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Sample records for transformer admittance characterization

  1. Analytical admittance characterization of high mobility channel

    SciTech Connect

    Mammeri, A. M.; Mahi, F. Z.; Varani, L.

    2015-03-30

    In this contribution, we investigate the small-signal admittance of the high electron mobility transistors field-effect channels under a continuation branching of the current between channel and gate by using an analytical model. The analytical approach takes into account the linearization of the 2D Poisson equation and the drift current along the channel. The analytical equations discuss the frequency dependence of the admittance at source and drain terminals on the geometrical transistor parameters.

  2. Feasibility of anomaly detection and characterization using trans-admittance mammography with 60 × 60 electrode array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Mingkang; Wi, Hun; Lee, Eun Jung; Woo, Eung Je; In Oh, Tong

    2014-10-01

    Electrical impedance imaging has the potential to detect an early stage of breast cancer due to higher admittivity values compared with those of normal breast tissues. The tumor size and extent of axillary lymph node involvement are important parameters to evaluate the breast cancer survival rate. Additionally, the anomaly characterization is required to distinguish a malignant tumor from a benign tumor. In order to overcome the limitation of breast cancer detection using impedance measurement probes, we developed the high density trans-admittance mammography (TAM) system with 60 × 60 electrode array and produced trans-admittance maps obtained at several frequency pairs. We applied the anomaly detection algorithm to the high density TAM system for estimating the volume and position of breast tumor. We tested four different sizes of anomaly with three different conductivity contrasts at four different depths. From multifrequency trans-admittance maps, we can readily observe the transversal position and estimate its volume and depth. Specially, the depth estimated values were obtained accurately, which were independent to the size and conductivity contrast when applying the new formula using Laplacian of trans-admittance map. The volume estimation was dependent on the conductivity contrast between anomaly and background in the breast phantom. We characterized two testing anomalies using frequency difference trans-admittance data to eliminate the dependency of anomaly position and size. We confirmed the anomaly detection and characterization algorithm with the high density TAM system on bovine breast tissue. Both results showed the feasibility of detecting the size and position of anomaly and tissue characterization for screening the breast cancer.

  3. Electrical characterization and thermal admittance spectroscopy analysis of InGaN/GaN MQW blue LED structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourim, El-Mostafa; Han, Jeong In

    2015-10-01

    Characterizations of InGaN/GaN-quantum wells based LED heterostructure were undertaken by static and dynamic electrical measurements at different temperatures. The analysis of the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics demonstrated different mechanisms involved in the current charge transport in the LED device. Experimental admittance spectra have been investigated in broad frequency range, at various temperature and different direct current biases. A specific extraction of the quantum well conductance, based on Nicollian and Goetzberger's model related to interface state conductance in Metal-Insulator-Semiconductor structure, has shown the effect of the quantum structure on the electric transport, and hence a correlation between the I-V electrical characteristics and the admittance spectroscopy has revealed the different conduction mechanisms involved in the charge transport in the InGaN/GaN LED. Activation energies and carrier capture velocity obtained from Arrhenius plots, determined from the thermally activated quantum well conductance peaks which are revealed with the used model, have confirmed that quantum well parameters are related to the carrier emission from confined levels in quantum wells.

  4. A new estimate of the effective elastic thickness of the Canadian shield from admittance analyses using the wavelet transform, and models of flexure and mantle convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, J. F.; Swain, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    The flexural rigidity of the Earth's cratonic regions is a topic of much controversy. While many studies have suggested that cratons possess high elastic strength, others maintain that the continental lithosphere is everywhere weak. In this study we focus on the Canadian shield, and show that perceived evidence for weak cratonic lithosphere is compromised by shortcomings of the spectral analysis technique. Here we compare estimates of the admittance between free-air gravity and topography in the spectral domain from wavelet and multitaper methods. We apply particular attention to their long wavelength values, since it is here that the signals from mantle convection, glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) and flexure are often present together. Our results show that, when used with certain parameter values, the multitaper method has a comparatively poor resolution at long wavelengths, and hence is not always able to distinguish between the harmonics due to convection and flexural processes. This renders it unreliable for estimating the flexural rigidity. We then show that the wavelet method does have the requisite properties to make this distinction, since it is able to correctly resolve a low-admittance dip at long wavelengths in both synthetic and real data. When the observed wavelet admittance of the Canadian shield is inverted against the predictions of a combined flexural, convection and GIA model, we find that the shield possesses a core of high effective elastic thickness (Te), greater than 118 km to 95% confidence, located to the immediate south-west of Hudson Bay.

  5. Reservoir characterization using wavelet transforms 

    E-print Network

    Rivera Vega, Nestor

    2004-09-30

    Automated detection of geological boundaries and determination of cyclic events controlling deposition can facilitate stratigraphic analysis and reservoir characterization. This study applies the wavelet transformation, a recent advance in signal...

  6. Capillary scale admittance detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Stamos, Brian N; Amornthammarong, Natchanon; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2014-12-01

    Techniques that have been variously termed oscillometric detection or (capacitively coupled) contactless conductivity detection (C(4)D) are known actually to respond to the admittance. It is not often appreciated that the frequency range (f) over which such systems respond (quasi)linearly with the cell conductance decreases acutely with increasing cell resistance. Guidance on optimum operating conditions for high cell resistance, such as for very small capillaries/channels and/or solutions of low specific conductance (?), is scant. It is specially necessary in this case to take the capacitance of the solution into account. At high frequencies and low ? values, much of the current passes through the solution behaving as a capacitor and the capacitance is not very dependent on the exact solution specific conductance, resulting in poor, zero, or even negative response. We investigated, both theoretically and experimentally, capillaries with inner radii of 5-160 ?m and ? ? 1-1400 ?S/cm, resulting in cell resistances of 51 G? to 176 k?. A 400-element discrete model was used to simulate the behavior. As model inputs, both the wall capacitance and the stray capacitance were measured. The solution and leakage capacitances were estimated from extant models. The model output was compared to the measured response of the detection system over broad ranges of f and ?. Other parameters studied include capillary material and wall thickness, electrode spacing and length, Faraday shield thickness, excitation wave forms, and amplitude. The simulations show good qualitative agreement with experimental results and correctly predict the negative response behavior observed under certain conditions. We provide optimum frequencies for different operating conditions. PMID:25355014

  7. Reservoir characterization using wavelet transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera Vega, Nestor

    Automated detection of geological boundaries and determination of cyclic events controlling deposition can facilitate stratigraphic analysis and reservoir characterization. This study applies the wavelet transformation, a recent advance in signal analysis techniques, to interpret cyclicity, determine its controlling factors, and detect zone boundaries. We tested the cyclostratigraphic assessments using well log and core data from a well in a fluvio-eolian sequence in the Ormskirk Sandstone, Irish Sea. The boundary detection technique was tested using log data from 10 wells in the Apiay field, Colombia. We processed the wavelet coefficients for each zone of the Ormskirk Formation and determined the wavelengths of the strongest cyclicities. Comparing these periodicities with Milankovitch cycles, we found a strong correspondence of the two. This suggests that climate exercised an important control on depositional cyclicity, as had been concluded in previous studies of the Ormskirk Sandstone. The wavelet coefficients from the log data in the Apiay field were combined to form features. These vectors were used in conjunction with pattern recognition techniques to perform detection in 7 boundaries. For the upper two units, the boundary was detected within 10 feet of their actual depth, in 90% of the wells. The mean detection performance in the Apiay field is 50%. We compared our method with other traditional techniques which do not focus on selecting optimal features for boundary identification. Those methods resulted in detection performances of 40% for the uppermost boundary, which lag behind the 90% performance of our method. Automated determination of geologic boundaries will expedite studies, and knowledge of the controlling deposition factors will enhance stratigraphic and reservoir characterization models. We expect that automated boundary detection and cyclicity analysis will prove to be valuable and time-saving methods for establishing correlations and their uncertainties in many types of oil and gas reservoirs, thus facilitating reservoir exploration and management.

  8. Multi-port admittance model for quantifying the scattering response of loaded plasmonic nanorod antennas.

    PubMed

    Panaretos, Anastasios H; Werner, Douglas H

    2015-02-23

    In this paper we demonstrate the feasibility of using multiport network theory to describe the admittance properties of a longitudinally loaded plasmonic nanorod antenna. Our analysis reveals that if the appropriate terminal ports are defined across the nanorod geometry then the corresponding voltage and current quantities can be probed and thus it becomes feasible to extract the admittance matrix of the structure. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that by utilizing cylindrical dielectric waveguide theory, closed form expressions can be derived that uniquely characterize the loading material in terms of its admittance. The combination of the admittance matrix information along with the load admittance expressions provides an effective methodology for computing the nanorod's input admittance/impedance for arbitrary loading scenarios. This is important because the admittance resonances are associated with the structure's scattering peaks which are excited by a plane wave polarized parallel to its long dimension. Subsequently, the proposed approach provides a fast and computationally efficient circuit-based methodology to predict and custom engineer the scattering properties of a loaded plasmonic nanorod without having to rely on repetitive lengthy full wave simulations. PMID:25836483

  9. Applications of Admittance Spectroscopy in Photovoltaic Devices Beyond Majority-Carrier Trapping Defects

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J. V.; Crandall, R. S.; Repins, I. L.; Nardes, A. M.; Levi, D. H.

    2011-01-01

    Admittance spectroscopy is commonly used to characterize majority-carrier trapping defects. In today's practical photovoltaic devices, however, a number of other physical mechanisms may contribute to the admittance measurement and interfere with the data interpretation. Such challenges arise due to the violation of basic assumptions of conventional admittance spectroscopy such as single-junction, ohmic contact, highly conductive absorbers, and measurement in reverse bias. We exploit such violations to devise admittance spectroscopy-based methods for studying the respective origins of 'interference': majority-carrier mobility, non-ohmic contact potential barrier, minority-carrier inversion at heterointerface, and minority-carrier lifetime in a device environment. These methods are applied to a variety of photovoltaic technologies: CdTe, Cu(In, Ga)Se{sub 2}, Si HIT cells, and organic photovoltaic materials.

  10. Applications of Admittance Spectroscopy in Photovoltaic Devices Beyond Majority Carrier Trapping Defects: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J. V.; Crandall, R. S.; Repins, I. L.; Nardes, A. M.; Levi, D. H.; Sulima, O.

    2011-07-01

    Admittance spectroscopy is commonly used to characterize majority-carrier trapping defects. In today's practical photovoltaic devices, however, a number of other physical mechanisms may contribute to the admittance measurement and interfere with the data interpretation. Such challenges arise due to the violation of basic assumptions of conventional admittance spectroscopy such as single-junction, ohmic contact, highly conductive absorbers, and measurement in reverse bias. We exploit such violations to devise admittance spectroscopy-based methods for studying the respective origins of 'interference': majority-carrier mobility, non-ohmic contact potential barrier, minority-carrier inversion at hetero-interface, and minority-carrier lifetime in a device environment. These methods are applied to a variety of photovoltaic technologies: CdTe, Cu(In,Ga)Se2, Si HIT cells, and organic photovoltaic materials.

  11. ADVERTISING / PUBLIC RELATIONS MAJOR Application for Admittance

    E-print Network

    Sun, Yi

    ADVERTISING / PUBLIC RELATIONS MAJOR Application for Admittance PLEASE PRINT SEMESTER: Fall attached a graded college essay. Return this application to: ADVERTISING/PUBLIC RELATIONS PROGRAM DIRECTOR ADVERTISING & PUBLIC RELATIONS PROGRAM 160 Convent Avenue - #472 Shepard Hall New York, NY 10031 www

  12. Localized Gravity/Topography Admittances on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGovern, Patrick J.; Solomon, Sean C.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Head, James W.

    2000-01-01

    Admittances from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) gravity and topography yield estimates of lithosphere thickness on Mars: central Tharsis > 100 km, Alba Patera = 50 km, southern highlands < 20 km (but south polar cap > 50 km). Alba Patera and Elysium Rise are similar structures.

  13. A creatinine biosensor based on admittance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ching, Congo Tak-Shing; Sun, Tai-Ping; Jheng, Deng-Yun; Tsai, Hou-Wei; Shieh, Hsiu-Li

    2015-08-01

    Regular check of blood creatinine level is very important as it is a measurement of renal function. Therefore, the objective of this study is to develop a simple and reliable creatinine biosensor based on admittance measurement for precise determination of creatinine. The creatinine biosensor was fabricated with creatinine deiminase immobilized on screen-printed carbon electrodes. Admittance measurement at a specific frequency ranges (22.80 - 84.71 Hz) showed that the biosensor has an excellent linear (r2 > 0.95) response range (50 - 250 uM), which covers the normal physiological and pathological ranges of blood creatinine levels. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) showed that the biosensor has excellent reliability and validity (ICC = 0.98). In conclusion, a simple and reliable creatinine biosensor was developed and it is capable of precisely determining blood creatinine levels in both the normal physiological and pathological ranges.

  14. Coulometric differential FFT admittance voltammetry determination of Amlodipine in pharmaceutical formulation by nano-composite electrode.

    PubMed

    Norouzi, Parviz; Gupta, Vinod Kumar; Larijani, Bagher; Rasoolipour, Solmaz; Faridbod, Farnoush; Ganjali, Mohammad R

    2015-01-01

    An electrochemical detection technique based on combination of was coulometric differential fast Fourier transformation admittance voltammetry (CDFFTAV) and nano-composite film modified glassy carbon electrode was successfully applied for sensitive determination of Amlodipine. The nano-composite film was made by a mixture of ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (EMIMBF4), multiwall carbon nanotube and Au nanoparticles as electrochemical mediators. Studies reveal that the irreversible oxidation of Amlodipine was highly facile on the electrode surface. The electrochemical response was established on calculation of the charge under the admittance peak, which was obtained by discrete integration of the admittance response in a selected potential range, obtained in a flow injection analysis. Once established the best operative optimum conditions, the resulting nano-composite film electrode showed a catalytic effect on the oxidation of the analyte. The response is linear in the Amlodipine concentration range of 1.0 × 10(-9) to 2.0 × 10(-7)M with a detection limit of 1.25 × 10(-10)M. Moreover, the proposed technique exhibited high sensitivity, fast response time (less than 6s) and long-term stability and reproducibility around 96%, and it was successfully used to the determination of Amlodipine content in the pharmaceutical formulation. PMID:25281143

  15. 9 CFR 117.3 - Admittance of animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Admittance of animals. 117.3 Section 117.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...

  16. 9 CFR 117.3 - Admittance of animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Admittance of animals. 117.3 Section 117.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...

  17. 9 CFR 117.3 - Admittance of animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Admittance of animals. 117.3 Section 117.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...

  18. 9 CFR 117.3 - Admittance of animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Admittance of animals. 117.3 Section 117.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...

  19. 9 CFR 117.3 - Admittance of animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Admittance of animals. 117.3 Section 117.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...

  20. Temperature admittance spectroscopy of boron doped chemical vapor deposition diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubkov, V. I.; Kucherova, O. V.; Bogdanov, S. A.; Zubkova, A. V.; Butler, J. E.; Ilyin, V. A.; Afanas'ev, A. V.; Vikharev, A. L.

    2015-10-01

    Precision admittance spectroscopy measurements over wide temperature and frequency ranges were carried out for chemical vapor deposition epitaxial diamond samples doped with various concentrations of boron. It was found that the experimentally detected boron activation energy in the samples decreased from 314 meV down to 101 meV with an increase of B/C ratio from 600 to 18000 ppm in the gas reactants. For the heavily doped samples, a transition from thermally activated valence band conduction to hopping within the impurity band (with apparent activation energy 20 meV) was detected at temperatures 120-150 K. Numerical simulation was used to estimate the impurity DOS broadening. Accurate determination of continuously altering activation energy, which takes place during the transformation of conduction mechanisms, was proposed by numerical differentiation of the Arrhenius plot. With increase of boron doping level the gradual decreasing of capture cross section from 3 × 10-13 down to 2 × 10-17 cm2 was noticed. Moreover, for the hopping conduction the capture cross section becomes 4 orders of magnitude less (˜2 × 10-20 cm2). At T > Troom in doped samples the birth of the second conductance peak was observed. We attribute it to a defect, related to the boron doping of the material.

  1. Admittance of multiterminal quantum Hall conductors at kilohertz frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Hernández, C.; Consejo, C.; Chaubet, C.; Degiovanni, P.

    2014-03-28

    We present an experimental study of the low frequency admittance of quantum Hall conductors in the [100?Hz, 1?MHz] frequency range. We show that the frequency dependence of the admittance of the sample strongly depends on the topology of the contacts connections. Our experimental results are well explained within the Christen and Büttiker approach for finite frequency transport in quantum Hall edge channels taking into account the influence of the coaxial cables capacitance. In the Hall bar geometry, we demonstrate that there exists a configuration in which the cable capacitance does not influence the admittance measurement of the sample. In this case, we measure the electrochemical capacitance of the sample and observe its dependence on the filling factor.

  2. CHARACTERIZATION OF A SPONTANEOUSLY TRANSFORMED CHICKEN MONONUCLEAR CELL LINE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We describe the characterization of a spontaneously transformed chicken monocytic cell line that developed as a single colony of cells in a heterophil culture that was inadvertently left in the incubator over a period of 25 days. These cells, hitherto named HTC, grow efficiently at both 37 C or 41 C...

  3. Thermal Analysis Technique for Printed Wiring Board Using Admittance Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanazawa, Takuro; Hatanaka, Ayumu; Kusuno, Nobuhiro; Mishima, Akira

    This paper presents a thermal analysis technique for printed wiring boards using an admittance matrix. The proposed technique uses the similarly between electricity and heat, and can be applied to the modified nodal method that is generally used for electrical circuits. This technique can forecast the amount of temperature rise in a printed wiring board with high accuracy, regardless of the anisotropic thermal conductivity and the number of meshes in the finite element method. In this paper, we introduce a method for constructing an admittance matrix for a thermal analysis, and present the results of applying the analysis technique to the printed wiring board.

  4. 48 CFR 3022.101-70 - Admittance of union representatives to DHS installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Admittance of union... APPLICATION OF LABOR LAWS TO GOVERNMENT ACQUISITIONS Basic Labor Policies 3022.101-70 Admittance of union representatives to DHS installations. (a) Admittance of union representatives to Transportation...

  5. Aerodynamic Admittance Function of Tall Buildings Ahsan Kareemb

    E-print Network

    Kareem, Ahsan

    . Frequency )( fSu ),( f )(* 1 ~ fSP 2 )( fH d )( fSY Displacement response spectrum DGLF Log. frequency Aerodynamic admittance Aero - BBM spectrum BBM transfer function BBM response spectrum )( fSu )( f )( fSM 2 1 are generally employed in formulating analysis of wind effects in the along-wind direction following the "gust

  6. Programming Project : Admittance Matrix and Power/Load-Flow

    E-print Network

    Wedeward, Kevin

    Programming Project : Admittance Matrix and Power/Load-Flow EE 581 April 19, 2012 1 Introduction This project will be to develop your own power-flow (also known as load-flow) solver to study balanced, three to solve for the system's power-flow. Your project will be demonstrated on two power systems (5-bus and 9

  7. 9 CFR 117.3 - Admittance of animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Admittance of animals. 117.3 Section 117.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS ANIMALS AT...

  8. 9 CFR 117.3 - Admittance of animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Admittance of animals. 117.3 Section 117.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS ANIMALS AT...

  9. 9 CFR 117.3 - Admittance of animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Admittance of animals. 117.3 Section 117.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS ANIMALS AT...

  10. 9 CFR 117.3 - Admittance of animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Admittance of animals. 117.3 Section 117.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS ANIMALS AT...

  11. 9 CFR 117.3 - Admittance of animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Admittance of animals. 117.3 Section 117.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS ANIMALS AT...

  12. Characterizing Nutrient Loads and Transformations in Suisun Bay and the Delta

    E-print Network

    Characterizing Nutrient Loads and Transformations in Suisun Bay and the Delta Modeling and Monitoring Approaches Emily Novick, David Senn SFEI #12;Motivation · Nutrient loads from the Delta Francisco Bay regulated by upstream transformations and losses within the Delta? · Are transformations

  13. The long-wavelength admittance and effective elastic thickness of the Canadian Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, J. F.; Swain, C. J.

    2014-06-01

    The strength of the cratonic lithosphere has been controversial. On the one hand, many estimates of effective elastic thickness (Te) greatly exceed the crustal thickness, but on the other the great majority of cratonic earthquakes occur in the upper crust. This implies that the seismogenic thickness of cratons is much smaller than Te, whereas in the ocean basins they are approximately the same, leading to suspicions about the large Te estimates. One region where such estimates have been questioned is the Canadian Shield, where glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) and mantle convection are thought to contribute to the long-wavelength undulations of the topography and gravity. To date these have not been included in models used to estimate Te from topography and gravity which conventionally are based only on loading and flexure. Here we devise a theoretical expression for the free-air (gravity/topography) admittance that includes the effects of GIA and convection as well as flexure and use it to estimate Te over the Canadian Shield. We use wavelet transforms for estimating the observed admittances, after showing that multitaper estimates, which have hitherto been popular for Te studies, have poor resolution at the long wavelengths where GIA and convection predominate, compared to wavelets. Our results suggest that Te over most of the shield exceeds 80 km, with a higher-Te core near the southwest shore of Hudson Bay. This means that the lack of mantle earthquakes in this craton is simply due to its high strength compared to the applied stresses.

  14. Admittance plethysmographic evaluation of undulatory massage for the edematous limb.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Z; Fujimori, Y; Wada, T; Togawa, T; Yamakoshi, K; Shimazu, H

    1979-03-01

    A new apparatus, called Hadomer has been developed for the treatment of peripheral lymphedema and venous disorder. It has cuffs with 5 rooms, through which the air pressure moves from periphery to proximal point, just like surging waves. The peripheral stagnant lymph and venous blood are displaced toward the heart by this pneumatic massage. Hadomer has been applied to more than 400 patients with the edematous limbs, with satisfactory results, such as decrease of swelling, pain and induration. These clinical results have been also confirmed by electrical admittance plethysmography which is useful to measure noninvasively the edematous volume and the blood flow. The admittance of the edematous limbs is high and after massaging with Hadomer it approaches normal range. The blood flow in the diseased limbs is less than the healthy one and it is observed better after pneumatically massaging. PMID:449402

  15. Impact and admittance modeling of the Isidis Planitia, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancinelli, Paolo; Mondini, Alessandro C.; Pauselli, Cristina; Federico, Costanzo

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the impact event that produced the Martian Isidis basin (0-20°N and 70-100°E) was modeled using the iSALE hydrocode, and the current lithospheric structure was obtained comparing the calculated admittance from topography and gravity data, with the admittance from top-load and bottom-load flexure models. The best-fit admittance model was obtained using a bottom-load flexure with a thinned crust of 10 km, likely formed by cooling of the surficial melt pool after the impact, and an elastic thickness of 36 km. We found that the impact produced crustal excavation and thickening, surficial melt pool and temperatures >1500 K beneath the area where the free-air maxima is observed. The geometry resulting from the impact modeling is compatible with the radius of the Isidis basin. Derived thermal gradient and heat flux are in agreement with an early-Noachian epoch for the Isidis impact event and with the intense volcanic activity that followed the impact.

  16. 48 CFR 1222.101-70 - Admittance of union representatives to DOT installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Admittance of union... Basic Labor Policies 1222.101-70 Admittance of union representatives to DOT installations. (a) It is DOT policy to admit labor union representatives of contractor employees to DOT installations to visit...

  17. Dynamic admittance of carbon nanotube-based molecular electronic devices and their equivalent electric circuit

    E-print Network

    Goddard III, William A.

    Dynamic admittance of carbon nanotube-based molecular electronic devices and their equivalent electric circuit This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text:10.1088/0957-4484/19/49/495203 Dynamic admittance of carbon nanotube-based molecular electronic

  18. Gravity/Topography Admittances and Lithospheric Evolution on Mars: The Importance of Finite-Amplitude Topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGovern, Patrick J.; Solomon, Sean C.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Head, J. W., III; Phillips, Roger J.; Simons, Mark

    2001-01-01

    We calculate localized gravity/topography admittances for Mars, in order to estimate elastic lithosphere thickness. A finite-amplitude correction to modeled gravity is required to properly interpret admittances in high-relief regions of Mars. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  19. Quality control of dairy products using single frequency admittance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabrook, M. F.; Darbyshire, A. M.; Petty, M. C.

    2006-02-01

    A reusable device for the detection of adulteration in dairy products such as milk and cream has been developed. The ac electrical admittance spectra of different samples have been studied using both uncoated and alkyl mercaptan-coated gold electrodes. Uncoated gold electrodes exhibited a polarization at around 250 Hz for full fat milk, while mercaptan-coated gold electrodes showed a similar effect at around 2 kHz. The characteristics at 100 kHz and 8 °C for all skimmed milk samples revealed a linear decrease in conductance with increasing water content over the entire range of water concentration. In contrast, the conductance of full fat milk, single and double cream, showed a linear decrease only at added water concentration higher than 6%. At lower concentrations, these dairy products exhibited anomalous conductivity maxima.

  20. Automatically calibrating admittances in KATE's autonomous launch operations model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Steve

    1992-01-01

    This report documents a 1000-line Symbolics LISP program that automatically calibrates all 15 fluid admittances in KATE's Autonomous Launch Operations (ALO) model. (KATE is Kennedy Space Center's Knowledge-based Autonomous Test Engineer, a diagnosis and repair expert system created for use on the Space Shuttle's various fluid flow systems.) As a new KATE application, the calibrator described here breaks new ground for KSC's Artificial Intelligence Lab by allowing KATE to both control and measure the hardware she supervises. By automating a formerly manual process, the calibrator: (1) saves the ALO model builder untold amounts of labor; (2) enables quick repairs after workmen accidently adjust ALO's hand valves; and (3) frees the modeler to pursue new KATE applications that previously were too complicated. Also reported are suggestions for enhancing the program: (1) to calibrate ALO's TV cameras, pumps, and sensor tolerances; and (2) to calibrate devices in other KATE models, such as the shuttle's LOX and Environment Control System (ECS).

  1. CHARACTERIZING MODERN AND FOSSIL GYMNOSPERM EXUDATES USING MICRO-FOURIER TRANSFORM INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY

    E-print Network

    Wolfe, Alexander P.

    CHARACTERIZING MODERN AND FOSSIL GYMNOSPERM EXUDATES USING MICRO-FOURIER TRANSFORM INFRARED spectroscopy have direct implications for the assessment of the fossil potential and the chemotaxonomic interpretation of modern and fossil gymnosperm exudates. Keywords: chemotaxonomy, plant resin, gum, conifers

  2. Plant Physiol. (1996) 112: 121-129 Genetic Transformation, Recovery, and Characterization of

    E-print Network

    Parrott, Wayne

    1996-01-01

    Plant Physiol. (1996) 112: 121-129 Genetic Transformation, Recovery, and Characterization, California 92121 (G.C.) Somatic embryos of Jack, a Glycine max (1.) Merrill cultivar, were transformed using. The recovered lines contained the HPHgene, but the Bt gene was lost in one line. The plasmid was rearranged

  3. Global Admittance Estimates of Elastic and Crustal Thickness of Venus: Results from Top, Hot Spot, and Bottom Loading Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smrekar, S. E.; Anderson, F. S.

    2005-01-01

    We have calculated admittance spectra using the spatio-spectral method [14] for Venus by moving the central location of the spectrum over a 1 grid, create 360x180 admittance spectra. We invert the observed admittance using top-loading (TL), hot spot (HS), and bottom loading (BL) models, resulting in elastic, crustal, and lithospheric thickness estimates (Te, Zc, and Zl) [0]. The result is a global map for interpreting subsurface structure. Estimated values of Te and Zc concur with previous TL local admittance results, but BL estimates indicate larger values than previously suspected.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of JBW structure and its thermal transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Hegazy, Eman Z.; Kosa, Samia A.; Abd El Maksod, Islam Hamdy

    2012-12-15

    In this paper, JBW zeolite prepared from Egyptian kaolin was investigated by means of XRD, IR, SEM, EDX and ion exchange of some heavy metals. Adsorption isotherms were used to investigate the structure and properties of the prepared zeolite. XRD analysis showed that the JBW was a pure crystalline phase with orthorhombic crystal symmetry. Thermal treatment showed that the JBW transformed into the It-Carn phase at 1000 Degree-Sign C through an intermediate crystalline alumino silicate phase. SEM images showed that the JBW crystallised in a cylindrical shape. However, spherical agglomerates were observed at lower magnifications. The ion exchange isotherms with Cu{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+} and Co{sup 2+} were found to follow a Freundlich isotherm. In addition, it shows higher affinity towards Cu{sup 2+} than other ions. - Graphical abstract: JBW zeolite structure was prepared from Egyptian kaolin and characterised. XRD analysis showed that the JBW was a pure crystalline phase with orthorhombic crystal symmetry. Thermal treatment showed that the JBW transformed into the It-Carn phase at 1000 Degree-Sign C through an intermediate crystalline alumino silicate phase. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Egyptian kaolin was successfully used to prepare pure phase of JBW Structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer JBW is stable till <300 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer JBW phase crystallizes as cylindrical shape but agglomerates in a Nano spherical shape. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ion exchange isotherms of Cu{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, and Co{sup 2+} followed up Freundlich isotherm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Selectivity towards Cu{sup 2+} is much higher than Co{sup 2+} or Ni{sup 2+}.

  5. Characterization, Modeling, and Energy Harvesting of Phase Transformations in Ferroelectric Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Wenda

    Solid state phase transformations can be induced through mechanical, electrical, and thermal loading in ferroelectric materials that are compositionally close to morphotropic phase boundaries. Large changes in strain, polarization, compliance, permittivity, and coupling properties are typically observed across the phase transformation regions and are phenomena of interest for energy harvesting and transduction applications where increased coupling behavior is desired. This work characterized and modeled solid state phase transformations in ferroelectric materials and assessed the potential of phase transforming materials for energy harvesting applications. Two types of phase transformations were studied. The first type was ferroelectric rhombohedral to ferroelectric orthorhombic observed in lead indium niobate lead magnesium niobate lead titanate (PIN-PMN-PT) and driven by deviatoric stress, temperature, and electric field. The second type of phase transformation is ferroelectric to antiferroelectric observed in lead zirconate titanate (PZT) and driven by pressure, temperature, and electric field. Experimental characterizations of the phase transformations were conducted in both PIN-PMN-PT and PZT in order to understand the thermodynamic characteristics of the phase transformations and map out the phase stability of both materials. The ferroelectric materials were characterized under combinations of stress, electric field, and temperature. Material models of phase transforming materials were developed using a thermodynamic based variant switching technique and thermodynamic observations of the phase transformations. These models replicate the phase transformation behavior of PIN-PMN-PT and PZT under mechanical and electrical loading conditions. The switching model worked in conjunction with linear piezoelectric equations as ferroelectric/ferroelastic constitutive equations within a finite element framework that solved the mechanical and electrical field equations. This paves the way for future modeling work of devices that incorporate phase transforming ferroelectrics. Studies on the energy harvesting capabilities of PIN-PMN-PT were conducted to gauge its potential as an energy harvesting material. Using the phase stability data collected in the characterization studies, an ideal energy harvesting cycle was designed and explored to ascertain the maximum energy harvesting density per cycle. The energy harvesting characteristics under non-ideal sinusoidal stress and constant electric load impedance were also investigated. Energy harvesting performance due to changes in loading frequency and electrical load impedance was reported.

  6. Fermi level pinning at GaN-interfaces: Correlation of electrical admittance and transient spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Witte, H.; Krtschil, A.; Lisker, M.; Rudloff, D.; Christen, J.; Krost, A.; Stutzmann, M.; Scholz, F.

    2000-07-01

    In GaN layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy as well as metal organic vapor phase epitaxy significant differences were found in the appearance of deep defects detected by thermal admittance spectroscopy as compared for deep level transient spectroscopy measurements. While, thermal admittance spectroscopy measurements which were made under zero bias conditions only show thermal emissions at activation energies between 130 and 170 meV, further deep levels existing in these GaN layers were evidenced by transient spectroscopy. This discrepancy is explained by a pinning effect of the Fermi level at the metal/GaN interface induced by high a concentration of the deep levels showing up in thermal admittance spectroscopy. The authors compare their results with a GaAs:Te Schottky-diode as a reference sample. Here, both spectroscopic methods give exactly the same deep level emissions.

  7. Evolute-based Hough transform method for characterization of ellipsoids.

    PubMed

    Kaytanli, B; Valentine, M T

    2013-03-01

    We propose a novel and algorithmically simple Hough transform method that exploits the geometric properties of ellipses to enable the robust determination of the ellipse position and properties. We make use of the unique features of the evolute created by Hough voting along the gradient vectors of a two-dimensional image to determine the ellipse centre, orientation and aspect ratio. A second one-dimensional voting is performed on the minor axis to uniquely determine the ellipse size. This reduction of search space substantially simplifies the algorithmic complexity. To demonstrate the accuracy of our method, we present analysis of single and multiple ellipsoidal particles, including polydisperse and imperfect ellipsoids, in both simulated images and electron micrographs. Given its mathematical simplicity, ease of implementation and reasonable algorithmic completion time, we anticipate that the proposed method will be broadly useful for image processing of ellipsoidal particles, including their detection and tracking for studies of colloidal suspensions, and for applications to drug delivery and microrheology. PMID:23301634

  8. Systematic characterization of the Herschel SPIRE Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopwood, R.; Polehampton, E. T.; Valtchanov, I.; Swinyard, B. M.; Fulton, T.; Lu, N.; Marchili, N.; van der Wiel, M. H. D.; Benielli, D.; Imhof, P.; Baluteau, J.-P.; Pearson, C.; Clements, D. L.; Griffin, M. J.; Lim, T. L.; Makiwa, G.; Naylor, D. A.; Noble, G.; Puga, E.; Spencer, L. D.

    2015-05-01

    A systematic programme of calibration observations was carried out to monitor the performance of the Spectral and Photometric Imaging REceiver (SPIRE) Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) instrument on board the Herschel Space Observatory. Observations of planets (including the prime point-source calibrator, Uranus), asteroids, line sources, dark sky and cross-calibration sources were made in order to monitor repeatability and sensitivity, and to improve FTS calibration. We present a complete analysis of the full set of calibration observations and use them to assess the performance of the FTS. Particular care is taken to understand and separate out the effect of pointing uncertainties, including the position of the internal beam steering mirror for sparse observations in the early part of the mission. The repeatability of spectral-line centre positions is <5 km s-1, for lines with signal-to-noise ratios >40, corresponding to <0.5-2.0 per cent of a resolution element. For spectral-line flux, the repeatability is better than 6 per cent, which improves to 1-2 per cent for spectra corrected for pointing offsets. The continuum repeatability is 4.4 per cent for the SPIRE Long Wavelength spectrometer (SLW) band and 13.6 per cent for the SPIRE Short Wavelength spectrometer (SSW) band, which reduces to ˜1 per cent once the data have been corrected for pointing offsets. Observations of dark sky were used to assess the sensitivity and the systematic offset in the continuum, both of which were found to be consistent across the FTS-detector arrays. The average point-source calibrated sensitivity for the centre detectors is 0.20 and 0.21 Jy [1?; 1 h], for SLW and SSW. The average continuum offset is 0.40 Jy for the SLW band and 0.28 Jy for the SSW band.

  9. TRANSFORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    LACKS,S.A.

    2003-10-09

    Transformation, which alters the genetic makeup of an individual, is a concept that intrigues the human imagination. In Streptococcus pneumoniae such transformation was first demonstrated. Perhaps our fascination with genetics derived from our ancestors observing their own progeny, with its retention and assortment of parental traits, but such interest must have been accelerated after the dawn of agriculture. It was in pea plants that Gregor Mendel in the late 1800s examined inherited traits and found them to be determined by physical elements, or genes, passed from parents to progeny. In our day, the material basis of these genetic determinants was revealed to be DNA by the lowly bacteria, in particular, the pneumococcus. For this species, transformation by free DNA is a sexual process that enables cells to sport new combinations of genes and traits. Genetic transformation of the type found in S. pneumoniae occurs naturally in many species of bacteria (70), but, initially only a few other transformable species were found, namely, Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitides, Neisseria gonorrheae, and Bacillus subtilis (96). Natural transformation, which requires a set of genes evolved for the purpose, contrasts with artificial transformation, which is accomplished by shocking cells either electrically, as in electroporation, or by ionic and temperature shifts. Although such artificial treatments can introduce very small amounts of DNA into virtually any type of cell, the amounts introduced by natural transformation are a million-fold greater, and S. pneumoniae can take up as much as 10% of its cellular DNA content (40).

  10. Characterization of rare transforming KRAS mutations in sporadic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Tong, Joanna H M; Lung, Raymond W M; Sin, Frankie M C; Law, Peggy P Y; Kang, Wei; Chan, Anthony W H; Ma, Brigette B Y; Mak, Tony W C; Ng, Simon S M; To, Ka Fai

    2014-06-01

    KRAS mutational status has been shown to be a predictive biomarker of resistance to anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. We report the spectrum of KRAS mutation in 1506 patients with colorectal cancer and the identification and characterization of rare insertion mutations within the functional domain of KRAS. KRAS mutations are found in 44.5% (670/1506) of the patients. Two cases are found to harbor double mutations involving both codons 12 and 13. The frequencies of KRAS mutations at its codons 12, 13, 61, and 146 are 75.1%, 19.3%, 2.5%, and 2.7%, respectively. The most abundant mutation of codon 12 is G12D, followed by G12V and G12C while G13D is the predominant mutation in codon 13. Mutations in other codons are rare. The KRAS mutation rate is significantly higher in women (48%, 296/617) than in men (42.1%, 374/889, P = 0.023). Tumors on the right colon have a higher frequency of KRAS mutations than those on the left (57.3% vs. 40.4%, P<0.0001). Two in-frame insertion mutations affect the phosphate-binding loop (codon 10-16) of KRAS are identified. One of them has never been reported before. Compared with wild-type protein, the insertion variants enhance the cellular accumulation of active RAS (RAS-GTP) and constitutively activate the downstream signaling pathway. NIH3T3 cells transfected with the insertion variants show enhanced anchorage-independent growth and in vivo tumorigenicity. Potentially these mutations contribute to primary resistance to anti-EGFR mAb therapy but the clinical implication requires further validation. PMID:24642870

  11. Characterization of fluids involved in the Gneiss-Charnockite transformation in Southern Kerala (India)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klatt, E.; Hoernes, S.; Raith, M.

    1988-01-01

    The characterization of fluids involved in the gneiss-charnockite transformation in southern Kerala are discussed. Using a variety of techniques, including microthermometry, Raman laser probe analysis, and mass spectrometry, it was concluded that the CO2-rich, N2-bearing metamorphic fluids in these rocks were internally-derived rather than having been introduced by CO2-streaming.

  12. Towards Efficient Automated Characterization of Irregular Histology Images via Transformation to Frieze-Like Patterns

    E-print Network

    Towards Efficient Automated Characterization of Irregular Histology Images via Transformation to Frieze-Like Patterns ABSTRACT Histology is used in both clinical and research contexts as a highly equipment has enabled high-throughput digitization of high-resolution histology slides, the manual scoring

  13. Fourier transform infrared as a powerful technique for the identification and characterization of filamentous fungi and yeasts.

    PubMed

    Santos, Cledir; Fraga, Marcelo E; Kozakiewicz, Zofia; Lima, Nelson

    2010-03-01

    Fourier transform infrared is considered a powerful technique for characterizing chemical compositions of complex probes such as microorganisms. It has successfully been applied to fungal identification. In this paper, the current state of identification and characterization of filamentous fungi and yeasts by Fourier transform infrared is reviewed. PMID:20079832

  14. Effects of Series Resistance and Inductance on Solar Cell Admittance Measurements(a)

    E-print Network

    Scofield, John H.

    cells. The model circuit consists of a capacitance C in parallel with a resistance r circuit consisting of a capacitance (C) in parallel with a shunt resistance (r), with these in series admittance of a four-element circuit is calculated and compared with measurements on two typical CIGS solar

  15. Admittance model for the shuttle remote manipulator system in four configurations. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadopoulos, Loukas; Tolson, Robert H.

    1993-01-01

    A possible scenario for robot task performance in space is to mount two small, dexterous arms to the end of the Shuttle Remote Manipulator System (SRMS). As these small robots perform tasks, the flexibility of the SRMS may cause unsuccessful task executions. In order to simulate the dynamic coupling between the SRMS and the arms, admittance models of the SRMS in four brakes locked configurations were developed. The admittance model permits calculation of the SRMS end-effector response due to end-effector disturbing forces. The model will then be used in conjunction with a Stewart Platform, a vehicle emulation system. An application of the admittance model was shown by simulating the disturbing forces using two SRMS payloads, the Dextrous Orbital Servicing System (DOSS) manipulator and DOSS carrying a 1000 lb. cylinder. Mode by mode comparisons were conducted to determine the minimum number of modes required in the admittance model while retaining dynamic fidelity. It was determined that for all four SRMS configurations studied, between 4 and 6 modes of the SRMS structure (depending on the excitation loads) were sufficient to retain tolerance of 0.01 inches and 0.01 deg. These tolerances correspond to the DOSS manipulator carrying no object. When the DOSS carries the 1000 lb. cylinder, between 15 and 20 modes were sufficient, approximately three or four times as many modes as for the unloaded case.

  16. Voice source characterization using pitch synchronous discrete cosine transform for speaker identification.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, A G; Abhiram, B; Prasanna, S R Mahadeva

    2015-06-01

    A characterization of the voice source (VS) signal by the pitch synchronous (PS) discrete cosine transform (DCT) is proposed. With the integrated linear prediction residual (ILPR) as the VS estimate, the PS DCT of the ILPR is evaluated as a feature vector for speaker identification (SID). On TIMIT and YOHO databases, using a Gaussian mixture model (GMM)-based classifier, it performs on par with existing VS-based features. On the NIST 2003 database, fusion with a GMM-based classifier using MFCC features improves the identification accuracy by 12% in absolute terms, proving that the proposed characterization has good promise as a feature for SID studies. PMID:26093457

  17. Solid-state characterization and transformation of various creatine phosphate sodium hydrates.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yun; Jiang, Linglei; Huang, Ying; Wang, Jian-Rong; Mei, Xuefeng

    2014-11-01

    Creatine phosphate sodium (CPS) salt is a first-line cardiovascular drug for severe diastolic heart failure. The drug exists in different hydrate forms. The marketed drug form was determined as CPS·4.5H2 O (H1); however, the reference standard was supplied as CPS·6H2 O (H2). In this work, we present two newly identified hydrate forms: a thermodynamically stable low hydrate form, CPS·1.5H2 O (H3), and a pressure-sensitive transit form, CPS·7H2 O (H4). The hydrate forms were discovered through a comprehensive solid-state screening experiment and fully characterized using a range of analytical techniques including X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), FTIR, Raman spectroscopy, hot-stage microscopy (HSM), thermogravimetric analysis, and differential scanning calorimetry. Stability tests revealed that H3 was the most stable hydrate under thermal stimulation. H4 is a pressure-sensitive hydrate and easily transforms to H2 and then H1 upon grinding. The form transformation process was closely monitored using the HSM, variable-temperature XRPD (VT-XRPD), and VT-Raman spectroscopy techniques. Specifically, the transformation of H4 to H1 is characterized in a single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation process. The newly discovered hydrate form H3 has superior physicochemical properties than the marketed forms and is worthy of further development. PMID:25223726

  18. 76 FR 31306 - Admittance to Practice and Roster of Registered Patent Attorneys and Agents Admitted to Practice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-31

    ...DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Patent and Trademark Office Admittance to Practice and Roster of Registered Patent Attorneys and Agents Admitted to Practice Before the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) (Proposed...

  19. Reliability of the input admittance of bowed-string instruments measured by the hammer method

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Ailin; Woodhouse, Jim

    2014-01-01

    and amplitude level for the largest low-frequency resonance. Sets of sensors mounted on the cello bridge Resonance frequency (Hz) Q factor Amplitude level (dB) 1 171.7 18.8 -25.2 3 173.3 26.2 -24.4 4 173.9 24.8 -25.4 The minimum added mass to allow useful... . IV A. Reliability of the input admittance of bowed-string instruments measured by the hammer method 3 200 500 1000 2000 4000?55 ?50 ?45 ?40 ?35 ?30 ?25 ?20 ?15 Frequency (Hz) |Y| (d B) FIG. 1. Bridge input admittance for the tested violin mea- sured...

  20. Admittance matrix of a trapezoidal piezoelectric heterogeneous bimorph.

    PubMed

    Schachtele, Jonathan; Goll, Erich; Muralt, Paul; Kaltenbacher, Dominik

    2012-12-01

    Bimorph structures are a standard method for transforming the high force of piezoelectric materials into a large deflection. In micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) applications, it is preferable to use structures consisting of a passive substrate (usually silicon) and one or more piezoelectric layers on the top. Such structures are called heterogeneous bimorphs or enakemesomorphs. In some MEMS applications- for example, for use as acoustic transducers-it is desirable to arrange such heterogeneous bimorphs in a circular shape, which results in trapezoidal cantilever structures. In this paper, an analytic dynamic description of such actuators is obtained. The resulting model is proved to be compatible with existing models for heterogeneous bimorphs with constant width. A comparison to a finite element analysis model of an exemplary layout shows divergences wholly within the same range as found for published models for constant-width structures. PMID:23221226

  1. Left ventricular epicardial admittance measurement for detection of acute LV dilation.

    PubMed

    Porterfield, John E; Larson, Erik R; Jenkins, James T; Escobedo, Daniel; Valvano, Jonathan W; Pearce, John A; Feldman, Marc D

    2011-03-01

    There are two implanted heart failure warning systems incorporated into biventricular pacemakers/automatic implantable cardiac defibrillators and tested in clinical trials: right heart pressures, and lung conductance measurements. However, both warning systems postdate measures of the earliest indicator of impending heart failure: left ventricular (LV) volume. There are currently no proposed implanted technologies that can perform LV blood volume measurements in humans. We propose to solve this problem by incorporating an admittance measurement system onto currently deployed biventricular and automatic implantable cardiac defibrillator leads. This study will demonstrate that an admittance measurement system can detect LV blood conductance from the epicardial position, despite the current generating and sensing electrodes being in constant motion with the heart, and with dynamic removal of the myocardial component of the returning voltage signal. Specifically, in 11 pigs, it will be demonstrated that 1) a physiological LV blood conductance signal can be derived; 2) LV dilation in response to dose-response intravenous neosynephrine can be detected by blood conductance in a similar fashion to the standard of endocardial crystals when admittance is used, but not when only traditional conductance is used; 3) the physiological impact of acute left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion and resultant LV dilation can be detected by blood conductance, before the anticipated secondary rise in right ventricular systolic pressure; and 4) a pleural effusion simulated by placing saline outside the pericardium does not serve as a source of artifact for blood conductance measurements. PMID:21148342

  2. Characterization of the transformation from calcium-deficient apatite to beta-tricalcium phosphate.

    PubMed

    Gibson, I R; Rehman, I; Best, S M; Bonfield, W

    2000-09-01

    The structural changes that occur during the transformation of a Ca-deficient apatite, prepared by a wet chemical method, to beta-TCP were investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of as-prepared samples and samples calcined at temperatures between 500 and 1100 degrees C showed that the transformation occurs over the temperature range 710-740 degrees C, under non-equilibrium conditions. The change in crystallite size with increasing calcination/sintering temperature was studied by XRD using the Scherrer formula. Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) analysis indicated considerable structural change in samples above and below this temperature range. Changes were observed in the hydroxyl, carbonate and phosphate bands as the calcination temperature was increased from 500 to 1100 degrees C. Even once a single beta-TCP phase is obtained at 740 degrees C there remains a considerable amount of structural change at temperatures between 740 and 1100 degrees C. This effect was illustrated by an unusual change in the lattice parameters of the beta-TCP structure and significant changes in the phosphate bands of the FTIR spectra as the calcination temperature was increased. The results obtained in this study show that the combined experimental techniques of XRD and FTIR are excellent complimentary methods for characterizing structural changes that occur during phase transformations. PMID:15348382

  3. Characterization of the transformation from calcium-deficient apatite to beta-tricalcium phosphate.

    PubMed

    Gibson, I R; Rehman, I; Best, S M; Bonfield, W

    2000-12-01

    The structural changes that occur during the transformation of a Ca-deficient apatite, prepared by a wet chemical method, to beta-TCp were investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of as-prepared samples and samples calcined at temperatures between 500 and 1100 degrees C showed that the transformation occurs over the temperature range 710-740 degrees C, under non-equilibrium conditions. The change in crystallite size with increasing calcination/sintering temperature was studied by XRD using the Scherrer formula. Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) analysis indicated considerable structural change in samples above and below this temperature range. Changes were observed in the hydroxyl, carbonate and phosphate bands as the calcination temperature was increased from 500 to 1100 degrees C. Even once a single beta-TCP phase is obtained at 740 degrees C there remains a considerable amount of structural change at temperatures between 740 and 1100 degrees C. This effect was illustrated by an unusual change in the lattice parameters of the beta-TCP structure and significant changes in the phosphate bands of FTIR spectra as the calcination temperature was increased. The results obtained in this study show that the combined experimental techniques of XRD and FTIR are excellent complimentary methods for characterizing structural changes that occur during phase transformations. PMID:15348063

  4. Transformation and characterization of bovine endothelial cells after in vitro treatment with benzo(a)pyrene

    SciTech Connect

    Grinspan, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    A cloned strain of bovine vascular endothelial cells with a finite in vitro lifespan was treated with the chemical carcinogen benzo(a)pyrene. Untreated cultures of this cell line senesced upon serial subcultivation and contained large non-dividing cells. In four out of eight trials, repeated subcultivation in the presence of benzo(a)pyrene produced transformed lines which appeared in cultures concomitant with the senescence of the parent cells. These lines exhibited an indefinite lifespan and a variety of altered phenotypic characteristics. Four characterized cell lines fit into two general categories. Two lines acquired an indefinite lifespan but otherwise exhibited characteristics of normal endothelial cells: contact inhibition of growth, anchorage dependence, serum requirement for growth of at least 5% fetal bovine serum, and inability to produce tumors in syngeneic hosts. In the other category, two lines acquired those characteristics normally associated with transformation: lack of contact inhibition of growth, anchorage independence, and ability to form tumors (hemangiosarcomas) in syngeneic hosts. Transformed lines lost some specialized characteristics retained by normal endothelial cells in vitro, although the ability to form hemangiosarcomas was retained by the tumorigenic cells. Finally, the two tumorigenic transformed lines have been found to contain non-random chromosomal changes: translocations of chromosome 15 and 21 and trisomy of chromosome 15. Preliminary studies have related these changes to the tumorigenicity of the cells because a non-tumorigenic line does not contain them and these alterations have also been demonstrated in the tumors caused by the injection of the tumorigenic cells.

  5. Characterization of the rapid expansion of supercritical solutions by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnamy, Anthony; Hermsdorf, Dana; Ueberschaer, Roman; Signorell, Ruth

    2005-05-15

    A new apparatus for the in situ characterization of the rapid expansion of supercritical solutions (RESS) by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is presented. The infrared characterization is complemented by particle sizing with a scanning mobility particle sizer, by three-wavelengths-extinction measurements, and by scanning electron microscopy. Several examples show that a wide range of information about particle properties can be obtained with this setup. One new aspect is the possibility to expand into the vacuum which also allows us to investigate the conditions in the collision-free region before the Mach disk. These investigations elucidate that in the free jet region the solvent CO{sub 2} condenses to particles with mean radii >50 nm for pre-expansion pressures between 100-400 bar and temperatures between 298-398 K.

  6. Compound specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) to characterize transformation mechanisms of ?-hexachlorocyclohexane.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Bashir, Safdar; Qin, Jinyi; Schindelka, Janine; Fischer, Anko; Nijenhuis, Ivonne; Herrmann, Hartmut; Wick, Lukas Y; Richnow, Hans H

    2014-09-15

    A systematic investigation of environmentally relevant transformation processes of alpha-hexachlorocyclohexane (?-HCH) was performed in order to explore the potential of compound specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) to characterize reaction mechanisms. The carbon isotope enrichment factors (?C) for the chemical transformations of ?-HCH via direct photolysis, indirect photolysis (UV/H2O2), hydrolysis, electro-reduction or reduction by Fe(0) were quantified and compared to those previously published for biodegradation. Hydrogen abstraction by hydroxyl radicals generated by UV/H2O2 led to ?C of -1.9 ± 0.2 ‰ with an apparent kinetic carbon isotope effect (AKIEC) of 1.012 ± 0.001. Dehydrochlorination by alkaline hydrolysis yielded ?C of -7.6 ± 0.4 ‰ with AKIEC of 1.048 ± 0.003. Dechlorination either by homolytic bond cleavage in direct photolysis (?C=-2.8 ± 0.2 ‰) or single-electron transfer in electro-reduction (?C=-3.8 ± 0.4 ‰) corresponded to AKIEC of 1.017 ± 0.001 and 1.023 ± 0.003, respectively. Dichloroelimination catalyzed by Fe(0) via two-electron transfers resulted in ?C of -4.9 ± 0.1 ‰. AKIEC values assuming either a concerted or a stepwise mechanism were 1.030 ± 0.0006 and 1.015 ± 0.0003, respectively. Contrary to biodegradation, no enantioselectivity of ?-HCH was observed in chemical reactions, which might be used to discriminate chemical and biological in situ transformations. PMID:25238192

  7. Optical Fourier transform based in-plane vibration characterization for MEMS comb structure.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yongfeng; Cao, Liangcai; You, Zheng; Zhao, Jiahao; Zhang, Zichen; Yang, Jianzhong

    2013-02-25

    On-line and on-wafer characterizations of mechanical properties of Micro-Electro-Mechanical-System (MEMS) with efficiency are very important to the mass production of MEMS foundry in the near future. However, challenges still remain. In this paper, we present an in-plane vibration characterizing method for MEMS comb using optical Fourier transform (OFT). In the experiment, the intensity distribution at the focal plane was captured to characterize the displacement of the vibrator in the MEMS comb structure. A typical MEMS comb was tested to verify the principle. The shape and the movement of MEMS comb was imitated and tested to calibrate the measurement by using a spatial light modulator (SLM). The relative standard deviations (RSD) of the measured displacements were better than 5%, where the RSD is defined as the ratio of the standard deviation to the mean. It is convinced that the presented method is feasible for on-line and on-wafer characterizations for MEMS with great convenience, high efficiency and low cost. PMID:23482039

  8. Delays in Admittance-Controlled Haptic Devices Make Simulated Masses Feel Heavier.

    PubMed

    Kuling, Irene A; Smeets, Jeroen B J; Lammertse, Piet; Onneweer, Bram; Mugge, Winfred

    2015-01-01

    In an admittance-controlled haptic device, input forces are used to calculate the movement of the device. Although developers try to minimize delays, there will always be delays between the applied force and the corresponding movement in such systems, which might affect what the user of the device perceives. In this experiment we tested whether these delays in a haptic human-robot interaction influence the perception of mass. In the experiment an admittance-controlled manipulator was used to simulate various masses. In a staircase design subjects had to decide which of two virtual masses was heavier after gently pushing them leftward with the right hand in mid-air (no friction, no gravity). The manipulator responded as quickly as possible or with an additional delay (25 or 50 ms) to the forces exerted by the subject on the handle of the haptic device. The perceived mass was ~10% larger for a delay of 25 ms and ~20% larger for a delay of 50 ms. Based on these results, we estimated that the delays that are present in nowadays admittance-controlled haptic devices (up to 20ms) will give an increase in perceived mass which is smaller than the Weber fraction for mass (~10% for inertial mass). Additional analyses showed that the subjects' decision on mass when the perceptual differences were small did not correlate with intuitive variables such as force, velocity or a combination of these, nor with any other measured variable, suggesting that subjects did not have a consistent strategy during guessing or used other sources of information, for example the efference copy of their pushes. PMID:26361353

  9. Delays in Admittance-Controlled Haptic Devices Make Simulated Masses Feel Heavier

    PubMed Central

    Kuling, Irene A.; Smeets, Jeroen B. J.; Lammertse, Piet; Onneweer, Bram; Mugge, Winfred

    2015-01-01

    In an admittance-controlled haptic device, input forces are used to calculate the movement of the device. Although developers try to minimize delays, there will always be delays between the applied force and the corresponding movement in such systems, which might affect what the user of the device perceives. In this experiment we tested whether these delays in a haptic human-robot interaction influence the perception of mass. In the experiment an admittance-controlled manipulator was used to simulate various masses. In a staircase design subjects had to decide which of two virtual masses was heavier after gently pushing them leftward with the right hand in mid-air (no friction, no gravity). The manipulator responded as quickly as possible or with an additional delay (25 or 50 ms) to the forces exerted by the subject on the handle of the haptic device. The perceived mass was ~10% larger for a delay of 25 ms and ~20% larger for a delay of 50 ms. Based on these results, we estimated that the delays that are present in nowadays admittance-controlled haptic devices (up to 20ms) will give an increase in perceived mass which is smaller than the Weber fraction for mass (~10% for inertial mass). Additional analyses showed that the subjects’ decision on mass when the perceptual differences were small did not correlate with intuitive variables such as force, velocity or a combination of these, nor with any other measured variable, suggesting that subjects did not have a consistent strategy during guessing or used other sources of information, for example the efference copy of their pushes. PMID:26361353

  10. Measuring the complex admittance of a nearly isolated graphene quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Miao-Lei; Wei, Da; Deng, Guang-Wei; Li, Shu-Xiao; Li, Hai-Ou; Cao, Gang; Tu, Tao; Xiao, Ming; Guo, Guang-Can; Guo, Guo-Ping; Jiang, Hong-Wen

    2014-08-18

    We measured the radio-frequency reflection spectrum of an on-chip reflection line resonator coupled to a graphene double quantum dot (DQD), which was etched almost isolated from the reservoir and reached the low tunnel rate region. The charge stability diagram of DQD was investigated via dispersive phase and magnitude shift of the resonator with a high quality factor. Its complex admittance and low tunnel rate to the reservoir was also determined from the reflected signal of the on-chip resonator. Our method may provide a non-invasive and sensitive way of charge state readout in isolated quantum dots.

  11. Admittance Test and Conceptual Study of a CW Positron Source for CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Golge, Serkan; Hyde, Charles E.; Freyberger, Arne

    2009-09-02

    A conceptual study of a Continuous Wave (CW) positron production is presented in this paper. The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Jefferson Lab (JLAB) operates with a CW electron beam with a well-defined emittance, time structure and energy spread. Positrons created via bremsstrahlung photons in a high-Z target emerge with a large emittance compared to incoming electron beam. An admittance study has been performed at CEBAF to estimate the maximum beam phase space area that can be transported in the LINAC and in the Arcs. A positron source is described utilizing the CEBAF injector electron beam, and directly injecting the positrons into the CEBAF LINAC.

  12. Interface edge effect and its contribution to the frequency dispersion of metal-oxide-semiconductor admittance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y. C.; Sah, C. T.

    1981-06-01

    Room temperature frequency dispersion of the admittance of MOS capacitors made on nondegenerate n-type silicon substrate with (111) surface orientation was studied. A simplified lumped equivalent circuit model which takes into account the interface edge effect, i.e. carrier generation-recombination-trapping via interface states near the edge of the surface inversion region, is proposed and found to be in good agreement with experimental data. The present model also suggests another method of calculating the density of interface states. Fundamental properties of interface states are estimated from experimental data. A self-consistency check is made among the values of equivalent circuit elements to substantiate the model.

  13. S. Boyd EE102 Circuit analysis via Laplace transform

    E-print Network

    S. Boyd EE102 Lecture 7 Circuit analysis via Laplace transform · analysis of general LRC circuits · impedance and admittance descriptions · natural and forced response · circuit analysis with impedances · natural frequencies and stability 7­1 #12;Circuit analysis example PSfrag replacements i u y L R initial

  14. Magnetic characterization of orthorhombic LiMnO2 and electrochemically transformed spinel LixMnO2 x , 1

    E-print Network

    Sadoway, Donald Robert

    Magnetic characterization of orthorhombic LiMnO2 and electrochemically transformed spinel LixMnO2 lattice in LiMnO2 is destroyed as the cation sublattice begins to transform to a spinel. Spin-glass behavior is, however, observed in Li0.39MnO2 as well. Compared to conventionally prepared spinel LiMn2O4

  15. Characterization of trabecular structure in human femur radiographic images using ridgelet transform and support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Bobby, T Christy; Ramakrishnan, S

    2012-01-01

    The evaluation of femur bone strength is a key component for fracture risk assessment. Recently, it has been demonstrated that bone strength depends not only on bone mass but also on factors related to bone quality, such as trabecular architecture and morphology. Current clinical methods for assessment of bone quality are largely dependent on assessing bone mass. However, these methods do not provide any information about bone structure which is considered to be an equally important factor in assessing bone quality. In this work, ridgelet transform based multi-scale geometric analysis is performed in radiographic images to characterize the trabecular structure. The trabecular regions of normal and abnormal human femur bone images (N=40) recorded under standard condition are used for the study. The regions of interest in the bone images are subjected to ridgelet transform for extracting useful features that evaluate changes taking place in the architecture of bone. The extracted features are correlated with apparent mineralization which is a key of representative architectural variation of the trabecular bone. Further to validate the results, images are also classified based on the extracted features using Support Vector Machines (SVM) with four different kernels. Results show that ridgelet transform are able to differentiate normal and abnormal femur bone images. The values of derived features such as energy and homogeneity are found to have good correlation with apparent mineralization. In abnormal images, the variations in the observed features are attributed to loss in bone mass, inhomogeneity and anisotropic nature of such images. Further, classification performed using polynomial kernel based SVM is found to be effective in terms of number of support vectors, sensitivity and specificity. Hence it appears that this method is useful for gross abnormality detection and micro-damage analysis. PMID:22846329

  16. Transforming growth factor-alpha: Characterization of the BamHl, Rsal, and Taql polymorphic regions

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, J.F.; May, E. ); Feingold, J. ); Stoll, C. )

    1993-07-01

    The authors have characterized the nature of structural alleles of the transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF[alpha]) locus by restriction-enzyme digestion with BamHI, RsaI, and TaqI. The BamHl polymorphic site is located within exon Vi, which codes for the 3' untranslated region. The two BamHI alleles differ by a single point mutation at the restriction site. The RsaI and TaqI polymorphic sites are located within intron V. The two alleles differ at the restriction site, either by a point mutation (RsaI) or by a 4-bp deletion (TaqI). This analysis permits the authors to devise a PCR method coupled with restriction digestions to directly identify the TGF[alpha] polymorphisms. Analysis of 99 Caucasian controls has revealed a highly significant (P < .001) association between the RsaI and the BamHI genotype. The frequency of the rare BamHI allele was significantly higher (P < .001) in transformed cell lines (.30) than in controls (.076). 28 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Hole transport characteristics in phosphorescent dye-doped NPB films by admittance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Chen, Jiangshan; Huang, Jinying; Dai, Yanfeng; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Liu, Su; Ma, Dongge

    2014-05-01

    Admittance spectroscopy is a powerful tool to determine the carrier mobility. The carrier mobility is a significant parameter to understand the behavior or to optimize the organic light-emitting diode or other organic semiconductor devices. Hole transport in phosphorescent dye, bis[2-(9,9-diethyl-9H-fluoren-2-yl)-1-phenyl-1Hbenzoimidazol-N,C3] iridium(acetylacetonate [(fbi)2Ir(acac)]) doped into N,N-diphenyl-N,N-bis(1-naphthylphenyl)-1,1-biphenyl-4,4-diamine (NPB) films was investigated by admittance spectroscopy. The results show that doped (fbi)2Ir(acac) molecules behave as hole traps in NPB, and lower the hole mobility. For thicker films(?300 nm), the electric field dependence of hole mobility is as expected positive, i.e., the mobility increases exponentially with the electric field. However, for thinner films (?300 nm), the electric field dependence of hole mobility is negative, i.e., the hole mobility decreases exponentially with the electric field. Physical mechanisms behind the negative field dependence of hole mobility are discussed. In addition, three frequency regions were divided to analyze the behaviors of the capacitance in the hole-only device and the physical mechanism was explained by trap theory and the parasitic capacitance effect.

  18. Localized Gravity/Topography Admittance and Correlation Spectra on Mars: Implications for Regional and Global Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGovern, Patrick J.; Solomon, Sean C.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Simons, Mark; Wieczorek, Mark A.; Phillips, Roger J.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Aharonson, Oded; Head, James W.

    2002-01-01

    [i] From gravity and topography data collected by the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft we calculate gravity/topography admittances and correlations in the spectral domain and compare them to those predicted from models of lithospheric flexure. On the basis of these comparisons we estimate the thickness of the Martian elastic lithosphere (T(sub e)) required to support the observed topographic load since the time of loading. We convert T(sub e) to estimates of heat flux and thermal gradient in the lithosphere through a consideration of the response of an elastic/plastic shell. In regions of high topography on Mars (e.g., the Tharsis rise and associated shield volcanoes), the mass-sheet (small-amplitude) approximation for the calculation of gravity from topography is inadequate. A correction that accounts for finite-amplitude topography tends to increase the amplitude of the predicted gravity signal at spacecraft altitudes. Proper implementation of this correction requires the use of radii from the center of mass (collectively known as the planetary shape ) in lieu of topography referenced to a gravitational equipotential. Anomalously dense surface layers or buried excess masses are not required to explain the observed admittances for the Tharsis Montes or Olympus Mons volcanoes when this correction is applied. Derived T, values generally decrease with increasing age of the lithospheric load, in a manner consistent with a rapid decline of mantle heat flux during the Noachian and more modest rates of decline during subsequent epochs.

  19. Computerized characterization of masses on mammograms: the rubber band straightening transform and texture analysis.

    PubMed

    Sahiner, B; Chan, H P; Petrick, N; Helvie, M A; Goodsitt, M M

    1998-04-01

    A new rubber band straightening transform (RBST) is introduced for characterization of mammographic masses as malignant or benign. The RBST transforms a band of pixels surrounding a segmented mass onto the Cartesian plane (the RBST image). The border of a mammographic mass appears approximately as a horizontal line, and possible speculations resemble vertical lines in the RBST image. In this study, the effectiveness of a set of directional textures extracted from the images before the RBST. A database of 168 mammograms containing biopsy-proven malignant and benign breast masses was digitized at a pixel size of 100 microns x 100 microns. Regions of interest (ROIs) containing the biopsied mass were extracted from each mammogram by an experienced radiologist. A clustering algorithm was employed for automated segmentation of each ROI into a mass object and background tissue. Texture features extracted from spatial gray-level dependence matrices and run-length statistics matrices were evaluated for three different regions and representations: (i) the entire ROI; (ii) a band of pixels surrounding the segmented mass object in the ROI; and (iii) the RBST image. Linear discriminant analysis was used for classification, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate the classification accuracy. Using the ROC curves as the performance measure, features extracted from the RBST images were found to be significantly more effective than those extracted from the original images. Features extracted from the RBST images yielded an area (Az) of 0.94 under the ROC curve for classification of mammographic masses as malignant and benign. PMID:9571620

  20. Energetic, enthusiastic and, by his own admittance, total-ly in love with hiswork, Bernard Slippers isa role model that

    E-print Network

    Energetic, enthusiastic and, by his own admittance, total- ly in love with hiswork, Bernard encountered on family outings, school camps, and around the cities where he lived as the child of teaching parents and grandparents that instilled a love for nature in me." He remembers his grand- mother's rock

  1. Sixteen-Year Change in Acoustic-Admittance Measures among Older Adults: Data from a Population-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nondahl, David M.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; Wiley, Terry L.; Tweed, Ted S.; Dalton, Dayna S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The primary purpose of this study was to measure the 16-year change in peak compensated static acoustic admittance (Peak Y[subscript tm]) in a population-based cohort of older adults, and to determine whether age was associated with any observed change in Peak Y[subscript tm]. Other tympanometric measures also were taken and analyzed.…

  2. 204 IEEE ELECTRON DEVICE LETTERS, VOL. 28, NO. 3, MARCH 2007 Admittance Measurements on OFET Channel and

    E-print Network

    Lee, Jong Duk

    . The effective delay of the R­C network depends on the sheet resistance of the channel, the insula- tor Channel and Its Modeling With R­C Network Keum-Dong Jung, Cheon An Lee, Dong-Wook Park, Byung-Gook Park­C network, and both the capacitance and loss of the measured admittance show good agreement with the model

  3. Characterization and Modeling of Transformation Induced Fatigue of Shape Memory Alloy Actuators 

    E-print Network

    Bertacchini, Olivier Walter

    2011-02-22

    The main focus of this research is the transformation induced fatigue behavior of shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators undergoing thermally induced martensitic phase transformation. The recent development of aerospace applications employing shape...

  4. The effect of flying and low humidity on the admittance of the tympanic membrane and middle ear system.

    PubMed

    Morse, Robert Peter

    2013-10-01

    Many passengers experience discomfort during flight because of the effect of low humidity on the skin, eyes, throat, and nose. In this physiological study, we have investigated whether flight and low humidity also affect the tympanic membrane. From previous studies, a decrease in admittance of the tympanic membrane through drying might be expected to affect the buffering capacity of the middle ear and to disrupt automatic pressure regulation. This investigation involved an observational study onboard an aircraft combined with experiments in an environmental chamber, where the humidity could be controlled but could not be made to be as low as during flight. For the flight study, there was a linear relationship between the peak compensated static admittance of the tympanic membrane and relative humidity with a constant of proportionality of 0.00315 mmho/% relative humidity. The low humidity at cruise altitude (minimum 22.7 %) was associated with a mean decrease in admittance of about 20 % compared with measures in the airport. From the chamber study, we further found that a mean decrease in relative humidity of 23.4 % led to a significant decrease in mean admittance by 0.11 mmho [F(1,8)?=?18.95, P?=?0.002], a decrease of 9.4 %. The order of magnitude for the effect of humidity was similar for the flight and environmental chamber studies. We conclude that admittance changes during flight were likely to have been caused by the low humidity in the aircraft cabin and that these changes may affect the automatic pressure regulation of the middle ear during descent. PMID:23887775

  5. Temperature dependence of current density and admittance in metal-insulator-semiconductor junctions with molecular insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadjie-Djomkam, A. B.; Ababou-Girard, S.; Hiremath, R.; Herrier, C.; Fabre, B.; Solal, F.; Godet, C.

    2011-10-01

    Electrical transport in ultrathin Metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) tunnel junctions is analyzed using the temperature dependence of current density and admittance characteristics, as illustrated by Hg//C12H25 - n Si junctions incorporating n-alkyl molecular layers (1.45 nm thick) covalently bonded to Si(111). The voltage partition is obtained from J(V, T) characteristics, over eight decades in current. In the low forward bias regime (0.2-0.4 V) governed by thermionic emission, the observed linear T-dependence of the effective barrier height, q?EFF(T)=q?B+(kT)?0dT, provides the tunnel barrier attenuation, exp(-?0dT), with ?0= 0.93 Å-1 and the thermionic emission barrier height, ?B=0.53 eV. In the high-forward-bias regime (0.5-2.0 V), the bias dependence of the tunnel barrier transparency, approximated by a modified Simmons model for a rectangular tunnel barrier, provides the tunnel barrier height, ?T=0.5 eV; the fitted prefactor value, G0 = 10-10 ?-1, is four decades smaller than the theoretical Simmons prefactor for MIM structures. The density distribution of defects localized at the C12H25 - n Si interface is deduced from admittance data (low-high frequency method) and from a simulation of the response time ?R(V) using Gomila's model for a non equilibrium tunnel junction. The low density of electrically active defects near mid-gap (DS < 2 × 1011 eV-1.cm-2) indicates a good passivation of dangling bonds at the dodecyl - n Si (111) interface.

  6. Morpho-anatomical characterization of mature embryo-derived callus of rice (Oryza sativa L.) suitable for transformation.

    PubMed

    Bevitori, R; Popielarska-Konieczna, M; dos Santos, E M; Grossi-de-Sá, M F; Petrofeza, S

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study was to morpho-anatomically characterize embryogenic rice calli during early induction of somatic embryogenesis of three Brazilian rice cultivars. Herein, we explored embryogenic units (EUs) from 2-week-old cut proliferated calli to verify whether they were suitable for Agrobacterium tumefasciens-mediated transformation. Histological analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to analyze these types of calli during early rice callogenesis in the cultivars BRS Primavera, BRS Bonança, and BRS Caiapó. The characteristics of the embryogenic cells were preserved in the EUs, which showed a globular, compact structure that contained tightly packed cells and thus rendered the cells suitable for transformation. The EUs of BRS Caiapó also maintained the characteristics of the non-embryogenic callus, such as an elongated morphology and a lack of cellular organization. In general, the observations of the histological sections corresponded with those of the SEM images. The histological analysis suggested that all cultivars used in these experiments have morphogenic potential. The EUs from proliferated 2-week-old cut calli maintained their embryogenic features. The EUs were subjected to Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, which exhibited a regeneration frequency of 58 % for transformed hygromycin-resistant cell lines. These results show that EUs from proliferated 2-week-old cut calli are suitable for plant transformation. PMID:24085343

  7. An Investigation into the Admittance of MIS-Structures Based on MBE HgCdTe with Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzyadukh, S. M.; Voitsekhovskii, A. V.; Nesmelov, S. N.; Dvoretskii, S. A.; N. Mikhailov, N.; Gorn, D. I.

    2013-12-01

    The results of investigations into the complex admittance of the MIS-structures based on heteroepitaxial MBE Hg1- x Cd x Te with quantum wells (QW) in the test-signal frequency range 1 kHz - 2 ?Hz at temperatures 8-300 K are reported. The thickness of single HgTe QWs was 5.6 and 7.1 nm, the content in the 35-nm thick barrier layers - 0.65 and 0.62, respectively.

  8. An Admittance Survey of Large Volcanoes on Venus: Implications for Volcano Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brian, A. W.; Smrekar, S. E.; Stofan, E. R.

    2004-01-01

    Estimates of the thickness of the venusian crust and elastic lithosphere are important in determining the rheological and thermal properties of Venus. These estimates offer insights into what conditions are needed for certain features, such as large volcanoes and coronae, to form. Lithospheric properties for much of the large volcano population on Venus are not well known. Previous studies of elastic thickness (Te) have concentrated on individual or small groups of edifices, or have used volcano models and fixed values of Te to match with observations of volcano morphologies. In addition, previous studies use different methods to estimate lithospheric parameters meaning it is difficult to compare their results. Following recent global studies of the admittance signatures exhibited by the venusian corona population, we performed a similar survey into large volcanoes in an effort to determine the range of lithospheric parameters shown by these features. This survey of the entire large volcano population used the same method throughout so that all estimates could be directly compared. By analysing a large number of edifices and comparing our results to observations of their morphology and models of volcano formation, we can help determine the controlling parameters that govern volcano growth on Venus.

  9. Determining the defect density of states by temperature derivative admittance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian V.; Levi, Dean H.

    2011-04-01

    We demonstrate that the temperature derivative admittance spectroscopy method can be used to directly determine the defect density of states. The density of defect states is proportional to the temperature derivative of the capacitance. This method is equivalent to the existing frequency derivative method in principle but possesses certain key advantages for detection of deep levels. To illustrate these advantages, we define the activation energy of a fictitious defect the Arrhenius plot of which extends diagonally across the measurable temperature-frequency range. Below this level (that is, shallower defects), the frequency derivative method is advantageous, and above this level (that is, deeper defects), the temperature derivative method is advantageous. The temperature derivative method allows a wider observation window of defect energy that avoids possible detection failure and facilitates simultaneous observation of multiple defects. For deep defects, it also yields more Arrhenius plot data points and therefore enables more accurate extraction of defect energy and capture cross-sections. In general, the temperature derivative method can avoid system noise at low frequency and is relatively immune to baseline effects due to parasitic circuit effects.

  10. Characterizing photochemical transformation of aqueous nC60 under environmentally relevant conditions.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yu Sik; Li, Qilin

    2010-04-15

    Engineered nanomaterials may undergo transformation upon interactions with various environmental factors. In this study, photochemical transformation of aqueous nC60 was investigated under UVA irradiation. nC60 underwent photochemical transformation in the presence of dissolved O2, resulting in surface oxygenation and hydroxylation as demonstrated by XPS and ATR-FTIR analyses. The reaction followed a pseudo-first order rate law with the apparent reaction rate constant of 2.2 x 10(-2) h(-1). However, the core of the nanoparticles remained intact over 21 days of irradiation. Although no mineralization or dissolution of nC60 was observed, experiments using fullerol as a reference fullerene derivative suggested likely dissolution and partial mineralization of nC60 under long-term UVA exposure. Aquatic humic acid reduced nC60 transformation kinetics presumably due to scavenging of reactive oxygen species. Results from this study imply that photochemical transformation is an important factor controlling nC60 physical and chemical properties as well as its fate and transport in the natural aqueous environment. In addition, changes in nC60 surface chemistry drastically reduced C60 extraction efficiency by toluene, suggesting that the existing analytical method for C60 may not be applicable to environmental samples. PMID:20337472

  11. Characterizing the microstructures of biological tissues using Mueller matrix and transformed polarization parameters

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Minghao; He, Honghui; Zeng, Nan; Du, E; Guo, Yihong; Liu, Shaoxiong; Wu, Jian; He, Yonghong; Ma, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Mueller matrices can be used as a powerful tool to probe qualitatively the microstructures of biological tissues. Certain transformation processes can provide new sets of parameters which are functions of the Mueller matrix elements but represent more explicitly the characteristic features of the sample. In this paper, we take the backscattering Mueller matrices of a group of tissues with distinctive structural properties. Using both experiments and Monte Carlo simulations, we demonstrate qualitatively the characteristic features of Mueller matrices corresponding to different structural and optical properties. We also calculate two sets of transformed polarization parameters using the Mueller matrix transformation (MMT) and Mueller matrix polar decomposition (MMPD) techniques. We demonstrate that the new parameters can separate the effects due to sample orientation and present quantitatively certain characteristic features of these tissues. Finally, we apply the transformed polarization parameters to the unstained human cervix cancerous tissues. Preliminary results show that the transformed polarization parameters can provide characteristic information to distinguish the cancerous and healthy tissues. PMID:25574434

  12. CHARACTERIZATION OF A SPONTANEOUSLY TRANSFORMED CHICKEN MACROPHAGE/MONOCYTIC CELL LINE HTC

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transformed and immortalized cells provide excellent models to study many functional aspects of their naturally occurring counterparts because of the ease of manipulations and their abilities to undergo innumerable cell divisions. Such cells are generated naturally or in culture through neoplastic ...

  13. Application of the 2-D Continuous Wavelet Transforms for Characterization of Geological and Geophysical Data 

    E-print Network

    Vuong, Au K

    2014-05-05

    their interpretation possible. These and similar results provide new insights into the complexity of the igneous processes forming Tamu Massif. The other research topic is to apply the CWT analysis to characterize and mea- sure the roughness of mineral surfaces...

  14. Agrobacterium rhizogenes-transformed Roots of Coffee (Coffea arabica): Conditions for Long-term Proliferation, and Morphological and Molecular Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Alpizar, E.; Dechamp, E.; Lapeyre-Montes, F.; Guilhaumon, C.; Bertrand, B.; Jourdan, C.; Lashermes, P.; Etienne, H.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims The aims of this study were to set up proliferation conditions for hairy roots of Coffea arabica regenerated after transformation by Agrobacterium rhizogenes strain A4-RS, and to carry out the morphological and molecular characterization of hairy root clones maintained over the long term. Methods Auxin supply, light conditions and sucrose concentration were modified with the aim of establishing efficient root proliferation conditions. The morphological variability among 62 established hairy root clones was phenotyped by scanning the roots and analysing the images using ‘whinRHIZO’ software procedures. PCR analysis of integration in transformed root cells of rol and aux oncogenes from the T-DNA of the Ri plasmid was used to study the molecular variability among clones. Key Results Auxin supply was necessary to obtain and stimulate growth and branching, and IBA applied at 0·5 µm was the most efficient auxin. Significant differences were shown among the 62 clones for total root length and for the percentage of fine roots. These variables were stable across subcultures and could hence be used for efficient characterization of hairy root clones. The majority of hairy root clones (86 %) exhibited non-significant phenotype differences with non-transformed roots. Eight clones were significantly different from the non-transformed controls in that they possessed a low proportion of fine roots. Two other hairy root clones grew significantly faster than the other clones. The PCR analysis revealed a low variability in the integration of rol and aux oncogenes in transformed root cells. The TR-DNA was never integrated as aux1 and aux2 genes were not found, although rolB and rolC genes from the TL-DNA were always present. Conclusions The discovery of low morphological variability among coffee hairy roots together with the identification of morphological variables allowing easy identification of phenotypically altered clones represent two important results. They make hairy roots a possible, and efficient, tool for functional-genomic studies of coffee root genes. PMID:18316320

  15. Lime kiln source characterization: Lime manufacturing industry Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Toney, M.L.

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this testing program is to obtain uncontrolled and controlled hydrogen chloride (HCl) and speciated hydrocarbon Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) emissions data from lime production plants to support a national emission standard for hazardous air pollutants (NESHAP). This report presents data from the Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements. FTIR source testing was conducted for the following purposes: Quantify HCl emission levels; and Gather screening (i.e., qualitative) data on other HAP emissions.

  16. Transformation of Chloroplast Ribosomal RNA Genes in Chlamydomonas: Molecular and Genetic Characterization of Integration Events

    PubMed Central

    Newman, S. M.; Boynton, J. E.; Gillham, N. W.; Randolph-Anderson, B. L.; Johnson, A. M.; Harris, E. H.

    1990-01-01

    Transformation of chloroplast ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes in Chlamydomonas has been achieved by the biolistic process using cloned chloroplast DNA fragments carrying mutations that confer antibiotic resistance. The sites of exchange employed during the integration of the donor DNA into the recipient genome have been localized using a combination of antibiotic resistance mutations in the 16S and 23S rRNA genes and restriction fragment length polymorphisms that flank these genes. Complete or nearly complete replacement of a region of the chloroplast genome in the recipient cell by the corresponding sequence from the donor plasmid was the most common integration event. Exchange events between the homologous donor and recipient sequences occurred preferentially near the vector:insert junctions. Insertion of the donor rRNA genes and flanking sequences into one inverted repeat of the recipient genome was followed by intramolecular copy correction so that both copies of the inverted repeat acquired identical sequences. Increased frequencies of rRNA gene transformants were achieved by reducing the copy number of the chloroplast genome in the recipient cells and by decreasing the heterology between donor and recipient DNA sequences flanking the selectable markers. In addition to producing bona fide chloroplast rRNA transformants, the biolistic process induced mutants resistant to low levels of streptomycin, typical of nuclear mutations in Chlamydomonas. PMID:1981764

  17. Characterization of directly transformed weedy Brassica rapa and introgressed B. rapa with Bt cry1Ac and gfp genes.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hong S; Halfhill, Matthew D; Good, Laura L; Raymer, Paul L; Neal Stewart, C

    2007-07-01

    Crop to weed transgene flow, which could result in more competitive weed populations, is an agricultural biosafety concern. Crop Brassica napus to weedy Brassica rapa hybridization has been extensively characterized to better understand the transgene flow and its consequences. In this study, weedy accessions of B. rapa were transformed with Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) cry1Ac- and green fluorescence protein (gfp)-coding transgenes using Agrobacterium to assess ecological performance of the wild biotype relative to introgressed hybrids in which the transgenic parent was the crop. Regenerated transgenic B. rapa events were characterized by progeny analysis, Bt protein enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Southern blot analysis, and GFP expression assay. GFP expression level and Bt protein concentration were significantly different between independent transgenic B. rapa events. Similar reproductive productivity was observed in comparison between transgenic B. rapa events and B. rapa x B. napus introgressed hybrids in greenhouse and field experiments. In the greenhouse, Bt transgenic plants experienced significantly less herbivory damage from the diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella). No differences were found in the field experiment under ambient, low, herbivore pressure. Directly transformed transgenic B. rapa plants should be a helpful experimental control to better understand crop genetic load in introgressed transgenic weeds. PMID:17333014

  18. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic characterization of grafting of 3-aminopropyl silanol onto aluminum/alumina substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azour, Halima; Derouault, Jean; Lauroua, Pierre; Vezon, Gérard

    2000-07-01

    In order to remedy the limitations of state-of-the-art methods for red blood cells grouping and antibody screening we have tried to develop a new type of immunosensors based upon a metallic substrate. The first two steps of the manufacturing of such a sensor consist in the anodization and in the silanization of the metal surface. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) has been used to investigate aluminum samples treated with the above process. FTIR analysis allows the accurate determination of the grafted species, and thus to perform the optimization of the experimental parameters.

  19. Processing and characterization of transformation-toughened ceramics with strength retention to elevated temperatures. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cutler, R.A.; Brinkpeter, C.B.; Vircar, A.V.; Shetty, D.K.

    1994-09-01

    Monolithic and three-layered Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} -- 15 vol % ZrO{sub 2} composites were fabricated by slip casting aqueous slurries. The outer and inner layers of three-layer composites contained unstabilized and partially stabilized ZrO{sub 2}, respectively. Transformation of part of the unstabilized ZrO{sub 2} led to surface compressive stresses in the outer layers. Strain gage, x-ray, indentation crack length, and strength measurements were used to determine the magnitude of residual stresses in the composites. The strength of the three-layer composites ({approx}1200 MPa) was 500--700 MPa higher than that of the monolithic outer layer composites at room temperature and 350 MPa higher at 750{degree}C. The strength differential decreased rapidly above the m {yields} t transformation temperature. Three-layered composites showed excellent damage resistance and improved reliability. Cam follower rollers were fabricated to demonstrate the applicability of this technique for making automotive components.

  20. Force Control and Nonlinear Master-Slave Force Profile to Manage an Admittance Type Multi-Fingered Haptic User Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony L. Crawford

    2012-08-01

    Natural movements and force feedback are important elements in using teleoperated equipment if complex and speedy manipulation tasks are to be accomplished in remote and/or hazardous environments, such as hot cells, glove boxes, decommissioning, explosives disarmament, and space to name a few. In order to achieve this end the research presented in this paper has developed an admittance type exoskeleton like multi-fingered haptic hand user interface that secures the user’s palm and provides 3-dimensional force feedback to the user’s fingertips. Atypical to conventional haptic hand user interfaces that limit themselves to integrating the human hand’s characteristics just into the system’s mechanical design this system also perpetuates that inspiration into the designed user interface’s controller. This is achieved by manifesting the property differences of manipulation and grasping activities as they pertain to the human hand into a nonlinear master-slave force relationship. The results presented in this paper show that the admittance-type system has sufficient bandwidth that it appears nearly transparent to the user when the user is in free motion and when the system is subjected to a manipulation task, increased performance is achieved using the nonlinear force relationship compared to the traditional linear scaling techniques implemented in the vast majority of systems.

  1. Characterization and correction of spectral distortions induced by microvibrations onboard the GOSAT Fourier transform spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Suto, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Jun; Desbiens, Raphael; Kawashima, Takahiro; Kuze, Akihiko

    2013-07-10

    Microvibrations onboard greenhouse gases observing satellite (GOSAT) cause scan speed variations in the TANSO Fourier transform spectrometer. The associated periodic sampling errors generate ghost features in O2 A-band spectra, where surface pressure and aerosol properties are retrieved to determine the optical path through the atmosphere. A correction algorithm has been developed to re-compute the interferograms at equally spaced sampling intervals. The key is to determine iteratively the amplitude and phase of sinusoidal perturbations with predetermined frequencies to minimize the magnitude of the out-of-band ghosts artifacts after correction of the sampling grid. This correction algorithm drastically reduces errors in retrieved surface pressure and improves agreement with ground-based observations. PMID:23852213

  2. Identification, purification and characterization of furfural transforming enzymes from Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Ujor, Victor; Wick, Macdonald; Ezeji, Thaddeus Chukwuemeka

    2015-06-01

    Generation of microbial inhibitory compounds such as furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) is a formidable roadblock to fermentation of lignocellulose-derived sugars to butanol. Bioabatement offers a cost effective strategy to circumvent this challenge. Although Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 can transform 2-3 g/L of furfural and HMF to their less toxic alcohols, higher concentrations present in biomass hydrolysates are intractable to microbial transformation. To delineate the mechanism by which C. beijerinckii detoxifies furfural and HMF, an aldo/keto reductase (AKR) and a short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) found to be over-expressed in furfural-challenged cultures of C. beijerinckii were cloned and over-expressed in Escherichia coli Rosetta-gami™ B(DE3)pLysS, and purified by histidine tag-assisted immobilized metal affinity chromatography. Protein gel analysis showed that the molecular weights of purified AKR and SDR are close to the predicted values of 37 kDa and 27 kDa, respectively. While AKR has apparent Km and Vmax values of 32.4 mM and 254.2 mM s(-1) respectively, using furfural as substrate, SDR showed lower Km (26.4 mM) and Vmax (22.6 mM s(-1)) values on the same substrate. However, AKR showed 7.1-fold higher specific activity on furfural than SDR. Further, both AKR and SDR were found to be active on HMF, benzaldehyde, and butyraldehyde. Both enzymes require NADPH as a cofactor for aldehydes reduction. Based on these results, it is proposed that AKR and SDR are involved in the biotransformation of furfural and HMF by C. beijerinckii. PMID:25796546

  3. Characterization of near-terahertz complementary metal-oxide semiconductor circuits using a Fourier-transform interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Arenas, D. J.; Shim, Dongha; Koukis, D. I.; Seok, Eunyoung; Tanner, D. B.; O, Kenneth K.

    2011-10-24

    Optical methods for measuring of the emission spectra of oscillator circuits operating in the 400-600 GHz range are described. The emitted power from patch antennas included in the circuits is measured by placing the circuit in the source chamber of a Fourier-transform interferometric spectrometer. The results show that this optical technique is useful for measuring circuits pushing the frontier in operating frequency. The technique also allows the characterization of the circuit by measuring the power radiated in the fundamental and in the harmonics. This capability is useful for oscillator architectures designed to cancel the fundamental and use higher harmonics. The radiated power was measured using two techniques: direct measurement of the power by placing the device in front of a bolometer of known responsivity, and by comparison to the estimated power from blackbody sources. The latter technique showed that these circuits have higher emission than blackbody sources at the operating frequencies, and, therefore, offer potential spectroscopy applications.

  4. Long-term batch study of sorption, transformation and extractability to characterize the fate of the veterinary antibiotic sulfadiazine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sittig, Stephan; Kasteel, Roy; Groeneweg, Joost; Vereecken, Harry

    2010-05-01

    The occurrence of veterinary antibiotic substances in various environmental compartments is of growing concern. Once released into the environment (e.g. via manure), these organic substances can cause changes in the composition of microbial populations, provoke the development and spreading of resistance genes and finally reach the food chain. The substance under study is the veterinary antibiotic sulfadiazine (SDZ), which belongs to the chemical group of the sulfonamides. These compounds are widely applied in animal husbandry. There are hardly any studies on the macroscopic sorption and desorption behaviour in combination with transformation processes, particularly investigating the sorbed fraction. We are conducting long-term batch sorption experiments to characterize the partitioning between the liquid and the solid phases as well as formation of transformation products. A sequential extraction procedure enables us to analyse the composition of the various sorbed fractions. We applied 14C-labelled SDZ in aqueous solution to fresh soil, originating from an agricultural field (silty loam). Adsorption and desorption studies are conducted for the duration of 60 d and 80 d, respectively. Unique setups for single time-steps allow us to trace the development of the partition process between the liquid and the solid phase and also partitioning within the solid phase. The composition of these liquid phases concerning the parent substance and the transformation products is analyzed. Using Radio-HPLC we find at least five transformation products: 4-hydroxy-sulfadiazine (4-OH-SDZ), 4-(2-iminopyrimidin-1(2H)-yl)-aniline (An-SDZ) and additionally three yet unknown products. By means of a sequential extraction, differently strong bound fractions of the compound can be distinguished. Extractions consist of a mild method (0.01 M CaCl2-solution; 24 h) followed by a methanol extraction (4 h). Finally, a residual fraction is gained by microwave extraction at an elevated temperature (150°C) and pressure (mixture of water and acetonitril, 4:1). Bound residues are determined by combustion. The course of the kinetic adsorption/desorption processes as well as the partitioning of the compound over the various solid phase fractions is observed. Sorption is time-dependent and strongly non-linear. The topsoil shows a significantly higher sorption affinity than the subsoil. While the amount of radioactivity sorbed to the soil matrix increases with time, the extractability decreases significantly, i. e. at the end of the experimental time there is no yield with mild extraction methods. On the contrary, after 60 d, there is still a considerably mass gained with the microwave extraction. Desorption is very slow due to hysteresis. In the topsoil transformation occurs with higher rates, leading to more detectable transformation products as in the subsoil. With our experimental setup it will be possible to set up a kinetic modell for the partitioning of the solute between the liquid and the solid phase. This description will also include an estimation of the transformation parameters.

  5. Characterization of microflora and transformation of organic matters in urban sewer system.

    PubMed

    Jin, Pengkang; Wang, Bin; Jiao, Ding; Sun, Guangxi; Wang, Baobao; Wang, Xiaochang C

    2015-11-01

    A study was conducted using a pilot sewer system consisting of 35 sequential sections, totalling 1200 m of gravity pipe. Urban sewage flowed into the sewer system at a constant flow rate until it reached physical and microbiological steady states. Microflora in the biofilm that attached to the inner surface along the pipe length were analysed. The organic compositions in both the liquid and gaseous phases of the sewer system were monitored. The results showed that typical fermentation bacteria, such as bacteroidetes and bacillus, were abundant in the system, indicating that the anoxic environment (DO = 0.3 mg/L) was suitable for fermentative bacterial growth. This resulted in a substantial reduction of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) along the pipe length and an increase of the biodegradable oxygen demand/chemical oxygen demand (BOD/COD) ratio from 0.68 at the beginning of the sewer system to 0.84 at the end of the sewer system; this was an indication of a transformation of organic matters from less-biodegradable to more-biodegradable products. Via molecular weight (MW) analysis, it was further identified that the larger organic molecules (MW > 10,000 Da) were transformed into products with smaller molecular weights. Regarding the fermentation products, the concentrations of the volatile fatty acids (VFAs) increased dramatically in the initial 600-m sections and then remained constant for the later sections except for the end section of the sewer; acetic acid was found to be the primary product of the VFAs. Gaseous carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) were found to increase along the length of the sewer system, whereas the concentrations of ethanol, lactic acid, and hydrogen (H2) were high at the beginning of the sewer and then decreased in the rear sections of the sewer system. It could thus be concluded that in an urban wastewater sewer system, fermentative microflora could perform important roles in contributing to organic matter removal and/or improving the biodegradability of organic matter. PMID:26218464

  6. CT angiography after 20 years: a transformation in cardiovascular disease characterization continues to advance.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Geoffrey D; Leipsic, Jonathon; Joseph Schoepf, U; Fleischmann, Dominik; Napel, Sandy

    2014-06-01

    Through a marriage of spiral computed tomography (CT) and graphical volumetric image processing, CT angiography was born 20 years ago. Fueled by a series of technical innovations in CT and image processing, over the next 5-15 years, CT angiography toppled conventional angiography, the undisputed diagnostic reference standard for vascular disease for the prior 70 years, as the preferred modality for the diagnosis and characterization of most cardiovascular abnormalities. This review recounts the evolution of CT angiography from its development and early challenges to a maturing modality that has provided unique insights into cardiovascular disease characterization and management. Selected clinical challenges, which include acute aortic syndromes, peripheral vascular disease, aortic stent-graft and transcatheter aortic valve assessment, and coronary artery disease, are presented as contrasting examples of how CT angiography is changing our approach to cardiovascular disease diagnosis and management. Finally, the recently introduced capabilities for multispectral imaging, tissue perfusion imaging, and radiation dose reduction through iterative reconstruction are explored with consideration toward the continued refinement and advancement of CT angiography. PMID:24848958

  7. Characterization of naphthenic acids by gas chromatography-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Xavier; Jobst, Karl J; Reiner, Eric J; Backus, Sean M; Peru, Kerry M; McMartin, Dena W; O'Sullivan, Gwen; Taguchi, Vince Y; Headley, John V

    2014-08-01

    During the bitumen extraction from the oil sands of Alberta, large volumes of process water containing naphthenic acids are stored in tailing ponds. The naphthenic acids along with other components in the processed waters are known to be toxic in aquatic environments. In view of the complex matrix and the toxicity of the processed waters, there is a need for complementary analytical techniques for comprehensive characterization of the naphthenic acid mixtures. This study reports the online gas chromatographic separation of naphthenic acid mixtures prior to ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry detection, using electron and chemical ionization. Two oil sands processed water samples and two groundwater samples were characterized to evaluate the performance of the instrumental technique. The high mass resolution of the system enabled visualization of the data using Kendrick mass defect plots. The addition of gas chromatographic separations enabled visualization of the data as unique compound class elution fingerprints. The technique is demonstrated to be a valuable tool for chemical fingerprinting of naphthenic acids. PMID:25001115

  8. Characterization of buried metal-molecule-metal junctions using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babayco, Christopher B.; Land, Donald P.; Parikh, Atul N.; Kiehl, Richard A.

    2014-09-01

    We have devised an infrared spectromicroscopy based experimental configuration to enable structural characterization of buried molecular junctions. Our design utilizes a small mercury drop at the focal point of an infrared microscope to act as a mirror in studying metal-molecule-metal (MmM) junctions. An organic molecular monolayer is formed either directly on the mercury drop or on a thin, infrared (IR) semi-transparent layer of Au deposited onto an IR transparent, undoped silicon substrate. Following the formation of the monolayer, films on either metal can be examined independently using specular reflection spectroscopy. Furthermore, by bringing together the two monolayers, a buried molecular bilayer within the MmM junction can be characterized. Independent examination of each half of the junction prior to junction formation also allows probing any structural and/or conformational changes that occur as a result of forming the bilayer. Because our approach allows assembling and disassembling microscopic junctions by forming and withdrawing Hg drops onto the monolayer covered metal, spatial mapping of junctions can be performed simply by translating the location of the derivatized silicon wafer. Finally, the applicability of this technique for the longer-term studies of changes in molecular structure in the presence of electrical bias is discussed.

  9. Development of imaging Fourier-transform spectroscopy for the characterization of turbulent jet flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harley, Jacob L.

    Recent advances in computational models to simulate turbulent, reactive flow fields have outpaced the ability to collect highly constraining data---throughout the entire flow field---for validating and improving such models. In particular, the ability to quantify in three dimensions both the mean scalar fields (i.e. temperature & species concentrations) and their respective fluctuation statistics via hyperspectral imaging would be a game-changing advancement in combustion diagnostics, with high impact in both validation and improvement efforts for computational combustion models. This research effort establishes imaging Fourier- transform spectrometry (IFTS) as a valuable tool (which complements laser diagnostics) for the study of turbulent combustion. Specifically, this effort (1) demonstrates that IFTS can be used to quantitatively measure spatially resolved spectra from a canonical turbulent flame; (2) establishes the utility of quantile spectra in first-ever quantitative comparisons between measured and modeled turbulent radiation interaction (TRI); (3) develops a simple onion-peeling-like spectral inversion methodology suitable for estimating radial scalar distributions in axisymmetric, optically-thick flames; (4) builds understanding of quantile spectra and demonstrates proof of concept for their use in estimating scalar fluctuation statistics.

  10. Characterizing microstructures of cancerous tissues using multispectral transformed Mueller matrix polarization parameters.

    PubMed

    He, Chao; He, Honghui; Chang, Jintao; Dong, Yang; Liu, Shaoxiong; Zeng, Nan; He, Yonghong; Ma, Hui

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we take the transmission 3 × 3 linear polarization Mueller matrix images of the unstained thin slices of human cervical and thyroid cancer tissues, and analyze their multispectral behavior using the Mueller matrix transformation (MMT) parameters. The experimental results show that for both cervical and thyroid cancerous tissues, the characteristic features of multispectral transmitted MMT parameters can be used to distinguish the normal and abnormal areas. Moreover, Monte Carlo simulations based on the sphere-cylinder birefringence model (SCBM) provide additional information of the relations between the characteristic spectral features of the MMT parameters and the microstructures of the tissues. Comparisons between the experimental and simulated data confirm that the contrast mechanism of the transmission MMT imaging for cancer detection is the breaking down of birefringent normal tissues for cervical cancer, or the formation of birefringent surrounding structures accompanying the inflammatory reaction for thyroid cancer. It is also testified that, the characteristic spectral features of polarization imaging techniques can provide more detailed microstructural information of tissues for diagnosis applications. PMID:26309757

  11. Characterization of Rainwater Dissolved Organic Matter by Ultrahigh Resolution Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, R. N.; Podgorski, D. C.; Mullaugh, K. M.; Avery, B.; Kieber, R. J.; Willey, J. D.; Cooper, W. T.

    2011-12-01

    Rainwater is a complex, heterogeneous mixture of dissolved organic matter (DOM) that remains largely uncharacterized at the molecular level. Rainwater with dissolved organic carbon values ranging from 3 to 450 ?M was collected during 40 separate rain events from 2007-2011 that included coastal and terrestrial storms based upon 36 hour back trajectories. Individual rain samples were lypholized and solvent added in preparation for analysis by negative electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure photoionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS). This data set is unique in that each rain event was analyzed individually and not combined allowing for unprecedented insight into rainwater DOM at the molecular level on an episodic basis. Unique elemental compositions were assigned for compounds belonging to CHO, CHOS and CHON classes. Data visualization by van Krevelen diagrams showed clear differences in coastal and terrestrial storm events with a majority of coastal storms having high H/C (1.5-2.0) relative to terrestrial storms. Further inspection of the data revealed that rainwater has relatively high O/C (1.4) and low H/C (<0.5) which suggests rainwater DOM is compositionally different than fog water, water soluble organic carbon isolated from aerosols and surface waters.

  12. Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy characterization of gaseous atmospheric pressure plasmas with 2 mm spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Laroche, G.; Vallade, J.; Bazinette, R.; Hernandez, E.; Hernandez, G.; Massines, F.; Nijnatten, P. van

    2012-10-15

    This paper describes an optical setup built to record Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectra in an atmospheric pressure plasma with a spatial resolution of 2 mm. The overall system consisted of three basic parts: (1) optical components located within the FTIR sample compartment, making it possible to define the size of the infrared beam (2 mm Multiplication-Sign 2 mm over a path length of 50 mm) imaged at the site of the plasma by (2) an optical interface positioned between the spectrometer and the plasma reactor. Once through the plasma region, (3) a retro-reflector module, located behind the plasma reactor, redirected the infrared beam coincident to the incident path up to a 45 Degree-Sign beamsplitter to reflect the beam toward a narrow-band mercury-cadmium-telluride detector. The antireflective plasma-coating experiments performed with ammonia and silane demonstrated that it was possible to quantify 42 and 2 ppm of these species in argon, respectively. In the case of ammonia, this was approximately three times less than this gas concentration typically used in plasma coating experiments while the silane limit of quantification was 35 times lower. Moreover, 70% of the incoming infrared radiation was focused within a 2 mm width at the site of the plasma, in reasonable agreement with the expected spatial resolution. The possibility of reaching this spatial resolution thus enabled us to measure the gaseous precursor consumption as a function of their residence time in the plasma.

  13. Identification and characterization of tebuconazole transformation products in soil by combining suspect screening and molecular typology.

    PubMed

    Storck, Veronika; Lucini, Luigi; Mamy, Laure; Ferrari, Federico; Papadopoulou, Evangelia S; Nikolaki, Sofia; Karas, Panagiotis A; Servien, Remi; Karpouzas, Dimitrios G; Trevisan, Marco; Benoit, Pierre; Martin-Laurent, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    Pesticides generate transformation products (TPs) when they are released into the environment. These TPs may be of ecotoxicological importance. Past studies have demonstrated how difficult it is to predict the occurrence of pesticide TPs and their environmental risk. The monitoring approaches mostly used in current regulatory frameworks target only known ecotoxicologically relevant TPs. Here, we present a novel combined approach which identifies and categorizes known and unknown pesticide TPs in soil by combining suspect screening time-of-flight mass spectrometry with in silico molecular typology. We used an empirical and theoretical pesticide TP library for compound identification by both non-target and target time-of-flight (tandem) mass spectrometry, followed by structural proposition through a molecular structure correlation program. In silico molecular typology was then used to group TPs according to common molecular descriptors and to indirectly elucidate their environmental parameters by analogy to known pesticide compounds with similar molecular descriptors. This approach was evaluated via the identification of TPs of the triazole fungicide tebuconazole occurring in soil during a field dissipation study. Overall, 22 empirical and 12 yet unknown TPs were detected, and categorized into three groups with defined environmental properties. This approach combining suspect screening time-of-flight mass spectrometry with molecular typology could be extended to other organic pollutants and used to rationalize the choice of TPs to be investigated towards a more comprehensive environmental risk assessment scheme. PMID:26552540

  14. Characterizing microstructures of cancerous tissues using multispectral transformed Mueller matrix polarization parameters

    PubMed Central

    He, Chao; He, Honghui; Chang, Jintao; Dong, Yang; Liu, Shaoxiong; Zeng, Nan; He, Yonghong; Ma, Hui

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we take the transmission 3 × 3 linear polarization Mueller matrix images of the unstained thin slices of human cervical and thyroid cancer tissues, and analyze their multispectral behavior using the Mueller matrix transformation (MMT) parameters. The experimental results show that for both cervical and thyroid cancerous tissues, the characteristic features of multispectral transmitted MMT parameters can be used to distinguish the normal and abnormal areas. Moreover, Monte Carlo simulations based on the sphere-cylinder birefringence model (SCBM) provide additional information of the relations between the characteristic spectral features of the MMT parameters and the microstructures of the tissues. Comparisons between the experimental and simulated data confirm that the contrast mechanism of the transmission MMT imaging for cancer detection is the breaking down of birefringent normal tissues for cervical cancer, or the formation of birefringent surrounding structures accompanying the inflammatory reaction for thyroid cancer. It is also testified that, the characteristic spectral features of polarization imaging techniques can provide more detailed microstructural information of tissues for diagnosis applications. PMID:26309757

  15. Characterizing the transformation and transfer of nitrogen during the aerobic treatment of organic wastes and digestates

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng Yang; Guardia, Amaury de; Daumoin, Mylene; Benoist, Jean-Claude

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ammonia emissions varied depending on the nature of wastes and the treatment conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nitrogen losses resulted from ammonia emissions and nitrification-denitrification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ammonification can be estimated from biodegradable carbon and carbon/nitrogen ratio. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ammonification was the main process contributing to N losses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nitrification rate was negatively correlated to stripping rate of ammonia nitrogen. - Abstract: The transformation and transfer of nitrogen during the aerobic treatment of seven wastes were studied in ventilated air-tight 10-L reactors at 35 Degree-Sign C. Studied wastes included distinct types of organic wastes and their digestates. Ammonia emissions varied depending on the kind of waste and treatment conditions. These emissions accounted for 2-43% of the initial nitrogen. Total nitrogen losses, which resulted mainly from ammonia emissions and nitrification-denitrification, accounted for 1-76% of the initial nitrogen. Ammonification was the main process responsible for nitrogen losses. An equation which allows estimating the ammonification flow of each type of waste according to its biodegradable carbon and carbon/nitrogen ratio was proposed. As a consequence of the lower contribution of storage and leachate rates, stripping and nitrification rates of ammonia nitrogen were negatively correlated. This observation suggests the possibility of promotingnitrification in order to reduce ammonia emissions.

  16. Characterization of a novel transcriptionally active domain in the transforming growth factor beta-regulated Smad3 protein.

    PubMed

    Prokova, Vassiliki; Mavridou, Sofia; Papakosta, Paraskevi; Kardassis, Dimitris

    2005-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) regulates transcriptional responses via activation of cytoplasmic effector proteins termed Smads. Following their phosphorylation by the type I TGFbeta receptor, Smads form oligomers and translocate to the nucleus where they activate the transcription of TGFbeta target genes in cooperation with nuclear cofactors and coactivators. In the present study, we have undertaken a deletion analysis of human Smad3 protein in order to characterize domains that are essential for transcriptional activation in mammalian cells. With this analysis, we showed that Smad3 contains two domains with transcriptional activation function: the MH2 domain and a second middle domain that includes the linker region and the first two beta strands of the MH2 domain. Using a protein-protein interaction assay based on biotinylation in vivo, we were able to show that a Smad3 protein bearing an internal deletion in the middle transactivation domain is characterized by normal oligomerization and receptor activation properties. However, this mutant has reduced transactivation capacity on synthetic or natural promoters and is unable to interact physically and functionally with the histone acetyltransferase p/CAF. The loss of interaction with p/CAF or other coactivators could account, at least in part, for the reduced transactivation capacity of this Smad3 mutant. Our data support an essential role of the previously uncharacterized middle region of Smad3 for nuclear functions, such as transcriptional activation and interaction with coactivators. PMID:15994459

  17. Characterization of full-scale carbon contactors for siloxane removal from biogas using online Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hepburn, C A; Martin, B D; Simms, N; McAdam, E J

    2015-01-01

    In this study, online Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy has been used to generate the first comprehensive characterization of full-scale carbon contactors for siloxane removal from biogas. Using FTIR, two clear operational regions within the exhaustion cycle were evidenced: an initial period of pseudo-steady state where the outlet siloxane concentration was consistently below the proposed siloxane limits; and a second period characterized by a progressive rise in outlet siloxane concentration during and after breakthrough. Due to the sharp breakthrough front identified, existing detection methods (which comprise field sampling coupled with laboratory-based chromatographic determination) are insufficiently responsive to define breakthrough, thus carbon contactors currently remain in service while providing limited protection to the combined heat and power engine. Integration of the exhaustion cycle to breakthrough identified average specific media capacities of 8.5-21.5 gsiloxane kg(-1)GAC, which are lower than that has been reported for vapour phase granular activated carbon (GAC). Further speciation of the biogas phase identified co-separation of organic compounds (alkanes and aromatics), which will inevitably reduce siloxane capacity. However, comparison of the five full-scale contactors identified that greater media capacity was accessible through operating contactors at velocities sufficient to diminish axial dispersion effects. In addition to enabling significant insight into gas phase GAC contactors, the use of FTIR for online control of GAC for siloxane removal is also presented. PMID:25413112

  18. Characterization of a variable angle reflection Fourier transform infrared accessory modified for surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Menegazzo, Nicola; Kegel, Laurel L; Kim, Yoon-Chang; Booksh, Karl S

    2010-10-01

    The Harrick AutoSeagull variable angle reflection accessory for Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometers provides access to various spectroscopic techniques in a highly flexible platform. In particular, its ability to perform total internal reflection measurements is of interest because it also forms the basis for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy in prism-based configurations. The work presented here discusses the modification of the AutoSeagull to perform SPR spectroscopy, allowing for easy incorporation of the technique into most common FT-IR spectrometers. The wavelength dependency of the dielectric constant of the plasmon-supporting metal (in our case, gold) is largely responsible for the sensitivity attributed to changes in the sample's refractive index (RI) monitored by SPR spectroscopy. Furthermore, the optical properties of gold are such that when near-infrared (NIR) and/or mid-infrared (mid-IR) wavelengths are used to excite surface plasmons, higher sensitivities to RI changes are experienced compared to surface plasmons excited with visible wavelengths. The result is that in addition to instrumental simplicity, SPR analysis on FT-IR spectrometers, as permitted by the modified AutoSeagull, also benefits from the wavelength ranges accessible. Adaptation of the AutoSeagull to SPR spectroscopy involved the incorporation of slit apertures to minimize the angular spread reaching the detector, resulting in sharper SPR "dips" but at the cost of noisier spectra. In addition, discussion of the system's analytical performance includes comparison of dip quality as a function of slit size, tailoring of the dip minima location with respect to incident angle, and sensitivity to bulk RI changes. PMID:20925990

  19. DNA binding to crystalline silica characterized by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Y; Daniel, L N; Whittaker, N; Saffiotti, U

    1994-01-01

    The interaction of DNA with crystalline silica in buffered aqueous solutions at physiologic pH has been investigated by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). In aqueous buffer, significant changes occur in the spectra of DNA and silica upon coincubation, suggesting that a DNA-silica complex forms as silica interacts with DNA. As compared to the spectrum of silica alone, the changes in the FT-IR spectrum of silica in the DNA-silica complex are consistent with an Si-O bond perturbation on the surface of the silica crystal. DNA remains in a B-form conformation in the DNA-silica complex. The most prominent changes in the DNA spectrum occur in the 1225 to 1000 cm-1 region. Upon binding, the PO2- asymmetric stretch at 1225 cm-1 is increased in intensity and slightly shifted to lower frequencies; the PO2- symmetric stretch at 1086 cm-1 is markedly increased in intensity and the band at 1053 cm-1, representing either the phosphodiester or the C-O stretch of DNA backbone, is significantly reduced in intensity. In D2O buffer, the DNA spectrum reveals a marked increase in intensity of the peak at 1086 cm-1 and a progressive decrease in intensity of the peak at 1053 cm-1 when DNA is exposed to increasing concentrations of silica. The carbonyl band at 1688 cm-1 diminishes and shifts to slightly lower frequencies with increasing concentrations of silica. The present study demonstrates that crystalline silica binds to the phosphate-sugar backbone of DNA.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7705292

  20. Spectral Characterizations of the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Thermistor Bolometers using Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornhill, K. Lee; Bitting, Herbert; Lee, Robert B., III; Paden, Jack; Pandey, Dhirendra K.; Priestley, Kory J.; Thomas, Susan; Wilson, Robert S.

    1998-01-01

    Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) techniques are being used to characterize the relative spectral response, or sensitivity, of scanning thermistor bolometers in the infrared (IR) region (2 - >= 100-micrometers). The bolometers are being used in the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) program. The CERES measurements are designed to provide precise, long term monitoring of the Earth's atmospheric radiation energy budget. The CERES instrument houses three bolometric radiometers, a total wavelength (0.3- >= 150-micrometers) sensor, a shortwave (0.3-5-micrometers) sensor, and an atmospheric window (8-12-micrometers) sensor. Accurate spectral characterization is necessary for determining filtered radiances for longwave radiometric calibrations. The CERES bolometers spectral response's are measured in the TRW FTS Vacuum Chamber Facility (FTS - VCF), which uses a FTS as the source and a cavity pyroelectric trap detector as the reference. The CERES bolometers and the cavity detector are contained in a vacuum chamber, while the FTS source is housed in a GN2 purged chamber. Due to the thermal time constant of the CERES bolometers, the FTS must be operated in a step mode. Data are acquired in 6 IR spectral bands covering the entire longwave IR region. In this paper, the TRW spectral calibration facility design and data measurement techniques are described. Two approaches are presented which convert the total channel FTS data into the final CERES spectral characterizations, producing the same calibration coefficients (within 0.1 percent). The resulting spectral response curves are shown, along with error sources in the two procedures. Finally, the impact of each spectral response curve on CERES data validation will be examined through analysis of filtered radiance values from various typical scene types.

  1. Physical Characterization of human centromeric regions using transformation-associated recombination cloning technology

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimir Larionov, Ph D

    2007-06-05

    A special interest in the organization of human centromeric DNA was stimulated a few years ago when two independent groups succeeded in reconstituting a functional human centromere, using constructs carrying centromere-specific alphoid DNA arrays. This work demonstrated the importance of DNA components in mammalian centromeres and opened a way for studying the structural requirements for de novo kinetochore formation and for construction of human artificial chromosomes (HACs) with therapeutic potential. To elucidate the structural requirements for formation of HACs with a functional kinetochore, we developed a new method for cloning of large DNA fragments for human centromeric regions that can be used as a substrate for HAC formation. This method exploits in vivo recombination in yeast (TAR cloning). In addition, a new strategy for the construction of alphoid DNA arrays was developed in our lab. The strategy involves the construction of uniform or hybrid synthetic alphoid DNA arrays by the RCA-TAR technique. This technique comprises two steps: rolling circle amplification of an alphoid DNA dimer and subsequent assembling of the amplified fragments by in vivo homologous recombination in yeast (Figure 1). Using this system, we constructed a set of different synthetic alphoid DNA arrays with a predetermined sequence varying in size from 30 to 140 kb and demonstrated that some of the arrays are competent in HAC formation. Because any nucleotide can be changed in a dimer before its amplification, this new technique is optimal for identifying the structural requirements for de novo kinetochore formation in HACs. Moreover, the technique makes possible to introduce into alphoid DNA arrays recognition sites for DNA-binding proteins. We have made the following progress on the studying of human centromeric regions using transformation-associated recombination cloning technology: i) minimal size of alphoid DNA array required for de novo kinetochore formation was estimated; ii) critical role of CENP-B binding site in do novo kinetochore formation was demonstrated; iii) role of gamma-satellite DNA in functional centromere was elucidated; iv) new generation of HAC with a conditional centromere was constructed for the study of epigenetic control of kinetochore function and for gene expression studies. These studies de novo kinetochore formation may thus provide both a fundamental knowledge and new points of intervention for therapy.

  2. Acoustic Attenuation Employing Variable Wall Admittance H. T. Banks K. M. Furati y K. Ito N. S. Luke C. J. Smith

    E-print Network

    Acoustic Attenuation Employing Variable Wall Admittance H. T. Banks #3; K. M. Furati #3;y K. Ito #3; N. S. Luke #3; C. J. Smith #3; July 8, 2002 Abstract In this discussion we present results for sound attenuation in a half plane using arrays of micro-acoustic actuators on a control surface. We explain and use

  3. Fibre optic sensors for load-displacement measurements and comparisons to piezo sensor based electromechanical admittance signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheshwari, Muneesh; Annamdas, Venu Gopal Madhav; Pang, John H. L.; Tjin, Swee Chuan; Asundi, Anand

    2015-04-01

    Structural health monitoring techniques using smart materials are on rise to meet the ever ending demand due to increased construction and manufacturing activities worldwide. The civil-structural components such as slabs, beams and columns and aero-components such as wings are constantly subjected to some or the other forms of external loading. This article thus focuses on condition monitoring due to loading/unloading cycle for a simply supported aluminum beam using multiple smart materials. On the specimen, fibre optic polarimetric sensor (FOPS) and fibre Bragg grating (FBG) sensors were glued. Piezoelectric wafer active sensor (PWAS) was also bonded at the centre of the specimen. FOPS and FBG provided the global and local strain measurements respectively whereas, PWAS predicted boundary condition variations by electromechanical admittance signatures. Thus these multiple smart materials together successfully assessed the condition of structure for loading and unloading tests.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of catalysts for the selective transformation of biomass-derived materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghampson, Isaac Tyrone

    The experimental work in this thesis focuses on generating catalysts for two intermediate processes related to the thermal conversion of lignocellulosic biomass: the synthesis and characterization of mesoporous silica supported cobalt catalysts for the Fischer-Tropsch reaction, and an exploration of the reactivity of bulk and supported molybdenum-based nitride catalysts for the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of guaiacol, a lignin model compound. The first section of the work details the synthesis of a series of silica-supported cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts with pore diameters ranging from 2-23 nm. Detailed X-ray diffraction measurements were used to determine the composition and particle diameters of the metal fraction, analyzed as a three-phase system containing Cofcc, Cohcp and CoO particles. Catalyst properties were determined at three stages in catalyst history: (1) after the initial calcination step to thermally decompose the catalyst precursor into Co3O4, (2) after the hydrogen reduction step to activate the catalyst to Co and (3) after the FT reaction. From the study, it was observed that larger pore diameters supported higher turnover frequency; smaller pore diameters yielded larger mole fraction of CoO; XRD on post-reduction and post-FTS catalyst samples indicated significant changes in dispersivity after reduction. In the next section, the catalytic behaviors of unsupported, activated carbon-, alumina-, and SBA-15 mesoporous silica-supported molybdenum nitride catalysts were evaluated for the hydrodeoxygenation of guaiacol (2-methoxy phenol) at 300°C and 5 MPa. The nitride catalysts were prepared by thermal decomposition of bulk and supported ammonium heptamolybdate to form MoO 3 followed by nitridation in either flowing ammonia or a nitrogen/hydrogen mixture. The catalytic properties were strongly affected by the nitriding and purging treatment as well as the physical and chemical properties of support. The overall reaction was influenced by the crystalline phase present in the catalyst, dispersion of molybdenum nitride/oxynitride, and the porosity of the support. The hydrodeoxygenation of guaiacol followed two proposed reaction pathways: demethylation (DME) of guaiacol to form catechol, followed by dehydroxylation to form phenol; or a direct demethoxylation (DMO) to form phenol. The selectivity of the reaction was expressed in terms of the phenol/catechol ratio. Phenol was the predominant product for all the catalysts studied, except for the alumina-supported catalysts (an effect of the alumina support). The results from this thesis are encouraging for the application of Mo nitride based catalysts for hydrodeoxygenation of whole pyrolysis oil.

  5. Secondary organic aerosol (trans)formation through aqueous phase guaiacol photonitration: chemical characterization of the products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grgi?, Irena; Kitanovski, Zoran; Krofli?, Ana; ?usak, Alen

    2014-05-01

    One of the largest primary sources of organic aerosol in the atmosphere is biomass burning (BB) (Laskin et al. 2009); in Europe its contribution to annual mean of PM10 is between 3 and 14 % (Maenhaut et al. 2012). During the process of wood burning many different products are formed via thermal degradation of wood lignin. Hardwood burning produces mainly syringol (2,6-dimetoxyphenol) derivatives, while softwood burning exclusively guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) and its derivatives. Taking into account physical properties of methoxyphenols only, their concentrations in atmospheric waters might be underestimated. So, their aqueous phase reactions can be an additional source of SOA, especially in regions under significant influence of wood combustion. An important class of compounds formed during physical and chemical aging of the primary BBA in the atmosphere is nitrocatechols, known as strong absorbers of UV and Vis light (Claeys et al. 2012). Very recently, methyl-nitrocatechols were proposed as suitable markers for highly oxidized secondary BBA (Iinuma et al. 2010, Kitanovski et al. 2012). In the present work, the formation of SOA through aqueous phase photooxidation and nitration of guaiacol was examined. The key objective was to chemically characterize the main low-volatility products and further to check their possible presence in the urban atmospheric aerosols. The aqueous phase reactions were performed in a thermostated reactor under simulated sunlight in the presence of H2O2 and nitrite. Guaiacol reaction products were first concentrated by solid-phase extraction (SPE) and then subjected to semi-preparative liquid chromatography.The main product compounds were fractionated and isolated as pure solids and their structure was further elucidated by using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H, 13C and 2D NMR) and direct infusion negative ion electro-spray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (( )ESI-MS/MS). The main photonitration products of guaiacol (4-nitroguaiacol, 6-nitroguaiacol and 4,6-dinitroguaiacol) were examined for their presence in winter aerosol samples by using an optimized HPLC-(-)ESI-MS/MS. 4-nitroguaiacol and 4,6-dinitroguaiacol were unambiguously identified in winter PM10 from Ljubljana, Slovenia, whereas the absence of 6-nitroguaiacol was further explained with the help of long-term reaction monitoring. To our knowledge, our study represents the first report on the identification of 4,6-dinitroguaiacol in ambient aerosols. Laskin, A. et al. (2009) Environ. Sci. Technol. 43, 3764-3771. Maenhaut, W. et al. (2012) Sci. Tot. Environ. 437, 226-236. Claeys, M. et al. (2012) Environ. Chem. 9, 273-284. Iinuma, Y. et al. (2010) Environ. Sci. Technol. 44, 8453-8459. Kitanovski, Z. et al. (2012)J. Chromatogr. A 1268, 35-43.

  6. Spatiotemporal characterization of land subsidence and uplift in Phoenix using InSAR time series and wavelet transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Megan Marie; Shirzaei, Manoochehr

    2015-08-01

    The effects of land subsidence pose a significant hazard to the environment and infrastructure in the arid, alluvial basins of Phoenix, Arizona. Improving our understanding of the source and mechanisms of subsidence is important for planning and risk management. Here we employ multitemporal interferometric analysis of large synthetic aperture radar data sets acquired by ERS and Envisat satellites to investigate ground deformation. The ERS data sets from 1992 to 1996 and Envisat, 2003-2010, are used to generate line of sight (LOS) time series and velocities in both the ascending and descending tracks. The general deformation pattern is consistent among data sets and is characterized by three zones of subsidence and a broad zone of uplift. The multitrack Envisat LOS time series of surface deformation are inverted to obtain spatiotemporal maps of the vertical and horizontal deformation fields. We use observation wells to provide an in situ, independent data set of hydraulic head levels. Then we analyze vertical interferometric synthetic aperture radar and hydraulic head level time series using continuous wavelet transform to separate periodic signal components and the long-term trend. The isolated signal components are used to estimate the elastic storage coefficient, the inelastic skeletal storage coefficient, and compaction time constants. Together these parameters describe the storage response of an aquifer system to changes in hydraulic head and surface elevation. Understanding aquifer parameters is useful for the ongoing management of groundwater resources.

  7. Damage characterization of polymer-based composite materials: Multivariable analysis and wavelet transform for clustering acoustic emission data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marec, A.; Thomas, J.-H.; El Guerjouma, R.

    2008-08-01

    In the present work, a procedure for the investigation of local damage in composite materials based on the analysis of the signals of acoustic emission (AE) is presented. One of the remaining problems is the analysis of the AE signals in order to identify the most critical damage mechanisms. In this work, unsupervised pattern recognition analyses (fuzzy C-means clustering) associated with a principal component analysis are the tools that are used for the classification of the monitored AE events. A cluster analysis of AE data is achieved and the resulting clusters are correlated to the damage mechanisms of the material under investigation. After being validated on model samples composed of unidirectional fiber-matrix composites, this method is applied to actual composites such as glass fiber/polyester cross-ply composites and sheet molding compound (SMC). Furthermore, AE signals generated by heterogeneous materials are not stationary. Thus, time-scale methods are used to determine new relevant descriptors to be introduced in the classification process in order to improve the characterization and the discrimination of the damage mechanisms. Continuous and discrete wavelet transforms are applied on typical damage mechanisms AE signals of glass fiber/polyester composites such as matrix cracking, fiber-matrix debonding. Time-scale descriptors are defined from these wavelet analyses. They provide a better discrimination of damage mechanisms than some time-based descriptors.

  8. Characterization of near-terahertz complementary metal-oxide semiconductor circuits using a Fourier-transform interferometer

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Arenas, D. J.; Shim, Dongha; Koukis, D. I.; Seok, Eunyoung; Tanner, D. B.; O, Kenneth K.

    2011-10-24

    Optical methods for measuring of the emission spectra of oscillator circuits operating in the 400-600 GHz range are described. The emitted power from patch antennas included in the circuits is measured by placing the circuit in the source chamber of a Fourier-transform interferometric spectrometer. The results show that this optical technique is useful for measuring circuits pushing the frontier in operating frequency. The technique also allows the characterization of the circuit by measuring the power radiated in the fundamental and in the harmonics. This capability is useful for oscillator architectures designed to cancel the fundamental and use higher harmonics. Themore »radiated power was measured using two techniques: direct measurement of the power by placing the device in front of a bolometer of known responsivity, and by comparison to the estimated power from blackbody sources. The latter technique showed that these circuits have higher emission than blackbody sources at the operating frequencies, and, therefore, offer potential spectroscopy applications.« less

  9. Characterizing Intermittency of 4-Hz Quasi-periodic Oscillation in XTE J1550-564 using Hilbert-Huang Transform

    E-print Network

    Su, Yi-Hao; Hu, Chin-Ping; Yang, Ting-Chang

    2015-01-01

    We present the time-frequency analysis results based on the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) for the evolution of a 4-Hz low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillation (LFQPO) around the black hole X-ray binary XTE J1550-564. The origin of LFQPOs is still debated. To understand the cause of the peak broadening, we utilized a recently developed time-frequency analysis, HHT, for tracking the evolution of the 4-Hz LFQPO from XTE J1550 564. By adaptively decomposing the ~4-Hz oscillatory component from the light curve and acquiring its instantaneous frequency, the Hilbert spectrum illustrates that the LFQPO is composed of a series of intermittent oscillations appearing occasionally between 3 Hz and 5 Hz. We further characterized this intermittency by computing the confidence limits of the instantaneous amplitudes of the intermittent oscillations, and constructed both the distributions of the QPO's high and low amplitude durations, which are the time intervals with and without significant ~4-Hz oscillations, respectively. ...

  10. Modeling of a ring rosen-type piezoelectric transformer by Hamilton's principle.

    PubMed

    Nadal, Clément; Pigache, Francois; Erhart, Ji?í

    2015-04-01

    This paper deals with the analytical modeling of a ring Rosen-type piezoelectric transformer. The developed model is based on a Hamiltonian approach, enabling to obtain main parameters and performance evaluation for the first radial vibratory modes. Methodology is detailed, and final results, both the input admittance and the electric potential distribution on the surface of the secondary part, are compared with numerical and experimental ones for discussion and validation. PMID:25881348

  11. Characterizing Intermittency of 4-Hz Quasi-periodic Oscillation in XTE J1550-564 Using Hilbert-Huang Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yi-Hao; Chou, Yi; Hu, Chin-Ping; Yang, Ting-Chang

    2015-12-01

    We present time-frequency analysis results based on the Hilbert–Huang transform (HHT) for the evolution of a 4-Hz low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillation (LFQPO) around the black hole X-ray binary XTE J1550–564. The origin of LFQPOs is still debated. To understand the cause of the peak broadening, we utilized a recently developed time-frequency analysis, HHT, for tracking the evolution of the 4-Hz LFQPO from XTE J1550–564. By adaptively decomposing the ?4-Hz oscillatory component from the light curve and acquiring its instantaneous frequency, the Hilbert spectrum illustrates that the LFQPO is composed of a series of intermittent oscillations appearing occasionally between 3 and 5 Hz. We further characterized this intermittency by computing the confidence limits of the instantaneous amplitudes of the intermittent oscillations, and constructed both the distributions of the QPO’s high- and low-amplitude durations, which are the time intervals with and without significant ?4-Hz oscillations, respectively. The mean high-amplitude duration is 1.45 s and 90% of the oscillation segments have lifetimes below 3.1 s. The mean low-amplitude duration is 0.42 s and 90% of these segments are shorter than 0.73 s. In addition, these intermittent oscillations exhibit a correlation between the oscillation’s rms amplitude and mean count rate. This correlation could be analogous to the linear rms-flux relation found in the 4-Hz LFQPO through Fourier analysis. We conclude that the LFQPO peak in the power spectrum is broadened owing to intermittent oscillations with varying frequencies, which could be explained by using the Lense–Thirring precession model.

  12. Performance analysis of a plasmonic sensor based on gold nanoparticle film in infrared light using the admittance loci method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahmachari, Kaushik; Ray, Mina

    2015-02-01

    A theoretical design of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) structure operating in attenuated total reflection (ATR) mode and comprising of silicon or chalcogenide (2S2G) prism material coated with gold film having different nanoparticle sizes has been reported along with some interesting performance related simulation results at the operating wavelength of 1200 nm in infrared. The admittance loci based technique has been employed for the appropriate choice of the metal layer thickness. The sensitivity and other performance parameters of the structure based on the choice of the high index prism material and correct gold nanoparticle size have also been presented. In comparison to other conventional prism based plasmonic structures, the proposed model provides the extra degree of freedom, i.e., variations of nanoparticle size in addition to the variation in layer thickness and the use of different high index prism materials like silicon, 2S2G materials, etc. Moreover, the width of the SPR curve can be controlled by using different high index prism materials as well as by changing gold nanoparticle size. Higher sensitivity can be achieved with 2S2G while higher detection accuracy is provided by silicon as prism material.

  13. Characterization of the chemical composition of soil humic acids using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeya, Kosuke; Sleighter, Rachel L.; Hatcher, Patrick G.; Watanabe, Akira

    2015-03-01

    The composition of humic acids (HAs) with varying degrees of humification isolated from 10 common Japanese soils was characterized using negative ion mode electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry at 12 T. In particular, attention was paid to polynuclear aromatic components, which are more associated with the refractory nature of HAs and their resistance to biodegradation in soil than single C ring aromatic entities, such as lignin-like components, and aliphatic functionalities. Thousands of peaks were observed in the m/z range of 200-700, and molecular formulas were assigned to 817-2457 peaks in each sample. The molecular formulas having H/C and O/C ratios similar to those of lipid, protein, and other aliphatics with low double bond equivalents (DBE) of 0-7 were generally observed across the m/z range of 200-700. Although there were a number of molecular formulas having H/C and O/C values similar to those of lignin across the wide m/z range in the HAs with a low degree of humification, most lignin-like molecular formulas in the larger m/z range (450-650) or irrespective of m/z were lacking in the HAs with middle and high degrees of humification, respectively. These observations suggest a longer residence time for lignin monomers/dimers (and their derivatives; m/z 200-400) than larger lignin oligomers (m/z 450-650) in HA structural domains. The number of molecular formulas having H/C and O/C values similar to condensed aromatics increased with increasing degree of humification. The m/z and DBE values of condensed aromatic-like molecular formulas in the HAs with a lower degree of humification were <500 and 10-25, respectively, whilst the ranges expanded to 600 and 30-33, respectively, in the highly-humified black HAs. Kendrick mass defect analysis using a carboxyl group as the characteristic functional group found that 31, 73, and 39 molecular formulas had chain-type, net-type, and biphenyl-type condensed aromatic acids, respectively, as possible structures. Summed peak magnitudes of the condensed aromatic-like molecular formulas, in particular those with higher DBE values (>17) expected to have at least 5 rings, increased with increasing degree of humification and aromatic C content (evaluated by solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy), suggesting their contribution to the intrinsic recalcitrance of HAs in soil.

  14. Identification and characterization of salmonella serotypes using DNA spectral characteristics by fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analysis of DNA samples of Salmonella serotypes (Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Infantis, Salmonella Heidelberg and Salmonella Kentucky) were performed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) spectrometer by placing directly in contact with a diamond attenua...

  15. Characterization of Atomic Structure, Relaxation and Phase Transformation Mechanisms in Bulk and Thin Film Amorphous Chalcogenides and Gallium Antimonide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Trenton Gerard

    This dissertation details the characterization of the atomic structure, relaxation processes and phase transformation mechanisms in a variety of chalcogenide (selenides and tellurides) and other non-oxide (Ga-Sb alloys) glasses which are highly relevant to optoelectronic and phase change memory applications. One of the principal goals of these studies is to develop a fundamental, atomistic understanding of the structure-property relationships in these materials. Variable temperature Raman spectroscopy is used to the study the structure and its temperature dependent relaxation in GexSe100-x glasses and supercooled liquids with x ? 33.33 %. It is shown that the compositional dependence of the relative fractions of the edge- and corner-shared GeSe4 tetrahedra is fully consistent with a structural model based on random connectivity between the tetrahedral and chain elements. Temperature-dependent structural changes involve a progressive conversion of edge-shared to corner shared GeSe4 tetrahedra with decreasing equilibration temperature. The time scale of this structural conversion agrees with both enthalpy and shear relaxation near the glass transition. The temperature dependent change in the edge- vs. corner- sharing tetrahedral speciation is shown to be related to the production of configurational entropy, indicating a connection between structural relaxation, configurational entropy, and viscous flow. A combination of Raman and 77Se nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is applied to study the structure of a series of Se-deficient GexSe100-x glasses, with 42 ? x ? 33.33. Considerable violation of chemical order in the nearest-neighbor coordination environments of the constituent atoms is observed in the stoichiometric GeSe2 glass. On the other hand, the presence of a random distribution of Ge-Ge bonds can be inferred in the Se-deficient glasses. Furthermore, the results of this study conclusively indicate that the structure of these glasses is intermediate between a randomly connected and a fully clustered network of GeSe4 tetrahedra and Se chains. Additionally, a new two-dimensional NMR spectroscopic technique is developed and applied to Ge-Se glasses that allowed the separation of isotropic and anisotropic chemical shifts. Through the analysis of the anisotropic sideband pattern in the second dimension it is possible to detect up to four distinct types of Se environments in the glass structure on the basis of their characteristic chemical shift anisotropies. 125Te NMR chemical shift systematics is established for coordination environments of Te atoms in a wide range of crystalline and glassy tellurides in the Ga-As-Sb-Te system. 125Te NMR spectroscopy is then used to investigate the short-range structure of amorphous and crystalline Ge1Sb2 Te4 and Ge2Sb2Te5 phase change alloys. Both alloys are found to consist of only heteropolar Ge/Sb-Te bonds in the amorphous and crystalline state and strong vacancy clustering in the nanocrystalline state that may facilitate a rapid displacive transformation between the amorphous and crystalline states without the need of significant atomic rearrangement or diffusion. Based on these 125Te NMR results a Te-centric model of the phase change mechanism in GST alloys is proposed. Structure and phase changes in amorphous Ga-Sb alloys are studied using synchrotron x-ray diffraction and 71Ga and 121Sb NMR spectroscopy. Pressure induced phase transformations in amorphous GaSb is shown to be consistent with the existence of an underlying polyamorphic phase transition between a low and a high-density amorphous phase. NMR results for amorphous Ga46Sb54 indicate that both Ga and Sb atoms are fourfold coordinated with 40% of these atoms participating in homopolar bonding in the as-deposited film. Subsequent crystallization into the zinc blend structure therefore requires extensive bond switching and elimination of homopolar bonds. For amorphous Ga14Sb86 both Ga and Sb atoms are found to be threefold coordinated allowing for a fast phase change kinetics although crystallization of thi

  16. Generation and characterization of soybean and marker-free tobacco plastid transformants over-expressing a bacterial 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase which provides strong herbicide tolerance.

    PubMed

    Dufourmantel, Nathalie; Dubald, Manuel; Matringe, Michel; Canard, Hélène; Garcon, Frédéric; Job, Claudette; Kay, Elisabeth; Wisniewski, Jean-Pierre; Ferullo, Jean-Marc; Pelissier, Bernard; Sailland, Alain; Tissot, Ghislaine

    2007-01-01

    Plant 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD) is part of the biosynthetic pathway leading to plastoquinone and vitamin E. This enzyme is also the molecular target of various new bleaching herbicides for which genetically engineered tolerant crops are being developed. We have expressed a sensitive bacterial hppd gene from Pseudomonas fluorescens in plastid transformants of tobacco and soybean and characterized in detail the recombinant lines. HPPD accumulates to approximately 5% of total soluble protein in transgenic chloroplasts of both species. As a result, the soybean and tobacco plastid transformants acquire a strong herbicide tolerance, performing better than nuclear transformants. In contrast, the over-expression of HPPD has no significant impact on the vitamin E content of leaves or seeds, quantitatively or qualitatively. A new strategy is presented and exemplified in tobacco which allows the rapid generation of antibiotic marker-free plastid transformants containing the herbicide tolerance gene only. This work reports, for the first time, the plastome engineering for herbicide tolerance in a major agronomic crop, and a technology leading to marker-free lines for this trait. PMID:17207262

  17. Transformation and characterization of an arsenic gene operon from urease-positive thermophilic Campylobacter (UPTC) in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, M; Kuribayashi, T; Yamamoto, S; Millar, B C; Moore, J E

    2016-01-01

    An arsenate susceptibility test was performed with transformed and cultured Escherichia coli DH5? cells, which carried recombinant DNA of full-length arsenic (ars) operon, namely a putative membrane permease, ArsP; a transcriptional repressor, ArsR; an arsenate reductase, ArsC; and an arsenical-resistance membrane transporter, Acr3, from the Japanese urease-positive thermophilic Campylobacter lari (UPTC) CF89-12. The E. coli DH5? transformant showed reduced susceptibility to arsenate (~1536 ?g/mL), compared to the control. Thus, these ars four-genes from the UPTC CF89-12 strain cells could confer a reduced susceptibility to arsenate in the transformed and E. coli DH5? cells. E. coli transformants with truncated ars operons, acr3 (acr3) and arsC-acr3 (?arsC-acr3), of the ars operon, showed an MIC value of 384 ?g/mL (~384 ?g/mL), similar to the E. coli cells which carried the pGEM-T vector (control). Reverse transcription PCR confirmed in vivo transcription of recombinant full-length ars operon and deletion variants (?acr3 and ?arsC-acr3) in the transformed E. coli cells. PMID:26122364

  18. Numerical calculations for effects of structure of skeletal muscle on frequency-dependence of its electrical admittance and impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Katsuhisa; Yamada, Ayumi; Kageyama, Hitomi; Igarashi, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Nana; Asami, Koji

    2015-06-01

    Numerical calculations were carried out by the finite difference method using three-dimensional models to examine effects of the structure of skeletal muscle on the frequency-dependence of its electrical admittance Y and impedance Z in transversal and longitudinal directions. In the models, the muscle cell was represented by a rectangular solid surrounded by a smooth surface membrane, and the cells were assumed to be distributed periodically. The width of the cross section of the cell, thickness of the intercellular medium, and the relative permittivities and the conductivities of the cell interior, the intercellular medium and the surface membrane were changed. Based on the results of the calculations, reported changes in Y and Z of the muscles from 1?kHz to 1?MHz were analyzed. The analyses revealed that a decreased cell radius was reasonable to explain the Y and Z of the muscles of immature rats, rats subjected to sciatic nerve crush at chronic stage and the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) mice. Changes in Y and Z due to the sciatic nerve crush at acute stage were attributable to the decreased cell radius, the increased space between the cells, the increased permittivity of the surface membrane and the increased conductivity of the cell interior. The changes in Z due to contraction were explained by the changes in the cell radius, and the conductivities of the cell interior and the intercellular medium. The changes in Z of meat due to aging were compared with the effects of the increase in the conductivity of the surface membrane.

  19. Diffuse-Reflectance Fourier-Transform Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy as a Method of Characterizing Changes in Soil Organic Matter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diffuse-Reflectance Fourier-Transform Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) can be used quickly and non destructively to identify and quantify the presence of important organic functional groups in environmental samples. However, soils contain myriad organic and inorganic components that absorb in the M...

  20. Diffuse-reflectance fourier-transform mid-infrared spectroscopy as a method of characterizing changes in soil organic matter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diffuse-Reflectance Fourier-Transform Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy (MidIR) can identify the presence of important organic functional groups in soil organic matter (SOM). Soils contain myriad organic and inorganic components that absorb in the MidIR so spectral interpretation needs to be validated in or...

  1. CHARACTERIZATION OF AMBIENT PM2.5 AEROSOL AT A SOUTHEASTERN US SITE: FOURIER TRANSFORM INFRARED ANALYSIS OR PARTICLE PHASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    During a field study in the summer of 2000 in the Research Triangle Park (RTP), aerosol samples were collected using a five stage cascade impactor and subsequently analyzed using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The impaction surfaces were stainless steel disks....

  2. Functional biocompatible magnetite-cellulose nanocomposite fibrous networks: Characterization by fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibi, Neda

    2015-02-01

    The preparation and characterization of functional biocompatible magnetite-cellulose nano-composite fibrous material is described. Magnetite-cellulose nano-composite was prepared by a combination of the solution-based formation of magnetic nano-particles and subsequent coating with amino celluloses. Characterization was accomplished using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) analysis. The peaks of Fe3O4 in the XRD pattern of nanocomposite confirm existence of the nanoparticles in the amino cellulose matrix. Magnetite-cellulose particles exhibit an average diameter of roughly 33 nm as demonstrated by field emission scanning electron microscopy. Magnetite nanoparticles were irregular spheres dispersed in the cellulose matrix. The vibration corresponding to the Nsbnd CH3 functional group about 2850 cm-1 is assigned in the FTIR spectra. Functionalized magnetite-cellulose nano-composite polymers have a potential range of application as targeted drug delivery system in biomedical field.

  3. Admittance-voltage profiling of AlxGa1-xN/GaN heterostructures: Frequency dependence of capacitance and conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, K.; Pletschen, W.; Godejohann, B.; Müller, S.; Menner, H. P.; Ambacher, O.

    2015-11-01

    Admittance-voltage profiling of AlxGa1-xN/GaN heterostructures was used to determine the frequency dependent capacitance and conductance of FET devices in the frequency range from 50 Hz to 1 MHz. The nominally undoped low pressure metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy structures were grown with an Al-content of 30%. An additional 1 nm thick AlN interlayer was placed in one structure before the Al0.3Ga0.7N layer growth. For frequencies below 108 Hz it is convenient to use equivalent circuits to represent electric or dielectric properties of a material, a method widely used, for example, in impedance spectroscopy. We want to emphasize the relation between frequency dependent admittance-voltage profiling and the corresponding equivalent circuits to the complex dielectric function. Debye and Drude models are used for the description of the frequency dependent admittance profiles in a range of depletion onset of the two-dimensional electron gas. Capacitance- and conductance-frequency profiles are fitted in the entire measured range by combining both models. Based on our results, we see contributions to the two-dimensional electron gas for our samples from surface states (80%) as well as from background doping in the Al0.3Ga0.7N barriers (20%). The specific resistance of the layers below the gate is above 105 ? cm for both samples and increases with increasing negative bias, i.e., the layers below the gate are essentially depleted. We propose that the resistance due to free charge carriers, determined by the Drude model, is located between gate and drain and, because of the AlN interlayer, the resistance is lowered by a factor of about 30 if compared to the sample without an AlN layer.

  4. Study and characterization of the irreversible transformation of electrically stressed planar Ti/TiOx/Ti junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillaume, N.; Puyoo, E.; Le Berre, M.; Albertini, D.; Baboux, N.; Chevalier, C.; Ayadi, K.; Grégoire, J.; Gautier, B.; Calmon, F.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the properties and characteristics of planar Ti/TiOx/Ti junctions, which consist of transverse TiOx lines drawn on Ti test patterns. Junctions are elaborated by means of local anodic oxidation using atomic force microscopy. An irreversible morphological transformation occurring in a reproducible manner is observed when these planar junctions are electrically stressed under ambient atmosphere. Structural and chemical analyses based on transmission electron microscopy techniques reveal the extension of the initial amorphous TiOx into a crystalline rutile phase. This irreversible transformation is proven to vanish completely if the electrical stress occurs under vacuum atmosphere. Finally, we carry out temperature dependent electrical measurements in order to elucidate their conduction mechanism: Schottky emission above an ultra-low potential barrier is assumed to dominate under vacuum atmosphere whereas ionic conduction seems to prevail in air.

  5. Derivation and characterization of POJ cells, transformed human fetal glial cells that retain their permissivity for JC virus.

    PubMed Central

    Mandl, C; Walker, D L; Frisque, R J

    1987-01-01

    The study of the medically important polyomavirus JC virus is limited to only a few laboratories, primarily because the permissive cell system most often used, primary human fetal glial cells, is difficult to obtain and propagate. We have introduced mutations at the origin of DNA replication of JC virus and transformed glial cells with the replication-defective genomes. Although normal glial cell cultures rapidly lose their permissivity for the virus after subculture, the transformed cells (designated POJ) had a greatly expanded life span and remained permissive for JC virus even after 30 passages in vitro. POJ cells constitutively express a functional T protein that complements the replication defect of lethal early-region mutations in JC virus. We expect that these cells will greatly facilitate the study of this human virus. Images PMID:3027403

  6. Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopic characterization of homogeneous solution concentration gradients near a container wall at different temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loo, B. H.; Burns, D. H.; Lee, Y. G. L.; Emerson, M. T.

    1991-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopic techniques were used to study the solution concentration gradient in succino nitrile-rich and water-rich homogeneous solutions. The spectroscopic data shows significant concentration dependency. Although FTIR-attenuated total reflectance could not yield surface spectra since the evanescent infrared wave penetrated deep into the bulk solution, it showed that water-rich clusters were decreased at higher temperatures. This result is consistent with the calorimetric results reported earlier.

  7. Characterization of separability and entanglement in $(2\\times{D})$- and $(3\\times{D})$-dimensional systems by single-qubit and single-qutrit unitary transformations

    E-print Network

    Salvatore M. Giampaolo; Fabrizio Illuminati

    2007-08-03

    We investigate the geometric characterization of pure state bipartite entanglement of $(2\\times{D})$- and $(3\\times{D})$-dimensional composite quantum systems. To this aim, we analyze the relationship between states and their images under the action of particular classes of local unitary operations. We find that invariance of states under the action of single-qubit and single-qutrit transformations is a necessary and sufficient condition for separability. We demonstrate that in the $(2\\times{D})$-dimensional case the von Neumann entropy of entanglement is a monotonic function of the minimum squared Euclidean distance between states and their images over the set of single qubit unitary transformations. Moreover, both in the $(2\\times{D})$- and in the $(3\\times{D})$-dimensional cases the minimum squared Euclidean distance exactly coincides with the linear entropy (and thus as well with the tangle measure of entanglement in the $(2\\times{D})$-dimensional case). These results provide a geometric characterization of entanglement measures originally established in informational frameworks. Consequences and applications of the formalism to quantum critical phenomena in spin systems are discussed.

  8. Characterization of separability and entanglement in (2xD)- and (3xD)-dimensional systems by single-qubit and single-qutrit unitary transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Giampaolo, Salvatore M.; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2007-10-15

    We investigate the geometric characterization of pure state bipartite entanglement of (2xD)- and (3xD)-dimensional composite quantum systems. To this aim, we analyze the relationship between states and their images under the action of particular classes of local unitary operations. We find that invariance of states under the action of single-qubit and single-qutrit transformations is a necessary and sufficient condition for separability. We demonstrate that in the (2xD)-dimensional case the von Neumann entropy of entanglement is a monotonic function of the minimum squared Euclidean distance between states and their images over the set of single qubit unitary transformations. Moreover, both in the (2xD)- and in the (3xD)-dimensional cases the minimum squared Euclidean distance exactly coincides with the linear entropy [and thus as well with the tangle measure of entanglement in the (2xD)-dimensional case]. These results provide a geometric characterization of entanglement measures originally established in informational frameworks. Consequences and applications of the formalism to quantum critical phenomena in spin systems are discussed.

  9. Evidences of buried loads in the base of the crust of Borborema Plateau (NE Brazil) from Bouguer admittance estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Roberto Gusmão; de Medeiros, Walter Eugênio

    2012-08-01

    In the Borborema Province (BP) - northeastern Brazil - two important Cenozoic events occurred at the surface: the Macau magmatism and the Borborema Plateau epeirogenesis. To obtain appropriated-scale geophysical data to explain the deep origins of these two events, different gravimetric/elevation databases were integrated with new surveys. Bouguer admittance estimates reveal that isostatic condition of the BP, especially in the Borborema Plateau, can be explained using elastic models to the lithosphere only if surface and buried loadings are combined. If the buried load is applied in the base of the crust, the ratio between buried and surface weights is circa 15 for a lithosphere with effective elastic thickness around 15 km and crust thickness around 33 km. From an interpretative viewpoint of the buried load, it is assumed that the lower crust under the Borborema Plateau might have an anomalous high value of density. Magmatic underplating might explain this fact as well as the observed surface magmatism and epeirogenesis. Crustal thickening of about 4 km under the Borborema Plateau and intracrustal seismic velocity discontinuity with high Vp/Vs ratio are geophysical facts consistent with magmatic underplating. However, the surface magmatism presents low volume and mainly alkaline composition - facts that are not entirely consistent with the hypothesis of magmatic underplating. Regardless the validity of this hypothesis, Cenozoic-to-present events in BP might be somewhat associated with imbalances in lithosphere-asthenospheric mantle and/or crust-lithospheric mantle systems. The existence of free-air anomalies showing no null integral over area and of an expressive positive geoid anomaly are geophysical evidences of these imbalances. Possibly, the Borborema Plateau is still suffering epeirogenesis. Post-depositional deformation found in Barreiras Formation strata, Late Quaternay fault reactivations, and AFT thermochronology analysis suggesting the existence of a cooling stage between 20 and 0 Ma might be geologic evidences of the continued action of epeirogenesis until the present. In addition, the relatively high level of the present intraplate seismicity recorded in several regions of the BP is another unequivocal geophysical evidence that the crust of the province is still submitted to accommodation processes.

  10. AIAA 2004-4053 Volume-to-Surface Transformations of

    E-print Network

    Flandro, Gary A.

    -4344. Propulsion Conference and Exhibit 11­14 July 2004 Fort Lauderdale, FL 40th AIAA/ASME/SAE/ASEE Joint Tullahoma pressure amplitude ( )r bA = burning surface admittance ( )r SA = inert surface admittance ( )r NA = nozzle

  11. Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier-transform infrared spectromicroscopy for characterization of the protein/peptide distribution in single microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Manli; Lu, Xiaolong; Yin, Xianzhen; Tong, Yajun; Peng, Weiwei; Wu, Li; Li, Haiyan; Yang, Yan; Gu, Jingkai; Xiao, Tiqiao; Chen, Min; Zhang, Jiwen

    2015-01-01

    The present study establishes a visualization method for the measurement of the distribution and localization of protein/peptide constituents within a single poly-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) microsphere using synchrotron radiation–based Fourier-transform infrared spectromicroscopy (SR-FTIR). The representative infrared wavenumbers specific for protein/peptide (Exenatide) and excipient (PLGA) were identified and chemical maps at the single microsphere level were generated by measuring and plotting the intensity of these specific bands. For quantitative analysis of the distribution within microspheres, Matlab software was used to transform the map file into a 3D matrix and the matrix values specific for the drug and excipient were extracted. Comparison of the normalized SR-FTIR maps of PLGA and Exenatide indicated that PLGA was uniformly distributed, while Exenatide was relatively non-uniformly distributed in the microspheres. In conclusion, SR-FTIR is a rapid, nondestructive and sensitive detection technology to provide the distribution of chemical constituents and functional groups in microparticles and microspheres. PMID:26579456

  12. Purification and characterization of paralytic shellfish toxin-transforming enzyme, sulfocarbamoylase I, from the Japanese bivalve Peronidia venulosa.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yuko; Ogawa, Noriyuki; Takahashi, Miyako; Lin, Hsi-Pin; Oshima, Yasukatsu

    2008-09-01

    The Japanese bivalve Peronidia venulosa contains paralytic shellfish toxin (PST)-transforming enzymes that convert the weakly toxic C-toxins to the more potent decarbamoyl toxins. The enzyme was purified 154-fold with a yield of 0.26% and was named sulfocarbamoylase I. It was found to be a protein with an estimated molecular weight of 300 kDa by gel filtration column chromatography. Observation of a single band equivalent to 150 kDa on SDS-PAGE with or without reducing agents suggested it to be a homodimer with ionically bound subunits. The enzyme catalyzes the hydrolysis of the carboxyl bond in the N-sulfocarbamoyl moiety of PSP-toxins. The sulfonyl moiety in the carbamoyl side chain of substrates is essential for enzyme recognition. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of nine tryptic peptides were determined by the Edman degradation method. In a database search using the BLAST program, no protein that shows remarkable homology was retrieved. Several characteristics of the enzyme were also compared with those of another PST-transforming enzyme, carbamoylase I, which was previously isolated from the Japanese clam Mactra chinensis. PMID:18599388

  13. Genetic transformation, recovery, and characterization of fertile soybean transgenic for a synthetic Bacillus thuringiensis cryIAc gene.

    PubMed

    Stewart, C N; Adang, M J; All, J N; Boerma, H R; Cardineau, G; Tucker, D; Parrott, W A

    1996-09-01

    Somatic embryos of jack, a Glycine max (L.) Merrill cultivar, were transformed using microprojectile bombardment with a synthetic Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal crystal protein gene (Bt cryIAc) driven by the 35S promoter and linked to the HPH gene. Approximately 10 g of tissue was bombarded, and three transgenic lines were selected on hygromycin-containing media and converted into plants. The recovered lines contained the HPH gene, but the Bt gene was lost in one line. The plasmid was rearranged in the second line, and the third line had two copies, one of which was rear-ranged. The CryIAc protein accumulated up to 46 ng mg-1 extractable protein. In detached-leaf bioassays, plants with an intact copy of the Bt gene, and to a lesser extent those with the rearranged copy, were protected from damage from corn earworm (Helicoverpa zea), soybean looper (Pseudoplusia includens), tobacco budworm (Heliothis virescens), and velvetbean caterpillar (Anticarsia gemmatalis). Corn earworm produced less than 3% defoliation on transgenic plants, compared with 20% on the lepidopteran-resistant breeding line GatIR81-296, and more than 40% on susceptible cultivars. Unlike previous reports of soybean transformation using this technique, all plants were fertile. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a soybean transgenic for a highly expressed insecticidal gene. PMID:8819322

  14. Characterization of transforming growth factor beta superfamily, growth factors, transcriptional factors, and lipopolysaccharide in bovine cystic ovarian follicles.

    PubMed

    Polat, I M; Alçi?ir, E; Pekcan, M; Vural, S A; Özenç, E; Canatan, H E; Küplülü, ?; Dal, G E; Yazlik, M O; Baklaci, C; Vural, M R

    2015-10-01

    The process of transformation of growing bovine follicles into cysts is still a mystery. Local expression of proteins or factors, including transforming growth factor ?, growth factors, and transcription factors, plays a central role in mammals. Therefore, in abattoir-derived cystic ovarian follicles and follicular fluid, the role of some transforming growth factor ? superfamily proteins, insulinlike growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and GATA-4 and GATA-6, were investigated. The relationship between intrafollicular lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and etiopathogenesis of ovarian cysts was also assessed. Data on the preovulatory follicle and the largest follicle (F1) were compared. The number of intrafollicular LPS-positive samples and LPS concentrations were higher in cysts. Immunohistochemical staining was mildly positive for IGF-1, inhibin alpha, and GATA-4 in thecal cells. Staining for anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH), growth differentiation factor-9, bone morphogenetic protein-6 (BMP-6), and GATA-6 was insufficient for their quantitation, and oocytes could not be stained for any of the proteins tested in the cystic follicles. Expression of BMP-6, inhibin alpha, and IGF-1 was moderately higher in granulosa cells of F1 follicles, and all the proteins were moderately expressed in granulosa cells in preovulatory follicles. However, loss of GATA-6 staining was significant in F1 follicles. Intrafollicular progesterone, IGF-1, and AMH concentrations in cysts and F1 follicles were significantly higher than those in preovulatory follicles. Western blot analyses revealed that follicular fluid inhibin-? was strongly expressed, whereas expression of growth differentiation factor-9, BMP-6, GATA-4 and GATA-6 was lower in cysts than in preovulatory follicles. Also, high intrafollicular AMH concentration and low BMP-6 expression were closely associated with cystic degeneration and atresia. In conclusion, immunohistochemical loss of BMP-6 and GATA-6 in the granulosa cells together with high intrafollicular LPS levels may play important roles in disruption of the ovulatory mechanism and steroidogenic reactions in type 2 cyst. Also, high intrafollicular AMH concentration along with low BMP-6 expression may be used as indicators of the bovine degenarative ovarian follicles. PMID:26166168

  15. Characterizing a large shear-zone with seismic and magnetotelluric methods: The case of the Dead Sea Transform

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maercklin, N.; Bedrosian, P.A.; Haberland, C.; Ritter, O.; Ryberg, T.; Weber, M.; Weckmann, U.

    2005-01-01

    Seismic tomography, imaging of seismic scatterers, and magnetotelluric soundings reveal a sharp lithologic contrast along a ???10 km long segment of the Arava Fault (AF), a prominent fault of the southern Dead Sea Transform (DST) in the Middle East. Low seismic velocities and resistivities occur on its western side and higher values east of it, and the boundary between the two units coincides partly with a seismic scattering image. At 1-4 km depth the boundary is offset to the east of the AF surface trace, suggesting that at least two fault strands exist, and that slip occurred on multiple strands throughout the margin's history. A westward fault jump, possibly associated with straightening of a fault bend, explains both our observations and the narrow fault zone observed by others. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Characterization of plasmonic hole arrays as transparent electrical contacts for organic photovoltaics using high-brightness Fourier transform methods

    PubMed Central

    Camino, Fernando E.; Nam, Chang-Yong; Pang, Yutong T.; Hoy, Jessica; Eisaman, Matthew D.; Black, Charles T.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.

    2014-01-01

    We present a methodology for probing light-matter interactions in prototype photovoltaic devices consisting of an organic semiconductor active layer with a semitransparent metal electrical contact exhibiting surface plasmon-based enhanced optical transmission. We achieve high-spectral irradiance in a spot size of less than 100??m using a high-brightness laser-driven light source and appropriate coupling optics. Spatially resolved Fourier transform photocurrent spectroscopy in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions allows us to measure external quantum efficiency with high sensitivity in small-area devices (<1?mm2). This allows for rapid fabrication of variable-pitch sub-wavelength hole arrays in metal films for use as transparent electrical contacts, and evaluation of the evanescent and propagating mode coupling to resonances in the active layer. PMID:25705085

  17. Experimental geometry for simultaneous beam characterization and sample imaging allowing for pink beam Fourier transform holography or coherent diffractive imaging.

    PubMed

    Flewett, Samuel; Eisebitt, Stefan

    2011-02-20

    One consequence of the self-amplified stimulated emission process used to generate x rays in free electron lasers (FELs) is the intrinsic shot-to-shot variance in the wavelength and temporal coherence. In order to optimize the results from diffractive imaging experiments at FEL sources, it will be advantageous to acquire a means of collecting coherence and spectral information simultaneously with the diffraction pattern from the sample we wish to study. We present a holographic mask geometry, including a grating structure, which can be used to extract both temporal and spatial coherence information alongside the sample scatter from each individual FEL shot and also allows for the real space reconstruction of the sample using either Fourier transform holography or iterative phase retrieval. PMID:21343964

  18. Thermal behavior of silicone rubber-based ceramizable composites characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and microcalorimetry.

    PubMed

    Anyszka, Rafa?; Bieli?ski, Dariusz M; J?drzejczyk, Marcin

    2013-12-01

    Ceramizable (ceramifiable) silicone rubber-based composites are commonly used for cable insulation. These materials are able to create a protective ceramic layer during fire due to the ceramization process, which occurs at high temperature. When the temperature is increased, the polymer matrix is degraded and filler particles stick together by the fluxing agent, producing a solid, continuous ceramic phase that protects the copper wire from heat and mechanical stress. Despite increasing interest in these materials that has resulted in growing applications in the cable industry, their thermal behavior and ceramization process are still insufficiently described in the literature. In this paper, the thermal behavior of ceramizable silicone rubber-based composites is studied using microcalorimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The analysis of the experimental data made it possible to develop complete information on the mechanism of composite ceramization. PMID:24359658

  19. Characterization of hyaluronate binding proteins isolated from 3T3 and murine sarcoma virus transformed 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Turley, E.A.; Moore, D.; Hayden, L.J.

    1987-06-02

    A hyaluronic acid binding fraction was purified from the supernatant media of both 3T3 and murine sarcoma virus (MSV) transformed 3T3 cultures by hyaluronate and immunoaffinity chromatography. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis resolved the hyaluronate affinity-purified fraction into three major protein bands of estimated molecular weight (M/sub r,e/) 70K, 66K, and 56K which contained hyaluronate binding activity and which were termed hyaluronate binding proteins (HABP). Hyaluronate affinity chromatography combined with immunoaffinity chromatography, using antibody directed against the larger HABP, allowed a 20-fold purification of HABP. Fractions isolated from 3T3 supernatant medium also contained additional binding molecules in the molecular weight range of 20K. This material was present in vanishingly small amounts and was not detected with a silver stain or with (/sup 35/S)methionine label. The three protein species isolated by hyaluronate affinity chromatography (M/sub r,e/ 70K, 66K, and 56K) were related to one another since they shared antigenic determinants and exhibited similar pI values. In isocratic conditions, HABP occurred as aggregates of up to 580 kilodaltons. Their glycoprotein nature was indicated by their incorporation of /sup 3/H-sugars. Enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay showed they were antigenically distinct from other hyaluronate binding proteins such as fibronectin, cartilage link protein, and the hyaluronate binding region of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan. The results are discussed with regard both to the functional significance of hyaluronate-cell surface interactions in transformed as well as normal cells and to the relationship of HABP to other reported hyaluronate binding proteins.

  20. Weathering trend characterization of medium-molecular weight polycyclic aromatic disulfur heterocycles by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hegazi, Abdelrahman H; Fathalla, Eiman M; Andersson, Jan T

    2014-09-01

    Different weathering factors act to change petroleum composition once it is spilled into the environment. n-Alkanes, biomarkers, low-molecular weight polyaromatic hydrocarbons and sulfur heterocycles compositional changing in the environment have been extensively studied by different researchers and many parameters have been used for oil source identification and monitoring of weathering and biological degradation processes. In this work, we studied the fate of medium-molecular weight polycyclic aromatic disulfur heterocycles (PAS2Hs), up to ca. 900Da, of artificially weathered Flotta North Sea crude oil by ultra high-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. It was found that PAS2Hs in studied crude oil having double bond equivalents (DBE) from 5 to 8 with a mass range from ca 316 to 582Da were less influenced even after six months artificial weathering experiment. However, compounds having DBEs 12, 11 and 10 were depleted after two, four and six months weathering, respectively. In addition, DBE 9 series was more susceptible to weathering than those of DBE 7 and 8. PMID:24997927

  1. Characterization of the surfaces of platinum/tin oxide based catalysts by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keiser, Joseph T.; Upchurch, Billy T.

    1990-01-01

    A Pt/SnO2 catalyst has been developed at NASA Langley that is effective for the oxidation of CO at room temperature (1). A mechanism has been proposed to explain the effectiveness of this catalyst (2), but most of the species involved in this mechanism have not been observed under actual catalytic conditions. A number of these species are potentially detectable by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), e.g., HOSnO sub x, HO sub y PtO sub z, Pt-CO, and SnHCO3. Therefore a preliminary investigation was conducted to determine what might be learned about this particular catalyst by transmission FTIR. The main advantage of FTIR for this work is that the catalyst can be examined under conditions similar to the actual catalytic conditions. This can be of critical importance since some surface species may exist only when the reaction gases are present. Another advantage of the infrared approach is that since vibrations are probed, subtle chemical details may be obtained. The main disadvantage of this approach is that FTIR is not nearly as sensitive as the Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) surface analytical techniques such as Auger, Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA), Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS), etc. Another problem is that the assignment of the observed infrared bands may be difficult.

  2. Characterization of genuine and fake artesunate anti-malarial tablets using Fourier transform infrared imaging and spatially offset Raman spectroscopy through blister packs.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Camilla; Eliasson, Charlotte; Macleod, Neil A; Newton, Paul N; Matousek, Pavel; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2007-11-01

    In support of the efforts to combat the illegal sale and distribution of counterfeit anti-malarial drugs, we evaluated a new analytical approach for the characterization and fast screening of fake and genuine artesunate tablets using a combination of Raman spectroscopy, Spatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy (SORS) and Attenuated Total Reflection-Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) imaging. Vibrational spectroscopy provided chemically specific information on the composition of the tablets; the complementary nature of Raman scattering and FTIR imaging allowed the characterization of both the overall and surface composition of the tablets. The depth-resolving power of the SORS approach provided chemically specific information on the overall composition of the tablets, non-invasively, through a variety of packaging types. Spatial imaging of the tablet surface (using ATR-FTIR) identified the location of domains of excipients and active ingredients with high sensitivity and enhanced spatial resolution. The advantages provided by a combination of SORS and ATR-FTIR imaging in this context confirm its potential for inclusion in the analytical protocol for forensic investigation of counterfeit medicines. PMID:17879090

  3. Characterization and petrophysical properties of hydrothemally altered lacustrine volcanistic rock in Geyser Valley (Kamchatka) and its transformation by weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvozdeva, Irina; Zerkal, Oleg; Samarin, Evgeny

    2013-04-01

    Work is devoted to the study of volcano sedimentary hydrothermally altered rocks in Geyser Valley (Kamchatka peninsula, Russia). The Geyser Valley is one of the most unique nature objects in Russia. There are quite large geyser fields. The valley of the river is part of the Uson-Geysernaya depression, where hydrothermal activity is very high. Besides geysers here are hot springs, mud pots and fumarols. In the late Pleistocene (about 45-35 thousand years ago) the lake was located in the site of the modern valley of the Geysernaya river, where sediments accumulated intensively. Sedimentary material came from several sources in the form of pyroclastic flows, ash falls, was supplied by permanent and temporary water streams. The total deposit thickness reached several hundred meters. In the late Pleistocene there was breakthrough of reservoir and further conditions for the lacustrine deposits formation did not arose. Later the rocks were intensively processed by thermal water. In 2007 large landslide was formed in lower part of the Geysernaya River on their left slope. Deposits of Geysernaya (Q34grn) series and Pemsovaya (Q34pmz) series were involved in landslide displacement. The headscarp was formed up to 100 m and a length of 800 m, exposing the volcano-sedimentary section of hydrothermally altered rocks - a unique opportunity for sampling and subsequent laboratory study. Thickness of lake sediments is interbedding of coarse-grain, medium-grain, fine-grain tuffites predominantly acidic composition. The study of thin sections revealed that all samples are lithoclastic and vitroclastic hydrothermally altered tuffits. Currently, the primary minerals and volcanic glass is largely replaced by clay minerals of the smectite group. Pores and cracks are made zeolites (heulandite and clinoptilolite). All this points to the low-temperature (<200 ° C) hydrothermal conditions with a pH near neutral. Tyere are acid plagioclase and quartz in most samples The high content of smectite causes high hygroscopy of deposits. Rocks are highly porous - of 37-65%, primarily low density - 0,9-1,65 g/cm3 wave velocities - from 0.74 km/s for porous to 3.42 km/sec for dense varieties. All samples are characterized by low strength characteristics: uniaxial compressive strength - 1.2 - 21.7 MPa, uniaxial tension - 0,6-4,7 MPa. By water saturation strength decreases rapidly. Soft coefficient ranges from 0.22 to 0.57. Proving to be on the land surface as a result of slope deformation, volcanic-sedimentary hydrothermally altered rocks are destroyed quickly by precipitation and temperature fluctuations Rock turned to sand, silt and clay depending on the original composition. It was found that often weathered to clayey state tuffites inherit structural and textural features of the primary species. The composition also varies: increased content of clay minerals (to 90%), decreasing the content of zeolites (not to exceed 10%). Quartz and plagioclase form sans fraction. Physical and mechanical properties vary widely: the density of the soil increases slightly up to 1,57-1,59 g/cm3 for sands, 1,2-1,79 g/cm3 for clays, porosity of 51-52% and 49-78% respectively, moisture 22-23% and 43-98/ Clays are in a state of semi-solid to fluid. The high content of smectite determines high plastic properties. Plasticity Index varies widely from 11 to 57. Cohesion and the internal friction angle obtained from shear tests also change widely. For clayey sand grip reaches 137 kPa, internal friction angle - 17 degrees. In clay grip ranges from 13 kPa to 120 kPa, and the internal friction angle - from 11 degrees to 31 degrees. Large variation of properties of the investigated soils is explained by the inhomogeneity of volcano-sedimentary formations both vertically and laterally, varying degrees of hydrothermal alteration and of weathering, fracturing and cracks filling The obtained datas can adequately characterize the volcanic-lacustrine sediments in the valley of the Geysernaya river and use them in calculations of slope stability and for and geological mapping.

  4. Appell Transformation and Canonical Transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torre, Amalia

    2011-07-01

    The interpretation of the optical Appell transformation, as previously elaborated in relation to the free-space paraxial propagation under both a rectangular and a circular cylindrical symmetry, is reviewed. Then, the caloric Appell transformation, well known in the theory of heat equation, is shown to be amenable for a similar interpretation involving the Laplace transform rather than the Fourier transform, when dealing with the 1D heat equation. Accordingly, when considering the radial heat equation, suitably defined Hankel-type transforms come to be involved in the inherent Appell transformation. The analysis is aimed at outlining the link between the Appell transformation and the canonical transforms.

  5. Characterization of organic composition in snow and surface waters in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region, using ultrahigh resolution Fourier transform mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yi, Y; Birks, S J; Cho, S; Gibson, J J

    2015-06-15

    This study was conducted to characterize the composition of dissolved organic compounds present in snow and surface waters in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region (AOSR) with the goal of identifying whether atmospherically-derived organic compounds present in snow are a significant contributor to the compounds detected in surface waters (i.e., rivers and lakes). We used electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI-FTICR MS) to characterize the dissolved organic compound compositions of snow and surface water samples. The organic profiles obtained for the snow samples show compositional differences between samples from near-field sites (<5 km from oil sands activities) and those from more distant locations (i.e., far-field sites). There are also significant compositional differences between samples collected in near-field sites and surface water samples in the AOSR. The composition of dissolved organic compounds at the upstream Athabasca River site (i.e., Athabasca River at Athabasca) is found to be different from samples obtained from downstream sites in the vicinity of oil sands operations (i.e., Athabasca River at Fort McMurray and Athabasca River at Firebag confluence). The upstream Athabasca River sites tended to share some compositional similarities with far-field snow deposition, while the downstream Athabasca River sites are more similar to local lakes and tributaries. This contrast likely indicates the relative role of regional snowmelt contributions to the Athabasca River vs inputs from local catchments in the reach downstream of Fort McMurray. PMID:25747374

  6. Chemical synthesis in protein engineering: total synthesis, purification and covalent structural characterization of a mitogenic protein, human transforming growth factor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Woo, D D; Clark-Lewis, I; Chait, B T; Kent, S B

    1989-10-01

    Successful approaches to protein engineering required that the desired analogs be easily and rapidly obtained in sufficient quantities and purities for unambiguous structural and functional characterizations. Chemical synthesis is the method of choice for engineering small peptides. We now demonstrate that with improved methodologies and instrumentation, total chemical synthesis can be used to produce a small protein in a form suitable for engineering studies. Active human transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha), a 50 amino acid long protein with three disulfide bonds, has been synthesized and purified in multiple tens of mg amounts in less than 7 days. The purified human TGF-alpha migrated as a single band on SDS-polyacrylamide gels, ran as a single sharp major band at pI = 6.2 on isoelectric focusing gels, displayed an MW = 5546.2 (Th.5546.3) by mass spectrometry, contained three disulfide bonds and had EGF receptor binding, mitogenic and soft agar colony formation activities. The locations of disulfide bonds were found to be analogous to those found in epidermal growth factor (EGF) and in human TGF-alpha expressed in bacteria. PMID:2813340

  7. Comparing Laser Desorption Ionization and Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization Coupled to Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry To Characterize Shale Oils at the Molecular Level

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cho, Yunjo; Jin, Jang Mi; Witt, Matthias; Birdwell, Justin E.; Na, Jeong-Geol; Roh, Nam-Sun; Kim, Sunghwan

    2013-01-01

    Laser desorption ionization (LDI) coupled to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) was used to analyze shale oils. Previous work showed that LDI is a sensitive ionization technique for assessing aromatic nitrogen compounds, and oils generated from Green River Formation oil shales are well-documented as being rich in nitrogen. The data presented here demonstrate that LDI is effective in ionizing high-double-bond-equivalent (DBE) compounds and, therefore, is a suitable method for characterizing compounds with condensed structures. Additionally, LDI generates radical cations and protonated ions concurrently, the distribution of which depends upon the molecular structures and elemental compositions, and the basicity of compounds is closely related to the generation of protonated ions. This study demonstrates that LDI FT-ICR MS is an effective ionization technique for use in the study of shale oils at the molecular level. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that LDI FT-ICR MS has been applied to shale oils.

  8. Structural characterization of arginine-vasopressin and lysine-vasopressin by Fourier- transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry and infrared multiphoton dissociation.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Giuliana; Battista, Fabio; Buchicchio, Alessandro; Amarena, Concetta G; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Guerrieri, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Arginine-vasopressin (AVP) and lysine-vasopressin (LVP) were analyzed by reversed-phase liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC-MS) using Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry (MS) electrospray ionization (ESI) in the positive ion mode. LVP and AVP exhibited the protonated adduct [M+H](+) as the predominant ion at m/z 1056.43965 and at m/z 1084.44561, respectively. Infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD), using a CO(2) laser source at a wavelength of 10.6 ?m, was applied to protonated vasopressin molecules. The IRMPD mass spectra presented abundant mass fragments essential for a complete structural information. Several fragment ions, shared between two target molecules, are discussed in detail. Some previously unpublished fragments were identified unambiguously utilizing the high resolution and accurate mass information provided by the FT-ICR mass spectrometer. The opening of the disulfide loop and the cleavage of the peptide bonds within the ring were observed even under low-energy fragmentation conditions. Coupling the high-performance FT-ICR mass spectrometer with IRMPD as a contemporary fragmentation technique proved to be very promising for the structural characterization of vasopressin. PMID:26307701

  9. A Molecular-level Approach for Characterizing Water-insoluble Components of Organic Aerosols Using Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priest, A. S.; Wozniak, A. S.; Hatcher, P. G.

    2011-12-01

    There is strong evidence that suggests emissions from human activities have played a substantial role in changing the chemical composition of the atmosphere, resulting in negative effects on climate and human and environmental health. Theory suggests that the molecular composition of organic aerosols plays a role in the specific impacts; however, due to the lack of suitable analytical methods for characterizing the inherently complex aerosol organic matter (OM), our molecular level understanding of the nature and reactivity of this material has been limited. Ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry has provided molecular formula information for thousands of species present in the water-soluble fraction of organic aerosols. However, fewer studies have examined the water-insoluble fraction, which typically accounts for 30-70% of aerosol OM. Here we employ pyridine, with its high solvating power for natural OM, as a suitable solvent for examining the water-insoluble fraction of field-collected organic aerosols using ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry. The molecular composition of the water-soluble organic matter (WSOM) and pyridine-soluble organic matter (PSOM) of organic aerosols was evaluated using negative ion mode electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR MS). Ambient aerosol samples were collected from rural sites in New York and Virginia in 2007. The mass spectral distribution of the ions detected using ESI FT-ICR MS allowed for the determination of molecular formulas for the thousands of peaks detected in each extract. Approximately 40% of the aerosol OM was WSOM, and the spectra were dominated by compounds with only carbon, hydrogen and oxygen (~45% of assigned formulas), with relatively smaller contributions from nitrogen- and sulfur-containing formulas. Pyridine, on the other hand, extracts a molecularly unique portion of aerosol OM. Approximately 25% of the formulas are unique to PSOM, and the remainder is common with WSOM. PSOM extracts are characterized by compounds that are relatively more aliphatic (higher H/C) and those that contain sulfur in their elemental formula. Up to 60% of the assigned molecular formulas contain one or more sulfur atom and these are likely organosulfates. The molecular information gained by the analysis of PSOM improves our understanding of the nature and reactivity of the water-insoluble compounds present in organic aerosols and may provide insight to the sources and environmentally relevant properties.

  10. Characterization of skin abnormalities in a mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta using high resolution magnetic resonance imaging and Fourier transform infrared imaging spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Canuto, H C; Fishbein, K W; Huang, A; Doty, S B; Herbert, R A; Peckham, J; Pleshko, N; Spencer, R G

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation of the skin phenotype in osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) typically involves biochemical measurements, such as histologic or biochemical assessment of the collagen produced from biopsy-derived dermal fibroblasts. As an alternative, the current study utilized non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) microscopy and optical spectroscopy to define biophysical characteristics of skin in an animal model of OI. MRI of skin harvested from control, homozygous oim/oim and heterozygous oim/+ mice demonstrated several differences in anatomic and biophysical properties. Fourier transform infrared imaging spectroscopy (FT-IRIS) was used to interpret observed MRI signal characteristics in terms of chemical composition. Differences between wild-type and OI mouse skin included the appearance of a collagen-depleted lower dermal layer containing prominent hair follicles in the oim/oim mice, accounting for 55% of skin thickness in these. The MRI magnetization transfer rate was lower by 50% in this layer as compared to the upper dermis, consistent with lower collagen content. The MRI transverse relaxation time, T2, was greater by 30% in the dermis of the oim/oim mice compared to controls, consistent with a more highly hydrated collagen network. Similarly, an FT-IRIS-defined measure of collagen integrity was 30% lower in the oim/oim mice. We conclude that characterization of phenotypic differences between the skin of OI and wild-type mice by MRI and FT-IRIS is feasible, and that these techniques provide powerful complementary approaches for the analysis of the skin phenotype in animal models of disease. PMID:21845737

  11. Optical characterization of free electron concentration in heteroepitaxial InN layers using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and a 2 Multiplication-Sign 2 transfer-matrix algebra

    SciTech Connect

    Katsidis, C. C.; Ajagunna, A. O.; Georgakilas, A.

    2013-02-21

    Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) reflectance spectroscopy has been implemented as a non-destructive, non-invasive, tool for the optical characterization of a set of c-plane InN single heteroepitaxial layers spanning a wide range of thicknesses (30-2000 nm). The c-plane (0001) InN epilayers were grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) on GaN(0001) buffer layers which had been grown on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) substrates. It is shown that for arbitrary multilayers with homogeneous anisotropic layers having their principal axes coincident with the laboratory coordinates, a 2 Multiplication-Sign 2 matrix algebra based on a general transfer-matrix method (GTMM) is adequate to interpret their optical response. Analysis of optical reflectance in the far and mid infrared spectral range has been found capable to discriminate between the bulk, the surface and interface contributions of free carriers in the InN epilayers revealing the existence of electron accumulation layers with carrier concentrations in mid 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} at both the InN surface and the InN/GaN interface. The spectra could be fitted with a three-layer model, determining the different electron concentration and mobility values of the bulk and of the surface and the interface electron accumulation layers in the InN films. The variation of these values with increasing InN thickness could be also sensitively detected by the optical measurements. The comparison between the optically determined drift mobility and the Hall mobility of the thickest sample reveals a value of r{sub H} = 1.49 for the Hall factor of InN at a carrier concentration of 1.11 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} at 300 Degree-Sign {Kappa}.

  12. Transformational Grammar and Cognitive Psycholinguistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, Mark

    1973-01-01

    An overview of Noam Chomsky's theories about transformational grammar and phonology is given. Since Chomsky was interested in characterizing what it is to know a language, the ways in which we demonstrate knowledge of our native language are discussed in detail. Particular emphasis is placed on describing how the transformational approach actually…

  13. CHARACTERIZATION OF PCB (POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYL) TRANSFORMER/CAPACITOR FLUIDS AND CORRELATION WITH PCDDS (POLYCHLORINATED DIBENZO-P-DIOXINS) AND PCDFS (POLYCHLORINATED DIBENZOFURANS) IN SOOT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dielectric fluids in transformers and capacitors often contain polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) or chlorobenzenes. These substances may generate polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) under certain conditions of combustion/pyrolysis. W...

  14. Transforming Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goens, George A.; Clover, Sharon I. R.

    1992-01-01

    Transforming the school as an organization requires change in all its components. More important, transformation connects the technical components with the human elements to create fundamental changes in the ways people perceive, think, and behave. With the community, a Wisconsin school board adopted a school district value statement to be used as…

  15. Reading Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Melinda

    2006-01-01

    The parents of students who attend Decatur High School thought that there was little hope of their kids going on to college. After a year or so in Decatur's reading program, their sons and daughters were both transformed and college bound. In this article, the author describes how Decatur was able to successfully transform their students. Seven…

  16. Transformational leadership.

    PubMed

    Luzinski, Craig

    2011-12-01

    This month, the director of the Magnet Recognition Program® takes an in-depth look at the Magnet® model component transformational leadership. The author examines the expectations for Magnet organizations around this component. What are the qualities that make a nursing leader truly transformational, and what is the best approach to successfully lead a healthcare organization through today's volatile healthcare environment? PMID:22094611

  17. Lightweight transformer

    SciTech Connect

    Swallom, D.W.; Enos, G.

    1990-05-01

    The technical effort described in this report relates to the program that was performed to design, fabricate, and test a lightweight transformer for Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) mission requirements. The objectives of this program were two-fold: (1) design and fabricate a lightweight transformer using liquid hydrogen as the coolant; and (2) test the completed transformer assembly with a low voltage, dc power source. Although the full power testing with liquid helium was not completed, the program demonstrated the viability of the design approach. The lightweight transformer was designed and fabricated, and low and moderate power testing was completed. The transformer is a liquid hydrogen cooled air core transformer that uses thin copper for its primary and secondary windings. The winding mass was approximately 12 kg, or 0.03 kg/kW. Further refinements of the design to a partial air core transformer could potentially reduce the winding mass to as low as 4 or 5 kg, or 0.0125 kg/kW. No attempt was made on this program to reduce the mass of the related structural components or cryogenic container. 8 refs., 39 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Organelle transformation.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Anjanabha; Kumar, Anish; Desai, Nirali; Parikh, Seema

    2012-01-01

    The source of genetic information in a plant cell is contained in nucleus, plastids, and mitochondria. Organelle transformation is getting a lot of attention nowadays because of its superior performance over the conventional and most commonly used nuclear transformation for obtaining transgenic lines. Absence of gene silencing, strong predictable transgene expression, and its application in molecular pharming, both in pharmaceutical and nutraceuticals, are some of many advantages. Other important benefits of utilizing this technology include the absence of transgene flow, as organelles are maternally inherited. This may increase the acceptability of organelle transformation technology in the development of transgenic crops in a wider scale all over the globe. As the need for crop productivity and therapeutic compounds increases, organelle transformation may be able to bridge the gap, thereby having a definite promise for the future. PMID:22610643

  19. Transformative copy

    E-print Network

    Offenhuber, Dietmar

    2008-01-01

    The ability to create an unlimited number of identical copies is a privilege of digital documents. What if that would not be the case, if each copy of a digital file would go along with some sort of transformation? This ...

  20. FOURIER TRANSFORM INFRARED PHOTOACOUSTIC SPECTROSCOPY CHARACTERIZATION OF SULFUR-OXYGEN SPECIES RESULTING FROM THE REACTION OF SO2 WITH CAO AND CACO3

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy (FTIR-PAS) has been used to investigate the reaction of SO2 in He with CaO and CaCO3 particles at temperatures between 25 and 900 C. SO2 reacts with CaC at 25 C, while the reaction of Ca-CO3 with SO2 is first evident at 550 C ...

  1. Isolation and Characterization of Human Intestinal Bacteria Capable of Transforming the Dietary Carcinogen 2-Amino-1-Methyl-6-Phenylimidazo[4,5-b]Pyridine?

    PubMed Central

    Vanhaecke, Lynn; Vercruysse, Filip; Boon, Nico; Verstraete, Willy; Cleenwerck, Ilse; De Wachter, Marjan; De Vos, Paul; van de Wiele, Tom

    2008-01-01

    2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) is a carcinogenic heterocyclic aromatic amine formed in meat products during cooking. Although the formation of hazardous PhIP metabolites by mammalian enzymes has been extensively reported, research on the putative involvement of the human intestinal microbiota in PhIP metabolism remains scarce. In this study, the in vitro conversion of PhIP into its microbial derivate, 7-hydroxy-5-methyl-3-phenyl-6,7,8,9-tetrahydropyrido[3?,2?:4,5]imidazo[1,2-a]pyrimidin-5-ium chloride (PhIP-M1), by fecal samples from 18 human volunteers was investigated. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis showed that all human fecal samples transformed PhIP but with efficiencies ranging from 1.8 to 96% after 72 h of incubation. Two PhIP-transforming strains, PhIP-M1-a and PhIP-M1-b, were isolated from human feces and identified by fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism and pheS sequence analyses as Enterococcus faecium strains. Some strains from culture collections belonging to the species E. durans, E. avium, E. faecium, and Lactobacillus reuteri were also able to perform this transformation. Yeast extract, special peptone, and meat extract supported PhIP transformation by the enriched E. faecium strains, while tryptone, monomeric sugars, starch, and cellulose did not. Glycerol was identified as a fecal matrix constituent required for PhIP transformation. Abiotic synthesis of PhIP-M1 and quantification of the glycerol metabolite 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde (3-HPA) confirmed that the anaerobic fermentation of glycerol via 3-HPA is the critical bacterial transformation process responsible for the formation of PhIP-M1. Whether it is a detoxification is still a matter of debate, since PhIP-M1 has been shown to be cytotoxic toward Caco-2 cells but is not mutagenic in the Ames assay. PMID:18192423

  2. Establishment and characterization of equine fibroblast cell lines transformed in vivo and in vitro by BPV-1: Model systems for equine sarcoids

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Z.Q.; Gault, E.A.; Gobeil, P.; Nixon, C.; Campo, M.S.; Nasir, L.

    2008-04-10

    It is now widely recognized that BPV-1 and less commonly BPV-2 are the causative agents of equine sarcoids. Here we present the generation of equine cell lines harboring BPV-1 genomes and expressing viral genes. These lines have been either explanted from sarcoid biopsies or generated in vitro by transfection of primary fibroblasts with BPV-1 DNA. Previously detected BPV-1 genome variations in equine sarcoids are also found in sarcoid cell lines, and only variant BPV-1 genomes can transform equine cells. These equine cell lines are morphologically transformed, proliferate faster than parental cells, have an extended life span and can grow independently of substrate. These characteristics are more marked the higher the level of viral E5, E6 and E7 gene expression. These findings confirm that the virus has an active role in the induction of sarcoids and the lines will be invaluable for further studies on the role of BPV-1 in sarcoid pathology.

  3. Characterizing kinetics of transport and transformation of selenium in water-sediment microcosm free from selenium contamination using a simple mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Fujita, M; Ike, M; Hashimoto, R; Nakagawa, T; Yamaguchi, K; Soda, S O

    2005-02-01

    This study developed a seven-compartment model for predicting the fate of selenium (Se) in an aquatic environment containing a water-sediment boundary. Speciation of Se in water-sediment microcosms under microaerobic conditions was measured to evaluate first-order kinetics of Se transportation and transformation. The microcosm consisted of a 10-ml solution containing 1mM soluble Se as selenate (Se6+) or selenite (Se4+) and 8 g wet sediment that was free from Se contamination, sampled from the Senri, Yamato, or Yodo Rivers in Osaka, Japan. Stepwise reaction coefficients describing transportation and transformation were determined using an inverse method on this model which includes: selenate (Se(W)6+) and selenite (Se(W)4+) in ponded water; selenate (Se(S)6+) and selenite (Se(S)4+), elemental Se (Se0), organic Se (Se2-) in sediment; and gaseous Se (DMSe). During this 1-month experiment, soluble Se was transported from ponded water to the sediment and Se was transformed sequentially to other Se species through biochemical reactions. Experimental and kinetic analyses indicated quantitatively that the Yamato River microcosm, with its high organic matter content, had a high adsorption rate of soluble Se. The Yodo River microcosm had a low adsorption rate for Se6+ and a low Se reduction rate. The Senri River microcosm had an apparent high volatilization rate of DMSe. The model developed in this study is extremely useful for predicting fate of Se in aquatic environment in the field. PMID:15621184

  4. Subsurface characterization of an oxidation-induced phase transformation and twinning in nickel-based superalloy exposed to oxy-combustion environments

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Jingxi; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Jablonski, Paul D.; Wise, Adam; Li, Jia; Laughlin, David E.; Sridhar, Seetharaman

    2012-07-30

    In the integration of oxy-fuel combustion to turbine power generation system, turbine alloys are exposed to high temperature and an atmosphere comprised of steam, CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. While surface and internal oxidation of the alloy takes place, the microstructure in the subsurface region also changes due to oxidation. In this study, bare metal coupons of Ni-base superalloys were exposed in oxy-fuel combustion environment for up to 1000 h and the oxidation-related microstructures were examined. Phase transformation occurred in the subsurface region in Ni-based superalloy and led to twinning. The transformation product phases were analyzed through thermodynamic equilibrium calculations and various electron microscopy techniques, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), orientation imaging microscopy (OIM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The mechanism by which the phase transformation and the formation of the microstructure occurred was also discussed. The possible effects of the product phases on the performance of the alloy in service were discussed.

  5. Fourier Transform Pairs The Fourier transform transforms a function of

    E-print Network

    Masci, Frank

    Fourier Transform Pairs The Fourier transform transforms a function of time, f(t), into a function of frequency, F(s): F {f(t)}(s) = F(s) = Z - f(t)e- j2st dt. The inverse Fourier transform transforms a func. The inverse Fourier transform of the Fourier trans- form is the identity transform: f(t) = Z - Z - f()e- j2s

  6. Light-induced catalytic transformation of ofloxacin by solar Fenton in various water matrices at a pilot plant: mineralization and characterization of major intermediate products.

    PubMed

    Michael, I; Hapeshi, E; Aceña, J; Perez, S; Petrovi?, M; Zapata, A; Barceló, D; Malato, S; Fatta-Kassinos, D

    2013-09-01

    This work investigated the application of a solar driven advanced oxidation process (solar Fenton), for the degradation of the antibiotic ofloxacin (OFX) in various environmental matrices at a pilot-scale. All experiments were carried out in a compound parabolic collector pilot plant in the presence of doses of H2O2 (2.5 mg L(-1)) and at an initial Fe(2+) concentration of 2 mg L(-1). The water matrices used for the solar Fenton experiments were: demineralized water (DW), simulated natural freshwater (SW), simulated effluent from municipal wastewater treatment plant (SWW) and pre-treated real effluent from municipal wastewater treatment plant (RE) to which OFX had been spiked at 10 mg L(-1). Dissolved organic carbon removal was found to be dependent on the chemical composition of the water matrix. OFX mineralization was higher in DW (78.1%) than in SW (58.3%) at 12 mg L(-1) of H2O2 consumption, implying the complexation of iron or the scavenging of hydroxyl radicals by the inorganic ions present in SW. On the other hand, the presence of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in SWW and RE, led to lower mineralization per dose of H2O2 compared to DW and SW. The major transformation products (TPs) formed during the solar Fenton treatment of OFX, were elucidated using liquid chromatography-time of flight-mass spectrometry (LC-ToF-MS). The transformation of OFX proceeded through a defluorination reaction, accompanied by some degree of piperazine and quinolone substituent transformation while a hydroxylation mechanism occurred by attack of the hydroxyl radicals generated during the process leading to the formation of TPs in all the water matrices, seven of which were tentatively identified. The results obtained from the toxicity bioassays indicated that the toxicity originates from the DOM present in RE and its oxidation products formed during the photocatalytic treatment and not from the TPs resulted from the oxidation of OFX. PMID:23712114

  7. Transformative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popham, W. James

    2008-01-01

    If you're at all skeptical that "formative assessment" is just another buzzword, then here's a book that will change the way you think about the role that formative assessment can play in transforming education into a more powerful and positive process. Renowned expert W. James Popham clarifies what formative assessment really is, why it's right…

  8. Transformation & Metamorphosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lott, Debra

    2009-01-01

    The sculptures of Canadian artist Brian Jungen are a great inspiration for a lesson on creating new forms. Jungen transforms found objects into unique creations without fully concealing their original form or purpose. Frank Stella's sculpture series, including "K.132,2007" made of stainless steel and spray paint, is another great example of…

  9. Recent advances in transformation optics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongmin; Zhang, Xiang

    2012-09-01

    Within the past a few years, transformation optics has emerged as a new research area, since it provides a general methodology and design tool for manipulating electromagnetic waves in a prescribed manner. Using transformation optics, researchers have demonstrated a host of striking phenomena and devices; many of which were only thought possible in science fiction. In this paper, we review the most recent advances in transformation optics. We focus on the theory, design, fabrication and characterization of transformation devices such as the carpet cloak, "Janus" lens and plasmonic cloak at optical frequencies, which allow routing light at the nanoscale. We also provide an outlook of the challenges and future directions in this fascinating area of transformation optics. PMID:22847459

  10. Expression and Functional Characterization of the Agrobacterium VirB2 Amino Acid Substitution Variants in T-pilus Biogenesis, Virulence, and Transient Transformation Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hung-Yi; Chen, Chao-Ying; Lai, Erh-Min

    2014-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a phytopathogenic bacterium that causes crown gall disease by transferring transferred DNA (T-DNA) into the plant genome. The translocation process is mediated by the type IV secretion system (T4SS) consisting of the VirD4 coupling protein and 11 VirB proteins (VirB1 to VirB11). All VirB proteins are required for the production of T-pilus, which consists of processed VirB2 (T-pilin) and VirB5 as major and minor subunits, respectively. VirB2 is an essential component of T4SS, but the roles of VirB2 and the assembled T-pilus in Agrobacterium virulence and the T-DNA transfer process remain unknown. Here, we generated 34 VirB2 amino acid substitution variants to study the functions of VirB2 involved in VirB2 stability, extracellular VirB2/T-pilus production and virulence of A. tumefaciens. From the capacity for extracellular VirB2 production (ExB2+ or ExB2?) and tumorigenesis on tomato stems (Vir+ or Vir?), the mutants could be classified into three groups: ExB2?/Vir?, ExB2?/Vir+, and ExB2+/Vir+. We also confirmed by electron microscopy that five ExB2?/Vir+ mutants exhibited a wild-type level of virulence with their deficiency in T-pilus formation. Interestingly, although the five T-pilus?/Vir+ uncoupling mutants retained a wild-type level of tumorigenesis efficiency on tomato stems and/or potato tuber discs, their transient transformation efficiency in Arabidopsis seedlings was highly attenuated. In conclusion, we have provided evidence for a role of T-pilus in Agrobacterium transformation process and have identified the domains and amino acid residues critical for VirB2 stability, T-pilus biogenesis, tumorigenesis, and transient transformation efficiency. PMID:24971727

  11. Identification, structural characterization and transformations of the high-temperature Zn9-?Sb7 phase in the Zn-Sb system.

    PubMed

    He, Allan; Svitlyk, Volodymyr; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Mozharivskyj, Yurij

    2015-12-28

    The Zn9-?Sb7 phase has been identified via high-temperature powder diffraction studies. Zn9-?Sb7 adopts two modifications: an ? form stable between 514 °C and 539 °C and a Zn-poorer ? form stable from 539 °C till its melting temperature of 581 °C. The Zn9-?Sb7 structure was solved from the powder data using the simulated annealing approach. Both modifications adopt the same hexagonal structure (P6/mmm) but with slightly different lattice parameters. The ?-to-? transformation is abrupt and first-order in nature. The Zn atoms occupy the tetrahedral holes created by Sb atoms. The ideal Zn9Sb7 composition can be explained by its tendency to adopt a charge balance configuration. Out of 7 Sb atoms, 3 Sb atoms form dimers (Sb(2-) ions) and 4 Sb atoms are isolated (Sb(3-) ions), which require 9 Zn(2+) cations for charge neutrality. PMID:26585771

  12. Characterization of Japanese color sticks by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manso, M.; Valadas, S.; Pessanha, S.; Guilherme, A.; Queralt, I.; Candeias, A. E.; Carvalho, M. L.

    2010-04-01

    This work comprises the use of energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) techniques for the study of the composition of twentieth century traditional Japanese color sticks. By using the combination of analytical techniques it was possible to obtain information on inorganic and organic pigments, binders and fillers present in the sticks. The colorant materials identified in the sticks were zinc and titanium white, chrome yellow, yellow and red ochre, vermillion, alizarin, indigo, Prussian and synthetic ultramarine blue. The results also showed that calcite and barite were used as inorganic mineral fillers while Arabic gum was the medium used. EDXRF offered great potential for such investigations since it allowed the identification of the elements present in the sample preserving its integrity. However, this information alone was not enough to clearly identify some of the materials in study and therefore it was necessary to use XRD and FTIR techniques.

  13. Phase transformation and electronic structure characterization of LixFePO4 by ab-initio calculations and soft x-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yung Jui; Barbiellini, B.; Liu, Xiaosong; Qiao, Ruimin; Moritz, B.; Devereaux, T. P.; Lin, Hsin; Hussain, Zahid; Yang, Wanli; Bansil, A.

    2014-03-01

    Olivine-structured LixFePO4 with appropriate surface treatment is a battery cathode material with promising capacity, cost and safety specifications. Fe-L and O-K edge soft x-ray absorption and emission spectra directly probe the unoccupied and occupied electronic states in the vicinity the Fermi energy. We present a first principles calculation and a comparison with the spectra to investigate the electronic states of LixFePO4. Upon fully (de)lithiation, the redistributed unoccupied Fe-3d and O-2p states indicate the fingerprints of the two-phase transformation. The redox couple is pinned such that a single electron injection into the valence states is well separated from the top of O-2p valence states due to Coulomb repulsion. We further explore the surface properties and discuss their implications on the performance and optimization of LixFePO4. Work supported by the US DOE.

  14. Identification and initial characterization of a new low-molecular-weight virus-encoded T antigen in a line of simian virus 40-transformed cells.

    PubMed Central

    Spangler, G J; Griffin, J D; Rubin, H; Livingston, D M

    1980-01-01

    SV80 cells, a simian virus 40 (SV40)-transformed derivative of a strain of human fibroblasts, synthesize an 8-kilodalton anti-T reactive polypeptide in addition to large T and small t antigens. Although not observed during lytic infection carried out under a variety of conditions, an anti-T reactive molecule which comigrated with the SV80 8-kilodalton protein during sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was synthesized by one of five other SV40-transformed cell lines studied. The SV40 8-kilodalton protein was present in lysates of cells exposed to a brief pulse of radioactive methionine and did not accumulate during an extended chase period. This polypeptide could not by generated by mixing an unlabeled extract of SV80 cells with a labeled extract of infected monkey cells. The 8-kilodalton molecule reacts with antibody raised against homogeneous large T antigen, is present only in the cytoplasm, is not complexed with T, lacks DNA-binding properties, and is not phosphorylated. This protein could be translated in a cell-free system programmed by SV40-specific mRNA. At least two messenger species (approximately 19S and approximately 22S) directed its synthesis. Tryptic peptide analysis of [35S]methionine-labeled proteins demonstrated that the 8-kilodalton protein contains all eight of the common T/t peptides and one additional peptide not present in the maps of t or T. It lacks both of the t-unique peptides. The organization of the integrated viral sequences which encode this molecule was determined by restriction endonuclease analysis. In particular, SV80 cells contain at least two integrated SV40 genomes which are oriented in tandem, with an intervening cellular sequence.. Images PMID:6159482

  15. Genesis of a Cerium Oxide-Supported Gold Catalyst for CO Oxidation: Transformation of Mononuclear Gold Complexes into Clusters as Characterized by X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Guerrero, V.; Lobo-Lapidus, R; Gates, B

    2009-01-01

    CeO{sub 2}-supported mononuclear gold species synthesized from Au(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}(acac) catalyzed CO oxidation at 353 K, with a turnover frequency of 6.5 x 10{sup -3} molecules of CO (Au atom s){sup -1} at CO and O{sub 2} partial pressures of 1.0 and 0.5 kPa, respectively. As the catalyst functioned in a flow reactor, the activity increased markedly so that within about 10 h the conversion of CO had increased from about 1% to almost 100%. Activated catalyst samples were characterized by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and found to incorporate clusters of gold, which increased in size, undergoing reduction, with increasing time of operation. The X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectrum of the catalyst used for the longest period was indistinguishable from that characterizing gold foil. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure data characterizing the catalyst after the longest period of operation indicated the presence of clusters of approximately 30 Au atoms each, on average. The evidence that the catalytic activity increased as the clusters grew is contrasted with earlier reports pointing to increasing activity of supported gold clusters as they were made smallerin a cluster size range largely exceeding ours.

  16. Hamlet's Transformation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usher, P. D.

    1997-12-01

    William Shakespeare's Hamlet has much evidence to suggest that the Bard was aware of the cosmological models of his time, specifically the geocentric bounded Ptolemaic and Tychonic models, and the infinite Diggesian. Moreover, Shakespeare describes how the Ptolemaic model is to be transformed to the Diggesian. Hamlet's "transformation" is the reason that Claudius, who personifies the Ptolemaic model, summons Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, who personify the Tychonic. Pantometria, written by Leonard Digges and his son Thomas in 1571, contains the first technical use of the word "transformation." At age thirty, Thomas Digges went on to propose his Perfit Description, as alluded to in Act Five where Hamlet's age is given as thirty. In Act Five as well, the words "bore" and "arms" refer to Thomas' vocation as muster-master and his scientific interest in ballistics. England's leading astronomer was also the father of the poet whose encomium introduced the First Folio of 1623. His oldest child Dudley became a member of the Virginia Company and facilitated the writing of The Tempest. Taken as a whole, such manifold connections to Thomas Digges support Hotson's contention that Shakespeare knew the Digges family. Rosencrantz and Guildenstern in Hamlet bear Danish names because they personify the Danish model, while the king's name is latinized like that of Claudius Ptolemaeus. The reason Shakespeare anglicized "Amleth" to "Hamlet" was because he saw a parallel between Book Three of Saxo Grammaticus and the eventual triumph of the Diggesian model. But Shakespeare eschewed Book Four, creating this particular ending from an infinity of other possibilities because it "suited his purpose," viz. to celebrate the concept of a boundless universe of stars like the Sun.

  17. Rotary Transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLyman, Colonel Wm. T.

    1996-01-01

    None given. From first Par: Many spacecraft (S/C) and surface rovers require the transfer of signals and power across rotating interfaces. Science instruments, antennas and solar arrays are elements needing rotary power transfer for certain (S/C) configurations. Delivery of signal and power has mainly been done by using the simplest means, the slip ring approach. This approach, although simple, leaves debris generating noise over a period of time...The rotary transformer is a good alternative to slip rings for signal and power transfer.

  18. Pseudomorphic transformation of amorphous silica microtubes into mesoporous MCM-41 type silica tubes. Synthesis, characterization and surface functionalization with titania, vanadia and zirconia.

    PubMed

    Patzsch, Julia; Schneider, Jörg J

    2013-02-01

    Silica tubes with MCM-41 type mesostructures were successfully synthesized by a combination of the Stoeber process and a pseudomorphic transformation using electrospun macrosized polystyrene fibres as structure directing templates. Two different morphologies of mesoporous silica tubes are accessible with this method: a hollow morphology with tunable silica wall thickness and with a mesoporous silica shell structure and a core containing amorphous silica. All one dimensional tube like porous silica materials have a high specific surface area of approximately 1000 m(2) g(-1) with well-ordered hexagonal mesopores. Grafting of Ti, V and Zr metallocene dichloride molecular complexes has been employed resulting in the deposition of titanium-, vanadium-, zirconium-oxide in the interior of the silica tubes after ceramisation of the green body composites. The respective oxides were coated on top of the inner mesoporous silica surface of the tubes. Such silica based hybrids might be potential support materials in heterogeneous catalysis (e.g. vanadia) as well as interesting catalysts for photocatalysis (for TiO(2), ZrO(2)). All materials were characterised by X-ray diffraction (SAXS and XRD), nitrogen adsorption at 77 K, UV/VIS diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV-DRS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). PMID:23168912

  19. Structural characterization of the medfly hsp83 gene and functional analysis of its proximal promoter region in vivo by germ-line transformation.

    PubMed

    Theodoraki, Maria; Tatari, Marianthi; Chrysanthis, George; Zacharopoulou, Antigone; Mintzas, Anastassios C

    2008-01-01

    In order to define the regulatory elements responsible for the expression of the medfly hsp83 (Cchsp83) gene, we determined the sequence of a genomic region of the gene that included 3,536 bp upstream of the transcription initiation site, the first untranslated exon of 144 bp, a 275-bp intron, and 516 bp of the second coding exon. Structural analysis of the 5' flanking region revealed the presence of a typical TATA box, 28 bp upstream of the transcription start site, and seven putative heat shock elements (HSEs) further upstream. The 5' untranslated region of the Cchsp83 mRNA was found to contain extensive secondary structure in the first 126 nucleotides. We carried out deletion functional analysis of the proximal promoter region (-380/+139) in vivo by germ line transformation using the lacZ as a reporter gene. We found that sequences in the -380/-86 region are essential for the constitutive expression of the Cchsp83 gene. Under normal conditions, the -380/+139 region was able to drive significant levels of transgene expression in all developmental stages of the medfly as well as in the ovaries and testis. In most stages, the temporal expression pattern of the reporter gene was similar to the respective pattern of the endogenous Cchsp83 gene. Although the -380/+139 promoter region contained two putative HSEs, it was found unable to confer any heat-induced expression in the reporter gene. PMID:18064699

  20. Special Features of Admittance in Mis Structures Based on Graded-Gap MBE n-Hg1- x Cd x Te ( x = 0.31-0.32) in a Temperature Range OF 8-300 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voitsekhovskii, A. V.; Nesmelov, S. N.; Dzyadukh, S. M.; Vasil'ev, V. V.; Varavin, V. S.; Dvoretskii, S. A.; Mikhailov, N. N.; Kuz'min, V. D.; Remesnik, V. G.

    2014-09-01

    Admittance of MIS structures based on graded-gap n-Hg1- ? Cd ? Te ( x = 0.31-0.32) grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is investigated in a wide temperature range (8-300 K). It is shown that the temperature and frequency dependences of the differential resistance of space charge region for structures with a graded-gap layer are qualitatively similar to those for structures without a graded-gap layer. It is found that for MIS structures based on MBE n-Hg1- ? Cd ? Te ( x = 0.31-0.32), regardless of the presence of a graded-gap layer, the differential resistance of space charge region is limited by the processes of Shockley-Read generation in the temperature range of 25-100 K.

  1. Transformational leadership.

    PubMed

    Marlow, D L

    1996-01-01

    In these uncertain times in the healthcare industry, administrators are asked to do more with less time and resources. Because of the extended roles they are playing in today's organizations, radiology administrators are looked upon as agents of change. What leadership skills do they need in this turbulent and uncertain healthcare environment? What are the trait's of tomorrow's leaders? The transformational leader is the one who will guide us through this changing healthcare environment. Several behavioral patterns emerge as important traits for tomorrow's leaders to have-individual consideration, intellectual stimulation and charisma. Tomorrow's leader must view each person as an individual, showing genuine concern and belief in each person's ability to perform. Transformational leaders stimulate others by encouraging them to be curious and try new ideas. The final characteristic, charisma, is the ability to inspire others. Luckily, leaders are made, not born: today's leaders can learn to be responsive, to draw out new ideas from employees, and to communicate self-esteem, energy and enthusiasm. PMID:10163135

  2. Static Semantics as Program Transformation

    E-print Network

    Costantini, Stefania

    Static Semantics as Program Transformation and Well-Founded Computation Stefania Costantini,1. In this paper, we propose a new constructive characterization of those semantics for disjunctive logic programs which are extensions of the well-founded semantics for normal programs. Based on considera- tions about

  3. ATMOSPHERIC TRANSFORMATION OF DIESEL EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The investigators anticipate successfully conducting a complex study to characterize the atmospheric transformations of DE under the influence of sunlight, O3, radicals, and organic compounds. It is hope that this study will present novel results on the atmospheric aging of...

  4. Evaluate and characterize mechanisms controlling transport, fate, and effects of army smokes in the aerosol wind tunnel: Transport, transformations, fate, and terrestrial ecological effects of hexachloroethane obscurant smokes

    SciTech Connect

    Cataldo, D.A.; Ligotke, M.W.; Bolton, H. Jr.; Fellows, R.J.; Van Voris, P.; McVeety, B.D.; Li, Shu-mei W.; McFadden, K.M.

    1989-09-01

    The terrestrial transport, chemical fate, and ecological effects of hexachloroethane (HC) smoke were evaluated under controlled wind tunnel conditions. The primary objectives of this research program are to characterize and assess the impacts of smoke and obscurants on: (1) natural vegetation characteristic of US Army training sites in the United States; (2) physical and chemical properties of soils representative of these training sites; and (3) soil microbiological and invertebrate communities. Impacts and dose/responses were evaluated based on exposure scenarios, including exposure duration, exposure rate, and sequential cumulative dosing. Key to understanding the environmental impacts of HC smoke/obscurants is establishing the importance of environmental parameters such as relative humidity and wind speed on airborne aerosol characteristics and deposition to receptor surfaces. Direct and indirect biotic effects were evaluated using five plant species and two soil types. HC aerosols were generated in a controlled atmosphere wind tunnel by combustion of hexachloroethane mixtures prepared to simulate normal pot burn rates and conditions. The aerosol was characterized and used to expose plant, soil, and other test systems. Particle sizes of airborne HC ranged from 1.3 to 2.1 {mu}m mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD), and particle size was affected by relative humidity over a range of 20% to 85%. Air concentrations employed ranged from 130 to 680 mg/m{sup 3}, depending on exposure scenario. Chlorocarbon concentrations within smokes, deposition rates for plant and soil surfaces, and persistence were determined. The fate of principal inorganic species (Zn, Al, and Cl) in a range of soils was assessed.

  5. Characterization of the Adsorption of Nucleic Acid Bases onto Ferrihydrite via Fourier Transform Infrared and Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy and X-ray Diffractometry.

    PubMed

    Canhisares-Filho, José E; Carneiro, Cristine E A; de Santana, Henrique; Urbano, Alexandre; da Costa, Antonio C S; Zaia, Cássia T B V; Zaia, Dimas A M

    2015-09-01

    Minerals could have played an important role in concentration, protection, and polymerization of biomolecules. Although iron is the fourth most abundant element in Earth's crust, there are few works in the literature that describe the use of iron oxide-hydroxide in prebiotic chemistry experiments. In the present work, the interaction of adenine, thymine, and uracil with ferrihydrite was studied under conditions that resemble those of prebiotic Earth. At acidic pH, anions in artificial seawater decreased the pH at the point of zero charge (pHpzc) of ferrihydrite; and at basic pH, cations increased the pHpzc. The adsorption of nucleic acid bases onto ferrihydrite followed the order adenine?> uracil?>?thymine. Adenine adsorption peaked at neutral pH; however, for thymine and uracil, adsorption increased with increasing pH. Electrostatic interactions did not appear to play an important role on the adsorption of nucleic acid bases onto ferrihydrite. Adenine adsorption onto ferrihydrite was higher in distilled water compared to artificial seawater. After ferrihydrite was mixed with artificial seawaters or nucleic acid bases, X-ray diffractograms and Fourier transform infrared spectra did not show any change. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy showed that the interaction of adenine with ferrihydrite was not pH-dependent. In contrast, the interactions of thymine and uracil with ferrihydrite were pH-dependent such that, at basic pH, thymine and uracil lay flat on the surface of ferrihydrite, and at acidic pH, thymine and uracil were perpendicular to the surface. Ferrihydrite adsorbed much more adenine than thymine; thus adenine would have been better protected against degradation by hydrolysis or UV radiation on prebiotic Earth. Key Words: Ferrihydrite-Nucleic acid bases-Seawater-Adsorption-Prebiotic chemistry. Astrobiology 15, 728-738. PMID:26393397

  6. A Maximum-Likelihood Approach to the Characterization of the Elastic Lithosphere from Gravity and Topography Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, F. J.; Olhede, S. C.

    2010-12-01

    In the words of Albert Tarantola: "Don't make me a model - make me a thousand models, and then draw randomly from those". For seismology, this may be the only approach viable, but to address the related question: "What is the strength of the lithosphere?" we can do better. There we have a multitude of data (topography, gravity anomalies on dense grids) and only a handful of parameters to invert for - which has, however, historically, been surprisingly hard to do. Nevertheless, as Albert would have liked it, we can derive the exact statistical distribution of the estimated unknowns, the parameters of a differential equation with stochastic inputs, with minimal assumptions on the distribution of the data themselves. From this we construct practical algorithms. The lithosphere is modeled using a differential equation characterized by a set of parameters, at least one of which, under the assumption of elastic behavior, is a proxy for its strength: the flexural rigidity (D), or, by extension, the elastic thickness. This lithospheric "system" takes an input: topographic loading by mountain building and other processes, and maps it into an output: the gravity anomaly and the final, measurable, topography. The input is not measurable but some of its properties can be characterized. The outputs are measurable but the relation between them is obfuscated by their stochastic nature and the presence of unmodeled components. Estimating D, usually in the spectral domain, involves constructing summaries of gravity and topography. Both admittance and coherence are popular; both are ratios of the cross-spectral density of gravity and topography to the power spectral densities of either. Despite the fact that neither admittance nor coherence are Gaussian, estimating D usually comes down to the least-squares fitting of a parameterized curve, where Gaussian behavior is tacitly assumed. In this two-step procedure, admittance or coherence are first estimated, and subsequently inverted for the strength parameters. Rarely, if ever, are lithospheric models found that satisfy both coherence and admittance to within their true error. Why don't they? Poorly characterized errors of admittance and coherence are not the only problems with this procedure. There is also the implicit annihilation of information during the construction of these statistics (coarsely sampled, sometimes squared, ratios, measures of the data as they are) themselves. Then there is the fact that we do not want to know coherence and admittance at all - we want to know properties of the lithosphere! In this presentation, we intend to abandon coherence and admittance studies for good, by proposing an entirely different method of estimating flexural rigidity, which returns it and its confidence interval, as well as a host of tests for the suitability of the assumptions made along the way, and the possible presence of correlated loads and anisotropy in the response. The crux of the method is that it employs a "Whittle" maximum-likelihood formulation that remains very grounded in the data themselves, and which is formulated in terms of variables that do have a Gaussian distribution.

  7. Characterization of CZTSSe photovoltaic device with an atomic layer-deposited passivation layer

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wei Cao, Yanyan; Caspar, Jonathan V.; Guo, Qijie; Johnson, Lynda K.; Mclean, Robert S.; Malajovich, Irina; Choudhury, Kaushik Roy

    2014-07-28

    We describe a CZTSSe (Cu{sub 2}ZnSn(S{sub 1?x},Se{sub x}){sub 4}) photovoltaic (PV) device with an ALD (atomic layer deposition) coated buffer dielectric layer for CZTSSe surface passivation. An ALD buffer layer, such as TiO{sub 2}, can be applied in order to reduce the interface recombination and improve the device's open-circuit voltage. Detailed characterization data including current-voltage, admittance spectroscopy, and capacitance profiling are presented in order to compare the performance of PV devices with and without the ALD layer.

  8. Molecular Characterization and Reactivity of Dissolved Organic Matter by High Resolution Nanospray Ionization Fourier Transform-Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FTICR-MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleighter, R. L.; Hatcher, S. A.; Hatcher, P. G.

    2006-12-01

    The ultrahigh resolving power of FTICR-MS allows for the intense characterization of dissolved organic matter (DOM). DOM is the largest reactive component of the global carbon cycle, and an improved understanding of its composition is necessary to determine the transport and eventual fate of pollutants. The seasonal and spatial variations in DOM composition are investigated by taking surface water samples from five different sampling sites, four times a year. Water sampling begins at the Dismal Swamp in North Carolina, continues north up the Elizabeth River to the Chesapeake Bay, and concludes approximately ten miles off the coast in the Atlantic Ocean. DOM was extracted from the water samples using C18 extraction disks and were prepared in 50:50 methanol:water. Ammonium hydroxide was added prior to nanospray in order to solubilize the DOM as well as to increase the ionization efficiency. The samples were continuously infused into the Apollo II ion source with an Advion TriVersa NanoMate system of a Bruker 12 Tesla Apex QE FTICR-MS with resolving powers exceeding 400,000. All samples were analyzed in negative ion mode and were externally and internally calibrated prior to data analysis. Our DOM mass spectra consist of a multitude of peaks spanning the range of 200-850 m/z. Complexity is apparent from the detection of up to 20 peaks per nominal mass at nearly every mass throughout that range. A molecular formula calculator generated molecular formula matches from which van Krevelen plots were constructed for characterization purposes. A wide range of molecules were observed each containing oxygen, sulfur and nitrogen functional groups. We utilize the van Krevelen diagram to assist in clustering the molecules according to their functional group compositions. To test the hypothesis that formation of adducts to DOM serve to protect peptides from bacterial degradation, microcosm experiments were performed with a small isotopically enriched peptide, GGGR. This peptide was predicted to covalently bond to DOM via a Michael addition reaction or Schiff base formation. Following the incubation of GGGR with DOM, adduct formation was examined by FTICR-MS. Covalent binding of GGGR to DOM is a process that may reduce the bioavailability and degradation of proteins in the environment and could potentially lead to their preservation on longer time scales. FTICR-MS is clearly a powerful technique used to examine the complex composition of DOM and allow for advancements in the areas of aquatic and analytical chemistry.

  9. Synthesis, structure characterization, and reversible transformation of a cobalt salt of a dilacunary ?-Keggin silicotungstate and sandwich-type di- and tetracobalt-containing silicotungstate dimers.

    PubMed

    Kikukawa, Yuji; Suzuki, Kosuke; Yamaguchi, Kazuya; Mizuno, Noritaka

    2013-08-01

    A cobalt salt of a ?-Keggin dilacunary silicotungstate, {CoL5}2[?-SiW10O34L2] [Co-SiW10; L = N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) or H2O], could be synthesized by the cation-exchange reaction of TBA4[?-H4SiW10O36] (TBA = tetra-n-butylammonium) with 2 equiv of Co(NO3)2 with respect to TBA4[?-H4SiW10O36] in a mixed solvent of DMF and acetone (97% yield). Each Co-SiW10 was linked by water molecules via a hydrogen-bonding network. Besides Co-SiW10, various kinds of isostructural M-SiW10 could be synthesized via the same procedure as that for Co-SiW10 (M = Mn(2+), Fe(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), and Cd(2+)). By the reaction of Co-SiW10 with 1 equiv of TBA6[?-H2SiW10O36] in acetone, a silicotungstate dimer pillared by two cobalt cations with a significantly slipped dimer configuration, TBA6[Co2(?-H3SiW10O36)2]·3H2O (Co2), could be synthesized. By the reaction of Co-SiW10 with 3 equiv of TBAOH in acetone, a tetracobalt-containing sandwich-type silicotungstate, TBA6[{Co(H2O)}2(?3-OH)2{Co(H2O)2}2(?-H2SiW10O36)2]·5H2O (Co4), could be synthesized. Compound Co4 possessed the tetracobalt-oxygen core, [{Co(H2O)}2(?3-OH)2{Co(H2O)2}2](6+), identical with those of previously reported Weakley-type sandwich polyoxometalates, [Co4(H2O)2(XM9O34)2](n-) (X = P(5+), Si(4+), Ge(4+), As(5+) or V(5+); M = Mo(6+) or W(6+)). The reversible transformation between these three compounds (Co-SiW10 ? Co2, Co-SiW10 ? Co4, and Co2 ? Co4) took place by the addition and/or subtraction of required components in appropriate solvents, affording the desired products in high yields (71-93% yields). PMID:23834162

  10. Enterprise transformation :lessons learned, pathways to success.

    SciTech Connect

    Slavin, Adam M.; Woodard, Joan Brune

    2006-05-01

    In this report, we characterize the key themes of transformation and tie them together in a ''how to'' guide. The perspectives were synthesized from strategic management literature, case studies, and from interviews with key management personnel from private industry on their transformation experiences.

  11. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and imaging of the nucleus to characterize DNA contributions in different phases of the cell cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Saumya; Zong, Xinying; Holton, Sarah E.; Prasanth, K. V.; Bhargava, Rohit

    2015-03-01

    Determination of neoplasia is largely dependent on the state of cell growth. Infrared (IR) spectroscopy has the potential to measure differences between normal and cancerous cells. When analyzing biopsy sections using IR spectroscopy, careful analyses become important since biochemical variations may be misinterpreted due to variations in cell cycle. Processes like DNA replication, transcription and translation to produce proteins are important in determining if the cells are actively dividing but no studies on this aspect using IR spectroscopy have been conducted on isolated cell nuclei. Nuclei hold critical information about the phase of cell and its capacity to divide, but IR spectra of nuclei are often confounded by cytoplasmic signals during data acquisition from intact cells and tissues. Therefore, we sought to separate nuclear signals from cytoplasmic signals and identify spectral differences that characterize different phases of the cell cycle. Both cells and isolated nuclei were analyzed to assess the effect of the cytoplasmic background and to identify spectral changes in nuclei in different phases of cell cycle. We observed that signals of DNA could be obtained when imaging nuclei isolated from cells in different phases of cell cycle, which is in contrast to the oft-cited case in cells wherein nuclear contributions are obscured. The differences across cell cycle phases were more pronounced in nucleic acid regions of the spectra, showing that the use of nuclear spectrum can provide additional information on cellular state. These results can aid in developing computational models that extract nuclear spectra from whole cells and tissues for more accurate assessment of biochemical variations.

  12. Canonoid and Poissonoid Transformations, Symmetries and BiHamiltonian Structures

    E-print Network

    Giovanni Rastelli; Manuele Santoprete

    2015-02-25

    We give a characterization of linear canonoid transformations on symplectic manifolds and we use it to generate biHamiltonian structures for some mechanical systems. Utilizing this characterization we also study the behavior of the harmonic oscillator under canonoid transformations. We present a description of canonoid transformations due to E.T. Whittaker, and we show that it leads, in a natural way, to the modern, coordinate-independent definition of canonoid transformations. We also generalize canonoid transformations to Poisson manifolds by introducing Poissonoid transformations. We give examples of such transformations for Euler's equations of the rigid body (on $\\mathcal{so}^\\ast (3) $ and $ so^\\ast (4)$) and for an integrable case of Kirchhoff's equations for the motion of a rigid body immersed in an ideal fluid. We study the relationship between biHamiltonian structures and Poissonoid transformations for these examples. We analyze the link between Poissonoid transformations, constants of motion, and symmetries.

  13. Transforming giants.

    PubMed

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss

    2008-01-01

    Large corporations have long been seen as lumbering, inflexible, bureaucratic--and clueless about global developments. But recently some multinationals seem to be transforming themselves: They're engaging employees, moving quickly, and introducing innovations that show true connection with the world. Harvard Business School's Kanter ventured with a research team inside a dozen global giants--including IBM, Procter & Gamble, Omron, CEMEX, Cisco, and Banco Real--to discover what has been driving the change. After conducting more than 350 interviews on five continents, she and her colleagues came away with a strong sense that we are witnessing the dawn of a new model of corporate power: The coordination of actions and decisions on the front lines now appears to stem from widely shared values and a sturdy platform of common processes and technology, not from top-down decrees. In particular, the values that engage the passions of far-flung workforces stress openness, inclusion, and making the world a better place. Through this shift in what might be called their guidance systems, the companies have become as creative and nimble as much smaller ones, even while taking on social and environmental challenges of a scale that only large enterprises could attempt. IBM, for instance, has created a nonprofit partnership, World Community Grid, through which any organization or individual can donate unused computing power to research projects and see what is being done with the donation in real time. IBM has gained an inspiring showcase for its new technology, helped business partners connect with the company in a positive way, and offered individuals all over the globe the chance to contribute to something big. PMID:18271317

  14. Transforming America's Energy Economy Transforming America's

    E-print Network

    #12;Transforming America's Energy Economy Transforming America's Energy Economy This document was prepared by the Chief Research Officers of the U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory National Energy Technology

  15. Nonlinear Transformations and Filtering Theory for Space Operations 

    E-print Network

    Weisman, Ryan Michael 1984-

    2012-11-19

    function is not Gaussian or cannot be completely characterized by the rst two statistical moments, the debiased solution could lead to a biased estimate. The transformation of variables technique [2] allows for exact mapping of the probability density... Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 3.4 Transformation of Variables Technique . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 vii 3.4.1 Transformation of Variables Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 3.4.2 Comparison...

  16. Phase Transformations in Confined Nanosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Shield, Jeffrey E.; Belashchenko, Kirill

    2014-04-29

    This project discovered that non-equilibrium structures, including chemically ordered structures not observed in bulk systems, form in isolated nanoscale systems. Further, a generalized model was developed that effectively explained the suppression of equilibrium phase transformations. This thermodynamic model considered the free energy decrease associated with the phase transformation was less than the increase in energy associated with the formation of an interphase interface, therefore inhibiting the phase transformation. A critical diameter exists where the system transitions to bulk behavior, and a generalized equation was formulated that successfully predicted this transition in the Fe-Au system. This provided and explains a new route to novel structures not possible in bulk systems. The structural characterization was accomplished using transmission electron microscopy in collaboration with Matthew Kramer of Ames Laboratory. The PI and graduate student visited Ames Laboratory several times a year to conduct the experiments.

  17. Transforming human gait for signature signals characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshad, Atika; Fadzil Ismail, Ahmad; Khan, Sheroz; Zahirul Alam, A. H. M.; Tasnim, Rumana; Samnan Haider, Syed; Shobaki, Mohammed M.; Shahid, Zeeshan

    2013-12-01

    An integrated wireless inductive sensor is reported based on a system for monitoring human movement and body size. The proposed system senses the presence of human beings using electromagnetic field by making use of basic inductive coupling approach, hence analysing the performance of human monitoring. The amalgamation of the integrated system proposed will help in providing better services to the elderly people resided in healthcare centres. The developed sensing system is of low cost, flexible, robust, and easily implantable and capable of inductive sensing through marking signature waveforms as a result of human movements.

  18. Evaluate and characterize mechanisms controlling transport, fate and effects of Army smokes in the aerosol wind tunnel: Transport, transformations, fate, and terrestrial ecological effects of red phosphorus-butyl rubber and white phosphorus obscurant smokes: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Van Voris, P.; Ligotke, M.W.; McFadden, K.M.; Li, S.M.W.; Thomas, B.L.; Cataldo, D.A.; Garland, T.R.; Fredrickson, J.K.; Bean, R.M.; Carlile, D.W.

    1987-10-01

    An evaluation of the terrestrial transport, transformations and ecological effects of phosphorus (red phosphorus-butyl rubber (RP/BR)) smoke obscurant was performed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. A similar evaluation using white phosphorus (WP) smoke/obscurant is currently proceeding. The objective is to characterize the effects of smokes and obscurants on: (1) natural vegetation characteristic of US Army training sites in the United States; (2) physical and chemical properties of representative of soils of those sites; and (3) soil microbiological communities. The influence and interactions of smoke/obscurant concentration, relative humidity (25%, 60%, 90% and simulated rain) and wind speed of 0.22 to 4.45 m/s by smoke is assessed. Five plant species and four soils were exposed to both single and repeated doses of RP/BR smokes in the Pacific Northwest Laboratory ''P-3'' rated recirculating environmental wind tunnel. Detailed results for RP/BR and limited results for WP are presented. Toxicity symptoms for plants exposed for 2, 4, 6, and 8 hours to concentrations of RP/BR ranging from 200 mg/m/sup 3/ included leaf tip burn, leaf curl, leaf abscission and drop, floral abortion, chlorosis, neucrotic spotting, wilting, desiccation and dieback. Grass and bushbean were the most sensitive. The intensity and duration of these effects varied. Soils effects data suggest that there is an increase in the mobility of selected trace elements after exposure; however, this effect appears to be ameliorated with time. Soil microbial community effects show a reduction in the production of nitrate after soil is exposed to RP/BR smoke. Most of the plant, soil and soil microbial effects are transient in nature and are somewhat less intense resulting from repeated exposures; however, there is evidence that some of these environmental impacts may be persistent. 43 refs., 44 figs., 67 tabs.

  19. Arsenic(V) Reduction in Relation to Iron(III) Transformation and Molecular Characterization of the Structural and Functional Microbial Community in Sediments of a Basin-Fill Aquifer in Northern Utah

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, Babur S.; Muruganandam, Subathra; Meng, Xianyu; Sorensen, Darwin L.; Dupont, R. Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Basin-fill aquifers of the Southwestern United States are associated with elevated concentrations of arsenic (As) in groundwater. Many private domestic wells in the Cache Valley Basin, UT, have As concentrations in excess of the U.S. EPA drinking water limit. Thirteen sediment cores were collected from the center of the valley at the depth of the shallow groundwater and were sectioned into layers based on redoxmorphic features. Three of the layers, two from redox transition zones and one from a depletion zone, were used to establish microcosms. Microcosms were treated with groundwater (GW) or groundwater plus glucose (GW+G) to investigate the extent of As reduction in relation to iron (Fe) transformation and characterize the microbial community structure and function by sequencing 16S rRNA and arsenate dissimilatory reductase (arrA) genes. Under the carbon-limited conditions of the GW treatment, As reduction was independent of Fe reduction, despite the abundance of sequences related to Geobacter and Shewanella, genera that include a variety of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria. The addition of glucose, an electron donor and carbon source, caused substantial shifts toward domination of the bacterial community by Clostridium-related organisms, and As reduction was correlated with Fe reduction for the sediments from the redox transition zone. The arrA gene sequencing from microcosms at day 54 of incubation showed the presence of 14 unique phylotypes, none of which were related to any previously described arrA gene sequence, suggesting a unique community of dissimilatory arsenate-respiring bacteria in the Cache Valley Basin. PMID:24632255

  20. Arsenic(V) reduction in relation to Iron(III) transformation and molecular characterization of the structural and functional microbial community in sediments of a basin-fill aquifer in Northern Utah.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Babur S; Muruganandam, Subathra; Meng, Xianyu; Sorensen, Darwin L; Dupont, R Ryan; McLean, Joan E

    2014-05-01

    Basin-fill aquifers of the Southwestern United States are associated with elevated concentrations of arsenic (As) in groundwater. Many private domestic wells in the Cache Valley Basin, UT, have As concentrations in excess of the U.S. EPA drinking water limit. Thirteen sediment cores were collected from the center of the valley at the depth of the shallow groundwater and were sectioned into layers based on redoxmorphic features. Three of the layers, two from redox transition zones and one from a depletion zone, were used to establish microcosms. Microcosms were treated with groundwater (GW) or groundwater plus glucose (GW+G) to investigate the extent of As reduction in relation to iron (Fe) transformation and characterize the microbial community structure and function by sequencing 16S rRNA and arsenate dissimilatory reductase (arrA) genes. Under the carbon-limited conditions of the GW treatment, As reduction was independent of Fe reduction, despite the abundance of sequences related to Geobacter and Shewanella, genera that include a variety of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria. The addition of glucose, an electron donor and carbon source, caused substantial shifts toward domination of the bacterial community by Clostridium-related organisms, and As reduction was correlated with Fe reduction for the sediments from the redox transition zone. The arrA gene sequencing from microcosms at day 54 of incubation showed the presence of 14 unique phylotypes, none of which were related to any previously described arrA gene sequence, suggesting a unique community of dissimilatory arsenate-respiring bacteria in the Cache Valley Basin. PMID:24632255

  1. A dynamic phase-field model for structural transformations and twinning: Regularized interfaces with transparent prescription of complex kinetics and nucleation. Part I: Formulation and one-dimensional characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Vaibhav; Dayal, Kaushik

    2015-12-01

    The motion of microstructural interfaces is important in modeling twinning and structural phase transformations. Continuum models fall into two classes: sharp-interface models, where interfaces are singular surfaces; and regularized-interface models, such as phase-field models, where interfaces are smeared out. The former are challenging for numerical solutions because the interfaces need to be explicitly tracked, but have the advantage that the kinetics of existing interfaces and the nucleation of new interfaces can be transparently and precisely prescribed. In contrast, phase-field models do not require explicit tracking of interfaces, thereby enabling relatively simple numerical calculations, but the specification of kinetics and nucleation is both restrictive and extremely opaque. This prevents straightforward calibration of phase-field models to experiment and/or molecular simulations, and breaks the multiscale hierarchy of passing information from atomic to continuum. Consequently, phase-field models cannot be confidently used in dynamic settings. This shortcoming of existing phase-field models motivates our work. We present the formulation of a phase-field model - i.e., a model with regularized interfaces that do not require explicit numerical tracking - that allows for easy and transparent prescription of complex interface kinetics and nucleation. The key ingredients are a re-parametrization of the energy density to clearly separate nucleation from kinetics; and an evolution law that comes from a conservation statement for interfaces. This enables clear prescription of nucleation - through the source term of the conservation law - and kinetics - through a distinct interfacial velocity field. A formal limit of the kinetic driving force recovers the classical continuum sharp-interface driving force, providing confidence in both the re-parametrized energy and the evolution statement. We present some 1D calculations characterizing the formulation; in a companion paper, we present more extensive 2D calculations.

  2. Integral Transforms Roe Goodman

    E-print Network

    Goodman, Roe

    Integral Transforms Roe Goodman Introduction to Math at Rutgers August 29, 2010 Roe Goodman operators Solution: Use characters of G and Fourier transform Roe Goodman Integral Transforms #12;Fourier)(p) Roe Goodman Integral Transforms #12;Diagonalization of Translation Invariant Operators Theorem Let G

  3. Decoding modulation of the neuromuscular transform.

    PubMed

    Stern, Estee; Fort, Timothy J; Miller, Mark W; Peskin, Charles S; Brezina, Vladimir

    2007-06-01

    When modulators of neuromuscular function alter the motor neuron spike patterns that elicit muscle contractions, it is predicted that they will also retune correspondingly the connecting processes of the neuromuscular transform. Here we confirm this prediction by analyzing data from the cardiac neuromuscular system of the blue crab. We apply a method that decodes the contraction response to the spike pattern in terms of three elementary building-block functions that completely characterize the neuromuscular transform. This method allows us to dissociate modulator-induced changes in the neuromuscular transform from changes in the spike pattern in the normally operating, essentially unperturbed neuromuscular system. PMID:19763188

  4. Decoding modulation of the neuromuscular transform

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Estee; Fort, Timothy J.; Miller, Mark W.; Peskin, Charles S.; Brezina, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    When modulators of neuromuscular function alter the motor neuron spike patterns that elicit muscle contractions, it is predicted that they will also retune correspondingly the connecting processes of the neuromuscular transform. Here we confirm this prediction by analyzing data from the cardiac neuromuscular system of the blue crab. We apply a method that decodes the contraction response to the spike pattern in terms of three elementary building-block functions that completely characterize the neuromuscular transform. This method allows us to dissociate modulator-induced changes in the neuromuscular transform from changes in the spike pattern in the normally operating, essentially unperturbed neuromuscular system. PMID:19763188

  5. Nonstandard Lorentz-Einstein transformations

    E-print Network

    Bernhard Rothenstein; Stefan Popescu

    2008-08-01

    The standard Lorentz transformations establish a relationship between the space-time coordinates of the same event when detected from two inertial reference frames I and I' in the standard arrangement. This event is characterized by the space-time coordinates E(x,tE) and E'(x',t'E), tE and t'E representing the readings of the standard synchronized clocks C(x) and C'(x') located in the two frames where the event takes place. We obtain the nonstandard Lorentz transformations establishing a "physically" correct relationship between the readings of the standard synchronized clocks and the readings of other clocks (ta,t'a) of the same inertial reference frames. This relationship of the type tE=f(x,ta), expresses the standard Lorentz transformations as a function of ta and t'a respectively. We present several cases of nonstandard Lorentz transformation (the case of radar detection, the case when one reference frame is filled with an ideal transparent dielectric and the case of relativity of the apparent, actual and synchronized positions of the same moving particle).

  6. Analyses of temperature-dependent interface states, series resistances, and AC electrical conductivities of Al/p—Si and Al/Bi4Ti3O12/p—Si structures by using the admittance spectroscopy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mert, Y?ld?r?m; Perihan, Durmu?; ?emsettin, Alt?ndal

    2013-10-01

    In this study, Al/p—Si and Al/Bi4Ti3O12/p—Si structures are fabricated and their interface states (Nss), the values of series resistance (Rs), and AC electrical conductivity (?ac) are obtained each as a function of temperature using admittance spectroscopy method which includes capacitance—voltage (C—V) and conductance—voltage (G—V) measurements. In addition, the effect of interfacial Bi4Ti3O12 (BTO) layer on the performance of the structure is investigated. The voltage-dependent profiles of Nss and Rs are obtained from the high-low frequency capacitance method and the Nicollian method, respectively. Experimental results show that Nss and Rs, as strong functions of temperature and applied bias voltage, each exhibit a peak, whose position shifts towards the reverse bias region, in the depletion region. Such a peak behavior is attributed to the particular distribution of Nss and the reordering and restructuring of Nss under the effect of temperature. The values of activation energy (Ea), obtained from the slope of the Arrhenius plot, of both structures are obtained to be bias voltage-independent, and the Ea of the metal-ferroelectric-semiconductor (MFS) structure is found to be half that of the metal—semiconductor (MS) structure. Furthermore, other main electrical parameters, such as carrier concentration of acceptor atoms (NA), built-in potential (Vbi), Fermi energy (EF), image force barrier lowering (? ?b), and barrier height (?b), are extracted using reverse bias C-2—V characteristics as a function of temperature.

  7. Chemical Transformation Simulator

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Chemical Transformation Simulator (CTS) is a web-based, high-throughput screening tool that automates the calculation and collection of physicochemical properties for an organic chemical of interest and its predicted products resulting from transformations in environmental sy...

  8. Transforming F0 Contours 

    E-print Network

    Gillett, Ben; King, Simon

    2003-01-01

    Voice transformation is the process of transforming the characteristics of speech uttered by a source speaker, such that a listener would believe the speech was uttered by a target speaker. Training F0 contour generation ...

  9. Transforming Voice Quality 

    E-print Network

    Gillett, Ben; King, Simon

    2003-01-01

    Voice transformation is the process of transforming the characteristics of speech uttered by a source speaker, such that a listener would believe the speech was uttered by a target speaker. In this paper we address the ...

  10. Landscapes of transformation

    E-print Network

    Ambs, Emily (Emily Kiersten)

    2007-01-01

    This thesis aims to examine the cultural effect of transformation through the lens of procedural techniques applied to the human body and architecture. The body and architecture both operate as landscapes of transformation. ...

  11. The Patch Transform

    E-print Network

    Avidan, Shai

    The patch transform represents an image as a bag of overlapping patches sampled on a regular grid. This representation allows users to manipulate images in the patch domain, which then seeds the inverse patch transform to ...

  12. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    FTIR - 1 Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy FTIR DETERMINATION OF MTBE IN GASOLINE AND ETHANOL IN VODKA AND MOUTHWASH Last updated: June 17, 2014 #12;FTIR - 2 Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

  13. LAPPED TRANSFORMS COMPRESSION

    E-print Network

    de Queiroz, Ricardo L.

    will describe the principles of a block transform and its corresponding transform matrix along with its to compression applications. In Sec. 6.11, image compression systems are briefly introduced, including JPEG

  14. 28-Channel rotary transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1981-01-01

    Transformer transmits power and digital data across rotating interface. Array has many parallel data channels, each with potential l megabaud data rate. Ferrite-cored transformers are spaced along rotor; airgap between them reduces crosstalk.

  15. Equations For Rotary Transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salomon, Phil M.; Wiktor, Peter J.; Marchetto, Carl A.

    1988-01-01

    Equations derived for input impedance, input power, and ratio of secondary current to primary current of rotary transformer. Used for quick analysis of transformer designs. Circuit model commonly used in textbooks on theory of ac circuits.

  16. Metrics for enterprise transformation

    E-print Network

    Blackburn, Craig D. (Craig David), S. M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this thesis is to depict the role of metrics in the evolving journey of enterprise transformation. To this end, three propositions are explored: (i) metrics and measurement systems drive transformation, ...

  17. Probabilistically Accurate Program Transformations

    E-print Network

    Misailovic, Sasa

    The standard approach to program transformation involves the use of discrete logical reasoning to prove that the transformation does not change the observable semantics of the program. We propose a new approach that, in ...

  18. Face Recognition using Curvelet Transform

    E-print Network

    Cohen, Rami

    2011-01-01

    Face recognition has been studied extensively for more than 20 years now. Since the beginning of 90s the subject has became a major issue. This technology is used in many important real-world applications, such as video surveillance, smart cards, database security, internet and intranet access. This report reviews recent two algorithms for face recognition which take advantage of a relatively new multiscale geometric analysis tool - Curvelet transform, for facial processing and feature extraction. This transform proves to be efficient especially due to its good ability to detect curves and lines, which characterize the human's face. An algorithm which is based on the two algorithms mentioned above is proposed, and its performance is evaluated on three data bases of faces: AT&T (ORL), Essex Grimace and Georgia-Tech. k-nearest neighbour (k-NN) and Support vector machine (SVM) classifiers are used, along with Principal Component Analysis (PCA) for dimensionality reduction. This algorithm shows good results, ...

  19. An experimental study and modeling of Transformer-Coupled Toroidal Plasma processing of materials

    E-print Network

    Bai, Bo, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01

    The Transformer Coupled Toroidal Plasma (TCTP) source uses a high power density plasma formed in a toroidal-shaped chamber by transformer coupling using a magnetic core. The objectives of the thesis are (1) to characterize ...

  20. Transformed Auto-correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jianfeng; Gao, Yang

    2014-05-01

    A transformed auto-correlation method is presented here, where a received signal is transformed based on a priori reflecting model, and then the transformed signal is cross-correlated to its original one. If the model is correct, after transformation, the reflected signal will be coherent to the transmitted signal, with zero delay. A map of transformed auto-correlation function with zero delay can be generated in a given parametric space. The significant peaks in the map may indicate the possible reflectors nearby the central transmitter. The true values of the parameters of reflectors can be estimated at the same time.

  1. Fourier-transform optical microsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, S. D.; Smith, R. L.; Gonzalez, C.; Stewart, K. P.; Hagopian, J. G.; Sirota, J. M.

    1999-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and initial characterization of a miniature single-pass Fourier-transform spectrometer (FTS) that has an optical bench that measures 1 cm x 5 cm x 10 cm is presented. The FTS is predicated on the classic Michelson interferometer design with a moving mirror. Precision translation of the mirror is accomplished by microfabrication of dovetailed bearing surfaces along single-crystal planes in silicon. Although it is miniaturized, the FTS maintains a relatively high spectral resolution, 0.1 cm-1, with adequate optical throughput.

  2. Phase Transformation in Cast Superaustenitic Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Nathaniel Steven Lee Phillips

    2006-12-12

    Superaustenitic stainless steels constitute a group of Fe-based alloys that are compositionally balanced to have a purely austenitic matrix and exhibit favorable pitting and crevice corrosion resistant properties and mechanical strength. However, intermetallic precipitates such as sigma and Laves can form during casting or exposure to high-temperature processing, which degrade the corrosion and mechanical properties of the material. The goal of this study was to accurately characterize the solid-solid phase transformations seen in cast superaustenitic stainless steels. Heat treatments were performed to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formations in alloys CN3MN and CK3MCuN. Microstructures were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, WDS). The equilibrium microstructures, composed primarily of sigma and Laves within purely austenitic matrices, showed slow transformation kinetics. Factors that determine the extent of transformation, including diffusion, nucleation, and growth, are discussed.

  3. An extension of the Laplace transform to Schwartz distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, D. R.

    1974-01-01

    A characterization of the Laplace transform is developed which extends the transform to the Schwartz distributions. The class of distributions includes the impulse functions and other singular functions which occur as solutions to ordinary and partial differential equations. The standard theorems on analyticity, uniqueness, and invertibility of the transform are proved by using the characterization as the definition of the Laplace transform. The definition uses sequences of linear transformations on the space of distributions which extends the Laplace transform to another class of generalized functions, the Mikusinski operators. It is shown that the sequential definition of the transform is equivalent to Schwartz' extension of the ordinary Laplace transform to distributions but, in contrast to Schwartz' definition, does not use the distributional Fourier transform. Several theorems concerning the particular linear transformations used to define the Laplace transforms are proved. All the results proved in one dimension are extended to the n-dimensional case, but proofs are presented only for those situations that require methods different from their one-dimensional analogs.

  4. Partially transformed relaxor ferroelectric single crystals with distributed phase transformation behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, John A.

    2015-11-01

    Relaxor ferroelectric single crystals such as PMN-PT and PIN-PMN-PT undergo field driven phase transformations when electrically or mechanically loaded in crystallographic directions that provide a positive driving force for the transformation. The observed behavior in certain compositions is a phase transformation distributed over a range of fields without a distinct forward or reverse coercive field. This work focuses on the material behavior that is observed when the crystals are loaded sufficiently to drive a partial transformation and then unloaded, as might occur when driving a transducer to achieve high power levels. Distributed transformations have been modeled using a normal distribution of transformation thresholds. A set of experiments was conducted to characterize the hysteresis loops that occur with the partial transformations. In this work the normal distribution model is extended to include the partial transformations that occur when the field is reversed before the transformation is complete. The resulting hysteresis loops produced by the model are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  5. From hatemonger to hero: the rhetorical transformation of Malcolm X 

    E-print Network

    Jurk, Sarah Nicole

    2003-01-01

    Since Malcolm X first emerged onto the American political landscape in the late 1950s, he has received much attention. Identifying and comprehending the significant narratives, ideographs, and characterizations within the rhetorical transformation...

  6. Estimates for the Fourier-Bessel transforms of multivariate functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abilov, V. A.; Kerimov, M. K.

    2012-06-01

    Two estimates useful in applications are proved for the Fourier-Bessel (or Hankel) transform in the space {L}_2 ( {{R}_ + ^2 } ) for some classes of two-variable functions characterized by a generalized modulus of continuity.

  7. Program Transformation in HATS

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, V.L.

    1999-02-24

    HATS is a general purpose syntax derivation tree based transformation system in which transformation sequences are described in special purpose language. A powerful feature of this language is that unification is an explicit operation. By making unification explicit, an elegant framework arises in which to express complex application conditions which in turn enables refined control strategies to be realized. This paper gives an overview of HATS, focusing especially on the framework provided by the transformation language and its potential with respect to control and general purpose transformation.

  8. Magnetically Controlled Variable Transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleiner, Charles T.

    1994-01-01

    Improved variable-transformer circuit, output voltage and current of which controlled by use of relatively small current supplied at relatively low power to control windings on its magnetic cores. Transformer circuits of this type called "magnetic amplifiers" because ratio between controlled output power and power driving control current of such circuit large. This ratio - power gain - can be as large as 100 in present circuit. Variable-transformer circuit offers advantages of efficiency, safety, and controllability over some prior variable-transformer circuits.

  9. Molecular cloning and characterization of a cellular phosphoprotein that interacts with a conserved C-terminal domain of adenovirus E1A involved in negative modulation of oncogenic transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Schaeper, U; Boyd, J M; Verma, S; Uhlmann, E; Subramanian, T; Chinnadurai, G

    1995-01-01

    The adenovirus type 2/5 E1A proteins transform primary baby rat kidney (BRK) cells in cooperation with the activated Ras (T24 ras) oncoprotein. The N-terminal half of E1A (exon 1) is essential for this transformation activity. While the C-terminal half of E1A (exon 2) is dispensable, a region located between residues 225 and 238 of the 243R E1A protein negatively modulates in vitro T24 ras cooperative transformation as well as the tumorigenic potential of E1A/T24 ras-transformed cells. The same C-terminal domain is also required for binding of a cellular 48-kDa phosphoprotein, C-terminal binding protein (CtBP). We have cloned the cDNA for CtBP via yeast two-hybrid interaction cloning. The cDNA encodes a 439-amino acid (48 kDa) protein that specifically interacts with exon 2 in yeast two-hybrid, in vitro protein binding, and in vivo coimmunoprecipitation analyses. This protein requires residues 225-238 of the 243R E1A protein for interaction. The predicted protein sequence of the isolated cDNA is identical to amino acid sequences obtained from peptides prepared from biochemically purified CtBP. Fine mapping of the CtBP-binding domain revealed that a 6-amino acid motif highly conserved among the E1A proteins of various human and animal adenoviruses is required for this interaction. These results suggest that interaction of CtBP with the E1A proteins may play a critical role in adenovirus replication and oncogenic transformation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7479821

  10. Generalized Lorentz Transformations

    E-print Network

    Virendra Gupta

    2013-12-05

    Generalized Lorentz transformations with modified velocity parameter are considered. Lorentz transformations depending on the mass of the observer are suggested.The modified formula for the addition of velocities remarkably preserves the constancy of the velocity of light for all observers. The Doppler red shift is affected and can provide a test of such generalisations.

  11. Pathways to Transformation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Bob; Cushing, Pamela

    The ubiquitous use of the term "transformation" in experiential education has blurred its specific meaning in any given case. Designing an effective curriculum requires instructors to determine what kind of transformation they would like to generate. A review of two research projects provides insights about different types of personal change and…

  12. Biochemical transformation of coals

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Mow S. (Rocky Point, NY); Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY)

    1999-03-23

    A method of biochemically transforming macromolecular compounds found in solid carbonaceous materials, such as coal is provided. The preparation of new microorganisms, metabolically weaned through challenge growth processes to biochemically transform solid carbonaceous materials at extreme temperatures, pressures, pH, salt and toxic metal concentrations is also disclosed.

  13. A Transformation Called "Twist"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The transformations found in secondary mathematics curriculum are typically limited to stretches and translations (e.g., ACARA, 2010). Advanced students may find the transformation, twist, to be of further interest. As most available resources are written for professional-level readers, this article is intended to be an introduction accessible to…

  14. Phase Transformations Course Outline

    E-print Network

    New South Wales, University of

    ; thermodynamics of phase transformations; solidification of pure metals and alloys; thermal supercooling transformations. Aspects of ferrous metallurgy and common classes of low carbon and alloy steels to be taught - thermal and constitutional super-cooling and their influence on interface stability. 2 Solute

  15. Support Principals, Transform Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguilar, Elena; Goldwasser, Davina; Tank-Crestetto, Kristina

    2011-01-01

    The Transformational Coaching Team in Oakland Unified School District provides differentiated, sustained, job-embedded support to the district's school leaders. In this article, members of the team describe how they work with principals to transform the culture of schools. Student achievement data show above-average improvement in schools in which…

  16. Genetic Transformation of Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Robert.

    1991-01-01

    An activity in which students transform an ampicillin-sensitive strain of E. coli with a plasmid containing a gene for ampicillin resistance is described. The procedure for the preparation of competent cells and the transformation of competent E. coli is provided. (KR)

  17. Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Understanding the global atmospheric changes is difficult with today's current technology. However, with high resolution and nearly continuous observations from a satellite, it's possible to transform our understanding of the atmosphere. To enable the next generation of atmospheric science, a new class of orbiting atmospheric sensors is being developed. The foundation of this advanced concept is the Fourier Transform Spectrometer, or FTS.

  18. Deployment & Market Transformation (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-04-01

    NREL's deployment and market transformation (D and MT) activities encompass the laboratory's full range of technologies, which span the energy efficiency and renewable energy spectrum. NREL staff educates partners on how they can advance sustainable energy applications and also provides clients with best practices for reducing barriers to innovation and market transformation.

  19. Biochemical transformation of coals

    DOEpatents

    Lin, M.S.; Premuzic, E.T.

    1999-03-23

    A method of biochemically transforming macromolecular compounds found in solid carbonaceous materials, such as coal is provided. The preparation of new microorganisms, metabolically weaned through challenge growth processes to biochemically transform solid carbonaceous materials at extreme temperatures, pressures, pH, salt and toxic metal concentrations is also disclosed. 7 figs.

  20. Transformer design tradeoffs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1977-01-01

    Technical memorandum includes transformer area product numbers, which are used to summarize dimensional and electrical properties of C-cores, pot cores, lamination, powder cores, and tape-wound cores. To aid in core selection, comparison of five common core materials is presented to indicate their influence on overall transformer efficiency and weight.

  1. Direct current transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khanna, S. M.; Urban, E. W. (inventors)

    1979-01-01

    A direct current transformer in which the primary consists of an elongated strip of superconductive material, across the ends of which is direct current potential is described. Parallel and closely spaced to the primary is positioned a transformer secondary consisting of a thin strip of magnetoresistive material.

  2. Two Different Squeeze Transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, D. (Editor); Kim, Y. S.

    1996-01-01

    Lorentz boosts are squeeze transformations. While these transformations are similar to those in squeezed states of light, they are fundamentally different from both physical and mathematical points of view. The difference is illustrated in terms of two coupled harmonic oscillators, and in terms of the covariant harmonic oscillator formalism.

  3. Lorentz transformation by mimicking the Lorentz transformation

    E-print Network

    Bernhard Rothenstein; Stefan Popescu

    2007-09-24

    We show that starting with the fact that special relativity theory is concerned with a distortion of the observed length of a moving rod, without mentioning if it is a "contraction" or "dilation", we can derive the Lorentz transformations for the spacetime coordinates of the same event. This derivation is based on expressing the length of the moving rod as a sum of components with all the lengths involved in this summation being measured by the observers of the same inertial reference frame.

  4. Transformer design tradeoffs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1976-01-01

    Material was presented to assist transformer designers in the transition from long-used English units to the less familiar metric equivalents. A coordination between the area product numbers ap (product of window and core cross-section areas) and current density J was developed for a given regulation and temperature rise. Straight-line relationships for Ap and Volume, Ap and surface area At and, Ap and weight were developed. These relationships can now be used as new tools to simplify and standardize the process of transformer design. They also made it possible to design transformers of small bulk and volume or to optimize efficiency.

  5. The same normal cell protein is phosphorylated after transformation by avian sarcoma viruses with unrelated transforming genes.

    PubMed Central

    Erikson, E; Cook, R; Miller, G J; Erikson, R L

    1981-01-01

    The phosphorylation of a normal cellular protein of molecular weight 34,000 (34K) is enhanced in Rous sarcoma virus-transformed chicken embryo fibroblasts apparently as a direct consequence of the phosphotransferase activity of the Rous sarcoma virus-transforming protein pp60src. We have prepared anti-34K serum by using 34K purified from normal fibroblasts to confirm that the transformation-specific phosphorylation described previously occurs on a normal cellular protein and to further characterize the nature of the protein. In this communication, we also show that the phosphorylation of 34K is also increased in cells transformed by either Fujinami or PRCII sarcoma virus, two recently characterized avian sarcoma viruses whose transforming proteins, although distinct from pp60src, are also associated with phosphotransferase activity. Moreover, comparative fingerprinting of tryptic phosphopeptides shows that the major site of phosphorylation of 34K is the same in all three cases. Images PMID:6100959

  6. Relativistic Transformation of Solid Angle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinley, John M.

    1980-01-01

    Rederives the relativistic transformations of light intensity from compact sources (stars) to show where and how the transformation of a solid angle contributes. Discusses astrophysical and other applications of the transformations. (Author/CS)

  7. Claude Sabbah FOURIER TRANSFORMATION AND

    E-print Network

    Sabbah, Claude

    Claude Sabbah FOURIER TRANSFORMATION AND STOKES STRUCTURES CHICAGO, MAY 2012 WORK IN PROGRESS, 2013 #12;FOURIER TRANSFORMATION AND STOKES STRUCTURES CHICAGO, MAY 2012 WORK IN PROGRESS (VERSION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1. Fourier transformation: some analogies between arithmetic and complex algebraic geometry

  8. How Political Science Became Modern: Racial Thought and the Transformation of the Discipline, 1880-1930

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blatt, Jessica

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation argues that changing ideas about race and engagement with race science were at the heart of a major transformation of political science in the 1920s, a transformation that I characterize as "becoming modern." This transformation was at once conceptual--visible in the basic categories and theoretical apparatus of the…

  9. Transformation of Oligomers of Lipidated Peptide Induced by Change in pH

    E-print Network

    Benedek, George B.

    Transformation of Oligomers of Lipidated Peptide Induced by Change in pH Ying Wang, Aleksey Lomakin of the lipidated peptides. Here, we report a transformation induced in Liraglutide oligomers by changing pH in the vicinity of pH 7. This fully reversible transformation is characterized by changes in the size

  10. Imaging Fourier transform spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C.L.

    1993-09-13

    This invention is comprised of an imaging Fourier transform spectrometer having a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer providing a series of images to a focal plane array camera. The focal plane array camera is clocked to a multiple of zero crossing occurrences as caused by a moving mirror of the Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and as detected by a laser detector such that the frame capture rate of the focal plane array camera corresponds to a multiple of the zero crossing rate of the Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The images are transmitted to a computer for processing such that representations of the images as viewed in the light of an arbitrary spectral ``fingerprint`` pattern can be displayed on a monitor or otherwise stored and manipulated by the computer.

  11. A Classical Science Transformed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovalevsky, Jean

    1979-01-01

    Describes how satellites and other tools of space technology have transformed classical geodesy into the science of space geodynamics. The establishment and the activities of the French Center for Geodynamic and Astronomical Research Studies (CERGA) are also included. (HM)

  12. Proof in Transformation Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, A. W.

    1971-01-01

    The first of three articles showing how inductively-obtained results in transformation geometry may be organized into a deductive system. This article discusses two approaches to enlargement (dilatation), one using coordinates and the other using synthetic methods. (MM)

  13. Transformer design tradeoffs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1977-01-01

    In space, power system transformer components are frequently the heaviest and bulkiest items in the power conversion circuit. They also have a significant effect upon the overall performance and efficiency of the system. Accordingly, the design of such transformers has an important effect on overall system weight, power-inversion efficiency, and cost. Relationships were between the parameters used by transformer designers that can be used as new tools to standardize and simplify transformer design. They can be used to optimize the design either for small size and weight or efficiency. The metric system of units, rather than the familiar English units, is used; however, material is presented to assist the reader in the transition from one system to the other.

  14. Selection of Transformed Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Huw D.; Sparks, Caroline A.

    The low frequency and randomness of transgene integration into host cells, combined with the significant challenges of recovering whole plants from those rare events, makes the use of selectable marker genes routine in plant transformation experiments. For research applications that are unlikely to be grown in the field, strong herbicide- or antibiotic resistance is commonly used. Here we use genes conferring resistance to glufosinate herbicides as an example of a selectable marker in wheat transformation by either Agrobacterium or biolistics.

  15. Series Transmission Line Transformer

    DOEpatents

    Buckles, Robert A. (Livermore, CA); Booth, Rex (Livermore, CA); Yen, Boris T. (El Cerrito, CA)

    2004-06-29

    A series transmission line transformer is set forth which includes two or more of impedance matched sets of at least two transmissions lines such as shielded cables, connected in parallel at one end ans series at the other in a cascading fashion. The cables are wound about a magnetic core. The series transmission line transformer (STLT) which can provide for higher impedance ratios and bandwidths, which is scalable, and which is of simpler design and construction.

  16. Applying Improved Efficiency Transformers 

    E-print Network

    Haggerty, N. K.; Malone, T. P.

    1998-01-01

    total owning costs over the life of the transformer. Acknowledgments The authors wish to express their appreciation to Mr. Dave Johnson of Eli Lilly and Company, Mr. Jim Robertson of Dow Chemical Company, and Mr. Dick Doughty of DuPont... EFFICIENCY TRANSFORMERS N. Kent Haggerty Timothy P. Malone Electrical Consultant Electrical Consultant DuPont USA DuPont USA Old Hickory, TN Charlotte, NC ABSTRACT Today's business and energy conscious environment affords both producers and consumers...

  17. Solid-state current transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farnsworth, D. L. (inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A signal transformation network which is uniquely characterized to exhibit a very low input impedance while maintaining a linear transfer characteristic when driven from a voltage source and when quiescently biased in the low microampere current range is described. In its simplest form, it consists of a tightly coupled two transistor network in which a common emitter input stage is interconnected directly with an emitter follower stage to provide virtually 100 percent negative feedback to the base input of the common emitter stage. Bias to the network is supplied via the common tie point of the common emitter stage collector terminal and the emitter follower base stage terminal by a regulated constant current source, and the output of the circuit is taken from the collector of the emitter follower stage.

  18. Floral Transformation of Wheat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Sujata; Loar, Star; Steber, Camille; Zale, Janice

    A method is described for the floral transformation of wheat using a protocol similar to the floral dip of Arabidopsis. This method does not employ tissue culture of dissected embryos, but instead pre-anthesis spikes with clipped florets at the early, mid to late uninucleate microspore stage are dipped in Agrobacterium infiltration media harboring a vector carrying anthocyanin reporters and the NPTII selectable marker. T1 seeds are examined for color changes induced in the embryo by the anthocyanin reporters. Putatively transformed seeds are germinated and the seedlings are screened for the presence of the NPTII gene based on resistance to paromomycin spray and assayed with NPTII ELISAs. Genomic DNA of putative transformants is digested and analyzed on Southern blots for copy number to determine whether the T-DNA has integrated into the nucleus and to show the number of insertions. The non-optimized transformation efficiencies range from 0.3 to 0.6% (number of transformants/number of florets dipped) but the efficiencies are higher in terms of the number of transformants produced/number of seeds set ranging from 0.9 to 10%. Research is underway to maximize seed set and optimize the protocol by testing different Agrobacterium strains, visual reporters, vectors, and surfactants.

  19. Residential market transformation: National and regional indicators

    SciTech Connect

    Van Wie McGrory, Laura L.; McNamara, Maureen; Suozzo, Margaret

    2000-06-01

    A variety of programs are underway to address market barriers to the adoption of energy-efficient residential technologies and practices. Most are administered by utilities, states, or regions that rely on the Energy Star as a consistent platform for program marketing and messaging. This paper reviews regional and national market transformation activities for three key residential end-uses -- air conditioning, clothes washing, and lighting -- characterizing current and ongoing programs; reporting on progress; identifying market indicators; and discussing implications.

  20. Phase Transformations in Binary Colloidal Monolayers

    E-print Network

    Ye Yang; Lin Fu; Catherine Marcoux; Joshua E. S. Socolar; Patrick Charbonneau; Benjamin B. Yellen

    2015-02-10

    Phase transformations can be difficult to characterize at the microscopic level due to the inability to directly observe individual atomic motions. Model colloidal systems, by contrast, permit the direct observation of individual particle dynamics and of collective rearrangements, which allows for real-space characterization of phase transitions. Here, we study a quasi-two-dimensional, binary colloidal alloy that exhibits liquid-solid and solid-solid phase transitions, focusing on the kinetics of a diffusionless transformation between two crystal phases. Experiments are conducted on a monolayer of magnetic and nonmagnetic spheres suspended in a thin layer of ferrofluid and exposed to a tunable magnetic field. A theoretical model of hard spheres with point dipoles at their centers is used to guide the choice of experimental parameters and characterize the underlying materials physics. When the applied field is normal to the fluid layer, a checkerboard crystal forms; when the angle between the field and the normal is sufficiently large, a striped crystal assembles. As the field is slowly tilted away from the normal, we find that the transformation pathway between the two phases depends strongly on crystal orientation, field strength, and degree of confinement of the monolayer. In some cases, the pathway occurs by smooth magnetostrictive shear, while in others it involves the sudden formation of martensitic plates.

  1. Influence of Very Fast Transients on Transformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Shigeto; Shimomura, Tetsurou; Shibuya, Yoshikazu; Ishii, Masaru

    Very fast transients (VFTs) occur in a gas insulated switchgear (GIS) at a disconnecting switch operation. VFTs are high frequency surges and are characterized by a fast steep wavefront and an oscillating waveform. VFTs cause voltage oscillations in a transformer winding connected directly to a GIS. VFTs in the GIS are simulated using the Laplace transform. The fast steep wavefront and the oscillating waveform attaking on the transformer are shown as a function of GIS constitutional parameters. For a case study, influence of the fast steep wavefront and the oscillating waveform is investigated on 550kV class transformer. In the case of VFTs at the transformer, a voltage level of the fast steep wavefront is larger than an amplitude of the oscillation waveform. However the interturn voltage oscillation in the winding caused by the oscillation waveform can be larger than that by the fast steep wavefront. The authors deduce that the voltage oscillations do not threaten the reliability of the interturn insulation.

  2. Discrete Fourier Transform Javier Montoya

    E-print Network

    Giger, Christine

    Discrete Fourier Transform Javier Montoya Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing ETH Zurich March 16, 2012 1 Introduction The Discrete form of the Fourier transform is known as Discrete Fourier Transform domain using the Inverse Discrete Fourier Transform (IDFT): f(x) = 1 N N-1 x=0 F(u)ej 2 N ux for u = 0, 1

  3. Transformation based endorsement systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sudkamp, Thomas

    1988-01-01

    Evidential reasoning techniques classically represent support for a hypothesis by a numeric value or an evidential interval. The combination of support is performed by an arithmetic rule which often requires restrictions to be placed on the set of possibilities. These assumptions usually require the hypotheses to be exhausitive and mutually exclusive. Endorsement based classification systems represent support for the alternatives symbolically rather than numerically. A framework for constructing endorsement systems is presented in which transformations are defined to generate and update the knowledge base. The interaction of the knowledge base and transformations produces a non-monotonic reasoning system. Two endorsement based reasoning systems are presented to demonstrate the flexibility of the transformational approach for reasoning with ambiguous and inconsistent information.

  4. Plastid transformation in soybean.

    PubMed

    Dubald, Manuel; Tissot, Ghislaine; Pelissier, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    The biotechnological potential of plastid genetic engineering has been illustrated in a limited number of higher plant species. We have developed a reproducible method to generate plastid transformants in soybean (Glycine max), a crop of major agronomic importance. The transformation vectors are delivered to embryogenic cultures by the particle gun method and selection performed using the aadA antibiotic resistance gene. Homoplasmy is established rapidly in the selected events without the need for further selection or regeneration cycles, and genes of interest can be expressed at a high level in green tissues. This is a significant step toward the commercial application of this technology. PMID:24599865

  5. Successful Transformational Radiology Leaders.

    PubMed

    Douget, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Transformational radiology leaders elevate subordinates, expand self-awareness, develop lasting relationships, strive to exceed expectations, and uphold the vision and goals of the organization. In order for radiology leaders to become more transformational in their leadership style there are four fundamental elements they must learn: idealized influence, individualized consideration, inspirational motivation, and intellectual stimulation. Leaders can utilize personality and self-assessments to learn more about themselves, identify areas of strengths and weaknesses, and learn to be more effective when leading employees. PMID:26710553

  6. Transformation of Follicular Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lossos, Izidore S.; Gascoyne, Randy D.

    2011-01-01

    Histological transformation of follicular lymphoma (FL) to a more aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphomas is a pivotal event in the natural history of FL and is associated with poor outcome. While commonly observed in clinical practice and despite multiple studies designed to address its pathogenesis, the biology of this process represents an enigma. In this chapter we present a state of the art review summarizing the definition of histologic transformation, its incidence, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, treatment and outcome. Furthermore, we specifically emphasize gaps in our knowledge that should be addressed in future studies. PMID:21658615

  7. The quantum Arnold transformation

    E-print Network

    Victor Aldaya; Francisco Cossio; Julio Guerrero; Francisco F. Lopez-Ruiz

    2010-11-02

    By a quantum version of the Arnold transformation of classical mechanics, all quantum dynamical systems whose classical equations of motion are non-homogeneous linear second-order ordinary differential equations, including systems with friction linear in velocity, can be related to the quantum free-particle dynamical system. This transformation provides a basic (Heisenberg-Weyl) algebra of quantum operators, along with well-defined Hermitian operators which can be chosen as evolution-like observables and complete the entire Schr\\"odinger algebra. It also proves to be very helpful in performing certain computations quickly, to obtain, for example, wave functions and closed analytic expressions for time-evolution operators.

  8. Fabrication and characterization of Na0.5K0.5NbO3-CuNb2O6 lead-free step-down piezoelectric transformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ming-Ru; Chu, Sheng-Yuan; Chan, I.-Hao; Huang, Sheng-Kai

    2011-08-01

    Lead-free (Na0.5K0.5)NbO3 (NKN) ceramics doped with 1 mol% CuNb2O6 (01CN) ceramics were prepared using the conventional mixed oxide method at a sintering temperature of 1075 °C. NKN + 1 mol% CuTa2O6 (NKN-01CN) ceramics sintered at 1075 °C exhibit excellent "hard" piezoelectric properties of kp = 40%, kt = 45%, and k33 = 57%, with ferroelectric property Ec = 23 kV/cm. The mechanical quality factor (Qm) is extraordinarily high (1933) and the temperature stability is excellent (Temperature coefficient of frequency (TCF) = -154 ppm/°C). The piezoelectric transformer (PT) was fabricated on NKN-01CN lead-free substrates, and the electrical characteristics were investigated. The devices were simplified into an equivalent circuit and analyzed using the MATLAB software package. The simulation results matched the experimental results. By reversing the input and the output, the step-down PT can be easily fabricated using a simple disk-type structure. A maximum efficiency of 93% with a voltage gain of 0.12 was measured, which was in good agreement with the simulation results (a maximum efficiency of 98.7% with a voltage gain of 0.13) for the step-down mode.

  9. Transformative Change Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bragg, D. D.; Kirby, C.; Witt, M. A.; Richie, D.; Mix, S.; Feldbaum, M.; Liu, S.; Mason, M.

    2014-01-01

    The Transformative Change Initiative (TCI) is dedicated to assisting community colleges to scale up innovation in the form of guided pathways, programs of study, and evidence-based strategies to improve student outcomes and program, organization, and system performance. The impetus for TCI is the Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and…

  10. Transforming Young Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Discussions of transformational change pervade the field of business but are rare in work with young people at risk--those most in need of deep change. Instead, the nation seems preoccupied with punishing or medicating problem behavior. Some propose the alternative of "rehabilitation," but that term means "to restore to former…

  11. Transforming American Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Michael B.; Mackey, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    In this article the authors accept as a given the National Education Technology Plan's vision of a transformed education system powered by technology such that learners receive personalized and engaging learning experiences, and where assessment, teaching, infrastructure, and productivity are redefined. The article analyzes this vision of a…

  12. transforming human health

    E-print Network

    Bukauskas, Feliksas

    malaria and solid tumors such as lung and breast cancers are in development. #12;A TrAnsformATive educATion At Yeshiva University we believe that a quality education involves more than just excellent classroom with ethical and moral sensitivity and are prepared to enter the world with a positive attitude

  13. Is Distance Learning Transformational?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoskins, Barbara J.

    2013-01-01

    Is distance learning transformational? The author heard this question posed to a panel of faculty members during Distance Education Week activities. After reflecting upon her own students' reaction to her syllabus, her answer to the question changed from an initial, enthusiastic "yes" to a reflective "maybe," given the most favorable environment.…

  14. Global Transformations and Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Rex R.

    1990-01-01

    Examines worldwide political, economic, and social transformations and their impact on agriculture, focusing on biotechnology. Discusses rise of international corporations and accompanying constraints on government power. Sees trend toward increasing agribusiness role in world food and agricultural sectors. Calls for broader views and research in…

  15. Imagination & Transformative Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loughlin, Kathleen A.

    Research was conducted to gain insight into both the facilitators of consciousness-raising and the nature of this emancipatory process. Consciousness-raising was defined as a transformation of consciousness in which individuals experience critical reflection and action that develops a deepened consciousness of their situation leading them to…

  16. High Resolution Transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volker, A. W. F.; Bloom, J. G. P.

    2009-03-01

    The introduction of phased arrays opens-up a range of new possibilities for ultrasonic inspections. Arrays come in various shapes ranging from linear arrays for weld inspection to circular arrays emitting guided waves for permanent monitoring applications. For this kind of applications, the data is best displayed as angle versus time to locate the position a defects. However, the data is normally measured as function of a certain spatial coordinate and time. A transformation is then applied to convert data from the spatial domain into the angle domain. The simplest example is a spatial Fourier transform. Unfortunately the resolution obtained by this kind of transforms is determined by the size of the array compared to the wavelength. The longer the array is compared to the wavelength, the higher is the resolution. The reason for this is the increased phase rotation along the aperture. A new iterative approach is proposed to overcome the shortcomings of the traditional plane wave decomposition. This is a so-called high resolution transform. The new approach yields at least a five times higher resolution and can deal easily with irregular sampling or missing data. The approach will be illustrated on numerically modeled.

  17. Transforming Nursery Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friendly, Martha

    1998-01-01

    Reviews "Transforming Nursery Education" by Peter Moss and Helen Penn. Maintains that the book clarifies issues and options in child care policy in Great Britain, is highly applicable to the situation in Canada, articulates the importance of values as central to developing early childhood policy and programs, highlights the importance of learning…

  18. Case Study: Ecosystem Transformations

    E-print Network

    Nippert, Jesse

    142 Chapter 15 Case Study: Ecosystem Transformations Along The Colorado Front Range: Prairie Dog-tailed prairie dog. Directional changes in climate and atmospheric chemistry are altering the environment foothills and mixed-grass to short-grass prairie. Among these direc- tional changes are elevated average

  19. Teaching, Caring, and Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieto, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    Educator Bell Hooks acknowledged the fundamental truth that teaching, caring, and transformation are closely linked, that is, that true teaching must be accompanied by a deep level of care in order for learning to take place. No matter how young or old, no matter the subject matter, and no matter where teaching and learning take place--a…

  20. TRANSFORMING Management Development

    E-print Network

    Neirotti, Juan Pablo

    DEVELOPING LEADERS TRANSFORMING TEAMS Management Development: What's in it for the Business? Terry of the following best summarises your current approach to evaluating the impact of major investments in management Executive Development is not an "event". Customisation means there is no "standard package". ...which means

  1. Transforming Education at Einstein

    E-print Network

    Emmons, Scott

    Transforming Education at Einstein EinstEin Winter/spring 2012 The Magazine for Alumni and Friends of Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University #12;2 EinstEin : WintEr/spring 2012 Meet Our interactive Companion Magazine Give Einstein's "virtual" version a try! this interactive version

  2. Steganograpic image transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Shuichi; Tanaka, Kiyoshi; Sugimura, Tatsuo

    1999-04-01

    Due to the drastic development of Internet, it has recently been a critical problem to secure multimedia contents against illegal use. In order to solve this problem, data hiding has drawn great attention as a promising method that plays a complementary role to conventional cryptographic techniques. The idea of this approach is found in ancient Greek literature as 'Steganography,' which means a 'covered writing' for special secret communication. This paper presents a new method for steganographic image transformation, which is different from conventional data hiding techniques. The transformation is achieved in frequency domain and the concept of Fourier filtering method is used. An input image is transformed into a fractal image, which can be used in Computer Graphic (CG) applications. Unauthorized users will not notice the 'secret' original image behind the fractal image, but even if they know that there is a hidden image it will be difficult for them to estimate the original image from the transformed image. Only authorized users who know the proper keys can regenerate the original image. The proposed method is applicable not only as a security tool for multimedia contents on web pages but also as a steganographic secret communication method through fractal images.

  3. Chained Quantum Arnold Transformations

    E-print Network

    Francisco F. López-Ruiz; Julio Guerrero; Victor Aldaya

    2011-09-06

    We put forward the concatenation of Quantum Arnold Transformations as a tool to obtain the wave function of a particle subjected to a harmonic potential which is switched on and off successively. This simulates the capture and release process of an ion in a trap and provides a mathematical picture of this physical process.

  4. Transformer Impedance Reflection Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Layton, William

    2014-01-01

    Questions often arise as to how a device attached to a transformer can draw power from the electrical power grid since it seems that the primary and secondary are not connected to one another. However, a closer look at how the primary and secondary are linked together magnetically and a consideration of the role of Lenz's law in this linkage…

  5. Transformer and Meter Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoms, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    Numerically-controlled 5-axis machine tool uses transformer and meter to determine and indicate whether tool is in home position, but lacks built-in test mode to check them. Tester makes possible test, and repair of components at machine rather then replace them when operation seems suspect.

  6. Fixture for winding transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, M. T.

    1980-01-01

    Bench-mounted fixture assists operator in winding toroid-shaped transformer cores. Toroid is rigidly held in place as wires are looped around. Arrangement frees both hands for rapid winding and untangling of wires that occurs when core is hand held.

  7. Computerized toroidal transformer design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Computer program designs transformers which have one primary /center tap permissible/ and up to 20 untapped secondaries, and which can handle up to 500 V across any one winding. Computer determines total secondary power, core type, primary turns, secondary turns, and wire sizes for primary and secondary windings.

  8. Textural transformations in lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals under confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shams, Alireza; Yao, Xuxia; Rey, Alejandro D.; Park, Jung Ok; Srinivasarao, Mohan

    2012-02-01

    Lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals under capillary confinement display textural transformations between planar radial and planar polar modes, in which a +1 disclination branches into two +1/2 lines. The texture transformation is characterized by the nature and kinematics of the branch point, the aperture angle, and the shape of the lines. This work presents and validates a model of these four phenomena, which yield the viscoelastic moduli of these novel mesophases.

  9. Rainbow Fourier Transform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandrov, Mikhail D.; Cairns, Brian; Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel technique for remote sensing of cloud droplet size distributions. Polarized reflectances in the scattering angle range between 135deg and 165deg exhibit a sharply defined rainbow structure, the shape of which is determined mostly by single scattering properties of cloud particles, and therefore, can be modeled using the Mie theory. Fitting the observed rainbow with such a model (computed for a parameterized family of particle size distributions) has been used for cloud droplet size retrievals. We discovered that the relationship between the rainbow structures and the corresponding particle size distributions is deeper than it had been commonly understood. In fact, the Mie theory-derived polarized reflectance as a function of reduced scattering angle (in the rainbow angular range) and the (monodisperse) particle radius appears to be a proxy to a kernel of an integral transform (similar to the sine Fourier transform on the positive semi-axis). This approach, called the rainbow Fourier transform (RFT), allows us to accurately retrieve the shape of the droplet size distribution by the application of the corresponding inverse transform to the observed polarized rainbow. While the basis functions of the proxy-transform are not exactly orthogonal in the finite angular range, this procedure needs to be complemented by a simple regression technique, which removes the retrieval artifacts. This non-parametric approach does not require any a priori knowledge of the droplet size distribution functional shape and is computationally fast (no look-up tables, no fitting, computations are the same as for the forward modeling).

  10. Evaluate and characterize mechanisms controlling transport, fate and effects of army smokes in an aerosol wind tunnel: Transport, transformations, fate and terrestrial ecological effects of fog oil obscurant smokes: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cataldo, D.A.; Van Voris, P.; Ligotke, M.W.; Fellows, R.J.; McVeety, B.D.; Li, Shu-mei W.; Bolton, H. Jr.; Fredrickson, J.K.

    1989-01-01

    The terrestrial transport, chemical fate, and ecological effects of fog oil (FO) smoke obscurants were evaluated under controlled wind tunnel conditions. The primary objectives of this research program are to characterize and assess the impacts of smoke and obscurants on: (1) natural vegetation characteristic of US Army training sites in the United States; (2) physical and chemical properties of soils representative of these training sites; and (3) soil microbiological and invertebrate communities. Impacts and dose/responses were evaluated based on an exposure scenario, including exposure duration, exposure rate, and sequential cumulative dosing. Key to understanding the environmental impacts of fog oil smoke/obscurants is establishing the importance of environmental parameters, such as relative humidity and wind speed on airborne aerosol characteristics and deposition to receptor surfaces. Direct and indirect biotic effects were evaluated using five plant species and three soil types. 29 refs., 35 figs., 32 tabs.

  11. Mineralogical transformations controlling acid mine drainage chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Peretyazhko, Tetyana; Zachara, John M.; Boily, Jean F.; Xia, Yuanxian; Gassman, Paul L.; Arey, Bruce W.; Burgos, William D.

    2009-05-30

    The role of Fe(III) minerals in controlling acid mine drainage (AMD) chemistry was studied using samples from two AMD sites [Gum Boot (GB) and Fridays-2 (FR)] located in northern Pennsylvania. Chemical extractions, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to identify and characterize Fe(III) phases. The mineralogical analysis revealed that schwertmannite and goethite were the principal Fe(III) phases in the sediments. Schwertmannite transformation occurred at the GB site where poorly-crystallized goethite rich in surface-bound sulfate was initially formed. In contrast, no schwertmannite transformation occurred at the FR site. The goethite in GB sediments had spherical morphology due to preservation of schwertmannite structure by adsorbed sulfate. Results of chemical extractions showed that poorly-crystallized goethite was subject to further crystallization accompanied by sulfate desorption. Changes in sulfate speciation preceded its desorption, with a conversion of bidentate- to monodentate-bound sulfate surface complexes. Laboratory sediment incubation experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of mineral transformation on water chemistry. Incubation experiments were carried out with schwertmannite-containing sediments and AMD waters with different pH and chemical composition. The pH decreased to 1.9-2.2 in all suspensions and the concentrations of dissolved Fe and S increased significantly. Regardless of differences in the initial water composition, pH, Fe and S were similar in suspensions of the same sediment. XRD measurements revealed that schwertmannite transformed into goethite in GB and FR sediments during laboratory incubation. The incubation experiment demonstrated that schwertmannite transformation controlled AMD water chemistry during “closed system” laboratory contact.

  12. Experiments on transformation thermodynamics: Molding the flow of heat

    E-print Network

    Schittny, Robert; Guenneau, Sebastien; Wegener, Martin

    2012-01-01

    It has recently been shown theoretically that the time-dependent heat conduction equation is form-invariant under curvilinear coordinate transformations. Thus, in analogy to transformation optics, fictitious transformed space can be mapped onto (meta-)materials with spatially inhomogeneous and anisotropic heat-conductivity tensors in the laboratory space. On this basis, we design, fabricate, and characterize a micro-structured thermal cloak that molds the flow of heat around an object in a metal plate. This allows for transient protection of the object from heating, while maintaining the same downstream heat flow as without object and cloak.

  13. Atmospheric transformation of diesel emissions.

    PubMed

    Zielinska, Barbara; Samy, Shar; McDonald, Jacob D; Seagrave, JeanClare

    2010-04-01

    The hypothesis of this study was that exposing diesel exhaust (DE*) to the atmosphere transforms its composition and toxicity. Our specific aims were (1) to characterize the gas- and particle-phase products of atmospheric transformations of DE under the influence of daylight, ozone (O3), hydroxyl (OH) radicals, and nitrate (NO3) radicals; and (2) to explore the biologic activity of DE before and after the transformations took place. The study was executed with the aid of the EUPHORE (European Photoreactor) outdoor simulation chamber facility in Valencia, Spain. EUPHORE is one of the largest and best-equipped facilities of its kind in the world, allowing investigation of atmospheric transformation processes under realistic ambient conditions (with dilutions in the range of 1:300). DE was generated on-site using a modern light-duty diesel engine and a dynamometer system equipped with a continuous emission-gas analyzer. The engine (a turbocharged, intercooled model with common-rail direct injection) was obtained from the Ford Motor Company. A first series of experiments was carried out in January 2005 (the winter 2005 campaign), a second in May 2005 (the summer 2005 campaign), and a third in May and June 2006 (the summer 2006 campaign). The diesel fuel that was used closely matched the one currently in use in most of the United States (containing 47 ppm sulfur and 15% aromatic compounds). Our experiments examined the effects on the composition of DE aged in the dark with added NO3 radicals and of DE aged in daylight with added OH radicals both with and without added volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In order to remove excess nitrogen oxides (NO(x)), a NO(x) denuder was devised and used to conduct experiments in realistic low-NO(x) conditions in both summer campaigns. A scanning mobility particle sizer was used to determine the particle size and the number and volume concentrations of particulate matter (PM) in the DE. O3, NO(x), and reactive nitrogen oxides (NO(y)) were monitored using chemiluminescence and Fourier transform infrared instruments. At the end of the exposures, samples of particle-associated and semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) were collected from the chamber for chemical analysis using an XAD-coated annular denuder followed by a filter and XAD cartridge. (XAD is an adsorbent polystyrene divinylbenzene resin used in sampling cartridges.) Samples for toxicity testing were collected using Teflon filters followed by two XAD cartridges. The chemical analyses included determination of organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), carbon fractions, inorganic ions (e.g., sulfate and nitrate), and speciated organic compounds (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons [PAHs], nitro-PAHs, polar compounds, alkanes, hopanes, and steranes). The toxicity tests were performed with extracts of PM combined with the SVOCs. The biologic activity of these extracts was evaluated in vivo by instilling them into the tracheas of rodents and measuring pulmonary toxicity, inflammation, and oxidative-stress responses. Results from the chemical analyses indicated that aging DE in the dark with added NO3 radicals and aging DE in daylight with and without additions led to the formation of additional particles and SVOC mass caused by reactions of VOCs, SVOCs, and inorganic gases. The greatest increase in mass occurred with the addition of VOCs as co-reactants. The proportions of the pyrolized OC (POC) fraction increased in the organic mass, which suggested that highly polar and oligomeric compounds had been formed. Results from the toxicity testing were consistent with the hypothesis that the toxicity of the samples had been affected by changes in their composition (caused both by the atmospheric aging and by changes in the initial composition of the DE presumably associated with changes in the engine, which was new at the outset and accrued wear during the study). PMID:20572366

  14. Algorithms for transform selection in multiple-transform video compression

    E-print Network

    Cai, Xun, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01

    Selecting proper transforms for video compression has been based on the rate-distortion criterion. Transforms that appear reasonable are incorporated into a video coding system and their performance is evaluated. This ...

  15. Shock phase transformation and release properties of aluminum nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Kipp, M.E.; Grady, D.E.

    1993-12-31

    Aluminum nitride is characterized by a non-recoverable volume phase transformation from the wurtzite (hexagonal) to the rocksalt (cubic) structure that commences about 22 GPa, accompanied by a volume strain of about 20%. A study of the manifestation of this large volume change under shock loading was made with four uniaxial strain impact experiments. Particle velocity histories of the shock and release states were obtained corresponding to impact pressures of 40 GPa, including the evolution of the shock and release waves with propagation distance. Stress-strain features characterizing aluminum nitride, including the phase transformation, were determined with numerical analysis techniques.

  16. Liquid Metal Transformers

    E-print Network

    Sheng, Lei; Liu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    The room temperature liquid metal is quickly emerging as an important functional material in a variety of areas like chip cooling, 3D printing or printed electronics etc. With diverse capabilities in electrical, thermal and flowing behaviors, such fluid owns many intriguing properties that had never been anticipated before. Here, we show a group of unconventional phenomena occurring on the liquid metal objects. Through applying electrical field on the liquid metals immersed in water, a series of complex transformation behaviors such as self-assembling of a sheet of liquid metal film into a single sphere, quick mergences of separate metal droplets, controlled self-rotation and planar locomotion of liquid metal objects can be realized. Meanwhile, it was also found that two accompanying water vortexes were induced and reliably swirled near the rotating liquid metal sphere. Further, effects of the shape, size, voltage, orientation and geometries of the electrodes to control the liquid metal transformers were clar...

  17. A DC Transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C.; Ihlefeld, Curtis M.; Starr, Stanley O.

    2013-01-01

    A component level dc transformer is described in which no alternating currents or voltages are present. It operates by combining features of a homopolar motor and a homopolar generator, both de devices, such that the output voltage of a de power supply can be stepped up (or down) with a corresponding step down (or up) in current. The basic theory for this device is developed, performance predictions are made, and the results from a small prototype are presented. Based on demonstrated technology in the literature, this de transformer should be scalable to low megawatt levels, but it is more suited to high current than high voltage applications. Significant development would be required before it could achieve the kilovolt levels needed for de power transmission.

  18. Reduction/Transformation Operators

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2006-09-01

    RTOp (reduction/transformation operators) is a collection of C++ software that provides the basic mechanism for implementinig vector operations in a flexible and efficient manner. This is the main interface utilized by Thyra to allow for the specification of specific vector reduction and/or transformation operations. The RTOp package contains three different types of software. (a) a small number of interoperability interfaces. (b) support software including code for the parallel SPMD mode based on only Teuchos::Comm(and notmore »MPl directly(, and (c) a library of pre-implemented RTOp subclasses for everything from simple AXPYs and norms, to more specialized vector operations. RTOp allows an algorithm developer to implement their own RTOp subclasses in a way that is independent from any specific serial, parallel, out-of-core or other type of vector implementation. RTOp is a required package by Thyra and MOOCHO. (c)« less

  19. Transforming the optical landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendry, J. B.; Luo, Yu; Zhao, Rongkuo

    2015-05-01

    Electromagnetism provides us with some of the most powerful tools in science, encompassing lasers, optical microscopes, magnetic resonance imaging scanners, radar, and a host of other techniques. To understand and develop the technology requires more than a set of formal equations. Scientists and engineers have to form a vivid picture that fires their imaginations and enables intuition to play a full role in the process of invention. It is to this end that transformation optics has been developed, exploiting Faraday’s picture of electric and magnetic fields as lines of force, which can be manipulated by the electrical permittivity and magnetic permeability of surrounding materials. Transformation optics says what has to be done to place the lines of force where we want them to be.

  20. High voltage isolation transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clatterbuck, C. H.; Ruitberg, A. P. (inventors)

    1985-01-01

    A high voltage isolation transformer is provided with primary and secondary coils separated by discrete electrostatic shields from the surfaces of insulating spools on which the coils are wound. The electrostatic shields are formed by coatings of a compound with a low electrical conductivity which completely encase the coils and adhere to the surfaces of the insulating spools adjacent to the coils. Coatings of the compound also line axial bores of the spools, thereby forming electrostatic shields separating the spools from legs of a ferromagnetic core extending through the bores. The transformer is able to isolate a high constant potential applied to one of its coils, without the occurrence of sparking or corona, by coupling the coatings, lining the axial bores to the ferromagnetic core and by coupling one terminal of each coil to the respective coating encasing the coil.

  1. Bacterial transformation of terpenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishko, V. V.; Nogovitsina, Y. M.; Ivshina, I. B.

    2014-04-01

    Data on the bacterial transformation of terpenoids published in the literature in the past decade are analyzed. Possible pathways for chemo-, regio- and stereoselective modifications of terpenoids are discussed. Considerable attention is given to new technological approaches to the synthesis of terpenoid derivatives suitable for the use in the perfume and food industry and promising as drugs and chiral intermediates for fine organic synthesis. The bibliography includes 246 references.

  2. Microbial transformation of benzosampangine.

    PubMed

    Orabi, K Y; Clark, A M; Hufford, C D

    2000-03-01

    Microbial transformation studies of the synthetic antifungal alkaloid benzosampangine (1) have revealed that 1 is metabolized by a number of microorganisms. Using a standard two-stage fermentation technique Absidia glauca (ATCC 22752), Cunninghamella blakesleeana (ATCC 8688a), Cunninghamella species (NRRL 5695), Fusarium solani f. sp. cucurbitae (CSIH #C-5), and Rhizopogon species (ATCC 36060) each produced a beta-glucopyranose conjugate of benzosampangine (2). The identity of 2 was established on the basis of spectroscopic data. PMID:10757729

  3. Transformer Impedance Reflection Demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Layton, William

    2014-10-01

    Questions often arise as to how a device attached to a transformer can draw power from the electrical power grid since it seems that the primary and secondary are not connected to one another. However, a closer look at how the primary and secondary are linked together magnetically and a consideration of the role of Lenz's law in this linkage may help to clear up this confusion.

  4. Transforming revenue management.

    PubMed

    Silveria, Richard; Alliegro, Debra; Nudd, Steven

    2008-11-01

    Healthcare organizations that want to undertake a patient administrative/revenue management transformation should: Define the vision with underlying business objectives and key performance measures. Strategically partner with key vendors for business process development and technology design. Create a program organization and governance infrastructure. Develop a corporate design model that defines the standards for operationalizing the vision. Execute the vision through technology deployment and corporate design model implementation. PMID:18990839

  5. Laminated piezoelectric transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vazquez Carazo, Alfredo (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A laminated piezoelectric transformer is provided using the longitudinal vibration modes for step-up voltage conversion applications. The input portions are polarized to deform in a longitudinal plane and are bonded to an output portion. The deformation of the input portions is mechanically coupled to the output portion, which deforms in the same longitudinal direction relative to the input portion. The output portion is polarized in the thickness direction relative its electrodes, and piezoelectrically generates a stepped-up output voltage.

  6. RECENT ADVANCES IN BARLEY TRANSFORMATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Barley, an important member of the cereals, has been successfully transformed through various methods such as particle bombardment, Agrobacterium-tumefaciens, DNA uptake, and electroporation. Initially, the transformation in barley concentrated on developing protocols using marker genes such as gus,...

  7. Transformer Abdullah Al-Otaibi

    E-print Network

    Masoudi, Husain M.

    induces a changing voltage in the secondary. II. HISTORY Michael Faraday demonstrated the principle of the transformer in 1831. The transformer is used by Faraday only to demonstrate the principle of electromagnetic

  8. Transformational Leadership, Integrity, and Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Laura M.

    2011-01-01

    Transformational leadership enjoys widespread appeal among student affairs professionals. National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA) and American College Personnel Association (ACPA) conferences frequently feature speakers who promote transformational leadership's two primary tenets: (1) change is the central purpose of…

  9. On transformational creativity Graeme Ritchie

    E-print Network

    Ritchie, Graeme

    On transformational creativity Graeme Ritchie Department of Computing Science University of creativity has been extremely influential, particularly her promo- tion of transformational creativity. We or methodological frameworks for studying computational creativity in general [Ritchie, 2001], [Wiggins, 2001; 2003

  10. Spectrum transformation for divergent iterations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Murli M.

    1991-01-01

    Certain spectrum transformation techniques are described that can be used to transform a diverging iteration into a converging one. Two techniques are considered called spectrum scaling and spectrum enveloping and how to obtain the optimum values of the transformation parameters is discussed. Numerical examples are given to show how this technique can be used to transform diverging iterations into converging ones; this technique can also be used to accelerate the convergence of otherwise convergent iterations.

  11. Thin-Film Power Transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, Romney R.

    1995-01-01

    Transformer core made of thin layers of insulating material interspersed with thin layers of ferromagnetic material. Flux-linking conductors made of thinner nonferromagnetic-conductor/insulator multilayers wrapped around core. Transformers have geometric features finer than those of transformers made in customary way by machining and mechanical pressing. In addition, some thin-film materials exhibit magnetic-flux-carrying capabilities superior to those of customary bulk transformer materials. Suitable for low-cost, high-yield mass production.

  12. Nonlinear transient simulation of transformers

    SciTech Connect

    Pierrat, L.; Tran-Quoc, T.; Montmeat, A.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper, a nonlinear model of transformer which takes into account both the saturation and the hysteresis is proposed. In order to simulate transient phenomena in transformers, a system of equations is presented. The digital simulation of the energization and de-energization of a three-phase distribution transformer is studied. Ferroresonant phenomena in iron core transformers supplied through capacitive links are presented. Finally, the influence of MOV arresters on overvoltage reduction is investigated.

  13. Mechanism of the ? -? phase transformation in iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewaele, A.; Denoual, C.; Anzellini, S.; Occelli, F.; Mezouar, M.; Cordier, P.; Merkel, S.; Véron, M.; Rausch, E.

    2015-05-01

    The ? -Fe?? -Fe pressure-induced transformation under pure hydrostatic static compression has been characterized with in situ x-ray diffraction using ? -Fe single crystals as starting samples. The forward transition starts at 14.9 GPa, and the reverse at 12 GPa, with a width of ? -? coexistence domain of the order of 2 GPa. The elastic stress in the sample increases in this domain, and partially relaxes after completion of the transformation. Orientation relations between parent ? -Fe and child ? -Fe have been determined, which definitely validates the Burgers path for the direct transition. On the reverse transition, an unexpected variant selection is observed. X-ray diffraction data, complemented with ex situ microstructural observations, suggest that this selection is caused by defects and stresses accumulated during the direct transition.

  14. Canonical Transformations of Kepler Trajectories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mostowski, Jan

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, canonical transformations generated by constants of motion in the case of the Kepler problem are discussed. It is shown that canonical transformations generated by angular momentum are rotations of the trajectory. Particular attention is paid to canonical transformations generated by the Runge-Lenz vector. It is shown that these…

  15. Isotropic Transformation Optics Approximate Cloaking

    E-print Network

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    Isotropic Transformation Optics and Approximate Cloaking Allan Greenleaf joint with Yaroslav Kurylev Matti Lassas Gunther Uhlmann CLK08 @ CSCAMM September 24, 2008 #12;Challenges of cloaking and other transformation optics (TO) designs: #12;Challenges of cloaking and other transformation optics (TO

  16. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Gerwert, Klaus

    Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy Klaus Gerwert, Lehrstuhl fu¨r Biophysik, Ruhr, Germany Based in part on the previous version of this Encyclopedia of Life Sciences (ELS) article, Fourier Transform IR by Johannes Orphal. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is an experimental technique

  17. Claude Sabbah FOURIER TRANSFORMATION OF

    E-print Network

    Sabbah, Claude

    Claude Sabbah FOURIER TRANSFORMATION OF D-MODULES AND APPLICATIONS LECTURE NOTES (CIRM, LUMINY://www.math.polytechnique.fr/~sabbah #12;FOURIER TRANSFORMATION OF D-MODULES AND APPLICATIONS LECTURE NOTES (CIRM, LUMINY, SEPT. 2010 of the Fourier transformation of holonomic D-modules. Firstly, a compar- ison is made with the usual Fourier

  18. Teacher Transformation: Transcending Hegemonic Roots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    In this dissertation study, I build from the research on transformative teaching (transformative for students), liberating theories (Liberating, Liberation and Liberating Theories) as well as literature about transformation, reflection and discourse to make the case that our historic and continuously inequitable results for students based on…

  19. Quality as Transformation: Educational Metamorphosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Ming

    2014-01-01

    The notion of "quality as transformation" has been widely used in the higher education sector. However, both quality and transformation are elusive terms. There is little research exploring how quality could be equated to transformation in the learning process. This paper will provide an insight into the relationship between quality and…

  20. Enhancing Understanding of Transformation Matrices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dick, Jonathan; Childrey, Maria

    2012-01-01

    With the Common Core State Standards' emphasis on transformations, teachers need a variety of approaches to increase student understanding. Teaching matrix transformations by focusing on row vectors gives students tools to create matrices to perform transformations. This empowerment opens many doors: Students are able to create the matrices for…

  1. A dynamic phase-field model for structural transformations and twinning: Regularized interfaces with transparent prescription of complex kinetics and nucleation. Part II: Two-dimensional characterization and boundary kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Vaibhav; Dayal, Kaushik

    2015-12-01

    A companion paper presented the formulation of a phase-field model - i.e., a model with regularized interfaces that do not require explicit numerical tracking - that allows for easy and transparent prescription of complex interface kinetics and nucleation. The key ingredients were a re-parametrization of the energy density to clearly separate nucleation from kinetics; and an evolution law that comes from a conservation statement for interfaces. This enables clear prescription of nucleation through the source term of the conservation law and of kinetics through an interfacial velocity field. This model overcomes an important shortcoming of existing phase-field models, namely that the specification of kinetics and nucleation is both restrictive and extremely opaque. In this paper, we present a number of numerical calculations - in one and two dimensions - that characterize our formulation. These calculations illustrate (i) highly-sensitive rate-dependent nucleation; (ii) independent prescription of the forward and backward nucleation stresses without changing the energy landscape; (iii) stick-slip interface kinetics; (iii) the competition between nucleation and kinetics in determining the final microstructural state; (iv) the effect of anisotropic kinetics; and (v) the effect of non-monotone kinetics. These calculations demonstrate the ability of this formulation to precisely prescribe complex nucleation and kinetics in a simple and transparent manner. We also extend our conservation statement to describe the kinetics of the junction lines between microstructural interfaces and boundaries. This enables us to prescribe an additional kinetic relation for the boundary, and we examine the interplay between the bulk kinetics and the junction kinetics.

  2. Surface catalyzed mercury transformation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varanasi, Patanjali

    Mercury is a known pollutant that has detrimental effect on human health and environment. The anthropogenic emissions of mercury account for 10 to 30% of worldwide mercury emissions. There is a need to control/reduce anthropogenic mercury emissions. Many mercury control technologies are available but their effectiveness is dependent on the chemical form of mercury, because different chemical forms of mercury have different physical and chemical properties. Mercury leaves the boiler in its elemental form but goes through various transformations in the post-combustion zone. There is a need to understand how fly ash and flue gas composition affect speciation, partitioning, and reactions of mercury under the full range of post-combustion zone conditions. This knowledge can then be used to predict the chemical transformation of mercury (elemental, oxidized or particulate) in the post combustion zone and thus help with the control of mercury emissions from coal-burning power plants. To accomplish this goal present study was conducted using five coal fly ashes. These ashes were characterized and their catalytic activity was compared under selected reaction conditions in a fixed bed reactor. Based on the results from these fly ash experiments, three key components (carbon, iron oxide and calcium oxide) were chosen. These three components were then used to prepare model fly ashes. Silica/alumina was used as a base for these model fly ashes. One, two or three component model fly ashes were then prepared to investigate mercury transformation reactions. The third set of experiments was performed with five different oxidation catalysts to further understand the mercury oxidation process. Based on the results of these three studies the key components were predicted for different fly ash compositions under variety of flue gas conditions. A fixed bed reactor system was used to conduct this study. In all the experiments, the inlet concentration of Hg0(g) was maintained at 35 mug/m 3 using a diffusion tube as the source of Hg0(g). All experiments were conducted using 4% O2 in nitrogen mix as a reaction gas, and other reactants (HCl, H2O and SO2, NO 2, Br2) were added as required. The fixed bed reactor was operated over a temperature range of 200 to 400°C. In each experiment, the reactor effluent was analyzed using the modified Ontario-Hydro method. After each experiment, fly ash particles were also analyzed for mercury. The results show that the ability of fly ash to adsorb and/or oxidize mercury is primarily dependent on its carbon, iron and calcium content. There can be either one or more than one key component at a particular temperature and flue gas condition. Surface area played a secondary role in effecting the mercury transformations when compared to the concentration of the key component in the fly ash. Amount carbon and surface area played a key important role in the adsorption of mercury. Increased concentration of gases in the flue gas other than oxygen and nitrogen caused decreased the amount of mercury adsorbed on carbon surface. Mercury adsorption by iron oxide primarily depended on the crystalline structure of iron oxide. alpha-iron oxide had no effect on mercury adsorption or oxidation under most of the flue gas conditions, but gamma-iron oxide adsorbed mercury under most of the flue gas conditions. Bromine is a very good oxidizing agent for mercury. But in the presence of calcium oxide containing fly ashes, all the oxidized mercury would be reduced to elemental form. Among the catalysts, it was observed that presence of free lattice chlorine in the catalyst was very important for the oxidation of mercury. But instead of using the catalyst alone, using it along with carbon may better serve the purpose by providing the adsorption surface for mercury and also some extra surface area for the reaction to occur (especially for fly ashes with low surface area).

  3. Computer simulation of martensitic transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ping

    1993-11-01

    The characteristics of martensitic transformations in solids are largely determined by the elastic strain that develops as martensite particles grow and interact. To study the development of microstructure, a finite-element computer simulation model was constructed to mimic the transformation process. The transformation is athermal and simulated at each incremental step by transforming the cell which maximizes the decrease in the free energy. To determine the free energy change, the elastic energy developed during martensite growth is calculated from the theory of linear elasticity for elastically homogeneous media, and updated as the transformation proceeds.

  4. A Fast Hermite Transform?

    PubMed Central

    Leibon, Gregory; Rockmore, Daniel N.; Park, Wooram; Taintor, Robert; Chirikjian, Gregory S.

    2008-01-01

    We present algorithms for fast and stable approximation of the Hermite transform of a compactly supported function on the real line, attainable via an application of a fast algebraic algorithm for computing sums associated with a three-term relation. Trade-offs between approximation in bandlimit (in the Hermite sense) and size of the support region are addressed. Numerical experiments are presented that show the feasibility and utility of our approach. Generalizations to any family of orthogonal polynomials are outlined. Applications to various problems in tomographic reconstruction, including the determination of protein structure, are discussed. PMID:20027202

  5. Thermal energy transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berdahl, C. M.; Thiele, C. L. (inventors)

    1979-01-01

    For use in combination with a heat engine, a thermal energy transformer is presented. It is comprised of a flux receiver having a first wall defining therein a radiation absorption cavity for converting solar flux to thermal energy, and a second wall defining an energy transfer wall for the heat engine. There is a heat pipe chamber interposed between the first and second walls having a working fluid disposed within the chamber and a wick lining the chamber for conducting the working fluid from the second wall to the first wall. Thermal energy is transferred from the radiation absorption cavity to the heat engine.

  6. Banded transformer cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, C. W. T. (inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A banded transformer core formed by positioning a pair of mated, similar core halves on a supporting pedestal. The core halves are encircled with a strap, selectively applying tension whereby a compressive force is applied to the core edge for reducing the innate air gap. A dc magnetic field is employed in supporting the core halves during initial phases of the banding operation, while an ac magnetic field subsequently is employed for detecting dimension changes occurring in the air gaps as tension is applied to the strap.

  7. Trkalian fields and Radon transformation

    E-print Network

    K. Saygili

    2010-03-27

    We write the spherical curl transformation for Trkalian fields using differential forms. Then we consider Radon transform of these fields. The Radon transform of a Trkalian field satisfies a corresponding eigenvalue equation on a sphere in transform space. The field can be reconstructed using knowledge of the Radon transform on a canonical hemisphere. We consider relation of the Radon transformation with Biot-Savart integral operator and discuss its transform introducing Radon-Biot- Savart operator. The Radon transform of a Trkalian field is an eigenvector of this operator. We also present an Ampere law type relation for these fields. We apply these to Lundquist solution. We present a Chandrasekhar-Kendall type solution of the corresponding equation in the transform space. Lastly, we focus on the Euclidean topologically massive Abelian gauge theory. The Radon transform of an anti-self-dual field is related by antipodal map on this sphere to the transform of the self-dual field obtained by inverting space coordinates. The Lundquist solution provides an example of quantization of topological mass in this context.

  8. Lorentz transformations: Einstein's derivation simplified

    E-print Network

    Bernhard Rothenstein; Stefan Popescu

    2007-02-19

    We show that the Lorentz transformations for the space-time coordinates of the same event are a direct consequence of the principle of relativity and of Einstein's distant clocks synchronization procedure. In our approach, imposing the linear character of the Lorentz transformations we guess that the transformation equation for the space coordinate has the form x=ax'+cbt'. Imposing the condition that it accounts for the time dilation relativistic effect and taking into account the fact that due to the clock synchronization a la Einstein the space-time coordinates of the same event in the two frames are related by x=ct and x'=ct', we find out expressions for a and b. Dividing the transformation equation for the space coordinate by c we obtain the transformation equation for the time coordinate t=at'+b/cx'. Combining the two transformation equations we obtain directly the inverse Lorentz transformations.

  9. Thermal-mechanical-noise-based CMUT characterization and sensing.

    PubMed

    Gurun, Gokce; Hochman, Michael; Hasler, Paul; Degertekin, F Levent

    2012-06-01

    When capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) are monolithically integrated with custom-designed low-noise electronics, the output noise of the system can be dominated by the CMUT thermal-mechanical noise both in air and in immersion even for devices with low capacitance. Because the thermal-mechanical noise can be related to the electrical admittance of the CMUTs, this provides an effective means of device characterization. This approach yields a novel method to test the functionality and uniformity of CMUT arrays and the integrated electronics when a direct connection to CMUT array element terminals is not available. Because these measurements can be performed in air at the wafer level, the approach is suitable for batch manufacturing and testing. We demonstrate this method on the elements of an 800-?m-diameter CMUT-on-CMOS array designed for intravascular imaging in the 10 to 20 MHz range. Noise measurements in air show the expected resonance behavior and spring softening effects. Noise measurements in immersion for the same array provide useful information on both the acoustic cross talk and radiation properties of the CMUT array elements. The good agreement between a CMUT model based on finite difference and boundary element methods and the noise measurements validates the model and indicates that the output noise is indeed dominated by thermal-mechanical noise. The measurement method can be exploited to implement CMUT-based passive sensors to measure immersion medium properties, or other parameters affecting the electro-mechanics of the CMUT structure. PMID:22718877

  10. Thermal-Mechanical Noise Based CMUT Characterization and Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Gurun, Gokce; Hochman, Michael; Hasler, Paul; Degertekin, F. Levent

    2012-01-01

    When capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) are monolithically integrated with custom-designed low-noise electronics, the output noise of the system can be dominated by the CMUT thermal-mechanical noise both in air and in immersion even for devices with low capacitance. Since the thermal-mechanical noise can be related to the electrical admittance of the CMUTs, this provides an effective means of device characterization. This approach yields a novel method to test the functionality and uniformity of CMUT arrays and the integrated electronics where a direct connection to CMUT array element terminals is not available. These measurements can be performed in air at the wafer level, suitable for batch manufacturing and testing. We demonstrate this method on the elements of an 800-?m diameter CMUT-on-CMOS array designed for intravascular imaging in the 10-20 MHz range. Noise measurements in air show the expected resonance behavior and spring softening effects. Noise measurements in immersion for the same array provide useful information on both the acoustic cross talk and radiation properties of the CMUT array elements. The good agreement between a CMUT model based on finite difference and boundary element method and the noise measurements validates the model and indicates that the output noise is indeed dominated by thermal-mechanical noise. The measurement method can be exploited to implement CMUT based passive sensors to measure immersion medium properties, or other parameters affecting the electro-mechanics of the CMUT structure. PMID:22718877

  11. Liquid Metal Transformers

    E-print Network

    Lei Sheng; Jie Zhang; Jing Liu

    2014-01-30

    The room temperature liquid metal is quickly emerging as an important functional material in a variety of areas like chip cooling, 3D printing or printed electronics etc. With diverse capabilities in electrical, thermal and flowing behaviors, such fluid owns many intriguing properties that had never been anticipated before. Here, we show a group of unconventional phenomena occurring on the liquid metal objects. Through applying electrical field on the liquid metals immersed in water, a series of complex transformation behaviors such as self-assembling of a sheet of liquid metal film into a single sphere, quick mergences of separate metal droplets, controlled self-rotation and planar locomotion of liquid metal objects can be realized. Meanwhile, it was also found that two accompanying water vortexes were induced and reliably swirled near the rotating liquid metal sphere. Further, effects of the shape, size, voltage, orientation and geometries of the electrodes to control the liquid metal transformers were clarified. Such events are hard to achieve otherwise on rigid metal or conventional liquid spheres. This finding has both fundamental and practical significances which suggest a generalized way of making smart soft machine, collecting discrete metal fluids, as well as flexibly manipulating liquid metal objects including accompanying devices.

  12. Transformational silicon electronics.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Jhonathan Prieto; Torres Sevilla, Galo Andres; Ghoneim, Mohamed Tarek; Inayat, Salman Bin; Ahmed, Sally M; Hussain, Aftab Mustansir; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2014-02-25

    In today's traditional electronics such as in computers or in mobile phones, billions of high-performance, ultra-low-power devices are neatly integrated in extremely compact areas on rigid and brittle but low-cost bulk monocrystalline silicon (100) wafers. Ninety percent of global electronics are made up of silicon. Therefore, we have developed a generic low-cost regenerative batch fabrication process to transform such wafers full of devices into thin (5 ?m), mechanically flexible, optically semitransparent silicon fabric with devices, then recycling the remaining wafer to generate multiple silicon fabric with chips and devices, ensuring low-cost and optimal utilization of the whole substrate. We show monocrystalline, amorphous, and polycrystalline silicon and silicon dioxide fabric, all from low-cost bulk silicon (100) wafers with the semiconductor industry's most advanced high-?/metal gate stack based high-performance, ultra-low-power capacitors, field effect transistors, energy harvesters, and storage to emphasize the effectiveness and versatility of this process to transform traditional electronics into flexible and semitransparent ones for multipurpose applications. PMID:24476361

  13. Image Transformations-Montserrat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A slightly oblique digital photograph of Montserrat taken from the International Space Station was posted to Earth Observatory in December 2001. An Earth Observatory reader used widely available software to correct the oblique perspective and adjust the color. The story of how he modified the image includes step-by-step instructions that can be applied to other photographs. Photographs of Earth taken by astronauts have shaped our view of the Earth and are part of our popular culture because NASA makes them easily accessible to the public. Read the Transformations Story for more information. The original image was digital photograph number ISS002-E-9309, taken on July 9, 2001, from the International Space Station and was provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA-JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth. Bill Innanen provided the transformed image and the story of how he did it.

  14. Fast Fourier transform telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Tegmark, Max; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2009-04-15

    We propose an all-digital telescope for 21 cm tomography, which combines key advantages of both single dishes and interferometers. The electric field is digitized by antennas on a rectangular grid, after which a series of fast Fourier transforms recovers simultaneous multifrequency images of up to half the sky. Thanks to Moore's law, the bandwidth up to which this is feasible has now reached about 1 GHz, and will likely continue doubling every couple of years. The main advantages over a single dish telescope are cost and orders of magnitude larger field-of-view, translating into dramatically better sensitivity for large-area surveys. The key advantages over traditional interferometers are cost (the correlator computational cost for an N-element array scales as Nlog{sub 2}N rather than N{sup 2}) and a compact synthesized beam. We argue that 21 cm tomography could be an ideal first application of a very large fast Fourier transform telescope, which would provide both massive sensitivity improvements per dollar and mitigate the off-beam point source foreground problem with its clean beam. Another potentially interesting application is cosmic microwave background polarization.

  15. Transformations of emotional experience.

    PubMed

    de Cortiñas, Lia Pistiner

    2013-06-01

    In this paper the author approaches mental pain and the problems in a psychoanalytic treatment of patients with difficulties in the psychic transformation of their emotional experiences. The author is interested in the symbolic failure related to the obstruction of development of phantasies, dreams, dream-thoughts, etc. She differentiates symbolization disturbances related to hypertrophic projective identification from a detention of these primitive communications and emotional isolation. She puts forward the conjecture that one factor in the arrest of this development is the detention of projective identifications and that, when this primitive means of communication is re-established in a container-contained relationship of mutual benefit, this initiates the development of a symbolization process that can replace the pathological 'protection'. Another hypothesis she develops is that of inaccessible caesuras that, associated with the detention of projective identification, obstruct any integrative or interactive movement. This caesura and the detention of projective identifications affect mental functions needed for dealing with mental pain. The personality is left with precarious mental equipment for transforming emotional experiences. How can a psychoanalytical process stimulate the development of creative symbolization, transforming the emotional experiences and leading towards mental growth? The author approaches the clinical problem with the metaphor of the psychic birth of emotional experience. The modulation of mental pain in a container-contained relationship is a central problem for the development of the human mind. For discovering and giving a meaning to emotional experience, the infant depends on reverie, a function necessary in order to develop an evolved consciousness capable of being aware, which is different from the rudimentary consciousness that perceives but does not understand. The development of mature mental equipment is associated with the personality's attitude towards mental pain. The differentiation between psychotic, neurotic or autistic functioning depends on what defences are erected to avoid mental pain. The primary link between infant and mother is where the building of mental equipment takes place, through communicational forms that, to begin with, are not verbal. The author suggests the need for the development of an ideo-grammar (in gestures, paralinguistic forms, etc.) in primary relations, as the precursor forms that will become the matrix for the mental tools for dealing with emotional experiences in a mature way. The paper stresses the significance of the parental containing function for the development of symbolization of prenatal emotional experiences. This containment develops ideograms, transformations of sense impressions into proto-symbols, instruments that attenuate the traumatic experiences of helplessness. The author takes Bion's ideas about extending the notion of dream-work to an alpha function that goes on continually, day and night, transforming raw emotional experiences in a 'dream'. In order to acquire a meaning, facts need to be 'dreamed' in this extended sense. Meaning and truth are the nurture of the mind. Mental growth, the development of adequate tools--including reverie--for dealing with mental pain, seen from a psychoanalytic perspective including reverie, implies that the object becomes a provider of meanings. Analysis begins to aim primarily at the generation or expansion of the mental container, instead of predominantly working on unconscious contents as such. PMID:23781834

  16. Anthropogenic transformation of the biomes, 1700 to 2000

    E-print Network

    Ellis, Erle C.

    RESEARCH PAPER Anthropogenic transformation of the biomes, 1700 to 2000 Erle C. Ellis1 *, Kees biomes (anthromes) were mapped for 1700, 1800, 1900 and 2000 using a rule-based anthrome classification- mation of terrestrial biomes was then characterized by map comparisons at century intervals. Results

  17. Transformational Leadership Characteristics Necessary for Today's Leaders in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basham, Lloyd Moman

    2012-01-01

    This study is concerned with the traits and characteristics of presidents of institutions of higher education who are considered transformational leaders. The study adds current data to the published and perceived characterization of leaders in higher education and their approaches to changing the learning environment at their institutions. This…

  18. Discrete signal transforms as a tool for processing and analyzing pulsed thermographic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarra-Castanedo, C.; González, D.; Galmiche, F.; Maldague, X. P.; Bendada, A.

    2006-04-01

    In this paper, we review some of the discrete signal transforms that are in use in the field of thermography for defect detection and/or characterization. Signal transformation is used with the purpose of finding an alternative domain where data analysis is more straightforward. For instance, it is possible to pass from the time domain to the frequency spectra through the one-dimensional discrete Fourier transform (DFT). The DFT constitutes the basis of pulsed phase thermography (PPT), but other transformations are possible such as the discrete wavelet transform (DWT) with the advantage that, in this case, time information is preserved after the transformation. It is also possible to rearrange data into domains others than frequency. For instance, the Hough transform (HT) allows the detection of regular forms (e.g. lines, curves, etc.) in a parameter space. The HT has been used in two different ways in thermography: for the detection of lines in thermal profiles, with the goal of discriminating between defective and non-defective regions; or it can be used to locate the inflection points in phase profiles obtained by PPT to extract the blind frequencies. The Laplace transform can also be used in the time domain to improve flaws detection and their characterization in the transformed space. Eigenvector-based transforms, such as singular value decomposition (SVD), have also been implemented. Principal component thermography (PCT) uses SVD to decompose thermographic data into a set of orthogonal modes. We discuss all these transforms and provide some comparative results.

  19. FTIR characterization of advanced materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, P. R.; Chang, A. C.

    1986-01-01

    This paper surveys the application of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to the characterization of advanced materials. FTIR sampling techniques including internal and external reflectance and photoacoustic spectroscopy are discussed. Representative examples from the literature of the analysis of resins, fibers, prepregs and composites are reviewed. A discussion of several promising specialized FTIR techniques is also presented.

  20. Long-term dialysis survivors: a transformational experience.

    PubMed

    Curtin, Roberta Braun; Mapes, Donna; Petillo, Marty; Oberley, Edith

    2002-05-01

    In this exploratory/descriptive study, the authors examined processes involved in some kidney patients' ability to survive on dialysis. Through long semistructured interviews with 18 dialysis survivors, they identified four self-affirmations that characterized participants' restructuring of self and four sets of illness experiences that required restructuring within the context of their extant worlds. The denouement involved the participants' transformation into comprehensive, active self-managers of their disease, its treatment, and its manifestations. The authors describe the participants' affirmations and adaptations leading to transformation. Understanding this process paves the way for research into the timing and sequence entailed in transformation and lays the groundwork for the development of interventions to guide kidney failure patients to the positive outcome of transformation: comprehensive, active self-management. PMID:11993559

  1. Instrument Line Shape Modeling and Correction for Off-Axis Detectors in Fourier Transform Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, K.; Worden, H.; Beer, R.

    1999-01-01

    Spectra measured by off-axis detectors in a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) are characterized by frequency scaling, asymmetry and broadening of their line shape, and self-apodization in the corresponding interferogram.

  2. ENANTIOSELECTIVE MICROBIAL TRANSFORMATION OF THE PHENYLPYRAZOLE INSECTICIDE FIPRONIL IN ANOXIC SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fipronil, a chiral insecticide, was biotransformed initially to fipronil sulfide in anoxic sediment slurries following a short lag period. Sediment slurries characterized as either sulfidogenic or methanogenic transformed fipronil with half-lives of approximately 35 and 40 days, ...

  3. SPECIATION OF HAZARDOUS INORGANIC COMPOUNDS BY FOURIER TRANSFORM INFRARED (FTIR) SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes an extension of the application of infrared methodology to characterize hazardous inorganic compounds in solid inorganic emissions, based on recent advances in instrumentation for Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The improved instrumentation, c...

  4. New Models of Mechanisms for the Motion Transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrovi?, Tomislav; Ivanov, Ivan

    In this paper two new mechanisms for the motion transformations are presented: screw mechanism for the transformation of one-way circular into two-way linear motion with impulse control and worm-planetary gear train with extremely height gear ratio. Both mechanisms represent new models of construction solutions for which patent protection has been achieved. These mechanisms are based on the application of the differential gearbox with two degrees of freedom. They are characterized by series of kinematic impacts at motion transformation and the possibility of temporary or permanent changes in the structure by subtracting the redundant degree of freedom. Thus the desired characteristic of the motion transformation is achieved. For each mechanism separately the principles of motion and transformation are described and the basic equations that describe the interdependence of geometric and kinematic and kinetic parameters of the system dynamics are given. The basic principles of controlling new mechanisms for motion transformation have been pointed to and the basic constructional performances which may find practical application have been given. The physical models of new systems of motion transformation have been designed and their operation has been presented. Performed experimental researches confirmed the theoretical results and very favorable kinematic characteristics of the mechanisms.

  5. Phase transformations in xerogels of mullite composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyatt, Mark J.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    1988-01-01

    Monophasic and diphasic xerogels have been prepared as precursors for mullite (3Al2O3-2SiO2). Monophasic xerogel was synthesized from tetraethyl orthosilicate and aluminum nitrate nanohydrate and the diphasic xerogel from colloidal suspension of silica and boehmite. The chemical and structural evolutions, as a function of thermal treatment, in these two types of sol-gel derived mullite precursor powders have been characterized by DTA, TGA, X-ray diffraction, SEM and infrared spectroscopy. Monophasic xerogel transforms to an Al-Si spinel from an amorphous structure at approximately 980 C. The spinel then changes into mullite on further heating. Diphasic xerogel forms mullite at approximately 1360 C. The components of the diphasic powder react independently up to the point of mullite formation. The transformation in the monophasic powder occurs rapidly and yields strongly crystalline mullite with no other phases present. The diphasic powder, however, transforms rather slowly and contains remnants of the starting materials (alpha-Al2O3, cristobalite) even after heating at high temperatures for long times (1600 C, 6 hr). The diphasic powder could be sintered to high density but not the monophasic powder in spite of its molecular level homogeneity.

  6. Biophysical Insights into Cancer Transformation and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pokorný, Ji?í; Foletti, Alberto; Kobilková, Jitka; Jandová, Anna; Vrba, Jan; Vrba, Jan; Nedbalová, Martina; ?o?ek, Aleš; Danani, Andrea; Tuszy?ski, Jack A.

    2013-01-01

    Biological systems are hierarchically self-organized complex structures characterized by nonlinear interactions. Biochemical energy is transformed into work of physical forces required for various biological functions. We postulate that energy transduction depends on endogenous electrodynamic fields generated by microtubules. Microtubules and mitochondria colocalize in cells with microtubules providing tracks for mitochondrial movement. Besides energy transformation, mitochondria form a spatially distributed proton charge layer and a resultant strong static electric field, which causes water ordering in the surrounding cytosol. These effects create conditions for generation of coherent electrodynamic field. The metabolic energy transduction pathways are strongly affected in cancers. Mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer cells (Warburg effect) or in fibroblasts associated with cancer cells (reverse Warburg effect) results in decreased or increased power of the generated electromagnetic field, respectively, and shifted and rebuilt frequency spectra. Disturbed electrodynamic interaction forces between cancer and healthy cells may favor local invasion and metastasis. A therapeutic strategy of targeting dysfunctional mitochondria for restoration of their physiological functions makes it possible to switch on the natural apoptotic pathway blocked in cancer transformed cells. Experience with dichloroacetate in cancer treatment and reestablishment of the healthy state may help in the development of novel effective drugs aimed at the mitochondrial function. PMID:23844381

  7. Genetic transformation of major cereal crops.

    PubMed

    Ji, Qing; Xu, Xing; Wang, Kan

    2013-01-01

    Of the more than 50,000 edible plant species in the world, at least 10,000 species are cereal grains. Three major cereal crops, rice (Oryza sativa), maize (Zea mays), and wheat (Triticum sp.), provide two-thirds of the world's food energy intake. Although crop yields have improved tremendously thanks to technological advances in the past 50 years, population increases and climate changes continue to threaten the sustainability of current crop productions. Whereas conventional and marker-assisted breeding programs continue to play a major role in crop improvement, genetic engineering has drawn an intense worldwide interest from the scientific community. In the past decade, genetic transformation technologies have revolutionized agricultural practices and millions of hectares of biotech crops have been cultured. Because of its unique ability to insert well-characterized gene sequences into the plant genome, genetic engineering can also provide effective tools to address fundamental biological questions. This technology is expected to continue to be an indispensable approach for both basic and applied research. Here, we overview briefly the development of the genetic transformation in the top seven cereals, namely maize, rice, wheat, barley (Hordeum vulgare), sorghum (Sorghum sp.), oat (Avena sativa), and millets. The advantages and disadvantages of the two major transformation methods, Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated and biolistic methods, are also discussed. PMID:24166432

  8. Fourier Transform Spectrometer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel F. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) data acquisition system includes an FTS spectrometer that receives a spectral signal and a laser signal. The system further includes a wideband detector, which is in communication with the FTS spectrometer and receives the spectral signal and laser signal from the FTS spectrometer. The wideband detector produces a composite signal comprising the laser signal and the spectral signal. The system further comprises a converter in communication with the wideband detector to receive and digitize the composite signal. The system further includes a signal processing unit that receives the composite signal from the converter. The signal processing unit further filters the laser signal and the spectral signal from the composite signal and demodulates the laser signal, to produce velocity corrected spectral data.

  9. A piezoelectric transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Won, C. C.

    1993-01-01

    This work describes a modeling and design method whereby a piezoelectric system is formulated by two sets of second-order equations, one for the mechanical system, and the other for the electrical system, coupled through the piezoelectric effect. The solution to this electromechanical coupled system gives a physical interpretation of the piezoelectric effect as a piezoelectric transformer that is a part of the piezoelectric system, which transfers the applied mechanical force into a force-controlled current source, and short circuit mechanical compliance into capacitance. It also transfers the voltage source into a voltage-controlled relative velocity input, and free motional capacitance into mechanical compliance. The formulation and interpretation simplify the modeling of smart structures and lead to physical insight that aids the designer. Due to its physical realization, the smart structural system can be unconditional stable and effectively control responses. This new concept has been demonstrated in three numerical examples for a simple piezoelectric system.

  10. Hadamard transform imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, M.D.

    1992-01-01

    We have constructed a Hadamard transform Raman microscopic imaging system, and have developed it to a high definition (64K pixel) technique. We have demonstrated multispectral Raman imaging and developed the first three-dimensional (digital confocal) Raman imaging. We have explored the systematic errors in Hadamard multiplexing techniques and developed corrections. We have used our Raman microscope techniques to explore defect distributions on graphite electrodes and damage effects on SERS-activated silver electrodes. We have used the microprobe capabilities of our instrument to investigate the kinetics of polyacrylamide formation in electrolysis capabilities. We have worked closely with a manufacture of holographic displays to develop and incorporate holographic filters and holographic beam splitters into Raman spectrographs and microscopes. Finally, we have developed Hadamard multiplexing techniques for densitometric measurements of protein or nucleic acid blots.

  11. Transformation plasticity in ductile solids

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, G.B.

    1993-02-01

    Research has addressed the role of martensitic transformation plasticity in the enhancement of toughness in high-strength austenitic steels, and the enhancement of formability in multiphase low-alloy sheet steels. In the austenitic steels, optimal processing conditions have been established to achieve a significant increase in strength level, in order to investigate the interaction of strain-induced transformation with the microvoid nucleation and shear localization mechanisms operating at ultrahigh strength levels. The stress-state dependence of transformation and fracture mechanisms has been investigated in model alloys, comparing behavior in uniaxial tension and blunt-notch tension specimens. A numerical constitutive model for transformation plasticity has been reformulated to allow a more thorough analysis of transformation/fracture interactions. Processing of a new low alloy steel composition has been optimized to stabilize retained austenite by isothermal bainitic transformation after intercritical annealing. Preliminary results show a good correlation of uniform ductility with the austenite amount and stability.

  12. 7 transformations of leadership.

    PubMed

    Rooke, David; Torbert, William R

    2005-04-01

    Most developmental psychologists agree that what differentiates one leader from another is not so much philosophy of leadership, personality, or style of management. Rather, it's internal "action logic"--how a leader interprets the surroundings and reacts when his or her power or safety is challenged. Relatively few leaders, however, try to understand their action logic, and fewer still have explored the possibility of changing it. They should, because leaders who undertake this voyage of personal understanding and development can transform not only their own capabilities but also those of their companies. The authors draw on 25 years of consulting experience and collaboration with psychologist Susanne Cook-Greuter to present a typology of leadership based on the way managers personally make sense of the world around them. Rooke and Torbert classify leaders into seven distinct actionlogic categories: Opportunists, Diplomats, Experts, Achievers, Individualists, Strategists, and Alchemists-the first three associated with below-average performance, the latter four with medium to high performance. These leadership styles are not fixed, the authors say, and executives who are willing to work at developing themselves and becoming more self-aware can almost certainly move toward one of the more effective action logics. A Diplomat, for instance, can succeed through hard work and self-reflection at transforming himself into a Strategist. Few people may become Alchemists, but many will have the desire and potential to become Individualists and Strategists. Corporations that help their executives and leadership teams to examine their action logics can reap rich rewards. PMID:15807040

  13. Hadamard Transform Infrared Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhou

    The primary objective of this research is the design and application of a stationary mask Hadamard transform infrared (HT-IR) spectrometer. Previous research in the area of stationary Hadamard encoding focused on the use of switching materials for the masks. However, these masks could not pass infrared radiation and, as a result, the advantages of stationary Hadamard encoding could not be applied to infrared spectrometry. A nontraditional mask, called a thermo-optic array for the stationary encoding of radiation (TOASTER), was proposed and implemented to perform the stationary Hadamard encoding. The Hadamard encoding procedure was performed with an array of electrically controlled IR sources. Operated with a reversed Czerny -Turner system, the source array was switched on or off according to the Hadamard functions. In this manner, the wavelength limitation to stationary Hadamard encoding was totally lifted. The research presented in this dissertation addresses two other aspects of stationary mask HT-IR. First, since the optical encoding of the TOASTER was thermally operated, the thermo-optic behavior of the electrically controlled IR sources was studied based on the theory of heat conduction. Secondly, a LiTaO_3 pyroelectric detector was employed in our prototype HT-IR spectrometer and as a result, the feasibility of low cost pyroelectric IR detectors for spectrometric use was investigated and discussed. The results of this work showed that the thermo -optic array and the corresponding optical design of the HT-IR could allow the prototype instrument to work in the IR region with a transform multiplex advantage. The thermo -optic stationary encoding method also provided frequency precision with experimental results of spectral subtraction. With regards to the thermo-optic behavior of the electrically controlled IR sources, the experimental data verified the physical and mathematical analysis proposed. In addition, the low cost pyroelectric IR detector, with proper signal processing, was found to be useful for spectrometric use under certain application requirements.

  14. Infrared transform spectral imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vujkovic-Cvijin, Pajo; Lee, Jamine; Gregor, Brian; Goldstein, Neil; Panfili, Raphael; Fox, Marsha

    2012-10-01

    A dispersive transform spectral imager named FAROS (FAst Reconfigurable Optical Sensor) has been developed for high frame rate, moderate-to-high resolution hyperspectral imaging. A programmable digital micromirror array (DMA) modulator makes it possible to adjust spectral, temporal and spatial resolution in real time to achieve optimum tradeoff for dynamic monitoring requirements. The system's F/2.8 collection optics produces diffraction-limited images in the mid-wave infrared (MWIR) spectral region. The optical system is based on a proprietary dual-pass Offner configuration with a single spherical mirror and a confocal spherical diffraction grating. FAROS fulfills two functions simultaneously: one output produces two-dimensional polychromatic imagery at the full focal plane array (FPA) frame rate for fast object acquisition and tracking, while the other output operates in parallel and produces variable-resolution spectral images via Hadamard transform encoding to assist in object discrimination and classification. The current version of the FAROS spectral imager is a multispectral technology demonstrator that operates in the MWIR with a 320 x 256 pixel InSb FPA running at 478 frames per second resulting in time resolution of several tens of milliseconds per hypercube. The instrument has been tested by monitoring small-scale rocket engine firings in outdoor environments. The instrument has no macro-scale moving parts, and conforms to a robust, small-volume and lightweight package, suitable for integration with small surveillance vehicles. The technology is also applicable to multispectral/hyperspectral imaging applications in diverse areas such as atmospheric contamination monitoring, agriculture, process control, and biomedical imaging, and can be adapted for use in any spectral domain from the ultraviolet (UV) to the LWIR region.

  15. Model transformations for state-space self-tuning control of multivariable stochastic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shieh, Leang S.; Bao, Yuan L.; Coleman, Norman P.

    1988-01-01

    The design of self-tuning controllers for multivariable stochastic systems is considered analytically. A long-division technique for finding the similarity transformation matrix and transforming the estimated left MFD to the right MFD is developed; the derivation is given in detail, and the procedures involved are briefly characterized.

  16. Transformation Systems at NASA Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buntine, Wray; Fischer, Bernd; Havelund, Klaus; Lowry, Michael; Pressburger, TOm; Roach, Steve; Robinson, Peter; VanBaalen, Jeffrey

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the experiences of the Automated Software Engineering Group at the NASA Ames Research Center in the development and application of three different transformation systems. The systems span the entire technology range, from deductive synthesis, to logic-based transformation, to almost compiler-like source-to-source transformation. These systems also span a range of NASA applications, including solving solar system geometry problems, generating data analysis software, and analyzing multi-threaded Java code.

  17. Cereal transformation through particle bombardment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casas, A. M.; Kononowicz, A. K.; Bressan, R. A.; Hasegawa, P. M.; Mitchell, C. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    The review focuses on experiments that lead to stable transformation in cereals using microprojectile bombardment. The discussion of biological factors that affect transformation examines target tissues and vector systems for gene transfer. The vector systems include reporter genes, selectable markers, genes of agronomic interest, and vector constructions. Other topics include physical parameters that affect DNA delivery, selection of stably transformed cells and plant regeneration, and analysis of gene expression and transmission to the progeny.

  18. Functions of TET Proteins in Hematopoietic Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jae-A; An, Jungeun; Ko, Myunggon

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is a well-characterized epigenetic modification that plays central roles in mammalian development, genomic imprinting, X-chromosome inactivation and silencing of retrotransposon elements. Aberrant DNA methylation pattern is a characteristic feature of cancers and associated with abnormal expression of oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes or repair genes. Ten-eleven-translocation (TET) proteins are recently characterized dioxygenases that catalyze progressive oxidation of 5-methylcytosine to produce 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and further oxidized derivatives. These oxidized methylcytosines not only potentiate DNA demethylation but also behave as independent epigenetic modifications per se. The expression or activity of TET proteins and DNA hydroxymethylation are highly dysregulated in a wide range of cancers including hematologic and non-hematologic malignancies, and accumulating evidence points TET proteins as a novel tumor suppressor in cancers. Here we review DNA demethylation-dependent and -independent functions of TET proteins. We also describe diverse TET loss-of-function mutations that are recurrently found in myeloid and lymphoid malignancies and their potential roles in hematopoietic transformation. We discuss consequences of the deficiency of individual Tet genes and potential compensation between different Tet members in mice. Possible mechanisms underlying facilitated oncogenic transformation of TET-deficient hematopoietic cells are also described. Lastly, we address non-mutational mechanisms that lead to suppression or inactivation of TET proteins in cancers. Strategies to restore normal 5mC oxidation status in cancers by targeting TET proteins may provide new avenues to expedite the development of promising anti-cancer agents. PMID:26552488

  19. Functions of TET Proteins in Hematopoietic Transformation.

    PubMed

    Han, Jae-A; An, Jungeun; Ko, Myunggon

    2015-11-30

    DNA methylation is a well-characterized epigenetic modification that plays central roles in mammalian development, genomic imprinting, X-chromosome inactivation and silencing of retrotransposon elements. Aberrant DNA methylation pattern is a characteristic feature of cancers and associated with abnormal expression of oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes or repair genes. Ten-eleven-translocation (TET) proteins are recently characterized dioxygenases that catalyze progressive oxidation of 5-methylcytosine to produce 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and further oxidized derivatives. These oxidized methylcytosines not only potentiate DNA demethylation but also behave as independent epigenetic modifications per se. The expression or activity of TET proteins and DNA hydroxymethylation are highly dysregulated in a wide range of cancers including hematologic and non-hematologic malignancies, and accumulating evidence points TET proteins as a novel tumor suppressor in cancers. Here we review DNA demethylation-dependent and -independent functions of TET proteins. We also describe diverse TET loss-of-function mutations that are recurrently found in myeloid and lymphoid malignancies and their potential roles in hematopoietic transformation. We discuss consequences of the deficiency of individual Tet genes and potential compensation between different Tet members in mice. Possible mechanisms underlying facilitated oncogenic transformation of TET-deficient hematopoietic cells are also described. Lastly, we address non-mutational mechanisms that lead to suppression or inactivation of TET proteins in cancers. Strategies to restore normal 5mC oxidation status in cancers by targeting TET proteins may provide new avenues to expedite the development of promising anti-cancer agents. PMID:26552488

  20. Medical data transformation using rewriting

    PubMed Central

    Ashish, Naveen; Toga, Arthur W.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a system for declaratively transforming medical subjects' data into a common data model representation. Our work is part of the “GAAIN” project on Alzheimer's disease data federation across multiple data providers. We present a general purpose data transformation system that we have developed by leveraging the existing state-of-the-art in data integration and query rewriting. In this work we have further extended the current technology with new formalisms that facilitate expressing a broader range of data transformation tasks, plus new execution methodologies to ensure efficient data transformation for disease datasets. PMID:25750622

  1. Anisotropic origin of transform faults.

    PubMed

    Freund, R; Merzer, A M

    1976-04-01

    Transform faults appear in the process of stretching during freezing of the surface films on liquid wax. These films are composed of a warp yarn of wax fibers with optical anisotropy. This fabric is absent in materials that fail to produce transform faults. The mechanical anisotropy of these wax films (with high tensile strength and low shear strength in the direction of spreading) is responsible for the initiation of the transform faults. It is suggested that the anisotropy of the ocean upper mantle recorded seismically may likewise be responsible for the creation of the ridge-ridge transform faults in the oceans. PMID:17792444

  2. Biomolecular Aspects of Mercury Transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johs, A.; Shi, L.; Miller, S. M.; Summers, A. O.; Liang, L.

    2008-12-01

    Bacteria participate significantly in mercury transformation in natural and industrial environments. Previous studies have shown that bacterial mercury resistance is mediated by the mer operon, typically located on transposons or plasmids. It encodes specific genes that facilitate uptake of mercury species, cleavage of organomercurials, and reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0). Expression of mer operon genes is regulated by MerR, a metal-responsive regulator protein on the level of transcription. In vitro studies have shown that MerR forms a non-transcribing pre-initiation complex with RNA polymerase and the promoter DNA. Binding of Hg(II) induces conformational changes in MerR and other components of the complex resulting in the transcription of mer operon genes. As part of ongoing investigations on allosteric conformational changes induced by Hg(II) in dimeric MerR, and the implications on the binding of RNA polymerase to the promoter of the mer operon, we applied small angle scattering to study the regulatory mechanism of MerR in the presence and absence of Hg(II). Our results show that in the presence of Hg(II) the MerR dimer undergoes a significant reorientation from a compact state to a conformation revealing two distinct domains. Bacterial reduction of Hg(II) can also occur at concentrations too low to induce mer operon functions. Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria, such as Shewanella and Geobacter are able to reduce Hg(II) in the presence of mineral oxides. This process has been linked to the activity of outer membrane multiheme cytochromes. We isolated and purified a decaheme outer membrane cytochrome OmcA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and characterized its envelope shape in solution by small angle x-ray scattering. Structural features were identified and compared to homology models. These results show that OmcA is an elongated macromolecule consisting of separate modules, which may be connected by flexible linkers.

  3. Logarithmic Transformations in Regression: Do You Transform Back Correctly?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dambolena, Ismael G.; Eriksen, Steven E.; Kopcso, David P.

    2009-01-01

    The logarithmic transformation is often used in regression analysis for a variety of purposes such as the linearization of a nonlinear relationship between two or more variables. We have noticed that when this transformation is applied to the response variable, the computation of the point estimate of the conditional mean of the original response…

  4. Plants having modified response to ethylene by transformation with an ETR nucleic acid

    DOEpatents

    Meyerowitz, Elliott M. (Pasadena, CA); Chang, Caren (Pasadena, CA); Bleecker, Anthony B. (Madison, WI)

    2001-01-01

    The invention includes transformed plants having at least one cell transformed with a modified ETR nucleic acid. Such plants have a phenotype characterized by a decrease in the response of at least one transformed plant cell to ethylene as compared to a plant not containing the transformed plant cell. Tissue and/or temporal specificity for expression of the modified ETR nucleic acid is controlled by selecting appropriate expression regulation sequences to target the location and/or time of expression of the transformed nucleic acid. The plants are made by transforming at least one plant cell with an appropriate modified ETR nucleic acid, regenerating plants from one or more of the transformed plant cells and selecting at least one plant having the desired phenotype.

  5. Detrecting and Locating Partial Discharges in Transformers

    SciTech Connect

    Shourbaji, A.; Richards, R.; Kisner, R. A.; Hardy, J.

    2005-02-04

    A collaborative research between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the American Electric Power (AEP), the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), and the State of Ohio Energy Office (OEO) has been formed to conduct a feasibility study to detect and locate partial discharges (PDs) inside large transformers. The success of early detection of the PDs is necessary to avoid costly catastrophic failures that can occur if the process of PD is ignored. The detection method under this research is based on an innovative technology developed by ORNL researchers using optical methods to sense the acoustical energy produced by the PDs. ORNL researchers conducted experimental studies to detect PD using an optical fiber as an acoustic sensor capable of detecting acoustical disturbances at any point along its length. This technical approach also has the potential to locate the point at which the PD was sensed within the transformer. Several optical approaches were experimentally investigated, including interferometric detection of acoustical disturbances along the sensing fiber, light detection and ranging (LIDAR) techniques using frequency modulation continuous wave (FMCW), frequency modulated (FM) laser with a multimode fiber, FM laser with a single mode fiber, and amplitude modulated (AM) laser with a multimode fiber. The implementation of the optical fiber-based acoustic measurement technique would include installing a fiber inside a transformer allowing real-time detection of PDs and determining their locations. The fibers are nonconductive and very small (core plus cladding are diameters of 125 ?m for single-mode fibers and 230 ?m for multimode fibers). The research identified the capabilities and limitations of using optical technology to detect and locate sources of acoustical disturbances such as in PDs in large transformers. Amplitude modulation techniques showed the most promising results and deserve further research to better quantify the technique’s sensitivity and its ability to characterize a PD event. Other sensing techniques have been also identified, such as the wavelength shifting fiber optics and custom fabricated fibers with special coatings.

  6. Genetic transformation of Vitis vinifera via organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mezzetti, Bruno; Pandolfini, Tiziana; Navacchi, Oriano; Landi, Lucia

    2002-01-01

    Background Efficient transformation and regeneration methods are a priority for successful application of genetic engineering to vegetative propagated plants such as grape. The current methods for the production of transgenic grape plants are based on Agrobacterium-mediated transformation followed by regeneration from embryogenic callus. However, grape embryogenic calli are laborious to establish and the phenotype of the regenerated plants can be altered. Results Transgenic grape plants (V. vinifera, table-grape cultivars Silcora and Thompson Seedless) were produced using a method based on regeneration via organogenesis. In vitro proliferating shoots were cultured in the presence of increasing concentrations of N6-benzyl adenine. The apical dome of the shoot was removed at each transplantation which, after three months, produced meristematic bulk tissue characterized by a strong capacity to differentiate adventitious shoots. Slices prepared from the meristematic bulk were used for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of grape plants with the gene DefH9-iaaM. After rooting on kanamycin containing media and greenhouse acclimatization, transgenic plants were transferred to the field. At the end of the first year of field cultivation, DefH9-iaaM grape plants were phenotypically homogeneous and did not show any morphological alterations in vegetative growth. The expression of DefH9-iaaM gene was detected in transgenic flower buds of both cultivars. Conclusions The phenotypic homogeneity of the regenerated plants highlights the validity of this method for both propagation and genetic transformation of table grape cultivars. Expression of the DefH9-iaaM gene takes place in young flower buds of transgenic plants from both grape cultivars. PMID:12354328

  7. A comparison of 1D analytical model and 3D finite element analysis with experiments for a rosen-type piezoelectric transformer.

    PubMed

    Boukazouha, F; Poulin-Vittrant, G; Tran-Huu-Hue, L P; Bavencoffe, M; Boubenider, F; Rguiti, M; Lethiecq, M

    2015-07-01

    This article is dedicated to the study of Piezoelectric Transformers (PTs), which offer promising solutions to the increasing need for integrated power electronics modules within autonomous systems. The advantages offered by such transformers include: immunity to electromagnetic disturbances; ease of miniaturisation for example, using conventional micro fabrication processes; and enhanced performance in terms of voltage gain and power efficiency. Central to the adequate description of such transformers is the need for complex analytical modeling tools, especially if one is attempting to include combined contributions due to (i) mechanical phenomena owing to the different propagation modes which differ at the primary and secondary sides of the PT; and (ii) electrical phenomena such as the voltage gain and power efficiency, which depend on the electrical load. The present work demonstrates an original one-dimensional (1D) analytical model, dedicated to a Rosen-type PT and simulation results are successively compared against that of a three-dimensional (3D) Finite Element Analysis (COMSOL Multiphysics software) and experimental results. The Rosen-type PT studied here is based on a single layer soft PZT (P191) with corresponding dimensions 18 mm × 3 mm × 1.5 mm, which operated at the second harmonic of 176 kHz. Detailed simulational and experimental results show that the presented 1D model predicts experimental measurements to within less than 10% error of the voltage gain at the second and third resonance frequency modes. Adjustment of the analytical model parameters is found to decrease errors relative to experimental voltage gain to within 1%, whilst a 2.5% error on the output admittance magnitude at the second resonance mode were obtained. Relying on the unique assumption of one-dimensionality, the present analytical model appears as a useful tool for Rosen-type PT design and behavior understanding. PMID:25753623

  8. Spreading rate dependence of gravity anomalies along oceanic transform faults.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Patricia M; Lin, Jian; Behn, Mark D; Montési, Laurent G J

    2007-07-12

    Mid-ocean ridge morphology and crustal accretion are known to depend on the spreading rate of the ridge. Slow-spreading mid-ocean-ridge segments exhibit significant crustal thinning towards transform and non-transform offsets, which is thought to arise from a three-dimensional process of buoyant mantle upwelling and melt migration focused beneath the centres of ridge segments. In contrast, fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges are characterized by smaller, segment-scale variations in crustal thickness, which reflect more uniform mantle upwelling beneath the ridge axis. Here we present a systematic study of the residual mantle Bouguer gravity anomaly of 19 oceanic transform faults that reveals a strong correlation between gravity signature and spreading rate. Previous studies have shown that slow-slipping transform faults are marked by more positive gravity anomalies than their adjacent ridge segments, but our analysis reveals that intermediate and fast-slipping transform faults exhibit more negative gravity anomalies than their adjacent ridge segments. This finding indicates that there is a mass deficit at intermediate- and fast-slipping transform faults, which could reflect increased rock porosity, serpentinization of mantle peridotite, and/or crustal thickening. The most negative anomalies correspond to topographic highs flanking the transform faults, rather than to transform troughs (where deformation is probably focused and porosity and alteration are expected to be greatest), indicating that crustal thickening could be an important contributor to the negative gravity anomalies observed. This finding in turn suggests that three-dimensional magma accretion may occur near intermediate- and fast-slipping transform faults. PMID:17625563

  9. Characterizing Q-Linear Transformations for Semidefinite Linear Complementarity Problems

    E-print Network

    Ramírez, Héctor

    ´opez Rub´en L´opez H´ector Ram´irez January 14, 2011 Abstract In this note we introduce a new class, called. On the other hand, when solving the LCP(M, q) (for some given M Rn×n and q Rn): find ¯x Rn + such that ¯y

  10. CHARACTERIZATION OF CHLORINATION TRANSFORMATION PRODUCTS OF SELECTED PESTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorination is a commonly-used disinfectant step in drinking water treatment. Should free chlorine be added to water used as a drinking water source, it is widely understood that many biological species in the water along with dissolved organic and inorganic chemicals will react...

  11. LORENTZ TRANSFORMATIONS AND STATISTICAL MECHANICS

    E-print Network

    LORENTZ TRANSFORMATIONS AND STATISTICAL MECHANICS Daniel Henry Gottlieb Abstract. 1. Introduction In [Gottlieb (1998)] and [Gottlieb (2000)] we launched a study of Lorentz trans­ formations. We find that every Lorentz transformation can be expressed as an ex­ ponential e F where F is a skew symmetric operator

  12. LORENTZ TRANSFORMATIONS AND STATISTICAL MECHANICS

    E-print Network

    LORENTZ TRANSFORMATIONS AND STATISTICAL MECHANICS Daniel Henry Gottlieb Abstract. 1. Introduction In [Gottlieb (1998)] and [Gottlieb (2000)] we launched a study of Lorentz trans- formations. We find that every Lorentz transformation can be expressed as an ex- ponential eF where F is a skew symmetric operator

  13. LORENTZ TRANSFORMATIONS AND STATISTICAL MECHANICS

    E-print Network

    LORENTZ TRANSFORMATIONS AND STATISTICAL MECHANICS In [Gottlieb (1998)] and [Gottlieb (2000)] we launched a study of Lorentz tr* *ans- formations. We find that every Lorentz transformation can be expressed as an ex- ponential eF where F is a skew symmetric

  14. Translating Transformation into Something Real.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cushing, P. J.

    1999-01-01

    Anthropological theory and the rites of passage model were used to understand Outward Bound (OB) student experiences of transformation. Three long ethnographic interviews with 22 OB students, conducted before, after, and 3 months after the course, revealed that although the transformational effect of the course was strong initially, additional…

  15. Data compression by wavelet transforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shahshahani, M.

    1992-01-01

    A wavelet transform algorithm is applied to image compression. It is observed that the algorithm does not suffer from the blockiness characteristic of the DCT-based algorithms at compression ratios exceeding 25:1, but the edges do not appear as sharp as they do with the latter method. Some suggestions for the improved performance of the wavelet transform method are presented.

  16. Travel and Adult Transformative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindstrom, Steven K.

    2011-01-01

    This phenomenological research study examines the lived experience of individual adult transformation in the context of travel. Adults throughout history have experienced profound personal and perception changes as a result of significant travel events. Transformative learning occurs through experience, crisis, and reflection, all of which are…

  17. Transformational Professional Learning, May 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Staff Development Council, 2004

    2004-01-01

    "Transformational Professional Learning" is a periodically published e-newsletter designed to influence what educational leaders think, say, and do to improve teaching and learning by promoting deep understanding of important issues, the transformation of beliefs and assumptions, and a stream of powerful goal-focused actions. There are two…

  18. Towards Transformative Leadership in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Oord, Lodewijk

    2013-01-01

    This article argues that an educational organization's type of leadership will to a very large extent determine the quality of personal transformation it instigates among its stakeholders. Focusing on the importance of transformative leadership, such leadership will be viewed as a critical and collaborative process in which school-based…

  19. Transformative Learning: Mutinous Thoughts Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The author finds himself rereading an article he wrote several years ago, in which he questioned transformative learning. He recalls some of his reasons for writing the article, and considers his present position. He reflects on the understanding of consciousness that underlies much of the literature on transformative learning, and compares it…

  20. Student Services Revitalization/Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pipitone, Brenda; Poirer, Wayne

    2011-01-01

    Over a two year period, a multidisciplinary team developed and implemented a plan to transform the delivery of student services at George Brown College in Toronto. It was a plan that called upon the College to fundamentally overhaul student services, but more importantly, to transform the service culture at the College through the students'…

  1. Parallel fast gauss transform

    SciTech Connect

    Sampath, Rahul S; Sundar, Hari; Veerapaneni, Shravan

    2010-01-01

    We present fast adaptive parallel algorithms to compute the sum of N Gaussians at N points. Direct sequential computation of this sum would take O(N{sup 2}) time. The parallel time complexity estimates for our algorithms are O(N/n{sub p}) for uniform point distributions and O( (N/n{sub p}) log (N/n{sub p}) + n{sub p}log n{sub p}) for non-uniform distributions using n{sub p} CPUs. We incorporate a plane-wave representation of the Gaussian kernel which permits 'diagonal translation'. We use parallel octrees and a new scheme for translating the plane-waves to efficiently handle non-uniform distributions. Computing the transform to six-digit accuracy at 120 billion points took approximately 140 seconds using 4096 cores on the Jaguar supercomputer. Our implementation is 'kernel-independent' and can handle other 'Gaussian-type' kernels even when explicit analytic expression for the kernel is not known. These algorithms form a new class of core computational machinery for solving parabolic PDEs on massively parallel architectures.

  2. Metal transformable-volume structures for space engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paton, Boris E.; Lobanov, Leonid M.; Volkov, Valentin S.

    2015-05-01

    The brief review of design solutions for existing transformable-volume structures (TVS) is given and main approaches are formulated for optimizing the metal transformable shell structures, allowing widening the sphere of their application in space engineering. Characterized are the methods, used for theoretical description of process of change in TVS shape, and also geometric parameters and properties of structural materials of thin shells allowing realization of their volume deforming at the maximum approach to the selected theoretical model. Technological aspects are described which are typical of the process of multi-sectional conical TVS design as applied to the conditions of its service under the effect of space environment factors (SEF).

  3. Structure fragmentation in Fe-based alloys by means of cyclic martensitic transformations of different types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondar, Volodimir I.; Danilchenko, Vitalij Ie; Dzevin, Ievgenij M.

    2014-02-01

    The effect of martensite transformations of different types on the misorientation of austenite crystalline lattice, which characterizes the degree of structure fragmentation, was investigated for Fe-Ni and Fe-Mn alloys. As a result of multiple face-centered cubic (f.c.c.)-body-centered cubic (b.c.c.)-f.c.c. transformations, an austenite single-crystalline specimen is transformed in a polycrystalline one due to progressive fragmentation. It was shown that the degree of fragmentation depends on the magnitude of volume change and the density of dislocations generated on martensitic transformations.

  4. A NEW FOURIER TRANSFORM JONATHAN WANG

    E-print Network

    May, J. Peter

    A NEW FOURIER TRANSFORM JONATHAN WANG Abstract. In order to define a geometric Fourier transform action of Gm, however, Laumon provides a uniform geometric construction of the Fourier transform in any the relation between this new functor and Laumon's homogeneous transform, the Fourier-Deligne transform

  5. Transformer Efficiency Assessment - Okinawa, Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas L. Baldwin; Robert J. Turk; Kurt S. Myers; Jake P. Gentle; Jason W. Bush

    2012-05-01

    The US Army Engineering & Support Center, Huntsville (USAESCH), and the US Marine Corps Base (MCB), Okinawa, Japan retained Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to conduct a Transformer Efficiency Assessment of “key” transformers located at multiple military bases in Okinawa, Japan. The purpose of this assessment is to support the Marine Corps Base, Okinawa in evaluating medium voltage distribution transformers for potential efficiency upgrades. The original scope of work included the MCB providing actual transformer nameplate data, manufacturer’s factory test sheets, electrical system data (kWh), demand data (kWd), power factor data, and electricity cost data. Unfortunately, the MCB’s actual data is not available and therefore making it necessary to de-scope the original assessment. Note: Any similar nameplate data, photos of similar transformer nameplates, and basic electrical details from one-line drawings (provided by MCB) are not a replacement for actual load loss test data. It is recommended that load measurements are performed on the high and low sides of transformers to better quantify actual load losses, demand data, and power factor data. We also recommend that actual data, when available, be inserted by MCB Okinawa where assumptions have been made and then the LCC analysis updated. This report covers a generalized assessment of modern U.S. transformers in a three level efficiency category, Low-Level efficiency, Medium-Level efficiency, and High-Level efficiency.

  6. Transformer Efficiency Assessment - Okinawa, Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas L. Baldwin; Robert J. Turk; Kurt S. Myers; Jake P. Gentle; Jason W. Bush

    2012-08-01

    The US Army Engineering & Support Center, Huntsville (USAESCH), and the US Marine Corps Base (MCB), Okinawa, Japan retained Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to conduct a Transformer Efficiency Assessment of “key” transformers located at multiple military bases in Okinawa, Japan. The purpose of this assessment is to support the Marine Corps Base, Okinawa in evaluating medium voltage distribution transformers for potential efficiency upgrades. The original scope of work included the MCB providing actual transformer nameplate data, manufacturer’s factory test sheets, electrical system data (kWh), demand data (kWd), power factor data, and electricity cost data. Unfortunately, the MCB’s actual data is not available and therefore making it necessary to de-scope the original assessment. Note: Any similar nameplate data, photos of similar transformer nameplates, and basic electrical details from one-line drawings (provided by MCB) are not a replacement for actual load loss test data. It is recommended that load measurements are performed on the high and low sides of transformers to better quantify actual load losses, demand data, and power factor data. We also recommend that actual data, when available, be inserted by MCB Okinawa where assumptions have been made and then the LCC analysis updated. This report covers a generalized assessment of modern U.S. transformers in a three level efficiency category, Low-Level efficiency, Medium-Level efficiency, and High-Level efficiency.

  7. Conduction-coupled Tesla transformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, J. L.

    2015-03-01

    A proof-of-principle Tesla transformer circuit is introduced. The new transformer exhibits the high voltage-high power output signal of shock-excited transformers. The circuit, with specification of proper circuit element values, is capable of obtaining extreme oscillatory voltages. The primary and secondary portions of the circuit communicate solely by conduction. The destructive arcing between the primary and secondary inductors in electromagnetically coupled transformers is ubiquitous. Flashover is eliminated in the new transformer as the high-voltage inductors do not interpenetrate and so do not possess an annular volume of electric field. The inductors are remote from one another. The high voltage secondary inductor is isolated in space, except for a base feed conductor, and obtains earth by its self-capacitance to the surroundings. Governing equations, for the ideal case of no damping, are developed from first principles. Experimental, theoretical, and circuit simulator data are presented for the new transformer. Commercial high-temperature superconductors are discussed as a means to eliminate the counter-intuitive damping due to small primary inductances in both the electromagnetic-coupled and new conduction-coupled transformers.

  8. Conduction-coupled Tesla transformer.

    PubMed

    Reed, J L

    2015-03-01

    A proof-of-principle Tesla transformer circuit is introduced. The new transformer exhibits the high voltage-high power output signal of shock-excited transformers. The circuit, with specification of proper circuit element values, is capable of obtaining extreme oscillatory voltages. The primary and secondary portions of the circuit communicate solely by conduction. The destructive arcing between the primary and secondary inductors in electromagnetically coupled transformers is ubiquitous. Flashover is eliminated in the new transformer as the high-voltage inductors do not interpenetrate and so do not possess an annular volume of electric field. The inductors are remote from one another. The high voltage secondary inductor is isolated in space, except for a base feed conductor, and obtains earth by its self-capacitance to the surroundings. Governing equations, for the ideal case of no damping, are developed from first principles. Experimental, theoretical, and circuit simulator data are presented for the new transformer. Commercial high-temperature superconductors are discussed as a means to eliminate the counter-intuitive damping due to small primary inductances in both the electromagnetic-coupled and new conduction-coupled transformers. PMID:25832281

  9. Transform coding for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glover, Daniel

    1993-01-01

    Data compression coding requirements for aerospace applications differ somewhat from the compression requirements for entertainment systems. On the one hand, entertainment applications are bit rate driven with the goal of getting the best quality possible with a given bandwidth. Science applications are quality driven with the goal of getting the lowest bit rate for a given level of reconstruction quality. In the past, the required quality level has been nothing less than perfect allowing only the use of lossless compression methods (if that). With the advent of better, faster, cheaper missions, an opportunity has arisen for lossy data compression methods to find a use in science applications as requirements for perfect quality reconstruction runs into cost constraints. This paper presents a review of the data compression problem from the space application perspective. Transform coding techniques are described and some simple, integer transforms are presented. The application of these transforms to space-based data compression problems is discussed. Integer transforms have an advantage over conventional transforms in computational complexity. Space applications are different from broadcast or entertainment in that it is desirable to have a simple encoder (in space) and tolerate a more complicated decoder (on the ground) rather than vice versa. Energy compaction with new transforms are compared with the Walsh-Hadamard (WHT), Discrete Cosine (DCT), and Integer Cosine (ICT) transforms.

  10. Modelling of the austenite-martensite transformation in stainless and TRIP steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geijselaers, H. J. M.; Hilkhuijsen, P.; Bor, T. C.; Perdahc?o?lu, E. S.; van den Boogaard, A. H.

    2013-05-01

    The transformation of austenite to martensite is a dominant factor in the description of the constitutive behavior during forming of TRIP assisted steels. To predict this transformation different models are currently available. In this paper the transformation is regarded as a stress induced process based on the thermodynamic action of the local stresses during transformation. A threshold for the thermodynamic action, above which transformation will occur, can be easily measured in a properly instrumented tensile test. The martensitic transformation is a diffusionless lattice shear. It is characterized by a habit plane normal n and a shear vector m, which are both defined with respect to the austenite lattice coordinate system. Therefore the thermodynamic action in each material grain strongly depends on the orientation of the grain with respect to the applied stress. Uniaxial tensile tests on both a non-textured austenitic stainless steel and one with a strong crystallographic texture were performed in both the rolling and the transverse directions. Both materials show mechanically induced phase transformation from austenite to martensite. When a strong texture is present in the austenite, differences between transformations during deformation in different directions can be observed clearly. The stress induced transformation theory, in combination with the textures measured before and after deformation, is used to explain and model the difference in transformation behavior when straining in various directions. During deformation the texture changes. This can have consequences for modeling of the transformation during non-proportional deformation.

  11. Spacecraft transformer and inductor design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1977-01-01

    The conversion process in spacecraft power electronics requires the use of magnetic components which frequently are the heaviest and bulkiest items in the conversion circuit. This handbook pertains to magnetic material selection, transformer and inductor design tradeoffs, transformer design, iron core dc inductor design, toroidal power core inductor design, window utilization factors, regulation, and temperature rise. Relationships are given which simplify and standardize the design of transformers and the analysis of the circuits in which they are used. The interactions of the various design parameters are also presented in simplified form so that tradeoffs and optimizations may easily be made.

  12. DNA UPTAKE BY TRANSFORMABLE BACTERIA

    SciTech Connect

    LACKS,S.A.

    1999-09-07

    The various processes of DNA uptake by cells can be categorized as: viral DNA entry, conjugation, or transformation. Within each category, a variety of mechanisms have been found. However, considerable similarities occur among the different mechanisms of conjugation and, especially, transformation. All of these natural mechanisms of DNA transfer are quite elaborate and involve multiple protein components, as the case may be, of the virus, the donor cell, and the recipient cell. The mechanisms of viral infection and conjugation will be discussed mainly with respect to their relevance to transformation.

  13. DNA Uptake by Transformable Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Lacks, Sanford A.

    1999-03-31

    The various processes of DNA uptake by cells can be categorized as: viral DNA entry, conjugation, or transformation. Within each category, a variety of mechanisms have been found. However, considerable similarities occur among the different mechanisms of conjugation and, especially, transformation. All of these natural mechanisms of DNA transfer are quite elaborate and involve multiple protein components, as the case may be, of the virus, the donor cell, and the recipient cell. The mechanisms of viral infection and conjugation will be discussed mainly with respect to their relevance to transformation.

  14. Intelligent Transformer: Possibilities and Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viktor, Beldjajev; Indrek, Roasto; Tõnu, Lehtla

    2011-01-01

    This paper covers the concept of an intelligent transformer that is a good candidate to replace a conventional low frequency transformer in the microgrids. As the power production and consumption can vary in a wide range, the new substations have to meet many requirements to guarantee reliable energy management in the autonomous networks. Different topologies of intelligent transformers can be used to meet these requirements. Therefore the advantages and disadvantages of the existing topologies were analyzed. The future trends and challenges are also discussed.

  15. Heat storage in alloy transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenall, C. E.; Gueceri, S. I.

    1980-01-01

    The theory of eutectic transformation was examined to find guidelines to the best material combinations to examine. The heats of transformation were measured calorimetrically, and the volume changes of expanding solid mixtures and homogeneous liquid solutions, especially during the transformation between the two states at fixed temperature, were measured by changes in X-ray absorption. Heat flow models appropriate to storage in phase change materials were developed along with efficient calculating procedures so that the relative importance of the problems associated with energy storage density, heat conduction, and similar properties could be assessed.

  16. Ripplet-II transform for feature extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jun; Wu, Dapeng

    2010-07-01

    Current image representation schemes have limited capability of representing 2D singularities (e.g., edges in an image). Wavelet transform has better performance in representing 1D singularities than Fourier transform. Recently invented ridgelet and curvelet transform achieve better performance in resolving 2D singularities than wavelet transform. To further improve the capability of representing 2D singularities, this paper proposes a new transform called ripplet transform Type II (ripplet-II). The new transform is able to capture 2D singularities along a family of curves in images. In fact, ridgelet transform is a special case of ripplet-II transform with degree 1. Ripplet-II transform can be used for feature extraction due to its efficiency in representing edges and textures. Experiments in texture classification and image retrieval demonstrate that the ripplet-II transform based scheme outperforms wavelet and ridgelet transform based approaches.

  17. Direction Neutral Language Transformation with Metamodels

    E-print Network

    Gogolla, Martin - Fachbereich 3

    Direction Neutral Language Transformation with Metamodels Martin Gogolla University of Bremen in a direction neutral way and opens the possibility for bidirectionality. Analogously, semantical objects can: descriptive transformation specification, direction neutral transformations, separation of syntax

  18. BIOLISTIC TRANSFORMATION OF SUGAR BEET CELL SUSPENSIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nonproprietary sugar beet transformation methods are plagued by low transformation frequencies and lack of reproducibility. In efforts to optimize the methods, we established highly embryogenic sugar beet cell suspension cultures for transformation by the particle bombardment method. Callus obtain...

  19. Transformational leadership in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Doody, Owen; Doody, Catriona M

    Traditionally, nurses have been over-managed and led inadequately, yet today they face unprecedented challenges and opportunities. Organisations constantly face changes that require an increasingly adaptive and flexible leadership. This type of adaptive leadership is referred to as 'transformational'; under it, environments of shared responsibilities that influence new ways of knowing are created. Transformational leadership motivates followers by appealing to higher ideas and moral values, where the leader has a deep set of internal values and ideas. This leads to followers acting to sustain the greater good, rather than their own interests, and supportive environments where responsibility is shared. This article focuses on transformational leadership and its application to nursing through the four components of transformational leadership. These are: idealised influence; inspirational motivation; intellectual stimulation; and individual consideration. PMID:23132001

  20. Cognitive Transformations and Extended Expertise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menary, Richard; Kirchhoff, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Expertise is extended by becoming immersed in cultural practices. We look at an example of mathematical expertise in which immersion in cognitive practices results in the transformation of expert performance.

  1. Lightweight, high-frequency transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, G. E.

    1983-01-01

    The 25-kVA space transformer was developed under contract by Thermal Technology Laboratory, Buffalo, N. Y. The NASA Lewis transformer technology program attempted to develop the baseline technology. For the 25-kVA transformer the input voltage was chosen as 200 V, the output voltage as 1500 V, the input voltage waveform as square wave, the duty cycle as continuous, the frequency range (within certain constraints) as 10 to 40 kHz, the operating temperatures as 85 deg. and 130 C, the baseplate temperature as 50 C, the equivalent leakage inductance as less than 10 micro-h, the operating environment as space, and the life expectancy as 10 years. Such a transformer can also be used for aircraft, ship and terrestrial applications.

  2. Rotary Transformer Seals Power In

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A.; Paulkovich, J.

    1982-01-01

    Rotary transformer originally developed for spacecraft transfers electrical power from stationary primary winding to rotating secondary without sliding contacts and very little leakage of electromagnetic radiation. Transformer has two stationary primary windings connected in parallel. Secondary, mounted on a shaft that extends out of housing, rotates between two windings of primary. Shaft of secondary is composed of electrically conducting inner and outer parts separated by an insulator. Electrical contact is made from secondary winding, through shaft, to external leads.

  3. Environmental Designer Drugs: When Transformation May Not Eliminate Risk

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Environmental transformation processes, including those occurring in natural and engineered systems, do not necessarily drastically alter molecular structures of bioactive organic contaminants. While the majority of generated transformation products are likely benign, substantial conservation of structure in transformation products can imply conservation or even creation of bioactivity across multiple biological end points and thus incomplete mitigation of ecological risk. Therefore, focusing solely on parent compound removal for contaminants of higher relative risk, the most common approach to fate characterization, provides no mechanistic relationship to potential biological effects and is inadequate as a comprehensive metric for reduction of ecological risks. Here, we explore these phenomena for endocrine-active steroid hormones, focusing on examples of conserved bioactivity and related implications for fate assessment, regulatory approaches, and research opportunities. PMID:25216024

  4. [Genomic Instability in Acute Transformation of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia].

    PubMed

    Guo, Su-Qing; Li, Ying-Hua

    2015-08-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disorder, characterized by excessive proliferation of myeloid cells. CML patients in early phase [also known as chronic phase (CP)] usually respond to treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), some patients respond initially to TKI, but later become resistant, then resulting in the transformation from CP to more advanced phase, which were subclassified as either accelerated phase or blastic phase. At present, the molecular mechanisms of CML have been not yet clear, and acute transformation has been not fully understood, studies have shown that genomic instability promotes the acute conversion of CML. This review discusses the molecular mechanisms leading to the transformation of CML, and some therapeutic approaches. PMID:26314473

  5. Quantitative clinical pharmacology is transforming drug regulation.

    PubMed

    Peck, Carl C

    2010-12-01

    Prior to 1970s, development and regulation of new drugs was devoid of a fully quantitative, pathophysiological conceptual foundation. Malcolm Rowland pioneered, in collaboration with colleagues and friends, our modern understanding of drug clearance concepts, and equipped drug development and regulatory scientists with key investigative tools such as physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling, standardized approaches to characterizing drug metabolism, and microdosing. From the 1970s to the present, Malcolm Rowland has contributed to key advances in pharmacokinetics that have had transformational impacts on drug regulatory science. These advances include concepts that have led to the fundamental understanding that mechanistically derived, quantitative variations in drug concentrations, rather than assigned dosage alone, drive pharmacodynamic effects (PKPD)-including disease biomarkers and clinical outcomes. This body of knowledge has transformed drug development and regulatory science theory and practice from naïve empiricism to a mechanism/model-based, quantitative scientific discipline. As a result, it is now possible to incorporate pre-clinical in vitro data on drug physico-chemical properties, metabolizing enzymes, transporters and permeability properties into PBPK-based simulations of expected PK distributions and drug-drug interactions in human populations. The most comprehensive application of PK-PD is in the modeling and simulation of clinical trials in the context of model-based drug development and regulation, imbedded in the "learn-confirm paradigm". Regulatory agencies have embraced these advances and incorporated them into regulatory requirements, approval acceleration pathways and regulatory decisions. These developments are reviewed here, with emphasis on key contributions of Malcolm Rowland that facilitated this transformation. PMID:20978827

  6. Scaling Transformation for Nonlocal Interactions

    E-print Network

    Hai-Jhun Wanng

    2015-03-06

    In the light of their relationships with renormalization, in this paper we associate the scaling transformation with nonlocal interactions. On one hand, the association leads us to interpret the nonlocality with locally symmetric method. On the other hand, we find that the nonlocal interaction between hadrons could be test ground for scaling transformation if ascribing the running effects in renormalization to scaling transformation. First we derive directly from group theory the operator/coordinate representation and unitary/spinor representation for scaling transformation, then link them together by inquiring a scaling-invariant interaction vertex mimicking the similar process of Lorentz transformation applied to Dirac equation. The main feature of this paper is that we discuss both the representations in a sole physical frame. The representations correspond respectively to the spatial freedom and the intrinsic freedom of the same quantum system. And the latter is recognized to contribute to spin angular momentum that in literature has never been considered seriously. The nonlocal interaction Lagrangian turns out to vary under scaling transformation, analogous to running cases in renormalization. And the total Lagrangian becomes scale invariant only under some extreme conditions. The conservation law of this extreme Lagrangian is discussed and a contribution named scalum appears to the spin angular momentum. Finally a mechanism is designed to test the scaling effect on nonlocal interaction.

  7. Neoplastic transformation of human cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goth-Goldstein, Regine

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this project was to gain a better understanding of the cellular mechanisms of cancer induction by ionizing radiation as a risk assessment for workers subjected to high LET irradiation such as that found in space. The following ions were used for irradiation: Iron, Argon, Neon, and Lanthanum. Two tests were performed: growth in low serum and growth in agar were used as indicators of cell transformation. The specific aims of this project were to: (1) compare the effectiveness of various ions on degree of transformation of a single dose of the same RBE; (2) determine if successive irradiations with the same ion (Ge 600 MeV/u) increases the degree of transformation; (3) test if clones with the greatest degree of transformation produce tumors in nude mice; and (4) construct a cell hybrid of a transformed and control (non-transformed) clone. The cells used for this work are human mammary epithelial cells with an extended lifespan and selected for growth in MEM + 10% serum.

  8. Seeing the Fisher Z-Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Charles F., Jr.; Richardson, Ken

    2004-01-01

    Since 1915, statisticians have been applying Fisher's Z-transformation to Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients. We offer new geometric interpretations of this transformation. (Contains 9 figures.)

  9. Homology of balanced complexes via the Fourier transform

    E-print Network

    Meshulam, Roy

    2011-01-01

    Let G_0,...,G_k be finite abelian groups and let G_0*...*G_k be the join of the 0-dimensional complexes G_i. We give a characterization of the integral k-coboundaries of subcomplexes of G_0*...*G_k in terms of the Fourier transform on the group G_0 \\times ... \\times G_k. This leads to an extension of a recent result of Musiker and Reiner on a topological interpretation of the cyclotomic polynomial.

  10. Bacterial Transformations of Naphthothiophenes

    PubMed Central

    Kropp, K. G.; Andersson, J. T.; Fedorak, P. M.

    1997-01-01

    Naphthothiophenes are minor components of fossil fuels, and they can enter the environment from oil spills. Naphtho[2,1-b]thiophene, naphtho[2,3-b]thiophene, and 1-methylnaphtho[2,1-b]thiophene were synthesized and used in biodegradation studies with 1-methylnaphthalene (1-MN)-degrading Pseudomonas strains W1, F, and BT1. Cultures were incubated with one of the naphthothiophenes with or without 1-MN, acidified, and extracted with CH(inf2)Cl(inf2). The extracts were analyzed by gas chromatography with flame photometric and mass detectors to characterize sulfur-containing metabolites and with an atomic emission detector for quantification. Only strain W1 was able to grow on naphtho[2,1-b]thiophene, but strains F and BT1 cometabolized this compound if 1-MN was present. 1-MN was required by all three strains to metabolize naphtho[2,3-b]thiophene, which was more resistant to biodegradation than the [2,1-b] isomer. Two metabolites of naphtho [2,1-b]thiophene were purified, analyzed by (sup1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and found to be 4-hydroxybenzothiophene-5-carboxylic acid (metabolite I) and 5-hydroxybenzothiophene-4-carboxylic acid (metabolite II). In cultures of strain W1 grown for 7 days on 52 (mu)mol of naphtho[2,1-b]thiophene, >84% of the substrate was degraded and metabolites I and II accounted for 19 and 9%, respectively, of the original amount of naphtho[2,1-b]thiophene. When 1-MN was present, strain W1 degraded >97% of the naphtho[2,1-b]thiophene and similar amounts of metabolite II were produced, but metabolite I did not accumulate. 1-MN was shown to promote the further degradation of metabolite I, but not of metabolite II, by strain W1. Thus, 1-MN enhanced the biodegradation of naphtho[2,1-b]thiophene. Approximately 70% of the 1-methylnaphtho [2,1-b]thiophene added to cultures of strain W1 with 1-MN was recovered as 4-hydroxy-3-methylbenzothiophene-5-carboxylic acid, the 3-methyl analog of metabolite I. The methyl substitution hindered further metabolism of 3-methyl-metabolite I even in the presence of 1-MN. Cometabolism of naphtho[2,3-b]thiophene yielded two products that were tentatively identified as 5-hydroxybenzothiophene-6-carboxylic and 6-hydroxybenzothiophene-5-carboxylic acids. PMID:16535687

  11. Transforming the Online Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horodyskyj, L.; Ben-Naim, D.; Semken, S. C.; Anbar, A. D.

    2013-12-01

    Traditional large lecture classes are fundamentally passive and teacher-centered. Most existing online courses are as well, including massive open online courses (MOOCs). Research tells us that this mode of instruction is not ideal for student learning. However, the unique attributes of the online environment have thus far been mostly underutilized. We hypothesize that new tools and the innovative curricula they enable can foster greater student engagement and enhance learning at large scale. To test this hypothesis, over the past three years, Arizona State University developed and offered "Habitable Worlds", an online-only astrobiology lab course. The course curriculum is based on the Drake Equation, which integrates across disciplines. The course pedagogy is organized around a term-long, individualized, game-inspired project in which each student must find and characterize rare habitable planets in a randomized field of hundreds of stars using concepts learned in the course. The curriculum allows us to meaningfully integrate concepts from Earth, physical, life, and social sciences in order to address questions related to the possibility of extraterrestrial life. The pedagogy motivates students to master concepts, which are taught through interactive and adaptive inquiry-driven tutorials, featuring focused feedback and alternative pathways that adjust to student abilities, built using an intelligent tutoring system (Smart Sparrow's Adaptive eLearning Platform - AeLP). Through the combination of the project and tutorials, students construct knowledge from experience, modeling the authentic practice of science. Because the tutorials are self-grading, the teaching staff is free to dedicate time to more intense learner-teacher interactions (such as tutoring weaker students or guiding advanced students towards broader applications of the concepts), using platforms like Piazza and Adobe Connect. The AeLP and Piazza provide robust data and analysis tools that allow us to investigate how students interact with the exercises, both in aggregate and at the individual level. These data have allowed us to identify and fix hidden problems in the exercises that students do not vocalize. More importantly, the AeLP provides the opportunity to construct and evaluate hypotheses in content presentation and evaluation methods that are simply not possible in traditional classroom settings, a task we are currently undertaking to determine the effectiveness of our approach.

  12. Radiogenic cell transformation and carcinogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T. C.; Georgy, K. A.; Mei, M.; Durante, M.; Craise, L. M.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation carcinogenesis is one of the major biological effects considered important in the risk assessment for space travel. Various biological model systems, including both cultured cells and animals, have been found useful for studying the carcinogenic effects of space radiations, which consist of energetic electrons, protons and heavy ions. The development of techniques for studying neoplastic cell transformation in culture has made it possible to examine the cellular and molecular mechanisms of radiation carcinogenesis. Cultured cell systems are thus complementary to animal models. Many investigators have determined the oncogenic effects of ionizing and nonionizing radiation in cultured mammalian cells. One of the cell systems used most often for radiation transformation studies is mouse embryonic cells (C3H10T1/2), which are easy to culture and give good quantitative dose-response curves. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for heavy ions with various energies and linear energy transfer (LET) have been obtained with this cell system. Similar RBE and LET relationship was observed by investigators for other cell systems. In addition to RBE measurements, fundamental questions on repair of sub- and potential oncogenic lesions, direct and indirect effect, primary target and lesion, the importance of cell-cell interaction and the role of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in radiogenic carcinogenesis have been studied, and interesting results have been found. Recently several human epithelial cell systems have been developed, and ionizing radiation have been shown to transform these cells. Oncogenic transformation of these cells, however, requires a long expression time and/or multiple radiation exposures. Limited experimental data indicate high-LET heavy ions can be more effective than low-LET radiation in inducing cell transformation. Cytogenetic and molecular analyses can be performed with cloned transformants to provide insights into basic genetic mechanism(s) of radiogenic transformation of human epithelial cells.

  13. Microbial transformation of deoxynivalenol (vomitoxin).

    PubMed Central

    He, P; Young, L G; Forsberg, C

    1992-01-01

    Microbial inocula from rumen fluid, soil, and contents of the large intestines of chickens (CLIC) and of swine (SLIC) were tested for their ability to transform deoxynivalenol (vomitoxin) in vitro. Microorganisms in (CLIC) completely transformed pure vomitoxin, and this activity was retained through six serial subcultures. No alteration of the toxin by incubation with SLIC was detected, whereas 35% of the vomitoxin was metabolized in the original culture of rumen fluid and 50% was metabolized by the soil sample, though metabolism was decreased in subsequent subcultures of either sample. A single metabolite was isolated and identified as deepoxy vomitoxin. The increase in concentration of deepoxy vomitoxin in the culture medium corresponded with the decrease in vomitoxin concentration. The vomitoxin transformation rate was not affected by either the ratio of CLIC to vomitoxin (5 to 0.2 g of CLIC per mg of vomitoxin) or the initial concentration of vomitoxin (14 to 1,400 ppm) in the medium. Biotransformation of vomitoxin was completely inhibited when the pH in the medium was lowered to 5.20. Sodium azide at a 0.1% (wt/vol) concentration in the medium blocked the transformation of vomitoxin, suggesting that the deepoxidation of vomitoxin is an energy-dependent process. About 50% of the vomitoxin in moldy corn in culture medium was transformed by microorganisms from CLIC. The vomitoxin transformation rate in moldy corn was not affected when the concentration of CLIC changed from 0.2 to 0.8 g/ml of medium. Vomitoxin in the moldy corn was not transformed when CLIC were added to corn without culture medium.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1476428

  14. Appell transformation and symmetry transformations for the paraxial wave equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torre, A.

    2011-07-01

    The analysis presented in this paper is the natural continuation of that developed in a previous paper, where the Appell transformation, well known in the theory of the heat equation, has been interpreted in relation to the paraxial (free) propagation under both a rectangular and a circular cylindrical symmetry as connecting solutions of the pertinent paraxial wave equation, which are generated by Fourier or Hankel pairs of functions. Indeed, here we will reformulate in optical terms the result proved by Leutwiler relative to the n-dimensional heat equation. Accordingly, we will show that the optical Appell transformation is essentially—in the sense clarified in the text—the only symmetry transformation for the paraxial wave equation.

  15. Electro-Optical Imaging Fourier-Transform Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin; Zhou, Hanying

    2006-01-01

    An electro-optical (E-O) imaging Fourier-transform spectrometer (IFTS), now under development, is a prototype of improved imaging spectrometers to be used for hyperspectral imaging, especially in the infrared spectral region. Unlike both imaging and non-imaging traditional Fourier-transform spectrometers, the E-O IFTS does not contain any moving parts. Elimination of the moving parts and the associated actuator mechanisms and supporting structures would increase reliability while enabling reductions in size and mass, relative to traditional Fourier-transform spectrometers that offer equivalent capabilities. Elimination of moving parts would also eliminate the vibrations caused by the motions of those parts. Figure 1 schematically depicts a traditional Fourier-transform spectrometer, wherein a critical time delay is varied by translating one the mirrors of a Michelson interferometer. The time-dependent optical output is a periodic representation of the input spectrum. Data characterizing the input spectrum are generated through fast-Fourier-transform (FFT) post-processing of the output in conjunction with the varying time delay.

  16. Transformation of restriction endonuclease phenotype in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    Muckerman, C.C.; Springhorn, S.S.; Greenberg, B.; Lacks, S.A.

    1982-10-01

    The genetic basis of the unique restriction endonuclease DpnI, that cleaves only at a methylated sequence, 5'-GmeATC-3', and of the complementary endonuclease DpnII, which cleaves at the same sequence when it is not methylated, was investigated. Different strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from patients contained either DpnI (two isolates) or DpnII (six isolates). The latter strains also contained DNA methylated at the 5'-GATC-3' sequence. A restrictable bacteriophage, HB-3, was used to characterize the various strains and to select for transformants. One laboratory strain contained neither DpnI nor DpnII. It was probably derived from a DpnI-containing strain, and its DNA was not methylated at 5'-GATC-3'. Cells of this strain were transformed to the DpnI restriction phenotype by DNA from a DpnI-containing strain and to the DpnII restriction phenotype by DNA from a DpnII-containing strain. Neither cross-transformation, that is, transformation to one phenotype by DNA from a strain of the other phenotype, nor spontaneous conversion was observed. Extracts of transformants to the new restriction phenotype were shown to contain the corresponding endonuclease.

  17. Structural transformation in nickel doped zinc oxide nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, Navendu; Sahai, Anshuman

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? A systematic study of 1–10% Ni doped ZnO nanostructures (Ni:ZnO NS). ? Effect of Ni concentration on properties of Ni:ZnO NS was intensively investigated. ? Structural transformation in Ni:ZnO NS demonstrated through characterizations. ? Alteration in vibrational modes of Ni:ZnO NS were meticulously analyzed. ? Intricacies of structural evolution, from particles to rods, were comprehended. -- Abstract: In this article, structural transformation in nickel doped zinc oxide nanostructures is reported. The ZnO nanostructures are synthesized with 1–10% of nickel doping through a chemical precipitation method. The undoped and doped nanostructures were systematically investigated employing X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM/SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and micro-Raman spectroscopy (?RS). The wurtzite phase of the material and associated lattice parameters were ascertained through XRD analysis. TEM/SEM images reveal the structural transformation of ZnO nanostructures with variation in nickel doping. The study of vibrational modes of nanostructures at different stages of structural transformation, as performed through FTIR and Raman spectroscopy, assist in deciphering the pivotal role of doping concentration in gradual evolution of nickel doped ZnO structure from nanoparticles to nanorods.

  18. Phase Transformations in Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon-Jun Kim

    2004-12-19

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) constitute both ferrite and austenite as a matrix. Such a microstructure confers a high corrosion resistance with favorable mechanical properties. However, intermetallic phases such as {sigma} and {chi} can also form during casting or high-temperature processing and can degrade the properties of the DSS. This research was initiated to develop time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagrams of two types of cast duplex stainless steels, CD3MN (Fe-22Cr-5Ni-Mo-N) and CD3MWCuN (Fe-25Cr-7Ni-Mo-W-Cu-N), in order to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formation. The alloys were heat treated isothermally or under controlled cooling conditions and then characterized using conventional metallographic methods that included tint etching, and also using electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). The kinetics of intermetallic-phase ({sigma} + {chi}) formation were analyzed using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (MA) equation in the case of isothermal transformations and a modified form of this equation in the case of continuous cooling transformations. The rate of intermetallic-phase formation was found to be much faster in CD3MWCuN than CD3MN due mainly to differences in the major alloying contents such as Cr, Ni and Mo. To examine in more detail the effects of these elements of the phase stabilities; a series of eight steel castings was designed with the Cr, Ni and Mo contents systematically varied with respect to the nominal composition of CD3MN. The effects of varying the contents of alloying additions on the formation of intermetallic phases were also studied computationally using the commercial thermodynamic software package, Thermo-Calc. In general, {sigma} was stabilized with increasing Cr addition and {chi} by increasing Mo addition. However, a delicate balance among Ni and other minor elements such as N and Si also exists. Phase equilibria in DSS can be affected by local composition fluctuations in the cast alloy. This may cause discrepancy between thermodynamic prediction and experimental observation.

  19. Immersed surfaces and membranes transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kats, E. I.; Monastyrsky, M. I.

    2015-06-01

    Physical and biological observation methods provide a variety of bilayer membranes’ shapes and their transformations. Besides, the topological and geometrical methods allow us to deduce a classification of all possible membrane surfaces. This double-sided approach leads to a deeper insight into membranes properties. Our goal is to apply an appropriate mathematical technique for classifying vesicles (closed surfaces in mathematical terminology) and for their transformation ways. The problem turned out to be an intricate one, and to our knowledge no mathematical techniques have been applied to its solution. We find that all vesicles can be decomposed in a small number of universality classes generated by a few ‘bricks’: a torus, a screwed torus, and the real projective plane. We consider several ways of transforming membrane surfaces, bearing in mind that they possess an additional extremal property. Our method exploits different constructions of minimal surfaces in S3. We estimate energetic barrier for transformation of minimal membrane surfaces using the so-called doubling procedure. This problem is far from being a pure theoretical exercise. For instance, almost all cells’ biological functions, or tumor progression, are accompanied by apparently singular cell membrane transformations.

  20. Imaging Fourier transform spectrometry of chemical plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Kenneth C.; Gross, Kevin C.; Perram, Glen P.

    2009-05-01

    A midwave infrared (MWIR) imaging Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS), the Telops FIRST-MWE (Field-portable Imaging Radiometric Spectrometer Technology - Midwave Extended) has been utilized for the standoff detection and characterization of chemical plumes. Successful collection and analysis of MWIR hyperspectral imagery of jet engine exhaust has allowed us to produce spatial profiles of both temperature and chemical constituent concentrations of exhaust plumes. Successful characterization of this high temperature combustion event has led to the collection and analysis of hyperspectral imagery of lower temperature emissions from industrial smokestacks. This paper presents MWIR data from remote collection of hyperspectral imagery of methyl salicilate (MeS), a chemical warfare agent simulant, during the Chemical Biological Distributed Early Warning System (CBDEWS) test at Dugway Proving Grounds, UT in 2008. The data did not contain spectral lines associated with emission of MeS. However, a few broad spectral features were present in the background-subtracted plume spectra. Further analysis will be required to assign these features, and determine the utility of MWIR hyperspectral imagery for analysis of chemical warfare agent plumes.

  1. Enhanced perturbative continuous unitary transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krull, H.; Drescher, N. A.; Uhrig, G. S.

    2012-09-01

    Unitary transformations are an essential tool for the theoretical understanding of many systems by mapping them to simpler effective models. A systematically controlled variant to perform such a mapping is a perturbative continuous unitary transformation (pCUT) among others. So far, this approach required an equidistant unperturbed spectrum. Here, we pursue two goals: First, we extend its applicability to nonequidistant spectra with the particular focus on an efficient derivation of the differential flow equations, which define the enhanced perturbative continuous unitary transformation (epCUT). Second, we show that the numerical integration of the flow equations yields a robust scheme to extract data from the epCUT. The method is illustrated by the perturbation of the harmonic oscillator with a quartic term and of the two-leg spin ladders in the strong-rung-coupling limit for uniform and alternating rung couplings. The latter case provides an example of perturbation around a nonequidistant spectrum.

  2. Heat storage in alloy transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenall, C. E.; Gueceri, S. I.; Farkas, D.; Labdon, M. B.; Nagaswami, N.; Pregger, B.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of using metal alloys as thermal energy storage media was determined. The following major elements were studied: (1) identification of congruently transforming alloys and thermochemical property measurements; (2) development of a precise and convenient method for measuring volume change during phase transformation and thermal expansion coefficients; (3) development of a numerical modeling routine for calculating heat flow in cylindrical heat exchangers containing phase change materials; and (4) identification of materials that could be used to contain the metal alloys. Several eutectic alloys and ternary intermetallic phases were determined. A method employing X-ray absorption techniques was developed to determine the coefficients of thermal expansion of both the solid and liquid phases and the volume change during phase transformation from data obtained during one continuous experimental test. The method and apparatus are discussed and the experimental results are presented. The development of the numerical modeling method is presented and results are discussed for both salt and metal alloy phase change media.

  3. Unsolved problems in plastid transformation

    PubMed Central

    Rigano, M. Manuela; Scotti, Nunzia; Cardi, Teodoro

    2012-01-01

    Plants have been proved as a novel production platform for a wide range of biologically important compounds such as enzymes, therapeutic proteins, antibiotics, and proteins with immunological properties. In this context, plastid genetic engineering can be potentially used to produce recombinant proteins. However, several challenges still remain to be overcome if the full potential of plastid transformation technology is to be realized. They include the development of plastid transformation systems for species other than tobacco, the expression of transgenes in non-green plastids, the increase of protein accumulation and the appearance of pleiotropic effects. In this paper, we discuss the novel tools recently developed to overcome some limitations of chloroplast transformation. PMID:22892591

  4. Trace Driven Data Structure Transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Janjusic, Tomislav; Kartsaklis, Christos

    2012-01-01

    As the complexity of scientific codes and computational hardware increases it is increasingly important to study the effects of data-structure layouts on program memory behavior. Program structure layouts affect the memory performance differently, therefore we need the capability to effectively study such transformations without the need to rewrite application codes. Trace-driven simulations are an effective and convenient mechanism to simulate program behavior at various granularities. During an application s execution, a tool known as a tracer or profiler, collects program flow data and records program instructions. The trace-file consists of tuples that associate each program instruction with program internal variables. In this paper we outline a proof-of-concept mechanism to apply data-structure transformations during trace simulation and observe effects on memory without the need to manually transform an application s code.

  5. Transforming Lives, Transforming Communities: Conceptual Framework for Further Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Delia

    A new conceptual framework for further education has been developed as part of the reforms currently being undertaken by Australia's Adult, Community, and Further Education Board. Four key principles underpin the curriculum framework: multiplicity, connectedness, critical intelligence, and transformation. According to the framework, educational…

  6. "Transformational Ministry" and "Reparative Therapy": Transformative Learning Gone Awry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grace, Andre P.

    North Americans' fear and preoccupation with safety and security as a result of the September 11 attacks is similar to that felt by gays and lesbians in daily life. Queer persons are not part of the Christian family, according to Jerry Falwell and other rightist Christian fundamentalists, including those involved in transformative ministry and…

  7. Liouville transformations and quantum reflection

    E-print Network

    Gabriel Dufour; Romain Guérout; Astrid Lambrecht; Serge Reynaud

    2015-02-21

    Liouville transformations of Schr\\"odinger equations preserve the scattering amplitudes while changing the effective potential. We discuss the properties of these gauge transformations and introduce a special Liouville gauge which allows one to map the problem of quantum reflection of an atom on an attractive Casimir-Polder well into that of reflection on a repulsive wall. We deduce a quantitative evaluation of quantum reflection probabilities in terms of the universal probability which corresponds to the solution of the $V_4=-C_4/z^4$ far-end Casimir-Polder potential.

  8. Polyanalytic relativistic second Bargmann transforms

    E-print Network

    Zouhair Mouayn

    2015-04-01

    We construct coherent states through special superpositions of photon number states of the relativistic isotonic oscillator. In each superposition the coefficients are chosen to be L 2 eingenfunctions of a sigma weight Maass Laplacian on the Poincare disk, which are associated with discrete eigenvalues. For each nonzero m the associated coherent states transform constitutes the m true polyanalytic extension of a relativistic version of the second Bargmann transform, whose integral kernel is expressed in terms of a special Appel Kampe de Feriet hypergeometric function. The obtained results could be used to extend the known semi classical analysis of quantum dynamics of the relativistic isotonic oscillator.

  9. Fourier transforms of UD integrals

    E-print Network

    Igor Kondrashuk; Anatoly Kotikov

    2008-02-23

    UD integrals published by N. Usyukina and A. Davydychev in 1992-1993 are integrals corresponding to ladder-type Feynman diagrams. The results are UD functions $\\Phi^{(L)},$ where $L$ is the number of loops. They play an important role in N=4 supersymmetic Yang-Mills theory. The integrals were defined and calculated in the momentum space. In this paper the position space representation of UD functions is investigated. We show that Fourier transforms of UD functions are UD functions of space-time intervals but this correspondence is indirect. For example, the Fourier transform of the second UD integral is the second UD integral.

  10. Conditional unitary transformation on biphotons

    SciTech Connect

    Brida, G.; Genovese, M.; Gramegna, M.; Chekhova, M.V.; Krivitsky, L.A.; Kulik, S.P.

    2004-09-01

    A conditional unitary transformation (90 deg. polarization rotation) is performed at single-photon level. The transformation is realized by rotating polarization for one of the photons of a polarization-entangled biphoton state (signal photon) by means of a Pockel cell triggered by the detection of the other (idler) photon after polarization selection. As a result, the state of the signal photon is losslessly changed from being completely unpolarized to being partially polarized, so that the final polarization degree is given by the idler detector quantum efficiency. This experiment can be used for developing a different method of absolute quantum efficiency calibration.

  11. Microbial Transformation of Flavonoids 1

    PubMed Central

    Ciegler, Alex; Lindenfelser, Lloyd A.; Nelson, George E. N.

    1971-01-01

    The ability of a number of fungal spores, and in particular of resting vegetative mycelia, to transform naringin and naringenin was studied. In general, only hydrolytic cleavage of the sugar moieties of naringin to produce prunin and naringenin was observed. Two cultures, Penicillium charlesii and Helminthosporium sativum, also produced two unidentified flavonoid compounds but in very low yields. No transformation of aglycone was detected, although the compound was metabolized by some cultures when supplied as the glycoside prunin. A fluorodensitometric method was developed for the quantitative analysis of flavonoid compounds. Images PMID:5137588

  12. Development of Toroidal Core Transformers

    SciTech Connect

    Leon, Francisco

    2014-05-31

    The original objective of this project was to design, build and test a few prototypes of singlephase dry-type distribution transformers of 25 kVA, 2.4 kV primary to 120 V transformers using cores made of a continuous steel strip shaped like a doughnut (toroid). At different points during the development of the project, the scope was enhanced to include the more practical case of a 25 kVA transformer for a 13.8 kV primary system voltage. Later, the scope was further expanded to design and build a 50 kVA unit to transformer voltage from 7.62 kV to 2x120 V. This is a common transformer used by Con Edison of New York and they are willing to test it in the field. The project officially started in September 2009 and ended in May 2014. The progress was reported periodically to DOE in eighteen quarterly reports. A Continuation Application was submitted to DOE in June 2010. In May 2011 we have requested a non-cost extension of the project. In December 2011, the Statement of Project Objectives (SOPO) was updated to reflect the real conditions and situation of the project as of 2011. A second Continuation Application was made and funding was approved in 2013 by DOE and the end date was extended to May 2014.The technical challenges that were overcome in this project include: the development of the technology to pass the impulse tests, derive a model for the thermal performance, produce a sound mechanical design, and estimate the inrush current. However, the greatest challenge that we faced during the development of the project was the complications of procuring the necessary parts and materials to build the transformers. The actual manufacturing process is relatively fast, but getting all parts together is a very lengthy process. The main products of this project are two prototypes of toroidal distribution transformers of 7.62 kV (to be used in a 13.8 kV system) to 2x120 V secondary (standard utilization voltage); one is rated at 25 kVA and the other at 50 kVA. The 25 kVA transformer passed the impulse test in KEMA high-voltage laboratories. Additional products include: nine papers published in the IEEE Transactions on Power Delivery, one patent has been filed, three PhD students were supported from beginning to graduation, five postdoctoral fellows, and three MSc students were partially supported. The electrical characteristics of our dry-type toroidal transformers are similar to those of the oil-immersed pole mounted transformers currently in use by many utilities, but toroids have higher efficiency. The no-load losses of the 50 kVA prototype are only 45 W. A standard transformer has no-load losses between 90 and 240 W. Thus, even the finest transformer built today with standard technology has double the amount of no-load losses than the prototype toroidal transformer. When the manufacturing process is prepared for mass production, the cost of a dry-type toroidal transformer would be similar to the price of an oil-filed standard design. However, because of the greatly reduced losses, the total ownership cost of a toroidal transformer could be about half of a traditional design. We got a grant from Power Bridge NY in the amount of $149,985 from June 2014 to May 2015 to continue developing the transformer with commercialization objectives. We are considering the possibility to incorporate a company to manufacture the transformers and have contacted investors. The current status of the real life testing is as follows: after several months of silence, Con Edison has re-started conversations and has shown willingness to test the transformer. Other companies, PSE&G and National Grid have recently also shown interest and we will present our product to them soon.

  13. A Novel Phenolic Compound, Chloroxynil, Improves Agrobacterium-Mediated Transient Transformation in Lotus japonicus

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Mitsuhiro; Cutler, Sean; Isobe, Sachiko

    2015-01-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated transformation is a commonly used method for plant genetic engineering. However, the limitations of Agrobacterium host-plant interactions and the complexity of plant tissue culture often make the production of transgenic plants difficult. Transformation efficiency in many legume species, including soybean and the common bean, has been reported to be quite low. To improve the transformation procedure in legumes, we screened for chemicals that increase the transformation efficiency of Lotus japonicus, a model legume species. A Chemical library was screened and chemicals that increase in transient transformation efficiency of L. japonicus accession, Miyakojima MG-20 were identified. The transient transformation efficiency was quantified by reporter activity in which an intron-containing reporter gene produces the GUS protein only when the T-DNA is expressed in the plant nuclei. We identified a phenolic compound, chloroxynil, which increased the genetic transformation of L. japonicus by Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA105. Characterization of the mode of chloroxynil action indicated that it enhanced Agrobacterium-mediated transformation through the activation of the Agrobacterium vir gene expression, similar to acetosyringone, a phenolic compound known to improve Agrobacterium-mediated transformation efficiency. Transient transformation efficiency of L. japonicus with 5 ?M chloroxynil was 60- and 6- fold higher than that of the control and acetosyringone treatment, respectively. In addition, transgenic L. japonicus lines were successfully generated by 5 ?M chloroxynil treatment.Furthermore, we show that chloroxynil improves L. japonicus transformation by Agrobacterium strain GV3101 and rice transformation. Our results demonstrate that chloroxynil significantly improves Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation efficiency of various agriculturally important crops. PMID:26176780

  14. Canonical transformations for space trajectory optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haissig, Christine M.; Mease, Kenneth D.; Vinh, Nguyen X.

    1992-01-01

    Canonical transformations are developed between the Cartesian coordinates, equinoctial elements, trajectory variables, and orbital elements for coplanar space trajectory optimization problems. The canonical transformations permit the state and adjoint or their solution, transversality conditions, the optimal control, and integrals of the motion, to be transformed between any of the common sets of coordinates for planar space trajectory optimization problems. Variations on the canonical transformations shown are straightforward to develop given the group properties of the canonical transformations.

  15. The Dual Horospherical Radon Transform as a Limit of Spherical Radon Transforms

    E-print Network

    Pasquale, Angela

    The Dual Horospherical Radon Transform as a Limit of Spherical Radon Transforms J. Hilgert, A of G. The horospherical Radon transform maps functions on X to functions on HorX by integrating over the dual horospherical Radon transform as a limit of dual spherical Radon transforms. 1. Introduction

  16. Transformative Pedagogy for Social Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores ways in which pedagogy for an elaborated form of transformative learning can be a useful catalyst for the development of social capital in community and workplace groups and networks. I begin with an example and then explore ideas of learning challenges embedded in building and maintaining social capital. I consider the…

  17. The Weir: Storytelling that Transforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karpiak, Irene E.

    2008-01-01

    Through the acts of telling our stories, writing our stories, and reading others' stories, we become known both to others and to ourselves. Drawing on the theme of transformation in the recent play "The Weir," this article explores the place of story in adult and continuing education and considers how story told by students can break through the…

  18. GREENER SYNTHETIC TRANSFORMATIONS USING MICROWAVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microwave irradiation has been used for a variety of organic transformations wherein chemical reactions are expedited because of selective adsorption of microwave (MW) energy by polar molecules, non-polar molecules being inert to the MW dielectric loss. The MW application under s...

  19. Placeless Organizations: Collaborating for Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nardi, Bonnie A.

    2007-01-01

    This article defines and discusses placeless organizations as sites and generators of learning on a large scale. The emphasis is on how placeless organizations structure themselves to carry out social transformation--necessarily involving intensive learning--on a national or global scale. The argument is made that place is not a necessary…

  20. BIODIVERSITY Sonoran Desert Ecosystem transformation

    E-print Network

    @gmail.com ABSTRACT Aim Biological invasions facilitate ecosystem transformation by altering the structure-level impacts on ecosystem processes in advance of a grass­fire cycle. Keywords Biological invasions Invasive species have been implicated in reduced species richness (Elton, 1958; Sanders et al., 2003

  1. Lorentz transformations of open systems

    E-print Network

    Asher Peres; Daniel R. Terno

    2001-07-29

    We consider open dynamical systems, subject to external interventions by agents that are not completely described by the theory (classical or quantal). These interventions are localized in regions that are relatively spacelike. Under these circumstances, no relativistic transformation law exists that relates the descriptions of the physical system by observers in relative motion. Still, physical laws are the same in all Lorentz frames.

  2. POWER Innovation: Transforming a Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quattrochi, David P.; Robinson, Edward J.; Chapman, Paul E.

    2014-01-01

    The Carrollton Exempted Village School District is experiencing a major transformation due to the Utica Shale industry boom that has positively impacted the district. New money has not been passed by the voters since 1977. As a result, the administration and board had to find alternative ways to fund the district, which includes partnering with…

  3. Neural data Fourier transforms, spectral

    E-print Network

    Lin, Kevin K.

    Neural data analysis - Session 2 Fourier transforms, spectral analysis #12;Why Fourier? A lot of these oscillations is often of interest Fourier analysis provides a way of identifying the frequencies of the oscillations present in a signal #12;Math review ­ complex numbers #12;Waves - terminology #12;Fourier series

  4. Some Special Fourier Transform Pairs

    E-print Network

    Vickers, James

    Some Special Fourier Transform Pairs 24.3 Introduction ' & $ % Prerequisites Before starting to . . . #12;1. Parseval's Theorem Recall from Unit 2 on Fourier Series that for a periodic signal fT (t) with complex Fourier coefficients cn(n = 0, ±1, ±2, . . .) Parseval's Theorem holds: 1 T + T 2 - T 2 f2 T (t

  5. Transforming Lives Through Klipsch School

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Eric E.

    in this area could possibly work on cell phone design, satellites, sensor design and monitoring, imaging and Electromagnetics Students could expect to work with lasers and laser applications including communications, imagingTransforming Lives Through Discovery Klipsch School Of Electrical and Computer Engineering Klipsch

  6. Fourier transform of confining potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Heiss, W.D.; Welke, G.M.

    1986-04-01

    The precise meaning of the Fourier transform of Vertical BarxVertical Bar/sup ..nu../ is examined. A general expression is given for real positive ..nu... For odd ..nu.., derivatives of principal value integrals are obtained, while even ..nu.. gives rise to derivatives of the delta function.

  7. Induced geometry from disformal transformation

    E-print Network

    Fang-Fang Yuan; Peng Huang

    2015-02-08

    In this note, we use the disformal transformation to induce a geometry from the manifold which is originally Riemannian. The new geometry obtained here can be considered as a generalization of Weyl integrable geometry. Based on these results, we further propose a geometry which is naturally a generalization of Weyl geometry.

  8. A Model of Transformative Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swartz, Ann L.; Triscari, Jacqlyn S.

    2011-01-01

    Two collaborative writing partners sought to deepen their understanding of transformative learning by conducting several spirals of grounded theory research on their own collaborative relationship. Drawing from adult education, business, and social science literature and including descriptive analysis of their records of activity and interaction…

  9. Transformational Leadership in Research Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilmore, Ryann M.

    2011-01-01

    In order to preserve research integrity, leaders at postsecondary research institutions must utilize transformational leadership behaviors in order to promote a campus culture that is the most conducive to responsible research conduct. In support of this assertion, the issue of research misconduct and its potential consequences for both…

  10. Transformation invariant stochastic catastrophe theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenmakers, Eric-Jan; Molenaar, Peter C. M.; Grasman, Raoul P. P. P.; Hartelman, Pascal A. I.; van der Maas, Han L. J.

    2005-11-01

    Catastrophe theory is a mathematical formalism for modeling nonlinear systems whose discontinuous behavior is determined by smooth changes in a small number of driving parameters. Fitting a catastrophe model to noisy data constitutes a serious challenge, however, because catastrophe theory was formulated specifically for deterministic systems. Loren Cobb addressed this challenge by developing a stochastic counterpart of catastrophe theory (SCT) based on Itô stochastic differential equations. In SCT, the stable and unstable equilibrium states of the system correspond to the modes and the antimodes of the empirical probability density function, respectively. Unfortunately, SCT is not invariant under smooth and invertible transformations of variables-this is an important limitation, since invariance to diffeomorphic transformations is essential in deterministic catastrophe theory. From the Itô transformation rules we derive a generalized version of SCT that does remain invariant under transformation and can include Cobb’s SCT as a special case. We show that an invariant function is obtained by multiplying the probability density function with the diffusion function of the stochastic process. This invariant function can be estimated by a straightforward time series analysis based on level crossings. We illustrate the invariance problem and its solution with two applications.

  11. Optimal cloning of unitary transformations

    E-print Network

    G. Chiribella; G. M. D'Ariano; P. Perinotti

    2009-04-14

    After proving a general no-cloning theorem for black boxes, we derive the optimal universal cloning of unitary transformations, from one to two copies. The optimal cloner is realized by quantum channels with memory, and greately outperforms the optimal measure-and-reprepare cloning strategy. Applications are outlined, including two-way quantum cryptographic protocols.

  12. Discontinuous Change: Leading Organizational Transformation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nadler, David A.; And Others

    This book provides insights into the dynamics of organizational transformation and presents a diagnostic framework for leading organizations through periods of radical change. Part 1 provides a framework for looking at the different types of change and the action strategies for dealing with them. Chapters include: (1) "Change Leadership: Core…

  13. where transformation happens macro program

    E-print Network

    Huang, Jianyu

    on the social justice issues core to our profession. courses + curricula · Social Innovation · Financialwhere transformation happens macro program BOSTON COLLEGE s c h o o l o f SOCIAL WORK #12;program overview Our macro curriculum is the first comprehensive social work graduate program to train social

  14. Readings in Applied Transformational Grammar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, Mark, Ed.

    This volume contains nineteen essays, dealing with various aspects of transformational grammar, by scholars such as Noam Chomsky, Eric H. Lenneberg, and Leon Jakobovits. These essays have been reprinted from sources such as "College English" and "Language Learning" and are intended for the most part for a nontechnical audience. The anthology is…

  15. Recent Developments in Transformational Grammar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Roderick A.

    1969-01-01

    In the years following the appearance of Noam Chomsky's book, "Syntactic Structures," in 1957, transformational grammarians modified and improved his initial model of language. The notion of a deep structure of meaning underlying a sentence's surface structure was revised to embody elements representing negation, command, and interrogation, and to…

  16. High-Voltage Isolation Transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clatterbuck, C. H.; Ruitberg, A. P.

    1985-01-01

    Arcing and field-included surface erosion reduced by electrostatic shields around windings and ferromagnetic core of 80-kilovolt isolation transformer. Fabricated from high-resistivity polyurethane-based material brushed on critical surfaces, shields maintained at approximately half potential difference of windings.

  17. Novel terminal strips for transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiler, E. M.

    1969-01-01

    Spacing tinned terminal leads between two tapes of woven glass fiber that are sandwich-bonded with pliable epoxy adhesive alleviates problems of taped leads pulling away from the transformer and shorting due to crossover of wires. Individual leads may or may not be enclosed in glass-fiber sleeves.

  18. Genetic transformation of sweet sorghum.

    PubMed

    Raghuwanshi, Anshu; Birch, Robert G

    2010-09-01

    Sweet sorghum has substantial potential as a biofuel feedstock, with advantages in some environments over alternatives such as sugarcane or maize. Gene technologies are likely to be important to achieve yields sufficient for food, fuel and fibre production from available global croplands, but sorghum has proven difficult to transform. Tissue culture recalcitrance and poor reproducibility of transformation protocols remain major challenges for grain sorghum, and there has been no reported success for sweet sorghum. Here we describe a repeatable transformation system for sweet sorghum, based on (1) optimized tissue culture conditions for embryogenic callus production with >90% regenerability in 12-week-old calli, and (2) an effective selection regimen for hygromycin resistance conferred by a Ubi-hpt transgene following particle bombardment. Using this method, we have produced sixteen independent transgenic lines from multiple batches at an overall efficiency of 0.09% transformants per excised immature embryo. Co-expression frequency of a non-selected luciferase reporter was 62.5%. Transgene integration and expression were confirmed in T(0) and T(1) plants by Southern analysis and luciferase assays. This success using the major international sweet sorghum cultivar Ramada provides a foundation for molecular improvement of sweet sorghum through the use of transgenes. Factors likely to be important for success with other sweet sorghum cultivars are identified. PMID:20535472

  19. Transforming California's Freight Transport System

    E-print Network

    California at Davis, University of

    Transforming California's Freight Transport System Policy Forum on the Role of Freight Transport April 19, 2013 1 #12;Freight Impacts at Many Levels 2 #12;Freight Transport Today: Contribution/2025 Attainment Year for Ozone and PM2.5 2032 Attainment Year for 0.075ppm 8-hour Ozone Standard Future Ozone

  20. Characterizing Clauses

    E-print Network

    Whitney, Martha Steele

    1907-01-01

    KU ScholarWorks | The University of Kansas Pre-1923 Dissertations and Theses Collection Characterizing Clauses 1907 by Martha Steele Whitney This work was digitized by the Scholarly Communications program staff in the KU Libraries’ Center...KU ScholarWorks | The University of Kansas Pre-1923 Dissertations and Theses Collection Characterizing Clauses 1907 by Martha Steele Whitney This work was digitized by the Scholarly Communications program staff in the KU Libraries’ Center...

  1. Characterization of fast interface states in nitrogen- and phosphorus-treated 4H-SiC MOS capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, W. C.; Goryll, M.; Marinella, M.; Kaplar, R. J.; Jiao, C.; Dhar, S.; Cooper, J. A.; Schroder, D. K.

    2015-07-01

    We investigate ‘fast interface states’ at semiconductor-dielectric interfaces in SiC MOS capacitors that underwent three different interface passivation processes: two nitrogen-based annealing techniques (NO and nitrogen-plasma) and phosphosilicate glass (PSG). ‘Fast interface’ states in this case refer to interface states with response times <1 ?s typically used in standard admittance based MOS characterization methods. In order to appropriately characterize the density of interface states (Dit) taking into account these fast states, conductance and high-low frequency C-V methods were used from room temperature down to 100 K. Measuring at lower temperature shifts the response of the fast interface states into the accessible measurement frequency range. The key finding of this work is that while fast interface states were detected in the nitrided samples, such states were not observed in PSG-passivated samples. On the other hand, conventional interface states with time constants similar to those found in silicon samples were detected at room temperature in the PSG samples. The capture cross-section of fast interface states is larger than that of conventional interface states and demonstrates a different energy dependence. These results strongly indicate that the significantly lower density of fast states at the PSG-SiC interface is one of the main reasons for higher channel mobility in PSG MOSFETs.

  2. Genetic transformation of marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. CC9311 (Cyanophyceae) by electroporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huaxin; Lin, Hanzhi; Jiang, Peng; Li, Fuchao; Qin, Song

    2013-03-01

    Synechococcus sp. CC9311 is a marine cyanobacterium characterized by type IV chromatic acclimation (CA). A genetic transformation system was developed as a first step to elucidate the molecular mechanism of CA. The results show that Synechococcus sp. CC9311 cells were sensitive to four commonly used antibiotics: ampicillin, kanamycin, spectinomycin, and chloramphenicol. An integrative plasmid to disrupt the putative phycoerythrin lyase gene mpeV, using a kanamycin resistance gene as selectable marker, was constructed by recombinant polymerase chain reaction. The plasmid was then transformed into Synechococcus sp. CC9311 via electroporation. High transformation efficiency was achieved at a field strength of 2 kV/cm. DNA analysis showed that mpeV was fully disrupted following challenge of the transformants with a high concentration of kanamycin. In addition, the transformants that displayed poor growth on agar SN medium could be successfully plated on agarose SN medium.

  3. Femtosecond stimulated emission pumping: Characterization ground state

    E-print Network

    Neumark, Daniel M.

    ­1 vibrational fre- quency, resonance impulsive stimulated Raman scattering RISRS was used to create ground state motion near the bottom of the well. The Fourier transform of the oscillations observed in the FPE spectraFemtosecond stimulated emission pumping: Characterization of the I2 À ground state Martin T. Zanni

  4. Hirota difference equation: Inverse scattering transform, darboux transformation, and solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogrebkov, A. K.

    2014-12-01

    We consider the direct and inverse problems for the Hirota difference equation. We introduce the Jost solutions and scattering data and describe their properties. In a special case, we show that the Darboux transformation allows finding the evolution in discrete time and obtaining a recursive procedure for sequentially constructing the Jost solution at an arbitrary time for a given initial value. We consider some properties of the soliton solutions.

  5. Germline Transformation of Drosophila Virilis Mediated by the Transposable Element Hobo

    PubMed Central

    Lozovskaya, E. R.; Nurminsky, D. I.; Hartl, D. L.; Sullivan, D. T.

    1996-01-01

    A laboratory strain of Drosophila virilis was genetically transformed with a hobo vector carrying the miniwhite cassette using a helper plasmid with an hsp70-driven hobo transposase-coding sequence. The rate of transformation was 0.5% per fertile G0 animal. Three transgenic insertions were cloned and characterized and found to be authentic hobo insertions. These results, together with the known wide-spread distribution of hobo in diverse insect species, suggest that hobo and related transposable elements may be of considerable utility in the germline transformation of insects other than D. melanogaster. PMID:8770594

  6. Matrix transformations between certain sequence spaces over the non-Newtonian complex field.

    PubMed

    Kadak, U?ur; Efe, Hakan

    2014-01-01

    In some cases, the most general linear operator between two sequence spaces is given by an infinite matrix. So the theory of matrix transformations has always been of great interest in the study of sequence spaces. In the present paper, we introduce the matrix transformations in sequence spaces over the field ?(*) and characterize some classes of infinite matrices with respect to the non-Newtonian calculus. Also we give the necessary and sufficient conditions on an infinite matrix transforming one of the classical sets over ?(*) to another one. Furthermore, the concept for sequence-to-sequence and series-to-series methods of summability is given with some illustrated examples. PMID:25110740

  7. Matrix Transformations between Certain Sequence Spaces over the Non-Newtonian Complex Field

    PubMed Central

    Efe, Hakan

    2014-01-01

    In some cases, the most general linear operator between two sequence spaces is given by an infinite matrix. So the theory of matrix transformations has always been of great interest in the study of sequence spaces. In the present paper, we introduce the matrix transformations in sequence spaces over the field ?* and characterize some classes of infinite matrices with respect to the non-Newtonian calculus. Also we give the necessary and sufficient conditions on an infinite matrix transforming one of the classical sets over ?* to another one. Furthermore, the concept for sequence-to-sequence and series-to-series methods of summability is given with some illustrated examples. PMID:25110740

  8. Minimum time generation of SU(2) transformations with asymmetric bounds on the controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Raffaele

    2015-11-01

    We study how to generate in minimum time special unitary transformations for a two-level quantum system under the assumptions that (i) the system is subject to a constant drift, (ii) its dynamics can be affected by three independent, bounded controls, and (iii) the bounds on the controls are asymmetric, that is, the constraint on the control in the direction of the drift is independent of that on the controls in the orthogonal plane. Using techniques recently developed for the analysis of SU(2 ) transformations, we fully characterize the reachable sets of the system and the optimal control strategies for any possible target transformation.

  9. Mg2SnO4 ceramics II. Electrical characterization

    E-print Network

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed

    (impedance or admittance) measurements in the frequency range 5 Hz±13 MHz were carried out on bodies sintered. Introduction In high speed computing devices, where temperature is prone to increase due to fast electronic is not as simple as to be solved by removing the heat in a fast mode. When the tempera- ture rises, it interferes

  10. Relationship between electrical admittivity and quantitative histopathology in human prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halter, Ryan; Milone, Michael; Schned, Alan; Heaney, John

    2010-04-01

    Passive bioelectrical properties have been demonstrated to provide sufficient contrast for use in differentiating benign from malignant tissue in a number of different organs including breast, prostate, cervix, bladder, and skin. The underlying microscopic anatomy responsible for these measured differences has been primarily speculative in the past. In this study we recorded electrical conductivity and permittivity spectra (100 Hz - 100 kHz) from 464 three mm diameter circular prostate samples. Each of these tissue specimens were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, processed onto microscopy slides, and digitized using optical microscopy. We used digital imaging processing tools to extract quantitative morphological features including total number of glands, average and total glandular lumen size, shape characteristics of the luminal spaces, and average and total glandular perimeter lengths. Correlative analysis was performed to assess the relationships between the tissue architectural features and the precisely co-registered electrical properties. We report on the findings from this analysis. This statistical assessment aims to provide a valuable piece of new information to help formulate a better understanding of the precise influence morphological architecture has on the flow of current through tissue.

  11. Using an admittance algorithm for bone drilling procedures.

    PubMed

    Accini, Fernando; Díaz, Iñaki; Gil, Jorge Juan

    2016-01-01

    Bone drilling is a common procedure in many types of surgeries, including orthopedic, neurological and otologic surgeries. Several technologies and control algorithms have been developed to help the surgeon automatically stop the drill before it goes through the boundary of the tissue being drilled. However, most of them rely on thrust force and cutting torque to detect bone layer transitions which has many drawbacks that affect the reliability of the process. This paper describes in detail a bone-drilling algorithm based only on the position control of the drill bit that overcomes such problems and presents additional advantages. The implication of each component of the algorithm in the drilling procedure is analyzed and the efficacy of the algorithm is experimentally validated with two types of bones. PMID:26516110

  12. Acid-catalyzed transformation of ionophore veterinary antibiotics: reaction mechanism and product implications.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peizhe; Yao, Hong; Minakata, Daisuke; Crittenden, John C; Pavlostathis, Spyros G; Huang, Ching-Hua

    2013-07-01

    Ionophore antibiotics (IPAs) are polyether antimicrobials widely used in the livestock industry and may enter the environment via land application of animal waste and agricultural runoff. Information is scarce regarding potential transformation of IPAs under environmental conditions. This study is among the first to identify the propensity of IPAs to undergo acid-catalyzed transformation in mildly acidic aquatic systems and characterize the reactions in depth. The study focused on the most widely used monensin (MON) and salinomycin (SAL), and also included narasin (NAR) in the investigation. All three IPAs are susceptible to acid-catalyzed transformation. MON reacts much more slowly than SAL and NAR and exhibits a different kinetic behavior that is further evaluated by a reversible reaction kinetic model. Extensive product characterization identifies that the spiro-ketal group of IPAs is the reactive site for the acid-catalyzed hydrolytic transformation, yielding predominantly isomeric and other products. Toxicity evaluation of the transformation products shows that the products retain some antimicrobial properties. The occurrence of IPAs and isomeric transformation products is also observed in poultry litter and agricultural runoff samples. Considering the common presence of mildly acidic environments (pH 4-7) in soils and waters, the acid-catalyzed transformation identified in this study likely plays an important role in the environmental fate of IPAs. PMID:23373828

  13. Discrete fourier transform (DFT) analysis for applications using iterative transform methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Bruce H. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    According to various embodiments, a method is provided for determining aberration data for an optical system. The method comprises collecting a data signal, and generating a pre-transformation algorithm. The data is pre-transformed by multiplying the data with the pre-transformation algorithm. A discrete Fourier transform of the pre-transformed data is performed in an iterative loop. The method further comprises back-transforming the data to generate aberration data.

  14. A transformational analysis of the EBL utility problem

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.; Rosenbloom, P.S.

    1996-12-31

    Efficiency is a major concern for all problem solving systems. One way of achieving efficiency is the application of learning techniques to speed up problem solving. Accordingly, there has been considerable amount of research on applying explanation-based learning (EBL) techniques to problem solving. However, EBL is known to suffer from the utility problem, where the cost of using the learned knowledge overwhelms its benefit. We show that how the cost increase of a learned rule in an EBL system can be analyzed by characterizing the learning process as a sequence of transformations from a problem solving episode to a learned rule. The analysis of how the cost changes through the transformations can be a useful tool for revealing the sources of cost increase in the learning system. We focus on the Soar problem solving system which uses a variant of EBL called chunking. The chunking process has been decomposed into a sequence of transformations from the problem solving to a chunk (learned rule). By analyzing these transformations, we have identified a set of sources which can make the output chunk expensive.

  15. Depleted uranium induces neoplastic transformation in human lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hong; LaCerte, Carolyne; Thompson, W Douglas; Wise, John Pierce

    2010-02-15

    Depleted uranium (DU) is commonly used in military armor and munitions, and thus, exposure of soldiers and noncombatants is frequent and widespread. Previous studies have shown that DU has both chemical and radiological toxicity and that the primary route of exposure of DU to humans is through inhalation and ingestion. However, there is limited research information on the potential carcinogenicity of DU in human bronchial cells. Accordingly, we determined the neoplastic transforming ability of particulate DU to human bronchial epithelial cells (BEP2D). We observed the loss of contact inhibition and anchorage independent growth in cells exposed to DU after 24 h. We also characterized these DU-induced transformed cell lines and found that 40% of the cell lines exhibit alterations in plating efficiency and no significant changes in the cytotoxic response to DU. Cytogenetic analyses showed that 53% of the DU-transformed cell lines possess a hypodiploid phenotype. These data indicate that human bronchial cells are transformed by DU and exhibit significant chromosome instability consistent with a neoplastic phenotype. PMID:20000475

  16. Experimental evidence of ? ? ? phase transformation in SiC quantum dots and their size-dependent luminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Xiaoxiao; Dai, Dejian; Fan, Baolu; Fan, Jiyang

    2014-11-10

    Phase transformation can occur among different SiC polytypes under extreme conditions such as high pressure or temperature. It remains unknown whether phase transformation can occur under normal conditions. We demonstrate that the ? ? ? phase transformation can occur at ambient temperature and pressure in nanoscale SiC. The microstructural characterization and light absorption and emission spectroscopy demonstrate the occurrence of this phase transformation. It is found that the quantum-confinement luminescence dominates in larger SiC quantum dots (QDs) and the surface-defect luminescence dominates in ultrasmall SiC QDs. The rare phenomenon of multiple-phonon-assisted light absorption is observed in the SiC QDs.

  17. Generalized Jordan-Wigner Transformations

    E-print Network

    C. D. Batista; G. Ortiz

    2000-08-25

    We introduce a new spin-fermion mapping, for arbitrary spin $S$ generating the SU(2) group algebra, that constitutes a natural generalization of the Jordan-Wigner transformation for $S=1/2$. The mapping, valid for regular lattices in any spatial dimension $d$, serves to unravel hidden symmetries in one representation that are manifest in the other. We illustrate the power of the transformation by finding exact solutions to lattice models previously unsolved by standard techniques. We also present a proof of the existence of the Haldane gap in $S=$1 bilinear nearest-neighbors Heisenberg spin chains and discuss the relevance of the mapping to models of strongly correlated electrons. Moreover, we present a general spin-anyon mapping for the case $d \\leq 2$.

  18. Continuous space-time transformations

    E-print Network

    Clément de Seguins Pazzis; Peter Šemrl

    2015-02-04

    We prove that every continuous map acting on the four-dimensional Minkowski space and preserving light cones in one direction only is either a Poincar\\'e similarity, that is, a product of a Lorentz transformation and a dilation, or it is of a very special degenerate form. In the presence of the continuity assumption the main tool in the proof is a basic result from the homotopy theory of spheres.

  19. Berezin Transform in Clifford Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ren Guangbin; Liu Liang

    2008-09-01

    In the weighted monogenic Bergman spaces A{sup 2}(B{sub n},Ll{sub 0,n},dV{sub {alpha}}), the Berezin transform of a bounded continuous function f tends to itself pointwise as the parameter {alpha} tends to infinity. As a consequence, the norm of the Toeplitz operator parallel T{sub f}{sup ({alpha})} parallel tends to parallel f parallel {sub {infinity}} as {alpha} tends to infinity.

  20. Chameleonic dilaton and conformal transformations

    E-print Network

    Andrea Zanzi

    2012-06-20

    We recently proposed a chameleonic solution to the cosmological constant problem - Phys. Rev. D82 (2010) 044006. One of the results of that paper is a non-equivalence of different conformal frames at the quantum level. In this letter we further discuss our proposal focusing our attention on the conformal transformation. Moreover, we point out that a different choice of parameters is necessary in the model.