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Sample records for three-axis thrust-vectoring system

  1. Thrust-vector control of a three-axis stabilized upper-stage rocket with fuel slosh dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio Hervas, Jaime; Reyhanoglu, Mahmut

    2014-05-01

    This paper studies the thrust vector control problem for an upper-stage rocket with fuel slosh dynamics. The dynamics of a three-axis stabilized spacecraft with a single partially-filled fuel tank are formulated and the sloshing propellant is modeled as a multi-mass-spring system, where the oscillation frequencies of the mass-spring elements represent the prominent sloshing modes. The equations of motion are expressed in terms of the three-dimensional spacecraft translational velocity vector, the attitude, the angular velocity, and the internal coordinates representing the slosh modes. A Lyapunov-based nonlinear feedback control law is proposed to control the translational velocity vector and the attitude of the spacecraft, while attenuating the sloshing modes characterizing the internal dynamics. A simulation example is included to illustrate the effectiveness of the control law.

  2. Ascent thrust vector control system test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Testing of the Ascent Thrust Vector Control System in support of the Ares 1-X program at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. This image is extracted from a high definition video file and is the highest resolution available

  3. Experimental investigations of thrust vectoring systems for VTOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rolls, L. S.; Aoyagi, K.

    1977-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of two technology programs sponsored by NASA to investigate the characteristics of two thrust vectoring schemes for V/STOL aircraft. The operational capability of the VTOL aircraft is dependent on maximum utilization of the installed thrust in both the cruise and powered lift modes of flight. An effective thrust vectoring system on the cruise propulsion unit is therefore essential to provide maximum payload in hover and STOL plus minimum specific fuel consumption in loiter and cruise. Introducing a high by-pass ratio fan system, augmenting the gas generator thrust, as the propulsion system for VTOL aircraft places increased significance on the performance of the relatively short coupled thrust vectoring systems. The two programs discussed herein include both large-scale and small-scale tests of a vectoring hood system with a vented, internal-lip and swivel nozzle systems. These tests indicated that a satisfactory thrust vectoring system can be developed.

  4. Space transportation system solid rocket booster thrust vector control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verble, A. J., Jr.; Mccool, A. A.; Potter, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Booster, Thrust Vector Control (TVC) system was designed in accordance with the following requirements: self-contained power supply, fail-safe operation, 20 flight uses after exposure to seawater landings, optimized cost, and component interchangeability. Trade studies were performed which led to the selection of a recirculating hydraulic system powered by Auxiliary Power Units (APU) which drive the hydraulic actuators and gimbal the solid rocket motor nozzle. Other approaches for the system design were studied in arriving at the recirculating hydraulic system powered by an APU. These systems must withstand the imposed environment and be usable for a minimum of 20 Space Transportation System flights with a minimum of refurbishment. The TVC system has completed the major portion of qualification and verification tests and is prepared to be cleared for the first Shuttle flight (STS-1). Substantiation data will include analytical and test data.

  5. Space Transportation System solid rocket booster thrust vector control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verble, A. J., Jr.; Mccool, A. A.; Potter, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Booster, Thrust Vector Control (TVC) system was designed in accordance with the following requirements: self-contained power supply, failsafe operation, 20 flight uses after exposure to seawater landings, optimized cost, and component interchangeability. Trade studies were performed which led to the selection of a recirculating hydraulic system powered by Auxiliary Power Units (APU) which drive the hydraulic actuators and gimbal the solid rocket motor nozzle. Other approaches for the system design were studied in arriving at the recirculating hydraulic system powered by an APU. These systems must withstand the imposed environment and be usable for a minimum of 20 Space Transportation System flights with a minimum of refurbishment. The TVC system completed the required qualification and verification tests and is certified for the intended application. Substantiation data include analytical and test data.

  6. Three axis velocity probe system

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.; Smith, Jr., Nelson S.; Utt, Carroll E.

    1992-01-01

    A three-axis velocity probe system for determining three-axis positional velocities of small particles in fluidized bed systems and similar applications. This system has a sensor head containing four closely-spaced sensing electrodes of small wires that have flat ends to establish a two axis plane, e.g. a X-Y plane. Two of the sensing electrodes are positioned along one of the axes and the other two are along the second axis. These four sensing electrodes are surrounded by a guard electrode, and the outer surface is a ground electrode and support member for the sensing head. The electrodes are excited by, for example, sinusoidal voltage having a peak-to-peak voltage of up to 500 volts at a frequency of 2 MHz. Capacitive currents flowing between the four sensing electrodes and the ground electrode are influenced by the presence and position of a particle passing the sensing head. Any changes in these currents due to the particle are amplified and synchronously detected to produce positional signal values that are converted to digital form. Using these digital forms and two values of time permit generation of values of the three components of the particle vector and thus the total velocity vector.

  7. Three axis attitude control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, Philip A. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A three-axis attitude control system for an orbiting body comprised of a motor driven flywheel supported by a torque producing active magnetic bearing is described. Free rotation of the flywheel is provided about its central axis and together with limited angular torsional deflections of the flywheel about two orthogonal axes which are perpendicular to the central axis. The motor comprises an electronically commutated DC motor, while the magnetic bearing comprises a radially servoed permanent magnet biased magnetic bearing capable of producing cross-axis torques on the flywheel. Three body attitude sensors for pitch, yaw and roll generate respective command signals along three mutually orthogonal axes (x, y, z) which are coupled to circuit means for energizing a set of control coils for producing torques about two of the axes (x and y) and speed control of the flywheel about the third (z) axis. An energy recovery system, which is operative during motor deceleration, is also included which permits the use of a high-speed motor to perform effectively as a reactive wheel suspended in the magnetic bearing.

  8. Developmental Testing of Electric Thrust Vector Control Systems for Manned Launch Vehicle Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, Lisa B.; Young, David T.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes recent developmental testing to verify the integration of a developmental electromechanical actuator (EMA) with high rate lithium ion batteries and a cross platform extensible controller. Testing was performed at the Thrust Vector Control Research, Development and Qualification Laboratory at the NASA George C. Marshall Space Flight Center. Electric Thrust Vector Control (ETVC) systems like the EMA may significantly reduce recurring launch costs and complexity compared to heritage systems. Electric actuator mechanisms and control requirements across dissimilar platforms are also discussed with a focus on the similarities leveraged and differences overcome by the cross platform extensible common controller architecture.

  9. Three-axis asymmetric radiation detector system

    DOEpatents

    Martini, Mario Pierangelo; Gedcke, Dale A.; Raudorf, Thomas W.; Sangsingkeow, Pat

    2000-01-01

    A three-axis radiation detection system whose inner and outer electrodes are shaped and positioned so that the shortest path between any point on the inner electrode and the outer electrode is a different length whereby the rise time of a pulse derived from a detected radiation event can uniquely define the azimuthal and radial position of that event, and the outer electrode is divided into a plurality of segments in the longitudinal axial direction for locating the axial location of a radiation detection event occurring in the diode.

  10. Design development of the Apollo command and service module thrust vector attitude control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    Development of the Apollo thrust vector control digital autopilot (TVC DAP) was summarized. This is the control system that provided pitch and yaw attitude control during velocity change maneuvers using the main rocket engine on the Apollo service module. A list of ten primary functional requirements for this control system are presented, each being subordinate to a more general requirement appearing earlier on the list. Development process functions were then identified and the essential information flow paths were explored. This provided some visibility into the particular NASA/contractor interface, as well as relationships between the many individual activities.

  11. Preliminary design study of a lateral-directional control system using thrust vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lallman, F. J.

    1985-01-01

    A preliminary design of a lateral-directional control system for a fighter airplane capable of controlled operation at extreme angles of attack is developed. The subject airplane is representative of a modern twin-engine high-performance jet fighter, is equipped with ailerons, rudder, and independent horizontal-tail surfaces. Idealized bidirectional thrust-vectoring engine nozzles are appended to the mathematic model of the airplane to provide additional control moments. Optimal schedules for lateral and directional pseudo control variables are calculated. Use of pseudo controls results in coordinated operation of the aerodynamic and thrust-vectoring controls with minimum coupling between the lateral and directional airplane dynamics. Linear quadratic regulator designs are used to specify a preliminary flight control system to improve the stability and response characteristics of the airplane. Simulated responses to step pilot control inputs are stable and well behaved. For lateral stick deflections, peak stability axis roll rates are between 1.25 and 1.60 rad/sec over an angle-of-attack range of 10 deg to 70 deg. For rudder pedal deflections, the roll rates accompanying the sideslip responses can be arrested by small lateral stick motions.

  12. Solid rocket thrust vector control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Thrust vector control systems that superimpose a side force on the motor thrust, steering being achieved by the side force causing a moment about the vehicle center of gravity are described. A brief review of thrust vector control systems is presented, and two systems, flexible joint and liquid injection, are treated in detail. Treatment of the flexible-joint thrust vector control system is limited to the design of the flexible joint and its insulation against hot motor gases. Treatment of the liquid injection thrust vector control system is limited to discussion of the injectant, valves, piping, storage tanks, and pressurization system; no evaluation is presented of the nozzle except for (1) the effect of the injectant and erosion at the injection port and (2) the effect of injection on pressure distribution within the nozzle.

  13. Implementation of the Orbital Maneuvering Systems Engine and Thrust Vector Control for the European Service Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millard, Jon

    2014-01-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) has entered into a partnership with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to develop and provide the Service Module (SM) for the Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) Program. The European Service Module (ESM) will provide main engine thrust by utilizing the Space Shuttle Program Orbital Maneuvering System Engine (OMS-E). Thrust Vector Control (TVC) of the OMS-E will be provided by the Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) TVC, also used during the Space Shuttle Program. NASA will be providing the OMS-E and OMS TVC to ESA as Government Furnished Equipment (GFE) to integrate into the ESM. This presentation will describe the OMS-E and OMS TVC and discuss the implementation of the hardware for the ESM.

  14. Design of a mixer for the thrust-vectoring system on the high-alpha research vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pahle, Joseph W.; Bundick, W. Thomas; Yeager, Jessie C.; Beissner, Fred L., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    One of the advanced control concepts being investigated on the High-Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) is multi-axis thrust vectoring using an experimental thrust-vectoring (TV) system consisting of three hydraulically actuated vanes per engine. A mixer is used to translate the pitch-, roll-, and yaw-TV commands into the appropriate TV-vane commands for distribution to the vane actuators. A computer-aided optimization process was developed to perform the inversion of the thrust-vectoring effectiveness data for use by the mixer in performing this command translation. Using this process a new mixer was designed for the HARV and evaluated in simulation and flight. An important element of the Mixer is the priority logic, which determines priority among the pitch-, roll-, and yaw-TV commands.

  15. Investigation of advanced thrust vectoring exhaust systems for high speed propulsive lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchison, R. A.; Petit, J. E.; Capone, F. J.; Whittaker, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents the results of a wind tunnel investigation conducted at the NASA-Langley research center to determine thrust vectoring/induced lift characteristics of advanced exhaust nozzle concepts installed on a supersonic tactical airplane model. Specific test objectives include: (1) basic aerodynamics of a wing body configuration, (2) investigation of induced lift effects, (3) evaluation of static and forward speed performance, and (4) the effectiveness of a canard surface to trim thrust vectoring/induced lift forces and moments.

  16. A static investigation of the thrust vectoring system of the F/A-18 high-alpha research vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Mary L.; Capone, Francis J.; Asbury, Scott C.

    1992-01-01

    A static (wind-off) test was conducted in the static test facility of the Langley 16-foot Transonic Tunnel to evaluate the vectoring capability and isolated nozzle performance of the proposed thrust vectoring system of the F/A-18 high alpha research vehicle (HARV). The thrust vectoring system consisted of three asymmetrically spaced vanes installed externally on a single test nozzle. Two nozzle configurations were tested: A maximum afterburner-power nozzle and a military-power nozzle. Vane size and vane actuation geometry were investigated, and an extensive matrix of vane deflection angles was tested. The nozzle pressure ratios ranged from two to six. The results indicate that the three vane system can successfully generate multiaxis (pitch and yaw) thrust vectoring. However, large resultant vector angles incurred large thrust losses. Resultant vector angles were always lower than the vane deflection angles. The maximum thrust vectoring angles achieved for the military-power nozzle were larger than the angles achieved for the maximum afterburner-power nozzle.

  17. Results of solar electric thrust vector control system design, development and tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleischer, G. E.

    1973-01-01

    Efforts to develop and test a thrust vector control system TVCS for a solar-energy-powered ion engine array are described. The results of solar electric propulsion system technology (SEPST) III real-time tests of present versions of TVCS hardware in combination with computer-simulated attitude dynamics of a solar electric multi-mission spacecraft (SEMMS) Phase A-type spacecraft configuration are summarized. Work on an improved solar electric TVCS, based on the use of a state estimator, is described. SEPST III tests of TVCS hardware have generally proved successful and dynamic response of the system is close to predictions. It appears that, if TVCS electronic hardware can be effectively replaced by control computer software, a significant advantage in control capability and flexibility can be gained in future developmental testing, with practical implications for flight systems as well. Finally, it is concluded from computer simulations that TVCS stabilization using rate estimation promises a substantial performance improvement over the present design.

  18. Application of Diagnostic Analysis Tools to the Ares I Thrust Vector Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maul, William A.; Melcher, Kevin J.; Chicatelli, Amy K.; Johnson, Stephen B.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle is being designed to support missions to the International Space Station (ISS), to the Moon, and beyond. The Ares I is undergoing design and development utilizing commercial-off-the-shelf tools and hardware when applicable, along with cutting edge launch technologies and state-of-the-art design and development. In support of the vehicle s design and development, the Ares Functional Fault Analysis group was tasked to develop an Ares Vehicle Diagnostic Model (AVDM) and to demonstrate the capability of that model to support failure-related analyses and design integration. One important component of the AVDM is the Upper Stage (US) Thrust Vector Control (TVC) diagnostic model-a representation of the failure space of the US TVC subsystem. This paper first presents an overview of the AVDM, its development approach, and the software used to implement the model and conduct diagnostic analysis. It then uses the US TVC diagnostic model to illustrate details of the development, implementation, analysis, and verification processes. Finally, the paper describes how the AVDM model can impact both design and ground operations, and how some of these impacts are being realized during discussions of US TVC diagnostic analyses with US TVC designers.

  19. Noise generated by a flight weight, air flow control valve in a vertical takeoff and landing aircraft thrust vectoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Ronald G.

    1989-01-01

    Tests were conducted in the NASA Lewis Research Center's Powered Lift Facility to experimentally evaluate the noise generated by a flight weight, 12 in. butterfly valve installed in a proposed vertical takeoff and landing thrust vectoring system. Fluctuating pressure measurements were made in the circular duct upstream and downstream of the valve. This data report presents the results of these tests. The maximum overall sound pressure level is generated in the duct downstream of the valve and reached a value of 180 dB at a valve pressure ratio of 2.8. At the higher valve pressure ratios the spectra downstream of the valve is broad banded with its maximum at 1000 Hz.

  20. Aerodynamics of thrust vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, J. B.; Lan, C. Edward

    1989-01-01

    Thrust vectoring as a means to enhance maneuverability and aerodynamic performane of a tactical aircraft is discussed. This concept usually involves the installation of a multifunction nozzle. With the nozzle, the engine thrust can be changed in direction without changing the attitude of the aircraft. Change in the direction of thrust induces a significant change in the aerodynamic forces on the aircraft. Therefore, this device can be used for lift-augmenting as well as stability and control purposes. When the thrust is deflected in the longitudinal direction, the lift force and the pitching stability can be manipulated, while the yawing stability can be controlled by directing the thrust in the lateral direction.

  1. Miniature image guided three-axis scanning and positioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avirovik, Dragan; Dave, Digant; Priya, Shashank

    2012-04-01

    We have developed a high precision three axes scanning and positioning system for integration with Multifunctional Image Guided Surgical (MIGS) Platform. The stage integrates three main components: an optical coherence tomography (OCT) probe, laser scalpel and suction cup. The requirements for this stage were to provide scanning area of 400mm2, resolution of less than 10 microns and scanning velocity in the range of 10 - 40 mm/s. The stage was modeled using computer aided design software NX Unigraphics. In addition to the parameters mentioned above, additional boundary conditions for the stage were set as low volume and modularity. Optimized stage model was fabricated by using rapid prototyping technique that integrates low cost stepper motors, threaded rod drive train and a stepper motor controller. The EZ4axis stepper motor controller was able to provide 1/8th microstep resolution control over the motors, which met the criterion desired for the MIGS platform. Integration of computer controlled three-axis stage with MIGS platform provides the opportunity for conducting intricate surgical procedures using remote control or joystick. The device is image guided using the OCT probe and it is able to pin point any location requiring a laser scalpel incision. Due to the scanning capabilities, a high quality threedimensional image of the tissue topography is obtained which allows the surgeon to make a confident decision of where to apply the laser scalpel and make an incision.

  2. A review of thrust-vectoring schemes for fighter applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrier, B. L.; Re, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents a review of thrust vectoring schemes for advanced fighter applications. Results are presented from wind tunnel and system integration studies on thrust vectoring nozzle concepts. Vectoring data are presented from wind tunnel tests of axisymmetric C-D (convergent-divergent) and nonaxisymmetric wedge, C-D, single ramp and USB (upper-surface blowing) nozzle concepts. Results from recent airframe/nozzle integration studies on the impact of thrust vectoring on weight, cooling and performance characteristics are discussed. This review indicates that the aircraft designer has, at his disposal, a wide range of thrust vectoring schemes which offer potential for added or improved aircraft capability.

  3. Comparative investigation of multiplane thrust vectoring nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, F.; Smereczniak, P.; Spetnagel, D.; Thayer, E.

    1992-01-01

    The inflight aerodynamic performance of multiplane vectoring nozzles is critical to development of advanced aircraft and flight control systems utilizing thrust vectoring. To investigate vectoring nozzle performance, subscale models of two second-generation thrust vectoring nozzle concepts currently under development for advanced fighters were integrated into an axisymmetric test pod. Installed drag and vectoring performance characteristics of both concepts were experimentally determined in wind tunnel testing. CFD analyses were conducted to understand the impact of internal flow turning on thrust vectoring characteristics. Both nozzles exhibited drag comparable with current nonvectoring axisymmetric nozzles. During vectored-thrust operations, forces produced by external flow effects amounted to about 25 percent of the total force measured.

  4. A Change of Inertia-Supporting the Thrust Vector Control of the Space Launch System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dziubanek, Adam J.

    2012-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) is America's next launch vehicle. To utilize the vehicle more economically, heritage hardware from the Space Transportation System (STS) will be used when possible. The Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) actuators could possibly be used in the core stage of the SLS. The dynamic characteristics of the SRB actuator will need to be tested on an Inertia Load Stand (ILS) that has been converted to Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). The inertia on the pendulum of the ILS will need to be changed to match the SSME inertia. In this testing environment an SRB actuator can be tested with the equivalent resistence of an SSME.

  5. Preliminary performance of a vertical-attitude takeoff and landing, supersonic cruise aircraft concept having thrust vectoring integrated into the flight control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robins, A. W.; Beissner, F. L., Jr.; Domack, C. S.; Swanson, E. E.

    1985-01-01

    A performance study was made of a vertical attitude takeoff and landing (VATOL), supersonic cruise aircraft concept having thrust vectoring integrated into the flight control system. Those characteristics considered were aerodynamics, weight, balance, and performance. Preliminary results indicate that high levels of supersonic aerodynamic performance can be achieved. Further, with the assumption of an advanced (1985 technology readiness) low bypass ratio turbofan engine and advanced structures, excellent mission performance capability is indicated.

  6. New Highly Dynamic Approach for Thrust Vector Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, M.; Ettl, J.; Grothe, D.; Hrbud, I.

    2015-09-01

    For a new launcher system a thrust vector control system is needed. This launch vehicle system consists of two rockets which are namely the VS-50 (two-stage suborbital vehicle) and the VLM-1 (three-stage microsatellite launch vehicle). VLM-1 and VS-50 are developed in a cooperation between the German Aerospace Center (DLR) and the Brazilian Aeronautics and Space Institute (IAE). To keep these two rockets on its trajectory during flight a highly dynamic thrust vector control system is required. For the purpose of developing such a highly dynamic thrust vector control system a master thesis was written by the author. The development includes all mechanical constructions as well as control algorithms and electronics design. Moreover an optimization of control algorithms was made to increase the dynamic capabilities of the thrust vector control system. The composition of the right components plus the sophisticated control algorithm make the thrust vector control system highly dynamic.

  7. Thrust vector control using electric actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechtel, Robert T.; Hall, David K.

    1995-01-01

    Presently, gimbaling of launch vehicle engines for thrust vector control is generally accomplished using a hydraulic system. In the case of the space shuttle solid rocket boosters and main engines, these systems are powered by hydrazine auxiliary power units. Use of electromechanical actuators would provide significant advantages in cost and maintenance. However, present energy source technologies such as batteries are heavy to the point of causing significant weight penalties. Utilizing capacitor technology developed by the Auburn University Space Power Institute in collaboration with the Auburn CCDS, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Auburn are developing EMA system components with emphasis on high discharge rate energy sources compatible with space shuttle type thrust vector control requirements. Testing has been done at MSFC as part of EMA system tests with loads up to 66000 newtons for pulse times of several seconds. Results show such an approach to be feasible providing a potential for reduced weight and operations costs for new launch vehicles.

  8. Thrust Vector Control using movable probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavalleri, Robert; Tiarn, Weihnurng; Readey, Harvey

    1990-01-01

    A study was undertaken to determine if movable probes or struts positioned in the nozzle can be used to provide Thrust Vector Control of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster. The study employed CFD to determine estimates of the shock standoff distance from the probe. An empirical correlation was used to construct the shock shape and the pressure distribution generated by the probe. The TVC performance for a single and multiple number of probes was then used to determine requirements for a maximum thrust angle offset of 7.5 degrees. Consideration was given to what materials would be suitable for the probe and if active cooling is required. Based on the performance analysis and thermal requirements, a Probe Thrust Vector Control (PTVC) system was sized. Indications are that a PTVC system weight is in the 1500 1bm weight range, compared to the existing weight of 7500 1bm for the SRB nozzle gimble system.

  9. Thrust vectoring for lateral-directional stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peron, Lee R.; Carpenter, Thomas

    1992-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of using thrust vectoring for lateral-directional control and the effects of reducing the tail size of a single-engine aircraft were investigated. The aerodynamic characteristics of the F-16 aircraft were generated by using the Aerodynamic Preliminary Analysis System II panel code. The resulting lateral-directional linear perturbation analysis of a modified F-16 aircraft with various tail sizes and yaw vectoring was performed at several speeds and altitudes to determine the stability and control trends for the aircraft compared to these trends for a baseline aircraft. A study of the paddle-type turning vane thrust vectoring control system as used on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration F/A-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle is also presented.

  10. The Magsat three axis arc second precision attitude transfer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenkel, F. W.; Heins, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The Magsat Attitude Transfer System (ATS), which provides attitude alteration in pitch, yaw, and roll is described. A remote vector magnetometer extends from Magsat on a 20 ft boom, requiring vector orientation by reference to coordinate axes determined by a set of star mapping cameras. The ATS was designed to perform in a solar illuminated environment by using an optically narrow bandwidth with synchronous demodulation at 9300 A. The pitch/yaw optical design, the electrooptics, and signal and switching diagrams are provided. Simple mirrors with no moving parts are placed on the magnetometer to reflect a collimated beam from the ATS for attitude indication, which is accurate to one part in 96. Alignment was completed within 24 hr after launch.

  11. Three-axis lever actuator with flexure hinges for an optical disk system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Chang-Soo; Kim, Soo-Hyun

    2002-10-01

    A three-axis lever actuator with a flexure hinge has been designed and fabricated. This actuator is driven by electromagnetic force based on a coil-magnet system and can be used as a high precision actuator and, especially as a pickup head actuator in optical disks. High precision and low sensitivity to external vibration are the major advantages of this lever actuator. An analysis model was found and compared to the finite element method. Dynamic characteristics of the three-axis lever actuator were measured. The results are in very close agreement to those predicted by the model and finite element analysis.

  12. Thrust vector control using electric actuation

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel, R.T.; Hall, D.K.

    1995-01-25

    Presently, gimbaling of launch vehicle engines for thrust vector control is generally accomplished using a hydraulic system. In the case of the space shuttle solid rocket boosters and main engines, these systems are powered by hydrazine auxiliary power units. Use of electromechanical actuators would provide significant advantages in cost and maintenance. However, present energy source technologies such as batteries are heavy to the point of causing significant weight penalties. Utilizing capacitor technology developed by the Auburn University Space Power Institute in collaboration with the Auburn CCDS, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Auburn are developing EMA system components with emphasis on high discharge rate energy sources compatible with space shuttle type thrust vector control requirements. Testing has been done at MSFC as part of EMA system tests with loads up to 66000 newtons for pulse times of several seconds. Results show such an approach to be feasible providing a potential for reduced weight and operations costs for new launch vehicles. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

  13. Computational Investigation of Fluidic Counterflow Thrust Vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Craig A.; Deere, Karen A.

    1999-01-01

    A computational study of fluidic counterflow thrust vectoring has been conducted. Two-dimensional numerical simulations were run using the computational fluid dynamics code PAB3D with two-equation turbulence closure and linear Reynolds stress modeling. For validation, computational results were compared to experimental data obtained at the NASA Langley Jet Exit Test Facility. In general, computational results were in good agreement with experimental performance data, indicating that efficient thrust vectoring can be obtained with low secondary flow requirements (less than 1% of the primary flow). An examination of the computational flowfield has revealed new details about the generation of a countercurrent shear layer, its relation to secondary suction, and its role in thrust vectoring. In addition to providing new information about the physics of counterflow thrust vectoring, this work appears to be the first documented attempt to simulate the counterflow thrust vectoring problem using computational fluid dynamics.

  14. Three axis electronic flight motion simulator real time control system design and implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Zhiyuan; Miao, Zhonghua Wang, Xiaohua; Wang, Xuyong

    2014-12-15

    A three axis electronic flight motion simulator is reported in this paper including the modelling, the controller design as well as the hardware implementation. This flight motion simulator could be used for inertial navigation test and high precision inertial navigation system with good dynamic and static performances. A real time control system is designed, several control system implementation problems were solved including time unification with parallel port interrupt, high speed finding-zero method of rotary inductosyn, zero-crossing management with continuous rotary, etc. Tests were carried out to show the effectiveness of the proposed real time control system.

  15. Three axis electronic flight motion simulator real time control system design and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhiyuan; Miao, Zhonghua; Wang, Xuyong; Wang, Xiaohua

    2014-12-01

    A three axis electronic flight motion simulator is reported in this paper including the modelling, the controller design as well as the hardware implementation. This flight motion simulator could be used for inertial navigation test and high precision inertial navigation system with good dynamic and static performances. A real time control system is designed, several control system implementation problems were solved including time unification with parallel port interrupt, high speed finding-zero method of rotary inductosyn, zero-crossing management with continuous rotary, etc. Tests were carried out to show the effectiveness of the proposed real time control system.

  16. A review of thrust-vectoring in support of a V/STOL non-moving mechanical propulsion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Páscoa, José C.; Dumas, Antonio; Trancossi, Michele; Stewart, Paul; Vucinic, Dean

    2013-09-01

    The advantages associated to Vertical Short-Take-Off and Landing (V/STOL) have been demonstrated since the early days of aviation, with the initial technolology being based on airships and later on helicopters and planes. Its operational advantages are enormous, being it in the field of military, humanitarian and rescue operations, or even in general aviation. Helicopters have limits in their maximum horizontal speed and classic V/STOL airplanes have problems associated with their large weight, due to the implementation of moving elements, when based on tilting rotors or turbojet vector mechanical oriented nozzles. A new alternative is proposed within the European Union Project ACHEON (Aerial Coanda High Efficiency Orienting-jet Nozzle). The project introduces a novel scheme to orient the jet that is free of moving elements. This is based on a Coanda effect nozzle supported in two fluid streams, also incorporating boundary layer plasma actuators to achieve larger deflection angles. Herein we introduce a state-of-the-art review of the concepts that have been proposed in the framework of jet orienting propulsion systems. This review allows to demonstrate the advantages of the new concept in comparison to competing technologies in use at present day, or of competing technologies under development worldwide.

  17. Electromechanical actuation for thrust vector control applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Mary Ellen

    1990-01-01

    The advanced launch system (ALS), is a launch vehicle that is designed to be cost-effective, highly reliable, and operationally efficient with a goal of reducing the cost per pound to orbit. An electromechanical actuation (EMA) system is being developed as an attractive alternative to the hydraulic systems. The controller will integrate 20 kHz resonant link power management and distribution (PMAD) technology and pulse population modulation (PPM) techniques to implement field-oriented vector control (FOVC) of a new advanced induction motor. The driver and the FOVC will be microprocessor controlled. For increased system reliability, a built-in test (BITE) capability will be included. This involves introducing testability into the design of a system such that testing is calibrated and exercised during the design, manufacturing, maintenance, and prelaunch activities. An actuator will be integrated with the motor controller for performance testing of the EMA thrust vector control (TVC) system. The EMA system and work proposed for the future are discussed.

  18. Thrust Vector Control for Nuclear Thermal Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ensworth, Clinton B. F.

    2013-01-01

    Future space missions may use Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) stages for human and cargo missions to Mars and other destinations. The vehicles are likely to require engine thrust vector control (TVC) to maintain desired flight trajectories. This paper explores requirements and concepts for TVC systems for representative NTR missions. Requirements for TVC systems were derived using 6 degree-of-freedom models of NTR vehicles. Various flight scenarios were evaluated to determine vehicle attitude control needs and to determine the applicability of TVC. Outputs from the models yielded key characteristics including engine gimbal angles, gimbal rates and gimbal actuator power. Additional factors such as engine thrust variability and engine thrust alignment errors were examined for impacts to gimbal requirements. Various technologies are surveyed for TVC systems for the NTR applications. A key factor in technology selection is the unique radiation environment present in NTR stages. Other considerations including mission duration and thermal environments influence the selection of optimal TVC technologies. Candidate technologies are compared to see which technologies, or combinations of technologies best fit the requirements for selected NTR missions. Representative TVC systems are proposed and key properties such as mass and power requirements are defined. The outputs from this effort can be used to refine NTR system sizing models, providing higher fidelity definition for TVC systems for future studies.

  19. Thrust-Vector Deflectors For Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soong, William C.

    1990-01-01

    Rotating shield steers thrust in desired direction. Report discusses use of thrust-vector deflectors (TVD's) to enhance controllability and reduce number of small rocket engines (thrustors) needed to control attitudes of artificial satellites. Developed in aircraft industry for use in jet engines. Principal advantages gained, lower cost and greater simplicity.

  20. Ground test of the D shaped vented thrust vectoring nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esker, D. W.

    1976-01-01

    Static ground tests of a large scale lift/cruise thrust vectoring nozzle were conducted to establish: (1) vectoring performance 'in' and 'out' of ground effect; (2) thrust spoilage capability; (3) compatibility of the nozzle with a turbotip fan; and (4) the nozzle structural temperature distribution. Vectoring performance of a short coupled, vented nozzle design on a large scale, (60%) basis was compared with small scale (4.5%) test nozzle results. The test nozzle was a "boilerplate" model of the MCAIR "D" vented nozzle configured for operation with the LF336/J85 turbotip lift fan system. Calibration of the LF336/J85 test fan with a simple convergent nozzle was performed with four different nozzle exit areas to establish reference thrust, nozzle pressure ratio, and nozzle corrected flow characteristics for comparison with the thrust vectoring nozzle data. Thrust vectoring tests with the 'D' vented nozzle were conducted over the range of vector angles between 0 and 117 deg for several different nozzle exit areas.

  1. Electromechanical actuation for thrust vector control applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Mary Ellen

    At present, actuation systems for the Thrust Vector Control (TVC) for launch vehicles are hydraulic systems. The Advanced Launch System (ALS), a joint initiative between NASA and the Air Force, is a launch vehicle that is designed to be cost effective, highly reliable and operationally efficient with a goal of reducing the cost per pound to orbit. As part of this initiative, an electromechanical actuation system is being developed as an attractive alternative to the hydraulic systems used today. NASA-Lewis is developing and demonstrating an Induction Motor Controller Actuation System with a 40 hp peak rating. The controller will integrate 20 kHz resonant link Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) technology and Pulse Population Modulation (PPM) techniques to implement Field Oriented Vector Control (FOVC) of a new advanced induction motor. Through PPM, multiphase variable frequency, variable voltage waveforms can be synthesized from the 20 kHz source. FOVC shows that varying both the voltage and frequency and their ratio (V/F), permits independent control of both torque and speed while operating at maximum efficiency at any point on the torque-speed curve. The driver and the FOVC will be microprocessor controlled. For increased system reliability, a Built-in Test (BITE) capability will be included. This involves introducing testability into the design of a system such that testing is calibrated and exercised during the design, manufacturing, maintenance and prelaunch activities. An actuator will be integrated with the motor controller for performance testing of the EMA TVC system. The design and fabrication of the motor controller is being done by General Dynamics Space Systems Division. The University of Wisconsin-Madison will assist in the design of the advanced induction motor and in the implementation of the FOVC theory. A 75 hp electronically controlled dynamometer will be used to test the motor controller in all four quadrants of operation using flight type

  2. Electromechanical actuation for thrust vector control applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Mary Ellen

    1990-01-01

    At present, actuation systems for the Thrust Vector Control (TVC) for launch vehicles are hydraulic systems. The Advanced Launch System (ALS), a joint initiative between NASA and the Air Force, is a launch vehicle that is designed to be cost effective, highly reliable and operationally efficient with a goal of reducing the cost per pound to orbit. As part of this initiative, an electromechanical actuation system is being developed as an attractive alternative to the hydraulic systems used today. NASA-Lewis is developing and demonstrating an Induction Motor Controller Actuation System with a 40 hp peak rating. The controller will integrate 20 kHz resonant link Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) technology and Pulse Population Modulation (PPM) techniques to implement Field Oriented Vector Control (FOVC) of a new advanced induction motor. Through PPM, multiphase variable frequency, variable voltage waveforms can be synthesized from the 20 kHz source. FOVC shows that varying both the voltage and frequency and their ratio (V/F), permits independent control of both torque and speed while operating at maximum efficiency at any point on the torque-speed curve. The driver and the FOVC will be microprocessor controlled. For increased system reliability, a Built-in Test (BITE) capability will be included. This involves introducing testability into the design of a system such that testing is calibrated and exercised during the design, manufacturing, maintenance and prelaunch activities. An actuator will be integrated with the motor controller for performance testing of the EMA TVC system. The design and fabrication of the motor controller is being done by General Dynamics Space Systems Division. The University of Wisconsin-Madison will assist in the design of the advanced induction motor and in the implementation of the FOVC theory. A 75 hp electronically controlled dynamometer will be used to test the motor controller in all four quadrants of operation using flight type

  3. Design of high power electromechanical actuator for thrust vector control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowan, J. R.; Myers, W. N.

    1991-01-01

    NASA-Marshall has undertaken the development of electromechanical actuators (EMAs) for thrust vector control (TVC) augmentation system implementation. The TVC EMA presented has as its major components two three-phase brushless dc motors, a two-pass gear-reduction system, and a roller screw for rotary-to-linear motion conversion. System control is furnished by a solid-state electronic controller and power supply; a pair of resolvers deliver position feedback to the controller, such that precise positioning is achieved. Peformance comparisons have been conducted between the EMA and comparable-performance hydraulic systems applicable to TVCs.

  4. Thrust vector control for the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counter, D. N.; Brinton, B. C.

    1975-01-01

    Thrust vector control (TVC) for the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) is obtained by omniaxis vectoring of the nozzle. The development and integration of the system are under the cognizance of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The nozzle and flexible bearing have been designed and will be built by Thiokol Corporation/Wasatch Division. The vector requirements of the system, the impact of multiple reuse on the components, and the unique problems associated with a large flexible bearing are discussed. The design details of each of the major TVC subcomponents are delineated. The subscale bearing development program and the overall development schedule also are presented.

  5. Experimental Study of an Axisymmetric Dual Throat Fluidic Thrust Vectoring Nozzle for Supersonic Aircraft Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flamm, Jeffrey D.; Deere, Karen A.; Mason, Mary L.; Berrier, Bobby L.; Johnson, Stuart K.

    2007-01-01

    An axisymmetric version of the Dual Throat Nozzle concept with a variable expansion ratio has been studied to determine the impacts on thrust vectoring and nozzle performance. The nozzle design, applicable to a supersonic aircraft, was guided using the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics code, PAB3D. The axisymmetric Dual Throat Nozzle concept was tested statically in the Jet Exit Test Facility at the NASA Langley Research Center. The nozzle geometric design variables included circumferential span of injection, cavity length, cavity convergence angle, and nozzle expansion ratio for conditions corresponding to take-off and landing, mid climb and cruise. Internal nozzle performance and thrust vectoring performance was determined for nozzle pressure ratios up to 10 with secondary injection rates up to 10 percent of the primary flow rate. The 60 degree span of injection generally performed better than the 90 degree span of injection using an equivalent injection area and number of holes, in agreement with computational results. For injection rates less than 7 percent, thrust vector angle for the 60 degree span of injection was 1.5 to 2 degrees higher than the 90 degree span of injection. Decreasing cavity length improved thrust ratio and discharge coefficient, but decreased thrust vector angle and thrust vectoring efficiency. Increasing cavity convergence angle from 20 to 30 degrees increased thrust vector angle by 1 degree over the range of injection rates tested, but adversely affected system thrust ratio and discharge coefficient. The dual throat nozzle concept generated the best thrust vectoring performance with an expansion ratio of 1.0 (a cavity in between two equal minimum areas). The variable expansion ratio geometry did not provide the expected improvements in discharge coefficient and system thrust ratio throughout the flight envelope of typical a supersonic aircraft. At mid-climb and cruise conditions, the variable geometry

  6. Design and test of electromechanical actuators for thrust vector control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, J. R.; Weir, Rae Ann

    1993-05-01

    New control mechanisms technologies are currently being explored to provide alternatives to hydraulic thrust vector control (TVC) actuation systems. For many years engineers have been encouraging the investigation of electromechanical actuators (EMA) to take the place of hydraulics for spacecraft control/gimballing systems. The rationale is to deliver a lighter, cleaner, safer, more easily maintained, as well as energy efficient space vehicle. In light of this continued concern to improve the TVC system, the Propulsion Laboratory at the NASA George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is involved in a program to develop electromechanical actuators for the purpose of testing and TVC system implementation. Through this effort, an electromechanical thrust vector control actuator has been designed and assembled. The design consists of the following major components: Two three-phase brushless dc motors, a two pass gear reduction system, and a roller screw, which converts rotational input into linear output. System control is provided by a solid-state electronic controller and power supply. A pair of resolvers and associated electronics deliver position feedback to the controller such that precise positioning is achieved. Testing and evaluation is currently in progress. Goals focus on performance comparisons between EMA's and similar hydraulic systems.

  7. Design and test of electromechanical actuators for thrust vector control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowan, J. R.; Weir, Rae Ann

    1993-01-01

    New control mechanisms technologies are currently being explored to provide alternatives to hydraulic thrust vector control (TVC) actuation systems. For many years engineers have been encouraging the investigation of electromechanical actuators (EMA) to take the place of hydraulics for spacecraft control/gimballing systems. The rationale is to deliver a lighter, cleaner, safer, more easily maintained, as well as energy efficient space vehicle. In light of this continued concern to improve the TVC system, the Propulsion Laboratory at the NASA George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is involved in a program to develop electromechanical actuators for the purpose of testing and TVC system implementation. Through this effort, an electromechanical thrust vector control actuator has been designed and assembled. The design consists of the following major components: Two three-phase brushless dc motors, a two pass gear reduction system, and a roller screw, which converts rotational input into linear output. System control is provided by a solid-state electronic controller and power supply. A pair of resolvers and associated electronics deliver position feedback to the controller such that precise positioning is achieved. Testing and evaluation is currently in progress. Goals focus on performance comparisons between EMA's and similar hydraulic systems.

  8. Experimental and theoretical comparison of the Probe Thrust Vector Control concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavalleri, Robert; Tiarn, Weihnurng; Lewis, Lynn

    1991-01-01

    A concept that offers an alternate method for thrust vector control of liquid or solid propellant rockets is the use of a solid body or probe that is inserted on demand through the wall of the rocket nozzle. This Probe Thrust Vector Control (PTVC) concept is an alternative to that of a gimbaled nozzle or a Liquid Injection Thrust Vector control system. The viability of the PTVC concept can be assessed either experimentally and/or with the use of CFD. A purely experimental assessment is time consuming and expensive, whereas a CFD assessment is time- and cost-effective. Two key requirements of the concept are PTVC vectoring performance and active cooling requirements for the probe to maintain its thermal and structural integrity. The objective of the work reported here is presentation of experimental subscale cold flow tests and comparison of these tests with CFD predictions and the response time of the PTVC system.

  9. Design and evaluation of thrust vectored nozzles using a multicomponent thrust stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Thomas W.; Blattner, Ernest W.; Stagner, Robert E.; Contreras, Juanita; Lencioni, Dennis; Mcintosh, Greg

    1990-01-01

    Future aircraft with the capability of short takeoff and landing, and improved maneuverability especially in the post-stall flight regime will incorporate exhaust nozzles which can be thrust vectored. In order to conduct thrust vector research in the Mechanical Engineering Department at Cal Poly, a program was planned with two objectives; design and construct a multicomponent thrust stand for the specific purpose of measuring nozzle thrust vectors; and to provide quality low moisture air to the thrust stand for cold flow nozzle tests. The design and fabrication of the six-component thrust stand was completed. Detailed evaluation tests of the thrust stand will continue upon the receipt of one signal conditioning option (-702) for the Fluke Data Acquisition System. Preliminary design of thrust nozzles with air supply plenums were completed. The air supply was analyzed with regard to head loss. Initial flow visualization tests were conducted using dual water jets.

  10. Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer attitude determination support with a multimission three-axis stabilized spacecraft flight dynamics support system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harman, Richard; Lee, Michael

    The Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) was launched June 7, 1992 by an expendable Delta 2 launch vehicle. The Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center used a multimission three-axis stabilized spacecraft (MTASS) Flight Dynamics Support System (FDSS) to support the EUVE launch and mission operations. For EUVE, MTASS has been used to monitor attitude sensor performance, study OBC attitude determination performance, and study attitude perturbations. The current status of these efforts are summarized. After its successful implementation for EUVE, the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS), and the Solar Anomalous and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX), MTASS has demonstrated multimission flight dynamics support systems can effectively bridge the gap between single-mission support systems of the past and future generic systems.

  11. Gyroless yaw control system for a three axis stabilized, zero-momentum spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stetson, Jr., John B. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A satellite attitude control system is usable in the absence of any inertial yaw attitude reference, such as a gyroscope, and in the absence of a pitch bias momentum. Both the roll-yaw rigid body dynamics and the roll-yaw orbit kinematics are modelled. Pitch and roll attitude control are conventional. The model receives inputs from a roll sensor, and roll and yaw torques from reaction wheel monitors. The model produces estimated yaw which controls the spacecraft yaw attitude.

  12. A three-axis angular monitoring system for the magnetic field satellite /MAGSAT/ mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collyer, P. W.; Schenkel, F. W.

    1980-01-01

    An electro-optical attitude transfer system was developed to monitor the angular orientation of magnetometers deployed at the end of a 20-foot boom extending outboard from the Magsat spacecraft. One autocollimator monitors pitch and yaw attitude, cooperating with a plane mirror at the end of the boom; a second monitors roll (twist) from an offset look-angle, using one dihedral reflector at the boom end and a second on the spacecraft. RMS errors due to all causes including linearity, G-forces, cross-coupling and translation are estimated to be 3.9 arcsec over + or - 180 arcsec excursion in pitch and yaw, and 5.3 to 7.5 arcsec over + or - 300 arcsec roll. Design and fabrication problems relative to the remote dihedral refector proved to be the most challenging, and solutions to these problems will be described.

  13. A three-axis high-resolution capacitive tactile imager system based on floating comb electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surapaneni, R.; Guo, Q.; Xie, Y.; Young, D. J.; Mastrangelo, C. H.

    2013-07-01

    We present the design, fabrication and testing of a high-resolution 169-sensing cell capacitive flexible tactile imager (FTI) for normal and shear stress measurement as an auxiliary sensor for robotic grippers and gait analysis. The FTI consists of a flexible high-density array of normal stress and two-dimensional shear stress sensors fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and flexible printed circuit board (FPCB) techniques. The drive/sense lines of the FTI are realized using FPCB whereas the floating electrodes (Au) are patterned on a compressible PDMS layer spin coated on the FPCB layer. The use of unconnected floating electrodes significantly improves the reliability of traditional quad-electrode contact sensing devices by eliminating the need for patterning electrical wiring on PDMS. When placed at the heel of a boot, this FTI senses the position and motion of the line of contact with the ground. Normal stress readouts are obtained from the net capacitance of the cell and the shear-sense direction is determined by the amount of asymmetric overlap of the floating combs with respect to the bottom electrodes. The FTI is characterized using a high-speed switched-capacitor circuit with a 12-bit resolution at full frame rates of 100 Hz (˜0.8 Mb s-1) capable of resolving a displacement as low as 60 µm. The FTI and the readout circuitry contribute to a noise/interference level of 5 mV and the sensitivity of normal and shear stress for the FTI is 0.38 MPa-1 and 79.5 GPa-1 respectively.

  14. Feedback control for counterflow thrust vectoring with a turbine engine: Experiment design and robust control design and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dores, Delfim Zambujo Das

    2005-11-01

    Engineering research over the last few years has successfully demonstrated the potential of thrust vector control using counterflow at conditions up to Mach 2. Flow configurations that include the pitch vectoring of rectangular jets and multi-axis vector control in diamond and axisymmetric nozzle geometries have been studied. Although bistable (on-off) fluid-based control has been around for some time, the present counterflow thrust vector control is unique because proportional and continuous jet response can be achieved in the absence of moving parts, while avoiding jet attachment, which renders most fluidic approaches unacceptable for aircraft and missile control applications. However, before this study, research had been limited to open-loop studies of counterflow thrust vectoring. For practical implementation it was vital that the counterflow scheme be used in conjunction with feedback control. Hence, the focus of this research was to develop and experimentally demonstrate a feedback control design methodology for counterflow thrust vectoring. This research focused on 2-D (pitch) thrust vectoring and addresses four key modeling issues. The first issue is to determine the measured variable to be commanded since the thrust vector angle is not measurable in real time. The second related issue is to determine the static mapping from the thrust vector angle to this measured variable. The third issue is to determine the dynamic relationship between the measured variable and the thrust vector angle. The fourth issue is to develop dynamic models with uncertainty characterizations. The final and main goal was the design and implementation of robust controllers that yield closed-loop systems with fast response times, and avoid overshoot in order to aid in the avoidance of attachment. These controllers should be simple and easy to implement in real applications. Hence, PID design has been chosen. Robust control design is accomplished by using ℓ1 control theory in

  15. Aerodynamics of thrust vectoring by Navier-Stokes solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, Jing-Biau; Lan, C. Edward

    1991-01-01

    Induced aerodynamics from thrust vectoring are investigated by a computational fluid dynamic method. A thin-layer Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes code with multiblock capability is used. Jet properties are specified on the nozzle exit plane to simulate the jet momentum. Results for a rectangular jet in a cross flow are compared with data to verify the code. Further verification of the calculation is made by comparing the numerical results with transonic data for a wing-body combination. Additional calculations were performed to elucidate the following thrust vectoring effects: the thrust vectoring effect on shock and expansion waves, induced effects on nearby surfaces, and the thrust vectoring effect on the leading edge vortex.

  16. Thrust Vectoring on the NASA F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.; Pahle, Joseph W.

    1996-01-01

    Investigations into a multiaxis thrust-vectoring system have been conducted on an F-18 configuration. These investigations include ground-based scale-model tests, ground-based full-scale testing, and flight testing. This thrust-vectoring system has been tested on the NASA F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). The system provides thrust vectoring in pitch and yaw axes. Ground-based subscale test data have been gathered as background to the flight phase of the program. Tests investigated aerodynamic interaction and vane control effectiveness. The ground-based full-scale data were gathered from static engine runs with image analysis to determine relative thrust-vectoring effectiveness. Flight tests have been conducted at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. Parameter identification input techniques have been developed. Individual vanes were not directly controlled because of a mixer-predictor function built into the flight control laws. Combined effects of the vanes have been measured in flight and compared to combined effects of the vanes as predicted by the cold-jet test data. Very good agreement has been found in the linearized effectiveness derivatives.

  17. Design of a three-axis magnetic field measurement system for the magnetic shield of the ring laser gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Chuiyu; Yao, Xu

    2015-10-01

    The magnetic field is one of the main causes of zero drift in a Ring Laser Gyroscope (RLG), which should be avoided by adopting a magnetic shielding system. The Gauss Meter is usually used to measure the magnetic shielding effectiveness. Generally, the traditional Gauss Meter has advantages of high measure range and high reliability, however, its drawbacks such as complex structure, high price and the PC client software cannot be customized at will, are also obvious. In this paper, aiming at a type of experimental magnetic shielding box of RLG, we design a new portable three-axis magnetic field measurement system. This system has both high modularity degree and reliability, with measuring range at ±48Gs, max resolution at 1.5mGs and can measure the magnetic field in x, y and z direction simultaneously. Besides, its PC client software can be easily customized to achieve the automatic DAQ, analysis, plotting and storage functions. The experiment shows that, this system can meet the measuring requirements of certain type of experimental magnetic shielding box for RLG, meanwhile, for the measurement of some other magnetic shielding effectiveness, this system is also applicable.

  18. Thrust and mass flow characteristics of four 36 inch diameter tip turbine fan thrust vectoring systems in and out of ground effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esker, D. W.; Roddiger, H. A.

    1979-01-01

    The calibration tests carried out on the propulsion system components of a 70 percent scale, powered model of a NASA 3-fan V/STOL aircraft configuration are described. The three X3/6B/T58 turbotip fan units used in the large scale powered model were tested on an isolated basis over a range of ground heights from H/D of 1.02 to infinity. A higher pressure ratio LF336/J85 fan unit was tested over a range of ground heights from 1.55 to infinity. The results of the test program demonstrated that: (1) the thrust and mass flow performance of the X376B/T58 nose lift unit is essentially constant for H/D variations down to 1.55; at H/D 1.02 back pressurization of the fan exit occurs and is accompanied by an increase in thrust of five percent; (2) a change in nose fan exit hub shape from flat plate to hemispherical produces no significant difference in louvered lift nozzle performance for height variations from H/D = 1.02 to infinity; (3) operation of the nose lift nozzle at the higher fan pressure ratio generated by the LF336/J85 fan system causes no significant change in ground proximity performance down to an H/D of 1.55, the lowest height tested with this unit; and (4) the performance of the left and right X376B/T58 lift/cruise units in the vertical lift mode remains unchanged, within plus or minus two percent for the range of ground heights from H/D = 1.02 to infinity.

  19. Development of a Low-Cost Attitude and Heading Reference System Using a Three-Axis Rotating Platform

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Ying-Chih; Jan, Shau-Shiun; Hsiao, Fei-Bin

    2010-01-01

    A development procedure for a low-cost attitude and heading reference system (AHRS) with a self-developed three-axis rotating platform has been proposed. The AHRS consists of one 3-axis accelerometer, three single-axis gyroscopes, and one 3-axis digital compass. Both the accelerometer and gyroscope triads are based on micro electro-mechanical system (MEMS) technology, and the digital compass is based on anisotropic-magnetoresistive (AMR) technology. The calibrations for each sensor triad are readily accomplished by using the scalar calibration and the least squares methods. The platform is suitable for the calibration and validation of the low-cost AHRS and it is affordable for most laboratories. With the calibrated parameters and data fusion algorithm for the orientation estimation, the self-developed AHRS demonstrates the capabilities of compensating for the sensor errors and outputting the estimated orientation in real-time. The validation results show that the estimated orientations of the developed AHRS are within the acceptable region. This verifies the practicability of the proposed development procedure. PMID:22319258

  20. An MRI-compatible three-axis focused ultrasound system for performing drug delivery studies in small animal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waspe, Adam C.; Chau, Anthony; Kukic, Aleksandra; Chopra, Rajiv; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2010-03-01

    MRI-guided focused-ultrasound is a non-invasive technique that can enhance the delivery of therapeutic agents. The objective of this work was to develop a focused-ultrasound system for preclinical research in small animals that is capable of sonicating with high spatial precision within a closed-bore MRI. The system features a computer-controlled, non-magnetic, three-axis positioning system that uses piezoelectric actuators and linear optical encoders to position a focused-ultrasound transducer to targeted tissues under MRI guidance. The actuator and encoder signals are transmitted through low-pass-filtered connectors on a grounded RF-penetration panel to prevent artifacts during image acquisition. The transducer is attached to the positioning system by a rigid arm and is submerged within a closed water tank. The arm passes into the tank through flexible bellows to ensure that the system remains sealed. An RF coil acquires high-resolution images in the vicinity of the target tissue. An aperture on the water tank, centered about the RF coil, provides an access point for target sonication. Registration between ultrasound and MRI coordinates involves sonicating a temperature-sensitive phantom and measuring the centroid of the thermal focal zone in 3D with MR thermometry. Linear distances of 5 cm with a positioning resolution of 0.05 mm can be achieved for each axis. The system was operated successfully on MRI scanners from different vendors at both 1.5 and 3.0 T, and simultaneous motion and imaging was possible without any mutual interference or imaging artifacts. This system is used for high-throughput small-animal experiments to study the efficacy of ultrasound-enhanced drug delivery.

  1. Analysis of Thrust Vectoring Capabilities for the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quadrelli, Marco B .; Gromov, Konstantin; Murray, Emmanuell

    2005-01-01

    A strategy to mitigate the impact of the trajectory design of the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) on the attitude control design is described in this paper. This paper shows how the thrust vectoring control torques, i.e. the torques required to steer the vehicle, depend on various parameters (thrust magnitude, thrust pod articulation angles, and thrust moment arms). Rather than using the entire reaction control system (RCS) system to steer the spacecraft, we investigate the potential utilization of only thrust vectoring of the main ion engines for the required attitude control to follow the representative trajectory. This study has identified some segments of the representative trajectory where the required control torque may exceed the designed ion engine capability, and how the proposed mitigation strategy succeeds in reducing the attitude control torques to within the existing capability.

  2. Internal performance characteristics of thrust-vectored axisymmetric ejector nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, Milton

    1995-01-01

    A series of thrust-vectored axisymmetric ejector nozzles were designed and experimentally tested for internal performance and pumping characteristics at the Langley research center. This study indicated that discontinuities in the performance occurred at low primary nozzle pressure ratios and that these discontinuities were mitigated by decreasing expansion area ratio. The addition of secondary flow increased the performance of the nozzles. The mid-to-high range of secondary flow provided the most overall improvements, and the greatest improvements were seen for the largest ejector area ratio. Thrust vectoring the ejector nozzles caused a reduction in performance and discharge coefficient. With or without secondary flow, the vectored ejector nozzles produced thrust vector angles that were equivalent to or greater than the geometric turning angle. With or without secondary flow, spacing ratio (ejector passage symmetry) had little effect on performance (gross thrust ratio), discharge coefficient, or thrust vector angle. For the unvectored ejectors, a small amount of secondary flow was sufficient to reduce the pressure levels on the shroud to provide cooling, but for the vectored ejector nozzles, a larger amount of secondary air was required to reduce the pressure levels to provide cooling.

  3. Aeroservoelastic Modeling and Validation of a Thrust-Vectoring F/A-18 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, Martin J.

    1996-01-01

    An F/A-18 aircraft was modified to perform flight research at high angles of attack (AOA) using thrust vectoring and advanced control law concepts for agility and performance enhancement and to provide a testbed for the computational fluid dynamics community. Aeroservoelastic (ASE) characteristics had changed considerably from the baseline F/A-18 aircraft because of structural and flight control system amendments, so analyses and flight tests were performed to verify structural stability at high AOA. Detailed actuator models that consider the physical, electrical, and mechanical elements of actuation and its installation on the airframe were employed in the analysis to accurately model the coupled dynamics of the airframe, actuators, and control surfaces. This report describes the ASE modeling procedure, ground test validation, flight test clearance, and test data analysis for the reconfigured F/A-18 aircraft. Multivariable ASE stability margins are calculated from flight data and compared to analytical margins. Because this thrust-vectoring configuration uses exhaust vanes to vector the thrust, the modeling issues are nearly identical for modem multi-axis nozzle configurations. This report correlates analysis results with flight test data and makes observations concerning the application of the linear predictions to thrust-vectoring and high-AOA flight.

  4. Multiaxis Thrust-Vectoring Characteristics of a Model Representative of the F-18 High-Alpha Research Vehicle at Angles of Attack From 0 deg to 70 deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Scott C.; Capone, Francis J.

    1995-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the multiaxis thrust-vectoring characteristics of the F-18 High-Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). A wingtip supported, partially metric, 0.10-scale jet-effects model of an F-18 prototype aircraft was modified with hardware to simulate the thrust-vectoring control system of the HARV. Testing was conducted at free-stream Mach numbers ranging from 0.30 to 0.70, at angles of attack from O' to 70', and at nozzle pressure ratios from 1.0 to approximately 5.0. Results indicate that the thrust-vectoring control system of the HARV can successfully generate multiaxis thrust-vectoring forces and moments. During vectoring, resultant thrust vector angles were always less than the corresponding geometric vane deflection angle and were accompanied by large thrust losses. Significant external flow effects that were dependent on Mach number and angle of attack were noted during vectoring operation. Comparisons of the aerodynamic and propulsive control capabilities of the HARV configuration indicate that substantial gains in controllability are provided by the multiaxis thrust-vectoring control system.

  5. Solid rocket booster thrust vector control V-2 off-nominal testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagan, B.

    1981-01-01

    The results of the V-2 off nominal test sequence performed on the space shuttle solid rocket booster thrust vector control (SRB TVC) system are reported. The TVC subsystem was subjected to 19 off nominal test conditions. The test sequence consisted of: 8 burp starts, 30 hot firings, 14 GN2 spin tests, and 3 servicing passive system tests. It is concluded that the TVC subsystem operated nominally in response to the given commands and test conditions. Test objectives, detail results, and data are included.

  6. Thrust vector control algorithm design for the Cassini spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enright, Paul J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a preliminary design of the thrust vector control algorithm for the interplanetary spacecraft, Cassini. Topics of discussion include flight software architecture, modeling of sensors, actuators, and vehicle dynamics, and controller design and analysis via classical methods. Special attention is paid to potential interactions with structural flexibilities and propellant dynamics. Controller performance is evaluated in a simulation environment built around a multi-body dynamics model, which contains nonlinear models of the relevant hardware and preliminary versions of supporting attitude determination and control functions.

  7. Performance and human factors results from thrust vectoring investigations in simulated air combat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pennington, J. E.; Meintel, A. J., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    In support of research related to advanced fighter technology, the Langley Differential Maneuvering Simulator (DMS) has been used to investigate the effects of advanced aerodynamic concepts, parametric changes in performance parameters, and advanced flight control systems on the combat capability of fighter airplanes. At least five studies were related to thrust vectoring and/or inflight thrust reversing. The aircraft simulated ranged from F-4 class to F-15 class, and included the AV-8 Harrier. This paper presents an overview of these studies including the assumptions involved, trends of results, and human factors considerations that were found.

  8. Attitude control of a spinning rocket via thrust vectoring

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.E.

    1990-12-19

    Two controllers are developed to provide attitude control of a spinning rocket that has a thrust vectoring capability. The first controller has a single-input/single-output design that ignores the gyroscopic coupling between the control channels. The second controller has a multi-input/multi-output structure that is specifically intended to account for the gyroscopic coupling effects. A performance comparison between the two approached is conducted for a range of roll rates. Each controller is tested for the ability to track step commands, and for the amount of coupling impurity. Both controllers are developed via a linear-quadratic-regulator synthesis procedure, which is motivated by the multi-input/multi-output nature of second controller. Time responses and a singular value analysis are used to evaluate controller performance. This paper describes the development and comparison of two controllers that are designed to provide attitude control of a spinning rocket that is equipped with thrust vector control. 12 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Linear Test Bed. Volume 2: Test Bed No. 2. [linear aerospike test bed for thrust vector control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Test bed No. 2 consists of 10 combustors welded in banks of 5 to 2 symmetrical tubular nozzle assemblies, an upper stationary thrust frame, a lower thrust frame which can be hinged, a power package, a triaxial combustion wave ignition system, a pneumatic control system, pneumatically actuated propellant valves, a purge and drain system, and an electrical control system. The power package consists of the Mark 29-F fuel turbopump, the Mark 29-0 oxidizer turbopump, a gas generator assembly, and propellant ducting. The system, designated as a linear aerospike system, was designed to demonstrate the feasibility of the concept and to explore technology related to thrust vector control, thrust vector optimization, improved sequencing and control, and advanced ignition systems. The propellants are liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen. The system was designed to operate at 1200-psia chamber pressure at an engine mixture ratio of 5.5. With 10 combustors, the sea level thrust is 95,000 pounds.

  10. Test stand for precise measurement of impulse and thrust vector of small attitude control jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodruff, J. R.; Chisel, D. M.

    1973-01-01

    A test stand which accurately measures the impulse bit and thrust vector of reaction jet thrusters used in the attitude control system of space vehicles has been developed. It can be used to measure, in a vacuum or ambient environment, both impulse and thrust vector of reaction jet thrusters using hydrazine or inert gas propellants. The ballistic pendulum configuration was selected because of its accuracy, simplicity, and versatility. The pendulum is mounted on flexure pivots rotating about a vertical axis at the center of its mass. The test stand has the following measurement capabilities: impulse of 0.00004 to 4.4 N-sec (0.00001 to 1.0 lb-sec) with a pulse duration of 0.5 msec to 1 sec; static thrust of 0.22 to 22 N (0.05 to 5 lb) with a 5 percent resolution; and thrust angle alinement of 0.22 to 22 N (0.05 to 5 lb) thrusters with 0.01 deg accuracy.

  11. An MRI-compatible three-axis focused ultrasound system for performing drug delivery studies in small animal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waspe, Adam C.; Chau, Anthony; Kukic, Aleksandra; Chopra, Rajiv; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this work was to develop an MRI-compatible focused-ultrasound system for preclinical research in small animal models capable of delivering exposures with high spatial precision in a closed-bore clinical imager. A computer-controlled, non-magnetic, 3-axis positioning system was developed using ceramic actuators and linear encoders to position a focused-ultrasound transducer within a clinical MR scanner. Registration between ultrasound and MRI coordinates involves sonicating a tissue-mimicking ultrasound phantom and measuring the centroid of the thermal focal zone with MR thermometry. Linear distances of 5 cm with a positioning resolution of 0.1 mm were achieved for each axis. The system was operated successfully in MR imagers from different vendors at both 1.5 and 3.0 T, and simultaneous motion and imaging was possible without any mutual interference or imaging artifacts. Initial experiments involving opening of the blood-brain barrier at specific targets within the brain suggest a targeting accuracy of 0.4 mm.

  12. Preliminary Investigation on Battery Sizing Investigation for Thrust Vector Control on Ares I and Ares V Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Thomas B.

    2011-01-01

    An investigation into the merits of battery powered Electro Hydrostatic Actuation (EHA) for Thrust Vector Control (TVC) of the Ares I and Ares V launch vehicles is described. A top level trade study was conducted to ascertain the technical merits of lithium-ion (Li-ion) and thermal battery performance to determine the preferred choice of an energy storage system chemistry that provides high power discharge capability for a relatively short duration.

  13. Multiaxis thrust vectoring using axisymmetric nozzles and postexit vanes on an F/A-18 configuration vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.; Noffz, Gregory K.; Grafton, Sue B.; Mason, Mary L.; Peron, Lee R.

    1991-01-01

    A ground-based investigation was conducted on an operational system of multiaxis thrust vectoring using postexit vanes around an axisymmetric nozzle. This thrust vectoring system will be tested on the NASA F/A-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) aircraft. The system provides thrust vectoring capability in both pitch and yaw. Ground based data were gathered from two separate tests at NASA Langley Research Center. The first was a static test in the 16-foot Transonic Tunnel Cold-Jet Facility with a 14.25 percent scale model of the axisymmetric nozzle and the postexit vanes. The second test was conducted in the 30 by 60 foot wind tunnel with a 16 percent F/A-18 complete configuration model. Data from the two sets are being used to develop models of jet plume deflection and thrust loss as a function of vane deflection. In addition, an aerodynamic interaction model based on plume deflection angles will be developed. Results from the scale model nozzle test showed that increased vane deflection caused exhaust plume turning. Aerodynamic interaction effects consisted primarily of favorable interaction of moments and unfavorable interaction of forces caused by the vectored jet plume.

  14. Altitude testing of a flight weight, self-cooled, 2D thrust vectoring exhaust nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooten, W. H.; Blozy, J. T.; Speir, D. W.; Lottig, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    The Augmented Deflector Exhaust Nozzle (ADEN) was tested in PSL-3 at NASA-Lewis Research Center using an F404 engine. The ADEN is a flight weight Single Expansion Ramp Nozzle with thrust vectoring, an internal cooling system utilizing the available engine fan flow, and a variable area throat controlled by the engine control system. Test conditions included dry and max A/B operation at nozzle pressure ratios from 2.0 to 15.0. High nozzle pressure loading was simulated to verify structural integrity at near maximum design pressure. Nozzle settings covered the full range in throat area and + or - 15 deg deflection angle. Test results demonstrated expected aerodynamic performance, cooling system effectiveness, control system stability, and mechanical integrity.

  15. Design and Testing of Three-Axis Satellite Attitude Determination and Stabilization Systems That Are Based on Magnetic Sensing and Actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psiaki, Mark L.; Guelman, Moshe

    2002-11-01

    Three-axis satellite attitude determination and active stabilization systems have been designed and tested using both flight experiments and simulation studies. These are being developed for use on low-Earth-orbiting name- satellites. Such satellites can be used as elements of constellations that implement synthetic aperture radar or that serve as nudes in a communications network. The research has addressed the problems of under-sensing and under-actuation that are present in magnetic-based systems. Magnetometer outputs are insensitive to rotation about the local Earth magnetic field, and magnetic torque coils cannot produce torque slump the field direction. A new attitude representation and a special globally-convergent extended Kalman filter have been used to solve the 3-axis attitude estimation problem. The efficacy of this system has been demonstrated using data from the missions, the Hubble Space Telescope and the Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer. Semi-active global 3-axis stabilization has been demonstrated using a simplified magnetometer output feedback control law in combination with weak passive stabilization of the axes. The passive stabilization can come from a very small momentum wheel or from a new aerodynamic system. The momentum-wheel-based concept has been successfully tested on the TechSat Gurwin II spacecraft.

  16. Design and evaluation of single and dual flow thrust vector nozzles with post exit vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Thomas W.; Vaccarezza, Stephen E.; Dobbins, Sean

    1992-01-01

    This Thrust Vectored Research project required that a 1/24 scale model of the F/A-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle, (HARV), propulsion system be constructed on the university campus. This propulsion system was designed for cold flow testing on a multicomponent test rig. Forces and moments were measured to study nozzle performance parameters. The flow visualization technique of color Schlieren photography was performed to investigate the flow phenomena at the nozzle exit. The flow interactions that were identified consisted of vane nozzleing between the outer and lower vanes and vane tip interference. The thrust vectoring system consisted of three asymmetrically spaced vanes installed circumferentially on a maximum afterburner nozzle. The performance of the nozzle was investigated with the outer and lower vanes equally deflected, (-10 deg is less than delta(sub v) is less than 25 deg), and with the upper vane fully retracted, (delta(sub v) equals -10 deg). The nozzle pressure ratio ranged from 4 to 6. The results indicated that a vane nozzleing effect developed at nozzle pressure ratios of 4 and 6 when the outer and lower vanes were deflected far enough into the flow field such that the increase in vane area accelerated the flow past the vanes causing distorted shock waves. This accelerated flow was a result of a pressure differential existing between the inside surface of the vane and the ambient pressure. The stagnation pressure that developed along the inside surface of the vane accelerated the flow past the vanes causing it to equalize with ambient pressure, thus providing distorted shock waves. A tip interference was present at the trailing edge of the upper vane as a result of low nozzle pressure, NPR 4, with high vane deflection, delta(sub v) equals 25 degrees, and also with a high nozzle pressure, NPR 6, and low vane deflections, delta(sub v) equals 15 degrees.

  17. Design and evaluation of single and dual flow thrust vector nozzles with post exit vanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Thomas W.; Vaccarezza, Stephen E.; Dobbins, Sean

    1992-12-01

    This Thrust Vectored Research project required that a 1/24 scale model of the F/A-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle, (HARV), propulsion system be constructed on the university campus. This propulsion system was designed for cold flow testing on a multicomponent test rig. Forces and moments were measured to study nozzle performance parameters. The flow visualization technique of color Schlieren photography was performed to investigate the flow phenomena at the nozzle exit. The flow interactions that were identified consisted of vane nozzleing between the outer and lower vanes and vane tip interference. The thrust vectoring system consisted of three asymmetrically spaced vanes installed circumferentially on a maximum afterburner nozzle. The performance of the nozzle was investigated with the outer and lower vanes equally deflected, (-10 deg is less than delta(sub v) is less than 25 deg), and with the upper vane fully retracted, (delta(sub v) equals -10 deg). The nozzle pressure ratio ranged from 4 to 6. The results indicated that a vane nozzleing effect developed at nozzle pressure ratios of 4 and 6 when the outer and lower vanes were deflected far enough into the flow field such that the increase in vane area accelerated the flow past the vanes causing distorted shock waves. This accelerated flow was a result of a pressure differential existing between the inside surface of the vane and the ambient pressure. The stagnation pressure that developed along the inside surface of the vane accelerated the flow past the vanes causing it to equalize with ambient pressure, thus providing distorted shock waves. A tip interference was present at the trailing edge of the upper vane as a result of low nozzle pressure, NPR 4, with high vane deflection, delta(sub v) equals 25 degrees, and also with a high nozzle pressure, NPR 6, and low vane deflections, delta(sub v) equals 15 degrees.

  18. Quantitative evaluation of a thrust vector controlled transport at the conceptual design phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricketts, Vincent Patrick

    The impetus to innovate, to push the bounds and break the molds of evolutionary design trends, often comes from competition but sometimes requires catalytic political legislature. For this research endeavor, the 'catalyzing legislation' comes in response to the rise in cost of fossil fuels and the request put forth by NASA on aircraft manufacturers to show reduced aircraft fuel consumption of +60% within 30 years. This necessitates that novel technologies be considered to achieve these values of improved performance. One such technology is thrust vector control (TVC). The beneficial characteristic of thrust vector control technology applied to the traditional tail-aft configuration (TAC) commercial transport is its ability to retain the operational advantage of this highly evolved aircraft type like cabin evacuation, ground operation, safety, and certification. This study explores if the TVC transport concept offers improved flight performance due to synergistically reducing the traditional empennage size, overall resulting in reduced weight and drag, and therefore reduced aircraft fuel consumption. In particular, this study explores if the TVC technology in combination with the reduced empennage methodology enables the TAC aircraft to synergistically evolve while complying with current safety and certification regulation. This research utilizes the multi-disciplinary parametric sizing software, AVD Sizing, developed by the Aerospace Vehicle Design (AVD) Laboratory. The sizing software is responsible for visualizing the total system solution space via parametric trades and is capable of determining if the TVC technology can enable the TAC aircraft to synergistically evolve, showing marked improvements in performance and cost. This study indicates that the TVC plus reduced empennage methodology shows marked improvements in performance and cost.

  19. Computational Study of Fluidic Thrust Vectoring using Separation Control in a Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deere, Karen; Berrier, Bobby L.; Flamm, Jeffrey D.; Johnson, Stuart K.

    2003-01-01

    A computational investigation of a two- dimensional nozzle was completed to assess the use of fluidic injection to manipulate flow separation and cause thrust vectoring of the primary jet thrust. The nozzle was designed with a recessed cavity to enhance the throat shifting method of fluidic thrust vectoring. The structured-grid, computational fluid dynamics code PAB3D was used to guide the design and analyze over 60 configurations. Nozzle design variables included cavity convergence angle, cavity length, fluidic injection angle, upstream minimum height, aft deck angle, and aft deck shape. All simulations were computed with a static freestream Mach number of 0.05. a nozzle pressure ratio of 3.858, and a fluidic injection flow rate equal to 6 percent of the primary flow rate. Results indicate that the recessed cavity enhances the throat shifting method of fluidic thrust vectoring and allows for greater thrust-vector angles without compromising thrust efficiency.

  20. Solid rocket booster thrust vector control subsystem test report (D-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagan, B.

    1978-01-01

    The results of the sequence of tests performed on the space shuttle solid rocket booster thrust vector control subsystem are presented. The operational characteristics of the thrust vector control subsystem components, as determined from the tests, are discussed. Special analyses of fuel consumption, basic steady state characteristics, GN2 spin, and actuator displacement were reviewed which will aid in understanding the performance of the auxiliary power unit. The possibility of components malfunction is also discussed.

  1. Static performance investigation of a skewed-throat multiaxis thrust-vectoring nozzle concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, David J.

    1994-01-01

    The static performance of a jet exhaust nozzle which achieves multiaxis thrust vectoring by physically skewing the geometric throat has been characterized in the static test facility of the 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. The nozzle has an asymmetric internal geometry defined by four surfaces: a convergent-divergent upper surface with its ridge perpendicular to the nozzle centerline, a convergent-divergent lower surface with its ridge skewed relative to the nozzle centerline, an outwardly deflected sidewall, and a straight sidewall. The primary goal of the concept is to provide efficient yaw thrust vectoring by forcing the sonic plane (nozzle throat) to form at a yaw angle defined by the skewed ridge of the lower surface contour. A secondary goal is to provide multiaxis thrust vectoring by combining the skewed-throat yaw-vectoring concept with upper and lower pitch flap deflections. The geometric parameters varied in this investigation included lower surface ridge skew angle, nozzle expansion ratio (divergence angle), aspect ratio, pitch flap deflection angle, and sidewall deflection angle. Nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 2 to a high of 11.5 for some configurations. The results of the investigation indicate that efficient, substantial multiaxis thrust vectoring was achieved by the skewed-throat nozzle concept. However, certain control surface deflections destabilized the internal flow field, which resulted in substantial shifts in the position and orientation of the sonic plane and had an adverse effect on thrust-vectoring and weight flow characteristics. By increasing the expansion ratio, the location of the sonic plane was stabilized. The asymmetric design resulted in interdependent pitch and yaw thrust vectoring as well as nonzero thrust-vector angles with undeflected control surfaces. By skewing the ridges of both the upper and lower surface contours, the interdependency between pitch and yaw thrust vectoring may be eliminated

  2. Static internal performance of an axisymmetric nozzle with multiaxis thrust-vectoring capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, George T., Jr.; Capone, Francis J.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the static test facility of the Langley 16 Foot Transonic Tunnel in order to determine the internal performance characteristics of a multiaxis thrust vectoring axisymmetric nozzle. Thrust vectoring for this nozzle was achieved by deflection of only the divergent section of this nozzle. The effects of nozzle power setting and divergent flap length were studied at nozzle deflection angles of 0 to 30 at nozzle pressure ratios up to 8.0.

  3. Flight-Determined Subsonic Longitudinal Stability and Control Derivatives of the F-18 High Angle of Attack Research Vehicle (HARV) with Thrust Vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, Kenneth W.; Wang, Kon-Sheng Charles

    1997-01-01

    The subsonic longitudinal stability and control derivatives of the F-18 High Angle of Attack Research Vehicle (HARV) are extracted from dynamic flight data using a maximum likelihood parameter identification technique. The technique uses the linearized aircraft equations of motion in their continuous/discrete form and accounts for state and measurement noise as well as thrust-vectoring effects. State noise is used to model the uncommanded forcing function caused by unsteady aerodynamics over the aircraft, particularly at high angles of attack. Thrust vectoring was implemented using electrohydraulically-actuated nozzle postexit vanes and a specialized research flight control system. During maneuvers, a control system feature provided independent aerodynamic control surface inputs and independent thrust-vectoring vane inputs, thereby eliminating correlations between the aircraft states and controls. Substantial variations in control excitation and dynamic response were exhibited for maneuvers conducted at different angles of attack. Opposing vane interactions caused most thrust-vectoring inputs to experience some exhaust plume interference and thus reduced effectiveness. The estimated stability and control derivatives are plotted, and a discussion relates them to predicted values and maneuver quality.

  4. Computational Study of an Axisymmetric Dual Throat Fluidic Thrust Vectoring Nozzle for a Supersonic Aircraft Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deere, Karen A.; Flamm, Jeffrey D.; Berrier, Bobby L.; Johnson, Stuart K.

    2007-01-01

    A computational investigation of an axisymmetric Dual Throat Nozzle concept has been conducted. This fluidic thrust-vectoring nozzle was designed with a recessed cavity to enhance the throat shifting technique for improved thrust vectoring. The structured-grid, unsteady Reynolds- Averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver PAB3D was used to guide the nozzle design and analyze performance. Nozzle design variables included extent of circumferential injection, cavity divergence angle, cavity length, and cavity convergence angle. Internal nozzle performance (wind-off conditions) and thrust vector angles were computed for several configurations over a range of nozzle pressure ratios from 1.89 to 10, with the fluidic injection flow rate equal to zero and up to 4 percent of the primary flow rate. The effect of a variable expansion ratio on nozzle performance over a range of freestream Mach numbers up to 2 was investigated. Results indicated that a 60 circumferential injection was a good compromise between large thrust vector angles and efficient internal nozzle performance. A cavity divergence angle greater than 10 was detrimental to thrust vector angle. Shortening the cavity length improved internal nozzle performance with a small penalty to thrust vector angle. Contrary to expectations, a variable expansion ratio did not improve thrust efficiency at the flight conditions investigated.

  5. A Computational Study of a New Dual Throat Fluidic Thrust Vectoring Nozzle Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deere, Karen A.; Berrier, Bobby L.; Flamm, Jeffrey D.; Johnson, Stuart K.

    2005-01-01

    A computational investigation of a two-dimensional nozzle was completed to assess the use of fluidic injection to manipulate flow separation and cause thrust vectoring of the primary jet thrust. The nozzle was designed with a recessed cavity to enhance the throat shifting method of fluidic thrust vectoring. Several design cycles with the structured-grid, computational fluid dynamics code PAB3D and with experiments in the NASA Langley Research Center Jet Exit Test Facility have been completed to guide the nozzle design and analyze performance. This paper presents computational results on potential design improvements for best experimental configuration tested to date. Nozzle design variables included cavity divergence angle, cavity convergence angle and upstream throat height. Pulsed fluidic injection was also investigated for its ability to decrease mass flow requirements. Internal nozzle performance (wind-off conditions) and thrust vector angles were computed for several configurations over a range of nozzle pressure ratios from 2 to 7, with the fluidic injection flow rate equal to 3 percent of the primary flow rate. Computational results indicate that increasing cavity divergence angle beyond 10 is detrimental to thrust vectoring efficiency, while increasing cavity convergence angle from 20 to 30 improves thrust vectoring efficiency at nozzle pressure ratios greater than 2, albeit at the expense of discharge coefficient. Pulsed injection was no more efficient than steady injection for the Dual Throat Nozzle concept.

  6. Pneumatic motor powered Thrust Vector Control (TVC) for liquid propelled launch vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, Mark C.; Evans, P. S.

    1992-02-01

    Recent studies performed for the Titan 4 launch vehicle indicate significant potential advantages in replacing the current stage 1 and 2 recirculating hydraulic TVC (thrust vector control) system with a PMA (pneumatic mechanical actuation) system. Some of the advantages of a PMA system over the recirculating hydraulic system include reduced part count and weight, reduced maintenance and life-cycle cost, and improved mission reliability. PMA technology, used in aircraft applications since the 1960s, is well suited in launch vehicle TVC applications where an existing pneumatic pressure source is available. A typical pneumatic motor TVC consists of a pneumatic power source, a dual rotor pneumatic motor, a gear box, a ball screw actuator, and the associated closed-loop servo-control elements. One key issue with implementing this mechanical approach is designing a TVC system to withstand large load transient disturbances during liquid engine starting. Hydraulic actuator transient loads have exceeded 60,000 lb(sub f) for a 30,000 lb(sub f) stall design actuator during ground starts of the Titan 3B, Stage 1 engine. A PMA TVC system must also withstand these start transients without imparting excessive reaction loads to the engine nozzle and thrust structure. Work completed to date with Martin Marietta to examine pneumatic motor powered TVC options and technology benefits is presented. The load transient issue is discussed along with potential solutions and the associated trades. General background on PMA technology and experience base is also presented.

  7. Internal performance of two nozzles utilizing gimbal concepts for thrust vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrier, Bobby L.; Taylor, John G.

    1990-01-01

    The internal performance of an axisymmetric convergent-divergent nozzle and a nonaxisymmetric convergent-divergent nozzle, both of which utilized a gimbal type mechanism for thrust vectoring was evaluated in the Static Test Facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. The nonaxisymmetric nozzle used the gimbal concept for yaw thrust vectoring only; pitch thrust vectoring was accomplished by simultaneous deflection of the upper and lower divergent flaps. The model geometric parameters investigated were pitch vector angle for the axisymmetric nozzle and pitch vector angle, yaw vector angle, nozzle throat aspect ratio, and nozzle expansion ratio for the nonaxisymmetric nozzle. All tests were conducted with no external flow, and nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 2.0 to approximately 12.0.

  8. Static Investigation of a Multiaxis Thrust-Vectoring Nozzle With Variable Internal Contouring Ability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, David J.; Mills, Charles T. L.; Mason, Mary L.

    1997-01-01

    The thrust efficiency and vectoring performance of a convergent-divergent nozzle were investigated at static conditions in the model preparation area of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. The diamond-shaped nozzle was capable of varying the internal contour of each quadrant individually by using cam mechanisms and retractable drawers to produce pitch and yaw thrust vectoring. Pitch thrust vectoring was achieved by either retracting the lower drawers to incline the throat or varying the internal flow-path contours to incline the throat. Yaw thrust vectoring was achieved by reducing flow area left of the nozzle centerline and increasing flow area right of the nozzle centerline; a skewed throat deflected the flow in the lateral direction.

  9. An Experimental/Modeling Study of Jet Attachment during Counterflow Thrust Vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strykowski, Paul J.

    1997-01-01

    Recent studies have shown the applicability of vectoring rectangular jets using asymmetrically applied counterflow in the presence of a short collar. This novel concept has applications in the aerospace industry where counterflow can be used to vector the thrust of a jet's exhaust, shortening take-off and landing distances and enhancing in-flight maneuverability of the aircraft. Counterflow thrust vectoring, 'CFTV' is desirable due to its fast time response, low thrust loss, and absence of moving parts. However, implementation of a CFTV system is only possible if bistable jet attachment can be prevented. This can be achieved by properly designing the geometry of the collar. An analytical model is developed herein to predict the conditions under which a two-dimensional jet will attach to an offset curved wall. Results from this model are then compared with experiment; for various jet exit Mach numbers, collar offset distances, and radii of curvature. Their excellent correlation permits use of the model as a tool for designing a CFTV system.

  10. Robust vibration suppression of an adaptive circular composite plate for satellite thrust vector control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Su; Ma, Kougen; Ghasemi-Nejhad, Mehrdad N.

    2008-03-01

    In this paper, a novel application of adaptive composite structures, a University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM) smart composite platform, is developed for the Thrust Vector Control (TVC) of satellites. The device top plate of the UHM platform is an adaptive circular composite plate (ACCP) that utilizes integrated sensors/actuators and controllers to suppress low frequency vibrations during the thruster firing as well as to potentially isolate dynamic responses from the satellite structure bus. Since the disturbance due to the satellite thruster firing can be estimated, a combined strategy of an adaptive disturbance observer (DOB) and feed-forward control is proposed for vibration suppression of the ACCP with multi-sensors and multi-actuators. Meanwhile, the effects of the DOB cut-off frequency and the relative degree of the low-pass filter on the DOB performance are investigated. Simulations and experimental results show that higher relative degree of the low-pass filter with the required cut-off frequency will enhance the DOB performance for a high-order system control. Further, although the increase of the filter cut-off frequency can guarantee a sufficient stability margin, it may cause an undesirable increase of the control bandwidth. The effectiveness of the proposed adaptive DOB with feed-forward control strategy is verified through simulations and experiments using the ACCP system.

  11. Evaluation of fluidic thrust vectoring nozzle via thrust pitching angle and thrust pitching moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Hirota, M.; Ouchi, K.; Saito, T.

    2016-03-01

    Shock vector control (SVC) in a converging-diverging nozzle with a rectangular cross-section is discussed as a fluidic thrust vectoring (FTV) method. The interaction between the primary nozzle flow and the secondary jet is examined using experiments and numerical simulations. The relationships between FTV parameters [nozzle pressure ratio (NPR) and secondary jet pressure ratio (SPR)] and FTV performance (thrust pitching angle and thrust pitching moment) are investigated. The experiments are conducted with an NPR of up to 10 and an SPR of up to 2.7. Numerical simulations of the nozzle flow are performed using a Navier-Stokes solver with input parameters set to match the experimental conditions. The thrust pitching angle and moment computed from the force-moment balance are used to evaluate FTV performance. The experiment and numerical results indicate that the FTV parameters (NPR and SPR) directly affect FTV performance. Conventionally, FTV performance evaluated by the common method using thrust pitching angle is highly dependent on the location of evaluation. Hence, in this study, we show that the thrust pitching moment, a parameter which is independent of the location, is the appropriate figure of merit to evaluate the performance of FTV systems.

  12. Two-DOF precision platform for spacecraft thrust vector control: control strategies and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Kougen; Ghasemi-Nejhad, Mehrdad N.

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents control strategies and simulations of a two-DOF precision platform as an adaptive thruster mount structure with precision positioning and active vibration suppression capabilities for thrust vector control of space satellites. First, the configuration of the two-DOF precision platform is introduced, which is an intelligent tripod with two in-plane rotational degrees of freedom for the top device-plate. Precision positioning of this platform is achieved using active members that extend or contract to tilt the top device-plate where the thruster is mounted. Kinematic analysis of the platform is then presented and followed by two control strategies; namely local control strategy and global control strategy. In the local control strategy, the motion of each active member is controlled locally according to the kinematical feature of the platform and the local sensor information to achieve the desired tilt of the top device-plate. In the global control strategy, the motion of each active member is adjusted according to the system level information from a tilt sensor. Fuzzy logic control is employed and the two control strategies are simulated and compared.

  13. Solid rocket booster thrust vector control subsystem verification test (V-2) report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagan, B.

    1979-01-01

    The results of the verification testing sequence V-2 performed on the space shuttle solid rocket booster thrust vector control subsystem are presented. A detailed history of the hot firings plus additional discussion of the auxiliary power unit and the hydraulic component performance is presented. The test objectives, data, and conclusions are included.

  14. Design Specification for a Thrust-Vectoring, Actuated-Nose-Strake Flight Control Law for the High-Alpha Research Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, Barton J.; Carzoo, Susan W.; Davidson, John B.; Hoffler, Keith D.; Lallman, Frederick J.; Messina, Michael D.; Murphy, Patrick C.; Ostroff, Aaron J.; Proffitt, Melissa S.; Yeager, Jessie C.; Foster, John V.; Bundick, W. Thomas; Connelly, Patrick J.; Kelly, John W.; Pahle, Joseph W.; Thomas, Michael; Wichman, Keith D.; Wilson, R. Joseph

    1996-01-01

    Specifications for a flight control law are delineated in sufficient detail to support coding the control law in flight software. This control law was designed for implementation and flight test on the High-Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV), which is an F/A-18 aircraft modified to include an experimental multi-axis thrust-vectoring system and actuated nose strakes for enhanced rolling (ANSER). The control law, known as the HARV ANSER Control Law, was designed to utilize a blend of conventional aerodynamic control effectors, thrust vectoring, and actuated nose strakes to provide increased agility and good handling qualities throughout the HARV flight envelope, including angles of attack up to 70 degrees.

  15. Development of a three axis fluidic airspeed sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neradka, V. F.

    1972-01-01

    A three axis fluidic airspeed sensor system has been fabricated and wind tunnel tested. The complete system consists of the fluidic sensor, air power supply and instrumentation and readout. The system is adapted to aircraft and requires only the standard aircraft 28V dc supply to function.

  16. Design Enhancements of the Two-Dimensional, Dual Throat Fluidic Thrust Vectoring Nozzle Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flamm, Jeffrey D.; Deere, Karen A.; Mason, Mary L.; Berrier, Bobby L.; Johnson, Stuart K.

    2006-01-01

    A Dual Throat Nozzle fluidic thrust vectoring technique that achieves higher thrust-vectoring efficiencies than other fluidic techniques, without sacrificing thrust efficiency has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The nozzle concept was designed with the aid of the structured-grid, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes computational fluidic dynamics code PAB3D. This new concept combines the thrust efficiency of sonic-plane skewing with increased thrust-vectoring efficiencies obtained by maximizing pressure differentials in a separated cavity located downstream of the nozzle throat. By injecting secondary flow asymmetrically at the upstream minimum area, a new aerodynamic minimum area is formed downstream of the geometric minimum and the sonic line is skewed, thus vectoring the exhaust flow. The nozzle was tested in the NASA Langley Research Center Jet Exit Test Facility. Internal nozzle performance characteristics were defined for nozzle pressure ratios up to 10, with a range of secondary injection flow rates up to 10 percent of the primary flow rate. Most of the data included in this paper shows the effect of secondary injection rate at a nozzle pressure ratio of 4. The effects of modifying cavity divergence angle, convergence angle and cavity shape on internal nozzle performance were investigated, as were effects of injection geometry, hole or slot. In agreement with computationally predicted data, experimental data verified that decreasing cavity divergence angle had a negative impact and increasing cavity convergence angle had a positive impact on thrust vector angle and thrust efficiency. A curved cavity apex provided improved thrust ratios at some injection rates. However, overall nozzle performance suffered with no secondary injection. Injection holes were more efficient than the injection slot over the range of injection rates, but the slot generated larger thrust vector angles for injection rates less than 4 percent of the primary flow rate.

  17. A Method for Integrating Thrust-Vectoring and Actuated Forebody Strakes with Conventional Aerodynamic Controls on a High-Performance Fighter Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lallman, Frederick J.; Davidson, John B.; Murphy, Patrick C.

    1998-01-01

    A method, called pseudo controls, of integrating several airplane controls to achieve cooperative operation is presented. The method eliminates conflicting control motions, minimizes the number of feedback control gains, and reduces the complication of feedback gain schedules. The method is applied to the lateral/directional controls of a modified high-performance airplane. The airplane has a conventional set of aerodynamic controls, an experimental set of thrust-vectoring controls, and an experimental set of actuated forebody strakes. The experimental controls give the airplane additional control power for enhanced stability and maneuvering capabilities while flying over an expanded envelope, especially at high angles of attack. The flight controls are scheduled to generate independent body-axis control moments. These control moments are coordinated to produce stability-axis angular accelerations. Inertial coupling moments are compensated. Thrust-vectoring controls are engaged according to their effectiveness relative to that of the aerodynamic controls. Vane-relief logic removes steady and slowly varying commands from the thrust-vectoring controls to alleviate heating of the thrust turning devices. The actuated forebody strakes are engaged at high angles of attack. This report presents the forward-loop elements of a flight control system that positions the flight controls according to the desired stability-axis accelerations. This report does not include the generation of the required angular acceleration commands by means of pilot controls or the feedback of sensed airplane motions.

  18. Three-axis adjustable loading structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, E. J.; Gray, D. T. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A three axis adjustable loading structure for testing the movable surfaces of aircraft by applying pressure, is described. The device has three electric drives where the wall angle, horizontal position, and vertical position of the test device can be rapidly and accurately positioned.

  19. Development and test of electromechanical actuators for thrust vector control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weir, Rae A.; Cowan, John R.

    1993-06-01

    A road map of milestones toward the goal of a full scale Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor/Flight Support Motor (RSRM/FSM) hot fire test is discussed. These milestones include: component feasibility, full power system demonstration, SSME hot fire tests, and RSRM hot fire tests. The participation of the Marshall Space Flight Center is emphasized.

  20. Development and test of electromechanical actuators for thrust vector control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weir, Rae A.; Cowan, John R.

    1993-01-01

    A road map of milestones toward the goal of a full scale Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor/Flight Support Motor (RSRM/FSM) hot fire test is discussed. These milestones include: component feasibility, full power system demonstration, SSME hot fire tests, and RSRM hot fire tests. The participation of the Marshall Space Flight Center is emphasized.

  1. Optimal Pitch Thrust-Vector Angle and Benefits for all Flight Regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilyard, Glenn B.; Bolonkin, Alexander

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center is exploring the optimum thrust-vector angle on aircraft. Simple aerodynamic performance models for various phases of aircraft flight are developed and optimization equations and algorithms are presented in this report. Results of optimal angles of thrust vectors and associated benefits for various flight regimes of aircraft (takeoff, climb, cruise, descent, final approach, and landing) are given. Results for a typical wide-body transport aircraft are also given. The benefits accruable for this class of aircraft are small, but the technique can be applied to other conventionally configured aircraft. The lower L/D aerodynamic characteristics of fighters generally would produce larger benefits than those produced for transport aircraft.

  2. Three axis control of an experimental platform using CMGs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Akio; Kurokawa, Haruhisa; Kokaji, Shigeru

    A three axis attitude control system was designed using exact linearization. We study the effect of inertia moment variation and sensor noise in exact linearization and show that it is expressed as parameter changes and disturbances in a linearized system. A robust attitude control system has been realized by applying robust model matching, which is a control method for a linear system. The control system was evaluated by computer simulations and ground experiments using control moment gyros, and robustness was verified.

  3. Translation Optics for 30 cm Ion Engine Thrust Vector Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haag, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Data were obtained from a 30 cm xenon ion thruster in which the accelerator grid was translated in the radial plane. The thruster was operated at three different throttle power levels, and the accelerator grid was incrementally translated in the X, Y, and azimuthal directions. Plume data was obtained downstream from the thruster using a Faraday probe mounted to a positioning system. Successive probe sweeps revealed variations in the plume direction. Thruster perveance, electron backstreaming limit, accelerator current, and plume deflection angle were taken at each power level, and for each accelerator grid position. Results showed that the thruster plume could easily be deflected up to six degrees without a prohibitive increase in accelerator impingement current. Results were similar in both X and Y direction.

  4. Multiaxis aircraft control power from thrust vectoring at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, F. J.; Mason, M. L.

    1986-01-01

    Extensive research programs conducted at the Langley Research Center have shown that thrust vectoring can be provided by multifunction (nonaxisymmetric) nozzles. Most of this research has been conducted on pitch vectoring at both static and forward flight conditions. Recent efforts have been aimed at evaluating yaw vectoring concepts at static (wind off) conditions. This paper summarizes results for three different twin-engine fighter configurations tested over a Mach number range of 0.15 to 2.47 at angles of attack up to 35 deg. The objective of these investigations was to determine the multiaxis control power characteristics provided by thrust vectoring. All three configurations employed two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles which provided pitch vectoring by differential deflection of the upper and lower nozzle divergent flaps. Three different means of yaw vectoring were tested: (1) a translating nozzle sidewall; (2) yaw flaps located in the nozzle sidewalls; and (3) canted nozzles. These investigations were conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel and the Lewis 10x10-Foot Supersonic Tunnel. Longitudinal and direction control power from thrust vectoring was greater than that provided by aerodynamic control effectors at low speed or at high angles of attack.

  5. Vista/F-16 Multi-Axis Thrust Vectoring (MATV) control law design and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwerneman, W. D.; Eller, B. G.

    1994-01-01

    For the Multi-Axis Thrust Vectoring (MATV) program, a new control law was developed using multi-axis thrust vectoring to augment the aircraft's aerodynamic control power to provide maneuverability above the normal F-16 angle of attack limit. The control law architecture was developed using Lockheed Fort Worth's offline and piloted simulation capabilities. The final flight control laws were used in flight test to demonstrate tactical benefits gained by using thrust vectoring in air-to-air combat. Differences between the simulator aerodynamics data base and the actual aircraft aerodynamics led to significantly different lateral-directional flying qualities during the flight test program than those identified during piloted simulation. A 'dial-a-gain' flight test control law update was performed in the middle of the flight test program. This approach allowed for inflight optimization of the aircraft's flying qualities. While this approach is not preferred over updating the simulator aerodynamic data base and then updating the control laws, the final selected gain set did provide adequate lateral-directional flying qualities over the MATV flight envelope. The resulting handling qualities and the departure resistance of the aircraft allowed the 422nd_squadron pilots to focus entirely on evaluating the aircraft's tactical utility.

  6. Static performance of nonaxisymmetric nozzles with yaw thrust-vectoring vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Mary L.; Berrier, Bobby L.

    1988-01-01

    A static test was conducted in the static test facility of the Langley 16 ft Transonic Tunnel to evaluate the effects of post exit vane vectoring on nonaxisymmetric nozzles. Three baseline nozzles were tested: an unvectored two dimensional convergent nozzle, an unvectored two dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle, and a pitch vectored two dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle. Each nozzle geometry was tested with 3 exit aspect ratios (exit width divided by exit height) of 1.5, 2.5 and 4.0. Two post exit yaw vanes were externally mounted on the nozzle sidewalls at the nozzle exit to generate yaw thrust vectoring. Vane deflection angle (0, -20 and -30 deg), vane planform and vane curvature were varied during the test. Results indicate that the post exit vane concept produced resultant yaw vector angles which were always smaller than the geometric yaw vector angle. Losses in resultant thrust ratio increased with the magnitude of resultant yaw vector angle. The widest post exit vane produced the largest degree of flow turning, but vane curvature had little effect on thrust vectoring. Pitch vectoring was independent of yaw vectoring, indicating that multiaxis thrust vectoring is feasible for the nozzle concepts tested.

  7. Fabrication and characterization of polymeric three-axis thermal accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Cátia; Noh, Jong; Fonseca, Helder; Pontes, António; Gaspar, João; Alexandre Rocha, Luis

    2015-08-01

    The concept, fabrication process, and characterization of a three-axis thermal accelerometer are presented in this paper. A combination of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology with microinjection molding enables the realization of functional, highly complex 3D geometries at the microscale, used here for the fabrication of a fully integrated three-axis accelerometer. While conventional thermal accelerometers are silicon based, using MEMS technologies only, the integration of polymeric materials and technologies into the fabrication process can greatly improve the realization of three-axis devices while diminishing the typical thermal losses. Three-axis thermal accelerometers were successfully fabricated by combining the proposed technologies proving the viability of the concept. Fabricated accelerometers show xy-axis sensitivity around 8 mV g-1, a z-axis sensitivity of 2.2 mV g-1 for a power of 45 mW and a 4 Hz bandwidth (bandwidth is based on simulations). Thermal tests performed showed that the heater can sustain up to 280 °C without overheating the remaining structures and damaging the device.

  8. Three-Axis Superconducting Gravity Gradiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, Ho Jung

    1987-01-01

    Gravity gradients measured even on accelerating platforms. Three-axis superconducting gravity gradiometer based on flux quantization and Meissner effect in superconductors and employs superconducting quantum interference device as amplifier. Incorporates several magnetically levitated proof masses. Gradiometer design integrates accelerometers for operation in differential mode. Principal use in commercial instruments for measurement of Earth-gravity gradients in geo-physical surveying and exploration for oil.

  9. Dryden/Edwards 1994 Thrust-Vectoring Aircraft Fleet - F-18 HARV, X-31, F-16 MATV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The three thrust-vectoring aircraft at Edwards, California, each capable of flying at extreme angles of attack, cruise over the California desert in formation during flight in March 1994. They are, from left, NASA's F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV), flown by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center; the X-31, flown by the X-31 International Test Organization (ITO) at Dryden; and the Air Force F-16 Multi-Axis Thrust Vectoring (MATV) aircraft. All three aircraft were flown in different programs and were developed independently. The NASA F-18 HARV was a testbed to produce aerodynamic data at high angles of attack to validate computer codes and wind tunnel research. The X-31 was used to study thrust vectoring to enhance close-in air combat maneuvering, while the F-16 MATV was a demonstration of how thrust vectoring could be applied to operational aircraft.

  10. Static investigation of two fluidic thrust-vectoring concepts on a two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, David J.

    1994-01-01

    A static investigation was conducted in the static test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel of two thrust-vectoring concepts which utilize fluidic mechanisms for deflecting the jet of a two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle. One concept involved using the Coanda effect to turn a sheet of injected secondary air along a curved sidewall flap and, through entrainment, draw the primary jet in the same direction to produce yaw thrust vectoring. The other concept involved deflecting the primary jet to produce pitch thrust vectoring by injecting secondary air through a transverse slot in the divergent flap, creating an oblique shock in the divergent channel. Utilizing the Coanda effect to produce yaw thrust vectoring was largely unsuccessful. Small vector angles were produced at low primary nozzle pressure ratios, probably because the momentum of the primary jet was low. Significant pitch thrust vector angles were produced by injecting secondary flow through a slot in the divergent flap. Thrust vector angle decreased with increasing nozzle pressure ratio but moderate levels were maintained at the highest nozzle pressure ratio tested. Thrust performance generally increased at low nozzle pressure ratios and decreased near the design pressure ratio with the addition of secondary flow.

  11. GRADIO three-axis electrostatic accelerometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernard, A.

    1987-01-01

    Dedicated accelerometers for satellite gravity gradiometry (GRADIO project) are described. The design profits from experience acquired with the CACTUS accelerometer payload of the satellite CASTOR-D5B and studies of highly accurate accelerometers for inertial navigation. The principle of operation, based on a three-axis electrostatic suspension of a cubic proof mass, is well suited for the measurements of accelerations less than 0.0001 m/sec/sec. A resolution better than 10 to the minus 11th power m/sec/sec/sq root Hz is expected.

  12. Evaluation of dual flow thrust vector nozzles with exhaust stream impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Thomas W.; Dobbins, Sean; Vaccarezza, Steven

    1992-01-01

    To supplement previous work performed by NASA, a cold-jet facility was established at the California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo campus. The purpose of this facility is to continue the studies of cold flow multiaxis thrust vectoring conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center. A single nozzle test apparatus was completed and is presently operational. Included are the results of the single flow test envelope that was requested by NASA personnel. Details about the test apparatus are included in the Cal Poly Semi-Annual Progress report.

  13. Experimental Study of a Nozzle Using Fluidic Counterflow for Thrust Vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flamm, Jeffrey D.

    1998-01-01

    A static experimental investigation of a counterflow thrust vectoring nozzle concept was performed. The study was conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center Jet Exit Test Facility. Internal performance characteristics were defined over a nozzle pressure ratio (jet total to ambient) range of 3.5 to 10.0. The effects of suction collar geometry and suction slot height on nozzle performance were examined. In the counterflow concept, thrust vectoring is achieved by applying a vacuum to a slot adjacent to a primary jet that is shrouded by a suction collar. Two flow phenomena work to vector the primary jet depending upon the test conditions and configuration. In one case, the vacuum source creates a secondary reverse flowing stream near the primary jet. The shear layers between the two counterflowing streams mix and entrain mass from the surrounding fluid. The presence of the collar inhibits mass entrainment and the flow near the collar accelerates, causing a drop in pressure on the collar. The second case works similarly except that the vacuum is not powerful enough to create a counterflowing stream and instead a coflowing stream is present. The primary jet is vectored if suction is applied asymmetrically on the top or bottom of the jet.

  14. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the ascent thrust vector control actuator subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. E.; Riccio, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. The independent analysis results for the Ascent Thrust Vector Control (ATVC) Actuator hardware are documented. The function of the Ascent Thrust Vector Control Actuators (ATVC) is to gimbal the main engines to provide for attitude and flight path control during ascent. During first stage flight, the SRB nozzles provide nearly all the steering. After SRB separation, the Orbiter is steered by gimbaling of its main engines. There are six electrohydraulic servoactuators, one pitch and one yaw for each of the three main engines. Each servoactuator is composed of four electrohydraulic servovalve assemblies, one second stage power spool valve assembly, one primary piston assembly and a switching valve. Each level of hardware was evaluated and analyzed for possible failure modes and effects. Criticality was assigned based upon the severity of the effect for each failure mode. Critical failures resulting in loss of ATVC were mainly due to loss of hydraulic fluid, fluid contamination and mechanical failures.

  15. Static investigation of a two-dimensional convergent-divergent exhaust nozzle with multiaxis thrust-vectoring capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, John G.

    1990-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Static Test Facility of the NASA Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the internal performance of two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles designed to have simultaneous pitch and yaw thrust vectoring capability. This concept utilized divergent flap rotation of thrust vectoring in the pitch plane and deflection of flat yaw flaps hinged at the end of the sidewalls for yaw thrust vectoring. The hinge location of the yaw flaps was varied at four positions from the nozzle exit plane to the throat plane. The yaw flaps were designed to contain the flow laterally independent of power setting. In order to eliminate any physical interference between the yaw flap deflected into the exhaust stream and the divergent flaps, the downstream corners of both upper and lower divergent flaps were cut off to allow for up to 30 deg of yaw flap deflection. The impact of varying the nozzle pitch vector angle, throat area, yaw flap hinge location, yaw flap length, and yaw flap deflection angle on nozzle internal performance characteristics, was studied. High-pressure air was used to simulate jet exhaust at nozzle pressure ratios up to 7.0. Static results indicate that configurations with the yaw flap hinge located upstream of the exit plane provide relatively high levels of thrust vectoring efficiency without causing large losses in resultant thrust ratio. Therefore, these configurations represent a viable concept for providing simultaneous pitch and yaw thrust vectoring.

  16. Preliminary Characterization of the Altair Lunar Lander Slosh Dynamics and Some Implications for the Thrust Vector Control Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Allan Y.; Strahan, Alan; Tanimoto, Rebekah; Casillas, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a conceptual design of the Thrust Vector Control (TVC) system and preliminary modeling of propellant slosh, for the Altair Lunar Lander. Altair is a vehicle element of the NASA Constellation Program aimed at returning humans to the moon. Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GN&C) is the measurement and control of spacecraft position, velocity, and attitude in support of mission objectives. One key GN&C function is the commanding of effectors that control attitude and impart delta V on the vehicle, utilizing both reaction control system (RCS) thrusters and throttling and TVC gimbaling of the vehicle main engine. Both the Altair descent and ascent modules carry fuel tanks. During thrusting maneuvers, the sloshing of liquid fuels in partially filled tanks can interact with the controlled system in such a way as to cause the overall system to be unstable. These fuel tanks must be properly placed, relative to the spacecraft's c.m., to avoid any unstable interactions. Following this will be a discussion of propellant slosh modeling work performed for the present vehicle configuration, including slosh frequency and participatory fluid mass predictions. Knowing the range of slosh mode frequencies over mission phases, the TVC bandwidth must be carefully selected so as not to excite the slosh modes at those frequencies. The likely need to increase the damping factor of slosh modes via baffles will also be discussed. To conclude, a discussion of operations procedures aimed at minimizing TVC-slosh interactions will be given.

  17. Three-axis particle impact probe

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.; Smith, Jr., Nelson S.; Utt, Carroll E.

    1992-01-01

    Three-axis particle impact probes detect particle impact vectors along x-, y-, and z-axes by spherical probe head mounted on the outer end of a shaft that is flexibly mounted in silicone rubber at the top of a housing so as to enable motion imparted to the head upon impact to be transmitted to a grounded electrode secured to the shaft within the housing. Excitable electrodes are mounted in the housing in a fixed position, spaced apart from the ground electrode and forming, with the ground electrode, capacitor pairs. Movement of the ground electrode results in changes in capacitance, and these difference in capacitance are used for measurement or derivation of momentum vectors along each of the three axes. In one embodiment, the ground electrode is mounted at the base of the shaft and is secured to a silicone rubber layer at the top of the housing, providing for cantilevered movement. In another embodiment, the shaft is mounted at its mid point in a flexible bushing so that it undergoes pivotal movement around that point.

  18. Three-axis particle impact probe

    SciTech Connect

    Fasching, G.E.; Smith, N.S. Jr.; Utt, C.E.

    1991-04-02

    Three-axis particle impact probes detect particle impact vectors along x-, y-, and z-axes by means of a head mounted on the outer end of a shaft that is flexibly mounted in silicone rubber at the top of a housing so as to enable motion imparted to the head upon impact to be transmitted to a grounded electrode secured to the shaft within the housing. Excitable electrodes are mounted in the housing in a fixed position, spaced apart from the ground electrode and forming, with the ground electrode, capacitor pairs. Movement of the ground electrode results in changes in capacitance, and these differences in capacitance are used for measurement or derivation of momentum vectors along each of the three axes. In one embodiment, the ground electrode is mounted at the base of the shaft and is secured to a silicone rubber layer at the top of the housing, providing for cantilevered movement. In another embodiment, the shaft is mounted at its mid point in a flexible bushing so that it undergoes pivotal movement around that point.

  19. A simple dynamic engine model for use in a real-time aircraft simulation with thrust vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Steven A.

    1990-01-01

    A simple dynamic engine model was developed for use in thrust vectoring control law development and real-time aircraft simulation. Engine dynamics were simulated using a throttle rate limiter and low-pass filter. This paper includes a description of a method to account for axial thrust loss resulting from thrust vectoring and the development of the simple dynamic engine model and its incorporation into the F-18 high alpha research vehicle (HARV) thrust vectoring simulation. The simple dynamic engine model was evaluated at Mach 0.2, 35,000-ft altitude and at Mach 0.7, 35,000-ft altitude. The simple dynamic engine model is within 3 percent of the steady state response, and within 25 percent of the transient response of the complete nonlinear dynamic engine model.

  20. Static internal performance of a two-dimensional convergent nozzle with thrust-vectoring capability up to 60 deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leavitt, L. D.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was conducted at wind-off conditions in the static-test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the internal performance characteristics of a two-dimensional convergent nozzle with a thrust-vectoring capability up to 60 deg. Vectoring was accomplished by a downward rotation of a hinged upper convergent flap and a corresponding rotation of a center-pivoted lower convergent flap. The effects of geometric thrust-vector angle and upper-rotating-flap geometry on internal nozzle performance characteristics were investigated. Nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 1.0 (jet off) to approximately 5.0.

  1. Static internal performance of single-expansion-ramp nozzles with thrust-vectoring capability up to 60 deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrier, B. L.; Leavitt, L. D.

    1984-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted at static conditions (wind off) in the static-test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. The effects of geometric thrust-vector angle, sidewall containment, ramp curvature, lower-flap lip angle, and ramp length on the internal performance of nonaxisymmetric single-expansion-ramp nozzles were investigated. Geometric thrust-vector angle was varied from -20 deg. to 60 deg., and nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 1.0 (jet off) to approximately 10.0.

  2. Closed-Loop Simulation Study of the Ares I Upper Stage Thrust Vector Control Subsystem for Nominal and Failure Scenarios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chicatelli, Amy; Fulton, Chris; Connolly, Joe; Hunker, Keith

    2010-01-01

    As a replacement to the current Shuttle, the Ares I rocket and Orion crew module are currently under development by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). This new launch vehicle is segmented into major elements, one of which is the Upper Stage (US). The US is further broken down into subsystems, one of which is the Thrust Vector Control (TVC) subsystem which gimbals the US rocket nozzle. Nominal and off-nominal simulations for the US TVC subsystem are needed in order to support the development of software used for control systems and diagnostics. In addition, a clear and complete understanding of the effect of off-nominal conditions on the vehicle flight dynamics is desired. To achieve these goals, a simulation of the US TVC subsystem combined with the Ares I vehicle as developed. This closed-loop dynamic model was created using Matlab s Simulink and a modified version of a vehicle simulation, MAVERIC, which is currently used in the Ares I project and was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). For this report, the effects on the flight trajectory of the Ares I vehicle are investigated after failures are injected into the US TVC subsystem. The comparisons of the off-nominal conditions observed in the US TVC subsystem with those of the Ares I vehicle flight dynamics are of particular interest.

  3. Selected Performance Measurements of the F-15 Active Axisymmetric Thrust-vectoring Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orme, John S.; Sims, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    Flight tests recently completed at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center evaluated performance of a hydromechanically vectored axisymmetric nozzle onboard the F-15 ACTIVE. A flight-test technique whereby strain gages installed onto engine mounts provided for the direct measurement of thrust and vector forces has proven to be extremely valuable. Flow turning and thrust efficiency, as well as nozzle static pressure distributions were measured and analyzed. This report presents results from testing at an altitude of 30,000 ft and a speed of Mach 0.9. Flow turning and thrust efficiency were found to be significantly different than predicted, and moreover, varied substantially with power setting and pitch vector angle. Results of an in-flight comparison of the direct thrust measurement technique and an engine simulation fell within the expected uncertainty bands. Overall nozzle performance at this flight condition demonstrated the F100-PW-229 thrust-vectoring nozzles to be highly capable and efficient.

  4. Static internal performance including thrust vectoring and reversing of two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Re, R. J.; Leavitt, L. D.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of geometric design parameters on two dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles were investigated at nozzle pressure ratios up to 12 in the static test facility. Forward flight (dry and afterburning power settings), vectored-thrust (afterburning power setting), and reverse-thrust (dry power setting) nozzles were investigated. The nozzles had thrust vector angles from 0 deg to 20.26 deg, throat aspect ratios of 3.696 to 7.612, throat radii from sharp to 2.738 cm, expansion ratios from 1.089 to 1.797, and various sidewall lengths. The results indicate that unvectored two dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles have static internal performance comparable to axisymmetric nozzles with similar expansion ratios.

  5. Static internal performance of a single expansion ramp nozzle with multiaxis thrust vectoring capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, Francis J.; Schirmer, Alberto W.

    1993-01-01

    An investigation was conducted at static conditions in order to determine the internal performance characteristics of a multiaxis thrust vectoring single expansion ramp nozzle. Yaw vectoring was achieved by deflecting yaw flaps in the nozzle sidewall into the nozzle exhaust flow. In order to eliminate any physical interference between the variable angle yaw flap deflected into the exhaust flow and the nozzle upper ramp and lower flap which were deflected for pitch vectoring, the downstream corners of both the nozzle ramp and lower flap were cut off to allow for up to 30 deg of yaw vectoring. The effects of nozzle upper ramp and lower flap cutout, yaw flap hinge line location and hinge inclination angle, sidewall containment, geometric pitch vector angle, and geometric yaw vector angle were studied. This investigation was conducted in the static-test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel at nozzle pressure ratios up to 8.0.

  6. Selected Performance Measurements of the F-15 ACTIVE Axisymmetric Thrust-Vectoring Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orme, John S.; Sims, Robert L.

    1999-01-01

    Flight tests recently completed at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center evaluated performance of a hydromechanically vectored axisymmetric nozzle onboard the F-15 ACTIVE. A flight-test technique whereby strain gages installed onto engine mounts provided for the direct measurement of thrust and vector forces has proven to be extremely valuable. Flow turning and thrust efficiency, as well as nozzle static pressure distributions were measured and analyzed. This report presents results from testing at an altitude of 30,000 ft and a speed of Mach 0.9. Flow turning and thrust efficiency were found to be significantly different than predicted, and moreover, varied substantially with power setting and pitch vector angle. Results of an in-flight comparison of the direct thrust measurement technique and an engine simulation fell within the expected uncertainty bands. Overall nozzle performance at this flight condition demonstrated the F100-PW-229 thrust-vectoring nozzles to be highly capable and efficient.

  7. PAB3D Simulations of a Nozzle with Fluidic Injection for Yaw Thrust-Vector Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deere, Karen A.

    1998-01-01

    An experimental and computational study was conducted on an exhaust nozzle with fluidic injection for yaw thrust-vector control. The nozzle concept was tested experimentally in the NASA Langley Jet Exit Test Facility (JETF) at nozzle pressure ratios up to 4 and secondary fluidic injection flow rates up to 15 percent of the primary flow rate. Although many injection-port geometries and two nozzle planforms (symmetric and asymmetric) were tested experimentally, this paper focuses on the computational results of the more successful asymmetric planform with a slot injection port. This nozzle concept was simulated with the Navier-Stokes flow solver, PAB3D, invoking the Shih, Zhu, and Lumley algebraic Reynolds stress turbulence model (ASM) at nozzle pressure ratios (NPRs) of 2,3, and 4 with secondary to primary injection flow rates (w(sub s)/w(sub p)) of 0, 2, 7 and 10 percent.

  8. Stable three-axis nuclear-spin gyroscope in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajoy, Ashok; Cappellaro, Paola

    2012-12-01

    Gyroscopes find wide applications in everyday life from navigation and inertial sensing to rotation sensors in hand-held devices and automobiles. Current devices, based on either atomic or solid-state systems, impose a choice between long-time stability and high sensitivity in a miniaturized system. Here, we introduce a quantum sensor that overcomes these limitations by providing a sensitive and stable three-axis gyroscope in the solid state. We achieve high sensitivity by exploiting the long coherence time of the 14N nuclear spin associated with the nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond, combined with the efficient polarization and measurement of its electronic spin. Although the gyroscope is based on a simple Ramsey interferometry scheme, we use coherent control of the quantum sensor to improve its coherence time and robustness against long-time drifts. Such a sensor can achieve a sensitivity of η˜0.5(mdegs-1)/Hzmm3 while offering enhanced stability in a small footprint. In addition, we exploit the four axes of delocalization of the nitrogen-vacancy center to measure not only the rate of rotation, but also its direction, thus obtaining a compact three-axis gyroscope.

  9. Fiber-optic three axis magnetometer prototype development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Thomas D.; Mccomb, David G.; Kingston, Bradley R.; Dube, C. Michael; Poehls, Kenneth A.; Wanser, Keith

    1989-01-01

    The goal of this research program was to develop a high sensitivity, fiber optic, interferometric, three-axis magnetometer for interplanetary spacecraft applications. Dynamics Technology, Inc. (DTI) has successfully integrated a low noise, high bandwidth interferometer with high sensitivity metallic glass transducers. Also, DTI has developed sophisticated signal processing electronics and complete data acquisition, filtering, and display software. The sensor was packaged in a compact, low power and weight unit which facilitates deployment. The magnetic field sensor had subgamma sensitivity and a dynamic range of 10(exp 5) gamma in a 10 Hz bandwidth. Furthermore, the vector instrument exhibited the lowest noise level when only one axis was in operation. A system noise level of 1 gamma rms was observed in a 1 Hz bandwidth. However, with the other two channels operating, the noise level increased by about one order of magnitude. Higher system noise was attributed to cross-channel interference among the dither fields.

  10. Computational Issues Associated with Temporally Deforming Geometries Such as Thrust Vectoring Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyalakuntla, Kishore; Soni, Bharat K.; Thornburg, Hugh J.; Yu, Robert

    1996-01-01

    During the past decade, computational simulation of fluid flow around complex configurations has progressed significantly and many notable successes have been reported, however, unsteady time-dependent solutions are not easily obtainable. The present effort involves unsteady time dependent simulation of temporally deforming geometries. Grid generation for a complex configuration can be a time consuming process and temporally varying geometries necessitate the regeneration of such grids for every time step. Traditional grid generation techniques have been tried and demonstrated to be inadequate to such simulations. Non-Uniform Rational B-splines (NURBS) based techniques provide a compact and accurate representation of the geometry. This definition can be coupled with a distribution mesh for a user defined spacing. The present method greatly reduces cpu requirements for time dependent remeshing, facilitating the simulation of more complex unsteady problems. A thrust vectoring nozzle has been chosen to demonstrate the capability as it is of current interest in the aerospace industry for better maneuverability of fighter aircraft in close combat and in post stall regimes. This current effort is the first step towards multidisciplinary design optimization which involves coupling the aerodynamic heat transfer and structural analysis techniques. Applications include simulation of temporally deforming bodies and aeroelastic problems.

  11. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Assessment of the ascent thrust vector control actuator subsystem FMEA/CIL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA effort first completed an analysis of the Ascent Thrust Vector Control Actuator (ATVD) hardware, generating draft failure modes and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. The IOA results were then compared to the NASA FMEA/CIL baseline with proposed Post 51-L updates included. A resolution of each discrepancy from the comparison is provided through additional analysis as required. This report documents the results of that comparison for the Orbiter ATVC hardware. The IOA product for the ATVC actuator analysis consisted of 25 failure mode worksheets that resulted in 16 potential critical items being identified. Comparison was made to the NASA baseline which consisted of 21 FMEAs and 13 CIL items. This comparison produced agreement on all CIL items. Based on the Pre 51-L baseline, all non-CIL FMEAs were also in agreement.

  12. Parametric study of a simultaneous pitch/yaw thrust vectoring single expansion ramp nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schirmer, Alberto W.; Capone, Francis J.

    1989-01-01

    In the course of the last eleven years, the concept of thrust vectoring has emerged as a promising method of enhancing aircraft control capabilities in post-stall flight incursions during combat. In order to study the application of simultaneous pitch and yaw vectoring to single expansion ramp nozzles, a static test was conducted in the NASA-Langley 16 foot transonic tunnel. This investigation was based on internal performance data provided by force, mass flow and internal pressure measurements at nozzle pressure ratios up to 8. The internal performance characteristics of the nozzle were studied for several combinations of six different parameters: yaw vectoring angle, pitch vectoring angle, upper ramp cutout, sidewall hinge location, hinge inclination angle and sidewall containment. Results indicated a 2-to- 3-percent decrease in resultant thrust ratio with vectoring in either pitch or yaw. Losses were mostly associated with the turning of supersonic flow. Resultant thrust ratios were also decreased by sideways expansion of the jet. The effects of cutback corners in the upper ramp and lower flap on performance were small. Maximum resultant yaw vector angles, about half of the flap angle, were achieved for the configuration with the most forward hinge location.

  13. Single-beam three-axis atomic magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haichao; Dong, Haifeng; Chen, Lin; Gao, Yang

    2016-08-01

    A single-beam atomic magnetometer being operated near zero-field and measuring three-axis fields simultaneously is demonstrated. We produce a rotating field on the x-0-y plane with the frequency of 90 Hz and a modulation field in the z axis at 130 Hz. The rotating field enables a nonzero z axis output when the transverse fields are zeroed using feedback systems. Based on the phase difference of π / 2 , x and y axes fields can be measured using one lock-in amplifier. Magnetic field sensitivities of 300 fT/Hz1/2 in x and y axes and 3 pT/Hz1/2 in the z axis are achieved.

  14. A simple dynamic engine model for use in a real-time aircraft simulation with thrust vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Steven A.

    1990-01-01

    A simple dynamic engine model was developed at the NASA Ames Research Center, Dryden Flight Research Facility, for use in thrust vectoring control law development and real-time aircraft simulation. The simple dynamic engine model of the F404-GE-400 engine (General Electric, Lynn, Massachusetts) operates within the aircraft simulator. It was developed using tabular data generated from a complete nonlinear dynamic engine model supplied by the manufacturer. Engine dynamics were simulated using a throttle rate limiter and low-pass filter. Included is a description of a method to account for axial thrust loss resulting from thrust vectoring. In addition, the development of the simple dynamic engine model and its incorporation into the F-18 high alpha research vehicle (HARV) thrust vectoring simulation. The simple dynamic engine model was evaluated at Mach 0.2, 35,000 ft altitude and at Mach 0.7, 35,000 ft altitude. The simple dynamic engine model is within 3 percent of the steady state response, and within 25 percent of the transient response of the complete nonlinear dynamic engine model.

  15. A unique three-axis gimbal mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilkert, J. M.; Jonas, Matthew

    2008-04-01

    Future space based deployable telescopes will be subject to non-atmospheric disturbances. Jitter and optical misalignment on a spacecraft can be caused by mechanical noise of the spacecraft, and settling after maneuvers. The introduction of optical misalignment and jitter can reduce the performance of an optical system resulting in pointing error and contributing to higher order aberrations. Adaptive optics can be used to control jitter and higher order aberrations in an optical system. In this paper, wavefront control methods for the Naval Postgraduate School adaptive optics testbed are developed. The focus is on removing structural noise from the flexible optical surface using discrete time proportional integral control with second order filters. Experiments using the adaptive optics testbed successfully demonstrate wavefront control methods, including a combined iterative feedback and gradient control technique. This control technique results in a three time improvement in RMS wavefront error over the individual controllers correcting from a biased mirror position. Second order discrete time notch filters are also used to remove induced low frequency actuator and sensor noise at 2Hz. Additionally a 2 Hz structural disturbance is simulated on a Micromachined Membrane Deformable Mirror and removed using discrete time notch filters combined with an iterative closed loop feedback controller, showing a 36 time improvement in RMS wavefront error over the iterative closed loop feedback alone.

  16. Improved Controller for a Three-Axis Piezoelectric Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Shanti; Palmer, Dean

    2009-01-01

    An improved closed-loop controller has been built for a three-axis piezoelectric positioning stage. The stage can be any of a number of commercially available or custom-made units that are used for precise three-axis positioning of optics in astronomical instruments and could be used for precise positioning in diverse fields of endeavor that include adaptive optics, fabrication of semiconductors, and nanotechnology.

  17. Experimental and Computational Investigation of Multiple Injection Ports in a Convergent-Divergent Nozzle for Fluidic Thrust Vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waithe, Kenrick A.; Deere, Karen A.

    2003-01-01

    A computational and experimental study was conducted to investigate the effects of multiple injection ports in a two-dimensional, convergent-divergent nozzle, for fluidic thrust vectoring. The concept of multiple injection ports was conceived to enhance the thrust vectoring capability of a convergent-divergent nozzle over that of a single injection port without increasing the secondary mass flow rate requirements. The experimental study was conducted at static conditions in the Jet Exit Test Facility of the 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel Complex at NASA Langley Research Center. Internal nozzle performance was obtained at nozzle pressure ratios up to 10 with secondary nozzle pressure ratios up to 1 for five configurations. The computational study was conducted using the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics code PAB3D with two-equation turbulence closure and linear Reynolds stress modeling. Internal nozzle performance was predicted for nozzle pressure ratios up to 10 with a secondary nozzle pressure ratio of 0.7 for two configurations. Results from the experimental study indicate a benefit to multiple injection ports in a convergent-divergent nozzle. In general, increasing the number of injection ports from one to two increased the pitch thrust vectoring capability without any thrust performance penalties at nozzle pressure ratios less than 4 with high secondary pressure ratios. Results from the computational study are in excellent agreement with experimental results and validates PAB3D as a tool for predicting internal nozzle performance of a two dimensional, convergent-divergent nozzle with multiple injection ports.

  18. Fully magnetic sliding mode control for acquiring three-axis attitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, M. Yu.; Roldugin, D. S.; Penkov, V. I.; Tkachev, S. S.; Mashtakov, Y. V.

    2016-04-01

    Satellite equipped with purely magnetic attitude control system is considered. Sliding mode control is used to achieve three-axis satellite attitude. Underactuation problem is solved for transient motion. Necessary attitude is acquired by proper sliding manifold construction. Satellite motion on the manifold is executed with magnetic control system. One manifold construction approach is proposed and discussed. Numerical examples are provided.

  19. An experimental investigation of thrust vectoring two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles installed in a twin-engine fighter model at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, Francis J.; Mason, Mary L.; Leavitt, Laurence D.

    1990-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine thrust vectoring capability of subscale 2-D convergent-divergent exhaust nozzles installed on a twin engine general research fighter model. Pitch thrust vectoring was accomplished by downward rotation of nozzle upper and lower flaps. The effects of nozzle sidewall cutback were studied for both unvectored and pitch vectored nozzles. A single cutback sidewall was employed for yaw thrust vectoring. This investigation was conducted at Mach numbers ranging from 0 to 1.20 and at angles of attack from -2 to 35 deg. High pressure air was used to simulate jet exhaust and provide values of nozzle pressure ratio up to 9.

  20. A charging model for three-axis stabilized spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massaro, M. J.; Green, T.; Ling, D.

    1977-01-01

    A charging model was developed for geosynchronous, three-axis stabilized spacecraft when under the influence of a geomagnetic substorm. The differential charging potentials between the thermally coated or blanketed outer surfaces and metallic structure of a spacecraft were determined when the spacecraft was immersed in a dense plasma cloud of energetic particles. The spacecraft-to-environment interaction was determined by representing the charged particle environment by equivalent current source forcing functions and by representing the spacecraft by its electrically equivalent circuit with respect to the plasma charging phenomenon. The charging model included a sun/earth/spacecraft orbit model that simulated the sum illumination conditions of the spacecraft outer surfaces throughout the orbital flight on a diurnal as well as a seasonal basis. Transient and steady-state numerical results for a three-axis stabilized spacecraft are presented.

  1. Three-axis attitude determination via Kalman filtering of magnetometer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martel, Francois; Pal, Parimal K.; Psiaki, Mark L.

    1988-01-01

    A three-axis Magnetometer/Kalman Filter attitude determination system for a spacecraft in low-altitude Earth orbit is developed, analyzed, and simulation tested. The motivation for developing this system is to achieve light weight and low cost for an attitude determination system. The extended Kalman filter estimates the attitude, attitude rates, and constant disturbance torques. Accuracy near that of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field model is achieved. Covariance computation and simulation testing demonstrate the filter's accuracy. One test case, a gravity-gradient stabilized spacecraft with a pitch momentum wheel and a magnetically-anchored damper, is a real satellite on which this attitude determination system will be used. The application to a nadir pointing satellite and the estimation of disturbance torques represent the significant extensions contributed by this paper. Beyond its usefulness purely for attitude determination, this system could be used as part of a low-cost three-axis attitude stabilization system.

  2. Thrust vectoring effects of a transverse gas injection into a supersonic cross flow of an axisymmetric convergent-divergent nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zmijanovic, V.; Lago, V.; Leger, L.; Depussay, E.; Sellam, M.; Chpoun, A.

    2013-03-01

    The transverse gas injection into the main supersonic flow of an axisymmetric convergent-divergent (C-D) propulsive nozzle is investigated for the fluidic thrust vectoring (FTV) possibilities as the segment part of the CNES "Perseus" project. Truncated ideal contour and conical C-D nozzles with different position and angle of the secondary circular injection port are selected as test models in the current numerical and experimental study. Analytical approach revealed parameters which affect the FTV efficiency, these criterions are further numerically explored and results data of the conical nozzle test cases are compared and coupled with the ones from experiments. It is found that upstream inclined injection has positive effect on vectoring capabilities and that with moderate secondary to primary mass-flow ratios, ranging around 5%, pertinent vector side force is possible to be achieved.

  3. Three-axis atomic magnetometer based on spin precession modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H. C.; Dong, H. F. Hu, X. Y.; Chen, L.; Gao, Y.

    2015-11-02

    We demonstrate a three-axis atomic magnetometer with one intensity-modulated pump beam and one orthogonal probe beam. The main field component is measured using the resonance of the pumping light, while the transverse field components are measured simultaneously using the optical rotation of the probe beam modulated by the spin precession. It is an all-optical magnetometer without using any modulation field or radio frequency field. Magnetic field sensitivity of 0.8 pT/Hz{sup 1∕2} is achieved under a bias field of 2 μT.

  4. Tooth brushing pattern classification using three-axis accelerometer and magnetic sensor for smart toothbrush.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang-Hwi; Lee, Jeong-Whan; Kim, Kyeong-Seop; Kim, Dong-Jun; Kim, Kyungho; Yang, Heui-Kyung; Jeong, Keesam; Lee, Byungchae

    2007-01-01

    The concept of intelligent toothbrush, capable of monitoring brushing motion, orientation through the grip axis, during toothbrushing was suggested in our previous study. In this study, we describe a tooth brushing pattern classification algorithm using three-axis accelerometer and three-axis magnetic sensor. We have found that inappropriate tooth brushing pattern showed specific moving patterns. In order to trace the position and orientation of toothbrush in a mouth, we need to know absolute coordinate information of toothbrush. By applying tilt-compensated azimuth (heading) calculation algorithm, which is generally used in small telematics devices, we could find the inclination and orientation information of toothbrush. To assess the feasibility of the proposed algorithm, 8 brushing patterns were preformed by 6 individual healthy subjects. The proposed algorithm showed the detection ratio of 98%. This study showed that the proposed monitoring system was conceived to aid dental care personnel in patient education and instruction in oral hygiene regarding brushing style. PMID:18002931

  5. Design and Modeling of a Three-axis Piezoresistive Microelectronic Accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benmoussa, N.; Benichou, A.; Ghaffour, K.; Benyoucef, B.

    Micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) for automotive industry and biomedical applications (BioMEMS) have the fastest growth rate within the MEMS market. The Microsystems job market imposes to research laboratories and universities to respond by increasing the quality of MEMS engineering and informatics interdisciplinary training programs. In this fact, our work consists to study and develop a three-axis piezoresistive accelerometer having uniform sensitivities along to three axes. This sensor which is made of a heavy proof mass and four long beams, allow us to obtain high sensitivities, by reducing the resonant frequencies. Uniform axial sensitivities, with a transverse sensitivity, could be obtained using a three-axis sensor. The stress analysis of this sensor was performed in order to determine the positions of the piezoresistances, in the four flexure beams.

  6. A three-axis SQUID-based absolute vector magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Schönau, T.; Schmelz, M.; Stolz, R.; Anders, S.; Linzen, S.; Meyer, H.-G.; Zakosarenko, V.; Meyer, M.

    2015-10-15

    We report on the development of a three-axis absolute vector magnetometer suited for mobile operation in the Earth’s magnetic field. It is based on low critical temperature dc superconducting quantum interference devices (LTS dc SQUIDs) with sub-micrometer sized cross-type Josephson junctions and exhibits a white noise level of about 10 fT/Hz{sup 1/2}. The width of superconducting strip lines is restricted to less than 6 μm in order to avoid flux trapping during cool-down in magnetically unshielded environment. The long-term stability of the flux-to-voltage transfer coefficients of the SQUID electronics is investigated in detail and a method is presented to significantly increase their reproducibility. We further demonstrate the long-term operation of the setup in a magnetic field varying by about 200 μT amplitude without the need for recalibration.

  7. A three-axis SQUID-based absolute vector magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönau, T.; Zakosarenko, V.; Schmelz, M.; Stolz, R.; Anders, S.; Linzen, S.; Meyer, M.; Meyer, H.-G.

    2015-10-01

    We report on the development of a three-axis absolute vector magnetometer suited for mobile operation in the Earth's magnetic field. It is based on low critical temperature dc superconducting quantum interference devices (LTS dc SQUIDs) with sub-micrometer sized cross-type Josephson junctions and exhibits a white noise level of about 10 fT/Hz1/2. The width of superconducting strip lines is restricted to less than 6 μm in order to avoid flux trapping during cool-down in magnetically unshielded environment. The long-term stability of the flux-to-voltage transfer coefficients of the SQUID electronics is investigated in detail and a method is presented to significantly increase their reproducibility. We further demonstrate the long-term operation of the setup in a magnetic field varying by about 200 μT amplitude without the need for recalibration.

  8. Description of the three axis low-g accelerometer package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amalavage, A. J.; Fikes, E. H.; Berry, E. H.

    1978-01-01

    The three axis low-g accelerometer package designed for use on the Space Processing Application Rocket (SPAR) Program is described. The package consists of the following major sections: (1) three Kearfott model 2412 accelerometers mounted in an orthogonal triad configuration on a temperature controlled, thermally isolated cube, (2) the accelerometer servoelectronics (printed circuit cards PC-6 through PC-12), and (3) the signal conditioner (printed circuit cards PC-15 and PC-16). The measurement range is 0 + or - 0.031 g with a quantization of 1.1 x 10 to the 7th power g. The package was flown successfully on six SPAR launches with the Black Brant booster. These flights provide approximately 300 s of free fall or zero-g environment.

  9. Method for spinning up a three-axis controlled spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vorlicek, Preston L. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A three-axis controlled spacecraft (1), typically a satellite, is spun up about its roll axis (20) prior to firing a motor (2), i.e., a perigee kick motor, to achieve the requisite degree of angular momentum stiffness. Thrusters (21) for imparting rotation about the roll axis (20) are activated in open-loop fashion, typically at less than full duty cycle. Cross-axis torques induced by this rotational motion are compensated for by means of closed control loops for each of the pitch and yaw axes (30, 40, respectively). Each closed control loop combines a prebias torque (72) with torques (75, 74) representative of position and rate feedback information, respectively. A deadband (52) within each closed control loop can be widened during the spinup, to conserve fuel. Position feedback information (75) in each of the control loops is disabled upon saturation of the gyroscope associated with the roll axis (20).

  10. Miniature multifunctional high-performance three-axis positioning and scanning platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avirovik, Dragan; Dave, Digant; Priya, Shashank

    2013-03-01

    This study proposes a novel concept for a three-axis positioning and scanning platform that overcomes the existing gap in technology towards meeting the requirements for displacements, resolution, weight carrying capacity and velocity at smaller dimensions. The novelty of this work stems from the fact that our three-axis stage design utilizes only two actuators. This system was developed to meet the specific requirements needed for implementation of Multifunctional Image Guided Surgical (MIGS) platform. Mathematical model accounting for the open and closed loop operation of the stage was developed. The stage can provide displacements between 10-20mm in each axis, resolution of less than 10μm and scanning velocity in the range of 10-40mm/s. It can carry weights up to 10grams while meeting the desired requirements. Additionally, the stage has small footprint (50mm × 50mm × 34mm), modular design and extremely cost-effective fabrication. Integration of computer controlled three-axis stage with MIGS platform will provide the opportunity for conducting intricate surgical procedures using remote control or joystick. We demonstrate novel applications that became possible due to the development of this stage.

  11. Static internal performance of a thrust vectoring and reversing two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle with an aft flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Re, R. J.; Leavitt, L. D.

    1986-01-01

    The static internal performance of a multifunction nozzle having some of the geometric characteristics of both two-dimensional convergent-divergent and single expansion ramp nozzles has been investigated in the static-test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. The internal expansion portion of the nozzle consisted of two symmetrical flat surfaces of equal length, and the external expansion portion of the nozzle consisted of a single aft flap. The aft flap could be varied in angle independently of the upper internal expansion surface to which it was attached. The effects of internal expansion ratio, nozzle thrust-vector angle (-30 deg. to 30 deg., aft flap shape, aft flap angle, and sidewall containment were determined for dry and afterburning power settings. In addition, a partial afterburning power setting nozzle, a fully deployed thrust reverser, and four vertical takeoff or landing nozzle, configurations were investigated. Nozzle pressure ratio was varied up to 10 for the dry power nozzles and 7 for the afterburning power nozzles.

  12. A static investigation of a simultaneous pitch and yaw thrust vectoring 2-D C-D nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, John G.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the static test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the internal performance and flow-turning capability of a two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle. Thrust vectoring in the pitch plane was provided by rotation of the divergent flaps. The exhaust stream was turned in the yaw direction by deflection of yaw flaps hinged at the end of the nozzle sidewalls. The yaw flap hinge location was varied along the divergent region of the nozzle at four locations including the exit plane and the throat plane. The three hinge locations upstream of the nozzle exit plane required the downstream corners of both upper and lower divergent flaps to be cut off to eliminate interference when the yaw flaps were deflected. Three different lengths of yaw flaps were tested at several angles of deflection. The nozzle simulated a dry power setting with an expansion ratio typical of subsonic cruise and was tested at nozzle pressure ratios from 2.0 to 7.0.

  13. Three-axis superconducting gravity gradiometer for sensitive gravity experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, M. Vol; Paik, Ho Jung; Canavan, Edgar R.

    2002-11-01

    Superconducting differential accelerometers have been used to test Newton's inverse square law and have been proposed for other sensitive experiments. These include searches for spin-mass coupling, detecting Earth's gravitomagnetic field, and testing the Equivalence Principle. This article discusses the principle and performance of a sensitive three-axis gravity gradiometer. This device utilizes quantized flux and the Meissner effect to provide stable test mass levitation and signal coupling, and superconducting quantum interference devices to provide very low-noise amplification of the signals. The instrument comprises a total of nine superconducting accelerometers, six linear and three angular. This configuration permits simultaneous measurement of the diagonal components of the gravity gradient tensor as well as platform acceleration in all six degrees of freedom. An analysis of this instrument is presented along with experimental results. Methods to correct for various motion-induced errors are demonstrated. Other error sources are also discussed. The resulting performance of the superconducting gravity gradiometer is 2 x10-11 s-2 Hz-1/2.

  14. Three-axis attitude determination from vector observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuster, M. D.; Oh, S. D.

    1981-01-01

    Two computationally efficient algorithms are presented for determining three-axis attitude from two or more vector observations. The first of these, the TRIAD algorithm, provides a deterministic (i.e., nonoptimal) solution for the attitude based on two vector observations. The second, the QUEST algorithm, is an optimal algorithm which determines the attitude that achieves the best weighted overlap of an arbitrary number of reference and observation vectors. Analytical expressions are given for the covariance matrices for the two algorithms using a fairly realistic model for the measurement errors. The mathematical relationship of the two algorithms and their relative merits are discussed and numerical examples are given. The advantage of computing the covariance matrix in the body frame rather than in the inertial frame (e.g., in terms of Euler angles) is emphasized. These results are valuable when a single-frame attitude must be computed frequently. They will also be useful to the mission analyst or spacecraft engineer for the evaluation of launch-window constraints or of attitude accuracies for different attitude sensor configurations.

  15. Real-Time Attitude Independent Three Axis Magnetometer Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crassidis, John L.; Lai, Kok-Lam; Harman, Richard R.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper new real-time approaches for three-axis magnetometer sensor calibration are derived. These approaches rely on a conversion of the magnetometer-body and geomagnetic-reference vectors into an attitude independent observation by using scalar checking. The goal of the full calibration problem involves the determination of the magnetometer bias vector, scale factors and non-orthogonality corrections. Although the actual solution to this full calibration problem involves the minimization of a quartic loss function, the problem can be converted into a quadratic loss function by a centering approximation. This leads to a simple batch linear least squares solution. In this paper we develop alternative real-time algorithms based on both the extended Kalman filter and Unscented filter. With these real-time algorithms, a full magnetometer calibration can now be performed on-orbit during typical spacecraft mission-mode operations. Simulation results indicate that both algorithms provide accurate integer resolution in real time, but the Unscented filter is more robust to large initial condition errors than the extended Kalman filter. The algorithms are also tested using actual data from the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE).

  16. Multiaxis control power from thrust vectoring for a supersonic fighter aircraft model at Mach 0.20 to 2.47

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, Francis J.; Bare, E. Ann

    1987-01-01

    The aeropropulsive characteristics of an advanced twin-engine fighter aircraft designed for supersonic cruise have been studied in the Langley 16-Foot Tansonic Tunnel and the Lewis 10- by 10-Foot Supersonic Tunnel. The objective was to determine multiaxis control-power characteristics from thrust vectoring. A two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle was designed to provide yaw vector angles of 0, -10, and -20 deg combined with geometric pitch vector angles of 0 and 15 deg. Yaw thrust vectoring was provided by yaw flaps located in the nozzle sidewalls. Roll control was obtained from differential pitch vectoring. This investigation was conducted at Mach numbers from 0.20 to 2.47. Angle of attack was varied from 0 to about 19 deg, and nozzle pressure ratio was varied from about 1 (jet off) to 28, depending on Mach number. Increments in force or moment coefficient that result from pitch or yaw thrust vectoring remain essentially constant over the entire angle-of-attack range of all Mach numbers tested. There was no effect of pitch vectoring on the lateral aerodynamic forces and moments and only very small effects of yaw vectoring on the longitudinal aerodynamic forces and moments. This result indicates little cross-coupling of control forces and moments for combined pitch-yaw vectoring.

  17. Three-axis force actuator for a magnetic bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gondhalekar, Vijay (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    This invention features a three-axis force actuator that axially, radially and rotatably supports a bearing member for frictionless rotation about an axis of rotation generally coincident with a Z-axis. Also featured is a magnetic bearing having such an actuator. The actuator includes an inner member, a magnetic member and a pole assembly having a ring member and four pole extending therefrom. The poles are equi-angular spaced from each other and radially spaced about the Z-axis. The inner member extends along the Z-axis and is a highly magnetic permeable material. The magnetic member is formed about the inner member outer surface, extends along the Z-axis and is configured so one magnetic pole polarity is located at its outer surface and the other polarity pole is located at its inner surface. Preferably, the magnetic member is a radially magnetized permanent magnet. The inner surface of the ring member is magnetically coupled to the magnetic member and a face of each pole is coupled to the bearing member. The magnetic member, the pole assembly, the inner member and the bearing member cooperate to generate a magnetic field that radially and rotatably supports a rotating member secured to the bearing member. The actuator further includes a plurality of electromagnetic coils. Preferably, a coil is formed about each pole and at least 2 coils are formed about the inner member. When energized, the electromagnetic coils generate a modulated magnetic field that stabilizes the rotating member in the desired operational position.

  18. Novel Calibration Algorithm for a Three-Axis Strapdown Magnetometer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan Xia; Li, Xi Sheng; Zhang, Xiao Juan; Feng, Yi Bo

    2014-01-01

    A complete error calibration model with 12 independent parameters is established by analyzing the three-axis magnetometer error mechanism. The said model conforms to an ellipsoid restriction, the parameters of the ellipsoid equation are estimated, and the ellipsoid coefficient matrix is derived. However, the calibration matrix cannot be determined completely, as there are fewer ellipsoid parameters than calibration model parameters. Mathematically, the calibration matrix derived from the ellipsoid coefficient matrix by a different matrix decomposition method is not unique, and there exists an unknown rotation matrix R between them. This paper puts forward a constant intersection angle method (angles between the geomagnetic field and gravitational field are fixed) to estimate R. The Tikhonov method is adopted to solve the problem that rounding errors or other errors may seriously affect the calculation results of R when the condition number of the matrix is very large. The geomagnetic field vector and heading error are further corrected by R. The constant intersection angle method is convenient and practical, as it is free from any additional calibration procedure or coordinate transformation. In addition, the simulation experiment indicates that the heading error declines from ±1° calibrated by classical ellipsoid fitting to ±0.2° calibrated by a constant intersection angle method, and the signal-to-noise ratio is 50 dB. The actual experiment exhibits that the heading error is further corrected from ±0.8° calibrated by the classical ellipsoid fitting to ±0.3° calibrated by a constant intersection angle method. PMID:24831110

  19. Control theory analysis of a three-axis VTOL flight director. M.S. Thesis - Pennsylvania State Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niessen, F. R.

    1971-01-01

    A control theory analysis of a VTOL flight director and the results of a fixed-based simulator evaluation of the flight-director commands are discussed. The VTOL configuration selected for this study is a helicopter-type VTOL which controls the direction of the thrust vector by means of vehicle-attitude changes and, furthermore, employs high-gain attitude stabilization. This configuration is the same as one which was simulated in actual instrument flight tests with a variable stability helicopter. Stability analyses are made for each of the flight-director commands, assuming a single input-output, multi-loop system model for each control axis. The analyses proceed from the inner-loops to the outer-loops, using an analytical pilot model selected on the basis of the innermost-loop dynamics. The time response of the analytical model of the system is primarily used to adjust system gains, while root locus plots are used to identify dominant modes and mode interactions.

  20. Effects of upper-surface blowing and thrust vectoring on low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a large-scale supersonic transport model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, P. L., Jr.; Mclemore, H. C.; Shivers, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    Tests were conducted in the Langley full-scale tunnel to determine the low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a large-scale arrow-wing supersonic transport configured with engines mounted above the wing for upper surface blowing, and conventional lower surface engines with provisions for thrust vectoring. A limited number of tests were conducted for the upper surface engine configuration in the high lift condition for beta = 10 in order to evaluate lateral directional characteristics, and with the right engine inoperative to evaluate the engine out condition.

  1. Three axis vector magnet set-up for cryogenic scanning probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    Galvis, J A; Herrera, E; Guillamón, I; Azpeitia, J; Luccas, R F; Munuera, C; Cuenca, M; Higuera, J A; Díaz, N; Pazos, M; García-Hernandez, M; Buendía, A; Vieira, S; Suderow, H

    2015-01-01

    We describe a three axis vector magnet system for cryogenic scanning probe microscopy measurements. We discuss the magnet support system and the power supply, consisting of a compact three way 100 A current source. We obtain tilted magnetic fields in all directions with maximum value of 5T along z-axis and of 1.2T for XY-plane magnetic fields. We describe a scanning tunneling microscopy-spectroscopy (STM-STS) set-up, operating in a dilution refrigerator, which includes a new high voltage ultralow noise piezodrive electronics and discuss the noise level due to vibrations. STM images and STS maps show atomic resolution and the tilted vortex lattice at 150 mK in the superconductor β-Bi2Pd. We observe a strongly elongated hexagonal lattice, which corresponds to the projection of the tilted hexagonal vortex lattice on the surface. We also discuss Magnetic Force Microscopy images in a variable temperature insert. PMID:25638089

  2. Three axis vector magnet set-up for cryogenic scanning probe microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Galvis, J. A.; Herrera, E.; Buendía, A.; Guillamón, I.; Vieira, S.; Suderow, H.; Azpeitia, J.; Luccas, R. F.; Munuera, C.; García-Hernandez, M.; and others

    2015-01-15

    We describe a three axis vector magnet system for cryogenic scanning probe microscopy measurements. We discuss the magnet support system and the power supply, consisting of a compact three way 100 A current source. We obtain tilted magnetic fields in all directions with maximum value of 5T along z-axis and of 1.2T for XY-plane magnetic fields. We describe a scanning tunneling microscopy-spectroscopy (STM-STS) set-up, operating in a dilution refrigerator, which includes a new high voltage ultralow noise piezodrive electronics and discuss the noise level due to vibrations. STM images and STS maps show atomic resolution and the tilted vortex lattice at 150 mK in the superconductor β-Bi{sub 2}Pd. We observe a strongly elongated hexagonal lattice, which corresponds to the projection of the tilted hexagonal vortex lattice on the surface. We also discuss Magnetic Force Microscopy images in a variable temperature insert.

  3. Autonomous space systems control incorporating automated maneuvers strategies in the presence of parameters uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Mazinan, A H; Shakhesi, S

    2016-05-01

    The research attempts to deal with the autonomous space systems incorporating new automated maneuvers strategies in the presence of parameters uncertainties. The main subject behind the investigation is to realize the high-resolution small amplitude orbital maneuvers via the first control strategy. And subsequently to realize the large amplitude orbital maneuvers via the second control strategy, as well. There is a trajectory optimization to provide the three-axis referenced commends for the aforementioned overactuated autonomous space system to be able to transfer from the initial orbit to its final ones, in finite burn, as long as the uncertainties of key parameters of the system such as the thrust vector, the center of the gravity, the moments of the inertia and so on are taken into real consideration. The strategies performances are finally considered through a series of experiments and a number of benchmarks to be tangibly verified. PMID:26895709

  4. Microfabrication of Three-Axis Tactile Feedback Actuator for Robot-Assisted Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doh, Eunhyup; Yoo, Jihyung; Lee, Hyungkew; Park, Joonah; Yun, Kwang-Seok

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we propose and demonstrate a three-axis tactile feedback actuator using pneumatic balloons for human perception applications such as robot-assisted surgery systems. A tactile actuator is composed of a center structure having four balloons, sidewalls with one lateral balloon on each sidewall, and a bottom structure supporting the center structure. We fabricated the proposed device using flexible poly(dimethylsiloxane) and hard polyurethane with final dimensions of 18 ×18 ×18 mm3. The four balloons on the center structure produce normal tactile display during pneumatic-pressure-assisted inflation. The lateral movement of the center structure driven by sidewall balloons generates a shear tactile display on fingertips. The center deflections of the circular and rectangular balloons were calculated and measured experimentally.

  5. Note: A compact three-axis optical force/torque sensor using photo-interrupters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ji-Chul; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Soohyun

    2013-12-01

    By integrating four photo-interrupters in a cross-shaped structure, we developed a compact three-axis optical force/torque (F/T) sensor. The developed sensor has a diameter of 28 mm and a thickness of 7 mm. Despite simplicity and compactness, the experiments with a prototype of the proposed sensor demonstrate notably high accuracy. The RMS errors are 0.5% ± 0.1% of the maximum vertical force in z-axis, 1.9% ± 0.2% of the maximum torque in x-axis, and 2.0% ± 0.3% of the maximum torque in y-axis. It is expected that the proposed sensor allows cost-effective integration of robot systems requiring compact and multi-axis F/T sensors such as a walking assist robot.

  6. Note: A compact three-axis optical force/torque sensor using photo-interrupters.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Chul; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Soohyun

    2013-12-01

    By integrating four photo-interrupters in a cross-shaped structure, we developed a compact three-axis optical force/torque (F/T) sensor. The developed sensor has a diameter of 28 mm and a thickness of 7 mm. Despite simplicity and compactness, the experiments with a prototype of the proposed sensor demonstrate notably high accuracy. The RMS errors are 0.5% ± 0.1% of the maximum vertical force in z-axis, 1.9% ± 0.2% of the maximum torque in x-axis, and 2.0% ± 0.3% of the maximum torque in y-axis. It is expected that the proposed sensor allows cost-effective integration of robot systems requiring compact and multi-axis F/T sensors such as a walking assist robot. PMID:24387485

  7. Simulation, fabrication and characterization of a three-axis piezoresistive accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amarasinghe, Ranjith; Viet Dao, Dzung; Toriyama, Toshiyuki; Sugiyama, Susumu

    2006-12-01

    This paper presents a miniaturized three-axis piezoresistive accelerometer using bulk micromachining technology. The accelerometer consists of a highly symmetric single-crystalline silicon crossbeam structure with 12 conventional two-terminal p-type piezoresistors diffused on the surface of the beams. The die size of the acceleration chip is 3 mm × 3 mm. In addition, it is significantly smaller than those of previously presented approaches. It measures three components of acceleration up to ± 10 g on three orthogonal axes simultaneously. The average measured sensitivities of the fabricated sensor for accelerations Ax, Ay, Az on the X, Y, Z axes are about 1.14, 1.15, 0.98 mV (V g)-1 respectively. The measurement results show a cross-axis sensitivity of <4%. This sensor is designed for use in biomechanical research applications such as human gesture recognition systems.

  8. Three-axis MEMS Accelerometer for Structural Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbin, E.; Koleda, A.; Nesterenko, T.; Vtorushin, S.

    2016-01-01

    Microelectromechanical system accelerometers are widely used for metrological measurements of acceleration, tilt, vibration, and shock in moving objects. The paper presents the analysis of MEMS accelerometer that can be used for the structural inspection. ANSYS Multiphysics platform is used to simulate the behavior of MEMS accelerometer by employing a finite element model and MATLAB/Simulink tools for modeling nonlinear dynamic systems.

  9. A low-voltage three-axis electromagnetically actuated micromirror for fine alignment among optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Il-Joo; Yoon, Euisik

    2009-08-01

    In this paper, a new three-axis electromagnetically actuated micromirror structure has been proposed and fabricated. It is electromagnetically actuated at low voltage using an external magnetic field. The main purpose of this work was to obtain a three-axis actuated micromirror in a mechanically robust structure with large static angular and vertical displacement at low actuation voltage for fine alignment among optical components in an active alignment module as well as conventional optical systems. The mirror plate and torsion bars are made of bulk silicon using a SOI wafer, and the actuation coils are made of electroplated Au. The maximum static deflection angles were measured as ±4.2° for x-axis actuation and ±9.2° for y-axis actuation, respectively. The maximum static vertical displacement was measured as ±42 µm for z-axis actuation. The actuation voltages were below 3 V for all actuation. The simulated resonant frequencies are several kHz, and these imply that the fabricated micromirror can be operated in sub-millisecond order. The measured radius of curvature (ROC) of the fabricated micromirror is 7.72 cm, and the surface roughness of the reflector is below 1.29 nm which ensure high optical performance such as high directionality and reflectivity. The fabricated micromirror has demonstrated large actuated displacement at low actuation voltage, and it enables us to compensate a larger misalignment value when it is used in an active alignment module. The robust torsion bar and lifting bar structure formed by bulk silicon allowed the proposed micromirror to have greater operating stability. The additional degree of freedom with z-axis actuation can decrease the difficulty in the assembly of optical components and increase the coupling efficiency between optical components.

  10. Development of three-axis inkjet printer for gear sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iba, Daisuke; Rodriguez Lopez, Ricardo; Kamimoto, Takahiro; Nakamura, Morimasa; Miura, Nanako; Iizuka, Takashi; Masuda, Arata; Moriwaki, Ichiro; Sone, Akira

    2016-04-01

    The long-term objective of our research is to develop sensor systems for detection of gear failure signs. As a very first step, this paper proposes a new method to create sensors directly printed on gears by a printer and conductive ink, and shows the printing system configuration and the procedure of sensor development. The developing printer system is a laser sintering system consisting of a laser and CNC machinery. The laser is able to synthesize micro conductive patterns, and introduced to the CNC machinery as a tool. In order to synthesize sensors on gears, we first design the micro-circuit pattern on a gear through the use of 3D-CAD, and create a program (G-code) for the CNC machinery by CAM. This paper shows initial experiments with the laser sintering process in order to obtain the optimal parameters for the laser setting. This new method proposed here may provide a new manufacturing process for mechanical parts, which have an additional functionality to detect failure, and possible improvements include creating more economical and sustainable systems.

  11. Three-axis active magnetic attitude control asymptotical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, M. Yu.; Roldugin, D. S.; Penkov, V. I.

    2015-05-01

    Active magnetic attitude control system providing given inertial attitude is considered. Control algorithm is constructed on the basis of a planar motion model. It decreases attitude discrepancy. Alternative approach is based on the PD-controller design. System behavior is analyzed for specific motion cases and sometimes for specific inertia tensor (axisymmetrical satellite) using averaging technique. Overall satellite angular motion is covered. Necessary attitude is found to be accessible for some control parameters. Stability is proven and optimal algorithm parameters are obtained. Floquet-based analysis is performed to verify and broaden analytical results.

  12. Three-Axis Attitude Control With a Single Wheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A.

    1987-01-01

    Single-device attitude-control system provides stabilization along three axes. Flywheel connected to electronically controlled motor rotates on magnetic bearing. At high rotational speed, small angular displacements about x and y axes, in response to control signals enable storage of relatively large amounts of angular momentum. Angular momentum about z axis stored in changes in rotational speed.

  13. Development of an ultraprecision three axis micromilling machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Wang, Bo; Liang, Yingchun

    2009-05-01

    To meet the requirement for high efficiency machining of the ultra-precision, ultra-smooth micro structured optical surface, an ultra-precision three axes micro milling machine was developed. The overall size of the machine is 600mm×500mm×700mm and all the strokes of three axes are 75mm. To overcome nonlinearity that always exists in conventional servo mechanism driven by ball screw, permanent-magnet linear motor is used to directly drive the aerostatic bearing slide. Linear encoder with 1.2 nm resolution was used as the feedback of position to buildup closed loop control system. The open architected CNC system is composed of the high performance embedded PMAC motion control card and standard industrial PC, and the control algorithm is based on "PID + velocity/acceleration feed forward + notch filter" strategy. Test results indicate that the positioning accuracy of all the three axes is less than +/-0.25μm, and the repetitive positioning accuracy is less than +/-0.2μm. The machine is proved to achieve nanometer scale through step response and sinusoidal signal track. The preparatory milling experiments with micro cemented carbide milling cutter further proves the processing capacity.

  14. Simulator evaluation of a perspective clipped-pole display and a thrust-vector controller for VTOL zero-zero landings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, M. R.; Greif, R. K.

    1975-01-01

    Five pilots participated in a simulator study to evaluate design features of a perspective clipped pole display and a side arm thrust vector controller for potential applications to VTOL zero visibility landings. Analyses of objective measures by a t test for related means showed significant learning effects, but did not show significant performance differences among display conditions. A mean longitudinal touchdown velocity of less than 4 knots, a mean vertical touchdown velocity of less than 1.22m/sec, and a mean longitudinal position error of approximately 15.24 m were attained during the final 10 trials of the experiment. The conclusion that adequate airspeed and altitude cues could be obtained from the glideslope and runway poles is supported by the absence of significant performance differences among display conditions.

  15. Performance of twin two-dimensional wedge nozzles including thrust vectoring and reversing effects at speeds up to Mach 2.20

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, F. J.; Maiden, D. L.

    1977-01-01

    Transonic tunnel and supersonic pressure tunnel tests were reformed to determine the performance characteristics of twin nonaxisymmetric or two-dimensional nozzles with fixed shrouds and variable-geometry wedges. The effects of thrust vectoring, reversing, and installation of various tails were also studied. The investigation was conducted statically and at flight speeds up to a Mach number of 2.20. The total pressure ratio of the simulated jet exhaust was varied up to approximately 26 depending on Mach number. The Reynolds number per meter varied up to 13.20 x 1 million. An analytical study was made to determine the effect on calculated wave drag by varying the mathematical model used to simulate nozzle jet-exhaust plume.

  16. Three-Axis Attitude Estimation With a High-Bandwidth Angular Rate Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David S.; Green, Joseph J.

    2013-01-01

    A continuing challenge for modern instrument pointing control systems is to meet the increasingly stringent pointing performance requirements imposed by emerging advanced scientific, defense, and civilian payloads. Instruments such as adaptive optics telescopes, space interferometers, and optical communications make unprecedented demands on precision pointing capabilities. A cost-effective method was developed for increasing the pointing performance for this class of NASA applications. The solution was to develop an attitude estimator that fuses star tracker and gyro measurements with a high-bandwidth angular rotation sensor (ARS). An ARS is a rate sensor whose bandwidth extends well beyond that of the gyro, typically up to 1,000 Hz or higher. The most promising ARS sensor technology is based on a magnetohydrodynamic concept, and has recently become available commercially. The key idea is that the sensor fusion of the star tracker, gyro, and ARS provides a high-bandwidth attitude estimate suitable for supporting pointing control with a fast-steering mirror or other type of tip/tilt correction for increased performance. The ARS is relatively inexpensive and can be bolted directly next to the gyro and star tracker on the spacecraft bus. The high-bandwidth attitude estimator fuses an ARS sensor with a standard three-axis suite comprised of a gyro and star tracker. The estimation architecture is based on a dual-complementary filter (DCF) structure. The DCF takes a frequency- weighted combination of the sensors such that each sensor is most heavily weighted in a frequency region where it has the lowest noise. An important property of the DCF is that it avoids the need to model disturbance torques in the filter mechanization. This is important because the disturbance torques are generally not known in applications. This property represents an advantage over the prior art because it overcomes a weakness of the Kalman filter that arises when fusing more than one rate

  17. Tunable three-axis magnetoresistance sensor with a spin-polarised current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jui-Hang; Chang, Ching-Ray

    2015-10-01

    A three-axis magnetic tunnel junction sensor with three ferromagnetic layers to achieve a linear and hysteresis-free response is proposed and studied analytically. We show that the orientation of the easy axis of the sensor and the sensitivity are tunable by changing the density of a injected spin-polarised current. Additionally, the sensors integrated in a full Wheatstone bridge can have perpendicular and transverse sensing capability in different initial magnetisation arrangements. A value of 0.35% TMR/Oe is observed in sensing the perpendicular field. These findings indicate that a three-axis sensor can be fabricated more easily on a flat substrate.

  18. Static thrust-vectoring performance of nonaxisymmetric convergent-divergent nozzles with post-exit yaw vanes. M.S. Thesis - George Washington Univ., Aug. 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foley, Robert J.; Pendergraft, Odis C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A static (wind-off) test was conducted in the Static Test Facility of the 16-ft transonic tunnel to determine the performance and turning effectiveness of post-exit yaw vanes installed on two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles. One nozzle design that was previously tested was used as a baseline, simulating dry power and afterburning power nozzles at both 0 and 20 degree pitch vectoring conditions. Vanes were installed on these four nozzle configurations to study the effects of vane deflection angle, longitudinal and lateral location, size, and camber. All vanes were hinged at the nozzle sidewall exit, and in addition, some were also hinged at the vane quarter chord (double-hinged). The vane concepts tested generally produced yaw thrust vectoring angles much less than the geometric vane angles, for (up to 8 percent) resultant thrust losses. When the nozzles were pitch vectored, yawing effectiveness decreased as the vanes were moved downstream. Thrust penalties and yawing effectiveness both decreased rapidly as the vanes were moved outboard (laterally). Vane length and height changes increased yawing effectiveness and thrust ratio losses, while using vane camber, and double-hinged vanes increased resultant yaw angles by 50 to 100 percent.

  19. Dual-waveband MWIR/visible three-axis stabilized sensor suite for submarine optronics masts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, George R.

    1998-10-01

    A dual-band MWIR/Visible Electro-Optic sensor suite has been developed for use in the CM010 family of Optronics Masts, currently being evolved by Pilkington Optronics for the Royal Navy's new Astute Class submarines. The sensor suite features a medium wave IR thermal imaging camera and a broadcast standard color TV camera, both of which view the scene through a common sapphire pressure window. Three-axis stabilization is provided for both sensors, in which pitch and yaw are controlled by a common line-of-sight prism behind the sensor window, while control of roll about the line of sight is achieved by individual optical derotators within the TI and visible band optics. Precision stabilized control is provided in both the MWIR and visible optical chains. The MWIR sensor consists of a diagonally-microscanned 320 X 240 focal plane, the microscan beam deflection being carried out by the TI piezo mirror. The visible sensor, designed for daylight use, consists of three 1024 X 1024 pixel frame transfer CCD focal planes, which in conjunction with variable neutral density filters yield excellent performance over a 103 dynamic range of daylight scene illuminance. Both optical systems provide Fields of View of 3, 6 and 24 degrees, and a Field of Regard covering from -15 degrees in depression to +60 degrees in elevation. Field of view switching is carried out by dual-band afocal optics situated in the common optical path. A 'Quick Look Round' mode allows both sensors to capture imagery through a full 360 degree azimuth sweep for subsequent analysis, with minimal mast exposure time.

  20. Time-optimal three-axis reorientation of asymmetric rigid spacecraft via homotopic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigates the time-optimal rest-to-rest three-axis reorientation of asymmetric rigid spacecraft. First, time-optimal solutions for the inertially symmetric rigid spacecraft (ISRS) three-axis reorientation are briefly reviewed. By utilizing initial costates and reorientation time of the ISRS time-optimal solution, the homotopic approach is introduced to solve the asymmetric rigid spacecraft time-optimal three-axis reorientation problem. The main merit is that the homotopic approach can start automatically and reliably, which would facilitate the real-time generation of open-loop time-optimal solutions for attitude slewing maneuvers. Finally, numerical examples are given to illustrate the performance of the proposed method. For principle axis reorientation, numerical results and analytical derivations show that, multiple time-optimal solutions exist and relations between them are given. For generic reorientation problem, though mathematical rigorous proof is not available to date, numerical results also indicated the existing of multiple time-optimal solutions.

  1. Flexible Piezoelectric Tactile Sensor Array for Dynamic Three-Axis Force Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ping; Liu, Weiting; Gu, Chunxin; Cheng, Xiaoying; Fu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    A new flexible piezoelectric tactile sensor array based on polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film is proposed for measuring three-axis dynamic contact force distribution. The array consists of six tactile units arranged as a 3 × 2 matrix with spacing 8 mm between neighbor units. In each unit, a PVDF film is sandwiched between four square-shaped upper electrodes and one square-shaped lower electrode, forming four piezoelectric capacitors. A truncated pyramid bump is located above the four piezoelectric capacitors to improve force transmission. A three-axis contact force transmitted from the top of the bump will lead to the four piezoelectric capacitors underneath undergoing different charge changes, from which the normal and shear components of the force can be calculated. A series of dynamic tests have been carried out by exerting sinusoidal forces with amplitudes ranging from 0 to 0.5 N in the x-axis, 0 to 0.5 N in the y-axis, and 0 to 1.5 N in the z-axis, separately. The tactile units show good sensitivities with 14.93, 14.92, and 6.62 pC/N in the x-, y-, and z-axes, respectively. They can work with good linearity, relatively low coupling effect, high repeatability, and acceptable frequency response in the range of 5–400 Hz to both normal and shear load. In addition, dynamic three-axis force measurement has been conducted for all of the tactile units. The average errors between the applied and calculated forces are 10.68% ± 6.84%. Furthermore, the sensor array can be easily integrated onto a curved surface, such as robotic and prosthetic hands, due to its excellent flexibility. PMID:27271631

  2. Flexible Piezoelectric Tactile Sensor Array for Dynamic Three-Axis Force Measurement.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ping; Liu, Weiting; Gu, Chunxin; Cheng, Xiaoying; Fu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    A new flexible piezoelectric tactile sensor array based on polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film is proposed for measuring three-axis dynamic contact force distribution. The array consists of six tactile units arranged as a 3 × 2 matrix with spacing 8 mm between neighbor units. In each unit, a PVDF film is sandwiched between four square-shaped upper electrodes and one square-shaped lower electrode, forming four piezoelectric capacitors. A truncated pyramid bump is located above the four piezoelectric capacitors to improve force transmission. A three-axis contact force transmitted from the top of the bump will lead to the four piezoelectric capacitors underneath undergoing different charge changes, from which the normal and shear components of the force can be calculated. A series of dynamic tests have been carried out by exerting sinusoidal forces with amplitudes ranging from 0 to 0.5 N in the x-axis, 0 to 0.5 N in the y-axis, and 0 to 1.5 N in the z-axis, separately. The tactile units show good sensitivities with 14.93, 14.92, and 6.62 pC/N in the x-, y-, and z-axes, respectively. They can work with good linearity, relatively low coupling effect, high repeatability, and acceptable frequency response in the range of 5-400 Hz to both normal and shear load. In addition, dynamic three-axis force measurement has been conducted for all of the tactile units. The average errors between the applied and calculated forces are 10.68% ± 6.84%. Furthermore, the sensor array can be easily integrated onto a curved surface, such as robotic and prosthetic hands, due to its excellent flexibility. PMID:27271631

  3. Robust three-axis attitude stabilization for inertial pointing spacecraft using magnetorquers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celani, Fabio

    2015-02-01

    In this work feedback control laws are designed for achieving three-axis attitude stabilization of inertial pointing spacecraft using only magnetic torquers. The designs are based on an almost periodic model of geomagnetic field along the spacecraft's orbit. Both attitude plus attitude rate feedback and attitude only feedback are proposed. Both feedback laws achieve local exponential stability robustly with respect to large uncertainties in the spacecraft's inertia matrix. The latter properties are proved using general averaging and Lyapunov stability. Simulations are included to validate the effectiveness of the proposed control algorithms.

  4. Three-Axis Time-Optimal Attitude Maneuvers of a Rigid-Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xijing; Li, Jisheng

    With the development trends for modern satellites towards macro-scale and micro-scale, new demands are requested for its attitude adjustment. Precise pointing control and rapid maneuvering capabilities have long been part of many space missions. While the development of computer technology enables new optimal algorithms being used continuously, a powerful tool for solving problem is provided. Many papers about attitude adjustment have been published, the configurations of the spacecraft are considered rigid body with flexible parts or gyrostate-type systems. The object function always include minimum time or minimum fuel. During earlier satellite missions, the attitude acquisition was achieved by using the momentum ex change devices, performed by a sequential single-axis slewing strategy. Recently, the simultaneous three-axis minimum-time maneuver(reorientation) problems have been studied by many researchers. It is important to research the minimum-time maneuver of a rigid spacecraft within onboard power limits, because of potential space application such as surveying multiple targets in space and academic value. The minimum-time maneuver of a rigid spacecraft is a basic problem because the solutions for maneuvering flexible spacecraft are based on the solution to the rigid body slew problem. A new method for the open-loop solution for a rigid spacecraft maneuver is presented. Having neglected all perturbation torque, the necessary conditions of spacecraft from one state to another state can be determined. There is difference between single-axis with multi-axis. For single- axis analytical solution is possible and the switching line passing through the state-space origin belongs to parabolic. For multi-axis, it is impossible to get analytical solution due to the dynamic coupling between the axes and must be solved numerically. Proved by modern research, Euler axis rotations are quasi-time-optimal in general. On the basis of minimum value principles, a research for

  5. A Three-Axis Force Sensor for Dual Finger Haptic Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Marco; Marcheschi, Simone; Salsedo, Fabio; Bergamasco, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    In this work we present the design process, the characterization and testing of a novel three-axis mechanical force sensor. This sensor is optimized for use in closed-loop force control of haptic devices with three degrees of freedom. In particular the sensor has been conceived for integration with a dual finger haptic interface that aims at simulating forces that occur during grasping and surface exploration. The sensing spring structure has been purposely designed in order to match force and layout specifications for the application. In this paper the design of the sensor is presented, starting from an analytic model that describes the characteristic matrix of the sensor. A procedure for designing an optimal overload protection mechanism is proposed. In the last part of the paper the authors describe the experimental characterization and the integrated test on a haptic hand exoskeleton showing the improvements in the controller performances provided by the inclusion of the force sensor. PMID:23202012

  6. Spatiotemporal evaluation of human colon motility using three-axis fluxgates and magnetic markers.

    PubMed

    Córdova-Fraga, T; Carneiro, A A O; de Araujo, D B; Oliveira, R B; Sosa, M; Baffa, O

    2005-11-01

    An alternative method to study the mechanical activity of the human colon in fasting and postprandial states is presented. The method is based on measurements of the magnetic fields produced by a magnetic marker, a small cylindrical NdBFe magnet, when it was ingested by the subjects. A portable magnetic probe, consisting of two digital three-axis fluxgate magnetometers, arranged in a first-order electronic gradiometer, was implemented for this research. Measurements were taken in 16 healthy male subjects. Contractile activity frequency measurements were taken along the colon length, including the ascending, transverse and descending sections, as well as the rectal sigmoidal section. Values for the contractile activity frequency of 2-5 cycles min(-1) were measured. The set-up is simple, low-cost and suitable for use in an unshielded environment. PMID:16594296

  7. The upgrade of the cold neutron three-axis spectrometer IN12 at the ILL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalzl, K.; Schmidt, W.; Raymond, S.; Feilbach, H.; Mounier, C.; Vettard, B.; Brückel, T.

    2016-05-01

    After nearly 40 years of successful operation the cold three-axis spectrometer IN12 at the Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, France, has been relocated to a new position and the primary spectrometer has been upgraded. Latest modern optical components are employed. A new guide in combination with a virtual source concept and a double focusing monochromator guarantee highest flux. With its high unpolarized and polarized neutron flux IN12 allows for demanding experiments. A velocity selector in the guide ensures a clean beam and a very low background. A gain in flux of about an order of magnitude at the sample position has been achieved compared to the previous instrument and IN12's wavelength range now extends far into the warmish region.

  8. Study on grinding of free-form optics surface in three-axis CNC machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Haicheng; Zhang, Yun-long; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Zhibin; Bao, Long-xiang; Su, Ying; Guo, Rui; Liu, Xuan-min

    2014-08-01

    Due to the glass is a type of brittle material, so the high-precision free-form optics of glass material is usually machined by the technical of grinding. In this paper, for the characteristics of the diamond grinding wheel, analyzing the grinding path of free-form optics and mathematical model of the path is established based on the three-axis CNC grinding device. Moreover, the cause of the interference in the process of grinding is analyzed and the methods of avoiding. Finally, based on the above analysis results, through the experiment, the free-form optics surface accuracy was reached to 3.6um, realize the machining of the free-form optics.

  9. Micromachined three-axis thermal accelerometer with a single composite heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahari, Jamal; Leung, Albert M.

    2011-07-01

    A novel three-axis thermal accelerometer is designed, fabricated, and characterized in this paper. The device includes two half sensor plates attached to buckled cantilevers to form out-of-plane structures. Cantilevers are assembled by a single push of a microprobe and preserve their shapes when they latch into stoppers anchored to the substrate. The fabrication process is based on surface micromachining on silicon substrates using polyimide as the structural layer and amorphous silicon as the sacrificial layer. The fabricated devices are individually packaged and characterized. Using a total heater power of 2.5 mW, the X, Y, and Z axes, respectively, showed sensitivities of 66, 64, and 25 µV g-1. Compared to the earlier versions of the same class accelerometers, the fabricated single heater accelerometer demonstrates more than fourfold sensitivity improvement.

  10. Self-Locking Avoidance and Stiffness Compensation of a Three-Axis Micromachined Electrostatically Suspended Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yonggang; Sun, Boqian; Han, Fengtian

    2016-01-01

    A micromachined electrostatically-suspended accelerometer (MESA) is a kind of three-axis inertial sensor based on fully-contactless electrostatic suspension of the proof mass (PM). It has the potential to offer broad bandwidth, high sensitivity, wide dynamic range and, thus, would be perfectly suited for land seismic acquisition. Previous experiments showed that it is hard to lift up the PM successfully during initial levitation as the mass needs to be levitated simultaneously in all six degrees of freedom (DoFs). By analyzing the coupling electrostatic forces and torques between three lateral axes, it is found there exists a self-locking zone due to the cross-axis coupling effect. To minimize the cross-axis coupling and solve the initial levitation problem, this paper proposes an effective control scheme by delaying the operation of one lateral actuator. The experimental result demonstrates that the PM can be levitated up with six-DoF suspension operation at any initial position. We also propose a feed-forward compensation approach to minimize the negative stiffness effect inherent in electrostatic suspension. The experiment results demonstrate that a more broadband linear amplitude-frequency response and higher suspension stiffness can be achieved, which is crucial to maintain high vector fidelity for potential use as a three-component MEMS geophone. The preliminary performance tests of the three-axis linear accelerometer were conducted under normal atmospheric pressure and room temperature. The main results and noise analysis are presented. It is shown that vacuum packaging of the MEMS sensor is essential to extend the bandwidth and lower the noise floor, especially for low-noise seismic data acquisition. PMID:27213376

  11. Self-Locking Avoidance and Stiffness Compensation of a Three-Axis Micromachined Electrostatically Suspended Accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yonggang; Sun, Boqian; Han, Fengtian

    2016-01-01

    A micromachined electrostatically-suspended accelerometer (MESA) is a kind of three-axis inertial sensor based on fully-contactless electrostatic suspension of the proof mass (PM). It has the potential to offer broad bandwidth, high sensitivity, wide dynamic range and, thus, would be perfectly suited for land seismic acquisition. Previous experiments showed that it is hard to lift up the PM successfully during initial levitation as the mass needs to be levitated simultaneously in all six degrees of freedom (DoFs). By analyzing the coupling electrostatic forces and torques between three lateral axes, it is found there exists a self-locking zone due to the cross-axis coupling effect. To minimize the cross-axis coupling and solve the initial levitation problem, this paper proposes an effective control scheme by delaying the operation of one lateral actuator. The experimental result demonstrates that the PM can be levitated up with six-DoF suspension operation at any initial position. We also propose a feed-forward compensation approach to minimize the negative stiffness effect inherent in electrostatic suspension. The experiment results demonstrate that a more broadband linear amplitude-frequency response and higher suspension stiffness can be achieved, which is crucial to maintain high vector fidelity for potential use as a three-component MEMS geophone. The preliminary performance tests of the three-axis linear accelerometer were conducted under normal atmospheric pressure and room temperature. The main results and noise analysis are presented. It is shown that vacuum packaging of the MEMS sensor is essential to extend the bandwidth and lower the noise floor, especially for low-noise seismic data acquisition. PMID:27213376

  12. Thermomechanical Actuator-Based Three-Axis Optical Scanner for High-Speed Two-Photon Endomicroscope Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shih-Chi; Choi, Heejin; So, Peter T. C.; Culpepper, Martin L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the design and characterization of a three-axis thermomechanical actuator-based endoscopic scanner for obtaining ex vivo two-photon images. The scanner consisted of two sub-systems: 1) an optical system (prism, gradient index lens, and optical fiber) that was used to deliver and collect light during imaging and 2) a small-scale silicon electromechanical scanner that could raster scan the focal point of the optics through a specimen. The scanner can be housed within a 7 mm Ø endoscope port and can scan at the speed of 3 kHz × 100 Hz × 30 Hz along three axes throughout a 125 × 125 × 100 μm3 volume. The high-speed thermomechanical actuation was achieved through the use of geometric contouring, pulsing technique, and mechanical frequency multiplication (MFM), where MFM is a new method for increasing the device cycling speed by pairing actuators of unequal forward and returning stroke speeds. Sample cross-sectional images of 15-μm fluorescent beads are presented to demonstrate the resolution and optical cross-sectioning capability of the two-photon imaging system. PMID:25673965

  13. A Study on Aircraft Engine Control Systems for Integrated Flight and Propulsion Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamane, Hideaki; Matsunaga, Yasushi; Kusakawa, Takeshi; Yasui, Hisako

    The Integrated Flight and Propulsion Control (IFPC) for a highly maneuverable aircraft and a fighter-class engine with pitch/yaw thrust vectoring is described. Of the two IFPC functions the aircraft maneuver control utilizes the thrust vectoring based on aerodynamic control surfaces/thrust vectoring control allocation specified by the Integrated Control Unit (ICU) of a FADEC (Full Authority Digital Electronic Control) system. On the other hand in the Performance Seeking Control (PSC) the ICU identifies engine's various characteristic changes, optimizes manipulated variables and finally adjusts engine control parameters in cooperation with the Engine Control Unit (ECU). It is shown by hardware-in-the-loop simulation that the thrust vectoring can enhance aircraft maneuverability/agility and that the PSC can improve engine performance parameters such as SFC (specific fuel consumption), thrust and gas temperature.

  14. Calibration of QM-MOURA three-axis magnetometer and gradiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Michelena, M.; Sanz, R.; Cerdán, M. F.; Fernández, A. B.

    2015-01-01

    MOURA instrument is a three-axis magnetometer and gradiometer designed and developed for Mars MetNet Precursor mission. The initial scientific goal of the instrument is to measure the local magnetic field in the surroundings of the lander i.e. to characterize the magnetic environment generated by the remanent magnetization of the crust and the superimposed daily variations of the field produced either by the solar wind incidence or by the thermomagnetic variations. Therefore, the qualification model (QM) will be tested in representative scenarios like magnetic surveys on terrestrial analogues of Mars and monitoring solar events, with the aim to achieve some experience prior to the arrival to Mars. In this work, we present a practical first approach for calibration of the instrument in the laboratory; a finer correction after the comparison of MOURA data with those of a reference magnetometer located in San Pablo de los Montes (SPT) INTERMAGNET Observatory; and a comparative recording of a geomagnetic storm as a demonstration of the compliance of the instrument capabilities with the scientific objectives.

  15. Three-axis optical force plate for studies in small animal locomotor mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, S. Tonia

    2006-05-15

    The use of force plates to measure whole-body locomotor mechanics is a well-established technique. However, commercially available force plates are not sensitive enough for use on small-bodied vertebrates or invertebrates. The standard design for single- and multiple-axis, high-sensitivity force plates built by individual research groups uses semiconductor foil strain gauges to measure deflections; yet foil strain gauges are highly temperature and position sensitive, resulting in a drifting base line and nonlinear responses. I present here a design for a three-axis optical force plate that was successfully calibrated to measure forces as small as 1.5 mN and is capable of determining the position of center of pressure with a mean error of 0.07 cm along the X axis and 0.13 cm along the Y axis. Using optical sensors instead of foil strain gauges to measure deflection, this force plate is not subject to temperature-related drift and is more robust against slight positioning inaccuracies. This force plate was used to measure forces produced by amphibious fishes weighing less than 2 g as they jumped off the force platform.

  16. Three-axis optical force plate for studies in small animal locomotor mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, S. Tonia

    2006-05-01

    The use of force plates to measure whole-body locomotor mechanics is a well-established technique. However, commercially available force plates are not sensitive enough for use on small-bodied vertebrates or invertebrates. The standard design for single- and multiple-axis, high-sensitivity force plates built by individual research groups uses semiconductor foil strain gauges to measure deflections; yet foil strain gauges are highly temperature and position sensitive, resulting in a drifting base line and nonlinear responses. I present here a design for a three-axis optical force plate that was successfully calibrated to measure forces as small as 1.5mN and is capable of determining the position of center of pressure with a mean error of 0.07cm along the X axis and 0.13cm along the Y axis. Using optical sensors instead of foil strain gauges to measure deflection, this force plate is not subject to temperature-related drift and is more robust against slight positioning inaccuracies. This force plate was used to measure forces produced by amphibious fishes weighing less than 2g as they jumped off the force platform.

  17. Design and fabrication of a three-axis multilayer gradient coil for magnetic resonance microscopy of mice.

    PubMed

    Chronik, B; Alejski, A; Rutt, B K

    2000-06-01

    There is great interest in the non-destructive capabilities of magnetic resonance microscopy for studying murine models of both disease and normal function; however, these studies place extreme demands on the MR hardware, most notably the gradient field system. We designed, using constrained current minimum inductance methods, and fabricated a complete, unshielded three-axis gradient coil set that utilizes interleaved, multilayer axes to achieve maximum gradient strengths of over 2000 mT m(-1) in rise times of less than 50 micros with an inner coil diameter of 5 cm. The coil was wire-wound using a rectangular wire that minimizes the deposited power for a given gradient efficiency. Water cooling was also incorporated into the coil to assist in thermal management. The duty cycle for the most extreme cases of single shot echo planar imaging (EPI) is limited by the thermal response and expressions for maximum rates of image collection are given for burst and continuous modes of operation. The final coil is capable of the collection of single shot EPI images with 6 mm field of view and 94 microm isotropic voxels at imaging rates exceeding 50 s(-1). PMID:10873203

  18. Design and fabrication of a three-axis edge ROU head and neck gradient coil.

    PubMed

    Chronik, B A; Alejski, A; Rutt, B K

    2000-12-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of a complete three-axis gradient coil capable of imaging the human neck is described. The analytic method of constrained current minimum inductance (CCMI) was used to position the uniform region of the gradient coil adjacent to and extending beyond the physical edge of the coil. The average gradient efficiency of the three balanced axes is 0.37 mT/m/A and the average inductance is 827 microH. With maximum amplifier current of 200A and receive signal sweep width of +/-125 kHz, the average minimum FOV using this gradient set is 7.9 cm. The completed coil has an inner diameter of 32 cm, an outer diameter of 42 cm, and a length (including cabling connections) of 80 cm. The entire coil was built in-house. The structure is actively water cooled. Heating measurements were made to characterize the thermal response of the coil under various operating conditions and it was determined that a continuous current of 100A could be passed through all three axes simultaneously without increasing the internal coil temperature by more than 23 degrees C. Eddy current measurements were made for all axes. With digital compensation, the gradient eddy current components could be adequately compensated. A large B(o) eddy current field is produced by the Gz axis that could be corrected through the use of an auxiliary B(o) compensation coil. Preliminary imaging results are shown in both phantoms and human subjects. PMID:11108634

  19. A novel stress isolation guard-ring design for the improvement of a three-axis piezoresistive accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Hsieh-Shen; Chang, Heng-Chung; Hu, Chih-Fan; Cheng, Chao-Lin; Fang, Weileun

    2011-10-01

    This study designs and implements a stress isolation guard-ring structure to improve the performances of the existing single proof-mass three-axis piezoresistive accelerometer. Thus, the environment disturbances, such as temperature variation and force/deflection transmittance, for a packaged three-axis piezoresistive accelerometer are significantly reduced. In application, the three-axis piezoresistive accelerometer has been fabricated using the bulk micromachining process on the SOI wafer. Experimental results show that the out-of-plane deformation of the suspended spring mass on the packaged accelerometer is reduced from 0.72 to 0.10 µm at a 150 °C temperature elevation. The temperature coefficient of zero-g offset for the presented sensor is reduced, and the temperature-induced sensitivity variation is minimized as well. Measurements also demonstrate that the guard-ring design successfully reduces the false signals induced by the force and displacement transmittance disturbances for one order of magnitude. Moreover, the three-axis acceleration sensing for the presented accelerometer with guard ring has also been demonstrated with sensitivities of 0.12-0.17 mV V-1 g-1 and nonlinearity < 1.02%.

  20. Three Axis Control of the Hubble Space Telescope Using Two Reaction Wheels and Magnetic Torquer Bars for Science Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hur-Diaz, Sun; Wirzburger, John; Smith, Dan

    2008-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is renowned for its superb pointing accuracy of less than 10 milli-arcseconds absolute pointing error. To accomplish this, the HST relies on its complement of four reaction wheel assemblies (RWAs) for attitude control and four magnetic torquer bars (MTBs) for momentum management. As with most satellites with reaction wheel control, the fourth RWA provides for fault tolerance to maintain three-axis pointing capability should a failure occur and a wheel is lost from operations. If an additional failure is encountered, the ability to maintain three-axis pointing is jeopardized. In order to prepare for this potential situation, HST Pointing Control Subsystem (PCS) Team developed a Two Reaction Wheel Science (TRS) control mode. This mode utilizes two RWAs and four magnetic torquer bars to achieve three-axis stabilization and pointing accuracy necessary for a continued science observing program. This paper presents the design of the TRS mode and operational considerations necessary to protect the spacecraft while allowing for a substantial science program.

  1. Flight-Determined, Subsonic, Lateral-Directional Stability and Control Derivatives of the Thrust-Vectoring F-18 High Angle of Attack Research Vehicle (HARV), and Comparisons to the Basic F-18 and Predicted Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, Kenneth W.; Wang, Kon-Sheng Charles

    1999-01-01

    The subsonic, lateral-directional, stability and control derivatives of the thrust-vectoring F-1 8 High Angle of Attack Research Vehicle (HARV) are extracted from flight data using a maximum likelihood parameter identification technique. State noise is accounted for in the identification formulation and is used to model the uncommanded forcing functions caused by unsteady aerodynamics. Preprogrammed maneuvers provided independent control surface inputs, eliminating problems of identifiability related to correlations between the aircraft controls and states. The HARV derivatives are plotted as functions of angles of attack between 10deg and 70deg and compared to flight estimates from the basic F-18 aircraft and to predictions from ground and wind tunnel tests. Unlike maneuvers of the basic F-18 aircraft, the HARV maneuvers were very precise and repeatable, resulting in tightly clustered estimates with small uncertainty levels. Significant differences were found between flight and prediction; however, some of these differences may be attributed to differences in the range of sideslip or input amplitude over which a given derivative was evaluated, and to differences between the HARV external configuration and that of the basic F-18 aircraft, upon which most of the prediction was based. Some HARV derivative fairings have been adjusted using basic F-18 derivatives (with low uncertainties) to help account for differences in variable ranges and the lack of HARV maneuvers at certain angles of attack.

  2. Fully printed flexible fingerprint-like three-axis tactile and slip force and temperature sensors for artificial skin.

    PubMed

    Harada, Shingo; Kanao, Kenichiro; Yamamoto, Yuki; Arie, Takayuki; Akita, Seiji; Takei, Kuniharu

    2014-12-23

    A three-axis tactile force sensor that determines the touch and slip/friction force may advance artificial skin and robotic applications by fully imitating human skin. The ability to detect slip/friction and tactile forces simultaneously allows unknown objects to be held in robotic applications. However, the functionalities of flexible devices have been limited to a tactile force in one direction due to difficulties fabricating devices on flexible substrates. Here we demonstrate a fully printed fingerprint-like three-axis tactile force and temperature sensor for artificial skin applications. To achieve economic macroscale devices, these sensors are fabricated and integrated using only printing methods. Strain engineering enables the strain distribution to be detected upon applying a slip/friction force. By reading the strain difference at four integrated force sensors for a pixel, both the tactile and slip/friction forces can be analyzed simultaneously. As a proof of concept, the high sensitivity and selectivity for both force and temperature are demonstrated using a 3×3 array artificial skin that senses tactile, slip/friction, and temperature. Multifunctional sensing components for a flexible device are important advances for both practical applications and basic research in flexible electronics. PMID:25437513

  3. Characterization of the non axial thrust generated by large solid propellant rocket motors in three axis stabilized ascent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmann, W. J.; Dionne, E. R.; Klemetson, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    Nonaxial thrusts produced by solid rocket motors during three-axis stabilized attitude control have been determined from ascent experience on twenty three Burner II, Burner IIA and Block 5D-1 upper stage vehicles. A data base representing four different rocket motor designs (three spherical and one extended spherical) totaling twenty five three-axis stabilized firings is generated. Solid rocket motor time-varying resultant and lateral side force vector magnitudes, directions and total impulses, and roll torque couple magnitudes, directions, and total impulses are tabulated in the appendix. Population means and three sigma deviations are plotted. Existing applicable ground test side force and roll torque magnitudes and total impulses are evaluated and compared to the above experience data base. Within the spherical motor population, the selected AEDC ground test data consistently underestimated experienced motor side forces, roll torques and total impulses. Within the extended spherical motor population, the selected AEDC test data predicted experienced motor side forces, roll torques, and total impulses, with surprising accuracy considering the very small size of the test and experience populations.

  4. Three-axis attitude and direction reference instrument has only one moving part

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bossler, F. B.

    1966-01-01

    Lunar vehicle instrument combines the functions of attitude reference, direction reference, and display in a unit having only one moving part. The device, using bubble levels and a calibrated dial, is used as a sextant prior to takeoff, and as a backup navigation system during flight.

  5. Three-axis stabilization of spacecraft using parameter-independent nonlinear quaternion feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Suresh M.; Kelkar, Atul G.

    1994-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of rigid spacecraft. A nonlinear control law which uses the feedback of the unit quaternion and the measured angular velocities is proposed and is shown to provide global asymptotic stability. The control law does not require the knowledge of the system parameters, and is therefore robust to modeling errors. The significance of the control law is that it can be used for large-angle maneuvers with guaranteed stability.

  6. Attitude determination with three-axis accelerometer for emergency atmospheric entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia-Llama, Eduardo (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Two algorithms are disclosed that, with the use of a 3-axis accelerometer, will be able to determine the angles of attack, sideslip and roll of a capsule-type spacecraft prior to entry (at very high altitudes, where the atmospheric density is still very low) and during entry. The invention relates to emergency situations in which no reliable attitude and attitude rate are available. Provided that the spacecraft would not attempt a guided entry without reliable attitude information, the objective of the entry system in such case would be to attempt a safe ballistic entry. A ballistic entry requires three controlled phases to be executed in sequence: First, cancel initial rates in case the spacecraft is tumbling; second, maneuver the capsule to a heat-shield-forward attitude, preferably to the trim attitude, to counteract the heat rate and heat load build up; and third, impart a ballistic bank or roll rate to null the average lift vector in order to prevent prolonged lift down situations. Being able to know the attitude, hence the attitude rate, will allow the control system (nominal or backup, automatic or manual) to cancel any initial angular rates. Also, since a heat-shield forward attitude and the trim attitude can be specified in terms of the angles of attack and sideslip, being able to determine the current attitude in terms of these angles will allow the control system to maneuver the vehicle to the desired attitude. Finally, being able to determine the roll angle will allow for the control of the roll ballistic rate during entry.

  7. Three axis pulsed plasma thruster with angled cathode and anode strip lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassady, R. Joseph (Inventor); Myers, Roger M. (Inventor); Osborne, Robert D. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A spacecraft attitude and altitude control system utilizes sets of three pulsed plasma thrusters connected to a single controller. The single controller controls the operation of each thruster in the set. The control of a set of three thrusters in the set makes it possible to provide a component of thrust along any one of three desired axes. This configuration reduces the total weight of a spacecraft since only one controller and its associated electronics is required for each set of thrusters rather than a controller for each thruster. The thrusters are positioned about the spacecraft such that the effect of the thrusters is balanced.

  8. OPMILL - MICRO COMPUTER PROGRAMMING ENVIRONMENT FOR CNC MILLING MACHINES THREE AXIS EQUATION PLOTTING CAPABILITIES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, R. B.

    1994-01-01

    OPMILL is a computer operating system for a Kearney and Trecker milling machine that provides a fast and easy way to program machine part manufacture with an IBM compatible PC. The program gives the machinist an "equation plotter" feature which plots any set of equations that define axis moves (up to three axes simultaneously) and converts those equations to a machine milling program that will move a cutter along a defined path. Other supported functions include: drill with peck, bolt circle, tap, mill arc, quarter circle, circle, circle 2 pass, frame, frame 2 pass, rotary frame, pocket, loop and repeat, and copy blocks. The system includes a tool manager that can handle up to 25 tools and automatically adjusts tool length for each tool. It will display all tool information and stop the milling machine at the appropriate time. Information for the program is entered via a series of menus and compiled to the Kearney and Trecker format. The program can then be loaded into the milling machine, the tool path graphically displayed, and tool change information or the program in Kearney and Trecker format viewed. The program has a complete file handling utility that allows the user to load the program into memory from the hard disk, save the program to the disk with comments, view directories, merge a program on the disk with one in memory, save a portion of a program in memory, and change directories. OPMILL was developed on an IBM PS/2 running DOS 3.3 with 1 MB of RAM. OPMILL was written for an IBM PC or compatible 8088 or 80286 machine connected via an RS-232 port to a Kearney and Trecker Data Mill 700/C Control milling machine. It requires a "D:" drive (fixed-disk or virtual), a browse or text display utility, and an EGA or better display. Users wishing to modify and recompile the source code will also need Turbo BASIC, Turbo C, and Crescent Software's QuickPak for Turbo BASIC. IBM PC and IBM PS/2 are registered trademarks of International Business Machines. Turbo

  9. Three-Axis Distributed Fiber Optic Strain Measurement in 3D Woven Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castellucci, Matt; Klute, Sandra; Lally, Evan M.; Froggatt, Mark E.; Lowry, David

    2013-01-01

    Recent advancements in composite materials technologies have broken further from traditional designs and require advanced instrumentation and analysis capabilities. Success or failure is highly dependent on design analysis and manufacturing processes. By monitoring smart structures throughout manufacturing and service life, residual and operational stresses can be assessed and structural integrity maintained. Composite smart structures can be manufactured by integrating fiber optic sensors into existing composite materials processes such as ply layup, filament winding and three-dimensional weaving. In this work optical fiber was integrated into 3D woven composite parts at a commercial woven products manufacturing facility. The fiber was then used to monitor the structures during a VARTM manufacturing process, and subsequent static and dynamic testing. Low cost telecommunications-grade optical fiber acts as the sensor using a high resolution commercial Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometer (OFDR) system providing distributed strain measurement at spatial resolutions as low as 2mm. Strain measurements using the optical fiber sensors are correlated to resistive strain gage measurements during static structural loading. Keywords: fiber optic, distributed strain sensing, Rayleigh scatter, optical frequency domain reflectometry

  10. Three-axis distributed fiber optic strain measurement in 3D woven composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellucci, Matt; Klute, Sandra; Lally, Evan M.; Froggatt, Mark E.; Lowry, David

    2013-03-01

    Recent advancements in composite materials technologies have broken further from traditional designs and require advanced instrumentation and analysis capabilities. Success or failure is highly dependent on design analysis and manufacturing processes. By monitoring smart structures throughout manufacturing and service life, residual and operational stresses can be assessed and structural integrity maintained. Composite smart structures can be manufactured by integrating fiber optic sensors into existing composite materials processes such as ply layup, filament winding and three-dimensional weaving. In this work optical fiber was integrated into 3D woven composite parts at a commercial woven products manufacturing facility. The fiber was then used to monitor the structures during a VARTM manufacturing process, and subsequent static and dynamic testing. Low cost telecommunications-grade optical fiber acts as the sensor using a high resolution commercial Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometer (OFDR) system providing distributed strain measurement at spatial resolutions as low as 2mm. Strain measurements using the optical fiber sensors are correlated to resistive strain gage measurements during static structural loading.

  11. Attitude control study for a large flexible spacecraft using a Solar Electric Propulsion System (SEPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolivar, A. F.; Key, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    The attitude control performance of the solar electric propulsion system (SEPS) was evaluated. A thrust vector control system for powered flight control was examined along with a gas jet reaction control system, and a reaction wheel system, both of which have been proposed for nonpowered flight control. Comprehensive computer simulations of each control system were made and evaluated using a 30 mode spacecraft model. Results obtained indicate that thrust vector control and reaction wheel systems offer acceptable smooth proportional control. The gas jet control system is shown to be risky for a flexible structure such as SEPS, and is therefore, not recommended as a primary control method.

  12. Research flight-control system development for the F-18 high alpha research vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pahle, Joseph W.; Powers, Bruce; Regenie, Victoria; Chacon, Vince; Degroote, Steve; Murnyak, Steven

    1991-01-01

    The F-18 high alpha research vehicle was recently modified by adding a thrust vectoring control system. A key element in the modification was the development of a research flight control system integrated with the basic F-18 flight control system. Discussed here are design requirements, system development, and research utility of the resulting configuration as an embedded system for flight research in the high angle of attack regime. Particular emphasis is given to control system modifications and control law features required for high angle of attack flight. Simulation results are used to illustrate some of the thrust vectoring control system capabilities and predicted maneuvering improvements.

  13. A three-axis micromachined accelerometer with a CMOS position-sense interface and digital offset-trim electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Lemkin, M.; Boser, B.E.

    1999-04-01

    This paper describes a three-axis accelerometer implemented in a surface-micromachining technology with integrated CMOS. The accelerometer measures changes in a capacitive half-bridge to detect deflections of a proof mass, which result from acceleration input. The half-bridge is connected to a fully differential position-sense interface, the output of which is used for one-bit force feedback. By enclosing the proof mass in a one-bit feedback loop, simultaneous force balancing and analog-to-digital conversion are achieved. On-chip digital offset-trim electronics enable compensation of random offset in the electronic interface. Analytical performance calculations are shown to accurately model device behavior. The fabricated single-chip accelerometer measures 4 {times} 4 mm{sup 2}, draws 27 mA from a 5-V supply, and has a dynamic range of 84, 81, and 70 dB along the x-, y-, and z-axes, respectively.

  14. Intelligent tires for identifying coefficient of friction of tire/road contact surfaces using three-axis accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzaki, Ryosuke; Kamai, Kazuto; Seki, Ryosuke

    2015-02-01

    Intelligent tires equipped with sensors as well as the monitoring of the tire/road contact conditions are in demand for improving vehicle control and safety. With the aim of identifying the coefficient of friction of tire/road contact surfaces during driving, including during cornering, we develop an identification scheme for the coefficient of friction that involves estimation of the slip angle and applied force by using a single lightweight three-axis accelerometer attached on the inner surface of the tire. To validate the developed scheme, we conduct tire-rolling tests using an accelerometer-equipped tire with various slip angles on various types of road surfaces, including dry and wet surfaces. The results of these tests confirm that the estimated slip angle and applied force are reasonable. Furthermore, the identified coefficient of friction by the developed scheme agreed with that measured by standardized tests.

  15. Three Three-Axis IEPE Accelerometers on the Inner Liner of a Tire for Finding the Tire-Road Friction Potential Indicators †

    PubMed Central

    Niskanen, Arto; Tuononen, Ari J.

    2015-01-01

    Direct tire-road contact friction estimation is essential for future autonomous cars and active safety systems. Friction estimation methods have been proposed earlier for driving conditions in the presence of a slip angle or slip ratio. However, the estimation of the friction from a freely-rolling tire is still an unsolved topic. Knowing the existing friction potential would be beneficial since vehicle control systems could be adjusted before any remarkable tire force has been produced. Since accelerometers are well-known and robust, and thus a promising sensor type for intelligent tires, this study uses three three-axis IEPE accelerometers on the inner liner of a tire to detect friction potential indicators on two equally smooth surfaces with different friction levels. The equal roughness was chosen for both surfaces in order to study the friction phenomena by neglecting the effect of surface texture on vibrations. The acceleration data before the contact is used to differentiate the two friction levels between the tire and the road. In addition, the contact lengths from the three accelerometers are used to validate the acceleration data. A method to differentiate the friction levels on the basis of the acceleration signal is also introduced. PMID:26251914

  16. Three Three-Axis IEPE Accelerometers on the Inner Liner of a Tire for Finding the Tire-Road Friction Potential Indicators.

    PubMed

    Niskanen, Arto; Tuononen, Ari J

    2015-01-01

    Direct tire-road contact friction estimation is essential for future autonomous cars and active safety systems. Friction estimation methods have been proposed earlier for driving conditions in the presence of a slip angle or slip ratio. However, the estimation of the friction from a freely-rolling tire is still an unsolved topic. Knowing the existing friction potential would be beneficial since vehicle control systems could be adjusted before any remarkable tire force has been produced. Since accelerometers are well-known and robust, and thus a promising sensor type for intelligent tires, this study uses three three-axis IEPE accelerometers on the inner liner of a tire to detect friction potential indicators on two equally smooth surfaces with different friction levels. The equal roughness was chosen for both surfaces in order to study the friction phenomena by neglecting the effect of surface texture on vibrations. The acceleration data before the contact is used to differentiate the two friction levels between the tire and the road. In addition, the contact lengths from the three accelerometers are used to validate the acceleration data. A method to differentiate the friction levels on the basis of the acceleration signal is also introduced. PMID:26251914

  17. Neutron optics of the ILL high-flux polarized neutron three-axis spectrometer IN20B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulda, Jiri; Courtois, Pierre; Saroun, Jan; Thomas, Michel; Enderle, M.; Flores, P.

    2001-11-01

    The three-axis spectrometer IN20 has been upgraded to enhance significantly the data collection rate in experiments using polarized neutrons to study magnetic excitations in the (higher) thermal energy range. To increase the monochromatic polarized neutron flux, a new geometry of the primary spectrometer, optimized by detailed ray-tracing simulations, has been adopted. The main ingredients are a neutron source of a diameter increased from 100 mm to 170 mm and a large double focusing monochromator, illuminated through a heavy input slit (virtual source) of adjustable width. This geometry permits to keep the background at a possibly low level while maximizing the solid angle available for monochromatic focusing. The real challenge of the project has been the new Heusler monochromator. With its active surface of 230 x 150 mm2, consisting of 75 crystal plates mounted in 15 columns, it is the largest polarizing crystal assembly ever built. In combination with the horizontally focusing analyzer of a similar design, implemented in spring 2000, the data collection rate in the polarization analysis mode has increased by a factor 30 - 50 in April 2001 as compared to the original IN20, which up to now has provided world's highest polarized neutron flux in the thermal energy range.

  18. Development of a three-axis hybrid mesh isolator using the pseudoelasticity of a shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Se-Hyun; Jang, Young-Soon; Han, Jae-Hung

    2011-07-01

    Launch vehicles and satellites experience severe vibration and pyroshock loads during flight phases. In particular, intense pyroshock, which is generated by the actuation of separation devices, can cause malfunctions in the electronic components in launch vehicles and satellites, potentially resulting in catastrophic failure during flight. This paper introduces a new three-axis hybrid mesh isolator using the pseudoelasticity of a shape memory alloy wire that was manufactured and tested to attenuate pyroshock and vibration transmitted to the electronic components. To characterize the isolation capability, quasi-static loading tests were performed; the test results showed that the pseudoelastic effect of the shape memory alloy wire significantly absorbs energy due to the stress-induced phase transformation. The ground pyroshock test results showed a remarkable pyroshock load attenuation of the hybrid mesh isolator in all frequency ranges. The dynamic characteristics and vibration isolation performances of the mesh isolators were also verified by random vibration tests. The healthiness of the hybrid mesh isolator was also studied under a harsh vibration loading level, and the results confirmed its wide applicability without degradation of the isolation capability.

  19. Parameter estimation of a three-axis spacecraft simulator using recursive least-squares approach with tracking differentiator and Extended Kalman Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zheyao; Qi, Naiming; Chen, Yukun

    2015-12-01

    Spacecraft simulators are widely used to study the dynamics, guidance, navigation, and control of a spacecraft on the ground. A spacecraft simulator can have three rotational degrees of freedom by using a spherical air-bearing to simulate a frictionless and micro-gravity space environment. The moment of inertia and center of mass are essential for control system design of ground-based three-axis spacecraft simulators. Unfortunately, they cannot be known precisely. This paper presents two approaches, i.e. a recursive least-squares (RLS) approach with tracking differentiator (TD) and Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) method, to estimate inertia parameters. The tracking differentiator (TD) filter the noise coupled with the measured signals and generate derivate of the measured signals. Combination of two TD filters in series obtains the angular accelerations that are required in RLS (TD-TD-RLS). Another method that does not need to estimate the angular accelerations is using the integrated form of dynamics equation. An extended TD (ETD) filter which can also generate the integration of the function of signals is presented for RLS (denoted as ETD-RLS). States and inertia parameters are estimated simultaneously using EKF. The observability is analyzed. All proposed methods are illustrated by simulations and experiments.

  20. Liquid Rocket Booster (LRB) for the Space Transportion System (STS) systems study. Appendix D: Trade study summary for the liquid rocket booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Trade studies plans for a number of elements in the Liquid Rocket Booster (LRB) component of the Space Transportation System (STS) are given in viewgraph form. Some of the elements covered include: avionics/flight control; avionics architecture; thrust vector control studies; engine control electronics; liquid rocket propellants; propellant pressurization systems; recoverable spacecraft; cryogenic tanks; and spacecraft construction materials.

  1. Three-axis acoustic device for levitation of droplets in an open gas stream and its application to examine sulfur dioxide absorption by water droplets.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Terrance L; Budwig, Ralph S

    2007-01-01

    Two acoustic devices to stabilize a droplet in an open gas stream (single-axis and three-axis levitators) have been designed and tested. The gas stream was provided by a jet apparatus with a 64 mm exit diameter and a uniform velocity profile. The acoustic source used was a Langevin vibrator with a concave reflector. The single-axis levitator relied primarily on the radial force from the acoustic field and was shown to be limited because of significant droplet wandering. The three-axis levitator relied on a combination of the axial and radial forces. The three-axis levitator was applied to examine droplet deformation and circulation and to investigate the uptake of SO(2) from the gas stream to the droplet. Droplets ranging in diameters from 2 to 5 mm were levitated in gas streams with velocities up to 9 ms. Droplet wandering was on the order of a half droplet diameter for a 3 mm diameter droplet. Droplet circulation ranged from the predicted Hadamard-Rybczynski pattern to a rotating droplet pattern. Droplet pH over a central volume of the droplet was measured by planar laser induced fluorescence. The results for the decay of droplet pH versus time are in general agreement with published theory and experiments. PMID:17503939

  2. Apollo guidance, navigation and control: Guidance system operations plan for manned CM earth orbital and lunar missions using Program COLOSSUS 3. Section 3: Digital autopilots (revision 14)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Digital autopilots for the manned command module earth orbital and lunar missions using program COLOSSUS 3 are discussed. Subjects presented are: (1) reaction control system digital autopilot, (2) thrust vector control autopilot, (3) entry autopilot and mission control programs, (4) takeover of Saturn steering, and (5) coasting flight attitude maneuver routine.

  3. Experience with a three-axis side-located controller during a static and centrifuge simulation of the piloted launch of a manned multistage vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, William H.; Holleman, Euclid C.

    1960-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine a human pilot's ability to control a multistage vehicle through the launch trajectory. The simulation was performed statically and dynamically by utilizing a human centrifuge. An interesting byproduct of the program was the three-axis side-located controller incorporated for pilot control inputs. This method of control proved to be acceptable for the successful completion of the tracking task during the simulation. There was no apparent effect of acceleration on the mechanical operation of the controller, but the pilot's control feel deteriorated as his dexterity decreased at high levels of acceleration. The application of control in a specific control mode was not difficult. However, coordination of more than one mode was difficult, and, in many instances, resulted in inadvertent control inputs. The acceptable control harmony at an acceleration level of 1 g became unacceptable at higher acceleration levels. Proper control-force harmony for a particular control task appears to be more critical for a three-axis controller than for conventional controllers. During simulations in which the pilot wore a pressure suit, the nature of the suit gloves further aggravated this condition.

  4. Drifts of a three-axis stabilizer under vibration of the frames and platform with unbalanced dynamically tuned gyroscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zbrutskii, A. V.; Sarapulov, S. A.

    1985-10-01

    It is shown that the unbalance of a dynamically tuned gyro, leading to gyro self-excitation through vibration of the platform in a gimball suspension, causes drifts of the stabilizer. The magnitude of the drift depends on the gyro balancing precision, the location of gyros on the platform, and the relationship between the moments of inertia of the suspension elements, the precision of the adjustment, and the ultimate rigidity of the platform. Ways to reduce the drifts of the system are examined.

  5. Design and fabrication of three-axis accelerometer sensor microsystem for wide temperature range applications using semi-custom process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merdassi, A.; Wang, Y.; Xereas, G.; Chodavarapu, V. P.

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes an integrated CMOS-MEMS inertial sensor microsystem, consisting of a 3-axis accelerometer sensor device and its complementary readout circuit, which is designed to operate over a wide temperature range from - 55°C to 175°C. The accelerometer device is based on capacitive transduction and is fabricated using PolyMUMPS, which is a commercial process available from MEMSCAP. The fabricated accelerometer device is then post-processed by depositing a layer of amorphous silicon carbide to form a composite sensor structure to improve its performance over an extended wide temperature range. We designed and fabricated a CMOS readout circuit in IBM 0.13μm process that interfaces with the accelerometer device to serve as a capacitance to voltage converter. The accelerometer device is designed to operate over a measurement range of +/-20g. The described sensor system allows low power, low cost and mass-producible implementation well suited for a variety of applications with harsh or wide temperature operating conditions.

  6. Two-photon three-axis digital scanned light-sheet microscopy (2P3A-DSLM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Weijian; Zhao, Jia; Chen, Xuanyang; Lin, Yuan; Ren, Huixia; Zhang, Yunfeng; Fan, Ming; Zhou, Zhuan; Cheng, Heping; Sun, Yujie; Chen, Liangyi

    2014-09-01

    In this presentation we report a new 3D scanned DSLM. The system combined 1) two-photon excitation, 2) scanning along the illumination axis (x-axis) using tunable acoustic gradient lens (TAG) to stretch the Rayleigh range [5], 3) scanning vertically to the illumination axis (y-axis) by one galvo mirror to create light sheet. 4) scanning along Z-axis to do fast 3D imaging by another galvo mirror. The image plane was kept aligned with the fast z-axis scanned light sheet plane by an electric tunable lens (ETL) as described in ref. 6. The light sheet can be tailored to any shape between 50×50 μm2 and more than 500×500 μm2 with constant thickness limited by diffraction and fast imaging rates limited by the detector. The tailorable illumination area allows multi-scale field of view (FOV), and is consequently capable of imaging cells, tissue and live animals in one setup.

  7. Dual-rate-loop control based on disturbance observer of angular acceleration for a three-axis aerial inertially stabilized platform.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiangyang; Jia, Yuan; Zhao, Qiang; Cai, Tongtong

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a dual-rate-loop control method based on disturbance observer (DOB) of angular acceleration for a three-axis ISP for aerial remote sensing applications, by which the control accuracy and stabilization of ISP are improved obviously. In stabilization loop of ISP, a dual-rate-loop strategy is designed through constituting inner rate loop and the outer rate loop, by which the capability of disturbance rejection is advanced. Further, a DOB-based on angular acceleration is proposed to attenuate the influences of the main disturbances on stabilization accuracy. Particularly, an information fusion method is suggested to obtain accurate angular acceleration in DOB design, which is the key for the disturbance compensation. The proposed methods are theoretically analyzed and experimentally validated to illustrate the effectiveness. PMID:27016450

  8. A new three-axis vibrating sample magnetometer for continuous high-temperature magnetization measurements: Applications to paleo- and archeointensity determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallet, Y.; Le Goff, M.

    2004-12-01

    We have developed a new three-axis vibrating sample magnetometer (Triaxe) which allows continuous high-temperature magnetization measurements of individual cylindrical 0.75 cm3 samples up to 650°C, and the acquisition of thermoremanent magnetization (TRM) in any direction with a field of up to 200 microT. This equipment offers many possibilities for investigating rock magnetic properties at high temperature. As a first application, we propose a fast (2 hours) automated experimental procedure based on a modified version of the Thellier and Thellier (1959) method revised by Coe (1967) which provides continuous intensity determinations over a large (typically 300°C) temperature interval for each sample. This procedure takes into account both the cooling rate dependence of the TRM acquisition and the anisotropy of TRM. Analyses of numerous pottery and baked brick fragments from Mesopotamia demonstrate the quality and the reliability of the data, and illustrate the potential of this new instrument for paleo- and archeomagnetism.

  9. Design and Integration of an Actuated Nose Strake Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flick, Bradley C.; Thomson, Michael P.; Regenie, Victoria A.; Wichman, Keith D.; Pahle, Joseph W.; Earls, Michael R.

    1996-01-01

    Aircraft flight characteristics at high angles of attack can be improved by controlling vortices shed from the nose. These characteristics have been investigated with the integration of the actuated nose strakes for enhanced rolling (ANSER) control system into the NASA F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle. Several hardware and software systems were developed to enable performance of the research goals. A strake interface box was developed to perform actuator control and failure detection outside the flight control computer. A three-mode ANSER control law was developed and installed in the Research Flight Control System. The thrust-vectoring mode does not command the strakes. The strakes and thrust-vectoring mode uses a combination of thrust vectoring and strakes for lateral- directional control, and strake mode uses strakes only for lateral-directional control. The system was integrated and tested in the Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) simulation for testing before installation in the aircraft. Performance of the ANSER system was monitored in real time during the 89-flight ANSER flight test program in the DFRC Mission Control Center. One discrepancy resulted in a set of research data not being obtained. The experiment was otherwise considered a success with the majority of the research objectives being met.

  10. Strategic avionics technology definition studies. Subtask 3-1A3: Electrical Actuation (ELA) Systems Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, J. P.; Cureton, K. L.; Olsen, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    Future aerospace vehicles will require use of the Electrical Actuator systems for flight control elements. This report presents a proposed ELA Test Facility for dynamic evaluation of high power linear Electrical Actuators with primary emphasis on Thrust Vector Control actuators. Details of the mechanical design, power and control systems, and data acquisition capability of the test facility are presented. A test procedure for evaluating the performance of the ELA Test Facility is also included.

  11. SERT 2 gimbal system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavesky, R. J.; Hurst, E. B.

    1971-01-01

    The gimbal system is described that was designed to mount the thruster and to reposition the thrust vector of a mercury ion bombardment thruster through the center of gravity of the SERT 2 assembly. The SERT 2 assembly was launched 3 February 1970. The gimbal ring, gimbal mounts, bearings, actuators, and environmental testing are described. Due to the accurate alinements provided, it was not necessary to use the gimbal for the intended function. However, the gimbals were operated successfully numerous times in space after 8 months of storage.

  12. Titan 3E/Centaur D-1T Systems Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A systems and operational summary of the Titan 3E/Centaur D-1T program is presented which describes vehicle assembly facilities, launch facilities, and management responsibilities, and also provides detailed information on the following separate systems: (1) mechanical systems, including structural components, insulation, propulsion units, reaction control, thrust vector control, hydraulic systems, and pneumatic equipment; (2) astrionics systems, such as instrumentation and telemetry, navigation and guidance, C-Band tracking system, and range safety command system; (3) digital computer unit software; (4) flight control systems; (5) electrical/electronic systems; and (6) ground support equipment, including checkout equipment.

  13. The Control System for the X-33 Linear Aerospike Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Jerry E.; Espenschied, Erich; Klop, Jeffrey

    1998-01-01

    The linear aerospike engine is being developed for single-stage -to-orbit (SSTO) applications. The primary advantages of a linear aerospike engine over a conventional bell nozzle engine include altitude compensation, which provides enhanced performance, and lower vehicle weight resulting from the integration of the engine into the vehicle structure. A feature of this integration is the ability to provide thrust vector control (TVC) by differential throttling of the engine combustion elements, rather than the more conventional approach of gimballing the entire engine. An analysis of the X-33 flight trajectories has shown that it is necessary to provide +/- 15% roll, pitch and yaw TVC authority with an optional capability of +/- 30% pitch at select times during the mission. The TVC performance requirements for X-33 engine became a major driver in the design of the engine control system. The thrust level of the X-33 engine as well as the amount of TVC are managed by a control system which consists of electronic, instrumentation, propellant valves, electro-mechanical actuators, spark igniters, and harnesses. The engine control system is responsible for the thrust control, mixture ratio control, thrust vector control, engine health monitoring, and communication to the vehicle during all operational modes of the engine (checkout, pre-start, start, main-stage, shutdown and post shutdown). The methodology for thrust vector control, the health monitoring approach which includes failure detection, isolation, and response, and the basic control system design are the topic of this paper. As an additional point of interest a brief description of the X-33 engine system will be included in this paper.

  14. A north-south stationkeeping ion thruster system for ATS-F.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worlock, R.; James, E.; Ramsey, W.; Trump, G.; Gant, G.; Jan, L.; Bartlett, R.

    1972-01-01

    An ion thruster system is being developed for the ATS-F satellite to demonstrate the application of ion thruster technology to the synchronous satellite north-south stationkeeping mission. The cesium bombardment ion thruster develops one millipound thrust at 2600 seconds specific impulse and provides thrust vectoring by accelerator electrode displacement. The propellant system is sized for two years operation at 25 percent duty cycle. Power conditioning circuitry is based on transistor inverters switching at 10 kHz. Thirteen command channels allow flexibility in operation; 12 telemetry channels provide information on system performance. Input power is less than 150 watts.

  15. System for imposing directional stability on a rocket-propelled vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, H. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An improved system for use in imposing directional stability on a rocket-propelled vehicle is described. The system includes a pivotally supported engine-mounting platform, a gimbal ring mounted on the platform and adapted to pivotally support a rocket engine and an hydraulic actuator connected to the platform for imparting selected pivotal motion. An accelerometer and a signal comparator circuit for providing error intelligence indicative of aberration in vehicle acceleration is included along with an actuator control circuit connected with the actuator and responsive to error intelligence for imparting pivotal motion to the platform. Relocation of the engine's thrust vector is thus achieved for imparting directional stability to the vehicle.

  16. Development of a unified guidance system for geocentric transfer. [for solar electric propulsion spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cake, J. E.; Regetz, J. D., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A method is presented for open loop guidance of a solar electric propulsion spacecraft to geosynchronous orbit. The method consists of determining the thrust vector profiles on the ground with an optimization computer program, and performing updates based on the difference between the actual trajectory and that predicted with a precision simulation computer program. The motivation for performing the guidance analysis during the mission planning phase is discussed, and a spacecraft design option that employs attitude orientation constraints is presented. The improvements required in both the optimization program and simulation program are set forth, together with the efforts to integrate the programs into the ground support software for the guidance system.

  17. Development of a unified guidance system for geocentric transfer. [solar electric propulsion spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cake, J. E.; Regetz, J. D., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A method is presented for open loop guidance of a solar electric propulsion spacecraft to geosynchronsus orbit. The method consists of determining the thrust vector profiles on the ground with an optimization computer program, and performing updates based on the difference between the actual trajectory and that predicted with a precision simulation computer program. The motivation for performing the guidance analysis during the mission planning phase is discussed, and a spacecraft design option that employs attitude orientation constraints is presented. The improvements required in both the optimization program and simulation program are set forth, together with the efforts to integrate the programs into the ground support software for the guidance system.

  18. X-31 high angle of attack control system performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Peter; Seamount, Patricia

    1994-01-01

    The design goals for the X-31 flight control system were: (1) level 1 handling qualities during post-stall maneuvering (30 to 70 degrees angle-of-attack); (2) thrust vectoring to enhance performance across the flight envelope; and (3) adequate pitch-down authority at high angle-of-attack. Additional performance goals are discussed. A description of the flight control system is presented, highlighting flight control system features in the pitch and roll axes and X-31 thrust vectoring characteristics. The high angle-of-attack envelope clearance approach will be described, including a brief explanation of analysis techniques and tools. Also, problems encountered during envelope expansion will be discussed. This presentation emphasizes control system solutions to problems encountered in envelope expansion. An essentially 'care free' envelope was cleared for the close-in-combat demonstrator phase. High angle-of-attack flying qualities maneuvers are currently being flown and evaluated. These results are compared with pilot opinions expressed during the close-in-combat program and with results obtained from the F-18 HARV for identical maneuvers. The status and preliminary results of these tests are discussed.

  19. Lift/cruise fan V/STOL technology aircraft design definition study. Volume 2: Propulsion transmission system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, W. J.

    1976-01-01

    Two types of lift/cruise fan technology aircraft were conceptually designed. One aircraft used turbotip fans pneumatically interconnected to three gas generators, and the other aircraft used variable pitch fans mechanically interconnected to three turboshaft engines. The components of each propulsion transmission system were analyzed and designed to the depth necessary to determine areas of risk, development methods, performance, weights and costs. The types of materials and manufacturing processes were identified to show that the designs followed a low cost approach. The lift/cruise fan thrust vectoring hoods, which are applicable to either aircraft configuration, were also evaluated to assure a low cost/low risk approach.

  20. SIT-5 system development.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyman, J., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A 5-cm structurally integrated ion thruster (SIT-5) has been developed for attitude control and stationkeeping of synchronous satellites. With two-dimension thrust-vectoring grids, a first generation unit has demonstrated a thrust of 0.56 mlb at a beam voltage of 1200 V, total mass efficiency of 64%, and electrical efficiency of 46.8%. Structural integrity is demonstrated with a dielectric-coated grid for shock (30 G), sinusoidal (9 G), and random (19.9 G rms) accelerations. System envelope is 31.8 cm long by 13.9 cm flange bolt circle, with a mass of 8.5 kg, including 6.2 kg mercury propellant. Characteristics of a second-generation unit indicate significant performance gains.

  1. F-15B ACTIVE with thrust vectoring nozzles on test stand at sunrise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This November 13, 1995, photograph of the F-15 Advanced Controls Technology for Integrated Vehicles (ACTIVE) at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, shows the aircraft on a test stand at sunrise. Not shown in this photograph are the aircraft's two new Pratt & Whitney nozzles that can turn up to 20 degrees in any direction. These nozzles give the aircraft thrust control in the pitch (up and down) and yaw (left and right) directions. This will reduce drag and increase fuel economy or range as compared with conventional aerodynamic controls, which increase the retarding forces (drag) acting upon the aircraft. These tests could result in significant performance increases for military and commercial aircraft. The research program is the product of a collaborative effort by NASA, the Air Force's Wright Laboratory, Pratt & Whitney, and McDonnell Douglas Aerospace. The aircraft was originally built as an F-15B (Serial #71-0290).

  2. Static internal performance of single expansion-ramp nozzles with thrust vectoring and reversing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Re, R. J.; Berrier, B. L.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of geometric design parameters on the internal performance of nonaxisymmetric single expansion-ramp nozzles were investigated at nozzle pressure ratios up to approximately 10. Forward-flight (cruise), vectored-thrust, and reversed-thrust nozzle operating modes were investigated.

  3. Advanced Launch System (ALS): Electrical actuation and power systems improve operability and cost picture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundberg, Gale R.

    1990-01-01

    To obtain the Advanced Launch System (ALS) primary goals of reduced costs and improved operability, there must be significant reductions in the launch operations and servicing requirements relative to current vehicle designs and practices. One of the primary methods for achieving these goals is by using vehicle electrical power system and controls for all actuation and avionics requirements. A brief status review of the ALS and its associated Advanced Development Program is presented to demonstrate maturation of those technologies that will help meet the overall operability and cost goals. The electric power and actuation systems are highlighted as a specific technology ready not only to meet the stringent ALS goals (cryogenic field valves and thrust vector controls with peak power demands to 75 hp), but also those of other launch vehicles, military and civilian aircraft, lunar/Martian vehicles, and a multitude of commercial applications.

  4. Advanced Launch System (ALS): Electrical actuation and power systems improve operability and cost picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundberg, Gale R.

    To obtain the Advanced Launch System (ALS) primary goals of reduced costs and improved operability, there must be significant reductions in the launch operations and servicing requirements relative to current vehicle designs and practices. One of the primary methods for achieving these goals is by using vehicle electrical power system and controls for all actuation and avionics requirements. A brief status review of the ALS and its associated Advanced Development Program is presented to demonstrate maturation of those technologies that will help meet the overall operability and cost goals. The electric power and actuation systems are highlighted as a specific technology ready not only to meet the stringent ALS goals (cryogenic field valves and thrust vector controls with peak power demands to 75 hp), but also those of other launch vehicles, military and civilian aircraft, lunar/Martian vehicles, and a multitude of commercial applications.

  5. Advanced launch system (ALS) - Electrical actuation and power systems improve operability and cost picture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundberg, Gale R.

    1990-01-01

    To obtain the Advanced Launch System (ALS) primary goals of reduced costs and improved operability, there must be significant reductions in the launch operations and servicing requirements relative to current vehicle designs and practices. One of the primary methods for achieving these goals is by using vehicle electrrical power system and controls for all aviation and avionics requirements. A brief status review of the ALS and its associated Advanced Development Program is presented to demonstrate maturation of those technologies that will help meet the overall operability and cost goals. The electric power and actuation systems are highlighted as a sdpecific technology ready not only to meet the stringent ALS goals (cryogenic field valves and thrust vector controls with peak power demands to 75 hp), but also those of other launch vehicles, military ans civilian aircraft, lunar/Martian vehicles, and a multitude of comercial applications.

  6. Advanced Launch System (ALS) actuation and power systems impact operability and cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundberg, Gale R.

    1990-01-01

    To obtain the Advanced Launch System (ALS) primary goals of reduced costs and improved operability, there must be significant reductions in the launch operations and servicing requirements relative to current vehicle designs and practices. One of the primary methods for achieving these goals is by using vehicle electrical power system and controls for all actuation and avionics requirements. A brief status review of the ALS and its associated Advanced Development Program is presented to demonstrate maturation of those technologies that will help meet the overall operability and cost goals. The electric power and actuation systems are highlighted as a specific technology ready not only to meet the stringent ALS goals (cryogenic field valves and thrust vector controls with peak power demands to 75 hp), but also those of other launch vehicles, military and civilian aircraft, lunar/Martian vehicles, and a multitude of commercial applications.

  7. Advanced launch system (ALS) actuation and power systems impact operability and cost

    SciTech Connect

    Sundberg, G.R. . Lewis Research Center)

    1990-09-01

    To obtain the advanced launch system (ALS) primary goals of reduced costs ($300/lb earth to LEO) and improved operability, there must be significant reductions in the launch operability, there must be significant reductions in the launch operations and servicing requirements relative to current vehicle designs and practices. One of the primary methods for achieving these goals is by using electrical actuation integrated with a single vehicle electrical power system and controls for all actuation and avionics requirements. This paper reviews the ALS and its associated advanced development program to demonstrate maturation of those technologies that will help meet the overall operability and cost goals. The electric power and actuation systems are highlighted as a specific technology ready not only to meet the ALS goals (cryogenic fuel valves and thrust vector controls with peak power demands to 75 hp), but also those of other launch vehicles, military and civilian aircraft, lunar/Martian vehicles and a multitude of commercial applications.

  8. Flight-determined benefits of integrated flight-propulsion control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, James F.; Burcham, Frank W., Jr.; Gatlin, Donald H.

    1992-01-01

    Over the last two decades, NASA has conducted several experiments in integrated flight-propulsion control. Benefits have included improved maneuverability; increased thrust, range, and survivability; reduced fuel consumption; and reduced maintenance. This paper presents the basic concepts for control integration, examples of implementation, and benefits. The F-111E experiment integrated the engine and inlet control systems. The YF-12C incorporated an integral control system involving the inlet, autopilot, autothrottle, airdata, navigation, and stability augmentation systems. The F-15 research involved integration of the engine, flight, and inlet control systems. Further extension of the integration included real-time, onboard optimization of engine, inlet, and flight control variables; a self-repairing flight control system; and an engines-only control concept for emergency control. The F-18A aircraft incorporated thrust vectoring integrated with the flight control system to provide enhanced maneuvering at high angles of attack. The flight research programs and the resulting benefits of each program are described.

  9. Analysis of a Linear System for Variable-Thrust Control in the Terminal Phase of Rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hord, Richard A.; Durling, Barbara J.

    1961-01-01

    A linear system for applying thrust to a ferry vehicle in the 3 terminal phase of rendezvous with a satellite is analyzed. This system requires that the ferry thrust vector per unit mass be variable and equal to a suitable linear combination of the measured position and velocity vectors of the ferry relative to the satellite. The variations of the ferry position, speed, acceleration, and mass ratio are examined for several combinations of the initial conditions and two basic control parameters analogous to the undamped natural frequency and the fraction of critical damping. Upon making a desirable selection of one control parameter and requiring minimum fuel expenditure for given terminal-phase initial conditions, a simplified analysis in one dimension practically fixes the choice of the remaining control parameter. The system can be implemented by an automatic controller or by a pilot.

  10. Three-axis electron-beam test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayton, J. A., Jr.; Ebihara, B. T.

    1981-01-01

    An electron beam test facility, which consists of a precision multidimensional manipulator built into an ultra-high-vacuum bell jar, was designed, fabricated, and operated at Lewis Research Center. The position within the bell jar of a Faraday cup which samples current in the electron beam under test, is controlled by the manipulator. Three orthogonal axes of motion are controlled by stepping motors driven by digital indexers, and the positions are displayed on electronic totalizers. In the transverse directions, the limits of travel are approximately + or - 2.5 cm from the center with a precision of 2.54 micron (0.0001 in.); in the axial direction, approximately 15.0 cm of travel are permitted with an accuracy of 12.7 micron (0.0005 in.). In addition, two manually operated motions are provided, the pitch and yaw of the Faraday cup with respect to the electron beam can be adjusted to within a few degrees. The current is sensed by pulse transformers and the data are processed by a dual channel box car averager with a digital output. The beam tester can be operated manually or it can be programmed for automated operation. In the automated mode, the beam tester is controlled by a microcomputer (installed at the test site) which communicates with a minicomputer at the central computing facility. The data are recorded and later processed by computer to obtain the desired graphical presentations.