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Sample records for tomography showed multiple

  1. Multiple 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Scans Showing Progression of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tsuruda, Toshihiro; Nagamachi, Shigeki; Nishimura, Masanori; Nakamura, Kunihide; Kitamura, Kazuo

    2016-05-01

    Although the precise mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) remain unclear, aortic wall inflammation has been implicated in AAA development. Several studies have reported the use of fluoro-deoxyglucose (F-FDG)/positron emission tomography (PET) to assess the nature of AAA.We present a case of 77-year-old Japanese male with juxta-anastomotic AAA who was followed up with multiple F-FDG-PET/CT scans over 7 years. The scans revealed chronological changes in aortic wall inflammation leading to progress and eventual rupture.This case supports a notion that aortic wall inflammation plays a role in AAA progression and rupture. PMID:27175690

  2. Olaparib shows promise in multiple tumor types.

    PubMed

    2013-07-01

    A phase II study of the PARP inhibitor olaparib (AstraZeneca) for cancer patients with inherited BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations confirmed earlier results showing clinical benefit for advanced breast and ovarian cancers, and demonstrated evidence of effectiveness against pancreatic and prostate cancers. PMID:23847380

  3. Dermascope guided multiple reference optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Dsouza, Roshan; Subhash, Hrebesh; Neuhaus, Kai; Hogan, Josh; Wilson, Carol; Leahy, Martin

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we report the feasibility of integrating a novel low cost optical coherence tomography (OCT) system with a dermascope for point-of-care applications. The proposed OCT system is based on an enhanced time-domain optical coherence tomographic system, called multiple reference OCT (MR-OCT), which uses a single miniature voice coil actuator and a partial mirror for extending the axial scan range. The system can simultaneously register both the superficial dermascope image and the depth-resolved OCT sub-surface information by an interactive beam steering method. A practitioner is able to obtain the depth resolved information of the point of interest by simply using the mouse cursor. The proposed approach of combining a dermascope with a low cost OCT provides a unique powerful optical imaging modality for a range of dermatological applications. Hand-held dermascopic OCT devices would also enable point of care and remote health monitoring. PMID:25401004

  4. Dermascope guided multiple reference optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Dsouza, Roshan; Subhash, Hrebesh; Neuhaus, Kai; Hogan, Josh; Wilson, Carol; Leahy, Martin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we report the feasibility of integrating a novel low cost optical coherence tomography (OCT) system with a dermascope for point-of-care applications. The proposed OCT system is based on an enhanced time-domain optical coherence tomographic system, called multiple reference OCT (MR-OCT), which uses a single miniature voice coil actuator and a partial mirror for extending the axial scan range. The system can simultaneously register both the superficial dermascope image and the depth-resolved OCT sub-surface information by an interactive beam steering method. A practitioner is able to obtain the depth resolved information of the point of interest by simply using the mouse cursor. The proposed approach of combining a dermascope with a low cost OCT provides a unique powerful optical imaging modality for a range of dermatological applications. Hand-held dermascopic OCT devices would also enable point of care and remote health monitoring. PMID:25401004

  5. Heavy Coffee Drinkers Show Lower Risk of Multiple Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Heavy Coffee Drinkers Show Lower Risk of Multiple Sclerosis But the finding isn't reason enough to ... coffee may have a lower risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS), a new large study suggests. Researchers found ...

  6. Finite frequency tomography shows a variety of plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolet, G.; Montelli, R.; Masters, G.; Dahlen, F. A.; Hung, S.

    2003-04-01

    The new technique of finite-frequency tomography (see abstract by Montelli et al., this meeting) is very powerful in imaging objects of small dimension in the lower mantle. The first global images of P velocity anomalies obtained by using this technique to invert a small but very accurate data set of long period P arrivals bottoming in the lower mantle show 18 low velocity anomalies in excess of -0.5%, all but two of which are associated with a known hotspot at the surface, and they serve as an unprecented glimpse into the deep mechanisms that give rise to hotspots. The following synopsis is given under the caveat that we have not yet incorporated high frequency waves into the interpretation, nor completed a full resolution analysis at the time of writing of this abstract (both will be presented at the meeting). We observe six or seven hotspots fed by a plume extending to the core-mantle boundary: Cap Verde, Easter Island, Hawaii, Kerguelen, St Helena, Tahiti, and perhaps also Azores. Several hotspots, among which are Bouvet, Bowie, and Mount Erebus, seem to originate at mid-mantle depth, while others (Afar, Ascension, Galapagos, Iceland, la Reunion and others) seem to be mostly confined to the upper mantle. Many renowned hotspots (such as Eifel, Samoa and Yellowstone) have only very weak low velocity anomalies at depth and may be the result of superficial processes confined to the top of the upper mantle. We confirm the existence of the two superplumes which both have Δ V_P < -0.5% extending as high as 2000 km depth. It is clear that no one plume/hotspot model can explain the variety in deep expressions of hotspots in the mantle. If midmantle plume origins represent originally deep plumes in their end stage, while the two unidentified anomalies are either beginning new plumes (Greenland) or plumes cut off in their initial ascent (W. Pacific), the large number of plumes caught in this phase would point to lengthy rise times of the order of tens of millions of years - which is representative for Newtonian fluids. The large number of plumes bottoming just below 670 km are indicative of a thermal boundary layer, at least locally, at the bottom of the upper mantle, which would favour a relatively hot lower mantle.

  7. Multiple-frequency body-wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigloch, Karin

    This dissertation deals with generating, exploring, and using the kind of seismic data that finite-frequency modeling was envisioned for. It represents a comprehensive inquiry into extracting frequency-dependent information from broadband waveforms of seismic body waves, and applying these data to global-scale imaging of the earth's interior. I develop a matched-filtering method to measure two new kinds of observables for global-scale seismology: multiple-frequency traveltimes and amplitudes. Observed waveforms are compared to predicted seismograms through cross-correlation after deconvolving the earthquake source time function from the data. The method is validated on a small data set in the Western U.S. I explore the dispersive properties and noise characteristics of the multiple-frequency measurements and find that dispersion is a significant signal, especially in the amplitude measurements. Amplitude patterns are spatially coherent over hundreds of kilometers. The signal processing is scaled and automated to process the entire database of ˜2000 suitable earthquakes that occurred worldwide between 1999 and 2007. In the first application of multiple-frequency body-wave tomography, the subset of traveltimes and amplitudes measured in North America is jointly inverted for P-wave structure and attenuation of the North American mantle. New USArray data represent an ideal testbed for this study. We obtain very detailed velocity structure down to ˜1800 km depth that reveals some major surprises. Not one but two whole-mantle subduction systems are present beneath North America. Presently, the Farallon slab descends from the Pacific Northwest coast to 1500 km depth beneath the Great Plains, whereas its stalled predecessor occupies the transition zone and lower mantle beneath the eastern half of the continent. We argue that the separation between them is linked to the end of the Laramide era 50 million years ago, a time of unusual tectonic and volcanic activity during which the flatly subducting slab is inferred to have caused the uplift of the ancestral Rocky Mountains.

  8. Complementary roles of brain scintigraphy and computed tomography in multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, A.J.; Brown, J.M.; Waller, S.F.; Lundy, M.M.; Brown, T.J.

    1983-12-01

    Cerebral computed tomography, with and without iodinated contrast, revealed the appearance and evolution of lesions in a 32-year-old man with multiple sclerosis. Two areas were enhanced with contrast, with one showing a mild mass effect and rim of enhancement. Serial brain scintigraphy using technetium-/sub 99m/ glucoheptonate, following the computed tomography, showed the appearance and regression of corresponding regions of increased uptake. Computed tomography one day prior to brain scintigraphy failed to demonstrate a region of increased accumulation of radiotracer. One week later, however, evidence of a corresponding unenhanced defect was noted on computed tomography. Clinical correlation is given additionally.

  9. View of southern quarry wall, facing west, showing multiple drill ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of southern quarry wall, facing west, showing multiple drill holes on face - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 4, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  10. Oblique view of the southwest side showing multiple roof planes. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of the southwest side showing multiple roof planes. View facing northeast - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Foundry, Seventh Street near Avenue F intersection, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  11. FEATURE 3, LARGE GUN POSITION, SHOWING MULTIPLE COMPARTMENTS, VIEW FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FEATURE 3, LARGE GUN POSITION, SHOWING MULTIPLE COMPARTMENTS, VIEW FACING SOUTH. - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Anti-Aircraft Battery Complex-Large Gun Position, East of Coral Sea Road, northwest of Hamilton Road, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  12. Multiple Energy Computer Tomography (MECT) at the NSLS: Status report

    SciTech Connect

    Dilmanian, F.A.; Wu, X.Y.; Chen, Z.; Ren, B.; Slatkin, D.N.; Chapman, D.; Schleifer, M.; Staicu, F.A.; Thomlinson, W.

    1994-09-01

    Status of the synchrotron-based computed tomography (CT) system Multiple Energy Computed Tomography (MECT) system is described. MECT, that uses monochromatic beams from the X17 superconducting wiggler beam line at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), will be used for imaging the human head and neck. An earlier prototype MECT produced images of phantoms and living rodents. This report summarizes the studies with the prototype, and describes the design, construction, and test results of the Clinical MECT system components.

  13. FEATURE 3, LARGE GUN POSITION, SHOWING MULTIPLE COMPARTMENTS, VIEW FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FEATURE 3, LARGE GUN POSITION, SHOWING MULTIPLE COMPARTMENTS, VIEW FACING SOUTH (with scale stick). - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Anti-Aircraft Battery Complex-Large Gun Position, East of Coral Sea Road, northwest of Hamilton Road, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  14. Five Kepler target stars that show multiple transiting exoplanet candidates

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, Jason H.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Borucki, William J.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Cochran, William D.; Endl, Michael; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Fressin, Francois; Ford, Eric B.; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2010-06-01

    We present and discuss five candidate exoplanetary systems identified with the Kepler spacecraft. These five systems show transits from multiple exoplanet candidates. Should these objects prove to be planetary in nature, then these five systems open new opportunities for the field of exoplanets and provide new insights into the formation and dynamical evolution of planetary systems. We discuss the methods used to identify multiple transiting objects from the Kepler photometry as well as the false-positive rejection methods that have been applied to these data. One system shows transits from three distinct objects while the remaining four systems show transits from two objects. Three systems have planet candidates that are near mean motion commensurabilities - two near 2:1 and one just outside 5:2. We discuss the implications that multitransiting systems have on the distribution of orbital inclinations in planetary systems, and hence their dynamical histories; as well as their likely masses and chemical compositions. A Monte Carlo study indicates that, with additional data, most of these systems should exhibit detectable transit timing variations (TTV) due to gravitational interactions - though none are apparent in these data. We also discuss new challenges that arise in TTV analyses due to the presence of more than two planets in a system.

  15. Multiple nontuberculous scrofulodermas showing dramatic response to clarithromycin.

    PubMed

    Parimalam, Kumar; Senthil, G; Vinnarasan, M; Arumugakani, V; Amutha, B M; Lalitha, S; Swarna, S

    2015-01-01

    Atypical mycobacteria are distinct from the Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Mycobacterium chelonae, a non-pigment producing rapid grower, can be found in many cutaneous sites; infection occurs most commonly after skin trauma from surgery, injections, or minor injuries. In immune competent patients, the infection is more frequently localized as a cellulitis or a nodule, whereas, in the immunocompromised patient, dissemination (more than five lesions) can occur. Because the organism is resistant to antituberculous therapy, abscess can develop and follow a chronic, indolent course. We report a case of multiple scrofuloderma due to nontuberculous infection caused by M. chelonae showing dramatic response to clarithromycin. PMID:25657914

  16. Multiple nontuberculous scrofulodermas showing dramatic response to clarithromycin

    PubMed Central

    Parimalam, Kumar; Senthil, G.; Vinnarasan, M.; Arumugakani, V.; Amutha, B. M.; Lalitha, S.; Swarna, S.

    2015-01-01

    Atypical mycobacteria are distinct from the Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Mycobacterium chelonae, a non-pigment producing rapid grower, can be found in many cutaneous sites; infection occurs most commonly after skin trauma from surgery, injections, or minor injuries. In immune competent patients, the infection is more frequently localized as a cellulitis or a nodule, whereas, in the immunocompromised patient, dissemination (more than five lesions) can occur. Because the organism is resistant to antituberculous therapy, abscess can develop and follow a chronic, indolent course. We report a case of multiple scrofuloderma due to nontuberculous infection caused by M. chelonae showing dramatic response to clarithromycin. PMID:25657914

  17. Recurrent and multiple bladder tumors show conserved expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    Lindgren, David; Gudjonsson, Sigurdur; Jee, Kowan Ja; Liedberg, Fredrik; Aits, Sonja; Andersson, Anna; Chebil, Gunilla; Borg, Åke; Knuutila, Sakari; Fioretos, Thoas; Månsson, Wiking; Höglund, Mattias

    2008-01-01

    Background Urothelial carcinomas originate from the epithelial cells of the inner lining of the bladder and may appear as single or as multiple synchronous tumors. Patients with urothelial carcinomas frequently show recurrences after treatment making follow-up necessary. The leading hypothesis explaining the origin of meta- and synchronous tumors assumes a monoclonal origin. However, the genetic relationship among consecutive tumors has been shown to be complex in as much as the genetic evolution does not adhere to the chronological appearance of the metachronous tumors. Consequently, genetically less evolved tumors may appear chronologically later than genetically related but more evolved tumors. Methods Forty-nine meta- or synchronous urothelial tumors from 22 patients were analyzed using expression profiling, conventional CGH, LOH, and mutation analyses. Results We show by CGH that partial chromosomal losses in the initial tumors may not be present in the recurring tumors, by LOH that different haplotypes may be lost and that detected regions of LOH may be smaller in recurring tumors, and that mutations present in the initial tumor may not be present in the recurring ones. In contrast we show that despite apparent genomic differences, the recurrent and multiple bladder tumors from the same patients display remarkably similar expression profiles. Conclusion Our findings show that even though the vast majority of the analyzed meta- and synchronous tumors from the same patients are not likely to have originated directly from the preceding tumor they still show remarkably similar expressions profiles. The presented data suggests that an expression profile is established early in tumor development and that this profile is stable and maintained in recurring tumors. PMID:18590527

  18. New World cattle show ancestry from multiple independent domestication events

    PubMed Central

    McTavish, Emily Jane; Decker, Jared E.; Schnabel, Robert D.; Taylor, Jeremy F.; Hillis, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Previous archeological and genetic research has shown that modern cattle breeds are descended from multiple independent domestication events of the wild aurochs (Bos primigenius) ∼10,000 y ago. Two primary areas of domestication in the Middle East/Europe and the Indian subcontinent resulted in taurine and indicine lines of cattle, respectively. American descendants of cattle brought by European explorers to the New World beginning in 1493 generally have been considered to belong to the taurine lineage. Our analyses of 47,506 single nucleotide polymorphisms show that these New World cattle breeds, as well as many related breeds of cattle in southern Europe, actually exhibit ancestry from both the taurine and indicine lineages. In this study, we show that, although European cattle are largely descended from the taurine lineage, gene flow from African cattle (partially of indicine origin) contributed substantial genomic components to both southern European cattle breeds and their New World descendants. New World cattle breeds, such as Texas Longhorns, provide an opportunity to study global population structure and domestication in cattle. Following their introduction into the Americas in the late 1400s, semiferal herds of cattle underwent between 80 and 200 generations of predominantly natural selection, as opposed to the human-mediated artificial selection of Old World breeding programs. Our analyses of global cattle breed population history show that the hybrid ancestry of New World breeds contributed genetic variation that likely facilitated the adaptation of these breeds to a novel environment. PMID:23530234

  19. New World cattle show ancestry from multiple independent domestication events.

    PubMed

    McTavish, Emily Jane; Decker, Jared E; Schnabel, Robert D; Taylor, Jeremy F; Hillis, David M

    2013-04-01

    Previous archeological and genetic research has shown that modern cattle breeds are descended from multiple independent domestication events of the wild aurochs (Bos primigenius) ∼10,000 y ago. Two primary areas of domestication in the Middle East/Europe and the Indian subcontinent resulted in taurine and indicine lines of cattle, respectively. American descendants of cattle brought by European explorers to the New World beginning in 1493 generally have been considered to belong to the taurine lineage. Our analyses of 47,506 single nucleotide polymorphisms show that these New World cattle breeds, as well as many related breeds of cattle in southern Europe, actually exhibit ancestry from both the taurine and indicine lineages. In this study, we show that, although European cattle are largely descended from the taurine lineage, gene flow from African cattle (partially of indicine origin) contributed substantial genomic components to both southern European cattle breeds and their New World descendants. New World cattle breeds, such as Texas Longhorns, provide an opportunity to study global population structure and domestication in cattle. Following their introduction into the Americas in the late 1400s, semiferal herds of cattle underwent between 80 and 200 generations of predominantly natural selection, as opposed to the human-mediated artificial selection of Old World breeding programs. Our analyses of global cattle breed population history show that the hybrid ancestry of New World breeds contributed genetic variation that likely facilitated the adaptation of these breeds to a novel environment. PMID:23530234

  20. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) in Optic Neuritis and Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lamirel, Cédric; Newman, Nancy J.; Biousse, Valérie

    2010-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive imaging technique routinely used in ophthalmology to visualize and quantify the layers of the retina. It also provides information on optic nerve head topography, peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, and macular volume which correlate with axonal loss. These measurements are of particular interest in optic neuropathies and in multiple sclerosis, and OCT parameters are now used as endpoints in neurologic clinical trials. PMID:20605617

  1. Characterization of light distribution and optimization of detector position for multiple reference optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhaus, Kai; Subhash, Hrebesh; Dsouza, Roshan; Hogan, Josh; Wilson, Carol; Leahy, Martin

    2015-03-01

    A time-domain optical coherence tomography system with respect to multiple reflections in the reference arm is simulated with Zemax and the optimal detector position is discussed based on the wavefront error. Multiple reference optical coherence tomography (MR-OCT) is a novel optical imaging platform using a single miniature actuator and partial mirror to recirculate light multiple times within the interferometric system. The recirculation corresponds to multiple path delays extending effectively the axial scan-range. The simulation of MR-OCT with lenses of 5 mm diameter shows that it is suitable to build a compact system using low-cost components. Subsequently MR-OCT enables an affordable miniature OCT for low recourse settings and personal or point-of-care applications.

  2. Diffuse optical tomography based on multiple access coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuefeng; Wang, Yuanqing; Su, Jinshan; Xu, Fan

    2016-04-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) has the advantages of being a non-invasive, non-radiation emitting and low-cost biological tissue imaging method, and many recent studies have employed this technology. By improving the spatial resolution and developing a new method for constantly improving the flexibility of the experimental device, the system can perform data acquisition rapidly and conveniently. We propose a method for rapid data acquisition based on multiple access coding; it can acquire data in parallel, and the system can greatly improve the temporal resolution of the data acquisition step in diffuse optical tomography thereafter. We simulate the encoding and decoding process of the source-detector pair and successfully isolate the source signal from mixed signals. The DOT image reconstruction highlight the effectiveness of the system.

  3. A computed tomography implementation of multiple-image radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Brankov, Jovan G.; Wernick, Miles N.; Yang Yongyi; Li Jun; Muehleman, Carol; Zhong Zhong; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2006-02-15

    Conventional x-ray computed tomography (CT) produces a single volumetric image that represents the spatially variant linear x-ray attenuation coefficient of an object. However, in many situations, differences in the x-ray attenuation properties of soft tissues are very small and difficult to measure in conventional x-ray imaging. In this work, we investigate an analyzer-based imaging method, called computed tomography multiple-image radiography (CT-MIR), which is a tomographic implementation of the recently proposed multiple-image radiography method. The CT-MIR method reconstructs concurrently three physical properties of the object. In addition to x-ray attenuation, CT-MIR produces volumetric images that represent the refraction and ultrasmall-angle scattering properties of the object. These three images can provide a rich description of the object's physical properties that are revealed by the probing x-ray beam. An imaging model for CT-MIR that is based on the x-ray transform of the object properties is established. The CT-MIR method is demonstrated by use of experimental data acquired at a synchroton radiation imaging beamline, and is compared to the pre-existing diffraction-enhanced imaging CT method. We also investigate the merit of an iterative reconstruction method for use with future clinical implementations of CT-MIR, which we anticipate would be photon limited.

  4. Multiple myeloma presenting as plasmacytoma of the jaws showing prominent bone formation during chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    An, S-Y; An, C-H; Choi, K-S; Heo, M-S

    2013-01-01

    A 65-year-old female visited our hospital complaining of a swelling on the left cheek area of 2 years' duration. A panoramic radiograph revealed an ill-defined osteolytic radiolucent bony lesion involving the left mandibular angle, ascending ramus, coronoid process and condylar process. Histological examination showed the mandibular lesion to be a plasmacytoma, and a systemic work-up was obtained to rule out multiple myeloma. Contrast-enhanced CT images showed a well-defined and slightly enhanced round mass on the left ramal area, accompanied by the destruction of the left ramus and posterior maxilla. An (18)F-fluorodeoxy-glucose positron emission tomography CT ((18)F-FDG PET/CT) scan revealed a hypermetabolic mass extending from the left mandible to the left maxillary sinus. The patient had M-protein in serum and urine, plasma cells up to 36.5% on bone marrow biopsy and anaemia as a clinical complication. The patient was diagnosed with multiple myeloma and received chemotherapy with thalidomide, cyclophosphamide and dexamethasone. A PET/CT scan taken 6 months later revealed that the hypermetabolic mass had disappeared and there was remarkable bone formation on the left mandible compared with a previous PET/CT scan. A panoramic radiograph taken 8 months later also demonstrated a prominent bone formation of the affected site. To the best of our knowledge, the current case is the first report of multiple myeloma presenting as plasmacytoma of the mandible with an FDG PET/CT scan. The lesion was solitary at diagnosis, and remarkable bone formation was newly observed on the radiographic examination during chemotherapy. PMID:23520399

  5. Rotation axis demultiplexer enabling simultaneous computed tomography of multiple samples

    PubMed Central

    Trtik, Pavel; Geiger, Fabian; Hovind, Jan; Lang, Udo; Lehmann, Eberhard; Vontobel, Peter; Peetermans, Steven

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a device that allows for simultaneous tomographic imaging of samples on three independent rotational axes. This rotation axis demultiplexer (POLYTOM) is equipped with anti-backlash gears and placed on a standard sample rotation stage thus allowing for the transformation of the input rotation axis onto two additional parallel vertical axes. Consequently, three times the number of samples can be investigated within a given time period, thereby reducing the acquisition time of multiple sample tomographic investigations by a factor of three. The results of our pilot experiments using neutron tomographic imaging are presented. We foresee that the device will be of particular use for tomographic imaging of elongated samples at low-flux (e.g. neutron) sources; however, its use for the more widespread types of imaging techniques (e.g. X-rays) is not ruled out. The highlights of this new device for the purpose of the (neutron) computed tomography are: • Anti-backlash transformation of the input rotation onto two additional rotational axes. • Reduction of the acquisition time of the multiple sample tomographic investigations by a factor of three. • Low-cost. PMID:27158597

  6. [A Patient with Early-Stage Multiple System Atrophy Showing Augmented Nystagmus in Light].

    PubMed

    Oguri, Masayoshi; Nakamura, Yousuke; Hara, Ayako; Kitano, Hiroya; Motokura, Toru

    2015-04-01

    The ability to fix the eyes on a target, visual fixation, is important for the maintenance of equilibrium. The visual suppression (VS) test is one method of measuring the function of visual fixation. The test records caloric nystagmus by electrooculography, and the maximum slow phase velocity of caloric nystagmus in darkness is compared with the slow phase velocity in light with eyes fixed. Lesions of the cerebellum, brain stem, and cerebrum cause abnormalities of VS. We report a patient whose VS became a clue in the diagnosis of a disorder of the central nervous system. A 54-year-old man complained of dizziness, which gradually increased in frequency over 5 months. He visited several clinics, where vestibular neutritis and cervical spondylosis were suspected and treated without improvement. Although a pure-tone auditory test revealed bilateral normal hearing, a caloric test showed a weak response and VS was lost with augmentation of caloric nystagmus in light on both sides. Both eye tracking and optokinetic nystagmus tests were abnormal. Although magnetic resonance imaging showed no abnormalities, single photon emission computed tomography revealed decreased blood flow in the parietal area. VS of caloric nystagmus towards the side of a lesion is reduced or abolished after unilateral flocculus damage, and is abolished bilaterally after bilateral flocculus damage. In the case of a parietal lobe or pontine lesion, VS is strongly abolished, and even augmentation of caloric nystagmus may be observed. In the present case, the patient was diagnosed with multiple-system atrophy after onset of dizziness. PMID:26536776

  7. Seismic tomography shows that upwelling beneath Iceland is confined to the upper mantle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foulger, G.R.; Pritchard, M.J.; Julian, B.R.; Evans, J.R.; Allen, R.M.; Nolet, G.; Morgan, W.J.; Bergsson, B.H.; Erlendsson, P.; Jakobsdottir, S.; Ragnarsson, S.; Stefansson, R.; Vogfjord, K.

    2001-01-01

    We report the results of the highest-resolution teleseismic tomography study yet performed of the upper mantle beneath Iceland. The experiment used data gathered by the Iceland Hotspot Project, which operated a 35-station network of continuously recording, digital, broad-band seismometers over all of Iceland 1996-1998. The structure of the upper mantle was determined using the ACH damped least-squares method and involved 42 stations, 3159 P-wave, and 1338 S-wave arrival times, including the phases P, pP, sP, PP, SP, PcP, PKIKP, pPKIKP, S, sS, SS, SKS and Sdiff. Artefacts, both perceptual and parametric, were minimized by well-tested smoothing techniques involving layer thinning and offset-and-averaging. Resolution is good beneath most of Iceland from ??? 60 km depth to a maximum of ??? 450 km depth and beneath the Tjornes Fracture Zone and near-shore parts of the Reykjanes ridge. The results reveal a coherent, negative wave-speed anomaly with a diameter of 200-250 km and anomalies in P-wave speed, Vp, as strong as -2.7 per cent and in S-wave speed, Vs, as strong as -4.9 per cent. The anomaly extends from the surface to the limit of good resolution at ??? 450 km depth. In the upper ??? 250 km it is centred beneath the eastern part of the Middle Volcanic Zone, coincident with the centre of the ??? 100 mGal Bouguer gravity low over Iceland, and a lower crustal low-velocity zone identified by receiver functions. This is probably the true centre of the Iceland hotspot. In the upper ??? 200 km, the low-wave-speed body extends along the Reykjanes ridge but is sharply truncated beneath the Tjornes Fracture Zone. This suggests that material may flow unimpeded along the Reykjanes ridge from beneath Iceland but is blocked beneath the Tjornes Fracture Zone. The magnitudes of the Vp, Vs and Vp/Vs anomalies cannot be explained by elevated temperature alone, but favour a model of maximum temperature anomalies <200 K, along with up to ??? 2 per cent of partial melt in the depth range ??? 100-300 km beneath east-central Iceland. The anomalous body is approximately cylindrical in the top 250 km but tabular in shape at greater depth, elongated north-south and generally underlying the spreading plate boundary. Such a morphological change and its relationship to surface rift zones are predicted to occur in convective upwellings driven by basal heating, passive upwelling in response to plate separation and lateral temperature gradients. Although we cannot resolve structure deeper than ??? 450 km, and do not detect a bottom to the anomaly, these models suggest that it extends no deeper than the mantle transition zone. Such models thus suggest a shallow origin for the Iceland hotspot rather than a deep mantle plume, and imply that the hotspot has been located on the spreading ridge in the centre of the north Atlantic for its entire history, and is not fixed relative to other Atlantic hotspots. The results are consistent with recent, regional full-thickness mantle tomography and whole-mantle tomography images that show a strong, low-wave-speed anomaly beneath the Iceland region that is confined to the upper mantle and thus do not require a plume in the lower mantle. Seismic and geochemical observations that are interpreted as indicating a lower mantle, or core-mantle boundary origin for the North Atlantic Igneous Province and the Iceland hotspot should be re-examined to consider whether they are consistent with upper mantle processes.

  8. Singular value decomposition metrics show limitations of detector design in diffuse fluorescence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Leblond, Frederic; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2010-01-01

    The spatial resolution and recovered contrast of images reconstructed from diffuse fluorescence tomography data are limited by the high scattering properties of light propagation in biological tissue. As a result, the image reconstruction process can be exceedingly vulnerable to inaccurate prior knowledge of tissue optical properties and stochastic noise. In light of these limitations, the optimal source-detector geometry for a fluorescence tomography system is non-trivial, requiring analytical methods to guide design. Analysis of the singular value decomposition of the matrix to be inverted for image reconstruction is one potential approach, providing key quantitative metrics, such as singular image mode spatial resolution and singular data mode frequency as a function of singular mode. In the present study, these metrics are used to analyze the effects of different sources of noise and model errors as related to image quality in the form of spatial resolution and contrast recovery. The image quality is demonstrated to be inherently noise-limited even when detection geometries were increased in complexity to allow maximal tissue sampling, suggesting that detection noise characteristics outweigh detection geometry for achieving optimal reconstructions. PMID:21258566

  9. Feature-space assessment of electrical impedance tomography coregistered with computed tomography in detecting multiple contrast targets

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Kalpagam; Liu, Jeff; Kohli, Kirpal

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Fusion of electrical impedance tomography (EIT) with computed tomography (CT) can be useful as a clinical tool for providing additional physiological information about tissues, but requires suitable fusion algorithms and validation procedures. This work explores the feasibility of fusing EIT and CT images using an algorithm for coregistration. The imaging performance is validated through feature space assessment on phantom contrast targets. Methods: EIT data were acquired by scanning a phantom using a circuit, configured for injecting current through 16 electrodes, placed around the phantom. A conductivity image of the phantom was obtained from the data using electrical impedance and diffuse optical tomography reconstruction software (EIDORS). A CT image of the phantom was also acquired. The EIT and CT images were fused using a region of interest (ROI) coregistration fusion algorithm. Phantom imaging experiments were carried out on objects of different contrasts, sizes, and positions. The conductive medium of the phantoms was made of a tissue-mimicking bolus material that is routinely used in clinical radiation therapy settings. To validate the imaging performance in detecting different contrasts, the ROI of the phantom was filled with distilled water and normal saline. Spatially separated cylindrical objects of different sizes were used for validating the imaging performance in multiple target detection. Analyses of the CT, EIT and the EIT/CT phantom images were carried out based on the variations of contrast, correlation, energy, and homogeneity, using a gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM). A reference image of the phantom was simulated using EIDORS, and the performances of the CT and EIT imaging systems were evaluated and compared against the performance of the EIT/CT system using various feature metrics, detectability, and structural similarity index measures. Results: In detecting distilled and normal saline water in bolus medium, EIT as a stand-alone imaging system showed contrast discrimination of 47%, while the CT imaging system showed a discrimination of only 1.5%. The structural similarity index measure showed a drop of 24% with EIT imaging compared to CT imaging. The average detectability measure for CT imaging was found to be 2.375 ± 0.19 before fusion. After complementing with EIT information, the detectability measure increased to 11.06 ± 2.04. Based on the feature metrics, the functional imaging quality of CT and EIT were found to be 2.29% and 86%, respectively, before fusion. Structural imaging quality was found to be 66% for CT and 16% for EIT. After fusion, functional imaging quality improved in CT imaging from 2.29% to 42% and the structural imaging quality of EIT imaging changed from 16% to 66%. The improvement in image quality was also observed in detecting objects of different sizes. Conclusions: The authors found a significant improvement in the contrast detectability performance of CT imaging when complemented with functional imaging information from EIT. Along with the feature assessment metrics, the concept of complementing CT with EIT imaging can lead to an EIT/CT imaging modality which might fully utilize the functional imaging abilities of EIT imaging, thereby enhancing the quality of care in the areas of cancer diagnosis and radiotherapy treatment planning.

  10. Multiple pulmonary sclerosing hemangiomas (pneumocytoma) mimicking lung metastasis detected in fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai Karuppusamy; Rajan, Firoz; Mehta, Sangita; Mohanan, Vyshakh; Shinto, Ajit Sugunan

    2014-07-01

    Pulmonary sclerosing hemangioma (PSH), or the alternative name of "sclerosing pneumocytoma," is a rare benign neoplasm. PSH is often asymptomatic and presents as a solitary or multiple pulmonary nodules on radiologic imaging studies. Few articles have been reported to describe the fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) findings about PSH. The authors describe an interesting but uncommonly encountered cause of false positive FDG PET scan in the thorax in a 25-year-old woman, a known case of arteriovenous malformation of oral cavity who underwent embolization and presented with incidental detection of bilateral lung nodules. She is asymptomatic and is on follow-up. PMID:25210285

  11. Multiple pulmonary sclerosing hemangiomas (pneumocytoma) mimicking lung metastasis detected in fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai Karuppusamy; Rajan, Firoz; Mehta, Sangita; Mohanan, Vyshakh; Shinto, Ajit Sugunan

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary sclerosing hemangioma (PSH), or the alternative name of “sclerosing pneumocytoma,” is a rare benign neoplasm. PSH is often asymptomatic and presents as a solitary or multiple pulmonary nodules on radiologic imaging studies. Few articles have been reported to describe the fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) findings about PSH. The authors describe an interesting but uncommonly encountered cause of false positive FDG PET scan in the thorax in a 25-year-old woman, a known case of arteriovenous malformation of oral cavity who underwent embolization and presented with incidental detection of bilateral lung nodules. She is asymptomatic and is on follow-up. PMID:25210285

  12. Multiple-energy Techniques in Industrial Computerized Tomography

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Schneberk, D.; Martz, H.; Azevedo, S.

    1990-08-01

    Considerable effort is being applied to develop multiple-energy industrial CT techniques for materials characterization. Multiple-energy CT can provide reliable estimates of effective Z (Z{sub eff}), weight fraction, and rigorous calculations of absolute density, all at the spatial resolution of the scanner. Currently, a wide variety of techniques exist for CT scanners, but each has certain problems and limitations. Ultimately, the best multi-energy CT technique would combine the qualities of accuracy, reliability, and wide range of application, and would require the smallest number of additional measurements. We have developed techniques for calculating material properties of industrial objects that differ somewhat from currently used methods. In this paper, we present our methods for calculating Z{sub eff}, weight fraction, and density. We begin with the simplest case -- methods for multiple-energy CT using isotopic sources -- and proceed to multiple-energy work with x-ray machine sources. The methods discussed here are illustrated on CT scans of PBX-9502 high explosives, a lexan-aluminum phantom, and a cylinder of glass beads used in a preliminary study to determine if CT can resolve three phases: air, water, and a high-Z oil. In the CT project at LLNL, we have constructed several CT scanners of varying scanning geometries using {gamma}- and x-ray sources. In our research, we employed two of these scanners: pencil-beam CAT for CT data using isotopic sources and video-CAT equipped with an IRT micro-focal x-ray machine source.

  13. RTM-based Teleseismic Reflection Tomography with Free Surface Multiples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdick, S. A.; De Hoop, M. V.; van der Hilst, R. D.

    2013-12-01

    Receiver function analysis of teleseismic converted and free surface reflected phases has long been a cornerstone of lithospheric studies. Discontinuities in elastic properties are revealed by deconvolving the incident wavefield from scattered phases and projecting the time differences to depth to form an image. The accuracy of the image is determined to a large extent by the accuracy of the method and background velocity model used, but popular approaches for projecting receiver functions to depth commonly rely on simplifying assumptions of a 1D velocity and planar discontinuities. In tectonically complex regions like subduction zones and rift systems, strong heterogeneity can create an ambiguous tradeoff between the background velocity and the depth of the discontinuities. Furthermore, such structures are apt to create caustics at high frequencies, rendering ray-based methods inadequate. In order to better constrain the background velocity and correctly place the discontinuities at depth, we employ a novel reverse-time migration (RTM) based reflection tomography method. We adapt our reflection tomography from exploration seismology for use with teleseismic phases. Active source methods for exploration have focused on the annihilation of extended images - image gathers formed with different subsurface angle or offset information - as a means of judging the accuracy of the model. Applying these approaches to teleseismic data is untenable because 1) the sparse and uneven distribution of earthquake sources leads to the incomplete construction of extended image, 2) the imperfect separation and source deconvolution of the scattered wavefield render previous error measurements unreliable, and 3) the planar geometry of incoming arrivals makes measures of subsurface offset insensitive to perturbations in the model. To overcome these obstacles, we have developed a flexible approach based on pairwise single-source image correlations. We determine the success of the RTM and thus the accuracy of the background velocity model by cross-correlation of the images produced using different teleseismic sources. Single-source images are created by propagating the incident and scattered wavefields to depth using a Helmholtz operator and combining the by applying an inverse scattering operator. The error function is then comprised of the weighted image correlation power at depth windows. The optimized velocity model is the one that minimizes power in the correlations away from zero depth shift. We develop our inversion scheme using the Augmented Lagrangian method and solve by conjugate gradient on a spline basis. We present details of the method and a 2D application to data from LA RISTRA in the western United States. In order to be effective in 2D, we require teleseismic phases arriving at the array at a broad sweep of incidence angles. With the Andean and Aleutian subduction zones along the strike of the array between 35° and 85° epicentral distance, LA RISTRA provides the ideal illumination for a tomographic inversion.

  14. Towards Omni-Tomography—Grand Fusion of Multiple Modalities for Simultaneous Interior Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ge; Zhang, Jie; Gao, Hao; Weir, Victor; Yu, Hengyong; Cong, Wenxiang; Xu, Xiaochen; Shen, Haiou; Bennett, James; Furth, Mark; Wang, Yue; Vannier, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We recently elevated interior tomography from its origin in computed tomography (CT) to a general tomographic principle, and proved its validity for other tomographic modalities including SPECT, MRI, and others. Here we propose “omni-tomography”, a novel concept for the grand fusion of multiple tomographic modalities for simultaneous data acquisition in a region of interest (ROI). Omni-tomography can be instrumental when physiological processes under investigation are multi-dimensional, multi-scale, multi-temporal and multi-parametric. Both preclinical and clinical studies now depend on in vivo tomography, often requiring separate evaluations by different imaging modalities. Over the past decade, two approaches have been used for multimodality fusion: Software based image registration and hybrid scanners such as PET-CT, PET-MRI, and SPECT-CT among others. While there are intrinsic limitations with both approaches, the main obstacle to the seamless fusion of multiple imaging modalities has been the bulkiness of each individual imager and the conflict of their physical (especially spatial) requirements. To address this challenge, omni-tomography is now unveiled as an emerging direction for biomedical imaging and systems biomedicine. PMID:22768108

  15. Bone Scan or 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography; Which Modality Better Shows Bone Metastases of Breast Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Balci, Tansel A.; Koc, Zehra P.; Komek, Halil

    2012-01-01

    Background In this multicenter study, we aimed to compare concurrent 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) and bone scan results of breast cancer patient. Patients and Methods 162 patients with breast cancer (158 female, 4 male; mean age 50.6 years) were included in the study. FDG PET/CT examination was performed in all patients, and concurrent bone scintigraphy in 68 patients. The results of FDG PET/CT and bone scan were compared. Results 132 of the 162 patients were operated on because of breast cancer. 89 patients had metastasis, and 4 had recurrent disease according to FDG PET/CT results. Metastatic sites in order of frequency were lymph nodes, bone, lung, liver, adrenal gland, local skin or muscle, brain, and peritoneum (peritonitis carcinomatosa). The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and negative and positive predictive value of bone scintigraphy versus FDG PET/CT were 96 vs. 100%, 100 vs. 98%, 100 vs. 83%, 100 vs. 100%, and 90 vs. 100%, respectively. Conclusion Although the 2 modalities were in concordance with each other, in 5 (21%) cases, FDG PET/CT could not show bone metastasis which were detected on bone scintigraphy. Hence, bone scintigraphy was superior to FDG PET/CT in the determination of bone metastasis derived from breast cancer. However, FDG PET/CT should be considered for soft tissue metastasis. PMID:24647778

  16. Multiple sclerosis patients show sexual dimorphism in cytokine responses to myelin antigens

    PubMed Central

    Moldovan, Ioana R.; Cotleur, Anne C.; Zamor, Natacha; Butler, Robert S.; Pelfrey, Clara M.

    2008-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis affects more women than men. The reasons for this are unknown. Previously, we have shown significant differences in women versus men in inflammatory cytokine responses to the major protein component of myelin, proteolipid protein (PLP), which is thought to be a target in MS patients. Here, using the ELISPOT assay, we examined sex differences in single-cell secretion of Th1 and Th2 cytokines from freshly isolated PBMC between relapsing remitting (RR) MS patients and healthy individuals. Cells were stimulated with MS-associated antigens including proteolipid protein (PLP), myelin basic protein (MBP), myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), and non-disease related antigens. Our data show a sex bias in the cytokine responses to multiple MS-relevant myelin antigens: Women with MS show IFNγ-skewed responses and men with MS show IL-5-skewed responses. These data extend our previous findings (Pelfrey et al., 2002): (1) by demonstrating gender skewing in cytokine responses to an expanded myelin antigen repertoire, which includes MBP, MOG and PLP; (2) by showing TNFα and IL-10 do not display comparable gender skewing compared to IFNγ and IL5; (3) by defining the patient population as early, untreated RR MS patients to avoid confounding factors, such as different disease stages/disability and immunomodulatory therapy; and (4) by showing HLA type does not appear to underlie the gender differences. These findings may explain increased susceptibility to MS in women and could contribute to the differences in disease severity between men and women. PMID:18022700

  17. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography in the diagnostic evaluation of smoldering multiple myeloma: identification of patients needing therapy

    PubMed Central

    Siontis, B; Kumar, S; Dispenzieri, A; Drake, M T; Lacy, M Q; Buadi, F; Dingli, D; Kapoor, P; Gonsalves, W; Gertz, M A; Rajkumar, S V

    2015-01-01

    We studied 188 patients with a suspected smoldering multiple myeloma (MM) who had undergone a positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) scan as part of their clinical evaluation. PET-CT was positive (clinical radiologist interpretation of increased bone uptake and/or evidence of lytic bone destruction) in 74 patients and negative in 114 patients. Of these, 25 patients with a positive PET-CT and 97 patients with a negative PET-CT were observed without therapy and formed the study cohort (n=122). The probability of progression to MM within 2 years was 75% in patients with a positive PET-CT observed without therapy compared with 30% in patients with a negative PET-CT; median time to progression was 21 months versus 60 months, respectively, P=0.0008. Of 25 patients with a positive PET-CT, the probability of progression was 87% at 2 years in those with evidence of underlying osteolysis (n=16) and 61% in patients with abnormal PET-CT uptake but no evidence of osteolysis (n=9). Patients with positive PET-CT and evidence of underlying osteolysis have a high risk of progression to MM within 2 years when observed without therapy. These observations support recent changes to imaging requirements in the International Myeloma Working Group updated diagnostic criteria for MM. PMID:26495861

  18. Limited-projection-angle hybrid fluorescence molecular tomography of multiple molecules.

    PubMed

    Radrich, Karin; Mohajerani, Pouyan; Bussemer, Johanna; Schwaiger, Markus; Beer, Ambros J; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2014-04-01

    An advantage of fluorescence methods over other imaging modalities is the ability to concurrently resolve multiple moieties using fluorochromes emitting at different spectral regions. Simultaneous imaging of spectrally separated agents is helpful in interrogating multiple functions or establishing internal controls for accurate measurements. Herein, we investigated multimoiety imaging in the context of a limited-projection-angle hybrid fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT), and x-ray computed tomography implementation and the further registration with positron emission tomography (PET) data. Multichannel FMT systems may image fluorescent probes of varying distribution patterns. Therefore, it is possible that different channels may require different use of priors and regularization parameters. We examined the performance of automatically estimating regularization factors implementing priors, using data-driven regularization specific for limited-projection-angle schemes. We were particularly interested in identifying the implementation variations between hybrid-FMT channels due to probe distribution variation. For this reason, initial validation of the data-driven algorithm on a phantom was followed by imaging different agent distributions in animals, assuming superficial and deep seated activity. We further demonstrate the benefits of combining hybrid FMT with PET to gain multiple readings on the molecular composition of disease. PMID:24770661

  19. Uncovered: Progenitors of globular clusters showing off their multiple stellar populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Grijs, Richard; Li, Chengyuan; Deng, Licai; Geller, Aaron M.; Xin, Yu; Hu, Yi; Faucher-Giguere, Claude-Andre

    2016-01-01

    Stars in star clusters are thought to form in a single burst from a common progenitor cloud of molecular gas, resulting in so-called simple stellar populations. However, old, massive globular clusters—with ages greater than 10 billion years—often host multiple stellar populations, indicating that more than one star-forming event may have occurred during their lifetimes. The most popular scenario for their formation invokes colliding stellar winds from late-stage, asymptotic-giant-branch stars. If this were correct, the initial globular cluster masses should be at least 10 times more massive than their current masses of typically a few x 105 Msun. However, large populations of clusters with masses greater than a few x 106 Msun are not found in the local Universe. Here we present Hubble Space Telescope observations of three 1-2 billion-year-old, massive star clusters in the Magellanic Clouds which show unequivocal evidence of burst-like star-formation activity that occurred a few x 108 years after their initial formation era. The spatial distributions of the younger stellar generations suggest that they may have originated from ambient gas clouds accreted by the clusters while orbiting in the disks of their host galaxies rather than from colliding stellar winds. Simple models imply that such clusters could indeed accrete sufficient gas reservoirs to form these stars. This may eventually give rise to the appearance of multiple stellar populations in globular clusters.

  20. Multiple idiopathic external and internal resorption: Case report with cone-beam computed tomography findings

    PubMed Central

    Uzuntas, Ceren Feriha; Kurt, Hakan

    2014-01-01

    Root resorption is loss of dental hard tissue as a result of clastic activities. The dental hard tissue of permanent teeth does not normally undergo resorption, except in cases of inflammation or trauma. However, there are rare cases of tooth resorption of an unknown cause, known as "idiopathic root resorption." This report would discuss a rare case of multiple idiopathic resorption in the permanent maxillary and mandibular teeth of an otherwise healthy 36-year-old male patient. In addition to a clinical examination, the patient was imaged using conventional radiography and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). The examinations revealed multiple external and internal resorption of the teeth in all four quadrants of the jaws with an unknown cause. Multiple root resorption is a rare clinical phenomenon that should be examined using different radiographic modalities. Cross-sectional CBCT is useful in the diagnosis and examination of such lesions. PMID:25473640

  1. Multiple idiopathic external and internal resorption: Case report with cone-beam computed tomography findings.

    PubMed

    Celikten, Berkan; Uzuntas, Ceren Feriha; Kurt, Hakan

    2014-12-01

    Root resorption is loss of dental hard tissue as a result of clastic activities. The dental hard tissue of permanent teeth does not normally undergo resorption, except in cases of inflammation or trauma. However, there are rare cases of tooth resorption of an unknown cause, known as "idiopathic root resorption." This report would discuss a rare case of multiple idiopathic resorption in the permanent maxillary and mandibular teeth of an otherwise healthy 36-year-old male patient. In addition to a clinical examination, the patient was imaged using conventional radiography and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). The examinations revealed multiple external and internal resorption of the teeth in all four quadrants of the jaws with an unknown cause. Multiple root resorption is a rare clinical phenomenon that should be examined using different radiographic modalities. Cross-sectional CBCT is useful in the diagnosis and examination of such lesions. PMID:25473640

  2. Methamphetamine-sensitized rats show augmented dopamine release to methylphenidate stimulation: a positron emission tomography using [18F]fallypride.

    PubMed

    Ota, Miho; Ogawa, Shintaro; Kato, Koichi; Wakabayashi, Chisato; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2015-04-30

    Previous studies demonstrated that patients with schizophrenia show greater sensitivity to psychostimulants than healthy subjects. Sensitization to psychostimulants and resultant alteration of dopaminergic neurotransmission in rodents have been suggested as a useful model of schizophrenia. This study was aimed to examine the use of methylphenidate as a psychostimulant to induce dopamine release and that of [18F]fallypride as a radioligand to estimate the release in a rat model of schizophrenia. Six rats were scanned by positron emission tomography (PET) twice before and after methylphenidate challenge to evaluate dopamine release. After the scans, these rats were sensitized by using repeated methamphetamine (MAP) administration. Then, they were re-scanned twice again before and after methylphenidate challenge to evaluate whether MAP-sensitized rats show greater sensitivity to methylphenidate. We revealed a main effect of MAP-pretreatment and that of metylphenidate challenge. We found that % change of distribution volume ratio after repeated administration of MAP was greater than that before sensitization. These results suggest that methylphenidate-induced striatal dopamine release increased after sensitization to MAP. PET scan using [18F]fallypride at methylphenidate-challenge may provide a biological marker for schizophrenia and be useful to diagnose schizophrenia. PMID:25703679

  3. Genome-wide association study of blood lead shows multiple associations near ALAD.

    PubMed

    Warrington, Nicole M; Zhu, Gu; Dy, Veronica; Heath, Andrew C; Madden, Pamela A F; Hemani, Gibran; Kemp, John P; Mcmahon, George; St Pourcain, Beate; Timpson, Nicholas J; Taylor, Caroline M; Golding, Jean; Lawlor, Debbie A; Steer, Colin; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Davey Smith, George; Evans, David M; Whitfield, John B

    2015-07-01

    Exposure to high levels of environmental lead, or biomarker evidence of high body lead content, is associated with anaemia, developmental and neurological deficits in children, and increased mortality in adults. Adverse effects of lead still occur despite substantial reduction in environmental exposure. There is genetic variation between individuals in blood lead concentration but the polymorphisms contributing to this have not been defined. We measured blood or erythrocyte lead content, and carried out genome-wide association analysis, on population-based cohorts of adult volunteers from Australia and UK (N = 5433). Samples from Australia were collected in two studies, in 1993-1996 and 2002-2005 and from UK in 1991-1992. One locus, at ALAD on chromosome 9, showed consistent association with blood lead across countries and evidence for multiple independent allelic effects. The most significant single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs1805313 (P = 3.91 × 10(-14) for lead concentration in a meta-analysis of all data), is known to have effects on ALAD expression in blood cells but other SNPs affecting ALAD expression did not affect blood lead. Variants at 12 other loci, including ABO, showed suggestive associations (5 × 10(-6) > P > 5 × 10(-8)). Identification of genetic polymorphisms affecting blood lead reinforces the view that genetic factors, as well as environmental ones, are important in determining blood lead levels. The ways in which ALAD variation affects lead uptake or distribution are still to be determined. PMID:25820613

  4. Multiple-frequency tomography of the upper mantle beneath the African/Iberian collision zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnin, Mickaël; Nolet, Guust; Villaseñor, Antonio; Gallart, Josep; Thomas, Christine

    2014-09-01

    During the Cenozoic, the geodynamics of the western Mediterranean domain has been characterized by a complex history of subduction of Mesozoic oceanic lithosphere. The final stage of these processes is proposed to have led to the development of the Calabria and Gibraltar arcs, whose formation is still under debate. In this study, we take advantage of the dense broad-band station networks now available in the Alborán Sea region, to develop a high-resolution 3-D tomographic P velocity model of the upper mantle beneath the African/Iberian collision zone that will better constraint the past dynamics of this zone. The model is based on 13200 teleseismic arrival times recorded between 2008 and 2012 at 279 stations for which cross-correlation delays are measured with a new technique in different frequency bands centred between 0.03 and 1.0 Hz, and for the first time interpreted using multiple frequency tomography. Our model shows, beneath the Alborán Sea, a strong (4 per cent) fast vertically dipping anomaly observed to at least 650 km depth. The arched shape of this anomaly, and its extent at depth, are coherent with a lithospheric slab, thus favouring the hypothesis of a westward consumption of the Ligurian ocean slab by roll-back during Cenozoic. In addition to this fast anomaly in the deep upper mantle, high intensity slow anomalies are widespread in the lithosphere and asthenosphere beneath Morocco and southern Spain. These anomalies are correlated at the surface with the position of the Rif and Atlas orogens and with Cenozoic volcanic fields. We thus confirm the presence, beneath Morocco, of an anomalous (hot?) upper mantle, but without clear indication for a lateral spreading of the Canary plume to the east.

  5. AFLP fingerprinting shows that a single Prymnesium parvum harmful algal bloom consists of multiple clones.

    PubMed

    Barreto, Felipe S; Tomas, Carmelo R; McCartney, Michael A

    2011-01-01

    Due to slow rates of molecular evolution, DNA sequences used to identify and build phylogenies of algal species involved in harmful algal blooms (HABs) are generally invariant at the intraspecific level. This means that it is unknown whether HAB events result from the growth of a single clone, a few dominant clones, or multiple clones. This is true despite the fact that several physiological and demographic traits, as well as toxicity, are known to vary across clones. We generated AFLP fingerprints from a set of 6 clonal isolates, taken from a bloom of Prymnesium parvum at a striped bass mariculture facility. This new haptophyte bloom was recently implicated in fish kills at several sites in the United States. The AFLP fragments were highly reproducible and showed that all isolates were distinguishable due to abundant AFLPs unique to single isolates. These results demonstrate that blooms can be genetically diverse outbreaks and indicate that AFLP can be a powerful molecular tool for characterizing and monitoring this diversity. PMID:21885572

  6. Cytokine profiles show heterogeneity of interferon-β response in multiple sclerosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Hegen, Harald; Adrianto, Indra; Lessard, Christopher J.; Millonig, Alban; Bertolotto, Antonio; Comabella, Manuel; Giovannoni, Gavin; Guger, Michael; Hoelzl, Martina; Khalil, Michael; Fazekas, Franz; Killestein, Joep; Lindberg, Raija L.P.; Malucchi, Simona; Mehling, Matthias; Montalban, Xavier; Rudzki, Dagmar; Schautzer, Franz; Sellebjerg, Finn; Sorensen, Per Soelberg; Deisenhammer, Florian; Steinman, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate serum cytokine profiles for their utility to determine the heterogeneous responses to interferon (IFN)–β treatment in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: Patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) or clinically isolated syndrome receiving de novo IFN-β treatment were included in this prospective, observational study. Number of relapses and changes in disability were assessed 2 years prior to and 2 years after initiation of treatment. Sera were collected at baseline and after 3 months on therapy. Cytokine levels in sera were assessed by Luminex multiplex assays. Baseline cytokine profiles were grouped by hierarchical clustering analysis. Demographic features, changes in cytokines, and clinical outcome were then assessed in the clustered patient groups. Results: A total of 157 patients were included in the study and clustered into 6 distinct subsets by baseline cytokine profiles. These subsets differed significantly in their clinical and biological response to IFN-β therapy. Two subsets were associated with patients who responded poorly to therapy. Two other subsets, associated with a good response to therapy, showed a significant reduction in relapse rates and no worsening of disability. Each subset also had differential changes in cytokine levels after 3 months of IFN-β treatment. Conclusions: There is heterogeneity in the immunologic pathways of the RRMS population, which correlates with IFN-β response. PMID:26894205

  7. Signal simulation and signal processing for multiple reference optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhaus, Kai; Subhash, Hrebesh; Dsouza, Roshan; Hogan, Josh; Wilson, Carol; Leahy, Martin

    2015-03-01

    The generation of a synthetic MR-OCT signal is presented and compared to a real acquired signal. Multiple reference optical coherence tomography (MR-OCT) is a novel time-domain interferometric system. The MR-OCT principle is adding a partial mirror to extend the axial scan range, which effectively extends the scan depth for imaging. The actuation of the scan mirror required for time-domain OCT, was demonstrated to operate with a low cost miniature voice coil, such as a speaker extracted from a smartphone or CD/DVD pick-up system. Building a compact and cost-effective optical imaging system will enable affordable medical diagnosis at low-resource setting applications. The partial mirror recirculates multiple reflections (orders) into the interferometric system and the increase of optical path delay does increase the beat frequency of the interference signal. The synthesis of such an interference signal using a numerical method is described in this manuscript.

  8. Imaging of neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis and stroke: Recent developments in positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Bieneke; Vugts, Danielle J; Funke, Uta; Molenaar, Ger T; Kruijer, Perry S; van Berckel, Bart N M; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; Windhorst, Albert D

    2016-03-01

    Neuroinflammation is thought to play a pivotal role in many diseases affecting the brain, including Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis and stroke. Neuroinflammation is characterised predominantly by microglial activation, which can be visualised using positron emission tomography (PET). Traditionally, translocator protein 18kDa (TSPO) is the target for imaging of neuroinflammation using PET. In this review, recent preclinical and clinical research using PET in Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis and stroke is summarised. In addition, new molecular targets for imaging of neuroinflammation, such as monoamine oxidases, adenosine receptors and cannabinoid receptor type 2, are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuro Inflammation edited by Helga E. de Vries and Markus Schwaninger. PMID:26643549

  9. Case report: gallium study showing a rare form of multiple myeloma

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, E.; Kasner, J.R.

    1981-12-01

    A case study is presented in which a rare form of multiple myeloma with soft tissue involvememt was diagnosed by a gallium scan using 3 mCi of Ga-67 citrate. Subsequent resting cardiac blood pool images suggested pericardial rather than myocardial involvement. (JMT)

  10. Computed Tomography Angiography of Situs Inversus, Portosystemic Shunt and Multiple Vena Cava Anomalies in a Dog

    PubMed Central

    OUI, Heejin; KIM, Jisun; BAE, Yeonho; OH, Juyeon; PARK, Seungjo; LEE, Gahyun; JEON, Sunghoon; CHOI, Jihye

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT A 5-year-old Shih Tzu was presented with intermittent vomiting and anorexia. Microhepatica and reversed position of the abdominal organs were observed on radiography. Ultrasonographically, portosystemic shunt (PSS) was tentatively diagnosed. Computed tomography (CT) revealed that the distended portal vein drained into the left hepatic vein. The caudal vena cava (CdVC) split postrenally and converged at the renal level. Cranial to this, the azygos continuation of the CdVC was confirmed. In the thorax, a persistent left cranial vena cava (CrVC) was found along with right CrVC. This is the first report of a dog with persistent left CrVC and multiple abdominal malformations. CT angiography was useful in evaluating the characteristics of each vascular anomaly and determining the required surgical correction in this complex case. PMID:23842117

  11. Optical Coherence Tomography in Multiple Sclerosis and Neuromyelitis Optica: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Noval, Susana; Contreras, Inés; Muñoz, Silvia; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Manzano, Beatriz; Rebolleda, Gema

    2011-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) uses light interference patterns to produce a cross-sectional image of the retina. It is capable of measuring the unmyelinated axons of the retinal ganglionar cells as they converge on the optic disc. In a disease like multiple sclerosis (MS), in which axonal loss has been identified as an important cause of sustained disability, it may prove an invaluable tool. OCT has demonstrated that axonal loss occurs after each episode of optic neuritis and that the degree of axonal loss is correlated to visual outcomes. Furthermore, axonal loss occurs in MS even in the absence of inflammatory episodes, and the degree of this loss is correlated with the duration of the disease process, with more thinning as the disease advances and in progressive forms. Thus, OCT retinal nerve fiber layer measurements may represent an objective outcome measure with which to evaluate the effect of treatment. PMID:22096638

  12. The role of positron emission tomography with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose integrated with computed tomography in the evaluation of patients with multiple myeloma undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Patriarca, Francesca; Carobolante, Francesca; Zamagni, Elena; Montefusco, Vittorio; Bruno, Benedetto; Englaro, Emanuaela; Nanni, Cristina; Geatti, Onelio; Isola, Miriam; Sperotto, Alessandra; Buttignol, Silvia; Stocchi, Raffaella; Corradini, Paolo; Cavo, Michele; Fanin, Renato

    2015-06-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) integrated with computed tomography (PET/CT) has been reported to be useful for screening myelomatous lesions at diagnosis in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) and for monitoring response to autologous stem cell transplantation (auto-SCT). The aim of the study was to evaluate the prognostic significance of PET/CT in MM patients who received allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). Patients who underwent upfront auto-SCT followed by allo-SCT, either as consolidation or salvage treatment, were studied with PET/CT before and/or within 6 months after allo-SCT. The number, the maximum standard uptake value (SUV), and the location (medullary or extramedullary) of focal lesions (FLs) were recorded and investigated as predictors of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) by univariate and multivariate analyses. Fifty-four patients had a PET/CT scan before allo-SCT. Of these, 22 patients (41%) had a negative PET/CT scan, 11 patients (20%) showed 1 to 3 FLs, and 21 patients (39%) had either a diffuse bone marrow involvement or more than 3 FLs. SUV was >4.2 in 21 patients (39%) and extramedullary disease (EMD) was present in 6 patients (11%). Multivariate analysis of prognostic factors before allo-SCT showed that persistence of EMD at transplantation was an independent predictor of poor PFS, whereas OS was negatively influenced by unrelated donor and SUV > 4.2. Fifty-nine patients had a PET/CT scan within 6 months after allo-SCT. Multivariate analysis of post-treatment variables showed that persistence of EMD and failure to obtain complete response or very good partial response after allo-SCT were strongly associated with shorter PFS and OS. Of the 46 patients with evaluable PET/CT scans both before and 6 months after allo-SCT, the 23 patients who maintained or reached a PET complete remission showed a significantly prolonged PFS and OS compared with the 23 patients with persistence of any PET positivity (2-year PFS: 51% versus 25%, P= .03; 2-year OS: 81% versus 47%, P= .001). This study indicates that PET/CT imaging before and after allo-SCT is significantly associated with the outcome, suggesting the utility of this technique for MM staging before allo-SCT and for response monitoring after the transplantation. PMID:25754658

  13. Patient No-Show Predictive Model Development using Multiple Data Sources for an Effective Overbooking Approach

    PubMed Central

    Hanauer, D.A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Patient no-shows in outpatient delivery systems remain problematic. The negative impacts include underutilized medical resources, increased healthcare costs, decreased access to care, and reduced clinic efficiency and provider productivity. Objective To develop an evidence-based predictive model for patient no-shows, and thus improve overbooking approaches in outpatient settings to reduce the negative impact of no-shows. Methods Ten years of retrospective data were extracted from a scheduling system and an electronic health record system from a single general pediatrics clinic, consisting of 7,988 distinct patients and 104,799 visits along with variables regarding appointment characteristics, patient demographics, and insurance information. Descriptive statistics were used to explore the impact of variables on show or no-show status. Logistic regression was used to develop a no-show predictive model, which was then used to construct an algorithm to determine the no-show threshold that calculates a predicted show/no-show status. This approach aims to overbook an appointment where a scheduled patient is predicted to be a no-show. The approach was compared with two commonly-used overbooking approaches to demonstrate the effectiveness in terms of patient wait time, physician idle time, overtime and total cost. Results From the training dataset, the optimal error rate is 10.6% with a no-show threshold being 0.74. This threshold successfully predicts the validation dataset with an error rate of 13.9%. The proposed overbooking approach demonstrated a significant reduction of at least 6% on patient waiting, 27% on overtime, and 3% on total costs compared to other common flat-overbooking methods. Conclusions This paper demonstrates an alternative way to accommodate overbooking, accounting for the prediction of an individual patient’s show/no-show status. The predictive no-show model leads to a dynamic overbooking policy that could improve patient waiting, overtime, and total costs in a clinic day while maintaining a full scheduling capacity. PMID:25298821

  14. Optical coherence tomography and its use in optical neuritis and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kemenyova, P; Turcani, P; Sutovsky, S; Waczulikova, I

    2014-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography is a relatively new non-invasive imaging technique used for obtaining the images and quantifying the layers of the retina. It also provides information about optic nerve head topography, peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, and macular volume which correlates with axonal loss. Until now, this method was used mainly in ophthalmology; now it has emerged as relevant in neurology as well. RNFL thickness is of particular interest in optic neuropathies and in multiple sclerosis. In sclerosis multiplex, axonal loss occurs as early as the first stages and the quantification of the RNFL thickness by OCT provides an indirect measure of axonal and neuronal loss in the anterior visual pathways. Because OCT is noninvasive, easy to obtain, and highly reproducible, it can be used as a marker of axonal loss and as an endpoint in clinical trials. This paper presents a comprehensive summary of the use of this new diagnostic method in multiple sclerosis patients (Fig. 1, Ref. 58). PMID:25428543

  15. Visual modeling shows that avian host parents use multiple visual cues in rejecting parasitic eggs

    PubMed Central

    Spottiswoode, Claire N.; Stevens, Martin

    2010-01-01

    One of the most striking outcomes of coevolution between species is egg mimicry by brood parasitic birds, resulting from rejection behavior by discriminating host parents. Yet, how exactly does a host detect a parasitic egg? Brood parasitism and egg rejection behavior provide a model system for exploring the relative importance of different visual cues used in a behavioral task. Although hosts are discriminating, we do not know exactly what cues they use, and to answer this it is crucial to account for the receiver's visual perception. Color, luminance (“perceived lightness”) and pattern information have never been simultaneously quantified and experimentally tested through a bird's eye. The cuckoo finch Anomalospiza imberbis and its hosts show spectacular polymorphisms in egg appearance, providing a good opportunity for investigating visual discrimination owing to the large range of patterns and colors involved. Here we combine field experiments in Africa with modeling of avian color vision and pattern discrimination to identify the specific visual cues used by hosts in making rejection decisions. We found that disparity between host and foreign eggs in both color and several aspects of pattern (dispersion, principal marking size, and variability in marking size) were important predictors of rejection, especially color. These cues correspond exactly to the principal differences between host and parasitic eggs, showing that hosts use the most reliable available cues in making rejection decisions, and select for parasitic eggs that are increasingly mimetic in a range of visual attributes. PMID:20421497

  16. Multiple Regression Methods Show Great Potential for Rare Variant Association Tests

    PubMed Central

    Xu, ChangJiang; Ladouceur, Martin; Dastani, Zari; Richards, J. Brent

    2012-01-01

    The investigation of associations between rare genetic variants and diseases or phenotypes has two goals. Firstly, the identification of which genes or genomic regions are associated, and secondly, discrimination of associated variants from background noise within each region. Over the last few years, many new methods have been developed which associate genomic regions with phenotypes. However, classical methods for high-dimensional data have received little attention. Here we investigate whether several classical statistical methods for high-dimensional data: ridge regression (RR), principal components regression (PCR), partial least squares regression (PLS), a sparse version of PLS (SPLS), and the LASSO are able to detect associations with rare genetic variants. These approaches have been extensively used in statistics to identify the true associations in data sets containing many predictor variables. Using genetic variants identified in three genes that were Sanger sequenced in 1998 individuals, we simulated continuous phenotypes under several different models, and we show that these feature selection and feature extraction methods can substantially outperform several popular methods for rare variant analysis. Furthermore, these approaches can identify which variants are contributing most to the model fit, and therefore both goals of rare variant analysis can be achieved simultaneously with the use of regression regularization methods. These methods are briefly illustrated with an analysis of adiponectin levels and variants in the ADIPOQ gene. PMID:22916111

  17. Juvenile mice show greater flexibility in multiple choice reversal learning than adults

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Carolyn; Wilbrecht, Linda

    2011-01-01

    We hypothesized that decision-making strategies in juvenile animals, rather than being immature, are optimized to navigate the uncertainty and instability likely to be encountered in the environment at the time of the animal’s transition to independence. We tested juvenile and young adult mice on discrimination and reversal of a 4-choice and 2-choice odor-based foraging task. Juvenile mice (P26–27) learned a 4-choice discrimination and reversal faster than adults (P60–70), making fewer perseverative and distraction errors. Juvenile mice had shorter choice latencies and more focused search strategies. In both ages, performance of the task was significantly impaired by a lesion of the dorsomedial frontal cortex. Our data show that the frontal cortex can support highly flexible behavior in juvenile mice at a time coincident with weaning and first independence. The unexpected developmental decline in flexibility of behavior one month later suggests that frontal cortex based executive function may not inevitably become more flexible with age, but rather may be developmentally tuned to optimize exploratory and exploitative behavior for each life stage. PMID:21949556

  18. Simultaneous multiple-depths en-face optical coherence tomography using multiple signal excitation of acousto-optic deflectors.

    PubMed

    Zurauskas, Mantas; Rogers, John; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh

    2013-01-28

    We present a novel low-coherence interferometer configuration, equipped with acousto-optic deflectors that can be used to simultaneously acquire up to eight time domain optical coherence tomography en-face images. The capabilities of the configuration are evaluated in terms of depth resolution, signal to noise ratio and crosstalk. Then the configuration is employed to demonstrate simultaneous en-face optical coherence tomography imaging at five different depths in a specimen of armadillidium vulgare. PMID:23389175

  19. A study of retinal parameters measured by optical coherence tomography in patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Sai-Jing; You, Yi-An; Zhang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    AIM To investigate the difference of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness and macular fovea thickness/volume between multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and healthy normal individuals using optical coherence tomography (OCT) and assess its association with visual field parameters. METHODS Thirty consecutive MS patients and 28 healthy controls were recruited in this prospective study. Comprehensive standardized ophthalmic examinations included visual acuity, cycloplegic refraction, intraocular pressure, gonioscopy, visual field, and RNFL thickness and macular fovea thickness/volume detection using Humphrey OCT. Mean values for the thickness of the peripapillary RNFL and macular volume were calculated. Associations between visual field parameters and RNFL thickness/macular volume were analyzed by Pearson correlation analysis. RESULTS The RNFL thicknesses in each quadrant, the average macular thickness, and the average macular volume in MS patients were all less than those in healthy controls, with statistically significant differences. The RNFL thickness and macular fovea thickness/volume were greater in eyes without optic neuritis than in eyes with optic neuritis. The average visual field parameters had positive correlations with the RNFL thickness and negative correlations with macular parameters in MS patients. CONCLUSION OCT measurements can effectively identify the nerve changes of MS patients, which provide more data for the diagnosis of MS. PMID:26682175

  20. Dermascope assisted interactive patient interface for multiple reference optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dsouza, Roshan; Subhash, Hrebesh; Neuhaus, Kai; Hogan, Josh; Wilson, Carol; Leahy, Martin

    2014-02-01

    There has been a growing interest in the development of a low cost depth-resolved non-invasive dermis imaging tool for both clinical and fundamental investigations of skin diseases. Multiple reference optical coherence tomography (MR-OCT) is a recently developed miniature time-domain low coherence interferometeric imaging platform, which promises to fit into robust, cost-effective designs that are virtually solid state, typical of handheld devices. In this paper we demonstrate the feasibility of MR-OCT for dermis imaging applications by incorporating it in a dermascope, which provides simultaneous imaging of dermis and an interactive tool for beam steering and registration of the OCT imaging beam at the dermis area. This allows the user to interactively investigate the depth resolved information of any target position of interest on the dermis by pointing the mouse cursor within the dermis image or selecting the area on a touch screen. Image acquisition is controlled with software that displays both the dermis and MR-OCT axial-scan, and allows detailed information of the depth scan signal to screen for skin disease. We believe this approach will have a significant impact on medical care.

  1. Optical coherence tomography: a window into the mechanisms of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Frohman, Elliot M; Fujimoto, James G; Frohman, Teresa C; Calabresi, Peter A; Cutter, Gary; Balcer, Laura J

    2009-01-01

    Summary The pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterized by demyelination, which culminates in a reduction in axonal transmission. Axonal and neuronal degeneration seem to be concomitant features of MS and are probably the pathological processes responsible for permanent disability in this disease. The retina is unique within the CNS in that it contains axons and glia but no myelin, and it is, therefore, an ideal structure within which to visualize the processes of neurodegeneration, neuroprotection, and potentially even neurorestoration. In particular, the retina enables us to investigate a specific compartment of the CNS that is targeted by the disease process. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) can provide high-resolution reconstructions of retinal anatomy in a rapid and reproducible fashion and, we believe, is ideal for precisely modeling the disease process in MS. In this Review, we provide a broad overview of the physics of OCT, the unique properties of this method with respect to imaging retinal architecture, and the applications that are being developed for OCT to understand mechanisms of tissue injury within the brain. PMID:19043423

  2. Hierarchical Bayesian regularization of reconstructions for diffuse optical tomography using multiple priors

    PubMed Central

    Abdelnour, Farras; Genovese, Christopher; Huppert, Theodore

    2010-01-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a non-invasive brain imaging technique that uses low-levels of near-infrared light to measure optical absorption changes due to regional blood flow and blood oxygen saturation in the brain. By arranging light sources and detectors in a grid over the surface of the scalp, DOT studies attempt to spatially localize changes in oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin in the brain that result from evoked brain activity during functional experiments. However, the reconstruction of accurate spatial images of hemoglobin changes from DOT data is an ill-posed linearized inverse problem, which requires model regularization to yield appropriate solutions. In this work, we describe and demonstrate the application of a parametric restricted maximum likelihood method (ReML) to incorporate multiple statistical priors into the recovery of optical images. This work is based on similar methods that have been applied to the inverse problem for magnetoencephalography (MEG). Herein, we discuss the adaptation of this model to DOT and demonstrate that this approach provides a means to objectively incorporate reconstruction constraints and demonstrate this approach through a series of simulated numerical examples. PMID:21258532

  3. A modified discrete algebraic reconstruction technique for multiple grey image reconstruction for limited angle range tomography.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhiting; Guan, Yong; Liu, Gang; Chen, Xiangyu; Li, Fahu; Guo, Pengfei; Tian, Yangchao

    2016-03-01

    The `missing wedge', which is due to a restricted rotation range, is a major challenge for quantitative analysis of an object using tomography. With prior knowledge of the grey levels, the discrete algebraic reconstruction technique (DART) is able to reconstruct objects accurately with projections in a limited angle range. However, the quality of the reconstructions declines as the number of grey levels increases. In this paper, a modified DART (MDART) was proposed, in which each independent region of homogeneous material was chosen as a research object, instead of the grey values. The grey values of each discrete region were estimated according to the solution of the linear projection equations. The iterative process of boundary pixels updating and correcting the grey values of each region was executed alternately. Simulation experiments of binary phantoms as well as multiple grey phantoms show that MDART is capable of achieving high-quality reconstructions with projections in a limited angle range. The interesting advancement of MDART is that neither prior knowledge of the grey values nor the number of grey levels is necessary. PMID:26917150

  4. Optical coherence tomography versus visual evoked potential in multiple sclerosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Fatehi, Farzad; Mehr, Lida Kiani; Dehghani, Alireza

    2012-01-01

    Background Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive instrument, which can be used to estimate the thickness of the retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) and provides an indirect measurement of axonal destruction in multiple sclerosis (MS). The main aim of this study was to find out any correlations between P100 latency in visual evoked potential (VEP) and RNFL thickness. Methods The patients with the definite history of optic neuritis regardless of the diagnosis of MS were included. The eyes with the history of blurred vision and increased VEP latency (> 115 milliseconds) were considered as cases and the eyes with normal latency were regarded as controls. RNFL thickness was compared between two groups of cases and controls. In addition, the correlation between VEP P100 latency and RNFL thickness in four quadrants of superior, nasal, inferior and temporal fields was estimated by spearman correlation coefficient. RNFL thickness between the patients with history of clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) was also compared to other two subgroups of RRMS and SPMS. Results There was significant negative correlation between VEP P100 latency and RNFL. In all four quadrants, with increasing VEP latency, RNFL thickness decreased. Furthermore, there was significant correlation between P100 latencies and mean RNFL thickness [Pearson correlation coefficient = -0.527, P < 0.001; RNFL (mean) = (-0.44 ± 0.087) × P100 + (153.6 ± 10.94)]. Comparing RNFL thickness between three groups of CIS, RRMS, and SPSM, no significant difference was detected in RNFL thickness (P > 0.05). Power analysis demonstrated that RNFL average had the highest area under curve. Conclusion OCT does have good correlations with P100 latency, indicating retinal non-myelinated axonal involvement in early stages in addition to the myelinated axonal involvement. However, it cannot be used as the sole test in evaluating visual pathway in optic neuritis and complementary tests as VEPs are recommended. PMID:24250852

  5. Current and future potential of retinal optical coherence tomography in multiple sclerosis with and without optic neuritis.

    PubMed

    Balk, Lisanne J; Petzold, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disorder characterized by inflammation and neuroaxonal degeneration. The latter is held responsible for the irreversible disability in patients with MS. The eye is a unique window into the brain. With the advent of optical coherence tomography, accurate quantification of retinal layer thickness has become feasible. Neuroaxonal degeneration affecting the retinal layers is structurally and functionally related to pathology in the visual pathways, which is most severe following MS optic neuritis. This is relevant to recognize because MS optic neuritis may mask the subtle thinning of retinal layers associated with global CNS atrophy, which is also related to more global loss of neurological function. Taken together, optical coherence tomography stands at the brink of becoming a validated imaging biomarker for monitoring neurodegeneration in MS and to provide end points for clinical trials. PMID:24832034

  6. Optical Coherence Tomography Reflects Brain Atrophy in Multiple Sclerosis: A Four-Year Study

    PubMed Central

    Saidha, Shiv; Al-Louzi, Omar; Ratchford, John N.; Bhargava, Pavan; Oh, Jiwon; Newsome, Scott D.; Prince, Jerry L.; Pham, Dzung; Roy, Snehashis; van Zijl, Peter; Balcer, Laura J.; Frohman, Elliot M.; Reich, Daniel S.; Crainiceanu, Ciprian; Calabresi, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this work was to determine whether atrophy of specific retinal layers and brain substructures are associated over time, in order to further validate the utility of optical coherence tomography (OCT) as an indicator of neuronal tissue damage in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods Cirrus high-definition OCT (including automated macular segmentation) was performed in 107 MS patients biannually (median follow-up: 46 months). Three-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging brain scans (including brain-substructure volumetrics) were performed annually. Individual-specific rates of change in retinal and brain measures (estimated with linear regression) were correlated, adjusting for age, sex, disease duration, and optic neuritis (ON) history. Results Rates of ganglion cell + inner plexiform layer (GCIP) and whole-brain (r = 0.45; p<0.001), gray matter (GM; r = 0.37; p<0.001), white matter (WM; r = 0.28; p = 0.007), and thalamic (r = 0.38; p < 0.001) atrophy were associated. GCIP and whole-brain (as well as GM and WM) atrophy rates were more strongly associated in progressive MS (r = 0.67; p<0.001) than relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS; r = 0.33; p = 0.007). However, correlation between rates of GCIP and whole-brain (and additionally GM and WM) atrophy in RRMS increased incrementally with step-wise refinement to exclude ON effects; excluding eyes and then patients (to account for a phenotype effect), the correlation increased to 0.45 and 0.60, respectively, consistent with effect modification. In RRMS, lesion accumulation rate was associated with GCIP (r = −0.30; p = 0.02) and inner nuclear layer (r = −0.25; p = 0.04) atrophy rates. Interpretation Over time GCIP atrophy appears to mirror whole-brain, and particularly GM, atrophy, especially in progressive MS, thereby reflecting underlying disease progression. Our findings support OCT for clinical monitoring and as an outcome in investigative trials. PMID:26190464

  7. Does distracting pain justify performing brain computed tomography in multiple traumas with mild head injury?

    PubMed

    Sadeghian, Homa; Motiei-Langroudi, Rouzbeh

    2016-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant health concern classified as mild, moderate, and severe. Although the indications to perform brain computed tomography (CT) are clear in moderate and severe cases, there still exists controversy in mild TBI (mTBI). We designed the study to evaluate the significance of distracting pain in patients with mTBI. The study population included patients with mild traumatic brain injury (GCS ≥13). Moderate and high risk factors including age <18 months or ≥60 years, moderate to severe or progressive headache, ≥2 episodes of vomiting, loss of consciousness (LOC), post-traumatic amnesia, seizure or prior antiepileptic use, alcohol intoxication, previous neurosurgical procedures, uncontrolled hypertension, anticoagulant use, presence of focal neurologic deficits, deformities in craniofacial region, and penetrating injuries were excluded. The patients were then grouped based on presence (DP+) or absence (DP-) of another organ fracture with severe pain (based on VAS). The primary outcome was any abnormal findings on brain CT scans; 330 patients were enrolled (184 DP+ and 146 DP-). Overall, two DP+ and one DP- patients had mild cerebral edema in brain CT (p > 0.99). No patients had any neurologic symptoms or signs in follow-up. Our results show that in the absence of any other risk factors, distracting pain from other organs (limbs, pelvis, and non-cervical spine) cannot be regarded as a brain CT indication in patients with mild TBI, as it is never associated with significant intracranial lesions. PMID:26931118

  8. Multiple Baseline SAR Tomography's Performance Analysis in Forest 3-D Structure Mapping with long term ALOS L band repeat pass InSAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Q.; Zebker, H. A.

    2013-12-01

    Acquiring accurate measurement of three-dimensional structure of forest globally , is key to improve quantitative understanding of the state and dynamics of ecosystems, particularly global carbon cycle. Moreover, forest contains a large portion of Earth's renewable natural resources. All these require an accurate, timely and cost-effective global forest vertical structure mapping. Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) remote sensing is widely acknowledged as a powerful tool to accomplish this task. Within the last decade, a number of experimental demonstrations of 3-D InSAR techniques have suggested the possibility of remotely sensing global 3-D vegetation structure. Among all the 3-D InSAR techniques, Multiple Baseline SAR Tomography( MB Tomo-SAR) is a very promising one. Multiple baseline SAR tomography exploits InSAR images acquired from different baselines and form a synthetic aperture in the vertical direction in order to retrieval vertical structure. Though theoretical predictions and several laboratory experiments show great reconstruction results, applying the method in real world condition still face a lot of challenges, including low acquisition number, irregular sample distribution, atmospheric phase noise and time decorrelation effect. In this article, we use L band ALOS spaceborne SAR data in Hawaii area to test the performance of MB TomoSAR . In the process, advanced Fourier beamforming method, atmospheric phase screen removal algorithm and time decorrelation effect are all applied. In addition, we also utilize the Landsat vegetation index and the result with other 3-D reconstruction methods as comparison to validate its performance.

  9. An objective rationale for the choice of regularisation parameter with application to global multiple-frequency S-wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaroli, C.; Sambridge, M.; Lévêque, J.-J.; Debayle, E.; Nolet, G.

    2013-06-01

    In a linear ill-posed inverse problem, the regularisation parameter (damping) controls the balance between minimising both the residual data misfit and the model norm. Poor knowledge of data uncertainties often makes the selection of damping rather arbitrary. To go beyond that subjectivity, an objective rationale for the choice of damping is presented, which is based on the coherency of delay-time estimates in different frequency bands. Our method is tailored to the problem of global Multiple-Frequency Tomography (MFT), using a data set of 287 078 S-wave delay-times measured in five frequency bands (10, 15, 22, 34, 51 s central periods). Whereas for each ray path the delay-time estimates should vary coherently from one period to the other, the noise most likely is not coherent. Thus, the lack of coherency of the information in different frequency bands is exploited, using an analogy with the cross-validation method, to identify models dominated by noise. In addition, a sharp change of behaviour of the model ℓ∞-norm, as the damping becomes lower than a threshold value, is interpreted as the signature of data noise starting to significantly pollute at least one model component. Models with damping larger than this threshold are diagnosed as being constructed with poor data exploitation. Finally, a preferred model is selected from the remaining range of permitted model solutions. This choice is quasi-objective in terms of model interpretation, as the selected model shows a high degree of similarity with almost all other permitted models (correlation superior to 98% up to spherical harmonic degree 80). The obtained tomographic model is displayed in mid lower-mantle (660-1910 km depth), and is shown to be compatible with three other recent global shear-velocity models. A wider application of the presented rationale should permit us to converge towards more objective seismic imaging of the Earth's mantle.

  10. An objective rationale for the choice of regularisation parameter with application to global multiple-frequency S-wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaroli, C.; Sambridge, M.; Lévêque, J.-J.; Debayle, E.; Nolet, G.

    2013-10-01

    In a linear ill-posed inverse problem, the regularisation parameter (damping) controls the balance between minimising both the residual data misfit and the model norm. Poor knowledge of data uncertainties often makes the selection of damping rather arbitrary. To go beyond that subjectivity, an objective rationale for the choice of damping is presented, which is based on the coherency of delay-time estimates in different frequency bands. Our method is tailored to the problem of global multiple-frequency tomography (MFT), using a data set of 287 078 S-wave delay times measured in five frequency bands (10, 15, 22, 34, and 51 s central periods). Whereas for each ray path the delay-time estimates should vary coherently from one period to the other, the noise most likely is not coherent. Thus, the lack of coherency of the information in different frequency bands is exploited, using an analogy with the cross-validation method, to identify models dominated by noise. In addition, a sharp change of behaviour of the model ℓ∞-norm, as the damping becomes lower than a threshold value, is interpreted as the signature of data noise starting to significantly pollute at least one model component. Models with damping larger than this threshold are diagnosed as being constructed with poor data exploitation. Finally, a preferred model is selected from the remaining range of permitted model solutions. This choice is quasi-objective in terms of model interpretation, as the selected model shows a high degree of similarity with almost all other permitted models (correlation superior to 98% up to spherical harmonic degree 80). The obtained tomographic model is displayed in the mid lower-mantle (660-1910 km depth), and is shown to be compatible with three other recent global shear-velocity models. A wider application of the presented rationale should permit us to converge towards more objective seismic imaging of Earth's mantle.

  11. Multiple Determinations of Sperm DNA Fragmentation Show That Varicocelectomy Is Not Indicated for Infertile Patients with Subclinical Varicocele

    PubMed Central

    García-Peiró, Agustín; Ribas-Maynou, Jordi; Oliver-Bonet, María; Navarro, Joaquima; Checa, Miguel A.; Nikolaou, Alexandros; Amengual, María J.; Abad, Carlos; Benet, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    Varicocele is one of the most common causes of low semen quality, which is reflected in high percentages of sperm cells with fragmented DNA. While varicocelectomy is usually performed to ameliorate a patient's fertility, its impact on sperm DNA integrity in the case of subclinical varicocele is poorly documented. In this study, multiple DNA fragmentation analyses (TUNEL, SCD, and SCSA) were performed on semen samples from sixty infertile patients with varicocele (15 clinical varicoceles, 19 clinical varicoceles after surgical treatment, 16 subclinical varicoceles, and 10 subclinical varicoceles after surgical treatment). TUNEL, SCD, and SCSA assays all showed substantial sperm DNA fragmentation levels that were comparable between subclinical and clinical varicocele patients. Importantly, varicocelectomy did improve sperm quality in patients with clinical varicocele; however, this was not the case in patients with subclinical varicocele. In summary, although infertile patients with clinical and subclinical varicocele have similar sperm DNA quality, varicocelectomy should only be advised for patients with clinical varicocele. PMID:24967335

  12. Monocular and binocular low-contrast visual acuity and optical coherence tomography in pediatric multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Waldman, Amy T.; Hiremath, Girish; Avery, Robert A.; Conger, Amy; Pineles, Stacy L.; Loguidice, Michael J.; Talman, Lauren S.; Galetta, Kristin M.; Shumski, Michael J.; Wilson, James; Ford, E'tona; Lavery, Amy M.; Conger, Darrel; Greenberg, Benjamin M.; Ellenberg, Jonas H.; Frohman, Elliot M.; Balcer, Laura J.; Calabresi, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Low-contrast letter acuity and optical coherence tomography (OCT) capture visual dysfunction and axonal loss in adult-onset multiple sclerosis (MS), and have been proposed as secondary outcome metrics for therapeutic trials. Clinical trials will soon be launched in pediatric MS, but such outcome metrics have not been well-validated in this population. Objectives To determine whether MS onset during childhood and adolescence is associated with measurable loss of visual acuity and thinning of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL), whether such features are noted only in the context of clinical optic nerve inflammation (optic neuritis, ON) or are a feature of MS even in the absence of optic nerve relapses, and to define the optimal methods for such detection. Study design Cross-sectional study Methods Monocular and binocular high- and low-contrast letter acuity and contrast sensitivity were assessed in a cross-sectional cohort of children (ages 5 to 17 years) with MS (N=22 patients, 44 eyes; 8 patients with a history of ON) and disease-free controls (N=29 patients; 58 eyes) from three academic centers. Binocular summation was determined by calculating the number of letters correctly identified using the binocular score minus the better eye score for each visual test. RNFL thickness was measured using OCT (Stratus OCT-3). Results were analyzed in terms of “eyes” as: MS ON+, MS ON−, and control eyes. Generalized estimating equation (GEE) regression models were used to compare patients to controls. Results Traditional high-contrast visual acuity scores did not differ between MS ON+, MS ON−, and controls eyes. MS ON+ eyes had decreased monocular (p<0.001) and decreased binocular (p=0.007) low-contrast letter acuity (Sloan 1.25% contrast charts) scores. Monocular visual acuity did not differ when comparing MS ON− and control eyes. The magnitude of binocular summation using low-contrast charts was similar for pediatric MS participants and controls and was not diminished in children with a history of ON. While the mean RNFL thickness for all MS eyes (103±17 μm) trended lower when compared to corresponding measures in control eyes (109±9 μm, p=0.085), we confirmed a highly significant reduction in mean RNFL thickness in MS eyes with a history of ON (86±22 μm, p<0.001). RNFL thickness of MS ON− eyes in pediatric MS patients (109±11 μm) did not differ from controls (p=0.994). Conclusions Low-contrast letter acuity detects subtle visual loss in MS patients with prior ON, consistent with incomplete recovery, a finding further supported by RNFL loss in ON affected eyes. In MS patients with prior unilateral ON, binocular acuity is decreased; however, the magnitude of binocular summation is preserved, unlike adult-onset MS who exhibit a reduced capacity for visual compensation in the context of unilateral injury. Also unlike findings in adult-onset MS, we did not demonstrate RNFL thinning in ON− eyes of children and adolescents with MS. Further validation is required to confirm whether neurodegeneration of visual pathways occurs in the absence of relapse, and thus whether OCT will serve as a sensitive metric for such pathology in the pediatric and adolescent MS context. PMID:24683535

  13. A tetrahedron beam computed tomography benchtop system with a multiple pixel field emission x-ray tube

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaochao; Kim, Joshua; Laganis, Philip; Schulze, Derek; Liang, Yongguang; Zhang, Tiezhi

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of Tetrahedron Beam Computed Tomography (TBCT) using a carbon nanotube (CNT) multiple pixel field emission x-ray (MPFEX) tube. Methods: A multiple pixel x-ray source facilitates the creation of novel x-ray imaging modalities. In a previous publication, the authors proposed a Tetrahedron Beam Computed Tomography (TBCT) imaging system which comprises a linear source array and a linear detector array that are orthogonal to each other. TBCT is expected to reduce scatter compared with Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) and to have better detector performance. Therefore, it may produce improved image quality for image guided radiotherapy. In this study, a TBCT benchtop system has been developed with an MPFEX tube. The tube has 75 CNT cold cathodes, which generate 75 x-ray focal spots on an elongated anode, and has 4 mm pixel spacing. An in-house-developed, 5-row CT detector array using silicon photodiodes and CdWO4 scintillators was employed in the system. Hardware and software were developed for tube control and detector data acquisition. The raw data were preprocessed for beam hardening and detector response linearity and were reconstructed with an FDK-based image reconstruction algorithm. Results: The focal spots were measured at about 1 × 2 mm2 using a star phantom. Each cathode generates around 3 mA cathode current with 2190 V gate voltage. The benchtop system is able to perform TBCT scans with a prolonged scanning time. Images of a commercial CT phantom were successfully acquired. Conclusions: A prototype system was developed, and preliminary phantom images were successfully acquired. MPFEX is a promising x-ray source for TBCT. Further improvement of tube output is needed in order for it to be used in clinical TBCT systems. PMID:21992368

  14. 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron-Emission Tomography Findings with Anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Encephalitis that Showed Variable Degrees of Catatonia: Three Cases Report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Mi; Kang, Joong Koo; Oh, Jungsu S.; Kim, Jae Seung; Shin, Yong-Wook; Kim, Chang-Yoon

    2014-01-01

    Catatonia is one of the main symptoms of anti-N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis. However, it is unknown whether metabolic changes observed with 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography (FDG-PET) are correlated with the severity of the catatonic symptoms and clinical course. Three patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis showing variable degrees of catatonia were performed with FDG-PET scans during the acute and recovery phase. PET findings showed hypermetabolism in the frontotemporoparietal regions and bilateral basal ganglia in the patient with mild catatonia, but more widespread hypermetabolic regions including the thalamus and brainstem were observed in the patients with more severe catatonia. Follow-up PET scans in one patient showed mild hypermetabolism in the right basal ganglia that correlated with mild rigidity and tonic posturing in the left extremities. Extent of cerebral metabolic changes correlates with the severity of catatonia accompanied by behavioural, motor, autonomic, and breathing abnormalities in anti-NMDAR encephalitis. PMID:25625091

  15. Multiple Rapid Swallow Maneuver Enhances the Clinical Utility of High-Resolution Manometry in Patients Showing Ineffective Esophageal Motility

    PubMed Central

    Min, Yang Won; Shin, Inseub; Son, Hee Jung; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The clinical significance of ineffective esophageal motility (IEM) together with multiple rapid swallow (MRS) has not been yet evaluated in the Chicago Classification v3.0. This study evaluated the adjunctive role of MRS in IEM and determined the criteria of abnormal MRS to maximize the utility of IEM. We analyzed 186 patients showing IEM or normal esophageal motility (NEM), who underwent esophageal high-resolution impedance–manometry for esophageal symptoms. Two different criteria for abnormal MRS were applied to IEM subjects, resulting in 2 corresponding subgroups: IEM-A when distal contractile integral (DCI) ratio between an average wet swallows and MRS contraction was <1 and IEM-B when MRS contraction DCI was <450 mm Hg-s-cm. One IEM subject inadequately performed MRS. Among the remaining 52 IEM subjects, 18 (34.6%) were classified into IEM-A and 23 (44.2%) into IEM-B. IEM subjects showed less complete bolus transit (median 0.0%, interquartile range 0.0–20.0% vs 60.0%, 30.0–80.0; P < 0.001) resulting in higher impaired bolus transit than NEM subjects (98.1% vs 66.9%, P = 0.001). IEM-B subjects showed additionally higher pathologic bolus exposure than NEM subjects (55.6% vs 29.3%, P = 0.001), whereas IEM-A subjects could not. Although IEM-B subjects had the highest prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease among the subjects groups, it did not reach statistical significance. In conclusion, IEM patients with abnormal MRS contraction have an increased risk of prolonged bolus clearance, poor bolus transit, and pathologic bolus exposure. IEM patients need to be assessed concerning whether MRS contraction DCI is <450 mm Hg-s-cm to segregate clinically relevant patients. PMID:26448010

  16. Multiple-frequency SH-wave tomography of the western US upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yue; Sigloch, Karin; Nolet, Guust

    2009-09-01

    We estimate the SH-wave velocity and attenuation structures of the western US upper mantle using the dense network of the USArray and new techniques: we observe a multiple-frequency data set of both traveltime and amplitude anomalies, and interpret these with full 3-D finite-frequency sensitivity kernels. Amplitudes show stronger frequency dependence than traveltimes. We perform a joint inversion on the measured traveltime and amplitude anomalies, interpreting them in terms of velocity and attenuation heterogeneities. Aside from the expected clear division between the slow, tectonically active region in the west and the fast craton in the east, several interesting smaller velocity anomalies are observed. The subduction along the Cascades at 100-300 km depths shows lateral discontinuity, with a `slab hole' (absence of fast anomalies) observed around 45°N. The delaminated Sierra Nevada Mountains root is observed to have sunk to 200 km depth. The Yellowstone plume seems to have an origin (weak slow velocity anomalies) near 1000 km depth, but the plume conduit seems to be interrupted by a fast anomaly, which is identified as a fragment of the Farallon slab. The S-velocity model shows a trench-perpendicular `slab gap' (absence of fast anomalies) at almost the same location as in the P model recently published by Sigloch et al. (2008). The methodological improvements described in the first paragraph have several benefits. Amplitude data help to sharpen the edges of narrow velocity heterogeneities in the shallow upper mantle. The focusing effect from velocity heterogeneity dominates over that of attenuation and must be considered when interpreting amplitude anomalies. In general, velocity and attenuation heterogeneities correlate positively, suggesting that temperature plays a major role in forming the anomalies.

  17. Spontaneous multiple mutations show both proximal spacing consistent with chronocoordinate events and alterations with p53-deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hill, Kathleen A; Wang, Jicheng; Farwell, Kelly D; Scaringe, William A; Sommer, Steve S

    2004-10-01

    Analysis of spontaneous multiple mutations in normal and tumor cells may constrain hypotheses about the mechanisms responsible for multiple mutations and provide insight into the mutator phenotype. In a previous study, spontaneous doublets in Big Blue mice were dramatically more frequent than expected by chance and exhibited a mutation pattern similar to that observed for single mutations [Mutat. Res. 452 (2000) 219]. The spacing between mutations in doublets was generally closer than expected by chance and the distribution of mutation spacing fit an exponential, albeit with substantial scatter. We now analyze 2658 additional mutants and confirm that doublets are enhanced dramatically relative to chance expectation. The spacing, frequency and pattern of spontaneous doublets and multiplets (domuplets) are examined as a function of age, tissue type, p53-deficiency and neoplasia in the new and combined data. The new and combined data confirm that the distribution of the spacing between mutations in doublets is non-random with the mutations more closely spaced than expected by chance (P < 0.0005; combined data), consistent with temporally coordinate (chronocoordinate) events. An exponential provides an excellent fit to the distribution (R2 = 0.98) and estimates that half of doublets have mutations separated by 120 nucleotides or less (the "half-life of mutation spacing"). We make several novel observations: (i) singlets and doublets show similar overall increases in frequency with age (ii) doublet frequency may be lower in the male germline, consistent with the generally reduced mutation frequency in the male germline (iii) doublet frequencies are elevated in somatic tissues of p53-deficient mice (Li-Fraumini cancer syndrome model; P = 0.005) and (iv) doublets and singlets in tumors from p53-deficient mice have a different mutation pattern (P = 0.007). The observations are consistent with chronocoordinate occurrence of spontaneous doublets and multiplets due to a transient error-prone condition and do not suggest a major role for the recently discovered Y family of error-prone polymerases. The enhancement of doublets in p53-deficient mice may contribute to cancer risk. PMID:15450421

  18. Fast linear solver for radiative transport equation with multiple right hand sides in diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jingfei; Kim, Hyun K.; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that radiative transfer equation (RTE) provides more accurate tomographic results than its diffusion approximation (DA). However, RTE-based tomographic reconstruction codes have limited applicability in practice due to their high computational cost. In this article, we propose a new efficient method for solving the RTE forward problem with multiple light sources in an all-at-once manner instead of solving it for each source separately. To this end, we introduce here a novel linear solver called block biconjugate gradient stabilized method (block BiCGStab) that makes full use of the shared information between different right hand sides to accelerate solution convergence. Two parallelized block BiCGStab methods are proposed for additional acceleration under limited threads situation. We evaluate the performance of this algorithm with numerical simulation studies involving the Delta-Eddington approximation to the scattering phase function. The results show that the single threading block RTE solver proposed here reduces computation time by a factor of 1.5-3 as compared to the traditional sequential solution method and the parallel block solver by a factor of 1.5 as compared to the traditional parallel sequential method. This block linear solver is, moreover, independent of discretization schemes and preconditioners used; thus further acceleration and higher accuracy can be expected when combined with other existing discretization schemes or preconditioners.

  19. Tomography using multiple wavelengths in digital holography: method, simulations, and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montfort, Frédéric; Charrière, Florian; Colomb, Tristan; Kuehn, Jonas; Cuche, Etienne; Depeursinge, Christian

    2006-04-01

    In this paper we present a method for tomographic imaging using multiple wavelengths in digital holographic microscopy. This method is based on the recording at different wavelengths equally separated in the k-domain, in off-axis geometry, of the interference between a reference wave and an object wave reflected by a microscopic sample and magnified by a microscope objective. A couple charged device (CCD) camera records consecutively the resulting holograms, which are then numerically reconstructed to obtain their resulting wavefront. Those wavefronts are then summed. The result of this operation is a constructive addition of complex waves in the selected plane and destructive addition in the others. Varying the plane of interest enables the scan the object in depth. For the presented simulations and experiments, twenty wavelengths are used in the 480-700 nm range. An object consisting of irregularly stairs with heights of 375, 525, 975, 1200 and 1275 nm is reconstructed. Its lateral dimensions are 250 × 250 microns. The results show clearly a 3D imaging technique with axial resolution under the micron.

  20. Reverse-time migration-based reflection tomography using teleseismic free surface multiples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdick, S.; de Hoop, M. V.; Wang, S.; van der Hilst, R. D.

    2014-02-01

    Converted and multiply reflected phases from teleseismic events are routinely used to create structural images of the crust-mantle boundary (Moho) and the elasticity contrasts within the crust and upper mantle. The accuracy of these images is to a large extent determined by the background velocity model used to propagate these phases to depth. In order to improve estimates of 3-D velocity variations and, hence, improve imaging, we develop a method of reverse-time migration-based reflection tomography for use with wavefields from teleseismic earthquakes recorded at broad-band seismograph arrays. Reflection tomography makes use of data redundancy-that is, the ability to generate numerous structural images of the subsurface with different parts of the wavefield. In exploration seismology (where it is known as migration velocity analysis) reflection tomography typically involves the generation of an extended image (e.g. offset- or angle-gathers), and the fitness of the background model is evaluated through the application of image-domain annihilators. In regional-scale passive source seismology, however, annihilation-based methods are inadequate because the sparse and irregular distribution of teleseismic sources is not likely to produce illumination over a sufficient range of angles. To overcome this problem we turn towards a source-indexed moveout scheme. Instead of extended image annihilation, we determine the success of the tomographic velocity model by cross correlating images produced with multiply scattered waves from different teleseismic sources. The optimal velocity model is the one that minimizes correlation power between windowed images away from zero depth shift. We base our inversion scheme on the seismic adjoint method and a conjugate gradient solver. For each image pair, the update direction is determined by correlations between downgoing wavefields with upgoing adjoint wavefields for both images. The sensitivity kernels used in this method is similar to those found in other forms of adjoint tomography, but their shapes are controlled by the spatial distribution of the error function. We present the method and a proof-of-concept with 2-D synthetic data.

  1. [A Case Strongly Suspected of Being Pulmonary Toxocariasis Showing Multiple Pulmonary Nodules with a Disappearing and Reappearing Halo Sign].

    PubMed

    Takakura, Akira; Harada, Shinya; Katono, Ken; Igawa, Satoshi; Katagiri, Masato; Yanase, Nobuo; Masuda, Noriyuki

    2015-03-01

    We report herein on a case strongly suspected of being pulmonary toxocariasis. A 22-year-old Indonesian man referred to our hospital presented with abnormal chest shadows upon medical examination. He had no symptoms. He did not have any pets nor did he eat raw beef or chicken. Hematological examination revealed eosinophilia and elevation of IgE. Chest computed tomography revealed 3 pulmonary nodules with the halo sign. We suspected a parasite infection and performed antiparasite antibody testing. Ascaris suum was slightly positive on the screening test. As specific antibody against the larval excretory-secretory products of Toxocara canis, measured at the National Institute of Infectious Diseases, was positive (level 3 up to 8). Subsequently, the abnormal chest shadows disappeared. However, two months later, 2 pulmonary nodules with the halo sign reappeared in other places. Diagnostic therapy with albendazole was performed for 8 weeks. Mild hepatic impairment emerged during therapy, but it was within the allowed range. Thereafter, the results improved for the imaging findings, eosinophilia, serum IgE level, and specific antibody. The antibody level became negative two months after the treatment had ended. We should consider toxocariasis in the differential diagnosis of migratory nodular shadows with the halo sign on chest computed tomography, and immunoserological testing is useful for the diagnosis. PMID:26552124

  2. An Objective Rationale for the Choice of Regularisation Parameter with Application to Global Multiple-Frequency S-Wave Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaroli, C.; Sambridge, M.; Leveque, J. J.; Debayle, E.; Nolet, G.

    2014-12-01

    In a linear ill-posed inverse problem, the regularisation parameter (damping) controls the balance between minimising both the residual data misfit and the model norm. Poor knowledge of data uncertainties often makes the selection of damping rather arbitrary. To go beyond that subjectivity, an objective rationale for the choice of damping is presented, which is based on the coherency of delay-time estimates in different frequency bands. Our method is tailored to the problem of global Multiple-Frequency Tomography, using a data set of 287078 S-wave delay-times measured in five frequency bands (10, 15, 22, 34, 51 s central periods). Whereas for each ray path the delay-time estimates should vary coherently from one period to the other, the noise most likely is not coherent. Thus, the lack of coherency of the information in different frequency bands is exploited, using an analogy with the cross-validation method, to identify models dominated by noise.In addition, a sharp change of behaviour of the model infinity-norm, as the damping becomes lower than a threshold value, is interpreted as the signature of data noise starting to significantly pollute at least one model component. Models with damping larger than this threshold are diagnosed as being constructed with poor data exploitation.Finally, a preferred model is selected from the remaining range of permitted model solutions. This choice is quasi-objective in terms of model interpretation, as the selected model shows a high degree of similarity with almost all other permitted models. The obtained tomographic model is displayed in mid lower-mantle (660-1910 km depth), and is shown to be mostly compatible with three other recent global shear-velocity models, while significant differences can be noticed. A wider application of the presented rationale should permit us to converge towards more objective seismic imaging of the Earth's mantle, using as much as possible of the relevant structural information in the data. This work was recently published: Zaroli, C., Sambridge, M., Lévêque, J.-J., Debayle, E., and Nolet, G. (2013) - Solid Earth, 4, 357-371, doi:10.5194/se-4-357-2013

  3. A Novel Immunofluorescent Computed Tomography (ICT) Method to Localise and Quantify Multiple Antigens in Large Tissue Volumes at High Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Parfitt, Geraint J.; Xie, Yilu; Reid, Korey M.; Dervillez, Xavier; Brown, Donald J.; Jester, James V.

    2012-01-01

    Current immunofluorescence protocols are limited as they do not provide reliable antibody staining within large tissue volumes (mm3) and cannot localise and quantify multiple antigens or cell populations in the same tissue at high resolution. To address this limitation, we have developed an approach to three-dimensionally visualise large tissue volumes (mm3) at high resolution (<1 µm) and with multiple antigen labelling, for volumetric and quantitative analysis. This is made possible through computer reconstruction of serial sectioned and sequentially immunostained butyl-methyl methacrylate (BMMA) embedded tissue. Using this novel immunofluorescent computed tomography (ICT) approach, we have three-dimensionally reconstructed part of the murine lower eyelid that contains the meibomian gland and localised cell nuclei (DAPI), Ki67 and cytokeratin 1 (CK1), as well as performing non-linear optical (NLO) microscopy imaging of collagen, to assess cell density, cell proliferation, gland keratinisation and gland volume respectively. Antigenicity was maintained after four iterative stains on the same tissue, suggesting that there is no defined limit to the number of antigens that can be immunostained for reconstruction, as long as the sections remain intact and the previous antibody has been successfully eluted. BMMA resin embedding also preserved fluorescence of transgenic proteins. We propose that ICT may provide valuable high resolution, three-dimensional biological maps of multiple biomolecules within a single tissue or organ to better characterise and quantify tissue structure and function. PMID:23300899

  4. Organic anion transporter 2 transcript variant 1 shows broad ligand selectivity when expressed in multiple cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Hotchkiss, Adam G.; Berrigan, Liam; Pelis, Ryan M.

    2015-01-01

    Organic anion transporter 2 (OAT2) is likely important for renal and hepatic drug elimination. Three variants of the OAT2 peptide sequence have been described – OAT2 transcript variant 1 (OAT2-tv1), OAT2 transcript variant 2 (OAT2-tv2), and OAT2 transcript variant 3 (OAT2-tv3). Early studies helping to define the ligand selectivity of OAT2 failed to identify the variant used, and the studies used several heterologous expression systems. In preliminary studies using OAT2-tv1, we failed to observe transport of several previously identified substrates, leading us to speculate that ligand selectivity of OAT2 differs with variant and/or heterologous expression system. The purpose was to further investigate the ligand selectivity of the OAT2 variants expressed in multiple cell types. We cloned OAT2-tv1 and OAT2-tv2, but were unsuccessful at amplifying mRNA for OAT2-tv3 from human kidney. OAT2-tv1 and OAT2-tv2 were individually expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK), Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK), or Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. mRNA for OAT2-tv1 and OAT2-tv2 was demonstrated in each cell type transfected with the respective construct, indicating their expression. OAT2-tv1 trafficked to the plasma membrane of all three cell types, but OAT2-tv2 did not. OAT2-tv1 transported penciclovir in all three cell types, but failed to transport para-aminohippurate, succinate, glutarate, estrone-3-sulfate, paclitaxel or dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate – previously identified substrates of OAT2-tv2. Not surprising given its lack of plasma membrane expression, OAT2-tv2 failed to transport any of the organic solutes examined, including penciclovir. Penciclovir transport by OAT2-tv1 was sensitive to large (e.g., cyclosporine A) and small (e.g., allopurinol) organic compounds, as well as organic anions, cations and neutral compounds, highlighting the multiselectivity of OAT2-tv1. The potencies with which indomethacin, furosemide, cyclosporine A and cimetidine inhibited OAT2-tv1 are in good agreement with previous studies using this variant, but inconsistent with studies using OAT2 with an unidentified sequence. This study shows that organic molecules with diverse physicochemical properties interact with OAT2-tv1, making it a likely site of drug interactions. Many previously identified substrates of OAT2 are not transported by OAT2-tv1, suggesting that variant and/or expression system may contribute. Future work should establish the expression pattern and ligand selectivity of OAT2-tv3. PMID:26500550

  5. A Finite Element Mesh Aggregating Approach to Multiple-Source Reconstruction in Bioluminescence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jingjing; Liu, Fang; Jiao, L. C.; Yang, Shuyuan; He, Xiaowei

    2011-01-01

    A finite element mesh aggregating approach is presented to reconstruct images of multiple internal bioluminescence sources. Rather than assuming independence between mesh nodes, the proposed reconstruction strategy exploits spatial structure of nodes and aggregation feature of density distribution on the finite element mesh to adaptively determine the number of sources and to improve the quality of reconstructed images. With the proposed strategy integrated in the regularization-based reconstruction process, reconstruction algorithms need no a priori knowledge of source number; even more importantly, they can automatically reconstruct multiple sources that differ greatly in density or power. PMID:22144980

  6. Investigation of a quantitative photoacoustic tomography fitting procedure on multiple targets in reflection geometry with diffuse optical measurement assistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chen; Kumavor, Patrick D.; Zhu, Quing

    2012-02-01

    Traditional Photoacoustic tomography provides the distribution of absorbed optical energy densities which are the products of the optical absorption coefficients and fluences. However, the absorption coefficient is the only functional parameter that is related to disease diagnosis, such as cancer. In this paper, we report the experimental investigation of an improved fitting procedure which can quantitatively characterize optical absorption coefficients of multiple targets. The original fitting procedure was proposed by us and used for a single target. The fitting procedure included a complete photoacoustic forward model, which incorporated an analytical model of light transport and a model of acoustic propagation. Using the target information from the PAT images and the background information from diffuse optical measurements (DOM), the fitting method minimizes the photoacoustic measurements and forward model data and recovers the target absorption coefficient quantitatively. The fitting errors in the absorption coefficients can reach 20% to 100% if the original fitting procedure is directly used on multiple targets. In our improved fitting method, the ratio between the photoacoustic intensities is introduced and served as extra input to the fitting procedure. As a result, the total number of unknown parameters is reduced and fitting accuracy is improved. The hybrid system used in the experiment combines a 64-channel photoacoustic system with a frequency-domain diffused optical system. The experiment was performed in the reflection geometry suitable for breast imaging. Phantom experiments include the combination of high contrast and low contrast targets with absorption coefficients ranging from 0.07 to 0.28 cm-1 and with different spatial separations. The phantoms were inserted into a chicken breast tissue. The fitting errors of multiple targets were reduced to less than 20% for both high and low contrast targets. These results illustrate the potential application of this quantitative DOM-assisted photoacoustic fitting procedure to image and diagnose breast cancer having multiple and complex tumor distribution.

  7. Robust Crystalline Hybrid Solid with Multiple Channels Showing High Anhydrous Proton Conductivity and a Wide Performance Temperature Range.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hong-Bin; Ren, Li-Te; Ning, Wei-Hua; Liu, Shao-Xian; Liu, Jian-Lan; Ren, Xiao-Ming

    2016-02-01

    A proton conductor displaying high anhydrous proton conductivity (≈10(-2) S cm(-1) ) and good performance over a broad temperature range is presented. This hybrid material is produced via doping HCl into open-framework chalcogenide(C2 N2 H10 )(C2 N2 H9 )2 Cu8 Sn3 S12 , and has cubopolyhedral cavities and multiple channels. PMID:26660269

  8. Hardware Implementation of Multiple Fan Beam Projection Technique in Optical Fibre Process Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Rahim, Ruzairi Abdul; Fazalul Rahiman, Mohd Hafiz; Leong, Lai Chen; Chan, Kok San; Pang, Jon Fea

    2008-01-01

    The main objective of this project is to implement the multiple fan beam projection technique using optical fibre sensors with the aim to achieve a high data acquisition rate. Multiple fan beam projection technique here is defined as allowing more than one emitter to transmit light at the same time using the switch-mode fan beam method. For the thirty-two pairs of sensors used, the 2-projection technique and 4-projection technique are being investigated. Sixteen sets of projections will complete one frame of light emission for the 2-projection technique while eight sets of projection will complete one frame of light emission for the 4-projection technique. In order to facilitate data acquisition process, PIC microcontroller and the sample and hold circuit are being used. This paper summarizes the hardware configuration and design for this project.

  9. Effect of Statin Therapy in 4-Year-Old Dichorionic Diamniotic Twins with Familial Hypercholesterolemia Showing Multiple Xanthomas.

    PubMed

    Miyagi, Yoshitsune; Harada-Shiba, Mariko; Ohta, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is characterized by a high level of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. We report 4-year-old dichorionic diamniotic twins (boy and girl) with FH who presented with multiple xanthomas on the face, both knees, both feet, and buttocks. Family history revealed vertical transmission of hypercholesterolemia from father to patients, thereby suggesting dominant inheritance. Lipid data of their mother did not match the criteria of FH. However, lipid data of maternal grandmother and maternal sister matched the criteria of FH. LDL receptor gene analysis of the family revealed that their father was heterozygous for a missense mutation, L547V, their mother was heterozygous for a nonsense mutation, C675X, and patients were compound heterozygous for L547V and C675X. After 10 months of treatment with pitavastatin (2 mg/day) and ezetimibe (10 mg/day), LDL-C decreased from 595 mg/dL to 267 mg/dL in the boy and from 530 mg/dL to 182 mg/dL in the girl. These findings suggest that lipid-lowering therapy with statin may be considered in pediatric patients with compound heterozygous FH (hetero FH) before inducing LDL apheresis, and gene analysis for true diagnosis in pediatric patients with multiple xanthomas should be considered, though they appear to be hetero FH from the family history and lipid data of parents. PMID:26510755

  10. Microsatellite Typing of Clinical and Environmental Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii Isolates from Cuba Shows Multiple Genetic Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Illnait-Zaragozi, Maria-Teresa; Martínez-Machín, Gerardo F.; Fernández-Andreu, Carlos M.; Boekhout, Teun; Meis, Jacques F.; Klaassen, Corné H. W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Human cryptococcal infections have been associated with bird droppings as a likely source of infection. Studies toward the local and global epidemiology of Cryptococcus spp. have been hampered by the lack of rapid, discriminatory, and exchangeable molecular typing methods. Methodology/Principal Findings We selected nine microsatellite markers for high-resolution fingerprinting from the genome of C. neoformans var. grubii. This panel of markers was applied to a collection of clinical (n = 122) and environmental (n = 68; from pigeon guano) C. neoformans var. grubii isolates from Cuba. All markers proved to be polymorphic. The average number of alleles per marker was 9 (range 5–51). A total of 104 genotypes could be distinguished. The discriminatory power of this panel of markers was 0.993. Multiple clusters of related genotypes could be discriminated that differed in only one or two microsatellite markers. These clusters were assigned as microsatellite complexes. The majority of environmental isolates (>70%) fell into 1 microsatellite complex containing only few clinical isolates (49 environmental versus 2 clinical). Clinical isolates were segregated over multiple microsatellite complexes. Conclusions/Significance A large genotypic variation exists in C. neoformans var. grubii. The genotypic segregation between clinical and environmental isolates from pigeon guano suggests additional source(s) of human cryptococcal infections. The selected panel of microsatellite markers is an excellent tool to study the epidemiology of C. neoformans var. grubii. PMID:20161737

  11. Nuclear and Chloroplast Microsatellites Show Multiple Introductions in the Worldwide Invasion History of Common Ragweed, Ambrosia artemisiifolia

    PubMed Central

    Gaudeul, Myriam; Giraud, Tatiana; Kiss, Levente; Shykoff, Jacqui A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Ambrosia artemisiifolia is a North American native that has become one of the most problematic invasive plants in Europe and Asia. We studied its worldwide population genetic structure, using both nuclear and chloroplast microsatellite markers and an unprecedented large population sampling. Our goals were (i) to identify the sources of the invasive populations; (ii) to assess whether all invasive populations were founded by multiple introductions, as previously found in France; (iii) to examine how the introductions have affected the amount and structure of genetic variation in Europe; (iv) to document how the colonization of Europe proceeded; (v) to check whether populations exhibit significant heterozygote deficiencies, as previously observed. Principal Findings We found evidence for multiple introductions of A. artemisiifolia, within regions but also within populations in most parts of its invasive range, leading to high levels of diversity. In Europe, introductions probably stem from two different regions of the native area: populations established in Central Europe appear to have originated from eastern North America, and Eastern European populations from more western North America. This may result from differential commercial exchanges between these geographic regions. Our results indicate that the expansion in Europe mostly occurred through long-distance dispersal, explaining the absence of isolation by distance and the weak influence of geography on the genetic structure in this area in contrast to the native range. Last, we detected significant heterozygote deficiencies in most populations. This may be explained by partial selfing, biparental inbreeding and/or a Wahlund effect and further investigation is warranted. Conclusions This insight into the sources and pathways of common ragweed expansion may help to better understand its invasion success and provides baseline data for future studies on the evolutionary processes involved during range expansion in novel environments. PMID:21423697

  12. DO INFANTS SHOW GENERALIZED IMITATION OF GESTURES? II. THE EFFECTS OF SKILLS TRAINING AND MULTIPLE EXEMPLAR MATCHING TRAINING

    PubMed Central

    Erjavec, Mihela; Lovett, Victoria E; Horne, Pauline J

    2009-01-01

    The determinants of generalized imitation of manual gestures were investigated in 1- to 2-year-old infants. Eleven infants were first trained eight baseline matching relations; then, four novel gestures that the infants did not match in probe trials were selected as target behaviors. Next, in a generalized imitation test in which matching responses to baseline models were intermittently reinforced, but matching responses to target models were not eligible for reinforcement, the infants matched baseline models but not the majority of their target behaviors. To ensure their failure to match the target behaviors was not due to motor constraints, the infants were trained, in a multiple-baseline procedure, to produce the target responses under stimulus control that did not include an antecedent model of the target behavior. There was no evidence of generalized imitation in subsequent tests. When the infants were next trained to match each target behavior to criterion (tested in extinction) in a multiple-baseline-across-behaviors procedure, only 2 infants continued to match all their targets in subsequent tests; the remaining infants matched only some of them. Seven infants were next given mixed matching training with the target behaviors to criterion (tested in extinction); they subsequently matched these targets without reinforcement when interspersed with trials on which matching responses to baseline models were intermittently reinforced. In repeat tests, administered at 3-week intervals, these 7 children (and 2 that did not take part in mixed matching training) continued to match most of their target behaviors. The results support a trained matching account, but provide no evidence of generalized imitation, in 1- to 2-year-old infants. PMID:19949493

  13. A bi-dimensional genome scan for prolificacy traits in pigs shows the existence of multiple epistatic QTL

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Prolificacy is the most important trait influencing the reproductive efficiency of pig production systems. The low heritability and sex-limited expression of prolificacy have hindered to some extent the improvement of this trait through artificial selection. Moreover, the relative contributions of additive, dominant and epistatic QTL to the genetic variance of pig prolificacy remain to be defined. In this work, we have undertaken this issue by performing one-dimensional and bi-dimensional genome scans for number of piglets born alive (NBA) and total number of piglets born (TNB) in a three generation Iberian by Meishan F2 intercross. Results The one-dimensional genome scan for NBA and TNB revealed the existence of two genome-wide highly significant QTL located on SSC13 (P < 0.001) and SSC17 (P < 0.01) with effects on both traits. This relative paucity of significant results contrasted very strongly with the wide array of highly significant epistatic QTL that emerged in the bi-dimensional genome-wide scan analysis. As much as 18 epistatic QTL were found for NBA (four at P < 0.01 and five at P < 0.05) and TNB (three at P < 0.01 and six at P < 0.05), respectively. These epistatic QTL were distributed in multiple genomic regions, which covered 13 of the 18 pig autosomes, and they had small individual effects that ranged between 3 to 4% of the phenotypic variance. Different patterns of interactions (a a, a d, d a and d d) were found amongst the epistatic QTL pairs identified in the current work. Conclusions The complex inheritance of prolificacy traits in pigs has been evidenced by identifying multiple additive (SSC13 and SSC17), dominant and epistatic QTL in an Iberian Meishan F2 intercross. Our results demonstrate that a significant fraction of the phenotypic variance of swine prolificacy traits can be attributed to first-order gene-by-gene interactions emphasizing that the phenotypic effects of alleles might be strongly modulated by the genetic background where they segregate. PMID:20040109

  14. Rationally engineered nanoparticles target multiple myeloma cells, overcome cell-adhesion-mediated drug resistance, and show enhanced efficacy in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kiziltepe, T; Ashley, J D; Stefanick, J F; Qi, Y M; Alves, N J; Handlogten, M W; Suckow, M A; Navari, R M; Bilgicer, B

    2012-01-01

    In the continuing search for effective cancer treatments, we report the rational engineering of a multifunctional nanoparticle that combines traditional chemotherapy with cell targeting and anti-adhesion functionalities. Very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) mediated adhesion of multiple myeloma (MM) cells to bone marrow stroma confers MM cells with cell-adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR). In our design, we used micellar nanoparticles as dynamic self-assembling scaffolds to present VLA-4-antagonist peptides and doxorubicin (Dox) conjugates, simultaneously, to selectively target MM cells and to overcome CAM-DR. Dox was conjugated to the nanoparticles through an acid-sensitive hydrazone bond. VLA-4-antagonist peptides were conjugated via a multifaceted synthetic procedure for generating precisely controlled number of targeting functionalities. The nanoparticles were efficiently internalized by MM cells and induced cytotoxicity. Mechanistic studies revealed that nanoparticles induced DNA double-strand breaks and apoptosis in MM cells. Importantly, multifunctional nanoparticles overcame CAM-DR, and were more efficacious than Dox when MM cells were cultured on fibronectin-coated plates. Finally, in a MM xenograft model, nanoparticles preferentially homed to MM tumors with ?10 fold more drug accumulation and demonstrated dramatic tumor growth inhibition with a reduced overall systemic toxicity. Altogether, we demonstrate the disease driven engineering of a nanoparticle-based drug delivery system, enabling the model of an integrative approach in the treatment of MM. PMID:22829966

  15. αβ T-cell receptors from multiple sclerosis brain lesions show MAIT cell–related features

    PubMed Central

    Held, Kathrin; Bhonsle-Deeng, Latika; Siewert, Katherina; Sato, Wakiro; Beltrán, Eduardo; Schmidt, Stephan; Rühl, Geraldine; Ng, Judy K.M.; Engerer, Peter; Moser, Markus; Klinkert, Wolfgang E.F.; Babbe, Holger; Misgeld, Thomas; Wekerle, Hartmut; Laplaud, David-Axel; Hohlfeld, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To characterize phenotypes of T cells that accumulated in multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions, to compare the lesional T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire of T-cell subsets to peripheral blood, and to identify paired α and β chains from single CD8+ T cells from an index patient who we followed for 18 years. Methods: We combined immunohistochemistry, laser microdissection, and single-cell multiplex PCR to characterize T-cell subtypes and identify paired TCRα and TCRβ chains from individual brain-infiltrating T cells in frozen brain sections. The lesional and peripheral TCR repertoires were analyzed by pyrosequencing. Results: We found that a TCR Vβ1+ T-cell population that was strikingly expanded in active brain lesions at clinical onset comprises several subclones expressing distinct yet closely related Vα7.2+ α chains, including a canonical Vα7.2-Jα33 chain of mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells. Three other α chains bear striking similarities in their antigen-recognizing, hypervariable complementarity determining region 3. Longitudinal repertoire studies revealed that the TCR chains that were massively expanded in brain at onset persisted for several years in blood or CSF but subsequently disappeared except for the canonical Vα7.2+ MAIT cell and a few other TCR sequences that were still detectable in blood after 18 years. Conclusions: Our observation that a massively expanded TCR Vβ1-Jβ2.3 chain paired with distinct yet closely related canonical or atypical MAIT cell–related α chains strongly points to an antigen-driven process in early active MS brain lesions. PMID:25977934

  16. Experiments with the nonlinear and chaotic behaviour of the multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (MART) algorithm for computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badea, Cristian; Gordon, Richard

    2004-04-01

    Among the iterative reconstruction algorithms for tomography, the multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (MART) has two advantages that make it stand out from other algorithms: it confines the image (and therefore the projection data) to the convex hull of the patient, and it maximizes entropy. In this paper, we have undertaken a series of experiments to determine the importance of MART nonlinearity to image quality. Variants of MART were implemented aiming to exploit and exaggerate the nonlinear properties of the algorithm. We introduce the Power MART, Boxcar Averaging MART and Bouncing MART algorithms. Power MART is linked to the relaxation concept. Its behaviour is similar to that of the chaos of a logistic equation. There appears to be an antagonism between increasing nonlinearity and noise in the projection data. The experiments confirm our general observation that regularization as a means of solving simultaneous linear equations that are underdetermined is suboptimal: it does not necessarily select the correct image from the hyperplane of solutions, and so does not maximize the image quality:x-ray dose ratio. Our investigations prove that there is scope to optimize CT algorithms and thereby achieve greater dose reduction.

  17. 3D nondestructive testing system with an affordable multiple reference optical-delay-based optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Dsouza, Roshan; Subhash, Hrebesh M; Neuhaus, Kai; Hogan, Josh; Wilson, Carol; Leahy, Martin

    2015-06-20

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is emerging as a powerful noncontact imaging technique, allowing high-quality cross-sectional imaging of scattering specimens nondestructively. However, the complexity and cost of current embodiments of an OCT system limit its use in various nondestructive testing (NDT) applications at resource-limited settings. In this paper, we demonstrate the feasibility of a novel low-cost OCT system for a range of nondestructive testing (NDT) applications. The proposed imaging system is based on an enhanced time-domain OCT system with a low cost and small form factor reference arm optical delay, called multiple reference OCT (MR-OCT), which uses a miniature voice coil actuator and a partial mirror for extending the axial scan range. The proposed approach is potentially a low-cost, compact, and unique optical imaging modality for a range of NDT applications in a low-resource setting. Using this method, we demonstrated the capability of MR-OCT to perform cross-sectional and volumetric imaging at 1200 A-scans per second. PMID:26193006

  18. Simultaneous Joint Inversion of Multiple Geophysical Data Sets and 3D Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maceira, M.; Rowe, C. A.; Borchers, B.; Steck, L. K.

    2008-12-01

    We present the results of our efforts to model the 3D seismic shear wave velocity structure by simultaneously and jointly inverting multiple geophysical observations. It has long been recognized that derivation of geophysical models for a given observable, such as body wave models or surface wave models, may provide good predictors of behavior for the specific parameter modeled, but often provides poor prediction capabilities for other parameters, even when we have empirical or theoretical knowledge of how the parameters relate to one another. Due to the non-unique properties of inversion methods, often we may find a solution for one data type but we must acknowledge that, although it can predict behavior of that data type, the solution is ambiguous and other models may serve equally well. Thus a joint, simultaneous inversion of all pertinent and available data types for a region may provide us with a far more robust model than obtained by using only a single parameter. Moreover, the extent of our well-resolved model may be significantly expanded due to the variable coverage provided by different measurements, and its features may be better constrained due to the different resolving powers of different data types. We are exploring the 3D seismic structure of a small portion of the Tarim Basin in northwest China using simultaneous joint inversion of surface wave group velocities, teleseismic P-wave receiver functions, S-wave travel times, and Bouguer gravity anomaly observations derived from the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission. An iterative, conjugate gradient-based least squares inversion is used to jointly model the four different data sets, using shear-velocity variations as the primary model parameters. Improved knowledge of the shear velocity structure of the Asian continent is of fundamental importance for understanding the geodynamic evolution and formation of continents and the processes acting within and on the continental lithosphere.

  19. Nucleotide sequence analysis of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus shows that multiple virus types are present in infected mink.

    PubMed Central

    Gottschalck, E; Alexandersen, S; Cohn, A; Poulsen, L A; Bloom, M E; Aasted, B

    1991-01-01

    Different isolates of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV) were cloned and nucleotide sequenced. Analysis of individual clones from two in vivo-derived isolates of high virulence indicated that more than one type of ADV DNA were present in each of these isolates. Analysis of several clones from two preparations of a cell culture-adapted isolate of low virulence showed the presence of only one type of ADV DNA. We also describe the nucleotide sequence from map units 44 to 88 of a new type of ADV DNA. The new type of ADV DNA is compared with the previously published ADV sequences, to which it shows 95% homology. These findings indicate that ADV, a single-stranded DNA virus, has a considerable degree of variability and that several virus types can be present simultaneously in an infected animal. PMID:1649336

  20. The Impact of Utilizing Different Optical Coherence Tomography Devices for Clinical Purposes and in Multiple Sclerosis Trials

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Christina V.; Syc, Stephanie B.; Stankiewicz, Aleksandra M.; Hiremath, Girish; Farrell, Sheena K.; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M.; Conger, Amy; Frohman, Teresa C.; Bisker, Esther R.; Balcer, Laura J.; Frohman, Elliot M.; Calabresi, Peter A.; Saidha, Shiv

    2011-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) derived retinal measures, particularly peri-papillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness, have been proposed as outcome measures in remyelinating and neuroprotective trials in multiple sclerosis (MS). With increasing utilization of multiple centers to improve power, elucidation of the impact of different OCT technologies is crucial to the design and interpretation of such studies. In this study, we assessed relation and agreement between RNFL thickness and total macular volume (in MS and healthy controls) derived from three commonly used OCT devices: Stratus time-domain OCT, and Cirrus HD-OCT and Spectralis, two spectral-domain (SD) OCT devices. OCT was performed on both Cirrus HD-OCT and Stratus in 229 participants and on both Cirrus HD-OCT and Spectralis in a separate cohort of 102 participants. Pearson correlation and Bland-Altman analyses were used to assess correlation and agreement between devices. All OCT retinal measures correlated highly between devices. The mean RNFL thickness was 7.4 µm lower on Cirrus HD-OCT than Stratus, indicating overall poor agreement for this measurement between these machines. Further, the limits of agreement (LOA) between Cirrus HD-OCT and Stratus were wide (−4.1 to 18.9 µm), indicating poor agreement at an individual subject level. The mean RNFL thickness was 1.94 µm (LOA: −5.74 to 9.62 µm) higher on Spectralis compared to Cirrus HD-OCT, indicating excellent agreement for this measurement across this cohort. Although these data indicate that these three devices agree poorly at an individual subject level (evidenced by wide LOA in both study cohorts) precluding their co-utilization in everyday practice, the small difference for mean measurements between Cirrus HD-OCT and Spectralis indicate pooled results from these two SD-devices could be used as outcome measures in clinical trials, provided patients are scanned on the same machine throughout the trial, similar to the utilization of multiple different MRI platforms in MS clinical trials. PMID:21853058

  1. Organic Anion Transporter 1 Is Inhibited by Multiple Mechanisms and Shows a Transport Mode Independent of Exchange.

    PubMed

    Hotchkiss, Adam G; Gao, Tiandai; Khan, Usman; Berrigan, Liam; Li, Mansong; Ingraham, Leslie; Pelis, Ryan M

    2015-12-01

    The mechanism by which drugs inhibit organic anion transporter 1 (OAT1) was examined. OAT1 was stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, and para-aminohippurate (PAH) and 6-carboxyfluorescein were the substrates. Most compounds (10 of 14) inhibited competitively, increasing the Michaelis constant (Km) without affecting the maximal transport rate (Jmax). Others were mixed-type (lowering Jmax and increasing Km) or noncompetitive (lowering Jmax only) inhibitors. The interaction of a noncompetitive inhibitor (telmisartan) with OAT1 was examined further. Binding of telmisartan to OAT1 was observed, but translocation was not. Telmisartan did not alter the plasma membrane expression of OAT1, indicating that it lowers Jmax by reducing the turnover number. PAH transport after telmisartan treatment and its washout recovered faster in the presence of 10% fetal bovine serum in the washout buffer, indicating that binding of telmisartan to OAT1 and its inhibitory effect are reversible. Together, these data suggest that telmisartan binds reversibly to a site distinct from substrate and stabilizes the transporter in a conformation unfavorable for translocation. In the absence of an exchangeable extracellular substrate, PAH efflux from CHO-OAT1 cells was relatively rapid. Telmisartan slowed PAH efflux, suggesting that some transporter-mediated efflux occurs independent of exchange. Although drug-drug interaction predictions at OAT1 assume competitive inhibition, these data show that OAT1 can be inhibited by other mechanisms, which could influence the accuracy of drug-drug interaction predictions at the transporter. Telmisartan was useful for examining how a noncompetitive inhibitor can alter OAT1 transport activity and for uncovering a transport mode independent of exchange. PMID:26370539

  2. Multiple-pressure-tapped core holder combined with X-ray computed tomography scanning for gas-water permeability measurements of methane-hydrate-bearing sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Yoshihiro; Jin, Yusuke; Uchiumi, Takashi; Nagao, Jiro

    2013-06-01

    We present a novel setup for measuring the effective gas-water permeability of methane-hydrate-bearing sediments. We developed a core holder with multiple pressure taps for measuring the pressure gradient of the gas and water phases. The gas-water flooding process was simultaneously detected using an X-ray computed tomography scanner. We successfully measured the effective gas-water permeability of an artificial sandy core with methane hydrate during the gas-water flooding test.

  3. Multiple mantle upwellings beneath the Northern East-African Rift System from relative P- and S-wave traveltime tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civiero, Chiara; Hammond, James; Goes, Saskia; Fishwick, Stewart; Ahmed, Abdulhakim; Ayele, Atalay; Doubre, Cecile; Goitom, Berhe; Keir, Derek; Kendall, Mike; Leroy, Sylvie; Ogubazghi, Ghebrebrhan; Rumpker, Georg; Stuart, Graham

    2015-04-01

    Mantle plumes have been invoked as the likely cause of East African Rift volcanism and extension. However, the nature of mantle upwelling is debated, with proposed configurations ranging from a single broad plume, the African Superplume, connected to the LLSVP beneath Southern Africa, to one or more distinct lower-mantle sources along the rift. We present a new relative travel-time tomography model that images detailed P- and S- wave velocities from P,S and SKS phases below the northern East-African, Red Sea and Gulf of Aden rift. Data comes from stations that cover the area from Tanzania to Saudi Arabia. The aperture of the integrated dataset allows us to image for the first time structures of ~100 km length scale down to depths of 900 km beneath this region. Our images provide evidence of at least two low-velocity structures with a diameter of ~200 km that continue through the transition zone and into the lower mantle: the first extends to at least 900 km beneath Afar, and a second reaching at least 750 km depth just west of the Main Ethiopian Rift, a region with off-rift volcanism. Taking into account seismic sensitivity to temperature and thermally controlled phase boundary topography, we interpret these features as multiple focused upwellings from below the transition zone with excess temperatures of 100±50 K. The scale of the upwellings is smaller than any of the previously proposed lower mantle plume sources. This suggests the ponding or flow of deep-plume material below the transition zone may be spawning smaller upper-mantle upwellings.

  4. Simultaneous multiplicative column-normalized method (SMART) for 3-D ionosphere tomography in comparison to other algebraic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerzen, T.; Minkwitz, D.

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy and availability of satellite-based applications like GNSS positioning and remote sensing crucially depends on the knowledge of the ionospheric electron density distribution. The tomography of the ionosphere is one of the major tools to provide link specific ionospheric corrections as well as to study and monitor physical processes in the ionosphere. In this paper, we introduce a simultaneous multiplicative column-normalized method (SMART) for electron density reconstruction. Further, SMART+ is developed by combining SMART with a successive correction method. In this way, a balancing between the measurements of intersected and not intersected voxels is realised. The methods are compared with the well-known algebraic reconstruction techniques ART and SART. All the four methods are applied to reconstruct the 3-D electron density distribution by ingestion of ground-based GNSS TEC data into the NeQuick model. The comparative case study is implemented over Europe during two periods of the year 2011 covering quiet to disturbed ionospheric conditions. In particular, the performance of the methods is compared in terms of the convergence behaviour and the capability to reproduce sTEC and electron density profiles. For this purpose, independent sTEC data of four IGS stations and electron density profiles of four ionosonde stations are taken as reference. The results indicate that SMART significantly reduces the number of iterations necessary to achieve a predefined accuracy level. Further, SMART+ decreases the median of the absolute sTEC error up to 15, 22, 46 and 67 % compared to SMART, SART, ART and NeQuick respectively.

  5. Radiation Treatment Planning Using Positron Emission and Computed Tomography for Lung and Pharyngeal Cancers: A Multiple-Threshold Method for [{sup 18}F]Fluoro-2-Deoxyglucose Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Okubo, Mitsuru; Nishimura, Yasumasa; Nakamatsu, Kiyoshi; Okumura, Masahiko R.T.; Shibata, Toru; Kanamori, Shuichi; Hanaoka, Kouhei R.T.; Hosono, Makoto

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: Clinical applicability of a multiple-threshold method for [{sup 18}F]fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) activity in radiation treatment planning was evaluated. Methods and Materials: A total of 32 patients who underwent positron emission and computed tomography (PET/CT) simulation were included; 18 patients had lung cancer, and 14 patients had pharyngeal cancer. For tumors of <=2 cm, 2 to 5 cm, and >5 cm, thresholds were defined as 2.5 standardized uptake value (SUV), 35%, and 20% of the maximum FDG activity, respectively. The cervical and mediastinal lymph nodes with the shortest axial diameter of >=10 mm were considered to be metastatic on CT (LNCT). The retropharyngeal lymph nodes with the shortest axial diameter of >=5 mm on CT and MRI were also defined as metastatic. Lymph nodes showing maximum FDG activity greater than the adopted thresholds for radiation therapy planning were designated LNPET-RTP, and lymph nodes with a maximum FDG activity of >=2.5 SUV were regarded as malignant and were designated LNPET-2.5 SUV. Results: The sizes of gross tumor volumes on PET (GTVPET) with the adopted thresholds in the axial plane were visually well fitted to those of GTV on CT (GTVCT). However, the volumes of GTVPET were larger than those of GTVCT, with significant differences (p < 0.0001) for lung cancer, due to respiratory motion. For lung cancer, the numbers of LNCT, LNPET-RTP, and LNPET-2.5 SUV were 29, 28, and 34, respectively. For pharyngeal cancer, the numbers of LNCT, LNPET-RTP, and LNPET-2.5 SUV were 14, 9, and 15, respectively. Conclusions: Our multiple thresholds were applicable for delineating the primary target on PET/CT simulation. However, these thresholds were inaccurate for depicting malignant lymph nodes.

  6. Organ dose measurements from multiple-detector computed tomography using a commercial dosimetry system and tomographic, physical phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavoie, Lindsey K.

    The technology of computed tomography (CT) imaging has soared over the last decade with the use of multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanners that are capable of performing studies in a matter of seconds. While the diagnostic information obtained from MDCT imaging is extremely valuable, it is important to ensure that the radiation doses resulting from these studies are at acceptably safe levels. This research project focused on the measurement of organ doses resulting from modern MDCT scanners. A commercially-available dosimetry system was used to measure organ doses. Small dosimeters made of optically-stimulated luminescent (OSL) material were analyzed with a portable OSL reader. Detailed verification of this system was performed. Characteristics studied include energy, scatter, and angular responses; dose linearity, ability to erase the exposed dose and ability to reuse dosimeters multiple times. The results of this verification process were positive. While small correction factors needed to be applied to the dose reported by the OSL reader, these factors were small and expected. Physical, tomographic pediatric and adult phantoms were used to measure organ doses. These phantoms were developed from CT images and are composed of tissue-equivalent materials. Because the adult phantom is comprised of numerous segments, dosimeters were placed in the phantom at several organ locations, and doses to select organs were measured using three clinical protocols: pediatric craniosynostosis, adult brain perfusion and adult cardiac CT angiography (CTA). A wide-beam, 320-slice, volumetric CT scanner and a 64-slice, MDCT scanner were used for organ dose measurements. Doses ranged from 1 to 26 mGy for the pediatric protocol, 1 to 1241 mGy for the brain perfusion protocol, and 2-100 mGy for the cardiac protocol. In most cases, the doses measured on the 64-slice scanner were higher than those on the 320-slice scanner. A methodology to measure organ doses with OSL dosimeters received from CT imaging has been presented. These measurements are especially important in keeping with the ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) principle. While diagnostic information from CT imaging is valuable and necessary, the dose to patients is always a consideration. This methodology aids in this important task. (Full text of this dissertation may be available via the University of Florida Libraries web site. Please check http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/etd.html)

  7. Dual modality optical coherence and whole-body photoacoustic tomography imaging of chick embryos in multiple development stages

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mengyang; Maurer, Barbara; Hermann, Boris; Zabihian, Behrooz; Sandrian, Michelle G.; Unterhuber, Angelika; Baumann, Bernhard; Zhang, Edward Z.; Beard, Paul C.; Weninger, Wolfgang J.; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Chick embryos are an important animal model for biomedical studies. The visualization of chick embryos, however, is limited mostly to postmortem sectional imaging methods. In this work, we present a dual modality optical imaging system that combines swept-source optical coherence tomography and whole-body photoacoustic tomography, and apply it to image chick embryos at three different development stages. The explanted chick embryos were imaged in toto with complementary contrast from both optical scattering and optical absorption. The results serve as a prelude to the use of the dual modality system in longitudinal whole-body monitoring of chick embryos in ovo. PMID:25401028

  8. Event-related potentials to tones show differences between children with multiple risk factors for dyslexia and control children before the onset of formal reading instruction.

    PubMed

    Hämäläinen, Jarmo A; Lohvansuu, Kaisa; Ervast, Leena; Leppänen, Paavo H T

    2015-02-01

    Multiple risk factors can affect the development of specific reading problems or dyslexia. In addition to the most prevalent and studied risk factor, phonological processing, auditory discrimination problems have also been found in children and adults with reading difficulties. The present study examined 37 children between the ages of 5 and 6, 11 of which had multiple risk factors for developing reading problems. The children participated in a passive oddball EEG experiment with sinusoidal sounds with changes in sound frequency, duration, or intensity. The responses to the standard stimuli showed a negative voltage shift in children at risk for reading problems compared to control children at 107-215 ms in frontocentral areas corresponding to P1 offset and N250 onset. Source analyses showed that the difference originated from the left and right auditory cortices. Additionally, the children at risk for reading problems had a larger late discriminative negativity (LDN) response in amplitude for sound frequency change than the control children. The amplitudes at the P1-N250 time window showed correlations to letter knowledge and phonological identification whereas the amplitudes at the LDN time window correlated with verbal short-term memory and rapid naming. These results support the view that problems in basic auditory processing abilities precede the onset of reading instruction and can act as one of the risk factors for dyslexia. PMID:24746550

  9. Parallel optical coherence tomography system.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuan; Arauz, Lina J; Castillo, Jose E; Barton, Jennifer K; Kostuk, Raymond K

    2007-12-01

    We present the design and procedures for implementing a parallel optical coherence tomography (POCT) imaging system that can be adapted to an endoscopic format. The POCT system consists of a single mode fiber (SMF) array with multiple reduced diameter (15 microm) SMFs in the sample arm with 15 microm center spacing between fibers. The size of the array determines the size of the transverse imaging field. Electronic scanning eliminates the need for mechanically scanning in the lateral direction. Experimental image data obtained with this system show the capability for parallel axial scan acquisition with lateral resolution comparable to mechanically scanned optical coherence tomography systems. PMID:18059671

  10. Double-tracer, multiple-organ transaxial emission computed tomography: improved localization and characterization of radiotracer distributions. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, B.L.; Hill, T.C.; Lovett, R.D.; Shulkin, P.; Zimmerman, R.E.

    1980-05-01

    Transaxial emission computed tomography (ECT) was performed in dogs with experimentally induced abscesses, using /sup 67/Ga and several /sup 99m/Tc-labeled organ-specific radiopharmaceuticals. Superimposition of /sup 99m/Tc ECT images onto the /sup 67/Ga uptake, correctly localizing a perinephric abscess, a splenic abscess, and a focus of osteomyelitis. This technique also permits further characterization or regions of decreased activity.

  11. Correlative Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, T. L.; McDonald, S. A.; Gholinia, A.; Geurts, R.; Janus, M.; Slater, T.; Haigh, S. J.; Ornek, C.; Almuaili, F.; Engelberg, D. L.; Thompson, G. E.; Withers, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly researchers are looking to bring together perspectives across multiple scales, or to combine insights from different techniques, for the same region of interest. To this end, correlative microscopy has already yielded substantial new insights in two dimensions (2D). Here we develop correlative tomography where the correlative task is somewhat more challenging because the volume of interest is typically hidden beneath the sample surface. We have threaded together x-ray computed tomography, serial section FIB-SEM tomography, electron backscatter diffraction and finally TEM elemental analysis all for the same 3D region. This has allowed observation of the competition between pitting corrosion and intergranular corrosion at multiple scales revealing the structural hierarchy, crystallography and chemistry of veiled corrosion pits in stainless steel. With automated correlative workflows and co-visualization of the multi-scale or multi-modal datasets the technique promises to provide insights across biological, geological and materials science that are impossible using either individual or multiple uncorrelated techniques. PMID:24736640

  12. [A case of septic pulmonary embolism showing the rapid appearance of multiple cavities in both lung fields induced by urinary tract infection].

    PubMed

    Miyaki, Junya; Souma, Shinya; Narumiya, Yasuyuki; Chiba, Shigehiro; Kugiyama, Kiyotaka

    2006-11-01

    A 69-year-old man who had benign prostatic hypertrophy and hypertension was admitted to our hospital because of urinary retention and high grade fever. Chest radiograph showed the appearance of multiple cavitating nodules in both lung fields within a few days after admission. Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in blood and sputum cultures, though there were no pathogens in urine culture. Abdominal CT demonstrated bilateral hydronephrosis. Since we could not detect any other infectious focuses such as bacterial endocarditis, septic thrombophlebitis etc., we reached the diagnosis of septic pulmonary embolism (SPE) induced by urinary tract infection (UTI). After diagnosis, the patient was given intravenous meropenem, ciprofloxacin, sulbactam/ampicilin, and recovered. Although several cases of SPE induced by UTI in diabetes mellitus patients have been reported, the present case who had no severe underlying disorder is very rare. PMID:17144591

  13. Multiple antigen peptide containing B and T cell epitopes of F1 antigen of Yersinia pestis showed enhanced Th1 immune response in murine model.

    PubMed

    Ali, R; Naqvi, R A; Kumar, S; Bhat, A A; Rao, D N

    2013-05-01

    Yersinia pestis is a facultative bacterium that can survive and proliferate inside host macrophages and cause bubonic, pneumonic and systemic infection. Apart from humoral response, cell-mediated protection plays a major role in combating the disease. Fraction 1 capsular antigen (F1-Ag) of Y. pestis has long been exploited as a vaccine candidate. In this study, F1-multiple antigenic peptide (F1-MAP or MAP)-specific cell-mediated and cytokine responses were studied in murine model. MAP consisting of three B and one T cell epitopes of F1-antigen with one palmitoyl residue was synthesized using Fmoc chemistry. Mice were immunized with different formulations of MAP in poly DL-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) microspheres. F1-MAP with CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG-ODN) as an adjuvant showed enhanced in vitro T cell proliferation and Th1 (IL-2, IFN-γ and TNF-α) and Th17 (IL-17A) cytokine secretion. Similar formulation also showed significantly higher numbers of cytokine (IL-2, IFN-γ)-secreting cells. Moreover, F1-MAP with CpG formulation showed significantly high (P < 0.001) percentage of CD4(+) IFN-γ(+) cells as compared to CD8(+) IFN-γ(+) cells, and also more (CD4- IFN-γ)(+) cells secrete perforin and granzyme as compared to (CD8- IFN-γ)(+) showing Th1 response. Thus, the study highlights the importance of Th1 cytokine and existence of CD4(+) and CD8(+) immune response. This study proposes a new perspective for the development of vaccination strategies for Y. pestis that trigger T cell immune response. PMID:23480362

  14. Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome and encephalomyelitis disseminata/multiple sclerosis show remarkable levels of similarity in phenomenology and neuroimmune characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background ‘Encephalomyelitis disseminata’ (multiple sclerosis) and myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) are both classified as diseases of the central nervous system by the World Health Organization. This review aims to compare the phenomenological and neuroimmune characteristics of MS with those of ME/CFS. Discussion There are remarkable phenomenological and neuroimmune overlaps between both disorders. Patients with ME/CFS and MS both experience severe levels of disabling fatigue and a worsening of symptoms following exercise and resort to energy conservation strategies in an attempt to meet the energy demands of day-to-day living. Debilitating autonomic symptoms, diminished cardiac responses to exercise, orthostatic intolerance and postural hypotension are experienced by patients with both illnesses. Both disorders show a relapsing-remitting or progressive course, while infections and psychosocial stress play a large part in worsening of fatigue symptoms. Activated immunoinflammatory, oxidative and nitrosative (O+NS) pathways and autoimmunity occur in both illnesses. The consequences of O+NS damage to self-epitopes is evidenced by the almost bewildering and almost identical array of autoantibodies formed against damaged epitopes seen in both illnesses. Mitochondrial dysfunctions, including lowered levels of ATP, decreased phosphocreatine synthesis and impaired oxidative phosphorylation, are heavily involved in the pathophysiology of both MS and ME/CFS. The findings produced by neuroimaging techniques are quite similar in both illnesses and show decreased cerebral blood flow, atrophy, gray matter reduction, white matter hyperintensities, increased cerebral lactate and choline signaling and lowered acetyl-aspartate levels. Summary This review shows that there are neuroimmune similarities between MS and ME/CFS. This further substantiates the view that ME/CFS is a neuroimmune illness and that patients with MS are immunologically primed to develop symptoms of ME/CFS. PMID:24229326

  15. Multiple imaging mode X-ray computed tomography for distinguishing active and inactive phases in lithium-ion battery cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komini Babu, Siddharth; Mohamed, Alexander I.; Whitacre, Jay F.; Litster, Shawn

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents the use of nanometer scale resolution X-ray computed tomography (nano-CT) in the three-dimensional (3D) imaging of a Li-ion battery cathode, including the separate volumes of active material, binder plus conductive additive, and pore. The different high and low atomic number (Z) materials are distinguished by sequentially imaging the lithium cobalt oxide electrode in absorption and then Zernike phase contrast modes. Morphological parameters of the active material and the additives are extracted from the 3D reconstructions, including the distribution of contact areas between the additives and the active material. This method could provide a better understanding of the electric current distribution and structural integrity of battery electrodes, as well as provide detailed geometries for computational models.

  16. Multiple medullary venous malformations decreasing cerebral blood flow: Case report

    SciTech Connect

    Tomura, N.; Inugami, A.; Uemura, K.; Hadeishi, H.; Yasui, N. )

    1991-02-01

    A rare case of multiple medullary venous malformations in the right cerebral hemisphere is reported. The literature review yielded only one case of multiple medullary venous malformations. Computed tomography scan showed multiple calcified lesions with linear contrast enhancement representing abnormal dilated vessels and mild atrophic change of the right cerebral hemisphere. Single-photon emission computed tomography using N-isopropyl-p-({sup 123}I) iodoamphetamine demonstrated decreased cerebral blood flow in the right cerebral hemisphere.

  17. Meaning of Interior Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ge; Yu, Hengyong

    2013-01-01

    The classic imaging geometry for computed tomography is for collection of un-truncated projections and reconstruction of a global image, with the Fourier transform as the theoretical foundation that is intrinsically non-local. Recently, interior tomography research has led to theoretically exact relationships between localities in the projection and image spaces and practically promising reconstruction algorithms. Initially, interior tomography was developed for x-ray computed tomography. Then, it has been elevated as a general imaging principle. Finally, a novel framework known as “omni-tomography” is being developed for grand fusion of multiple imaging modalities, allowing tomographic synchrony of diversified features. PMID:23912256

  18. The tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism gene shows locus homogeneity on chromosome 15q11-q13 and evidence of multiple mutations in southern African negroids

    SciTech Connect

    Kedda, M.A.; Stevens, G.; Manga, P.; Viljoen, C.; Jenkins, T.; Ramsay, M. Univ. of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg )

    1994-06-01

    Tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism (ty-pos OCA) is an autosomal recessive disorder of the melanin pigmentary system. South African ty-pos OCA individuals occur with two distinct phenotypes, with or without darkly pigmented patches (ephelides, or dendritic freckles) on exposed areas of the skin. These phenotypes are concordant within families, suggesting that there may be more than one mutation at the ty-pos OCA locus. Linkage studies carried out in 41 families have shown linkage between markers in the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome (PWS/AS) region on chromosome 15q11-q13 and ty-pos OCA. Analysis showed no obligatory crossovers between the alleles at the D15S12 locus and ty-pos OCA, suggesting that the D15S12 locus is very close to or part of the disease locus, which is postulated to be the human homologue, P, of the mouse pink-eyed dilution gene, p. Unlike caucasoid [open quotes]ty-pos OCA[close quotes] individuals, negroid ty-pos OCA individuals do not show any evidence of locus heterogeneity. Studies of allelic association between the polymorphic alleles detected at the D15S12 locus and ephelus status suggest that there was a single major mutation giving rise to ty-pos OCA without ephelides. There may, however, be two major mutations causing ty-pos OCA with ephelides, one associated with D15S12 allele 1 and the other associated with D15S12 allele 2. The two loci, GABRA5 and D15S24, flanking D15S12, are both hypervariable, and many different haplotypes were observed with the alleles at the three loci on both ty-pos OCA-associated chromosomes and [open quotes]normal[close quotes] chromosomes. No haplotype showed statistically significant association with ty-pos OCA, and thus none could be used to predict the origins of the ty-pos OCA mutations. On the basis of the D15S12 results, there is evidence for multiple ty-pos OCA mutations in southern African negroids. 31 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  19. Lymphocyte Subsets Show Different Response Patterns to In Vivo Bound Natalizumab—A Flow Cytometric Study on Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Einhaeupl, Max; Oppermann, Katrin; Hitzl, Wolfgang; Wipfler, Peter; Sellner, Johann; Golaszewski, Stefan; Afazel, Shahrzad; Haschke-Becher, Elisabeth; Trinka, Eugen; Kraus, Joerg

    2012-01-01

    Natalizumab is an effective monoclonal antibody therapy for the treatment of relapsing- remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) and interferes with immune cell migration into the central nervous system by blocking the α4 subunit of very-late activation antigen-4 (VLA-4). Although well tolerated and very effective, some patients still suffer from relapses in spite of natalizumab therapy or from unwanted side effects like progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). In search of a routine-qualified biomarker on the effectiveness of natalizumab therapy we applied flow cytometry and analyzed natalizumab binding to α4 and α4 integrin surface levels on T-cells, B-cells, natural killer (NK) cells, and NKT cells from 26 RRMS patients under up to 72 weeks of therapy. Four-weekly infusions of natalizumab resulted in a significant and sustained increase of lymphocyte-bound natalizumab (p<0.001) which was paralleled by a significant decrease in detectability of the α4 integrin subunit on all lymphocyte subsets (p<0.001). We observed pronounced natalizumab accumulations on T and B cells at single measurements in all patients who reported clinical disease activity (n = 4). The natalizumab binding capacity of in vitro saturated lymphocytes collected during therapy was strongly diminished compared to treatment-naive cells indicating a therapy-induced reduction of α4. Summing up, this pilot study shows that flow cytometry is a useful method to monitor natalizumab binding to lymphocytes from RRMS patients under therapy. Investigating natalizumab binding provides an opportunity to evaluate the molecular level of effectiveness of natalizumab therapy in individual patients. In combination with natalizumab saturation experiments, it possibly even provides a means of studying the feasability of patient-tailored infusion intervals. A routine-qualified biomarker on the basis of individual natalizumab saturation on lymphocyte subsets might be an effective tool to improve treatment safety. PMID:22363732

  20. Validation of quantitative attenuation and backscattering coefficient measurements by optical coherence tomography in the concentration-dependent and multiple scattering regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almasian, Mitra; Bosschaart, Nienke; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Faber, Dirk J.

    2015-12-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has the potential to quantitatively measure optical properties of tissue such as the attenuation coefficient and backscattering coefficient. However, to obtain reliable values for strong scattering tissues, accurate consideration of the effects of multiple scattering and the nonlinear relation between the scattering coefficient and scatterer concentration (concentration-dependent scattering) is required. We present a comprehensive model for the OCT signal in which we quantitatively account for both effects, as well as our system parameters (confocal point spread function and sensitivity roll-off). We verify our model with experimental data from controlled phantoms of monodisperse silica beads (scattering coefficients between 1 and 30 mm-1 and scattering anisotropy between 0.4 and 0.9). The optical properties of the phantoms are calculated using Mie theory combined with the Percus-Yevick structure factor to account for concentration-dependent scattering. We demonstrate excellent agreement between the OCT attenuation and backscattering coefficient predicted by our model and experimentally derived values. We conclude that this model enables us to accurately model OCT-derived parameters (i.e., attenuation and backscattering coefficients) in the concentration-dependent and multiple scattering regime for spherical monodisperse samples.

  1. Multigrid-based reconstruction algorithm for quantitative photoacoustic tomography

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengfu; Montcel, Bruno; Yuan, Zhen; Liu, Wanyu; Vray, Didier

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a multigrid inversion framework for quantitative photoacoustic tomography reconstruction. The forward model of optical fluence distribution and the inverse problem are solved at multiple resolutions. A fixed-point iteration scheme is formulated for each resolution and used as a cost function. The simulated and experimental results for quantitative photoacoustic tomography reconstruction show that the proposed multigrid inversion can dramatically reduce the required number of iterations for the optimization process without loss of reliability in the results. PMID:26203371

  2. "The Show"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehring, John

    2004-01-01

    For the past 16 years, the blue-collar city of Huntington, West Virginia, has rolled out the red carpet to welcome young wrestlers and their families as old friends. They have come to town chasing the same dream for a spot in what many of them call "The Show". For three days, under the lights of an arena packed with 5,000 fans, the state's best…

  3. "The Show"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehring, John

    2004-01-01

    For the past 16 years, the blue-collar city of Huntington, West Virginia, has rolled out the red carpet to welcome young wrestlers and their families as old friends. They have come to town chasing the same dream for a spot in what many of them call "The Show". For three days, under the lights of an arena packed with 5,000 fans, the state's best

  4. 18F-fluoroethyl-L-tyrosine positron emission tomography for the differential diagnosis of tumefactive multiple sclerosis versus glioma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    KEBIR, SIED; GAERTNER, FLORIAN C.; MUELLER, MARCUS; NELLES, MICHAEL; SIMON, MATTHIAS; SCHÄFER, NIKLAS; STUPLICH, MORITZ; SCHAUB, CHRISTINA; NIESSEN, MICHAEL; MACK, FREDERIC; BUNDSCHUH, RALPH; GRESCHUS, SUSANNE; ESSLER, MARKUS; GLAS, MARTIN; HERRLINGER, ULRICH

    2016-01-01

    Large demyelinating inflammatory central nervous system (CNS) lesions may present with contrast enhancement on magnetic resonance imaging and may mimic CNS tumors such as glioma. In ambiguous cases, new diagnostic tools that may be helpful for distinguishing between demyelinating inflammatory and neoplastic CNS lesions are required. The current study presents the case of a patient with a large contrast-enhanced frontal brain lesion, who was initially diagnosed with tumefactive multiple sclerosis. Following the progression of the brain lesion, an 18F-fluoroethyl-L-tyrosine positron emission tomography (18F-FET PET) was performed, revealing markedly elevated static 18F-FET uptake parameters along with time activity-curves consistent with glioma. Subsequently, a biopsy was undertaken, which confirmed the presence of anaplastic oligoastrocytoma. This case illustrates that 18F-FET PET may provide useful diagnostic information in cases where distinction between neoplastic and demyelinating inflammatory CNS lesions is challenging. However, further systematic and prospective analyses are warranted to explore the value of this method in this setting. PMID:26998148

  5. Successful sinus restoration for transverse-sigmoid sinus dural arteriovenous fistula complicated by multiple venous sinus occlusions: The usefulness of preoperative computed tomography venography

    PubMed Central

    Takemoto, Koichiro; Higashi, Toshio; Sakamoto, Seisaburo; Inoue, Tooru

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although sinus restoration for transverse-sigmoid sinus (TSS) dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) has rarely been reported over the past decade, its advantage and indication still remain unclear. Herein, we discuss the indications and technical aspects of this therapy with a review of the literature. Case Description: A 79-year-old female was referred to our department with generalized convulsion. An angiogram revealed a DAVF at the junction of the right TSS. The right sigmoid and left transverse sinuses were occluded, which resulted in remarkable leptomeningeal venous reflux and cerebral venous congestion. A preoperative computed tomography (CT) venogram precisely revealed the occluded segment of the right sigmoid sinus, which facilitated the sinus restoration with balloon percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting. Conclusion: Sinus restoration is preferable in patients with severe cerebral venous congestion due to multiple sinus occlusions and/or a restricted collateral venous outlet. CT venography is useful for precise evaluation of the length and configuration of the occluded segment, which thus make it possible to evaluate the feasibility of stenting. PMID:26392914

  6. The meaning of interior tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ge; Yu, Hengyong

    2013-08-01

    The classic imaging geometry for computed tomography is for the collection of un-truncated projections and the reconstruction of a global image, with the Fourier transform as the theoretical foundation that is intrinsically non-local. Recently, interior tomography research has led to theoretically exact relationships between localities in the projection and image spaces and practically promising reconstruction algorithms. Initially, interior tomography was developed for x-ray computed tomography. Then, it was elevated to have the status of a general imaging principle. Finally, a novel framework known as omni-tomography is being developed for a grand fusion of multiple imaging modalities, allowing tomographic synchrony of diversified features.

  7. Multiple mantle upwellings in the transition zone beneath the northern East-African Rift system from relative P-wave travel-time tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civiero, Chiara; Hammond, James O. S.; Goes, Saskia; Fishwick, Stewart; Ahmed, Abdulhakim; Ayele, Atalay; Doubre, Cecile; Goitom, Berhe; Keir, Derek; Kendall, J.-Michael; Leroy, Sylvie; Ogubazghi, Ghebrebrhan; Rümpker, Georg; Stuart, Graham W.

    2015-09-01

    Mantle plumes and consequent plate extension have been invoked as the likely cause of East African Rift volcanism. However, the nature of mantle upwelling is debated, with proposed configurations ranging from a single broad plume connected to the large low-shear-velocity province beneath Southern Africa, the so-called African Superplume, to multiple lower-mantle sources along the rift. We present a new P-wave travel-time tomography model below the northern East-African, Red Sea, and Gulf of Aden rifts and surrounding areas. Data are from stations that span an area from Madagascar to Saudi Arabia. The aperture of the integrated data set allows us to image structures of ˜100 km length-scale down to depths of 700-800 km beneath the study region. Our images provide evidence of two clusters of low-velocity structures consisting of features with diameter of 100-200 km that extend through the transition zone, the first beneath Afar and a second just west of the Main Ethiopian Rift, a region with off-rift volcanism. Considering seismic sensitivity to temperature, we interpret these features as upwellings with excess temperatures of 100 ± 50 K. The scale of the upwellings is smaller than expected for lower mantle plume sources. This, together with the change in pattern of the low-velocity anomalies across the base of the transition zone, suggests that ponding or flow of deep-plume material below the transition zone may be spawning these upper mantle upwellings. This article was corrected on 28 SEP 2015. See the end of the full text for details.

  8. Adding Papillomacular Bundle Measurements to Standard Optical Coherence Tomography Does Not Increase Sensitivity to Detect Prior Optic Neuritis in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Laible, Mona; Jarius, Sven; Schmidt-Bacher, Annette; Platten, Michael; Haas, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To improve the detection of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thinning in multiple sclerosis (MS), a special peripapillary ring scanning algorithm (N-site RNFL, N-RNFL) was developed for spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). In contrast to the standard protocol (ST-RNFL) scanning starts nasally, not temporally, and provides an additional sector of analysis, the papillomacular bundle (PMB). We aimed to ascertain whether the temporal RNFL differs between the two techniques, whether N-RNFL is more sensitive than ST-RNFL to detect previous optic neuritis (ON), and whether analyzing the PMB adds additional sensitivity. Furthermore, we investigated whether RNFL is associated with disease severity and/or disease duration. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional case-control study of 38 patients with MS, of whom 24 had a history of ON, and 40 healthy controls (HC). Subjects with ON within the previous 6 months were excluded. Records included clinical characteristics, visual evoked potentials (VEP), and SD-OCT in both techniques. Results In a total of 73 evaluable MS eyes, temporal N-RNFL was abnormal in 17.8%, temporal ST-RNFL in 19.2%, and the PMB-RNFL in 21.9%. In ON eyes, the sensitivity of temporal N-RNFL and ST-RNFL did not differ significantly (37.0%/33.3%, p = 0.556). The sensitivity of VEP was 85.2%. RNFL thickness was associated with disease severity in all eyes, with and without a history of ON, and with disease duration. Conclusion The two OCT techniques detected previous ON with similar sensitivity, but the sensitivity of VEPs was superior to that of both N-RNFL and ST-RNFL. Our results indicate that the widely used ST-RNFL technique is appropriate for peripapillary RNFL measurements in MS patients. PMID:27171375

  9. New Geomorphic map of SW Fraser Lowland, NW Washington, Shows Multiple Post-LGM Moraines, Fossil Shorelines, Outburst Flood and Glacial Outwash Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Easterbrook, D. J.; Kovanen, D. J.; Haugerud, R. A.

    2008-12-01

    We have interpreted a ~1 pulse/m2 lidar survey (acquired in 2006 in leaf-on conditions under contract to the USGS) to construct a geomorphic map of western Whatcom County. The new lidar data reveal the existence of previously unrecognized landforms. Within this landscape, we see these features that reflect a rich post-LGM history: Glacial: Ice contact deposits interpreted as moraines reveal at least 8 successive moraines associated with the late Pleistocene Fraser Glaciation. At least two of the moraine crests were formed during ice re- advance; others may mark stillstands during ice retreat. All are older than about 10,250 14C yrs BP, based on basal peat from a kettle in outwash associated with the youngest moraine. Marine: Extensive and successive fossil shorelines, wave-cut notches, wave-washed surfaces, down- slope truncation of gullies, and deltas along the fringe of uplands surrounding the SW Fraser Lowland document former relative sea level and probable glacioisostatic tilting. The highest shorelines are at nearly 150 m above sea level. Some shorelines are cut into moraines, while others are truncated by them. Uplifted back-beach surfaces of likely mid-Holocene age at Birch Bay and Neptune Beach (elevations ~1 m and ~3 m higher than modern back-beach surfaces) suggest Holocene uplift. Glaciofluvial: Large, stepped, sediment wave bed-forms, with wavelengths of 430 to 850 m and heights from 1 to 3.5 m, record deposition associated with high discharge and rapid water release. Sub-parallel, narrow scour troughs are up to 4 km in length and 8 m in depth. These high energy geomorphic features record at least three large discharge events. Their apparent associations with former ice margins indicate that they are the result of outburst floods. Multiple outwash surfaces in the lowland are also related to former ice margins. Fluvial: At present the Nooksack River flows west from the town of Everson and reaches Bellingham Bay just south of Ferndale. Relatively low channel gradient, absence of incised valley walls west of Everson, and some archaeologic data suggests that the Nooksack formerly drained north from the town of Everson, via Sumas, into the Fraser River. Human activity: Modified land surfaces include river levees, highways, railways, and sea walls. Confinement of the modern Nooksack River has reduced depositional compensation for ongoing subsidence and led to net loss of surface elevation.

  10. Novel human astrovirus strains showing multiple recombinations within highly conserved ORF1b detected from hospitalized acute watery diarrhea cases in Kolkata, India.

    PubMed

    Pativada, Madhusudhan; Bhattacharya, Rittwika; Krishnan, Triveni

    2013-12-01

    Human astroviruses (HAstVs) associated with acute watery diarrhea among hospitalized infants, children and adults as sole or mixed infection, were earlier reported from Kolkata, India. Further, novel recombinations have been detected through sequencing of the highly conserved ORF1b (RdRp) region of seven human astrovirus strains in Kolkata, India. Primers were designed and the ORF1b region was amplified by RT-PCR and sequenced. To examine the evolutionary pressures influencing the evolution of human astroviruses we implemented evolutionary genetics analysis. Maximum recombination break points detected in Kolkata strain IDH1300 were 8 and a single break point location was detected at 1205nt position. Partition-wise phylogenetic analyses of the IDH1300 Kolkata strain did not show close homology to the reference strains. Further phylogenetic analyses of full length ORF1b region of the seven human astrovirus strains showed that they formed a close cluster with each other and displayed a separate lineage in comparison to reference human astrovirus strains worldwide. This study shows the emergence of novel recombinant human astrovirus strains in Kolkata, India, warranting stringent surveillance to monitor the genetic diversity of human astrovirus strains infecting different age groups. PMID:24064378

  11. Attenuation-difference radar tomography: results of a multiple-plane experiment at the U.S. Geological Survey Fractured-Rock Research Site, Mirror Lake, New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lane, J.W., Jr.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Harris, J.M.; Haeni, F.P.; Gorelick, S.M.

    2000-01-01

    Attenuation-difference, borehole-radar tomography was used to monitor a series of sodium chloride tracer injection tests conducted within the FSE, wellfield at the U.S. Geological Survey Fractured-Rock Hydrology Research Site in Grafton County, New Hampshire, USA. Borehole-radar tomography surveys were conducted using the sequential-scanning and injection method in three boreholes that form a triangular prism of adjoining tomographic image planes. Results indicate that time-lapse tomography methods provide high-resolution images of tracer distribution in permeable zones.

  12. Stripe sensor tomography.

    PubMed

    Barbic, Mladen; Vltava, Lvcian; Barrett, Christopher P; Emery, Teresa H; Scherer, Axel

    2008-03-01

    We introduce a general concept of tomographic imaging for the case of an imaging sensor that has a stripelike shape. We first show that there is no difference, in principle, between two-dimensional tomography using conventional electromagnetic or particle radiation and tomography where a stripe sensor is mechanically scanned over a sample at a sequence of different angles. For a single stripe detector imaging, linear motion and angular rotation are required. We experimentally demonstrate single stripe sensor imaging principle using an elongated inductive coil detector. By utilizing an array of parallel stripe sensors that can be individually addressed, two-dimensional imaging can be performed with rotation only, eliminating the requirement for linear motion, as we also experimentally demonstrate with parallel coil array. We conclude that imaging with a stripe-type sensor of particular width and thickness (where the width is much larger than the thickness) is resolution limited only by the thickness (smaller parameter) of the sensor. We give examples of multiple sensor families where this imaging technique may be beneficial such as magnetoresistive, inductive, superconducting quantum interference device, and Hall effect sensors, and, in particular, discuss the possibilities of the technique in the field of magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:18377013

  13. Microarray delineation of familial chromosomal imbalance with deletion 5q35 and duplication 10q25 in a child showing multiple anomalies and dysmorphism.

    PubMed

    Masri, Amira; Gimelli, Stefania; Hamamy, Hanan; Sloan-Béna, Frédérique

    2014-05-01

    We describe a 6-month-old female with developmental delay, hypotonia, supernumerary nipples, and distinct craniofacial features. Postnatal chromosome analysis revealed an unbalanced karyotype involving a der (5) and array-CGH defined two unbalanced regions with partial 2.3 Mb deletion of 5q35.3 in combination with a large 19.5 Mb duplication of chromosome 10 from q25.3 to q26.3. Parental karyotyping analysis showed that the father was carrier of a balanced t(5;10)(q35;q25). Two cousins of the proband with similar facial features had the same unbalanced karyotype with presence of the der (5) inherited from the malsegregation of the familial translocation. Additionally, three siblings (two deceased and one abortion) manifested a more severe phenotype including congenital heart defect, cleft palate, and agenesis of the corpus callosum and were diagnosed with unbalanced karyotypes inherited from the familial balanced translocation. PMID:24478242

  14. Cytokinin-Deficient Transgenic Arabidopsis Plants Show Multiple Developmental Alterations Indicating Opposite Functions of Cytokinins in the Regulation of Shoot and Root Meristem Activity

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Tomáš; Motyka, Václav; Laucou, Valérie; Smets, Rafaël; Van Onckelen, Harry; Schmülling, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Cytokinins are hormones that regulate cell division and development. As a result of a lack of specific mutants and biochemical tools, it has not been possible to study the consequences of cytokinin deficiency. Cytokinin-deficient plants are expected to yield information about processes in which cytokinins are limiting and that, therefore, they might regulate. We have engineered transgenic Arabidopsis plants that overexpress individually six different members of the cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase (AtCKX) gene family and have undertaken a detailed phenotypic analysis. Transgenic plants had increased cytokinin breakdown (30 to 45% of wild-type cytokinin content) and reduced expression of the cytokinin reporter gene ARR5:GUS (β-glucuronidase). Cytokinin deficiency resulted in diminished activity of the vegetative and floral shoot apical meristems and leaf primordia, indicating an absolute requirement for the hormone. By contrast, cytokinins are negative regulators of root growth and lateral root formation. We show that the increased growth of the primary root is linked to an enhanced meristematic cell number, suggesting that cytokinins control the exit of cells from the root meristem. Different AtCKX-green fluorescent protein fusion proteins were localized to the vacuoles or the endoplasmic reticulum and possibly to the extracellular space, indicating that subcellular compartmentation plays an important role in cytokinin biology. Analyses of promoter:GUS fusion genes showed differential expression of AtCKX genes during plant development, the activity being confined predominantly to zones of active growth. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that cytokinins have central, but opposite, regulatory functions in root and shoot meristems and indicate that a fine-tuned control of catabolism plays an important role in ensuring the proper regulation of cytokinin functions. PMID:14555694

  15. Patterns of landscape form in the upper Rhône basin, Central Swiss Alps, predominantly show lithologic controls despite multiple glaciations and variations in rock uplift rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutenbecker, L. A.; Costa, A.; Schlunegger, F.

    2015-10-01

    The development of topography is mainly dependent on the interplay of uplift and erosion, which are in term controlled by various factors including climate, glaciers, lithology, seismic activity and short-term variables such as anthropogenic impact. While most studies have focused on the role of tectonics and climate on the landscape form and underlying processes, less attention has been paid on exploring the controls of lithology on erosion. The Central European Alps are characterized by a large spatial variability in exposed lithologies and as such offer an ideal laboratory to investigate the lithological controls on erosion and landscape form. Here, we focus on the ca. 5400 km2-large upper Rhône basin situated in the Central Swiss Alps to explore how the lithological architecture of the bedrock conditions the Alpine landscape. To this extent, we extract geomorphological parameters along the channels of ca. 50 tributary basins, whose catchments are located in either granitic basement rocks (External massifs), oceanic meta-sedimentary and ophiolitic rocks (Penninic nappes) or fine-grained continental-margin sediments (Helvetic nappes). The analysis of longitudinal river profiles show that all tributary rivers within the Rhône basin are in topographic transient state as testified by mainly convex or concave-convex longitudinal stream channel profiles with several knickpoints of either tectonic or glacial origin. In addition, although the entire Rhône basin shows a strong glacial inheritance (and is still partly glaciated) and some of the highest uplift rates recently measured in the Alps, the river network has responded differently to those perturbations as revealed by the morphometric data. In particular, tributary basins in the Helvetic nappes are the most equilibrated (concave river profiles, overall lower elevations, less steep slope gradients and lowest hypsometric integrals), while the tributaries located in the External massifs are least equilibrated, where streams yield strong convex long profiles, and where the tributary basins have the highest hypsometric integral and reveal the steepest hillslopes. We interpret this pattern to reflect differences in response times of the fluvial erosion in tributary streams towards glacial and tectonic perturbations, where the corresponding lengths strongly depend on the lithology and therefore on the bedrock erodibility.

  16. A Multiple siRNA-Based Anti-HIV/SHIV Microbicide Shows Protection in Both In Vitro and In Vivo Models

    PubMed Central

    Raulji, Payal; Mohapatra, Subhra; Mohapatra, Shyam S

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) types 1 and 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2) are the etiologic agents of AIDS. Most HIV-1 infected individuals worldwide are women, who acquire HIV infections during sexual contact. Blocking HIV mucosal transmission and local spread in the female lower genital tract is important in preventing infection and ultimately eliminating the pandemic. Microbicides work by destroying the microbes or preventing them from establishing an infection. Thus, a number of different types of microbicides are under investigation, however, the lack of their solubility and bioavailability, and toxicity has been major hurdles. Herein, we report the development of multifunctional chitosan-lipid nanocomplexes that can effectively deliver plasmids encoding siRNA(s) as microbicides without adverse effects and provide significant protection against HIV in both in vitro and in vivo models. Chitosan or chitosan-lipid (chlipid) was complexed with a cocktail of plasmids encoding HIV-1-specific siRNAs (psiRNAs) and evaluated for their efficacy in HEK-293 cells, PBMCs derived from nonhuman primates, 3-dimensional human vaginal ectocervical tissue (3D-VEC) model and also in non-human primate model. Moreover, prophylactic administration of the chlipid to deliver a psiRNA cocktail intravaginally with a cream formulation in a non-human primate model showed substantial reduction of SHIV (simian/human immunodeficiency virus SF162) viral titers. Taken together, these studies demonstrate the potential of chlipid-siRNA nanocomplexes as a potential genetic microbicide against HIV infections. PMID:26407080

  17. Mitochondrial phylogeny shows multiple independent ecological transitions and northern dispersion despite of Pleistocene glaciations in meadow and steppe vipers (Vipera ursinii and Vipera renardi).

    PubMed

    Zinenko, Oleksandr; Stümpel, Nikolaus; Mazanaeva, Lyudmila; Bakiev, Andrey; Shiryaev, Konstantin; Pavlov, Aleksey; Kotenko, Tatiana; Kukushkin, Oleg; Chikin, Yury; Duisebayeva, Tatiana; Nilson, Göran; Orlov, Nikolai L; Tuniyev, Sako; Ananjeva, Natalia B; Murphy, Robert W; Joger, Ulrich

    2015-03-01

    The phylogeny and historical demography of small Eurasian vipers of the Vipera ursinii and V. renardi complexes were studied using mitochondrial DNA sequences analysed with Bayesian inference, Maximum Likelihood and Maximum Parsimony approaches, and mismatch distributions. Diversification in the group resulted from an initial dispersion in the later Pliocene - Pleistocene in two directions: north-westwards via the Balkans (V. ursinii complex) and north-eastwards from Asia Minor via the Caucasus (V. renardi complex). An independent, comparatively recent transition occurred from montane habitats to lowland grasslands in different mitochondrial lineages during the Late Pleistocene, when representatives of the both complexes had reached lowland steppes to the north. Effective population size showed clear signs of rapid growth in eastern V. renardi, triggered by colonization of vast lowland steppes, but in western V. ursinii complex grew during the Last Glaciation and experienced stabilization in Holocene. Expansion and population growth in lowland lineages of V. renardi was not strongly affected by Pleistocene climatic oscillations, when cold, dry conditions could have favoured species living in open grasslands. The high diversity of closely related haplotypes in the Caucasus and Tien-Shan could have resulted from repetitive expansion-constriction-isolation events in montane regions during Pleistocene climate fluctuations. The mitochondrial phylogeny pattern conflicts with the current taxonomy. PMID:25527984

  18. Parallel acoustic delay lines for photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yapici, Murat Kaya; Kim, Chulhong; Chang, Cheng-Chung; Jeon, Mansik; Guo, Zijian; Cai, Xin; Zou, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-11-01

    Achieving real-time photoacoustic (PA) tomography typically requires multi-element ultrasound transducer arrays and their associated multiple data acquisition (DAQ) electronics to receive PA waves simultaneously. We report the first demonstration of a photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system using optical fiber-based parallel acoustic delay lines (PADLs). By employing PADLs to introduce specific time delays, the PA signals (on the order of a few micro seconds) can be forced to arrive at the ultrasonic transducers at different times. As a result, time-delayed PA signals in multiple channels can be ultimately received and processed in a serial manner with a single-element transducer, followed by single-channel DAQ electronics. Our results show that an optically absorbing target in an optically scattering medium can be photoacoustically imaged using the newly developed PADL-based PAT system. Potentially, this approach could be adopted to significantly reduce the complexity and cost of ultrasonic array receiver systems.

  19. Parallel acoustic delay lines for photoacoustic tomography.

    PubMed

    Yapici, Murat Kaya; Kim, Chulhong; Chang, Cheng-Chung; Jeon, Mansik; Guo, Zijian; Cai, Xin; Zou, Jun; Wang, Lihong V

    2012-11-01

    Achieving real-time photoacoustic (PA) tomography typically requires multi-element ultrasound transducer arrays and their associated multiple data acquisition (DAQ) electronics to receive PA waves simultaneously. We report the first demonstration of a photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system using optical fiber-based parallel acoustic delay lines (PADLs). By employing PADLs to introduce specific time delays, the PA signals (on the order of a few micro seconds) can be forced to arrive at the ultrasonic transducers at different times. As a result, time-delayed PA signals in multiple channels can be ultimately received and processed in a serial manner with a single-element transducer, followed by single-channel DAQ electronics. Our results show that an optically absorbing target in an optically scattering medium can be photoacoustically imaged using the newly developed PADL-based PAT system. Potentially, this approach could be adopted to significantly reduce the complexity and cost of ultrasonic array receiver systems. PMID:23139043

  20. Multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Peller, Patrick J

    2015-04-01

    This article presents a review of multiple myeloma, precursor states, and related plasma cell disorders. The clinical roles of fluorodeoxyglucose PET/computed tomography (CT) and the potential to improve the management of patients with multiple myeloma are discussed. The clinical and research data supporting the utility of PET/CT use in evaluating myeloma and other plasma cell dyscrasias continues to grow. PMID:25829088

  1. Computed tomography of infantile hepatic hemangioendothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Lucaya, J.; Enriquez, G.; Amat, L.; Gonzalez-Rivero, M.A.

    1985-04-01

    Computed tomography (CT) was performed on five infants with hepatic hemangioendothelioma. Precontrast scans showed solitary or multiple, homogeneous, circumscribed areas with reduced attenuation values. Tiny tumoral calcifications were identified in two patients. Serial scans, after injection of a bolus of contrast material, showed early massive enhancement, which was either diffuse or peripheral. On delayed scans, multinocular tumors became isodense with surrounding liver, while all solitary ones showed varied degrees of centripetal enhancement and persistent central cleftlike unenhanced areas. The authors believe that these CT features are characteristic and obviate arteriographic confirmation.

  2. Toward real-time bent-ray breast ultrasound tomography using GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labyed, Yassin; Huang, Lianjie

    2014-03-01

    Breast ultrasound tomography is a promising imaging modality that has the potential to improve the diagnosis and screening of breast cancer. We develop a bent-ray ultrasound tomography algorithm to reconstruct sound-speed images of the breast. We investigate the acceleration of the algorithm using graphical processing units (GPUs). We adapt the algorithmic steps of ultrasound bent-ray tomography to a GPU cluster, and use multi-GPU scaling to speed up the computation. Our results show that it is very promising to use a GPU cluster with multiple GPU cards to achieve nearly real-time tomographic reconstruction.

  3. Experimental Demonstration of Spectral Intensity Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    Ryczkowski, Piotr; Turunen, Jari; Friberg, Ari T; Genty, Goëry

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally spectral-domain intensity optical coherence tomography using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer with balanced detection. We show that the technique allows for a point spread function with reduced full-width at half maximum compared to conventional optical coherence tomography. The method further provides benefits similar to those of chirped-pulse interferometry in terms of dispersion cancellation but only requires a broadband incoherent source and standard detectors. The measurements are in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions. Finally, we propose an approach that enables the elimination of potential artefacts arising from multiple interfaces. PMID:26916668

  4. Experimental Demonstration of Spectral Intensity Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryczkowski, Piotr; Turunen, Jari; Friberg, Ari T.; Genty, Goëry

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate experimentally spectral-domain intensity optical coherence tomography using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer with balanced detection. We show that the technique allows for a point spread function with reduced full-width at half maximum compared to conventional optical coherence tomography. The method further provides benefits similar to those of chirped-pulse interferometry in terms of dispersion cancellation but only requires a broadband incoherent source and standard detectors. The measurements are in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions. Finally, we propose an approach that enables the elimination of potential artefacts arising from multiple interfaces.

  5. Experimental Demonstration of Spectral Intensity Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ryczkowski, Piotr; Turunen, Jari; Friberg, Ari T.; Genty, Goëry

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally spectral-domain intensity optical coherence tomography using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer with balanced detection. We show that the technique allows for a point spread function with reduced full-width at half maximum compared to conventional optical coherence tomography. The method further provides benefits similar to those of chirped-pulse interferometry in terms of dispersion cancellation but only requires a broadband incoherent source and standard detectors. The measurements are in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions. Finally, we propose an approach that enables the elimination of potential artefacts arising from multiple interfaces. PMID:26916668

  6. Parallel acoustic delay lines for photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yapici, Murat Kaya; Kim, Chulhong; Chang, Cheng-Chung; Jeon, Mansik; Guo, Zijian; Cai, Xin; Zou, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-03-01

    Achieving real-time photoacoustic (PA) tomography typically requires massive ultrasound transducer arrays and data acquisition (DAQ) electronics to receive PA waves simultaneously. In this paper, we report the first demonstration of a photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system using optical fiber-based parallel acoustic delay lines (PADLs). By employing PADLs to introduce specific time delays, the PA signals (on the order of a few micro seconds) can be forced to arrive at the ultrasonic transducers at different times. As a result, time-delayed PA signals in multiple channels can be ultimately received and processed in a serial manner with a single-element transducer, followed by single-channel DAQ electronics. Our results show that an optically absorbing target in an optically scattering medium can be photoacoustically imaged using the newly developed PADL-based PAT system. Potentially, this approach could be adopted to significantly reduce the complexity and cost of ultrasonic array receiver systems.

  7. Solar tomography adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Ren, Deqing; Zhu, Yongtian; Zhang, Xi; Dou, Jiangpei; Zhao, Gang

    2014-03-10

    Conventional solar adaptive optics uses one deformable mirror (DM) and one guide star for wave-front sensing, which seriously limits high-resolution imaging over a large field of view (FOV). Recent progress toward multiconjugate adaptive optics indicates that atmosphere turbulence induced wave-front distortion at different altitudes can be reconstructed by using multiple guide stars. To maximize the performance over a large FOV, we propose a solar tomography adaptive optics (TAO) system that uses tomographic wave-front information and uses one DM. We show that by fully taking advantage of the knowledge of three-dimensional wave-front distribution, a classical solar adaptive optics with one DM can provide an extra performance gain for high-resolution imaging over a large FOV in the near infrared. The TAO will allow existing one-deformable-mirror solar adaptive optics to deliver better performance over a large FOV for high-resolution magnetic field investigation, where solar activities occur in a two-dimensional field up to 60'', and where the near infrared is superior to the visible in terms of magnetic field sensitivity. PMID:24663427

  8. A comparison of fluoroscopy and computed tomography-derived volumetric multiple exposure transmission holography for the guidance of lumbar pedicle screw insertion.

    PubMed

    Benzel, E C; Rupp, F W; McCormack, B M; Baldwin, N G; Anson, J A; Adams, M S

    1995-10-01

    Holographic technology has recently been modified in such a manner that it may now provide clinical use. It allows the visualization of complex structures in three dimensions and permits clinician interaction with the image, which, in turn, provides significant additional geometric and anatomic information. To objectively assess the potential clinical applicability of holography in pedicle screw placement, we studied 11 elderly human cadavers. All of the cadavers, each of which showed significant degenerative disease of the lumbar spine, underwent thin-section computed tomographic scans of the lumbar spine. The acquired digital information was processed, and volumetric multiple exposure transmission holographic images were rendered. Pedicle screws were passed into anatomically acceptable and radiographically visualized L3-L5 pedicles in each cadaver, half using fluoroscopic guidance and half using holographic guidance alone. The accuracy of screw placement was objectively assessed by a three-point grading scale. The total score for the placement of each pedicle screw was determined by both trajectory (location within the pedicle) and accuracy (containment within the vertebral body) of screw tip placement parameters. Three points were possible for each screw placed. Screw placement in the last six cadavers was individually timed for each technique, and fluoroscopic time was also recorded. Each technique was used on 27 pedicles. The total score for fluoroscopic screw placement was 71 (71 of a possible 81; 88%) and for holographic screw placement was 74 (74 of a possible 81; 91%). In the last six cadavers, the screw placement time (per cadaver) was 8 minutes for fluoroscopic placement and 3.6 minutes for holographic placement. Fluoroscopic time averaged 1.9 minutes per cadaver.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8559300

  9. Noise reduction in muon tomography for detecting high density objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benettoni, M.; Bettella, G.; Bonomi, G.; Calvagno, G.; Calvini, P.; Checchia, P.; Cortelazzo, G.; Cossutta, L.; Donzella, A.; Furlan, M.; Gonella, F.; Pegoraro, M.; Rigoni Garola, A.; Ronchese, P.; Squarcia, S.; Subieta, M.; Vanini, S.; Viesti, G.; Zanuttigh, P.; Zenoni, A.; Zumerle, G.

    2013-12-01

    The muon tomography technique, based on multiple Coulomb scattering of cosmic ray muons, has been proposed as a tool to detect the presence of high density objects inside closed volumes. In this paper a new and innovative method is presented to handle the density fluctuations (noise) of reconstructed images, a well known problem of this technique. The effectiveness of our method is evaluated using experimental data obtained with a muon tomography prototype located at the Legnaro National Laboratories (LNL) of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN). The results reported in this paper, obtained with real cosmic ray data, show that with appropriate image filtering and muon momentum classification, the muon tomography technique can detect high density materials, such as lead, albeit surrounded by light or medium density material, in short times. A comparison with algorithms published in literature is also presented.

  10. Pseudolocal tomography

    DOEpatents

    Katsevich, A.J.; Ramm, A.G.

    1996-07-23

    Local tomographic data is used to determine the location and value of a discontinuity between a first internal density of an object and a second density of a region within the object. A beam of radiation is directed in a predetermined pattern through the region of the object containing the discontinuity. Relative attenuation data of the beam is determined within the predetermined pattern having a first data component that includes attenuation data through the region. The relative attenuation data is input to a pseudo-local tomography function, where the difference between the internal density and the pseudo-local tomography function is computed across the discontinuity. The pseudo-local tomography function outputs the location of the discontinuity and the difference in density between the first density and the second density. 7 figs.

  11. Pseudolocal tomography

    DOEpatents

    Katsevich, Alexander J.; Ramm, Alexander G.

    1996-01-01

    Local tomographic data is used to determine the location and value of a discontinuity between a first internal density of an object and a second density of a region within the object. A beam of radiation is directed in a predetermined pattern through the region of the object containing the discontinuity. Relative attenuation data of the beam is determined within the predetermined pattern having a first data component that includes attenuation data through the region. The relative attenuation data is input to a pseudo-local tomography function, where the difference between the internal density and the pseudo-local tomography function is computed across the discontinuity. The pseudo-local tomography function outputs the location of the discontinuity and the difference in density between the first density and the second density.

  12. Real-time processing for full-range Fourier-domain optical-coherence tomography with zero-filling interpolation using multiple graphic processing units.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yuuki; Maeno, Seiya; Aoshima, Kenji; Hasegawa, Haruyuki; Koseki, Hitoshi

    2010-09-01

    The real-time display of full-range, 2048?axial pixelx1024?lateral pixel, Fourier-domain optical-coherence tomography (FD-OCT) images is demonstrated. The required speed was achieved by using dual graphic processing units (GPUs) with many stream processors to realize highly parallel processing. We used a zero-filling technique, including a forward Fourier transform, a zero padding to increase the axial data-array size to 8192, an inverse-Fourier transform back to the spectral domain, a linear interpolation from wavelength to wavenumber, a lateral Hilbert transform to obtain the complex spectrum, a Fourier transform to obtain the axial profiles, and a log scaling. The data-transfer time of the frame grabber was 15.73?ms, and the processing time, which includes the data transfer between the GPU memory and the host computer, was 14.75?ms, for a total time shorter than the 36.70?ms frame-interval time using a line-scan CCD camera operated at 27.9?kHz. That is, our OCT system achieved a processed-image display rate of 27.23 frames/s. PMID:20820218

  13. Seismic Tomography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Don L.; Dziewonski, Adam M.

    1984-01-01

    Describes how seismic tomography is used to analyze the waves produced by earthquakes. The information obtained from the procedure can then be used to map the earth's mantle in three dimensions. The resulting maps are then studied to determine such information as the convective flow that propels the crustal plates. (JN)

  14. Inferring Positions of Tumor and Nodes in Stage III Lung Cancer From Multiple Anatomical Surrogates Using Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Malinowski, Kathleen T.; Pantarotto, Jason R.; Senan, Suresh

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of modeling Stage III lung cancer tumor and node positions from anatomical surrogates. Methods and Materials: To localize their centroids, the primary tumor and lymph nodes from 16 Stage III lung cancer patients were contoured in 10 equal-phase planning four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) image sets. The centroids of anatomical respiratory surrogates (carina, xyphoid, nipples, mid-sternum) in each image set were also localized. The correlations between target and surrogate positions were determined, and ordinary least-squares (OLS) and partial least-squares (PLS) regression models based on a subset of respiratory phases (three to eight randomly selected) were created to predict the target positions in the remaining images. The three-phase image sets that provided the best predictive information were used to create models based on either the carina alone or all surrogates. Results: The surrogate most correlated with target motion varied widely. Depending on the number of phases used to build the models, mean OLS and PLS errors were 1.0 to 1.4 mm and 0.8 to 1.0 mm, respectively. Models trained on the 0%, 40%, and 80% respiration phases had mean ({+-} standard deviation) PLS errors of 0.8 {+-} 0.5 mm and 1.1 {+-} 1.1 mm for models based on all surrogates and carina alone, respectively. For target coordinates with motion >5 mm, the mean three-phase PLS error based on all surrogates was 1.1 mm. Conclusions: Our results establish the feasibility of inferring primary tumor and nodal motion from anatomical surrogates in 4D CT scans of Stage III lung cancer. Using inferential modeling to decrease the processing time of 4D CT scans may facilitate incorporation of patient-specific treatment margins.

  15. Assessment of Interfraction Patient Setup for Head-and-Neck Cancer Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Using Multiple Computed Tomography-Based Image Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, X. Sharon; Hu, Angie Y.; Lee, Steve P.; Lee, Percy; DeMarco, John; Li, X. Allen; Steinberg, Michael L.; Kupelian, Patrick; Low, Daniel

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: Various image guidance systems are commonly used in conjunction with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in head-and-neck cancer irradiation. The purpose of this study was to assess interfraction patient setup variations for 3 computed tomography (CT)-based on-board image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) modalities. Methods and Materials: A total of 3302 CT scans for 117 patients, including 53 patients receiving megavoltage cone-beam CT (MVCBCT), 29 receiving kilovoltage cone-beam CT (KVCBCT), and 35 receiving megavoltage fan-beam CT (MVFBCT), were retrospectively analyzed. The daily variations in the mediolateral (ML), craniocaudal (CC), and anteroposterior (AP) dimensions were measured. The clinical target volume-to-planned target volume (CTV-to-PTV) margins were calculated using 2.5Σ + 0.7 σ, where Σ and σ were systematic and random positioning errors, respectively. Various patient characteristics for the MVCBCT group, including weight, weight loss, tumor location, and initial body mass index, were analyzed to determine their possible correlation with daily patient setup. Results: The average interfraction displacements (± standard deviation) in the ML, CC, and AP directions were 0.5 ± 1.5, −0.3 ± 2.0, and 0.3 ± 1.7 mm (KVCBCT); 0.2 ± 1.9, −0.2 ± 2.4, and 0.0 ± 1.7 mm (MVFBCT); and 0.0 ± 1.8, 0.5 ± 1.7, and 0.8 ± 3.0 mm (MVCBCT). The day-to-day random errors for KVCBCT, MVFBCT, and MVCBCT were 1.4-1.6, 1.7, and 2.0-2.1 mm. The interobserver variations were 0.8, 1.1, and 0.7 mm (MVCBCT); 0.5, 0.4, and 0.8 mm (MVFBCT); and 0.5, 0.4, and 0.6 mm (KVCBCT) in the ML, CC, and AP directions, respectively. The maximal calculated uniform CTV-to-PTV margins were 5.6, 6.9, and 8.9 mm for KVCBCT, MVFBCT, and MVCBCT, respectively. For the evaluated patient characteristics, the calculated margins for different patient parameters appeared to differ; analysis of variance (ANOVA) and/or t test analysis found no statistically significant setup difference in any direction. Conclusions: Daily random setup errors and CTV-to-PTV margins for treatment of head-and-neck cancer were affected by imaging quality. Our data indicated that larger margins were associated with MVFBCT and MVCBCT, compared with smaller margins for KVCBCT. IGRT modalities with better image quality are encouraged in clinical practice.

  16. Linker insertion mutants of simian virus 40 large T antigen that show trans-dominant interference with wild-type large T antigen map to multiple sites within the T-antigen gene.

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, J Y; Cole, C N

    1989-01-01

    Linker insertion mutants affecting the simian virus 40 (SV40) large tumor (T) antigen were constructed by inserting a 12-base-pair oligonucleotide linker into restriction endonuclease cleavage sites located within the early region of SV40. One mutant, with the insertion at amino acid 5, was viable in CV-1p and BSC-1 cells, indicating that sequences very close to the amino terminus of large T could be altered without affecting the lytic infection cycle of SV40. All other mutants affecting large T were not viable. In complementation assays between the linker insertion mutants and either a late-gene mutant, dlBC865, or a host range/helper function (hr/hf) mutant, dlA2475, delayed complementation was seen with the 6 of the 10 nonviable mutants. Of these 10 mutants, 5 formed plaques 3 to 4 days later than in control complementations, while complementation by one of the mutants, inA2827, with an insertion at amino acid 520, was delayed more than 1 week. Most mutants which showed delayed complementation replicated less well in Cos-1 cells than did a control mutant, dlA1209, which produced no T antigen. The replication of inA2827(aa520) was reduced by more than 90%. Similar interference with viral DNA replication was seen when CV-1, HeLa, or 293 cells were cotransfected with an origin-defective plasmid encoding wild-type large T antigen and with inA2827(aa520). Only one of the mutant T antigens, inA2807(aa303), was unstable. These results indicate that some of the mutant T antigens interfered with functions of wild-type T required for viral DNA replication. However, not all of the mutants which showed delayed complementation also showed interference with viral DNA replication. This indicates that mutant large T antigens may interfere trans dominantly with multiple activities of wild-type large T antigen. Images PMID:2552152

  17. Considering sources and detectors distributions for quantitative photoacoustic tomography

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ningning; Deumié, Carole; Da Silva, Anabela

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a hybrid imaging modality that takes advantage of high optical contrast brought by optical imaging and high spatial resolution brought by ultrasound imaging. However, the quantification in photoacoustic imaging is challenging. Multiple optical illumination approach has proven to achieve uncoupling of diffusion and absorption effects. In this paper, this protocol is adopted and synthetic photoacoustic data, blurred with some noise, were generated. The influence of the distribution of optical sources and transducers on the reconstruction of the absorption and diffusion coefficients maps is studied. Specific situations with limited view angles were examined. The results show multiple illuminations with a wide field improve the reconstructions. PMID:25426322

  18. Solar Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davila, J. M.

    1993-12-01

    Images obtained by observing the solar corona from a single spacecraft typically measure the line-of-sight integral of the volumetric emissivity through the source. The resulting two-dimensional observations have an unavoidable ambiguity along the line of sight that can be removed only by making assumptions about the three dimensional nature of the emission. These ambiguities can be removed by observing the Sun from different vantage points, at the same time, i.e. solar tomography. The basic concept of tomographic is fairly simple. For an optically thin emission source, like the solar corona, each pixel in an image represents the line of sight integration of the volumetric emissivity of the plasma at the wavelength of observation. By obtaining several of these observations, from various angles, the underlying three dimensional structure of the emission can be deduced. This principle has been used extensively in the Medical community for the imaging of internal structure of the body with such techniques as Computer Aided Tomography (CAT) scanners and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). The purpose of this paper is to take an intial look at the following two questions: (1) Is tomography feasible with a few spacecraft?; and (2) What scientific objectives can be addressed?

  19. Pleural tuberculosis presented as multiple pleural masses: An atypical presentation

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Anand; Choudhury, Sushmita

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculous involvement of the pleura usually presents as pleural effusion, empyema or pleural thickening. Pleural tuberculosis presenting with multiple masses without parenchymal involvement or lymphadenopathy has been reported rarely in the English literature. We report a case of a 68-year-old male with unilateral pleural tuberculosis presenting as multiple different sized nodular masses evident on computed tomography (CT) of the chest with a large hemorrhagic pleural effusion, which initially raised a possibility of mesothelioma. Pleuroscopy also revealed multiple pleural masses. Pathological examination of the biopsy specimen showed multiple epitheloid cell granulomas confirming the diagnosis. PMID:23661917

  20. High-Grade Glioma Radiation Therapy Target Volumes and Patterns of Failure Obtained From Magnetic Resonance Imaging and {sup 18}F-FDOPA Positron Emission Tomography Delineations From Multiple Observers

    SciTech Connect

    Kosztyla, Robert; Chan, Elisa K.; Hsu, Fred; Wilson, Don; Ma, Roy; Cheung, Arthur; Zhang, Susan; Moiseenko, Vitali; Benard, Francois; Nichol, Alan

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to compare recurrent tumor locations after radiation therapy with pretreatment delineations of high-grade gliomas from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 3,4-dihydroxy-6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-L-phenylalanine ({sup 18}F-FDOPA) positron emission tomography (PET) using contours delineated by multiple observers. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients with newly diagnosed high-grade gliomas underwent computed tomography (CT), gadolinium contrast-enhanced MRI, and {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT. The image sets (CT, MRI, and PET/CT) were registered, and 5 observers contoured gross tumor volumes (GTVs) using MRI and PET. Consensus contours were obtained by simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE). Interobserver variability was quantified by the percentage of volume overlap. Recurrent tumor locations after radiation therapy were contoured by each observer using CT or MRI. Consensus recurrence contours were obtained with STAPLE. Results: The mean interobserver volume overlap for PET GTVs (42% ± 22%) and MRI GTVs (41% ± 22%) was not significantly different (P=.67). The mean consensus volume was significantly larger for PET GTVs (58.6 ± 52.4 cm{sup 3}) than for MRI GTVs (30.8 ± 26.0 cm{sup 3}, P=.003). More than 95% of the consensus recurrence volume was within the 95% isodose surface for 11 of 12 (92%) cases with recurrent tumor imaging. Ten (91%) of these cases extended beyond the PET GTV, and 9 (82%) were contained within a 2-cm margin on the MRI GTV. One recurrence (8%) was located outside the 95% isodose surface. Conclusions: High-grade glioma contours obtained with {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET had similar interobserver agreement to volumes obtained with MRI. Although PET-based consensus target volumes were larger than MRI-based volumes, treatment planning using PET-based volumes may not have yielded better treatment outcomes, given that all but 1 recurrence extended beyond the PET GTV and most were contained by a 2-cm margin on the MRI GTV.

  1. Spent nuclear fuel assembly inspection using neutron computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Chad Lee

    The research presented here focuses on spent nuclear fuel assembly inspection using neutron computed tomography. Experimental measurements involving neutron beam transmission through a spent nuclear fuel assembly serve as benchmark measurements for an MCNP simulation model. Comparison of measured results to simulation results shows good agreement. Generation of tomography images from MCNP tally results was accomplished using adapted versions of built in MATLAB algorithms. Multiple fuel assembly models were examined to provide a broad set of conclusions. Tomography images revealing assembly geometric information including the fuel element lattice structure and missing elements can be obtained using high energy neutrons. A projection difference technique was developed which reveals the substitution of unirradiated fuel elements for irradiated fuel elements, using high energy neutrons. More subtle material differences such as altering the burnup of individual elements can be identified with lower energy neutrons provided the scattered neutron contribution to the image is limited. The research results show that neutron computed tomography can be used to inspect spent nuclear fuel assemblies for the purpose of identifying anomalies such as missing elements or substituted elements. The ability to identify anomalies in spent fuel assemblies can be used to deter diversion of material by increasing the risk of early detection as well as improve reprocessing facility operations by confirming the spent fuel configuration is as expected or allowing segregation if anomalies are detected.

  2. Quantum gate-set tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blume-Kohout, Robin

    2014-03-01

    Quantum information technology is built on (1) physical qubits and (2) precise, accurate quantum logic gates that transform their states. Developing quantum logic gates requires good characterization - both in the development phase, where we need to identify a device's flaws so as to fix them, and in the production phase, where we need to make sure that the device works within specs and predict residual error rates and types. This task falls to quantum state and process tomography. But until recently, protocols for tomography relied on a pre-existing and perfectly calibrated reference frame comprising the measurements (and, for process tomography, input states) used to characterize the device. In practice, these measurements are neither independent nor perfectly known - they are usually implemented via exactly the same gates that we are trying to characterize! In the past year, several partial solutions to this self-consistency problem have been proposed. I will present a framework (gate set tomography, or GST) that addresses and resolves this problem, by self-consistently characterizing an entire set of quantum logic gates on a black-box quantum device. In particular, it contains an explicit closed-form protocol for linear-inversion gate set tomography (LGST), which is immune to both calibration error and technical pathologies like local maxima of the likelihood (which plagued earlier methods). GST also demonstrates significant (multiple orders of magnitude) improvements in efficiency over standard tomography by using data derived from long sequences of gates (much like randomized benchmarking). GST has now been applied to qubit devices in multiple technologies. I will present and discuss results of GST experiments in technologies including a single trapped-ion qubit and a silicon quantum dot qubit. Sandia National Laboratories is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL850.

  3. Emission Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Robert J.

    Positron (PET) and Single photon tomography (SPECT) are both methods used to acquire data in nuclear medicine from the detection of gamma photons. While SPECT is normally performed by rotating a device such as one or more gamma cameras around a patient, conventional PET devices are normally composed of rings of individual detectors, such as small BGO crystals. The total number of such detectors can be very high, and requires clever electronic design to reduce the total number of components. In both PET and SPECT the data recorded must be reconstructed to form sets of transaxial slices, after various types of correction to remove sources of degradation such as scatter etc. Filtered backprojection as originally employed in both PET and SPECT is now being widely superseded by iterative techniques such as OSEM, which are increasing being operated in true 3D.

  4. Reduced retinal nerve fiber layer and macular thickness in patients with multiple sclerosis with no history of optic neuritis identified by the use of spectral domain high-definition optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Fjeldstad, Cecilie; Bemben, Michael; Pardo, Gabriel

    2011-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic immune-mediated disease of the central nervous system (CNS), with both inflammatory and degenerative components. The visual system is frequently involved, often in the form of visual loss from optic neuritis (ON). Retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) loss has been demonstrated in individuals with MS, not only in those with previous ON but also in absence of historical evidence of previous acute inflammation/demyelination of the optic nerve. Peripapillary RNFL measurements of all quadrants, central macular thickness, and average macular thickness were performed in 32 eyes of healthy volunteers and 60 eyes of individuals with a diagnosis of relapsing remitting MS using high definition spectral domain optical coherence tomography (HD-OCT). Both the Macular Cube 512 × 128 scan and RNFL measurement by the Optic Disc Cube 200 × 200 protocol were performed on all eyes. Eyes of individuals with MS with no previous ON had significantly decreased overall RNFL thickness (89.1 μm) compared to controls (98.0 μm) (p < 0.05). MS mainly affected the temporal quadrant (56.6 μm versus [vs.] 67.8 μm) (p < 0.05), and inferior quadrant (117.9 μm vs. 132.1 μm) (p < 0.05), respectively. Also, the patients with MS demonstrated significantly decreased average macular thickness (280 μm) compared to the control group (287 μm) (p < 0.05). A significant correlation between RNFL and average macular thickness was also found in eyes of patients with MS (r = 0.69, p < 0.01). HD-OCT is a quick, inexpensive and promising tool to detect subclinical changes in RNFL and macular thickness in individuals with MS. Longitudinal studies should be encouraged to examine disease progression over time in individuals with MS. PMID:21917458

  5. A multi-phase level set framework for source reconstruction in bioluminescence tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Heyu; Qu Xiaochao; Liang Jimin; He Xiaowei; Chen Xueli; Yang Da'an; Tian Jie

    2010-07-01

    We propose a novel multi-phase level set algorithm for solving the inverse problem of bioluminescence tomography. The distribution of unknown interior source is considered as piecewise constant and represented by using multiple level set functions. The localization of interior bioluminescence source is implemented by tracing the evolution of level set function. An alternate search scheme is incorporated to ensure the global optimal of reconstruction. Both numerical and physical experiments are performed to evaluate the developed level set reconstruction method. Reconstruction results show that the proposed method can stably resolve the interior source of bioluminescence tomography.

  6. Random matrix-based dimensionality reduction for bioluminescence tomography reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Styles, Iain B.; Basevi, Hector R. A.; Guggenheim, James A.; Dehghani, Hamid

    2013-06-01

    We show how a random matrix can be used to reduce the dimensionality of the bioluminescence tomography reconstruction problem. A randomised low-rank approximation for the sensitivity matrix is computed, and we show how this can be used to reconstruct the bioluminescence source distribution on a randomised basis for the mesh nodes. The distribution on the original mesh can be found easily via a simple matrix multiplication. The majority of the computation required can be performed in advance of the reconstruction, and the reconstruction time itself is of the order milliseconds. This could allow for high frame rate real-time reconstructions to be performed.

  7. Proton computed tomography from multiple physics processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bopp, C.; Colin, J.; Cussol, D.; Finck, Ch; Labalme, M.; Rousseau, M.; Brasse, D.

    2013-10-01

    Proton CT (pCT) nowadays aims at improving hadron therapy treatment planning by mapping the relative stopping power (RSP) of materials with respect to water. The RSP depends mainly on the electron density of the materials. The main information used is the energy of the protons. However, during a pCT acquisition, the spatial and angular deviation of each particle is recorded and the information about its transmission is implicitly available. The potential use of those observables in order to get information about the materials is being investigated. Monte Carlo simulations of protons sent into homogeneous materials were performed, and the influence of the chemical composition on the outputs was studied. A pCT acquisition of a head phantom scan was simulated. Brain lesions with the same electron density but different concentrations of oxygen were used to evaluate the different observables. Tomographic images from the different physics processes were reconstructed using a filtered back-projection algorithm. Preliminary results indicate that information is present in the reconstructed images of transmission and angular deviation that may help differentiate tissues. However, the statistical uncertainty on these observables generates further challenge in order to obtain an optimal reconstruction and extract the most pertinent information.

  8. Single photon emission computed tomography in AIDS dementia complex

    SciTech Connect

    Pohl, P.; Vogl, G.; Fill, H.; Roessler, H.Z.; Zangerle, R.; Gerstenbrand, F.

    1988-08-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies were performed in AIDS dementia complex using IMP in 12 patients (and HM-PAO in four of these same patients). In all patients, SPECT revealed either multiple or focal uptake defects, the latter corresponding with focal signs or symptoms in all but one case. Computerized tomography showed a diffuse cerebral atrophy in eight of 12 patients, magnetic resonance imaging exhibited changes like atrophy and/or leukoencephalopathy in two of five cases. Our data indicate that both disturbance of cerebral amine metabolism and alteration of local perfusion share in the pathogenesis of AIDS dementia complex. SPECT is an important aid in the diagnosis of AIDS dementia complex and contributes to the understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of this disorder.

  9. RF tomography of metallic objects in free space: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia; Ewing, Robert L.; Berdanier, Charles; Baker, Christopher

    2015-05-01

    RF tomography has great potential in defense and homeland security applications. A distributed sensing research facility is under development at Air Force Research Lab. To develop a RF tomographic imaging system for the facility, preliminary experiments have been performed in an indoor range with 12 radar sensors distributed on a circle of 3m radius. Ultra-wideband pulses are used to illuminate single and multiple metallic targets. The echoes received by distributed sensors were processed and combined for tomography reconstruction. Traditional matched filter algorithm and truncated singular value decomposition (SVD) algorithm are compared in terms of their complexity, accuracy, and suitability for distributed processing. A new algorithm is proposed for shape reconstruction, which jointly estimates the object boundary and scatter points on the waveform's propagation path. The results show that the new algorithm allows accurate reconstruction of object shape, which is not available through the matched filter and truncated SVD algorithms.

  10. Photoacoustic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lihong V.

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) refers to imaging that is based on the photoacoustic effect. Although the photoacoustic effect as a physical phenomenon was first reported on by Alexander Graham Bell in 1880 [1], PAT as an imaging technology was developed only after the advent of ultrasonic transducers, computers, and lasers [2-31]. A review on biomedical photoacoustics is available [32]. The motivation for PAT is to combine optical-absorption contrast with ultrasonic spatial resolution for deep imaging in the optical quasi-diffusive or diffusive regime. In PAT, the tissue is irradiated by usually a short-pulsed laser beam to achieve a thermal and acoustic impulse response (Fig. 19.1). Locally absorbed light is converted into heat, which is further converted to a pressure rise via thermo-elastic expansion. The initial pressure rise - determined by the local optical absorption coefficient (μ â ), fluence (ψ) and other thermal and mechanical properties - propagates as an ultrasonic wave, which is referred to as a photoacoustic wave.

  11. Non-contact fluorescence optical tomography with scanning patterned illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Amit; Bangerth, Wolfgang; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2006-07-01

    This article describes a novel non-contact fluorescence optical tomography scheme which utilizes multiple area illumination patterns, to reduce the ill-posedness of the inverse problem involved in recovering interior fluorescence yield distributions in biological tissue from boundary fluorescence measurements. The image reconstruction is posed as an optimization problem which seeks a tissue optical property distribution minimizing, for all illumination patterns simultaneously, a regularized difference between the observed boundary measurements of light distribution, and the boundary measurements predicted from a physical model. Multiple excitation source illumination patterns are described by line and Gaussian sources scanning the simulated tissue phantom surface and by employing diffractive optics-generated patterns. Multiple measurement data sets generated by scanning excitation sources are processed simultaneously to generate the interior fluorescence distribution in tissue by implementing the fluorescence tomography algorithm in a parallel framework suitable for multiprocessor computers. Image reconstructions for single and multiple fluorescent targets (5mm diameter) embedded in a 512ml simulated tissue phantom are demonstrated, with depths of the fluorescent targets from the illumination plane between 1cm to 2cm. We show both qualitative and quantitative improvements of our algorithm over reconstructions from only a single measurement.

  12. Television Quiz Show Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Jonnie Lynn

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the simulation of four television quiz shows for students in China studying English as a foreign language (EFL). It discusses the adaptation and implementation of television quiz shows and how the students reacted to them.

  13. Quasi In-Focus Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmi, Masato; Kurata, Takayuki; Sekimoto, Mitsugu; Haruna, Masamitsu

    2004-02-01

    We propose here a unique method for in-focus imaging over the entire cross-sectional area of interest. This is the so-called quasi in-focus optical coherence tomography (OCT) or multiple OCT in which OCT images are obtained by shifting the focal plane of an objective, followed by piling up of these OCT images. A preliminary experiment was made using chicken tissue as a sample; as a result, a stripe pattern of fibrous muscle was clearly observed over a depth of more than 3 mm. In in-vitro tomographic imaging of the human stomach wall, quasi in-focus OCT can provide a very clear image of the muscularis mucosae, which is a bending film like tissue of a few tens of microns thickness, showing that our method is useful for the early-stage diagnosis of stomach cancer.

  14. Hierarchical Cluster Analysis of Three-Dimensional Reconstructions of Unbiased Sampled Microglia Shows not Continuous Morphological Changes from Stage 1 to 2 after Multiple Dengue Infections in Callithrix penicillata

    PubMed Central

    Diniz, Daniel G.; Silva, Geane O.; Naves, Thaís B.; Fernandes, Taiany N.; Araújo, Sanderson C.; Diniz, José A. P.; de Farias, Luis H. S.; Sosthenes, Marcia C. K.; Diniz, Cristovam G.; Anthony, Daniel C.; da Costa Vasconcelos, Pedro F.; Picanço Diniz, Cristovam W.

    2016-01-01

    It is known that microglial morphology and function are related, but few studies have explored the subtleties of microglial morphological changes in response to specific pathogens. In the present report we quantitated microglia morphological changes in a monkey model of dengue disease with virus CNS invasion. To mimic multiple infections that usually occur in endemic areas, where higher dengue infection incidence and abundant mosquito vectors carrying different serotypes coexist, subjects received once a week subcutaneous injections of DENV3 (genotype III)-infected culture supernatant followed 24 h later by an injection of anti-DENV2 antibody. Control animals received either weekly anti-DENV2 antibodies, or no injections. Brain sections were immunolabeled for DENV3 antigens and IBA-1. Random and systematic microglial samples were taken from the polymorphic layer of dentate gyrus for 3-D reconstructions, where we found intense immunostaining for TNFα and DENV3 virus antigens. We submitted all bi- or multimodal morphological parameters of microglia to hierarchical cluster analysis and found two major morphological phenotypes designated types I and II. Compared to type I (stage 1), type II microglia were more complex; displaying higher number of nodes, processes and trees and larger surface area and volumes (stage 2). Type II microglia were found only in infected monkeys, whereas type I microglia was found in both control and infected subjects. Hierarchical cluster analysis of morphological parameters of 3-D reconstructions of random and systematic selected samples in control and ADE dengue infected monkeys suggests that microglia morphological changes from stage 1 to stage 2 may not be continuous. PMID:27047345

  15. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs.

  16. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Welch, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

  17. Positron Emission Tomography Findings in Atypical Polypoid Adenomyoma

    PubMed Central

    Fukami, Tatsuya; Yoshikai, Tomonori; Tsujioka, Hiroshi; Tohyama, Atsushi; Sorano, Sumire; Matsuoka, Sakiko; Yamamoto, Hiroko; Nakamura, Sumie; Goto, Maki; Matsuoka, Ryoei; Oya, Masafumi; Torii, Yoshikuni; Eguchi, Fuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Atypical polypoid adenomyoma (APAM) is a rare polypoid tumor of the uterus composed of atypical endometrial glands surrounded by smooth muscle. A 29-year-old nulligravida, was clinically diagnosed with endocervical myoma and underwent trans-uterine cervical resection with hysteroscope. The histopathological diagnosis of specimens was APAM. Eight months later, she diagnosed recurrent uterine tumor. The positron emission tomography (PET-CT) imaging showed an increased fluorodeoxyglucose uptake. She has performed hysterectomy and was diagnosed APAM. Therapy for APAM depends on multiple factors such as age at presentation and desire for childbearing among others. This is the first report of PET-CT findings in APAM. PMID:27134711

  18. A Holographic Road Show.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkpatrick, Larry D.; Rugheimer, Mac

    1979-01-01

    Describes the viewing sessions and the holograms of a holographic road show. The traveling exhibits, believed to stimulate interest in physics, include a wide variety of holograms and demonstrate several physical principles. (GA)

  19. Role of positron emission tomography/computed tomography in bone malignancies.

    PubMed

    Peller, Patrick J

    2013-09-01

    This article presents an overview of positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging of bone tumors for the practicing radiologist. The clinical roles and utility of (18)F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT in patients with primary bone tumors, osseous metastases, and multiple myeloma are reviewed. The clinical and research data supporting the utility of PET/CT in the evaluation of skeletal malignancies continues to grow. PMID:24010909

  20. Diffraction tomography of strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lionheart, W. R. B.; Withers, P. J.

    2015-04-01

    We consider whether it is possible to recover the three dimensional strain field tomographically from neutron and x-ray diffraction data for polycrystalline materials. We show that the distribution of strain transverse to a ray cannot be deduced from one diffraction pattern accumulated along that path, but that a certain moment of that data corresponds to the transverse ray transform of the strain tensor and so may be recovered by inverting that transform given sufficient data. We show that the whole strain tensor can be reconstructed from diffraction data measured using rotations about six directions that do not lie on a projective conic. In addition we give an inversion formula for complete data for the transverse ray transform. We also show that Bragg edge transmission data, which has been suggested for strain tomography with polychromatic data, cannot provide the strain distribution within the material but only the average along the ray path.

  1. Statistically efficient tomography of low rank states with incomplete measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Anirudh; Kypraios, Theodore; Guţă, Mădălin

    2016-04-01

    The construction of physically relevant low dimensional state models, and the design of appropriate measurements are key issues in tackling quantum state tomography for large dimensional systems. We consider the statistical problem of estimating low rank states in the set-up of multiple ions tomography, and investigate how the estimation error behaves with a reduction in the number of measurement settings, compared with the standard ion tomography setup. We present extensive simulation results showing that the error is robust with respect to the choice of states of a given rank, the random selection of settings, and that the number of settings can be significantly reduced with only a negligible increase in error. We present an argument to explain these findings based on a concentration inequality for the Fisher information matrix. In the more general setup of random basis measurements we use this argument to show that for certain rank r states it suffices to measure in O(r{log}d) bases to achieve the average Fisher information over all bases. We present numerical evidence for random states of up to eight atoms, which suggests that a similar behaviour holds in the case of Pauli bases measurements, for randomly chosen states. The relation to similar problems in compressed sensing is also discussed.

  2. Quantum tomography of an electron.

    PubMed

    Jullien, T; Roulleau, P; Roche, B; Cavanna, A; Jin, Y; Glattli, D C

    2014-10-30

    The complete knowledge of a quantum state allows the prediction of the probability of all possible measurement outcomes, a crucial step in quantum mechanics. It can be provided by tomographic methods which have been applied to atomic, molecular, spin and photonic states. For optical or microwave photons, standard tomography is obtained by mixing the unknown state with a large-amplitude coherent photon field. However, for fermions such as electrons in condensed matter, this approach is not applicable because fermionic fields are limited to small amplitudes (at most one particle per state), and so far no determination of an electron wavefunction has been made. Recent proposals involving quantum conductors suggest that the wavefunction can be obtained by measuring the time-dependent current of electronic wave interferometers or the current noise of electronic Hanbury-Brown/Twiss interferometers. Here we show that such measurements are possible despite the extreme noise sensitivity required, and present the reconstructed wavefunction quasi-probability, or Wigner distribution function, of single electrons injected into a ballistic conductor. Many identical electrons are prepared in well-controlled quantum states called levitons by repeatedly applying Lorentzian voltage pulses to a contact on the conductor. After passing through an electron beam splitter, the levitons are mixed with a weak-amplitude fermionic field formed by a coherent superposition of electron-hole pairs generated by a small alternating current with a frequency that is a multiple of the voltage pulse frequency. Antibunching of the electrons and holes with the levitons at the beam splitter changes the leviton partition statistics, and the noise variations provide the energy density matrix elements of the levitons. This demonstration of quantum tomography makes the developing field of electron quantum optics with ballistic conductors a new test-bed for quantum information with fermions. These results may find direct application in probing the entanglement of electron flying quantum bits, electron decoherence and electron interactions. They could also be applied to cold fermionic (or spin-1/2) atoms. PMID:25355360

  3. Showing What They Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cech, Scott J.

    2008-01-01

    Having students show their skills in three dimensions, known as performance-based assessment, dates back at least to Socrates. Individual schools such as Barrington High School--located just outside of Providence--have been requiring students to actively demonstrate their knowledge for years. The Rhode Island's high school graduating class became…

  4. Obesity in show cats.

    PubMed

    Corbee, R J

    2014-12-01

    Obesity is an important disease with a high prevalence in cats. Because obesity is related to several other diseases, it is important to identify the population at risk. Several risk factors for obesity have been described in the literature. A higher incidence of obesity in certain cat breeds has been suggested. The aim of this study was to determine whether obesity occurs more often in certain breeds. The second aim was to relate the increased prevalence of obesity in certain breeds to the official standards of that breed. To this end, 268 cats of 22 different breeds investigated by determining their body condition score (BCS) on a nine-point scale by inspection and palpation, at two different cat shows. Overall, 45.5% of the show cats had a BCS > 5, and 4.5% of the show cats had a BCS > 7. There were significant differences between breeds, which could be related to the breed standards. Most overweight and obese cats were in the neutered group. It warrants firm discussions with breeders and cat show judges to come to different interpretations of the standards in order to prevent overweight conditions in certain breeds from being the standard of beauty. Neutering predisposes for obesity and requires early nutritional intervention to prevent obese conditions. PMID:24612018

  5. Show What You Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eccleston, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Big things come in small packages. This saying came to the mind of the author after he created a simple math review activity for his fourth grade students. Though simple, it has proven to be extremely advantageous in reinforcing math concepts. He uses this activity, which he calls "Show What You Know," often. This activity provides the perfect…

  6. Stage a Water Show

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frasier, Debra

    2008-01-01

    In the author's book titled "The Incredible Water Show," the characters from "Miss Alaineus: A Vocabulary Disaster" used an ocean of information to stage an inventive performance about the water cycle. In this article, the author relates how she turned the story into hands-on science teaching for real-life fifth-grade students. The author also…

  7. The Ozone Show.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathieu, Aaron

    2000-01-01

    Uses a talk show activity for a final assessment tool for students to debate about the ozone hole. Students are assessed on five areas: (1) cooperative learning; (2) the written component; (3) content; (4) self-evaluation; and (5) peer evaluation. (SAH)

  8. Computed tomography findings of paracoccidiodomycosis in musculoskeletal system

    PubMed Central

    Lima Júnior, Francisco Valtenor Araújo; Savarese, Leonor Garbin; Monsignore, Lucas Moretti; Martinez, Roberto; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate musculoskeletal involvement in paracoccidioidomycosis at computed tomography. Materials and Methods Development of a retrospective study based on a review of radiologic and pathologic reports in the institution database. Patients with histopathologically confirmed musculoskeletal paracoccidioidomycosis and submitted to computed tomography were included in the present study. The imaging findings were consensually described by two radiologists. In order to avoid bias in the analysis, one patient with uncountable bone lesions was excluded from the study. Results A total of seven patients were included in the present study. A total of 18 bone lesions were counted. The study group consisted of 7 patients. A total number of 18 bone lesions were counted. Osteoarticular lesions were the first manifestation of the disease in four patients (57.14%). Bone lesions were multiple in 42.85% of patients. Appendicular and axial skeleton were affected in 85.71% and 42.85% of cases, respectively. Bone involvement was characterized by well-demarcated osteolytic lesions. Marginal osteosclerosis was identified in 72.22% of the lesions, while lamellar periosteal reaction and soft tissue component were present in 5.55% of them. One patient showed multiple small lesions with bone sequestra. Conclusion Paracoccidioidomycosis can be included in the differential diagnosis of either single or multiple osteolytic lesions in young patients even in the absence of a previous diagnosis of pulmonary or visceral paracoccidioidomycosis PMID:25798000

  9. Obesity in show dogs.

    PubMed

    Corbee, R J

    2012-08-11

    Obesity is an important disease with a growing incidence. Because obesity is related to several other diseases, and decreases life span, it is important to identify the population at risk. Several risk factors for obesity have been described in the literature. A higher incidence of obesity in certain breeds is often suggested. The aim of this study was to determine whether obesity occurs more often in certain breeds. The second aim was to relate the increased prevalence of obesity in certain breeds to the official standards of that breed. To this end, we investigated 1379 dogs of 128 different breeds by determining their body condition score (BCS). Overall, 18.6% of the show dogs had a BCS >5, and 1.1% of the show dogs had a BCS>7. There were significant differences between breeds, which could be correlated to the breed standards. It warrants firm discussions with breeders and judges in order to come to different interpretations of the standards to prevent overweight conditions from being the standard of beauty. PMID:22882163

  10. Not a "reality" show.

    PubMed

    Wrong, Terence; Baumgart, Erica

    2013-01-01

    The authors of the preceding articles raise legitimate questions about patient and staff rights and the unintended consequences of allowing ABC News to film inside teaching hospitals. We explain why we regard their fears as baseless and not supported by what we heard from individuals portrayed in the filming, our decade-long experience making medical documentaries, and the full un-aired context of the scenes shown in the broadcast. The authors don't and can't know what conversations we had, what documents we reviewed, and what protections we put in place in each televised scene. Finally, we hope to correct several misleading examples cited by the authors as well as their offhand mischaracterization of our program as a "reality" show. PMID:23631336

  11. Public medical shows.

    PubMed

    Walusinski, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    In the second half of the 19th century, Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893) became famous for the quality of his teaching and his innovative neurological discoveries, bringing many French and foreign students to Paris. A hunger for recognition, together with progressive and anticlerical ideals, led Charcot to invite writers, journalists, and politicians to his lessons, during which he presented the results of his work on hysteria. These events became public performances, for which physicians and patients were transformed into actors. Major newspapers ran accounts of these consultations, more like theatrical shows in some respects. The resultant enthusiasm prompted other physicians in Paris and throughout France to try and imitate them. We will compare the form and substance of Charcot's lessons with those given by Jules-Bernard Luys (1828-1897), Victor Dumontpallier (1826-1899), Ambroise-Auguste Liébault (1823-1904), Hippolyte Bernheim (1840-1919), Joseph Grasset (1849-1918), and Albert Pitres (1848-1928). We will also note their impact on contemporary cinema and theatre. PMID:25273491

  12. Electronic hardware design of electrical capacitance tomography systems.

    PubMed

    Saied, I; Meribout, M

    2016-06-28

    Electrical tomography techniques for process imaging are very prominent for industrial applications, such as the oil and gas industry and chemical refineries, owing to their ability to provide the flow regime of a flowing fluid within a relatively high throughput. Among the various techniques, electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) is gaining popularity due to its non-invasive nature and its capability to differentiate between different phases based on their permittivity distribution. In recent years, several hardware designs have been provided for ECT systems that have improved its resolution of measurements to be around attofarads (aF, 10(-18) F), or the number of channels, that is required to be large for some applications that require a significant amount of data. In terms of image acquisition time, some recent systems could achieve a throughput of a few hundred frames per second, while data processing time could be achieved in only a few milliseconds per frame. This paper outlines the concept and main features of the most recent front-end and back-end electronic circuits dedicated for ECT systems. In this paper, multiple-excitation capacitance polling, a front-end electronic technique, shows promising results for ECT systems to acquire fast data acquisition speeds. A highly parallel field-programmable gate array (FPGA) based architecture for a fast reconstruction algorithm is also described.This article is part of the themed issue 'Supersensing through industrial process tomography'. PMID:27185964

  13. Turbocharging Quantum Tomography.

    SciTech Connect

    Blume-Kohout, Robin J; Gamble, John King,; Nielsen, Erik; Maunz, Peter Lukas Wilhelm; Scholten, Travis L.; Rudinger, Kenneth Michael

    2015-01-01

    Quantum tomography is used to characterize quantum operations implemented in quantum information processing (QIP) hardware. Traditionally, state tomography has been used to characterize the quantum state prepared in an initialization procedure, while quantum process tomography is used to characterize dynamical operations on a QIP system. As such, tomography is critical to the development of QIP hardware (since it is necessary both for debugging and validating as-built devices, and its results are used to influence the next generation of devices). But tomography su %7C ers from several critical drawbacks. In this report, we present new research that resolves several of these flaws. We describe a new form of tomography called gate set tomography (GST), which unifies state and process tomography, avoids prior methods critical reliance on precalibrated operations that are not generally available, and can achieve unprecedented accuracies. We report on theory and experimental development of adaptive tomography protocols that achieve far higher fidelity in state reconstruction than non-adaptive methods. Finally, we present a new theoretical and experimental analysis of process tomography on multispin systems, and demonstrate how to more e %7C ectively detect and characterize quantum noise using carefully tailored ensembles of input states.

  14. Numerical study of grating-assisted optical diffraction tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Chaumet, Patrick C.; Belkebir, Kamal; Sentenac, Anne

    2007-07-15

    We study the resolution of an optical diffraction tomography system in which the objects are either in an homogeneous background or deposited onto a glass prism, a prism surmounted by a thin metallic film or a prism surmounted by a metallic film covered by a periodically nanostructured dielectric layer. For all these configurations, we present an inversion procedure that yields the map of the relative permittivity of the objects from their diffracted far field. When multiple scattering can be neglected, we show that the homogeneous, prism, and metallic film configurations yield a resolution about {lambda}/4 while the grating substrate yields a resolution better than {lambda}/10. When Born approximation fails, we point out that it is possible to neglect the coupling between the object and the substrate and account solely for the multiple scattering within the objects to obtain a satisfactory reconstruction. Last, we present the robustness of our inversion procedure to noise.

  15. Spectral thresholding quantum tomography for low rank states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butucea, Cristina; Guţă, Mădălin; Kypraios, Theodore

    2015-11-01

    The estimation of high dimensional quantum states is an important statistical problem arising in current quantum technology applications. A key example is the tomography of multiple ions states, employed in the validation of state preparation in ion trap experiments (Häffner et al 2005 Nature 438 643). Since full tomography becomes unfeasible even for a small number of ions, there is a need to investigate lower dimensional statistical models which capture prior information about the state, and to devise estimation methods tailored to such models. In this paper we propose several new methods aimed at the efficient estimation of low rank states and analyse their performance for multiple ions tomography. All methods consist in first computing the least squares estimator, followed by its truncation to an appropriately chosen smaller rank. The latter is done by setting eigenvalues below a certain ‘noise level’ to zero, while keeping the rest unchanged, or normalizing them appropriately. We show that (up to logarithmic factors in the space dimension) the mean square error of the resulting estimators scales as r\\cdot d/N where r is the rank, d={2}k is the dimension of the Hilbert space, and N is the number of quantum samples. Furthermore we establish a lower bound for the asymptotic minimax risk which shows that the above scaling is optimal. The performance of the estimators is analysed in an extensive simulations study, with emphasis on the dependence on the state rank, and the number of measurement repetitions. We find that all estimators perform significantly better than the least squares, with the ‘physical estimator’ (which is a bona fide density matrix) slightly outperforming the other estimators.

  16. Controlled Cardiac Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chenglin; Liu, Ying; Wang, Ge

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) has been a hot topic for years because of the clinical importance of cardiac diseases and the rapid evolution of CT systems. In this paper, we propose a novel strategy for controlled cardiac CT that may effectively reduce image artifacts due to cardiac and respiratory motions. Our approach is radically different from existing ones and is based on controlling the X-ray source rotation velocity and powering status in reference to the cardiac motion. We theoretically show that by such a control-based intervention the data acquisition process can be optimized for cardiac CT in the cases of periodic and quasiperiodic cardiac motions. Specifically, we formulate the corresponding coordination/control schemes for either exact or approximate matches between the ideal and actual source positions, and report representative simulation results that support our analytic findings. PMID:23165017

  17. Prospects of photoacoustic tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lihong V.

    2008-01-01

    Commercially available high-resolution three-dimensional optical imaging modalities—including confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, and optical coherence tomography—have fundamentally impacted biomedicine. Unfortunately, such tools cannot penetrate biological tissue deeper than the optical transport mean free path (∼1 mm in the skin). Photoacoustic tomography, which combines strong optical contrast and high ultrasonic resolution in a single modality, has broken through this fundamental depth limitation and achieved superdepth high-resolution optical imaging. In parallel, radio frequency-or microwave-induced thermoacoustic tomography is being actively developed to combine radio frequency or microwave contrast with ultrasonic resolution. In this Vision 20∕20 article, the prospects of photoacoustic tomography are envisaged in the following aspects: (1) photoacoustic microscopy of optical absorption emerging as a mainstream technology, (2) melanoma detection using photoacoustic microscopy, (3) photoacoustic endoscopy, (4) simultaneous functional and molecular photoacoustic tomography, (5) photoacoustic tomography of gene expression, (6) Doppler photoacoustic tomography for flow measurement, (7) photoacoustic tomography of metabolic rate of oxygen, (8) photoacoustic mapping of sentinel lymph nodes, (9) multiscale photoacoustic imaging in vivo with common signal origins, (10) simultaneous photoacoustic and thermoacoustic tomography of the breast, (11) photoacoustic and thermoacoustic tomography of the brain, and (12) low-background thermoacoustic molecular imaging. PMID:19175133

  18. FDG PET/CT in a rare case of multiple cutaneous metastases in carcinoma larynx

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anurag; Chauhan, MS; Pandit, AG; Kumar, Rajeev; Sharma, Amit; Dubey, IP

    2012-01-01

    Distant metastases in squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx have an incidence of 6.5-7.2% and most commonly involves the lungs, liver, and bone. Metastases to the skin are very rare, but, when present, they are usually considered a poor prognostic sign. This most often affect the supradiaphragmatic area, i.e., the head, neck, thorax, or upper extremities. We have reported 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) scan of a patient with squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx showing multiple subcutaneous nodules all over the body, which was helpful in the assessment as well as staging of the disease. PMID:24019660

  19. Optical coherence tomography helps differentiate neuromyelitis optica and MS optic neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Ratchford, J N.; Quigg, M E.; Conger, A; Frohman, T; Frohman, E; Balcer, L J.; Calabresi, P A.; Kerr, D A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness and macular volume in neuromyelitis optica (NMO) spectrum patients using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Background: OCT can quantify damage to retinal ganglion cell axons and can identify abnormalities in multiple sclerosis and optic neuritis (ON) eyes. OCT may also be useful in the evaluation of patients with NMO. Methods: OCT and visual function testing were performed in 26 NMO spectrum patients with a history of ON, 17 patients with isolated longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM) without ON, 378 patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), and 77 healthy controls at 2 centers. Results: Substantial RNFL thinning was seen in NMO ON eyes (63.6 μm) relative to both RRMS ON eyes (88.3 μm, p < 0.0001) and control eyes (102.4 μm, p < 0.0001). A first episode of ON was estimated to cause 24 μm more loss of RNFL thickness in NMO than RRMS. Similar results were seen for macular volume. ON also was associated with more severe visual impairment in NMO spectrum patients than in RRMS patients. Eyes in the LETM group and unaffected NMO eyes were not significantly different from controls, though conclusions about these subgroups were limited by small sample sizes. Conclusions: Optical coherence tomography (OCT) shows more severe retinal damage after optic neuritis (ON) episodes in neuromyelitis optica (NMO) than in relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis. Identification of substantial retinal nerve fiber layer loss (>15 μm) after ON in a non–multiple sclerosis patient should prompt consideration of an NMO spectrum condition. OCT may be a useful tool for the evaluation of patients with NMO. GLOSSARY CI = confidence interval; ETDRS = Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study; IgG = immunoglobulin G; LETM = longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis; MS = multiple sclerosis; NMO = neuromyelitis optica; OCT = optical coherence tomography; ON = optic neuritis; RNFL = retinal nerve fiber layer; RRMS = relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis. PMID:19636050

  20. Optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Podoleanu, A Gh

    2012-01-01

    The review provides a concise explanation of principles of operation of different optical coherence tomography methods. A comparative analysis of their advantages and disadvantages is presented in relation to specific applications. The review will assist the reader in making an educated choice on the most suitable optical coherence tomography method to be used in a particular application. PMID:22708800

  1. Dual seven pinhole tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Bizais, Y.; Zubal, I.G.; Rowe, R.W.; Bennett, G.W.; Brill, A.B.

    1982-01-01

    Emission tomography using two orthogonal sets of projections through seven pinhole collimators is considered. This paper describes the acquisition system, the reconstruction algorithm, presents results obtained in phantom studies, and discusses the advantages and disadvantages of this method over conventional Seven Pinhole Tomography.

  2. Maxillary Swelling as the First Evidence of Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Kasamatsu, Atsushi; Kimura, Yasushi; Tsujimura, Hideki; Kanazawa, Harusachi; Koide, Nao; Miyamoto, Isao; Endo-Sakamoto, Yosuke; Shiiba, Masashi; Tanzawa, Hideki; Uzawa, Katsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a malignant neoplasm of plasma cells characterized by proliferation of a single clone of abnormal immunoglobulin-secreting plasma cells. Since the amount of hemopoietic bone marrow is decreased in the maxilla, oral manifestations of multiple myeloma are less common in the maxilla than in the mandible. We report the case of 33-year-old Japanese man who presented with a mass in the right maxillary alveolar region. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance images showed a soft tissue mass in the right maxilla eroding the anterior and lateral walls of the maxillary sinus and extending into the buccal space. The biopsy results, imaging, and laboratory investigations led to the diagnosis of multiple myeloma. This case report suggests that oral surgeons and dentists should properly address oral manifestations as first indications of multiple myeloma. PMID:26640721

  3. Diverse Findings in Calcified Thrombus Between Histopathology and In Vivo Imaging Including Intravascular Ultrasound, Optical Coherence Tomography, and Angioscopy.

    PubMed

    Koga, Seiji; Ikeda, Satoshi; Nakata, Tomoo; Kawano, Hiroaki; Abe, Kuniko; Maemura, Koji

    2015-12-01

    A 46-year-old woman on hemodialysis due to end-stage renal disease was admitted for repeated thrombus formation in previously implanted drug-eluting stents in the right coronary artery. We could successfully aspirate this thrombus, and histopathology revealed a calcified thrombus comprising multiple microcalcifications and fibrinous materials. This is the first report showing how a calcified thrombus is visualized in vivo by intracoronary imaging modalities including intravascular ultrasound, optical coherence tomography, and angioscopy. PMID:26549397

  4. Multiple myeloma with biclonal gammopathy accompanied by prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nae Yu; Gong, Soo Jung; Kim, Jimyung; Youn, Seon Min; Lee, Jung-Ae

    2011-10-01

    We report a rare case of multiple myeloma with biclonal gammopathy (IgG kappa and IgA lambda type) in a 58-year-old man with prostate cancer who presented with lower back pain. Through computed tomography (CT) imaging, an osteolytic lesion at the L3 vertebra and an enhancing lesion of the prostate gland with multiple lymphadenopathies were found. In the whole body positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT), an additional osteoblastic bone lesion was found in the left ischial bone. A prostate biopsy was performed, and adenocarcinoma was confirmed. Decompression surgery of the L3 vertebra was conducted, and the pathologic result indicated that the lesion was a plasma cell neoplasm. Immunofixation electrophoresis showed the presence of biclonal gammopathy (IgG kappa and IgA lambda). Bone marrow plasma cells (CD138 positive cells) comprised 7.2% of nucleated cells and showed kappa positivity. We started radiation therapy for the L3 vertebra lesion, with a total dose of 3,940 cGy, and androgen deprivation therapy as treatment for the prostate cancer. PMID:22016684

  5. Applied potential tomography. A new noninvasive technique for measuring gastric emptying

    SciTech Connect

    Avill, R.; Mangnall, Y.F.; Bird, N.C.; Brown, B.H.; Barber, D.C.; Seagar, A.D.; Johnson, A.G.; Read, N.W.

    1987-04-01

    Applied potential tomography is a new, noninvasive technique that yields sequential images of the resistivity of gastric contents after subjects have ingested a liquid or semisolid meal. This study validates the technique as a means of measuring gastric emptying. Experiments in vitro showed an excellent correlation between measurements of resistivity and either the square of the radius of a glass rod or the volume of water in a spherical balloon when both were placed in an oval tank containing saline. Altering the lateral position of the rod in the tank did not alter the values obtained. Images of abdominal resistivity were also directly correlated with the volume of air in a gastric balloon. Profiles of gastric emptying of liquid meals obtained using applied potential tomography were very similar to those obtained using scintigraphy or dye dilution techniques, provided that acid secretion was inhibited by cimetidine. Profiles of emptying of a mashed potato meal using applied potential tomography were also very similar to those obtained by scintigraphy. Measurements of the emptying of a liquid meal from the stomach were reproducible if acid secretion was inhibited by cimetidine. Thus, applied potential tomography is an accurate and reproducible method of measuring gastric emptying of liquids and particulate food. It is inexpensive, well tolerated, easy to use, and ideally suited for multiple studies in patients, even those who are pregnant.

  6. Single-cell diffraction tomography with optofluidic rotation about a tilted axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Paul; Schürmann, Mirjam; Chan, Chii J.; Guck, Jochen

    2015-08-01

    Optical diffraction tomography (ODT) is a tomographic technique that can be used to measure the three-dimensional (3D) refractive index distribution within living cells without the requirement of any marker. In principle, ODT can be regarded as a generalization of optical projection tomography which is equivalent to computerized tomography (CT). Both optical tomographic techniques require projection-phase images of cells measured at multiple angles. However, the reconstruction of the 3D refractive index distribution post-measurement differs for the two techniques. It is known that ODT yields better results than projection tomography, because it takes into account diffraction of the imaging light due to the refractive index structure of the sample. Here, we apply ODT to biological cells in a microfluidic chip which combines optical trapping and microfluidic flow to achieve an optofluidic single-cell rotation. In particular, we address the problem that arises when the trapped cell is not rotating about an axis perpendicular to the imaging plane, but is instead arbitrarily tilted. In this paper we show that the 3D reconstruction can be improved by taking into account such a tilted rotational axis in the reconstruction process.

  7. Wavelet-based time-dependent travel time tomography method and its application in imaging the Etna volcano in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Haijiang

    2015-10-01

    It has been a challenge to image velocity changes in real time by seismic travel time tomography. If more seismic events are included in the tomographic system, the inverted velocity models do not have necessary time resolution to resolve velocity changes. But if fewer events are used for real-time tomography, the system is less stable and the inverted model may contain some artifacts, and thus, resolved velocity changes may not be real. To mitigate these issues, we propose a wavelet-based time-dependent double-difference (DD) tomography method. The new method combines the multiscale property of wavelet representation and the fast converging property of the simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique to solve the velocity models at multiple scales for sequential time segments. We first test the new method using synthetic data constructed using real event and station distribution for Mount Etna volcano in Italy. Then we show its effectiveness to determine velocity changes for the 2001 and 2002 eruptions of Mount Etna volcano. Compared to standard DD tomography that uses seismic events from a longer time period, wavelet-based time-dependent tomography better resolves velocity changes that may be caused by fracture closure and opening as well as fluid migration before and after volcano eruptions.

  8. Diagnosis of sacral perineural cysts by computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Tabas, J H; Deeb, Z L

    1986-07-01

    Three cases of sacral perineural cysts associated with chronic low-back pain are described with their myelography, computed tomography, and plain film findings. Significant findings include multiple cystic dilatations of lumbosacral nerve root sheaths, enlargement of the sacral foramina by masses isodense with cerebrospinal fluid, and asymmetric epidural fat distribution. Recognition of these findings on unenhanced computed tomography scans should preclude further evaluation by myelography and intrathecal metrizamide (Amipaque) computed tomography. These cysts are usually not the primary cause of back and leg pain. PMID:2942338

  9. Multiple-image radiography.

    PubMed

    Wernick, Miles N; Wirjadi, Oliver; Chapman, Dean; Zhong, Zhong; Galatsanos, Nikolas P; Yang, Yongyi; Brankov, Jovan G; Oltulu, Oral; Anastasio, Mark A; Muehleman, Carol

    2003-12-01

    Conventional radiography produces a single image of an object by measuring the attenuation of an x-ray beam passing through it. When imaging weakly absorbing tissues, x-ray attenuation may be a suboptimal signature of disease-related information. In this paper we describe a new phase-sensitive imaging method, called multiple-image radiography (MIR), which is an improvement on a prior technique called diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI). This paper elaborates on our initial presentation of the idea in Wernick et al (2002 Proc. Int. Symp. Biomed. Imaging pp 129-32). MIR simultaneously produces several images from a set of measurements made with a single x-ray beam. Specifically, MIR yields three images depicting separately the effects of refraction, ultra-small-angle scatter and attenuation by the object. All three images have good contrast, in part because they are virtually immune from degradation due to scatter at higher angles. MIR also yields a very comprehensive object description, consisting of the angular intensity spectrum of a transmitted x-ray beam at every image pixel, within a narrow angular range. Our experiments are based on data acquired using a synchrotron light source; however, in preparation for more practical implementations using conventional x-ray sources, we develop and evaluate algorithms designed for Poisson noise, which is characteristic of photon-limited imaging. The results suggest that MIR is capable of operating at low photon count levels, therefore the method shows promise for use with conventional x-ray sources. The results also show that, in addition to producing new types of object descriptions, MIR produces substantially more accurate images than its predecessor, DEI. MIR results are shown in the form of planar images of a phantom and a biological specimen. A preliminary demonstration of the use of MIR for computed tomography is also presented. PMID:14703164

  10. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging features of renal cell carcinoma and pulmonary metastases in a dog.

    PubMed

    Song, Sun-Hye; Park, Noh-Won; Eom, Ki-Dong

    2014-05-01

    A 9-year-old spayed female cocker spaniel dog was referred for hematuria. A large abdominal mass and multiple pulmonary nodules were identified radiographically. A whole-body 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-d-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scan revealed intensely increased uptake in a renal mass and the pulmonary nodules. Renal cell carcinoma was diagnosed on histological examination. PMID:24790233

  11. Optical coherence tomography used for internal biometrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shoude; Sherif, Sherif; Mao, Youxin; Flueraru, Costel

    2007-06-01

    Traditional biometric technologies used for security and person identification essentially deal with fingerprints, hand geometry and face images. However, because all these technologies use external features of human body, they can be easily fooled and tampered with by distorting, modifying or counterfeiting these features. Nowadays, internal biometrics which detects the internal ID features of an object is becoming increasingly important. Being capable of exploring under-skin structure, optical coherence tomography (OCT) system can be used as a powerful tool for internal biometrics. We have applied fiber-optic and full-field OCT systems to detect the multiple-layer 2D images and 3D profile of the fingerprints, which eventually result in a higher discrimination than the traditional 2D recognition methods. More importantly, the OCT based fingerprint recognition has the ability to easily distinguish artificial fingerprint dummies by analyzing the extracted layered surfaces. Experiments show that our OCT systems successfully detected the dummy, which was made of plasticene and was used to bypass the commercially available fingerprint scanning system with a false accept rate (FAR) of 100%.

  12. Algorithm for Rapid Tomography of Gas Concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Price, P.N.; Fischer, M.L.; Gadgil, A.J.; Sextro, R.G.

    2000-06-27

    We present a new computed tomography method, the low third derivative (LTD) method, that is particularly suited for reconstructing the spatial distribution of gas concentrations from path-integral data for a small number of optical paths. The method finds a spatial distribution of gas concentrations that (1) has path integrals that agree with measured path integrals, and (2) has a low third spatial derivative in each direction, at every point. The trade-off between (1) and (2) is controlled by an adjustable parameter, which can be set based on analysis of the path-integral data. The method produces a set of linear equations, which can be solved with a single matrix multiplication if the constraint that all concentrations must be positive is ignored; the method is therefore extremely rapid. Analysis of experimental data from thousands of concentration distributions shows that the method works nearly as well as Smooth Basis Function Minimization (the best method previously available), yet is 100 times faster.

  13. Using GPU for Seismic Emission Tomography processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dricker, I. G.; Cooke, A. J.; Friberg, P. A.; Hellman, S. B.

    2010-12-01

    Seismic Emission Tomography (SET) is an emerging technique which is rapidly gaining popularity in both earthquake seismology and the oil and gas industry. Stacking seismic records from multiple channels of a surface seismic array with moveout correction dramatically increases the signal-to-noise ratio and allows monitoring of fine-scale microseismicity. Using SET to detect active seismic locations within the study volume requires time-shifting and stacking the trace for each seismic recording channel and node in the 3D Earth grid. Algorithmically, this implies five nested loops over space coordinates, channel lists and time. Even the most powerful PC CPUs proved impractical for this task; only rough models could be built in a reasonable period of time. Fortunately the SET computational kernel is easy to parallelize, because computations for each grid node and recording channel are independent, so we could achieve significant (of order x100) speedups on Nvidia GPUs with OpenCL. In this case study we show how progressive optimization, from Matlab to C, and on to OpenCL, improved performance. We discuss various problems encountered, give practical guidance on refactoring, and include benchmarks on several GPUs.

  14. Single photon emission computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Piez, C.W. Jr.; Holman, B.L.

    1985-07-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is becoming an increasingly important part of routine clinical nuclear medicine. By providing tomographic reconstructions in multiple planes through the patient, SPECT expands the clinical applications in nuclear medicine as well as providing better contrast, edge definition and separation of target from background activities. Imaging techniques have been developed for the evaluation of regional cerebral blood flow using radiolabeled amines. Thus, cerebral functional imaging can be used in the diagnosis of acute cerebral infarction, cerebral vascular disease, dementia and epilepsy. SPECT plays a complementary role in the evaluation of coronary artery disease, particularly when it is coupled with thallium-201 and exercise testing. SPECT extends our diagnostic capabilities in additional areas, such as liver and bone scintigraphy as well as tumor imaging with gallium-67.

  15. X-ray tensor tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malecki, A.; Potdevin, G.; Biernath, T.; Eggl, E.; Willer, K.; Lasser, T.; Maisenbacher, J.; Gibmeier, J.; Wanner, A.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-02-01

    Here we introduce a new concept for x-ray computed tomography that yields information about the local micro-morphology and its orientation in each voxel of the reconstructed 3D tomogram. Contrary to conventional x-ray CT, which only reconstructs a single scalar value for each point in the 3D image, our approach provides a full scattering tensor with multiple independent structural parameters in each volume element. In the application example shown in this study, we highlight that our method can visualize sub-pixel fiber orientations in a carbon composite sample, hence demonstrating its value for non-destructive testing applications. Moreover, as the method is based on the use of a conventional x-ray tube, we believe that it will also have a great impact in the wider range of material science investigations and in future medical diagnostics. The authors declare no competing financial interests.

  16. Matrix-based image reconstruction methods for tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Llacer, J.; Meng, J.D.

    1984-10-01

    Matrix methods of image reconstruction have not been used, in general, because of the large size of practical matrices, ill condition upon inversion and the success of Fourier-based techniques. An exception is the work that has been done at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for imaging with accelerated radioactive ions. An extension of that work into more general imaging problems shows that, with a correct formulation of the problem, positron tomography with ring geometries results in well behaved matrices which can be used for image reconstruction with no distortion of the point response in the field of view and flexibility in the design of the instrument. Maximum Likelihood Estimator methods of reconstruction, which use the system matrices tailored to specific instruments and do not need matrix inversion, are shown to result in good preliminary images. A parallel processing computer structure based on multiple inexpensive microprocessors is proposed as a system to implement the matrix-MLE methods. 14 references, 7 figures.

  17. Myasthenia gravis and invasive thymoma with multiple intracranial metastases.

    PubMed

    Koç, Filiz; Yerdelen, Deniz; Sarica, Yakup

    2003-06-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease. Approximately 15% of patients with MG have thymoma. Approximately 30% to 40% of them are invasive. A 26-year-old man was admitted with cough and difficulty breathing. He had transsternal thymectomy resulting from MG accompanied by thymoma 6 years previously. Thorax computerized tomography (CT) scans showed metastases to the extra-mediastinum. Diagnosis of invasive thymoma was made by CT-guided biopsy. A PAC regimen (cisplatin, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide) and radiotherapy were added to MG treatment. Ten months later, he presented again with headache, weakness, and difficulty swallowing. We determined that he had intracranial multiple metastases. He was hospitalized. Cerebral multiple metastases were evaluated as inoperable. However, he died of transtentorial herniation after 1 month. This MG case accompanied by invasive thymoma with multiple intracranial metastases is discussed. PMID:19078711

  18. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography-computed tomography in oncology.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Gerwin P; Kramer, Harald; Reiser, Maximilian F; Glaser, Christian

    2007-06-01

    The advent of positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) and whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) has introduced tumor imaging with a systemic and functional approach compared with established sequential, multimodal diagnostic algorithms.Whole-body PET with [18F]-fluoro-2-desoxy-glucose is a useful imaging procedure for tumor staging and monitoring that can visualize active tumor tissue by detecting pathological glucose metabolism. The combination of PET with the detailed anatomical information of multislice computed tomography as dual-modality scanners has markedly increased lesion localization and diagnostic accuracy compared with both modalities as standalone applications.Hardware innovations, such as the introduction of multi-receiver channel whole-body MRI scanners at 1.5 and, recently, 3 T, combined with acquisition acceleration techniques, have made high-resolution WB-MRI clinically feasible. Now, a dedicated assessment of individual organs with various soft tissue contrast, spatial resolution, and contrast media dynamics can be combined with whole-body anatomical coverage in a multiplanar imaging approach. More flexible protocols (eg, T1-weighted turbo spin-echo and short inversion recovery imaging, dedicated lung imaging or dynamic contrast-enhanced studies of the abdomen) can be performed within 45 minutes.Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging has recently been proposed for tumor screening of asymptomatic individuals, and potentially life-changing diagnoses, such as formerly unknown malignancy, have been reported. However, larger patient cohort studies will have to show the cost efficiency and the clinical effectiveness of such an approach.For initial tumor staging, PET-CT has proved more accurate for the definition of T-stage and lymph node assessment, mainly because of the missing metabolic information in WB-MRI. However, new applications, such as magnetic resonance whole-body diffusion-weighted imaging or lymphotropic contrast agents, may significantly increase sensitivity in near future. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging has shown advantages for the detection of distant metastatic disease, especially from tumors frequently spreading to the liver or brain and as a whole-body bone marrow screening application. Within this context, WB-MRI is highly accurate for the detection of skeletal metastases and staging of multiple myeloma. This article summarizes recent developments of CT/PET-CT and WB-MRI and highlights their performance within the scope of systemic oncological imaging. PMID:17762383

  19. Speckle contrast diffuse correlation tomography of complex turbid medium flow

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chong; Irwin, Daniel; Lin, Yu; Shang, Yu; He, Lian; Kong, Weikai; Luo, Jia; Yu, Guoqiang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Developed herein is a three-dimensional (3D) flow contrast imaging system leveraging advancements in the extension of laser speckle contrast imaging theories to deep tissues along with our recently developed finite-element diffuse correlation tomography (DCT) reconstruction scheme. This technique, termed speckle contrast diffuse correlation tomography (scDCT), enables incorporation of complex optical property heterogeneities and sample boundaries. When combined with a reflectance-based design, this system facilitates a rapid segue into flow contrast imaging of larger, in vivo applications such as humans. Methods: A highly sensitive CCD camera was integrated into a reflectance-based optical system. Four long-coherence laser source positions were coupled to an optical switch for sequencing of tomographic data acquisition providing multiple projections through the sample. This system was investigated through incorporation of liquid and solid tissue-like phantoms exhibiting optical properties and flow characteristics typical of human tissues. Computer simulations were also performed for comparisons. A uniquely encountered smear correction algorithm was employed to correct point-source illumination contributions during image capture with the frame-transfer CCD and reflectance setup. Results: Measurements with scDCT on a homogeneous liquid phantom showed that speckle contrast-based deep flow indices were within 12% of those from standard DCT. Inclusion of a solid phantom submerged below the liquid phantom surface allowed for heterogeneity detection and validation. The heterogeneity was identified successfully by reconstructed 3D flow contrast tomography with scDCT. The heterogeneity center and dimensions and averaged relative flow (within 3%) and localization were in agreement with actuality and computer simulations, respectively. Conclusions: A custom cost-effective CCD-based reflectance 3D flow imaging system demonstrated rapid acquisition of dense boundary data and, with further studies, a high potential for translatability to real tissues with arbitrary boundaries. A requisite correction was also found for measurements in the fashion of scDCT to recover accurate speckle contrast of deep tissues. PMID:26133600

  20. Seismic Window Selection and Misfit Measurements for Global Adjoint Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, W.; Bozdag, E.; Lefebvre, M.; Podhorszki, N.; Smith, J. A.; Tromp, J.

    2013-12-01

    Global Adjoint Tomography requires fast parallel processing of large datasets. After obtaing the preprocessed observed and synthetic seismograms, we use the open source software packages FLEXWIN (Maggi et al. 2007) to select time windows and MEASURE_ADJ to make measurements. These measurements define adjoint sources for data assimilation. Previous versions of these tools work on a pair of SAC files---observed and synthetic seismic data for the same component and station, and loop over all seismic records associated with one earthquake. Given the large number of stations and earthquakes, the frequent read and write operations create severe I/O bottlenecks on modern computing platforms. We present new versions of these tools utilizing a new seismic data format, namely the Adaptive Seismic Data Format(ASDF). This new format shows superior scalability for applications on high-performance computers and accommodates various types of data, including earthquake, industry and seismic interferometry datasets. ASDF also provides user-friendly APIs, which can be easily integrated into the adjoint tomography workflow and combined with other data processing tools. In addition to solving the I/O bottleneck, we are making several improvements to these tools. For example, FLEXWIN is tuned to select windows for different types of earthquakes. To capture their distinct features, we categorize earthquakes by their depths and frequency bands. Moreover, instead of only picking phases between the first P arrival and the surface-wave arrivals, our aim is to select and assimilate many other later prominent phases in adjoint tomography. For example, in the body-wave band (17 s - 60 s), we include SKS, sSKS and their multiple, while in the surface-wave band (60 s - 120 s) we incorporate major-arc surface waves.

  1. Speckle contrast diffuse correlation tomography of complex turbid medium flow

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chong; Irwin, Daniel; Lin, Yu; Shang, Yu; He, Lian; Kong, Weikai; Yu, Guoqiang; Luo, Jia

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Developed herein is a three-dimensional (3D) flow contrast imaging system leveraging advancements in the extension of laser speckle contrast imaging theories to deep tissues along with our recently developed finite-element diffuse correlation tomography (DCT) reconstruction scheme. This technique, termed speckle contrast diffuse correlation tomography (scDCT), enables incorporation of complex optical property heterogeneities and sample boundaries. When combined with a reflectance-based design, this system facilitates a rapid segue into flow contrast imaging of larger, in vivo applications such as humans. Methods: A highly sensitive CCD camera was integrated into a reflectance-based optical system. Four long-coherence laser source positions were coupled to an optical switch for sequencing of tomographic data acquisition providing multiple projections through the sample. This system was investigated through incorporation of liquid and solid tissue-like phantoms exhibiting optical properties and flow characteristics typical of human tissues. Computer simulations were also performed for comparisons. A uniquely encountered smear correction algorithm was employed to correct point-source illumination contributions during image capture with the frame-transfer CCD and reflectance setup. Results: Measurements with scDCT on a homogeneous liquid phantom showed that speckle contrast-based deep flow indices were within 12% of those from standard DCT. Inclusion of a solid phantom submerged below the liquid phantom surface allowed for heterogeneity detection and validation. The heterogeneity was identified successfully by reconstructed 3D flow contrast tomography with scDCT. The heterogeneity center and dimensions and averaged relative flow (within 3%) and localization were in agreement with actuality and computer simulations, respectively. Conclusions: A custom cost-effective CCD-based reflectance 3D flow imaging system demonstrated rapid acquisition of dense boundary data and, with further studies, a high potential for translatability to real tissues with arbitrary boundaries. A requisite correction was also found for measurements in the fashion of scDCT to recover accurate speckle contrast of deep tissues.

  2. Spectral distortion in diffuse molecular luminescence tomography in turbid media

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Scott C.; Pogue, Brian W.; Tuttle, Stephen B.; Dehghani, Hamid; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2009-01-01

    The influence of tissue optical properties on the shape of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence emission spectra propagating through multiple centimeters of tissue-like media was investigated. Fluorescence emission spectra measured from 6 cm homogeneous tissue-simulating phantoms show dramatic spectral distortion which results in emission peak shifts of up to 60 nm in wavelength. Measured spectral shapes are highly dependent on the photon path length and the scattered photon field in the NIR amplifies the wavelength-dependent absorption of the fluorescence spectra. Simulations of the peak propagation using diffusion modeling describe the experimental observations and confirm the path length dependence of fluorescence emission spectra. Spectral changes are largest for long path length measurements and thus will be most important in human tomography studies in the NIR. Spectrally resolved detection strategies are required to detect and interpret these effects which may otherwise produce erroneous intensity measurements. This observed phenomenon is analogous to beam hardening in x-ray tomography, which can lead to image artifacts without appropriate compensation. The peak shift toward longer wavelengths, and therefore lower energy photons, observed for NIR luminescent signals propagating through tissue may readily be described as a beam softening phenomenon. PMID:20157444

  3. Poor Uptake of Fluorodeoxyglucose in Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography Scan for Intraocular Choroidal Melanoma in Asian Indian Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rahul S.; Shah, Parag K.; Narendran, Venkatapathy

    2016-01-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) scan is fast becoming a very useful tool in diagnosing and staging of several malignancies that affect the human body. We report three cases of ocular choroidal malignant melanoma, wherein FDG PET-CT scan did not show as good uptake as seen in other cancers. PMID:26912980

  4. Parenting Multiples

    MedlinePlus

    ... the birth of a child. So parents of twins or higher-order multiples (triplets or more) can ... the chances of having multiples. The incidence of twin and higher-order multiple births has climbed rapidly ...

  5. A lotus root-like appearance in carotid stenosis on optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hyukwon; Yoon, Hyuck Jun; Hong, Jeong-Ho; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Sohn, Sung-Il; Lee, Chang-Young

    2016-06-01

    An 82-year-old man visited the outpatient clinic of our stroke centre because of dizziness. He had a previous history of stroke without definite sequelae. Severe stenosis in the left proximal internal carotid artery (ICA) was seen on Doppler sonography. Conventional angiography revealed focal severe stenosis with 'string sign' in the left proximal ICA and delayed distal run off. Optical coherence tomography showed multiple channels surrounding a narrowed central lumen (lotus root-like appearance). Carotid stent placement with a protection device was done without complications. The patient was discharged in good condition 5 days after the procedure. PMID:25999379

  6. In vivo deep tissue imaging using wavefront shaping optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hyeonseung; Lee, Peter; Lee, KyeoReh; Jang, Jaeduck; Lim, Jaeguyn; Jang, Wooyoung; Jeong, Yong; Park, YongKeun

    2016-10-01

    Multiple light scattering in tissue limits the penetration of optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. Here, we present in vivo OCT imaging of a live mouse using wavefront shaping (WS) to enhance the penetration depth. A digital micromirror device was used in a spectral-domain OCT system for complex WS of an incident beam which resulted in the optimal delivery of light energy into deep tissue. Ex vivo imaging of chicken breasts and mouse ear tissues showed enhancements in the strength of the image signals and the penetration depth, and in vivo imaging of the tail of a live mouse provided a multilayered structure inside the tissue. PMID:26895566

  7. Practical Bayesian tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granade, Christopher; Combes, Joshua; Cory, D. G.

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, Bayesian methods have been proposed as a solution to a wide range of issues in quantum state and process tomography. State-of-the-art Bayesian tomography solutions suffer from three problems: numerical intractability, a lack of informative prior distributions, and an inability to track time-dependent processes. Here, we address all three problems. First, we use modern statistical methods, as pioneered by Huszár and Houlsby (2012 Phys. Rev. A 85 052120) and by Ferrie (2014 New J. Phys. 16 093035), to make Bayesian tomography numerically tractable. Our approach allows for practical computation of Bayesian point and region estimators for quantum states and channels. Second, we propose the first priors on quantum states and channels that allow for including useful experimental insight. Finally, we develop a method that allows tracking of time-dependent states and estimates the drift and diffusion processes affecting a state. We provide source code and animated visual examples for our methods.

  8. Seeing the Unseen—Bioturbation in 4D: Tracing Bioirrigation in Marine Sediment Using Positron Emission Tomography and Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Delefosse, Matthieu; Kristensen, Erik; Crunelle, Diane; Braad, Poul Erik; Dam, Johan Hygum; Thisgaard, Helge; Thomassen, Anders; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Understanding spatial and temporal patterns of bioirrigation induced by benthic fauna ventilation is critical given its significance on benthic nutrient exchange and biogeochemistry in coastal ecosystems. The quantification of this process challenges marine scientists because faunal activities and behaviors are concealed in an opaque sediment matrix. Here, we use a hybrid medical imaging technique, positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) to provide a qualitative visual and fully quantitative description of bioirrigation in 4D (space and time). As a study case, we present images of porewater advection induced by the well-studied lugworm (Arenicola marina). Our results show that PET/CT allows more comprehensive studies on ventilation and bioirrigation than possible using techniques traditionally applied in marine ecology. We provide a dynamic three-dimensional description of bioirrigation by the lugworm at very high temporal and spatial resolution. Results obtained with the PET/CT are in agreement with literature data on lugworm ventilation and bioirrigation. Major advantages of PET/CT over methods commonly used are its non-invasive and non-destructive approach and its capacity to provide information that otherwise would require multiple methods. Furthermore, PET/CT scan is versatile as it can be used for a variety of benthic macrofauna species and sediment types and it provides information on burrow morphology or animal behavior. The lack of accessibility to the expensive equipment is its major drawback which can only be overcome through collaboration among several institutions. PMID:25837626

  9. Electron tomography of cells.

    PubMed

    Gan, Lu; Jensen, Grant J

    2012-02-01

    The electron microscope has contributed deep insights into biological structure since its invention nearly 80 years ago. Advances in instrumentation and methodology in recent decades have now enabled electron tomography to become the highest resolution three-dimensional (3D) imaging technique available for unique objects such as cells. Cells can be imaged either plastic-embedded or frozen-hydrated. Then the series of projection images are aligned and back-projected to generate a 3D reconstruction or 'tomogram'. Here, we review how electron tomography has begun to reveal the molecular organization of cells and how the existing and upcoming technologies promise even greater insights into structural cell biology. PMID:22082691

  10. 10. INTERIOR VIEW SHOWING MOUNTINGS FROM TUNING DEVICE. VIEW SHOWS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. INTERIOR VIEW SHOWING MOUNTINGS FROM TUNING DEVICE. VIEW SHOWS COPPER SHEETING ON WALLS. - Chollas Heights Naval Radio Transmitting Facility, Helix House, 6410 Zero Road, San Diego, San Diego County, CA

  11. 1. Contextual view of cottage, showing front east elevation, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Contextual view of cottage, showing front east elevation, showing in distance blacksmith shop (left) and summer kitchen (right); camera facing southwest. - Lemmon-Anderson-Hixson Ranch, Cottage, 11220 North Virginia Street, Reno, Washoe County, NV

  12. 4. View of west elevation, showing stone structure, showing a ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. View of west elevation, showing stone structure, showing a portion of north elevation; camera facing southeast. - Lemmon-Anderson-Hixson Ranch, Cottage, 11220 North Virginia Street, Reno, Washoe County, NV

  13. Emission tomography of the kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Teates, C.D.; Croft, B.Y.; Brenbridge, N.A.; Bray, S.T.; Williamson, B.R.

    1983-12-01

    Single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) was done on two patients with suspected renal masses. Nuclear scintigraphy was equivocal on two tumors readily identified by SPECT. Single photon tomography is cost effective and increases the reliability of nuclear scintigraphy.

  14. 15. Detail showing lower chord pinconnected to vertical member, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Detail showing lower chord pin-connected to vertical member, showing floor beam riveted to extension of vertical member below pin-connection, and showing brackets supporting cantilevered sidewalk. View to southwest. - Selby Avenue Bridge, Spanning Short Line Railways track at Selby Avenue between Hamline & Snelling Avenues, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  15. Computed tomography in facial trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Zilkha, A.

    1982-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT), plain radiography, and conventional tomography were performed on 30 patients with facial trauma. CT demonstrated bone and soft-tissue involvement. In all cases, CT was superior to tomography in the assessment of facial injury. It is suggested that CT follow plain radiography in the evaluation of facial trauma.

  16. FIB-SEM tomography of human skin telocytes and their extracellular vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Cretoiu, Dragos; Gherghiceanu, Mihaela; Hummel, Eric; Zimmermann, Hans; Simionescu, Olga; Popescu, Laurentiu M

    2015-01-01

    We have shown in 2012 the existence of telocytes (TCs) in human dermis. TCs were described by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as interstitial cells located in non-epithelial spaces (stroma) of many organs (see www.telocytes.com). TCs have very long prolongations (tens to hundreds micrometers) named Telopodes (Tps). These Tps have a special conformation with dilated portions named podoms (containing mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum and caveolae) and very thin segments (below resolving power of light microscopy), called podomers. To show the real 3D architecture of TC network, we used the most advanced available electron microscope technology: focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) tomography. Generally, 3D reconstruction of dermal TCs by FIB-SEM tomography revealed the existence of Tps with various conformations: (i) long, flattened irregular veils (ribbon-like segments) with knobs, corresponding to podoms, and (ii) tubular structures (podomers) with uneven calibre because of irregular dilations (knobs) – the podoms. FIB-SEM tomography also showed numerous extracellular vesicles (diameter 438.6 ± 149.1 nm, n = 30) released by a human dermal TC. Our data might be useful for understanding the role(s) of TCs in intercellular signalling and communication, as well as for comprehension of pathologies like scleroderma, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, etc. PMID:25823591

  17. A Phase Space Tomography Diagnostic for Pitz

    SciTech Connect

    D.J. Holder; B.D. Muratori; F.E. Hannon; S. Khodyachykh; A. Oppelt

    2006-06-26

    The Photo Injector Test Facility at DESY in Zeuthen (PITZ) is a European collaboration developing RF photocathode electron guns for light source and linear collider projects. As part of the collaborative work being partially funded by the EU's FP6 programme, CCLRC Daresbury Laboratory and DESY are designing and building a phase space tomography diagnostic based on a set of multiple quadrupoles and view screens. In order to measure the beam emittance, four screens with intermediate quadrupole doublets will be used. The equipment will be installed and tested at PITZ as part of the facility upgrade presently ongoing. Following simulations of the gun using the ASTRA code at a range of energies, simulations of the electron beam parameters through the matching and tomography sections must be undertaken in order to specify the optimum arrangement of magnets and screens.

  18. Radar Tomography of Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herique, A.; Barucci, A.; Biele, J.; Ho, T.-M.; Kofman, W.; Krause, C.; Michel, P.; Plettemeier, D.; Prado, J. Y.; Souyris, J. C.; Zine, S.; Ulamec, S.

    2011-10-01

    The internal structure of NEAs is a key point for the understanding of asteroid accretion and dynamical evolution. This structure remains largely unknown although there are some indirect evidences that a rubble pile structure is really common. Radar tomography is the most promising way to probe the NEA internal structure in order to characterise its composition and its heterogeneity from decimetric to global scale.

  19. Gallstone ileus with multiple stones: Where Rigler triad meets Bouveret’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gaduputi, Vinaya; Tariq, Hassan; Rahnemai-Azar, Amir A; Dev, Anil; Farkas, Daniel T

    2015-01-01

    A 53-year-old man with multiple medical conditions presented to the emergency department with complaints of vomiting, anorexia and diffuse colicky abdominal pain for 3 d. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen and pelvis showed radiographic findings consistent with Rigler triad seen in small proportion of patients with small bowel obstruction secondary to gallstone impaction. In addition there was a gastric outlet obstruction, consistent with Bouveret’s syndrome. The patient underwent an exploratory laparotomy and enterotomy with multiple stones extracted. The patient had an uneventful post-surgical clinical course and was discharged home. PMID:26730285

  20. 28. MAP SHOWING LOCATION OF ARVFS FACILITY AS BUILT. SHOWS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. MAP SHOWING LOCATION OF ARVFS FACILITY AS BUILT. SHOWS LINCOLN BOULEVARD, BIG LOST RIVER, AND NAVAL REACTORS FACILITY. F.C. TORKELSON DRAWING NUMBER 842-ARVFS-101-2. DATED OCTOBER 12, 1965. INEL INDEX CODE NUMBER: 075 0101 851 151969. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  1. Single photon emission computed tomography-guided Cerenkov luminescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhenhua; Chen, Xueli; Liang, Jimin; Qu, Xiaochao; Chen, Duofang; Yang, Weidong; Wang, Jing; Cao, Feng; Tian, Jie

    2012-07-01

    Cerenkov luminescence tomography (CLT) has become a valuable tool for preclinical imaging because of its ability of reconstructing the three-dimensional distribution and activity of the radiopharmaceuticals. However, it is still far from a mature technology and suffers from relatively low spatial resolution due to the ill-posed inverse problem for the tomographic reconstruction. In this paper, we presented a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-guided reconstruction method for CLT, in which a priori information of the permissible source region (PSR) from SPECT imaging results was incorporated to effectively reduce the ill-posedness of the inverse reconstruction problem. The performance of the method was first validated with the experimental reconstruction of an adult athymic nude mouse implanted with a Na131I radioactive source and an adult athymic nude mouse received an intravenous tail injection of Na131I. A tissue-mimic phantom based experiment was then conducted to illustrate the ability of the proposed method in resolving double sources. Compared with the traditional PSR strategy in which the PSR was determined by the surface flux distribution, the proposed method obtained much more accurate and encouraging localization and resolution results. Preliminary results showed that the proposed SPECT-guided reconstruction method was insensitive to the regularization methods and ignored the heterogeneity of tissues which can avoid the segmentation procedure of the organs.

  2. Neural networks for calibration tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur

    1993-01-01

    Artificial neural networks are suitable for performing pattern-to-pattern calibrations. These calibrations are potentially useful for facilities operations in aeronautics, the control of optical alignment, and the like. Computed tomography is compared with neural net calibration tomography for estimating density from its x-ray transform. X-ray transforms are measured, for example, in diffuse-illumination, holographic interferometry of fluids. Computed tomography and neural net calibration tomography are shown to have comparable performance for a 10 degree viewing cone and 29 interferograms within that cone. The system of tomography discussed is proposed as a relevant test of neural networks and other parallel processors intended for using flow visualization data.

  3. Ambient-noise Tomography of the European Lithosphere: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basini, P.; Boschi, L.; Nissen-Meyer, T.; Verbeke, J.; Giardini, D.

    2011-12-01

    Europe is covered nonuniformly by both seismic instruments and earthquakes. To enhance seismic resolution, it is then essential to exploit the information which comes from cross-correlation of stacked seismic ambient noise. Our group at ETH compiled a dense regional database of European station-station surface-wave dispersion between 8-35 seconds using noise-interferometry, resulting in a dramatic growth in seismic coverage with respect to earthquake-based tomography. It has recently been shown how adjoint techniques can be applied to ambient-noise data, overcoming the often severe nonuniformity in the geographic distribution of noise "sources", and the subsequent discrepancies between the recorded noise cross-correlation and the theoretical Green's function. We focus on using seismic ambient noise generated in oceans as data to map 3D structure beneath Europe. While earlier "noise-tomography" studies have relied on ray-theory (the infinite-frequency approximation), we apply an iterative, gradient-based inversion where Fréchet derivatives are computed using a spectral-element wave propagation (SPECFEM3D) and adjoint method. Our initial model is composed of two contributions: (1) EPcrust, a new crustal model for the European plate, derived from collection of numerous independent previous studies of multiple scale lengths (i.e. EuCRUST07, ESC Moho, Alps Model), (2) a new adaptive-grid surface-wave tomography of the uppermost mantle down to periods of 35 seconds. This model is discretized with irregular meshes (using Cubit) that honor all relevant discontinuities and are adaptive within the inversion procedure. The misfit function between modeled and data-based cross-correlations that defines the adjoint source is based on a multitaper traveltime difference, allowing us to iterative from coarse to fine scale. We address the peculiar issue of non-uniform noise sources by including the noise distribution in the inversion process and show examples of such noise source gradients. Noise sources originate from vastly different regions depending on the frequency content, and important aspect for minimizing misfit functions which is well accommodated by our multi-taper measurements. We present initial results of the iterative inversion process. We assess the relevance of finite-frequency effects in the context of regional-scale ambient-noise tomography, interpreting our tomographic results in terms of crust and lithospheric/asthenospheric structure in the region of interest.

  4. EDITORIAL: Industrial Process Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Robert M.

    2004-07-01

    Industrial process tomography remains a multidisciplinary field with considerable interest for many varied participants. Indeed this adds greatly to its appeal. It is a pleasure and a privilege to once again act as guest editor for a special feature issue of Measurement Science and Technology on industrial process tomography, the last being in December 2002. Those involved in the subject appreciate the efforts of Measurement Science and Technology in producing another issue and I thank the journal on their behalf. It can be seen that there are considerable differences in the composition of material covered in this issue compared with previous publications. The dominance of electrical impedance and electrical capacitance techniques is reduced and there is increased emphasis on general utility of tomographic methods. This is encompassed in the papers of Hoyle and Jia (visualization) and Dierick et al (Octopus). Electrical capacitance tomography has been a core modality for industrial applications. This issue includes new work in two very interesting aspects of image reconstruction: pattern matching (Takei and Saito) and simulated annealing (Ortiz-Aleman et al). It is important to take advantage of knowledge of the process such as the presence of only two components, and then to have robust reconstruction methods provided by pattern matching and by simulated annealing. Although crude reconstruction methods such as approximation by linear back projection were utilized for initial work on electrical impedance tomography, the techniques published here are much more advanced. The paper by Kim et al includes modelling of a two-component system permitting an adaption-related approach; the paper by Tossavainen et al models free surface boundaries to enable the estimation of shapes of objects within the target. There are clear improvements on the previous crude and blurred reconstructions where boundaries were merely inferred rather than estimated as in these new developments. Interest in magnetic induction tomography has evolved recently and I am pleased to note the inclusion of new work in that modality by Casanova et al. Note that this work also makes full use of prior information to improve reconstruction results. A modality that is relatively new to industrial applications is featured by Holstein et al, namely acoustic tomography. The novelty is provided by using measurements of the speed of sound in gas (air) to identify temperature distributions. Two well chosen applications illustrate the technique. Hard-field tomography, that is the modalities of x-ray and gamma-ray tomography, has always been of interest for some industrial applications. Often this has been for the high resolution of reconstructions available with these techniques, but there application has been restricted due to concerns about use of ionizing radiation. Cattle et al include an application to a process where the material to be imaged is a gamma emitter, i.e. only passive sources are used. The novelty here is that both source and attenuation information is used concurrently to obtain reconstructions. I thank the authors for a fascinating collection of papers that reflect current interest in the subject of industrial process tomography.

  5. The new cold neutron tomography set-up at SINQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baechler, S.; Masschaele, B.; Cauwels, P.; Dierick, M.; Jolie, J.; Materna, T.; Mondelaers, W.

    2002-04-01

    A new cold neutron tomography set-up is operational at the neutron spallation source SINQ of the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Villigen, Switzerland. The detection system is based on a 6LiF/ZnS:Ag conversion screen and a CCD camera. Several tests have been carried out to characterize the quality of the tomography system, such as homogeneity, reproducibility, L/D-ratio and spatial resolution. The high flux and the good efficiency of the detector lead to very short exposure times. Thus, a typical set of tomography scans can be performed in only 20 min. Then, 3D computed tomography objects were calculated using the filtered back-projection reconstruction method. Initial results of various samples show that cold neutron tomography can be a useful tool for industry, geology and dentistry. Furthermore, suitable applications can be found in the field of archeology.

  6. Seismic tomography and continental drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trubitsyn, V. P.

    2008-11-01

    Based on data of seismic tomography, the structure of the mantle flows of the contemporary Earth and the continental drift are calculated. Results of calculation of the contemporary motion of continents and their future drift for 150 Myr are presented. The present-day positions of six continents and the nine largest islands are taken as an initial state. The contemporary temperature distribution in the mantle is calculated according to the data of seismic tomography. The 3-D distribution of seismic wave velocities is converted into the density distribution and then into the temperature distribution. The Stokes equation is numerically solved for flows in a viscous mantle with floating continents for the given initial temperature distribution. In this way, the velocities of convective flows are determined in the entire present-day mantle and the surface distribution for the Earth’s heat flux is obtained. The reliability of the calculated flows in the mantle is estimated by the comparison of the calculated velocities of the contemporary continents and oceanic lithosphere with data of satellite measurements. Further, evolutionary equations of convection with floating continents were numerically solved. The calculated structure of mantle flows, temperature distribution, and position of continents are presented for a time moment 150 Myr in the future. The resulting successive changes in the position of continents in time show how islands (in particular, Japan and Indonesia) will be attached to continents and how continents will converge, exhibiting a tendency toward the formation of a new supercontinent in the southern hemisphere of the Earth.

  7. Planning a Successful Tech Show

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikirk, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Tech shows are a great way to introduce prospective students, parents, and local business and industry to a technology and engineering or career and technical education program. In addition to showcasing instructional programs, a tech show allows students to demonstrate their professionalism and skills, practice public presentations, and interact

  8. Hey Teacher, Your Personality's Showing!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulsen, James R.

    1977-01-01

    A study of 30 fourth, fifth, and sixth grade teachers and 300 of their students showed that a teacher's age, sex, and years of experience did not relate to students' mathematics achievement, but that more effective teachers showed greater "freedom from defensive behavior" than did less effective teachers. (DT)

  9. Planning a Successful Tech Show

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikirk, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Tech shows are a great way to introduce prospective students, parents, and local business and industry to a technology and engineering or career and technical education program. In addition to showcasing instructional programs, a tech show allows students to demonstrate their professionalism and skills, practice public presentations, and interact…

  10. Multiple Books, Multiple Authors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kountz, Carol

    When a class of lethargic college students showed no enthusiasm for their reading assignments in English class, one instructor turned to drama. She assigned a collaborative script, and the students' enthusiasm and motivation relegated her to a "pleasant oblivion." She thought that the novelty of the play genre might enliven the class, and she had…

  11. EDITORIAL: Optical tomography and digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coupland, Jeremy; Lobera, Julia

    2008-07-01

    The articles in this special feature in Measurement Science and Technology concern exciting new developments in the field of digital holography—the process of electronically recording and numerically reconstructing an optical field [1]. Making use of the enormous advances in digital imaging and computer technology, digital holography is presented in a range of applications from fluid flow measurement and structural analysis to medical imaging. The science of digital holography rests on the foundations of optical holography, on the work of Gabor in the late 1940s, and on the development of laser sources in the 1960s, which made his vision a practical reality [2]. Optical holography, however, uses a photosensitive material, both to record a latent image and subsequently to behave as a diffractive optical element with which to reconstruct the incident field. In this way display holograms, using silver halide materials for example, can produce life-size images that are virtually indistinguishable from the object itself [3]. Digital holography, in contrast, separates the steps of recording and reconstruction, and the final image is most often in the form of a 3D computer model. Of course, television cameras have been used from the beginnings of holography to record interferometric images. However, the huge disparity between the resolution of holographic recording materials (more than 3000 cycles/mm) and television cameras (around 50 cycles/mm) was raised as a major concern by early researchers. TV holography, as it was sometimes called, generally recorded low numerical aperture (NA) holograms producing images with characteristically large speckle and was therefore more often referred to as electronic speckle pattern interferomery (ESPI) [4]. It is possible, however, to record large NA holograms on a sensor with restricted resolution by using an objective lens or a diverging reference wave [5]. This is generally referred to as digital holographic microscopy (DHM) since the resolution now places a limit on the size of the object that can be recorded. Some 60 years after the pioneering work of Gabor, digital imaging and associated computer technology offers a step change in capability with which to further exploit holography. Modern image sensors are now available with almost 30 million photosensitive elements, which corresponds to a staggering 100-fold increase compared to standard television images. At the same time personal computers have been optimized for imaging and graphics applications and this allows more sophisticated algorithms to be used in the reconstruction process. Although resolution still falls short of the materials used for optical holography, the ability to process data numerically generally outweighs this drawback and presents us with a host of new opportunities. Faced with the ability to record and process holograms numerically, it is natural to ask the question 'what information is present within recordings of scattered light?'. In fact this question could be posed by anyone using light, or indeed any other wave disturbance, for measurement purposes. For the case of optical holography, Wolf published his answer in 1969 [6], showing that for the case of weak scattering (small perturbations) and plane wave illumination, the amplitude and phase of each plane wave within the scattered field are proportional to those of a periodic variation in the refractive index contrast (i.e. a Bragg grating). This Fourier decomposition of the object was published almost simultaneously by Dandliker and Weiss [7], who also provided a graphical illustration of the technique. These works are the basis of optical tomography and provide us with the link between holographic data and 3D form. Digital holographic reconstruction and optical tomography was the theme of an international workshop [8] held in Loughborough in 2007, and many of the topics debated at the workshop have become the subject of the papers in this issue. In general terms the papers we present describe closely related holographic techniques that address application areas within the field of engineering. The application of digital holography to 3D fluid flow measurement is addressed by several authors. Salah et al demonstrate the simplicity of digital holography with an in-line multiple exposure holographic system using a low-cost laser diode. Soria and Atkinson discuss limitations of low NA holography in fluid velocimetry and demonstrate the potential of a multiple camera, in-line technique which they call Tomographic Digital Holographic Particle Image Velocimetry (Tomo-HPIV). Problems caused by the twin images (real and virtual) of in-line HPIV are described by Ooms et al. It is shown how sign ambiguity can be eliminated and bias errors suppressed by the application of a suitable threshold in piecewise correlation of the reconstructed field. Denis et al explain the problem of twin image removal as a deconvolution process and compare suppression algorithms based on wavelet decomposition. This process can be considered as an inverse problem and the benefits of this approach are discussed with reference to particulate holograms by Gire et al. Of course, the twin image problem can be solved by off-axis holographic geometries which, in effect, add a carrier modulation. Arroyo presents a comparison of carrier modulation strategies that have been presented in the literature and shows circumstances in which the information in each of the real and virtual images can be separated when the sensor resolution is less than that required by the NA of the objective. State-of-the-art digital holographic microscopy (DHM) is presented by Kühn et al. This paper uses an off-axis geometry that simultaneously records images at two wavelengths. The microscope allows the surface profile to be measured from a single recording and sub-nanometre axial resolution is demonstrated. Another interesting application of DHM is addressed by Grilli et al. They report a transmission set-up to investigate poling in a lithium niobate crystal. Developments in the field of optical tomography are covered by the majority of the papers in this issue. The paper by Debailleul et al shows the differences between images reconstructed from a single holographic recording and those synthesized from a series of holograms made with different plane wave illumination. This is optical diffraction tomography (ODT), the original method discussed by Wolf that is characterized by large NA and monochromatic illumination. An alternative strategy is to synthesize the image from holograms made at several wavelengths with low NA optics. This can be done either by sweeping the source or detector response or the reference path in a white light interferometer. These methods are called spectral domain and temporal domain optical coherence tomography (SD-ODT and TD-OCT) respectively. SD-OCT is illustrated in the paper by Potcoava and Kim for biomedical applications. SD- and TD-OCT are compared with confocal microscopy in the paper by Stifter et al. The huge potential of OCT as a diagnostic in polymer and composite materials is apparent from this work. There are clearly many different ways to implement optical tomography, and several established techniques, such as scanning white light interferometry (SWLI) and confocal microscopy, can be considered to be tomographic processes. We present two papers in this issue. The first attempts to bring together the topics of holography, microscopy and tomography within the framework of linear systems theory. It is shown that the images (or interferograms) produced by these instruments can be considered as estimates of refractive index contrast that are obtained using a linear inversion of the scattered field data. It is noted, however, that this is only strictly correct for the case of weak scattering and this is only a crude approximation for many cases of practical interest. The second paper that we present illustrates this for the case of mono-disperse particles in air. Here the number density of the particles is such that multiple scattering is prevalent; however, a priori knowledge of particle size and refractive index allows individual particles to be located accurately. In general, reconstruction can be thought of as a nonlinear optimization process that is used to discover the object which best explains the measured field and is consistent with a priori information. As Gire et al point out in their article, a priori knowledge can also be used to overcome the Nyquist sampling criteria. Although some caution should be exercised (for example, it is not usually possible to decide whether a given solution is unique), it is interesting to note that despite the disparity in resolution, digital holography and computer technology might yet create 3D images of greater clarity than the best optical holograms. References [1] Schnars U and Jueptner W 2005 Digital Holography (Berlin: Springer) ISBN: 978 3 540 21934 7 [2] Gabor D 1948 A new microscopic principle Nature 161 777-8 [3] Bjelkhagen H I 1993 Silver-Halide Recording Materials (Berlin: Springer) ISBN 3 540 58619 9 [4] Leendertz J A 1970 Interferometric displacement measurement on scattering surfaces utilizing speckle effect J. Phys. E: Sci. Instrum. 3 214-8 [5] Marquet P, Rappaz B, Magistretti P J, Cuche E, Emery Y, Colomb T and Depeursinge C 2005 Digital holographic microscopy: a noninvasive contrast imaging technique allowing quantitative visualization of living cells with subwavelength axial accuracy Opt. Lett. 30 468-70 [6] Wolf E 1969 Three-dimensional structure determination of semi-transparent objects from holographic data Opt. Commun. 1 153-6 [7] Dandliker R and Weiss K 1970 Reconstruction of the three-dimensional refractive index from scattered waves Opt. Commun. 1 323-8 [8] Coupland J and Lobera J 2007 International Workshop on Digital Holographic Reconstruction and Optical Tomography for Engineering Applications ISBN 978 0 947974 56 5

  12. Multiple Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a nervous system disease that affects your brain and spinal cord. It damages the ... attacks healthy cells in your body by mistake. Multiple sclerosis affects women more than men. It often begins ...

  13. Multiple sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease that affects the brain and spinal cord ( central nervous system ). ... Multiple sclerosis (MS) affects women more than men. The disorder is most commonly diagnosed between ages 20 to ...

  14. Multiple Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    MENU ... is multiple sclerosis (MS)? Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease that affects the nervous system. Normally, antibodies produced by the immune system help protect the body against viruses, bacteria and other foreign substances. In people who have MS, ...

  15. Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, Dirk J.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    Seventy percent of our body is made up of water. For that reason, radiation based medical imaging techniques operate in spectral regions where water absorption is low (Fig. 18.1, panel). Well known modalities are MRI that operates at radio frequencies, and PET/SPECT which work in the high frequency range. Water absorption is also low around the part of the spectrum that is visible to the human eye. In this spectral region, scattering of the light by tissue structures roughly decreases with wavelength. Therefore, most optical imaging techniques such as (confocal) microscopy, optical tomography and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) use wavelengths between 650 and 1300 nm to allow reasonable imaging depths.

  16. Positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, E J; Phelps, M E

    1979-01-01

    Conventional nuclear imaging techniques utilizing lead collimation rely on radioactive tracers with little role in human physiology. The principles of imaging based on coincidence detection of the annihilation radiation produced in positron decay indicate that this mode of detection is uniquely suited for use in emission computed tomography. The only gamma-ray-emitting isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen are positron emitters, which yield energies too high for conventional imaging techniques. Thus development of positron emitters in nuclear medicine imaging would make possible the use of a new class of physiologically active, positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals. The application of these principles is described in the use of a physiologically active compound labeled with a positron emitter and positron-emission computed tomography to measure the local cerebral metabolic rate in humans. PMID:440173

  17. Controllable tomography phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiu, Peng; Zhou, Xin; Kuang, Cuifang; Xu, Yingke; Liu, Xu

    2015-03-01

    Tomography phase microscopy (TPM) is a new microscopic method that can quantitatively yield the volumetric 3D distribution of a sample's refractive index (RI), which is significant for cell biology research. In this paper, a controllable TPM system is introduced. In this system a circulatory phase-shifting method and piezoelectric ceramic are used which enable the TPM system to record the 3D RI distribution at a more controllable speed, from 1 to 40 fps, than in the other TPM systems reported. The resolution of the RI distribution obtained by this controllable TPM is much better than that in images recorded by phase contrast microscopy and interference tomography microscopy. The realization of controllable TPM not only allows for the application of TPM to the measurement of kinds of RI sample, but also contributes to academic and technological support for the practical use of TPM.

  18. Photoacoustic / Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandrian, Michelle Gabriele; Zhang, Edward; Považay, Boris; Laufer, Jan; Alex, Aneesh; Beard, Paul; Drexler, Wolfgang

    Preliminary work describing the multimodal combination of optical coherence tomography (OCT) and photoacoustic (PA) imaging has demonstrated the potential for these two techniques to nicely complement each other, providing access to information about tissue scattering and absorption, respectively. In practice, however, there exist limitations to combining OCT and PA using conventional methods for PA signal acquisition, and thus, there have been relatively few successful demonstrations of a combined approach. Of the multimodal systems that have been presented, one that may offer a solution for translation to clinical use employs an all-optical ultrasonic detection technique based on a Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI)-based sensor. This chapter chronicles the efforts towards combining PA imaging and OCT, with a focus on a PA tomography (PAT)/OCT system that uses this FPI sensor for all-optical detection

  19. Primary central nervous system lymphoma in an human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient mimicking bilateral eye sign in brain seen in fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai Karuppusany; Thirugnanam, Rajasekar; Shibu, Deepu; Kalarikal, Radhakrishnan Edathurthy; Shinto, Ajit Sugunan

    2014-01-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) has proven useful in the diagnosis, staging, and detection of metastasis and posttreatment monitoring of several malignancies in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. It also has the ability to make the important distinction between malignancy and infection in the evaluation of central nervous system (CNS) lesions, leading to the initiation of the appropriate treatment and precluding the need for invasive biopsy. We report an interesting case of HIV positive 35-year-old woman presented with headache, disorientation, and decreased level of consciousness. She underwent whole body PET/CT which showed multiple lesions in the cerebrum which mimics bilateral eye in brain. A diagnosis of a primary CNS lymphoma was made and patient was started on chemotherapy. PMID:24761060

  20. Primary central nervous system lymphoma in an human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient mimicking bilateral eye sign in brain seen in fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai Karuppusany; Thirugnanam, Rajasekar; Shibu, Deepu; Kalarikal, Radhakrishnan Edathurthy; Shinto, Ajit Sugunan

    2014-04-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) has proven useful in the diagnosis, staging, and detection of metastasis and posttreatment monitoring of several malignancies in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. It also has the ability to make the important distinction between malignancy and infection in the evaluation of central nervous system (CNS) lesions, leading to the initiation of the appropriate treatment and precluding the need for invasive biopsy. We report an interesting case of HIV positive 35-year-old woman presented with headache, disorientation, and decreased level of consciousness. She underwent whole body PET/CT which showed multiple lesions in the cerebrum which mimics bilateral eye in brain. A diagnosis of a primary CNS lymphoma was made and patient was started on chemotherapy. PMID:24761060

  1. Tutorial on photoacoustic tomography.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lihong V

    2016-06-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) has become one of the fastest growing fields in biomedical optics. Unlike pure optical imaging, such as confocal microscopy and two-photon microscopy, PAT employs acoustic detection to image optical absorption contrast with high-resolution deep into scattering tissue. So far, PAT has been widely used for multiscale anatomical, functional, and molecular imaging of biological tissues. We focus on PAT’s basic principles, major implementations, imaging contrasts, and recent applications. PMID:27086868

  2. Computed tomography status

    SciTech Connect

    Hansche, B.D.

    1983-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a relatively new radiographic technique which has become widely used in the medical field, where it is better known as computerized axial tomographic (CAT) scanning. This technique is also being adopted by the industrial radiographic community, although the greater range of densities, variation in samples sizes, plus possible requirement for finer resolution make it difficult to duplicate the excellent results that the medical scanners have achieved.

  3. Compton tomography system

    DOEpatents

    Grubsky, Victor; Romanoov, Volodymyr; Shoemaker, Keith; Patton, Edward Matthew; Jannson, Tomasz

    2016-02-02

    A Compton tomography system comprises an x-ray source configured to produce a planar x-ray beam. The beam irradiates a slice of an object to be imaged, producing Compton-scattered x-rays. The Compton-scattered x-rays are imaged by an x-ray camera. Translation of the object with respect to the source and camera or vice versa allows three-dimensional object imaging.

  4. Experimental adaptive Bayesian tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsov, K. S.; Straupe, S. S.; Radchenko, I. V.; Houlsby, N. M. T.; Huszár, F.; Kulik, S. P.

    2013-06-01

    We report an experimental realization of an adaptive quantum state tomography protocol. Our method takes advantage of a Bayesian approach to statistical inference and is naturally tailored for adaptive strategies. For pure states, we observe close to N-1 scaling of infidelity with overall number of registered events, while the best nonadaptive protocols allow for N-1/2 scaling only. Experiments are performed for polarization qubits, but the approach is readily adapted to any dimension.

  5. Computed Tomography Status

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Hansche, B. D.

    1983-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a relatively new radiographic technique which has become widely used in the medical field, where it is better known as computerized axial tomographic (CAT) scanning. This technique is also being adopted by the industrial radiographic community, although the greater range of densities, variation in samples sizes, plus possible requirement for finer resolution make it difficult to duplicate the excellent results that the medical scanners have achieved.

  6. Ionospheric tomography using the FORTE satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, T.C.

    1993-08-01

    The possibility of obtaining ionospheric profile data via tomographic techniques has elicited considerable interest in recent years. The input data for the method is a set of total electron content measurements along intersecting lines of sight which form a grid. This can conveniently be provided by a fast-moving satellite with a VHF beacon which will generate the multiple paths needed for effective tomography. Los Alamos and Sandia National Laboratories will launch and operate the FORTE satellite for the US Department of Energy, with launch scheduled in 1995. FORTE will provide such a beacon. Additionally, wideband VHF receivers aboard the satellite will allow corraborative measurements of ionospheric profile parameters in some cases.

  7. Multiple Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Multiple Sclerosis Information Page Condensed from Multiple Sclerosis: Hope Through ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Multiple Sclerosis? An unpredictable disease of the central nervous system, ...

  8. Generalized local emission tomography

    DOEpatents

    Katsevich, Alexander J.

    1998-01-01

    Emission tomography enables locations and values of internal isotope density distributions to be determined from radiation emitted from the whole object. In the method for locating the values of discontinuities, the intensities of radiation emitted from either the whole object or a region of the object containing the discontinuities are inputted to a local tomography function .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) to define the location S of the isotope density discontinuity. The asymptotic behavior of .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) is determined in a neighborhood of S, and the value for the discontinuity is estimated from the asymptotic behavior of .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) knowing pointwise values of the attenuation coefficient within the object. In the method for determining the location of the discontinuity, the intensities of radiation emitted from an object are inputted to a local tomography function .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) to define the location S of the density discontinuity and the location .GAMMA. of the attenuation coefficient discontinuity. Pointwise values of the attenuation coefficient within the object need not be known in this case.

  9. Enhanced local tomography

    DOEpatents

    Katsevich, Alexander J.; Ramm, Alexander G.

    1996-01-01

    Local tomography is enhanced to determine the location and value of a discontinuity between a first internal density of an object and a second density of a region within the object. A beam of radiation is directed in a predetermined pattern through the region of the object containing the discontinuity. Relative attenuation data of the beam is determined within the predetermined pattern having a first data component that includes attenuation data through the region. In a first method for evaluating the value of the discontinuity, the relative attenuation data is inputted to a local tomography function .function..sub..LAMBDA. to define the location S of the density discontinuity. The asymptotic behavior of .function..sub..LAMBDA. is determined in a neighborhood of S, and the value for the discontinuity is estimated from the asymptotic behavior of .function..sub..LAMBDA.. In a second method for evaluating the value of the discontinuity, a gradient value for a mollified local tomography function .gradient..function..sub..LAMBDA..epsilon. (x.sub.ij) is determined along the discontinuity; and the value of the jump of the density across the discontinuity curve (or surface) S is estimated from the gradient values.

  10. Polychromatic diffraction contrast tomography

    SciTech Connect

    King, A.; Reischig, P.; Adrien, J.; Peetermans, S.; Ludwig, W.

    2014-11-15

    This tutorial review introduces the use of polychromatic radiation for 3D grain mapping using X-ray diffraction contrast tomography. The objective is to produce a 3D map of the grain shapes and orientations within a bulk, millimeter-sized polycrystalline sample. The use of polychromatic radiation enables the standard synchrotron X-ray technique to be applied in a wider range of contexts: 1) Using laboratory X-ray sources allows a much wider application of the diffraction contrast tomography technique. 2) Neutron sources allow large samples, or samples containing high Z elements to be studied. 3) Applied to synchrotron sources, smaller samples may be treated, or faster measurements may be possible. Challenges and particularities in the data acquisition and processing, and the limitations of the different variants, are discussed. - Highlights: • We present a tutorial review of polychromatic diffraction contrast tomography techniques. • The use of polychromatic radiation allows the standard synchrotron DCT technique to be extended to a range of other sources. • The characteristics and limitations of all variants of the techniques are derived, discussed and compared. • Examples using laboratory X-ray and cold neutron radiation are presented. • Suggestions for the future development of these techniques are presented.

  11. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., <10 km), the acoustic wave field densely samples properties of the water column over the width of the receiver array. A method, referred to as ocean acoustic reverberation tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography. PMID:26723303

  12. A Case of Uveal Colobomas Showing Marked Left-Right Difference in Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Moriya, Takeshi; Ochi, Ryosuke; Imagawa, Yukihiro; Sato, Bumpei; Morishita, Seita; Tonari, Masahiro; Fukumoto, Masanori; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Takatoshi; Kida, Teruyo; Ikeda, Tsunehiko

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Congenital uveal colobomas, including inferior iris and choroidal colobomas, are associated with microcornea and microphthalmia and often show left-right differences (laterality). The purpose of this study was to report a case of choroidal coloboma associated with left-right differences in diabetic retinopathy (DR). Case This study reports a 59-year-old male with bilateral iris and choroidal colobomas. The colobomatous area in the patient's right eye extended to the macula, and his right eye had been amblyopic since birth. The colobomatous area in his left eye was less extensive and did not involve the macula. Examination of the patient's left eye revealed multiple hemorrhages and hard exudates in the macula due to DR, but examination of his right eye showed almost no changes in DR, thus revealing a marked left-right difference. Optical coherence tomography showed more extensive retinal thinning in the patient's right eye than in his left eye. Fluorescein fundus angiography revealed a retinal nonperfusion area only in the left eye, and panretinal photocoagulation was subsequently performed. Conclusion Our findings show that the reason for the left-right difference in DR was attributed to the more severe choroidal coloboma and retinal thinning in the patient's right eye compared to his left eye, thus reducing oxygen demand, as is also seen in eyes with severe myopia. PMID:27099608

  13. Laser optoacoustic tomography for medical diagnostics: principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oraevsky, Alexander A.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.; Jacques, Steven L.; Tittel, Frank K.

    1996-04-01

    This paper is to describe principles of laser optoacoustic tomography for medical diagnostics. Two types of imaging modes are presented. The first is the tomography in transmission mode, which utilizes detection of stress transients transmitted from the laser-excited volume toward the depth through thick layers of tissue. The second is the tomography in reflection mode which utilizes detection of stress transients generated in superficial tissue layer and reflected back toward tissue surface. To distinguish the two modes, we have abbreviated them as (1) laser optoacoustic tomography in transmission mode, LOATT, and (2) time-resolved stress detection tomography of light absorption, TRSDTLA, in reflection mode where emphasis is made on high spatial resolution of images. The basis for laser optoacoustic tomography is the time-resolved detection of laser-induced transient stress waves, selectively generated in absorbing tissues of diagnostic interest. Such a technique allows one to visualize absorbed light distribution in turbid biological tissues irradiated by short laser pulses. Laser optoacoustic tomography can be used for detection of tissue pathological changes that result in either increased concentration of various tissue chromophores such as hemoglobin or in development of enhanced microcirculation in diseased tissue. Potential areas of applications are diagnosis of cancer, brain hemorrhages, arterial atherosclerotic plaques, and other diseased tissues. In addition, it can provide feedback information during medical treatments. Both LOATT and TRSDTLA utilize laser excitation of biological tissues and sensitive detection of laser-induced stress waves. Optical selectivity is based upon differences in optical properties of pathologically different tissues. Sensitivity comes from stress generation under irradiation conditions of temporal stress confinement. The use of sensitive wide-band lithium niobate acoustic transducers expands limits of laser optoacoustic tomography. The technology allows us to determine directly temperature distributions in tissues and locate tissues volumes with different absorption. To demonstrate principles of TRSDTLA, experiments were conducted in vivo with mice-model for breast cancer using specially designed front-surface transducers- reflectometers. To present advantages and limitation of LOATT, experiments were performed in phantoms made of gel with polystyrene spheres colored with copper sulfate. Our experimental results and theoretical calculations show that TRSDTLA can be applied for non- invasive histology of layered tissues with in-depth resolution of up to 2 microns. TRSDTLA in acoustic reflection mode is promising for diagnostics of skin and ocular diseases. LOATT in acoustic transmission mode can be applied for detection of small tissue volumes with enhanced absorption located inside organs at the depth of up to 10 cm.

  14. Utility of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in a child with chronic granulomatous disease.

    PubMed

    Garg, Gunjan; DaSilva, Raphaella; Bhalakia, Avni; Milstein, David M

    2016-01-01

    We report the fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG - PET/CT) findings in an 11-month-old boy with suspected milk protein allergy, presented to the hospital with 2-month history of fever of unknown origin and failure to thrive. It showed FDG avid lymphadenopathy above and below the diaphragm and splenic focus, which could represent diffuse inflammatory process or lymphoma. Subsequent jejunal biopsy showed non-necrotizing granulomas. PMID:26917900

  15. Utility of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in a child with chronic granulomatous disease

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Gunjan; DaSilva, Raphaella; Bhalakia, Avni; Milstein, David M.

    2016-01-01

    We report the fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG - PET/CT) findings in an 11-month-old boy with suspected milk protein allergy, presented to the hospital with 2-month history of fever of unknown origin and failure to thrive. It showed FDG avid lymphadenopathy above and below the diaphragm and splenic focus, which could represent diffuse inflammatory process or lymphoma. Subsequent jejunal biopsy showed non-necrotizing granulomas. PMID:26917900

  16. Time-domain diffuse optical tomography using analytic statistical characteristics of photon trajectories

    SciTech Connect

    Konovalov, Aleksandr B; Vlasov, V V; Kalintsev, A G; Lyubimov, Vladimir V; Kravtsenyuk, Olga V

    2006-11-30

    The inverse problem of diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is reduced by the method of photon average trajectories (PAT) to the solution of the integral equation integrated along the conditional mean statistical photon trajectory. The PAT bending near the flat boundary of a scattering medium is estimated analytically. These estimates are used to determine the analytic statistical characteristics of photon trajectories for the flat layer geometry. The inverse DOT problem is solved by using the multiplicative algebraic algorithm modified to improve the convergence of the iteration reconstruction process. The numerical experiment shows that the modified PAT method permits the reconstruction of near-surface optical inhomogeneities virtually without distortions. (special issue devoted to multiple radiation scattering in random media)

  17. National Orange Show Photovoltaic Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Jimenez Sheri Raborn, CPA; Tom Baker

    2008-03-31

    National Orange Show Photovoltaic Demonstration created a 400KW Photovoltaic self-generation plant at the National Orange Show Events Center (NOS). The NOS owns a 120-acre state fairground where it operates an events center and produces an annual citrus fair known as the Orange Show. The NOS governing board wanted to employ cost-saving programs for annual energy expenses. It is hoped the Photovoltaic program will result in overall savings for the NOS, help reduce the State's energy demands as relating to electrical power consumption, improve quality of life within the affected grid area as well as increase the energy efficiency of buildings at our venue. In addition, the potential to reduce operational expenses would have a tremendous effect on the ability of the NOS to service its community.

  18. Multiplicity Counting

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, William H.

    2015-12-01

    This set of slides begins by giving background and a review of neutron counting; three attributes of a verification item are discussed: 240Pueff mass; α, the ratio of (α,n) neutrons to spontaneous fission neutrons; and leakage multiplication. It then takes up neutron detector systems – theory & concepts (coincidence counting, moderation, die-away time); detector systems – some important details (deadtime, corrections); introduction to multiplicity counting; multiplicity electronics and example distributions; singles, doubles, and triples from measured multiplicity distributions; and the point model: multiplicity mathematics.

  19. Optical Coherence Tomography of the Newborn Airway

    PubMed Central

    Ridgway, James M.; Su, Jianping; Wright, Ryan; Guo, Shuguang; Kim, David C.; Barretto, Roberto; Ahuja, Gurpreet; Sepehr, Ali; Perez, Jorge; Sills, Jack H.; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Acquired subglottic stenosis in a newborn is often associated with prolonged endotracheal intubation. This condition is generally diagnosed during operative endoscopy after airway injury has occurred. Unfortunately, endoscopy is unable to characterize the submucosal changes observed in such airway injuries. Other modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and ultrasound, do not possess the necessary level of resolution to differentiate scar, neocartilage, and edema. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an imaging modality that produces high-resolution, cross-sectional images of living tissue (8 to 20 µm). We examined the ability of this noninvasive technique to characterize the newborn airway in a prospective clinical trial. Methods Twelve newborn patients who required ventilatory support underwent OCT airway imaging. Comparative analysis of intubated and non-intubated states was performed. Results Imaging of the supraglottis, glottis, subglottis, and trachea was performed in 12 patients, revealing unique tissue characteristics as related to turbidity, signal backscattering, and architecture. Multiple structures were identified, including the vocal folds, cricoid cartilage, tracheal rings, ducts, glands, and vessels. Conclusions Optical coherence tomography clearly identifies in vivo tissue layers and regional architecture while offering detailed information concerning tissue microstructures. The diagnostic potential of this technology makes OCT a promising modality in the study and surveillance of the neonatal airway. PMID:18564528

  20. Multiple Intracranial Aneurysms Associated with Behçet's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Sangwoo; Kim, Jaeho; Kim, Chong-gue

    2016-01-01

    Behçet's disease is an inflammatory disorder involving multiple organs. Its cause is still unknown, but vasculitis is the major pathologic characteristic. The common vascular lesions associated with Behçet's disease are aneurysm formation, arterial or venous occlusive diseases, and varices. Arterial aneurysms mostly occur in large arteries. Intracranial aneurysms hardly occur with Behçet's disease. We would like to present a 41-year-old female patient with Behçet's disease who showed symptoms of severe headache due to subarachnoid hemorrhage. Brain computed tomography revealed multiple aneurysms. We also present a literature review of intracranial arterial aneurysms associated with Behçet's disease. PMID:27114964

  1. [A Case of Cecal Cancer with Multiple Cutaneous Metastases].

    PubMed

    Komoto, Masahiro; Tanaka, Ryota; Kametani, Naoki; Kato, Yukihiro; Yamagata, Shigehito; Nakazawa, Kazunori; Kanehara, Isao; Ako, Eiji; Yamada, Nobuya; Nishimura, Shigehiko; Fujita, Shigeki; Taenaka, Naoyuki

    2015-11-01

    We encountered a case of cutaneous metastases from colorectal carcinoma. A 63-year-old woman underwent laparoscopic-assisted ileocecal resection for cecal cancer. Computed tomography (CT) showed multiple liver metastases. The tumor was diagnosed as a well-differentiated adenocarcinoma and was staged as pSE, pN1, sH2, ly1, v1, CP0cM0, fStage ?. She was treated with 33 courses of the 5-fluorouracil, Leucovorin, and irinotecan (FOLFIRI) regimen and 15 courses of the 5-fluorouracil, Leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (mFOLFOX6) plus bevacizumab regimen. Thirty-four months after resection, multiple cutaneous tumors were noted, predominantly on the lower abdomen, and we resected 2 of them. Histologically, the specimens were diagnosed as well-differentiated adenocarcinoma, which was similar to that of cecal carcinoma. After 1 course of regorafenib, she died 3 years after the primary surgical resection. PMID:26805285

  2. Multiple Intracranial Aneurysms Associated with Behçet's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ha, Sangwoo; Kim, Jaeho; Kim, Chong-Gue; Jang, Suk Jung

    2016-03-01

    Behçet's disease is an inflammatory disorder involving multiple organs. Its cause is still unknown, but vasculitis is the major pathologic characteristic. The common vascular lesions associated with Behçet's disease are aneurysm formation, arterial or venous occlusive diseases, and varices. Arterial aneurysms mostly occur in large arteries. Intracranial aneurysms hardly occur with Behçet's disease. We would like to present a 41-year-old female patient with Behçet's disease who showed symptoms of severe headache due to subarachnoid hemorrhage. Brain computed tomography revealed multiple aneurysms. We also present a literature review of intracranial arterial aneurysms associated with Behçet's disease. PMID:27114964

  3. Vertebral sarcoidosis: demonstration of bone involvement by computerized axial tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Dinerstein, S.L.; Kovarsky, J.

    1984-08-01

    A report is given of a rare case of vertebral sarcoidosis with negative conventional spinal x-ray films, yet with typical cystic lesions of the spine found incidentally during abdominal computerized axial tomography (CAT). The patient was a 28-year-old black man, who was admitted for evaluation of a 1 1/2-year history of diffuse myalgias, intermittent fever to 102 F orally, bilateral hilar adenopathy, and leukopenia. A technetium polyphosphate bone scan revealed diffuse areas of increased uptake over the sternum, entire vertebral column, and pelvis. Conventional x-ray films of the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine, and an AP view of the pelvis were all normal. Chest x-ray film revealed only bilateral hilar adenopathy. During the course of an extensive negative evaluation for infection, an abdominal CAT scan was done, showing multiple, small, sclerotic-rimmed cysts at multiple levels of the lower thoracic and lumbar spine. Bone marrow biopsy revealed only changes consistent with anemia of chronic disease. Mediastinal lymph node biopsy revealed noncaseating granulomas. A tentative diagnosis of sarcoidosis was made, and treatment with prednisone, isoniazid and rifampin was begun. Within two weeks of initiation of prednisone therapy, the patient was symptom-free. A repeat technetium polyphosphate bone scan revealed only a small residual area of mildly increased uptake over the upper thoracic vertebrae.

  4. Ionospheric imaging using computerized tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Austen, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    Computerized tomography (CT) techniques can be used to produce a two-dimensional image of the electron density in the ionosphere. The necessary data are transionospheric satellite beacon total electron content (TEC) data recorded simultaneously at multiple ground stations. The ionospheric imaging case presents a difficult problem due to large amounts of missing data. This is a consequence of the locations of the transmitter (in orbit) and receivers (ground-based) and causes the reconstruction algorithm to fail to correctly reconstruct the background density profile. Despite this limitation, a method has been developed which successfully reconstructs the irregularities and variations in the profile. A computer program simulates the data collection and image reconstruction process. This allows the method to be tested with several electron density models, transmitter and receiver locations, and noniterative and iterative reconstruction algorithms. Simulations are performed assuming a 1,000-km-altitude polar-orbiting satellite and several ground stations. The imaged region is 3,500 km wide by 800 km high. A new algorithm, which is a modification of the discrete backprojection algorithm, is developed for use with nonuniform sampling geometries.

  5. Photoacoustic tomography: principles and advances

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jun; Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is an emerging imaging modality that shows great potential for preclinical research and clinical practice. As a hybrid technique, PAT is based on the acoustic detection of optical absorption from either endogenous chromophores, such as oxy-hemoglobin and deoxy-hemoglobin, or exogenous contrast agents, such as organic dyes and nanoparticles. Because ultrasound scatters much less than light in tissue, PAT generates high-resolution images in both the optical ballistic and diffusive regimes. Over the past decade, the photoacoustic technique has been evolving rapidly, leading to a variety of exciting discoveries and applications. This review covers the basic principles of PAT and its different implementations. Strengths of PAT are highlighted, along with the most recent imaging results. PMID:25642127

  6. Spatial light interference tomography (SLIT)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhuo; Marks, Daniel L.; Carney, Paul Scott; Millet, Larry J.; Gillette, Martha U.; Mihi, Agustin; Braun, Paul V.; Shen, Zhen; Prasanth, Supriya G.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2011-01-01

    We present spatial light interference tomography (SLIT), a label-free method for 3D imaging of transparent structures such as live cells. SLIT uses the principle of interferometric imaging with broadband fields and combines the optical gating due to the micron-scale coherence length with that of the high numerical aperture objective lens. Measuring the phase shift map associated with the object as it is translated through focus provides full information about the 3D distribution associated with the refractive index. Using a reconstruction algorithm based on the Born approximation, we show that the sample structure may be recovered via a 3D, complex field deconvolution. We illustrate the method with reconstructed tomographic refractive index distributions of microspheres, photonic crystals, and unstained living cells. PMID:21996999

  7. rf testbed for thermoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallon, D.; Yan, L.; Hanson, G. W.; Patch, S. K.

    2009-06-01

    Thermoacoustic signal excitation is a function of intrinsic tissue properties and illuminating electric field. De-ionized (DI) water is a preferred acoustic coupling medium for thermoacoustics because acoustic and electromagnetic waves propagate in DI water with very little loss. We have designed a water-filled testbed propagating a controlled electric field with respect to pulse shape, power, and polarization. Directional coupler line sections permit measurement of incident, reflected, and transmitted powers. Both S-parameters and Ey measurement show that the electric-field distribution is relatively uniform in testbed. Comparing baseline power measurements to those taken with a test object in place yields power loss in the object, which should correlate to thermoacoustic signal strength. Moreover, power loss—and therefore thermoacoustic computerized tomography signal strength—is sensitive to the orientation of the object to the polarization of the electric field. This testbed will enable quantitative characterization of the thermoacoustic contrast mechanism in ex vivo tissue specimens.

  8. Electrical Impedance Tomography of Electrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Meir, Arie; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-01-01

    The primary goal of this study is to explore the hypothesis that changes in pH during electrolysis can be detected with Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT). The study has relevance to real time control of minimally invasive surgery with electrolytic ablation. To investigate the hypothesis, we compare EIT reconstructed images to optical images acquired using pH-sensitive dyes embedded in a physiological saline agar gel phantom treated with electrolysis. We further demonstrate the biological relevance of our work using a bacterial E.Coli model, grown on the phantom. The results demonstrate the ability of EIT to image pH changes in a physiological saline phantom and show that these changes correlate with cell death in the E.coli model. The results are promising, and invite further experimental explorations. PMID:26039686

  9. Magic Carpet Shows Its Colors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The upper left image in this display is from the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit, showing the 'Magic Carpet' region near the rover at Gusev Crater, Mars, on Sol 7, the seventh martian day of its journey (Jan. 10, 2004). The lower image, also from the panoramic camera, is a monochrome (single filter) image of a rock in the 'Magic Carpet' area. Note that colored portions of the rock correlate with extracted spectra shown in the plot to the side. Four different types of materials are shown: the rock itself, the soil in front of the rock, some brighter soil on top of the rock, and some dust that has collected in small recesses on the rock face ('spots'). Each color on the spectra matches a line on the graph, showing how the panoramic camera's different colored filters are used to broadly assess the varying mineral compositions of martian rocks and soils.

  10. Computed tomography: the investigation of choice for aortic dissection?

    PubMed Central

    Singh, H; Fitzgerald, E; Ruttley, M S

    1986-01-01

    Computed tomography has become established as complementary to aortography in the investigation of patients with suspected aortic dissection. Two cases of dissecting aneurysm are reported in which extensive aortography failed to show evidence of dissection. In both cases dissection was demonstrated by computed tomography. The diagnosis was confirmed in one case at operation and in the other case by follow up. It is suggested that computed tomography is the diagnostic method of first choice in aortic dissection. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:3730218

  11. Assessment of asthmatic inflammation using hybrid fluorescence molecular tomography-x-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaopeng; Prakash, Jaya; Ruscitti, Francesca; Glasl, Sarah; Stellari, Fabio Franco; Villetti, Gino; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear imaging plays a critical role in asthma research but is limited in its readings of biology due to the short-lived signals of radio-isotopes. We employed hybrid fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) and x-ray computed tomography (XCT) for the assessment of asthmatic inflammation based on resolving cathepsin activity and matrix metalloproteinase activity in dust mite, ragweed, and Aspergillus species-challenged mice. The reconstructed multimodal fluorescence distribution showed good correspondence with ex vivo cryosection images and histological images, confirming FMT-XCT as an interesting alternative for asthma research.

  12. Positron emission tomography and computed tomography assessments of the aging human brain

    SciTech Connect

    de Leon, M.J.; George, A.E.; Ferris, S.H.; Christman, D.R.; Fowler, J.S.; Gentes, C.I.; Brodie, J.; Reisberg, B.; Wolf, A.P.

    1984-02-01

    The relationship between alterations in brain structure and brain function was studied in vivo in both young and elderly human subjects. Computed tomography revealed significant age-related ventricular and cortical sulcal dilatation. The cortical changes were most closely related to age. Positron emission tomography failed to show regional changes in brain glucose metabolic rate. The results suggest that the normal aging brain undergoes structural atrophic changes without incurring regional metabolic changes. Examination of the correlations between the structural and the metabolic measures revealed no significant relationships. These data are discussed with respect to the significant structure-function relationships that have been reported in Alzheimer disease. 27 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  13. ENVITEC shows off air technologies

    SciTech Connect

    McIlvaine, R.W.

    1995-08-01

    The ENVITEC International Trade Fair for Environmental Protection and Waste Management Technologies, held in June in Duesseldorf, Germany, is the largest air pollution exhibition in the world and may be the largest environmental technology show overall. Visitors saw thousands of environmental solutions from 1,318 companies representing 29 countries and occupying roughly 43,000 square meters of exhibit space. Many innovations were displayed under the category, ``thermal treatment of air pollutants.`` New technologies include the following: regenerative thermal oxidizers; wet systems for removing pollutants; biological scrubbers;electrostatic precipitators; selective adsorption systems; activated-coke adsorbers; optimization of scrubber systems; and air pollution monitors.

  14. Statistical reconstruction for cosmic ray muon tomography.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Larry J; Blanpied, Gary S; Borozdin, Konstantin N; Fraser, Andrew M; Hengartner, Nicolas W; Klimenko, Alexei V; Morris, Christopher L; Orum, Chris; Sossong, Michael J

    2007-08-01

    Highly penetrating cosmic ray muons constantly shower the earth at a rate of about 1 muon per cm2 per minute. We have developed a technique which exploits the multiple Coulomb scattering of these particles to perform nondestructive inspection without the use of artificial radiation. In prior work [1]-[3], we have described heuristic methods for processing muon data to create reconstructed images. In this paper, we present a maximum likelihood/expectation maximization tomographic reconstruction algorithm designed for the technique. This algorithm borrows much from techniques used in medical imaging, particularly emission tomography, but the statistics of muon scattering dictates differences. We describe the statistical model for multiple scattering, derive the reconstruction algorithm, and present simulated examples. We also propose methods to improve the robustness of the algorithm to experimental errors and events departing from the statistical model. PMID:17688203

  15. Addition of bevacizumab to neoadjuvant chemotherapy for Stage IV ovarian serous adenocarcinoma with multiple lymph node metastases: a case report.

    PubMed

    Liu, H; Shi, Y; Zhang, G N; Song, S Q; Hu, T

    2015-01-01

    A 50-year-old female patient was diagnosed with Stage IV ovarian serous adenocarcinoma with multiple lymph node metastases. The CA-125 level normalized after four cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) using paclitaxel, nedaplatin, and bevacizumab (BEV) before surgery. A positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) scan showed significantly reduced bilateral adnexal masses after NACT fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) metabolism in multiple lymph nodes was inhibited significantly, and the number and sites of metastatic lesions were decreased. The patient underwent optimal cytoreductive surgery. Chemotherapy was continued after surgery and image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) (40 Gy) was applied for the remaining lymph nodes in the pelvic cavity and cervicothoracic region. No sign of recurrence has been observed in this patient nine months after surgery. The patient achieved a satisfactory outcome and no serious side effects were observed. Therefore, addition of BEV to NACT is a new method for the pre-operative treatment of advanced ovarian cancer. PMID:26189267

  16. Hyperspectral optical diffraction tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, JaeHwang; Kim, Kyoohyun; Yoon, Jonghee; Park, YongKeun

    2016-02-01

    Here, we present a novel microscopic technique for measuring wavelength-dependent three-dimensional (3-D) distributions of the refractive indices (RIs) of microscopic samples in the visible wavelengths. Employing 3-D quantitative phase microscopy techniques with a wavelength-swept source, 3-D RI tomograms were obtained in the range of 450 - 700 nm with a spectral resolution of a few nanometers. The capability of the technique was demonstrated by measuring the hyperspectral 3-D RI tomograms of polystyrene beads, human red blood cells, and hepatocytes. The results demonstrate the potential for label-free molecular specific 3-D tomography of biological samples.

  17. Hyperspectral optical diffraction tomography.

    PubMed

    Jung, JaeHwang; Kim, Kyoohyun; Yoon, Jonghee; Park, YongKeun

    2016-02-01

    Here, we present a novel microscopic technique for measuring wavelength-dependent three-dimensional (3-D) distributions of the refractive indices (RIs) of microscopic samples in the visible wavelengths. Employing 3-D quantitative phase microscopy techniques with a wavelength-swept source, 3-D RI tomograms were obtained in the range of 450 - 700 nm with a spectral resolution of a few nanometers. The capability of the technique was demonstrated by measuring the hyperspectral 3-D RI tomograms of polystyrene beads, human red blood cells, and hepatocytes. The results demonstrate the potential for label-free molecular specific 3-D tomography of biological samples. PMID:26906777

  18. Radial reflection diffraction tomography

    DOEpatents

    Lehman, Sean K.

    2012-12-18

    A wave-based tomographic imaging method and apparatus based upon one or more rotating radially outward oriented transmitting and receiving elements have been developed for non-destructive evaluation. At successive angular locations at a fixed radius, a predetermined transmitting element can launch a primary field and one or more predetermined receiving elements can collect the backscattered field in a "pitch/catch" operation. A Hilbert space inverse wave (HSIW) algorithm can construct images of the received scattered energy waves using operating modes chosen for a particular application. Applications include, improved intravascular imaging, bore hole tomography, and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of parts having existing access holes.

  19. DIY Tomography sample holder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lari, L.; Wright, I.; Boyes, E. D.

    2015-10-01

    A very simple tomography sample holder at minimal cost was developed in-house. The holder is based on a JEOL single tilt fast exchange sample holder where its exchangeable tip was modified to allow high angle degree tilt. The shape of the tip was designed to retain mechanical stability while minimising the lateral size of the tip. The sample can be mounted on as for a standard 3mm Cu grids as well as semi-circular grids from FIB sample preparation. Applications of the holder on different sample systems are shown.

  20. High frequency electromagnetic tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, W.; Ramirez, A.; Ueng, T.; Latorre, R.

    1989-09-01

    An experiment was conducted in G Tunnel at the Nevada Test Site to evaluate high frequency electromagnetic tomography as a candidate for in situ monitoring of hydrology in the near field of a heater placed in densely welded tuff. Tomographs of 200 MHz electromagnetic permittivity were made for several planes between boreholes. Data were taken before the heater was turned on, during heating and during cooldown of the rockmass. This data is interpreted to yield maps of changes in water content of the rockmass as a function of time. This interpretation is based on laboratory measurement of electromagnetic permittivity as a function of water content for densely welded tuff. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Atom Probe Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Michael K; Forbes, Richard

    2009-01-01

    This introductory tutorial describes the technique of atom probe tomography for materials characterization at the atomic level. The evolution of the technique from the initial atom probe field ion microscope to today s state-of-the-art three dimensional atom probe is outlined. An introduction is presented on the basic physics behind the technique, the operation of the instrument, and the reconstruction of the three-dimensional data. The common methods for analyzing the three-dimensional atom probe data, including atom maps, isoconcentration surfaces, proximity histograms, maximum separation methods, and concentration frequency distributions, are described.

  2. Compressive Phase Contrast Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Maia, Filipe; MacDowell, Alastair; Marchesini, Stefano; Padmore, Howard A.; Parkinson, Dula Y.; Pien, Jack; Schirotzek, Andre; Yang, Chao

    2010-09-01

    When x-rays penetrate soft matter, their phase changes more rapidly than their amplitude. Interference effects visible with high brightness sources creates higher contrast, edge enhanced images. When the object is piecewise smooth (made of big blocks of a few components), such higher contrast datasets have a sparse solution. We apply basis pursuit solvers to improve SNR, remove ring artifacts, reduce the number of views and radiation dose from phase contrast datasets collected at the Hard X-Ray Micro Tomography Beamline at the Advanced Light Source. We report a GPU code for the most computationally intensive task, the gridding and inverse gridding algorithm (non uniform sampled Fourier transform).

  3. Percutaneous management of multiple liver abscesses

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.H.; Collins, T.L.; Yrizarry, J.M.

    1982-08-01

    Percutaneous catheter drainage is now an accepted technique in the management of hepatic and other intraabdominal abscesses. Most abscesses accepted by the radiologist for drainage are unilocular with a safe percutaneous approach. This report demonstrates that even multiple hepatic abscesses may be successfully managed by percutaneous drainage. The use of computed tomography (CT) for diagnosis and sonography for safe puncture guidance is discussed.

  4. Contrast-enhanced fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/contrast-enhanced computed tomography in mediastinal T-cell lymphoma with superior vena cava syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Santhosh, Sampath; Gorla, Arun Kumar Reddy; Bhattacharya, Anish; Varma, Subhash Chander; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) is a routine investigation for the staging of lymphomas. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography is mandatory whenever parenchymal lesions, especially in the liver and spleen are suspected. We report a rare case of primary mediastinal T-cell lymphoma evaluated with contrast-enhanced PET/CT that showed features of superior vena cava syndrome. PMID:26917907

  5. ShowMe3D

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from themore » displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.« less

  6. "Show me" bioethics and politics.

    PubMed

    Christopher, Myra J

    2007-10-01

    Missouri, the "Show Me State," has become the epicenter of several important national public policy debates, including abortion rights, the right to choose and refuse medical treatment, and, most recently, early stem cell research. In this environment, the Center for Practical Bioethics (formerly, Midwest Bioethics Center) emerged and grew. The Center's role in these "cultural wars" is not to advocate for a particular position but to provide well researched and objective information, perspective, and advocacy for the ethical justification of policy positions; and to serve as a neutral convener and provider of a public forum for discussion. In this article, the Center's work on early stem cell research is a case study through which to argue that not only the Center, but also the field of bioethics has a critical role in the politics of public health policy. PMID:17926217

  7. Phoenix Scoop Inverted Showing Rasp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on Sol 49, or the 49th Martian day of the mission (July 14, 2008), shows the silver colored rasp protruding from NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Robotic Arm scoop. The scoop is inverted and the rasp is pointing up.

    Shown with its forks pointing toward the ground is the thermal and electrical conductivity probe, at the lower right. The Robotic Arm Camera is pointed toward the ground.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is led by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  8. ShowMe3D

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Michael B

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from the displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.

  9. Imaging of in vitro and in vivo bones and joints with continuous-wave diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yong; Iftimia, Nicusor V.; Jiang, Huabei; Lyndon Key, L.; Bolster, Marcy B.

    2001-03-01

    WWe present what is believed to be the first absorption and scattering images of in vitro and in vivo bones and joints from continuous-wave tomographic measurements. Human finger and chicken bones embedded in cylindrical scattering media were imaged at multiple transverse planes with Clemson multi-channel diffuse optical imager. Both absorption and scattering images were obtained using our nonlinear, finite element based reconstruction algorithm. This study shows that diffuse optical tomography (DOT) has the potential to be used for detection and monitoring of bone and joint diseases such as osteoporosis and arthritis.

  10. Speckle reduction in optical coherence tomography by two-step image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hang; Li, Zhongliang; Wang, Xiangzhao; Zhang, Xiangyang

    2015-03-01

    The image quality of optical coherence tomography can be severely influenced by speckle noise (i.e., signal-degrading speckle). Averaging multiple B-scans can effectively suppress speckle noise. Because of sample motion, images subject to averaging must be aligned exactly. We propose a two-step image registration scheme that combines global and local registrations for speckle reduction by the averaging of multiple B-scans. The method begins with a global registration to compensate for overall motion, which is estimated based on the rigid transformation model involving translation and rotation. Then each A-scan is aligned by cross-correlation using a graph-based algorithm, followed by a pixel subdivision method to improve smoothness in local registration. The method does not rely on any information about the retinal layer boundaries. We have applied this method to the registration of macular optical coherence tomography images. The results show the reduction of speckle noise and the enhanced visualization of layer structures. A signal-to-noise ratio improvement of nearly the square root of the number of averaged B-scans and a contrast-to-noise ratio improvement of around 11 are achieved through our method.

  11. Casimir experiments showing saturation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Sernelius, Bo E.

    2009-10-15

    We address several different Casimir experiments where theory and experiment disagree. First out is the classical Casimir force measurement between two metal half spaces; here both in the form of the torsion pendulum experiment by Lamoreaux and in the form of the Casimir pressure measurement between a gold sphere and a gold plate as performed by Decca et al.; theory predicts a large negative thermal correction, absent in the high precision experiments. The third experiment is the measurement of the Casimir force between a metal plate and a laser irradiated semiconductor membrane as performed by Chen et al.; the change in force with laser intensity is larger than predicted by theory. The fourth experiment is the measurement of the Casimir force between an atom and a wall in the form of the measurement by Obrecht et al. of the change in oscillation frequency of a {sup 87}Rb Bose-Einstein condensate trapped to a fused silica wall; the change is smaller than predicted by theory. We show that saturation effects can explain the discrepancies between theory and experiment observed in all these cases.

  12. Whole-body 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography images before and after chemotherapy for Kaposi sarcoma and highly active antiretrovirus therapy.

    PubMed

    Morooka, Miyako; Ito, Kimiteru; Kubota, Kazuo; Minamimoto, Ryogo; Shida, Yoshitaka; Hasuo, Kanehiro; Ito, Tateki; Tasato, Daisuke; Honda, Haruhito; Teruya, Katsuji; Kikuchi, Yoshimi; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2010-12-01

    Kaposi sarcoma is an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related disease that mainly involves the skin, gastrointestinal gut, and lungs. Whole-body 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography and computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) scanning is useful for simultaneous detection of multiple lesions of Kaposi sarcoma. We present a 67-year-old man with a history of infection with human immunodeficiency virus who presented with numerous cutaneous lesions. FDG-PET/CT images showed lesions in the skin, lung, and lymph nodes. The gastrointestinal lesions were detected using gastric fiberscopy (GF) and colon fiberscopy (CF). After Kaposi sarcoma therapy, the uptake in the lesions of the skin, lung, and lymph nodes decreased, but new lesions were detected in the pancreas and lumbar spine. He had pancreatitis and Candida spondilitis. Whole-body FDG-PET/CT is useful for detecting lesions and determining the extension to which the disease has spread, adding the gastrointestinal lesions by GF and CF. After therapy, FDG-PET/CT can be used to demonstrate which lesions remain active and to determine the overall response to treatment. In this case, we show how useful FDG-PET/CT is and how difficult it is to treat Kaposi sarcoma. PMID:21191742

  13. Computed Tomography Measuring Inside Machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wozniak, James F.; Scudder, Henry J.; Anders, Jeffrey E.

    1995-01-01

    Computed tomography applied to obtain approximate measurements of radial distances from centerline of turbopump to leading edges of diffuser vanes in turbopump. Use of computed tomography has significance beyond turbopump application: example of general concept of measuring internal dimensions of assembly of parts without having to perform time-consuming task of taking assembly apart and measuring internal parts on coordinate-measuring machine.

  14. Beam tomography research at Daresbury Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hock, K. M.; Ibison, M. G.; Holder, D. J.; Muratori, B. D.; Wolski, A.; Kourkafas, G.; Shepherd, B. J. A.

    2014-07-01

    Beam tomography research at Daresbury Laboratory has focussed on the development of normalised phase space techniques-starting with the idea of sampling tomographic projections at equal phase advances. This idea has influenced the design and operation of the tomography sections at the Photo Injector Test Facility at Zeuthen (PITZ) and at the Accelerator and Lasers in Combined Experiments (ALICE) at Daresbury. We have studied the feasibility of using normalised phase space to measure the effect of space charge. Quadrupole scan measurements are carried out at two different parts of a beamline. Reconstructions at the same location give results that are clearly rotated with respect to each other in normalised phase space. We are able to show that a significant part of this rotation can be attributed to the effect of space charge. We show how the normalised phase space technique can be used to increase the reliability of the Maximum Entropy Technique (MENT). While MENT is known for its ability to work with just a few projections, the accuracy of its reconstructions has seldom been questioned. We show that for typical phase space distributions, MENT could produce results that look quite different from the original. We demonstrate that a normalised phase space technique could give results that are closer to the actual distribution. We also present simpler ways of deriving the phase space tomography formalism and the Maximum Entropy Technique.

  15. Mapping distributed brain function and networks with diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggebrecht, Adam T.; Ferradal, Silvina L.; Robichaux-Viehoever, Amy; Hassanpour, Mahlega S.; Dehghani, Hamid; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Hershey, Tamara; Culver, Joseph P.

    2014-06-01

    Mapping of human brain function has revolutionized systems neuroscience. However, traditional functional neuroimaging by positron emission tomography or functional magnetic resonance imaging cannot be used when applications require portability, or are contraindicated because of ionizing radiation (positron emission tomography) or implanted metal (functional magnetic resonance imaging). Optical neuroimaging offers a non-invasive alternative that is radiation free and compatible with implanted metal and electronic devices (for example, pacemakers). However, optical imaging technology has heretofore lacked the combination of spatial resolution and wide field of view sufficient to map distributed brain functions. Here, we present a high-density diffuse optical tomography imaging array that can map higher-order, distributed brain function. The system was tested by imaging four hierarchical language tasks and multiple resting-state networks including the dorsal attention and default mode networks. Finally, we imaged brain function in patients with Parkinson's disease and implanted deep brain stimulators that preclude functional magnetic resonance imaging.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: multiple sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pericak-Vance MA, Haines JL; Multiple Sclerosis Genetics Group. Interleukin 7 receptor alpha chain (IL7R) shows allelic and functional association with multiple sclerosis. Nat Genet. 2007 Sep; ...

  17. Multiple Object Adaptive Optics: Mixed NGS/LGS tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Tim; Gendron, Eric; Basden, Alastair; Martin, Olivier; Osborn, James; Henry, David; Hubert, Zoltan; Sivo, Gaetano; Gratadour, Damien; Chemla, Fanny; Sevin, Arnaud; Cohen, Matthieu; Younger, Eddy; Vidal, Fabrice; Wilson, Richard; Batterley, Tim; Bitenc, Urban; Reeves, Andrew; Bharmal, Nazim; Raynaud, Henri-François; Kulcsar, Caroline; Conan, Jean-Marc; Guzman, Dani; De Cos Juez, Javier; Huet, Jean-Michel; Perret, Denis; Dickson, Colin; Atkinson, David; Baillie, Tom; Longmore, Andy; Todd, Stephen; Talbot, Gordon; Morris, Simon; Myers, Richard; Rousset, Gérard

    2013-12-01

    Open-loop adaptive optics has been successfully demonstrated on-sky by several groups, including the fully tomographic MOAO demonstration made using CANARY. MOAO instrumentation such as RAVEN will deliver the first astronomical science and other planned instruments aim to extend both open-loop AO performance and the number of corrected fields. Many of these planned systems rely on the use of tomographic open-loop LGS wavefront sensing. Here we present results from the combined NGS/LGS tomographic CANARY system and then compare the NGS- and LGS-based tomographic system performance. We identify the major system performance drivers, and highlight some potential routes for further exploitation of open-loop tomographic AO.

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... conditions and whether you have a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or thyroid problems. ... asthma, multiple myeloma or any disorder of the heart, kidneys or thyroid gland , or if you have ...

  19. EDITORIAL: Industrial Process Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anton Johansen, Geir; Wang, Mi

    2008-09-01

    There has been tremendous development within measurement science and technology over the past couple of decades. New sensor technologies and compact versatile signal recovery electronics are continuously expanding the limits of what can be measured and the accuracy with which this can be done. Miniaturization of sensors and the use of nanotechnology push these limits further. Also, thanks to powerful and cost-effective computer systems, sophisticated measurement and reconstruction algorithms previously only accessible in advanced laboratories are now available for in situ online measurement systems. The process industries increasingly require more process-related information, motivated by key issues such as improved process control, process utilization and process yields, ultimately driven by cost-effectiveness, quality assurance, environmental and safety demands. Industrial process tomography methods have taken advantage of the general progress in measurement science, and aim at providing more information, both quantitatively and qualitatively, on multiphase systems and their dynamics. The typical approach for such systems has been to carry out one local or bulk measurement and assume that this is representative of the whole system. In some cases, this is sufficient. However, there are many complex systems where the component distribution varies continuously and often unpredictably in space and time. The foundation of industrial tomography is to conduct several measurements around the periphery of a multiphase process, and use these measurements to unravel the cross-sectional distribution of the process components in time and space. This information is used in the design and optimization of industrial processes and process equipment, and also to improve the accuracy of multiphase system measurements in general. In this issue we are proud to present a selection of the 145 papers presented at the 5th World Congress on Industrial Process Tomography in Bergen, September 2007. Interestingly, x-ray technologies, one of the first imaging modalities available, keep on moving the limits on both spatial and temporal measurement resolution; experimental results of less than 100 nm and several thousand frames/s are reported, respectively. Important progress is demonstrated in research and development on sensor technologies and algorithms for data processing and image reconstruction, including unconventional sensor design and adaptation of the sensors to the application in question. The number of applications to which tomographic methods are applied is steadily increasing, and results obtained in a representative selection of applications are included. As guest editors we would like express our appreciation and thanks to all authors who have contributed and to IOP staff for excellent collaboration in the process of finalizing this special feature.

  20. Lamb wave diffraction tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyarenko, Eugene Valentinovich

    As the worldwide aviation fleet continues to age, methods for accurately predicting the presence of structural flaws, such as hidden corrosion and disbonds, that compromise air worthiness become increasingly necessary. Ultrasonic guided waves, Lamb waves, allow large sections of aircraft structures to be rapidly inspected. However, extracting quantitative information from Lamb wave data has always involved highly trained personnel with a detailed knowledge of mechanical waveguide physics. In addition, human inspection process tends to be highly subjective, slow and prone to errors. The only practical alternative to traditional inspection routine is a software expert system capable of interpreting data with minimum error and maximum speed and reliability. Such a system would use the laws of guided wave propagation and material parameters to help signal processing algorithms automatically extract information from digitized waveforms. This work discusses several practical approaches to building such an expert system. The next step in the inspection process is data interpretation, and imaging is the most natural way to represent two-dimensional structures. Unlike conventional ultrasonic C-scan imaging that requires access to the whole inspected area, tomographic algorithms work with data collected over the perimeter of the sample. Combined with the ability of Lamb waves to travel over large distances, tomography becomes the method of choice for solving NDE problems. This work explores different tomographic reconstruction techniques to graphically represent the Lamb wave data in quantitative maps that can be easily interpreted by technicians. Because the velocity of Lamb waves depends on the thickness, the traveltimes of the fundamental modes can be converted into a thickness map of the inspected region. Lamb waves cannot penetrate through holes and other strongly scattering defects and the assumption of straight wave paths, essential for many tomographic algorithms, fails. Diffraction tomography is a way to incorporate scattering effects into tomographic algorithms in order to improve image quality and resolution. This work describes the iterative reconstruction procedure developed for the Lamb Wave tomography and allowing for ray bending correction for imaging of moderately scattering objects.

  1. Multiple homicides.

    PubMed

    Copeland, A R

    1989-09-01

    A study of multiple homicides or multiple deaths involving a solitary incident of violence by another individual was performed on the case files of the Office of the Medical Examiner of Metropolitan Dade County in Miami, Florida, during 1983-1987. A total of 107 multiple homicides were studied: 88 double, 17 triple, one quadruple, and one quintuple. The 236 victims were analyzed regarding age, race, sex, cause of death, toxicologic data, perpetrator, locale of the incident, and reason for the incident. This article compares this type of slaying with other types of homicide including those perpetrated by serial killers. Suggestions for future research in this field are offered. PMID:2782297

  2. Optical coherence tomography image enhancement by using gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce-de-Leon, Y. R.; Lopez-Rios, J. A.; Pichardo-Molina, J. L.; Alcalá Ochoa, N.

    2011-08-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is an imaging technique to get cross-sectional images with resolutions of a few microns and deep penetration in tissue of some millimeters. For many years OCT has been applied to analyze different human tissues like eyes, skin, teeth, urinary bladders, gastrointestinal, respiratory or genitourinary tracts and recently breast cancer tissues have been studied. Many of these tissues are composed specially of lipids and collagen, proteins which cause multiple light scattering (MLS) reducing significantly the optical depth and the contrast of OCT imaging. So, one of the big challenges of this technique is to acquire images with good contrast. Gold nanoparticles (NPs) exhibit interesting optical properties due to its plasmon resonance frequency. Optical absorbance is strong when gold NPs have dimension under 50 nm, but over this size optical scattering becomes dominant. In this work we show the preliminary results of the use of gold NPs as a contrast medium to enhance the OCT images quality. Our experimental results show which type of particles (morphology and size) present the best enhancement in the region of 1325 nm which corresponds to the central wavelength source excitation. All our experiments were carried out with a commercial OCT (thorlabs) system and our NPs were tested in water and gel phantoms.

  3. Multiple myeloma: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Nau, Konrad C; Lewis, William D

    2008-10-01

    Multiple myeloma, the most common bone malignancy, is occurring with increasing frequency in older persons. Typical symptoms are bone pain, malaise, anemia, renal insufficiency, and hypercalcemia. Incidental discovery on comprehensive laboratory panels is common. The disease is diagnosed with serum or urine protein electrophoresis or immunofixation and bone marrow aspirate analysis. Skeletal radiographs are important in staging multiple myeloma and revealing lytic lesions, vertebral compression fractures, and osteoporosis. Magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography or computed tomography are emerging as useful tools in the evaluation of patients with myeloma; magnetic resonance imaging is preferred for evaluating acute spinal compression. Nuclear bone scans and dual energy x-ray absorptiometry have no role in the diagnosis and staging of myeloma. The differential diagnosis of monoclonal gammopathies includes monoclonal gammopathy of uncertain significance, smoldering (asymptomatic) and symptomatic multiple myeloma, amyloidosis, B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Waldenström macroglobulinemia, and rare plasma cell leukemia and heavy chain diseases. Patients with monoclonal gammopathy of uncertain significance or smoldering multiple myeloma should be followed closely, but not treated. Symptomatic multiple myeloma is treated with chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation, if possible. Melphalan, prednisolone, dexamethasone, vincristine, doxorubicin, bortezomib, and thalidomide and its analogue lenalidomide have been used successfully. It is important that family physicians recognize and appropriately treat multiple myeloma complications. Bone pain is treated with opiates, bisphosphonates, radiotherapy, vertebroplasty, or kyphoplasty; nephrotoxic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs should be avoided. Hypercalcemia is treated with isotonic saline infusions, steroids, furosemide, or bisphosphonates. Because of susceptibility to infections, patients require broad-spectrum antibiotics for febrile illness and immunization against influenza, pneumococcus, and Haemophilus influenzae B. Five-year survival rates approach 33 percent, and the median survival rate is 33 months. PMID:18841734

  4. Contactless inductive flow tomography.

    PubMed

    Stefani, Frank; Gundrum, Thomas; Gerbeth, Gunter

    2004-11-01

    The three-dimensional velocity field of a propeller-driven liquid metal flow is reconstructed by a contactless inductive flow tomography. The underlying theory is presented within the framework of an integral equation system that governs the magnetic field distribution in a moving electrically conducting fluid. For small magnetic Reynolds numbers this integral equation system can be cast into a linear inverse problem for the determination of the velocity field from externally measured magnetic fields. A robust reconstruction of the large scale velocity field is already achieved by applying the external magnetic field alternately in two orthogonal directions and measuring the corresponding sets of induced magnetic fields. Kelvin's theorem is exploited to regularize the resulting velocity field by using the kinetic energy of the flow as a regularizing functional. The results of this technique are shown to be in satisfactory agreement with ultrasonic measurements. PMID:15600752

  5. 4-D Photoacoustic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Wang, Bo; Ji, Lijun; Jiang, Huabei

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) offers three-dimensional (3D) structural and functional imaging of living biological tissue with label-free, optical absorption contrast. These attributes lend PAT imaging to a wide variety of applications in clinical medicine and preclinical research. Despite advances in live animal imaging with PAT, there is still a need for 3D imaging at centimeter depths in real-time. We report the development of four dimensional (4D) PAT, which integrates time resolutions with 3D spatial resolution, obtained using spherical arrays of ultrasonic detectors. The 4D PAT technique generates motion pictures of imaged tissue, enabling real time tracking of dynamic physiological and pathological processes at hundred micrometer-millisecond resolutions. The 4D PAT technique is used here to image needle-based drug delivery and pharmacokinetics. We also use this technique to monitor 1) fast hemodynamic changes during inter-ictal epileptic seizures and 2) temperature variations during tumor thermal therapy.

  6. Self-calibrating tomography for multidimensional systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quesada, Nicolás; Brańczyk, Agata M.; James, Daniel F. V.

    2013-06-01

    Quantum state tomography relies on the ability to perform well-characterized unitary operations, which are not always available. This places restrictions on which physical systems can be characterized using such techniques. We develop a formalism that circumvents the requirement for well-characterized unitary operations by treating unknown parameters in the state and unitary process on the same footing, thereby simultaneously performing state and partial process tomography. Our formalism is generalized to d-level systems, and we provide a specific example for a V-type three-level atomic system whose transition dipole moments are not known. We show that it is always possible to retrieve not only the unknown state but also the process parameters, except for a set of zero measure in the state-parameter space.

  7. Quantum state tomography via linear regression estimation.

    PubMed

    Qi, Bo; Hou, Zhibo; Li, Li; Dong, Daoyi; Xiang, Guoyong; Guo, Guangcan

    2013-01-01

    A simple yet efficient state reconstruction algorithm of linear regression estimation (LRE) is presented for quantum state tomography. In this method, quantum state reconstruction is converted into a parameter estimation problem of a linear regression model and the least-squares method is employed to estimate the unknown parameters. An asymptotic mean squared error (MSE) upper bound for all possible states to be estimated is given analytically, which depends explicitly upon the involved measurement bases. This analytical MSE upper bound can guide one to choose optimal measurement sets. The computational complexity of LRE is O(d(4)) where d is the dimension of the quantum state. Numerical examples show that LRE is much faster than maximum-likelihood estimation for quantum state tomography. PMID:24336519

  8. Process tomography for unitary quantum channels

    SciTech Connect

    Gutoski, Gus; Johnston, Nathaniel

    2014-03-15

    We study the number of measurements required for quantum process tomography under prior information, such as a promise that the unknown channel is unitary. We introduce the notion of an interactive observable and we show that any unitary channel acting on a d-level quantum system can be uniquely identified among all other channels (unitary or otherwise) with only O(d{sup 2}) interactive observables, as opposed to the O(d{sup 4}) required for tomography of arbitrary channels. This result generalizes to the problem of identifying channels with at most q Kraus operators, and slight improvements can be obtained if we wish to identify such a channel only among unital channels or among other channels with q Kraus operators. These results are proven via explicit construction of large subspaces of Hermitian matrices with various conditions on rank, eigenvalues, and partial trace. Our constructions are built upon various forms of totally nonsingular matrices.

  9. Whole breast tissue characterization with ultrasound tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duric, Neb; Littrup, Peter; Li, Cuiping; Roy, Olivier; Schmidt, Steve; Seamans, John; Wallen, Andrea; Bey-Knight, Lisa

    2015-03-01

    A number of clinical trials have shown that screening ultrasound, supplemental to mammography, detects additional cancers in women with dense breasts. However, labor intensity, operator dependence and high recall rates have limited adoption. This paper describes the use of ultrasound tomography for whole-breast tissue stiffness measurements as a first step toward addressing the issue of high recall rates. The validation of the technique using an anthropomorphic phantom is described. In-vivo applications are demonstrated on 13 breast masses, indicating that lesion stiffness correlates with lesion type as expected. Comparison of lesion stiffness measurements with standard elastography was available for 11 masses and showed a strong correlation between the 2 measures. It is concluded that ultrasound tomography can map out the 3 dimensional distribution of tissue stiffness over the whole breast. Such a capability is well suited for screening where additional characterization may improve the specificity of screening ultrasound, thereby lowering barriers to acceptance.

  10. Grating-based tomography of human tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Bert; Schulz, Georg; Mehlin, Andrea; Herzen, Julia; Lang, Sabrina; Holme, Margaret; Zanette, Irene; Hieber, Simone; Deyhle, Hans; Beckmann, Felix; Pfeiffer, Franz; Weitkamp, Timm

    2012-07-01

    The development of therapies to improve our health requires a detailed knowledge on the anatomy of soft tissues from the human body down to the cellular level. Grating-based phase contrast micro computed tomography using synchrotron radiation provides a sensitivity, which allows visualizing micrometer size anatomical features in soft tissue without applying any contrast agent. We show phase contrast tomography data of human brain, tumor vessels and constricted arteries from the beamline ID 19 (ESRF) and urethral tissue from the beamline W2 (HASYLAB/DESY) with micrometer resolution. Here, we demonstrate that anatomical features can be identified within brain tissue as well known from histology. Using human urethral tissue, the application of two photon energies is compared. Tumor vessels thicker than 20 μm can be perfectly segmented. The morphology of coronary arteries can be better extracted in formalin than after paraffin embedding.

  11. Global Adjoint Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozdag, Ebru; Lefebvre, Matthieu; Lei, Wenjie; Peter, Daniel; Smith, James; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Tromp, Jeroen

    2015-04-01

    We will present our initial results of global adjoint tomography based on 3D seismic wave simulations which is one of the most challenging examples in seismology in terms of intense computational requirements and vast amount of high-quality seismic data that can potentially be assimilated in inversions. Using a spectral-element method, we incorporate full 3D wave propagation in seismic tomography by running synthetic seismograms and adjoint simulations to compute exact sensitivity kernels in realistic 3D background models. We run our global simulations on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Cray XK7 "Titan" system taking advantage of the GPU version of the SPECFEM3D_GLOBE package. We have started iterations with initially selected 253 earthquakes within the magnitude range of 5.5 < Mw < 7.0 and numerical simulations having resolution down to ~27 s to invert for a transversely isotropic crust and mantle model using a non-linear conjugate gradient algorithm. The measurements are currently based on frequency-dependent traveltime misfits. We use both minor- and major-arc body and surface waves by running 200 min simulations where inversions are performed with more than 2.6 million measurements. Our initial results after 12 iterations already indicate several prominent features such as enhanced slab (e.g., Hellenic, Japan, Bismarck, Sandwich), plume/hotspot (e.g., the Pacific superplume, Caroline, Yellowstone, Hawaii) images, etc. To improve the resolution and ray coverage, particularly in the lower mantle, our aim is to increase the resolution of numerical simulations first going down to ~17 s and then to ~9 s to incorporate high-frequency body waves in inversions. While keeping track of the progress and illumination of features in our models with a limited data set, we work towards to assimilate all available data in inversions from all seismic networks and earthquakes in the global CMT catalogue.

  12. Multiple myeloma

    MedlinePlus

    Plasma cell dyscrasia; Plasma cell myeloma; Malignant plasmacytoma; Plasmacytoma of bone; Myeloma - multiple ... myeloma most commonly causes a low red blood cell count ( anemia ), which can lead to fatigue and ...

  13. Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma of Multiple Skeletal Muscles Involvement Seen on FDG PET/CT Scans

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yue; Sowjanya, Medapati; You, Jia; Xu, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Abstract As normal healthy skeletal muscle does not contain lymphoid tissue, extra nodal lymphoma involving multiple muscles is rare, as well. This study reports a case of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) of multiple skeletal muscles involvement and a review of differential diagnosis of it. A 37-year-old female presented to our hospital after being diagnosed with NHL for 7 months. She had received six courses of cyclophosphamide hydroxydaunorubicin oncovin prednisolone etoposide (CHOPE) chemotherapy. Then she felt pain and noticed swelling on her left calf. The fluorodeoxyglucose (18FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) image showed abnormal focal FDG uptake in hypo-pharynx, which was the primary NHL and also in multiple groups of muscles in whole body. As the patient has history NHL, lymphoma of multiple muscle involvement was suspected. Finally, an ultrasound-guided tissue biopsy was performed on the left calf and histological examination yielded lymphomatous cells infiltration in the left gastrocnemius. Through this report, we emphasize that a multidisciplinary team approach with clinician, radiologist, and pathologist is essential for proper diagnosis, staging, and management of such rare lesions. PMID:25950693

  14. Computed tomography of the body

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.K.T.; Stanley, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    By the end of the fourth year of clinical use, the number of articles dealing with computed body tomography (CT) had increased exponentially. Over 100 articles were published during this review period. This chapter examines new application of CT in the neck, musculoskeletal system and the breast. The chapter begins with an examination of the technical aspects of the operation and performance of CT scanners during this review period. The anatomy of various regions of the body, such as neck, chest, liver and biliary system, genitourinary tract, and pelvis are examined. Brief discussions of pediatric computed tomography, computed tomography-guided biopsy, and radiation therapy are presented. (KRM)

  15. High-speed multiple-mode mass-sensing resolves dynamic nanoscale mass distributions

    PubMed Central

    Olcum, Selim; Cermak, Nathan; Wasserman, Steven C.; Manalis, Scott R.

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneously measuring multiple eigenmode frequencies of nanomechanical resonators can determine the position and mass of surface-adsorbed proteins, and could ultimately reveal the mass tomography of nanoscale analytes. However, existing measurement techniques are slow (<1 Hz bandwidth), limiting throughput and preventing use with resonators generating fast transient signals. Here we develop a general platform for independently and simultaneously oscillating multiple modes of mechanical resonators, enabling frequency measurements that can precisely track fast transient signals within a user-defined bandwidth that exceeds 500 Hz. We use this enhanced bandwidth to resolve signals from multiple nanoparticles flowing simultaneously through a suspended nanochannel resonator and show that four resonant modes are sufficient for determining their individual position and mass with an accuracy near 150 nm and 40 attograms throughout their 150-ms transit. We envision that our method can be readily extended to other systems to increase bandwidth, number of modes, or number of resonators. PMID:25963304

  16. Universal quantum data compression via nondestructive tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Charles H.; Harrow, Aram W.; Lloyd, Seth

    2006-03-15

    Quantum-state tomography--the practice of estimating a quantum state by performing measurements on it - is useful in a variety of contexts. We introduce 'gentle tomography' as a version of tomography that preserves the measured quantum data. As an application of gentle tomography, we describe a polynomial-time method for universal source coding.

  17. Imaging local brain function with emission computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, D.E.

    1984-03-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using /sup 18/F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was used to map local cerebral glucose utilization in the study of local cerebral function. This information differs fundamentally from structural assessment by means of computed tomography (CT). In normal human volunteers, the FDG scan was used to determine the cerebral metabolic response to conrolled sensory stimulation and the effects of aging. Cerebral metabolic patterns are distinctive among depressed and demented elderly patients. The FDG scan appears normal in the depressed patient, studded with multiple metabolic defects in patients with multiple infarct dementia, and in the patients with Alzheimer disease, metabolism is particularly reduced in the parietal cortex, but only slightly reduced in the caudate and thalamus. The interictal FDG scan effectively detects hypometabolic brain zones that are sites of onset for seizures in patients with partial epilepsy, even though these zones usually appear normal on CT scans. The future prospects of PET are discussed.

  18. Evaluation of dacryocystorhinostomy failure with computed tomography and computed tomographic dacryocystography.

    PubMed

    Glatt, H J; Chan, A C; Barrett, L

    1991-10-15

    Five patients with dacryocystorhinostomy failures were examined with computed tomography or computed tomographic dacryocystography. In computed tomographic dacryocystography, radiopaque dye was instilled into the lacrimal sac before computed tomography to show its shape, location, and relation to surrounding structures. Problems with the bony ostium were detected in all five patients. Recurrent nasal polyposis, a retained metallic clip, and an unresected ethmoid air cell were also identified. Computed tomography and computed tomographic dacryocystography provided important information that facilitated reoperation after dacryocystorhinostomy failure. PMID:1928246

  19. Serial two-photon tomography: an automated method for ex-vivo mouse brain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ragan, Timothy; Kadiri, Lolahon R.; Venkataraju, Kannan Umadevi; Bahlmann, Karsten; Sutin, Jason; Taranda, Julian; Arganda-Carreras, Ignacio; Kim, Yongsoo; Seung, H. Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Here we describe an automated method, which we call serial two-photon (STP) tomography, that achieves high-throughput fluorescence imaging of mouse brains by integrating two-photon microscopy and tissue sectioning. STP tomography generates high-resolution datasets that are free of distortions and can be readily warped in 3D, for example, for comparing multiple anatomical tracings. This method opens the door to routine systematic studies of neuroanatomy in mouse models of human brain disorders. PMID:22245809

  20. Optical homodyne tomography with polynomial series expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Benichi, Hugo; Furusawa, Akira

    2011-09-15

    We present and demonstrate a method for optical homodyne tomography based on the inverse Radon transform. Different from the usual filtered back-projection algorithm, this method uses an appropriate polynomial series to expand the Wigner function and the marginal distribution, and discretize Fourier space. We show that this technique solves most technical difficulties encountered with kernel deconvolution-based methods and reconstructs overall better and smoother Wigner functions. We also give estimators of the reconstruction errors for both methods and show improvement in noise handling properties and resilience to statistical errors.

  1. Quantum process tomography of energy and phase relaxation through adaptive measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenberg, Markku; Wilhelm, Frank

    2013-03-01

    Quantum process tomography tends to be very time consuming when multiple degrees of freedom are studied simultaneously. We propose a method of efficient quantum process tomography to estimate the energy and phase relaxation rates in qubits. The method applies Bayesian inference to adaptively choose measurements based on the previously obtained measurement outcomes. We adopt sequential Monte-Carlo approach to perform the Bayesian updates and make use of a fast numerical implementation of the algorithm. We compare the performance of our method to conventional offline (implemented after experimental data collection) strategies and illustrate how our method can speed up quantum process tomography. Funded by IARPA through the MQCO program

  2. Frequency multiplexed long range swept source optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Zurauskas, Mantas; Bradu, Adrian; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel swept source optical coherence tomography configuration, equipped with acousto-optic deflectors that can be used to simultaneously acquire multiple B-scans originating from different depths. The sensitivity range of the configuration is evaluated while acquiring five simultaneous B-scans. Then the configuration is employed to demonstrate long range B-scan imaging by combining two simultaneous B-scans from a mouse head sample. PMID:23760762

  3. Findings in computerized axial tomography of tuberculous encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Estaol, B; Lombardo, L; Prez-Ortega, R; Flores-Barroeta, F

    1981-01-01

    A 24 year-old woman with miliary tuberculosis of the lungs, developed a diffuse encephalopathy with signs of increased intracraneal pressure and without meningitis. A CAT scanner disclosed decreased density of the white matter and multiple nodular lesions enhanced with the infusion of contrast media. To our knowledge, this is the first description of the findings in computerized axial tomography of a patient with miliary tuberculosis and hematogenous dissemination associated to diffuse encephalopathy without meningitis. PMID:7247611

  4. Stellar Multiplicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchne, Gaspard; Kraus, Adam

    2013-08-01

    Stellar multiplicity is a ubiquitous outcome of the star-formation process. The frequency and main characteristics of multiple systems, and their dependence on primary mass and environment, are powerful tools to probe this process. Although early attempts were fraught with selection biases and limited completeness, instrumentation breakthroughs in the past two decades now enable robust statistical analyses. In this review, we summarize current empirical knowledge of stellar multiplicity for main sequence stars and brown dwarfs, as well as among populations of pre-main-sequence stars and embedded protostars. Among field objects, the multiplicity rate and breadth of the orbital period distribution are steep functions of the primary mass, whereas the mass ratio distribution is essentially flat for most populations other than the lowest mass objects. The time-variation of the frequency of visual companions follows two parallel, constant tracks corresponding to loose and dense stellar populations, although current observations do not yet distinguish whether initial multiplicity properties are universal or dependent on the physical conditions of the parent cloud. Nonetheless, these quantitative trends provide a rich comparison basis for numerical and analytical models of star formation.

  5. Sensing flame structure by process tomography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Liu, Shi; Zhou, Wanting; Qi, Xin; Lei, Jing; Mu, Huaiping

    2016-06-28

    Non-intrusive visualization of the structure of flames can offer us many advantages in studying the reaction mechanisms of combustion and observing special distributions of the parameters required for the development of equipment such as jet engines and gas turbines. Process tomography is a relatively new technique for such a task, but is useful owing to its fast speed and capability of detecting signals related to ionizations caused by chemical reactions and thermal effects. Electric capacitance tomography (ECT) is one of the process tomographic techniques. ECT usually comprises a sensor array of electrodes that detect permittivity variations in the measuring zone, a data-logging device and a computer that controls data acquisition and carries out image reconstruction. There have been studies on ECT imaging of flames; however, ECT has not been exploited sufficiently to reveal the inner structure of the flames. In this study, a sensor with planar electrodes is created, and the associated three-dimensional sensitivity map is generated by the finite-element method to detect flame structure. A series of experiments are carried out covering a range of feed rates of fuel and air. Data are collected by the ECT sensor and hardware. The results of the ECT reconstruction show good agreement with actual features, and the structure of the flame is found. This opens up a new route for the study of flames.This article is part of the themed issue 'Supersensing through industrial process tomography'. PMID:27185962

  6. Diagnostic Advances in Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Barley, Kevin; Chari, Ajai

    2016-04-01

    There have been several advances in the diagnosis of multiple myeloma (MM) in recent years. Serum free light chains have improved the ability to diagnose light chain MM; however, there are still difficulties in the serologic diagnosis of MM in some cases, particularly IgA MM. A novel heavy/light chain assay is able to improve the accuracy of diagnosis in these cases. Free light chains may also improve the diagnosis of extramedullary disease in difficult cases such as disease involving the central nervous system, pleura, or ascites. Advances in imaging such as whole body low-dose computed tomography (CT) whole body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) have improved sensitivity in identifying lytic bone lesions, which would enable earlier treatment, and monitoring of osseous disease particularly in non- or oligosecretory disease. New techniques such as fused PET/MRI may further enhance the diagnosis of both bone lesions and extramedullary disease. PMID:26922745

  7. Calibration of electrical impedance tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, W; Ramirez, A

    2000-05-01

    Over the past 10 years we have developed methods for imaging the electrical resistivity of soil and rock formations. These technologies have been called electrical resistance tomography of ERT (e.g. Daily and Owen, 1991). Recently we have been striving to extend this capability to include images of electric impedance--with a new nomenclature of electrical impedance tomography or EIT (Ramirez et al., 1999). Electrical impedance is simply a generalization of resistance. Whereas resistance is the zero frequency ratio of voltage and current, impedance includes both the magnitude and phase relationship between voltage and current at frequency. This phase and its frequency behavior is closely related to what in geophysics is called induced polarization or (Sumner, 1976). Why is this phase or IP important? IP is known to be related to many physical phenomena of importance so that image of IP will be maps of such things as mineralization and cation exchange IP (Marshall and Madden, 1959). Also, it is likely that IP, used in conjunction with resistivity, will yield information about the subsurface that can not be obtained by either piece of information separately. In order to define the accuracy of our technologies to image impedance we have constructed a physical model of known impedance that can be used as a calibration standard. It consists of 616 resistors, along with some capacitors to provide the reactive response, arranged in a three dimensional structure as in figure 1. Figure 2 shows the construction of the network and defines the coordinate system used to describe it. This network of components is a bounded and discrete version of the unbounded and continuous medium with which we normally work (the subsurface). The network has several desirable qualities: (1) The impedance values are known (to the accuracy of the component values). (2) The component values and their 3D distribution is easily controlled. (3) Error associated with electrode noise is eliminated. (4) Each box formed by 12 adjacent components corresponds to a voxel in the finite difference forward model used in the inverse code and this correspondence makes for easy comparison of inversion results and model physical parameters. Using this network we can study the errors associated with the measurement system (called Zombie) separated from the errors introduced by electrode noise. We can also learn details in the behavior of the inversion software (called CR3D) by comparing images and model.

  8. Guided wave tomography performance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huthwaite, Peter; Lowe, Michael; Cawley, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Quantifying wall loss caused by corrosion is a significant challenge for the petrochemical industry. Corrosion commonly occurs at pipe supports, where surface access for inspection is limited. Guided wave tomography is pursued as a solution to this: guided waves are transmitted through the region of interest from an array, and tomographic reconstruction techniques are applied to the measured signals in order to produce a map of thickness. There are many parameters in the system which can affect the performance; this paper investigates how the accuracy varies as defect width and depth, operating frequency and guided wave mode are all changed. For the S0 mode, the best performance was seen around 170kHz on the 10mm plate, with poor performance seen at almost all other frequencies. A0 showed better performance across a broad range of frequencies, with resolution improving with frequency as the wavelength reduced. However, it was shown that the resolution limit did drop relative to the wavelength, limiting the performance at high frequencies slightly.

  9. Multiple linear analysis methods for the quantification of irreversibly binding radiotracers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su Jin; Lee, Jae Sung; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Frost, James; Wand, Gary; McCaul, Mary E; Lee, Dong Soo

    2008-12-01

    Gjedde-Patlak graphical analysis (GPGA) has commonly been used to quantify the net accumulations (K(in)) of radioligands that bind or are taken up irreversibly. We suggest an alternative approach (MLAIR: multiple linear analysis for irreversible radiotracers) for the quantification of these types of tracers. Two multiple linear regression model equations were derived from differential equations of the two-tissue compartment model with irreversible binding. Multiple linear analysis for irreversible radiotracer 1 has a desirable feature for ordinary least square estimations because only the dependent variable C(T)(t) is noisy. Multiple linear analysis for irreversible radiotracer 2 provides K(in) from direct estimates of the coefficients of independent variables without the mediation of a division operation. During computer simulations, MLAIR1 provided less biased K(in) estimates than the other linear methods, but showed a high uncertainty level for noisy data, whereas MLAIR2 increased the robustness of estimation in terms of variability, but at the expense of increased bias. For real [(11)C]MeNTI positron emission tomography data, both methods showed good correlations, with parameters estimated using the standard nonlinear least squares method. Multiple linear analysis for irreversible radiotracer 2 parametric images showed remarkable image quality as compared with GPGA images. It also showed markedly improved statistical power for voxelwise comparisons than GPGA. The two MLAIR approaches examined were found to have several advantages over the conventional GPGA method. PMID:18628777

  10. Time-dependent seismic tomography and its application to the Coso geothermal area, 1996-2006

    SciTech Connect

    Julian, B.R.; G.R. Foulger; F. Monastero

    2008-04-01

    Measurements of temporal changes in Earth structure are commonly determined using localearthquake tomography computer programs that invert multiple seismic-wave arrival time data sets separately and assume that any differences in the structural results arise from real temporal variations. This assumption is dangerous because the results of repeated tomography experiments would differ even if the structure did not change, simply because of variation in the seismic ray distribution caused by the natural variation in earthquake locations. Even if the source locations did not change (if only explosion data were used, for example), derived structures would inevitably differ because of observational errors. A better approach is to invert multiple data sets simultaneously, which makes it possible to determine what changes are truly required by the data. This problem is similar to that of seeking models consistent with initial assumptions, and techniques similar to the “damped least squares” method can solve it. We have developed a computer program, dtomo, that inverts multiple epochs of arrival-time measurements to determine hypocentral parameters and structural changes between epochs. We shall apply this program to data from the seismically active Coso geothermal area, California, in the near future. The permanent network operated there by the US Navy, supplemented by temporary stations, has provided excellent earthquake arrival-time data covering a span of more than a decade. Furthermore, structural change is expected in the area as a result of geothermal exploitation of the resource. We have studied the period 1996 through 2006. Our results to date using the traditional method show, for a 2-km horizontal grid spacing, an irregular strengthening with time of a negative VP/VS anomaly in the upper ~ 2 km of the reservoir. This progressive reduction in VP/VS results predominately from an increase of VS with respect to VP. Such a change is expected to result from effects of geothermal operations such as decreasing fluid pressure and the drying of argillaceous minerals such as illite.

  11. Multiple-Trellis-Coded Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, D.; Simon, M. K.

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical gain over simple multiple-phase-shift keying at least 2 to 3 decibels. Multiple-trellis-coded modulation scheme combined with M-ary modulation shows theoretically to yield asymptotic gains in performance over uncoded multiple-phase-shift keying, while employing symmetric multiple-phase-shift signal constellations and avoiding code catastrophe. Suitable for satellite and terrestrial-mobile/satellite communications or other communications requiring burst-error correction. Extended to such higher dimensional modulations as quadrature amplitude modulation.

  12. Multiphoton tomography of astronauts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Weinigel, Martin; Pietruszka, Anna; Bückle, Rainer; Gerlach, Nicole; Heinrich, Ulrike

    2015-03-01

    Weightlessness may impair the astronaut's health conditions. Skin impairments belong to the most frequent health problems during space missions. Within the Skin B project, skin physiological changes during long duration space flights are currently investigated on three European astronauts that work for nearly half a year at the ISS. Measurements on the hydration, the transepidermal water loss, the surface structure, elasticity and the tissue density by ultrasound are conducted. Furthermore, high-resolution in vivo histology is performed by multiphoton tomography with 300 nm spatial and 200 ps temporal resolution. The mobile certified medical tomograph with a flexible 360° scan head attached to a mechano-optical arm is employed to measure two-photon autofluorescence and SHG in the volar forearm of the astronauts. Modification of the tissue architecture and of the fluorescent biomolecules NAD(P)H, keratin, melanin and elastin are detected as well as of SHG-active collagen. Thinning of the vital epidermis, a decrease of the autofluoresence intensity, an increase in the long fluorescence lifetime, and a reduced skin ageing index SAAID based on an increased collagen level in the upper dermis have been found. Current studies focus on recovery effects.

  13. Cardiovascular Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonetsu, Taishi; Villiger, Martin; Bouma, Brett E.; Jang, Ik-Kyung

    The potential of optical coherence tomography (OCT) for intravascular imaging and assessing the microstructure of atherosclerosis was suggested already by Huang et al. at the very beginning of OCT [1]. For ophthalmology, the eye provides a natural window for OCT to image the retinal microstructure, and OCT has rapidly become the standard imaging modality to diagnose retinal disease and assess disease progression and response to therapy [1, 2]. Intravascular imaging is more invasive by nature and requires imaging through a catheter probe. This has triggered the development of advanced fiber-optic OCT systems with compact, rotating fiber probes, to image the vessel by circumferentially scanning the luminal wall [3, 4]. In 1998, we established the first cardiac OCT research group at the Massachusetts General Hospital to explore the clinical applications of OCT. The first imaging of rabbit aorta was reported by Fujimoto et al. [5], followed by the first swine measurements in vivo by Tearney et al. [6], and finally the first assessment of coronary arteries in patients by Jang et al. [7]. The scope of this chapter is to highlight the steps taken to bring intravascular OCT from bench to bedside over the last 15 years. We will give a general description of atherosclerosis and its pathophysiology and the specific technical implementation of OCT for intravascular imaging through a fiber-optic probe. The motivation is to provide sufficient medical details to provide a basic introduction to the terminology, principles, and challenges of intracoronary imaging.

  14. Computerized tomography calibrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, Herbert P. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A set of interchangeable pieces comprising a computerized tomography calibrator, and a method of use thereof, permits focusing of a computerized tomographic (CT) system. The interchangeable pieces include a plurality of nestable, generally planar mother rings, adapted for the receipt of planar inserts of predetermined sizes, and of predetermined material densities. The inserts further define openings therein for receipt of plural sub-inserts. All pieces are of known sizes and densities, permitting the assembling of different configurations of materials of known sizes and combinations of densities, for calibration (i.e., focusing) of a computerized tomographic system through variation of operating variables thereof. Rather than serving as a phanton, which is intended to be representative of a particular workpiece to be tested, the set of interchangeable pieces permits simple and easy standardized calibration of a CT system. The calibrator and its related method of use further includes use of air or of particular fluids for filling various openings, as part of a selected configuration of the set of pieces.

  15. [Optical coherence tomography].

    PubMed

    von Braunmühl, T

    2015-07-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) was introduced in the 1990s in dermatology and is nowadays established as a noninvasive high-resolution technique for the in vivo evaluation of the skin. To date several studies have been successfully demonstrated the application of OCT for various dermatological questions. The main indication for OCT in the daily practice is the noninvasive diagnosis of nonmelanoma skin cancer such as actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma. OCT has also been shown to be a valuable tool in treatment monitoring and evaluation of therapeutic success of noninvasive treatment strategies like topical immune modulators or photodynamic treatment. Other potential applications for OCT include inflammatory diseases, microbial or parasitic infestations of the skin, e.g. scabies mites or onychomycosis. In recent years high-definition OCT devices have been developed that can potentially be used for the evaluation of melanocytic lesions and, due to the higher resolution, for the visualization of intrafollicular demodex mites. Furthermore different commercially available devices offer-in addition to the cross-sectional images-a fast-generated horizontal (en face) imaging mode. With respect to resolution and penetration depth the OCT technique is taking a middle position in comparison to other noninvasive imaging devices in dermatology such as sonography and reflectance confocal microscopy. PMID:25809459

  16. Doppler Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Werkmeister, René M.; Blatter, Cedric; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2014-01-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) has revolutionized ophthalmology. Since its introduction in the early 1990s it has continuously improved in terms of speed, resolution and sensitivity. The technique has also seen a variety of extensions aiming to assess functional aspects of the tissue in addition to morphology. One of these approaches is Doppler OCT (DOCT), which aims to visualize and quantify blood flow. Such extensions were already implemented in time domain systems, but have gained importance with the introduction of Fourier domain OCT. Nowadays phase-sensitive detection techniques are most widely used to extract blood velocity and blood flow from tissues. A common problem with the technique is that the Doppler angle is not known and several approaches have been realized to obtain absolute velocity and flow data from the retina. Additional studies are required to elucidate which of these techniques is most promising. In the recent years, however, several groups have shown that data can be obtained with high validity and reproducibility. In addition, several groups have published values for total retinal blood flow. Another promising application relates to non-invasive angiography. As compared to standard techniques such as fluorescein and indocyanine-green angiography the technique offers two major advantages: no dye is required and depth resolution is required is provided. As such Doppler OCT has the potential to improve our abilities to diagnose and monitor ocular vascular diseases. PMID:24704352

  17. Endoscopic Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chao; Fujimoto, James G.; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Mashimo, Hiroshi

    New gastrointestinal (GI) cancers are expected to affect more than 290,200 new patients and will cause more than 144,570 deaths in the United States in 2013 [1]. When detected and treated early, the 5-year survival rate for colorectal cancer increases by a factor of 1.4 [1]. For esophageal cancer, the rate increases by a factor of 2 [1]. The majority of GI cancers begin as small lesions that are difficult to identify with conventional endoscopy. With resolutions approaching that of histopathology, optical coherence tomography (OCT) is well suited for detecting the changes in tissue microstructure associated with early GI cancers. Since the lesions are not endoscopically apparent, however, it is necessary to survey a relatively large area of the GI tract. Tissue motion is another limiting factor in the GI tract; therefore, in vivo imaging must be performed at extremely high speeds. OCT imaging can be performed using fiber optics and miniaturized lens systems, enabling endoscopic OCT inside the human body in conjunction with conventional video endoscopy. An OCT probe can be inserted through the working channel of a standard endoscope, thus enabling depth-resolved imaging of tissue microstructure in the GI tract with micron-scale resolution simultaneously with the endoscopic view (Fig. 68.1).

  18. Voxel Based Morphometry in Optical Coherence Tomography: Validation & Core Findings

    PubMed Central

    Antony, Bhavna J.; Chen, Min; Carass, Aaron; Jedynak, Bruno M.; Al-Louzi, Omar; Solomon, Sharon D.; Saidha, Shiv; Calabresi, Peter A.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) of the human retina is now becoming established as an important modality for the detection and tracking of various ocular diseases. Voxel based morphometry (VBM) is a long standing neuroimaging analysis technique that allows for the exploration of the regional differences in the brain. There has been limited work done in developing registration based methods for OCT, which has hampered the advancement of VBM analyses in OCT based population studies. Following on from our recent development of an OCT registration method, we explore the potential benefits of VBM analysis in cohorts of healthy controls (HCs) and multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Specifically, we validate the stability of VBM analysis in two pools of HCs showing no significant difference between the two populations. Additionally, we also present a retrospective study of age and sex matched HCs and relapsing remitting MS patients, demonstrating results consistent with the reported literature while providing insight into the retinal changes associated with this MS subtype. PMID:27199503

  19. Automated Segmentation of Soils Using X-ray Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M.; Miller, E.; McKinley, J.

    2014-12-01

    X-ray tomography (CT) has long been a useful tool for three-dimensional imaging of compositionally heterogeneous objects. In the environmental sciences, CT is an efficient tool for the nondestructive inspection of sediment and soil cores. However, in order to extract parameters describing such properties as pore space and solid-phase distribution, the imaged volume must be segmented according to relevant categories. When done manually by image inspection, segmentation produces results that are often inconsistent, and applying the method over multiple images may be impractical. Modern machine learning techniques have been shown to be more accurate than humans at some vision tasks in fields of histology and remote sensing, and those techniques may be useful for environmental samples. We present a technique using deep learning to categorize a tomographic volume into solid and pore regions, while also identifying morphologically similar solid-phase regions within the imaged object. Finally, we show how the composition of these characteristic solid constituents may be estimated by propagating two dimensional XRF data through the segmented volume. This research was funded by the Chemical Imaging Initiative under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program at PNNL.

  20. An Active Retinal Tracker for Clinical Optical Coherence Tomography Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Ferguson, R. Daniel; Paunescu, Lelia Adelina; Beaton, Siobahn; Schuman, Joel S.

    2007-01-01

    An active, hardware-based retinal tracker was built into a clinical optical coherence tomography (OCT) system for stabilization of high-resolution retinal sections. The retinal tracker locks onto common fundus features, detects transverse eye motion via changes in feature reflectance, and positions the OCT diagnostic beam to fixed coordinates on the retina with mirrors driven by a feedback control loop. The system was tested in a full clinical protocol on subjects with normal and glaucomatous eyes. Analysis software was developed to co-align and co-add multiple fundus and OCT images and to extract quantitative information on location of structures in the images. Tracking was highly accurate and reproducible on all but one subject resulting in the ability to scan the same retinal location continually over long periods of time. The results show qualitative improvement in nearly all co-added OCT scans and a reduction in the variance of the position of the optic disc cup edge to less than one pixel. The tracking system can be easily configured for ultrahigh-resolution OCT systems for advanced image modalities. For example, tracking will allow full three-dimensional scans of the retina, the duration of which is currently effectively prohibited by eye motion. PMID:15910111

  1. Volume estimation of multidensity nodules with thoracic computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Gavrielides, Marios A; Li, Qin; Zeng, Rongping; Myers, Kyle J; Sahiner, Berkman; Petrick, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    This work focuses on volume estimation of "multidensity" lung nodules in a phantom computed tomography study. Eight objects were manufactured by enclosing spherical cores within larger spheres of double the diameter but with a different density. Different combinations of outer-shell/inner-core diameters and densities were created. The nodules were placed within an anthropomorphic phantom and scanned with various acquisition and reconstruction parameters. The volumes of the entire multidensity object as well as the inner core of the object were estimated using a model-based volume estimator. Results showed percent volume bias across all nodules and imaging protocols with slice thicknesses [Formula: see text] ranging from [Formula: see text] to 6.6% for the entire object (standard deviation ranged from 1.5% to 7.6%), and within [Formula: see text] to 5.7% for the inner-core measurement (standard deviation ranged from 2.0% to 17.7%). Overall, the estimation error was larger for the inner-core measurements, which was expected due to the smaller size of the core. Reconstructed slice thickness was found to substantially affect volumetric error for both tasks; exposure and reconstruction kernel were not. These findings provide information for understanding uncertainty in volumetry of nodules that include multiple densities such as ground glass opacities with a solid component. PMID:26844235

  2. Lung vasculature imaging using speckle variance optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cua, Michelle; Lee, Anthony M. D.; Lane, Pierre M.; McWilliams, Annette; Shaipanich, Tawimas; MacAulay, Calum E.; Yang, Victor X. D.; Lam, Stephen

    2012-02-01

    Architectural changes in and remodeling of the bronchial and pulmonary vasculature are important pathways in diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and lung cancer. However, there is a lack of methods that can find and examine small bronchial vasculature in vivo. Structural lung airway imaging using optical coherence tomography (OCT) has previously been shown to be of great utility in examining bronchial lesions during lung cancer screening under the guidance of autofluorescence bronchoscopy. Using a fiber optic endoscopic OCT probe, we acquire OCT images from in vivo human subjects. The side-looking, circumferentially-scanning probe is inserted down the instrument channel of a standard bronchoscope and manually guided to the imaging location. Multiple images are collected with the probe spinning proximally at 100Hz. Due to friction, the distal end of the probe does not spin perfectly synchronous with the proximal end, resulting in non-uniform rotational distortion (NURD) of the images. First, we apply a correction algorithm to remove NURD. We then use a speckle variance algorithm to identify vasculature. The initial data show a vascaulture density in small human airways similar to what would be expected.

  3. Blood oxygenation monitoring by diffuse optical tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Patachia, M; Dutu, D.C.A.; Dumitras, D.C.

    2011-01-24

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) makes it possible to reconstruct, in two or three dimensions, the internal structure of the biological tissues based on the distribution of the absorption coefficient and the reduced scattering coefficient, using optical measurements at multiple source - detector positions on the tissue surface. The measurement of the light intensity transmitted through the tissue can be also used to compute the haemoglobin and oxyhaemoglobin concentrations, measuring the selective absorption of the main blood chromophores by near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). The spectral selectivity of the system and the evaluation of the blood volume and blood oxygenation (BV and OXY distributions), together with the reconstruction of the inner structure of the tissue, can improve the accuracy of early cancer diagnosis, based on the tissue angiogenesis characterisation. (application of lasers and laser-optical methods in life sciences)

  4. Multiscale photoacoustic microscopy and computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lihong V.

    2009-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is probably the fastest growing biomedical imaging technology owing to its capability of high-resolution sensing of rich optical contrast in vivo at depths beyond the optical transport mean free path (~1 mm in the skin). Existing high-resolution optical imaging technologies, such as confocal microscopy and two-photon microscopy, have fundamentally impacted biomedicine but cannot reach such depths. Taking advantage of low ultrasonic scattering, PAT indirectly improves tissue transparency by 100 to 1000 fold and consequently enables deeply penetrating functional and molecular imaging at high spatial resolution. Further, PAT holds the promise of in vivo imaging at multiple length scales ranging from subcellular organelles to organs with the same contrast origin, an important application in multiscale systems biology research. PMID:20161535

  5. ICG enhanced co-registered diffuse optical tomography and photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chen; Kumavor, Patrick D.; Xu, Yan; Zhu, Quing

    2013-03-01

    To overcome the intensive light scattering in the biological tissue, diffuse optical tomography (DOT) in the near infrared range for breast lesion detection usually is combined with other imaging modalities such as ultrasound, X-ray, and MRI, to provide guidance. However, the guided imaging modalities may depend on different contrast mechanics compared to the optical contrast in the DOT. As a result, they can't provide reliable guidance for diffuse optical tomography because some lesions may not be detectable by a non-optical modality but yet have high optical contrast. An imaging modality which can provide the guidance from optical contrast is desirable for DOT. In this paper, we present a system that combines diffuse optical tomography and photoacoustic tomography (PAT), to detect and characterize the deeply-seated targets embedded in a turbid medium. Photoacoustic tomography utilizes a short-pulsed laser beam to penetrate into tissue diffusively. Upon absorption of the light by the target, photoacoustic waves are generated and used to reconstruct, at ultrasound resolution, the optical absorption distribution that reveals optical contrast. The combined system used in the experiment combines a 64-channel photoacoustic system with a frequency-domain diffused optical system. To further improve the contrast, the exogenous contrast agent, indocyanine green (ICG) is used. Our experiment results show that the combined system can detect a tumormimicking phantom up to 2.5 cm in depth and 10 μM in concentration. Mice experiments also confirmed that the combined system can detect the tumor region and monitor the ICG uptake and washout in the tumor region. This method can potentially improve the accuracy to detect the small breast lesions or any lesions which are sensitive to the reference change, such as the lesions located on the chest wall.

  6. Multiple Sclerosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on multiple sclerosis is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then…

  7. Multiple Intelligences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laughlin, Janet

    1999-01-01

    Details the characteristics of Howard Gardner's seven multiple intelligences (MI): linguistic, logical-mathematical, bodily-kinesthetic, spatial, musical, interpersonal, and intrapersonal. Discusses the implications of MI for instruction. Explores how students can study using their preferred learning style - visual, auditory, and physical study…

  8. Finger Multiplication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Bill

    2010-01-01

    The author has been prompted to write this article about finger multiplication for a number of reasons. Firstly there are a number of related articles in past issues of "Mathematics Teaching" ("MT") which have connections to this algorithm. Secondly, very few of his primary teaching students and professional colleagues appear to be aware of the…

  9. Imaging the Mantle Transition Zone Using Multimode Waveform Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, A. J.; Lebedev, S.

    2014-12-01

    The mantle tranisition zone (TZ) is defined by discontinuities in seismic wave velocities at 410 and 660 km depth, and is thought to play an important role in governing thermo-chemical transport between the upper and lower mantle, in addition to the dynamic evolution of the planet. Furthermore, it has long been at the center of debate between whole-mantle and multi-layered convection models. Although not so well resolved in early tomographic models, improvements in imaging methods and availability of high-quality seismic data have provided increasingly detailed images capable of capturing TZ structure. The variations in isotropic velocity and presence of anisotropy can be used to infer constraints on the thermal and chemical nature of the TZ, and ongoing deformation and transport. For anisotropy in particular, its detection in the deep upper mantle and TZ has remained elusive, with few global models showing significant azimuthal anisotropy at these depths. We utilize automated, multimode waveform inversion to extract structural information from surface, S, and multiple-S waveforms, resulting in a dataset of more than 3/4 of a million successful vertical-component fits. Using a more precise regularization of anisotropy, tuned to honour the amplitude and orientation of anisotropic terms uniformly, we have generated two new models with improved TZ sensitivity to variations in isotropic heterogeneity (SL2013sv), and the detection of azimuthal anisotropy (SL2013svA). For instance high-velocity isotropic anomalies associated with subducted Tethyan lithosphere are detected beneath Eurasia, as well as subducted high-velocity oceanic lithosphere beneath North America. We quantify the requirement for TZ anisotropy through analysis of SL2013svA. Finally we also compare our recent tomography models with other global models (both isotropic and anisotropic), and discuss the implications of their similarities and differences on mantle transition zone properties.

  10. Posttraumatic spinal cord cysts: clinical features and characterization with metrizamide computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Quencer, R.M.; Green, B.A.; Eismont, F.J.

    1983-02-01

    Sixteen patients with posttraumatic spinal cord cysts (PTSCC) were evaluated clinically and studied with metrizamide computed tomography (MCT). These patients presented months to years following a severe spinal cord injury, usually with new or progressively worsening neurological symptoms. The development of the PTSCC was unrelated to the location, type, and severity of injury, or to the time interval from the original injury. MCT showed that these cysts occur most frequently in normal or atrophic cords, they may be multiple, they most frequently are found in the dorsal portion of the cord, and they may vary along their length in width and position within the cord. Knowledge of this radiographic morphology is crucial to the surgical planning. The location of the cysts and the mode of their enlargement are correlated with anatomic features of the spinal cord and changes in cerebrospinal fluid dynamics. Cyst-to-subarachnoid space shunting relieves the majority of symptoms.

  11. Study of spatial resolution of proton computed tomography using a silicon strip detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraya, Y.; Izumikawa, T.; Goto, J.; Kawasaki, T.; Kimura, T.

    2014-01-01

    Proton computed tomography (CT) is an imaging technique using a high-energy proton beam penetrating the human body and shows promise for improving the quality of cancer therapy with high-energy particle beams because more accurate electron density distribution measurements can be achieved with proton CT. The deterioration of the spatial resolution owing to multiple Coulomb scattering is, however, a crucial issue. The control of the radiation dose and the long exposure time are also problems to be solved. We have developed a prototype system for proton CT with a silicon strip detector and performed a beam test for imaging. The distribution of the electron density has been measured precisely. We also demonstrated an improvement in spatial resolution by reconstructing the proton trajectory. A spatial resolution of 0.45 mm is achieved for a 25-mm-thick polyethylene object. This will be a useful result for upgrading proton CT application for practical use.

  12. Myeloma (multiple)

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Multiple myeloma is the most common primary cancer of the bones in adults, representing about 1% of all cancers diagnosed in the US in 2004, and 14% of all haematological malignancies. In the UK, multiple myeloma accounts for 1% of all new cases of cancer diagnosed each year. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatment in people with asymptomatic early stage multiple myeloma (stage I)? What are the effects of first-line treatments in people with advanced stage multiple myeloma (stages II and III)? What are the effect of salvage treatments, or supportive therapy, in people with advanced stage multiple myeloma (stages II and III)? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to November 2004 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 71 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: allogenic transplant (non-myeloablative), autologous stem cell transplant (early or late transplantation, double or single, purging of), bisphosphonates, bone marrow stem cells, bortezomib, chemotherapy (combination, conventional dose, intermediate dose plus stem cell rescue, high-dose plus stem cell rescue), combination chemotherapy plus corticosteroids, deferred treatment (in stage I disease), early chemotherapy plus corticosteroids (in stage I disease), epoetin alpha, first-line treatments, infection prophylaxis, interferon, maintenance therapy (in advanced multiple myeloma), melphalan (normal dose, high dose before autologous stem cell transplantation, plus total body irradiation), optimum priming regimen, peripheral blood stem cells, plasmapheresis, salvage therapy regimens, single-agent chemotherapy (adding prednisolone), single-agent chemotherapy (bendamustine, melphalan, cyclophosphamide, lomustine, carmustine) with or without corticosteroid (prednisolone, dexamethasone), syngeneic transplantation, and thalidomide (and derivatives).

  13. [A case of malignant perivascular epithelioid cell tumor of the retroperitoneum with multiple metastases].

    PubMed

    Oh, Hye Won; Kim, Tae Hyo; Cha, Ra Ri; Kim, Na Young; Kim, Hyun Jin; Jung, Woon Tae; Lee, Ok Jae; Lee, Jeong Hee

    2014-11-01

    Perivascular epithelioid cell tumors (PEComas) are unusual mesenchymal neoplasms composed of histologically and immunohistochemically distinct perivascular epithelioid cells (PECs). Although PEComas have the potential to behave in a malignant fashion, malignant PEComas arising from the retroperitoneum are extremely rare. A 68-year-old woman presented with a painful palpable mass in her left upper abdomen. Computed tomography of the abdomen showed a 9 cm sized heterogeneous mass in left para-aortic space and multiple hypervascular nodules in the liver. (18)F-fludeoxyglucose-PET/CT showed multifocal hyper-metabolic lesions in retroperitoneum, liver, and skeletal bones. Percutaneous needle biopsies were done on the retroperitoneal and hepatic mass. Both specimens were positive for human melanoma black-45 (HMB-45) on histological and immunohistochemical staining which was compatible with PEComas. Herein, we report a rare case of retroperitoneal PEComa with multiple metastases involving liver and bone at initial diagnosis that exhibited aggressive behavior and resulted in a devastating prognosis. PMID:25420742

  14. Nanoscale chemical tomography of buried organic-inorganic interfaces in the chiton tooth.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Lyle M; Joester, Derk

    2011-01-13

    Biological organisms possess an unparalleled ability to control the structure and properties of mineralized tissues. They are able, for example, to guide the formation of smoothly curving single crystals or tough, lightweight, self-repairing skeletal elements. In many biominerals, an organic matrix interacts with the mineral as it forms, controls its morphology and polymorph, and is occluded during mineralization. The remarkable functional properties of the resulting composites-such as outstanding fracture toughness and wear resistance-can be attributed to buried organic-inorganic interfaces at multiple hierarchical levels. Analysing and controlling such interfaces at the nanometre length scale is critical also in emerging organic electronic and photovoltaic hybrid materials. However, elucidating the structural and chemical complexity of buried organic-inorganic interfaces presents a challenge to state-of-the-art imaging techniques. Here we show that pulsed-laser atom-probe tomography reveals three-dimensional chemical maps of organic fibres with a diameter of 5-10 nm in the surrounding nano-crystalline magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) mineral in the tooth of a marine mollusc, the chiton Chaetopleura apiculata. Remarkably, most fibres co-localize with either sodium or magnesium. Furthermore, clustering of these cations in the fibre indicates a structural level of hierarchy previously undetected. Our results demonstrate that in the chiton tooth, individual organic fibres have different chemical compositions, and therefore probably different functional roles in controlling fibre formation and matrix-mineral interactions. Atom-probe tomography is able to detect this chemical/structural heterogeneity by virtue of its high three-dimensional spatial resolution and sensitivity across the periodic table. We anticipate that the quantitative analysis and visualization of nanometre-scale interfaces by laser-pulsed atom-probe tomography will contribute greatly to our understanding not only of biominerals (such as bone, dentine and enamel), but also of synthetic organic-inorganic composites. PMID:21228873

  15. Endovascular treatment of multiple aneurysms complicating Cogan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Angiletta, Domenico; Wiesel, Paola; Pulli, Raffaele; Marinazzo, Davide; Bortone, Alessandro Santo; Regina, Guido

    2015-02-01

    To report the use of endografts to manage multiple aneurysms due to Cogan syndrome (CS). A 38-year-old woman with descending thoracic aorta and right common carotid artery aneurysms due to CS was treated with endovascular grafts. After 4 years, angio computed tomography scan demonstrated complete exclusion of the aneurysms with no signs of endoleak, whereas echo color Doppler showed patency of the carotid graft, no signs of restenosis, no progression of the disease in the landing zones, and complete aneurysm exclusion. Endovascular repair seems to have favorable long-term outcomes and should be considered a viable alternative to surgery in unfit for open surgery patients, even if they are young, and when the aneurysm size and location would pose a higher risk of perioperative and postoperative complications after an open surgical procedure. PMID:25462550

  16. Multiple Small Intestine Perforations after Organophosphorous Poisoning: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Sudha Jasmine; Peter, John Victor; Suryawanshi, Mayur Keshav

    2016-01-01

    Organophosphate poisoning has significant gastrointestinal manifestations including vomiting, diarrhea, cramps and increased salivation. We report an uncommon gastrointestinal complication of multiple small intestinal perforations following organophosphorus poisoning. A 28-year old male presented after ingesting dichlorvos mixed with alcohol. Following the initial cholinergic symptoms, the patient developed severe shock with fever, attributed to aspiration pneumonia. Despite appropriate antibiotics, shock was persistent. Over the next 24-hours, he developed abdominal distension, loose stools and high nasogastric aspirates. Computed tomography showed pneumoperitonium. Exploratory laparotomy revealed six perforations in the jejunum and ileum. The involved portion of the bowel was resected and re-anastomosed, following which only 80-cm of small bowel was left. Postoperatively, shock resolved over 72-hours. However, over the next few days, patient developed features of anastomotic leak. Since only a small portion of the small bowel was preserved, a conservative approach was adopted. He deteriorated further and finally succumbed to the illness. PMID:27134898

  17. Diffusion driven reconstruction for positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Mondal, Partha P.; Rajan, K.

    2006-11-06

    Reconstruction map of the radionucleus distribution in positron emission tomography imaging is an ill-posed inverse problem. Existing reconstruction methodologies based on maximum a posteriori principle reconstruct images that suffer from artifacts. A method is proposed for generating better map of radionucleus distribution primarily based on surface diffusion model. The mean curvature diffusion has resulted in efficient noise suppression when applied to an isolated edge embedded in noise. Experimental results show that the proposed approach has better image resolution and edge-preservation capability. The reconstruction methodology will therefore find applications in biomedical imaging and bioengineering.

  18. Space variant deconvolution for optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prashanth, R.; Bhattacharya, Shanti

    2011-12-01

    We present a method for mitigating space variant blur occurring in the images acquired using Optical coherence tomography (OCT). The effect of Gaussian beam divergence on the image resolution is analyzed mathematically to develop space dependent two dimensional point spread functions that define the blurring kernel. Two standard deconvolution algorithms are used to deblur the images using the space dependent point spread functions. We show that the deconvolution method is effective in improving the transverse resolution of cross sectional OCT images at regions up to several times as deep as the confocal region of the Gaussian beam.

  19. Digital Holographic Tomography for biological cellular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milligan, Kristen

    A new implementation of Digital Holographic Tomography (DHT) has been applied to biological cellular imaging in this thesis. The DHT technique provides quantitative information relating a cell's intracellular features to its variance in index of refraction or physical thickness. This can be used to monitor changes in a cell due to examples such as cancerous disease progression or the effects of drug delivery. The DHT technique has been integrated within the housing of a fluorescence microscope for increased robustness and user convenience. Three dimensional height and refractive index profiles of different blood cells have been generated. The results of these profiles validate and show promise in this novel technique.

  20. How noise affects quantum detector tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q.; Renema, J. J.; Gaggero, A.; Mattioli, F.; Leoni, R.; van Exter, M. P.; de Dood, M. J. A.

    2015-10-01

    We determine the full photon number response of a NbN superconducting nanowire single photon detector via quantum detector tomography, and the results show the separation of linear, effective absorption efficiency from the internal detection efficiencies. In addition, we demonstrate an error budget for the complete quantum characterization of the detector. We find that for short times, the dominant noise source is shot noise, while laser power fluctuations limit the accuracy for longer timescales. The combined standard uncertainty of the internal detection efficiency derived from our measurements is about 2%.

  1. Database tomography for commercial application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostoff, Ronald N.; Eberhart, Henry J.

    1994-01-01

    Database tomography is a method for extracting themes and their relationships from text. The algorithms, employed begin with word frequency and word proximity analysis and build upon these results. When the word 'database' is used, think of medical or police records, patents, journals, or papers, etc. (any text information that can be computer stored). Database tomography features a full text, user interactive technique enabling the user to identify areas of interest, establish relationships, and map trends for a deeper understanding of an area of interest. Database tomography concepts and applications have been reported in journals and presented at conferences. One important feature of the database tomography algorithm is that it can be used on a database of any size, and will facilitate the users ability to understand the volume of content therein. While employing the process to identify research opportunities it became obvious that this promising technology has potential applications for business, science, engineering, law, and academe. Examples include evaluating marketing trends, strategies, relationships and associations. Also, the database tomography process would be a powerful component in the area of competitive intelligence, national security intelligence and patent analysis. User interests and involvement cannot be overemphasized.

  2. Bayesian Approach to Short Period Slowness Tomography in Central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maceira, M.; Taylor, S. R.; Ammon, C. J.

    2003-12-01

    We are investigating the utility of short-period, high-resolution surface-wave slowness maps for lowering detection thresholds and allowing for discrimination of explosions and earthquakes at lower magnitudes (3.0-4.8). We focus on the region of central Asia between 69 and 108 degrees east longitude and 29 and 54 degrees north latitude. We retrieved broadband waveform data from more than 1,100 events that occurred between January 1997 and May 2002. Waveforms were obtained from four different networks comprising 13 individual stations. Using multiple-filter and phase-matched filter techniques, we measured the dispersion characteristics of the signals between 6 and 30 seconds. These Rayleigh-wave group velocity dispersion curves were used to compute high-resolution, half a degree cell size, slowness tomographic maps for each period. We adopted a Bayesian tomography method to solve the equation that relates travel-time data with the slowness structure. We used a declustering technique to minimize the effect of event clusters on the results. Our model is similar, to some extent, to the a priori model, but contains more structure and the cell size is smaller (0.5 compared to 1 degree cell size for the a priori model). The tomographic patterns correlate well with known geologic and tectonic features in the area. Accumulations of relatively young sediments across Eurasia are greater than on any other continent due to the continuing rapid uplift across much of central Asia. The short periods are primarily sensitive to upper crustal structures. The tomographic images display low velocities associated with the known sedimentary basins - Tarim, Junggar and Quaidam basins - in the area of central Asia under study. High velocities are associated with mountainous tectonic features such as the Tien Shan. We validated our maps using Rayleigh group-velocity dispersion curves for 640 events that occurred on the region of interest between January 1993 and December 1996. We analyzed group velocity residuals between the new model and the a priori model using these independent measurements. The overall refined model predictions are good. More over, they show a significant improvement at short and intermediate periods (6 to 15 s) with respect to the a priori model. The refined model also shows a 15 percent improvement in the detection of surfaces waves with respect to previous 1D models. Therefore, these improved high-resolution, short-period tomography maps can be used to lower the Ms detection thresholds to be used for construction of regional mb:Ms discriminants.

  3. Classification and 3D averaging with missing wedge correction in biological electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    Bartesaghi, A.; Sprechmann, P.; Liu, J.; Randall, G.; Sapiro, G.; Subramaniam, S.

    2008-01-01

    Strategies for the determination of 3D structures of biological macromolecules using electron crystallography and single-particle electron microscopy utilize powerful tools for the averaging of information obtained from 2D projection images of structurally homogeneous specimens. In contrast, electron tomographic approaches have often been used to study the 3D structures of heterogeneous, one-of-a-kind objects such as whole cells where image-averaging strategies are not applicable. Complex entities such as cells and viruses, nevertheless, contain multiple copies of numerous macromolecules that can individually be subjected to 3D averaging. Here we present a complete framework for alignment, classification, and averaging of volumes derived by electron tomography that is computationally efficient and effectively accounts for the missing wedge that is inherent to limited-angle electron tomography. Modeling the missing data as a multiplying mask in reciprocal space we show that the effect of the missing wedge can be accounted for seamlessly in all alignment and classification operations. We solve the alignment problem using the convolution theorem in harmonic analysis, thus eliminating the need for approaches that require exhaustive angular search, and adopt an iterative approach to alignment and classification that does not require the use of external references. We demonstrate that our method can be successfully applied for 3D classification and averaging of phantom volumes as well as experimentally obtained tomograms of GroEL where the outcomes of the analysis can be quantitatively compared against the expected results. PMID:18440828

  4. Quantitative photoacoustic tomography

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhen; Jiang, Huabei

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, several algorithms that allow for quantitative photoacoustic reconstruction of tissue optical, acoustic and physiological properties are described in a finite-element method based framework. These quantitative reconstruction algorithms are compared, and the merits and limitations associated with these methods are discussed. In addition, a multispectral approach is presented for concurrent reconstructions of multiple parameters including deoxyhaemoglobin, oxyhaemoglobin and water concentrations as well as acoustic speed. Simulation and in vivo experiments are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the reconstruction algorithms presented. PMID:19581254

  5. Glucose uptake heterogeneity of the leg muscles is similar between patients with multiple sclerosis and healthy controls during walking

    PubMed Central

    Kindred, John H.; Ketelhut, Nathaniel B.; Rudroff, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Background Difficulties in ambulation are one of the main problems reported by patients with multiple sclerosis. A previous study by our research group showed increased recruitment of muscle groups during walking but the influence of skeletal muscle properties, such as muscle fiber activity, has not been fully elucidated. The purpose of this investigation was to use the novel method of calculating glucose uptake heterogeneity in the leg muscles of patients with multiple sclerosis and compare these results to healthy controls. Methods Eight patients with multiple sclerosis (4 men) and 8 healthy controls (4 men) performed 15 min of treadmill walking at a comfortable self-selected speed following muscle strength tests. Participants were injected with ≈8 millicuries of [18F]-Fluorodeoxyglucose during walking after which positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging was performed. Findings No differences in muscle strength were detected between multiple sclerosis and control groups (P > 0.27). Within the multiple sclerosis group differences in muscle volume existed between the stronger and weaker legs in the vastus lateralis, semitendinosus, and semimembranosus (P < 0.03). Glucose uptake heterogeneity between the groups was not different for any muscle group or individual muscle of the legs (P > 0.16, P ≥ 0.05). Interpretations Patients with multiple sclerosis and healthy controls showed similar muscle fiber activity during walking. Interpretations of these results, with respect to our previous study, suggest that walking difficulties in patients with multiple sclerosis may be more associated with altered central nervous system motor patterns rather than alterations in skeletal muscle properties. PMID:25541392

  6. Quantum state tomography with incomplete data: Maximum entropy and variational quantum tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, D. S.; Lavor, C.; Gomes-Ruggiero, M. A.; Cesário, A. T.; Vianna, R. O.; Maciel, T. O.

    2013-05-01

    Whenever we do not have an informationally complete set of measurements, the estimate of a quantum state cannot be uniquely determined. In this case, among the density matrices compatible with the available data, the one commonly preferred is the one which is the most uncommitted to the missing information. This is the purpose of the maximum entropy estimation (MaxEnt) and the variational quantum tomography (VQT). Here, we propose a variant of VQT and show its relationship with MaxEnt methods in quantum tomographies with an incomplete set of measurements. We prove their equivalence in the case of eigenbasis measurements, and through numerical simulations we stress their similar behavior. Hence, in the modified VQT formulation we have an estimate of a quantum state as unbiased as in MaxEnt and with the benefit that VQT can be more efficiently solved by means of linear semidefinite programs.

  7. Combined positron emission tomography and computed tomography to visualize and quantify fluid flow in sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernø, M. A.; Gauteplass, J.; Hauge, L. P.; Abell, G. E.; Adamsen, T. C. H.; Graue, A.

    2015-09-01

    Here we show for the first time the combined positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) imaging of flow processes within porous rocks to quantify the development in local fluid saturations. The coupling between local rock structure and displacement fronts is demonstrated in exploratory experiments using this novel approach. We also compare quantification of 3-D temporal and spatial water saturations in two similar CO2 storage tests in sandstone imaged separately with PET and CT. The applicability of each visualization technique is evaluated for a range of displacement processes, and the favorable implementation of combining PET/CT for laboratory core analysis is discussed. We learn that the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is over an order of magnitude higher for PET compared with CT for the studied processes.

  8. Quantitative cone beam X-ray luminescence tomography/X-ray computed tomography imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Dongmei; Zhu, Shouping Chen, Xueli; Chao, Tiantian; Cao, Xu; Zhao, Fengjun; Huang, Liyu; Liang, Jimin

    2014-11-10

    X-ray luminescence tomography (XLT) is an imaging technology based on X-ray-excitable materials. The main purpose of this paper is to obtain quantitative luminescence concentration using the structural information of the X-ray computed tomography (XCT) in the hybrid cone beam XLT/XCT system. A multi-wavelength luminescence cone beam XLT method with the structural a priori information is presented to relieve the severe ill-posedness problem in the cone beam XLT. The nanophosphors and phantom experiments were undertaken to access the linear relationship of the system response. Then, an in vivo mouse experiment was conducted. The in vivo experimental results show that the recovered concentration error as low as 6.67% with the location error of 0.85 mm can be achieved. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can accurately recover the nanophosphor inclusion and realize the quantitative imaging.

  9. On the Limitations of Interstation Distances in Ambient Noise Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Y.; Yang, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Ambient noise tomography (ANT) has recently become a popular tomography method to study crustal structures thanks to its unique capability to extract short-period surface waves. Empirically, in order to reliably measure surface wave dispersion curves from time-domain cross-correlations, interstation distances between a pair of stations have to be longer than two/three wavelengths. This requirement imposed a strong constraint on the use of ambient noise tomography at the long-period end at local- and regional-scale tomography studies. In this study, we use ambient noise data from USArray/Transportable Array recorded during 2007-2012 to investigate whether dispersion measurements from cross-correlations of ambient noise at short interstation distances are consistent with those at long distances and whether the short-path dispersion measurements can be used in tomography, especially in local- and regional-scale tomography. Our results show that: (1) surface wave phase velocity dispersion curves measured by a Frequency-Time Analysis technique (FTAN) from time-domain cross-correlations are consistent with those measured by a spectral method tracing the zero crossings of the real part of cross spectrum functions in frequency domain; (2) dispersion measurements from time-domain cross-correlations with short interstation distances, up to only one wavelength, are consistent with and also reliable as those with interstation distances longer than three wavelengths; and (3) these short-path measurements can be included in ambient noise tomography to improve path coverage and resolution. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation of China (NSFC, #41374059) and the Special Fund for Basic Scientific Research of Central Colleges, China University of Geosciences (Wuhan) (#CUG090106 and #CUGL100402).

  10. Electron tomography of dislocation structures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, G.S.; House, S.D.; Kacher, J.; Tanaka, M.; Higashida, K.; Robertson, I.M.

    2014-01-15

    Recent developments in the application of electron tomography for characterizing microstructures in crystalline solids are described. The underlying principles for electron tomography are presented in the context of typical challenges in adapting the technique to crystalline systems and in using diffraction contrast imaging conditions. Methods for overcoming the limitations associated with the angular range, the number of acquired images, and uniformity of image contrast are introduced. In addition, a method for incorporating the real space coordinate system into the tomogram is presented. As the approach emphasizes development of experimental solutions to the challenges, the solutions developed and implemented are presented in the form of examples.

  11. Multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Nylander, Alyssa; Hafler, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a multifocal demyelinating disease with progressive neurodegeneration caused by an autoimmune response to self-antigens in a genetically susceptible individual. While the formation and persistence of meningeal lymphoid follicles suggest persistence of antigens to drive the continuing inflammatory and humoral response, the identity of an antigen or infectious agent leading to the oligoclonal expansion of B and T cells is unknown. In this review we examine new paradigms for understanding the immunopathology of MS, present recent data defining the common genetic variants underlying disease susceptibility, and explore how improved understanding of immune pathway disruption can inform MS prognosis and treatment decisions. PMID:22466660

  12. Portable 3-D computed tomography system

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, D. H.; Davis, A. W.; Keating, S. C.; Claytor, T. N.

    2001-06-01

    Through a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement between Los Alamos National Laboratory and HYTEC, Inc., a portable 3-D Computed Tomography (CT) system has been developed that dramatically reduces the overall complexity and time-to-completion for performing CT studies. The system incorporates an amorphous silicon flat-panel detector, coupled motion control and state of the art software to produce high quality CT results. All alignment, image calibration and radiation exposure monitoring is handled in software, thereby, eliminating the need for precise mechanical positioning during setup or a highly stable source of radiation. The image acquisition hardware occupies a minimal 30-inch x 48-inch footprint and is mounted on a portable cart for transportation between multiple X-ray sites. The software is built on the Windows NT/2K operating system for maximum flexibility in today's industry, and offers an unprecedented user interface designed for technicians and operators who have minimal computer training. Multiple reconstruction methods (parallel, fan and cone beam) are provided and can be run in a parallel-processed mode on any number of Windows NT/2K computers to decrease reconstruction time. Visualization software offers 2-D and 3-D viewing including slice animation and volume rendering of entire objects.

  13. Multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Harousseau, Jean-Luc; Shaughnessy, John; Richardson, Paul

    2004-01-01

    High-dose therapy with stem cell transplantation (SCT) and novel targeted therapies (thalidomide, its more potent analogues, and bortezomib) represent two approaches for overcoming resistance of multiple myeloma (MM) cells to conventional therapies. While it is now clear that dose-intensification improves the outcome in younger patients, long-term remissions are obtained in a minority of patients. Therefore, the impact of novel agents as part of front-line therapy is the objective of ongoing trials. Gene expression profiling (GEP) will help to improve the management of MM not only by identifying prognostic subgroups but also by defining molecular pathways that are associated with these subgroups and that are possible targets for future therapies. In Section I, Dr. John Shaughnessy describes recent data obtained with GEP of CD138-purified plasma cells from patients with MM. His group has already shown that overexpression of the Wnt signaling inhibitor DKK1 by MM plasma cells blocks osteoblast differentiation and contributes to the development of osteolytic bone lesions. Recent data allow identification of four subgroups of MM in which GEP is highly correlated not only with different clinical characteristics and outcome but also with different cytogenetic abnormalities. In addition, abnormal expression of only three genes (RAN, ZHX-2, CHC1L) is associated with rapid relapses. In the context of intensive therapy with tandem autotransplantations, this model appears to be more powerful than current prognostic models based on standard biologic variables and cytogenetics. Understanding why the dysregulation of these three genes is associated with a more aggressive behavior of the disease will help to define new therapeutic strategies. In Section II, Dr. Jean-Luc Harousseau presents recent results achieved with tandem autologous SCT (ASCT) and with reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) allogeneic SCT. ASCT is now considered as the standard of care in patients up to 65 years of age. The IFM (Intergroupe Francophone du Myelome) has recently shown that double ASCT is superior to single ASCT. Current results of three other randomized trials confirm that double ASCT is superior, at least in terms of event-free survival. However, patients with poor prognostic features do poorly even after tandem ASCT. Strategies to further improve the outcome of ASCT include more intensive therapies and the use of novel agents such as thalidomide and immunomodulatory analogs (IMiDs) or bortezomib. Results of allogeneic SCT remain disappointing in MM even with T cell-depleted grafts. Preliminary results of a strategy combining ASCT to reduce tumor burden and RIC allogeneic SCT are encouraging, although the follow-up is still short. However, again, patients with chromosome 13 deletions have poor results with RIC. Longer follow-up of ongoing multicentric studies will help to clarify the indications of RIC. In Section III, Dr. Paul Richardson summarizes current knowledge of novel targeted therapies in MM. A better understanding of interactions between MM cells and bone marrow stromal cells and of the signaling cascades whereby cytokines mediate proliferation, survival, drug resistance and migration of MM cells provide the rationale for testing novel agents in relapsed/refractory MM. Increased angiogenesis coupled with the known anti-angiogenesis activity of thalidomide justified its use in refractory MM. The remarkable responses initially achieved prompted a number of clinical studies in different indications and the development of more potent IMIDs. Among them CC-5013 (Revlimid) has been tested in Phase I/II studies and a randomized Phase III study has just been completed. Blockade of NF-kappa B using the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (Velcade) may mediate anti-MM activity by inhibiting interleukin (IL)-6 production in stromal cells and other mechanisms of action have been shown in preclinical studies. Based on the promising results of the Phase II trial, a large randomized trial of bortezomib versus dexamethasone has been completed. Studies of bortezomib combined with other drugs are ongoing. Arsenic trioxide has a number of properties showing that it targets MM cells interacting with the microenvironment. Clinical studies are ongoing as well. Other agents in MM have already been or will probably be translated soon from the bench to the bedside. PMID:15561686

  14. imaging volcanos with gravity and muon tomography measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourde, Kevin; Gibert, Dominique; Marteau, Jacques; Deroussi, Sébastien; Dufour, Fabrice; de Bremond d'Ars, Jean; Ianigro, Jean-Christophe; Gardien, Serge; Girerd, Claude

    2015-04-01

    Both muon tomography and gravimetry are geohysical methods that provide information on the density structure of the Earth's subsurface. Muon tomography measures the natural flux of cosmic muons and its attenuation produced by the screening effect of the rock mass to image. Gravimetry generally consists in measurements of the vertical component of the local gravity field. Both methods are linearly linked to density, but their spatial sensitivity is very different. Muon tomography essentially works like medical X-ray scan and integrates density information along elongated narrow conical volumes while gravimetry measurements are linked to density by a 3-dimensional integral encompassing the whole studied domain. We show that gravity data are almost useless to constrain the density structure in regions sampled by more than two muon tomography acquisitions. Interestingly the resolution in deeper regions not sampled by muon tomography is significantly improved by joining the two techniques. Examples taken from field experiments performed on La Soufrière of Guadeloupe volcano are discussed.

  15. On the limitations of interstation distances in ambient noise tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yinhe; Yang, Yingjie; Xu, Yixian; Xu, Hongrui; Zhao, Kaifeng; Wang, Kai

    2015-05-01

    Ambient noise tomography (ANT) has recently become a popular tomography method to study crustal structures thanks to its unique capability to extract short-period surface waves. Empirically, in order to reliably measure surface wave dispersion curves from time-domain cross-correlations, interstation distances between a pair of stations have to be longer than two/three wavelengths. This requirement imposed a strong constraint on the use of ANT at the long-period end at local- and regional-scale tomography studies. In this study, we use ambient noise data from USArray/Transportable Array recorded during 2007-2012 to investigate whether dispersion measurements from cross-correlations of ambient noise at short interstation distances are consistent with those at long distances and whether the short-path dispersion measurements can be used in tomography, especially in local- and regional-scale tomography. Our results show that: (1) surface wave phase velocity dispersion curves measured by a frequency-time analysis technique (FTAN) from time-domain cross-correlations are consistent with those measured by a spectral method tracing the zero crossings of the real part of cross-spectrum functions in frequency domain; (2) dispersion measurements from time-domain cross-correlations with short interstation distances, up to only one wavelength, are consistent with and also reliable as those with interstation distances longer than three wavelengths and (3) these short-path measurements can be included in ANT to improve path coverage and resolution.

  16. Complex differential variance algorithm for optical coherence tomography angiography

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Ahhyun S.; Chico-Calero, Isabel; Vakoc, Benjamin J.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a complex differential variance (CDV) algorithm for optical coherence tomography based angiography. The algorithm exploits both the intensity and phase changes of optical coherence tomography (OCT) signals from flowing blood to achieve high vascular contrast, and also intrinsically reject undesirable phase signals originating from small displacement axial bulk tissue motion and instrument synchronization errors. We present this algorithm within a broader discussion of the properties of OCT signal dynamics. The performance of the algorithm is compared against two other existing algorithms using both phantom measurements and in vivo data. We show that the algorithm provides better contrast for a given number of measurements and equivalent spatial averaging. PMID:25426313

  17. Acousto-electric tomography and CGO solutions with internal data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocyigit, Ilker

    2012-12-01

    Acousto-electric tomography is a hybrid imaging technique that aims to overcome the ill-posedness of the electric impedance tomography. We consider the problem of reconstructing the internal conductivity of an object by making electric measurements on the boundary while perturbing the conductivity by sending ultrasound waves to the object. We show that the conductivity can be uniquely recovered by using one boundary potential. AET is reduced to an inverse problem with internal data, and corresponding uniqueness and Lipschitz-type stability results are given. An iterative method for reconstructing the current and then the conductivity is presented along with numerical examples.

  18. Heliospheric Tomography from IPS Data at 140 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejia-Ambriz, J. C.; Jackson, B. V.; Gonzalez-Esparza, A.; Buffington, A.

    2014-12-01

    Interplanetary scintillation (IPS) from radio telescopes provides data to study density and velocity evolution of the solar wind and heliospheric disturbances. A tomography program developed at the University of California, San Diego, makes 3D reconstructions and forecasts of the inner heliosphere dynamics from IPS results. For the first time we incorporate 140 MHz IPS results from the MEXican Array Radio Telescope (MEXART) into the tomography program. We show that MEXART data complement observations from other radio-systems located at different longitudes, thus providing more complete heliospheric coverage.

  19. Design of a muon tomography system with a plastic scintillator and wavelength-shifting fiber arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Woo Jin; Kim, Hyun-Il; An, Su Jung; Lee, Chae Young; Baek, Cheol-Ha; Chung, Yong Hyun

    2013-12-01

    Recently, monitoring nuclear materials to avoid nuclear terrorism has become an important area of national security. It can be difficult to detect gamma rays from nuclear material because they are easily shielded by shielding material. Muon tomography using multiple -Coulomb scattering derived from muons can be utilized to detect special nuclear materials (SNMs) such as uranium-235 and plutonium-239. We designed a muon tomography system composed of four detector modules. The incident and scattered muon tracks can be calculated by two top and two bottom detectors, respectively. 3D tomographic images are obtained by extracting the crossing points of muon tracks with a point-of-closest-approach algorithm. The purpose of this study was to optimize the muon tomography system using Monte Carlo simulation code. The effects of the geometric parameters of the muon tomography system on material Z-discrimination capability were simulated and evaluated.

  20. Anisotropic resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herwanger, J. V.; Pain, C. C.; Binley, A.; de Oliveira, C. R. E.; Worthington, M. H.

    2004-08-01

    Geophysical tomographic techniques have the potential to remotely detect and characterize geological features, such as fractures and spatially varying lithologies, by their response to signals passed through these features. Anisotropic behaviour in many geological materials necessitates the generalization of tomographic methods to include anisotropic material properties in order to attain high-quality images of the subsurface. In this paper, we present a finite element (FE) based direct-current electrical inversion method to reconstruct the conductivity tensor at each node point of a FE mesh from electrical resistance measurements. The inverse problem is formulated as a functional optimization and the non-uniqueness of the electrical inverse problem is overcome by adding penalty terms for structure and anisotropy. We use a modified Levenberg-Marquardt method for the functional optimization and the resulting set of linear equation is solved using pre-conditioned conjugate gradients. The method is tested using both synthetic and field experiments in cross-well geometry. The acquisition geometry for both experiments uses a cross-well experiment at a hard-rock test site in Cornwall, southwest England. Two wells, spaced at 25.7 m, were equipped with electrodes at a 1 m spacing at depths from 21-108 m and data were gathered in pole-pole geometry. The test synthetic model consists of a strongly anisotropic and conductive body underlain by an isotropic resistive formation. Beneath the resistive formation, the model comprises a moderately anisotropic and moderately conductive half-space, intersected by an isotropic conductive layer. This model geometry was derived from the interpretation of a seismic tomogram and available geological logs and the conductivity values are based on observed conductivities. We use the test model to confirm the ability of the inversion scheme to recover the (known) true model. We find that all key features of the model are recovered. However, the inversion model is smoother than the true model and the difference in absolute value of anisotropy and conductivity between features is slightly underestimated. Using an anisotropic conductivity distribution aggravates the problem of non-uniqueness of the solution of the inverse electrical problem. This problem can be overcome by applying appropriate structural and anisotropy constraints. We find that running a suite of inversions with varying constraint levels and subsequent examination of the results (including the inspection of residual maps) offers a viable method for choosing appropriate numerical values for the imposed constraints. Inversion of field data reveals a strongly anisotropic subsurface with marked spatial variations of both magnitude of anisotropy and conductivity. Average conductivities range from 0.001 S m-1 (= 1000 ? m) to 0.003 S m-1 (= 333 ? m) and anisotropy values range from 0 per cent to more than 300 per cent. As an independent test of the reliability of the structures revealed by anisotropic electric tomography, anisotropic seismic traveltime tomograms were calculated. We find a convincing structural agreement between the two independently derived images. Areas of high electric anisotropy coincide with seismically anisotropic areas and we observe an anticorrelation between electric conductivity and seismic velocity. Both observations are consistent with anisotropy anomalies caused by fracturing or layering.

  1. Probable Syphilitic Aortitis Documented by Positron Emission Tomography.

    PubMed

    Joseph Davey, Dvora; Acosta, Lourdes Del Rocio Carrera; Gupta, Pawan; Konda, Kelika A; Caceres, Carlos F; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2016-03-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has been used to aid in diagnosis of inflammatory and infectious disease. We describe the case of a patient with early latent syphilis with increased metabolic activity along the aorta detected via PET, suggesting probable aortitis. Three months after treatment, the PET showed apparent resolution of the aortitis. PMID:26859808

  2. Computed tomography demonstration of subarachnoid-pleural fistula.

    PubMed

    Hicken, P; Martin, J; Hakanson, S

    1990-08-01

    A persistent left pleural effusion caused diagnostic difficulty in a young girl, 2 years after a road accident had rendered her paraplegic. Eventually, after instillation of a contrast medium into the pleural fluid, computed tomography showed a fistulous communication between the subarachnoid and pleural spaces at the level in the dorsal spine where trauma had occurred. PMID:2207780

  3. Dictionary-learning-based reconstruction method for electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baodong; Yu, Hengyong; Verbridge, Scott S; Sun, Lizhi; Wang, Ge

    2014-01-01

    Electron tomography usually suffers from so-called “missing wedge” artifacts caused by limited tilt angle range. An equally sloped tomography (EST) acquisition scheme (which should be called the linogram sampling scheme) was recently applied to achieve 2.4-angstrom resolution. On the other hand, a compressive sensing inspired reconstruction algorithm, known as adaptive dictionary based statistical iterative reconstruction (ADSIR), has been reported for X-ray computed tomography. In this paper, we evaluate the EST, ADSIR, and an ordered-subset simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (OS-SART), and compare the ES and equally angled (EA) data acquisition modes. Our results show that OS-SART is comparable to EST, and the ADSIR outperforms EST and OS-SART. Furthermore, the equally sloped projection data acquisition mode has no advantage over the conventional equally angled mode in this context. PMID:25104167

  4. Diagnosis of dementia with single photon emission computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Jagust, W.J.; Budinger, T.F.; Reed, B.R.

    1987-03-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography is a practical modality for the study of physiologic cerebral activity in vivo. We utilized single photon emission computed tomography and N-isopropyl-p-iodoamphetamine iodine 123 to evaluate regional cerebral blood flow in nine patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), five healthy elderly control subjects, and two patients with multi-infarct dementia. We found that all subjects with AD demonstrated flow deficits in temporoparietal cortex bilaterally, and that the ratio of activity in bilateral temporoparietal cortex to activity in the whole slice allowed the differentiation of all patients with AD from both the controls and from the patients with multi-infarct dementia. Furthermore, this ratio showed a strong correlation with disease severity in the AD group. Single photon emission computed tomography appears to be useful in the differential diagnosis of dementia and reflects clinical features of the disease.

  5. Gate Set Tomography of a 3D Transmon Qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yudan; Novikov, Sergey; Greenbaum, Daniel; Skinner, Andrew; Palmer, B. S.

    2015-03-01

    Quantum gate set tomography is a recently developed tool for characterizing quantum gates that does not suffer from the inaccuracies inherent in standard quantum process tomography. We present the results of a gate set tomography (GST) experiment done on a superconducting 3D transmon qubit. π and π / 2 rotations over the x- and y-axes were used as the initial calibrated gates. We performed linear inversion on data from a 4-fiducial experiment to obtain an initial tomographic estimate, which was then used as the starting point for a maximum likelihood procedure. The calibrated gates all achieved fidelity above 98%, which was further verified by randomized benchmarking. The robustness of GST was also examined by introducing errors deliberately. We show that GST with maximum likelihood estimation is able to discern errors due to a mixed initial state, as well as due to a tilted rotation axis in our gate operation.

  6. Low-cost diffuse optical tomography for the classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minagawa, Taisuke; Zirak, Peyman; Weigel, Udo M.; Kristoffersen, Anna K.; Mateos, Nicolas; Valencia, Alejandra; Durduran, Turgut

    2012-10-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is an emerging imaging modality with potential applications in oncology, neurology, and other clinical areas. It allows the non-invasive probing of the tissue function using relatively inexpensive and safe instrumentation. An educational laboratory setup of a DOT system could be used to demonstrate how photons propagate through tissues, basics of medical tomography, and the concepts of multiple scattering and absorption. Here, we report a DOT setup that could be introduced to the advanced undergraduate or early graduate curriculum using inexpensive and readily available tools. The basis of the system is the LEGO Mindstorms NXT platform which controls the light sources, the detectors (photo-diodes), a mechanical 2D scanning platform, and the data acquisition. A basic tomographic reconstruction is implemented in standard numerical software, and 3D images are reconstructed. The concept was tested and developed in an educational environment that involved a high-school student and a group of post-doctoral fellows.

  7. Analytic reconstruction approach for parallel translational computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kong, Huihua; Yu, Hengyong

    2015-01-01

    To develop low-cost and low-dose computed tomography (CT) scanners for developing countries, recently a parallel translational computed tomography (PTCT) is proposed, and the source and detector are translated oppositely with respect to the imaging object without a slip-ring. In this paper, we develop an analytic filtered-backprojection (FBP)-type reconstruction algorithm for two dimensional (2D) fan-beam PTCT and extend it to three dimensional (3D) cone-beam geometry in a Feldkamp-type framework. Particularly, a weighting function is constructed to deal with data redundancy for multiple translations PTCT to eliminate image artifacts. Extensive numerical simulations are performed to validate and evaluate the proposed analytic reconstruction algorithms, and the results confirm their correctness and merits. PMID:25882732

  8. Intravascular optical coherence tomography on a beating heart model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamouche, Guy; Dufour, Marc; Hewko, Mark; Vergnole, Sébastien; Gauthier, Bruno; Bisaillon, Charles-Étienne; Monchalin, Jean-Pierre; Sowa, Michael G.

    2010-07-01

    The advantages and limitations of using a beating heart model in the development of intravascular optical coherence tomography are discussed. The model fills the gap between bench experiments, performed on phantoms and excised arteries, and whole animal in-vivo preparations. The beating heart model is stable for many hours, allowing for extended measurement times and multiple imaging sessions under in-vivo conditions without the complications of maintaining whole-animal preparation. The perfusate supplying the heart with nutrients can be switched between light scattering blood to a nonscattering perfusate to allow the optical system to be optimized without the need of an efficient blood displacement strategy. Direct access to the coronary vessels means that there is no need for x-ray fluoroscopic guidance of the catheter to the heart, as is the case in whole animal preparation. The model proves to be a valuable asset in the development of our intravascular optical coherence tomography technology.

  9. Computed tomography of intramuscular myxoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ekelund, L.; Herrlin, K.; Rydholm, A.

    1982-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) was performed in seven patients with intramuscular myxoma. All lesions were well demarcated, of homogeneous appearance and attenuation values ranging from 10 to 60 (HU). The tumor size, as estimated at CT, correlated well with the size of the surgical specimen, which is in contrast to the findings in some high grade malignant sarcomas.

  10. Pheochromocytoma: value of computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, T.J.; Sheedy, P.F. II; van Heerden, J.A.; Sheps, S.G.; Hattery, R.R.; Stephens, D.H.

    1983-08-01

    A review of 60 histologically proven pheochromocytoma confirmed the value of computed tomography (CT) in the evaluation of this tumor. CT was found to be an accurate means of locating the tumor in 52 patients presented for the first time and 8 patients with evidence of recurrence.

  11. Motion Compensation in Emission Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Hoff, Jörg; Langner, Jens

    With the ever-improving spatial resolution available in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and, especially, in positron emission tomography (PET), the unavoidable organ and subject motion is becoming one of the dominant factors limiting the practically achievable spatial resolution in the tomographic images. Moreover, uncorrected subject motion can lead to potentially severe image artifacts and compromise the quantitative integrity of the data. The latter is of special importance in PET where quantitative assessment of tracer concentrations is commonplace both in static investigations via so-called standardized uptake values (SUVs) and in dynamic studies aiming at tracer kinetic modeling and quantification of the corresponding transport constants. Correction of the heart-cycle-related motion in cardiac applications has a long tradition and is covered extensively in the literature. Correction of breathing-related organ motion in emission tomography, however, has drawn considerable interest only in recent years in the context of oncological PET. This is mainly due to the demands of therapy response monitoring and radiation treatment planning. The third important area is high-precision motion correction of random head motion in brain investigations. In this chapter, we give an overview of the methods employed to minimize - and possibly eliminate - the motion influence in emission tomography.

  12. Computed tomography:the details.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2007-07-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) is a well established technique, particularly in medical imaging, but also applied in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imaging. Basic CT imaging via back-projection is treated in many texts, but often with insufficient detail to appreciate subtleties such as the role of non-uniform sampling densities. Herein are given some details often neglected in many texts.

  13. X-ray Computed Tomography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michael, Greg

    2001-01-01

    Describes computed tomography (CT), a medical imaging technique that produces images of transaxial planes through the human body. A CT image is reconstructed mathematically from a large number of one-dimensional projections of a plane. The technique is used in radiological examinations and radiotherapy treatment planning. (Author/MM)

  14. Nonabsorbable suture granuloma mimicking ovarian cancer recurrence at combined positron emission tomography/computed tomography evaluation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction This is the first case of suture granuloma mimicking isolated ovarian cancer relapse. Only six analogous cases have been previously reported in other malignancies. Case presentation We report the case of a 44-year-old Caucasian woman with partially platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer in which radiological features, including computed tomography and combined 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography, were strongly suggestive of isolated cancer relapse in her right subdiaphragmatic region. Laparoscopic examination resulted negative, but was not completely suitable due to widespread adhesive syndrome. The laparotomy for secondary cytoreductive surgery and biopsy of the suspected area showed inflammatory granuloma caused by nonabsorbable propylene suture, without evidence of neoplastic cells. Moreover, unexpected peritoneal carcinosis was found. Conclusions This evidence suggests that clinical details about previous surgical procedures are necessary for adequate interpretation. Although much progress has been made in imaging techniques, especially in the promising field of combined 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography, these procedures should be still thoroughly investigated in order to promptly rule out tumor recurrence and avoid unnecessary surgery. PMID:24942653

  15. [Multiple myeloma].

    PubMed

    Kortüm, K M; Engelhardt, M; Rasche, L; Knop, S; Einsele, H

    2013-08-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a cancer originating from terminally differentiated B lymphocytes, the plasma cells and is classified as a B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. As clonal plasma cells secrete immunoglobulin molecules (lacking antigenic specificity), an "M component" can incidentally be detected. Besides intact immunoglobulin molecules, free light chains can be produced. Although there is no specific treatment for monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), which is the defined as the presence of clonal bone marrow plasma cells and low levels (serum and/or urine) of the M component, it should be followed up in affected individuals. The symptoms of MM are numerous and often nonspecific. Diagnosis includes the quantification of monoclonal proteins in serum and urine, blood count, electrolytes and renal function, imaging of the skeleton and bone marrow puncture. The cornerstone of therapy includes melphalan- or cyclophosphamide-based regimens incorporating one of the "novel drugs" (i.e. bortezomib, thalidomide, or lenalidomide). PMID:23860514

  16. [Multiple apheresis].

    PubMed

    Coffe, C

    2007-05-01

    Multiple apheresis makes it possible to obtain at least two labile blood components from a single donor using a cell separator. It can be either multicomponent apheresis leading to the preparation of at least two different blood component types or red blood cell apheresis providing two identical red blood cell concentrates. These techniques available in addition to whole blood donation, are modifying collection strategies in many Etablissements Français du Sang and will contribute to improve stock logistics in the future. In areas with insufficient stock, these procedures will help achieve blood component self-sufficiency. The author first describes the principle underlying different--current or future--techniques as well as their advantages and drawbacks. He finally addresses the potential impact of these processes on the evolution of blood collection and the advantages to be gained. PMID:17521944

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... conditions and whether you have a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or thyroid problems. ... ray; soft tissue, such as organs like the heart or liver, shows up in shades of gray, ...

  18. Holographic interferometric tomography for reconstructing flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cha, Soyoung S.

    1994-01-01

    Holographic interferometric tomography is a technique for instantaneously capturing and quantitatively reconstructing three-dimensional flow fields. It has a very useful application potential for high-speed aerodynamics. However, three major challenging tasks need to be accomplished before its practical applications. First, fluid flows are mostly unsteady or at least non repeatable. Consequently, a means for Instantaneously recording three-dimensional flow fields, that is, a simple holographic technique for simultaneously recording multi-directional projections, needs to be developed. Second, while holographic interferometry provides enormous data storage capabilities, expeditious data extraction from complicated interferograms is very important for timely near real-time applications. Third, unlike medical applications, flow tomography does not provide complete data sets but instead involves ill-posed reconstruction problems of incomplete projection and limited angular scanning. During this summer research period, new experimental techniques and corresponding hardware were developed and tested to address the above mentioned tasks. The first task was achieved by diffuser illumination. This concept allows instantaneous capture of many projections with a conventional setup for single-projection recording. For the second task, a phase-shifting technique was incorporated. This technique allows one to acquire multiple phase-stepped interferograms for a single projection and thus to extract phase information from intensity data almost at real-time. For the third task, the research that has been extensively conducted previously was utilized. In this research period, a complete experimental setup that provides the above three major capabilities was designed, built, and tested by integrating all the techniques. A simple laboratory experiment for simulating wind-tunnel testing was then conducted. A test flow was produced by employing a relatively simple device that generated a gravity-driven flow. The flow was then experimentally investigated to check the viability of the holographic interferometric tomographic technique before wind-tunnel application.

  19. Sparsity-driven autofocus for multipass SAR tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muirhead, F.; Mulgrew, B.; Woodhouse, I. H.; Greig, D.

    2015-10-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems produce high resolution, two dimensional imaging of areas of environmental interest. SAR interferometry and tomography enables these techniques to extend to three dimensional imaging by exploiting multiple SAR images with diversity in space and time. These techniques require accurate phase information over multiple images as the data is extremely sensitive to deviations from the reference track, therefore to enable interferometry and tomography an accurate autofocus solution is required. This paper investigates phase errors resulting from navigational uncertainties in multipass spotlight SAR imaging and uses techniques from the field of compressive sensing to achieve an autofocus solution. The proposed algorithm builds on previous autofocus work by expanding it to the multipass case and jointly recovers phase errors for all images simultaneously, making it extremely useful for interferometry and tomography techniques. The algorithm described uses pixels that are stable in all SAR images to gain an autofocus solution as these are the pixels that are the focus for analysis using tomography. This is unlike conventional autofocus, which just works on an image-by-image basis. The tools of compressive sensing can be used to concurrently select pixels for bright image elements that are stable and coherent over all images, as these pixels are sparse in the image domain, and calculate the phase errors present in each pass. Using the multipass data after autofocus, height distributions for scatterers in single pixels are determined for simulated forest scenes at X-band. The performance of the autofocus algorithm is examined through numerical simulations and is also applied to real data collected from Selex ES's airborne, X-band, experimental SAR system. The experimental results demonstrate that the algorithm effectively achieves an autofocus solution. By finding the vertical distribution of two scatterers in a single pixel over simulated forestry images we can determine if compressive sensing can be utilized to gain information on scatterers below the canopy at X-band in future studies.

  20. Optical coherency matrix tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagalwala, Kumel H.; Kondakci, H. Esat; Abouraddy, Ayman F.; Saleh, Bahaa E. A.

    2015-10-01

    The coherence of an optical beam having multiple degrees of freedom (DoFs) is described by a coherency matrix G spanning these DoFs. This optical coherency matrix has not been measured in its entirety to date—even in the simplest case of two binary DoFs where G is a 4 × 4 matrix. We establish a methodical yet versatile approach—optical coherency matrix tomography—for reconstructing G that exploits the analogy between this problem in classical optics and that of tomographically reconstructing the density matrix associated with multipartite quantum states in quantum information science. Here G is reconstructed from a minimal set of linearly independent measurements, each a cascade of projective measurements for each DoF. We report the first experimental measurements of the 4 × 4 coherency matrix G associated with an electromagnetic beam in which polarization and a spatial DoF are relevant, ranging from the traditional two-point Young’s double slit to spatial parity and orbital angular momentum modes.

  1. Optical coherency matrix tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kagalwala, Kumel H.; Kondakci, H. Esat; Abouraddy, Ayman F.; Saleh, Bahaa E. A.

    2015-01-01

    The coherence of an optical beam having multiple degrees of freedom (DoFs) is described by a coherency matrix G spanning these DoFs. This optical coherency matrix has not been measured in its entirety to date—even in the simplest case of two binary DoFs where G is a 4 × 4 matrix. We establish a methodical yet versatile approach—optical coherency matrix tomography—for reconstructing G that exploits the analogy between this problem in classical optics and that of tomographically reconstructing the density matrix associated with multipartite quantum states in quantum information science. Here G is reconstructed from a minimal set of linearly independent measurements, each a cascade of projective measurements for each DoF. We report the first experimental measurements of the 4 × 4 coherency matrix G associated with an electromagnetic beam in which polarization and a spatial DoF are relevant, ranging from the traditional two-point Young’s double slit to spatial parity and orbital angular momentum modes. PMID:26478452

  2. Utility of single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography imaging in evaluation of chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Harisankar, Chidambaram Natrajan Balasubramanian; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai; Bhattacharya, Anish; Singh, Paramjeet; Sen, Ramesh

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Abnormal morphologic findings in imaging were thought to explain the etiology of low back pain (LBP). However, it is now known that variety of morphologic abnormalities is noted even in asymptomatic individuals. Single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) could be used to differentiate incidental findings from clinically significant findings. Objective: This study was performed to define the SPECT/CT patterns in patients with LBP and to correlate these with clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. Materials and Methods: Thirty adult patients with LBP of duration 3 months or more were prospectively evaluated in this study. Patients with known or suspected malignancy, trauma or infectious processes were excluded. A detailed history of sensory and motor symptoms and neurologic examination was performed. All the patients were subjected to MRI and bone scintigraphy with hybrid SPECT/CT of the lumbo-sacral spine within 1 month of each other. The patients were classified into those with and without neurologic symptoms, activity limitation. The findings of clinical examination and imaging were compared. MRI and SPECT/CT findings were also compared. Results: Thirty patients (18 men and 12 women; mean age 38 years; range 17-64 years) were eligible for the study. Clinically, 14 of 30 (46%) had neurologic signs and or symptoms. Six of the 30 patients (20%) had positive straight leg raising test (SLRT). Twenty-two of the 30 patients (73%) had SPECT abnormality. Most frequent SPECT/CT abnormality was tracer uptake in the anterior part of vertebral body with osteophytes/sclerotic changes. Significant positive agreement was noted between this finding and MRI evidence of degenerative disc disease. Only 13% of patients had more than one abnormality in SPECT. All 30 patients had MRI abnormalities. The most frequent abnormality was degenerative disc disease and facet joint arthropathy. MRI showed single intervertebral disc abnormality in 36% of the patients and more than one intervertebral disc abnormality in remaining 64% patients. Fifteen of the 30 patients had facet joint arthropathy. 60% of these patients had involvement of more than one level facet joints while 38% had associated inter vertebral disc disease. 83% of the patients with positive SLRT had SPECT and MRI abnormalities. 100% of patients with neurologic symptoms had SPECT and MRI abnormalities. Conclusion: Addition of hybrid SPECT/CT data will help differentiate incidental from significant MRI abnormalities as all patients with LBP have MRI abnormalities and most have MRI abnormalities at multiple sites. Tracer uptake in the anterior part of the vertebral body represents degenerative disc disease. MRI is sensitive and SPECT/CT is specific for facet joint arthropathy. Both investigations are best used complementary to each other. PMID:23919068

  3. A rare case of nonenhancing primary central nervous system lymphoma mimic multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hai; Dong, Huiqing

    2015-01-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is reported to have increased in the last decades. Early diagnosis is crucial for proper management of this tumor. We report a case of a 48-year-old man who was initially diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed multiple lesions with hypersignals in the bilateral basal ganglia and brain stem in T2-weighted image and non-enhancement, while positron emission tomography showed a low uptake of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose in the affected brain, indicative of demyelination. However, this individual was correctly diagnosed with PCNSL after biopsy and further histological analysis. Primary central nervous system lymphoma must be considered even when nonenhancing, diffuse lesions are seen on MRI. A visible tumor on imaging is essential to ensure an early brain biopsy and histological diagnosis. PMID:26492120

  4. Lung Postmortem Autopsy Revealing Extramedullary Involvement in Multiple Myeloma Causing Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ravinet, Aurélie; Perbet, Sébastien; Guièze, Romain; Guérin, Renaud; Gayraud, Guillaume; Aliane, Jugurtha; Tremblay, Aymeric; Pascal, Julien; Ledoux, Albane; Chaleteix, Carine; Dechelotte, Pierre; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; Bazin, Jean-Etienne; Constantin, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary involvement with multiple myeloma is rare. We report the case of a 61-year-old man with past medical history of chronic respiratory failure with emphysema, and a known multiple myeloma (Durie and Salmon stage III B and t(4;14) translocation). Six months after diagnosis and first line of treatment, he presented acute dyspnea with interstitial lung disease. Computed tomography showed severe bullous emphysema and diffuse, patchy, multifocal infiltrations bilaterally with nodular character, small bilateral pleural effusions, mediastinal lymphadenopathy, and a known lytic lesion of the 12th vertebra. He was treated with piperacillin-tazobactam, amikacin, oseltamivir, and methylprednisolone. Finally, outcome was unfavourable. Postmortem analysis revealed diffuse and nodular infracentimetric infiltration of the lung parenchyma by neoplastic plasma cells. Physicians should be aware that acute respiratory distress syndrome not responding to treatment of common causes could be a manifestation of the disease, even with negative BAL or biopsy and could be promptly treated with salvage therapy. PMID:25165587

  5. Eigenvector decomposition of full-spectrum x-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzales, Brian J.; Lalush, David S.

    2012-03-01

    Energy-discriminated x-ray computed tomography (CT) data were projected onto a set of basis functions to suppress the noise in filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstructions. The x-ray CT data were acquired using a novel x-ray system which incorporated a single-pixel photon-counting x-ray detector to measure the x-ray spectrum for each projection ray. A matrix of the spectral response of different materials was decomposed using eigenvalue decomposition to form the basis functions. Projection of FBP onto basis functions created a de facto image segmentation of multiple contrast agents. Final reconstructions showed significant noise suppression while preserving important energy-axis data. The noise suppression was demonstrated by a marked improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) along the energy axis for multiple regions of interest in the reconstructed images. Basis functions used on a more coarsely sampled energy axis still showed an improved SNR. We conclude that the noise-resolution trade off along the energy axis was significantly improved using the eigenvalue decomposition basis functions.

  6. Eigenvector decomposition of full-spectrum x-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Brian J; Lalush, David S

    2012-03-01

    Energy-discriminated x-ray computed tomography (CT) data were projected onto a set of basis functions to suppress the noise in filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstructions. The x-ray CT data were acquired using a novel x-ray system which incorporated a single-pixel photon-counting x-ray detector to measure the x-ray spectrum for each projection ray. A matrix of the spectral response of different materials was decomposed using eigenvalue decomposition to form the basis functions. Projection of FBP onto basis functions created a de facto image segmentation of multiple contrast agents. Final reconstructions showed significant noise suppression while preserving important energy-axis data. The noise suppression was demonstrated by a marked improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) along the energy axis for multiple regions of interest in the reconstructed images. Basis functions used on a more coarsely sampled energy axis still showed an improved SNR. We conclude that the noise-resolution trade off along the energy axis was significantly improved using the eigenvalue decomposition basis functions. PMID:22343097

  7. Technetium-99m methylene diphosphonate uptake in the brachialis muscle hematoma in a patient with prostate cancer and coagulation disorder mimicking bone metastasis evaluated by single-photon emission tomography-computed tomography/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai Karuppusamy; Mohanan, Vyshakh; Madhavan, Devdas; Shinto, Ajit Sugunan

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of 79-year-old male with prostate cancer and coagulation disorder presented with left shoulder pain. He underwent bone scintigraphy to rule out metastasis, which showed intense foci of tracer activity in the left axilla. Hybrid single-photon emission tomography-computed tomography (SPECT/CT) of the shoulder region localized tracer uptake to the left brachialis muscle hematoma. PMID:24379534

  8. Technetium-99m methylene diphosphonate uptake in the brachialis muscle hematoma in a patient with prostate cancer and coagulation disorder mimicking bone metastasis evaluated by single-photon emission tomography-computed tomography/computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai Karuppusamy; Mohanan, Vyshakh; Madhavan, Devdas; Shinto, Ajit Sugunan

    2013-10-01

    We report a case of 79-year-old male with prostate cancer and coagulation disorder presented with left shoulder pain. He underwent bone scintigraphy to rule out metastasis, which showed intense foci of tracer activity in the left axilla. Hybrid single-photon emission tomography-computed tomography (SPECT/CT) of the shoulder region localized tracer uptake to the left brachialis muscle hematoma. PMID:24379534

  9. Limited-angle tomography for analyzer-based phase-contrast x-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Majidi, Keivan; Wernick, Miles N; Li, Jun; Muehleman, Carol; Brankov, Jovan G

    2014-07-01

    Multiple-image radiography (MIR) is an analyzer-based phase-contrast x-ray imaging method, which is emerging as a potential alternative to conventional radiography. MIR simultaneously generates three planar parametric images containing information about scattering, refraction and attenuation properties of the object. The MIR planar images are linear tomographic projections of the corresponding object properties, which allows reconstruction of volumetric images using computed tomography (CT) methods. However, when acquiring a full range of linear projections around the tissue of interest is not feasible or the scanning time is limited, limited-angle tomography techniques can be used to reconstruct these volumetric images near the central plane, which is the plane that contains the pivot point of the tomographic movement. In this work, we use computer simulations to explore the applicability of limited-angle tomography to MIR. We also investigate the accuracy of reconstructions as a function of number of tomographic angles for a fixed total radiation exposure. We use this function to find an optimal range of angles over which data should be acquired for limited-angle tomography MIR (LAT-MIR). Next, we apply the LAT-MIR technique to experimentally acquired MIR projections obtained in a cadaveric human thumb study. We compare the reconstructed slices near the central plane to the same slices reconstructed by CT-MIR using the full angular view around the object. Finally, we perform a task-based evaluation of LAT-MIR performance for different numbers of angular views, and use template matching to detect cartilage in the refraction image near the central plane. We use the signal-to-noise ratio of this test as the detectability metric to investigate an optimum range of tomographic angles for detecting soft tissues in LAT-MIR. Both results show that there is an optimum range of angular view for data acquisition where LAT-MIR yields the best performance, comparable to CT-MIR only if one considers volumetric images near the central plane and not the whole volume. PMID:24898008

  10. Limited-angle tomography for analyzer-based phase-contrast x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majidi, Keivan; Wernick, Miles N.; Li, Jun; Muehleman, Carol; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2014-07-01

    Multiple-image radiography (MIR) is an analyzer-based phase-contrast x-ray imaging method, which is emerging as a potential alternative to conventional radiography. MIR simultaneously generates three planar parametric images containing information about scattering, refraction and attenuation properties of the object. The MIR planar images are linear tomographic projections of the corresponding object properties, which allows reconstruction of volumetric images using computed tomography (CT) methods. However, when acquiring a full range of linear projections around the tissue of interest is not feasible or the scanning time is limited, limited-angle tomography techniques can be used to reconstruct these volumetric images near the central plane, which is the plane that contains the pivot point of the tomographic movement. In this work, we use computer simulations to explore the applicability of limited-angle tomography to MIR. We also investigate the accuracy of reconstructions as a function of number of tomographic angles for a fixed total radiation exposure. We use this function to find an optimal range of angles over which data should be acquired for limited-angle tomography MIR (LAT-MIR). Next, we apply the LAT-MIR technique to experimentally acquired MIR projections obtained in a cadaveric human thumb study. We compare the reconstructed slices near the central plane to the same slices reconstructed by CT-MIR using the full angular view around the object. Finally, we perform a task-based evaluation of LAT-MIR performance for different numbers of angular views, and use template matching to detect cartilage in the refraction image near the central plane. We use the signal-to-noise ratio of this test as the detectability metric to investigate an optimum range of tomographic angles for detecting soft tissues in LAT-MIR. Both results show that there is an optimum range of angular view for data acquisition where LAT-MIR yields the best performance, comparable to CT-MIR only if one considers volumetric images near the central plane and not the whole volume.

  11. Limited-angle tomography for analyzer-based phase-contrast X-ray imaging

    PubMed Central

    Majidi, Keivan; Wernick, Miles N; Li, Jun; Muehleman, Carol; Brankov, Jovan G

    2014-01-01

    Multiple-Image Radiography (MIR) is an analyzer-based phase-contrast X-ray imaging method (ABI), which is emerging as a potential alternative to conventional radiography. MIR simultaneously generates three planar parametric images containing information about scattering, refraction and attenuation properties of the object. The MIR planar images are linear tomographic projections of the corresponding object properties, which allows reconstruction of volumetric images using computed tomography (CT) methods. However, when acquiring a full range of linear projections around the tissue of interest is not feasible or the scanning time is limited, limited-angle tomography techniques can be used to reconstruct these volumetric images near the central plane, which is the plane that contains the pivot point of the tomographic movement. In this work, we use computer simulations to explore the applicability of limited-angle tomography to MIR. We also investigate the accuracy of reconstructions as a function of number of tomographic angles for a fixed total radiation exposure. We use this function to find an optimal range of angles over which data should be acquired for limited-angle tomography MIR (LAT-MIR). Next, we apply the LAT-MIR technique to experimentally acquired MIR projections obtained in a cadaveric human thumb study. We compare the reconstructed slices near the central plane to the same slices reconstructed by CT-MIR using the full angular view around the object. Finally, we perform a task-based evaluation of LAT-MIR performance for different numbers of angular views, and use template matching to detect cartilage in the refraction image near the central plane. We use the signal-to-noise ratio of this test as the detectability metric to investigate an optimum range of tomographic angles for detecting soft tissues in LAT-MIR. Both results show that there is an optimum range of angular view for data acquisition where LAT-MIR yields the best performance, comparable to CT-MIR only if one considers volumetric images near the central plane and not the whole volume. PMID:24898008

  12. Carrier multiplication in graphene.

    PubMed

    Winzer, Torben; Knorr, Andreas; Malic, Ermin

    2010-12-01

    Graphene as a zero-bandgap semiconductor is an ideal model structure to study the carrier relaxation channels, which are inefficient in conventional semiconductors. In particular, it is of fundamental interest to address the question whether Auger-type processes significantly influence the carrier dynamics in graphene. These scattering channels bridge the valence and conduction band allowing carrier multiplication, a process that generates multiple charge carriers from the absorption of a single photon. This has been suggested in literature for improving the efficiency of solar cells. Here we show, based on microscopic calculations within the density matrix formalism, that Auger processes do play an unusually strong role for the relaxation dynamics of photoexcited charge carriers in graphene. We predict that a considerable carrier multiplication takes place, confirming the potential of graphene as a new material for high-efficiency photodevices. PMID:21053963

  13. Electron Tomography: Seeing Atoms in Three Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Arslan, Ilke; Stach, Eric A.

    2012-11-01

    Our eyes - a parallel lens system - have the phenomenal ability to observe and "reconstruct" the three-dimensional world, relaying a 3-D image to our brains. Imaging of the nanoworld is best done with electrons rather than photons because of their lower wavelengths and higher resolution. The advent of aberration-correction has led to transmission electron microscopes with sub-Angstrom resolution that can resolve single atoms. Yet, no matter what detector is used, the resulting images are only two-dimensional projections of three-dimensional objects. Electron tomography is a technique that allows reconstruction of the three-dimensional structure and morphology of nanomaterials from such projections. X-ray tomography has been used in many branches of science for nearly half a century, and in the biological sciences electron tomography has been a powerful tool for understanding ultrastructure. However, for many years crystalline materials posed a challenge to electron tomography because diffraction contrast (a change in intensity in the image at particular crystal orientations) creates artifacts in the 3-D reconstruction. In 2003, with advances in scanning transmission electron microscopy, Midgley and colleagues obtained the first electron tomograms of crystalline materials. Shortly thereafter, Arslan et al. showed that the spatial resolution could be improved to 1 nm in all three spatial dimensions and visualized the formation of faceted 3.5-nm quantum dots embedded in a Si matrix. However, with that work existing reconstruction algorithms appeared to have reached their limit. To attain a resolution of 1 nm, a total of 140 images over ±78 degrees of tilt were needed. Writing in Nature Materials, Goris et al. now report a novel algorithm for 3-D reconstruction of the atomic structure of free-standing Au nanorods, using only four projection images. I.A. acknowledges collaboration with J.D. Roehling, K.J. Batenburg, B.C. Gates and A. Katz for Figure 1, supported in part by the DOE BES DE-SC0005822, and in part by the LDRD program at PNNL. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle under contract DE-AC05-76RL01830.

  14. Clinical multiphoton FLIM tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten

    2012-03-01

    This paper gives an overview on current clinical high resolution multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging in volunteers and patients. Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) in Life Sciences was introduced in Jena/Germany in 1988/89 based on a ZEISS confocal picosecond dye laser scanning microscope equipped with a single photon counting unit. The porphyrin distribution in living cells and living tumor-bearing mice was studied with high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution. Ten years later, time-gated cameras were employed to detect dental caries in volunteers based on one-photon excitation of autofluorescent bacteria with long fluorescence lifetimes. Nowadays, one-photon FLIM based on picosecond VIS laser diodes are used to study ocular diseases in humans. Already one decade ago, first clinical twophoton FLIM images in humans were taken with the certified clinical multiphoton femtosecond laser tomograph DermaInspectTM. Multiphoton tomographs with FLIM modules are now operating in hospitals at Brisbane, Tokyo, Berlin, Paris, London, Modena and other European cities. Multiple FLIM detectors allow spectral FLIM with a temporal resolution down to 20 ps (MCP) / 250 ps (PMT) and a spectral resolution of 10 nm. Major FLIM applications include the detection of intradermal sunscreen and tattoo nanoparticles, the detection of different melanin types, the early diagnosis of dermatitis and malignant melanoma, as well as the measurement of therapeutic effects in pateints suffering from dermatitis. So far, more than 1,000 patients and volunteers have been investigated with the clinical multiphoton FLIM tomographs DermaInspectTM and MPTflexTM.

  15. A metallography and x-ray tomography study of spall damage in ultrapure Al

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, M. L.; Bie, B. X.; Zhao, F. P.; Fan, D.; Luo, S. N.; Hu, C. M.; Ran, X. X.; Xiao, X. H.; Yang, W. G.; Li, P.

    2014-07-15

    We characterize spall damage in shock-recovered ultrapure Al with metallography and x-ray tomography. The measured damage profiles in ultrapure Al induced by planar impact at different shock strengths, can be described with a Gaussian function, and showed dependence on shock strengths. Optical metallography is reasonably accurate for damage profile measurements, and agrees within 10–25% with x-ray tomography. Full tomography analysis showed that void size distributions followed a power law with an exponent of γ = 1.5 ± 2.0, which is likely due to void nucleation and growth, and the exponent is considerably smaller than the predictions from percolation models.

  16. Spatial filtering in electrical impedance tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Corazza, M.; von Ellenrieder, N.; Muravchik, C. H.

    2012-12-01

    We propose a new method to localize electrical conductivity changes in the human head using Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT). In EIT, a localized conductivity change produces a change in the electric potential distribution which is equivalent to a potential generated by a dipole at the same location. We propose to estimate the location of conductivity changes with the same techniques used to solve the Electroencephalography source localization problem. In particular, we show an adaptation of the Linear Constrain Minimum Variance Beamforming technique to perform this estimation. We simulate a localized 10% conductivity change in a realistic model of the human head to apply the method. Results show that depending on the noise level, the method can accurately localize the conductivity change.

  17. Computerized tomography in acute and chronic pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Kalmar, J.A.; Matthews, C.C.; Bishop, L.A.

    1984-11-01

    Modern imaging techniques have revolutionized the diagnostic evaluation of pancreatitis, primarily demonstrating its complications. Computerized tomography (CT) is a more sensitive method than ultrasonography and pancreatic ductography. A chart review revealed 214 patients at our hospital with a discharge diagnosis of pancreatitis. Sixty patients had CT for evaluation of possible complications. Only five scans were normal. Of 37 cases of acute pancreatitis, 92% demonstrated localized or diffuse enlargement, and 65% showed loss of pancreatic outline. Other frequent findings included thickening of perirenal fascia (49%), ileus (43%), edema of mesentery (35%), and inflammatory exudate (32%). Abscess and pseudocyst were each detected in 8% of cases. In chronic pancreatitis 65% of patients showed localized or diffuse pancreatic enlargement. Atrophy of the gland (30%), calcification (30%), pseudocyst (26%), and dilated pancreatic ducts (17%) were also seen. CT is effective in evaluating pancreatitis and its complications. 14 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  18. Optical Coherence Tomography Velocimetry with Complex Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malm, A.; Waigh, T. A.; Jaradat, S.; Tomlin, R.

    2015-04-01

    We present recent results obtained with an Optical Coherence Tomography Velocimetry technique. An optical interferometer measures the velocity of a sheared fluid at specific depths of the sample using the coherence length of the light source. The technique allows the dynamics of 3 pico liter volumes to be probed inside opaque complex fluids. In a study of opaque starch suspensions, classical bulk rheology experiments show non-linear shear thickening, whereas observations of the velocity profiles as a function of distance across the gap show Newtonian behavior. The ability of the technique to measure velocity fluctuations is also discussed for the case of polyacrylamide samples which were observed to display shear banding behavior. A relationship between the viscoelasticity of the sample and the size of the apparent fluctuations is observed.

  19. Cone-beam computed tomography: An inevitable investigation in cleidocranial dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nandita S; Gogri, Ajas A; Kajale, Manasi M; Kadam, Sonali G

    2015-01-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia is a heritable skeletal dysplasia and one of the most common features of this syndrome is multiple impacted supernumerary teeth. Cone-beam computed tomography, the most recent advancement in maxillofacial imaging, provides the clinician to view the morphology of the skull and the dentition in all three dimensions and help in treatment planning for the patient. PMID:26097368

  20. The Neural Correlates of Driving Performance Identified Using Positron Emission Tomography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horikawa, E.; Okamura, N.; Tashiro, M.; Sakurada, Y.; Maruyama, M.; Arai, H.; Yamaguchi, K.; Sasaki, H.; Yanai, K.; Itoh, M.

    2005-01-01

    Driving is a complex behavior involving multiple cognitive domains. To identify neural correlates of driving performance, [^1^5O]H"2O positron emission tomography was performed using a simulated driving task. Compared with the resting condition, simulated driving increased regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the cerebellum, occipital, and…

  1. Photoacoustic tomography of vascular compliance in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hai, Pengfei; Zhou, Yong; Liang, Jinyang; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-12-01

    Characterization of blood vessel elastic properties can help in detecting thrombosis and preventing life-threatening conditions such as acute myocardial infarction or stroke. Vascular elastic photoacoustic tomography (VE-PAT) is proposed to measure blood vessel compliance in humans. Implemented on a linear-array-based photoacoustic computed tomography system, VE-PAT can quantify blood vessel compliance changes due to simulated thrombosis and occlusion. The feasibility of the VE-PAT system was first demonstrated by measuring the strains under uniaxial loading in perfused blood vessel phantoms and quantifying their compliance changes due to the simulated thrombosis. The VE-PAT system detected a decrease in the compliances of blood vessel phantoms with simulated thrombosis, which was validated by a standard compression test. The VE-PAT system was then applied to assess blood vessel compliance in a human subject. Experimental results showed a decrease in compliance when an occlusion occurred downstream from the measurement point in the blood vessels, demonstrating VE-PAT's potential for clinical thrombosis detection.

  2. Atom probe tomography (APT) of carbonate minerals.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Huerta, Alberto; Laiginhas, Fernando; Reinhard, David A; Prosa, Ty J; Martens, Rich L

    2016-01-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) combines the highest spatial resolution with chemical data at atomic scale for the analysis of materials. For geological specimens, the process of field evaporation and molecular ion formation and interpretation is not yet entirely understood. The objective of this study is to determine the best conditions for the preparation and analysis by APT of carbonate minerals, of great importance in the interpretation of geological processes, focusing on the bulk chemical composition. Results show that the complexity of the mass spectrum is different for calcite and dolomite and relates to dissimilarities in crystalochemical parameters. In addition, APT bulk chemistry of calcite closely matches the expected stoichiometry but fails to provide accurate atomic percentages for elements in dolomite under the experimental conditions evaluated in this work. For both calcite and dolomite, APT underestimates the amount of oxygen based on their chemical formula, whereas it is able to detect small percentages of elemental substitutions in crystal lattices. Overall, our results demonstrate that APT of carbonate minerals is possible, but further optimization of the experimental parameters are required to improve the use of atom probe tomography for the correct interpretation of mineral geochemistry. PMID:26519815

  3. Estimation of linear functionals in emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Kuruc, A.

    1995-08-01

    In emission tomography, the spatial distribution of a radioactive tracer is estimated from a finite sample of externally-detected photons. We present an algorithm-independent theory of statistical accuracy attainable in emission tomography that makes minimal assumptions about the underlying image. Let f denote the tracer density as a function of position (i.e., f is the image being estimated). We consider the problem of estimating the linear functional {Phi}(f) {triple_bond} {integral}{phi}(x)f(x) dx, where {phi} is a smooth function, from n independent observations identically distributed according to the Radon transform of f. Assuming only that f is bounded above and below away from 0, we construct statistically efficient estimators for {Phi}(f). By definition, the variance of the efficient estimator is a best-possible lower bound (depending on and f) on the variance of unbiased estimators of {Phi}(f). Our results show that, in general, the efficient estimator will have a smaller variance than the standard estimator based on the filtered-backprojection reconstruction algorithm. The improvement in performance is obtained by exploiting the range properties of the Radon transform.

  4. Gate-set tomography and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blume-Kohout, Robin

    Four years ago, there was no reliable way to characterize and debug quantum gates. Process tomography required perfectly pre-calibrated gates, while randomized benchmarking only yielded an overall error rate. Gate-set tomography (GST) emerged around 2012-13 in several variants (most notably at IBM; see PRA 87, 062119) to address this need, providing complete and calibration-free characterization of gates. At Sandia, we have pushed the capabilities of GST well beyond these initial goals. In this talk, I'll demonstrate our open web interface, show how we characterize gates with accuracy at the Heisenberg limit, discuss how we put error bars on the results, and present experimental GST estimates with 1e-5 error bars. I'll also present preliminary results of GST on 2-qubit gates, including a brief survey of the tricks we use to make it possible. I'll conclude with an analysis of GST's limitations (e.g., it scales poorly), and the techniques under development for characterizing and debugging larger (3+ qubit) systems.

  5. Design and characterization of a small muon tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Woo Jin; An, Su Jung; Kim, Hyun-Il; Lee, Chae Young; Chung, Heejun; Chung, Yong Hyun

    2015-02-01

    Muon tomography is a useful method for monitoring special nuclear materials (SNMs) because it can provide effective information on the presence of high-Z materials, has a high enough energy to deeply penetrate large amounts of shielding, and does not lead to any health risks and danger above background. We developed a 2-D muon detector and designed a muon tomography system employing four detector modules. Two top and two bottom detectors are, respectively, employed to record the incident and the scattered muon trajectories. The detector module for the muon tomography system consists of a plastic scintillator, wavelength-shifting (WLS) fiber arrays placed orthogonally on the top and the bottom of the scintillator, and a position-sensitive photomultiplier (PSPMT). The WLS fiber arrays absorb light photons emitted by the plastic scintillator and re-emit green lights guided to the PSPMT. The light distribution among the WLS fiber arrays determines the position of the muon interaction; consequently, 3-D tomographic images can be obtained by extracting the crossing points of the individual muon trajectories by using a point-of-closest-approach algorithm. The goal of this study is to optimize the design parameters of a muon tomography system by using the Geant4 code and to experimentally evaluate the performance of the prototype detector. Images obtained by the prototype detector with a 420-nm laser light source showed good agreement with the simulation results. This indicates that the proposed detector is feasible for use in a muon tomography system and can be used to verify the Z-discrimination capability of the muon tomography system.

  6. Rare case of isolated splenic metastases from gastric cancer detected with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai Karuppusamy; Sivanesan, Balasubramanian; Shibu, Deepu; Shinto, Ajit Sugunan

    2013-01-01

    We report a rare case of isolated splenic metastasis from gastric cancer detected with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). A 55-year-old man with gastric cancer 1 year post surgery, evaluated with PET/CT showed focal, intense uptake in the spleen, with no other abnormal findings. On splenectomy, the lesion was confirmed as metastasis from gastric cancer pathologically. PMID:24163522

  7. Performance of MCAO on the E-ELT using the Fractal Iterative Method for fast atmospheric tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallon, Michel; Béchet, Clémentine; Tallon-Bosc, Isabelle; Le Louarn, Miska; Thiébaut, Éric; Clare, Richard; Marchetti, Enrico

    2011-09-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) on Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs) must overcome the difficulty of solving a huge number of equations in real time, especially when atmospheric tomography is involved. This is particularly the case for multi-conjugate or multi-objects AO systems. The Fractal Iterative Method (FrIM) has been introduced as a fast iterative algorithm for minimum variance wavefront reconstruction and control on ELTs. In particular, it includes an accurate fast computation of turbulence priors by using the so-called fractal operator. We present the first results obtained with FrIM in closed-loop in the context of atmospheric tomography. The method has been tested on Octopus, the end-to-end AO simulator at ESO, by considering MAORY, the multi-conjugate AO module planed for the E-ELT. This module aims at correcting a 2 arcmin field-of-view, by using 3 deformable mirrors, 6 Sodium laser guide stars, and 3 natural guide stars for low-order wavefront sensing. We show the performance obtained in different conditions and analyze the effect of some parameters of FrIM, like the weight of the priors, or the number of conjugate gradient iterations for solving the reconstruction. We show how the duration of the simulations can be shortened on such a large aperture, with the introduction of artificial vibrations in the simulation. The results are also compared to a more classical approach using matrix-vector multiplication.

  8. Characterization of pore structure and strain localization in Majella limestone by X-ray computed tomography and digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yuntao; Hall, Stephen A.; Baud, Patrick; Wong, Teng-fong

    2015-02-01

    Standard techniques for computed tomography imaging are not directly applicable to a carbonate rock because of the geometric complexity of its pore space. In this study, we first characterized the pore structure in Majella limestone with 30 per cent porosity. Microtomography data acquired on this rock was partitioned into three distinct domains: macropores, solid grains, and an intermediate domain made up of voxels of solid embedded with micropores below the resolution. A morphological analysis of the microtomography images shows that in Majella limestone both the solid and intermediate domains are interconnected in a manner similar to that reported previously in a less porous limestone. We however show that the macroporosity in Majella limestone is fundamentally different, in that it has a percolative backbone which may contribute significantly to its permeability. We then applied for the first time 3-D-volumetric digital image correlation (DIC) to characterize the mode of mechanical failure in this limestone. Samples were triaxially deformed over a wide range of confining pressures. Tomography imaging was performed on these samples before and after deformation. Inelastic compaction was observed at all tested pressures associated with both brittle and ductile behaviors. Our DIC analysis reveals the structure of compacting shear bands in Majella limestone deformed in the transitional regime. It also indicates an increase of geometric complexity with increasing confinement-from a planar shear band, to a curvilinear band, and ultimately to a diffuse multiplicity of bands, before shear localization is inhibited as the failure mode completes the transition to delocalized cataclastic flow.

  9. Thalamic neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cifelli, Alberto; Arridge, Marzena; Jezzard, Peter; Esiri, Margaret M; Palace, Jacqueline; Matthews, Paul M

    2002-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis is still regarded primarily as a disease of the white matter. However, recent evidence suggests that there may be significant involvement of gray matter. Here, we have used magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy in vivo and histopathology postmortem to estimate thalamic neuronal loss in patients with multiple sclerosis. Our results show that neuronal loss in multiple sclerosis can be substantial (30-35% reduction). We conclude that a neurodegenerative pathology may make a major contribution to the genesis of symptoms in multiple sclerosis. PMID:12402265

  10. Multiple osteochondromas

    PubMed Central

    Bovée, Judith VMG

    2008-01-01

    Multiple osteochondromas (MO) is characterised by development of two or more cartilage capped bony outgrowths (osteochondromas) of the long bones. The prevalence is estimated at 1:50,000, and it seems to be higher in males (male-to-female ratio 1.5:1). Osteochondromas develop and increase in size in the first decade of life, ceasing to grow when the growth plates close at puberty. They are pedunculated or sessile (broad base) and can vary widely in size. The number of osteochondromas may vary significantly within and between families, the mean number of locations is 15–18. The majority are asymptomatic and located in bones that develop from cartilage, especially the long bones of the extremities, predominantly around the knee. The facial bones are not affected. Osteochondromas may cause pain, functional problems and deformities, especially of the forearm, that may be reason for surgical removal. The most important complication is malignant transformation of osteochondroma towards secondary peripheral chondrosarcoma, which is estimated to occur in 0.5–5%. MO is an autosomal dominant disorder and is genetically heterogeneous. In almost 90% of MO patients germline mutations in the tumour suppressor genes EXT1 or EXT2 are found. The EXT genes encode glycosyltransferases, catalyzing heparan sulphate polymerization. The diagnosis is based on radiological and clinical documentation, supplemented with, if available, histological evaluation of osteochondromas. If the exact mutation is known antenatal diagnosis is technically possible. MO should be distinguished from metachondromatosis, dysplasia epiphysealis hemimelica and Ollier disease. Osteochondromas are benign lesions and do not affect life expectancy. Management includes removal of osteochondromas when they give complaints. Removed osteochondromas should be examined for malignant transformation towards secondary peripheral chondrosarcoma. Patients should be well instructed and regular follow-up for early detection of malignancy seems justified. For secondary peripheral chondrosarcoma, en-bloc resection of the lesion and its pseudocapsule with tumour-free margins, preferably in a bone tumour referral centre, should be performed. PMID:18271966

  11. Reconstructive tomography in gas dynamics and plasma physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikalov, Valerii Vladimirovich; Preobrazhenskii, Nikolai Georgievich

    The physics, mathematics, and principal applications of reconstructive tomography are examined with particular reference to problems in aerodynamics, gas dynamics, and plasma physics. The discussion covers fluoroscopic tomography and tomosynthesis, tomography with a priori constraints, mathematical formalisms of the linear tomography of asymmetric objects, theoretical principles of the linear tomography of two-dimensional objects, and algorithms of two-dimensional linear tomography. Some problems in three-dimensional linear tomography are also discussed.

  12. Cumulative phase delay imaging for contrast-enhanced ultrasound tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demi, Libertario; van Sloun, Ruud J. G.; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2015-11-01

    Standard dynamic-contrast enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) imaging detects and estimates ultrasound-contrast-agent (UCA) concentration based on the amplitude of the nonlinear (harmonic) components generated during ultrasound (US) propagation through UCAs. However, harmonic components generation is not specific to UCAs, as it also occurs for US propagating through tissue. Moreover, nonlinear artifacts affect standard DCE-US imaging, causing contrast to tissue ratio reduction, and resulting in possible misclassification of tissue and misinterpretation of UCA concentration. Furthermore, no contrast-specific modality exists for DCE-US tomography; in particular speed-of-sound changes due to UCAs are well within those caused by different tissue types. Recently, a new marker for UCAs has been introduced. A cumulative phase delay (CPD) between the second harmonic and fundamental component is in fact observable for US propagating through UCAs, and is absent in tissue. In this paper, tomographic US images based on CPD are for the first time presented and compared to speed-of-sound US tomography. Results show the applicability of this marker for contrast specific US imaging, with cumulative phase delay imaging (CPDI) showing superior capabilities in detecting and localizing UCA, as compared to speed-of-sound US tomography. Cavities (filled with UCA) which were down to 1 mm in diameter were clearly detectable. Moreover, CPDI is free of the above mentioned nonlinear artifacts. These results open important possibilities to DCE-US tomography, with potential applications to breast imaging for cancer localization.

  13. High resolution imaging with impulse based thermoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellnberger, Stephan; Hajiaboli, Amir; Sergiadis, George; Razansky, Daniel; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2011-07-01

    Existing imaging modalities like microwave- or radiofrequency (RF) induced thermoacoustic tomography systems show the potential for resolving structures deep inside tissue due to the high penetration properties of RF. However, one of the major drawbacks of existing thermoacoustic tomography systems with pulse modulated carrier frequency excitation is the compromise between efficient signal generation and attainable spatial resolution. In order to overcome limitations of conventional thermoacoustic imaging methods, we herein present and experimentally validate our novel approach towards high resolution thermoacoustic tomography. Instead of carrier-frequency amplification, we utilize ultrahigh-energy electromagnetic impulses at nanosecond duration with near-field energy coupling, thus maintaining thermoacoustic signal strength without compromising spatial resolution. Preliminary experiments on highly absorbing objects, consisting of copper wires with characteristic sizes of ~100 μm, reveal the resolution performance which yields 160 μm. Furthermore, benefits like its cost effectiveness, simplicity and compactness with the potential application in small animal imaging as well as human body imaging show that thermoacoustic tomography with impulse excitation is a promising imaging modality which has a broad range of applications.

  14. Vibration-based photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rui; Rajian, Justin R.; Wang, Pu; Slipchenko, Mikhail N.; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2013-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging employing molecular overtone vibration as contrast mechanism opens a new avenue for deep tissue imaging with chemical bond selectivity. Here, we demonstrate vibration-based photoacoustic tomography with an imaging depth on the centimeter scale. To provide sufficient pulse energy at the overtone transition wavelengths, we constructed a compact, barium nitrite crystal-based Raman laser for excitation of 2nd overtone of C-H bond. Using a 5-ns Nd:YAG laser as pumping source, up to 105 mJ pulse energy at 1197 nm was generated. Vibrational photoacoutic spectroscopy and tomography of phantom (polyethylene tube) immersed in whole milk was performed. With a pulse energy of 47 mJ on the milk surface, up to 2.5 cm penetration depth was reached with a signal-to-noise ratio of 12.

  15. Seismic Tomography in Sensor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, L.; Song, W.; Lees, J. M.; Xing, G.

    2012-12-01

    Tomography imaging, applied to seismology, requires a new, decentralized approach if high resolution calculations are to be performed in a sensor network configuration. The real-time data retrieval from a network of large-amount wireless seismic stations to a central server is virtually impossible due to the sheer data amount and resource limitations. In this paper, we propose and design a distributed algorithm for processing data and inverting tomography in the network, while avoiding costly data collections and centralized computations. Based on a partition of the tomographic inversion problem, the new algorithms distribute the computational burden to sensor nodes and perform real-time tomographic inversion in the network, so that we can recover a high resolution tomographic model in real-time under the constraints of network resources. Our emulation results indicate that the distributed algorithms successfully reconstruct the synthetic models, while reducing and balancing the communication and computation cost to a large extent.

  16. Multiple Masculinity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Il'inykh, S. A.

    2012-01-01

    Data from a sociological study conducted in Novosibirsk show that in this Russian population the "real man" is expected to pursue victory, risk, struggle, leadership, and success. In addition, however, there is also a natural masculinity in which there is no rigid framework of the image of the "real man." Moreover, natural masculinity represents

  17. Multiple Masculinity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Il'inykh, S. A.

    2012-01-01

    Data from a sociological study conducted in Novosibirsk show that in this Russian population the "real man" is expected to pursue victory, risk, struggle, leadership, and success. In addition, however, there is also a natural masculinity in which there is no rigid framework of the image of the "real man." Moreover, natural masculinity represents…

  18. In vivo imaging of orthotopic prostate cancer with far-red gene reporter fluorescence tomography and in vivo and ex vivo validation

    PubMed Central

    Darne, Chinmay D.; Tan, I-Chih; Wu, Grace; Wilganowski, Nathaniel; Robinson, Holly; Azhdarinia, Ali; Zhu, Banghe; Rasmussen, John C.; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Fluorescence gene reporters have recently become available for excitation at far-red wavelengths, enabling opportunities for small animal in vivo gene reporter fluorescence tomography (GRFT). We employed multiple projections of the far-red fluorescence gene reporters IFP1.4 and iRFP, excited by a point source in transillumination geometry in order to reconstruct the location of orthotopically implanted human prostate cancer (PC3), which stably expresses the reporter. Reconstruction was performed using a linear radiative-transfer-based regularization-free tomographic method. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of a radiolabeled antibody-based agent that targeted epithelial cell adhesion molecule overexpressed on PC3 cells was used to confirm in vivo GRFT results. Validation of GRFT results was also conducted from ex vivo fluorescence imaging of resected prostate tumor. In addition, in mice with large primary prostate tumors, a combination of GRFT and PET showed that the radiolabeled antibody did not penetrate the tumor, consistent with known tumor transport limitations of large (∼150  kDa) molecules. These results represent the first tomography of a living animal using far-red gene reporters. PMID:23797877

  19. Cyst-based measurements for assessing lymphangioleiomyomatosis in computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, P. Brown, M. S.; Kim, H.; Kim, H.; Goldin, J. G.; Argula, R.; Strange, C.

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: To investigate the efficacy of a new family of measurements made on individual pulmonary cysts extracted from computed tomography (CT) for assessing the severity of lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM). Methods: CT images were analyzed using thresholding to identify a cystic region of interest from chest CT of LAM patients. Individual cysts were then extracted from the cystic region by the watershed algorithm, which separates individual cysts based on subtle edges within the cystic regions. A family of measurements were then computed, which quantify the amount, distribution, and boundary appearance of the cysts. Sequential floating feature selection was used to select a small subset of features for quantification of the severity of LAM. Adjusted R{sup 2} from multiple linear regression and R{sup 2} from linear regression against measurements from spirometry were used to compare the performance of our proposed measurements with currently used density based CT measurements in the literature, namely, the relative area measure and the D measure. Results: Volumetric CT data, performed at total lung capacity and residual volume, from a total of 49 subjects enrolled in the MILES trial were used in our study. Our proposed measures had adjusted R{sup 2} ranging from 0.42 to 0.59 when regressing against the spirometry measures, with p < 0.05. For previously used density based CT measurements in the literature, the best R{sup 2} was 0.46 (for only one instance), with the majority being lower than 0.3 or p > 0.05. Conclusions: The proposed family of CT-based cyst measurements have better correlation with spirometric measures than previously used density based CT measurements. They show potential as a sensitive tool for quantitatively assessing the severity of LAM.

  20. Cranial computed tomography and MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.; Rao, K.C.V.G.

    1987-01-01

    This book appears to be a hybrid between an atlas and a text. The second edition attempts to depict the current status of both computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in neuroradiology. Although only the final chapter of the book is completely devoted to cranial MR imaging, MR images are scattered throughout various other chapters. There is coverage of the major anatomic and pathophysiologic entities. There are 17 chapters with images, tables, and diagrams.

  1. Computed tomography of projectile injuries.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, A J; Rutty, G N; Robinson, C; Morgan, B

    2008-10-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a gold standard in clinical imaging but forensic professions have been slow to embrace radiological advances. Forensic applications of CT are now exponentially expanding, replacing other imaging methods. As post-mortem cross-sectional imaging increases, radiologists will fall under increasing pressure to interpret complex forensic cases involving both living and deceased patients. This review presents a wide variety of weapon and projectile types aiding interpretation of projectile injuries both in forensic and clinical practice. PMID:18774364

  2. Computed tomography of gynecologic diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, B.H.; Moss, A.A.; Mihara, K.; Goldberg, H.I.; Glazer, G.M.

    1983-10-01

    Although computed tomography (CT) provides superb images of all areas of the body, sonography, because of its lack of ionizing radiation and its real-time and multiplanar capacities, has become the preferred initial method of evaluating the female pelvis. This has resulted in a relative paucity of information in the literature concerning CT features of benign pelvic disorders in particular and prompted the authors to review our experience with third-generation CT scanning of the uterus and ovaries.

  3. Bacterial quorum sensing inhibitors: attractive alternatives for control of infectious pathogens showing multiple drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Ashima K; Vinothkumar, Kittappa; Rajpara, Neha

    2013-04-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a bacterial communication process that depends on the bacterial population density. It involves small diffusible signaling molecules which activate the expression of myriad genes that control diverse array of functions like bioluminescence, virulence, biofilm formation, sporulation, to name a few. Since QS is responsible for virulence in the clinically relevant bacteria, inhibition of QS appears to be a promising strategy to control these pathogenic bacteria. With indiscriminate use of antibiotics, there has been an alarming increase in the number of antibiotic resistant pathogens. Antibiotics are no longer the magic bullets they were once thought to be and therefore there is a need for development of new antibiotics and/or other novel strategies to combat the infections caused by multidrug resistant organisms. Quorum sensing inhibition or quorum quenching has been pursued as one of such novel strategies. While antibiotics kill or slow down the growth of bacteria, quorum sensing inhibitors (QSIs) or quorum quenchers (QQs) attenuate bacterial virulence. A large body of work on QS has been carried out in deadly pathogens like Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio fischeri, V. harveyi, Escherichia coli and V. cholerae etc to unravel the mechanisms of QS as well as identify and study QSIs. This review describes various aspects of QS, QSI, different model systems to study these phenomena and recent patents on various QSIs. It suggests QSIs as attractive alternatives for controlling human, animal and plant pathogens and their utility in agriculture and other industries. PMID:23394143

  4. Behind the curtain of tauopathy: a show of multiple players orchestrating tau toxicity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yunpeng; Wu, Zhihao; Zhou, Bing

    2016-01-01

    tau, a microtubule-associated protein, directly binds with microtubules to dynamically regulate the organization of cellular cytoskeletons, and is especially abundant in neurons of the central nervous system. Under disease conditions such as Pick's disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, frontotemporal dementia, parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 and Alzheimer's disease, tau proteins can self-assemble to paired helical filaments progressing to neurofibrillary tangles. In these diseases, collectively referred to as "tauopathies", alterations of diverse tau modifications including phosphorylation, metal ion binding, glycosylation, as well as structural changes of tau proteins have all been observed, indicating the complexity and variability of factors in the regulation of tau toxicity. Here, we review our current knowledge and hypotheses from relevant studies on tau toxicity, emphasizing the roles of phosphorylations, metal ions, folding and clearance control underlining tau etiology and their regulations. A summary of clinical efforts and associated findings of drug candidates under development is also presented. It is hoped that a more comprehensive understanding of tau regulation will provide us with a better blueprint of tau networking in neuronal cells and offer hints for the design of more efficient strategies to tackle tau-related diseases in the future. PMID:26403791

  5. Correlated cryogenic photoactivated localization microscopy and cryo-electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi-Wei; Chen, Songye; Tocheva, Elitza I; Treuner-Lange, Anke; Lbach, Stephanie; Sgaard-Andersen, Lotte; Jensen, Grant J

    2014-07-01

    Cryo-electron tomography (CET) produces three-dimensional images of cells in a near-native state at macromolecular resolution, but identifying structures of interest can be challenging. Here we describe a correlated cryo-PALM (photoactivated localization microscopy)-CET method for localizing objects within cryo-tomograms to beyond the diffraction limit of the light microscope. Using cryo-PALM-CET, we identified multiple and new conformations of the dynamic type VI secretion system in the crowded interior of Myxococcus xanthus. PMID:24813625

  6. X-ray Multimodal Tomography Using Speckle-Vector Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berujon, Sebastien; Ziegler, Eric

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate computerized tomography (CT) reconstructions from absorption, phase, and dark-field signals obtained from scans acquired when the x-ray probe light is modulated with speckle. Two different interlaced schemes are proposed to reduce the number of sample exposures. First, the already demonstrated x-ray speckle-vector tracking (XSVT) concept for projection imaging allows the three signal CT reconstructions from multiple images per projection. Second, a modified XSVT approach is shown to provide absorption and phase reconstructions, this time from a single image per angular projection. Reconstructions from data obtained at a synchrotron facility emphasize the potential of the approaches for the imaging of complex samples.

  7. One step geometrical calibration method for optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Díaz, Jesús; Stritzel, Jenny; Rahlves, Maik; Majdani, Omid; Reithmeier, Eduard; Ortmaier, Tobias; Roth, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel one-step calibration methodology for geometrical distortion correction for optical coherence tomography (OCT). A calibration standard especially designed for OCT is introduced, which consists of an array of inverse pyramidal structures. The use of multiple landmarks situated on four different height levels on the pyramids allow performing a 3D geometrical calibration. The calibration procedure itself is based on a parametric model of the OCT beam propagation. It is validated by experimental results and enables the reduction of systematic errors by more than one order of magnitude. In future, our results can improve OCT image reconstruction and interpretation for medical applications such as real time monitoring of surgery.

  8. Review of Terahertz Tomography Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillet, J. P.; Recur, B.; Frederique, L.; Bousquet, B.; Canioni, L.; Manek-Hnninger, I.; Desbarats, P.; Mounaix, P.

    2014-04-01

    Terahertz and millimeter waves penetrate various dielectric materials, including plastics, ceramics, crystals, and concrete, allowing terahertz transmission and reflection images to be considered as a new imaging tool complementary to X-Ray or Infrared. Terahertz imaging is a well-established technique in various laboratory and industrial applications. However, these images are often two-dimensional. Three-dimensional, transmission-mode imaging is limited to thin samples, due to the absorption of the sample accumulated in the propagation direction. A tomographic imaging procedure can be used to acquire and to render three-dimensional images in the terahertz frequency range, as in the optical, infrared or X-ray regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. In this paper, after a brief introduction to two dimensional millimeter waves and terahertz imaging we establish the principles of tomography for Terahertz Computed tomography (CT), tomosynthesis (TS), synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and time-of-flight (TOF) terahertz tomography. For each technique, we present advantages, drawbacks and limitations for imaging the internal structure of an object.

  9. Inherent Limitations of Hydraulic Tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohling, G.C.; Butler, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    We offer a cautionary note in response to an increasing level of enthusiasm regarding high-resolution aquifer characterization with hydraulic tomography. We use synthetic examples based on two recent field experiments to demonstrate that a high degree of nonuniqueness remains in estimates of hydraulic parameter fields even when those estimates are based on simultaneous analysis of a number of carefully controlled hydraulic tests. We must, therefore, be careful not to oversell the technique to the community of practicing hydrogeologists, promising a degree of accuracy and resolution that, in many settings, will remain unattainable, regardless of the amount of effort invested in the field investigation. No practically feasible amount of hydraulic tomography data will ever remove the need to regularize or bias the inverse problem in some fashion in order to obtain a unique solution. Thus, along with improving the resolution of hydraulic tomography techniques, we must also strive to couple those techniques with procedures for experimental design and uncertainty assessment and with other more cost-effective field methods, such as geophysical surveying and, in unconsolidated formations, direct-push profiling, in order to develop methods for subsurface characterization with the resolution and accuracy needed for practical field applications. Copyright ?? 2010 The Author(s). Journal compilation ?? 2010 National Ground Water Association.

  10. High-Resolution Imaging of San Andreas Fault at Parkfield, California, Using Seismic Velocity and Anisotropy Tomography and Seismic Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Thurber, C.; Liu, Y.; Roecker, S.; Lu, R.; Toksoz, N.

    2004-12-01

    We characterized the detailed structure of the San Andreas fault zone at multiple scales using an extensive dataset collected around the SAFOD site from our long-term deployments of PASSCAL and USArray seismic instruments, and the USGS Northern California and UC Berkeley HRSN networks, SAFOD borehole logs, borehole seismometers, and several active-source projects. A suite of techniques are employed to better constrain the internal structure of the fault zone, including seismic travel-time tomography, shear-wave splitting tomography and seismic interferometry. Adaptive-mesh double-difference tomography is used to derive high-resolution Vp and Vs models around the fault zone with the waveform cross-correlation derived differential times. Knowing three-dimensional (3-D) Vp/Vs variations is helpful to have a more complete characterization of the mechanical properties and geological identity of fault zone materials. Vp/Vs variations are reliably determined by the inversion of S-P time differences constructed only from similar P and S ray paths. Our velocity models show the high-velocity granitic rocks on the southwest side of the fault, a complex low-velocity zone beneath and southwest of the surface fault trace, and an extensive low-velocity zone overlying deeper bedrock on the northeast side. We systematically analyzed shear wave splitting for seismic data observed at PASO and UC Berkeley HRSN networks. Although polarization direction of the fast shear wave and the delay time show substantial scatter for different events observed at a common station, there are spatially consistent patterns when projecting them to various depths along corresponding ray paths, derived from a 3-D shear velocity model. We developed a 3-D shear-wave splitting tomography method to image the spatial anisotropy distribution by back projecting shear wave splitting delay times along ray paths. The anisotropy percentage model shows strong heterogeneities, consistent with the strong spatial variations in both measured delay times and fast polarization directions. The fault zone is highly anisotropic down to a depth of ~4 km and then becomes less anisotropic at greater depths. Seismic interferometry means the process of generating new seismic responses by cross-correlating seismic observations at different receiver locations. Based on the principle of seismic interferometry and reciprocity, we created pseudo shot profiles as if a shot was excited at one earthquake location and observed by a set of receivers at other earthquake locations. Preliminary results show that several reflectors may exist inside the fault zone.

  11. High-Resolution Imaging of San Andreas Fault at Parkfield, California, Using Seismic Velocity and Anisotropy Tomography and Seismic Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Thurber, C.; Liu, Y.; Roecker, S.; Lu, R.; Toksoz, N.

    2007-12-01

    We characterized the detailed structure of the San Andreas fault zone at multiple scales using an extensive dataset collected around the SAFOD site from our long-term deployments of PASSCAL and USArray seismic instruments, and the USGS Northern California and UC Berkeley HRSN networks, SAFOD borehole logs, borehole seismometers, and several active-source projects. A suite of techniques are employed to better constrain the internal structure of the fault zone, including seismic travel-time tomography, shear-wave splitting tomography and seismic interferometry. Adaptive-mesh double-difference tomography is used to derive high-resolution Vp and Vs models around the fault zone with the waveform cross-correlation derived differential times. Knowing three-dimensional (3-D) Vp/Vs variations is helpful to have a more complete characterization of the mechanical properties and geological identity of fault zone materials. Vp/Vs variations are reliably determined by the inversion of S-P time differences constructed only from similar P and S ray paths. Our velocity models show the high-velocity granitic rocks on the southwest side of the fault, a complex low-velocity zone beneath and southwest of the surface fault trace, and an extensive low-velocity zone overlying deeper bedrock on the northeast side. We systematically analyzed shear wave splitting for seismic data observed at PASO and UC Berkeley HRSN networks. Although polarization direction of the fast shear wave and the delay time show substantial scatter for different events observed at a common station, there are spatially consistent patterns when projecting them to various depths along corresponding ray paths, derived from a 3-D shear velocity model. We developed a 3-D shear-wave splitting tomography method to image the spatial anisotropy distribution by back projecting shear wave splitting delay times along ray paths. The anisotropy percentage model shows strong heterogeneities, consistent with the strong spatial variations in both measured delay times and fast polarization directions. The fault zone is highly anisotropic down to a depth of ~4 km and then becomes less anisotropic at greater depths. Seismic interferometry means the process of generating new seismic responses by cross-correlating seismic observations at different receiver locations. Based on the principle of seismic interferometry and reciprocity, we created pseudo shot profiles as if a shot was excited at one earthquake location and observed by a set of receivers at other earthquake locations. Preliminary results show that several reflectors may exist inside the fault zone.

  12. EPiK-a Workflow for Electron Tomography in Kepler*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianwu; Crawl, Daniel; Phan, Sébastien; Lawrence, Albert; Ellisman, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Scientific workflows integrate data and computing interfaces as configurable, semi-automatic graphs to solve a scientific problem. Kepler is such a software system for designing, executing, reusing, evolving, archiving and sharing scientific workflows. Electron tomography (ET) enables high-resolution views of complex cellular structures, such as cytoskeletons, organelles, viruses and chromosomes. Imaging investigations produce large datasets. For instance, in Electron Tomography, the size of a 16 fold image tilt series is about 65 Gigabytes with each projection image including 4096 by 4096 pixels. When we use serial sections or montage technique for large field ET, the dataset will be even larger. For higher resolution images with multiple tilt series, the data size may be in terabyte range. Demands of mass data processing and complex algorithms require the integration of diverse codes into flexible software structures. This paper describes a workflow for Electron Tomography Programs in Kepler (EPiK). This EPiK workflow embeds the tracking process of IMOD, and realizes the main algorithms including filtered backprojection (FBP) from TxBR and iterative reconstruction methods. We have tested the three dimensional (3D) reconstruction process using EPiK on ET data. EPiK can be a potential toolkit for biology researchers with the advantage of logical viewing, easy handling, convenient sharing and future extensibility. PMID:25621086

  13. Adjoint tomography of Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, H.; Bozdag, E.; Peter, D. B.; Tromp, J.

    2011-12-01

    We use spectral-element and adjoint methods to iteratively resolve crustal and upper mantle heterogeneity in Europe, using 159 earthquakes, with magnitudes from 5 to 6.5, and data from 338 stations. Crustal model EPcrust1.0 (Molinari& Morelli, 2010) combined with mantle model S362ANI (Kustowski et al. 2008) comprise the initial 3D model M00. Before the iterative inversion, earthquake source parameters (i.e, centroid moment tensor and location), are recalculated using 3D Green's functions and Fréchet derivatives. Since we concentrate on upper mantle structures, involving significant anisotropy in the asthenosphere, transversely isotropic (frequency-dependent) traveltime sensitivity kernels are employed in the inversion. Long-period surface waves (25 s -- 150 s) and short-period body waves (15 s -- 40 s) are combined to constrain shallow and deep structures simultaneously. With each iteration, higher frequency signals are incorporated in the inversion. Statistical assessments of traveltime anomalies and logarithmic waveform differences enable us to validate the inverted sources and structural parameters. Our current model, M15, shows numerous interesting features, for instance, slabs underneath the Hellenic, Vrancea and Calabria arcs, a slab detachment underneath the Central Apennines, mantle upwelling associated with the Eifel hotspot in Northern German, slow wavespeed structures in several back-arc basins, e.g., the Ponnonian basin and the Tyrrhenian sea, and a sharp transition of the Teisseyre-Tornquist suture zone between central Europe and the East European platform.

  14. Reconstruction of apparent orthotropic conductivity tensor image using magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Kim, Ji Eun; Jeong, Woo Chul; Kim, Hyung Joong; Woo, Eung Je; Kwon, Oh In

    2015-03-14

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography visualizes current density and/or conductivity distributions inside an electrically conductive object. Injecting currents into the imaging object along at least two different directions, induced magnetic flux density data can be measured using a magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Without rotating the object inside the scanner, we can measure only one component of the magnetic flux density denoted as B{sub z}. Since the biological tissues such as skeletal muscle and brain white matter show strong anisotropic properties, the reconstruction of anisotropic conductivity tensor is indispensable for the accurate observations in the biological systems. In this paper, we propose a direct method to reconstruct an axial apparent orthotropic conductivity tensor by using multiple B{sub z} data subject to multiple injection currents. To investigate the anisotropic conductivity properties, we first recover the internal current density from the measured B{sub z} data. From the recovered internal current density and the curl-free condition of the electric field, we derive an over-determined matrix system for determining the internal absolute orthotropic conductivity tensor. The over-determined matrix system is designed to use a combination of two loops around each pixel. Numerical simulations and phantom experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm stably determines the orthotropic conductivity tensor.

  15. Motion clustering for deblurring multispectral optoacoustic tomography images of the mouse heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taruttis, Adrian; Claussen, Jing; Razansky, Daniel; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac imaging in small animals is a valuable tool in basic biological research and drug discovery for cardiovascular disease. Multispectral optoacoustic tomography (MSOT) represents an emerging imaging modality capable of visualizing specific tissue chromophores at high resolution and deep in tissues in vivo by separating their spectral signatures. Whereas single-wavelength images can be acquired by multielement ultrasound detection in real-time imaging, using multiple wavelengths at separate times can lead to image blurring due to motion during acquisition. Therefore, MSOT imaging of the heart results in degraded resolution because of the heartbeat. In this work, we applied a clustering algorithm, k-means, to automatically separate a sequence of single-pulse images at multiple excitation wavelengths into clusters corresponding to different stages of the cardiac cycle. We then performed spectral unmixing on each cluster to obtain images of tissue intrinsic chromophores at different cardiac stages, showing reduced sensitivity to motion compared to signal averaging without clustering. We found that myocardium images of improved resolution and contrast can be achieved using MSOT motion clustering correction. The correction method presented could be generally applied to other MSOT imaging applications prone to motion artifacts, for example, by respiration and heartbeat.

  16. Reconstruction of apparent orthotropic conductivity tensor image using magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Kim, Ji Eun; Jeong, Woo Chul; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography visualizes current density and/or conductivity distributions inside an electrically conductive object. Injecting currents into the imaging object along at least two different directions, induced magnetic flux density data can be measured using a magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Without rotating the object inside the scanner, we can measure only one component of the magnetic flux density denoted as Bz. Since the biological tissues such as skeletal muscle and brain white matter show strong anisotropic properties, the reconstruction of anisotropic conductivity tensor is indispensable for the accurate observations in the biological systems. In this paper, we propose a direct method to reconstruct an axial apparent orthotropic conductivity tensor by using multiple Bz data subject to multiple injection currents. To investigate the anisotropic conductivity properties, we first recover the internal current density from the measured Bz data. From the recovered internal current density and the curl-free condition of the electric field, we derive an over-determined matrix system for determining the internal absolute orthotropic conductivity tensor. The over-determined matrix system is designed to use a combination of two loops around each pixel. Numerical simulations and phantom experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm stably determines the orthotropic conductivity tensor.

  17. Imaging modal content of cone photoreceptors using adaptive optics optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhuolin; Kocaoglu, Omer P.; Turner, Timothy L.; Miller, Donald T.

    2015-03-01

    It has been long established that photoreceptors capture light based on the principles of optical waveguiding. Yet after decades of experimental and theoretical investigations considerable uncertainty remains, even for the most basic prediction as to whether photoreceptors support more than a single waveguide mode. To test for modal behavior in human cone photoreceptors, we took advantage of adaptive-optics optical coherence tomography (AO-OCT, λc=785 nm) to noninvasively image in three dimensions the reflectance profiles generated in the inner and outer segments (IS, OS) of cones. Mode content was examined over a range of cone diameters by imaging cones from 0.6° to 10° retinal eccentricity (n = 1802). Fundamental to the method was extraction of reflections at the cone IS/OS junction and cone outer segment tip (COST). Modal content properties of size, circularity and orientation were quantified using second moment analysis. Analysis of the cone reflections indicates waveguide properties of cone IS and OS depend on segment diameter. Cone IS was found to support a single mode near the fovea (<=3°) and multiple modes further away (<4°). In contrast, no evidence of multiple modes was found in the cone OSs. The IS/OS and COST reflections share a common optical aperture, are most circular near the fovea, and show no orientation preference.

  18. Single particle tomography in EMAN2.

    PubMed

    Galaz-Montoya, Jesús G; Flanagan, John; Schmid, Michael F; Ludtke, Steven J

    2015-06-01

    Single particle tomography (SPT or subtomogram averaging) offers a powerful alternative to traditional 2-D single particle reconstruction for studying conformationally or compositionally heterogeneous macromolecules. It can also provide direct observation (without labeling or staining) of complexes inside cells at nanometer resolution. The development of computational methods and tools for SPT remains an area of active research. Here we present the EMAN2.1 SPT toolbox, which offers a full SPT processing pipeline, from particle picking to post-alignment analysis of subtomogram averages, automating most steps. Different algorithm combinations can be applied at each step, providing versatility and allowing for procedural cross-testing and specimen-specific strategies. Alignment methods include all-vs-all, binary tree, iterative single-model refinement, multiple-model refinement, and self-symmetry alignment. An efficient angular search, Graphic Processing Unit (GPU) acceleration and both threaded and distributed parallelism are provided to speed up processing. Finally, automated simulations, per particle reconstruction of subtiltseries, and per-particle Contrast Transfer Function (CTF) correction have been implemented. Processing examples using both real and simulated data are shown for several structures. PMID:25956334

  19. Finite Quantum Tomography and Semidefinite Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaee, M.; Rezaee, M.; Jafarizadeh, M. A.

    2007-06-01

    Using the convex semidefinite programming method and superoperator formalism we obtain the finite quantum tomography of some mixed quantum states such as: truncated coherent states tomography, phase tomography and coherent spin state tomography, qudit tomography, N-qubit tomography, where that obtained results are in agreement with those of References (Buzek et al., Chaos, Solitons and Fractals 10 (1999) 981; Schack and Caves, Separable states of N quantum bits. In: Proceedings of the X. International Symposium on Theoretical Electrical Engineering, 73. W. Mathis and T. Schindler, eds. Otto-von-Guericke University of Magdeburg, Germany (1999); Pegg and Barnett Physical Review A 39 (1989) 1665; Barnett and Pegg Journal of Modern Optics 36 (1989) 7; St. Weigert Acta Physica Slov. 4 (1999) 613).

  20. Electrical resistance tomography of concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, W.; Ramirez, A.; Binley, A.; Henry-Poulter, S.

    1993-10-01

    The purpose of this work is to determine the feasibility of using Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) to nondestructively examine the interior of concrete structures such as bridge pillars and roadways. We report the results of experiments wherein ERT is used to image the two concrete specimens in the laboratory. Each specimen is 5 inches square and 12 inches long and contained steel reinforcing rods along its length. Twenty electrodes were placed on each sample and an-image of electrical resistivity distribution was generated from current and voltage measurements. We found that the images show the general location of the reinforcing steel and, what`s more important, delineate the absence of the steel. The method may therefore be useful for determining if such steel has been destroyed by corrosion, however to make it useful, the technique must have better resolution so that individual reinforcing steel units are resolved.

  1. [The ureters: findings at multidetector computed tomography].

    PubMed

    López Amaya, J E; Mejía Restrepo, J; Nicolau Molina, C; Zuluaga Santamaría, A; Mazzaro, M

    2010-01-01

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and advances in CT urography techniques have enabled vast improvements in the depiction of the ureter. Studies of the ureter can find a wide variety of conditions including congenital defects and anatomic variants (anomalies in the origin, distribution, and distal insertion of the ureter) as well as all benign and malignant causes of focal and diffuse wall thickening (inflammatory and infectious processes, and neoplasms, as well as iatrogenic thickening and postsurgical changes). Other benign processes like ureteral kinking and stenosis due to extrinsic compression of the iliac vessels are also well characterized by MDCT. The aim of this article is to show the spectrum of ureteral variants and disease apart from common entities related to stones. PMID:20627329

  2. Optical coherence tomography examination of hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Wei; Huang, Zheng; Xu, Jianshu; Yang, Hongqin; Li, Hui; Xie, Shusen

    2014-09-01

    Human hair is a keratinous tissue composed mostly of flexible keratin, which can form a complex architecture consisting of distinct compartments or units (e.g. hair bulb, inner root sheath, shaft). Variations in hair shaft morphology can reflect ethnical diversity, but may also indicate internal diseases, nutritional deficiency, or hair and scalp disorders. Hair shaft abnormalities in cross section and diameter, as well as ultramorphological characterization and follicle shapes, might be visualized non-invasively by high-speed 2D and 3D optical coherence tomography (OCT). In this study, swept source OCT (ThorLabs) was used to examine human hair. Preliminary results showed that the high-speed OCT was a suitable and promising tool for non-invasive analysis of hair conditions.

  3. Mouse brain imaging using photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Yang; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-03-01

    Photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) provides structural and functional information when used in small animal brain imaging. Acoustic distortion caused by bone structures largely limits the deep brain image quality. In our work, we present ex vivo PACT images of freshly excised mouse brain, intending that can serve as a gold standard for future PACT in vivo studies on small animal brain imaging. Our results show that structures such as the striatum, hippocampus, ventricles, and cerebellum can be clearly di erentiated. An artery feature called the Circle of Willis, located at the bottom of the brain, can also be seen. These results indicate that if acoustic distortion can be accurately accounted for, PACT should be able to image the entire mouse brain with rich structural information.

  4. Computed tomography in intracranial supratentorial osteochondroma

    SciTech Connect

    Matz, S.; Israeli, Y.; Shalit, M.N.; Cohen, M.L.

    1981-02-01

    A case of a huge intracranial frontoparietal osteochondroma in a 20-year-old man is reported. The presenting symptoms were headache, vomiting, and blurred vision. Apart from papilledema, no other abnormal neurological signs were present. A specific preoperative diagnosis could not be reached from the information provided by plain skull films, angiography, and radionuclide scan. The findings on computed tomography were those of a high density mass interspersed with small foci of lower densities, producing a honeycomb appearance, and surrounded by deposits of nodular calcification. The postcontrast scan showed a moderate degree of enhancement with preservation of the precontrast honeycomb pattern. These particular features may enable a correct preoperative histological diagnosis to be offered with a high degree of probability.

  5. Gate Set Tomography on two qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Erik; Blume-Kohout, Robin; Gamble, John; Rudinger, Kenneth

    Gate set tomography (GST) is a method for characterizing quantum gates that does not require pre-calibrated operations, and has been used to both certify and improve the operation of single qubits. We analyze the performance of GST applied to a simulated two-qubit system, and show that Heisenberg scaling is achieved in this case. We present a GST analysis of preliminary two-qubit experimental data, and draw comparisons with the simulated data case. Finally, we will discuss recent theoretical developments that have improved the efficiency of GST estimation procedures, and which are particularly beneficial when characterizing two qubit systems. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  6. Experimental Drug for Rheumatoid Arthritis Shows Promise

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_158076.html Experimental Drug for Rheumatoid Arthritis Shows Promise Baricitinib helped patients who failed other ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental drug to treat rheumatoid arthritis showed promise in a new six-month trial. ...

  7. Ultrasonic guided wave tomography for ice detection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiang; Rose, Joseph L

    2016-04-01

    Of great concern for many structures, particularly critical sections of rotary and fixed wing aircrafts, is the ability to detect ice either on grounded or in-flight vehicles. As a consequence, some work is reported here that could be useful for a variety of different industries where ice formation is an important problem. This paper presents experimental validations of a probability-based reconstruction algorithm (PRA) on ice detection of plate-like structures. The ice detection tests are performed for three different specimens: a single layer aluminum plate with a circular ice sensing array, a titanium plate with a sparse rectangular ice sensing array, and a carbon-fiber-reinforced titanium plate with an embedded ice sensing array mounted on a carbon fiber back plate. Cases from the simple to the more challenging exemplify that special modes can be used to differentiate ice from water, a sparse rectangular array could also be used for ice detection, and an ice sensing array could be further used to detect the ice on the sensor free side, a very useful application of ice sensing for aircraft wings, for example. Ice detection images for the respective cases are reconstructed to investigate the feasibility of ice sensing with ultrasonic guided wave tomography technology. The results show that the PRA based ultrasonic guided wave tomography method successfully detected and showed ice spots correctly for all three cases. This corroborates the fact that ultrasonic guided wave imaging technology could be a potential useful ice sensing tool in plate-like structures. PMID:26746159

  8. Broadband frequency-domain near-infrared spectral tomography using a mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia; Jiang, Shudong; Paulsen, Keith D.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2009-01-01

    Frequency-domain near-infrared (NIR) diffuse spectral tomography with a mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser is presented, providing tunable multiwavelength quantitative spectroscopy with maximal power for thick tissue imaging. The system was developed to show that intrinsically high stability can be achieved with many wavelengths in the NIR range, using a mode-locked signal of 80 MHz with heterodyned lock-in detection. The effect of cumulative noise from multiple wavelengths of data on the reconstruction process was studied, and it was shown that inclusion of more wavelengths can reduce skew in the noise distribution. This normalization of the data variance then minimizes errors in estimation of chromophore concentrations. Simulations and tissue phantom experiments were used to quantify this improvement in image accuracy for recovery of tissue hemoglobin and oxygen saturation. PMID:19340109

  9. Three-dimensional holographic reconstruction from computational tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yan; Cao, Liangcai; Zhang, Hao; He, Qingsheng; Jin, Guofan

    2014-11-01

    An angular spectrum holographic algorithm is proposed for generating three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction from multiple computational tomography (CT) slices. Objects consist of multiple slices can be easily modeled by the angular spectrum. So the 3D structure can be built through the superposition of computer generated phase holograms originally from parallel discrete planes at different depths. Then the superposed phase hologram is uploaded to the phase-only spatial light modulator (SLM). With the SLM illuminated by the coherent light, the 3D reconstruction is observed by a camera. The proposed method is more computationally efficient compared with the point source algorithm, and the angular spectrum holographic algorithm can process more large-capacity CT data for the 3D visualization. Experiment demonstrates the feasibility of reconstructing CT biological structure with holographic display.

  10. Are the 18F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography findings in bronchopulmonary carcinoid tumors different than expected?

    PubMed

    Alpay, Levent; Lacin, Tunc; Kanbur, Serda; Kiral, Hakan; Ersoz, Elcin; Bayram, Serkan; Dogruyol, Talha; Baysungur, Volkan; Yalcinkaya, Irfan

    2013-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary carcinoid tumors (BPCT) are known as low malignity tumors. Different surgical methods are therapeutically used, ranging from simple excision of the mass to large regional resections. Also, the role of positron emission tomography in the diagnosis and staging of BPCT is controversial as false negative results has been reported in literature. Our aim was to study the diagnostic value of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) and the therapeutic effect of specific surgical treatment on BPCT. We studied retrospectively from 2005 to 2011 75 cases of BPCT. Preoperative investigations included computerized tomography (CT), bronchoscopy and 18F-FDG PET. Statistical comparisons were performed based on tumor type, extent of the resection and the standardized uptake value (SUV). Fifty six cases were typical, 15 atypical and 4 oncocytic (a subtype of typical carcinoid). Of these patients, 27 (17 with typical, 8 with atypical and 2 with oncocytic carcinoid) had undergone a 18F-FDG PET scan. Operatory mortality was 0%, while the 7 years survival rate amounted to 97.5%. No recurrences were seen. Mean SUV was 5.28 for typical and 5.08 for atypical BPCT. The oncocytic type exhibited a particularly high SUV. In conclusion, our study, contrary to the findings of others, showed that the 18F-FDG uptake of BPCT was similar to that of malignant diseases. Aggressive surgical treatment resulted in a very good prognosis for these carcinoid tumors. PMID:24251310

  11. Diffuse optical tomography guided quantitative fluorescence molecular tomography.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yiyong; Jiang, Huabei

    2008-04-20

    We describe a method that combines fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) with diffuse optical tomography (DOT), which allows us to study the impact of heterogeneous optical property distribution on FMT, an issue that has not been systemically studied. Both numerical simulations and phantom experiments were performed based on our finite-element reconstruction algorithms. The experiments were conducted using a noncontact optical fiber free, multiangle transmission system. In both the simulations and experiments, a fluorescent target was embedded in an optically heterogeneous background medium. The simulation results clearly suggest the necessity of considering the absorption coefficient (mu(a)) and reduced scattering coefficient (mu'(s)) distributions for quantitatively accurate FMT, especially in terms of the accuracy of reconstructed fluorophore absorption coefficient (mu(a(x-->m))). Subsequent phantom experiments with an indocyanine green (ICG)-containing target confirm the simulation findings. In addition, we performed a series of phantom experiments with low ICG concentration (0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6 and 1.0 microM) in the target to systematically evaluate the quantitative accuracy of our FMT approach. The results indicate that, with the knowledge of optical property distribution, the accuracy of the recovered fluorophore concentration is improved significantly over that without such a priori information. In particular absolute value of mu(a(x-->m) ) from our DOT guided FMT are quantitatively consistent with that obtained using spectroscopic methods. PMID:18425173

  12. Multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Rühl, Geraldine; Niedl, Anna G.; Patronov, Atanas; Siewert, Katherina; Pinkert, Stefan; Kalemanov, Maria; Friese, Manuel A.; Attfield, Kathrine E.; Antes, Iris; Hohlfeld, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify target antigens presented by human leukocyte antigen (HLA)–A*02:01 to the myelin-reactive human T-cell receptor (TCR) 2D1, which was originally isolated from a CD8+ T-cell clone recognizing proteolipid protein (PLP) in the context of HLA-A*03:01, we employed a new antigen search technology. Methods: We used our recently developed antigen search technology that employs plasmid-encoded combinatorial peptide libraries and a highly sensitive single cell detection system to identify endogenous candidate peptides of mice and human origin. We validated candidate antigens by independent T-cell assays using synthetic peptides and refolded HLA:peptide complexes. A molecular model of HLA-A*02:01:peptide complexes was obtained by molecular dynamics simulations. Results: We identified one peptide from glycerolphosphatidylcholine phosphodiesterase 1, which is identical in mice and humans and originates from a protein that is expressed in many cell types. When bound to HLA-A*02:01, this peptide cross-stimulates the PLP-reactive HLA-A3-restricted TCR 2D1. Investigation of molecular details revealed that the peptide length plays a crucial role in its capacity to bind HLA-A*02:01 and to activate TCR 2D1. Molecular modeling illustrated the 3D structures of activating HLA:peptide complexes. Conclusions: Our results show that our antigen search technology allows us to identify new candidate antigens of a presumably pathogenic, autoreactive, human CD8+ T-cell-derived TCR. They further illustrate how this TCR, which recognizes a myelin peptide bound to HLA-A*03:01, may cross-react with an unrelated peptide presented by the protective HLA class I allele HLA-A*02:01. PMID:27231714

  13. Observation of the pulp horn by swept source optical coherence tomography and cone beam computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iino, Yoshiko; Yoshioka, Toshihiko; Hanada, Takahiro; Ebihara, Arata; Sunakawa, Mitsuhiro; Sumi, Yasunori; Suda, Hideaki

    2015-02-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is one of the most useful diagnostic techniques in dentistry but it involves ionizing radiation, while swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) has been introduced recently as a nondestructive, real-time, high resolution imaging technique using low-coherence interferometry, which involves no ionizing radiation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of SS-OCT to detect the pulp horn (PH) in comparison with that of CBCT. Ten extracted human mandibular molars were used. After horizontally removing a half of the tooth crown, the distance from the cut dentin surface to PH was measured using microfocus computed tomography (Micro CT) (SL) as the gold standard, by CBCT (CL) and by SS-OCT (OL). In the SS-OCT images, only when PH was observed beneath the overlying dentin, the distance from the cut dentin surface to PH was recorded. If the pulp was exposed, it was defined as pulp exposure (PE). The results obtained by the above three methods were statistically analyzed by Spearman's rank correlation coefficient at a significance level of p < 0.01. SS-OCT detected the presence of PH when the distance from the cut dentin surface to PH determined by SL was 2.33 mm or less. Strong correlations of the measured values were found between SL and CL (r=0.87), SL and OL (r=0.96), and CL and OL (r=0.86). The results showed that SS-OCT images correlated closely with CBCT images, suggesting that SS-OCT can be a useful tool for the detection of PH.

  14. Tomography of spatial mode detectors.

    PubMed

    Bobrov, I B; Kovlakov, E V; Markov, A A; Straupe, S S; Kulik, S P

    2015-01-26

    Transformation and detection of photons in higher-order spatial modes usually requires complicated holographic techniques. Detectors based on spatial holograms suffer from non-idealities and should be carefully calibrated. We report a novel method for analyzing the quality of projective measurements in spatial mode basis inspired by quantum detector tomography. It allows us to calibrate the detector response using only gaussian beams. We experimentally investigate the inherent inaccuracy of the existing methods of mode transformation and provide a full statistical reconstruction of the POVM (positive operator valued measure) elements for holographic spatial mode detectors. PMID:25835824

  15. Continuous wave ultrasonic Doppler tomography

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Haidong-Dong; Tsui, Chun Sing Louis; Halliwell, Michael; Wells, Peter N. T.

    2011-01-01

    In continuous wave ultrasonic Doppler tomography (DT), the ultrasonic beam moves relative to the scanned object to acquire Doppler-shifted frequency spectra which correspond to cross-range projections of the scattering and reflecting structures within the object. The relative motion can be circular or linear. These data are then backprojected to reconstruct the two-dimensional image of the object cross section. By using coherent processing, the spatial resolution of ultrasonic DT is close to an order of magnitude better than that of traditional pulse-echo imaging at the same ultrasound frequency. PMID:22866236

  16. Trichinosis diagnosed by computed tomography.

    PubMed Central

    Kreel, L.; Poon, W. S.; Nainby-Luxmoore, J. C.

    1988-01-01

    Trichinosis is a worldwide disease contained by good husbandry and culinary practice, presenting unexpectedly in individual cases or mini-epidemics. The disease varies greatly in its manifestation and severity although when marked can be recognized by fever with myositis and periorbital oedema. Antibody tests are specific but the appearance on computed tomography of the brain are sufficiently characteristic to allow a confident diagnosis. Two cases where such appearances led to the diagnosis are reported. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:3249711

  17. NEUTRON IMAGING, RADIOGRAPHY AND TOMOGRAPHY.

    SciTech Connect

    SMITH,G.C.

    2002-03-01

    Neutrons are an invaluable probe in a wide range of scientific, medical and commercial endeavors. Many of these applications require the recording of an image of the neutron signal, either in one-dimension or in two-dimensions. We summarize the reactions of neutrons with the most important elements that are used for their detection. A description is then given of the major techniques used in neutron imaging, with emphasis on the detection media and position readout principle. Important characteristics such as position resolution, linearity, counting rate capability and sensitivity to gamma-background are discussed. Finally, the application of a subset of these instruments in radiology and tomography is described.

  18. Computed tomography of stress fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Murcia, M.; Brennan, R.E.; Edeiken, J.

    1982-06-01

    An athletic young female developed gradual onset of pain in the right leg. Plain radiographs demonstrated solid periosteal reaction in the tibia compatible with stress fracture. She stopped sport activites but her pain continued. Follow-up radiographs of the tibia revealed changes suspicious for osteoid osteoma. Computed tomography (CT) scan demonstrated periosteal reaction, but in addition, lucent fracture lines in the tibial cortex were evident. CT obviated the need for more invasive diagnostic procedures in this patient. In selected cases CT may be useful to confirm the diagnosis of stress fracture when plain radiographic or routine tomographic studies are not diagnostic.

  19. Computed tomography of facial fractures.

    PubMed

    Furlow, Bryant

    2014-01-01

    Facial skeletal fractures are common, potentially serious, and frequently associated with other life-threatening conditions, such as traumatic brain injuries. Facial fractures can be simple or complex and sometimes involve serious complications. Computed tomography has revolutionized the rapid and precise assessment of craniofacial and neck fractures in patients with severe facial trauma. This article introduces readers to the epidemiology, skeletal anatomy and biomechanics, complications, and diagnostic imaging of facial fractures. In addition, this article describes efforts to develop and validate a quantitative scoring system for facial fracture severity and reviews treatment strategies for facial skeletal fractures. PMID:24806070

  20. X-ray computerized tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Wellington, S.L.; Vinegar, H.J.

    1987-08-01

    Computerized tomography (CT) is a new radiological imaging technique that measures density and atomic composition inside opaque objects. A revolutionary advance in medical radiology since 1972, CT has only recently been applied in petrophysics and reservoir engineering. This paper discusses several petrophysical applications, including three-dimensional (3D) measurement of density and porosity; rock mechanics studies; correlation of core logs with well logs; characterization of mud invasion, fractures, and disturbed core; and quantification of complex mineralogies and sand/shale ratios. Reservoir engineering applications presented include fundamental studies of CO/sub 2/ displacement in cores, focussing on viscous fingering, gravity segregation, miscibility, and mobility control.