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Sample records for trachytes

  1. Trace-element partitioning in pantellerites and trachytes

    SciTech Connect

    Mahood, G.A.; Stimac, J.A. )

    1990-08-01

    In order to investigate the effect of increasing melt peralkalinity on partitioning, partition coefficients have been determined using neutron activation analyses of coexisting phenocrysts and glass of five samples from Pantelleria spanning the range trachyte to pantellerite. Alkali feldspar partition coefficients for Fe, Rb, Ba, Sr, and Eu vary with melt peralkalinity due to changes in melt polymerization and to the systematic increase in X{sub or} and decrease in X{sub an} of the feldspar. In going from trachyte to pantellerite, Fe partition coefficients increase from 0.04 to 0.10, presumably because Fe{sup +3} increasingly substitutes in the feldspar tetrahedral site as melt activity of Al declines and Fe concentrations increase. Partition coefficients for trivalent light REEs (rare earth elements) decrease and the partitioning pattern becomes flatter, the most evolved samples having some of the lowest published values for feldspar. The hundredfold decline in Eu partition coefficients (2.5 to 0.024) and the decrease in the size of the positive partitioning anomaly are attributed to increasing Eu{sup 3+}/Eu{sup 2+} in the melt as it becomes more peralkaline, as well as to concomitant decrease in the Ca content of feldspar. As a result, the behavior of Eu during fractional crystallization of peralkaline suites is fundamentally different from that in metaluminous suites; absolute abundances rise and the size of the negative Eu anomaly changes little with fractionation beyond pantelleritic trachyte.

  2. Mixing Experiments with Natural Shoshonitic and Trachytic Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Campos, C. P.; Perugini, D.; Kolzenburg, S.; Petrelli, M.; Dorfman, A.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2010-12-01

    Evidence of cyclic replenishment of the shallow magmatic reservoir with deeper alkali basaltic (shoshonitic) magma (Campi Flegrei, in Italy; e.g. Arienzo et al., 2008, Bull. Volc.) motivated this study. Based on previous isotopic data, Agnano-Monte Spina trachyte and Minopoli shoshonite have been chosen as the most suitable end-member melts for simulating magma mixing in this system. Results from different mixing experiments with natural volcanic samples from this region will be presented. For this purpose time series using two different techniques have been performed: 1) a high-temperature centrifuge and 2) a viscometer. For the centrifuge experiments the rotating speed was 1850 revolutions per minute and the acceleration 1000 g. This way, dynamic conditions closer to those calculated for magma chambers (Reynolds Numbers [Re] around 100) could be simulated. For every experiment, a 4 mm thick disk of previously homogenized crystal free shoshonitic glass and an 8 mm thick disk of homogenized crystal free trachytic glass were loaded in a 5mm diameter Pt capsule. The capsule was then sealed on both sides, but for a small opening on the upper end, allowing intersticial degassing during the acceleration. Samples were arranged in a buoyantly unstable geometry, where the denser material is placed at the inner side of the rotating circle (basaltic trachyandesite, ρ=2.63 g/cm3 at 1169° C) and the lighter material at the external side (trachyte, ρ=2.45 g/cm3 at ~1000°C). Temperature has been kept constant at 1,200° during all experimental runs, with a negligible thermal gradient (<1°C). Forced convection was applied via centrifugal acceleration and density instabilities. Results from three experimental runs with the centrifuge: after 5, 20 and 120 min will be presented and discussed. The second set of experiments consisted of two runs (25- and 168-hours duration) under Taylor-Couette flow, according to De Campos et al. (2008, Chem. Geol.). Higher amounts of the same end-members, in different proportions, have been mixed together using a concentric cylinder viscometer. For the 2nd set of experiments forced convection has been simulated by stirring with a spindle. Experimental conditions were constrained by: 1) constant angular velocity (0.5 rotations per minute) and 2) constant temperature (1,300°C). The experiments terminated by stopping all movement, extracting the spindle from the sample and letting the sample cool to room temperature. Cylinders of the resultant mixed glasses were recovered by drilling and, prepared for microprobe analysis. Microprobe and ICP-MS analyses along longitudinal lines from sections of all the resulting products reveal a complex non-linear mixing process with different mobility for different elements. Chemical data from both experiments (with the centrifuge and the viscometer) will be discussed in a comparative way. Our results highlight the importance of chaotic dynamics for the efficiency of the mixing process in silicate melts.

  3. Severe leaching of trachytic glass without devitrification, Terceira, Azores

    SciTech Connect

    Mungall, J.E.; Martin, R.F. )

    1994-01-01

    Pumice produced during the subplinian phase of eruption of a peralkaline trachyte lava on the island of Terceira, Azores, has undergone extensive leaching at ambient conditions by groundwater, while remaining in a glassy state. Over 25% of F, Na, K, Si, Fe, Ti, and Mn originally present has been removed, whereas U, Al, Nb, Ca, Y, and Rb show smaller but significant losses. Thorium , Zr, Hf, Ta, and Lu have remained immobile. Water content (measured as LOI) has increased up to tenfold, whereas the Sr content has risen by up to 80%. The absence of devitrification requires that leached elements escaped by diffusing through the glass; a coefficient of chemical diffusion D[sub Na] between 1.8 X 10[sup [minus]19] cm[sup 2] s[sup [minus]1] and 6.1 X 10[sup [minus]19] cm[sup 2] s[sup [minus]1] has been calculated, in excellent agreement with previously published experimentally derived values for comparably low temperatures. Water has not replaced the leached cations on a charge-equivalent basis, a finding that requires an explanation other than simple binary interdiffusion. The authors suggest that a simultaneous influx of molecular water and cation exchange between Na[sup +] in the glass and H[sup +] in the groundwater opens the glass structure and frees cations, which can diffuse outward by hydrolysis of bridging oxygen atoms. Reported mobilities have important implications for such diverse fields as igneous petrology, nuclear waste management, and agriculture.

  4. Petrogenesis of basalt-trachyte lavas from Olmoti Crater, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollel, Godwin F.; Swisher, Carl C., III; McHenry, Lindsay J.; Feigenson, Mark D.; Carr, Michael J.

    2009-08-01

    Olmoti Crater is part of the Plio-Pleistocene Ngorongoro Volcanic Highland (NVH) in northern Tanzania to the south of Gregory Rift. The Gregory Rift is part of the eastern branch of the East African Rift System (EARS) that stretches some 4000 km from the Read Sea and Gulf of Aden in the north to the Zambezi River in Mozambique. Here, we (1) characterize the chemistry and mineral compositions of lavas from Olmoti Crater, (2) determine the age and duration of Olmoti volcanic activity through 40Ar/ 39Ar dating of Olmoti Crater wall lavas and (3) determine the genesis of Olmoti lavas and the relationship to other NVH and EARS volcanics and (4) their correlation with volcanics in the Olduvai and Laetoli stratigraphic sequences. Olmoti lavas collected from the lower part of the exposed crater wall section (OLS) range from basalt to trachyandesite whereas the upper part of the section (OUS) is trachytic. Petrography and major and trace element data reflect a very low degree partial melt origin for the Olmoti lavas, presumably of peridotite, followed by extensive fractionation. The 87Sr/ 86Sr data overlap whereas Nd and Pb isotope data are distinct between OLS and OUS samples. Interpretation of the isotope data suggests mixing of enriched mantle (EM I) with high-μ-like reservoirs, consistent with the model of Bell and Blenkinsop [Bell, K., Blenkinsop, J., 1987. Nd and Sr isotopic compositions of East African carbonatites: implications for mantle heterogeneity. Geology 5, 99-102] for East African carbonatite lavas. The isotope ratios are within the range of values defined by Oceanic Island Basalt (OIB) globally and moderate normalized Tb/Yb ratios (2.3-1.6) in these lavas suggest melting in the lithospheric mantle consistent with other studies in the region. 40Ar/ 39Ar incremental-heating analyses of matrix and anorthoclase separates from Olmoti OLS and OUS lavas indicate that volcanic activity was short in duration, lasting ˜200 kyr from 2.01 ± 0.03 Ma to 1.80 ± 0.01 Ma. The age of Olmoti activity overlaps with ages reported for Ngorongoro Caldera, implying contemporaneous activity of multiple NVH volcanic centers during part of the eruption interval. Olmoti is considered the source for the bulk of interbedded volcanics and volcaniclastic deposits that comprise much of the upper Bed I section of nearby Olduvai Gorge, and part of the Laetoli sequence, both known for their well preserved fossils and archaeological remains. Age and chemical data reported here are compatible with those derived from tephra and lava interbedded in Bed I at Olduvai Gorge and from the Olpiro Beds at Laetoli.

  5. Open system evolution of trachyte and phonolite magmas from the East Africa Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, E. Y.; Espejel, V.

    2011-12-01

    The Quaternary Suswa volcanic system consists of a large shield volcano that developed two nested summit calderas and erupted metaluminous to peralkaline trachyte and phonolite lavas and tuffs. Suswa is adjacent to the Greater Olkaria Volcanic Center, Longonot, Eburru, and Menengai volcanic systems, which erupted trachyte, comendite, and pantellerite. These volcanoes comprise the Central Kenya Peralkaline Province and are the site of active geothermal energy production and exploration. Mafic to intermediate lavas (Elementieta, Ndabibi, and Lolonito-Akira-Tandamara volcanic fields) lie in the rift floor between the shield volcanoes and occur as components of mixed magmas within the complexes. Suswa includes two suites of trachyte-phonolite lavas and tuffs. The first suite (C1) consists of lavas that built the original shield volcano and lavas and tuffs related to the formation of the first caldera; the second suite (C2) consists of lavas and tuffs erupted during and after the formation of the second caldera. Trachyte-carbonate immiscibility has been recorded in C1 ash flow units. The lavas and tuffs of the C2 suite are generally less peralkaline and more silica undersaturated than those of the C1 suite and did not share a common parental magma. Geochemical modeling precludes fractional crystallization as the sole process for Suswa magmas. Instead, assimilation of syenitic material (probably the crystal mush left over from C1 fractional crystallization), resorption, and mixing between the mafic to intermediate lavas satellite to the shield volcanoes have contributed to the composition and eruptive style of these volcanoes.

  6. Geology and the origin of trachytes and pantellerites from the Eburru volcanic field, Kenya Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velador, J. M.; Omenda, P. A.; Anthony, E. Y.

    2002-12-01

    The Eburru volcanic field is located in the Kenya Rift, where it is part of the very young axial volcanic activity. The Eburru field belongs to the complex of volcanoes -- Menegai, Eburru, Olkaria, Longonot, and Suswa -- that are centered on the Kenya Dome. All of these volcanoes are prime targets for geothermal energy, with Kenya's one geothermal plant at Olkaria.. Correlation with dated volcanism implies that the activity at Eburru is at most approximately 500,000 years. The surfaces preserved on the youngest flows suggest that they erupted within the last 1,000 years. Mapping indicates that the volcanic field is divided into an older western section, composed of pantellerites (Er1) and overlying, faulted trachytes (Et1), and a younger eastern section. The eastern section has a mapable ring structure, and is composed of trachytes (Et2) and pantellerites (Er2). Some of these flows may be contemporaneous, but the final phase of eruption is exclusively pantellerite. We have chemical data for all units except the older pantellerites. The data indicate that the trachytes and rhyolites are both pantelleritic in terms of their alumina and iron contents. This is in contradistinction to the rhyolites immediately adjacent at Olkaria, which are comenditic. Concentrations for all elements are highly elevated, except for Ba, Sr, K, P, and Ti that show deep negative anomalies. The relationship between the trachytes (Et2) and pantellerites (Er2) is one in which the pantellerites consistently have the highest concentrations in all elements, including those with negative anomalies. Correlation coefficients for pairs such as Zr and Rb support the field evidence for the western Et1 trachytes being a separate magmatic event from the Et2 and Er2 units of the eastern field. Sanidine is the principal phenocrystic phase in these rocks, and thus the elevated Sr and Ba in the pantellerites preclude simple crystal fractionation to derive pantellerite from trachyte. Bailey and Macdonald (1975, Min. Mag. 40, 405-414) reached the same conclusion and noted high correlation coefficients among F, Zr, and Rb on one hand and Cl, Nb, and Y as a second group. They argued that a halogen-bearing vapor is important to the genesis of the pantellerites. We have verified the same elemental correlations for our data set. Lowenstern (1994, Amer. Min. 79, 353-369) documented immiscible halide fluids in fluid inclusions from the type locality Pantelleria, Italy. This direct observation of halide lends credence to the importance of fluids in peralkaline rhyolites. We are currently examining fluid inclusions from the Eburru samples for similar evidence of a complex volatile phase.

  7. Open System evolution of peralkaline trachyte and phonolite from the Suswa volcano, Kenya rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, John Charles; Espejel-García, Vanessa V.; Anthony, Elizabeth Y.; Omenda, Peter

    2012-11-01

    Suswa is the southernmost volcanic center in the Central Kenya Peralkaline Province (CKPP) and represents the only salic center to have erupted significant volumes of peralkaline silica-undersaturated lavas and tuffs (trachyte, nepheline trachyte and phonolite). The eruptive products of Suswa can be clearly divided into two series, which correspond closely to the volcano's eruptive history. The earlier series (C1) includes lavas and tuffs that built the initial shield volcano (pre-caldera, unit S1) and erupted during the first caldera collapse (syn-caldera, units S2-S5); these rocks are dominated by peralkaline, silica-saturated to mildly under-saturated trachyte. The later series (C2) includes lavas and tuffs that erupted within the caldera structure following the initial collapse (post-caldera, units S6-S7) and during the creation of a second smaller, nested caldera and central "island block" (ring trench group, RTG, unit S8); these rocks are dominated by peralkaline phonolite. In this study, we combine mineralogical evidence with the results of major-element, trace-element, and thermodynamic modelling to propose a complex model for the origin of the Suswa volcano. From these results we conclude that C1 is the result of protracted fractional crystallization of a fairly "dry" alkali basalt (< 1 wt.% H2O) under relatively high pressure (400 MPa) and low oxygen fugacity (FMQ to FMQ-1). Although C1 appears to be primarily the result of closed system processes, a variety of open system processes are responsible for C2. We propose that crystallization of C1 trachyte resulted in the formation of a syenitic residue, which was assimilated (Ma/Mc = 0.1) during a later stage of recharge and differentiation of alkali basalt to produce post-caldera ne-trachyte. Post-caldera (S6-7) phonolites were in turn the result of fractional crystallization of this ne-trachyte. RTG phonolites, however, are the result of feldspar resorption prompted perhaps by magma recharge as evidenced by reverse zoning in alkali feldspar and linear compatible trace element patterns.

  8. Assessment for the use of waste of trachyte in the brick production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coletti, Chiara; Cultrone, Giuseppe; Maritan, Lara; Mazzoli, Claudio

    2015-04-01

    The preliminary results of the potential advantage of incorporating wastes from a quarry's trachyte, as temper in brick production is the main aim of this work. Three different mixtures elaborated by adding 5, 10 and 15 wt. % of trachyte were studied. Each mix was fired in a electric oven at the temperatures of 900, 1000 and 1100 °C. The influence of the waste addition was investigated under micro and meso-scale and considering several aspects in order to define aesthetic, mineralogical and physical features of fired samples. The microstructure of the samples was evaluated by X-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The main phases identified were quartz, plagioclase, K-feldspar, biotite, hematite and diopside. Colorimetric study highlighted changes on the chromatic appearance depending on the trachyte contents and the firing temperatures reached. Hydric parameters (UNI EN 772-7, 1998) showed a decreasing absorption behaviour and an overall poor interconnection of pores for samples with the highest content of trachyte (15%). The values of open porosity determined by hydric test were comprised between 35 and 38% and decreased with increasing the firing temperature and the trachyte content. Mercury intrusion porosimetry showed the pore size distribution in the range comprised between 0.001-100 µm. The results of total open porosity obtained (from 19 to 38%) were quite similar to those measured by hydric tests. Physical-mechanical properties and structural anisotropy were checked combining the uniaxial compressive strength (DT) and the ultrasound velocity test (NDT). A rather closed concordance between these techniques was observed when comparing the average values of mechanical stress and the propagation velocities of ultrasound waves. Finally, freeze-thaw (UNI EN 12371) and salt crystallization tests (UNI EN 12370) carried out on bricks proved their high resistance to decay under stressed environmental conditions. The results of the present investigation contribute to understand the possibilities of recycling waste of trachyte to obtain new brick types and satisfying the necessity of saving energy, reducing the production costs and preserving the shortage of raw materials. Acknowledgements: This study was financially supported by Research Group RNM179 of the Junta de Andalucía and by the Research Project MAT2012-34473

  9. Geomagnetic field intensity determination from Pleistocene trachytic lava flows in Jeju Geopark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Doohee; Yu, Yongjae; Liu, Qingsong; Jiang, Zhaoxia; Koh, Gi Won; Koh, Dong-Chan

    2014-03-01

    A composite of 28 trachytic lava flows were recovered from the Jeju Geopark Drilling Project (JGDP) in Jeju Geopark, one of the new seven wonders of Nature declared by UNESCO in 2011. Each trachytic lava flow has a tendency to increase in magnetic grain size from the rapidly cooled brecciated margin and vesicle streaked zone downward into the massive crystalline flow interiors. The brecciated margin and vesicle streaked zone of individual trachytic lava flow contains exclusively fine-grained magnetite as inclusions in plagioclase. High-fidelity paleointensity determinations were obtained from 26 (out of 224 examined) samples from JGDP cores. Temporal variation of virtual axial dipole moments (VADMs) calculated from the absolute paleointensity estimates follows the trend of sint-800 data for the interval from ˜80 to ˜360 ka. High VADM from flow 21 possibly represents real intensity peak, as previously recognized high VADM in Japan at ˜336 ka, in Trans-Mexican volcanism ˜339, and in Hawaii ˜340-350 ka. Perhaps such a strong magnetic intensity near ˜325-350 ka might be smoothed out in relative paleointensity records.

  10. Origin of xenoliths in the trachyte at Puu Waawaa, Hualalai Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, D.A.; Bohrson, W.A.

    1991-01-01

    Rare dunite and 2-pyroxene gabbro xenoliths occur in banded trachyte at Puu Waawaa on Hualalai Volcano, Hawaii. Mineral compositions suggest that these xenoliths formed as cumulates of tholeiitic basalt at shallow depth in a subcaldera magma reservoir. Subsequently, the minerals in the xenoliths underwent subsolidus reequilibration that particularly affected chromite compositions by decreasing their Mg numbers. In addition, olivine lost CaO and plagioclase lost MgO and Fe2O3 during subsolidus reequilibration. The xenoliths also reacted with the host trachyte to form secondary mica, amphibole, and orthopyroxene, and to further modify the compositions of some olivine, clinopyroxene, and spinel grains. The reaction products indicate that the host trachyte melt was hydrous. Clinopyroxene in one dunite sample and olivine in most dunite samples have undergone partial melting, apparently in response to addition of water to the xenolith. These xenoliths do not contain CO2 fluid inclusions, so common in xenoliths from other localities on Hualalai, which suggests that CO2 was introduced from alkalic basalt magma between the time CO2-inclusion-free xenoliths erupted at 106??6 ka and the time CO2-inclusion-rich xenoliths erupted within the last 15 ka. ?? 1991 Springer-Verlag.

  11. Discovery of a trachyte ignimbrite sequence at Hualālai, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, Thomas; Owen, Jacqueline

    2016-05-01

    Ignimbrites are common in many intraplate ocean islands but have been missing from the known geological record in Hawaii. During a recent field campaign, the remnants of a trachytic ignimbrite sequence have been discovered at Hualālai volcano, fortuitously preserved from subsequent basaltic lava flow cover. We provide a preliminary description of these deposits, as well as bulk and glass chemical analyses to determine their potential relationship with other nearby trachytes from Pu'u Wa'awa'a (PWW) and Pu'u Anahulu (PA). The results suggest that these ignimbrites are from neither PWW nor PA, but instead may relate to trachytes that are found as maar wallrock blocks some 20 km distant. Therefore, despite being rare overall in Hawaii, the ignimbrites—and more generally trachytes—were probably widespread around Hualālai. Compared to other intraplate ocean islands, the combination of a fast-moving plate, high magma supply, and eruption rates underneath Hawaiian volcanoes may explain the scarcity of ignimbrites preserved at the surface. Their presence at Hualālai could reflect unusual conditions of edifice stress during the transition from shield to post-shield volcanism.

  12. Crystallization kinetics of alkali feldspars in cooling and decompression-induced crystallization experiments in trachytic melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzilli, Fabio; Carroll, Michael R.

    2013-10-01

    Cooling and decompression experiments have been carried out on trachytic melts in order to investigate crystallization kinetics of alkali feldspar, the effect of the degree of undercooling ( ΔT = T liquidus - T experimental) and time on nucleation and crystal growth process. This experimental work gives us new data about crystallization kinetics of trachytic melts, and it that will be useful to better understand the natural system of Campi Flegrei volcanoes. Experiments have been conducted using cold seal pressure vessel apparatus, at pressure between 30 and 200 MPa, temperature between 750 and 855 °C, time between 7,200 and 57,600 s and redox condition close to the NNO +0.8 buffer. These conditions are ideal to reproducing pre- and syn-eruptive conditions of the Campi Flegrei volcanoes, where the "conditions" pertain to the complete range of pressures, temperatures and time at which the experiments were performed. Alkali feldspar is the main phase present in this trachyte, and its abundance can strongly vary with small changes in pressure, temperature and water content in the melt, implying appreciable variations in the textures and in the crystallization kinetics. The obtained results show that crystallization kinetics are strictly related to ΔT, time, final pressure, superheating (- ΔT) and water content in the melt. ΔT is the driving force of the crystallization, and it has a strong influence on nucleation and growth processes. In fact, the growth process dominates crystallization at small ΔT, whereas the nucleation dominates crystallization at large ΔT. Time also is an important variable during crystallization process, because long experiment durations involve more nucleation events of alkali feldspar than short experiment durations. This is an important aspect to understand magma evolution in the magma chamber and in the conduit, which in turn has strong effects on magma rheology.

  13. Dredged trachyte and basalt from kodiak seamount and the adjacent aleutian trench, alaska.

    PubMed

    Forbes, R B; Hoskin, C M

    1969-10-24

    Blocky fragments of aegirine-augite trachyte (with accompanying icerafted gravels.) were recovered from the upper slopes of Kodiak Seamount in several dredge hauls. An alkali basalt pillow segment was also dredged from a moatlike depression, at a depth of 5000 meters, near the west base of the seamount. These retrievals confirm the volcanic origin of Kodiak Seamount and further support the view of Engel, Engel, and Havens that the higher elevations of seamounts are composed of alkali basalts or related variants. PMID:17731907

  14. Rise and fall of a basalt-trachyte-rhyolite magma system at the Kane Springs Wash Caldera, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Steven W.; Mahood, Gail A.

    1986-11-01

    Magmas erupted at the Kane Springs Wash volcanic center record the buildup and decay of a silicic magma chamber within the upper crust between 14.1 and 13.2 Ma ago. Intrusion of a variety of mantle-derived basaltic magmas into the crust sustained the system thermally, but only alkali basalts appear to be parental. Fractionation of alkali basalt, together with 10 20% contamination by partial melts of the lower crust, generated trachyandesite magmas. Mafic trachytes, with magma temperatures of ˜1,000° C, were initially generated from trachyandesites at depths greater than 15 km. Continued fractionation combined with assimilation of upper crustal melts at a depth of 5 10 km produced more evolved trachytes and high-silica rhyolites. These silicic magmas erupted as the Kane Wash Tuff 14.1 Ma ago from a chamber zoned from fayalite-bearing alkali rhyolite near 820° C at the roof to a trachytic “dominant volume”. Initial ash flows of the Kane Wash Tuff, Member V1, are metaluminous, whereas later cooling units, Members V2 and V3, are mildly peralkaline and have higher Fe, Zr, and Hf and lower Ca, Th/Ta, Rb/ Zr, and LREE/HREE. Less than 1 % upper crustal component was involved in generation of Members V2 and V3 from trachytic magma. Eruption of ˜130 km3 of magma resulted in collapse of the Kane Springs Wash caldera. Trachytic magma from deeper levels of the system was extruded onto the caldera floor shortly afterward, forming a central trachyte/syenite complex. Replacement of this magma by hotter, more mafic magma may have induced additional melting of the already heated chamber walls, as high-silica rhyolites that erupted in the “moat” surrounding the central complex have a large crustal component. Early moat rhyolites had temperatures near 800° C and, in contrast to the Kane Wash Tuff, are ferroedenite-bearing, have higher Al, K/Na, Th/Ta, and Ba, and have lower Fe, REE, and Zr. Fractional crystallization of this magma within the cooling and crystallizing magma chamber formed biotite-bearing rhyolite in isolated pockets. The most evolved of these had temperatures near 700° C, elevated F contents, H2O contents of ˜5 wt.%, Rb> 500 ppm, chondrite-normalized LREE/HREE <1, and formed vapor-phase topaz. Declining temperatures and Cl/ F from the Kane Wash Tuff through the moat rhyolites may reflect decreasing basalt input into the base of the system and increasing proportions of upper crustal melts in the silicic magmas.

  15. Phase relations in trachytes: implication for magma storage conditions in the Chaîne des Puys (French Massif Central)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, C.; Champallier, R.; Prouteau, G.; Pichavant, M.; Arbaret, L.; Balcone-Boissard, H.; Boudon, G.; Boivin, P.; Bourdier, J. L.; Scaillet, B.

    2012-04-01

    Trachytes from the Chaîne des Puys, French Massif Central, have been studied by performing phase equilibria in order to (i) constrain the storage conditions of the trachytic magmas that lead to explosive eruptions (either dome destructions as concentrated or diluted pyroclastic density currents or highly explosive events) and (ii) provide phase relationships and compositions for differentiated alkaline magmas. Phase assemblage, proportion, and compositions have been determined on six trachytes (62-69 wt % SiO2 and 10.5-12.0 wt % alkali) mostly coming from the actual domes dated from 9.2 to 15 Ka and aligned along a 10-km distance in the Chaîne des Puys. All samples contain ~23-30 % of phenocrysts, mainly consisting of plagioclase (15-17 % and K-feldspars for the two SiO2-richest samples), biotites (2-6 % except in the SiO2-poorest sample, where it is absent), and Fe-Ti oxides (1-3 %). The three SiO2-poorest samples also contain ~2 % of amphibole and the SiO2-richest one has 1 % of clinopyroxene. All samples have apatite and zircon as minor phases and sphene for the SiO2-richest one. Glasses (melt inclusions and residual glasses) analysed in pumices resulting from highly explosive events, show trachytic to rhyolitic compositions (65-73 wt % SiO2 and 10.5-13.0 wt % alkali). Analyses of melt inclusions (EMP by-difference method) and the biotite+K-feldspar+magnetite hygrobarometer both suggest pre-eruptive H2O contents up to 7-8 wt %, which are so far the highest contents ever reported for alkaline liquids. The melt inclusions also contain ~3400 ppm chlorine, ~700 ppm fluorine, and ~300 ppm sulphur (EMP analyses). Phase equilibria of six representative trachytes have been performed between 200 and 400 MPa, 700-900°C, H2O saturation, and oxygen fugacity from NNO-1 to NNO+1. The comparison between the natural and experimental products suggests magma storage conditions at pressures of 300-350 MPa, temperatures increasing from 700 to 825°C with decreasing bulk SiO2 contents, oxygen fugacity from NNO to NNO+1, and melt H2O contents close to saturation conditions (~8 wt. %). The high H2O contents of the trachytes show that wet conditions prevail during the differentiation of continental alkaline series.

  16. Cenozoic intra-plate magmatism in the Darfur volcanic province: mantle source, phonolite-trachyte genesis and relation to other volcanic provinces in NE Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucassen, Friedrich; Pudlo, Dieter; Franz, Gerhard; Romer, Rolf L.; Dulski, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Chemical and Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic compositions of Late Cenozoic to Quaternary small-volume phonolite, trachyte and related mafic rocks from the Darfur volcanic province/NW-Sudan have been investigated. Isotope signatures indicate variable but minor crustal contributions. Some phonolitic and trachytic rocks show the same isotopic composition as their primitive mantle-derived parents, and no crustal contributions are visible in the trace element patterns of these samples. The magmatic evolution of the evolved rocks is dominated by crystal fractionation. The Si-undersaturated strongly alkaline phonolite and the Si-saturated mildly alkaline trachyte can be modelled by fractionation of basanite and basalt, respectively. The suite of basanite-basalt-phonolite-trachyte with characteristic isotope signatures from the Darfur volcanic province fits the compositional features of other Cenozoic intra-plate magmatism scattered in North and Central Africa (e.g., Tibesti, Maghreb, Cameroon line), which evolved on a lithosphere that was reworked or formed during the Neoproterozoic.

  17. Partial melting and fractionation in the Mesa Chivato alkali basalt-trachyte series, Mount Taylor Volcanic Field, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, C. M.; Schmidt, M. E.; Crumpler, L. S.; Wolff, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    Mesa Chivato comprises a series of alkaline cones, flows, and domes within the Mount Taylor Volcanic Field (MTVF) in northwest New Mexico. Compositions range from alkali basalt to trachyte. Intermediate magmas are less well represented than mafic and felsic rocks, but benmoreites and transitional benmoreite-trachytes provide a window into the differentiation processes. Major element, trace element, and isotopic data suggest that petrogenesis of benmoreite proceeded by fractional crystallization of mafic liquids and magma mixing with partially melted mafic rocks. Major element mass balance models permit the derivation of transitional benmoreite/trachyte from the benmoreite by 20-25% crystallization of microphenocryst phases (olivine, plagioclase, Ti-magnetite, and apatite) and further fractionation to trachyte by 10-15% crystallization of olivine, plagioclase and alkali feldspar, Fe-Ti oxide, and apatite. These models are supported by SiO2-Sr and -Ba systematics. However, the hawaiite to benmoreite gap cannot be crossed by fractional crystallization alone. While major element models permit the mafic lavas to yield the benmoreite, they require extensive fractionation of clinopyroxene and plagioclase - this is unsupported by petrography (clinopyroxene phenocrysts are rare in the mafic rocks and lacking in the intermediate rocks) and cannot explain the benmoreite's very high Sr contents (>1800 ppm), which would have been depleted by plagioclase fractionation. From LA-ICPMS analysis of plagioclase: 87Sr/86Sr of early alkali basalt (0.70285-0.70300) and late hawaiite (0.70406-0.70421) bracket the 87Sr/86Sr of the benmoreite (0.70361-0.70406). Thus, either could represent the fractionated liquid parental to the benmoreite and the other the partially melted source.

  18. Petrogenesis of trachyte and rhyolite magmas on Ponza Island (Italy) and its relationship to the Campanian magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelo, Paone

    2013-11-01

    Magmatism on Ponza island (Italy) has been reviewed, considering both new and literature data, and compared with the Campanian Volcanic District (CVD) rocks. Different origins have been inferred for the two main rock types (trachyte and rhyolite). The trachytes were formed by fractional crystallization (FC) processes coupled with minor upper crustal contamination from magmas similar to the least evolved magma erupted into CVD. The rhyolites formed by partial melting of a lower crust component. The two lithotypes evolved through intra-suite FC, and they are correlated with the volcanic rocks of the CVD by major element, trace element and isotope data, extending the Campanian compositional spectrum. To explain the FC and the melting processes, a tectonic model is developed in which most of the FC for the CVD occurred in the lower-intermediate crust where magma rises from the upper mantle and is stored in a process of magma accumulation and fractionation. These processes have produced enough heat to melt the crust and cause several rhyolite episodes in Ponza Island. A subduction-related setting must be inferred to explain the origin of the Ponza trachytes and rhyolites and the rest of the CVD volcanism.

  19. Extensive mixing features at 27-41 Ka postcaldera trachytes at Long Valley caldera, CA: Mixing/mingling of basalt with trachyte and mobilization of young granitic material to form kspar megacrysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagmann, I. J.; Mahood, G.

    2014-12-01

    Five small lava domes erupted at the NW margin of Long Valley caldera from 41 to 27 Ka. They range from trachyte (66% SiO2) to trachyandesite (60%), with the youngest lava being the most mafic. Mixing features are pervasive, with enclaves, kspar megacrysts, crystal clots of various grain sizes, compositions, and degrees of resorption indicating multiple episodes of mafic injection, mobilization of young granitic material, and mixing/mingling of alkali basalt with trachyte to alkali rhyolite magmas similar to those at Mammoth Mountain. Enclaves range from 49 to 57% SiO2 and form a mixing line with a felsic end member at 67% SiO2. In order to quantify the distribution of enclaves and large (1-4 cm), resorbed, kspar megacrysts, outcrop-scale point counting was performed at >200 locations on the lavas. Contour maps show that kspar content is highest at the vent, but mafic-intermediate enclaves are irregularly distributed. Fe-Ti oxide temperatures for the host trachytic magmas are 915-1080°C, with the coolest temperatures at flow termini. Enclave temperatures are similar, 950-1120°C, with cooler temperatures in more felsic enclaves that are typically located near flow termini, indicating prolonged thermal and chemical interaction with the host magma. Calculated pressures are 2-4 kbar for host magmas, but some mafic crystal clots yield pressures up to 12 kbar, near the Moho at Long Valley. The kspar megacrysts match the composition of phenocrysts in late-erupted Bishop Tuff, suggesting that the megacrysts originated from solidified equivalents of magma remaining after eruption of the Bishop Tuff at 760 Ka. These data suggest a model in which alkali basalts are generated in the uppermost mantle and, through AFC, evolve into trachytes. Repeated basaltic injections keep the trachyte hot and partially melt young granites, resulting in entrainment of kspar megacrysts. The most mafic enclaves in the NW domes match the alkali basalt compositions of the most mafic enclaves in Mono Craters Dome 12, 20 km to the north. This could indicate a shared mafic source at depth. Dome 12 is considerably more eroded than the rest of the 10- to 0.6-Ka Mono Craters, and may be about the same age as the NW domes. If so, there was a major mafic intrusion event along the N-S Mono Basin/ Mammoth Mountain trend at 27-41 Ka.

  20. Geology of Volcan Las Navajas, a pleistocene trachyte/peralkaline rhyolite volcanic center in Nayarit, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Hegre, J.A.; Nelson, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    Volcan Las Navajas, located in the northwestern portion of the Mexican Volcanic Belt has produced a sequence of volcanic rocks with compositions in marked contrast to the predominantly calc-alkaline volcanoes which predominate in this part of Mexico. The oldest exposed lavas consist of trachytes with 63% SiO/sub 2/, 6% FeO*, and 500 ppm Zr along with comenditic rhyolites with 68% SiO/sub 2/, 5% FeO*, 800 ppm Zr, and an agpaitic index of 1.0. These lavas were followed by the eruption of a comenditic ash-flow tuff and the formation of a caldera 2.7 km in diameter. This caldera was subsequently filled by eruptions of pantelleritic rhyolite obsidian lava flows with 72% SiO/sub 2/, 8% FeO*, 1100 ppm Zr, and an agpaitic index of 1.5 to 1.9. A second caldera was then formed which is offset to the south of the main eruptive vents for previous eruptions. This younger caldera has a diameter of about 4.8 km and its southern walls have been covered by calc-alkaline andesitic lavas erupted from nearby Sanganguey volcano. Volcanoclastic sediments in the floor of the younger caldera have been tilted and faulted in a manner suggestive of late stage resurgence. Subsequent eruptions within the caldera, however, have been restricted to calc-alkaline andesites. Tectonically, the area in which this volcano occurs appears to have been undergoing a crustal rifting event since the Pliocene. The occurrence of these peralkaline rocks lends further support to such a hypothesis.

  1. Cooling and crystallization recorded in trachytic enclaves hosted in pantelleritic magmas (Pantelleria, Italy): Implications for pantellerite petrogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, Patrizia; Rotolo, Silvio G.

    2015-08-01

    This study focuses on the comenditic trachyte enclaves hosted in pantelleritic lava and pumices emplaced during one of the most recent eruptive events at Pantelleria (~ 6 ka). Enclaves range from mm-sized fragments to dm-sized blocks with spheroidal to amoeboid shapes and characteristic globular surfaces; they are crystal-rich with ~ 30 vol% large anorthoclase, less abundant Fe-rich olivine, clinopyroxene and Fe-Ti oxides. Vesicles ranging from a few mm to 1-2 cm in size are distributed throughout the enclave and are commonly filled with microlite-free vesicular glass. The groundmass presents spectacular textures, including fine to coarse spherulites and hopper and skeletal microlites (mostly anorthoclase) with 10-35 vol% residual glass and 10-15 vol% small vesicles (< 50 μm to 200 μm). Residual glass has a pantelleritic composition with Na + K/Al > 2. Accordingly, the microlite composition is close to that of the host pantellerite. These textures were acquired during a magma mixing event prior to the eruption: (i) a vapor-saturated comenditic trachyte magma intruded the shallower, cooler pantellerite magma body, triggering a first degassing event (first boiling) and rapid crystallization with a high degree of undercooling (ΔT = 100-150 °C); (ii) vapor exsolution induced by rapid crystallization (second boiling) produced the microvesicular groundmass; and (iii) vapor pressure forced the residual pantelleritic liquid to migrate into the large vesicles and/or outside the enclaves. Based on this interpretation, these enclaves can be used as a natural laboratory for identifying the chemical and physical processes driving the evolution of silicic magmas at Pantelleria. In particular, they can be used to assess whether pantellerite melts can be obtained from comenditic trachytes after extensive crystallization followed by gas-driven filter-pressing and consequent (pantellerite) melt segregation.

  2. The Axum-Adwa basalt-trachyte complex: a late magmatic activity at the periphery of the Afar plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natali, C.; Beccaluva, L.; Bianchini, G.; Siena, F.

    2013-08-01

    The Axum-Adwa igneous complex consists of a basalt-trachyte (syenite) suite emplaced at the northern periphery of the Ethiopian plateau, after the paroxysmal eruption of the Oligocene (ca 30 Ma) continental flood basalts (CFB), which is related to the Afar plume activity. 40Ar/39Ar and K-Ar ages, carried out for the first time on felsic and basaltic rocks, constrain the magmatic age of the greater part of the complex around Axum to 19-15 Ma, whereas trachytic lavas from volcanic centres NE of Adwa are dated ca 27 Ma. The felsic compositions straddle the critical SiO2-saturation boundary, ranging from normative quartz trachyte lavas east of Adwa to normative (and modal) nepheline syenite subvolcanic domes (the obelisks stones of ancient axumites) around Axum. Petrogenetic modelling based on rock chemical data and phase equilibria calculations by PELE (Boudreau 1999) shows that low-pressure fractional crystallization processes, starting from mildly alkaline- and alkaline basalts comparable to those present in the complex, could generate SiO2-saturated trachytes and SiO2-undersaturated syenites, respectively, which correspond to residual liquid fractions of 17 and 10 %. The observed differentiation processes are consistent with the development of rifting events and formation of shallow magma chambers plausibly located between displaced (tilted) crustal blocks that favoured trapping of basaltic parental magmas and their fractionation to felsic differentiates. In syenitic domes, late- to post-magmatic processes are sometimes evidenced by secondary mineral associations (e.g. Bete Giorgis dome) which overprint the magmatic parageneses, and mainly induce additional nepheline and sodic pyroxene neo-crystallization. These metasomatic reactions were promoted by the circulation of Na-Cl-rich deuteric fluids (600-400 °C), as indicated by mineral and bulk rock chemical budgets as well as by δ18O analyses on mineral separates. The occurrence of this magmatism post-dating the CFB event, characterized by comparatively lower volume of more alkaline products, conforms to the progressive vanishing of the Afar plume thermal effects and the parallel decrease of the partial melting degrees of the related mantle sources. This evolution is also concomitant with the variation of the tectono-magmatic regime from regional lithospheric extension (CFB eruption) to localized rifting processes that favoured magmatic differentiation.

  3. Stratigraphy, chronology, and sedimentology of ignimbrites from the white trachytic tuff, Roccamonfina Volcano, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannetti, Bernardino; De Casa, Giancarlo

    2000-03-01

    We describe the stratigraphy, chronology, and grain size characteristics of the white trachytic tuff (WTT) of Roccamonfina Volcano (Italy). The pyroclastic rock was emplaced between 317 and 230 Ma BP during seven major eruptive events (units A to G) and three minor events (units BC, CD, and DE). These units are separated by paleosol layers and compositionally well-differentiated pyroclastic successions. Stratigraphic control is favored by the occurrence at the base of major units of marker layers. Four WTT units (1 to 4) occur within the central caldera. These are not positively correlated with specific extracaldera units. The source of most of the WTT units was the central caldera. Units B and C were controlled by the western wall of the caldera, whereas units D and E were able to overcome this barrier, spreading symmetrically along the flanks of MC. The maximum pumice size (MP) of units increases with distance from the caldera, whereas the maximum lithic size (ML) decreases. MP and ML of the marker layer of unit D (MKDa-MKDp) do not show any systematic variations with respect to the central caldera. In contrast, the thickness of surge MKDa decreases with distance from the source, and MKDp accumulates to the north of MC probably controlled, respectively, by mobility-transport power and by wind blowing northwards. The grain size characteristics of the WTT deposits are used for classifying the units. There is no systematic variation of the grain size as a function of stratigraphic height either among units or within single units. Large variation of components in subunit E1, with repetitive alternation of pyroclastic flow to surge through fallout vs. surge deposits, suggests that the process of eruption took place in a complex or piecemeal fashion. Pumice concentration zones (PCZ) occur at all WTT levels on the volcano, but they are much thicker and pumice clasts are much larger within the central caldera. These were probably originated by the disruption of lava (flow or dome) to pumice fragments and fine ash due to sudden depressurization and interaction with lake waters of the molten lava. Local basal PCZ are, in some cases, similar to the lapilli-rich "layer 1P" that has been described elsewhere, and may have been deposited from currents transitional between pyroclastic surge and flow. Other basal PCZ formed in response to small undulations in the substrate, or can be originated by fallout. Lenticular PCZ within ignimbrite interiors and tops are interpreted to record marginal pumice levees and pumice rafts, some of which were buried by subsequant pyroclastic flows. Lithic concentration zones (LCZ) also occur at various stratigraphic height within the extracaldera ignimbrites, whereas intracaldera LCZ are absent, probably due to the fact that ignimbrite currents are strongly energetic and erosive near vent. LCZ at the top of basal inversely graded layers are formed by mechanical sieving or dispersive pressure in response to variable velocity gradients and particle concentration gradients (a segregation process). Coarse LCZ and coarse lithic breccias (LB), that reside in the interior or tops of pyroclastic flows and that occur in medial to distal areas, are interpreted to be the result of slugs of lithic-rich debris introduced by vent collapse or rockslides into the moving pyroclastic flows along their flow paths. These LCZ become mixed to varying degrees due to differential densities and velocities relative to the pyroclastic flows (desegregation processes).

  4. Occurrence of fluororichterite and fluorian biotite in the In Tifar trachyte neck (Tazrouk district, Hoggar volcanic province, Sahara, Algeria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzouni-Sekkal, Abla; Bonin, Bernard; Ben El Khaznadji, Riad

    2013-09-01

    The unusual occurrence in the In Tifar trachyte neck (Tazrouk district, Hoggar volcanic province, Sahara, Algeria) of the fluorian biotite-fluororichterite association is presented. The two mineral species were previously unknown in the Hoggar and their association is uncommon worldwide. Ti-rich biotite has 28-40% OH sites occupied by fluorine, hence the use of the modifier "fluorian". Sodic-calcic fluororichterite has more than 55% OH sites filled by fluorine, hence the use of the prefix "fluoro". Well-defined F-Mg affinities are documented in both cases, while Cl remains very low. Temperatures are estimated roughly at 775-700 °C at low pressures. The fluorian biotite → fluororichterite sequence of crystallisation implies increasingly high fH2F2/fH2O ratios in metaluminous H2O-dominated evolving to peralkaline F-enriched fluids.

  5. Petrology and geochemistry of Late Holocene felsic magmas from Rungwe volcano (Tanzania), with implications for trachytic Rungwe Pumice eruption dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontijn, Karen; Elburg, Marlina A.; Nikogosian, Igor K.; van Bergen, Manfred J.; Ernst, Gerald G. J.

    2013-09-01

    Rungwe in southern Tanzania is an active volcanic centre in the East African Rift System, characterised by Plinian-style explosive eruptions of metaluminous to slightly peralkaline trachytic silica-undersaturated magmas during its late Holocene history. Variations in whole-rock major and trace element compositions of erupted products have been investigated, in combination with electron microprobe data for melt inclusions and phenocrysts comprising sanidine, biotite, clinopyroxene, titanomagnetite, ilmenite, haüyne, titanite, apatite and traces of plagioclase and amphibole. Compositional variations largely reflect fractional crystallisation, with a limited influence of magma mixing. Subtle variations in whole-rock composition and mineralogical characteristics between and within deposits, suggest the existence of a chemically zoned trachytic magma chamber beneath Rungwe. For the two most important studied deposits, the Isongole and Rungwe Pumice, co-existing Fe-Ti oxides constrain pre-eruptive temperature to 915-950 °C and oxygen fugacity to NNO + 0.25-NNO + 0.45. For the Rungwe Pumice, melt inclusions suggest that the melt was water-undersaturated (maximum inferred H2O concentration 5.5 wt.%). In the range of the defined pre-eruptive temperatures, this corresponds to melt viscosities as low as 103.3 Pa · s, i.e. significantly lower than magmas that typically generate highly explosive eruptions. Because no microlites formed in the conduit during ascent, which would have strongly increased the effective magma viscosity, the highly explosive nature of the eruptions may be attributable to a crucial role of exsolved CO2 and S phases, and very high ascent rates.

  6. Mixing Experiments with Shoshonitic and Trachytic Melts using a High-Temperature Centrifuge and a Viscometer: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Campos, Cristina; Dorfman, Alexander; Perugini, Diego; Kolzenburg, Stephan; Petrelli, Maurizio; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2010-05-01

    Evidence of cyclic replenishment of the shallow magmatic reservoir with deeper alkali basaltic (shoshonitic) magma (Campi Flegrei, in Italy; see Arienzo et al., 2008, Bull. Volcanol.) motivated this study. Results from different mixing experiments using natural volcanic samples from this region will be presented. The end-member melts derive from the Agnano-Monte Spina (trachytic) and Minopoli (shoshonitic) eruptions. Based on previous isotopic data, these are thought to be the most suitable counterparts for simulating the extreme interacting compositions in this system. In order to study the mixing dynamics between these natural magmas, we performed time series of convection-diffusion experiments using two different techniques: 1) a high-temperature centrifuge and 2) a viscometer. For the centrifuge experiments the rotating speed was 1850 revolutions per minute and the acceleration 10 3 g. In this way, dynamic conditions closer to those calculated for magma chambers (Reynolds Numbers [Re] around 102) could be simulated. For every experiment, a 4 mm thick disk of previously homogenized crystal free shoshonitic glass and an 8 mm thick disk of homogenized crystal free trachytic glass were loaded in a 5mm diameter Pt capsule. The capsule was then sealed on both sides, but for a small opening on the upper end, allowing intersticial degassing during the acceleration. Samples were arranged in a buoyantly unstable geometry, where the denser material is placed at the inner side of the rotating circle (basaltic trachyandesite, ρ=2.63 g/cm3 at 1169oC) and the lighter material at the external side (trachyte, ρ=2.45 g/cm3 at ~1000oC). Temperature has been kept constant at 1,200oC during all experimental runs, with a negligible thermal gradient (< 1°C). Forced convection was applied via centrifugal acceleration and density instabilities. Results from three experimental runs with the centrifuge: after 5, 20 and 120 min will be discussed. The second set of experiments consisted of two experimental runs (25- and 168-hours duration) under Taylor-Couette flow, according to De Campos et al. (2008, Chem. Geol.). Higher amounts of the same end-members, in different proportions, have been mixed together using a concentric cylinder viscometer. For the 2nd set of experiments forced convection has been simulated by stirring with a spindle. Experimental conditions were constrained by: 1) constant angular velocity (0.5 rotations per minute) and 2) constant temperature (1,300° Celsius). The experiments terminated by stopping all movement, extracting the spindle from the sample and letting the sample cool to room temperature. Cylinders of the resultant mixed glasses were recovered by drilling and, prepared for microprobe analysis. Microprobe and ICP-MS analyses along longitudinal lines from sections of all the resulting products reveal a complex non-linear mixing process with different mobility for different elements. Chemical data obtained from both experiments (with the centrifuge and the viscometer) will be discussed in a comparative way.

  7. Spherulites growth in trachytic melts: a textural quantitative study from synchrotron X-ray microtomography and SEM data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzilli, Fabio; Mancini, Lucia; Giuli, Gabriele; Cicconi, Maria Rita; Voltolini, Marco; Carroll, Michael R.

    2013-04-01

    This study shows the first textural data on synthetic alkali-feldspar spherulites grown in trachytic melts during cooling and decompression experiments with water-saturated conditions. Previous textural studies have shown the shape evolution and the growth process of spherulites as a function of undercooling (T) and water content, although just in basaltic and rhyolitic melts [1-3]. Spherulites are spherical clusters of polycrystalline aggregates that occur commonly in rhyolitic melts under highly non-equilibrium conditions [3-4]. Cooling and decompression experiments have been carried out on trachytic melts in order to investigate crystallization kinetics of alkali feldspars and the implications for magma dynamics during the ascent towards the surface. Experiments have been conducted using cold seal pressure vessel apparatus at pressure range of 30 - 200 MPa, temperature of 750 - 850 °C and time of 2 - 16 hours, thereby reproducing pre- and syn-eruptive conditions of the Campi Flegrei volcanoes. This study presents quantitative data on spherulite morphologies obtained both by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and synchrotron X-ray microtomography. Size, aspect ratio, number and crystallographic misorientation of alkali feldspar crystals will be measured. Furthermore, experiments performed at different durations could allow us to follow the growth and the evolution of spherulites. The shape of spherulites changes as a function of ΔT and experimental durations. Two kind of spherulites occured during experiments: open spherulites and close spherulites. The open spherulites are characterized by an structure with large (generally rectangular prismatic), widely spaced fibers with main axis converging towards a central nucleus, in agreement with previous observations [5-6]. Instead, the close spherulites consist of acicular and tiny fibers radially aggregated around a nucleus and single crystals are hardly distinguishable. First preliminary results show: a) spherulites grow between 70-200 MPa, thus the nucleation process was favored at higher water contents; b) open spherulites seem to be favored at low ΔT, whereas close spherulites were favored in experiments at higher ΔT and long durations; c) estimated growth rates of spherulites were of 10-7 cm/s. References: [1] Lofgren G. (1971); Journal of Geophysical Research, 76, 5635-5648. [2] Gimeno D. (2003); Journal of Non-Crystaline Solids, 323, 84-90. [3] Watkins J., Manga M., Huber C. and Martin M. (2008); Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, [4] Grànàsy L., Pusztai T., Tegze G., Warren J. A. and Douglas J. F. (2005); Physical Review, 72, 011605. [5] Keith, H. D. and Padden F. J. (1963); Journal of Applied Physics, 8, 2409-2421. [6] Lofgren G. (1980); Princeton University Press, pp. 487-551.

  8. Geometry of the Trachyte Mesa intrusion, Henry Mountains, Utah: Implications for the emplacement of small melt volumes into the upper crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetmore, Paul H.; Connor, Charles B.; Kruse, Sarah E.; Callihan, Sean; Pignotta, Geoffrey; Stremtan, Ciprian; Burke, Andrea

    2009-08-01

    The Trachyte Mesa intrusion is one of several small satellite bodies to the larger intrusions of the Henry Mountains, Utah. Most previous studies have worked under the assumptions that Trachyte Mesa is blister shaped and intruded into flat and gently NW dipping strata. In this study we combine structural and geophysical data sets to constrain the structural geology of the host lithologies and the unmodified geometry of the intrusion. Trachyte Mesa intrudes a series of northeast trending upright and open folds formed within the Jurassic Entrada Formation. Truncation of these folds at the contact with the overlying Curtis/Summerville formations indicates the folds are Middle Jurassic. Magnetic and 2-D resistivity surveys focused on the southwestern portion of the intrusion where it is concealed by overlying strata. These data clearly delineate the outline of the buried intrusion. The intrusion is 2.2 km long and 0.7 km wide with an average thickness of ˜15 m (maximum ˜40 m). The majority of the intrusion (both exposed and buried portions) is confined within the axis of a syncline bound to the NW and SE by anticlines. The intrusion does, however, overtop the hinge of the bounding anticline to the northwest in a few places along its length. In cross section the intrusion is characterized by concave-up top and bottom surfaces, except along portions where it overtops the bounding anticline. The geometry and structural position of the Trachyte Mesa intrusion suggest that preexisting structure and the density of the magma relative to that of host rocks fundamentally controlled the emplacement of this intrusion.

  9. Deformation structures associated with the Trachyte Mesa intrusion, Henry Mountains, Utah: Implications for sill and laccolith emplacement mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Penelope I. R.; McCaffrey, Ken J. W.; Wilson, Robert W.; Jarvis, Ian; Holdsworth, Robert E.

    2016-06-01

    Deformation structures in the wall rocks of igneous intrusions emplaced at shallow crustal depths preserve an important record of how space was created for magma in the host rocks. Trachyte Mesa, a small Oligocene age intrusion in the Henry Mountains, Utah, is composed of a series of stacked tabular, sheet-like intrusions emplaced at 3-3.5 km depth into sandstone-dominated sedimentary sequences of late Palaeozoic-Mesozoic age. New structural analysis of the spatial distribution, geometry, kinematics and relative timings of deformation structures in the host rocks of the intrusion has enabled the recognition of distinct pre-, syn-, and late-stage-emplacement deformation phases. Our observations suggest a two-stage growth mechanism for individual sheets where radial growth of a thin sheet was followed by vertical inflation. Dip-slip faults formed during vertical inflation; they are restricted to the tips of individual sheets due to strain localisation, with magma preferentially exploiting these faults, initiating sill (sheet) climbing. The order in which sheets are stacked impacts on the intrusion geometry and associated deformation of wall rocks. Our results offer new insights into the incremental intrusion geometries of shallow-level magmatic bodies and the potential impact of their emplacement on surrounding host rocks.

  10. Combined Effect of Crystals and Bubbles on the Rheology of Trachytic Magmas from Monte Nuovo (Campi Flegrei, Italy) (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vona, A.; Romano, C.; Giordano, D.; Russell, K.

    2013-12-01

    We present results of high-temperature, uniaxial deformation experiments on samples of natural trachytic magma from the Monte Nuovo (1538 AD) eruption. The experiments were performed using a high-temperature uniaxial press at dry atmospheric conditions and under controlled deformation rates. Each experiment involved deforming cores of natural (i.e., crystal- and vesicle-bearing) scoriaceous samples isothermally (600 to 800° C) at constant displacement rates (CDR) corresponding to strain rates between 10-7 and 10-4 s-1. Measured viscosities vary between 1010 and 1013 Pa s. The rheology of these complex natural materials is fully described by a simplified Herschel-Bulkely equation involving two rheometric parameters: consistency K and flow index n. We estimate the combined effects of crystals and pores on the rheology of these multiphase suspensions. Our results demonstrate that the presence of pores has a major impact on the rheological response of magmas and may produce a marked decrease in their apparent viscosity. At the same time, the presence of pores leads to a strong decrease in the strength of the magma inducing local and temporal variation in the deformation regimes (ductile vs. brittle). Brittle failure was in fact observed at T=600°C and strain rates of 10-5 s-1 and at T=800°C for the highest applied strain rate (10-4 s-1), respectively. This study constitutes an important step toward the estimation of multiphase rheological evolution of Monte Nuovo magmas and toward the general understanding of the full complexities governing the dynamics of magma transport in natural systems.

  11. Settling dynamics of basaltic (Etna) and trachytic (Laacher See) ash particles: insight from laboratory high speed imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Bello, E.; Andronico, D.; Vu Duc, A.; Cristaldi, A.; Kueppers, U.; Ricci, T.; Scarlato, P.; Scollo, S.; Taddeucci, J.

    2014-12-01

    Existing experimental and numerical models of ash sedimentation from volcanic plumes consider aerodynamic properties of particles as a function of their shape, density and size. However, rather than individually, particles are often observed to settle through zones of high particle concentration associated with gravitational instabilities (e.g., particle-rich fingers) where sedimentation is controlled by the properties of the bulk down-flow of settling particles. In order to investigate the differences in the aerodynamic behaviour of ash particles when settling individually or in mass, we performed systematic large-scale ash settling experiments. Natural basaltic ash from Etna (Italy, sampled in July 2014) and trachytic, pumiceous ash from Laacher See (Germany, 12.900 y BP) was used as starting material. For Etna, we used particles in the classes 0-125 and 125-500 μm, for Laacher See, we used 40-90 and 500-1000 μm. For each class, we released 40-500 g of sample from heights of 2 to 5 m with different, controlled volumetric flow rates, in an unconstrained open space and at minimal air movement. All experiments were recorded with a high-speed camera at 2000 fps. A vertical laser sheet crossing the flow enhanced visibility of particles. After release, particles were observed to cluster, leading to locally enhanced fall velocities. High-speed imaging, manual and automatic tracking analyses are being used to provide full characterization of particle settling dynamics as a function of particle concentration in the flow, density and particle size. SEM analysis will provide particle shape characterization. The main results are i) measured settling velocities of individual particles increase with increasing particle concentration; ii) particle sorting during sedimentation is observed. This suggests that particle dispersion during fallout may be one reason explaining larger than theoretical depletion rates of fine particles from volcanic ash clouds.

  12. A trachyte-syenite core within a basaltic nest: filtering of primitive injections by a multi-stage magma plumbing system (Oki-Dōzen, south-west Japan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenna, Marco; Nakada, Setsuya; Miura, Daisuke; Toshida, Kiyoshi; Ito, Hisatoshi; Hokanishi, Natsumi; Nakai, Shun'ichi

    2015-08-01

    Oki-Dōzen (Japan) is a Late Miocene (7-5 Ma) intraplate alkalic volcano composed of a central trachytic pyroclastic complex surrounded by a ring-shaped succession of basaltic to trachybasaltic lavas and pyroclastic rocks and dispersed trachytic bodies. The central trachytic complex is in contact with a syenite that was intruded into the basement early Miocene volcano-sedimentary succession. In the centre of the system there are no alkalic basaltic rocks that are correlative of the outer flank ring. We present whole-rock major and trace element chemistry, Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions and petrological data from the central trachytic volcanic complex and the intrusive syenite body, as well as from the outer ring basaltic succession. We also present and discuss a new set of zircon U/Pb ages collected from the central trachyte and syenite bodies. All the eruptive products of Oki-Dōzen, as well as the syenite, plot on a single liquid line of descent initiated from a mantle-derived alkalic basaltic parent. A younger (2.8 Ma) basaltic eruption (Uzuka basalt) has isotopic compositions that distinguish it from the rest of the system. Geochemical modelling indicates that magmatic differentiation through crystal fractionation and minor crustal assimilation occurred in crustal and shallow sub-volcanic magma reservoirs. In the central part of the system, a number of vertically spaced reservoirs acted as a filter, capturing basaltic dykes and hindering their ascent. In the outer region, dykes either reached the surface unhindered and erupted to form the basaltic/trachybasaltic succession or stalled at crustal levels and differentiated to trachyte before forming dispersed domes/flows. The central plumbing system "filter" resulted in a nest-shaped volcano, with a trachytic core surrounded by basaltic products, and stopped direct injection of basaltic magmas into the shallow syenitic magma reservoir, likely preventing its destabilization and explosive eruption.

  13. Preliminary Studies of the Emplacement of Trachytic Lava Flows and Domes in an Ice- Contact Environment: Mount Edziza, British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamoreaux, K. A.; Skilling, I. P.; Endress, C.; Edwards, B.; Lloyd, A.; Hungerford, J.

    2006-12-01

    Mount Edziza Volcanic Complex (MEVC) lies within the Northern Cordilleran Volcanic Province (NCVP), in northwest British Columbia, Canada. The eruption products include basalt, trachyte, and rhyolite that have been emplaced in a variety of subaerial, sub-ice and subaqueous environments from about 8Ma to less than 2000 y.b.p. The Ice Peak Formation (IPF) is approximately 1Ma (Souther, 1992) and includes basaltic and trachytic effusive and explosive products. Two IPF bluffs on the western side of Edziza, Ornostay Bluff (OB) and Koosick Bluff (KB), and another nearby construct (Triangle Dome, TD) were interpreted by Souther (1992) as sequences of trachytic lavas flows (OB, KB) and a lava dome (TD) formed in an ice-contact environment. This interpretation was confirmed through detailed field examination of joint patterns, visible textures, and other structures. Both OB and KB consist of several lava flows, which vary from several to 75 or more meters in thickness, emplaced on a steep surface. Basal flow breccias (locally hydrothermally-altered), are overlain by massive conchoidally-fractured lava with large-sized (greater than 1m in width) poorly-developed columns, local flow banding, and folded incorporated flow breccia. The tops of the flows display better-developed and smaller- scale columns with well-developed perpendicular planar joints. Textures are comparable to those in rhyolite domes, implying a similar viscosity on emplacement. Column orientations and joint measurements at OB and KB indicate local cooling against a steep surface, which is interpreted as ice. Spectacular fanning columns at TD likely indicate emplacement of several very steep-sided domes within a sub-ice cavity or cavities. Geochronology and volatile analysis of glass is currently ongoing. Detailed study of the products will help constrain paleo-ice thicknesses at the MEVC at the time of lava emplacement. Preliminary interpretation based upon the thicknesses of TD and OB suggests a minimum ice thickness of at least 225 meters at both centers.

  14. Polybaric evolution of phonolite, trachyte, and rhyolite volcanoes in Eastern Marie Byrd Land, Antarctica: Controls on peralkalinity and silica saturation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LeMasurier, W.E.; Futa, K.; Hole, M.; Kawachi, Y.

    2003-01-01

    In the Marie Byrd Land volcanic province, peralkaline and metaluminous trachytes, phonolites, and rhyolites occur in 18 large shield volcanoes that are closely associated in time and space. They are arrayed radially across an 800 km wide structural dome, with the oldest at the crest and the youngest around the flanks. Several lines of evidence suggest that these rocks evolved via open-system, polybaric fractionation. We have used mass balance modeling of major elements together with trace-element data and mineral chemistry to help explain the evolution of this diverse suite of felsic rocks, which appear to have been generated coevally in isolated magma chambers, and erupted close to each other in patterns related to tectonic uplift and extension within the West Antarctic rift system. Isotopic and trace-element data indicate that this occurred with only minimal crustal contamination. We focus on volcanoes of the Executive Committee Range and Mount Murphy, where we find good representation of basalts and felsic rocks within a small area. Our results suggest that the felsic rocks were derived from basaltic magmas that differentiated at multiple levels during their passage to the surface: first to ferrogabbroic compositions near the base of the lithosphere, then to intermediate compositions near the base of the crust, and finally to felsic compositions in mid- to upper crustal reservoirs. The high-pressure history has been largely masked by low-pressure processes. The best indications of a high-pressure history are the mineral phases in cumulate nodules and their correlation with modeling results, with REE anomalies, and with the composition of an unusual gabbroic intrusion. Silica saturation characteristics are believed to have originated in magma chambers near the base of the crust, via fractionation of variable proportions of kaersutite and plagioclase. Development of peralkalinity in felsic rocks took place in upper crustal reservoirs by fractionating a high ratio of plagioclase to clinopyroxene under conditions of low pH2O. With increasing pH2O, the ratio plagioclase/clinopyroxene in the fractionated assemblage decreases and metaluminous liquids resulted. Crustal contamination seems to have had a role in suppressing peralkalinity, and was probably a factor in the origin of high-silica metaluminous rhyolite, but metaluminous rocks are uncommon. The volume and diversity of felsic rocks were probably enhanced by the structure of the lithosphere, the persistence of plume activity, and the immobility of the Antarctic plate. Mechanical boundaries at the base of the lithosphere and crust, and within the crust, appear to have acted as filters, trapping magmas at multiple levels, and prolonging the fractionation process. Final volumes would have been further enhanced by repeated refluxing of the same magma chambers, controlled by plume activity and plate immobility.

  15. Which came first: the pumice or the obsidian? Complex degassing transitions during the 114ka trachytic Pu'u Wa'aWa'a eruption (Hawaii)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, J. E.; Shea, T.; Hellebrand, E.

    2012-12-01

    Fragmental obsidian clasts are highly correlated with coeval pumice in eruptions that produce obsidian (e.g., Lipari, Aeolian Islands; Little Glass Mountain, California; Mono-Inyo chain, California; Taupo, New Zealand), implying that at least some magma is able to degas quiescently prior to or during the explosive stage of an eruption. However, gross stratigraphic relationships reveal a consistent pattern of explosive activity transitioning to effusive activity (e.g., obsidian flows), suggesting subsurface stratification of magmatic volatiles. A prevailing conceptual model of obsidian formation reconciles these observations through (1) formation of dense glassy material by collapse of vesicles in bubbly magma, occuring in the shallow conduit or at the surface, (2) subsequent ascent of gas-rich magma and fragmentation/assimilation of the previously-emplaced obsidian clasts, followed by (3) transition to dominantly effusive eruptive activity. The Pu'u Wa'aWa'a trachytic pumice cone is unique feature in the Hawaii island volcanic landscape, otherwise dominated by basaltic lava. Around 114 ka, a pulsating explosive eruption at Hualalai Volcano expelled trachytic pumice, forming a ~150-200 m high cone. This phase was immediately followed by the outpouring of a large trachyte flow (the most voluminous silicic lava flow identified in Hawaii ~5 km3), identical in bulk composition to the pumice. The tephra deposits of the cone contain abundant obsidian clasts, as well as pyroclasts bearing striking gradual textural transitions and discretely banded pumiceous, scoriaceous and aphanitic material. The intricate variations in glass H2O contents (measured by microRaman), microlite and vesicle abundances (textural analysis), along with the chemical traits (EMPA) displayed by glasses from the diverse textural end-members suggest a complex ascent and eruption history. We test three hypotheses: (a) the obsidian clasts formed during ascent, stalling and outgassing of the magma (i.e., similar to the prevailing models mentioned above), (b) the obsidian clasts formed thorough shear-induced degassing-outgassing during the entire ascent stage, and (c) obsidian derives from volatile poor portions of the magma reservoir, which were disrupted and mingled with volatile-rich magma.

  16. Stress-induced comenditic trachyte effusion triggered by trachybasalt intrusion: multidisciplinary study of the AD 1761 eruption at Terceira Island (Azores)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimentel, A.; Zanon, V.; de Groot, L. V.; Hipólito, A.; Di Chiara, A.; Self, S.

    2016-03-01

    The AD 1761 eruption on Terceira was the only historical subaerial event on the island and one of the last recorded in the Azores. The eruption occurred along the fissure zone that crosses the island and produced a trachybasalt lava flow and scoria cones. Small comenditic trachyte lava domes (known as Mistérios Negros) were also thought by some to have formed simultaneously on the eastern flank of Santa Bárbara Volcano. Following a multidisciplinary approach, we combined geological mapping, paleomagnetic, petrographic, mineral and whole-rock geochemical and structural analyses to study this eruption. The paleomagnetic dating method compared geomagnetic vectors (directions and intensities) recorded by both the AD 1761 lava flow and Mistérios Negros domes and revealed that the two events were indeed coeval. Based on new data and interpretation of historical records, we have accordingly reconstructed the AD 1761 eruptive dynamics and distinguished three phases: (1) a precursory phase characterized by decreased degassing in the fumarolic field of Pico Alto Volcano and a gradual increase of seismic activity, which marked the intrusion of trachybasalt magma; (2) a first eruptive phase that started with phreatic explosions on the eastern flank of Santa Bárbara Volcano, followed by the inconspicuous effusion of comenditic trachyte (66 wt% SiO2), forming a WNW-ESE-oriented chain of lava domes; and (3) a second eruptive phase on the central part of the fissure zone, where a Hawaiian to Strombolian-style eruption formed small scoria cones (E-W to ENE-WSW-oriented) and a trachybasalt lava flow (50 wt% SiO2) which buried 27 houses in Biscoitos village. Petrological analyses show that the two batches of magma were emitted independently without evidence of interaction. We envisage that the dome-forming event was triggered by local stress changes induced by intrusion of the trachybasalt dyke along the fissure zone, which created tensile stress conditions that promoted ascent of comenditic trachyte magma stored beneath Santa Bárbara Volcano.

  17. Origin of a silica-oversaturated quartz trachyte rhyolite suite through combined crustal melting, magma mixing, and fractional crystallization: the Leyva Canyon volcano, Trans-Pecos Magmatic Province, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, John Charles; Urbanczyk, Kevin M.

    2001-11-01

    The Leyva Canyon Member of the Rawls Formation is a sequence of Oligocene (27.3-27.1 Ma) silicic lava, tuff, and volcaniclastic rock that comprise a trachytic shield volcano in the central Bofecillos Mountains of Big Bend Ranch State Park, Texas. This silicic unit developed within a volcanic field that was otherwise dominated by silica-undersaturated, mafic to intermediate lava. Quartz trachyte to low-silica rhyolite of the Leyva Canyon volcano appears to be the result of magma mixing between mantle-derived, alkalic mafic magmas and peraluminous crustal melt (˜40% crustal input), followed by ˜65% fractional crystallization. The parental mafic component was probably similar to silica-undersaturated, mafic lavas of the Rawls Formation. Peraluminous, A-type high-silica rhyolite represents the earliest-erupted lavas of the Leyva Canyon volcano and is unrelated to quartz trachyte and low-silica rhyolite via fractional crystallization. The high-silica rhyolite provides evidence for an episode of crustal melting beneath the Leyva Canyon volcano. Data from the Rawls Formation suggest that silica-undersaturated, alkalic (ne-normative) mafic magmas may evolve via fractional crystallization alone to silica-undersaturated silicic compositions (ne-trachyte), but require magma mixing with crustal-derived silicic magmas coupled with fractional crystallization to produce silica-oversaturated magmas (quartz trachyte-rhyolite). Mixing with a high-Al 2O 3 crustal component results in silica-oversaturated, mildly peraluminous and metaluminous to mildly peralkalic felsic rocks, rather than the strongly peralkalic rocks more commonly associated with alkalic mafic magmas.

  18. From pumice to obsidian: eruptive behaviors that produce tephra-flow dyads. II- The 114ka trachyte eruption at Pu'u Wa'awa'a (Hawai'i).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, T.; Leonhardi, T. C.; Giachetti, T.; Larsen, J. F.; Lindoo, A. N.

    2014-12-01

    Associations of tephra and lava flow/domes produced by eruptions involving evolved magmas are a common occurrence in various types of volcanic settings (e.g. Pu'u Wa'awa'a ~114ka, Hawaii; South Mono ~AD625, California; Newberry Big Obsidian flow ~AD700, Oregon; Big Glass Mountain ~AD1100, California; Inyo ~AD1350, California, Chaitén AD2008-2009, Chile; Cordón Caulle AD2011-2012, Chile), ejecting up to a few cubic km of material (tephra+flow/dome). Most, if not all, of these eruptions have in common the paradoxical coexistence of (1) eruptive styles which are inferred to be sustained in nature (subplinian and plinian), with (2) a pulsatory behavior displayed by the resulting fall deposits, and (3) the coeval ejection of vesicular tephra and pyroclastic obsidian. Through two case studies, we explore this apparent set of paradoxes, and their significance in understanding transitions from explosive to effusive behavior. In this second case study (also cf. Shea et al., same session), we present new field, textural and geochemical data pertaining to the 114ka Pu'u Wa'awa'a trachyte eruption in Hawai'i. This large volume (>5 km3) event produced both a tephra cone (~1.6 km in diameter) and a thick (>250 m) lava flow, which have been largely covered by the more recent basaltic Mauna Loa and Hualalai lava flows. The trachyte tephra contains juvenile material displaying a large textural variety (pumice, scoria, obsidian, microcrystalline trachyte and banded-clasts), which can be linked with the extent of degassing and the formation of feldspar microlites. Notably, the abundance of microlites can be used to reconstruct an ascent and devolatilization history that accounts for all the seemingly contradictory observations.

  19. Geochemical characteristics and petrogenesis of phonolites and trachytic rocks from the České Středohoří Volcanic Complex, the Ohře Rift, Bohemian Massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerman, Lukáš; Ulrych, Jaromír; Řanda, Zdeněk; Erban, Vojtěch; Hegner, Ernst; Magna, Tomáš; Balogh, Kadosa; Frána, Jaroslav; Lang, Miloš; Novák, Jiří K.

    2015-05-01

    Trachyandesites, trachytes and phonolites represent the most evolved rock types within the České Středohoří Volcanic Complex (CSVC) in the Ohře/Eger Rift. The K-Ar ages of the suite range from ~ 33.8 to ~ 25.8 Ma. Major and trace element variation in the basanite - trachybasalt - trachyandesite series can be explained by several stages of modification of parental magmas by assimilation-fractional crystallization (AFC) involving fractionation of olivine, clinopyroxene, apatite, amphibole and Ti-oxide and bulk continental crust (BCC) as an assimilate. Relative to plausible basanitic starting compositions, the trachytes are moderately depleted in Sr, exhibit more pronounced depletions in P and Ti and some of them also show mild MREE depletion. Such composition requires variable amphibole, clinopyroxene, plagioclase ± apatite, titanite and/or Ti-magnetite fractionation and BCC assimilation. Two types of phonolites (type A and B phonolite) can be distinguished on the basis of overall REE patterns, Gd/Gd* ratios and Ba and Sr contents. Type B phonolites are depleted in Ba, Sr and MREE as a result of extensive alkali feldspar, plagioclase and amphibole fractionation. Modelling of trace element distributions implies basanitic magmas as the most likely parental composition of the basanite - trachybasalt - trachyandesite - trachyte - phonolite suite formed through magmatic differentiation. The Sr-Nd isotopic compositions in the samples can be explained with the assimilation of continental crust by such parental magmas. The highly radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr found in some phonolites are contrasted by uniform Nd isotopic signature; this feature may be explained by contamination and/or overprint of source magmas by Na-Rb-rich material with radiogenic Sr signature formed due to high-Rb (> 200 ppm) character of these melts/fluids. The nature of such contaminant is further evidenced by elevated Li (and Cs in some cases) abundances in type B phonolites although at least two distinct fluids are implicated from the Li-Cs correlations. The derivation of these melts/liquids from sedimentary and/or meta-sedimentary crustal sources is underscored by variable but overall light Li isotopic compositions. Some phonolites exhibit enrichments in high-field-strength elements coupled with increased Zr/Nb ratios. In contrast to previous studies, we show that this feature, apparent in many volcanic rocks from the Bohemian Massif, can be explained with progressive melt fractionation of parental magmas involving amphibole and plagioclase.

  20. Relationships between pre-eruptive conditions and eruptive styles of phonolite-trachyte magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andújar, Joan; Scaillet, Bruno

    2012-11-01

    Phonolitic eruptions can erupt either effusively or explosively, and in some cases develop highly energetic events such as caldera-forming eruptions. However, the mechanisms that control the eruptive behaviour of such compositions are not well understood. By combining pre-eruptive data of well studied phonolitic eruptions we show that the explosive-effusive style of the phonolitic magma is controlled by the amount of volatiles, the degree of water-undersaturation and the depth of magma storage, the explosive character generally increasing with pressure depth and water contents. However, external factors, such as ingestion of external water, or latter processes occurring in the conduit, can modify the starting eruptive dynamic acquired at the levels of magma ponding.

  1. Influence of starting material on the degassing behavior of trachytic and phonolitic melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preuss, Oliver; Marxer, Holger; Nowak, Marcus

    2015-04-01

    The dynamic magmatic processes beneath volcanic systems, occurring during magma ascent, cannot be observed directly in nature. Simulation of magma ascent in the lab realized by continuous decompression (CD) of a volatile containing melt is essential to understand these processes that may lead to potentially catastrophic eruptions threatening millions of people in highly populated areas like Naples located between the Campi Flegrei Volcanic Field and the Monte Somma-Vesuvio strato-volcano. In this project, experimental simulations of Campanian Ignimbrite (CI) magma ascent will give insight to the mechanisms of the CI super eruption, thus providing tools for volcanic hazard assessment at the high risk Campanian Volcanic District and other comparable volcanic systems. Additionally, comparable experiments with the same conditions using the 'white pumice' composition of the catastrophic Vesuvius AD 79 (VAD79) eruption, have been conducted. So far, the experiments were performed in an internally heated argon pressure vessel coupled with a high-pressure low-flow metering valve and a piezoelectric nano-positioning system using a starting pressure of 200 MPa, H2O content of about 5 wt% and two different decompression rates (0.024 and 0.17 MPa/s) at a superliquidus temperature of 1050 ° C to ensure a crystal free melt and a homogeneous bubble nucleation. Experiments were conducted with both, glass powder and cylinders, subsequently decompressed to 75 and 100 MPa and rapidly quenched. Beside the results that e.g. decompression rate, volatile content, fluid solubility and target pressure affect the degassing behavior of the melt, the influence of the starting material on the degassing processes is significant. Analyses of BSE- and transmitted light microscopy images revealed a different degassing behavior of glass cylinder experiments compared to powders. Nitrogen has a very low solubility in hydrous silicate melts, supporting our suggestion that preexisting nitrogen rich bubbles (from trapped air between the single glass grains) in the melt lead to growth of these preexisting bubbles resulting in near equilibrium degassing where no further nucleation is needed. This results in much higher porosities of the degassed samples compared to those where pure dissolved H2O is present. The same effect was observed by repeating these experiments with a phonolitic VAD79 composition. In ongoing experiments using glass cylinders as starting material, approximately 0.4 wt% chlorine (average Campanian Ignimbrite melt inclusion data [1]) will be added as a volatile component to study the influence on the degassing behavior of hydrous CI melt. [1] Marianelli et al. (2006) Geology 34(11), 937

  2. Oligocene volcanism and multiple caldera formation in the Chinati Mountains, Presidio County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Cepeda, J.C.; Henry, C.D.

    1983-01-01

    The Chinati Mountains caldera, which lies in Trans-Pecos Texas in the southern Basin and Range Province, was formed by eruption of the Mitchell Mesa Rhyolite. Volcanism in the Chinati Mountains area began several million years before formation of the Chinati Mountains caldera. Rocks of the Morita Ranch Formation, Infiernito caldera, and Shely Group ring the caldera on the south, east, and north. After its collapse, the caldera was filled by rhyolitic to trachytic lava flows and an ash-flow tuff of the Chinati Mountains Group. These include, from oldest to youngest, the lower trachyte, middle trachyte, lower rhyolite, upper trachyte, and upper rhyolite (ash-flow tuff). The Chinati Mountains Group was then intruded by the West Chinati Stock, the resurgent dome of the caldera. Three cycles of rhyolitic to trachytic magmatism, all derived from a zoned magma chamber, are represented by (1) Mitchell Mesa Rhyolite to lower and middle trachytes, (2) lower rhyolite to upper trachyte, and (3) upper rhyolite to West Chinati Stock. Dominant caldera collapse followed eruption of the Mitchell Mesa Rhyolite, but collapse is also associated with rhyolitic eruptions in the second and third cycles. The entire sequence erupted between 32 and 33 mya. The Chinati Mountains area is the site of one major, inactive silver mine and numerous prospects for silver, lead, zinc, copper, molybdenum, uranium, and fluorite. The Shafter silver district produced 31 million ounces of silver from Permian dolomitic limestones just south of the southern boundary of the caldera. Major prospects are associated with a quartz-monzonite porphyry intrusion (copper-molybdenum) just west of Shafter and with the West Chinati Stock (silver, lead, zinc, copper, and fluorite). All mineralization is probably genetically related to the caldera. 74 references, 15 figures, 3 tables.

  3. Disequilibrium crystal-liquid processes at Hamblin-Cleopatra volcano, Lake Mead area, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Daniel S.; Thompson, Keith G.; Smith, Eugene I.; McDowell, Fred W.

    2012-09-01

    The 60 km3 Hamblin-Cleopatra stratovolcano produced shoshonite, latite, and trachyte lavas throughout its Miocene eruptive history. Low-silica rhyolite and silica-undersaturated hawaiite erupted before and after lavas of the Hamblin-Cleopatra volcano. Shoshonite, latite, and trachyte resulted from contamination of felsic (trachyte to low-silica rhyolite) anatectic liquids with crystals from hawaiite. Most of the entrained crystals were not in equilibrium with liquid represented by groundmass, but were mingled with liquid shortly before eruption. Crystal aggregates are common inclusions in the lavas, and are sources of the contaminating minerals. The resulting bulk compositions of these porphyritic lavas form a continuum that resembles a liquid line of descent, as dictated by mass balance.

  4. Petrogenesis of Cenozoic volcanic rocks in the NW sector of the Gharyan volcanic field, Libya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lustrino, Michele; Cucciniello, Ciro; Melluso, Leone; Tassinari, Colombo C. G.; dè Gennaro, Roberto; Serracino, Marcello

    2012-12-01

    The north-western sector of the Gharyan volcanic field (northern Libya) consists of trachytic-phonolitic domes emplaced between ~ 41 and 38 Ma, and small-volume mafic alkaline volcanic centres (basanites, tephrites, alkali basalts, hawaiites and rare benmoreites) of Middle Miocene-Pliocene age (~ 12-2 Ma). Two types of trachytes and phonolites have been recognized on the basis of petrography, mineralogy and geochemistry. Type-1 trachytes and phonolites display a smooth spoon-shaped REE pattern without negative Europium anomalies. Type-2 trachytes and phonolites show a remarkable Eu negative anomaly, higher concentration in HFSE (Nbsbnd Tasbnd Zrsbnd Hf), REE and Ti than Type-1 rocks. The origin of Type-1 trachytes and phonolites is compatible with removal of clinopyroxene, plagioclase, alkali feldspar, amphibole, magnetite and titanite starting from benmoreitic magmas, found in the same outcrops. Type-2 trachytes and phonolites could be the result of extensive fractional crystallization starting from mafic alkaline magma, without removal of titanite. In primitive mantle-normalized diagrams, the mafic rocks (Mg# = 62-68, Cr up to 514 ppm, Ni up to 425 ppm) show peaks at Nb and Ta and troughs at K. These characteristics, coupled with low 87Sr/86Sr(i) (0.7033-0.7038) and positive ɛNd (from + 4.2 to + 5.3) features typical of the mafic anorogenic magmas of the northern African plate and of HIMU-OIB-like magma in general. The origin of the mafic rocks is compatible from a derivation from low degree partial melting (3-9%) shallow mantle sources in the spinel/garnet facies, placed just below the rigid plate in the uppermost low-velocity zone. The origin of the igneous activity is considered linked to passive lithospheric thinning related to the development of continental rifts like those of Sicily Channel (e.g., Pantelleria and Linosa) and Sardinia (e.g., Campidano Graben) in the Central-Western Mediterranean Sea.

  5. Temporal evolution of a post-caldera, mildly peralkaline magmatic system: Furnas volcano, São Miguel, Azores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffery, A. J.; Gertisser, R.; O'Driscoll, B.; Pacheco, J. M.; Whitley, S.; Pimentel, A.; Self, S.

    2016-05-01

    Furnas is one of three active central volcanoes on São Miguel Island, Azores, and is considered to be one of the most hazardous in the archipelago. In this study, the pre-eruptive magma plumbing system of the 10 young (<5 ka), intra-caldera, sub-Plinian, trachytic eruptions of the Upper Furnas Group (UFG) is investigated via whole rock major and trace element geochemistry, mineral chemistry, thermobarometry, and petrogenetic modelling. The main aim of this work is to elucidate the petrogenesis of the Furnas trachytes, constrain the P-T-fO2 conditions under which they evolve, and investigate the temporal evolution of the magma plumbing system. Results indicate that the trachytes are derived predominantly from extended fractional crystallisation of alkali basalt parental magmas, at depths between ~3 and 4 km. This is considered to take place in a density-stratified reservoir, with alkali basalt magmas at the base and hydrous trachytes forming an upper cap or cupola. The presence of this reservoir at shallow crustal depths beneath the caldera likely inhibits the ascent and subsequent eruption of mafic magmas, generating a compositional Daly Gap. Rare syenitic ejecta represent in situ crystallisation of trachytic magmas in the thermal boundary zone at the top of the reservoir. Trachytic enclaves within these syenites, in addition to banded pumices and ubiquitous clinopyroxene antecrysts in the UFG pumice falls, provide evidence for mingling/mixing processes within the magmatic system. Despite relatively uniform major element compositions, systematic trace element variations within individual eruptions highlight the importance of fractional crystallisation during late-stage evolution of the trachytes. This is facilitated by the accumulation of water and the development of mild peralkalinity, which contribute to low pre-eruptive melt viscosities and efficient crystal settling. Compositional zoning patterns between individual eruptions cannot be accounted for by periodic tapping of a single magma batch undergoing fractional crystallisation. Instead, up to four individual cycles are recognised, in which a zoned cap of eruptible trachytic magma, formed at the top of the reservoir, was erupted in one or more eruptions and was re-established via intermittent replenishment and subsequent fractional crystallisation.

  6. A new felsic cone-sheet swarm in the Central Atlantic Islands: The cone-sheet swarm of Boa Vista (Cape Verde)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancochea, Eumenio; Huertas, María José; Hernán, Francisco; Brändle, José Luis

    2014-03-01

    The island of Boa Vista is one of the oceanic islands with the largest amount of felsic rocks reported in the world (50% of the total outcropping igneous rocks of Boa Vista). The felsic rocks are trachytes and phonolites generated within the second main stage of the volcanic activity that lasted about four million years.

  7. Volcanic geology and eruption frequency, São Miguel, Azores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Richard B.

    1990-01-01

    Six volcanic zones comprise São Miguel, the largest island in the Azores. All are Quaternary in age except the last, which is partly Pliocene. From west to east the zones are (1) the trachyte stratovolcano of Sete Cidades, (2) a field of alkali-basalt cinder cones and lava flows with minor trachyte, (3) the trachyte stratovolcano of Agua de Pau, (4) a field of alkali-basalt cinder cones and lava flows with minor trachyte and tristanite, (5) the trachyte stratovolcano of Furnas, and (6) the Nordeste shield, which includes the Povoação caldera and consists of alkali basalt, tristanite, and trachyte. New radiocarbon and K-Ar ages augment stratigraphic data obtained during recent geologic mapping of the entire island and provide improved data to interpret eruption frequency. Average dormant intervals for the past approximately 3000 years in the areas active during that time are about 400 years for Sete Cidades, 145 for zone 2, 1150 for Agua de Pau, and 370 for Furnas. However, the average dormant interval at Sete Cidades increased from 400 to about 680 years before each of the past two eruptions, and the interval at Furnas decreased from 370 to about 195 years before each of the past four eruptions. Eruptions in zone 4 occurred about once every 1000 years during latest Pleistocene and early Holocene time; none has occurred for about 3000 years. The Povoação caldera truncates part of the Nordeste shield and probably formed during the middle to late Pleistocene. Calderas formed during latest Pleistocene time at the three younger stratovolcanoes in the sequence: outer Agua de Pau (between 46 and 26.5 ka), Sete Cidades (about 22 ka), inner Agua de Pau (15.2 ka), and Furnas (about 12 ka). Normal faults are common, but many are buried by Holocene trachyte pumice. Most faults trend northwest or west-northwest and are related to the Terceira rift, whose most active segment on São Miguel passes through Sete Cidades and zone 2. A major normal fault displaces Nordeste lavas 150–250 m and may mark the location of an ancestral Terceira rift. Recent seismicity (e.g., in the 1980s) generally has been scattered, but some small earthquake swarms have occurred beneath the north-eastern flank of Agua de Pau.

  8. Tectonic controls on the genesis of ignimbrites from the Campanian Volcanic Zone, southern Italy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rolandi, G.; Bellucci, F.; Heizler, M.T.; Belkin, H.E.; de Vivo, B.

    2003-01-01

    The Campanian Plain is an 80 x 30 km region of southern Italy, bordered by the Apennine Chain, that has experienced subsidence during the Quaternary. This region, volcanologically active in the last 600 ka, has been identified as the Campanian Volcanic Zone (CVZ). The products of three periods of trachytic ignimbrite volcanism (289-246 ka, 157 ka and 106 ka) have been identified in the Apennine area in the last 300 ka. These deposits probably represent distal ash flow units of ignimbrite eruptions which occurred throughout the CVZ. The resulting deposits are interstratified with marine sediments indicating that periods of repeated volcano-tectonic emergence and subsidence may have occurred in the past. The eruption, defined as the Campanian Ignimbrite (CI), with the largest volume (310 km3), occurred in the CVZ 39 ka ago. The products of the CI eruption consist of two units (unit-1 and unit-2) formed from a single compositionally zoned magma body. Slightly different in composition, three trachytic melts constitute the two units. Unit-1 type A is an acid trachyte, type B is a trachyte and type C of unit-2 is a mafic trachyte. The CI, vented from pre-existing neotectonic faults, formed during the Apennine uplift, Initially the venting of volatile-rich type A magma deposited the products to the N-NE of the CVZ. During the eruption, the Acerra graben already affected by a NE-SW fault system, was transected by E-W faults, forming a cross-graben that extended to the gulf of Naples. E-W faults were then further dislocated by NE-SW transcurrent movements. This additional collapse significantly influenced the deposition of the B-type magma of unit-1, and the C-type magma of unit-2 toward the E-SE and S, in the Bay of Naples. The pumice fall deposit underlying the CI deposits, until now thought to be associated with the CI eruption, is not a strict transition from plinian to CI-forming activity. It is derived instead from an independent source probably located near the Naples area. This initial volcanic activity is assumed to be a precursor to the CI trachytic eruptions, which vented along regional faults.

  9. Preliminary Interpretation of Glacial and Glaciofluvial Deposits Associated with 1 Ma Glaciovolcanism of the Ice Peak Formation, Edziza volcanic complex, British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endress, C.; Edwards, B.; Skilling, I.; Lloyd, A.; Lamoreaux, K.; Hungerford, J.

    2006-12-01

    The Mount Edziza Volcanic Complex (MEVC) comprises ~775 km3 of basalt, trachyte and rhyolite erupted in a variety of subaerial, sub-ice and subaqueous environments from about 8Ma to <2000 y.b.p. It forms a major component of the Stikine peralkaline subprovince of the central part of the northern Cordilleran volcanic province (NCVP), northwestern British Columbia, Canada. The Ice Peak Formation (IPF) is a widespread unit of the MEVC erupted about 1Ma (Souther, 1992) and includes basaltic and trachytic lava flows, trachytic domes, pyroclastic rocks, and a variety of glacial and glaciofluvial volcaniclastic rocks. Souther's (1992) interpretation of some of the trachytic effusive rocks as ice-contact has been confirmed by our recent study of flow morphologies and joint patterns (LaMoreaux et al., 2006). No evidence of mechanical interaction of the trachytic lava flows with the underlying glaciogenic deposits was observed, so they may be significantly older than 1Ma. However, these deposits may provide a critical record of local and/or regional paleoclimate conditions during a period of the Pleistocene that is poorly constrained in terrestrial settings. Massive and bedded, poorly sorted, pebble-cobble volcaniclastic sandstones exposed immediately beneath IPF trachytic lava flows were examined at 5 widely-spaced localities on the western and northern sides of the MEVC plateau. One of the locations, on the north-central edge of the Sezill Creek drainage, was described by Spooner et al. (1992) as meltout till and glaciolacustrine sediments. The other sequences have not previously been described and include three areas in the headwaters of Sezill Creek and one area at the northwestern end of the MEVC plateau. We interpret these sequences as deposits of meltout tills, debris flows, hyperconcentrated flood flows, with minor stream flows and subaqueous suspension in local areas. The widespread distribution of similar, stratigraphically equivalent glaciogenic deposits is perhaps more consistent with an "ice-sheet" environment, than valley glaciers. The presence of abundant grains of fresh volcanic glass in the glaciogenic deposits is consistent with deposition of the sediments penecontemporaneously with the eruption of IPF volcanics. Mineralogical, geochemical, geochronological and componentry studies are in progress to constrain possible relationships between IPF eruptions and the glaciogenic sediments, to document the palaeoenvironments in detail, and to understand the ice sheet conditions at Edziza at this time.

  10. The felsic complex of the Vallehermoso Caldera: interior of an ancient volcanic system (La Gomera, Canary Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Losada, J. A.; Martinez-Frias, J.

    2004-10-01

    A mid-to-upper Miocene felsic cone sheet dike complex, caldera collapse and dome intrusion, located around the Vallehermoso and Tamargada areas (North of La Gomera Island) is described. It constitutes one of the less-known volcanic episodes in the Canary Archipelago and especially in La Gomera Island. Based on detailed field and structural evidence, it is suggested that the cone sheet shows, at the surface, an almost circular geometry truncated to the NW sector. After the cone sheet dike complex formed, decompression of the interior of an assumed shallow magma chamber occurred due to the subsequent migration of felsic magma throughout the dikes of the cone sheet. This last event caused the roof of the magma chamber to collapse, leading to the formation of a 3- to 4-km-wide caldera. A breccia deposit formed during the collapse and filled a depressed central area which finally was affected by an episode of magmatic resurgence, leading to a later almost circular dome intrusion. The association of cone sheet, breccia deposits and domes constitutes the so-called "Trachytic-Phonolitic Complex" (TPC) and should be viewed as the root of an ancient intensely eroded volcanic edifice made of trachytes, nepheline-phonolites and minor Haüyne phonolites as the dominant materials. A description of the structural, petrological and geochemical features of the Trachytic-Phonolitic Complex and a discussion about their origin are considered in this paper. We also consider the correlation between another felsic intrusion of alkali gabbros and syenites (called Tamargada syenites) that also crops out in the Vallehermoso-Tamargada area with respect to the Trachytic-Phonolitic Complex. Our data suggest that this alkaline intrusion of alkali gabbros and syenites belongs to an earlier intrusive episode. On the basis of petrological, geochemical and detailed field studies, both trachytes and nepheline-phonolites included in the Trachytic-Phonolitic Complex most likely evolved from alkali mafic magmas from the Upper Old Basalt formation through a dominant fractional crystallization process. Additionally, haüyne phonolites could develop from local and later magmatic processes such as gas transfer that altered and changed a small part of the previously mentioned nepheline phonolites to haüyne phonolites.

  11. Volcanism in the western part of the rift valley in Southern Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crossley, R.; Knight, R. M.

    1981-06-01

    The stratigraphy, tectonic history, petrography and major oxide petrochemistry of the volcanic sequences in the western part of the rift valley in southern Kenya is summarised. Volcanism and rift faulting began 15 and 7 m.y. ago respectively. A recurrent feature of Miocene and Pliocene volcanism was the tendency for salic magmas to be preferentially erupted in the northern part of the area: the accumulation of a northward-thickening Pliocene trachyte pile is particularly notable. Transitional-mildly alkalic basalts and trachytes were erupted only after the onset of rift faulting, from sites within the rift structure, and so can be considered «rift dependent». Nephelinites, melanephelinites, limburgites and phonolites were erupted before and after onset of rift faulting, from sites within and outside the rift structure, and so can be considered «rift independent».

  12. The ultimate summit eruption of Puy de Dôme volcano (Chaîne des Puys, French Massif Central) about 10,700 years ago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miallier, Didier; Boivin, Pierre; Deniel, Catherine; Gourgaud, Alain; Lanos, Philippe; Sforna, Marie; Pilleyre, Thierry

    2010-11-01

    The Puy de Dôme volcano is a trachytic lava dome, about 11,000 y old. New pyroclastic layers originating from the volcano itself were discovered covering the summit and the flanks of the volcano. These pyroclastic layers do not fit with the previous interpretation, assuming a non-explosive dome-forming eruption. The tephra display pyroclastic surge features and exhibit fresh trachytic lapilli, basement lithics, allogeneous basaltic lava and clinker fragments requiring an open vent eruption. This ultimate eruption occurred after a period of rest, long enough for vegetation to develop on the volcano, as evidenced by carbonized plant fragments. Radiocarbon dating of some of these fragments gave an age of c.10,700 y also suggesting a significant rest duration.

  13. Le magmatisme sursaturé infrabréchique du centre du Cantal (Massif Central français)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vatin-Perignon, N.; Maury, R. C.; Milesi, J. P.

    1980-09-01

    Silica oversaturated lavas and pyroclastic flows, 9 to 7,5 M.Y. old, have been emplaced during the sinking of the central volcanotectonic caldera of alkalic stratovolcano Cantal. They can be grouped in a non linear fractional crystallisation series ranging from mugearites to rhyolitic trachytes, comenditic trachytes and comendites through benmoreites. Their evolution results mainly from plagioclase fractionation, alkali feldspar and ferromagnesian minerals playing only a restricted role. We consider this oversaturated group, which follows primordial basanitic lavas in the history of the stratovolcano, as the most evolved liquids resulting from differentiation under high water pressures and oxygen fugacities of alkali basic magmas in a great magma chamber. The less evolved liquids (intermediate and basic) would have been emplaced later, building the greatest part of the volcanic pile.

  14. Mid-Tertiary magmatism in western Big Bend National Park, Texas, U.S.A.: Evolution of basaltic source regions and generation of peralkaline rhyolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Don F.; Ren, Minghua; Adams, David T.; Tsai, Heng; Long, Leon E.

    2012-07-01

    Tertiary magmatism in the Big Bend region of southwestern Texas spanned 47 to 17 Ma and included representatives of all three phases (Early, Main and Late) of the Trans-Pecos magmatic province. Early phase magmatism was manifested in the Alamo Creek Basalt, an alkalic lava series ranging from basalt to benmoreite, and silicic alkalic intrusions of the Christmas Mountains. Main phase magmatism in the late Eocene/early Oligocene produced Bee Mountain Basalt, a lava series ranging from hawaiite and potassic trachybasalt to latite, widespread trachytic lavas of Tule Mountain Trachyte and silicic rocks associated with the Pine Mountain Caldera in the Chisos Mountains. Late main phase magmatism produced trachyte lava and numerous dome complexes of peralkaline Burro Mesa Rhyolite (~ 29 Ma) in western Big Bend National Park. Late stage basaltic magmatism is sparsely represented by a few lavas in the Big Bend Park area, the adjacent Black Gap area and, most notably, in the nearby Bofecillos Mountains, where alkalic basaltic rocks were emplaced as lava and dikes concurrent with active normal faulting. Trace element modeling, Nd isotope ratios and calculated depths of segregation for estimated ancestral basaltic magmas suggest that Alamo Creek basalts (ɛNdt ~ 6.15 to 2.33) were derived from depths (~ 120 to 90 km) near the lithosphere/asthenosphere boundary at temperatures of ~ 1600 to1560 °C, whereas primitive Bee Mountain basalts (ɛNdt ~ 0.285 to - 1.20) may have been segregated at shallower depths (~ 80 to 50 km) and lower temperatures (~ 1520 to 1430 °C) within the continental lithosphere. Nb/La versus Ba/La plots suggest that all were derived from OIB-modified continental lithosphere. Late stage basaltic rocks from the Bofecillos Mountains may indicate a return to source depths and temperatures similar to those calculated for Alamo Creek Basalt primitive magmas. We suggest that a zone of melting ascended into the continental lithosphere during main-phase activity and then descended as magmatism died out. Variation within Burro Mesa Rhyolite is best explained by fractional crystallization of a mix of alkali feldspar, fayalite and Fe-Ti oxide. Comendite of the Burro Mesa Rhyolite evolved from trachyte as batches in relatively small independent magma systems, as suggested by widespread occurrence of trachytic magma enclaves within Burro Mesa lava and results of fractionation modeling. Trachyte may have been derived by fractional crystallization of intermediate magma similar to that erupted as part of Bee Mountain Basalt. ɛNdt values of trachyte lava (0.745) and two samples of Burro Mesa Rhyolite (- 0.52 and 1.52) are consistent with the above models. In all, ~ 5 wt.% comendite may be produced from 100 parts of parental trachybasalt. Negative Nb anomalies in some Bee Mountain, Tule Mountain Trachyte and Burro Mesa incompatible element plots may have been inherited from lithospheric mantle rather than from a descending plate associated with subduction. Late phase basalts lack such a Nb anomaly, as do all of our Alamo Creek analyses but one. Even if some slab fluids partially metasomatized lithospheric mantle, these igneous rocks are much more typical of continental rifts than continental arcs. We relate Big Bend magmatism to asthenospheric mantle upwelling accompanying foundering of the subducted Farallon slab as the convergence rate between the North American and the Farallon plates decreased beginning about 50 Ma. Upwelling asthenosphere heated the base of the continental lithosphere, producing the Alamo Creek series; magmatism climaxed with main phase magmatism generated within middle continental lithosphere, and then, accompanying regional extension, gradually died out by 18 Ma.

  15. Stratigraphy and evolution of the trachy-rhyolitic volcanism of the Senafe area (Eastern Eritrean Plateau)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanettin, B.; Bellieni, G.; Visentin, E. Justin

    2006-08-01

    The Senafe area reveals a pile of stratoid volcanic rocks ("Senafe" ignimbrite), of considerable extent and thickness, which are the products of the first volcanic event which took place in this sector, close to the upper margin of the Afar escarpment. The Senafe ignimbrite is composed prevalently of trachyte with differing degrees of alkalinity: trachy-dacite of transitional series, and trachyte s. s. of mildly alkaline series. K/Ar radiometric measurements carried out on three samples give ages ranging between 21 and 23 Ma (Lower Miocene) and show that the Senafe ignimbrite with transitional character is an extension of the Serae rhyolite of the Central Eritrean Plateau, and may also be correlated with the Miocene Alaji rhyolite of the Central Ethiopian Plateau. In contrast, the more alkaline ignimbrite shows good correlations with the trachyte emitted by the Miocene Termaber alkaline central volcanoes of Ethiopia. It is noted that, in the course of the Miocene volcanism in Eritrea, the volumetric ratio between associated basalt and ignimbrite diminishes from west to east, i.e., approaching the Afar escarpment. The stratoid volcanic rocks are injected by thick trachytic and rhyolitic dykes. As radiometric measurements on them could not be performed, their age is unknown, but it is probably more recent than that of the injected ignimbrite, according to Merla and Minucci [Merla, G., Minucci, E., 1938. Missione geologica nel Tigrai. In: La serie dei terreni, vol. 1. Regia Accademia d'Italia, Centro Studi per l'Africa Orientale Italiana, Rome, Italy, pp. 1-362] for similar dykes and domes occurring in the Adwa-Axum area (Tigrai, Ethiopia), not far from Senafe. A section is devoted to the dyke feeders of the Eritrean and Adwa-Axum volcanism.

  16. Geochemical and isotopic insights into the assembly, evolution and disruption of a magmatic plumbing system before and after a cataclysmic caldera-collapse eruption at Ischia volcano (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, R. J.; Civetta, L.; Arienzo, I.; D'Antonio, M.; Moretti, R.; Orsi, G.; Tomlinson, E. L.; Albert, P. G.; Menzies, M. A.

    2014-09-01

    New geochemical and isotopic data on volcanic rocks spanning the period ~75-50 ka BP on Ischia volcano, Italy, shed light on the evolution of the magmatic system before and after the catastrophic, caldera-forming Monte Epomeo Green Tuff (MEGT) eruption. Volcanic activity during this period was influenced by a large, composite and differentiating magmatic system, replenished several times with isotopically distinct magmas of deep provenance. Chemical and isotopic variations highlight that the pre-MEGT eruptions were fed by trachytic/phonolitic magmas from an isotopically zoned reservoir that were poorly enriched in radiogenic Sr and became progressively less radiogenic with time. Just prior to the MEGT eruption, the magmatic system was recharged by an isotopically distinct magma, relatively more enriched in radiogenic Sr with respect to the previously erupted magmas. This second magma initially fed several SubPlinian explosive eruptions and later supplied the climactic, phonolitic-to-trachytic MEGT eruption(s). Isotopic data, together with erupted volume estimations obtained for MEGT eruption(s), indicate that >5-10 km3 of this relatively enriched magma had accumulated in the Ischia plumbing system. Geochemical modelling indicates that it accumulated at shallow depths (4-6 km), over a period of ca. 20 ka. After the MEGT eruption, volcanic activity was fed by a new batch of less differentiated (trachyte-latite) magma that was slightly less enriched in radiogenic Sr. The geochemical and Sr-Nd-isotopic variations through time reflect the upward flux of isotopically distinct magma batches, variably contaminated by Hercynian crust at 8-12 km depth. The deep-sourced latitic to trachytic magmas stalled at shallow depths (4-6 km depth), differentiated to phonolite through crystal fractionation and assimilation of a feldspar-rich mush, or ascended directly to the surface and erupted.

  17. The roles of fractional crystallization, magma mixing, crystal mush remobilization and volatile-melt interactions in the genesis of a young basalt-peralkaline rhyolite suite, the greater Olkaria volcanic complex, Kenya Rift valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Macdonald, R.; Belkin, H.E.; Fitton, J.G.; Rogers, N.W.; Nejbert, K.; Tindle, A.G.; Marshall, A.S.

    2008-01-01

    The Greater Olkaria Volcanic Complex is a young (???20 ka) multi-centred lava and dome field dominated by the eruption of peralkaline rhyolites. Basaltic and trachytic magmas have been erupted peripherally to the complex and also form, with mugearites and benmoreites, an extensive suite of magmatic inclusions in the rhyolites. The eruptive rocks commonly represent mixed magmas and the magmatic inclusions are themselves two-, three- or four-component mixes. All rock types may carry xenocrysts of alkali feldspar, and less commonly plagioclase, derived from magma mixing and by remobilization of crystal mushes and/or plutonic rocks. Xenoliths in the range gabbro-syenite are common in the lavas and magmatic inclusions, the more salic varieties sometimes containing silicic glass representing partial melts and ranging in composition from anorthite ?? corundum- to acmite-normative. The peralkaline varieties are broadly similar, in major element terms, to the eruptive peralkaline rhyolites. The basalt-trachyte suite formed by a combination of fractional crystallization, magma mixing and resorption of earlier-formed crystals. Matrix glass in metaluminous trachytes has a peralkaline rhyolitic composition, indicating that the eruptive rhyolites may have formed by fractional crystallization of trachyte. Anomalous trace element enrichments (e.g. ??? 2000 ppm Y in a benmoreite) and negative Ce anomalies may have resulted from various Na- and K-enriched fluids evolving from melts of intermediate composition and either being lost from the system or enriched in other parts of the reservoirs. A small group of nepheline-normative, usually peralkaline, magmatic inclusions was formed by fluid transfer between peralkaline rhyolitic and benmoreitic magmas. The plumbing system of the complex consists of several independent reservoirs and conduits, repeatedly recharged by batches of mafic magma, with ubiquitous magma mixing. ?? The Author 2008. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  18. The Campanian Ignimbrite (southern Italy) geochemical zoning: insight on the generation of a super-eruption from catastrophic differentiation and fast withdrawal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappalardo, Lucia; Ottolini, Luisa; Mastrolorenzo, Giuseppe

    2008-07-01

    More than ca 100 km3 of nearly homogeneous crystal-poor phonolite and ca 100 km3 of slightly zoned trachyte were erupted 39 ka during the Campanian Ignimbrite super eruption, the most powerful in the Neapolitan area. Partition coefficient calculations, equilibrium mineral assemblages, glass compositions and texture were used to reconstruct compositional, thermal and pressure gradients in the pre-eruptive reservoir as well as timing and mechanisms of evolution towards magma chamber overpressure and eruption. Our petrologic data indicate that a wide sill-like trachytic magma chamber was active under the Campanian Plain at 2.5 kbar before CI eruption. Thermal exchange between high liquidus (1199°C) trachytic sill and cool country rocks caused intense undercooling, driving a catastrophic and fast (102 years) in situ fractional crystallization and crustal assimilation that produced a water oversaturated phonolitic cap and an overpressure in the chamber that triggered the super eruption. This process culminated in an abrupt reservoir opening and in a fast single-step high decompression. Sanidine phenocrysts crystal size distributions reveal high differentiation rate, thus suggesting that such a sill-like magmatic system is capable of evolving in a very short time and erupting suddenly with only short-term warning.

  19. The volcano-pluton interface; The Longonot (Kenya) and Kûngnât (Greenland) peralkaline complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macdonald, R.; Bagiński, B.; Upton, B. G. J.

    2014-05-01

    An important step in studying volcanic processes is to consider the coeval processes in the subjacent magma reservoir(s). The trachytic caldera volcano Longonot (Kenya Rift Valley) and the Kûngnât syenite complex (Gardar province, Greenland) are taken to represent complementary magmatic systems, providing evidence of the volcanic and plutonic stages of evolution, respectively. The systems show many features in common; they have similar sizes, experienced two periods of caldera collapse, and were dominated by trachytic magmas, with smaller volumes of basic magma. Magmatic differentiation was dominantly by fractional crystallization of basaltic parents, with minor episodes of magma mixing and, at Kûngnât, some crustal contamination of parental basalts. A model is presented of a single, hypothetical trachytic centre, showing how evidence from one complex can be used to infer processes at the other. For example, an active convective system, with formation of wall and floor syenitic cumulates, can be inferred to exist in the Longonot magma chamber. At Kûngnât, the intermittent development of compositionally zoned caps to the magma chamber is postulated and the nature of syn-caldera eruptive activity is outlined.

  20. Deccan volcanism in Rajasthan: 40Ar-39Ar geochronology and geochemistry of the Tavidar volcanic suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Archisman; Pande, Kanchan; Hegner, Ernst; Sharma, Kamal Kant; Dayal, A. M.; Sheth, Hetu C.; Mistry, Harish

    2012-10-01

    The Tavidar volcanic suite in western Rajasthan, India, comprises a group of lava flows (and subordinate pyroclastic deposits) of highly diverse compositions ranging from basalt through trachyte to rhyolite. We have dated five samples of the Tavidar volcanic rocks by the 40Ar-39Ar incremental heating technique. One trachyte and two rhyolite samples yield very good plateau, isochron and inverse isochron ages of 67-65 Ma, typical of the Deccan Traps large igneous province. A subalkalic basalt and a basaltic trachyandesite yield saddle-shaped argon release spectra and show evidence for excess argon. Importantly, all five samples have very similar Nd-Sr isotopic ratios, and constitute a broadly cogenetic magmatic suite with the rhyolites possibly derived by closed-system fractional crystallization of trachytic magmas. The Tavidar rocks' isotopic data overlap, or are very close to, those of the Mahabaleshwar and Panhala Formation basalts in the Western Ghats type section 700-800 km to the southeast. We therefore infer that the Tavidar rocks, having initial Nd values of +3.2 to +0.7, have incorporated only small amounts of lower continental crust. The Tavidar volcanic suite attests to the great areal extent of the Deccan Traps, and reaffirms the great compositional diversity evident in the northwestern Deccan Traps.

  1. Eruptive history and magmatic stability of Erebus volcano, Antarctica: Insights from englacial tephra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iverson, Nels A.; Kyle, Philip R.; Dunbar, Nelia W.; McIntosh, William C.; Pearce, Nicholas J. G.

    2014-11-01

    tephrostratigraphy of the active Antarctic Erebus volcano was determined from englacial tephra on the ice-covered flanks of Erebus and an adjacent volcano. The tephra are used to reconstruct the eruptive history and magmatic evolution of Erebus. More fine-grained and blocky particles define tephra formed in phreatomagmatic eruptions and larger fluidal shards are characteristic of magmatic eruptions and in some cases both eruptive types are identified in a single mixed tephra. The eruptions forming the mixed tephra likely started as phreatomagmatic eruptions which transitioned into Strombolian eruptions as the nonmagmatic water source was exhausted. We reconstructed the eruptive history of Erebus using the tephra layers stratigraphic position, 40Ar/39Ar ages, shard morphology, and grain size. Major and trace element analyses of individual glass shards were measured by electron probe microanalysis and LA-ICP-MS. Trachybasalt, trachyte, and phonolite tephra were identified. All phonolitic tephra are Erebus-derived with compositions similar to volcanic bombs erupted from Erebus over the past 40 years. The tephra show that Erebus magma has not significantly changed for 40 ka. The uniformity of the glass chemical composition implies that the phonolite magma has crystallized in the same manner without change throughout the late Quaternary, suggesting long-term stability of the Erebus magmatic system. Trachyte and trachybasalt tephra were likely erupted from Marie Byrd Land and the McMurdo Sound area, respectively. The trachytic tephra can be regionally correlated and could provide an important time-stratigraphic marker in Antarctic ice cores.

  2. Geochemistry of Archean alkalic volcanic rocks from the Crystal Lake area, east of Kirkland Lake, Ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ujike, Osamu

    1985-05-01

    Twelve samples of Timiskaming volcanics from the Crystal Lake area were analyzed for major and trace elements (Ta, Th, Zr, Hf, V, Cr, Sc, rare earth elements (REE), Y, etc.) by X-ray fluorescence and instrumental neutron activation analysis techniques. The samples, which include mafic trachytes, trachytes and leucite trachytes, represent several batches of Archean alkalic magmas differentiated at shallow depths. The Cr/Sc sbnd Cr systematics and REE, Zr sbnd Th and Zr sbnd Y characteristics show, however, that their primary magmas generated at great depths in the "enriched" mantle where garnet remained in the refractory residue of partial melt. The chemical similarity between the Timiskaming samples and modern alkalic rocks in mature volcanic arcs strongly implies that the Timiskaming volcanism represents the last stage of a late Archean island arc volcanism present in the southwestern Abitibi Belt, Superior Province. The occurrence of Timiskaming-type alkalic rocks is not rare in Archean greenstone belts, thereby suggesting that a tectonic setting similar to modern volcanic arc system might have been common in late Archean time.

  3. A basic radial dike swarm of Boa Vista (Cape Verde Archipelago); its significance in the evolution of the island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancochea, Eumenio; Hernán, Francisco; Huertas, María José; Brändle, José Luis

    2012-10-01

    A basic radial dike swarm unrelated to other basic units of Boa Vista (Cape Verde Archipelago) has been localized and characterized in the central sector of the island. According to new radiometric data three main stages in the evolution of Boa Vista are distinguished: the earlier (the Old Volcanic Complex: 17-16 Ma) is equivalent to the shield building stage of Hawaii and the later (the Recent Volcanics (8-4 Ma) is in some aspects comparable to the post-erosional stage. An important intermediate essentially felsic stage (the Trachytic-Phonolitic Complex: 14.3-12.8 Ma) followed the basaltic shield stage. This felsic stage has equivalents in some other oceanic islands as the Canary Islands, specially Gran Canaria, Tenerife, and La Gomera. The central sector of Boa Vista is also occupied by the Felsic Subvolcanic Complex, a unit consisting of phonolitic breccias, syenites and monzonites that represent the Trachytic-Phonolitic Complex hypabyssal roots. The felsic rocks as a whole constitute half of the total amount of igneous rocks on the island making up Boa Vista, the island with the highest percentage of felsic rocks in the Central Atlantic Ocean. More than 200 dikes of the basic radial swarm intruding the Felsic Subvolcanic Complex have been measured. The intensity of the multiple dike injection is sometimes rather high, roughly a dike every 5 m. The individual dikes have an observable mean length of about 300 m. The composition of these dikes is always foiditic (nephelinites, melilitites, and limburgites), slightly different in composition (more alkaline and richer in incompatible elements) to the other basic units of the island (the Old Volcanic Complex and the Recent Volcanics). The radial dikes converge in an area located NW of the geometrical center of Boa Vista, a zone where the hypothetical center of the Old Volcanic Complex and the Trachytic-Phonolitic Complex edifices must also have been situated. The ages obtained from the dikes (between 14.8 and 11.5 Ma) indicate that the radial injections are contemporary with the phonolites and the trachytes of the Trachytic-Phonolitic Complex and yet are part of the intermediate evolutionary stage of Boa Vista.

  4. Ages of zircons from pre-, syn- and post-caldera eruption products of the Changbaishan Volcano, indicating rapid magmatic development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, H.; Fan, Q.; Zhang, H.; Schmitt, A. K.

    2013-12-01

    The Millennium Eruption of Changbaishan Volcano with its eponymous 1000 CE eruption age represents one of the two largest volcanic eruptions on Earth in the past 2000 years. In addition to this major caldera-producing eruption of comendite magma, the Changbaishan Volcano also erupted smaller-scale comendite at ~5 ka and trachyte at ~0.3 ka. Here we report U-Th disequilibrium ages of zircons from pumice and lava of the pre-caldera (~5 ka), syn-caldera (the 1 ka Millennium eruption), and post-caldera (~0.3 ka) events. The zircon isochron ages are 12.4+/-1.5 ka (2σ, n=29, MSWD=0.87) for the 5 ka eruption, and 12.2 +/- 1.7 ka (n=16, MSWD=1.0) for the 1 ka eruption which is in agreement within uncertainty with a previously reported isochron age of 10.6+/-1.6 ka (n=11, MSWD=0.61) for a different 1 ka sample (Zou et al., 2010, Lithos). The zircon storage times in the pre-eruptive magma body are thus 7 ka for the pre-caldera eruption and 11 ka for the syn-caldera eruption. Furthermore, identical zircon ages in pre-caldera and syn-caldera rocks suggest that both comenditic eruptions tapped the same magma body. In contrast to the uniform zircon ages for the 5 ka and 1 ka comenditic eruptions, zircon ages for the post-caldera 0.3 ka trachytic eruption define multimodal age populations. The youngest peak for the 0.3 ka eruption is 2.6+/-1.8 ka (n=11, MSWD=0.90), an older peak is 130+/-10 ka (n=13, MSWD=1.7), and the oldest population is ≧230 ka (near U-Th equilibrium). The youngest mode represents zircon microphenocrysts (autocrysts) that crystallized in a trachytic magma chamber in the built-up to the 0.3 ka eruption, whereas the 130 ka and ≧230 ka zircons are interpreted as antecrysts derived from earlier episodes of magmatism. If this interpretation is correct, the zircon storage time in the eruptible magma body for the 0.3 ka eruption is extremely short at 2.3+/-1.8 ka. The distinct multimodal zircon age distributions for the 0.3 ka eruption of trachytic magma suggests this post-caldera eruption tapped a separate magma chamber, and argues against any significant mixing between comendite and trachyte magma bodies at Changbaishan Volcano.

  5. The role of magma mixing and mafic recharge in the evolution of a back-arc quaternary caldera: The case of Payún Matrú, Western Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernando, Irene Raquel; Petrinovic, Ivan Alejandro; Llambías, Eduardo Jorge; D'Elia, Leandro; González, Pablo Diego; Aragón, Eugenio

    2016-02-01

    The Quaternary Payún Matrú volcano is a long-lived edifice that developed a summit caldera 8 km wide, with abundant pre- and post-caldera volcanic activity. It is the main volcano of the Payún Matrú Volcanic Field, which is located in the back-arc Payenia Basaltic Province, at mid-western Argentina. The composition of Payún Matrú is mainly trachytic, with lesser amounts of trachyandesitic and basaltic trachyandesitic lavas. The Payún Matrú Volcanic Field includes also the Payún Liso stratovolcano and more than 200 monogenetic basaltic cones and associated lava flows that are located east and west of the caldera. The aim of this work is to show the Payún Matrú evolution based on the mineralogical and textural characterization and to make inferences on the trigger mechanism for the explosive eruption which leads to the caldera formation. Some intermediate lavas and trachytes include phenocrysts with contrasting textures and composition, such as inverse zoning in plagioclase and clinopyroxenes, sieved plagioclases with a more calcic rim and calcic plagioclases with a more sodic rim, indicating that they could not have formed together and suggesting magma mixing processes. In addition, a few lavas show mafic enclaves or texturally different groundmasses with fluidal contacts, indicating mingling between two magmas. These lavas are found in the pre-caldera stage and the early post-caldera stage of Payún Matrú. The trachytic pyroclastic deposits related to the caldera collapse do not exhibit evidence of hybridization, although they present a minor proportion of dissolved feldspars and biotite replaced by anhydrous minerals, suggesting that a restricted zone of the chamber was reheated. This may be explained by a mafic recharge event where part of the host trachytic magma was heated, but without a complete homogenization between the host and recharging magmas. These features, in addition to the abundant basaltic volcanism east and west of the caldera, suggest that the trigger mechanism for the explosive eruption was the injection of basaltic magma into the trachytic chamber of Payún Matrú.

  6. Geology and petrology of the Woods Mountains Volcanic Center, southeastern California: Implications for the genesis of peralkaline rhyolite ash flow tuffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCurry, Michael

    1988-12-01

    The Woods Mountains Volcanic Center is a middle Miocene silicic caldera complex located at the transition from the northern to the southern Basin and Range provinces of the western United States. It consists of a trachyte-trachydacite-rhyolite-peralkaline rhyolite association of lava flows, domes, plugs, pyroclastic rocks, and epiclastic breccia. Volcanism began at about 16.4 Ma, near the end of a local resurgence of felsic to intermediate magmatism and associated crustal extension. Numerous metaluminous high-K trachyte, trachydacite, and rhyolite lava flows, domes, and pyroclastic deposits accumulated from vents scattered over an area of 200 km2 forming a broad volcanic field with an initial volume of about 10 km3. At 15.8 Ma, about 80 km3 of metaluminous to mildly peralkaline high-K rhyolite ash flows were erupted from vents in the western part of fhe field in three closely spaced pulses, resulting in the formation of a trap door caldera 10 km in diameter. The ash flows formed the Wild Horse Mesa Tuff, a compositionally zoned ash flow sheet that originally covered an area of about 600 km2 to a maximum thickness of at least 320 m. High-K trachyte pumice lapilli, some of which are intimately banded with rhyolite, were produced late in the two later eruptions, Intracaldera volcanism from widely distributed vents rapidly filled the caldera with about 10 km3 of high-K, mildly peralkaline, high-silica rhyolite lava flows and pyroclastic deposits. These are interlayered with breccia derived from the caldera scarp. They are intruded by numerous compositionally similar plugs, some of which structurally uplifted and fractured the center of the caldera. The center evolved above a high-K trachyte magma chamber about 10 km in diameter that had developed and differentiated within the upper crust at about 15.8 Ma. Petrological, geochemical, and geophysical data are consistent with the idea that a cap of peralkaline rhyolite magma formed within the trachyte chamber as a result of fractional crystallization within chemical boundary layers.

  7. Volcaniclastic facies architecture of a long-lived, nested silicic tuff ring: the Los Loros volcano, Mendoza, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Németh, Károly; Risso, Corina; Nullo, Francisco

    2010-05-01

    Los Loros is a small, well-preserved volcanic depression. New K/Ar age dating revealed that the volcano is least 1 million years old. The circular morphology of the ~50 m deep and ~ 1 km broad crater of Los Loros was initially inferred to be of phreatomagmatic origin. Recent work, however, concluded that Los Loros is a far more complex volcano than originally thought; with multiple eruptive phases produced by magmatic and minor phreatomagmatic explosive fragmentation-dominated eruptive processes that consequently formed a low aspect ratio volcano. Previous work also suggested that volcanic rocks of Los Loros were entirely basaltic in composition (Puente Formation) and their age was mid-upper Pleistocene. Newly obtained geochemical data, alongside a new age determination, underlies the fact that the volcano is far older than had been expected from its morphology, and its composition shows no signs of basalt, instead it is trachytic. The volcanic succession forms a ~100 m thick pile sitting directly on Cretaceous continental red beds. The base of the volcanic succession is a polymict volcaniclastic conglomerate with variable bed thickness and occasional cross stratification, indicating a channel-filling nature and an origin from a braided river system. The diversity of the clasts suggests that they likely have been transported from a nearby Miocene back-arc volcanic complex, the Sierra Cachahuén (~40 km), which is a lava dome dominated multiple volcano with thick silicic pyroclastic successions. The volcaniclastic conglomerate is covered by a trachytic pumiceous unit thickening toward the SSE. They are composed of loosely packed rounded pumice lapilli. These beds have a well-sorted texture with no characteristic internal stratification, indicating that they are fall in origin and the bed thickness variation is inferred to reflect the paleo-wind direction. A thick pile of pumiceous tuff (up to 20 m) overlies the basal pumice fall unit. It is stratified, cross-bedded and having erosional contacts to the underlying pumice fall beds suggest deposition from high particle concentration pyroclastic density currents. This succession is inferred to represent an original pumice ring formation in a braided river network, where external surface and shallow sub-surface water were available to influence the eruption, causing slight phreatomagmatic affinity. This initial volcaniclastic succession is covered by immature, but thick (dm-to-m) pelitic palosoils and/or channel-filling volcanic conglomerates, suggesting a significant time break (tens of thousands of years), erosion and landscape resetting by fluvial networks after the pumice ring was formed. The rejuvenation of the volcanic vent is represented by a thick pyroclastic and lava capping unit. At least three units of trachytic pyroclastic breccias can be separated on the basis of their welding textures and pumice-to-lithic ratios. The gradual transition from stratified trachytic pumiceous beds to welded units indicates that these units are formed from laterally moving pumiceous pyroclastic density currents (e.g. small-volume ignimbrites). The topmost unit of Los Loros is a trachytic lava flow, which is well-preserved in the East. Monomict volcanic conglomerate covers the eastern sector of the lower slopes of Los Loros, suggesting long-lasting alluvial deposition since the volcanism. The eruptive sequence preserved at Los Loros indicates an initial pumice ring formation on an active alluvial plain. The significant time gap between the basal and capping volcanic units suggests a long-lasting inter-eruptive period prior to resumption of volcanic activity, forming small-volume, low aspect ratio trachytic ignimbrites and capping lava flows. Los Loros is a unique volcano in the sense that it "mimics" a tuff ring in its morphology and geometrical parameters; however, its eruptive sequence is more typical to those eruptions associated with large-volume silicic composition volcanoes with significant inter-eruptive periods.

  8. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of the late Cretaceous potassic-alkaline volcanic rocks from the Amasya Region (northern Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gülmez, Fatma; Genç, Can; Tüysüz, Okan; Karacık, Zekiye; Roden, Mike; Billor, Zeki; Hames, Willis

    2013-04-01

    The Cretaceous Lokman Formation (Alp, 1972) , is a volcano-sedimantary unit that comprises high- to ultra high-K alkaline volcanic rocks in Amasya Region (40°N, 35°E). The volcanic rocks expose as small outcrops and interfingered with pyroclastic and epiclastic rocks, and are classified as leucitite, tephriphonolite (LT), lamprophyres, trachytes and rarely andesites. LT and lamprophyres occur as dikes cutting each other, and rare lava flows. Trachytes are observed as small domes in the field and lots of pebbles and blocks within the clastic deposits derived from the domes. Samples of LT comprise lct+cpx (diopsite)+plg+mag+ap and classified as leucite-basanite mineralogically and tephri-phonolite geochemically. Ar-Ar age dating from leucites show that the leucite-bearing volcanic activity formed 75.6±3.7 Ma. The mineralogic composition of melanokratic lamprophyre dikes are represented by Kfs+cpx+mica+ap+mag. They defined geochemically as phono-tephrite and phonolite. The Ar-Ar plateau ages from the phlogopites from two different outcrops are 76.78 and 77.48 Ma. The main minerals of trachytic rocks are amp + bt + pl + Kfs + spn + ap +opq. They are classified as alkaline trachyandesite, geochemically. Radiometric age data from Kfs minerals reveal that the trachytic volcanism occurred 75.83±0.09 Ma. Except one andesitic sample, lamprophyres and trachytes of the Lokman Formation are the high- and ultra high-K and alkaline rocks. LT and lamprophyres are characterized by relatively high MgO (3.25-7.04 wt.%), K2O (4.34-6.54 wt.%), Na2O (3.42-5.74 wt.%). Total analcimization of leucite minerals let to decreasing its K2O, and increasing the Na2O contents. Therefore, K2O/Na2O values for LT and the lamprophyres (0.92-2.27) are relatively low. Trachytic suite is also high-K and alkaline in nature. On MORB normalized plots, all of the volcanic rocks from Lokman Formation display enrichment of LIL elements significantly relative to HFSE, and depletions of Nb-Ta and Ti elements. Mg# (44.78 - 62.24), FeO (4.74-7.80 wt.%), Nb (6.3-14.4 ppm) and Ni (20-81 ppm) contents of these rocks imply that these rocks were not originated directly from the primitive melts. The geochemical findings suggest a source that is similar with subduction-related magmas. The evaluation of the geological data and combined with the geochemical findings suggest that the high- to ultrahigh-K alkaline volcanic rocks of the Lokman formation were generated by the partial melting processes of a heterogeneous magma source that was modified by the subduction of the Neo-Tethys ocean during the late Cretaceous period.

  9. Glass and mineral analyses from first deposits of Peach Spring Supereruption (SW USA) illuminate initial tapping of a zoned magma chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mccracken, R. G.; Miller, C. F.; Buesch, D.; Gualda, G. A.; Covey, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Peach Spring supereruption (18.78±0.02 Ma) was sourced from Silver Creek caldera in the southern Black Mountains, Arizona (Ferguson et al. in press). The resulting ignimbrite, the Peach Spring Tuff (PST), blanketed >32,000 km2 of Arizona, California, and Nevada (Buesch, 1993). Underlying the ignimbrite is a thin (≤ 1m thick) basal layered deposit that consists of texturally distinct layers 1a-e (Valentine et al. 1989) and is present up to ~100 km from the source caldera. Basal layered deposits contain the first material erupted during the PST supereruption, preceding the main eruption event. Petrography and geochemistry of minerals and pumice clasts from basal layered deposits collected ~15-100 km from the caldera, combined with a survey of glass and crystal compositions from both outflow and basal deposits, permit (1) comparisons with the overlying ignimbrite, and (2) insights into the initial stages of the supereruption and extraction of magma from the chamber. Pumice clasts from a pumice-rich layer (1a2) of the basal deposit were characterized by LA-ICPMS and SEM. Unaltered glass has a uniform high-Si rhyolite composition (76.7% SiO2, 13.0% Al2O3, 3.6% Na2O, 5.3% K2O, 0.6% FeO, <0.1% MgO, 0.6% CaO, 0.1% TiO2). Mildly altered glass is similar but has lower Na2O and higher K2O. Pumice clasts are relatively crystal poor (<10% phenocrysts) with an assemblage dominated by sanidine (~Or55Ab43An2), with lesser plagioclase (~Ab73An19Or8), minor hornblende and biotite, and accessory magnetite, sphene, zircon, chevkinite, and apatite; no quartz was identified. Initial LA-ICPMS results for glass reveal REE patterns with large negative Gd (0.21: i.e. U-shaped REE pattern) and Eu (0.31) anomalies, very low Ba and Sr (≤10 ppm), and high Rb (~250 ppm). These compositions are essentially identical to those of the most common pumice from distal outflow ignimbrite, but very different from crystal-rich (>30%) trachyte pumice that dominates the intracaldera fill and is present at the tops of proximal outflow sections (Pamukcu et al. in press). A broader survey by EMP of minerals and glass shards from basal layered deposits and outflow ignimbrite (Buesch, 1993 and unpublished data, 1992) support the general conclusion that distal outflow is dominated by high-Si rhyolite, but demonstrate that trachyte is present throughout ignimbrite and basal deposits. Although SiO2 concentration is dominantly ~76-78 wt%, a small but persistent population ranges from ~66-72 wt%. Likewise, 6% (in layer 1a2) to 40% of all plagioclase in basal and outflow deposit samples is relatively calcic (An>27), indicating trachyte origin. The above data (1) confirm the existence of two compositions of erupted magma (phenocryst-poor, high-Si rhyolite, crystal-rich trachyte); (2) demonstrate that the initial eruption (basal layer) tapped the same magmas as the ignimbrite; and (3) reveal that, although rhyolite dominates outside the caldera, trachyte like that in intracaldera deposits was also tapped throughout the eruption. These relations are consistent with eruption from a vertically stratified magma chamber with trachyte (cumulate?) beneath rhyolite, but indicate that either chamber stratification was imperfectly developed or some magma from deeper levels was entrained throughout the eruption.

  10. Primary origin of some trachytoid magmas: Inferences from naturally quenched glasses in hydrothermally metasomatized gabbroic xenoliths (Hyblean area, Sicily)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viccaro, Marco; Scribano, Vittorio; Cristofolini, Renato; Ottolini, Luisa; Manuella, Fabio C.

    2009-12-01

    Hydrothermally-modified gabbroic xenoliths from the Hyblean tuff-breccia deposits (Sicily) consist of albitized plagioclase, Fe-Mg-rich clays, aegirine-augite, ± zeolites, titanite, apatite, magnetite, and hydrothermal zircon. Pockets of silicate glass with perlitic cracking occur in some samples forming 15-20% (by volume) of the rock modal assemblage. Electron microprobe analyses show the trachytic composition of the glass, with generally peralkaline sodic affinity [molar Al 2O 3/(Na 2O + K 2O) ~ 0.8 (average value); molar Al 2O 3/(Na 2O + K 2O + CaO) ~ 0.7 (average value); Na 2O/K 2O (wt.%) = 1.7-2.3]. The glass trace element abundances, obtained by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analyses are consistent with those of world-wide trachytes (e.g. Zr/Ti = 0.15-018; Nb/Y = 0.73-1). Relatively high abundances of Cl (700-1600 ppm) and F (> 500 ppm) were also detected in the glass. Careful macroscopic and microscopic observations exclude the possibility that external silicate melt infiltrated the xenolith. The occurrence of glass pockets between the mafic clay assemblages and the feldspar grains, along with comparisons between chemical compositions of the glass and the surrounding minerals, suggest that the glass is due to the melting of a eutectoid system consisting of Na-rich alkali feldspar, Fe-Mg-rich clays and aegirine-augite. Halogens had probably played an important role in the partial melting process by decreasing the melting temperature of modal minerals, especially feldspar. The occurrence of these trachytic glasses lends support to petrologic models suggesting that partial melting of a hydrothermally altered, brine-rich oceanic crust induced by shallow-seated basic intrusions can produce primary trachytoid melts. This may explain the "Daly-gap" characterizing some oceanic within-plate volcanoes.

  11. Volatiles in pantellerite magmas: A case study of the Green Tuff Plinian eruption (Island of Pantelleria, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzo, Giovanni; Landi, Patrizia; Rotolo, Silvio G.

    2013-07-01

    The Green Tuff (GT) Plinian eruption, the largest in magnitude at Pantelleria, erupted 3 to 7 km3 DRE of pantellerite magma and a small volume of trachyte. Fifty-nine anorthoclase-hosted melt inclusions from the two basal pumice members were analyzed by FT-IR spectroscopy in order to assess the pre-eruptive H2O content in the pantellerite melt. Microanalytical methods were used to determine major element, Cl, F and S contents. Melt inclusions and glassy groundmasses have a nearly homogeneous pantelleritic composition (peralkaline index = 1.9-2.2) and variable water contents ranging from 1.4 to as high as 4.2 wt %, i.e. much higher than the 1.4 wt % of earlier published studies. The chlorine content is constant at about 1 wt %. Combined Cl and H2O data were used to estimate a confining pressure of about 50 MPa (depth around 2-3 km) for the GT magma chamber. The chamber was characterized by a compositional zoning with a dominant pantellerite overlying a trachyte magma. Soon after the GT eruption, intra-caldera volcanism was dominated by the eruption of voluminous trachyte lava flows, while pantellerite melt production resumed after about 20 ka with numerous low-volume, mildly explosive (Strombolian) to effusive eruptions. Comparison with data from the literature reveals that, despite the different explosivity, the post-caldera Strombolian eruptions and the GT Plinian eruption were fed by pantelleritic magmas with similar water contents. Chlorine and CO2 contents suggest that the young magma reservoirs feeding the Strombolian to effusive activity were deeper (h ≥ 4.5 km) than the much larger (based on erupted volumes) magma chamber which fed the GT eruption.

  12. Volcanic history and 40Ar/39Ar and 14C geochronology of Terceira Island, Azores, Portugal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calvert, A.T.; Moore, R.B.; McGeehin, J.P.; Rodrigues da Silva, A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Seven new 40Ar/39Ar and 23 new radiocarbon ages of eruptive units, in support of new geologic mapping, improve the known chronology of Middle to Late Pleistocene and Holocene volcanic activity on the island of Terceira, Azores and define an east-to-west progression in stratovolcano growth. The argon ages indicate that Cinco Picos Volcano, the oldest on Terceira, completed its main subaerial cone building activity by about 370-380??ka. Collapse of the upper part of the stratovolcanic edifice to form a 7 ?? 9??km caldera occurred some time after 370??ka. Postcaldera eruptions of basalt from cinder cones on and near the caldera floor and trachytic pyroclastic flow and pumice fall deposits from younger volcanoes west of Cinco Picos have refilled much of the caldera. The southern portion of Guilherme Moniz Volcano, in the central part of the island, began erupting prior to 270??ka and produced trachyte domes, flows, and minor pyroclastic deposits until at least 111??ka. The northern part of Guilherme Moniz Caldera is less well exposed than the southern part, but reflects a similar age range. The northwest portion of the caldera was formed sometime after 44??ka. Several well-studied ignimbrites that blanket much of the island likely erupted from Guilherme Moniz Volcano. The Pico Alto Volcanic Center, a tightly spaced cluster of trachyte domes and short flows, is a younger part of Guilherme Moniz Volcano. Stratigraphic studies and our new radiocarbon ages suggest that most of the Pico Alto eruptions occurred during the period from about 9000 to 1000??years BP. Santa Barbara Volcano is the youngest stratovolcano on Terceira, began erupting prior to 29??ka, and has been active historically. ?? 2006.

  13. Granodiorite and alkaline suite at Gale crater: continental crust on early Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sautter, V.; Toplis, M. J.; Cousin, A.; Fabre, C.; Wiens, R. C.; Mangold, N.; Forni, O.; Gasnault, O.; Pinet, P.; Rapin, W.; Fisk, M.; Le Deit, L.; Meslin, P.-Y.; Maurice, S.; Lasue, J.; Stolper, E.; Beck, P.; Wray, J.; Bridges, J. C.; Le Mouelic, S.

    2015-10-01

    The Curiosity rover landed at Gale, an early Hesperian age crater formed within Noachian terrains on Mars. The rover encountered a great variety of felsic igneous float rocks ranging from granodiorite to trachy andesite and trachyte during the first part of the traverse up to sol 550. They are the first in-situ evidence of low density early Noachian crust on Mars, sampled by Peace Vallis river cross-cutting the crater wall over a 2-3km thick vertical section, below the basaltic regolite.

  14. Structure and geological evolution of the island of Ponza, Italy: inferences from geological and gravimetric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellucci, F.; Grimaldi, M.; Lirer, L.; Rapolla, A.

    1997-10-01

    A geological and a geophysical survey have been carried out at Ponza Island, Tyrrhenian sea, Italy. Geological and structural data allowed to identify three main tectonic systems: NW-SE, NE-SW and E-W trending. The first one is related to a pre-volcanic tectonic event, probably linked to the Pliocene extensional activity of the Tyrrhenian evolution; the other two systems affected the volcanic units in two different stages of the Lower Pleistocene, the earlier one after the rhyolitic hyaloclastic formation (HF) emplacement and the later one after the emplacement of older trachytic pyroclastic deposits (Lower Pyroclastic Units—LPU). The latter event was followed by the emersion of the whole Ponza area, as testified by a marked erosional surface and marine terrace deposits cropping out at the top of LPU. The Upper Pyroclastic Units (UPU) represent the younger trachytic activity of the island (1.3 Myr) and do not show evidence of tectonic activity. The NW-SE-trending tectonic system probably assisted the rhyolitic magma rise, while the NE-SW- and E-W-trending systems mainly assisted the trachytic magma rise, responsible for the explosive and effusive activity in the southern area and for the hydrothermal fluids that caused alteration processes in the northern area. A 161-station gravimetric survey was carried out on the island and surrounding islets. The geological data and the gravimetric survey have been used to propose a 2.5 D model in which rhyolitic hyaloclastic deposits (ρ = 1.7 g cm -3) overlay an articulated Meso-Cenozoic sedimentary substratum (ρ = 2.6 g cm -3) laying at a depth to 300 m below sea level. Both formations are crossed by rhyolitic dykes (ρ = 2.4 g cm -3) which mark feeder fractures. In the M. Guardia area, where a maximum is present, this model accounts for the presence of a horst of the rigid basement, a shallow trachytic lava flow and its feeder (ρ = 2.8 g cm -3).

  15. Zonal and vertcal variations in welding rate and composition of ignimbrites in the bambouto volcano (cameroon line, central africa): volcanological importance.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nono, A.; Nkouathio, D. G.; Gountie Dedzo, M.; Njonfang, E.; Kagou Dongmo, A.; Tchoufa, M.

    2003-04-01

    The Bambouto Mountain is a shield volcano, that lies between Longitudes 10^o and 10^o10'E and the Latitudes 5^o35' and 5^o45'N. It is part of the Cameroon Volcanic Line, and lies in the NE linear axis to Mts Cameroon and Manengouba. It is elliptic (45-50 km X 20-25 km) and bears two collaspsed calderas at its summit. Volcanic activity of this volcano is in three dynamism: an effusive volcanic activity, that at the origin of lava flow (basanite, basalt, hawaiite, benmoréite, trachyte, tephrite,...), an extrusive phase responsible of the formation of trachytic, phonolitic and rarely basaltic domes. Lastly an explosive phase which gave rise to strombolian ejecta and several ignimbritic sheets. Ignimbrites are common and occur as discontinuous sheets 10-30 m thick, at times up to 100 m. These ignimbrites are various, ranging from tuffaceous facies which are more or less rich in lithic fragments to compact. trachyto-rhyolitic facies. Thin sections of these ignimbrites show full or partly cracked alkali feldspars, plagioclase, biotite, clinopyroxenes, trachyte fragments and entirely deformed flames, devitrified or partly altered in a devitrified matrix. They also enclosed xenoliths of granito-gneissic basement rocks, trachytes, scoria and carbonaceous rocks (lignite and/or carbonised wood). These ignimbritic elements are not found in all facies (Gountie Dedzo, 2002). In addition, the different ignimbritic facies, present degrees of welding depending on outcrop locality or on stratigraphic position in the eruption episode. Hand specimen and thin section studies indicate different welding rates and compaction depend on the emission source of the tephras, emission temperature and intensity of the eruption. Following the afore mentioned and description of proposed geological cross-section, they exist many volcanic phases and ignimbritic emissions in the Bamboutos Mountain. A forerunner phase in which lava flows were outpoured in the south of the volcano just after the initial strombolian eruption was followed by at least three other eruptive phases on the south flank and inside the caldera. It intercalates other lava types, thus presenting a complex chronostratigraphic for the entire massif (Nono and al., 2002) Keys words : Cameroon Volcanic Line, Bambouto Mountain, Ignimbrite. Welding. bibliographic Reference Nono A., Njonfang E., Kagou Dongmo A., Nkouathio D. G., Tchoua F. M., 2002. Mise en evidence d'une phase initiale strombolienne ante-ignimbritique dans les monts Bambouto, Ouest-Cameroun. 19th colloquim of African geology, 19th-22th March. El Jadida, Morocco. Gountie Dedzo M., 2002. Les dépôts et coulées pyroclastiques dans les Monts Bambouto : leur importance dans la chronostratigraphie. Mém. de Maît. Univ. Dschang, 58p.

  16. Chemical and mineralogic trends within the Timber Mountain--Oasis Valley caldera complex, Nevada: Evidence for Multiple cycles of chemical evolution in a long-lived silicic magma system

    SciTech Connect

    Broxton, D. E.; Warren, R. G.; Byers, F. M.; Scott, R. B.

    1989-05-10

    Rocks of the Miocene and Pliocene Timber Mountain--Oasis Valley(TM-OV) caldera complex in the southwest Nevada volcanic field are dominantlyrhyolites and quartz latites (trachytes). Minor basalticto dacitic rocks were erupted peripherally to the caldera complex and in themoat of the youngest caldera. We divided the petrologic evolution of thecaldera complex into a series of petrochemicalcycles based on systematic changes in rock chemistry, modal petrography, andmineral chemistry as a function of time. Each petrochemical cycle ischaracterized by periods of systematic differentitiation toward more siliceousor rhyolitic compositions. Breaks between cycles are generally abrupt andfollow either times of major ash flow tuff eruption or episodes of relativelymafic (basaltic to dacitic) volcanism.

  17. Formation of the Late Permian Panzhihua plutonic-hypabyssal-volcanic igneous complex: Implications for the genesis of Fe-Ti oxide deposits and A-type granites of SW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shellnutt, J. G.; Jahn, B.-M.

    2010-01-01

    The Late Permian (260 Ma) Emeishan large igneous province of SW China contains numerous magmatic Fe-Ti oxide deposits. The Fe-Ti oxide deposits occur in the lower parts of evolved layered gabbroic intrusions which are spatially and temporally associated with A-type granitic rocks. The 260 Ma Panzhihua layered gabbroic intrusion hosts one of the largest magmatic Fe-Ti oxide deposits in China and is coeval with a peralkaline A-type granitic pluton. The granite has intruded the overlying Emeishan flood basalts and fed at least one dyke which erupted onto the surface producing columnar jointed trachytes. The presence of syenodiorite between the layered gabbro and granite is evidence for compositional evolution from mafic to intermediate to felsic rocks. The syenodiorites have intermediate to felsic composition with SiO 2 = 61 to 65 wt.%, MgO = 0.27 to 0.6 wt.% and CaO = 1.0 to 2.5 wt.% as compared to the granite SiO 2 = 65 to 72 wt.%, MgO = 0.1 to 0.4 wt.%, CaO = < 1.0 wt.%. Primitive-mantle-normalized incompatible element plots show corresponding reciprocal patterns between the mafic and felsic rocks. The chondrite-normalized REE patterns show Eu anomalies changing from > 1(Eu/Eu* = 1.1 to 2.6) in the gabbroic intrusion, to < 1 in the syenodiorite (Eu/Eu* = 0.75 to 0.83), granites and trachytes (Eu/Eu* = 0.55-0.87). Previously published ɛNd (T) values from clinopyroxenes ( ɛNd (T) = + 1.1 to + 3.2) of the gabbroic intrusion match the whole-rock values of the syenodiorite ( ɛNd (T) = + 2.1 to + 2.5), granite and trachyte ( ɛNd (T) = + 2.2 to + 2.9), suggesting that all rock types originated from the same mantle source. MELTS and trace element modeling confirm that all rock types can be generated by fractional crystallization of high-Ti Emeishan basalt. The jump in SiO 2 from the gabbro to the syenodiorite is attributed to the en masse crystallization of the Fe-Ti oxides. The geological and geochemical data indicate that fractional crystallization of a common parental magma produced the layered gabbroic intrusion and Fe-Ti oxide deposit, the syenodiorite, granites and trachyte of the Panzhihua region, which thus form a genetically related plutonic-hypabyssal-volcanic complex. Other granite-gabbro complexes in the region likely formed in a similar manner.

  18. Geochemistry and mineralogy of the older (> 40 ka) ignimbrites in the Campanian Plain, southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkin, Harvey E.; Raia, Federica; Rolandi, Giuseppe; Jackson, John C.; de Vivo, Benedetto

    2010-05-01

    The Campanian Plain in southern Italy has been volcanically active during the last 600 ka. The largest and best known eruption at 39 ka formed the Campanian Ignimbrite (CI), which has the largest volume (~310 km3) and the greatest areal extent. However, significant, but scattered deposits of older ignimbrites underlie the CI and document a long history of trachytic eruptions. We examined the geochemistry and mineralogy of 11 older ignimbrite strata by optical petrography, electron microprobe, scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, and various whole-rock geochemical techniques. Strata at Durazzano (116.1 ka), Moschiano (184.7 ka), Seiano Valley A (245.9 ka), Seiano Valley B (289.6 ka), Taurano 7 (205.6 and 210.4 ka), Taurano 9 (183.8 ka), and Taurano 14 (157.4 ka) have been previously dated by the 40Ar/39Ar technique (Rolandi et al., 2003, Min. & Pet., 79) on hand-picked sanidine. The older ignimbrites are trachytic, but are highly altered with LOI from 8 to 17 wt%. Whole-rock compositions reflect variable element mobility during weathering; TiO2, Al2O3, Fe-oxide, and CaO tend to be enriched relative to average CI composition, whereas Na2O and K2O are depleted. X-ray diffraction identified major chabazite, kaolinite, and illite-smectite alteration products in some samples. The phenocryst mineralogy in all of the strata is typical for trachyte magma and consists of plagioclase (~An80 to ~An40), potassium feldspar (~Or50 to ~Or80), biotite (TiO2 = ~4.6 wt%, BaO = ~0.70 wt%, F = ~0.65 wt%), diopside (~Ca47Mg48Fe5 to ~Ca48Mg34Fe18), titanomagnetite, and uncommon Ca-amphibole. Relatively immobile trace elements Zr, Hf, Nb, and Th display similar abundance, linear trends, and ratios as those measured in the Campanian Ignimbrite: Th/Hf = ~4, Zr/Hf = ~50, and Zr/Nb = ~6. The similarity of trace element systematics and phenocryst mineralogy among the Campanian Ignimbrite and the older ignimbrites suggests that the magmagenesis processes and parental source have been relatively constant during the long period of trachyte volcanism in the Campanian Plain.

  19. Intermittent upwelling of asthenosphere beneath the Gregory Rift, Kenya

    SciTech Connect

    Tatsumi, Yoshiyuki Kyoto Univ. ); Kimura, Nobukazu ); Itaya, Tetsumaru ); Koyaguchi, Takehiro ); Suwa, Kanenori )

    1991-06-01

    K-Ar dates and chemical compositions of basalts in the Gregory Rift, Kenya, demonstrate marked secular variation of lava chemistry. Two magmatic cycles characterized by incompatible element relative depletion are recognized; both occurring immediately after the peak of basaltic volcanism and coeval with both trachyte/phonolite volcanism and domal uplift of the region. These cycles may be attributed to increasing degree of partial melting of mantle source material in association with thinning of the lithosphere by thermal erosion through contact with hot upwelling asthenospheric mantle. Cyclic variation in asthenosphere upwelling may be considered an important controlling process in the evolution of the Gregory Rift.

  20. Petrological Features of The Post-Collisional Volcanics on the Izmir-Ankara-Erzincan Suture Zone at Around Almus and Yıldızeli Regions, NE Turkey.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göçmengil, G.; Karacik, Z.; Genç, Ş. C.

    2014-12-01

    Following the closure of the northern Neo-Tethyan ocean, post-collisional magmatism developed both on the Izmir-Ankara-Erzincan suture zone (IAESZ) and the northern (Pontides) and southern (Kırşehir block) continents. Cenozoic volcanics (particularly Middle to Upper Eocene) from the Almus and Yıldızeli regions (NE, Turkey) have poorly known and exposed along the northern and southern part of the IAESZ respectively. In this presentation; we present geological, geochemical and isotopic data of these volcanic rocks to characterize the petrological evolution and petrogenesis on the different tectonic blocks. Almus region, have a composite basement of Mesozoic metamorphic and ophiolitic rocks. Volcanic and sedimentary units of the Middle Eocene covering the basement units have a stratigraphic sequence of: a basal conglomerate; fossiliferous sandstone/shale; epiclastic rocks; auto-brecciated lavas with basalt/basaltic andesite lava flows. All these units are cut by trachyte stocks. Besides, basement of Yıldızeli region consisting of Cretaceous Kırşehir block metamorphics with IAESZ melangé and flysch units. Volcanic and sedimentary units covers the basement are trachyte-trachyandesite lavas; fossiliferous limestone; basalt/basaltic andesite lava flows; pyroclastic units with dacitic lavas. Basalt/basaltic andesites from Almus region are sub-alkaline/mildly alkaline and display middle to high-K character. REE data display relative enrichments in LILE (Sr, K, Rb, Ba, Th) together with negative anomalies of Nb, Ta and P. Trachyte stocks are shoshonitic and display LILE enrichment together with negative patters of Nb, Ta, P and Eu. Besides, trachyte-trachyandesite and basalt/basaltic andesite from Yıldızeli region are sub-alkaline/mildly alkaline with middle-K to shoshonitic character. REE patterns show enrichments in LILE and depletion of Nb, Ta, P and Ti for both rock suites. The 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd ratios of volcanic rocks from both regions, range from 0.704389 to 0.707134 and from 0.512631 to 0.512867 respectively. Regarding the geochemical and isotopic data, we suggest the mantle sources modified previously by subduction related fluids and/or crustal contamination might played an important role of the evolution of the volcanism in the aforementioned regions.

  1. Stable isotope analyses of the peralkaline volcanics Gregory Rift Valley, Kenya

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, S.; Macdonald, R.; Fallick, A. E.; Kelly, M.

    1993-01-01

    Delta O-18 analyses of the Naivasha rhyolites, basalts, Menengai trachytes and the Yatta phonolite are presented together with D/H analyses of the Naivasha rhyolites. Delta O-18 results vary from 5.7 to 8.9 per mill which is within the reported range of delta O-18 analyses for continental volcanics. Closure temperatures calulated from the basalts and rhyolites show equilibration to be at magmatic temperatures. D/H values range from -40 to -148 per mill indicating that the rhyolites have undergone large scale degasssing.

  2. Yield strengths of flows on the earth, Mars, and moon. [application of Bingham plastic model to lava flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, H. J.; Arthur, D. W. G.; Schaber, G. G.

    1978-01-01

    Dimensions of flows on the earth, Mars, and moon and their topographic gradients obtained from remote measurements are used to calculate yield strengths with a view to explore the validity of the Bingham plastic model and determine whether there is a relation between yield strengths and silica contents. Other factors are considered such as the vagaries of natural phenomena that might contribute to erroneous interpretations and measurements. Comparison of yield strengths of Martian and lunar flows with terrestrial flows suggests that the Martian and lunar flows are more akin to terrestrial basalts than they are to terrestrial andesites, trachytes, and rhyolites.

  3. Transition from steady to unsteady Plinian eruption column: the VEI 5, 4.6 ka Fogo A Plinian eruption, São Miguel, Azores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pensa, Alessandra; Cas, Raymond; Giordano, Guido; Porreca, Massimiliano; Wallenstein, Nicolau

    2015-10-01

    The 4.6 ka Fogo A trachytic Plinian eruption on São Miguel Island, Azores, Portugal, is composed by four main phases: 1) Initial phreatomagmatic activity which emplaced thin surge deposits with accretionary lapilli; 2) fully buoyant steady Plinian activity which generated a prominent trachytic basal fall-out deposit; 3) partial collapsing activity, which led to the emplacement of two trachytic-trachydacitic intra-plinian ignimbrites (pink and black ignimbrites) and associated surge deposits, inter-stratified within two fall-out deposits; 4) vent widening and fully collapsing activity which caused the emplacement of the climactic brown trachydacitic ignimbrite. The deposits of these four main phases have been organised into three members FGA1, FGA2 and FGA3, sub-divided into 15 stratigraphic or emplacement units. The fluctuations from a steady to unsteady Plinian eruption column parallel the change in composition of the magma from trachytic to trachydacitic. Although minimal, the change in composition resulted in a marked change in colour of the juvenile clasts from white at the base (first phase) to pink and light-dark grey banded and black (second and third phases) and to dark brown (fourth phase). Density analysis of juvenile clasts revealed that the change in composition did not significantly affect the density of the juvenile pumice pyroclasts, the vesicularity of which increases from 70% to 85% up through the sequence. The pink and the black intra-plinian ignimbrites were emplaced only, within the narrow paleo-valleys of the southern flank with maximum thicknesses of 9 m and 5 m respectively, transitioning onto adjacent topographic highs where thin veneer surge layers were deposited. The fall-out deposits inter-bedded between the ignimbrites lack basal reverse grading, indicating that the eruption column continued to be sustained during the partial collapses generating the intra-plinian ignimbrites. The climactic dark brown ignimbrite was emplaced radially with a maximum thickness of > 40 m. The absence of oxidation surfaces or evidence of reworking within the Fogo A deposits, indicates that there were no time breaks during the different phases of the eruption. The on-land bulk volume of the three ignimbrites has been estimated around 3.2 km3, while the volume of the intra-plinian fall-out deposits is ~ 0.003 km3. These bulk volume estimations, summed with the basal fall-out volume calculated by Walker and Croasdale (1970), makes a total bulk volume for the Fogo A deposits of 4.4 km3 indicating a Volcanic Explosively Index of 5, higher than previously estimated. This result is fundamental for the forecasting a possible scenario for a future eruption.

  4. Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr isotopic systematics of the Pea Ridge Fe-P deposit and related rocks, southeast Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Marikos, M.A.; Barton, M.D. . Dept. of Geosciences)

    1993-03-01

    Pea ridge is a discordant Middle Proterozoic Fe-P deposit hosted in rhyolite tuffs and flows of the 1.4--1.5 Ga St. Francois terrane. Host rocks and the deposit are cut by basalt and aplite/pegmatite dikes. The deposit overlies a blind pluton which is partially surrounded by a trachytic ring complex. In the deposit, which is mined for Fe, early Qtz+Amph+Mag+Ap rock is cut by Mag+Ap+Qtz rock. Subsequently, portions of the deposit and host rocks were brecciated, oxidized and silicified to produce a complex suite of rocks enriched in Hem+Qtz+Ksp+Mu. Late breccia pipes/dikes cut the complex and were mineralized with Bar+Ksp+Flu+Chl+Cc+REE-phosphates. Sm/Nd and Rb/Sr isotopic systematics have been studied to: (1) constrain source(s) of igneous rocks and deposit components, (2) refine ages of magmatism, mineralization, and later hydrothermal activity, (3) begin regional comparison of isotopic systematics in SE Missouri Fe deposits, and (4) complement ongoing Missouri DGLS/USGS studies. Fourteen combined Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr analyses were done on materials including two host rhyolites, two nearby trachytes, two gneiss samples representing plausible basement, two intramineral dikes, and six samples of mineralization.

  5. Age and petrology of the Tertiary As Sarat volcanic field, southwestern Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    du Bray, E.A.; Stoeser, D.B.; McKee, E.H.

    1991-01-01

    Harrat As Sarat forms the second smallest and southernmost of the basalt fields of western Saudi Arabia and is part of a voluminous Red Sea rift-related continental alkali basalt province. The rocks of the As Sarat were emplaced during the first stage of Red Sea rifting and represent the northernmost extension of the Tertiary Trap Series volcanics that occur mainly in the Yemen Arab Republic and Ethiopia. The field consists of up to 580 m of basalt flows, that are intruded by basaltic plugs, necks, minor dikes, and highly evolved peralkaline trachyte intrusions. K-Ar ages indicate that the As Sarat field formed between 31 and 22 Ma and contains an eruption hiatus of one million years that began about 25 Ma ago. Pre-hiatus flows are primarily hypersthene normative intersertal subalkaline basalt, whereas the majority of post-hiatus flows are nepheline normative alkali basalt and hawaiite with trachytic textures. Normative compositions of the basalts are consistent with their genesis by partial melting at varying depths. Trace element abundances in the basalt indicate that varying degrees of partial melting and fractional crystallization (or crystal accumulation) had major and minor roles, respectively, in development of compositional variation in these rocks. Modeling indicates that the pre-hiatus subalkaline basalts represent 8-10 percent mantle melting at depths of about 70 km and the post-hiatus alkali basalts represent 4-9 percent mantle melting at depths greater than 70 km. ?? 1991.

  6. Evidence of Middle Jurassic magmatism within the Seychelles microcontinent: Implications for the breakup of Gondwana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shellnutt, J. G.; Lee, T.-Y.; Chiu, H.-Y.; Lee, Y.-H.; Wong, J.

    2015-12-01

    The breakup of East and West Gondwana occurred during the Jurassic, but the exact timing is uncertain due to the limited exposure of rocks suitable for radioisotopic dating. Trachytic rocks from Silhouette Island, Seychelles, yielded a range of zircon ages from Paleoproterozoic to Cenozoic. The 206Pb/238U age of the trachyte is 64.9 ± 1.6 Ma (Danian) but the majority of zircons yielded an age of 163.8 ± 1.8 Ma (Callovian) with a small subset yielding an age of 147.7 ± 4.5 Ma (Tithonian). The Hf isotopes of the Callovian (ɛHf(t) = +4.1 to +13.4) and Danian (ɛHf(t) = +1.9 to +7.1) zircons indicate that they were derived from moderately depleted mantle sources whereas the Tithonian zircons (ɛHf(t) = -7.0 to -7.3) were derived from an enriched source. The identification of middle Jurassic zircons indicates that rifting and magmatism were likely contemporaneous during the initial separation of East and West Gondwana.

  7. Mineralogy, geochemistry and petrogenesis of the recent magmatic formations from Mbengwi, a continental sector of the Cameroon Volcanic Line (CVL), Central Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbassa, Benoît Joseph; Njonfang, Emmanuel; Benoit, Mathieu; Kamgang, Pierre; Grégoire, Michel; Duchene, Stephanie; Brunet, Pierre; Ateba, Bekoa; Tchoua, Félix M.

    2012-11-01

    The Mbengwi recent magmatic formations consist of volcanics and syenites belonging to the same magmatic episode. Lavas form a bimodal basanite-rhyolite alkaline series with a gap between 50 and 62 wt.% SiO2. Mafic lavas (basanite-hawaiite) are sodic while felsic rocks (trachyte-rhyolite-syenites) are sodi-potassic, slightly metaluminous to peralkaline. The geochemical and isotopic characteristics (0.7031 < (87Sr/86Sr)initial < 0.7043; 1.03 < ɛNdi < 5.17) of these rocks are similar to those of other rocks from the CVL. The main differentiation process is fractional crystallization with two trends of fractionation. Their Rb/Sr isochron age of 28.2 Ma, almost similar to 27.40 ± 0.6 Ma K/Ar age obtained in a trachyte from neighboring Bamenda Mountains system, precludes any local age migration of an hypothetic hotspot. Mafic lavas have OIB features displaying an isotopic signature similar to that of HIMU mantle source different from FOZO known as source of most parental magmas along the CVL.

  8. Th-230 - U-238 series disequilibrium of the Olkaria basalts Gregory Rift Valley, Kenya: Petrogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, S.; Macdonald, R.; Kelly, M.

    1993-01-01

    Strong mixing trends on a (Th-230/Th-232) versus Th diagram show that the basalts are mixed magmas which have undergone interaction with the crust. Instantaneous Th/U ratios are less than time integrated ones but these exceed the Th/U ratios in the MORB and OIB sources. This indicates that the mantle may have undergone some metasomatic fluxing, crustal contamination of the basalts will also enhance these ratios. Early activity on the Akira plain is represented by early basalts and hawaiites. The early basalt samples are known to predate the earliest comendites. The most recent phase of activity is represented by another cinder cone 40-50 m high being feldspar and clinopyroxene phyric. Inclusions which occur in the comendites vary in size and distribution. The largest and most porphyritic are the trachytes (up to 40 cm) with alkali feldspar phases up to 6 mm and small pyroxenes in the ground mass. The second set of inclusions are smaller (up to 10 cm) and are largely aphyric. The distribution of the inclusions are not uniform, the Broad Acres (C5) lavas contain 2-5 percent. The size of the inclusions decrease from south to north, as does the abundance of the trachytic inclusions. The major element variations in the Naivasha basalts, hawaiites and magmatic inclusions are discussed.

  9. Heat capacity, configurational heat capacity and fragility of hydrous magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Genova, D.; Romano, C.; Giordano, D.; Alletti, M.

    2014-10-01

    The glassy and liquid heat capacities of four series of dry and hydrous natural glasses and magma as a function of temperature and water content (up to 19.9 mol%) were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The analyzed compositions are basalt, latite, trachyte and pantellerite. The results of this study indicate that the measured heat capacity of glasses (Cpg) is a linear function of composition and is well reproduced by the empirical model of Richet (1987). For the investigated glasses, the partial molar heat capacity of water can be considered as independent of composition, in agreement with Bouhifd et al. (2006). For hydrous liquids, the heat capacity (Cpliq) decreases nonlinearly with increasing water content. Previously published models, combined with the partial molar heat capacity of water from the literature, are not able to reproduce our experimental data in a satisfactory way. We estimated the partial molar heat capacity of water (CpH2O) in hydrous magma over a broad compositional range. The proposed value is 41 ± 3 J mol-1 K-1. Water strongly affects the configurational heat capacity at the glass transition temperature [Cpconf (Tg)]. An increases of Cpconf (Tg) with water content was measured for the polymerized liquids (trachyte and pantellerite), while the opposite behavior was observed for the most depolymerized liquids (basalt and latite). Structural and rheological implications of this behavior are discussed in light of the presented results.

  10. Trace element distribution coefficients in alkaline series. [Titanites; bitite

    SciTech Connect

    Lemarchand, F.; Villemant, B.; Calas, G.

    1987-05-01

    Mineral/groundmass partition coefficients for U, Th, Zr, Hf, Ta, Rb, REE, Co and Sc have been systematically measured in olivine, clinopyroxene, amphibole, biotite, Ti-magnetites, titanite, zircon and feldspars, in basaltic to trachytic lavas from alkaline series (Velay, Chaine des Puys: Massif Central, France and Fayal: Azores). Average partition coefficients are defined within the experimental uncertainty for limited compositional ranges (basalt-hawaiite, mugearites, benmoreite-trachyte), and are useful for trace element modelling. The new results for U, Th, Ta, Zr and Hf partition coefficients show contrasting behaviour. They can thus be used as ''key elements'' for identifying fractionating mineral phases in differentiation processes (e.g. Ta and Th for amphibole and mica). Partition coefficient may be calculated using the two-lattice model suggested by NIELSEN (1985). Such values show a considerably reduced chemical dependence in natural systems, relative to weight per cent D values. The residual variations may be accounted for by temperature or volatile influence. This calculation greatly enhances modelling possibilities using trace elements for comparing differentiation series as well as for predicting the behaviour of elements during magmatic differentiation.

  11. Occurrence of an unknown Atlantic eruption in the Chaîne des Puys volcanic field (Massif Central, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouannic, G.; Walter-Simonnet, A. V.; Bossuet, G.; Cubizolle, H.; Boivin, P.; Devidal, J. L.; Oberlin, C.

    2014-08-01

    A volcanic ash layer, called MF1, was recently identified in Holocene sediments from the Gourgon and Molhiac peat bogs (Monts du Forez, French Massif Central). This ash layer consists of colorless shards with a heterogeneous trachytic to rhyolitic composition. The trace elements analyzed by Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) attest to a local origin. Radiocarbon dating of peat samples taken within and below the ash layer indicates the best age at 6339 ± 61 cal yr BP, i.e. an age contemporaneous with the volcanic activity of Montchal, Montcineyre and Pavin volcanoes from the Chaîne des Puys volcanic field. These volcanoes are characterized by basaltic and trachytic products, thus the rhyolitic composition of MF1 tephra suggests that it is likely originated from an unknown eruption. These results again confirm the interest of studying the distal volcanic ash fallouts in order to establish or specify records of past eruptions of volcanic fields. Identification of this new tephra layer also provides an additional tephrochronological marker for Eastern French Massif Central.

  12. Geochemical fingerprint of the primary magma composition in the marine tephras originated from the Baegdusan and Ulleung volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Chungwan; Kim, Seonyoung; Lee, Changyeol

    2014-12-01

    The intraplate Baegdusan (Changbai) and Ulleung volcanoes located on the border of China, North Korea, and East/Japan Sea, respectively, have been explained by appeals to both hotspots and asthenospheric mantle upwelling (wet plume) caused by the stagnant Pacific plate. To understand the origin of the Baegdusan and Ulleung volcanism, we performed geochemical analyses on the tephra deposits in the East/Japan Sea basins originating from the Baegdusan and Ulleung volcanoes. The volcanic glass in the tephra from the Baegdusan and Ulleung volcanoes ranged from alkaline trachyte to peralkaline rhyolite and from phonolite to trachyte, respectively. The tephra from the two intraplate volcanoes showed highly enriched incompatible elements, such as Tb, Nb, Hf, and Ta, distinct from those of the ordinary arc volcanoes of the Japanese islands. The straddle distribution of the Th/Yb and Ta/Yb ratios of the tephra deposits from the Baegdusan volcano may originate from the alkali basaltic magma resulting from mixing between the wet plume from the stagnant Pacific plate in the transition zone and the overlying shallow asthenospheric mantle. In contrast, the deposits from the Ulleung volcano show a minor contribution of the stagnant slab to the basaltic magma, implying either partial melting of a more enriched mantle, smaller degrees of partial melting of a garnet-bearing mantle source, or a combination of both processes as the magma genesis. Our study indicated that the Baegdusan and Ulleung volcanoes have different magma sources and evolutionary histories.

  13. Evolution of anorthoclase phonolite, Mt. Erebus, Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.A.; Kyle, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    Over the last 1 m.y. Mt. Erebus (3794 m) has erupted mainly anorthoclase phonolite (AP) and lesser trachyte, kaersutite phonolite and intermediate differentiates. An active convecting AP lava lake, identical in composition to the older lavas, existed from 1972 until late 1984. Most of the rocks define a strongly undersaturated continuous sodic differentiation series, composed of basanite, Ne-hawaiite, Ne-mugearite, Ne-benmoreite and AP. The main phenocryst phases and their ranges are: olivine (Fo 81-43), clinopyroxene (Wo 50-44, En 42-24, Fs 11-30), opaque oxides (Usp 52-79) and feldspar. Major, trace and REE analyses exhibit smooth trends on variation diagrams. REE are strongly LREE enriched and increase from La/sub N/=220 in the basanites to 400 in AP. There are no significant Eu anomalies. Published isotopic data show derivation of the basanite parental magmas from a depleted (/sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr=0.703) heterogeneous mantle source similar to that for oceanic island basalts. Crustal contamination is insignificant except in the trachytes. Evolution of the Erebus lineage by fractional crystallization of the above phases plus apatite is supported by mass balance models. Differentiation probably occurred in larger, hotter and lower P/sub H20/ magma chambers compared to the basanite to kaersutite phonolite DVDP lineage (Kyle, 1981) of the neighboring Hut Point Peninsula. Mt. Erebus may mark the site of a major mantle upwelling.

  14. Clinopyroxene-liquid thermometers and barometers specific to alkaline differentiated magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masotta, M.; Mollo, S.; Freda, C.; Gaeta, M.; Moore, G.

    2013-12-01

    We present new thermometers and barometers based on clinopyroxene-liquid equilibria specific to alkaline differentiated magmas. The new models were calibrated through the regression analyses of experimental datasets obtained by merging phase equilibria experiments from the literature with new experiments performed by using trachytic and phonolitic starting compositions. The regression strategy was twofold: (1) we have tested previous thermometric and barometric equations and recalibrated these models using the new datasets; (2) we have calibrated a new thermometer and a new barometer including only regression parameters that closely describe the compositional variability of the datasets. The new models yield more precise estimates than previous thermometers and barometers when used to predict temperatures and pressures of alkaline differentiated magmas. We have tested the reliability of the new equations by using clinopyroxene-liquid pairs from trachytes and phonolites erupted during major explosive eruptions at the Phlegrean Fields and Mt. Vesuvius (central Italy). The test yielded crystallization conditions comparable to those determined by means of melt and fluid inclusion analyses and phase equilibria studies; this validates the use of the proposed models for precise estimates of crystallization temperatures and pressures in differentiated alkaline magmas. Because these magmas feed some of the most voluminous, explosive, and threatening volcanic eruptions in the world, a better understanding of the environmental conditions of their reservoirs is mandatory and this is now possible with the new models provided here.

  15. Evolution of melts of the Changbaishan Tianchi volcano (China-North Korea) as a model of ore-magmatic system formation: Data from melt inclusions studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, O. A.; Andreeva, I. A.; Yarmolyuk, V. V.; Borisovskiy, S. E.

    2016-01-01

    The composition and evolution of the melts of trachytes from the volcano were studied based on examining the inclusions of mineral-forming media by means of X-ray and ion microanalysis. A correlation was shown between the degree of enrichment of these melts in rare elements and the processes of magmatic differentiation. It was found that trachytes of the volcano were generated in highly differentiated alkaline melts enriched in Hf, Nb, Zr, Ta, U, Th, Rb, Y, and REEs under 1020-1060°C. The evolution of melts was determined by the processes of crystal fractionation. The main volatile components in the melts are water, fluorine, and chlorine with the concentrations of 0.1-0.5, 0.2-0.5, and 0.2-0.3 wt %, respectively. The melt crystallization was accompanied by degassing caused by the decrease in the outer pressure. The low concentrations of water and fluorine represent the melt composition by these components exclusively at the time of the melt movement towards the Earth's surface just before the eruption.

  16. Xenopumices from the 2011-2012 submarine eruption of El Hierro (Canary Islands, Spain): Constraints on the plumbing system and magma ascent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meletlidis, S.; Di Roberto, A.; Pompilio, M.; Bertagnini, A.; Iribarren, I.; Felpeto, A.; Torres, P. A.; D'Oriano, C.

    2012-09-01

    Textures, petrography and geochemical compositions of products emitted during the onset of the 2011-2012 submarine eruption (15 October, 2011) off the coast of El Hierro have been investigated to get information on interaction mechanism between the first rising magma and the crust during the onset of the eruption as well as to get information on magma storage and plumbing systems beneath El Hierro volcano. Studied products consist of 5-50 cm bombs with an outer black to greenish, vesicular crust with bulk basanite composition containing pumiceous xenoliths (xenopumices). Our results show that xenopumices are much more heterogeneous that previously observed, since consist of a macro-scale mingling of a gray trachyte and white rhyolite. We interpreted xenopumices as resulting from the interaction (heating) between the basanitic magma feeding the eruption, a stagnant trachytic magma pocket/s and an associated hydrothermally altered halo with rhyolitic composition. Our findings confirm the importance of the study of the early products of an eruption since they can contain crucial information on the plumbing system geometry and the mechanism of magma ascent.

  17. Complex zoning of clinopyroxenes in the lavas of vulsini, latium, Italy: Evidence for magma mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Michael; Varekamp, Johan C.; Van Bergen, Manfred J.

    1982-12-01

    Microprobe analyses of pyroxene phenocrysts occurring in two tephritic leucitites, two leucite phonolites and one trachyte from Vulsini are reported. Three compositionally distinct types of pyroxene occur in the tephritic leucitites: (a) salite, forming resorbed cores in pyroxene phenocrysts; (b) diopside, forming euhedral-anhedral cores in pyroxene phenocrysts: and (c) pyroxene of intermediate composition to (a) and (b), which occurs as mantels around the phenocryst cores, as separate phenocrysts and as microphenocrysts. The pyroxenes in the leucite phonolites and in the trachyte do not show discontinuous zoning such as that shown by pyroxenes in the tephritic leucitites. The compositional characteristics of the latter are most easily explained by the mixing of two magmas, both tephritic leucitite in composition, one of which was relatively evolved (Fe-rich) and carried salite phenocrysts, the other relatively primitive (Mg-rich) which carried diopside phenocrysts. A review of petrographic and geochemical evidence indicates that magma mixing may have been an important process, in addition to fractional crystallization, at Vulsini and at other central Italian volcanic centres. The implications for theories about the origin of potassium-rich magmas in western Italy are briefly discussed.

  18. Geochemical Constraints on Alkaline Volcanic Rocks of the MT. Baegdu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, S.

    2011-12-01

    Major and trace elements abd Nd-Sr isotopic analyses for the alkaline volcanic rocks in the Mt. Baegdu were carried out to interpret the origin of the alkaline basaltic magma and their petrogenetic evolution in relation to Quaternary tectonism in the Korean peninsula. The volcanic rocks of the Mt. Baegdu belong to K-series with high K2O/Na2O ratio. Variation of major and trace elements indicates that the volcanic rocks are products of the fractional crystallization and assimilation of basaltic magma, and the basaltic rocks have a range of strontium isotope ratios(87Sr/86Sr=0.70496~0.70518) and trachytic and alkali-rhyolitic rocks have a range of strontium isotope ratios(87Sr/86Sr=0.70841~0.71086). The basaltic rocks are originated from depleted mantle source and trachytic and alkali-rhyolitic rocks are derived from alkaline basaltic magma with a large amounts of continental material assimilation. Also it is noted that significant high-field strength element depletions(characteristics of subduction-related arc magmas) are not observed, suggesting that slab-derived materials might not hava played a primary role in the genesis of the magma in the Mt. Baegdu volcano.

  19. The VORISA Project: An Integrated Approach to Assessing Volcanic Hazard and Risk in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, J. M.; Moufti, R.

    2013-12-01

    The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has numerous large monogenetic volcanic fields, known locally as 'Harrat'. The largest of these, Harrat Rahat, produced a basaltic fissure eruption in 1256 AD with lava flows travelling within 20 km of the Islamic holy city Al-Madinah. With over 900 visible basaltic and trachytic vents and periodic seismic swarms indicating stalled eruptions, an understanding of the risk of future eruptions in this volcanic field is vital. To systematically address this need we developed the Volcanic Risk in Saudi Arabia (VORISA) Project, a 3-year, multi-disciplinary international research collaboration that integrates geological, geophysical, hazard and risk studies. Detailed mapping and geochemical studies are being combined with new and existing age determinations to determine the style and sequence of events during past basaltic and trachytic eruptions. Data from gravity and magnetotelluric surveys are being integrated with microearthquake data from an 8-station borehole seismic research array to geophysically characterise the structure and nature of the crust, and thus constrain possible physical controls on magma propagation. All available data are being synthesised in hazard models to determine patterns in eruption frequency, magnitude, and style of past activity, as well as the probable location and style of a future event. Combined with geospatial vulnerability data, these hazard models, which include a reconstruction of the 1256 AD eruption, enable us to calculate and communicate volcanic risk to the city of Al-Madinah.

  20. Petrology of the Guenfalabo ring-complex: An example of a complete series along the Cameroon Volcanic Line (CVL), Cameroon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donald Ngonge, E.; Hollanda, Maria Helena B. M.; Nsifa, E. Nkonguin; Tchoua, Felix M.

    2014-08-01

    In the Guenfalabo ring-complex (GRC), two non-comagmatic rock suites have been identified as a result of two volcanic episodes: Suite 1 (68.8 ± 1.7 Ma by K/Ar on trachyte) of peralkaline trachytes and pantellerites cogenetic with alkaline syenites, granites and rhyolitic flows and tuffs; Suite 2 (62 ± 2 Ma by K/Ar on basalt), a bimodal and complete series of alkali olivine basalts and associated microgabbro dykes, diorites, syenites and granites, cross-cutting the former. Kaersutite in the trachytes of Suite 1 has mantle-derived signatures: TiO2 > 4%, MgO < 15%, FeO > 8%, Ti = 0.63 c.p.f.u. and Al = 2, characteristic of kaersutites of HP and HT origin: 13-23 kbar, 1100-1220 °C. The trachytes are probably products of FC of a basaltic parent that did not attain higher crustal levels. The Suite 1 rocks are enriched in Rb, K, Zr, Nb, LREE, alkalis, and (Ce/Yb)N = 7-15 probably due to some effect of metasomatism during the magma ascension. Fe-Ti enrichment is corroborated by the presence of ferropseudobrookite-ilmenite-ulvospinel in the syenites and ilmenite in the pantellerite. The Rb/Ba > 1 in the trachytes (2.44, 26.7), pantellerite (6.33), alkaline granites (0.63-1.8) and the 87Sr/86Sr in the alkaline granites (=0.74060) depict the role of AFC. The ankaramites of the Suite 2 rocks are olivine-phyric (25%), Fo85-88, have 50-52% clinopyroxene (salite), 5% plagioclase (An55-36) and 7% Fe-Ti oxides. Trace element modeling indicates an origin from a basaltic magma of about 25% PM of spinel lherzolite mixed with a magma from <1% PM of garnet lherzolite (3-4% garnet) in a proportion of 1:4. The cogenetic alkali basalts and the microgabbro-diorite-syenite-granite that constitute the Suite 2 rocks, with a Daly gap of 54% > SiO2 < 58%, result from this Early Cenozoic magmatic event. The basalts have: Zr = 225-253, Nb = 98-111, Y = 33-56, typical of FOZO, a HIMU-type OIB related magmas (Sr/Sri = 0.70202-0.7034; Nd/Nd = 0.51282-0.512545; 206Pb/204Pb = 19.13, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.59 and 208Pb/204Pb = 38.64. The (La/Yb)N ratios (9-20) indicate a high REE fractionation and garnet-lherzolite source. Elemental ratios as La/Nb = 0.49-0.81, Nb/Y = 1.00-2.04 suggest crustal contamination of minor importance. The (La/Sm)N ratios (2-3.5) and LREE enrichment corroborate the contribution of a subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM). REE spectra and minor element spidergrams are concordant for each rock suite.

  1. Extreme Magma Differentiation in a Hawaiian Magma Chamber: An Analysis of Gabbro and Syenite Xenoliths From Hualalai Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamberger, P. J.; Hammer, J. E.

    2003-12-01

    Large volumes of highly differentiated trachyte magma erupted from Hualalai Volcano 103+/-11 k.y.a. as a >275m thick flow on the north flank, a large pumice and obsidian cone, lavas at the NW tip of the main rift zone, and as blocks in a maar deposit. The principle flow is recognized as the largest single eruptive event on the island of Hawaii (Moore, et al., 1987). This episode contradicts previous notions of Hawaiian evolution, which generally associate highly evolved magmas with the conclusion of the post-shield alkalic stage (e.g., West Maui volcano). Hualalai differs from this pattern in that the evolved magmas appeared at the beginning of the post-shield alkalic stage and were erupted over a relatively narrow time interval. These distinctions have significant implications for our understanding of Hawaiian volcanoes' magmatic plumbing systems, including the depths, magma replenishment and extraction frequencies, and longevity of the reservoirs that feed eruptions, especially in the transitory interval between the tholeiitic shield and alkalic post-shield stages. Gabbro and syenite nodules erupted <10 k.y.a. from Hualalai's summit vents may represent cumulates, residual liquids, and/or crystallized magmas associated with trachyte differentiation, and thus provide insight into the processes leading to extreme fractionation. Because they contain a large number of phases and preserve reaction relationships in the form of mineral textures, the crystalline nodules may incorporate more information about magma differentiation conditions than can be extracted from the relatively homogeneous and micro-crystalline trachyte itself. The nodules were transported to the surface in alkali basalt at numerous vents and were found distributed in spatter and tephra deposits near the summit of the volcano over a region several km in diameter. They span broad compositional and textural spectra. Modes range from 58-93 vol% felsic minerals, dominantly plagioclase, with augite and Ca-poor pyroxene comprising most of the balance. Several nodules contain the hydrous minerals biotite and calcic amphibole. Accessory phases include ilmenite, magnetite, apatite, zircon, +/- olivine or quartz. In many instances, the major minerals are clearly in reaction relationship with their surroundings. E.g., blebs of alkali feldspar dispersed throughout large plagioclase phenocrysts suggest the existence of precursor ternary feldspar; crystallographically-controlled oxide stringers along pyroxene planes suggest oxidation. We are considering deposit characteristics, mineral assemblages, and phase compositions of the basalt-hosted xenoliths to infer the depth and H2O content of magma fractionation.

  2. The effect of air pollution on the stone decay of the Cologne Cathedral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graue, B.; Siegesmund, S.; Licha, T.; Simon, K.; Oyhantcabal, P.; Middendorf, B.

    2012-04-01

    Different building stones of the Cologne Cathedral show a large variation of weathering phenomena. The Drachenfels trachyte, which was the construction material for the medieval part of the cathedral, shows significant surface deterioration, back-weathering coexisting with flaking, crumbling or the massive formation of gypsum crusts. Wolff (1992) first mentioned the negative interferences between the Schlaitdorfer sandstone and the Londorfer basalt lava or the Drachenfels trachyte and the Krensheimer muschelkalk. Crust formation on limestone, sandstone, and volcanic rock from the Cologne Cathedral as well as from the Xanten and Altenberg Cathedral are investigated. These three buildings are located in different areas and exposed to varying industrial, urban, and rural environmental situations. The material investigated range from dark grey to black framboidal crusts. This 3 to 10 mm thick cauliflower-like form of gypsum crust incorporates particles from the pollution fluxes. It covers the stone surface and mainly occurs at sites protected from wind and direct rain. Secondly, thin laminar black crusts trace the stone surface and may cover complete sections of the building's structure not necessarily preferring protected sites. This kind of crust seems to have very strong bonds between the thin black crust and the stone surface. Major and trace element distribution show an enrichment of sulfur, indicating the presence of gypsum, lead and other typical pollutants (arsenic, antimony, bismuth, tin etc.), which generally can be linked to traffic and industry. This indicates that even though the SO2 emission has decreased due to i.e. stronger regulations of waste incineration plants and the ban of leaded petrol, the pollutants are still present in the crusts on the building stones. From systematic SEM observations it becomes evident that the total amount of pollution is less pronounced in the Altenberg and Xanten Cathedrals as compared with the Cologne Cathedral. The formation of gypsum occurs at lower amounts in Altenberg, which correlates well with the measured SO2 content. On the other hand, the increasing H2O content in the trachyte and the crusts correlates well with an increasing phyllosilicate formation. Through the combination of different analytical techniques it was possible to clearly distinguish samples from the industrial or rural environment. If the data is compared to actual pollutant emissions, the analyzed samples imply present but also past pollution fluxes. Thus, the soiled zones of the built environment can function as environmental indicators.

  3. Cobb Hotspot Volcanism Prior to 7 Million Years ago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, R.; Fisk, M.; Duncan, R.; Rowe, M.; Russo, C.; Dziak, R.

    2003-12-01

    From where the Cobb hotspot currently resides beneath Axial Seamount on the Juan de Fuca Ridge, a discontinuous trail of seamounts of increasing age extends 1800 km to the northwest, all the way to the Alaskan Trench off of the southern tip of Kodiak Island. These seamounts record the evolution of mantle melting and volcanism at the Cobb hotspot over the past 30+ million years, including how the approach of the Juan de Fuca Ridge from the east affected the hotspot. We conducted multibeam mapping and stratigraphically-controlled rock sampling of several of the seamounts created by the Cobb hotspot up until 7 Ma. Using the Alvin submersible to do depth transects for geological observations and rock sampling allowed us to establish the volcanic style and setting represented by each sample, and to avoid the thick ferro-manganese oxide coatings and abundant ice-rafted debris common in the Gulf of Alaska. Our goal is to understand the volcanic histories and morphologies of these seamounts with an eye to how volcanism at the hotspot was affected by the approaching ridge. Our targeted seamounts included, from SE to NW, Warwick ( 7 Ma on 9 Ma crust), Murray ( 28 Ma on 39 Ma crust), Patton ( 30 Ma on 42 Ma crust), and Marchand (30+? Ma on 43 Ma crust). Marchand Seamount, though small compared to the others, appears to be the oldest unsubducted volcanic product of the Cobb hotspot. So far, we have XRF data for our samples, and argon dating and trace element analyses are underway. Warwick Seamount yielded only tholeiitic basalts, while most of the samples from the other seamounts are evolved alkalic rocks. Murray samples are entirely alkalic, being dominantly trachytes and trachydacites, with a few mugearites. Rocks from Patton are mainly hawaiites and mugearites, with rare tholeiitic to transitional basalts and a single trachyte. Marchand samples are trachydacites and trachytes similar to the differentiated Patton and Murray samples. Basement drilling at ODP Hole 887D in a saddle near Murray Seamount did recover tholeiites beneath about 40m of alkalic basalt flows interbedded with sediments, so apparently tholeiites, while poorly exposed today, did play some role in the construction of the 28+ Ma seamounts. The lack of alkalic rocks on Warwick may be related to the fact that it formed near the Juan de Fuca Ridge (on 2 m.y. old crust), while the other seamounts formed on 11+ m.y. old crust.

  4. Petrological inferences on the evolution of magmas erupted in the Andagua Valley, Peru (Central Volcanic Zone)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sørensen, E. V.; Holm, P. M.

    2008-10-01

    Major and trace element and Sr and Nd isotope data is presented from the Andagua valley scoria cone and lava field (15°32' S 72°19' W), Southern Peru in the northernmost part of the Central Volcanic Zone (CVZ). The rocks are all quite evolved in composition (SiO 2 = 55-64 wt.%) and classify as benmoreites, latites and few mugearites and trachytes. Samples are characterized by high Na 2O (4.2-5.2 wt.%), Sr (600-1300 ppm), Ba (800-1600 ppm). The main difference between the benmoreites and latites is in the Na 2O content that reach the highest so far reported from CVZ for these SiO 2 concentrations. The rocks are generally nearly aphyric but latites and trachytes are more porphyritic. Amphibole microphenocrysts generally are only present in latites and trachytes. The difference between benmoreite and latite samples is reflected in lower P 2O 5 and Zr content of the latite samples documenting the existence of two compositional different parental magma types. The investigated volcanic activity spans the Pleistocene to Recent with the historic activity concentrated in the area just south of Andagua. Combined relative stratigraphy, petrography and geochemistry define volcanic units and demonstrate that rocks from Chilcayoc Grande, Chilcayoc Chico 2, Jenchana, Sucna 1 and Chilcayoc Chico 1 represent the most recent volcanic activity. The main trend samples, each form a co-magmatic group resulting in sub-parallel trends in many variations diagrams. It is furthermore shown that these trends point towards calculated mixing lines relating the individual units through a binary mixing process, thus indicating a two stage evolution. In the case of Jenchana, Sucna 1 and Chilcayoc Chico 1, the samples define positive correlation trends in the Sr vs. Rb diagram that can be extrapolated back towards origo indicating nearly perfect incompatibility of Sr and Rb. This together with generally high Sr/Y (50-105) and low Y content (< 16 ppm) suggest lack of plagioclase fractionation and residual garnet in the source and is taken as evidence for relatively high pressure (lower crustal) origin of the mixing event. The amphibole bearing samples form individual co-magmatic groups that cannot be related to each other. This means that the amphibole bearing samples originates from different magmas. The lavas of the Ninamama group are comparable in age to the main trend samples but different in petrography and composition, why the two compositional different magmas must have existed within a small confined area within a limited time span.

  5. Formation of U-depleted rhyolite from a basanite at El Hierro, Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigmarsson, Olgeir; Laporte, Didier; Carpentier, Marion; Devouard, Bertrand; Devidal, Jean-Luc; Marti, Joan

    2013-03-01

    Phonolite and trachyte are the felsic magmas of the alkaline magma suites, which characterize the Canary Islands. The October 2011 submarine eruption off El Hierro, the westernmost island, nevertheless, produced a small volume of rhyolitic magma. The rhyolite occurred as highly vesicular, white coloured pumices enveloped in and mingled with darker coloured basanitic pumice. The basanitic pumice is relatively crystal poor with a few euhedral olivines (mostly Fo77-79), clinopyroxenes and Fe-rich spinels, whereas very rare olivine of same composition is found together with equally rare Fe-sulphide and FeTi-rich oxides in the rhyolite. The Fe-Mg exchange equilibrium in the oxides permits to calculate an equilibrium temperature of 970-890 °C for the rhyolite, in agreement with quartz-melt equilibrium at ca. 930 °C. A striking mineralogical feature of the rhyolite is the presence of rounded to contorted grains of milky quartz, which are xenocrysts incorporated and partly dissolved into the magma. Analyses of residual volatile concentrations in the glasses show that the rhyolite melt was highly degassed, whereas the basanitic glass still has important halogen concentrations. Trace element patterns of the mafic glasses and their elevated incompatible element concentrations are typical of the western Canary Island basanites. In contrast, the trace element composition of the rhyolite shows surprisingly low concentrations for all elements except the most incompatible ones (e.g. Rb, Ba, K and Th). All other measured LILE, HFSE and REE have significantly lower concentration than the basanitic counterpart that can be explained by fractionation of accessory phases (1 % apatite, 1 % sphene and 0.1 % zircon). Surprisingly, low U concentration is presumably related to elevated oxygen fugacity in the rhyolite, causing U to be in a hexavalent state, and fluxing of F-rich gas leading to volatilization of UF6, known to emanate at low temperature. The results suggest that a gas-rich basanitic melt remobilized a small volume of stagnant rhyolitic melt formed by incorporation of approximately 10 % quartz-rich sediment into a late differentiate of trachytic composition. Sediments at the interface of an old oceanic crust adjacent to a continental shield and younger volcanic island are likely to act as magma traps were sediment assimilation may alter the mantle-derived magma composition. Quartz assimilation thus explains the production of rhyolite magma in a volcanic island characterized by an alkaline magma series from primitive basanites to trachytes.

  6. U-series zircon age constraints on the plumbing system and magma residence times of the Changbai volcano, China/North Korea border

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Haibo; Fan, Qicheng; Zhang, Hongfu; Schmitt, Axel K.

    2014-07-01

    The Changbai (or Baitoushan, Paektu) volcano on the China/North Korea border is best known for its climactic caldera-forming eruption of 100 km3 of comendite materials 1000 years (1 ka) ago. The polygenetic Changbai volcano also erupted moderate-volume pre-caldera comendite lava at ~ 4 ka and small-volume post-caldera trachyte ignimbrite at ~ 0.3 ka. Here we report 238U-230Th disequilibrium ages of zircons from lavas and ignimbrites of the pre-caldera (~ 4 ka), syn-caldera (1 ka), and post-caldera (~ 0.3 ka) events. The zircon isochron ages are 12.2 ± 1.1 ka (2σ) for the 4-ka comendite lava and 12.2 ± 1.7 ka for the 1-ka comendite ignimbrite. Zircons from the 0.3-ka trachyte ignimbrite exhibit 3 respective peaks at 2.6 ± 1.8 ka, 130 ± 10 ka and > 230 ka. The indistinguishable zircon ages for the 4-ka pre-caldera eruption of comendite lava and the 1-ka caldera-forming eruption of comendite pumice and ignimbrite suggest that the 4-ka lava provides an early sampling of a much larger magma body at depth and thus serves as a kind of petrologic early-warning signal. In addition, the 4-ka lava may represent the lowest-temperature magma in the roof zone of a thermally zoned magma chamber that usually escapes first. The distinctive multi-modal zircon age distributions of the 0.3-ka trachytic eruption, however, reveal that this post-caldera eruption tapped a different magma body and indicate that Changbai's magmatic plumbing system had changed after the 1-ka caldera-forming climactic eruption. Our results suggest very short zircon and magma residence times for the Changbai volcano (8 kyr for the 4-ka eruption, 11-12 kyr for the 1-ka eruption and 2.3 kyr for the 0.3-ka eruption).

  7. The Mount Manengouba, a complex volcano of the Cameroon Line: Volcanic history, petrological and geochemical features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouclet, André; Kagou Dongmo, Armand; Bardintzeff, Jacques-Marie; Wandji, Pierre; Chakam Tagheu, Pulchérie; Nkouathio, David; Bellon, Hervé; Ruffet, Gilles

    2014-09-01

    The volcanic story of Mount Manengouba is related to four chronological stages: (1) forming of the early Manengouba shield volcano between 1.55 and 0.94 Ma, (2) building of the Eboga strato-cone between 0.94 and 0.89 Ma, (3) caldera collapse and silicic extrusions of the Elengoum Complex between 0.89 and 0.70 Ma, and (4) intra-caldera and flank activity between 0.45 and 0.11 Ma. The volume of the volcano is calculated at 320 km3 ± 5%. The volcanic rocks are attributed to two magmatic outputs. The first and main magma generation produced the shield volcano, the strato-cone, and the syn- to post-caldera extrusions, displaying a complete series from basanites to trachytes (magmatic Group 1). The second magma generation is limited to the late and flank activity evolving from basanites to trachy-phonolite (magmatic Group 2). Both magmatic groups belong to the under-saturated alkaline sodic series. Petrological calculations locate the magmatic reservoir between 37 and 39 km in the upper mantle for the Group 1 lavas, and between 42 and 44 km for the Group 2 lavas. Trachytes were generated in a secondary crustal reservoir. Magmatic series evolve with medium to low pressure fractional crystallization of olivine, pyroxene, oxides, feldspar, and apatite. Significant crustal assimilation is evidenced in trachytes. The magma of Group 1 was generated with 3-6% of partial melting of a moderately enriched source containing 3-7% of garnet. Melting took place in the spinel to garnet transition zone located at 70-90 km and around 25 kb. The magma of Group 2 resulted from a slightly higher partial melting from a less garnet-rich source that indicates uprising of the melting column in the upper part of transition zone. Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope data of the Manengouba rocks and neighboring lavas are analyzed and compared with those of the mafic lavas of the CVL. Three source components are distinguished: a depleted component originated from the asthenospheric swell, a radiogenic component linked to the contaminated lithosphere of the Neoproterozoic mobile belt, and an enriched component or the lithosphere possibly related to pre-rifting magmatic processes.

  8. Eruptive and Transportation Processes During Caldera-Forming Eruptions of Sete Cidades Volcano, São Miguel, Azores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kueppers, U.; Queiroz, M. G.; Pacheco, J. M.

    2007-12-01

    Sete Cidades volcano forms the Western part of the island of São Miguel, Azores, which is hosting three active trachytic central volcanoes (Sete Cidades, Fogo, Furnas). Volcanic activity in the archipelago exhibits a strong tectonic control and on São Miguel, the NW-SE trending basaltic Terceira Rift is intersecting the central volcanoes. All three have erupted since the settlement of the island in the 15{th} century. The Eastern part of the island is considered extinct. The oldest dated subaerial rocks of Sete Cidades exhibit an age of 210 ka. Morphology of the present summit caldera (5 km diameter, up to 350 m deep), stratigraphy, and distribution of the deposits suggest a multiple-stage evolution and at least three caldera-forming eruptions (CFE) are assumed to have occurred. 14C-dating revealed ages of 36, 29, and 16 ka, respectively, for the most recent ones. Today, the average slope angle is 12° and the maximum distance of the coastline from the caldera rim approx. 5 km. Assuming a comparable situation at the time of the CFE, a large portion of the eruptive products has probably not been deposited on land. After a pause of several thousand years, eruptive activity resumed approx. 5 ka ago and started filling the caldera. As deposits of minor thickness and distribution can be found between the deposits of the CFE, it is unclear whether the caldera formation is completely finished. Climatic factors (e.g. precipitation, air humidity) have affected the deposits by erosion, weathering, and possibly significant reworking and caused dense vegetation on all flanks of the volcano. Still, it was possible to establish distribution and thickness of the deposits of the CFE and constrain differences in eruptive behaviour and transport/emplacement mechanisms. They are composed of air-fall deposits and pyroclastic density currents but show significant differences amongst them: (1) Degree of pre- and syn-eruptive magma-magma interaction and syn-eruptive magma-water interaction. (2) Ratio of juvenile/lithic content and basaltic/trachytic magma. (3) Degree of vesiculation and crystal content of the juvenile material. (4) Percentage of air-fall deposits within the deposits of a single CFE and the timing of their deposition. (5) Distribution of air-fall deposits. (6) Degree of welding. The results highlight the bandwidth of possible eruptive scenarios at this trachytic central volcano cut by an active rift. Based on the study of these eruptions, volcanic hazard maps can be produced that are essential for adequate risk assessment.

  9. Accommodating structures and deformation associated with the emplacement of high level magmatic intrusions, Henry Mountains, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, P. I. R.; McCaffrey, K. J. W.; Davidson, J. P.; Holdsworth, R. E.; Murphy, P.; Jarvis, I.

    2012-04-01

    High-level sill and laccolith complexes form an important part of volcanic plumbing systems in which magma is emplaced as a series of sub-horizontal tabular sheet-like intrusions. Few studies of these intrusion types have looked in detail at the host rock, emplacement-related deformation structures, and how the additional volume of rock is accommodated within the crust, i.e. the 'space problem'. The aim of this study is to develop an understanding of the stages of emplacement and the internal textural evolution of Tertiary sills and laccoliths in the Henry Mountains. We have carried out kinematic and geometrical studies of emplacement-related structures in the host rocks. This work is supplemented by micro-scale textural and geochemical studies of plagioclase feldspar and amphibole phenocryst populations within the intrusions. Fabric studies recognise micro-structural fabrics (associated with accommodating structures) from magmatic fabrics (associated with magma flow). Crystal size distribution (CSD) studies help constrain the crystal:molten rock ratio and mechanical properties of the intruding magma, in addition to helping identify individual magma pulses. Fieldwork to date has focused on two satellite intrusions to Mt. Hilliers: Trachyte Mesa (the most distal intrusion; simple geometries); and Maiden Creek (closer to Mt. Hilliers; more complex geometries) both of which are emplaced into the Entrada Formation sandstone. Preliminary results highlight the importance of shear zones in accommodating the extra volume of magma at depth. Trachyte Mesa is an elongate (NE-SW) laccolith comprised of multiple, stacked intrusive sheets. Semi-brittle shear fabrics (Riedel shear fractures) can be identified on the top surface of the intrusion. Furthermore, sub-horizontal shear zone fabrics can also be observed adjacent to the frontal propagating tip of individual intrusive sheets, e.g. at the northwest lateral margin of Trachyte Mesa. A well-developed shear zone was also identified above the Maiden Creek intrusion. Maiden Creek is a sill with a complex elliptical shape and several finger-like lobes. Detailed outcrop studies across two neighbouring lobes have identified a sub-horizontal shear zone which may be traced from the top of each intrusive lobe. This shear zone separates low/ moderately-deformed sandstones above from highly deformed sandstones below and between the two lobes, hence acting as a detachment zone. Fabrics (stretched plagioclase phenocrysts) within the igneous rock, seen on the top surface of the intrusive lobes directly beneath this shear zone, support the timing of the shear zone being contemporaneous with emplacement of the intrusive lobes. The shear zone appears to have played a critical role in accommodating the volumetric changes associated with magma emplacement.

  10. The evolution of a silicic magma system: isotopic and chemical evidence from the Woods Mountains volcanic center, eastern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musselwhite, D. S.; Depaolo, D. J.; McCurry, M.

    1989-01-01

    The isotopic compositions of Nd and Sr and concentrations of major and trace elements were measured in flows and tuffs of the Woods Mountains volcanic center of eastern California to assess the relative roles of mantle versus crustal magma sources and of fractional crystallization in the evolution of silicic magmatic systems. This site was chosen because the contrast in isotopic composition between Precambrian-to-Mesozoic country rocks and the underlying mantle make the isotope ratios sensitive indicators of the proportions of crustal- and mantle-derived magma. The major eruptive unit is the Wild Horse Mesa tuff (15.8 m.y. old), a compositionally zoned rhyolite ignimbrite. Trachyte pumice fragments in the ash-flow deposits provide information on intermediate composition magma types. Crustal xenoliths and younger flows of basalt and andesite (10 m.y. old) provide opportunities to confirm the isotopic compositions of potential mantle and crustal magma sources inferred from regional patterns. The trachyte and rhyolite have ɛNd values of -6.2 to -7.5 and initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios mostly between 0.7086 and 0.7113. These magmas cannot have been melted directly from the continental basement because the ɛNd values are too high. They also cannot have formed by closed system fractional crystallization of basalt because the 87Sr/86Sr ratios are higher than likely values for parental basalt. Both major and trace element variations indicate that crystal fractionation was an important process. These results require that the silicic magmas are end products of the evolution of mantle-derived basalt that underwent extensive fractional crystallization accompanied by assimilation of crustal rock. The mass fraction of crustal components in the trachyte and rhyolite is estimated to be between 10% and 40%, with the lower end of the range considered more likely. The generation of magmas with SiO2 contents greater than 60% appears to be dominated by crystal fractionation with minimal assimilation of upper crustal rocks.

  11. The petrochemistry of Jake_M: a martian mugearite.

    PubMed

    Stolper, E M; Baker, M B; Newcombe, M E; Schmidt, M E; Treiman, A H; Cousin, A; Dyar, M D; Fisk, M R; Gellert, R; King, P L; Leshin, L; Maurice, S; McLennan, S M; Minitti, M E; Perrett, G; Rowland, S; Sautter, V; Wiens, R C

    2013-09-27

    "Jake_M," the first rock analyzed by the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer instrument on the Curiosity rover, differs substantially in chemical composition from other known martian igneous rocks: It is alkaline (>15% normative nepheline) and relatively fractionated. Jake_M is compositionally similar to terrestrial mugearites, a rock type typically found at ocean islands and continental rifts. By analogy with these comparable terrestrial rocks, Jake_M could have been produced by extensive fractional crystallization of a primary alkaline or transitional magma at elevated pressure, with or without elevated water contents. The discovery of Jake_M suggests that alkaline magmas may be more abundant on Mars than on Earth and that Curiosity could encounter even more fractionated alkaline rocks (for example, phonolites and trachytes). PMID:24072927

  12. Petrology and mineralogy of the La Peña igneous complex, Mendoza, Argentina: An alkaline occurrence in the Miocene magmatism of the Southern Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, Diego Sebastián; Galliski, Miguel Ángel; Márquez-Zavalía, María Florencia; Colombo, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    The La Peña alkaline igneous complex (LPC) is located in the Precordillera (32°41‧34″ S - 68°59‧48″ W) of Mendoza province, Argentina, above the southern boundary of the present-day flat-slab segment. It is a 19 km2 and 5 km diameter subcircular massif emplaced during the Miocene (19 Ma) in the Silurian-Devonian Villavicencio Fm. The LPC is composed of several plutonic and subvolcanic intrusions represented by: a cumulate of clinopyroxenite intruded by mafic dikes and pegmatitic gabbroic dikes, isolated bodies of malignite, a central intrusive syenite that develops a wide magmatic breccia in the contact with clinopyroxenite, syenitic and trachytic porphyries, a system of radial and ring dikes of different compositions (trachyte, syenite, phonolite, alkaline lamprophyre, tephrite), and late mafic breccias. The main minerals that form the LPC, ordered according to their abundance, are: pyroxene (diopside, hedenbergite), calcium amphibole (pargasite, ferro-pargasite, potassic-ferro-pargasite, potassic-hastingsite, magnesio-hastingsite, hastingsite, potassic-ferro-ferri-sadanagaite), trioctahedral micas (annite-phlogopite series), plagioclase (bytownite to oligoclase), K-feldspar (sanidine and orthoclase), nepheline, sodalite, apatite group minerals (fluorapatite, hydroxylapatite), andradite, titanite, magnetite, spinel, ilmenite, and several Cu-Fe sulfides. Late hydrothermal minerals are represented by zeolites (scolecite, thomsonite-Ca), epidote, calcite and chlorite. The trace element patterns, coupled with published data on Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes, suggest that the primary magma of the LPC was generated in an initially depleted but later enriched lithospheric mantle formed mainly by a metasomatized spinel lherzolite, and that this magmatism has a subduction-related signature. The trace elements pattern of these alkaline rocks is similar to other Miocene calc-alkaline occurrences from the magmatic arc of the Southern Central Andes. Mineral and whole-rock chemical compositions support the interpretation that a first batch of a tephritic magma produced a cumulate of clinopyroxenite (clinopyroxene + magnetite + apatite) and a residual melt that crystallized as malignite at a shallow emplacement level (<5 km). Fractional crystallization in a deep chamber, coupled with rock assimilation, produced successive magma pulses that gave the composite central syenite, the syenitic and trachitic porphyries, and trachytic dikes. The latest rocks (phonolites) reflect an extreme fractionation with Ca, Al and K removal by feldspars. Mingling relationships between tephrites-basanites and trachytes-phonolites, plus compositional variations linked to the reabsorption surface observed in the K-feldspar from the phonolitic dikes, suggest recharge events with local mixing in the late-stages of the LPC evolution. The emplacement of the LPC melts at a shallow crustal level was favored by the aperture of extensional NNW-SSE fractures genetically linked to a local brittle shear zone, active at 18-19 Ma during a strong compressional event, that initiated the regime of flat-slab subduction in this part of the Andes.

  13. Non-omnia moriantur-toxicity of mancozeb on dead wood microarthropod fauna.

    PubMed

    Adamski, Zbigniew; Bloszyk, Jerzy; Bruin, Jan; Ziemnicki, Kazimierz

    2007-01-01

    The effect of Dithane M-45 (dithiocarbamate fungicide; active substance: mancozeb) was studied on microarthropod fauna inhabiting dead wood. Although the exposure was almost never 100% lethal for the majority of observed taxa, almost all (Mesostigmata, Oribatida, some Uropodina, Actinedida, Collembola and Diplopoda) showed very high correlation between concentration of the fungicide and mortality (r > 0.86). Only Stigmaeidae showed low correlation (r = 0.293). For the majority of taxa LC(50 )values were close to the concentrations used during agrochemical activities in woods. Only Trachytes aegrota showed full susceptibility to the fungicide within the range of recommended field concentrations used in forestry (characterised by the low LC(95 )value). Tolerance of mesostigmatid and oribatid mites was found to differ between juveniles and adults, but not consistently. Related Uropodina species varied in susceptibility to the fungicide. PMID:17522956

  14. Radiocarbon dates for lava flows and pyroclastic deposits on Sao Miguel, Azores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, R.B.; Rubin, M.

    1991-01-01

    We report 63 new radiocarbon analyses of samples from Sao Miguel, the largest island in the Azores archipelago. The samples are mainly carbonized tree roots and other plant material collected from beneath 20 mafic lava flows and spatter deposits and from within and beneath 42 trachytic pyroclastic flow, pyroclastic surge, mudflow, pumice-fall and lacustrine deposits and lava flows. One calcite date is reported. These dates establish ages for 48 previously undated lava flows and pyroclastic deposits, and revise three ages previously reported. These data are critical to deciphering the Holocene and late Pleistocene eruptive history of Sao Miguel and evaluating its potential volcanic hazards. Average dormant intervals during the past 3000 years are about 400 years for Sete Cidades volcano, 145 years for volcanic Zone 2, 1150 years for Agua de Pau volcano and 320 years for Furnas volcano. No known eruptions have occurred in volcanic Zone 4 during the past 3000 years. -from Authors

  15. Age of Kōko Seamount, Emperor Seamount chain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, David A.; Dalrymple, G. Brent

    1973-01-01

    KAr ages obtained by the conventional isotope-dilution and the 40Ar/39Ar techniques on two sanidine trachytes, four basalts, and a phonolite dredged from the top of Ko¯ko Seamount, 300 km north of the Hawaiian-Emperor bend, show that the seamount is 46.4 ± 1.1 my old. These data indicate that the volcanoes in the Hawaiian-Emperor chain continue to increase in age to the west and north beyond Midway Atoll, as predicted by the melting-spot hypothesis for the origin of the chain, and that the rate of volcanic migration along the chain was nonlinear between the time of formation of the island of Hawaii and Ko¯ko Seamount.

  16. Generation of compositionally atypical hydrocarbons in CO[sub 2]-rich geologic environments

    SciTech Connect

    Gize, A ); Macdonald, R. )

    1993-02-01

    Bitumen seepages from a trachyte flow on the Suswa volcano (East African Rift) are anomalously enriched in O and N heteroatomic organic compounds and depleted in aliphatics. Compositional and geologic data suggest that the biogenically derived bitumens were extracted and/or transported by liquid or supercritical CO[sub 2] rather than H[sub 2]O, possibly from caldera-lake sediments. Compositionally atypical hydrocarbons and reduced carbon associated with other alkaline-peralkaline igneous complexes, as well as Hg and Au deposits, may also reflect CO[sub 2] fluids. Hydrocarbon extraction and migration in CO[sub 2]-rich fluids are considered realistic mechanisms in certain geologic environments. 22 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Geological investigations of volcanic rocks at Mount Discovery, Mount Morning, and Mason Spur, McMurdo Sound

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, A.C.; Kyle, P.R.; More, J.A.; Meeker, K.

    1986-01-01

    This work includes mapping of volcanic geology, description of geologic sections, and collection of samples for geochemical analysis and potassium-argon dating. Reconnaissance mapping of Mount Discovery shows that this 2681-meter-high composite volcano comprises a core of plagioclase-phyric nepheline-benmoreite flows, lahars, and volcanoclastic fluviatile sediments, which are thought to be the unit dated at 5.44 million years. Reconnaissance mapping of Mount Morning shows that this is a young volcano principally composed of kaersutite-bearing phonolite flows erupted both from the summit crater and from small parasitic domes on the upper northern slopes of the mountain. A sample from one of these parasitic domes has been dated at 1.15 million years. Description of five geologic sections at Mason Spur has provided a more detailed understanding of the older trachytic volcanic complex, which is now dated at 11.5 to 12.8 years and is divided into seven mapped units.

  18. Reconnaissance geology of the Jabal Khatam Quadrangle, sheet 26/39 D, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fairer, G.M.

    1983-01-01

    The Jabal Khatam quadrangle encompasses an area of about 2,725 km2 on the edge of the Precambrian shield in northwestern Saudi Arabia, between lat 26°00' and 26°30' N. and long 39°30' and 40°00' E. The southern one-third and northeastern corner of the area are covered by Tertiary and Quaternary basalt flows of Harrat Khaybar and Harrat Ithnayn. In one small area on its northern edge, Harrat Khaybar is composed of Tertiary rhyolitic tuff and trachyte. Most of the northern one-third and eastern part of the quadrangle are covered by Paleozoic Siq Sandstone. The remainder of the quadrangle is composed of trachyandesite flows, agglomerate, graywacke, and sparse marble of the Hulayfah group and intrusive rocks that range in composition from alkali-feldspar granite to diabase. No deposits with economic potential were found. However, the geothermal potential of the quadrangle warrants further investigation.

  19. The Breccia Museo formation, Campi Flegrei, southern Italy: Geochronology, chemostratigraphy and relationship with the Campanian Ignimbrite eruption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fedele, L.; Scarpati, C.; Lanphere, M.; Melluso, L.; Morra, V.; Perrotta, A.; Ricci, G.

    2008-01-01

    The Breccia Museo is one of the most debated volcanic formations of the Campi Flegrei volcanic district. The deposit, made up of six distinctive stratigraphic units, has been interpreted by some as the proximal facies of the major caldera-forming Campanian Ignimbrite eruption, and by others as the product of several, more recent, independent and localized events. New geochemical and chemostratigraphical data and Ar - Ar age determinations for several units of the Breccia Museo deposits (???39 ka), correlate well with the Campanian Ignimbrite-forming eruption. The chemical zoning of the Breccia Museo deposits is interpreted here to be a consequence of a three-stage event that tapped a vertically zoned trachytic magma chamber. ?? Springer-Verlag 2008.

  20. Isotopic composition of lead and strontium from Ascension and Gough Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gast, P.W.; Tilton, G.R.; Hedge, C.

    1964-01-01

    Isotopic composition of lead and strontium has been determined in a series of rock samples from two islands on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Both inter-and intra-island variations exist in the abundance of radiogenic isotopes of both elements. Lead from basalt of Ascension Island has a Pb206-Pb 204 ratio of 19.5, while the corresponding ratio at Gough Island is only 18.4. The Pb208-Pb204 ratios from the two islands do not differ. Conversely, strontium from basalt of Ascension Island is less radiogenic than that from Gough Island basalts. The trachytes of both islands have lead and strontium that is more radiogenic than that found in the basalts. The inter-island differences indicate the existence of regional variations in the uranium-lead and rubidium-strontium ratios of the upper mantle source of these rocks and show that isotope compositions are a means for investigating chemical heterogeneities in the mantle.

  1. The Petrochemistry of Jake_M: A Martian Mugearite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolper, E. M.; Baker, M. B.; Newcombe, M. E.; Schmidt, M. E.; Treiman, A. H.; Cousin, A.; Dyar, M. D.; Fisk, M. R.; Gellert, R.; King, P. L.; Leshin, L.; Maurice, S.; McLennan, S. M.; Minitti, M. E.; Perrett, G.; Rowland, S.; Sautter, V.; Wiens, R. C.; Kemppinen, Osku; Bridges, Nathan; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Cremers, David; Bell, James F.; Edgar, Lauren; Farmer, Jack; Godber, Austin; Wadhwa, Meenakshi; Wellington, Danika; McEwan, Ian; Newman, Claire; Richardson, Mark; Charpentier, Antoine; Peret, Laurent; Blank, Jennifer; Weigle, Gerald; Li, Shuai; Milliken, Ralph; Robertson, Kevin; Sun, Vivian; Edwards, Christopher; Ehlmann, Bethany; Farley, Kenneth; Griffes, Jennifer; Grotzinger, John; Miller, Hayden; Pilorget, Cedric; Rice, Melissa; Siebach, Kirsten; Stack, Katie; Brunet, Claude; Hipkin, Victoria; Léveillé, Richard; Marchand, Geneviève; Sánchez, Pablo Sobrón; Favot, Laurent; Cody, George; Steele, Andrew; Flückiger, Lorenzo; Lees, David; Nefian, Ara; Martin, Mildred; Gailhanou, Marc; Westall, Frances; Israël, Guy; Agard, Christophe; Baroukh, Julien; Donny, Christophe; Gaboriaud, Alain; Guillemot, Philippe; Lafaille, Vivian; Lorigny, Eric; Paillet, Alexis; Pérez, René; Saccoccio, Muriel; Yana, Charles; Armiens-Aparicio, Carlos; Rodríguez, Javier Caride; Blázquez, Isaías Carrasco; Gómez, Felipe Gómez; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Hettrich, Sebastian; Malvitte, Alain Lepinette; Jiménez, Mercedes Marín; Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Martín-Soler, Javier; Martín-Torres, F. Javier; Jurado, Antonio Molina; Mora-Sotomayor, Luis; Caro, Guillermo Muñoz; López, Sara Navarro; Peinado-González, Verónica; Pla-García, Jorge; Manfredi, José Antonio Rodriguez; Romeral-Planelló, Julio José; Fuentes, Sara Alejandra Sans; Martinez, Eduardo Sebastian; Redondo, Josefina Torres; Urqui-O'Callaghan, Roser; Mier, María-Paz Zorzano; Chipera, Steve; Lacour, Jean-Luc; Mauchien, Patrick; Sirven, Jean-Baptiste; Manning, Heidi; Fairén, Alberto; Hayes, Alexander; Joseph, Jonathan; Squyres, Steven; Sullivan, Robert; Thomas, Peter; Dupont, Audrey; Lundberg, Angela; Melikechi, Noureddine; Mezzacappa, Alissa; DeMarines, Julia; Grinspoon, David; Reitz, Günther; Prats, Benito; Atlaskin, Evgeny; Genzer, Maria; Harri, Ari-Matti; Haukka, Harri; Kahanpää, Henrik; Kauhanen, Janne; Kemppinen, Osku; Paton, Mark; Polkko, Jouni; Schmidt, Walter; Siili, Tero; Fabre, Cécile; Wray, James; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Poitrasson, Franck; Patel, Kiran; Gorevan, Stephen; Indyk, Stephen; Paulsen, Gale; Gupta, Sanjeev; Bish, David; Schieber, Juergen; Gondet, Brigitte; Langevin, Yves; Geffroy, Claude; Baratoux, David; Berger, Gilles; Cros, Alain; d'Uston, Claude; Forni, Olivier; Gasnault, Olivier; Lasue, Jérémie; Lee, Qiu-Mei; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Pallier, Etienne; Parot, Yann; Pinet, Patrick; Schröder, Susanne; Toplis, Mike; Lewin, Éric; Brunner, Will; Heydari, Ezat; Achilles, Cherie; Oehler, Dorothy; Sutter, Brad; Cabane, Michel; Coscia, David; Israël, Guy; Szopa, Cyril; Teinturier, Samuel; Dromart, Gilles; Robert, François; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Mangold, Nicolas; Nachon, Marion; Buch, Arnaud; Stalport, Fabien; Coll, Patrice; François, Pascaline; Raulin, François; Cameron, James; Clegg, Sam; DeLapp, Dorothea; Dingler, Robert; Jackson, Ryan Steele; Johnstone, Stephen; Lanza, Nina; Little, Cynthia; Nelson, Tony; Williams, Richard B.; Kirkland, Laurel; Baker, Burt; Cantor, Bruce; Caplinger, Michael; Davis, Scott; Duston, Brian; Edgett, Kenneth; Fay, Donald; Hardgrove, Craig; Harker, David; Herrera, Paul; Jensen, Elsa; Kennedy, Megan R.; Krezoski, Gillian; Krysak, Daniel; Lipkaman, Leslie; Malin, Michael; McCartney, Elaina; McNair, Sean; Nixon, Brian; Posiolova, Liliya; Ravine, Michael; Salamon, Andrew; Saper, Lee; Stoiber, Kevin; Supulver, Kimberley; Van Beek, Jason; Van Beek, Tessa; Zimdar, Robert; French, Katherine Louise; Iagnemma, Karl; Miller, Kristen; Summons, Roger; Goesmann, Fred; Goetz, Walter; Hviid, Stubbe; Johnson, Micah; Lefavor, Matthew; Lyness, Eric; Breves, Elly; Fassett, Caleb; Blake, David F.; Bristow, Thomas; DesMarais, David; Edwards, Laurence; Haberle, Robert; Hoehler, Tori; Hollingsworth, Jeff; Kahre, Melinda; Keely, Leslie; McKay, Christopher; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Bleacher, Lora; Brinckerhoff, William; Choi, David; Conrad, Pamela; Dworkin, Jason P.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer; Floyd, Melissa; Freissinet, Caroline; Garvin, James; Glavin, Daniel; Harpold, Daniel; Mahaffy, Paul; Martin, David K.; McAdam, Amy; Pavlov, Alexander; Raaen, Eric; Smith, Michael D.; Stern, Jennifer; Tan, Florence; Trainer, Melissa; Meyer, Michael; Posner, Arik; Voytek, Mary; Anderson, Robert C.; Aubrey, Andrew; Beegle, Luther W.; Behar, Alberto; Blaney, Diana; Brinza, David; Calef, Fred; Christensen, Lance; Crisp, Joy; DeFlores, Lauren; Ehlmann, Bethany; Feldman, Jason; Feldman, Sabrina; Flesch, Gregory; Hurowitz, Joel; Jun, Insoo; Keymeulen, Didier; Maki, Justin; Mischna, Michael; Morookian, John Michael; Parker, Timothy; Pavri, Betina; Schoppers, Marcel; Sengstacken, Aaron; Simmonds, John J.; Spanovich, Nicole; Juarez, Manuel de la Torre; Vasavada, Ashwin; Webster, Christopher R.; Yen, Albert; Archer, Paul Douglas; Cucinotta, Francis; Jones, John H.; Ming, Douglas; Morris, Richard V.; Niles, Paul; Rampe, Elizabeth; Nolan, Thomas; Radziemski, Leon; Barraclough, Bruce; Bender, Steve; Berman, Daniel; Dobrea, Eldar Noe; Tokar, Robert; Vaniman, David; Williams, Rebecca M. E.; Yingst, Aileen; Lewis, Kevin; Cleghorn, Timothy; Huntress, Wesley; Manhès, Gérard; Hudgins, Judy; Olson, Timothy; Stewart, Noel; Sarrazin, Philippe; Grant, John; Vicenzi, Edward; Wilson, Sharon A.; Bullock, Mark; Ehresmann, Bent; Hamilton, Victoria; Hassler, Donald; Peterson, Joseph; Rafkin, Scot; Zeitlin, Cary; Fedosov, Fedor; Golovin, Dmitry; Karpushkina, Natalya; Kozyrev, Alexander; Litvak, Maxim; Malakhov, Alexey; Mitrofanov, Igor; Mokrousov, Maxim; Nikiforov, Sergey; Prokhorov, Vasily; Sanin, Anton; Tretyakov, Vladislav; Varenikov, Alexey; Vostrukhin, Andrey; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Clark, Benton; Wolff, Michael; Botta, Oliver; Drake, Darrell; Bean, Keri; Lemmon, Mark; Schwenzer, Susanne P.; Anderson, Ryan B.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth; Lee, Ella Mae; Sucharski, Robert; Hernández, Miguel Ángel de Pablo; Ávalos, Juan José Blanco; Ramos, Miguel; Jones, Andrea; Kim, Myung-Hee; Malespin, Charles; Plante, Ianik; Muller, Jan-Peter; Navarro-González, Rafael; Ewing, Ryan; Boynton, William; Downs, Robert; Fitzgibbon, Mike; Harshman, Karl; Morrison, Shaunna; Dietrich, William; Kortmann, Onno; Palucis, Marisa; Sumner, Dawn Y.; Williams, Amy; Lugmair, Günter; Wilson, Michael A.; Rubin, David; Jakosky, Bruce; Balic-Zunic, Tonci; Frydenvang, Jens; Jensen, Jaqueline Kløvgaard; Kinch, Kjartan; Koefoed, Asmus; Madsen, Morten Bo; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane; Boyd, Nick; Campbell, John L.; Pradler, Irina; VanBommel, Scott; Jacob, Samantha; Owen, Tobias; Atlaskin, Evgeny; Savijärvi, Hannu; Boehm, Eckart; Böttcher, Stephan; Burmeister, Sönke; Guo, Jingnan; Köhler, Jan; García, César Martín; Mueller-Mellin, Reinhold; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert; Bridges, John C.; McConnochie, Timothy; Benna, Mehdi; Franz, Heather; Bower, Hannah; Brunner, Anna; Blau, Hannah; Boucher, Thomas; Carmosino, Marco; Atreya, Sushil; Elliott, Harvey; Halleaux, Douglas; Rennó, Nilton; Wong, Michael; Pepin, Robert; Elliott, Beverley; Spray, John; Thompson, Lucy; Gordon, Suzanne; Newsom, Horton; Ollila, Ann; Williams, Joshua; Vasconcelos, Paulo; Bentz, Jennifer; Nealson, Kenneth; Popa, Radu; Kah, Linda C.; Moersch, Jeffrey; Tate, Christopher; Day, Mackenzie; Kocurek, Gary; Hallet, Bernard; Sletten, Ronald; Francis, Raymond; McCullough, Emily; Cloutis, Ed; ten Kate, Inge Loes; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Arvidson, Raymond; Fraeman, Abigail; Scholes, Daniel; Slavney, Susan; Stein, Thomas; Ward, Jennifer; Berger, Jeffrey; Moores, John E.

    2013-09-01

    “Jake_M,” the first rock analyzed by the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer instrument on the Curiosity rover, differs substantially in chemical composition from other known martian igneous rocks: It is alkaline (>15% normative nepheline) and relatively fractionated. Jake_M is compositionally similar to terrestrial mugearites, a rock type typically found at ocean islands and continental rifts. By analogy with these comparable terrestrial rocks, Jake_M could have been produced by extensive fractional crystallization of a primary alkaline or transitional magma at elevated pressure, with or without elevated water contents. The discovery of Jake_M suggests that alkaline magmas may be more abundant on Mars than on Earth and that Curiosity could encounter even more fractionated alkaline rocks (for example, phonolites and trachytes).

  2. A new Eemian record of Antarctic tephra layers retrieved from the Talos Dome ice core (Northern Victoria Land)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narcisi, Biancamaria; Petit, Jean Robert; Langone, Antonio; Stenni, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    Polar ice sheets are remarkable repositories of tephra layers. The Talos Dome ice core (72°49‧S, 159°11‧E), drilled at the edge of the East Antarctic Plateau, close to Late Quaternary volcanoes, offers considerable potential to extend the current tephra time-stratigraphic framework. A tephrochronological study was undertaken of the ice core sections related to the Last Interglacial and the transition to the subsequent glacial period. Thirteen macroscopically visible layers, interpreted to be related to primary deposition of fallout tephra, have been analysed for quantitative grain size and glass shard geochemistry. The layers, precisely framed within the climate (δ18O) record for the core, span in age from 111.6 ± 1.9 to 123.3 ± 2.2 ka. Coarse particle size suggests origin from regional sources. Indeed, the vast majority of the samples display an alkaline affinity and trachytic composition that are both typical geochemical features of rifting Antarctic volcanism. Using subtle differences in the geochemical signatures and the comparison with data from previous studies, a few layers are attributed to known coeval Mt. Melbourne eruptions. Another sample subset is consistent with derivation from The Pleiades and Mt. Rittmann volcanoes. One peculiar trachytic glass population appears to be related to activity of the more distant Marie Byrd Land volcanoes. The newly detected tephras provide stratigraphic markers that could facilitate future synchronisation and dating of palaeoclimatic records. The Talos Dome tephra inventory also contributes significantly to the reconstruction of the Northern Victoria Land explosive volcanism, for which chronostratigraphic data for the Last Interglacial temporal segment are poor.

  3. A volcanological and geochemical investigation of Boa Vista, Cape Verde Islands; 40Ar/ 39Ar geochronology and field constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyhr, Charlotte T.; Holm, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    Boa Vista, the easternmost island in the Cape Verde archipelago, consists of volcanic products, minor intrusions and a thin partial sedimentary cover. The first 15 age results from 40Ar/ 39Ar incremental heating analysis of groundmass separates from volcanic and plutonic rocks from Boa Vista are presented. The combination of age results and field observations demonstrates that the volcanic activity that formed the island occurred in three main stages: (1) > 16 Ma, (2) 15-12.5 Ma and (3) 9.5-4.5 Ma. The first stage, restricted to the north eastern part of the island, is dominated by ankaramitic lavas. The second stage, consisting of evolved lavas of phonolitic-trachytic compositions and nepheline syenites, makes up large central parts of the island. The large volume of evolved rocks and the extended eruption period of several Ma make stage 2 in Boa Vista unique to Cape Verde. Mainly basanites and nephelinites were erupted during the third stage, initially dominated by eruption of subaerial mafic lavas around 9 Ma. Pillow lavas are erupted around 7 Ma whereupon dominantly subaerial mafic lavas were erupted. Stage 3 saw volcanism in many centres distributed mainly along the present coastline and with activity partly overlapping in time. The volcanic evolution of Boa Vista constrains the initiation of volcanic activity in the Cape Verde archipelago to the eastern islands. Major and trace element geochemistry of 160 volcanic and plutonic rocks representing the entire exposed chronological sequence on Boa Vista is presented, revealing an extremely well developed Daly Gap. Only a little was modified from the mafic magmas that rose in small batches from the mantle. Compositional variation distinguishes each volcanic complex and was to a large extent present in the mantle melts. The highly evolved stage 2 phonolites and trachytes are related through the fractional crystallization of three compositionally distinct magmas. Two of these may have been derived by crystal fractionation of primitive Boa Vista melts, whereas the third was not.

  4. Petrogenesis of coeval silica-saturated and silica-undersaturated alkaline rocks: Mineralogical and geochemical evidence from the Saima alkaline complex, NE China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yu-Sheng; Yang, Jin-Hui; Sun, Jin-Feng; Zhang, Ji-Heng; Wu, Fu-Yuan

    2016-03-01

    A combined study of zircon U-Pb ages, mineral chemistry, whole-rock elements and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopes was carried out for the Saima alkaline complex in the northeastern China, in order to investigate the source and petrogenesis of coeval silica-saturated and silica-undersaturated alkaline rocks. The Saima alkaline complex consists of nepheline syenites, quartz-bearing syenites and alkaline volcanic rocks (i.e., phonolite and trachyte), with minor mafic dikes and carbonatitic veins. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) zircon U-Pb dating gives consistent ages of 230-224 Ma for these rocks, suggesting that they are coeval. All alkaline rocks in the Saima complex are enriched in large ion lithophile elements (LILEs) and light rare earth elements (LREEs), and depleted in high field strength elements (HFSEs) with significant negative Nb, Ta and Ti anomalies. Geochemical data and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic compositions indicate that the various alkaline rocks were all derived from partial melting of an ancient, re-enriched lithospheric mantle in the garnet stability field, but experienced variable siliceous- or carbonate-rich crustal contamination. Based on petrographic evidence, mineral compositions, and whole-rock geochemical data, two distinct magmatic evolutionary trends are proposed to explain the coeval emplacement of the various rock types within the Saima alkaline complex. The silica-undersaturated rocks (nepheline syenites and phonolites) result from alkali feldspar + apatite + titanite crystal fractionation of an alkaline mafic parental melt combined with assimilation of marine carbonate host rocks. In contrast, the generation of silica-saturated rocks (quartz-bearing syenites and trachytes) may be attributed to subsequent and continued clinopyroxene + apatite + biotite crystal fractionation coupled with assimilation of siliceous sediments.

  5. Chemically diverse, episodic volcanism offshore southern and peninsular California

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A.S.; Gunn, S.H. ); Bohrson, W.A. . Dept. Earth and Space Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Volcanic rocks recovered from eight seamounts offshore southern and peninsular California are chemically diverse. Compositions of lavas from seven small to moderately sized seamounts between 30.5[degree] and 34.0 N latitudes include low-K[sub 2]O tholeiitic, transitional, and mildly to moderately alkalic basalt. Volcanic rocks from the upper part of the much larger and morphologically complex edifice of Rocas Alijos, offshore central Baja California at about 25.0 N latitude, are highly differentiated trachyandesite and trachyte. The low-K[sub 2]O basalts are MORB-like with low abundances of incompatible elements and lower [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr and higher [sup 143]Nd/[sup 144]Nd ratios than MORB from the East Pacific Rise. The alkalic compositions have higher abundances of incompatible elements and isotopic data indicate more variably enriched mantle sources than those of seamounts near the East Pacific Rise, but the compositions of all samples are within the mantle array defined by other ocean-island basalts. [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar laser fusion ages for the seamounts span a large range. MORB-like lava from one of the northern edifices is as old as the underlying oceanic crust ([approximately]23 Ma), indicating that it originated at a spreading center. Other seamount lava ages are much younger (16.6--9.1 Ma) than the underlying oceanic crust. The trachytes from Rocas Alijos are less than 300,000 years old, indicating that the last volcanism on this large edifice occurred recently. The region offshore southern and peninsular California is tectonically complex and has many volcanic edifices of varying sizes, shapes, and orientations. The data available for volcanic rocks from this region suggest that the seamounts formed from multiple episodes of chemically diverse volcanism occurring sporadically from early Miocene to Recent.

  6. Stratigraphy, geochronology and evolution of the Mt. Melbourne volcanic field (North Victoria Land, Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, Guido; Lucci, Federico; Phillips, David; Cozzupoli, Domenico; Runci, Valentina

    2012-11-01

    Mt. Melbourne (2,732 m a.s.l.) is a large quiescent stratovolcano located in Northern Victoria Land (Antarctica) and is one of a handful of volcanoes on the Antarctic plate with the potential for large-scale explosive eruptions. During the XVIII Italian Expedition in 2002-2003, the Mt. Melbourne volcanic succession was studied in terms of stratigraphy and sampled for 40Ar/39Ar age determinations and geochemistry. The early, Lower Pleistocene, volcanism was largely alkali basaltic to hawaiitic in composition and monogenetic in style, producing tens of small scoria cones and lava flows scattered over a wide area across the Transantarctic Mountains (Random Hills Period). During the Middle Pleistocene, volcanic activity focused to the area of the Mt. Melbourne stratovolcano, where several monogenetic centres show the transition from early sub-glacial/subaqueous conditions to emergent subaerial conditions (Shield Nunatak Period). The oldest exposed deposit associated with the early activity of the Mt. Melbourne stratovolcano (Mt. Melbourne Period) is a trachytic subaerial ignimbrite dated at 123.6 ± 6.0 ka, which reflects the establishment of a crustal magma chamber. Above the ignimbrite a succession of alkali basaltic, hawaiitic, and subordinate benmoreitic lavas and scoria cones is exposed, dated at 90.7 ± 19.0 ka. The Holocene deposits are exposed at the top of Mt. Melbourne, where the crater rim is composed of trachytic to rhyolitic pumice fall deposits, which are also extensively dispersed around the volcano, likely originated from Plinian-scale eruptions. The most recent explosive deposit proved difficult to date accurately because very low quantities of radiogenic 40Ar were released, resulting in imprecise plateau ages of 50 ± 70 and 35 ± 22 ka.

  7. Classification and Geochemical Characterization of Igneous Rocks: Southern Part of Chihuahua City, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontes, I. D.; Espejel-Garcia, V. V.; Villalobos-Aragon, A.

    2013-05-01

    Chihuahua City is the capital of the state with the same name, located in northern Mexico. The city was established near the Chuviscar River, but in the last decades it has been extended to the nearby areas (mountains), with volcanic (rhyolitic tuffs), and sedimentary rocks (limestone). The study area includes areas in the south part of Chihuahua City, where we can still find unbuilt lands and it is possible to appreciate outcrops of igneous rocks. This project includes 5 study spots, which are located about 9 km. far from the south extreme of the city. This research is developed in order to complement the geological information in this area, as there is no is detailed record of it. In the geological map H13-10 (SGM, 1997), it is said that the urban area is covered by Quaternary conglomerates, while exploring the region we have located several igneous rocks outcrops. In three of the sampling points, dark colored intrusive igneous rocks with large crystals appear in blocks without noticeable fractures. While in the other two sampling points, highly fractured blocks of pink aphanitic igneous rocks, showing traces of pyrolusite were observed. The petrographic study shows the two different textures that classify these rocks as extrusive (aphanitic) or intrusive (phaneritic), both with quartz and feldspars being the dominant minerals. Geochemical analyses confirm the felsic composition of the rocks, varying form trachytes to rhyolites. The trace element results show high contents of Sr, Ba, V, Rb, and Zr in trachytic compositions, while there are high concentrations of Mn, W, Rb and Co for rhyolitic compositions.

  8. Petrological and geochemical comparition between the upper and lower rhyolite of the Binchuan basaltic profile,Emeishan LIP succession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huixin, H.; Yu, W.

    2013-12-01

    Emeishan basalt is well known worldwide,and it has been well tested from the geochemistry and petrology.However,the eruptional rock sequences is rare reported. Some former work reported that on the top of Emeishan basalt,there is always sit with rhyolite(or felsic-composition,mainly are rhyolite and trachyte ).This work is focusing on newly found rhyolite and trachyte succession at the bottom of Binchuan basalt pofile,and the comparition between the bottom and top felsic-composition of the Binchuan pofile basaltic related succession from petrological and geochemistry points. The bottom rhyolite is lack of phenocryst,and the filling of blowhole is observed quartz only. Otherwise,the phenocryst of the top rhyolite is mainly alkaline-feldspar. The upper layered rhyolite is less sillical rich than the lower part with the content of SiO2 65-70,68-74 respectively. Additionally,the content of TiO2 (0.82-0.87,0.57-0.70),Total Fe2O3(5.15-5.87,2.89-4.88),MgO(2.13-2.64,0.19-0.48),CaO(1.18-1.49,0.13-0.42), P2O5(0.18-0.25,0.02-0.25) of the upper layered rhyolite is more abundant than the lower layer. However,the amount of the Na2O,K2O of both upper and lower rhyolite can not be distinguished clearly as weathering effect suspectively. This may note that the two kinds of rhyolite are formed from different geological process. The upper may due to the crystallization differentiation of the mafic magmas ,while the lower is formed in the result of crust remelting.

  9. Shield volcanoes of Marie Byrd Land, West Antarctic rift: oceanic island similarities, continental signature, and tectonic controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeMasurier, Wesley

    2013-06-01

    The Marie Byrd Land volcanic province is largely defined by 18 large (up to ~1,800 km3) alkaline shield volcanoes, each surmounted by a summit section of varied felsic rocks dominated by trachytic flows. They are distributed over a 500 × 800-km block-faulted dome within the West Antarctic rift. The basement contact of volcanic sections is ~500 masl at one site and 3,000 mbsl at another, 70 km away, which illustrates the scale of block faulting but complicates an understanding of volcanic structure. Furthermore, the continental ice sheet buries 16 volcanoes to progressively greater heights inland. However, five are sufficiently exposed to allow meaningful comparisons with alkaline oceanic island volcanoes; these comparisons are used as a guide to estimate the structure of Marie Byrd Land volcanoes. The type example for this study is Mt. Murphy, the most completely exposed volcano. It consists of a 1,400-m section of alkaline basalt overlain by trachyte and benmoreite flows that make up ~7-13 % of the volcano volume. In gross structure and composition, Mt. Murphy is similar to Gran Canaria volcano, Canary Islands, but the percent of felsic rock may be three times that of Gran Canaria, if the estimate is approximately correct. Departures from the oceanic island example are believed to represent the imprint of the Marie Byrd Land lithosphere and tectonic environment on volcano evolution. These include a lack of order in the sequence of felsic rock types, lack of progression toward more silica undersaturated compositions with time, absence of a highly undersaturated mafic resurgent stage, and perhaps, a relatively large volume of felsic rock.

  10. A-type,'' flood rhyolites of Trans-Pecos Texas: A major crustal melting event at 36. 8 Ma

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, C.D.; James, E.W. . Bureau of Economic Geology)

    1993-04-01

    The Bracks Rhyolite, Star Mountain Formation, and Crossen Trachyte are related, voluminous, high-temperature ([ge]900 C) silicic lavas that constitute an abrupt, major eruptive event in Trans-Pecos Texas. They were emplaced rapidly at 36.8 Ma, at the onset of the main phase of subduction-related volcanism and immediately preceding a major basalt outpouring. Individual flows are as much as 55 km long, cover 1,000 km[sup 2], and have volumes of as much as 75 km[sup 3]. Cumulatively, they cover 10,000[sup 2] km and comprise 1,000 km[sup 3]. Despite areal extents comparable to those of ash-flow tuffs, outcrop and petrographic features clearly demonstrate that these rocks were emplaced as lavas. All the silicic lavas are mildly peralkaline quartz trachytes to low-SiO[sub 2] rhyolites (67%--72% SiO[sub 2]). They have mineralogic and chemical characteristics of A-type'' granites, including Fe-rich pyroxene, fayalite, and sodic amphibole; high Na[sub 2]O + K[sub 2]O, Ga/Al, Zr, Nb, and Y; and low CaO, MgO, and Sr. Most elements do not correlate with SiO[sub 2], indicating that they are not differentiation suites. Individual flows are strikingly homogeneous. Pb isotopic compositions show a narrow range that indicate either a homogeneous source with Th/U [approx] 6 or thorough mixing. These characteristics are consistent with magma generation by high degrees of partial melting of depleted, anhydrous crust. Trace-element models support crustal melting over AFC processes. Heat was supplied by major infusion of basalt that coincided with a regional flare-up in magmatism in the southern Cordillera. Thus, the lavas indicate both introduction of new crust and recycling of old crust.

  11. Tectonic significance of Neoproterozoic magmatism of Nakora area, Malani igneous suite, Western Rajasthan, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Naresh; Vallinayagam, G.

    2014-05-01

    Three magmatic phases are distinguished in the Neoproterozoic Nakora Ring Complex (NRC) of Malani Igneous Suite (MIS), namely (a) Extrusive (b) Intrusive and (c) Dyke phase. Magmatism at NRC initiated with minor amount of (basic) basalt flows and followed by the extensive/voluminous acid (rhyolites-trachytes) flows. The ripple marks are observed at the Dadawari area of NRC in tuffaceous rhyolite flow which suggests the aqueous condition of flows deposition. The emplacement of the magma appears to have been controlled by a well defined NE-SW tectonic lineament and cut by radial pattern of dykes. These NE-SW tectonic lineaments are the linear zones of crustal weakness and high heat flow. The spheroidal and rapakivi structures in the Nakora acid volcanics indicate the relationship between genetic link and magma mixing. Basalt-trachyte-rhyolite association suggests that the large amount of heat is supplied to the crust from the magma chamber before the eruption. The field (elliptical/ring structures), mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of Nakora granites attest an alkaline character in their evolution and consistent with within plate tectonic setting. The emplacement of these granites and associated volcanics is controlled by ring structures, a manifestation of plume activity and cauldron subsidence, an evidence of extensional tectonic environment. NRC granites are the product of partial melting of rocks similar to banded gneiss from Kolar Schist Belt of India. The present investigations suggest that the magmatic suites of NRC rocks are derived from a crustal source and the required heat supplied from a mantle plume.

  12. The Chaîne des Puys: how complicated can monogentic get?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Wyk de Vries, B.; Grosse, P.; Marquez, A.; Petronis, M. S.; Kervyn, M.; Delcamp, A.; Mossoux, S.; Troll, V. R.

    2012-12-01

    The Chaîne des Puys (Massif Centrale of France) is part of a prospective volcano-tectonic UNESCO World Heritage site including the Limagne Rift fault (http://www.chainedespuys-failledelimagne.com/). The strategy is to present the monogentic field that is as representative of other such fields, but which itself is uniquely special. Effectively, the Chaîne des Puys would become a sort of ambassador for monogentic volcanism, raising the profile of all other sites. Here, I want to go through some recent work on the chain, looking at morphology, morphometry, structure, lithology and petrology and show some of the intriguing complexities of this classic highly variable monogentic alignment. Also, I want to build on the historical development of ideas that can be traced back to characters such as Montlosier, Humphrey Davey, Faraday, Lyell, and Von Humbolt... and many more. I focus, first, on the central the Puy de Dôme. This classic trachyte dome has been known for some time to be the product of two eruptions, and recently we have found that it is related to a number of cryptodome intrusions that have created flanking bulges, fed at least two major explosive eruptions, and extensively modified the topography of the field. Strangely, Von Humbolt's concept of 'craters of elevation' rises up in a reanalysis of these structures. Secondly, I visit Lemptégy (www.auvergne-volcan.com/), that in 1857, Scrope called 'an insignificant cone grazed by sheep', but now quarried out and showing the internal structure expected for the Puy de Dôme bulges, as well as illustrating that a seemingly simple scoria cone plumbing can be infernally complicated. Thirdly, I consider the Beaunit, a bucolic village in a maar, where the process of crustal ingestion suggests an intimate relationship between eruptive dynamics and assimilation. With these three examples I show some of the complications and interactions of monogentic basaltic to trachytic volcanism typified by the Chaîne des Puys.

  13. Petrogenesis of the Miocene felsic volcanism from the south of Izmir (Western Turkey) and its regional tectono-magmatic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karacik, Z.; Genç, C.

    2013-12-01

    Miocene volcanism, mainly intermediate and rarely mafic and felsic in composition, was produced under the effects of the extensional tectonic regime in western Turkey. The Karaburun and Cumaovasi volcanics are the cases for understanding the magma source(s) and petrological processes, producing the extension-related mafic and felsic bimodal volcanism. The Karaburun volcanics (KV) are mainly distributed north to south direction within the Karaburun peninsula and span a wide compositional spectrum from basalt (20 Ma) to rhyolite (16 Ma), and younger trachyte and trachydacites (13 Ma). The products of the subaerial felsic volcanism (the Cumaovasi volcanics, CV; 17 Ma) which are represented by cluster of topaz bearing rhyolite domes, related pyroclastic rocks occur within the NE-SW trending Cubukludag graben. The intermediate and mafic volcanic rocks are lack in the volcanic succession of CV. The lavas of the Cumaovasi volcanics are silicic which are calc alkaline, peralumious and enriched significantly in LILE. Extremely low Sr, Ba values, Eu depletions and very low LaN/YbN ratios are typical for rhyolites. The Karaburun volcanics, with the exception of the minor alkaline basaltic and trachytic lavas, are mainly calc alkaline and metaluminous intermediate lavas. The petrological data revealed that the KV and CV were formed in extensional tectonic setting, but evolved by different petrological processes in different magma chambers. The Cumaovasi lavas have a unique chemical composition, and closely similar to the extension related topaz bearing rhyolites formed from small magma bodies. Our data reveal that extension related mafic injections caused crustal anatectic melting and produced felsic melts that rapidly ascended into the upper crust.

  14. A 3D model of crustal magnetization at the Pinacate Volcanic Field, NW Sonora, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Abdeslem, Juan; Calmus, Thierry

    2015-08-01

    The Pinacate Volcanic Field (PVF) is located near the western border of the southern Basin and Range province, in the State of Sonora NW Mexico, and within the Gulf of California Extensional Province. This volcanic field contains the shield volcano Santa Clara, which mainly consists of basaltic to trachytic volcanic rocks, and reaches an altitude of ~ 1200 m. The PVF disrupts a series of discontinuous ranges of low topographic relief aligned in a NW direction, which consist mainly of Proterozoic metamorphic rocks and Proterozoic through Paleogene granitoids. The PVF covers an area of approximately 60 by 55 km, and includes more than 400 well-preserved cinder cones and vents and eight maar craters. It was active from about 1.7 Ma until about 13 ka. We have used the ages and magnetic polarities of the volcanic rocks, along with mapped magnetic anomalies and their inverse modeling to determine that the Pinacate Volcanic Field was formed during two volcanic episodes. The oldest one built the Santa Clara shield volcano of basaltic and trachytic composition, and occurred during the geomagnetic Matuyama Chron of reverse polarity, which also includes the normal polarity Jaramillo and Olduvai Subchrons, thus imprinting both normal and reverse magnetization in the volcanic products. The younger Pinacate series of basaltic composition represents monogenetic volcanic activity that extends all around the PVF and occurred during the subsequent geomagnetic Brunhes Chron of normal polarity. Magnetic anomalies toward the north of the Santa Clara volcano are the most intense in the PVF, and their inverse modeling indicates the presence of a large subsurface body magnetized in the present direction of the geomagnetic field. This suggests that the magma chambers at depth cooled below the Curie temperature during the Brunhes Chron.

  15. Preliminary AMS Study in Cretaceous Igneous Rocks of Valle Chico Complex, Uruguay: Statistical Determination of Magnetic Susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcelona, H.; Mena, M.; Sanchez-Bettucci, L.

    2009-05-01

    The Valle Chico Complex, at southeast Uruguay, is related Paraná-Etendeka Province. The study involved basaltic lavas, quarz-syenites, and rhyolitic and trachytic dikes. Samples were taken from 18 sites and the AMS of 250 specimens was analyzed. The AMS is modeled by a second order tensor K and it graphical representation is a symmetric ellipsoid. The axes relations determine parameters which describe different properties like shape, lineation, and foliation, degree of anisotropy and bulk magnetic susceptibility. Under this perspective, one lava, dike, or igneous body can be considered a mosaic of magnetic susceptibility domains (MSD). The DSM is an area with specific degree of homogeneity in the distribution of parameters values and cinematic conditions. An average tensor would weigh only one MSD, but if the site is a mosaic, subsets of specimens with similar parameters can be created. Hypothesis tests can be used to establish parameter similarities. It would be suitable considered as a MSD the subsets with statistically significant differences in at least one of its means parameters, and therefore, be treated independently. Once defined the MSDs the tensor analysis continues. The basalt-andesitic lavas present MSD with an NNW magnetic foliation, dipping 10. The K1 are sub-horizontal, oriented E-W and reprsent the magmatic flow direction. The quartz-syenites show a variable magnetic fabric or prolate ellipsoids mayor axes dispose parallel to the flow direction (10 to the SSE). Deformed syenites show N300/11 magnetic foliation, consistent with the trend of fractures. The K1 is subvertical. The MSD defined in rhyolitic dikes have magnetic foliations consistent with the structural trend. The trachytic dikes show an important indetermination in the magnetic response. However, a 62/N90 magnetic lineation was defined. The MSDs obtained are consistent with the geological structures and contribute to the knowledge of the tectonic, magmatic and kinematic events.

  16. Experimental constraints on the differentiation process and pre-eruptive conditions in the magmatic system of Phlegraean Fields (Naples, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbrizio, Alessandro; Carroll, Michael R.

    2008-03-01

    Phase relations of two samples of the Breccia Museo Eruption (BME), BME is an explosive event that took place (about 20 ky ago) during the caldera-forming phase of the Ignimbrite Campana eruption, have been determined experimentally as a function of temperature (700 to 885 C), pressure (50 to 200 MPa) and water content of the melt. The crystallization experiments were carried out at fO 2 = NNO + 1 log unit. Melt water content ranged from 3.4 to 8 wt.% (H 2O saturation). The synthetic products are compared to the natural phases to constrain the pre-eruptive conditions of trachytic magma in the presence of an H 2O-rich fluid. The major phases occurring in the BME have been reproduced. The stability of biotite is favoured at pressures higher than 135 MPa. Phase equilibria at 200 MPa reproduce the phase assemblage of the magma only at temperatures below 775 C. Phase abundances and melt fractions indicate that the eruption tapped a magma body that was at a temperature of 780 C and a pressure in the range 200-140 MPa. The observed major element variations are fully consistent with a fractional crystallization of a sanidine-dominated assemblage starting from the least differentiated trachytes. The compositions of the experimental products are compatible with the progressive tapping of a shallow magma chamber that was chemically zoned. These results suggest that after an early eruptive phase during which the upper, most differentiated level of the magma chamber was tapped, the sudden collapse of the roof of the reservoir triggered drainage of the less evolved remaining magma.

  17. Volcanic unrest in Kenya: geological history from a satellite perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, E.; Biggs, J.; Edmonds, M.; Vye-Brown, C.

    2013-12-01

    The East African Rift (EAR) system is a 5,000 km long series of fault bounded depressions that run from Djibouti to Mozambique. In the Kenyan Rift, fourteen Quaternary volcanoes lie along the central rift axis. These volcanoes are principally composed of trachyte pyroclastics and trachyte and basaltic lavas forming low-angle multi-vent edifices. Between 1997 and 2008, geodetic activity has been observed at five Kenyan volcanoes, all of which have undergone periods of caldera collapse and explosive activity. We present a remote-sensing study to investigate the temporal and spatial development of volcanic activity at Longonot volcano. High-resolution mapping using ArcGIS and an immersive 3D visualisation suite (GeovisionaryTM) has been used with imagery derived from ASTER, SPOT5 and GDEM data to identify boundaries of eruptive units and establish relative age in order to add further detail to Longonot's recent eruptive history. Mapping of the deposits at Longonot is key to understand the recent geological history and forms the basis for future volcanic hazard research to inform risk assessments and mitigation programs in Kenya. Calderas at Kenyan volcanoes are elliptical in plan view and we use high-resolution imagery to investigate the regional stresses and structural control leading to the formation of these elliptical calderas. We find that volcanoes in the central and northern segments of the Kenyan rift are elongated nearly parallel to the direction of least horizontal compressive stress, likely as a reflection of the direction of the plate motion vector at the time of caldera collapse. The southern volcanoes however are elongated at an acute angle to the plate motion vector, most likely as a result of oblique opening of the Kenyan rift in this region.

  18. Maximum Historical Seismic Intensity Map of S. Miguel Island (azores)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, D.; Gaspar, J. L.; Ferreira, T.; Queiroz, G.

    The Azores archipelago is situated in the Atlantic Ocean where the American, African and Eurasian lithospheric plates meet. The so-called Azores Triple Junction located in the area where the Terceira Rift, a NW-SE to WNW-ESE fault system with a dextral component, intersects the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, with an approximate N-S direction, dominates its geological setting. S. Miguel Island is located in the eastern segment of the Terceira Rift, showing a high diversity of volcanic and tectonic structures. It is the largest Azorean island and includes three active trachytic central volcanoes with caldera (Sete Cidades, Fogo and Furnas) placed in the intersection of the NW-SE Ter- ceira Rift regional faults with an E-W deep fault system thought to be a relic of a Mid-Atlantic Ridge transform fault. N-S and NE-SW faults also occur in this con- text. Basaltic cinder cones emplaced along NW-SE fractures link that major volcanic structures. The easternmost part of the island comprises an inactive trachytic central volcano (Povoação) and an old basaltic volcanic complex (Nordeste). Since the settle- ment of the island, early in the XV century, several destructive earthquakes occurred in the Azores region. At least 11 events hit S. Miguel Island with high intensity, some of which caused several deaths and significant damages. The analysis of historical documents allowed reconstructing the history and the impact of all those earthquakes and new intensity maps using the 1998 European Macrosseismic Scale were produced for each event. The data was then integrated in order to obtain the maximum historical seismic intensity map of S. Miguel. This tool is regarded as an important document for hazard assessment and risk mitigation taking in account that indicates the location of dangerous seismogenic zones and provides a comprehensive set of data to be applied in land-use planning, emergency planning and building construction.

  19. The ˜1000-years BP explosive eruption of Caldeira Volcano (Faial, Azores): the first stage of incremental caldera formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimentel, Adriano; Pacheco, José; Self, Stephen

    2015-05-01

    The ˜1000-years BP eruption of Caldeira Volcano (Faial Island) was one of the last major explosive events recorded in the Azores. It produced a complex succession of pyroclastic deposits, known as the C11, divided into three members. At the base is the Brejo Member, a sequence of fine- to coarse-grained parallel-bedded ash layers found in the NW sector of the island. The middle part corresponds to the Inverno Member, a coarse-grained massive pumice fall deposit, restricted to the north flank of Caldeira Volcano. The top is dominated by the Cedros Member which includes massive to diffuse-stratified lapilli-ash and lithic breccias, exposed along the north and east flanks of the volcano. A minimum bulk volume of at least 0.22 km3 (>0.1 km3 dense rock equivalent (DRE)) is estimated for the C11 eruption, although a large portion may have been deposited offshore. The juvenile products are trachytic (59 wt% SiO2) with a homogenous whole-rock composition and mineral assemblage throughout the pyroclastic succession. However, petrographic and groundmass glass analyses indicate magma mingling/mixing processes between two trachytic batches. The C11 eruption history is divided into three phases (following the member division) with distinct eruptive styles: (1) an initial phreatomagmatic phase caused by rising magma (˜950 °C) encountering a crater pond or aquifer, (2) a fall-dominated phase which established a sub-Plinian column up to 14 km high (mass eruption rate (MER) of 1.2 × 107 kg/s) and (3) prolonged pyroclastic fountaining and sustained quasi-steady pyroclastic density current generation followed by summit collapse. The C11 eruption is interpreted as the first stage in the formation of an incremental caldera. This study provides valuable insights for a better understanding of small but complex explosive eruptions and their impact on ocean islands.

  20. Comenditic and pantelleritic ash-flow tuffs from Volcan Las Navajas, Nayarit, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S.A.; Hebre, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Two distinctive ash-flow tuffs occur around the base of Volcan Las Navajas, a Pleistocene trachyte - peralkaline rhyolite center located in the northwestern segment of the Mexican Volcanic belt. The lower ash-flow unit is locally up to 65 m thick, is lithic rich and contains pumice blocks of comenditic rhyolite. The unit is not extensively exposed, and thus its areal extent and volume cannot be determined. Its chemical characteristics and stratigraphic relationship to other products erupted from Las Navajas suggest that it is related to the formation of the older of the two calderas which occur on Las Navajas. Unconformably overlying this unwelded ash-flow is a pantelleritic airfall pumice unit which is locally welded. This airfall unit is conformably overlain by a welded as-flow tuff that contains fiamme of pantelleritic composition (72 %SiO/sub 2/, 8% FeO*, 900 ppm Zr, agpaitic index of 1.7) as well as pumice blocks that show evidence of various degrees of mixing between pantellerite and trachyte. This suggests eruption from a chemically zoned magma chamber. This unit is locally up to 20 m thick, although its top has been removed by erosion. It is found on all sides of Las Navajas except on the south where it may be covered by Volcan Sanganguey, a Pleistocene to Recent calc-alkaline volcano. The welded ash-flow has been dated by K - Ar at 0.2+/-0.1 m.y. Stratigraphically and chemically this ash-flow appears to be related to the formation of younger of the two calderas.

  1. Peralkaline magma evolution and the tephra record in the Ethiopian Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rooney, Tyrone O.; Hart, William K.; Hall, Chris M.; Ayalew, Dereje; Ghiorso, Mark S.; Hidalgo, Paulo; Yirgu, Gezahegn

    2012-09-01

    The 3.119 ± 0.010 Ma Chefe Donsa phreatomagmatic deposits on the shoulder of the Ethiopian Rift mark the northern termination of the Silti-Debre Zeyit Fault Zone, a linear zone of focused extension within the modern Ethiopian Rift. These peralkaline pumice fragments and glass shards span a wide range of glass compositions but have a restricted phenocryst assemblage dominated by unzoned sanidine. Glass shards found within the ash occupy a far more limited compositional range (75-76 wt% SiO2) in comparison with the pumice (64-75 wt% SiO2), which is rarely mingled. Thermodynamic modeling shows that liquids broadly similar to the least evolved glass composition can be achieved with 50-60 % fractionation of moderately crustally contaminated basalt. Inconsistencies between modeled solutions and the observed values of CaO and P2O5 highlight the important role of fluorine in stabilizing fluor-apatite and the limitations of current thermodynamic models largely resulting from the scarce experimental data available for the role of fluorine in igneous phase stability. On the basis of limited feldspar heterogeneity and crystal content of pumice at Chefe Donsa, and the difficulties of extracting small volumes of Si-rich melt in classical fractional crystallization models, we suggest a two-step polybaric process: (1) basaltic magma ponds at mid-upper-crustal depths and fractionates to form a crystal/magma mush. Once this mush has reached 50-60 % crystallinity, the interstitial liquid may be extracted from the rigid crystal framework. The trachytic magma extracted at this step is equivalent to the most primitive pumice analyzed at Chefe Donsa. (2) The extracted trachytic liquid will rise and continue to crystallize, generating a second mush zone from which rhyolite liquids may be extracted. Some of the compositional range observed in the Chefe Donsa deposits may result from the fresh intrusion of trachyte magma, which may also provide an eruption trigger. This model may have wider application in understanding the origin of the Daly Gap in Ethiopian magmas—intermediate liquids may not be extracted from crystal-liquid mushes due to insufficient crystallization to yield a rigid framework. The wide range of glass compositions characteristic of the proximal Chefe Donsa deposits is not recorded in temporally equivalent tephra deposits located in regional depocenters. Our results show that glass shards, which represent the material most likely transported to distal depocenters, occupy a limited compositional range at high SiO2 values and overlap some distal tephra deposits. These results suggest that distal tephra deposits may not faithfully record the potentially wide range in magma compositions present in a magmatic system just prior to eruption and that robust distal-proximal tephra correlations must include a careful analysis of the full range of materials in the proximal deposit.

  2. Hazards associated with alkaline glaciovolcanism at Hoodoo Mountain and Mt. Edziza, western Canada: comparisons to the 2010 Eyjafjallajokull eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, B. R.

    2010-12-01

    The hazards associated with 2010 eruption from Eyjafjallajokull were well documented, and included flooding, pyroclastic activity, and local/regional ash and aerosol dispersal (e.g., Gudmundsson et al, 2010, Session V27). At least two ice-capped, alkaline volcanoes in northwestern British Columbia could produce similar styles of eruptive activity with associated local and regional hazards: Hoodoo Mountain and the Mt. Edziza volcanic complex. Similar to Eyjafjallajokull, both of the Canada volcanoes have likely had multiple Holocene eruptions of lava flows from beneath snow/ice cover, both eruption mildly alkaline basaltic to trachytic lavas, and both also have a history of explosive eruptions. Hoodoo Mountain volcano, which is approximately 17 cubic kilometers in volume, erupts dominantly trachyte-phonolite composition lavas, although it also has closely associated basaltic centers. Most of its history has been dominated by effusive eruptions, but at least one thick sequence of eutaxitic pyroclastic materials has been erupted in the past 50 ka (Edwards et al, 2002). It is presently covered by snow and a 3 km diameter ice cap that feeds a few small, flank alpine glaciers. The Mt. Edziza volcanic complex is much larger, with an estimated total eruptive volume of approximately 650 cubic km; it has had an extended eruptive history during the Plio-Pleistocene (Souther et al, 1984) including basaltic and trachytic eruptions. It presently hosts an ice-filled summit caldera approximately 2.8 by 2 km, which feeds several alpine glaciers radiating outwards in all directions. Edziza has several striking morphological similarities to Eyjafjallajokull, including the similar-sized summit ice cap dominated by silicic eruption products, an overall elongate morphology, and flanking fields of basaltic lava flows. Although Hoodoo and Edziza volcanoes are located in relatively remote parts of British Columbia, eruptions from either would likely partly melt existing snow and ice cover, generating locally important lahars and flooding along major BC water courses (Iskut and Stikine rivers). More importantly, fine silicic ash produced by phreatomagmatic activity could be a significant hazard for North American airspace, just as ash from Alaskan eruptions (e.g. Redoubt 1989/1990) has caused occasional air traffic problems. This possibility has recently been re-enforced by studies of lacustrine-deposited ash across western Canada (Lakeman et al 2008). *Edwards et al (2002) Subglacial, phonolitic volcanism at Hoodoo Mountain volcano, Canadian Cordillera, Bull Volc. DOI: 10.1007/s00445-002-0202-9 *Lakeman et al (2008) Holocene tephras in lake cores from northern British Columbia: Can. J. Earth Sci. 45, 935-947. *Souther et al (1984) Chronology of the peralkaline late Cenozoic Mount Edziza volcanic complex, northern British Columbia, Canada. Geol. Soc. Am. Bull. 95, 337-349.

  3. Incision of the Colorado River in southern Utah - insights from channel profiles, local incision rates, and modeling of lithologic controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, K.; Whipple, K.; Heimsath, A.

    2009-04-01

    The Colorado River and its tributaries in southern Utah and northern Arizona provide an opportunity to study the propagation of bedrock incision through a large heterogeneous fluvial network, as the system is continuing to adjust to the baselevel fall responsible for the Grand Canyon. Although the carving of the Grand Canyon was largely complete by ~1 Ma, the canyon ends at Lee's Ferry and the incision history of Colorado River system upstream of the associated large knickpoint has been the subject of debate. In conjunction with existing incision rate estimates based on the dating of strath terraces, we use longitudinal profiles of the Colorado and tributaries between Marble Canyon and Cataract Canyon to investigate the incision history of the Colorado in this region. We find that all but two of the tributaries in this region steepen as they enter the Colorado River. The consistent presence of oversteepened reaches with similar elevation drops in the lower section of these channels, and their coincidence within a corridor of high local relief along the Colorado, suggest that the tributaries are steepening in response to an episode of increased incision rate on the Colorado River. This analysis is supported by available incision rate data, as the spatial distribution of incision rates predicted by the channel profiles is consistent with existing rate estimates. The two analyzed tributaries that show no evidence for this incision pulse, Trachyte Creek and Bullfrog Creek, have smoothly concave profiles and do not contain knickpoints. In order to evaluate the significance of these anomalous channel profiles, we measure in situ 10Be concentrations on four gravel-covered strath surfaces elevated from 1 m to 110 m above Trachyte Creek. The surfaces yield exposure ages that range from approximately 2.5 ka to 267 ka and suggest incision rates that vary between 350 and 600 m/my. These incision rates are similar to other rates determined within the high-relief corridor, and suggest that despite the lack of knickpoints in their long profiles, Trachyte and Bullfrog Creeks are also responding to the increase in incision rate on the Colorado. Sustained high incision rates combined with a smoothly concave profile suggest that these channels are responding in a continuous, transport-limited manner, perhaps driven by the combination of extremely durable diorite sediment and weak, easily abraded bedrock found in the channels of the Henry Mountains. Finally, we use a simple numerical model of detachment-limited bedrock incision to investigate the relationship between the large convexity in the Colorado River at Lee's Ferry and the incision we observe farther upstream. Model results suggest that the pulse of incision we observe may be related to the interaction between the propagation of headward incision through the Grand Canyon and the presence of an upstream-dipping lithologic boundary at Lee's Ferry. This suggests that the large knickpoint at Lee's Ferry is neither the upstream extent of Grand Canyon incision nor solely related to lithology, but instead results from a combination of lithologic and transient effects.

  4. U-Pb Geochronology of Hydrous Silica (Siebengebirge, Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaschek, Frank; Nemchin, Alexander; Geisler, Thorsten; Heuser, Alexander; Merle, Renaud

    2015-04-01

    Low-temperature, hydrous weathering eventually leads to characteristic products such as silica indurations. Elevated U concentrations and the ability of silica to maintain a closed system permits silica to be dated by the U-Pb method, which, in turn, will potentially allow constraining the timing of near-surface processes. To test the feasibility of silica U-Pb geochronology, we sampled opal and chalcedony from the Siebengebirge, Germany. This study area is situated at the terminus of the Cenozoic Lower Rhine Basin on the Rhenish Massif. The investigated samples include silicified gravels from the Mittelbachtal locality, renowned for the embedded wood opal. Structural characterization of the silica phases (Raman spectroscopy) was combined with in situ isotopic analyses, using ion microprobe and LA-ICPMS techniques. In the Siebengebirge area fluviatile sediments of Upper Oligocene age were covered by an extended trachyte tuff at around 25 Ma. Silica is known to indurate some domains within the tuff and, in particular, certain horizons within the subjacent fluviatile sediments ('Tertiärquarzite'). Cementation of the gravels occurred during at least three successive growth stages: early paracrystalline silica (opal-CT), fibrous chalcedony, and late microcrystalline quartz. It has traditionally been assumed that this silica induration reflects intense weathering, more or less synchronous with the deposition of the volcanic ashes. Results from U-Pb geochronology returned a range of discrete 206Pb-238U ages, recording a protracted silicification history. For instance, we obtained 22 ± 1 Ma for opal-CT cement from a silicified tuff, 16.6 ± 0.5 Ma for silicified wood and opal-CT cement in the fluviatile gravels, as well as 11 ± 1 Ma for texturally late chalcedony. While silicification of the sampled tuff might be contemporaneous with late-stage basalts, opaline silicification of the subjacent sediments and their wood in the Mittelbachtal clearly postdates active Siebengebirge volcanism, and the clastic sedimentation by about 8 Myr. To account for the age discrepancies, opal-CT formation might be a local and episodic phenomenon, reflecting progressive denudation of the trachyte tuff cover. Alternatively, the dominant silicification event of the Mittelbachtal silcretes could be of regional significance (Middle Miocene Climatic Optimum). Our relatively fast approach by LA-ICPMS analysis will be used to further expand the database.

  5. Bubble Nucleation in Hydrous Magmas: The Impact of Melt Composition, Water Content, and Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, J. E.; Lewis, A. E.

    2009-12-01

    When magma rises toward the surface, water - the most abundant volatile dissolved in most magmas - exsolves and forms bubbles, because its solubility in magma decreases with lower pressure. The kinetics of bubble nucleation has been linked to the eruptive behavior of magma, and may even control whether eruptions are violently explosive or effusively passive. Assuming bubbles nucleate homogeneously, both the onset and rate of their nucleation are controlled mainly by the degree to which water is supersaturated in the melt (?P) and the surface tension (?) between the bubble and its host melt. In fact, ? is critical, because even small changes in ? lead to large differences in ?P needed to trigger nucleation. Despite the importance of ? in controlling bubble nucleation, and thus possibly in determining the eruptive behavior of volcanoes, we lack predictive models of ?, and even know little about how it varies between magmas. From what data exist, we know that dissolved water content impacts ?, as does temperature and melt composition. To expand the database of measured values of ?, we have carried hydrothermal decompression experiments on hydrous rhyolite, pantellerite, and trachyte. Those melts were first hydrated at high pressure and temperature, typically for 5 days, and then decompressed to lower pressure within a few seconds (hence, instantaneous decompression), and then the melt was quenched rapidly after spending some fixed amount of time at the new lower pressure. Bubble number densities are measured in 3D, and divided by time to estimate nucleation rate. From those rates as a function of decompression, we then estimate the value of ?. Our preliminary results suggest that, at 900 C, pantellerite (highly per-alkaline rhyolite) with 6.2 wt.% dissolved water has a ? of 0.063 N/m and trachyte with 4.7 wt.% water has a ? of ~0.078 N/m. Our results on rhyolite reveal that at constant water content (~5 wt.%) ? decreases about 20% as temperature increases from 775 to 875 C, roughly equal to the impact of isothermally increasing water content by a weight percent. When we combine our results with published surface tensions determined by similar methods we find that ? correlates, albeit weakly, with melt viscosity, suggesting that the structure of hydrous melt may play an important role in determining surface tension. Indeed, we find that ? correlates with the concentration of structural modifiers in the melt, modified for water content and temperature; that same modified parameter correlates strongly with melt viscosity. These preliminary findings suggest that surface tension may be predictable by knowing magma composition and temperature. We plan to expand our database by carrying out further decompression studies using different melt compositions, water contents, and temperatures.

  6. Topographic Attributes of Three Hawaiian Lava Flows: Implications for Evaluation of Lava Flow Emplacement on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimbelman, J. R.

    2004-12-01

    Differential Global Positioning System surveys were carried out recently across portions of three lava flows on the Big Island of Hawaii. Transects crossed an entire flow in several cases, and in other cases provided detailed information about selected flow margins. The 1907 basalt (a'a) flow from the southwestern rift zone of Mauna Loa has easy access at several points via the Ocean View Estates road system; flow thickness ranges from about 1 m near the middle of the eastern flow lobe to more than 10 m toward the distal end of this flow. Several components of a benmoreite (alkali-rich basaltic andesite) flow complex from Mauna Kea were examined near the small community of Mana (with permission of the Parker Ranch management), on the western flank of the volcano. The flows are more than 14,000 years old and completely covered with soil more than a meter thick, but flow morphology at the decameter scale remains very evident in aerial photographs; some benmoreite flows have up to 30 m of relief along their middle reaches. A trachyte flow more than 100,000 years old extends down slope from Puu Waawaa, on the northern flank of Hualalai; Puu Anahulu represents a very advanced stage of magmatic differentiation that resulted in a flow complex with more than 120 m of relief at its southern margin. Width/thickness represents a good discriminator between these three Hawaiian lava flows. Unfortunately, width is often the most difficult parameter to measure remotely for flows on other planets. Recent imaging data from the Thermal Emission Imaging System on the Mars Odyssey spacecraft reveal important new details of lava flows in the Tharsis region of Mars, some of which can be combined with elevation information from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter. The precise topographic characteristics of diverse Hawaiian lava flows provide a new tool for evaluating the potential emplacement conditions for some Martian lava flows, which appear to be more consistent with the basalt to basaltic andesite lava flows than with the highly evolved trachyte flows. Future work, supported by a grant from the NASA Planetary Geology and Geophysics Program, will obtain additional precise topographic information for several Hawaiian flows to expand the topographic data set for comparison with the Martian flows, as well as lava flows on other planetary bodies.

  7. 40Ar/39Ar dating of the eruptive history of Mount Erebus, Antarctica: volcano evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esser, Richard P.; Kyle, Philip R.; McIntosh, William C.

    2004-12-01

    Mt. Erebus, a 3,794-meter-high active polygenetic stratovolcano, is composed of voluminous anorthoclase-phyric tephriphonolite and phonolite lavas overlying unknown volumes of poorly exposed, less differentiated lavas. The older basanite to phonotephrite lavas crop out on Fang Ridge, an eroded remnant of a proto-Erebus volcano and at other isolated locations on the flanks of the Mt. Erebus edifice. Anorthoclase feldspars in the phonolitic lavas are large (~10 cm), abundant (~30 40%) and contain numerous melt inclusions. Although excess argon is known to exist within the melt inclusions, rigorous sample preparation was used to remove the majority of the contaminant. Twenty-five sample sites were dated by the 40Ar/39Ar method (using 20 anorthoclase, 5 plagioclase and 9 groundmass concentrates) to examine the eruptive history of the volcano. Cape Barne, the oldest site, is 1,311±16 ka and represents the first of three stages of eruptive activity on the Mt. Erebus edifice. It shows a transition from sub-aqueous to sub-aerial volcanism that may mark the initiation of proto-Erebus eruptive activity. It is inferred that a further ~300 ky of basanitic/phonotephritic volcanism built a low, broad platform shield volcano. Cessation of the shield-building phase is marked by eruptions at Fang Ridge at ~1,000 ka. The termination of proto-Erebus eruptive activity is marked by the stratigraphically highest flow at Fang Ridge (758±20 ka). Younger lavas (~550 250 ka) on a modern-Erebus edifice are characterized by phonotephrites, tephriphonolites and trachytes. Plagioclase-phyric phonotephrite from coastal and flank flows yield ages between 531±38 and 368±18 ka. The initiation of anorthoclase tephriphonolite occurred in the southwest sector of the volcano at and around Turks Head (243±10 ka). A short pulse of effusive activity marked by crustal contamination occurred ~160 ka as indicated by at least two trachytic flows (157±6 and 166±10 ka). Most anorthoclase-phyric lavas, characteristic of Mt. Erebus, are less than 250 ka. All Mt. Erebus flows between about 250 and 90 ka are anorthoclase tephriphonolite in composition.

  8. The proximal marine record of the Marsili Seamount in the last 7 ka (Southern Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy): Implications for the active processes in the Tyrrhenian Sea back-arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamburrino, S.; Vallefuoco, M.; Ventura, G.; Insinga, D. D.; Sprovieri, M.; Tiepolo, M.; Passaro, S.

    2015-10-01

    The volcanism of back-arc basins resembles that of oceanic spreading centers, rifts, and, in vanishing stages, extensional arcs, depending on the amount and rate of the dynamic processes associated to the subduction. Marsili Seamount (MS) represents the axial ridge of the Southern Tyrrhenian Sea back-arc basin, which is connected to the slab roll-backing processes affecting the Calabrian Arc (Italy). The Southern Tyrrhenian Sea back-arc is characterized by a significant decline in the spreading rate with time (2.8-3.1 mm/a to less than 1.8 mm/a in the last 0.78-1 Ma). MS develops between about 1 Ma and 3 ka and mainly consists of lava flows erupted from central and fissural vents. The MS products belong to the calcalkaline association and range in composition from basalts to trachytes. We present new stratigraphic, geochronological, and geochemical data (glass shards and minerals) of tephra from a 2.35 m long gravity core (Marsili1 core) recovered on MS at 943 m b.s.l. We recognize five tephras [M1 (top of the core) to M5 (bottom)] represented by poorly to highly vesiculated ashes. The lowermost tephra M5 emplaced between ca. 7 and 26 ka B.P.; it represents the less evolved distal counterpart of the Unit D related to the Biancavilla-Montalto products of Mount Etna (Sicily). The M1 to M4 tephras emplaced between 2.1 and 7.2 ka B.P. and are related to strombolian-like submarine eruptions of NNE-SSW aligned MS vents. The composition of the M1-M4 glasses ranges from basaltic trachyandesites to andesites and trachytes. The M1 to M4 magmas mainly originated by crystal fractionation from a heterogeneous mantle source with varying LILE enrichments by subduction-related fluids. The degree of evolution of the MS magmas increases with decreasing time. The formation of vertically stacked magma storage zones at the crust/mantle interface and within MS is related to the vanishing Southern Tyrrhenian Sea opening, which implies the rapid (< 1 Ma) evolution from a slow spreading back-arc setting to an arc system.

  9. Megacrystic Clinopyroxene Basalts Sample A Deep Crustal Underplate To The Mount Taylor Volcanic Field, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, M. E.; Schrader, C. M.; Crumpler, L. S.; Wolff, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    The alkaline and compositionally diverse (basanite to high-Si rhyolite) Mount Taylor Volcanic Field (MTVF), New Mexico comprises 4 regions that cover ~75 x 40 km2: (1) Mount Taylor, a large composite volcano and a surrounding field of basaltic vents; (2) Grants Ridge, constructed of topaz rhyolitic ignimbrite and coulees; (3) Mesa Chivato, a plateau of alkali basalts and mugearitic to trachytic domes; and (4) the Rio Puero basaltic necks. Distributed throughout its history (~3.6 to 1.26 Ma; Crumpler and Goff, 2012) and area (excepting Rio Puerco Necks) is a texturally distinct family of differentiated basalts (Mg# 43.2-53.4). These basalts contain resorbed and moth-eaten megacrysts (up to 2 cm) of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, and olivine ±Ti-magnetite ±ilmenite ±rare orthopyroxene. Some megacrystic lava flows have gabbroic cumulate inclusions with mineral compositions similar to the megacrysts, suggesting a common origin. For instance, gabbroic and megacrystic clinopyroxenes form linear positive arrays in TiO2 (0.2-2.3 wt%) with respect to Al2O3 (0.7-9.3 wt%). The lowest Al clinopyroxenes are found in a gabbroic inclusion and are associated with partially melted intercumulus orthopyroxene. Megacrystic and gabbroic plagioclase (An 41-80) in 4 representative thin sections were analyzed for 87Sr/86Sr by Laser Ablation ICP-MS. 87Sr/86Sr values for the suite range from 0.7036 to 0.7047. The low 87Sr/86Sr plagioclases (0.7036 to 0.7037) are associated with high Ti-Al clinopyroxenes. Likewise, the higher 87Sr/86Sr plagioclases (0.7043 to 0.7047) are associated with the low-Al clinopyroxenes. Taken together, these megacrysts track the differentiation of an intrusive body (or related bodies) from alkaline to Si-saturated conditions by fractional crystallization and crustal assimilation. The intrusive body likely underplates portions of the MTVF that have generated silicic magmas (Mount Taylor, Grants Ridge, Mesa Chivato). Although disequilibrium is implied by resorbed grain boundaries, clinopyroxene-liquid geobarometry calculations (Putirka, 2008) suggest crystallization occurred in the lower crust at ~1200°C and 12.4 kbar. This intrusive body may represent a common deep crustal heat source to link the diverse silicic magmas (mugerites, trachytes, trachy-andesites and dacites, high-Si rhyolites, and topaz rhyolites) of the MTVF.

  10. The pre-eruptive volatile contents of recent basaltic and pantelleritic magmas at Pantelleria (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gioncada, A.; Landi, P.

    2010-01-01

    Pantelleria Island, located in the Sicily Channel Rift Zone (Italy), is the type locality for the peralkaline rhyolitic rocks called pantellerites. In the last 50 ka, after the large Green Tuff caldera-forming eruption, volcanic activity at Pantelleria has consisted of effusive and explosive eruptions mostly vented inside and along the rim of the caldera and producing silicic lava flows, lava domes and poorly dispersed pantelleritic pumice fall deposits. Basaltic cinder cones and lava flows are only present outside the caldera in the NW sector of the island. The most recent basaltic (Cuddie Rosse, ˜ 20 ka) and pantelleritic (Cuddia Randazzo and Cuddia del Gallo, ˜ 6 ka) pyroclastic products were sampled to investigate magmatic volatile contents through the study of melt inclusions. The melt inclusions in pyroxene and olivine phenocrysts of Cuddie Rosse scoriae have an alkali basalt composition. The dissolved volatiles comprise 0.9-1.6 wt.% H 2O, several hundred ppm of CO 2, 1600-2000 ppm of sulphur and 500-900 ppm of chlorine. The water-carbon dioxide couple gives a confining pressure ˜ 2 kbar prior to the eruption. This result indicates that episodes of magma ponding and crystallization occurred in the upper crust prior to eruption. The melt inclusions in feldspar, fayalite and aenigmatite phenocrysts of Cuddia del Gallo and Cuddia Randazzo pumice have a pantelleritic composition (Agpaitic Indices 1.3-2.1), up to 4.4 wt.% H 2O, 8700 ppm Cl, 6000 ppm F, and CO 2 below the detection limit. Sulphur averaging 420 ppm has been measured in Cuddia Randazzo melt inclusions. These data indicate relatively high volatile contents for these low-energy Strombolian-type eruptions. Melt inclusions in Cuddia del Gallo pumice show the most evolved composition (Agpaitic Indices 2-2.1) and the highest volatile content, in agreement with fluid saturation conditions in the magma chamber prior to the eruption. This implies a confining pressure of ˜ 1 kbar for the top of the pantelleritic reservoir. The composition of melt inclusions and mineralogical assemblage of Cuddia Randazzo pumice indicate that it has a lower evolutionary degree (Agpaitic Indices 1.3-1.8) and lower pre-eruptive Cl and H 2O contents than Cuddia del Gallo pumice. An increase in pressure due to the exsolution of volatiles in the upper part of the pantelleritic reservoir may have triggered the Cuddia del Gallo explosive eruption. Evidence of widespread pre-eruptive mingling between trachytes and pantellerites suggests that the intrusion of trachytic magma into the pantelleritic reservoir likely played a major role in destabilizing the magma system just prior to the Cuddia Randazzo event.

  11. Spatio-temporal evolution of a dispersed magmatic system and its implications for volcano growth, Jeju Island Volcanic Field, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenna, Marco; Cronin, Shane J.; Smith, Ian E. M.; Sohn, Young Kwan; Maas, Roland

    2012-09-01

    Jeju Island is the emergent portion of a basaltic volcanic field developed over the last c. 1.8 Ma on continental crust. Initial volcanism comprised dispersed, small-volume (< 0.01 km3) alkali basaltic eruptions that incrementally constructed a tuff pile. Lavas and scoria from continuing small-scaled monogenetic volcanism capped this foundation. From c. 0.4 Ma large-volume (> 1 km3) eruptions began, with lavas building a composite shield. Three magma suites can be recognized: Early Pleistocene high-Al alkali (HAA), and Late Pleistocene to Holocene low-Al alkali (LAA) and subalkali (SA). The chemical similarity between small-volume and primitive large-volume eruptions suggests analogous parent magmas and fractionation histories that are independent of erupted volumes. The large-volume magmas evolved to trachyte, which erupted in two distinct episodes: the HAA Sanbangsan suite at c. 750 ka and the LAA Hallasan suite at c. 25 ka. Sr and Nd isotopes indicate that the early trachytes were contaminated by upper crustal material, whereas the later magmas were not. Both suites bear a Nd isotope signature indicative of lower crustal interaction. Sub-suites transitional between HAA and LAA, and between LAA and SA, indicate that melting occurred in discrete, but adjacent, mantle domains. Throughout the evolution of this volcano, each magma batch erupted separately, and a centralized plumbing system was never created. The Island's central peak (Mt. Halla 1950 m a.s.l.) is therefore not a sensu stricto stratovolcano, but marks the point of peak magma output in a distributed magmatic system. Jeju's shape and topography thus represent the spatial variation of fertility of the mantle below it. An increase in melt production in the Late Pleistocene was related to a deepening of the melting zone due to regional tectonic rearrangements. Temporal coincidences between magmatic pulses on Jeju and large-scale caldera eruptive events along the nearest subduction system in Kyushu, Japan, suggest that tectonic extension and changing strain rates may drive volcanism on a regional basis, influencing the intraplate volcanism of Jeju Island.

  12. 40Ar/(39)Ar dating of the Kapthurin Formation, Baringo, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Deino, Alan L; McBrearty, Sally

    2002-01-01

    The(40)Ar/(39)Ar radiometric dating technique has been applied to tuffs and lavas of the Kapthurin Formation in the Tugen Hills, Kenya Rift Valley. Two variants of the(40)Ar/(39)Ar technique, single-crystal total fusion (SCTF) and laser incremental heating (LIH) have been employed to date five marker horizons within the formation: near the base, the Kasurein Basalt at 0.61+/-0.04 Ma; the Pumice Tuff at 0.543+/-0.004 Ma; the Upper Kasurein Basalt at 0.552+/-0.015 Ma; the Grey Tuff at 0.509+/-0.009 Ma; and within the upper part of the formation, the Bedded Tuff at 0.284+/-0.012 Ma. The new, precise radiometric age determination for the Pumice Tuff also provides an age for the widespread Lake Baringo Trachyte, since the Pumice Tuff is the early pyroclastic phase of this voluminous trachyte eruption. These results establish the age of fossil hominids KNM-BK 63-67 and KNM-BK 8518 at approximately 0.510-0.512 Ma, a significant finding given that few Middle Pleistocene hominids are radiometrically dated. The Kapthurin hominids are thus the near contemporaries of those from Bodo, Ethiopia and Tanzania. A flake and core industry from lacustrine sediments in the lower part of the formation is constrained by new dates of 0.55-0.52 Ma, a period during which the Acheulian industry, characterized by handaxes, is known throughout East Africa. Points, typical of the Middle Stone Age (MSA), are found in Kapthurin Formation sediments now shown to date to between 0.509+/-0.009 Ma and 0.284+/-0.012 Ma. This date exceeds previous estimates for the age of the MSA elsewhere in East Africa by 49 ka, and establishes the age of Acheulian to MSA transition for the region. Evidence of the use of the Levallois technique for the manufacture of both small flakes and biface preforms, the systematic production of blades, and the use and processing of red ochre also occurs in this interval. The presence of blades and red ochre at this depth is important as blades signify a high degree of technical competence and red ochre suggests symbolic behavior. PMID:11795974

  13. Petrochemical features of Miocene volcanism around the Çubukludağ graben and Karaburun peninsula, western Turkey: Implications for crustal melting related silicic volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karacık, Z.; Genç, Ş. C.; Gülmez, F.

    2013-09-01

    Widespread Neogene volcanism, mainly intermediate and rarely mafic and felsic in composition, was controlled by the extensional tectonic regime in western Turkey. The Karaburun and Cumaovası volcanics are the cases for understanding the magma source(s) and petrological processes, producing the extension-related mafic and felsic volcanism. The Karaburun volcanics (KV) are mainly oriented north to south in the Karaburun peninsula and span a wide spectrum from basalt (20 Ma) to rhyolite (16 Ma), and younger trachyte and trachydacites (13 Ma). The products of the subaerial silicic volcanism (the Cumaovası volcanics, CV; 17 Ma) which are represented by cluster of rhyolite domes, related pyroclastics occur within the NE-SW trending Çubukludağ graben, and intermediate and mafic volcanic rocks are lack in this area. The lavas of the Cumaovası volcanics are high silica rhyolites and rare dacites which are calc alkaline, peralumious and enriched significantly in LILE. Extremely low Sr, Ba values, extremely Eu depletions and very low LaN/YbN ratios are typical for the rhyolites of CV, similar to the topaz rhyolites. The Karaburun volcanics, with the exception of the minor alkaline basaltic and trachytic lavas, are mainly calc alkaline and metaluminous intermediate lavas. 87Sr/86Sr ratios of the KV and dacitic samples of CV are close to each other and range from 0.708 to 0.709; while Sr isotopic ratios of the rhyolites are significantly high and variable (0.724-0.786). 143Nd/144Nd ratios of the CV and KV, except for the alkaline samples, are similar for both sequences vary from 0.51230 to 0.51242. Geological, geochemical, isotopic and radiochronologic data reveal that the KV and CV were formed in extensional tectonic setting, but evolved by different petrological processes in different magma chambers. During the Neogene, underplated mafic magma was injected into the crust and hybridized by mantle and crustal derived materials. Geochemical features and trace element modeling for the mafic members of the KV indicate that they were derived from enriched lithospheric mantle and modified by fractional crystallization from basalt to rhyolite (Helvacı et al., 2009). Unexpectedly, the felsic lavas from Cumaovası region have a unique chemical composition, and similar to the extension related rhyolites formed from small magma bodies. Our data reveal that extension related mafic inputs caused crustal anatectic melting and formed felsic melts that rapidly ascended into the upper crust. The Cumaovası felsic rocks were differentiated into the highly evolved silica-rich melts within the magma chambers trapped near the surface.

  14. Petrogenesis of the Sabongari alkaline complex, cameroon line (central Africa): Preliminary petrological and geochemical constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Njonfang, Emmanuel; Tchoneng, Gilbert Tchuenté; Cozzupoli, Domenico; Lucci, Federico

    2013-07-01

    The petrography, mineral chemistry and geochemical features of the Sabongari alkaline complex are presented and discussed in this paper with the aim of constraining its petrogenesis and comparing it with other alkaline complexes of the Cameroon Line. The complex is mainly made up of felsic rocks: (i) granites predominate and include pyroxene-amphibole (the most abundant), amphibole-biotite, biotite and pyroxene types; (ii) syenites are subordinate and comprise amphibole-pyroxene and amphibole-biotite quartz syenites; (iii) pyroxene-amphibole-biotite trachyte and (iv) relatively abundant rhyolite. The minor basic and intermediate terms associated with felsic rocks consist of basanites, microdiorite and monzodioites. Two groups of pyroxene bearing rocks are distinguished: a basanite-trachyte-granite (Group 1) bimodal series (SiO2 gap: 44 and 63 wt.%) and a basanite-microdiorite-monzodiorite-syenite-granite (Group 2) less pronounced bimodal series (reduced SiO2 gap: 56-67 wt.%). Both are metaluminous to peralkaline whereas felsic rocks bare of pyroxene (Group 3) are metaluminous to peraluminous. The Group 1 basanite is SiO2-undersaturated (modal analcite in the groundmass and 11.04 wt.% normative nepheline); its Ni (240 ppm) and Cr (450 ppm) contents, near mantle values, indicate its most primitive character. The Group 2 basanite is rather slightly SiO2-saturated (1.56 wt.% normative hypersthene), a marker of its high crustal contamination (low Nb/Y-high Rb/Y). The La/Yb and Gd/Yb values of both basanites (1: 19.47 and 2.92; 2: 9.09 and 2.23) suggest their common parental magma composition, and their crystallization through two episodes of partial melting (2% and 3% respectively) of a lherzolite mantle source with <4% residual garnet. The effects of crustal contamination were selectively felt in the values of HFSE/LREE, LREE/LILE and LREE/HFSE ratios, known as indicators. Similar features have been recently obtained in the felsic lavas of the Cameroon Volcanic Line.

  15. Carbonatites and primary carbonates in the Rio Apa and Amambay regions, NE Paraguay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comin-Chiaramonti, Piero; De Min, Angelo; Girardi, Vicente A. V.; Gomes, Celso B.

    2014-02-01

    In the Rio Apa and Amambay regions, north-eastern Paraguay (NPAA), potassic, alkaline-carbonatitic rocks (138-139 Ma) predate the eruption of tholeiitic flood basalts (133 ± 1 Ma). These rocks, mainly outcropping as dykes or ring-like complexes, intrude a Cambro-Ordovician carbonate platform and Precambrian metamorphic rocks along with their Silurian and Permo-Carboniferous sediments. The main rock-types range from basanite to trachyte and trachyphonolite (and intrusive equivalents) to carbonatite, in addition to glimmeritic and pyroxenitic veins. Geological and geophysical evidence indicate that the NPAA magmatism is related to extensional tectonics, like the Early Cretaceous alkaline-carbonatitic complexes from central-eastern Paraguay (127 ± 1 Ma) and the eastern magmatic occurrences of the Paraná Basin. Oxygen and carbon isotope compositions (whole rocks and carbonates) vary from values close to the field of continental lithospheric mantle, or that of primary carbonatites, up to values typical of a hydrothermal environment. An isotope exchange model implies that the main isotope variations, ranging from a magmatic (e.g., 1200 °C) to a low temperature (< 400 °C) environment, involved fluids with CO2/H2O ratios between 0.8 and 1.0. In particular, the Osbnd C isotopic variations, in combination with the La vs La/Yb ratios, suggest an increasingly higher level of carbonate in the silicate liquids, with increasing evolution, i.e., basanite → phonotephrite → trachyphonolite-phonolite (trachyte) → carbonatite. Srsbnd Nd isotopes show that the carbonatites are mantle derived without significant crustal contamination and that they can be related to isotopically enriched sources where newly formed veins (enriched component) and peridotite matrix (depleted component) underwent differing isotopic evolution. TDM model ages for NPAA range from 1.2 to 2.3 Ga. Considering that in the whole Paraná Basin isotopically distinct K-alkaline and tholeiitic magmas were generated following the enrichment of the subcontinental mantle mainly between 1.0 and 2.3 Ga (Paleo-Mesoproterozoic events), the mantle sources preserved the isotopic heterogeneities over long time periods, suggesting a non-convective, i.e., lithospheric, mantle source beneath different cratonic or intercratonic areas.

  16. The campi flegrei (Italy) geothermal system: A fluid inclusion study of the mofete and San Vito fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    de, Vivo B.; Belkin, H.E.; Barbieri, M.; Chelini, W.; Lattanzi, P.; Lima, A.; Tolomeo, L.

    1989-01-01

    A fluid inclusion study of core from the Mofete 1, Mofete 2, Mofete 5, San Vito 1, and San Vito 3 geothermal wells (Campi Flegrei, Campania, Italy) indicates that the hydrothermal minerals were precipitated from aqueous fluids (??CO2) that were moderately saline (3-4 wt.% NaCl equiv.) to hypersaline (> 26 wt.% NaCl equiv.) and at least in part, boiling. Three types of primary fluid inclusions were found in authigenic K-feldspar, quartz, calcite, and epidote: (A) two-phase [liquid (L) + vapor (V)], liquid-rich inclusions with a range of salinity; (B) two-phase (L + V), vaporrich inclusions with low salinity; and (C) three-phase [L + V + crystals (NaCL)], liquid-rich inclusions with hypersalinity. Results of microthermometric and crushing studies are reported for twenty drill core samples taken from the lower portions of the five vertical wells. Data presented for selected core samples reveal a general decrease in porosity and increase in bulk density with increasing depth and temperature. Hydrothermal minerals commonly fill fractures and pore-spaces and define a zonation pattern, similar in all five wells studied, in response to increasing depth (pressure) and temperature. A greenschist facies assemblage, defined by albite + actinolite, gives way to an amphibolite facies, defined by plagioclase (andesine) + hornblende, in the San Vito 1 well at about 380??C. The fluid inclusion salinity values mimic the saline and hypersaline fluids found by drilling. Fluid inclusion V/L homogenization temperatures increase with depth and generally correspond to the extrapolated down-hole temperatures. However, fluid inclusion data for Mofete 5 and mineral assemblage data for San Vito 3, indicate fossil, higher-temperature regimes. A limited 87Sr/86Sr study of leachate (carbonate) and the leached cores shows that for most samples (except San Vito 3) the carbonate deposition has been from slightly 87Sr-enriched fluids and that Sr isotopic exchange has been incomplete. However, San Vito 3 cores show an approach to fluid/rock Sr equilibrium with a fluid similar to modern ocean water in 87Sr/86Sr ratio. The Campi Flegrei volcanic system has evolved undersaturated products, mostly trachyte, and defines a large (??? 12 km) caldera. The hydrothermal system developed in this location can be used as an analog for fossil systems in similar trachytic environments. The potential for ore mineralization is expressed by the recognition, from fluid inclusion and drilling data, of ore-forming environments such as boiling and brine stratification. ?? 1989.

  17. Monogenetic volcanic fields and their geoheritage values of western Saudi Arabia and their implication to holistic geoeducation projects locally and globally (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemeth, K.; Moufti, R.

    2013-12-01

    Monogeneitc volcanic fields are the most common manifestation of volcanism on Earth and other planets. They composed of small volume and short lived volcanoes each of them with a relatively simple eruption history. In spite of recent researches demonstrated complex, repeated and geochemically distinct eruption histories commonly associated with te formation of small-volume volcanoes, they are still considerred as volcanoes that are in human-scale and therefore ideal to use them as educational tools or part of volcanic geoheritage projects including geopark developments. In the western margin of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia there are at least 9 intracontinental volcanic fields subparalell with the Red Sea Rift ranging from alkaline basaltic to basalt-trachyte bimodal dispersed volcanic systems. Among these volcanic fields the geoheritage value of three fields were recently evaluated and proposed that they are suitable for further development to establish the first volcanic geoparks in the Arabian Peninsula in the area of 1) Al Madinah (AMVF) 2) Kishb (KVF) and 3) Hutaymah Volcanic Fields (HVF). The AMVF offers a natural concept based on specific volcanic precinct ordering of its volcanic geoheritages from the most accessable and most common volcanism that is historically significant (eg. scoria and lava spatter cones with extensive lava fields) toward a more adventure geotourism style approach in remote, less common but more destructive type of volcanism (eg. trachytic explosion craters). In the contrary, the KVF is a perfect site where phreatomagmatic volcanism and their consequences were identified as a major driving force for further geopark developments. The HVF with its rich archaeological and cultural sites and superbly exposed variously eroded tuff rings and maars offer a good location to develop geoeducation programs to highlight short- and long-term climatic and hydrologic changes in an area a volcanic field evolved. The three Saudi projects also demonstrate the need to arrange and coordinate geoeducational projects locally and globally around common geological assets such as monogenetic volcanic fields. We also provide a conceptual model to link various sites of monogenetic volcanic fields along a volcanologically valid holistic geoconservation and geoeducation programs that are scientifically well-established. Well-preserved maar craters such as Harrat Hutaymah (A) and erosionally enlarged maars such as Tabah (B) are internationally significant geotopes of volcanic geoheritage sites of Saudi Arabia

  18. Fluid-melt partitioning of sulfur in differentiated arc magmas and the sulfur yield of explosive volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masotta, M.; Keppler, H.; Chaudhari, A.

    2016-03-01

    The fluid-melt partitioning of sulfur (DSfluid/melt) in differentiated arc magmas has been experimentally investigated under oxidizing conditions (Re-ReO2 buffer) from 800 to 950 °C at 200 MPa. The starting glasses ranged in composition from trachyte to rhyolite and were synthesized targeting the composition of the residual melt formed after 10-60% crystallization of originally trachy-andesitic, dacitic and rhyodacitic magmas (Masotta and Keppler, 2015). Fluid compositions were determined both by mass balance and by Raman spectroscopy of fluid inclusions. DSfluid/melt increases exponentially with increasing melt differentiation, ranging from 2 to 15 in the trachytic melt, from 20 to 100 in the dacitic and rhyodacitic melts and from 100 to 120 in the rhyolitic melt. The variation of the DSfluid/melt is entirely controlled by the compositional variation of the silicate melt, with temperature having at most a minor effect within the range investigated. Experiments from this study were used together with data from the literature to calibrate the following model that allows predicting DSfluid/melt for oxidized arc magmas: where nbo/t is the non-bridging oxygen atoms per tetrahedron, ASI is the alumina saturation index, Al# and Ca# are two empirical compositional parameters calculated in molar units (Al # = XAl2O3/XSiO2 +XTiO2 +XAl2O3 and Ca # = XCaO/XNa2O +XK2O). The interplay between fluid-melt partitioning and anhydrite solubility determines the sulfur distribution among anhydrite, melt and fluid. At increasing melt polymerization, the exponential increase of the partition coefficient and the decrease of anhydrite solubility favor the accumulation of sulfur either in the fluid phase or as anhydrite. On the other hand, the higher anhydrite solubility and lower partition coefficient for less polymerized melts favor the retention of sulfur in the melt. At equilibrium conditions, these effects yield a maximum of the sulfur fraction in the fluid phase for slightly depolymerized melts (nbo/t = 0.05-0.15). Our data allow quantitative predictions of the sulfur yield of explosive volcanic eruptions over a wide range of magma compositions.

  19. Excess 210Po in 2010 Eyjafjallajökull tephra (Iceland): Evidence for pre-eruptive gas accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigmarsson, Olgeir; Condomines, Michel; Gauthier, Pierre-Jean

    2015-10-01

    Excess gas phase in magmas erupting explosively is well known worldwide. However, the origin of this gas phase, in excess of what can be dissolved in the erupting magma at depth, and the rate of gas accumulation is less well defined. The 2010 mildly explosive eruption at Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland, produced mingled tephra of benmoreitic and trachytic composition whereas alkali basalt was emitted during preceding flank eruption. Tephra of the first explosive phase are composed of three glass types, alkaline rhyolite, mixed benmoreite, and basalt, which suggests that the basaltic magma intruded a pre-existing rhyolitic magma chamber, and ultimately triggered the eruption. The mixed benmoreitic tephra (erupted on 15 and 17 April 2010) had large 210Po in excess of 210Pb [(210Po /210Pb) 0 = 1.88 ] at the time of eruption, and possibly a small 210Pb excess over its parent 226Ra. In contrast, the preceding flank eruption produced basalt with (210Po) 0 = 0, upon eruption, and the final trachyte had lost most of its 210Po during open-system degassing. The 210Po excess in the first erupted benmoreites is interpreted to result from 210Po degassing of basaltic magma and the accumulation of 210Po-enriched gas, either in the upper part of the basaltic intrusion, below the rhyolite-basalt interface, or in the pre-existing residual rhyolitic magma chamber. From a simple model of radon and polonium accumulation in the rhyolitic reservoir, the ratio of the mass of basalt magma degassing over the mass of magma accumulating the excess gas decreased from 20 to 15 over 2 days, implying zoned magma reservoir, with the uppermost and gas-richest part erupting first. The duration of pre-eruptive gas accumulation in this model is approximately one year. This corresponds closely to the initiation of a seismic swarm beneath Eyjafjallajökull, early June 2009, which was the first pre-eruptive signal detected. The coincidence between initiation of gas accumulation at relatively shallow depth and deeper seismicity strongly suggests that the excess gas phase originated from a basalt magma batch intruded at depth, and that this gas phase reached the surface approximately a year later.

  20. Evidence of a Pre-eruptive Fluid Phase for the Millennium Eruption, Paektu Volcano, North Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacovino, K.; Sisson, T. W.; Lowenstern, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    We present initial results of a study of comenditic to trachytic melt inclusions from the Millennium Eruption (ME) of Paektu volcano (AD 946; VEI≥7; 25 km3 DRE). Paektu volcano (aka Changbaishan) is a remote and poorly studied intraplate stratovolcano whose 37 km2 caldera is bisected by the political border between North Korea and China, limiting studies of its proximal deposits. ME magmas are predominantly phenocryst-poor (≤3 vol%) comendites plus a volumetrically minor late-stage, more phenocryst-rich (10-20 vol%) trachyte. Sizeable (100-500 µm diameter) glassy but bubble-bearing melt inclusions are widespread in anorthoclase and hedenbergite phenocrysts, as well as in rarer quartz and fayalite phenocrysts. Comparing the relative enrichments of incompatible volatile and non-volatile elements in melt inclusions along a liquid line of descent shows decreasing volatile/Zr ratios suggesting the partitioning of volatiles into a fluid phase. This suggests that current gas-yield estimates (Horn & Schminke, 2000) for the ME, based on the petrologic method (difference in volatiles between melt inclusions and matrix glass), could be severe underestimates. Establishing the composition and quantity of a pre-eruptive fluid phase is the primary goal of this study and has implications for eruption triggering and for modeling the climatic effects of one of the largest eruptions in the last 10,000 years. Including results from Horne and Schminke (2000), melt inclusions from within a single pumice fall unit show a wide range in dissolved volatile contents and magma chemistries. Concentrations of H2O are moderate (2-3.5 wt% via FTIR), with Cl and F ranging from 500-4600 ppm and 1100-4700 ppm (via EPMA). CO2 is below the detection limit of 2 ppm (FTIR with N2 purge) in bubble-bearing melt inclusions, but is detectable (≤56 ppm) in melt inclusions homogenized at 100 MPa and 850-900 °C for ~30 min (conditions also leading to reduction of dissolved H2O to 0.6-2 wt%). Characterization of a co-existing fluid phase in ME magmas is being investigated with further melt inclusion analyses, mineral-melt-fluid equilibrium calculations, and phase equilibrium experiments on fluid-saturated liquid lines of descent and on volatile solubilities of the ME trachyite-comendite suite.

  1. Electrical conductivity and streaming potential coefficient in a moderately alkaline lava series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrier, Frédéric; Froidefond, Thierry

    2003-05-01

    Coupled hydraulic and electrical problems are being investigated with renewed interest in geophysical applications. In this study, electrical conductivity and streaming potential coefficient (SPC) have been measured in the laboratory for crushed oceanite, hawaite, and trachyte samples from an almost complete moderately alkaline lava series from the Mururoa atoll (French Polynesia). For pH varying from 7 to 9.5 and ionic strength varying from 0.1 to 100 mmol/l, despite the closely related mineralogy of the rocks, contrasted results are obtained for the surface conductivity as defined by Revil and Glover: 0.10±0.07 mS/m, 8.3±0.2 mS/m and 1.05±0.16 mS/m for oceanite, hawaite, and trachyte, respectively, and for the inferred ζ potential: -6.6±0.3 mV, -26.3±0.5 mV, and -14.6±0.3 mV, respectively. The higher values obtained with hawaite suggest that electrical properties are controlled by secondary and accessory minerals such as clay minerals and zeolites resulting from low-temperature seawater alteration, rather than by the magmatic differentiation. Furthermore, a synthesis of results obtained with 20 rock samples indicates that signatures of the alteration process may emerge from the study of the ζ potential as a function of surface conductivity. The results with the lava series can be used to derive estimates of the scaling of basalt resistivity and associated SPC as a function of permeability. For permeability values smaller than 10 -15 m 2, the value of the SPC can be dramatically affected by the value of the surface conductivity. At least in the brittle crust, a better knowledge of the contributions of clay minerals and zeolites to surface conduction is therefore needed, both for the interpretation of electrical conductivity profiles and for the estimation of electrical variations associated with groundwater flow, as could be produced for example during volcanic or tectonic cycles.

  2. Early Miocene Kirka-Phrigian caldera, western Anatolia - an example of large volume silicic magma generation in extensional setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seghedi, Ioan; Helvacı, Cahit

    2014-05-01

    Large rhyolitic ignimbrite occurrences are close connected to the Early Miocene initiation of extensional processes in the central-west Anatolia along Taşvanlı-Afyon zones. Field correlations, petrographical, geochemical and geochronological data lead to a substantial reinterpretation of the ignimbrite surrounding Kırka area, known from its world-class borate deposits, as representing the climatic event of a caldera collapse, unknown up to now and newly named "Kırka-Phrigian caldera". The caldera, which is roughly oval (24 km x 15km) in shape, one of the largest in Turkey, is supposed to have been formed in a single stage collapse event, at ~19 Ma that generated huge volume extracaldera outflow ignimbrites. Transtensive/distensive tectonic stresses since 25 Ma ago resulted in the NNW-SSE elongation of the magma chamber and influenced the roughly elliptical shape of the subsided block (caldera floor) belonging to the apex of Eskişehir-Afyon-Isparta volcanic area. Intracaldera post-collapse sedimentation and volcanism (at ~ 18 Ma) was controlled through subsidence-related faults with generation of a series of volcanic structures (mainly domes) showing a large compositional range from saturated silicic rhyolites and crystal-rich trachytes to undersaturated lamproites. Such volcanic rock association is typical for lithospheric extension. In this scenario, enriched mantle components within the subcontinental lithospheric mantle will begin to melt via decompression melting during the initiation of extension. Interaction of these melts with crustal rocks, fractionation processes and crustal anatexis driven by the heat contained in the ascending mantle melts produced the silicic compositions in a large crustal reservoir. Such silicic melts generated the initial eruptions of Kırka-Phrigian caldera ignimbrites. The rock volume and geochemical evidence suggests that silicic volcanic rocks come from a long-lived magma chamber that evolved episodically; after caldera generation there is a shift to small volume episodic rhyolitic, trachytic and lamproitic volcanism, the last ones indicating a more primitive magma input with evident origin in an enriched mantle lithosphere. The volcanic rock succession provides a direct picture of the state of the magmatic system at the time of eruptions that generated caldera and post-caldera structures and offer an excellent example for silicic magma generation and associated potassic and ultrapotassic intermediate-mafic rocks in post-collisional extensional setting.

  3. Compositional Controls on Melt Polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugger, C.; Hammer, J.

    2005-12-01

    The structure and rheology of silicate melts are strongly controlled by composition, namely the concentrations of network-forming and -modifying cations. Melt viscosity is implicated in kinetic theories of phase transformations as a proxy for component mobility, which partly controls rates of crystal and bubble nucleation and growth. To anticipate reaction kinetics in magmas and focus experimental work on key variables, compositional controls on melt structure are systematically investigated using NBO/T (Mysen, 1988), the ratio of non-bridging oxygens to tetrahedrally coordinated cations. Silicon, ferric iron, and aluminum are network-formers, whereas alkalis and divalent cations are network-modifiers unless needed to charge-balance trivalent cations in tetrahedral coordination. NBO/T calculations are performed over 4D composition space (alkalis, silica, divalent and trivalent cations), in which 3 components are varied independently, creating a cube. We assess the effects of individual components using slices through the cube contoured for NBO/T. Ratios are also calculated for naturally occurring liquids and MELTS-generated liquid lines of descent derived from basalts with similar silica contents but varying in alkalis. Naturally occurring melts are highly polymerized (NBO/T of 0-1) compared to silicate minerals (0-4). Calculations show that replacing network-modifiers with network-formers decreases NBO/T; conversely, replacing formers with modifiers increases the ratio. However, polymerization increases when alumina replaces silica or when alkalis replace divalent cations. Natural alkali-rich melts tend to have fewer divalent cations than alkali-poor melts at similar silica contents, thus they are more polymerized and have higher viscosities. Contrary to common perception, the lower viscosities of highly differentiated alkalic melts (e.g. trachytes, phonolites) compared to silica-rich rhyolites are attributed to lower silica rather than greater alkalis. In fact, the greater alkali content of trachyte compared to andesite (10 and 5 wt%, respectively) is equivalent to the polymerization contrast between dacite and andesite (65 vs 60 wt% silica). After ~60% crystal fractionation in MELTS, alkali-poor basalt produces a liquid with an NBO/T value ~2x greater than the trachy-basalt derivative, corresponding to a viscosity ~1 order of magnitude lower.

  4. Mafic and felsic igneous rocks at Gale crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sautter, Violaine; Cousin, Agnès; Mangold, Nicolas; Toplis, Michael; Fabre, Cécile; Forni, Olivier; Payré, Valérie; Gasnault, Olivier; Ollila, Anne; Rapin, William; Fisk, Martin; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Wiens, Roger; Maurice, Sylvestre; Lasue, Jérémie; Newsom, Horton; Lanza, Nina

    2015-04-01

    The Curiosity rover landed at Gale, an early Hesperian age crater formed within Noachian terrains on Mars. The rover encountered a great variety of igneous rocks to the west of the Yellow Knife Bay sedimentary unit (from sol 13 to 800) which are float rocks or clasts in conglomerates. Textural and compositional analyses using MastCam and ChemCam Remote micro Imager (RMI) and Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) with a ˜300-500 µm laser spot lead to the recognition of 53 massive (non layered) igneous targets, both intrusive and effusive, ranging from mafic rocks where feldspars form less than 50% of the rock to felsic samples where feldspar is the dominant mineral. From morphology, color, grain size, patina and chemistry, at least 5 different groups of rocks have been identified: (1) a basaltic class with shiny aspect, conchoidal frature, no visible grains (less than 0.2mm) in a dark matrix with a few mm sized light-toned crystals (21 targets) (2) a porphyritic trachyandesite class with light-toned, bladed and polygonal crystals 1-20 mm in length set in a dark gray mesostasis (11 targets); (3) light toned trachytes with no visible grains sometimes vesiculated or forming flat targets (6 targets); (4) microgabbro-norite (grain size < 1mm) and gabbro-norite (grain size >1 mm) showing dark and light toned crystals in similar proportion ( 8 targets); (5) light-toned diorite/granodiorite showing coarse granular (>4 mm) texture either pristine or blocky, strongly weathered rocks (9 rock targets). Overall, these rocks comprise 2 distinct geochemical series: (i) an alkali-suite: basanite, gabbro trachy-andesite and trachyte) including porphyritic and aphyric members; (ii) quartz-normative intrusives close to granodioritic composition. The former looks like felsic clasts recently described in two SNC meteorites (NWA 7034 and 7533), the first Noachian breccia sampling the martian regolith. It is geochemically consistent with differentiation of liquids produced by low degrees of partial melting of the primitive martian mantle. The latter rock-type is unlike anything proposed in the literature for Mars but resembles Archean TTG's encountered on Earth related to the building of continental crust. This work thus provides the first in-situ detection of low density leucocratic igneous rocks on Mars in the southern highlands.

  5. Geochemical and isotopic constraints on the petrogenesis of the Puesto La Peña undersaturated potassic complex, Mendoza province, Argentina: Geodynamic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zappettini, Eduardo O.; Villar, Luisa M.; Hernández, Laura B.; Santos, João O.

    2013-03-01

    Major and trace element and radiogenic and stable isotope data are reported for the Miocene Puesto La Peña undersaturated potassic complex, located in the Argentine Precordillera. The complex is composed of a pyroxenite core surrounded by a malignite-borolanite association, followed by radial and ring dikes composed of alkaline lamprophyres, tephrite to phonolite and intermediate varieties, porphyritic microledmorite, benmoreite, alkaline trachyte and a swarm of ultrabasic ouachitite dikes. Late trachytic to phonolitic volcanic necks and associated dikes crop out surrounding the malignitic-borolanitic massif. Major and trace element data are consistent with their derivation by partial melting from an enriched, probably lithospheric, metasomatized heterogeneous mantle involving spinel- and garnet-facies mantle sources. The trace element and isotope data indicate that all rock types are derived from a common parental magma and are thus cogenetic. Sr, Nd and Pb variations in the different studied lithologies are restricted, except for the evidence of Sr decoupling in the ouachitite samples. Their Sr-Nd isotope compositions follow the "mantle array" defined by oceanic basalts, within the OIB field, consistent with an intraplate depleted source. The genesis of the ouachitite is interpreted to be related to mixing between asthenospheric magma and melts from the lower lithosphere consisting of K-rich metasomatic layers. The Dupal like Pb isotopes signature suggests a mantle modification by introduction of continental crust material in the upper mantle; this is consistent with the Sr-Nd isotope data from the late silica-undersaturated felsic dikes and volcanic necks. Multistage mantle extraction would have occurred by the end of Neoproterozoic to lower Paleozoic times as indicated by the isotopic data. Partial melting was initiated by mantle upwelling decompression during lithosphere extension. Back-arc extensional conditions during the latest Early Miocene (19 Ma), related to the geometry of the Pacific subducted plate beneath the South American plate, favored the tectonic conditions for magma ascent from a magmatic reservoir located at around 30 km depth in the crust. A fractional crystallization process, primarily of clinopynoxene, plagioclase, alkali feldspar, nepheline and lesser biotite, magnetite, and apatite, first yielded the cumulate clinopyroxenite, followed by the malignite-borolanite association and the late dikes and volcanic necks. The morphology of the complex, as well as the relationship between their different facies, points to a cauldron subsidence model of emplacement.

  6. Mapping of the major structures of the African rift system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohr, P. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. ERTS-1 imagery of the African rift system has already proved of great value in structural geological studies. One of the interesting megastructures expressed on the imagery occurs some 40 km east of the eastern margin of the main Ethiopian rift, in Arussi province, and extending between latitude 71/2 and 81/4 deg N. The Badda-Encuolo ridge proves to have been a line of major Tertiary volcanism and probably supplied the thick Trap Series flood basalt sequence exposed farther east in the canyons of the Webi Shebeli drainage system. The ridge itself was built up by the waning activity of the Sagatu line of volcanism. Serendipitious has been the discovery on Mt. Badda of several deeply glaciated valleys, many of which show clearly on the ERTS-1 imagery. It seems that Mt. Badda was one of the most important glacial centers in eastern Africa during the Pleistocene. Three major late-Tertiary trachytic centers lie between the Badda-Encuolo ridge and the rift valley. The relationships of these three volcanoes to each other and to the rift faulting is revealed for the first time by the ERTS-1 imagery, as is the form of the cladera of Baltata and the crater of Chilalo.

  7. Geochemical "fingerprints" for Olduvai Gorge Bed II tuffs and implications for the Oldowan-Acheulean transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHenry, Lindsay J.; Njau, Jackson K.; de la Torre, Ignacio; Pante, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Bed II is a critical part of early Pleistocene Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania. Its deposits include transitions from humid to more arid conditions (with associated faunal changes), from Homo habilis to erectus, and from Oldowan to Acheulean technology. Bed II (~ 1.8-1.2 Ma) is stratigraphically and environmentally complex, with facies changes, faulting, and unconformities, making site-to-site correlation over the ~ 20 km of exposure difficult. Bed II tuffs are thinner, less evenly preserved, and more reworked than those of Bed I. Five marker tuffs (Tuffs IIA-IID, Bird Print Tuff (BPT)), plus local tephra, were collected from multiple sites and characterized using stratigraphic position, mineral assemblage, and electron probe microanalysis of phenocryst (feldspar, hornblende, augite, titanomagnetite) and glass (where available) composition. Lowermost Bed II tuffs are dominantly nephelinitic, Middle Bed II tuffs (BPT, Tuff IIC) have basaltic components, and upper Bed II Tuff IID is trachytic. The BPT and Tuff IID are identified widely using phenocryst compositions (high-Ca plagioclase and high-Ti hornblende, respectively), though IID was originally (Hay, 1976) misidentified as Tuff IIC at Loc 91 (SHK Annexe) in the Side Gorge. This work helps establish a high-resolution basin-wide paleolandscape context for the Oldowan-Acheulean transition and helps link hominin, faunal and archaeological records.

  8. Spherulites and thundereggs from pitchstones of the Deccan Traps: geology, petrochemistry, and emplacement environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kshirsagar, Pooja V.; Sheth, Hetu C.; Seaman, Sheila J.; Shaikh, Badrealam; Mohite, Poonam; Gurav, Trupti; Chandrasekharam, D.

    2012-03-01

    Spherulites and thundereggs are rounded, typically spherical, polycrystalline objects found in glassy silicic rocks. Spherulites are dominantly made up of radiating microscopic fibers of alkali feldspar and a silica mineral (commonly quartz). They form due to heterogeneous nucleation in highly supercooled rhyolitic melts or by devitrification of glass. Associated features are lithophysae ("stone bubbles"), which have an exterior (sometimes concentric shells) of fine quartz and feldspar, and internal cavities left by escaping gas; when filled by secondary silica, these are termed thundereggs. Here, we describe four distinct occurrences of spherulites and thundereggs, in pitchstones (mostly rhyolitic, some trachytic) of the Deccan Traps, India. The thundereggs at one locality were previously misidentified as rhyolitic lava bombs and products of pyroclastic extrusive activity. We have characterized the thundereggs petrographically and geochemically and have determined low contents of magmatic water (0.21-0.38 wt.%) in them using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. We consider that the spherulite-bearing outcrops at one of the localities are of lava flows, but the other three represent subvolcanic intrusions. Based on the structural disposition of the Deccan sheet intrusions studied here and considerations of regional geology, we suggest that they are cone sheets emplaced from a plutonic center now submerged beneath the Arabian Sea.

  9. Alkaline ring complexes in Sudan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vail, J. R.

    An anorogenic petrographic province containing nearly 100 alkaline ring complexes extends across Sudan. These anorogenic complexes are distinct from late-orogenic granite-gabbro, calcalkaline plutonic centres particularly in the eastern part of Sudan, many of which also take the form of ring complexes. The biggest, most closely spaces, and most numerous ring complexes occur in a discontinuous belt of alkali granites and syenites, rarer foid syenites, and associated extrusive trachytes, rhyolites and ignimbrites exposed intermittently across 100 km from the Bayuda Desert and Nile River Valley near Khartoum to northern Kordofan Province and the Nuba Mountains region of central Sudan. These complexes range in age from Ordovician to Jurassic, but show no progressive change in age or distribution pattern other than a tendency to align locally in NW-trending bands, which might reflect zones of weakness in the underlying basement rocks. Mesozoic syenites and alkali granites forming plugs and ring complexes lie in a belt parallel to the coast in the Red Sea Hills of eastern Sudan. In the north-west of the country, alkali granites and foid syenites of Tertiary age crop out in the basement inlier of J. Uweinat, and Mesozoic granites, syenites and foid syenites form igneous plutons in Equatoria Province in the extreme south.

  10. Thick lava flows of Karisimbi Volcano, Rwanda: insights from SIR-C interferometric topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKay, Mary E.; Rowland, Scott K.; Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.; Garbeil, Harold

    We use a digital elevation model (DEM) derived from interferometrically processed SIR-C radar data to estimate the thickness of massive trachyte lava flows on the east flank of Karisimbi Volcano, Rwanda. The flows are as long as 12km and average 40-60m (up to >140m) in thickness. By calculating and subtracting a reference surface from the DEM, we derived a map of flow thickness, which we used to calculate the volume (up to 1km3 for an individual flow, and 1.8km3 for all the identified flows) and yield strength of several flows (23-124kPa). Using the DEM we estimated apparent viscosity based on the spacing of large folds (1.2×1012 to 5.5×1012Pas for surface viscosity, and 7.5×1010 to 5.2×1011Pas for interior viscosity, for a strain interval of 24h). We use shaded-relief images of the DEM to map basic flow structures such as channels, shear zones, and surface folds, as well as flow boundaries. The flow thickness map also proves invaluable in mapping flows where flow boundaries are indistinct and poorly expressed in the radar backscatter and shaded-relief images.

  11. Magma mixing in a zoned alkalic intrusion

    SciTech Connect

    Price, J.G.; Henry, C.D.; Barker, D.S.; Rubin, J.N.

    1985-01-01

    The Marble Canyon stock is unique among the alkalic intrusions of the Trans-Pecos magmatic province in being zoned from a critically silica-undersaturated rim of alkali gabbro (AG) to a silica-oversaturated core of quartz syenite (QS). Hybrid rocks of intermediate chemical and mineralogical compositions occur between the rim and core. Nepheline-syenite dikes occur only within the AG. Silica-rich dikes of quartz trachyte, pegmatite, and aplite cut the AG, QS, and hybrid rocks. Thermodynamic calculations of silica activity in the magmas illustrate the presence of two trends with decreasing temperature: a silica-poor trend from AG to nepheline syenite and a silica-rich trend from hybrid rocks to QS. Least-square modeling of rock and mineral compositions suggests 1) the nepheline syenites were derived by crystal-liquid fractionation from nearly solidified AG at the rim of the stock, 2) AG magma farther from the rim mixed with a small proportion of granitic magma, and 3) the mixture then differentiated to produce the hybrid rocks and QS. Zirconium dioxide inclusions in plagioclase crystals of the hybrid rocks and QS indicate that the AG magma contained some crystals before it mixed with the granitic magma. Two origins for the granitic magma are possible: 1) a late-stage differentiate of a mantle-derived hypersthene-normative magma and 2) melting of crustal material by the AG magma. Recognition of magma mixing might not have been possible if the AG had been hypersthene-normative.

  12. Gels composed of sodium-aluminum silicate, Lake Magadi, Kenya

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eugster, H.P.; Jones, B.F.

    1968-01-01

    Sodium-aluminum silicate gels are found in surftcial deposits as thick as 5 centimeters in the Magadi area of Kenya. Chemical data indicate they are formed by the interaction of hot alkaline springwaters (67?? to 82??C; pH, about 9) with alkali trachyte flows and their detritus, rather than by direct precipitation. In the process, Na2O is added from and silica is released to the saline waters of the springs. Algal mats protect the gels from erosion and act as thermal insulators. The gels are probably yearly accumulates that are washed into the lakes during floods. Crystallization of these gels in the laboratory yields analcite; this fact suggests that some analcite beds in lacustrine deposits may have formed from gels. Textural evidence indicates that cherts of rocks of the Pleistocene chert series in the Magadi area may have formed from soft sodium silicate gels. Similar gels may have acted as substrates for the accumulation and preservation of prebiological organic matter during the Precambrian.

  13. Geochemical trends through time and lateral variability of diatom floras in the Pleistocene Olorgesailie Formation, southern Kenya Rift Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, R. B.; Renaut, R. W.; Potts, R.; Behrensmeyer, A. K.

    The Olorgesailie Formation (1.2-0.49 Ma) consists of fluvial and lacustrine rift sediments that have yielded abundant Acheulean artifacts and a fossil hominin ( Homo cf. erectus). In testing prior understandings of the paleoenvironmental context, we define nine new geochemical zones. A Chemical Index of Alteration suggests increased catchment weathering during deposition of Members 1, 2, 7, 11, and 13. Biophile elements (Br, S) peak in M8-9 and lower M13 possibly reflecting increased input from soil erosion. REE data show that the Magadi Trachytes supplied most siliciclastic grains. Sixteen diatom stages indicate conductivities of 200-16,000 μS cm - 1 and pH of 7.5-9.5 for five deep-water lakes, ten shallow lakes and sixteen wetlands. These results are compared with diatom data from other sections in the basin and show aquatic spatial variability over km-scale distances. Similar floras are traceable over several kilometers for M2, M3 and M9, indicating broadly homogeneous lacustrine conditions during these times, but diatoms in other members imply variable conditions, some related to local tectonic controls. This lateral and temporal variability emphasizes the importance of carrying out stratigraphic sampling at multiple sites within a basin in efforts to define the environmental context relevant to human evolution.

  14. Wide dispersal and deposition of distal tephra during the Pleistocene ‘Campanian Ignimbrite/Y5’ eruption, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyle, David M.; Ricketts, Graham D.; Margari, Vasiliki; van Andel, Tjeerd H.; Sinitsyn, Andrei A.; Praslov, Nicolai D.; Lisitsyn, Sergei

    2006-11-01

    A trachytic volcanic ash layer is widely distributed across south-western Russia, where it is found both in well-characterised archaeological contexts close to the Don River (the Paleolithic sites of Kostenki-Borschevo (51.4°N, 39.0°E), and in undisturbed geological contexts. This ash layer has all of the characteristics of a distal tephra fall deposit: it is fine grained and unimodal with a grain size of 60-170 μm, dominated by strongly elongate glass shard fragments. Chemical analysis confirms that this ash layer is a distal equivalent of the deposits of the ca 39.3 ka Campanian Ignimbrite eruption of the Phlegrean Fields, Italy, and correlates with the widely recognised Y5 ash layer in marine cores in the south-eastern Mediterranean. This work shows that ash particles can be dispersed over considerable distances (>2500 km) and areas (>1.5-3×10 6 km 2) during large-magnitude explosive eruptions. The volume of the products associated with this event (31-50 km 3 of magma erupted as fallout tephra, and a total volume of 105-210 km 3 of magma, or 2.5-5×10 14 kg) confirms the Campanian Ignimbrite/Y5 eruption as the most significant known volcanic eruption in Europe of the past 100 ka. This correlation places tight constraints on the absolute ages of a number of important archaeological horizons in southern Russia.

  15. Quantifying the Reduction Intensity of Handaxes with 3D Technology: A Pilot Study on Handaxes in the Danjiangkou Reservoir Region, Central China.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Kuman, Kathleen; Li, Chaorong

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to analyzing the reduction intensity of handaxes with the aid of 3D scanning technology. Two quantitative reduction indices, the Scar Density Index (SDI) and the Flaked Area Index (FAI), are applied to handaxes from the third terrace of the Danjiangkou Reservoir Region (DRR), central China, dated to the Middle Pleistocene. The results show that most of the DRR handaxes in this sample show moderate reduction, which also reflects a least-effort reduction strategy and a generally short use-life for these tools. Detailed examination of the DRR handaxes by sector reveals that the tips generally show the most reduction, while the bases show the least shaping, with cortex often preserved on the base to facilitate handling. While western Acheulean assemblages in this regard are variable, there are many examples of handaxes of varying age with trimming of the bases. We also found no significant differences in the levels of reduction between the two main raw materials, quartz phyllite and trachyte. However, the type of blank used (large flakes versus cobbles) and the type of shaping (bifacial, partly bifacial and unifacial) do play a significant role in the reduction intensity of the DRR handaxes. Finally, a small number of handaxes from the younger (the early Late Pleistocene) second terrace of the DRR was compared with those from the third terrace. The results indicate that there is no technological change in the reduction intensity through time in these two DRR terraces. PMID:26331954

  16. Silurian magmatism in eastern Senegal and its significance for the Paleozoic evolution of NW-Gondwana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullgraf, Thomas; Ndiaye, Papa Moussa; Blein, Olivier; Buscail, François; Lahondère, Didier; Le Métour, Joël; Sergeev, Sergey; Tegyey, Monique

    2013-02-01

    Submarine basalt and trachyte of the Nandoumba group occur in eastern Senegal within the Bassarides branch of the Mauritanides orogen. The unit forms part of the parautochthonous domain which is stacked between underlying Neoproterozoic to Paleozoic foreland and overlying Variscan nappes. The crystallisation age of the volcanic to subvolcanic rocks has been determined by U-Pb single zircon SHRIMP method at 428 ± 5.2 Ma whereas zircon xenocryst ages vary from 500 to 2200 Ma. The shape of the xenocryst grains document proximal Neo- and Paleoproterozoic and distal Mesoproterozoic provenance areas for assimilated sediments. This is compatible with the Paleoproterozoic Birimian basement and Neoproterozoic cover rocks nearby whereas an origin from the Amazonian craton could be assumed for distal Mesoproterozoic zircons. Geochemical and Sm-Nd isotope whole rock analysis show that basalts of the Nandoumba group are similar to modern transitional to alkaline volcanic lavas in intraplate settings. Those basalts have a deep mantle source with a great contribution of a recycled mantle component such as EM1 and/or EM2. The basalts resemble in their composition those from the Meguma terrane of Nova Scotia which are of similar age suggesting a common source and therefore connection of Meguma with Gondwana during this period. Review of circum-Atlantic Silurian magmatism indicates ongoing fragmentation of NW-Gondwana that started in Cambro/Ordovician times.

  17. 40Ar/(39)Ar geochronology and paleomagnetic stratigraphy of the Lukeino and lower Chemeron Formations at Tabarin and Kapcheberek, Tugen Hills, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Deino, Alan L; Tauxe, Lisa; Monaghan, Marc; Hill, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    (40)Ar/(39)Ar single-crystal laser-fusion dating, K-Ar dating, and paleomagnetic reversal stratigraphy have been used to determine the chronostratigraphy of the Kabarnet Trachyte, Lukeino Formation, Kaparaina Basalt Formation, and Chemeron Formation at the sites of Kapcheberek (BPRP#77) and Tabarin (BPRP#77) in the Tugen Hills, Kenya. The succession ranges in age from 6.56-3.8 Ma. The upper Lukeino Formation at Kapcherberek, including the fauna from the site BPRP#76, was deposited during chron C3r and can be constrained to the interval 5.88-5.72 Ma. The Chemeron Formation at Tabarin includes at the base an ignimbrite and associated basal air-fall tuff with a combined age of 5.31+/-0.03 Ma. Sedimentary and volcaniclastic rocks of the Chemeron Formation which unconformably overlie the ignimbrite record chrons C3n.2n through C2Ar. The combined(40)Ar/(39)Ar and paleomagnetic data constrain the age of this sequence to 4.63-3.837 Ma. The age of the Tabarin mandible fragment (KNM-TH 13150) and associated fauna at site BPRP#77 in the Chemeron Formation is 4.48-4.41 Ma, marginally older than similar early hominids from Aramis, Ethiopia. Basin subsidence appears to be defining an overall accumulation rate of about 17 cm/ka over the 2.7 Ma represented at Tabarin and Kapcheberek, despite episodes of rapid accumulation and hiatuses. PMID:11795971

  18. Nature of basalt-deep crust interaction in the petrogenesis of a potassium-rich, silicic-dominated eruptive system, Davis Mountain volcanic field, west Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, R.L.; Walker, J.A. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    The Davis Mountain volcanic field (DMVF) is one of several silicic-dominated eruptive centers that constitute the bulk of the Trans Pecos volcanic province (TPVP). New major-, trace element, and Pb-O isotope data on local granulite-facies xenoliths and the DMVF are used in evaluating the extent of basalt-deep crust interaction to produce voluminous silicic lavas and -ignimbrites. The DMVF (39.3--35.4 Ma) is a high-K, alkali basalt-potassic trachybasalt-shoshonite-latite-trachyte-rhyolite volcanoplutonic series with the evolved members being silica-saturated. DMF silicic rocks are characterized by high concentrations of Rb, Th, U, and K, low-[sup 18]O and have a broad range in Pb isotopes. These characteristics are inconsistent with an origin by partial melting of a Rb-Th-U depleted, unradiogenic Pb granulitic deep crust. However, distinctly different Pb isotope compositions between mafic and silicic rocks preclude an origin by fractional crystallization alone. Multistage-AFC involving a mantle-source, various proportions of OL-CPX-PLAG-KSPAR-MAG-AP-BIO-QTZ-aenigmatite-ZR differentiation, limited (<10%) amounts of deep and upper crustal contamination, and mixing between mafic and silicic magmas can satisfactorily account for the observed chemical and isotopic variation in the DMVF.

  19. Gels composed of sodium-aluminium silicate, lake magadi, kenya.

    PubMed

    Eugster, H P; Jones, B F

    1968-07-12

    Sodium-aluminum silicate gels are found in surficial deposits as thick as 5 centimeters in the Magadi area of Kenya. Chemical data indicate they are formed by the interaction of hot alkaline springwaters (67 degrees to 82 degrees C; pH, about 9) with alkali trachyte flows and their detritus, rather than by direct precipitation. In the process, Na(2)O is added from and silica is released to the saline waters of the springs. Algal mats protect the gels from erosion and act as thermal insulators. The gels are probably yearly accumulates that are washed into the lakes during floods. Crystallization of these gels in the laboratory yields analcite; this fact suggests that some analcite beds in lacustrine deposits may have formed from gels. Textural evidence indicates that cherts of rocks of the Pleistocene chert series in the Magadi area may have formed from soft sodium silicate gels. Similar gels may have acted as substrates for the accumulation and preservation of prebiological organic matter during the Precambrian. PMID:17770594

  20. Geochemistry of high-potassium rocks from the mid-Tertiary Guffey volcanic center, Thirtynine Mile volcanic field, central Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Wobus, R.A.; Mochel, D.W. ); Mertzman, S.A.; Eide, E.A.; Rothwarf, M.T. ); Loeffler, B.M.; Johnson, D.A. ); Keating, G.N.; Sultz, K. ); Benjamin, A.E. ); Venzke, E.A. ); Filson, T. )

    1990-07-01

    The Guffey volcanic center is the largest within the 2000 km{sup 2} mid-Tertiary Thirtynine Mile volcanic field of central Colorado. This study is the first to provide extensive chemical data for these alkalic volcanic and subvolcanic rocks, which present the eroded remnants of a large stratovolcano of Oligocene age. Formation of early domes and flows of latite and trachyte within the Guffey center was followed by extrusion of a thick series of basalt, trachybasalt, and shoshonite flows and lahars. Plugs, dikes, and vents ranging from basalt to rhyolite cut the thick mafic deposits, and felsic tuffs breccias chemically identical to the small rhyolitic plutons are locally preserved. Whole-rack major and trace element analyses of 80 samples, ranging almost continuously from 47% to 78% SiO{sub 2}, indicate that the rocks of the Guffey center are among the most highly enriched in K{sub 2}O (up to 6%) and rare earth elements (typically 200-300 ppm) of any volcanic rocks in Colorado. These observations, along with the relatively high concentrations of Ba and Rb and the depletion of Cr and Ni, suggest an appreciable contribution of lower crustal material to the magmas that produced the Thirtynine Mile volcanic rocks.

  1. Enhanced crystal fabric analysis of a lava flow sample by neutron texture diffraction: A case study from the Castello d'Ischia dome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Jens M.; Iezzi, Gianluca; Albertini, Gianni; Gunter, Mickey E.; Piochi, Monica; Ventura, Guido; Jansen, Ekkehard; Fiori, Fabrizio

    2013-01-01

    The crystal fabric of a lava has been analyzed for the first time by neutron texture diffraction. In this study we quantitatively investigate the crystallographic preferred orientation of feldspars in the Castello d'Ischia (Ischia Island, Italy) trachytic exogenous dome. The crystallographic preferred orientation was measured with the monochromatic neutron texture diffractometer SV7 at the Forschungszentrum Jülich in Germany and a Rietveld refinement was applied to the sum diffraction pattern. The complementary thin section analysis showed that the three-dimensional crystal shape and the corresponding shape preferred orientation are in agreement with the quantitative orientation distributions of the neutron texture data. The (0k0) crystallographic planes of the feldspars are roughly parallel to the local flow bands, whereas the other corresponding pole figures show that a pivotal rotation of the anorthoclase and sanidine crystals was active during the emplacement of this lava dome. In combination with scanning electron microscopy investigations, electron probe microanalysis, XRF, and X-ray diffraction, the Rietveld refinement of the neutron diffraction data indicates a slow cooling dynamic on the order of several months during their crystallization under subaerial conditions. Results attained here demonstrate that neutron texture diffraction is a powerful tool that can be applied to lava flows.

  2. The Sagatu Ridge dike swarm, Ethiopian rift margin. [tectonic evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohr, P. A.; Potter, E. C.

    1976-01-01

    A swarm of dikes forms the core of the Sagatu Ridge, a 70-km-long topographic feature elevated to more than 4000 m above sea level and 1500 m above the level of the Eastern (Somalian) plateau. The ridge trends NNE and lies about 50 km east of the northeasterly trending rift-valley margin. Intrusion of the dikes and buildup of the flood-lava pile, largely hawaiitic but with trachyte preponderant in the final stages, occurred during the late Pliocene-early Pleistocene and may have been contemporaneous with downwarping of the protorift trough to the west. The ensuing faulting that formed the present rift margin, however, bypassed the ridge. The peculiar situation and orientation of the Sagatu Ridge, and its temporary existence as a line of crustal extension and voluminous magmatism, are considered related to a powerful structural control by a major line of Precambrian crustal weakness, well exposed further south. Transverse rift structures of unknown type appear to have limited the development of the ridge to the north and south.

  3. Dyella jiangningensis sp. nov., a γ-proteobacterium isolated from the surface of potassium-bearing rock.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fei; Guo, Xin-qi; Wang, Peng; He, Lin-yan; Huang, Zhi; Sheng, Xia-fang

    2013-09-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, motile with one polar flagellum γ-proteobacterium, designated strain SBZ3-12(T), was isolated from surfaces of weathered potassic trachyte. Phylogenetic analysis of this strain based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that it was most closely related to Dyella japonica XD53(T) (97.9% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), Dyella terrae JS14-6(T) (97.7%), Dyella soli JS12-10(T) (97.5%) and Dyella koreensis BB4(T) (97.0%). The DNA G+C content of strain SBZ3-12(T) was 64.0 mol%. In addition, iso-C(17:1)ω9c, iso-C(15:0) and iso-C(16:0) were the major cellular fatty acids and ubiquinone Q-8 was the predominant respiratory quinone. The low DNA-DNA relatedness values between strain SBZ3-12(T) and recognized species of the genus Dyella and the many phenotypic properties supported the classification of strain SBZ3-12(T) as a representative of a novel species of the genus Dyella, for which the name Dyella jiangningensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is SBZ3-12(T) ( =CCTCC AB 2012160(T) =KACC 16539(T) =DSM 26119(T)). PMID:23435246

  4. Quantifying the Reduction Intensity of Handaxes with 3D Technology: A Pilot Study on Handaxes in the Danjiangkou Reservoir Region, Central China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao; Kuman, Kathleen; Li, Chaorong

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to analyzing the reduction intensity of handaxes with the aid of 3D scanning technology. Two quantitative reduction indices, the Scar Density Index (SDI) and the Flaked Area Index (FAI), are applied to handaxes from the third terrace of the Danjiangkou Reservoir Region (DRR), central China, dated to the Middle Pleistocene. The results show that most of the DRR handaxes in this sample show moderate reduction, which also reflects a least-effort reduction strategy and a generally short use-life for these tools. Detailed examination of the DRR handaxes by sector reveals that the tips generally show the most reduction, while the bases show the least shaping, with cortex often preserved on the base to facilitate handling. While western Acheulean assemblages in this regard are variable, there are many examples of handaxes of varying age with trimming of the bases. We also found no significant differences in the levels of reduction between the two main raw materials, quartz phyllite and trachyte. However, the type of blank used (large flakes versus cobbles) and the type of shaping (bifacial, partly bifacial and unifacial) do play a significant role in the reduction intensity of the DRR handaxes. Finally, a small number of handaxes from the younger (the early Late Pleistocene) second terrace of the DRR was compared with those from the third terrace. The results indicate that there is no technological change in the reduction intensity through time in these two DRR terraces. PMID:26331954

  5. Ash generation and distribution from the April-May 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland.

    PubMed

    Gudmundsson, Magnús T; Thordarson, Thorvaldur; Höskuldsson, Armann; Larsen, Gudrún; Björnsson, Halldór; Prata, Fred J; Oddsson, Björn; Magnússon, Eyjólfur; Högnadóttir, Thórdís; Petersen, Guðrún Nína; Hayward, Chris L; Stevenson, John A; Jónsdóttir, Ingibjörg

    2012-01-01

    The 39-day long eruption at the summit of Eyjafjallajökull volcano in April-May 2010 was of modest size but ash was widely dispersed. By combining data from ground surveys and remote sensing we show that the erupted material was 4.8±1.2·10¹¹ kg (benmoreite and trachyte, dense rock equivalent volume 0.18±0.05 km³). About 20% was lava and water-transported tephra, 80% was airborne tephra (bulk volume 0.27 km³) transported by 3-10 km high plumes. The airborne tephra was mostly fine ash (diameter <1000 µm). At least 7·10¹⁰ kg (70 Tg) was very fine ash (<28 µm), several times more than previously estimated via satellite retrievals. About 50% of the tephra fell in Iceland with the remainder carried towards south and east, detected over ~7 million km² in Europe and the North Atlantic. Of order 10¹⁰ kg (2%) are considered to have been transported longer than 600-700 km with <10⁸ kg (<0.02%) reaching mainland Europe. PMID:22893851

  6. Fault-related carbonate breccia dykes in the La Chilca area, Eastern Precordillera, San Juan, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro de Machuca, Brígida; Perucca, Laura P.

    2015-03-01

    Carbonate fault breccia dykes in the Cerro La Chilca area, Eastern Precordillera, west-central Argentina, provide clues on the probable mechanism of both fault movement and dyke injection. Breccia dykes intrude Upper Carboniferous sedimentary rocks and Triassic La Flecha Trachyte Formation. The timing of breccia dyke emplacement is constrained by cross cutting relationships with the uppermost Triassic unit and conformable contacts with the Early Miocene sedimentary rocks. This study supports a tectonic-hydrothermal origin for these breccia dykes; fragmentation and subsequent hydraulic injection of fluidized breccia are the more important processes in the breccia dyke development. Brecciation can be triggered by seismic activity which acts as a catalyst. The escape of fluidized material can be attributed to hydrostatic pressure and the direction of movement of the material establishes the direction of least pressure. Previous studies have shown that cross-strike structures have had an important role in the evolution of this Andean segment since at least Triassic times. These structures represent pre-existing crustal fabrics that could have controlled the emplacement of the dykes. The dykes, which are composed mostly of carbonate fault breccia, were injected upward along WNW fractures.

  7. Effects of crystallization and bubble nucleation on the elastic properties of magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripoli, B. A.; Ulmer, P.; Eric, R.; Cordonnier, B.; Burg, J.

    2012-12-01

    Seismic tomography of potentially hazardous volcanoes is a prime tool to assess the physical state of magma reservoirs. Processes occurring in the conduit or in the chamber, such as crystallization and bubble exsolution, control the magma rheology, hence the style of volcanic eruption. Elastic parameters of vapor-saturated, partially molten systems are thus providing fundamental information for the identification of such reservoirs under active and seemingly dormant volcanoes. This knowledge will potentially serve to assess their risk. We present preliminary data on compression and shear wave propagation velocities of a chemically simplified melt analogous to andesite and trachyte, in the system CaO-Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O-CO2. These ultrasonic velocities are measured simultaneously in a Paterson-type internally-heated gas pressure apparatus at confining pressures up to 300 MPa and temperatures up to 1000°C. Using the pulse transmission technique, the experiments are performed at frequencies ranging from 0.1 to 3 MHz. Variations in the elastic parameters induced by the presence of bubbles or dissolved water in glassy samples are discussed for various pressures and temperatures. As the investigated melt undergoes plagioclase crystallization, a thermal plateau is maintained over specific time duration in order to measure the changes in seismic properties of in-situ crystallizing magmas. This maintained temperature varies between 800° and 1000°C depending on the amount of dissolved water in the system.

  8. A chronology of foreland deformation: ultra-violet laser 40Ar/ 39Ar dating of syn/late-orogenic intrusions from the Variscides of southwest Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, David; Meere, Patrick A.; Wartho, Jo-Anne

    2005-08-01

    The Upper Palaeozoic sedimentary rocks of the Munster and South Munster Basins, southern Ireland, lie within the Rhenohercynian Zone of the European Variscan orogeny. This foreland region accommodated shortening during the Asturian phase of Variscan deformation at the end of the Carboniferous by the development of kilometre-scale and lower order folding, high angle reverse faulting and regional fabric development. At the southwestern extremity of the belt lies the Black Ball/White Ball Heads area of the Beara Peninsula where high-level igneous intrusions locally exhibit a close relationship with both the ductile and late brittle phases of Variscan deformation. 40Ar/ 39Ar ultra-violet laser analysis of phlogopite crystals from these intrusions (principally trachytic dykes) has yielded ages that, when combined with structural field relationships, help to constrain the timing of Variscan deformation in southern Ireland. These ages include 314.44±1.00 Ma for a penetratively deformed lamprophric pipe on Black Ball Head, 301.98±1.47-298.08±0.61 Ma for dyke material associated with later stage brittle deformation and a date of 296.88±0.60 Ma for an undeformed post-orogenic dyke on White Ball Head.

  9. Inner structure of the Puy de Dôme volcano: cross-comparison of geophysical models (ERT, gravimetry, muon imaging)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portal, A.; Labazuy, P.; Lénat, J.-F.; Béné, S.; Boivin, P.; Busato, E.; Cârloganu, C.; Combaret, C.; Dupieux, P.; Fehr, F.; Gay, P.; Laktineh, I.; Miallier, D.; Mirabito, L.; Niess, V.; Vulpescu, B.

    2013-01-01

    Muon imaging of volcanoes and of geological structures in general is actively being developed by several groups in the world. It has the potential to provide 3-D density distributions with an accuracy of a few percent. At this stage of development, comparisons with established geophysical methods are useful to validate the method. An experiment has been carried out in 2011 and 2012 on a large trachytic dome, the Puy de Dôme volcano, to perform such a comparison of muon imaging with gravimetric tomography and 2-D electrical resistivity tomography. Here, we present the preliminary results for the last two methods. North-south and east-west resistivity profiles allow us to model the resistivity distribution down to the base of the dome. The modelling of the Bouguer anomaly provides models for the density distribution within the dome that are directly comparable with the results from the muon imaging. Our ultimate goal is to derive a model of the dome using the joint interpretation of all sets of data.

  10. Geochemical composition, petrography and 40Ar/39Ar age of the Heldburg phonolite: implications on magma mixing and mingling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abratis, Michael; Viereck, Lothar; Pfänder, Jörg A.; Hentschel, Roland

    2015-11-01

    Differentiated magmatic rocks such as trachyte and phonolite are volumetrically subordinate to mafic volcanic rocks within the Cenozoic Central European Volcanic Province (exceptions are the East Eifel and the Rhön volcanic fields). Within the volcanic field of the "Heldburg dike swarm" (Heldburger Gangschar), the phonolite of the Burgberg near Heldburg represents the only known occurrence of differentiated magmatic rocks. However, the Heldburg phonolite is famous foremost for containing mantle xenoliths (spinel lherzolite). Former studies proposing a cogenetic relationship between the phonolite and the peridotites concluded that the phonolite magma must have evolved under upper mantle conditions. Herewith, we present petrographic and geochemical evidence for magma mixing and mingling in the Heldburg phonolite melt due to the intrusion of mantle-derived basanitic magma, which is exposed today as dikes at the foot of the Heldburg Burgberg. During this process, the mantle xenoliths were introduced into the phonolite melt as they all contain rims of basanitic magma. Extensive mingling features (e.g., schlieren layers, load casts, flame structures, mafic enclaves) are developed, indicating that the basanite and the zoned phonolitic body were melts at the time of mixing. These petrographic and geochemical indications of two coeval melts of different composition are substantiated by 40Ar/39Ar dating, revealing identical ages of ca. 15 Ma.

  11. Eruptive viscosity and volcano morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posin, Seth B.; Greeley, Ronald

    1988-01-01

    Terrestrial central volcanoes formed predominantly from lava flows were classified as shields, stratovolcanoes, and domes. Shield volcanoes tend to be large in areal extent, have convex slopes, and are characterized by their resemblance to inverted hellenic war shields. Stratovolcanoes have concave slopes, whereas domes are smaller and have gentle convex slopes near the vent that increase near the perimeter. In addition to these differences in morphology, several other variations were observed. The most important is composition: shield volcanoes tend to be basaltic, stratovolcanoes tend to be andesitic, and domes tend to be dacitic. However, important exceptions include Fuji, Pico, Mayon, Izalco, and Fuego which have stratovolcano morphologies but are composed of basaltic lavas. Similarly, Ribkwo is a Kenyan shield volcano composed of trachyte and Suswa and Kilombe are shields composed of phonolite. These exceptions indicate that eruptive conditions, rather than composition, may be the primary factors that determine volcano morphology. The objective of this study is to determine the relationships, if any, between eruptive conditions (viscosity, erupted volume, and effusion rate) and effusive volcano morphology. Moreover, it is the goal of this study to incorporate these relationships into a model to predict the eruptive conditions of extraterrestrial (Martian) volcanoes based on their morphology.

  12. Chemistry and chronology of magmatic processes, Central Kenya Peralkaline province, East African Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, E.; Deino, A. L.; White, J. C.; Omenda, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    We report here a synthesis of the geochemistry of magma evolution correlated with 40Ar/39Ar, 14 C, and U-series chronology for volcanoes in the Central Kenya Peralkaline Province (CKPP). The volcanic centers - Menengai, Eburru, Olkaria, Longonot, and Suswa - are at the apex of the Kenya Dome, and consist of trachyte, phonolite, comendite, and pantellerite. These volcanic centers are within the graben of the EARS and are characterized by a shield-building phase followed by caldera collapse and subsequent post-caldera eruptions. Geochemical modeling demonstrates that the magmas are the result of fractional crystallization of alkali basaltic magmas and magma mixing. Longonot and Suswa have the most chronologic data -14 C, Ar/Ar and U-series - and they show that the youngest eruptions have 230 Th/232Th of 0.8, which was inherited from the magma system prior to eruption. Subsequent changes in 230 Th/232 Th are due to post-eruptive decay of 230 Th and correlate well with 14 C and Ar/Ar.

  13. A numerically calibrated reference level (MP28) for the terrestrial mammal-based biozonation of the European Upper Oligocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertz, Dieter F.; Renne, Paul R.; Wuttke, Michael; Mödden, Clemens

    2007-04-01

    The fauna of the Enspel (Westerwald) and the neighbouring Kärlich (Neuwied basin) fossil deposits correspond to the Upper Oligocene Mammal Paleogene (MP) reference level 28 and 28 30, respectively. Basaltic flows and a trachyte tuff terminating and predating the fossil deposit sedimentation allow to numerically calibrate the MP reference levels by radioisotope dating. Laser fusion 40Ar/39Ar step heating on volcanic feldspars yield a time interval of 24.9 24.5 Ma for reference level MP28 at Enspel and a maximum age of 25.5 Ma for the time interval MP28 MP30 at Kärlich. Interpolation between the time intervals determined for the Enspel reference level MP28 and the age of the global Oligocene/Miocene boundary of 24.0 ± 0.1 Ma taken from literature results in time intervals of 24.5 24.2 Ma and 24.2 23.9 Ma for the younger reference levels MP29 and MP30, respectively. These intervals of ≤ 0.4 m.y. for MP reference levels of the latest Oligocene are short relative to older Oligocene MP reference levels 21 27 between 34 and 25 Ma. Since subdivision into MP reference levels essentially is based on assemblages of mammal taxa and on evolutionary changes in tooth morphology of mammals short MP time intervals during the latest Oligocene indicate a rapid evolutionary change relative to the early Oligocene.

  14. Italian zeolitized rocks of technological interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de'Gennaro, M.; Langella, A.

    1996-09-01

    Large areas of Italian territory are covered by thick and widespread deposits of zeolite-bearing volcaniclastic products. The main zeolites are phillipsite and chabazite spread over the whole peninsula, and clinoptilolite recorded only in Sardinia. A trachytic to phonolitic glassy precursor accounts for the formation of the former zeolites characterized by low Si/Al ratios (?3.00), while clinoptilolite is related to more acidic volcanism. The genesis of most of these zeolitized deposits is linked to pyroclastic flow emplacement mechanisms characterized by quite high temperatures and by the presence of abundant fluids. The main utilization of these materials has been and still is as dimension stones in the building industry. Currently, limited amounts are also employed in animal farming (dietary supplement, pet litter and manure deodorizer) and in agriculture as soil improvement and slow-release fertilizers. New fields of application have been proposed for these products on account of their easy availability, very low cost, their high-grade zeolites (50 70%), and good technological features such as high cation exchange capacities and adsorption properties.

  15. Insights into the Structure and Surface Geology of Isla Socorro, Mexico, from Airborne Magnetic and Gamma-Ray Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paoletti, V.; Gruber, S.; Varley, N.; D'Antonio, M.; Supper, R.; Motschka, K.

    2016-05-01

    The island of Socorro is located in the eastern Pacific Ocean, 650 km off the coast of Mexico. It is a rare example of an oceanic volcanic island whose above sea level volume is made up mostly of peralkaline trachytes and rhyolites, with subordinate mafic rocks. Subaerial volcanism started several hundred thousand years ago and continues until recent times. We present an investigation of surface and subsurface geology of the island, based on the first detailed extensive geophysical survey on the island. Acquired airborne magnetic and gamma-ray data were compared to existing geological information and supplemented with field investigations and satellite imagery. Magnetic data show a wide minimum in the central part of the island, possibly connected to a high-temperature zone in the deeper central portion of the volcano, likely to be due to a still hot magma body. The data also depict two parallel edges possibly suggesting the existence of a nested caldera. Analysis on upward continued magnetic data by recent imaging techniques highlighted two deep sources located around 5 km b.s.l., interpreted as feeding structures that are now filled with crystalline rocks. Gamma-ray data have been interpreted through integration with the geological survey results. Several previously known volcanic deposits have been identified based on radioelement distribution, and others have been redefined based on field evidence. A new succession of volcanic members is proposed, to be verified through more detailed geological mapping, geochemical analyses of rock samples and radiometric dating.

  16. Assessment of the atmospheric impact of volcanic eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigurdsson, H.

    1988-01-01

    The dominant global impact of volcanic activity is likely to be related to the effects of volcanic gases on the Earth's atmosphere. Volcanic gas emissions from individual volcanic arc eruptions are likely to cause increases in the stratospheric optical depth that result in surface landmass temperature decline of 2 to 3 K for less than a decade. Trachytic and intermediate magmas are much more effective in this regard than high-silica magmas, and may also lead to extensive ozone depletion due to effect of halogens and magmatic water. Given the assumed relationship between arc volcanism and subduction rate, and the relatively small variation in global spreading rates in the geologic record, it is unlikely that the rates of arc volcanism have varied greatly during the Cenozoic. Hotspot related basaltic fissure eruptions in the subaerial environment have a higher mass yield of sulfur, but lofting of the valcanic aerosol to levels above the tropopause is required for a climate impact. High-latitude events, such as the Laki 1783 eruption can easily penetrate the tropopause and enter the stratosphere, but formation of a stratospheric volcanic aerosol form low-latitude effusive basaltic eruptions is problematical, due to the elevated low-latitude tropopause. Due to the high sulfur content of hotspot-derived basaltic magmas, their very high mass eruption rates and the episodic behavior, hotspots must be regarded as potentially major modifiers of Earth's climate through the action of their volcanic volatiles on the chemistry and physics of the atmosphere.

  17. Volcanology, geochemistry and age of the Lausitz Volcanic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büchner, J.; Tietz, O.; Viereck, L.; Suhr, P.; Abratis, M.

    2015-11-01

    The Lausitz (Lusatia) Volcanic Field is part of the Central European Volcanic Province, and its magmas represent an alkaline trend from olivine nephelinites and basanites to trachytes and phonolites, typical for intraplate settings. Neighbouring volcanic fields are the České Středohoří Mountains to the south-west and the Fore-Sudetic Basin in Lower Silesia to the east. More than 1000 volcanic structures associated with approximately 500 vents have been located within this volcanic field. Residuals of scoria cones, lava lakes, lava flows and maar-diatreme in filling occur in situ near the level of the original syn-volcanic terrain. In more deeply eroded structures, volcanic relicts outcrop as plugs or feeders. Evolved rocks occur as monogenetic domes or intrusions in diatremes, while their volcaniclastic equivalents are rare. Twenty-three localities were dated using the 40Ar/39Ar method. The ages range from 35 to 27 Ma, with a focus around 32-29 Ma, indicating Late Eocene and mainly Oligocene volcanism for the LVF. Differentiated rocks appear to be slightly younger than less differentiated. No geographical age clusters are apparent.

  18. The petrogenesis of sodic island arc magmas at Savo volcano, Solomon Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. J.; Petterson, M. G.; Saunders, A. D.; Millar, I. L.; Jenkin, G. R. T.; Toba, T.; Naden, J.; Cook, J. M.

    2009-12-01

    Savo, Solomon Islands, is a historically active volcano dominated by sodic, alkaline lavas, and pyroclastic rocks with up to 7.5 wt% Na2O, and high Sr, arc-like trace element chemistry. The suite is dominated by mugearites (plagioclase-clinopyroxene-magnetite ± amphibole ± olivine) and trachytes (plagioclase-amphibole-magnetite ± biotite). The presence of hydrous minerals (amphibole, biotite) indicates relatively wet magmas. In such melts, plagioclase is relatively unstable relative to iron oxides and ferromagnesian silicates; it is the latter minerals (particularly hornblende) that dominate cumulate nodules at Savo and drive the chemical differentiation of the suite, with a limited role for plagioclase. This is potentially occurring in a crustal “hot zone”, with major chemical differentiation occurring at depth. Batches of magma ascend periodically, where they are subject to decompression, water saturation and further cooling, resulting in closed-system crystallisation of plagioclase, and ultimately the production of sodic, crystal and feldspar-rich, high-Sr rocks. The sodic and hydrous nature of the parental magmas is interpreted to be the result of partial melting of metasomatised mantle, but radiogenic isotope data (Pb, Sr, Nd) cannot uniquely identify the source of the metasomatic agent.

  19. Age discrimination among eruptives of Menengai Caldera, Kenya, using vegetation parameters from satellite imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blodget, Herbert W.; Heirtzler, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented of an investigation to determine the degree to which digitally processed Landsat TM imagery can be used to discriminate among vegetated lava flows of different ages in the Menengai Caldera, Kenya. A selective series of five images, consisting of a color-coded Landsat 5 classification and four color composites, are compared with geologic maps. The most recent of more than 70 postcaldera flows within the caldera are trachytes, which are variably covered by shrubs and subsidiary grasses. Soil development evolves as a function of time, and as such supports a changing plant community. Progressively older flows exhibit the increasing dominance of grasses over bushes. The Landsat images correlated well with geologic maps, but the two mapped age classes could be further subdivided on the basis of different vegetation communities. It is concluded that field maps can be modified, and in some cases corrected by use of such imagery, and that digitally enhanced Landsat imagery can be a useful aid to field mapping in similar terrains.

  20. Ash generation and distribution from the April-May 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland

    PubMed Central

    Gudmundsson, Magnús T.; Thordarson, Thorvaldur; Höskuldsson, Ármann; Larsen, Gudrún; Björnsson, Halldór; Prata, Fred J.; Oddsson, Björn; Magnússon, Eyjólfur; Högnadóttir, Thórdís; Petersen, Guðrún Nína; Hayward, Chris L.; Stevenson, John A.; Jónsdóttir, Ingibjörg

    2012-01-01

    The 39-day long eruption at the summit of Eyjafjallajökull volcano in April–May 2010 was of modest size but ash was widely dispersed. By combining data from ground surveys and remote sensing we show that the erupted material was 4.8±1.2·1011 kg (benmoreite and trachyte, dense rock equivalent volume 0.18±0.05 km3). About 20% was lava and water-transported tephra, 80% was airborne tephra (bulk volume 0.27 km3) transported by 3–10 km high plumes. The airborne tephra was mostly fine ash (diameter <1000 µm). At least 7·1010 kg (70 Tg) was very fine ash (<28 µm), several times more than previously estimated via satellite retrievals. About 50% of the tephra fell in Iceland with the remainder carried towards south and east, detected over ~7 million km2 in Europe and the North Atlantic. Of order 1010 kg (2%) are considered to have been transported longer than 600–700 km with <108 kg (<0.02%) reaching mainland Europe. PMID:22893851

  1. Experimentally observed iron redox kinetics in silicic liquids: Implications for Fe/sup 3 +//Fe/sup 2 +/ variations in rhyolite lava

    SciTech Connect

    Naney, M.T.; Swanson, S.E.

    1989-01-01

    Iron redox kinetics in silicate liquids were investigated by melting 100 mg pellets of compacted rhyolite, pantellerite, pantelleritic trachyte, and andesite rock powders at 1243 and 1343/degree/C in a moderately reducing furnace atmosphere (log fO/sub 2/ = /minus/7.83) for periods of 1 to 4320 minutes. The redox state of glasses produced by quenching these liquids was determined by colorimetric analysis of the ferrous iron and total iron content. Redox equilibrium, indicated by the attainment of a constant FeO/FeO/sub tot/ ratio, was observed for all temperature-composition conditions studied, except for 1243/degree/C experiments with USGS rhyolite standard RGM-1. This is consistent with the low diffusivity of reacting components in high viscosity rhyolite liquids. In the 1243/degree/C experiments with RGM-1, no change in the FeO/FeO/sub tot/ ratio was observed after 4320 minutes. This implies that redox equilibrium is not maintained in natural rhyolite lavas which erupt as significantly lower temperatures (720--850/degree/C). We conclude that sluggish redox kinetics precludes major changes in the oxidation state of a rhyolite magma during the eruption process. If this is true, then the quenched magma, represented by glassy rhyolites, preserves the pre-eruption redox signature of the magma. 2 refs.

  2. Insights into the Structure and Surface Geology of Isla Socorro, Mexico, from Airborne Magnetic and Gamma-Ray Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paoletti, V.; Gruber, S.; Varley, N.; D'Antonio, M.; Supper, R.; Motschka, K.

    2015-12-01

    The island of Socorro is located in the eastern Pacific Ocean, 650 km off the coast of Mexico. It is a rare example of an oceanic volcanic island whose above sea level volume is made up mostly of peralkaline trachytes and rhyolites, with subordinate mafic rocks. Subaerial volcanism started several hundred thousand years ago and continues until recent times. We present an investigation of surface and subsurface geology of the island, based on the first detailed extensive geophysical survey on the island. Acquired airborne magnetic and gamma-ray data were compared to existing geological information and supplemented with field investigations and satellite imagery. Magnetic data show a wide minimum in the central part of the island, possibly connected to a high-temperature zone in the deeper central portion of the volcano, likely to be due to a still hot magma body. The data also depict two parallel edges possibly suggesting the existence of a nested caldera. Analysis on upward continued magnetic data by recent imaging techniques highlighted two deep sources located around 5 km b.s.l., interpreted as feeding structures that are now filled with crystalline rocks. Gamma-ray data have been interpreted through integration with the geological survey results. Several previously known volcanic deposits have been identified based on radioelement distribution, and others have been redefined based on field evidence. A new succession of volcanic members is proposed, to be verified through more detailed geological mapping, geochemical analyses of rock samples and radiometric dating.

  3. The uppermost crust structure of Ischia (southern Italy) from ambient noise Rayleigh waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strollo, R.; Nunziata, C.; Iannotta, A.; Iannotta, D.

    2015-05-01

    Ambient noise measurements were performed at the island of Ischia (southern Italy) along alignments of 2.4-7 km by using two three-component seismic stations. Synchronous noise recordings of 2-20 h were cross-correlated over 20-30 s windows, stacked and iteratively band-pass filtered to enhance the dispersive wave trains. Frequency time analysis was performed on the vertical and radial components of cross-correlations and the fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave group velocity was obtained. Validation of the dispersion data was possible with those obtained from an earthquake recording along a close path. The non-linear inversion of average Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion curves along 13 paths (receiver inter-distances) allowed the definition of shear wave velocity models in the uppermost 1-2 km of the crust. The correlation of VS profiles vs. depth and drilling stratigraphy allowed to attribute VS lower than 1 km/s to tuffs and VS of 1.41 km/s to very fractured lavas. Higher VS are found in the central area of the island, in correspondence of the resurgent area. The top of the trachytic lava basement, with VS of 2.2-2.4 km/s and density of 2.3 g/cm3 is about 0.6-0.7 km deep b.s.l. in the centre of Ischia, below altered, very fractured lava or thermally altered tuff.

  4. 40Ar/39Ar Dating of the Pleistocene Peninj Group, Lake Natron, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deino, A. L.; Dominguez-Rodrigo, M.; Luque, L.

    2006-12-01

    40Ar/39Ar incremental-heating experiments on basaltic lavas and single-crystal total-fusion analyses of trachytic tuffs provide for the first time accurate resolution of the chronostratigraphy of the Pleistocene Peninj Group west of Lake Natron, northern Tanzania. These new data force a major revision of the chronology of the entire sequence: the base of the group is now ~1.75 Ma, the Wa Mbugu basalt within the Main Tuff is 1.19 ± 0.03 Ma (Cobb Mountain paleomagnetic event), and the top of the Peninj Group is 1.01 ± 0.03 Ma. Thus the Achulean and Olduwan artifact assemblages found in the Upper Sands and Clays of the upper Humbu Formation above the Wa Mbugu basalt are about ~1.2 to 1.1 Ma, half a million years younger than previously believed. The revised chronology also clarifies the age of the major lake expansion recorded within the upper part of the Peninj Group. This lacustrine phase is now constrained to ~1.1 to 1.0 Ma, corresponding to a previously identified episode of lake expansion in East Africa between 1.1 and 0.9 Ma (Trauth et al., 2005).

  5. The age and petrogenesis of alkaline magmatism in the Ampasindava Peninsula and Nosy Be archipelago, northern Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucciniello, C.; Tucker, R. D.; Jourdan, F.; Melluso, L.; Morra, V.

    2015-05-01

    The Ampasindava alkaline province consists of a series of circular and elliptical intrusions, lava flows, dyke swarms and plugs of Cenozoic age emplaced into the Mesozoic-Cenozoic sedimentary rocks of the Antsiranana basin (NW Madagascar) and above the crystalline basement. The magmatism in the Ampasindava region is linked to a NW-SE trending extensional tectonic setting. New 40Ar/39Ar age determinations on feldspar separate of alkali granites and basaltic dykes yielded ages of 18.01 0.36 Ma and 26 7 Ma, respectively. Alkali basalts and basanites, nepheline syenites and phonolites, and silica saturated-to-oversaturated syenites, trachytes, granites and rhyolites are the main outcropping lithologies. These rocks have sodic affinity. The felsic rocks are dominant, and range from peraluminous to peralkaline. The mantle-normalized incompatible element patterns of the mafic lavas match those of Na-alkaline lavas in within-plate rift settings. The patterns are identical in shape and absolute concentrations to those of the Bobaomby (Cap d'Ambre) and Massif d'Ambre primitive volcanic rocks. These geochemical features are broadly compatible with variable degrees of partial melting of incompatible element-enriched mantle sources. The mineralogical and geochemical variations are consistent with fractional crystallization processes involving removal of olivine, feldspar, clinopyroxene, amphibole, Fe-Ti oxides and apatite. Removal of small amount of titanite explains the concave upward lanthanide pattern in the evolved nepheline syenites and phonolites, which are additionally rich in exotic silicates typical of agpaitic magmas (eudialyte, F-disilicates).

  6. Major-element geochemistry of the Silent Canyon-Black Mountain peralkaline volcanic centers, northwestern Nevada Test Site: applications to an assessment of renewed volcanism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crowe, Bruce M.; Sargent, Kenneth A.

    1979-01-01

    The Silent Canyon and Black Mountain volcanic centers are located in the northern part of the Nevada Test Site. The Silent Canyon volcanic center is a buried cauldron complex of Miocene age (13-15 m.y.). Black Mountain volcanic center is an elliptical-shaped cauldron complex of late Miocene age. The lavas and tuffs of the two centers comprise a subalkaline-peralkaline association. Rock types range from quartz normative subalkaline trachyte and rhyolite to peralkaline comendite. The Gold Flat Member of the Thirsty Canyon Tuff (Black Mountain) is a pantellerite. The major-element geochemistry of the Black Mountain-Silent Canyon volcanic centers differs in the total range and distribution of Si02, contents, the degree of peralkalinity (molecular Na2O+K2O>Al2O3) and in the values of total iron and alumina through the range of rock types. These differences indicate that the suites were unrelated and evolved from differing magma bodies. The Black Mountain volcanic cycle represents a renewed phase of volcanism following cessation of the Timber Mountain-Silent Canyon volcanic cycles. Consequently, there is a small but numerically incalculable probability of recurrence of Black Mountain-type volcanism within the Nevada Test Site region. This represents a potential risk with respect to deep geologic storage of high-level radioactive waste at the Nevada Test Site.

  7. Origin of Volcanic Seamounts Offshore California Related to Interaction of Abandoned Spreading Centers with the Continental Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, A. S.; Clague, D. A.; Paduan, J. B.; Cousens, B. L.; Huard, J.

    2007-12-01

    The numerous NE-SW trending volcanic seamounts at the continental margin offshore central to Southern California owe their existence to the complex tectonics that resulted when small spreading ridge segments intersected and partly subducted beneath the continental margin during the Miocene plate reorganization. A limited number of dredged samples had indicated multiple episodes of coeval, alkalic volcanism at geographically widely separated sites (Davis et al., 2002, GSA Bull. 114, 316-333). 450 new samples were collected from 8 seamounts from 37. 5°N to 32.3°N with MBARI's ROV Tiburon. Ar-Ar ages for 50 of these samples extend the ages of volcanism from 18 Ma to 2.8 Ma. The dominant whole rock compositions are differentiated alkalic basalt, hawaiite, and mugearite, but include minor benmoreite, trachyte, and rare tholeiitic basalt. This entire range of compositions is also present in glassy margins or in volcaniclastic breccias, except for the trachyte, which had no glassy margins. Trace element abundances and ratios (e.g. REE, Zr, Nb, Ta, Th, Ba, etc.) are typical for ocean island basalt, whether the seamount is located on the Pacific plate (e.g. Pioneer, Gumdrop, Guide, Davidson, San Juan, San Marcos) or on the continental slope (Rodriguez) or within the Southern Continental Borderland (Northeast Bank). Nine samples, predominantly from Rodriguez Seamount, show a calc-alkaline trend with lower Nb, Ta, and higher Th. These samples may be erratics (Paduan et al., 2007, Marine Geology, in press). Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic compositions plot within the Pacific N-MORB field for the northern seamounts (Pioneer, Gumdrop, Guide) but suggest progressively more radiogenic sources southward. There is considerable scatter at each site, especially with regard to 87Sr/86Sr, despite severe acid-leaching of the samples. Isotopic and trace element compositions indicate sources that are heterogeneous at a small scale. Chondrite-normalized Ce/Yb suggest smaller degree of melting and more alkalic compositions with decreasing age, although there is again considerable scatter. Chondrite-normalized La/Sm versus Zr/Nb form a continuum from the seamount lavas to depleted N-MORB and E-MORB suggesting a common origin by decompression melting of a mantle source with randomly distributed enriched heterogeneities, which are incorporated to a greater degree with decreasing degree of melting. Based on symmetric magnetic anomalies, only Davidson Seamount has been identified as straddling a fossil spreading center (Lonsdale, 1991, AAPG Mem. 47, 87-125). However, the other seamounts along the continental margin with the same NE-SW orientation and similar geochemical characteristics probably originated in a similar setting, erupting lavas along zones of weakness in the ocean floor fabric related to past seafloor spreading. Small volumes of magma can apparently rise long after spreading ceases if there is enough enriched source component to facilitate melting combined with zones of weakness in the underlying ocean crust fabric and/or extensional tectonics.

  8. Genesis and evolution of mafic and felsic magmas at Quaternary volcanoes within the Main Ethiopian Rift: Insights from Gedemsa and Fanta 'Ale complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, F.; D'Antonio, M.; Civetta, L.; Tonarini, S.; Orsi, G.; Ayalew, D.; Yirgu, G.; Dell'Erba, F.; Di Vito, M. A.; Isaia, R.

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation carried out on young volcanic rocks from the Gedemsa and Fanta 'Ale complexes, located in the Main Ethiopian Rift, the site of an intense magmatism since Eocene-Oligocene. The earlier NW-SE direction of extension of the Rift, which generated NE-SW trending faults, rotated around E-W in Quaternary times, and produced the still active N to N-NE Wonji Fault System. The Gedemsa volcano is located in the central part of the Ethiopian Rift, about 100 km SE of Addis Ababa. It is characterized by a wide central caldera, about 8 km in diameter. The general stratigraphic sequence in the area includes, from base upwards, rift-floor ignimbrites, pantelleritic and subordinate trachytic pyroclastic deposits and lava flows and domes, and widespread basaltic deposits. The Fanta 'Ale volcanic complex is located in the northern part of the Main Ethiopian Rift, where the Afar depression begins. It is characterized by a summit caldera of which the diameter is about 4 km. This volcano erupted trachytic and rhyolitic lavas, whereas the most diffuse unit is an ignimbrite related to the caldera collapse. Explosive activity has occurred inside and outside the caldera, forming tuff cones and thick pumice-fallout deposits. The only mafic unit is represented by a basaltic eruption that occurred in 1870 AD. Historical eruptions and intense fumarolic activity are evidence for the persistence activity of the Fanta 'Ale in this part of the Main Ethiopian Rift. New geochemical and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope data on representative samples from Gedemsa and Fanta 'Ale volcanoes are presented and discussed in order to shed light on the genesis of mafic and felsic magmas, the genetic link between them, and their possible interaction with the local crust. Volcanic rocks show a typical mafic-felsic bi-modal distribution with few intermediate terms (Daly Gap), as observed at regional scale along the Main Ethiopian Rift as well as on the plateau. Geochemical data and modeling suggest that magmas evolved mainly through fractional crystallization processes, accounting for the entire mafic-felsic compositional variation. However, Sr-Nd-Pb isotope data reveal also open-system evolution processes. The most differentiated, Sr-poor rhyolites suffered important low temperature contamination by shallow fluids of hydrothermal and/or meteoric origin. This affected mostly the Sr isotopic composition of whole-rocks, and much less that of separated feldspars that provide more reliable 87Sr/86Sr values. Mafic rocks, as well as the least contaminated felsic rocks, provide evidence for two components involved in the genesis and evolution of mafic magmas: a mantle component, carrying the isotopic composition of the Afar plume, and a crustal component, likely Pan-African sialic lower crust, that might have been added in small amounts, about 2%, to mafic magmas. The origin of the primary magmas is inferred to have occurred by 7% partial melting of a mixed source region including both depleted and enriched mantle components.

  9. New chronological and geochemical constraints on the genesis and geological evolution of Ponza and Palmarola Volcanic Islands (Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadoux, Anita; Pinti, Daniele L.; Aznar, Cyril; Chiesa, Sergio; Gillot, Pierre-Yves

    2005-04-01

    A new geochronological and geochemical study of the volcanic rocks of the Ponza and Palmarola Islands, Pontine Archipelago, has been carried out. This archipelago is located along the boundary between the Italian continental shelf and the opening Tyrrhenian basin. It is a key area to study volcanism related to the opening of the Tyrrhenian Sea. Ponza is the oldest felsic magmatic manifestation in the central Tyrrhenian area. Previous studies suggested that Ponza volcanic activity began before 5 Ma. Twenty-five new K-Ar ages constrain the volcanic activity (rhyolitic hyaloclastites and dykes) to the last 4.2 Ma, with two episodes of quiescence between 3.7 and 3.2 Ma and between 2.9 and 1.0 Ma. A new volcanic episode dated at 3.2-2.9 Ma has been identified on the central and southern Ponza, with emplacement of pyroclastic units. At 1.0 Ma, a trachytic episode ended the volcanic activity. The near island of Palmarola exhibits rhyolitic hyaloclastites and domes dated between 1.6 and 1.5 Ma, indicating that the island was entirely built during the Early Pleistocene in a short span of time of ca. 120 ka. Although only 6-8 km apart, the two islands display significantly different geochemical signatures. Ponza rhyolites show major and trace element compositions representative of orogenic magmas of subduction/collision zones: high-K calc-alkaline and metaluminous rhyolites (Agpaitic Index [AI] and Alumina Saturation Index [ASI] <1), high LILE/HFSE (Th/Ta=16-21) and LREE/HFSE ratios (La/Nb>3), and Nb-Ta negative anomalies. In Palmarola, the orogenic character is also present, but much less marked than in Ponza: rhyolites have a peralkaline character (AI>1), lower LILE/HFSE (Th/Ta=11-15), low LREE/HFSE ratios (La/Nb=1-2) close to those of anorogenic lavas, and the Nb-Ta negative anomalies are almost absent. Y/Nb ratios indicate different magmatic sources, one similar to island-arc or active continental margin basalts for Ponza rhyolites, and the others probably involving an OIB type component for Palmarola rhyolites and Ponza trachytes. Palmarola volcanics represent a transitional magmatism: although a preserved collisional geochemical imprint, they show geochemical features approaching those of anorogenic lavas erupted in a within-plate context. The change of magmatism evidenced in this study can be related to the tectonic evolution of the area. Indeed, Hf, Ta and Rb contents suggest that the oldest Pliocene rhyolites of Ponza would emplace in a syn- to late-collisional setting, while the younger Pleistocene rhyolites of Palmarola would be emplaced in a post-collisional setting in which the orogenic character (Th/Ta) decreases and mantle influence (Nb/Ta) increases. Geochemical modeling strongly suggests that the Palmarola rhyolites represent the waning stages of a subduction-related magmatism. The K-Ar datings allow us to estimate precisely the transition of magmatism to last less than 1.3 Ma. The transitional magmas may be the result of the upwelling of asthenospheric mantle inducing melting of a metasomatized lithospheric mantle and the mixing between these two sources. This upwelling could occur during the extension of the Tyrrhenian basin, caused by the slab retreat and steepening, or during a process of slab break-off starting in the Pliocene.

  10. Petrogenesis of the early Cretaceous Valle Chico igneous complex (SE Uruguay): Relationships with Paraná Etendeka magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lustrino, Michele; Melluso, Leone; Brotzu, Pietro; Gomes, Celso B.; Morbidelli, Lucio; Muzio, Rossana; Ruberti, Excelso; Tassinari, Colombo C. G.

    2005-06-01

    The early Cretaceous (˜130 Ma) igneous complex of Valle Chico (SE Uruguay) is made up of felsic plutonic and subordinate volcanic rocks and dykes cropping out over an area of about 250 km 2. This complex is strictly linked with the formation of the Paraná-Etendeka Igneous Province and the first stages of the South Atlantic Ocean rifting. The plutonic rocks range from quartz-monzonite to syenite, quartz-syenite and granite. The volcanic rocks and the dykes range from quartz-latite to trachyte and rhyolite; no substantial differences in term of chemical composition have been found between plutonic and volcanic rocks. Only a sample of basaltic composition (with tholeiitic affinity) has been sampled associated with the felsic rocks. The Agpaitic Index of the Valle Chico felsic rocks range from 0.72 to 1.34, with the peralkaline terms confined in the most evolved samples (SiO 2>65 wt.%). Initial 87Sr/ 86Sr (130) of the felsic rocks range from 0.7046 to 0.7201, but the range of 87Sr/ 86Sr of low-Rb/Sr samples cluster at 0.7083; 143Nd/ 144Nd (130) ratios range from 0.5121 (syenite) to 0.5117 (granite). The tholeiitic basalt show more depleted isotopic compositions ( 87Sr/ 86Sr (130)=0.7061; 143Nd/ 144Nd (130)=0.5122), and plots in the field of other early Cretaceous low-Ti basaltic rocks of SE Uruguay. The radiogenic Sr and unradiogenic Nd of the Valle Chico felsic rocks require involvement of lower crustal material in their genesis either as melt contaminant or as protolith (crustal anatexis). In particular, most of the Valle Chico (VC) felsic rocks define a near-vertical array in Sr-Nd isotopic spaces, pointing toward classical EMI-type composition; this feature is considered to reflect a lower crust involvement as observed for other mafic and felsic rocks of the Paraná-Etendeka Igneous Province. Decompression melting of the lower crust related to Gondwana continental rifting before the opening of the South Atlantic Ocean or the presence of thermal anomalies related to the Tristan plume may have induced the lower crust to partially melt. Alternative hypothesis considers contamination of upper mantle by a mafic/ultramafic keel composed of lower crust and uppermost mantle after delamination and detachment processes. This interaction may have occurred after the continent-continent collision during the last stages of the Panafrican Orogeny. This "lower crust" model does not exclude active involvement of upper crust as contaminant, necessary to explain the strongly radiogenic 87Sr/ 86Sr (130) isotopic composition of some VC SiO 2-rich rocks. Mineralogical (sporadic presence of pigeonite, Ca-Na and Na clinopyroxene, calcic- and calco-sodic amphibole) and geochemical evidences (major and trace element as well as Sr-Nd isotopic similarities with the felsic early Cretaceous volcanic rocks of the Arequita Formation in SE Uruguay) allow us to propose for the VC rocks a transitional rock series (the most abundant rock types are of syenitic/trachytic composition) preferentially evolving towards SiO 2-oversaturated compositions (granite/rhyolite) also with a strong upper crustal contribution as melt contaminant. This conclusion is in contrast with previous studies according which the VC complex had clear alkaline affinity. Many similarities between VC and the coeval Paresis granitoids (Etendeka, Namibia) are evidenced in this paper. The genetic similarities between VC and the rhyolites (s.l.) of SE Uruguay may find counterparts with the genetic link existing between the early Cretaceous tholeiitic-alkaline Messum complex and the quartz latites (s.l.) of the Awahab Formation (Etendeka region, Namibia).

  11. REE variation in alkaline mafic lavas across the North Tanzanian Divergence zone, a possible indicator of varying lithospheric thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mana, S.; Carr, M. J.; Feigenson, M.; Furman, T.; Swisher, C. C.

    2012-12-01

    The magmatic evolution of the North Tanzanian Divergence zone (NTD), the southern termination of the eastern branch of the East African Rift (EAR), is of interest as a currently active magmatic-rich continental rift. In fact, the role of magmatism in continental rift initiation and evolution is of much debate and contrasts are currently drawn between amagmatic and magmatic-rich rift systems. The NTD possesses a wide array of pre-rift Miocene volcanoes to currently active volcanoes broadly distributed across the valley floor to the adjacent rift margins and characterized by having very heterogeneous chemical compositions. A highly diverse array of magmas from basalt to rhyolite, trachyte, phonolite and carbonatite occur at various volcanic centers, some of which have erupted more then one magma type. We analyzed 11 samples from Ketumbeine volcano for whole rock major and trace element abundances, Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic signatures and Ar/Ar ages. Two alkaline rock series are distinguished: a basanite to tephra-phonolite magma series and an alkali basalt to basaltic trachy-andesite magma series. Interestingly, the two magma series represent distinct ages of volcanism: the alkali basalt series is older with ages ranging between 2.2 and 1.9 Ma, while the basanite series erupted at about 1.2 Ma. The temporal separation of the two magma series occurs on a regional scale as well with the basanite to phonolite lavas erupted during the entire period of the NTD volcanism (5.8 Ma to Present), whereas the basalt to trachyte magma series is restricted to two brief intervals: the first between 2.4 and 1.6 Ma, immediately before the major rifting event dated by MacIntyre et al. (1974) at 1.2 Ma, and the second at about 0.5 Ma at Kibo and Mawenzi (Kilimanjaro). We model the source of the NTD as being derived from a metasomatized lithospheric mantle including variable amounts of garnet, amphibole and phlogopite. The most mafic and presumably less contaminated NTD volcanics have systematic REE variations (Sm/Yb versus La/Sm) that are consistent with different degrees of partial melting (La/Sm), and varying amounts of garnet and amphibole in the source (Sm/Yb). Many of the more evolved samples have greater radiogenic isotopic ratios and evolve via assimilation and fractional crystallization to lower Sm/Yb and higher La/Sm. Different degree of partial melting may reflect heat flow variations, while heterogeneity in the source is consistent with pressure conditions that imply changes in the depth of melting. In fact, REE abundances of key NTD volcanics (e.g. Essimingor) indicate melting in the garnet and phlogopite stability zone indicating the presence of a relatively thick lithosphere, while the absence of garnet indicate areas characterized by thinning of the lithosphere. MacIntyre, R.M., Mitchell, J.G., Dawson, J.B., 1974. Age of fault movements in Tanzanian sector of East African Rift System. Nature 247, 354-356.

  12. Geochemistry and petrology of the Early Miocene lamproites and related volcanic rocks in the Thrace Basin, NW Anatolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ersoy, Yalçın E.; Palmer, Martin R.; Uysal, İbrahim; Gündoğan, İbrahim

    2014-08-01

    The extensional Thrace basin (NW Anatolia) contains an association of early Miocene diopside-leucite-phlogopite (Doğanca) and diopside-phlogopite (Korucuköy) lamproites with Oligocene medium-K calc-alkaline andesites (Keşan volcanics), early Miocene shoshonitic rocks (Altınyazı trachyte) and middle Miocene Na-alkaline basalts (Beğendik basalts). The Doğanca lamproite (K2O = 5.1-5.5 wt.%; K/Na = 2.78-2.89; MgO = 11.4-11.8 wt.%) consists of olivine (Fo71-86), diopside (Al2O3 = 1.0-5.0, Na2O = 0.2-0.6), phlogopite (TiO2 = 1.1-9.4, Al2O3 = 11.1-13.9), spinel (Mg# = 22.9-32.6; Cr# = 64-83.4), leucite, apatite, zircon, Fe-Ti-oxides and magnetite in a poikilitic sanidine matrix. The potassic volcanic units (lamproites and trachytes) in the region have similarly high Sr and low Nd isotopic compositions (87Sr/86Sr(i) = 0.70835-0.70873 and 143Nd/144Nd(i) = 0.51227-0.51232). The major and trace element compositions and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic ratios of the shoshonitic, ultrapotassic and lamproitic units closely resemble those of other Mediterranean ultrapotassic lamproites (i.e., orogenic lamproites) from Italia, Serbia, Macedonia and western Anatolia. The Beğendik basalts show intraplate geochemical signatures with an Na-alkaline composition, an absence of Nb negative anomalies on primitive mantle-normalized multi-element diagrams, as well as low Sr (~ 0.70416) and high Nd (0.51293) isotopic ratios; and include olivine (Fo72-84), diopside, spinel, Fe-Ti-oxides and magnetite. The Oligocene Keşan volcanics were emplaced in the earlier stages of extension in Thrace, and represent the typical volcanic products of post-collisional volcanism. The continental crust-like trace element abundances and isotopic compositions of the most primitive early Miocene ultrapotassic rocks (Mg# up to 74) indicate that their mantle sources were intensely contaminated by the continental material. By considering the geodynamic evolution of the region, including oceanic subduction, crustal accretion, crustal subduction and post-collisional extension, it is suggested that the mantle sources of the potassic volcanic units were most likely metasomatized by direct subduction of continental blocks during accretion and assemblage of various Alpine tectono-stratigraphic units. Overall, the magma production occurred in an extensional tectonic setting that controlled the core-complex formation and related basin development, with the middle Miocene Beğendik basalts being derived from asthenospheric sources during the late stages of extension.

  13. Understanding the Peach Spring supereruption through its basal layer deposits (Southwestern USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCracken, R. G.; Miller, C. F.; Dufek, J.; Gualda, G. A.; Buesch, D.; Brooks, C. E.

    2011-12-01

    The Peach Spring Tuff (PST) supereruption occurred 18.8 Mya, depositing a thick ignimbrite over 32,000 km^2 of the NW Arizona, SE California, and S Nevada. At the base of the ignimbrite is a thin (≤1 m thick) layered unit that has been identified as a surge deposit (Valentine et al 1989, 1990; Wilson & Self 1989 offer a contrary interpretation) that extends 100 km east and 65 km west from its source, the Silver Creek caldera in the southern Black Mountains, AZ (Ferguson 2008). These deposits record the first material ejected from the PST magma body immediately before the main ignimbrite-forming event, and provide (1) samples of the first magma to be tapped and (2) evidence for the initial eruptive process and potentially eruption triggers. We are investigating textures and petrology of pumice clasts taken from an internally structureless layer within the basal unit. We have determined roundness of pumice clasts from six exposures located 22 to 96 km from the source caldera, using the approach of Manga et al (2011) (the first application of their metric to a putative surge deposit). Roundness (R) is defined as 4πA/P^2, where A is the cross-sectional area of a clast and P is its perimeter. Mean R values range from 0.76 to 0.80, showing no systematic change with distance from the caldera. Generally, the R values for samples show negatively skewed distributions, with the majority of the pumice clasts having values between 0.75 and 0.85 but with values as low as 0.60 and as high as 0.90; standard deviations also vary little from sample to sample. This relative uniformity suggests that pumice clasts may have reached a saturation roundness (beyond which they would round little) in the high-energy environment near the vent and early in the transport processes of the surge. The pumice clasts are relatively crystal-poor, with a phenocryst assemblage comprising abundant sanidine, lesser plagioclase, minor hornblende and biotite, and accessory magnetite, sphene, zircon, chevkinite, apatite, and fluorite; quartz is minimal or absent. Phenocrysts in the pumice are mostly fragments, suggesting syn-eruption fragmentation within magma chamber and/or conduit. Preliminary SEM analysis of the glass indicates dominantly high-silica rhyolite compositions (≥77% wt SiO_2) consistent with previous electron microprobe values. The siliceous glass composition and low phenocryst abundance are similar to typical pumice clasts in the outflow sheet. These pumice clasts are much more evolved than crystal-rich, trachytic pumice clasts that form a minor component in the basal layer unit, are more common in the overlying ignimbrite, and dominate the intracaldera fill. Trachytic magma is interpreted as a mush from the base of the chamber that was heated and remobilized by a recharging episode prior to the climactic eruption. Basal layer pumice compositions suggest the initial magma was drawn primarily from the chamber's top with minor contribution from near the bottom and that extent of entrainment of deep-level magma increased over the course of the eruption.

  14. Reviving Moribund Intrusive Complexes: Mafic Thermal Input, the Accessory Mineral Record, and the Pluton-Volcano Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C. F.; Gualda, G. A.; Padilla, A. J.; Pamukcu, A. S.; Claiborne, L. L.; Carley, T. L.; Flanagan, D. M.

    2011-12-01

    Intrusive and extrusive silicic systems spanning subduction zone, oceanic, and intracontinental settings and ranging from small, persistent eruptive centers to supereruptions show evidence for periodic thermal input. We present examples demonstrating that this input is responsible for remobilizing stagnant intrusions and apparently triggering eruptions. Mafic recharge is the evident heat source in some and implicated indirectly in others. Field relations, textures, accessory mineral zoning, and U-Pb and U-Th geochronology provide evidence for the inferred thermal reinvigoration of these systems: --Mount St. Helens, WA (active subduction zone volcano): Combined U-Th dating and elemental analysis demonstrates that zircon grew from residual silicic melt in relatively cool storage zones,10's to 100's of ky prior to eruption, and that its growth was episodic over the history of the system. Zircon crystals are thus samples of stagnant intrusive ("plutonic") parts of the St. Helens system, entrained in hotter ascending magmas during replenishment and local rejuvenation. --Highland Range volcanics & Searchlight pluton, NV (Miocene volcanic-plutonic system, incipient crustal extension): Evidence for late-stage mingling between intermediate and highly evolved, crystal-rich magma is preserved in the pluton, large dikes, a near-surface plug, and the final erupted products of the system, which were accompanied and followed by andesite lavas. Resorption and reaction rimming of sphene and large feldspar and quartz crystals in the dikes, plug, and volcanic rocks attest to heating. We infer that voluminous andesite invaded nearly-solid leucogranite, remobilized it, and triggered final eruptions. --Peach Spring Tuff, AZ, CA, NV (Miocene supereruption, incipient crustal extension): In contrast to phenocryst-poor rhyolitic outflow, intracaldera tuff is crystal-rich trachyte. Feldspar and sphene phenocrysts are extensively resorbed and rims of zircon crystals record a >100 degree C spike in T. We conclude that the trachyte tuff is cumulate from the base of the pre-eruption chamber that was remobilized by an intense heating event. Based on Rhyolite-MELTS modelling, we estimate that this cumulate was initially uneruptible "rigid sponge" with 10-20% melt. Sparse andesitic enclaves may reflect the source of thermal rejuvenation of the mush. --Austurhorn intrusive complex (Late Miocene) & historic silicic eruptions, Iceland (hyperactive mid-ocean rift adjacent to hot spot): Austurhorn records extensive mingling between basaltic and silicic magma. Zircon U-Pb data reveal a major episode of mafic intrusion at 6.0 Ma. This intrusion partially remobilized felsic material and induced a second episode of zircon growth in the dominantly 6.5 Ma complex. Historic silicic eruptions are also usually accompanied by mafic lavas and/or enclaves, and zircon records T significantly lower than erupting magma and ages of 10's of ka. Our experience suggests that thermal rejuvenation plays a vital role in the dynamic behavior of many and perhaps most silicic systems. It is further consistent with the hypothesis that such systems are long-lived but that their normal state is as melt-poor, immobile, uneruptible bodies that only sporadically spring to life.

  15. Nd, Sr, and O isotopic variations in metaluminous ash-flow tuffs and related volcanic rocks at the Timber Mountain/Oasis Valley Caldera, Complex, SW Nevada: implications for the origin and evolution of large-volume silicic magma bodies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farmer, G.L.; Broxton, D.E.; Warren, R.G.; Pickthorn, W.

    1991-01-01

    Nd, Sr and O isotopic data were obtained from silicic ash-flow tuffs and lavas at the Tertiary age (16-9 Ma) Timber (Mountain/Oasis Valley volcanic center (TMOV) in southern Nevada, to assess models for the origin and evolution of the large-volume silicic magma bodies generated in this region. The large-volume (>900 km3), chemically-zoned, Topopah Spring (TS) and Tiva Canyon (TC) members of the Paintbrush Tuff, and the Rainier Mesa (RM) and Ammonia Tanks (AT) members of the younger Timber Mountain Tuff all have internal Nd and Sr isotopic zonations. In each tuff, high-silica rhyolites have lower initial e{open}Nd values (???1 e{open}Nd unit), higher87Sr/86Sr, and lower Nd and Sr contents, than cocrupted trachytes. The TS, TC, and RM members have similar e{open}Nd values for high-silica rhyolites (-11.7 to -11.2) and trachytes (-10.5 to -10.7), but the younger AT member has a higher e{open}Nd for both compositional types (-10.3 and -9.4). Oxygen isotope data confirm that the TC and AT members were derived from low e{open}Nd magmas. The internal Sr and Nd isotopic variations in each tuff are interpreted to be the result of the incorporation of 20-40% (by mass) wall-rock into magmas that were injected into the upper crust. The low e{open}Nd magmas most likely formed via the incorporation of low ??18O, hydrothermally-altered, wall-rock. Small-volume rhyolite lavas and ash-flow tuffs have similar isotopic characteristics to the large-volume ash-flow tuffs, but lavas erupted from extracaldera vents may have interacted with higher ??18O crustal rocks peripheral to the main magma chamber(s). Andesitic lavas from the 13-14 Ma Wahmonie/Salyer volcanic center southeast of the TMOV have low e{open}Nd (-13.2 to -13.8) and are considered on the basis of textural evidence to be mixtures of basaltic composition magmas and large proportions (70-80%) of anatectic crustal melts. A similar process may have occurred early in the magmatic history of the TMOV. The large-volume rhyolites may represent a mature stage of magmatism after repeated injection of basaltic magmas, crustal melting, and volcanism cleared sufficient space in the upper crust for large magma bodies to accumulate and differentiate. The TMOV rhyolites and 0-10 Ma old basalts that erupted in southern Nevada all have similar Nd and Sr isotopic compositions, which suggests that silicic and mafic magmatism at the TMOV were genetically related. The distinctive isotopic compositions of the AT member may reflect temporal changes in the isotopic compositions of basaltic magmas entering the upper crust, possibly as a result of increasing "basification" of a lower crustal magma source by repeated injection of mantle-derived mafic magmas. ?? 1991 Springer-Verlag.

  16. Geology and ground-water resources of the island of Molokai, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stearns, Harold T.; Macdonald, Gordon A.

    1947-01-01

    The island of Molokai is the fifth largest of the Hawaiian Islands, with an area of 250 square miles. It lies 25 miles southeast of Oahu, and 8.5 miles northwest of Maui. It consists of two principal parts, each a major volcanic mountain. East Molokai rises to 4,970 feet altitude. It is built largely of basaltic lavas, with a thin cap of andesites and a little trachyte. The volcanic rocks of East Molokai are named the East Molokai volcanic series, the basaltic part being separated as the lower member of the series, and the andesites and trachytes as the upper member. Large cinder cones and bulbous domes are associated with the lavas of the upper member. Thin beds of ash are present locally in both members. The lavas of the lower member are cut by innumerable dikes lying in two major rift zones trending eastward and northwestward. A large caldera, more than 4 miles long, and a smaller pit 0.8 mile across existed near the summit of the volcano. The rocks formed in and under the caldera are separated on plate 1 as the caldera complex. Stream erosion has cut large amphitheater-headed valleys into the northern coast of East Molokai, exposing the dikes and the caldera complex.West Molokai is lower than East Molokai, rising to 1,380 feet altitude. It was built by basaltic lavas erupted along rift zones trending southwestward and northwestward. Many of the flows were unusually fluid. The volcanic rocks of West Molokai Volcano are named the West Molokai volcanic series. Along its eastern side, the mountain is broken by a series of faults along which its eastern edge has been dropped downward. West Molokai Volcano became extinct earlier than East Molokai Volcano, and its flank is partly buried beneath lavas of East Molokai.Both volcanic mountains were built upward from the sea floor probably during Tertiary time. Following the close of volcanic activity stream erosion cut large canyons on East Molokai, but accomplished much less on drier West Molokai. Marine erosion attacked both parts of the island, producing high sea-cliffs on the windward coast. In late Tertiary or early Pleistocene time the island was submerged to a level at least 560 feet above the present shore line, then reemerged. Later shifts of sea level, probably partly resulting from Pleistocene glaciation and deglaciation, ranged from 300 feet below to 100 feet or more above present sea level. Marine deposits on the southern slope extend to an altitude of at least 200 feet. Eruption of the Kalaupapa basalt built a small lava cone at the foot of the northern cliff, forming Kalaupapa peninsula; and a small submarine eruption off the eastern end of Molokai built the Mokuhooniki tuff cone, the fragments of which now form Hooniki and Kanaha Islands. Deposition of marine and fluviatile sediments has built a series of narrow flats close to sea-level along the southern coast. Nearly the entire island is underlain, close to sea level, by ground water of the basal zone of saturation. Beneath West Molokai, the Hoolehua Plain between West and East Molokai, and the southern coastal area of East Molokai, the basal water is brackish. Beneath much of East Molokai, fresh basal water is obtainable. Small amounts of fresh water are perched at high levels in East Molokai by thin poorly permeable ash beds. Fresh water is confined at high levels in permeable compartments between poorly permeable dikes in the rift zones of East Molokai, and can be developed by tunnels. Projects to bring the abundant surface and ground water of the large wind ward valleys to the Hoolehua Plain are described. Future developments are suggested. All wells and water-development tunnels are described in tables.

  17. Igneous evolution of a complex laccolith-caldera, the Solitario, Trans-Pecos Texas: Implications for calderas and subjacent plutons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henry, C.D.; Kunk, M.J.; Muehlberger, W.R.; McIntosh, W.C.

    1997-01-01

    The Solitario is a large, combination laccolith and caldera (herein termed "laccocaldera"), with a 16-km-diameter dome over which developed a 6 x 2 km caldera. This laccocaldera underwent a complex sequence of predoming sill, laccolith, and dike intrusion and concurrent volcanism; doming with emplacement of a main laccolith; ash-flow eruption and caldera collapse; intracaldera sedimentation and volcanism; and late intrusion. Detailed geologic mapping and 40Ar/39Ar dating reveal that the Solitario evolved over an interval of approximately 1 m.y. in three distinct pulses at 36.0, 35.4, and 35.0 Ma. The size, duration, and episodicity of Solitario magmatism are more typical of large ash-flow calderas than of most previously described laccoliths. Small volumes of magma intruded as abundant rhyolitic to trachytic sills and small laccoliths and extruded as lavas and tuffs during the first pulse at 36.0 Ma. Emplacement of the main laccolith, doming, ash-flow eruption, and caldera collapse occurred at 35.4 Ma during the most voluminous pulse. A complex sequence of debris-flow and debris-avalanche deposits, megabreccia, trachyte lava, and minor ash-flow tuff subsequently filled the caldera. The final magmatic pulse at 35.0 Ma consisted of several small laccoliths or stocks and numerous dikes in caldera fill and along the ring fracture. Solitario rocks appear to be part of a broadly cogenetic, metaluminous suite. Peralkaline rhyolite lava domes were emplaced north and west of the Solitario at approximately 35.4 Ma, contemporaneous with laccolith emplacement and the main pulse in the Solitario. The spatial and temporal relation along with sparse geochemical data suggest that the peralkaline rhyolites are crustal melts related to the magmatic-thermal flux represented by the main pulse of Solitario magmatism. Current models of laccolith emplacement and evolution suggest a continuum from initial sill emplacement through growth of the main laccolith. Although the Solitario laccocaldera followed this sequence of events, our field and 40Ar/39Ar data demonstrate that it developed through repeated, episodic magma injections, separated by 0.4 to 0.6 m.y. intervals of little or no activity. This evolution requires a deep, long-lived magma source, well below the main laccolith. Laccoliths are commonly thought to be small, shallow features that are not representative of major, silicic magmatic systems such as calderas and batholiths. In contrast, we suggest that magma chambers beneath many ashflow calderas are tabular, floored intrusions, including laccoliths. Evidence for this conclusion includes the following: (1) many large plutons are recognized to be laccoliths or at least tabular, (2) the Solitario and several larger calderas are known to have developed over laccoliths, and (3) magma chambers beneath calderas, which are as much as 80 km in diameter, cannot be as deep as they are wide or some would extend into the upper mantle. The Solitario formed during a tectonically neutral period following Laramide deformation and preceding Basin and Range extension. Therefore, space for the main laccolith was made by uplift of its roof and possibly subsidence of the floor, not by concurrent faulting. Laccolith-type injection is probably a common way that space is made for magma bodies of appreciable areal extent in the upper crust.

  18. Edaphics, active tectonics and animal movements in the Kenyan Rift - implications for early human evolution and dispersal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kübler, Simon; Owenga, Peter; Rucina, Stephen; King, Geoffrey C. P.

    2014-05-01

    The quality of soils (edaphics) and the associated vegetation strongly controls the health of grazing animals. Until now, this has hardly been appreciated by paleo-anthropologists who only take into account the availability of water and vegetation in landscape reconstruction attempts. A lack of understanding the importance of the edaphics of a region greatly limits interpretations of the relation between our ancestors and animals over the last few million years. If a region lacks vital trace elements then wild grazing and browsing animals will avoid it and go to considerable length and take major risks to seek out better pasture. As a consequence animals must move around the landscape at different times of the year. In complex landscapes, such as tectonically active rifts, hominins can use advanced group behaviour to gain strategic advantage for hunting. Our study in the southern Kenya rift in the Lake Magadi region shows that the edaphics and active rift structures play a key role in present day animal movements as well as the for the location of an early hominin site at Mt. Olorgesailie. We carried out field analysis based on studying the relationship between the geology and soil development as well as the tectonic geomorphology to identify 'good' and 'bad' regions both in terms of edaphics and accessibility for grazing animals. We further sampled different soils that developed on the volcanic bedrock and sediment sources of the region and interviewed the local Maasai shepherds to learn about present-day good and bad grazing sites. At the Olorgesailie site the rift valley floor is covered with flood trachytes; basalts only occur at Mt. Olorgesailie and farther east up the rift flank. The hominin site is located in lacustrine sediments at the southern edge of a playa that extends north and northwest of Mt. Olorgesailie. The lakebeds are now tilted and eroded by motion on two north-south striking faults. The lake was trapped by basalt flows from Mt. Olorgesailie and was released by the fault motion leading to deep river incision and exposure of the site. To the west and the north steep fault scarps bound the playa forming a natural barrier for animals. Field observations and information from local shepherds suggest that the trachytes at the valley floor produce rather poor soils whereas the soils developed on lacustrine and alluvial sediments close to the hominin site are much more attractive grazing sites for present-day animals. This is supported by first results from soil analysis. With a lake in the past the Olorgesailie site represents an key example of how early hominins may have used strategic advance of the landscape. While steep fault scarps blocked the northern pathway, the southern lakeshore represented one of the few accessible places for animals to be suffiently provided with nutrients and thus, was an excellent location for hominins to stalemate and hunt down prey. Future studies will include additional sites in the central and northern Kenya rift.

  19. Phlogopite Thermometer Calibration and Use: Magmatic History and Processes in the Roman Potassic Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, A.; Rutherford, M.

    2003-12-01

    Previous investigations have shown that the partitioning of titanium between melt and phlogopite is temperature-dependent (e.g. Tronnes et al., 1985; Righter and Carmichael, 1996). For many compositions of the Roman Potassic Province, a Ti-in-phlogopite geothermometer is useful over a large crystallization interval and has the advantage of being independent of pressure. Righter and Carmichael (1996) present a single geothermometer of the form lnD TiO2 phl/liq = a/T + b where D is wt.% TiO2 in phlogopite/wt.% TiO2 in glass, T is in Kelvins, and a and b are constants. Our investigation indicates that titanium partitioning into phlogopite is lower in peralkaline melts than in metaluminous and peraluminous melts. These results are consistent with previous experiments which show that the activity coefficient of TiO2 is decreased in peralkaline melts (Hess, 1995). We have calibrated two new geothermometers. For peraluminous and metaluminous compositions: (1) ln D TiO2 phl/liq = 16200/T - 11.02; r2 = 0.85. This geothermometer was calibrated using data from our experiments on Agnano Monte Spina trachytes and the metaluminous and peraluminous data used by Righter and Carmichael. For peralkaline compositions: (2) lnD TiO2 phl/liq = 15180/T - 10.8; r2 = 0.90. This geothermometer was calibrated with our experimental data from 79 A.D. Vesuvius compositions and the data of Guo and Green (1990). The molar (Na2O+K2O)/Al2O3 ratios of these compositions are 1.0 and 1.3 respectively; we have not yet investigated higher degrees of peralkalinity. These geothermometers constrain the pre-eruption temperatures of materials from the Roman Potassic Province. Geothermometer (1) gives a temperature of 929oC for Layer B1 and 938oC for Layer D1 trachytes of Agnano Monte Spina. These temperatures agree with water-undersaturated (CO2-bearing) phase equilibria experiments on these compositions. The peralkaline geothermometer (2) gives a temperature of 857oC for the white pumice of the 79 A.D. Vesuvius eruption; this agrees with phase equilibria obtained from water-saturated experiments. For the gray pumice of 79 A.D. Vesuvius, we calculate a temperature of 924oC. This temperature is similar to that obtained from phase equilibria data if it is assumed that hornblende, sanidine, and leucite were not part of the pre-eruption phenocryst assemblage but instead were added during syn-eruptive mixing with phonolite. In contrast, the original geothermometer of Righter and Carmichael (1996) overestimated Vesuvius temperatures by 60-65o; phase equilibria experiments suggest that phlogopite had not even begun to crystallize at these temperatures. Thus our new calibrations are more accurate for a broader range of compositions.

  20. Geochemistry of Natural Components in the Near-Field Environment, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Z.E. Peterman; T.A. Oliver

    2006-06-19

    The natural near-field environment in and around the emplacement drifts of the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, includes the host rock, dust, seepage water, and pore water. The chemical compositions of these components have been analyzed to provide a basis for assessing possible chemical and mineralogical reactions that may occur in and around the emplacement drifts during the heating and cooling cycle. The crystal-poor rhyolite of the Topopah Spring Tuff of Miocene age with an average silica (SiO{sub 2}) content of 76 percent will host the proposed repository. Samples of the rhyolite are relatively uniform in chemical composition as shown by an average coefficient of variation (CV) of 8.6 percent for major elements. The major component of underground dust is comminuted tuff generated during construction of the tunnel. Average CVs for major elements of dust samples collected from the main tunnel (Exploratory Studies Facility, ESF) and a cross drift (Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block, ECRB) are 25 and 28 percent, respectively. This increased variability is due to a variable amount of dust derived from trachyte with SiO{sub 2} contents as low as 66 percent (from overlying crystal-rich members) and from surface dust with an even lower average SiO{sub 2} content of 60 percent (from the abundance of trachyte in outcrop and carbonate dust derived from nearby ranges). The composition of the water-soluble fraction of dust is of interest with regard to possible salt deliquescence on waste canisters. The nitrate-to-chloride (NO{sub 3}{sup -}/Cl{sup -}) ratio (weight) is used to assess the potential corrosive nature of the salts because an excess of NO{sub 3}{sup -} over Cl{sup -} may inhibit the formation of the more corrosive calcium chloride brines in deliquescing salts. The soluble fractions of dust samples typically have NO{sub 3}{sup -}/Cl{sup -} ratios between 1 and 10. About 30 samples of seepage into the south ramp of the ECRB have an average NO{sub 3}{sup -}/Cl{sup -} of 0.62. Pore water extracted from core samples of the repository host rock has lower NO{sub 3}{sup -}/Cl{sup -}-ratios with an average value of 0.28 and a range over two orders of magnitude. Of all the components of the natural system, pore water has the largest compositional variability with an average CV of 62 percent, and thus, is the most difficult to characterize. Because pore water is extracted from dry-drilled core, its solute content may have been increased by evaporation during drilling, handling, storage, and extraction by ultracentrifugation. Further, microbial activity in the core during storage may reduce the concentration of NO{sub 3}{sup -} thus decreasing the NO{sub 3}{sup -}/Cl{sup -} ratio. Therefore, the more dilute pore water samples might be considered the most representative of native pore water with NO{sub 3}{sup -}/Cl{sup -} ratios close to unity or greater.

  1. Some New Constraints On The Stratigraphic And Structural Setting Of The Soda Lake Geothermal Field, Churchill County, Nevada - McLACHLAN, Holly S. and FAULDS, James E., Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLachlan, H. S.

    2012-12-01

    Our research group is currently conducting a regional survey to identify favorable structural settings of producing and prospective geothermal fields in the Great Basin. The Soda Lake geothermal field - one of the oldest consistently producing fields in this study region - is located in west-central Nevada near the heart of the Carson Sink. Producing and prospective geothermal fields in the surrounding highlands are hosted in 1) fault termination zones (Desert Queen), 2) accommodation zones (Brady's Hot Springs) and 3) fault step-overs (Desert Peak). However, the structural setting is challenging to identify at the Soda Lake field, because it lies in the central part of a large basin with no nearby bedrock exposures. The well field at Soda Lake is centered ~3.5 km NNE of the Holocene Soda Lake maar, from which it takes its name. The geothermal field was identified serendipitously during the drilling of an irrigation survey well in the early 20th century. Modern exploratory drilling at the field began in the mid-1970s and has continued sporadically to the present. There are currently more than 28 500+ m wells at and near the production site. The exceptional drilling density at Soda Lake allows for comparatively reliable correlation of stratigraphy in the subsurface below the feature-poor Carson Sink. Stratigraphy in the Soda Lake geothermal area is relatively "layer cake" at the scale of the well field. Unconsolidated sediments extend more than 1000 m below surface. The upper few hundred meters are composed of fluvial and lacustrine sediments derived from Sierran batholith source rocks. The deeper basin fill derives from more proximal mafic to felsic Miocene volcanic rocks along the basin margins. At ~450-650 m depth, basin sediments are interrupted by a 5.11 Ma trachytic basalt of restricted lateral extent and variable thickness. Most wells intercept ~50-250 m of fine lacustrine sediments below this basalt body before intercepting the basin floor. Basin floor rocks consist of a thick (>1500 m) package of fine-grained altered basalts and interbedded sedimentary rocks. Within this package, in the central portion of the well field, a ~300-500 m thick marker of laminated siltstones + coarse-grained, porphyritic plagioclase basalt has been identified in cuttings. Variations in thickness within the marker suggest older faults with significant throw were primarily northwest striking. Large local variations in the thickness of the 5.11 Ma trachytic basalt body support this interpretation and indicate NW-striking faulting likely continued through ~5 Ma B.P. However, all evidence indicates near-surface (<1000 m depth) faults at the Soda Lake geothermal field strike NNE, perpendicular to the contemporary extension direction. Structural interpretation is in progress for the Soda Lake geothermal field. In conjunction with recently obtained 3D seismic and microgravity surveys, stratigraphic information obtained from cuttings broadly constrains the structural setting. These data may permit determination of the specific structural host environment and should allow for assessment of how the prevailing faults at the site correlate with regional scale trends.

  2. The crystallization of shoshonitic to peralkaline trachyphonolitic magmas in a H2O-Cl-F-rich environment at Ischia (Italy), with implications for the feeder system of the Campania Plain volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melluso, L.; Morra, V.; Guarino, V.; de'Gennaro, R.; Franciosi, L.; Grifa, C.

    2014-12-01

    Bulk-rock and mineralogical characterization of massive samples (lava flows, lava domes, scoria, spatter), chosen to be representative of different activity periods and of the whole known compositional range of Ischia island (Roman Magmatic Province, Campanian district) is reported in this paper. The rocks vary in composition from shoshonites to peralkaline trachyphonolites. Crystallization started with Al-rich chromite inclusions and their host magnesian olivine in shoshonites and latites, and ended with låvenite, rinkite, kochite, hiortdahlite, hainite, Mn-aenigmatite, britholite and Ti-Zr-rich aegirine in the groundmass of the peralkaline trachyphonolites. Removal of feldspar-bearing assemblages (with calcic-to-sodic plagioclase in shoshonites and latites, sodic sanidine and anorthoclase in trachytes and trachyphonolites) is established throughout the compositional range, and is accompanied by interaction between variably evolved magmas (with their differing phenocryst assemblage), mostly in mafic and intermediate compositions. This led to enrichment in Mn, alkalis, Zr, Nb, REE, Rb, Th, U, Cl and F, and depletion in Mg, Fe, V, Ca, Ba, Sr and Eu in the most evolved magmas. The Ischian rocks have a tendency to sodic affinity and by peculiar mineral compositions and compositional trends, which do not indicate extremely oxidizing conditions. The Ischian rocks thus differ from the Phlegrean Fields analogues and the ultrapotassic, more silica undersaturated rocks of Somma-Vesuvius. Overall, variations in the chemical compositions of the rocks and their trends imply unrelated feeding systems and thus are inconsistent with the hypothesis of a common magma reservoir beneath the main volcanic areas of the Campanian Plain.

  3. KAr chronology of the ultimate activity of piton des neiges volcano, reunion island, Indian ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillot, P.-Y.; Nativel, P.

    1982-07-01

    Potassium-argon measurements were made on 17 samples from the ultimate stage of activity of the Piton des Neiges volcano, which corresponds to a differentiated series with lavas varying from basalt to quartz trachyte. Samples were selected as a function of their stratigraphic position and their representativity of magmatic evolution. The technology used to date young volcanic rocks (Pleistocene) by KAr is described and discussed because of its reliability in the analysis of modern lavas and because of the agreement of the results with the available stratigraphic control. The data, together with those previously obtained by McDougall, yield ages ranging between 330,000 and 30,000 years, with two mainly effusive periods separated by a phase of instability of chiefly explosive volcanism around 190,000 to 150,000 years ago. A rough correlation between the chemical evolution of the lavas and time is established. The Kudo and Weil geothermometer, when cross-checked with Buddington and Lindsley's geothermometer, allows us to establish that the lavas of the two effusive periods correspond to two different depths of the magmatic chamber in the oceanic crust (17 and 10 km respectively). The phase of instability may correspond to a sudden variation in these magmatic conditions. The differentiated series, the ultimate stage of activity of the Piton des Neiges volcano (330,000 and 30,000 years), can be explained as the evolution of a magmatic body, isolated when the focus of basaltic eruption migrated southeast from Piton des Neiges to Piton de la Fournaise.

  4. Igneous Rocks of the East Pacific Rise: The alkali volcanic suite appear to be differentiated from a tholeiitic basalt extruded from the mantle.

    PubMed

    Engel, A E; Engel, C G

    1964-10-23

    The apical parts of large volcanoes along the East Pacific Rise (islands and seamounts) are encrusted with rocks of the alkali volcanic suite (alkali basalt, andesine- and oligoclase-andesite, and trachyte). In contrast, the more submerged parts of the Rise are largely composed of a tholeiitic basalt which has low concentrations of K, P, U, Th, Pb, and Ti. This tholeiitic basalt is either the predominant or the only magma generated in the earth's mantle under oceanic ridges and rises. It is at least 1000-fold more abundant than the alkali suite, which is probably derived from tholeiitic basalt by magmatic differentiation in and immediately below the larger volcanoes. Distinction of oceanic tholeiites from almost all continental tholeiites is possible on the simple basis of total potassium content, with the discontinuity at 0.3 to 0.5 percent K(2)O by weight. Oceanic tholeiites also are readily distinguished from some 19 out of 20 basalts of oceanic islands and seamount cappings by having less than 0.3 percent K(2)O by weight and more than 48 percent SiO(2). Deep drilling into oceanic volcanoes should, however, core basalts transitional between the oceanic tholeiites and the presumed derivative alkali basalts. The composition of the oceanic tholeiites suggests that the mantle under the East Pacific Rise contains less than 0.10 percent potassium oxide by weight; 0.1 part per million of uranium and 0.4 part of thorium; a potassium:rubidium ratio of about 1200 and a potassium: uranium ratio of about 10(4). PMID:17806796

  5. Rapid incision of the Colorado River in Glen Canyon - insights from channel profiles, local incision rates, and modeling of lithologic controls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cook, K.L.; Whipple, K.X.; Heimsath, A.M.; Hanks, T.C.

    2009-01-01

    The Colorado River system in southern Utah and northern Arizona is continuing to adjust to the baselevel fall responsible for the carving of the Grand Canyon. Estimates of bedrock incision rates in this area vary widely, hinting at the transient state of the Colorado and its tributaries. In conjunction with these data, we use longitudinal profiles of the Colorado and tributaries between Marble Canyon and Cataract Canyon to investigate the incision history of the Colorado in this region. We find that almost all of the tributaries in this region steepen as they enter the Colorado River. The consistent presence of oversteepened reaches with similar elevation drops in the lower section of these channels, and their coincidence within a corridor of high local relief along the Colorado, suggest that the tributaries are steepening in response to an episode of increased incision rate on the mainstem. This analysis makes testable predictions about spatial variations in incision rates; these predictions are consistent with existing rate estimates and can be used to guide further studies. We also present cosmogenic nuclide data from the Henry Mountains of southern Utah. We measured in situ 10Be concentrations on four gravel-covered strath surfaces elevated from 1 m to 110 m above Trachyte Creek. The surfaces yield exposure ages that range from approximately 2??5 ka to 267 ka and suggest incision rates that vary between 350 and 600 m/my. These incision rates are similar to other rates determined within the high-relief corridor. Available data thus support the interpretation that tributaries of the Colorado River upstream of the Grand Canyon are responding to a recent pulse of rapid incision on the Colorado. Numerical modeling of detachment-limited bedrock incision suggests that this incision pulse is likely related to the upstream-dipping lithologic boundary at the northern edge of the Kaibab upwarp. ?? 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Assimilation of ocean crust by hawaiitic and mugearitic magmas: an example from Eiao (Marquesas)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caroff, Martial; Guillou, Hervé; Lamiaux, Michaël; Maury, René C.; Guille, Gérard; Cotten, Joseph

    1999-02-01

    Three holes were drilled in the northern (Dominique), central (Sophie) and southern (Naore) parts of the volcanic shield of Eiao island in the Marquesas archipelago, French Polynesia. These were continuously cored with an excellent recovery and reached depths of 500 m (Sophie) and 800 m (Dominique and Naore). K-Ar dating indicates that the volcanic sequence penetrated was emplaced between 5.52±0.05 Ma and 4.95±0.04 Ma. Petrographic types include tholeiites, alkali basalts, picrobasalts, hawaiites, mugearites and trachytes. Intermediate lavas (hawaiites and mugearites) are fairly common. They occur within stratigraphic units denoted D1, D2, D3, S1, S2, S3, N1, and N2, respectively (D: Dominique; S: Sophie; N: Naore). The D3, S1 and N1 hawaiites and mugearites appear to be derived from fractional crystallization of parental alkali basalt magmas. The other groups are characterized by variable enrichments in Sr (D1, D2 and S3), P 2O 5 (D2), Th (S2 and N2) and light rare earth elements (D2) or by depletion in heavy rare earth elements (S2 and N2). We suggest that these trace element characteristics reflect open system differentiation processes which occurred during the building of Eiao volcanic shield. Two stages of assimilation coupled with fractional crystallization (AFC) are proposed. The calculated compositions of the two contaminants suggest that they were leucocratic materials located at different levels of the oceanic crust. Finally, a water-induced assimilation process is invoked to explain the origin of the S3 hawaiites: these lavas are enriched in Al 2O 3, Na 2O and Sr, inferred to reflect plagioclase breakdown within the Eiao plumbing system.

  7. The last 40 ka tephrostratigraphic record of Lake Ohrid, Albania and Macedonia: a very distal archive for ash dispersal from Italian volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, B.; Sulpizio, R.; Zanchetta, G.; Wulf, S.; Wessels, M.; Daut, G.; Nowaczyk, N.

    2008-10-01

    A 1075 cm long core (Lz1120) was recovered in the south-eastern part of the Lake Ohrid (Republics of Macedonia and Albania) and sampled for identification of tephra layers. Magnetic susceptibility investigations show rather high magnetic values throughout the core, with peaks unrelated to the occurrence of tephra layers but instead to the relative abundance of detrital magnetic minerals in the sediment. Naked-eye inspection of the core allowed us to identify of two tephra layers, at 896-897 cm and 1070-1075 cm. Laboratory inspection of the grain-size fraction > 125 μm allowed for the identification of a third cryptotephra at 310-315 cm. Major element analyses on glass shards of the tephra layers at 896-897 cm and 1070-1075 cm show a trachytic composition, and indicate a correlation with the regionally dispersed Y-3 and Y-5 tephra layers, dated at ca 30 and 39 cal ka BP. The cryptotephra at 310-315 cm has a mugearitic-benmoreitic composition, and was correlated with the FL eruption of Mt. Etna, dated at 3370 ± 70 cal yr BP. These ages are in agreement with five 14C AMS measurements carried out on plant remains and macrofossils from the lake sediments at different depths along the core. The recognition of distal tephra from Italian volcanoes allows us to link the Lake Ohrid succession to other archives located in the Mediterranean area and in eastern Europe. The benmoreitic-mugearitic tephra layer at 310-315 cm is the first recognition in the Balkan area of a distal ash deposit from a mid-intensity explosive eruption of Mt. Etna, as far as 600 km from the source.

  8. The Olorgesailie Drilling Project (ODP): a high-resolution drill core record from a hominin site in the East African Rift Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dommain, R.; Potts, R.; Behrensmeyer, A. K.; Deino, A. L.

    2014-12-01

    The East African rift valley contains an outstanding record of hominin fossils that document human evolution over the Plio-Pleistocene when the global and regional climate and the rift valley itself changed markedly. The sediments of fossil localities typically provide, however, only short time windows into past climatic and environmental conditions. Continuous, long-term terrestrial records are now becoming available through core drilling to help elucidate the paleoenvironmental context of human evolution. Here we present a 500,000 year long high-resolution drill core record obtained from a key fossil and archeological site - the Olorgesailie Basin in the southern Kenya Rift Valley, well known for its sequence of archeological and faunal sites for the past 1.2 million years. In 2012 two drill cores (54 and 166 m long) were collected in the Koora Plain just south of Mt. Olorgesailie as part of the Olorgesailie Drilling Project (ODP) to establish a detailed climate and ecological record associated with the last evidence of Homo erectus in Africa, the oldest transition of Acheulean to Middle Stone Age technology, and large mammal species turnover, all of which are documented in the Olorgesailie excavations. The cores were sampled at the National Lacustrine Core Facility. More than 140 samples of tephra and trachytic basement lavas have led to high-precision 40Ar/39Ar dating. The cores are being analyzed for a suite of paleoclimatic and paleoecological proxies such as diatoms, pollen, fungal spores, phytoliths, ostracodes, carbonate isotopes, leaf wax biomarkers, charcoal, and clay mineralogy. Sedimentological analyses, including lithological descriptions, microscopic smear slide analysis (242 samples), and grain-size analysis, reveal a highly variable sedimentary sequence of deep lake phases with laminated sediments, diatomites, shallow lake and near shore phases, fluvial deposits, paleosols, interspersed carbonate layers, and abundant volcanic ash deposits. Magnetic susceptibility indicates climatic variation potentially related to precessional cycles.

  9. Mineralogy, provenance, and diagenesis of a potassic basaltic sandstone on Mars: CheMin X-ray diffraction of the Windjana sample (Kimberley area, Gale Crater)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treiman, Allan H.; Bish, David L.; Vaniman, David T.; Chipera, Steve J.; Blake, David F.; Ming, Doug W.; Morris, Richard V.; Bristow, Thomas F.; Morrison, Shaunna M.; Baker, Michael B.; Rampe, Elizabeth B.; Downs, Robert T.; Filiberto, Justin; Glazner, Allen F.; Gellert, Ralf; Thompson, Lucy M.; Schmidt, Mariek E.; Le Deit, Laetitia; Wiens, Roger C.; McAdam, Amy C.; Achilles, Cherie N.; Edgett, Kenneth S.; Farmer, Jack D.; Fendrich, Kim V.; Grotzinger, John P.; Gupta, Sanjeev; Morookian, John Michael; Newcombe, Megan E.; Rice, Melissa S.; Spray, John G.; Stolper, Edward M.; Sumner, Dawn Y.; Vasavada, Ashwin R.; Yen, Albert S.

    2016-01-01

    The Windjana drill sample, a sandstone of the Dillinger member (Kimberley formation, Gale Crater, Mars), was analyzed by CheMin X-ray diffraction (XRD) in the MSL Curiosity rover. From Rietveld refinements of its XRD pattern, Windjana contains the following: sanidine (21% weight, ~Or95); augite (20%); magnetite (12%); pigeonite; olivine; plagioclase; amorphous and smectitic material (~25%); and percent levels of others including ilmenite, fluorapatite, and bassanite. From mass balance on the Alpha Proton X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) chemical analysis, the amorphous material is Fe rich with nearly no other cations—like ferrihydrite. The Windjana sample shows little alteration and was likely cemented by its magnetite and ferrihydrite. From ChemCam Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectrometer (LIBS) chemical analyses, Windjana is representative of the Dillinger and Mount Remarkable members of the Kimberley formation. LIBS data suggest that the Kimberley sediments include at least three chemical components. The most K-rich targets have 5.6% K2O, ~1.8 times that of Windjana, implying a sediment component with >40% sanidine, e.g., a trachyte. A second component is rich in mafic minerals, with little feldspar (like a shergottite). A third component is richer in plagioclase and in Na2O, and is likely to be basaltic. The K-rich sediment component is consistent with APXS and ChemCam observations of K-rich rocks elsewhere in Gale Crater. The source of this sediment component was likely volcanic. The presence of sediment from many igneous sources, in concert with Curiosity's identifications of other igneous materials (e.g., mugearite), implies that the northern rim of Gale Crater exposes a diverse igneous complex, at least as diverse as that found in similar-age terranes on Earth.

  10. Igneous rocks of the East Pacific Rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engel, A.E.J.; Engel, C.G.

    1964-01-01

    The apical parts of large volcanoes along the East Pacific Rise (islands and seamounts) are encrusted with rocks of the alkali volcanic suite (alkali basalt, andesine- and oligoclase-andesite, and trachyte). In contrast, the more submerged parts of the Rise are largely composed of a tholeiitic basalt which has low concentrations of K, P, U, Th, Pb, and Ti. This tholeiitic basalt is either the predominant or the only magma generated in the earth's mantle under oceanic ridges and rises. It is at least 1000-fold more abundant than the alkali suite, which is probably derived from tholeiitic basalt by magmatic differentiation in and immediately below the larger volcanoes. Distinction of oceanic tholeiites from almost all continental tholeiites is possible on the simple basis of total potassium content, with the discontinuity at 0.3 to 0.5 percent K2O by weight. Oceanic tholeiites also are readily distinguished from some 19 out of 20 basalts of oceanic islands and seamount cappings by having less than 0.3 percent K2O by weight and more than 48 percent SiO2. Deep drilling into oceanic volcanoes should, however, core basalts transitional between the oceanic tholeiites and the presumed derivative alkali basalts.The composition of the oceanic tholeiites suggests that the mantle under the East Pacific Rise contains less than 0.10 percent potassium oxide by weight; 0.1 part per million of uranium and 0.4 part of thorium; a potassium:rubidium ratio of about 1200 and a potassium: uranium ratio of about 104.

  11. Middle Miocene nepheline-bearing mafic and evolved alkaline igneous rocks at House Mountain, Arizona Transition Zone, north-central Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Wittke, J.; Holm, R.F.; Ranney, W.D.R. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    The Middle Miocene House Mountain shield volcano is located on the northern margin of the Arizona Transition Zone, about 7 km SW of Sedona, AZ. Deep erosion has exposed internal structural and stratigraphic relationships of the volcano. Mapping documents two igneous suites: (1) alkali basalt to trachyte and alkali-feldspar syenite, and (2) olivine melanephelinite, nepheline monzodiorite, nepheline monzosyenite and nepheline syenite. The rocks of the first suite occur as dikes and flows, which, with a thick pyroclastic section, are the principal units of the volcano. The melanephelinite is nonvesicular and intruded as a large irregular dike and several smaller dikes. The nepheline-bearing syenitic rocks, which are phaneritic with nepheline and clinopyroxene crystals up to 1 cm in diameter, occur as pods and sheets within the melanephelinite. Also within the melanephelinite are wispy leucocratic segregations, syenitic fracture-fillings, and ocelli. The largest phaneritic sheet is [approx]18 m thick; it displays crude subhorizontal compositional banding and vuggy surfaces. The latter indicate that the magmas were fluid-rich. Compositions intermediate between the melanephelinite and syenitic rocks have not been found. Although the syenitic rocks are coarse-grained, mapping indicates the they are near the summit of the volcano and were probably emplaced at a depth of less than 1 km, possibly of only a few hundred meters. The field relationships of the phaneritic rocks can be explained by ascent and coalescence of immiscible syenitic liquids within the melanephelinite dike. Calculated density contrasts between melanephelinite and syenitic liquids exceed 0.2 g/cm[sup 3].

  12. Recognition of Variants of A-type Rhyolite: a Comparison of the Snake River Plain and Trans-Pecos Texas Volcanic Provinces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, A. N.; Wolff, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    The SRP and the TPVP volcanic fields are known for high-grade rheomorphic ignimbrites that are often indistinguishable from lavas in outcrop, as well as extensive true silicic lavas [1, 2]. Both styles of emplacement are favored by high magmatic temperatures and low volatile contents compared to rhyolites that form 'conventional' non- to densely welded ignimbrites and areally restricted lava domes. Both areas are intraplate provinces; the SRP rocks are dominantly metaluminous to slightly peraluminous rhyolites that make up the dominant part of a bimodal association erupted over a continental hotspot. In contrast, TPVP rocks have alkaline affinities and include both trachytes and peralkaline rhyolites, erupted in a continental back-arc setting during a time of transition from lithospheric compression to extension [3]. Both plot as A- type rhyolites on geochemical discrimination diagrams despite strong compositional contrasts; the TPVP rocks exhibit relatively low Mg, Ca, Ba, and Sr at similar SiO2 levels while Fe and high field-strength elements are on average elevated compared to SR-type units. Here we propose a sub-class of A-type rhyolites, informally designated XA or extreme-A-type, exemplified by the Trans-Pecos lavas. Worldwide, XA and A-type rhyolites may also be found in close association. The compositional differences between XA and A-type rhyolites are ultimately due to generation from contrasting source materials under similar conditions of temperature and P(H2O). [1] Henry & Wolff (1992) Bull Volcanol 54, 171-186; [2] Branney et al. (2008) Bull Volcanol 70, 293-314; [3] Henry & Price (1984) JGR 89, 8765-8786.

  13. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of late Ediacaran (605-580 Ma) post-collisional alkaline rocks from the Katherina ring complex, south Sinai, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azer, M. K.; Obeid, M. A.; Ren, M.

    2014-10-01

    The Katherina ring complex (KRC) in the central part of south Sinai, Egypt, is a typical ring complex of late Neoproterozoic age (605-580 Ma). It was developed during the final tectono-magmatic stage of the north Arabian-Nubian Shield (ANS) during evolution of the Pan-African crust. The KRC includes Katherina volcanics, subvolcanic bodies, ring dykes and Katherina granitic pluton. The Katherina volcanics represent the earliest stage of the KRC, which was subsequently followed by emplacement of the subvolcanic bodies and ring dykes. The Katherina granitic pluton depicts as the latest evolution stage of the KRC that intruded all the early formed rock units in the concerned area. The Katherina volcanics are essentially composed of rhyolites, ignimbrite, volcanic breccia and tuffs. Mineralogically, the peralkaline rhyolites contain sodic amphiboles and aegirine. The rhyolite whole rock chemistry has acmite-normative character. The subvolcanic bodies of the KRC are represented by peralkaline microgranite and porphyritic quartz syenite. The ring dykes are semicircular in shape and consist mainly of quartz syenite, quartz trachyte and trachybasalt rock types. The Katherina subvolcanic rocks, volcanic rocks as well as the ring dykes are alkaline or/and peralkaline in nature. The alkaline granitic pluton forms the inner core of the KRC, including the high mountainous areas of G. Abbas Pasha, G. Bab, G. Katherina and G. Musa. These mountains are made up of alkaline syenogranite and alkali feldspar granite. The mantle signature recorded in the KRC indicates a juvenile ANS crust partial melting process for the generation of this system. The evolution of the KRC rocks is mainly dominated by crystal fractionation and crustal contamination. Mineral geothermometry points to the high temperature character of the KRC, up to 700-1100 °C.

  14. Explaining Tristan-Gough Plume Dynamics with New Age Data from Multiple Age-Progressive Seamount Sub-Tracks in the Young Walvis Ridge Guyot Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnur, S.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Class, C.; Sager, W. W.

    2014-12-01

    Together, the Etendeka flood basalt province of Namibia, the old Walvis Ridge and the young Walvis Ridge guyot province constitute a 130 Myr record of hotspot volcanism in the South Atlantic. Previous age-dating along the Walvis Ridge has revealed a strong linear age progression (~30 mm/a, Rohde et al. 2013) that is consistent with modeled relative spreading rates between the African and South American plates (~33 mm/a over the past 3 Myr, NUVEL-1 model). However, tracing the path of the African plate over the Tristan-Gough hotspot is more complicated in the guyot province because the seamounts do not form a single trail. Instead we see a region of diffuse volcanism with multiple discontinuous linear sub-tracks of seamounts and coeval volcanism at edifices located up to 400 km apart. We present here the results of 24 new 40Ar/39Ar step-heating experiments on groundmass and phenocryst separates from trachybasalts, trachy-andesites, trachytes and similarly evolved rocks dredged from the guyot province in 2012. The age-dating results represent nine seamounts in the southern half of the guyot province, most of which have never been studied before. We will combine the new ages with previous high-resolution ages from nearby seamounts to constrain plate motion rates recorded by each of the sub-tracks. We will compare the results with previously-established absolute plate motion models in order to shed light on the relationship between plume dynamics and the unusual spatial distribution of volcanism in this region.

  15. Digital mapping of accommodating structures and deformation associated with the emplacement of high level magmatic intrusions, Henry Mountains, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, P. I.; McCaffrey, K. J.; Holdsworth, R. E.; Davidson, J. P.; Murphy, P. J.; Jarvis, I.

    2012-12-01

    High-level sill and laccolith complexes form an important part of volcanic plumbing systems in which magma is emplaced as a series of sub-horizontal tabular sheet-like intrusions. Few studies of these intrusion types have looked in detail at the host rock, emplacement-related deformation structures, and how the additional volume of rock is accommodated within the crust, i.e. the 'space problem'. The aim of this study is to develop an understanding of the stages of emplacement (style of emplacement versus style of host rock deformation) and the internal textural evolution of Tertiary sills and laccoliths in the Henry Mountains, whilst also attempting to resolve the 'space problem'. Conventional field mapping, outcrop studies and detailed data collection of deformation structures has been combined with digital mapping using FieldMove™ and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) in order to enable 3D modelling of the intrusive bodies and emplacement-related host rock deformation. Kinematic and geometrical studies of emplacement-related structures in the host rocks are supplemented by micro-scale textural and geochemical studies of deformed host rocks, plagioclase feldspar and amphibole phenocryst populations within the intrusions, and the intrusion-host rock contact zone. Fabric studies recognise micro-structural fabrics (associated with accommodating structures) from magmatic fabrics (associated with magma flow). Crystal size distribution (CSD) studies help constrain the crystal:molten rock ratio and mechanical properties of the intruding magma, in addition to helping identify individual magma pulses. Fieldwork to date has focused on two satellite intrusions to Mt. Hilliers: Trachyte Mesa (the most distal intrusion; simple geometries); and Maiden Creek (closer to Mt. Hilliers; more complex geometries) both of which are emplaced into the Jurassic Entrada Formation sandstone. Preliminary results highlight the importance of faults, fractures, deformation bands and newly identified shear zones in accommodating the extra volume of magma at depth.

  16. Late Pleistocene zircon ages for intracaldera domes at Gölcük (Isparta, Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Axel K.; Danišík, Martin; Siebel, Wolfgang; Elitok, Ömer; Chang, Yu-Wei; Shen, Chuan-Chou

    2014-10-01

    Pleistocene to Quaternary volcanism in the Isparta region (SW Anatolia, Turkey) comprises potassic lavas and pyroclastic deposits, which are largely centered around Gölcük caldera. Trachytic intracaldera lava domes represent the latest eruptive event at Gölcük, and their eruption age is crucial for defining a minimum age for the preceding caldera-forming explosive eruption. Here, we present combined U-Th and (U-Th)/He zircon geochronological data for two intracaldera lava domes constraining their crystallization and eruption ages, respectively. U-Th zircon crystallization ages peak between ca. 15 and 25 ka. In rare instances U-Th zircon crystallization ages date back to ca. 59 and 136 ka. U-Th zircon crystallization ages also permit (U-Th)/He eruption ages from the same crystals to be individually corrected for uranium series decay chain disequilibrium, which is mainly due to the deficit of the intermediate daughter 230Th in zircon. Average disequilibrium-corrected (U-Th)/He zircon ages are 14.1 ± 0.5 and 12.9 ± 0.4 ka (1σ). These ages are indistinguishable within analytical uncertainties suggesting that both lavas erupted quasi simultaneously. This contradicts published K-Ar ages that suggest an extended hiatus from ca. 52 to 24 ka between intracaldera dome eruptions. Evidence for protracted zircon crystallization over several thousands of years prior to eruption indicates the presence of a long-lived magma reservoir underneath Gölcük caldera. Implications of the revised eruptive geochronology presented here include younger ages for the latest effusive eruptions at Gölcük, and potentially also a more recent explosive eruption than previously assumed.

  17. The Deccan tholeiite lavas and dykes of Ghatkopar-Powai area, Mumbai, Panvel flexure zone: Geochemistry, stratigraphic status, and tectonic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Hetu C.; Zellmer, Georg F.; Demonterova, Elena I.; Ivanov, Alexei V.; Kumar, Rohit; Patel, Rakesh Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Mumbai City, situated on the western Indian coast, is well known for exposures of late-stage Deccan pillow basalts and spilites, pyroclastic rocks, rhyolite lavas, and trachyte intrusions. These rock units, and a little-studied sequence of tholeiitic flows and dykes in the eastern part of Mumbai City, constitute the west-dipping limb of a regional tectonic structure called the Panvel flexure. Here we present field, petrographic, major and trace element and Sr-Nd isotopic data on these tholeiitic flows and dykes, best exposed in the Ghatkopar-Powai area. The flows closely resemble the Mahabaleshwar Formation of the thick Western Ghats sequence to the east, in Sr-Nd isotopic ratios and multielement patterns, but have other geochemical characteristics (e.g., incompatible trace element ratios) unlike the Mahabaleshwar or any other Formation. The flows may have originated from a nearby eruptive center, possibly offshore of Mumbai. Two dykes resemble the Ambenali Formation of the Western Ghats in all geochemical characteristics, though they may not represent feeders of the Ambenali Formation lavas. Most dykes are distinct from any of the Western Ghats stratigraphic units. Some show partial (e.g., Sr-Nd isotopic) similarities to the Mahabaleshwar Formation, and these include several dykes with unusual, concave-downward REE patterns suggesting residual amphibole and thus a lithospheric source. The flows and dykes are inferred to have undergone little or no contamination, by lower continental crust. Most dykes are almost vertical, suggesting emplacement after the formation of the Panvel flexure, and indicate considerable east-west lithospheric extension during this late but magmatically vigorous stage of Deccan volcanism.

  18. Chitinophaga jiangningensis sp. nov., a mineral-weathering bacterium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Cheng, Cheng; He, Lin-Yan; Huang, Zhi; Sheng, Xia-Fang

    2014-01-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped bacterial strain, JN53(T), was isolated from the surfaces of weathered rock (potassic trachyte) from Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, PR China. Strain JN53(T) grew optimally at 30 °C, pH 7.0. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain JN53(T) belonged to the genus Chitinophaga in the family Chitinophagaceae. It was most closely related to Chitinophaga terrae KP01(T) (97.3 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), Chitinophaga eiseniae YC6729(T) (96.3 %). Strain JN53(T) contained MK-7 as the major menaquinone and homospermidine as the major polyamine. The main fatty acids of strain JN53(T) were iso-C15 : 0, C16 : 1ω5c, C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c (summed feature 3), iso-C17 : 0 3-OH, C16 : 0, iso-C15 : 0 3-OH and C16 : 0 3-OH. The polar lipid profile contained phosphatidylethanolamine, unknown aminolipids and unknown lipids. The total DNA G+C content of strain JN53(T) was 49.7 mol%. The low level of DNA-DNA relatedness to other species of the genus Chitinophaga and the many phenotypic properties that distinguished strain JN53(T) from recognized species of this genus demonstrated that isolate JN53(T) should be classified as representing a novel species of the genus Chitinophaga, for which the name Chitinophaga jiangningensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is JN53(T) ( = CCTCC AB 2013166(T) = JCM 19354(T)). PMID:24052630

  19. Magmatic processes inferred from chemical composition, texture and crystal size distribution of the Heikongshan lavas in the Tengchong volcanic field, SW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hongmei; Xu, Jiandong; Lin, Chuanyong; Shi, Lanbin; Chen, Xiaode

    2012-09-01

    The products of volcanic eruption contain abundant information about the magmatic processes in a magma chamber. In this paper, we study the magmatic processes associated with the Heikongshan volcano in the Tengchong volcanic field (TVF), Yunnan Province of southwestern China, through chemical composition, texture and crystal size distribution (CSD) analysis of volcanic lavas. The Heikongshan lavas comprise five flow units associated with three different episodes of volcanic eruption since the middle Pleistocene. Bulk rock chemical analyses indicate that unit I is a basaltic trachyandesite, units II-IV are of trachyandesite, and unit V is composed of trachyte. The textures of these lavas can be further classified into three main groups accordingly, each represented by different phenocryst and groundmass assemblages, reflecting the changes of physical environment in the magma chamber. CSD analysis of plagioclase phenocrysts yields a mixture of CSD curves, some of which are nearly straight lines, while others are weakly concave-up. These concave-up CSD curves are consistent with magma mixing between host magma and early residual dacitic magma. In specifics, the CSD curve of large plagioclase phenocrysts (>1.6 mm) in unit I reflects the characteristic of early dacitic magma. Whereas, the CSD curves of small plagioclase phenocrysts (<1.6 mm) in units II-IV yield straight lines, indicating a relatively steady open system in which they formed. In contrast, influenced by the plagioclase crystals in early dacitic magma, the CSD curves of large plagioclase phenocrysts (>1.6 mm) in units II-IV deviated from their original trend and formed in concave-up shape. Finally, in the last episode when unit V formed, the magma temperature decreased, resulting in the formation of relatively large amount of small-sized plagioclase crystals. Such process is reflected in the CSD diagram by a relatively higher value of intercept and the steeper slope.

  20. Chitinophaga longshanensis sp. nov., a mineral-weathering bacterium isolated from weathered rock.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shan; Zhang, Wen-Bin; Sheng, Xia-Fang; He, Lin-Yan; Huang, Zhi

    2015-02-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, yellow-pigmented, non-motile, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped bacterial strain, Z29(T), was isolated from the surface of weathered rock (potassic trachyte) from Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, PR China. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences suggested that strain Z29(T) belongs to the genus Chitinophaga in the family Chitinophagaceae. Levels of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity between strain Z29(T) and the type strains of recognized species of the genus Chitinophaga ranged from 92.7 to 98.2 %. The main fatty acids of strain Z29(T) were iso-C15 : 0, C16 : 1ω5c and iso-C17 : 0 3-OH. It also contained menaquinone 7 (MK-7) as the respiratory quinone and homospermidine as the main polyamine. The polar lipid profile contained phosphatidylethanolamine, unknown aminolipids, unknown phospholipids and unknown lipids. The total DNA G+C content of strain Z29(T) was 51.3 mol%. Phenotypic properties and chemotaxonomic data supported the affiliation of strain Z29(T) with the genus Chitinophaga. The low level of DNA-DNA relatedness (ranging from 14.6 to 29.8 %) to the type strains of other species of the genus Chitinophaga and differential phenotypic properties demonstrated that strain Z29(T) represents a novel species of the genus Chitinophaga, for which the name Chitinophaga longshanensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is Z29(T) ( = CCTCC AB 2014066(T) = LMG 28237(T)). PMID:25376849

  1. Overview of Geothermal Development at Olkaria in Kenya

    SciTech Connect

    Svanbjornsson, Andres; Matthiasson, Jonas; Frimannsson, Hreinn; Arnorsson, Stefan; Rjornsson, Sveinbjorn; Stefansson, Valqarour; Samundsson, Kristjan

    1983-12-15

    The Olkaria geothermal field has been under continuous development since 1970. A feasibility study, completed in 1976, after six wells had been drilled and tested, indicated that development of the Olkaria field was feasible. The feasibility study was followed by production drilling and the construction of three 15 MW generating units. The first unit was brought on stream in July 1981, the second in December, 1982, and the third is scheduled to be completed in early 1985. The current output of 19 productive wells is equivalent to 46 MWe. Distribution of fumaroles and resistivity surveys indicate an areal extent of some 80 km{sup 2} for the Olkaria geothermal field. Gas chemistry of fumaroles indicates comparable underground temperatures over the whole field, 200-250{degrees}C. The capacity of the resource has been estimated to be 500-1000 MW electric for a production period of 25 years. Most of the drilling has been confined to a small part of the geothermal field. Here maximum recorded downhole temperature is 339{degrees}C and temperatures follow the boiling point curve with depth. A thin steam zone at 240{degrees}C is observed in the top of the reservoir at approximately 600-700 m depth. The reservoir fluid is dilute, of the sodium chloride type, contains chloride in the range of 200-700 ppm. The reservoir rocks consist of a sequence of near horizontal lavas and tuffs of trachytic composition, but basaltic andesites have also beenidentified. The drilled rocks at Olkaria are of relatively low permeability, the average yield of wells being equivalent to about 2.5 MWe. Exploratory drilling is presently in porgress in the Olkaria field, the aim being to locate new production areas withing the field. Three holes have been completed and the forth and last hole under the present plan is being drilled.

  2. Stratigraphy, age and environments of the late Miocene Mpesida Beds, Tugen Hills, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kingston, John D; Fine Jacobs, Bonnie; Hill, Andrew; Deino, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Interpretations of faunal assemblages from the late Miocene Mpesida Beds in the Tugen Hills of the Central Kenyan Rift Valley have figured prominently in discussions of faunal turnover and establishment of the modern East African communities. These faunal changes have important implications for the divergence of the human lineage from the African apes ca. 8-5 Ma. While fossil material recovered from the Mpesida Beds has traditionally been analyzed collectively, accumulating evidence indicates that Mpesida facies span the 7-6 Ma interval and are scattered more than 25 km along the eastern flanks of the Tugen Hills. Stratigraphic distinctions between Mpesida facies and younger sediments in the sequence, such as the Lukeino Formation, are not yet fully resolved, further complicating temporal assessments and stratigraphic context of Mpesida facies. These issues are discussed with specific reference to exposures of Mpesida facies at Rurmoch, where large fossil tree fragments were swept up in an ancient ash flow. Preserved anatomical features of the fossil wood as well as estimated tree heights suggest a wet, lowland rainforest in this portion of the rift valley. Stable isotopic analyses of fossil enamel and paleosol components indicate the presence of more open habitats locally. Overlying air-fall tuffs and epiclastic debris, possibly associated with the ash flow, have yielded an assemblage of vertebrate fossils including two teeth belonging to one of the earliest colombines of typical body size known from Africa, after the rather small Microcolobus. Single-crystal, laser-fusion,(40)Ar/(39)Ar dates from a capping trachyte flow as well as tuffs just below the lava contact indicate an age of greater than 6.37 Ma for the fossil material. PMID:11795970

  3. Large cutting tools in the Danjiangkou Reservoir Region, central China.

    PubMed

    Kuman, Kathleen; Li, Chaorong; Li, Hao

    2014-11-01

    Handaxe-bearing sites in China are currently known to occur in a number of alluvial basins, the best known being Dingcun, Bose and Luonan. Bose in the south and Luonan in central China on the northern margin of the Qinling Mountains are most familiar to English-speaking researchers. Here we document the Danjiangkou Reservoir Region (DRR) as another major area for large cutting tools (LCTs), located in central China on the southeastern edge of the Qinling Mountains. Large cutting tools are preserved in three terraces of the Han and Dan Rivers in Hubei and Henan Provinces, with dates from ca. 0.8 Ma (millions of years ago) (Terrace 4) to the first half of the Middle Pleistocene (Terrace 3), and possibly to the Late Pleistocene (Terrace 2). This paper reports on LCTs discovered in Terraces 3 and 2, with a majority from the older terrace (and one specimen from Terrace 4). Regional environments during the Middle Pleistocene were relatively warm, humid and stable. Despite the poor quality of raw materials (predominantly quartz phyllite and trachyte for the LCTs), good examples of both handaxes and cleavers are present, plus two types of picks. The LCT technology is compared and contrasted with other Asian industries and with the Acheulean. Overall the DRR LCTs show both technological and morphological similarities with Acheulean LCTs, with some differences that are mainly attributed to raw material properties, subsistence ecology, and 'cultural drift.' The DRR LCTs expand the range of morphological variability of the East Asian material and highlight the need for greater reliance on technological analysis and raw material evaluation for best comparison of Chinese assemblages with the Acheulean tradition. PMID:25223718

  4. Geological and 40Ar/39Ar age constraints on late-stage Deccan rhyolitic volcanism, inter-volcanic sedimentation, and the Panvel flexure from the Dongri area, Mumbai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Hetu C.; Pande, Kanchan

    2014-04-01

    Post-K-Pg Boundary Deccan magmatism is well known from the Mumbai area in the Panvel flexure zone. Represented by the Salsette Subgroup, it shows characters atypical of much of the Deccan Traps, including rhyolite lavas and tuffs, mafic tuffs and breccias, spilitic pillow basalts, and "intertrappean" sedimentary or volcanosedimentary deposits, with mafic intrusions as well as trachyte intrusions containing basaltic enclaves. The intertrappean deposits have been interpreted as formed in shallow marine or lagoonal environments in small fault-bounded basins due to syn-volcanic subsidence. We report a previously unknown sedimentary deposit underlying the Dongri rhyolite flow from the upper part of the Salsette Subgroup, with a westerly tectonic dip due to the Panvel flexure. We have obtained concordant 40Ar/39Ar ages of 62.6 ± 0.6 Ma (2σ) and 62.9 ± 0.2 Ma (2σ) for samples taken from two separate outcrops of this rhyolite. The results are significant in showing that (i) Danian inter-volcanic sedimentary deposits formed throughout Mumbai, (ii) the rock units are consistent with the stratigraphy postulated earlier for Mumbai, (iii) shale fragments known in some Dongri tuffs were likely derived from the sedimentary deposit under the Dongri rhyolite, (iv) the total duration of extrusive and intrusive Deccan magmatism was at least 8-9 million years, and (v) Panvel flexure formed, or continued to form, after 63 Ma, possibly even 62 Ma, and could not have formed by 65-64 Ma as concluded in a recent study.

  5. Variable Sources and Differentiation of Lavas from the Copahue-Caviahue Eruptive Complex, Neuquen Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, E.; Ort, M. H.

    2012-12-01

    Caldera collapse (˜180 km2) associated with a large Pliocene pyroclastic eruption and subsequent glacial erosion exposed an extensive and complex cross-section of pre-caldera volcanic history (at least 5 My) at the Copahue-Caviahue Eruptive Center (CCEC) in the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ) of Argentina. Lava flows in wall exposures range from olivine-rich basaltic andesite to trachyte, are typically horizontal, vary in abundance and thickness at different wall exposures, and rarely correlate with flows in adjacent sections, although some lava and pyroclastic deposits from adjacent sections are similar in petrography, mineral assemblage, and geochemistry. Bulk-rock geochemical and isotopic data indicate at least two distinct primary melt types contributed to pre-caldera CCEC volcanism, and their differentiates produced a high-K and a low-K series. Incompatible element and isotope systematics suggest they are not related by differentiation of a common parental melt, and less-evolved examples of both types occur throughout the pre-caldera stratigraphic section, suggesting long-lived recharge of the local system by variably-sourced magmas. Petrographic and mineral chemistry evidence indicates that mixing of dissimilar magma types produced compositionally intermediate magmas. The location of the CCEC, rear of the volcanic front (VF), yet trenchward of regional backarc basin (BAB) volcanism, is reflected by the composition of CCEC lavas, which are transitional between local VF and BAB types. Thus, contrasting low- and high-K CCEC magmas in the SVZ rear-arc may reflect local focusing of VF-like (low-K) and BAB-like (high-K) melts.

  6. Chitinophaga qingshengii sp. nov., isolated from weathered rock surface.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheng; Wang, Qi; He, Lin-Yan; Huang, Zhi; Sheng, Xia-Fang

    2015-01-01

    A novel mineral-weathering bacterium was isolated from weathered rock (potassic trachyte) surfaces collected from Nanjing (Jiangsu, PR China). Cells of strain JN246(T) were Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped and non-motile. Strain JN246(T) was aerobic, catalase- and oxidase-positive, and grew optimally at 28 °C and pH 7.0. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain JN246(T) belonged to the genus Chitinophaga and the closest phylogenetic relatives were Chitinophaga eiseniae YC6729(T) (98.5% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), Chitinophaga terrae KP01(T) (96.8%), and Chitinophaga jiangningensis JN53(T) (96.3 %). The major respiratory quinone was MK-7 and the major polyamine was homospermidine. The major fatty acids were iso-C15:0, C16:1ω5c, C16:0 and iso-C17:0 3-OH. The polar lipid profile of strain JN246(T) consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine, unknown aminolipids and unknown lipids. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain JN246(T) was 48.8 mol%. Based on the low level of DNA-DNA relatedness of strain JN246(T) (ranging from 22.6% to 42.4%) to the type strains of other species of the genus Chitinophaga and unique phenotypic characteristics, strain JN246(T) represents a novel species of the genus Chitinophaga, for which the name Chitinophaga qingshengii sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is JN246(T) ( = CCTCC AB 2014201(T) = JCM 30026(T)). PMID:25342110

  7. Volcanic stratigraphy of the Barrel Springs--Wild Cherry Formations, Davis Mountains, Trans-Pecos Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, D.F. . Dept. Geology); Henry, C.D. . Bureau of Economic Geology); Kunk, M.J. )

    1993-02-01

    Detailed mapping, stratigraphy, [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar ages, and geochemistry allow, for the first time, a coherent volcanic history of the Barrel Springs--Wild Cherry (BS-WC) units, the most widespread of the Davis Mountains volcanic field (DMVF). These units erupted dominantly from the [approximately] 20 km-diameter Paradise Mountain caldera (PMC), in the west-central DMVF, where thick, locally silicified and kaolinized intracaldera tuffs and interbedded lavas were resurgently domed by an 8 x 5-km-diameter syenitic intrusion. BS-WC units, all rhyolites, consist dominantly of a lower, moderately porphyritic ash-flow tuff; a petrographically similar, middle ash-flow tuff; and an upper group of voluminous, abundantly porphyritic lavas. The lower ash-flow tuff is strongly rheomorphic throughout its occurrence. The middle ash-flow is also rheomorphic in thick outcrops near the PMC but not in thin ([<=]10m), distal outcrops. These three units are interbedded with lavas lithologically similar to the tuffs near the PMC and with volcaniclastic sedimentary rocks in more distal area. The two ash-flow tuffs are separated by strongly porphyritic trachyte lavas of the Mount Locke Formation in the vicinity of the PMC. Sources and extents of individual flows of the upper lavas have not been positively identified. [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar ages of alkali feldspar phenocrysts from thirteen samples constrain most BS-WC to a 300 ka span. The lower tuff erupted about 35.6 Ma. The middle tuff and part of the voluminous lava package erupted at 35.3 Ma. Ages of two lavas are 35.1 Ma, which suggests prolonged eruption. Correlations based on lithology and age relations are supplemented by trace element and mineral studies that confirm close geochemical affinities.

  8. An Initial Report of Research Into the Identification of Lava Flows at the Broken Top and North Crater Cinder Cones in the Craters of the Moon Lava Field by Their Chemical and Petrographic Composition (the Great Rift of Idaho, Snake River Plain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lendyel, P.; Koronovsky, N.

    2013-12-01

    Craters of the Moon lava field was formed during the Great Rift of Idaho volcanic activity for more than 15 Ka. There are still unsolved questions about chemical and petrographic compositions of lava flows inside the Craters of the Moon lava field, their relative and absolute ages, and depths of their magma generation chambers. The research undertaken by the author is based on results of field work, petrographic and microprobe analysis of lava samples, and published materials on the Great Rift and adjacent territories. The chemical and petrographic composition of North Crater and Broken Top cinder cones and lava flows, and the South Highway and Blue Dragon lava flows was analyzed. The North Crater lava flow and cinder cone mainly consist of trachybasalts and basaltic trachyandesite. The South Highway lava flow can be divided into three groups of flow and cinder, which are 1) dacite-trachydacite-trachyte; 2) basalt-trachybasalt, and 3) andesite-trachyandesite. The main lava flow of Broken Top is composed of trachybasalt and basaltic trachyandesite. The cinder cone of Broken Top consists of basaltic andesite and basaltic trachyandesite. It is shown that the chemical composition of glass, olivine and the spinel group minerals is unique in each lava flow or cinder cone, which serves as a tool to identify each lava flow. Depths of magma generation were estimated for North Crater, South Highway, Broken Top and Blue Dragon lava flows. It was determined that during the evolution of volcanic activity of the Great Rift the depth of magma generation has decreased. This is explained by the decompression which took place as the Great Rift stretched, allowing the magma chamber to rise closer to the surface. This can be observed in the eruptive and non-eruptive fissures that run parallel to the rift.

  9. Phonolites and peralkaline rhyolites from a single magma source in the mantle : A new look at some Black Hills rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchner, J.G. . Dept. of Geography-Geology)

    1993-03-01

    A re-evaluation of existing data from the Deer Mountain-Terry Peak-Sugarloaf Mountain area of the Black Hills, plus some new data, suggests the real possibility that both silica-undersaturated and silica-oversaturated alkaline-peralkaline rocks evolved from the same mantle-derived parent magma. Mineralogically, aegirine rhyolites, phonolites, a minette and the mantle are linked by an association of Mg-rich olivine-phlogopite structures, zenocrystic phlogopite and diopside-cored pyroxene phenocrysts. Trends of silica vs. major elements, trace elements (V,Sc,Ni) and MgO/FeOt are continuous and preclude being fortuitous. Peralkalinity also increases with silica in a well-defined trend. Increasing ferric oxide to total iron oxide indicates increasing oxygen fugacity with silica saturation. A mantle origin for the phonolites is supported by Sr-isotope data of Beintema (1986) and Beintema and Montgomery (1986). Higher Sr-isotope ratios for the aegirine rhyolites, suggesting a lower crustal origin, actually may result from magmatic processes, as shown by others for ocean island basalt-phonolite-comendite associations. Early fractionation of mafic phases drives trends away from the Ne-minimum on the residua diagram, indicating that magma evolution took place above residua temperatures, thus avoiding the thermal divide. Later fractionation of alkali feldspars accounts for variation in the aegirine rhyolites. Rising alkalies and oxygen explain variations in peralkalinity and ferric iron content. Pressure-dependent immiscibility possibly may be the cause of a silica gap in rock types, as rocks with low quartz contents are not found, except as phaneritic inclusions. A model is suggested in which either a fractionating minette or trachyte magma could yield the series of rocks under study.

  10. Post 19 ka B.P. eruptive history of Ulleung Island, Korea, inferred from an intra-caldera pyroclastic sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, G. B.; Cronin, S. J.; Yoon, W. S.; Sohn, Y. K.

    2014-04-01

    Ulleung Island is a Quaternary volcanic island located in the mid-western part of the East Sea (Sea of Japan) back-arc basin, which has erupted from the Pliocene until the late Holocene. This study focuses on reconstructing the latest eruptive history of the island by describing the sedimentological and stratigraphic characteristics of the most recent, trachytic/phonolitic pyroclastic sequence, named the Nari Tephra Formation. This formation is preserved as a succession of unwelded pyroclastic and epiclastic deposits within an embayed margin of the Nari Caldera. The embayment acted as a topographic trap for proximal pyroclastic deposits, and contains a complete record of the past 19,000 years of eruption history. The formation includes evidence for five separate eruptive episodes (Member N-1 to N-5), with intervening weathered and/or soil horizons indicating hundreds to thousands of years of repose between each eruption. Eruption styles and depositional mechanisms varied between and during individual episodes, reflecting changing dynamics of the magma plumbing system, magmatic gas coupling, and a variable role of external water. Extra-caldera sequences show that only a few of these eruptions generated sustained eruption columns or pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) large enough to overtop the caldera wall. Thus tephra sequences outside the caldera provide an underestimate of eruption frequency, and care needs to be taken in the interpretation and correlation to distal tephra sequences recognized in marine and terrestrial records. In addition, topographic effects of caldera structures should be considered for the assessment of PDC-related hazards in such moderately sized pyroclastic eruptions.

  11. On the anatomy of magma chamber and caldera collapse: The example of trachy-phonolitic explosive eruptions of the Roman Province (central Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palladino, Danilo M.; Gaeta, Mario; Giaccio, Biagio; Sottili, Gianluca

    2014-06-01

    Textural and compositional features of pyroclastic products erupted during caldera-forming events often reveal the tapping of different portions of variably zoned magma chambers due to changing geometries of the conduit/vent systems. Here we report on ultrapotassic trachytic-phonolitic explosive eruptions of the Roman Province (central Italy), which show remarkable changes of textural features and glass compositions in the juvenile material, even if the bulk chemical composition is essentially constant. In each example, the lower eruption sequence contains whitish, crystal-poor (leucite-free), highly vesicular pumice, emplaced by early Plinian fallout and/or pyroclastic currents; upsection, the eruption sequence contains black, low porphyritic (sanidine + leucite-bearing), moderately vesicular, scoria or spatter, emplaced by major pyroclastic flows (red tuff with black scoria) and associated co-ignimbrite, coarse lithic-rich breccias. This suggests a shift from a central feeder conduit, tapping the central part of the magma chamber, to a ring fracture vent system, tapping the peripheral portions of the magma chamber, during caldera collapse. Key features of these evacuating magma chambers are the thermal and volatile concentration (Xvol) gradients that produce the observed textural and compositional spectrum of trachy-phonolitic rock types. In particular, the degrees of freedom during the crystallization of these ultrapotassic magmas are increased by the variation of the leucite stability field at different PH2O conditions. Both leucite-free and leucite-bearing differentiated ultrapotassic rock types can be produced in the course of individual eruptions, as a result of pre-eruptive conditions in the feeder magma, with no need to invoke different differentiation suites related to mantle source heterogeneities of parental magmas.

  12. Rb-Sr and oxygen isotopic study of alkalic rocks from the Trans-Pecos magmatic province, Texas: Implications for the petrogenesis and hydrothermal alteration of continental alkalic rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D.D.; Malek, D.J.; Dahl, D.A. )

    1988-10-01

    Rb-Sr and O isotopic data for mid-Tertiary alkalic rocks from the Trans-Pecos magmatic province of west Texas demonstrate that hydrothermal alteration and fluid/rock (cation exchange) interactions have affected the isotope geochemistry of these rocks. Strontium and O isotopic data for late-stage minerals in an alkali basalt (hawaiite) still record two episodes of fluid/rock interactions. These data suggest that later meteoric fluids introduced Sr with a Cretaceous marine {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio into minerals with significant cation exchange capacity. Dilute HCl leaching experiments demonstrate the removal of this labile or exchangeable Sr from the alkali basalt. Rb-Sr isotopic data for the leached alkali basalt and handpicked calcite record a crystallization age of 42 Ma, consistent with K-Ar data for an unaltered alkali basalt (hawaiite) dike from the same area (42.6 {plus minus} 1.3 Ma). Leaching experiments on one phonolite suggest the Sr isotopic variability in unleached phonolite and nepheline trachyte samples may be attributed to Sr in secondary calcite and zeolites, which have an upper Cretaceous marine {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio. Rb-Sr isotopic data for leached phonolite and sanidine separate yield an age of 36.5 {plus minus} 0.8 Ma, within analytical uncertainty of a K-Ar biotite age (36.0 {plus minus} 1.1 Ma) of another phonolite. These leaching experiments demonstrate that the Rb-Sr isotopic systematics of hydrothermally-altered continental alkalic rocks may be significantly improved, providing more reliable geochronologic and isotopic tracer information necessary in constructing precise models of mantle sources.

  13. Kizilcaören ore-bearing complex with carbonatites (northwestern Anatolia, Turkey): Formation time and mineralogy of rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikiforov, A. V.; Öztürk, H.; Altuncu, S.; Lebedev, V. A.

    2014-02-01

    The results of isotope-geochronological and mineralogical studies of the rocks making up the Kizilcaören fluorite-barite-REE deposit, northwestern Anatolia, Turkey are discussed in the paper. The ore is a constituent of the subvolcanic complex localized in a large fault zone. The complex combines (from earlier to later rocks): (1) phonolite and trachyte stocks, (2) carbonatite and carbonate-silicate dikelike bodies; and (3) fluorite-barite-bastnaesite ore in the form of thick homogeneous veins and cement in breccia. The K-Ar dating of silicate igneous rocks and carbonatites shows that they were formed in the Chattian Age of the Oligocene 25-24 Ma ago. Mineralogical observations show that the ore is the youngest constituent in the rock complex. Supergene alteration deeply transformed ore-bearing rocks, in particular, resulting in leaching of primary minerals, presumably Ca-Mn-Fe carbonates, and in cementation of the residual bastnaesitefluorite framework by Fe and Mn hydroxides. Most of the studied rocks contain pyrochlore, LREE fluorocarbonates, Nb-bearing rutile, Fe-Mg micas, and K-feldspar. The genetic features of the deposit have been considered. In general, the ore-bearing rock complex is compared in the set of rocks and their mineralogy and geochemistry with deposits of the Gallinas Mountains in the United States, the Arshan and Khalyuta deposits in the western Transbaikalia region, and Mushugai-Khuduk deposit in Mongolia. The Kizilcaören deposit represents a variant of postmagmatic mineralization closely related to carbonatite magmatism associated with alkaline and subalkaline intermediate rocks.

  14. Geology and mineral deposits of the Hekimhan-Hasancelebi iron district, Turkey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, Herbert S.; Kendiro'glu, Zeki; Ozdemir; Celil, Bogaz; Resat; Onder, Osman; Gurel, Nafis

    1972-01-01

    An area of 210 sq km was investigated in the Hekimhan-Hasancelebi district. of central Turkey as part of the Maden Tetkik ve Arama Institusu(MTA)-U. S. Geological Survey(USGS) mineral exploration and training project to explore for iron deposits and to provide on-.the-job training for MTA geologists. The rocks of the area are Cretaceous and Tertiary sedimentary and volcanic rocks intruded by syenite and a serpentinized mafic and ultramafic complex and overlain unconformably by late .Tertiary basalt. The base of the section is a thick mafic volcanic-sedimentary sequence with diverse rocks that include conglomerate, sandstone, shale, tuff, limestone, and basalt. The upper part of the sequence is metasomatized near syenite contacts. The sequence is conformably overlain by trachyte and unconformably overlain by massive limestone. Overlying the limestone is a Tertiary sedimentary sequence which is dominantly conglomerate and sandstone with local limestone and volcanic rocks. This series is in turn overlain by olivine basalt. Mineral deposits are associated with the two types of intrusive rocks. Hematite-magnetite in the Karakuz mine area and in the Bahcedami-Hasancelebi area is related to the syenite, and siderite in the Deveci mine area is possibly related to the mafic-ultramafic rocks. Significant iron resources are found, only in the Karakuz and Deveci areas. In the Karakuz area disseminations, veins, and replacements consisting of hematite and magnetite are present. Most of the material is low grade. In the Deveci mine area a large deposit of siderite apparently is a replacement of carbonate beds adjacent to serpentinized igneous rock. The upper part of the siderite deposit is weathered and enriched to a mixture of iron and manganese oxides of direct shipping ore grade. Additional investigation of both the Karakuz and .Deveci mine areas is recommended including: 1. A detailed gravity and magnetic survey of part of the Karakuz area. 2. Diamond drilling at both the Karakuz and Deveci areas.

  15. Petrogenesis of peralkaline rhyolites in an intra-plate setting: Glass House Mountains, southeast Queensland, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Fengli; Niu, Yaoling; Regelous, Marcel; Zhu, Di-Cheng

    2015-02-01

    We report petrological and geochemical data on coeval trachybasalts, syenites with enclaves, trachytes, peralkaline rhyolites and peraluminous rhyolites from the Glass House Mountains-Maleny-Noosa area, southeast Queensland, Australia. This rock association and the unique characteristics of the peralkaline rhyolites offer convincing lines of evidence that the petrogenesis of the peralkaline rhyolites is a straightforward consequence of protracted fractional crystallization from basaltic melts of alkali-rich composition. Compared to the common peraluminous rhyolites elsewhere, the peralkaline rhyolites here are characterized by elevated abundances of most incompatible elements, especially the very high Nb (vs. Th) and Ta (vs. U), the very low Ba, Sr and Eu and the extremely high 87Sr/86Sr ratio. The high Nb and Ta are inherited from the parental alkali basaltic melts. The low Ba, Sr and Eu result from removal of plagioclase during the protracted fractional crystallization. These rocks altogether define a Rb-Sr isochron of ~ 28 Ma, which is similar to Ar-Ar age data on these rocks in the literature. The extremely high 87Sr/86Sr ratio of the peralkaline rhyolites (up to 1.88) is actually characteristic of peralkaline rhyolites because of extreme Sr (also Eu and Ba) depletion and thus the very high Rb/Sr ratio. That is, the Sr in these rocks is essentially radiogenic 87Sr accumulated from the 87Rb decay since the volcanism. We suggest that the petrogenesis of the peralkaline rhyolites from the Glass House Mountain area may be of general significance globally. The coeval peraluminous rhyolites apparently result from crustal anatexis in response to the basaltic magma underplating. The small "Daly Gap" exhibited in this rock association is anticipated during the protracted fractional crystallization from basaltic parent to the more evolved felsic varieties.

  16. Geology and geochemistry of the Mount Riley-Mount Cox pluton, Dona Ana County, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Zimbelman, D.R.; Siems, D.F.; Kilburn, J.E.; Hubert, A.E.

    1985-01-01

    The Mount Riley-Mount Cox area is comprised of a relatively homogeneous pluton of rhyodacite rising some 1600 feet above the La Mesa surface. The pluton, of apparent Tertiary age, intrudes Cretaceous sedimentary rocks and Tertiary ( ) latite and tuff. The rhyodacite is holocrystalline, light gray to pinkish gray, porphyritic to microporphyritic, and locally banded. Phenocrysts include hornblende, quartz, biotite, and calcite. The phenocrysts range in size from 0.2 to 2 mm and make up one to fifteen percent of the rock. The phenocrysts often display a glomerophyric texture within a trachytic groundmass. The groundmass ranges from cryptocrystalline to very fine grained and is composed of plagioclase, quartz, potassium feldspar, hornblende/biotite, and iron-oxide material. Locally, the rhyodacite displays millimeter-scale banding and a poikilitic texture consisting of quartz oikiocrysts and plagioclase chadocrysts. The rhyodacite averages 68.74%, SiO/sub 2/, 0.39% TiO/sub 2/, 16.40% Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 2.87% Fe/sub t/, 0.10% MnO, 1.21% MgO, 2.56% CaO, 3.79% Na/sub 2/O, and 3.96% K/sub 2/O. The rhyodacite is cut by veins and veinlets of brown to white calcite. The veins attain a maximum thickness of one meter, are locally bordered by calcite-cemented breccia zones, and locally include pyrite. The veins trend north or northwest, consistent with regional trends for the Rio Grande rift and the Texas Lineament, respectively. Sixty-five samples of rhyodacite, breccia, and vein were analyzed for 31 elements by emission-spectrographic methods. Trace-element data suggestive of hydrothermal mineralization was not recognized.

  17. Geochemical study of laterites of the Jamnagar district, Gujarat, India: Implications on parent rock, mineralogy and tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshram, R. R.; Randive, K. R.

    2011-11-01

    The laterite deposits occur in a linear stretch along the northern Arabian Sea coast in the Jamnagar and Porbandar districts of, Gujarat state, India. These deposits are characterised by presence of gibbsite, kaoline, calcite, quartz, anatase, natroalunite, goethite and hematite, and relicts of mafic minerals and plagioclase. On the basis of petro-mineralogy and geochemistry, these deposits are grouped as aluminous laterites (Fe 2O 3 - 1.45-3.84%, Av. 3.13, Al 2O 3 - 39.31-57.24, Av. 45.80) and laterites (Fe 2O 3 - 9.84-32.21, Av. 25.13%, Al 2O 3 - 34.74-49.59, Av. 41.27). The major, trace and REE characteristics of laterites indicate that these were formed in situ by the alteration of parent rocks of trachytic/andesitic composition, and the process of bauxitisation followed the path of destruction of kaolinite and deferruginisation. The correlation patterns of several trace and rare earth elements and their preferential enrichment have indicated that there is an influence of precursor rock on the distribution of trace elements. The Jamnagar laterite deposits occur as capping over the Deccan Trap basaltic lava flows and pyroclasic deposits. Lateritisation prevailed during Palaeocene age when India was separated from the Seychelles and passing over the equator. During this time climate, morphology and drainage conditions were favourable for lateritisation that result in the formation of Jamnagar and other laterite deposits within the Deccan Province. Flood basaltic provinces of Deccan, Columbia, North Australia and Hawaii appear good location for hosting laterite deposits due to their wide areal extent, small geological time span and uniform chemical composition. However, comparison of the major flood basaltic provinces of the world has indicated that their palaeopositions along with palaeoclimate, morphology and drainage are equally important factors for facilitating lateritisation.

  18. Fluoride content in drinking water supply in São Miguel volcanic island (Azores, Portugal).

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, S; Coutinho, R; Cruz, J V

    2012-08-15

    High fluoride contents in the water supply of the city of Ponta Delgada, located in the volcanic island of São Miguel (Azores, Portugal) have been reported. Dental fluorosis in São Miguel has been identified and described in several medical surveys. The water supply in Ponta Delgada consists entirely of groundwater. A study was carried out in order to characterize the natural F-pollution of a group of springs (30) and wells (3), that are associated to active central volcanoes of a trachytic nature. Two springs known for their high content in fluoride were sampled, both located in the central volcano of Furnas. The sampled waters are cold, ranging from slightly acidic to slightly alkaline (pH range 6.53-7.60), exhibiting a low electrical conductivity (springs range 87-502 μS/cm; wells range 237-1761 μS/cm), and are mainly from the Na-HCO(3), Na-HCO(3)-Cl and Na-Cl-HCO(3) water types. Results suggest two main trends of geochemical evolution: silicate weathering, enhanced by CO(2) dilution, and seawater spraying. Fluoride contents range between 0.17 mg/L and 2 mg/L, and no seasonal variations were detected. Results in the sources of the water supply system are lower than those of the Furnas volcano, which reach 5.09 mgF/L, demonstrating the effect of F-rich gaseous emanations in this area. Instead, the higher fluoride contents in the water supply are mainly due to silicate weathering in aquifers made of more evolved volcanic rocks. PMID:22705903

  19. Landform Variability in the Chaine Des Puys Tracing Multiple Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wyk de Vries, B.; Grosse, P.

    2014-12-01

    The Chaîne des Puys is a highly varied, type monogenetic field, and was acknowledged by 38th WH UNESCO Committee to contain Outstanding Universal Value. The Chaîne des Puys - Limagne Fault should be presented in 2016 for World Heritage Status. The 30 km long Chaîne des Puys contains ranges from simple basaltic scoria cones to complex, multicrater cones, and small simple domes to complicated trachytic edifices. There is also a range of phreatomagmatic landforms from tuff rings to maars and vulcanian to sub plinian deposits. There is a wide range of pahoehoe and aa lava types, that have flowed over different topographies. Here we take morphometrical data to analyse the variability of the edifices using a 10 m regional topographic DTM. The volcanoes form a broad continuum of morphological features, and height/widths of domes and cones overlap. Some edifices, are smooth and elliptical, even though they have erupted complex lava sequences, while others complex shapes, but are related to simple lava flows. There seems to be no easy correlation between cone morphology and eruption histories derived from lava fields and distal tephras. In the few cones where the interior is visible, the shape of the cone is seen to vary with changing eruption events. The final shape is a combination of changing activity, with the last events having the strongest morphometic signature. The broad variations in edifice, lava field, and deposit morphology are described and quantified, however it becomes clear from the few individual eruptions already studied, that to fully appreciate the range of monogenetic eruption scenarios presented by the Chaîne des Puys, much more detailed work is required. This is being made possible by new acquisitions of LiDAR imagery, new geophysical work, and the combination of excellent preservation and extensive outcrop that is partly the result the original geology and long term responsible land management by the local populace, regional park and local government.

  20. Zircon evidence for a ~200 k.y. supereruption-related thermal flare-up in the Miocene southern Black Mountains, western Arizona, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, Susanne M.; Miller, Calvin F.; Mundil, Roland; Ferguson, Charles A.; Wooden, Joseph L.

    2014-07-01

    The Silver Creek caldera (southern Black Mountains, western Arizona) is the source of the 18.8 Ma, >700 km3 Peach Spring Tuff (PST) supereruption, the largest eruption generated in the Colorado River Extensional Corridor (CREC) of the southwestern United States. Within and immediately surrounding the caldera is a sequence of volcanics and intrusions ranging in age from ~19 to 17 Ma. These units offer a record of magmatic processes prior to, during, and immediately following the PST eruption. To investigate the thermal evolution of the magmatic center that produced the PST, we applied a combination of Ti-in-zircon thermometry, zircon saturation thermometry, and high-precision U-Pb CA-TIMS zircon dating to representative pre- and post-supereruption volcanic and intrusive units from the caldera and its environs. Similar to intracaldera PST zircons, zircons from a pre-PST trachytic lava (19 Ma) and a post-PST caldera intrusion (18.8 Ma) yield exceptionally high-Ti concentrations (most >20 ppm, some up to nearly 60 ppm), corresponding to calculated temperatures that exceed 900 °C. In these units, Ti-in-zircon temperatures typically surpass zircon saturation temperatures (ZSTs), suggesting the entrainment of zircon that had grown in hotter environments within the magmatic system. Titanium concentrations in younger volcanic and intrusive units (~18.7-17.5 Ma) decline through time, corresponding to an average cooling rate of 10-3.5 °C/year. The ~200 k.y. thermal peak evident at Silver Creek caldera is spatially limited: elsewhere in the Miocene record of the northern CREC, Ti-in-zircon concentrations and ZSTs are much lower, suggesting that felsic magmas were generally substantially cooler.

  1. Thermal state and implications for eruptive styles of the intra-Plinian and climactic ignimbrites of the 4.6 ka Fogo A eruption sequence, São Miguel, Azores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pensa, A.; Giordano, G.; Cas, R. A. F.; Porreca, M.

    2015-11-01

    The 4.6 ka Fogo A Plinian eruption was a caldera-forming volcanic event on São Miguel Island, Azores. The deposit succession is very complex, composed of a thick trachytic Plinian fallout deposit interstratified with two intra-Plinian ignimbrites (named "pink ignimbrite" and "black ignimbrite" sequentially). The succession ends with a main ignimbrite (named "dark brown ignimbrite"), which represents the deposit of complete collapse of the eruption column and the end of the eruption. In this work, emplacement temperatures of the three ignimbrites are estimated by study of partial thermal remanent magnetization (pTRM) of lithic clasts. A total of 140 oriented lithic clasts were collected from 15 localities distributed along the northern and southern flanks of Fogo volcano. The paleomagnetic data reveal different emplacement temperatures and thermal histories that were experienced by each ignimbrite. The results indicate the presence of five different paleomagnetic behaviours that suggest emplacement temperatures of 350-400 °C for the first (pink) intra-Plinian ignimbrite, temperatures higher than 580-600 °C for the second (black) intra-Plinian ignimbrite and 250-370 °C for the last (dark brown) climactic ignimbrite. The thermal history experienced by each pyroclastic flow and its ignimbrite deposit was also assessed by the use of the magnetite-ilmenite geothermometer to determine the pre-eruptive magma temperature (estimated to be around 900 °C). We interpret the different emplacement temperatures of the Fogo A ignimbrites as being due to a combination of factors. These include (i) collapse from different heights of the eruption column and the resultant different amounts of air entrainment into the gas-particle mixture, (ii) variable content of lithic clasts and (iii) different types of juvenile clasts in the ignimbrites.

  2. Late Ordovician volcanism in Korea constrains the timing for breakup of Sino-Korean Craton from Gondwana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Deung-Lyong; Lee, Seung Ryeol; Koh, Hee Jae; Park, Jun-Beom; Armstrong, Richard; Choi, Duck K.

    2014-12-01

    In the early Paleozoic the Sino-Korean Craton (SKC) and South China Craton (SCC) were situated along the margin of east Gondwana. The SKC was connected to core Gondwana by an epeiric sea which was the site for deposition of lower Paleozoic sequences of SKC. The SKC and SCC may have drifted away from core Gondwana sometime during the mid-Paleozoic and would have been outboard microcontinents in the late Paleozoic, until they collided to form the East Asian continent in the Triassic. The breakup of SCC from Gondwana was suggested to have taken place at ∼380 Ma, while no reliable suggestions have hitherto been made for breakup of SKC from Gondwana. This study presents a convincing evidence for breakup of SKC from Gondwana, based on the recognition of Late Ordovician volcanism in Korea. New SHRIMP U-Pb zircon ages, 445.0 ± 3.7 Ma and 452.5 ± 3.2 Ma, are obtained from trachytic rocks of the Ongnyeobong Formation of Taebaeksan Basin in Korea which occupied the marginal part of the SKC in the early Paleozoic. This Late Ordovician volcanism along with previous records of Ordovician volcanic activities along the western margin of the SKC is interpreted indicating the development of an incipient oceanic ridge. The oceanic ridge uplifted the SKC including the epeiric sea, which subsequently resulted in terminating the early Paleozoic sedimentation of the epeiric sea. The paucity of lower Paleozoic volcanic rocks across much of the SKC however suggests that the oceanic ridge did not extend into the epeiric sea. Instead, spreading of oceanic ridge entailed dextral movement of associated transform faults, which may have played a major role in breakup of SKC from mainland Gondwana by the end of Ordovician.

  3. New constraints on the pyroclastic eruptive history of the Campanian volcanic Plain (Italy)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    de Vivo, B.; Rolandi, G.; Gans, P.B.; Calvert, A.; Bohrson, W.A.; Spera, F.J.; Belkin, H.E.

    2001-01-01

    The ???150 km3 (DRE) trachytic Campanian Ignimbrite, which is situated north-west of Naples, Italy, is one of the largest eruptions in the Mediterranean region in the last 200 ky. Despite centuries of investigation, the age and eruptive history of the Campanian Ignimbrite is still debated, as is the chronology of other significant volcanic events of the Campanian Plain within the last 200-300 ky. New 40Ar/39Ar geochronology defines the age of the Campanian Ignimbrite at 39.28 ?? 0.11 ka, about 2 ky older than the previous best estimate. Based on the distribution of the Campanian Ignimbrite and associated uppermost proximal lithic and polyclastic breccias, we suggest that the Campanian Ignimbrite magma was emitted from fissures activated along neotectonic Apennine faults rather than from ring fractures defining a Campi Flegrei caldera. Significantly, new volcanological, geochronological, and geochemical data distinguish previously unrecognized ignimbrite deposits in the Campanian Plain, accurately dated between 157 and 205 ka. These ages, coupled with a xenocrystic sanidine component >315 ka, extend the volcanic history of this region by over 200 ky. Recent work also identifies a pyroclastic deposit, dated at 18.0 ka, outside of the topographic Campi Flegrei basin, expanding the spatial distribution of post-Campanian Ignimbrite deposits. These new discoveries emphasize the importance of continued investigation of the ages, distribution, volumes, and eruption dynamics of volcanic events associated with the Campanian Plain. Such information is critical for accurate assessment of the volcanic hazards associated with potentially large-volume explosive eruptions in close proximity to the densely populated Neapolitan region.

  4. Magmatic (silicates/saline/sulfur-rich/CO2) immiscibility and zirconium and rare-earth element enrichment from alkaline magma chamber margins : Evidence from Ponza Island, Pontine Archipelago, Italy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belkin, H.E.; de Vivo, B.; Lima, A.; Torok, K.

    1996-01-01

    Fluid inclusions were measured from a feldspathoid-bearing syenite xenolith entrained in trachyte from Ponza, one of the islands of the Pontine Archipelago, located in the Gulf of Gaeta, Italy. The feldspathoid-bearing syenite consists mainly of potassium feldspar, clinopyroxene, amphibole, biotite, titanite, manganoan magnetite, apatite with minor nosean, Na-rich feldspar, pyrrhotite, and rare cheralite. Baddeleyite and zirkelite occur associated with manganoan magnetite. Detailed electron-microprobe analysis reveals enrichments in REE, Y, Nb, U, Th as well as Cl and F in appropriate phases. Fluid inclusions observed in potassium feldspar are either silicate-melt or aqueous inclusions. The aqueous inclusions can be further classified as. (1) one-phase vapor, (2) two-phase (V + L) inclusions, vapor-rich inclusions with a small amount of CO2 in most cases; homogenization of the inclusions always occurred in the vapor phase between 359 and 424??C, salinities vary from 2.9 to 8.5 wt. % NaCl equivalent; and. (3) three-phase and multiphase inclusions (hypersaline/sulfur-rich aqueous inclusions sometimes with up to 8 or more solid phases). Daughter minerals dissolve on heating before vapor/liquid homogenization. Standardless quantitative scanning electron microscope X-ray fluorescence analysis has tentatively identified the following chloride and sulfate daughter crystals; halite, sylvite, glauberite. arcanite, anhydrite, and thenardite. Melting of the daughter crystals occurs between 459 and 536??C (54 to 65 wt. % NaCI equivalent) whereas total homogenization is between 640 and 755??C. The occurrence of silicate-melt inclusions and high-temperature, solute-rich aqueous inclusions suggests that the druse or miarolitic texture of the xenolith is late-stage magmatic. The xenolith from Ponza represents a portion of the peripheral magma chamber wall that has recorded the magmatic/hydrothermal transition and the passage of high solute fluids enriched in chlorides, sulfur, and incompatible elements.

  5. Experimental melting of phlogopite-bearing mantle at 1 GPa: Implications for potassic magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condamine, Pierre; Médard, Etienne

    2014-07-01

    We have experimentally investigated the fluid-absent melting of a phlogopite peridotite at 1.0 GPa (1000-1300 °C) to understand the source of K2O- and SiO2-rich magmas that occur in continental, post-collisional and island arc settings. Using a new extraction technique specially developed for hydrous conditions combined with iterative sandwich experiments, we have determined the composition of low- to high-degree melts (Φ=1.4 to 24.2 wt.%) of metasomatized lherzolite and harzburgite sources. Due to small amounts of adsorbed water in the starting material, amphibole crystallized at the lowest investigated temperatures. Amphibole breaks down at 1050-1075 °C, while phlogopite-breakdown occurs at 1150-1200 °C. This last temperature is higher than the previously determined in a mantle assemblage, due to the presence of stabilizing F and Ti. Phlogopite-lherzolite melts incongruently according to the continuous reaction: 0.49 phlogopite + 0.56 orthopyroxene + 0.47 clinopyroxene + 0.05 spinel = 0.58 olivine + 1.00 melt. In the phlogopite-harzburgite, the reaction is: 0.70 phlogopite + 1.24 orthopyroxene + 0.05 spinel = 0.99 olivine + 1.00 melt. The K2O content of water-undersaturated melts in equilibrium with residual phlogopite is buffered, depending on the source fertility: from ∼3.9 wt.% in lherzolite to ∼6.7 wt.% in harzburgite. Primary melts are silica-saturated and evolve from trachyte to basaltic andesite (63.5-52.1 wt.% SiO2) with increasing temperature. Calculations indicate that such silica-rich melts can readily be extracted from their mantle source, due to their low viscosity. Our results confirm that potassic, silica-rich magmas described worldwide in post-collisional settings are generated by melting of a metasomatized phlogopite-bearing mantle in the spinel stability field.

  6. U-Th zircon dating of the great Millennium eruption of Changbaishan volcano: Evidence for rapid development of a catastrophic eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, H.; Fan, Q.; Zhang, H.

    2010-12-01

    The Changbaishan volcano extending across the border of northeast China and North Korea erupted about 100 km3 peralkaline rhyolites around 1000 AD. This Millennium eruption is one of the two largest explosive eruptions in the past 2000 years. We conducted uranium-thorium dating of zircons from the Changbaishan volcanic rocks. Zircon isochron ages are 9.2±1.2 ka. The rhyolitic magma chamber beneath Changbaishan was formed at 9.2 ka BP (before present) by closed-system fractionation of parental trachytic magmas, and explosively erupted at 1 ka BP. The magma storage time is about 8 ka, which is significantly short compared with typical residence times of large volume explosive eruptions (50-135 ka). This work demonstrates that peralkaline rhyolitic magmas from the Changbaishan volcano can develop into a catastrophic eruptive phase quite quickly. Based on titanium-in-zircon geothermometer and alkali feldspar-glass geothermometer, the rhyolitic magmas were formed at a relatively low temperature (~ 740±40 °C). The short magma storage time and low magma temperature may have helped the Changbaishan large volume rhyolitic magma escape crustal contamination. Changbaishan volcano is still an active volcano. There is a low seismic velocity zone below Changbaishan volcano extending from 10 to over 65 km depth. An electrical conductivity anomaly exists at 20 km depth below the volcano. Numerous hot springs and fumaroles are present on the volcano. Although short storage time of 8000 years does not necessarily mean that the next eruption is imminent, our present study does indicate that the still dangerous Changbaishan volcano is capable of rapidly producing catastrophic, explosive eruptions in the foreseeable future.

  7. Natural background groundwater composition in the Azores archipelago (Portugal): a hydrogeochemical study and threshold value determination.

    PubMed

    Cruz, J V; Andrade, C

    2015-07-01

    Groundwater discharges were sampled in selected springs from São Miguel (Furnas and Fogo trachytic central volcanoes) and Santa Maria islands (Azores, Portugal), in order to characterize natural background levels (NBLs) and proceed to the determination of threshold values (TVs). Besides being a key issue in order to fully assess the anthropogenic pressures, NBLs are also instrumental to derive TVs, therefore complying with requirements from the European Union Groundwater Directive. The composition of groundwater corresponds mainly to low mineralized Na-HCO3 to Na-Cl water types, the latter dominant in Santa Maria island, with a decreasing order of Na>Ca>Mg>K and Cl>HCO3>SO4>NO3 for cations and anion respectively. The majority of the samples are slightly acid to slightly alkaline (pH range of 5.45-7.43), and the electrical conductivity range between 180 and 1458 μS/cm. Groundwater composition is controlled by two major drivers, addition of sea salts and dissolution of silicate minerals. Results shown that TVs established along the present study are in general in the lower rank when compared to the range of values proposed by the several EU member states, with the main exception of NO3, reflecting the impact of agriculture activities over water quality in the Azores, and lower than the national ones. The comparison between the estimated NBL and TV with values derived with another dataset from the Azores, usually higher, depicts the effect of a larger and diverse number of groundwater sources over calculations. On the other hand, all samples which show a contribution from volcanic/hydrothermal systems were excluded from the dataset, which explains why the derived NBLs and TVs are lower comparing to other active volcanic areas, which is also a conservative approach on a subject that has regulatory implications. PMID:25813965

  8. Mineralogy, provenance, and diagenesis of a potassic basaltic sandstone on Mars: CheMin X‐ray diffraction of the Windjana sample (Kimberley area, Gale Crater)

    PubMed Central

    Bish, David L.; Vaniman, David T.; Chipera, Steve J.; Blake, David F.; Ming, Doug W.; Morris, Richard V.; Bristow, Thomas F.; Morrison, Shaunna M.; Baker, Michael B.; Rampe, Elizabeth B.; Downs, Robert T.; Filiberto, Justin; Glazner, Allen F.; Gellert, Ralf; Thompson, Lucy M.; Schmidt, Mariek E.; Le Deit, Laetitia; Wiens, Roger C.; McAdam, Amy C.; Achilles, Cherie N.; Edgett, Kenneth S.; Farmer, Jack D.; Fendrich, Kim V.; Grotzinger, John P.; Gupta, Sanjeev; Morookian, John Michael; Newcombe, Megan E.; Rice, Melissa S.; Spray, John G.; Stolper, Edward M.; Sumner, Dawn Y.; Vasavada, Ashwin R.; Yen, Albert S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Windjana drill sample, a sandstone of the Dillinger member (Kimberley formation, Gale Crater, Mars), was analyzed by CheMin X‐ray diffraction (XRD) in the MSL Curiosity rover. From Rietveld refinements of its XRD pattern, Windjana contains the following: sanidine (21% weight, ~Or95); augite (20%); magnetite (12%); pigeonite; olivine; plagioclase; amorphous and smectitic material (~25%); and percent levels of others including ilmenite, fluorapatite, and bassanite. From mass balance on the Alpha Proton X‐ray Spectrometer (APXS) chemical analysis, the amorphous material is Fe rich with nearly no other cations—like ferrihydrite. The Windjana sample shows little alteration and was likely cemented by its magnetite and ferrihydrite. From ChemCam Laser‐Induced Breakdown Spectrometer (LIBS) chemical analyses, Windjana is representative of the Dillinger and Mount Remarkable members of the Kimberley formation. LIBS data suggest that the Kimberley sediments include at least three chemical components. The most K‐rich targets have 5.6% K2O, ~1.8 times that of Windjana, implying a sediment component with >40% sanidine, e.g., a trachyte. A second component is rich in mafic minerals, with little feldspar (like a shergottite). A third component is richer in plagioclase and in Na2O, and is likely to be basaltic. The K‐rich sediment component is consistent with APXS and ChemCam observations of K‐rich rocks elsewhere in Gale Crater. The source of this sediment component was likely volcanic. The presence of sediment from many igneous sources, in concert with Curiosity's identifications of other igneous materials (e.g., mugearite), implies that the northern rim of Gale Crater exposes a diverse igneous complex, at least as diverse as that found in similar‐age terranes on Earth. PMID:27134806

  9. Preliminary Interpretation on the Role of Sub-Ice Topography on the Emplacement of Basaltic Pillow Lavas at Tennana Cone, Mount Edziza Volcanic Complex, British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hungerford, J. D.; Skilling, I.; Lloyd, A.; Edwards, B.

    2006-12-01

    The Mount Edziza Volcanic Complex (MEVC) is a northeast trending, 75km long volcanic edifice in Northern British Columbia. Erupting cyclically over the last 7.5 ma, volcanic centers along the complex have erupted alkalic basalts to rhyolites and a range of intermediate alkalic lavas. Several episodes of sub-ice or ice- contact volcanism are recorded since 2Ma (Souther, 1992), including a basaltic volcaniclastic ridge and associated lava flows at Tennena Cone on the western side of the MEVC. Tennena Cone (TC) is a 200m high sequence, dominated by pillow-fragment breccias, that overlies trachytic lava flows of the approximately 1Ma-old Ice Peak Formation (IPF). The IPF flows vary from 3 to 7 meters in thickness and form a cliff-forming stepped topography. Underlying the IPF lavas are glaciogenic sediments, of dominantly glaciofluvial origin. A widespread area of pillow and subaqueous lobate lava flows that originated from TC were emplaced on its western margin. These lavas overlie both the steep topography of the IPF, and distally, the glaciogenic sediments. The geomorphology and structures of the TC lava flows suggest that were initially emplaced as sheet-like pillow lavas with local ponding on a dissected plateau of underlying IPF lavas, but as they approached the steep sub-ice cliffs of IPF lavas (and thicker ice), the growth of pillow mounds at the flow termini occurred. However, at one locality the pillow lavas spilled over a gap in the sub-ice cliffs, and were then focused downstream within sub-ice sinuous drainage tunnels. We intend to conduct volatile analyses on samples of glass rinds of pillow lavas in both pillow mounds and sheets to constrain the thickness of overlying ice. Knowing ice thickness and reconstructing the paleo- topography, we can begin to interpret how ice flow dynamics may control the emplacement of sub-ice basaltic lavas.

  10. The age and petrogenesis of alkaline magmatism in the Ampasindava Peninsula and Nosy Be archipelago, northern Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucciniello, C.; Tucker, R. D.; Jourdan, F.; Melluso, L.; Morra, V.

    2016-04-01

    The Ampasindava alkaline province consists of a series of circular and elliptical intrusions, lava flows, dyke swarms and plugs of Cenozoic age emplaced into the Mesozoic-Cenozoic sedimentary rocks of the Antsiranana basin (NW Madagascar) and above the crystalline basement. The magmatism in the Ampasindava region is linked to a NW-SE trending extensional tectonic setting. New 40Ar/39Ar age determinations on feldspar separate of alkali granites and basaltic dykes yielded ages of 18.01 ± 0.36 Ma and 26 ± 7 Ma, respectively. Alkali basalts and basanites, nepheline syenites and phonolites, and silica saturated-to-oversaturated syenites, trachytes, granites and rhyolites are the main outcropping lithologies. These rocks have sodic affinity. The felsic rocks are dominant, and range from peraluminous to peralkaline. The mantle-normalized incompatible element patterns of the mafic lavas match those of Na-alkaline lavas in within-plate rift settings. The patterns are identical in shape and absolute concentrations to those of the Bobaomby (Cap d'Ambre) and Massif d'Ambre primitive volcanic rocks. These geochemical features are broadly compatible with variable degrees of partial melting of incompatible element-enriched mantle sources. The mineralogical and geochemical variations are consistent with fractional crystallization processes involving removal of olivine, feldspar, clinopyroxene, amphibole, Fe-Ti oxides and apatite. Removal of small amount of titanite explains the concave upward lanthanide pattern in the evolved nepheline syenites and phonolites, which are additionally rich in exotic silicates typical of agpaitic magmas (eudialyte, F-disilicates).

  11. The Ngorongoro Volcanic Highland and its relationships to volcanic deposits at Olduvai Gorge and East African Rift volcanism.

    PubMed

    Mollel, Godwin F; Swisher, Carl C

    2012-08-01

    The Ngorongoro Volcanic Highland (NVH), situated adjacent and to the east of Olduvai Gorge in northern Tanzania, is the source of the immense quantities of lava, ignimbrite, air fall ash, and volcaniclastic debris that occur interbedded in the Plio-Pleistocene sedimentary deposits in the Laetoli and Olduvai areas. These volcanics have proven crucial to unraveling stratigraphic correlations, the age of these successions, the archaeological and paleontological remains, as well as the source materials from which the bulk of the stone tools were manufactured. The NVH towers some 2,000 m above the Olduvai and Laetoli landscapes, affecting local climate, run-off, and providing varying elevation - climate controlled ecosystem, habitats, and riparian corridors extending into the Olduvai and Laetoli lowlands. The NVH also plays a crucial role in addressing the genesis and history of East African Rift (EAR) magmatism in northern Tanzania. In this contribution, we provide age and petrochemical compositions of the major NVH centers: Lemagurut, basalt to benmorite, 2.4-2.2 Ma; Satiman, tephrite to phonolite, 4.6-3.5 Ma; Oldeani, basalt to trachyandesite, 1.6-1.5 Ma; Ngorongoro, basalt to rhyolite, 2.3-2.0 Ma; Olmoti, basalt to trachyte, 2.0-1.8 Ma; Embagai, nephelinite to phonolite, 1.2-0.6 Ma; and Engelosin, phonolite, 3-2.7 Ma. We then discuss how these correlate in time and composition with volcanics preserved at Olduvai Gorge. Finally, we place this into context with our current understanding as to the eruptive history of the NVH and relationship to East African Rift volcanism. PMID:22404967

  12. Megacrystic pyroxene basalts sample deep crustal gabbroic cumulates beneath the Mount Taylor volcanic field, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Mariek E.; Schrader, Christian M.; Crumpler, Larry S.; Rowe, Michael C.; Wolff, John A.; Boroughs, Scott P.

    2016-04-01

    Distributed over the ~ 2.3 m.y. history of the alkaline and compositionally diverse Mount Taylor Volcanic Field (MTVF), New Mexico is a widespread texturally distinct family of differentiated basalts that contain resorbed megacrysts (up to 3 cm) of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, and olivine ± Ti-magnetite ± ilmenite ± orthopyroxene. These lavas have gabbroic cumulate inclusions with mineral compositions similar to the megacrysts, suggesting a common origin. Gabbroic and megacrystic clinopyroxenes form positive linear arrays in TiO2 (0.2-2.3 wt.%) with respect to Al2O3 (0.7-9.3 wt.%). Plagioclase (An41-80) from representative thin sections analyzed for 87Sr/86Sr by laser ablation ICP-MS range from 0.7036 to 0.7048. The low 87Sr/86Sr plagioclases (0.7036 to 0.7037) are associated with high Ti-Al clinopyroxenes. Likewise, the higher 87Sr/86Sr plagioclases (0.7043 to 0.7047) are associated with the low-Al clinopyroxenes. Taken together, the pyroxene and plagioclase megacrysts appear to track the differentiation of a gabbroic pluton (or related plutons) from alkaline to Si-saturated conditions by fractional crystallization and crustal assimilation. Clinopyroxene-liquid geobarometry calculations suggest that crystallization occurred near the crust-mantle transition at an average of ~ 1200 °C and 12-13 kbar. The distribution of the megacrystic pyroxene basalts suggests that a gabbroic intrusive body underlies subregions of the MTVF that have generated silicic magmas. The gabbro is interpreted to be a significant heat and mass input into the lower crust that is capable of driving the petrogenesis of diverse silicic compositions (through fractionation and crustal assimilation), including mugearites, trachytes, trachy-andesites and dacites, high-Si rhyolites, and topaz rhyolites of the MTVF.

  13. Vent distribution in the Quaternary Payún Matrú Volcanic Field, western Argentina: Its relation to tectonics and crustal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernando, I. R.; Franzese, J. R.; Llambías, E. J.; Petrinovic, I. A.

    2014-05-01

    The Payún Matrú Volcanic Field consists of two polygenetic and mostly trachytic volcanoes (Payún Matrú with a summit caldera and Payún Liso) along with around 220 scoria cones and basaltic lava flows. This volcanic field belongs to the Payenia Basaltic Province (33° 30‧-38° S), a Quaternary Andean back-arc basaltic province of the Southern Volcanic Zone, in western Argentina. The vent density distribution of the Payún Matrú Volcanic Field is different from the other volcanic fields within Payenia. The Payún Matrú volcano and the scoria cones are distributed in an E-W oriented fringe about 15 km wide and 70 km long, with the Payún Matrú caldera in the middle of this fringe. The structural framework in which the volcanic field is located allows to infer that this vent density distribution is strongly conditioned by pre-existing crustal anisotropies. The volcanic field is located in a transfer zone related to Jurassic extensional structures of the Neuquén Basin, which were inverted also as a transfer zone during the Miocene compressive deformation that formed the Malargüe fold and thrust belt, and, in addition, it is located in the southern margin of a Neogene syn-orogenic basin. The analysis of vent center location and vent morphology is helpful to determine basaltic vent alignments within the Payún Matrú Volcanic Field and to infer the syn-eruptive stress field. This analysis shows that vent alignments are compatible with the present-day maximum horizontal stress, as measured by break-out of oil wells.

  14. Xenopumice erupted on 15 October 2011 offshore of El Hierro (Canary Islands): a subvolcanic snapshot of magmatic, hydrothermal and pyrometamorphic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Moro, S.; Di Roberto, A.; Meletlidis, S.; Pompilio, M.; Bertagnini, A.; Agostini, S.; Ridolfi, F.; Renzulli, A.

    2015-06-01

    On 15 October 2011, a submarine eruption offshore of El Hierro Island gave rise to floating volcanic products, known as xenopumices, i.e., pumiceous xenoliths partly mingled and coated with the juvenile basanitic magma. Over the last few years, no consensus in the scientific community in explaining the origin of these products has been reached. In order to better understand the formation of xenopumice, we present a textural, mineralogical, and geochemical study of the possible magmatic, hydrothermal, and pyrometamorphic processes, which usually operate in the plumbing systems of active volcanoes. We carried out a comprehensive SEM investigation and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope analyses on some samples representative of three different xenopumice facies. All the data were compared with previous studies, new data for El Hierro extrusives and a literature dataset of Canary Islands igneous and sedimentary rocks. In the investigated xenopumices, we emphasize the presence of restitic magmatic phases as well as crystallization of minerals (mainly olivine + pyroxene + magnetite aggregates) as pseudomorphs after pre-existing mafic phenocrysts, providing evidence of pyrometamorphism induced by the high-T juvenile basanitic magma. In addition, we identify veins consisting of zircon + REE-oxides + mullite associated with Si-rich glass and hydrothermal quartz, which indicate the fundamental role played by hydrothermal fluid circulation in the xenopumice protolith. The petrological data agree with a pre-syneruptive formation of the xenopumice, when El Hierro basanite magma intruded hydrothermally altered trachyandesite to trachyte rocks and triggered local partial melting. Therefore, the El Hierro xenopumice represents a snapshot of the transient processes at the magma-wall rock interface, which normally occurs in the feeding system of active volcanoes.

  15. Settling dynamics of natural ash particles: insight from laboratory high speed imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Bello, Elisabetta; Andronico, Daniele; Duc, Alix Vu; Kueppers, Ulrich; Cristaldi, Antonio; Ricci, Tullio; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Scollo, Simona; Taddeucci, Jacopo

    2015-04-01

    Existing experimental and numerical models of ash sedimentation from volcanic plumes consider aerodynamic properties of particles as a function of their shape, density and size. However, rather than individually, particles are often observed to settle through zones of high particle concentration associated with gravitational instabilities (e.g., particle-rich fingers) where sedimentation is controlled by the properties of the bulk down-flow of settling particles. In order to investigate the differences in the aerodynamic behaviour of ash particles when settling individually or in mass, we performed systematic large-scale ash settling experiments. Natural basaltic ash from Etna (Italy, sampled in July 2014) and trachytic, pumiceous ash from Laacher See (Germany, 12.900 y BP) was used as starting material. For Etna, we used particles in the classes 0-125 and 125-500 µm, for Laacher See, we used 40-90 and 500-1000 µm. For each class, we released 40-500 g of sample from heights of 2 to 5 m with different, controlled volumetric flow rates, in an unconstrained open space and at minimal air movement. All experiments were recorded with a high-speed camera at 2000 fps. A vertical laser sheet crossing the flow enhanced visibility of particles. After release, particles were observed to cluster, leading to locally enhanced fall velocities. High-speed imaging, manual and automatic tracking analyses are being used to provide full characterization of particle settling dynamics as a function of particle concentration in the flow, density and particle size. SEM analysis will provide particle shape characterization. The main results are i) measured settling velocities of individual particles increase with increasing particle concentration; ii) particle sorting during sedimentation is observed. This suggests that particle dispersion during fallout may be one reason explaining larger than theoretical depletion rates of fine particles from volcanic ash clouds.

  16. The role of carbon from recycled sediments in the origin of ultrapotassic igneous rocks in the Central Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conticelli, Sandro; Avanzinelli, Riccardo; Ammannati, Edoardo; Casalini, Martina

    2015-09-01

    The Central Mediterranean region is one of the most important areas on Earth for studying subduction-related potassic and ultrapotassic magmatism, derived from partial melting of the metasomatised lithospheric mantle wedge. In this region, leucite-free (i.e., lamproite) and leucite-bearing (i.e., kamafugite, leucitite, and plagioleucitite) ultrapotassic rocks closely occur, in a time-related progression, linked to the evolution of both the mantle source and the regional tectonic regime. Time- and space-related magmatism migration followed the roll-back of the subducting slab and the anticlockwise drift of the Italian Peninsula. Leucite-free silica-rich lamproites are restricted to the early stage of magmatism and are associated with ultrapotassic shoshonites and high-K calc-alkaline volcanic rocks. Leucite-bearing (i.e., Roman Province) rocks are erupted consistently later than lamproite-like and associated shoshonitic rocks, with post-leucititic volcanism occurring in the late stage of volcanic activity with eruption of alkali-basaltic to latitic and trachytic rocks, often after major caldera-forming events. Present-day ultrapotassic volcanism is restricted to the Neapolitan area. Central Mediterranean potassic and ultrapotassic rocks are extremely enriched in incompatible trace elements with variable fractionation of Ta, Nb, and Ti in comparison to Th and large ion lithophile elements (LILE). They are also variably enriched in radiogenic Sr and Pb and unradiogenic Nd. The main geochemical and isotopic signatures are consistent with sediment recycling within the mantle wedge via subduction. A twofold metasomatism, induced by the recycle of pelitic sediments and dehydration of lawsonite-bearing schists generates the early metasomatic events that enriched the mantle wedge from which leucite-free ultrapotassic rocks (i.e., lamproite) were generated. Recycling of carbonate-rich pelites played an important role in the shift to silica-undersaturated ultrapotassic rocks (kalsilite- and leucite-bearing) of the classic 'Roman province'.

  17. Cutting Costs by Locating High Production Wells: A Test of the Volcano seismic Approach to Finding ''Blind'' Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Eylon Shalev; Peter E. Malin; Wendy McCausland

    2002-06-06

    In the summer of 2000, Duke University and the Kenyan power generation company, KenGen, conducted a microearthquake monitoring experiment at Longonot volcano in Kenya. Longonot is one of several major late Quaternary trachyte volcanoes in the Kenya Rift. They study was aimed at developing seismic methods for locating buried hydrothermal areas in the Rift on the basis of their microearthquake activity and wave propagation effects. A comparison of microearthquake records from 4.5 Hz, 2 Hz, and broadband seismometers revealed strong high-frequency site and wave-propagation effects. The lower frequency seismometers were needed to detect and record individual phases. Two-dozen 3-component 2- Hz L22 seismographs and PASSCAL loggers were then distributed around Longonot. Recordings from this network located one seismically active area on Longonot's southwest flank. The events from this area were emergent, shallow (<3 km), small (M<1), and spatially restricted. Evidently, the hydrothermal system in this area is not currently very extensive or active. To establish the nature of the site effects, the data were analyzed using three spectral techniques that reduce source effects. The data were also compared to a simple forward model. The results show that, in certain frequency ranges, the technique of dividing the horizontal motion by the vertical motion (H/V) to remove the source fails because of non-uniform vertical amplification. Outside these frequencies, the three methods resolve the same, dominant, harmonic frequencies at a given site. In a few cases, the spectra can be fit with forward models containing low velocity surface layers. The analysis suggests that the emergent, low frequency character of the microearthquake signals is due to attenuation and scattering in the near surface ash deposits.

  18. Magmatic complexity on early Mars as seen through a combination of orbital, in-situ and meteorite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sautter, Violaine; Toplis, Michael J.; Beck, Pierre; Mangold, Nicolas; Wiens, Roger; Pinet, Patrick; Cousin, Agnes; Maurice, Sylvestre; LeDeit, Laetitia; Hewins, Roger; Gasnault, Olivier; Quantin, Cathy; Forni, Olivier; Newsom, Horton; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Wray, James; Bridges, Nathan; Payré, Valérie; Rapin, William; Le Mouélic, Stéphane

    2016-06-01

    Until recently, Mars was considered a basalt-covered world, but this vision is evolving thanks to new orbital, in situ and meteorite observations, in particular of rocks of the ancient Noachian period. In this contribution we summarise newly recognised compositional and mineralogical differences between older and more recent rocks, and explore the geodynamic implications of these new findings. For example the MSL rover has discovered abundant felsic rocks close to the landing site coming from the wall of Gale crater ranging from alkali basalt to trachyte. In addition, the recently discovered Martian regolith breccia NWA 7034 (and paired samples) contain many coarse-grained noritic-monzonitic clasts demonstrably Noachian in age, and even some clasts that plot in the mugearite field. Olivine is also conspicuously lacking in these ancient samples, in contrast to later Hesperian rocks. The alkali-suite requires low-degree melting of the Martian mantle at low pressure, whereas the later Hesperian magmatism would appear to be produced by higher mantle temperatures. Various scenarios are proposed to explain these observations, including different styles of magmatic activity (i.e. passive upwelling vs. hotspots). A second petrological suite of increasing interest involves quartzo-feldspathic materials that were first inferred from orbit, in local patches in the southern highlands and in the lower units of Valles Marineris. However, identification of felsic rocks from orbit is limited by the low detectability of feldspar in the near infrared. On the other hand, the MSL rover has described the texture, mineralogy and composition of felsic rocks in Gale crater that are granodiorite-like samples akin to terrestrial TTG (Tonalite-Trondhjemite-Granodiorite suites). These observations, and the low average density of the highlands crust, suggest the early formation of 'continental' crust on Mars, although the details of the geodynamic scenario and the importance of volatiles in their generation are aspects that require further work.

  19. Quartenary Gede Salak volcanic complex, Banten area, at the junction between Sumatra arc and Java arc, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurniawan, I.; Hasenaka, T.; Suparka, E.

    2011-12-01

    Pleistocene Gede Salak volcanic complex is located at Banten, northwestern edge of Java island (NWJ), forming a part of Sunda arc. The volcanism is associated with the subduction of the India-Australia plate beneath Eurasian plate at the rate of 7 cm/y. This volcanic complex consists of Gede, Salak, Batur and Wadas volcanoes. To southeast is located Pinang volcano, and to south is volcanic complex of Rawa Dano. These volcanoes are located near Sunda Strait, a transitional zone between Java arc and Sumatera arc where oblique subduction is observed. The distance of all these volcanoes from Java trench varies from 250 km to 300 km. This study is the first geochemical study of volcanic rocks characterizing across-arc variation of Java-Sumatra junction. Gede Salak volcanic complex consists of pyroclastic flow deposits in the western part and lava flows in the eastern part. The later development of dome Wadas formation is probably associated with fault structures trending northwest to southeast. Pinang volcano mainly consists of basaltic lavas. Rawa Dano volcanic complex consists of two caldera, Anyer caldera and Dano caldera, which produced large amount of volcanic tuff called Tufa Banten. Samples from this volcanic complex include basaltic to trachytic rocks, in the range of medium-K to high-K. MgO content is less than 3 %. Elements of Rb, Zr, Ce, and La increase with increasing SiO2. Chondrite-normalized REE patterns are similar to those of island arc basalts. When compared to volcanic samples from western Java volcanoes (WJ), REE pattern is similar to those from back-arc volcanoes. Gede Salak volcano is slightly enriched in the subduction component, as illustrated by the low Nb/Zr and elevated Ba/Zr ratios. B/Nb and B/Zr ratios are in the range of 1.5 - 5.4 and 0.03 - 0.10 respectively, which are higher than those of the back arc volcano in central Java (CJ), but lower than those of the frontal volcanoes there. Across arc variation of NWJ including GSVC, Pinang and Rawa Dano volcanic complex shows a decreasing trend of subduction component from the volcanic front to back arc. Although the trend is similar to other arcs, the decreasing rate is small. Comparison with WJ and CJ suggests that the mantle underneath NWJ has a small but definite influence of subduction component, i.e. altered oceanic crust (AOC) and sediment (SED) to MORB source. Fluid (SED and AOC) contribution at NWJ is higher than that of WJ but less than that of CJ.

  20. Offshore Oligo-Miocene volcanic fields within the Corsica-Liguria Basin: Magmatic diversity and slab evolution in the western Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Réhault, J.-P.; Honthaas, C.; Guennoc, P.; Bellon, H.; Ruffet, G.; Cotten, J.; Sosson, M.; Maury, R. C.

    2012-07-01

    The European and Corsica-Sardinia margins of the Ligurian Sea (western Mediterranean) have been affected by a geochemically diverse igneous activity, offshore and onshore, since the Eocene. This magmatism occurred in a global subduction-related framework. On the European side, the oldest Tertiary magmatism dated at ca. 35 Ma was mainly calc-alkaline. It included the emplacement of plutonic bodies of adakitic affinity, such as the quartz microdiorite laccolith locally referred to as "esterellite". Younger magmatic events on-land within the whole Ligurian domain were mostly medium-K or K-rich calc-alkaline. Miocene volcanic activity was important in Sardinia, where andesites and ignimbrites were erupted during several magmatic cycles. In Corsica, it was minor although it emplaced lamprophyres near Sisco at 15 Ma. Dredging and diving cruises conducted in the Ligurian Sea during the last thirty years allowed us to collect a number of submarine samples. We discuss here their geochemistry (major and trace elements) and their whole-rock K-Ar ages and mineral 40Ar-39Ar plateau ages. Around 15 Ma, minor amounts of adakitic lavas were emplaced off southwestern Corsica, in the deepest part of the Liguria-Corsica Basin. They rested over the thinnest southwestern Corsica Hercynian continental crust. Closer to the coast, contemporaneous calc-alkaline rocks erupted on a less thinned crust. The adakitic events could be indicative of either the final stages of active subduction, or alternatively of a slab tearing linked to the southeastern retreat and steepening of the slab. The latter event could be connected with the end of the Corsica-Sardinia block drifting and its correlative eastern collision. Younger volcanic effusions, dated at 14-6 Ma, occurred mostly northwest and north of Corsica. K-rich calc-alkaline basalts, shoshonites and K-rich trachytes were emplaced during this period, and alkali basalts erupted as early as 12 Ma in Sardinia. In the Toulon area, alkali basalts dated at 7-6 Ma represent the last onshore activity just before the Messinian crisis, and the Pliocene alkali basaltic outpouring in Sardinia. We propose to link these latter volcanic events to the development of a slab window in a post-collisional tectonic framework.

  1. Geologic Mapping in Nogal Peak Quadrangle: Geochemistry, Intrusive Relations and Mineralization in the Sierra Blanca Igneous Complex, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, F.; Kelley, S. A.; Lawrence, J. R.; Cikowski, C. T.; Krier, D. J.; Goff, C. J.; McLemore, V. T.

    2011-12-01

    Nogal Peak quadrangle is located in the northern Sierra Blanca Igneous Complex (SBIC) and contains most of the White Mountain Wilderness (geologic map is available at http://geoinfo.nmt.edu/publications/maps/geologic/ofgm/details.cfml?Volume=134). The geology of the quad consists of a late Eocene to Oligocene volcanic pile (Sierra Blanca Volcanics, mostly alkali basalt to trachyte) intruded by a multitude of dikes, plugs and three stocks: Rialto, 31.4 Ma (mostly syenite), Three Rivers, ca. 29 to 27 Ma (quartz syenite intruded by subordinate alkali granite), and Bonito Lake, 26.6 Ma (mostly monzonite). Three Rivers stock is partially surrounded by alkali rhyolites that geochemically resemble the alkali granites. The circular shape of the stock and surrounding rhyolites suggests they form the root of a probable caldera. SBIC rocks have compositions typical of those found within the Rocky Mountain alkaline belt and those associated with continental rift zone magmatism. Because the volcanic host rocks are deeply eroded, intrusive relations with the stocks are well exposed. Most contacts at stock margins are near vertical. Roof pendants are common near some contacts and stoped blocks up to 700 m long are found within the Three Rivers stock. Contacts, pendants and stoped blocks generally display some combination of hornfelsing, brecciation, fracturing, faulting and mineralization. Sierra Blanca Volcanics display hydrothermal alteration increasing from argillic in the NW sector of the quad to high-temperature porpylitic near stock margins. Retrograde phyllic alteration occurs within breccia pipes and portions of the stocks. Mineral deposits consist of four types: Placer Au, fissure veins (mostly Ag-Pb-Zn±Au), breccia pipes (Au-Mo-Cu), and porphyry Mo-Cu. A singular pipe on the SW margin of Bonito Lake stock contains sapphire-lazulite-alunite. Although Au has been intermittently mined in the quad since 1865, best production of Au originated around the turn of the last century from the Parsons Mine, a breccia pipe in the southern Rialto stock. The Great Western Mine deposit, located within three breccia pipes on the north margin of Three Rivers stock, apparently contains 150,000 troy ounces of low-grade, disseminated Au. Three Rivers syenites and alkali granites are slightly enriched in REE compared to typical intrusive rock standards but are not high enough to be exploitable. One alkali granite sample contains 2850 ppm Zr, about 5 to 10 times the values of typical rock standards.

  2. A study of melt inclusions at Vulcano (Aeolian Islands, Italy): insights on the primitive magmas and on the volcanic feeding system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gioncada, A.; Clocchiatti, R.; Sbrana, A.; Bottazzi, P.; Massare, D.; Ottolini, L.

    This work presents the results of a microthermometric and EPMA-SIMS study of melt inclusions in phenocrysts of rocks of the shoshonitic eruptive complex of Vulcano (Aeolian Islands, Italy). Different primitive magmas related to two different evolutionary series, an older one (50-25ka) and a younger one (15 ka to 1890A.D.), were identified as melt inclusions in olivine Fo88-91 crystals. Both are characterized by high Ca/Al ratio and present very similar Rb/Sr, B/Be and patterns of trace elements, with Nb and Ti anomalies typical of a subduction zone. The two basalts present the same temperature of crystallization (1180+/-20 °C) and similar volatile abundances. The H2O, S and Cl contents are relatively high, whereas magmatic CO2 concentrations are very low, probably due to CO2 loss before low-pressure crystallization and entrapment of melt inclusions. The mineral chemistry of the basaltic assemblages and the high Ca/Al ratio of melt inclusions indicate an origin from a depleted, metasomatized clinopyroxene-rich peridotitic mantle. The younger primitive melt is characterized with respect to the older one by higher K2O and incompatible element abundances, by lower Zr/Nb and La/Nb, and by higher Ba/Rb and LREE enrichment. A different degree of partial melting of the same source can explain the chemical differences between the two magmas. However, some anomalies in Sr, Rb and K contents suggest either a slightly different source for the two magmas or differing extents of crustal contamination. Low-pressure degassing and cooling of the basaltic magmas produce shoshonitic liquids. The melt inclusions indicate evolutionary paths via fractional crystallization, leading to trachytic compositions during the older activity and to rhyolitic compositions during the recent one. The bulk-rock compositions record a more complex history than do the melt inclusions, due to the syneruptive mixing processes commonly affecting the magmas erupted at Vulcano. The composition and temperature data on melt inclusions suggest that in the older period of activity several shallow magmatic reservoirs existed; in the younger one a relatively homogeneous feeding system is active. The shallow magmatic reservoir feeding the recent eruptive activity probably has a vertical configuration, with basaltic magma in the deeper zones and differentiated magmas in shallower, low-volume, dike-like reservoirs.

  3. Internal structure of a complex lava dome and of its surrounding inferred from gravity and magnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portal, Angélie; Gailler, Lydie-Sarah; Lénat, Jean-François; Labzuy, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    The observation of volcanic domes growth (e.g. St. Helens, Unzen, Montserrat) shows that it is often characterized by a series of extrusion phases, domes explosions and collapses. As a result, their internal structure, after the eruptive activity has ended, is complex, including massive extrusions and lava lobes, talus and pyroclastic deposits. On an older dome, the knowledge of its internal structure will, in turn, allow to reconstruct its construction. This requires a combination of geologic and geophysical investigations. Here we describe a study of the Puy de Dôme volcano (French Massif Central), an 11,000 years old trachytic volcanic dome. This study is based on gravity and magnetic surveys. Furthermore, the analysis of a high resolution topographical survey (LiDAR) allows, on the one hand, to differentiate several specific zones or structures at the surface and, on the other hand, suggests that the dome may be part of a larger system associated with a large shallow intrusive body. Our gravity survey, carried out in 2012 and 2013, provides a high coverage with 1600 new gravity stations. Differential GPS positioning of the stations and a high resolution DEM allow to construct an accurate new residual Bouguer anomaly map. A complementary ground magnetic survey has also been carried out on the dome itself and its immediate surroundings. The resulting anomaly has been reduced to the magnetic pole to remove the dipolar behavior of magnetic anomalies. The complex gravity and magnetic anomaly patterns suggest that the internal structure of the dome is heterogeneous. A first qualitative analysis of gravity anomaly shows a globally positive signature in the central part of the dome (with a possible continuation to the North) and a lower one on the other flanks. A positive magnetic anomaly is also associated with the dome central part, but with a significantly larger extent than the gravimetric one. In the neighborhood of the dome several gravity and magnetic anomalies are associated with mafic lava flows and scoria cones. However, a large amplitude magnetic anomaly at the northern foot of the dome has not been clearly identified yet with a known geological structure. Gravity and magnetic models (2D and 3D) allow us to investigate the range of the different internal structures that may account for the observed anomalies. When coupled with geological information, the interpretation of the geophysical models leads to a more restricted domain of solutions. A rather constrained image of the structure of the Puy de Dôme and its surrounding can thus be derived and used to reconstruct the volcanic succession of events in this area.

  4. Cannibalism of olivine-rich cumulate xenoliths during the 1998 eruption of Piton de la Fournaise (La Réunion hotspot): Implications for the generation of magma diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salaün, A.; Villemant, B.; Semet, M. P.; Staudacher, T.

    2010-12-01

    Contrasting with its unusual isotopic homogeneity compared to other hotspot volcanoes, Piton de la Fournaise has produced a large diversity of basaltic magmas over its 0.5 Ma history: picrites and two types of transitional basalts with distinct petrological and chemical compositions. A minor group of evolved basalts (anomalous group of basalts or AGB) is enriched in both compatible (Mg, Fe, Ti, Cr, and Ni) and incompatible (K, Th, and La) elements and depleted in Ca and Si relative to the dominant group of evolved basalts. The 1998 eruption simultaneously produced the two basaltic types at two distinct vents (Hudson vent: AGB, Kapor vent: common basalt) but from the same feeding conduit. Glasses of both magmas are close in composition and belong to the single differentiation trend defined by all 1998-2007 glass compositions. Thermodynamic model (MELTS code) shows that AGB-type magmas cannot be produced by high pressure (> 1 GPa) clinopyroxene fractionation as previously proposed and that all melts of the 1998-2007 activity period are produced by low pressure (< 800 MPa) crystal fractionation from the most primitive basalt (MgO ~ 9%). Modal composition of 1998 lavas (mass balance calculation and SEM image analysis) and olivine crystal composition show that Hudson lavas have assimilated significant fractions of olivine xenocrysts contrary to Kapor lavas. In addition, the higher incompatible element contents of Hudson lavas suggest contamination by a differentiated (trachytic) melt. All AGB share the following characteristics: (i) evolved glass compositions, (ii) 5-10% olivine xenocrysts, and (iii) vents located in a narrow region at the summit of the edifice. They are interpreted as the result of the assimilation of olivine-rich xenoliths either by evolved melts or by basaltic melts contaminated by low fractions of differentiated melts produced from interstitial glass frequently coating cumulates minerals or resulting from partial melting of cumulates bearing pyroxene or plagioclase (wehrlitic to gabbroic cumulates). The scarcity of AGB magmas is attributed to their shallow transfer path in rarely intruded lateral zones of Piton de la Fournaise volcano: wehrlitic to gabbroic cumulates bodies are either heterogeneously distributed within the edifice or have been depleted in low melting point components in the 'Rift Zone' where most of the recent eruptive events are emplaced. These results emphasize the exceptional chemical homogeneity of the primary basaltic melt involved in volcanic activity of Piton de la Fournaise hotspot for 0.5 Ma and the increasingly recognized role of magma-wall rock interactions in erupted magma compositions.

  5. Geology and geochemistry of the Macheng Algoma-type banded iron-formation, North China Craton: Constraints on mineralization events and genesis of high-grade iron ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huaying; Niu, Xianglong; Zhang, Lianchang; Pirajno, Franco; Luo, Huabao; Qin, Feng; Cui, Minli; Wang, Changle; Qi, Min

    2015-12-01

    The Macheng iron deposit is located in the eastern Hebei province of the North China Craton (NCC). It is hosted in Neoarchean metamorphic rocks of Baimiaozi formation in the Dantazi Group, consisting of biotite-leptynite, plagioclase-gneiss, plagioclase-amphibolite, migmatite, migmatitic granite and quartz schist. Geochemical analyses of the host biotite leptynite and plagioclase amphibolites show that their protoliths are both volcanics, inferred to be trachytic basalt and basaltic andesite, respectively. Based on the geochemical signature of the host rocks, together with geology of the iron deposit, it is inferred that the Macheng BIF is an Algoma-type iron exhalative formation, formed in an arc-related basin in the Neoarchean. Post-Archean Australian Shale (PAAS)-normalized rare earth elements (REEs) plus yttrium (Y) concentrations of different BIF ores with gneissic, striated and banded structure in the Macheng deposit, show similar patterns with depletions in light rare earth elements (LREEs) and middle rare earth elements (MREEs) relative to heavy rare earth elements (HREEs) and with apparently positive La, Y and Eu anomalies. Y/Ho ratios of the gneissic, striated and banded BIF ores vary from 37 to 56. These geochemical features of the BIF ores reveal their affinity with the sea water and the presence of a high-temperature hydrothermal component, indicating that both the seawater and high temperature hydrothermal fluids derived from alteration of oceanic basalts and komatiites may contribute to formation of the Macheng BIF. Geological, mineralogical and geochemical studies of the Macheng deposit recognized two kinds of high-grade iron ores. One is massive oxidized high-grade ore (Fe2O3T = 74.37-86.20 wt.%), mainly consisting of hematite with some magnetite, which shows geochemical characteristics of the gneissic, striated and banded BIF ores. The other type is magnetite high-grade ore, also massive and consisting of magnetite, with distinct characteristics in trace elements of the gneissic, striated and banded BIF ores but show similarity to those of the migmatitic iron ores with significantly negative Eu anomalies. The geochemical discrepancy or duality between the two types of high-grade ores in Macheng suggests that they formed by two different mechanisms. One is related to supergene enrichment, caused by oxidation of magnetite and the leaching of gangue minerals from BIF to form high-grade ore. The other is probably related to intensive migmatization which produced high-grade ores by altering the primary iron ores.

  6. The tectonic evolution of Cenozoic extensional basins, northeast Brazil: Geochronological constraints from continental basalt 40Ar/39Ar ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, Zorano Sérgio; Vasconcelos, Paulo Marcos; Knesel, Kurt Michael; da Silveira Dias, Luiz Gustavo; Roesner, Eduardo Henrique; Cordeiro de Farias, Paulo Roberto; de Morais Neto, João Marinho

    2013-12-01

    The Boa Vista and Cubati Basins, Paraíba, Brazil, are NW-SE extension-related intracratonic basins that resulted from tectonic stresses after the opening of the South Atlantic. These basins contain lacustrine fossiliferous sediments, bentonite beds, and basalt flows that preserve Cenozoic continental records. 40Ar/39Ar ages for six whole-rocks from two distinct basaltic flows underlying the sediments in the Boa Vista basin are 27.3 ± 0.8 and 25.4 ± 1.3 Ma, while three grains from a basaltic flow overlying the sediments yield 22.0 ± 0.2 Ma. The sediments at the nearby Cubati Basin are overlain by a basalt flow with ages of ˜25.4 Ma. Three whole-rocks from an NE-SW-trending trachytic dyke cross cutting the sediments at the Boa Vista Basin yield 40Ar/39Ar ages of ˜12.45 ± 0.06, 12.59 ± 0.07, and 12.58 ± 0.07 Ma. Three whole-rocks from a nearby volcanic plug (Chupador) yield an age of 23.4 ± 0.1 Ma. The geochronological results combined with stratigraphic correlations between the two basins allow bracketing the age of the main sedimentary and bentonic units within the Boa Vista and Cubati Basins between 25.5 ± 1.3 and 24.9 ± 0.1 Ma. The ages, combined with field observations reveal that the formation of the Boa Vista and Cubati basins is associated with mantle-derived magmas channelled through reactivated Precambrian shear zones. Our geochronological results suggest that a temporal link with the Fernando de Noronha and Saint Helena hot spots can be excluded as possible sources of the Boa Vista and Cubati magmas. Rather, the extensional tectonics in the 30-20 Ma interval, long after Gondwana break-up, may be associated with the re-activation of continental-scale shear zones that channelled small batches of mantle-derived magmas.

  7. Cosmogenic He-3 exposure ages of basalts from Ascension Island - implications for evolution of ocean islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammon, K.; Dunai, T. J.; Stuart, F. M.; Meriaux, A.-S.; Gayer, E.

    2009-04-01

    Ascension Island is the emergent top of a volcano situated at 7°56'S and 14°22'W in the South Atlantic Ocean, approximately 90 km west of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and 50 km south of the Ascension Fracture Zone [1, 2]. It rises about 860 m above sea level and the base of the volcano covers about 2000 km2 approximately 3200 m beneath sea level [3]. Volcanic activity is associated with the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and commenced at 6-7 Ma [2, 4, 5]. The volcanic rocks of Ascension Island are transitional to mildly-alkaline basalt to rhyolite volcanic suite and are distinguished by trace element ratios (e.g. Zr/Nb) [3]. Whereas the age of the trachyte intrusions are well constrained (0.6 - 1.0 Ma) [e.g. 3] the younger basalt suites have not been dated reliably and the low K concentration make Ar/Ar dating difficult. In order to reconstruct the volcanic history of Ascension Island we have used cosmogenic He-3 in olivine and pyroxene phenocrysts from uneroded basalt flows to date the three basalt lava suites that appear to span the range of volcanism. Ages of co-genetic pyroxene and olivine agree within analytical uncertainties. Implanted radiogenic He-4 tends to lower He-3 derived exposure ages therefore some olivine samples were etched with HF/HNO3 to remove about 30% of the sample mass. The so etched olivine is systematically older (by less than 10%) than the unetched samples. The three basalt suites have exposure ages of 300 to 190 ka. The high and intermediate Zr/Nb basalts seem to have been erupted contemporaneously or at least in overlapping events about 300 ka ago. These suites were previously thought to be separated in time on the basis of K-Ar chronology and stratigraphy [3]. The third suite which seams to be a more local vent is erupted between 260 and 190 ka. Our new data indicate the co-existence of different magma chambers with different geochemical signatures. [1] E. Bourdon, C. Hemond, Mineralogy and Petrology 71(2001) 127-138. [2] D.L. Nielson, B.S. Sibbett, Geothermics 25(1996) 427-448. [3] B. Weaver et al., Geothermics 25(1996) 449-470. [4] C. Harris, J.D. Bell, F.B. Atkins, Earth and Planetary Science Letters 60(1982) 79-85. [5] F. Klingelhoefer, et al., Earth and Planetary Science Letters 190(2001) 41-56.

  8. The Magmatic Evolution of Dabbahu Volcano, Afar, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, L. P.; Blundy, J.; Yirgu, G.

    2008-12-01

    Dabbahu is situated in the western region of Afar, Ethiopia, at the northern end of the Manda Hararo rift segment. This volcano came back to life in 2005 with a small rhyolitic eruption from the Da'Ure vent, the first such eruption in Africa for a century. This coincided with the start of a major rifting event which has been modelled as a basalt dyke injection (Wright et al 2006). The aim of this research is to provide an insight into the history and evolution of a silicic magmatic centre in the rift, and to contribute to the wider aims of the NERC Afar Consortium to track the creation, migration, evolution and emplacement of magma from the asthenosphere to the crust. Here we report the results of recent fieldwork in the northern, ESE and summit areas of the volcano, the first geological expedition to the area for over 30 years (Barberi et al, 1975). The volcano is characterised by a wide range of magma types from alkali-basalts, through trachytes to pantellerites. Initial mapping has revealed that the volcano has not evolved through eruptions from a central vent but mainly through a series of N-S trending fissures located across the volcano, sub-parallel to the current rift axis. At least four generations of rifting have been identified, each associated with obsidian flows and pyroclastic deposits, some of which contain pumices and obsidian-pumice bombs ranging from ~0.08 to 2 m in length. Dabbahu shows several signs of rejuvenation, including substantial fumaroles activity. Geodetic surveys reveal subsidence of Dabbahu and nearby Gabho following the 2005 event, and subsequent inflation, consistent with emplacement of a shallow magma body. Our new SIMS data from feldspar hosted melt inclusions, suggests crystallisation occurs from depths of ~12 km. However, many inclusions are trapped between 3.5 and 6 km, suggesting magma is typically stored in this region prior to eruption. Whole rock and micro-analytical data of our samples will allow us to comprehensively characterise the magma which will provide information on the relationship between Dabbahu's sub-volcanic system and the magmas involved in the dyking events. Many of these erupted units will be dated using 40Ar-39Ar techniques.

  9. Magmatism and Eurekan deformation in the High Arctic Large Igneous Province: 40Ar- 39Ar age of Kap Washington Group volcanics, North Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegner, C.; Storey, M.; Holm, P. M.; Thorarinsson, S. B.; Zhao, X.; Lo, C.-H.; Knudsen, M. F.

    2011-03-01

    The High Arctic Large Igneous Province is unusual on two counts: first, magmatism was prolonged and has been suggested to include an initial tholeiitic phase (130-80 Ma) and a second alkaline phase (85-60 Ma); second, it was subsequently deformed during the Eurekan Orogeny. New 40Ar-39Ar dating of alkaline volcanics from Kap Kane, part of the Kap Washington Group volcanics at the northern tip of Greenland, provides an emplacement age of 71.2 ± 0.5 Ma obtained from amphibole in lapilli tuffs, and a thermal resetting age of 49-47 Ma obtained in feldspar and whole-rocks from trachyte flows. Patch perthite feldspars and coeval resetting of Rb-Sr isotopes by hydrothermal fluids provide further support for thermal overprinting. This thermal event is interpreted as a result of compressional tectonism of the Kap Cannon Thrust Zone in which older Palaeozoic metasediments were thrusted northwards over the Kap Washington Group volcanics. The formation of the tholeiitic suite (130-80 Ma) is linked to the opening of the Canada Basin and may involve mantle plume action. Formation of the alkaline suite (85-60 Ma) is attributed to continental rifting in the Lincoln Sea area linked to seafloor spreading in the Labrador Sea and the Baffin Bay, and to eastwards displacement of Greenland relative to North America. The alkaline suite, therefore, may be unrelated to the main tholeiitic phase of the High Arctic Large Igneous Province. The subsequent initiation of continental rifting and ensuing seafloor spreading in the Northeast Atlantic resulted in spreading and volcanism (61-25 Ma) on both sides of Greenland, pushing Greenland northwards relative to North America. The tectonic setting in the High Arctic thus changed from extensional to compressional and volcanic activity was terminated. Evaluation of plate kinematic models shows that the relative northwards movement of Greenland culminated in the Eocene, coinciding with thermal resetting. We conclude that compression in North Greenland peaked at 49-47 Ma and coincided with the Eurekan Orogeny in a belt across the Canadian Arctic Islands and western Svalbard.

  10. Volcanic activity and its link to glaciation cycles: Single-grain age and geochemistry of Early to Middle Miocene volcanic glass from ANDRILL AND-2A core, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyland, R. E.; Panter, K. S.; Rocchi, S.; Di Vincenzo, G.; Del Carlo, P.; Tiepolo, M.; Field, B.; Gorsevski, P.

    2013-01-01

    In the frame of the ANtarctic DRILLing Program, volcanic glass fragments were collected from the AND-2A core between ~ 354 and 765 m below sea floor (mbsf) as accumulations (5-70 vol.%) within sediments. Here, we present the physical characteristics, age and geochemistry of the glass, which enable us to reconstruct Early to Middle Miocene volcanic activity in southern McMurdo Sound and, for the first time, document the response of volcanism to climate change in Antarctica. Glass-rich sediments include muddy-to-fine sandstone and stratified diamictite. Glass varies in color, size, vesicularity, crystal content, angularity, and degree of alteration. The mostly fresh glass exhibits delicate cuspate forms indicating deposition as primary ash fall. 40Ar-39Ar age determinations on individual glass grains are in good agreement with the depositional age model of the sediments (ca. 15.6 to 18.6 Ma), supporting for most of them a primary origin, however, some samples do contain older fragments that indicate glass recycling during times of enhanced glacial erosion. Most glasses are mafic (MgO = 3 to 9 wt.%) and vary from hypersthene to nepheline normative with a restricted range in SiO2 (45.2 ± 0.8 wt.%, 1σ) and trace element concentrations typical of the rift-related alkaline rocks in the Erebus Volcanic Province. The glass extends known composition of early phase Mount Morning activity (ca. 11-19 Ma), the only known Early to Middle Miocene source, to a more mafic end, revealing a previously unknown explosive, strongly alkaline, basaltic phase and the most primitive forms of both strongly alkaline (basanite to phonolite) and moderately alkaline (alkali basalt to trachyte) magma associations. The glass-rich sediments occur in glacimarine sequences that record 56 cycles of glacial advance and retreat. Volcanic response to glacial cyclicity is observed both physically and geochemically in AND-2A glass. Higher glass volumes in sediments correlate with ice minimum conditions between 300 and 800 mbsf. Ratios of Ba to Hf, Nb, La and Zr in mafic glasses (≥ 5 wt.% MgO) show a systematic increase in mean values during intervals of ice retreat and decreasing values with ice expansion, suggesting tapping of magmas with variable incompatible to compatible trace element ratios. This may be related to changes in the stress state of the crust in response to rapid ice volume fluctuations over the volcano, which may influence magma chemistry by varying the duration and depth of magma storage.

  11. The epilog of the western paleo-Pacific subduction: Inferred from spatial and temporal variations and geochemistry of the Late Cretaceous to Early Cenozoic silicic magmatism in coastal South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cheng-Hong; Lee, Chi-Yu; Shinjo, Ryuichi

    2016-01-01

    The Late Cretaceous to Early Cenozoic magmatism in the South China coastal area produced some amounts of rhyolitic rocks in two phases, which may be used to unravel the geohistory of the epilog of the paleo-Pacific plate subduction system. Essence of the Phase I rocks is the high temperature rhyolite (A-type)-trachydacite association in north Fujian (95-91 Ma) that was coeval with regional A-type granites. They succeeded the vast rhyolite-dacite-andesite (RDA) associations and I-type granitoids (113.5-96 Ma) and preceded the silicic-dominating rhyolite/basalt bimodal suites or monolithologic rhyolite in Zhejiang (89-86 Ma). Phase II rocks include (a) the RDA association or rhyolite alone in some drifted continental fragments nearby (83-56 Ma) and (b) the following rift-basin related rhyolite-trachyte/basalt bimodal suites in Guangdong and west Taiwan (56-38 Ma). The silicic volcanism, spatially changed from a NE-SW to the nearly E-W direction after 83 Ma, may reflect tectonic-driven eruptions occurred in the post-orogenic extensional (Phase I), resumed plate subducting (Phase IIa) and continental margin rifting (Phase IIb) stages. Rhyolitic rocks basically are shoshonitic to high-K calc-alkaline affinities while the Phase IIa RDA associations are mostly concentrated in the high-K to medium-K calc-alkaline series. All these rocks generally possess a continental arc character in tectonic discrimination diagrams, except shoshonitic rocks that have within-plate signatures. Based on the trace element and Nd-Pb isotope data, A-type rocks are suggested to have derived from mixing between trachydacitic (or syenitic) magmas and crustal melts of various sources under the high temperature condition (±metasomatism), and the succeeding silicic rocks are derivatives of the contaminated lithospheric mantle melts through crystal fractionation. On the other hand, Phase II silicic rocks are mainly the fractionation products of mafic magmas originated either from the lithospheric or the asthenospheric mantle. In reflection to such magmatotectonics with time, break-off of the subducted slab shortly before 113.5 Ma, change of the plate-moving direction between 86 and 83 Ma, and termination of plate movement probably at ∼56 Ma signify the epilog of the paleo-Pacific plate.

  12. Triassic "adakitic" rocks in an extensional setting (North China): Melts from the cratonic lower crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qiang; Zheng, Jianping; Griffin, W. L.; Zhang, Ming; Tang, Huayun; Su, Yuping; Ping, Xianquan

    2012-09-01

    Adakite was originally defined as a specific type of magmatic rock derived from melting of subducted oceanic plates (Defant, M.J., Drummond, M.S., 1990. Derivation of some modern arc magmas by melting of young subducted lithosphere. Nature 347 (6294), 662-665), producing unique chemical signatures with high Sr/Y and La/Yb. However, widespread occurrences of igneous rocks that are geochemically similar to the adakites, but from diverse tectonic settings, suggest that "adakitic" rocks may have a variety of origins. Late Triassic high Sr/Y lavas, mainly trachytes with minor pyroxene andesite and rhyolite, are found at Shuiquangou, in the Yanshanian fold-and-thrust belt on the northern margin of the North China Craton. Data on mineral chemistry, major and trace elements and Sr-Nd isotopes of whole rocks, and in situ U-Pb age and Hf-isotope analyses of zircons are reported here. The Shuiquangou volcanic rocks with high Sr/Y (> 72) and (La/Yb)N (> 24) also show enrichment in light rare-earth elements and large-ion lithophile elements (e.g., Rb, Ba and Pb), and depletion in high-field-strength elements (e.g., Nb, Ta and Ti). They have low Ce/Pb (< 4.3) and Nb/U (< 4.8) and moderate (Gd/Yb)N (2.8-3.9). U-Pb dating of zircons yields concordant and lower-intercept ages of ~ 220 Ma, indicating that they erupted during the late Triassic. Concordant grains and an upper intercept age of ~ 2.50 Ga suggest that Neoarchean materials may have been involved in their petrogenesis. The relatively low initial 87Sr/86Sr (0.70529 to 0.70540) and negative ɛNd(t) (- 3.9 to - 9.9) of the these rocks, and the negative ɛHf(t) (- 8.6 to - 1.1) of their zircons, suggest that the magmas were derived by partial melting of the cratonic lower crust, induced by continuous magmatic underplating under an extensional regime following the southward subduction of the Paleo-Asian Ocean. Their high Sr/Y is inherited from their source, and does not necessarily imply melting at great depths (e.g., garnet-bearing lower crust). We suggest that partial melting of the ancient lower crust may be important for the petrogenesis of "adakitic" magmas in a continental extensional setting.

  13. Heterogeneous refertilization of the upper mantle beneath the Azorean volcanoes. Evidence from mantle xenoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannatelli, C.; Frezzotti, M.; Zanon, V.; Petrelli, M.; Neumann, E.; Peccerillo, A.

    2011-12-01

    Several mantle xenoliths from the island of Sao Miguel (Azores, Portugal) have been studied to investigate the nature of the mantle beneath the Azorean archipelago. Ultramafic xenoliths are porphyroclastic spinel harzburgite and subordinate clinopyroxene-poor lherzolite, range between 3 and 10 cm in size and show clear signs of plastic deformation. In harzburgites, olivine porphyroclasts have Fo89-91, while in neoblasts it ranges between 80 and 87. Mg# in orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene spans between 85-91 and 84-92 respectively, while spinel is characterized by Cr# between 64 and 78. Two harzburgites show phlogopite. In lherzolite, olivine porphyroclasts show Fo89-91, orthopyroxenes and clinopyroxenes have Mg# 91-92 and 90-92 respectively, and spinel has Cr# 76-84. Abundant silica- and alkali-rich glass is present as intergranular micro-veins, and as primary melt inclusions in both porphyroclasts and neoblasts. Orthopyroxene porphyroclasts (1 - 6 mm) have exsolution-free rims, strong ondulatory extinction, and clinopyroxene exsolution at the core as well as abundant primary Silicate Melt Inclusions (SMIs). SMIs are quartz-hyperstene normative trachydacitic silicate glass (SiO2 = 62.3-67.9 wt%), containing CO2 bubbles. Trachydacitic glass is particularly rich in alkali, LILE (e.g., Rb, Ba, and Sr), LREE-enriched, and strongly depleted in HFSE, MREE and HREE, compatible with a melt containing a large component of deep eclogitic source (e.g. residual garnet and rutile). Olivine, clinopyroxene and rare orthopyroxene polygonal neoblasts (< 0.5 mm) also contain primary SMIs. However, these last SMIs are trachyte-phonolite, mostly nepheline normative and are REE- and HFSE-enriched, have low LREE/MREE ratios and selective LILE enrichment, consistent with small fractions of metasomatic melts generated from an upper mantle source. Some xenoliths contain melt inclusions of both kinds, but some record just one of the two metasomatic events that have refertilized the refractory mantle. We interpret the high local mantle fertility beneath the Azores to be derived by the recycling of buoyant oceanic crust material that refertilizes the refractory mantle by percolation of eclogite partial melts, such as those hosted in orthopyroxene porphyroclasts. Our data provide evidence for storage of mafic oceanic slab enclaves in a heterogeneous upper mantle in a region of ocean island basalt volcanism.

  14. Origin of Tertiary to Recent EM- and subduction-like chemical and isotopic signatures in Auca Mahuida region (37°-38°S) and other Patagonian plateau lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Suzanne Mahlburg; Jones, Helen A.; Kay, Robert W.

    2013-07-01

    The alkaline volcanic rocks of the 1.8-0.9 Ma Auca Mahuida and post-mid-Pliocene Rio Colorado backarc volcanic fields east of the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone at ~37°-38°S have pronounced intraplate-like chemical signatures with some striking similarities to oceanic DM-EM1-like lavas of the south Atlantic Tristan da Cunha type. These backarc lavas are considered to have formed as a series of mantle batches typified by 4-7 % melting, with decompression melting initiating in a garnet-bearing mantle above a steepening subduction zone, and final equilibration occurring near the base of a ~65- to 70-km-thick lithosphere at temperatures of ~1,350-1,380 °C. Evolved Auca Mahuida mugearite to trachytic samples are best explained by crystal fractionation with limited mixing of partial melts of recently underplated basalts, in line with isotopic signatures that preclude significant radiogenic contamination in a preexisting refractory crust. Higher Ba/La and subtly higher La/Ta ratios than in nearby ~24-20 Ma primitive basalts or oceanic (OIB) lavas are attributed to the residual effects of slab fluids introduced during a shallow subduction episode recorded in the arc-like chemistry of the adjacent 7-4 Ma Chachahuén volcanic complex. Positive Sr, K and Ba spikes on mantle-normalized patterns of both primitive Auca Mahuida and ~24-20 Ma basalts, like those in EM-like OIB basalts, are attributed to mixing of continental lithosphere into the asthenosphere. In Patagonia, this mixing is suggested to have peaked as the South America continent accommodated to major late Oligocene plate convergence changes, as similar Sr, K and Ba spikes and DM-EM1 signatures are absent in ~50-30 Ma backarc lavas north of 51°S, and all of those south of 51°S. Introduction of an EM1-like component associated with lateral mantle flow of a Tristan da Cunha source is largely precluded by its Cretaceous age and distance to Patagonia.

  15. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of the Neogene-Quaternary Harrat Al-Madinah intercontinental volcanic field, Saudi Arabia: Implications for duration and migration of volcanic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moufti, M. R.; Moghazi, A. M.; Ali, K. A.

    2013-01-01

    New 40Ar/39Ar ages, based on incremental heating techniques for groundmass separates of 25 samples, are presented for the Harrat Al-Madinah volcanic field, part of Harrat Rahat in the north western part of the Arabian plate. This area is an active volcanic field characterized by the occurrence of two historical eruptions approximately in 641 and 1256 AD. Field investigations of the main volcanic landforms indicate dominantly monogenetic strombolian eruptions, in addition to local more explosive eruptions. The lavas consist mainly of olivine basalt and hawaiite flows with minor evolved rocks of mugearite, benmoreite, and trachyte that occur mainly as domes, tuff cones and occasionally as lava flows. Previous K/Ar dating shows that the Harrat Al-Madinah lava flows and associated domes comprise seven units spanning an age range of ca. 1.7 Ma-Recent. The new 40Ar/39Ar age determinations confirm, to a great extent, the previously obtained K/Ar ages in the sense that no major systematic biases were found in the general stratigraphy of the different flow units. However, the 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages show that volcanism in this area began in the Neogene (˜10 Ma) and continued to Recent, with the most voluminous eruptions occurring in the Quaternary. Neogene volcanism occurred in at least three pulses around 10, 5 and 2 Ma, whereas Quaternary volcanism produced at least seven units reflecting lava flow emplacement in the time period of 1.90 Ma-Recent. Thus, the whole duration of volcanic activity in the Harrat Al-Madinah (10 Ma-Recent) appears much longer than that previously identified. The longevity of volcanism in the same part of the moving Arabian plate and absence of evidence for uni-directional migration of volcanic activity indicate that there is no fixed plume beneath this region. The NNW-trending distribution of the volcanic vents is parallel to the Red Sea, and suggests their origin is related to periodic extensional episodes along the reactivated Red Sea fault system.

  16. Paleomagnetism, Geochronology, and Geochemistry of the Type Section of the Stanislaus Group: Reference Parameters from the Stable Sierra Nevada Microplate, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farner, M. J.; Pluhar, C. J.; Asami, R.; Putirka, K. D.; Busby, C.; Renne, P. R.

    2012-12-01

    The Late Miocene Stanislaus Group, of California and Nevada is composed of Table Mountain Formation, Eureka Valley Tuff, and Dardanelles Formation. This ~9.0-~10.2 million year old unit interrupted Miocene andesitic arc volcanism in the Sierra Nevada, providing a regional lithostratigraphic marker that has been used extensively to reconstruct tilt and uplift of the range, Neogene tectonics of the Walker Lane Belt, magmagenetic processes beneath the Sierra Nevada, and lithospheric evolution of the Sierra Nevada and Eastern California. A recent study (Koerner et al, 2009) produced a measured section and geologic map of the Stanislaus Group type section, but until now this locality has never seen comprehensive multidisciplinary study of the geochronology, geochemistry, and magnetostratigraphy of the site and to integrate this into the overall understanding of the Stanislaus Group. Stratigraphy, geochemistry, and paleomagnetism from the type section suggest addition of a basal trachyte lava flow member to the Eureka Valley tuff and adds an additional intermediate-polarity lava flow to Table Mountain Formation magnetostratigraphy. This study dates the youngest member of the Stanislaus Group, the Dardanelles Formation, by 40Ar/39Ar radioisotopic dating for the first time, yielding an age of 9.048 ± 0.017 Ma. Paleomagnetic results verify the previous paleomagnetic reference direction from the Sierra Nevada microplate for the Tollhouse Flat Member of the Eureka Valley Tuff (King et al., 2007). However, our work revises the By-Day Member reference direction to D = 349.6°, I = 51.9° n = 8, α95 = 3.0°, k = 346. This difference is because the prior work analyzed By-Day localities within the tectonically-active Walker Lane Belt. The revised reference direction is critical for measurements of relative vertical-axis rotation studies in the Walker Lane. Our study also demonstrates that little to no vertical-axis rotation of the Sierra Nevada microplate has occurred since Stanislaus Group emplacement. Geochemistry suggests that a distinct set of magma chambers and vents sourced the Table Mountain Formation lavas at the type section, which were different from magma sources emplacing lavas at Sonora Peak and Grouse Meadow. Type section Table Mountain lavas underwent a distinct magmatic evolutionary history, perhaps involving fractionation at shallower depths compared to the Sonora Pass and Grouse Meadows flows.

  17. Age of Magmatism and Eurekan Deformation in North Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegner, Christian; Storey, Michael; Holm, Paul M.; Thorarinsson, Sigurjon; Knudsen, Mads F.

    2014-05-01

    The alpine mountains of Northernmost Greenland are composed of Phanerozoic sediments and volcanic rocks that make up a broadly East-West striking orogenic belt. The major components include: 1) Cambrian-Devonian sediments deposited in the Franklinian Basin; 2) Ellesmerian (365-345 Ma) deformation of these sediments into a fold belt; 3) renewed extension and deposition of Carboniferous-Cretaceous sediments and Cretaceous-Paleogene volcanic rocks of the Kap Washington Group; and 4) Eurekan deformation of sediments and volcanic rocks. We present results of 40Ar-39Ar, U-Pb and Rb-Sr dating of volcanic rocks of the Kap Washington Group. This volcanic succesion is part of the High Arctic Large Igneous Province, exceeds 5 km in thickness, and is composed of bimodal alkaline flows, agglomerates and ignimbrites including peralkaline compositions typical of continental rifts such as the East African Rift. Based on zircon U-Pb and amphibole 40Ar-39Ar ages most volcanics were emplaced at 71-68 Ma, but activity continued down to 61 Ma. A thermal resetting age of 49-47 Ma is also identified in 40Ar-39Ar whole-rock data for trachyte flows. Patch perthite feldspars and coeval resetting of Rb-Sr isotopes by hydrothermal fluids provide further support for thermal overprinting, interpreted as a result of Eurekan compressional tectonism. It is striking that North Greenland volcanism terminated at about the same time (c. 61 Ma) as magmatism in the North Atlantic Large Igneous Province began. We suggest that this was a corollary of a change from extensional to compressional tectonism in the High Arctic. In the period when Greenland moved together with Eurasia (>60 Ma), the separation from North America resulted in rift-related alkaline magmatism in the High Arctic. When Greenland subsequently moved as a separate plate (60-35 Ma), overlapping spreading on both sides pushed it northwards and volcanism in the High Arctic stopped due to compression. Evaluation of plate kinematic models shows that the relative northwards movement of Greenland culminated in the Eocene, coinciding with thermal resetting. We conclude that compression in North Greenland peaked at 49-47 Ma and coincided with the Eurekan Orogeny in a belt across the Canadian Arctic Islands and western Svalbard.

  18. Reconciling the Shadow of a Subduction Signature with Rift Geochemistry and Tectonic Environment in Eastern Marie Byrd Land, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeMasurier, W. E.; Choi, S.

    2013-12-01

    Basalt-trachyte volcanoes in the Marie Byrd Land (MBL) Cenozoic province lie along the Amundsen Sea coast on the north flank of the West Antarctic rift. In the province as a whole, the basalts are characterized by OIB-like geochemistry, restricted ranges of 87Sr/86Sr (0.70254 - 0.70368) and 143Nd/144Nd (0.51286 - 0.51368) and a wide range of 206Pb/204Pb (19.50 - 20.69). Basalts at three volcanoes in central and eastern MBL, of Miocene and Quaternary age, display a variety of geochemical anomalies compared with the above. These include low 143Nd/144Nd (0.51276 - 0.51281), very high Ba (e.g. 1398ppm) associated with low K and low Th, slightly depressed Nb and Ta, and elevated EM2 signatures. These are only erratically displayed, from one volcano to another, and even from one sample locality to another in the same volcano. In some cases, anomalous sample localities lie above or below sample localities with relatively 'normal' characteristics. Furthermore, the whole complement of anomalies is rarely displayed in a single sample. These characteristics suggest a subduction influence, but one that seems to have been filtered, or partly masked. Major episodes of subduction and granite plutonism in MBL took place in the late Devonian, Permian, and late Cretaceous. The last of these ended ~90 Ma, and was followed by continental break-up, rifting and lithospheric attenuation that produced the West Antarctic rift as we know it today. Thus, the enigmatic geochemical signatures in these three volcanoes may have been acquired 80-90 m.y. after subduction ended, and following the subsequent tectonic reorganization to a rift environment. We suspect that the sublithospheric source was heterogeneously and incompletely metasomatized by fluids that originated with slab dewatering during the subduction episodes. Interestingly, pelagic rocks, probably similar to those that were subducted, have geochemical characteristics that seem to be reflected in the geochemical anomalies of the basalts, and thus, could have been somehow involved in the metasomatizing process.

  19. The effects of acid leaching on 40Ar/39Ar age dating results using samples from the Walvis Ridge hotspot trail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klath, J. F.; Koppers, A. A.; Heaton, D. E.; Schnur, S.

    2013-12-01

    In this study we systematically explore how acid leaching can be used to reduce the negative effects of seawater alteration on the 40Ar/39Ar age dating of submarine basalts. Koppers et al (2000) showed that acid leaching of groundmass samples generated more consistent ages as well as ages more concordant with phenocrystic mineral phases, compared to samples that were left untreated. By studying the effects of progressively increasing the strength and length of acid treatment, we will show how acid leaching of groundmass separates reduces alteration while leaving the initial eruption signature intact. Samples were chosen from the Walvis ridge hotspot trail in the southeast Atlantic. Three samples were selected based on degree and style of alteration. Two samples (basalt and basaltic andesite) appear highly altered in thin section. The basalt contains diffuse iddingsite alteration that is pervasive throughout the groundmass. The basaltic andesite displays focused secondary mineral phases within and around abundant vesicles. The third sample, a trachyte, shows relatively minor degrees of alteration in thin section. These groundmass separates were divided into four splits and treated with a progressively stronger acid and for longer duration. One split from each rock was left untreated to act as a baseline. Of the other three splits from each sample, one was treated with a mild leach (1N HCl and 1N HNO3), one a strong leach (1N HCl, 1N HNO3, 6N HCl, and 3N HNO3), and lastly the strong leach performed twice. The samples were then handpicked to remove any remaining visible alteration. The untreated samples were picked as well, removing the most distinctly altered grains. All splits were analyzed by electron microprobe, x-ray fluorescence (XRF) and the incremental heating 40Ar/39Ar dating method. We will report on the results of an image analysis of microprobe backscatter images and elemental maps taken of individual groundmass grains. This analysis will show the location of alteration within the groundmass and how it is changing as acid leaching strength and duration progresses. We will discuss bulk composition comparisons as well as how depletions and enrichments vary amongst major and trace elements. Lastly, we will report 40Ar/39Ar step heating results, in particular K/Ca ratios and age spectra, to better understand the effect of leaching strength on the effective removal of groundmass alteration during 40Ar/39Ar age dating.

  20. Seismic properties of magmatic processes at laboratory scale: Effects of crystallization and bubble nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripoli, Barbara; Cordonnier, Benoit; Ulmer, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Seismic tomography of potentially hazardous volcanoes is a prime tool to assess the dimensions of magmatic reservoirs and possible magmatic ascent. Magma rheology and volcanic eruptive style are to a first order controlled by processes occurring in the conduit or in the chamber, such as crystallization and bubble exsolution. Seismic velocities are strongly affected by these processes (Carrichi et al, 2009) but the only few constrained measurements don't allow yet to establish a link between seismic tomography and the textural state of the volcanic system. Elastic parameters of vapor-saturated, partially molten systems are thus providing fundamental information for the identification of such reservoirs under active and seemingly dormant volcanoes. We investigated a chemically simplified melt analogous to andesite and trachyte, in the system CaO-Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O-CO2 (Picard et al, 2011), which undergoes plagioclase crystallization and bubble exsolution. Using a Paterson-type internally-heated gas pressure apparatus, we measured the ultrasonic velocities at a constant pressure of 250 MPa and at a frequency of 0.1 MHz. Samples have been first heated at 850 °C for 30 minutes. Subsequently, the temperature has been decreased to 650 °C at a rate of 0.5 or 0.1 °C/min and velocities were recorded every 45 minutes. In order to characterize the microstructure evolution, series of cold-seal experiments at identical pressure conditions but with rapid-quenching at each of the recorded temperatures have been undertaken. We will present new experimental results that clarify the dependence of the seismic velocities on the evolution of microstructures (bubble and crystal-size distribution) as well as the evolution of composition (melt and crystals). REFERENCES Caricchi, L., Burlini, L., and Ulmer, P. (2009) Propagation of P and S-waves in magmas with different crystal contents: insights into the crystallinity of magmatic reservoirs. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 178, 740-750. Picard D., Arbaret L., Pichavant M., Champallier R. and Launeau P. (2011). Rheology and microstructure of experimentally deformed plagioclase suspensions, Geology, 39, 747-750.

  1. Improving the sensitivity of an interferometric fiber optic sensor for acoustic detection in rockfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenato, L.; Palmieri, L.; Autizi, E.; Galtarossa, A.; Pasuto, A.

    2013-12-01

    Being intrinsically EMI free and offering superior hostile environment operation, fiber optic sensor technology represents a valuable alternative to standard sensors technology in landslides monitoring. Here an improved design for a fiber optic sensor to be used for ultrasonic acoustic detection in rockfall monitoring is proposed. Basically, the original sensor consists of a fiber coil tightly wound on an aluminum flanged hollow mandrel that acts as the sensing arm of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer [1]. To further improve sensor sensitivity, the use of a special fiber, with polyimide coating and very large numerical aperture, has been proposed and tested. The polyimide coating, harder and thinner than standard coating, makes the fiber more sensitive to acoustic waves and increase the coupling efficiency between fiber and mandrel. At the same time, a fiber with very large numerical aperture allows for a much smaller bending radius and thus enables the design of a sensor with reduced size, or with the same external size but housing a longer fiber. Part of the research activity has been then focused toward the optimization of the shape and dimensions of the mandrel: to this aim, a large set of numerical simulations has been performed and they are here presented and discussed. The performance assessment gained with new sensors has been carried in a controlled scenario by using a block of trachyte in which the sensors have been screwed in internally threaded chemical anchors housed in holes drilled on one face of the block. Ultrasonic signals have been generated in a repeatable way by dropping a 5-mm-diameter steel ball along a steep slide. Experimental tests, carried out by firstly comparing the performance of a sensor made with special fiber with respect to the original one, have shown an increased sensitivity of almost 35 % in the detected acoustic energy. Further tests, carried out on a sensor with optimized dimensions and made with special fiber, have shown an increased sensitivity of an impressive 400% with respect to the sensor with special fiber, but original dimensions. These results further confirm the viability of fiber optic acoustic sensors for acoustic detection in rockfall monitoring. Moreover, it is shown how an optimized design can be allowed only by choosing the adequate fiber. References: [1] L. Schenato, L. Palmieri, G. Gruca, D. Iannuzzi, G. Marcato, A. Pasuto, A. Galtarossa, "Fiber optic sensors for precursory acoustic signals detection in rockfall events", J. Eur. Opt. Soc, Rapid Publ. 7, 2012.

  2. Geology and geochemistry of Pelagatos, Cerro del Agua, and Dos Cerros monogenetic volcanoes in the Sierra Chichinautzin Volcanic Field, south of México City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agustín-Flores, Javier; Siebe, Claus; Guilbaud, Marie-Noëlle

    2011-04-01

    This study focuses on the geology and geochemistry of three closely-spaced monogenetic volcanoes that are located in the NE sector of the Sierra Chichinautzin Volcanic Field near México City. Pelagatos (3020 m.a.s.l.) is a small scoria cone (0.0017 km 3) with lava flows (0.036 km 3) that covered an area of 4.9 km 2. Cerro del Agua scoria cone (3480 m.a.s.l., 0.028 km 3) produced several lava flows (0.24 km 3) covering an area of 17.6 km 2. Dos Cerros is a lava shield which covers an area of 80.3 km 2 and is crowned by two scoria cones: Tezpomayo (3080 m.a.s.l., 0.022 km 3) and La Ninfa (3000 m.a.s.l., 0.032 km 3). The eruptions of Cerro del Agua and Pelagatos occurred between 2500 and 14,000 yr BP. The Dos Cerros eruption took place close to 14,000 yr BP as constrained by radiocarbon dating. Rocks from these three volcanoes are olivine-hypersthene normative basaltic andesites and andesites with porphyritic, aphanitic, and glomeroporphyritic textures. Their mineral assemblages include olivine, clinopyroxene, and orthopyroxene phenocrysts (≤ 10 vol.%) embedded in a trachytic groundmass which consists mainly of plagioclase microlites and glass. Pelagatos rocks also present quartz xenocrysts. Due to their high Cr and Ni contents, and high Mg#s, Pelagatos rocks are considered to be derived from primitive magmas, hence the importance of this volcano for understanding petrogenetic processes in this region. Major and trace element abundances and petrography of products from these volcanoes indicate a certain degree of crystal fractionation during ascent to the surface. However, the magmas that formed the volcanoes evolved independently from each other and are not cogenetically related. REE, HFSE, LILE, and isotopic (Sr, Nd, and Pb) compositions point towards a heterogeneous mantle source that has been metasomatized by aqueous/melt phases from the subducted Cocos slab. There is no clear evidence of important crustal contributions in the compositions of Pelagatos and Cerro del Agua rocks. The Sr-isotopic composition of Dos Cerros, however, indicates a small degree of crustal contamination.

  3. Geochemical and temporal patterns of felsic volcanism in Ethiopia

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, R.C.; Westgate, J.A.; Giday, W.G.; Aronson, J.L.; Hart, W.K.

    1985-01-01

    At least three major geochemical groups characterize late Cenozoic felsic volcanism exposed in the central Ethiopian Rift graben or along its uplifted margins. Each group is distinguished by age and/or position with distinctive compositional traits that are probably tectonically controlled. They include: (1) large-volume Pliocene tholeiitic to calcalkaline rhyolitic ignimbrites that form >500m thick exposures along the rift margins. These have moderate FeO/sub T/ (1.5-3.0%), low CaO (<0.5%) and moderately steep REE slopes (Ce/Yb = 21-24) with large negative Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu* = 0.2-0.4). K/Ar ages range from 4.5 to 3.0 Ma. These ignimbrites must have been associated with major caldera-forming events, but no calderas of this age or chemistry have yet been found; (2) Plio-Pleistocene trachytic volcanoes occur on the Ethiopian Highland, parallel to the rift axis. These have low SiO/sub 2/ (60-70%), high FeO/sub T/ (4-8%) and steep REE patterns (Ce/Yb = 25-37) with very small negative Eu anomalies (0.8-0.9). The volcanoes of Chilalo, Kaka, Hunkulu and the Bada Range are of this group. K/Ar ages range from 3.5 to 1.0 Ma; (3) Pleistocene peralkaline rhyolitic volcanoes of the Ethiopian Rift graben have high FeO/sub T/ (5-8%), high Na/sub 2/O (6-8%) and shallow REE profiles (Ce/Yb = 14-21) with small Eu anomalies (0.5 to 0.6). K/Ar ages range from 0.5 to <0.05 Ma. The volcanoes of Aluto and Dofen are of this group. Eruption of Group 1 signaled the modern rapid development of the present rift; Group 2 overlapped in time and mainly was confined to the Plateau margins; and Group 3 represents the present mature stage of rift floor volcanism.

  4. Fluvial geochemistry in São Miguel Island (Azores, Portugal): source and fluxes of inorganic solutes in an active volcanic environment.

    PubMed

    Freire, P; Andrade, C; Coutinho, R; Cruz, J V

    2013-06-01

    River water chemistry in two of the major rivers in São Miguel Island (Azores archipelago, Portugal) has been characterized monthly between June 2010 and October 2011 in order to estimate the main geochemical processes that explain water composition and to estimate solute fluxes and the thermal water input to rivers. Both rivers (Ribeira Grande - RRG, and Ribeira Quente - RRQ) drain active trachytic central volcanoes. The number of sampling stations is seven in RRG and six in RRQ. Rivers are mainly slightly acid to basic in nature (pH in the range 5.41-8.70 in RRG and 5.90-8.10 in RRQ) and from the Na-HCO3 and Na-HCO3-Cl water types. In both cases water temperature increases towards the river mouth and median values are slightly higher in Ribeira Quente (15.5-22.4°C) comparing to Ribeira Grande river (15.2-19.7°C). Electrical conductivity suggests poorly mineralized waters (139-456 μS/cm in RRG and 209-402 μS/cm in RRQ, and values increase downstream. Higher solute fluxes are associated to HCO3 and Na, and the total CO2 flux is equal to 3647 t/yr in RRQ and 7546 t/yr in RRG. Mixture with thermal water discharges also influences river water chemistry and in RRQ the contribution to the annual average discharge rate was estimated in 2.96×10(6)m(3)/yr (12.8% of overall discharge rate in the watershed). In RRG thermal water discharges were estimated in 2.4×10(6)m(3)/yr (14.9% of the discharge rate). The minimum total CO2-consumption associated with low-temperature weathering is equal to 0.58×10(6)mol/km(2)/yr in Ribeira Quente river and equal to 0.78×10(6)mol/km(2)/yr in Ribeira Grande river. PMID:23542489

  5. Major element, REE, and Pb, Nd and Sr isotopic geochemistry of Cenozoic volcanic rocks of eastern China: implications for their origin from suboceanic-type mantle reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Basu, A.R.; Wang, Junwen; Huang, Wankang; Xie, Guanghong; Tatsumoto, M.

    1991-01-01

    Major- and rare-earth-element (REE) concentrations and UThPb, SmNd, and RbSr isotope systematics are reported for Cenozoic volcanic rocks from northeastern and eastern China. These volcanic rocks, characteristically lacking the calc-alkaline suite of orogenic belts, were emplaced in a rift system which formed in response to the subduction of the western Pacific plate beneath the eastern Asiatic continental margin. The rocks sampled range from basanite and alkali olivine basalt, through olivine tholeiite and quartz tholeiite, to potassic basalts, alkali trachytes, pantellerite, and limburgite. These rock suites represent the volcanic centers of Datong, Hanobar, Kuandian, Changbaishan and Wudalianchi in northeastern China, and Mingxi in the Fujian Province of eastern China. The major-element and REE geochemistry is characteristic of each volcanic suite broadly evolving through cogenetic magmatic processes. Some of the outstanding features of the isotopic correlation arrays are as follows: (1) NdSr shows an anticorrelation within the field of ocean island basalts, extending from the MORB end-member to an enriched, time-averaged high Rb Sr and Nd Sr end-member (EM1), (2) SrPb also shows an anticorrelation, similar to that of Hawaiian and walvis Ridge basalts, (3) NdPb shows a positive correlation, and (4) the 207Pb 204Pb vs 206Pb 204Pb plot shows linear arrays parallel to the general trend (NHRL) for MORB on both sides of the geochron, although in the 208Pb 204Pb vs 206Pb 204Pb plot the linear array is significantly displaced above the NHRL in a pattern similar to that of the oceanic island basalts that show the Dupal signatures. In all isotope correlation patterns, the data arrays define two different mantle components-a MORB-like component and an enriched mantle component. The isotopic data presented here clearly demonstrate the existence of Dupal compositions in the sources of the continental volcanic rocks of eastern China. We suggest that the subcontinental mantle beneath eastern China served as the reservoir for the EMI component, and that the MORB component was either introduced by subduction of the Kula-Pacific Ridge beneath the Asiatic plate in the Late Cretaceous, as proposed by Uyeda and Miyashiro, or by upwellings in the subcontinental asthenosphere due to subduction. ?? 1991.

  6. The occurrence of a complete continental rift type of volcanic rocks suite along the Yerer-Tullu Wellel Volcano Tectonic Lineament, Central Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abebe Adhana, Tsegaye

    2014-11-01

    The Yerer-Tullu Wellel Volcano-tectonic Lineament (YTVL) is an E-W trending fault system or aborted rift that intercepts the Main Ethiopian Rift (MER) at Debre Zeyt (Bishoftu)/Yerer, in the eastern periphery of Addis Ababa. The structure is in correspondence with the westward extension of the southern margin of the Gulf of Aden rift. The YTVL extends for more than 500 km with a very clear northern fault margin, between Addis Ababa and Ambo known as the “Ambo Fault”. The southern margin is indicated by an E-W trending segmented lineaments at the latitude of about N 8°30‧, the Bedele-Metu being the most clear segment. In between these limits there are several evolved central volcanoes and cinder cones. The central volcanoes range in age from 12 to 7 Ma in the western most (Tullu Wellel) and gradually the upper limit get younger towards East to less than 1 Ma in the Wenchi and Debre Zeyt (Bishoftu) areas. These volcanic products cover the whole spectrum of a continental rift volcanic rocks suite: (1) in the eastern zone (Yerer-Bishoftu) the suite is silica over-saturated, ranging in composition from transitional basalt to peralkaline rhyolite, (2) moving westwards, between Wechacha and Wenchi, the rocks suite is silica saturated ranging in composition from alkali basalt to trachyte, (3) further West between Ijaji-Konchi and Nekemt the rocks suite is silica under-saturated ranging in composition from basanite to phonolite. Crossing the Dedessa lineament, the Tullu Wellel rocks appear to be silica saturated. Within a single suite fractional crystallization is the predominant evolutional process even in the silica over-saturated suite. The westwards progressive silica under-saturation and increase in alkalinity (except for the Tullu Wellel volcanic centers) is interpreted by the gradual deepening of an anomalous mantle where partial fusion took place. Therefore, as distance increases from the MER junction to the West, the amount of melt on the upper mantle was gradually reduced and became more alkaline but poorer in silica.

  7. Geologic map of the Tetilla Peak Quadrangle, Santa Fe and Sandoval counties, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sawyer, D.A.; Shroba, R.R.; Minor, S.A.; Thompson, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    This digital geologic map summarizes all available geologic information for the Tetilla Peak quadrangle located immediately southwest of Santa Fe, New Mexico. The geologic map consists of new polygon (geologic map units) and line (contact, fault, fold axis, dike, flow contact, hachure) data, as well as point data (locations for structural measurements, geochemical and geochronologic data, geophysical soundings, and water wells). The map database has been generated at 1:24,000 scale, and provides significant new geologic information for an area of the southern Cerros del Rio volcanic field, which sits astride the boundary of the Espanola and Santo Domingo basins of the Rio Grande rift. The quadrangle includes the west part of the village of La Cienega along its eastern border and includes the southeasternmost part of the Cochiti Pueblo reservation along its northwest side. The central part of the quadrangle consists of Santa Fe National Forest and Bureau of Land Management lands, and parts of several Spanish-era land grants. Interstate 25 cuts through the southern half of the quadrangle between Santa Fe and Santo Domingo Pueblo. Canada de Santa Fe, a major river tributary to the Rio Grande, cuts through the quadrangle, but there is no dirt or paved road along the canyon bottom. A small abandoned uranium mine (the La Bajada mine) is found in the bottom of the Canada de Santa Fe about 3 km east of the La Bajada fault zone; it has been partially reclaimed. The surface geology of the Tetilla Peak quadrangle consists predominantly of a thin (1-2 m generally, locally as thick as 10? m) layer of windblown surficial deposits that has been reworked colluvially. Locally, landslide, fluvial, and pediment deposits are also important. These colluvial deposits mantle the principal bedrocks units, which are (from most to least common): (1) basalts, basanites, andesite, and trachyte of the Pliocene (2.7-2.2 Ma) Cerros del Rio volcanic field; (2) unconsolidated deposits of the Santa Fe Group, mainly along the western border, in the hanging wall of the La Bajada fault zone, but locally extending 2-3 km east under the Cerros del Rio volcanic field; (3) older Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary rocks (Abiquiu?, Espinaso, and Galisteo Formations); (4) intrusive rocks of the Cerrillos intrusive center that are roughly coeval with the Espinaso volcanic rocks; and (5) Mesozoic sedimentary rocks ranging in age from the Upper Triassic Chinle Formation to the Upper Cretaceous Mancos Shale.

  8. The relationship between carbonate facies, volcanic rocks and plant remains in a late Palaeozoic lacustrine system (San Ignacio Fm, Frontal Cordillera, San Juan province, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busquets, P.; Méndez-Bedia, I.; Gallastegui, G.; Colombo, F.; Cardó, R.; Limarino, O.; Heredia, N.; Césari, S. N.

    2013-07-01

    The San Ignacio Fm, a late Palaeozoic foreland basin succession that crops out in the Frontal Cordillera (Argentinean Andes), contains lacustrine microbial carbonates and volcanic rocks. Modification by extensive pedogenic processes contributed to the massive aspect of the calcareous beds. Most of the volcanic deposits in the San Ignacio Fm consist of pyroclastic rocks and resedimented volcaniclastic deposits. Less frequent lava flows produced during effusive eruptions led to the generation of tabular layers of fine-grained, greenish or grey andesites, trachytes and dacites. Pyroclastic flow deposits correspond mainly to welded ignimbrites made up of former glassy pyroclasts devitrified to microcrystalline groundmass, scarce crystals of euhedral plagioclase, quartz and K-feldspar, opaque minerals, aggregates of fine-grained phyllosilicates and fiammes defining a bedding-parallel foliation generated by welding or diagenetic compaction. Widespread silicified and silica-permineralized plant remains and carbonate mud clasts are found, usually embedded within the ignimbrites. The carbonate sequences are underlain and overlain by volcanic rocks. The carbonate sequence bottoms are mostly gradational, while their tops are usually sharp. The lower part of the carbonate sequences is made up of mud which appear progressively, filling interstices in the top of the underlying volcanic rocks. They gradually become more abundant until they form the whole of the rock fabric. Carbonate on volcanic sandstones and pyroclastic deposits occur, with the nucleation of micritic carbonate and associated production of pyrite. Cyanobacteria, which formed the locus of mineral precipitation, were related with this nucleation. The growth of some of the algal mounds was halted by the progressive accumulation of volcanic ash particles, but in most cases the upper boundary is sharp and suddenly truncated by pyroclastic flows or volcanic avalanches. These pyroclastic flows partially destroyed the carbonate beds and palaeosols. Microbial carbonate clasts, silicified and silica-permineralized tree trunks, log stumps and other plant remains such as small branches and small roots inside pieces of wood (interpreted as fragments of nurse logs) are commonly found embedded within the ignimbrites. The study of the carbonate and volcanic rocks of the San Ignacio Fm allows the authors to propose a facies model that increases our understanding of lacustrine environments that developed in volcanic settings.

  9. The extimated presence of differentiated higly explosive magmas beneath Vesuvius and Campi Flegrei: evidence from geochemical and textural studies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappalardo, Lucia; Mastrolorenzo, Giuseppe

    2010-05-01

    Highly catastrophic explosive eruptions are supplied by Si-rich magmas, generated at shallower level in crust by the evolution of mantle liquids. The timescale of these evolution processes is a crucial factor, because of its control on the length of volcano repose interval leading to high explosive events. Campi Flegrei and Somma-Vesuvius alkaline volcanic systems, located respectively at few kilometers west and east of Neapolitan metropolitan area, produced a variety of eruptions ranging from not explosive lava flows and domes to highly destructive eruptions. Both these high risk volcanoes are in repose time since the last eruption occurred in the 1538 and 1944 BP, respectively. Since that time, the volcanoes experienced fumarolic activity, low level of seismicity with rare earthquakes swarms, as well as two bradyseismic crisis (1969-1972 and 1982-1984) localized in the center of Campi Flegrei caldera, that generated a net uplift of 3.5 m around the town of Pozzuoli. A wide low velocity layer interpreted as an extended magmatic body has been detected at 8-10 km depth beneath these volcanoes by seismic data. The capability of this reservoir to erupt explosively again strongly depends on magma differentiation degree, therefore the knowledge of the time lapse necessary at not explosive mafic liquids to differentiate toward explosive magmas is very crucial to predict the size of a possible short-term future eruption in Campanian area. Our petrologic data indicate that a multi-depth supply system was active under the Campanian Plain since 39 ka. Fractional crystallization during magma cooling associated with upward migration of less dense evolved liquids appears to be the prevalent differentiation process. Our results indicate that huge steam exolution occurred during the late stage of trachyte and phonolite crystallization thus accounting for the high Volcanic Explosivity Index (VEI) of eruptions supplied by these melts. Moreover our CSD data on phenocrysts reveal rapid crystallization and differentiation time for alkaline Campanian magmas (in the order of decades to few centuries). This evidence implies that the 400 km2 partial melting zone detected by tomography study at 8-10 km depth beneath Vesuvius and Campi Flegrei, should consist of differentiated magma already capable to produce also large scale (plinian) explosive events in case of renewal of the activity from the present closed-conduit state.

  10. The seasonal variation for the discharge and water quality of a stream in volcanic island, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, K.; Moon, D.; Park, K.

    2007-12-01

    Assessment of the groundwater resources in a volcanic island is so difficult, because permeable and impermeable layers were formed from lava flows in different times and various lithologies. Jeju island is the largest volcanic island in Korea, and is composed of plateau and shield forming basaltic to trachytic lava flows, numerous tuff rings/cones, scoria cones during its long volcanic history (about 1.8 Ma). Most of streams in Jeju island are dry in normal times. Owing to high permeable geologic features such as clinkers, stream run-off occurs when precipitation is over 40 mm/day. To understand runoff phenomena in Jeju island, some streams are monitored automatically about stream stage, and water quality. Oedocheon (cheon means stream) is monitored during the normal and runoff period. Oedocheon is a permanent stream in Jeju island, and its water quantity and quality is originated by a spring water from lava flow boundaries. The surface limit and watershed parameters for the Oedocheon watershed were created and calculated by WMS software. Stream stages respond very quick during the runoff time, but the duration of the runoff is so short about a few hours. Parameters such as landuse, soil condition, preconditioned rainfall, and vegetables influence runoff phenomena. Periodic stream discharge measurements and chemical analyses of the water were preformed in order to analyze the seasonal variation of the stream water quantity and quality in normal times. Considering water intake quantities, ordinary stream discharge is 2,569~50,415 m3/day, average 21,215m3/day. Water qualities are dependent on each measurement season. Electrical conductivity is 101.7-202.0 ¥ìS/cm, pH is 7.38-8.38, and water temperature is 10.8-23.3¡É. Major ion concentrations also varies seasonally. Mg is 2.39-7.45 mg/l, Ca is 4.11-11.54 mg/l, Na is 4.80-13.24 mg/l, K is 1.64-3.47 mg/l, SO4 is 2.78-8.25 mg/l, HCO3 is 17.78-36.61 mg/l, and Cl is 6.43-22.77 mg/l. The stream discharge and water quality are so correlated with rainfall. The analyses of the responses to the rainfall in each season can be used to estimate the size of the underground groundwater watershed.

  11. Magmatic Evolution of the Western Azores Islands (Corvo and Flores)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larrea, P.; Galé, C.; Ubide, T.; Widom, E.; Lago, M.; França, Z.; Tierz, P.

    2012-12-01

    Corvo and Flores islands belong to the western group of the Azores archipelago, to the west of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Several studies have proposed a common magmatic evolution for both islands. However, most of these studies focus on other Azorean islands. In order to investigate the processes that control the evolution of Corvo and Flores we have studied representative samples of the whole volcanostratigraphical sequence in both islands, including lava flows and dikes. Similarly to other oceanic islands, Corvo and Flores are made up of an alternation of porphyritic rocks and microlitic rocks. The former are picrobasalts and basalts with 5 to 60 volume fraction of large (2-15 mm), primitive antecrysts of olivine, clinopyroxene and plagioclase. The latter are Mg-poor hawaites to trachytes. The Mg-rich composition of the porphyritic rocks is due to the accumulation of primitive antecrysts within a more evolved groundmass. In contrast, the composition of the microlitic rocks provides information on the differentiation processes that controlled the evolution of both islands. The microlitic rocks present holocrystalline to hypocrystalline textures with a mineral assemblage mainly composed of microcrysts of plagioclase, olivine, clinopyroxene opaque minerals and accessory amphibole and apatite. Their major element whole rock composition can be best modeled by a polybaric fractional crystallization process (MELTS software) starting at 500 MPa with cooling steps of 5 degrees Celsius and a water content of 1 %, starting from the most primitive analyzed microlitic rock (MgO: 9.04%; Cr: 630 ppm; Ni: 200 ppm). Hence, we confirm that both islands derived from a common primary magma. The crystallization of the antecrysts included in the porphyritic rocks was probably related to the initial stages of the differentiation process. On the other hand, the microlitic rocks and the groundmass of the porphyritic rocks are related to the residual melts of the polybaric fractional crystallization process, probably at shallower magmatic chambers (< 15 km). In conclusion, the processes of fractional crystallization and accumulation of antecrysts control the composition of the products of Corvo and Flores volcanic islands.

  12. Post-caldera faulting of the Late Quaternary Menengai caldera, Central Kenya Rift (0.20°S, 36.07°E)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedl, Simon; Melnick, Daniel; Mibei, Geoffrey K.; Njue, Lucy; Strecker, Manfred R.

    2015-04-01

    A structural geological analysis of young caldera volcanoes is necessary to characterize their volcanic activity, assess their geothermal potential, and decipher the spatio-temporal relationships of faults on a larger tectonic scale. Menengai caldera is one of several major Quaternary trachytic caldera volcanoes that are aligned along the volcano-tectonic axis of the Kenya Rift, the archetypal active magmatic rift and nascent plate boundary between the Nubia and Somalia plates. The caldera covers an area of approximately 80 km² and is among the youngest and also largest calderas in the East African Rift, situated close to Nakuru - a densely populated urban area. There is an increasing interest in caldera volcanoes in the Kenya Rift, because these are sites of relatively young volcanic and tectonic activity, and they are considered important sites for geothermal exploration and future use for the generation of geothermal power. Previous studies of Menengai showed that the caldera collapsed in a multi-event, multiple-block style, possibly as early as 29 ka. In an attempt to characterize the youngest tectonic activity along the volcano-tectonic axis in the transition between the Central and Northern Kenya rifts we first used a high-resolution digital surface model, which we derived by structure-from-motion from an unmanned aerial vehicle campaign. This enabled us to identify previously unrecognized normal faults, associated dyke intrusions and volcanic eruptive centers, and transfer faults with strike-slip kinematics in the caldera interior and its vicinity. In a second step we verified these structures at outcrop scale, assessed their relationship with known stratigraphic horizons and dated units, and performed detailed fault measurements, which we subsequently used for fault-kinematic analysis. The most important structures that we mapped are a series of north-northeast striking normal faults, which cross-cut both the caldera walls and early Holocene lake shorelines outside the caldera. These faults have similar strikes as Pleistocene faults that define the left-stepping, north-northeast oriented segments of the volcano-tectonic axis of the inner trough of the Central Kenya Rift. In the center of the caldera, these faults are kinematically linked with oblique-slip and strike-slip transfer faults, similar to other sectors in the Central Kenya Rift. The structural setup of Menengai and the faults to the north and south of the eruptive center is thus compatible with tectono-magmatic activity in an oblique extensional tectonic regime, which reflects the tectonic and seismic activity along a nascent plate boundary.

  13. Unusual evolution of silica-under- and -oversaturated alkaline rocks in the Cenozoic Ambohimirahavavy Complex (Madagascar): Mineralogical and geochemical evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrade, Guillaume; Béziat, Didier; Salvi, Stefano; Tiepolo, Massimo; Paquette, Jean-Louis; Rakotovao, Soatsitohaina

    2014-10-01

    The almost unknown Ambohimirahavavy ring complex in the Cenozoic alkaline province of northwestern Madagascar has recently attracted considerable interest because of the discovery of important rare-metal mineralization. The complex consists of arc-shaped bodies made up of silica-under- and -oversaturated syenites and extremely evolved peralkaline granitic dykes, as well as several mafic to felsic volcanic units, including basalt, phonolite and trachyte, all of which have an alkaline affinity. Uranium-lead zircon ages of 24.2 ± 0.6 Ma and 23.5 ± 6.8 Ma have been obtained for nepheline syenites and peralkaline granitic dykes, respectively, which, together with field data and ages of neighboring complexes, support emplacement controlled by regional lithospheric structures, rather than an evolving hot spot. Whole-rock major and trace-element and Sr-Nd isotopic data for the mafic suite suggest that the parental melt of this complex was generated by low degrees of melting of a metasomatized mantle source with residual amphibole. Fractional crystallization of this alkali basaltic melt likely produced the silica-undersaturated suite. We propose that the silica-oversaturated suite evolved from the undersaturated melt after contamination of the latter by crustal material. Further evolution to peralkaline compositions in both suites is attributed mainly to plagioclase and alkali feldspar segregation. Nepheline and feldspar compositions, as well as considerations of mineral equilibria among mafic silicates and Fe-Ti oxide minerals indicate crystallization temperatures of 1000 to 700 °C and an oxygen fugacity of 0.4 to 0.8 log units below the fayalite-magnetite-quartz (FMQ) buffer at 1 kbar for the silica-undersaturated melt, and temperatures of 860 to 570 °C and an oxygen fugacity of 1.5 to 3.8 log units below FMQ for the oversaturated syenitic melt. The undersaturated melt evolved towards a more peralkaline composition. Crystallization of arfvedsonite plus aegirine further reduced the melt the evolution of which ended with fluid exsolution. At late stages of crystallization, the oversaturated melt departed from the reducing trend of the undersaturated melt, evolving towards high oxygen fugacity. Very late exsolution of the fluid permitted concentration of the HFSE in the last stages of magmatic evolution with local production of low-temperature pegmatitic phases extremely enriched in these elements.

  14. Subduction-related High- to Ultrahigh-Potassic Rocks of the Ankara-Erzincan Suture Belt of Turkey: a geochemical and isotopic approach to source and petrogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genc, S. Can; Gulmez, Fatma; Karacik, Zekiye; Tuysuz, Okan; Prelevic, Dejan; Roden, Michael F.; Hames, Willis E.; Zeki Billor, M.

    2014-05-01

    A Late Cretaceous Volcano-sedimantary Succession (LCVS) trends parallel to Neo-Tethyan Suture in North Central Anatolia. Volcanic members of the LCVS consist mainy of coeval leucite phonolite/tephrites, trachytes, lamprophyres and andesitic rocks. Obtained Ar-Ar ages reveal that the volcanic activity occurred between 73.6±0.18 and 76.78±0.19 Ma, contemporaneous with the subduction of the Neo-Tethyan ocean beneath the Pontides. The volcanic rocks of LCVS are classified as alkaline, High- to ultrahigh-K, and silica-saturated and silica-unsaturated, geochemically. Rare calc-alkaline andesitic lavas are also occur within the volcanic sucession. Except the calc-alkaline samples, magmatic members of LCVS have similar major and trace element concentrations similar to the plagioleucitites or ultrapotassic rocks of the active orogenic zones (i.e. the Roman Province ultrapotassic series, Peccerillo, 2005). The multi element patterns on N-MORB- and Chondrite-normalized spider diagrams are characterized by significant LILE and LREE enrichments relative to HFSE and HREE, and display apparent Nb and Ta depletions, implying the subduction-related magmas. 87Sr/86Sr(i) (0.704493-0.706090) and 143Nd/144Nd(i) (0.512523-0.512680) isotope ratios are close to the mantle array, and are also in between the Aeolian Islands CA-Potassic rocks (Peccerillo, 2005), BSE and the circum-Mediterranean anorogenic Cenozoic igneous province (CiMACI, Lustrino&Wilson, 2007). Variable Mg# (33-60) evidences that these rocks are the products of evolved melts. The lead isotope values display a trend between EMI and DM, suggesting that the crustal involvement is more effective process during the generation of some lamprophyres relative to the other ultrapotassic rocks of LCVS. The results of clinopyroxene thermobarometry calculations reveal significant differences in depth of crystallization for the rock suites. Some trace element abundances and inter elemental ratios together with their co-variations show that the magmatic rock suites of LCVS had different crystallization history. REE melting modelings suggest a common mantle source, which contains variable amount of spinel lerzolite and garnet lerzolitic proportions. Considering the presence of some phlogopite-bearing clinopyroxenite xenolits in the lamprophyre and the leucite-bearing rocks, we propose that the LCVS ultrapotassic rocks were possibly derived from the low degree partial melting of veined SCLM. Keywords: High- to Ultrahigh-K, Isotope, Ar-Ar, Cretaceous, Turkey, Veined SCLM Lustrino, M., Wilson, M., 2007. ESR 81, 1-65. Peccerillo, A., 1995. Springer-Verlag. 365pp.

  15. Tephra record from the Sea of Marmara for the last 70 ka and its paleoceanographic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagatay, M.; Wulf, S.; Guichard, F.; Ozmaral, A.; Sancar; Akçer-Ön, S.; Henry, P.; Gasperini, L.

    2013-12-01

    Sea of Marmara (SoM) is a gateway between the Mediterraean and Black seas, and a tectonically active basin located on a transform plate boundary. Tephra record in the SoM is therefore very important for dating palaeoceanographic, paleoclimatic and tectonic events. We report three tephra units in cores from the SoM extending back to ca 70 ka BP and including an upper marine and a lower lacustrine units separated by a 12 ka (uncalib.) boundary. The uppermost tephra unit is up to 8 mm thick layer in the marine unit. It is heterogenous phonolitic with high total alkali content of 12.4-15.7 wt % and K2O/Na2O of 0.9 to 1.2. The middle and lower tephra layers occur in the lacustrine unit in ca 29 m-long Core MD-01-2430. The middle tephra (MT-1) is a 70 mm-thick homogeneously rhyolitic layer. The lower tephra (MT-2) is 140 mm thick and has a phonolitic-trachytic composition with CaO content of 1.7-1.9 wt % and bimodal K2O/Na2O of 1.0-1.4. Using their geochemical composition and stratigraphic analysis, we assign the tephra units, from top to bottom, to Vesuvius AP2 Pumice, Santorini Cape Riva and Campanian Ignimbrite, which have been previously dated at 3.5 ka BP, 21.95 ka BP, and 39.3 ka BP (all calender ka). The continuous sedimentary record in the Core MD-01-2430 covering the last ca 70 ka indicates that the SoM was lacustrine, disconnected from the Mediterraean Sea during MIS4, MIS3 and most of MIS2. This implies that the sill depth of the Çanakkale Strait (Dardanelles) was shallower than the present-day -65 m sill depth during MIS3 and MIS4. Figure 1: Morphotectonic map of the Sea of Marmara showing location of the studied cores (red stars). Figure 2: Geochemical biplots of tephra glass composition. a) Total alkali silica diagram b) FeO versus total alkalies for allocating cryptotephras from core MNTKS34 and ML01 to the AP2 tephra from Vesuvius. c) FeO versus CaO for correlating tephra MT1 with the Y-2 tephra from Santorini. d) SiO2 versus CaO for discriminating the MT2 tephra (Campanian Ignimbrite).

  16. Phreatomagmatic eruptions under the West Antarctic Ice Sheet: potential hazard for ice sheet stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iverson, N. A.; Dunbar, N. W.; Lieb-Lappen, R.; Kim, E. J.; Golden, E. J.; Obbard, R. W.

    2014-12-01

    Volcanic tephra layers have been seen in most ice cores in Antarctica. These tephra layers are deposited almost instantaneously across wide areas of ice sheets, creating horizons that can provide "pinning points" to adjust ice time scales that may otherwise be lacking detailed chronology. A combination of traditional particle morphology characterization by SEM with new non-destructive X-ray micro-computed tomography (Micro-CT) has been used to analyze selected coarse grained tephra in the West Antarctica Ice Sheet (WAIS) Divide WDC06A ice core. Micro-CT has the ability to image particles as small as 50µm in length (15µm resolution), quantifying both particle shape and size. The WDC06A contains hundreds of dusty layers of which 36 have so far been identified as primary tephra layers. Two of these tephra layers have been characterized as phreatomagmatic eruptions based on SEM imagery and are blocky and platy in nature, with rare magmatic particles. These layers are strikingly different in composition from the typical phonolitic and trachytic tephra produced from West Antarctic volcanoes. These two layers are coarser in grain size, with many particles (including feldspar crystals) exceeding 100µm in length. One tephra layer found at 3149.138m deep in the ice core is a coarse ~1mm thick basanitic tephra layer with a WDC06-7 ice core age of 45,381±2000yrs. The second layer is a ~1.3 cm thick zoned trachyandesite to trachydacite tephra found at 2569.205m deep with an ice core age 22,470±835yrs. Micro-CT analysis shows that WDC06A-3149.138 has normal grading with the largest particles at the bottom of the sample (~160μm). WDC06A-2569.205 has a bimodal distribution of particles with large particles at the top and bottom of the layer. These large particles are more spherical in shape at the base and become more irregular and finer grained higher in the layer, likely showing changes in eruption dynamics. The distinct chemistry as well as the blocky and large grain size of the two tephra lead us to believe that these eruptions are from volcanoes proximal to WAIS Divide and did not transport far because neither tephra was observed in the Byrd core (<100km away). It is likely that these tephra are sourced from volcanoes beneath the WAIS and have since been buried and if they were to erupt again, may contribute to ice sheet instability.

  17. The petrology and geochemistry of Gharyan volcanic province of NW Libya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Hafdh, N. M.; Gafeer, A. S.

    2015-04-01

    Gharyan Volcanic Province (GVP) is one of the four major outpouring volcanic provinces (Jabal as Sawda, Jabal Al Haruj, and Jabal Nuqay) in Libya. It culminates the extreme NNW-SSE linear trend with the other province which defines a systematic decrease in age from NWW to SSE. The voluminous petrologic and chronologic episode in GVP is the Old Lava Series (OLS). This OLS (55-50 Ma) is flown over 1000 km of Mesozoic rocks that are sliced by Wadi Ghan fault zone. The second cycle is represented by the phonolite-trachyte intrusions (40 Ma). Those intrusions occur in the form of laccoliths and plugs where Wadi Ghan fault zone has a conspicuous effect in their emplacement behavior. The Late Volcanic Center (LVC) is the main young volcanic activity in the province (<12 Ma). They show different mode of eruptions on the continuous plateau of OLS. Young Lava Series (YLS) are minor eruptions that have a distinctive appearance on the field and landsat image by occupying an ancient buried wadies. The compound phonolite laccoliths in Garyat Gamatat al-Gharyiha area increase in relief northwardly due to the imparity of denudation with the OLS flows at the southern portions of the area. One of those phonolite samples shows a crustal contamination due to its anomalous in Sr content. The radial pattern of OLS flows in urban area has some differentiation degree by their relative evolution from basalts to basaltic andesites. The chemistry of LVC in the same area does not show close concordance with the LVC basanitic suite of Busrewil and Wadsworth (1980). On other hand, the basaltic sill in Garyat Gamatat al-Gharyiha area is belonging to the LVC activity in GVP by their concordant with the geochemistry of LVC basanitic phase. The ultrabasic rocks in the investigated areas are four-phase lherzolite (olivine + orthopyroxene + clinopyroxene + spinel) restrict only in LVC phase as sub-rounded nodules. These xenoliths penetrate the whole crust with relatively large velocity by melts with sub-continental mantle source (OIB) beneath GVP.

  18. Heat capacity of hydrous trachybasalt from Mt Etna: comparison with CaAl2Si2O8 (An)-CaMgSi2O6 (Di) as basaltic proxy compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, D.; Nichols, A. R. L.; Potuzak, M.; Di Genova, D.; Romano, C.; Russell, J. K.

    2015-12-01

    The specific heat capacity ( C p) of six variably hydrated ( 3.5 wt% H2O) iron-bearing Etna trachybasaltic glasses and liquids has been measured using differential scanning calorimetry from room temperature across the glass transition region. These data are compared to heat capacity measurements on thirteen melt compositions in the iron-free anorthite (An)-diopside (Di) system over a similar range of H2O contents. These data extend considerably the published C p measurements for hydrous melts and glasses. The results for the Etna trachybasalts show nonlinear variations in, both, the heat capacity of the glass at the onset of the glass transition (i.e., C p g ) and the fully relaxed liquid (i.e., C p l ) with increasing H2O content. Similarly, the "configurational heat capacity" (i.e., C p c = C p l - C p g ) varies nonlinearly with H2O content. The An-Di hydrous compositions investigated show similar trends, with C p values varying as a function of melt composition and H2O content. The results show that values in hydrous C p g , C p l and C p c in the depolymerized glasses and liquids are substantially different from those observed for more polymerized hydrous albitic, leucogranitic, trachytic and phonolitic multicomponent compositions previously investigated. Polymerized melts have lower C p l and C p c and higher C p g with respect to more depolymerized compositions. The covariation between C p values and the degree of polymerization in glasses and melts is well described in terms of SMhydrous and NBO/ T hydrous. Values of C p c increase sharply with increasing depolymerization up to SMhydrous 30-35 mol% (NBO/ T hydrous 0.5) and then stabilize to an almost constant value. The partial molar heat capacity of H2O for both glasses ( C_{{{p}{H}2 {O}}}^{g} ) and liquids ( C_{{{p}{H}2 {O}}}^{l} ) appears to be independent of composition and, assuming ideal mixing, we obtain a value for C_{{{p}{H}2 {O}}}^{l} of 79 J mol-1 K-1. However, we note that a range of values for C_{{{p}{H}2 {O}}}^{l} (i.e., 78-87 J mol-1 K-1) proposed by previous workers will reproduce the extended data to within experimental uncertainty. Our analysis suggests that more data are required in order to ascribe a compositional dependence (i.e., nonideal mixing) to C_{{{p}{H}2 {O}}}^{l}.

  19. Paleo-tectonic positions of Northeast Africa d

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotfy, Hamza I.; Odah, Hatem H.

    2015-06-01

    The middle/late Paleocene basalts which cover the Late Cretaceous sandstone in the East Gilf Kebir Plateau were sampled for paleomagnetic investigation. The progressive thermal demagnetization revealed that The hematite component was parallel to the present-day field and the goethite overprint. Its pole is considered as representing recent low-temperature martitization of the magnetite upon exposure to intensive chemical alteration. The magnetite-anchored component was N-S dual-polarity with shallow equatorial inclinations. Based on its overwhelming existence, this component was considered as the characteristic remanence of the sampled basalt. Its north pole (71.7°N/203.5°E) was considered as representing the geomagnetic field during the eruption of the basalt. The reliability of the East Gilf Kebir basalt (59 ± 1.7 Ma) pole was constrained by its comparison with synchronous poles rotated from the main tectonic units using Euler Pole rotation. This basalt pole places NE Africa, along its present N-S azimuth at a far south tropical paleo-latitude. Cairo [30°N], was at paleo-latitude 11.8°N in middle/late Paleocene (59 Ma), that is about 18° south to its present-day latitude. Comparing the present pole with the Mansouri ring complex (132 ± 10 Ma) Early Cretaceous pole (47°N/259°E) and two poles from the Wadi Natash volcanic field; the alkali basalt (104 ± 7 Ma) Middle Cretaceous pole [55°N/250°E] and the trachyte/Phonolite (86-78 Ma) Late Cretaceous pole [66.5°N/229°E], a Cretaceous-Paleocene segment [132-59 Ma] of the Apparent Polar Wander Path [APWP] of Africa could be traced. These poles can, concurrently, verify the paleo-azimuth and paleo-latitude evolution of the African plate during the Cretaceous and Paleocene.

  20. Precambrian alkaline magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blichert-Toft, J.; Arndt, N. T.; Ludden, J. N.

    1996-04-01

    There are very few alkaline rocks in Precambrian terrains. The oldest well-documented examples are 2.7 Ga trachytes and leucite phonolites from the Kirkland Lake region of Canada. These rocks are highly potassic, with major- and trace-element characteristics closely resembling those of shoshonitic lavas in modern island arcs. Other examples of Archean alkaline rocks are limited to rare, volumetrically insignificant lamprophyric dikes and syenitic intrusions. Archean alkaline rocks similar to those of modern oceanic islands have not been reported. The oldest oceanic island suites are found in the 2.0-1.9 Ga Circum-Superior Belt of Canada which contains several successions of transitional to strongly alkaline volcanic rocks. Explanations for the paucity of Precambrian alkaline rocks fall into two main categories. (a) Alkaline magmatism was not uncommon in the Precambrian, but the rocks that formed did not survive. The alkaline rocks may have been destroyed preferentially because they formed late-stage volcanoes composed of friable pyroclastics and unstable feldspathoids, and were thus particularly vulnerable to erosion. Alternatively, the alkaline rock sequences may have erupted as part of a volcanic series that did not normally become incorporated in growing Archean continents, as would have been the case if oceanic plateaus made up the bulk of greenstone belts. (b) Alkaline rocks may indeed have been very rare because conditions in the Archean mantle were not appropriate for the formation of this type of magma. Higher temperatures may have led to more extensive partial melting, such that low-degree melts either were not produced or were overwhelmed by high-degree melts. Other possible factors include lower CO 2 contents in melting regions, which inhibited the formation of silica-undersaturated magmas, and the absence of metasomatized lower lithosphere, which precluded the formation of rift-type magmas. The late-Archean shoshonites apparently formed in a subduction environment. At present our knowledge of Archean volcanic rocks and Archean tectonic processes is insufficient to decide between the various possible interpretations.

  1. Evidence for timing of the initiation of India \\-Asia collision from igneous rocks in Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, X.; Zhao, Z.; Zhou, S.; Dong, G.; Guo, T.; Wang, L.

    2002-12-01

    Resent studies on igneous rocks in Tibet provide new evidence for timing of the initiation of India\\-Asia collision. It has been defined that the Neo\\-Tethys started to open from middle Triassic (T2) and reached its widest width in J2\\-K1 (177 \\­¦120 Ma) by petrological and paleontology evidence from Indus\\-Yalung Zangbo ophiolites, which marked the suture between south margin of Lhasa block and north margin of Indian block. Andesite\\-dominated arc volcanic rocks and calc\\-alkaline granitoids in the Gangdese to the north of the ophiolites zone, as indicators of subduction of Neo\\-Tethys oceanic plate, formed in 155.7 \\­¦65 Ma. Petrotectonic assemblages of muscovite\\-bearing granite, leuco\\-granite and high\\- potassium calc\\-alkaline granite aged from 55.7 Ma to less than 10 Ma are no doubt records of collision and post\\-collision processes. Wide spreading post\\-collisional high\\-potassium volcanic rocks (high\\-K calc\\-alkaline and shoshonitic series) in Tibet erupted during 40 \\­¦30 Ma, 25 \\­¦10 Ma and less than 10 Ma. Therefore, India\\-Asia collision took place during the period between 65 Ma and 55 Ma. More critical evidence, however, came from Linzizong volcanic formation, which widely spread in southern Gangdese magmatic belt. The Paleocene\\-Eocene (aged 63.89 \\­¦49.2 Ma) sub\\-horizontal terrestrial volcanic strata unconfomably overlay on the late Cretaceous sedimentary strata (Shexing Formation) being strongly deformed. Linzizong volcanic formation mainly consists of high\\-K2O andesite, trachyandesite, trachyte, rhyolite and thick acidic ignimbrite, characterized by high content of K2O and partly peraluminous, especially in the middle to upper parts of the column, showing obvious geochemical signature of collisional \\­¦post\\-collisional volcanic rocks. In combination with the stratigraphical and paleontological evidence in southern Tibet that documented dramatic change in sedimentary facies and microfuna content across the Cretaceous \\-Tertiary (K/T) boundary (Wan et al., 2002), it is concluded that the collision between India and Lhasa Continental blocks was most likely initiated at ~ K/T boundary time (~ 65 Ma).

  2. Magmatism and Eurekan deformation in the High Arctic Large Igneous Province: Age and geological constraints from North Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegner, C.; Storey, M.; Holm, P. M.; Thorarinsson, S. B.; Zhao, X.; Tappe, S.; Heaman, L.; Knudsen, M. F.

    2013-12-01

    Age, compositional and geological data show the High Arctic Large Igneous Province is unusual on two counts: first, magmatism was prolonged and include an initial tholeiitic phase (130-80 Ma) and a second alkaline phase (85-60 Ma); second, it was subsequently deformed during the Eurekan orogeny. New 40Ar-39Ar and U-Pb dating provides emplacement ages of 71-68 Ma for most of the Kap Washington alkaline volcanics of North Greenland, but with activity continuing down to 61 Ma. A thermal resetting age of 49-47 Ma is also identified in 40Ar-39Ar whole-rock data for trachyte flows. Patch perthite feldspars and coeval resetting of Rb-Sr isotopes by hydrothermal fluids provide further support for thermal overprinting, interpreted as a result of Eurekan compressional tectonism. The formation of the tholeiitic suite (130-80 Ma) appears to be associated with the opening of the Canada Basin and may have involved mantle plume action. Formation of the alkaline suite (85-60 Ma) is attributed to continental rifting in the Lincoln Sea area linked to seafloor spreading in the Labrador Sea and the Baffin Bay. The alkaline and tholeiitic suites of the High Arctic may therefore be unrelated. It is striking that High Arctic volcanism terminates at about the same time (c. 60 Ma) as magmatism in the North Atlantic Large Igneous Province begins. We suggest this is a corollary of a change from extensional to compressional tectonism in the High Arctic. In the period when Greenland moved together with Eurasia (>60 Ma), the separation from North America resulted in rift-related alkaline magmatism in the High Arctic. When Greenland subsequently moved as a separate plate (60-35 Ma), overlapping spreading on both sides pushed it northwards and volcanism in the High Arctic stopped due to compression. Evaluation of plate kinematic models shows that the relative northwards movement of Greenland culminated in the Eocene, coinciding with thermal resetting. We conclude that compression in North Greenland peaked at 49-47 Ma and coincided with the Eurekan Orogeny in a belt across the Canadian Arctic Islands and western Svalbard.

  3. Floating stones off El Hierro, Canary Islands: xenoliths of pre-island sedimentary origin in the early products of the October 2011 eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troll, V. R.; Klügel, A.; Longpré, M.-A.; Burchardt, S.; Deegan, F. M.; Carracedo, J. C.; Wiesmaier, S.; Kueppers, U.; Dahren, B.; Blythe, L. S.; Hansteen, T. H.; Freda, C.; Budd, D. A.; Jolis, E. M.; Jonsson, E.; Meade, F. C.; Harris, C.; Berg, S. E.; Mancini, L.; Polacci, M.; Pedroza, K.

    2012-03-01

    A submarine eruption started off the south coast of El Hierro, Canary Islands, on 10 October 2011 and continues at the time of this writing (February 2012). In the first days of the event, peculiar eruption products were found floating on the sea surface, drifting for long distances from the eruption site. These specimens, which have in the meantime been termed "restingolites" (after the close-by village of La Restinga), appeared as black volcanic "bombs" that exhibit cores of white and porous pumice-like material. Since their brief appearance, the nature and origin of these "floating stones" has been vigorously debated among researchers, with important implications for the interpretation of the hazard potential of the ongoing eruption. The "restingolites" have been proposed to be either (i) juvenile high-silica magma (e.g. rhyolite), (ii) remelted magmatic material (trachyte), (iii) altered volcanic rock, or (iv) reheated hyaloclastites or zeolite from the submarine slopes of El Hierro. Here, we provide evidence that supports yet a different conclusion. We have analysed the textures and compositions of representative "restingolites" and compared the results to previous work on similar rocks found in the Canary Islands. Based on their high-silica content, the lack of igneous trace element signatures, the presence of remnant quartz crystals, jasper fragments and carbonate as well as wollastonite (derived from thermal overprint of carbonate) and their relatively high oxygen isotope values, we conclude that "restingolites" are in fact xenoliths from pre-island sedimentary layers that were picked up and heated by the ascending magma, causing them to partially melt and vesiculate. As they are closely resembling pumice in appearance, but are xenolithic in origin, we refer to these rocks as "xeno-pumice". The El Hierro xeno-pumices hence represent messengers from depth that help us to understand the interaction between ascending magma and crustal lithologies beneath the Canary Islands as well as in similar Atlantic islands that rest on sediment-covered ocean crust (e.g. Cape Verdes, Azores). The occurrence of "restingolites" indicates that crustal recycling is a relevant process in ocean islands, too, but does not herald the arrival of potentially explosive high-silica magma in the active plumbing system beneath El Hierro.

  4. Hermann Wilhelm Abich im Kaukasus: Zum zweihundertsten Geburtstag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibold, Ilse; Seibold, Eugen

    2006-11-01

    Hermann Abich was born in 1806 in Berlin and died in 1886 in Graz. He grew up in a wealthy family which had friendly relations with famous scientists like Alexander von Humboldt, Leopold von Buch or Carl Ritter. After his studies in Heidelberg and Berlin he turned to extended fieldwork at the volcanoes of Italy. In 1833 1834 he published excellent petrological/chemical results and got soon a good scientific reputation. Thus he was nominated as Professor for Geology and Mineralogy of the prestigious Russian University in Dorpat (now Tartu, Esthonia) in 1842. In 1844 he was sent to Armenia by the Russian authorities. For the next three decades his fieldwork with about 190 publications was concentrated on the Great and Lesser Caucasus. This was a period of Russian expansion to the South with long-lasting regional fights. But he enjoyed the support of powerful governors. He was an indefatigable and enthusiastic explorer and a precise observer and designer. His interests covered many fields: morphology, glaciology, structural geology, volcanology with Thermal Springs, mineral resources from hydrocarbons, coal, salt to ores, stratigraphy and paleontology as a base for geological maps. But he also gave advice for practical problems, and he was active in meteorology, botany and archaeology. Alltogether he became “the Father of Caucasus Geology”. The following sketch stresses only on three aspects of his activities. He was one of the first pioneers in hydrocarbon exploration, especially around the anticlines with the mud volcanoes near Baku. In many respects, however, his fundamental ideas were erronous. He explained the structure of the Great Caucasus by the traditional theories of Leopold von Buch and Elie de Beaumont. The Caucasus anticline “was elevated by forces acting from beneath”. Following them he tried to discover regularities in the strike of mountain chains. Similarily he treated volcanism like Alexander von Humboldt and Leopold von Buch with their two groups of phenomena: voluminous, mostly basaltic “elevation craters” versus isolated, mostly trachytic and relatively small cones of “true volcanoes”. In spite of the isolation of the Caucasus region he had cultivated continuously contacts with leading geologists in Europe and was honoured by many institutions. He left Russia in 1876 for Vienna planning to write there the final monograph volumes about his investigations but he died before he could complete them.

  5. Groundwater and urbanisation, risks and mitigation: The case for the city of Windhoek, Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mapani, B. S.

    The City of Windhoek is underlain by the Kuiseb Schist, locally known as the “Windhoek Schist” and amphibolites. In the low-lying parts of the Windhoek valley, gravels and sands are present. The Windhoek schist has several lithologies, dominated by garnet-muscovite-chlorite-biotite schist, with distinctive cleavage. This pervasive cleavage renders the underlying lithology permeable to fluids percolating from the surface into the aquifer. Other minor lithologies are trachytes, metarhyolites and quartzites found to the east of the city. The amphibolite is part of the Matchless belt, and traverses the city in a NE-SW fashion. When weathered, it forms a perfect aquiclude. North-south and northeast-southwest trending faults with a few splays cut across the Kuiseb Schist. The faults play a significant role in increasing the fracture density of the fissile schist. The faults are the major links that form channels between the surface and the aquifer below. The city of Windhoek uses the aquifer both as a source of fresh water and as a storage facility. The recharge areas of the aquifer lie to the east and south- to southeast of the city in the vicinity of the suburb of Kleine Kuppe. The soil horizon over the Windhoek schist is very shallow and most buildings are built directly on bedrock. The thin soil horizon makes the aquifer prone to pollution, caused either by accidents such as spills or by carelessness due to unsupervised dumping. The fissility and fracture density of the schist imply that leakage of surface waters, phenols, septic-tank spills, sewer-bursts, chemical and industrial contaminants and other such materials can reach the aquifer in unusually high rainfall years. The effects of fuels and oils are much more adverse, as they may remain in soils for long periods. The rapid urbanization and building of informal settlements without sewage reticulation has increased the risk of pollution to the Windhoek aquifer. The close monitoring of sewage pipes, filling stations and dump sites (including cemeteries), preferably using a GIS-based model, is the best way to prevent future pollution.

  6. Anatomy of a lava dome using muon radiography and electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenat, J.

    2011-12-01

    For the TOMUVOL Collaboration Previous works (e.g. Tanaka et al., 2008) have demonstrated the capacity of muon radiography techniques to image the internal structure of volcanoes. The method is based on the attenuation of the flux of high energy atmospheric muons through a volcanic edifice, which is measured by a muon telescope installed at some distance from the volcano. The telescope is composed of three parallel matrices of detectors in order to record the angle of incidence of the muons. The aperture of the telescope and its resolution are determined by the distance between the matrices, their surface and their segmentation. TOMUVOL is a project, involving astroparticle and particle physicists and volcanologists, aimed at developing muon tomography of volcanoes. The ultimate goal is to construct autonomous, portable, remote controlled muon telescopes to study and monitor active volcanoes. A first experiment has been carried out on a large, 11000-year-old, trachytic dome, the Puy de Dôme, located in the French Central Massif. The telescope system is derived from particle physics experiments. The sensors are glass resistive plate chambers. The telescope has two 1 m2 and one 1/6 m2 planes. It is located 2 km away from the summit of Puy de Dôme (elevation 1465 m), at 868 m in elevation, Signals have been accumulated during several months. A high resolution LiDAR digital terrain model has been used in computing a density model of the dome, averaged along the path of the muons through the dome. In parallel, an electrical resistivity section of the dome has been obtained using a long (2.2 km) line of electrodes. The internal structure of the dome is thus described with two physical parameters (density and resistivity). This allows us to analyse jointly the results of the two types of measurements. At the time of writing, a new muon radiography campaign is being carried out from a different viewpoint. This is the first step towards a tomographic image of the volcano's internal structure. Reference: Tanaka, H. K. M., T. Nakano, S. Takahashi, J. Yoshida, M. Takeo, J. Oikawa, T. Ohminato, Y. Aoki, E. Koyama, H. Tsuji, H. Ohshima, T. Maekawa, H. Watanabe, and K. Niwa, Radiographic imaging below a volcanic crater floor with cosmic-ray muons, Am. J. Sci., 308, 843-850, 2008.

  7. Baseline geochemical characteristics of groundwater in the mountainous area of Jeju Island, South Korea: Implications for degree of mineralization and nitrate contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Dong-Chan; Chae, Gi-Tak; Yoon, Yoon-Yeol; Kang, Bong-Rae; Koh, Gi-Won; Park, Ki-Hwa

    2009-09-01

    SummaryHydrogeochemical characteristics of groundwater were investigated to elucidate baseline quality for basaltic aquifers of a mountainous area dominated by natural land cover in the volcanic island of Jeju, South Korea. Principal component analysis (PCA) resulted in four principal components (PC) of which PC1, PC3 and PC4 represented natural mineralization by water-rock interaction, while PC2 corresponded to anthropogenic contamination from nitrate sources. Hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) was performed to assess the effect of the geochemical and hydrologic processes on each sample. Six sample groups, distinguished by total dissolved solids (TDS), nitrate concentration, and water type, resulted from the HCA: high-altitude springs, low-mineral water, nitrate-contaminated water, intermediate-mineral water, and two groups of high-mineral water. Water types were transformed from Na(Mg, Ca)-HCO 3 for low-mineral water to Na-HCO 3 for high-mineral water. Nitrate-contaminated water occurred near the boundary of natural and agricultural land uses of the western area. High-mineral water had higher calcite saturation states than other groups. The high-mineral water also had tritium ( 3H) values lower than 1.5 TU, indicating a significant contribution of old groundwater. In contrast, low-mineral water had tritium values of about 3 TU, which is close to those of rainwater. Geographically, the high-mineral water was concentrated in the southwestern area, where intermediate-mineral water was also found. This distribution was likely related to the presence of extensive trachytic rocks, which could have formed locally isolated aquifers, enabling prolonged water-rock interactions; the higher location of low-permeability hydrovolcanic tuffs in the subsurface of the southern area would also increase chances of tapping aquifers below the hydrovolcanic tuffs. The cumulative probability of TDS showed two breakpoints of 50 and 150 mg/L that distinguished high-altitude springs, low-mineral water, and high-mineral water. The cumulative probability of nitrate provided possible threshold values for anthropogenic contamination of 2.5 and 5.5 mg/L. That 32% of samples had nitrate concentrations higher than 2.5 mg/L indicated high vulnerability to surface contamination sources in this mountainous area. HCA seems to be more effective for interpreting the baseline chemistry of groundwater than other threshold-calculating statistics in that HCA revealed geochemical processes including natural mineralization and anthropogenic contamination. Our study suggests that the cumulative probability and HCA are useful as complementary methods for determining threshold values.

  8. Duration of gas accumulation before the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption constrained by 210Po-210Pb-226Ra disequilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigmarsson, Olgeir; Gauthier, Pierre-Jean; Condomines, Michel

    2014-05-01

    Excess gas phase in magmas erupting explosively is well known world-wide. However, the origin of this gas phase, in excess of what can be dissolved in the erupting magma at depth, and the duration of gas accumulation, is less well defined. The 2010 mildly explosive eruption at Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland, produced mingled tephra of benmoreiitic and trachytic composition whereas alkali basalt (MgO > 8 %) was emitted during the preceding flank eruption. The silicic tephra of the first explosive phase is composed of three glass types, alkaline rhyolite, mixed benmoreiite, and evolved basalt (MgO < 5 %). The rhyolitic glass is indistinguishable from tephra glass composition emitted during the penultimate eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in 1821-23 AD (Sigmarsson et al., 2011). Tephra from the first explosive phase, emitted on 15 and 17 April, had large 210Po in excess of 210Pb ((210Po/210Pb)0 as high as 2!) and a small, but significant, 210Pb excess over its parent 226Ra ((210Pb/226Ra)0= 1.05 and 1.04, respectively). These excesses suggest rapid accumulation of Po and Rn together with the major gas species in the residual rhyolitic magma from the 1821-23 eruption. The gas most likely originates from the basalt recharge that eventually provoked the eruption. Basalts emitted a month earlier during the flank eruption at Fimmvörðuháls lost all their Po upon eruption and had (210Po/210Pb)0 equal to 0). From a simple model of radon and polonium degassing and accumulation, the mass of basalt magma degassing over the mass of silicic magma accumulating the excess gas can be calculated. Moreover, the duration of gas accumulation can be shown to be close to 300 days. This duration suggests that gas was liberated from the basaltic magma since June 2009, a month that corresponds to the initial seismic swarm beneath Eyjafjallajökull preceding the explosive eruption of 14 April 2010.

  9. Felsic volcanism in a basic shield (El Hierro, Canary Islands). Implications in terms of volcanic hazards.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrazzi, Dario; Becerril Carretero, Laura; Martí Molist, Joan; Meletlidis, Stavros; Galindo Jiménez, Inés

    2014-05-01

    El Hierro, the southwesternmost and smallest island of the Canary Archipelago, is a complex basaltic shield volcano characterized by mainly effusive volcanism with both Strombolian and Hawaiian activity. Explosive felsic volcanism is not a common feature of the archipelago and, so far, it has only been reported on the central islands of Tenerife and Gran Canaria, where it has been responsible for the formation of large central volcanic complexes. The presence of felsic rocks on the other islands of the archipelago and specifically on El Hierro is mostly restricted to subvolcanic intrusions and a few lava flows, generally associated with the oldest parts of the islands. We hereby report the presence of a trachytic pumice deposit on the island of El Hierro, referred to here as the Malpaso Member. A detailed stratigraphic, lithological, and sedimentological study was carried out on the deposits of this explosive episode of felsic composition, which is the only one found on the Canary Islands apart from those of Gran Canaria and Tenerife. Four different subunits were identified on the basis of their lithological and granulometrical characteristics. The products of the eruption correspond to a single eruptive event and cover an area of about 13 km2. This deposit originated from a base-surge-type explosive eruption with a subsequent radial emplacement of dilute PDC currents, was emplaced from the vent that would have been located in a similar position to the volcano of Tanganasoga. The low vesicularity of juvenile fragments and the morphological characteristics of the fine particles, as well as the high proportion of lithic fragments and the ash-rich nature of the deposit, suggest that magma/water interaction controlled the dynamics of the eruption. This study demonstrates that magmas from El Hierro could have the potential for producing an explosive eruption, in an environment in which the majority of the eruptions are basaltic and effusive in nature. Bearing in mind the style and the spatial extent of the studied eruption, a future event with similar characteristics would have a serious impact on the population, infrastructures, and economy of the island of El Hierro. For this reason it is clearly of great importance to assess the potential volcanic hazard on the island. This research was partially funded by the MINECO grant CGL2011-16144-E and the European Commission (FT7 Theme: ENV.2011.1.3.3-1; Grant 282759: "VUELCO").

  10. Multiple Magmatic Events Over 40 Ma in the Fish Creek Mountains, North-central Great Basin, Nevada, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousens, B.; Henry, C. D.; Stevens, C.; Varve, S.

    2011-12-01

    The Fish Creek Mountains, located in north-central Nevada south of Battle Mountain, is a site of multiple igneous events ranging from ca. 35 Ma to 1 Ma, covering most of the igneous history of the Great Basin of the western United States. Such extended volcanic activity allows for documentation of mantle sources and petrogenetic processes over time. Beginning approximately 50 Ma, the Great Basin experienced a magmatic front that began migrating southwestward across southern Idaho, central Oregon and into northern Nevada and Utah. Intermediate, "arc-like" andesite and dacite dominated volcanic activity in northeastern Nevada between about 45 and 36 Ma. By 34 Ma, a northwest-trending belt of rhyolitic ash-flow calderas began to develop through central Nevada, the "ignimbrite flare-up". Volcanism then migrated westwards towards the Sierra Nevada. In north-central Nevada, the oldest lavas are ca. 35 Ma basaltic andesites through rhyolites that are exposed in the western Shoshone Range, the eastern Tobin Range, and the northern and eastern Fish Creek Mountains. Plagioclase-rich andesites, dacite intrusions, and volcanic breccias occur in a belt along the western side of the Fish Creek Mountains. The bulk of the Fish Creek Mountains is composed of the 24.7 Ma Fish Creek Mountains rhyolitic tuff that is largely confined to an undeformed caldera structure. The caldera and tuff are anomalously young compared to nearby felsic centers such as the Caetano caldera (33.8Ma) and Shoshone Range (39-35 Ma) and relative to the southwest to west magmatic migration. The basal tuff is unwelded, with abundant pumice and lithic (primarily volcanic) fragments but only rare crystals. Sanidine and smoky quartz phenocrysts become more abundant upsection and glassy fiamme (hydrated to devitrified) are common, but the abundance of lithic fragments diminishes. 16-15 Ma volcanic rocks of the Northern Nevada Rift are exposed in the Battle Mountain area, ranging in composition from subalkaine basalt to rhyolite and rare trachyte. These rocks are linked to the Columbia River flood basalt event. Along the northwestern margin of the Fish Creek Mountains and in the center of the caldera complex are exposed late Pliocene to Quaternary lava flows and cinder cones of the Buffalo Valley volcanic field. The Buffalo Valley volcanic rocks are alkalic basalts that are locally vesicular, with rare plagioclase and olivine phenocrysts as well as plagioclase megacrysts up to several centimeters in size. Trace element and isotopic characteristics are similar to those of the Pliocene-Pleistocene Lunar Craters volcanic field in central Nevada. Ongoing geochemical analyses will outline variations in mantle sources and post-melting processes in the multiple volcanic systems of north-central Nevada.

  11. Cenozoic Bimodal Volcanic Rocks of the Northeast boundary of Tibetan Plateau: implication for the collision-induced mantle flow beneath the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, X.; Mo, X.; Zhao, Z.

    2011-12-01

    Cenozoic bimodal volcanic rocks of the Northeastern boundary of Tibetan Plateau are found in the area of West Qinling in China, E104°30'-105°36' and N33°35'-34°40',which located tectonically to the western boundary of Ordos block and also the north section of the N-S trending Helan mountain-Liupan mountain-Yunnan tectonic belt. The geological setting of the bimodal volcanic rocks belongs to an assemblage of Cratonic blocks composed of many small blocks linked by oroginic belts(Deng et al., 1996). The bimodal volcanic rocks, similar to those in East African rift, are consisted of kamafugite, volcanic eruption carbonatite, shoshonite, rhyolite and/or trachyte. The age of the bimodal volcanic rocks is between 23Ma to 7.1Ma according to isotopic dating of K/Ar and 39Ar/40Ar. All of these volcaic rocks in the volcanic assemblage have the characteristics rich in LREE and LIL. Not only that, the HFS, especially Nb, Zr and P in the volcanic rocks are higher than other Cenozoic alkaline volcanic rocks in Tibetan Plateau. The 87Sr/86Sr=0.704031-0.70525, 206Pb/204Pb=18.408-19.062, 207Pb/204Pb=15.476-15.677, 208Pb/204Pb=38.061-39.414 and ɛ(Nd) =0.3-5.3 of the volcanic rocks, all of these are akin to the feature of Neo-Tethyan mantle geochemical end member as represented by Yaluzangbu ophiolites defined by Zhao and Mo et al (2009), and also akin to the volcanic rocks related to Ontong Java and FOZO mantle plum(Yu et al.,2009). Cenozoic bimodal volcanic rocks in Western Qinling, Northeastern boundary of Tibetan Plateau provide ideal lithoprobes for understanding of the mantle beneath Tibetan Plateau and showed that the Cenozoic bimodal volcanic rocks bear the geochemical feature of Indian ocean mantle domain, and its genesis may be related to mantle plum, the magmatic source of the bimodal volcanic rocks should be a depleted mantle. For this reason, we suggest the bimodal volcaic rock is a rifting magmatisim, and its origin and genesis of the bimodal volcaic rocks of Northeast boundary in Tibetan plateau are probably related to northeastward migration and upwelling of the India-Asia collision-induced asthenosphere mantle flow along the deep faults of East Kunlun and North boundary of West Qinling beneath the Tibetan plateau.

  12. Petrology and geochemistry of the San Félix-San Ambrosio islands, Eastern Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper Percker, Oliver; Lara, Luis E.

    2015-04-01

    The San Félix-San Ambrosio (SF-SA) islands, Eastern Pacific, are fragments of two volcanic sequences 20 km apart. Both represent the top of an eroded large shield-volcano which rises over the Nazca Plate. Here, new geochemical and 40Ar/39Ar geochronological data are presented in order to understand magmatic evolution and source features. Two units are recognized on the SF island: (1) the Cerro Amarillo unit (CAU) (190±30 ka) formed by a hyaloclastic-tuff cone and basanitic lavas (Ba/Yb=519; Ba/Zr=2.19; La/Yb=49.88; Nb/Ta=17.96; Nb/Y=3.78; Nb/Zr=0.25) with absent or scarce modal content of plagioclase (<5%); and (2) Plateau unit (PU) (210±60 ka) formed by a basanitic lava succession with high modal content of plagioclase (>20%). The hyaloclastic-tuff cone of the CAU contains aphanitic-trachytic lithic fragments of Na-augite and kaersutite, which correspond to the final product of fractional crystallization of olivine+clinopyroxene+Fe-Ti oxides+apatite±plagioclase from alkaline primitive liquids similar to SF-SA lavas. The geochemical data suggest that the islands represent different evolutive stages of a same volcanic intraplate complex. The alkaline to transitional SA lavas (Ba/Yb=249; Ba/Zr=1.60; La/Yb=24.62; Nb/Ta=16.55; Nb/Y=2.22; Nb/Zr=0.19) would represent the shield stage (ca 2.9 Ma), while the basanitic SF lavas the post-erosional stage (ca 0.2 Ma). Considering the Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic data of the SF-SA lavas, previous works have ruled out a genetic relationship between SF-SA islands and the nearby Nazca Ridge. An heterogeneous mantle plume with mantelic metasomatized recycled lithologies is hypothesized as a possible magmatic source capable of explaining the petrologic differences between the SF-SA islands and between the CAU and PU, in SF island. This research is supported by FONDECYT Project 1141303.

  13. Chapter 13 Petrogenesis of the Campanian Ignimbrite: implications for crystal-melt separation and open-system processes from major and trace elements and Th isotopic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohrson, W.A.; Spera, F.J.; Fowler, S.J.; Belkin, H.E.; de Vivo, B.; Rolandi, G.

    2006-01-01

    The Campanian Ignimbrite is a large-volume trachytic to phonolitic ignimbrite that was deposited at ???39.3 ka and represents one of a number of highly explosive volcanic events that have occurred in the region near Naples, Italy. Thermodynamic modeling using the MELTS algorithm reveals that major element variations are dominated by crystal-liquid separation at 0.15 GPa. Initial dissolved H2O content in the parental melt is ???3 wt.% and the magmatic system fugacity of oxygen was buffered along QFM+1. Significantly, MELTS results also indicate that the liquid line of descent is marked by a large change in the proportion of melt (from 0.46 to 0.09) at ???884??C, which leads to a discontinuity in melt composition (i.e., a compositional gap) and different thermodynamic and transport properties of melt and magma across the gap. Crystallization of alkali feldspar and plagioclase dominates the phase assemblage at this pseudo-invariant point temperature of ???884??C. Evaluation of the variations in the trace elements Zr, Nb, Th, U, Rb, Sm, and Sr using a mass balance equation that accounts for changing bulk mineral-melt partition coefficients as crystallization occurs indicates that crystal-liquid separation and open-system processes were important. Th isotope data yield an apparent isochron that is ???20 kyr younger than the age of the deposit, and age-corrected Th isotope data indicate that the magma body was an open system at the time of eruption. Because open-system behavior can profoundly change isotopic and elemental characteristics of a magma body, these Th results illustrate that it is critical to understand the contribution that open-system processes make to magmatic systems prior to assigning relevance to age or timescale information derived from such systems. Fluid-magma interaction has been proposed as a mechanism to change isotopic and elemental characteristics of magma bodies, but an evaluation of the mass and thermal constraints on such a process suggests large-scale interaction is unlikely. In the case of the magma body associated with the Campanian Ignimbrite, the most likely source of the open-system signatures is assimilation of partial melts of compositionally heterogeneous basement composed of cumulates and intrusive equivalents of volcanic activity that has characterized the Campanian region for over 300 kyr. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Spring geochemistry in an active volcanic environment (São Miguel, Azores): source and fluxes of inorganic solutes.

    PubMed

    Freire, P; Andrade, C; Coutinho, R; Cruz, J V

    2014-01-01

    Mineral waters were monthly sampled in selected springs from Furnas and Fogo trachytic central volcanoes (São Miguel, Azores, Portugal). Water temperatures between 15.1 °C and 90.2 °C, characterize poorly mineralized waters of Na-HCO₃ and Na-HCO₃-Cl types. According to the spring location, two watersheds were selected in each volcano to evaluate solute fluxes and chemical weathering rates (Fogo volcano: Ribeira Grande river - RRG; Furnas volcano: Ribeira Quente river - RRQ). Na, Mg, K and Ca fluxes in groundwater represented 43%, 60%, 46% and 57% of the total (subsurface plus surface fluxes) in RRG, and respectively 43%, 53%, 46% and 49% in RRQ. Average HCO₃ flux is ten times higher in RRQ (130.1 × 10(6) mol/yr) compared to RRG (13.8 × 10(6) mol/yr), reflecting the volcano degassing and the lower ratio between groundwater and river water fluxes. Based on these values, total CO₂-consumption by weathering ranged from 1.5 × 10(6)mol/km(2)/yr (RRG) to 4 × 10(6)mol/km(2)/yr (RRQ). TDS load varied between 3772 t/yr (RRG) and 15388 t/yr (RRQ), and the ratio between values in groundwater and in surface water is respectively equal to 0.72 and 2.04. The associated chemical weathering rates in groundwater were 206 t/km(2)/yr (RRG) and 399 t/km(2)/yr (RRQ). Coupled to river water, these values indicate that total chemical weathering rates are respectively equal to 493 t/km(2)/yr and 594 t/km(2)/yr. A similar approach developed for the entire archipelago showed that the chemical weathering rates due to groundwater are in the range from 33 to 321 t/km(2)/yr, being partially controlled by the age of the islands. Results of the present study point out to the need to consider groundwater solute fluxes due to weathering when establishing geochemical budgets. PMID:23933431

  15. Geochronology, geochemistry and isotope tracing of the Oligocene magmatism of the Buchim-Damjan-Borov Dol ore district: Implications for timing, duration and source of the magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, St.; Barcikowski, J.; von Quadt, A.; Gallhofer, D.; Peytcheva, I.; Heinrich, C. A.; Serafimovski, T.

    2013-11-01

    Timing, source and magmatic evolution of the intrusions in the Buchim-Damjan-Borov Dol ore district of the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (F.Y.R.O.M.) have been studied. They intrude the Circum Rhodope Unit close to the contact with the Vardar Zone and are a part of the Late Eocene-Oligocene Macedonian Rhodope-North Aegean belt. The magmatism at Buchim-Damjan-Borov Dol occurred between 24.04 ± 0.77 and 24.51 ± 0.89 Ma, as indicated by chemical-annealing (CA)-LA ICP-MS zircon dating. Major element, trace and rare earth element analyses have been performed on the various intrusive rocks. All ore bearing magmas were classified as trachyandesitic, except the youngest intrusion which is not associated with mineralization; the Black Hill locality (24.04 ± 0.77 Ma) shows a trachytic composition. The distribution of the trace elements, enrichment of large ion lithophile elements (LILE) and depletion in high field strength elements (HFSE), indicates subduction-related magmatism; most of the magmas follow a calc-alkaline fractionation trend with shoshonitic affinities; additionally, Sr/Y (10 to 90) and La/Yb values show some similarities to adakite-like magmas. Sr and Nd isotope ratios (Sri = 0.70658 to 0.70740 and Ndi = 0.512425-0.512497) show that the magmatic products were slightly contaminated by continental crust material, e.g., the Variscan/Cadomian basement. In the Late Eocene-Oligocene belt the magmatism between 29 and 35 Ma is dominated by crustal melting with an increase in the mantle contribution between 20 and 27 Ma. We suggest the following scenario for the magmatic history of the Buchim-Damjan-Borov Dol ore district: a slab rollback of an oceanic slab located further to the SW which led to extensional and compressional features in upper levels of the continental crust. In the middle to upper crust three consecutive crystallization stages occurred at variable depths as indicated by amphibole zonation. Mixing of newly formed crust with mantle-like affinities and continental crust material in variable degrees during the ascent of the magma can explain all geochemical characteristics. The magma crystallized as dykes or stocks near the Earth's surface (> 1 km) after its final emplacement and contemporaneous hydrothermal activity led to different mineralization styles depending on the lithology of the host rocks.

  16. Fluid-Rock Interaction in the Miocene Tejeda Caldera, Gran Canaria, Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donoghue, E.; Troll, V. R.; Harris, C.; Walter, T. R.; Pérez Torrado, F. J.

    2007-12-01

    Rhyolite-trachyte tuffs deposited within the Miocene Tejeda caldera (Mogán Group 14-13.3Ma) show evidence of severe fluid-rock interaction. The altered tuffs are restricted to a peripheral zone directly inside the caldera margin, and occur at four distinct horizons within the mid-upper Mogán ignimbrite succession. Upper-Mogán tuffs display pervasive intermediate argillic alteration (smectite+illite+zeolites+adularia) and silicification (microcrystalline quartz+amorphous silica), indicative of low-temperature (≤250°C) near-neutral pH conditions. Quartz+kaolinite+muscovite+chlorite+calcite alteration of mid-Mogán tuffs and breccias may reflect boiling of higher-temperature, acidic hydrothermal fluids at depth. Si+Na+K+Pb+Sr+Rb were highly mobile during fluid-rock interaction, whereas Ti+Zr+Nb were dominantly refractory. Altered intra-caldera tuffs (n=65) have higher δ18O values than equivalent unaltered extra-caldera ignimbrites, reflecting an overall low-temperature near-surface environment in which meteoric water (δD ca.-15‰, δ18O ca.-3‰) was the dominant fluid source. A decrease in δ18O from upper- to mid- Mogán altered tuffs is consistent with an increase in fluid temperature with depth. Unaltered ignimbrites have δD values of -110 to -168‰ (n=6) and ≤0.2wt% H2O, indicative of Rayleigh-type H2O-exsolution. Altered tuffs have δD values of -52 to -117‰ (n=75) and up to 4wt% H2O, reflecting interaction with steam (δD\\ll-15‰) or an evolved low-δD fluid. Apparently unaltered ignimbrites between altered horizons (n=13), and shield basalts directly outside the caldera margin (n=6), have elevated δD and H2O values relative to equivalent unaltered rocks, indicative of minor alteration. Supported by numerical modelling, our Gran Canaria data reflect an intrusion-related, structurally controlled epithermal system, in which fluids and/or vapours migrated through intra-caldera tuffs via channelised, porous flow. This study may help to unravel the complex processes of fluid-rock interaction characteristic of both active and fossil caldera-hosted epithermal systems that are presently inaccessible or poorly exposed.

  17. Interaction between caldera collapse and eruptive dynamics during the Campanian Ignimbrite eruption, Phlegraean Fields, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosi, M.; Vezzoli, L.; Aleotti, P.; de Censi, M.

    1996-04-01

    The Campanian Ignimbrite (36000 years B.P.) was produced by the explosive eruption of at least 80 km3 DRE of trachytic ash and pumice which covered most of the southern Italian peninsula and the eastern Mediterranean region. The eruption has been related to the 12-x15-km-diameter caldera located in the Phlegraean Fields, west of Naples. Proximal deposits on the periphery of the Phlegraean Fields comprise the following pyroclastic sequence from base to top: densely welded ignimbrite and lithic-rich breccias (unit A); sintered ignimbrite, low-grade ignimbrite and lithic-rich breccia (unit B); lithic-rich breccia and spatter agglutinate (unit C); and low-grade ignimbrite (unit D). Stratigraphic and componentry data, as well as distribution of accidental lithic types and the composition of pumice clasts of different units, indicate that coarse, lithic-rich breccias were emplaced at different stages during the eruption. Lower breccias are associated with fines-rich ignimbrites and are interpreted as co-ignimbrite lag breccia deposits. The main breccia unit (C) does not grade into a fines-rich ignimbrite, and therefore is interpreted as formed from a distinct lithic-rich flow. Units A and B exhibit a similar pattern of accidental lithic types, indicating that they were erupted from the same area, probably in the E of the caldera. Units C and D display a distinct pattern of lithics indicating expulsion from vent(s) that cut different areas. We suggest that unit C was ejected from several vents during the main stage of caldera collapse. Field relationships between spatter agglutinate and the breccia support the possibility that these deposits were erupted contemporaneously from vents with different eruptive style. The breccia may have resulted from a combination of magmatic and hydrothermal explosive activity that accompanied extensive fracturing and subsidence of the magma-chamber roof. The spatter rags probably derived from sustained and vigorous pyroclastic fountains. We propose that the association lithic-rich breccia and spatter agglutinate records the occurrence of catastrophic piecemeal collapse.

  18. The Mantle and Basalt-Crust Interaction Below the Mount Taylor Volcanic Field, New Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrader, Christian M.; Crumpler, Larry S.; Schmidt, Marick E.

    2010-01-01

    The Mount Taylor Volcanic Field (MTVF) lies on the Jemez Lineament on the southeastern margin of the Colorado Plateau. The field is centered on the Mt. Taylor composite volcano and includes Mesa Chivato to the NE and Grants Ridge to the WSW. MTVF magmatism spans approximately 3.8-1.5 Ma (K-Ar). Magmas are dominantly alkaline with mafic compositions ranging from basanite to hy-basalt and felsic compositions ranging from ne-trachyte to rhyolite. We are investigating the state of the mantle and the spatial and temporal variation in basalt-crustal interaction below the MTVF by examining mantle xenoliths and basalts in the context of new mapping and future Ar-Ar dating. The earliest dated magmatism in the field is a basanite flow south of Mt. Taylor. Mantle xenolith-bearing alkali basalts and basanites occur on Mesa Chivato and in the region of Mt. Taylor, though most basalts are peripheral to the main cone. Xenolith-bearing magmatism persists at least into the early stages of conebuilding. Preliminary examination of the mantle xenolith suite suggests it is dominantly lherzolitic but contains likely examples of both melt-depleted (harzburgitic) and melt-enriched (clinopyroxenitic) mantle. There are aphyric and crystal-poor hawaiites, some of which are hy-normative, on and near Mt. Taylor, but many of the more evolved MTVF basalts show evidence of complex histories. Mt. Taylor basalts higher in the cone-building sequence contain >40% zoned plagioclase pheno- and megacrysts. Other basalts peripheral to Mt. Taylor and at Grants Ridge contain clinopyroxene and plagioclase megacrysts and cumulate-textured xenoliths, suggesting they interacted with lower crustal cumulates. Among the questions we are addressing: What was the chemical and thermal state of the mantle recorded by the basaltic suites and xenoliths and how did it change with time? Are multiple parental basalts (Si-saturated vs. undersaturated) represented and, if so, what changes in the mantle or in the tectonic regime allowed their coexistence or caused the transition?

  19. Temporal and geochemical evolution of the Cenozoic intraplate volcanism of Zealandia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timm, Christian; Hoernle, Kaj; Werner, Reinhard; Hauff, Folkmar; den Bogaard, Paul van; White, James; Mortimer, Nick; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    In order to constrain better the distribution, age, geochemistry and origin of widespread Cenozoic intraplate volcanism on Zealandia, the New Zealand micro-continent, we report new 40Ar/ 39Ar and geochemical (major and trace element and Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotope) data from offshore (Chatham Rise, Campbell and Challenger Plateaus) and onland (North, South, Auckland, Campbell, Chatham and Antipodes Islands of New Zealand) volcanism on Zealandia. The samples include nephelinite, basanite through phonolite, alkali basalt through trachyte/rhyolite, and minor tholeiite and basaltic andesite, all of which have ocean island basalt (OIB)-type trace element signatures and which range in age from 64.8 to 0.17 Ma. Isotope ratios show a wide range in composition ( 87Sr/ 86Sr = 0.7027-0.7050, 143Nd/ 144Nd = 0.5128-0.5131, 177Hf/ 176Hf = 0.2829-0.2831, 206Pb/ 204Pb = 18.62-20.67, 207Pb/ 204Pb = 15.54-15.72 and 208Pb/ 204Pb = 38.27-40.34) with samples plotting between mid-ocean-ridge basalts (MORB) and Cretaceous New Zealand intraplate volcanic rocks. Major characteristics of Zealandia's Cenozoic volcanism include longevity, irregular distribution and lack of age progressions in the direction of plate motion, or indeed any systematic temporal or spatial geochemical variations. We believe that these characteristics can be best explained in the context of lithospheric detachment, which causes upwelling and melting of the upper asthenospheric mantle and portions of the removed lithosphere. We propose that a large-scale seismic low-velocity anomaly, that stretches from beneath West Antarctica to Zealandia at a depth of > 600 km may represent a geochemical reservoir that has been in existence since the Cretaceous, and has been supplying the upper mantle beneath Zealandia with HIMU-type plume material throughout the Cenozoic. In addition, the sources of the Cenozoic intraplate volcanism may be at least partially derived through melting of locally detached Zealandia lower lithosphere.

  20. Timescales of magma processes occurred prior to recent Campi Flegrei caldera eruptions: first results from diffusion profiles on plagioclase phenocrysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Antonio, Massimo; Arienzo, Ilenia; Fedele, Lorenzo; Iovine, Raffaella; Carmine Mazzeo, Fabio; Civetta, Lucia; Orsi, Giovanni; Wörner, Gerhard

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge of the timescales of magma rising and stagnation, as well as mingling/mixing processes occurring in the shallow plumbing system of an active volcano is crucial for volcanic hazard assessment and risk mitigation. Among few recently developed methodologies, high-precision, high spatial resolution analysis of major-, minor- and trace elements on zoned phenocrysts through electron microprobe techniques represents a powerful tool to provide good estimates of timescales of pre-eruptive magma rising, stagnation and/or mingling/mixing processes. To this purpose, volcanic rock samples of trachytic composition representative of the Agnano-Monte Spina eruption (4.7 ka CAL BP) occurred at the Campi Flegrei caldera (southern Italy) have been selected. The investigation has been carried out in the framework of Project V2 - Precursori di Eruzioni, funded by the Italian Dipartimento per la Protezione Civile - Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia. The investigated rock samples are pumice fragments from which double-polished, 100 µm thick thin sections have been prepared for analytical purposes. Back-scattered electrons (BSE) images have been acquired at the scanning electron microscope (SEM), in order to identify the plagioclase phenocrysts suitable to be analyzed successively, selected among those that best display their zoning. After a careful observation of the BSE images, major-, minor- and selected trace element contents have been determined through combined energy-dispersive and wavelength-dispersive system electron microprobe analyses (EDS-WDS-EMPA) on transects crossing the growth zones of the selected phenocrysts. This methodology has allowed reconstructing the diffusion profile of some key-elements through the growth zones of the investigated phenocrysts. Successively, the diffusion profiles have been combined with textural features obtained through BSE images in order to obtain diffusion models aimed at estimating the timescales of crystals' residence, and possibly mixing events among compositionally distinct magmas. The first results of the application of this methodology to the samples representative of the Agnano-Monte Spina eruption have yielded magma residence and mixing timescales in quite good agreement with previous, independent estimates. These and future results will be integrated with all available information for the interpretation of observed current variations in the dynamics of the Campi Flegrei caldera, and for an effective definition of possible precursors of a future eruption.

  1. St. Helena Revisited: Characteristics and Origin of the Type HIMU OIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, B.

    2006-12-01

    Saint Helena, South Atlantic Ocean (15° 57' S, 5° 43' W), is the type HIMU hotspot oceanic island, the basalt - hawaiite - mugearite - benmoreite - trachyte volcanic suite having anomalously high 206Pb/204Pb of 20.4-20.9. Eruptions were from two main centres, the older Northeastern Volcanic Centre (NEVC) and the younger Southwestern Volcanic Centre (SWVC), the latter of which is divided into Lower Shield (LS), Main Shield (MS), Upper Shield (US), Late Extrusive Phase (LEP), and Late Intrusive Phase (LIP) episodes. Whole rock K-Ar ages suggest that subaerial volcanism spanned a period of 7 million years, from 14 Ma to 7 Ma, but new, precise, 40Ar/39Ar ages bracket the subaerial volcanism between 10.15 ± 0.13 Ma (a basal flow in the NEVC sequence) and 8.13 ± 0.08 Ma (a LEP lava flow). Within the mafic (basalt and hawaiite) lava flows, spanning approximately 2 million years of eruptive activity, there is only limited geochemical variation; for example, Zr/Nb averages 4.5 and only ranges from 4.0 to 5.2. Nonetheless, within some stratigraphic sequences (the SWVC Main Shield) there are subtle trends of, for example, decreasing Zr/Nb and increasing P/Nb, K/Nb, and Rb/Nb with stratigraphic height. These trends are interpreted to record a decreasing degree of melting through time rather than a variation in mixing proportions of discrete mantle source components. Increasing compositional diversity through time, and an increasing proportion of more evolved lava compositions, reflects an increasing degree of crystal fractionation. Although not apparent from whole rock major and trace element variations, phenocryst compositions suggest an important role for magma mixing in the origin of the volcanic suite. Both the trace element and isotopic (Pb, Sr, Nd, Hf, Os) characteristics of St. Helena volcanic rocks, and of HIMU OIB in general, are consistent with an ultimate origin from recycled ancient lithosphere, although the physical location of the source region (deep mantle plume; heterogeneous shallow upper mantle) is unresolved. The temporal and compositional relationships of volcanism in the St. Helena - Cameroon Line trend are not, however, consistent with a simple model of the passage of the African plate over a deep mantle plume.

  2. Regional Variation in the Timing of Cessation of Laramide Folding, Uplift, and Post Flat-Slab Ignimbrite Flare Ups in West Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, M. E.; Casey, J.; Lapen, T. J.

    2013-12-01

    Tertiary volcanism in the Trans-Pecos region of West Texas is thought to be related to: 1) a major Farallon buoyant object-related slab flattening period resulting in early arc volcanic activity progressively shifting eastward to New Mexico and West Texas, 2) a subsequent slab-steepening/roll back or slab break away period resulting in renewed and extensive volcanism and ignimbrite flare ups across the region, and 3) final minor volcanism related to Basin and Range extension. Evidence for these tectonic induced volcanic periods can be observed in volcanic compositional variation and the timing and style of volcanism and deformation. This includes highly varied pre-folding mafic alkaline and calc-alkane volcanic and intrusive rocks from ~46Ma (Eocene) to ~32Ma (Oligocene). This is followed by broadly distributed, post-folding calc-alkaline volcanism with subsidiary alkaline mafic volcanism during subsequent regionally varying slab steepening or break away periods (38Ma to 28Ma). Later, smaller-scale, almost exclusively mafic volcanism is associated with Basin and Range extension that occurred between 25 to 2Ma (Barker, 1987). This study attempts to refine regional differences in the cessation of Laramide folding and episodic slab-asthenosphere influenced volcanism in West Texas by utilizing LA-ICP-MS U/Pb zircon geochronology. Ages have been measured for volcanic rock samples that occur both above and below the angular unconformity, including: the Eagle Mountain Lower Rhyolite, an unnamed tuff and trachyte unit from the Garren Group in the Indio Mountains, the Davis Mountains Huelster Fm. and Petan Basalts, the Chinati Mountains Morita Ranch Fm., the Tascotal Fm. From the Alamito Creek and Green Valley area, the Vieja Group from the Rio Grande River area, and the Big Bend National Park South Rim Fm. and Chisos Fm.. In addition, ages for detrital zircons have been obtained in silicilastics below the unconformity within Tertiary Black Peaks, Hannold Hill, and Canoe Formations to constrain the youngest zircon ages in each, as well as to constrain the range of igneous rock ages sampled from proximal fluvial source regions. Samples have been dated in an attempt to more precisely constrain the ages of the cessation of Laramide shortening and ignimbrite flare ups after flat-slab subduction across West Texas. Based on our preliminary results, we suggest cessation of shortening associated with Laramide-style deformation and uplift in the northern Trans-Pecos region ceased by ~38 Ma (Eocene) and persisted in the south e.g., in the Big Bend region until ~31 Ma (Oligocene). These differences may be explained by fundamental changes in the North American plate basal lithospheric structure from north to south in the region.

  3. Modes and times of caldera resurgence: The < 10 ka evolution of Ischia Caldera, Italy, from high-precision archaeomagnetic dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vezzoli, Luigina; Principe, Claudia; Malfatti, Jonas; Arrighi, Simone; Tanguy, Jean-Claude; Le Goff, Maxime

    2009-10-01

    Ischia is a well exposed and densely populated late Quaternary caldera in the Campanian magmatic province of Italy. Ischia Caldera experienced an average uplift rate of 3.3 cm/year in the last ca. 30 ka and is still actively resurging. During the last 10 ka, coeval with the resurgence, a volcanic field of alkali-trachytic to trachyandesitic lava domes, lava flows, tuff and scoria rings, and pumice cones developed, mainly on the eastern sector of the caldera, along both resurgence-related faults and regional NNW- and NE-striking faults. In order to improve both our understanding of the recent volcanic history and the evaluation of future risks on Ischia Island, a high-precision archaeomagnetic dating method was applied to the products of 12 volcanic centres with probable age < 10 ka. Accurate paleofield directions with a median 95% confidence angle of 1.47 were measured on 277 lava and spatter samples (25 sites). Coupled with the reference curves for secular variation in the western Mediterranean sea (during the last 3000 years) and eastern Europe (from 3000 to 8000 years ago), ages of between 4100 BC and 355 AD were obtained. These archaeomagnetic data were supported by a volcanologic and stratigraphic survey and are consistent with written sources, archaeological findings, and previous isotopic (K/Ar and 14C) ages. Archaeomagnetic and other geochronological data, as well as stratigraphic constraints, show that, during the studied time interval, Ischia volcanism occurred in five periods separated by phases of quiescence and coeval with earthquake and landslide events. This fact suggests a pulsating mode of uplifting and deformations of the Ischia resurgence. During the two oldest periods of activity (7200-6800 BC and 4100-2300 BC), resurgence probably produced a dome-shaped structure. Location and geometry of vents suggest the occurrence of magma uprise along the fractures produced by bending of the overburden crustal block. Most of magma was emplaced as intrusions at the interior of the resurgent block, whereas volcanism was represented by very viscous, differentiated, and crystallized lavas that emplaced as domes and high aspect-ratio flows. The resurgent dome caused recurrent lateral collapses that removed about 2.5 km 3 of rocks. During the three youngest periods of activity (1800-1000 BC; 650 BC -355 AD; and 1302 AD), resurgence affected a fault-bounded, asymmetric block. This resulted from both (a) hydrostatic rebound of the crustal block after removal of material involved into huge slope instability triggering an increase in uplift rate, and (b) new influxes of less evolved magma batches into the shallow reservoir that, in turn, favoured the intense volcanism of the last 4000 years.

  4. Geology and ore deposits of the Chicago Creek area, Clear Creek County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrison, J.E.; Wells, J.D.

    1956-01-01

    The Chicago Creek area, Clear Creek County, Colo., forms part of the Front Range mineral belt, which is a northeast-trending belt of coextensive porphyry intrusive rocks and hydrothermal veins of Tertiary age. More than $4.5 million worth of gold, silver, copper, lead, zinc, and uranium was produced from the mines in the area between 1859 and 1954. This investigation was made by the Geological survey on behalf of the Division of Raw Materials of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The bedrock in the area is Precambrian and consists of igneous rocks, some of which have been metamorphosed , and metasedimentary rocks. The metasedimentary rocks include biotite-quartz-plagioclase gneiss that is locally garnetiferous, sillimanitic biotite-quartz gneiss, amphibolite, and lime-silicate gneiss. Rocks that may be metasedimentary or meta-igneous are quartz monzonite gneiss and granite gneiss and pegmatite. The granite gneiss and pegmatite locally form a migmatite with the biotitic metasedimentary rocks. These older rocks have been intruded by granodiorite, quartz, and granite pegmatite. During Tertiary time the Precambrian rocks were invaded by dikes and plugs of quartz monzonite porphyry, alaskite porphyry, granite porphyry, monzonite porphyry, bostonite and garnetiferous bostonite porphyry, quartz bostonite porphyry, trachytic granite porphyry, and biotite-quartz latite-porphyry. Solifluction debris of Wisconsin age forms sheets filling some of the high basins, covering some of the steep slopes, and filling parts of some of the valleys; talus and talus slides of Wisconsin age rest of or are mixed with solifluction debris in some of the high basins. Recent and/or Pleistocene alluvium is present along valley flats of the larger streams and gulches. Two periods of Precambrian folding can be recognized in the area. The older folding crumpled the metasedimentary rocks into a series of upright and overturned north-northeast plunging anticlines and synclines. Quartz monzonite gneiss, granite gneiss and pegmatite, granodiorite, and quartz diorite and associated hornblendite are metamorphosed during this period. The second period of folding appears to have been the reflection at depth of faulting nearer the surface; it resulted in crushing as well as some folding of the already folded rocks into terrace and monoclinal folds that plunge gently east-northeast. The biotite-muscovite granite, which is the youngest major Precambrian rock unit, is both concordant (phacolithic) and crosscutting along the older fold system and has been fractured by the younger fold system.

  5. Fragmentation Of Magma: Is It For Free?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimanowski, B.

    2006-12-01

    Explosive volcanism is characterized by the production of (fine) ash, predominantly by brittle-type fragmentation processes. Experiments have been carried out to study the fragmentation mechanisms, to measure the critical material parameters, and to quantify the mechanical energy release. The relevance of these experiments was verified by comparative studies of the experimentally produced ash and their natural analogues. In several case studies, the kinetic energy release of selected eruptions and the proportional importance of the energy consumed by the fragmentation of magma could be reconstructed. From isothermal deformation experiments using subliquidus melts from volcanic rocks, we learn that deformation changes its character from ductile to elastic mode once the critical strain rates are exceeded. Then, the spall-strength of the material governs the onset of fragmentation and the conversion ratio of deformation energy into fragmentation energy. Porous trachytic material, for example, was found to be more than 2 orders of magnitude "weaker" than compact basaltic melt. A thermodynamic description of stress induced brittle fragmentation was developed, that allows the calculation of the strain rates that led to explosive fragmentation of a magma from grain-size data of brittle-type ash particles. For phreatomagmatic and magmatic explosive volcanism, the fragmentation energy represents a major amount of kinetic energy that needs to be generated before and/or during an explosive eruption. In many models, however, fragmentation either just "happens" at certain conditions, or is treated as a black box with no numbers on it. Models assigning the kinetic energy needed for fragmentation, in-vent transport, and eruption during explosive volcanic events mainly to the work of compression of magmatic gases may run into problems, because of thermodynamic restrictions to gas overpressure and because of the short time character of volcanic processes, that prevents the system to approach equilibrium values. Models of phreatomagmatic explosion assign the source of mechanical (deformation) energy to the thermal energy converted during magma/water interaction. Magmatic explosions may be explained by a "volcano-seismic" model, where a volume of magma is exposed to supercritical strain rates and the energy of ongoing deformation now is stored mechanically. Depending on the "strength" of the material (and probably triggered by external mechanisms) onset of magma fragmentation leads into an explosive eruption.

  6. Phase equilibria constraints on the chemical and physical evolution of the campanian ignimbrite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fowler, S.J.; Spera, F.J.; Bohrson, W.A.; Belkin, H.E.; de Vivo, B.

    2007-01-01

    The Campanian Ignimbrite is a > 200 km3 trachyte-phonolite pyroclastic deposit that erupted at 39.3 ?? 0.1 ka within the Campi Flegrei west of Naples, Italy. Here we test the hypothesis that Campanian Ignimbrite magma was derived by isobaric crystal fractionation of a parental basaltic trachyandesitic melt that reacted and came into local equilibrium with small amounts (5-10 wt%) of crustal rock (skarns and foid-syenites) during crystallization. Comparison of observed crystal and magma compositions with results of phase equilibria assimilation-fractionation simulations (MELTS) is generally very good. Oxygen fugacity was approximately buffered along QFM+1 (where QFM is the quartz-fayalite-magnetite buffer) during isobaric fractionation at 0.15 GPa (???6 km depth). The parental melt, reconstructed from melt inclusion and host clinopyroxene compositions, is found to be basaltic trachyandesite liquid (51.1 wt% SiO2, 9.3 wt% MgO, 3 wt% H2O). A significant feature of phase equilibria simulations is the existence of a pseudo-invariant temperature, ???883??C, at which the fraction of melt remaining in the system decreases abruptly from ???0.5 to < 0.1. Crystallization at the pseudo-invariant point leads to abrupt changes in the composition, properties (density, dissolved water content), and physical state (viscosity, volume fraction fluid) of melt and magma. A dramatic decrease in melt viscosity (from 1700 Pa s to ???200 Pa s), coupled with a change in the volume fraction of water in magma (from ??? 0.1 to 0.8) and a dramatic decrease in melt and magma density acted as a destabilizing eruption trigger. Thermal models suggest a timescale of ??? 200 kyr from the beginning of fractionation until eruption, leading to an apparent rate of evolved magma generation of about 10-3 km3/year. In situ crystallization and crystal settling in density-stratified regions, as well as in convectively mixed, less evolved subjacent magma, operate rapidly enough to match this apparent volumetric rate of evolved magma production. ?? Copyright 2007 Oxford University Press.

  7. The Influence of Volatiles on the Glass Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, A. R.; Giordano, D.; Morizet, Y.; Dingwell, D. B.; Kohn, S. C.; Brooker, R. A.

    2004-12-01

    The glass transition is the temperature interval across which melt relaxation times change appreciably, from instantaneous at high temperatures (super-cooled liquid) to infinite at low temperatures (glass). It has several important implications, being where the speciation of water is locked into the melt structure, viscous flow and welding stop and elastic response to mechanical stress commences. It depends on composition, thermal history and the timescale of the experimental method being used. In this study we use the variation of heat capacity with temperature measured by differential scanning calorimetry to define glass transition temperatures (Tg) for a series of synthetic and natural samples with a range of volatile contents. Two methods have been used to define Tg: a) the temperature of the onset of the glass transition, and b) the temperature of the peak in heat capacity across the glass transition. For each sample the thermal history (cooling and heating at 10 K/min) is the same, allowing direct comparison of Tg. The samples include natural glasses with a wide range of compositions (trachyte, dacite, phonolite, basalt) that have been doped with varying amounts of water, basaltic glasses from the Hawaiian drill core that contain naturally occurring amounts of water and jadeite glasses synthesised with varying amounts of water and carbon dioxide. We will show that for each natural composition water affects Tg with the same overall pattern. Increasing water contents cause Tg to decrease (2 wt.% water causes drops of 190 to 280° C), with the largest effect occurring with the addition of the first 1 wt.% of water (drops of 110 to 200° C). The drop varies depending on the glass composition. The effect of carbon dioxide on the Tg of jadeite glass is less clear, no systematic variation with concentration occurs. Water affects the Tg of jadeite glass in exactly the same way as in the natural compositions. We will also examine how the width of the glass transition (in terms of temperature) and the height of the heat capacity peak are affected by composition and volatile content.

  8. Increasing Interaction of Alkaline Magmas with Lower Crustal Gabbroic Cumulates over the Evolution of Mt. Taylor Volcanic Field, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, M. E.; Crumpler, L. S.; Schrader, C.

    2010-12-01

    The Mount Taylor Volcanic Field at the southeastern edge of the Colorado Plateau, New Mexico erupted diverse alkaline magmas from ~3.8 to 1.5 Ma (Crumpler, 1980; Perry et al., 1990). The earliest eruptions include high silica topaz rhyolites of Grants Ridge (plagioclase, quartz, biotite) and Si-under saturated basanites and trachytes at Mt Taylor stratovolcano. Mt. Taylor was later constructed of stacks of thick, trachyandesitic to rhyolitic lava flows that were subsequently eroded into a ~4-km across amphitheatre opening toward the southeast. Early Mt. Taylor rhyolitic lavas exposed within the amphitheatre contain quartz, plagioclase, hornblende, and biotite (± sanidine) phenocrysts. Later cone-building trachydacite to trachyandesite lavas are crystal-rich with plagioclase and augite megacrysts (± hornblende, ± quartz) and record an overall trend of decreasing SiO2 with time. The last eruptions ~1.5 Ma from the stratovolcano (Perry et al. 1990) produced thick (>70 m), viscous lava flows that contain up to 50% zoned plagioclase phenocrysts. While SiO2 decreased among the silicic magmas, the degree of silica saturation increased among peripheral basaltic magmas from basanite to ne-normative hawaiite to hy-normative basalts. Evidence of increasing crustal contamination within the basalts includes zoned plagioclase megacrysts, augite and plagioclase cumulate texture xenoliths with accompanying xenocrysts. These textures within the basalts combined with abundant, complex plagioclase among the cone-building silicic magmas imply interaction and mixing with gabbroic cumulate mush in the lower crust beneath Mt. Taylor Volcano. Contemporaneous basanitic to trachytitc volcanism in the northern part of the volcanic field at Mesa Chivato (Crumpler, 1980) was more widely distributed, smaller volume, and produced mainly aphyric magmas. The lower crustal gabbroic cumulates either do not extend northward beneath Mesa Chivato, or they were not accessed by lower magma flux rate in that part of the volcanic field. Future work will include quantifying the magma volumes combined with new 40Ar/39Ar dates to understand heat and mass flux rates for the entire volcanic field. In addition, we hope to investigate if early F-rich fluids of Grants Ridge topaz rhyolite are sourced in the mantle, and whether F is an important volatile component over the history of the magma system.

  9. Alkalic rocks and resources of thorium and associated elements in the Powderhorn District, Gunnison County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, J.C.; Hedlund, D.C.

    1981-01-01

    Alkalic igneous rocks and related concentrations of thorium, niobium, rare-earth elements, titanium, and other elements have long been known in the Powderhorn mining district and have been explored intermittently for several decades. The deposits formed chiefly about 570 m.y. (million years) ago in latest Precambrian or Early Cambrian time. They were emplaced in lower Proterozoic (Proterozoic X) metasedimentary, metavolcanic, and plutonic rocks. The complex of alkalic rocks of Iron Hill occupies 31 km 2 (square kilometers) and is composed of pyroxenite, uncompahgrite, ijolite, nepheline syenite, and carbonatite, in order of generally decreasing age. Fenite occurs in a zone, in places more than 0.6 km (kilometer) wide, around a large part of the margin of the complex and adjacent to alkalic dikes intruding Precambrian host rock. The alkalic rocks have a radioactivity, chiefly due to thorium, greater than that of the surrounding Powderhorn Granite (Proterozoic X) and metamorphic rocks. The pyroxenite, uncompahgrite, ijolite, and nepheline syenite, which form more than 80 percent of the complex, have fairly uniform radioactivity. Radioactivity in the carbonatite stock, carbonatite dikes, and the carbonatite-pyroxenite mixed rock zone, however, generally exceeds that in the other rocks of the complex. The thorium concentrations in the Powderhorn district occur in six types of deposits: thorite veins, a large massive carbonatite body, carbonatite dikes, trachyte dikes, magnetite-ilmeniteperovskite dikes or segregations, and disseminations in small, anomalously radioactive plutons chiefly of granite or quartz syenite that are older than rocks of the alkalic complex. The highest grade thorium concentrations in the district are in veins that commonly occur in steeply dipping, crosscutting shear or breccia zones in the Precambrian rocks. They range in thickness from a centimeter or less to 5 m (meters) and are as much as 1 km long. The thorite veins are composed chiefly of potassic feldspar, white to smoky quartz, calcite, barite, goethite, and hematite, and also contain thorite, jasper, magnetite, pyrite, galena, chalcopyrite, sphalerite, synchysite, apatite, fluorite, biotite, sodic amphibole, rutile, monazite, bastnaesite, and vanadinite. The Th0 2 content of the thorite veins ranges from less than 0.01 percent to as much as 4.9 percent in high-grade samples. The Th0 2 content is generally less than 1 percent, however, and is only 0.05 to 0.1 percent in many of the veins examined in the district. Samples of the dolomitic carbonatite of Iron Hill mostly range from 3 to 145 ppm (parts per million) thorium. Thirty samples of the carbonatite dikes, the most radioactive rocks within the complex of Iron Hill, contain about 30 to 3,200 ppm thorium and a trace to about 1.5 percent rare-earth oxides. The magnetite-ilmenite-perovskite rocks have a radioactivity of 2 to 12 times the background of Precambrian granite that is attributable chiefly to thorium substitution for calcium in the perovskite. In two analyses the perovskite contains 0.12 and 0.15 percent Th0 2 . Trachyte dikes as much as 25 m thick cut the Precambrian rocks; their radioactivity is generally about two to four times the background of typical Precambrian granite, is locally higher, but is low relative to other types of thorium concentrations. A finegrained granite that is anomalously radioactive occurs in thick, dikelike plutons as much as 1.2 km wide, or more. The thorium content varies widely within the granite bodies. Eight samples of the granite contain 32 to 281 ppm thorium (averaging 115 ppm). The economic potential of thorium in the Powderhorn district is related in part to other elements such as niobium, titanium, iron, and rare earths. The proportions of niobium and rare earths to thorium vary in different parts of the district. Within the carbonatite body of Iron Hill, the Nb 2 0 5 content greatly exceeds Th0 2 , but the Th0 2 -Nb 2 0 5

  10. Geology and ground-water resources of the island of Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stearns, Harold T.; Macdonald, Gordon A.

    1946-01-01

    Hawaii, the largest island in the Hawaiian group, is 93 miles long, 76 miles wide, and covers 4,030 square miles. Mauna Loa Volcano is 13,680 feet high and Mauna Kea is 13,784 feet high. Plate 1 shows the geology, wells, springs, and water-development tunnels. Plate 2 is a map and description of points of geologic interest along the main highways. Plate 3 (same sheet as plate 2) shows highways and points of geologic interest in Hawaii National Park area. The volcanic terms used in the report are defined. Hawaii was built by five volcanoes. All the rocks are volcanic, except for minor amounts of sedimentary rock derived from them. Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes erupt often; Hualalai Volcano last erupted in 1801; Mauna Kea has had Recent but no historic eruptions; Kohala Mountain has long been extinct.Kohala Mountain constitutes the northern end of the island. It is built largely of rocks of the Pololu volcanic series which are dominantly olivine basalt with a few thin intercalated beds of vitric basaltic ash. After the eruption of this series, Kohala Volcano was deeply eroded on the windward (northeastern) side, and a deep soil formed on its other slopes. Later, oligoclase andesite and trachyte lava flows, named the Hawi volcanic series, were erupted. They rest on soil at the top of the Pololu series, and lie in the valleys cut into the Pololu lavas on the windward slope. Both the Pololu and Hawi volcanics were erupted from three rift zones trending N. 35° W., S. 65° E., and S. 50° W. from the summit of the mountain. The rift zones are marked at the surface by rows or cinder cones, and beneath the surface by innumerable dikes. A caldera occupied the summit of the mountain at the beginning of the eruption of the Hawi lavas, and for a time confined the flows. It was gradually filled and the lava escaped northeastward into the large valleys. Some of the caldera faults can still be traced. A shallow graben indents the summit now. South of Kohala Mountain lies the much larger volcano of Mauna Kea. The early rocks of Mauna Kea constitute the Hamakua volcanic series. The lower member of this series consists chiefly of olivine basalt flows with intercalated thin beds of vitric basaltic ash. The olivine basalt of the lower member changes gradationally into the upper member, in which basalt and olivine basalt arc still abundant, but andesite also is present. Lavas of the upper member interfinger with Hawi lavas of Kohala Mountain. The Hamakua volcanic series is mantled with Pahala ash 5 to 20 feet thick, above which lie the rocks of the Laupahoehoe volcanic series. Locally the two series are separated by erosional unconformity, The Laupahoehoe lavas are dominantly andesite. The andesites erupted after the last glacial epoch are mapped separately on plate 1. The Laupahoehoe volcanic series, and probably also the Hamakua volcanic series, were erupted principally from three rift zones, trending west, northeast and south-southeast from the summit of the mountain. The upper slopes are studded with many large cinder cones, lying principally along the rift zones. Late in its geologic history, Mauna Kea was capped by a small glacier, presumably contemporaneous with the Wisconsin stage of glaciation in North America, which left conspicuous terminal, lateral, and ground moraines. Deposits exposed in canyons on the southern slope, formerly believed to be of glacial origin, are now believed to be volcanic explosion breccias. The main bulk of Hualalai Volcano is built of basalts of the Hualalai volcanic series. One flow of andesite has been found. The cinder and spatter cones lie principally along three rift zones which trend northwest, north, and southeast from the summit. On the northern slope of Hualalai Volcano lies the large trachyte pumice cone of Puu Waawaa, and its thick flow of trachyte. These are grouped together as the Waawaa volcanics. They are partly buried by later basalts from both Hualalai and Mauna Loa. The last eruption of Hualalai Volcano, in 1800–1801, produced olivine basalt.The earliest exposed rocks of Mauna Loa comprise the Ninole volcanic series. Several beds of altered vitric ash are intercalated with the lavas. Following eruption of the Ninole series, a long period or quiescence occurred, during which deep amphitheater-headed valleys were cut. This was followed by the eruption of the Kahuku volcanic series, consisting mostly of lavas with some thin beds of ash. The Rahuku series is overlain by the Pahala ash, which overlies also the Hilina volcanic series on Kilauea, the Hamakua volcanic series on Mauna Kea, and the Hawi volcanic series on Kohala, providing a rough datum for correlation of the lavas of the four mountains. Deposition of the Pahala ash was followed on Mauna Loa by eruption of the Kau volcanic series, which has continued until the present time. The historic and flaws of the Kau series are mapped separately on plate 1. The historic eruptions and volcanic activity of Mauna Loa are briefly described. The western and southern slopes of Mauna Loa are cut by normal faults along which the lower flanks of the mountain have slipped seaward.The Kau volcanic series and presumably also the Kahuku and Ninole volcanic series were erupted principally from vents along two rift zones which extend northeast and southwest from the summit caldera. The lavas of all three series are preponderantly olivine basalt. Many of the lavas contain small amounts of hypersthene.The Pahala ash on the northeastern and eastern slopes of Mauna Loa was derived largely from Mauna Kea. West and south of Kilauea Caldera, however, it was derived principally from Kilauea. Minor amounts were contributed by eruptions of Mauna Loa. It is a vitric basaltic ash, now generally altered to palagonite.The earliest exposed lavas and thin intercalated ash beds of Kilauea Volcano comprise the Hilina volcanic series. These are capped by the Pahala ash, which in turn, is overlain by the lavas and thin ash beds of the Puna volcanic series. The volcanics of both series were erupted along two rift zones, one extending southwestward from Kilauea Caldera, and the other extending southeastward for 5 miles and then bending sharply east by north. The lavas of both series are very largely olivine basalt. A few flows contain hypersthene. Augite phenocrysts are common in Mauna Loa lavas, but rare in those of Kilauea, indicating that crystallization has not progressed as far in the magma chamber of Kilauea Volcano as in that of Mauna Loa. Eruption of the Puna volcanic series has continued until the present time, the historic flows being separated from the prehistoric ones on plate 1. The historic eruptions and volcanic activity of Kilauea are briefly described. Kilauea Volcano originated on the southern slope of Mauna Loa where faults intersected the Eastern Fundamental Fissure of the Hawaiian Archipelago. The southern flank of Kilauea is cut by normal faults, along which the southern part is sliding seaward.The volcanoes of the island of Hawaii are believed to have started their activity in the Tertiary period. The great erosional period which followed deposition of the Pololu and Ninole volcanic series is placed near the end of the Pliocene. The Hilina and Hamakua volcanic series were probably erupted in the late Pliocene and earlier Pleistocene. The Hawi volcanic series and the Waawaa volcanics are probably early or middle Pleistocene in age. The main period of deposition of the Pahala ash was probably late in the middle Pleistocene or early in the upper Pleistocene. The Laupahoehoe volcanic series is late Pleistocene and Recent in age, most of the flows antedating the Wisconsin glaciation. The Hualalai volcanic series probably extends from Tertiary to historic time, and the Kau and Puna volcanic series from late Pleistocene to the present. A chapter is devoted to the petrography of the rocks in which are listed all reliable chemical rock analyses. The rocks of the island are highly permeable. Most of the rainfall sinks quickly into the ground. Perennial streams are present only on the windward slopes of Kohala Mountain and Mauna Kea. Most of the water sinks rapidly to the basal water table, where it floats on salt water according to the Ghyben-Herzberg principle. Basal water escapes in springs at or near sea level all along the coast. Only a very small proportion of it is recovered in wells. Along the windward coasts the basal water is of good quality and large supplies await development. Along the leeward coasts most of the basal water is brackish.In Kohala Mountain, much water is perched on ash beds in the Pololu volcanic series and on ash and soil at the base of the Hawi volcanic series. It escapes in perched springs in the big valleys and along the windward sea cliff and is recovered in tunnels. Along the windward slope of Mauna Keu, small amounts of water are perched by ash beds and dense lava flows in the Hamakua volcanic series. Small perched springs issue from these structures and water is recovered by tunnels. In the Kau District ash beds perch considerable water, which is recovered by many tunnels. On the southern slope of Mauna Kea small springs are perched by beds of hill wash.Dikes in the rift zones are relatively impermeable, but enclose masses of permeable rock. Water is confined at high level in the interdike compartments in Kohala Mountain, and probably in the other volcanoes. It escapes in high-level springs in the deep valleys on Kohala Mountain; some of it is recovered by tunnels.It is estimated that an average of about 13,085 million gallons of water a day falls as rain over the whole island. Of this only about 2.5 percent is visibly discharged from wells, tunnels, and springs. Large supplies of basal groundwater await development. Projects for development of additional water for the city of Hilo and the Kona District are described. Chemical analyses of water, water supplies of towns and villages, descriptions of wells, springs, and tunnels, and discharge records of numerous springs and tunnels are given in tabulated form.

  11. Origin of the Alkaline Post-Erosional Volcanism on the Island of Mauritius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; White, W. M.

    2010-12-01

    Mauritius is the penultimate island of the Reunion mantle plume. Three episodes of eruptive activity has been recognized on this island: the Older Series, the Intermediate Series, and the Younger Series. The Older Series represent solidified lavas that form the shield volcano. The Intermediate Series and the Younger Series are categorized as post-erosional volcanism. Our new 40Ar/39Ar ages show that the construction of the Mauritius shield was well underway by 8.9 Ma. The shield-stage ended about 4.75 Ma, with the intrusion of trachytes (McDougall and Chamalaun, 1969). The Intermediate Series lavas subsequently erupted between 3.5 Ma and 1.66 Ma. This was followed by a hiatus of more than 0.6 million years. The hiatus ended with eruption of the Younger Series lavas, which continued until nearly the present. We found that the hiatus between the Intermediate and Younger Series was shorter than was previously believed, but appears to be real. While outcrops of the Intermediate Series are restricted to the southwestern area of the island, we found that the Intermediate Series lavas are present beneath Younger Series lava flows in drill cores throughout the rest of the island. The overall evolution of Mauritius resembles that of Hawaii, but there are some significant differences between them. The Older Series lavas on Mauritius are transitional between alkali basalt and tholeiite, different from the tholeiitic composition of shield lavas on Hawaii. Like Hawaii, the post-erosional volcanics have more 'depleted' isotopic signatures than shield-stage lavas. Unlike Hawaii, the post-erosional volcanism was interrupted by a long hiatus and the post-erosional lavas do not show strong silica undersaturation or strong enrichment in incompatible elements. Instead, the post-erosional lavas are only slightly less silica-saturated than the shield-building lavas and are less incompatible-element enriched. Our new isotope data show that the post-erosional lavas could be a mixture of the Reunion mantle plume and the depleted mantle source. We propose the during the early shield stage, melts from the Reunion plume rise into the cold oceanic lithosphere where they react with depleted mantle peridotite to form pyroxenite or eclogite veins. The post-erosional volcanism magmas form when the pyroxenite or eclogite veins are later melted by heat conducted into the lithosphere from the plume below. Mauritius is built on a 65 Ma old and 75 km thick oceanic lithosphere. Our simple calculations show that the conductive heat from the plume will raise the temperature of the lowermost 12 km of the lithosphere up to the pyroxenite solidus within 9 Ma, remelting the veins. Lithospheric flexure due to the construction of the next volcano in the volcanic chain (Reunion Island in the case of Mauritius) may dictate whether melts of the veins can reach the surface. Differences in post-erosional magma compositions between Mauritius and Hawaii may reflect the significantly thicker lithosphere beneath Hawaii and the greater heat flux provided by the Hawaiian plume.

  12. Hydrogeology study of Faial Island, the Azores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutinho, R. M.; Cruz, J. V.

    2011-12-01

    Azores Archipelago is a Portuguese territory formed by nine islands divided into three groups (eastern, central and western) located in the North Atlantic Ocean. The islands stretch along a NW-SE direction near the so called Azores triple junction, where the North American Plate, the African Plate and the Eurasian Plate meet. Faial Island is the westernmost island of the central group, located between 38°30'56'' to 38°38'40'' N latitude and 28°35'55'' to 28°50'06'' W longitude. Faial is affected by important tectonic features with a WNW-ESE general trend. These features combined with faults with NNW-SSE to NW-SE and NE-SW directions may have conditioned the emplacement of the central volcano with caldera on the central part of the island. In what concerns the geomorphology, besides the central volcano with caldera, one should refer to the graben on the eastern sector, to the scoria cones alignment on the W and to the flattened sector SE of the central volcano. The drainage network is markedly controlled by tectonics and the drainage density is higher on the northern and southern flanks of the central volcano. The origin of the island started more than 800000 years ago with the emplacement of a composite volcano on the NE of the island (Ribeirinha Complex) consisting of a series of lava flows of basaltic to benmoreitic composition and undifferentiated pyroclasts. The complex (Cedros Complex) which followed is about 580000 years old and corresponds to the central volcano formed by suites of basaltic to trachitic lava flows, pyroclasts and domes. Approximately 50000 ago an important fissural activity took place on the eastern part of the island and originated Almoxarife Formation consisting of basaltic to benmoreitic lava flows, scoria cones and tuff cones. The Caldeira Formation (~16000 years) comprises benmoreitic to trachytic materials emitted from the central volcano, whose explosive phases generated ten members formed mainly by pumice fall deposits and pyroclastic flows. Capelo Complex, which is partially contemporary to the previous formation, comprises the western fissural volcanism and the historical eruptions of Cabeço do Fogo and Capelinhos. Groundwater occurs in two main aquifer systems: (1) the basal aquifer that corresponds to the freshwater lens floating over underlying salt water and (2) perched water bodies. 15 drilled wells and 10 hand dug wells extract water from the basal aquifer and about 80 springs drain the volcanic edifices at different altitudes. In what concerns hydrodynamic characterisation, an estimate of the recession constant of the springs yielded values from 2x10-3 to 14.2x10-3. Calculated transmissivity values for the basal aquifer and a perched aquifer are within the range of 9.5x10-3 to 3x10-2 m2/s. Hydraulic diffusivity estimated from tidal effect measurements has a value of 2634 m2/d. Physical and chemical water analysis shows that they are cold, except for two of them. Four water samples show high CO2 contents. Water from springs and from wells not contaminated by salt water intrusion are bicarbonated and sodium rich in composition while water from contaminated wells has higher chloride and magnesium contents. Geochemical modelling indicates that the major mineralizing processes are silicate dissolution and salt water intrusion.

  13. Facies characterization based on physical properties from downhole logging for the sediment record of Lake Van, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgarten, H.; Wonik, T.; Kwiecien, O.

    2014-11-01

    Lake Van (Turkey) is the 4th largest terminal lake in the world and is located at a key position for climatic reconstruction. The ICDP project 'PALEOVAN' is a deep-drilling campaign initiated in the summer of 2010 to enhance the understanding of paleoclimatic and paleoenvironmental conditions in the Middle East for a period of 550,000 years. Multiple coring of two sites (Northern Basin and Ahlat Ridge) at a water depth of up to 360 m has been performed. The sedimentary record is mainly composed of clayey silts and tephra deposits that were supplied by four volcanic sources: 1) the Süphan volcano, located on the northern shore, 2) the Nemrut volcano, 15 km west of the westernshore, 3) the Incekaya volcano, on the southwestern shore and 4) intralake eruptive centers. The dominant chemical composition of the volcanic sources is known from studies of land deposits. High-quality downhole logs have been acquired from both sites. To construct a continuous lithological profile, 180 m of downhole logging data from the Ahlat Ridge have been analyzed by cluster analysis. To improve the differentiation of the sediments, two elemental intensity profiles from x-ray fluorescence core-scanning (calcium and zirconium) performed on the composite profile core material were added to the cluster analysis. Five cluster units were derived and transformed into three tephra and two clayey silt units. To compare the two clayey silt units with the composite profile from the visual core description (VCD) that showed 15 lithological units, the composite profile was classified into two major groups of lacustrine sediments: banded clayey silts (interpreted as glacial deposits) and laminated clayey silts (interpreted as interglacial deposits). Despite this simplification, no correlation between the two clayey silt units derived from cluster analysis and the banded and laminated clayey silts could be found. The following reasons are proposed: (a) the comparability of the datasets was limited by significant depth shifts of up to 2.5 m between the composite profile based on the VCD and the downhole measurements in hole 2D of the Ahlat Ridge, (b) a correlation was difficult to ascertain from the vertical resolution of the downhole logging data and the extremely detailed core description in mm-scale, (c) mixed signals were obtained because of prevailing thin layers and intercalations of different lithotypes and (d) cluster analysis was difficult to perform because the contrast within the input data is too low (possibly background sedimentation) to distinguish between glacial and interglacial deposits. Tephra units are characterized by contrasting properties and differ mainly in their magnetic susceptibility, spectral gamma ray components (uranium, thorium and potassium) and XRF-intensities of calcium and zirconium. Tephra units have been linked to the dominant volcanic composition of the deposited tephra layers and partly to the volcanic sources. Depth trends are derived with prevailing basaltic deposits in the bottom part (128 m-210 m below lake floor) and are gradually outweighed by the highly differentiated (dacitic and rhyolitic/trachytic) products towards the top of the record.

  14. Geodynamic control on melt production in the central Azores : new insights from major and trace elements, Sr, Nd, Pb, Hf isotopic data and K/Ar ages on the islands of Terceira, Sao Jorge and Faial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildenbrand, A.; Weis, D. A.; Madureira, P.; Marques, F. O.

    2012-12-01

    A combined geochronological and geochemical study has been carried out on the volcanic islands of Terceira, São Jorge, and Faial (central Azores) to examine the relationships between mantle dynamics, melt production and regional deformation close to the triple junction between the American, the Eurasian and the Nubian lithospheric plates. The lavas analyzed span the last 1.3 Myr, and have been erupted during two main periods prior to 800 ka and after 750 ka, respectively. They range in composition from alkaline basalts/basanites to trachytes, and overall exhibit a strong enrichment in highly incompatible elements. The whole range of isotopic compositions here reported (87Sr/86Sr: 0.703508-0.703913; 143Nd/144Nd: 0.512882-0.513010; 206Pb/204Pb: 19.0840- 20.0932; 207Pb/204Pb: 15.5388-15.6409; 208Pb/204Pb: 38.7416-39.3921; 176Hf/177Hf: 0.282956-0.283111) suggests the involvement of three components: (1) a weakly radiogenic component reflecting the source of regional MORBs, (2) a main HIMU-type component represented in the three islands, and (3) an additional component in Faial recent lavas, which appears similar to the EM type end-member previously recognized on other Azores eruptive complexes. The geographical distribution of the enriched components and the synchronous construction of various islands at the regional scale rules out a single narrow active plume. They suggest in turn the presence of dispersed residual enriched mantle blobs, interpreted as remnants from a large heterogeneous plume probably responsible for edification of the Azores plateau several Myr ago. The lavas erupted in São Jorge and Faial prior to 800 ka have similar and homogeneous isotopic ratios, which partly overlap the compositional field of MORBs from the adjacent portion of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). Their genesis can be explained by the regional development of N150 transtensive tectonic structures, which promoted significant decompression melting of the upper mantle, with correlative dilute expression of the enriched components. In contrast, the youngest lavas (< 750 ka) erupted along the N110 main structural direction on the three islands are significantly enriched in LILE and LREE, and generally have variable but more radiogenic isotopic compositions. Such characteristics suggest low-degree partial melting and greater incorporation of fertile residual mantle anomalies during passive tectonic reactivation of pre-existing transform faults promoted by recent ridge-push at the MAR. We propose that sub-aerial volcanism over the last 1.3 Myr in the central Azores recorded a sudden change in the conditions of melt generation which most probably reveals a major reconfiguration of regional deformation accompanying the recent geodynamic reorganization of the Eurasia-Nubia plate boundary.

  15. Earliest Silicic Volcanism Associated with Mid-Miocene Flood Basalts: Tuffs Interbedded with Steens Basalt, Nevada and Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luckett, M.; Mahood, G. A.; Benson, T. R.

    2013-12-01

    During the main phase of Steens and Columbia River flood basalt eruptions between ~16.7 and 15.0 Ma, spatially associated silicic volcanism was widespread, ~4,000 km3 of silicic magma erupting at calderas and smaller centers dispersed across ~25,000 km2 in eastern Oregon and northern Nevada (Coble and Mahood, 2012). The oldest flood basalts erupted from a focus at Steens Mountain in eastern Oregon, where the section of lavas is ~1 km thick. The Steens Basalt thins southward to only a few flows thick in northern Nevada, either because fewer flows were emplaced this far from the focus or because fewer dikes propagated to the surface on encountering thicker continental crust and/or were intercepted by growing bodies of silicic magma that ultimately erupted in McDermitt Caldera Field (Rytuba and McKee, 1984), High Rock Caldera Complex, and the Lone Mountain/Hawks Valley center (Wypych et al., 2011). Rhyolitic tuffs have not been recognized interbedded with the basalt lavas in the type section, but we have identified several silicic tuffs interbedded with Steens Basalt in the southern Pueblo Mountains and in the Trout Creek Mountains. Although noted by previous workers (e.g., Avent, 1965; Minor, 1986; Hart et al., 1989), they have not been studied. We identified six tuffaceous intervals 20 cm to 15 m thick in the escarpment of the southern Pueblo Mountains near the Oregon-Nevada border where the Steens basalt section is ~250 m thick, with the base unexposed. Two intervals are lithic-rich, reworked volcaniclastic sediments, but four are primary or only slightly reworked sequences of fall deposits that range from fine ash to lapilli in grain size. The heat and weight of the overlying basaltic lava flows has fused the tuffs so that the upper parts of thicker tuffaceous intervals and entire thinner ones are converted to vitrophyres, with crystals of alkali feldspar × quartz × biotite typically 1-2 mm in diameter set in a dense, black, variably hydrated, glassy matrix. We have analyzed the vitrophyres of these four tuffs and, accounting for possible crystal enrichment/depletion in fall deposits and the observed mineralogy, we believe they represent eruption of an alkali rhyolite, two trachydacites and one trachyte. In their weakly alkalic composition they are most similar to the more alkalic lavas from the Hawks Valley/Lone Mountain center or the oldest ignimbrite from High Rock Caldera Complex, the Idaho Canyon Tuff. They appear to be insufficiently allkalic to come from McDermitt Caldera Field. Jarboe et al. (2010) report a reverse paleomagnetic polarity for a sample of Steens Basalt within the section in the southern Pueblo Mountains, making it equivalent to lower Steens Basalt at the type section at Steens Mountain. This suggests that at least minor silicic volcanism accompanied the earliest stages of flood basalt magmatism. We have irradiated alkali feldspar from the fused tuffs for 40Ar/39Ar analysis, and will present this data as a way to determine the timing of these earliest silicic eruptions, and to provide ages for Steens basalt lavas more precise than can be obtained on the low-K basalts themselves.

  16. An enriched mantle source for potassic basanites: evidence from Karisimbi volcano, Virunga volcanic province, Rwanda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, N. W.; de Mulder, M.; Hawkesworth, C. J.

    1992-09-01

    Lavas from Karisimbi, the largest volcano in the Virunga province in the Western Branch of the African rift on the Zaire-Rwandan border, constitute a suite of mafic potassic basanites and more evolved potassic derivatives. All of the lavas are potassic with K2O/Na2O≥1, and enriched in incompatible elements, with chondrite normalised (La/Yb)n>18 and Nb/Zr>0.25. The 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd ratios reflect these enriched compositions, varying from 0.7052 and 0.51258 respectively in the K-basanites to 0.7132 and 0.51226 in the most evolved K-trachyte, although at MgO abundances >4% there is no systematic variation of isotope ratios with fractionation. At >4% MgO, lava compositions were controlled by assimilation and fractional crystallization in a sub-volcanic magma chamber. Trace-element and isotope variations in the more mafic lavas appear to reflect mixing between a “primitive” K-basanite (PKB) magma and a Sr-rich end-member, similar to melilite nephelinites from the neighbouring volcano, Nyiragongo. Both endmembers are mantle-derived and isotopically distinct, with the PKB being characterised by 87Sr/86Sr up to 0.707 and 143Nd/144Nd as low as 0.51236. Alternatively, isotope variations may be the time-integrated response to trace-element fractionations in a variably enriched mantle source. The Pb isotope variations within Karisimbi are complex. In the more evolved lavas all three ratios increase coherently with fractionation, whereas in the mafic varieties 206Pb/204Pb remains roughly constant at ˜19.2 while 207Pb/204Pb and 208Pb/204Pb vary from 15.67 to 15.78 and 39.49 to 40.80 respectively, defining sub-vertical trends, consistent with PKB-nephelinite magma mixing. The Nd and Sr isotopes indicate trace-element fractionation in the PKB source at ˜1 Ga, similar to ages derived from the overlying crust and suggesting a lithospheric origin. Elevated 208Pb/204Pb and 208Pb*/206Pb* values of the PKB are also consistent with Th/U fractionation at a similar time. However, this 1Ga age contrasts with that derived from the elevated 207Pb/204Pb ratios which indicate U/Pb fractionation during the Archaean. Crustal contamination can be excluded as the major control of Pb isotope variation in the PKB because their high Ce/Pb ratios (˜27) are similar to those typical of oceanic basalts. Parent/daughter trace-element fractionation and the high Ti, Nb and Ta abundances of the PKB lavas are all consistent with enrichment of a lithospheric source region by small-degree silicate melts at ˜1Ga. Comparison between measured and time-integrated trace-element ratios suggests that the degree of melting associated with recent magmatism was ≥5%. These data show that significant Th/U and Rb/Sr fractionation can be produced by intra-mantle melting processes and that high 208Pb/204Pb and 208Pb*/206Pb* values can evolve within the upper mantle and do not necessarily require the recycling of crustal material. Comparable isotope features in continental flood basalts and DUPAL ocean island basalts may be explained in a similar way.

  17. Magma evolution in the Ellittico volcano sequence outcropping at Serra Giannicola Grande, Mt. Etna, Italy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristofolini, R.; de Rosa, R.; Ferlito, C.; Tripodo, M.

    2003-04-01

    The volcanic sequence examined here outcrops at Serra Giannicola Grande, along the south-western wall of the Valle del Bove (Mt. Etna Volcano), at an elevation between 2230 and 2700 m (Cristofolini et al., 2002). It is referred to the activity of the Ellittico volcanic complex (Ferlito &Cristofolini, 1989), and unconformably lies over on an erosional surface of the Cuvigghiuni synthem (Calvari et al., 1994). Petrological and geochimical investigations on lava flows, showed that: -The analyzed rocks have a Na-alkaline affinity and cover a compositional range from hawaiites to benmoreites and trachytes. -The common mineral association (pl+cpx+ol+mt) of Etnean lavas is present, both as phenocrysts and in groundmass; kaersutite as phenocryst phase isalso present in some of the samples. -The least differentiated lava flows, interbedded with volcanoclastic deposits in the middle part of the sequence, exhibit the widest compositional heterogeneity; they are referable to the existence of distinct magma batches, characterized by differing ascent rates and/or other processes, such as crustal contamination, occurring at shallow levels. It is noteworthy that mafic lavas differ in their contents of K (and Rb) and follow distinct trends of evolution. This suggests that magmas from at least two different sources were feeding the activity of the volcano. -The presence of the most differentiated lavas in the upper part of the sequence, is consistent with the presence of shallow reservoirs during the last stages of the Ellittico activity, where magmas could evolve due to crystal fractionation. The MELTS petrological code (Ghiorso &Sack, 1995) was used in order to quantify the evolution of the different magmas; this program simulates fractionation and assimilation processes in silicate melts under various physical and compositional conditions, and gives as a result compositions of residual liquids and of fractionated solid phases and their amounts. References Calvari, S., Groppelli, G. &Pasquarè, G. (1994): Preliminary geological data on the south-western wall of the Valle del Bove, Mt. Etna, Sicily. Acta Vulcanologica, 5, 15-30. Cristofolini, R., Corsaro, R.A., &Ferlito, C. (1991): Variazioni petrochimiche nella successione etnea: un riesame in base a nuovi dati da campioni di superficie e sondaggi. Acta Vulcanologica, 1, 25-37. Cristofolini, R.; De Rosa; Ferlito, C.; Iacquinta, G. &Tripodo, M. (2001): Abstract: Influenza di un ambiente glaciale o periglaciale sul comportamento eruttivo del centro dell'Ellittico (Distretto vulcanico etneo). FIST- Geoitalia 2001, 712-713. Cristofolini, R.; De Rosa; Ferlito, C.; &Tripodo, M. (2002): Abstract: Variazioni petrografiche e geochimiche della sequenza vulcanica affiorante nell’area della Serra Giannicola Grande (Distretto Vulcanico Etneo). Plinius, 28, 126-127. Ferlito, C. &Cristofolini, R. (1989): Geologia dell’area sommitale dell’Etna. Boll. Acc. Gioenia Sci. Nat., Catania, 335, 357-380. Ghiorso, M. S. &Sack, R. O. (1995): Chemical mass transfer in magmatic processes, IV. A revised and internally consistent thermodynamic model for the interpolation and extrapolation of liquid-solid equilibria in magmatic system at elevated temperatures and pressures. Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 119, 197-212.

  18. Neolithic to Bronze Age Somma-Vesuvius activity improved by distal tephrostratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, B.; Siani, G.; Sulpizio, R.; Zanchetta, G.; Paterne, M.; Santacroce, R.

    2009-12-01

    Mt Somma-Vesuvius (SV) volcano is one of the most dangerous volcanoes in the world. Many stratigraphic studies allowed reconstructing its eruptive history (e.g. Santacroce et al., 2008), which was characterised by few large explosive eruptions, and minor explosive and effusive events. The periods between large explosive eruptions were characterised by different behaviours, with the frequency of the minor eruptive events that increases with the decreasing age. As an example, very few explosive events are recorded into the proximal stratigraphy of the Mercato-Avellino interplinian period (between 8890±90 and 4365±40 cal yr BP). However, several phonolitic-trachytic tephra layers recognised in the Sulmona paleo-lake and dated between ca 7600 and 4800 cal yr BP (Giaccio et al., 2009) have been interpreted as products of the SV activity. This correlation contradicts the proximal data, and points out the need of further study in order to better constrain the eruptive history of the SV. Further material to this discussion is supplied by the tephrochronologic study of the marine core MD90-918 from Ionian sea (ca. 400 km S-E of SV). The core chronology and stratigraphy is supported by 14C AMS dating and isotopic δ18O. Geochemical investigations on the recognised tephra layers, indicate for the first time the existence of 5 distinct Vesuvian tephra layers in the Mercato-Avellino period, which encompass the Neolithic-Bronze Age transition. All the tephra layers are geochemically fully comparable to the phonolitic products of the Mercato and Avellino eruptions. It is noteworthy that they are geochemically different from the Sulmona basin’s tephra layers. The first and older tephra layer in core MD90-918 occurs during the Sapropel S1a, and can be easily correlated to the Mercato eruption. It is followed by a rhyolitic tephra layer which can be correlated to the Gabellotto-FiumeBianco eruption from Lipari island (Siani et al., 2004). The remaining 4 tephra layers have an astonishing similar composition with the Mercato products, suggesting that they were erupted from the same magma chamber. This finding evidences as distal archives can preserve more efficiently the traces of the past volcanic activity with respect to the proximal ones, and points out how the eruptive history of one of the most hazardous and studied volcanoes in the world is not yet completely resolved. Giaccio, B., et al., Tephra layers from Holocene lake sediments of the Sulmona basin, central Italy: implications for volcanic activity in Peninsular Italy and tephrostratigraphy in the central Mediterranean area, QSR (2009). Santacroce R., et al., Age and whole rock-glass compositions of proximal pyroclastics from the major explosive eruptions of Somma-Vesuvius: a review as a tool for distal tephrostratigraphy. JVGR (2008). Siani G., et al., Tephrostratigraphy study for the last 18,000 14C years in a deep-sea sediment sequence for the South Adriatic. QSR (2004) 23 : 2485-2500.

  19. The Early Jurassic Bokan Mountain peralkaline granitic complex (southeastern Alaska): Geochemistry, petrogenesis and rare-metal mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostal, Jaroslav; Kontak, Daniel J.; Karl, Susan M.

    2014-08-01

    The Early Jurassic (ca. 177 Ma) Bokan Mountain granitic complex, located on southern Prince of Wales Island, southernmost Alaska, cross-cuts Paleozoic igneous and metasedimentary rocks of the Alexander terrane of the North American Cordillera and was emplaced during a rifting event. The complex is a circular body (~ 3 km in diameter) of peralkaline granitic composition that has a core of arfvedsonite granite surrounded by aegirine granite. All the rock-forming minerals typically record a two-stage growth history and aegirine and arfvedsonite were the last major phases to crystallize from the magma. The Bokan granites and related dikes have SiO2 from 72 to 78 wt.%, high iron (FeO (tot) ~ 3-4.5 wt.%) and alkali (8-10 wt.%) concentrations with high FeO(tot)/(FeO(tot) + MgO) ratios (typically > 0.95) and the molar Al2O3/(Na2O + K2O) ratio < 1. The granitic rocks are characterized by elevated contents of rare earth elements (REE), Th, U and high field strength elements (HFSE) and low contents of Ca, Sr, Ba and Eu, typical of peralkaline granites. The granites have high positive εNd values which are indicative of a mantle signature. The parent magma is inferred to be derived from an earlier metasomatized lithospheric mantle by low degrees of partial melting and generated the Bokan granitic melt through extensive fractional crystallization. The Bokan complex hosts significant rare-metal (REE, Y, U, Th, Nb) mineralization that is related to the late-stage crystallization history of the complex which involved the overlap of emplacement of felsic dikes, including pegmatite bodies, and generation of orthomagmatic fluids. The abundances of REE, HFSE, U and Th as well as Pb and Nd isotopic values of the pluton and dikes were modified by orthomagmatic hydrothermal fluids highly enriched in the strongly incompatible trace elements, which also escaped along zones of structural weakness to generate rare-metal mineralization. The latter was deposited in two stages: the first relates to the latest stage of magma emplacement and is associated with felsic dikes that intruded along the faults and shear deformations, whereas the second stage involved ingress of hydrothermal fluids that both remobilized and enriched the initial magmatic mineralization. Mineralization is mostly composed of “new” minerals. Fluorine complexing played a role during the transportation of REE and HFSE in hydrothermal fluids and oxygen isotopes in the granites and quartz veins negate the significant incursion of an external fluid and support a dominantly orthomagmatic hydrothermal system. Many other REE-HFSE deposits hosted by peralkaline felsic rocks (nepheline syenites, peralkaline granites and peralkaline trachytes) were formed by a similar two stage process.

  20. Electrical resistivity tomography applied to a complex lava dome: 2D and 3D models comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portal, Angélie; Fargier, Yannick; Lénat, Jean-François; Labazuy, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    The study of volcanic domes growth (e.g. St. Helens, Unzen, Montserrat) shows that it is often characterized by a succession of extrusion phases, dome explosions and collapse events. Lava dome eruptive activity may last from days to decades. Therefore, their internal structure, at the end of the eruption, is complex and includes massive extrusions and lava lobes, talus and pyroclastic deposits as well as hydrothermal alteration. The electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) method, initially developed for environmental and engineering exploration, is now commonly used for volcano structure imaging. Because a large range of resistivity values is often observed in volcanic environments, the method is well suited to study the internal structure of volcanic edifices. We performed an ERT survey on an 11ka years old trachytic lava dome, the Puy de Dôme volcano (French Massif Central). The analysis of a recent high resolution DEM (LiDAR 0.5 m), as well as other geophysical data, strongly suggest that the Puy de Dôme is a composite dome. 11 ERT profiles have been carried out, both at the scale of the entire dome (base diameter of ~2 km and height of 400 m) on the one hand, and at a smaller scale on the summit part on the other hand. Each profile is composed of 64 electrodes. Three different electrode spacing have been used depending on the study area (35 m for the entire dome, 10 m and 5 m for its summit part). Some profiles were performed with half-length roll-along acquisitions, in order to keep a good trade-off between depth of investigation and resolution. Both Wenner-alpha and Wenner-Schlumberger protocols were used. 2-D models of the electrical resistivity distribution were computed using RES2DINV software. In order to constrain inversion models interpretation, the depth of investigation (DOI) method was applied to those results. It aims to compute a sensitivity index on inversion results, illustrating how the data influence the model and constraining models interpretation. Geometry and location of ERT profiles on the Puy de Dôme volcano allow to compute 3D inversion models of the electrical resistivity distribution with a new inversion code. This code uses tetrahedrons to discretize the 3D model and uses also a conventional Gauss-Newton inversion scheme combined to an Occam regularisation to process the data. It allows to take into account all the data information and prevents the construction of 3D artefacts present in conventional 2D inversion results. Inversion results show a strong electrical resistivity heterogeneity of the entire dome. Underlying volcanic edifices are clearly identified below the lava dome. Generally speaking, the flanks of the volcano show high resistivity values, and the summit part is more conductive but also very heterogeneous.

  1. Petrological and geochemical studies of mantle xenoliths from La Palma, Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janisch, Astrid; Ntaflos, Theodoros

    2015-04-01

    La Palma is the second youngest island, after El Hierro, of the Canary archipelago. The archipelago consists of seven large islands, forming an east-west-trending island chain, and several seamounts. All together they form a volcanic belt of around 800 km length and 450 km width, which presumably comprises roughly the Canary hotspot. The islands are located off the western coast of Morocco, Africa. The distance ranges from 100 km to 500 km. Concurrently with the distance, subaerial volcanism age progresses from the oldest lava in the east to the youngest in the west of the archipelago. Presently, La Palma is in the shield building stage of growth (alongside with El Hierro and Tenerife) and is furthermore the fastest growing island of the Canary archipelago. Historical volcanic eruptions are restricted on the younger islands, La Palma and El Hierro, with the last eruption at the south end of La Palma in 1971. Mantle xenoliths described in this work were collected at the slopes of San Antonio Volcano, Fuencaliente, brought to the surface during the 1677/1678 eruption. The mantle xenolith collection comprises sp-lherzolites, sp-harzburgites and pyroxenites. The texture can be distinguished between coarse-grained matrix and fine-grained veins in various thicknesses, mostly with olivine and pyroxene but also with amphibole, phlogopite as well as apatite. Mineral analyses reveal the existence of primary and secondary ol, cpx and opx. Primary ol has Fo contents of 89.2 to 91.7 and NiO ranging from 0.3 to 0.45 wt.%, whereas secondary ol show Fo values of 78.4 to 91.9 but with NiO below 0.3 wt.%. Primary cpx are predominantly Cr-Diopsides with En48.7-51.9-Wo43.5-44.3-Fs4.1-4.9 and Mg# of 91.5 to 92.4. Secondary cpx, primarily Ti-Augit, display En36.7-44.4-Wo47.7-49.6-Fs6.7-13.0 and Mg# of 75.3 to 90.8. Primary opx compositions are in range of En89.3-90.6-Wo1.3-1.5-Fs8.1-9.3 with Mg# between 90.7 and 92.0. Secondary opx exhibit En88.7-89.2-Wo1.7-1.9-Fs9.1-9.5 and Mg# of 90.7 to 91.6. Cr# in sp extends from 50.4 to 87.9 suggesting that all pre-existing sp has been influenced by melt percolation. A striking feature of these rocks is the presence of intergranular glasses as an effect of melt percolation. The composition of the glasses is phonolitic, trachytic and basanitic. Such compositions correspond to the rock types found in the south of La Palma along the Cumbre Vieja ridge indicating that the xenoliths besides the modal metasomatism have experienced host basalt infiltration. The peculiarity of one sample is haüyne, localized within veins in association with amphibole, olivine and clinopyroxene. Evidently in this sample, the host-basalt infiltrated the mantle xenolith for haüyne is commonly part of basaltic lava. Equilibration temperatures calculated using two-pyroxene-thermometer of Brey and Koehler (1990) are estimated to be in the wide range of 726 to 1105°C at 1.5 GPa pressure, indicating that the studied xenoliths sample various depths of the oceanic lithosphere underneath the Canary Islands. References BREY, G.P. & KOEHLER, T. (1990). Geothermobarometry in four-phase lherzolites II. New thermobarometers, and practical assessment of existing thermobarometers. Journal of Petrology 31, 1353-1378.

  2. Emplacement of the La Peña alkaline igneous complex, Mendoza, Argentina (33° S): Implications for the early Miocene tectonic regime in the retroarc of the Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, D. S.; Galliski, M. A.; Márquez-Zavalía, M. F.

    2014-03-01

    The La Peña alkaline complex (LPC) of Miocene age (18-19 Ma) lies on the eastern front of the Precordillera (32°41ʹ34ʺS, 68°59ʹ48″W, 1400-2900 m a.s.l.), 30 km northwest of Mendoza city, Argentina. It is a subcircular massif of 19 km2 and 5 km in diameter, intruded in the metasedimentary sequence of the Villavicencio Formation of Silurian-Devonian age. It is the result of integration of multiple pulses derived from one or more deep magma chambers, which form a suite of silicate rocks grouped into: a clinopyroxenite body, a central syenite facies with a large breccia zone at the contact with the clinopyroxenite, bodies of malignite, trachyte and syenite porphyry necks, and a system of radial and annular dikes of different compositions. Its subcircular geometry and dike system distribution are frequent features of intraplate plutons or plutons emplaced in post-orogenic settings. These morphostructural features characterize numerous alkaline complexes worldwide and denote the importance of magmatic pressures that cause doming with radial and annular fracturing, in a brittle country rock. However, in the LPC, the attitude of the internal fabric of plutonic and subvolcanic units and the preferential layout of dikes match the NW-SE extensional fractures widely distributed in the host rock. This feature indicates a strong tectonic control linked to the structure that facilitate space for emplacement, corresponding to the brittle shear zone parallel to the N-S stratigraphy of the country rock. Shearing produced a system of discontinuities, with a K fractal fracture pattern, given by the combination of Riedel (R), anti-Riedel (R‧), (P) and extensional (T) fracture systems, responsible for the control of melt migration by the opening of various fracture branches, but particularly through the NW-SE (T) fractures. Five different pulses would have ascent, (1) an initial one from which cumulate clinopyroxenite was formed, (2) a phase of mafic composition represented by dikes cross-cutting the clinopyroxenite, (3) a malignite facies that causes a small breccia in the clinopyroxenite, (4) a central syenite facies that develops breccias at the contact with the clinopyroxenite and, finally, (5) porphyry necks and a system of radial dikes intruding all units. At the moment of the emplacement different mechanisms would have acted, they summarized in: 1) opening of discontinuities synchronous to the magma circulation as the principal mechanism for formation of dikes and conduits; 2) stoping processes, that play an important role in the development of the breccia zone and enabling an efficient transference of material during the emplacement of the syenitic magma and 3) shear-related deformation (regional stress), affected the internal fabric of the facies, causing intracrystalline deformation and submagmatic flow, which is very evident in the central syenite intrusive. The kinematic analysis of shear planes allows proposing that emplacement of the LPC took place in a transtensive regime, which would have occurred in the back-arc of the Andes orogen, during a long period spanning from Miocene to the present, of the compressive deformation responsible, westward and at the same latitude, for the development of the Aconcagua fold and thrust belt.

  3. The evolving contribution of border faults and intra-rift faults in early-stage East African rifts: insights from the Natron (Tanzania) and Magadi (Kenya) basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muirhead, J.; Kattenhorn, S. A.; Dindi, E.; Gama, R.

    2013-12-01

    In the early stages of continental rifting, East African Rift (EAR) basins are conventionally depicted as asymmetric basins bounded on one side by a ~100 km-long border fault. As rifting progresses, strain concentrates into the rift center, producing intra-rift faults. The timing and nature of the transition from border fault to intra-rift-dominated strain accommodation is unclear. Our study focuses on this transitional phase of continental rifting by exploring the spatial and temporal evolution of faulting in the Natron (border fault initiation at ~3 Ma) and Magadi (~7 Ma) basins of northern Tanzania and southern Kenya, respectively. We compare the morphologies and activity histories of faults in each basin using field observations and remote sensing in order to address the relative contributions of border faults and intra-rift faults to crustal strain accommodation as rifting progresses. The ~500 m-high border fault along the western margin of the Natron basin is steep compared to many border faults in the eastern branch of the EAR, indicating limited scarp degradation by mass wasting. Locally, the escarpment shows open fissures and young scarps 10s of meters high and a few kilometers long, implying ongoing border fault activity in this young rift. However, intra-rift faults within ~1 Ma lavas are greatly eroded and fresh scarps are typically absent, implying long recurrence intervals between slip events. Rift-normal topographic profiles across the Natron basin show the lowest elevations in the lake-filled basin adjacent to the border fault, where a number of hydrothermal springs along the border fault system expel water into the lake. In contrast to Natron, a ~1600 m high, densely vegetated, border fault escarpment along the western edge of the Magadi basin is highly degraded; we were unable to identify evidence of recent rupturing. Rift-normal elevation profiles indicate the focus of strain has migrated away from the border fault into the rift center, where faults pervasively dissect 1.2-0.8 Ma trachyte lavas. Unlike Natron, intra-rift faults in the Magadi basin exhibit primarily steep, little-degraded fault scarps, implying greater activity than Natron intra-rift faults. Numerous fault-associated springs feed water into perennial Lake Magadi, which has no surface drainage input, yet survives despite a high evaporation rate that has created economically viable evaporite deposits. Calcite vein-filled joints are common along fault zones around Lake Magadi, as well as several cm veins around columnar joints that imply isotropic expansion of the fracture network under high pressures of CO2-rich fluids. Our work indicates that the locus of strain in this portion of the EAR transfers from the border fault to the center of the rift basin some time between 3 and 7 million years after rift initiation. This transition likely reflects the evolving respective roles of crustal flexure and magma budget in focusing strain, as well as the hydrothermal fluid budget along evolving fault zones.

  4. Mineralogical, Chemical, and Isotopic Characterization of Fracture-Coating Minerals in Borehole Samples from Western Pahute Mesa and Oasis Valley, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Benedict, F C; Rose, T P; Zhou, X

    2000-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of a mineralogical and geochemical investigation of fracture-coating phases obtained from archived borehole core and cuttings samples from the western Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley region. The objective is to provide data needed to validate UGTA flow and transport models for this region. Fracture-lining minerals were characterized using micrographic techniques (SEM-EDS), and selected calcite samples were analyzed for their stable isotope ({sup 13}C/{sup 12}C and {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O) and rare earth element (REE) abundances. The main conclusions are as follows: (1) The distribution of fracture-lining mineral phases is a function of primary rock type, the style and degree of syn-depositional alteration, effects of post-depositional hydrothermal alteration, and fracture location relative to recharge waters (in the unsaturated zone) or through going groundwater (in the saturated zone). (2) Fracture-lining minerals within the welded tuff aquifers (principally the Timber Mountain and Paintbrush Tuffs) are characterized by the assemblage calcite + chalcedony + Fe- and Mn-oxyhydroxides + mixed illite/smectite (in approximate decreasing order of abundance). The predominant mode of host rock alteration is quartzofeldspathic. (3) Interbedded rhyolitic lava flow aquifers are characterized by the fracture-lining assemblage chalcedony + mixed illite/smectite + Fe- and Mn-oxyhydroxides {+-} calcite {+-} quartz {+-} K-feldspar (in approximate decreasing order of abundance). These include lava flow aquifers from the Thirsty Canyon, Beatty Wash, Paintbrush, and Quartz Mountain groups. The predominant mode of host rock alteration is quartzofeldspathic. (4) Fracture-lining zeolite minerals are abundant only within one of the basaltic lava flow aquifers (Trachyte of Ribbon Cliff) where they occur with chalcedony + calcite + clay minerals. (5) Stable isotope analyses ({sup 13}C/{sup 12}C and {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O) of secondary calcite samples were used to deduce the origin and temperature of formation of the calcite. These data are also useful for constraining the geochemical evolution of dissolved inorganic carbon in groundwater flowpath models. Two general types of secondary calcite are recognized on the basis of temperature conditions. (6) Low- to moderate-temperature calcite (<45 C) was deposited from local recharge or from ambient regional groundwater flow. It contains carbon from either pedogenic (soil zone) or carbonate bedrock sources, and occurs at depths up to {approx}2200 ft. It commonly forms transparent, euhedral crystals that may reflect recent precipitation from groundwater, especially in ER-EC-4 and -7. (7) High-temperature calcite ({approx}50 to 116 C) was deposited from groundwater that previously equilibrated with carbonate bedrock, and is observed at depths greater than {approx}1900 ft. It typically occurs as dense, opaque crystalline veins. It is most prevalent in wells located within the moat of the Timber Mountain caldera (particularly ER-EC-1, -5 and -6), and was probably deposited under hydrothermal conditions following earlier periods of volcanic activity. (8) Variations in REE patterns for secondary calcite reflect the influence of groundwater chemistry, host rock chemistry, the carbonate source, and the physiochemical conditions of deposition. The partitioning of LREE relative to HREE is influenced by water chemistry (e.g. complexing with HCO{sub 3}{sup -} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ions) and by the preferential substitution of LREE for Ca{sup 2+} in the calcite crystal lattice. (9) Changes in the oxidation state of Ce and Eu are reflected as anomalies in chondrite- and shale-normalized REE plots, and are useful indicators of redox conditions during calcite formation. Strong negative Ce and Eu anomalies are most pronounced in samples from relatively shallow depths, but are not observed in all ''shallow'' samples. In general, comparative studies of REE patterns in secondary calcite with REE patterns in groundwater are needed to determine the applicability of these data for constraining reactive flow and transport models.

  5. Western Tibet relief evolution, insight from sedimentary record and thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahéo, Gweltaz; Gourbet, Loraine; Hervé Leloup, Philippe; Sorrel, Philippe; Shuster, David L.; Paquette, Jean-Louis; Quillévéré, Frédéric

    2014-05-01

    The Tibetan plateau is defined as a low relief high elevation zone, resulting from India-Asia convergence. However, its morphology is relatively heterogeneous. Especially the western Tibetan plateau is characterized by a strong relief, numerous peaks higher than 6000 m.a.s.l. and large (up to 10 km), deep (1-2 km) valleys. We investigate the origin of this particular morphology, coupling geomorphologic studies with sedimentary records and (U-Th)/He thermochronometry. The western Tibet Tertiary sedimentation is mostly characterized by conglomerates, red sandstone and siltstones related with alluvial fan deposits. Zircon U-Pb dating of interbedded trachyte flows implies that deposition started before 25 Ma and was still ongoing at 20 Ma. These continental, detrital deposits are filling wide open valleys during probable arid climatic conditions. Such valleys are thus interpreted as inherited basins, paleovalleys, formed before detrital sedimentation i.e. at ~25 Ma. Moreover, rare marine sediments were observed below the detrital deposits. Foraminifera suggest an Oligocene age, which implies that the paleovalleys already existed during the Oligocene, and that the emersion of the Western Tibetan Plateau occurred between the Oligocene and 25 Ma. This emersion thus occurred much later than the India-Asia collision (~50-45Ma) but is compatible with the onset of the main thickening phase of the Indian plate. The orientation of the inherited valley axis appears to be that of active strike slip faults that induced eastward extrusion of Western Tibet. This suggests that such extrusion was already active at the time of sedimentation (both marine and continental). Thus extrusion was also active during the plateau emersion at Oligocene time. The morphology of the valleys, and their sedimentary infilling, suggest that a significant relief, similar to present-day one (about 1000-2000m between valleys floor and surrounding peaks) already existed at the time of sedimentation. This implies that very little erosion and only uplift took place following plateau emersion. Assuming an Oligocene emersion and considering the present-day elevation of the valley floor (~ 4300-4500 m.a.s.l.) it yields a mean uplift rate of about 120-170m/Ma. In order to test the slow erosion hypothesis we performed apatite (U-Th)/He dating. Samples have been collected from a vertical profile in a Cretaceous granodiorite. Ages range from 13 to 22Ma. Based on the age variation with sampling elevation an apparent elevation rate of about 0.7 mm/yr is obtained. Modelling of age-elevation relationships indicates that the measured cooling ages are compatible with a slow, continuous exhumation/erosion rate from 25 Ma to the present time. This is similar to previous calculations obtained elsewhere on the Tibetan plateau. Today, the western Tibet is an internally drained area and local erosion induces filling of the paleovalleys. This implies that earlier erosion products were evacuated out of the plateau through the river network. Displacement along the Karakorum fault might be responsible from isolating Western Tibet from the nearby Indus drainage. In conclusion, this study suggests that western Tibet morphology is inherited from the ante-emersion relief (Oligocene?) that was preserved by combination of slow erosion and evacuation of the detrital sediments toward the Indus river network.

  6. Experimental quantification of P-T conditions of mantle refertilisation at shallow depth under spreading ridges and formation of plagioclase + spinel lherzolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalot-Prat, Françoise; Falloon, Trevor J.; Green, David H.

    2014-05-01

    We studied the first-order melting process of differentiation in the Earth, and the major process of rejuvenation of the upper mantle after melting related to plate spreading (Chalot-Prat et al, 2010; 2013). We conducted experiments at High Pressure (0.75 and 0.5 GPa) and High Temperature (1260-1100°C) to obtain magma compositions in equilibrium with the mineral assemblages of a plagioclase + spinel lherzolite. These PT conditions prevail at 17-30km below axial oceanic spreading ridges. We used a "trial and error" approach in a system involving nine elements (Cr-Na-Fe-Ca-Mg-Al-Si-Ti-Ni). This approaches as closely as possible a natural mantle composition, Cr being a key element in the system. Our objectives were : • to determine experimentally the compositions of melts in equilibrium with plagioclase + spinel lherzolite, with emphasis on the role of plagioclase composition in controlling melt compositions; • to test the hypothesis that MORB are produced at shallow depth (17-30kms) • to quantify liquid- and mantle residue compositional paths at decreasing T and low P to understand magma differentiation by "percolation-reaction" at shallow depth in the mantle; • to compare experimental mantle mineral compositions to those of re-fertilised oceanic mantle lithosphere outcropping at the axis of oceanic spreading ridges, enabling quantification of the pressure (i.e. depth) and temperature of the re-fertilisation process that leads to formation of plagioclase and indicates the minimum thickness of the lithosphere at ridge axes. In the normative basalt tetrahedron, liquids plot on two parallel cotectic lines from silica-oversaturated (basaltic andesite at 0.75 GPa or andesite at 0.5 GPa) at the calcic end to silica-undersaturated compositions (trachyte) at the sodic end. The lower the pressure, the greater the silica oversaturation. Besides the plagioclase solid solution has a dominant role in determining the solidus temperature of plagioclase + spinel lherzolites, at a given pressure at shallow depth. The cotectic lines can be interpreted either as defining partial melting compositions or evolution trends for melts invading and metasomatizing refractory peridotite by reactive porous flow, at 17-30 km. The mismatch between the compositions of the most primitive MORB glasses and the experimental liquids from plagioclase+spinel lherzolites confirms that melt equilibration and segregation of parental MORB occurs deeper than 30km. Mantle mineral compositions are mostly pressure dependent, excluding the co-variance of Na2OCpx and AnPlag, which is pressure independent and enables estimation of AnPlag (if the plagioclase is saussuritised), knowing Na2OCpx of the natural mantle Cpx. Our experimental data are thus tools for estimating mantle re-fertilisation depth in natural plagioclase+spinel lherzolites. The Lanzo plagioclase ± spinel re-fertilised lherzolites (Piccardo et al., 2007) clearly match our 0.75 GPa data, suggesting that re-fertilisation of the oceanic lithosphere occurred at depths of 25 - 30 km below the mid-ocean ridge axis. The most exciting result of this HT-HP experimental work, which imparts even more confidence and significance to our data, is the fit of the five phases of an experimental plagioclase + spinel lherzolite with those of natural plagioclase ± spinel lherzolites. References: Chalot-Prat, Falloon, Green & Hibberson, J. Pet., 51, 11, 2349-2376, 2010; Chalot-Prat, Falloon, Green & Hibberson, Lithos, 172-173, 61-80, 2013. Piccardo, G.B., Zanetti, A., Müntener, O., 2007. Lithos 94, 181-209.

  7. Origin of seamount volcanism in northeast Indian Ocean with emphasis on Christmas Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taneja, R.; O'Neill, C.; Rushmer, T. A.; Jourdan, F.; Blichert-Toft, J.; Turner, S.; Lackie, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    The Northeast Indian Ocean has been a central point of research in the recent past due to its intraplate geophysical and geochemical characteristics. It is dominated by sub-aerial volcanic islands and submerged guyots and two islands, namely, Cocos (Keeling) Island and Christmas Island. Christmas Island, the focus of this study, consists of limestone and mafic intraplate volcanics. The origin of most of the features in northeast Indian Ocean is not fully understood. Christmas Island has experienced multiple stages of intraplate volcanic activity as previously established by 40Ar/39Ar radioisotopic analyses of basalts from the island (Hoernl et al., 2011). Here, we present new 40Ar/39Ar ages where the rock samples from Waterfall Spring (WS), Ethel Beach (EB) & Dolly Beach (DB) on the east coast of the island yielded plateau and mini-plateau ages of 37.75±0.77 Ma, 37.10±0.66 Ma and 43.37±0.45 Ma respectively, whereas a sample from Flying Fish Cove (FFC) in the north of the island yielded a minimum age of 38.6±0.5 Ma. All these units are part of the Lower Volcanics Series. The samples from the west coast (Winifred Beach, WB) are younger with an age of 4.32 ± 0.17 Ma, and are part of the Upper Volcanic Series. This confirms two stages of volcanism at the island with a gap of around 38 Ma. The 40Ar/39Ar radioisotopic ages were overlayed on Gplates and seismic tomography models to determine its paleo motion. The present position of the island is 10.5°S, 105.5°E. During Eocene its reconstructed position was 30°S latitude. Seismic tomography models have highlighted a low velocity zone beneath the island during Eocene. Geochemically, the two volcanic suites (Upper & Lower) are mostly similar in their major and trace element composition. The majority of localities (WS, EB, and WB) are basanites; where as that from Dolly Beach is basaltic. The Dale's (west coast), are trachyte and appear evolved with high SiO2. They also have low Ba and Sr ~25ppm, whereas those from east coast have 550 - 900 ppm Sr. Despite an age difference of more than 38 Ma, there is no significant difference between Hf, Nd and Pb isotopic signatures of the Upper Volcanic and Lower Volcanic series which show an enriched component, interpreted by Hoernle et.al (2011) to be due to contamination by continental material. This signifies a common homogenous source for a period of more than 40 Ma in contrast to many OIBs. Dale's do have a distinct isotopic character from the Lower Volcanic Series and this signature is still under study. These geochemical analyses from the island broadly lie within those sampled by Hoernle et al. (2011) from their regional study. Here, we are looking at the island in detail. We present geochronological, geophysical and geochemical data from the island which addresses this model using Christmas Island as an example. Ref: Hoernle et al., 2011, Origin of Indian Ocean Seamount Province by shallow recycling of continental lithosphere, Nature Geoscience 4: 883-887

  8. Origin of andesitic rocks: Geochemical constraints from Mesozoic volcanics in the Luzong basin, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Long; Zhao, Zi-Fu; Zheng, Yong-Fei

    2014-03-01

    A combined study of whole-rock major-trace elements and Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopes as well as zircon U-Pb ages and Hf-O isotopes was carried out for Mesozoic andesitic-basaltic volcanics from the Luzong basin in the Middle-Lower Yangtze River Belt, South China. The results provide insights into the origin of mantle sources above fossil Andes-type oceanic subduction zone and thus into the petrogenesis of andesitic rocks on fossil and modern continental margins. These volcanics are primarily composed of basaltic trachyandesite and trachyandesite, with small amounts of trachybasalt and trachyte. They exhibit variable contents of SiO2 (48.66-63.43 wt.%), MgO (0.39-4.85 wt.%), Na2O (1.22-6.07 wt.%) and K2O (2.53-10.10 wt.%), with highly variable K2O/Na2O ratios from 0.45 to 7.39. They are characterized by arc-like trace element distribution patterns, with significant enrichment of LILE, Pb and LREE but depletion of HFSE. They exhibit relatively enriched Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotope compositions, with initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.7050 to 0.7066, negative ɛNd(t) values of - 8.0 to - 3.1, negative ɛHf(t) values of - 11.1 to - 1.1, and elevated 207Pb/204Pb and 208Pb/204Pb ratios at given 206Pb/204Pb ratios. Zircon U-Pb dating yields consistent ages of 127 ± 2 to 137 ± 1 Ma for magma emplacement through volcanic eruption. The zircon exhibits slightly high δ18O values of 5.3 to 7.6‰ and variable ɛHf(t) values of - 13.1 to 2.6. An integrated interpretation of all these geochemical data leads to the conclusion that the Luzong andesitic-basaltic volcanics were primarily derived from partial melting of fertile and enriched, mafic-ultramafic mantle sources that are similar to those of continental arc andesites. Such mantle sources are hypothesized to form by reaction of the mantle wedge peridotite not only with hydrous felsic melts derived from partial melting of seafloor sediment but also with aqueous fluid derived from metamorphic dehydration of altered oceanic basalt during subduction of the fossil Andes-type oceanic crust beneath continental margin. As a consequence, the mantle wedge would be metasomatized by larger amounts of the felsic melts than the case for oceanic arc basalts, yielding less ultramafic lithologies for the andesitic to basaltic magmatism. Therefore, the significant incorporation of sediment-derived felsic melts into the mantle wedge is likely a key premise to the origin of andesitic rocks in fossil and modern continental margins.

  9. Paleomagnetic, Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility, and 40AR/39AR Data from the Cienega Volcano, Cerros del Rio Volcanic Field, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucher, M. S.; Petronis, M. S.; Lindline, J.; Van Wyk de Vries, B.

    2012-12-01

    Cinder cone eruptions are typically interpreted to have formed by the ascension of magma through a simple conduit. Recent field work and laboratory studies on different excavated volcanoes around the world suggest that magma transport within cinder cones can involve a complex system of feeder geometries. We studied the Cienega volcano, a cinder cone in the Cerros del Rio volcanic field, northern New Mexico, in order to better understand the complexity and the evolution of volcanic plumbing systems in the development of cinder cone volcanoes. We hypothesized that cinder cone plumbing systems are inherently complex and involve numerous feeder geometries (e.g. dikes, sills) and flow patterns both towards and away from the central vent complex. The Cienega volcano comprises tephra fall deposits as well as several vents, multiple intrusions, and numerous lava flow sequences. We inspected the magmatic plumbing system using different laboratory methods including paleomagnetic, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS), rock magnetic and thin section studies. We collected samples across each outcrop of the feeder system. The dikes are olivine porphyritic basalts with major clinopyroxene, calcic plagioclase feldspar, magnetite, and xenocrystic quartz. Most samples display a trachytic texture with plagioclase crystals showing a preferred orientation parallel to the dike margins. The magnetic information is held predominantly by a cubic phase magnetite with a low- to moderate-Ti composition of Single or Pseudo-Single Domain grains. The AMS results show various flow directions. Three of six dikes yielded magma flow directions away from the vent. The other dikes showed both a subvertical flow, which corresponds to the typical movement of magma in a dike originating from a deeper crustal level, and a downward flow direction. We concluded that magma initially flowed upward from the magma chamber until it encountered flow resistance. At this structural level (the current exposure level), the magma flowed laterally away from the ascent location. Magma transport was, therefore, not solely directed into the central conduit but actually involved numerous conduits away from the vent area. The in situ results for eight paleomagnetic sites provide a group mean of D=354.2°, I=19.7°, α95= 4.8°, 5/8. The virtual geomagnetic pole dispersion of the group mean yields a value of 1.19, significantly lower than the predicted VGP dispersion estimate of 15° for the paleolatitude of the site (35.7°N). The results indicate that the different dikes were emplaced within a short period of time (<100 years) relative to a secular variation of the geomagnetic field. Four new whole rock 40Ar/39Ar age determinations from both vent and dike facies are indistinguishable at 2.75 Ma. These ages place the eruptive events in the latest Pliocene and indicate rapid magma injections and cone construction relative to secular variation.

  10. Pleistocene Volcanic Fields in the Anahim Volcanic Belt: What, why, how? - Chilcotin Highland, West-Central British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, Christian; Guest, Bernard

    2013-04-01

    A large number of volcanic features, including stratovolcanoes, cinder cones, domes, flows and erosional remnants of these exist in the eastern part of the Anahim Volcanic Belt (AVB) around Satah Mountain and Baldface Mountain. These two fields (abbreviated SMVF and BMVF below) are located south and east of the Itcha Ranges in the Chilcotin Highland of west-central British Columbia. Petrographic, geochemical and geochronological studies are hoped to clarify the volcano-tectonic association of these fields and if/how they relate to the nearby AVB. The studies might also provide corroboration of the hot-spot that has been proposed as the source of magmatism in the area, ranging from mid-Miocene ages in the western part of the AVB to Holocene ages at its eastern end at Nazko Cone. During two field campaigns, 20 centres in the SMVF aligned on a NNW-SSE trending topographic high and seven centres in the BMVF were studied with a focus on geochemistry and ages of the erupted lavas. With the exception of Satah Mountain, the most prominent and best-preserved edifice, individual centres are generally small in elevation (200-300 m) and volume. At almost all edifices, there is evidence for glacial modification, which likely removed most of the once-existing (?) pyroclastic material; water-magma interaction could be observed at one centre as well. Extensive coverage by glacial till limits outcrops to cliffs on the edifices' flanks or to local "windows" in the Quaternary deposits. This makes stratigraphic relationships, both within the fields and the surrounding volcanic rocks of the AVB and Chilcotin Flood Basalts (CFB), unclear. Preliminary XRF results indicate a high variability of the lavas, even between centres close to each other. Erupted lavas range from undersaturated basanites (44 wt% SiO2), trachybasalts and trachytes to high-alkali phonolites (14 wt% Na2O+K2O). In general, larger structures in the SMVF appear to have erupted more evolved rocks whereas smaller centres, often just remnants of plugs and necks, and centres in the more easterly BMVF, erupted more primitive rocks. In addition, all new whole-rock ages were determined using the Ar-Ar method for eleven SMVF centres and seven in the BMVF, with clusters around 1.85 Ma for the former and 2.22 Ma for the latter. These ages coincide with existing K-Ar ages for the nearby Itcha Ranges (3.5-1.1 Ma) and would fit well with the hot-spot hypothesis for the AVB. The prevalence of evolved rocks in the SMVF and BMVF might further indicate a relationship to the high-alkaline rocks of the AVB. Further studies will focus (1) on the geochemistry and ages of additional centres, including the yet-unstudied southern part of the Rainbow Range shield volcano in the AVB; (2) the isotopic composition of the lavas to identify possible source regions of the erupted magmas; (3) potential mechanisms and tectonic controls leading to magma ascent along the apparent W-E trend of the AVB, which heretofore has been explained by a mantle plume.

  11. The Satah Mountain and Baldface Mountain Volcanic Fields, Chilcotin Highland, West-Central British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, C.; Guest, B.

    2012-12-01

    A large number of volcanic features, including stratovolcanoes, cinder cones, domes, flows and erosional remnants of these exist in the Satah Mountain Volcanic Field (SMVF) and Baldface Mountain Volcanic Fields (BMVF), located near the Itcha Ranges in the Chilcotin Highland of west-central British Columbia. Petrographical, geochemical and geochronological studies are hoped to clarify the volcano-tectonic association of these fields and their relation with the nearby Anahim Volcanic Belt (AVB) and possibly provide a confirmation for the hot-spot that has been proposed as the source of magmatism in the area from the mid-Miocene to the Holocene. During field work, 20 centres in the SMVF aligned on a NNW-SSE trending topographic high and seven centres in the BMVF were studied with a focus on geochemistry and ages of the lavas erupted. With the exception of Satah Mountain, the most prominent and best-preserved edifice, individual centres are generally small in height (200-300 m) and volume. There is clear evidence for glacial modification of edifices, which likely removed most of the once-existing pyroclastic material, and water-magma interaction could be observed at one centre as well. Extensive coverage by glacial till limits outcrops to cliffs on the edifices' flanks or to local "windows" in the Quaternary deposits. This makes stratigraphic relationships, both within the fields and the surrounding volcanic rocks of the Anahim Volcanic Belt (AVB) and Chilcotin Flood Basalts (CFB), unclear. Preliminary XRF results indicate a high variability of the lavas, even between centres close to each other. Erupted lavas range from undersaturated basanites (44 wt% SiO2), trachybasalts and trachytes to high-alkali phonolites (14 wt% Na2O+K2O). In general, larger structures in the SMVF appear to have erupted more evolved rocks whereas smaller centres, often just remnants of plugs and necks, and centres in the BMVF erupted more primitive rocks. In addition, whole-rock ages were determined using the Ar-Ar method for eight SMVF centres and four in the BMVF, with clusters around 1.79 Ma for the former and 2.36 Ma for the latter. These ages coincide with existing K-Ar ages for the nearby Itcha Ranges and fit well with the hot-spot hypothesis for the AVB. The prevalence of evolved rocks in the SMVF and BMVF might also indicate a relationship to the high-alkaline rocks of the AVB. Further studies will focus (1) on the geochemistry and ages of additional centres, including the yet-unstudied southern part of the Rainbow Range shield volcano in the AVB, and (2) the isotopic composition of the lavas to identify possible source regions of the erupted magmas.

  12. Stratigraphic evolution of the Cascade back arc, northern Klamath County, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    Stratigraphy in the back arc of the Cascade Range between 42° 37' 30" N and 43° 22' 30" N includes volcanic and volcaniclastic sedimentary rocks deposited during the late Miocene to Pleistocene. Five stages of landscape evolution are identified within the 85 km-long study area. During the late Miocene, the first stage of landscape evolution was characterized by widespread eruption of phreatomagmatic basaltic tuff cones, some with late stage lava flows partially filling craters. These basaltic tuff deposits interfinger with lacustrine and sedimentary rocks and olivine basalt (n=1, 49.26 wt % SiO2, 1.460 wt % TiO2, 0.42 wt % K2O, 151 ppm Cr) to basaltic andesite (n=1, 56.13 wt % SiO2, 4.584 wt % TiO2, 0.83 wt % K2O, 25 ppm Cr) lava flows. Dacitic pyroclastic flows are also present. Erosion followed this stage. During the second stage, porphyritic (plagioclase and olivine) olivine basalt flows (n=7, 49.6 wt %, 1.52 wt % TiO2, 0.54 wt % K2O, 183 ppm Cr) partially covered the eroded surface and lap onto remnants of tuff cones that were protected from erosion by lava flow-filled craters. Contemporary eruption of basaltic andesite (n=8, 51.67 wt % SiO2, 1.24 wt % TiO2, 0.63 wt % K2O, 59 ppm Cr) stratovolcanoes produced areas of higher relief in the landscape. Age dates for lava flows of this stage are approximately 5 Ma. Volcaniclastic sedimentation and eruption of a suite of trachytic lava (54.61 to 67.25 wt % SiO2, 1.511 to 0.826 wt % TiO2, 1.12 to 2.48 wt % K2O, 16 to n.d. ppm Cr) flows, domes, and pyroclastic flows characterized stage three in the south. A trachyandesite lava flow was dated at 4.09 Ma. Eruption of andesite, olivine basalt, and basaltic andesite flows from isolated vents and shield volcanoes occurred on an eroding surface throughout the area as stage three progressed. During stage three the paleoslope appears to change from a gently eastward dipping surface (intracanyon flows dated 3.68 Ma) to a gently southward dipping surface (lava flow dated 3.63 Ma). Stage 4 was characterized by north-northwest and northeast-striking block faulting, drainage reorganization, canyon cutting, and the onset of eruption of low-volume, thin (2 m) aphyric olivine basalt flows. These include low K2O, low TiO2 flows with moderate Cr content (n=17, 47.95 wt % SiO2, 1.10 wt % TiO2, 0.14 wt % K2O, 200 ppm Cr) and higher K2O, TiO2, and Cr content (n=7, 49.76 wt % SiO2, 1.42 TiO2, 0.64 K2O, 252 ppm Cr). These lava flows disrupted north-south drainage patterns and caused repeated relocation of streams. A date of 1.62 Ma was obtained for one of these flows. A low-volume andesite (n=4, 57.76 wt % SiO2, 0.88 wt % TiO2, 1.47 wt % K2O, 58 ppm Cr) stratovolcanoes age dated at 1.71 ma was erupted in the south. During stage 5, volcanism shifted to the south near the Cascade arc and was dominated by eruptions of basalt, basaltic andesite, and trachyandesite lava flows and cinder cones. Age dates indicate these eruptions are younger than 1.1 Ma.

  13. Evolution of the Campanian Ignimbrite Magmatic System I: Constraints on Compositional Zonation and Eruption Probability Imposed By Phase Equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, S.; Spera, F.; Bohrson, W.; Belkin, H.; Devivo, B.

    2005-12-01

    The eruption and deposition of the ~39.3 ka Campanian Ignimbrite (CI), a large volume (~200 km3 DRE) trachytic to phonolitic ignimbrite, is the dominant event in the history of the Campi Flegrei volcanic field near Naples, Italy. In an effort to comprehend its petrological evolution, we have conducted ~~110 MELTS (Ghiorso, 1997) phase equilibria simulations of the major element evolution of parental CI magma. The goals of this work are to approximate oxygen fugacity (fO2), initial dissolved water content and pressure at which isobaric closed system fractional crystallization of parental melt most accurately captures the observed liquid line of descent and to study the implications of heat extraction from parental CI magma with respect to the origin of compositional zonation and the probability of explosive eruption. Although the CI magma body did not evolve as a perfectly closed system, this assumption allows quantitative insight into magma-host rock mass exchange using trace element and isotopic data (see companion contribution by Bohrson et al.). The parental melt composition was reconstructed using data for melt inclusions trapped within CI clinopyroxene phenocrysts reported by Webster et al. (2003), while allowing for reaction between parental melt and clinopyroxene host. The inferred parental melt is a basaltic trachyandesite. The search space for pressure, (fO2) and initial dissolved H2O was 0.1-0.5 in 0.05 GPa increments, QFM-1 to QFM+3 and 1, 2 and 3 wt. % H2O, respectively. The criteria used to judge the quality of a simulation include correspondence of the MELTS prediction with CI liquid and phenocryst compositions. Results indicate that a good first-order model involves evolution from a basaltic trachyandesite parent by isobaric (~0.15 GPa) crystal fractionation initially containing ~3 wt% dissolved H2O along the QFM+1 buffer. H2O first saturates at 1127°C at 0.15 GPa when the dissolved water content is ~4 wt %. A striking result is the discovery of a pseudo-invariant point at ~883°C (Tip) and 0.15 GPa. The fraction of melt changes abruptly from ~0.5 to ~0.1 at Tip due to the simultaneous crystallization of alkali feldspar, plagioclase, spinel, biotite and apatite. At Tip, there is a dramatic decrease in the viscosity of melt (by a factor of four) and magma density (~5%) and an increase in the dissolved H2O content of the melt (from 4.4-5.1 wt%) and in the volume fraction,θ, of supercritical fluid in the multiphase system. In particular, θ increases from ~0.05 at 885°C to ~0.6 at 882°C. The liquid composition also changes discontinuously at Tip with Si, Na, and H2O increasing and K and Al decreasing as temperature falls below Tip. The marked variations in composition and properties of volatile-saturated melt and magma were the trigger that led to the catastrophic eruption and formation of the compositionally-zoned CI magma. Because phase equilibria modeling provides information on the enthalpy changes associated with fractional crystallization and because the dimensions of the CI magma chamber and heat extraction rate can be approximated, a time scale for CI magmatic evolution can be derived. The estimated crystallization duration (τ) is10-100 ka and 75% of τ is spent at or near Tip.

  14. Petrology, geochemistry and geochonology of the Jacupiranga ultramafic, alkaline and carbonatitic complex (southern Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmyz, Luanna; Arnaud, Nicolas; Biondi, João Carlos

    2015-04-01

    Brazilian carbonatitic complexes are located at the edges of the Paleozoic basins and are usually associated to tectonic crustal flexuring or deep fault zones. The Jacupiranga Complex is a 65 km² ultrabasic-alkaline carbonatitic intrusive body outcroping at the northeastern border of the Paraná Basin, South of São Paulo State (Brazil). The northern portion of the unit is mostly composed of peridotitic rocks, while the southern part contains ijolites, melteigites, clinopyroxenites and carbonatites which host a phosphate deposit, mined since 1966. Even though the carbonatites only represent 1% of the Complex's area, they have concentrated most of the historical petrogenetic studies, leaving almost unknown the petrogenetic and the geochronological characteristics of other rocks. This explains why the few petrogenetic models from the literature are very partial and mostly unsatisfactory. While the peridotitic rocks are largely hindered by the absence of fresh outcrops, the regolith thickness and the high serpentinization degree, field observations and petrographic data notably show a heterogeneous zone around the peridotitic body. That zone is composed of a large variety of lithotypes over a relatively small area (~9 km²), comprising diorites, monzodiorites, alkali feldspar syenites, trachytes, lamprophyres and syenites. Moreover, these rocks present a restricted lateral continuity (decametric)