo Gusmão Albuquerque; Araújo, Mayara Lopes; Lima, Ricardo Carvalho

    2015-07-01

    Many surgeons are concerned about the flow capacity of a skeletonized internal thoracic artery (ITA) in comparison with a pedicled ITA used during coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). This work aims to summarize the evidence comparing the flow capacity of a skeletonized versus pedicled ITA during CABG. We performed systematic review and meta-analysis according to the PRISMA statement based on a search in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL/CCTR, ClinicalTrials.gov, SciELO, LILACS, Google Scholar and reference lists of relevant articles. Studies included were original studies whose populations comprised patients undergoing CABG; compared outcomes between skeletonized versus pedicled ITA; the outcomes included data regarding intraoperative flow capacity of the grafts; the studies were prospective or retrospective or non-randomized or randomized controlled trials. In total, eight studies were identified and reviewed for eligibility and data were extracted. Forest plots and the summarized difference in means including 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated and meta-regressions were performed. There was a statistically significant difference in favour of the skeletonized ITA compared with the pedicled ITA in terms of flow capacity (random-effect model: additional 20.8 ml/min, 95% CI 6.6-35.0, P = 0.004), being the summary measures under the influence of heterogeneity of the effects, but free from publication bias. We observed a difference with regard to the type of study, since non-randomized studies together demonstrated the superiority of a skeletonized ITA (random-effect model: additional 32.3 ml/min, 95% CI 21.0-43.6, P < 0.001), but the randomized studies together did not show it (random-effect model: additional 13.2 ml/min, 95% CI -1.1 to 27.6, P = 0.071). Meta-regression demonstrated some modulation influence by female gender, age and diabetes on the flow capacity of grafts. In summary, in terms of flow capacity, a skeletonized ITA appears to be superior in

  14. ACCF/SCAI/STS/AATS/AHA/ASNC/HFSA/SCCT 2012 appropriate use criteria for coronary revascularization focused update: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manesh R; Dehmer, Gregory J; Hirshfeld, John W; Smith, Peter K; Spertus, John A; Masoudi, Frederick A; Dehmer, Gregory J; Patel, Manesh R; Smith, Peter K; Chambers, Charles E; Ferguson, T Bruce; Garcia, Mario J; Grover, Frederick L; Holmes, David R; Klein, Lloyd W; Limacher, Marian C; Mack, Michael J; Malenka, David J; Park, Myung H; Ragosta, Michael; Ritchie, James L; Rose, Geoffrey A; Rosenberg, Alan B; Russo, Andrea M; Shemin, Richard J; Weintraub, William S; Wolk, Michael J; Bailey, Steven R; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Kramer, Christopher M; Min, James K; Patel, Manesh R; Shaw, Leslee; Stainback, Raymond F; Allen, Joseph M

    2012-04-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an update of the appropriate use criteria (AUC) for coronary revascularization frequently considered. In the initial document, 180 clinical scenarios were developed to mimic patient presentations encountered in everyday practice and included information on symptom status, extent of medical therapy, risk level as assessed by noninvasive testing, and coronary anatomy. This update provides a reassessment of clinical scenarios the writing group felt to be affected by significant changes in the medical literature or gaps from prior criteria. The methodology used in this update is similar to the initial document, and the definition of appropriateness was unchanged. The technical panel scored the clinical scenarios on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that revascularization is considered appropriate and likely to improve patients' health outcomes or survival. Scores of 1 to 3 indicate revascularization is considered inappropriate and unlikely to improve health outcomes or survival. Scores in the mid-range (4 to 6) indicate a clinical scenario for which the likelihood that coronary revascularization will improve health outcomes or survival is uncertain. In general, as seen with the prior AUC, the use of coronary revascularization for patients with acute coronary syndromes and combinations of significant symptoms and/or ischemia is appropriate. In contrast, revascularization of asymptomatic patients or patients with low-risk findings on noninvasive testing and minimal medical therapy are viewed less favorably. The technical panel felt that based on recent studies, coronary artery bypass grafting remains an appropriate method of revascularization for patients with high burden of coronary artery disease (CAD

  15. ACCF/SCAI/STS/AATS/AHA/ASNC/HFSA/SCCT 2012 Appropriate use criteria for coronary revascularization focused update: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manesh R; Dehmer, Gregory J; Hirshfeld, John W; Smith, Peter K; Spertus, John A

    2012-02-28

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an update of the appropriate use criteria (AUC) for coronary revascularization frequently considered. In the initial document, 180 clinical scenarios were developed to mimic patient presentations encountered in everyday practice and included information on symptom status, extent of medical therapy, risk level as assessed by noninvasive testing, and coronary anatomy. This update provides a reassessment of clinical scenarios the writing group felt to be affected by significant changes in the medical literature or gaps from prior criteria. The methodology used in this update is similar to the initial document, and the definition of appropriateness was unchanged. The technical panel scored the clinical scenarios on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that revascularization is considered appropriate and likely to improve patients' health outcomes or survival. Scores of 1 to 3 indicate revascularization is considered inappropriate and unlikely to improve health outcomes or survival. Scores in the mid-range (4 to 6) indicate a clinical scenario for which the likelihood that coronary revascularization will improve health outcomes or survival is uncertain. In general, as seen with the prior AUC, the use of coronary revascularization for patients with acute coronary syndromes and combinations of significant symptoms and/or ischemia is appropriate. In contrast, revascularization of asymptomatic patients or patients with low-risk findings on noninvasive testing and minimal medical therapy are viewed less favorably. The technical panel felt that based on recent studies, coronary artery bypass grafting remains an appropriate method of revascularization for patients with high burden of coronary artery disease (CAD

  16. An effective intra-operative neurophysiological monitoring scheme for aneurysm clipping and spinal fusion surgeries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goryawala, Mohammed; Yaylali, Ilker; Cabrerizo, Mercedes; Vedala, Krishnatej; Adjouadi, Malek

    2012-04-01

    Somatosensory-evoked potentials (SSEPs) have been widely used for intra-operative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM). Currently at least 200-300 trials are required to generate a readable SSEP signal. This study introduces a novel approach that yields accurate detection results of the SSEP signal yet with a significantly reduced number of trials, resulting in an effectual monitoring process. The analysis was performed on data recorded in seven patients undergoing surgery, where the posterior tibial nerve was stimulated and the SSEP response was recorded from scalp electroencephalography using two bipolar electrodes, C3-C4 and CZ-FZ. The proposed approach employs an innovative, simple yet effective algorithm based on a patient-specific Gaussian template to detect the SSEP using only 30 trials. The time latencies of the P37 and N45 peaks are detected along with the peak-to-peak amplitudes. The time latencies are detected with a mean accuracy greater than 95%. Also, the P37 and N45 peak latencies and the peak-to-peak amplitude were found to be consistent throughout the surgical procedure within the 10% and 50% acceptable clinical limits, respectively. The results obtained support the assertion that the algorithm is capable of detecting SSEPs with high accuracy and consistency throughout the entire surgical procedure using only 30 trials.

  17. Staged treatment of thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis with flow injection abscess.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hao; Zhang, Yupeng; Shen, Xiongjie; Luo, Chengke; Xu, Zhengquan; Liu, Zheng; Liu, Xiangyang; Wang, Xiyang

    2015-01-01

    The study was to investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of posterior-only approach combining with puncture drainage under CT-guide in staged treatment of thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis with flow injection abscess. We retrospectively analyzed 15 patients (came from 72 cases with thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis) with flow injection abscesses underwent surgery from January 2007 to February 2009, and evaluated the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scoring system of nerve function, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), abscess absorption time and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), preoperatively and postoperatively. 15 patients were followed up for 13-37 months, no recurrence of tuberculosis, no fixation loosening and neurologic symptoms aggravated. The flow injection abscesses are absorbed within 3-6 months postoperative operation. In final follow-up, ESR went down to 5.2±2.1 mm/h from preoperative 79.6±14.8 mm/h, CRP decreased from preoperative 49.3±7.5 mg/L to 1.8±0.7 mg/L, ODI changed from 75.13±20.15 to 16.72±8.62, all of them changed significantly (P<0.05). In conclusions, one-stage posterior debridement, interbody fusion, pedicle screw fixation and two-stage CT-guided interventional therapy were safe and effective in treatment of the thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis with flow injection abscess. PMID:26770442

  18. Staged treatment of thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis with flow injection abscess

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Hao; Zhang, Yupeng; Shen, Xiongjie; Luo, Chengke; Xu, Zhengquan; Liu, Zheng; Liu, Xiangyang; Wang, Xiyang

    2015-01-01

    The study was to investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of posterior-only approach combining with puncture drainage under CT-guide in staged treatment of thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis with flow injection abscess. We retrospectively analyzed 15 patients (came from 72 cases with thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis) with flow injection abscesses underwent surgery from January 2007 to February 2009, and evaluated the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scoring system of nerve function, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), abscess absorption time and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), preoperatively and postoperatively. 15 patients were followed up for 13-37 months, no recurrence of tuberculosis, no fixation loosening and neurologic symptoms aggravated. The flow injection abscesses are absorbed within 3-6 months postoperative operation. In final follow-up, ESR went down to 5.2±2.1 mm/h from preoperative 79.6±14.8 mm/h, CRP decreased from preoperative 49.3±7.5 mg/L to 1.8±0.7 mg/L, ODI changed from 75.13±20.15 to 16.72±8.62, all of them changed significantly (P<0.05). In conclusions, one-stage posterior debridement, interbody fusion, pedicle screw fixation and two-stage CT-guided interventional therapy were safe and effective in treatment of the thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis with flow injection abscess. PMID:26770442

  19. Bilateral internal thoracic artery grafting

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of the left internal mammary artery graft to the anterior descending coronary artery as a surgical strategy has been shown to improve the survival rate and decrease the risk of adverse cardiac events in patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery. These clinical benefits appear to be related to the superior short and long-term patency rates of the internal thoracic artery graft. Although the advantages of using of both internal thoracic arteries (ITA) for bypass grafting have taken longer to prove, recent results from multiple data sets now support these findings. The major advantage of bilateral ITA grafting appears to be improved survival rate, while the disadvantages of complex ITA grafting include the increased complexity of operation, and an increased risk of wound complications. While these short-term disadvantages have been mitigated in contemporary surgical practice, they have not eliminated. Bilateral ITA grafting should be considered the procedure of choice for patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery that have a predicted survival rate of longer than ten years. PMID:23977627

  20. Endovascular aortic injury repair after thoracic pedicle screw placement.

    PubMed

    Pesenti, S; Bartoli, M A; Blondel, B; Peltier, E; Adetchessi, T; Fuentes, S

    2014-09-01

    Our objective was to describe the management and prevention of thoracic aortic injuries caused by a malposition of pedicle screws in corrective surgery of major spine deformities. Positioning pedicle screws in thoracic vertebras by posterior approach exposes to the risk of injury of the elements placed ahead of the thoracic spine, as the descending thoracic aorta. This complication can result in a cataclysmic bleeding, needing urgent vascular care, but it can also be totally asymptomatic, resulting in the long run in a pseudoaneurysm, justifying the systematic removal of the hardware. We report the case of a 76-year-old woman who underwent spinal correction surgery for thoraco-lumbar degenerative kypho-scoliosis. Immediately after the surgery, a thoracic aortic injury caused by the left T7 pedicle screw was diagnosed. The patient underwent a two-step surgery. The first step was realized by vascular surgeons and aimed to secure the aortic wall by short endovascular aortic grafting. During the second step, spine surgeons removed the responsible screw by posterior approach. The patient was discharged in a rehabilitation center 7 days after the second surgery. When such a complication occurs, a co-management by vascular and spine surgeons is necessary to avoid major complications. Endovascular management of this kind of vascular injuries permits to avoid an open surgery that have a great rate of morbi-mortality in frail patients. Nowadays, technologies exist to prevent this kind of event and may improve the security when positioning pedicle screws. PMID:25023930

  1. Clinical outcomes of video‐assisted thoracic surgery and stereotactic body radiation therapy for early‐stage non‐small cell lung cancer: A meta‐analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Longfei

    2016-01-01

    Background We compared video‐assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) lobectomy and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SABR) to explore clinical outcomes in the treatment of patients with early stage NSCLC. Methods Major medical databases were systematically searched to identify studies on VATS and SBRT published between January 2010 and October 2015. English publications of stage I and II NSCLC with adequate patients and SBRT doses were included. A multivariate random effects model was used to perform meta‐analysis to compare overall survival (OS) and disease‐free survival (DFS) between VATS and SBRT, adjusting for median age and operable patient numbers. Results Thirteen VATS (3436 patients) and 24 SBRT (4433) studies were eligible. The median age and follow‐up duration was 68 years and 42 months for VATS and 74 years and 29.4 months for SBRT patients. After adjusting for the proportion of operable patients and median age, the estimated OS rates at one, two, three, and five years with VATS were 94%, 89%, 84%, and 69% compared with 96%, 94%, 89%, and 82% for SBRT. The estimated DFS rates at one, two, three, and five years with VATS were 97%, 93%, 87%, and 77% compared with 86%, 80%, 73%, and 58% for SBRT. Conclusion Before adjustment, patients treated with SBRT had poorer clinical outcomes compared to those treated with VATS. A substantial difference between median age and operability exists between patients treated with SBRT and VATS. After adjusting for these differences, OS and DFS did not differ significantly between the two techniques.

  2. Pleural abnormalities: thoracic ultrasound to the rescue!

    PubMed Central

    Pathmanathan, Sega; Lakshminarayana, Umesh B.; Avery, Gerard R.; Kastelik, Jack A.; Morjaria, Jaymin B.

    2013-01-01

    Diaphragmatic hernias that are diagnosed in adulthood may be traumatic or congenital in nature. Therefore, respiratory specialists need to be aware of the presentation of patients with these conditions. In this report, we describe a case series of patients with congenital and traumatic diaphragmatic hernias and highlight a varied range of their presentations. Abnormalities were noted in the thorax on the chest radiographs, but it was unclear as to the nature of the anomaly. The findings on thoracic ultrasound conducted by a pulmonologist helped to direct appropriate investigations avoiding unnecessary interventions. Instead of pleural effusions, consolidation or collapse, thoracic computed tomography demonstrated diaphragmatic hernias which were managed either conservatively or by surgery. There is increasing evidence that pulmonary specialists should be trained in thoracic ultrasonography to identify pleural pathology as well as safely conducting pleural-based interventions. PMID:23819018

  3. Pleural abnormalities: thoracic ultrasound to the rescue!

    PubMed

    Aslam, Imran; Pathmanathan, Sega; Lakshminarayana, Umesh B; Avery, Gerard R; Kastelik, Jack A; Morjaria, Jaymin B

    2013-07-01

    Diaphragmatic hernias that are diagnosed in adulthood may be traumatic or congenital in nature. Therefore, respiratory specialists need to be aware of the presentation of patients with these conditions. In this report, we describe a case series of patients with congenital and traumatic diaphragmatic hernias and highlight a varied range of their presentations. Abnormalities were noted in the thorax on the chest radiographs, but it was unclear as to the nature of the anomaly. The findings on thoracic ultrasound conducted by a pulmonologist helped to direct appropriate investigations avoiding unnecessary interventions. Instead of pleural effusions, consolidation or collapse, thoracic computed tomography demonstrated diaphragmatic hernias which were managed either conservatively or by surgery. There is increasing evidence that pulmonary specialists should be trained in thoracic ultrasonography to identify pleural pathology as well as safely conducting pleural-based interventions. PMID:23819018

  4. Change of paradigm in thoracic radionecrosis management.

    PubMed

    Dast, S; Assaf, N; Dessena, L; Almousawi, H; Herlin, C; Berna, P; Sinna, R

    2016-06-01

    Classically, muscular or omental flaps are the gold standard in the management of thoracic defects following radionecrosis debridement. Their vascular supply and antibacterial property was supposed to enhance healing compared with cutaneous flaps. The evolution of reconstructive surgery allowed us to challenge this dogma. Therefore, we present five consecutive cases of thoracic radionecrosis reconstructed with cutaneous perforator flaps. In four patients, we performed a free deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap and one patient had a thoracodorsal perforator (TDAP) flap. Median time healing was 22.6 days with satisfactory cutaneous covering and good aesthetic results. There were no flap necrosis, no donor site complications. We believe that perforator flaps are a new alternative, reliable and elegant option that questions the dogma of muscular flaps in the management of thoracic radionecrosis. PMID:26831037

  5. One-Stage Posterior Debridement and Transpedicular Screw Fixation for Treating Monosegmental Thoracic and Lumbar Spinal Tuberculosis in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhili; Peng, Aifeng; Long, Xinhua; Yang, Dong; Huang, Shanhu

    2014-01-01

    Spinal tuberculosis is still prevalent in some developing countries. The purpose of this study is to investigate the efficacy and safety of one-stage posterior debridement, autogenous bone grafting, and transpedicular screw fixation in treating monosegmental thoracic and lumbar tuberculosis in adults. 37 patients were retrospectively reviewed in this study. The data of images, operative time and blood loss volume, perioperative complications, time to achieve bony fusion, VAS score, and neurologic function preoperatively and postoperatively were collected. The mean follow-up period was 21.5 ± 3.5 months. The tuberculosis was cured after surgery in all patients, and no recurrence was observed. Bony fusion was achieved in all patients with a mean time of 5.6 ± 2.5 months. Neurological outcome did not change in one case with grade A, and increased by 1–3 grades in the other patients with nerve deficit. The average preoperative and postoperative VAS scores were 5.5 ± 2.23 and 1.5 ± 1.22, respectively; the difference was significant (P < 0.05). There were three perioperative complications (8.1%, 3/37) observed in this study. In conclusion, the procedure of one-stage posterior debridement, interbody fusion with autogenous bone grafting, and posterior fixation with pedicle screw is effective and safe for treating monosegmental thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis in adults. PMID:24701134

  6. Rare case of thoracic kidney detected by renal scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Aravintho; Agrawal, Archi; Purandare, Nilendu; Shah, Sneha; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2016-01-01

    Intrathoracic kidney is a rare congenital abnormality with lowest frequency among all renal ectopias. Patients with thoracic kidneys are usually asymptomatic, and the condition is usually discovered incidentally during radiological evaluation for other conditions or during thoracic surgery. We report a case of a 62-year-old male who was referred to our department for renal scintigraphy for a nonvisualized left kidney on ultrasonography report. Both Tc-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid scans revealed a left thoracic kidney which was confirmed by CT scan of the thorax and abdomen. PMID:27385896

  7. Rare case of thoracic kidney detected by renal scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Aravintho; Agrawal, Archi; Purandare, Nilendu; Shah, Sneha; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2016-01-01

    Intrathoracic kidney is a rare congenital abnormality with lowest frequency among all renal ectopias. Patients with thoracic kidneys are usually asymptomatic, and the condition is usually discovered incidentally during radiological evaluation for other conditions or during thoracic surgery. We report a case of a 62-year-old male who was referred to our department for renal scintigraphy for a nonvisualized left kidney on ultrasonography report. Both Tc-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid scans revealed a left thoracic kidney which was confirmed by CT scan of the thorax and abdomen. PMID:27385896

  8. Chimeric Anterolateral Thigh Flap for Total Thoracic Esophageal Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Moya, Alejandro; Segura-Sampedro, Juan J; Sicilia-Castro, Domingo; Carvajo-Pérez, Francisco; Gómez-Cía, Tomás; Vázquez-Medina, Antonio; Ibáñez-Delgado, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Gastric pull-up is generally the first choice for a total thoracic esophageal reconstruction. Malfunction of this gastric conduit is uncommon, but devastating when it occurs: it causes marked comorbidity to the patient, preventing oral intake and worsening quality of life. Secondary salvage thoracic esophageal reconstruction surgery is usually performed with free or pedicled jejunum flaps or colon interposition. We present a case of a total thoracic esophageal reconstruction with an externally monitored chimeric anterolateral thigh flap, extending from the cervical esophagus to the retrosternal gastroplasty remnant. Intestinal reconstructive techniques were not an available option for this patient. PMID:26694271

  9. ACCF/SCAI/STS/AATS/AHA/ASNC 2009 Appropriateness Criteria for Coronary Revascularization: A Report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriateness Criteria Task Force, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology: Endorsed by the American Society of Echocardiography, the Heart Failure Society of America, and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manesh R; Dehmer, Gregory J; Hirshfeld, John W; Smith, Peter K; Spertus, John A

    2009-03-10

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriateness review of common clinical scenarios in which coronary revascularization is frequently considered. The clinical scenarios were developed to mimic common situations encountered in everyday practice and included information on symptom status, extent of medical therapy, risk level as assessed by noninvasive testing, and coronary anatomy. Approximately 180 clinical scenarios were developed by a writing committee and scored by a separate technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that revascularization was considered appropriate and likely to improve health outcomes or survival. Scores of 1 to 3 indicate revascularization was considered inappropriate and unlikely to improve health outcomes or survival. The mid range (4 to 6) indicates a clinical scenario for which the likelihood that coronary revascularization would improve health outcomes or survival was considered uncertain. For the majority of the clinical scenarios, the panel only considered the appropriateness of revascularization irrespective of whether this was accomplished by percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG). In a select subgroup of clinical scenarios in which revascularization is generally considered appropriate, the appropriateness of PCI and CABG individually as the primary mode of revascularization was considered. In general, the use of coronary revascularization for patients with acute coronary syndromes and combinations of significant symptoms and/or ischemia was viewed favorably. In contrast, revascularization of asymptomatic patients or patients with low-risk findings on noninvasive testing and minimal medical therapy were viewed less favorably. It is

  10. ACCF/SCAI/STS/AATS/AHA/ASNC 2009 Appropriateness Criteria for Coronary Revascularization : a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriateness Criteria Task Force, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology. Endorsed by the American Society of Echocardiography, the Heart Failure Society of America, and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manesh R; Dehmer, Gregory J; Hirshfeld, John W; Smith, Peter K; Spertus, John A; Masoudi, Frederick A; Brindis, Ralph G; Beckman, Karen J; Chambers, Charles E; Ferguson, T Bruce; Garcia, Mario J; Grover, Frederick L; Holmes, David R; Klein, Lloyd W; Limacher, Marian; Mack, Michael J; Malenka, David J; Park, Myung H; Ragosta, Michael; Ritchie, James L; Rose, Geoffrey A; Rosenberg, Alan B; Shemin, Richard J; Weintraub, William S; Wolk, Michael J; Allen, Joseph M; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Peterson, Eric D

    2009-02-15

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriateness review of common clinical scenarios in which coronary revascularization is frequently considered. The clinical scenarios were developed to mimic common situations encountered in everyday practice and included information on symptom status, extent of medical therapy, risk level as assessed by noninvasive testing, and coronary anatomy. Approximately 180 clinical scenarios were developed by a writing committee and scored by a separate technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that revascularization was considered appropriate and likely to improve health outcomes or survival. Scores of 1 to 3 indicate revascularization was considered inappropriate and unlikely to improve health outcomes or survival. The mid range (4 to 6) indicates a clinical scenario for which the likelihood that coronary revascularization would improve health outcomes or survival was considered uncertain. For the majority of the clinical scenarios, the panel only considered the appropriateness of revascularization irrespective of whether this was accomplished by percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG). In a select subgroup of clinical scenarios in which revascularization is generally considered appropriate, the appropriateness of PCI and CABG individually as the primary mode of revascularization was considered. In general, the use of coronary revascularization for patients with acute coronary syndromes and combinations of significant symptoms and/or ischemia was viewed favorably. In contrast, revascularization of asymptomatic patients or patients with low-risk findings on noninvasive testing and minimal medical therapy were viewed less favorably. It is

  11. ACCF/SCAI/STS/AATS/AHA/ASNC 2009 Appropriateness Criteria for Coronary Revascularization: a report by the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriateness Criteria Task Force, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology Endorsed by the American Society of Echocardiography, the Heart Failure Society of America, and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manesh R; Dehmer, Gregory J; Hirshfeld, John W; Smith, Peter K; Spertus, John A

    2009-02-10

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriateness review of common clinical scenarios in which coronary revascularization is frequently considered. The clinical scenarios were developed to mimic common situations encountered in everyday practice and included information on symptom status, extent of medical therapy, risk level as assessed by noninvasive testing, and coronary anatomy. Approximately 180 clinical scenarios were developed by a writing committee and scored by a separate technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that revascularization was considered appropriate and likely to improve health outcomes or survival. Scores of 1 to 3 indicate revascularization was considered inappropriate and unlikely to improve health outcomes or survival. The mid range (4 to 6) indicates a clinical scenario for which the likelihood that coronary revascularization would improve health outcomes or survival was considered uncertain. For the majority of the clinical scenarios, the panel only considered the appropriateness of revascularization irrespective of whether this was accomplished by percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG). In a select subgroup of clinical scenarios in which revascularization is generally considered appropriate, the appropriateness of PCI and CABG individually as the primary mode of revascularization was considered. In general, the use of coronary revascularization for patients with acute coronary syndromes and combinations of significant symptoms and/or ischemia was viewed favorably. In contrast, revascularization of asymptomatic patients or patients with low-risk findings on noninvasive testing and minimal medical therapy were viewed less favorably. It is

  12. Usefulness of an Image Fusion Model Using Three-Dimensional CT and MRI with Indocyanine Green Fluorescence Endoscopy as a Multimodal Assistant System in Endoscopic Transsphenoidal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Akihiro; Ohnishi, Takanori; Kohno, Shohei; Nishida, Naoya; Nakamura, Yawara; Ohtsuka, Yoshihiro; Matsumoto, Shirabe; Ohue, Shiro

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. We investigate the usefulness of multimodal assistant systems using a fusion model of preoperative three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) along with endoscopy with indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescence in establishing endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery (ETSS) as a more effective treatment procedure. Methods. Thirty-five consecutive patients undergoing ETSS in our hospital between April 2014 and March 2015 were enrolled in the study. In all patients, fusion models of 3D-CT and MRI were created by reconstructing preoperative images. In addition, in 10 patients, 12.5 mg of ICG was intravenously administered, allowing visualization of surrounding structures. We evaluated the accuracy and utility of these combined modalities in ETSS. Results. The fusion model of 3D-CT and MRI clearly demonstrated the complicated structures in the sphenoidal sinus and the position of the internal carotid arteries (ICAs), even with extensive tumor infiltration. ICG endoscopy enabled us to visualize the surrounding structures by the phasic appearance of fluorescent signals emitted at specific consecutive elapsed times. Conclusions. Preoperative 3D-CT and MRI fusion models with intraoperative ICG endoscopy allowed distinct visualization of vital structures in cases where tumors had extensively infiltrated the sphenoidal sinus. Additionally, the ICG endoscope was a useful real-time monitoring tool for ETSS. PMID:26339240

  13. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Deep Vein Thrombosis in Patients Undergoing Lumbar Interbody Fusion Surgery: A Single-Center Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Si-Dong; Ding, Wen-Yuan; Yang, Da-Long; Shen, Yong; Zhang, Ying-Ze; Feng, Shi-Qing; Zhao, Feng-Dong

    2015-12-01

    This cross-sectional study was designed to obtain the current prevalence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and analyze related risk factors in patients undergoing lumbar interbody fusion. Medical record data were collected from Department of Spinal Surgery, The Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University, between July 2014 and March 2015. Both univariate analysis and binary logistic regression analysis were performed to determine risk factors for DVT. A total of 995 patients were admitted into this study, including 484 men and 511 women, aged from 14 to 89 years old (median 50, IQR 19). The detection rate of lower limb DVT by ultrasonography was 22.4% (223/995) in patients undergoing lumbar interbody fusion. Notably, average VAS (visual analog scale) score in the first 3 days after surgery in the DVT group was more than that in the non-DVT group (Z = -21.69, P < 0.001). The logistic regression model was established as logit P = -13.257 + 0.056*X1 - 0.243*X8 + 2.085*X10 + 0.001*X12, (X1 = age; X8 = HDL; X10 = VAS; X12 = blood transfusion; x = 677.763, P < 0.001). In conclusion, advanced age, high postoperative VAS scores, and blood transfusion were risk factors for postoperative lower limb DVT. As well, the logistic regression model may contribute to an early evaluation postoperatively to ascertain the risk of lower limb DVT in patients undergoing lumbar interbody fusion surgery. PMID:26632909

  14. Thoracic outlet anatomy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... spinal vertebra to the rib. There may be pain in the neck and shoulders, and numbess in the last 3 fingers and inner forearm. Thoracic outlet syndrome is usually treated with physical therapy which helps ...

  15. Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) causes pain in the shoulder, arm, and neck. It happens when the nerves or blood vessels just below your ... vein is compressed, your hand might be sensitive to cold, or turn pale or bluish. Your arm ...

  16. Prospective, Randomized, Multicenter FDA IDE Study of CHARITÉ Artificial Disc versus Lumbar Fusion: Effect at 5-year Follow-up of Prior Surgery and Prior Discectomy on Clinical Outcomes Following Lumbar Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    McAfee, Paul C.; Banco, Robert J.; Blumenthal, Scott L.; Guyer, Richard D.; Holt, Richard T.; Majd, Mohamed E.

    2009-01-01

    Background Candidates for spinal arthrodesis or arthroplasty often present with a history of prior surgery such as laminectomy, laminotomy or discectomy. In this study, lumbar arthroplasty patients with prior surgery, and in particular patients with prior discectomy, were evaluated for their clinical outcomes at the 5-year time point. Methods Randomized patients from the 5-year CHARITÉ investigational device exemption (IDE) study were divided as follows: 1) fusion prior surgery (excluding prior decompression with fusion) group (FSG); 2) fusion prior discectomy group (FDG); 3) fusion no prior surgery group (FNG); 4) arthroplasty prior surgery group (ASG); 5) arthroplasty prior discectomy group (ADG); and 6) arthroplasty no prior surgery group (ANG). The 5-year clinical outcomes included visual analog scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index 2.0 (ODI), patient satisfaction, and work status. Results In the arthroplasty group, all subgroups had statistically significant VAS improvements from baseline (VAS change from baseline: ASG = -36.6 ± 29.6, P < 0.0001; ADG = -40.2 ± 30.9, P = 0.0002; ANG = -36.5 ± 34.6, P < 0.0001). There was no statistical difference between subgroups (P = 0.5587). In the fusion group, VAS changes from baseline were statistically significant for the FNG and FSG subgroups, but not for the FDG patients (FNG = -46.3 ± 28.8, P < 0.0001; FSG = -24.2 ± 36.4, P = 0.0444; FDG = -26.7 ± 38.7, P = 0.2188). A trend of decreased VAS improvements was observed for FSG versus FNG (P = 0.0703) subgroups. Similar findings and trends were observed in ODI scores (Changes in ODI from baseline: ASG = -20.4 ± 23.8, P < 0.0001; ANG = -26.6±21.1, P < 0.0001; ADG= -17.6 ± 28.6, P = 0.0116; FSG = -14.5 ± 21.2, P = 0.0303; FNG= -32.5 ± 22.6, P < 0.0001; FDG = -10.7 ± 9.4, P = 0.0938). The greatest improvement in work status from preoperative to postoperative was seen in the ADG subgroup (28% increase in part- and full-time employment), while the FDG subgroup

  17. Video-assisted thoracic surgery―the past, present status and the future

    PubMed Central

    Luh, Shi-ping; Liu, Hui-ping

    2006-01-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) has developed very rapidly in these two decades, and has replaced conventional open thoracotomy as a standard procedure for some simple thoracic operations as well as an option or a complementary procedure for some other more complex operations. In this paper we will review its development history, the present status and the future perspectives. PMID:16421967

  18. Congenital thoracic lordosis and scoliosis in a cat.

    PubMed

    Lee, Maris S; Taylor, Jim; Lefbom, Bonnie

    2014-08-01

    A 10-week-old domestic shorthair kitten was referred for intermittent episodes of dyspnea, cyanosis and a suspected congenital thoracic anomaly. Physical examination showed an obvious palpable concavity in the caudal thoracic spine. Thoracic radiographs showed severe caudal thoracic lordosis from T5 to T13 with a Cobb angle of -77°, a centroid lordosis angle of -68°, a vertebral index of 6.3 and a flattened sternum. Severe loss of vital capacity was suspected and surgical correction of the thoracic deformity was to be performed in two separate stages, the first being surgical ventral distraction on the sternum to increase thoracic volume and rigid fixation with an external splint. The second stage, if required, would be surgical correction of the spinal deformity to also increase thoracic volume. The initial stage of surgery was performed and postoperative radiographs showed a vertebral index of 10.3. The kitten suffered a left sided pneumothorax in recovery and died from cardiorespiratory arrest despite immediate pleural drainage and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Treatment recommendations that may benefit future case management are discussed. PMID:24393777

  19. The Use of Bone Morphogenetic Protein in Pediatric Cervical Spine Fusion Surgery: Case Reports and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Molinari, Robert W; Molinari, Christine

    2016-02-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective There is a paucity of literature describing the use of bone graft substitutes to achieve fusion in the pediatric cervical spine. The outcomes and complications involving the off-label use of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 in the pediatric cervical spine are not clearly defined. The purpose of this article is to report successful fusion without complications in two pediatric patients who had instrumented occipitocervical fusion using low-dose BMP-2. Methods A retrospective review of the medical records was performed, and the patients were followed for 5 years. Two patients under 10 years of age with upper cervical instability were treated with occipitocervical instrumented fusion using rigid occipitocervical fixation techniques along with conventionally available low-dose BMP-2. A Medline and PubMed literature search was conducted using the terms "bone morphogenetic protein," "BMP," "rh-BMP2," "bone graft substitutes," and "pediatric cervical spine." Results Solid occipitocervical fusion was achieved in both pediatric patients. There were no reported perioperative or follow-up complications. At 5-year follow-up, radiographs in both patients showed successful occipital cervical fusion without evidence of instrumentation failure or changes in the occipitocervical alignment. To date, there are few published reports on this topic. Complications and the appropriate dosage application in the pediatric posterior cervical spine remain unknown. Conclusions We describe two pediatric patients with upper cervical instability who achieved successful occipital cervical fusion without complication using off-label BMP-2. This report underscores the potential for BMP-2 to achieve successful arthrodesis of the posterior occipitocervical junction in pediatric patients. Use should be judicious as complications and long-term outcomes of pediatric BMP-2 use remain undefined in the existing literature. PMID:26835215

  20. [Thoracic endometriosis: A difficult diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Hagneré, P; Deswarte, S; Leleu, O

    2011-09-01

    Thoracic endometriosis is a rare disease, which presents in women at a mean age of 35 years, later than for pelvic endometriosis. There are no known predisposing factors for the condition and its pathogenesis is not yet clearly established. The symptoms always appear in connection with the periods of the person affected by the condition, occurring within 24-48 h after the start of menstruation. Catamenial pneumothorax is the most common clinical entity. It is associated with pelvic endometriosis in 30-50% of cases. Thoracoscopy, preferably performed during menstruation, allows full inspection of the diaphragm and the pleural cavity for defects in the diaphragm, endometrial nodules and bullae. The level of CA 125 is often elevated but this is not a reliable or specific marker. Medical treatment is aimed at blocking the action of estrogen on the endometrium and ectopic endometrial implants. GnRH analogues or danazol are the preferred treatments. Surgery to repair and strengthen the diaphragm and/or resect nodules or bullae also has a role, supplemented by pleurodesis to prevent further pneumothorax or effusions. The main risk is recurrence, and thus the current usual practice is to combine surgery, immediately followed by hormone therapy focusing on GnRH analogues. PMID:21943537

  1. Thoracic spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 6th ed. New ...

  2. Thoracic pedicle subtraction osteotomy in the treatment of severe pediatric deformities.

    PubMed

    Bakaloudis, Georgios; Lolli, Francesco; Di Silvestre, Mario; Greggi, Tiziana; Astolfi, Stefano; Martikos, Konstantinos; Vommaro, Francesco; Barbanti-Brodano, Giovanni; Cioni, Alfredo; Giacomini, Stefano

    2011-05-01

    The traditional surgical treatment of severe spinal deformities, both in adult and pediatric patients, consisted of a 360° approach. Posterior-based spinal osteotomy has recently been reported as a useful and safe technique in maximizing kyphosis and/or kyphoscoliosis correction. It obviates the deleterious effects of an anterior approach and can increase the magnitude of correction both in the coronal and sagittal plane. There are few reports in the literature focusing on the surgical treatment of severe spinal deformities in large pediatric-only series (age <16 years old) by means of a posterior-based spinal osteotomy, with no consistent results on the use of a single posterior-based thoracic pedicle subtraction osteotomy in the treatment of such challenging group of patients. The purpose of the present study was to review our operative experience with pediatric patients undergoing a single level PSO for the correction of thoracic kyphosis/kyphoscoliosis in the region of the spinal cord (T12 and cephalad), and determine the safety and efficacy of posterior thoracic pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO) in the treatment of severe pediatric deformities. A retrospective review was performed on 12 consecutive pediatric patients (6 F, 6 M) treated by means of a posterior thoracic PSO between 2002 and 2006 in a single Institution. Average age at surgery was 12.6 years (range, 9-16), whereas the deformity was due to a severe juvenile idiopathic scoliosis in seven cases (average preoperative main thoracic 113°; 90-135); an infantile idiopathic scoliosis in two cases (preoperative main thoracic of 95° and 105°, respectively); a post-laminectomy kypho-scoliosis of 95° (for a intra-medullar ependimoma); an angular kypho-scoliosis due to a spondylo-epiphisary dysplasia (already operated on four times); and a sharp congenital kypho-scoliosis (already operated on by means of a anterior-posterior in situ fusion). In all patients a pedicle screws instrumentation was used

  3. Thoracic Endometriosis Syndrome: A Veritable Pandora's Box.

    PubMed

    Nair, Sobha S; Nayar, Jayashree

    2016-04-01

    Thoracic endometriosis syndrome is a rare disorder characterised by the presence of functioning endometrial tissue in pleura, lung parenchyma, airways, and/or encompasses mainly four clinical entities-catamenial pneumothorax, catamenial haemothorax, catamenial haemoptysis and lung nodules. The cases were studied retrospectively by reviewing the records at Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences, for duration of five years i.e., form March 2010-2014 and analysed for the clinical presentation and management of thoracic endometriosis syndrome. Catamenial breathlessness was the main symptom. Pneumothorax and pleural effusion were the findings on investigations. Histopathology report of endometriosis was present in three cases (50%). Conditions with excess oestrogen like endometriosis, fibroid, adenomyosis were diagnosed in these patients by pelvic scan. After the initial supportive treatment with hormones, pleurodesis, hysterectomy and lung decortication were the treatment modalities. Two cases that had multiple recurrences were diagnosed as disseminated TES. They underwent combined treatment of surgery and hormones. PMID:27190904

  4. Cerebrospinal Fluid Leakage after Thoracic Decompression

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Pan-Pan; Liu, Xiao-Guang; Yu, Miao

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study is to review cerebrospinal fluid leakage (CSFL) after thoracic decompression and describe its regular and special features. Data Sources: Literature cited in this review was retrieved from PubMed and Medline and was primarily published during the last 10 years. “Cerebrospinal fluid”, “leakage”, “dural tears”, and “thoracic decompression” were the indexed terms. Relevant citations in the retrieved articles were also screened to include more data. Study Selection: All retrieved literature was scrutinized, and four categories were recorded: incidence and risk factors, complications, treatment modalities, and prognosis. Results: CSFL is much more frequent after thoracic decompression than after cervical and lumbar spinal surgeries. Its occurrence is related to many clinical factors, especially the presence of ossified ligaments and the adhesion of the dural sac. While its impact on the late neurological recovery is currently controversial, CSFL increases the risk of other perioperative complications, such as low intracranial pressure symptoms, infection, and vascular events. The combined use of primary repairs during the operation and conservative treatment postoperatively is generally effective for most CSFL cases, whereas lumbar drains and reoperations should be implemented as rescue options for refractory cases only. Conclusions: CSFL after thoracic decompression has not been specifically investigated, so the present study provides a systematic and comprehensive review of the issue. CSFL is a multi-factor-related complication, and pathological factors play a decisive role. The importance of CSFL is in its impact on the increased risk of other complications during the postoperative period. Methods to prevent these complications are in need. In addition, though the required treatment resources are not special for CSFL after thoracic decompression, most CSFL cases are conservatively curable, and surgeons should be

  5. Radiofrequency bipolar hemostatic sealer reduces blood loss, transfusion requirements, and cost for patients undergoing multilevel spinal fusion surgery: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A relatively new method of electrocautery, the radiofrequency bipolar hemostatic sealer (RBHS), uses saline-cooled delivery of energy, which seals blood vessels rather than burning them. We assessed the benefits of RBHS as a blood conservation strategy in adult patients undergoing multilevel spinal fusion surgery. Methods In a retrospective cohort study, we compared blood utilization in 36 patients undergoing multilevel spinal fusion surgery with RBHS (Aquamantys®, Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN, USA) to that of a historical control group (n = 38) matched for variables related to blood loss. Transfusion-related costs were calculated by two methods. Results Patient characteristics in the two groups were similar. Intraoperatively, blood loss was 55% less in the RBHS group than in the control group (810 ± 530 vs. 1,800 ± 1,600 mL; p = 0.002), and over the entire hospital stay, red cell utilization was 51% less (2.4 ± 3.4 vs. 4.9 ± 4.5 units/patient; p = 0.01) and plasma use was 56% less (1.1 ± 2.4 vs. 2.5 ± 3.4 units/patient; p = 0.03) in the RBHS group. Platelet use was 0.1 ± 0.5 and 0.3 ± 0.6 units/patient in the RBHS and control groups, respectively (p = 0.07). The perioperative decrease in hemoglobin was less in the RBHS group than in the control group (−2.0 ± 2.2 vs. –3.2 ± 2.1 g/dL; p = 0.04), and hemoglobin at discharge was higher in the RBHS group (10.5 ± 1.4 vs. 9.7 ± 0.9 g/dL; p = 0.01). The estimated transfusion-related cost savings were $745/case by acquisition cost and approximately 3- to 5-fold this amount by activity-based cost. Conclusions The use of RBHS in patients undergoing multilevel spine fusion surgery can conserve blood, promote higher hemoglobin levels, and reduce transfusion-related costs. PMID:24997589

  6. Radiology of thoracic diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Swensen, S.J.; Pugatch, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents the essential clinical and radiologic findings of a wide variety of thoracic diseases. The authors include conventional, CT and MR images of each disease discussed. In addition, they present practical differential diagnostic considerations for most of the radiographic findings or patterns portrayed.

  7. [Thoracic oncology: annual review].

    PubMed

    Sculier, J-P; Berghmans, T; Meert, A-P

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to review the literature published in 2011-12 in the field of thoracic oncology. Are discussed because of new original publications: epidemiology, screening, pulmonary nodule, diagnosis and assessment, treatment of lung cancer non-small cell, small cell lung cancer, prognosis, palliative care and end of life, organization of care, mesothelioma. PMID:23755717

  8. Thoracic duct cyst of posterior mediastinum: a “challenging” differential diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Electra, Michalopoulou-Manoloutsiou; Evangelia, Athanasiou; Mattheos, Bobos; Dimitris, Hatzibougias I.; Tsavlis, Drosos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Charalampidis, Chralampos; Fassiadis, Nikolaos; Mparmpetakis, Nikolaos; Pavlidis, Pavlos; Andreas, Mpakas; Stamatis, Arikas; Alexandros, Kolettas; Kosmas, Tsakiridis

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic duct cysts of the mediastinum are extremely rare entities and their pathogenesis still remains unknown. Imaging methods are not specific and show a cystic mass, however the real nature of the lesion is confirmed only with the help of histopathological examination after surgical excision. Here, we present a case of thoracic cyst in a 28-year-old female, lining in posterior lower mediastinum. The cyst was removed by video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) and the histopathological findings were that of thoracic duct cyst. Through this case, we propose an ideal surgical approach and diagnostic procedure. PMID:27275479

  9. [Robotic surgery].

    PubMed

    Sándor, József; Haidegger, Tamás; Kormos, Katalin; Ferencz, Andrea; Csukás, Domokos; Bráth, Endre; Szabó, Györgyi; Wéber, György

    2013-10-01

    Due to the fast spread of laparoscopic cholecystectomy, surgical procedures have been changed essentially. The new techniques applied for both abdominal and thoracic procedures provided the possibility for minimally invasive access with all its advantages. Robots - originally developed for industrial applications - were retrofitted for laparoscopic procedures. The currently prevailing robot-assisted surgery is ergonomically more advantageous for the surgeon, as well as for the patient through the more precise preparative activity thanks to the regained 3D vision. The gradual decrease of costs of robotic surgical systems and development of new generations of minimally invasive devices may lead to substantial changes in routine surgical procedures. PMID:24144815

  10. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion in the outpatient ambulatory surgery setting compared with the inpatient hospital setting: analysis of 1000 consecutive cases.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Tim; Godil, Saniya S; Mehrlich, Melissa; Mendenhall, Stephen; Asher, Anthony L; McGirt, Matthew J

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE In an era of escalating health care costs and pressure to improve efficiency and cost of care, ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) have emerged as lower-cost options for many surgical therapies. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is one of the most prevalent spine surgeries performed, and the frequency of its performance is rapidly increasing as the aging population grows. Although ASCs offer significant cost advantages over hospital-based surgical centers, concern over the safety of outpatient ACDF has slowed its adoption. The authors intended to 1) determine the safety of the first 1000 consecutive ACDF surgeries performed in their outpatient ASC, and 2) compare the safety of these outpatient ACDFs with that of consecutive ACDFs performed during the same time period in the hospital setting. METHODS A total of 1000 consecutive patients who underwent ACDF in an ACS (outpatient ACDF) and 484 consecutive patients who underwent ACDF at Vanderbilt University Hospital (inpatient ACDF) from 2006 to 2013 were included in this retrospective study of patients' medical records. Data were collected on patient demographics, comorbidities, operative details, and perioperative and 90-day morbidity. Perioperative morbidity and hospital readmission were compared between the outpatient and inpatient ACDF groups. RESULTS Of the first 1000 outpatient ACDF cases performed in the authors' ASC, 629 (62.9%) were 1-level and 365 (36.5%) were 2-level ACDFs. Mean patient age was 49.5 ± 8.6, and 484 (48.4%) were males. All patients were observed postoperatively at the ASC postanesthesia care unit (PACU) for 4 hours before being discharged home. Eight patients (0.8%) were transferred from the surgery center to the hospital postoperatively (for pain control [n = 3], chest pain and electrocardiogram changes [n = 2], intraoperative CSF leak [n = 1], postoperative hematoma [n = 1], and profound postoperative weakness and surgical reexploration [n = 1]). No perioperative

  11. En bloc resection of a thoracic chordoma is possible using minimally invasive anterior access: An 8-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Goomany, Anand; Timothy, Jake; Robson, Craig; Rao, Abhay

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic spine chordomas are a rare clinical entity and present several diagnostic and management challenges. Posterior debulking techniques are the traditional approach for the resection of thoracic tumors involving the vertebral body. Anterior approaches to the thoracic spine enable complete tumor resection and interbody fusion. However, this approach has previously required a thoracotomy incision, which is associated with significant perioperative morbidity, pain, and the potential for compromised ventilation and subsequent respiratory sequelae. The extreme lateral approach to the anterior spine has been used to treat degenerative disorders of the lower thoracic and lumbar spine, and reduces the potential complications compared with the anterior transperitoneal/transpleural approach. However, such an approach has not been utilized in the treatment of thoracic chordomas. We describe the first case of an en bloc resection of a thoracic chordoma via a minimally invasive eXtreme lateral interbody fusion approach. PMID:26933363

  12. En bloc resection of a thoracic chordoma is possible using minimally invasive anterior access: An 8-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Goomany, Anand; Timothy, Jake; Robson, Craig; Rao, Abhay

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic spine chordomas are a rare clinical entity and present several diagnostic and management challenges. Posterior debulking techniques are the traditional approach for the resection of thoracic tumors involving the vertebral body. Anterior approaches to the thoracic spine enable complete tumor resection and interbody fusion. However, this approach has previously required a thoracotomy incision, which is associated with significant perioperative morbidity, pain, and the potential for compromised ventilation and subsequent respiratory sequelae. The extreme lateral approach to the anterior spine has been used to treat degenerative disorders of the lower thoracic and lumbar spine, and reduces the potential complications compared with the anterior transperitoneal/transpleural approach. However, such an approach has not been utilized in the treatment of thoracic chordomas. We describe the first case of an en bloc resection of a thoracic chordoma via a minimally invasive eXtreme lateral interbody fusion approach. PMID:26933363

  13. Normal and abnormal spine and thoracic cage development

    PubMed Central

    Canavese, Federico; Dimeglio, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Development of the spine and thoracic cage consists of a complex series of events involving multiple metabolic processes, genes and signaling pathways. During growth, complex phenomena occur in rapid succession. This succession of events, this establishment of elements, is programmed according to a hierarchy. These events are well synchronized to maintain harmonious limb, spine and thoracic cage relationships, as growth in the various body segments does not occur simultaneously at the same magnitude or rate. In most severe cases of untreated progressive early-onset spinal deformities, respiratory insufficiency and pulmonary and cardiac hypertension (cor pulmonale), which characterize thoracic insufficiency syndrome (TIS), can develop, sometimes leading to death. TIS is the inability of the thorax to ensure normal breathing. This clinical condition can be linked to costo-vertebral malformations (e.g., fused ribs, hemivertebrae, congenital bars), neuromuscular diseases (e.g., expiratory congenital hypotonia), Jeune or Jarcho-Levin syndromes or to 50% to 75% fusion of the thoracic spine before seven years of age. Complex spinal deformities alter normal growth plate development, and vertebral bodies become progressively distorted, perpetuating the disorder. Therefore, many scoliotic deformities can become growth plate disorders over time. This review aims to provide a comprehensive review of how spinal deformities can affect normal spine and thoracic cage growth. Previous conceptualizations are integrated with more recent scientific data to provide a better understanding of both normal and abnormal spine and thoracic cage growth. PMID:24147251

  14. Post-operative care to promote recovery for thoracic surgical patients: a nursing perspective

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The change in patient population leads to an inevitable transformation among the healthcare system. Over the past decades, thoracic surgical technique has been evolving from conventional open thoracotomy to minimally invasive video assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Thoracic nursing team of Prince of Wales Hospital (PWH) grows together with the evolution and aims at providing holistic and quality care to patients require thoracic operation. In order to enhance patient post-operative recovery, few strategies have been implemented including early mobilization, staff training and clinical audit. On the other hand, nursing case management approach was proved to be a cost-effective method in managing patients. It is also suitable for thoracic patients, especially for those who are suffering from thoracic neoplasm. It is believed that, the introduction of nursing case management approach would provide a better holistic care to the thoracic patients. PMID:26941973

  15. Using Provocative Discography and Computed Tomography to Select Patients with Refractory Discogenic Low Back Pain for Lumbar Fusion Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Henry C; Fahim, Daniel K; Perez-Cruet, Mick

    2016-01-01

    Background Context Controversy remains over the use of provocative discography in conjunction with computed tomography (CT) to locate symptomatic intervertebral discs in patients with chronic, low back pain (LBP). The current study explores the relationship between discogenic pain and disc morphology using discography and CT, respectively, and investigates the efficacy of this combined method in identifying surgical candidates for lumbar fusion by evaluating outcomes. Methods 43 consecutive patients between 2006 and 2013 who presented with refractory low back pain and underwent discography and CT were enrolled in the study. For this study, "refractory LBP" was defined as pain symptoms that persisted or worsened after 6 months of non-operative treatments. Concordant pain was defined as discography-provoked LBP of similar character and location with an intensity of ≥ 8/10. Fusion candidates demonstrated positive-level discography and concordant annular tears on CT at no more than two contiguous levels, and at least one negative control disc with intact annulus. Surgical outcomes were statistically analyzed using Visual Analog Scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and Short Form-36 (SF-36) for back-related pain and disability preoperatively, and 2 weeks, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. Results Annular tears were found in 87 discs. Concordant pain was reported by 9 (20.9%) patients at L3-L4, 21 (50.0%) at L4-L5, and 34 (82.9%) at L5-S1; pain occurred significantly more often in discs with annular tears than those without (p<0.001). Painless discs were independent of annulus status (p=0.90). 18 (42%) of the original 43 patients underwent lumbar fusion at L3-L4 (n=1(6%)), L4-L5 (n=6 (33%)), L5-S1 (n=5 (28%)), and two-level L4-S1 (n=6 (33%)) via a minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MITLIF) approach with the aim to replace the nucleus pulposus with bone graft material. Median follow-up time was 18 months (range: 12–78 months

  16. Using Provocative Discography and Computed Tomography to Select Patients with Refractory Discogenic Low Back Pain for Lumbar Fusion Surgery.

    PubMed

    Xi, Mengqiao Alan; Tong, Henry C; Fahim, Daniel K; Perez-Cruet, Mick

    2016-01-01

    Background Context Controversy remains over the use of provocative discography in conjunction with computed tomography (CT) to locate symptomatic intervertebral discs in patients with chronic, low back pain (LBP). The current study explores the relationship between discogenic pain and disc morphology using discography and CT, respectively, and investigates the efficacy of this combined method in identifying surgical candidates for lumbar fusion by evaluating outcomes. Methods 43 consecutive patients between 2006 and 2013 who presented with refractory low back pain and underwent discography and CT were enrolled in the study. For this study, "refractory LBP" was defined as pain symptoms that persisted or worsened after 6 months of non-operative treatments. Concordant pain was defined as discography-provoked LBP of similar character and location with an intensity of ≥ 8/10. Fusion candidates demonstrated positive-level discography and concordant annular tears on CT at no more than two contiguous levels, and at least one negative control disc with intact annulus. Surgical outcomes were statistically analyzed using Visual Analog Scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and Short Form-36 (SF-36) for back-related pain and disability preoperatively, and 2 weeks, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. Results Annular tears were found in 87 discs. Concordant pain was reported by 9 (20.9%) patients at L3-L4, 21 (50.0%) at L4-L5, and 34 (82.9%) at L5-S1; pain occurred significantly more often in discs with annular tears than those without (p<0.001). Painless discs were independent of annulus status (p=0.90). 18 (42%) of the original 43 patients underwent lumbar fusion at L3-L4 (n=1(6%)), L4-L5 (n=6 (33%)), L5-S1 (n=5 (28%)), and two-level L4-S1 (n=6 (33%)) via a minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MITLIF) approach with the aim to replace the nucleus pulposus with bone graft material. Median follow-up time was 18 months (range: 12-78 months

  17. Comparison of Hybrid Surgery Incorporating Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion and Artificial Arthroplasty versus Multilevel Fusion for Multilevel Cervical Spondylosis: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zang, Leyuan; Ma, Min; Hu, Jianxin; Qiu, Hao; Huang, Bo; Chu, Tongwei

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Few studies have reported the safety and efficacy of hybrid surgery (HS), and some of the studies comparing HS with ACDF have reported conflicting results. We conducted this meta-analysis to clarify the advantages of HS in the treatment of multilevel cervical spondylosis. MATERIAL AND METHODS We performed a systematic literature search in PubMed, Medline, and CNKI to identify relevant controlled trials published up to October 2015. The standardized mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) of the perioperative parameters, visual analogue scale pain score (VAS), neck disability index (NDI), and range of motion (ROM) of C2-C7 and adjacent segments were calculated. We also analyzed complications and Odom scale scores using risk difference (RD) and 95% CI. RESULTS In total, 7 studies were included. The pooled data exhibited significant differences in blood loss between the 2 groups. However, there was no evidence indicating significant differences in operation time, complications, VAS, NDI, or Odom scale scores. Compared with the ACDF group, the HS group exhibited significantly protected C2-C7 ROM and reduced adjacent-segment ROM. CONCLUSIONS The safety of HS may be as good as that of ACDF. Furthermore, HS is superior to ACDF in conserving cervical spine ROM and decreasing adjacent-segment ROM. However, the results should be accepted cautiously due to the limitations of the study. Studies with larger sample sizes and longer follow-up periods are required to confirm and update the results of the present study. PMID:26709008

  18. Metabolic phenotype-microRNA data fusion analysis of the systemic consequences of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Q; Li, J V; Seyfried, F; le Roux, C W; Ashrafian, H; Athanasiou, T; Fenske, W; Darzi, A; Nicholson, J K; Holmes, E; Gooderham, N J

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Bariatric surgery offers sustained marked weight loss and often remission of type 2 diabetes, yet the mechanisms of establishment of these health benefits are not clear. Subjects/Methods: We mapped the coordinated systemic responses of gut hormones, the circulating miRNAome and the metabolome in a rat model of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery. Results: The response of circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) to RYGB was striking and selective. Analysis of 14 significantly altered circulating miRNAs within a pathway context was suggestive of modulation of signaling pathways including G protein signaling, neurodegeneration, inflammation, and growth and apoptosis responses. Concomitant alterations in the metabolome indicated increased glucose transport, accelerated glycolysis and inhibited gluconeogenesis in the liver. Of particular significance, we show significantly decreased circulating miRNA-122 levels and a more modest decline in hepatic levels, following surgery. In mechanistic studies, manipulation of miRNA-122 levels in a cell model induced changes in the activity of key enzymes involved in hepatic energy metabolism, glucose transport, glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle, pentose phosphate shunt, fatty-acid oxidation and gluconeogenesis, consistent with the findings of the in vivo surgery-mediated responses, indicating the powerful homeostatic activity of the miRNAs. Conclusions: The close association between energy metabolism, neuronal signaling and gut microbial metabolites derived from the circulating miRNA, plasma, urine and liver metabolite and gut hormone correlations further supports an enhanced gut-brain signaling, which we suggest is hormonally mediated by both traditional gut hormones and miRNAs. This transomic approach to map the crosstalk between the circulating miRNAome and metabolome offers opportunities to understand complex systems biology within a disease and interventional treatment setting. PMID:25783038

  19. Comparison of Hybrid Surgery Incorporating Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion and Artificial Arthroplasty Versus Multilevel Fusion for Multilevel Cervical Spondylosis: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Leyuan; Ma, Min; Hu, Jianxin; Qiu, Hao; Huang, Bo; Chu, Tongwei

    2015-01-01

    Background Few studies have reported the safety and efficacy of hybrid surgery (HS), and some of the studies comparing HS with ACDF have reported conflicting results. We conducted this meta-analysis to clarify the advantages of HS in the treatment of multilevel cervical spondylosis. Material/Methods We performed a systematic literature search in PubMed, Medline, and CNKI to identify relevant controlled trials published up to October 2015. The standardized mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) of the perioperative parameters, visual analogue scale pain score (VAS), neck disability index (NDI), and range of motion (ROM) of C2–C7 and adjacent segments were calculated. We also analyzed complications and Odom scale scores using risk difference (RD) and 95% CI. Results In total, 7 studies were included. The pooled data exhibited significant differences in blood loss between the 2 groups. However, there was no evidence indicating significant differences in operation time, complications, VAS, NDI, or Odom scale scores. Compared with the ACDF group, the HS group exhibited significantly protected C2-C7 ROM and reduced adjacent-segment ROM. Conclusions The safety of HS may be as good as that of ACDF. Furthermore, HS is superior to ACDF in conserving cervical spine ROM and decreasing adjacent-segment ROM. However, the results should be accepted cautiously due to the limitations of the study. Studies with larger sample sizes and longer follow-up periods are required to confirm and update the results of the present study. PMID:26709008

  20. Reasons to participate in European Society of Thoracic Surgeons database

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The process of data collection inevitably involves costs at various levels. Nevertheless, this effort is essential to base our knowledge and the consequent decision making on solid foundations. The European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) database collects a large amount of data on general thoracic surgery derived from about 60 units representative of 11 nations. Since its beginning in 2001, the ESTS database has contributed to increase the knowledge and the quality of care in our specialty. The present paper illustrates the ultimate finalities and the obtained results of this data collection, providing a broad overview of the motivations to participate to the ESTS database. PMID:25984355

  1. Nonmalignant Adult Thoracic Lymphatic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Itkin, Maxim; McCormack, Francis X

    2016-09-01

    The thoracic lymphatic disorders are a heterogeneous group of uncommon conditions that are associated with thoracic masses, interstitial pulmonary infiltrates, and chylous complications. Accurate diagnosis of the thoracic lymphatic disorders has important implications for the newest approaches to management, including embolization and treatment with antilymphangiogenic drugs. New imaging techniques to characterize lymphatic flow, such as dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance lymphangiogram, are redefining approaches to disease classification and therapy. PMID:27514588

  2. Multifocal thoracic chordoma mimicking a paraganglioma.

    PubMed

    Conzo, Giovanni; Gambardella, Claudio; Pasquali, Daniela; Ciancia, Giuseppe; Avenia, Nicola; Pietra, Cristina Della; Napolitano, Salvatore; Palazzo, Antonietta; Mauriello, Claudio; Parmeggiani, Domenico; Pettinato, Guido; Napolitano, Vincenzo; Santini, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Chordoma of thoracic vertebras is a very rare locally invasive neoplasm with low grade malignancy arising from embryonic notochordal remnants. Radical surgery remains the cornerstone of the treatment. We describe a case of multifocal T1-T2 chordoma, without bone and disc involvement, incidentally misdiagnosed as a paraganglioma, occurring in a 47-year-old male asymptomatic patient. Neoplasm was radically removed by an endocrine surgeon through a right extended cervicotomy. A preoperative reliable diagnosis of chordoma, as in the reported case, is often difficult. Radical surgery can provide a favorable outcome but, given the high rates of local recurrence of this neoplasm, a strict and careful follow-up is recommended. Although very rare, chordoma should be suggested in the differential diagnosis of the paravertebral cervical masses of unknown origin. Spine surgeon consultation and a FNB should be routinely included in the multidisciplinary preoperative work-up of these neoplasms. PMID:24125991

  3. Non-intubated thoracic surgery—A survey from the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Sorge, Roberto; Akopov, Andrej; Congregado, Miguel; Grodzki, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Background A survey amongst the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) members has been performed to investigate the currents trends, rates of adoption as well as potential for future expansion of non-intubated thoracic surgery (NITS) performed under spontaneous ventilation. Methods A 14-question-based questionnaire has been e-mailed to ESTS members. To facilitate the completion of the questionnaire, questions entailed either quantitative or multiple-choice answers. Investigated issues included previous experience with NITS and number of procedures performed, preferred types of anesthesia protocols (i.e., thoracic epidural anesthesia, intercostal or paravertebral blocks, laryngeal mask, use of additional sedation), type of procedures, ideal candidates for NITS, main advantages and technical disadvantages. Non-univocal answer to multiple-choice questions was permitted. Results Out of 105 responders, 62 reported an experience with NITS. The preferred types of anesthesia were intercostal blocks with (59%) or without (50%) sedation, followed by laryngeal mask with sedation (43%) and thoracic epidural anesthesia with sedation (20%). The most frequently performed procedures included thoracoscopic management of recurrent pleural effusion (98%), pleural decortication for empyema thoracis and lung biopsy for interstitial lung disease (26% each); pericardial window and mediastinal biopsy (20% each). More complex procedures such as lobectomy, lung volume reduction surgery and thymectomy have been performed by a minority of responders (2% each). Poor-risk patients due to co-morbidities (70%) and patients with poor pulmonary function (43%) were considered the ideal candidates. Main advantages included faster, recovery (67%), reduced morbidity (59%) and shorter hospital stay with decreased costs (43% each). Reported technical disadvantages included coughing (59%) and poor maneuverability due to diaphragmatic and lung movements (56%). Overall, 69% of responders indicated

  4. Thoracic trauma in horses.

    PubMed

    Sprayberry, Kim A; Barrett, Elizabeth J

    2015-04-01

    Traumatic injuries involving the thorax can be superficial, necessitating only routine wound care, or they may extend to deeper tissue planes and disrupt structures immediately vital to respiratory and cardiac function. Diagnostic imaging, especially ultrasound, should be considered part of a comprehensive examination, both at admission and during follow-up. Horses generally respond well to diligent monitoring, intervention for complications, and appropriate medical or surgical care after sustaining traumatic wounds of the thorax. This article reviews the various types of thoracic injury and their management. PMID:25770070

  5. [Josef Koncz (1916-1988)--pioneer of cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Schmitto, J D; Tjindra, C; Kolat, P; Hintze, E; Liakopoulos, O J; Popov, A F; Sellin, C; Dörge, H; Schöndube, F A

    2007-03-01

    Josef Koncz (1916-1988) was until given emeritus status in 1982 director of the Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, which was specifically founded for him in Goettingen, Germany. By the fusion of three different surgical branches the University hospital of Goettingen took over the role of a pacemaker and initiated a standard in the development of this new specialty in Germany. The scientific and clinical work done by the Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery was shaped by the personality of the surgeon and scientist Josef Koncz. He was a successful surgeon and innovative pioneer in one person. Already in 1956, he started open-heart surgery and proceeded this technique in an impressing series. In 1965 he was the first in Germany who operated upon the transposition of the great vessels by Mustard's method and developed together with his long-standing assistant, Huschang Rastan, an operation technique to extend the left-ventricular outflow tract combined with tunnel-shaped subvalvular aortic valve stenosis. Another essential element of his work is related to the establishment of the Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery as an independent specialty, ending in the foundation of the German Society for Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery in 1971. PMID:17458023

  6. Thoracic spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... The test is done in a hospital radiology department or in the health care provider's office. You will lie on the x-ray table in different positions. If the x-ray ...

  7. Thoracic outlet syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... tingling Update Date 11/4/2014 Updated by: John A. Daller, MD, PhD., Department of Surgery, University ... commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact ...

  8. Biomechanical comparison of unilateral and bilateral pedicle screws fixation for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion after decompressive surgery -- a finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Little is known about the biomechanical effectiveness of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) cages in different positioning and various posterior implants used after decompressive surgery. The use of the various implants will induce the kinematic and mechanical changes in range of motion (ROM) and stresses at the surgical and adjacent segments. Unilateral pedicle screw with or without supplementary facet screw fixation in the minimally invasive TLIF procedure has not been ascertained to provide adequate stability without the need to expose on the contralateral side. This study used finite element (FE) models to investigate biomechanical differences in ROM and stress on the neighboring structures after TLIF cages insertion in conjunction with posterior fixation. Methods A validated finite-element (FE) model of L1-S1 was established to implant three types of cages (TLIF with a single moon-shaped cage in the anterior or middle portion of vertebral bodies, and TLIF with a left diagonally placed ogival-shaped cage) from the left L4-5 level after unilateral decompressive surgery. Further, the effects of unilateral versus bilateral pedicle screw fixation (UPSF vs. BPSF) in each TLIF cage model was compared to analyze parameters, including stresses and ROM on the neighboring annulus, cage-vertebral interface and pedicle screws. Results All the TLIF cages positioned with BPSF showed similar ROM (<5%) at surgical and adjacent levels, except TLIF with an anterior cage in flexion (61% lower) and TLIF with a left diagonal cage in left lateral bending (33% lower) at surgical level. On the other hand, the TLIF cage models with left UPSF showed varying changes of ROM and annulus stress in extension, right lateral bending and right axial rotation at surgical level. In particular, the TLIF model with a diagonal cage, UPSF, and contralateral facet screw fixation stabilize segmental motion of the surgical level mostly in extension and contralaterally axial

  9. Thoracic outlet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ozoa, Glenn; Alves, Daniel; Fish, David E

    2011-08-01

    Of the many clinical entities involving the neck region, one of the most intriguing is thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS). TOS is an array of disorders that involves injury to the neurovascular structures in the cervicobrachial region. A classification system based on etiology, symptoms, clinical presentation, and anatomy is supported by most physicians. The first type of TOS is vascular, involving compression of either the subclavian artery or vein. The second type is true neurogenic TOS, which involves injury to the brachial plexus. Finally, the third and most controversial type is referred to as disputed neurogenic TOS. This article aims to provide the reader some understanding of the pathophysiology, workup, and treatment of this fascinating clinical entity. PMID:21824588

  10. Vascular Thoracic Outlet Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Mohamad Anas; Aljabri, Badr; Al-Omran, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Two distinct terms are used to describe vascular thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) depending on which structure is predominantly affected: venous TOS (due to subclavian vein compression) and arterial TOS (due to subclavian artery compression). Although the venous and arterial subtypes of TOS affect only 3% and <1% of all TOS patients respectively, the diagnostic and management approaches to venous and arterial TOS have undergone considerable evolution due to the recent emergence of minimally invasive endovascular techniques such as catheter-directed arterial and venous thrombolysis, and balloon angioplasty. In this review, we discuss the anatomical factors, etiology, pathogenesis and clinical presentation of vascular TOS patients. In addition, we use the most up to date observational evidence available to provide a contemporary approach to the diagnosis and management of venous TOS and arterial TOS patients. PMID:27568153

  11. Canine lateral thoracic fasciocutaneous flap: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Cao Minh; Hoàng, Văn Lu'o'ng; Pham, Thi Ngoc; Hoàng, Manh An

    2009-10-01

    For the purpose of reconstructive surgery training and research, we have developed a new skin flap model: canine lateral thoracic fasciocutaneous flap. Anatomical study found that the lateral thoracic arteries in dogs have similar anatomical characteristics to human's ones. Based on these vessels, if a skin flap was designed within the vessels territory (size 5 x 8 cm) it could survive completely, whereas, if designed beyond the vessels territory (size 5 x 14 cm) would result in partial necrosis of the flap. This fasciocutaneous flap model closely simulates the human surgery and could be valuable for training and research. Furthermore, this flap could be applied in the veterinary practice for reconstruction of canine forelimbs and cervical area. PMID:19638323

  12. Surgical Repair of Retrograde Type A Aortic Dissection after Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Young; Kim, Yeon Soo; Ryoo, Ji Yoon

    2014-01-01

    It is expected that the stent graft will become an alternative method for treating aortic diseases or reducing the extent of surgery; therefore, thoracic endovascular aortic repair has widened its indications. However, it can have rare but serious complications such as paraplegia and retrograde type A aortic dissection. Here, we report a surgical repair of retrograde type A aortic dissection that was performed after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. PMID:24570865

  13. Standard of Practice for the Endovascular Treatment of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Type B Dissections

    SciTech Connect

    Fanelli, Fabrizio; Dake, Michael D.

    2009-09-15

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) represents a minimally invasive technique alternative to conventional open surgical reconstruction for the treatment of thoracic aortic pathologies. Rapid advances in endovascular technology and procedural breakthroughs have contributed to a dramatic transformation of the entire field of thoracic aortic surgery. TEVAR procedures can be challenging and, at times, extraordinarily difficult. They require seasoned endovascular experience and refined skills. Of all endovascular procedures, meticulous assessment of anatomy and preoperative procedure planning are absolutely paramount to produce optimal outcomes. These guidelines are intended for use in quality-improvement programs that assess the standard of care expected from all physicians who perform TEVAR procedures.

  14. Diabetic thoracic radiculopathy: an unusual cause of post-thoracotomy pain.

    PubMed

    Brewer, R; Bedlack, R; Massey, E

    2003-05-01

    Persistent pain is common following thoracotomy. A 64-year-old retired electrician with Type 2 diabetes presented with chest wall and abdominal pain 3 months following video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Postoperatively the patient had suffered pain despite a functioning thoracic epidural catheter. Following investigation, his persistent pain was due to diabetic thoracic radiculopathy (DTR). The disorder is characterized by pain, sensory loss, abdominal and thoracic muscle weakness in patients with diabetes. As in this patient, the pain and sensory loss usually resolve within one year after onset. The disorder may be distinguished from intercostal neuralgia based upon clinical and electromyographic features. PMID:12749978

  15. Thoracic surgical training in Europe: what has changed recently?

    PubMed Central

    Lerut, Antoon E. M. R.

    2016-01-01

    Training in thoracic surgery (TS) traditionally varies amongst countries in Europe. The theoretical content of the training, the length of training, the amount of self-performed procedures to be done and the definition of training units all differ in European countries. However, in the past two decades, several initiatives were taken to harmonize TS training in Europe. The purpose of this paper is to highlight these initiatives and their impact on today’s TS training in Europe. PMID:27047948

  16. Surgical Treatment for Central Calcified Thoracic Disk Herniation: A Novel L-Shaped Osteotome.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Qing-shan; Lun, Deng-xing; Xu, Zhao-wan; Dai, Wei-hua; Liu, Da-yong

    2015-09-01

    Few reports are available on the posterior transfacet approach for the treatment of central calcified thoracic disk herniation (TDH). The objective of this study was to assess outcomes and complications in a consecutive series of patients with TDH who underwent posterior transfacet decompression and diskectomy with segmental instrumentation and fusion. The data for 27 patients (16 males and 11 females) were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed, including clinical presentation, blood loss, operative time, pre- and postoperative complications, visual analog scale, Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score, and Frankel grade. All patients underwent trans-facet decompression and segmental instrumentation with interbody fusion. Mean patient age at surgery was 55.2 years (range, 21-81 years). Average follow-up was 30±19 months (range, 12-50 months). All patients were successfully treated with posterior decompression and segmental instrumentation with interbody fusion. Average operative time was 124±58 minutes (range, 87-180 minutes). Mean blood loss was 439±225 mL (range, 300-1500 mL). Average pre- and postoperative JOA scores were 4.12±0.87 and 8.01±0.97 points, respectively. Overall JOA scores showed a significant postoperative improvement. Overall recovery rates were excellent in 12 patients, good in 6, fair in 5, and unchanged in 1. No patient was classified as worse. The results suggest that the posterior approach using a special L-shaped osteotome is feasible. No major complications occurred while achieving adequate decompression for central calcified TDH. PMID:26375537

  17. The thoracic anterior spinal cord adhesion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, T R; Dineen, R; White, B; Jaspan, T

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study included a series of middle-aged male and female patients who presented with chronic anterior hemicord dysfunction progressing to paraplegia. Imaging of anterior thoracic cord displacement by either a dural adhesion or a dural defect with associated cord herniation is presented. Methods This is a retrospective review of cases referred to a tertiary neuroscience centre over a 19-year period. Imaging series were classified by two experienced neuroradiologists against several criteria and correlated with clinical examination and/or findings at surgery. Results 16 cases were available for full review. Nine were considered to represent adhesions (four confirmed surgically) and four to represent true herniation (three confirmed surgically). In the three remaining cases the diagnosis was radiologically uncertain. Conclusion The authors propose “thoracic anterior spinal cord adhesion syndrome” as a novel term to describe this patient cohort and suggest appropriate clinicoradiological features for diagnosis. Several possible aetiologies are also suggested, with disc rupture and inflammation followed by disc resorption and dural pocket formation being a possible mechanism predisposing to herniation at the extreme end of a clinicopathological spectrum. PMID:22665931

  18. Advances in chest drain management in thoracic disease

    PubMed Central

    George, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    An adequate chest drainage system aims to drain fluid and air and restore the negative pleural pressure facilitating lung expansion. In thoracic surgery the post-operative use of the conventional underwater seal chest drainage system fulfills these requirements, however they allow great variability amongst practices. In addition they do not offer accurate data and they are often inconvenient to both patients and hospital staff. This article aims to simplify the myths surrounding the management of chest drains following chest surgery, review current experience and explore the advantages of modern digital chest drain systems and address their disease-specific use. PMID:26941971

  19. Strategies to treat thoracic aortitis and infected aortic grafts.

    PubMed

    Kahlberg, A; Melissano, G; Tshomba, Y; Leopardi, M; Chiesa, R

    2015-04-01

    Infectious thoracic aortitis is a rare disease, especially since the incidence of syphilis and tuberculosis has dropped in western countries. However, the risk to develop an infectious aortitis and subsequent mycotic aneurysm formation is still present, particularly in case of associated endocarditis, sepsis, and in immunosuppressive disorders. Moreover, the number of surgical and endovascular thoracic aortic repairs is continuously increasing, and infective graft complications are observed more frequently. Several etiopathogenetic factors may play a role in thoracic aortic and prosthetic infections, including hematogenous seeding, local bacterial translocation, and iatrogenous contamination. Also, fistulization of the esophagus or the bronchial tree is commonly associated with these diseases, and it represents a critical event requiring a multidisciplinary management. Knowledge on underlying micro-organisms, antibiotic efficacy, risk factors, and prevention strategies has a key role in the management of this spectrum of infectious diseases involving the thoracic aorta. When the diagnosis of a mycotic aneurysm or a prosthetic graft infection is established, treatment is demanding, often including a number of surgical options. Patients are usually severely compromised by sepsis, and in most cases they are considered unfit for surgery for general clinical conditions or local concerns. Thus, results of different therapeutic strategies for infectious diseases of the thoracic aorta are still burdened with very high morbidity and mortality. In this manuscript, we review the literature regarding the main issues related to thoracic infectious aortitis and aortic graft infections, and we report our personal series of patients surgically treated at our institution for these conditions from 1993 to 2014. PMID:25608572

  20. [Thoracic outlet syndrome].

    PubMed

    Sonoo, Masahiro

    2014-12-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a well-known disorder, but its definition has been disputed. TOS is differentiated into five distinct disorders: arterial vascular, venous vascular, traumatic neurovascular, true neurologic (TN-TOS), and nonspecific TOS. TN-TOS is caused by compression of the lower plexus (T1>C8 roots and/or lower trunk) by a fibrous band. The most frequent presenting symptoms are insidious-onset atrophy and weakness of the intrinsic hand muscles, predominantly in the thenar eminence and radial digital flexors. Numbness and sensory loss are usually present, mainly in the ulnar forearm, although severe pain or pain/paresthesia proximal to the elbow can occur; however, sensory symptoms or signs can be absent in some patients. Nerve conduction studies are pathognomonic and show the loss or severe attenuation of the sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) of the medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve. Additionally, they show a severely depressed median compound muscle action potential (CMAP) and, subsequently, a depressed ulnar CMAP and SNAP. TN-TOS is a rare disorder, although its incidence may be higher than previously believed. Hirayama disease is an important differential diagnosis. Nonspecific TOS, which is mainly diagnosed by provocative maneuvers, corresponds to the classical concept of TOS. However, this concept is now challenged and the existence of nonspecific TOS is doubted. PMID:25475030

  1. Long-term three-dimensional changes of the spine after posterior spinal instrumentation and fusion in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Papin, P; Labelle, H; Delorme, S; Aubin, C E; de Guise, J A; Dansereau, J

    1999-01-01

    This is a prospective study comparing the short- and long-term three-dimensional (3D) changes in shape, length and balance of the spine after spinal instrumentation and fusion in a group of adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis. The objective of the study was to evaluate the stability over time of the postoperative changes of the spine after instrumentation with multi rod, hook and screw instrumentation systems. Thirty adolescents (average age: 14.5+/-1.6 years) undergoing surgery by a posterior approach had computerized 3D reconstructions of the spine done at an average of 3 days preoperatively (stage I), and 2 months (stage II) and 2,5 years (stage III) after surgery, using a digital multi-planar radiographic technique. Stages I, II and III were compared using various geometrical parameters of spinal length, curve severity, and orientation. Significant improvement of curve magnitude between stages I and II was documented in the frontal plane for thoracic and lumbar curves, as well as in the orientation of the plane of maximum deformity, which was significantly shifted towards the sagittal plane in thoracic curves. However, there was a significant loss of this correction between stages II and III. Slight changes were noted in apical vertebral rotation, in thoracic kyphosis and in lumbar lordosis. Spinal length and height were significantly increased at stage II, but at long-term follow-up spinal length continued to increase while spinal height remained similar. These results indicate that although a significant 3D correction can be obtained after posterior instrumentation and fusion, a significant loss of correction and an increase in spinal length occur in the years following surgery, suggesting that a crankshaft phenomenon may be an important factor altering the long-term 3D correction after posterior instrumentation of the spine for idiopathic scoliosis. PMID:10190849

  2. Thoracoscopic Pericardial Window Creation and Thoracic Duct Ligation in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Ouzounian, Steven P.; Napoleon, Lori; Permut, Lester C.; Golombek, Sergio G.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: We describe 2 newborn infants with persistent pericardial effusion treated with thoracoscopic pericardial window and thoracic duct ligation. Methods: Patient 1 was a premature female newborn who presented with severe cardiac anomalies, including dextrocardia. She was treated with pulmonary artery banding and pacemaker placement for complete cardiac block. Postoperatively, she developed pericarditis with persistent symptomatic pericardial effusion. She did not improve despite pericardial drain placement. She was treated with a thoracoscopic pericardial window. Patient 2 was a newborn male who presented with cardiac tamponade secondary to congenital chylopericardium. He did not respond to pericardial drain placement or medical management with fasting, total parenteral nutrition, and octreotide. He was treated with thoracoscopic pericardial window and thoracic duct ligation. Results: Patient 1 improved rapidly. The pericardial effusion disappeared. The chest tube was removed 5 days following surgery. She died 6 weeks later of a cardiac arrhythmia secondary to pacemaker failure. The pericardial effusion had resolved. Patient 2 responded to the pericardial window and thoracic duct ligation. He was discharged 10 days following the procedure. Conclusions: Thoracoscopy provides an excellent approach to the pericardium. Pericardial windows and biopsy can be safely performed with this approach. The thoracic duct can be easily identified and ligated even in small babies. Recovery can be fast with minimal postoperative discomfort. Cosmetic results are excellent and length of hospitalization is minimized. PMID:14626403

  3. Missed Traumatic Thoracic Spondyloptosis With no Neurological Deficit: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Farooque, Kamran; Khatri, Kavin; Gupta, Ankit

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Traumatic thoracic spondyloptosis is caused by high energy trauma and is usually associated with severe neurological deficit. Cases presenting without any neurological deficit can be difficult to diagnose and manage. Case Presentation We reported a four-week spondyloptosis of the ninth thoracic vertebra over the tenth thoracic vertebra, in a 20-year-old male without any neurological deficit. The patient had associated chest injuries. The spine injury was managed surgically with in-situ posterior instrumentation and fusion. The patient tolerated the operation well and postoperatively there was no neurological deterioration or surgical complication. Conclusions Patients presenting with spondyloptosis with no neurological deficit can be managed with in-situ fusion via pedicle screws, especially when presenting late and with minimal kyphosis. PMID:27218044

  4. A case of T2 radiculopathy after anterior C5–6 fusion

    PubMed Central

    Takenaka, Tomofumi; Ohnishi, Yu-ichiro; Oshino, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic radiculopathy is a rare entity. Symptomatic adjacent-segment disease after anterior cervical fusion occurs commonly in the lower cervical spine segment. We describe the clinical presentation and treatment of T2 radiculopathy after C5–6 anterior fusion. A 60-year-old man presented with the right axillary pain for 3 months. He had undergone C5–6 anterior fusion for cervical spondylosis 5 years prior. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance images showed T2–3 degenerative disease. C5–6 anterior fusion exacerbated the T2–3 segment involved in the patient’s scoliotic deformity. After 2 months of conservative treatment, we decompressed the T2 foramen via T2–3 hemilaminectomy and partial facet resection. After the surgery, his symptoms disappeared. T2 radiculopathy is rare but should be considered in the differential diagnosis of chest pain. Surgeons should pay attention not only to adjacent-segment disease but also to segmental degeneration at the apex of a scoliotic deformity after cervical anterior fusion. PMID:27197614

  5. A case of T2 radiculopathy after anterior C5-6 fusion.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Tomofumi; Ohnishi, Yu-Ichiro; Oshino, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic radiculopathy is a rare entity. Symptomatic adjacent-segment disease after anterior cervical fusion occurs commonly in the lower cervical spine segment. We describe the clinical presentation and treatment of T2 radiculopathy after C5-6 anterior fusion. A 60-year-old man presented with the right axillary pain for 3 months. He had undergone C5-6 anterior fusion for cervical spondylosis 5 years prior. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance images showed T2-3 degenerative disease. C5-6 anterior fusion exacerbated the T2-3 segment involved in the patient's scoliotic deformity. After 2 months of conservative treatment, we decompressed the T2 foramen via T2-3 hemilaminectomy and partial facet resection. After the surgery, his symptoms disappeared. T2 radiculopathy is rare but should be considered in the differential diagnosis of chest pain. Surgeons should pay attention not only to adjacent-segment disease but also to segmental degeneration at the apex of a scoliotic deformity after cervical anterior fusion. PMID:27197614

  6. Thoracic Radiculopathy due to Rare Causes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic radiculopathy represents an uncommon spinal disorder that is frequently overlooked in the evaluation of thoracic, or abdominal pain syndrome. The clinical representation of this uncommon disorder is often atypical. With many differential diagnoses to consider, it is not surprising that the cause of thoracic radiculopathy is often not discovered for months, or years, after the symptoms arise. We report two rare cases of thoracic radiculopathy; one case was caused by extraskeletal Ewing sarcoma (EES) along the thoracic paraspinal area, and the other by foraminal stenosis, due to a bony spur of the thoracic vertebra. As such, thoracic radiculopathy should be considered in the diagnosis of patients with thoracic and abdominal pain, especially if initial diagnostic studies are inconclusive. PMID:27446792

  7. Thoracic Endometriosis Syndrome: A Veritable Pandora’s Box

    PubMed Central

    Nayar, Jayashree

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic endometriosis syndrome is a rare disorder characterised by the presence of functioning endometrial tissue in pleura, lung parenchyma, airways, and/or encompasses mainly four clinical entities–catamenial pneumothorax, catamenial haemothorax, catamenial haemoptysis and lung nodules. The cases were studied retrospectively by reviewing the records at Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences, for duration of five years i.e., form March 2010-2014 and analysed for the clinical presentation and management of thoracic endometriosis syndrome. Catamenial breathlessness was the main symptom. Pneumothorax and pleural effusion were the findings on investigations. Histopathology report of endometriosis was present in three cases (50%). Conditions with excess oestrogen like endometriosis, fibroid, adenomyosis were diagnosed in these patients by pelvic scan. After the initial supportive treatment with hormones, pleurodesis, hysterectomy and lung decortication were the treatment modalities. Two cases that had multiple recurrences were diagnosed as disseminated TES. They underwent combined treatment of surgery and hormones. PMID:27190904

  8. Primary Intradural Extramedullary Spinal Melanoma in the Lower Thoracic Spine

    PubMed Central

    Hering, Kathrin; Bresch, Anke; Lobsien, Donald; Mueller, Wolf; Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter; Seidel, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    Background Context. Up to date, only four cases of primary intradural extramedullary spinal cord melanoma (PIEM) have been reported. No previous reports have described a case of PIEM located in the lower thoracic spine with long-term follow-up. Purpose. Demonstrating an unusual, extremely rare case of melanoma manifestation. Study Design. Case report. Methods. We report a case of a 57-year-old female suffering from increasing lower extremity pain, left-sided paresis, and paraesthesia due to spinal cord compression caused by PIEM in the lower thoracic spine. Results. Extensive investigation excluded other possible primary melanoma sites and metastases. For spinal cord decompression, the tumor at level T12 was resected, yet incompletely. Adjuvant radiotherapy was administered two weeks after surgery. The patient was recurrence-free at 104 weeks after radiotherapy but presents with unchanged neurological symptoms. Conclusion. Primary intradural extramedullary melanoma (PIEM) is extremely rare and its clinical course is unpredictable. PMID:27127667

  9. Robotic surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Robot-assisted surgery; Robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery; Laparoscopic surgery with robotic assistance ... Robotic surgery is similar to laparoscopic surgery. It can be performed through smaller cuts than open surgery. ...

  10. Neurological Complications Following Endoluminal Repair of Thoracic Aortic Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, J. P.; Taylor, P. R.; Bell, R. E.; Chan, Y. C.; Sabharwal, T.; Carrell, T. W. G.; Reidy, J. F.

    2007-09-15

    Open surgery for thoracic aortic disease is associated with significant morbidity and the reported rates for paraplegia and stroke are 3%-19% and 6%-11%, respectively. Spinal cord ischemia and stroke have also been reported following endoluminal repair. This study reviews the incidence of paraplegia and stroke in a series of 186 patients treated with thoracic stent grafts. From July 1997 to September 2006, 186 patients (125 men) underwent endoluminal repair of thoracic aortic pathology. Mean age was 71 years (range, 17-90 years). One hundred twenty-eight patients were treated electively and 58 patients had urgent procedures. Anesthesia was epidural in 131, general in 50, and local in 5 patients. Seven patients developed paraplegia (3.8%; two urgent and five elective). All occurred in-hospital apart from one associated with severe hypotension after a myocardial infarction at 3 weeks. Four of these recovered with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage. One patient with paraplegia died and two had permanent neurological deficit. The rate of permanent paraplegia and death was 1.6%. There were seven strokes (3.8%; four urgent and three elective). Three patients made a complete recovery, one had permanent expressive dysphasia, and three died. The rate of permanent stroke and death was 2.1%. Endoluminal treatment of thoracic aortic disease is an attractive alternative to open surgery; however, there is still a risk of paraplegia and stroke. Permanent neurological deficits and death occurred in 3.7% of the patients in this series. We conclude that prompt recognition of paraplegia and immediate insertion of a CSF drain can be an effective way of recovering spinal cord function and improving the prognosis.

  11. Thoracic spinal trauma and associated injuries: should early spinal decompression be considered?

    PubMed

    Petitjean, M E; Mousselard, H; Pointillart, V; Lassie, P; Senegas, J; Dabadie, P

    1995-08-01

    The relative benefits of conservative or surgical treatment in thoracic spinal trauma are still controversial. Owing to its anatomic relations, thoracic spinal trauma is specific regarding neurologic prognosis, the high incidence of associated injuries, and surgical management. Over a 30-month period, 49 patients sustained thoracic spinal trauma with neurologic impairment. The authors review population characteristics, associated injuries, and surgical management, and underline the high incidence of associated injuries, in particular, blunt chest trauma. In their opinion, early spinal decompression has no indication in complete paraplegia. Concerning partial paraplegia, early surgery may enhance neurologic recovery. Nevertheless, they suggest three main criteria in deciding whether or not to perform surgery early: the existence of residual spinal compression, the degree of neurologic impairment, and the presence of potential hemorrhagic lesions or blunt chest trauma, especially pulmonary contusion. PMID:7674409

  12. [A case of thoracic actinomycosis].

    PubMed

    Denisova, O A; Cherniavskaia, G M; Beloborodova, É I; Topol'nitskiĭ, E B; Iakimenko, Iu V; Chernogoriuk, G É; Beloborodova, E V; Strezh, Iu A; Vil'danova, L R

    2014-01-01

    A case of thoracic actinomycosis manifest as round shadow in the lung is described. Diagnosis was based on the presence of actinomycetes in a transthoracic lung biopsy sample. Treatment for 3 months resulted in recovery. No relapse was documented during 1 year follow-up period. PMID:25265662

  13. A Thoracic Surgical Case Presented at the First Academic Meeting of the Chosun (Korean) Medical Association Held in 1947

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won-Gon

    2016-01-01

    The late Prof. Kyeok Boo Han (1913–2005) was one of the pioneers in the early stages of the establishment of thoracic surgery in Korea. He was in charge of thoracic surgery at Seoul National University Hospital from 1948 to the outbreak of the Korean War in 1950. He presented a thoracic surgical case entitled “Adhesive (constrictive) pericarditis: one surgical case” at the first academic meeting of the Chosun (an old name for Korea) Medical Association, held in 1947. This presentation is considered to be the first thoracic surgical case presented by a Korean surgeon at a domestic medical meeting after the National Liberation from Japanese colonial rule in 1945. In this regard, this study was intended to analyze the content and the meaning of the case, published in a journal in 1948. PMID:27525248

  14. A Thoracic Surgical Case Presented at the First Academic Meeting of the Chosun (Korean) Medical Association Held in 1947.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won-Gon

    2016-08-01

    The late Prof. Kyeok Boo Han (1913-2005) was one of the pioneers in the early stages of the establishment of thoracic surgery in Korea. He was in charge of thoracic surgery at Seoul National University Hospital from 1948 to the outbreak of the Korean War in 1950. He presented a thoracic surgical case entitled "Adhesive (constrictive) pericarditis: one surgical case" at the first academic meeting of the Chosun (an old name for Korea) Medical Association, held in 1947. This presentation is considered to be the first thoracic surgical case presented by a Korean surgeon at a domestic medical meeting after the National Liberation from Japanese colonial rule in 1945. In this regard, this study was intended to analyze the content and the meaning of the case, published in a journal in 1948. PMID:27525248

  15. Emergency Thoracic US: The Essentials.

    PubMed

    Wongwaisayawan, Sirote; Suwannanon, Ruedeekorn; Sawatmongkorngul, Sorravit; Kaewlai, Rathachai

    2016-01-01

    Acute thoracic symptoms are common among adults visiting emergency departments in the United States. Adults with these symptoms constitute a large burden on the overall resources used in the emergency department. The wide range of possible causes can make a definitive diagnosis challenging, even after clinical evaluation and initial laboratory testing. In addition to radiography and computed tomography, thoracic ultrasonography (US) is an alternative imaging modality that can be readily performed in real time at the patient's bedside to help diagnose many thoracic diseases manifesting acutely and in the trauma setting. Advantages of US include availability, relatively low cost, and lack of ionizing radiation. Emergency thoracic US consists of two main parts, lung and pleura US and focused cardiac US, which are closely related. Acoustic mismatches among aerated lungs, pleura, chest wall, and pathologic conditions produce artifacts useful for diagnosis of pneumothorax and pulmonary edema and help in detection of subpleural, pleural, and chest wall pathologic conditions such as pneumonia, pleural effusion, and fractures. Visual assessment of cardiac contractility and detection of right ventricular dilatation and pericardial effusion at focused cardiac US are critical in patients presenting with acute dyspnea and trauma. Additional US examinations of the inferior vena cava for noninvasive volume assessment and of the groin areas for detection of deep venous thrombosis are often performed at the same time. This multiorgan US approach can provide valuable information for emergency treatment of both traumatic and nontraumatic thoracic diseases involving the lungs, pleura, chest wall, heart, and vascular system. Online supplemental material is available for this article. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27035835

  16. Endovascular Repair of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Findeiss, Laura K.; Cody, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    Degenerative aneurysms of the thoracic aorta are increasing in prevalence; open repair of descending thoracic aortic aneurysms is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Repair of isolated descending thoracic aortic aneurysms using stent grafts was introduced in 1995, and in an anatomically suitable subgroup of patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm, repair with endovascular stent graft provides favorable outcomes, with decreased perioperative morbidity and mortality relative to open repair. The cornerstones of successful thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair are appropriate patient selection, thorough preprocedural planning, and cautious procedural execution, the elements of which are discussed here. PMID:22379281

  17. Spontaneous healing of retroperitoneal chylous leakage following anterior lumbar spinal surgery: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Su, I-Chang

    2007-01-01

    Cisterna chyli is prone to injury in any retroperitoneal surgery. However, retroperitoneal chylous leakage is a rare complication after anterior spinal surgery. To the best of our knowledge, only ten cases have been reported in the English literature. We present a case of a 49-year-old man who had lumbar metastasis and associated radiculopathy. He had transient retroperitoneal chylous leakage after anterior tumor decompression, interbody bony fusion, and instrumental fixation from L2 to L4. The leakage stopped spontaneously after we temporarily clamped the drain tube. Intraperitoneal ascites accumulation developed thereafter due to nutritional loss and impaired hepatic reserves. We gathered ten reported cases of chylous leak after anterior thoracolumbar or lumbar spinal surgery, and categorized all these cases into two groups, depending on the integrity of diaphragm. Six patients received anterior spinal surgery without diaphragm splitting. Postoperative chylous leak stopped after conservative treatment. Another five cases received diaphragm splitting in the interim of anterior spinal surgery. Chylous leakage stopped spontaneously in four patients. The remaining one had a chylothorax secondary to postop chyloretroperitoneum. It was resolved only after surgical intervention. In view of these cases, all the chylous leakage could be spontaneously closed without complications, except for one who had a secondary chylothorax and required thoracic duct ligation and chemopleurodesis. We conclude that intraoperative diaphragm splitting or incision does not increase the risk of secondary chylothorax if it was closed tightly at the end of the surgery and the chest tube drainage properly done. PMID:17273839

  18. Aneurysm growth after late conversion of thoracic endovascular aortic repair

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Ichiro; Haijima, Norimasa

    2015-01-01

    A 69-year-old man underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair of a descending aortic aneurysm. Three years later, he developed impending rupture due to aneurysmal expansion that included the proximal landing zone. Urgent open surgery was performed via lateral thoracotomy, and a Dacron graft was sewn to the previous stent graft distally with Teflon felt reinforcement. Postoperatively, four sequential computed tomography scans demonstrated that the aneurysm was additionally increasing in size probably due to continuous hematoma production, suggesting a possibility of endoleaks. This case demonstrates the importance of careful radiologic surveillance after endovascular repair, and also after partial open conversion. PMID:27489673

  19. Retained Intra- Thoracic Surgical Pack Mimicking as Recurrent Aspergilloma

    PubMed Central

    Mir, Ruquaya; Singh, Vikram P.

    2012-01-01

    An intrathoracic gossypiboma is a rare condition. We are reporting a case of intrathoracicgossypiboma which was misdiagnosed as a recurrent aspergilloma. In our patient, the gossypiboma manifested as a pleural- based extra pulmonary mass which had a large contact area with the pleura and it displayed an extra pulmonary location. A retained surgical swab (gossypiboma) is a rare but an important complication of an intra- thoracic surgery. The diagnosis is usually overlooked, as in our case, resulting in delay of treatment, complications and a prolonged hospitalization. PMID:23373051

  20. Cosmetic Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Body Looking and feeling your best Cosmetic surgery Cosmetic surgery Teens might have cosmetic surgery for a ... about my body? What are the risks of cosmetic surgery? top People who have cosmetic surgery face ...

  1. Reoperation for thoracic outlet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sessions, R T

    1989-01-01

    The clinical history and operative findings in a group of 60 patients who underwent reoperation for thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) are presented. The patients were severely disabled by arm, shoulder, and neck pain and presented with physical findings pointing to scar fixation of the brachial plexus in the neck (upper tract recurrence) or at the thoracic outlet (lower tract recurrence). The causes of recurrence of TOS as discovered at operation are outlined. Basic principles governing the surgical management of recurrent TOS are elimination of the known causes of recurrence, thorough neurolysis of the brachial plexus, and coverage of the nerves with healthy fat. The role of an expanded PTFE surgical membrane (Gortex) as an adjunct to prevent recurrent scarring is discussed. The surgeon who operates on patients with recurrent TOS must be capable of managing the potential intraoperative complications of severe nerve injury and life threatening bleeding. PMID:2745532

  2. Thoracoscopic Thoracic Duct Ligation for Persistent Cervical Chyle Leak: Utility of Immediate Pathologic Confirmation

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Alexander T.; Benharash, Peyman; French, Samuel W.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Chylous fistulas can occur after neck surgery. Both nonoperative measures and direct fistula ligation may lead to fistula resolution. However, a refractory fistula requires upstream thoracic duct ligation. This can be accomplished minimally invasively. Success depends on lymphatic flow interruption where the duct enters the thorax. We report on the utility of frozen section confirmation in achieving this goal. Methods: Persistent chylous fistulas occurred in 2 patients after left cervical operations. In the first patient, attempted direct fistula ligation and sclerosant application failed. Fasting, parenteral nutrition, and somatostatin-analog provided no benefit. For the second patient, nonoperative treatment was also ineffective. Prior radiation therapy and multiple cervical operations militated against attempted direct fistula ligation. Both patients underwent thoracoscopic thoracic duct interruption. Results: In both cases, a duct candidate was identified between the aorta and azygos vein. Frozen section analysis of tissue resected between endoclips verified it as thoracic duct. Fistula resolution ensued promptly in both instances. Conclusions: This report lends further credence to the efficacy of minimally invasive thoracic duct ligation in treating postoperative cervical chylous fistulas. Frozen section confirmation of thoracic duct tissue is useful. It allows one facile with thoracoscopy, but less familiar with thoracic duct ligation, to confidently terminate the operation. PMID:19793489

  3. [Perioperative Pain Management of Minimally Invasive Esophagectomy with Bilateral Continuous Thoracic Paravertebral Block].

    PubMed

    Hida, Kumiko; Murata, Hiroaki; Sakai, Akiko; Ogami, Keiko; Maekawa, Takuji; Hara, Tetsuya

    2016-02-01

    Minimally invasive esophagectomy has become popular as a surgical procedure for esophageal cancer. We describe bilateral continuous thoracic paravertebral blocks for perioperative pain management in 3 patients who underwent minimally invasive esophagectomy. After anesthesia induction, bilateral thoracic paravertebral catheters were placed under ultrasound guidance with the patients in left lateral decubitus position at the sixth or seventh right intercostal space and eighth or ninth left intercostal space, respectively. Multiple ports for thoracoscopic procedures were located between the right third and ninth intercostal spaces. Laparoscopy-assisted gastric tube reconstruction was performed with skin incisions at bilateral T7-10 dermatomes. Intraoperative intermittent bolus injections of ropivacaine through the thoracic paravertebral catheters were used in combination with sevoflurane-remifentanil anesthesia, followed by continuous thoracic paravertebral infusion of ropivacaine for postoperative analgesia with continuous intravenous fentanyl infusion and periodical intravenous acetaminophen administration. Numerical rating scales of postoperative pain at rest and when coughing were 4 or less for 48 hr after surgery. No complications related to thoracic paravertebral catheterization were observed. Bilateral continuous thoracic paravertebral blocks at different intercostal levels can provide good perioperative analgesia for minimally invasive esophagectomy. PMID:27017762

  4. Endovascular Repair of Contained Rupture of the Thoracic Aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Robert; Loosemore, Tom; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2002-08-15

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of stent-grafts for the treatment of acute rupture of the thoracic aorta. Methods: Four patients with acute contained ruptures of the thoracic aorta were treated by insertion of stent-grafts. The underlying aortic lesions were aneurysm, acute aortic ulcer, acute type B dissection and giant cell aortitis. The procedures were performed under general anesthesia in three patients and local anesthesia in one patient. Results: All stent-grafts were successfully deployed. All patients survived the procedure and are now alive and well at follow-up (mean 6.3 months, range 44 days-16 months). One patient underwent a second stent procedure 10 days after the first procedure because of a proximal endoleak. All hemothoraces have resolved. There were no complications. Conclusion:Treatment of acute contained ruptures of the thoracic aorta by the insertion of stent-grafts is feasible. The technical success rates,complication rates and patient survival compare favorably with emergency surgery.

  5. Clinical outcomes after decompressive laminectomy for symptomatic ossification of ligamentum flavum at the thoracic spine.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Zhao-Ming; Wu, Qian; Meng, Ting-Ting; Zhu, Yong-Jian; Qu, Dong-Bin; Wang, Ji-Xing; Jiang, Jian-Ming; Lu, Kai-Wu; Zheng, Shuai; Zhu, Si-Yuan; Chen, Jian-Ting

    2016-06-01

    Ossification of the ligamentum flavum (OLF) is a rare disease that causes acquired thoracic spinal canal stenosis and thoracic myelopathy. The aim of this study was to investigate clinical outcomes of symptomatic thoracic OLF treated using posterior decompressive laminectomy. We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 22 patients who underwent posterior decompressive laminectomy for symptomatic thoracic OLF. The surgical results were evaluated using the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scoring system and Hirabayashi recovery rate. The intensity of pain was evaluated using a visual analog scale (VAS). The mean duration of follow-up was 35.6months. The mean JOA score was significantly improved at final follow-up (9.18±standard deviation of 1.53 points [range, 6-11 points]) compared with before surgery (5.64±2.04 points [range, 3-9 points]) (P<0.001). The mean Hirabayashi recovery rate was 65.49% (range, 20-100%). Recovery outcomes were excellent in nine patients, good in eight patients, fair in four patients and unchanged in one patient. No patient was classified as deteriorated. The VAS scores were 2.82±3.08 before surgery and 0.59±1.05 at final follow-up (P=0.001). Surgical complications, which resolved after appropriate and prompt treatment, included dural tear in five patients, cerebrospinal fluid leakage in one patient, immediate postoperative neurologic deterioration in one patient, epidural hematoma in one patient, and wound infection in one patient. Our findings suggest that posterior decompressive laminectomy is an effective treatment for symptomatic thoracic OLF and provides satisfactory clinical improvement, but surgery for thoracic OLF is associated with a relatively high incidence of complications. PMID:26898582

  6. Endovascular Management of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Fattori, Rossella Russo, Vincenzo; Lovato, Luigi; Buttazzi, Katia; Rinaldi, Giovanni

    2011-12-15

    The overall survival of patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) has improved significantly in the past few years. Endovascular treatment, proposed as an alternative to surgery, has been considered a therapeutic innovation because of its low degree of invasiveness, which allows the treatment of even high-surgical risk patients with limited complications and mortality. A major limitation is the lack of adequate evidence regarding long-term benefit and durability because follow-up has been limited to just a few years even in the largest series. The combination of endovascular exclusion with visceral branch revascularization for the treatment of thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysms involving the visceral aorta has also been attempted. As an alternative, endografts with branches represent a technological evolution that allows treatment of complex anatomy. Even if only small numbers of patients and short follow-up are available, this technical approach, which has with limited mortality (<10%) and paraplegia rates, to expand endovascular treatment to TAA seems feasible. With improved capability to recognize proper anatomy and select clinical candidates, the choice of endovascular stent-graft placement may offer a strategy to optimize management and improve prognosis.

  7. ANESTHETIC MANAGEMENT IN UNEXPECTED EXTRA- ADRENAL PHEOCROMOCYTOMA PRESENTING WITH THORACIC SPINAL CORD COMPRESSION.

    PubMed

    El Kouny, Amr; Al Harbi, Mohammed; Arif, Rashid Muhammad; Ilyas, Nazar; Hamed, El Abbasy Omar; Memon, Maqsood; Nawaz, Ali; Dimitriou, Vassilios

    2016-02-01

    A 52 yearold female presented with a thoracic paravertebral tumour causing spinal nerve root compression and lower limbs neurologic symptoms. The patient was scheduled to undergo thoracic decompression laminectomy and instrumentation. Markedly severe hemodynamic fluctuations happened during the manipulation of the tumor and continued after the tumor was removed. After multimodal antihypertensive therapy the vital signs were adequately managed and the surgery was successfully performed without complications. The patient was discharged without any sequelae ten days later. The pathology report indicated the diagnosis of extra-adrenal pheochromocytoma. Unexpected pheochromocytoma may lead to a fatal hypertensive crisis during surgery. For anesthesiologists and surgeons who encounter an unexpected hypertensive crisis during surgery, undiagnosed pheochromocytoma should always be considered. PMID:27382822

  8. Thoracic spine sports-related injuries.

    PubMed

    Menzer, Heather; Gill, G Keith; Paterson, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Although sports-related injuries to the thoracic spine are relatively uncommon, they are among the most feared due to the potential for catastrophic neurologic injury. The increased biomechanical support of the thoracic spine makes injuries in this region particularly rare compared with the cervical and lumbar spine. As a result, thoracic spine injuries can be missed easily, difficult to diagnose, and problematic to treat. Recognition of mechanism and awareness of injury patterns help physicians determine a diagnosis and create an index of suspicion for unstable thoracic spine injuries. Aggressive full-contact sports receive the most attention for spinal injury; however several sports with repetitive loading of the spine can cause severe injuries, including rowing, gymnastics, and golf. The goal of this article was to provide an overview of the unique anatomic and biomechanical features of the thoracic spine and to discuss some of the more common thoracic injuries that can affect athletes. PMID:25574880

  9. The fibre type composition of thoracic and lumbar paravertebral muscles in man.

    PubMed Central

    Sirca, A; Kostevc, V

    1985-01-01

    Samples of longissimus and multifidi muscles at the thoracic and lumbar levels of the spine were examined histochemically on autopsy specimens from 21 adult male subjects (aged 22 to 46 years) and on biopsies from 17 adult patients during surgery for disorders of the lumbar intervertebral disc. In the superficial and deep thoracic muscles, 74% of fibres were of the Type I variety. In the lumbar region, Type I fibres amounted to 57% in the superficial, and to 63% in the deep muscles. The diameter of Type I fibres was significantly greater than that of Type II fibres. Images Fig. 1 PMID:2934358

  10. The fibre type composition of thoracic and lumbar paravertebral muscles in man.

    PubMed

    Sirca, A; Kostevc, V

    1985-08-01

    Samples of longissimus and multifidi muscles at the thoracic and lumbar levels of the spine were examined histochemically on autopsy specimens from 21 adult male subjects (aged 22 to 46 years) and on biopsies from 17 adult patients during surgery for disorders of the lumbar intervertebral disc. In the superficial and deep thoracic muscles, 74% of fibres were of the Type I variety. In the lumbar region, Type I fibres amounted to 57% in the superficial, and to 63% in the deep muscles. The diameter of Type I fibres was significantly greater than that of Type II fibres. PMID:2934358

  11. Thoracic aorta aneurysm open repair in heart transplant recipient; the anesthesiologist's perspective

    PubMed Central

    Monaco, Fabrizio; Oriani, Alessandro; De Luca, Monica; Bignami, Elena; Sala, Alessandra; Chiesa, Roberto; Melissano, Germano; Zangrillo, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Many years following transplantation, heart transplant recipients may require noncardiac major surgeries. Anesthesia in such patients may be challenging due to physiological and pharmacological problems regarding allograft denervation and difficult immunosuppressive management. Massive hemorrhage, hypoperfusion, renal, respiratory failure, and infections are some of the most frequent complications related to thoracic aorta aneurysm repair. Understanding how to optimize hemodynamic and infectious risks may have a substantial impact on the outcome. This case report aims at discussing risk stratification and anesthetic management of a 54-year-old heart transplant female recipient, affected by Marfan syndrome, undergoing thoracic aorta aneurysm repair. PMID:26750703

  12. Practical genetics of thoracic aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Elefteriades, John A; Pomianowski, Pawel

    2013-01-01

    This chapter will provide a practical look at the rapidly evolving field regarding the genetics of thoracic aortic aneurysm. It will start with a look at the history of the genetics of thoracic aortic aneurysm and will then move on to elucidating the discovery of familial patterns of thoracic aortic aneurysm. We will next review the Mendelian genetics of transmission of thoracic aortic aneurysm. We will move on to the molecular genetics at the DNA level and finish with a discussion of the molecular genetics at the RNA level, including a promising investigational "RNA Signature" test that we have been developing at Yale. PMID:23993238

  13. Traumatic injury of the thoracic duct.

    PubMed

    Guzman, A E; Rossi, L; Witte, C L; Smyth, S

    2002-03-01

    Injuries to the thoracic duct are infrequent but may become life-threatening when chylous leakage persists. This report describes 6 patients with such injuries in whom the leakage resolved spontaneously in one, was corrected using microsurgical lymphatic repair or lymphatic-venous anastomosis in two, successfully treated either by ligation of the thoracic duct or insertion of a peritoneovenous shunt in two, and was eventually controlled after bilateral pleurodesis and thoracic duct ligation by insertion of a peritoneo-venous shunt in one. Conventional lymphography is superior to lymphoscintigraphy and is usually required to document disruption of the thoracic duct. PMID:11939572

  14. Subsequent surgery rates after cervical total disc replacement using a Mobi-C Cervical Disc Prosthesis versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: a prospective randomized clinical trial with 5-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Robert J; Davis, Reginald J; Hoffman, Gregory A; Bae, Hyun W; Hisey, Michael S; Kim, Kee D; Gaede, Steven E; Nunley, Pierce Dalton

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Cervical total disc replacement (TDR) has been shown in a number of prospective clinical studies to be a viable treatment alternative to anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for the treatment of symptomatic degenerative disc disease. In addition to preserving motion, evidence suggests that cervical TDR may result in a lower incidence of subsequent surgical intervention than treatment with fusion. The goal of this study was to evaluate subsequent surgery rates up to 5 years in patients treated with TDR or ACDF at 1 or 2 contiguous levels between C-3 and C-7. METHODS This was a prospective, multicenter, randomized, unblinded clinical trial. Patients with symptomatic degenerative disc disease were enrolled to receive 1- or 2-level treatment with either TDR as the investigational device or ACDF as the control treatment. There were 260 patients in the 1-level study (179 TDR and 81 ACDF patients) and 339 patients in the 2-level study (234 TDR and 105 ACDF patients). RESULTS At 5 years, the occurrence of subsequent surgical intervention was significantly higher among ACDF patients for 1-level (TDR, 4.5% [8/179]; ACDF, 17.3% [14/81]; p = 0.0012) and 2-level (TDR, 7.3% [17/234]; ACDF, 21.0% [22/105], p = 0.0007) treatment. The TDR group demonstrated significantly fewer index- and adjacent-level subsequent surgeries in both the 1- and 2-level cohorts. CONCLUSIONS Five-year results showed treatment with cervical TDR to result in a significantly lower rate of subsequent surgical intervention than treatment with ACDF for both 1 and 2 levels of treatment. Clinical trial registration no.: NCT00389597 ( clinicaltrials.gov ). PMID:26799118

  15. Full Endoscopic Spinal Surgery Techniques: Advancements, Indications, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Yue, James J.; Long, William

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in both surgical instrumentation and full endoscopic spine techniques have resulted in positive clinical outcomes in the treatment of cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine pathologies. Endoscopic techniques impart minimal approach related disruption of non-pathologic spinal anatomy and function while concurrently maximizing functional visualization and correction of pathological tissues. An advanced understanding of the applicable functional neuroanatomy, in particular the neuroforamen, is essential for successful outcomes. Additionally, an understanding of the varying types of disc prolapse pathology in relation to the neuroforamen will result in more optimal surgical outcomes. Indications for lumbar endoscopic spine surgery include disc herniations, spinal stenosis, infections, medial branch rhizotomy, and interbody fusion. Limitations are based on both non spine and spine related findings. A high riding iliac wing, a more posteriorly located retroperitoneal cavity, an overly distal or proximally migrated herniated disc are all relative contra-indications to lumbar endoscopic spinal surgery techniques. Modifications in scope size and visual field of view angulation have enabled both anterior and posterior cervical decompression. Endoscopic burrs, electrocautery, and focused laser technology allow for the least invasive spinal surgical techniques in all age groups and across varying body habitus. Complications include among others, dural tears, dysesthsia, nerve injury, and infection. PMID:26114086

  16. Rotational flaps in oncologic breast surgery. Anatomical and technical considerations.

    PubMed

    Acea Nebril, Benigno; Builes Ramírez, Sergio; García Novoa, Alejandra; Varela Lamas, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Local flaps are a group of surgical procedures that can solve the thoracic closure of large defects after breast cancer surgery with low morbidity. Its use in skin necrosis complications after conservative surgery or skin sparing mastectomies facilitates the initiation of adjuvant treatments and reduces delays in this patient group. This article describes the anatomical basis for the planning of thoracic and abdominal local flaps. Also, the application of these local flaps for closing large defects in the chest and selective flaps for skin coverage by necrosis in breast conserving surgery. PMID:27140865

  17. Biological performance of a polycaprolactone-based scaffold used as fusion cage device in a large animal model of spinal reconstructive surgery.

    PubMed

    Abbah, Sunny A; Lam, Christopher X L; Hutmacher, Dietmar W; Goh, James C H; Wong, Hee-Kit

    2009-10-01

    A bioactive and bioresorbable scaffold fabricated from medical grade poly (epsilon-caprolactone) and incorporating 20% beta-tricalcium phosphate (mPCL-TCP) was recently developed for bone regeneration at load bearing sites. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate bone ingrowth into mPCL-TCP in a large animal model of lumbar interbody fusion. Six pigs underwent a 2-level (L3/4; L5/6) anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) implanted with mPCL-TCP + 0.6 mg rhBMP-2 as treatment group while four other pigs implanted with autogenous bone graft served as control. Computed tomographic scanning and histology revealed complete defect bridging in all (100%) specimen from the treatment group as early as 3 months. Histological evidence of continuing bone remodeling and maturation was observed at 6 months. In the control group, only partial bridging was observed at 3 months and only 50% of segments in this group showed complete defect bridging at 6 months. Furthermore, 25% of segments in the control group showed evidence of graft fracture, resorption and pseudoarthrosis. In contrast, no evidence of graft fractures, pseudoarthrosis or foreign body reaction was observed in the treatment group. These results reveal that mPCL-TCP scaffolds could act as bone graft substitutes by providing a suitable environment for bone regeneration in a dynamic load bearing setting such as in a porcine model of interbody spine fusion. PMID:19540586

  18. Medical teleconference about thoracic surgery using free Internet software.

    PubMed

    Obuchi, Toshiro; Shiono, Hiroyuki; Shimada, Junichi; Kaga, Kichizo; Kurihara, Masatoshi; Iwasaki, Akinori

    2011-11-01

    Surgical teleconferences using advanced academic networks are becoming common; however, reports regarding Internet teleconferencing using free software packages such as Skype, USTREAM, and Dropbox are very rare. Teleconferences concerning mainly surgical techniques were held five times between Fukuoka University Hospital and other institutions from April to September 2010. These teleconferences used Skype and USTREAM as videophones to establish communication. Both PowerPoint presentations and surgical videos were made. These presentation files were previously sent to all stations via mail, e-mail, or Dropbox, and shared. A slide-show was simultaneously performed following the presenter's cue in each station. All teleconferences were successfully completed, even though there were minor instances of the Skype link being broken for unknown reasons during the telecommunication. Internet surgical teleconferences using ordinary software are therefore considered to be sufficiently feasible. This method will become more convenient and common as the Internet environments advance. PMID:21969167

  19. Whole organ and tissue reconstruction in thoracic regenerative surgery.

    PubMed

    Lim, Mei Ling; Jungebluth, Philipp; Ajalloueian, Fatemeh; Friedrich, Linda Helen; Gilevich, Irina; Grinnemo, Karl-Henrik; Gubareva, Elena; Haag, Johannes C; Lemon, Greg; Sjöqvist, Sebastian; Caplan, Arthur L; Macchiarini, Paolo

    2013-10-01

    Development of novel prognostic, diagnostic, and treatment options will provide major benefits for millions of patients with acute or chronic respiratory dysfunction, cardiac-related disorders, esophageal problems, or other diseases in the thorax. Allogeneic organ transplant is currently available. However, it remains a trap because of its dependency on a very limited supply of donated organs, which may be needed for both initial and subsequent transplants. Furthermore, it requires lifelong treatment with immunosuppressants, which are associated with adverse effects. Despite early clinical applications of bioengineered organs and tissues, routine implementation is still far off. For this review, we searched the PubMed, MEDLINE, and Ovid databases for the following keywords for each tissue or organ: tissue engineering, biological and synthetic scaffold/graft, acellular and decelluar(ized), reseeding, bioreactor, tissue replacement, and transplantation. We identified the current state-of-the-art practices in tissue engineering with a focus on advances during the past 5 years. We discuss advantages and disadvantages of biological and synthetic solutions and introduce novel strategies and technologies for the field. The ethical challenges of innovation in this area are also reviewed. PMID:24079685

  20. [Thirty-five years' experience of thoracic surgery].

    PubMed

    Levashov, Iu N; Akopov, A L; El'kin, A V; Iablonskiĭ, P K; Orlov, S V; Mosin, I V; Varlamov, V V; Levashev, N Iu

    2006-01-01

    The paper pools the experience gained in the surgical treatment of lung malformations in children and adults, which has been used to develop their current classification. It also presents the outcomes of surgical treatment of acute infectious lung destructions, by taking into account the Marchuk severity index. Modes of surgical treatment of bullous pulmonary emphysema have been provided, which yield minimum postoperative mortality rates (3%). The experience of surgical treatment of 110 patients with cicatrical tracheal stenosis is summarized. The authors also present the results of operations made in 390 patients with Stage III non-small cell carcinoma of the lung, specify indications and procedures for resection of the bifurcation of the trachea when the latter is involved in the tumorous process. They also summarize the experience gained in having performed more than 300 operations in the past 5 years for progressive pulmonary tuberculosis, with 2.7% mortality, and 106 final pneumonectomies for postoperative recurrent pulmonary tuberculosis. The experience with allografting of the trachea (n = 2) and lung (n = 3) is important and little studied in our country. PMID:16610301

  1. Contamination of underwater seal drainage systems in thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Hornick, P; John, L C; Wallis, J; Wilkins, V; Rees, G M; Edmondson, S J

    1992-01-01

    The incidence of bacteriological contamination of drainage fluid (water constituting the underwater seal plus drainage effluent) was studied in 38 patients (50 chest drains), up to 6 days after thoracotomy. No bacteriological contamination was demonstrated in any of the samples taken during this period of time. We conclude that the underwater seal drainage system may be left for up to 6 days postoperatively without change of any of its components and without risk of contamination. PMID:1736790

  2. Video-assisted thoracic surgery for pulmonary sequestration.

    PubMed

    Aydoğdu, Koray; Sayılır, Ebru; İncekara, Funda; Fındık, Göktürk; Kaya, Sadi

    2015-11-01

    Bronchopulmonary sequestration is a rare developmental abnormality. Most cases are asymptomatic and found incidentally. The definitive treatment for bronchopulmonary sequestration is surgical excision. An 18-year-old man was admitted to our clinic with longstanding cough, fever, and dense sputum. Chest computed tomography identified cystic bronchiectasis in common areas of the left lower lobe, and parenchymal destruction with air-fluid levels. A left lower lobectomy was performed via a video-thoracoscopic approach. PMID:25957092

  3. [Thoracic surgery for patients with deep vein thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Sekine, Y; Koh, E

    2012-07-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a main cause of pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE), and therefore both diseases are categorized as a serial pathophysiology of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Treatment goals for DVT include stopping clot propagation and preventing the recurrence of thrombus, the occurrence of PTE, and the development of pulmonary hypertension, which can be a complication of multiple recurrent pulmonary emboli. Clinical guidelines stratify the risk of VTE to 4 levels and recommend the treatment options. In high or extremely high risk patients for VTE, the use of low-dose heparin is recommended. The prevention against VTE, such as elastic compression stockings and intermittent sequential pneumatic leg compression( ISPC), is the most important prophylactic treatment against perioperative PTE by reducing thrombotic risk in low or moderate high risk patients for VET. Since there is no clear evidence that screening all or even selected patients for thrombophilias improves long-term outcomes, the physician's clinical judgment, and consultation with appropriate subspecialists should guide management perioperatively. Once PTE is suspected, immediate and accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment are mandatory. PMID:22868431

  4. Clinical pathway for thoracic surgery in an Italian centre

    PubMed Central

    Salati, Michele; Tiberi, Michela; Sabbatini, Armando; Gentili, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Clinical care pathways are developed to standardize postoperative patient care and the main impetus is to improve quality of care, decrease variation in care and reduce costs. We report the clinical pathway of care adopted at our centre since the introduction of Uniportal VATS program for major lung resections. PMID:26941966

  5. Clinical pathway for thoracic surgery in an Italian centre.

    PubMed

    Refai, Majed; Salati, Michele; Tiberi, Michela; Sabbatini, Armando; Gentili, Paolo

    2016-02-01

    Clinical care pathways are developed to standardize postoperative patient care and the main impetus is to improve quality of care, decrease variation in care and reduce costs. We report the clinical pathway of care adopted at our centre since the introduction of Uniportal VATS program for major lung resections. PMID:26941966

  6. Secondary aorto-esophageal fistula after thoracic aortic aneurysm endovascular repair treated by covered esophageal stenting

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Mary; Shlomovitz, Eran; Darling, Gail; Roche-Nagle, Graham

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair for thoracic aortic aneurysms is an accepted alternative to open surgery, especially in patients with significant comorbidities. The procedure itself has a low risk of complications and fistulas to surrounding organs are rarely reported. An 86-year-old patient was admitted to our hospital with gastro intestinal (GI) bleeding and a suspected aortoesophageal fistula. Eight months prior, the patient had undergone a stent graft repair of a mycotic thoracic aneurysm. Computerized tomography angiography and upper GI endoscopy confirmed an aortoesophageal fistula, which was treated by esophageal stenting. With early recognition, esophageal stenting may have a role in the initial emergency control of bleeding from and palliation of aortoesophageal fistula. PMID:27574612

  7. Secondary aorto-esophageal fistula after thoracic aortic aneurysm endovascular repair treated by covered esophageal stenting.

    PubMed

    Tao, Mary; Shlomovitz, Eran; Darling, Gail; Roche-Nagle, Graham

    2016-08-16

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair for thoracic aortic aneurysms is an accepted alternative to open surgery, especially in patients with significant comorbidities. The procedure itself has a low risk of complications and fistulas to surrounding organs are rarely reported. An 86-year-old patient was admitted to our hospital with gastro intestinal (GI) bleeding and a suspected aortoesophageal fistula. Eight months prior, the patient had undergone a stent graft repair of a mycotic thoracic aneurysm. Computerized tomography angiography and upper GI endoscopy confirmed an aortoesophageal fistula, which was treated by esophageal stenting. With early recognition, esophageal stenting may have a role in the initial emergency control of bleeding from and palliation of aortoesophageal fistula. PMID:27574612

  8. Endoscopic procedures of the upper-thoracic sympathetic chain. A review.

    PubMed

    Drott, C; Göthberg, G; Claes, G

    1993-02-01

    The upsurge of endoscopic surgical procedures now includes procedures of the thoracic sympathetic chain. The number of articles on this issue is rapidly increasing. This article reviews the indications for as well as the technique, complications, side effects, and results of endoscopic upper-thoracic sympathetic ablation. Since 1977, nearly 900 cases have been described in the literature. The main indication is usually hyperhidrosis. The described techniques vary in detail, but the common denominators are simplicity, expedience, minimal surgical trauma, few complications, and low cost compared with standard methods of open surgery. The results are excellent, durable, and stand well compared with results of previous open techniques. Due to the overwhelming advantages of endoscopic methods, we can foresee an increasing adoption of these techniques and a subsequent relegation of the various open surgical procedures of the upper-thoracic sympathetic chain. PMID:8431126

  9. Cataract Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics ...

  10. Percutaneous laser disc decompression for thoracic disc disease: report of 10 cases

    PubMed Central

    Haufe, Scott M.W.; Mork, Anthony R.; Pyne, Morgan; Baker, Ryan A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Discogenic pain or herniation causing neural impingement of the thoracic vertebrae is less common than that in the cervical or lumbar regions. Treatment of thoracic discogenic pain usually involves conservative measures. If this fails, conventional fusion or discectomy can be considered, but these procedures carry significant risk. Objectives: To assess the efficacy and safety of percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) for the treatment of thoracic disc disease. Methods: Ten patients with thoracic discogenic pain who were unresponsive to conservative intervention underwent the PLDD procedure. Thoracic pain was assessed using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores preoperatively and at 6-month intervals with a minimum of 18-months follow-up. Patients were diagnosed and chosen for enrollment based on abnormal MRI findings and positive provocative discograms. Patients with gross herniations were not included. Results: Length of follow-up ranged from 18 to 31 months (mean: 24.2 mo). Median pretreatment thoracic VAS score was 8.5 (range: 5-10) and median VAS score at final follow-up was 3.8 (range: 0-9). Postoperative improvement was significant with a 99% confidence interval. Of interest, patients generally fell into two groups, those with significant pain reduction and those with little to no improvement. Although complications such as pneumothorax, discitis, or nerve damage were possible, no adverse events occurred during the procedures. Limitations: The study is limited by its small size and lack of a sham group. Larger controlled studies are warranted. Conclusions: With further clinical evidence, PLDD could be considered a viable option with a low risk of complication for the treatment of thoracic discogenic pain that does not resolve with conservative treatment. PMID:20567616

  11. The Thoracic Shape of Hominoids

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Lap Ki

    2014-01-01

    In hominoids, the broad thorax has been assumed to contribute to their dorsal scapular position. However, the dorsoventral diameter of their cranial thorax was found in one study to be longer in hominoids. There are insufficient data on thoracic shape to explain the relationship between broad thorax and dorsal scapular position. The current study presents data on multilevel cross-sectional shape and volume distribution in a range of primates. Biplanar radiographs of intact fluid-preserved cadavers were taken to measure the cross-sectional shape of ten equally spaced levels through the sternum (called decisternal levels) and the relative volume of the nine intervening thoracic segments. It was found that the cranial thorax of hominoids is larger and broader (except in the first two decisternal levels) than that of other primates. The cranial thorax of hominoids has a longer dorsoventral diameter because the increase in dorsoventral diameter caused by the increase in the volume of the cranial thorax overcompensates for the decrease caused by the broadening of the cranial thorax. The larger and broader cranial thorax in hominoids can be explained as a locomotor adaptation for scapular gliding and as a respiratory adaptation for reducing the effects of orthograde posture on ventilation-perfusion inequality. PMID:24818026

  12. Thoracic organ transplantation: laboratory methods.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jignesh K; Kobashigawa, Jon A

    2013-01-01

    Although great progress has been achieved in thoracic organ transplantation through the development of effective immunosuppression, there is still significant risk of rejection during the early post-transplant period, creating a need for routine monitoring for both acute antibody and cellular mediated rejection. The currently available multiplexed, microbead assays utilizing solubilized HLA antigens afford the capability of sensitive detection and identification of HLA and non-HLA specific antibodies. These assays are being used to assess the relative strength of donor specific antibodies; to permit performance of virtual crossmatches which can reduce the waiting time to transplantation; to monitor antibody levels during desensitization; and for heart transplants to monitor antibodies post-transplant. For cell mediated immune responses, the recent development of gene expression profiling has allowed noninvasive monitoring of heart transplant recipients yielding predictive values for acute cellular rejection. T cell immune monitoring in heart and lung transplant recipients has allowed individual tailoring of immunosuppression, particularly to minimize risk of infection. While the current antibody and cellular laboratory techniques have enhanced the ability to manage thoracic organ transplant recipients, future developments from improved understanding of microchimerism and graft tolerance may allow more refined allograft monitoring techniques. PMID:23775735

  13. The thoracic shape of hominoids.

    PubMed

    Chan, Lap Ki

    2014-01-01

    In hominoids, the broad thorax has been assumed to contribute to their dorsal scapular position. However, the dorsoventral diameter of their cranial thorax was found in one study to be longer in hominoids. There are insufficient data on thoracic shape to explain the relationship between broad thorax and dorsal scapular position. The current study presents data on multilevel cross-sectional shape and volume distribution in a range of primates. Biplanar radiographs of intact fluid-preserved cadavers were taken to measure the cross-sectional shape of ten equally spaced levels through the sternum (called decisternal levels) and the relative volume of the nine intervening thoracic segments. It was found that the cranial thorax of hominoids is larger and broader (except in the first two decisternal levels) than that of other primates. The cranial thorax of hominoids has a longer dorsoventral diameter because the increase in dorsoventral diameter caused by the increase in the volume of the cranial thorax overcompensates for the decrease caused by the broadening of the cranial thorax. The larger and broader cranial thorax in hominoids can be explained as a locomotor adaptation for scapular gliding and as a respiratory adaptation for reducing the effects of orthograde posture on ventilation-perfusion inequality. PMID:24818026

  14. Computed tomography of thoracic and lumbar spine fractures that have been treated with Harrington instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Golimbu, C.; Firooznia, H.; Rafii, M.; Engler, G.; Delman, A.

    1984-06-01

    Twenty patients with fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spine underwent computed tomography (CT) following Harrington distraction instrumentation and a spinal fusion. CT was done to search for a cause of persistent cord or nerve root compression in those patients who failed to improve and completely recover their partial neurologic deficit (14 cases). The most common abnormality was the presence of residual bone fragments originating in the burst fracture of a vertebral body displaced posteriorly, into the spinal canal. In patients with complications in the late recovery period, CT found exuberant callus indenting the canal or lack of fusion of the bone grafts placed in the anterolateral aspect of the vertebral bodies. This experience indicates that CT is the modality of choice for spinal canal evaluation in those patients who fail to have an optimal clinical course following fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spine treated with Harrington rods.

  15. Lung Volume Reduction Surgery

    PubMed Central

    DeCamp, Malcolm M.; McKenna, Robert J.; Deschamps, Claude C.; Krasna, Mark J.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) is the safe, effective, and durable palliation of dyspnea in appropriately selected patients with moderate to severe emphysema. Appropriate patient selection and preoperative preparation are prerequisites for successful LVRS. An effective LVRS program requires participation by and communication between experts from pulmonary medicine, thoracic surgery, thoracic anesthesiology, critical care medicine, rehabilitation medicine, respiratory therapy, chest radiology, and nursing. The critical analysis of perioperative outcomes has influenced details of the conduct of the procedure and has established a bilateral, stapled approach as the standard of care for LVRS. The National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT) remains the world's largest multi-center, randomized trial comparing LVRS to maximal medical therapy. NETT purposely enrolled a broad spectrum of anatomic patterns of emphysema. This, along with the prospective, audited collection of extensive demographic, physiologic, radiographic, surgical and quality-of-life data, has positioned NETT as the most robust repository of evidence to guide the refinement of patient selection criteria for LVRS, to assist surgeons in providing optimal intraoperative and postoperative care, and to establish benchmarks for survival, complication rates, return to independent living, and durability of response. This article reviews the evolution of current LVRS practice with a particular emphasis on technical aspects of the operation, including the predictors and consequences of its most common complications. PMID:18453353

  16. Effect of thoracic arthrodesis in prepubertal New Zealand white rabbits on cardio-pulmonary function

    PubMed Central

    Canavese, Federico; Dimeglio, Alain; Barbetta, Davide; Pereira, Bruno; Fabbro, Sergio; Bassini, Federica; Canavese, Bartolomeo

    2014-01-01

    Background: This experimental study was aimed at evaluating the type of cardiac and pulmonary involvement, in relation to changes of the thoracic spine and cage in prepubertal rabbits with nondeformed spine following dorsal arthrodesis. The hypothesis was that T1-T12 arthrodesis modified thoracic dimensions, but would not modify cardiopulmonary function once skeletal maturity was reached. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in 16 female New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits. Nine rabbits were subjected to T1-T12 dorsal arthrodesis while seven were sham-operated. Echocardiographic images were obtained at 12 months after surgery and parameters for 2-dimensional and M-mode echocardiographic variables were assessed. One week before echocardiographic examination, blood samples were withdrawn from the animals’ central artery of the left ear to obtain blood gas values. One week after echocardiographic assessment, a thoracic CT scan was performed under general anesthesia. Chest depth (CD) and width (CW), thoracic kyphosis (ThK) and sternal length (StL) were measured; thoracic index (ThI), expressed as CD/CW ratio. All subjects were euthanized after the CT scan. Heart and lungs were subsequently removed to measure weight and volume. Results: The values for 2-dimensional and M-mode echocardiographic variables were found to be uniformly and significantly higher, compared to those reported in anesthetized rabbits. CD, ThK, and StL were considerably lower in operated rabbits, as compared to the ones that were sham-operated. Similarly, the ThI was lower in operated rabbits than in sham-operated ones. Conclusion: Irregularities in thoracic cage growth resulting from thoracic spine arthrodesis did not alter blood and echocardiographic parameters in NZW rabbits. PMID:24741141

  17. A penetrating dorsal thoracic injury that is lucky from every aspect: A case report

    PubMed Central

    İlhan, Mehmet; Gök, Ali Fuat Kaan; Öner, Gizem; Günay, Kayıhan; Ertekin, Cemalettin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Penetrating thoracic trauma management represents a major problem for emergency department staff. In these cases, we reported a patient, who can be deemed very lucky, because of both the trauma mechanism and the provided first aid at scene. Presentation of case A 30-year-old man was transported to the emergency surgery outpatient clinic after being stabbed from his back. A knife entered thorax from the dorsal region paravertebrally between two scapulae. No vascular and thoracic injuries were detected in the CT. The knife was then pulled and removed, and pressure dressing was applied on the wound. He was discharged with full recovery on the second day of admission. Discussion Thoracic traumas may present as blunt or penetrating traumas. Trauma with penetrating dorsal thoracic injuries is usually in the form of stabbing, sharp penetrating object injuries, or firearm injuries. The aim of a successful trauma management is to determine whether a life-threatening condition exists. The general rules of penetrating trauma management are to avoid in-depth exploration for wound site assessment, to avoid removal of penetrating object without accurate diagnosis, and to keep in mind the possibility of intubation for airway security in every moment. Conclusion During the initial care of patients with penetrating trauma, the object should not be removed from its place. Our patient was lucky enough in that no thoracic pathology developed during the accident and he was not subjected to any secondary trauma during ambulance transport. PMID:27100954

  18. [Thoracic nocardiosis - a clinical report].

    PubMed

    Vale, Artur; Guerra, Miguel; Martins, Daniel; Lameiras, Angelina; Miranda, José; Vouga, Luís

    2014-01-01

    Nocardia genus microorganisms are ubiquitous, Gram positive aerobic bacterias, responsible for disease mainly in immunocompromised hosts, with cellular immune response commitment. Inhalation is the main form of transmition and pulmonary disease is the most frequent presentation. Dissemination may occur by contiguity and also via hematogenous. The clinical and imaging presentation is not specific, and diagnosis is obtained after identification of Nocardia bacteria in biological samples. Since there are no reliable studies that indicate the best therapeutic option, treatment should be individualized and based on antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Surgical drainage should also be considered in all patients. The authors present a clinical case of a patient with thoracic nocardiosis, and make a short literature review on the theme. PMID:25596394

  19. Ossification of thoracic ligamenta flava

    SciTech Connect

    Kudo, S.; Minoru, O.; Russell, W.J.

    1983-07-01

    Although ligamentum flavum ossification (LFO) often occurs in normal persons, there are no reports of its detection on lateral chest radiographs made during screening examinations. Review of 1,744 consecutive lateral chest radiographs identified LFO in 6.2% of males and 4.8% of females. LFO occurred mainly at the intervertebral segments from T9-T10 through T12-L1. Most prevalent was the hook-shaped LFO, protruding inferoirly from the inferior facets into the projections of the intervertabral foramina. Though LFO can cause severe neurologic symptoms, none of the affected persons in this study reported such symptoms. LFO was first visualized radiographically when the subjects were 20-40 years old, and it may be a physiologic condition. The LFO in these cases existed independent of thoracic posterior longitudinal ligament ossification, diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis, and degenerative osteoarthritis.

  20. [Thoracic actinomycosis versus bronchial cancer].

    PubMed

    Brombacher-Frey, I; Wöckel, W; Kreusser, T

    1992-01-01

    We report on 4 thoracic actinomycoses; in three of these four cases a bronchial carcinoma was suspected, and in case No. 2 this carcinoma had been considered to be in a very advanced and inoperable stage. A man of 51 years of age was in a generally run-down condition. He also noticed that his sputum was tinged with blood. The x-ray film showed a large space-occupying growth at the right lung hilus. Repeated perbronchial biopsies of the focus did not yield any diagnosis. Actinomycosis was identified histologically only in the tissue samples obtained via thoracotomy. After a three-month penicillin course the hilar shadow receded. A 61-year old male patient was transferred to our Pneumological Hospital, being strongly suspected of suffering from an extensive bronchial carcinoma, and having multiple intrathoracic space-occupying growths as well as pleural effusions, a pericardial effusion, and an infiltration of the left thoracic wall with fistula formation; however, histological examination of skin biopsies revealed that he was suffering from actinomycosis. Antibiotic therapy cured him completely in a six-month course. In a man of 32 years of age who had been indulging for many years in a severe abuse of nicotin, we suspected a central bronchial carcinoma on the basis of his x-ray, but histology of the tissue taken from the space-occupying growth via diagnostic thoracotomy revealed that this patient, too, suffered from actinomycosis. Complete recession occurred after several months of antibiotic treatment. A woman of 82 years had been an inpatient for several months in another hospital because of relapsing pleuropneumonias on the right side. She was transferred to us as an outpatient after a renewed relapse. We conducted a transcutaneous fine-needle biopsy of the right indurating pleural effusion. A few actinomyces filaments were seen on histological examination of the purulent exudate. Hence, actinomycosis was confirmed. After antibiotic therapy the finding receded

  1. Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Tumours with the Patient Under Thoracic Epidural Anaesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Pouliquen, Cassiopee; Kabbani, Youssef Saignac, Pierre; Gekiere, Jean-Pierre; Palussiere, Jean

    2011-02-15

    Radiofrequency ablation of lung tumours is a curative technique that is newly considered being offered to nonsurgical patients. It is of major interest because it enables local destruction of the tumour without surgery and spares healthy parenchyma. However, some patients have previous serious respiratory failure, thus ruling out mechanical ventilation. To operate with the patient under thoracic epidural is an answer to this problem. Our experience shows that the procedure is able to be performed completely without converting to general anaesthesia.

  2. A Twelve-Year Consecutive Case Experience in Thoracic Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jenny T.; Bonneau, Laura A.; Weigel, Tracey L.; Maloney, James D.; Castro, Francisco; Shulzhenko, Nikita

    2016-01-01

    Background: We describe the second largest contemporary series of flaps used in thoracic reconstruction. Methods: A retrospective review of patients undergoing thoracomyoplasty from 2001 to 2013 was conducted. Ninety-one consecutive patients were identified. Results: Thoracomyoplasty was performed for 67 patients with intrathoracic indications and 24 patients with chest wall defects. Malignancy and infection were the most common indications for reconstruction (P < 0.01). The latissimus dorsi (LD), pectoralis major, and serratus anterior muscle flaps remained the workhorses of reconstruction (LD and pectoralis major: 64% flaps in chest wall reconstruction; LD and serratus anterior: 85% of flaps in intrathoracic indication). Only 12% of patients required mesh. Only 6% of patients with <2 ribs resected required mesh when compared with 24% with 3–4 ribs, and 100% with 5 or more ribs resected (P < 0.01). Increased rib resections required in chest wall reconstruction resulted in a longer hospital stay (P < 0.01). Total comorbidities and complications were related to length of stay only in intrathoracic indication (P < 0.01). Average intubation time was significantly higher in patients undergoing intrathoracic indication (5.51 days) than chest wall reconstruction (0.04 days), P < 0.05. Average hospital stay was significantly higher in patients undergoing intrathoracic indication (23 days) than chest wall reconstruction (12 days), P < 0.05. One-year survival was most poor for intrathoracic indication (59%) versus chest wall reconstruction (83%), P = 0.0048. Conclusion: Thoracic reconstruction remains a safe and successful intervention that reliably treats complex and challenging problems, allowing more complex thoracic surgery problems to be salvaged. PMID:27257568

  3. Clinical analysis of thoracic ossified ligamentum flavum without ventral compressive lesion

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sang Hoon; Kim, Wook Ha; Chung, Sang-Bong; Jin, Yong Jun; Park, Kun Woo; Lee, Joon Woo; Chung, Sang-Ki; Yeom, Jin S.; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Chung, Chun Kee; Kang, Heung Sik; Kim, Hyun-Jib

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical characteristics of thoracic ossified ligamentum flavum (OLF) and to elucidate prognostic factors as well as effective surgical treatment modality. The authors analyzed 106 thoracic OLF cases retrospectively from January 1999 to December 2008. The operative (n = 40) and the non-operative group (n = 66) were diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and/or computed tomography (CT) imaging. We excluded cases exhibiting ventral compressive lesions causing subarachnoid space effacement in thoracic vertebrae as well as those with a coexisting cervical compressive myelopathy. Those in the operative group were treated with decompressive laminectomy as well as resection of OLF. The preoperative neurologic status and postoperative outcomes of patients, as indicated by their modified Japanese Orthopedic Association (mJOA) scores and recovery rate (RR), Modic changes, the axial (fused or non-fused) and sagittal (omega or beak) configurations of OLF, and the ratios of the cross-sectional area (CSA) and anteroposterior diameter (APD) of the most compressed level were studied. The most commonly affected segment was the T10–11 vertebral body level (n = 49, 27.1%) and the least affected segment was the T7–8 level (n = 1, 0.6%). The ratios of the CSA in non-fused and fused types were 77.3 and 59.3% (p < 0.001). When Modic changes were present with OLF, initial mJOA score was found to be significantly lower than those without Modic change (7.62 vs. 9.09, p = 0.033). Neurological status improved after decompressive laminectomy without fusion (preoperative vs. last mJOA; 7.1 ± 2.01 vs. 8.57 ± 1.91, p < 0.001). However, one patient exhibited transient deterioration of her neurological status after surgery. In the axial configuration, fused-type OLF revealed a significant risk for a decreased postoperative mJOA score (0–7, severe and moderate) (Odds ratio: 5.54, χ2 = 4.41, p = 0.036, 95% CI: 1.014–30

  4. Minimally invasive mediastinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Melfi, Franca M. A.; Mussi, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    In the past, mediastinal surgery was associated with the necessity of a maximum exposure, which was accomplished through various approaches. In the early 1990s, many surgical fields, including thoracic surgery, observed the development of minimally invasive techniques. These included video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS), which confers clear advantages over an open approach, such as less trauma, short hospital stay, increased cosmetic results and preservation of lung function. However, VATS is associated with several disadvantages. For this reason, it is not routinely performed for resection of mediastinal mass lesions, especially those located in the anterior mediastinum, a tiny and remote space that contains vital structures at risk of injury. Robotic systems can overcome the limits of VATS, offering three-dimensional (3D) vision and wristed instrumentations, and are being increasingly used. With regards to thymectomy for myasthenia gravis (MG), unilateral and bilateral VATS approaches have demonstrated good long-term neurologic results with low complication rates. Nevertheless, some authors still advocate the necessity of maximum exposure, especially when considering the distribution of normal and ectopic thymic tissue. In recent studies, the robotic approach has shown to provide similar neurological outcomes when compared to transsternal and VATS approaches, and is associated with a low morbidity. Importantly, through a unilateral robotic technique, it is possible to dissect and remove at least the same amount of mediastinal fat tissue. Preliminary results on early-stage thymomatous disease indicated that minimally invasive approaches are safe and feasible, with a low rate of pleural recurrence, underlining the necessity of a “no-touch” technique. However, especially for thymomatous disease characterized by an indolent nature, further studies with long follow-up period are necessary in order to assess oncologic and neurologic results through minimally

  5. Minimally invasive mediastinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Melfi, Franca M A; Fanucchi, Olivia; Mussi, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    In the past, mediastinal surgery was associated with the necessity of a maximum exposure, which was accomplished through various approaches. In the early 1990s, many surgical fields, including thoracic surgery, observed the development of minimally invasive techniques. These included video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS), which confers clear advantages over an open approach, such as less trauma, short hospital stay, increased cosmetic results and preservation of lung function. However, VATS is associated with several disadvantages. For this reason, it is not routinely performed for resection of mediastinal mass lesions, especially those located in the anterior mediastinum, a tiny and remote space that contains vital structures at risk of injury. Robotic systems can overcome the limits of VATS, offering three-dimensional (3D) vision and wristed instrumentations, and are being increasingly used. With regards to thymectomy for myasthenia gravis (MG), unilateral and bilateral VATS approaches have demonstrated good long-term neurologic results with low complication rates. Nevertheless, some authors still advocate the necessity of maximum exposure, especially when considering the distribution of normal and ectopic thymic tissue. In recent studies, the robotic approach has shown to provide similar neurological outcomes when compared to transsternal and VATS approaches, and is associated with a low morbidity. Importantly, through a unilateral robotic technique, it is possible to dissect and remove at least the same amount of mediastinal fat tissue. Preliminary results on early-stage thymomatous disease indicated that minimally invasive approaches are safe and feasible, with a low rate of pleural recurrence, underlining the necessity of a "no-touch" technique. However, especially for thymomatous disease characterized by an indolent nature, further studies with long follow-up period are necessary in order to assess oncologic and neurologic results through minimally invasive

  6. Experimental laparoscopic and thoracoscopic discectomy and instrumented spinal fusion. A feasibility study using a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Mühlbauer, M; Ferguson, J; Losert, U; Koos, W T

    1998-03-01

    To explore the safety and the effectiveness of laparoscopic and thoracoscopic spinal surgery, an acute/non-survival animal trial was performed in 5 pigs using rigid and flexible endoscopes, flouroscopy, a holmium-YAG laser, and prototype instruments and implants. Our study aimed to approach the intervertebral disc space and spinal canal using laparoscopic and thoracoscopic techniques and to explore the potential and limits for endoscopic anterior spinal decompression and fusion. In a lateral recumbency access was provided to the anterolateral aspect of the lumbar spine from L1/2 to L7/S1, the thoracic spine was accessible from T2/3 to the diaphragmatic insertion. Complete disc space emptying with penetration into the spinal canal could be performed, epidural bleeding could be controlled by a hemostatic sponge, however bleeding restricted visualization for further endoscopic manipulation in the spinal canal. Intervertebral fusion was accomplished at T6/7, L4/5 and L7/S1 using small fragment plates with 3.5 mm screws and iliac bone grafts or prototype carbon fiber cages. On post mortem examination we found no dural tears and no nerve root damage, all animals had stabilized fusion sites and good implant position. We conclude that minimally invasive thoracoscopic and laparoscopic approaches to the spine are feasible and safe to perform disc decompression and implant placement for spinal fusion. In addition to currently performed laparoscopic interbody fusion, also plate fixation to reestablish lordosis of the lumbar spine is feasible at least in the porcine model. Careful disc decompression must be performed prior to implant introduction to prevent iatrogenic disc protrusion and spinal cord or nerve root compression. However, further surgical exploration of the spinal canal using these techniques does not provide adequate visualization of epidural spaces and therefore must be regarded as unsafe. PMID:9565956

  7. Robotic surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Robot-assisted surgery; Robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery; Laparoscopic surgery with robotic assistance ... computer station and directs the movements of a robot. Small surgical tools are attached to the robot's ...

  8. Outpatient Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Policymakers | Members | Patients | News Media Anesthesia 101 Patient Safety Stories Resources About Home » Patients » Preparing For Surgery » Types of Surgery » Outpatient Surgery Share this Page Preparing For ...

  9. Plastic Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Plastic Surgery KidsHealth > For Teens > Plastic Surgery Print A ... her forehead lightened with a laser? What Is Plastic Surgery? Just because the name includes the word " ...

  10. Lung surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pneumonectomy; Lobectomy; Lung biopsy; Thoracoscopy; Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery; VATS ... You will have general anesthesia before surgery. You will be asleep and unable to feel pain. Two common ways to do surgery on your lungs are thoracotomy and video- ...

  11. Thoracic and abdominal blastomycosis in a horse.

    PubMed

    Toribio, R E; Kohn, C W; Lawrence, A E; Hardy, J; Hutt, J A

    1999-05-01

    A 5-year-old Quarter Horse mare was examined because of lethargy, fever, and weight loss of 1 month's duration. Thoracic auscultation revealed decreased lung sounds cranioventrally. Thoracic ultrasonography revealed bilateral anechoic areas with hyperechoic strands, consistent with pleural effusion and fibrin tags. A large amount of free fluid was evident during abdominal ultrasonography. Abnormalities included anemia, hyperproteinemia, hyperglobulinemia, hyperfibrinogenemia, and hypoalbuminemia. Thoracic radiography revealed alveolar infiltrates in the cranial and caudoventral lung fields. A cavitary mass, consistent with an abscess, could be seen caudodorsal to the crura of the diaphragm. Ultrasonographic evaluation of this area revealed a hypoechoic mass with septations. Bilateral thoracocentesis was performed. Bacterial culture of the pleural fluid did not yield growth, but Blastomyces dermatitidis was isolated from pleural fluid, abdominal fluid, and an aspirate of the abscess. The mare was euthanatized, and a diagnosis of thoracic and abdominal blastomycosis was confirmed at necropsy. PMID:10319179

  12. Tracheo-Bronchial Obstruction and Esophageal Perforation after TEVAR for Thoracic Aortic Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Daisuke; Tanaka, Haruki; Komatsu, Kazunori; Ohtsu, Yoshinori; Terasaki, Takamitsu; Wada, Yuko; Takano, Tamaki; Koike, Shoichiro; Amano, Jun

    2014-01-01

    A 67-year-old man was referred to our hospital for an ascending aortic aneurysm, thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm and aortic regurgitation. Graft repair of the thoracic aortic arch and aortic valve replacement was given priority and completed, however he developed descending aortic rupture before the second scheduled surgery, and endovascular stent grafting was performed. He subsequently developed tracheobronchial obstruction and esophageal perforation. The patient underwent urgent esophagectomy and enterostomy with continuity later reestablished. However, he died of sepsis 5 months after surgery. Despite the less invasive nature of endovascular treatment, esophageal perforation can nevertheless occur and postoperative vigilance is well warranted. PMID:25593630

  13. Patient specific stress and rupture analysis of ascending thoracic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, Olfa; Davis, Frances M; Rodriguez-Matas, Jose F; Duprey, Ambroise; Avril, Stéphane

    2015-07-16

    An ascending thoracic aortic aneurysm (ATAA) is a serious medical condition which, more often than not, requires surgery. Aneurysm diameter is the primary clinical criterion for determining when surgical intervention is necessary but, biomechanical studies have suggested that the diameter criterion is insufficient. This manuscript presents a method for obtaining the patient specific wall stress distribution of the ATAA and the retrospective rupture risk for each patient. Five human ATAAs and the preoperative dynamic CT scans were obtained during elective surgeries to replace each patient's aneurysm with a synthetic graft. The material properties and rupture stress for each tissue sample were identified using bulge inflation tests. The dynamic CT scans were used to generate patient specific geometries for a finite element (FE) model of each patient's aneurysm. The material properties from the bulge inflation tests were implemented in the FE model and the wall stress distribution at four different pressures was estimated. Three different rupture risk assessments were compared: the maximum diameter, the rupture risk index, and the overpressure index. The peak wall stress values for the patients ranged from 28% to 94% of the ATAA's failure stress. The rupture risk and overpressure indices were both only weakly correlated with diameter (ρ=-0.29, both cases). In the future, we plan to conduct a large experimental and computational study that includes asymptomatic patients under surveillance, patients undergoing elective surgery, and patients who have experienced rupture or dissection to determine if the rupture risk index or maximum diameter can meaningfully differentiate between the groups. PMID:25979384

  14. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension resulting from a thoracic osteophyte.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ling-Chien; Hsu, Yung-Chu

    2015-06-01

    We report a 34-year-old woman who presented with progressive postural headache and neck tightness over 1week. We confirmed the diagnosis of spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) and spinal images showed a thoracic osteophyte caused the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak. SIH caused by spinal CSF leak is generally thought to be a consequence of deficiency of the spinal meninges in conjunction with trivial trauma. Less commonly, spinal bony pathology can lead to SIH. We reviewed 13 reported patients with bony structural pathology related SIH. After two to three epidural blood patches, eight patients underwent surgery. They generally had good outcomes. In conclusion, even though surgical repair confers specific risks, it should be considered after repetitive failures of epidural blood patches. The long-term prognoses of surgical versus non-surgical patients warrants further investigation. PMID:25778385

  15. [Robot-assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery for Lung Cancer].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hiroshige; Taniguchi, Yuji

    2016-07-01

    As surgical robots have widely spread, verification of their usefulness in the general thoracic surgery field is required. The most favorable advantage of robotic surgery is the markedly free movement of joint-equipped robotic forceps under three-dimensional high-vision. Accurate operation makes complex procedures straightforward and may overcome weak points of previous thoracoscopic surgery. Robotic surgery for lung cancer has been safely introduced and initial results have shown favorable. It is still at the stage of clinical research, but is expected to take its usefulness in the procedure of hilar exposure, lymph node dissection and the suturing of lung parenchyma or bronchus. The evidence is insufficient for robotic thoracic surgery, and also safety management, education and significant cost are larger problems. Now, urgent issues are to carry out clinical trial for advanced medical care and insurance acquisition. PMID:27440027

  16. When did cardiac surgery begin?

    PubMed

    Shumacker, H B

    1989-01-01

    Heart surgery is generally regarded as having begun on September 10, 1896 when Ludwig Rehn sutured a myocardial laceration successfully. There are valid reasons, however, to believe that cardiac surgery had its origin nearly a century earlier with the operative drainage of the pericardium by the little known Spanish surgeon, Francisco Romero, and highly regarded Baron Dominique Jean Larrey. This procedure entailed making a thoracic incision and opening and draining the pericardium. It must necessarily be considered a cardiac operation. The pericardium is part of the heart; its epicardium continues as the serosal layer of the fibrous pericardium; the pericardium is fused to the heart's base and great vessels; all books on heart surgery include pericardial operations. When Romero first operated is unknown, but it antedated 1814 when his work was presented in Paris; Larrey's operation was performed in 1810. These contributions are presented, and their priority with regard to the later initial efforts to suture myocardial laceration is reviewed briefly. PMID:2651455

  17. Effect of magnesium infusion on thoracic epidural analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sampa Dutta; Mitra, Koel; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Roy, Suddhadeb; Sarkar, Aniruddha; Kundu, Sudeshna; Goswami, Anupam; Sarkar, Uday Narayan; Sanki, Prakash; Mitra, Ritabrata

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Patients of lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) having an ASA status III or more are likely to be further downgraded by surgery to critical levels of pulmonary function. Aim: To compare the efficacy of thoracic epidural block with (0.125%) bupivacaine, fentanyl combination and (0.125%) bupivacaine, fentanyl combination with adjunctive intravenous magnesium infusion for the relief of postoperative pain in patients undergoing LVRS. Methods: Patients were operated under general anesthesia. Thirty minutes before the anticipated completion of skin closure in both groups, (Group A and Group B) 7 ml of (0.125%) bupivacaine calculated as 1.5 ml/thoracic segment space for achieving analgesia in dermatomes of T4, T5, T6, T7, and T8 segments, along with fentanyl 50 μg (0.5 ml), was administered through the catheter, activating the epidural block, and the time was noted. Thereafter, in patients of Group A, magnesium sulfate injection 30 mg/kg i.v. bolus was followed by infusion of magnesium sulfate at 10 mg/kg/hr and continued up to 24 hours. Group B was treated as control. Results and Analysis: A significant increase in the mean and maximum duration of analgesia in Group A in comparison with Group B (P<0.05) was observed. Total epidural dose of fentanyl and bupivacaine required in Group A was significantly lower in comparison with Group B in 24 hours. Discussion: Requirement of total doses of local anesthetics along with opioids could be minimized by magnesium infusion; therefore, the further downgradation of patients of LVRS may be prevented. Conclusion: Intravenous magnesium can prolong opioid-induced analgesia while minimizing nausea, pruritus, and somnolence. PMID:21655018

  18. Cytomegalovirus Immunoglobulin After Thoracic Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Grossi, Paolo; Mohacsi, Paul; Szabolcs, Zoltán; Potena, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a highly complex pathogen which, despite modern prophylactic regimens, continues to affect a high proportion of thoracic organ transplant recipients. The symptomatic manifestations of CMV infection are compounded by adverse indirect effects induced by the multiple immunomodulatory actions of CMV. These include a higher risk of acute rejection, cardiac allograft vasculopathy after heart transplantation, and potentially bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome in lung transplant recipients, with a greater propensity for opportunistic secondary infections. Prophylaxis for CMV using antiviral agents (typically oral valganciclovir or intravenous ganciclovir) is now almost universal, at least in high-risk transplants (D+/R−). Even with extended prophylactic regimens, however, challenges remain. The CMV events can still occur despite antiviral prophylaxis, including late-onset infection or recurrent disease, and patients with ganciclovir-resistant CMV infection or who are intolerant to antiviral therapy require alternative strategies. The CMV immunoglobulin (CMVIG) and antiviral agents have complementary modes of action. High-titer CMVIG preparations provide passive CMV-specific immunity but also exert complex immunomodulatory properties which augment the antiviral effect of antiviral agents and offer the potential to suppress the indirect effects of CMV infection. This supplement discusses the available data concerning the immunological and clinical effects of CMVIG after heart or lung transplantation. PMID:26900989

  19. Modified uniportal video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS)

    PubMed Central

    Balderson, Stafford S.; D’Amico, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) for resectable lung cancer patients has been frequently used in the past decades. The potential beneficial advantages and safety of VATS has been shown in large patient series and meta-analyses. The strategy of limiting access to one incision in one intercostal space (uniportal VATS) has been adopted by some thoracic surgeons in recent years. We have described a modified uniportal VATS technique with its potential advantages. Modified uniportal VATS potentially offers better exposure, beneficial opportunities for education and improved comfort for the thoracic surgery team in clinical usage. PMID:27134839

  20. Spinal cord protection in aortic endovascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Scott, D A; Denton, M J

    2016-09-01

    A persistent neurological deficit, such as paraplegia or paraparesis, secondary to spinal cord injury remains one of the most feared complications of surgery on the descending thoracic or abdominal aorta. This is despite sophisticated advances in imaging and the use of less invasive endovascular procedures. Extensive fenestrated endovascular aortic graft prostheses still carry a risk of spinal cord injury of up to 10%; thus, this risk should be identified and strategies implemented to protect the spinal cord and maintain perfusion. The patients at highest risk are those undergoing extensive thoracic aortic stenting including thoracic, abdominal, and pelvic vessels. Although many techniques are available, lumbar cerebrospinal fluid drainage remains the most frequent intervention, along with maintenance of perfusion pressure and possibly staged procedures to allow collateral vessel stabilization. Many questions remain regarding other technical aspects, spinal cord monitoring and cooling, pharmacological protection, and the optimal duration of interventions into the postoperative period. PMID:27566805

  1. [Tracheal compression caused by hematoma and felt strips around an anastomosis site following repair of thoracic aneurysm: a case report].

    PubMed

    Sato, Masanori; Goto, Yukiko; Hirao, Osamu; Ohta, Noriyuki; Uchiyama, Akinori; Fujino, Yuji; Mashimo, Takashi

    2009-09-01

    Respiratory complication is common after a repair of thoracic aneurysm, although tracheal compression caused by hematoma and felt strips following surgery is a rare cause. We report the case of a patient who experienced difficult weaning from ventilator after a repair of a thoracic aortic aneurysm and was diagnosed as a tracheal compression outside of trachea revealed by bronchoscopy and chest CT scan. Re-operation was successfully performed to relieve the compression under monitoring by bronchoscopy. Patient was disconnected from the ventilator three weeks after the reoperation and transferred to a rehabilitation hospital. PMID:19764443

  2. Transdiscal mid- and upper thoracic vertebroplasty: first description of 2 exemplary cases.

    PubMed

    Filis, Andreas K; Aghayev, Kamran; Schaller, Bernhard; Luksza, Jennifer; Vrionis, Frank D

    2016-08-01

    Kyphoplasty and vertebroplasty are established treatment methods to reinforce fractured vertebral bodies. In cases of previous pedicle screw instrumentation, vertebral body cannulation may be challenging. The authors describe, for the first time, an approach through the adjacent inferior vertebra and disc space in the thoracic spine for cement augmentation. A 78-year-old woman underwent posterior fusion with pedicle screws after vertebrectomy and reconstruction with cement and Steinmann pins for a pathological T-7 fracture. Two months later she developed a compression fracture of the vertebral body at the lower part of the construct, and a vertebroplasty was performed. Because a standard transpedicular route was not available, an inferior transdiscal trajectory was used for the cement injection. A 73-year-old man with a history of rheumatoid arthritis underwent cervicothoracic fusion posteriorly for subluxation. He developed pain in the upper thoracic area, and the authors performed a transdiscal vertebroplasty at T-2. The standard transpedicular route was not possible. The vertebral body was satisfactorily filled up with cement. Clinically both patients benefited significantly in terms of back pain and showed an uneventful follow-up of 3 months. Transdiscal vertebroplasty can achieve good results in the mid- and upper thoracic spine when a standard transpedicular trajectory is not possible, and can therefore be a good alternative in select cases. PMID:26967987

  3. Surgery in 2013 and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Windsor, Morgan N.; Goldstraw, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer related mortality. The role of surgery continues to evolve and in the last ten years there have been a number of significant changes in the surgical management of lung cancer. These changes extend across the entire surgical spectrum of lung cancer management including diagnosis, staging, treatment and pathology. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanning and ultrasound (EBUS) have redefined traditional staging paradigms, and surgical techniques, including video-assisted thoracoscopy (VATS), robotic surgery and uniportal surgery, are now accepted as standard of care in many centers. The changing pathology of lung cancer, with more peripheral tumours and an increase in adenocarcinomas has important implications for the Thoracic surgeon. Screening, using Low-Dose CT scanning, is having an impact, with not only a higher percentage of lower stage cancers detected, but also redefining the role of sublobar resection. The incidence of pneumonectomy has reduced as have the rates of “exploratory thoracotomy”. In general, lung resection is considered for stage I and II patients with a selected role in more advanced stage disease as part of a multimodality approach. This paper will look at these issues and how they impact on Thoracic Surgical practice in 2013 and beyond. PMID:24163751

  4. Permanent Iodine-125 Interstitial Planar Seed Brachytherapy for Close or Positive Margins for Thoracic Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Mutyala, Subhakar; Stewart, Alexandra; Khan, Atif J.; Cormack, Robert A.; O'Farrell, Desmond; Sugarbaker, David; Devlin, Phillip M.

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To assess toxicity and outcome following permanent iodine-125 seed implant as an adjunct to surgical resection in cases of advanced thoracic malignancy. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved retrospective review was performed. Fifty-nine patients were identified as having undergone thoracic brachytherapy seed implantation between September 1999 and December 2006. Data for patient demographics, tumor details, and morbidity and mortality were recorded. Results: Fifty-nine patients received 64 implants. At a median follow-up of 17 months, 1-year and 2-year Kaplan-Meier rates of estimated overall survival were 94.1% and 82.0%, respectively. The 1-year and 2-year local control rates were 80.1% and 67.4%, respectively. The median time to develop local recurrence was 11 months. Grades 3 and 4 toxicity rates were 12% at 1 year. Conclusions: This review shows relatively low toxicity for interstitial planar seed implantation after thoracic surgical resection. The high local control results suggest that an incomplete oncologic surgery plus a brachytherapy implant for treating advanced thoracic malignancy merit further investigation.

  5. Applications of robotics for laryngeal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hillel, Alexander T.; Kapoor, Ankur; Simaan, Nabil; Taylor, Russell H.; Flint, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis The author presents the clinical application of robotics to laryngeal surgery in terms of enhancement of surgical precision and performance of other minimally invasive procedures not feasible with current instrumentation. Presented in this article are comparisons of human arm with robotic arm in terms of degrees of freedom and discussion of surgeries and outcomes with use of the robotic arm. Robotic equipment for laryngeal surgery has the potential to overcome many of the limitations of endolaryngeal procedures by improving optics, increasing instrument degrees of freedom, and modulating tremor. Outside of laryngology, a multi-armed robotic system would have utility in microvascular procedures at the base of the skull, sinus surgery, and single port gastrointestinal and thoracic access surgery. PMID:18570959

  6. Evaluation of the effectiveness of thoracic sympathectomy in the treatment of primary hyperhidrosis of hands and armpits using the measurement of skin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Jabłoński, Sławomir; Rzepkowska-Misiak, Beata; Piskorz, Łukasz; Brocki, Marian; Wcisło, Szymon; Smigielski, Jacek; Kordiak, Jacek

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Hyperhidrosis is excessive sweating beyond the needs of thermoregulation. It is disease which mostly affects young people, often carrying a considerable amount of socio-economic implications. Thoracic sympathectomy is now considered to be the "gold standard" in the treatment of idiopathic hyperhidrosis of hands and armpits. Aim Assessment of early effectiveness of thoracic sympathectomy using skin resistance measurements performed before surgery and in the postoperative period. Material and methods A group of 20 patients with idiopathic excessive sweating of hands and the armpit was enrolled in the study. Patients underwent two-stage thoracic sympathectomy with resection of Th2-Th4 ganglions. The skin resistance measurements were made at six previously designated points on the day of surgery and the first day after the operation. Results In all operated patients we obtained complete remission of symptoms on the first day after the surgery. Inhibition of sweating was confirmed using the standard starch iodine (Minor) test. At all measurement points we obtained a statistically significant increase of skin resistance, assuming p < 0.05. To check whether there is a statistically significant difference in the results before and after surgery we used sequence pairs Wilcoxon test. Conclusions Thoracic sympathectomy is an effective curative treatment for primary hyperhidrosis of hands and armpits. Statistically significant increase of skin resistance in all cases is a good method of assessing the effectiveness of the above surgery in the early postoperative period. PMID:23256019

  7. Successful Treatment of a Three-Column Thoracic Extension Injury with Recumbency

    PubMed Central

    Choy, Winward; Smith, Zachary A; Viljoen, Stephanus V; Lindley, Timothy E

    2016-01-01

    We report a unique instance of a 66-year-old male patient with an unstable three-column thoracic extension injury at the level of T4/5 who was treated with recumbency and bracing without surgery. A posterior long segment fixation was attempted three times on two separate occasions over the course of a week with failure due to difficulty in ventilating the patient during prone positioning, cardiopulmonary arrest, and hemodynamic instability during prone positioning for surgery. The decision then was to treat this fracture with recumbency. He was fitted with a thoracolumbosacral orthosis (TLSO), and was kept on bed rest for eight weeks. The patient’s activity was advanced to head of bed for 45 degrees for four weeks and then to 90 degrees for four other weeks. At his 16th week visit, the patient was asymptomatic, and a computer tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the thoracic spine demonstrated evidence of osteophyte bridging and restoration of normal alignment. Three-column thoracic extension injuries can be successfully treated with recumbency in poor surgical candidates. PMID:27335719

  8. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Alexander; Girardi, Federico; Sama, Andrew; Lebl, Darren; Cammisa, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) is a relatively new technique that allows the surgeon to access the intervertebral space from a direct lateral approach either anterior to or through the psoas muscle. This approach provides an alternative to anterior lumbar interbody fusion with instrumentation, posterior lumbar interbody fusion, and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for anterior column support. LLIF is minimally invasive, safe, better structural support from the apophyseal ring, potential for coronal plane deformity correction, and indirect decompression, which have has made this technique popular. LLIF is currently being utilized for a variety of pathologies including but not limited to adult de novo lumbar scoliosis, central and foraminal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, and adjacent segment degeneration. Although early clinical outcomes have been good, the potential for significant neurological and vascular vertebral endplate complications exists. Nevertheless, LLIF is a promising technique with the potential to more effectively treat complex adult de novo scoliosis and achieve predictable fusion while avoiding the complications of traditional anterior surgery and posterior interbody techniques. PMID:26713134

  9. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Abhijit; Hughes, Alexander; Girardi, Federico; Sama, Andrew; Lebl, Darren; Cammisa, Frank

    2015-12-01

    The lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) is a relatively new technique that allows the surgeon to access the intervertebral space from a direct lateral approach either anterior to or through the psoas muscle. This approach provides an alternative to anterior lumbar interbody fusion with instrumentation, posterior lumbar interbody fusion, and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for anterior column support. LLIF is minimally invasive, safe, better structural support from the apophyseal ring, potential for coronal plane deformity correction, and indirect decompression, which have has made this technique popular. LLIF is currently being utilized for a variety of pathologies including but not limited to adult de novo lumbar scoliosis, central and foraminal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, and adjacent segment degeneration. Although early clinical outcomes have been good, the potential for significant neurological and vascular vertebral endplate complications exists. Nevertheless, LLIF is a promising technique with the potential to more effectively treat complex adult de novo scoliosis and achieve predictable fusion while avoiding the complications of traditional anterior surgery and posterior interbody techniques. PMID:26713134

  10. Performing an Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Gregory D; Kurd, Mark F; Millhouse, Paul W; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Hilibrand, Alan S

    2016-06-01

    An anterior cervical discectomy and fusion is one of the most common procedures performed in spine surgery. It allows for a direct decompression of the spinal cord and the neural foramen. When performed properly, the results of this procedure are some of the best in spine surgery. PMID:27187618

  11. Spontaneous Ligamentum Flavum Hematoma in the Rigid Thoracic Spine : A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Woo; Song, Joon-Ho; Chang, In-Bok

    2008-01-01

    Ligamentum flavum hematoma is a rare condition. Twenty cases including present case have been reported in English-language literature. Among them, only one case reported in pure thoracic spine. A 72-year-old man presented with thoracic myelopathy without precedent cause. Magnetic resonance images revealed a posterior semicircular mass which was located in T7 and T8 level compressing the spinal cord dorsally. T7-8 total laminectomy and extirpation of the mass was performed. One month later following surgery, the patient fully recovered to normal state. Pathologic result was confirmed as ligamentum flavum hematoma. Ligamentum flavum hematoma of rigid thoracic spine is a very rare disease entity. Most reported cases were confined to mobile cervical and lumbar spine. Surgeons should be aware that there seems to be another different pathogenesis other than previously reported cases of mobile cervical and lumbar spine. PMID:19096657

  12. Penetrating injuries to the thoracic great vessels.

    PubMed

    Demetriades, D

    1997-01-01

    Penetrating injuries to the thoracic great vessels have been diagnosed with increased frequency because of the escalating use of automatic weapons. The overall incidence is 5.3% of gunshot wounds and 2% of stab wounds to the chest. Most of these patients reach the hospital dead or in severe shock. The overall mortality of thoracic aortic injuries is higher than 90% and in subclavian vascular injuries higher than 65%. In the prehospital phase, the "scoop and run" policy offers the best chances of survival and no attempts should be made for any form of stabilization. Investigations should be reserved only for fairly stable patients. Angiography, color flow Doppler, and transesophageal echocardiography may be useful in selected cases. Patients in cardiac arrest or imminent cardiac arrest may benefit from an emergency room thoracotomy. The surgical approach to specific thoracic great vessels is described. PMID:9271743

  13. [Thoracic oncology in Archivos de Bronconeumología 2008].

    PubMed

    de Cos-Escuín, Julio Sánchez

    2009-01-01

    The articles on thoracic oncology published in this journal during the year 2008 are briefly commented on. As regards the epidemiology, it is noted that the standardised incidence rate of lung cancer in males is starting to decline, and there is another study that analysed links between two common diseases, COPD and lung cancer. Other works have focused on aspects such as diagnosis, staging or prognosis, and analysing the value of positron emission tomography in the assessment of a solitary pulmonary nodule, the effectiveness of aspiration transbronchial needle aspiration in mediastinal staging, the prognostic significance of the over-expression and amplification of c-erbB-2 in patients with small cell carcinoma. As regards treatment, other authors analysed the survival of patients with N2 lung cancer detected during or after lung resection surgery. The new therapeutic technique of ablation of lung tumours by radiofrequency in the early stages is the subject of two publications that describe its basis, indications, contraindications and first results. Lastly, the communication skills needed to inform patients, surgery of lung metastases, and the presentation of an unusual case of carcinoid tumour were the subjects of other articles. PMID:19303529

  14. Early versus Late Surgical Treatment for Neurogenic Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hashel, Jasem Yousef; El Shorbgy, Ashraf Ali M. A.; Elshereef, Rawhia R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To compare the outcome of early surgical intervention versus late surgical treatment in cases of neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (NTOS). Design. Prospective study. Settings. Secondary care (Al-Minia University Hospital, Egypt) from 2007 to 2010. Participants. Thirty-five patients of NTOS (25 women and 10 men, aged 20–52 years), were classified into 2 groups. First group (20 patients) was operated within 3 months of the onset and the second group (15 patients) was operated 6 months after physiotherapy. Interventions. All patients were operated via supraclavicular surgical approach. Outcomes Measures. Both groups were evaluated clinically and, neurophysiologically and answered the disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH) questionnaire preoperatively and 6 months after the surgery. Results. Paraesthesia, pain, and sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) of ulnar nerve were significantly improved in group one. Muscle weakness and denervation in electromyography EMG were less frequent in group one. The postoperative DASH score improved in both groups but it was less significant in group two (P < .001 in group 1 and P < .05 in group 2). Conclusions. Surgical treatment of NTOS improves functional disability and stop degeneration of the nerves. Early surgical treatment decreases the occurrence of muscle wasting and denervation of nerves compared to late surgery. PMID:24109518

  15. Transforaminal Approach in Thoracal Disc Pathologies: Transforaminal Microdiscectomy Technique

    PubMed Central

    Dalbayrak, Sedat; Öztürk, Kadir; Yılmaz, Mesut; Gökdağ, Mahmut; Ayten, Murat

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Many surgical approaches have been defined and implemented in the last few decades for thoracic disc herniations. The endoscopic foraminal approach in foraminal, lateral, and far lateral disc hernias is a contemporary minimal invasive approach. This study was performed to show that the approach is possible using the microscope without an endoscope, and even the intervention on the discs within the spinal canal is possible by having access through the foramen. Methods. Forty-two cases with disc hernias in the medial of the pedicle were included in this study; surgeries were performed with transforaminal approach and microsurgically. Extraforaminal disc hernias were not included in the study. Access was made through the Kambin triangle, foramen was enlarged, and spinal canal was entered. Results. The procedure took 65 minutes in the average, and the mean bleeding amount was about 100cc. They were mobilized within the same day postoperatively. No complications were seen. Follow-up periods range between 5 and 84 months, and the mean follow-up period is 30.2 months. Conclusion. Transforaminal microdiscectomy is a method that can be performed in any clinic with standard spinal surgery equipment. It does not require additional equipment or high costs. PMID:24839557

  16. Genetics Home Reference: familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions familial TAAD familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Open All Close All Description Familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection ( familial TAAD ) involves problems with the ...

  17. CT of nontraumatic thoracic aortic emergencies.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Sanjeev; West, O Clark

    2005-10-01

    Computed tomography (CT), especially multidetector row CT (MDCT), is often the preferred imaging test used for evaluation of nontraumatic thoracic aortic abnormalities. Unenhanced images, usually followed by contrast-enhanced arterial imaging, allow for rapid detailed aortic assessment. Understanding the spectrum of acute thoracic aortic conditions which may present similarly (aortic dissection, aneurysm rupture, penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer, intramural hematoma) will ensure that patients are diagnosed and treated appropriately. Familiarity with imaging protocols and potential mimics will prevent confusion of normal anatomy and variants with aortic disease. PMID:16274000

  18. A survey among Brazilian thoracic surgeons about the use of preoperative 2D and 3D images

    PubMed Central

    Cipriano, Federico Enrique Garcia; Arcêncio, Livia; Dessotte, Lycio Umeda; Rodrigues, Alfredo José; Vicente, Walter Villela de Andrade

    2016-01-01

    Background Describe the characteristics of how the thoracic surgeon uses the 2D/3D medical imaging to perform surgical planning, clinical practice and teaching in thoracic surgery and check the initial choice and the final choice of the Brazilian Thoracic surgeon as the 2D and 3D models pictures before and after acquiring theoretical knowledge on the generation, manipulation and interactive 3D views. Methods A descriptive research type Survey cross to data provided by the Brazilian Thoracic Surgeons (members of the Brazilian Society of Thoracic Surgery) who responded to the online questionnaire via the internet on their computers or personal devices. Results Of the 395 invitations visualized distributed by email, 107 surgeons completed the survey. There was no statically difference when comparing the 2D vs. 3D models pictures for the following purposes: diagnosis, assessment of the extent of disease, preoperative surgical planning, and communication among physicians, resident training, and undergraduate medical education. Regarding the type of tomographic image display routinely used in clinical practice (2D or 3D or 2D–3D model image) and the one preferred by the surgeon at the end of the questionnaire. Answers surgeons for exclusive use of 2D images: initial choice =50.47% and preferably end =14.02%. Responses surgeons to use 3D models in combination with 2D images: initial choice =48.60% and preferably end =85.05%. There was a significant change in the final selection of 3D models used together with the 2D images (P<0.0001). Conclusions There is a lack of knowledge of the 3D imaging, as well as the use and interactive manipulation in dedicated 3D applications, with consequent lack of uniformity in the surgical planning based on CT images. These findings certainly confirm in changing the preference of thoracic surgeons of 2D views of technologies for 3D images. PMID:27621874

  19. Late failure of posterior fixation without bone fusion for vertebral metastases

    PubMed Central

    Bellato, Renato Tavares; Teixeira, William Gemio Jacobsen; Torelli, Alessandro Gonzalez; Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; de Barros, Tarcísio Eloy Pessoa; de Camargo, Olavo Pires

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE : To verify the frequency of late radiological com-plications in spinal fixation surgeries performed without fu-sion in oncological patients METHODS : This is a retrospective analysis analysing failure in cases of non-fused vertebral fixation in an oncology reference hospital between 2009 and 2014. Failure was defined as implant loosening or bre-akage, as well as new angular or translation deformities RESULTS : One hundred and five cases were analyzed. The most common site of primary tumor was the breast and the most common place of metastasis was the thoracic spine. The average follow-up was 22.7 months. Nine cases (8%) of failure were reported, with an average time until failure of 9.5 months. The most common failure was implant loosening. No case required further surgery CONCLUSION : The occurrence of failure was not different than that reported for fused cases. The time interval until failure was higher than the median of survival of the majority (88%) of cases. Level of Evidence IV, Therapeutic Study. PMID:27057142

  20. Management of an aorto-esophageal fistula, complicating a descending thoracic aortic aneurysm endovascularly repaired.

    PubMed

    Georvasili, Vaia K; Bali, Christina; Peroulis, Michalis; Kouvelos, George; Avgos, Stavros; Godevenos, Dimitris; Liakakos, Theodoros; Matsagkas, Miltiadis

    2016-04-01

    Aorto-esophageal fistula (AEF) is a rare but devastating complication of thoracic aorta endovascular repair (TEVAR). We report a case of a 64-year-old male who presented with chest pain and high CRP levels 10 months after TEVAR for a 9 cm diameter descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. The diagnosis of an AEF was confirmed and the patient was treated conservatively with broad spectrum antibiotics and total parental alimentation. After control of sepsis was achieved, esophagectomy with gastric tube reconstruction was performed and an omental pedicle was used to cover the aortic wall. No intervention to the aorta was made at that time due to the potentially infected mediastinum. The patient's recovery was uneventful and 2 years postoperatively he is in good condition and lives a normal life. Esophagectomy seems to be a mandatory stage of treatment in the setting of AEF. In cases where signs of graft infection are persistent, aortic surgery might be also necessary. PMID:24838140

  1. Successful Endobronchial stenting for bronchial compression from a massive thoracic aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Comer, David; Bedi, Amit; Kennedy, Peter; McManus, Kieran; McIlwaine, Werner

    2010-01-01

    A case of bronchial occlusion caused by a thoracic aortic aneurysm and the relief of this obstruction by the implantation of expandable metallic stents is described. Stent deployment provided an immediate improvement in lung ventilation and chest radiograph appearances. Stent insertion was uncomplicated, but weaning from mechanical ventilation was unsuccessful and the patient died from a ventilator-associated pneumonia, unrelated to the procedure. Endobronchial stenting should be considered as a non-invasive therapy for the treatment of bronchial obstruction, with respiratory compromise, caused by a thoracic aortic aneurysm when vascular surgery is not an option. The medium to long term survival of this patient group is poor. This can be attributed to complications related to the stent and also to the poor performance status of these patients. PMID:24946305

  2. [Effectiveness of Portable Thoracic Drainage Kit for Outpatient Treatment of Spontaneous Pneumothorax].

    PubMed

    Sato, Nobuyuki; Abe, Koutaro; Ishibashi, Naoya; Imai, Tadashi

    2016-06-01

    The demand for outpatient management of spontaneous pneumothorax (SP) has been increased, therefore we evaluated the effectiveness of Thoracic Egg(TE), a portable thoracic drainage kit for SP. We studied 43 SP patients who had received TE treatment between May 2008 and October 2010. Ages were ranged 12~73 years (mean:29.1), with 39 males, 4 females, 25 had primary, 18 had recurrent, pneumothorax. Of the 43 patients, 23 were treated outpatient therapy with TE only, 20 were required hospitalization for persistent air leakage, poor expansion or intent to surgery. Surgical intervention was undergone in 18 patients for persistent air leaks or recurrent pneumothorax. The average length of treatment was 8.4 days for outpatient therapy only cases. Of 25 patients who had primary SP, 18( 72%) were not required hospitalization. Outpatient therapy using TE was considered very useful for SP, especially for primary cases. PMID:27246123

  3. Current trends in pedicle screw stimulation techniques: lumbosacral, thoracic, and cervical levels.

    PubMed

    Isley, Michael R; Zhang, Xiao-Feng; Balzer, Jeffrey R; Leppanen, Ronald E

    2012-06-01

    Unequivocally, pedicle screw instrumentation has evolved as a primary construct for the treatment of both common and complex spinal disorders. However an inevitable and potentially major complication associated with this type of surgery is misplacement of a pedicle screw(s) which may result in neural and vascular complications, as well as impair the biomechanical stability of the spinal instrumentation resulting in loss of fixation. In light of these potential surgical complications, critical reviews of outcome data for treatment of chronic, low-back pain using pedicle screw instrumentation concluded that "pedicle screw fixation improves radiographically demonstrated fusion rates;" however the expense and complication rates for such constructs are considerable in light of the clinical benefit (Resnick et al. 2005a). Currently, neuromonitoring using free-run and evoked (triggered) electromyography (EMG) is widely used and advocated for safer and more accurate placement of pedicle screws during open instrumentation procedures, and more recently, guiding percutaneous placement (minimally invasive) where the pedicle cannot be easily inspected visually. The latter technique, evoked or triggered EMG when applied to pedicle screw instrumentation surgeries, has been referred to as the pedicle screw stimulation technique. As concluded in the Position Statement by the American Society of Neurophysiological Monitoring (ASNM), multimodality neuromonitoring using free-run EMG and the pedicle screw stimulation technique was considered a practice option and not yet a standard of care (Leppanen 2005). Subsequently, the American Association of Neurological Surgeons/Congress of Neurological Surgeons (AANS/CNS) Joint Section on Disorders of the Spine and Peripheral Nerves published their "Guidelines for the Performance of Fusion Procedures for Degenerative Disease of the Lumbar Spine" (Heary 2005, Resnick et al. 2005a, Resnick et al. 2005b). It was concluded that the "primary

  4. Brain surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... Before surgery, the hair on part of the scalp is shaved and the area is cleaned. The doctor makes ...

  5. After Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... side effects. There is usually some pain with surgery. There may also be swelling and soreness around ... the first few days, weeks, or months after surgery. Some other questions to ask are How long ...

  6. Turbinate surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Turbinectomy; Turbinoplasty; Turbinate reduction; Nasal airway surgery ... There are several types of turbinate surgery: Turbinectomy: All or part of the lower turbinate is taken out. This can be done in several different ways, but sometimes a ...

  7. Ketamine in adult cardiac surgery and the cardiac surgery Intensive Care Unit: An evidence-based clinical review

    PubMed Central

    Mazzeffi, Michael; Johnson, Kyle; Paciullo, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Ketamine is a unique anesthetic drug that provides analgesia, hypnosis, and amnesia with minimal respiratory and cardiovascular depression. Because of its sympathomimetic properties it would seem to be an excellent choice for patients with depressed ventricular function in cardiac surgery. However, its use has not gained widespread acceptance in adult cardiac surgery patients, perhaps due to its perceived negative psychotropic effects. Despite this limitation, it is receiving renewed interest in the United States as a sedative and analgesic drug for critically ill-patients. In this manuscript, the authors provide an evidence-based clinical review of ketamine use in cardiac surgery patients for intensive care physicians, cardio-thoracic anesthesiologists, and cardio-thoracic surgeons. All MEDLINE indexed clinical trials performed during the last 20 years in adult cardiac surgery patients were included in the review. PMID:25849690

  8. Orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Gehrig, Laura M B

    2011-09-01

    Orthopedic surgery is a specialty of surgery dedicated to the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases and injuries of the musculoskeletal system in all age groups. Careers in orthopedic surgery span the spectrum from general orthopedics to those of subspecialty expertise in orthopedic trauma, hand, pediatrics, total joint, foot and ankle, sports medicine, and oncology to name a few. PMID:21871990

  9. Endograft Collapse After Endovascular Treatment for Thoracic Aortic Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bandorski, Dirk Brueck, Martin; Guenther, Hans-Ulrich; Manke, Christoph

    2010-06-15

    Endovascular treatment is an established therapy for thoracic aortic disease. Collapse of the endograft is a potentially fatal complication. We reviewed 16 patients with a thoracic endograft between 2001 and 2006. Medical records of the treated patients were studied. Data collected include age, gender, diagnosis, indication for endoluminal treatment, type of endograft, and time of follow up. All patients (n = 16; mean age, 61 years; range, 21-82 years) underwent computed tomography (CT) for location of the lesion and planning of the intervention. Time of follow-up with CT scan ranged from 1 to 61 months. Indications for endovascular treatment were degenerative aneurysm (n = 7; 44%), aortic dissection (n = 2; 12%), perforated aortic ulcer (n = 4; 25%), and traumatic aortic injury (n = 3; 19%). Three patients suffered from a collapse of the endograft (one patient distal, two patients proximal) between 3 and 8 days after endovascular treatment. These patients were younger (mean age, 37 {+-} 25 years vs. 67 {+-} 16 years; P < 0.05) and showed more oversizing (proximal, 36 {+-} 19.8% vs. 29 {+-} 20.7% [P > 0.05]; distal, 45 {+-} 23.5% vs. 38 {+-} 21.7% [P > 0.05]). Proximal collapse was corrected by placing a bare stent. In conclusion, risk factors for stent-graft collapse are a small lumen of the aorta and a small radius of the aortic arch curvature (young patients), as well as oversizing, which is an important risk factor and is described for different types of endografts and protheses (Gore TAG and Cook Zenith). Dilatation of the collapsed stent-graft is not sufficient. Following therapy implantation of a second stent or surgery is necessary in patients with a proximal endograft collapse. Distal endograft collapse can possibly be treated conservatively under close follow-up.

  10. [MRSA-related empyema as thoracic surgical site infection].

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Hisao

    2009-09-01

    The incidence of empyema as a thoracic surgical site infection (SSI) is relating low, but empyema related to MRSA poses an unenviable therapeutic challenge. We review 3 cases of MRSA-related empyema as SSI seem in the last 10 years, and evaluate therapeutic measures. All 3 subjects began being administered vancomycin (VCM) systemically once the diagnosis was established. Subject 1 developed MRSA-related empyema following pulmonary segmentectomy for small-cell lung cancer. The subject was treated following a diagnosis of incisional SSI, with delayed adequate pleural drainage, resulting in treatment difficulties, but was cured without becoming MRSA-negative. Subject 2 developed MRSA-related empyema following pulmonary lobectomy for advanced lung cancer associated with pneumoconiosis. Following bronchoplasty, a chest tube was placed for long-term drainage. The subject did not become MRSA-negative after VCM administration, but became so after linezolid treatment, facilitating a cure. Subject 3, who had secondary pneumothorax, underwent thoracoscopic partial hepatic resection. Intraoperative findings suggested pleural cavity infection, necessitating a prophylactic drain, but MRSA-related pyothorax developed. Fibrinolysis with urokinase effectively cleared up the poor drainage and the subject was cured without becoming MRSA-negative. In conclusion, in controlling MRSA-related empyema as SSI noted that: (1) long-term postperative thoracic drain retention may lead to retrograde infection; (2) surgical procedures reducing the extent of pulmonary resection may effectively prevent pyothorax progression; (3) for poor drainage in advanced pyothorax, fibrinolytic therapy is worth attempting before thoracoscopic surgery; and (4) the timing for discontinuing anti-MRSA drugs should be determined based on the clinical course rather than negative conversion of bacteria. PMID:19860251

  11. Functional chiral asymmetry in descending thoracic aorta.

    PubMed

    Frazin, L J; Lanza, G; Vonesh, M; Khasho, F; Spitzzeri, C; McGee, S; Mehlman, D; Chandran, K B; Talano, J; McPherson, D

    1990-12-01

    To determine whether rotational blood flow or chiral asymmetry exists in the human descending thoracic aorta, we established the ability of color Doppler ultrasound to detect rotational flow in a tornado tube model of a vortex descending fluid column. In a model of the human aortic arch with a pulse duplicator, color Doppler was then used to demonstrate that rotational flow occurs first in the transverse arch and then in the proximal descending thoracic aorta. With the use of color Doppler esophageal echocardiography, 53 patients (age range, 25-78 years; mean age, 56.4 years) were prospectively examined for rotational flow in the descending thoracic aorta. At 10 cm superior to retro-left ventricular position, 22 of 38 patients (58%) revealed rotational flow with obvious diastolic counterclockwise rotation but less obvious systolic clockwise rotation. At 5 cm superior to retro-left ventricular position, 29 of 46 patients (63%) revealed rotational flow with a tendency toward systolic clockwise and diastolic counterclockwise rotation. At the retro-left ventricular position, 47 of 53 patients (89%) revealed rotational flow, usually of a clockwise direction, occurring in systole. Our data suggest that aortic flow is not purely pulsatile and axial but has a rotational component. Rotational flow begins in the aortic arch and is carried through to the descending thoracic aorta, where flow is chirally asymmetric with systolic clockwise and diastolic counterclockwise components. These data demonstrate an aortic rotational flow component that may have physiological implications for organ perfusion. PMID:2242523

  12. Fusion breeder

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R.W.

    1982-04-20

    The fusion breeder is a fusion reactor designed with special blankets to maximize the transmutation by 14 MeV neutrons of uranium-238 to plutonium or thorium to uranium-233 for use as a fuel for fission reactors. Breeding fissile fuels has not been a goal of the US fusion energy program. This paper suggests it is time for a policy change to make the fusion breeder a goal of the US fusion program and the US nuclear energy program. The purpose of this paper is to suggest this policy change be made and tell why it should be made, and to outline specific research and development goals so that the fusion breeder will be developed in time to meet fissile fuel needs.

  13. Chronic pain and the thoracic spine.

    PubMed

    Louw, Adriaan; Schmidt, Stephen G

    2015-07-01

    In recent years there has been an increased interest in pain neuroscience in physical therapy.1,2 Emerging pain neuroscience research has challenged prevailing models used to understand and treat pain, including the Cartesian model of pain and the pain gate.2-4 Focus has shifted to the brain's processing of a pain experience, the pain neuromatrix and more recently, cortical reorganisation of body maps.2,3,5,6 In turn, these emerging theories have catapulted new treatments, such as therapeutic neuroscience education (TNE)7-10 and graded motor imagery (GMI),11,12 to the forefront of treating people suffering from persistent spinal pain. In line with their increased use, both of these approaches have exponentially gathered increasing evidence to support their use.4,10 For example, various randomised controlled trials and systematic reviews have shown that teaching patients more about the biology and physiology of their pain experience leads to positive changes in pain, pain catastrophization, function, physical movement and healthcare utilisation.7-10 Graded motor imagery, in turn, has shown increasing evidence to help pain and disability in complex pain states such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS).11,12 Most research using TNE and GMI has focussed on chronic low back pain (CLBP) and CRPS and none of these advanced pain treatments have been trialled on the thoracic spine. This lack of research and writings in regards to the thoracic spine is not unique to pain science, but also in manual therapy. There are, however, very unique pain neuroscience issues that skilled manual therapists may find clinically meaningful when treating a patient struggling with persistent thoracic pain. Utilising the latest understanding of pain neuroscience, three key clinical chronic thoracic issues will be discussed - hypersensitisation of intercostal nerves, posterior primary rami nerves mimicking Cloward areas and mechanical and sensitisation issues of the spinal dura in the

  14. Chronic pain and the thoracic spine

    PubMed Central

    Louw, Adriaan; Schmidt, Stephen G.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increased interest in pain neuroscience in physical therapy.1,2 Emerging pain neuroscience research has challenged prevailing models used to understand and treat pain, including the Cartesian model of pain and the pain gate.2–4 Focus has shifted to the brain's processing of a pain experience, the pain neuromatrix and more recently, cortical reorganisation of body maps.2,3,5,6 In turn, these emerging theories have catapulted new treatments, such as therapeutic neuroscience education (TNE)7–10 and graded motor imagery (GMI),11,12 to the forefront of treating people suffering from persistent spinal pain. In line with their increased use, both of these approaches have exponentially gathered increasing evidence to support their use.4,10 For example, various randomised controlled trials and systematic reviews have shown that teaching patients more about the biology and physiology of their pain experience leads to positive changes in pain, pain catastrophization, function, physical movement and healthcare utilisation.7–10 Graded motor imagery, in turn, has shown increasing evidence to help pain and disability in complex pain states such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS).11,12 Most research using TNE and GMI has focussed on chronic low back pain (CLBP) and CRPS and none of these advanced pain treatments have been trialled on the thoracic spine. This lack of research and writings in regards to the thoracic spine is not unique to pain science, but also in manual therapy. There are, however, very unique pain neuroscience issues that skilled manual therapists may find clinically meaningful when treating a patient struggling with persistent thoracic pain. Utilising the latest understanding of pain neuroscience, three key clinical chronic thoracic issues will be discussed – hypersensitisation of intercostal nerves, posterior primary rami nerves mimicking Cloward areas and mechanical and sensitisation issues of the spinal dura in

  15. Endovascular Stent Graft Placement in the Treatment of Ruptured Tuberculous Pseudoaneurysm of the Descending Thoracic Aorta: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, Sozen Memis, Ahmet; Kale, Arzum Buket, Suat

    2009-05-15

    We report a successful repair of a ruptured tuberculous pseudoaneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta by endovascular stent graft placement. This procedure is starting to be accepted as an alternative method to surgery, and we review similar cases in the literature.

  16. Fusion Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Schmidt

    2002-02-20

    If a fusion DEMO reactor can be brought into operation during the first half of this century, fusion power production can have a significant impact on carbon dioxide production during the latter half of the century. An assessment of fusion implementation scenarios shows that the resource demands and waste production associated with these scenarios are manageable factors. If fusion is implemented during the latter half of this century it will be one element of a portfolio of (hopefully) carbon dioxide limiting sources of electrical power. It is time to assess the regional implications of fusion power implementation. An important attribute of fusion power is the wide range of possible regions of the country, or countries in the world, where power plants can be located. Unlike most renewable energy options, fusion energy will function within a local distribution system and not require costly, and difficult, long distance transmission systems. For example, the East Coast of the United States is a prime candidate for fusion power deployment by virtue of its distance from renewable energy sources. As fossil fuels become less and less available as an energy option, the transmission of energy across bodies of water will become very expensive. On a global scale, fusion power will be particularly attractive for regions separated from sources of renewable energy by oceans.

  17. Transient Monoplegia as a Result of Unilateral Femoral Artery Ischemia Detected by Multimodal Intraoperative Neuromonitoring in Posterior Scoliosis Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pankowski, Rafal; Roclawski, Marek; Dziegiel, Krzysztof; Ceynowa, Marcin; Mikulicz, Marcin; Mazurek, Tomasz; Kloc, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This is to report a case of 16-year-old girl with transient right lower limb monoplegia as a result of femoral artery ischemia detected by multimodal intraoperative spinal cord neuromonitoring (MISNM) during posterior correction surgery of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. A patient with a marfanoid body habitus and LENKE IA type scoliosis with the right thoracic curve of 48° of Cobb angle was admitted for posterior spinal fusion from Th6 to L2. After selective pedicle screws instrumentation and corrective maneuvers motor evoked potentials (MEP) began to decrease with no concomitant changes in somato-sensory evoked potentials recordings. The instrumentation was released first partially than completely with rod removal but the patient demonstrated constantly increasing serious neurological motor deficit of the whole right lower limb. Every technical cause of the MEP changes was eliminated and during the wake-up test the right foot was found to be pale and cold with no popliteal and dorsalis pedis pulses palpable. The patient was repositioned and the pelvic pad was placed more cranially. Instantly, the pulse and color returned to the patient's foot. Following MEP recordings showed gradual return of motor function up to the baseline at the end of the surgery, whereas somato-sensory evoked potentials were within normal range through the whole procedure. This case emphasizes the importance of the proper pelvic pad positioning during the complex spine surgeries performed in prone position of the patient. A few cases of neurological complications have been described which were the result of vascular occlusion after prolonged pressure in the inguinal area during posterior scoliosis surgery when the patient was in prone position. If incorrectly interpreted, they would have a significant impact on the course of scoliosis surgery. PMID:26871822

  18. Single-stage Anterior and Posterior Fusion Surgery for Correction of Cervical Kyphotic Deformity Using Intervertebral Cages and Cervical Lateral Mass Screws: Postoperative Changes in Total Spine Sagittal Alignment in Three Cases with a Minimum Follow-up of Five Years.

    PubMed

    Ogihara, Satoshi; Kunogi, Junichi

    2015-01-01

    The surgical treatment of cervical kyphotic deformity remains challenging. As a surgical method that is safer and avoids major complications, the authors present a procedure of single-stage anterior and posterior fusion to correct cervical kyphosis using anterior interbody fusion cages without plating, as illustrated by three consecutive cases. Case 1 was a 78-year-old woman who presented with a dropped head caused by degeneration of her cervical spine. Case 2 was a 54-year-old woman with athetoid cerebral palsy. She presented with cervical myelopathy and cervical kyphosis. Case 3 was a 71-year-old woman with cervical kyphotic deformity following a laminectomy. All three patients underwent anterior release and interbody fusion with cages and posterior fusion with cervical lateral mass screw (LMS) fixation. Postoperative radiographs showed that correction of kyphosis was 39° in case 1, 43° in case 2, and 39° in case 3. In all three cases, improvement of symptoms was established without major perioperative complications, solid fusion was achieved, and no loss of correction was observed at a minimum follow-up of 61 months. We also report that preoperative total spine sagittal malalignment was improved after corrective surgery for cervical kyphosis and was maintained at the latest follow-up in all three cases. The combination of anterior fusion cages and LMS is considered a safe and effective procedure in cases of severe cervical kyphotic deformity. Preoperative total spine sagittal malalignment improved, accompanied by correction of cervical kyphosis, and was maintained at last follow-up in all three cases. PMID:26119893

  19. Improved Surgery Planning Using 3-D Printing: a Case Study.

    PubMed

    Singhal, A J; Shetty, V; Bhagavan, K R; Ragothaman, Ananthan; Shetty, V; Koneru, Ganesh; Agarwala, M

    2016-04-01

    The role of 3-D printing is presented for improved patient-specific surgery planning. Key benefits are time saved and surgery outcome. Two hard-tissue surgery models were 3-D printed, for orthopedic, pelvic surgery, and craniofacial surgery. We discuss software data conversion in computed tomography (CT)/magnetic resonance (MR) medical image for 3-D printing. 3-D printed models save time in surgery planning and help visualize complex pre-operative anatomy. Time saved in surgery planning can be as much as two thirds. In addition to improved surgery accuracy, 3-D printing presents opportunity in materials research. Other hard-tissue and soft-tissue cases in maxillofacial, abdominal, thoracic, cardiac, orthodontics, and neurosurgery are considered. We recommend using 3-D printing as standard protocol for surgery planning and for teaching surgery practices. A quick turnaround time of a 3-D printed surgery model, in improved accuracy in surgery planning, is helpful for the surgery team. It is recommended that these costs be within 20 % of the total surgery budget. PMID:27303117